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Sample records for european ccr5-delta32 allele

  1. Is the European spatial distribution of the HIV-1-resistant CCR5-Delta32 allele formed by a breakdown of the pathocenosis due to the historical Roman expansion?

    PubMed

    Faure, Eric; Royer-Carenzi, Manuela

    2008-12-01

    We studied the possible effects of the expansion of ancient Mediterranean civilizations during the five centuries before and after Christ on the European distribution of the mutant allele for the chemokine receptor gene CCR5 which has a 32-bp deletion (CCR5-Delta32). There is a strong evidence for the unitary origin of the CCR5-Delta32 mutation, this it is found principally in Europe and Western Asia, with generally a north-south downhill cline frequency. Homozygous carriers of this mutation show a resistance to HIV-1 infection and a slower progression towards AIDS. However, HIV has clearly emerged too recently to have been the selective force on CCR5. Our analyses showed strong negative correlations in Europe between the allele frequency and two historical parameters, i.e. the first colonization dates by the great ancient Mediterranean civilizations, and the distances from the Northern frontiers of the Roman Empire in its greatest expansion. Moreover, other studies have shown that the deletion frequencies in both German Bronze Age and Swedish Neolithic populations were similar to those found in the corresponding modern populations, and this deletion has been found in ancient DNA of around 7000 years ago, suggesting that in the past, the deletion frequency could have been relatively high in European populations. In addition, in West Nile virus pathogenesis, CCR5 plays an antimicrobial role showing that host genetic factors are highly pathogen-specific. Our results added to all these previous data suggest that the actual European allele frequency distribution might not be due to genes spreading, but to a negative selection resulting in the spread of pathogens principally during Roman expansion. Indeed, as gene flows from colonizers to European native populations were extremely low, the mutational changes might be associated with vulnerability to imported infections. To date, the nature of the parasites remains unknown; however, zoonoses could be incriminated. PMID

  2. Frequency of the CCR5-delta32 allele in Brazilian populations: A systematic literature review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva-Carvalho, Wlisses Henrique Veloso; de Moura, Ronald Rodrigues; Coelho, Antonio Victor Campos; Crovella, Sergio; Guimarães, Rafael Lima

    2016-09-01

    The CCR5 is a chemokine receptor widely expressed by several immune cells that are engaged in inflammatory responses. Some populations have individuals exhibiting a 32bp deletion in the CCR5 gene (CCR5-delta32) that produces a truncated non-functional protein not expressed on the cell surface. This polymorphism, known to be associated with susceptibility to infectious and inflammatory diseases, such as osteomyelitis, pre-eclampsia, systemic lupus erythematous, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and HIV/AIDS, is more commonly found in European populations with average frequency of 10%. However, it is also possible to observe a significant frequency in other world populations, such as the Brazilian one. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of CCR5-delta32 genetic association studies in Brazilian populations throughout the country to estimate the frequency of this polymorphism. We also compared CCR5-delta32 frequencies across Brazilian regions. The systematic literature reviewed studies involving delta32 allele in Brazilian populations published from 1995 to 2015. Among the reviewed literature, 25 studies including 30 Brazilian populations distributed between the North, Northeast, South and Southeast regions were included in our meta-analysis. We observed an overall allelic frequency of 4% (95%-CI, 0.03-0.05), that was considered moderate and, notably, higher than some European populations, such as Cyprus (2.8%), Italy (3%) and Greece (2.4%). Regarding the regional frequency comparisons between North-Northeast (N-NE) and South-Southeast (S-SE) regions, we observed an allelic frequency of 3% (95%-CI, 0.02-0.04) and 4% (95%-CI, 0.03-0.05), respectively. The populations from S-SE regions had a slightly higher CCR5-delta32 frequency than N-NE regions (OR=1.41, p=0.002). Although there are several studies about the CCR5-delta32 polymorphism and its effect on the immune response of some infectious diseases, this report is the first meta

  3. Could FIV zoonosis responsible of the breakdown of the pathocenosis which has reduced the European CCR5-Delta32 allele frequencies?

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Background In Europe, the north-south downhill cline frequency of the chemokine receptor CCR5 allele with a 32-bp deletion (CCR5-Δ32) raises interesting questions for evolutionary biologists. We had suggested first that, in the past, the European colonizers, principally Romans, might have been instrumental of a progressively decrease of the frequencies southwards. Indeed, statistical analyses suggested strong negative correlations between the allele frequency and historical parameters including the colonization dates by Mediterranean civilisations. The gene flows from colonizers to native populations were extremely low but colonizers are responsible of the spread of several diseases suggesting that the dissemination of parasites in naive populations could have induced a breakdown rupture of the fragile pathocenosis changing the balance among diseases. The new equilibrium state has been reached through a negative selection of the null allele. Results Most of the human diseases are zoonoses and cat might have been instrumental in the decrease of the allele frequency, because its diffusion through Europe was a gradual process, due principally to Romans; and that several cat zoonoses could be transmitted to man. The possible implication of a feline lentivirus (FIV) which does not use CCR5 as co-receptor is discussed. This virus can infect primate cells in vitro and induces clinical signs in macaque. Moreover, most of the historical regions with null or low frequency of CCR5-Δ32 allele coincide with historical range of the wild felid species which harbor species-specific FIVs. Conclusion We proposed the hypothesis that the actual European CCR5 allelic frequencies are the result of a negative selection due to a disease spreading. A cat zoonosis, could be the most plausible hypothesis. Future studies could provide if CCR5 can play an antimicrobial role in FIV pathogenesis. Moreover, studies of ancient DNA could provide more evidences regarding the implications of

  4. Low-cost simultaneous detection of CCR5-delta32 and HLA-B*5701 alleles in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infected patients by selective multiplex endpoint PCR.

    PubMed

    Rosi, Andrea; Meini, Genny; Materazzi, Angelo; Vicenti, Ilaria; Saladini, Francesco; Zazzi, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    Host genetic traits impact susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, disease progression as well as antiretroviral drug pharmacokinetics and toxicity. Remarkable examples include a 32-bp deletion in the CCR5 coreceptor molecule (CCR5-delta32) impairing attachment of monocytotropic HIV-1 to the host cell membrane and the HLA-B*5701 allele, strongly associated with a potentially fatal hypersensitivity reaction triggered by abacavir, a nucleoside inhibitor of HIV reverse transcriptase. We developed a simple selective multiplex endpoint PCR method for simultaneous analysis of both genetic traits. Two primers were designed for amplification of a region surrounding the CCR5 32-bp deletion site. One common forward primer and two reverse primers with different 3' termini targeting the HLA-B*570101 and HLA-B*570102 alleles were designed for HLA-B*5701 analysis. A panel of 110 reference DNA samples typed in the HLA-B locus was used for development and blind validation of the assay. All the 45 HLA-B*5701 positive and the 55 HLA-B*5701 negative samples were correctly identified. The CCR5-delta32 allele was readily detected in 7 samples and did not interfere with detection of HLA-B*5701 while providing an internal amplification control. Multiplex PCR products were easily identified in agarose gels with no background noise. This simple and low-cost end-point selective multiplex PCR can conveniently screen HIV patients for the protective CCR5-delta32 allele and the risk of developing abacavir hypersensitivity reaction. PMID:26341061

  5. Distribution of the CCR5delta32 allele (gene variant CCR5) in Rondônia, Western Amazonian region, Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Farias, Josileide Duarte; Santos, Marlene Guimarães; de França, Andonai Krauze; Delani, Daniel; Tada, Mauro Shugiro; Casseb, Almeida Andrade; Simões, Aguinaldo Luiz; Engracia, Vera

    2012-01-01

    Since around 1723, on the occasion of its initial colonization by Europeans, Rondonia has received successive waves of immigrants. This has been further swelled by individuals from northeastern Brazil, who began entering at the beginning of the twentieth century. The ethnic composition varies across the state according to the various sites of settlement of each wave of immigrants. We analyzed the frequency of the CCR5Δ32 allele of the CCR5 chemokine receptor, which is considered a Caucasian marker, in five sample sets from the population. Four were collected in Porto Velho, the state capital and the site of several waves of migration. Of these, two, from the Hospital de Base were comprised of HB Mothers and HB Newborns presenting allele frequencies of 3.5% and 3.1%, respectively, a third from the peri-urban neighborhoods of Candelária/Bate-Estaca (1.8%), whereas a fourth, from the Research Center on Tropical Medicine/CEPEM (0.6%), was composed of malaria patients under treament. The fifth sample (3.4%) came from the inland Quilombola village of Pedras Negras. Two homozygous individuals (CCR5Δ32/CCR5Δ32) were detected among the HB Mother samples. The frequency of this allele was heterogeneous and higher where the European inflow was more pronounced. The presence of the allele in Pedras Negras revealed European miscegenation in a community largely comprising Quilombolas. PMID:22481870

  6. Distribution of the CCR5delta32 allele (gene variant CCR5) in Rondônia, Western Amazonian region, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Farias, Josileide Duarte; Santos, Marlene Guimarães; de França, Andonai Krauze; Delani, Daniel; Tada, Mauro Shugiro; Casseb, Almeida Andrade; Simões, Aguinaldo Luiz; Engracia, Vera

    2012-01-01

    Since around 1723, on the occasion of its initial colonization by Europeans, Rondonia has received successive waves of immigrants. This has been further swelled by individuals from northeastern Brazil, who began entering at the beginning of the twentieth century. The ethnic composition varies across the state according to the various sites of settlement of each wave of immigrants. We analyzed the frequency of the CCR5Δ32 allele of the CCR5 chemokine receptor, which is considered a Caucasian marker, in five sample sets from the population. Four were collected in Porto Velho, the state capital and the site of several waves of migration. Of these, two, from the Hospital de Base were comprised of HB Mothers and HB Newborns presenting allele frequencies of 3.5% and 3.1%, respectively, a third from the peri-urban neighborhoods of Candelária/Bate-Estaca (1.8%), whereas a fourth, from the Research Center on Tropical Medicine/CEPEM (0.6%), was composed of malaria patients under treament. The fifth sample (3.4%) came from the inland Quilombola village of Pedras Negras. Two homozygous individuals (CCR5Δ32/CCR5Δ32) were detected among the HB Mother samples. The frequency of this allele was heterogeneous and higher where the European inflow was more pronounced. The presence of the allele in Pedras Negras revealed European miscegenation in a community largely comprising Quilombolas. PMID:22481870

  7. HEK293T Cells Are Heterozygous for CCR5 Delta 32 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Chunxia; Jia, Xiaopeng; Lu, Lingling; Ma, Ping; Wei, Min

    2016-01-01

    C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a receptor for chemokines and a co-receptor for HIV-1 entry into the target CD4+ cells. CCR5 delta 32 deletion is a loss-of-function mutation, resistant to HIV-1 infection. We tried to induce the CCR5 delta 32 mutation harnessing the genome editing technique, CRISPR-Cas9 (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats, CRISPR and CRISPR associated protein 9, Cas9) in the commonly used cell line human embryonic kidney HEK 293T cells. Surprisingly, we found that HEK293T cells are heterozygous for CCR5 delta 32 mutation, in contrast to the wild type CCR5 cells, human acute T cell leukemia cell line Jurkat and human breast adenocarcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 cells. This finding indicates that at least one human cell line is heterozygous for the CCR5 delta 32 mutation. We also found that in PCR amplification, wild type CCR5 DNA and mutant delta 32 DNA can form mismatched heteroduplex and move slowly in gel electrophoresis. PMID:27042825

  8. Frequency of the CCR5-delta32 mutation in the Atlantic island populations of Madeira, the Azores, Cabo Verde, and São Tomé e Príncipe.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Tamira; Brehm, António; Fernandes, Ana Teresa

    2006-12-01

    There is evidence that the CCR5-delta32 mutation confers protection against HIV-1 infection to homozygous individuals. It is believed that this mutation spread through Europe with the Vikings and that it has been subjected to positive selection, leading to a high frequency in Europe (approximately 10%). We carried out the present study to determine the 32-bp deletion allele and genotype frequencies of the CCR5 gene (CCR5-delta32) in the Atlantic island populations of Madeira, the Azores, Cabo Verde, and São Tomé e Principe. These Atlantic archipelagos were all colonized by the Portuguese in the 15th and 16th centuries, but the latter two received most of their settlers from the West African coast. The frequency of the CCR5-delta32 mutation varies between 0% in São Tomé e Príncipe and 16.5% in the Azores. The Azores Islands have one of the highest frequencies of homozygotes found in Europe (4.8%). There are significant differences (P < 0.05) between some of these populations, for example, between São Tomé e Príncipe and Cabo Verde, and even within populations (e.g., Portugal, Madeira, and the Azores). PMID:17564248

  9. Analysis of peripheral T cells and the CC chemokine receptor (CCR5) delta32 polymorphism in prostate cancer patients treated with carboxymethyl-glucan (CM-G).

    PubMed

    Magnani, Marciane; Castro-Gomez, Raul Hernan; Aoki, Mateus Nobrega; Gregório, Emerson Pereira; Libos, Farid; Morimoto, Helena Kaminami; Reiche, Edna Maria Vissoci; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2012-01-01

    β-Glucan, derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a biological response modifier which affects the innate and adaptive immune responses. The CCR5 chemokine receptor is crucial for immune cell responses. In this study, the effects of the carboxymethylated form of β-glucan (CM-G) on the lymphocyte population of CCR5 genotype patients with prostate cancer (PCa), undergoing androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) was assessed. The CCR5 genotype and lymphocyte population was investigated by cytometry flow in 30 Brazilian patients with advanced PCa who were treated with CM-G for 28 days. The analysis of the CCR5 chemokine receptor revealed that the wild-type genotype Wt/Wt was present in 80% of patients, while the heterozygotic genotype Wt/delta32 was present in 20% of patients. After CM-G administration, a significant increase in CD3(+), CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes was observed in patients who displayed the wild-type genotype for the CCR5 chemokine receptor. No association was found between patient's age or length of ADT and increase in T lymphocyte cells. The results demonstrated the ability of CM-G to stimulate CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the peripheral blood of patients carrying a wild-type CCR5 genotype, suggesting an interaction between immunomodulation by CM-G and the CCR5 receptor. PMID:21827290

  10. Impact of CCR5delta32 host genetic background and disease progression on HIV-1 intrahost evolutionary processes: efficient hypothesis testing through hierarchical phylogenetic models.

    PubMed

    Edo-Matas, Diana; Lemey, Philippe; Tom, Jennifer A; Serna-Bolea, Cèlia; van den Blink, Agnes E; van 't Wout, Angélique B; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Suchard, Marc A

    2011-05-01

    The interplay between C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) host genetic background, disease progression, and intrahost HIV-1 evolutionary dynamics remains unclear because differences in viral evolution between hosts limit the ability to draw conclusions across hosts stratified into clinically relevant populations. Similar inference problems are proliferating across many measurably evolving pathogens for which intrahost sequence samples are readily available. To this end, we propose novel hierarchical phylogenetic models (HPMs) that incorporate fixed effects to test for differences in dynamics across host populations in a formal statistical framework employing stochastic search variable selection and model averaging. To clarify the role of CCR5 host genetic background and disease progression on viral evolutionary patterns, we obtain gp120 envelope sequences from clonal HIV-1 variants isolated at multiple time points in the course of infection from populations of HIV-1-infected individuals who only harbored CCR5-using HIV-1 variants at all time points. Presence or absence of a CCR5 wt/Δ32 genotype and progressive or long-term nonprogressive course of infection stratify the clinical populations in a two-way design. As compared with the standard approach of analyzing sequences from each patient independently, the HPM provides more efficient estimation of evolutionary parameters such as nucleotide substitution rates and d(N)/d(S) rate ratios, as shown by significant shrinkage of the estimator variance. The fixed effects also correct for nonindependence of data between populations and results in even further shrinkage of individual patient estimates. Model selection suggests an association between nucleotide substitution rate and disease progression, but a role for CCR5 genotype remains elusive. Given the absence of clear d(N)/d(S) differences between patient groups, delayed onset of AIDS symptoms appears to be solely associated with lower viral replication rates rather than with differences in selection on amino acid fixation. PMID:21135151

  11. Persistence of the common Hartnup disease D173N allele in populations of European origin.

    PubMed

    Azmanov, Dimitar N; Rodgers, Helen; Auray-Blais, Christiane; Giguère, Robert; Bailey, Charles; Bröer, Stefan; Rasko, John E J; Cavanaugh, Juleen A

    2007-11-01

    Hartnup disorder is an aminoaciduria that results from mutations in the recently described gene SLC6A19 on chromosome 5p15.33. The disease is inherited in a simple recessive manner and ten different mutations have been described to date. One mutation, the D173N allele, is present in 42% of Hartnup chromosomes from apparently unrelated families from both Australia and North America. We report an investigation of the origins of the D173N allele using a unique combination of variants including SNPs, microsatellites, and a VNTR across 211 Kb spanning the SLC6A19 locus. All individuals who carry the mutant allele share an identical core haplotype suggesting a single common ancestor, indicating that the elevated frequency of the D173N allele is not a result of recurrent mutation. Analyses of these data indicate that the allele is more than 1000 years old. We compare the reasons for survival of this allele with other major alleles in some other common autosomal recessive diseases occurring in European Caucasians. We postulate that survival of this allele may be a consequence of failure of the allele to completely inactivate the transport of neutral amino acids. PMID:17555458

  12. Derived immune and ancestral pigmentation alleles in a 7,000-year-old Mesolithic European.

    PubMed

    Olalde, Iñigo; Allentoft, Morten E; Sánchez-Quinto, Federico; Santpere, Gabriel; Chiang, Charleston W K; DeGiorgio, Michael; Prado-Martinez, Javier; Rodríguez, Juan Antonio; Rasmussen, Simon; Quilez, Javier; Ramírez, Oscar; Marigorta, Urko M; Fernández-Callejo, Marcos; Prada, María Encina; Encinas, Julio Manuel Vidal; Nielsen, Rasmus; Netea, Mihai G; Novembre, John; Sturm, Richard A; Sabeti, Pardis; Marquès-Bonet, Tomàs; Navarro, Arcadi; Willerslev, Eske; Lalueza-Fox, Carles

    2014-03-13

    Ancient genomic sequences have started to reveal the origin and the demographic impact of farmers from the Neolithic period spreading into Europe. The adoption of farming, stock breeding and sedentary societies during the Neolithic may have resulted in adaptive changes in genes associated with immunity and diet. However, the limited data available from earlier hunter-gatherers preclude an understanding of the selective processes associated with this crucial transition to agriculture in recent human evolution. Here we sequence an approximately 7,000-year-old Mesolithic skeleton discovered at the La Braña-Arintero site in León, Spain, to retrieve a complete pre-agricultural European human genome. Analysis of this genome in the context of other ancient samples suggests the existence of a common ancient genomic signature across western and central Eurasia from the Upper Paleolithic to the Mesolithic. The La Braña individual carries ancestral alleles in several skin pigmentation genes, suggesting that the light skin of modern Europeans was not yet ubiquitous in Mesolithic times. Moreover, we provide evidence that a significant number of derived, putatively adaptive variants associated with pathogen resistance in modern Europeans were already present in this hunter-gatherer. PMID:24463515

  13. Derived Immune and Ancestral Pigmentation Alleles in a 7,000-Year-old Mesolithic European

    PubMed Central

    Olalde, Iñigo; Allentoft, Morten E.; Sánchez-Quinto, Federico; Santpere, Gabriel; Chiang, Charleston W. K.; DeGiorgio, Michael; Prado-Martínez, Javier; Rodríguez, Juan Antonio; Rasmussen, Simon; Quilez, Javier; Ramírez, Oscar; Marigorta, Urko M.; Fernández-Callejo, Marcos; Prada, María Encina; Encinas, Julio Manuel Vidal; Nielsen, Rasmus; Netea, Mihai G.; Novembre, John; Sturm, Richard A.; Sabeti, Pardis; Marquès-Bonet, Tomàs; Navarro, Arcadi; Willerslev, Eske; Lalueza-Fox, Carles

    2014-01-01

    Ancient genomic sequences have started revealing the origin and the demographic impact of Neolithic farmers spreading into Europe1–3. The adoption of farming, stock breeding and sedentary societies during the Neolithic may have resulted in adaptive changes in genes associated with immunity and diet4. However, the limited data available from earlier hunter-gatherers precludes an understanding of the selective processes associated with this crucial transition to agriculture in recent human evolution. By sequencing a ~7,000-year-old Mesolithic skeleton discovered at the La Braña-Arintero site in León (Spain), we retrieved the first complete pre-agricultural European human genome. Analysis of this genome in the context of other ancient samples suggests the existence of a common ancient genomic signature across Western and Central Eurasia from the Upper Paleolithic to the Mesolithic. The La Braña individual carries ancestral alleles in several skin pigmentation genes, suggesting that the light skin of modern Europeans was not yet ubiquitous in Mesolithic times. Moreover, we provide evidence that a significant number of derived, putatively adaptive variants associated with pathogen resistance in modern Europeans were already present in this hunter-gatherer. Hence, these genomic variants cannot represent novel mutations that occurred during the adaptation to the farming lifestyle. PMID:24463515

  14. HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1 Allele and Haplotype Frequencies Distinguish Eastern European Americans from the General European American Population

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Steven J.; Tu, Bin; Lazaro, Ana; Yang, Ruyan; Lancaster, Alex K.; Cao, Kai; Ng, Jennifer; Hurley, Carolyn Katovich

    2012-01-01

    Sequence based typing was used to identify HLA-A,B,C,DRB1 alleles from 558 consecutively recruited U.S. volunteers with Eastern European ancestry for an unrelated hematopoietic stem cell registry. Four of the 31 HLA-A alleles, 29 -C alleles, 59 -B alleles, and 42 -DRB1 alleles identified (A*0325, B*440204, Cw*0332, and *0732N) are novel. The HLA-A*02010101g allele was observed at a frequency of 0.28. Two-, three- and four-locus haplotypes were estimated using the expectation maximization algorithm. The highest-frequency extended haplotypes (A*010101g-Cw*070101g-B*0801g-DRB1*0301 and A*03010101g-Cw*0702-B*0702-DRB1*1501) were observed at frequencies of 0.04 and 0.03, respectively. Linkage disequilibrium values (D’ij) of the constituent 2-locus haplotypes were highly significant for both extended haplotypes (p-values were less than 8 × 10−10), but were consistently higher for the more frequent haplotype. Balancing selection was inferred to be acting on all four loci, with the strongest evidence of balancing selection observed for the HLA-C locus. Comparisons of the A-C-B haplotype and DRB1 frequencies in this population to those for African, European and western Asian populations revealed high degrees of identity with Czech, Polish, and Slovenian populations and significant differences from the general European American population. PMID:19000140

  15. Pistil-function breakdown in a new S-allele of European pear, S21*, confers self-compatibility.

    PubMed

    Sanzol, Javier

    2009-03-01

    European pear exhibits RNase-based gametophytic self-incompatibility controlled by the polymorphic S-locus. S-allele diversity of cultivars has been extensively investigated; however, no mutant alleles conferring self-compatibility have been reported. In this study, two European pear cultivars, 'Abugo' and 'Ceremeño', were classified as self-compatible after fruit/seed setting and pollen tube growth examination. S-genotyping through S-PCR and sequencing identified a new S-RNase allele in the two cultivars, with identical deduced amino acid sequence as S(21), but differing at the nucleotide level. Test-pollinations and analysis of descendants suggested that the new allele is a self-compatible pistil-mutated variant of S(21), so it was named S(21)*. S-genotypes assigned to 'Abugo' and 'Ceremeño' were S(10)S(21)* and S(21)*S(25) respectively, of which S(25) is a new functional S-allele of European pear. Reciprocal crosses between cultivars bearing S(21) and S(21)* indicated that both alleles exhibit the same pollen function; however, cultivars bearing S(21)* had impaired pistil-S function as they failed to reject either S(21) or S (21)* pollen. RT-PCR analysis showed absence of S(21)* -RNase gene expression in styles of 'Abugo' and 'Ceremeño', suggesting a possible origin for S(21)* pistil dysfunction. Two polymorphisms found within the S-RNase genomic region (a retrotransposon insertion within the intron of S(21)* and indels at the 3'UTR) might explain the different pattern of expression between S(21) and S(21)*. Evaluation of cultivars with unknown S-genotype identified another cultivar 'Azucar Verde' bearing S(21)*, and pollen tube growth examination confirmed self-compatibility for this cultivar as well. This is the first report of a mutated S-allele conferring self-compatibility in European pear. PMID:19096853

  16. Polymorphisms in the CCR5 promoter region influence disease progression in perinatally human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected children.

    PubMed

    Ometto, L; Bertorelle, R; Mainardi, M; Zanchetta, M; Tognazzo, S; Rampon, O; Ruga, E; Chieco-Bianchi, L; De Rossi, A

    2001-03-01

    The effect of CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) promoter polymorphisms on the natural history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease was studied in 73 HIV-1-infected children. The CCR5(59338-59537) promoter haplotype, CCR5-59029A/G polymorphism, and CCR5Delta32 and CCR2-64I alterations were investigated. After exclusion of carriers of CCR5Delta32 or CCR2-64I, Kaplan-Meier analysis disclosed that children with the P1/P1(59353C,59356C,59402A) genotype progressed faster to disease than did children with other haplotypes (P=.016). When CCR2-64I carriers were included, this effect had borderline significance (P=.065) and was lost when CCR5Delta32 carriers were also considered (P=.387). The P1/P1 effect was strongest early after infection, when progression to disease was mainly associated with CCR5 coreceptor-using viruses. These results indicate that the P1/P1 genotype is predictive of rapid progression in HIV-1-infected children lacking CCR5Delta32 or CCR5-64I alleles. The observation of a linkage disequilibrium between P1 and 59029A might explain the previously reported association between 59029A homozygosity and rapid disease progression. PMID:11181160

  17. Allelic differences between Europeans and Chinese for CREB1 SNPs and their implications in gene expression regulation, hippocampal structure and function, and bipolar disorder susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Luo, X-J; Rietschel, M; Lewis, C M; Mattheisen, M; Müller-Myhsok, B; Jamain, S; Leboyer, M; Landén, M; Thompson, P M; Cichon, S; Nöthen, M M; Schulze, T G; Sullivan, P F; Bergen, S E; Donohoe, G; Morris, D W; Hargreaves, A; Gill, M; Corvin, A; Hultman, C; Toga, A W; Shi, L; Lin, Q; Shi, H; Gan, L; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Czamara, D; Henry, C; Etain, B; Bis, J C; Ikram, M A; Fornage, M; Debette, S; Launer, L J; Seshadri, S; Erk, S; Walter, H; Heinz, A; Bellivier, F; Stein, J L; Medland, S E; Arias Vasquez, A; Hibar, D P; Franke, B; Martin, N G; Wright, M J; Su, B

    2014-04-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a polygenic disorder that shares substantial genetic risk factors with major depressive disorder (MDD). Genetic analyses have reported numerous BD susceptibility genes, while some variants, such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CACNA1C have been successfully replicated, many others have not and subsequently their effects on the intermediate phenotypes cannot be verified. Here, we studied the MDD-related gene CREB1 in a set of independent BD sample groups of European ancestry (a total of 64,888 subjects) and identified multiple SNPs significantly associated with BD (the most significant being SNP rs6785[A], P=6.32 × 10(-5), odds ratio (OR)=1.090). Risk SNPs were then subjected to further analyses in healthy Europeans for intermediate phenotypes of BD, including hippocampal volume, hippocampal function and cognitive performance. Our results showed that the risk SNPs were significantly associated with hippocampal volume and hippocampal function, with the risk alleles showing a decreased hippocampal volume and diminished activation of the left hippocampus, adding further evidence for their involvement in BD susceptibility. We also found the risk SNPs were strongly associated with CREB1 expression in lymphoblastoid cells (P<0.005) and the prefrontal cortex (P<1.0 × 10(-6)). Remarkably, population genetic analysis indicated that CREB1 displayed striking differences in allele frequencies between continental populations, and the risk alleles were completely absent in East Asian populations. We demonstrated that the regional prevalence of the CREB1 risk alleles in Europeans is likely caused by genetic hitchhiking due to natural selection acting on a nearby gene. Our results suggest that differential population histories due to natural selection on regional populations may lead to genetic heterogeneity of susceptibility to complex diseases, such as BD, and explain inconsistencies in detecting the genetic markers of these diseases among

  18. Haplotype block structure study of the CFTR gene. Most variants are associated with the M470 allele in several European populations.

    PubMed

    Pompei, Fiorenza; Ciminelli, Bianca Maria; Bombieri, Cristina; Ciccacci, Cinzia; Koudova, Monika; Giorgi, Silvia; Belpinati, Francesca; Begnini, Angela; Cerny, Milos; Des Georges, Marie; Claustres, Mireille; Ferec, Claude; Macek, Milan; Modiano, Guido; Pignatti, Pier Franco

    2006-01-01

    An average of about 1700 CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) alleles from normal individuals from different European populations were extensively screened for DNA sequence variation. A total of 80 variants were observed: 61 coding SNSs (results already published), 13 noncoding SNSs, three STRs, two short deletions, and one nucleotide insertion. Eight DNA variants were classified as non-CF causing due to their high frequency of occurrence. Through this survey the CFTR has become the most exhaustively studied gene for its coding sequence variability and, though to a lesser extent, for its noncoding sequence variability as well. Interestingly, most variation was associated with the M470 allele, while the V470 allele showed an 'extended haplotype homozygosity' (EHH). These findings make us suggest a role for selection acting either on the M470V itself or through an hitchhiking mechanism involving a second site. The possible ancient origin of the V allele in an 'out of Africa' time frame is discussed. PMID:16251901

  19. HLA allele and haplotype frequencies in the Albanian population and their relationship with the other European populations.

    PubMed

    Sulcebe, G; Sanchez-Mazas, A; Tiercy, J-M; Shyti, E; Mone, I; Ylli, Z; Kardhashi, V

    2009-12-01

    Human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles are very interesting markers in identifying population relationships. Moreover, their frequency distribution data are important in the implementation of donor-recipient registry programs for transplantation purposes and also in determining the genetic predisposition for many diseases. For these reasons, we studied the HLA class I and II allele and haplotype frequencies in 160 healthy, unrelated Albanian individuals originating from all regions of the country. The HLA genotyping was performed through a 2-digit resolution SSOP method. The data were analysed with Arlequin and Phylip programs. No deviation was found from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. A total of 17 A*, 30 B*, 12 Cw*, 13 DRB1* and 5 DQB1* alleles were identified. The six most frequent HLA-A-B-DRB1 haplotypes were A*02-B*18-DRB1*11 (5.60%), A*02-B*51-DRB1*16 (4.74%), A*01-B*08-DRB1*03 (3.48%), A*24-B*35-DRB1*11 (2.77%), A*02-B*51-DRB1*13 (2.21%), A*24-B*35-DRB1*14 (1.89%). Interestingly, 12 HLA-A-B-Cw-DRB1-DQB1 haplotypes occurred at a frequency >1%. When compared with the other populations, a close relationship was found with North Greek, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Romanian, Turkish, Cretan, Serbian, Croatian and Italian populations. A higher differentiation in allele frequency level was found with Western Europe populations. These data are the first report of HLA allele and haplotype distribution in an Albanian population inside this country. When compared with other populations, their distribution frequencies show close similarities with neighbouring populations of the entire Balkan area. PMID:19703234

  20. Helicobacter pylori Genotyping from American Indigenous Groups Shows Novel Amerindian vacA and cagA Alleles and Asian, African and European Admixture

    PubMed Central

    Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Perez-Perez, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Valencia, Gerardo; Mendoza, Irma; Peñaloza-Espinosa, Rosenda; Ramos, Irma; Kersulyte, Dangeruta; Reyes-Leon, Adriana; Romo, Carolina; Granados, Julio; Muñoz, Leopoldo; Berg, Douglas E.; Torres, Javier

    2011-01-01

    It is valuable to extend genotyping studies of Helicobacter pylori to strains from indigenous communities across the world to better define adaption, evolution, and associated diseases. We aimed to genetically characterize both human individuals and their infecting H. pylori from indigenous communities of Mexico, and to compare them with those from other human groups. We studied individuals from three indigenous groups, Tarahumaras from the North, Huichols from the West and Nahuas from the center of Mexico. Volunteers were sampled at their community site, DNA was isolated from white blood cells and mtDNA, Y-chromosome, and STR alleles were studied. H. pylori was cultured from gastric juice, and DNA extracted for genotyping of virulence and housekeeping genes. We found Amerindian mtDNA haplogroups (A, B, C, and D), Y-chromosome DYS19T, and Amerindian STRs alleles frequent in the three groups, confirming Amerindian ancestry in these Mexican groups. Concerning H.pylori cagA phylogenetic analyses, although most isolates were of the Western type, a new Amerindian cluster neither Western nor Asian, was formed by some indigenous Mexican, Colombian, Peruvian and Venezuelan isolates. Similarly, vacA phylogenetic analyses showed the existence of a novel Amerindian type in isolates from Alaska, Mexico and Colombia. With hspA strains from Mexico and other American groups clustered within the three major groups, Asian, African or European. Genotyping of housekeeping genes confirmed that Mexican strains formed a novel Asian-related Amerindian group together with strains from remote Amazon Aborigines. This study shows that Mexican indigenous people with Amerindian markers are colonized with H. pylori showing admixture of Asian, European and African strains in genes known to interact with the gastric mucosa. We present evidence of novel Amerindian cagA and vacA alleles in indigenous groups of North and South America. PMID:22073291

  1. The Interplay between Natural Selection and Susceptibility to Melanoma on Allele 374F of SLC45A2 Gene in a South European Population

    PubMed Central

    López, Saioa; García, Óscar; Yurrebaso, Iñaki; Flores, Carlos; Acosta-Herrera, Marialbert; Chen, Hua; Gardeazabal, Jesús; Careaga, Jesús María; Boyano, María Dolores; Sánchez, Ana; Ratón-Nieto, Juan Antonio; Sevilla, Arrate; Smith-Zubiaga, Isabel; de Galdeano, Alicia García; Martinez-Cadenas, Conrado; Izagirre, Neskuts; de la Rúa, Concepción; Alonso, Santos

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to study the selective pressures interacting on SLC45A2 to investigate the interplay between selection and susceptibility to disease. Thus, we enrolled 500 volunteers from a geographically limited population (Basques from the North of Spain) and by resequencing the whole coding region and intron 5 of the 34 most and the 34 least pigmented individuals according to the reflectance distribution, we observed that the polymorphism Leu374Phe (L374F, rs16891982) was statistically associated with skin color variability within this sample. In particular, allele 374F was significantly more frequent among the individuals with lighter skin. Further genotyping an independent set of 558 individuals of a geographically wider population with known ancestry in the Spanish population also revealed that the frequency of L374F was significantly correlated with the incident UV radiation intensity. Selection tests suggest that allele 374F is being positively selected in South Europeans, thus indicating that depigmentation is an adaptive process. Interestingly, by genotyping 119 melanoma samples, we show that this variant is also associated with an increased susceptibility to melanoma in our populations. The ultimate driving force for this adaptation is unknown, but it is compatible with the vitamin D hypothesis. This shows that molecular evolution analysis can be used as a useful technology to predict phenotypic and biomedical consequences in humans. PMID:25093503

  2. Ancient DNA analysis reveals high frequency of European lactase persistence allele (T-13910) in medieval central europe.

