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Sample records for eulerian gyrokinetic-maxwell solver

  1. EUPDF: An Eulerian-Based Monte Carlo Probability Density Function (PDF) Solver. User's Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    EUPDF is an Eulerian-based Monte Carlo PDF solver developed for application with sprays, combustion, parallel computing and unstructured grids. It is designed to be massively parallel and could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase flow and spray solvers. The solver accommodates the use of an unstructured mesh with mixed elements of either triangular, quadrilateral, and/or tetrahedral type. The manual provides the user with the coding required to couple the PDF code to any given flow code and a basic understanding of the EUPDF code structure as well as the models involved in the PDF formulation. The source code of EUPDF will be available with the release of the National Combustion Code (NCC) as a complete package.

  2. An unstructured mesh arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian unsteady incompressible flow solver and its application to insect flight aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xiaohui; Cao, Yuanwei; Zhao, Yong

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an unstructured mesh Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) incompressible flow solver is developed to investigate the aerodynamics of insect hovering flight. The proposed finite-volume ALE Navier-Stokes solver is based on the artificial compressibility method (ACM) with a high-resolution method of characteristics-based scheme on unstructured grids. The present ALE model is validated and assessed through flow passing over an oscillating cylinder. Good agreements with experimental results and other numerical solutions are obtained, which demonstrates the accuracy and the capability of the present model. The lift generation mechanisms of 2D wing in hovering motion, including wake capture, delayed stall, rapid pitch, as well as clap and fling are then studied and illustrated using the current ALE model. Moreover, the optimized angular amplitude in symmetry model, 45°, is firstly reported in details using averaged lift and the energy power method. Besides, the lift generation of complete cyclic clap and fling motion, which is simulated by few researchers using the ALE method due to large deformation, is studied and clarified for the first time. The present ALE model is found to be a useful tool to investigate lift force generation mechanism for insect wing flight.

  3. A Lagrangian-Eulerian Mapping Solver for Direct Numerical Simulation of Bubble-Laden Turbulent Shear Flows Using the Two-Fluid Formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhinin, O. A.; Elghobashi, S. E.

    1999-09-01

    In a recent study we showed that the two-fluid (TF) formulation can be used in the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of bubble- (or particle-) laden decaying isotropic turbulence with considerable saving in CPU-time and memory as compared to the trajectory approach employed by many researchers. In the present paper, we develop a Lagrangian-Eulerian mapping (LEM) solver for DNS of bubble-laden turbulent shear flows using TF. The purpose of LEM is to resolve the large gradients of bubble velocity and concentration which result from the absence of the diffusion terms in the equations of bubble-phase motion and the preferential accumulation of bubbles. A standard finite-difference scheme (FDS) fails to resolve these gradients. We examine the performance of the new method in DNS of a bubble-laden Taylor-Green vortex, spatially developing plane mixing layer, and homogeneous shear turbulent flow.

  4. A 3D, fully Eulerian, VOF-based solver to study the interaction between two fluids and moving rigid bodies using the fictitious domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Ashish; Raessi, Mehdi

    2016-04-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) and fully Eulerian approach to capturing the interaction between two fluids and moving rigid structures by using the fictitious domain and volume-of-fluid (VOF) methods. The solid bodies can have arbitrarily complex geometry and can pierce the fluid-fluid interface, forming contact lines. The three-phase interfaces are resolved and reconstructed by using a VOF-based methodology. Then, a consistent scheme is employed for transporting mass and momentum, allowing for simulations of three-phase flows of large density ratios. The Eulerian approach significantly simplifies numerical resolution of the kinematics of rigid bodies of complex geometry and with six degrees of freedom. The fluid-structure interaction (FSI) is computed using the fictitious domain method. The methodology was developed in a message passing interface (MPI) parallel framework accelerated with graphics processing units (GPUs). The computationally intensive solution of the pressure Poisson equation is ported to GPUs, while the remaining calculations are performed on CPUs. The performance and accuracy of the methodology are assessed using an array of test cases, focusing individually on the flow solver and the FSI in surface-piercing configurations. Finally, an application of the proposed methodology in simulations of the ocean wave energy converters is presented.

  5. EUPDF: Eulerian Monte Carlo Probability Density Function Solver for Applications With Parallel Computing, Unstructured Grids, and Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    The success of any solution methodology used in the study of gas-turbine combustor flows depends a great deal on how well it can model the various complex and rate controlling processes associated with the spray's turbulent transport, mixing, chemical kinetics, evaporation, and spreading rates, as well as convective and radiative heat transfer and other phenomena. The phenomena to be modeled, which are controlled by these processes, often strongly interact with each other at different times and locations. In particular, turbulence plays an important role in determining the rates of mass and heat transfer, chemical reactions, and evaporation in many practical combustion devices. The influence of turbulence in a diffusion flame manifests itself in several forms, ranging from the so-called wrinkled, or stretched, flamelets regime to the distributed combustion regime, depending upon how turbulence interacts with various flame scales. Conventional turbulence models have difficulty treating highly nonlinear reaction rates. A solution procedure based on the composition joint probability density function (PDF) approach holds the promise of modeling various important combustion phenomena relevant to practical combustion devices (such as extinction, blowoff limits, and emissions predictions) because it can account for nonlinear chemical reaction rates without making approximations. In an attempt to advance the state-of-the-art in multidimensional numerical methods, we at the NASA Lewis Research Center extended our previous work on the PDF method to unstructured grids, parallel computing, and sprays. EUPDF, which was developed by M.S. Raju of Nyma, Inc., was designed to be massively parallel and could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase and/or spray solvers. EUPDF can use an unstructured mesh with mixed triangular, quadrilateral, and/or tetrahedral elements. The application of the PDF method showed favorable results when applied to several supersonic

  6. Eulerian action principles for linearized reduced dynamical equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brizard, Alain

    1994-08-01

    New Eulerian action principles for the linearized gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov equations and the linearized kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (kinetic-MHD) equations are presented. The variational fields for the linearized gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell equations are the perturbed electromagnetic potentials (φ1,A1) and the gyroangle-independent gyrocenter (gy) function Sgy, while the variational fields for the linearized kinetic-MHD equations are the ideal MHD fluid displacement ξ and the gyroangle-independent drift-kinetic (dk) function Sdk (defined as the drift-kinetic limit of Sgy). According to the Lie-transform approach to Vlasov perturbation theory, Sgy generates first-order perturbations in the gyrocenter distribution F1≡{Sgy, F0}gc, where F1 satisfies the linearized gyrokinetic Vlasov equation and {, }gc denotes the unperturbed guiding-center (gc) Poisson bracket. Previous quadratic variational forms were constructed ad hoc from the linearized equations, and required the linearized gyrokinetic (or drift-kinetic) Vlasov equation to be solved a priori (e.g., by integration along an unperturbed guiding-center orbit) through the use of the normal-mode and ballooning-mode representations. The presented action principles ignore these requirements and, thus, apply to more general perturbations.

  7. An Eulerian/Lagrangian coupling procedure for three-dimensional vortical flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felici, Helene M.; Drela, Mark

    1993-01-01

    A coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian method is presented for the reduction of numerical diffusion observed in solutions of 3D vortical flows using standard Eulerian finite-volume time-marching procedures. A Lagrangian particle tracking method, added to the Eulerian time-marching procedure, provides a correction of the Eulerian solution. In turn, the Eulerian solution is used to integrate the Lagrangian state-vector along the particles trajectories. While the Eulerian solution ensures the conservation of mass and sets the pressure field, the particle markers describe accurately the convection properties and enhance the vorticity and entropy capturing capabilities of the Eulerian solver. The Eulerian/Lagrangian coupling strategies are discussed and the combined scheme is tested on a constant stagnation pressure flow in a 90 deg bend and on a swirling pipe flow. As the numerical diffusion is reduced when using the Lagrangian correction, a vorticity gradient augmentation is identified as a basic problem of this inviscid calculation.

  8. Objective Eulerian coherent structures.

    PubMed

    Serra, Mattia; Haller, George

    2016-05-01

    We define objective Eulerian Coherent Structures (OECSs) in two-dimensional, non-autonomous dynamical systems as the instantaneously most influential material curves. Specifically, OECSs are stationary curves of the averaged instantaneous material stretching-rate or material shearing-rate functionals. From these objective (frame-invariant) variational principles, we obtain explicit differential equations for hyperbolic, elliptic, and parabolic OECSs. As an illustration, we compute OECSs in an unsteady ocean velocity data set. In comparison to structures suggested by other common Eulerian diagnostic tools, we find OECSs to be the correct short-term cores of observed trajectory deformation patterns. PMID:27249950

  9. Objective Eulerian coherent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Mattia; Haller, George

    2016-05-01

    We define objective Eulerian Coherent Structures (OECSs) in two-dimensional, non-autonomous dynamical systems as the instantaneously most influential material curves. Specifically, OECSs are stationary curves of the averaged instantaneous material stretching-rate or material shearing-rate functionals. From these objective (frame-invariant) variational principles, we obtain explicit differential equations for hyperbolic, elliptic, and parabolic OECSs. As an illustration, we compute OECSs in an unsteady ocean velocity data set. In comparison to structures suggested by other common Eulerian diagnostic tools, we find OECSs to be the correct short-term cores of observed trajectory deformation patterns.

  10. Reduction of numerical diffusion in three-dimensional vortical flows using a coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian solution procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felici, Helene M.; Drela, Mark

    1993-01-01

    A new approach based on the coupling of an Eulerian and a Lagrangian solver, aimed at reducing the numerical diffusion errors of standard Eulerian time-marching finite-volume solvers, is presented. The approach is applied to the computation of the secondary flow in two bent pipes and the flow around a 3D wing. Using convective point markers the Lagrangian approach provides a correction of the basic Eulerian solution. The Eulerian flow in turn integrates in time the Lagrangian state-vector. A comparison of coarse and fine grid Eulerian solutions makes it possible to identify numerical diffusion. It is shown that the Eulerian/Lagrangian approach is an effective method for reducing numerical diffusion errors.

  11. A multigrid fluid pressure solver handling separating solid boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Chentanez, Nuttapong; Müller-Fischer, Matthias

    2012-08-01

    We present a multigrid method for solving the linear complementarity problem (LCP) resulting from discretizing the Poisson equation subject to separating solid boundary conditions in an Eulerian liquid simulation’s pressure projection step. The method requires only a few small changes to a multigrid solver for linear systems. Our generalized solver is fast enough to handle 3D liquid simulations with separating boundary conditions in practical domain sizes. Previous methods could only handle relatively small 2D domains in reasonable time, because they used expensive quadratic programming (QP) solvers. We demonstrate our technique in several practical scenarios, including nonaxis-aligned containers and moving solids in which the omission of separating boundary conditions results in disturbing artifacts of liquid sticking to solids. Our measurements show, that the convergence rate of our LCP solver is close to that of a standard multigrid solver. PMID:22411885

  12. Coupling of a compressible vortex particle-mesh method with a near-body compressible discontinuous Galerkin solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, Philippe; Winckelmans, Gregoire; Chatelain, Philippe; Hillewaert, Koen

    2015-11-01

    A hybrid approach, coupling a compressible vortex particle-mesh method (CVPM, also with efficient Poisson solver) and a high order compressible discontinuous Galerkin Eulerian solver, is being developed in order to efficiently simulate flows past bodies; also in the transonic regime. The Eulerian solver is dedicated to capturing the anisotropic flow structures in the near-wall region whereas the CVPM solver is exploited away from the body and in the wake. An overlapping domain decomposition approach is used. The Eulerian solver, which captures the near-body region, also corrects the CVPM solution in that region at every time step. The CVPM solver, which captures the region away from the body and the wake, also provides the outer boundary conditions to the Eulerian solver. Because of the coupling, a boundary element method is also required for consistency. The approach is assessed on typical 2D benchmark cases. Supported by the Fund for Research Training in Industry and Agriculture (F.R.I.A.).

  13. Amesos Solver Package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-03-01

    Amesos is the Direct Sparse Solver Package in Trilinos. The goal of Amesos is to make AX=S as easy as it sounds, at least for direct methods. Amesos provides interfaces to a number of third party sparse direct solvers, including SuperLU, SuperLU MPI, DSCPACK, UMFPACK and KLU. Amesos provides a common object oriented interface to the best sparse direct solvers in the world. A sparse direct solver solves for x in Ax = b. wheremore » A is a matrix and x and b are vectors (or multi-vectors). A sparse direct solver flrst factors A into trinagular matrices L and U such that A = LU via gaussian elimination and then solves LU x = b. Switching amongst solvers in Amesos roquires a change to a single parameter. Yet, no solver needs to be linked it, unless it is used. All conversions between the matrices provided by the user and the format required by the underlying solver is performed by Amesos. As new sparse direct solvers are created, they will be incorporated into Amesos, allowing the user to simpty link with the new solver, change a single parameter in the calling sequence, and use the new solver. Amesos allows users to specify whether the matrix has changed. Amesos can be used anywhere that any sparse direct solver is needed.« less

  14. Amesos Solver Package

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, Vendall S.; Heroux, Michael A.; Hoekstra, Robert J.; Sala, Marzio

    2004-03-01

    Amesos is the Direct Sparse Solver Package in Trilinos. The goal of Amesos is to make AX=S as easy as it sounds, at least for direct methods. Amesos provides interfaces to a number of third party sparse direct solvers, including SuperLU, SuperLU MPI, DSCPACK, UMFPACK and KLU. Amesos provides a common object oriented interface to the best sparse direct solvers in the world. A sparse direct solver solves for x in Ax = b. where A is a matrix and x and b are vectors (or multi-vectors). A sparse direct solver flrst factors A into trinagular matrices L and U such that A = LU via gaussian elimination and then solves LU x = b. Switching amongst solvers in Amesos roquires a change to a single parameter. Yet, no solver needs to be linked it, unless it is used. All conversions between the matrices provided by the user and the format required by the underlying solver is performed by Amesos. As new sparse direct solvers are created, they will be incorporated into Amesos, allowing the user to simpty link with the new solver, change a single parameter in the calling sequence, and use the new solver. Amesos allows users to specify whether the matrix has changed. Amesos can be used anywhere that any sparse direct solver is needed.

  15. Coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian transport of large debris by tsunamis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, Daniel A. S.; Ferreira, Rui M. L.; Sousa Oliveira, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Tsunamis are notorious for the large disruption they can cause on coastal environments, not only due to the imparted momentum of the incoming wave but also due to its capacity to transport large quantities of solid debris, either from natural or human-made sources, over great distances. A 2DH numerical model under development at CERIS-IST (Ferreira et al., 2009; Conde, 2013) - STAV2D - capable of simulating solid transport in both Eulerian and Lagrangian paradigms will be used to assess the relevance of Lagrangian-Eulerian coupling when modelling the transport of solid debris by tsunamis. The model has been previously validated and applied to tsunami scenarios (Conde, 2013), being well-suited for overland tsunami propagation and capable of handling morphodynamic changes in estuaries and seashores. The discretization scheme is an explicit Finite Volume technique employing flux-vector splitting and a reviewed Roe-Riemann solver. Source term formulations are employed in a semi-implicit way, including the two-way coupling of the Lagrangian and Eulerian solvers by means of conservative mass and momentum transfers between fluid and solid phases. The model was applied to Sines Port, a major commercial port in Portugal, where two tsunamigenic scenarios are considered: an 8.5 Mw scenario, consistent with the Great Lisbon Earthquake and Tsunami of the 1st November 1755 (Baptista, 2009), and an hypothetical 9.5 Mw worst-case scenario based on the same historical event. Open-ocean propagation of these scenarios were simulated with GeoClaw model from ClawPack (Leveque, 2011). Following previous efforts on the modelling of debris transport by tsunamis in seaports (Conde, 2015), this work discusses the sensitivity of the obtained results with respect to the phenomenological detail of the employed Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation and the resolution of the mesh used in the Eulerian solver. The results have shown that the fluid to debris mass ratio is the key parameter regarding the

  16. Comparison of Joint Modeling Approaches Including Eulerian Sliding Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, I; Antoun, T; Vorobiev, O

    2009-12-16

    Accurate representation of discontinuities such as joints and faults is a key ingredient for high fidelity modeling of shock propagation in geologic media. The following study was done to improve treatment of discontinuities (joints) in the Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN (Lomov and Liu 2005). Lagrangian methods with conforming meshes and explicit inclusion of joints in the geologic model are well suited for such an analysis. Unfortunately, current meshing tools are unable to automatically generate adequate hexahedral meshes for large numbers of irregular polyhedra. Another concern is that joint stiffness in such explicit computations requires significantly reduced time steps, with negative implications for both the efficiency and quality of the numerical solution. An alternative approach is to use non-conforming meshes and embed joint information into regular computational elements. However, once slip displacement on the joints become comparable to the zone size, Lagrangian (even non-conforming) meshes could suffer from tangling and decreased time step problems. The use of non-conforming meshes in an Eulerian solver may alleviate these difficulties and provide a viable numerical approach for modeling the effects of faults on the dynamic response of geologic materials. We studied shock propagation in jointed/faulted media using a Lagrangian and two Eulerian approaches. To investigate the accuracy of this joint treatment the GEODYN calculations have been compared with results from the Lagrangian code GEODYN-L which uses an explicit treatment of joints via common plane contact. We explore two approaches to joint treatment in the code, one for joints with finite thickness and the other for tight joints. In all cases the sliding interfaces are tracked explicitly without homogenization or blending the joint and block response into an average response. In general, rock joints will introduce an increase in normal compliance in addition to a reduction in shear strength. In the

  17. Nonlinear Eulerian thermoelasticity for anisotropic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, J. D.

    2013-10-01

    A complete continuum thermoelastic theory for large deformation of crystals of arbitrary symmetry is developed. The theory incorporates as a fundamental state variable in the thermodynamic potentials what is termed an Eulerian strain tensor (in material coordinates) constructed from the inverse of the deformation gradient. Thermodynamic identities and relationships among Eulerian and the usual Lagrangian material coefficients are derived, significantly extending previous literature that focused on materials with cubic or hexagonal symmetry and hydrostatic loading conditions. Analytical solutions for homogeneous deformations of ideal cubic crystals are studied over a prescribed range of elastic coefficients; stress states and intrinsic stability measures are compared. For realistic coefficients, Eulerian theory is shown to predict more physically realistic behavior than Lagrangian theory under large compression and shear. Analytical solutions for shock compression of anisotropic single crystals are derived for internal energy functions quartic in Lagrangian or Eulerian strain and linear in entropy; results are analyzed for quartz, sapphire, and diamond. When elastic constants of up to order four are included, both Lagrangian and Eulerian theories are capable of matching Hugoniot data. When only the second-order elastic constant is known, an alternative theory incorporating a mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian strain tensor provides a reasonable approximation of experimental data.

  18. An Eulerian/Lagrangian method for computing blade/vortex impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinhoff, John; Senge, Heinrich; Yonghu, Wenren

    1991-01-01

    A combined Eulerian/Lagrangian approach to calculating helicopter rotor flows with concentrated vortices is described. The method computes a general evolving vorticity distribution without any significant numerical diffusion. Concentrated vortices can be accurately propagated over long distances on relatively coarse grids with cores only several grid cells wide. The method is demonstrated for a blade/vortex impingement case in 2D and 3D where a vortex is cut by a rotor blade, and the results are compared to previous 2D calculations involving a fifth-order Navier-Stokes solver on a finer grid.

  19. CASTRO: A NEW COMPRESSIBLE ASTROPHYSICAL SOLVER. II. GRAY RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Almgren, A.; Bell, J.; Howell, L.; Burrows, A.

    2011-10-01

    We describe the development of a flux-limited gray radiation solver for the compressible astrophysics code, CASTRO. CASTRO uses an Eulerian grid with block-structured adaptive mesh refinement based on a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular variable-sized grids with simultaneous refinement in both space and time. The gray radiation solver is based on a mixed-frame formulation of radiation hydrodynamics. In our approach, the system is split into two parts, one part that couples the radiation and fluid in a hyperbolic subsystem, and another parabolic part that evolves radiation diffusion and source-sink terms. The hyperbolic subsystem is solved explicitly with a high-order Godunov scheme, whereas the parabolic part is solved implicitly with a first-order backward Euler method.

  20. Numerical simulation of spray coalescence in an Eulerian framework: Direct quadrature method of moments and multi-fluid method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, R. O.; Laurent, F.; Massot, M.

    2008-03-01

    The scope of the present study is Eulerian modeling and simulation of polydisperse liquid sprays undergoing droplet coalescence and evaporation. The fundamental mathematical description is the Williams spray equation governing the joint number density function f(v,u;x,t) of droplet volume and velocity. Eulerian multi-fluid models have already been rigorously derived from this equation in Laurent et al. [F. Laurent, M. Massot, P. Villedieu, Eulerian multi-fluid modeling for the numerical simulation of coalescence in polydisperse dense liquid sprays, J. Comput. Phys. 194 (2004) 505-543]. The first key feature of the paper is the application of direct quadrature method of moments (DQMOM) introduced by Marchisio and Fox [D.L. Marchisio, R.O. Fox, Solution of population balance equations using the direct quadrature method of moments, J. Aerosol Sci. 36 (2005) 43-73] to the Williams spray equation. Both the multi-fluid method and DQMOM yield systems of Eulerian conservation equations with complicated interaction terms representing coalescence. In order to focus on the difficulties associated with treating size-dependent coalescence and to avoid numerical uncertainty issues associated with two-way coupling, only one-way coupling between the droplets and a given gas velocity field is considered. In order to validate and compare these approaches, the chosen configuration is a self-similar 2D axisymmetrical decelerating nozzle with sprays having various size distributions, ranging from smooth ones up to Dirac delta functions. The second key feature of the paper is a thorough comparison of the two approaches for various test-cases to a reference solution obtained through a classical stochastic Lagrangian solver. Both Eulerian models prove to describe adequately spray coalescence and yield a very interesting alternative to the Lagrangian solver. The third key point of the study is a detailed description of the limitations associated with each method, thus giving criteria for

  1. The Case for Including Eulerian Kinematics in Undergraduate Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uram, Earl M.

    A Eulerian framework is proposed as an alternative to the Lagrangian framework usually used in undergraduate dynamics courses. An attempt to introduce Eulerian kinematics into a dynamics course is discussed. (LMH)

  2. Performance Analysis of GYRO: A Tool Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, P.; Roth, P.; Candy, J.; Shan, Hongzhang; Mahinthakumar,G.; Sreepathi, S.; Carrington, L.; Kaiser, T.; Snavely, A.; Reed, D.; Zhang, Y.; Huck, K.; Malony, A.; Shende, S.; Moore, S.; Wolf, F.

    2005-06-26

    The performance of the Eulerian gyrokinetic-Maxwell solver code GYRO is analyzed on five high performance computing systems. First, a manual approach is taken, using custom scripts to analyze the output of embedded wall clock timers, floating point operation counts collected using hardware performance counters, and traces of user and communication events collected using the profiling interface to Message Passing Interface (MPI) libraries. Parts of the analysis are then repeated or extended using a number of sophisticated performance analysis tools: IPM, KOJAK, SvPablo, TAU, and the PMaC modeling tool suite. The paper briefly discusses what has been discovered via this manual analysis process, what performance analyses are inconvenient or infeasible to attempt manually, and to what extent the tools show promise in accelerating or significantly extending the manual performance analyses.

  3. Examination of Eulerian and Lagrangian Coordinate Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remillard, Wilfred J.

    1978-01-01

    Studies the relationship between Eulerian and Lagrangian coordinate systems with the help of computer plots of variables such as density and particle displacement. Gives examples which illustrate the differences in the shape of a traveling wave as seen by observers in the two systems. (Author/GA)

  4. Parallel Multigrid Equation Solver

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-09-07

    Prometheus is a fully parallel multigrid equation solver for matrices that arise in unstructured grid finite element applications. It includes a geometric and an algebraic multigrid method and has solved problems of up to 76 mullion degrees of feedom, problems in linear elasticity on the ASCI blue pacific and ASCI red machines.

  5. Eulerian network modeling of longitudinal dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmani, Yashar; Balhoff, Matthew T.

    2015-10-01

    A novel Eulerian network model that incorporates "shear dispersion," the stretching of solute due to nonuniform velocity profiles within pore throats is developed. The superposing transport method (STM) is nonlocal in time (i.e., uses information from several previous time steps) and is equivalent to performing network-wide time convolutions of elementary throat response functions. Predicted macroscopic longitudinal dispersion coefficients for disordered sphere packs are in good agreement with published experimental data. We further investigate the impact of mixing assumptions within pores on macroscopic longitudinal dispersion and find the dependence to be weak for disordered sphere packs. Limitations of Eulerian network models as a whole are also discussed, and their inappropriateness for ordered porous media concluded.

  6. Pliris Solver Package

    SciTech Connect

    Kotulski, Joseph D.; Womble, David E.; Greenberg, David; Driessen, Brian

    2004-03-01

    PLIRIS is an object-oriented solver built on top of a previous matrix solver used in a number of application codes. Puns solves a linear system directly via LU factorization with partial pivoting. The user provides the linear system in terms of Epetra Objects including a matrix and right-hand-sides. The user can then factor the matrix and perform the forward and back solve at a later time or solve for multiple right-hand-sides at once. This package is used when dense matrices are obtained in the problem formulation. These dense matrices occur whenever boundary element techniques are chosen for the solution procedure. This has been used in electromagnetics for both static and frequency domain problems.

  7. Pliris Solver Package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-03-01

    PLIRIS is an object-oriented solver built on top of a previous matrix solver used in a number of application codes. Puns solves a linear system directly via LU factorization with partial pivoting. The user provides the linear system in terms of Epetra Objects including a matrix and right-hand-sides. The user can then factor the matrix and perform the forward and back solve at a later time or solve for multiple right-hand-sides at once. This packagemore » is used when dense matrices are obtained in the problem formulation. These dense matrices occur whenever boundary element techniques are chosen for the solution procedure. This has been used in electromagnetics for both static and frequency domain problems.« less

  8. Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A.; Eder, D.; Masters, N.; Fisher, A.; Anderson, R.; Gunney, B.; Wang, P.; Benson, D.; Dixit, P.

    2009-09-29

    This is a simulation code involving an ALE (arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) hydrocode with AMR (adaptive mesh refinement) and pluggable physics packages for material strength, heat conduction, radiation diffusion, and laser ray tracing developed a LLNL, UCSD, and Berkeley Lab. The code is an extension of the open source SAMRAI (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Interface) code/library. The code can be used in laser facilities such as the National Ignition Facility. The code is alsi being applied to slurry flow (landslides).

  9. Numerical analysis of bipropellant combustion in liquid thrust chambers by an Eulerian-Eulerian approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dang, A. L.; Navaz, H. K.; Rangel, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The liquid thrust chambers performance (LTCP) code is used for parametric studies of flow and combustion in liquid rocket engines. Multiphase flow equations are solved in an Eulerian-Eulerian framework, and multistep finite rate chemistry is incorporated. The discretization scheme is fully implicit and is based on the total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme, which is accurate, robust, very efficient and capable of handling steep gradients and stiff chemistry. Effects of injection velocity and chamber size have been considered, and the effect of group combustion on the evaporation rate has been studied for a dense spray.

  10. HPCCG Solver Package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-03-01

    HPCCG is a simple PDE application and preconditioned conjugate gradient solver that solves a linear system on a beam-shaped domain. Although it does not address many performance issues present in real engineering applications, such as load imbalance and preconditioner scalability, it can serve as a first "sanity test" of new processor design choices, inter-connect network design choices and the scalability of a new computer system. Because it is self-contained, easy to compile and easily scaledmore » to 100s or 1000s of porcessors, it can be an attractive study code for computer system designers.« less

  11. Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-09-29

    This is a simulation code involving an ALE (arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) hydrocode with AMR (adaptive mesh refinement) and pluggable physics packages for material strength, heat conduction, radiation diffusion, and laser ray tracing developed a LLNL, UCSD, and Berkeley Lab. The code is an extension of the open source SAMRAI (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Interface) code/library. The code can be used in laser facilities such as the National Ignition Facility. The code is alsi being appliedmore » to slurry flow (landslides).« less

  12. Numerical methods for the weakly compressible Generalized Langevin Model in Eulerian reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarnykh, Dmitrii; Litvinov, Sergey; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2016-06-01

    A well established approach for the computation of turbulent flow without resolving all turbulent flow scales is to solve a filtered or averaged set of equations, and to model non-resolved scales by closures derived from transported probability density functions (PDF) for velocity fluctuations. Effective numerical methods for PDF transport employ the equivalence between the Fokker-Planck equation for the PDF and a Generalized Langevin Model (GLM), and compute the PDF by transporting a set of sampling particles by GLM (Pope (1985) [1]). The natural representation of GLM is a system of stochastic differential equations in a Lagrangian reference frame, typically solved by particle methods. A representation in a Eulerian reference frame, however, has the potential to significantly reduce computational effort and to allow for the seamless integration into a Eulerian-frame numerical flow solver. GLM in a Eulerian frame (GLMEF) formally corresponds to the nonlinear fluctuating hydrodynamic equations derived by Nakamura and Yoshimori (2009) [12]. Unlike the more common Landau-Lifshitz Navier-Stokes (LLNS) equations these equations are derived from the underdamped Langevin equation and are not based on a local equilibrium assumption. Similarly to LLNS equations the numerical solution of GLMEF requires special considerations. In this paper we investigate different numerical approaches to solving GLMEF with respect to the correct representation of stochastic properties of the solution. We find that a discretely conservative staggered finite-difference scheme, adapted from a scheme originally proposed for turbulent incompressible flow, in conjunction with a strongly stable (for non-stochastic PDE) Runge-Kutta method performs better for GLMEF than schemes adopted from those proposed previously for the LLNS. We show that equilibrium stochastic fluctuations are correctly reproduced.

  13. Parallel tridiagonal equation solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, H. S.

    1974-01-01

    Three parallel algorithms were compared for the direct solution of tridiagonal linear systems of equations. The algorithms are suitable for computers such as ILLIAC 4 and CDC STAR. For array computers similar to ILLIAC 4, cyclic odd-even reduction has the least operation count for highly structured sets of equations, and recursive doubling has the least count for relatively unstructured sets of equations. Since the difference in operation counts for these two algorithms is not substantial, their relative running times may be more related to overhead operations, which are not measured in this paper. The third algorithm, based on Buneman's Poisson solver, has more arithmetic operations than the others, and appears to be the least favorable. For pipeline computers similar to CDC STAR, cyclic odd-even reduction appears to be the most preferable algorithm for all cases.

  14. Amesos2 Templated Direct Sparse Solver Package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-05-24

    Amesos2 is a templated direct sparse solver package. Amesos2 provides interfaces to direct sparse solvers, rather than providing native solver capabilities. Amesos2 is a derivative work of the Trilinos package Amesos.

  15. Eulerian derivation of the Coriolis force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageyama, Akira; Hyodo, Mamoru

    2006-02-01

    In textbooks of geophysical fluid dynamics, the Coriolis force and the centrifugal force in a rotating fluid system are derived by making use of the fluid parcel concept. In contrast to this intuitive derivation to the apparent forces, more rigorous derivation would be useful not only for the pedagogical purpose but also for the applications to other kinds of rotating geophysical systems rather than the fluid. The purpose of this paper is to show a general procedure to derive the transformed equations in the rotating frame of reference based on the local Galilean transformation and rotational coordinate transformation of field quantities. The generality and usefulness of this Eulerian approach is demonstrated in the derivation of apparent forces in rotating fluids as well as the transformed electromagnetic field equation in the rotating system.

  16. Fragmentation statistics from Eulerian hydrocode calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Trucano, T.G.; Grady, D.E.; McGlaun, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a procedure for computing discrete fragmentation information for terminal ballistics events from the continuum data that emerges from two-dimensional Eulerian hydrocode simulations of these events. The present examples deal with the normal impact of lead cylinders on lead plates at velocities below 1600 m/s. In this regime, the resulting debris is almost exclusively solid lead fragments. We have experimental data of sufficient accuracy to evaluate the extraction of such fragmentation information from code simulations. The problem is interesting because the observed distribution of fragment size would require extreme subgrid resolution in the hydrocode if the statistics were computed directly. Our approach is different. We ask whether or not the general continuum description predicted by the code contains enough information to allow coupling of an analytic fragmentation theory that successfully predicts fragmentation statistics. We believe that this approach is valid, and discuss our current success in matching experimental data. 10 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Magnetic Field Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilin, Andrew V.

    2006-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Solver computer program calculates the magnetic field generated by a group of collinear, cylindrical axisymmetric electromagnet coils. Given the current flowing in, and the number of turns, axial position, and axial and radial dimensions of each coil, the program calculates matrix coefficients for a finite-difference system of equations that approximates a two-dimensional partial differential equation for the magnetic potential contributed by the coil. The program iteratively solves these finite-difference equations by use of the modified incomplete Cholesky preconditioned-conjugate-gradient method. The total magnetic potential as a function of axial (z) and radial (r) position is then calculated as a sum of the magnetic potentials of the individual coils, using a high-accuracy interpolation scheme. Then the r and z components of the magnetic field as functions of r and z are calculated from the total magnetic potential by use of a high-accuracy finite-difference scheme. Notably, for the finite-difference calculations, the program generates nonuniform two-dimensional computational meshes from nonuniform one-dimensional meshes. Each mesh is generated in such a way as to minimize the numerical error for a benchmark one-dimensional magnetostatic problem.

  18. 2D Resistive Magnetohydrodynamics Calculations with an Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousculp, C. L.; Gianakon, T. A.; Lipnikov, K. N.; Nelson, E. M.

    2015-11-01

    Single fluid resistive MHD is useful for modeling Z-pinch configurations in cylindrical geometry. One such example is thin walled liners for shock physics or HEDP experiments driven by capacitor banks such as the LANL's PHELIX or Sandia-Z. MHD is also useful for modeling high-explosive-driven flux compression generators (FCGs) and their high-current switches. The resistive MHD in our arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian (ALE) code operates in one and two dimensions in both Cartesian and cylindrical geometry. It is implemented as a time-step split operator, which consists of, ideal MHD connected to the explicit hydro momentum and energy equations and a second order mimetic discretization solver for implicit solution of the magnetic diffusion equation. In a staggered grid scheme, a single-component of cell-centered magnetic flux is conserved in the Lagrangian frame exactly, while magnetic forces are accumulated at the nodes. Total energy is conserved to round off. Total flux is conserved under the ALE relaxation and remap. The diffusion solver consistently computes Ohmic heating. Both Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions are available with coupling to external circuit models. Example calculations will be shown.

  19. Sherlock Holmes, Master Problem Solver.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballew, Hunter

    1994-01-01

    Shows the connections between Sherlock Holmes's investigative methods and mathematical problem solving, including observations, characteristics of the problem solver, importance of data, questioning the obvious, learning from experience, learning from errors, and indirect proof. (MKR)

  20. Eulerian Formulation of Spatially Constrained Elastic Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynen, Alexandre

    Slender elastic rods are ubiquitous in nature and technology. For a vast majority of applications, the rod deflection is restricted by an external constraint and a significant part of the elastic body is in contact with a stiff constraining surface. The research work presented in this doctoral dissertation formulates a computational model for the solution of elastic rods constrained inside or around frictionless tube-like surfaces. The segmentation strategy adopted to cope with this complex class of problems consists in sequencing the global problem into, comparatively simpler, elementary problems either in continuous contact with the constraint or contact-free between their extremities. Within the conventional Lagrangian formulation of elastic rods, this approach is however associated with two major drawbacks. First, the boundary conditions specifying the locations of the rod centerline at both extremities of each elementary problem lead to the establishment of isoperimetric constraints, i.e., integral constraints on the unknown length of the rod. Second, the assessment of the unilateral contact condition requires, in principle, the comparison of two curves parametrized by distinct curvilinear coordinates, viz. the rod centerline and the constraint axis. Both conspire to burden the computations associated with the method. To streamline the solution along the elementary problems and rationalize the assessment of the unilateral contact condition, the rod governing equations are reformulated within the Eulerian framework of the constraint. The methodical exploration of both types of elementary problems leads to specific formulations of the rod governing equations that stress the profound connection between the mechanics of the rod and the geometry of the constraint surface. The proposed Eulerian reformulation, which restates the rod local equilibrium in terms of the curvilinear coordinate associated with the constraint axis, describes the rod deformed configuration

  1. CASTRO: A NEW COMPRESSIBLE ASTROPHYSICAL SOLVER. III. MULTIGROUP RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Almgren, A.; Bell, J.; Howell, L.; Burrows, A.; Dolence, J.

    2013-01-15

    We present a formulation for multigroup radiation hydrodynamics that is correct to order O(v/c) using the comoving-frame approach and the flux-limited diffusion approximation. We describe a numerical algorithm for solving the system, implemented in the compressible astrophysics code, CASTRO. CASTRO uses a Eulerian grid with block-structured adaptive mesh refinement based on a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular variable-sized grids with simultaneous refinement in both space and time. In our multigroup radiation solver, the system is split into three parts: one part that couples the radiation and fluid in a hyperbolic subsystem, another part that advects the radiation in frequency space, and a parabolic part that evolves radiation diffusion and source-sink terms. The hyperbolic subsystem and the frequency space advection are solved explicitly with high-order Godunov schemes, whereas the parabolic part is solved implicitly with a first-order backward Euler method. Our multigroup radiation solver works for both neutrino and photon radiation.

  2. CASTRO: A New Compressible Astrophysical Solver. III. Multigroup Radiation Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Howell, L.; Almgren, A.; Burrows, A.; Dolence, J.; Bell, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a formulation for multigroup radiation hydrodynamics that is correct to order O(v/c) using the comoving-frame approach and the flux-limited diffusion approximation. We describe a numerical algorithm for solving the system, implemented in the compressible astrophysics code, CASTRO. CASTRO uses a Eulerian grid with block-structured adaptive mesh refinement based on a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular variable-sized grids with simultaneous refinement in both space and time. In our multigroup radiation solver, the system is split into three parts: one part that couples the radiation and fluid in a hyperbolic subsystem, another part that advects the radiation in frequency space, and a parabolic part that evolves radiation diffusion and source-sink terms. The hyperbolic subsystem and the frequency space advection are solved explicitly with high-order Godunov schemes, whereas the parabolic part is solved implicitly with a first-order backward Euler method. Our multigroup radiation solver works for both neutrino and photon radiation.

  3. SPH and Eulerian underwater bubble collapse simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Swegle, J.W.; Kipp, M.E.

    1998-05-01

    SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) is a gridless Lagrangian technique which is appealing as a possible alternative to numerical techniques currently used to analyze high deformation impulsive loading events. Previously, the SPH algorithm has been subjected to detailed testing and analysis to determine the feasibility of using the coupled finite-element/SPH code PRONTO/SPH for the analysis of various types of underwater explosion problems involving fluid-structure and shock-structure interactions. Here, SPH and Eulerian simulations are used to study the details of underwater bubble collapse, particularly the formation of re-entrant jets during collapse, and the loads generated on nearby structures by the jet and the complete collapse of the bubble. Jet formation is shown to be due simply to the asymmetry caused by nearby structures which disrupt the symmetry of the collapse. However, the load generated by the jet is a minor precursor to the major loads which occur at the time of complete collapse of the bubble.

  4. AUTOMATIC DIFFERENTIATION OF AN EULERIAN HYDROCODE

    SciTech Connect

    R. HENNINGER; A. CARLE; P. MAUDLIN

    2000-11-01

    Automatic differentiation (AD) is applied to a two-dimensional Eulerian hydrodynamics computer code (hydrocode) to provide gradients that will be used for design optimization and uncertainty analysis. We examine AD in both the forward and adjoint (reverse) mode using Automatic Differentiation of Fortran (ADIFOR, version 3.0). Setup time, accuracy, and run times are described for three problems. The test set consists of a one-dimensional shock-propagation problem, a two-dimensional metal-jet-formation problem and a two-dimensional shell-collapse problem. Setup time for ADIFOR was approximately one month starting from a simplified, fixed-dimension version of the original code. ADIFOR produced accurate (as compared to finite difference) gradients in both modes for all of the problems. These test problems had 17 independent variables. We find that the forward mode is up to 39% slower and the adjoint mode is at least 11% faster than finding the gradient by means of finite differences. Problems of real interest will certainly have more independent variables. The adjoint mode is thus favored since the computational time increases only slightly for additional independent variables.

  5. Eulerian and Lagrangian statistics in fully developed rotating turbulent flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biferale, Luca; Bonaccorso, Fabio; Mazzitelli, Irene; Lanotte, Alessandra; Perlekar, Prasad; Musacchio, Stefano; Hinsberg, Michel; Toschi, Federico

    2015-11-01

    We present results concerning both Eulerian and Lagrangian statistics for turbulent under rotation at small and large Rossby numbers. Concerning the Eulerian statistics we discuss the effects of the presence of strong coherent large-scale vortical structures on the small-scale statistics. Concerning Lagrangian properties, we discuss the effects of preferential sampling at changing the inertial properties of the particles also due to the centrifugal and Coriolis forces. Supported by the ERC AdG NewTURB num. 339032.

  6. Coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian Simulation for Overpressure Structural Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Andrew; Pan, Hua; Miller, David; Cogar, John

    2011-06-01

    Accurately modeling blast dynamics is critical in the assessment of structures subjected to blast loading. The current industry standard for modeling blast effects in Lagrangian based Finite Element simulations is CONWEP; tabulated pressure data taken directly from blast events. CONWEP is limited, however, and may not always be physically representative of the blast/structural interaction that occurs in the field. Eulerian hydrocodes provide advantages over CONWEP in that they can capture shock front interaction and model blast surface interfaces with fidelity due to the presence of the working fluid. Eulerian codes, however, break down over larger time scales; whereas, Lagrangian modeling allows for discrete finite elements with definable boundary interfaces that can be tracked out to longer time scales. Hence, a hybrid approach that couples the Eulerian blast modeling with Lagrangian system dynamics is necessary. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate improvements in overpressure structural response modeling using a Coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian algorithm implemented in VelodyneTM. Velodyne results using the Coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian algorithm are compared to results from Eulerian hydrocode simulations and Velodyne simulations using the CONWEP algorithm.

  7. A lagrangian-eulerian description of debris transport by a tsunami in the Lisbon waterfront

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, Daniel; Canelas, Ricardo; Baptista, Maria Ana; João Telhado, Maria; Ferreira, Rui M. L.

    2013-04-01

    Several major tsunamis are known to have struck the Portuguese coast over the past millennia (Baptista and Miranda, 2009). The Tagus estuary has great exposure to tsunami occurrences and, being bordered by the largest metropolitan area in the country, is a particularly worrisome location in what concerns safety of populations and economic losses due to disruption of built infrastructures. The last major earthquake and tsunami combination known to have critically affected the Tagus estuary dates back to November 1st 1755. This catastrophe critically damaged Lisbon's infrastructures, led to numerous casualties and priceless heritage losses. The urban tissue of the present city still bears visible the effects of the catastrophe and of the ensuing protection measures. The objective of this work is to simulate the propagation of debris carried by a 1755-like tsunami along the present-day bathimetric and altimetric conditions of Lisbon waterfront. Particular emphasis was directed to the modeling of vehicles since the tsunami is likely to affect areas that are major traffic nodes such as Alcântara, with more than 1500 vehicles in road network of about 3 km. The simulation tool employed is based on a 2DH spatial (eulerian) shallow-flow approach suited to complex and dynamic bottom boundaries. The discretization technique relies on a finite-volume scheme, based on a flux-splitting technique incorporating a reviewed version of the Roe Riemann solver (Canelas et al. 2013). Two formulations were employed to model the advection of debris: a fully coupled continuum approach, where solid bodies are described by the concentration only and an uncoupled material (lagrangian) formulation where solid bodies are tracked between two time-steps once the flow field is determined by the eulerian solver. In the latter case, concentrations are updated after tracking the solid bodies thus correcting the mass and momentum balance to be used for the next time-step. The urban tissue was

  8. Scalable Parallel Algebraic Multigrid Solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, R; Lu, S; Tong, C; Vassilevski, P

    2005-03-23

    The authors propose a parallel algebraic multilevel algorithm (AMG), which has the novel feature that the subproblem residing in each processor is defined over the entire partition domain, although the vast majority of unknowns for each subproblem are associated with the partition owned by the corresponding processor. This feature ensures that a global coarse description of the problem is contained within each of the subproblems. The advantages of this approach are that interprocessor communication is minimized in the solution process while an optimal order of convergence rate is preserved; and the speed of local subproblem solvers can be maximized using the best existing sequential algebraic solvers.

  9. General complex polynomial root solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skowron, J.; Gould, A.

    2012-12-01

    This general complex polynomial root solver, implemented in Fortran and further optimized for binary microlenses, uses a new algorithm to solve polynomial equations and is 1.6-3 times faster than the ZROOTS subroutine that is commercially available from Numerical Recipes, depending on application. The largest improvement, when compared to naive solvers, comes from a fail-safe procedure that permits skipping the majority of the calculations in the great majority of cases, without risking catastrophic failure in the few cases that these are actually required.

  10. Self-correcting Multigrid Solver

    SciTech Connect

    Jerome L.V. Lewandowski

    2004-06-29

    A new multigrid algorithm based on the method of self-correction for the solution of elliptic problems is described. The method exploits information contained in the residual to dynamically modify the source term (right-hand side) of the elliptic problem. It is shown that the self-correcting solver is more efficient at damping the short wavelength modes of the algebraic error than its standard equivalent. When used in conjunction with a multigrid method, the resulting solver displays an improved convergence rate with no additional computational work.

  11. An arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation for solving moving boundary problems with large displacements and rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erzincanli, Belkis; Sahin, Mehmet

    2013-12-01

    An Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) formulation based on the unstructured finite volume method is proposed for solving moving boundary problems with large displacements and rotations. The numerical method is based on the side-centered arrangement of the primitive variables that does not require any ad-hoc modifications in order to enhance pressure coupling. The continuity equation is satisfied within each element at machine precision and the summation of the continuity equations can be exactly reduced to the domain boundary, which is important for the global mass conservation. A special attention is given to construct an ALE algorithm obeying the discrete geometric conservation law (DGCL). The mesh deformation algorithm is based on the indirect Radial Basis Function (RBF) algorithm at each time level while avoiding remeshing in order to enhance numerical robustness. For the parallel solution of resulting large-scale algebraic equations in a fully coupled form, a matrix factorization is introduced similar to that of the projection method for the whole system and the parallel algebraic multigrid solver BoomerAMG is used for the scaled discrete Laplacian provided by the HYPRE library which we access through the PETSc library. The present numerical algorithm is initially validated for the decaying Taylor-Green vortex flow, the flow past an oscillating circular cylinder in a channel and the flow induced by an oscillating sphere in a cubic cavity. Then the numerical algorithm is applied to the numerical simulation of flow field around a pair of flapping Drosophila wings in hover flight. The time variation of the Eulerian coherent structures in the near wake is shown along with the aerodynamic loads.

  12. ECHO: a Eulerian conservative high-order scheme for general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics and magnetodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zanna, L.; Zanotti, O.; Bucciantini, N.; Londrillo, P.

    2007-10-01

    Aims:We present a new numerical code, ECHO, based on a Eulerian conservative high-order scheme for time dependent three-dimensional general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (GRMHD) and magnetodynamics (GRMD). ECHO is aimed at providing a shock-capturing conservative method able to work at an arbitrary level of formal accuracy (for smooth flows), where the other existing GRMHD and GRMD schemes yield an overall second order at most. Moreover, our goal is to present a general framework based on the 3+1 Eulerian formalism, allowing for different sets of equations and different algorithms and working in a generic space-time metric, so that ECHO may be easily coupled to any solver for Einstein's equations. Methods: Our finite-difference conservative scheme previously developed for special relativistic hydrodynamics and MHD is extended here to the general relativistic case. Various high-order reconstruction methods are implemented and a two-wave approximate Riemann solver is used. The induction equation is treated by adopting the upwind constrained transport (UCT) procedures, appropriate to preserving the divergence-free condition of the magnetic field in shock-capturing methods. The limiting case of magnetodynamics (also known as force-free degenerate electrodynamics) is implemented by simply replacing the fluid velocity with the electromagnetic drift velocity and by neglecting the contribution of matter to the stress tensor. Results: ECHO is particularly accurate, efficient, versatile, and robust. It has been tested against several astrophysical applications, like magnetized accretion onto black holes and constant angular momentum thick disks threaded by toroidal fields. A novel test of the propagation of large-amplitude, circularly polarized Alfvén waves is proposed, and this allows us to prove the spatial and temporal high-order properties of ECHO very accurately. In particular, we show that reconstruction based on a monotonicity-preserving (MP) filter applied to a

  13. Ice Accretion Modeling using an Eulerian Approach for Droplet Impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Joe Woong; Garza, Dennis P.; Sankar, Lakshmi N.; Kreeger, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional Eulerian analysis has been developed for modeling droplet impingement on lifting bodes. The Eulerian model solves the conservation equations of mass and momentum to obtain the droplet flow field properties on the same mesh used in CFD simulations. For complex configurations such as a full rotorcraft, the Eulerian approach is more efficient because the Lagrangian approach would require a significant amount of seeding for accurate estimates of collection efficiency. Simulations are done for various benchmark cases such as NACA0012 airfoil, MS317 airfoil and oscillating SC2110 airfoil to illustrate its use. The present results are compared with results from the Lagrangian approach used in an industry standard analysis called LEWICE.

  14. Eulerian Time-Domain Filtering for Spatial LES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruett, C. David

    1997-01-01

    Eulerian time-domain filtering seems to be appropriate for LES (large eddy simulation) of flows whose large coherent structures convect approximately at a common characteristic velocity; e.g., mixing layers, jets, and wakes. For these flows, we develop an approach to LES based on an explicit second-order digital Butterworth filter, which is applied in,the time domain in an Eulerian context. The approach is validated through a priori and a posteriori analyses of the simulated flow of a heated, subsonic, axisymmetric jet.

  15. Constructing the Lagrangian in the Eulerian coordinate for relativistic hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiueh, Tzihong

    1994-02-01

    The Lorentz-covariant Lagrangian for an ideal relativistic flow is constructed in the Eulerian coordinate. In contrast to the Lagrangian of nonrelativistic flows in the Eulerian formulation, for which the continuity equation is required to be externally imposed as a constraint [Mittag, Stephen, and Yourgrau, in Variational Principles in Dynamics .ul and Quantum Theory, edited by W. Yourgrau and X. Mandelstam (Dover, New York, 1968)], this Lorentz-covariant Lagrangian automatically yields the continuity equation as well as the equation of state. In addition, the relativistic generalization of the Bernoulli equation can also be derived from the present formulation.

  16. EULERIAN DECORRELATION OF FLUCTUATIONS IN THE INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Osman, K. T.; Dasso, S.; Weygand, J. M.; Kivelson, M. G.

    2010-09-20

    A method is devised for estimating the two-time correlation function and the associated Eulerian decorrelation timescale in turbulence. With the assumptions of a single decorrelation time and a frozen-in flow approximation for the single-point analysis, the method compares two-point correlation measurements with single-point correlation measurements at the corresponding spatial lag. This method is applied to interplanetary magnetic field measurements from the Advanced Composition Explorer and Wind spacecraft. An average Eulerian decorrelation time of 2.9 hr is found. This measures the total rate of distortion of turbulent fluid elements-including sweeping, nonlinear distortion, and wave propagation.

  17. Time-domain Raman analytical forward solvers.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Fabrizio; Binzoni, Tiziano; Sekar, Sanathana Konugolu Venkata; Farina, Andrea; Cavalieri, Stefano; Pifferi, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    A set of time-domain analytical forward solvers for Raman signals detected from homogeneous diffusive media is presented. The time-domain solvers have been developed for two geometries: the parallelepiped and the finite cylinder. The potential presence of a background fluorescence emission, contaminating the Raman signal, has also been taken into account. All the solvers have been obtained as solutions of the time dependent diffusion equation. The validation of the solvers has been performed by means of comparisons with the results of "gold standard" Monte Carlo simulations. These forward solvers provide an accurate tool to explore the information content encoded in the time-resolved Raman measurements. PMID:27607645

  18. A generalized gyrokinetic Poisson solver

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Z.; Lee, W.W.

    1995-03-01

    A generalized gyrokinetic Poisson solver has been developed, which employs local operations in the configuration space to compute the polarization density response. The new technique is based on the actual physical process of gyrophase-averaging. It is useful for nonlocal simulations using general geometry equilibrium. Since it utilizes local operations rather than the global ones such as FFT, the new method is most amenable to massively parallel algorithms.

  19. On unstructured grids and solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, T. J.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamentals and the state-of-the-art technology for unstructured grids and solvers are highlighted. Algorithms and techniques pertinent to mesh generation are discussed. It is shown that grid generation and grid manipulation schemes rely on fast multidimensional searching. Flow solution techniques for the Euler equations, which can be derived from the integral form of the equations are discussed. Sample calculations are also provided.

  20. Numerical Study of Coal Gasification Using Eulerian-Eulerian Multiphase Model

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, S.; Guenther, C.; Orsino, S.

    2007-09-01

    Gasification converts the carbon-containing material into a synthesis gas (syngas) which can be used as a fuel to generate electricity or used as a basic chemical building block for a large number of uses in the petrochemical and refining industries. Based on the mode of conveyance of the fuel and the gasifying medium, gasification can be classified into fixed or moving bed, fluidized bed, and entrained flow reactors. Entrained flow gasifiers normally feature dilute flow with small particle size and can be successfully modeled with the Discrete Phase Method (DPM). For the other types, the Eulerian-Eulerian (E-E) or the so called two-fluid multiphase model is a more appropriate approach. The E-E model treats the solid phase as a distinct interpenetrating granular “fluid” and it is the most general-purposed multi-fluid model. This approach provides transient, three-dimensional, detailed information inside the reactor which would otherwise be unobtainable through experiments due to the large scale, high pressure and/or temperature. In this paper, a transient, three-dimensional model of the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) transport gasifier will be presented to illustrate how Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) can be used for large-scale complicated geometry with detailed physics and chemistry. In the model, eleven species are included in the gas phase while four pseudo-species are assumed in the solid phase. A total of sixteen reactions, both homogeneous (involving only gas phase species) and heterogeneous (involving species in both gas and solid phases), are used to model the coal gasification chemistry. Computational results have been validated against PSDF experimental data from lignite to bituminous coals under both air and oxygen blown conditions. The PSDF gasifier geometry was meshed with about 70,000, hexahedra-dominated cells. A total of six cases with different coal, feed gas, and/or operation conditions have been performed. The predicted and

  1. Numerical Simulation of Drophila Flight Based on Arbitrary Langrangian-Eulerian Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erzincanli, Belkis; Sahin, Mehmet

    2012-11-01

    A parallel unstructured finite volume algorithm based on Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) method has been developed in order to investigate the wake structure around a pair of flapping Drosophila wings. The numerical method uses a side-centered arrangement of the primitive variables that does not require any ad-hoc modifications in order to enhance pressure coupling. A radial basis function (RBF) interpolation method is also implemented in order to achieve large mesh deformations. For the parallel solution of resulting large-scale algebraic equations, a matrix factorization is introduced similar to that of the projection method for the whole coupled system and two-cycle of BoomerAMG solver is used for the scaled discrete Laplacian provided by the HYPRE library which we access through the PETSc library. The present numerical algorithm is initially validated for the flow past an oscillating circular cylinder in a channel and the flow induced by an oscillating sphere in a cubic cavity. Then the numerical algorithm is applied to the numerical simulation of flow field around a pair of flapping Drosophila wing in hover flight. The time variation of the near wake structure is shown along with the aerodynamic loads and particle traces. The authors acknowledge financial support from Turkish National Scientific and Technical Research Council (TUBITAK) through project number 111M332. The authors would like to thank Michael Dickinson and Michael Elzinga for providing the experimental data.

  2. Crystal level simulations using Eulerian finite element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, R; Barton, N R; Benson, D J

    2004-02-06

    Over the last several years, significant progress has been made in the use of crystal level material models in simulations of forming operations. However, in Lagrangian finite element approaches simulation capabilities are limited in many cases by mesh distortion associated with deformation heterogeneity. Contexts in which such large distortions arise include: bulk deformation to strains approaching or exceeding unity, especially in highly anisotropic or multiphase materials; shear band formation and intersection of shear bands; and indentation with sharp indenters. Investigators have in the past used Eulerian finite element methods with material response determined from crystal aggregates to study steady state forming processes. However, Eulerian and Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) finite element methods have not been widely utilized for simulation of transient deformation processes at the crystal level. The advection schemes used in Eulerian and ALE codes control mesh distortion and allow for simulation of much larger total deformations. We will discuss material state representation issues related to advection and will present results from ALE simulations.

  3. QUANTIFYING SUBGRID POLLUTANT VARIABILITY IN EULERIAN AIR QUALITY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to properly assess human risk due to exposure to hazardous air pollutants or air toxics, detailed information is needed on the location and magnitude of ambient air toxic concentrations. Regional scale Eulerian air quality models are typically limited to relatively coar...

  4. Eulerian-Lagrangian solution of the convection-dispersion equation in natural co-ordinates.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, R.T.; Casulli, V.; Milford, S.N.

    1984-01-01

    The vast majority of numerical investigations of transport phenomena use an Eulerian formulation for the convenience that the computational grids are fixed in space. An Eulerian-Lagrangian method (ELM) of solution for the convection-dispersion equation is discussed and analyzed. The ELM uses the Lagrangian concept in an Eulerian computational grid system.-from Authors

  5. Extension of the Time-Spectral Approach to Overset Solvers for Arbitrary Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leffell, Joshua Isaac; Murman, Scott M.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    demonstrated marked success in reducing the computational costs associated with simulating periodic forced flows, but have yet to be fully applied to overset or Cartesian solvers for arbitrary motion with dynamic hole-cutting. Overset and Cartesian grid methodologies are versatile techniques capable of handling complex geometry configurations in practical engineering applications, and the combination of the Time-Spectral approach with this general capability potentially provides an enabling new design and analysis tool. In an arbitrary moving-body scenario for these approaches, a Lagrangian body moves through a fixed Eulerian mesh and mesh points in the Eulerian mesh interior to the solid body are removed (cut or blanked), leaving a hole in the Eulerian mesh. During the dynamic motion some gridpoints in the domain are blanked and do not have a complete set of time-samples preventing a direct implementation of the Time-Spectral method. Murman[6] demonstrated the Time-Spectral approach for a Cartesian solver with a rigid domain motion, wherein the hole cutting remains constant. Similarly, Custer et al. [15, 16] used the NASA overset OVERFLOW solver and limited the amount of relative motion to ensure static hole-cutting and interpolation. Recently, Mavriplis and Mundis[17] demonstrated a qualitative method for applying the Time-Spectral approach to an unstructured overset solver for arbitrary motion. The goal of the current work is to develop a robust and general method for handling arbitrary motion with the Time-Spectral approach within an overset or Cartesian mesh method, while still approaching the spectral convergence rate of the original Time-Spectral approach. The viscous OVERFLOW solver will be augmented with the new Time-Spectral algorithm and the capability of the method for benchmark problems in rotorcraft and turbomachinery will be demonstrated. This abstract begins with a brief synopsis of the Time-Spectral approach for overset grids and provides details of e current

  6. Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Alan

    2005-03-18

    Sparse systems of linear equations arise in many engineering applications, including finite elements, finite volumes, and others. The solution of linear systems is often the most computationally intensive portion of the application. Depending on the complexity of problems addressed by the application, there may be no single solver capable of solving all of the linear systems that arise. This motivates the desire to switch an application from one solver librwy to another, depending on the problem being solved. The interfaces provided by solver libraries differ greatly, making it difficult to switch an application code from one library to another. The amount of library-specific code in an application Can be greatly reduced by having an abstraction layer between solver libraries and the application, putting a common "face" on various solver libraries. One such abstraction layer is the Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers (EEl), which has seen significant use by finite element applications at Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  7. Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Prosthetic Aortic Valves: Comparison between Immersed Boundary and Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Techniques for the Mesh Representation

    PubMed Central

    Iannaccone, Francesco; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan; Segers, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In recent years the role of FSI (fluid-structure interaction) simulations in the analysis of the fluid-mechanics of heart valves is becoming more and more important, being able to capture the interaction between the blood and both the surrounding biological tissues and the valve itself. When setting up an FSI simulation, several choices have to be made to select the most suitable approach for the case of interest: in particular, to simulate flexible leaflet cardiac valves, the type of discretization of the fluid domain is crucial, which can be described with an ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) or an Eulerian formulation. The majority of the reported 3D heart valve FSI simulations are performed with the Eulerian formulation, allowing for large deformations of the domains without compromising the quality of the fluid grid. Nevertheless, it is known that the ALE-FSI approach guarantees more accurate results at the interface between the solid and the fluid. The goal of this paper is to describe the same aortic valve model in the two cases, comparing the performances of an ALE-based FSI solution and an Eulerian-based FSI approach. After a first simplified 2D case, the aortic geometry was considered in a full 3D set-up. The model was kept as similar as possible in the two settings, to better compare the simulations’ outcomes. Although for the 2D case the differences were unsubstantial, in our experience the performance of a full 3D ALE-FSI simulation was significantly limited by the technical problems and requirements inherent to the ALE formulation, mainly related to the mesh motion and deformation of the fluid domain. As a secondary outcome of this work, it is important to point out that the choice of the solver also influenced the reliability of the final results. PMID:27128798

  8. Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Prosthetic Aortic Valves: Comparison between Immersed Boundary and Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Techniques for the Mesh Representation.