    PubMed

    Krüttli, Annina; Bouwman, Abigail; Akgül, Gülfirde; Della Casa, Philippe; Rühli, Frank; Warinner, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Ruminant milk and dairy products are important food resources in many European, African, and Middle Eastern societies. These regions are also associated with derived genetic variants for lactase persistence. In mammals, lactase, the enzyme that hydrolyzes the milk sugar lactose, is normally down-regulated after weaning, but at least five human populations around the world have independently evolved mutations regulating the expression of the lactase-phlorizin-hydrolase gene. These mutations result in a dominant lactase persistence phenotype and continued lactase tolerance in adulthood. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at C/T-13910 is responsible for most lactase persistence in European populations, but when and where the T-13910 polymorphism originated and the evolutionary processes by which it rose to high frequency in Europe have been the subject of strong debate. A history of dairying is presumed to be a prerequisite, but archaeological evidence is lacking. In this study, DNA was extracted from the dentine of 36 individuals excavated at a medieval cemetery in Dalheim, Germany. Eighteen individuals were successfully genotyped for the C/T-13910 SNP by molecular cloning and sequencing, of which 13 (72%) exhibited a European lactase persistence genotype: 44% CT, 28% TT. Previous ancient DNA-based studies found that lactase persistence genotypes fall below detection levels in most regions of Neolithic Europe. Our research shows that by AD 1200, lactase persistence frequency had risen to over 70% in this community in western Central Europe. Given that lactase persistence genotype frequency in present-day Germany and Austria is estimated at 71-80%, our results suggest that genetic lactase persistence likely reached modern levels before the historic population declines associated with the Black Death, thus excluding plague-associated evolutionary forces in the rise of lactase persistence in this region. This new evidence sheds light on the dynamic evolutionary

  3. Ancient DNA Analysis Reveals High Frequency of European Lactase Persistence Allele (T-13910) in Medieval Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Akgül, Gülfirde; Della Casa, Philippe; Rühli, Frank; Warinner, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Ruminant milk and dairy products are important food resources in many European, African, and Middle Eastern societies. These regions are also associated with derived genetic variants for lactase persistence. In mammals, lactase, the enzyme that hydrolyzes the milk sugar lactose, is normally down-regulated after weaning, but at least five human populations around the world have independently evolved mutations regulating the expression of the lactase-phlorizin-hydrolase gene. These mutations result in a dominant lactase persistence phenotype and continued lactase tolerance in adulthood. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at C/T-13910 is responsible for most lactase persistence in European populations, but when and where the T-13910 polymorphism originated and the evolutionary processes by which it rose to high frequency in Europe have been the subject of strong debate. A history of dairying is presumed to be a prerequisite, but archaeological evidence is lacking. In this study, DNA was extracted from the dentine of 36 individuals excavated at a medieval cemetery in Dalheim, Germany. Eighteen individuals were successfully genotyped for the C/T-13910 SNP by molecular cloning and sequencing, of which 13 (72%) exhibited a European lactase persistence genotype: 44% CT, 28% TT. Previous ancient DNA-based studies found that lactase persistence genotypes fall below detection levels in most regions of Neolithic Europe. Our research shows that by AD 1200, lactase persistence frequency had risen to over 70% in this community in western Central Europe. Given that lactase persistence genotype frequency in present-day Germany and Austria is estimated at 71–80%, our results suggest that genetic lactase persistence likely reached modern levels before the historic population declines associated with the Black Death, thus excluding plague-associated evolutionary forces in the rise of lactase persistence in this region. This new evidence sheds light on the dynamic evolutionary

  4. Functional Significance of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the Lactase Gene in Diverse United States Subjects and Evidence for a Novel Lactase Persistence Allele at -13909 in Those of European Ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Baffour-Awuah, Nana Yaa; Fleet, Sarah; Baker, Susan S.; Butler, Johannah L.; Campbell, Catarina; Tischfield, Samuel; Mitchell, Paul D.; Moon, Jennifer E.; Allende-Richter, Sophie; Fishman, Laurie; Bousvaros, Athos; Fox, Victor; Kuokkanen, Mikko; Montgomery, Robert K.; Grand, Richard J.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Recent data from mainly homogeneous European and African populations implicate a 140 bp region 5′ to the transcriptional start site of LCT (the lactase gene) as a regulatory site for lactase persistence and non-persistence. As there are no studies of United States non-homogeneous populations, we performed genotype/phenotype analysis of the -13910 and -22018 LCT SNPs in New England children, mostly of European ancestry. Methods Duodenal biopsies were processed for disaccharidase activities, RNA quantification by RT-PCR, allelic expression ratios by PCR, and genotyping and SNP analysis. Results were compared to clinical information. Results Lactase activity and mRNA levels, as well as sucrase-to-lactase ratios of enzyme activity and mRNA, showed robust correlations with genotype. None of the other LCT SNPs showed as strong a correlation with enzyme or mRNA activities as did -13910. Data were consistent with the -13910 being the causal sequence variant rather than -22018. Four individuals heterozygous for -13910T/C had allelic expression patterns similar to individuals with -13910C/C genotypes; of these, 2 showed equal LCT expression from the 2 alleles and a novel variant (-13909C>A) associated with lactase persistence. Conclusion The identification of -13910C/C genotype is very likely to predict lactase non-persistence, consistent with prior published studies. A -13910T/T genotype will frequently, but not perfectly, predict lactase persistence in this mixed European-ancestry population; a -13910T/C genotype will not predict the phenotype. A long, rare haplotype in 2 individuals with -13910T/C genotype but equal allele-specific expression contains a novel lactase persistence allele present at -13909. PMID:25625576

  5. Frequency of alleles conferring resistance to Bt maize in French and US corn belt populations of the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis.

    PubMed

    Bourguet, D; Chaufaux, J; Séguin, M; Buisson, C; Hinton, J L; Stodola, T J; Porter, P; Cronholm, G; Buschman, L L; Andow, D A

    2003-05-01

    Farmers, industry, governments and environmental groups agree that it would be useful to manage transgenic crops producing insecticidal proteins to delay the evolution of resistance in target pests. The main strategy proposed for delaying resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis ( Bt) toxins in transgenic crops is the high-dose/refuge strategy. This strategy is based on the unverified assumption that resistance alleles are initially rare (<10(-3)). We used an F(2) screen on >1,200 isofemale lines of Ostrinia nubilalis Hübner (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) collected in France and the US corn belt during 1999-2001. In none of the isofemale lines did we detect alleles conferring resistance to Bt maize producing the Cry1Ab toxin. A Bayesian analysis of the data indicates that the frequency of resistance alleles in France was <9.20 x 10(-4) with 95% probability, and a detection probability of >80%. In the northern US corn belt, the frequency of resistance to Bt maize was <4.23 x 10(-4) with 95% probability, and a detection probability of >90%. Only 95 lines have been screened from the southern US corn belt, so these data are still inconclusive. These results suggest that resistance is probably rare enough in France and the northern US corn belt for the high-dose plus refuge strategy to delay resistance to Bt maize. PMID:12748773

  6. Resolution of HLA-B*44:02:01G, -DRB1*14:01:01G and -DQB1*03:01:01G reveals a high allelic variability among 12 European populations.

    PubMed

    Vidan-Jeras, B; Buhler, S; Dubois, V; Grubic, Z; Ivanova, M; Jaatinen, T; Ligeiro, D; Lokki, M-L; Papasteriades, C; Poli, F; Spyropoulou-Vlachou, M; Tordai, A; Viken, M K; Wenda, S; Nunes, J M; Sanchez-Mazas, A; Tiercy, J-M

    2014-11-01

    Within the framework of the EU-funded HLA-NET action, an analysis of three G-group alleles, HLA-B*44:02:01G, DRB1*14:01:01G and DQB1*03:01:01G, was undertaken in 12 European populations. Ambiguities were resolved by polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific amplification (PCR-SSP) or PCR-sequence-based typing (PCR-SBT) in a total of 5095 individuals. The results of the DRB1*14:01/14:54 ambiguity showed high relative ratios (24-53%) of DRB1*14:01 in Bulgarians, Croatians, Greeks, Italians and Slovenians, contrasting with low ratios (6-13%) in Austrians, Finnish, French, Hungarians, Norwegians and Swiss. Resolution of the B*44:02/44:27 ambiguity showed that B*44:27 had a high relative ratio in Slovenians (25.5%) and Bulgarians (37%) and low in French and Swiss (0.02-1%), and was not observed in Greeks and Italians. The highest relative ratio of DQB1*03:19 was found in Portuguese (11%), by contrast with low ratios (0-3%) in the other five populations. Analysis of the A, B, DRB1 phenotypes and family-derived haplotypes in 1719 and 403 individuals positive for either HLA-B*44:02G or DRB1*14:01G ambiguities, respectively, showed some preferential associations, such as A*26∼DRB1*14:01, B*35∼DRB1*14:01, B*38∼DRB1*14:01 and B*44:27∼DRB1*16. Because these ambiguities are located outside the peptide-binding site, they may not be recognized by alloreactive T-cells. However, because of strong linkage disequilibrium (LD), the DRB1*14:01 vs DRB1*14:54 and the B*44:02 vs B*44:27 mismatches are associated to DRB3-, and C-mismatches, respectively. These results are informative for algorithms searching unrelated hematopoietic stem cell donors. For B*44:27-positive patients, searches are expected to be more successful when requesting donors from Southeastern-European ancestry. Furthermore, the introduction of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typing strategies that allow resolving exon 4 (for class I) and exon 3 (for class II) polymorphisms can be expected to contribute

  7. [Features of the distribution of alleles of the HLA-DRB1 04 and HLA-DQB1 03 genes among healthy people of European origin in Western Siberia].

    PubMed

    Sartakova, M L; Konenkov, V I; Kimura, A

    1993-04-01

    The allelic HLA-DRB1 04 and HLA-DQB1 03 polymorphism in caucasians living among the West Siberia Mongoloid aborigenes was studied. As a result of our studies, it was shown that the HLA-DRB1 0403/07 predominates and HLA-DRB1 0404/08 is absent in the Russian population of West Siberia, in contrast to those among Caucasians living in West Europe and North America. The frequencies of HLA-DQB1 03 alleles are similar to those observed among the all Caucasians. Gametic association HLA-DR4 - HLA-DQw was found for the first time in Caucasians of West Siberia. PMID:8354474

  8. What Is a Recessive Allele?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Biology Teacher, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presents four misconceptions students have concerning the concepts of recessive and dominant alleles. Discusses the spectrum of dominant-recessive relationships, different levels of analysis between phenotype and genotype, possible causes of dominance, and an example involving wrinkled peas. (MDH)

  9. Delimiting Allelic Imbalance of TYMS by Allele-Specific Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Balboa-Beltrán, Emilia; Cruz, Raquel; Carracedo, Angel; Barros, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Allelic imbalance of thymidylate synthase (TYMS) is attributed to polymorphisms in the 5′- and 3′-untranslated region (UTR). These polymorphisms have been related to the risk of suffering different cancers, for example leukemia, breast or gastric cancer, and response to different drugs, among which are methotrexate glutamates, stavudine, and specifically 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), as TYMS is its direct target. A vast literature has been published in relation to 5-FU, even suggesting the sole use of these polymorphisms to effectively manage 5-FU dosage. Estimates of the extent to which these polymorphisms influence in TYMS expression have in the past been based on functional analysis by luciferase assays and quantification of TYMS mRNA, but both these studies, as the association studies with cancer risk or with toxicity or response to 5-FU, are very contradictory. Regarding functional assays, the artificial genetic environment created in luciferase assay and the problems derived from quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCRs), for example the use of a reference gene, may have distorted the results. To avoid these sources of interference, we have analyzed the allelic imbalance of TYMS by allelic-specific analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients. Allelic imbalance in PBMCs, taken from 40 patients with suspected myeloproliferative haematological diseases, was determined by fluorescent fragment analysis (for the 3′-UTR polymorphism), Sanger sequencing and allelic-specific qPCR in multiplex (for the 5′-UTR polymorphisms). For neither the 3′- nor the 5′-UTR polymorphisms did the observed allelic imbalance exceed 1.5 fold. None of the TYMS polymorphisms is statistically associated with allelic imbalance. The results acquired allow us to deny the previously established assertion of an influence of 2 to 4 fold of the rs45445694 and rs2853542 polymorphisms in the expression of TYMS and narrow its allelic imbalance to 1.5 fold

  10. Tetra-allelic SNPs: Informative forensic markers compiled from public whole-genome sequence data.

    PubMed

    Phillips, C; Amigo, J; Carracedo, Á; Lareu, M V

    2015-11-01

    Multiple-allele single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are potentially useful for forensic DNA analysis as they can provide more discrimination power than normal binary SNPs. In addition, the presence in a profile of more than two alleles per marker provides a clearer indication of mixed DNA than assessments of imbalanced signals in the peak pairs of binary SNPs. Using the 1000 Genomes Phase III human variant data release of 2014 as the starting point, this study collated 961 tetra-allelic SNPs that pass minimum sequence quality thresholds and where four separate nucleotide substitution alleles were detected. Although most of these loci had three of the four alleles in combined frequencies of 2% or less, 160 had high heterozygosities with 50 exceeding those of 'ideal' 0.5:0.5 binary SNPs. From this set of most polymorphic tetra-allelic SNPs, we identified markers most informative for forensic purposes and explored these loci in detail. Subsets of the most polymorphic tetra-allelic SNPs will make useful additions to current panels of forensic identification SNPs and ancestry-informative SNPs. The 24 most discriminatory tetra-allelic SNPs were estimated to detect more than two alleles in at least one marker per profile in 99.9% of mixtures of African contributors. In European contributor mixtures 99.4% of profiles would show multiple allele patterns, but this drops to 92.6% of East Asian contributor mixtures due to reduced levels of polymorphism for the 24 SNPs in this population group. PMID:26209763

  11. Invasive Allele Spread under Preemptive Competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasi, J. A.; Korniss, G.; Caraco, T.

    We study a discrete spatial model for invasive allele spread in which two alleles compete preemptively, initially only the "residents" (weaker competitors) being present. We find that the spread of the advantageous mutation is well described by homogeneous nucleation; in particular, in large systems the time-dependent global density of the resident allele is well approximated by Avrami's law.

  12. Type 2 diabetes risk alleles demonstrate extreme directional differentiation among human populations, compared to other diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Corona, Erik; Sikora, Martin; Dudley, Joel T; Morgan, Alex A; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Nilsen, Geoffrey B; Ruau, David; Lincoln, Stephen E; Bustamante, Carlos D; Butte, Atul J

    2012-01-01

    Many disease-susceptible SNPs exhibit significant disparity in ancestral and derived allele frequencies across worldwide populations. While previous studies have examined population differentiation of alleles at specific SNPs, global ethnic patterns of ensembles of disease risk alleles across human diseases are unexamined. To examine these patterns, we manually curated ethnic disease association data from 5,065 papers on human genetic studies representing 1,495 diseases, recording the precise risk alleles and their measured population frequencies and estimated effect sizes. We systematically compared the population frequencies of cross-ethnic risk alleles for each disease across 1,397 individuals from 11 HapMap populations, 1,064 individuals from 53 HGDP populations, and 49 individuals with whole-genome sequences from 10 populations. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) demonstrated extreme directional differentiation of risk allele frequencies across human populations, compared with null distributions of European-frequency matched control genomic alleles and risk alleles for other diseases. Most T2D risk alleles share a consistent pattern of decreasing frequencies along human migration into East Asia. Furthermore, we show that these patterns contribute to disparities in predicted genetic risk across 1,397 HapMap individuals, T2D genetic risk being consistently higher for individuals in the African populations and lower in the Asian populations, irrespective of the ethnicity considered in the initial discovery of risk alleles. We observed a similar pattern in the distribution of T2D Genetic Risk Scores, which are associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program cohort, for the same individuals. This disparity may be attributable to the promotion of energy storage and usage appropriate to environments and inconsistent energy intake. Our results indicate that the differential frequencies of T2D risk alleles may contribute to the observed

  13. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Alleles Demonstrate Extreme Directional Differentiation among Human Populations, Compared to Other Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rong; Corona, Erik; Sikora, Martin; Dudley, Joel T.; Morgan, Alex A.; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Nilsen, Geoffrey B.; Ruau, David; Lincoln, Stephen E.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Butte, Atul J.

    2012-01-01

    Many disease-susceptible SNPs exhibit significant disparity in ancestral and derived allele frequencies across worldwide populations. While previous studies have examined population differentiation of alleles at specific SNPs, global ethnic patterns of ensembles of disease risk alleles across human diseases are unexamined. To examine these patterns, we manually curated ethnic disease association data from 5,065 papers on human genetic studies representing 1,495 diseases, recording the precise risk alleles and their measured population frequencies and estimated effect sizes. We systematically compared the population frequencies of cross-ethnic risk alleles for each disease across 1,397 individuals from 11 HapMap populations, 1,064 individuals from 53 HGDP populations, and 49 individuals with whole-genome sequences from 10 populations. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) demonstrated extreme directional differentiation of risk allele frequencies across human populations, compared with null distributions of European-frequency matched control genomic alleles and risk alleles for other diseases. Most T2D risk alleles share a consistent pattern of decreasing frequencies along human migration into East Asia. Furthermore, we show that these patterns contribute to disparities in predicted genetic risk across 1,397 HapMap individuals, T2D genetic risk being consistently higher for individuals in the African populations and lower in the Asian populations, irrespective of the ethnicity considered in the initial discovery of risk alleles. We observed a similar pattern in the distribution of T2D Genetic Risk Scores, which are associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program cohort, for the same individuals. This disparity may be attributable to the promotion of energy storage and usage appropriate to environments and inconsistent energy intake. Our results indicate that the differential frequencies of T2D risk alleles may contribute to the observed

  14. No Association Between CEL-HYB Hybrid Allele and Chronic Pancreatitis in Asian Populations.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wen-Bin; Boulling, Arnaud; Masamune, Atsushi; Issarapu, Prachand; Masson, Emmanuelle; Wu, Hao; Sun, Xiao-Tian; Hu, Liang-Hao; Zhou, Dai-Zhan; He, Lin; Fichou, Yann; Nakano, Eriko; Hamada, Shin; Kakuta, Yoichi; Kume, Kiyoshi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Paliwal, Sumit; Mani, K Radha; Bhaskar, Seema; Cooper, David N; Férec, Claude; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Chandak, Giriraj R; Chen, Jian-Min; Li, Zhao-Shen; Liao, Zhuan

    2016-06-01

    A hybrid allele between the carboxyl ester lipase gene (CEL) and its pseudogene, CELP (called CEL-HYB), generated by nonallelic homologous recombination between CEL intron 10 and CELP intron 10', was found to increase susceptibility to chronic pancreatitis in a case-control study of patients of European ancestry. We attempted to replicate this finding in 3 independent cohorts from China, Japan, and India, but failed to detect the CEL-HYB allele in any of these populations. The CEL-HYB allele might therefore be an ethnic-specific risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. An alternative hybrid allele (CEL-HYB2) was identified in all 3 Asian populations (1.7% combined carrier frequency), but was not associated with chronic pancreatitis. PMID:26946345

  15. Biased Allele Expression and Aggression in Hybrid Honeybees may be Influenced by Inappropriate Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Joshua D.; Arechavaleta-Velasco, Miguel E.; Tsuruda, Jennifer M.; Hunt, Greg J.

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid effects are often exhibited asymmetrically between reciprocal families. One way this could happen is if silencing of one parent’s allele occurs in one lineage but not the other, which could affect the phenotypes of the hybrids asymmetrically by silencing that allele in only one of the hybrid families. We have previously tested for allele-specific expression biases in hybrids of European and Africanized honeybees and we found that there was an asymmetric overabundance of genes showing a maternal bias in the family with a European mother. Here, we further analyze allelic bias in these hybrids to ascertain whether they may underlie previously described asymmetries in metabolism and aggression in similar hybrid families and we speculate on what mechanisms may produce this biased allele usage. We find that there are over 500 genes that have some form of biased allele usage and over 200 of these are biased toward the maternal allele but only in the family with European maternity, mirroring the pattern observed for aggression and metabolic rate. This asymmetrically biased set is enriched for genes in loci associated with aggressive behavior and also for mitochondrial-localizing proteins. It contains many genes that play important roles in metabolic regulation. Moreover we find genes relating to the piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway, which is involved in chromatin modifications and epigenetic regulation and may help explain the mechanism underlying this asymmetric allele use. Based on these findings and previous work investigating aggression and metabolism in bees, we propose a novel hypothesis; that the asymmetric pattern of biased allele usage in these hybrids is a result of inappropriate use of piRNA-mediated nuclear-cytoplasmic signaling that is normally used to modulate aggression in honeybees. This is the first report of widespread asymmetric effects on allelic expression in hybrids and may represent a novel mechanism for gene regulation. PMID:26648977

  16. Chemokine Receptor-5Delta32 Mutation is No Risk Factor for Ischemic-Type Biliary Lesion in Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Heidenhain, Christoph; Puhl, Gero; Moench, Christian; Lautem, Anja; Neuhaus, Peter

    2009-01-01

    It has been shown that certain chemokine receptor polymorphisms may correspond to certain complications after organ transplantation. Ischemic-type biliary lesion (ITBL) encounters for major morbidity and mortality in liver transplant recipients. So far, the exact cause for ITBL remains unclear. Certain risk factors for the development of ITBL like donor age and cold ischemic time are well described. In a previous study, a 32-nucleotide deletion of the chemokine receptor-5Delta32 (CCR-5Delta32) was strongly associated with the incidence of ITBL in adult liver transplantation. This study re-evaluates the association of CCR-5Delta32 gene polymorphism and the incidence of ITBL. 169 patients were included into this retrospective analysis. 134 patients were homozygous for wild-type CCR-5, 33 patients heterozygous, and 2 patients were homozygous for CCR-5Delta32 mutation. There were no major differences in donor or recipients demographics. No association was found between CCR-5Delta32 mutation and the development of ITBL. We conclude that CCR-5Delta32 is no risk factor for the development of ITBL in our patient cohort. PMID:20107582

  17. Genetically Determined Amerindian Ancestry Correlates with Increased Frequency of Risk Alleles for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, E; Webb, R; Rasmussen, A.; Kelly, J.A; Riba, L.; Kaufman, K.M.; Garcia-de la Torre, I.; Moctezuma, J.F.; Maradiaga-Ceceña, M.A.; Cardiel, M.; Acevedo, E.; Cucho-Venegas, M.; Garcia, M.A.; Gamron, S.; Pons-Estel, B.A.; Vasconcelos, C.; Martin, J.; Tusié-Luna, T.; Harley, J.B.; Richardson, B.; Sawalha, A.H.; Alarcón-Riquelme, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To analyze if genetically determined Amerindian ancestry predicts the increased presence of risk alleles of known susceptibility genes for systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods Single nucleotide polymorphisms within 16 confirmed genetic susceptibility loci for SLE were genotyped in a set of 804 Mestizo lupus patients and 667 Mestizo normal healthy controls. In addition, 347 admixture informative markers were genotyped. Individual ancestry proportions were determined using STRUCTURE. Association analysis was performed using PLINK, and correlation of the presence of risk alleles with ancestry was done using linear regression. Results A meta-analysis of the genetic association of the 16 SNPs across populations showed that TNFSF4, STAT4, PDCD1, ITGAM, and IRF5 were associated with lupus in a Hispanic-Mestizo cohort enriched for European and Amerindian ancestry. In addition, two SNPs within the MHC region, previously associated in a genome-wide association study in Europeans, were also associated in Mestizos. Using linear regression we predict an average increase of 2.34 risk alleles when comparing a lupus patient with 100% Amerindian ancestry to an SLE patient with 0% American Indian Ancestry (p<0.0001). SLE patients with 43% more Amerindian ancestry are predicted to carry one additional risk allele. Conclusion Amerindian ancestry increased the number of risk alleles for lupus. PMID:20848568

  18. Distribution of CGG repeats and FRAXAC1/DXS548 alleles in South American populations.

    PubMed

    Mingroni-Netto, Regina Célia; Angeli, Claudia B; Auricchio, Maria Teresa B M; Leal-Mesquita, Emygdia R; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Andrea K C; Ferrari, Iris; Hutz, Mara H; Salzano, Francisco M; Hill, Kim; Hurtado, A Magdalena; Vianna-Morgante, Angela M

    2002-08-15

    In order to assess the molecular variability related to fragile X (FMR1 locus), we investigated the distribution of CGG repeats and DXS548/FRAXAC1 haplotypes in normal South American populations of different ethnic backgrounds. Special attention was given to Amerindian Wai-Wai (Northern Brazil) and Ache (Paraguay), as well as to Brazilian isolated communities of African ancestry, the remnants of quilombos. Comparison of samples from quilombos, Amerindians, and the ethnically mixed, but mainly European-derived population of São Paulo revealed that the 30-copy allele of the fragile X gene is the most frequent in all groups. A second peak at 20 repeats was present in the population of São Paulo only, confirming this as a European peculiarity. The distribution of DXS548 and FRAXAC1 alleles led to a high expected heterozygosity in African Brazilians, followed by that observed in the population of São Paulo. Amerindians showed the lowest diversity in CGG repeats and DXS548/FRAXAC1 haplotypes. Some rare alleles, for example, the 148-bp (FRAXAC1) or 200-bp (DXS548) variants, which seem to be almost absent in Europe, occurred in higher frequencies among African Brazilians. This suggests a general trend for higher genetic diversity among Africans; these rarer alleles could be African in origin and would have been lost or possibly were not present in the groups that gave rise to the Europeans. PMID:12210320

  19. Characterization of the treefrog null allele, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I.

    1992-04-01

    Spring peeper (Hyla crucifer) tadpoles collected from the waste storage area during the Biological and Ecological Site Characterization of the Feed Materials Production Center (FEMP) in 1986 and 1987 appeared to be unique. A null (inactive) allele was found at the glucose phosphate isomerase enzyme locus in significant frequencies (approximately 20%) each year; this allele did not appear to occur in the offsite sample collected approximately 15km from the FEMP. Null alleles at this locus have not been reported in other amphibian populations; when they have been found in other organisms they have invariably been lethal in the homozygous condition.

  20. Characterization of the treefrog null allele

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I. . Dept. of Zoology)

    1990-12-01

    As part of the authors intensive year-long baseline ecological study, they characterized the degree of genetic polymorphism and heterozygosity in selected Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) populations using electrophoretic techniques. These data are being used as an indicator of stress by comparing populations on and off the FMPC site. The current study was initiated to determine whether this GPI null allele is lethal, when homozygous, in spring peepers. Also, a sampling protocol was implemented to determine whether a linear effect occurs relative to the frequency of the null allele offsite and to determine the origination site of the null allele. 18 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Pyrosequencing for Accurate Imprinted Allele Expression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bing; Damaschke, Nathan; Yao, Tianyu; McCormick, Johnathon; Wagner, Jennifer; Jarrard, David

    2016-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic mechanism that restricts gene expression to one inherited allele. Improper maintenance of imprinting has been implicated in a number of human diseases and developmental syndromes. Assays are needed that can quantify the contribution of each paternal allele to a gene expression profile. We have developed a rapid, sensitive quantitative assay for the measurement of individual allelic ratios termed Pyrosequencing for Imprinted Expression (PIE). Advantages of PIE over other approaches include shorter experimental time, decreased labor, avoiding the need for restriction endonuclease enzymes at polymorphic sites, and prevent heteroduplex formation which is problematic in quantitative PCR-based methods. We demonstrate the improved sensitivity of PIE including the ability to detect differences in allelic expression down to 1%. The assay is capable of measuring genomic heterozygosity as well as imprinting in a single run. PIE is applied to determine the status of Insulin-like Growth Factor-2 (IGF2) imprinting in human and mouse tissues. PMID:25581900

  2. Recovery of CD4+ T Cells in HIV patients with a stable virologic response to antiretroviral therapy is associated with polymorphisms of interleukin-6 and central major histocompatibility complex genes.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Sonia; Rosenow, Ann A; James, Ian R; Roberts, Steven G; Nolan, Richard C; French, Martyn A; Price, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    We investigated whether polymorphisms in genes associated with HIV disease progression and/or immune activation affect CD4+ T-cell recovery in HIV patients who began combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) with advanced immunodeficiency and achieved stable control of plasma viremia. Patients with CD4 T-cell counts <300 cells/microL (n = 33) and >400 cells/microL (n = 37) on ART were compared. A multiple case-control logistic regression associated carriage of BAT1(1,2) or interleukin (IL)6-174(2,2) with low CD4 T-cell counts (P = 0.012). BAT1*2 uniquely marks the central major histocompatibility complex region of a conserved haplotype (HLA-A1,B8,BAT1*2,TNFA-308*2,DR3,DQ2). There was no association between alleles carried at CCR5Delta32, CCR5 59029, CCR5 59353, CCR2+190 (V64I), SDF1 3'UTR, IL1A+4845, IL1B+3953, IL4-589, IL10-592, IL10-R1+536, IL10-R1+1112, IL12B 3'UTR, TNFA-308, or TNFA-1031 and CD4 T-cell counts. We suggest that immune activation and/or CD4 T-cell apoptosis in HIV patients on effective ART is influenced by genetic factors. PMID:16340466

  3. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Soderlund, Carol A; Nelson, William M; Goff, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https://code.google.com/p/allele

  4. Allele Workbench: Transcriptome Pipeline and Interactive Graphics for Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Soderlund, Carol A.; Nelson, William M.; Goff, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https://code.google.com/p/allele

  5. Bovine Polledness – An Autosomal Dominant Trait with Allelic Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Medugorac, Ivica; Seichter, Doris; Graf, Alexander; Russ, Ingolf; Blum, Helmut; Göpel, Karl Heinrich; Rothammer, Sophie; Förster, Martin; Krebs, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The persistent horns are an important trait of speciation for the family Bovidae with complex morphogenesis taking place briefly after birth. The polledness is highly favourable in modern cattle breeding systems but serious animal welfare issues urge for a solution in the production of hornless cattle other than dehorning. Although the dominant inhibition of horn morphogenesis was discovered more than 70 years ago, and the causative mutation was mapped almost 20 years ago, its molecular nature remained unknown. Here, we report allelic heterogeneity of the POLLED locus. First, we mapped the POLLED locus to a ∼381-kb interval in a multi-breed case-control design. Targeted re-sequencing of an enlarged candidate interval (547 kb) in 16 sires with known POLLED genotype did not detect a common allele associated with polled status. In eight sires of Alpine and Scottish origin (four polled versus four horned), we identified a single candidate mutation, a complex 202 bp insertion-deletion event that showed perfect association to the polled phenotype in various European cattle breeds, except Holstein-Friesian. The analysis of the same candidate interval in eight Holsteins identified five candidate variants which segregate as a 260 kb haplotype also perfectly associated with the POLLED gene without recombination or interference with the 202 bp insertion-deletion. We further identified bulls which are progeny tested as homozygous polled but bearing both, 202 bp insertion-deletion and Friesian haplotype. The distribution of genotypes of the two putative POLLED alleles in large semi-random sample (1,261 animals) supports the hypothesis of two independent mutations. PMID:22737241

  6. Three allele combinations associated with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Favorova, Olga O; Favorov, Alexander V; Boiko, Alexey N; Andreewski, Timofey V; Sudomoina, Marina A; Alekseenkov, Alexey D; Kulakova, Olga G; Gusev, Eugenyi I; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Ochs, Michael F

    2006-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disease of polygenic etiology. Dissection of its genetic background is a complex problem, because of the combinatorial possibilities of gene-gene interactions. As genotyping methods improve throughput, approaches that can explore multigene interactions appropriately should lead to improved understanding of MS. Methods 286 unrelated patients with definite MS and 362 unrelated healthy controls of Russian descent were genotyped at polymorphic loci (including SNPs, repeat polymorphisms, and an insertion/deletion) of the DRB1, TNF, LT, TGFβ1, CCR5 and CTLA4 genes and TNFa and TNFb microsatellites. Each allele carriership in patients and controls was compared by Fisher's exact test, and disease-associated combinations of alleles in the data set were sought using a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo-based method recently developed by our group. Results We identified two previously unknown MS-associated tri-allelic combinations: -509TGFβ1*C, DRB1*18(3), CTLA4*G and -238TNF*B1,-308TNF*A2, CTLA4*G, which perfectly separate MS cases from controls, at least in the present sample. The previously described DRB1*15(2) allele, the microsatellite TNFa9 allele and the biallelic combination CCR5Δ32, DRB1*04 were also reidentified as MS-associated. Conclusion These results represent an independent validation of MS association with DRB1*15(2) and TNFa9 in Russians and are the first to find the interplay of three loci in conferring susceptibility to MS. They demonstrate the efficacy of our approach for the identification of complex-disease-associated combinations of alleles. PMID:16872485

  7. European Mistletoe

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov Key References American mistletoe. Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Web site. Accessed at www.naturaldatabase.com on July 7, 2009. European mistletoe. Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Web site. Accessed at www.naturaldatabase.com on July ...

  8. European Community.

    PubMed

    1987-05-01

    The European Community was established in 1951 to reconcile France and Germany after World War II and to make possible the eventual federation of Europe. By 1986, there were 12 member countries: France, Italy, Belgium, the Federal Republic of Germany, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Denmark, Ireland, the United Kingdom, Greece, Spain, and Portugal. Principal areas of concern are internal and external trade, agriculture, monetary coordination, fisheries, common industrial and commercial policies, assistance, science and research, and common social and regional policies. The European Community has a budget of US$34.035 billion/year, funded by customs duties and 1.4% of each member's value-added tax. The treaties establishing the European Community call for members to form a common market, a common customs tariff, and common agricultural, transport, economic, and nuclear policies. Major European Community institutions include the Commission, Council of Ministers, European Parliament, Court of Justice, and Economic and Social Committee. The Community is the world's largest trading unit, accounting for 15% of world trade. The 2 main goals of the Community's industrial policy are to create an open internal market and to promote technological innovation in order to improve international competitiveness. The European Community aims to contribute to the economic and social development of Third World countries as well. PMID:12177941

  9. Tetrasomic Segregation for Multiple Alleles in Alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Quiros, Carlos F.

    1982-01-01

    Evidence of tetrasomic inheritance in alfalfa, Medicago sativa L. and M. falcata L., for multiple codominant alleles at three isozymic loci is reported in this study. The locus Prx-1 governing anodal peroxidase and the loci Lap-1 and Lap-2 governing anodal leucine-aminopeptidase were studied by starch gel electrophoresis in seedling root tissue or seeds. The progenies from several di-, tri- or tetra-allelic plants belong to the species M. sativa and M. falcata and their hybrids were studied for the segregation of the three genes. In all cases, tetrasomic inheritance of chromosomal-type segregation was observed. In another progeny resulting from the crossing of two plants involving four different alleles at locus Lap-2, tetrasomic segregation with the possible occurrence of double reduction was observed. This study presents direct evidence of autotetraploidy and the existence of tetra-allelic loci in alfalfa. It also supports the concept that the species M. sativa and M. falcata are genetically close enough to be considered biotypes of a common species. PMID:17246077

  10. Demographic history and rare allele sharing among human populations.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Simon; Henn, Brenna M; Gutenkunst, Ryan N; Indap, Amit R; Marth, Gabor T; Clark, Andrew G; Yu, Fuli; Gibbs, Richard A; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2011-07-19

    High-throughput sequencing technology enables population-level surveys of human genomic variation. Here, we examine the joint allele frequency distributions across continental human populations and present an approach for combining complementary aspects of whole-genome, low-coverage data and targeted high-coverage data. We apply this approach to data generated by the pilot phase of the Thousand Genomes Project, including whole-genome 2-4× coverage data for 179 samples from HapMap European, Asian, and African panels as well as high-coverage target sequencing of the exons of 800 genes from 697 individuals in seven populations. We use the site frequency spectra obtained from these data to infer demographic parameters for an Out-of-Africa model for populations of African, European, and Asian descent and to predict, by a jackknife-based approach, the amount of genetic diversity that will be discovered as sample sizes are increased. We predict that the number of discovered nonsynonymous coding variants will reach 100,000 in each population after ∼1,000 sequenced chromosomes per population, whereas ∼2,500 chromosomes will be needed for the same number of synonymous variants. Beyond this point, the number of segregating sites in the European and Asian panel populations is expected to overcome that of the African panel because of faster recent population growth. Overall, we find that the majority of human genomic variable sites are rare and exhibit little sharing among diverged populations. Our results emphasize that replication of disease association for specific rare genetic variants across diverged populations must overcome both reduced statistical power because of rarity and higher population divergence. PMID:21730125

  11. Demographic history and rare allele sharing among human populations

    PubMed Central

    Gravel, Simon; Henn, Brenna M.; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.; Indap, Amit R.; Marth, Gabor T.; Clark, Andrew G.; Yu, Fuli; Gibbs, Richard A.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Altshuler, David L.; Durbin, Richard M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Bentley, David R.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Clark, Andrew G.; Collins, Francis S.; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Donnelly, Peter; Egholm, Michael; Flicek, Paul; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Knoppers, Bartha M.; Lander, Eric S.; Lehrach, Hans; Mardis, Elaine R.; McVean, Gil A.; Nickerson, Debbie A.; Peltonen, Leena; Schafer, Alan J.; Sherry, Stephen T.; Wang, Jun; Wilson, Richard K.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Deiros, David; Metzker, Mike; Muzny, Donna; Reid, Jeff; Wheeler, David; Wang, Jun; Li, Jingxiang; Jian, Min; Li, Guoqing; Li, Ruiqiang; Liang, Huiqing; Tian, Geng; Wang, Bo; Wang, Jian; Wang, Wei; Yang, Huanming; Zhang, Xiuqing; Zheng, Huisong; Lander, Eric S.; Altshuler, David L.; Ambrogio, Lauren; Bloom, Toby; Cibulskis, Kristian; Fennell, Tim J.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Jaffe, David B.; Shefler, Erica; Sougnez, Carrie L.; Bentley, David R.; Gormley, Niall; Humphray, Sean; Kingsbury, Zoya; Koko-Gonzales, Paula; Stone, Jennifer; McKernan, Kevin J.; Costa, Gina L.; Ichikawa, Jeffry K.; Lee, Clarence C.; Sudbrak, Ralf; Lehrach, Hans; Borodina, Tatiana A.; Dahl, Andreas; Davydov, Alexey N.; Marquardt, Peter; Mertes, Florian; Nietfeld, Wilfiried; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schreiber, Stefan; Soldatov, Aleksey V.; Timmermann, Bernd; Tolzmann, Marius; Egholm, Michael; Affourtit, Jason; Ashworth, Dana; Attiya, Said; Bachorski, Melissa; Buglione, Eli; Burke, Adam; Caprio, Amanda; Celone, Christopher; Clark, Shauna; Conners, David; Desany, Brian; Gu, Lisa; Guccione, Lorri; Kao, Kalvin; Kebbel, Andrew; Knowlton, Jennifer; Labrecque, Matthew; McDade, Louise; Mealmaker, Craig; Minderman, Melissa; Nawrocki, Anne; Niazi, Faheem; Pareja, Kristen; Ramenani, Ravi; Riches, David; Song, Wanmin; Turcotte, Cynthia; Wang, Shally; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Dooling, David; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Robert; Weinstock, George; Durbin, Richard M.; Burton, John; Carter, David M.; Churcher, Carol; Coffey, Alison; Cox, Anthony; Palotie, Aarno; Quail, Michael; Skelly, Tom; Stalker, James; Swerdlow, Harold P.; Turner, Daniel; De Witte, Anniek; Giles, Shane; Gibbs, Richard A.; Wheeler, David; Bainbridge, Matthew; Challis, Danny; Sabo, Aniko; Yu, Fuli; Yu, Jin; Wang, Jun; Fang, Xiaodong; Guo, Xiaosen; Li, Ruiqiang; Li, Yingrui; Luo, Ruibang; Tai, Shuaishuai; Wu, Honglong; Zheng, Hancheng; Zheng, Xiaole; Zhou, Yan; Li, Guoqing; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Marth, Gabor T.; Garrison, Erik P.; Huang, Weichun; Indap, Amit; Kural, Deniz; Lee, Wan-Ping; Leong, Wen Fung; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Stewart, Chip; Stromberg, Michael P.; Ward, Alistair N.; Wu, Jiantao; Lee, Charles; Mills, Ryan E.; Shi, Xinghua; Daly, Mark J.; DePristo, Mark A.; Altshuler, David L.; Ball, Aaron D.; Banks, Eric; Bloom, Toby; Browning, Brian L.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Fennell, Tim J.; Garimella, Kiran V.; Grossman, Sharon R.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Hanna, Matt; Hartl, Chris; Jaffe, David B.; Kernytsky, Andrew M.; Korn, Joshua M.; Li, Heng; Maguire, Jared R.; McCarroll, Steven A.; McKenna, Aaron; Nemesh, James C.; Philippakis, Anthony A.; Poplin, Ryan E.; Price, Alkes; Rivas, Manuel A.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Schaffner, Stephen F.; Shefler, Erica; Shlyakhter, Ilya A.; Cooper, David N.; Ball, Edward V.; Mort, Matthew; Phillips, Andrew D.; Stenson, Peter D.; Sebat, Jonathan; Makarov, Vladimir; Ye, Kenny; Yoon, Seungtai C.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Clark, Andrew G.; Boyko, Adam; Degenhardt, Jeremiah; Gravel, Simon; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.; Kaganovich, Mark; Keinan, Alon; Lacroute, Phil; Ma, Xin; Reynolds, Andy; Clarke, Laura; Flicek, Paul; Cunningham, Fiona; Herrero, Javier; Keenen, Stephen; Kulesha, Eugene; Leinonen, Rasko; McLaren, William M.; Radhakrishnan, Rajesh; Smith, Richard E.; Zalunin, Vadim; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Korbel, Jan O.; Stütz, Adrian M.; Humphray, Sean; Bauer, Markus; Cheetham, R. Keira; Cox, Tony; Eberle, Michael; James, Terena; Kahn, Scott; Murray, Lisa; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Ye, Kai; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Fu, Yutao; Hyland, Fiona C. L.; Manning, Jonathan M.; McLaughlin, Stephen F.; Peckham, Heather E.; Sakarya, Onur; Sun, Yongming A.; Tsung, Eric F.; Batzer, Mark A.; Konkel, Miriam K.; Walker, Jerilyn A.; Sudbrak, Ralf; Albrecht, Marcus W.; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav S.; Herwig, Ralf; Parkhomchuk, Dimitri V.; Sherry, Stephen T.; Agarwala, Richa; Khouri, Hoda M.; Morgulis, Aleksandr O.; Paschall, Justin E.; Phan, Lon D.; Rotmistrovsky, Kirill E.; Sanders, Robert D.; Shumway, Martin F.; Xiao, Chunlin; McVean, Gil A.; Auton, Adam; Iqbal, Zamin; Lunter, Gerton; Marchini, Jonathan L.; Moutsianas, Loukas; Myers, Simon; Tumian, Afidalina; Desany, Brian; Knight, James; Winer, Roger; Craig, David W.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Steve M.; Christoforides, Alexis; Kurdoglu, Ahmet A.; Pearson, John V.; Sinari, Shripad A.; Tembe, Waibhav D.; Haussler, David; Hinrichs, Angie S.; Katzman, Sol J.; Kern, Andrew; Kuhn, Robert M.; Przeworski, Molly; Hernandez, Ryan D.; Howie, Bryan; Kelley, Joanna L.; Melton, S. Cord; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Li, Yun; Anderson, Paul; Blackwell, Tom; Chen, Wei; Cookson, William O.; Ding, Jun; Kang, Hyun Min; Lathrop, Mark; Liang, Liming; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Scheet, Paul; Sidore, Carlo; Snyder, Matthew; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zöllner, Sebastian; Awadalla, Philip; Casals, Ferran; Idaghdour, Youssef; Keebler, John; Stone, Eric A.; Zilversmit, Martine; Jorde, Lynn; Xing, Jinchuan; Eichler, Evan E.; Aksay, Gozde; Alkan, Can; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Sahinalp, S. Cenk; Sudmant, Peter H.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Chen, Ken; Chinwalla, Asif; Ding, Li; Koboldt, Daniel C.; McLellan, Mike D.; Dooling, David; Weinstock, George; Wallis, John W.; Wendl, Michael C.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Durbin, Richard M.; Albers, Cornelis A.; Ayub, Qasim; Balasubramaniam, Senduran; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Carter, David M.; Chen, Yuan; Conrad, Donald F.; Danecek, Petr; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Hu, Min; Huang, Ni; Hurles, Matt E.; Jin, Hanjun; Jostins, Luke; Keane, Thomas M.; Le, Si Quang; Lindsay, Sarah; Long, Quan; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Parts, Leopold; Stalker, James; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Walter, Klaudia; Zhang, Yujun; Gerstein, Mark B.; Snyder, Michael; Abyzov, Alexej; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Bjornson, Robert; Du, Jiang; Grubert, Fabian; Habegger, Lukas; Haraksingh, Rajini; Jee, Justin; Khurana, Ekta; Lam, Hugo Y. K.; Leng, Jing; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Urban, Alexander E.; Zhang, Zhengdong; Li, Yingrui; Luo, Ruibang; Marth, Gabor T.; Garrison, Erik P.; Kural, Deniz; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Stewart, Chip; Stromberg, Michael P.; Ward, Alistair N.; Wu, Jiantao; Lee, Charles; Mills, Ryan E.; Shi, Xinghua; McCarroll, Steven A.; Banks, Eric; DePristo, Mark A.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Hartl, Chris; Korn, Joshua M.; Li, Heng; Nemesh, James C.; Sebat, Jonathan; Makarov, Vladimir; Ye, Kenny; Yoon, Seungtai C.; Degenhardt, Jeremiah; Kaganovich, Mark; Clarke, Laura; Smith, Richard E.; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Korbel, Jan O.; Humphray, Sean; Cheetham, R. Keira; Eberle, Michael; Kahn, Scott; Murray, Lisa; Ye, Kai; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Fu, Yutao; Peckham, Heather E.; Sun, Yongming A.; Batzer, Mark A.; Konkel, Miriam K.; Walker, Jerilyn A.; Xiao, Chunlin; Iqbal, Zamin; Desany, Brian; Blackwell, Tom; Snyder, Matthew; Xing, Jinchuan; Eichler, Evan E.; Aksay, Gozde; Alkan, Can; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Chen, Ken; Chinwalla, Asif; Ding, Li; McLellan, Mike D.; Wallis, John W.; Hurles, Matt E.; Conrad, Donald F.; Walter, Klaudia; Zhang, Yujun; Gerstein, Mark B.; Snyder, Michael; Abyzov, Alexej; Du, Jiang; Grubert, Fabian; Haraksingh, Rajini; Jee, Justin; Khurana, Ekta; Lam, Hugo Y. K.; Leng, Jing; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Urban, Alexander E.; Zhang, Zhengdong; Gibbs, Richard A.; Bainbridge, Matthew; Challis, Danny; Coafra, Cristian; Dinh, Huyen; Kovar, Christie; Lee, Sandy; Muzny, Donna; Nazareth, Lynne; Reid, Jeff; Sabo, Aniko; Yu, Fuli; Yu, Jin; Marth, Gabor T.; Garrison, Erik P.; Indap, Amit; Leong, Wen Fung; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Stewart, Chip; Ward, Alistair N.; Wu, Jiantao; Cibulskis, Kristian; Fennell, Tim J.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Garimella, Kiran V.; Hartl, Chris; Shefler, Erica; Sougnez, Carrie L.; Wilkinson, Jane; Clark, Andrew G.; Gravel, Simon; Grubert, Fabian; Clarke, Laura; Flicek, Paul; Smith, Richard E.; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Sherry, Stephen T.; Khouri, Hoda M.; Paschall, Justin E.; Shumway, Martin F.; Xiao, Chunlin; McVean, Gil A.; Katzman, Sol J.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Blackwell, Tom; Mardis, Elaine R.; Dooling, David; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Robert; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Durbin, Richard M.; Balasubramaniam, Senduran; Coffey, Allison; Keane, Thomas M.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Palotie, Aarno; Scott, Carol; Stalker, James; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Gerstein, Mark B.; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Knoppers, Bartha M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Gharani, Neda; Gibbs, Richard A.; Jorde, Lynn; Kaye, Jane S.; Kent, Alastair; Li, Taosha; McGuire, Amy L.; McVean, Gil A.; Ossorio, Pilar N.; Rotimi, Charles N.; Su, Yeyang; Toji, Lorraine H.; TylerSmith, Chris; Brooks, Lisa D.; Felsenfeld, Adam L.; McEwen, Jean E.; Abdallah, Assya; Juenger, Christopher R.; Clemm, Nicholas C.; Collins, Francis S.; Duncanson, Audrey; Green, Eric D.; Guyer, Mark S.; Peterson, Jane L.; Schafer, Alan J.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Altshuler, David L.; Auton, Adam; Brooks, Lisa D.; Durbin, Richard M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Hurles, Matt E.; McVean, Gil A.

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technology enables population-level surveys of human genomic variation. Here, we examine the joint allele frequency distributions across continental human populations and present an approach for combining complementary aspects of whole-genome, low-coverage data and targeted high-coverage data. We apply this approach to data generated by the pilot phase of the Thousand Genomes Project, including whole-genome 2–4× coverage data for 179 samples from HapMap European, Asian, and African panels as well as high-coverage target sequencing of the exons of 800 genes from 697 individuals in seven populations. We use the site frequency spectra obtained from these data to infer demographic parameters for an Out-of-Africa model for populations of African, European, and Asian descent and to predict, by a jackknife-based approach, the amount of genetic diversity that will be discovered as sample sizes are increased. We predict that the number of discovered nonsynonymous coding variants will reach 100,000 in each population after ∼1,000 sequenced chromosomes per population, whereas ∼2,500 chromosomes will be needed for the same number of synonymous variants. Beyond this point, the number of segregating sites in the European and Asian panel populations is expected to overcome that of the African panel because of faster recent population growth. Overall, we find that the majority of human genomic variable sites are rare and exhibit little sharing among diverged populations. Our results emphasize that replication of disease association for specific rare genetic variants across diverged populations must overcome both reduced statistical power because of rarity and higher population divergence. PMID:21730125

  12. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Allele Loci in the Qatari Population

    PubMed Central

    Abi Khalil, Charbel; Fakhro, Khalid A.; Robay, Amal; Ramstetter, Monica D.; Al-Azwani, Iman K.; Malek, Joel A.; Zirie, Mahmoud; Jayyousi, Amin; Badii, Ramin; Al-Nabet Al-Marri, Ajayeb; Chiuchiolo, Maria J.; Al-Shakaki, Alya; Chidiac, Omar; Gharbiah, Maey; Bener, Abdulbari; Stadler, Dora; Hackett, Neil R.; Mezey, Jason G.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing in the Middle East. However, the genetic risk factors for T2D in the Middle Eastern populations are not known, as the majority of studies of genetic risk for T2D are in Europeans and Asians. Methods All subjects were ≥3 generation Qataris. Cases with T2D (n = 1,124) and controls (n = 590) were randomly recruited and assigned to the 3 known Qatari genetic subpopulations [Bedouin (Q1), Persian/South Asian (Q2) and African (Q3)]. Subjects underwent genotyping for 37 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 29 genes known to be associated with T2D in Europeans and/or Asian populations, and an additional 27 tag SNPs related to these susceptibility loci. Pre-study power analysis suggested that with the known incidence of T2D in adult Qataris (22%), the study population size would be sufficient to detect significant differences if the SNPs were risk factors among Qataris, assuming that the odds ratio (OR) for T2D SNPs in Qatari’s is greater than or equal to the SNP with highest known OR in other populations. Results Haplotype analysis demonstrated that Qatari haplotypes in the region of known T2D risk alleles in Q1 and Q2 genetic subpopulations were similar to European haplotypes. After Benjamini-Hochberg adjustment for multiple testing, only two SNPs (rs7903146 and rs4506565), both associated with transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2), achieved statistical significance in the whole study population. When T2D subjects and control subjects were assigned to the known 3 Qatari subpopulations, and analyzed individually and with the Q1 and Q2 genetic subpopulations combined, one of these SNPs (rs4506565) was also significant in the admixed group. No other SNPs associated with T2D in all Qataris or individual genetic subpopulations. Conclusions With the caveats of the power analysis, the European/Asian T2D SNPs do not contribute significantly to the high prevalence of T2D in the Qatari population, suggesting

  13. Frequency of CCR5Δ32 allele in healthy Bosniak population

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Grażyna; Valjevac, Amina; Skonieczna-Żydecka, Karolina; Mackic-Djurovic, Mirela; Parczewski, Miłosz; Urbańska, Anna; Salkic, Nermin N

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence has demonstrated the role of CCR5Δ32 in a variety of human diseases: from infectious and inflammatory diseases to cancer. Several studies have confirmed that genetic variants in chemokine receptor CCR5 gene are correlated with susceptibility and resistance to HIV infection. A 32-nucleotide deletion within the CCR5 reading frame is associated with decreased susceptibility to HIV acquisition and a slower progression to AIDS. Mean frequency of CCR5Δ32 allele in Europe is approximately 10%. The highest allele frequency is observed among Nordic populations (about 12%) and the lowest in the regions of Southeast Mediterranean (about 5%). Although the frequency of CCR5Δ32 was determined in numerous European populations, there is a lack of studies on this variant in the Bosnia and Herzegovina population. Therefore, the aim of our study was to assess the frequency of CCR5Δ32 allele in the cohort of Bosniaks and compare the results with European reports. CCR5Δ32 was detected by sequence-specific PCR in a sample of 100 healthy Bosniaks (DNA collected 2011-2013). Mean age of the cohort being 58.8 (±10.7) years, with 82% of women. We identified 17 heterozygotes and one mutant homozygote in study group, with mean ∆32 allele frequency of 9.5%. CCR5∆32 allele frequency among Bosniaks is comparable to that found in Caucasian populations and follows the pattern of the north-southern gradient observed for Europe. Further studies on larger cohorts with adequate female-to-male ratio are necessary. PMID:25172974

  14. HLA-B alleles of the Cayapa of Ecuador: New B39 and B15 alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Garber, T.L.; Butler, L.M.; Watkins, D.I.

    1995-05-01

    Recent data suggest that HLA-B locus alleles can evolve quickly in native South American populations. To investigate further this phenomenon of new HLA-B variants among Amerindians, we studied samples from another South American tribe, the Cayapa from Ecuador. We selected individuals for HLA-B molecular typing based upon their HLA class II typing results. Three new variants of HLA-B39 and one new variant of HLA-B15 were found in the Cayapa: HLA-B*3905, HLA-B*3906, HLA-B*3907, and HLA-B*1522. A total of thirteen new HLA-B alleles have now been found in the four South American tribes studied. Each of these four tribes studied, including the Cayapa, had novel alleles that were not found in any of the other tribes, suggesting that many of these new HLA-B alleles may have evolved since the Paleo-Indians originally populated South America. Each of these 13 new alleles contained predicted amino acid replacements that were located in the peptide binding site. These amino acid replacements may affect the sequence motif of the bound peptides, suggesting that these new alleles have been maintained by selection. New allelic variants have been found for all common HLA-B locus antigenic groups present in South American tribes with the exception of B48. In spite of its high frequency in South American tribes, no evidence for variants of B48 has been found in all the Amerindians studied, suggesting that B48 may have unique characteristics among the B locus alleles. 70 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Crohn's Disease Risk Alleles on the NOD2 Locus Have Been Maintained by Natural Selection on Standing Variation

    PubMed Central

    Nakagome, Shigeki; Mano, Shuhei; Kozlowski, Lukasz; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Shibata, Hiroki; Fukumaki, Yasuaki; Kidd, Judith R.; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Kawamura, Shoji; Oota, Hiroki

    2012-01-01

    Risk alleles for complex diseases are widely spread throughout human populations. However, little is known about the geographic distribution and frequencies of risk alleles, which may contribute to differences in disease susceptibility and prevalence among populations. Here, we focus on Crohn's disease (CD) as a model for the evolutionary study of complex disease alleles. Recent genome-wide association studies and classical linkage analyses have identified more than 70 susceptible genomic regions for CD in Europeans, but only a few have been confirmed in non-European populations. Our analysis of eight European-specific susceptibility genes using HapMap data shows that at the NOD2 locus the CD-risk alleles are linked with a haplotype specific to CEU at a frequency that is significantly higher compared with the entire genome. We subsequently examined nine global populations and found that the CD-risk alleles spread through hitchhiking with a high-frequency haplotype (H1) exclusive to Europeans. To examine the neutrality of NOD2, we performed phylogenetic network analyses, coalescent simulation, protein structural prediction, characterization of mutation patterns, and estimations of population growth and time to most recent common ancestor (TMRCA). We found that while H1 was significantly prevalent in European populations, the H1 TMRCA predated human migration out of Africa. H1 is likely to have undergone negative selection because 1) the root of H1 genealogy is defined by a preexisting amino acid substitution that causes serious conformational changes to the NOD2 protein, 2) the haplotype has almost become extinct in Africa, and 3) the haplotype has not been affected by the recent European expansion reflected in the other haplotypes. Nevertheless, H1 has survived in European populations, suggesting that the haplotype is advantageous to this group. We propose that several CD-risk alleles, which destabilize and disrupt the NOD2 protein, have been maintained by natural

  16. Microsatellite allele frequencies in humans and chimpanzees, with implications for constraints on allele size.

    PubMed

    Garza, J C; Slatkin, M; Freimer, N B

    1995-07-01

    The distributions of allele sizes at eight simple-sequence repeat (SSR) or microsatellite loci in chimpanzees are found and compared with the distributions previously obtained from several human populations. At several loci, the differences in average allele size between chimpanzees and humans are sufficiently small that there might be a constraint on the evolution of average allele size. Furthermore, a model that allows for a bias in the mutation process shows that for some loci a weak bias can account for the observations. Several alleles at one of the loci (Mfd 59) were sequenced. Differences between alleles of different lengths were found to be more complex than previously assumed. An 8-base-pair deletion was present in the nonvariable region of the chimpanzee locus. This locus contains a previously unrecognized repeated region, which is imperfect in humans and perfect in chimpanzees. The apparently greater opportunity for mutation conferred by the two perfect repeat regions in chimpanzees is reflected in the higher variance in repeat number at Mfd 59 in chimpanzees than in humans. These data indicate that interspecific differences in allele length are not always attributable to simple changes in the number of repeats. PMID:7659015

  17. Molecular analysis of human leukocyte antigen class I and class II allele frequencies and haplotype distribution in Pakistani population

    PubMed Central

    Moatter, T.; Aban, M.; Tabassum, S.; Shaikh, U.; Pervez, S.

    2010-01-01

    AIM: Distribution of HLA class I and II alleles and haplotype was studied in Pakistani population and compared with the data reported for Caucasoid, Africans, Orientals and Arab populations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: HLA class I and II polymorphisms in 1000 unrelated Pakistani individuals was studied using sequence-specific primers and polymerase chain reaction and assay. RESULTS: The most frequent class I alleles observed were A*02, B*35 and CW*07, with frequencies of 19.2, 13.7 and 20%, respectively. Fifteen distinct HLA-DRB1 alleles and eight HLA-DQB1 alleles were recognized. The most frequently observed DRB1 alleles which represented more than 60% of the subjects were DRB1 *03, *07, *11 and *15. The rare DRB1 alleles detected in this study were HLADRB1 *08 and *09, having frequencies of 0.9 and 1.7%, respectively. In addition, at DRB1-DQB1 loci there were 179 different haplotypes and 285 unique genotypes and the most common haplotype was DRB1*15-DQB1*06 which represented 17% of the total DRB1-DQB1 haplotypes. In our population, haplotype A*33-B*58-Cw*03 comprised 2.8% of the total class I haplotypes observed. This haplotype was seen only in the oriental populations and has not been reported in the African or European Caucasoid. CONCLUSION: Our study showed a close similarity of HLA class I and II alleles with that of European Caucasoid and Orientals. In Pakistani population, two rare loci and three haplotypes were identified, whereas haplotypes characteristic of Caucasians, Africans and Orientals were also found, suggesting an admixture of different races due to migration to and from this region. PMID:21206703

  18. Do Heliconius butterfly species exchange mimicry alleles?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joel; Kronforst, Marcus R.

    2013-01-01

    Hybridization has the potential to transfer beneficial alleles across species boundaries, and there are a growing number of examples in which this has apparently occurred. Recent studies suggest that Heliconius butterflies have transferred wing pattern mimicry alleles between species via hybridization, but ancestral polymorphism could also produce a signature of shared ancestry around mimicry genes. To distinguish between these alternative hypotheses, we measured DNA sequence divergence around putatively introgressed mimicry loci and compared this with the rest of the genome. Our results reveal that putatively introgressed regions show strongly reduced sequence divergence between co-mimetic species, suggesting that their divergence times are younger than the rest of the genome. This is consistent with introgression and not ancestral variation. We further show that this signature of introgression occurs at sites throughout the genome, not just around mimicry genes. PMID:23864282

  19. Allele-specific expression assays using Solexa

    PubMed Central

    Main, Bradley J; Bickel, Ryan D; McIntyre, Lauren M; Graze, Rita M; Calabrese, Peter P; Nuzhdin, Sergey V

    2009-01-01

    Background Allele-specific expression (ASE) assays can be used to identify cis, trans, and cis-by-trans regulatory variation. Understanding the source of expression variation has important implications for disease susceptibility, phenotypic diversity, and adaptation. While ASE is commonly measured via relative fluorescence at a SNP, next generation sequencing provides an opportunity to measure ASE in an accurate and high-throughput manner using read counts. Results We introduce a Solexa-based method to perform large numbers of ASE assays using only a single lane of a Solexa flowcell. In brief, transcripts of interest, which contain a known SNP, are PCR enriched and barcoded to enable multiplexing. Then high-throughput sequencing is used to estimate allele-specific expression using sequencing counts. To validate this method, we measured the allelic bias in a dilution series and found high correlations between measured and expected values (r>0.9, p < 0.001). We applied this method to a set of 5 genes in a Drosophila simulans parental mix, F1 and introgression and found that for these genes the majority of expression divergence can be explained by cis-regulatory variation. Conclusion We present a new method with the capacity to measure ASE for large numbers of assays using as little as one lane of a Solexa flowcell. This will be a valuable technique for molecular and population genetic studies, as well as for verification of genome-wide data sets. PMID:19740431

  20. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F.; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G.; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W. Florian; Edwards, Robert A.; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2015-10-30

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. In conclusion, together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts.

  1. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; et al

    2015-10-30

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population andmore » functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. In conclusion, together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts.« less

  2. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F.; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G.; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W. Florian; Edwards, Robert A.; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. Together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts. PMID:26515720

  3. Reconstructing the prior probabilities of allelic phylogenies.

    PubMed Central

    Golding, G Brian

    2002-01-01

    In general when a phylogeny is reconstructed from DNA or protein sequence data, it makes use only of the probabilities of obtaining some phylogeny given a collection of data. It is also possible to determine the prior probabilities of different phylogenies. This information can be of use in analyzing the biological causes for the observed divergence of sampled taxa. Unusually "rare" topologies for a given data set may be indicative of different biological forces acting. A recursive algorithm is presented that calculates the prior probabilities of a phylogeny for different allelic samples and for different phylogenies. This method is a straightforward extension of Ewens' sample distribution. The probability of obtaining each possible sample according to Ewens' distribution is further subdivided into each of the possible phylogenetic topologies. These probabilities depend not only on the identity of the alleles and on 4N(mu) (four times the effective population size times the neutral mutation rate) but also on the phylogenetic relationships among the alleles. Illustrations of the algorithm are given to demonstrate how different phylogenies are favored under different conditions. PMID:12072482

  4. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity.

    PubMed

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; De Masi, Leon; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S; Fraser, George P; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W Florian; Edwards, Robert A; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R; Rankin, Shelley C; Schifferli, Dieter M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. Together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts. PMID:26515720

  5. Ethnic variation in allele distribution of the androgen receptor (AR) (CAG)n repeat.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Christine M; Lowe, Lynn P; Lee, Hoon; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Dyer, Alan R; Metzger, Boyd E; Lowe, William L; Urbanek, Margrit

    2012-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is important in reproductive organ development, as well as tissue homeostasis of the pancreas, liver, and skeletal muscle in adulthood. The trinucleotide (CAG)(n) repeat polymorphism in exon 1 of the AR gene is thought to regulate AR activity, with longer alleles conferring reduced receptor activity. Therefore, the evaluation of the allelic distribution of the AR (CAG)(n) repeat in various ethnic groups is crucial in understanding the interindividual variability in AR activity. We evaluated ethnic variation of this AR polymorphism by genotyping individuals from the multiethnic Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome study cohort. We genotyped 4421 Caucasian mothers and 3365 offspring of European ancestry; 1494 Thai mothers and 1742 offspring; 1119 Afro-Caribbean mothers and 1142 offspring; and 780 Hispanic mothers and 770 offspring of Mexican ancestry from Bellflower, California. The distributions of (CAG)(n) alleles among all 4 ethnic groups are significantly different (P < .0001). Pairwise tests confirmed significant differences between each pair of ethnicities tested (P < 10(-28)). The relative AR (CAG)(n) repeat length in the different groups was as follows: Afro-Caribbean (shortest repeat lengths and greatest predicted AR activity) < Caucasian < Hispanic < Thai (longest repeat length and lowest predicted AR activity). Significant interethnic differences in the allele frequencies of the AR exon 1 (CAG)(n) polymorphism exist. Our results suggest that there may be potential ethnic differences in androgenic pathway activity and androgen sensitivity. PMID:21597087

  6. Increasing long term response by selecting for favorable minor alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term response of genomic selection can be improved by considering allele frequencies of selected markers or quantitative trait loci (QTLs). A previous formula to weight allele frequency of favorable minor alleles was tested, and 2 new formulas were developed. The previous formula used nonlinear...

  7. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, O.E.; Pan, D.

    1994-07-19

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating. 2 figs.

  8. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Oliver E.; Pan, David

    1994-01-01

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating.

  9. Distribution of HLA alleles in Portugal and Cabo Verde. Relationships with the slave trade route.

    PubMed

    Spínola, H; Brehm, A; Williams, F; Jesus, J; Middleton, D

    2002-07-01

    HLA-A, -B, and -DR frequencies were analysed in populations from Portugal and the Madeira and Cabo Verde Archipelagos, aiming to characterize their genetic composition. Portuguese settlers colonized both Archipelagos in the 15th and 16th centuries. Madeira received many sub-Saharan slaves to work in the sugar plantations, and Cabo Verde served as a pivotal market in the Atlantic slave trade and was populated by individuals coming from the Senegambia region of the West African coast. The population of Madeira shows the highest genetic diversity and the presence of alleles and haplotypes usually linked to sub-Saharan populations, the haplotypes accounting for 3.5% of the total. Cabo Verde presents typical markers acknowledged to be of European or Ibero-Mediterranean origin, thus revealing the admixture of European settlers with Sub-Saharan slaves. Altogether the number of European haplotypes reaches 15% of the total. The Portuguese population shows a perceivable and significant heterogeneity both in allele and haplotype frequencies, unveiling a differential input of peoples from different origins. A PCA of the populations studied, plus other relevant ones, clearly shows gene heterogeneity in mainland Portugal as well as the differences and relationships between these populations and Madeira and Cabo Verde. PMID:12418969

  10. Fixation probability with multiple alleles and projected average allelic effect on selection.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Sabin; Lahaie, Philippe

    2009-06-01

    The first-order effect of selection on the probability of fixation of an allele, with respect to an intensity of selection s>0 in a diploid population of fixed finite size N, undergoing discrete, non-overlapping generations, is shown to be given by the sum of the average effects of that allele on the coefficient of selection in the current generation and all future generations, given the population state in the current generation. This projected average allelic effect is a weighted sum of average allelic effects in allozygous and autozygous offspring in the initial generation, with weights given in terms of expected coalescence times, under neutrality, for the lineages of two or three gametes chosen at random in the same generation. This is shown in the framework of multiple alleles at one locus, with genotypic values determining either viability or fertility differences, and with either multinomial or exchangeable reproduction schemes. In the limit of weak selection in a large population such that Ns tends to zero, the initial average allelic effects in allozygous offspring and autozygous offspring have the same weight on the fixation probability only in the domain of application of the Kingman coalescent. With frequency-dependent selection in a linear-game-theoretic context with two phenotypes determined by additive gene action, the first-order effect on the fixation probability is a combination of two effects of frequency-independent selection, one in a haploid population, the other in a diploid population. In the domain of application of the Kingman coalescent as the population size goes to infinity and Ns to zero, the first effect is three times more important than the second effect. This explains the one-third law of evolutionary dynamics in this domain, and shows how this law can be extended beyond this domain. PMID:19249322

  11. Borrowed alleles and convergence in serpentine adaptation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Brian J; Lahner, Brett; DaCosta, Jeffrey M; Weisman, Caroline M; Hollister, Jesse D; Salt, David E; Bomblies, Kirsten; Yant, Levi

    2016-07-19

    Serpentine barrens represent extreme hazards for plant colonists. These sites are characterized by high porosity leading to drought, lack of essential mineral nutrients, and phytotoxic levels of metals. Nevertheless, nature forged populations adapted to these challenges. Here, we use a population-based evolutionary genomic approach coupled with elemental profiling to assess how autotetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa adapted to a multichallenge serpentine habitat in the Austrian Alps. We first demonstrate that serpentine-adapted plants exhibit dramatically altered elemental accumulation levels in common conditions, and then resequence 24 autotetraploid individuals from three populations to perform a genome scan. We find evidence for highly localized selective sweeps that point to a polygenic, multitrait basis for serpentine adaptation. Comparing our results to a previous study of independent serpentine colonizations in the closely related diploid Arabidopsis lyrata in the United Kingdom and United States, we find the highest levels of differentiation in 11 of the same loci, providing candidate alleles for mediating convergent evolution. This overlap between independent colonizations in different species suggests that a limited number of evolutionary strategies are suited to overcome the multiple challenges of serpentine adaptation. Interestingly, we detect footprints of selection in A. arenosa in the context of substantial gene flow from nearby off-serpentine populations of A. arenosa, as well as from A. lyrata In several cases, quantitative tests of introgression indicate that some alleles exhibiting strong selective sweep signatures appear to have been introgressed from A. lyrata This finding suggests that migrant alleles may have facilitated adaptation of A. arenosa to this multihazard environment. PMID:27357660

  12. Borrowed alleles and convergence in serpentine adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Brian J.; Lahner, Brett; DaCosta, Jeffrey M.; Weisman, Caroline M.; Hollister, Jesse D.; Salt, David E.; Bomblies, Kirsten; Yant, Levi

    2016-01-01

    Serpentine barrens represent extreme hazards for plant colonists. These sites are characterized by high porosity leading to drought, lack of essential mineral nutrients, and phytotoxic levels of metals. Nevertheless, nature forged populations adapted to these challenges. Here, we use a population-based evolutionary genomic approach coupled with elemental profiling to assess how autotetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa adapted to a multichallenge serpentine habitat in the Austrian Alps. We first demonstrate that serpentine-adapted plants exhibit dramatically altered elemental accumulation levels in common conditions, and then resequence 24 autotetraploid individuals from three populations to perform a genome scan. We find evidence for highly localized selective sweeps that point to a polygenic, multitrait basis for serpentine adaptation. Comparing our results to a previous study of independent serpentine colonizations in the closely related diploid Arabidopsis lyrata in the United Kingdom and United States, we find the highest levels of differentiation in 11 of the same loci, providing candidate alleles for mediating convergent evolution. This overlap between independent colonizations in different species suggests that a limited number of evolutionary strategies are suited to overcome the multiple challenges of serpentine adaptation. Interestingly, we detect footprints of selection in A. arenosa in the context of substantial gene flow from nearby off-serpentine populations of A. arenosa, as well as from A. lyrata. In several cases, quantitative tests of introgression indicate that some alleles exhibiting strong selective sweep signatures appear to have been introgressed from A. lyrata. This finding suggests that migrant alleles may have facilitated adaptation of A. arenosa to this multihazard environment. PMID:27357660

  13. Allelic genealogies in sporophytic self-incompatibility systems in plants.

    PubMed Central

    Schierup, M H; Vekemans, X; Christiansen, F B

    1998-01-01

    Expectations for the time scale and structure of allelic genealogies in finite populations are formed under three models of sporophytic self-incompatibility. The models differ in the dominance interactions among the alleles that determine the self-incompatibility phenotype: In the SSIcod model, alleles act codominantly in both pollen and style, in the SSIdom model, alleles form a dominance hierarchy, and in SSIdomcod, alleles are codominant in the style and show a dominance hierarchy in the pollen. Coalescence times of alleles rarely differ more than threefold from those under gametophytic self-incompatibility, and transspecific polymorphism is therefore expected to be equally common. The previously reported directional turnover process of alleles in the SSIdomcod model results in coalescence times lower and substitution rates higher than those in the other models. The SSIdom model assumes strong asymmetries in allelic action, and the most recessive extant allele is likely to be the most recent common ancestor. Despite these asymmetries, the expected shape of the allele genealogies does not deviate markedly from the shape of a neutral gene genealogy. The application of the results to sequence surveys of alleles, including interspecific comparisons, is discussed. PMID:9799270

  14. Allelic frequencies and statistical data obtained from 12 codis STR loci in an admixed population of the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    da Costa Francez, Pablo Abdon; Rodrigues, Elzemar Martins Ribeiro; Frazão, Gleycianne Furtado; dos Reis Borges, Nathalia Danielly; dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista

    2011-01-01

    The allelic frequencies of 12 short tandem repeat loci were obtained from a sample of 307 unrelated individuals living in Macapá, a city in the northern Amazon region, Brazil. These loci are the most commonly used in forensics and paternity testing. Based on the allele frequency obtained for the population of Macapá, we estimated an interethnic admixture for the three parental groups (European, Native American and African) of, respectively, 46%, 35% and 19%. Comparing these allele frequencies with those of other Brazilian populations and of the Iberian Peninsula population, no significant distances were observed. The interpopulation genetic distances (FST coefficients) to the present database ranged from FST = 0.0016 between Macapá and Belém to FST = 0.0036 between Macapá and the Iberian Peninsula. PMID:21637540