    PubMed

    Bavo, Alessandra M; Rocatello, Giorgia; Iannaccone, Francesco; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan; Segers, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In recent years the role of FSI (fluid-structure interaction) simulations in the analysis of the fluid-mechanics of heart valves is becoming more and more important, being able to capture the interaction between the blood and both the surrounding biological tissues and the valve itself. When setting up an FSI simulation, several choices have to be made to select the most suitable approach for the case of interest: in particular, to simulate flexible leaflet cardiac valves, the type of discretization of the fluid domain is crucial, which can be described with an ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) or an Eulerian formulation. The majority of the reported 3D heart valve FSI simulations are performed with the Eulerian formulation, allowing for large deformations of the domains without compromising the quality of the fluid grid. Nevertheless, it is known that the ALE-FSI approach guarantees more accurate results at the interface between the solid and the fluid. The goal of this paper is to describe the same aortic valve model in the two cases, comparing the performances of an ALE-based FSI solution and an Eulerian-based FSI approach. After a first simplified 2D case, the aortic geometry was considered in a full 3D set-up. The model was kept as similar as possible in the two settings, to better compare the simulations' outcomes. Although for the 2D case the differences were unsubstantial, in our experience the performance of a full 3D ALE-FSI simulation was significantly limited by the technical problems and requirements inherent to the ALE formulation, mainly related to the mesh motion and deformation of the fluid domain. As a secondary outcome of this work, it is important to point out that the choice of the solver also influenced the reliability of the final results. PMID:27128798

  9. Analysis Tools for CFD Multigrid Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.; Thomas, James L.; Diskin, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Analysis tools are needed to guide the development and evaluate the performance of multigrid solvers for the fluid flow equations. Classical analysis tools, such as local mode analysis, often fail to accurately predict performance. Two-grid analysis tools, herein referred to as Idealized Coarse Grid and Idealized Relaxation iterations, have been developed and evaluated within a pilot multigrid solver. These new tools are applicable to general systems of equations and/or discretizations and point to problem areas within an existing multigrid solver. Idealized Relaxation and Idealized Coarse Grid are applied in developing textbook-efficient multigrid solvers for incompressible stagnation flow problems.

  10. Accurate direct Eulerian simulation of dynamic elastic-plastic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kamm, James R; Walter, John W

    2009-01-01

    The simulation of dynamic, large strain deformation is an important, difficult, and unsolved computational challenge. Existing Eulerian schemes for dynamic material response are plagued by unresolved issues. We present a new scheme for the first-order system of elasto-plasticity equations in the Eulerian frame. This system has an intrinsic constraint on the inverse deformation gradient. Standard Godunov schemes do not satisfy this constraint. The method of Flux Distributions (FD) was devised to discretely enforce such constraints for numerical schemes with cell-centered variables. We describe a Flux Distribution approach that enforces the inverse deformation gradient constraint. As this approach is new and novel, we do not yet have numerical results to validate our claims. This paper is the first installment of our program to develop this new method.

  11. Modified Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for hydrodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorek, Shaul; Borisov, Vyacheslav

    2012-04-01

    We present the modified Eulerian-Lagrangian (MEL) formulation, based on non-divergent forms of partial differential balance equations, for simulating transport of extensive quantities in a porous medium. Hydrodynamic derivatives are written in terms of modified velocities for particles propagating phase and component quantities along their respective paths. The particles physically interpreted velocities also address the heterogeneity of the matrix and fluid properties. The MEL formulation is also implemented to parabolic Partial Differential Equations (PDE's) as these are shown to be interchangeable with equivalent PDE's having hyperbolic - parabolic characteristics, without violating the same physical concepts. We prove that the MEL schemes provide a convergent and monotone approximation also to PDE's with discontinuous coefficients. An extension to the Peclet number is presented that also accounts for advective dominant PDE's with no reference to the fluid velocity or even when this velocity is not introduced. In Sorek et al. [27], a mathematical analysis for a linear system of coupled PDE's and an example of nonlinear PDE's, proved that the finite difference MEL, unlike an Eulerian scheme, guaranties the absence of spurious oscillations. Currently, we present notions of monotone interpolation associated with the MEL particle tracking procedure and prove the convergence of the MEL schemes to the original balance equation also for discontinuous coefficients on the basis of difference schemes approximating PDE's. We provide numerical examples, also with highly random fields of permeabilities and/or dispersivities, suggesting that the MEL scheme produces resolutions that are more consistent with the physical phenomenon in comparison to the Eulerian and the Eulerian-Lagrangian (EL) schemes.

  12. A Dynamically Adaptive Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Method for Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R W; Pember, R B; Elliott, N S

    2004-01-28

    A new method that combines staggered grid Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) techniques with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) has been developed for solution of the Euler equations. The novel components of the combined ALE-AMR method hinge upon the integration of traditional AMR techniques with both staggered grid Lagrangian operators as well as elliptic relaxation operators on moving, deforming mesh hierarchies. Numerical examples demonstrate the utility of the method in performing detailed three-dimensional shock-driven instability calculations.

  13. A Dynamically Adaptive Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Method for Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R W; Pember, R B; Elliott, N S

    2002-10-19

    A new method that combines staggered grid Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) techniques with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) has been developed for solution of the Euler equations. The novel components of the combined ALE-AMR method hinge upon the integration of traditional AMR techniques with both staggered grid Lagrangian operators as well as elliptic relaxation operators on moving, deforming mesh hierarchies. Numerical examples demonstrate the utility of the method in performing detailed three-dimensional shock-driven instability calculations.

  14. A domain decomposition scheme for Eulerian shock physics codes

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R.L.; Hertel, E.S. Jr.

    1994-08-01

    A new algorithm which allows for complex domain decomposition in Eulerian codes was developed at Sandia National Laboratories. This new feature allows a user to customize the zoning for each portion of a calculation and to refine volumes of the computational space of particular interest This option is available in one, two, and three dimensions. The new technique will be described in detail and several examples of the effectiveness of this technique will also be discussed.

  15. An overview of mesoscale material modeling with Eulerian hydrocodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olney, K.; Benson, D. J.; Nesterenko, V.

    2014-05-01

    Eulerian hydrocodes were originally developed for simulating strong shocks in solids and fluids, but their ability to handle arbitrarily large deformations and the formation of new free surfaces makes them attractive for simulating the deformation and failure of materials at the mesoscopic scale. A summary of several numerical techniques that have been developed to address issues that commonly arise for this class of problems is presented.

  16. The hybrid Eulerian Lagrangian numerical scheme tested with Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A. B.; Sørensen, B.; Tarning-Andersen, P.; Christensen, J. H.; Brandt, J.; Kaas, E.

    2012-12-01

    A newly developed transport scheme, the Hybrid Eulerian Lagrangian (HEL) scheme, has been tested using a module for atmospheric chemistry, including 58 chemical species, and compared to two other traditional advection schemes; a classical pseudospectral Eulerian method the Accurate Space Derivative (ASD) scheme and the bi-cubic semi-Lagrangian (SL) scheme using classical rotation tests. The rotation tests have been designed to test and compare the advection schemes for different spatial and temporal resolutions in different chemical conditions (rural and urban) and for different shapes (cone and slotted cylinder). This gives the advection schemes different challenges with respect to relatively slow or fast chemistry and smooth or sharp gradients. In every test, error measures have been calculated and used for ranking of the advection schemes with respect to performance, i.e. lowest overall errors for all chemical species. The results presented show that the new transport scheme, HEL, by far outperforms both the Eulerian and semi-Lagrangian schemes with very low error estimates compared to the two other schemes.

  17. The hybrid Eulerian Lagrangian numerical scheme tested with Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A. B.; Sørensen, B.; Tarning-Andersen, P.; Christensen, J. H.; Brandt, J.; Kaas, E.

    2012-11-01

    A newly developed advection scheme, the Hybrid Eulerian Lagrangian (HEL) scheme, has been tested, including a module for atmospheric chemistry, including 58 chemical species, and compared to two other traditional advection schemes; a classical pseudospectral Eulerian method the Accurate Space Derivative (ASD) scheme and the bi-cubic semi-Lagrangian (SL) scheme using classical rotation tests. The rotation tests have been designed to test and compare the advection schemes for different spatial and temporal resolutions in different chemical conditions (rural and urban) and for different shapes (cone and slotted cylinder) giving the advection schemes different challenges with respect to relatively slow or fast chemistry and smooth or sharp gradients, respectively. In every test, error measures have been calculated and used for ranking of the advection schemes with respect to performance, i.e. lowest overall errors for all chemical species. Furthermore, the HEL and SL schemes have been compared in a shallow water model, demonstrating the performance in a more realistic non-linear deformation flow. The results in this paper show that the new advection scheme, HEL, by far outperforms both the Eulerian and semi-Lagrangian schemes with very low error estimates compared to the two other schemes. Although no analytic solution can be obtained for the performance in the non-linear shallow water model flow, the tracer distribution appears realistic as compared to LMCSL when a mixing between local parcel concentrations is introduced in HEL.

  18. MACSYMA's symbolic ordinary differential equation solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    The MACSYMA's symbolic ordinary differential equation solver ODE2 is described. The code for this routine is delineated, which is of interest because it is written in top-level MACSYMA language, and may serve as a good example of programming in that language. Other symbolic ordinary differential equation solvers are mentioned.

  19. KLU2 Direct Linear Solver Package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-01-04

    KLU2 is a direct sparse solver for solving unsymmetric linear systems. It is related to the existing KLU solver, (in Amesos package and also as a stand-alone package from University of Florida) but provides template support for scalar and ordinal types. It uses a left looking LU factorization method.

  20. Improving Resource-Unaware SAT Solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölldobler, Steffen; Manthey, Norbert; Saptawijaya, Ari

    The paper discusses cache utilization in state-of-the-art SAT solvers. The aim of the study is to show how a resource-unaware SAT solver can be improved by utilizing the cache sensibly. The analysis is performed on a CDCL-based SAT solver using a subset of the industrial SAT Competition 2009 benchmark. For the analysis, the total cycles, the resource stall cycles, the L2 cache hits and the L2 cache misses are traced using sample based profiling. Based on the analysis, several techniques - some of which have not been used in SAT solvers so far - are proposed resulting in a combined speedup up to 83% without affecting the search path of the solver. The average speedup on the benchmark is 60%. The new techniques are also applied to MiniSAT2.0 improving its runtime by 20% on average.

  1. Belos Block Linear Solvers Package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-03-01

    Belos is an extensible and interoperable framework for large-scale, iterative methods for solving systems of linear equations with multiple right-hand sides. The motivation for this framework is to provide a generic interface to a collection of algorithms for solving large-scale linear systems. Belos is interoperable because both the matrix and vectors are considered to be opaque objects--only knowledge of the matrix and vectors via elementary operations is necessary. An implementation of Balos is accomplished viamore » the use of interfaces. One of the goals of Belos is to allow the user flexibility in specifying the data representation for the matrix and vectors and so leverage any existing software investment. The algorithms that will be included in package are Krylov-based linear solvers, like Block GMRES (Generalized Minimal RESidual) and Block CG (Conjugate-Gradient).« less

  2. On two-phase flow solvers in irregular domains with contact line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepilliez, Mathieu; Popescu, Elena Roxana; Gibou, Frederic; Tanguy, Sébastien

    2016-09-01

    We present numerical methods that enable the direct numerical simulation of two-phase flows in irregular domains. A method is presented to account for surface tension effects in a mesh cell containing a triple line between the liquid, gas and solid phases. Our numerical method is based on the level-set method to capture the liquid-gas interface and on the single-phase Navier-Stokes solver in irregular domain proposed in [35] to impose the solid boundary in an Eulerian framework. We also present a strategy for the implicit treatment of the viscous term and how to impose both a Neumann boundary condition and a jump condition when solving for the pressure field. Special care is given on how to take into account the contact angle, the no-slip boundary condition for the velocity field and the volume forces. Finally, we present numerical results in two and three spatial dimensions evaluating our simulations with several benchmarks.

  3. SUDOKU A STORY & A SOLVER

    SciTech Connect

    GARDNER, P.R.

    2006-04-01

    Sudoku, also known as Number Place, is a logic-based placement puzzle. The aim of the puzzle is to enter a numerical digit from 1 through 9 in each cell of a 9 x 9 grid made up of 3 x 3 subgrids (called ''regions''), starting with various digits given in some cells (the ''givens''). Each row, column, and region must contain only one instance of each numeral. Completing the puzzle requires patience and logical ability. Although first published in a U.S. puzzle magazine in 1979, Sudoku initially caught on in Japan in 1986 and attained international popularity in 2005. Last fall, after noticing Sudoku puzzles in some newspapers and magazines, I attempted a few just to see how hard they were. Of course, the difficulties varied considerably. ''Obviously'' one could use Trial and Error but all the advice was to ''Use Logic''. Thinking to flex, and strengthen, those powers, I began to tackle the puzzles systematically. That is, when I discovered a new tactical rule, I would write it down, eventually generating a list of ten or so, with some having overlap. They served pretty well except for the more difficult puzzles, but even then I managed to develop an additional three rules that covered all of them until I hit the Oregonian puzzle shown. With all of my rules, I could not seem to solve that puzzle. Initially putting my failure down to rapid mental fatigue (being unable to hold a sufficient quantity of information in my mind at one time), I decided to write a program to implement my rules and see what I had failed to notice earlier. The solver, too, failed. That is, my rules were insufficient to solve that particular puzzle. I happened across a book written by a fellow who constructs such puzzles and who claimed that, sometimes, the only tactic left was trial and error. With a trial and error routine implemented, my solver successfully completed the Oregonian puzzle, and has successfully solved every puzzle submitted to it since.

  4. ALPS - A LINEAR PROGRAM SOLVER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterna, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    Linear programming is a widely-used engineering and management tool. Scheduling, resource allocation, and production planning are all well-known applications of linear programs (LP's). Most LP's are too large to be solved by hand, so over the decades many computer codes for solving LP's have been developed. ALPS, A Linear Program Solver, is a full-featured LP analysis program. ALPS can solve plain linear programs as well as more complicated mixed integer and pure integer programs. ALPS also contains an efficient solution technique for pure binary (0-1 integer) programs. One of the many weaknesses of LP solvers is the lack of interaction with the user. ALPS is a menu-driven program with no special commands or keywords to learn. In addition, ALPS contains a full-screen editor to enter and maintain the LP formulation. These formulations can be written to and read from plain ASCII files for portability. For those less experienced in LP formulation, ALPS contains a problem "parser" which checks the formulation for errors. ALPS creates fully formatted, readable reports that can be sent to a printer or output file. ALPS is written entirely in IBM's APL2/PC product, Version 1.01. The APL2 workspace containing all the ALPS code can be run on any APL2/PC system (AT or 386). On a 32-bit system, this configuration can take advantage of all extended memory. The user can also examine and modify the ALPS code. The APL2 workspace has also been "packed" to be run on any DOS system (without APL2) as a stand-alone "EXE" file, but has limited memory capacity on a 640K system. A numeric coprocessor (80X87) is optional but recommended. The standard distribution medium for ALPS is a 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. IBM, IBM PC and IBM APL2 are registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

  5. Effects of Helicity on Lagrangian and Eulerian Time Correlations in Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Zhou, Ye

    1998-01-01

    Taylor series expansions of turbulent time correlation functions are applied to show that helicity influences Eulerian time correlations more strongly than Lagrangian time correlations: to second order in time, the helicity effect on Lagrangian time correlations vanishes, but the helicity effect on Eulerian time correlations is nonzero. Fourier analysis shows that the helicity effect on Eulerian time correlations is confined to the largest inertial range scales. Some implications for sound radiation by swirling flows are discussed.

  6. A scalable 2-D parallel sparse solver

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, S.C.; Mitra, S.

    1995-12-01

    Scalability beyond a small number of processors, typically 32 or less, is known to be a problem for existing parallel general sparse (PGS) direct solvers. This paper presents a parallel general sparse PGS direct solver for general sparse linear systems on distributed memory machines. The algorithm is based on the well-known sequential sparse algorithm Y12M. To achieve efficient parallelization, a 2-D scattered decomposition of the sparse matrix is used. The proposed algorithm is more scalable than existing parallel sparse direct solvers. Its scalability is evaluated on a 256 processor nCUBE2s machine using Boeing/Harwell benchmark matrices.

  7. SIERRA framework version 4 : solver services.

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Alan B.

    2005-02-01

    Several SIERRA applications make use of third-party libraries to solve systems of linear and nonlinear equations, and to solve eigenproblems. The classes and interfaces in the SIERRA framework that provide linear system assembly services and access to solver libraries are collectively referred to as solver services. This paper provides an overview of SIERRA's solver services including the design goals that drove the development, and relationships and interactions among the various classes. The process of assembling and manipulating linear systems will be described, as well as access to solution methods and other operations.

  8. An Overview of Mesoscale Material Modeling with Eulerian Hydrocodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, David

    2013-06-01

    Eulerian hydrocodes were originally developed for simulating strong shocks in solids and fluids, but their ability to handle arbitrarily large deformations and the formation of new free surfaces makes them attractive for simulating the deformation and failure of materials at the mesoscopic scale. A summary of some of the numerical techniques that have been developed to address common issues for this class of problems is presented with the shock compression of powders used as a model problem. Achieving the correct packing density with the correct statistical distribution of particle sizes and shapes is, in itself, a challenging problem. However, since Eulerian codes permit multiple materials within each element, or cell, the material interfaces do not have to follow the mesh lines. The use of digital image processing to map the pixels of micrographs to the Eulerian mesh has proven to be a popular and useful means of creating accurate models of complex microstructures. Micro CT scans have been used to extend this approach to three dimensions for several classes of materials. The interaction between the particles is of considerable interest. During shock compression, individual particles may melt and form jets, and the voids between them collapse. Dynamic interface ordering has become a necessity, and many codes now have a suite of options for handling multi-material mechanics. True contact algorithms are now replacing multi-material approximations in some cases. At the mesoscale, material properties often vary spatially due to sub-scale effects. Using a large number of material species to represent the variations is usually unattractive. Directly specifying the properties point-wise as history variables has not proven successful because the limiters in the transport algorithms quickly smooth out the variations. Circumventing the limiter problem is shown to be relatively simple with the use of a reference configuration and the transport of the initial coordinates

  9. Lagrangian and Eulerian statistics obtained from direct numerical simulations of homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, Kyle D.; Eaton, John K.

    1991-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation is used to study dispersion in decaying isotropic turbulence and homogeneous shear flow. Both Lagrangian and Eulerian data are presented allowing direct comparison, but at fairly low Reynolds number. The quantities presented include properties of the dispersion tensor, isoprobability contours of particle displacement, Lagrangian and Eulerian velocity autocorrelations and time scale ratios, and the eddy diffusivity tensor. The Lagrangian time microscale is found to be consistently larger than the Eulerian microscale, presumably due to the advection of the small scales by the large scales in the Eulerian reference frame.

  10. MESA: A 3-D Eulerian hydrocode for penetration mechanics studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Holian, K.S.; Henninger, R.

    1991-01-01

    We describe an explicit, finite-difference hydrocode, called MESA, and compare calculations to metal and ceramic plate impacts with spall and to Taylor cylinder tests. The MESA code was developed with support from DARPA, the Army and the Marine Corps for use in armor/anti-armor problems primarily, but the code has been used for a number of other applications. MESA includes 2-D and 3-D Eulerian hydrodynamics, a number of material strength and fracture models, and a programmed burn high explosives model. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Euler solvers for transonic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanleer, Bram

    1989-01-01

    The 1980s may well be called the Euler era of applied aerodynamics. Computer codes based on discrete approximations of the Euler equations are now routinely used to obtain solutions of transonic flow problems in which the effects of entropy and vorticity production are significant. Such codes can even predict separation from a sharp edge, owing to the inclusion of artificial dissipation, intended to lend numerical stability to the calculation but at the same time enforcing the Kutta condition. One effect not correctly predictable by Euler codes is the separation from a smooth surface, and neither is viscous drag; for these some form of the Navier-Stokes equation is needed. It, therefore, comes as no surprise to observe that the Navier-Stokes has already begun before Euler solutions were fully exploited. Moreover, most numerical developments for the Euler equations are now constrained by the requirement that the techniques introduced, notably artificial dissipation, must not interfere with the new physics added when going from an Euler to a full Navier-Stokes approximation. In order to appreciate the contributions of Euler solvers to the understanding of transonic aerodynamics, it is useful to review the components of these computational tools. Space discretization, time- or pseudo-time marching and boundary procedures, the essential constituents are discussed. The subject of grid generation and grid adaptation to the solution are touched upon only where relevant. A list of unanswered questions and an outlook for the future are covered.

  12. ALPS: A Linear Program Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferencz, Donald C.; Viterna, Larry A.

    1991-01-01

    ALPS is a computer program which can be used to solve general linear program (optimization) problems. ALPS was designed for those who have minimal linear programming (LP) knowledge and features a menu-driven scheme to guide the user through the process of creating and solving LP formulations. Once created, the problems can be edited and stored in standard DOS ASCII files to provide portability to various word processors or even other linear programming packages. Unlike many math-oriented LP solvers, ALPS contains an LP parser that reads through the LP formulation and reports several types of errors to the user. ALPS provides a large amount of solution data which is often useful in problem solving. In addition to pure linear programs, ALPS can solve for integer, mixed integer, and binary type problems. Pure linear programs are solved with the revised simplex method. Integer or mixed integer programs are solved initially with the revised simplex, and the completed using the branch-and-bound technique. Binary programs are solved with the method of implicit enumeration. This manual describes how to use ALPS to create, edit, and solve linear programming problems. Instructions for installing ALPS on a PC compatible computer are included in the appendices along with a general introduction to linear programming. A programmers guide is also included for assistance in modifying and maintaining the program.

  13. Parallelizing alternating direction implicit solver on GPUs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present a parallel Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) solver on GPUs. Our implementation significantly improves existing implementations in two aspects. First, we address the scalability issue of existing Parallel Cyclic Reduction (PCR) implementations by eliminating their hardware resource con...

  14. Optimization of solver for gas flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savichkin, D.; Dodulad, O.; Kloss, Yu

    2014-05-01

    The main purpose of the work is optimization of the solver for rarefied gas flow modeling based on the Boltzmann equation. Optimization method is based on SIMD extensions for ×86 processors. Computational code is profiled and manually optimized with SSE instructions. Heat flow, shock waves and Knudsen pump are modeled with optimized solver. Dependencies of computational time from mesh sizes and CPU capabilities are provided.

  15. A parallel PCG solver for MODFLOW.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yanhui; Li, Guomin

    2009-01-01

    In order to simulate large-scale ground water flow problems more efficiently with MODFLOW, the OpenMP programming paradigm was used to parallelize the preconditioned conjugate-gradient (PCG) solver with in this study. Incremental parallelization, the significant advantage supported by OpenMP on a shared-memory computer, made the solver transit to a parallel program smoothly one block of code at a time. The parallel PCG solver, suitable for both MODFLOW-2000 and MODFLOW-2005, is verified using an 8-processor computer. Both the impact of compilers and different model domain sizes were considered in the numerical experiments. Based on the timing results, execution times using the parallel PCG solver are typically about 1.40 to 5.31 times faster than those using the serial one. In addition, the simulation results are the exact same as the original PCG solver, because the majority of serial codes were not changed. It is worth noting that this parallelizing approach reduces cost in terms of software maintenance because only a single source PCG solver code needs to be maintained in the MODFLOW source tree. PMID:19563427

  16. Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-03-18

    Sparse systems of linear equations arise in many engineering applications, including finite elements, finite volumes, and others. The solution of linear systems is often the most computationally intensive portion of the application. Depending on the complexity of problems addressed by the application, there may be no single solver capable of solving all of the linear systems that arise. This motivates the desire to switch an application from one solver librwy to another, depending on themore » problem being solved. The interfaces provided by solver libraries differ greatly, making it difficult to switch an application code from one library to another. The amount of library-specific code in an application Can be greatly reduced by having an abstraction layer between solver libraries and the application, putting a common "face" on various solver libraries. One such abstraction layer is the Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers (EEl), which has seen significant use by finite element applications at Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.« less

  17. Eulerian hydrocode modeling of a dynamic tensile extrusion experiment (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Burkett, Michael W; Clancy, Sean P

    2009-01-01

    Eulerian hydrocode simulations utilizing the Mechanical Threshold Stress flow stress model were performed to provide insight into a dynamic extrusion experiment. The dynamic extrusion response of copper (three different grain sizes) and tantalum spheres were simulated with MESA, an explicit, 2-D Eulerian continuum mechanics hydrocode and compared with experimental data. The experimental data consisted of high-speed images of the extrusion process, recovered extruded samples, and post test metallography. The hydrocode was developed to predict large-strain and high-strain-rate loading problems. Some of the features of the features of MESA include a high-order advection algorithm, a material interface tracking scheme and a van Leer monotonic advection-limiting. The Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS) model was utilized to evolve the flow stress as a function of strain, strain rate and temperature for copper and tantalum. Plastic strains exceeding 300% were predicted in the extrusion of copper at 400 m/s, while plastic strains exceeding 800% were predicted for Ta. Quantitative comparisons between the predicted and measured deformation topologies and extrusion rate were made. Additionally, predictions of the texture evolution (based upon the deformation rate history and the rigid body rotations experienced by the copper during the extrusion process) were compared with the orientation imaging microscopy measurements. Finally, comparisons between the calculated and measured influence of the initial texture on the dynamic extrusion response of tantalum was performed.

  18. An Eulerian approach for computing the finite time Lyapunov exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Shingyu

    2011-05-01

    We propose efficient Eulerian methods for approximating the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE). The idea is to compute the related flow map using the Level Set Method and the Liouville equation. There are several advantages of the proposed approach. Unlike the usual Lagrangian-type computations, the resulting method requires the velocity field defined only at discrete locations. No interpolation of the velocity field is needed. Also, the method automatically stops a particle trajectory in the case when the ray hits the boundary of the computational domain. The computational complexity of the algorithm is O(Δ x-( d+1) ) with d the dimension of the physical space. Since there are the same number of mesh points in the x- t space, the computational complexity of the proposed Eulerian approach is optimal in the sense that each grid point is visited for only O(1) time. We also extend the algorithm to compute the FTLE on a co-dimension one manifold. The resulting algorithm does not require computation on any local coordinate system and is simple to implement even for an evolving manifold.

  19. Eulerian-Lagrangian Simulations of Transonic Flutter Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendiksen, Oddvar O.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of recent applications of Eulerian-Lagrangian computational schemes in simulating transonic flutter instabilities. This approach, the fluid-structure system is treated as a single continuum dynamics problem, by switching from an Eulerian to a Lagrangian formulation at the fluid-structure boundary. This computational approach effectively eliminates the phase integration errors associated with previous methods, where the fluid and structure are integrated sequentially using different schemes. The formulation is based on Hamilton's Principle in mixed coordinates, and both finite volume and finite element discretization schemes are considered. Results from numerical simulations of transonic flutter instabilities are presented for isolated wings, thin panels, and turbomachinery blades. The results suggest that the method is capable of reproducing the energy exchange between the fluid and the structure with significantly less error than existing methods. Localized flutter modes and panel flutter modes involving traveling waves can also be simulated effectively with no a priori knowledge of the type of instability involved.

  20. Advanced three-dimensional Eulerian hydrodynamic algorithm development

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, W.J.; Kothe, D.B.; Mosso, S.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of this project is to investigate, implement, and evaluate algorithms that have high potential for improving the robustness, fidelity and accuracy of three-dimensional Eulerian hydrodynamic simulations. Eulerian computations are necessary to simulate a number of important physical phenomena ranging from the molding process for metal parts to nuclear weapons safety issues to astrophysical phenomena such as that associated with a Type 2 supernovae. A number of algorithmic issues were explored in the course of this research including interface/volume tracking, surface physics integration, high resolution integration techniques, multilevel iterative methods, multimaterial hydrodynamics and coupling radiation with hydrodynamics. This project combines core strengths of several Laboratory divisions. The project has high institutional benefit given the renewed emphasis on numerical simulations in Science-Based Stockpile Stewardship and the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative and LANL`s tactical goals related to high performance computing and simulation.

  1. PSPIKE: A Parallel Hybrid Sparse Linear System Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manguoglu, Murat; Sameh, Ahmed H.; Schenk, Olaf

    The availability of large-scale computing platforms comprised of tens of thousands of multicore processors motivates the need for the next generation of highly scalable sparse linear system solvers. These solvers must optimize parallel performance, processor (serial) performance, as well as memory requirements, while being robust across broad classes of applications and systems. In this paper, we present a new parallel solver that combines the desirable characteristics of direct methods (robustness) and effective iterative solvers (low computational cost), while alleviating their drawbacks (memory requirements, lack of robustness). Our proposed hybrid solver is based on the general sparse solver PARDISO, and the “Spike” family of hybrid solvers. The resulting algorithm, called PSPIKE, is as robust as direct solvers, more reliable than classical preconditioned Krylov subspace methods, and much more scalable than direct sparse solvers. We support our performance and parallel scalability claims using detailed experimental studies and comparison with direct solvers, as well as classical preconditioned Krylov methods.

  2. A three-dimensional finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian Localized Adjoint Method (ELLAM) for solute-transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heberton, C.I.; Russell, T.F.; Konikow, L.F.; Hornberger, G.Z.

    2000-01-01

    This report documents the U.S. Geological Survey Eulerian-Lagrangian Localized Adjoint Method (ELLAM) algorithm that solves an integral form of the solute-transport equation, incorporating an implicit-in-time difference approximation for the dispersive and sink terms. Like the algorithm in the original version of the U.S. Geological Survey MOC3D transport model, ELLAM uses a method of characteristics approach to solve the transport equation on the basis of the velocity field. The ELLAM algorithm, however, is based on an integral formulation of conservation of mass and uses appropriate numerical techniques to obtain global conservation of mass. The implicit procedure eliminates several stability criteria required for an explicit formulation. Consequently, ELLAM allows large transport time increments to be used. ELLAM can produce qualitatively good results using a small number of transport time steps. A description of the ELLAM numerical method, the data-input requirements and output options, and the results of simulator testing and evaluation are presented. The ELLAM algorithm was evaluated for the same set of problems used to test and evaluate Version 1 and Version 2 of MOC3D. These test results indicate that ELLAM offers a viable alternative to the explicit and implicit solvers in MOC3D. Its use is desirable when mass balance is imperative or a fast, qualitative model result is needed. Although accurate solutions can be generated using ELLAM, its efficiency relative to the two previously documented solution algorithms is problem dependent.

  3. A coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian method for the solution of three-dimensional vortical flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felici, Helene Marie

    1992-01-01

    A coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian method is presented for the reduction of numerical diffusion observed in solutions of three-dimensional rotational flows using standard Eulerian finite-volume time-marching procedures. A Lagrangian particle tracking method using particle markers is added to the Eulerian time-marching procedure and provides a correction of the Eulerian solution. In turn, the Eulerian solutions is used to integrate the Lagrangian state-vector along the particles trajectories. The Lagrangian correction technique does not require any a-priori information on the structure or position of the vortical regions. While the Eulerian solution ensures the conservation of mass and sets the pressure field, the particle markers, used as 'accuracy boosters,' take advantage of the accurate convection description of the Lagrangian solution and enhance the vorticity and entropy capturing capabilities of standard Eulerian finite-volume methods. The combined solution procedures is tested in several applications. The convection of a Lamb vortex in a straight channel is used as an unsteady compressible flow preservation test case. The other test cases concern steady incompressible flow calculations and include the preservation of turbulent inlet velocity profile, the swirling flow in a pipe, and the constant stagnation pressure flow and secondary flow calculations in bends. The last application deals with the external flow past a wing with emphasis on the trailing vortex solution. The improvement due to the addition of the Lagrangian correction technique is measured by comparison with analytical solutions when available or with Eulerian solutions on finer grids. The use of the combined Eulerian/Lagrangian scheme results in substantially lower grid resolution requirements than the standard Eulerian scheme for a given solution accuracy.

  4. Hamiltonian magnetohydrodynamics: Lagrangian, Eulerian, and dynamically accessible stability—Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Andreussi, T.; Morrison, P. J.; Pegoraro, F.

    2013-09-15

    Stability conditions of magnetized plasma flows are obtained by exploiting the Hamiltonian structure of the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations and, in particular, by using three kinds of energy principles. First, the Lagrangian variable energy principle is described and sufficient stability conditions are presented. Next, plasma flows are described in terms of Eulerian variables and the noncanonical Hamiltonian formulation of MHD is exploited. For symmetric equilibria, the energy-Casimir principle is expanded to second order and sufficient conditions for stability to symmetric perturbation are obtained. Then, dynamically accessible variations, i.e., variations that explicitly preserve invariants of the system, are introduced and the respective energy principle is considered. General criteria for stability are obtained, along with comparisons between the three different approaches.

  5. Adaptive reconnection-based arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian method

    SciTech Connect

    Bo, Wurigen; Shashkov, Mikhail

    2015-07-21

    We present a new adaptive Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) method. This method is based on the reconnection-based ALE (ReALE) methodology of Refs. [35], [34] and [6]. The main elements in a standard ReALE method are: an explicit Lagrangian phase on an arbitrary polygonal (in 2D) mesh in which the solution and positions of grid nodes are updated; a rezoning phase in which a new grid is defined by changing the connectivity (using Voronoi tessellation) but not the number of cells; and a remapping phase in which the Lagrangian solution is transferred onto the new grid. Furthermore, in the standard ReALE method, the rezoned mesh is smoothed by using one or several steps toward centroidal Voronoi tessellation, but it is not adapted to the solution in any way.

  6. Adaptive reconnection-based arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian method

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bo, Wurigen; Shashkov, Mikhail

    2015-07-21

    We present a new adaptive Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) method. This method is based on the reconnection-based ALE (ReALE) methodology of Refs. [35], [34] and [6]. The main elements in a standard ReALE method are: an explicit Lagrangian phase on an arbitrary polygonal (in 2D) mesh in which the solution and positions of grid nodes are updated; a rezoning phase in which a new grid is defined by changing the connectivity (using Voronoi tessellation) but not the number of cells; and a remapping phase in which the Lagrangian solution is transferred onto the new grid. Furthermore, in the standard ReALEmore » method, the rezoned mesh is smoothed by using one or several steps toward centroidal Voronoi tessellation, but it is not adapted to the solution in any way.« less

  7. Full Eulerian lattice Boltzmann model for conjugate heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yang; Li, Decai; Shu, Shi; Niu, Xiaodong

    2015-12-01

    In this paper a full Eulerian lattice Boltzmann model is proposed for conjugate heat transfer. A unified governing equation with a source term for the temperature field is derived. By introducing the source term, we prove that the continuity of temperature and its normal flux at the interface is satisfied automatically. The curved interface is assumed to be zigzag lines. All physical quantities are recorded and updated on a Cartesian grid. As a result, any complicated treatment near the interface is avoided, which makes the proposed model suitable to simulate the conjugate heat transfer with complex interfaces efficiently. The present conjugate interface treatment is validated by several steady and unsteady numerical tests, including pure heat conduction, forced convection, and natural convection problems. Both flat and curved interfaces are also involved. The obtained results show good agreement with the analytical and/or finite volume results.

  8. Vortex and strain skeletons in Eulerian and Lagrangian frames.

    PubMed

    Sahner, Jan; Weinkauf, Tino; Teuber, Nathalie; Hege, Hans-Christian

    2007-01-01

    We present an approach to analyze mixing in flow fields by extracting vortex and strain features as extremal structures of derived scalar quantities that satisfy a duality property: they indicate vortical as well as high-strain (saddletype) regions. Specifically, we consider the Okubo-Weiss criterion and the recently introduced MZ-criterion. While the first is derived from a purely Eulerian framework, the latter is based on Lagrangian considerations. In both cases high values indicate vortex activity whereas low values indicate regions of high strain. By considering the extremal features of those quantities, we define the notions of a vortex and a strain skeleton in a hierarchical manner: the collection of maximal 0D, 1D and 2D structures assemble the vortex skeleton; the minimal structures identify the strain skeleton. We extract those features using scalar field topology and apply our method to a number of steady and unsteady 3D flow fields. PMID:17622681

  9. Noninvasive Free Flap Monitoring Using Eulerian Video Magnification

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan Fang; Vuong, Christopher; Walker, Paul Charles; Peterson, Nathaniel Ray; Inman, Jared Christian; Filho, Pedro Alcantara Andrade; Lee, Steve Choon-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Eulerian Video Magnification (EVM) can enhance subtle changes in videos to reveal what was once invisible to the naked eye. In this proof of concept study, we investigated using EVM as a novel form of free flap monitoring. Free flaps with skin paddles were filmed in the operating room with manipulation of their pedicles. In a representative 77-year-old female who received a latissimus dorsi-serratus-rib composite free flap, EVM was able to detect blockage of arterial or venous supply instantaneously, providing a visible representation through degree of color change in videos. EVM has the potential to serve as a powerful free flap monitoring tool with the benefit of being noninvasive, sensitive, easy-to-use, and nearly cost-free. PMID:27092284

  10. The Eulerian time correlation function from direct simulation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Robert; He, Guowei

    2001-11-01

    The Eulerian time correlation function in homogeneous isotropic turbulence is obtained from direct numerical simulation. We develop curvefits of this function using a producure suggested by Boon and Yip (Molecular Hydrodynamics), which develops a continued fraction expansion of the Laplace transform of the time correlation function. Results of different two-pole expressions are compared with the results of the simulations. Good agreement using one such expression is obtained. The curvefit is developed both for the DNS dataset and for the time correlation function computed from LES. The dynamic meaning of the time correlation function in turbulence is compared to the role of the time correlation function in molecular hydrodynamics, where it is associated with the hydrodynamic modes of the fluid.

  11. An implicit-explicit Eulerian Godunov scheme for compressible flow

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.P.; Colella, P.; Glaz, H.M.

    1995-02-01

    A hybrid implicit-explicit scheme is developed for Eulerian hydrodynamics. The hybridization is a continuous switch and operates on each characteristic field separately. The explicit scheme is a version of the second-order Geodunov scheme; the implicit method is only first-order accurate in time but leads to a block tridiagonal matrix inversion for efficiency and is unconditionally stable for the case of linear advection. The methodology is described for the cases of linear advection, for nonlinear scalar problems, and for gas dynamics. An important element of our work is the use of a modified Engquist-Osher flux function in place of the Godunov flux. Several numerical results are presented to demonstrate the properties of the method, especially stable numerical shocks at very high CFL numbers and second-order accurate steady states. 24 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Relativistic perturbations in ΛCDM: Eulerian & Lagrangian approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, Eleonora; Rampf, Cornelius

    2016-01-01

    We study the relativistic dynamics of a pressure-less and irrotational fluid of dark matter (CDM) with a cosmological constant (Λ), up to second order in cosmological perturbation theory. In our analysis we also account for vector and tensor perturbations and include primordial non-Gaussianity. We consider three gauges: the synchronous-comoving gauge, the Poisson gauge and the total matter gauge, where the first is the unique relativistic Lagrangian frame of reference, and the latters are convenient gauge choices for Eulerian frames. Our starting point is the metric and fluid variables in the Poisson gauge up to second order. We then perform the gauge transformations to the synchronous-comoving gauge and subsequently to the total matter gauge. Our expressions for the metrics, densities, velocities, and the gauge generators are novel and coincide with known results in the limit of a vanishing cosmological constant.

  13. Full Eulerian lattice Boltzmann model for conjugate heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yang; Li, Decai; Shu, Shi; Niu, Xiaodong

    2015-12-01

    In this paper a full Eulerian lattice Boltzmann model is proposed for conjugate heat transfer. A unified governing equation with a source term for the temperature field is derived. By introducing the source term, we prove that the continuity of temperature and its normal flux at the interface is satisfied automatically. The curved interface is assumed to be zigzag lines. All physical quantities are recorded and updated on a Cartesian grid. As a result, any complicated treatment near the interface is avoided, which makes the proposed model suitable to simulate the conjugate heat transfer with complex interfaces efficiently. The present conjugate interface treatment is validated by several steady and unsteady numerical tests, including pure heat conduction, forced convection, and natural convection problems. Both flat and curved interfaces are also involved. The obtained results show good agreement with the analytical and/or finite volume results. PMID:26764851

  14. Development and deployment of constitutive softening routines in Eulerian hydrocodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, Timothy Jesse; Dewers, Thomas A.; Swan, Matthew Scot

    2013-03-01

    The state of the art in failure modeling enables assessment of crack nucleation, propagation, and progression to fragmentation due to high velocity impact. Vulnerability assessments suggest a need to track material behavior through failure, to the point of fragmentation and beyond. This eld of research is particularly challenging for structures made of porous quasi-brittle materials, such as ceramics used in modern armor systems, due to the complex material response when loading exceeds the quasi-brittle material's elastic limit. Further complications arise when incorporating the quasi-brittle material response in multi-material Eulerian hydrocode simulations. In this report, recent e orts in coupling a ceramic materials response in the post-failure regime with an Eulerian hydro code are described. Material behavior is modeled by the Kayenta material model [2]and Alegra as the host nite element code [14]. Kayenta, a three invariant phenomenological plasticity model originally developed for modeling the stress response of geologic materials, has in recent years been used with some success in the modeling of ceramic and other quasi-brittle materials to high velocity impact. Due to the granular nature of ceramic materials, Kayenta allows for signi cant pressures to develop due to dilatant plastic ow, even in shear dominated loading where traditional equations of state predict little or no pressure response. When a material's ability to carry further load is compromised, Kayenta allows the material's strength and sti ness to progressively degrade through the evolution of damage to the point of material failure. As material dilatation and damage progress, accommodations are made within Alegra to treat in a consistent manner the evolving state.

  15. Techniques to derive geometries for image-based Eulerian computations

    PubMed Central

    Dillard, Seth; Buchholz, James; Vigmostad, Sarah; Kim, Hyunggun; Udaykumar, H.S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The performance of three frequently used level set-based segmentation methods is examined for the purpose of defining features and boundary conditions for image-based Eulerian fluid and solid mechanics models. The focus of the evaluation is to identify an approach that produces the best geometric representation from a computational fluid/solid modeling point of view. In particular, extraction of geometries from a wide variety of imaging modalities and noise intensities, to supply to an immersed boundary approach, is targeted. Design/methodology/approach Two- and three-dimensional images, acquired from optical, X-ray CT, and ultrasound imaging modalities, are segmented with active contours, k-means, and adaptive clustering methods. Segmentation contours are converted to level sets and smoothed as necessary for use in fluid/solid simulations. Results produced by the three approaches are compared visually and with contrast ratio, signal-to-noise ratio, and contrast-to-noise ratio measures. Findings While the active contours method possesses built-in smoothing and regularization and produces continuous contours, the clustering methods (k-means and adaptive clustering) produce discrete (pixelated) contours that require smoothing using speckle-reducing anisotropic diffusion (SRAD). Thus, for images with high contrast and low to moderate noise, active contours are generally preferable. However, adaptive clustering is found to be far superior to the other two methods for images possessing high levels of noise and global intensity variations, due to its more sophisticated use of local pixel/voxel intensity statistics. Originality/value It is often difficult to know a priori which segmentation will perform best for a given image type, particularly when geometric modeling is the ultimate goal. This work offers insight to the algorithm selection process, as well as outlining a practical framework for generating useful geometric surfaces in an Eulerian setting. PMID

  16. New iterative solvers for the NAG Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Salvini, S.; Shaw, G.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the work which has been carried out at NAG Ltd to update the iterative solvers for sparse systems of linear equations, both symmetric and unsymmetric, in the NAG Fortran 77 Library. Our current plans to extend this work and include it in our other numerical libraries in our range are also briefly mentioned. We have added to the Library the new Chapter F11, entirely dedicated to sparse linear algebra. At Mark 17, the F11 Chapter includes sparse iterative solvers, preconditioners, utilities and black-box routines for sparse symmetric (both positive-definite and indefinite) linear systems. Mark 18 will add solvers, preconditioners, utilities and black-boxes for sparse unsymmetric systems: the development of these has already been completed.

  17. Using SPARK as a Solver for Modelica

    SciTech Connect

    Wetter, Michael; Wetter, Michael; Haves, Philip; Moshier, Michael A.; Sowell, Edward F.

    2008-06-30

    Modelica is an object-oriented acausal modeling language that is well positioned to become a de-facto standard for expressing models of complex physical systems. To simulate a model expressed in Modelica, it needs to be translated into executable code. For generating run-time efficient code, such a translation needs to employ algebraic formula manipulations. As the SPARK solver has been shown to be competitive for generating such code but currently cannot be used with the Modelica language, we report in this paper how SPARK's symbolic and numerical algorithms can be implemented in OpenModelica, an open-source implementation of a Modelica modeling and simulation environment. We also report benchmark results that show that for our air flow network simulation benchmark, the SPARK solver is competitive with Dymola, which is believed to provide the best solver for Modelica.

  18. Steady potential solver for unsteady aerodynamic analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyniak, Dan

    1994-01-01

    Development of a steady flow solver for use with LINFLO was the objective of this report. The solver must be compatible with LINFLO, be composed of composite mesh, and have transonic capability. The approaches used were: (1) steady flow potential equations written in nonconservative form; (2) Newton's Method; (3) implicit, least-squares, interpolation method to obtain finite difference equations; and (4) matrix inversion routines from LINFLO. This report was given during the NASA LeRC Workshop on Forced Response in Turbomachinery in August of 1993.

  19. Multigrid in energy preconditioner for Krylov solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Slaybaugh, R.N.; Evans, T.M.; Davidson, G.G.; Wilson, P.P.H.

    2013-06-01

    We have added a new multigrid in energy (MGE) preconditioner to the Denovo discrete-ordinates radiation transport code. This preconditioner takes advantage of a new multilevel parallel decomposition. A multigroup Krylov subspace iterative solver that is decomposed in energy as well as space-angle forms the backbone of the transport solves in Denovo. The space-angle-energy decomposition facilitates scaling to hundreds of thousands of cores. The multigrid in energy preconditioner scales well in the energy dimension and significantly reduces the number of Krylov iterations required for convergence. This preconditioner is well-suited for use with advanced eigenvalue solvers such as Rayleigh Quotient Iteration and Arnoldi.

  20. ODE System Solver W. Krylov Iteration & Rootfinding

    SciTech Connect

    Hindmarsh, Alan C.

    1991-09-09

    LSODKR is a new initial value ODE solver for stiff and nonstiff systems. It is a variant of the LSODPK and LSODE solvers, intended mainly for large stiff systems. The main differences between LSODKR and LSODE are the following: (a) for stiff systems, LSODKR uses a corrector iteration composed of Newton iteration and one of four preconditioned Krylov subspace iteration methods. The user must supply routines for the preconditioning operations, (b) Within the corrector iteration, LSODKR does automatic switching between functional (fixpoint) iteration and modified Newton iteration, (c) LSODKR includes the ability to find roots of given functions of the solution during the integration.

  1. ODE System Solver W. Krylov Iteration & Rootfinding

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1991-09-09

    LSODKR is a new initial value ODE solver for stiff and nonstiff systems. It is a variant of the LSODPK and LSODE solvers, intended mainly for large stiff systems. The main differences between LSODKR and LSODE are the following: (a) for stiff systems, LSODKR uses a corrector iteration composed of Newton iteration and one of four preconditioned Krylov subspace iteration methods. The user must supply routines for the preconditioning operations, (b) Within the corrector iteration,more » LSODKR does automatic switching between functional (fixpoint) iteration and modified Newton iteration, (c) LSODKR includes the ability to find roots of given functions of the solution during the integration.« less

  2. Wave Speeds, Riemann Solvers and Artificial Viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, W.J.

    1999-07-18

    A common perspective on the numerical solution of the equation Euler equations for shock physics is examined. The common viewpoint is based upon the selection of nonlinear wavespeeds upon which the dissipation (implicit or explicit) is founded. This perspective shows commonality between Riemann solver based method (i.e. Godunov-type) and artificial viscosity (i.e. von Neumann-Richtmyer). As an example we derive an improved nonlinear viscous stabilization of a Richtmyer-Lax-Wendroff method. Additionally, we will define a form of classical artificial viscosity based upon the HLL Riemann solver.

  3. A comparison of Lagrangian/Eulerian approaches for tracking the kinematics of high deformation solid motion.

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, Thomas L.; Farnsworth, Grant V.; Ketcheson, David Isaac; Robinson, Allen Conrad

    2009-09-01

    The modeling of solids is most naturally placed within a Lagrangian framework because it requires constitutive models which depend on knowledge of the original material orientations and subsequent deformations. Detailed kinematic information is needed to ensure material frame indifference which is captured through the deformation gradient F. Such information can be tracked easily in a Lagrangian code. Unfortunately, not all problems can be easily modeled using Lagrangian concepts due to severe distortions in the underlying motion. Either a Lagrangian/Eulerian or a pure Eulerian modeling framework must be introduced. We discuss and contrast several Lagrangian/Eulerian approaches for keeping track of the details of material kinematics.

  4. AN EULERIAN-LAGRANGIAN LOCALIZED ADJOINT METHOD FOR THE ADVECTION-DIFFUSION EQUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many numerical methods use characteristic analysis to accommodate the advective component of transport. Such characteristic methods include Eulerian-Lagrangian methods (ELM), modified method of characteristics (MMOC), and operator splitting methods. A generalization of characteri...

  5. EULERIAN-LAGRANGIAN LOCALIZED ADJOINT METHOD FOR THE ADVECTION-DIFFUSION EQUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many numerical methods use characteristic analysis to accommodate the advective component of transport. uch characteristic methods include Eulerian-Lagrangian methods (ELM), modified method of characteristics (MMOC), and operator splitting methods. eneralization of characteristic...

  6. Imposing a Lagrangian Particle Framework on an Eulerian Hydrodynamics Infrastructure in Flash

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubey, A.; Daley, C.; ZuHone, J.; Ricker, P. M.; Weide, K.; Graziani, C.

    2012-01-01

    In many astrophysical simulations, both Eulerian and Lagrangian quantities are of interest. For example, in a galaxy cluster merger simulation, the intracluster gas can have Eulerian discretization, while dark matter can be modeled using particles. FLASH, a component-based scientific simulation code, superimposes a Lagrangian framework atop an adaptive mesh refinement Eulerian framework to enable such simulations. The discretization of the field variables is Eulerian, while the Lagrangian entities occur in many different forms including tracer particles, massive particles, charged particles in particle-in-cell mode, and Lagrangian markers to model fluid structure interactions. These widely varying roles for Lagrangian entities are possible because of the highly modular, flexible, and extensible architecture of the Lagrangian framework. In this paper, we describe the Lagrangian framework in FLASH in the context of two very different applications, Type Ia supernovae and galaxy cluster mergers, which use the Lagrangian entities in fundamentally different ways.

  7. The backward phase flow and FBI-transform-based Eulerian Gaussian beams for the Schroedinger equation

    SciTech Connect

    Leung Shingyu; Qian Jianliang

    2010-11-20

    We propose the backward phase flow method to implement the Fourier-Bros-Iagolnitzer (FBI)-transform-based Eulerian Gaussian beam method for solving the Schroedinger equation in the semi-classical regime. The idea of Eulerian Gaussian beams has been first proposed in . In this paper we aim at two crucial computational issues of the Eulerian Gaussian beam method: how to carry out long-time beam propagation and how to compute beam ingredients rapidly in phase space. By virtue of the FBI transform, we address the first issue by introducing the reinitialization strategy into the Eulerian Gaussian beam framework. Essentially we reinitialize beam propagation by applying the FBI transform to wavefields at intermediate time steps when the beams become too wide. To address the second issue, inspired by the original phase flow method, we propose the backward phase flow method which allows us to compute beam ingredients rapidly. Numerical examples demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed algorithms.

  8. Multi-dimensional arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method for dynamic fluid-structure interaction. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.; Zeuch, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method for analyzing fluid-structure interactions in fast-reactor containment with complex internal structures. The fluid transient can be calculated either implicitly or explicitly, using a finite-difference mesh with vertices that may be moved with the fluid (Lagrangian), held fixed (Eulerian), or moved in any other prescribed manner (hybrid Lagrangian Eulerian). The structural response is computed explicitly by two nonlinear, elastic-plastic finite-element modules formulated in corotational coordinates. Interaction between fluid and structure is accounted for by enforcing the interface boundary conditions. The method has convincing advantages in treating complicated phenomena such as flow through perforated structures, large material distortions, flow around corners and irregularities, and highly contorted fluid boundaries. Several sample problems are given to illustrate the effectiveness of this arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method.

  9. Complete Eulerian-mean tracer equation for coarse resolution OGCMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovikov, M. S.; Canuto, V. M.

    2006-06-01

    McDougall and McIntosh showed that the adiabatic mesoscale mixing is represented incompletely in the tracer Eulerian-averaged equation (EAE) of coarse resolution OGCMs. We show that completing EAE requires an adequate decomposition of the mesoscale tracer flux which is achieved by means of transforming mesoscale fields to isopycnal coordinates (IC) where mesoscale dynamics has the simplest form. The transformation results in splitting Fτ into two components and : the former is determined by buoyancy mesoscale dynamics only and has a trivial kinematic dependence on the mean tracer field, the latter is determined by mesoscale tracer dynamics. Thus, the problem of modelling (parameterizing) Fτ in ZC is divided in two stages which can be termed kinematic and dynamic. The kinematic stage consists in adequate decomposing Fτ, and the result is expressed in terms of mesoscale fields. The dynamic stage consists in applying a specific dynamic mesoscale model to parameterize the components of Fτ. In this article, we show that some components of Fτ are missing in ZC-OGCMs tracer equation and that their contribution is of the same order of magnitude as the mesoscale contribution itself. We also show that Fτ has components across mean isopycnals and that their existence is consistent with the adiabatic approximation which requires vanishing all fluxes across isopycnal surfaces. As for practical results, we derive the complete equation for the large scale tracer in ZC-OGCMs and present the parameterization of the terms which have been missing thus far.

  10. Lagrangian, Eulerian, and Dynamically Accessible Stability of MHD flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreussi, Tommaso; Morrison, Philip; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2012-10-01

    Stability conditions of magnetized plasma flows are obtained by exploiting the Hamiltonian structure of the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations and, in particular, by using three kinds of energy principles. First, the Lagrangian energy principle of Ref. [1] is introduced and sufficient stability conditions are presented. Next, plasma flows are described in terms of Eulerian variables and the noncanonical Hamiltonian formulation of MHD [2] is exploited. For symmetric equilibria, the energy-Casimir principle of Ref. [3] is expanded to second order and sufficient conditions for stability to symmetric perturbation are obtained. Then, dynamically accessible variations, i.e. variations that explicitly preserve the invariants of the system, are introduced and the respective energy principle is considered. As in Ref. [4], general criteria for stability are obtained. A comparison between the three different approaches is finally presented. [4pt] [1] E.A. Frieman and M. Rotenberg, Rev. Mod. Phys., 32 898 (1960).[0pt] [2] P.J. Morrison, J.M. Greene, Phys. Rev. Lett., 45 790 (1980).[0pt] [3] T. Andreussi, P.J. Morrison, F. Pegoraro, Phys. Plasmas, 19 052102 (2012).[0pt] [4] E. Hameiri, Phys. Plasmas, 10 2643 (2003).

  11. Eulerian simulations of collisional effects on electrostatic plasma waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzi, Oreste; Valentini, Francesco; Perrone, Denise; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2013-09-01

    The problem of collisions in a plasma is a wide subject with a huge historical literature. In fact, the description of realistic plasmas is a tough problem to attack, both from the theoretical and the numerical point of view. In this paper, a Eulerian time-splitting algorithm for the study of the propagation of electrostatic waves in collisional plasmas is presented. Collisions are modeled through one-dimensional operators of the Fokker-Planck type, both in linear and nonlinear forms. The accuracy of the numerical code is discussed by comparing the numerical results to the analytical predictions obtained in some limit cases when trying to evaluate the effects of collisions in the phenomenon of wave plasma echo and collisional dissipation of Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal waves. Particular attention is devoted to the study of the nonlinear Dougherty collisional operator, recently used to describe the collisional dissipation of electron plasma waves in a pure electron plasma column [M. W. Anderson and T. M. O'Neil, Phys. Plasmas 14, 112110 (2007)]. Finally, for the study of collisional plasmas, a recipe to set the simulation parameters in order to prevent the filamentation problem can be provided, by exploiting the property of velocity diffusion operators to smooth out small velocity scales.

  12. Characterization of Pacific Ocean Surface Temperatures Using Eulerian Motion Magnification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojo Hernandez, J. D.; Mesa, O. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Eulerian Motion Magnification Method was used in order to identify the spatial-temporal patterns in the variability of sea-surface temperatures (SST) in the Pacific Ocean. This method, developed by a research team at MIT, consists in jointly applying spatial and temporal filters to a sequence of images with a known playback speed, and then amplifying the intensity of a signal associated with a certain frequency, so that periodic phenomena can be easily displayed. Magnifying the SST in the frequency band of 2-7 years - which corresponds to ENSO- various processes can be clearly observed, such as the dynamics of temperature variability in the Pacific Ocean associated with the occurrence of warm and cool episodes of the differentiated ocean warming type (Central-Pacific El Nino and Eastern-Pacific El Nino), the possible interaction between tropical and extra-tropical waves that may enhance or diminish the possible ENSO events, and it displays that the ocean heating and/or cooling patterns can be represented as Kelvin and Rosby wave propagation at inter-annual scale.

  13. Eulerian simulations of collisional effects on electrostatic plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Pezzi, Oreste; Valentini, Francesco; Perrone, Denise; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2013-09-15

    The problem of collisions in a plasma is a wide subject with a huge historical literature. In fact, the description of realistic plasmas is a tough problem to attack, both from the theoretical and the numerical point of view. In this paper, a Eulerian time-splitting algorithm for the study of the propagation of electrostatic waves in collisional plasmas is presented. Collisions are modeled through one-dimensional operators of the Fokker-Planck type, both in linear and nonlinear forms. The accuracy of the numerical code is discussed by comparing the numerical results to the analytical predictions obtained in some limit cases when trying to evaluate the effects of collisions in the phenomenon of wave plasma echo and collisional dissipation of Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal waves. Particular attention is devoted to the study of the nonlinear Dougherty collisional operator, recently used to describe the collisional dissipation of electron plasma waves in a pure electron plasma column [M. W. Anderson and T. M. O'Neil, Phys. Plasmas 14, 112110 (2007)]. Finally, for the study of collisional plasmas, a recipe to set the simulation parameters in order to prevent the filamentation problem can be provided, by exploiting the property of velocity diffusion operators to smooth out small velocity scales.

  14. Lagrangian and Eulerian description of bed-load particle kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballio, Francesco; Sadabadi, Seyed Abbas Hosseini; Pokrajac, Dubravka; Radice, Alessio

    2016-04-01

    The motion of bed-load sediment particles transported by a flow can be analyzed within a Lagrangian or an Eulerian framework. In the former case, we consider the particles as individual objects in motion and we study their kinematic properties. The latter approach is instead referred to suitably chosen control volumes. Quantities describing sediment motion in the two frameworks are different, and the relationships among the two approaches are not straightforward. In this work, we intend to discuss the kinematic properties of sediment transport: first, a set of quantities is univocally defined; then, relationships among different representations are explored. Proof-of-concept results presented in the study are from a recent experiment involving weak bed-load sediment transport, where the moving particles were released over a fixed rough bed. The bulk flow velocity was 1.4 times the critical value for incipient particle motion, and particles were mostly moving by rolling and sliding, with limited saltation. The particle motion was filmed from the top and the measurements were conducted by image-based methods, obtaining extensive samples of virtually-instantaneous quantities.

  15. Ising-like phase transition of an n-component Eulerian face-cubic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Chengxiang; Guo, Wenan; Deng, Youjin

    2013-11-01

    By means of Monte Carlo simulations and a finite-size scaling analysis, we find a critical line of an n-component Eulerian face-cubic model on the square lattice and the simple cubic lattice in the region v>1, where v is the bond weight. The phase transition belongs to the Ising universality class independent of n. The critical properties of the phase transition can also be captured by the percolation of the complement of the Eulerian graph.

  16. Lagrangian and Eulerian Statistics of Vorticity Dynamics in Turbulent Stratified Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobitz, Frank; Schneider, Kai; Farge, Marie

    2015-11-01

    The Lagrangian and Eulerian time-rate of change statistics of vorticity in homogeneous turbulence with shear and stable stratification are studied. Direct numerical simulations are performed, in which the Richardson number is varied from Ri=0, corresponding to unstratified shear flow, to Ri=1, corresponding to strongly stratified shear flow. The probability density functions (pdfs) of both Lagrangian and Eulerian time-rates of change show a strong influence on the Richardson number. The Lagrangian time-rate of change pdf has a stretched-exponential shape due to the vortex stretching and tilting term in the equation for fluctuating vorticity. The shape of the Eulerian time-rate of change pdf was also observed to be stretched-exponential and the extreme values for the Eulerian time-rate of change are larger than those observed for the Lagrangian counterpart due to the nonlinear term in the vorticity equation. The Lagrangian and Eulerian acceleration pdfs are mainly determined by the pressure-gradient and nonlinear terms in the Navier-Stokes equation, respectively. The Lagrangian time-rate of change pdf of fluctuating density does not show a stretched exponential shape, while its Eulerian counterpart does due to the nonlinear term in the in the density advection-diffusion equation.

  17. Verifying a Local Generic Solver in Coq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Martin; Karbyshev, Aleksandr; Seidl, Helmut

    Fixpoint engines are the core components of program analysis tools and compilers. If these tools are to be trusted, special attention should be paid also to the correctness of such solvers. In this paper we consider the local generic fixpoint solver RLD which can be applied to constraint systems {x}sqsupseteq fx,{x}in V, over some lattice {D} where the right-hand sides f x are given as arbitrary functions implemented in some specification language. The verification of this algorithm is challenging, because it uses higher-order functions and relies on side effects to track variable dependences as they are encountered dynamically during fixpoint iterations. Here, we present a correctness proof of this algorithm which has been formalized by means of the interactive proof assistant Coq.

  18. Aleph Field Solver Challenge Problem Results Summary.

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Russell; Moore, Stan Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Aleph models continuum electrostatic and steady and transient thermal fields using a finite-element method. Much work has gone into expanding the core solver capability to support enriched mod- eling consisting of multiple interacting fields, special boundary conditions and two-way interfacial coupling with particles modeled using Aleph's complementary particle-in-cell capability. This report provides quantitative evidence for correct implementation of Aleph's field solver via order- of-convergence assessments on a collection of problems of increasing complexity. It is intended to provide Aleph with a pedigree and to establish a basis for confidence in results for more challeng- ing problems important to Sandia's mission that Aleph was specifically designed to address.