  15. The regulatory element READ1 epistatically influences reading and language, with both deleterious and protective alleles

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Natalie R; Eicher, John D; Miller, Laura L; Kong, Yong; Smith, Shelley D; Pennington, Bruce F; Willcutt, Erik G; Olson, Richard K; Ring, Susan M; Gruen, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    Background Reading disability (RD) and language impairment (LI) are heritable learning disabilities that obstruct acquisition and use of written and spoken language, respectively. We previously reported that two risk haplotypes, each in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) with an allele of READ1, a polymorphic compound short tandem repeat within intron 2 of risk gene DCDC2, are associated with RD and LI. Additionally, we showed a non-additive genetic interaction between READ1 and KIAHap, a previously reported risk haplotype in risk gene KIAA0319, and that READ1 binds the transcriptional regulator ETV6. Objective To examine the hypothesis that READ1 is a transcriptional regulator of KIAA0319. Methods We characterised associations between READ1 alleles and RD and LI in a large European cohort, and also assessed interactions between READ1 and KIAHap and their effect on performance on measures of reading, language and IQ. We also used family-based data to characterise the genetic interaction, and chromatin conformation capture (3C) to investigate the possibility of a physical interaction between READ1 and KIAHap. Results and conclusions READ1 and KIAHap show interdependence—READ1 risk alleles synergise with KIAHap, whereas READ1 protective alleles act epistatically to negate the effects of KIAHap. The family data suggest that these variants interact in trans genetically, while the 3C results show that a region of DCDC2 containing READ1 interacts physically with the region upstream of KIAA0319. These data support a model in which READ1 regulates KIAA0319 expression through KIAHap and in which the additive effects of READ1 and KIAHap alleles are responsible for the trans genetic interaction. PMID:26660103

  16. Distribution of CYP2D6 alleles and phenotypes in the Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Deise C; Genro, Júlia P; Sortica, Vinicius A; Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme; de Moraes, Maria Elizabete; Pena, Sergio D J; dos Santos, Andrea K Ribeiro; Romano-Silva, Marco A; Hutz, Mara H

    2014-01-01

    The CYP2D6 enzyme is one of the most important members of the cytochrome P450 superfamily. This enzyme metabolizes approximately 25% of currently prescribed medications. The CYP2D6 gene presents a high allele heterogeneity that determines great inter-individual variation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the variability of CYP2D6 alleles, genotypes and predicted phenotypes in Brazilians. Eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms and CYP2D6 duplications/multiplications were genotyped by TaqMan assays in 1020 individuals from North, Northeast, South, and Southeast Brazil. Eighteen CYP2D6 alleles were identified in the Brazilian population. The CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*2 alleles were the most frequent and widely distributed in different geographical regions of Brazil. The highest number of CYPD6 alleles observed was six and the frequency of individuals with more than two copies ranged from 6.3% (in Southern Brazil) to 10.2% (Northern Brazil). The analysis of molecular variance showed that CYP2D6 is homogeneously distributed across different Brazilian regions and most of the differences can be attributed to inter-individual differences. The most frequent predicted metabolic status was EM (83.5%). Overall 2.5% and 3.7% of Brazilians were PMs and UMs respectively. Genomic ancestry proportions differ only in the prevalence of intermediate metabolizers. The IM predicted phenotype is associated with a higher proportion of African ancestry and a lower proportion of European ancestry in Brazilians. PM and UM classes did not vary among regions and/or ancestry proportions therefore unique CYP2D6 testing guidelines for Brazilians are possible and could potentially avoid ineffective or adverse events outcomes due to drug prescriptions. PMID:25329392

  17. Distribution of CYP2D6 Alleles and Phenotypes in the Brazilian Population

    PubMed Central

    Sortica, Vinicius A.; Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme; de Moraes, Maria Elizabete; Pena, Sergio D. J.; dos Santos, Ândrea K. Ribeiro; Romano-Silva, Marco A.; Hutz, Mara H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The CYP2D6 enzyme is one of the most important members of the cytochrome P450 superfamily. This enzyme metabolizes approximately 25% of currently prescribed medications. The CYP2D6 gene presents a high allele heterogeneity that determines great inter-individual variation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the variability of CYP2D6 alleles, genotypes and predicted phenotypes in Brazilians. Eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms and CYP2D6 duplications/multiplications were genotyped by TaqMan assays in 1020 individuals from North, Northeast, South, and Southeast Brazil. Eighteen CYP2D6 alleles were identified in the Brazilian population. The CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*2 alleles were the most frequent and widely distributed in different geographical regions of Brazil. The highest number of CYPD6 alleles observed was six and the frequency of individuals with more than two copies ranged from 6.3% (in Southern Brazil) to 10.2% (Northern Brazil). The analysis of molecular variance showed that CYP2D6 is homogeneously distributed across different Brazilian regions and most of the differences can be attributed to inter-individual differences. The most frequent predicted metabolic status was EM (83.5%). Overall 2.5% and 3.7% of Brazilians were PMs and UMs respectively. Genomic ancestry proportions differ only in the prevalence of intermediate metabolizers. The IM predicted phenotype is associated with a higher proportion of African ancestry and a lower proportion of European ancestry in Brazilians. PM and UM classes did not vary among regions and/or ancestry proportions therefore unique CYP2D6 testing guidelines for Brazilians are possible and could potentially avoid ineffective or adverse events outcomes due to drug prescriptions. PMID:25329392

  18. Exquisite allele discrimination by toehold hairpin primers

    PubMed Central

    Byrom, Michelle; Bhadra, Sanchita; Jiang, Yu Sherry; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to detect and monitor single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in biological samples is an enabling research and clinical tool. We have developed a surprising, inexpensive primer design method that provides exquisite discrimination between SNPs. The field of DNA computation is largely reliant on using so-called toeholds to initiate strand displacement reactions, leading to the execution of kinetically trapped circuits. We have now similarly found that the short toehold sequence to a target of interest can initiate both strand displacement within the hairpin and extension of the primer by a polymerase, both of which will further stabilize the primer:template complex. However, if the short toehold does not bind, neither of these events can readily occur and thus amplification should not occur. Toehold hairpin primers were used to detect drug resistance alleles in two genes, rpoB and katG, in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome, and ten alleles in the Escherichia coli genome. During real-time PCR, the primers discriminate between mismatched templates with Cq delays that are frequently so large that the presence or absence of mismatches is essentially a ‘yes/no’ answer. PMID:24990378

  19. A 'new' allele giving further insight into the LW blood group system.

    PubMed

    Sistonen, P; Tippett, P

    1982-01-01

    Nea, a red cell antigen present in 6% of Finnish people but in less than 1% of other Europeans tested, is shown to be part of the LW system. Tests on 10,025 Finnish donors show the antithetical relationship of anti-Nea (proposed name anti-LWb) and anti-LW made by LW3 people (proposed name anti-LWa). Tests on families of previously reported LW3 propositi and of LW(a-b+) Finnish donors support the hypothesis that Nea (LWb) is an allele at the LW locus which when homozygous produces the phenotype once called LW3. PMID:6808767

  20. Allelic disequilibrium and allele frequency distribution as a function of social and demographic history.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, E A; Neel, J V

    1997-01-01

    Allelic disequilibrium between closely linked genes is a common observation in human populations and often gives rise to speculation concerning the role of selective forces. In a previous treatment, we have developed a population model of the expected distribution of rare variants (including private polymorphisms) in Amerindians and have argued that, because of the great expansion of Amerindian numbers with the advent of agriculture, most of these rare variants are of relatively recent origin. Many other populations have similar histories of striking recent expansions. In this treatment, we demonstrate that, in consequence of this fact, a high degree of linkage disequilibrium between two nonhomologous alleles <0.5 cM apart is the "normal" expectation, even in the absence of selection. This expectation is enhanced by the previous subdivision of human populations into relatively isolated tribes characterized by a high level of endogamy and inbreeding. We also demonstrate that the alleles associated with a recessive disease phenotype are expected to exist in a population in very variable frequencies: there is no need to postulate positive selection with respect to the more common disease-associated alleles for such entities as phenylketonuria or cystic fibrosis. PMID:8981963

  1. Schizophrenia susceptibility alleles are enriched for alleles that affect gene expression in adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Alexander L; Jones, Lesley; Moskvina, Valentina; Kirov, George; Gejman, Pablo V; Levinson, Douglas F; Sanders, Alan R; Purcell, Shaun; Visscher, Peter M; Craddock, Nick; Owen, Michael J; Holmans, Peter; O’Donovan, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    It is widely thought that alleles that influence susceptibility to common diseases, including schizophrenia, will frequently do so through effects on gene expression. Since only a small proportion of the genetic variance for schizophrenia has been attributed to specific loci, this remains an unproven hypothesis. The International Schizophrenia Consortium (ISC) recently reported a substantial polygenic contribution to that disorder, and that schizophrenia risk alleles are enriched among SNPs selected for marginal evidence for association (p<0.5) from genome wide association studies (GWAS). It follows that if schizophrenia susceptibility alleles are enriched for those that affect gene expression, those marginally associated SNPs which are also eQTLs should carry more true association signals compared with SNPs which are not. To test this, we identified marginally associated (p<0.5) SNPs from two of the largest available schizophrenia GWAS datasets. We assigned eQTL status to those SNPs based upon an eQTL dataset derived from adult human brain. Using the polygenic score method of analysis reported by the ISC, we observed and replicated the observation that higher probability cis-eQTLs predicted schizophrenia better than those with a lower probability for being a cis-eQTL. Our data support the hypothesis that alleles conferring risk of schizophrenia are enriched among those that affect gene expression. Moreover, our data show that notwithstanding the likely developmental origin of schizophrenia, studies of adult brain tissue can in principle allow relevant susceptibility eQTLs to be identified. PMID:21339752

  2. Allelic Interactions Heritably Alter the Activity of a Metastable Maize Pl Allele

    PubMed Central

    Hollick, J. B.; Patterson, G. I.; Coe-Jr., E. H.; Cone, K. C.; Chandler, V. L.

    1995-01-01

    The maize pl locus encodes a transcriptional activator of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes. The Pl-Rhoades (Pl-Rh) allele confers robust purple anthocyanin pigment in several tissues. Spontaneous derivatives of Pl-Rh, termed Pl'-mahogany (Pl'-mah), arise that confer reduced pigment and are meiotically heritable. These derivatives influence other Pl-Rh alleles such that only Pl'-mah alleles are transmitted from a Pl-Rh/Pl'-mah heterozygote. Genetic crosses establish that chromosomal segregation distortion does not explain this exclusive transmission and suggest that Pl-Rh invariably changes to Pl'-mah when exposed to Pl'-mah. Such behavior is a hallmark of paramutation. Cosegregation experiments demonstrate that this paramutagenic activity is genetically linked to the pl locus. By visually quantifying pl action through successive crosses, we find that phenotypic expression is inversely related to paramutagenic strength. In addition, the paramutagenic state is metastable; reversion to a nonparamutagenic Pl-Rh state can occur. The behavior of Pl-Rh is unique, yet it shares characteristics with paramutation at two other maize loci, b and r. Previous analysis of b and r paramutation revealed extensive differences and led to suggestions of distinct molecular mechanisms. Consideration of the common features of all three systems reinvigorates the interpretation that the mechanistic processes of these three allelic interactions are similar. PMID:8647404

  3. Allele-specific disparity in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In a cancer cell the number of copies of a locus may vary due to amplification and deletion and these variations are denoted as copy number alterations (CNAs). We focus on the disparity of CNAs in tumour samples, which were compared to those in blood in order to identify the directional loss of heterozygosity. Methods We propose a numerical algorithm and apply it to data from the Illumina 109K-SNP array on 112 samples from breast cancer patients. B-allele frequency (BAF) and log R ratio (LRR) of Illumina were used to estimate Euclidian distances. For each locus, we compared genotypes in blood and tumour for subset of samples being heterozygous in blood. We identified loci showing preferential disparity from heterozygous toward either the A/B-allele homozygous (allelic disparity). The chi-squared and Cochran-Armitage trend tests were used to examine whether there is an association between high levels of disparity in single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and molecular, clinical and tumour-related parameters. To identify pathways and network functions over-represented within the resulting gene sets, we used Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Results To identify loci with a high level of disparity, we selected SNPs 1) with a substantial degree of disparity and 2) with substantial frequency (at least 50% of the samples heterozygous for the respective locus). We report the overall difference in disparity in high-grade tumours compared to low-grade tumours (p-value < 0.001) and significant associations between disparity in multiple single loci and clinical parameters. The most significantly associated network functions within the genes represented in the loci of disparity were identified, including lipid metabolism, small-molecule biochemistry, and nervous system development and function. No evidence for over-representation of directional disparity in a list of stem cell genes was obtained, however genes appeared to be more often altered by deletion than by

  4. Allele Specific p53 Mutant Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xin; Vazquez, Alexei; Levine, Arnold J.; Carpizo, Darren R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Rescuing the function of mutant p53 protein is an attractive cancer therapeutic strategy. Using the NCI anticancer drug screen data, we identified two compounds from the thiosemicarbazone family that manifest increased growth inhibitory activity in mutant p53 cells, particularly for the p53R175 mutant. Mechanistic studies reveal that NSC319726 restores WT structure and function to the p53R175 mutant. This compound kills p53R172H knock-in mice with extensive apoptosis and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in a 175-allele specific mutant p53 dependent manner. This activity depends upon the zinc ion chelating properties of the compound as well as redox changes. These data identify NSC319726 as a p53R175 mutant reactivator and as a lead compound for p53 targeted drug development. PMID:22624712

  5. First report on HLA-DPA1 gene allelic distribution in the general Lebanese population

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Joseph; Shammaa, Dina; Abbas, Fatmeh; Mahfouz, Rami A.R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims HLA-DPA1 is an important marker in bone marrow and organ transplantation and a highly emerging screening parameter in histocompatibility laboratories. Being highly polymorphic, it has another significant value in detecting population origins and migrations. This is the first study to assess DPA1 allele frequencies in an Arab population. Methods The HLA DPA1 alleles were identified using the One-Lambda assays on a Luminex reverse SSO DNA typing system. Our study included 101 individuals coming from different Lebanese geographical areas representing the different communities and religious sects of the country. Results We compared the results of this study to 16 different populations and found very interesting similarities and differences between Lebanese people and individuals of European ancestry. Conclusion This study is the first to describe the different allelic frequencies of HLA-DPA1 in the Lebanese population and will serve as a template that can be later used for disease association studies both at the level of the country and internationally. PMID:27014585

  6. RHCE variant allele: RHCE*ce254G,733G.

    PubMed

    Keller, Jessica A; Horn, Trina; Chiappa, Colleen; Melland, Camilla; Vietz, Christine; Castilho, Lilian; Keller, Margaret A

    2014-01-01

    A novel RHCE allele was identified in a 53-year-old African American female blood donor with an Rh phenotype of D+ CE-c+ e+ and a negative antibody screen. The donor's cells typed e+ with all antisera tested. By gel-based genotyping and Edna analysis, the two RHCE alleles in this donor were characterized.One allele was found to be the known allele RHCE*Ol.20.01(RHCE*ce733G) and the second was novel: RHCE*Ol.06.02(RHCE*ce254G,733G). PMID:25695437

  7. Nomenclature for human CYP2D6 alleles.

    PubMed

    Daly, A K; Brockmöller, J; Broly, F; Eichelbaum, M; Evans, W E; Gonzalez, F J; Huang, J D; Idle, J R; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Ishizaki, T; Jacqz-Aigrain, E; Meyer, U A; Nebert, D W; Steen, V M; Wolf, C R; Zanger, U M

    1996-06-01

    To standardize CYP2D6 allele nomenclature, and to conform with international human gene nomenclature guidelines, an alternative to the current arbitrary system is described. Based on recommendations for human genome nomenclature, we propose that alleles be designated by CYP2D6 followed by an asterisk and a combination of roman letters and arabic numerals distinct for each allele with the number specifying the key mutation and, where appropriate, a letter specifying additional mutations. Criteria for classification as a separate allele and protein nomenclature are also presented. PMID:8807658

  8. The effect of deleterious alleles on adaptation in asexual populations.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Toby; Barton, Nick H

    2002-01-01

    We calculate the fixation probability of a beneficial allele that arises as the result of a unique mutation in an asexual population that is subject to recurrent deleterious mutation at rate U. Our analysis is an extension of previous works, which make a biologically restrictive assumption that selection against deleterious alleles is stronger than that on the beneficial allele of interest. We show that when selection against deleterious alleles is weak, beneficial alleles that confer a selective advantage that is small relative to U have greatly reduced probabilities of fixation. We discuss the consequences of this effect for the distribution of effects of alleles fixed during adaptation. We show that a selective sweep will increase the fixation probabilities of other beneficial mutations arising during some short interval afterward. We use the calculated fixation probabilities to estimate the expected rate of fitness improvement in an asexual population when beneficial alleles arise continually at some low rate proportional to U. We estimate the rate of mutation that is optimal in the sense that it maximizes this rate of fitness improvement. Again, this analysis relaxes the assumption made previously that selection against deleterious alleles is stronger than on beneficial alleles. PMID:12242249

  9. Mutated tumor alleles are expressed according to their DNA frequency

    PubMed Central

    Castle, John C.; Loewer, Martin; Boegel, Sebastian; Tadmor, Arbel D.; Boisguerin, Valesca; de Graaf, Jos; Paret, Claudia; Diken, Mustafa; Kreiter, Sebastian; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2014-01-01

    The transcription of tumor mutations from DNA into RNA has implications for biology, epigenetics and clinical practice. It is not clear if mutations are in general transcribed and, if so, at what proportion to the wild-type allele. Here, we examined the correlation between DNA mutation allele frequency and RNA mutation allele frequency. We sequenced the exome and transcriptome of tumor cell lines with large copy number variations, identified heterozygous single nucleotide mutations and absolute DNA copy number, and determined the corresponding DNA and RNA mutation allele fraction. We found that 99% of the DNA mutations in expressed genes are expressed as RNA. Moreover, we found a high correlation between the DNA and RNA mutation allele frequency. Exceptions are mutations that cause premature termination codons and therefore activate nonsense-mediated decay. Beyond this, we did not find evidence of any wide-scale mechanism, such as allele-specific epigenetic silencing, preferentially promoting mutated or wild-type alleles. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that genes are equally transcribed from all alleles, mutated and wild-type, and thus transcribed in proportion to their DNA allele frequency. PMID:24752137

  10. Mutated tumor alleles are expressed according to their DNA frequency.

    PubMed

    Castle, John C; Loewer, Martin; Boegel, Sebastian; Tadmor, Arbel D; Boisguerin, Valesca; de Graaf, Jos; Paret, Claudia; Diken, Mustafa; Kreiter, Sebastian; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2014-01-01

    The transcription of tumor mutations from DNA into RNA has implications for biology, epigenetics and clinical practice. It is not clear if mutations are in general transcribed and, if so, at what proportion to the wild-type allele. Here, we examined the correlation between DNA mutation allele frequency and RNA mutation allele frequency. We sequenced the exome and transcriptome of tumor cell lines with large copy number variations, identified heterozygous single nucleotide mutations and absolute DNA copy number, and determined the corresponding DNA and RNA mutation allele fraction. We found that 99% of the DNA mutations in expressed genes are expressed as RNA. Moreover, we found a high correlation between the DNA and RNA mutation allele frequency. Exceptions are mutations that cause premature termination codons and therefore activate nonsense-mediated decay. Beyond this, we did not find evidence of any wide-scale mechanism, such as allele-specific epigenetic silencing, preferentially promoting mutated or wild-type alleles. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that genes are equally transcribed from all alleles, mutated and wild-type, and thus transcribed in proportion to their DNA allele frequency. PMID:24752137

  11. Further data on the microsatellite locus D12S67 in worldwide populations: an unusual distribution of D12S67 alleles in Native Americans.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, R J; Federle, L; Sofro, A S; Papiha, S S; Briceno, I; Bernal, J E

    2000-08-01

    We report the frequencies of alleles at the microsatellite locus D12S67 in 2 widely separated ethnic groups of the world: 2 populations from Sulawesi, an island in the Indonesian archipelago, and 5 Native American tribes of Colombia, South America. The allele frequencies in the Minihasans and Torajans of Sulawesi are similar to each other (but the modal class allele is different) and in general agreement with those reported in mainland Asian groups, but different from both Europeans and Chinese Han of Taiwan. The 5 Native American tribes (Arsario, Kogui, Ijka, Wayuu, and Coreguaje) display different allele frequencies from those seen in Sulawesi populations, in other groups from Europe and mainland Asia, and in Chinese Han of Taiwan. Native Americans exhibit a bimodal distribution of alleles, unlike other groups, with significant differences among the tribes. The Arsario and Kogui have no admixture with Europeans or Africans and are the most distinctive, while the Wayuu have the most admixture and show most similarity to other groups. The data suggest that nonadmixed Native Americans may be quite distinctive with respect to this marker. The most common allele varies across the 5 tribes, from 249 base pairs to 261 base pairs. All samples exhibit Hardy-Weinberg genotype proportions; heterozygosities are lowest in the 2 nonadmixed Native American tribes. Examination of all the available data indicates that some east Asian and southeast Asian groups are characterized by a high frequency of smaller sized D12S67 alleles, while other populations have a greater proportion of the larger sized alleles. The cumulative, though still highly restricted, population data on locus D12S67 demonstrate that it may be of considerable value in anthropological genetic studies of ethnic groups. Data are required on Native Americans outside Colombia before this marker can be used in admixture studies of this group. PMID:11048795

  12. Several different lactase persistence associated alleles and high diversity of the lactase gene in the admixed Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Deise C; Santos, Sidney E B; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea K C; Hutz, Mara H

    2012-01-01

    Adult-type hypolactasia is a common phenotype caused by the lactase enzyme deficiency. The -13910 C>T polymorphism, located 14 Kb upstream of the lactase gene (LCT) in the MCM6 gene was associated with lactase persistence (LP) in Europeans. This polymorphism is rare in Africa but several other variants associated with lactase persistence were observed in Africans. The aims of this study were to identify polymorphisms in the MCM6 region associated with the lactase persistence phenotype and to determine the distribution of LCT gene haplotypes in 981 individuals from North, Northeast and South Brazil. These polymorphisms were genotyped by PCR based methods and sequencing. The -13779*C,-13910*T, -13937*A, -14010*C, -14011*T LP alleles previously described in the MCM6 gene region that acts as an enhancer for the LCT gene were identified in Brazilians. The most common LP allele was -13910*T. Its frequency was highly correlated with European ancestry in the Brazilian populations investigated. The -13910*T was higher (0.295) in southern Brazilians of European ancestry and lower (0.175) in the Northern admixed population. LCT haplotypes were derived from the 10 LCT SNPs genotyped. Overall twenty six haplotypes previously described were identified in the four Brazilian populations studied. The Multidimensional Scaling analysis showed that Belém, in the north, was closer to Amerindians. Northeastern and southern Afro-descendants were more related with Bantu-speaking South Africans whereas the Southern population with European ancestry grouped with Southern and Northern Europeans. This study shows a high variability considering the number of LCT haplotypes observed. Due to the highly admixed nature of the Brazilian populations, the diagnosis of hypolactasia in Brazil, based only in the investigation of the -13910*T allele is an oversimplification. PMID:23029545

  13. Naturally occurring allele diversity allows potato cultivation in northern latitudes.

    PubMed

    Kloosterman, Bjorn; Abelenda, José A; Gomez, María del Mar Carretero; Oortwijn, Marian; de Boer, Jan M; Kowitwanich, Krissana; Horvath, Beatrix M; van Eck, Herman J; Smaczniak, Cezary; Prat, Salomé; Visser, Richard G F; Bachem, Christian W B

    2013-03-14

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) originates from the Andes and evolved short-day-dependent tuber formation as a vegetative propagation strategy. Here we describe the identification of a central regulator underlying a major-effect quantitative trait locus for plant maturity and initiation of tuber development. We show that this gene belongs to the family of DOF (DNA-binding with one finger) transcription factors and regulates tuberization and plant life cycle length, by acting as a mediator between the circadian clock and the StSP6A mobile tuberization signal. We also show that natural allelic variants evade post-translational light regulation, allowing cultivation outside the geographical centre of origin of potato. Potato is a member of the Solanaceae family and is one of the world's most important food crops. This annual plant originates from the Andean regions of South America. Potato develops tubers from underground stems called stolons. Its equatorial origin makes potato essentially short-day dependent for tuberization and potato will not make tubers in the long-day conditions of spring and summer in the northern latitudes. When introduced in temperate zones, wild material will form tubers in the course of the autumnal shortening of day-length. Thus, one of the first selected traits in potato leading to a European potato type is likely to have been long-day acclimation for tuberization. Potato breeders can exploit the naturally occurring variation in tuberization onset and life cycle length, allowing varietal breeding for different latitudes, harvest times and markets. PMID:23467094

  14. Identification of the third/extra allele for forensic application in cases with TPOX tri-allelic pattern.

    PubMed

    Picanço, Juliane Bentes; Raimann, Paulo Eduardo; da Motta, Carlos Henrique Ares Silveira; Rodenbusch, Rodrigo; Gusmão, Leonor; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2015-05-01

    Genotyping of polymorphic short tandem repeats (STRs) loci is widely used in forensic DNA analysis. STR loci eventually present tri-allelic pattern as a genotyping irregularity and, in that situation, the doubt about the tri-allele locus frequency calculation can reduce the analysis strength. In the TPOX human STR locus, tri-allelic genotypes have been reported with a widely varied frequency among human populations. We investigate whether there is a single extra allele (the third allele) in the TPOX tri-allelic pattern, what it is, and where it is, aiming to understand its genomic anatomy and to propose the knowledge of this TPOX extra allele from genetic profile, thus preserving the two standard TPOX alleles in forensic analyses. We looked for TPOX tri-allelic subjects in 75,113 Brazilian families. Considering only the parental generation (mother+father) we had 150,226 unrelated subjects evaluated. From this total, we found 88 unrelated subjects with tri-allelic pattern in the TPOX locus (0.06%; 88/150,226). Seventy three of these 88 subjects (73/88; 83%) had the Clayton's original Type 2 tri-allelic pattern (three peaks of even intensity). The remaining 17% (15/88) show a new Type 2 derived category with heterozygote peak imbalance (one double dose peak plus one regular sized peak). In this paper we present detailed data from 66 trios (mother+father+child) with true biological relationships. In 39 of these families (39/66; 59%) the extra TPOX allele was transmitted either from the mother or from the father to the child. Evidences indicated the allele 10 as the extra TPOX allele, and it is on the X chromosome. The present data, which support the previous Lane hypothesis, improve the knowledge about tri-allelic pattern of TPOX CODIS' locus allowing the use of TPOX profile in forensic analyses even when with tri-allelic pattern. This evaluation is now available for different forensic applications. PMID:25549886

  15. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots.

    PubMed

    Baker, Christopher L; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9+/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape. PMID:26368021

  16. Allelic heterogeneity in NCF2 associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility across four ethnic populations

    PubMed Central

    Kim-Howard, Xana; Sun, Celi; Molineros, Julio E.; Maiti, Amit K.; Chandru, Hema; Adler, Adam; Wiley, Graham B.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Kottyan, Leah; Guthridge, Joel M.; Rasmussen, Astrid; Kelly, Jennifer; Sánchez, Elena; Raj, Prithvi; Li, Quan-Zhen; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Chung, Won Tae; Park, Yong-Beom; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shim, Seung Cheol; Lee, Shin-Seok; Han, Bok-Ghee; Olsen, Nancy J.; Karp, David R.; Moser, Kathy; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Wakeland, Edward K.; James, Judith A.; Harley, John B.; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta; Looger, Loren L.; Nath, Swapan K.; Acevedo, Eduardo; Acevedo, Eduardo; La Torre, Ignacio García-De; Maradiaga-Ceceña, Marco A.; Cardiel, Mario H.; Esquivel-Valerio, Jorge A.; Rodriguez-Amado, Jacqueline; Moctezuma, José Francisco; Miranda, Pedro; Perandones, Carlos; Aires, Buenos; Castel, Cecilia; Laborde, Hugo A.; Alba, Paula; Musuruana, Jorge; Goecke, Annelise; Foster, Carola; Orozco, Lorena; Baca, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports have associated NCF2, encoding a core component of the multi-protein NADPH oxidase (NADPHO), with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility in individuals of European ancestry. To identify ethnicity-specific and -robust variants within NCF2, we assessed 145 SNPs in and around the NCF2 gene in 5325 cases and 21 866 controls of European-American (EA), African-American (AA), Hispanic (HS) and Korean (KR) ancestry. Subsequent imputation, conditional, haplotype and bioinformatic analyses identified seven potentially functional SLE-predisposing variants. Association with non-synonymous rs17849502, previously reported in EA, was detected in EA, HS and AA (PEA = 1.01 × 10−54, PHS = 3.68 × 10−10, PAA = 0.03); synonymous rs17849501 was similarly significant. These SNPs were monomorphic in KR. Novel associations were detected with coding variants at rs35937854 in AA (PAA = 1.49 × 10−9), and rs13306575 in HS and KR (PHS = 7.04 × 10−7, PKR = 3.30 × 10−3). In KR, a 3-SNP haplotype was significantly associated (P = 4.20 × 10−7), implying that SLE predisposing variants were tagged. Significant SNP–SNP interaction (P = 0.02) was detected between rs13306575 and rs17849502 in HS, and a dramatically increased risk (OR = 6.55) with a risk allele at each locus. Molecular modeling predicts that these non-synonymous mutations could disrupt NADPHO complex assembly. The risk allele of rs17849501, located in a conserved transcriptional regulatory region, increased reporter gene activity, suggesting in vivo enhancer function. Our results not only establish allelic heterogeneity within NCF2 associated with SLE, but also emphasize the utility of multi-ethnic cohorts to identify predisposing variants explaining additional phenotypic variance (‘missing heritability’) of complex diseases like SLE. PMID:24163247

  17. Allelic heterogeneity in NCF2 associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility across four ethnic populations.

    PubMed

    Kim-Howard, Xana; Sun, Celi; Molineros, Julio E; Maiti, Amit K; Chandru, Hema; Adler, Adam; Wiley, Graham B; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Kottyan, Leah; Guthridge, Joel M; Rasmussen, Astrid; Kelly, Jennifer; Sánchez, Elena; Raj, Prithvi; Li, Quan-Zhen; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Chung, Won Tae; Park, Yong-Beom; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shim, Seung Cheol; Lee, Shin-Seok; Han, Bok-Ghee; Olsen, Nancy J; Karp, David R; Moser, Kathy; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; Wakeland, Edward K; James, Judith A; Harley, John B; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Gaffney, Patrick M; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta; Looger, Loren L; Nath, Swapan K

    2014-03-15

    Recent reports have associated NCF2, encoding a core component of the multi-protein NADPH oxidase (NADPHO), with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility in individuals of European ancestry. To identify ethnicity-specific and -robust variants within NCF2, we assessed 145 SNPs in and around the NCF2 gene in 5325 cases and 21 866 controls of European-American (EA), African-American (AA), Hispanic (HS) and Korean (KR) ancestry. Subsequent imputation, conditional, haplotype and bioinformatic analyses identified seven potentially functional SLE-predisposing variants. Association with non-synonymous rs17849502, previously reported in EA, was detected in EA, HS and AA (P(EA) = 1.01 × 10(-54), PHS = 3.68 × 10(-10), P(AA) = 0.03); synonymous rs17849501 was similarly significant. These SNPs were monomorphic in KR. Novel associations were detected with coding variants at rs35937854 in AA (PAA = 1.49 × 10(-9)), and rs13306575 in HS and KR (P(HS) = 7.04 × 10(-7), P(KR) = 3.30 × 10(-3)). In KR, a 3-SNP haplotype was significantly associated (P = 4.20 × 10(-7)), implying that SLE predisposing variants were tagged. Significant SNP-SNP interaction (P = 0.02) was detected between rs13306575 and rs17849502 in HS, and a dramatically increased risk (OR = 6.55) with a risk allele at each locus. Molecular modeling predicts that these non-synonymous mutations could disrupt NADPHO complex assembly. The risk allele of rs17849501, located in a conserved transcriptional regulatory region, increased reporter gene activity, suggesting in vivo enhancer function. Our results not only establish allelic heterogeneity within NCF2 associated with SLE, but also emphasize the utility of multi-ethnic cohorts to identify predisposing variants explaining additional phenotypic variance ('missing heritability') of complex diseases like SLE. PMID:24163247

  18. Biased Allelic Expression in Human Primary Fibroblast Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Christelle; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Santoni, Federico; Delaneau, Olivier; Fort, Alexandre; Popadin, Konstantin Y.; Garieri, Marco; Falconnet, Emilie; Ribaux, Pascale; Guipponi, Michel; Padioleau, Ismael; Carninci, Piero; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.

    2015-01-01

    The study of gene expression in mammalian single cells via genomic technologies now provides the possibility to investigate the patterns of allelic gene expression. We used single-cell RNA sequencing to detect the allele-specific mRNA level in 203 single human primary fibroblasts over 133,633 unique heterozygous single-nucleotide variants (hetSNVs). We observed that at the snapshot of analyses, each cell contained mostly transcripts from one allele from the majority of genes; indeed, 76.4% of the hetSNVs displayed stochastic monoallelic expression in single cells. Remarkably, adjacent hetSNVs exhibited a haplotype-consistent allelic ratio; in contrast, distant sites located in two different genes were independent of the haplotype structure. Moreover, the allele-specific expression in single cells correlated with the abundance of the cellular transcript. We observed that genes expressing both alleles in the majority of the single cells at a given time point were rare and enriched with highly expressed genes. The relative abundance of each allele in a cell was controlled by some regulatory mechanisms given that we observed related single-cell allelic profiles according to genes. Overall, these results have direct implications in cellular phenotypic variability. PMID:25557783

  19. A gene feature enumeration approach for describing HLA allele polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Mack, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    HLA genotyping via next generation sequencing (NGS) poses challenges for the use of HLA allele names to analyze and discuss sequence polymorphism. NGS will identify many new synonymous and non-coding HLA sequence variants. Allele names identify the types of nucleotide polymorphism that define an allele (non-synonymous, synonymous and non-coding changes), but do not describe how polymorphism is distributed among the individual features (the flanking untranslated regions, exons and introns) of a gene. Further, HLA alleles cannot be named in the absence of antigen-recognition domain (ARD) encoding exons. Here, a system for describing HLA polymorphism in terms of HLA gene features (GFs) is proposed. This system enumerates the unique nucleotide sequences for each GF in an HLA gene, and records these in a GF enumeration notation that allows both more granular dissection of allele-level HLA polymorphism and the discussion and analysis of GFs in the absence of ARD-encoding exon sequences. PMID:26416087

  20. The frequency of HLA alleles in the Romanian population.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Ileana; Boșcaiu, Voicu; Cianga, Petru; Dinu, Andrei-Antoniu; Gai, Elena; Melinte, Mihaela; Moise, Ana

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele frequencies is essential for bone marrow and kidney donor searches. The Romanian Caucasian population is heterogeneous and information on HLA polymorphism has not been well studied. We characterized the HLA genetic profile and allele frequencies of regional populations in Romania. HLA-A, B and DRB1 alleles were examined in 8252 individuals, belonging to the four main regions of Romania. The most common alleles found in the Romanian population are the following: HLA-A*01, A*02, A*03, A*11, A*24; HLA-B*18, B*35, B*44, B*51 and HLA-DRB1*01, DRB1*03, DRB1*07, DRB1*11, DRB1*13, DRB1*15, DRB1*16. More than half of the alleles are non-homogeneously spread in Romania. These results provide a starting point for future analyses of genetic heterogeneity in Romania. PMID:26711124

  1. Population Dynamics of Sex-Determining Alleles in Honey Bees and Self-Incompatibility Alleles in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Shozo; Nei, Masatoshi

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical theories of the population dynamics of sex-determining alleles in honey bees are developed. It is shown that in an infinitely large population the equilibrium frequency of a sex allele is 1/n, where n is the number of alleles in the population, and the asymptotic rate of approach to this equilibrium is 2/(3n) per generation. Formulae for the distribution of allele frequencies and the effective and actual numbers of alleles that can be maintained in a finite population are derived by taking into account the population size and mutation rate. It is shown that the allele frequencies in a finite population may deviate considerably from 1/n. Using these results, available data on the number of sex alleles in honey bee populations are discussed. It is also shown that the number of self-incompatibility alleles in plants can be studied in a much simpler way by the method used in this paper. A brief discussion about general overdominant selection is presented. PMID:17248901

  2. Detection of Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Stricto ospC Alleles Associated with Human Lyme Borreliosis Worldwide in Non-Human-Biting Tick Ixodes affinis and Rodent Hosts in Southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Golovchenko, Maryna; Hönig, Václav; Mallátová, Nadja; Krbková, Lenka; Mikulášek, Peter; Fedorova, Natalia; Belfiore, Natalia M.; Grubhoffer, Libor; Lane, Robert S.; Oliver, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Comparative analysis of ospC genes from 127 Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto strains collected in European and North American regions where Lyme disease is endemic and where it is not endemic revealed a close relatedness of geographically distinct populations. ospC alleles A, B, and L were detected on both continents in vectors and hosts, including humans. Six ospC alleles, A, B, L, Q, R, and V, were prevalent in Europe; 4 of them were detected in samples of human origin. Ten ospC alleles, A, B, D, E3, F, G, H, H3, I3, and M, were identified in the far-western United States. Four ospC alleles, B, G, H, and L, were abundant in the southeastern United States. Here we present the first expanded analysis of ospC alleles of B. burgdorferi strains from the southeastern United States with respect to their relatedness to strains from other North American and European localities. We demonstrate that ospC genotypes commonly associated with human Lyme disease in European and North American regions where the disease is endemic were detected in B. burgdorferi strains isolated from the non-human-biting tick Ixodes affinis and rodent hosts in the southeastern United States. We discovered that some ospC alleles previously known only from Europe are widely distributed in the southeastern United States, a finding that confirms the hypothesis of transoceanic migration of Borrelia species. PMID:23263953

  3. Allele frequencies at microsatellite loci: The stepwise mutation model revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Valdes, A.M.; Slatkin, M. ); Freimer, N.B. )

    1993-03-01

    The authors summarize available data on the frequencies of alleles at microsatellite loci in human populations and compare observed distributions of allele frequencies to those generated by a simulation of the stepwise mutation model. They show that observed frequency distributions at 108 loci are consistent with the results of the model under the assumption that mutations cause an increase or decrease in repeat number by one and under the condition that the product Nu, where N is the effective population size and u is the mutation rate, is larger than one. It is also shown that the variance of the distribution of allele sizes is a useful estimator of Nu and performs much better than previously suggested estimators for the stepwise mutation model. In the data, there is no correlation between the mean and variance in allele size at a locus or between the number of alleles and mean allele size, which suggests that the mutation rate at these loci is independent of allele size. 39 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Common alleles contribute to schizophrenia in CNV carriers

    PubMed Central

    Tansey, K E; Rees, E; Linden, D E; Ripke, S; Chambert, K D; Moran, J L; McCarroll, S A; Holmans, P; Kirov, G; Walters, J; Owen, M J; O'Donovan, M C

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of schizophrenia is complex, involving risk alleles ranging from common alleles of weak effect to rare alleles of large effect, the best exemplar of the latter being large copy number variants (CNVs). It is currently unknown whether pathophysiology in those with defined rare mutations overlaps with that in other individuals with the disorder who do not share the same rare mutation. Under an extreme heterogeneity model, carriers of specific high-penetrance mutations form distinct subgroups. In contrast, under a polygenic threshold model, high-penetrance rare allele carriers possess many risk factors, of which the rare allele is the only one, albeit an important, factor. Under the latter model, cases with rare mutations can be expected to share some common risk alleles, and therefore pathophysiological mechanisms, with cases without the same mutation. Here we show that, compared with controls, individuals with schizophrenia who have known pathogenic CNVs carry an excess burden of common risk alleles (P=2.25 × 10−17) defined from a genome-wide association study largely based on individuals without known CNVs. Our finding is not consistent with an extreme heterogeneity model for CNV carriers, but does offer support for the polygenic threshold model of schizophrenia. That this is so provides support for the notion that studies aiming to model the effects of rare variation may uncover pathophysiological mechanisms of relevance to those with the disorder more widely. PMID:26390827

  5. Common alleles contribute to schizophrenia in CNV carriers.

    PubMed

    Tansey, K E; Rees, E; Linden, D E; Ripke, S; Chambert, K D; Moran, J L; McCarroll, S A; Holmans, P; Kirov, G; Walters, J; Owen, M J; O'Donovan, M C

    2016-08-01

    The genetic architecture of schizophrenia is complex, involving risk alleles ranging from common alleles of weak effect to rare alleles of large effect, the best exemplar of the latter being large copy number variants (CNVs). It is currently unknown whether pathophysiology in those with defined rare mutations overlaps with that in other individuals with the disorder who do not share the same rare mutation. Under an extreme heterogeneity model, carriers of specific high-penetrance mutations form distinct subgroups. In contrast, under a polygenic threshold model, high-penetrance rare allele carriers possess many risk factors, of which the rare allele is the only one, albeit an important, factor. Under the latter model, cases with rare mutations can be expected to share some common risk alleles, and therefore pathophysiological mechanisms, with cases without the same mutation. Here we show that, compared with controls, individuals with schizophrenia who have known pathogenic CNVs carry an excess burden of common risk alleles (P=2.25 × 10(-17)) defined from a genome-wide association study largely based on individuals without known CNVs. Our finding is not consistent with an extreme heterogeneity model for CNV carriers, but does offer support for the polygenic threshold model of schizophrenia. That this is so provides support for the notion that studies aiming to model the effects of rare variation may uncover pathophysiological mechanisms of relevance to those with the disorder more widely. PMID:26390827

  6. Bayesian Inference of Natural Selection from Allele Frequency Time Series.

    PubMed

    Schraiber, Joshua G; Evans, Steven N; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2016-05-01

    The advent of accessible ancient DNA technology now allows the direct ascertainment of allele frequencies in ancestral populations, thereby enabling the use of allele frequency time series to detect and estimate natural selection. Such direct observations of allele frequency dynamics are expected to be more powerful than inferences made using patterns of linked neutral variation obtained from modern individuals. We developed a Bayesian method to make use of allele frequency time series data and infer the parameters of general diploid selection, along with allele age, in nonequilibrium populations. We introduce a novel path augmentation approach, in which we use Markov chain Monte Carlo to integrate over the space of allele frequency trajectories consistent with the observed data. Using simulations, we show that this approach has good power to estimate selection coefficients and allele age. Moreover, when applying our approach to data on horse coat color, we find that ignoring a relevant demographic history can significantly bias the results of inference. Our approach is made available in a C++ software package. PMID:27010022

  7. The human leucocyte antigen DQB1*0602 allele is associated with electroencephelograph differences in individuals with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Manzotte, Thais; Guindalini, Camila; Mazzotti, Diego R; Palombini, Luciana; de Souza, Altay L; Poyares, Dalva; Bittencourt, Lia R A; Tufik, Sergio

    2013-04-01

    Human leucocyte antigen (HLA) DQB1*0602 allele, a well-known genetic risk factor for narcolepsy, has been associated with sleep parameters in healthy subjects. We aimed to assess the association of this allele with daytime sleepiness and altered sleep electroencephalogram characteristics in the general population and in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). Eight hundred and ninety-four individuals from the Epidemiologic Study of Sleep were genotyped for the HLA DQB1*0602 allele. Full-night polysomnography was performed, and daytime sleepiness was analysed according to the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. HLA-DQB1*0602 allele-positive and -negative subjects in the general population, as well as in patients with OSAS, exhibited similar sleep parameters and levels of daytime sleepiness. However, spectral analysis showed that allele-positive individuals with OSAS exhibited higher theta power during sleep Stage 1 (P < 0.05) in occipital derivations, and lower delta power during sleep Stages 1 and 2 (P < 0.01) compared with individuals negative for the allele, even after correction for potential confounders as age, sex, body mass index and European ancestry. No significant differences in the electroencephalogram variables were found in individuals without OSAS. The data highlight the HLA-DQB1*0602 as a potential genetic factor influencing sleep physiology in individuals diagnosed with OSAS. PMID:23136848

  8. Inactive alleles of cytochrome P450 2C19 may be positively selected in human evolution

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cytochrome P450 CYP2C19 metabolizes a wide range of pharmacologically active substances and a relatively small number of naturally occurring environmental toxins. Poor activity alleles of CYP2C19 are very frequent worldwide, particularly in Asia, raising the possibility that reduced metabolism could be advantageous in some circumstances. The evolutionary selective forces acting on this gene have not previously been investigated. We analyzed CYP2C19 genetic markers from 127 Gambians and on 120 chromosomes from Yoruba, Europeans and Asians (Japanese + Han Chinese) in the Hapmap database. Haplotype breakdown was explored using bifurcation plots and relative extended haplotype homozygosity (REHH). Allele frequency differentiation across populations was estimated using the fixation index (FST) and haplotype diversity with coalescent models. Results Bifurcation plots suggested conservation of alleles conferring slow metabolism (CYP2C19*2 and *3). REHH was high around CYP2C19*2 in Yoruba (REHH 8.3, at 133.3 kb from the core) and to a lesser extent in Europeans (3.5, at 37.7 kb) and Asians (2.8, at −29.7 kb). FST at the CYP2C19 locus was low overall (0.098). CYP2C19*3 was an FST outlier in Asians (0.293), CYP2C19 haplotype diversity < = 0.037, p <0.001. Conclusions We found some evidence that the slow metabolizing allele CYP2C19*2 is subject to positive selective forces worldwide. Similar evidence was also found for CYP2C19*3 which is frequent only in Asia. FST is low at the CYP2C19 locus, suggesting balancing selection overall. The biological factors responsible for these selective pressures are currently unknown. One possible explanation is that early humans were exposed to a ubiquitous novel toxin activated by CYP2C19. The genetic adaptation took place within the last 10,000 years which coincides with the development of systematic agricultural practices. PMID:24690327

  9. Recurrence of the R408W Mutation in the Phenylalanine Hydroxylase Locus in Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Eisensmith, Randy C.; Goltsov, Alexei A.; O'Neill, Charles; Tyfield, Linda A.; Schwartz, Eugene I.; Kuzmin, Alexei I.; Baranovskaya, Svetlana S.; Tsukerman, Gennady L.; Treacy, Eileen; Scriver, Charles R.; Güttler, Flemming; Guldberg, Per; Eiken, Hans G.; Apold, Jaran; Svensson, Elisabeth; Naughten, Eileen; Cahalane, Seamus F.; Croke, David T.; Cockburn, Forrester; Woo, Savio L. C.

    1995-01-01

    The relative frequency of the common phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) mutation R408W and its associations with polymorphic RFLP, VNTR, and short-tandem-repeat (STR) sites in the PAH gene were examined in many European populations and one representative North American population of defined European descent. This mutation was found to cluster in two regions: in northwest Europe among Irish and Scottish peoples, and in eastern Europe, including the Commonwealth of Independent States. This allele was significantly less frequent in intervening populations. In eastern European populations, the R408W mutation is strongly associated with RFLP haplotype 2, the three-copy VNTR allele (VNTR 3), and the 240-bp STR allele. In northwestern European populations, it is strongly associated with RFLP haplotype 1, the VNTR allele containing eight repeats (VNTR 8), and the 244-bp STR allele. An examination of the linkage between the R408W mutation and highly polymorphic RFLP, VNTR, and STR haplotypes suggests that recurrence is the most likely mechanism to account for the two different major haplotype associations of R408W in Europe. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:7825588

  10. MicroRNA-3148 modulates allelic expression of toll-like receptor 7 variant associated with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yun; Zhao, Jian; Sakurai, Daisuke; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Kimberly, Robert P; Kamen, Diane L; Gilkeson, Gary S; Jacob, Chaim O; Scofield, R Hal; Langefeld, Carl D; Kelly, Jennifer A; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle A; Reveille, John D; Vilá, Luis M; Alarcón, Graciela S; Vyse, Timothy J; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; Freedman, Barry I; Gaffney, Patrick M; Sivils, Kathy Moser; James, Judith A; Gregersen, Peter K; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Niewold, Timothy B; Merrill, Joan T; Criswell, Lindsey A; Stevens, Anne M; Boackle, Susan A; Cantor, Rita M; Chen, Weiling; Grossman, Jeniffer M; Hahn, Bevra H; Harley, John B; Alarcόn-Riquelme, Marta E; Brown, Elizabeth E; Tsao, Betty P

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that the G allele of rs3853839 at 3'untranslated region (UTR) of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) was associated with elevated transcript expression and increased risk for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in 9,274 Eastern Asians [P = 6.5×10(-10), odds ratio (OR) (95%CI) = 1.27 (1.17-1.36)]. Here, we conducted trans-ancestral fine-mapping in 13,339 subjects including European Americans, African Americans, and Amerindian/Hispanics and confirmed rs3853839 as the only variant within the TLR7-TLR8 region exhibiting consistent and independent association with SLE (Pmeta = 7.5×10(-11), OR = 1.24 [1.18-1.34]). The risk G allele was associated with significantly increased levels of TLR7 mRNA and protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and elevated luciferase activity of reporter gene in transfected cells. TLR7 3'UTR sequence bearing the non-risk C allele of rs3853839 matches a predicted binding site of microRNA-3148 (miR-3148), suggesting that this microRNA may regulate TLR7 expression. Indeed, miR-3148 levels were inversely correlated with TLR7 transcript levels in PBMCs from SLE patients and controls (R(2) = 0.255, P = 0.001). Overexpression of miR-3148 in HEK-293 cells led to significant dose-dependent decrease in luciferase activity for construct driven by TLR7 3'UTR segment bearing the C allele (P = 0.0003). Compared with the G-allele construct, the C-allele construct showed greater than two-fold reduction of luciferase activity in the presence of miR-3148. Reduced modulation by miR-3148 conferred slower degradation of the risk G-allele containing TLR7 transcripts, resulting in elevated levels of gene products. These data establish rs3853839 of TLR7 as a shared risk variant of SLE in 22,613 subjects of Asian, EA, AA, and Amerindian/Hispanic ancestries (Pmeta  = 2.0×10(-19), OR = 1.25 [1.20-1.32]), which confers allelic effect on transcript turnover via differential binding to the epigenetic factor

  11. MicroRNA-3148 Modulates Allelic Expression of Toll-Like Receptor 7 Variant Associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Daisuke; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Kamen, Diane L.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Scofield, R. Hal; Langefeld, Carl D.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle A.; Reveille, John D.; Vilá, Luis M.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Freedman, Barry I.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Sivils, Kathy Moser; James, Judith A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Niewold, Timothy B.; Merrill, Joan T.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Stevens, Anne M.; Boackle, Susan A.; Cantor, Rita M.; Chen, Weiling; Grossman, Jeniffer M.; Hahn, Bevra H.; Harley, John B.; Alarcόn-Riquelme, Marta E.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Tsao, Betty P.

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that the G allele of rs3853839 at 3′untranslated region (UTR) of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) was associated with elevated transcript expression and increased risk for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in 9,274 Eastern Asians [P = 6.5×10−10, odds ratio (OR) (95%CI) = 1.27 (1.17–1.36)]. Here, we conducted trans-ancestral fine-mapping in 13,339 subjects including European Americans, African Americans, and Amerindian/Hispanics and confirmed rs3853839 as the only variant within the TLR7-TLR8 region exhibiting consistent and independent association with SLE (Pmeta = 7.5×10−11, OR = 1.24 [1.18–1.34]). The risk G allele was associated with significantly increased levels of TLR7 mRNA and protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and elevated luciferase activity of reporter gene in transfected cells. TLR7 3′UTR sequence bearing the non-risk C allele of rs3853839 matches a predicted binding site of microRNA-3148 (miR-3148), suggesting that this microRNA may regulate TLR7 expression. Indeed, miR-3148 levels were inversely correlated with TLR7 transcript levels in PBMCs from SLE patients and controls (R2 = 0.255, P = 0.001). Overexpression of miR-3148 in HEK-293 cells led to significant dose-dependent decrease in luciferase activity for construct driven by TLR7 3′UTR segment bearing the C allele (P = 0.0003). Compared with the G-allele construct, the C-allele construct showed greater than two-fold reduction of luciferase activity in the presence of miR-3148. Reduced modulation by miR-3148 conferred slower degradation of the risk G-allele containing TLR7 transcripts, resulting in elevated levels of gene products. These data establish rs3853839 of TLR7 as a shared risk variant of SLE in 22,613 subjects of Asian, EA, AA, and Amerindian/Hispanic ancestries (Pmeta = 2.0×10−19, OR = 1.25 [1.20–1.32]), which confers allelic effect on transcript turnover via differential binding to the

  12. A New Electrophoresis Technique to Seperate Microsatellite Alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditional agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis have been used commonly for microsatellite (simple sequence repeats, SSRs) analysis, but they are labor- intensive and not always able to provide accurate sizes for different alleles. Capillary sequencers provide automated analysis and accur...

  13. Differential and limited expression of mutant alleles in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Naim U.; Sperling, Adam S.; Bolli, Niccolo; Wedge, David C.; Van Loo, Peter; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Shammas, Masood A.; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Samur, Mehmet K.; Richardson, Paul G.; Magrangeas, Florence; Minvielle, Stephane; Futreal, P. Andrew; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Avet-Loiseau, Herve; Parmigiani, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has delineated mutational profiles in multiple myeloma and reported a median of 52 mutations per patient, as well as a set of commonly mutated genes across multiple patients. In this study, we have used deep sequencing of RNA from a subset of these patients to evaluate the proportion of expressed mutations. We find that the majority of previously identified mutations occur within genes with very low or no detectable expression. On average, 27% (range, 11% to 47%) of mutated alleles are found to be expressed, and among mutated genes that are expressed, there often is allele-specific expression where either the mutant or wild-type allele is suppressed. Even in the absence of an overall change in gene expression, the presence of differential allelic expression within malignant cells highlights the important contribution of RNA-sequencing in identifying clinically significant mutational changes relevant to our understanding of myeloma biology and also for therapeutic applications. PMID:25237203

  14. Differential and limited expression of mutant alleles in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Naim U; Sperling, Adam S; Bolli, Niccolo; Wedge, David C; Van Loo, Peter; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Shammas, Masood A; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Samur, Mehmet K; Richardson, Paul G; Magrangeas, Florence; Minvielle, Stephane; Futreal, P Andrew; Anderson, Kenneth C; Avet-Loiseau, Herve; Campbell, Peter J; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Munshi, Nikhil C

    2014-11-13

    Recent work has delineated mutational profiles in multiple myeloma and reported a median of 52 mutations per patient, as well as a set of commonly mutated genes across multiple patients. In this study, we have used deep sequencing of RNA from a subset of these patients to evaluate the proportion of expressed mutations. We find that the majority of previously identified mutations occur within genes with very low or no detectable expression. On average, 27% (range, 11% to 47%) of mutated alleles are found to be expressed, and among mutated genes that are expressed, there often is allele-specific expression where either the mutant or wild-type allele is suppressed. Even in the absence of an overall change in gene expression, the presence of differential allelic expression within malignant cells highlights the important contribution of RNA-sequencing in identifying clinically significant mutational changes relevant to our understanding of myeloma biology and also for therapeutic applications. PMID:25237203

  15. DRD4 dopamine receptor allelic diversity in various primate species

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M.; Higley, D.; O`Brien, S.

    1994-09-01

    The DRD4 dopamine receptor is uniquely characterized by a 48 bp repeating segment within the coding region, located in exon III. Different DRD4 alleles are produced by the presence of additional 48 bp repeats, each of which adds 16 amino acids to the length of the 3rd intracytoplasmic loop of the receptor. The DRD4 receptor is therefore an intriguing candidate gene for behaviors which are influenced by dopamine function. In several human populations, DRD4 alleles with 2-8 and 10 repeats have previously been identified, and the 4 and 7 repeat alleles are the most abundant. We have determined DRD4 genotypes in the following nonhuman primate species: chimpanzee N=2, pygmy chimpanzee N=2, gorilla N=4, siamang N=2, Gelada baboon N=1, gibbon N=1, orangutan (Bornean and Sumatran) N=62, spider monkey N=4, owl monkey N=1, Colobus monkey N=1, Patas monkey N=1, ruffed lemur N=1, rhesus macaque N=8, and vervet monkey N=28. The degree of DRD4 polymorphism and which DRD4 alleles were present both showed considerable variation across primate species. In contrast to the human, rhesus macaque monkeys were monomorphic. The 4 and 7 repeat allels, highly abundant in the human, may not be present in certain other primates. For example, the four spider monkeys we studied showed the 7, 8 and 9 repeat length alleles and the only gibbon we analyzed was homozygous for the 9 repeat allele (thus far not observed in the human). Genotyping of other primate species and sequencing of the individual DRD4 repeat alleles in different species may help us determine the ancestral DRD4 repeat length and identify connections between DRD4 genotype and phenotype.

  16. Recurrent Muscle Weakness with Rhabdomyolysis, Metabolic Crises, and Cardiac Arrhythmia Due to Bi-allelic TANGO2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R.; Liu, Pengfei; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Watkin, Levi B.; Chiang, Theodore; Leduc, Magalie S.; Zhu, Wenmiao; Ding, Yan; Pan, Shujuan; Vetrini, Francesco; Miyake, Christina Y.; Shinawi, Marwan; Gambin, Tomasz; Eldomery, Mohammad K.; Akdemir, Zeynep Hande Coban; Emrick, Lisa; Wilnai, Yael; Schelley, Susan; Koenig, Mary Kay; Memon, Nada; Farach, Laura S.; Coe, Bradley P.; Azamian, Mahshid; Hernandez, Patricia; Zapata, Gladys; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Muzny, Donna M.; Lotze, Timothy; Clark, Gary; Wilfong, Angus; Northrup, Hope; Adesina, Adekunle; Bacino, Carlos A.; Scaglia, Fernando; Bonnen, Penelope E.; Crosson, Jane; Duis, Jessica; Maegawa, Gustavo H.B.; Coman, David; Inwood, Anita; McGill, Jim; Boerwinkle, Eric; Graham, Brett; Beaudet, Art; Eng, Christine M.; Hanchard, Neil A.; Xia, Fan; Orange, Jordan S.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Yang, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    The underlying genetic etiology of rhabdomyolysis remains elusive in a significant fraction of individuals presenting with recurrent metabolic crises and muscle weakness. Using exome sequencing, we identified bi-allelic mutations in TANGO2 encoding transport and Golgi organization 2 homolog (Drosophila) in 12 subjects with episodic rhabdomyolysis, hypoglycemia, hyperammonemia, and susceptibility to life-threatening cardiac tachyarrhythmias. A recurrent homozygous c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation was found in four unrelated individuals of Hispanic/Latino origin, and a homozygous ∼34 kb deletion affecting exons 3–9 was observed in two families of European ancestry. One individual of mixed Hispanic/European descent was found to be compound heterozygous for c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) and the deletion of exons 3–9. Additionally, a homozygous exons 4–6 deletion was identified in a consanguineous Middle Eastern Arab family. No homozygotes have been reported for these changes in control databases. Fibroblasts derived from a subject with the recurrent c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation showed evidence of increased endoplasmic reticulum stress and a reduction in Golgi volume density in comparison to control. Our results show that the c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation and the exons 3–9 heterozygous deletion in TANGO2 are recurrent pathogenic alleles present in the Latino/Hispanic and European populations, respectively, causing considerable morbidity in the homozygotes in these populations. PMID:26805781

  17. Allele-specific MMP-3 transcription under in vivo conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Chaoyong; Odeberg, Jacob; Hamsten, Anders; Eriksson, Per . E-mail: Per.Eriksson@ki.se

    2006-09-29

    A common matrix metalloproteinases-3 (MMP-3) -1612 5A/6A promoter polymorphism is associated with risk for cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and other diseases. Here we used the haplotype chromatin immunoprecipitation method to study allele-specific MMP-3 expression under in vivo conditions in heterozygous THP-1 cells. Pyrosequencing was used to analyse the ratio of 5A-allele to 6A-allele after chromatin immunoprecipitation using an antibody against phosphorylated active RNA polymerase II. There was no allele-specific difference in transcriptional activity during basal conditions, i.e., in unstimulated monocytic THP-1 cells. However, after stimulation of MMP-3 expression by monocyte differentiation or incubation with IL-1{beta}, the haplotype containing the 5A-allele was associated with higher transcriptional activity compared with the 6A-containing haplotype. Electromobility shift assay demonstrated increased binding of nuclear proteins to the 5A-allele after monocyte differentiation. In conclusion, the common MMP-3 5A/6A promoter polymorphism appears to be functional only during specific environmental conditions involving inflammation.

  18. Testing for Ancient Selection Using Cross-population Allele Frequency Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Racimo, Fernando

    2016-02-01

    A powerful way to detect selection in a population is by modeling local allele frequency changes in a particular region of the genome under scenarios of selection and neutrality and finding which model is most compatible with the data. A previous method based on a cross-population composite likelihood ratio (XP-CLR) uses an outgroup population to detect departures from neutrality that could be compatible with hard or soft sweeps, at linked sites near a beneficial allele. However, this method is most sensitive to recent selection and may miss selective events that happened a long time ago. To overcome this, we developed an extension of XP-CLR that jointly models the behavior of a selected allele in a three-population tree. Our method - called "3-population composite likelihood ratio" (3P-CLR) - outperforms XP-CLR when testing for selection that occurred before two populations split from each other and can distinguish between those events and events that occurred specifically in each of the populations after the split. We applied our new test to population genomic data from the 1000 Genomes Project, to search for selective sweeps that occurred before the split of Yoruba and Eurasians, but after their split from Neanderthals, and that could have led to the spread of modern-human-specific phenotypes. We also searched for sweep events that occurred in East Asians, Europeans, and the ancestors of both populations, after their split from Yoruba. In both cases, we are able to confirm a number of regions identified by previous methods and find several new candidates for selection in recent and ancient times. For some of these, we also find suggestive functional mutations that may have driven the selective events. PMID:26596347

  19. Cellular Adhesion Gene SELP Is Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Displays Differential Allelic Expression

    PubMed Central

    Petit-Teixeira, Elisabeth; Hugo Teixeira, Vitor; Steiner, Anke; Quente, Elfi; Wolfram, Grit; Scholz, Markus; Pierlot, Céline; Migliorini, Paola; Bombardieri, Stefano; Balsa, Alejandro; Westhovens, René; Barrera, Pilar; Radstake, Timothy R. D. J.; Alves, Helena; Bardin, Thomas; Prum, Bernard; Emmrich, Frank; Cornelis, François

    2014-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a key event is infiltration of inflammatory immune cells into the synovial lining, possibly aggravated by dysregulation of cellular adhesion molecules. Therefore, single nucleotide polymorphisms of 14 genes involved in cellular adhesion processes (CAST, ITGA4, ITGB1, ITGB2, PECAM1, PTEN, PTPN11, PTPRC, PXN, SELE, SELP, SRC, TYK2, and VCAM1) were analyzed for association with RA. Association analysis was performed consecutively in three European RA family sample groups (Nfamilies = 407). Additionally, we investigated differential allelic expression, a possible functional consequence of genetic variants. SELP (selectin P, CD62P) SNP-allele rs6136-T was associated with risk for RA in two RA family sample groups as well as in global analysis of all three groups (ptotal = 0.003). This allele was also expressed preferentially (p<10−6) with a two- fold average increase in regulated samples. Differential expression is supported by data from Genevar MuTHER (p1 = 0.004; p2 = 0.0177). Evidence for influence of rs6136 on transcription factor binding was also found in silico and in public datasets reporting in vitro data. In summary, we found SELP rs6136-T to be associated with RA and with increased expression of SELP mRNA. SELP is located on the surface of endothelial cells and crucial for recruitment, adhesion, and migration of inflammatory cells into the joint. Genetically determined increased SELP expression levels might thus be a novel additional risk factor for RA. PMID:25147926

  20. HLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and -DQB1 alleles and haplotypes in first-generation Pakistani immigrants in Norway.

    PubMed

    Rønningen, K S; Yap, S E; Brandal, K; Stormyr, A; Lie, B A; Rasmussen, T; Stray-Pedersen, B; Akselsen, H E

    2012-04-01

    Human leucocyte antigen (HLA) polymorphisms among immigrants from Pakistan have not been well investigated. Immigration to Norway started in the late 1960s for working purposes. From 1975, immigration was mainly for marriages and family reunion. When recruiting couples for a birth cohort study, we ended up with 65.5% of the 374 parents genotyped being closely related. This was also reflected in that 21% of newborns were homozygotes for their DRB1-DQA1-DQB1 genotype. For being able to study HLA class II genes frequencies among unrelated individuals, we had to exclude 195 of the parents from data analysis. High-resolution typing for the DRB1 locus, low/intermediate for the DQA1 locus and resolution genotyping for the DQB1 locus were performed in all the 179 parents and their newborns from the Punjab province of Pakistan. We identified 25 DRB1, nine DQA1 and 14 DRB1 alleles in the 179 unrelated parents included in our analysis. The most frequent alleles were DRB1*03:01:01 (15.9%) and DRB1*07:01:01 (15.9%), DQA1*01:03 (22.1%) and DQB1*02:01:01 (26.0%). Forty-one haplotypes were identified, including DRB1*13:02:01-DQA1*01:02-DQB1*06:03:01, not earlier reported. Supported by the few earlier reports on Pakistani groups living in Pakistan, it appears that alleles found among those living in Norway are of Indo-European or mixed ethnic origin. This study provides the first comprehensive report of HLA class II alleles and haplotypes in Norwegian Pakistani immigrants. When the unrelated parents were compared with all parents genotyped, there were, however, no significant differences in allele frequencies, confirming that consanguineous marriages are usual in Pakistan. PMID:22171671

  1. Association of smoking behavior with an odorant receptor allele telomeric to the human major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    Santos, Pablo Sandro Carvalho; Füst, George; Prohászka, Zoltán; Volz, Armin; Horton, Roger; Miretti, Marcos; Yu, Chack-Yung; Beck, Stephan; Uchanska-Ziegler, Barbara; Ziegler, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    Smoking behavior has been associated in two independent European cohorts with the most common Caucasian human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotype (A1-B8-DR3). We aimed to test whether polymorphic members of the two odorant receptor (OR) clusters within the extended HLA complex might be responsible for the observed association, by genotyping a cohort of Hungarian women in which the mentioned association had been found. One hundred and eighty HLA haplotypes from Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain families were analyzed in silico to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within OR genes that are in linkage disequilibrium with the A1-B8-DR3 haplotype, as well as with two other haplotypes indirectly linked to smoking behavior. A nonsynonymous SNP within the OR12D3 gene (rs3749971(T)) was found to be linked to the A1-B8-DR3 haplotype. This polymorphism leads to a (97)Thr --> Ile exchange that affects a putative ligand binding region of the OR12D3 protein. Smoking was found to be associated in the Hungarian cohort with the rs3749971(T) allele (p = 1.05 x 10(-2)), with higher significance than with A1-B8-DR3 (p = 2.38 x 10(-2)). Our results link smoking to a distinct OR allele, and demonstrate that the rs3749971(T) polymorphism is associated with the HLA haplotype-dependent differential recognition of cigarette smoke components, at least among Caucasian women. PMID:18939942

  2. [Distribution and frequency of HLA alleles and haplotypes in Brazilians with type 1 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Alves, Crésio; Meyer, Isadora; Vieira, Nara; Toralles, Maria Betânia P; LeMaire, Denise

    2006-06-01

    The genetic predisposition to type 1 diabetes (DM1) is associated with genes of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system, specially the HLA-DR and -DQ. In Caucasians, the HLA-DR3 and -DR4 antigens are associated with susceptibility and the -DR2, with protection. In Brazil, a country with a large miscegenation of European Caucasians, Native Amerindians and African Blacks, the genetic basis of DM1 has not been adequately studied. The aim of this paper is to present a critical review of articles indexed in the MEDLINE and LILACS-BIREME data basis about the association of HLA with DM1 in Brazilians. Eight papers, all of them from the Southeast region, were found. Immunogenetic susceptibility to DM1 in Brazilians was associated with HLA-DRB1*03, -DRB*04, -DQB1*0201, -DQB1*0302 alleles, and protection against DM1 was associated with HLA-DQB1*0602, -DQB1*0301 alleles and -DR2 and -DR7 antigens. Since the Brazilian population is not racially homogeneous, it is not possible to extrapolate studies from a single region to the remainder of the country. It is necessary to study populations from different regions to identify new associations or to strengthen associations with the ones already identified. This knowledge will contribute to future prophylactic or therapeutic interventions in the group of Brazilians at risk of developing DM1. PMID:16936983

  3. An ancestral allele of grapevine transcription factor MYB14 promotes plant defence

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Dong; Fischer, Sabine; Merz, Patrick; Bogs, Jochen; Riemann, Michael; Nick, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Stilbene synthase is a key enzyme for the production of the phytoalexin resveratrol. Some clones of Vitis sylvestris, a wild European grapevine species which is almost extinct, have been shown to accumulate more resveratrol in response to different forms of stress. In the current study, we asked whether the induction of stilbene synthase transcripts in Hoe29, one of the V. sylvestris clones with elevated stilbene inducibility, might result from the elevated induction of the transcription factor MYB14. The MYB14 promoter of Hoe29 and of Ke83 (a second stilbene-inducible genotype) harboured distinct regions and were applied to a promoter–reporter system. We show that stilbene synthase inducibility correlates with differences in the induction of MYB14 transcripts for these two genotypes. Both alleles were induced by UV in a promoter–reporter assay, but only the MYB14 promoter from Hoe29 was induced by flg22, consistent with the stilbene synthase expression of the donor genotypes, where both respond to UV but only Hoe29 is responsive to Plasmopara viticola during defence. We mapped upstream signals and found that a RboH-dependent oxidative burst, calcium influx, a MAPK cascade, and jasmonate activated the MYB14 promoter, whereas salicylic acid was ineffective. Our data suggest that the Hoe29 allele of the MYB14 promoter has potential as a candidate target for resistance breeding. PMID:26842984

  4. An ancestral allele of grapevine transcription factor MYB14 promotes plant defence.

    PubMed

    Duan, Dong; Fischer, Sabine; Merz, Patrick; Bogs, Jochen; Riemann, Michael; Nick, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Stilbene synthase is a key enzyme for the production of the phytoalexin resveratrol. Some clones of Vitis sylvestris, a wild European grapevine species which is almost extinct, have been shown to accumulate more resveratrol in response to different forms of stress. In the current study, we asked whether the induction of stilbene synthase transcripts in Hoe29, one of the V. sylvestris clones with elevated stilbene inducibility, might result from the elevated induction of the transcription factor MYB14. The MYB14 promoter of Hoe29 and of Ke83 (a second stilbene-inducible genotype) harboured distinct regions and were applied to a promoter-reporter system. We show that stilbene synthase inducibility correlates with differences in the induction of MYB14 transcripts for these two genotypes. Both alleles were induced by UV in a promoter-reporter assay, but only the MYB14 promoter from Hoe29 was induced by flg22, consistent with the stilbene synthase expression of the donor genotypes, where both respond to UV but only Hoe29 is responsive to Plasmopara viticola during defence. We mapped upstream signals and found that a RboH-dependent oxidative burst, calcium influx, a MAPK cascade, and jasmonate activated the MYB14 promoter, whereas salicylic acid was ineffective. Our data suggest that the Hoe29 allele of the MYB14 promoter has potential as a candidate target for resistance breeding. PMID:26842984

  5. A limit to the divergent allele advantage model supported by variable pathogen recognition across HLA-DRB1 allele lineages.