  19. Domain decomposition for the SPN solver MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Jamelot, Erell; Baudron, Anne-Marie; Lautard, Jean-Jacques

    2012-07-01

    In this article we present a domain decomposition method for the mixed SPN equations, discretized with Raviart-Thomas-Nedelec finite elements. This domain decomposition is based on the iterative Schwarz algorithm with Robin interface conditions to handle communications. After having described this method, we give details on how to optimize the convergence. Finally, we give some numerical results computed in a realistic 3D domain. The computations are done with the MINOS solver of the APOLLO3 (R) code. (authors)

  20. A perspective on unstructured grid flow solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1995-01-01

    This survey paper assesses the status of compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes solvers on unstructured grids. Different spatial and temporal discretization options for steady and unsteady flows are discussed. The integration of these components into an overall framework to solve practical problems is addressed. Issues such as grid adaptation, higher order methods, hybrid discretizations and parallel computing are briefly discussed. Finally, some outstanding issues and future research directions are presented.

  1. Differential geometry based solvation model I: Eulerian formulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhan; Baker, Nathan A; Wei, G W

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents a differential geometry based model for the analysis and computation of the equilibrium property of solvation. Differential geometry theory of surfaces is utilized to define and construct smooth interfaces with good stability and differentiability for use in characterizing the solvent-solute boundaries and in generating continuous dielectric functions across the computational domain. A total free energy functional is constructed to couple polar and nonpolar contributions to the salvation process. Geometric measure theory is employed to rigorously convert a Lagrangian formulation of the surface energy into an Eulerian formulation so as to bring all energy terms into an equal footing. By minimizing the total free energy functional, we derive coupled generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation (GPBE) and generalized geometric flow equation (GGFE) for the electrostatic potential and the construction of realistic solvent-solute boundaries, respectively. By solving the coupled GPBE and GGFE, we obtain the electrostatic potential, the solvent-solute boundary profile, and the smooth dielectric function, and thereby improve the accuracy and stability of implicit solvation calculations. We also design efficient second order numerical schemes for the solution of the GPBE and GGFE. Matrix resulted from the discretization of the GPBE is accelerated with appropriate preconditioners. An alternative direct implicit (ADI) scheme is designed to improve the stability of solving the GGFE. Two iterative approaches are designed to solve the coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations. Extensive numerical experiments are designed to validate the present theoretical model, test computational methods, and optimize numerical algorithms. Example solvation analysis of both small compounds and proteins are carried out to further demonstrate the accuracy, stability, efficiency and robustness of the present new model and numerical approaches. Comparison is given to

  2. MILAMIN 2 - Fast MATLAB FEM solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Marcin; Krotkiewski, Marcin; Schmid, Daniel W.

    2013-04-01

    MILAMIN is a free and efficient MATLAB-based two-dimensional FEM solver utilizing unstructured meshes [Dabrowski et al., G-cubed (2008)]. The code consists of steady-state thermal diffusion and incompressible Stokes flow solvers implemented in approximately 200 lines of native MATLAB code. The brevity makes the code easily customizable. An important quality of MILAMIN is speed - it can handle millions of nodes within minutes on one CPU core of a standard desktop computer, and is faster than many commercial solutions. The new MILAMIN 2 allows three-dimensional modeling. It is designed as a set of functional modules that can be used as building blocks for efficient FEM simulations using MATLAB. The utilities are largely implemented as native MATLAB functions. For performance critical parts we use MUTILS - a suite of compiled MEX functions optimized for shared memory multi-core computers. The most important features of MILAMIN 2 are: 1. Modular approach to defining, tracking, and discretizing the geometry of the model 2. Interfaces to external mesh generators (e.g., Triangle, Fade2d, T3D) and mesh utilities (e.g., element type conversion, fast point location, boundary extraction) 3. Efficient computation of the stiffness matrix for a wide range of element types, anisotropic materials and three-dimensional problems 4. Fast global matrix assembly using a dedicated MEX function 5. Automatic integration rules 6. Flexible prescription (spatial, temporal, and field functions) and efficient application of Dirichlet, Neuman, and periodic boundary conditions 7. Treatment of transient and non-linear problems 8. Various iterative and multi-level solution strategies 9. Post-processing tools (e.g., numerical integration) 10. Visualization primitives using MATLAB, and VTK export functions We provide a large number of examples that show how to implement a custom FEM solver using the MILAMIN 2 framework. The examples are MATLAB scripts of increasing complexity that address a given

  3. On Lagrangian and Eulerian Acceleration in Rotating and Sheared Homogeneous Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobitz, Frank; Schneider, Kai; Bos, Wouter; Farge, Marie

    2013-11-01

    The Lagrangian and Eulerian acceleration properties of turbulence are of importance for problems ranging from fundamental theoretical considerations to modeling of dispersion processes. The acceleration statistics of rotating and sheared homogeneous turbulence are studied here using direct numerical simulations. The study focusses in particular on the influence of the Coriolis to shear rate ratio and also on the scale dependence of the statistics. The probability density functions (pdfs) of both Lagrangian and Eulerian acceleration show a strong and similar influence on the rotation ratio. The flatness further quantifies this influence and yields values close to three for strong rotation. For moderate and vanishing rotation, the flatness of the Eulerian acceleration is larger than that of the Lagrangian acceleration, contrary to previous results for isotropic turbulence. A wavelet-based scale-dependent analysis shows that the flatness of both Eulerian and Lagrangian acceleration increases as scale decreases. For strong rotation, the Eulerian acceleration is more intermittent than the Lagrangian acceleration, while the opposite result is obtained for moderate rotation.

  4. Footprints of Lagrangian flow structures in Eulerian concentration distributions in periodic mixing flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speetjens, M. F. M.; Lauret, M.; Nijmeijer, H.; Anderson, P. D.

    2013-05-01

    Transport of passive tracers may be described through the spatio-temporal evolution of Eulerian concentration distributions or via the geometrical composition of the Lagrangian flow structure. The present study seeks to deepen insight into the connection between the Eulerian and Lagrangian perspectives by investigating the role of Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) in the Eulerian concentration distributions in time-periodic and spatially-periodic mixing flows. Representation of the Eulerian transport by the mapping method, describing realistic transport problems by distribution matrices, admits a generic analysis based on matrix and graph theory. This reveals that LCSs-and the transport barriers that separate them-leave a distinct “footprint” in the eigenmode spectrum of the distribution matrix and, by proxy, of the underlying Eulerian transport operator. Transport barriers impart a block-diagonal structure upon the mapping matrix, where each block matrix A corresponds with a given LCS. Its kind is reflected in the spectrum of A; higher-order periodicity yields a distinct permutation within A. The composition of the distribution matrix versus the Lagrangian flow structure thus predicted is demonstrated by way of examples. These findings increase fundamental understanding of transport phenomena and have great practical potential for e.g. flow and mixing control.

  5. Approximate Riemann solvers for the Godunov SPH (GSPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puri, Kunal; Ramachandran, Prabhu

    2014-08-01

    The Godunov Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (GSPH) method is coupled with non-iterative, approximate Riemann solvers for solutions to the compressible Euler equations. The use of approximate solvers avoids the expensive solution of the non-linear Riemann problem for every interacting particle pair, as required by GSPH. In addition, we establish an equivalence between the dissipative terms of GSPH and the signal based SPH artificial viscosity, under the restriction of a class of approximate Riemann solvers. This equivalence is used to explain the anomalous “wall heating” experienced by GSPH and we provide some suggestions to overcome it. Numerical tests in one and two dimensions are used to validate the proposed Riemann solvers. A general SPH pairing instability is observed for two-dimensional problems when using unequal mass particles. In general, Ducowicz Roe's and HLLC approximate Riemann solvers are found to be suitable replacements for the iterative Riemann solver in the original GSPH scheme.

  6. New Multigrid Solver Advances in TOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Falgout, R D; Brannick, J; Brezina, M; Manteuffel, T; McCormick, S

    2005-06-27

    In this paper, we highlight new multigrid solver advances in the Terascale Optimal PDE Simulations (TOPS) project in the Scientific Discovery Through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program. We discuss two new algebraic multigrid (AMG) developments in TOPS: the adaptive smoothed aggregation method ({alpha}SA) and a coarse-grid selection algorithm based on compatible relaxation (CR). The {alpha}SA method is showing promising results in initial studies for Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) applications. The CR method has the potential to greatly improve the applicability of AMG.

  7. DPS--a computerised diagnostic problem solver.

    PubMed

    Bartos, P; Gyárfas, F; Popper, M

    1982-01-01

    The paper contains a short description of the DPS system which is a computerized diagnostic problem solver. The system is under development of the Research Institute of Medical Bionics in Bratislava, Czechoslovakia. Its underlying philosophy yields from viewing the diagnostic process as process of cognitive problem solving. The implementation of the system is based on the methods of Artificial Intelligence and utilisation of production systems and frame theory should be noted in this context. Finally a list of program modules and their characterisation is presented. PMID:6811229

  8. Updates to the NEQAIR Radiation Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Brandis, Aaron M.

    2014-01-01

    The NEQAIR code is one of the original heritage solvers for radiative heating prediction in aerothermal environments, and is still used today for mission design purposes. This paper discusses the implementation of the first major revision to the NEQAIR code in the last five years, NEQAIR v14.0. The most notable features of NEQAIR v14.0 are the parallelization of the radiation computation, reducing runtimes by about 30×, and the inclusion of mid-wave CO2 infrared radiation.

  9. Input-output-controlled nonlinear equation solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    To upgrade the efficiency and stability of the successive substitution (SS) and Newton-Raphson (NR) schemes, the concept of input-output-controlled solvers (IOCS) is introduced. By employing the formal properties of the constrained version of the SS and NR schemes, the IOCS algorithm can handle indefiniteness of the system Jacobian, can maintain iterate monotonicity, and provide for separate control of load incrementation and iterate excursions, as well as having other features. To illustrate the algorithmic properties, the results for several benchmark examples are presented. These define the associated numerical efficiency and stability of the IOCS.

  10. Boundary condition-enforced immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann flux solver for thermal flows with Neumann boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Shu, C.; Yang, L. M.

    2016-02-01

    A boundary condition-enforced-immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann flux solver is proposed in this work for effective simulation of thermal flows with Neumann boundary conditions. In this method, two auxiliary layers of Lagrangian points are introduced and respectively placed inside and outside of the solid body, on which the temperature corrections (related to the heat source) are set as unknowns. To effectively consider the fluid-boundary interaction, these unknowns are expressed as algebraic summations of the temperature correction on Eulerian points, which are in turn obtained from biased distributions of unknown temperature corrections on the immersed boundary. By enforcing the temperature gradient at the solid boundary being equal to that approximated by the corrected temperature field, a set of algebraic equations are formed and solved to obtain all the unknowns simultaneously. They are then distributed biasedly to the inner region of the auxiliary layer so that the diffusion from the smooth delta function can be reduced substantially. In addition, the solutions of the flow and temperature fields are obtained by the thermal lattice Boltzmann flux solver with the second order of accuracy. The proposed method is well validated through its applications to simulate several benchmarks of natural, forced and mixed convection problems. It has been demonstrated that the present solver has about 1.724 order of accuracy and the error between the present result and theoretical value for the temperature gradient on the solid surface is in the order of 10-13, which indicates that the proposed method is able to satisfy the Neumann boundary condition accurately.

  11. A LES-based Eulerian-Lagrangian approach to predict the dynamics of bubble plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga, Bruño; Stoesser, Thorsten; Lai, Chris C. K.; Socolofsky, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    An approach for Eulerian-Lagrangian large-eddy simulation of bubble plume dynamics is presented and its performance evaluated. The main numerical novelties consist in defining the gas-liquid coupling based on the bubble size to mesh resolution ratio (Dp/Δx) and the interpolation between Eulerian and Lagrangian frameworks through the use of delta functions. The model's performance is thoroughly validated for a bubble plume in a cubic tank in initially quiescent water using experimental data obtained from high-resolution ADV and PIV measurements. The predicted time-averaged velocities and second-order statistics show good agreement with the measurements, including the reproduction of the anisotropic nature of the plume's turbulence. Further, the predicted Eulerian and Lagrangian velocity fields, second-order turbulence statistics and interfacial gas-liquid forces are quantified and discussed as well as the visualization of the time-averaged primary and secondary flow structure in the tank.

  12. Simulation on gasification of forestry residues in fluidized beds by Eulerian-Lagrangian approach.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jun; Zhong, Wenqi; Jin, Baosheng; Shao, Yingjuan; Liu, Hao

    2012-10-01

    A comprehensive three-dimensional numerical model is developed to simulate forestry residues gasification in a fluidized bed reactor using Eulerian-Lagrangian approach. The complex granular flow behaviors and chemical reaction characteristics are addressed simultaneously. The model uses an Eulerian method for fluid phase and a discrete particle method for solid phase, which takes particle contact force into account. Heterogeneous and homogenous reaction rates are solved on the Eulerian grid. The numerical model is employed to study the gasification performance in a lab-scale pine gasifier. A series of simulations have been performed with some critical parameters including temperature, equivalence ratio and steam to biomass ratio. The model predicts product gas composition and carbon conversion efficiency in good agreement with experimental data. The formation and development of flow regimes, profiles of particle species, and distributions of gas compositions inside the reactor are also discussed. PMID:22858466

  13. Comparison of electromagnetic solvers for antennas mounted on vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocker, M. S. L.; Hipp, S.; Spinnler, F.; Tazi, H.; Eibert, T. F.

    2015-11-01

    An electromagnetic solver comparison for various use cases of antennas mounted on vehicles is presented. For this purpose, several modeling approaches, called transient, frequency and integral solver, including the features fast resonant method and autoregressive filter, offered by CST MWS, are investigated. The solvers and methods are compared for a roof antenna itself, a simplified vehicle, a roof including a panorama window and a combination of antenna and vehicle. With these examples, the influence of different materials, data formats and parameters such as size and complexity are investigated. Also, the necessary configurations for the mesh and the solvers are described.

  14. Modeling and Numerical Challenges in Eulerian-Lagrangian Computations of Shock-driven Multiphase Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diggs, Angela; Balachandar, Sivaramakrishnan

    2015-06-01

    The present work addresses the numerical methods required for particle-gas and particle-particle interactions in Eulerian-Lagrangian simulations of multiphase flow. Local volume fraction as seen by each particle is the quantity of foremost importance in modeling and evaluating such interactions. We consider a general multiphase flow with a distribution of particles inside a fluid flow discretized on an Eulerian grid. Particle volume fraction is needed both as a Lagrangian quantity associated with each particle and also as an Eulerian quantity associated with the flow. In Eulerian Projection (EP) methods, the volume fraction is first obtained within each cell as an Eulerian quantity and then interpolated to each particle. In Lagrangian Projection (LP) methods, the particle volume fraction is obtained at each particle and then projected onto the Eulerian grid. Traditionally, EP methods are used in multiphase flow, but sub-grid resolution can be obtained through use of LP methods. By evaluating the total error and its components we compare the performance of EP and LP methods. The standard von Neumann error analysis technique has been adapted for rigorous evaluation of rate of convergence. The methods presented can be extended to obtain accurate field representations of other Lagrangian quantities. Most importantly, we will show that such careful attention to numerical methodologies is needed in order to capture complex shock interaction with a bed of particles. Supported by U.S. Department of Defense SMART Program and the U.S. Department of Energy PSAAP-II program under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  15. On code verification of RANS solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eça, L.; Klaij, C. M.; Vaz, G.; Hoekstra, M.; Pereira, F. S.

    2016-04-01

    This article discusses Code Verification of Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) solvers that rely on face based finite volume discretizations for volumes of arbitrary shape. The study includes test cases with known analytical solutions (generated with the method of manufactured solutions) corresponding to laminar and turbulent flow, with the latter using eddy-viscosity turbulence models. The procedure to perform Code Verification based on grid refinement studies is discussed and the requirements for its correct application are illustrated in a simple one-dimensional problem. It is shown that geometrically similar grids are recommended for proper Code Verification and so the data should not have scatter making the use of least square fits unnecessary. Results show that it may be advantageous to determine the extrapolated error to cell size/time step zero instead of assuming that it is zero, especially when it is hard to determine the asymptotic order of grid convergence. In the RANS examples, several of the features of the ReFRESCO solver are checked including the effects of the available turbulence models in the convergence properties of the code. It is shown that it is required to account for non-orthogonality effects in the discretization of the diffusion terms and that the turbulence quantities transport equations can deteriorate the order of grid convergence of mean flow quantities.

  16. Using the scalable nonlinear equations solvers package

    SciTech Connect

    Gropp, W.D.; McInnes, L.C.; Smith, B.F.

    1995-02-01

    SNES (Scalable Nonlinear Equations Solvers) is a software package for the numerical solution of large-scale systems of nonlinear equations on both uniprocessors and parallel architectures. SNES also contains a component for the solution of unconstrained minimization problems, called SUMS (Scalable Unconstrained Minimization Solvers). Newton-like methods, which are known for their efficiency and robustness, constitute the core of the package. As part of the multilevel PETSc library, SNES incorporates many features and options from other parts of PETSc. In keeping with the spirit of the PETSc library, the nonlinear solution routines are data-structure-neutral, making them flexible and easily extensible. This users guide contains a detailed description of uniprocessor usage of SNES, with some added comments regarding multiprocessor usage. At this time the parallel version is undergoing refinement and extension, as we work toward a common interface for the uniprocessor and parallel cases. Thus, forthcoming versions of the software will contain additional features, and changes to parallel interface may result at any time. The new parallel version will employ the MPI (Message Passing Interface) standard for interprocessor communication. Since most of these details will be hidden, users will need to perform only minimal message-passing programming.

  17. Algebraic Multiscale Solver for Elastic Geomechanical Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelletto, N.; Hajibeygi, H.; Tchelepi, H.

    2015-12-01

    Predicting the geomechanical response of geological formations to thermal, pressure, and mechanical loading is important in many engineering applications. The mathematical formulation that describes deformation of a reservoir coupled with flow and transport entails heterogeneous coefficients with a wide range of length scales. Such detailed heterogeneous descriptions of reservoir properties impose severe computational challenges for the study of realistic-scale (km) reservoirs. To deal with these challenges, we developed an Algebraic Multiscale Solver for ELastic geomechanical deformation (EL-AMS). Constructed on finite element fine-scale system, EL-AMS imposes a coarse-scale grid, which is a non-overlapping decomposition of the domain. Then, local (coarse) basis functions for the displacement vector are introduced. These basis functions honor the elastic properties of the local domains subject to the imposed local boundary conditions. The basis form the Restriction and Prolongation operators. These operators allow for the construction of accurate coarse-scale systems for the displacement. While the multiscale system is efficient for resolving low-frequency errors, coupling it with a fine-scale smoother, e.g., ILU(0), leads to an efficient iterative solver. Numerical results for several test cases illustrate that EL-AMS is quite efficient and applicable to simulate elastic deformation of large-scale heterogeneous reservoirs.

  18. Equations of nonlinear dynamics of elastic shells in cylindrical Eulerian coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubov, L. M.

    2016-05-01

    The equations of dynamics of elastic shells subjected to large deformations are formulated. The Eulerian coordinates on a circular cylinder and time are accepted as independent variables, and one of the unknown functions is the distance from a point of the shell surface to the cylinder axis. The equations of dynamics of nonlinearly elastic shells in the Eulerian coordinates are convenient for exact formulation of the problem on the interaction of strongly deformable shells with moving fluids and gases. The equations obtained can be used for dynamic calculations of fluids and gases flowings in pipelines, blood vessels, hoses, and other nonlinearly deformable thin-walled tubular elements of constructions.

  19. Modeling of confined turbulent fluid-particle flows using Eulerian and Lagrangian schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adeniji-Fashola, A.; Chen, C. P.

    1990-01-01

    Two important aspects of fluid-particulate interaction in dilute gas-particle turbulent flows (the turbulent particle dispersion and the turbulence modulation effects) are addressed, using the Eulerian and Lagrangian modeling approaches to describe the particulate phase. Gradient-diffusion approximations are employed in the Eulerian formulation, while a stochastic procedure is utilized to simulate turbulent dispersion in the Lagrangina formulation. The k-epsilon turbulence model is used to characterize the time and length scales of the continuous phase turbulence. Models proposed for both schemes are used to predict turbulent fully-developed gas-solid vertical pipe flow with reasonable accuracy.

  20. Eulerian Mapping Closure Approach for Probability Density Function of Concentration in Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Guowei; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Eulerian mapping closure approach is developed for uncertainty propagation in computational fluid mechanics. The approach is used to study the Probability Density Function (PDF) for the concentration of species advected by a random shear flow. An analytical argument shows that fluctuation of the concentration field at one point in space is non-Gaussian and exhibits stretched exponential form. An Eulerian mapping approach provides an appropriate approximation to both convection and diffusion terms and leads to a closed mapping equation. The results obtained describe the evolution of the initial Gaussian field, which is in agreement with direct numerical simulations.

  1. Development and Evaluation of a Hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Czader, B.; Percell, P.; Byun, D.

    2014-12-01

    A hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian modeling tool has been developed using the CMAQ code. It is a moving nest domain that resides in a base Eulerian model with the same vertical CMAQ structure and physical and chemical interactions. It may follow the trajectory defined by the mean mixed-layer wind or any other user defined trajectory. It was developed as a computationally efficient 3-D grid sub-model for the purpose of evaluations of the source-receptor relationship. The correctness of the algorithms and the overall performance was evaluated against CMAQ simulation results.

  2. A coupled PFEM-Eulerian approach for the solution of porous FSI problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larese, A.; Rossi, R.; Oñate, E.; Idelsohn, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    This paper aims to present a coupled solution strategy for the problem of seepage through a rockfill dam taking into account the free-surface flow within the solid as well as in its vicinity. A combination of a Lagrangian model for the structural behavior and an Eulerian approach for the fluid is used. The particle finite element method is adopted for the evaluation of the structural response, whereas an Eulerian fixed-mesh approach is employed for the fluid. The free surface is tracked by the use of a level set technique. The numerical results are validated with experiments on scale models rockfill dams.

  3. jShyLU Scalable Hybrid Preconditioner and Solver

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-09-11

    ShyLU is numerical software to solve sparse linear systems of equations. ShyLU uses a hybrid direct-iterative Schur complement method, and may be used either as a preconditioner or as a solver. ShyLU is parallel and optimized for a single compute Solver node. ShyLU will be a package in the Trilinos software framework.

  4. Experiences with linear solvers for oil reservoir simulation problems

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, W.; Janardhan, R.; Biswas, D.; Carey, G.

    1996-12-31

    This talk will focus on practical experiences with iterative linear solver algorithms used in conjunction with Amoco Production Company`s Falcon oil reservoir simulation code. The goal of this study is to determine the best linear solver algorithms for these types of problems. The results of numerical experiments will be presented.

  5. Shape reanalysis and sensitivities utilizing preconditioned iterative boundary solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guru Prasad, K.; Kane, J. H.

    1992-01-01

    The computational advantages associated with the utilization of preconditined iterative equation solvers are quantified for the reanalysis of perturbed shapes using continuum structural boundary element analysis (BEA). Both single- and multi-zone three-dimensional problems are examined. Significant reductions in computer time are obtained by making use of previously computed solution vectors and preconditioners in subsequent analyses. The effectiveness of this technique is demonstrated for the computation of shape response sensitivities required in shape optimization. Computer times and accuracies achieved using the preconditioned iterative solvers are compared with those obtained via direct solvers and implicit differentiation of the boundary integral equations. It is concluded that this approach employing preconditioned iterative equation solvers in reanalysis and sensitivity analysis can be competitive with if not superior to those involving direct solvers.

  6. A real-time impurity solver for DMFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyungwon; Aron, Camille; Han, Jong E.; Kotliar, Gabriel

    Dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) offers a non-perturbative approach to problems with strongly correlated electrons. The method heavily relies on the ability to numerically solve an auxiliary Anderson-type impurity problem. While powerful Matsubara-frequency solvers have been developed over the past two decades to tackle equilibrium situations, the status of real-time impurity solvers that could compete with Matsubara-frequency solvers and be readily generalizable to non-equilibrium situations is still premature. We present a real-time solver which is based on a quantum Master equation description of the dissipative dynamics of the impurity and its exact diagonalization. As a benchmark, we illustrate the strengths of our solver in the context of the equilibrium Mott-insulator transition of the one-band Hubbard model and compare it with iterative perturbation theory (IPT) method. Finally, we discuss its direct application to a nonequilibrium situation.

  7. Linear iterative solvers for implicit ODE methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saylor, Paul E.; Skeel, Robert D.

    1990-01-01

    The numerical solution of stiff initial value problems, which lead to the problem of solving large systems of mildly nonlinear equations are considered. For many problems derived from engineering and science, a solution is possible only with methods derived from iterative linear equation solvers. A common approach to solving the nonlinear equations is to employ an approximate solution obtained from an explicit method. The error is examined to determine how it is distributed among the stiff and non-stiff components, which bears on the choice of an iterative method. The conclusion is that error is (roughly) uniformly distributed, a fact that suggests the Chebyshev method (and the accompanying Manteuffel adaptive parameter algorithm). This method is described, also commenting on Richardson's method and its advantages for large problems. Richardson's method and the Chebyshev method with the Mantueffel algorithm are applied to the solution of the nonlinear equations by Newton's method.

  8. Scalable Adaptive Multilevel Solvers for Multiphysics Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jinchao

    2014-12-01

    In this project, we investigated adaptive, parallel, and multilevel methods for numerical modeling of various real-world applications, including Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), complex fluids, Electromagnetism, Navier-Stokes equations, and reservoir simulation. First, we have designed improved mathematical models and numerical discretizaitons for viscoelastic fluids and MHD. Second, we have derived new a posteriori error estimators and extended the applicability of adaptivity to various problems. Third, we have developed multilevel solvers for solving scalar partial differential equations (PDEs) as well as coupled systems of PDEs, especially on unstructured grids. Moreover, we have integrated the study between adaptive method and multilevel methods, and made significant efforts and advances in adaptive multilevel methods of the multi-physics problems.

  9. Optimising a parallel conjugate gradient solver

    SciTech Connect

    Field, M.R.

    1996-12-31

    This work arises from the introduction of a parallel iterative solver to a large structural analysis finite element code. The code is called FEX and it was developed at Hitachi`s Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. The FEX package can deal with a large range of structural analysis problems using a large number of finite element techniques. FEX can solve either stress or thermal analysis problems of a range of different types from plane stress to a full three-dimensional model. These problems can consist of a number of different materials which can be modelled by a range of material models. The structure being modelled can have the load applied at either a point or a surface, or by a pressure, a centrifugal force or just gravity. Alternatively a thermal load can be applied with a given initial temperature. The displacement of the structure can be constrained by having a fixed boundary or by prescribing the displacement at a boundary.

  10. General purpose nonlinear system solver based on Newton-Krylov method.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-12-01

    KINSOL is part of a software family called SUNDIALS: SUite of Nonlinear and Differential/Algebraic equation Solvers [1]. KINSOL is a general-purpose nonlinear system solver based on Newton-Krylov and fixed-point solver technologies [2].

  11. INVESTIGATION OF PHOTOCHEMICAL MODELING OF POINT SOURCE POLLUTANTS WITH EULERIAN GRID AND LAGRANGIAN PLUME APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper, results of Eulerian grid and Lagrangian photochemical model simulations of emissions from a major elevated point source are presented. eries of simulations with grid sizes varying from 30 km to 2 km were performed with the Urban Airshed Model, a photochemical grid ...

  12. MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF TWO-PARTICLE RELATIVE DIFFUSION USING EULERIAN STATISTICS: EXTENDED ABSTRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Monte Carlo technique for the simulation of two-particle relative diffusion is developed using the Eulerian statistical properties of the turbulence. Numerical results are presented which clarify the role of interparticle velocity correlations and reveal the importance of an Eu...

  13. Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint methods for reactive transport in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.E.; Wang, Hong

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we present Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint methods (ELLAM) to solve convection-diffusion-reaction equations governing contaminant transport in groundwater flowing through an adsorbing porous medium. These ELLAM schemes can treat various combinations of boundary conditions and conserve mass. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the strong potential of ELLAM schemes.

  14. TREATMENT FOR LAGRANGIAN TRANSPORT AND DIFFUSION OF SUBGRID PLUMES IN A EULERIAN GRID FRAMEWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since Eulerian grid models cannot explicitly treat processes existing on spatial scales smaller than the grid cell size, it is imperative to be able to develop innovative approaches to simulate relevant subgrid scale features within the modeling grid framework. otable class of su...

  15. Eulerian simulation of the perforation of aluminum plates by nondeforming projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, S.A.

    1992-03-01

    A new algorithm for the treatment of sliding interfaces between solids with or without friction in an Eulerian wavecode is described. The algorithm has been implemented in the two-dimensional version of the CTH code. The code was used to simulate penetration and perforation of aluminum plates by rigid, conical-nosed tungsten projectiles. Comparison with experimental data is provided.

  16. PREFACE SPECIAL ISSUE ON MODEL EVALUATION: EVALUATION OF URBAN AND REGIONAL EULERIAN AIR QUALITY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The "Preface to the Special Edition on Model Evaluation: Evaluation of Urban and Regional Eulerian Air Quality Models" is a brief introduction to the papers included in a special issue of Atmospheric Environment. The Preface provides a background for the papers, which have thei...

  17. Evaluation of methods for calculating volume fraction in Eulerian-Lagrangian multiphase flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diggs, Angela; Balachandar, S.

    2016-05-01

    The present work addresses numerical methods required to compute particle volume fraction or number density. Local volume fraction of the lth particle, αl, is the quantity of foremost importance in calculating the gas-mediated particle-particle interaction effect in multiphase flows. A general multiphase flow with a distribution of Lagrangian particles inside a fluid flow discretized on an Eulerian grid is considered. Particle volume fraction is needed both as a Lagrangian quantity associated with each particle and also as an Eulerian quantity associated with the grid cell for Eulerian-Lagrangian simulations. In Grid-Based (GB) methods the particle volume fraction is first obtained within each grid cell as an Eulerian quantity and then the local particle volume fraction associated with any Lagrangian particle can be obtained from interpolation. The second class of methods presented are Particle-Based (PB) methods, where particle volume fraction will first be obtained at each particle as a Lagrangian quantity, which then can be projected onto the Eulerian grid. Traditionally, the GB methods are used in multiphase flow, but sub-grid resolution can be obtained through use of the PB methods. By evaluating the total error, and its discretization, bias and statistical error components, the performance of the different PB methods is compared against several common GB methods of calculating volume fraction. The standard von Neumann error analysis technique has been adapted for evaluation of rate of convergence of the different methods. The discussion and error analysis presented focus on the volume fraction calculation, but the methods can be extended to obtain field representations of other Lagrangian quantities, such as particle velocity and temperature.

  18. Comparison of open-source linear programming solvers.

    SciTech Connect

    Gearhart, Jared Lee; Adair, Kristin Lynn; Durfee, Justin D.; Jones, Katherine A.; Martin, Nathaniel; Detry, Richard Joseph

    2013-10-01

    When developing linear programming models, issues such as budget limitations, customer requirements, or licensing may preclude the use of commercial linear programming solvers. In such cases, one option is to use an open-source linear programming solver. A survey of linear programming tools was conducted to identify potential open-source solvers. From this survey, four open-source solvers were tested using a collection of linear programming test problems and the results were compared to IBM ILOG CPLEX Optimizer (CPLEX) [1], an industry standard. The solvers considered were: COIN-OR Linear Programming (CLP) [2], [3], GNU Linear Programming Kit (GLPK) [4], lp_solve [5] and Modular In-core Nonlinear Optimization System (MINOS) [6]. As no open-source solver outperforms CPLEX, this study demonstrates the power of commercial linear programming software. CLP was found to be the top performing open-source solver considered in terms of capability and speed. GLPK also performed well but cannot match the speed of CLP or CPLEX. lp_solve and MINOS were considerably slower and encountered issues when solving several test problems.

  19. Multi-GPU kinetic solvers using MPI and CUDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabelok, Sergey; Arslanbekov, Robert; Kolobov, Vladimir

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes recent progress towards porting a Unified Flow Solver (UFS) to heterogeneous parallel computing. The main challenge of porting UFS to graphics processing units (GPUs) comes from the dynamically adapted mesh, which causes irregular data access. We describe the implementation of CUDA kernels for three modules in UFS: the direct Boltzmann solver using discrete velocity method (DVM), the DSMC module, and the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) solver, all using octree Cartesian mesh with adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR). Double digit speedup on single GPU and good scaling for multi-GPU has been demonstrated.

  20. A non-conforming 3D spherical harmonic transport solver

    SciTech Connect

    Van Criekingen, S.

    2006-07-01

    A new 3D transport solver for the time-independent Boltzmann transport equation has been developed. This solver is based on the second-order even-parity form of the transport equation. The angular discretization is performed through the expansion of the angular neutron flux in spherical harmonics (PN method). The novelty of this solver is the use of non-conforming finite elements for the spatial discretization. Such elements lead to a discontinuous flux approximation. This interface continuity requirement relaxation property is shared with mixed-dual formulations such as the ones based on Raviart-Thomas finite elements. Encouraging numerical results are presented. (authors)

  1. Elliptic Solvers for Adaptive Mesh Refinement Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D.J.; Dendy, J.E., Jr.; Shapira, Y.

    1999-06-03

    We are developing multigrid methods that will efficiently solve elliptic problems with anisotropic and discontinuous coefficients on adaptive grids. The final product will be a library that provides for the simplified solution of such problems. This library will directly benefit the efforts of other Laboratory groups. The focus of this work is research on serial and parallel elliptic algorithms and the inclusion of our black-box multigrid techniques into this new setting. The approach applies the Los Alamos object-oriented class libraries that greatly simplify the development of serial and parallel adaptive mesh refinement applications. In the final year of this LDRD, we focused on putting the software together; in particular we completed the final AMR++ library, we wrote tutorials and manuals, and we built example applications. We implemented the Fast Adaptive Composite Grid method as the principal elliptic solver. We presented results at the Overset Grid Conference and other more AMR specific conferences. We worked on optimization of serial and parallel performance and published several papers on the details of this work. Performance remains an important issue and is the subject of continuing research work.

  2. Advanced Multigrid Solvers for Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Achi

    1999-01-01

    The main objective of this project has been to support the development of multigrid techniques in computational fluid dynamics that can achieve "textbook multigrid efficiency" (TME), which is several orders of magnitude faster than current industrial CFD solvers. Toward that goal we have assembled a detailed table which lists every foreseen kind of computational difficulty for achieving it, together with the possible ways for resolving the difficulty, their current state of development, and references. We have developed several codes to test and demonstrate, in the framework of simple model problems, several approaches for overcoming the most important of the listed difficulties that had not been resolved before. In particular, TME has been demonstrated for incompressible flows on one hand, and for near-sonic flows on the other hand. General approaches were advanced for the relaxation of stagnation points and boundary conditions under various situations. Also, new algebraic multigrid techniques were formed for treating unstructured grid formulations. More details on all these are given below.

  3. LSPRAY: Lagrangian Spray Solver for Applications With Parallel Computing and Unstructured Gas-Phase Flow Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Manthena S.

    1998-01-01

    Sprays occur in a wide variety of industrial and power applications and in the processing of materials. A liquid spray is a phase flow with a gas as the continuous phase and a liquid as the dispersed phase (in the form of droplets or ligaments). Interactions between the two phases, which are coupled through exchanges of mass, momentum, and energy, can occur in different ways at different times and locations involving various thermal, mass, and fluid dynamic factors. An understanding of the flow, combustion, and thermal properties of a rapidly vaporizing spray requires careful modeling of the rate-controlling processes associated with the spray's turbulent transport, mixing, chemical kinetics, evaporation, and spreading rates, as well as other phenomena. In an attempt to advance the state-of-the-art in multidimensional numerical methods, we at the NASA Lewis Research Center extended our previous work on sprays to unstructured grids and parallel computing. LSPRAY, which was developed by M.S. Raju of Nyma, Inc., is designed to be massively parallel and could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase flow and/or Monte Carlo probability density function (PDF) solver. The LSPRAY solver accommodates the use of an unstructured mesh with mixed triangular, quadrilateral, and/or tetrahedral elements in the gas-phase solvers. It is used specifically for fuel sprays within gas turbine combustors, but it has many other uses. The spray model used in LSPRAY provided favorable results when applied to stratified-charge rotary combustion (Wankel) engines and several other confined and unconfined spray flames. The source code will be available with the National Combustion Code (NCC) as a complete package.

  4. Handling Vacuum Regions in a Hybrid Plasma Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmström, M.

    2013-04-01

    In a hybrid plasma solver (particle ions, fluid mass-less electrons) regions of vacuum, or very low charge density, can cause problems since the evaluation of the electric field involves division by charge density. This causes large electric fields in low density regions that can lead to numerical instabilities. Here we propose a self consistent handling of vacuum regions for hybrid solvers. Vacuum regions can be considered having infinite resistivity, and in this limit Faraday's law approaches a magnetic diffusion equation. We describe an algorithm that solves such a diffusion equation in regions with charge density below a threshold value. We also present an implementation of this algorithm in a hybrid plasma solver, and an application to the interaction between the Moon and the solar wind. We also discuss the implementation of hyperresistivity for smoothing the electric field in a PIC solver.

  5. Parallel iterative solvers and preconditioners using approximate hierarchical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Grama, A.; Kumar, V.; Sameh, A.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we report results of the performance, convergence, and accuracy of a parallel GMRES solver for Boundary Element Methods. The solver uses a hierarchical approximate matrix-vector product based on a hybrid Barnes-Hut / Fast Multipole Method. We study the impact of various accuracy parameters on the convergence and show that with minimal loss in accuracy, our solver yields significant speedups. We demonstrate the excellent parallel efficiency and scalability of our solver. The combined speedups from approximation and parallelism represent an improvement of several orders in solution time. We also develop fast and paralellizable preconditioners for this problem. We report on the performance of an inner-outer scheme and a preconditioner based on truncated Green`s function. Experimental results on a 256 processor Cray T3D are presented.

  6. Large eddy simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability using the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method

    SciTech Connect

    Darlington, R

    1999-12-01

    This research addresses the application of a large eddy simulation (LES) to Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. First, ALE simulations of simplified Rayleigh-Taylor instability are studied. The advantages of ALE over Eulerian simulations are shown. Next, the behavior of the LES is examined in a more complicated ALE simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The effects of eddy viscosity and stochastic backscatter are examined. The LES is also coupled with ALE to increase grid resolution in areas where it is needed. Finally, the methods studied above are applied to two sets of experimental simulations. In these simulations, ALE allows the mesh to follow expanding experimental targets, while LES can be used to mimic the effect of unresolved instability modes.

  7. Cosmological dynamics: from the Eulerian to the Lagrangian frame. Part I. Newtonian approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Eleonora; Maino, Davide; Matarrese, Sabino E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it

    2014-06-01

    We analyse the non-linear gravitational dynamics of a pressure-less fluid in the Newtonian limit of General Relativity in both the Eulerian and Lagrangian pictures. Starting from the Newtonian metric in the Poisson gauge, we transform to the synchronous and comoving gauge and obtain the Lagrangian metric within the Newtonian approximation. Our approach is fully non-perturbative, which implies that if our quantities are expanded according to the rules of standard perturbation theory, all terms are exactly recovered at any order in perturbation theory, only provided they are Newtonian. We explicitly show this result up to second order and in both gauges. Our transformation clarifies the meaning of the change of spatial and time coordinates from the Eulerian to the Lagrangian frame in the Newtonian approximation.

  8. Simulation of the dispersion of nuclear contamination using an adaptive Eulerian grid model.

    PubMed

    Lagzi, I; Kármán, D; Turányi, T; Tomlin, A S; Haszpra, L

    2004-01-01

    Application of an Eulerian model using layered adaptive unstructured grids coupled to a meso-scale meteorological model is presented for modelling the dispersion of nuclear contamination following the accidental release from a single but strong source to the atmosphere. The model automatically places a finer resolution grid, adaptively in time, in regions were high spatial numerical error is expected. The high-resolution grid region follows the movement of the contaminated air over time. Using this method, grid resolutions of the order of 6 km can be achieved in a computationally effective way. The concept is illustrated by the simulation of hypothetical nuclear accidents at the Paks NPP, in Central Hungary. The paper demonstrates that the adaptive model can achieve accuracy comparable to that of a high-resolution Eulerian model using significantly less grid points and computer simulation time. PMID:15149762

  9. An Eulerian formulation for large deformations of anisotropic elastic and viscoelastic solids and viscous fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, M. B.; Nadler, B.

    2016-03-01

    An Eulerian formulation has been developed for the constitutive response of a group of materials that includes anisotropic elastic and viscoelastic solids and viscous fluids. The material is considered to be a composite of an elastic solid and a viscous fluid. Evolution equations are proposed for a triad of vectors m i that represent the stretches and orientations of material line elements in the solid component. Evolution equations for an orthonormal triad of vectors s i are also proposed to characterize anisotropy of the fluid component. In particular, for an elastic solid it is shown that the material response is totally characterized by the functional form of the strain energy and by the current values of m i , which are measurable in the current state of the material. Moreover, it is shown that the proposed Eulerian formulation removes unphysical arbitrariness of the choice of the reference configuration in the standard formulation of constitutive equations for anisotropic elastic solids.

  10. Eulerian CFD modeling and X-ray validation of non-evaporating diesel spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Qingluan; Som, Sibendu; Quan, Shaoping; Pomraning, Eric; Senecal, P. K.

    2013-11-01

    This work implemented an Eulerian single-phase approach by Vallet et al. into CFD software (Convergent) for diesel spray simulations. This Eulerian approach considers liquid and gas phase as a complex mixture of a single flow with a highly variable density to describe the near nozzle dense sprays. The mean density is obtained form the Favre-averaged liquid mass fraction. Liquid mass fraction is transported with a model for the turbulent liquid diffusion flux into the gas. A mean gradient-based model is employed for the diffusion flux in this study. A non-evaporating diesel spray was measured using x-ray radiography at Argonne National Laboratory. The quantitative and time-resolved data of liquid penetration and mass distribution in the dense spray region are used to validate this approach. The different turbulence models are also used for the simulations. The comparison between the simulated results and experimental data and the turbulence model effect are discussed.

  11. Comparison of Direct Eulerian Godunov and Lagrange Plus Remap, Artificial Viscosity Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Pember, R B; Anderson, R W

    2001-03-30

    The authors compare two algorithms for solving the equations of unsteady inviscid compressible flow in an Eulerian frame: a staggered grid, Lagrange plus remap artificial viscosity scheme and a cell-centered, direct Eulerian higher-order Godunov scheme. They use the two methods to compute solutions to a number of one- and two-dimensional problems. The results show the accuracy of the two schemes to be generally equivalent. In a 1984 survey paper by Woodward and Colella, the Lagrange plus remap approach did not compare favorably with the higher-order Godunov methodology. They examine, therefore, how certain features of the staggered grid scheme considered here contribute to its improved accuracy. The critical features are shown to be the use of a monotonic artificial viscosity in the Lagrange step and, in the remap step, the use of a corner transport upwind scheme with van Leer limiters in conjunction with separate advection of internal and kinetic energies.

  12. A three-dimensional Eulerian method for the numerical simulation of high-velocity impact problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shi-Yu; Liu, Kai-Xin; Chen, Qian-Yi

    2014-03-01

    In the present paper, a three-dimensional (3D) Eulerian technique for the 3D numerical simulation of high-velocity impact problems is proposed. In the Eulerian framework, a complete 3D conservation element and solution element scheme for conservative hyperbolic governing equations with source terms is given. A modified ghost fluid method is proposed for the treatment of the boundary conditions. Numerical simulations of the Taylor bar problem and the ricochet phenomenon of a sphere impacting a plate target at an angle of 60° are carried out. The numerical results are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental observations. It is proved that our computational technique is feasible for analyzing 3D high-velocity impact problems.

  13. Littoral transport in the surf zone elucidated by an Eulerian sediment tracer.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duane, D.B.; James, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    An Eulerian, or time integration, sand tracer experiment was designed and carried out in the surf zone near Pt. Mugu, California on April 19, 1972. Data indicate that conditions of stationarity and finite boundaries required for proper application of Eulerian tracer theory exist for short time periods in the surf zone. Grain counts suggest time required for tracer sand to attain equilibrium concentration is on the order of 30-60 minutes. Grain counts also indicate transport (discharge) was strongly dependent upon grain size, with the maximum rate occurring in the size 2.5-2.75 phi, decreasing to both finer and coarser sizes. The measured instantaneous transport was at the annual rate of 2.4 x 106 m3/yr.- Authors

  14. Simulations of needle insertion by using a Eulerian hydrocode FEM and the experimental validations.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hiroyuki; Noda, Shigeho; Yokota, Hideo; Takagi, Shu; Himeno, Ryutaro; Okazawa, Shigenobu

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, simulations for needle insertion were performed by using a novel Eulerian hydrocode FEM, which was adaptive for large deformation and tissue fracture. We also performed experiments for the same needle insertion with silicon rubbers and needles, which had conical tips of different angles in order to investigate the accuracy of the simulations. The resistance forces in the simulations accurately followed those in the experiments until the conical portion of the needle was inside the rubbers, and the validation of the Eulerian hydrocode was revealed. However, the present simulation showed that after the conical portion was inside the tissue, the simulated resistance forces became lower than the experimental ones. The proportional increase of the friction forces and the roughly flatness of the tip force along the time were simulated. It was predicted that the tightening force along the needle side was underestimated. PMID:18982649

  15. Extension of rezoned Eulerian-Lagrangian method to astrophysical plasma applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, M. T.; Wu, S. T.; Dryer, Murray

    1993-01-01

    The rezoned Eulerian-Lagrangian procedure developed by Brackbill and Pracht (1973), which is limited to simple configurations of the magnetic fields, is modified in order to make it applicable to astrophysical plasma. For this purpose, two specific methods are introduced, which make it possible to determine the initial field topology for which no analytical expressions are available. Numerical examples illustrating these methods are presented.

  16. A Lagrangian-Eulerian finite element method with adaptive gridding for advection-dispersion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Ijiri, Y.; Karasaki, K.

    1994-02-01

    In the present paper, a Lagrangian-Eulerian finite element method with adaptive gridding for solving advection-dispersion equations is described. The code creates new grid points in the vicinity of sharp fronts at every time step in order to reduce numerical dispersion. The code yields quite accurate solutions for a wide range of mesh Peclet numbers and for mesh Courant numbers well in excess of 1.

  17. An Eulerian-Lagrangian Form for the Euler Equations in Sobolev Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooley, Benjamin C.; Robinson, James C.

    2016-06-01

    In 2000 Constantin showed that the incompressible Euler equations can be written in an "Eulerian-Lagrangian" form which involves the back-to-labels map (the inverse of the trajectory map for each fixed time). In the same paper a local existence result is proved in certain Hölder spaces {C^{1,μ}} . We review the Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation of the equations and prove that given initial data in H s for {n ≥ 2} and {s > n/2+1} , a unique local-in-time solution exists on the n-torus that is continuous into H s and C 1 into H s-1. These solutions automatically have C 1 trajectories. The proof here is direct and does not appeal to results already known about the classical formulation. Moreover, these solutions are regular enough that the classical and Eulerian-Lagrangian formulations are equivalent, therefore what we present amounts to an alternative approach to some of the standard theory.

  18. a Marker-Based Eulerian-Lagrangian Method for Multiphase Flow with Supersonic Combustion Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaofeng; Wang, Jiangfeng

    2016-06-01

    The atomization of liquid fuel is a kind of intricate dynamic process from continuous phase to discrete phase. Procedures of fuel spray in supersonic flow are modeled with an Eulerian-Lagrangian computational fluid dynamics methodology. The method combines two distinct techniques and develops an integrated numerical simulation method to simulate the atomization processes. The traditional finite volume method based on stationary (Eulerian) Cartesian grid is used to resolve the flow field, and multi-component Navier-Stokes equations are adopted in present work, with accounting for the mass exchange and heat transfer occupied by vaporization process. The marker-based moving (Lagrangian) grid is utilized to depict the behavior of atomized liquid sprays injected into a gaseous environment, and discrete droplet model 13 is adopted. To verify the current approach, the proposed method is applied to simulate processes of liquid atomization in supersonic cross flow. Three classic breakup models, TAB model, wave model and K-H/R-T hybrid model, are discussed. The numerical results are compared with multiple perspectives quantitatively, including spray penetration height and droplet size distribution. In addition, the complex flow field structures induced by the presence of liquid spray are illustrated and discussed. It is validated that the maker-based Eulerian-Lagrangian method is effective and reliable.

  19. Ozone seasonality above the tropical tropopause: reconciling the Eulerian and Lagrangian perspectives of transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abalos, M.; Ploeger, F.; Konopka, P.; Randel, W. J.; Serrano, E.

    2013-11-01

    We aim to reconcile the recently published, apparently contrasting results regarding the relative importance of tropical upwelling versus horizontal transport for the seasonality of ozone above the tropical tropopause. Different analysis methods in the literature (Lagrangian versus Eulerian, and isentropic versus pressure vertical coordinates) yield different perspectives of ozone transport, and the results must be carefully compared in equivalent terms to avoid misinterpretation. By examining the Lagrangian calculations in the Eulerian formulation, we show here that the results are in fact consistent with each other and with a common understanding of the ozone transport processes near and above the tropical tropopause. We further emphasize that the complementary approaches are suited for answering two different scientific questions: (1) what drives the observed seasonal cycle in ozone at a particular level above the tropical tropopause? and (2) how important is horizontal transport from mid-latitudes for ozone concentrations in the tropical lower stratosphere? Regarding the first question, the analysis of the transformed Eulerian mean (TEM) ozone budget shows that the annual cycle in tropical upwelling is the main forcing of the ozone seasonality at altitudes with large vertical gradients in the tropical lower stratosphere. To answer the second question a Lagrangian framework must be used, and the results show that a large fraction (~50%) of the ozone molecules ascending through the tropical lower stratosphere is of extra-tropical origin and has been in-mixed from mid-latitudes.

  20. Ozone seasonality above the tropical tropopause: reconciling the Eulerian and Lagrangian perspectives of transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abalos, M.; Ploeger, F.; Konopka, P.; Randel, W. J.; Serrano, E.

    2013-07-01

    We aim to reconcile the recently published, apparently contrasting results regarding the relative importance of tropical upwelling versus horizontal transport for the seasonality of ozone above the tropical tropopause. Different analysis methods in the literature (Lagrangian versus Eulerian, and isentropic versus pressure vertical coordinates) yield different perspectives of ozone transport, and the results must be carefully compared in equivalent terms to avoid misinterpretation. By examining the Lagrangian calculations in the Eulerian formulation, we show here that the results are in fact consistent with each other and with a common understanding of the ozone transport processes near and above the tropical tropopause. We further emphasize that the complementary approaches are suited for answering two different scientific questions: (1) what drives the observed seasonal cycle in ozone at a particular level above the tropical tropopause? and (2) how important is horizontal transport from mid-latitudes for ozone concentrations in the tropical lower stratosphere? Regarding the first question, the analysis of the Transformed Eulerian Mean (TEM) ozone budget shows that the annual cycle in tropical upwelling is the main forcing of the ozone seasonality at altitudes with large vertical gradients in the tropical lower stratosphere. To answer the second question a Lagrangian framework must be used, and the results show that a large fraction (∼50%) of the ozone molecules ascending through the tropical lower stratosphere is of extra-tropical origin and has been in-mixed from mid-latitudes.

  1. A new Eulerian method to estimate "spicy" Agulhas leakage in climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putrasahan, D. A.; Beal, Lisa M.; Kirtman, Ben P.; Cheng, Yu

    2015-06-01

    The Agulhas leakage brings warm and saline water from the Indian Ocean into the South Atlantic, forming part of the returning branch of the global thermohaline circulation, an important component of climate. We develop a new method using the passive tracer spice, to estimate Agulhas leakage transport in an ocean eddy-resolving climate model that properly captures Agulhas Retroflection and leakage. We identify Agulhas leakage waters as positive spice anomalies (≥ +0.1) and are able to trace leakage to depths greater than 1000 m. Spice-based Eulerian Agulhas leakage captures spikes in Lagrangian leakage transport which coincide with the passage of Agulhas rings, yielding a statistically significant correlation (0.47). On interannual times scales, differences between Eulerian and Lagrangian transports are reduced and correlation increases to 0.77. We obtain a mean spice-based Eulerian Agulhas leakage of 17 ± 4 sverdrup (Sv) and Lagrangian Agulhas leakage of 18 ± 2 Sv, which are within the range of observational estimates.

  2. Eulerian Simulation of Acoustic Waves Over Long Range in Realistic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitta, Subhashini; Steinhoff, John

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we describe a new method for computation of long-range acoustics. The approach is a hybrid of near and far-field methods, and is unique in its Eulerian treatment of the far-field propagation. The near-field generated by any existing method to project an acoustic solution onto a spherical surface that surrounds a source. The acoustic field on this source surface is then extended to an arbitrarily large distance in an inhomogeneous far-field. This would normally require an Eulerian solution of the wave equation. However, conventional Eulerian methods have prohibitive grid requirements. This problem is overcome by using a new method, ``Wave Confinement'' (WC) that propagates wave-identifying phase fronts as nonlinear solitary waves that live on grid indefinitely. This involves modification of wave equation by the addition of a nonlinear term without changing the basic conservation properties of the equation. These solitary waves can then be used to ``carry'' the essential integrals of the acoustic wave. For example, arrival time, centroid position and other properties that are invariant as the wave passes a grid point. Because of this property the grid can be made as coarse as necessary, consistent with overall accuracy to resolve atmospheric/ground variations. This work is being funded by the U.S. Army under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program (contract number: # W911W6-12-C-0036). The authors would like to thank Dr. Frank Caradonna and Dr. Ben W. Sim for this support.

  3. Eulerian models for particle trajectory crossing in turbulent flows over a large range of Stokes numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Rodney O.; Vie, Aymeric; Laurent, Frederique; Chalons, Christophe; Massot, Marc

    2012-11-01

    Numerous applications involve a disperse phase carried by a gaseous flow. To simulate such flows, one can resort to a number density function (NDF) governed a kinetic equation. Traditionally, Lagrangian Monte-Carlo methods are used to solve for the NDF, but are expensive as the number of numerical particles needed must be large to control statistical errors. Moreover, such methods are not well adapted to high-performance computing because of the intrinsic inhomogeneity of the NDF. To overcome these issues, Eulerian methods can be used to solve for the moments of the NDF resulting in an unclosed Eulerian system of hyperbolic conservation laws. To obtain closure, in this work a multivariate bi-Gaussian quadrature is used, which can account for particle trajectory crossing (PTC) over a large range of Stokes numbers. This closure uses up to four quadrature points in 2-D velocity phase space to capture large-scale PTC, and an anisotropic Gaussian distribution around each quadrature point to model small-scale PTC. Simulations of 2-D particle-laden isotropic turbulence at different Stokes numbers are employed to validate the Eulerian models against results from the Lagrangian approach. Good agreement is found for the number density fields over the entire range of Stokes numbers tested. Research carried out at the Center for Turbulence Research 2012 Summer Program.

  4. Eulerian laser Doppler vibrometry: Online blade damage identification on a multi-blade test rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberholster, A. J.; Heyns, P. S.

    2011-01-01

    Laser Doppler vibrometry enables the telemetry-free measurement of online turbomachinery blade vibration. Specifically, the Eulerian or fixed reference frame implementation of laser vibrometry provides a practical solution to the condition monitoring of rotating blades. The short data samples that are characteristic of this measurement approach do however negate the use of traditional frequency domain signal processing techniques. It is therefore necessary to employ techniques such as time domain analysis and non-harmonic Fourier analysis to obtain useful information from the blade vibration signatures. The latter analysis technique allows the calculation of phase angle trends which can be used as indicators of blade health deterioration, as has been shown in previous work for a single-blade rotor. This article presents the results from tests conducted on a five-blade axial-flow test rotor at different rotor speeds and measurement positions. With the aid of artificial neural networks, it is demonstrated that the parameters obtained from non-harmonic Fourier analysis and time domain signal processing on Eulerian laser Doppler vibrometry signals can successfully be used to identify and quantify blade damage from among healthy blades. It is also shown that the natural frequencies of individual blades can be approximated from the Eulerian signatures recorded during rotor run-up and run-down.

  5. Unit physics performance of a mix model in Eulerian fluid computations

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, Erik; Douglass, Rod

    2011-01-25

    In this report, we evaluate the performance of a K-L drag-buoyancy mix model, described in a reference study by Dimonte-Tipton [1] hereafter denoted as [D-T]. The model was implemented in an Eulerian multi-material AMR code, and the results are discussed here for a series of unit physics tests. The tests were chosen to calibrate the model coefficients against empirical data, principally from RT (Rayleigh-Taylor) and RM (Richtmyer-Meshkov) experiments, and the present results are compared to experiments and to results reported in [D-T]. Results show the Eulerian implementation of the mix model agrees well with expectations for test problems in which there is no convective flow of the mass averaged fluid, i.e., in RT mix or in the decay of homogeneous isotropic turbulence (HIT). In RM shock-driven mix, the mix layer moves through the Eulerian computational grid, and there are differences with the previous results computed in a Lagrange frame [D-T]. The differences are attributed to the mass averaged fluid motion and examined in detail. Shock and re-shock mix are not well matched simultaneously. Results are also presented and discussed regarding model sensitivity to coefficient values and to initial conditions (IC), grid convergence, and the generation of atomically mixed volume fractions.

  6. Structure of sheared and rotating turbulence: Multiscale statistics of Lagrangian and Eulerian accelerations and passive scalar dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobitz, Frank G.; Schneider, Kai; Bos, Wouter J. T.; Farge, Marie

    2016-01-01

    The acceleration statistics of sheared and rotating homogeneous turbulence are studied using direct numerical simulation results. The statistical properties of Lagrangian and Eulerian accelerations are considered together with the influence of the rotation to shear ratio, as well as the scale dependence of their statistics. The probability density functions (pdfs) of both Lagrangian and Eulerian accelerations show a strong and similar dependence on the rotation to shear ratio. The variance and flatness of both accelerations are analyzed and the extreme values of the Eulerian acceleration are observed to be above those of the Lagrangian acceleration. For strong rotation it is observed that flatness yields values close to three, corresponding to Gaussian-like behavior, and for moderate and vanishing rotation the flatness increases. Furthermore, the Lagrangian and Eulerian accelerations are shown to be strongly correlated for strong rotation due to a reduced nonlinear term in this case. A wavelet-based scale-dependent analysis shows that the flatness of both Eulerian and Lagrangian accelerations increases as scale decreases, which provides evidence for intermittent behavior. For strong rotation the Eulerian acceleration is even more intermittent than the Lagrangian acceleration, while the opposite result is obtained for moderate rotation. Moreover, the dynamics of a passive scalar with gradient production in the direction of the mean velocity gradient is analyzed and the influence of the rotation to shear ratio is studied. Concerning the concentration of a passive scalar spread by the flow, the pdf of its Eulerian time rate of change presents higher extreme values than those of its Lagrangian time rate of change. This suggests that the Eulerian time rate of change of scalar concentration is mainly due to advection, while its Lagrangian counterpart is only due to gradient production and viscous dissipation.

  7. Structure of sheared and rotating turbulence: Multiscale statistics of Lagrangian and Eulerian accelerations and passive scalar dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jacobitz, Frank G; Schneider, Kai; Bos, Wouter J T; Farge, Marie

    2016-01-01

    The acceleration statistics of sheared and rotating homogeneous turbulence are studied using direct numerical simulation results. The statistical properties of Lagrangian and Eulerian accelerations are considered together with the influence of the rotation to shear ratio, as well as the scale dependence of their statistics. The probability density functions (pdfs) of both Lagrangian and Eulerian accelerations show a strong and similar dependence on the rotation to shear ratio. The variance and flatness of both accelerations are analyzed and the extreme values of the Eulerian acceleration are observed to be above those of the Lagrangian acceleration. For strong rotation it is observed that flatness yields values close to three, corresponding to Gaussian-like behavior, and for moderate and vanishing rotation the flatness increases. Furthermore, the Lagrangian and Eulerian accelerations are shown to be strongly correlated for strong rotation due to a reduced nonlinear term in this case. A wavelet-based scale-dependent analysis shows that the flatness of both Eulerian and Lagrangian accelerations increases as scale decreases, which provides evidence for intermittent behavior. For strong rotation the Eulerian acceleration is even more intermittent than the Lagrangian acceleration, while the opposite result is obtained for moderate rotation. Moreover, the dynamics of a passive scalar with gradient production in the direction of the mean velocity gradient is analyzed and the influence of the rotation to shear ratio is studied. Concerning the concentration of a passive scalar spread by the flow, the pdf of its Eulerian time rate of change presents higher extreme values than those of its Lagrangian time rate of change. This suggests that the Eulerian time rate of change of scalar concentration is mainly due to advection, while its Lagrangian counterpart is only due to gradient production and viscous dissipation. PMID:26871161

  8. An advanced implicit solver for MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udrea, Bogdan

    A new implicit algorithm has been developed for the solution of the time-dependent, viscous and resistive single fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. The algorithm is based on an approximate Riemann solver for the hyperbolic fluxes and central differencing applied on a staggered grid for the parabolic fluxes. The algorithm employs a locally aligned coordinate system that allows the solution to the Riemann problems to be solved in a natural direction, normal to cell interfaces. The result is an original scheme that is robust and reduces the complexity of the flux formulas. The evaluation of the parabolic fluxes is also implemented using a locally aligned coordinate system, this time on the staggered grid. The implicit formulation employed by WARP3 is a two level scheme that was applied for the first time to the single fluid MHD model. The flux Jacobians that appear in the implicit scheme are evaluated numerically. The linear system that results from the implicit discretization is solved using a robust symmetric Gauss-Seidel method. The code has an explicit mode capability so that implementation and test of new algorithms or new physics can be performed in this simpler mode. Last but not least the code was designed and written to run on parallel computers so that complex, high resolution runs can be per formed in hours rather than days. The code has been benchmarked against analytical and experimental gas dynamics and MHD results. The benchmarks consisted of one-dimensional Riemann problems and diffusion dominated problems, two-dimensional supersonic flow over a wedge, axisymmetric magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster simulation and three-dimensional supersonic flow over intersecting wedges and spheromak stability simulation. The code has been proven to be robust and the results of the simulations showed excellent agreement with analytical and experimental results. Parallel performance studies showed that the code performs as expected when run on parallel

  9. Benchmarking transport solvers for fracture flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olkiewicz, Piotr; Dabrowski, Marcin

    2015-04-01

    Fracture flow may dominate in rocks with low porosity and it can accompany both industrial and natural processes. Typical examples of such processes are natural flows in crystalline rocks and industrial flows in geothermal systems or hydraulic fracturing. Fracture flow provides an important mechanism for transporting mass and energy. For example, geothermal energy is primarily transported by the flow of the heated water or steam rather than by the thermal diffusion. The geometry of the fracture network and the distribution of the mean apertures of individual fractures are the key parameters with regard to the fracture network transmissivity. Transport in fractures can occur through the combination of advection and diffusion processes like in the case of dissolved chemical components. The local distribution of the fracture aperture may play an important role for both flow and transport processes. In this work, we benchmark various numerical solvers for flow and transport processes in a single fracture in 2D and 3D. Fracture aperture distributions are generated by a number of synthetic methods. We examine a single-phase flow of an incompressible viscous Newtonian fluid in the low Reynolds number limit. Periodic boundary conditions are used and a pressure difference is imposed in the background. The velocity field is primarly found using the Stokes equations. We systematically compare the obtained velocity field to the results obtained by solving the Reynolds equation. This allows us to examine the impact of the aperture distribution on the permeability of the medium and the local velocity distribution for two different mathematical descriptions of the fracture flow. Furthermore, we analyse the impact of aperture distribution on the front characteristics such as the standard deviation and the fractal dimension for systems in 2D and 3D.

  10. A robust multilevel simultaneous eigenvalue solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costiner, Sorin; Taasan, Shlomo

    1993-01-01

    Multilevel (ML) algorithms for eigenvalue problems are often faced with several types of difficulties such as: the mixing of approximated eigenvectors by the solution process, the approximation of incomplete clusters of eigenvectors, the poor representation of solution on coarse levels, and the existence of close or equal eigenvalues. Algorithms that do not treat appropriately these difficulties usually fail, or their performance degrades when facing them. These issues motivated the development of a robust adaptive ML algorithm which treats these difficulties, for the calculation of a few eigenvectors and their corresponding eigenvalues. The main techniques used in the new algorithm include: the adaptive completion and separation of the relevant clusters on different levels, the simultaneous treatment of solutions within each cluster, and the robustness tests which monitor the algorithm's efficiency and convergence. The eigenvectors' separation efficiency is based on a new ML projection technique generalizing the Rayleigh Ritz projection, combined with a technique, the backrotations. These separation techniques, when combined with an FMG formulation, in many cases lead to algorithms of O(qN) complexity, for q eigenvectors of size N on the finest level. Previously developed ML algorithms are less focused on the mentioned difficulties. Moreover, algorithms which employ fine level separation techniques are of O(q(sub 2)N) complexity and usually do not overcome all these difficulties. Computational examples are presented where Schrodinger type eigenvalue problems in 2-D and 3-D, having equal and closely clustered eigenvalues, are solved with the efficiency of the Poisson multigrid solver. A second order approximation is obtained in O(qN) work, where the total computational work is equivalent to only a few fine level relaxations per eigenvector.

  11. A Comparative Study of Randomized Constraint Solvers for Random-Symbolic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takaki, Mitsuo; Cavalcanti, Diego; Gheyi, Rohit; Iyoda, Juliano; dAmorim, Marcelo; Prudencio, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    The complexity of constraints is a major obstacle for constraint-based software verification. Automatic constraint solvers are fundamentally incomplete: input constraints often build on some undecidable theory or some theory the solver does not support. This paper proposes and evaluates several randomized solvers to address this issue. We compare the effectiveness of a symbolic solver (CVC3), a random solver, three hybrid solvers (i.e., mix of random and symbolic), and two heuristic search solvers. We evaluate the solvers on two benchmarks: one consisting of manually generated constraints and another generated with a concolic execution of 8 subjects. In addition to fully decidable constraints, the benchmarks include constraints with non-linear integer arithmetic, integer modulo and division, bitwise arithmetic, and floating-point arithmetic. As expected symbolic solving (in particular, CVC3) subsumes the other solvers for the concolic execution of subjects that only generate decidable constraints. For the remaining subjects the solvers are complementary.

  12. Eulerian-Lagrangian numerical scheme for simulating advection, dispersion, and transient storage in streams and a comparison of numerical methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, T.J.; Runkel, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    Past applications of one-dimensional advection, dispersion, and transient storage zone models have almost exclusively relied on a central differencing, Eulerian numerical approximation to the nonconservative form of the fundamental equation. However, there are scenarios where this approach generates unacceptable error. A new numerical scheme for this type of modeling is presented here that is based on tracking Lagrangian control volumes across a fixed (Eulerian) grid. Numerical tests are used to provide a direct comparison of the new scheme versus nonconservative Eulerian numerical methods, in terms of both accuracy and mass conservation. Key characteristics of systems for which the Lagrangian scheme performs better than the Eulerian scheme include: nonuniform flow fields, steep gradient plume fronts, and pulse and steady point source loadings in advection-dominated systems. A new analytical derivation is presented that provides insight into the loss of mass conservation in the nonconservative Eulerian scheme. This derivation shows that loss of mass conservation in the vicinity of spatial flow changes is directly proportional to the lateral inflow rate and the change in stream concentration due to the inflow. While the nonconservative Eulerian scheme has clearly worked well for past published applications, it is important for users to be aware of the scheme's limitations. ?? 2008 ASCE.

  13. Quantitative analysis of numerical solvers for oscillatory biomolecular system models

    PubMed Central

    Quo, Chang F; Wang, May D

    2008-01-01

    Background This article provides guidelines for selecting optimal numerical solvers for biomolecular system models. Because various parameters of the same system could have drastically different ranges from 10-15 to 1010, the ODEs can be stiff and ill-conditioned, resulting in non-unique, non-existing, or non-reproducible modeling solutions. Previous studies have not examined in depth how to best select numerical solvers for biomolecular system models, which makes it difficult to experimentally validate the modeling results. To address this problem, we have chosen one of the well-known stiff initial value problems with limit cycle behavior as a test-bed system model. Solving this model, we have illustrated that different answers may result from different numerical solvers. We use MATLAB numerical solvers because they are optimized and widely used by the modeling community. We have also conducted a systematic study of numerical solver performances by using qualitative and quantitative measures such as convergence, accuracy, and computational cost (i.e. in terms of function evaluation, partial derivative, LU decomposition, and "take-off" points). The results show that the modeling solutions can be drastically different using different numerical solvers. Thus, it is important to intelligently select numerical solvers when solving biomolecular system models. Results The classic Belousov-Zhabotinskii (BZ) reaction is described by the Oregonator model and is used as a case study. We report two guidelines in selecting optimal numerical solver(s) for stiff, complex oscillatory systems: (i) for problems with unknown parameters, ode45 is the optimal choice regardless of the relative error tolerance; (ii) for known stiff problems, both ode113 and ode15s are good choices under strict relative tolerance conditions. Conclusions For any given biomolecular model, by building a library of numerical solvers with quantitative performance assessment metric, we show that it is possible

  14. Euler/Navier-Stokes Solvers Applied to Ducted Fan Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Srivastava, Rakesh

    1997-01-01

    Due to noise considerations, ultra high bypass ducted fans have become a more viable design. These ducted fans typically consist of a rotor stage containing a wide chord fan and a stator stage. One of the concerns for this design is the classical flutter that keeps occurring in various unducted fan blade designs. These flutter are catastrophic and are to be avoided in the flight envelope of the engine. Some numerical investigations by Williams, Cho and Dalton, have suggested that a duct around a propeller makes it more unstable. This needs to be further investigated. In order to design an engine to safely perform a set of desired tasks, accurate information of the stresses on the blade during the entire cycle of blade motion is required. This requirement in turn demands that accurate knowledge of steady and unsteady blade loading be available. Aerodynamic solvers based on unsteady three-dimensional analysis will provide accurate and fast solutions and are best suited for aeroelastic analysis. The Euler solvers capture significant physics of the flowfield and are reasonably fast. An aerodynamic solver Ref. based on Euler equations had been developed under a separate grant from NASA Lewis in the past. Under the current grant, this solver has been modified to calculate the aeroelastic characteristics of unducted and ducted rotors. Even though, the aeroelastic solver based on three-dimensional Euler equations is computationally efficient, it is still very expensive to investigate the effects of multiple stages on the aeroelastic characteristics. In order to investigate the effects of multiple stages, a two-dimensional multi stage aeroelastic solver was also developed under this task, in collaboration with Dr. T. S. R. Reddy of the University of Toledo. Both of these solvers were applied to several test cases and validated against experimental data, where available.

  15. EUPDF-II: An Eulerian Joint Scalar Monte Carlo PDF Module : User's Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.; Liu, Nan-Suey (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    EUPDF-II provides the solution for the species and temperature fields based on an evolution equation for PDF (Probability Density Function) and it is developed mainly for application with sprays, combustion, parallel computing, and unstructured grids. It is designed to be massively parallel and could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase CFD and spray solvers. The solver accommodates the use of an unstructured mesh with mixed elements of either triangular, quadrilateral, and/or tetrahedral type. The manual provides the user with an understanding of the various models involved in the PDF formulation, its code structure and solution algorithm, and various other issues related to parallelization and its coupling with other solvers. The source code of EUPDF-II will be available with National Combustion Code (NCC) as a complete package.

  16. Performance Models for the Spike Banded Linear System Solver

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Manguoglu, Murat; Saied, Faisal; Sameh, Ahmed; Grama, Ananth

    2011-01-01

    With availability of large-scale parallel platforms comprised of tens-of-thousands of processors and beyond, there is significant impetus for the development of scalable parallel sparse linear system solvers and preconditioners. An integral part of this design process is the development of performance models capable of predicting performance and providing accurate cost models for the solvers and preconditioners. There has been some work in the past on characterizing performance of the iterative solvers themselves. In this paper, we investigate the problem of characterizing performance and scalability of banded preconditioners. Recent work has demonstrated the superior convergence properties and robustness of banded preconditioners,more » compared to state-of-the-art ILU family of preconditioners as well as algebraic multigrid preconditioners. Furthermore, when used in conjunction with efficient banded solvers, banded preconditioners are capable of significantly faster time-to-solution. Our banded solver, the Truncated Spike algorithm is specifically designed for parallel performance and tolerance to deep memory hierarchies. Its regular structure is also highly amenable to accurate performance characterization. Using these characteristics, we derive the following results in this paper: (i) we develop parallel formulations of the Truncated Spike solver, (ii) we develop a highly accurate pseudo-analytical parallel performance model for our solver, (iii) we show excellent predication capabilities of our model – based on which we argue the high scalability of our solver. Our pseudo-analytical performance model is based on analytical performance characterization of each phase of our solver. These analytical models are then parameterized using actual runtime information on target platforms. An important consequence of our performance models is that they reveal underlying performance bottlenecks in both serial and parallel formulations. All of our results are validated

  17. The novel high-performance 3-D MT inverse solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglyakov, Mikhail; Geraskin, Alexey; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    We present novel, robust, scalable, and fast 3-D magnetotelluric (MT) inverse solver. The solver is written in multi-language paradigm to make it as efficient, readable and maintainable as possible. Separation of concerns and single responsibility concepts go through implementation of the solver. As a forward modelling engine a modern scalable solver extrEMe, based on contracting integral equation approach, is used. Iterative gradient-type (quasi-Newton) optimization scheme is invoked to search for (regularized) inverse problem solution, and adjoint source approach is used to calculate efficiently the gradient of the misfit. The inverse solver is able to deal with highly detailed and contrasting models, allows for working (separately or jointly) with any type of MT responses, and supports massive parallelization. Moreover, different parallelization strategies implemented in the code allow optimal usage of available computational resources for a given problem statement. To parameterize an inverse domain the so-called mask parameterization is implemented, which means that one can merge any subset of forward modelling cells in order to account for (usually) irregular distribution of observation sites. We report results of 3-D numerical experiments aimed at analysing the robustness, performance and scalability of the code. In particular, our computational experiments carried out at different platforms ranging from modern laptops to HPC Piz Daint (6th supercomputer in the world) demonstrate practically linear scalability of the code up to thousands of nodes.

  18. Performance of Nonlinear Finite-Difference Poisson-Boltzmann Solvers.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qin; Hsieh, Meng-Juei; Wang, Jun; Luo, Ray

    2010-01-12

    We implemented and optimized seven finite-difference solvers for the full nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation in biomolecular applications, including four relaxation methods, one conjugate gradient method, and two inexact Newton methods. The performance of the seven solvers was extensively evaluated with a large number of nucleic acids and proteins. Worth noting is the inexact Newton method in our analysis. We investigated the role of linear solvers in its performance by incorporating the incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient and the geometric multigrid into its inner linear loop. We tailored and optimized both linear solvers for faster convergence rate. In addition, we explored strategies to optimize the successive over-relaxation method to reduce its convergence failures without too much sacrifice in its convergence rate. Specifically we attempted to adaptively change the relaxation parameter and to utilize the damping strategy from the inexact Newton method to improve the successive over-relaxation method. Our analysis shows that the nonlinear methods accompanied with a functional-assisted strategy, such as the conjugate gradient method and the inexact Newton method, can guarantee convergence in the tested molecules. Especially the inexact Newton method exhibits impressive performance when it is combined with highly efficient linear solvers that are tailored for its special requirement. PMID:24723843

  19. Adaptive kinetic-fluid solvers for heterogeneous computing architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabelok, Sergey; Arslanbekov, Robert; Kolobov, Vladimir

    2015-12-01

    We show feasibility and benefits of porting an adaptive multi-scale kinetic-fluid code to CPU-GPU systems. Challenges are due to the irregular data access for adaptive Cartesian mesh, vast difference of computational cost between kinetic and fluid cells, and desire to evenly load all CPUs and GPUs during grid adaptation and algorithm refinement. Our Unified Flow Solver (UFS) combines Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) with automatic cell-by-cell selection of kinetic or fluid solvers based on continuum breakdown criteria. Using GPUs enables hybrid simulations of mixed rarefied-continuum flows with a million of Boltzmann cells each having a 24 × 24 × 24 velocity mesh. We describe the implementation of CUDA kernels for three modules in UFS: the direct Boltzmann solver using the discrete velocity method (DVM), the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) solver, and a mesoscopic solver based on the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), all using adaptive Cartesian mesh. Double digit speedups on single GPU and good scaling for multi-GPUs have been demonstrated.

  20. General Equation Set Solver for Compressible and Incompressible Turbomachinery Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sondak, Douglas L.; Dorney, Daniel J.

    2002-01-01

    Turbomachines for propulsion applications operate with many different working fluids and flow conditions. The flow may be incompressible, such as in the liquid hydrogen pump in a rocket engine, or supersonic, such as in the turbine which may drive the hydrogen pump. Separate codes have traditionally been used for incompressible and compressible flow solvers. The General Equation Set (GES) method can be used to solve both incompressible and compressible flows, and it is not restricted to perfect gases, as are many compressible-flow turbomachinery solvers. An unsteady GES turbomachinery flow solver has been developed and applied to both air and water flows through turbines. It has been shown to be an excellent alternative to maintaining two separate codes.

  1. Two Solvers for Tractable Temporal Constraints with Preferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossi, F.; Khatib,L.; Morris, P.; Morris, R.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A number of reasoning problems involving the manipulation of temporal information can naturally be viewed as implicitly inducing an ordering of potential local decisions involving time on the basis of preferences. Soft temporal constraints problems allow to describe in a natural way scenarios where events happen over time and preferences are associated to event distances and durations. In general, solving soft temporal problems require exponential time in the worst case, but there are interesting subclasses of problems which are polynomially solvable. We describe two solvers based on two different approaches for solving the same tractable subclass. For each solver we present the theoretical results it stands on, a description of the algorithm and some experimental results. The random generator used to build the problems on which tests are performed is also described. Finally, we compare the two solvers highlighting the tradeoff between performance and representational power.

  2. A multiple right hand side iterative solver for history matching

    SciTech Connect

    Killough, J.E.; Sharma, Y.; Dupuy, A.; Bissell, R.; Wallis, J.

    1995-12-31

    History matching of oil and gas reservoirs can be accelerated by directly calculating the gradients of observed quantities (e.g., well pressure) with respect to the adjustable reserve parameters (e.g., permeability). This leads to a set of linear equations which add a significant overhead to the full simulation run without gradients. Direct Gauss elimination solvers can be used to address this problem by performing the factorization of the matrix only once and then reusing the factor matrix for the solution of the multiple right hand sides. This is a limited technique, however. Experience has shown that problems with greater than few thousand cells may not be practical for direct solvers because of computation time and memory limitations. This paper discusses the implementation of a multiple right hand side iterative linear equation solver (MRHS) for a system of adjoint equations to significantly enhance the performance of a gradient simulator.

  3. Gpu Implementation of a Viscous Flow Solver on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tianhao; Chen, Long

    2016-06-01

    Graphics processing units have gained popularities in scientific computing over past several years due to their outstanding parallel computing capability. Computational fluid dynamics applications involve large amounts of calculations, therefore a latest GPU card is preferable of which the peak computing performance and memory bandwidth are much better than a contemporary high-end CPU. We herein focus on the detailed implementation of our GPU targeting Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations solver based on finite-volume method. The solver employs a vertex-centered scheme on unstructured grids for the sake of being capable of handling complex topologies. Multiple optimizations are carried out to improve the memory accessing performance and kernel utilization. Both steady and unsteady flow simulation cases are carried out using explicit Runge-Kutta scheme. The solver with GPU acceleration in this paper is demonstrated to have competitive advantages over the CPU targeting one.

  4. Stability analysis of Eulerian-Lagrangian methods for the one-dimensional shallow-water equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casulli, V.; Cheng, R.T.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper stability and error analyses are discussed for some finite difference methods when applied to the one-dimensional shallow-water equations. Two finite difference formulations, which are based on a combined Eulerian-Lagrangian approach, are discussed. In the first part of this paper the results of numerical analyses for an explicit Eulerian-Lagrangian method (ELM) have shown that the method is unconditionally stable. This method, which is a generalized fixed grid method of characteristics, covers the Courant-Isaacson-Rees method as a special case. Some artificial viscosity is introduced by this scheme. However, because the method is unconditionally stable, the artificial viscosity can be brought under control either by reducing the spatial increment or by increasing the size of time step. The second part of the paper discusses a class of semi-implicit finite difference methods for the one-dimensional shallow-water equations. This method, when the Eulerian-Lagrangian approach is used for the convective terms, is also unconditionally stable and highly accurate for small space increments or large time steps. The semi-implicit methods seem to be more computationally efficient than the explicit ELM; at each time step a single tridiagonal system of linear equations is solved. The combined explicit and implicit ELM is best used in formulating a solution strategy for solving a network of interconnected channels. The explicit ELM is used at channel junctions for each time step. The semi-implicit method is then applied to the interior points in each channel segment. Following this solution strategy, the channel network problem can be reduced to a set of independent one-dimensional open-channel flow problems. Numerical results support properties given by the stability and error analyses. ?? 1990.

  5. A Eulerian-Lagrangian Model to Simulate Two-Phase/Particulate Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apte, S. V.; Mahesh, K.; Lundgren, T.

    2003-01-01

    Figure 1 shows a snapshot of liquid fuel spray coming out of an injector nozzle in a realistic gas-turbine combustor. Here the spray atomization was simulated using a stochastic secondary breakup model (Apte et al. 2003a) with point-particle approximation for the droplets. Very close to the injector, it is observed that the spray density is large and the droplets cannot be treated as point-particles. The volume displaced by the liquid in this region is significant and can alter the gas-phase ow and spray evolution. In order to address this issue, one can compute the dense spray regime by an Eulerian-Lagrangian technique using advanced interface tracking/level-set methods (Sussman et al. 1994; Tryggvason et al. 2001; Herrmann 2003). This, however, is computationally intensive and may not be viable in realistic complex configurations. We therefore plan to develop a methodology based on Eulerian-Lagrangian technique which will allow us to capture the essential features of primary atomization using models to capture interactions between the fluid and droplets and which can be directly applied to the standard atomization models used in practice. The numerical scheme for unstructured grids developed by Mahesh et al. (2003) for incompressible flows is modified to take into account the droplet volume fraction. The numerical framework is directly applicable to realistic combustor geometries. Our main objectives in this work are: Develop a numerical formulation based on Eulerian-Lagrangian techniques with models for interaction terms between the fluid and particles to capture the Kelvin- Helmholtz type instabilities observed during primary atomization. Validate this technique for various two-phase and particulate flows. Assess its applicability to capture primary atomization of liquid jets in conjunction with secondary atomization models.

  6. An Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Discretization of MHD on 3D Unstructured Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Rieben, R N; White, D A; Wallin, B K; Solberg, J M

    2006-06-12

    We present an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) discretization of the equations of resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) on unstructured hexahedral grids. The method is formulated using an operator-split approach with three distinct phases: electromagnetic diffusion, Lagrangian motion, and Eulerian advection. The resistive magnetic dynamo equation is discretized using a compatible mixed finite element method with a 2nd order accurate implicit time differencing scheme which preserves the divergence-free nature of the magnetic field. At each discrete time step, electromagnetic force and heat terms are calculated and coupled to the hydrodynamic equations to compute the Lagrangian motion of the conducting materials. By virtue of the compatible discretization method used, the invariants of Lagrangian MHD motion are preserved in a discrete sense. When the Lagrangian motion of the mesh causes significant distortion, that distortion is corrected with a relaxation of the mesh, followed by a 2nd order monotonic remap of the electromagnetic state variables. The remap is equivalent to Eulerian advection of the magnetic flux density with a fictitious mesh relaxation velocity. The magnetic advection is performed using a novel variant of constrained transport (CT) that is valid for unstructured hexahedral grids with arbitrary mesh velocities. The advection method maintains the divergence free nature of the magnetic field and is second order accurate in regions where the solution is sufficiently smooth. For regions in which the magnetic field is discontinuous (e.g. MHD shocks) the method is limited using a novel variant of algebraic flux correction (AFC) which is local extremum diminishing (LED) and divergence preserving. Finally, we verify each stage of the discretization via a set of numerical experiments.

  7. A High-order Eulerian-Lagrangian Finite Element Method for Coupled Electro-mechanical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandstetter, Gerd

    The main focus of this work is on the development of a high-order Eulerian-Lagrangian finite element method for the simulation of electro-mechanical systems. The coupled problem is solved by a staggered scheme, where the mechanical motion is discretized by standard Lagrangian finite elements, and the electrical field is solved on a fixed Eulerian grid with embedded boundary conditions. Traditional Lagrangian-Lagrangian or arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methods encounter deficiencies, for example, when dealing with mesh distortion due to large deformations, or topology changes due to contacting bodies. The presented Eulerian-Lagrangian approach addresses these issues in a natural way. Within this context we develop a high-order immersed boundary discontinuous-Galerkin (IB-DG) method, which is shown to be necessary for (i) the accurate representation of the electrical gradient along nonlinear boundary features such as singular corners, and (ii) to achieve full convergence during the iterative global solution. We develop an implicit scheme based on the mid-point rule, as well as an explicit scheme based on the centered-difference method, with the incorporation of energy conserving, frictionless contact algorithms for an elastic-to-rigid-surface contact. The performance of the proposed method is assessed for several benchmark tests: the electro-static force vector around a singular corner, the quasi-static pull-in of an electro-mechanically actuated switch, the excitation of a carbon nanotube at resonance, and the cyclic impact simulation of a micro-electro-mechanical resonant-switch. We report improved accuracy for the high-order method as compared to low-order methods, and linear convergence in the iterative solution of the staggered scheme. Additionally, we investigate a Newton-Krylov shooting scheme in order to directly find cyclic steady states of electro-mechanical devices excited at resonance-- as opposed to a naive time-stepping from zero initial

  8. Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian approach in reduced order modeling of a flow with a moving boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, W.; Roszak, R.; Morzyński, M.

    2013-06-01

    Flow-induced deflections of aircraft structures result in oscillations that might turn into such a dangerous phenomena like flutter or buffeting. In this paper the design of an aeroelastic system consisting of Reduced Order Model (ROM) of the flow with a moving boundary is presented. The model is based on Galerkin projection of governing equation onto space spanned by modes obtained from high-fidelity computations. The motion of the boundary and mesh is defined in Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) approach and results in additional convective term in Galerkin system. The developed system is demonstrated on the example of a flow around an oscillating wing.

  9. Modeling erosion in a centrifugal pump in an Eulerian-Lagrangian frame using OpenFOAM®

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Alejandro; Stickland, Matthew; Dempster, William

    2015-07-01

    Erosion induced by solid particle impingement is a very commonwear mechanism in turbomachinery and Computational Fluid Dynamics is one of the most widely used tools for its prediction. In this article, erosion is modeled in one of the channels of a centrifugal pump using OpenFOAM®,which is an Open Source CFD package. A review of some of the most commonly used erosion models is carried out in an Eulerian-Lagrangian frame along with a comparative study of the erosion rates obtained with each model. Results yielded some disparities between models due to the different factors taken into consideration. The mesh is then deformed to obtain the resulting eroded geometry.

  10. Lagrangian and arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian simulations of complex roll-forming processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crutzen, Yanick; Boman, Romain; Papeleux, Luc; Ponthot, Jean-Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formalism is a breakthrough technique in the numerical simulation of the continuous-type roll-forming process. In contrast to the classical Lagrangian approach, the ALE formalism can compute the hopefully stationary state for the entire mill length with definitely effortless set-up tasks thanks to a nearly-stationary mesh. In this paper, advantages of ALE and Lagrangian formalisms are extensively discussed for simulating such continuous-type processes. Through a highly complex industrial application, the ease of use of ALE modelling is illustrated with the in-house code METAFOR. ALE and Lagrangian results are in good agreement with each other.

  11. Fast Euler solver for transonic airfoils. I - Theory. II - Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dadone, Andrea; Moretti, Gino

    1988-01-01

    Equations written in terms of generalized Riemann variables are presently integrated by inverting six bidiagonal matrices and two tridiagonal matrices, using an implicit Euler solver that is based on the lambda-formulation. The solution is found on a C-grid whose boundaries are very close to the airfoil. The fast solver is then applied to the computation of several flowfields on a NACA 0012 airfoil at various Mach number and alpha values, yielding results that are primarily concerned with transonic flows. The effects of grid fineness and boundary distances are analyzed; the code is found to be robust and accurate, as well as fast.

  12. Numerical System Solver Developed for the National Cycle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binder, Michael P.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the National Cycle Program (NCP), a powerful new numerical solver has been developed to support the simulation of aeropropulsion systems. This software uses a hierarchical object-oriented design. It can provide steady-state and time-dependent solutions to nonlinear and even discontinuous problems typically encountered when aircraft and spacecraft propulsion systems are simulated. It also can handle constrained solutions, in which one or more factors may limit the behavior of the engine system. Timedependent simulation capabilities include adaptive time-stepping and synchronization with digital control elements. The NCP solver is playing an important role in making the NCP a flexible, powerful, and reliable simulation package.

  13. A fast Eulerian multiphase flow model for volcanic ash plumes: turbulence, heat transfer and particle non-equilibrium dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerminara, Matteo; Esposti Ongaro, Tomaso; Carlo Berselli, Luigi

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a compressible multiphase flow model to simulate the three-dimensional dynamics of turbulent volcanic ash plumes. The model describes the eruptive mixture as a polydisperse fluid, composed of different types of gases and particles, treated as interpenetrating Eulerian phases. Solid phases represent the discrete ash classes into which the total granulometric spectrum is discretized, and can differ by size and density. The model is designed to quickly and accurately resolve important physical phenomena in the dynamics of volcanic ash plumes. In particular, it can simulate turbulent mixing (driving atmospheric entrainment and controlling the heat transfer), thermal expansion (controlling the plume buoyancy), the interaction between solid particles and volcanic gas (including kinetic non-equilibrium effects) and the effects of compressibility (over-pressured eruptions and infrasonic measurements). The model is based on the turbulent dispersed multiphase flow theory for dilute flows (volume concentration <0.001, implying that averaged inter-particle distance is larger than 10 diameters) where particle collisions are neglected. Moreover, in order to speed up the code without losing accuracy, we make the hypothesis of fine particles (Stokes number <0.2 , i.e., volcanic ash particles finer then a millimeter), so that we are able to consider non-equilibrium effects only at the first order. We adopt LES formalism (which is preferable in transient regimes) for compressible flows to model the non-linear coupling between turbulent scales and the effect of sub-grid turbulence on the large-scale dynamics. A three-dimensional numerical code has been developed basing on the OpenFOAM computational framework, a CFD open source parallel software package. Numerical benchmarks demonstrate that the model is able to capture important non-equilibrium phenomena in gas-particle mixtures, such as particle clustering and ejection from large-eddy turbulent structures, as well

  14. Modeling of dispersed flow film boiling with two flow, five field Eulerian-Eulerian approach and effects of spacer grids on heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergun, Sule

    In the case of a postulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in a nuclear reactor, an accurate prediction of clad temperature is needed to determine the safety margins. The large break LOCA analyses can be divided in to three time periods. These periods are blowdown, refill and reflood. During the blowdown and reflood phases of the LOCA, when the local void fraction is greater than 80% and the wall is at a temperature above minimum film boiling temperature (Tmin), heat is transferred from the fuel rod to a continuous vapor flow with dispersed droplets. The high void fraction mixture of droplets and vapor provide cooling to prevent the clad temperature from exceeding the safety limit. The heat transfer process for high void fraction mixture is called dispersed flow film boiling (DFFB). This thesis has been modeled DFFB in the reflood phase of a LOCA in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) rod bundle. In this study, the modifications and modification requirements for the COBRA-TF code to obtain a five field Eulerian - Eulerian modeling for two-phase DFFB is described. COBRA-TF is a best estimate code developed for the rod bundle analysis and has four fields, namely, vapor, entrained drop and continuous liquid film. COBRA-TF has a detailed reflood package which takes effect of spacer grids on heat transfer into account. This study has a detailed description of code's solution scheme and the models used for dispersed flow film boiling. The dispersed flow film boiling heat transfer model of the COBRA-TF code has been modified by adding a small droplet field to the code as the fifth field. The effect of smaller, thermally more active droplets on heat, mass and momentum transfer during DFFB has been modeled. Since the large drop break up due to spacer grids is one of the reasons for small droplet generation, the spacer grid models of the COBRA-TF have been revised and modified. In addition to small droplet generation, the spacer grid rewet is an important aspect of heat

  15. Eulerian method for computing multivalued solutions of the Euler-Poisson equations and applications to wave breaking in klystrons.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiantao; Wöhlbier, John G; Jin, Shi; Booske, John H

    2004-01-01

    We provide methods of computing multivalued solutions to the Euler-Poisson system and test them in the context of a klystron amplifier. An Eulerian formulation capable of computing multivalued solutions is derived from a kinetic description of the Euler-Poisson system and a moment closure. The system of the moment equations may be closed due to the special structure of the solution in phase space. The Eulerian moment equations are computed for a velocity modulated electron beam, which has been shown by prior Lagrangian theories to break in a finite time and form multivalued solutions. The results of the Eulerian moment equations are compared to direct computation of the kinetic equations and a Lagrangian method also developed in the paper. We use the Lagrangian formulation for the explicit computation of wave breaking time and location for typical velocity modulation boundary conditions. PMID:15324179

  16. Eulerian description of high-order bounce-back scheme for lattice Boltzmann equation with curved boundary.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.; Leaf, G. K.; Mathematics and Computer Science; The City Univ. of New York

    2009-04-01

    We propose an Eulerian description of the bounce-back boundary condition based on the high-order implicit time-marching schemes to improve the accuracy of lattice Boltzmann simulation in the vicinity of curved boundary. The Eulerian description requires only one grid spacing between fluid nodes when second-order accuracy in time and space is desired, although high-order accurate boundary conditions can be constructed on more grid-point support. The Eulerian description also provides an analytical framework for several different interpolation-based boundary conditions. For instance, the semi-Lagrangian, linear interpolation boundary condition is found to be a first-order upwind discretization that changes the time-marching schemes from implicit to explicit as the distance between the fluid boundary node and the solid boundary increases.

  17. Velocity-space resolution, entropy production, and upwind dissipation in Eulerian gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.; Waltz, R.E.

    2006-03-15

    Equations which describe the evolution of volume-averaged gyrokinetic entropy are derived and added to GYRO [J. Candy and R.E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)], a Eulerian gyrokinetic turbulence simulation code. In particular, the creation of entropy through spatial upwind dissipation (there is zero velocity-space dissipation in GYRO) and the reduction of entropy via the production of fluctuations are monitored in detail. This new diagnostic has yielded several key confirmations of the validity of the GYRO simulations. First, fluctuations balance dissipation in the ensemble-averaged sense, thus demonstrating that turbulent GYRO simulations achieve a true statistical steady state. Second, at the standard spatial grid size, neither entropy nor energy flux is significantly changed by a 16-fold increase (from 32 to 512 grid points per cell) in the number of grid points in the two-dimensional velocity space. Third, the measured flux is invariant to an eightfold increase in the upwind dissipation coefficients. A notable conclusion is that the lack of change in entropy with grid refinement refutes the familiar but incorrect notion that Eulerian gyrokinetic codes miss important velocity-space structure. The issues of density and energy conservation and their relation to negligible second-order effects such as the parallel nonlinearity are also discussed.

  18. Analytical Model for Pair Dispersion in Gaussian Models of Eulerian Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyink, Gregory; Benveniste, Damien

    2012-11-01

    Synthetic models of Eulerian turbulence are often used as computational shortcuts for studying Lagrangian properties of turbulence (e.g. Elliott & Majda, 1996). These models have been criticized by Thomson & Devenish (2005), who argued on physical grounds that their sweeping effects are very different from true turbulence. We give analytical results for Eulerian turbulence modeled by Gaussian fields. Our starting point is an exact integrodifferential equation for the particle pair separation distribution obtained from Gaussian integration-by-parts. When velocity correlation times are short, a Markovian approximation leads to a Richardson-type diffusion model. We obtain a time-dependent pair diffusivity tensor of the form Kij (r , t) =Sij (r) τ (r , t) where Sij (r) is the structure-function tensor and τ (r , t) is an effective correlation time of velocity increments. Crucially, this is found to be the minimum value of three times: the intrinsic turnover time τeddy (r) at separation r, the overall evolution time t , and the sweeping time r /v0 with v0 the rms velocity. We thus verify the main argument of Thomson & Devenish (2005), but we predict scaling laws for pair dispersion different from theirs for zero-mean velocity ensembles.

  19. Modeling of combustion processes of stick propellants via combined Eulerian-Lagrangian approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, K. K.; Hsieh, K. C.; Athavale, M. M.

    1988-01-01

    This research is motivated by the improved ballistic performance of large-caliber guns using stick propellant charges. A comprehensive theoretical model for predicting the flame spreading, combustion, and grain deformation phenomena of long, unslotted stick propellants is presented. The formulation is based upon a combined Eulerian-Lagrangian approach to simulate special characteristics of the two phase combustion process in a cartridge loaded with a bundle of sticks. The model considers five separate regions consisting of the internal perforation, the solid phase, the external interstitial gas phase, and two lumped parameter regions at either end of the stick bundle. For the external gas phase region, a set of transient one-dimensional fluid-dynamic equations using the Eulerian approach is obtained; governing equations for the stick propellants are formulated using the Lagrangian approach. The motion of a representative stick is derived by considering the forces acting on the entire propellant stick. The instantaneous temperature and stress fields in the stick propellant are modeled by considering the transient axisymmetric heat conduction equation and dynamic structural analysis.

  20. MULTIFLUID EULERIAN MODELLING OF DENSE GAS-SOLID FLUIDIZED BED HYDRODYNAMICS: INFLUENCE OF THE DISSIPATION PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Reuge, N; Cadoret, L.; Pannala, Sreekanth; Syamlal, M; Coufort, C; Caussat, B

    2008-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models must be thoroughly validated before they can be used with confidence for designing fluidized bed reactors. In this study, validation data were collected from a fluidized bed of (Geldart's group B) alumina particles operated at different gas velocities involving two fluidization hydrodynamic regimes (bubbling and slugging). The bed expansion, height of bed fluctuations, and frequency of fluctuations were measured from a videos of the fluidized bed. The Eulerian-Eulerian two fluid model MFIX was then used to simulate the experiments. Two different models for the particle stresses - Schaeffer (Syamlal et al., (1993), Schaeffer (1987)) and Princeton (Srivastava and Sundaresan (2003)) models - and different values of the restitution coefficient and internal angle of friction were evaluated. 3-D simulations are required for getting quantitative and qualitative agreement with experimental data. The results from the Princeton model are in better agreement with data than from the Schaeffer model. Both free-slip and Johnson-Jackson boundary conditions give nearly identical results. An increase in e from 0.8 to 1 leads to larger bed expansions and lower heights of fluctuations in the bubbling regime whereas it leads to unchanged bed expansion and to a massive reduction in the height of fluctuations in the slugging regime. The angle of internal friction (φ) in the range 10 -40 does not affect the bed expansion, but its reduction significantly reduces the height of fluctuations.

  1. Simulations of Nonaxisymmetric Instability in a Rotating Star: A Comparison between Eulerian and Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Scott C.; Houser, Janet L.; Centrella, Joan M.

    1996-02-01

    We have carried out three-dimensional numerical simulations of the dynamical bar instability in a rotating star and the resulting gravitational radiation using both an Eulerian code written in cylindrical coordinates and a smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code. The star is modeled initially as a polytrope with index n = 3/2 and Trot|W| ≍ 0.30, where Trot is the rotational kinetic energy and |W| is the gravitational potential energy. In both codes the gravitational field is purely Newtonian, and the gravitational radiation is calculated in the quadrupole approximation. We have run three simulations with the Eulerian code, varying the number of angular zones and the treatment of the boundary between the star and the vacuum. Using the SPH code we did seven runs, varying the number of particles, the artificial viscosity, and the type of initial model. We compare the growth rate and rotation speed of the bar, the mass, and angular momentum distributions, and the gravitational radiation quantities. We highlight the successes and difficulties of both methods and make suggestions for future improvements.

  2. Assessment of Linear Finite-Difference Poisson-Boltzmann Solvers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Luo, Ray

    2009-01-01

    CPU time and memory usage are two vital issues that any numerical solvers for the Poisson-Boltzmann equation have to face in biomolecular applications. In this study we systematically analyzed the CPU time and memory usage of five commonly used finite-difference solvers with a large and diversified set of biomolecular structures. Our comparative analysis shows that modified incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient and geometric multigrid are the most efficient in the diversified test set. For the two efficient solvers, our test shows that their CPU times increase approximately linearly with the numbers of grids. Their CPU times also increase almost linearly with the negative logarithm of the convergence criterion at very similar rate. Our comparison further shows that geometric multigrid performs better in the large set of tested biomolecules. However, modified incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient is superior to geometric multigrid in molecular dynamics simulations of tested molecules. We also investigated other significant components in numerical solutions of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. It turns out that the time-limiting step is the free boundary condition setup for the linear systems for the selected proteins if the electrostatic focusing is not used. Thus, development of future numerical solvers for the Poisson-Boltzmann equation should balance all aspects of the numerical procedures in realistic biomolecular applications. PMID:20063271

  3. Navier-Stokes Solvers and Generalizations for Reacting Flow Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Elman, Howard C

    2013-01-27

    This is an overview of our accomplishments during the final term of this grant (1 September 2008 -- 30 June 2012). These fall mainly into three categories: fast algorithms for linear eigenvalue problems; solution algorithms and modeling methods for partial differential equations with uncertain coefficients; and preconditioning methods and solvers for models of computational fluid dynamics (CFD).

  4. Assessment of linear finite-difference Poisson-Boltzmann solvers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Luo, Ray

    2010-06-01

    CPU time and memory usage are two vital issues that any numerical solvers for the Poisson-Boltzmann equation have to face in biomolecular applications. In this study, we systematically analyzed the CPU time and memory usage of five commonly used finite-difference solvers with a large and diversified set of biomolecular structures. Our comparative analysis shows that modified incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient and geometric multigrid are the most efficient in the diversified test set. For the two efficient solvers, our test shows that their CPU times increase approximately linearly with the numbers of grids. Their CPU times also increase almost linearly with the negative logarithm of the convergence criterion at very similar rate. Our comparison further shows that geometric multigrid performs better in the large set of tested biomolecules. However, modified incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient is superior to geometric multigrid in molecular dynamics simulations of tested molecules. We also investigated other significant components in numerical solutions of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. It turns out that the time-limiting step is the free boundary condition setup for the linear systems for the selected proteins if the electrostatic focusing is not used. Thus, development of future numerical solvers for the Poisson-Boltzmann equation should balance all aspects of the numerical procedures in realistic biomolecular applications. PMID:20063271

  5. Advances in computational fluid dynamics solvers for modern computing environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertenstein, Daniel; Humphrey, John R.; Paolini, Aaron L.; Kelmelis, Eric J.

    2013-05-01

    EM Photonics has been investigating the application of massively multicore processors to a key problem area: Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). While the capabilities of CFD solvers have continually increased and improved to support features such as moving bodies and adjoint-based mesh adaptation, the software architecture has often lagged behind. This has led to poor scaling as core counts reach the tens of thousands. In the modern High Performance Computing (HPC) world, clusters with hundreds of thousands of cores are becoming the standard. In addition, accelerator devices such as NVIDIA GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi are being installed in many new systems. It is important for CFD solvers to take advantage of the new hardware as the computations involved are well suited for the massively multicore architecture. In our work, we demonstrate that new features in NVIDIA GPUs are able to empower existing CFD solvers by example using AVUS, a CFD solver developed by the Air Force Research Labratory (AFRL) and the Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC). The effort has resulted in increased performance and scalability without sacrificing accuracy. There are many well-known codes in the CFD space that can benefit from this work, such as FUN3D, OVERFLOW, and TetrUSS. Such codes are widely used in the commercial, government, and defense sectors.

  6. Coordinate Projection-based Solver for ODE with Invariants

    SciTech Connect

    Serban, Radu

    2008-04-08

    CPODES is a general purpose (serial and parallel) solver for systems of ordinary differential equation (ODE) with invariants. It implements a coordinate projection approach using different types of projection (orthogonal or oblique) and one of several methods for the decompositon of the Jacobian of the invariant equations.

  7. Intellectual Abilities That Discriminate Good and Poor Problem Solvers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Ruth Ann

    1981-01-01

    This study compared good and poor fourth-grade problem solvers on a battery of 19 "reference" tests for verbal, induction, numerical, word fluency, memory, perceptual speed, and simple visualization abilities. Results suggest verbal, numerical, and especially induction abilities are important to successful mathematical problem solving. (MP)

  8. Eulerian Lagrangian Adaptive Fup Collocation Method for solving the conservative solute transport in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotovac, Hrvoje; Srzic, Veljko

    2014-05-01

    Contaminant transport in natural aquifers is a complex, multiscale process that is frequently studied using different Eulerian, Lagrangian and hybrid numerical methods. Conservative solute transport is typically modeled using the advection-dispersion equation (ADE). Despite the large number of available numerical methods that have been developed to solve it, the accurate numerical solution of the ADE still presents formidable challenges. In particular, current numerical solutions of multidimensional advection-dominated transport in non-uniform velocity fields are affected by one or all of the following problems: numerical dispersion that introduces artificial mixing and dilution, grid orientation effects, unresolved spatial and temporal scales and unphysical numerical oscillations (e.g., Herrera et al, 2009; Bosso et al., 2012). In this work we will present Eulerian Lagrangian Adaptive Fup Collocation Method (ELAFCM) based on Fup basis functions and collocation approach for spatial approximation and explicit stabilized Runge-Kutta-Chebyshev temporal integration (public domain routine SERK2) which is especially well suited for stiff parabolic problems. Spatial adaptive strategy is based on Fup basis functions which are closely related to the wavelets and splines so that they are also compactly supported basis functions; they exactly describe algebraic polynomials and enable a multiresolution adaptive analysis (MRA). MRA is here performed via Fup Collocation Transform (FCT) so that at each time step concentration solution is decomposed using only a few significant Fup basis functions on adaptive collocation grid with appropriate scales (frequencies) and locations, a desired level of accuracy and a near minimum computational cost. FCT adds more collocations points and higher resolution levels only in sensitive zones with sharp concentration gradients, fronts and/or narrow transition zones. According to the our recent achievements there is no need for solving the large

  9. Multiscale Universal Interface: A concurrent framework for coupling heterogeneous solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yu-Hang; Kudo, Shuhei; Bian, Xin; Li, Zhen; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: Concurrently coupled numerical simulations using heterogeneous solvers are powerful tools for modeling multiscale phenomena. However, major modifications to existing codes are often required to enable such simulations, posing significant difficulties in practice. In this paper we present a C++ library, i.e. the Multiscale Universal Interface (MUI), which is capable of facilitating the coupling effort for a wide range of multiscale simulations. The library adopts a header-only form with minimal external dependency and hence can be easily dropped into existing codes. A data sampler concept is introduced, combined with a hybrid dynamic/static typing mechanism, to create an easily customizable framework for solver-independent data interpretation. The library integrates MPI MPMD support and an asynchronous communication protocol to handle inter-solver information exchange irrespective of the solvers' own MPI awareness. Template metaprogramming is heavily employed to simultaneously improve runtime performance and code flexibility. We validated the library by solving three different multiscale problems, which also serve to demonstrate the flexibility of the framework in handling heterogeneous models and solvers. In the first example, a Couette flow was simulated using two concurrently coupled Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of different spatial resolutions. In the second example, we coupled the deterministic SPH method with the stochastic Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method to study the effect of surface grafting on the hydrodynamics properties on the surface. In the third example, we consider conjugate heat transfer between a solid domain and a fluid domain by coupling the particle-based energy-conserving DPD (eDPD) method with the Finite Element Method (FEM)

  10. Decision Engines for Software Analysis Using Satisfiability Modulo Theories Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorner, Nikolaj

    2010-01-01

    The area of software analysis, testing and verification is now undergoing a revolution thanks to the use of automated and scalable support for logical methods. A well-recognized premise is that at the core of software analysis engines is invariably a component using logical formulas for describing states and transformations between system states. The process of using this information for discovering and checking program properties (including such important properties as safety and security) amounts to automatic theorem proving. In particular, theorem provers that directly support common software constructs offer a compelling basis. Such provers are commonly called satisfiability modulo theories (SMT) solvers. Z3 is a state-of-the-art SMT solver. It is developed at Microsoft Research. It can be used to check the satisfiability of logical formulas over one or more theories such as arithmetic, bit-vectors, lists, records and arrays. The talk describes some of the technology behind modern SMT solvers, including the solver Z3. Z3 is currently mainly targeted at solving problems that arise in software analysis and verification. It has been applied to various contexts, such as systems for dynamic symbolic simulation (Pex, SAGE, Vigilante), for program verification and extended static checking (Spec#/Boggie, VCC, HAVOC), for software model checking (Yogi, SLAM), model-based design (FORMULA), security protocol code (F7), program run-time analysis and invariant generation (VS3). We will describe how it integrates support for a variety of theories that arise naturally in the context of the applications. There are several new promising avenues and the talk will touch on some of these and the challenges related to SMT solvers. Proceedings

  11. Migration of vectorized iterative solvers to distributed memory architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Pommerell, C.; Ruehl, R.

    1994-12-31

    Both necessity and opportunity motivate the use of high-performance computers for iterative linear solvers. Necessity results from the size of the problems being solved-smaller problems are often better handled by direct methods. Opportunity arises from the formulation of the iterative methods in terms of simple linear algebra operations, even if this {open_quote}natural{close_quotes} parallelism is not easy to exploit in irregularly structured sparse matrices and with good preconditioners. As a result, high-performance implementations of iterative solvers have attracted a lot of interest in recent years. Most efforts are geared to vectorize or parallelize the dominating operation-structured or unstructured sparse matrix-vector multiplication, or to increase locality and parallelism by reformulating the algorithm-reducing global synchronization in inner products or local data exchange in preconditioners. Target architectures for iterative solvers currently include mostly vector supercomputers and architectures with one or few optimized (e.g., super-scalar and/or super-pipelined RISC) processors and hierarchical memory systems. More recently, parallel computers with physically distributed memory and a better price/performance ratio have been offered by vendors as a very interesting alternative to vector supercomputers. However, programming comfort on such distributed memory parallel processors (DMPPs) still lags behind. Here the authors are concerned with iterative solvers and their changing computing environment. In particular, they are considering migration from traditional vector supercomputers to DMPPs. Application requirements force one to use flexible and portable libraries. They want to extend the portability of iterative solvers rather than reimplementing everything for each new machine, or even for each new architecture.

  12. Multiscale Universal Interface: A concurrent framework for coupling heterogeneous solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yu-Hang; Kudo, Shuhei; Bian, Xin; Li, Zhen; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-09-01

    Concurrently coupled numerical simulations using heterogeneous solvers are powerful tools for modeling multiscale phenomena. However, major modifications to existing codes are often required to enable such simulations, posing significant difficulties in practice. In this paper we present a C++ library, i.e. the Multiscale Universal Interface (MUI), which is capable of facilitating the coupling effort for a wide range of multiscale simulations. The library adopts a header-only form with minimal external dependency and hence can be easily dropped into existing codes. A data sampler concept is introduced, combined with a hybrid dynamic/static typing mechanism, to create an easily customizable framework for solver-independent data interpretation. The library integrates MPI MPMD support and an asynchronous communication protocol to handle inter-solver information exchange irrespective of the solvers' own MPI awareness. Template metaprogramming is heavily employed to simultaneously improve runtime performance and code flexibility. We validated the library by solving three different multiscale problems, which also serve to demonstrate the flexibility of the framework in handling heterogeneous models and solvers. In the first example, a Couette flow was simulated using two concurrently coupled Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of different spatial resolutions. In the second example, we coupled the deterministic SPH method with the stochastic Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method to study the effect of surface grafting on the hydrodynamics properties on the surface. In the third example, we consider conjugate heat transfer between a solid domain and a fluid domain by coupling the particle-based energy-conserving DPD (eDPD) method with the Finite Element Method (FEM).

  13. Efficient three-dimensional Poisson solvers in open rectangular conducting pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Ji

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) Poisson solver plays an important role in the study of space-charge effects on charged particle beam dynamics in particle accelerators. In this paper, we propose three new 3D Poisson solvers for a charged particle beam in an open rectangular conducting pipe. These three solvers include a spectral integrated Green function (IGF) solver, a 3D spectral solver, and a 3D integrated Green function solver. These solvers effectively handle the longitudinal open boundary condition using a finite computational domain that contains the beam itself. This saves the computational cost of using an extra larger longitudinal domain in order to set up an appropriate finite boundary condition. Using an integrated Green function also avoids the need to resolve rapid variation of the Green function inside the beam. The numerical operational cost of the spectral IGF solver and the 3D IGF solver scales as O(N log(N)) , where N is the number of grid points. The cost of the 3D spectral solver scales as O(Nn N) , where Nn is the maximum longitudinal mode number. We compare these three solvers using several numerical examples and discuss the advantageous regime of each solver in the physical application.

  14. ASHEE-1.0: a compressible, equilibrium-Eulerian model for volcanic ash plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerminara, M.; Esposti Ongaro, T.; Berselli, L. C.

    2016-02-01

    A new fluid-dynamic model is developed to numerically simulate the non-equilibrium dynamics of polydisperse gas-particle mixtures forming volcanic plumes. Starting from the three-dimensional N-phase Eulerian transport equations for a mixture of gases and solid dispersed particles, we adopt an asymptotic expansion strategy to derive a compressible version of the first-order non-equilibrium model, valid for low-concentration regimes (particle volume fraction less than 10-3) and particle Stokes number (St - i.e., the ratio between relaxation time and flow characteristic time) not exceeding about 0.2. The new model, which is called ASHEE (ASH Equilibrium Eulerian), is significantly faster than the N-phase Eulerian model while retaining the capability to describe gas-particle non-equilibrium effects. Direct Numerical Simulation accurately reproduces the dynamics of isotropic, compressible turbulence in subsonic regimes. For gas-particle mixtures, it describes the main features of density fluctuations and the preferential concentration and clustering of particles by turbulence, thus verifying the model reliability and suitability for the numerical simulation of high-Reynolds number and high-temperature regimes in the presence of a dispersed phase. On the other hand, Large-Eddy Numerical Simulations of forced plumes are able to reproduce the averaged and instantaneous flow properties. In particular, the self-similar Gaussian radial profile and the development of large-scale coherent structures are reproduced, including the rate of turbulent mixing and entrainment of atmospheric air. Application to the Large-Eddy Simulation of the injection of the eruptive mixture in a stratified atmosphere describes some of the important features of turbulent volcanic plumes, including air entrainment, buoyancy reversal and maximum plume height. For very fine particles (St → 0, when non-equilibrium effects are negligible) the model reduces to the so-called dusty-gas model. However

  15. Eulerian frequency analysis of structural vibrations from high-speed video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venanzoni, Andrea; De Ryck, Laurent; Cuenca, Jacques

    2016-06-01

    An approach for the analysis of the frequency content of structural vibrations from high-speed video recordings is proposed. The techniques and tools proposed rely on an Eulerian approach, that is, using the time history of pixels independently to analyse structural motion, as opposed to Lagrangian approaches, where the motion of the structure is tracked in time. The starting point is an existing Eulerian motion magnification method, which consists in decomposing the video frames into a set of spatial scales through a so-called Laplacian pyramid [1]. Each scale - or level - can be amplified independently to reconstruct a magnified motion of the observed structure. The approach proposed here provides two analysis tools or pre-amplification steps. The first tool provides a representation of the global frequency content of a video per pyramid level. This may be further enhanced by applying an angular filter in the spatial frequency domain to each frame of the video before the Laplacian pyramid decomposition, which allows for the identification of the frequency content of the structural vibrations in a particular direction of space. This proposed tool complements the existing Eulerian magnification method by amplifying selectively the levels containing relevant motion information with respect to their frequency content. This magnifies the displacement while limiting the noise contribution. The second tool is a holographic representation of the frequency content of a vibrating structure, yielding a map of the predominant frequency components across the structure. In contrast to the global frequency content representation of the video, this tool provides a local analysis of the periodic gray scale intensity changes of the frame in order to identify the vibrating parts of the structure and their main frequencies. Validation cases are provided and the advantages and limits of the approaches are discussed. The first validation case consists of the frequency content

  16. Particle transport in the human respiratory tract: formulation of a nodal inverse distance weighted Eulerian-Lagrangian transport and implementation of the Wind-Kessel algorithm for an oral delivery.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Ravishekar; Guo, Peng; Przekwas, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    This paper is the first in a series wherein efficient computational methods are developed and implemented to accurately quantify the transport, deposition, and clearance of the microsized particles (range of interest: 2 to 10 µm) in the human respiratory tract. In particular, this paper (part I) deals with (i) development of a detailed 3D computational finite volume mesh comprising of the NOPL (nasal, oral, pharyngeal and larynx), trachea and several airway generations; (ii) use of CFD Research Corporation's finite volume Computational Biology (CoBi) flow solver to obtain the flow physics for an oral inhalation simulation; (iii) implement a novel and accurate nodal inverse distance weighted Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation to accurately obtain the deposition, and (iv) development of Wind-Kessel boundary condition algorithm. This new Wind-Kessel boundary condition algorithm allows the 'escaped' particles to reenter the airway through the outlets, thereby to an extent accounting for the drawbacks of having a finite number of lung generations in the computational mesh. The deposition rates in the NOPL, trachea, the first and second bifurcation were computed, and they were in reasonable accord with the Typical Path Length model. The quantitatively validated results indicate that these developments will be useful for (i) obtaining depositions in diseased lungs (because of asthma and COPD), for which there are no empirical models, and (ii) obtaining the secondary clearance (mucociliary clearance) of the deposited particles. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26317686

  17. Lagrangian and Eulerian diffusion study in the coastal surface layers. Progress report, July 1, 1979-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, H H; Okubo, A; Wilson, R E; Sanderson, B; Pritchard, D W

    1980-07-01

    This research project addresses a fundamental problem in turbulence theory, the relation between Lagrangian and Eulerian statistics, by carrying out, analyzing, and interpreting a set of field experiments in the coastal waters off the south shore of Long Island. The study will not only provide information on the relation between the Lagrangian and Eulerian autocorrelations but also between the various experimental methods for quantitatively estimating turbulent diffusion. Two experiments, one in summer and one in winter, consisting of simultaneous measurements of dye diffusion, drogue dispersion, and Eulerian current velocities in a typical coastal locale were planned. In order to ensure a match between the Lagrangian (drogues, dye) scales of motion and the Eulerian (current meters) scales, however, a preliminary experiment, consisting of a 6 mooring current meter array and a short (approx. 3 hours) drogue experiment, was conducted during March 1980. Results of this preliminary experiment and their implications to the experimental program are discussed. The principal results were an improved design of our current meter array, and a wider variety of drogue experiments, i.e., multi-level, multi-scale, and continuous source simulation.

  18. Erratum: “Hamiltonian magnetohydrodynamics: Lagrangian, Eulerian, and dynamically accessible stability—Theory” [Phys. Plasmas 20, 092104 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Andreussi, T.; Morrison, P. J.; Pegoraro, F.

    2015-03-15

    An algebraic mistake in the rendering of the Energy Casimir stability condition for a symmetric magnetohydrodynamics plasma configuration with flows made in the article Andreussi et al. “Hamiltonian magnetohydrodynamics: Lagrangian, Eulerian, and dynamically accessible stability—Theory,” Phys. Plasmas 20, 092104 (2013) is corrected.

  19. The backward phase flow and FBI-transform-based Eulerian Gaussian beams for the Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Shingyu; Qian, Jianliang

    2010-11-01

    We propose the backward phase flow method to implement the Fourier-Bros-Iagolnitzer (FBI)-transform-based Eulerian Gaussian beam method for solving the Schrödinger equation in the semi-classical regime. The idea of Eulerian Gaussian beams has been first proposed in [12]. In this paper we aim at two crucial computational issues of the Eulerian Gaussian beam method: how to carry out long-time beam propagation and how to compute beam ingredients rapidly in phase space. By virtue of the FBI transform, we address the first issue by introducing the reinitialization strategy into the Eulerian Gaussian beam framework. Essentially we reinitialize beam propagation by applying the FBI transform to wavefields at intermediate time steps when the beams become too wide. To address the second issue, inspired by the original phase flow method, we propose the backward phase flow method which allows us to compute beam ingredients rapidly. Numerical examples demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed algorithms.

  20. Direct numerical simulation of rigid bodies in multiphase flow within an Eulerian framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauschenberger, P.; Weigand, B.

    2015-06-01

    A new method is presented to simulate rigid body motion in the Volume-of-Fluid based multiphase code Free Surface 3D. The specific feature of the new method is that it works within an Eulerian framework without the need for a Lagrangian representation of rigid bodies. Several test cases are shown to prove the validity of the numerical scheme. The technique is able to conserve the shape of arbitrarily shaped rigid bodies and predict terminal velocities of rigid spheres. The instability of a falling ellipsoid is captured. Multiple rigid bodies including collisions may be considered using only one Volume-of-Fluid variable which allows to simulate the drafting, kissing and tumbling phenomena of two rigid spheres. The method can easily be extended to rigid bodies undergoing phase change processes.

  1. A Generalized Critical Velocity Window Based on Material Property for Cold Spraying by Eulerian Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. Y.; Yu, M.; Wang, F. F.; Yin, S.; Liao, H. L.

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, the previously developed Eulerian model (Yu et al., J Therm Spray Technol 21(3):745-752, 2012), which could well predict the critical velocity and erosion velocity, was extended to other commonly used materials such as aluminum, iron, nickel, stainless steel 316, and Inconel718 for studying the influence of material property and establishing a generalized window of critical velocity. Results show that the deformation behavior of the used materials could be classified as coordinated deformation (copper, iron, nickel) and uncoordinated deformation patterns (aluminum, stainless steel, and Inconel718). However, it was found that the steady maximum equivalent plastic strain values at the critical velocity for each material concentrate in the extent of 2.6-3.0 regardless of deformation pattern. Dimensionless analysis shows that, the calculated critical velocity increases with the increase of material characteristic velocity, and this relationship can be primarily used to predict the critical velocity.

  2. BEST statistics of Markovian fluxes: a tale of Eulerian tours and Fermionic ghosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polettini, Matteo

    2015-09-01

    We provide an exact expression for the statistics of the fluxes of Markov jump processes at all times, improving on asymptotic results from large deviation theory. The main ingredient is a generalization of the BEST theorem in enumeratoric graph theory to Eulerian tours with open ends. In the long-time limit we reobtain Sanov’s theorem for Markov processes, which expresses the exponential suppression of fluctuations in terms of relative entropy. The finite-time power-law term, increasingly important with the system size, is a spanning-tree determinant that, by introducing Grassmann variables, can be absorbed into the effective Lagrangian of a Fermionic ghost field on a metric space, coupled to a gauge potential. With reference to concepts in nonequilibrium stochastic thermodynamics, the metric is related to the dynamical activity that measures net communication between states, and the connection is made to a previous gauge theory for diffusion processes.

  3. Recent developments of the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian containment code ALICE-II. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.; Zeuch, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    The ANL arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian containment code ALICE was developed for use in fast reactor containment studies and is particularly suited for problems involving complex fluid-structure interactions. Many improvements have been made which has resulted in a second version of the code, ALICE-II. A selection of some important improvements are given in this paper. To realistically analyze the above-core hydrodynamics containing a movable upper internal structure (UIS), a 3-D pipe element has been adopted to calculate the response of the UIS columns that connect the UIS to the vessel head. A corotational coordinate scheme for large displacement, small strain, elastic-plastic structural-dynamic analysis is utilized in the formulation. Both geometric and material nonlinearities are considered. The governing equations are integrated explicitly using a central difference procedure. Many sample problems are presented, including comparisons of ALICE-II and ICECO-CEL results on the APRICOT Phase 3 problems.