    PubMed

    Lau, Q; Yasukochi, Y; Satta, Y

    2015-11-01

    Genetic diversity in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules is thought to have arisen from the co-evolution between host and pathogen and maintained by balancing selection. Heterozygote advantage is a common proposed scenario for maintaining high levels of diversity in HLA genes, and extending from this, the divergent allele advantage (DAA) model suggests that individuals with more divergent HLA alleles bind and recognize a wider array of antigens. While the DAA model seems biologically suitable for driving HLA diversity, there is likely an upper threshold to the amount of sequence divergence. We used peptide-binding and pathogen-recognition capacity of DRB1 alleles as a model to further explore the DAA model; within the DRB1 locus, we examined binding predictions based on two distinct phylogenetic groups (denoted group A and B) previously identified based on non-peptide-binding region (PBR) nucleotide sequences. Predictions in this study support that group A allele and group B allele lineages have contrasting binding/recognition capacity, with only the latter supporting the DAA model. Furthermore, computer simulations revealed an inconsistency in the DAA model alone with observed extent of polymorphisms, supporting that the DAA model could only work effectively in combination with other mechanisms. Overall, we support that the mechanisms driving HLA diversity are non-exclusive. By investigating the relationships among HLA alleles, and pathogens recognized, we can provide further insights into the mechanisms on how humans have adapted to infectious diseases over time. PMID:26392055

  6. Impriniting of human H19: Allele-specific CpG methylation, loss of the active allele in Wilms tumor, and potential for somatic allele switching

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Shields, T.; Crenshaw, T.; Hao, Y.; Moulton, T.; Tycko, B. )

    1993-07-01

    Genomic imprinting and monoallelic gene expression appear to play a role in human genetic disease and tumorigenesis. The human H19 gene, at chromosome 11p15, has previously been shown to be monoallelically expressed. Since CpG methylation has been implicated in imprinting, the authors analyzed methylation of H19 DNA. In fetal and adult organs the transcriptionally silent H19 allele was extensively hypermethylated through the entire gene and its promoter, and, consistent with a functional role for DNA methylation, expression of an H19 promoter-reporter construct was inhibited by in vitro methylation. Gynogenetic ovarian teratomas were found to contain only hypomethylated H19 DNA, suggesting that the expressed H19 allele might be maternal. This was confirmed by analysis of 11p15 polymorphisms in a patient with Wilms tumor. The tumor had lost the maternal 11p15, and H19 expression in the normal kidney was exclusively from this allele. Imprinting of human H19 appears to be susceptible to tissue-specific modulation in somatic development; in one individual, cerebellar cells were found to express only the otherwise silent allele. Implications of these findings for the role of DNA methylation in imprinting and for H19 as a candidate imprinted tumor-suppressor gene are discussed. 57 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Dissecting Allele Architecture of Early Onset IBD Using High-Density Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Prahalad, Sampath; Walters, Thomas; Guthery, Stephen L.; Dubinsky, Marla; Baldassano, Robert; Crandall, Wallace V.; Rosh, Joel; Markowitz, James; Stephens, Michael; Kellermayer, Richard; Pfefferkorn, Marian; Heyman, Melvin B.; LeLeiko, Neal; Mack, David; Moulton, Dedrick; Kappelman, Michael D.; Kumar, Archana; Prince, Jarod; Bose, Promita; Mondal, Kajari; Ramachandran, Dhanya; Bohnsack, John F.; Griffiths, Anne M.; Haberman, Yael; Essers, Jonah; Thompson, Susan D.; Aronow, Bruce; Keljo, David J.; Hyams, Jeffrey S.; Denson, Lee A.; Kugathasan, Subra

    2015-01-01

    Background The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are common, complex disorders in which genetic and environmental factors are believed to interact leading to chronic inflammatory responses against the gut microbiota. Earlier genetic studies performed in mostly adult population of European descent identified 163 loci affecting IBD risk, but most have relatively modest effect sizes, and altogether explain only ~20% of the genetic susceptibility. Pediatric onset represents about 25% of overall incident cases in IBD, characterized by distinct disease physiology, course and risks. The goal of this study is to compare the allelic architecture of early onset IBD with adult onset in population of European descent. Methods We performed a fine mapping association study of early onset IBD using high-density Immunochip genotyping on 1008 pediatric-onset IBD cases (801 Crohn’s disease; 121 ulcerative colitis and 86 IBD undetermined) and 1633 healthy controls. Of the 158 SNP genotypes obtained (out of the 163 identified in adult onset), this study replicated 4% (5 SNPs out of 136) of the SNPs identified in the Crohn’s disease (CD) cases and 0.8% (1 SNP out of 128) in the ulcerative colitis (UC) cases. Replicated SNPs implicated the well known NOD2 and IL23R. The point estimate for the odds ratio (ORs) for NOD2 was above and outside the confidence intervals reported in adult onset. A polygenic liability score weakly predicted the age of onset for a larger collection of CD cases (p< 0.03, R2= 0.007), but not for the smaller number of UC cases. Conclusions The allelic architecture of common susceptibility variants for early onset IBD is similar to that of adult onset. This immunochip genotyping study failed to identify additional common variants that may explain the distinct phenotype that characterize early onset IBD. A comprehensive dissection of genetic loci is necessary to further characterize the genetic architecture of early onset IBD. PMID:26098103

  8. How the Number of Alleles Influences Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hat, Beata; Paszek, Pawel; Kimmel, Marek; Piechor, Kazimierz; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2007-07-01

    The higher organisms, eukaryotes, are diploid and most of their genes have two homological copies (alleles). However, the number of alleles in a cell is not constant. In the S phase of the cell cycle all the genome is duplicated and then in the G2 phase and mitosis, which together last for several hours, most of the genes have four copies instead of two. Cancer development is, in many cases, associated with a change in allele number. Several genetic diseases are caused by haploinsufficiency: Lack of one of the alleles or its improper functioning. In the paper we consider the stochastic expression of a gene having a variable number of copies. We applied our previously developed method in which the reaction channels are split into slow (connected with change of gene state) and fast (connected with mRNA/protein synthesis/decay), the later being approximated by deterministic reaction rate equations. As a result we represent gene expression as a piecewise deterministic time-continuous Markov process, which is further related with a system of partial differential hyperbolic equations for probability density functions (pdfs) of protein distribution. The stationary pdfs are calculated analytically for haploidal gene or numerically for diploidal and tetraploidal ones. We distinguished nine classes of simultaneous activation of haploid, diploid and tetraploid genes. This allows for analysis of potential consequences of gene duplication or allele loss. We show that when gene activity is autoregulated by a positive feedback, the change in number of gene alleles may have dramatic consequences for its regulation and may not be compensated by the change of efficiency of mRNA synthesis per allele.

  9. The allele frequency spectrum in genome-wide human variation data reveals signals of differential demographic history in three large world populations.

    PubMed Central

    Marth, Gabor T; Czabarka, Eva; Murvai, Janos; Sherry, Stephen T

    2004-01-01

    We have studied a genome-wide set of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele frequency measures for African-American, East Asian, and European-American samples. For this analysis we derived a simple, closed mathematical formulation for the spectrum of expected allele frequencies when the sampled populations have experienced nonstationary demographic histories. The direct calculation generates the spectrum orders of magnitude faster than coalescent simulations do and allows us to generate spectra for a large number of alternative histories on a multidimensional parameter grid. Model-fitting experiments using this grid reveal significant population-specific differences among the demographic histories that best describe the observed allele frequency spectra. European and Asian spectra show a bottleneck-shaped history: a reduction of effective population size in the past followed by a recent phase of size recovery. In contrast, the African-American spectrum shows a history of moderate but uninterrupted population expansion. These differences are expected to have profound consequences for the design of medical association studies. The analytical methods developed for this study, i.e., a closed mathematical formulation for the allele frequency spectrum, correcting the ascertainment bias introduced by shallow SNP sampling, and dealing with variable sample sizes provide a general framework for the analysis of public variation data. PMID:15020430

  10. Systematic Detection of Epistatic Interactions Based on Allele Pair Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Marit; Beyer, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Epistatic genetic interactions are key for understanding the genetic contribution to complex traits. Epistasis is always defined with respect to some trait such as growth rate or fitness. Whereas most existing epistasis screens explicitly test for a trait, it is also possible to implicitly test for fitness traits by searching for the over- or under-representation of allele pairs in a given population. Such analysis of imbalanced allele pair frequencies of distant loci has not been exploited yet on a genome-wide scale, mostly due to statistical difficulties such as the multiple testing problem. We propose a new approach called Imbalanced Allele Pair frequencies (ImAP) for inferring epistatic interactions that is exclusively based on DNA sequence information. Our approach is based on genome-wide SNP data sampled from a population with known family structure. We make use of genotype information of parent-child trios and inspect 3×3 contingency tables for detecting pairs of alleles from different genomic positions that are over- or under-represented in the population. We also developed a simulation setup which mimics the pedigree structure by simultaneously assuming independence of the markers. When applied to mouse SNP data, our method detected 168 imbalanced allele pairs, which is substantially more than in simulations assuming no interactions. We could validate a significant number of the interactions with external data, and we found that interacting loci are enriched for genes involved in developmental processes. PMID:22346757

  11. Rare allelic forms of PRDM9 associated with childhood leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hussin, Julie; Sinnett, Daniel; Casals, Ferran; Idaghdour, Youssef; Bruat, Vanessa; Saillour, Virginie; Healy, Jasmine; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; de Malliard, Thibault; Busche, Stephan; Spinella, Jean-François; Larivière, Mathieu; Gibson, Greg; Andersson, Anna; Holmfeldt, Linda; Ma, Jing; Wei, Lei; Zhang, Jinghui; Andelfinger, Gregor; Downing, James R.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Awadalla, Philip

    2013-01-01

    One of the most rapidly evolving genes in humans, PRDM9, is a key determinant of the distribution of meiotic recombination events. Mutations in this meiotic-specific gene have previously been associated with male infertility in humans and recent studies suggest that PRDM9 may be involved in pathological genomic rearrangements. In studying genomes from families with children affected by B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), we characterized meiotic recombination patterns within a family with two siblings having hyperdiploid childhood B-ALL and observed unusual localization of maternal recombination events. The mother of the family carries a rare PRDM9 allele, potentially explaining the unusual patterns found. From exomes sequenced in 44 additional parents of children affected with B-ALL, we discovered a substantial and significant excess of rare allelic forms of PRDM9. The rare PRDM9 alleles are transmitted to the affected children in half the cases; nonetheless there remains a significant excess of rare alleles among patients relative to controls. We successfully replicated this latter observation in an independent cohort of 50 children with B-ALL, where we found an excess of rare PRDM9 alleles in aneuploid and infant B-ALL patients. PRDM9 variability in humans is thought to influence genomic instability, and these data support a potential role for PRDM9 variation in risk of acquiring aneuploidies or genomic rearrangements associated with childhood leukemogenesis. PMID:23222848

  12. Estimating allelic diversity generated by excision of different transposon types.

    PubMed

    Nordborg, M; Walbot, V

    1995-05-01

    Methods are presented for calculating the number and type of different DNA sequences generated by base excision and insertion events at a given site in a known DNA sequence. We calculate, for example, that excision of the Mu1 transposon from the bz1::Mu1 allele of maize should generate more than 500,000 unique alleles given the extent of base deletion (up to 34 bases removed) and base insertion (0-5 bases) observed thus far in sequenced excision alleles. Analysis of this universe of potential alleles can, for example, be used to predict the frequency of creation of stop codons or repair-generated duplications. In general, knowledge of the distribution of alleles can be used to evaluate models of both excision and repair by determining whether particular events occur more frequently than expected. Such quantitative analysis complements the qualitative description provided by the DNA sequence of individual events. Similar methods can be used to evaluate the outcome of other cases of DNA breakage and repair such as programmed V(D)J recombination in immunoglobin genes. PMID:24172918

  13. STR allele sequence variation: Current knowledge and future issues.

    PubMed

    Gettings, Katherine Butler; Aponte, Rachel A; Vallone, Peter M; Butler, John M

    2015-09-01

    This article reviews what is currently known about short tandem repeat (STR) allelic sequence variation in and around the twenty-four loci most commonly used throughout the world to perform forensic DNA investigations. These STR loci include D1S1656, TPOX, D2S441, D2S1338, D3S1358, FGA, CSF1PO, D5S818, SE33, D6S1043, D7S820, D8S1179, D10S1248, TH01, vWA, D12S391, D13S317, Penta E, D16S539, D18S51, D19S433, D21S11, Penta D, and D22S1045. All known reported variant alleles are compiled along with genomic information available from GenBank, dbSNP, and the 1000 Genomes Project. Supplementary files are included which provide annotated reference sequences for each STR locus, characterize genomic variation around the STR repeat region, and compare alleles present in currently available STR kit allelic ladders. Looking to the future, STR allele nomenclature options are discussed as they relate to next generation sequencing efforts underway. PMID:26197946

  14. Allelic and genotypic associations of DRD2 TaqI A polymorphism with heroin dependence in Spanish subjects: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    Perez de los Cobos, Jose; Baiget, Montserrat; Trujols, Joan; Sinol, Nuria; Volpini, Victor; Banuls, Enrique; Calafell, Francesc; Luquero, Elena; del Rio, Elisabeth; Alvarez, Enric

    2007-01-01

    Background Conflicting associations with heroin dependence have been found involving the A1 allele of dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2) TaqI A polymorphism. Methods We compared two samples of unrelated Spanish individuals, all of European origin: 281 methadone-maintained heroin-dependent patients (207 males and 74 females) who frequently used non-opioid substances, and 145 control subjects (98 males and 47 females). Results The A1-A1 genotype was detected in 7.1% of patients and 1.4% of controls (P = 0.011, odds ratio = 5.48, 95% CI 1.26–23.78). Although the A1 allele was not associated with heroin dependence in the entire sample, the frequency of A1 allele was higher in male patients than in male controls (24.4% vs. 16.3%, P = 0.024, odds ratio = 1.65, 95% CI 1.07–2.57). A logistic regression analysis showed an interaction between DRD2 alleles and gender (odds ratio = 1.77, 95% CI 1.15–2.70). Conclusion Our results indicate that, in Spanish individuals, genotypes of the DRD2 TaqI A polymorphism contribute to variations in the risk of heroin dependence, while single alleles contribute only in males. PMID:17543096

  15. Population genetics of the vitamin D binding protein (GC) subtypes in the Asian-Pacific area: description of new alleles at the GC locus.

    PubMed

    Kamboh, M I; Ranford, P R; Kirk, R L

    1984-01-01

    Isoelectric focussing (IEF) in thin layer polyacrylamide gels pH range 4-6.5 has been used to analyse the GC phenotypes of 4233 individuals from 28 different population groups in the Asian, Pacific, and Australian area. Because this technique reveals subtypes of the common GC*1 allele, there is almost a two-fold increase in the mean heterozygosity at the GC locus using IEF compared with conventional electrophoresis. The highest frequency (above 50%) of the GC*1S allele was encountered in Indian populations, reflecting genetic affinities with Europeans. By comparison, east and south east Asians are unique offing maximum values of the GC*1F allele (50%). With the exception of a few Pacific populations which show similar frequencies to east Asians, all other groups in the Pacific area, including Australia, have values of GC*1F similar to GC*1S ranging from 27% to 40%. The GC*2 frequency in most populations varies from 20% to 30%. However, some Polynesian groups have values up to 40% and Australian Aborigines less than 10%. Among other alleles, GC*1A1 is found to be widely distributed among Australian Aborigines and Melanesians and occurs sporadically in Polynesians, Micronesians, and in the Lesser Sunda Islands. Four new alleles, GC*1C24, GC*1C35 Aborigine, GC*1A21, and GC*1A22 are described. The gene frequency data at the GC locus has been used to calculate Nei genetic distances between the populations studied. PMID:6541632

  16. Puroindoline allelic diversity in Indian wheat germplasm and identification of new allelic variants

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rohit; Arora, Shaweta; Singh, Kashmir; Garg, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Grain hardness is an important quality trait that influences product development in wheat. This trait is governed by variation in puroindoline proteins (PINA and PINB). Our study evaluated 551 Indian wheat germplasm lines for diversity in Pina and Pinb genes. Eighty-two lines were shortlisted for full length sequencing and grain hardness studies. Sequencing studies identified six unknown alleles: two for the Pina gene and four for the Pinb gene. Five of them were novel with non-synonymous changes in the corresponding amino acid sequences. Identified mutations in the deduced mature proteins and their pre- and pro-peptides influenced the hardness characteristics of the grain. We classified these 82 varieties into different hardness categories with reference to international and Indian systems of classification. The majority of Indian wheat varieties were categorized as hard. This study revealed that unexplored Indian wheat germplasm can be a good source of genetic variability for both Pina and Pinb genes, helping in marker-assisted breeding and in obtaining wheat with different textural properties. PMID:26366114

  17. Interaction Analysis between HLA-DRB1 Shared Epitope Alleles and MHC Class II Transactivator CIITA Gene with Regard to Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ronninger, Marcus; Seddighzadeh, Maria; Eike, Morten Christoph; Plant, Darren; Daha, Nina A.; Skinningsrud, Beate; Worthington, Jane; Kvien, Tore K.; Toes, Rene E. M.; Lie, Benedicte A.; Alfredsson, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    HLA-DRB1 shared epitope (SE) alleles are the strongest genetic determinants for autoantibody positive rheumatoid arthritis (RA). One of the key regulators in expression of HLA class II receptors is MHC class II transactivator (CIITA). A variant of the CIITA gene has been found to associate with inflammatory diseases. We wanted to explore whether the risk variant rs3087456 in the CIITA gene interacts with the HLA-DRB1 SE alleles regarding the risk of developing RA. We tested this hypothesis in a case-control study with 11767 individuals from four European Caucasian populations (6649 RA cases and 5118 controls). We found no significant additive interaction for risk alleles among Swedish Caucasians with RA (n = 3869, attributable proportion due to interaction (AP) = 0.2, 95%CI: −0.2–0.5) or when stratifying for anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) presence (ACPA positive disease: n = 2945, AP = 0.3, 95%CI: −0.05–0.6, ACPA negative: n = 2268, AP = −0.2, 95%CI: −1.0–0.6). We further found no significant interaction between the main subgroups of SE alleles (DRB1*01, DRB1*04 or DRB1*10) and CIITA. Similar analysis of three independent RA cohorts from British, Dutch and Norwegian populations also indicated an absence of significant interaction between genetic variants in CIITA and SE alleles with regard to RA risk. Our data suggest that risk from the CIITA locus is independent of the major risk for RA from HLA-DRB1 SE alleles, given that no significant interaction between rs3087456 and SE alleles was observed. Since a biological link between products of these genes is evident, the genetic contribution from CIITA and class II antigens in the autoimmune process may involve additional unidentified factors. PMID:22461888

  18. Generation of Mice with a Conditional Allele for Ift172

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Paul W.; Howard, Tiffani L.; Maurer, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Ift172 encodes a gene product that is part of a complex that mediates intraflagellar transport (IFT), a process necessary for the genesis and maintenance of cilia. Genetic studies in mice have offered evidence that Ift172 also plays a role in hedgehog signaling. Disruption of Ift172 in mice is associated with lethality at about embryonic day 11, limiting studies to understand the role for Ift172 in later development and the adult. To further our understanding of the later roles of Ift172, we have generated mice with a conditional allele for Ift172. We have confirmed the phenotype of the disrupted allele by using CRE expression directed by the prx1 enhancer to disrupt the conditional Ift172 allele in the developing limb. PMID:19521792

  19. Allele surfing promotes microbial adaptation from standing variation.

    PubMed

    Gralka, Matti; Stiewe, Fabian; Farrell, Fred; Möbius, Wolfram; Waclaw, Bartlomiej; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2016-08-01

    The coupling of ecology and evolution during range expansions enables mutations to establish at expanding range margins and reach high frequencies. This phenomenon, called allele surfing, is thought to have caused revolutions in the gene pool of many species, most evidently in microbial communities. It has remained unclear, however, under which conditions allele surfing promotes or hinders adaptation. Here, using microbial experiments and simulations, we show that, starting with standing adaptive variation, range expansions generate a larger increase in mean fitness than spatially uniform population expansions. The adaptation gain results from 'soft' selective sweeps emerging from surfing beneficial mutations. The rate of these surfing events is shown to sensitively depend on the strength of genetic drift, which varies among strains and environmental conditions. More generally, allele surfing promotes the rate of adaptation per biomass produced, which could help developing biofilms and other resource-limited populations to cope with environmental challenges. PMID:27307400

  20. Apolipoprotein E alleles in women with severe pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, B; Rigó, J; Fintor, L; Karádi, I; Tóth, T

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated the frequency of apolipoprotein E (apoE) alleles among women with severe pre-eclampsia. The presence of the three most common apoE alleles (epsilon 2, epsilon 3, epsilon 4) was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism in three groups of white women: non-pregnant healthy (n = 101), pregnant healthy (n = 52), and pregnant with a diagnosis of severe pre-eclampsia (n = 54). The frequency of apo epsilon 2 was highest among women with severe pre-eclampsia (16.6%) followed by non-pregnant women (12.9%), and those experiencing a healthy pregnancy (10.6%). The higher frequency of the apo epsilon 2 allele detected among women with severe pre-eclampsia suggests that apoE may play a role in the development of pre-eclampsia. PMID:9659248

  1. Extensive HLA class I allele promiscuity among viral CTL epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Frahm, Nicole; Yusim, Karina; Suscovich, Todd J.; Adams, Sharon; Sidney, John; Hraber, Peter; Hewitt, Hannah S.; Linde, Caitlyn H.; Kavanagh, Daniel G.; Woodberry, Tonia; Henry, Leah M.; Faircloth, Kellie; Listgarten, Jennifer; Kadie, Carl; Jojic, Nebojsa; Sango, Kaori; Brown, Nancy V.; Pae, Eunice; Zaman, M. Tauheed; Bihl, Florian; Khatri, Ashok; John, Mina; Mallal, Simon; Marincola, Francesco M.; Walker, Bruce D.; Sette, Alessandro; Heckerman, David; Korber, Bette T.; Brander, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Summary Promiscuous binding of T helper epitopes to MHC class II molecules has been well established, but few examples of promiscuous class I restricted epitopes exist. To address the extent of promiscuity of HLA class I peptides, responses to 242 well-defined viral epitopes were tested in 100 subjects regardless of the individuals’ HLA type. Surprisingly, half of all detected responses were seen in the absence of the originally reported restricting HLA class I allele, and only 3% of epitopes were recognized exclusively in the presence of their original allele. Functional assays confirmed the frequent recognition of HLA class I-restricted T cell epitopes on several alternative alleles across HLA class I supertypes and encoded on different class I loci. These data have significant implications for the understanding of MHC class I restricted antigen presentation and vaccine development. PMID:17705138

  2. Whole-exome imputation of sequence variants identified two novel alleles associated with adult body height in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Du, Mengmeng; Auer, Paul L.; Jiao, Shuo; Haessler, Jeffrey; Altshuler, David; Boerwinkle, Eric; Carlson, Christopher S.; Carty, Cara L.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Curtis, Keith; Franceschini, Nora; Hsu, Li; Jackson, Rebecca; Lange, Leslie A.; Lettre, Guillaume; Monda, Keri L.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Reiner, Alex P.; Rich, Stephen S.; Rosse, Stephanie A.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Willer, Cristen J.; Wilson, James G.; North, Kari; Kooperberg, Charles; Heard-Costa, Nancy; Peters, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Adult body height is a quantitative trait for which genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous loci, primarily in European populations. These loci, comprising common variants, explain <10% of the phenotypic variance in height. We searched for novel associations between height and common (minor allele frequency, MAF ≥5%) or infrequent (0.5% < MAF < 5%) variants across the exome in African Americans. Using a reference panel of 1692 African Americans and 471 Europeans from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's (NHLBI) Exome Sequencing Project (ESP), we imputed whole-exome sequence data into 13 719 African Americans with existing array-based GWAS data (discovery). Variants achieving a height-association threshold of P < 5E−06 in the imputed dataset were followed up in an independent sample of 1989 African Americans with whole-exome sequence data (replication). We used P < 2.5E−07 (=0.05/196 779 variants) to define statistically significant associations in meta-analyses combining the discovery and replication sets (N = 15 708). We discovered and replicated three independent loci for association: 5p13.3/C5orf22/rs17410035 (MAF = 0.10, β = 0.64 cm, P = 8.3E−08), 13q14.2/SPRYD7/rs114089985 (MAF = 0.03, β = 1.46 cm, P = 4.8E−10) and 17q23.3/GH2/rs2006123 (MAF = 0.30; β = 0.47 cm; P = 4.7E−09). Conditional analyses suggested 5p13.3 (C5orf22/rs17410035) and 13q14.2 (SPRYD7/rs114089985) may harbor novel height alleles independent of previous GWAS-identified variants (r2 with GWAS loci <0.01); whereas 17q23.3/GH2/rs2006123 was correlated with GWAS-identified variants in European and African populations. Notably, 13q14.2/rs114089985 is infrequent in African Americans (MAF = 3%), extremely rare in European Americans (MAF = 0.03%), and monomorphic in Asian populations, suggesting it may be an African-American-specific height allele. Our findings demonstrate that whole-exome imputation of sequence variants can identify low

  3. Distribution of a pseudodeficiency allele among Tay-Sachs carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Tomczak, J.; Grebner, E.E. ); Boogen, C. )

    1993-08-01

    Recently Triggs-Raine et al. (1992) identified a new mutation in the gene coding for the [alpha]-subunit of [beta]-hexosaminidase A (hex A), the enzyme whose deficiency causes Tay-Sachs disease. This mutation, a C[sub 739]-to-T transition in exon 7, results in an altered enzyme that is active (albeit at reduced levels) in cells but that has essentially no activity in serum. This so-called pseudodeficient allele was first detected in compound heterozygotes who also carried a Tay-Sachs disease allele and therefore had no detectable hex A in their serum but who were in good health. Carriers of this apparently benign mutation are generally indistinguishable from carriers of a lethal mutation by means of routine enzyme-based screening tests, because the product of the pseudodeficient allele is not detectable in serum and has decreased activity in cells. This suggests that some individuals who have been classified as Tay-Sachs carriers are actually carriers of the pseudodeficient allele and are not at risk to have a child affected with Tay-Sachs disease. The pseudodeficient allele may also be responsible for some inconclusive diagnoses, where leukocyte values fall below the normal range but are still above the carrier range. The fact that there are now two mutant alleles (the psuedodeficient and the adult) that are indistinguishable from the lethal infantile mutations by means of enzyme assay yet that are phenotypically very different and that together may account for as much as 12% of enzyme-defined carriers on the basis of the data here suggests that DNA analysis should be part of a comprehensive screening program. It will be particularly useful to identify the mutations in couples at risk, before they undergo prenatal diagnosis. DNA analysis will also resolve some inconclusive diagnoses.

  4. Allele-specific DNA methylation reinforces PEAR1 enhancer activity.

    PubMed

    Izzi, Benedetta; Pistoni, Mariaelena; Cludts, Katrien; Akkor, Pinar; Lambrechts, Diether; Verfaillie, Catherine; Verhamme, Peter; Freson, Kathleen; Hoylaerts, Marc F

    2016-08-18

    Genetic variation in the PEAR1 locus is linked to platelet reactivity and cardiovascular disease. The major G allele of rs12041331, an intronic cytosine guanine dinucleotide-single-nucleotide polymorphism (CpG-SNP), is associated with higher PEAR1 expression in platelets and endothelial cells than the minor A allele. The molecular mechanism underlying this difference remains elusive. We have characterized the histone modification profiles of the intronic region surrounding rs12041331 and identified H3K4Me1 enhancer-specific enrichment for the region that covers the CpG-SNP. Interestingly, methylation studies revealed that the CpG site is fully methylated in leukocytes of GG carriers. Nuclear protein extracts from megakaryocytes, endothelial cells, vs control HEK-293 cells show a 3-fold higher affinity for the methylated G allele compared with nonmethylated G or A alleles in a gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay. To understand the positive relationship between methylation and gene expression, we studied DNA methylation at 4 different loci of PEAR1 during in vitro megakaryopoiesis. During differentiation, the CpG-SNP remained fully methylated, while we observed rapid methylation increases at the CpG-island overlapping the first 5'-untranslated region exon, paralleling the increased PEAR1 expression. In the same region, A-allele carriers of rs12041331 showed significantly lower DNA methylation at CGI1 compared with GG homozygote. This CpG-island contains binding sites for the methylation-sensitive transcription factor CTCF, whose binding is known to play a role in enhancer activation and/or repression. In conclusion, we report the molecular characterization of the first platelet function-related CpG-SNP, a genetic predisposition that reinforces PEAR1 enhancer activity through allele-specific DNA methylation. PMID:27313330

  5. A common allele on chromosome 9 associated with coronary heartdisease

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, Ruth; Pertsemlidis, Alexander; Kavaslar, Nihan; Stewart, Alexandre; Roberts, Robert; Cox, David R.; Hinds, David; Pennachio, Len; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Folsom, Aaron R.; Boerwinkle,Eric; Hobbs, Helen H.; Cohen, Jonathan C.

    2007-03-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of death in Western countries. Here we used genome-wide association scanning to identify a 58 kb interval on chromosome 9 that was consistently associated with CHD in six independent samples. The interval contains no annotated genes and is not associated with established CHD risk factors such as plasma lipoproteins, hypertension or diabetes. Homozygotes for the risk allele comprise 20-25% of Caucasians and have a {approx}30-40% increased risk of CHD. These data indicate that the susceptibility allele acts through a novel mechanism to increase CHD risk in a large fraction of the population.

  6. Data-adaptive algorithms for calling alleles in repeat polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Stoughton, R; Bumgarner, R; Frederick, W J; McIndoe, R A

    1997-01-01

    Data-adaptive algorithms are presented for separating overlapping signatures of heterozygotic allele pairs in electrophoresis data. Application is demonstrated for human microsatellite CA-repeat polymorphisms in LiCor 4000 and ABI 373 data. The algorithms allow overlapping alleles to be called correctly in almost every case where a trained observer could do so, and provide a fast automated objective alternative to human reading of the gels. The algorithm also supplies an indication of confidence level which can be used to flag marginal cases for verification by eye, or as input to later stages of statistical analysis. PMID:9059812

  7. Reduced Height (Rht) Alleles Affect Wheat Grain Quality

    PubMed Central

    Casebow, Richard; Hadley, Caroline; Uppal, Rajneet; Addisu, Molla; Loddo, Stefano; Kowalski, Ania; Griffiths, Simon; Gooding, Mike

    2016-01-01

    The effects of dwarfing alleles (reduced height, Rht) in near isogenic lines on wheat grain quality are characterised in field experiments and related to effects on crop height, grain yield and GA-sensitivity. Alleles included those that conferred GA-insensitivity (Rht-B1b, Rht-B1c, Rht-D1b, Rht-D1c) as well as those that retained GA-sensitivity (rht(tall), Rht8, Rht8 + Ppd-D1a, Rht12). Full characterisation was facilitated by including factors with which the effects of Rht alleles are known to interact for grain yield (i.e. system, [conventional or organic]; tillage intensity [plough-based, minimum or zero]; nitrogen fertilizer level [0–450 kg N/ha]; and genetic backgrounds varying in height [cvs Maris Huntsman, Maris Widgeon, and Mercia]. Allele effects on mean grain weight and grain specific weight were positively associated with final crop height: dwarfing reduced these quality criteria irrespective of crop management or GA-sensitivity. In all but two experiments the effects of dwarfing alleles on grain nitrogen and sulphur concentrations were closely and negatively related to effects on grain yield, e.g. a quadratic relationship between grain yield and crop height manipulated by the GA-insensitive alleles was mirrored by quadratic relationships for nitrogen and sulphur concentrations: the highest yields and most dilute concentrations occurred around 80cm. In one of the two exceptional experiments the GA-insensitive Rht-B1b and Rht-B1c significantly (P<0.05) reduced grain nitrogen concentration in the absence of an effect on yield, and in the remaining experiment the GA-sensitive Rht8 significantly reduced both grain yield and grain nitrogen concentration simultaneously. When Rht alleles diluted grain nitrogen concentration, N:S ratios and SDS-sedimentation volumes were often improved. Hagberg falling number (HFN) was negatively related to crop height but benefits from dwarfing were only seen for GA-insensitive alleles. For HFN, therefore, there was the

  8. Reduced Height (Rht) Alleles Affect Wheat Grain Quality.

    PubMed

    Casebow, Richard; Hadley, Caroline; Uppal, Rajneet; Addisu, Molla; Loddo, Stefano; Kowalski, Ania; Griffiths, Simon; Gooding, Mike

    2016-01-01

    The effects of dwarfing alleles (reduced height, Rht) in near isogenic lines on wheat grain quality are characterised in field experiments and related to effects on crop height, grain yield and GA-sensitivity. Alleles included those that conferred GA-insensitivity (Rht-B1b, Rht-B1c, Rht-D1b, Rht-D1c) as well as those that retained GA-sensitivity (rht(tall), Rht8, Rht8 + Ppd-D1a, Rht12). Full characterisation was facilitated by including factors with which the effects of Rht alleles are known to interact for grain yield (i.e. system, [conventional or organic]; tillage intensity [plough-based, minimum or zero]; nitrogen fertilizer level [0-450 kg N/ha]; and genetic backgrounds varying in height [cvs Maris Huntsman, Maris Widgeon, and Mercia]. Allele effects on mean grain weight and grain specific weight were positively associated with final crop height: dwarfing reduced these quality criteria irrespective of crop management or GA-sensitivity. In all but two experiments the effects of dwarfing alleles on grain nitrogen and sulphur concentrations were closely and negatively related to effects on grain yield, e.g. a quadratic relationship between grain yield and crop height manipulated by the GA-insensitive alleles was mirrored by quadratic relationships for nitrogen and sulphur concentrations: the highest yields and most dilute concentrations occurred around 80cm. In one of the two exceptional experiments the GA-insensitive Rht-B1b and Rht-B1c significantly (P<0.05) reduced grain nitrogen concentration in the absence of an effect on yield, and in the remaining experiment the GA-sensitive Rht8 significantly reduced both grain yield and grain nitrogen concentration simultaneously. When Rht alleles diluted grain nitrogen concentration, N:S ratios and SDS-sedimentation volumes were often improved. Hagberg falling number (HFN) was negatively related to crop height but benefits from dwarfing were only seen for GA-insensitive alleles. For HFN, therefore, there was the

  9. PTPN22 R620W minor allele is a genetic risk factor for giant cell arteritis.

    PubMed

    Lester, Susan; Hewitt, Alex W; Ruediger, Carlee D; Bradbury, Linda; De Smit, Elisabeth; Wiese, Michael D; Black, Rachel; Harrison, Andrew; Jones, Graeme; Littlejohn, Geoffrey O; Merriman, Tony R; Shenstone, Bain; Smith, Malcolm D; Rischmueller, Maureen; Brown, Matthew A; Hill, Catherine L

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is one of the commonest forms of vasculitis in the elderly, and may result in blindness and stroke. The pathogenesis of GCA is not understood, although environmental, infectious and genetic risk factors are implicated. One gene of interest is PTPN22, encoding lymphoid protein tyrosine phosphatase (Lyp), expressed exclusively in immune cells, which is proposed to be an 'archetypal non-HLA autoimmunity gene'. The minor allele of a functional PTPN22 single nucleotide polymorphism (rs2476601, R620W), which disrupts an interaction motif in the protein, was originally reported to be associated with biopsy-proven GCA in Spanish patients, with supporting data from three replicate Northern European studies. Recently, this observation was extended with additional patients and controls, and studies encompassing European, Scandinavian, UK and American patients. The aim of our study was to determine the association between PTPN22 rs2476601 (R620W) and biopsy-proven GCA in an Australian case cohort. PMID:27110387

  10. PTPN22 R620W minor allele is a genetic risk factor for giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Susan; Hewitt, Alex W; Ruediger, Carlee D; Bradbury, Linda; De Smit, Elisabeth; Wiese, Michael D; Black, Rachel; Harrison, Andrew; Jones, Graeme; Littlejohn, Geoffrey O; Merriman, Tony R; Shenstone, Bain; Smith, Malcolm D; Rischmueller, Maureen; Brown, Matthew A; Hill, Catherine L

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is one of the commonest forms of vasculitis in the elderly, and may result in blindness and stroke. The pathogenesis of GCA is not understood, although environmental, infectious and genetic risk factors are implicated. One gene of interest is PTPN22, encoding lymphoid protein tyrosine phosphatase (Lyp), expressed exclusively in immune cells, which is proposed to be an ‘archetypal non-HLA autoimmunity gene’. The minor allele of a functional PTPN22 single nucleotide polymorphism (rs2476601, R620W), which disrupts an interaction motif in the protein, was originally reported to be associated with biopsy-proven GCA in Spanish patients, with supporting data from three replicate Northern European studies. Recently, this observation was extended with additional patients and controls, and studies encompassing European, Scandinavian, UK and American patients. The aim of our study was to determine the association between PTPN22 rs2476601 (R620W) and biopsy-proven GCA in an Australian case cohort. PMID:27110387

  11. Using expected allele number as objective function to design between and within breed conservation of farm animal biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Simianer, H

    2005-06-01

    Conservation of genetic diversity in farm animal species can be achieved by preventing extinction of breeds and by reducing genetic drift within breeds. It is suggested to use the expected number of alleles segregating in the species after a given time period as objective function in the design of conservation strategies. A formal approach is presented to predict this quantity based on marker information, accounting for extinction probability of breeds and effective population size within breeds as the major component of genetic drift. Based on this model, relative efficiency of different strategies of diversity conservation can be quantified. Formulas are given to derive the marginal expected number of alleles with respect to genetic drift within population and extinction probability, respectively. The suggested approach is illustrated with an example of 13 European cattle breeds. With the assumed parameters, drift is shown to be the major force leading to loss of alleles, and different breeds are prioritized for activities to reduce risk of extinction and for measures to reduce genetic drift, respectively. Although different aspects of the model need to be further refined, the suggested methodology provides a general and flexible tool to derive the optimum conservation strategy in various scenarios. PMID:16130469

  12. Clonal Ordering of 17p and 5q Allelic Losses in Barrett Dysplasia and Adenocarcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blount, Patricia L.; Meltzer, Stephen J.; Yin, Jing; Huang, Ying; Krasna, Mark J.; Reid, Brian J.