  4. A Dynamically Adaptive Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Method for Solution of the Euler Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R W; Elliott, N S; Pember, R B

    2003-02-14

    A new method that combines staggered grid arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) techniques with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) has been developed for solution of the Euler equations. The novel components of the methods are driven by the need to reconcile traditional AMR techniques with the staggered variables and moving, deforming meshes associated with Lagrange based ALE schemes. We develop interlevel solution transfer operators and interlevel boundary conditions first in the case of purely Lagrangian hydrodynamics, and then extend these ideas into an ALE method by developing adaptive extensions of elliptic mesh relaxation techniques. Conservation properties of the method are analyzed, and a series of test problem calculations are presented which demonstrate the utility and efficiency of the method.

  5. Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Method with Local Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Modeling Shock Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R W; Pember, R B; Elliott, N S

    2001-10-22

    A new method that combines staggered grid Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) techniques with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) has been developed for solution of the Euler equations. This method facilitates the solution of problems currently at and beyond the boundary of soluble problems by traditional ALE methods by focusing computational resources where they are required through dynamic adaption. Many of the core issues involved in the development of the combined ALEAMR method hinge upon the integration of AMR with a staggered grid Lagrangian integration method. The novel components of the method are mainly driven by the need to reconcile traditional AMR techniques, which are typically employed on stationary meshes with cell-centered quantities, with the staggered grids and grid motion employed by Lagrangian methods. Numerical examples are presented which demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method.

  6. A new Lagrangian-Eulerian finite element method for modeling contaminant transport in fractured porous formations

    SciTech Connect

    Birkholzer, J.; Karasaki, K.

    1996-09-01

    Fracture network simulators have been extensively used in the past for obtaining a better understanding of flow and transport processes in fractured rock. However, most of these models do not account for fluid or solute exchange between the fractures and the porous matrix, although diffusion into the matrix pores can have a major impact on the spreading of contaminants. In the present paper a new finite element code TRIPOLY is introduced which combines a powerful Lagrangian-Eulerian approach for solving flow and transport in networks of discrete fractures with an efficient method to account for the diffusive interaction between the fractures and the adjacent matrix blocks. The code is capable of handling large-scale fracture-matrix systems comprising individual fractures and matrix blocks of arbitrary size, shape, and dimension.

  7. Implementation of a High Explosive Equation of State into an Eulerian Hydrocode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littlefield, David L.; Baker, Ernest L.

    2004-07-01

    The implementation of a high explosive equation of state into the Eulerian hydrocode CTH is described. The equation of state is an extension to JWL referred to as JWLB, and is intended to model the thermodynamic state of detonation products from a high explosive reaction. The EOS was originally cast in a form p = p(ρ, e), where p is the pressure, ρ is the density and e is the internal energy. However, the target application code requires an EOS of the form p = p(ρ, T), where T is the temperature, so it was necessary to reformulate the EOS in a thermodynamically consistent manner. A Helmholtz potential, developed from the original EOS, insures this consistency. Example calculations are shown that illustrate the veracity of this implementation.

  8. Application of Goldthorpe PDF model to dynamic fracture. Applications using the GRIM Eulerian hydrocode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullis, I. G.; Church, P. D.; Townsley, R.; Greenwood, P.; Proud, W. G.

    2006-08-01

    The Goldthorpe Path Dependent Failure (PDF) model has been incorporated into the GRIM Eulerian hydrocode and has been applied to a number of dynamic fracture scenarios. The model has allowed a step change improvement in the simulation of fracture processes in an Euler scheme. The applications include shear plugging of a plate due to ballistic impact, prediction of the so-called V{50} for a small mass projectile and the impact of a generic EFP against an aluminium plate target. It has been noted that the prediction of temperature in hydrocodes, still requires more effort, particularly when materials approach the melt point. In addition there is also significant batch to batch variation in the fracture properties in materials, which needs to be taken into account when simulating a given application scenario. The paper discusses these points and recognises that GRIM is now an integral part of the design process for new ballistic designs.

  9. Comparison between Lagrangian and Eulerian approaches in predicting motion of micron-sized particles in laminar flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, M. S.; Rismanian, M.; Monjezi, M.; Zendehbad, M.; Fatehiboroujeni, S.

    2014-06-01

    Modeling the behavior of suspended particles in gaseous phase is important for diverse reasons; e.g. aerosol is usually the main subject of CFD simulations in clean rooms. Additionally, to determine the rate and sites of deposition of particles suspended in inhaled air, the motion of the particles should be predicted in lung airways. Meanwhile there are two basically different approaches to simulate the behavior of particles suspension, Lagrangian and Eulerian approaches. This study compares the results of these two approaches on simulating the same problem. An in-house particle tracking code was developed to simulate the motion of particles with Lagrangian approach. In order to simulate the same problem with Eulerian approach, the solution to the transport equation with appropriate initial and boundary conditions was used. In the first case study, diffusion of particles, initially positioned homogeneously on an infinite plane was modeled with both approaches and the results were compared and the mismatch between Lagrangian and Eulerian approaches was analyzed for different concentrations. In the second case study, airflow with parabolic velocity profile moving between two parallel plates was modeled with two approaches. The airflow initially contained a homogeneous suspension of particles and the plates were maintained at zero concentration. The concentration along the plates was compared between the two approaches and the differences in the performance of each approach were investigated, again for different initial concentrations. The overall results confirm that as particle concentration falls below a minimum amount, approximately 105 m-2, the results of the two approaches deviate considerably from each other and hence the Eulerian approach cannot be taken as an alternative for Lagrangian approach for low concentrations. For the third problem, we investigated the 3D particle flow in an expanding lung alveolus. It is shown that when the number of total released

  10. A Generalized Eulerian-Lagrangian Analysis, with Application to Liquid Flows with Vapor Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejong, Frederik J.; Meyyappan, Meyya

    1993-01-01

    Under a NASA MSFC SBIR Phase 2 effort an analysis has been developed for liquid flows with vapor bubbles such as those in liquid rocket engine components. The analysis is based on a combined Eulerian-Lagrangian technique, in which Eulerian conservation equations are solved for the liquid phase, while Lagrangian equations of motion are integrated in computational coordinates for the vapor phase. The novel aspect of the Lagrangian analysis developed under this effort is that it combines features of the so-called particle distribution approach with those of the so-called particle trajectory approach and can, in fact, be considered as a generalization of both of those traditional methods. The result of this generalization is a reduction in CPU time and memory requirements. Particle time step (stability) limitations have been eliminated by semi-implicit integration of the particle equations of motion (and, for certain applications, the particle temperature equation), although practical limitations remain in effect for reasons of accuracy. The analysis has been applied to the simulation of cavitating flow through a single-bladed section of a labyrinth seal. Models for the simulation of bubble formation and growth have been included, as well as models for bubble drag and heat transfer. The results indicate that bubble formation is more or less 'explosive'. for a given flow field, the number density of bubble nucleation sites is very sensitive to the vapor properties and the surface tension. The bubble motion, on the other hand, is much less sensitive to the properties, but is affected strongly by the local pressure gradients in the flow field. In situations where either the material properties or the flow field are not known with sufficient accuracy, parametric studies can be carried out rapidly to assess the effect of the important variables. Future work will include application of the analysis to cavitation in inducer flow fields.

  11. A generalized Eulerian-Lagrangian analysis, with application to liquid flows with vapor bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejong, Frederik J.; Meyyappan, Meyya

    1993-07-01

    Under a NASA MSFC SBIR Phase 2 effort an analysis has been developed for liquid flows with vapor bubbles such as those in liquid rocket engine components. The analysis is based on a combined Eulerian-Lagrangian technique, in which Eulerian conservation equations are solved for the liquid phase, while Lagrangian equations of motion are integrated in computational coordinates for the vapor phase. The novel aspect of the Lagrangian analysis developed under this effort is that it combines features of the so-called particle distribution approach with those of the so-called particle trajectory approach and can, in fact, be considered as a generalization of both of those traditional methods. The result of this generalization is a reduction in CPU time and memory requirements. Particle time step (stability) limitations have been eliminated by semi-implicit integration of the particle equations of motion (and, for certain applications, the particle temperature equation), although practical limitations remain in effect for reasons of accuracy. The analysis has been applied to the simulation of cavitating flow through a single-bladed section of a labyrinth seal. Models for the simulation of bubble formation and growth have been included, as well as models for bubble drag and heat transfer. The results indicate that bubble formation is more or less 'explosive'. for a given flow field, the number density of bubble nucleation sites is very sensitive to the vapor properties and the surface tension. The bubble motion, on the other hand, is much less sensitive to the properties, but is affected strongly by the local pressure gradients in the flow field. In situations where either the material properties or the flow field are not known with sufficient accuracy, parametric studies can be carried out rapidly to assess the effect of the important variables. Future work will include application of the analysis to cavitation in inducer flow fields.

  12. Eulerian kinematics of flow through spatially periodic models of porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsche, Ludwig C.; Brenner, Howard

    1989-09-01

    For spatially periodic models of porous media, and incompressible fluids, we consider here in detail the physical interpretation of averaged velocity fields in terms of a purely continuum-level Eulerian seepage flux relation involving the mass flow across an arbitrarily oriented ‘macroscale’ surface element. We prove that the appropriately averaged microscale velocities do indeed satisfy a macroscale Eulerian flux relation (albeit to some approximation), provided that the surface ‘element’ is large compared with the pore lengthscale (microscale). A quantitative discussion of an ‘intermediate scale’ (lying between the pore scale and a characteristic macroscale) is achieved through the use of locally periodic velocity fields. Within the context of seepage velocity kinematics, our developments provide a conceptual foundation that renders continuum theories of flow of incompressible fluids through (periodic) porous media entirely selfcontained on the macroscale—free from any details of the discrete microscale structure (inaccessible to macroscopic observers) from which this continuum theory sprang. The error bounds and scaling laws derived are of special interest when the macroscale/microscale disparity is not very ‘wide’. With reference to current rational mechanical theories of ‘immiscible mixtures,’ our analysis provides a constructive existence proof, at least for periodic models of porous media, for phase-specific velocities; heretofore, such velocities were usually accepted, in a Lagrangian sense, on an axiomatic basis. Thus, clarification and quantification of the kinematical aspects of the continuum hypothesis for certain classes of multiphase systems can be effected a priori by our arguments, independently of any subsequent macroscale dynamical modelling. Our analysis, whereby we systematically proceed from a discrete picture of the underlying geometry to a purely continuum picture, may be likened to that achieved in classical statistical

  13. Elliptic Solvers with Adaptive Mesh Refinement on Complex Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Phillip, B.

    2000-07-24

    Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) is a numerical technique for locally tailoring the resolution computational grids. Multilevel algorithms for solving elliptic problems on adaptive grids include the Fast Adaptive Composite grid method (FAC) and its parallel variants (AFAC and AFACx). Theory that confirms the independence of the convergence rates of FAC and AFAC on the number of refinement levels exists under certain ellipticity and approximation property conditions. Similar theory needs to be developed for AFACx. The effectiveness of multigrid-based elliptic solvers such as FAC, AFAC, and AFACx on adaptively refined overlapping grids is not clearly understood. Finally, a non-trivial eye model problem will be solved by combining the power of using overlapping grids for complex moving geometries, AMR, and multilevel elliptic solvers.

  14. An Upwind Solver for the National Combustion Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sockol, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    An upwind solver is presented for the unstructured grid National Combustion Code (NCC). The compressible Navier-Stokes equations with time-derivative preconditioning and preconditioned flux-difference splitting of the inviscid terms are used. First order derivatives are computed on cell faces and used to evaluate the shear stresses and heat fluxes. A new flux limiter uses these same first order derivatives in the evaluation of left and right states used in the flux-difference splitting. The k-epsilon turbulence equations are solved with the same second-order method. The new solver has been installed in a recent version of NCC and the resulting code has been tested successfully in 2D on two laminar cases with known solutions and one turbulent case with experimental data.

  15. Parallel Auxiliary Space AMG Solver for $H(div)$ Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kolev, Tzanio V.; Vassilevski, Panayot S.

    2012-12-18

    We present a family of scalable preconditioners for matrices arising in the discretization of $H(div)$ problems using the lowest order Raviart--Thomas finite elements. Our approach belongs to the class of “auxiliary space''--based methods and requires only the finite element stiffness matrix plus some minimal additional discretization information about the topology and orientation of mesh entities. Also, we provide a detailed algebraic description of the theory, parallel implementation, and different variants of this parallel auxiliary space divergence solver (ADS) and discuss its relations to the Hiptmair--Xu (HX) auxiliary space decomposition of $H(div)$ [SIAM J. Numer. Anal., 45 (2007), pp. 2483--2509] and to the auxiliary space Maxwell solver AMS [J. Comput. Math., 27 (2009), pp. 604--623]. Finally, an extensive set of numerical experiments demonstrates the robustness and scalability of our implementation on large-scale $H(div)$ problems with large jumps in the material coefficients.

  16. Verification and Validation Studies for the LAVA CFD Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moini-Yekta, Shayan; Barad, Michael F; Sozer, Emre; Brehm, Christoph; Housman, Jeffrey A.; Kiris, Cetin C.

    2013-01-01

    The verification and validation of the Launch Ascent and Vehicle Aerodynamics (LAVA) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver is presented. A modern strategy for verification and validation is described incorporating verification tests, validation benchmarks, continuous integration and version control methods for automated testing in a collaborative development environment. The purpose of the approach is to integrate the verification and validation process into the development of the solver and improve productivity. This paper uses the Method of Manufactured Solutions (MMS) for the verification of 2D Euler equations, 3D Navier-Stokes equations as well as turbulence models. A method for systematic refinement of unstructured grids is also presented. Verification using inviscid vortex propagation and flow over a flat plate is highlighted. Simulation results using laminar and turbulent flow past a NACA 0012 airfoil and ONERA M6 wing are validated against experimental and numerical data.

  17. A spectral Poisson solver for kinetic plasma simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeremley, Daniel; Obberath, Jens; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2011-10-01

    Plasma resonance spectroscopy is a well established plasma diagnostic method, realized in several designs. One of these designs is the multipole resonance probe (MRP). In its idealized - geometrically simplified - version it consists of two dielectrically shielded, hemispherical electrodes to which an RF signal is applied. A numerical tool is under development which is capable of simulating the dynamics of the plasma surrounding the MRP in electrostatic approximation. In this contribution we concentrate on the specialized Poisson solver for that tool. The plasma is represented by an ensemble of point charges. By expanding both the charge density and the potential into spherical harmonics, a largely analytical solution of the Poisson problem can be employed. For a practical implementation, the expansion must be appropriately truncated. With this spectral solver we are able to efficiently solve the Poisson equation in a kinetic plasma simulation without the need of introducing a spatial discretization.

  18. Benchmarking ICRF Full-wave Solvers for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    R. V. Budny, L. Berry, R. Bilato, P. Bonoli, M. Brambilla, R. J. Dumont, A. Fukuyama, R. Harvey, E. F. Jaeger, K. Indireshkumar, E. Lerche, D. McCune, C. K. Phillips, V. Vdovin, J. Wright, and members of the ITPA-IOS

    2011-01-06

    Abstract Benchmarking of full-wave solvers for ICRF simulations is performed using plasma profiles and equilibria obtained from integrated self-consistent modeling predictions of four ITER plasmas. One is for a high performance baseline (5.3 T, 15 MA) DT H-mode. The others are for half-field, half-current plasmas of interest for the pre-activation phase with bulk plasma ion species being either hydrogen or He4. The predicted profiles are used by six full-wave solver groups to simulate the ICRF electromagnetic fields and heating, and by three of these groups to simulate the current-drive. Approximate agreement is achieved for the predicted heating power for the DT and He4 cases. Factor of two disagreements are found for the cases with second harmonic He3 heating in bulk H cases. Approximate agreement is achieved simulating the ICRF current drive.

  19. A functional implementation of the Jacobi eigen-solver

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, A.P.W.; Hiromoto, R.E.

    1993-02-01

    In this paper, we describe the systematic development of two implementations of the Jacobi eigen-solver and give performance results for the MIT/Motorola Monsoon dataflow machine. Our study is carried out using MINT, the MIT Monsoon simulator. The design of these implementations follows from the mathematics of the Jacobi method, and not from a translation of an existing sequential code. The functional semantics with respect to array updates, which cause excessive array copying, has lead us to a new implementation of a parallel ``group-rotations`` algorithm first described by Sameh. Our version of this algorithm requires 0(n{sup 3}) operations, whereas Sameh`s original version requires 0(n{sup 4}) operations. The implementations are programmed in the language Id, and although Id has non-functional features, we have restricted the development of our eigen-solvers to the functional sub-set of the language.

  20. A functional implementation of the Jacobi eigen-solver

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, A.P.W. . Dept. of Computer Science); Hiromoto, R.E. )

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the systematic development of two implementations of the Jacobi eigen-solver and give performance results for the MIT/Motorola Monsoon dataflow machine. Our study is carried out using MINT, the MIT Monsoon simulator. The design of these implementations follows from the mathematics of the Jacobi method, and not from a translation of an existing sequential code. The functional semantics with respect to array updates, which cause excessive array copying, has lead us to a new implementation of a parallel group-rotations'' algorithm first described by Sameh. Our version of this algorithm requires 0(n[sup 3]) operations, whereas Sameh's original version requires 0(n[sup 4]) operations. The implementations are programmed in the language Id, and although Id has non-functional features, we have restricted the development of our eigen-solvers to the functional sub-set of the language.

  1. LDRD report : parallel repartitioning for optimal solver performance.

    SciTech Connect

    Heaphy, Robert; Devine, Karen Dragon; Preis, Robert; Hendrickson, Bruce Alan; Heroux, Michael Allen; Boman, Erik Gunnar

    2004-02-01

    We have developed infrastructure, utilities and partitioning methods to improve data partitioning in linear solvers and preconditioners. Our efforts included incorporation of data repartitioning capabilities from the Zoltan toolkit into the Trilinos solver framework, (allowing dynamic repartitioning of Trilinos matrices); implementation of efficient distributed data directories and unstructured communication utilities in Zoltan and Trilinos; development of a new multi-constraint geometric partitioning algorithm (which can generate one decomposition that is good with respect to multiple criteria); and research into hypergraph partitioning algorithms (which provide up to 56% reduction of communication volume compared to graph partitioning for a number of emerging applications). This report includes descriptions of the infrastructure and algorithms developed, along with results demonstrating the effectiveness of our approaches.

  2. On improving linear solver performance: a block variant of GMRES

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, A H; Dennis, J M; Jessup, E R

    2004-05-10

    The increasing gap between processor performance and memory access time warrants the re-examination of data movement in iterative linear solver algorithms. For this reason, we explore and establish the feasibility of modifying a standard iterative linear solver algorithm in a manner that reduces the movement of data through memory. In particular, we present an alternative to the restarted GMRES algorithm for solving a single right-hand side linear system Ax = b based on solving the block linear system AX = B. Algorithm performance, i.e. time to solution, is improved by using the matrix A in operations on groups of vectors. Experimental results demonstrate the importance of implementation choices on data movement as well as the effectiveness of the new method on a variety of problems from different application areas.

  3. A Nonlinear Modal Aeroelastic Solver for FUN3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Benjamin D.; Bartels, Robert E.; Biedron, Robert T.; Scott, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    A nonlinear structural solver has been implemented internally within the NASA FUN3D computational fluid dynamics code, allowing for some new aeroelastic capabilities. Using a modal representation of the structure, a set of differential or differential-algebraic equations are derived for general thin structures with geometric nonlinearities. ODEPACK and LAPACK routines are linked with FUN3D, and the nonlinear equations are solved at each CFD time step. The existing predictor-corrector method is retained, whereby the structural solution is updated after mesh deformation. The nonlinear solver is validated using a test case for a flexible aeroshell at transonic, supersonic, and hypersonic flow conditions. Agreement with linear theory is seen for the static aeroelastic solutions at relatively low dynamic pressures, but structural nonlinearities limit deformation amplitudes at high dynamic pressures. No flutter was found at any of the tested trajectory points, though LCO may be possible in the transonic regime.

  4. Scalable Out-of-Core Solvers on Xeon Phi Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    D'Azevedo, Ed F; Chan, Ki Shing; Su, Shiquan; Wong, Kwai

    2015-01-01

    This paper documents the implementation of a distributive out-of-core (OOC) solver for performing LU and Cholesky factorizations of a large dense matrix on clusters of many-core programmable co-processors. The out-of- core algorithm combines both the left-looking and right-looking schemes aimed to minimize the movement of data between the CPU host and the co-processor, optimizing data locality as well as computing throughput. The OOC solver is built to align with the format of the ScaLAPACK software library, making it readily portable to any existing codes using ScaLAPACK. A runtime analysis conducted on Beacon (an Intel Xeon plus Intel Xeon Phi cluster which composed of 48 nodes of multi-core CPU and MIC) at the Na- tional Institute for Computational Sciences is presented. Comparison of the performance on the Intel Xeon Phi and GPU clusters are also provided.

  5. Brittle Solvers: Lessons and insights into effective solvers for visco-plasticity in geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiegelman, M. W.; May, D.; Wilson, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Plasticity/Fracture and rock failure are essential ingredients in geodynamic models as terrestrial rocks do not possess an infinite yield strength. Numerous physical mechanisms have been proposed to limit the strength of rocks, including low temperature plasticity and brittle fracture. While ductile and creep behavior of rocks at depth is largely accepted, the constitutive relations associated with brittle failure, or shear localisation, are more controversial. Nevertheless, there are really only a few macroscopic constitutive laws for visco-plasticity that are regularly used in geodynamics models. Independent of derivation, all of these can be cast as simple effective viscosities which act as stress limiters with different choices for yield surfaces; the most common being a von Mises (constant yield stress) or Drucker-Prager (pressure dependent yield-stress) criterion. The choice of plasticity model, however, can have significant consequences for the degree of non-linearity in a problem and the choice and efficiency of non-linear solvers. Here we describe a series of simplified 2 and 3-D model problems to elucidate several issues associated with obtaining accurate description and solution of visco-plastic problems. We demonstrate that1) Picard/Successive substitution schemes for solution of the non-linear problems can often stall at large values of the non-linear residual, thus producing spurious solutions2) Combined Picard/Newton schemes can be effective for a range of plasticity models, however, they can produce serious convergence problems for strongly pressure dependent plasticity models such as Drucker-Prager.3) Nevertheless, full Drucker-Prager may not be the plasticity model of choice for strong materials as the dynamic pressures produced in these layers can develop pathological behavior with Drucker-Prager, leading to stress strengthening rather than stress weakening behavior.4) In general, for any incompressible Stoke's problem, it is highly advisable to

  6. A chemical reaction network solver for the astrophysics code NIRVANA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, U.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Chemistry often plays an important role in astrophysical gases. It regulates thermal properties by changing species abundances and via ionization processes. This way, time-dependent cooling mechanisms and other chemistry-related energy sources can have a profound influence on the dynamical evolution of an astrophysical system. Modeling those effects with the underlying chemical kinetics in realistic magneto-gasdynamical simulations provide the basis for a better link to observations. Aims: The present work describes the implementation of a chemical reaction network solver into the magneto-gasdynamical code NIRVANA. For this purpose a multispecies structure is installed, and a new module for evolving the rate equations of chemical kinetics is developed and coupled to the dynamical part of the code. A small chemical network for a hydrogen-helium plasma was constructed including associated thermal processes which is used in test problems. Methods: Evolving a chemical network within time-dependent simulations requires the additional solution of a set of coupled advection-reaction equations for species and gas temperature. Second-order Strang-splitting is used to separate the advection part from the reaction part. The ordinary differential equation (ODE) system representing the reaction part is solved with a fourth-order generalized Runge-Kutta method applicable for stiff systems inherent to astrochemistry. Results: A series of tests was performed in order to check the correctness of numerical and technical implementation. Tests include well-known stiff ODE problems from the mathematical literature in order to confirm accuracy properties of the solver used as well as problems combining gasdynamics and chemistry. Overall, very satisfactory results are achieved. Conclusions: The NIRVANA code is now ready to handle astrochemical processes in time-dependent simulations. An easy-to-use interface allows implementation of complex networks including thermal processes

  7. Scaling Algebraic Multigrid Solvers: On the Road to Exascale

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, A H; Falgout, R D; Gamblin, T; Kolev, T; Schulz, M; Yang, U M

    2010-12-12

    Algebraic Multigrid (AMG) solvers are an essential component of many large-scale scientific simulation codes. Their continued numerical scalability and efficient implementation is critical for preparing these codes for exascale. Our experiences on modern multi-core machines show that significant challenges must be addressed for AMG to perform well on such machines. We discuss our experiences and describe the techniques we have used to overcome scalability challenges for AMG on hybrid architectures in preparation for exascale.

  8. Boltzmann Solver with Adaptive Mesh in Velocity Space

    SciTech Connect

    Kolobov, Vladimir I.; Arslanbekov, Robert R.; Frolova, Anna A.

    2011-05-20

    We describe the implementation of direct Boltzmann solver with Adaptive Mesh in Velocity Space (AMVS) using quad/octree data structure. The benefits of the AMVS technique are demonstrated for the charged particle transport in weakly ionized plasmas where the collision integral is linear. We also describe the implementation of AMVS for the nonlinear Boltzmann collision integral. Test computations demonstrate both advantages and deficiencies of the current method for calculations of narrow-kernel distributions.

  9. A contribution to the great Riemann solver debate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, James J.

    1992-01-01

    The aims of this paper are threefold: to increase the level of awareness within the shock capturing community to the fact that many Godunov-type methods contain subtle flaws that can cause spurious solutions to be computed; to identify one mechanism that might thwart attempts to produce very high resolution simulations; and to proffer a simple strategy for overcoming the specific failings of individual Riemann solvers.

  10. An automatic ordering method for incomplete factorization iterative solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Forsyth, P.A.; Tang, W.P. . Dept. of Computer Science); D'Azevedo, E.F.D. )

    1991-01-01

    The minimum discarded fill (MDF) ordering strategy for incomplete factorization iterative solvers is developed. MDF ordering is demonstrated for several model son-symmetric problems, as well as a water-flooding simulation which uses an unstructured grid. The model problems show a three to five fold decrease in the number of iterations compared to natural orderings. Greater than twofold improvement was observed for the waterflooding simulation. 26 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Menu-Driven Solver Of Linear-Programming Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterna, L. A.; Ferencz, D.

    1992-01-01

    Program assists inexperienced user in formulating linear-programming problems. A Linear Program Solver (ALPS) computer program is full-featured LP analysis program. Solves plain linear-programming problems as well as more-complicated mixed-integer and pure-integer programs. Also contains efficient technique for solution of purely binary linear-programming problems. Written entirely in IBM's APL2/PC software, Version 1.01. Packed program contains licensed material, property of IBM (copyright 1988, all rights reserved).

  12. NITSOL: A Newton iterative solver for nonlinear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pernice, M.; Walker, H.F.

    1996-12-31

    Newton iterative methods, also known as truncated Newton methods, are implementations of Newton`s method in which the linear systems that characterize Newton steps are solved approximately using iterative linear algebra methods. Here, we outline a well-developed Newton iterative algorithm together with a Fortran implementation called NITSOL. The basic algorithm is an inexact Newton method globalized by backtracking, in which each initial trial step is determined by applying an iterative linear solver until an inexact Newton criterion is satisfied. In the implementation, the user can specify inexact Newton criteria in several ways and select an iterative linear solver from among several popular {open_quotes}transpose-free{close_quotes} Krylov subspace methods. Jacobian-vector products used by the Krylov solver can be either evaluated analytically with a user-supplied routine or approximated using finite differences of function values. A flexible interface permits a wide variety of preconditioning strategies and allows the user to define a preconditioner and optionally update it periodically. We give details of these and other features and demonstrate the performance of the implementation on a representative set of test problems.

  13. Transonic Drag Prediction Using an Unstructured Multigrid Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.; Levy, David W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results obtained with the NSU-3D unstructured multigrid solver for the AIAA Drag Prediction Workshop held in Anaheim, CA, June 2001. The test case for the workshop consists of a wing-body configuration at transonic flow conditions. Flow analyses for a complete test matrix of lift coefficient values and Mach numbers at a constant Reynolds number are performed, thus producing a set of drag polars and drag rise curves which are compared with experimental data. Results were obtained independently by both authors using an identical baseline grid and different refined grids. Most cases were run in parallel on commodity cluster-type machines while the largest cases were run on an SGI Origin machine using 128 processors. The objective of this paper is to study the accuracy of the subject unstructured grid solver for predicting drag in the transonic cruise regime, to assess the efficiency of the method in terms of convergence, cpu time, and memory, and to determine the effects of grid resolution on this predictive ability and its computational efficiency. A good predictive ability is demonstrated over a wide range of conditions, although accuracy was found to degrade for cases at higher Mach numbers and lift values where increasing amounts of flow separation occur. The ability to rapidly compute large numbers of cases at varying flow conditions using an unstructured solver on inexpensive clusters of commodity computers is also demonstrated.

  14. A Survey of Solver-Related Geometry and Meshing Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, James; Daniel, Derick; Gudenkauf, Jared; Hine, David; Sideroff, Chris

    2016-01-01

    There is a concern in the computational fluid dynamics community that mesh generation is a significant bottleneck in the CFD workflow. This is one of several papers that will help set the stage for a moderated panel discussion addressing this issue. Although certain general "rules of thumb" and a priori mesh metrics can be used to ensure that some base level of mesh quality is achieved, inadequate consideration is often given to the type of solver or particular flow regime on which the mesh will be utilized. This paper explores how an analyst may want to think differently about a mesh based on considerations such as if a flow is compressible vs. incompressible or hypersonic vs. subsonic or if the solver is node-centered vs. cell-centered. This paper is a high-level investigation intended to provide general insight into how considering the nature of the solver or flow when performing mesh generation has the potential to increase the accuracy and/or robustness of the solution and drive the mesh generation process to a state where it is no longer a hindrance to the analysis process.

  15. An AMR capable finite element diffusion solver for ALE hydrocodes [An AMR capable diffusion solver for ALE-AMR

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A. C.; Bailey, D. S.; Kaiser, T. B.; Eder, D. C.; Gunney, B. T. N.; Masters, N. D.; Koniges, A. E.; Anderson, R. W.

    2015-02-01

    Here, we present a novel method for the solution of the diffusion equation on a composite AMR mesh. This approach is suitable for including diffusion based physics modules to hydrocodes that support ALE and AMR capabilities. To illustrate, we proffer our implementations of diffusion based radiation transport and heat conduction in a hydrocode called ALE-AMR. Numerical experiments conducted with the diffusion solver and associated physics packages yield 2nd order convergence in the L2 norm.

  16. A direct Arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian ADER-WENO finite volume scheme on unstructured tetrahedral meshes for conservative and non-conservative hyperbolic systems in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscheri, Walter; Dumbser, Michael

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we present a new family of high order accurate Arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) one-step ADER-WENO finite volume schemes for the solution of nonlinear systems of conservative and non-conservative hyperbolic partial differential equations with stiff source terms on moving tetrahedral meshes in three space dimensions. A WENO reconstruction technique is used to achieve high order of accuracy in space, while an element-local space-time Discontinuous Galerkin finite element predictor on moving curved meshes is used to obtain a high order accurate one-step time discretization. Within the space-time predictor the physical element is mapped onto a reference element using a high order isoparametric approach, where the space-time basis and test functions are given by the Lagrange interpolation polynomials passing through a predefined set of space-time nodes. Since our algorithm is cell-centered, the final mesh motion is computed by using a suitable node solver algorithm. A rezoning step as well as a flattener strategy are used in some of the test problems to avoid mesh tangling or excessive element deformations that may occur when the computation involves strong shocks or shear waves. The ALE algorithm presented in this article belongs to the so-called direct ALE methods because the final Lagrangian finite volume scheme is based directly on a space-time conservation formulation of the governing PDE system, with the rezoned geometry taken already into account during the computation of the fluxes. We apply our new high order unstructured ALE schemes to the 3D Euler equations of compressible gas dynamics, for which a set of classical numerical test problems has been solved and for which convergence rates up to sixth order of accuracy in space and time have been obtained. We furthermore consider the equations of classical ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) as well as the non-conservative seven-equation Baer-Nunziato model of compressible multi-phase flows with

  17. Hyperbolic self-gravity solver for large scale hydrodynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Ryosuke; Nagakura, Hiroki; Okawa, Hirotada; Fujisawa, Kotaro

    2016-04-01

    A new computationally efficient method has been introduced to treat self-gravity in Eulerian hydrodynamical simulations. It is applied simply by modifying the Poisson equation into an inhomogeneous wave equation. This roughly corresponds to the weak field limit of the Einstein equations in general relativity, and as long as the gravitation propagation speed is taken to be larger than the hydrodynamical characteristic speed, the results agree with solutions for the Poisson equation. The solutions almost perfectly agree if the domain is taken large enough, or appropriate boundary conditions are given. Our new method cannot only significantly reduce the computational time compared with existent methods, but is also fully compatible with massive parallel computation, nested grids, and adaptive mesh refinement techniques, all of which can accelerate the progress in computational astrophysics and cosmology.

  18. Examination of Isentropic Circulation Response to A Doubling of Carbon Dioxide Using Statistical Transformed Eulerian Mean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Pauluis, O. M.

    2012-12-01

    Responses of the isentropic circulation to a doubling of carbon dioxide (CO2) are examined in an atmospheric general circulation model on both dry and moist isentropes using the method of statistical transformed Eulerian mean (STEM). The STEM formulation allows an estimation of the atmospheric circulation on moist isentropes and separates the isentropic circulation into the Eulerian-mean and the eddy components. It also allows a decomposition of the global warming response into the changes in commonly used zonal and monthly mean climate variables such as the mean meridional velocity, isentropic surfaces, meridional eddy flux, and eddy variance. It is found that, as a consequence of CO2 doubling, the dry isentropic circulation weakens across all latitudes in both hemispheres. The weaker circulation within the tropical Hadley Cell is mainly a result of the reduction in mean meridional circulation while the reduction in eddy sensible heat flux largely contributes to the slow down of the circulation in the midlatitudes. The total heat transport analyzed on dry isentropes, however, increases in the tropics because of the increase in dry effective stratification whereas it decreases in the extratropics following the reduction in poleward eddy sensible heat transport. Furthermore, distinct features are found on moist isentropes. The tropical circulation also weakens on moist isentropes but not much change is found in total heat transport. The extratropical circulation shifts poleward on moist isentropes with an intensification (weakening) of the circulation on the poleward (equatorward) flank, which is primarily due to the change in eddy latent heat transport and mean moist isentropic surface. The total heat transport in the midlatitudes also shows a poleward shift but is of smaller magnitude. The difference between the dry and moist isentropic circulation reveals the role of moisture associated with the eddies, which strongly intensifies in the midlatitudes and dominates

  19. Application of Aeroelastic Solvers Based on Navier Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2001-01-01

    The propulsion element of the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) initiative is directed towards increasing the overall efficiency of current aircraft engines. This effort requires an increase in the efficiency of various components, such as fans, compressors, turbines etc. Improvement in engine efficiency can be accomplished through the use of lighter materials, larger diameter fans and/or higher-pressure ratio compressors. However, each of these has the potential to result in aeroelastic problems such as flutter or forced response. To address the aeroelastic problems, the Structural Dynamics Branch of NASA Glenn has been involved in the development of numerical capabilities for analyzing the aeroelastic stability characteristics and forced response of wide chord fans, multi-stage compressors and turbines. In order to design an engine to safely perform a set of desired tasks, accurate information of the stresses on the blade during the entire cycle of blade motion is required. This requirement in turn demands that accurate knowledge of steady and unsteady blade loading is available. To obtain the steady and unsteady aerodynamic forces for the complex flows around the engine components, for the flow regimes encountered by the rotor, an advanced compressible Navier-Stokes solver is required. A finite volume based Navier-Stokes solver has been developed at Mississippi State University (MSU) for solving the flow field around multistage rotors. The focus of the current research effort, under NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC3- 596 was on developing an aeroelastic analysis code (entitled TURBO-AE) based on the Navier-Stokes solver developed by MSU. The TURBO-AE code has been developed for flutter analysis of turbomachine components and delivered to NASA and its industry partners. The code has been verified. validated and is being applied by NASA Glenn and by aircraft engine manufacturers to analyze the aeroelastic stability characteristics of modem fans, compressors

  20. Code Verification of the HIGRAD Computational Fluid Dynamics Solver

    SciTech Connect

    Van Buren, Kendra L.; Canfield, Jesse M.; Hemez, Francois M.; Sauer, Jeremy A.

    2012-05-04

    The purpose of this report is to outline code and solution verification activities applied to HIGRAD, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and used to simulate various phenomena such as the propagation of wildfires and atmospheric hydrodynamics. Code verification efforts, as described in this report, are an important first step to establish the credibility of numerical simulations. They provide evidence that the mathematical formulation is properly implemented without significant mistakes that would adversely impact the application of interest. Highly accurate analytical solutions are derived for four code verification test problems that exercise different aspects of the code. These test problems are referred to as: (i) the quiet start, (ii) the passive advection, (iii) the passive diffusion, and (iv) the piston-like problem. These problems are simulated using HIGRAD with different levels of mesh discretization and the numerical solutions are compared to their analytical counterparts. In addition, the rates of convergence are estimated to verify the numerical performance of the solver. The first three test problems produce numerical approximations as expected. The fourth test problem (piston-like) indicates the extent to which the code is able to simulate a 'mild' discontinuity, which is a condition that would typically be better handled by a Lagrangian formulation. The current investigation concludes that the numerical implementation of the solver performs as expected. The quality of solutions is sufficient to provide credible simulations of fluid flows around wind turbines. The main caveat associated to these findings is the low coverage provided by these four problems, and somewhat limited verification activities. A more comprehensive evaluation of HIGRAD may be beneficial for future studies.

  1. Algorithms for parallel flow solvers on message passing architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderwijngaart, Rob F.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this project has been to identify and test suitable technologies for implementation of fluid flow solvers -- possibly coupled with structures and heat equation solvers -- on MIMD parallel computers. In the course of this investigation much attention has been paid to efficient domain decomposition strategies for ADI-type algorithms. Multi-partitioning derives its efficiency from the assignment of several blocks of grid points to each processor in the parallel computer. A coarse-grain parallelism is obtained, and a near-perfect load balance results. In uni-partitioning every processor receives responsibility for exactly one block of grid points instead of several. This necessitates fine-grain pipelined program execution in order to obtain a reasonable load balance. Although fine-grain parallelism is less desirable on many systems, especially high-latency networks of workstations, uni-partition methods are still in wide use in production codes for flow problems. Consequently, it remains important to achieve good efficiency with this technique that has essentially been superseded by multi-partitioning for parallel ADI-type algorithms. Another reason for the concentration on improving the performance of pipeline methods is their applicability in other types of flow solver kernels with stronger implied data dependence. Analytical expressions can be derived for the size of the dynamic load imbalance incurred in traditional pipelines. From these it can be determined what is the optimal first-processor retardation that leads to the shortest total completion time for the pipeline process. Theoretical predictions of pipeline performance with and without optimization match experimental observations on the iPSC/860 very well. Analysis of pipeline performance also highlights the effect of uncareful grid partitioning in flow solvers that employ pipeline algorithms. If grid blocks at boundaries are not at least as large in the wall-normal direction as those

  2. A Simple Quantum Integro-Differential Solver (SQuIDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argüelles Delgado, Carlos A.; Salvado, Jordi; Weaver, Christopher N.

    2015-11-01

    Simple Quantum Integro-Differential Solver (SQuIDS) is a C++ code designed to solve semi-analytically the evolution of a set of density matrices and scalar functions. This is done efficiently by expressing all operators in an SU(N) basis. SQuIDS provides a base class from which users can derive new classes to include new non-trivial terms from the right hand sides of density matrix equations. The code was designed in the context of solving neutrino oscillation problems, but can be applied to any problem that involves solving the quantum evolution of a collection of particles with Hilbert space of dimension up to six.

  3. Object-Oriented Design for Sparse Direct Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrian, Florin; Kumfert, Gary; Pothen, Alex

    1999-01-01

    We discuss the object-oriented design of a software package for solving sparse, symmetric systems of equations (positive definite and indefinite) by direct methods. At the highest layers, we decouple data structure classes from algorithmic classes for flexibility. We describe the important structural and algorithmic classes in our design, and discuss the trade-offs we made for high performance. The kernels at the lower layers were optimized by hand. Our results show no performance loss from our object-oriented design, while providing flexibility, case of use, and extensibility over solvers using procedural design.

  4. FDIPS: Finite Difference Iterative Potential-field Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Gabor; van der Holst, Bartholomeus; Huang, Zhenguang

    2016-06-01

    FDIPS is a finite difference iterative potential-field solver that can generate the 3D potential magnetic field solution based on a magnetogram. It is offered as an alternative to the spherical harmonics approach, as when the number of spherical harmonics is increased, using the raw magnetogram data given on a grid that is uniform in the sine of the latitude coordinate can result in inaccurate and unreliable results, especially in the polar regions close to the Sun. FDIPS is written in Fortran 90 and uses the MPI library for parallel execution.

  5. Hierarchically Parallelized Constrained Nonlinear Solvers with Automated Substructuring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, Joe; Kwang, Abel

    1994-01-01

    This paper develops a parallelizable multilevel multiple constrained nonlinear equation solver. The substructuring process is automated to yield appropriately balanced partitioning of each succeeding level. Due to the generality of the procedure,_sequential, as well as partially and fully parallel environments can be handled. This includes both single and multiprocessor assignment per individual partition. Several benchmark examples are presented. These illustrate the robustness of the procedure as well as its capability to yield significant reductions in memory utilization and calculational effort due both to updating and inversion.

  6. Preconditioned CG-solvers and finite element grids

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, R.; Selberherr, S.

    1994-12-31

    To extract parasitic capacitances in wiring structures of integrated circuits the authors developed the two- and three-dimensional finite element program SCAP (Smart Capacitance Analysis Program). The program computes the task of the electrostatic field from a solution of Poisson`s equation via finite elements and calculates the energies from which the capacitance matrix is extracted. The unknown potential vector, which has for three-dimensional applications 5000-50000 unknowns, is computed by a ICCG solver. Currently three- and six-node triangular, four- and ten-node tetrahedronal elements are supported.

  7. Reformulation of the Fourier-Bessel steady state mode solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Robert C.

    2016-09-01

    The Fourier-Bessel resonator state mode solver is reformulated using Maxwell's field coupled curl equations. The matrix generating expressions are greatly simplified as well as a reduction in the number of pre-computed tables making the technique simpler to implement on a desktop computer. The reformulation maintains the theoretical equivalence of the permittivity and permeability and as such structures containing both electric and magnetic properties can be examined. Computation examples are presented for a surface nanoscale axial photonic resonator and hybrid { ε , μ } quasi-crystal resonator.

  8. High Energy Boundary Conditions for a Cartesian Mesh Euler Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Shishir A.; Murman, Scott M.; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Inlets and exhaust nozzles are often omitted or fared over in aerodynamic simulations of aircraft due to the complexities involving in the modeling of engine details such as complex geometry and flow physics. However, the assumption is often improper as inlet or plume flows have a substantial effect on vehicle aerodynamics. A tool for specifying inlet and exhaust plume conditions through the use of high-energy boundary conditions in an established inviscid flow solver is presented. The effects of the plume on the flow fields near the inlet and plume are discussed.

  9. A fast solver for the Ornstein-Zernike equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, C. T.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2004-07-01

    In this paper, we report on the design and analysis of a multilevel method for the solution of the Ornstein-Zernike Equations and related systems of integro-algebraic equations. Our approach is based on an extension of the Atkinson-Brakhage method, with Newton-GMRES used as the coarse mesh solver. We report on several numerical experiments to illustrate the effectiveness of the method. The problems chosen are related to simple short ranged fluids with continuous potentials. Speedups over traditional methods for a given accuracy are reported. The new multilevel method is roughly six times faster than Newton-GMRES and 40 times faster than Picard.

  10. Performance issues for iterative solvers in device simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Qing; Forsyth, P. A.; Mcmacken, J. R. F.; Tang, Wei-Pai

    1994-01-01

    Due to memory limitations, iterative methods have become the method of choice for large scale semiconductor device simulation. However, it is well known that these methods still suffer from reliability problems. The linear systems which appear in numerical simulation of semiconductor devices are notoriously ill-conditioned. In order to produce robust algorithms for practical problems, careful attention must be given to many implementation issues. This paper concentrates on strategies for developing robust preconditioners. In addition, effective data structures and convergence check issues are also discussed. These algorithms are compared with a standard direct sparse matrix solver on a variety of problems.

  11. Evaluating point-based POMDP solvers on multicore machines.

    PubMed

    Shani, Guy

    2010-08-01

    Recent scaling up of partially observable Markov decision process solvers toward realistic applications is largely due to point-based methods which quickly provide approximate solutions for midsized problems. New multicore machines offer an opportunity to scale up to larger domains. These machines support parallel execution and can speed up existing algorithms considerably. In this paper, we evaluate several ways in which point-based algorithms can be adapted to parallel computing. We overview the challenges and opportunities and present experimental results, providing evidence to the usability of our suggestions. PMID:19914897

  12. Numerical study of droplet dynamics in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell gas channel using an embedded Eulerian-Lagrangian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarauta, Alex; Ryzhakov, Pavel; Secanell, Marc; Waghmare, Prashant R.; Pons-Prats, Jordi

    2016-08-01

    An embedded Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for the simulation of droplet dynamics within a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) channel is presented. Air is modeled using an Eulerian formulation, whereas water is described with a Lagrangian framework. Using this framework, the gas-liquid interface can be accurately identified. The surface tension force is computed using the curvature defined by the boundary of the Lagrangian mesh. The method naturally accounts for material property changes across the interface and accurately represents the pressure discontinuity. A sessile drop in a horizontal surface, a sessile drop in an inclined plane and droplets in a PEFC channel are solved for as numerical examples and compared to experimental data. Numerical results are in excellent agreement with experimental data. Numerical results are also compared to results obtained with the semi-analytical model previously developed by the authors in order to discuss the limitations of the semi-analytical approach.

  13. An implicit finite-difference algorithm for hyperbolic systems in conservation-law form. [application to Eulerian gasdynamic equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beam, R. M.; Warming, R. F.

    1976-01-01

    An implicit finite-difference scheme is developed for the efficient numerical solution of nonlinear hyperbolic systems in conservation-law form. The algorithm is second-order time-accurate, noniterative, and in a spatially factored form. Second- or fourth-order central and second-order one-sided spatial differencing are accommodated within the solution of a block tridiagonal system of equations. Significant conceptual and computational simplifications are made for systems whose flux vectors are homogeneous functions (of degree one), e.g., the Eulerian gasdynamic equations. Conservative hybrid schemes, which switch from central to one-sided spatial differencing whenever the local characteristic speeds are of the same sign, are constructed to improve the resolution of weak solutions. Numerical solutions are presented for a nonlinear scalar model equation and the two-dimensional Eulerian gasdynamic equations.

  14. Very Large Eddy Simulations of a Jet-A Spray Reacting Flow in a Single Element LDI Injector With and Without Invoking an Eulerian Scalar DWFDF Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the very large eddy simulations (VLES) of a Jet-A spray reacting flow in a single element lean direct injection (LDI) injector by using the National Combustion Code (NCC) with and without invoking the Eulerian scalar DWFDF method, in which DWFDF is defined as the density weighted time filtered fine grained probability density function. The flow field is calculated by using the time filtered compressible Navier-Stokes equations (TFNS) with nonlinear subscale turbulence models, and when the Eulerian scalar DWFDF method is invoked, the energy and species mass fractions are calculated by solving the equation of DWFDF. A nonlinear subscale model for closing the convection term of the Eulerian scalar DWFDF equation is used and will be briefly described in this paper. Detailed comparisons between the results and available experimental data are carried out. Some positive findings of invoking the Eulerian scalar DWFDF method in both improving the simulation quality and maintaining economic computing cost are observed.

  15. Advanced Sensitivity Analysis of the Danish Eulerian Model in Parallel and Grid Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostromsky, Tz.; Dimov, I.; Marinov, P.; Georgieva, R.; Zlatev, Z.

    2011-11-01

    A 3-stage sensitivity analysis approach, based on analysis of variances technique for calculating Sobol's global sensitivity indices and computationaly efficient Monte Carlo integration techniques is considered and applied to a large-scale air pollurion model, the Danish Eulerian Model. On the first stage it is necessary to carry out a set of computationally expensive numerical experiments and to extract the necessary sensitivity analysis data. The output is used to construct mesh-functions of ozone concentration ratios to be used in the next stages for evaluating the necessary variances. Here we use a specially adapted for the purpose version of the model, called SA-DEM. It has been successfully implemented and run on the most powerful parallel supercomputer in Bulgaria—IBM Blue Gene/P. A more advanced version, capable of using efficiently the full capacity of this powerful supercomputer, is described in this paper, followed by some performance analysis of the numerical experiments. Another source of computational power for solving such a tuff numerical problem is the computational grid. That is why another version of SA-DEM has been adapted to exploit efficiently the capacity of our Grid infrastructure. The numerical results from both the parallel and Grid implementation are presented, compared and analysed.

  16. A regularised one-dimensional drop formation and coalescence model on a single Eulerian grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driessen, Theo; Jeurissen, Roger; Wijshoff, Herman; van der Bos, Arjan; Snoeijer, Jacco; Lohse, Detlef

    2011-11-01

    Droplets with a well-controlled size and speed are required in many industrial and medical applications. In this work we study axisymmetric droplet formation from a piezo inkjet print head. The breakup of an axisymmetric viscous jet is considered in the lubrication approximation. The discretised equations are solved on a fixed equidistant one-dimensional Eulerian grid. The governing equations are implemented in a conservative second order accurate total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme, preventing the numerical diffusivity. Singularities that occur at pinchoff and coalescence are regularised by a small modification on the surface tension. The modification is of the order of the spatial step. This regularisation ensures that the solution of the presented numerical model converges to the exact solution of the breakup of a jet in the lubrication approximation. The results of the presented numerical model agree quantitatively with the analytical solution of the Rayleigh-Plateau instability, and with experimental results on the final stage of the Rayleigh-Plateau instability.

  17. A cyclostrophic transformed Eulerian zonal mean model for the middle atmosphere of slowly rotating planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, King-Fai; Yao, Kaixuan; Taketa, Cameron; Zhang, Xi; Liang, Mao-Chang; Jiang, Xun; Newman, Claire; Tung, Ka-Kit; Yung, Yuk L.

    2016-04-01

    With the advance of modern computers, studies of planetary atmospheres have heavily relied on general circulation models (GCMs). Because these GCMs are usually very complicated, the simulations are sometimes difficult to understand. Here we develop a semi-analytic zonally averaged, cyclostrophic residual Eulerian model to illustrate how some of the large-scale structures of the middle atmospheric circulation can be explained qualitatively in terms of simple thermal (e.g. solar heating) and mechanical (the Eliassen-Palm flux divergence) forcings. This model is a generalization of that for fast rotating planets such as the Earth, where geostrophy dominates (Andrews and McIntyre 1987). The solution to this semi-analytic model consists of a set of modified Hough functions of the generalized Laplace's tidal equation with the cyclostrohpic terms. As an example, we apply this model to Titan. We show that the seasonal variations of the temperature and the circulation of these slowly-rotating planets can be well reproduced by adjusting only three parameters in the model: the Brunt-Väisälä bouyancy frequency, the Newtonian radiative cooling rate, and the Rayleigh friction damping rate. We will also discuss an application of this model to study the meridional transport of photochemically produced tracers that can be observed by space instruments.

  18. Simulations of sooting turbulent jet flames using a hybrid flamelet/stochastic Eulerian field method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consalvi, Jean-Louis; Nmira, Fatiha; Burot, Daria

    2016-03-01

    The stochastic Eulerian field method is applied to simulate 12 turbulent C1-C3 hydrocarbon jet diffusion flames covering a wide range of Reynolds numbers and fuel sooting propensities. The joint scalar probability density function (PDF) is a function of the mixture fraction, enthalpy defect, scalar dissipation rate and representative soot properties. Soot production is modelled by a semi-empirical acetylene/benzene-based soot model. Spectral gas and soot radiation is modelled using a wide-band correlated-k model. Emission turbulent radiation interactions (TRIs) are taken into account by means of the PDF method, whereas absorption TRIs are modelled using the optically thin fluctuation approximation. Model predictions are found to be in reasonable agreement with experimental data in terms of flame structure, soot quantities and radiative loss. Mean soot volume fractions are predicted within a factor of two of the experiments whereas radiant fractions and peaks of wall radiative fluxes are within 20%. The study also aims to assess approximate radiative models, namely the optically thin approximation (OTA) and grey medium approximation. These approximations affect significantly the radiative loss and should be avoided if accurate predictions of the radiative flux are desired. At atmospheric pressure, the relative errors that they produced on the peaks of temperature and soot volume fraction are within both experimental and model uncertainties. However, these discrepancies are found to increase with pressure, suggesting that spectral models describing properly the self-absorption should be considered at over-atmospheric pressure.

  19. A point-centered arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian hydrodynamic approach for tetrahedral meshes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Morgan, Nathaniel R.; Waltz, Jacob I.; Burton, Donald E.; Charest, Marc R.; Canfield, Thomas R.; Wohlbier, John G.

    2015-02-24

    We present a three dimensional (3D) arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamic scheme suitable for modeling complex compressible flows on tetrahedral meshes. The new approach stores the conserved variables (mass, momentum, and total energy) at the nodes of the mesh and solves the conservation equations on a control volume surrounding the point. This type of an approach is termed a point-centered hydrodynamic (PCH) method. The conservation equations are discretized using an edge-based finite element (FE) approach with linear basis functions. All fluxes in the new approach are calculated at the center of each tetrahedron. A multidirectional Riemann-like problem is solved atmore » the center of the tetrahedron. The advective fluxes are calculated by solving a 1D Riemann problem on each face of the nodal control volume. A 2-stage Runge–Kutta method is used to evolve the solution forward in time, where the advective fluxes are part of the temporal integration. The mesh velocity is smoothed by solving a Laplacian equation. The details of the new ALE hydrodynamic scheme are discussed. Results from a range of numerical test problems are presented.« less

  20. Unit physics testing of a mix model in an eulerian fluid computation

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, Erik; Douglass, Rod

    2010-01-01

    A K-L turbulence mix model driven with a drag-buoyancy source term is tested in an Eulerian code in a series of basic unit-physics tests, as part of a mix validation milestone. The model and the closure coefficient values are derived in the work of Dimonte-Tipton [D-T] in Phys.Flu.18, 085101 (2006), and many of the test problems were reported there, where the mix model operated in Lagrange computations. The drag-buoyancy K-L mix model was implemented within the Eulerian code framework by A.J. Scannapieco. Mix model performance is evaluated in terms of mix width growth rates compared to experiments in select regimes. Results in our Eulerian code are presented for several unit-physics I-D test problems including the decay of homogeneous isotropic turbulence (HIT), Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable mixing, shock amplification of initial turbulence, Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) mixing in several single shock test cases and in comparison to two RM experiments including re-shock (Vetter-Sturtevant and Poggi, et.al.). Sensitivity to model parameters, to Atwood number, and to initial conditions are examined. Results here are in good agreement in some tests (HIT, RT) with the previous results reported for the mix model in the Lagrange calculations. The HIT turbulent decay agrees closely with analytic expectations, and the RT growth rate matches experimental values for the default values of the model coefficients proposed in [D-T]. Results for RM characterized with a power law growth rate differ from the previous mix model work but are still within the range for reasonable agreement with experiments. Sensitivity to IC values in the RM studies are examined; results are sensitive to initial values of L[t=O], which largely determines the RM mix layer growth rate, and generally differs from the IC values used in the RT studies. Result sensitivity to initial turbulence, K[t=O], is seen to be small but significant above a threshold value. Initial conditions can be adjusted so that single

  1. Eulerian and Lagrangian methods for vortex tracking in 2D and 3D flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yangzi; Green, Melissa

    2014-11-01

    Coherent structures are a key component of unsteady flows in shear layers. Improvement of experimental techniques has led to larger amounts of data and requires of automated procedures for vortex tracking. Many vortex criteria are Eulerian, and identify the structures by an instantaneous local swirling motion in the field, which are indicated by closed or spiral streamlines or pathlines in a reference frame. Alternatively, a Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) analysis is a Lagrangian method based on the quantities calculated along fluid particle trajectories. In the current work, vortex detection is demonstrated on data from the simulation of two cases: a 2D flow with a flat plate undergoing a 45 ° pitch-up maneuver and a 3D wall-bounded turbulence channel flow. Vortices are visualized and tracked by their centers and boundaries using Γ1, the Q criterion, and LCS saddle points. In the cases of 2D flow, saddle points trace showed a rapid acceleration of the structure which indicates the shedding from the plate. For channel flow, saddle points trace shows that average structure convection speed exhibits a similar trend as a function of wall-normal distance as the mean velocity profile, and leads to statistical quantities of vortex dynamics. Dr. Jeff Eldredge and his research group at UCLA are gratefully acknowledged for sharing the database of simulation for the current research. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under AFOSR Award No. FA9550-14-1-0210.

  2. Relativistic Eulerian Vlasov simulations of the amplification of seed pulses by Brillouin backscattering in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shoucri, M.; Matte, J.-P.; Vidal, F.

    2015-05-15

    We apply an Eulerian Vlasov code to study the amplification by Brillouin scattering of a short seed laser pulse by a long pump laser pulse in an underdense plasma. The stimulated Brillouin backscattering interaction is the coupling of the pump and seed electromagnetic waves propagating in opposite directions, and the ion plasma wave. The code solves the one-dimensional relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell set of equations. Large amplitude ion waves are generated. In the simulations we present, the density plateau of the plasma is n{sub e}=0.3 n{sub c} (n{sub c} is the critical density), which excludes spurious stimulated Raman scattering amplification (which can occur only if n{sub e}

  3. Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian simulations of stationary and non-stationary metal forming processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boman, R.; Ponthot, J.-P.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate modelling of sheet metal forming processes, such as cold roll forming, by the finite element method using the classical Lagrangian formulation usually requires a very large mesh leading to huge CPU times. In order to model industrial roll forming lines including many tools in a reasonable time, the sheet has to be shortened or the element size has to be increased leading to inaccurate results. An alternative method is given by the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formalism which consists in decoupling the motion of the material and the mesh, the nodes of which are fixed in the rolling direction but are free to move on perpendicular plane, following the geometrical boundary of the sheet. The whole forming line can then be modelled using a limited number of brick and contact elements because the mesh is only refined near the tools where bending and contact occur. In this paper, ALE results are compared to previous Lagrangian simulations and experimental measurement on a U-channel, including springback. Advantages of the ALE method are finally demonstrated by the simulation of a tubular rocker panel on a 16-stands forming mill.

  4. A point-centered arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian hydrodynamic approach for tetrahedral meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Nathaniel R.; Waltz, Jacob I.; Burton, Donald E.; Charest, Marc R.; Canfield, Thomas R.; Wohlbier, John G.

    2015-02-24

    We present a three dimensional (3D) arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamic scheme suitable for modeling complex compressible flows on tetrahedral meshes. The new approach stores the conserved variables (mass, momentum, and total energy) at the nodes of the mesh and solves the conservation equations on a control volume surrounding the point. This type of an approach is termed a point-centered hydrodynamic (PCH) method. The conservation equations are discretized using an edge-based finite element (FE) approach with linear basis functions. All fluxes in the new approach are calculated at the center of each tetrahedron. A multidirectional Riemann-like problem is solved at the center of the tetrahedron. The advective fluxes are calculated by solving a 1D Riemann problem on each face of the nodal control volume. A 2-stage Runge–Kutta method is used to evolve the solution forward in time, where the advective fluxes are part of the temporal integration. The mesh velocity is smoothed by solving a Laplacian equation. The details of the new ALE hydrodynamic scheme are discussed. Results from a range of numerical test problems are presented.

  5. A combined Eulerian-Lagrangian two-phase analysis of the SSME HPOTP nozzle plug trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Robert; Mcconnaughey, P. K.; Dejong, F. J.; Sabnis, J. S.; Pribik, D.

    1989-01-01

    As a result of high cycle fatigue, hydrogen embrittlement, and extended engine use, it was observed in testing that the trailing edge on the first stage nozzle plug in the High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump (HPOTP) could detach. The objective was to predict the trajectories followed by particles exiting the turbine. Experiments had shown that the heat exchanger soils, which lie downstream of the turbine, would be ruptured by particles traveling in the order of 360 ft/sec. An axisymmetric solution of the flow was obtained from the work of Lin et. al., who used INS3D to obtain the solution. The particle trajectories were obtained using the method of de Jong et. al., which employs Lagrangian tracking of the particle through the Eulerian flow field. The collision parameters were obtained from experiments conducted by Rocketdyne using problem specific alloys, speeds, and projectile geometries. A complete 3-D analysis using the most likely collision parameters shows maximum particle velocities of 200 ft/sec. in the heat exchanger region. Subsequent to this analysis, an engine level test was conducted in which seven particles passed through the turbine but no damage was observed on the heat exchanger coils.

  6. Numerical flow Simulation around a flat plate during heavy rainfall using Lagrangian Eulerian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhir, Gaurav; Suman, Sawan

    2015-11-01

    Experimental evidence shows that aircrafts operating under heavy rainfall conditions face deterioration of lift and increase in drag. This scenario can be a critical design challenge especially for slow moving vehicles such as airships. Effective roughening of airfoil surface caused by an uneven water film, loss of flow momentum and the loss of vehicle momentum due to its collision with the raindrops are the primary reasons causing the drag to increase. Our work focuses primarily on the numerical quantification of boundary layer momentum loss caused due to raindrops. The collision of raindrops with a solid surface leads to formation of an ejecta fog of splashed back droplets with their sizes being of the order of micrometers and their acceleration leads to boundary layer momentum loss. We model the airflow within a flat plate boundary layer using a Lagrangian-Eulerian approach with the raindrops being considered as non-deformable, non-spinning and non-interacting droplets. We employ an inter-phase coupling term to account for the interaction between the boundary layer flow and the droplets. Our presentation will focus on several comparisons (velocity field, lift and drag at various angles of attack) with the results of the standard (rain-free) Prandtl boundary layer flow. Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi.

  7. Eulerian methods for the description of soot: mathematical modeling and numerical scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. T.; Wick, A.; Laurent, F.; Fox, R.; Pitsch, H.

    2014-11-01

    A development and comparison between numerical methods for soot modeling derived from the population balance equations (PBE) is presented. The soot mechanism includes nucleation, surface growth, oxidation, aggregation and breakage (Mueller et al., Proceed. Combust. Inst., 2009, 2011). For comparison, data from the ethylene premixed flame of Xu et al. (Combust. Flame 108, 1997) over a range of equivalence ratios are used. Two types of methods are introduced. The first is a moment method in which the closure is obtained through a reconstruction of the number density function (NDF). In particular, the NDF can be approximated by a sum of Gamma distribution functions (Yuan et al., J. Aero. Sci. 51, 2012). The second is Eulerian multi-fluid (MF), which is a size discretization method (Laurent et al., Combust. Theory Modelling 5, 2001) considering one or two moments per section. The case of one moment per section is also known as a sectional method. The accuracy of MF methods depends on the number of sections. Eventually, an extension of these two methods considering the surface area as a function of volume is taken into account to describe more precisely the geometry of soot particles. The solutions from these methods are compared with solutions from Monte Carlo method.

  8. Parallel octree-based hexahedral mesh generation for eulerian to lagrangian conversion.

    SciTech Connect

    Staten, Matthew L.; Owen, Steven James

    2010-09-01

    Computational simulation must often be performed on domains where materials are represented as scalar quantities or volume fractions at cell centers of an octree-based grid. Common examples include bio-medical, geotechnical or shock physics calculations where interface boundaries are represented only as discrete statistical approximations. In this work, we introduce new methods for generating Lagrangian computational meshes from Eulerian-based data. We focus specifically on shock physics problems that are relevant to ASC codes such as CTH and Alegra. New procedures for generating all-hexahedral finite element meshes from volume fraction data are introduced. A new primal-contouring approach is introduced for defining a geometric domain. New methods for refinement, node smoothing, resolving non-manifold conditions and defining geometry are also introduced as well as an extension of the algorithm to handle tetrahedral meshes. We also describe new scalable MPI-based implementations of these procedures. We describe a new software module, Sculptor, which has been developed for use as an embedded component of CTH. We also describe its interface and its use within the mesh generation code, CUBIT. Several examples are shown to illustrate the capabilities of Sculptor.

  9. Flow-driven cloud formation and fragmentation: results from Eulerian and Lagrangian simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitsch, Fabian; Naab, Thorsten; Walch, Stefanie

    2011-07-01

    The fragmentation of shocked flows in a thermally bistable medium provides a natural mechanism to form turbulent cold clouds as precursors to molecular clouds. Yet because of the large density and temperature differences and the range of dynamical scales involved, following this process with numerical simulations is challenging. We compare two-dimensional simulations of flow-driven cloud formation without self-gravity, using the Lagrangian smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code VINE and the Eulerian grid code PROTEUS. Results are qualitatively similar for both methods, yet the variable spatial resolution of the SPH method leads to smaller fragments and thinner filaments, rendering the overall morphologies different. Thermal and hydrodynamical instabilities lead to rapid cooling and fragmentation into cold clumps with temperatures below 300 K. For clumps more massive than 1 M⊙ pc-1, the clump mass function has an average slope of -0.8. The internal velocity dispersion of the clumps is nearly an order of magnitude smaller than their relative motion, rendering it subsonic with respect to the internal sound speed of the clumps but supersonic as seen by an external observer. For the SPH simulations most of the cold gas resides at temperatures below 100 K, while the grid-based models show an additional, substantial component between 100 and 300 K. Independent of the numerical method, our models confirm that converging flows of warm neutral gas fragment rapidly and form high-density, low-temperature clumps as possible seeds for star formation.

  10. Validation of an Eulerian population model for the marine copepod Calanus finmarchicus in the Norwegian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alver, Morten Omholt; Broch, Ole Jacob; Melle, Webjørn; Bagøien, Espen; Slagstad, Dag

    2016-08-01

    Calanus finmarchicus is an important zooplankton species in the Norwegian Sea, as a dominant food organism for pelagic fish larvae, and a potentially large source of marine lipids and proteins. Its position in the marine food web also makes it an important model species in assessing the risk posed by oil spills in the Norwegian and Arctic Seas. In this study, an Eulerian population model for C.finmarchicus, coupled to the physical and ecological model SINMOD, is presented. The model includes the full life cycle of C. finmarchicus with a representation of all developmental stages. The model has been validated against field measurements made in different areas of the Norwegian Sea in 1997 and 1998. The model displays geographical and temporal distributions of development stages that is in line with observed patterns. When comparing time series for selected regions, we see a high degree of variability both in the field samples and model output. On average, the model deviations are near half of the summed variability of the field data and model estimates. The model has applications within assessment of ecological production, and the potential for harvesting in the Norwegian and Arctic Seas, but in combination with other models, also for the assessment of ecological effects of oil spills and other types of pollution.

  11. Implementation of the TEPLA Damage Model in a 3D Eulerian Hydrocode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holian, Kathleen S.; Clancy, Sean P.; Maudlin, Paul J.

    2007-06-01

    A sophisticated damage model (TEPLA) has been implemented into a three-dimensional (Cartesian) computer code (Pagosa) used here at Los Alamos National Laboratory. TEPLA was originally an isotropic damage model based upon the Gurson flow surface (a potential function used in conjunction with the associated flow law) that models damage due to both porosity growth and plastic strain. It has since been modified to model anisotropic elastoplastic material strength as well. Pagosa is an Eulerian hydrodynamics code that has the following special features: a predictor-corrector Lagrangian step that advances the state variables in time, a high-order advection algorithm that remaps the problem back to the original mesh every time step, and a material interface tracking scheme with van Leer monotonic advection. It also includes a variety of equation of state, strength, fracture, and high explosive burn models. We will describe the physics of the TEPLA model (that models both strength and damage) and will show preliminary results of test problems that are used to validate the model. The four test problems (simple shear, stretching rod, Taylor anvil, and plate impact) can be compared with either analytic solutions or with experimental data.

  12. Coupled Plasticity and Damage Modeling and Their Applications in a Three-Dimensional Eulerian Hydrocode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkett, Michael W.; Clancy, Sean P.; Maudlin, Paul J.; Holian, Kathleen S.

    2004-07-01

    Previously developed constitutive models and solution algorithms for continuum-level anisotropic elastoplastic material strength and an isotropic damage model TEPLA have been implemented in the three-dimensional Eulerian hydrodynamics code known as CONEJO. The anisotropic constitutive modeling is posed in an unrotated material frame of reference using the theorem of polar decomposition to compute rigid-body rotation. TEPLA is based upon the Gurson flow surface (a potential function used in conjunction with the associated flow law). The original TEPLA equation set has been extended to include anisotropic elastoplasticity and has been recast into a new implicit solution algorithm based upon an eigenvalue scheme to accommodate the anisotropy. This algorithm solves a two-by-two system of nonlinear equations using a Newton-Raphson iteration scheme. Simulations of a shaped-charge jet formation, a Taylor cylinder impact, and an explosively loaded hemishell were selected to demonstrate the utility of this modeling capability. The predicted deformation topology, plastic strain, and porosity distributions are shown for the three simulations.

  13. Modeling Anisotropic Plasticity: 3D Eulerian Hydrocode Simulations of High Strain Rate Deformation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkett, Michael; Clancy, Sean; Maudlin, Paul; Holian, Kathleen

    2001-06-01

    : Previously developed constitutive models and solution algorithms for anisotropic elastoplastic material strength has been implemented in the three-dimensional CONEJO hydrodynamics code. CONEJO is an explicit, Eulerian continuum mechanics code that is utilized to predict formation processes associated with material deformation at elevated strain-rates and is a code development project under the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) program. Some special features of CONEJO include a high-order advection algorithm, a material interface tracking scheme, and van Leer monotonic advection-limiting. The anisotropic constitutive modeling is posed in an unrotated material frame using the theorem of polar decomposition to describe rigid body rotation. An Euler-Rodrigues description is used to quantify the rigid body rotations. Continuous quadratic yield functions fitted from polycrystal simulations for a metallic hexagonal-close-packed structure were utilized. Associative flow formulations incorporating these yield functions were solved using a geometric normal return method. Simple rectangular shear problems, "R-value" problems, and Taylor cylinder impact test data were utilized to verify and validate the implementation of the anisotropic model. A "stretching rod" problem (involving large strain and strain-rate deformation) was selected to investigate the effects of material anisotropy for this deformation process. The rod necking rate and topology was compared for CONEJO simulations using several isotropic and anisotropic descriptions that utilized the Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS) model.

  14. Efficient simulation of pitch angle collisions in a 2+2-D Eulerian Vlasov code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Jeff; Berger, R.; Brunner, S.; Tran, T.

    2014-10-01

    Here we discuss pitch angle scattering collisions in the context of the Eulerian-based kinetic code LOKI that evolves the Vlasov-Poisson system in 2+2-dimensional phase space. The collision operator is discretized using 4th order accurate conservative finite-differencing. The treatment of the Vlasov operator in phase-space uses an approach based on a minimally diffuse, fourth-order-accurate discretization (Banks and Hittinger, IEEE T. Plasma Sci. 39, 2198). The overall scheme is therefore discretely conservative and controls unphysical oscillations. Some details of the numerical scheme will be presented, and the implementation on modern highly concurrent parallel computers will be discussed. We will present results of collisional effects on linear and non-linear Landau damping of electron plasma waves (EPWs). In addition we will present initial results showing the effect of collisions on the evolution of EPWs in two space dimensions. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and funded by the LDRD program at LLNL under project tracking code 12-ERD-061.

  15. Rain scavenging of tritiated water vapour: a numerical Eulerian stationary model.

    PubMed

    Atanassov, D; Galeriu, D

    2011-01-01

    The tradition in tritium washout modeling is to unite the washout model with a Gaussian plume model describing dispersion of tritium vapour in the atmosphere. In the present study, an alternative approach is proposed. A numerical Eulerian model that describes washout independently of dispersion is developed. The sensitivity analysis to model parameters has shown that the washout process is influenced most significantly by rainfall parameters and air temperature: different raindrop size distributions cause differences of up to about 70% in the washout outputs; a change of 15°C in the air temperature causes an effect of about 50%. Results are presented showing calculated values of washout outputs (tritium concentration in rain, tritium downward flux, washout coefficient) for different tritium vapour profiles, rainfall rates and air temperatures. The general conclusion is that the washout process is too complex to be described comprehensively by the simple washout coefficient concept. We suggest the approach proposed here for directly calculating the tritium downward flux and concentration in the rainwater is preferable. PMID:20934237

  16. A subcell remapping method on staggered polygonal grids for arbitrary-Lagrangian Eulerian methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loubère, Raphaël; Shashkov, Mikhail J.

    2005-10-01

    We describe a new remapping algorithm for use in arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) simulations. The new features of this remapper are designed to complement a staggered-mesh Lagrangian phase in which the cells may be general polygons (in two dimensions), and which uses subcell discretizations to control unphysical mesh distortion and hourglassing. Our new remapping algorithm consists of three stages. A gathering stage, in which we interpolate momentum, internal energy, and kinetic energy to the subcells in a conservative way. A subcell remapping stage, in which we conservatively remap mass, momentum, internal, and kinetic energy from the subcells of the Lagrangian mesh to the subcells of the new rezoned mesh. A scattering stage, in which we conservatively recover the primary variables: subcell density, nodal velocity, and cell-centered specific internal energy on the new rezoned mesh. We prove that our new remapping algorithm is conservative, reversible, and satisfies the DeBar consistency condition. We also demonstrate computationally that our new remapping method is robust and accurate for a series of test problems in one and two dimensions.

  17. Multiply scaled constrained nonlinear equation solvers. [for nonlinear heat conduction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, Joe; Krishna, Lala

    1986-01-01

    To improve the numerical stability of nonlinear equation solvers, a partitioned multiply scaled constraint scheme is developed. This scheme enables hierarchical levels of control for nonlinear equation solvers. To complement the procedure, partitioned convergence checks are established along with self-adaptive partitioning schemes. Overall, such procedures greatly enhance the numerical stability of the original solvers. To demonstrate and motivate the development of the scheme, the problem of nonlinear heat conduction is considered. In this context the main emphasis is given to successive substitution-type schemes. To verify the improved numerical characteristics associated with partitioned multiply scaled solvers, results are presented for several benchmark examples.

  18. A GPU-accelerated flow solver for incompressible two-phase fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codyer, Stephen; Raessi, Mehdi; Khanna, Gaurav

    2011-11-01

    We present a numerical solver for incompressible, immiscible, two-phase fluid flows that is accelerated by using Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). The Navier-Stokes equations are solved by the projection method, which involves solving a pressure Poisson problem at each time step. A second-order discretization of the Poisson problem leads to a sparse matrix with five and seven diagonals for two- and three-dimensional simulations, respectively. Running a serial linear algebra solver on a single CPU can take 50-99.9% of the total simulation time to solve the above system for pressure. To remove this bottleneck, we utilized the large parallelization capabilities of GPUs; we developed a linear algebra solver based on the conjugate gradient iterative method (CGIM) by using CUDA 4.0 libraries and compared its performance with CUSP, an open-source, GPU library for linear algebra. Compared to running the CGIM solver on a single CPU core, for a 2D case, our GPU solver yields speedups of up to 88x in solver time and 81x overall time on a single GPU card. In 3D cases, the speedups are up to 81x (solver) and 15x (overall). Speedup is faster at higher grid resolutions and our GPU solver outperforms CUSP. Current work examines the acceleration versus a parallel CGIM CPU solver.

  19. A Riemann solver for single-phase and two-phase shallow flow models based on relaxation. Relations with Roe and VFRoe solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelanti, Marica; Bouchut, François; Mangeney, Anne

    2011-02-01

    We present a Riemann solver derived by a relaxation technique for classical single-phase shallow flow equations and for a two-phase shallow flow model describing a mixture of solid granular material and fluid. Our primary interest is the numerical approximation of this two-phase solid/fluid model, whose complexity poses numerical difficulties that cannot be efficiently addressed by existing solvers. In particular, we are concerned with ensuring a robust treatment of dry bed states. The relaxation system used by the proposed solver is formulated by introducing auxiliary variables that replace the momenta in the spatial gradients of the original model systems. The resulting relaxation solver is related to Roe solver in that its Riemann solution for the flow height and relaxation variables is formally computed as Roe's Riemann solution. The relaxation solver has the advantage of a certain degree of freedom in the specification of the wave structure through the choice of the relaxation parameters. This flexibility can be exploited to handle robustly vacuum states, which is a well known difficulty of standard Roe's method, while maintaining Roe's low diffusivity. For the single-phase model positivity of flow height is rigorously preserved. For the two-phase model positivity of volume fractions in general is not ensured, and a suitable restriction on the CFL number might be needed. Nonetheless, numerical experiments suggest that the proposed two-phase flow solver efficiently models wet/dry fronts and vacuum formation for a large range of flow conditions. As a corollary of our study, we show that for single-phase shallow flow equations the relaxation solver is formally equivalent to the VFRoe solver with conservative variables of Gallouët and Masella [T. Gallouët, J.-M. Masella, Un schéma de Godunov approché C.R. Acad. Sci. Paris, Série I, 323 (1996) 77-84]. The relaxation interpretation allows establishing positivity conditions for this VFRoe method.

  20. ICECO-CEL: a coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian code for analyzing primary system response in fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.

    1981-02-01

    This report describes a coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian code, ICECO-CEL, for analyzing the response of the primary system during hypothetical core disruptive accidents. The implicit Eulerian method is used to calculate the fluid motion so that large fluid distortion, two-dimensional sliding interface, flow around corners, flow through coolant passageways, and out-flow boundary conditions can be treated. The explicit Lagrangian formulation is employed to compute the response of the containment vessel and other elastic-plastic solids inside the reactor containment. Large displacements, as well as geometrical and material nonlinearities are considered in the analysis. Marker particles are utilized to define the free surface or the material interface and to visualize the fluid motion. The basic equations and numerical techniques used in the Eulerian hydrodynamics and Lagrangian structural dynamics are described. Treatment of the above-core hydrodynamics, sodium spillage, fluid cavitation, free-surface boundary conditions and heat transfer are also presented. Examples are given to illustrate the capabilities of the computer code. Comparisons of the code predictions with available experimental data are also made.

  1. Long-term simulation of large deformation, mechano-chemical fluid-structure interactions in ALE and fully Eulerian coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, S.; Richter, T.; Wick, T.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we develop numerical schemes for mechano-chemical fluid-structure interactions with long-term effects. We investigate a model of a growing solid interacting with an incompressible fluid. A typical example for such a situation is the formation and growth of plaque in blood vessels. This application includes two particular difficulties: First, growth may lead to very large deformations, up to full clogging of the fluid domain. We derive a simplified set of equations including a fluid-structure interaction system coupled to an ODE model for plaque growth in Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) coordinates and in Eulerian coordinates. The latter novel technique is capable of handling very large deformations up to contact. The second difficulty stems from the different time scales: while the dynamics of the fluid demand to resolve a scale of seconds, growth typically takes place in a range of months. We propose a temporal two-scale approach using local small-scale problems to compute an effective wall stress that will enter a long-scale problem. Our proposed techniques are substantiated with several numerical tests that include comparisons of the Eulerian and ALE approaches as well as convergence studies.

  2. Fast solver for systems of axisymmetric ring vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, James H.; Amos, Donald E.

    1992-03-01

    A method that is capable of efficient calculation of the axisymmetric flowfield produced by a large system of ring vortices is presented in this paper. The system of ring vortices can, in turn, be used to model body surfaces and wakes in incompressible unsteady axisymmetric flowfields. This method takes advantage of source-point and field-point series expansion, which enables one to make calculations for interactions between groups of vortices that are in well-separated spatial domains rather than having to consider interactions between every pair of vortices. A FORTRAN computer code, RSOLV, has been written to execute the fast solution technique. For 100 vortices in the field, there is virtually no CPU time savings with the fast solver. For 10,000 vortices in the flow, the fast solver obtains solutions in about 1-3 percent of the time required for the direct solution technique. Formulas for the self-induced velocity of discretized regions of the flowfield have been developed. Use of these formulas allows correct convection of discretized patches of vorticity in the flowfiled.

  3. An efficient chemical kinetics solver using high dimensional model representation

    SciTech Connect

    Shorter, J.A.; Ip, P.C.; Rabitz, H.A.

    1999-09-09

    A high dimensional model representation (HDMR) technique is introduced to capture the input-output behavior of chemical kinetic models. The HDMR expresses the output chemical species concentrations as a rapidly convergent hierarchical correlated function expansion in the input variables. In this paper, the input variables are taken as the species concentrations at time t{sub i} and the output is the concentrations at time t{sub i} + {delta}, where {delta} can be much larger than conventional integration time steps. A specially designed set of model runs is performed to determine the correlated functions making up the HDMR. The resultant HDMR can be used to (1) identify the key input variables acting independently or cooperatively on the output, and (2) create a high speed fully equivalent operational model (FEOM) serving to replace the original kinetic model and its differential equation solver. A demonstration of the HDMR technique is presented for stratospheric chemical kinetics. The FEOM proved to give accurate and stable chemical concentrations out to long times of many years. In addition, the FEOM was found to be orders of magnitude faster than a conventional stiff equation solver. This computational acceleration should have significance in many chemical kinetic applications.

  4. Using computer algebra and SMT solvers in algebraic biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda Osorio, Mateo

    2014-05-01

    Biologic processes are represented as Boolean networks, in a discrete time. The dynamics within these networks are approached with the help of SMT Solvers and the use of computer algebra. Software such as Maple and Z3 was used in this case. The number of stationary states for each network was calculated. The network studied here corresponds to the immune system under the effects of drastic mood changes. Mood is considered as a Boolean variable that affects the entire dynamics of the immune system, changing the Boolean satisfiability and the number of stationary states of the immune network. Results obtained show Z3's great potential as a SMT Solver. Some of these results were verified in Maple, even though it showed not to be as suitable for the problem approach. The solving code was constructed using Z3-Python and Z3-SMT-LiB. Results obtained are important in biology systems and are expected to help in the design of immune therapies. As a future line of research, more complex Boolean network representations of the immune system as well as the whole psychological apparatus are suggested.

  5. Matrix decomposition graphics processing unit solver for Poisson image editing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zhao; Wei, Li

    2012-10-01

    In recent years, gradient-domain methods have been widely discussed in the image processing field, including seamless cloning and image stitching. These algorithms are commonly carried out by solving a large sparse linear system: the Poisson equation. However, solving the Poisson equation is a computational and memory intensive task which makes it not suitable for real-time image editing. A new matrix decomposition graphics processing unit (GPU) solver (MDGS) is proposed to settle the problem. A matrix decomposition method is used to distribute the work among GPU threads, so that MDGS will take full advantage of the computing power of current GPUs. Additionally, MDGS is a hybrid solver (combines both the direct and iterative techniques) and has two-level architecture. These enable MDGS to generate identical solutions with those of the common Poisson methods and achieve high convergence rate in most cases. This approach is advantageous in terms of parallelizability, enabling real-time image processing, low memory-taken and extensive applications.

  6. Agglomeration Multigrid for an Unstructured-Grid Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal; Pandya, Mohagna J.

    2004-01-01

    An agglomeration multigrid scheme has been implemented into the sequential version of the NASA code USM3Dns, tetrahedral cell-centered finite volume Euler/Navier-Stokes flow solver. Efficiency and robustness of the multigrid-enhanced flow solver have been assessed for three configurations assuming an inviscid flow and one configuration assuming a viscous fully turbulent flow. The inviscid studies include a transonic flow over the ONERA M6 wing and a generic business jet with flow-through nacelles and a low subsonic flow over a high-lift trapezoidal wing. The viscous case includes a fully turbulent flow over the RAE 2822 rectangular wing. The multigrid solutions converged with 12%-33% of the Central Processing Unit (CPU) time required by the solutions obtained without multigrid. For all of the inviscid cases, multigrid in conjunction with an explicit time-stepping scheme performed the best with regard to the run time memory and CPU time requirements. However, for the viscous case multigrid had to be used with an implicit backward Euler time-stepping scheme that increased the run time memory requirement by 22% as compared to the run made without multigrid.

  7. Adaptively truncated Hilbert spaces for Hamiltonian-based impurity solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Go, Ara; Millis, Andrew

    We investigate truncations of the exponentially large Hilbert space in the exact diagonalization (ED) as an impurity solver for the dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). A key issue is to maintain the high degree of numerical accuracy required in the construction of Greens functions. We test various truncation schemes with similar number of Slater determinants in both Hilbert spaces for the ground state and a particle- or a hole-excited state, and show that the excited states play an important role in accurate computation as well as the ground state. Appropriate truncation for both spaces enables us to compute the accurate self-energy of the impurity Hamiltonian with up to eight correlated orbitals hybridized with a sufficient number of bath orbitals to obtain converged solutions of the self-consistent equation in the DMFT, which is not solvable by the original ED. Application to spin-orbit coupled multi-orbital models and the one-dimensional Hubbard model and comparison to results from exact diagonalization and the configuration interaction based impurity solvers demonstrate the power of the method. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy under Grants No. DE-FG02-04ER46169 and DE-SC0006613.

  8. Assessent of elliptic solvers for the pressure Poisson equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strodtbeck, J. P.; Polly, J. B.; McDonough, J. M.

    2008-11-01

    It is well known that as much as 80% of the total arithmetic needed for a solution of the incompressible Navier--Stokes equations can be expended for solving the pressure Poisson equation, and this has long been one of the prime motivations for study of elliptic solvers. In recent years various Krylov-subspace methods have begun to receive wide use because of their rapid convergence rates and automatic generation of iteration parameters. However, it is actually total floating-point arithmetic operations that must be of concern when selecting a solver for CFD, and not simply required number of iterations. In the present study we recast speed of convergence for typical CFD pressure Poisson problems in terms of CPU time spent on floating-point arithmetic and demonstrate that in many cases simple successive-overrelaxation (SOR) methods are as effective as some of the popular Krylov-subspace techniques such as BiCGStab(l) provided optimal SOR iteration parameters are employed; furthermore, SOR procedures require significantly less memory. We then describe some techniques for automatically predicting optimal SOR parameters.

  9. User documentation for PVODE, an ODE solver for parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Hindmarsh, A.C., LLNL

    1998-05-01

    PVODE is a general purpose ordinary differential equation (ODE) solver for stiff and nonstiff ODES It is based on CVODE [5] [6], which is written in ANSI- standard C PVODE uses MPI (Message-Passing Interface) [8] and a revised version of the vector module in CVODE to achieve parallelism and portability PVODE is intended for the SPMD (Single Program Multiple Data) environment with distributed memory, in which all vectors are identically distributed across processors In particular, the vector module is designed to help the user assign a contiguous segment of a given vector to each of the processors for parallel computation The idea is for each processor to solve a certain fixed subset of the ODES To better understand PVODE, we first need to understand CVODE and its historical background The ODE solver CVODE, which was written by Cohen and Hindmarsh, combines features of two earlier Fortran codes, VODE [l] and VODPK [3] Those two codes were written by Brown, Byrne, and Hindmarsh. Both use variable-coefficient multi-step integration methods, and address both stiff and nonstiff systems (Stiffness is defined as the presence of one or more very small damping time constants ) VODE uses direct linear algebraic techniques to solve the underlying banded or dense linear systems of equations in conjunction with a modified Newton method in the stiff ODE case On the other hand, VODPK uses a preconditioned Krylov iterative method [2] to solve the underlying linear system User-supplied preconditioners directly address the dominant source of stiffness Consequently, CVODE implements both the direct and iterative methods Currently, with regard to the nonlinear and linear system solution, PVODE has three method options available. functional iteration, Newton iteration with a diagonal approximate Jacobian, and Newton iteration with the iterative method SPGMR (Scaled Preconditioned Generalized Minimal Residual method) Both CVODE and PVODE are written in such a way that other linear

  10. Case studies of water supply in oceanic extratropical cyclones using an Eulerian-Lagrangian method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gongbo

    An Eulerian-Lagrangian method has been developed to study the transport of water supply to precipitation in a rainstorm. Water mass in an air parcel is not conservative so the trajectory of the air parcel cannot describe the complete motion of the moisture. This method represents a rainstorm, a limited area of heavy precipitation in a three-hour period in a model, with several thousands air parcels. The water contributing to the rainstorm's precipitation from these parcels is tracked backward to recover its transport and its source regions. Exchange of moisture among these parcel by diffusion, convection and stable precipitation is computed. Water from surface evaporation that is ingested into parcels in the planetary boundary layer is computed. The moisture exchange between these parcels and other portions of the atmosphere is excluded from consideration. Water supply of two oceanic extratropical cyclones has been simulated. Fields of wind velocity, moisture and moisture sources/sinks are provided on the Eulerian grid using the Limited Area Mesoscale Prediction System for 90s (Kreitzberg and Perkey 1976, Cohen 1994). Simulations are performed over a period of 24 hours for one cyclone and 36 hours for the other. Seven rainstorms are selected during the life cycles of the two cyclones to represent different developing stages and different precipitation systems. Results show that about 80% of the water supply for identified precipitation can be tracked back 24 hours for some rainstorms and 36 hours for others. Tests on water budget computations show other errors are negligible. Transport tracks are established between rainstorm precipitation and the water source regions. They are roughly categorized as anticyclonic, cyclonic, sharp- turnings and complex motion patterns associated with horizontal origins and initial altitudes. Comparison of these tracks with the warm conveyor belt (Browning 1971, Harrold 1973) and the cold conveyor belt (Carlson 1980) conceptual

  11. Hybrid N-order Lagrangian interpolation Eulerian-Lagrangian method for salinity calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan-cheng; Zhu, Shou-xian; Zhou, Lin; You, Xiao-bao; Zhang, Wen-jing

    2016-04-01

    The Eulerian-Lagrangian method (ELM) has been used by many ocean models as the solution of the advection equation, but the numerical error caused by interpolation imposes restriction on its accuracy. In the present study, hybrid N-order Lagrangian interpolation ELM (LiELM) is put forward in which the N-order Lagrangian interpolation is used at first, then the lower order Lagrangian interpolation is applied in the points where the interpolation results are abnormally higher or lower. The calculation results of a step-shaped salinity advection model are analyzed, which show that higher order ( N=3-8) LiELM can reduce the mean numerical error of salinity calculation, but the numerical oscillation error is still significant. Even number order LiELM makes larger numerical oscillation error than its adjacent odd number order LiELM. Hybrid N-order LiELM can remove numerical oscillation, and it significantly reduces the mean numerical error when N is even and the current is in fixed direction, while it makes less effect on mean numerical error when N is odd or the current direction changes periodically. Hybrid odd number order LiELM makes less mean numerical error than its adjacent even number order LiELM when the current is in the fixed direction, while the mean numerical error decreases as N increases when the current direction changes periodically, so odd number of N may be better for application. Among various types of Hybrid N-order LiELM, the scheme reducing N-order directly to 1st-order may be the optimal for synthetic selection of accuracy and computational efficiency.

  12. Eulerian and Lagrangian Measurements of Water Flow and Residence Time in a Fringing Coral Reef Embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storlazzi, C. D.; Messina, A. M.; Cheriton, O. M.; Biggs, T. W.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrodynamic processes on coral reefs are important for nutrient cycling, larval dispersal, temperature variability, and understanding the impacts of terrestrial sediment, nutrients, and contaminants from adjacent impaired watersheds on coral reef ecosystems. Our goal was to understand the spatial and temporal variability in flow velocities and the associated residence time of water in the fringing coral reef flat-lined embayment of Faga'alu, on the island of Tutuila in American Samoa. To accomplish this, data from three bottom-mounted acoustic current profilers and 102 individual Lagrangian ocean surface current drifter deployments (5 drifters x 21 deployments) were combined with meteorologic data and numerical wave model results. These data and model results, collected over nine days, made it possible to evaluate the relative contribution of tidal, wind, and wave forcing on the flow patterns. The high number of drifter deployments made it possible for the velocity data to be binned into 100 m x 100 m grid cells and the resulting residence times computed for the different sets of forcing conditions. Cumulative progressive vectors calculated from the acoustic current profilers closely matched the tracks from concurrently deployed surface current drifters, showing the applicability of this hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian measurement scheme to understand flow patterns in this geomorphically complex embayment. The bay-wide man current speeds (residence times) varied from 1-37 cm/s (2.78-0.08 hr), 1-36 cm/s (2.78-0.08 hr), and 5-64 cm/s (0.56-0.04 hr) under tidal, wind, and wave forcing, respectively; the highest speeds (shortest residence times) were measured on the outer reef flat closest to where waves were breaking on the reef crest and were slowest (longest) over the inner reef flat close to shore and deep in the embayment.

  13. SIMULATION OF GEOMATERIALS USING CONTINUUM DAMAGE MODELS ON AN EULERIAN GRID

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, I; Antoun, T H

    2004-09-17

    A new continuum model for directional tensile failure has been developed that can simulate weakening and void formation due to directional tensile failure. The model is developed within the context of a properly invariant nonlinear thermomechanical theory. A second order damage tensor is introduced which allows simulation of weakening to tension applied in one direction, without weakening to subsequent tension applied in perpendicular directions. This damage tensor can be advected using standard methods in computer codes. Porosity is used as an isotropic measure of volumetric void strain and its evolution is influenced by tensile failure. The rate of dissipation due to directional tensile failure takes a particularly simple form, which can be analyzed easily. Specifically, the model can be combined with general constitutive equations for porous compaction and dilation, as well as viscoplasticity. A robust non-iterative numerical scheme for integrating these evolution equations is proposed. This constitutive model has been implemented into an Eulerian shock wave code with adaptive mesh refinement. A comparison of experimental results and computational simulations of spherical wave propagation in Danby marble was made. The experiment consisted of a 2-cm-diameter explosive charge detonated in the center of a cylindrical rock sample. Radial particle velocity histories were recorded at several concentric locations in the sample. An extensively damaged region near the charge cavity and two networks of cracks were evident in the specimen after the test. The first network consists of radial cracks emanating form the cavity and extending about halfway through the specimen. The second network consists of circumferential cracks occurring in a relatively narrow band that extends from the outer boundary of the radially cracked region toward the free surface. The calculations indicated load-induced anisotropy such as was observed in the experiment.

  14. Observed sea ice thickness changes in the Beaufort Gyre through synthesis of Eulerian and Lagrangian data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, A. R.; Hutchings, J. K.; Haas, C.; Eicken, H.

    2014-12-01

    In-situ and satellite observations have shown significant reductions in the extent and thickness of Arctic sea ice, which are considered by many to be evidence of major cryospheric changes amplifying global climate change. Multiyear (MY) sea ice thinning and retreat of the oldest and thickest ice, will accelerate further ice loss. MY sea ice also represents the greatest impediment to navigation in the Arctic and greatest hazard to marine infrastructure. Recirculation of sea ice within the Beaufort Gyre is critical to the replenishment of MY ice lost from the Arctic through either melt or export. Here we analyze thickness changes of sea ice as it drifts in different regions of the Gyre. Using a combined Eulerian-Lagrangian approach we identify satellite-tracked buoys that made repeat overpasses within 30 km of four moored ice profiling sonars (IPSs), which comprise part of the Beaufort Gyre Exploration Program (BGEP). Using the IPS data, we derive ice draft distributions corresponding to each of these overpasses, which allows tracking of changes in the ice thickness in vicinity of each buoy. Changes in modal values of ice thickness during winter agree with simple models of thermodynamic growth.In the case of one buoy that made a total of four overpasses (see figure below), a dramatic shift in a secondary modal thickness during the summer of 2007 agrees well the magnitude of melt recorded by a nearby ice mass balance buoy (IMB). To extend the number of repeat passes, we generate pseudo-Langrangian ice drift tracks using daily gridded fields of satellite-derived ice velocity. This allows us to deploy "numerical buoys" every day anywhere in the Arctic. Using this approach we identify numerous cases where sea ice observed over one mooring persistently drifts over another. Such inter-mooring ice advection events allow us to examine how sea ice thickness distribution in the Beaufort Gyre is influenced by dynamic and thermodynamic processes processes.

  15. The Quasi-Eulerian Hydrophone: A New Approach for Ocean Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, H.; Dziak, R. P.; Fowler, M. J.; Hammond, S. R.; Meinig, C.

    2005-12-01

    For the last 10 years Oregon State University and NOAA/Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory have successfully operated and maintained autonomous hydrophone arrays to monitor low frequency acoustic energy of earthquakes and marine mammal calls in remote ocean areas where no historical record existed. These hydrophones are moored at mid-water depth and require a routine servicing cruise to retrieve the stored data. The system is robust, but it is not real-time and it takes up to a year before acoustic events can be identified from the raw acoustic data. As a result, we frequently miss opportunities to observe ocean acoustic events as they occur. A new type of autonomous hydrophone called a Quasi-Eulerian hydrophone (QUEphone) is under development at OSU/PMEL. This instrument allows near-real-time monitoring of a selected study area. It is a tether-free float with a built-in hydrophone monitoring system and a buoyancy controller. It is capable of repeat ascent/descent cycles in up to 2000 m of water. In contrast to the conventional Lagrangean float, the QUEphone float stays in the same area by maintaining negative buoyancy and remaining on the seafloor for most of its life span. While on the seafloor the QUEphone runs an intelligent event detection algorithm, and upon detection of a significant number of events will surface to transmit a small data file to shore. We have conducted brief test deployments of the QUEphone in both a fresh-water lake and marine waters off Oregon coast, and the results of these tests will be discussed and compared with other hydrophone data. Once fully developed the QUEphone is expected to provide near real-time analysis capability of earthquakes that affect seafloor hydrothermal vents and their associated ecosystems. Such fast reaction will allow for a rapid response to seismic events, enabling researchers to examine how changes in hydrothermal activity affect deep-ocean vent ecosystems.

  16. Geometric effects in microfluidics on heterogeneous cell stress using an Eulerian-Lagrangian approach.

    PubMed

    Warren, K M; Mpagazehe, J N; LeDuc, P R; Higgs, C F

    2016-02-01

    The response of individual cells at the micro-scale in cell mechanics is important in understanding how they are affected by changing environments. To control cell stresses, microfluidics can be implemented since there is tremendous control over the geometry of the devices. Designing microfluidic devices to induce and manipulate stress levels on biological cells can be aided by computational modeling approaches. Such approaches serve as an efficient precursor to fabricating various microfluidic geometries that induce predictable levels of stress on biological cells, based on their mechanical properties. Here, a three-dimensional, multiphase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling approach was implemented for soft biological materials. The computational model incorporates the physics of the particle dynamics, fluid dynamics and solid mechanics, which allows us to study how stresses affect the cells. By using an Eulerian-Lagrangian approach to treat the fluid domain as a continuum in the microfluidics, we are conducting studies of the cells' movement and the stresses applied to the cell. As a result of our studies, we were able to determine that a channel with periodically alternating columns of obstacles was capable of stressing cells at the highest rate, and that microfluidic systems can be engineered to impose heterogenous cell stresses through geometric configuring. We found that when using controlled geometries of the microfluidics channels with staggered obstructions, we could increase the maximum cell stress by nearly 200 times over cells flowing through microfluidic channels with no obstructions. Incorporating computational modeling in the design of microfluidic configurations for controllable cell stressing could help in the design of microfludic devices for stressing cells such as cell homogenizers. PMID:26753780

  17. A Eulerian nutrient to fish model of the Baltic Sea — A feasibility-study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, Hagen; Neumann, Thomas; Fennel, Wolfgang

    2013-09-01

    A nutrient-to-fish-model with an explicit two-way interaction between a biogeochemical model of the lower food web and a fish model component is presented for the example of the Baltic Sea, demonstrating the feasibility of a consistent coupling of the upper and lower parts of the food web in a Eulerian model system. In the Baltic Sea, the fish stock is dominated by two prey species (sprat and herring) and one predator (cod). The dynamics of the fish model is driven by size (mass-class) dependent predator-prey interactions while the interaction between the biogeochemical and Fish model component is established through feeding of prey fish on zooplankton and recycling of fish biomass to nutrients and detritus. The fish model component is coupled to an advanced three dimensional biogeochemical model (ERGOM, Neumann et al., 2002). A horizontally explicit representation of fish requires the implementation of fish behavior. As a first step, we propose an algorithm to stimulate fish migration by letting the fish follow the food. Moreover, fish species are guided to their respective spawning areas. Results of first three-dimensional simulations are presented with emphasis on the transport of matter by moving fish. The spawning areas of cod and sprat are in the deep basins, which are not well reached by advective transport. Hence the deposition of matter in these areas by spawning fish could play some role in the distribution of matter. The approach is not limited to applications for the Baltic and the model can be transferred also to other systems.

  18. A block iterative LU solver for weakly coupled linear systems. [in fluid dynamics equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, C. H.

    1977-01-01

    A hybrid technique, called the block iterative LU solver, is proposed for solving the linear equations resulting from a finite element numerical analysis of certain fluid dynamics problems where the equations are weakly coupled between distinct sets of variables. Either the block Jacobi iterative method or the block Gauss-Seidel iterative solver is combined with LU decomposition.

  19. T2CG1, a package of preconditioned conjugate gradient solvers for TOUGH2

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, G.; Pruess, K.; Antunez, E.

    1994-03-01

    Most of the computational work in the numerical simulation of fluid and heat flows in permeable media arises in the solution of large systems of linear equations. The simplest technique for solving such equations is by direct methods. However, because of large storage requirements and accumulation of roundoff errors, the application of direct solution techniques is limited, depending on matrix bandwidth, to systems of a few hundred to at most a few thousand simultaneous equations. T2CG1, a package of preconditioned conjugate gradient solvers, has been added to TOUGH2 to complement its direct solver and significantly increase the size of problems tractable on PCs. T2CG1 includes three different solvers: a Bi-Conjugate Gradient (BCG) solver, a Bi-Conjugate Gradient Squared (BCGS) solver, and a Generalized Minimum Residual (GMRES) solver. Results from six test problems with up to 30,000 equations show that T2CG1 (1) is significantly (and invariably) faster and requires far less memory than the MA28 direct solver, (2) it makes possible the solution of very large three-dimensional problems on PCs, and (3) that the BCGS solver is the fastest of the three in the tested problems. Sample problems are presented related to heat and fluid flow at Yucca Mountain and WIPP, environmental remediation by the Thermal Enhanced Vapor Extraction System, and geothermal resources.

  20. Integration of a Multigrid ODE solver into an open medical simulation framework.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xunlei; Yao, Jianhua; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Lee, Huai-Ping; Audette, Michel A

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present the implementation of a Multigrid ODE solver in SOFA framework. By combining the stability advantage of coarse meshes and the transient detail preserving virtue of fine meshes, Multigrid ODE solver computes more efficiently than classic ODE solvers based on a single level discretization. With the ever wider adoption of the SOFA framework in many surgical simulation projects, introducing this Multigrid ODE solver into SOFA's pool of ODE solvers shall benefit the entire community. This contribution potentially has broad ramifications in the surgical simulation research community, given that in a single-resolution system, a constitutively realistic interactive tissue response, which presupposes large elements, is in direct conflict with the need to represent clinically relevant critical tissues in the simulation, which are typically be comprised of small elements. PMID:23366578

  1. High-performance equation solvers and their impact on finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, Eugene L.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Davis, D. Dale, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The role of equation solvers in modern structural analysis software is described. Direct and iterative equation solvers which exploit vectorization on modern high-performance computer systems are described and compared. The direct solvers are two Cholesky factorization methods. The first method utilizes a novel variable-band data storage format to achieve very high computation rates and the second method uses a sparse data storage format designed to reduce the number of operations. The iterative solvers are preconditioned conjugate gradient methods. Two different preconditioners are included; the first uses a diagonal matrix storage scheme to achieve high computation rates and the second requires a sparse data storage scheme and converges to the solution in fewer iterations that the first. The impact of using all of the equation solvers in a common structural analysis software system is demonstrated by solving several representative structural analysis problems.

  2. A High-Order Direct Solver for Helmholtz Equations with Neumann Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xian-He; Zhuang, Yu

    1997-01-01

    In this study, a compact finite-difference discretization is first developed for Helmholtz equations on rectangular domains. Special treatments are then introduced for Neumann and Neumann-Dirichlet boundary conditions to achieve accuracy and separability. Finally, a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) based technique is used to yield a fast direct solver. Analytical and experimental results show this newly proposed solver is comparable to the conventional second-order elliptic solver when accuracy is not a primary concern, and is significantly faster than that of the conventional solver if a highly accurate solution is required. In addition, this newly proposed fourth order Helmholtz solver is parallel in nature. It is readily available for parallel and distributed computers. The compact scheme introduced in this study is likely extendible for sixth-order accurate algorithms and for more general elliptic equations.

  3. Diffusion of Zonal Variables Using Node-Centered Diffusion Solver

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T B

    2007-08-06

    Tom Kaiser [1] has done some preliminary work to use the node-centered diffusion solver (originally developed by T. Palmer [2]) in Kull for diffusion of zonal variables such as electron temperature. To avoid numerical diffusion, Tom used a scheme developed by Shestakov et al. [3] and found their scheme could, in the vicinity of steep gradients, decouple nearest-neighbor zonal sub-meshes leading to 'alternating-zone' (red-black mode) errors. Tom extended their scheme to couple the sub-meshes with appropriate chosen artificial diffusion and thereby solved the 'alternating-zone' problem. Because the choice of the artificial diffusion coefficient could be very delicate, it is desirable to use a scheme that does not require the artificial diffusion but still able to avoid both numerical diffusion and the 'alternating-zone' problem. In this document we present such a scheme.

  4. Accurate derivative evaluation for any Grad-Shafranov solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketson, L. F.; Cerfon, A. J.; Rachh, M.; Freidberg, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    We present a numerical scheme that can be combined with any fixed boundary finite element based Poisson or Grad-Shafranov solver to compute the first and second partial derivatives of the solution to these equations with the same order of convergence as the solution itself. At the heart of our scheme is an efficient and accurate computation of the Dirichlet to Neumann map through the evaluation of a singular volume integral and the solution to a Fredholm integral equation of the second kind. Our numerical method is particularly useful for magnetic confinement fusion simulations, since it allows the evaluation of quantities such as the magnetic field, the parallel current density and the magnetic curvature with much higher accuracy than has been previously feasible on the affordable coarse grids that are usually implemented.

  5. Perturbative forward solver software for small localized fluorophores in tissue

    PubMed Central

    Martelli, F.; Bianco, S. Del; Di Ninni, P.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a forward solver software for the time domain and the CW domain based on the Born approximation for simulating the effect of small localized fluorophores embedded in a non-fluorescent biological tissue is proposed. The fluorescence emission is treated with a mathematical model that describes the migration of photons from the source to the fluorophore and of emitted fluorescent photons from the fluorophore to the detector for all those geometries for which Green’s functions are available. Subroutines written in FORTRAN that can be used for calculating the fluorescent signal for the infinite medium and for the slab are provided with a linked file. With these subroutines, quantities such as reflectance, transmittance, and fluence rate can be calculated. PMID:22254165

  6. Perturbative forward solver software for small localized fluorophores in tissue.

    PubMed

    Martelli, F; Del Bianco, S; Di Ninni, P

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a forward solver software for the time domain and the CW domain based on the Born approximation for simulating the effect of small localized fluorophores embedded in a non-fluorescent biological tissue is proposed. The fluorescence emission is treated with a mathematical model that describes the migration of photons from the source to the fluorophore and of emitted fluorescent photons from the fluorophore to the detector for all those geometries for which Green's functions are available. Subroutines written in FORTRAN that can be used for calculating the fluorescent signal for the infinite medium and for the slab are provided with a linked file. With these subroutines, quantities such as reflectance, transmittance, and fluence rate can be calculated. PMID:22254165

  7. Periodic Density Functional Theory Solver using Multiresolution Analysis with MADNESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Robert; Thornton, William

    2011-03-01

    We describe the first implementation of the all-electron Kohn-Sham density functional periodic solver (DFT) using multi-wavelets and fast integral equations using MADNESS (multiresolution adaptive numerical environment for scientific simulation; http://code.google.com/p/m-a-d-n-e-s-s). The multiresolution nature of a multi-wavelet basis allows for fast computation with guaranteed precision. By reformulating the Kohn-Sham eigenvalue equation into the Lippmann-Schwinger equation, we can avoid using the derivative operator which allows better control of overall precision for the all-electron problem. Other highlights include the development of periodic integral operators with low-rank separation, an adaptable model potential for nuclear potential, and an implementation for Hartree Fock exchange. This work was supported by NSF project OCI-0904972 and made use of resources at the Center for Computational Sciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  8. Progress in developing Poisson-Boltzmann equation solvers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuan; Li, Lin; Petukh, Marharyta; Alexov, Emil

    2013-01-01

    This review outlines the recent progress made in developing more accurate and efficient solutions to model electrostatics in systems comprised of bio-macromolecules and nano-objects, the last one referring to objects that do not have biological function themselves but nowadays are frequently used in biophysical and medical approaches in conjunction with bio-macromolecules. The problem of modeling macromolecular electrostatics is reviewed from two different angles: as a mathematical task provided the specific definition of the system to be modeled and as a physical problem aiming to better capture the phenomena occurring in the real experiments. In addition, specific attention is paid to methods to extend the capabilities of the existing solvers to model large systems toward applications of calculations of the electrostatic potential and energies in molecular motors, mitochondria complex, photosynthetic machinery and systems involving large nano-objects. PMID:24199185

  9. Using parallel banded linear system solvers in generalized eigenvalue problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Hong; Moss, William F.

    1993-01-01

    Subspace iteration is a reliable and cost effective method for solving positive definite banded symmetric generalized eigenproblems, especially in the case of large scale problems. This paper discusses an algorithm that makes use of two parallel banded solvers in subspace iteration. A shift is introduced to decompose the banded linear systems into relatively independent subsystems and to accelerate the iterations. With this shift, an eigenproblem is mapped efficiently into the memories of a multiprocessor and a high speed-up is obtained for parallel implementations. An optimal shift is a shift that balances total computation and communication costs. Under certain conditions, we show how to estimate an optimal shift analytically using the decay rate for the inverse of a banded matrix, and how to improve this estimate. Computational results on iPSC/2 and iPSC/860 multiprocessors are presented.

  10. Progress in developing Poisson-Boltzmann equation solvers.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan; Li, Lin; Petukh, Marharyta; Alexov, Emil

    2013-03-01

    This review outlines the recent progress made in developing more accurate and efficient solutions to model electrostatics in systems comprised of bio-macromolecules and nano-objects, the last one referring to objects that do not have biological function themselves but nowadays are frequently used in biophysical and medical approaches in conjunction with bio-macromolecules. The problem of modeling macromolecular electrostatics is reviewed from two different angles: as a mathematical task provided the specific definition of the system to be modeled and as a physical problem aiming to better capture the phenomena occurring in the real experiments. In addition, specific attention is paid to methods to extend the capabilities of the existing solvers to model large systems toward applications of calculations of the electrostatic potential and energies in molecular motors, mitochondria complex, photosynthetic machinery and systems involving large nano-objects. PMID:24199185

  11. A fast elliptic solver for simply connected domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamgnia, E.; Sameh, A.

    1989-08-01

    We present a fast method for solving the Laplace, Poisson, and the Helmholtz equations on two-dimensional simply connected regions with smooth curved boundaries. The region is first mapped onto the unit disk, using a conformal transformation. The transformed equations are then solved on the unit disk, using mainly Rapid Elliptic Solvers (RES). The construction of the mapping itself gives rise to large linear systems of equations in whose solution RES play a major role. Our numerical experiments on the Alliant FX/8 and one CPU of the Cray X-MP/48 indicate that the scheme presented here is suitable for parallel and vector machines, respectively. Our scheme is efficient on any architecture which supports powerful fast Fourier transforms.

  12. AN ADAPTIVE PARTICLE-MESH GRAVITY SOLVER FOR ENZO

    SciTech Connect

    Passy, Jean-Claude; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-11-01

    We describe and implement an adaptive particle-mesh algorithm to solve the Poisson equation for grid-based hydrodynamics codes with nested grids. The algorithm is implemented and extensively tested within the astrophysical code Enzo against the multigrid solver available by default. We find that while both algorithms show similar accuracy for smooth mass distributions, the adaptive particle-mesh algorithm is more accurate for the case of point masses, and is generally less noisy. We also demonstrate that the two-body problem can be solved accurately in a configuration with nested grids. In addition, we discuss the effect of subcycling, and demonstrate that evolving all the levels with the same timestep yields even greater precision.

  13. Towards a fully automated eclipsing binary solver for Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingley, Brandon; Sadowski, Gilles; Siopis, Christos

    2009-02-01

    Gaia, an ESA cornerstone mission, will obtain of the order of 100 high-precision photometric observations and lower precision radial velocity measurements over five years for around a billion stars several hundred thousand of which will be eclipsing binaries. In order to extract the characteristics of these systems, a fully automated code must be available. During the process of this development, two tools that may be of use to the transit community have emerged: a very fast, simple, detached eclipsing binary simulator/solver based on a new approach and an interacting eclipsing binary simulator with most of the features of the Wilson-Devinney and Nightfall codes, but fully documented and written in easy-to-follow and highly portable Java. Currently undergoing development and testing, this code includes an intuitive graphical interface and an optimizer for the estimation of the physical parameters of the system.

  14. Extending the QUDA Library with the eigCG Solver

    SciTech Connect

    Strelchenko, Alexei; Stathopoulos, Andreas

    2014-12-12

    While the incremental eigCG algorithm [ 1 ] is included in many LQCD software packages, its realization on GPU micro-architectures was still missing. In this session we report our experi- ence of the eigCG implementation in the QUDA library. In particular, we will focus on how to employ the mixed precision technique to accelerate solutions of large sparse linear systems with multiple right-hand sides on GPUs. Although application of mixed precision techniques is a well-known optimization approach for linear solvers, its utilization for the eigenvector com- puting within eigCG requires special consideration. We will discuss implementation aspects of the mixed precision deflation and illustrate its numerical behavior on the example of the Wilson twisted mass fermion matrix inversions

  15. Polyurethanes: versatile materials and sustainable problem solvers for today's challenges.

    PubMed

    Engels, Hans-Wilhelm; Pirkl, Hans-Georg; Albers, Reinhard; Albach, Rolf W; Krause, Jens; Hoffmann, Andreas; Casselmann, Holger; Dormish, Jeff

    2013-09-01

    Polyurethanes are the only class of polymers that display thermoplastic, elastomeric, and thermoset behavior depending on their chemical and morphological makeup. In addition to compact polyurethanes, foamed variations in particular are very widespread, and they achieve their targeted properties at very low weights. The simple production of sandwich structures and material composites in a single processing step is a key advantage of polyurethane technology. The requirement of energy and resource efficiency increasingly demands lightweight structures. Polyurethanes can serve this requirement by acting as matrix materials or as flexible adhesives for composites. Polyurethanes are indispensable when it comes to high-quality decorative coatings or maintaining the value of numerous objects. They are extremely adaptable and sustainable problem solvers for today's challenges facing our society, all of which impose special demands on materials. PMID:23893938

  16. A Navier-Stokes solver for turbomachinery applications

    SciTech Connect

    Arnone, A.; Swanson, R.C. )

    1993-04-01

    A computer code for solving the Reynolds-averaged full Navier-Stokes equations has been developed and applied using H- and C-type grids. The Baldwin-Lomax eddy-viscosity model is used for turbulence closure. The integration in time is based on an explicit four-stage Runge-Kutta scheme. Local time stepping, variable coefficient implicit residual smoothing, and a full multigrid method have been implemented to accelerate steady-state calculations. A grid independence analysis is presented for a transonic rotor blade. Comparisons with experimental data show that the code is an accurate viscous solver and can give very good blade-to-blade predictions for engineering applications.

  17. A comparison of solver performance for complex gastric electrophysiology models.

    PubMed

    Sathar, Shameer; Cheng, Leo K; Trew, Mark L

    2015-08-01

    Computational techniques for solving systems of equations arising in gastric electrophysiology have not been studied for efficient solution process. We present a computationally challenging problem of simulating gastric electrophysiology in anatomically realistic stomach geometries with multiple intracellular and extracellular domains. The multiscale nature of the problem and mesh resolution required to capture geometric and functional features necessitates efficient solution methods if the problem is to be tractable. In this study, we investigated and compared several parallel preconditioners for the linear systems arising from tetrahedral discretisation of electrically isotropic and anisotropic problems, with and without stimuli. The results showed that the isotropic problem was computationally less challenging than the anisotropic problem and that the application of extracellular stimuli increased workload considerably. Preconditioning based on block Jacobi and algebraic multigrid solvers were found to have the best overall solution times and least iteration counts, respectively. The algebraic multigrid preconditioner would be expected to perform better on large problems. PMID:26736543

  18. Status Of The UPS Space-Marching Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawerence, Scott L.; VanDalsem, William (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The status of the three-dimensional parabolized Navier-Stokes solver UPS is described. The UPS code, initiated at NASA Ames Research Center in 1986, continues to develop and evolve through application to supersonic and hypersonic flow fields. Hypersonic applications have motivated enhancement of the physical modeling capabilities of the code, specifically real gas modeling, boundary conditions, and turbulence and transition modeling. The UPS code has also been modified to enhance robustness and efficiency in order to be practically used in concert with an optimization code for supersonic transport design. These developments are briefly described along with some relevant results for generic test problems obtained during verification of the enhancements. Included developments and results have previously been published and widely disseminated domestically.

  19. Workload Characterization of CFD Applications Using Partial Differential Equation Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waheed, Abdul; Yan, Jerry; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Workload characterization is used for modeling and evaluating of computing systems at different levels of detail. We present workload characterization for a class of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) applications that solve Partial Differential Equations (PDEs). This workload characterization focuses on three high performance computing platforms: SGI Origin2000, EBM SP-2, a cluster of Intel Pentium Pro bases PCs. We execute extensive measurement-based experiments on these platforms to gather statistics of system resource usage, which results in workload characterization. Our workload characterization approach yields a coarse-grain resource utilization behavior that is being applied for performance modeling and evaluation of distributed high performance metacomputing systems. In addition, this study enhances our understanding of interactions between PDE solver workloads and high performance computing platforms and is useful for tuning these applications.

  20. A fast solver for systems of axisymmetric ring vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, James H.; Amos, Donald E.

    1990-09-01

    A method which is capable of efficient calculation of the axisymmetric flow field produced by a large system of ring vortices is presented in this report. The system of ring vortices can, in turn, be used to model body surfaces and wakes in incompressible unsteady axisymmetric flow fields. This method takes advantage of source point and field point series expansions which enables one to make calculations for interactions between groups of vortices which are in well separated spatial domains rather than having to consider interactions between every pair of vortices. In this work, series expansions for the stream function of the ring vortex system are obtained. Such expansions explicitly contain the radial and axial velocity components. A FORTRAN computer code RSOLV has been written to execute the fast solution technique to calculate the stream function and the axial and radial velocity components at points in the flow field. Test cases have been run to optimize the code and to benchmark the truncation errors and CPU time savings associated with the method. Non-dimensional truncation errors for the stream function and total velocity field are on the order of 5 times 10(exp -5) and 3 times 10(exp -3) respectively. Single precision accuracy produces errors in these quantities up to about 1 times 10(exp -5). For 100 vortices in the field, there is virtually no CPU time savings with the fast solver. For 10,000 vortices in the flow, the fast solver obtains solutions in about 1 to 3 percent of the time required for the direct solution technique. Simulations of vortices with square and circular cores were run in order to obtain expressions for the self-induced velocities of such vortices.

  1. Accuracy and Efficiency in Fixed-Point Neural ODE Solvers.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Michael; Furber, Steve

    2015-10-01

    Simulation of neural behavior on digital architectures often requires the solution of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) at each step of the simulation. For some neural models, this is a significant computational burden, so efficiency is important. Accuracy is also relevant because solutions can be sensitive to model parameterization and time step. These issues are emphasized on fixed-point processors like the ARM unit used in the SpiNNaker architecture. Using the Izhikevich neural model as an example, we explore some solution methods, showing how specific techniques can be used to find balanced solutions. We have investigated a number of important and related issues, such as introducing explicit solver reduction (ESR) for merging an explicit ODE solver and autonomous ODE into one algebraic formula, with benefits for both accuracy and speed; a simple, efficient mechanism for cancelling the cumulative lag in state variables caused by threshold crossing between time steps; an exact result for the membrane potential of the Izhikevich model with the other state variable held fixed. Parametric variations of the Izhikevich neuron show both similarities and differences in terms of algorithms and arithmetic types that perform well, making an overall best solution challenging to identify, but we show that particular cases can be improved significantly using the techniques described. Using a 1 ms simulation time step and 32-bit fixed-point arithmetic to promote real-time performance, one of the second-order Runge-Kutta methods looks to be the best compromise; Midpoint for speed or Trapezoid for accuracy. SpiNNaker offers an unusual combination of low energy use and real-time performance, so some compromises on accuracy might be expected. However, with a careful choice of approach, results comparable to those of general-purpose systems should be possible in many realistic cases. PMID:26313605

  2. High Energy Boundary Conditions for a Cartesian Mesh Euler Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Shishir; Murman, Scott; Aftosmis, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Inlets and exhaust nozzles are common place in the world of flight. Yet, many aerodynamic simulation packages do not provide a method of modelling such high energy boundaries in the flow field. For the purposes of aerodynamic simulation, inlets and exhausts are often fared over and it is assumed that the flow differences resulting from this assumption are minimal. While this is an adequate assumption for the prediction of lift, the lack of a plume behind the aircraft creates an evacuated base region thus effecting both drag and pitching moment values. In addition, the flow in the base region is often mis-predicted resulting in incorrect base drag. In order to accurately predict these quantities, a method for specifying inlet and exhaust conditions needs to be available in aerodynamic simulation packages. A method for a first approximation of a plume without accounting for chemical reactions is added to the Cartesian mesh based aerodynamic simulation package CART3D. The method consists of 3 steps. In the first step, a components approach where each triangle is assigned a component number is used. Here, a method for marking the inlet or exhaust plane triangles as separate components is discussed. In step two, the flow solver is modified to accept a reference state for the components marked inlet or exhaust. In the third step, the flow solver uses these separated components and the reference state to compute the correct flow condition at that triangle. The present method is implemented in the CART3D package which consists of a set of tools for generating a Cartesian volume mesh from a set of component triangulations. The Euler equations are solved on the resulting unstructured Cartesian mesh. The present methods is implemented in this package and its usefulness is demonstrated with two validation cases. A generic missile body is also presented to show the usefulness of the method on a real world geometry.

  3. Tightly Coupled Geodynamic Systems: Software, Implicit Solvers & Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, D.; Le Pourhiet, L.; Brown, J.

    2011-12-01

    The generic term "multi-physics" is used to define physical processes which are described by a collection of partial differential equations, or "physics". Numerous processes in geodynamics fall into this category. For example, the evolution of viscous fluid flow and heat transport within the mantle (Stokes flow + energy conservation), the dynamics of melt migration (Stokes flow + Darcy flow + porosity evolution) and landscape evolution (Stokes + diffusion/advection over a surface). The development of software to numerically investigate processes that are described through the composition of different physics components are typically (a) designed for one particular set of physics and are never intended to be extended, or coupled to other processes (b) enforce that certain non-linearity's (or coupling) are explicitly removed from the system for reasons of computational efficiency, or due the lack of a robust non-linear solver (e.g. most models in the mantle convection community). We describe a software infrastructure which enables us to easily introduce new physics with minimal code modifications; tightly couple all physics without introducing splitting errors; exploit modern linear/non-linear solvers and permit the re-use of monolithic preconditioners for individual physics blocks (e.g. saddle point preconditioners for Stokes). Here we present a number of examples to illustrate the flexibility and importance of using this software infra-structure. Using the Stokes system as a prototype, we show results illustrating (i) visco-plastic shear banding experiments, (ii) how coupling Stokes flow with the evolution of the material coordinates can yield temporal stability in the free surface evolution and (iii) the discretisation error associated with decoupling Stokes equation from the heat transport equation in models of mantle convection with various rheologies.