    1993-04-01

    Both 17p and 5q allelic losses appear to be involved in the pathogenesis or progression of many human solid tumors. In colon carcinogenesis, there is strong evidence that the targets of the 17p and 5q allelic losses are TP53, the gene encoding p53, and APC, respectively. It is widely accepted that 5q allelic losses precede 17p allelic losses in the progression to colonic carcinoma. The data, however, supporting this proposed order are largely based on the prevalence of 17p and 5q allelic losses in adenomas and unrelated adenocarcinomas from different patients. We investigated the order in which 17p and 5q allelic losses developed during neoplastic progression in Barrett esophagus by evaluating multiple aneuploid cell populations from the same patient. Using DNA content flow cytometric cell sorting and polymerase chain reaction, 38 aneuploid cell populations from 14 patients with Barrett esophagus who had high grade dysplasia, cancer or both were evaluated for 17p and 5q allelic losses. 17p allelic losses preceded 5q allelic losses in 7 patients, both 17p and 5q allelic losses were present in all aneuploid populations of 4 patients, and only 17p (without 5q) allelic losses were present in the aneuploid populations of 3 patients. In no patient did we find that a 5q allelic loss preceded a 17p allelic loss. Our data suggest that 17p allelic losses typically occur before 5q allelic losses during neoplastic progression in Barrett esophagus.

  13. Distribution of the FYBES and RHCE*ce(733C>G) alleles in an Argentinean population: Implications for transfusion medicine

    PubMed Central

    Cotorruelo, Carlos M; Fiori, Silvana V; Borrás, Silvia E García; Racca, Liliana L; Biondi, Claudia S; Racca, Amelia L

    2008-01-01

    Background The understanding of the molecular bases of blood groups makes possible the identification of red cell antigens and antibodies using molecular approaches, especially when haemagglutination is of limited value. The practical application of DNA typing requires the analysis of the polymorphism and allele distribution of the blood group genes under study since genetic variability was observed among different ethnic groups. Urban populations of Argentina are assumed to have a white Caucasian European genetic component. However, historical and biological data account for the influence of other ethnic groups. In this work we analyse FY and RH blood group alleles attributed to Africans and that could have clinical implications in the immune destruction of erythrocytes. Methods We studied 103 white trios (father, mother and child, 309 samples) from the city of Rosario by allele specific PCRs and serological methods. The data obtained were analysed with the appropriate statistical test considering only fathers and mothers (n = 206). Results We found the presence of the FY*BES and RHCE*ce(733C>G) alleles and an elevated frequency (0.0583) for the Dce haplotype. The number of individuals with a concomitant occurrence of both alleles was significantly higher than that expected by chance. We found that 4.68% of the present gene pool is composed by alleles primarily associated with African ancestry and about 10% of the individuals carried at least one RH or FY allele that is predominantly observed among African populations. Thirteen percent of Fy(b-) subjects were FY*A/FY*BES. Conclusion Taken together, the results suggest that admixture events between African slaves and European immigrants at the beginning of the 20th century made the physical characteristics of black Africans to be invisible nowadays. Considering that it was a recent historical event, the FY*BES and RHCE*ce(733C>G) alleles did not have time to become widespread but remain concentrated within families

  14. Power Laws for Heavy-Tailed Distributions: Modeling Allele and Haplotype Diversity for the National Marrow Donor Program

    PubMed Central

    Gragert, Loren; Maiers, Martin; Chatterjee, Ansu; Albrecht, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Measures of allele and haplotype diversity, which are fundamental properties in population genetics, often follow heavy tailed distributions. These measures are of particular interest in the field of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Donor/Recipient suitability for HSCT is determined by Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) similarity. Match predictions rely upon a precise description of HLA diversity, yet classical estimates are inaccurate given the heavy-tailed nature of the distribution. This directly affects HSCT matching and diversity measures in broader fields such as species richness. We, therefore, have developed a power-law based estimator to measure allele and haplotype diversity that accommodates heavy tails using the concepts of regular variation and occupancy distributions. Application of our estimator to 6.59 million donors in the Be The Match Registry revealed that haplotypes follow a heavy tail distribution across all ethnicities: for example, 44.65% of the European American haplotypes are represented by only 1 individual. Indeed, our discovery rate of all U.S. European American haplotypes is estimated at 23.45% based upon sampling 3.97% of the population, leaving a large number of unobserved haplotypes. Population coverage, however, is much higher at 99.4% given that 90% of European Americans carry one of the 4.5% most frequent haplotypes. Alleles were found to be less diverse suggesting the current registry represents most alleles in the population. Thus, for HSCT registries, haplotype discovery will remain high with continued recruitment to a very deep level of sampling, but population coverage will not. Finally, we compared the convergence of our power-law versus classical diversity estimators such as Capture recapture, Chao, ACE and Jackknife methods. When fit to the haplotype data, our estimator displayed favorable properties in terms of convergence (with respect to sampling depth) and accuracy (with respect to diversity estimates). This

  15. Power laws for heavy-tailed distributions: modeling allele and haplotype diversity for the national marrow donor program.

    PubMed

    Slater, Noa; Louzoun, Yoram; Gragert, Loren; Maiers, Martin; Chatterjee, Ansu; Albrecht, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Measures of allele and haplotype diversity, which are fundamental properties in population genetics, often follow heavy tailed distributions. These measures are of particular interest in the field of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Donor/Recipient suitability for HSCT is determined by Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) similarity. Match predictions rely upon a precise description of HLA diversity, yet classical estimates are inaccurate given the heavy-tailed nature of the distribution. This directly affects HSCT matching and diversity measures in broader fields such as species richness. We, therefore, have developed a power-law based estimator to measure allele and haplotype diversity that accommodates heavy tails using the concepts of regular variation and occupancy distributions. Application of our estimator to 6.59 million donors in the Be The Match Registry revealed that haplotypes follow a heavy tail distribution across all ethnicities: for example, 44.65% of the European American haplotypes are represented by only 1 individual. Indeed, our discovery rate of all U.S. European American haplotypes is estimated at 23.45% based upon sampling 3.97% of the population, leaving a large number of unobserved haplotypes. Population coverage, however, is much higher at 99.4% given that 90% of European Americans carry one of the 4.5% most frequent haplotypes. Alleles were found to be less diverse suggesting the current registry represents most alleles in the population. Thus, for HSCT registries, haplotype discovery will remain high with continued recruitment to a very deep level of sampling, but population coverage will not. Finally, we compared the convergence of our power-law versus classical diversity estimators such as Capture recapture, Chao, ACE and Jackknife methods. When fit to the haplotype data, our estimator displayed favorable properties in terms of convergence (with respect to sampling depth) and accuracy (with respect to diversity estimates). This

  16. Registration of two allelic erect leaf mutants of sorghum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two allelic sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] erect leaf (erl) mutants were isolated from an Annotated Individually-pedigreed Mutagenized Sorghum (AIMS) mutant library developed at the Plant Stress and Germplasm Development Unit, at Lubbock, Texas. The two mutants, erl1-1 and erl1-2, were isol...

  17. Efficient nonmeiotic allele introgression in livestock using custom endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wenfang; Carlson, Daniel F.; Lancto, Cheryl A.; Garbe, John R.; Webster, Dennis A.; Hackett, Perry B.; Fahrenkrug, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    We have expanded the livestock gene editing toolbox to include transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nuclease (TALEN)- and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9-stimulated homology-directed repair (HDR) using plasmid, rAAV, and oligonucleotide templates. Toward the genetic dehorning of dairy cattle, we introgressed a bovine POLLED allele into horned bull fibroblasts. Single nucleotide alterations or small indels were introduced into 14 additional genes in pig, goat, and cattle fibroblasts using TALEN mRNA and oligonucleotide transfection with efficiencies of 10–50% in populations. Several of the chosen edits mimic naturally occurring performance-enhancing or disease- resistance alleles, including alteration of single base pairs. Up to 70% of the fibroblast colonies propagated without selection harbored the intended edits, of which more than one-half were homozygous. Edited fibroblasts were used to generate pigs with knockout alleles in the DAZL and APC genes to model infertility and colon cancer. Our methods enable unprecedented meiosis-free intraspecific and interspecific introgression of select alleles in livestock for agricultural and biomedical applications. PMID:24014591

  18. Generation of mice with a conditional Lbh null allele.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Linsey E; Briegel, Karoline J

    2013-07-01

    Limb bud and heart (LBH) is a developmentally expressed, tissue-specific transcription cofactor in vertebrates that acts in the WNT signaling pathway, a genetic program critical for embryogenesis and adult tissue homeostasis. Aberrant gain-of-function of LBH is implicated in both human congenital disease and cancer. The normal physiological function of LBH has remained elusive owing to a lack of genetic loss-of-function models. Here, we have generated mice with a conditional null allele of Lbh by flanking exon 2 with loxP sites (Lbh(flox)). Homozygous Lbh(flox) and Lbh(loxP) mice, in which the Neo cassette was removed through FLPe-mediated recombination, were viable and fertile, indicating that these conditional Lbh alleles are fully functional. Lbh(loxP) mice were then crossed with a Rosa26-Cre line, resulting in ubiquitous deletion of exon 2 and abolishment of LBH protein expression. Mice homozygous for the Lbh null allele (Lbh(Δ)(2)) displayed normal embryonic development and postnatal growth with morphologies indistinguishable from wild-type littermates. However, mammary gland development, which occurs primarily after birth, was perturbed. Thus, the conditional Lbh allele will be a valuable tool to uncover the currently unknown tissue-specific roles of LBH in postnatal development and disease. PMID:23495064

  19. MHC class II DR allelic diversity in bighorn sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that decreased diversity and/or unique polymorphisms in MHC class II alleles of bighorn sheep (BHS, Ovis canadensis) are responsible for lower titer of antibodies against Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin, in comparison to domestic sheep (DS, Ovis aries). To test this hypothesis, DRA...

  20. Multifragment alleles in DNA fingerprints of the parrot, Amazona ventralis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, M.K.; White, B.N.

    1991-01-01

    Human DNA probes that identify variable numbers of tandem repeat loci are being used to generate DNA fingerprints in many animal and plant species. In most species the majority of the sc rable autoradiographic bands of the DNA fingerprint represent alleles from numerous unlinked loci. This study was initiated to use DNA fingerprints to determine the amount of band-sharing among captive Hispaniolan parrots (Amazona ventralis) with known genetic relationships. This would form the data base to examine DNA fingerprints of the closely related and endangered Puerto Rican parrot (A. vittata) and to estimate the degree of inbreeding in the relic population. We found by segregation analysis of the bands scored in the DNA fingerprints of the Hispaniolan parrots that there may be as few as two to five loci identified by the human 33.15 probe. Furthermore, at one locus we identified seven alleles, one of which is represented by as many as 19 cosegregating bands. It is unknown how common multiband alleles might be in natural populations, and their existence will cause problems in the assessment of relatedness by band-sharing analysis. We believe, therefore, that a pedigree analysis should be included in all DNA fingerprinting studies, where possible, in order to estimate the number of loci identified by a minisatellite DNA probe and to examine the nature of their alleles.

  1. Functional Allelic Variation at Key Photoperiod Response QTL in Maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical maize represents a valuable genetic resource containing unique alleles not present in elite temperate maize. The strong delay in flowering in response to long daylength photoperiods exhibited by most tropical maize hinders its incorporation into temperate maize breeding programs. We tested ...

  2. RECOVERY OF EXOTIC ALLELES IN ENHANCED TROPICAL YELLOW GERMPLASM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enhancement of overall diversity levels and the incorporation of new favorable traits are major benefits of using exotic germplasm in elite breeding programs. Agronomic deficiencies and poor adaptation often limits use of exotic germplasm in plant breeding programs. To introgress exotic alleles into...

  3. PUTATIVE ALLELES FOR INCREASED YIELD FROM SOYBEAN PLANT INTRODUCTIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving seed yield of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] cultivars is an important goal of breeding programs. The objective of this study was to evaluate two soybean plant introductions (PIs) as sources of alleles for the enhancement of seed yield in North American cultivars. A soybean population ...

  4. Distribution of forensic marker allelic frequencies in Pernambuco, Northestern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, S M; Souza, C A; Rabelo, K C N; Souza, P R E; Moura, R R; Oliveira, T C; Crovella, S

    2015-01-01

    Pernambuco is one of the 27 federal units of Brazil, ranking seventh in the number of inhabitants. We examined the allele frequencies of 13 short tandem repeat loci (CFS1PO, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D21S11, FGA, TH01, vWA, and TPOX), the minimum recommended by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and commonly used in forensic genetics laboratories in Brazil, in a sample of 609 unrelated individuals from all geographic regions of Pernambuco. The allele frequencies ranged from 5 to 47.2%. No significant differences for any loci analyzed were observed compared with other publications in other various regions of Brazil. Most of the markers observed were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The occurrence of the allele 47.2 (locus FGA) and alleles 35.1 and 39 (locus D21S11), also described in a single study of the Brazilian population, was observed. The other forensic parameters analyzed (matching probability, power of discrimination, polymorphic information content, paternity exclusion, complement factor I, observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity) indicated that the studied markers are very informative for human forensic identification purposes in the Pernambuco population. PMID:25966202

  5. Natural allelic variations in highly polyploidy Saccharum complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) as important sugar and biofuel crop are highly polypoid with complex genomes. A large amount of natural phenotypic variation exists in sugarcane germplasm. Understanding its allelic variance has been challenging but is a critical foundation for discovery of the genomic seq...

  6. Tissue-specific patterns of allelically-skewed DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Marzi, Sarah J.; Meaburn, Emma L.; Dempster, Emma L.; Lunnon, Katie; Paya-Cano, Jose L.; Smith, Rebecca G.; Volta, Manuela; Troakes, Claire; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.; Mill, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT While DNA methylation is usually thought to be symmetrical across both alleles, there are some notable exceptions. Genomic imprinting and X chromosome inactivation are two well-studied sources of allele-specific methylation (ASM), but recent research has indicated a more complex pattern in which genotypic variation can be associated with allelically-skewed DNA methylation in cis. Given the known heterogeneity of DNA methylation across tissues and cell types we explored inter- and intra-individual variation in ASM across several regions of the human brain and whole blood from multiple individuals. Consistent with previous studies, we find widespread ASM with > 4% of the ∼220,000 loci interrogated showing evidence of allelically-skewed DNA methylation. We identify ASM flanking known imprinted regions, and show that ASM sites are enriched in DNase I hypersensitivity sites and often located in an extended genomic context of intermediate DNA methylation. We also detect examples of genotype-driven ASM, some of which are tissue-specific. These findings contribute to our understanding of the nature of differential DNA methylation across tissues and have important implications for genetic studies of complex disease. As a resource to the community, ASM patterns across each of the tissues studied are available in a searchable online database: http://epigenetics.essex.ac.uk/ASMBrainBlood. PMID:26786711

  7. Further evidence for allelic heterogeneity in Hartnup disorder.

    PubMed

    Azmanov, Dimitar N; Kowalczuk, Sonja; Rodgers, Helen; Auray-Blais, Christiane; Giguère, Robert; Rasko, John E J; Bröer, Stefan; Cavanaugh, Juleen A

    2008-10-01

    Hartnup disorder is an autosomal recessive impairment of amino acid transport in kidney and intestine. Mutations in SLC6A19 have been shown to cosegregate with the disease in the predicted recessive manner; however, in two previous studies (Seow et al., Nat Genet 2004;36:1003-1007; Kleta et al., Nat Genet 2004;36:999-1002), not all causative alleles were identified in all affected individuals, raising the possibility that other genes may contribute to Hartnup disorder. We have now investigated six newly acquired families of Australian and Canadian (Province of Quebec) origin and resequenced the entire coding region of SLC6A19 in families with only a single disease allele identified. We also studied one American family in whom no mutations had been identified in a previous study (Kleta et al., Nat Genet 2004;36:999-1002). We have identified seven novel mutations in SLC6A19 that show functional obliteration of the protein in vitro, explaining Hartnup disorder in all reported families so far. We demonstrate that Hartnup disorder is allelically heterogeneous with two mutated SLC6A19 alleles, whether identical or not, necessary for manifestation of the characteristic aminoaciduria in affected individuals. This study resolves the previous hypothesis that other genes contribute to the Hartnup phenotype. PMID:18484095

  8. Recovery of Exotic Alleles in Enhanced Tropical Yellow Germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enhancement of overall diversity levels and the incorporation of new favorable traits are major benefits of using exotic germplasm in elite breeding programs. Agronomic deficiencies and poor adaptation often limits use of exotic germplasm in plant breeding programs. To introgress exotic alleles into...

  9. Estimating the age of alleles by use of intraallelic variability

    SciTech Connect

    Slatkin, M.; Rannala, B.

    1997-02-01

    A method is presented for estimating the age of an allele by use of its frequency and the extent of variation among different copies. The method uses the joint distribution of the number of copies in a population sample and the coalescence times of the intraallelic gene genealogy conditioned on the number of copies. The linear birth-death process is used to approximate the dynamics of a rare allele in a finite population. A maximum-likelihood estimate of the age of the allele is obtained by Monte Carlo integration over the coalescence times. The method is applied to two alleles at the cystic fibrosis (CFTR) locus, {Delta}F508 and G542X, for which intraallelic variability at three intronic microsatellite loci has been examined. Our results indicate that G542X is somewhat older than {Delta}F508. Although absolute estimates depend on the mutation rates at the microsatellite loci, our results support the hypothesis that {Delta}F508 arose <500 generations ({approx}10,000 years) ago. 32 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Increase in NRAS mutant allele percentage during metastatic melanoma progression.

    PubMed

    Funck-Brentano, Elisa; Hélias-Rodzewicz, Zofia; Longvert, Christine; Mokhtari, Karima; Saiag, Philippe; Emile, Jean-François

    2016-06-01

    One-fifth of cutaneous melanomas have dominant gain-of-function mutations of the NRAS oncogene. We report the first two cases of increasing NRAS mutant allele frequency in melanoma metastases and show that the chromosomal mechanism of this homozygosity is an increased polysomy of chromosome 1. We observed an increase in NRAS mutant allele percentage (NRAS-MA%) in the metastatic melanoma progression from 2 patients with melanomas harbouring a NRAS mutation (p.Q61K in case 1 and p.Q61R in case 2). In case 1, we observed a NRAS-MA% increase from 18% within the first metastatic node to 81%, 92% and 85% respectively in the three subsequent metastases: lymph node, brain and subcutaneous metastases biopsied 1, 6 and 17 months, respectively, after the initial lymph node biopsy. In case 2, we observed an increase in NRAS-MA% from 40% within the primary melanoma to 63% within the metastatic lymph node. FISH analysis showed the same results in both cases: a frequent polysomy of chromosome 1 in metastasis samples with NRAS mutant allele percentage >60%, while most cells were disomic in the samples with well-balanced heterozygous mutations. The percentage of NRAS mutant allele may increase during metastatic progression and may be associated with chromosomal instability. Further studies are needed to evaluate the prognostic impact of the NRAS homozygous status and/or polyploidy in metastatic cutaneous melanomas. PMID:26990546

  11. Interethnic variation of CYP2C19 alleles, 'predicted' phenotypes and 'measured' metabolic phenotypes across world populations.

    PubMed

    Fricke-Galindo, I; Céspedes-Garro, C; Rodrigues-Soares, F; Naranjo, M E G; Delgado, Á; de Andrés, F; López-López, M; Peñas-Lledó, E; LLerena, A

    2016-04-01

    The present study evaluates the worldwide frequency distribution of CYP2C19 alleles and CYP2C19 metabolic phenotypes ('predicted' from genotypes and 'measured' with a probe drug) among healthy volunteers from different ethnic groups and geographic regions, as well as the relationship between the 'predicted' and 'measured' CYP2C19 metabolic phenotypes. A total of 52 181 healthy volunteers were studied within 138 selected original research papers. CYP2C19*17 was 42- and 24-fold more frequent in Mediterranean-South Europeans and Middle Easterns than in East Asians (P<0.001, in both cases). Contrarily, CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C19*3 alleles were more frequent in East Asians (30.26% and 6.89%, respectively), and even a twofold higher frequency of these alleles was found in Native populations from Oceania (61.30% and 14.42%, respectively; P<0.001, in all cases), which may be a consequence of genetic drift process in the Pacific Islands. Regarding CYP2C19 metabolic phenotype, poor metabolizers (PMs) were more frequent among Asians than in Europeans, contrarily to the phenomenon reported for CYP2D6. A correlation has been found between the frequencies of CYP2C19 poor metabolism 'predicted' from CYP2C19 genotypes (gPMs) and the poor metabolic phenotype 'measured' with a probe drug (mPMs) when subjects are either classified by ethnicity (r=0.94, P<0.001) or geographic region (r=0.99, P=0.002). Nevertheless, further research is needed in African and Asian populations, which are under-represented, and additional CYP2C19 variants and the 'measured' phenotype should be studied. PMID:26503820

  12. [Biobanks European infrastructure].

    PubMed

    Kinkorová, Judita; Topolčan, Ondřej

    2016-01-01

    Biobanks are structured repositories of human tissue samples connected with specific information. They became an integral part of personalized medicine in the new millennium. At the European research area biobanks are isolated not well coordinated and connected to the network. European commission supports European infrastructure BBMRI-ERIC (Biobanks and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure European Research Infrastructure Consortium), consortium of 54 members with more than 225 associated organizations, largely biobanks from over 30 countries. The aim is to support biomedical research using stored samples. Czech Republic is a member of the consortium as a national node BBMRI_CZ, consisting of five partners. PMID:27256149

  13. The CFTR Met 470 Allele Is Associated with Lower Birth Rates in Fertile Men from a Population Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Kosova, Gülüm; Pickrell, Joseph K.; Kelley, Joanna L.; McArdle, Patrick F.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Abney, Mark; Ober, Carole

    2010-01-01

    Although little is known about the role of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene in reproductive physiology, numerous variants in this gene have been implicated in etiology of male infertility due to congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD). Here, we studied the fertility effects of three CBAVD–associated CFTR polymorphisms, the (TG)m and polyT repeat polymorphisms in intron 8 and Met470Val in exon 10, in healthy men of European descent. Homozygosity for the Met470 allele was associated with lower birth rates, defined as the number of births per year of marriage (P = 0.0029). The Met470Val locus explained 4.36% of the phenotypic variance in birth rate, and men homozygous for the Met470 allele had 0.56 fewer children on average compared to Val470 carrier men. The derived Val470 allele occurs at high frequencies in non-African populations (allele frequency  = 0.51 in HapMap CEU), whereas it is very rare in African population (Fst  = 0.43 between HapMap CEU and YRI). In addition, haplotypes bearing Val470 show a lack of genetic diversity and are thus longer than haplotypes bearing Met470 (measured by an integrated haplotype score [iHS] of −1.93 in HapMap CEU). The fraction of SNPs in the HapMap Phase2 data set with more extreme Fst and iHS measures is 0.003, consistent with a selective sweep outside of Africa. The fertility advantage conferred by Val470 relative to Met470 may provide a selective mechanism for these population genetic observations. PMID:20532200

  14. Nomenclature for alleles of the thiopurine methyltransferase gene.

    PubMed

    Appell, Malin L; Berg, Jonathan; Duley, John; Evans, William E; Kennedy, Martin A; Lennard, Lynne; Marinaki, Tony; McLeod, Howard L; Relling, Mary V; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias; Weinshilboum, Richard; Yeoh, Allen E J; McDonagh, Ellen M; Hebert, Joan M; Klein, Teri E; Coulthard, Sally A

    2013-04-01

    The drug-metabolizing enzyme thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) has become one of the best examples of pharmacogenomics to be translated into routine clinical practice. TPMT metabolizes the thiopurines 6-mercaptopurine, 6-thioguanine, and azathioprine, drugs that are widely used for treatment of acute leukemias, inflammatory bowel diseases, and other disorders of immune regulation. Since the discovery of genetic polymorphisms in the TPMT gene, many sequence variants that cause a decreased enzyme activity have been identified and characterized. Increasingly, to optimize dose, pretreatment determination of TPMT status before commencing thiopurine therapy is now routine in many countries. Novel TPMT sequence variants are currently numbered sequentially using PubMed as a source of information; however, this has caused some problems as exemplified by two instances in which authors' articles appeared on PubMed at the same time, resulting in the same allele numbers given to different polymorphisms. Hence, there is an urgent need to establish an order and consensus to the numbering of known and novel TPMT sequence variants. To address this problem, a TPMT nomenclature committee was formed in 2010, to define the nomenclature and numbering of novel variants for the TPMT gene. A website (http://www.imh.liu.se/tpmtalleles) serves as a platform for this work. Researchers are encouraged to submit novel TPMT alleles to the committee for designation and reservation of unique allele numbers. The committee has decided to renumber two alleles: nucleotide position 106 (G>A) from TPMT*24 to TPMT*30 and position 611 (T>C, rs79901429) from TPMT*28 to TPMT*31. Nomenclature for all other known alleles remains unchanged. PMID:23407052

  15. KIR2DL2/2DL3-E35 alleles are functionally stronger than -Q35 alleles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bari, Rafijul; Thapa, Rajoo; Bao, Ju; Li, Ying; Zheng, Jie; Leung, Wing

    2016-03-01

    KIR2DL2 and KIR2DL3 segregate as alleles of a single locus in the centromeric motif of the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene family. Although KIR2DL2/L3 polymorphism is known to be associated with many human diseases and is an important factor for donor selection in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the molecular determinant of functional diversity among various alleles is unclear. In this study we found that KIR2DL2/L3 with glutamic acid at position 35 (E35) are functionally stronger than those with glutamine at the same position (Q35). Cytotoxicity assay showed that NK cells from HLA-C1 positive donors with KIR2DL2/L3-E35 could kill more target cells lacking their ligands than NK cells with the weaker -Q35 alleles, indicating better licensing of KIR2DL2/L3+ NK cells with the stronger alleles. Molecular modeling analysis reveals that the glutamic acid, which is negatively charged, interacts with positively charged histidine located at position 55, thereby stabilizing KIR2DL2/L3 dimer and reducing entropy loss when KIR2DL2/3 binds to HLA-C ligand. The results of this study will be important for future studies of KIR2DL2/L3-associated diseases as well as for donor selection in allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

  16. KIR2DL2/2DL3-E35 alleles are functionally stronger than -Q35 alleles

    PubMed Central

    Bari, Rafijul; Thapa, Rajoo; Bao, Ju; Li, Ying; Zheng, Jie; Leung, Wing

    2016-01-01

    KIR2DL2 and KIR2DL3 segregate as alleles of a single locus in the centromeric motif of the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene family. Although KIR2DL2/L3 polymorphism is known to be associated with many human diseases and is an important factor for donor selection in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the molecular determinant of functional diversity among various alleles is unclear. In this study we found that KIR2DL2/L3 with glutamic acid at position 35 (E35) are functionally stronger than those with glutamine at the same position (Q35). Cytotoxicity assay showed that NK cells from HLA-C1 positive donors with KIR2DL2/L3-E35 could kill more target cells lacking their ligands than NK cells with the weaker -Q35 alleles, indicating better licensing of KIR2DL2/L3+ NK cells with the stronger alleles. Molecular modeling analysis reveals that the glutamic acid, which is negatively charged, interacts with positively charged histidine located at position 55, thereby stabilizing KIR2DL2/L3 dimer and reducing entropy loss when KIR2DL2/3 binds to HLA-C ligand. The results of this study will be important for future studies of KIR2DL2/L3-associated diseases as well as for donor selection in allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:27030405

  17. Allelic divergence and cultivar-specific SSR alleles revealed by capillary electrophoresis using fluorescence-labeled SSR markers in sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Though sugarcane cultivars (Saccharum spp. hybrids) are complex aneu-polyploid hybrids, genetic evaluation and tracking of clone- or cultivar-specific alleles become possible due to capillary electrophoregrams (CE) using fluorescence-labeled SSR primer pairs. Twenty-four sugarcane cultivars, 12 each...

  18. Hemochromatosis: Niche Construction and the Genetic Domino Effect in the European Neolithic.

    PubMed

    McCullough, John M; Heath, Kathleen M; Smith, Alexis M

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is caused by a potentially lethal recessive gene (HFE, C282Y allele) that increases iron absorption and reaches polymorphic levels in northern European populations. Because persons carrying the allele absorb iron more readily than do noncarriers, it has often been suggested that HFE is an adaptation to anemia. We hypothesize positive selection for HFE began during or after the European Neolithic with the adoption of an iron-deficient high-grain and dairying diet and consequent anemia, a finding confirmed in Neolithic and later European skeletons. HFE frequency compared with rate of lactase persistence in Eurasia yields a positive linear correlation coefficient of 0.86. We suggest this is just one of many mutations that became common after the adoption of agriculture. PMID:26416321

  19. A European perspective on maize history.

    PubMed

    Tenaillon, Maud Irène; Charcosset, Alain

    2011-03-01

    Maize was domesticated at least 8700 years ago in the highlands of Mexico. Genome-wide studies have greatly contributed to shed light into the diffusion of maize through the Americas from its center of origin. Also the presence of two European introductions in southern and northern Europe is now established. Such a spread was accompanied by an extreme diversification, and adaptation to the long days and low temperatures of temperate climates has been a key step in maize evolution. Linkage mapping and association mapping have successfully led to the identification of a handful set of the genetic factors that have contributed to maize adaptation, opening the way to new discoveries. Ultimately, these alleles will contribute to sustain breeding efforts to meet the new challenges raised by the evolution of mankind. PMID:21377617

  20. Transvection in the Drosophila Ultrabithorax Gene: A Cbx(1) Mutant Allele Induces Ectopic Expression of a Normal Allele in Trans

    PubMed Central

    Castelli-Gair, J. E.; Micol, J. L.; Garcia-Bellido, A.

    1990-01-01

    In wild-type Drosophila melanogaster larvae, the Ultrabithorax (Ubx) gene is expressed in the haltere imaginal discs but not in the majority of cells of the wing imaginal discs. Ectopic expression of the Ubx gene in wing discs can be elicited by the presence of Contrabithorax (Cbx) gain-of-function alleles of the Ubx gene or by loss-of-function mutations in Polycomb (Pc) or in other trans-regulatory genes which behave as repressors of Ubx gene activity. Several Ubx loss-of-function alleles cause the absence of detectable Ubx proteins (UBX) or the presence of truncated UBX lacking the homeodomain. We have compared adult wing phenotypes with larval wing disc UBX patterns in genotypes involving double mutant chromosomes carrying in cis one of those Ubx mutations and the Cbx(1) mutation. We show that such double mutant genes are (1) active in the same cells in which the single mutant Cbx(1) is expressed, although they are unable to yield functional proteins, and (2) able to induce ectopic expression of a normal homologous Ubx allele in a part of the cells in which the single mutant Cbx(1) is active. That induction is conditional upon pairing of the homologous chromosomes (the phenomenon known as transvection), and it is not mediated by UBX. Depletion of Pc gene products by Pc(3) mutation strongly enhances the induction phenomenon, as shown by (1) the increase of the number of wing disc cells in which induction of the homologous allele is detectable, and (2) the induction of not only a paired normal allele but also an unpaired one. PMID:2121595

  1. European auxiliary propulsion, 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holcomb, L. B.

    1972-01-01

    The chemical and electric auxiliary propulsion technology of the United Kingdom, France, and West Germany is discussed in detail, and the propulsion technology achievements of Italy, India, Japan, and Russia are reviewed. A comparison is presented of Shell 405 catalyst and a European spontaneous hydrazine catalyst called CNESRO I. Finally, conclusions are drawn regarding future trends in European auxiliary propulsion technology development.

  2. A commonly carried allele of the obesity-related FTO gene is associated with reduced brain volume in the healthy elderly

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jason L.; Hua, Xue; Lee, Suh; Hibar, Derrek P.; Leow, Alex D.; Dinov, Ivo D.; Toga, Arthur W.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Shen, Li; Foroud, Tatiana; Pankratz, Nathan; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Craig, David W.; Gerber, Jill D.; Allen, April N.; Corneveaux, Jason J.; Stephan, Dietrich A.; DeCarli, Charles S.; DeChairo, Bryan M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Jack, Clifford R.; Weiner, Michael W.; Raji, Cyrus A.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Becker, James T.; Carmichael, Owen T.; Thompson, Paul M.; Weiner, Michael; Thal, Leon; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowki, John; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Gamst, Anthony; Potter, William Z.; Montine, Tom; Anders, Dale; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; Bandy, Dan; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Trojanowki, John; Shaw, Les; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Korecka, Magdalena; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Harvey, Danielle; Gamst, Anthony; Kornak, John; Kachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Vorobik, Remi; Quinn, Joseph; Schneider, Lon; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan; Fleisher, Adam S.; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Morris, John C.; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Badger, Beverly; Grossman, Hillel; Tang, Cheuk; Stern, Jessica; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Bach, Julie; Duara, Ranjan; Isaacson, Richard; Strauman, Silvia; Albert, Marilyn S.; Pedroso, Julia; Toroney, Jaimie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J; De Santi, Susan M; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Aiello, Marilyn; Clark, Christopher M.; Pham, Cassie; Nunez, Jessica; Smith, Charles D.; Given II, Curtis A.; Hardy, Peter; DeKosky, Steven T.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Porsteinsson, Anton; McCallum, Colleen; Cramer, Steven C.; Mulnard, Ruth A.; McAdams-Ortiz, Catherine; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Laubinger, Mary M.; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Lu, Po H.; Fletcher, Rita; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin; Herring, Scott; Hake, Ann M.; van Dyck, Christopher H.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Bifano, Laurel A.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Graham, Simon; Caldwell, Curtis; Feldman, Howard; Assaly, Michele; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R.; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Gitelman, Darren; Johnson, Nancy; Mesulam, Marsel; Sadowsky, Carl; Villena, Teresa; Mesner, Scott; Aisen, Paul S.; Johnson, Kathleen B.; Behan, Kelly E.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Rentz, Dorene M.; Johnson, Keith A.; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Ashford, Wes; Sabbagh, Marwan; Connor, Donald; Obradov, Sanja; Killiany, Ron; Norbash, Alex; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Jayam-Trouth, Annapurni; Wang, Paul; Auchus, Alexander P.; Huang, Juebin; Friedland, Robert P.; DeCarli, Charles; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Kittur, Smita; Mirje, Seema; Johnson, Sterling C.; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T-Y; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Highum, Diane; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre N.; Hendin, Barry A.; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Beversdorf, David Q.; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Gandy, Sam; Marenberg, Marjorie E.; Rovner, Barry W.; Pearlson, Godfrey; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Saykin, Andrew J.; Santulli, Robert B.; Pare, Nadia; Williamson, Jeff D.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Potter, Huntington; Ashok Raj, B.; Giordano, Amy; Ott, Brian R.; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Cohen, Ronald; Wilks, Kerri L.

    2010-01-01

    A recently identified variant within the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene is carried by 46% of Western Europeans and is associated with an ~1.2 kg higher weight, on average, in adults and an ~1 cm greater waist circumference. With >1 billion overweight and 300 million obese persons worldwide, it is crucial to understand the implications of carrying this very common allele for the health of our aging population. FTO is highly expressed in the brain and elevated body mass index (BMI) is associated with brain atrophy, but it is unknown how the obesity-associated risk allele affects human brain structure. We therefore generated 3D maps of regional brain volume differences in 206 healthy elderly subjects scanned with MRI and genotyped as part of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. We found a pattern of systematic brain volume deficits in carriers of the obesity-associated risk allele versus noncarriers. Relative to structure volumes in the mean template, FTO risk allele carriers versus noncarriers had an average brain volume difference of ~8% in the frontal lobes and 12% in the occipital lobes—these regions also showed significant volume deficits in subjects with higher BMI. These brain differences were not attributable to differences in cholesterol levels, hypertension, or the volume of white matter hyperintensities; which were not detectably higher in FTO risk allele carriers versus noncarriers. These brain maps reveal that a commonly carried susceptibility allele for obesity is associated with structural brain atrophy, with implications for the health of the elderly. PMID:20404173

  3. A commonly carried allele of the obesity-related FTO gene is associated with reduced brain volume in the healthy elderly.