  4. Laser engine simulation using pressure based Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, Hazim Saad

    1994-03-01

    Analysis of the flow field in a laser engine represents a difficult computational problem involving combinations of complex physical and gas-dynamical processes. Following a brief discussion of these processes a calculation procedure using primitive variables formulation on a nonstaggered grid system is introduced. Based on this procedure, a pressure based Navier-Stokes solver (PBNS) is developed using a generalized curvilinear coordinate system. The solver is first tested in application to a subsonic compressible flow over an insulated flat plate and to a flow in an axisymmetric converging-diverging nozzle. Next, the PBNS code is used to analyze the flowfield and performance of a laser thruster. The physical/numerical model includes the geometric ray tracing for the laser beam, beam power absorption, plasma radiation losses, and plasma thermophysical and optical properties. Equilibrium hydrogen is used as a flowing gas and its properties are calculated using the Hydrogen Properties Calculation (HPC) based on the methods of statistical thermodynamics. Two thrustor configurations, two laser types (CO2 and iodide), various laser power levels, and various injection conditions are tested. The results of these tests include the temperature, pressure, velocity, and Mach number contours, as well as tables of the laser beam power absorbed, radiation losses to the thrustor walls, thrust level, and specific impulse. The maximum specific impulse obtained in these tests is 1537 sec for a CO2 laser thruster and 827 sec for an iodide laser thruster. Up to 100% power absorption can be achieved; however, radiation losses from the hot plasma are quite high disallowing a full conversion of the absorbed power into the thermal energy of the propellant. The PBNS code can be used to study the effects of various design parameters on the performance of a laser thruster and provide guidelines for the preliminary design of a laser engine.

  5. Domain decomposed preconditioners with Krylov subspace methods as subdomain solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Pernice, M.

    1994-12-31

    Domain decomposed preconditioners for nonsymmetric partial differential equations typically require the solution of problems on the subdomains. Most implementations employ exact solvers to obtain these solutions. Consequently work and storage requirements for the subdomain problems grow rapidly with the size of the subdomain problems. Subdomain solves constitute the single largest computational cost of a domain decomposed preconditioner, and improving the efficiency of this phase of the computation will have a significant impact on the performance of the overall method. The small local memory available on the nodes of most message-passing multicomputers motivates consideration of the use of an iterative method for solving subdomain problems. For large-scale systems of equations that are derived from three-dimensional problems, memory considerations alone may dictate the need for using iterative methods for the subdomain problems. In addition to reduced storage requirements, use of an iterative solver on the subdomains allows flexibility in specifying the accuracy of the subdomain solutions. Substantial savings in solution time is possible if the quality of the domain decomposed preconditioner is not degraded too much by relaxing the accuracy of the subdomain solutions. While some work in this direction has been conducted for symmetric problems, similar studies for nonsymmetric problems appear not to have been pursued. This work represents a first step in this direction, and explores the effectiveness of performing subdomain solves using several transpose-free Krylov subspace methods, GMRES, transpose-free QMR, CGS, and a smoothed version of CGS. Depending on the difficulty of the subdomain problem and the convergence tolerance used, a reduction in solution time is possible in addition to the reduced memory requirements. The domain decomposed preconditioner is a Schur complement method in which the interface operators are approximated using interface probing.

  6. A three-dimensional fast solver for arbitrary vorton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.H.; Baty, R.S.

    1994-05-01

    A method which is capable of an efficient calculation of the three-dimensional flow field produced by a large system of vortons (discretized regions of vorticity) is presented in this report. The system of vortons can, in turn, be used to model body surfaces, container boundaries, free-surfaces, plumes, jets, and wakes in unsteady three-dimensional flow fields. This method takes advantage of multipole and local series expansions which enables one to make calculations for interactions between groups of vortons which are in well-separated spatial domains rather than having to consider interactions between every pair of vortons. In this work, series expansions for the vector potential of the vorton system are obtained. From such expansions, the three components of velocity can be obtained explicitly. A Fortran computer code FAST3D has been written to calculate the vector potential and the velocity components at selected points in the flow field. In this code, the evaluation points do not have to coincide with the location of the vortons themselves. Test cases have been run to benchmark the truncation errors and CPU time savings associated with the method. Non-dimensional truncation errors for the magnitudes of the vector potential and velocity fields are on the order of 10{sup {minus}4}and 10{sup {minus}3} respectively. Single precision accuracy produces errors in these quantities of up to 10{sup {minus}5}. For less than 1,000 to 2,000 vortons in the field, there is virtually no CPU time savings with the fast solver. For 100,000 vortons in the flow, the fast solver obtains solutions in 1 % to 10% of the time required for the direct solution technique depending upon the configuration.

  7. A Fast Poisson Solver with Periodic Boundary Conditions for GPU Clusters in Various Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rattermann, Dale Nicholas

    Fast Poisson solvers using the Fast Fourier Transform on uniform grids are especially suited for parallel implementation, making them appropriate for portability on graphical processing unit (GPU) devices. The goal of the following work was to implement, test, and evaluate a fast Poisson solver for periodic boundary conditions for use on a variety of GPU configurations. The solver used in this research was FLASH, an immersed-boundary-based method, which is well suited for complex, time-dependent geometries, has robust adaptive mesh refinement/de-refinement capabilities to capture evolving flow structures, and has been successfully implemented on conventional, parallel supercomputers. However, these solvers are still computationally costly to employ, and the total solver time is dominated by the solution of the pressure Poisson equation using state-of-the-art multigrid methods. FLASH improves the performance of its multigrid solvers by integrating a parallel FFT solver on a uniform grid during a coarse level. This hybrid solver could then be theoretically improved by replacing the highly-parallelizable FFT solver with one that utilizes GPUs, and, thus, was the motivation for my research. In the present work, the CPU-utilizing parallel FFT solver (PFFT) used in the base version of FLASH for solving the Poisson equation on uniform grids has been modified to enable parallel execution on CUDA-enabled GPU devices. New algorithms have been implemented to replace the Poisson solver that decompose the computational domain and send each new block to a GPU for parallel computation. One-dimensional (1-D) decomposition of the computational domain minimizes the amount of network traffic involved in this bandwidth-intensive computation by limiting the amount of all-to-all communication required between processes. Advanced techniques have been incorporated and implemented in a GPU-centric code design, while allowing end users the flexibility of parameter control at runtime in

  8. Exit of a blast wave from a conical nozzle. [flow field calculations by Eulerian computer code DORF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K.; Johnson, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    The Eulerian computer code DORF was used in the analysis of a two-dimensional, unsteady flow field resulting from semi-confined explosions for propulsive applications. Initially, the ambient gas inside the conical shaped nozzle is set into motion due to the expansion of the explosion product gas, forming a shock wave. When this shock front exits the nozzle, it takes almost a spherical form while a complex interaction between the nozzle and compression and rarefaction waves takes place behind the shock. The results show an excellent agreement with experimental data.

  9. Novel Instrumentation for Column Measurements and Regional Eulerian Modeling for Network Design in Boston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Samra, J.; Gottlieb, E.; Budney, J.; Wofsy, S. C.; McKain, K.; Hase, F.; Gerbig, C.; Chance, K.; McManus, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    Urban areas emit most of the greenhouse gases and therefore represent the largest sources of human influence on climate change. Their emission flux is currently determined by the measured gas concentration near the earth's surface, but this alone is insufficient due to the high variance associated with small-scale atmospheric motions, planetary boundary layer dynamics and heterogeneity of the urban landscape. Path-integrated column measurements that integrate through a mixed layer or across a plume are much more compatible with the scale of atmospheric models. The changes in time and space of the column-averaged concentration directly track anthropogenic emissions because the mass balance itself is sensed. Current column measurement instrumentation is however costly and operationally complex. In this paper we present the development of a compact, simplified solar-tracking spectrometer, measuring the vertical column amount of CO2, CH4, CO, O2, H2O, etc. in the atmosphere. It will add the 3rd dimension (vertical) information to the existing surface network in Boston. Using the sun as a light source, the column-averaged number densities of different gas species are captured in the solar radiation spectrum recorded by a near-infrared Fourier transform spectrometer (0.1 cm-1 resolution) at the ground. The current setup is based on diffuser optics and is able to record the whole solar disk. It therefore is insensitive to the solar variability, has fewer tracking requirements, and is rugged and mobile at the same time. These spectrometers have the potential to be deployed in a multi-dimensional network gathering data from upwind, inside and downwind of Boston. A mobile spectrometer unit can be deployed to transect the urban dome, providing measurements continuously in space. The network strategy is developed using a data-model framework based on the regional Eulerian WRF Greenhouse Gas model WRF-GHG. In this paper we will mainly discuss the development of the novel column

  10. Direct Arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian ADER-MOOD finite volume schemes for multidimensional hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscheri, Walter; Loubère, Raphaël; Dumbser, Michael

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we present a new family of efficient high order accurate direct Arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) one-step ADER-MOOD finite volume schemes for the solution of nonlinear hyperbolic systems of conservation laws for moving unstructured triangular and tetrahedral meshes. This family is the next generation of the ALE ADER-WENO schemes presented in [16,20]. Here, we use again an element-local space-time Galerkin finite element predictor method to achieve a high order accurate one-step time discretization, while the somewhat expensive WENO approach on moving meshes, used to obtain high order of accuracy in space, is replaced by an a posteriori MOOD loop which is shown to be less expensive but still as accurate. This a posteriori MOOD loop ensures the numerical solution in each cell at any discrete time level to fulfill a set of user-defined detection criteria. If a cell average does not satisfy the detection criteria, then the solution is locally re-computed by progressively decrementing the order of the polynomial reconstruction, following a so-called cascade of predefined schemes with decreasing approximation order. A so-called parachute scheme, typically a very robust first order Godunov-type finite volume method, is employed as a last resort for highly problematic cells. The cascade of schemes defines how the decrementing process is carried out, i.e. how many schemes are tried and which orders are adopted for the polynomial reconstructions. The cascade and the parachute scheme are choices of the user or the code developer. Consequently the iterative MOOD loop allows the numerical solution to maintain some interesting properties such as positivity, mesh validity, etc., which are otherwise difficult to ensure. We have applied our new high order unstructured direct ALE ADER-MOOD schemes to the multi-dimensional Euler equations of compressible gas dynamics. A large set of test problems has been simulated and analyzed to assess the validity of our approach

  11. Acceleration of FDTD mode solver by high-performance computing techniques.

    PubMed

    Han, Lin; Xi, Yanping; Huang, Wei-Ping

    2010-06-21

    A two-dimensional (2D) compact finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) mode solver is developed based on wave equation formalism in combination with the matrix pencil method (MPM). The method is validated for calculation of both real guided and complex leaky modes of typical optical waveguides against the bench-mark finite-difference (FD) eigen mode solver. By taking advantage of the inherent parallel nature of the FDTD algorithm, the mode solver is implemented on graphics processing units (GPUs) using the compute unified device architecture (CUDA). It is demonstrated that the high-performance computing technique leads to significant acceleration of the FDTD mode solver with more than 30 times improvement in computational efficiency in comparison with the conventional FDTD mode solver running on CPU of a standard desktop computer. The computational efficiency of the accelerated FDTD method is in the same order of magnitude of the standard finite-difference eigen mode solver and yet require much less memory (e.g., less than 10%). Therefore, the new method may serve as an efficient, accurate and robust tool for mode calculation of optical waveguides even when the conventional eigen value mode solvers are no longer applicable due to memory limitation. PMID:20588502

  12. GORRAM: Introducing accurate operational-speed radiative transfer Monte Carlo solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buras-Schnell, Robert; Schnell, Franziska; Buras, Allan

    2016-06-01

    We present a new approach for solving the radiative transfer equation in horizontally homogeneous atmospheres. The motivation was to develop a fast yet accurate radiative transfer solver to be used in operational retrieval algorithms for next generation meteorological satellites. The core component is the program GORRAM (Generator Of Really Rapid Accurate Monte-Carlo) which generates solvers individually optimized for the intended task. These solvers consist of a Monte Carlo model capable of path recycling and a representative set of photon paths. Latter is generated using the simulated annealing technique. GORRAM automatically takes advantage of limitations on the variability of the atmosphere. Due to this optimization the number of photon paths necessary for accurate results can be reduced by several orders of magnitude. For the shown example of a forward model intended for an aerosol satellite retrieval, comparison with an exact yet slow solver shows that a precision of better than 1% can be achieved with only 36 photons. The computational time is at least an order of magnitude faster than any other type of radiative transfer solver. Merely the lookup table approach often used in satellite retrieval is faster, but on the other hand suffers from limited accuracy. This makes GORRAM-generated solvers an eligible candidate as forward model in operational-speed retrieval algorithms and data assimilation applications. GORRAM also has the potential to create fast solvers of other integrable equations.

  13. Oasis: A high-level/high-performance open source Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Mikael; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian

    2015-03-01

    Oasis is a high-level/high-performance finite element Navier-Stokes solver written from scratch in Python using building blocks from the FEniCS project (fenicsproject.org). The solver is unstructured and targets large-scale applications in complex geometries on massively parallel clusters. Oasis utilizes MPI and interfaces, through FEniCS, to the linear algebra backend PETSc. Oasis advocates a high-level, programmable user interface through the creation of highly flexible Python modules for new problems. Through the high-level Python interface the user is placed in complete control of every aspect of the solver. A version of the solver, that is using piecewise linear elements for both velocity and pressure, is shown to reproduce very well the classical, spectral, turbulent channel simulations of Moser et al. (1999). The computational speed is strongly dominated by the iterative solvers provided by the linear algebra backend, which is arguably the best performance any similar implicit solver using PETSc may hope for. Higher order accuracy is also demonstrated and new solvers may be easily added within the same framework.

  14. The impact of improved sparse linear solvers on industrial engineering applications

    SciTech Connect

    Heroux, M.; Baddourah, M.; Poole, E.L.; Yang, Chao Wu

    1996-12-31

    There are usually many factors that ultimately determine the quality of computer simulation for engineering applications. Some of the most important are the quality of the analytical model and approximation scheme, the accuracy of the input data and the capability of the computing resources. However, in many engineering applications the characteristics of the sparse linear solver are the key factors in determining how complex a problem a given application code can solve. Therefore, the advent of a dramatically improved solver often brings with it dramatic improvements in our ability to do accurate and cost effective computer simulations. In this presentation we discuss the current status of sparse iterative and direct solvers in several key industrial CFD and structures codes, and show the impact that recent advances in linear solvers have made on both our ability to perform challenging simulations and the cost of those simulations. We also present some of the current challenges we have and the constraints we face in trying to improve these solvers. Finally, we discuss future requirements for sparse linear solvers on high performance architectures and try to indicate the opportunities that exist if we can develop even more improvements in linear solver capabilities.

  15. The effects of advection solvers on the performance of air quality models

    SciTech Connect

    Tanrikulu, S.; Odman, M.T.

    1996-12-31

    The available numerical solvers for the advection term in the chemical species conservation equation have different properties, and consequently introduce different types of errors. These errors can affect the performance of air quality models and lead to biases in model results. In this study, a large number of advection solvers have been studied and six of them were identified as having potential for use in photochemical models. The identified solvers were evaluated extensively using various numerical tests that are relevant to air quality simulations. Among the solvers evaluated, three of them showed better performance in terms of accuracy and some other characteristics such as conservation of mass and positivity. They are the solvers by Bott, Yuamartino, and Dabdub and Seinfeld. These three solvers were incorporated into the SARMAP Air Quality Model (SAQM) and the August 3-6, 1990 ozone episode in the San Joaquin Valley of California was simulated with each. A model performance analysis was conducted for each simulation using the rich air quality database of the 1990 San Joaquin Valley Air Quality Study. The results of the simulations were compared with each other and the effects of advection solvers on the performance of the model are discussed.

  16. Robust large-scale parallel nonlinear solvers for simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Bader, Brett William; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2005-11-01

    This report documents research to develop robust and efficient solution techniques for solving large-scale systems of nonlinear equations. The most widely used method for solving systems of nonlinear equations is Newton's method. While much research has been devoted to augmenting Newton-based solvers (usually with globalization techniques), little has been devoted to exploring the application of different models. Our research has been directed at evaluating techniques using different models than Newton's method: a lower order model, Broyden's method, and a higher order model, the tensor method. We have developed large-scale versions of each of these models and have demonstrated their use in important applications at Sandia. Broyden's method replaces the Jacobian with an approximation, allowing codes that cannot evaluate a Jacobian or have an inaccurate Jacobian to converge to a solution. Limited-memory methods, which have been successful in optimization, allow us to extend this approach to large-scale problems. We compare the robustness and efficiency of Newton's method, modified Newton's method, Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov method, and our limited-memory Broyden method. Comparisons are carried out for large-scale applications of fluid flow simulations and electronic circuit simulations. Results show that, in cases where the Jacobian was inaccurate or could not be computed, Broyden's method converged in some cases where Newton's method failed to converge. We identify conditions where Broyden's method can be more efficient than Newton's method. We also present modifications to a large-scale tensor method, originally proposed by Bouaricha, for greater efficiency, better robustness, and wider applicability. Tensor methods are an alternative to Newton-based methods and are based on computing a step based on a local quadratic model rather than a linear model. The advantage of Bouaricha's method is that it can use any existing linear solver, which makes it simple to write

  17. Application of an unstructured grid flow solver to planes, trains and automobiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spragle, Gregory S.; Smith, Wayne A.; Yadlin, Yoram

    1993-01-01

    Rampant, an unstructured flow solver developed at Fluent Inc., is used to compute three-dimensional, viscous, turbulent, compressible flow fields within complex solution domains. Rampant is an explicit, finite-volume flow solver capable of computing flow fields using either triangular (2d) or tetrahedral (3d) unstructured grids. Local time stepping, implicit residual smoothing, and multigrid techniques are used to accelerate the convergence of the explicit scheme. The paper describes the Rampant flow solver and presents flow field solutions about a plane, train, and automobile.

  18. A multigrid solver for semi-implicit global shallow-water models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barros, Saulo R. M.; Dee, Dick P.; Dickstein, Flavio

    1990-01-01

    A multigrid solver is developed for the discretized two-dimensional elliptic equation on the sphere that arises from a semiimplicit time discretization of the global shallow-water equations. Different formulations of the semiimplicit scheme result in variable-coefficient Helmholtz-type equations for which no fast direct solvers are available. The efficiency of the multigrid solver is optimal, in the sense that the total operation count is proportional to the number of unknowns. Numerical experiments using initial data derived from actual 300-mb height and wind velocity fields indicate that the present model has very good accuracy and stability properties.

  19. Investigation of Bubble-Slag Layer Behaviors with Hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian Modeling and Large Eddy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linmin; Li, Baokuan

    2016-03-01

    In ladle metallurgy, bubble-liquid interaction leads to complex phase structures. Gas bubble behavior, as well as the induced slag layer behavior, plays a significant role in the refining process and the steel quality. In the present work, a mathematical model using the large eddy simulation (LES) is developed to investigate the bubble transport and slag layer behavior in a water model of an argon-stirred ladle. The Eulerian volume of fluid model is adopted to track the liquid steel-slag-air free surfaces while the Lagrangian discrete phase model is used for tracking and handling the dynamics of discrete bubbles. The bubble coalescence is considered using O'Rourke's algorithm to solve the bubble diameter redistribution and bubbles are removed after leaving the air-liquid interface. The turbulent liquid flow that is induced by bubble-liquid interaction is solved by LES. The slag layer fluactuation, slag droplet entrainment and spout eye open-close phenomenon are well revealed. The bubble diameter distribution and the spout eye size are compared with the experiment. The results show that the hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian-LES model provides a valid modeling framework to predict the unsteady gas bubble-slag layer coupled behaviors.

  20. APPROXIMATION OF MULTIFLUID MIXTURE RESPONSE FOR SIMULATION OF SHARP AND DIFFUSE MATERIAL INTERFACES ON AN EULERIAN GRID

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, I; Liu, B

    2005-09-29

    Multimaterial Eulerian and Arbitrary Lagragian-Eulerian (ALE) codes usually use volume fractions of materials to track individual components in mixed cells. Material advection usually is calculated either by interface capturing, where a high-order van Leer-like slope reconstruction technique is applied, or interface tracking, where a normal reconstruction technique is applied. The former approach is more appropriate for gas-like substances, and the latter is ideal for solids and liquids, since it does not smear out material interfaces. A wide range of problems involves both diffuse and sharp interfaces between substances and demands a combination of these techniques. It is possible to treat all substances that can diffuse into each other as a single material and only keep mass fractions of the individual components of the mixture. The material response can be determined based on the assumption of pressure and temperature equilibrium between components of the mixture. Unfortunately, it is extremely difficult to solve the corresponding system of equations. In order to avoid these problems one can introduce an effective gamma and employ the ideal gas approximation to calculate mixture response. This method provides reliable results, is able to compute strong shock waves, and deals with complex equations of state. Results from a number of simulations using this scheme are presented.

  1. From streamline jumping to strange eigenmodes: Bridging the Lagrangian and Eulerian pictures of the kinematics of mixing in granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christov, Ivan C.; Ottino, Julio M.; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2011-10-01

    Through a combined computational-experimental study of flow in a slowly rotating quasi-two-dimensional container, we show several new aspects related to the kinematics of granular mixing. In the Lagrangian frame, for small numbers of revolutions, the mixing pattern is captured by a model termed "streamline jumping." This minimal model, arising at the limit of a vanishingly thin surface flowing layer, possesses no intrinsic stretching or streamline crossing in the usual sense, yet it can lead to complex particle trajectories. Meanwhile, for intermediate numbers of revolutions, we show the presence of naturally persistent granular mixing patterns, i.e., "strange" eigenmodes of the advection-diffusion operator governing the mixing process in Eulerian frame. Through a comparative analysis of the structure of eigenmodes and the corresponding Poincaré section and finite-time Lyapunov exponent field of the flow, the relationship between the Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions of mixing is highlighted. Finally, we show how the mapping method for scalar transport can be modified to include diffusion. This allows us to examine (for the first time in a granular flow) the change in shape, lifespan, and eventual decay of eigenmodes due to diffusive effects at larger numbers of revolutions.

  2. Simulations of Spray Reacting Flows in a Single Element LDI Injector With and Without Invoking an Eulerian Scalar PDF Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the numerical simulations of the Jet-A spray reacting flow in a single element lean direct injection (LDI) injector by using the National Combustion Code (NCC) with and without invoking the Eulerian scalar probability density function (PDF) method. The flow field is calculated by using the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS and URANS) with nonlinear turbulence models, and when the scalar PDF method is invoked, the energy and compositions or species mass fractions are calculated by solving the equation of an ensemble averaged density-weighted fine-grained probability density function that is referred to here as the averaged probability density function (APDF). A nonlinear model for closing the convection term of the scalar APDF equation is used in the presented simulations and will be briefly described. Detailed comparisons between the results and available experimental data are carried out. Some positive findings of invoking the Eulerian scalar PDF method in both improving the simulation quality and reducing the computing cost are observed.

  3. Adjoint of the global Eulerian-Lagrangian coupled atmospheric transport model (A-GELCA v1.0): development and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, Dmitry A.; Maksyutov, Shamil; Yaremchuk, Alexey; Ganshin, Alexander; Kaminski, Thomas; Blessing, Simon; Sasakawa, Motoki; Gomez-Pelaez, Angel J.; Starchenko, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    We present the development of the Adjoint of the Global Eulerian-Lagrangian Coupled Atmospheric (A-GELCA) model that consists of the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) model as an Eulerian three-dimensional transport model (TM), and FLEXPART (FLEXible PARTicle dispersion model) as the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM). The forward tangent linear and adjoint components of the Eulerian model were constructed directly from the original NIES TM code using an automatic differentiation tool known as TAF (Transformation of Algorithms in Fortran; http://www.FastOpt.com, with additional manual pre- and post-processing aimed at improving transparency and clarity of the code and optimizing the performance of the computing, including MPI (Message Passing Interface). The Lagrangian component did not require any code modification, as LPDMs are self-adjoint and track a significant number of particles backward in time in order to calculate the sensitivity of the observations to the neighboring emission areas. The constructed Eulerian adjoint was coupled with the Lagrangian component at a time boundary in the global domain. The simulations presented in this work were performed using the A-GELCA model in forward and adjoint modes. The forward simulation shows that the coupled model improves reproduction of the seasonal cycle and short-term variability of CO2. Mean bias and standard deviation for five of the six Siberian sites considered decrease roughly by 1 ppm when using the coupled model. The adjoint of the Eulerian model was shown, through several numerical tests, to be very accurate (within machine epsilon with mismatch around to ±6 e-14) compared to direct forward sensitivity calculations. The developed adjoint of the coupled model combines the flux conservation and stability of an Eulerian discrete adjoint formulation with the flexibility, accuracy, and high resolution of a Lagrangian backward trajectory formulation. A-GELCA will be incorporated

  4. Verification of continuum drift kinetic equation solvers in NIMROD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, E. D.; Kruger, S. E.; Ji, J.-Y.; Belli, E. A.; Lyons, B. C.

    2015-03-01

    Verification of continuum solutions to the electron and ion drift kinetic equations (DKEs) in NIMROD [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comp. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] is demonstrated through comparison with several neoclassical transport codes, most notably NEO [E. A. Belli and J. Candy, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 015015 (2012)]. The DKE solutions use NIMROD's spatial representation, 2D finite-elements in the poloidal plane and a 1D Fourier expansion in toroidal angle. For 2D velocity space, a novel 1D expansion in finite elements is applied for the pitch angle dependence and a collocation grid is used for the normalized speed coordinate. The full, linearized Coulomb collision operator is kept and shown to be important for obtaining quantitative results. Bootstrap currents, parallel ion flows, and radial particle and heat fluxes show quantitative agreement between NIMROD and NEO for a variety of tokamak equilibria. In addition, velocity space distribution function contours for ions and electrons show nearly identical detailed structure and agree quantitatively. A Θ-centered, implicit time discretization and a block-preconditioned, iterative linear algebra solver provide efficient electron and ion DKE solutions that ultimately will be used to obtain closures for NIMROD's evolving fluid model.

  5. Incremental planning to control a blackboard-based problem solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durfee, E. H.; Lesser, V. R.

    1987-01-01

    To control problem solving activity, a planner must resolve uncertainty about which specific long-term goals (solutions) to pursue and about which sequences of actions will best achieve those goals. A planner is described that abstracts the problem solving state to recognize possible competing and compatible solutions and to roughly predict the importance and expense of developing these solutions. With this information, the planner plans sequences of problem solving activities that most efficiently resolve its uncertainty about which of the possible solutions to work toward. The planner only details actions for the near future because the results of these actions will influence how (and whether) a plan should be pursued. As problem solving proceeds, the planner adds new details to the plan incrementally, and monitors and repairs the plan to insure it achieves its goals whenever possible. Through experiments, researchers illustrate how these new mechanisms significantly improve problem solving decisions and reduce overall computation. They briefly discuss current research directions, including how these mechanisms can improve a problem solver's real-time response and can enhance cooperation in a distributed problem solving network.

  6. Towards Batched Linear Solvers on Accelerated Hardware Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Haidar, Azzam; Dong, Tingzing Tim; Tomov, Stanimire; Dongarra, Jack J

    2015-01-01

    As hardware evolves, an increasingly effective approach to develop energy efficient, high-performance solvers, is to design them to work on many small and independent problems. Indeed, many applications already need this functionality, especially for GPUs, which are known to be currently about four to five times more energy efficient than multicore CPUs for every floating-point operation. In this paper, we describe the development of the main one-sided factorizations: LU, QR, and Cholesky; that are needed for a set of small dense matrices to work in parallel. We refer to such algorithms as batched factorizations. Our approach is based on representing the algorithms as a sequence of batched BLAS routines for GPU-contained execution. Note that this is similar in functionality to the LAPACK and the hybrid MAGMA algorithms for large-matrix factorizations. But it is different from a straightforward approach, whereby each of GPU's symmetric multiprocessors factorizes a single problem at a time. We illustrate how our performance analysis together with the profiling and tracing tools guided the development of batched factorizations to achieve up to 2-fold speedup and 3-fold better energy efficiency compared to our highly optimized batched CPU implementations based on the MKL library on a two-sockets, Intel Sandy Bridge server. Compared to a batched LU factorization featured in the NVIDIA's CUBLAS library for GPUs, we achieves up to 2.5-fold speedup on the K40 GPU.

  7. Algorithmic Enhancements to the VULCAN Navier-Stokes Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litton, D. K.; Edwards, J. R.; White, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    VULCAN (Viscous Upwind aLgorithm for Complex flow ANalysis) is a cell centered, finite volume code used to solve high speed flows related to hypersonic vehicles. Two algorithms are presented for expanding the range of applications of the current Navier-Stokes solver implemented in VULCAN. The first addition is a highly implicit approach that uses subiterations to enhance block to block connectivity between adjacent subdomains. The addition of this scheme allows more efficient solution of viscous flows on highly-stretched meshes. The second algorithm addresses the shortcomings associated with density-based schemes by the addition of a time-derivative preconditioning strategy. High speed, compressible flows are typically solved with density based schemes, which show a high level of degradation in accuracy and convergence at low Mach numbers (M less than or equal to 0.1). With the addition of preconditioning and associated modifications to the numerical discretization scheme, the eigenvalues will scale with the local velocity, and the above problems will be eliminated. With these additions, VULCAN now has improved convergence behavior for multi-block, highly-stretched meshes and also can solve the Navier-Stokes equations for very low Mach numbers.

  8. A tearing-based hybrid parallel banded linear system solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, Maxim; Sameh, Ahmed H.

    2009-04-01

    A new parallel algorithm for the solution of banded linear systems is proposed. The scheme tears the coefficient matrix into several overlapped independent blocks in which the size of the overlap is equal to the system's bandwidth. A corresponding splitting of the right-hand side is also provided. The resulting independent, and smaller size, linear systems are solved under the constraint that the solutions corresponding to the overlap regions are identical. This results in a linear system whose size is proportional to the sum of the overlap regions which we refer to as the "balance" system. We propose a solution strategy that does not require obtaining this "balance" system explicitly. Once the balance system is solved, retrieving the rest of the solution can be realized with almost perfect parallelism. Our proposed algorithm is a hybrid scheme that combines direct and iterative methods for solving a single banded system of linear equations on parallel architectures. It has broad applications in finite-element analysis, particularly as a parallel solver of banded preconditioners that can be used in conjunction with outer Krylov iterative schemes.

  9. An optimal iterative solver for the Stokes problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wathen, A.; Silvester, D.

    1994-12-31

    Discretisations of the classical Stokes Problem for slow viscous incompressible flow gives rise to systems of equations in matrix form for the velocity u and the pressure p, where the coefficient matrix is symmetric but necessarily indefinite. The square submatrix A is symmetric and positive definite and represents a discrete (vector) Laplacian and the submatrix C may be the zero matrix or more generally will be symmetric positive semi-definite. For `stabilised` discretisations (C {ne} 0) and descretisations which are inherently `stable` (C = 0) and so do not admit spurious pressure components even as the mesh size, h approaches zero, the Schur compliment of the matrix has spectral condition number independent of h (given also that B is bounded). Here the authors will show how this property together with a multigrid preconditioner only for the Laplacian block A yields an optimal solver for the Stokes problem through use of the Minimum Residual iteration. That is, combining Minimum Residual iteration for the matrix equation with a block preconditioner which comprises a small number of multigrid V-cycles for the Laplacian block A together with a simple diagonal scaling block provides an iterative solution procedure for which the computational work grows only linearly with the problem size.

  10. A generalized Poisson solver for first-principles device simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bani-Hashemian, Mohammad Hossein; Brück, Sascha; Luisier, Mathieu; VandeVondele, Joost

    2016-01-01

    Electronic structure calculations of atomistic systems based on density functional theory involve solving the Poisson equation. In this paper, we present a plane-wave based algorithm for solving the generalized Poisson equation subject to periodic or homogeneous Neumann conditions on the boundaries of the simulation cell and Dirichlet type conditions imposed at arbitrary subdomains. In this way, source, drain, and gate voltages can be imposed across atomistic models of electronic devices. Dirichlet conditions are enforced as constraints in a variational framework giving rise to a saddle point problem. The resulting system of equations is then solved using a stationary iterative method in which the generalized Poisson operator is preconditioned with the standard Laplace operator. The solver can make use of any sufficiently smooth function modelling the dielectric constant, including density dependent dielectric continuum models. For all the boundary conditions, consistent derivatives are available and molecular dynamics simulations can be performed. The convergence behaviour of the scheme is investigated and its capabilities are demonstrated.

  11. Two-Dimensional Ffowcs Williams/Hawkings Equation Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.

    2005-01-01

    FWH2D is a Fortran 90 computer program that solves a two-dimensional (2D) version of the equation, derived by J. E. Ffowcs Williams and D. L. Hawkings, for sound generated by turbulent flow. FWH2D was developed especially for estimating noise generated by airflows around such approximately 2D airframe components as slats. The user provides input data on fluctuations of pressure, density, and velocity on some surface. These data are combined with information about the geometry of the surface to calculate histories of thickness and loading terms. These histories are fast-Fourier-transformed into the frequency domain. For each frequency of interest and each observer position specified by the user, kernel functions are integrated over the surface by use of the trapezoidal rule to calculate a pressure signal. The resulting frequency-domain signals are inverse-fast-Fourier-transformed back into the time domain. The output of the code consists of the time- and frequency-domain representations of the pressure signals at the observer positions. Because of its approximate nature, FWH2D overpredicts the noise from a finite-length (3D) component. The advantage of FWH2D is that it requires a fraction of the computation time of a 3D Ffowcs Williams/Hawkings solver.

  12. A generalized Poisson solver for first-principles device simulations.

    PubMed

    Bani-Hashemian, Mohammad Hossein; Brück, Sascha; Luisier, Mathieu; VandeVondele, Joost

    2016-01-28

    Electronic structure calculations of atomistic systems based on density functional theory involve solving the Poisson equation. In this paper, we present a plane-wave based algorithm for solving the generalized Poisson equation subject to periodic or homogeneous Neumann conditions on the boundaries of the simulation cell and Dirichlet type conditions imposed at arbitrary subdomains. In this way, source, drain, and gate voltages can be imposed across atomistic models of electronic devices. Dirichlet conditions are enforced as constraints in a variational framework giving rise to a saddle point problem. The resulting system of equations is then solved using a stationary iterative method in which the generalized Poisson operator is preconditioned with the standard Laplace operator. The solver can make use of any sufficiently smooth function modelling the dielectric constant, including density dependent dielectric continuum models. For all the boundary conditions, consistent derivatives are available and molecular dynamics simulations can be performed. The convergence behaviour of the scheme is investigated and its capabilities are demonstrated. PMID:26827208

  13. A multiblock multigrid three-dimensional Euler equation solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannizzaro, Frank E.; Elmiligui, Alaa; Melson, N. Duane; Vonlavante, E.

    1990-01-01

    Current aerodynamic designs are often quite complex (geometrically). Flexible computational tools are needed for the analysis of a wide range of configurations with both internal and external flows. In the past, geometrically dissimilar configurations required different analysis codes with different grid topologies in each. The duplicity of codes can be avoided with the use of a general multiblock formulation which can handle any grid topology. Rather than hard wiring the grid topology into the program, it is instead dictated by input to the program. In this work, the compressible Euler equations, written in a body-fitted finite-volume formulation, are solved using a pseudo-time-marching approach. Two upwind methods (van Leer's flux-vector-splitting and Roe's flux-differencing) were investigated. Two types of explicit solvers (a two-step predictor-corrector and a modified multistage Runge-Kutta) were used with multigrid acceleration to enhance convergence. A multiblock strategy is used to allow greater geometric flexibility. A report on simple explicit upwind schemes for solving compressible flows is included.

  14. Parallelizable approximate solvers for recursions arising in preconditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, Y.

    1996-12-31

    For the recursions used in the Modified Incomplete LU (MILU) preconditioner, namely, the incomplete decomposition, forward elimination and back substitution processes, a parallelizable approximate solver is presented. The present analysis shows that the solutions of the recursions depend only weakly on their initial conditions and may be interpreted to indicate that the inexact solution is close, in some sense, to the exact one. The method is based on a domain decomposition approach, suitable for parallel implementations with message passing architectures. It requires a fixed number of communication steps per preconditioned iteration, independently of the number of subdomains or the size of the problem. The overlapping subdomains are either cubes (suitable for mesh-connected arrays of processors) or constructed by the data-flow rule of the recursions (suitable for line-connected arrays with possibly SIMD or vector processors). Numerical examples show that, in both cases, the overhead in the number of iterations required for convergence of the preconditioned iteration is small relatively to the speed-up gained.

  15. Generation of Minimum-Consistent DFA Using SAT Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Nobuo; Aizawa, Akiko

    The purpose of this study is to develop efficient methods for the minimum-consistent DFA (deterministic finite state automaton) problem. The graph-coloring based SAT (satisfiability) approach proposed by Heule is a state of the art method for this problem. It specially achieves high performance computing in dense problems such as in a popular benchmark problem where rich information about labels is included. In contrast, to solve sparse problems is a challenge for the minimum-consistent DFA problem. To solve sparse problems, we propose three approaches to the SAT formulation: a) the binary color representation, b) the dynamic symmetry breaking and c) the hyper-graph coloring constraint. We organized an experiment using the existing benchmark problems and sparse problems made from them. We observed that our symmetry breaking constraints made the speed up the running time of SAT solver. In addition with this, our other proposed methods were showing the possibility to improve the performance. Then we simulated the perfomance of our methods under the condition that we executed the several program set-ups in parallel. Compared with the previous research results, we finally could reduce the average relative time by 66.5% and the total relative time by 7.6% for sparse problems and by 79.7% and 38.5% for dense problems, respectively. These results showed that our proposed methods were effective for difficult problems.

  16. New numerical solver for flows at various Mach numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miczek, F.; Röpke, F. K.; Edelmann, P. V. F.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Many problems in stellar astrophysics feature flows at low Mach numbers. Conventional compressible hydrodynamics schemes frequently used in the field have been developed for the transonic regime and exhibit excessive numerical dissipation for these flows. Aims: While schemes were proposed that solve hydrodynamics strictly in the low Mach regime and thus restrict their applicability, we aim at developing a scheme that correctly operates in a wide range of Mach numbers. Methods: Based on an analysis of the asymptotic behavior of the Euler equations in the low Mach limit we propose a novel scheme that is able to maintain a low Mach number flow setup while retaining all effects of compressibility. This is achieved by a suitable modification of the well-known Roe solver. Results: Numerical tests demonstrate the capability of this new scheme to reproduce slow flow structures even in moderate numerical resolution. Conclusions: Our scheme provides a promising approach to a consistent multidimensional hydrodynamical treatment of astrophysical low Mach number problems such as convection, instabilities, and mixing in stellar evolution.

  17. Approximate Riemann Solvers for the Cosmic Ray Magnetohydrodynamical Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudoh, Yuki; Hanawa, Tomoyuki

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the cosmic-ray magnetohydrodynamic (CR MHD) equations to improve the numerical simulations. We propose to solve them in the fully conservation form, which is equivalent to the conventional CR MHD equations. In the fully conservation form, the CR energy equation is replaced with the CR "number" conservation, where the CR number density is defined as the three fourths power of the CR energy density. The former contains an extra source term, while latter does not. An approximate Riemann solver is derived from the CR MHD equations in the fully conservation form. Based on the analysis, we propose a numerical scheme of which solutions satisfy the Rankine-Hugoniot relation at any shock. We demonstrate that it reproduces the Riemann solution derived by Pfrommer et al. (2006) for a 1D CR hydrodynamic shock tube problem. We compare the solution with those obtained by solving the CR energy equation. The latter solutions deviate from the Riemann solution seriously, when the CR pressure dominates over the gas pressure in the post-shocked gas. The former solutions converge to the Riemann solution and are of the second order accuracy in space and time. Our numerical examples include an expansion of high pressure sphere in an magnetized medium. Fast and slow shocks are sharply resolved in the example. We also discuss possible extension of the CR MHD equations to evaluate the average CR energy.

  18. Cooperative solutions coupling a geometry engine and adaptive solver codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickens, Thomas P.

    1995-01-01

    Follow-on work has progressed in using Aero Grid and Paneling System (AGPS), a geometry and visualization system, as a dynamic real time geometry monitor, manipulator, and interrogator for other codes. In particular, AGPS has been successfully coupled with adaptive flow solvers which iterate, refining the grid in areas of interest, and continuing on to a solution. With the coupling to the geometry engine, the new grids represent the actual geometry much more accurately since they are derived directly from the geometry and do not use refits to the first-cut grids. Additional work has been done with design runs where the geometric shape is modified to achieve a desired result. Various constraints are used to point the solution in a reasonable direction which also more closely satisfies the desired results. Concepts and techniques are presented, as well as examples of sample case studies. Issues such as distributed operation of the cooperative codes versus running all codes locally and pre-calculation for performance are discussed. Future directions are considered which will build on these techniques in light of changing computer environments.

  19. Shared Memory Parallelism for 3D Cartesian Discrete Ordinates Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, Salli; Dutka-Malen, Ivan; Plagne, Laurent; Ponçot, Angélique; Ramet, Pierre

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the design and the performance of DOMINO, a 3D Cartesian SN solver that implements two nested levels of parallelism (multicore+SIMD) on shared memory computation nodes. DOMINO is written in C++, a multi-paradigm programming language that enables the use of powerful and generic parallel programming tools such as Intel TBB and Eigen. These two libraries allow us to combine multi-thread parallelism with vector operations in an efficient and yet portable way. As a result, DOMINO can exploit the full power of modern multi-core processors and is able to tackle very large simulations, that usually require large HPC clusters, using a single computing node. For example, DOMINO solves a 3D full core PWR eigenvalue problem involving 26 energy groups, 288 angular directions (S16), 46 × 106 spatial cells and 1 × 1012 DoFs within 11 hours on a single 32-core SMP node. This represents a sustained performance of 235 GFlops and 40:74% of the SMP node peak performance for the DOMINO sweep implementation. The very high Flops/Watt ratio of DOMINO makes it a very interesting building block for a future many-nodes nuclear simulation tool.

  20. Verification of continuum drift kinetic equation solvers in NIMROD

    SciTech Connect

    Held, E. D.; Ji, J.-Y.; Kruger, S. E.; Belli, E. A.; Lyons, B. C.

    2015-03-15

    Verification of continuum solutions to the electron and ion drift kinetic equations (DKEs) in NIMROD [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comp. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] is demonstrated through comparison with several neoclassical transport codes, most notably NEO [E. A. Belli and J. Candy, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 015015 (2012)]. The DKE solutions use NIMROD's spatial representation, 2D finite-elements in the poloidal plane and a 1D Fourier expansion in toroidal angle. For 2D velocity space, a novel 1D expansion in finite elements is applied for the pitch angle dependence and a collocation grid is used for the normalized speed coordinate. The full, linearized Coulomb collision operator is kept and shown to be important for obtaining quantitative results. Bootstrap currents, parallel ion flows, and radial particle and heat fluxes show quantitative agreement between NIMROD and NEO for a variety of tokamak equilibria. In addition, velocity space distribution function contours for ions and electrons show nearly identical detailed structure and agree quantitatively. A Θ-centered, implicit time discretization and a block-preconditioned, iterative linear algebra solver provide efficient electron and ion DKE solutions that ultimately will be used to obtain closures for NIMROD's evolving fluid model.

  1. Coherent Turbulence Structure Detection in Plant Canopies using a Coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian Detection Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, B. N.; Stoll, R.

    2012-12-01

    Early studies of turbulence in plant canopies have found several universal features unique to this type of flow. Perhaps the most striking is the observation of highly coherent turbulent motions that are exceptionally efficient in transporting momentum and scalars even in the presence of low gradients. This efficient transport mechanism has come to be associated with coherent structures that have length scales on the order of the canopy height. These structures are thought to be produced by an inviscid instability mechanism at the canopy top analogous to that of a planar mixing-layer. The most complete picture of the spatial composition of these canopy structures has come form the large-eddy simulation study of [Finnigan, J. J., R. H. Shaw, E. G. Patton, 2009. Turbulence structure above a vegetation canopy. J. Fluid Mech. 637, pp. 387-424.]. This study reports that these mixing-layer-like structures begin their life as rolled 'Stuart' vortices that, through turbulent fluctuations, evolve into hairpin vortices. These vortices have a tendency to become paired as a set of upwind head-down and downwind head-up hairpins, which are linked to scalar ramps commonly reported in canopy flow studies. There are still several unanswered questions about canopy-scale coherent structures, particularly in terms of how these structures originate and how they behave before and after pairing. Discovering the underlying mechanisms behind these structures is a critical part of understanding and modeling canopy transport processes. To answer these questions, we have developed a structure detection method that uses Lagrangian particle trajectories as a trigger for composite averaging of Eulerian flow variables obtained from large-eddy simulations. This method is able to detect the head-down and head-up hairpins independently using single particles, or at various stages in the pairing process using multiple particles. Results paint a clear picture of the spatial details of the composite

  2. User's Manual for PCSMS (Parallel Complex Sparse Matrix Solver). Version 1.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. J.

    2000-01-01

    PCSMS (Parallel Complex Sparse Matrix Solver) is a computer code written to make use of the existing real sparse direct solvers to solve complex, sparse matrix linear equations. PCSMS converts complex matrices into real matrices and use real, sparse direct matrix solvers to factor and solve the real matrices. The solution vector is reconverted to complex numbers. Though, this utility is written for Silicon Graphics (SGI) real sparse matrix solution routines, it is general in nature and can be easily modified to work with any real sparse matrix solver. The User's Manual is written to make the user acquainted with the installation and operation of the code. Driver routines are given to aid the users to integrate PCSMS routines in their own codes.

  3. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; USA, Richland Washington; Sun, Yannan; USA, Richland Washington; Martinez, Jayson J.; USA, Richland Washington; Fu, Tao; USA, Richland Washington; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; et al

    2014-11-27

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developedmore » using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.« less

  4. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; USA, Richland Washington; Sun, Yannan; USA, Richland Washington; Martinez, Jayson J.; USA, Richland Washington; Fu, Tao; USA, Richland Washington; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; USA, Richland Washington; Carlson, Thomas J.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-11-27

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.

  5. Fault tolerance in an inner-outer solver: A GVR-enabled case study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ziming; Chien, Andrew A.; Teranishi, Keita

    2015-04-18

    Resilience is a major challenge for large-scale systems. It is particularly important for iterative linear solvers, since they take much of the time of many scientific applications. We show that single bit flip errors in the Flexible GMRES iterative linear solver can lead to high computational overhead or even failure to converge to the right answer. Informed by these results, we design and evaluate several strategies for fault tolerance in both inner and outer solvers appropriate across a range of error rates. We implement them, extending Trilinos’ solver library with the Global View Resilience (GVR) programming model, which provides multi-stream snapshots, multi-version data structures with portable and rich error checking/recovery. Lastly, experimental results validate correct execution with low performance overhead under varied error conditions.

  6. A novel high-order, entropy stable, 3D AMR MHD solver with guaranteed positive pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derigs, Dominik; Winters, Andrew R.; Gassner, Gregor J.; Walch, Stefanie

    2016-07-01

    We describe a high-order numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) solver built upon a novel non-linear entropy stable numerical flux function that supports eight travelling wave solutions. By construction the solver conserves mass, momentum, and energy and is entropy stable. The method is designed to treat the divergence-free constraint on the magnetic field in a similar fashion to a hyperbolic divergence cleaning technique. The solver described herein is especially well-suited for flows involving strong discontinuities. Furthermore, we present a new formulation to guarantee positivity of the pressure. We present the underlying theory and implementation of the new solver into the multi-physics, multi-scale adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) simulation code FLASH (http://flash.uchicago.edu)

  7. The use of inexact ODE solver in waveform relaxation methods on a massively parallel computer

    SciTech Connect

    Luk, W.S.; Wing, O.

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents the use of inexact ordinary differential equation (ODE) solver in waveform relaxation methods for solving initial value problems: Since the conventional ODE solvers are inherently sequential, the inexact ODE solver is used by taking time points from only previous waveform iteration for time integration. As a result, this method is truly massively parallel, as the equation is completely unfolded both in system and in time. Convergence analysis shows that the spectral radius of the iteration equation resulting from the {open_quotes}inexact{close_quotes} solver is the same as that from the standard method, and hence the new method is robust. The parallel implementation issues on the DECmpp 12000/Sx computer will also be discussed. Numerical results illustrate that though the number of iterations in the inexact method is increased over the exact method, as expected, the computation time is much reduced because of the large-scale parallelism.

  8. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; Sun, Yannan; Martinez, Jayson J.; Fu, Tao; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature. PMID:25427517

  9. i QIST: An open source continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo impurity solver toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Li; Wang, Yilin; Meng, Zi Yang; Du, Liang; Werner, Philipp; Dai, Xi

    2015-10-01

    Quantum impurity solvers have a broad range of applications in theoretical studies of strongly correlated electron systems. Especially, they play a key role in dynamical mean-field theory calculations of correlated lattice models and realistic materials. Therefore, the development and implementation of efficient quantum impurity solvers is an important task. In this paper, we present an open source interacting quantum impurity solver toolkit (dubbed i QIST). This package contains several highly optimized quantum impurity solvers which are based on the hybridization expansion continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo algorithm, as well as some essential pre- and post-processing tools. We first introduce the basic principle of continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo algorithm and then discuss the implementation details and optimization strategies. The software framework, major features, and installation procedure for i QIST are also explained. Finally, several simple tutorials are presented in order to demonstrate the usage and power of i QIST.

  10. A novel high-order, entropy stable, 3D AMR MHD solver with guaranteed positive pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derigs, Dominik; Winters, Andrew R.; Gassner, Gregor J.; Walch, Stefanie

    2016-07-01

    We describe a high-order numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) solver built upon a novel non-linear entropy stable numerical flux function that supports eight travelling wave solutions. By construction the solver conserves mass, momentum, and energy and is entropy stable. The method is designed to treat the divergence-free constraint on the magnetic field in a similar fashion to a hyperbolic divergence cleaning technique. The solver described herein is especially well-suited for flows involving strong discontinuities. Furthermore, we present a new formulation to guarantee positivity of the pressure. We present the underlying theory and implementation of the new solver into the multi-physics, multi-scale adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) simulation code FLASH (http://flash.uchicago.edu).

  11. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z Daniel; Sun, Yannan; Martinez, Jayson J; Fu, Tao; McMichael, Geoffrey A; Carlson, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature. PMID:25427517

  12. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; Sun, Yannan; Martinez, Jayson J.; Fu, Tao; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2014-11-01

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.

  13. Finite difference method accelerated with sparse solvers for structural analysis of the metal-organic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guda, A. A.; Guda, S. A.; Soldatov, M. A.; Lomachenko, K. A.; Bugaev, A. L.; Lamberti, C.; Gawelda, W.; Bressler, C.; Smolentsev, G.; Soldatov, A. V.; Joly, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Finite difference method (FDM) implemented in the FDMNES software [Phys. Rev. B, 2001, 63, 125120] was revised. Thorough analysis shows, that the calculated diagonal in the FDM matrix consists of about 96% zero elements. Thus a sparse solver would be more suitable for the problem instead of traditional Gaussian elimination for the diagonal neighbourhood. We have tried several iterative sparse solvers and the direct one MUMPS solver with METIS ordering turned out to be the best. Compared to the Gaussian solver present method is up to 40 times faster and allows XANES simulations for complex systems already on personal computers. We show applicability of the software for metal-organic [Fe(bpy)3]2+ complex both for low spin and high spin states populated after laser excitation.

  14. Fault tolerance in an inner-outer solver: A GVR-enabled case study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Ziming; Chien, Andrew A.; Teranishi, Keita

    2015-04-18

    Resilience is a major challenge for large-scale systems. It is particularly important for iterative linear solvers, since they take much of the time of many scientific applications. We show that single bit flip errors in the Flexible GMRES iterative linear solver can lead to high computational overhead or even failure to converge to the right answer. Informed by these results, we design and evaluate several strategies for fault tolerance in both inner and outer solvers appropriate across a range of error rates. We implement them, extending Trilinos’ solver library with the Global View Resilience (GVR) programming model, which provides multi-streammore » snapshots, multi-version data structures with portable and rich error checking/recovery. Lastly, experimental results validate correct execution with low performance overhead under varied error conditions.« less

  15. A two-dimensional HLLC Riemann solver for conservation laws: Application to Euler and magnetohydrodynamic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsara, Dinshaw S.

    2012-09-01

    In this paper we present a genuinely two-dimensional HLLC Riemann solver. On logically rectangular meshes, it accepts four input states that come together at an edge and outputs the multi-dimensionally upwinded fluxes in both directions. This work builds on, and improves, our prior work on two-dimensional HLL Riemann solvers. The HLL Riemann solver presented here achieves its stabilization by introducing a constant state in the region of strong interaction, where four one-dimensional Riemann problems interact vigorously with one another. A robust version of the HLL Riemann solver is presented here along with a strategy for introducing sub-structure in the strongly-interacting state. Introducing sub-structure turns the two-dimensional HLL Riemann solver into a two-dimensional HLLC Riemann solver. The sub-structure that we introduce represents a contact discontinuity which can be oriented in any direction relative to the mesh. The Riemann solver presented here is general and can work with any system of conservation laws. We also present a second order accurate Godunov scheme that works in three dimensions and is entirely based on the present multidimensional HLLC Riemann solver technology. The methods presented are cost-competitive with traditional higher order Godunov schemes. The two-dimensional HLLC Riemann solver is shown to work robustly for Euler and Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows. Several stringent test problems are presented to show that the inclusion of genuinely multidimensional effects into higher order Godunov schemes indeed produces some very compelling advantages. For two dimensional problems, we were routinely able to run simulations with CFL numbers of ˜0.7, with some two-dimensional simulations capable of reaching higher CFL numbers. For three dimensional problems, CFL numbers as high as ˜0.6 were found to be stable. We show that on resolution-starved meshes, the scheme presented here outperforms unsplit second order Godunov schemes that are based

  16. Maxwell solvers for the simulations of the laser-matter interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuter, Rachel; Grech, Mickael; Gonzalez de Alaiza Martinez, Pedro; Bonnaud, Guy; d'Humières, Emmanuel

    2014-06-01

    With the advent of high intensity laser beams, solving the Maxwell equations with a free-dispersive algorithm is becoming essential. Several Maxwell solvers, implemented in Particle-In-Cell codes, have been proposed. We present here some of them by describing their computational stencil in two-dimensional geometry and defining their stability area as well as their numerical dispersion relation. Numerical simulations of Backward Raman amplification and laser wake-field are presented to compare these different solvers.

  17. The development of an intelligent interface to a computational fluid dynamics flow-solver code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Anthony D.

    1988-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Lewis are currently developing an 'intelligent' interface to aid in the development and use of large, computational fluid dynamics flow-solver codes for studying the internal fluid behavior of aerospace propulsion systems. This paper discusses the requirements, design, and implementation of an intelligent interface to Proteus, a general purpose, 3-D, Navier-Stokes flow solver. The interface is called PROTAIS to denote its introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) concepts to the Proteus code.

  18. The development of an intelligent interface to a computational fluid dynamics flow-solver code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Anthony D.

    1988-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Lewis are currently developing an 'intelligent' interface to aid in the development and use of large, computational fluid dynamics flow-solver codes for studying the internal fluid behavior of aerospace propulsion systems. This paper discusses the requirements, design, and implementation of an intelligent interface to Proteus, a general purpose, three-dimensional, Navier-Stokes flow solver. The interface is called PROTAIS to denote its introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) concepts to the Proteus code.

  19. Implementation of a parallel unstructured Euler solver on the CM-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morano, Eric; Mavriplis, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    An efficient unstructured 3D Euler solver is parallelized on a Thinking Machine Corporation Connection Machine 5, distributed memory computer with vectoring capability. In this paper, the single instruction multiple data (SIMD) strategy is employed through the use of the CM Fortran language and the CMSSL scientific library. The performance of the CMSSL mesh partitioner is evaluated and the overall efficiency of the parallel flow solver is discussed.

  20. Eigenvalue calculation procedure for an Euler/Navier-Stokes solver with application to flows over airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahajan, Aparajit J.; Dowell, Earl H.; Bliss, Donald B.

    1991-01-01

    A Lanczos procedure is presently applied to a Navier-Stokes (N-S) solver for eigenvalues and eigenvectors associated with the small-perturbation analysis of the N-S equations' finite-difference representation for airfoil flows; the matrix used is very large, sparse, real, and nonsymmetric. The Lanczos procedure is shown to furnish complete spectral information for the eigenvalues, as required for transient-stability analysis of N-S solvers.

  1. Domain decomposition solvers for PDEs : some basics, practical tools, and new developments.

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, Clark R.

    2010-11-01

    The first part of this talk provides a basic introduction to the building blocks of domain decomposition solvers. Specific details are given for both the classical overlapping Schwarz (OS) algorithm and a recent iterative substructuring (IS) approach called balancing domain decomposition by constraints (BDDC). A more recent hybrid OS-IS approach is also described. The success of domain decomposition solvers depends critically on the coarse space. Similarities and differences between the coarse spaces for OS and BDDC approaches are discussed, along with how they can be obtained from discrete harmonic extensions. Connections are also made between coarse spaces and multiscale modeling approaches from computational mechanics. As a specific example, details are provided on constructing coarse spaces for incompressible fluid problems. The next part of the talk deals with a variety of implementation details for domain decomposition solvers. These include mesh partitioning options, local and global solver options, reducing the coarse space dimension, dealing with constraint equations, residual weighting to accelerate the convergence of OS methods, and recycling of Krylov spaces to efficiently solve problems with multiple right hand sides. Some potential bottlenecks and remedies for domain decomposition solvers are also discussed. The final part of the talk concerns some recent theoretical advances, new algorithms, and open questions in the analysis of domain decomposition solvers. The focus will be primarily on the work of the speaker and his colleagues on elasticity, fluid mechanics, problems in H(curl), and the analysis of subdomains with irregular boundaries.

  2. A numerically exact local solver applied to salt boundary inversion in seismic full-waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willemsen, Bram; Malcolm, Alison; Lewis, Winston

    2016-03-01

    In a set of problems ranging from 4-D seismic to salt boundary estimation, updates to the velocity model often have a highly localized nature. Numerical techniques for these applications such as full-waveform inversion (FWI) require an estimate of the wavefield to compute the model updates. When dealing with localized problems, it is wasteful to compute these updates in the global domain, when we only need them in our region of interest. This paper introduces a local solver that generates forward and adjoint wavefields which are, to machine precision, identical to those generated by a full-domain solver evaluated within the region of interest. This means that the local solver computes all interactions between model updates within the region of interest and the inhomogeneities in the background model outside. Because no approximations are made in the calculation of the forward and adjoint wavefields, the local solver can compute the identical gradient in the region of interest as would be computed by the more expensive full-domain solver. In this paper, the local solver is used to efficiently generate the FWI gradient at the boundary of a salt body. This gradient is then used in a level set method to automatically update the salt boundary.

  3. Fast Poisson, Fast Helmholtz and fast linear elastostatic solvers on rectangular parallelepipeds

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegmann, A.

    1999-06-01

    FFT-based fast Poisson and fast Helmholtz solvers on rectangular parallelepipeds for periodic boundary conditions in one-, two and three space dimensions can also be used to solve Dirichlet and Neumann boundary value problems. For non-zero boundary conditions, this is the special, grid-aligned case of jump corrections used in the Explicit Jump Immersed Interface method. Fast elastostatic solvers for periodic boundary conditions in two and three dimensions can also be based on the FFT. From the periodic solvers we derive fast solvers for the new 'normal' boundary conditions and essential boundary conditions on rectangular parallelepipeds. The periodic case allows a simple proof of existence and uniqueness of the solutions to the discretization of normal boundary conditions. Numerical examples demonstrate the efficiency of the fast elastostatic solvers for non-periodic boundary conditions. More importantly, the fast solvers on rectangular parallelepipeds can be used together with the Immersed Interface Method to solve problems on non-rectangular domains with general boundary conditions. Details of this are reported in the preprint The Explicit Jump Immersed Interface Method for 2D Linear Elastostatics by the author.

  4. Continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo impurity solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gull, Emanuel; Werner, Philipp; Fuchs, Sebastian; Surer, Brigitte; Pruschke, Thomas; Troyer, Matthias

    2011-04-01

    Continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo impurity solvers are algorithms that sample the partition function of an impurity model using diagrammatic Monte Carlo techniques. The present paper describes codes that implement the interaction expansion algorithm originally developed by Rubtsov, Savkin, and Lichtenstein, as well as the hybridization expansion method developed by Werner, Millis, Troyer, et al. These impurity solvers are part of the ALPS-DMFT application package and are accompanied by an implementation of dynamical mean-field self-consistency equations for (single orbital single site) dynamical mean-field problems with arbitrary densities of states. Program summaryProgram title: dmft Catalogue identifier: AEIL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEIL_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: ALPS LIBRARY LICENSE version 1.1 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 899 806 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 32 153 916 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Operating system: The ALPS libraries have been tested on the following platforms and compilers: Linux with GNU Compiler Collection (g++ version 3.1 and higher), and Intel C++ Compiler (icc version 7.0 and higher) MacOS X with GNU Compiler (g++ Apple-version 3.1, 3.3 and 4.0) IBM AIX with Visual Age C++ (xlC version 6.0) and GNU (g++ version 3.1 and higher) compilers Compaq Tru64 UNIX with Compq C++ Compiler (cxx) SGI IRIX with MIPSpro C++ Compiler (CC) HP-UX with HP C++ Compiler (aCC) Windows with Cygwin or coLinux platforms and GNU Compiler Collection (g++ version 3.1 and higher) RAM: 10 MB-1 GB Classification: 7.3 External routines: ALPS [1], BLAS/LAPACK, HDF5 Nature of problem: (See [2].) Quantum impurity models describe an atom or molecule embedded in a host material with which it can exchange electrons. They are basic to nanoscience as

  5. A Radiation Transfer Solver for Athena Using Short Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Shane W.; Stone, James M.; Jiang, Yan-Fei

    2012-03-01

    We describe the implementation of a module for the Athena magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code that solves the time-independent, multi-frequency radiative transfer (RT) equation on multidimensional Cartesian simulation domains, including scattering and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) effects. The module is based on well known and well tested algorithms developed for modeling stellar atmospheres, including the method of short characteristics to solve the RT equation, accelerated Lambda iteration to handle scattering and non-LTE effects, and parallelization via domain decomposition. The module serves several purposes: it can be used to generate spectra and images, to compute a variable Eddington tensor (VET) for full radiation MHD simulations, and to calculate the heating and cooling source terms in the MHD equations in flows where radiation pressure is small compared with gas pressure. For the latter case, the module is combined with the standard MHD integrators using operator splitting: we describe this approach in detail, including a new constraint on the time step for stability due to radiation diffusion modes. Implementation of the VET method for radiation pressure dominated flows is described in a companion paper. We present results from a suite of test problems for both the RT solver itself and for dynamical problems that include radiative heating and cooling. These tests demonstrate that the radiative transfer solution is accurate and confirm that the operator split method is stable, convergent, and efficient for problems of interest. We demonstrate there is no need to adopt ad hoc assumptions of questionable accuracy to solve RT problems in concert with MHD: the computational cost for our general-purpose module for simple (e.g., LTE gray) problems can be comparable to or less than a single time step of Athena's MHD integrators, and only few times more expensive than that for more general (non-LTE) problems.

  6. A RADIATION TRANSFER SOLVER FOR ATHENA USING SHORT CHARACTERISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Shane W.; Stone, James M.; Jiang Yanfei

    2012-03-01

    We describe the implementation of a module for the Athena magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code that solves the time-independent, multi-frequency radiative transfer (RT) equation on multidimensional Cartesian simulation domains, including scattering and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) effects. The module is based on well known and well tested algorithms developed for modeling stellar atmospheres, including the method of short characteristics to solve the RT equation, accelerated Lambda iteration to handle scattering and non-LTE effects, and parallelization via domain decomposition. The module serves several purposes: it can be used to generate spectra and images, to compute a variable Eddington tensor (VET) for full radiation MHD simulations, and to calculate the heating and cooling source terms in the MHD equations in flows where radiation pressure is small compared with gas pressure. For the latter case, the module is combined with the standard MHD integrators using operator splitting: we describe this approach in detail, including a new constraint on the time step for stability due to radiation diffusion modes. Implementation of the VET method for radiation pressure dominated flows is described in a companion paper. We present results from a suite of test problems for both the RT solver itself and for dynamical problems that include radiative heating and cooling. These tests demonstrate that the radiative transfer solution is accurate and confirm that the operator split method is stable, convergent, and efficient for problems of interest. We demonstrate there is no need to adopt ad hoc assumptions of questionable accuracy to solve RT problems in concert with MHD: the computational cost for our general-purpose module for simple (e.g., LTE gray) problems can be comparable to or less than a single time step of Athena's MHD integrators, and only few times more expensive than that for more general (non-LTE) problems.

  7. A two-dimensional fast solver for arbitrary vortex distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.H.; Baty, R.S.

    1997-04-01

    A method which is capable of an efficient calculation of the two-dimensional stream function and velocity field produced by a large system of vortices is presented in this report. This work is based on the adaptive scheme of Carrier, Greengard, and Rokhlin with the added feature that the evaluation or target points do not have to coincide with the location of the source or vortex positions. A simple algorithm based on numerical experiments has been developed to optimize the method for cases where the number of vortices N{sub V} differs significantly from the number of target points N{sub T}. The ability to specify separate source and target fields provides an efficient means for calculating boundary conditions, trajectories of passive scalar quantities, and stream-function plots, etc. Test cases have been run to benchmark the truncation errors and CPU time savings associated with the method. For six terms in the series expansions, non-dimensional truncation errors for the magnitudes of the complex potential and velocity fields are on the order of 10{sup {minus}5} and 10{sup {minus}3} respectively. The authors found that the CPU time scales as {radical}(N{sub V}N{sub T}) for N{sub V}/N{sub T} in the range of 0.1 to 10. For {radical}(N{sub V}N{sub T}) less than 200, there is virtually no CPU time savings while for {radical}N{sub V}N{sub T} roughly equal to 20,000, the fast solver obtains solutions in about 1% of the time required for the direct solution technique depending somewhat upon the configuration of the vortex field and the target field.

  8. Finite Element Simulation of a Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Aft Skirt Splashdown Using an Arbitrary Lagrangian-eulerian Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melis, Matthew E.

    2003-01-01

    Explicit finite element techniques employing an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methodology, within the transient dynamic code LS-DYNA, are used to predict splashdown loads on a proposed replacement/upgrade of the hydrazine tanks on the thrust vector control system housed within the aft skirt of a Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster. Two preliminary studies are performed prior to the full aft skirt analysis: An analysis of the proposed tank impacting water without supporting aft skirt structure, and an analysis of space capsule water drop tests conducted at NASA's Langley Research Center. Results from the preliminary studies provide confidence that useful predictions can be made by applying the ALE methodology to a detailed analysis of a 26-degree section of the skirt with proposed tank attached. Results for all three studies are presented and compared to limited experimental data. The challenges of using the LS-DYNA ALE capability for this type of analysis are discussed.

  9. Solution of Euler's Equations of Motion and Eulerian Angles for near symmetric rigid bodies subject to constant moments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longuski, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Analytic expressions are found for Euler's Equations of Motion and for the Eulerian Angles for both symmetric and near symmetric rigid bodies under the influence of arbitrary constant body-fixed torques. These solutions provide the body-fixed angular velocities and the attitude of the body, respectively, as functions of time. They are of special interest in applications to spinning spacecraft (such as the Galileo Spacecraft to be launched in 1984) because they include the effect of time-varying spin rate. Thus they can be applied to spin-up and spin-down maneuvers as well as to error analysis for thruster misalignments. The solutions are given for arbitrary initial conditions in terms of Fresnel, Sine and Cosine Integrals. Numerical integration of the governing differential equations has verified that the approximate analytic solutions are very accurate in many physical situations of interest.

  10. Modelling of macrosegregation in direct chill casting considering columnar-to-equiaxed transition using 3-phase Eulerian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, J.; Lin, Y. J.; Nie, Y.; Wu, M.; Ludwig, A.

    2015-06-01

    A 3-phase Eulerian approach is used to model the macrosegregation during solidification in direct chill (DC) casting of binary bronze (Cu-Sn). The three phases are the melt, the solidifying columnar dendrites and the equiaxed grains. The thermodynamic information of Cu-Sn is included based on published thermodynamic data, which are coupled with the 3-phase solidification model. The occurrence of columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET), phase interactions, feeding flow, equiaxed sedimentation and their influence on macrosegregation are considered in the model. The model is applied to a laboratory DC casting process of bronze as a benchmark to demonstrate the model potentials. The simulation results of mixed columnar and equiaxed solidification as well as the formation of macrosegregation are presented. The focus of this work is to analyze and discuss the macrosegregation mechanisms by different flow including feeding flow and crystal sedimentation.

  11. Finite Element Simulation of a Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Aft Skirt Splashdown Using an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melis, Matthew E.

    2003-01-01

    Explicit finite element techniques employing an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methodology, within the transient dynamic code LS-DYNA, are used to predict splashdown loads on a proposed replacement/upgrade of the hydrazine tanks on the thrust vector control system housed within the aft skirt of a Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster. Two preliminary studies are performed prior to the full aft skirt analysis: An analysis of the proposed tank impacting water without supporting aft skirt structure, and an analysis of space capsule water drop tests conducted at NASA's Langley Research Center. Results from the preliminary studies provide confidence that useful predictions can be made by applying the ALE methodology to a detailed analysis of a 26-degree section of the skirt with proposed tank attached. Results for all three studies are presented and compared to limited experimental data. The challenges of using the LS-DYNA ALE capability for this type of analysis are discussed.

  12. Lagrangian and Eulerian analysis of transport and mixing in the three dimensional, time dependent Hill's spherical vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIlhany, Kevin L.; Guth, Stephen; Wiggins, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we extend the notion of Eulerian indicators (EIs), previously developed for two dimensional time dependent flows, to three dimensional time dependent flows, where the time dependence can be arbitrary. These are applied to a study of transport and mixing in the Hill's spherical vortex subject to a linear strain rate field. We consider the axisymmetric case and the fully three dimensional case with different types of time dependence. We develop a Lagrangian characterization of transport and mixing appropriate for open three dimensional flows and we show that the EIs provide a detailed description of the flow structure that can be correlated with the Lagrangian transport and mixing results. The EIs yield results consistent with the dynamics of the Hill's vortex flow characteristics, correlation with transverse shear, and anti-correlation with transversality.

  13. A finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint method for solution of the advection-dispersion equation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, R.W.; Russell, T.F.

    1993-01-01

    Test results demonstrate that the finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint method (FVELLAM) outperforms standard finite-difference methods for solute transport problems that are dominated by advection. FVELLAM systematically conserves mass globally with all types of boundary conditions. Integrated finite differences, instead of finite elements, are used to approximate the governing equation. This approach, in conjunction with a forward tracking scheme, greatly facilitates mass conservation. The mass storage integral is numerically evaluated at the current time level, and quadrature points are then tracked forward in time to the next level. Forward tracking permits straightforward treatment of inflow boundaries, thus avoiding the inherent problem in backtracking of characteristic lines intersecting inflow boundaries. FVELLAM extends previous results by obtaining mass conservation locally on Lagrangian space-time elements. -from Authors

  14. A combined Eulerian-Lagrangian two-phase flow analysis of SSME HPOTP nozzle plug trajectories. I - Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Jong, Frederik J.; Sabnis, Jayant S.; Mcconnaughey, Paul K.

    1989-01-01

    A computer code has been developed for the analysis of SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine) HPOTP (High Pressure Oxidizer Turbo Pump) nozzle plug trajectories in the turnaround duct downstream of the turbine. The algorithm is based on a combined Eulerian-Lagrangian analysis originally developed for the study of two-phase flows. The Lagrangian part of this analysis has been enhanced to include three-dimensional particle motion and the effect of particle-wall collisions in complex geometries (with a large number of boundaries). The sensitivity of the nozzle plug trajectories to a variety of parameters has been determined, via the qualitative analysis of a select number of computed trajectories. The results of extensive parametric studies have been reported in a companion paper.

  15. Efficient IMRT inverse planning with a new L1-solver: template for first-order conic solver.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hojin; Suh, Tae-Suk; Lee, Rena; Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2012-07-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) inverse planning using total-variation (TV) regularization has been proposed to reduce the complexity of fluence maps and facilitate dose delivery. Conventionally, the optimization problem with L-1 norm is solved with quadratic programming (QP), which is time consuming and memory expensive due to the second-order Newton update. This study proposes to use a new algorithm, template for first-order conic solver (TFOCS), for fast and memory-efficient optimization in IMRT inverse planning. The TFOCS utilizes dual-variable updates and first-order approaches for TV minimization without the need to compute and store the enlarged Hessian matrix required for Newton update in the QP technique. To evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method, two clinical cases were used for IMRT inverse planning: a head and neck case and a prostate case. For comparison, the conventional QP-based method for the TV form was adopted to solve the fluence map optimization problem in the above two cases. The convergence criteria and algorithm parameters were selected to achieve similar dose conformity for a fair comparison between the two methods. Compared with conventional QP-based approach, the proposed TFOCS-based method shows a remarkable improvement in computational efficiency for fluence map optimization, while maintaining the conformal dose distribution. Compared with QP-based algorithms, the computational speed using TFOCS for fluence optimization is increased by a factor of 4 to 6, and at the same time the memory requirement is reduced by a factor of 3 to 4. Therefore, TFOCS provides an effective, fast and memory-efficient method for IMRT inverse planning. The unique features of the approach should be particularly important in inverse planning involving a large number of beams, such as in VMAT and dense angularly sampled and sparse intensity modulated radiation therapy (DASSIM-RT). PMID:22683930

  16. Lagrangian or Eulerian; real or Fourier? Not all approaches to large-scale structure are created equal

    SciTech Connect

    Tassev, Svetlin

    2014-06-01

    We present a pedagogical systematic investigation of the accuracy of Eulerian and Lagrangian perturbation theories of large-scale structure. We show that significant differences exist between them especially when trying to model the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO). We find that the best available model of the BAO in real space is the Zel'dovich Approximation (ZA), giving an accuracy of ∼<3% at redshift of z = 0 in modelling the matter 2-pt function around the acoustic peak. All corrections to the ZA around the BAO scale are perfectly perturbative in real space. Any attempt to achieve better precision requires calibrating the theory to simulations because of the need to renormalize those corrections. In contrast, theories which do not fully preserve the ZA as their solution, receive O(1) corrections around the acoustic peak in real space at z = 0, and are thus of suspicious convergence at low redshift around the BAO. As an example, we find that a similar accuracy of 3% for the acoustic peak is achieved by Eulerian Standard Perturbation Theory (SPT) at linear order only at z ≈ 4. Thus even when SPT is perturbative, one needs to include loop corrections for z∼<4 in real space. In Fourier space, all models perform similarly, and are controlled by the overdensity amplitude, thus recovering standard results. However, that comes at a price. Real space cleanly separates the BAO signal from non-linear dynamics. In contrast, Fourier space mixes signal from short mildly non-linear scales with the linear signal from the BAO to the level that non-linear contributions from short scales dominate. Therefore, one has little hope in constructing a systematic theory for the BAO in Fourier space.

  17. Users` manual for LEHGC: A Lagrangian-Eulerian Finite-Element Model of Hydrogeochemical Transport Through Saturated-Unsaturated Media. Version 1.1

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Gour-Tsyh; Carpenter, S.L.; Hopkins, P.L.; Siegel, M.D.

    1995-11-01

    The computer program LEHGC is a Hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian Finite-Element Model of HydroGeo-Chemical (LEHGC) Transport Through Saturated-Unsaturated Media. LEHGC iteratively solves two-dimensional transport and geochemical equilibrium equations and is a descendant of HYDROGEOCHEM, a strictly Eulerian finite-element reactive transport code. The hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian scheme improves on the Eulerian scheme by allowing larger time steps to be used in the advection-dominant transport calculations. This causes less numerical dispersion and alleviates the problem of calculated negative concentrations at sharp concentration fronts. The code also is more computationally efficient than the strictly Eulerian version. LEHGC is designed for generic application to reactive transport problems associated with contaminant transport in subsurface media. Input to the program includes the geometry of the system, the spatial distribution of finite elements and nodes, the properties of the media, the potential chemical reactions, and the initial and boundary conditions. Output includes the spatial distribution of chemical element concentrations as a function of time and space and the chemical speciation at user-specified nodes. LEHGC Version 1.1 is a modification of LEHGC Version 1.0. The modification includes: (1) devising a tracking algorithm with the computational effort proportional to N where N is the number of computational grid nodes rather than N{sup 2} as in LEHGC Version 1.0, (2) including multiple adsorbing sites and multiple ion-exchange sites, (3) using four preconditioned conjugate gradient methods for the solution of matrix equations, and (4) providing a model for some features of solute transport by colloids.

  18. Efficient Parallel Kernel Solvers for Computational Fluid Dynamics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xian-He

    1997-01-01

    Distributed-memory parallel computers dominate today's parallel computing arena. These machines, such as Intel Paragon, IBM SP2, and Cray Origin2OO, have successfully delivered high performance computing power for solving some of the so-called "grand-challenge" problems. Despite initial success, parallel machines have not been widely accepted in production engineering environments due to the complexity of parallel programming. On a parallel computing system, a task has to be partitioned and distributed appropriately among processors to reduce communication cost and to attain load balance. More importantly, even with careful partitioning and mapping, the performance of an algorithm may still be unsatisfactory, since conventional sequential algorithms may be serial in nature and may not be implemented efficiently on parallel machines. In many cases, new algorithms have to be introduced to increase parallel performance. In order to achieve optimal performance, in addition to partitioning and mapping, a careful performance study should be conducted for a given application to find a good algorithm-machine combination. This process, however, is usually painful and elusive. The goal of this project is to design and develop efficient parallel algorithms for highly accurate Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations and other engineering applications. The work plan is 1) developing highly accurate parallel numerical algorithms, 2) conduct preliminary testing to verify the effectiveness and potential of these algorithms, 3) incorporate newly developed algorithms into actual simulation packages. The work plan has well achieved. Two highly accurate, efficient Poisson solvers have been developed and tested based on two different approaches: (1) Adopting a mathematical geometry which has a better capacity to describe the fluid, (2) Using compact scheme to gain high order accuracy in numerical discretization. The previously developed Parallel Diagonal Dominant (PDD) algorithm

  19. Solving Upwind-Biased Discretizations. 2; Multigrid Solver Using Semicoarsening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris

    1999-01-01

    This paper studies a novel multigrid approach to the solution for a second order upwind biased discretization of the convection equation in two dimensions. This approach is based on semi-coarsening and well balanced explicit correction terms added to coarse-grid operators to maintain on coarse-grid the same cross-characteristic interaction as on the target (fine) grid. Colored relaxation schemes are used on all the levels allowing a very efficient parallel implementation. The results of the numerical tests can be summarized as follows: 1) The residual asymptotic convergence rate of the proposed V(0, 2) multigrid cycle is about 3 per cycle. This convergence rate far surpasses the theoretical limit (4/3) predicted for standard multigrid algorithms using full coarsening. The reported efficiency does not deteriorate with increasing the cycle, depth (number of levels) and/or refining the target-grid mesh spacing. 2) The full multi-grid algorithm (FMG) with two V(0, 2) cycles on the target grid and just one V(0, 2) cycle on all the coarse grids always provides an approximate solution with the algebraic error less than the discretization error. Estimates of the total work in the FMG algorithm are ranged between 18 and 30 minimal work units (depending on the target (discretizatioin). Thus, the overall efficiency of the FMG solver closely approaches (if does not achieve) the goal of the textbook multigrid efficiency. 3) A novel approach to deriving a discrete solution approximating the true continuous solution with a relative accuracy given in advance is developed. An adaptive multigrid algorithm (AMA) using comparison of the solutions on two successive target grids to estimate the accuracy of the current target-grid solution is defined. A desired relative accuracy is accepted as an input parameter. The final target grid on which this accuracy can be achieved is chosen automatically in the solution process. the actual relative accuracy of the discrete solution approximation

  20. A Computationally Efficient Multicomponent Equilibrium Solver for Aerosols (MESA)

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.; Peters, Len K.

    2005-12-23

    This paper describes the development and application of a new multicomponent equilibrium solver for aerosol-phase (MESA) to predict the complex solid-liquid partitioning in atmospheric particles containing H+, NH4+, Na+, Ca2+, SO4=, HSO4-, NO3-, and Cl- ions. The algorithm of MESA involves integrating the set of ordinary differential equations describing the transient precipitation and dissolution reactions for each salt until the system satisfies the equilibrium or mass convergence criteria. Arbitrary values are chosen for the dissolution and precipitation rate constants such that their ratio is equal to the equilibrium constant. Numerically, this approach is equivalent to iterating all the equilibrium reactions simultaneously with a single iteration loop. Because CaSO4 is sparingly soluble, it is assumed to exist as a solid over the entire RH range to simplify the algorithm for calcium containing particles. Temperature-dependent mutual deliquescence relative humidity polynomials (valid from 240 to 310 K) for all the possible salt mixtures were constructed using the comprehensive Pitzer-Simonson-Clegg (PSC) activity coefficient model at 298.15 K and temperature-dependent equilibrium constants in MESA. Performance of MESA is evaluated for 16 representative mixed-electrolyte systems commonly found in tropospheric aerosols using PSC and two other multicomponent activity coefficient methods – Multicomponent Taylor Expansion Method (MTEM) of Zaveri et al. [2004], and the widely-used Kusik and Meissner method (KM), and the results are compared against the predictions of the Web-based AIM Model III or available experimental data. Excellent agreement was found between AIM, MESA-PSC, and MESA-MTEM predictions of the multistage deliquescence growth as a function of RH. On the other hand, MESA-KM displayed up to 20% deviations in the mass growth factors for common salt mixtures in the sulfate-poor cases while significant discrepancies were found in the predicted multistage

  1. MODFLOW-2000, The U.S. Geological Survey Modular Ground-Water Model -- GMG Linear Equation Solver Package Documentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, John D.; Naff, Richard L.

    2004-01-01

    A geometric multigrid solver (GMG), based in the preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm, has been developed for solving systems of equations resulting from applying the cell-centered finite difference algorithm to flow in porous media. This solver has been adapted to the U.S. Geological Survey ground-water flow model MODFLOW-2000. The documentation herein is a description of the solver and the adaptation to MODFLOW-2000.

  2. Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers (FEI) version 2.9 : users guide and reference manual.

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Alan B.

    2005-02-01

    The Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers (FEI) is a linear system assembly library. Sparse systems of linear equations arise in many computational engineering applications, and the solution of linear systems is often the most computationally intensive portion of the application. Depending on the complexity of problems addressed by the application, there may be no single solver package capable of solving all of the linear systems that arise. This motivates the need to switch an application from one solver library to another, depending on the problem being solved. The interfaces provided by various solver libraries for data assembly and problem solution differ greatly, making it difficult to switch an application code from one library to another. The amount of library-specific code in an application can be greatly reduced by having an abstraction layer that puts a 'common face' on various solver libraries. The FEI has seen significant use by finite element applications at Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The original FEI offered several advantages over using linear algebra libraries directly, but also imposed significant limitations and disadvantages. A new set of interfaces has been added with the goal of removing the limitations of the original FEI while maintaining and extending its strengths.

  3. Computer implementations of iterative and non-iterative crystal plasticity solvers on high performance graphics hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, Daniel J.; Knezevic, Marko

    2015-10-01

    We present parallel implementations of Newton-Raphson iterative and spectral based non-iterative solvers for single-crystal visco-plasticity models on a specialized computer hardware integrating a graphics-processing unit (GPU). We explore two implementations for the iterative solver on GPU multiprocessors: one based on a thread per crystal parallelization on local memory and another based on multiple threads per crystal on shared memory. The non-iterative solver implementation on the GPU hardware is based on a divide-conquer approach for matrix operations. The reduction of computational time for the iterative scheme was found to approach one order of magnitude. From detailed performance comparisons of the developed GPU iterative and non-iterative implementations, we conclude that the spectral non-iterative solver programed on a GPU platform is superior over the iterative implementation in terms of runtime as well as ease of implementation. It provides remarkable speedup factors exceeding three orders of magnitude over the iterative scalar version of the solver.

  4. Building a Dispersion Relation Solver for Hot Plasmas with Arbitrary Non-relativistic Parallel Velocity Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X.; Waters, T.; Gary, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    Collisionless space plasmas often deviate from Maxwellian-like velocity distributions. To study kinetic waves and instabilities in such plasmas, the dispersion relation, which depends on the velocity distribution, needs to be solved numerically. Most current dispersion solvers (e.g. WHAMP) take advantage of mathematical properties of the Gaussian (or generalized Lorentzian) function, and assume that the velocity distributions can be modeled by a combination of several drift-Maxwellian (or drift-Lorentzian) components. In this study we are developing a kinetic dispersion solver that admits nearly arbitrary non-relativistic parallel velocity distributions. A key part of any dispersion solver is the evaluation of a Hilbert transform of the velocity distribution function and its derivative along Landau contours. Our new solver builds upon a recent method to compute the Hilbert transform accurately and efficiently using the fast Fourier transform, while simultaneously treating the singularities arising from resonances analytically. We have benchmarked our new solver against other codes dealing with Maxwellian distributions. As an example usage of our code, we will show results for several instabilities that occur for electron velocity distributions observed in the solar wind.

  5. Application of NASA General-Purpose Solver to Large-Scale Computations in Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Storaasli, Olaf O.

    2004-01-01

    Of several iterative and direct equation solvers evaluated previously for computations in aeroacoustics, the most promising was the NASA-developed General-Purpose Solver (winner of NASA's 1999 software of the year award). This paper presents detailed, single-processor statistics of the performance of this solver, which has been tailored and optimized for large-scale aeroacoustic computations. The statistics, compiled using an SGI ORIGIN 2000 computer with 12 Gb available memory (RAM) and eight available processors, are the central processing unit time, RAM requirements, and solution error. The equation solver is capable of solving 10 thousand complex unknowns in as little as 0.01 sec using 0.02 Gb RAM, and 8.4 million complex unknowns in slightly less than 3 hours using all 12 Gb. This latter solution is the largest aeroacoustics problem solved to date with this technique. The study was unable to detect any noticeable error in the solution, since noise levels predicted from these solution vectors are in excellent agreement with the noise levels computed from the exact solution. The equation solver provides a means for obtaining numerical solutions to aeroacoustics problems in three dimensions.

  6. Parallel performance investigations of an unstructured mesh Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    2000-01-01

    A Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver based on unstructured mesh techniques for analysis of high-lift configurations is described. The method makes use of an agglomeration multigrid solver for convergence acceleration. Implicit line-smoothing is employed to relieve the stiffness associated with highly stretched meshes. A GMRES technique is also implemented to speed convergence at the expense of additional memory usage. The solver is cache efficient and fully vectorizable, and is parallelized using a two-level hybrid MPI-OpenMP implementation suitable for shared and/or distributed memory architectures, as well as clusters of shared memory machines. Convergence and scalability results are illustrated for various high-lift cases.

  7. Effect of imposed boundary conditions on the accuracy of transport of intensity equation based solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Carranza, J.; Falaggis, K.; Kozacki, T.; Kujawinska, Malgorzata

    2013-05-01

    The transport of intensity equation (TIE) describes the relation between the object phase and the intensity distribution in the Fresnel region and can be used as a non-interferometric technique to estimate the phase distribution of an object. A number of techniques have been developed to solve the TIE. In this work we focus on one popular class of Poisson solvers that are based on Fourier and the Multigrid techniques. The aim of this paper is to present an analysis of these types of TIE solvers taking into account the effect of the boundary condition, i.e. the Neumann Boundary Condition (NBC), the Dirichlet Boundary Condition (DBC), and the Periodic Boundary Condition (PBC). This analysis, which depends on the location of an object wave-front in the detector plane, aims to identify the advantages and disadvantage of these kinds of solvers and to provide the rules for choice of the best fitted boundary condition.

  8. Prediction of ship resistance in head waves using RANS based solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Hafizul; Akimoto, Hiromichi

    2016-07-01

    Maneuverability prediction of ships using CFD has gained high popularity over the years because of its improving accuracy and economics. This paper discusses the estimation of calm water and added resistance properties of a KVLCC2 model using a light and economical RaNS based solver, called SHIP_Motion. The solver solves overset structured mesh using finite volume method. In the calm water test, total drag coefficient, sinkage and trim values were predicted together with mesh dependency analysis and compared with experimental data. For added resistance in head sea, short wave cases were simulated and compared with experimental and other simulation data. Overall the results were well predicted and showed good agreement with comparative data. The paper concludes that it is well possible to predict ship maneuverability characteristics using the present solver, with reasonable accuracy utilizing minimum computational resources and within acceptable time.

  9. Numerical Investigation of Vertical Plunging Jet Using a Hybrid Multifluid–VOF Multiphase CFD Solver

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shonibare, Olabanji Y.; Wardle, Kent E.

    2015-01-01

    A novel hybrid multiphase flow solver has been used to conduct simulations of a vertical plunging liquid jet. This solver combines a multifluid methodology with selective interface sharpening to enable simulation of both the initial jet impingement and the long-time entrained bubble plume phenomena. Models are implemented for variable bubble size capturing and dynamic switching of interface sharpened regions to capture transitions between the initially fully segregated flow types into the dispersed bubbly flow regime. It was found that the solver was able to capture the salient features of the flow phenomena under study and areas for quantitative improvement havemore » been explored and identified. In particular, a population balance approach is employed and detailed calibration of the underlying models with experimental data is required to enable quantitative prediction of bubble size and distribution to capture the transition between segregated and dispersed flow types with greater fidelity.« less

  10. Using a multifrontal sparse solver in a high performance, finite element code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Scott D.; Lucas, Robert; Raefsky, Arthur

    1990-01-01

    We consider the performance of the finite element method on a vector supercomputer. The computationally intensive parts of the finite element method are typically the individual element forms and the solution of the global stiffness matrix both of which are vectorized in high performance codes. To further increase throughput, new algorithms are needed. We compare a multifrontal sparse solver to a traditional skyline solver in a finite element code on a vector supercomputer. The multifrontal solver uses the Multiple-Minimum Degree reordering heuristic to reduce the number of operations required to factor a sparse matrix and full matrix computational kernels (e.g., BLAS3) to enhance vector performance. The net result in an order-of-magnitude reduction in run time for a finite element application on one processor of a Cray X-MP.

  11. Flutter and Forced Response Analyses of Cascades using a Two-Dimensional Linearized Euler Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Srivastava, R.; Mehmed, O.

    1999-01-01

    Flutter and forced response analyses for a cascade of blades in subsonic and transonic flow is presented. The structural model for each blade is a typical section with bending and torsion degrees of freedom. The unsteady aerodynamic forces due to bending and torsion motions. and due to a vortical gust disturbance are obtained by solving unsteady linearized Euler equations. The unsteady linearized equations are obtained by linearizing the unsteady nonlinear equations about the steady flow. The predicted unsteady aerodynamic forces include the effect of steady aerodynamic loading due to airfoil shape, thickness and angle of attack. The aeroelastic equations are solved in the frequency domain by coupling the un- steady aerodynamic forces to the aeroelastic solver MISER. The present unsteady aerodynamic solver showed good correlation with published results for both flutter and forced response predictions. Further improvements are required to use the unsteady aerodynamic solver in a design cycle.

  12. Parallel multigrid solver of radiative transfer equation for photon transport via graphics processing unit.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hao; Phan, Lan; Lin, Yuting

    2012-09-01

    A graphics processing unit-based parallel multigrid solver for a radiative transfer equation with vacuum boundary condition or reflection boundary condition is presented for heterogeneous media with complex geometry based on two-dimensional triangular meshes or three-dimensional tetrahedral meshes. The computational complexity of this parallel solver is linearly proportional to the degrees of freedom in both angular and spatial variables, while the full multigrid method is utilized to minimize the number of iterations. The overall gain of speed is roughly 30 to 300 fold with respect to our prior multigrid solver, which depends on the underlying regime and the parallelization. The numerical validations are presented with the MATLAB codes at https://sites.google.com/site/rtefastsolver/. PMID:23085905

  13. Frequency Domain Modelling by a Direct-Iterative Solver: A Space and Wavelet Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hustedt, B.; Operto, S.; Virieux, J.

    2002-12-01

    Seismic forward modelling of wave propagation phenomena in complex rheologic media using a frequency domain finite-difference (FDFD) technique is of special interest for multisource experiments and waveform inversion schemes, because the complete wavefield solution can be computed in a fast and efficient way. FDFD modelling requires the inversion of an extremely large matrix-equation A x x = b, by either a direct or an iterative solver. The direct solver computes an effective inverse of A, called LU factorization. The main handicap is additional computer memory required for storing matrix fill-in coefficients, that are created during the factorization process. Iterative solvers are not limited by memory constraints (additional coefficients), but the convergence depends on a good initial solution difficult to guess before hand. For both solvers, available computer resources has limited wide-spread FDFD modelling applications to mainly two-dimensional (2D) and rarely three-dimensional (3D) problems. In order to overcome these limits, we propose the combination of a direct solver and an iterative solver, called Direct-Iterative Solver (DIS). The direct solver is used to compute an exact wavefield solution on a coarse discretized grid. We use a multifrontal decomposition technique. The coarse-grid size is determined preliminary by limits of the available computer resources, rather than by the wave simulation problem. We project the exact coarse-grid solution on a fine-grid, and use it as an initial solution for an iterative solver, which convergences to an acceptable approximation of the desired fine-grid solution. Two different DIS schemes have been implemented and tested for numerical accuracy and computational performance. The first approach, called the Direct-Iterative-Space Solver (DISS), projects the coarse-grid solution on the fine-grid by a bilinear interpolation. Though the interpolated solution nicely approximates the desired fine-grid solution, still for

  14. Wavelet-based Poisson Solver for use in Particle-In-CellSimulations

    SciTech Connect

    Terzic, B.; Mihalcea, D.; Bohn, C.L.; Pogorelov, I.V.

    2005-05-13

    We report on a successful implementation of a wavelet based Poisson solver for use in 3D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. One new aspect of our algorithm is its ability to treat the general(inhomogeneous) Dirichlet boundary conditions (BCs). The solver harnesses advantages afforded by the wavelet formulation, such as sparsity of operators and data sets, existence of effective preconditioners, and the ability simultaneously to remove numerical noise and further compress relevant data sets. Having tested our method as a stand-alone solver on two model problems, we merged it into IMPACT-T to obtain a fully functional serial PIC code. We present and discuss preliminary results of application of the new code to the modeling of the Fermilab/NICADD and AES/JLab photoinjectors.

  15. A Parallel Multigrid Solver for Viscous Flows on Anisotropic Structured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prieto, Manuel; Montero, Ruben S.; Llorente, Ignacio M.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an efficient parallel multigrid solver for speeding up the computation of a 3-D model that treats the flow of a viscous fluid over a flat plate. The main interest of this simulation lies in exhibiting some basic difficulties that prevent optimal multigrid efficiencies from being achieved. As the computing platform, we have used Coral, a Beowulf-class system based on Intel Pentium processors and equipped with GigaNet cLAN and switched Fast Ethernet networks. Our study not only examines the scalability of the solver but also includes a performance evaluation of Coral where the investigated solver has been used to compare several of its design choices, namely, the interconnection network (GigaNet versus switched Fast-Ethernet) and the node configuration (dual nodes versus single nodes). As a reference, the performance results have been compared with those obtained with the NAS-MG benchmark.

  16. Efficiency optimization of a fast Poisson solver in beam dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Dawei; Pöplau, Gisela; van Rienen, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Calculating the solution of Poisson's equation relating to space charge force is still the major time consumption in beam dynamics simulations and calls for further improvement. In this paper, we summarize a classical fast Poisson solver in beam dynamics simulations: the integrated Green's function method. We introduce three optimization steps of the classical Poisson solver routine: using the reduced integrated Green's function instead of the integrated Green's function; using the discrete cosine transform instead of discrete Fourier transform for the Green's function; using a novel fast convolution routine instead of an explicitly zero-padded convolution. The new Poisson solver routine preserves the advantages of fast computation and high accuracy. This provides a fast routine for high performance calculation of the space charge effect in accelerators.

  17. Plasma wave simulation based on versatile FEM solver on Alcator C-mod

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraiwa, S.; Meneghini, O.; Parker, R.; Wallace, G.; Wilson, J.

    2009-11-26

    The finite element method (FEM) has the potential of simulating plasma waves seamlessly from the core to the vacuum and antenna regions. We explored the possibility of using a versatile FEM solver package, COMSOL, for lower hybrid (LH) wave simulation. Special care was paid to boundary conditions to satisfy toroidal symmetry. The non-trivial issue of introducing hot plasma effects was addressed by an iterative algorithm. These techniques are verified both analytically and numerically. In the lower hybrid (LH) grill antenna coupling problem, the FEM solver successfully reproduced the solution that was obtained analytically. Propagation of LH waves on the Alcator C and Alcator C-MOD plasmas was compared with a ray-tracing code, showing good consistency. The approach based on the FEM is computationally less intensive compared to spectral domain solvers, and more suitable for the simulation of larger device such as ITER.

  18. Galerkin CFD solvers for use in a multi-disciplinary suite for modeling advanced flight vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffitt, Nicholas J.

    This work extends existing Galerkin CFD solvers for use in a multi-disciplinary suite. The suite is proposed as a means of modeling advanced flight vehicles, which exhibit strong coupling between aerodynamics, structural dynamics, controls, rigid body motion, propulsion, and heat transfer. Such applications include aeroelastics, aeroacoustics, stability and control, and other highly coupled applications. The suite uses NASA STARS for modeling structural dynamics and heat transfer. Aerodynamics, propulsion, and rigid body dynamics are modeled in one of the five CFD solvers below. Euler2D and Euler3D are Galerkin CFD solvers created at OSU by Cowan (2003). These solvers are capable of modeling compressible inviscid aerodynamics with modal elastics and rigid body motion. This work reorganized these solvers to improve efficiency during editing and at run time. Simple and efficient propulsion models were added, including rocket, turbojet, and scramjet engines. Viscous terms were added to the previous solvers to create NS2D and NS3D. The viscous contributions were demonstrated in the inertial and non-inertial frames. Variable viscosity (Sutherland's equation) and heat transfer boundary conditions were added to both solvers but not verified in this work. Two turbulence models were implemented in NS2D and NS3D: Spalart-Allmarus (SA) model of Deck, et al. (2002) and Menter's SST model (1994). A rotation correction term (Shur, et al., 2000) was added to the production of turbulence. Local time stepping and artificial dissipation were adapted to each model. CFDsol is a Taylor-Galerkin solver with an SA turbulence model. This work improved the time accuracy, far field stability, viscous terms, Sutherland?s equation, and SA model with NS3D as a guideline and added the propulsion models from Euler3D to CFDsol. Simple geometries were demonstrated to utilize current meshing and processing capabilities. Air-breathing hypersonic flight vehicles (AHFVs) represent the ultimate

  19. A survey of the parallel performance and accuracy of Poisson solvers for electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    García-Risueño, Pablo; Alberdi-Rodriguez, Joseba; Oliveira, Micael J T; Andrade, Xavier; Pippig, Michael; Muguerza, Javier; Arruabarrena, Agustin; Rubio, Angel

    2014-03-01

    We present an analysis of different methods to calculate the classical electrostatic Hartree potential created by charge distributions. Our goal is to provide the reader with an estimation on the performance-in terms of both numerical complexity and accuracy-of popular Poisson solvers, and to give an intuitive idea on the way these solvers operate. Highly parallelizable routines have been implemented in a first-principle simulation code (Octopus) to be used in our tests, so that reliable conclusions about the capability of methods to tackle large systems in cluster computing can be obtained from our work. PMID:24249048

  20. Variable transfer methods for fluid-structure interaction computations with staggered solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaassen, J. M.; Klapka, I.; Leonard, B.; Hirsch, C.

    2009-09-01

    This paper intends to study methods that have been tested to transfer variables from one skin mesh to another (the two meshes being nonconform) in order to compute fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems with staggered solvers. The methods are a contact elements method developed by Stam, and different radial basis functions methods. The structure code is OOFELIE® developed at Open-Engineering (Belgium) and the fluid code is FINETM/Hexa developed at Numeca International (Belgium). The paper presents the performances of the methods on a simple variable transfer, and testcases that have been performed with the solver developed by the two companies.

  1. Newton-Raphson preconditioner for Krylov type solvers on GPU devices.

    PubMed

    Kushida, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    A new Newton-Raphson method based preconditioner for Krylov type linear equation solvers for GPGPU is developed, and the performance is investigated. Conventional preconditioners improve the convergence of Krylov type solvers, and perform well on CPUs. However, they do not perform well on GPGPUs, because of the complexity of implementing powerful preconditioners. The developed preconditioner is based on the BFGS Hessian matrix approximation technique, which is well known as a robust and fast nonlinear equation solver. Because the Hessian matrix in the BFGS represents the coefficient matrix of a system of linear equations in some sense, the approximated Hessian matrix can be a preconditioner. On the other hand, BFGS is required to store dense matrices and to invert them, which should be avoided on modern computers and supercomputers. To overcome these disadvantages, we therefore introduce a limited memory BFGS, which requires less memory space and less computational effort than the BFGS. In addition, a limited memory BFGS can be implemented with BLAS libraries, which are well optimized for target architectures. There are advantages and disadvantages to the Hessian matrix approximation becoming better as the Krylov solver iteration continues. The preconditioning matrix varies through Krylov solver iterations, and only flexible Krylov solvers can work well with the developed preconditioner. The GCR method, which is a flexible Krylov solver, is employed because of the prevalence of GCR as a Krylov solver with a variable preconditioner. As a result of the performance investigation, the new preconditioner indicates the following benefits: (1) The new preconditioner is robust; i.e., it converges while conventional preconditioners (the diagonal scaling, and the SSOR preconditioners) fail. (2) In the best case scenarios, it is over 10 times faster than conventional preconditioners on a CPU. (3) Because it requries only simple operations, it performs well on a GPGPU. In

  2. Nearly Interactive Parabolized Navier-Stokes Solver for High Speed Forebody and Inlet Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.; Liou, May-Fun; Jones, William H.; Trefny, Charles J.

    2009-01-01

    A system of computer programs is being developed for the preliminary design of high speed inlets and forebodies. The system comprises four functions: geometry definition, flow grid generation, flow solver, and graphics post-processor. The system runs on a dedicated personal computer using the Windows operating system and is controlled by graphical user interfaces written in MATLAB (The Mathworks, Inc.). The flow solver uses the Parabolized Navier-Stokes equations to compute millions of mesh points in several minutes. Sample two-dimensional and three-dimensional calculations are demonstrated in the paper.

  3. Variants and extensions of a fast direct numerical cauchy-riemann solver, with illustrative applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, E. D.; Lomax, H.

    1977-01-01

    Revised and extended versions of a fast, direct (noniterative) numerical Cauchy-Riemann solver are presented for solving finite difference approximations of first order systems of partial differential equations. Although the difference operators treated are linear and elliptic, one significant application of these extended direct Cauchy-Riemann solvers is in the fast, semidirect (iterative) solution of fluid dynamic problems governed by the nonlinear mixed elliptic-hyperbolic equations of transonic flow. Different versions of the algorithms are derived and the corresponding FORTRAN computer programs for a simple example problem are described and listed. The algorithms are demonstrated to be efficient and accurate.

  4. Evaluation of a comprehensive Eulerian air quality model with multiple chemical species measurements using principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shao-Meng; Anlauf, K. G.; Wiebe, H. A.; Bottenheim, J. W.; Puckett, K. J.

    Using a principal component analysis technique and data on atmospheric gases and aerosols at a rural site in Ontario, Canada from the Eulerian model evaluation field study (EMEFS), the Eulerian acid deposition and oxidant model (ADOM) is evaluated. Seventy-nine and 76% of the variances in the data and model output, respectively, are explained by three principal components. They are a chemically aged/ transported component, a diurnal cycle component, and an area emission component, all characterized by their ratios of gases and temporal variation patterns. The ADOM component contributions to sulphur species are in general agreement with the EMEFS components, but with notable differences for key photochemical species including O 3. The temporal variations of the ADOM components are close to those of the EMEFS components. The EMEFS chemically aged/transported component shows a high degree of photochemical processing, with the ratios [NO x]/[TNO y]=0.3 and [O 3]/([TNO y]-[NO x])=9±1. The corresponding ADOM component predicts lower G[NO x]/[TNO y] and [NO 3]/([TNO y]-[NO x]) ratios, probably caused by a chemical mechanism in the model that is too fast, and lower contributions to O 3, NO 2, TNO 3, PAN, TNO y, and HCHO, probably caused by model grid dilution or lower model emissions. The EMEFS diurnal component owes its variance to the daily photochemistry and nighttime dry deposition of the chemical species. In comparison, the matching ADOM component underpredicts the ratio [O 3]/([TNO y]-[NO x]) and the NO 2 consumption and O 3 production but overpredicts the contributions to the other species. The EMEFS emission component represents emissions from local/regional area sources. The corresponding ADOM component underpredicts TNO y by 44% and the fraction of TNO y as NO x compared to the EMEFS component, suggesting that the model has lower emissions of NO x and a photochemical mechanism that converts NO x faster than indicated by the EMEFS results.

  5. An Intercomparison of Semi-Eulerian and Lagrangian Based Cyclone Tracking Methods for the North Pacific and Alaskan Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shippee, N. J.; Atkinson, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    The idea of considering the "end user perspective" regarding storm activity and objective tracking methods used to compile information on their behaviour is particularly important in the Alaskan region. Annually, coastal regions in the North are exposed to stormy conditions, though most impacts occur during periods where multiple storms track over the same area in a short period of time (serial cyclones) or where strong storms occur without the presence of a protective sea ice buffer. From a fixed perspective (i.e. Eulerian), a storm may be identified more by the impacts that it generates at that location (winds, sea state, erosion). From a Lagrangian (tracking) view, the intensity, duration, and characteristics of the synoptic environment may prove more relevant for understanding. The overall "effectiveness" of an objective tracking method depends on the intended use of the provided information. While pitting different methods against each other is not necessarily a fruitful exercise (Mesquita et al. 2009), the reality is that one method may better reflect the reality of storm activity and impacts to those experiencing the weather first hand. One of the more subtle points in extra-tropical cyclone tracking and comparison work is the method by which a storm is defined. Most cyclones are analyzed on MSLP fields; others define a cyclone by relative vorticity (ζ) maxima at 850 hPa (NH) and minima (SH). Storms can also be defined by wind events, or even impacts, at a location. Using counts of strong wind events at a grid point or location can account for pressure gradients both associated with storms and absent of a synoptic event. Three separate tracking algorithms are analyzed to determine the method most likely to produce a long-term homogeneous dataset that can be used to train a statistical seasonal prediction method. These methods include the Serreze algorithm, Hodges TRACK algorithm, and Atkinson algorithm. Both the Serreze and Hodges methods provide a tracking

  6. An Eulerian transport/transformation/removal model for SO2 and sulfate. I - Model development. II - Model calculation of SO(x) transport in the eastern United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, G. R.; Peters, L. K.

    1984-01-01

    A three-dimensional, time dependent Eulerian atmospheric SO2 and sulfate transport/transformation/removal model is described and applied to the eastern U.S. The model was developed in anticipation of increased input to the atmospheric sulfur content by coal-burning power plants in the near future and is intended as an aid in identifying sources of SO2. The Eulerian transport model incorporates functions for chemical transformations, dry deposition, spatial topographical variations, spatial and temporal variations of mixing layer heights, the wind field, eddy diffusivities, deposition velocities, and temperature and water concentration profiles. Attention is also given to the SO2 photochemical oxidation mechanism and rates. Results from a 72-hr simulation of SO(x) transport over the eastern U.S., using actual 1974 meteorological data, illustrate the model's capability to depict interactions between emissions, transport, chemistry and removal. Concentration distributions are demonstrated to have significant spatial and temporal variations.

  7. Solution of the advection-dispersion equation by a finite-volume eulerian-lagrangian local adjoint method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, R.W.; Russell, T.F.

    1992-01-01

    A finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian local adjoint method for solution of the advection-dispersion equation is developed and discussed. The method is mass conservative and can solve advection-dominated ground-water solute-transport problems accurately and efficiently. An integrated finite-difference approach is used in the method. A key component of the method is that the integral representing the mass-storage term is evaluated numerically at the current time level. Integration points, and the mass associated with these points, are then forward tracked up to the next time level. The number of integration points required to reach a specified level of accuracy is problem dependent and increases as the sharpness of the simulated solute front increases. Integration points are generally equally spaced within each grid cell. For problems involving variable coefficients it has been found to be advantageous to include additional integration points at strategic locations in each well. These locations are determined by backtracking. Forward tracking of boundary fluxes by the method alleviates problems that are encountered in the backtracking approaches of most characteristic methods. A test problem is used to illustrate that the new method offers substantial advantages over other numerical methods for a wide range of problems.

  8. A geometrically-conservative, synchronized, flux-corrected remap for arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian computations with nodal finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Ortega, A.; Scovazzi, G.

    2011-07-01

    This article describes a conservative synchronized remap algorithm applicable to arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian computations with nodal finite elements. In the proposed approach, ideas derived from flux-corrected transport (FCT) methods are extended to conservative remap. Unique to the proposed method is the direct incorporation of the geometric conservation law (GCL) in the resulting numerical scheme. It is shown here that the geometric conservation law allows the method to inherit the positivity preserving and local extrema diminishing (LED) properties typical of FCT schemes. The proposed framework is extended to the systems of equations that typically arise in meteorological and compressible flow computations. The proposed algorithm remaps the vector fields associated with these problems by means of a synchronized strategy. The present paper also complements and extends the work of the second author on nodal-based methods for shock hydrodynamics, delivering a fully integrated suite of Lagrangian/remap algorithms for computations of compressible materials under extreme load conditions. Extensive testing in one, two, and three dimensions shows that the method is robust and accurate under typical computational scenarios.

  9. ASTRID: A 3D Eulerian software for subcooled boiling modelling - comparison with experimental results in tubes and annuli

    SciTech Connect

    Briere, E.; Larrauri, D.; Olive, J.

    1995-09-01

    For about four years, Electricite de France has been developing a 3-D computer code for the Eulerian simulation of two-phase flows. This code, named ASTRID, is based on the six-equation two-fluid model. Boiling water flows, such as those encountered in nuclear reactors, are among the main applications of ASTRID. In order to provide ASTRID with closure laws and boundary conditions suitable for boiling flows, a boiling model has been developed by EDF and the Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse. In the fluid, the heat and mass transfer between a bubble and the liquid is being modelled. At the heating wall, the incipient boiling point is determined according to Hsu`s criterion and the boiling heat flux is split into three additive terms: a convective term, a quenching term and a vaporisation term. This model uses several correlations. EDF`s program in boiling two-phase flows also includes experimental studies, some of which are performed in collaboration with other laboratories. Refrigerant subcooled boiling both in tubular (DEBORA experiment, CEN Grenoble) and in annular geometry (Arizona State University Experiment) have been computed with ASTRID. The simulations show the satisfactory results already obtained on void fraction and liquid temperature. Ways of improvement of the model are drawn especially on the dynamical part.

  10. Prognostic residual mean flow in an ocean general circulation model and its relation to prognostic Eulerian mean flow

    SciTech Connect

    Saenz, Juan A.; Chen, Qingshan; Ringler, Todd

    2015-05-19

    Recent work has shown that taking the thickness-weighted average (TWA) of the Boussinesq equations in buoyancy coordinates results in exact equations governing the prognostic residual mean flow where eddy–mean flow interactions appear in the horizontal momentum equations as the divergence of the Eliassen–Palm flux tensor (EPFT). It has been proposed that, given the mathematical tractability of the TWA equations, the physical interpretation of the EPFT, and its relation to potential vorticity fluxes, the TWA is an appropriate framework for modeling ocean circulation with parameterized eddies. The authors test the feasibility of this proposition and investigate the connections between the TWA framework and the conventional framework used in models, where Eulerian mean flow prognostic variables are solved for. Using the TWA framework as a starting point, this study explores the well-known connections between vertical transfer of horizontal momentum by eddy form drag and eddy overturning by the bolus velocity, used by Greatbatch and Lamb and Gent and McWilliams to parameterize eddies. After implementing the TWA framework in an ocean general circulation model, we verify our analysis by comparing the flows in an idealized Southern Ocean configuration simulated using the TWA and conventional frameworks with the same mesoscale eddy parameterization.

  11. Prognostic residual mean flow in an ocean general circulation model and its relation to prognostic Eulerian mean flow

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Saenz, Juan A.; Chen, Qingshan; Ringler, Todd

    2015-05-19

    Recent work has shown that taking the thickness-weighted average (TWA) of the Boussinesq equations in buoyancy coordinates results in exact equations governing the prognostic residual mean flow where eddy–mean flow interactions appear in the horizontal momentum equations as the divergence of the Eliassen–Palm flux tensor (EPFT). It has been proposed that, given the mathematical tractability of the TWA equations, the physical interpretation of the EPFT, and its relation to potential vorticity fluxes, the TWA is an appropriate framework for modeling ocean circulation with parameterized eddies. The authors test the feasibility of this proposition and investigate the connections between the TWAmore » framework and the conventional framework used in models, where Eulerian mean flow prognostic variables are solved for. Using the TWA framework as a starting point, this study explores the well-known connections between vertical transfer of horizontal momentum by eddy form drag and eddy overturning by the bolus velocity, used by Greatbatch and Lamb and Gent and McWilliams to parameterize eddies. After implementing the TWA framework in an ocean general circulation model, we verify our analysis by comparing the flows in an idealized Southern Ocean configuration simulated using the TWA and conventional frameworks with the same mesoscale eddy parameterization.« less

  12. Effects of fuel cetane number on the structure of diesel spray combustion: An accelerated Eulerian stochastic fields method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jangi, Mehdi; Lucchini, Tommaso; Gong, Cheng; Bai, Xue-Song

    2015-09-01

    An Eulerian stochastic fields (ESF) method accelerated with the chemistry coordinate mapping (CCM) approach for modelling spray combustion is formulated, and applied to model diesel combustion in a constant volume vessel. In ESF-CCM, the thermodynamic states of the discretised stochastic fields are mapped into a low-dimensional phase space. Integration of the chemical stiff ODEs is performed in the phase space and the results are mapped back to the physical domain. After validating the ESF-CCM, the method is used to investigate the effects of fuel cetane number on the structure of diesel spray combustion. It is shown that, depending of the fuel cetane number, liftoff length is varied, which can lead to a change in combustion mode from classical diesel spray combustion to fuel-lean premixed burned combustion. Spray combustion with a shorter liftoff length exhibits the characteristics of the classical conceptual diesel combustion model proposed by Dec in 1997 (http://dx.doi.org/10.4271/970873), whereas in a case with a lower cetane number the liftoff length is much larger and the spray combustion probably occurs in a fuel-lean-premixed mode of combustion. Nevertheless, the transport budget at the liftoff location shows that stabilisation at all cetane numbers is governed primarily by the auto-ignition process.

  13. Penetration of rod projectiles in semi-infinite targets : a validation test for Eulerian X-FEM in ALEGRA.

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Byoung Yoon; Leavy, Richard Brian; Niederhaus, John Henry J.

    2013-03-01

    The finite-element shock hydrodynamics code ALEGRA has recently been upgraded to include an X-FEM implementation in 2D for simulating impact, sliding, and release between materials in the Eulerian frame. For validation testing purposes, the problem of long-rod penetration in semi-infinite targets is considered in this report, at velocities of 500 to 3000 m/s. We describe testing simulations done using ALEGRA with and without the X-FEM capability, in order to verify its adequacy by showing X-FEM recovers the good results found with the standard ALEGRA formulation. The X-FEM results for depth of penetration differ from previously measured experimental data by less than 2%, and from the standard formulation results by less than 1%. They converge monotonically under mesh refinement at first order. Sensitivities to domain size and rear boundary condition are investigated and shown to be small. Aside from some simulation stability issues, X-FEM is found to produce good results for this classical impact and penetration problem.

  14. A family of Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint methods for multi-dimensional advection-reaction equations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Man, S.; Ewing, R.E.; Qin, G.; Lyons, S.L.; Al-Lawatia, M.

    1999-06-10

    Many difficult problems arise in the numerical simulation of fluid flow processes within porous media in petroleum reservoir simulation and in subsurface contaminant transport and remediation. The authors develop a family of Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint methods for the solution of the initial-boundary value problems for first-order advection-reaction equations on general multi-dimensional domains. Different tracking algorithms, including the Euler and Runge-Kutta algorithms, are used. The derived schemes, which are full mass conservative, naturally incorporate inflow boundary conditions into their formulations and do not need any artificial outflow boundary conditions. Moreover, they have regularly structured, well-conditioned, symmetric, and positive-definite coefficient matrices, which can be efficiently solved by the conjugate gradient method in an optimal order number of iterations without any preconditioning needed. Numerical results are presented to compare the performance of the ELLAM schemes with many well studied and widely used methods, including the upwind finite difference method, the Galerkin and the Petrov-Galerkin finite element methods with backward-Euler or Crank-Nicolson temporal discretization, the streamline diffusion finite element methods, the monotonic upstream-centered scheme for conservation laws (MUSCL), and the Minmod scheme.

  15. Fluid-structure-interaction analyses of reactor vessel using improved hybrid Lagrangian Eulerian code ALICE-II

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes fluid-structure-interaction and structure response analyses of a reactor vessel subjected to loadings associated with postulated accidents, using the hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian code ALICE-II. This code has been improved recently to accommodate many features associated with innovative designs of reactor vessels. Calculational capabilities have been developed to treat water in the reactor cavity outside the vessel, internal shield structures and internal thin shells. The objective of the present analyses is to study the cover response and potential for missile generation in response to a fuel-coolant interaction in the core region. Three calculations were performed using the cover weight as a parameter. To study the effect of the cavity water, vessel response calculations for both wet- and dry-cavity designs are compared. Results indicate that for all cases studied and for the design parameters assumed, the calculated cover displacements are all smaller than the bolts` ultimate displacement and no missile generation of the closure head is predicted. Also, solutions reveal that the cavity water of the wet-cavity design plays an important role of restraining the downward displacement of the bottom head. Based on these studies, the analyses predict that the structure integrity is maintained throughout the postulated accident for the wet-cavity design.

  16. Fluid-structure-interaction analyses of reactor vessel using improved hybrid Lagrangian Eulerian code ALICE-II

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes fluid-structure-interaction and structure response analyses of a reactor vessel subjected to loadings associated with postulated accidents, using the hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian code ALICE-II. This code has been improved recently to accommodate many features associated with innovative designs of reactor vessels. Calculational capabilities have been developed to treat water in the reactor cavity outside the vessel, internal shield structures and internal thin shells. The objective of the present analyses is to study the cover response and potential for missile generation in response to a fuel-coolant interaction in the core region. Three calculations were performed using the cover weight as a parameter. To study the effect of the cavity water, vessel response calculations for both wet- and dry-cavity designs are compared. Results indicate that for all cases studied and for the design parameters assumed, the calculated cover displacements are all smaller than the bolts' ultimate displacement and no missile generation of the closure head is predicted. Also, solutions reveal that the cavity water of the wet-cavity design plays an important role of restraining the downward displacement of the bottom head. Based on these studies, the analyses predict that the structure integrity is maintained throughout the postulated accident for the wet-cavity design.

  17. Immersed boundary method with non-uniform distribution of Lagrangian markers for a non-uniform Eulerian mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiki, G.; Balachandar, S.

    2016-02-01

    This study presents a technique to incorporate spheres in a channel flow that uses a non-uniform Eulerian grid using immersed boundary methods with direct forcing. An efficient algorithm is presented which distributes the Lagrangian markers non-uniformly to match the fluid grid and keep the number of markers optimized. Also a novel method to calculate the area weights of the Lagrangian markers is given. It is observed that even the best available algorithms for uniform distribution of markers on a sphere result in a finite error. Using vector spherical harmonics, this error is quantified and reduced to machine precision. A series of simulations of a stationary and moving sphere in a periodic channel at Reynolds number range of 1-100 are presented. Results for a sphere in an ambient shear flow in close proximity of a wall are also shown, where the present non-uniform distribution offers an order of magnitude reduction over uniform distribution of Lagrangian markers. Simulations of a random cluster of 640 monodisperse spherical particles show a 77% reduction in Lagrangian markers with an error of 0.135% in computing the total drag.

  18. A flow integrated DSD hydrodynamics strategy for computing the motion of detonation of insensitive high explosives on an Eulerian grid

    SciTech Connect

    Short, Mark; Aslam, Tariq D

    2010-01-01

    The detonation structure in many insensitive high explosives consists of two temporally disparate zones of heat release. In PBX 9502, there is a fast reaction zone ({approx} 25 ns) during which reactants are converted to gaseous products and small carbon clusters, followed by a slower regime ({approx} 250 ns) of carbon coagulation. A hybrid approach for determining the propagation of two-stage heat release detonations has been developed that utilizes a detonation shock dynamics (DSD) based strategy for the fast reaction zone with a direct hydrodynamic simulation of the flow in the slow zone. Unlike a standard DSD/programmed bum formulation, the evolution of the fast zone DSD-like surface is coupled to the flow in the slow reaction zone. We have termed this formulation flow integrated detonation shock dynamics (FIDSD). The purpose of the present paper is to show how the FIDSD formulation can be applied to detonation propagation on an Eulerian grid using an algorithm based on level set interface tracking and a ghost fluid approach.

  19. Non-dissipative cloud transport in Eulerian grid models by the volume-of-fluid (VOF) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinneburg, Detlef; Knoth, Oswald

    The formation of clouds is coupled to the vapour saturation condition. Cloud modelling is therefore dramatically disturbed by dilution processes, which are induced by recurrent interpolations on the fixed (Eulerian) grid. The numerical diffusion gives rise to degeneration and premature disappearance of the modelled clouds. The difficulties increase, if sectional mass representation in the drop microphysics and aerosol chemistry is considered. To tackle this problem, stringently defined and tracked phase boundaries are required. The numerical diffusion of clouds can be totally suppressed by the volume-of-fluid (VOF) method, which is applied here in connection with an atmospheric model. The cloud phase is distinguished by prognosing the partial cloud volume in all grid cells near the cloud boundary. Adopting elementary geometrical forms for the intracellular cloud volume and simple diagnostic rules of their alignment, the standard transport fluxes can be used in the new equation. Separate variables for the cloud and environmental phase complete the transport scheme. The VOF method and its realisation are described in detail. Advection, condensation, evaporation, and turbulent diffusion are considered within the VOF framework. The variation of the grid resolution and turbulence conditions for a rising thermal leads to striking arguments in favour of the VOF method, resulting in higher intensity, lifting, and lifetime as well as clear boundaries of the simulated clouds (even for low grid resolution).

  20. Simulation of Unsteady Flows Using an Unstructured Navier-Stokes Solver on Moving and Stationary Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Vatsa, Veer N.; Atkins, Harold L.

    2005-01-01

    We apply an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) solver for unstructured grids to unsteady flows on moving and stationary grids. Example problems considered are relevant to active flow control and stability and control. Computational results are presented using the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model and are compared to experimental data. The effect of grid and time-step refinement are examined.