    PubMed

    Ho, April J; Stein, Jason L; Hua, Xue; Lee, Suh; Hibar, Derrek P; Leow, Alex D; Dinov, Ivo D; Toga, Arthur W; Saykin, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Foroud, Tatiana; Pankratz, Nathan; Huentelman, Matthew J; Craig, David W; Gerber, Jill D; Allen, April N; Corneveaux, Jason J; Stephan, Dietrich A; DeCarli, Charles S; DeChairo, Bryan M; Potkin, Steven G; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael W; Raji, Cyrus A; Lopez, Oscar L; Becker, James T; Carmichael, Owen T; Thompson, Paul M

    2010-05-01

    A recently identified variant within the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene is carried by 46% of Western Europeans and is associated with an approximately 1.2 kg higher weight, on average, in adults and an approximately 1 cm greater waist circumference. With >1 billion overweight and 300 million obese persons worldwide, it is crucial to understand the implications of carrying this very common allele for the health of our aging population. FTO is highly expressed in the brain and elevated body mass index (BMI) is associated with brain atrophy, but it is unknown how the obesity-associated risk allele affects human brain structure. We therefore generated 3D maps of regional brain volume differences in 206 healthy elderly subjects scanned with MRI and genotyped as part of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. We found a pattern of systematic brain volume deficits in carriers of the obesity-associated risk allele versus noncarriers. Relative to structure volumes in the mean template, FTO risk allele carriers versus noncarriers had an average brain volume difference of approximately 8% in the frontal lobes and 12% in the occipital lobes-these regions also showed significant volume deficits in subjects with higher BMI. These brain differences were not attributable to differences in cholesterol levels, hypertension, or the volume of white matter hyperintensities; which were not detectably higher in FTO risk allele carriers versus noncarriers. These brain maps reveal that a commonly carried susceptibility allele for obesity is associated with structural brain atrophy, with implications for the health of the elderly. PMID:20404173

  4. Assessment of biodiversity in Chilean cattle using the distribution of major histocompatibility complex class II BoLA-DRB3 allele.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, S-N; Miyasaka, T; Matsumoto, Y; Xue, G; Diaz, V de la Barra; Rogberg-Muñoz, A; Giovambattista, G; Ortiz, M; Oltra, J; Kanemaki, M; Onuma, M; Aida, Y

    2015-01-01

    Bovine leukocyte antigens (BoLAs) are used extensively as markers for bovine disease and immunological traits. In this study, we estimated BoLA-DRB3 allele frequencies using 888 cattle from 10 groups, including seven cattle breeds and three crossbreeds: 99 Red Angus, 100 Black Angus, 81 Chilean Wagyu, 49 Hereford, 95 Hereford × Angus, 71 Hereford × Jersey, 20 Hereford × Overo Colorado, 113 Holstein, 136 Overo Colorado, and 124 Overo Negro cattle. Forty-six BoLA-DRB3 alleles were identified, and each group had between 12 and 29 different BoLA-DRB3 alleles. Overo Negro had the highest number of alleles (29); this breed is considered in Chile to be an 'Old type' European Holstein Friesian descendant. By contrast, we detected 21 alleles in Holstein cattle, which are considered to be a 'Present type' Holstein Friesian cattle. Chilean cattle groups and four Japanese breeds were compared by neighbor-joining trees and a principal component analysis (PCA). The phylogenetic tree showed that Red Angus and Black Angus cattle were in the same clade, crossbreeds were closely related to their parent breeds, and Holstein cattle from Chile were closely related to Holstein cattle in Japan. Overall, the tree provided a thorough description of breed history. It also showed that the Overo Negro breed was closely related to the Holstein breed, consistent with historical data indicating that Overo Negro is an 'Old type' Holstein Friesian cattle. This allelic information will be important for investigating the relationship between major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and disease. PMID:25430590

  5. Protective effect of the AT137RQ and ARQK176 PrP alleles against classical scrapie in Sarda breed sheep

    PubMed Central

    Vaccari, Gabriele; Scavia, Gaia; Sala, Marcello; Cosseddu, Gianmario; Chiappini, Barbara; Conte, Michela; Esposito, Elena; Lorenzetti, Raniero; Perfetti, Gabriella; Marconi, Paola; Scholl, Francesco; Barbaro, Katia; Bella, Antonino; Nonno, Romolo; Agrimi, Umberto

    2009-01-01

    The susceptibility of sheep to scrapie is under the control of the host’s prion protein (PrP) gene and is also influenced by the strain of the agent. PrP polymorphisms at codons 136 (A/V), 154 (R/H) and 171 (Q/R/H) are the main determinants of susceptibility/resistance of sheep to classical scrapie. They are combined in four main variants of the wild-type ARQ allele: VRQ, AHQ, ARH and ARR. Breeding programmes have been undertaken on this basis in the European Union and the USA to increase the frequency of the resistant ARR allele in sheep populations. Herein, we report the results of a multi-flock study showing the protective effect of polymorphisms other than those at codons 136, 154 and 171 in Sarda breed sheep. All ARQ/ARQ affected sheep (n = 154) and 378 negative ARQ/ARQ controls from four scrapie outbreaks were submitted to sequencing of the PrP gene. The distribution of variations other than those at the standard three codons, between scrapie cases and negative controls, was statistically different in all flocks. In particular, the AT137RQ and ARQK176 alleles showed a clear protective effect. This is the first study demonstrating a protective influence of alleles other than ARR under field conditions. If further investigations in other sheep breeds and with other scrapie sources confirm these findings, the availability of various protective alleles in breeding programmes of sheep for scrapie resistance could be useful in breeds with a low frequency of the ARR allele and would allow maintaining a wider variability of the PrP gene. PMID:19171116

  6. Human Leukocyte Antigen Alleles and Cytomegalovirus Infection After Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Futohi, Farzaneh; Saber, Azadeh; Nemati, Eglim; Einollahi, Behzad; Rostami, Zohre

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several studies have been conducted on the relationship between a number of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and cytomegalovirus infection (CMV), in kidney transplant recipients, after transplantation. However, only a limited number of HLAs have been investigated, so far, and the results have been contradictory. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between 59 HLA alleles and the CMV infection, in transplant recipients, after kidney transplantation. Patients and Methods: This retrospective cohort study was conducted on 200 patients, receiving a kidney transplant, in Baqiyatallah Hospital, in Tehran, during 2013. Throughout a one-year follow-up of kidney transplant recipients, in case of detecting the CMV antigen in patients’ blood, at any time, they were placed in the group of patients with CMV infection, whereas, if no CMV-specific antigen was developed, over a year, patients were placed in the group of patients without CMV infection, after transplantation. This study investigated the relationship between CMV infection in kidney transplant recipients and 59 HLA alleles, including 14 HLA-A, 28 HLA-B, and 17 HLA-DRB1 cases. Results: Of all participants, 104 patients (52%) were diagnosed with CMV infection. There was no significant difference between the two groups, with and without CMV infection, in terms of patient’s characteristics. The CMV infection, in patients receiving a transplanted organ from deceased donor, was significantly more prevalent than in those receiving kidney transplant from living donor (63% vs. 39%, respectively, P = 0.001). Recipients with HLA-B44 were more infected with CMV compared with patients without this allele (80% vs. 50%, respectively, P = 0.024); on the contrary, kidney recipients with HLA-DRB1-1 were less infected with CMV than patients without this allele (31% vs. 55%, respectively, P = 0.020). There was no significant relationship between CMV infection and other HLA alleles. Results of

  7. A novel HLA-B*14 allele - B*14:53 - genetics and serology.

    PubMed

    Street, J; Davies, E; Darke, C

    2016-08-01

    HLA-B*14:53 was found in a UK European normal blood donor prior to registration on the Welsh Bone Marrow Donor Registry. It differs from B*14:13 by one base (103G>T) in exon 2 resulting in a substitution of alanine (A) in B*14:13 to serine (S) in B*14:53. Unique among current HLA-B*14 alleles, B*14:53 and B*14:13 share a motif of 59 bases between positions 361 and 419 in exon 3. This motif is present in numerous HLA-B alleles the commonest overall being B*08:01, suggesting that both B*14:53 and B*14:13 arose from intralocus gene conversion events with B*08:01. Thus, B*14:53 probably arose from B*14:01:01 (which has TCC at codon 11 (S), while B*14:13 arose from B*14:02:01:01 which has GCC at codon 11 (A). Additionally, the two likely B*14:53-bearing and B*14:13-bearing haplotypes are typical of B*14:01:01-bearing and B*14:02:01:01-bearing haplotypes, respectively. Serological testing, using 49 antisera with HLA-B64, or B64, B65 reactivity, showed that the B*14:53 specificity did not react as a B64 (B*14:01) specificity and may appear as a short/weak HLA-B14. This implies that residues additional to S at position 11 are involved in HLA-B64 serological identity; for example, the motif 11S 97W 116F is possessed by B*14:01 and many other B*14 products (and B*39:79 plus some HLA-C products) but not B65 (B*14:02) or the B*14:53 specificity. B*14:53 was found in a random HLA sequence-based typed population of 32 530 normal subjects indicating a low precision allele frequency of 0.000015 in subjects resident in Wales. PMID:27312672

  8. Narcolepsy-Associated HLA Class I Alleles Implicate Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tafti, Mehdi; Lammers, Gert J.; Dauvilliers, Yves; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Mayer, Geert; Nowak, Jacek; Pfister, Corinne; Dubois, Valérie; Eliaou, Jean-François; Eberhard, Hans-Peter; Liblau, Roland; Wierzbicka, Aleksandra; Geisler, Peter; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Mathis, Johannes; Lecendreux, Michel; Khatami, Ramin; Heinzer, Raphaël; Haba-Rubio, José; Feketeova, Eva; Baumann, Christian R.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Tiercy, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Narcolepsy with cataplexy is tightly associated with the HLA class II allele DQB1*06:02. Evidence indicates a complex contribution of HLA class II genes to narcolepsy susceptibility with a recent independent association with HLA-DPB1. The cause of narcolepsy is supposed be an autoimmune attack against hypocretin-producing neurons. Despite the strong association with HLA class II, there is no evidence for CD4+ T-cell-mediated mechanism in narcolepsy. Since neurons express class I and not class II molecules, the final effector immune cells involved might include class I-restricted CD8+ T-cells. Methods: HLA class I (A, B, and C) and II (DQB1) genotypes were analyzed in 944 European narcolepsy with cataplexy patients and in 4,043 control subjects matched by country of origin. All patients and controls were DQB1*06:02 positive and class I associations were conditioned on DQB1 alleles. Results: HLA-A*11:01 (OR = 1.49 [1.18–1.87] P = 7.0*10−4), C*04:01 (OR = 1.34 [1.10–1.63] P = 3.23*10−3), and B*35:01 (OR = 1.46 [1.13–1.89] P = 3.64*10−3) were associated with susceptibility to narcolepsy. Analysis of polymorphic class I amino-acids revealed even stronger associations with key antigen-binding residues HLA-A-Tyr9 (OR = 1.32 [1.15–1.52] P = 6.95*10−5) and HLA-C-Ser11 (OR = 1.34 [1.15–1.57] P = 2.43*10−4). Conclusions: Our findings provide a genetic basis for increased susceptibility to infectious factors or an immune cytotoxic mechanism in narcolepsy, potentially targeting hypocretin neurons. Citation: Tafti M, Lammers GJ, Dauvilliers Y, Overeem S, Mayer G, Nowak J, Pfister C, Dubois V, Eliaou JF, Eberhard HP, Liblau R, Wierzbicka A, Geisler P, Bassetti CL, Mathis J, Lecendreux M, Khatami R, Heinzer R, Haba-Rubio J, Feketeova E, Baumann CR, Kutalik Z, Tiercy JM. Narcolepsy-associated HLA class I alleles implicate cell-mediated cytotoxicity. SLEEP 2016;39(3):581–587. PMID:26518595

  9. Attenuated APC alleles produce functional protein from internal translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Heppner Goss, Kathleen; Trzepacz, Chris; Tuohy, Thérèse M. F.; Groden, Joanna

    2002-01-01

    Some truncating mutations of the APC tumor suppressor gene are associated with an attenuated phenotype of familial adenomatous polyposis coli (AAPC). This work demonstrates that APC alleles with 5′ mutations produce APC protein that down-regulates β-catenin, inhibits β-catenin/T cell factor-mediated transactivation, and induces cell-cycle arrest. Transfection studies demonstrate that cap-independent translation is initiated internally at an AUG at codon 184 of APC. Furthermore, APC coding sequence between AAPC mutations and AUG 184 permits internal ribosome entry in a bicistronic vector. These data suggest that AAPC alleles in vivo may produce functional APC by internal initiation and establish a functional correlation between 5′ APC mutations and their associated clinical phenotype. PMID:12034871

  10. High throughput automated allele frequency estimation by pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Doostzadeh, Julie; Shokralla, Shadi; Absalan, Farnaz; Jalili, Roxana; Mohandessi, Sharareh; Langston, James W; Davis, Ronald W; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Gharizadeh, Baback

    2008-01-01

    Pyrosequencing is a DNA sequencing method based on the principle of sequencing-by-synthesis and pyrophosphate detection through a series of enzymatic reactions. This bioluminometric, real-time DNA sequencing technique offers unique applications that are cost-effective and user-friendly. In this study, we have combined a number of methods to develop an accurate, robust and cost efficient method to determine allele frequencies in large populations for association studies. The assay offers the advantage of minimal systemic sampling errors, uses a general biotin amplification approach, and replaces dTTP for dATP-apha-thio to avoid non-uniform higher peaks in order to increase accuracy. We demonstrate that this newly developed assay is a robust, cost-effective, accurate and reproducible approach for large-scale genotyping of DNA pools. We also discuss potential improvements of the software for more accurate allele frequency analysis. PMID:18628978

  11. High Throughput Automated Allele Frequency Estimation by Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Absalan, Farnaz; Jalili, Roxana; Mohandessi, Sharareh; Langston, James W.; Davis, Ronald W.; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Gharizadeh, Baback

    2008-01-01

    Pyrosequencing is a DNA sequencing method based on the principle of sequencing-by-synthesis and pyrophosphate detection through a series of enzymatic reactions. This bioluminometric, real-time DNA sequencing technique offers unique applications that are cost-effective and user-friendly. In this study, we have combined a number of methods to develop an accurate, robust and cost efficient method to determine allele frequencies in large populations for association studies. The assay offers the advantage of minimal systemic sampling errors, uses a general biotin amplification approach, and replaces dTTP for dATP-apha-thio to avoid non-uniform higher peaks in order to increase accuracy. We demonstrate that this newly developed assay is a robust, cost-effective, accurate and reproducible approach for large-scale genotyping of DNA pools. We also discuss potential improvements of the software for more accurate allele frequency analysis. PMID:18628978

  12. Parallel Mapping of Antibiotic Resistance Alleles in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Pooneh; Knight, Rob; Gill, Ryan T.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical genomics expands our understanding of microbial tolerance to inhibitory chemicals, but its scope is often limited by the throughput of genome-scale library construction and genotype-phenotype mapping. Here we report a method for rapid, parallel, and deep characterization of the response to antibiotics in Escherichia coli using a barcoded genome-scale library, next-generation sequencing, and streamlined bioinformatics software. The method provides quantitative growth data (over 200,000 measurements) and identifies contributing antimicrobial resistance and susceptibility alleles. Using multivariate analysis, we also find that subtle differences in the population responses resonate across multiple levels of functional hierarchy. Finally, we use machine learning to identify a unique allelic and proteomic fingerprint for each antibiotic. The method can be broadly applied to tolerance for any chemical from toxic metabolites to next-generation biofuels and antibiotics. PMID:26771672

  13. Early allelic selection in maize as revealed by ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    Jaenicke-Després, Viviane; Buckler, Ed S; Smith, Bruce D; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Cooper, Alan; Doebley, John; Pääbo, Svante

    2003-11-14

    Maize was domesticated from teosinte, a wild grass, by approximately 6300 years ago in Mexico. After initial domestication, early farmers continued to select for advantageous morphological and biochemical traits in this important crop. However, the timing and sequence of character selection are, thus far, known only for morphological features discernible in corn cobs. We have analyzed three genes involved in the control of plant architecture, storage protein synthesis, and starch production from archaeological maize samples from Mexico and the southwestern United States. The results reveal that the alleles typical of contemporary maize were present in Mexican maize by 4400 years ago. However, as recently as 2000 years ago, allelic selection at one of the genes may not yet have been complete. PMID:14615538

  14. Clostridium difficile Genome Editing Using pyrE Alleles.

    PubMed

    Ehsaan, Muhammad; Kuehne, Sarah A; Minton, Nigel P

    2016-01-01

    Precise manipulation (in-frame deletions and substitutions) of the Clostridium difficile genome is possible through a two-stage process of single-crossover integration and subsequent isolation of double-crossover excision events using replication-defective plasmids that carry a counterselection marker. Use of a codA (cytosine deaminase) or pyrE (orotate phosphoribosyltransferase) as counter selection markers appears equally effective, but there is considerable merit in using a pyrE mutant as the host as, through the use of allele-coupled exchange (ACE) vectors, mutants created (by whatever means) can be rapidly complemented concomitant with restoration of the pyrE allele. This avoids the phenotypic effects frequently observed with high-copy-number plasmids and dispenses with the need to add antibiotic to ensure plasmid retention. PMID:27507332

  15. Microsatellite Variation in Honey Bee (Apis Mellifera L.) Populations: Hierarchical Genetic Structure and Test of the Infinite Allele and Stepwise Mutation Models

    PubMed Central

    Estoup, A.; Garnery, L.; Solignac, M.; Cornuet, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Samples from nine populations belonging to three African (intermissa, scutellata and capensis) and four European (mellifera, ligustica, carnica and cecropia) Apis mellifera subspecies were scored for seven microsatellite loci. A large amount of genetic variation (between seven and 30 alleles per locus) was detected. Average heterozygosity and average number of alleles were significantly higher in African than in European subspecies, in agreement with larger effective population sizes in Africa. Microsatellite analyses confirmed that A. mellifera evolved in three distinct and deeply differentiated lineages previously detected by morphological and mitochondrial DNA studies. Dendrogram analysis of workers from a given population indicated that super-sisters cluster together when using a sufficient number of microsatellite data whereas half-sisters do not. An index of classification was derived to summarize the clustering of different taxonomic levels in large phylogenetic trees based on individual genotypes. Finally, individual population X loci data were used to test the adequacy of the two alternative mutation models, the infinite allele model (IAM) and the stepwise mutation models. The better fit overall of the IAM probably results from the majority of the microsatellites used including repeats of two or three different length motifs (compound microsatellites). PMID:7498746

  16. Mammalian interspecies substitution of immune modulatory alleles by genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Lillico, Simon G.; Proudfoot, Chris; King, Tim J.; Tan, Wenfang; Zhang, Lei; Mardjuki, Rachel; Paschon, David E.; Rebar, Edward J.; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Mileham, Alan J.; McLaren, David G.; Whitelaw, C. Bruce A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a fundamentally novel feat of animal genetic engineering: the precise and efficient substitution of an agronomic haplotype into a domesticated species. Zinc finger nuclease in-embryo editing of the RELA locus generated live born domestic pigs with the warthog RELA orthologue, associated with resilience to African Swine Fever. The ability to efficiently achieve interspecies allele introgression in one generation opens unprecedented opportunities for agriculture and basic research. PMID:26898342

  17. Natural Allelic Variations in Highly Polyploidy Saccharum Complex

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jian; Yang, Xiping; Resende, Marcio F. R.; Neves, Leandro G.; Todd, James; Zhang, Jisen; Comstock, Jack C.; Wang, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) is an important sugar and biofuel crop with high polyploid and complex genomes. The Saccharum complex, comprised of Saccharum genus and a few related genera, are important genetic resources for sugarcane breeding. A large amount of natural variation exists within the Saccharum complex. Though understanding their allelic variation has been challenging, it is critical to dissect allelic structure and to identify the alleles controlling important traits in sugarcane. To characterize natural variations in Saccharum complex, a target enrichment sequencing approach was used to assay 12 representative germplasm accessions. In total, 55,946 highly efficient probes were designed based on the sorghum genome and sugarcane unigene set targeting a total of 6 Mb of the sugarcane genome. A pipeline specifically tailored for polyploid sequence variants and genotype calling was established. BWA-mem and sorghum genome approved to be an acceptable aligner and reference for sugarcane target enrichment sequence analysis, respectively. Genetic variations including 1,166,066 non-redundant SNPs, 150,421 InDels, 919 gene copy number variations, and 1,257 gene presence/absence variations were detected. SNPs from three different callers (Samtools, Freebayes, and GATK) were compared and the validation rates were nearly 90%. Based on the SNP loci of each accession and their ploidy levels, 999,258 single dosage SNPs were identified and most loci were estimated as largely homozygotes. An average of 34,397 haplotype blocks for each accession was inferred. The highest divergence time among the Saccharum spp. was estimated as 1.2 million years ago (MYA). Saccharum spp. diverged from Erianthus and Sorghum approximately 5 and 6 MYA, respectively. The target enrichment sequencing approach provided an effective way to discover and catalog natural allelic variation in highly polyploid or heterozygous genomes. PMID:27375658

  18. Triploidy with cyclopia and identical HLA alleles in the parents.

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, J C; Philip, P; Charpentier, G; Ferrari, M; Donzeau, M; Ayraud, N

    1984-01-01

    A 22-week pregnancy was terminated after discovery of serious echographic abnormalities. Fetal examination showed cyclopia, sacral meningocele, and syndactyly. The karyotype was 69,XXX. The parents had identical HLA alleles A1, A2, and Bw21. The mechanism of the triploidy was determined by chromosome marker analysis to be digyny. The association of triploidy with holoprosencephaly and the parents' identical immunological status are discussed. Images PMID:6607355

  19. Mammalian interspecies substitution of immune modulatory alleles by genome editing.

    PubMed

    Lillico, Simon G; Proudfoot, Chris; King, Tim J; Tan, Wenfang; Zhang, Lei; Mardjuki, Rachel; Paschon, David E; Rebar, Edward J; Urnov, Fyodor D; Mileham, Alan J; McLaren, David G; Whitelaw, C Bruce A

    2016-01-01

    We describe a fundamentally novel feat of animal genetic engineering: the precise and efficient substitution of an agronomic haplotype into a domesticated species. Zinc finger nuclease in-embryo editing of the RELA locus generated live born domestic pigs with the warthog RELA orthologue, associated with resilience to African Swine Fever. The ability to efficiently achieve interspecies allele introgression in one generation opens unprecedented opportunities for agriculture and basic research. PMID:26898342

  20. Natural Allelic Variations in Highly Polyploidy Saccharum Complex.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Yang, Xiping; Resende, Marcio F R; Neves, Leandro G; Todd, James; Zhang, Jisen; Comstock, Jack C; Wang, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) is an important sugar and biofuel crop with high polyploid and complex genomes. The Saccharum complex, comprised of Saccharum genus and a few related genera, are important genetic resources for sugarcane breeding. A large amount of natural variation exists within the Saccharum complex. Though understanding their allelic variation has been challenging, it is critical to dissect allelic structure and to identify the alleles controlling important traits in sugarcane. To characterize natural variations in Saccharum complex, a target enrichment sequencing approach was used to assay 12 representative germplasm accessions. In total, 55,946 highly efficient probes were designed based on the sorghum genome and sugarcane unigene set targeting a total of 6 Mb of the sugarcane genome. A pipeline specifically tailored for polyploid sequence variants and genotype calling was established. BWA-mem and sorghum genome approved to be an acceptable aligner and reference for sugarcane target enrichment sequence analysis, respectively. Genetic variations including 1,166,066 non-redundant SNPs, 150,421 InDels, 919 gene copy number variations, and 1,257 gene presence/absence variations were detected. SNPs from three different callers (Samtools, Freebayes, and GATK) were compared and the validation rates were nearly 90%. Based on the SNP loci of each accession and their ploidy levels, 999,258 single dosage SNPs were identified and most loci were estimated as largely homozygotes. An average of 34,397 haplotype blocks for each accession was inferred. The highest divergence time among the Saccharum spp. was estimated as 1.2 million years ago (MYA). Saccharum spp. diverged from Erianthus and Sorghum approximately 5 and 6 MYA, respectively. The target enrichment sequencing approach provided an effective way to discover and catalog natural allelic variation in highly polyploid or heterozygous genomes. PMID:27375658

  1. Fast spatial ancestry via flexible allele frequency surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Rañola, John Michael; Novembre, John; Lange, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Unique modeling and computational challenges arise in locating the geographic origin of individuals based on their genetic backgrounds. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) vary widely in informativeness, allele frequencies change non-linearly with geography and reliable localization requires evidence to be integrated across a multitude of SNPs. These problems become even more acute for individuals of mixed ancestry. It is hardly surprising that matching genetic models to computational constraints has limited the development of methods for estimating geographic origins. We attack these related problems by borrowing ideas from image processing and optimization theory. Our proposed model divides the region of interest into pixels and operates SNP by SNP. We estimate allele frequencies across the landscape by maximizing a product of binomial likelihoods penalized by nearest neighbor interactions. Penalization smooths allele frequency estimates and promotes estimation at pixels with no data. Maximization is accomplished by a minorize–maximize (MM) algorithm. Once allele frequency surfaces are available, one can apply Bayes’ rule to compute the posterior probability that each pixel is the pixel of origin of a given person. Placement of admixed individuals on the landscape is more complicated and requires estimation of the fractional contribution of each pixel to a person’s genome. This estimation problem also succumbs to a penalized MM algorithm. Results: We applied the model to the Population Reference Sample (POPRES) data. The model gives better localization for both unmixed and admixed individuals than existing methods despite using just a small fraction of the available SNPs. Computing times are comparable with the best competing software. Availability and implementation: Software will be freely available as the OriGen package in R. Contact: ranolaj@uw.edu or klange@ucla.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at

  2. Inferring Selection Intensity and Allele Age from Multilocus Haplotype Structure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2013-01-01

    It is a challenging task to infer selection intensity and allele age from population genetic data. Here we present a method that can efficiently estimate selection intensity and allele age from the multilocus haplotype structure in the vicinity of a segregating mutant under positive selection. We use a structured-coalescent approach to model the effect of directional selection on the gene genealogies of neutral markers linked to the selected mutant. The frequency trajectory of the selected allele follows the Wright-Fisher model. Given the position of the selected mutant, we propose a simplified multilocus haplotype model that can efficiently model the dynamics of the ancestral haplotypes under the joint influence of selection and recombination. This model approximates the ancestral genealogies of the sample, which reduces the number of states from an exponential function of the number of single-nucleotide polymorphism loci to a quadratic function. That allows parameter inference from data covering DNA regions as large as several hundred kilo-bases. Importance sampling algorithms are adopted to evaluate the probability of a sample by exploring the space of both allele frequency trajectories of the selected mutation and gene genealogies of the linked sites. We demonstrate by simulation that the method can accurately estimate selection intensity for moderate and strong positive selection. We apply the method to a data set of the G6PD gene in an African population and obtain an estimate of 0.0456 (95% confidence interval 0.0144−0.0769) for the selection intensity. The proposed method is novel in jointly modeling the multilocus haplotype pattern caused by recombination and mutation, allowing the analysis of haplotype data in recombining regions. Moreover, the method is applicable to data from populations under exponential growth and a variety of other demographic histories. PMID:23797107

  3. Natural Allelic Variations in Highly Polyploidy Saccharum Complex

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Song, Jian; Yang, Xiping; Resende, Marcio F. R.; Neves, Leandro G.; Todd, James; Zhang, Jisen; Comstock, Jack C.; Wang, Jianping

    2016-06-08

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) is an important sugar and biofuel crop with high polyploid and complex genomes. The Saccharum complex, comprised of Saccharum genus and a few related genera, are important genetic resources for sugarcane breeding. A large amount of natural variation exists within the Saccharum complex. Though understanding their allelic variation has been challenging, it is critical to dissect allelic structure and to identify the alleles controlling important traits in sugarcane. To characterize natural variations in Saccharum complex, a target enrichment sequencing approach was used to assay 12 representative germplasm accessions. In total, 55,946 highly efficient probes were designed basedmore » on the sorghum genome and sugarcane unigene set targeting a total of 6 Mb of the sugarcane genome. A pipeline specifically tailored for polyploid sequence variants and genotype calling was established. BWAmem and sorghum genome approved to be an acceptable aligner and reference for sugarcane target enrichment sequence analysis, respectively. Genetic variations including 1,166,066 non -redundant SNPs, 150,421 InDels, 919 gene copy number variations, and 1,257 gene presence/absence variations were detected. SNPs from three different callers (Samtools, Freebayes, and GATK) were compared and the validation rates were nearly 90%. Based on the SNP loci of each accession and their ploidy levels, 999,258 single dosage SNPs were identified and most loci were estimated as largely homozygotes. An average of 34,397 haplotype blocks for each accession was inferred. The highest divergence time among the Saccharum spp. was estimated as 1.2 million years ago (MYA). Saccharum spp, diverged from Erianthus and Sorghum approximately 5 and 6 MYA, respectively. The target enrichment sequencing approach provided an effective way to discover and catalog natural allelic variation in highly polyploid or heterozygous genomes.« less

  4. Genetic Comparison of a Croatian Isolate and CEPH European Founders

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Pau; Vitart, Véronique; Hayward, Caroline; Tenesa, Albert; Zgaga, Lina; Juricic, Danica; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nicholas D; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Wright, Alan F; Haley, Chris S; Knott, Sara A

    2010-01-01

    Human isolates have been postulated as a good resource for the identification of QTL due to reduced genetic diversity and a more homogeneous environment. Isolates may also have increased linkage disequilibrium (LD) due to small effective population size and, either loss or increase in frequency of alleles that are rare in the general population from which they originate. Here we investigate the difference in allele and genotype frequencies, LD and homozygous tracts between an isolate—several villages from the island of Vis in Croatia—and an outbred population of European origin: the Hapmap CEPH founders. Using the HumanHap300 v1 Genotyping BeadChip, we show that our population does not differ greatly from the reference CEU outbred population despite having a slightly higher proportion of monomorphic loci, a slightly higher long-range LD, and a greater proportion of individuals with long homozygous tracts. We conclude that genotyping arrays should perform equally well in our isolate as in outbred European populations for disease mapping studies and that SNP–trait associations discovered in our well-characterized Croatian isolate should be valid in the general European population from which they descend. Genet. Epidemiol. 34: 140–145, 2010. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:19697321

  5. Tracing pastoralist migrations to southern Africa with lactase persistence alleles.

    PubMed

    Macholdt, Enrico; Lede, Vera; Barbieri, Chiara; Mpoloka, Sununguko W; Chen, Hua; Slatkin, Montgomery; Pakendorf, Brigitte; Stoneking, Mark

    2014-04-14

    Although southern African Khoisan populations are often assumed to have remained largely isolated during prehistory, there is growing evidence for a migration of pastoralists from eastern Africa some 2,000 years ago, prior to the arrival of Bantu-speaking populations in southern Africa. Eastern Africa harbors distinctive lactase persistence (LP) alleles, and therefore LP alleles in southern African populations may be derived from this eastern African pastoralist migration. We sequenced the lactase enhancer region in 457 individuals from 18 Khoisan and seven Bantu-speaking groups from Botswana, Namibia, and Zambia and additionally genotyped four short tandem repeat (STR) loci that flank the lactase enhancer region. We found nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms, of which the most frequent is -14010(∗)C, which was previously found to be associated with LP in Kenya and Tanzania and to exhibit a strong signal of positive selection. This allele occurs in significantly higher frequency in pastoralist groups and in Khoe-speaking groups in our study, supporting the hypothesis of a migration of eastern African pastoralists that was primarily associated with Khoe speakers. Moreover, we find a signal of ongoing positive selection in all three pastoralist groups in our study, as well as (surprisingly) in two foraging groups. PMID:24704073

  6. Pollution-tolerant allele in fingernail clams (Musculium transversum).

    PubMed

    Sloss, B L; Romano, M A; Anderson, R V

    1998-08-01

    For nearly 50 years, the fingernail clam (Musculium transversum) was believed to be virtually eliminated from the Illinois River. In 1991, workers began finding substantial populations of M. transversum in the Illinois River including several beds in and around the highly polluted Chicago Sanitary District. In order to determine if populations of M. transversum from polluted sites exhibited any genetic response to the high levels of toxins and to examine the genetic structure of several populations of M. transversum for any changes due to the population crash, starch-gel electrophoresis was performed on M. transversum from three Illinois River localities and four Mississippi River basin locations. The sampled populations produced an inbreeding coefficient (FIS) of 0.929, indicating that the populations were highly inbred. The results of a suspected founder effect due to a bottleneck was suggested by an FST = 0.442. The isozyme Glucose-6-phosphate isomerase-2 (Gpi-2) produced allelic frequency patterns that were consistent with expected patterns of a pollution-tolerant allele. Polluted sites exhibited elevated frequencies of Gpi-2(100) whereas nonpolluted sites exhibited elevated frequencies of Gpi-2(74). This frequency pattern suggested that natural selection was occurring in populations under severe toxic pressures, leading to an increase in the frequency of the allele Gpi-2(100). Therefore, Gpi-2(100) is a possible pollution-tolerant mutation in M. transversum. PMID:9680522

  7. Allele-specific tumor spectrum in pten knockin mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Karikomi, Matt; Naidu, Shan; Rajmohan, Ravi; Caserta, Enrico; Chen, Hui-Zi; Rawahneh, Maysoon; Moffitt, Julie; Stephens, Julie A; Fernandez, Soledad A; Weinstein, Michael; Wang, Danxin; Sadee, Wolfgang; La Perle, Krista; Stromberg, Paul; Rosol, Thomas J; Eng, Charis; Ostrowski, Michael C; Leone, Gustavo

    2010-03-16

    Germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homology deleted on chromosome 10) cause Cowden and Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba (BRR) syndromes, two dominantly inherited disorders characterized by mental retardation, multiple hamartomas, and variable cancer risk. Here, we modeled three sentinel mutant alleles of PTEN identified in patients with Cowden syndrome and show that the nonsense Pten(4-5) and missense Pten(C124R) and Pten(G129E) alleles lacking lipid phosphatase activity cause similar developmental abnormalities but distinct tumor spectra with varying severity and age of onset. Allele-specific differences may be accounted for by loss of function for Pten(4-5), hypomorphic function for Pten(C124R), and gain of function for Pten(G129E). These data demonstrate that the variable tumor phenotypes observed in patients with Cowden and BRR syndromes can be attributed to specific mutations in PTEN that alter protein function through distinct mechanisms. PMID:20194734

  8. Genome-wide Association Study Identifies HLA 8.1 Ancestral Haplotype Alleles as Major Genetic Risk Factors for Myositis Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Frederick W.; Chen, Wei; O’Hanlon, Terrance P.; Cooper, Robert G.; Vencovsky, Jiri; Rider, Lisa G.; Danko, Katalin; Wedderburn, Lucy R.; Lundberg, Ingrid E.; Pachman, Lauren M.; Reed, Ann M.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Padyukov, Leonid; Selva-O’Callaghan, Albert; Radstake, Timothy R.; Isenberg, David A.; Chinoy, Hector; Ollier, William E.R.; Scheet, Paul; Peng, Bo; Lee, Annette; Byun, Jinyoung; Lamb, Janine A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Amos, Christopher I.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune muscle diseases (myositis) comprise a group of complex phenotypes influenced by genetic and environmental factors. To identify genetic risk factors in patients of European ancestry, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of the major myositis phenotypes in a total of 1710 cases, which included 705 adult dermatomyositis; 473 juvenile dermatomyositis; 532 polymyositis; and 202 adult dermatomyositis, juvenile dermatomyositis or polymyositis patients with anti-histidyl tRNA synthetase (anti-Jo-1) autoantibodies, and compared them with 4724 controls. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms showing strong associations (P < 5 × 10−8) in GWAS were identified in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region for all myositis phenotypes together, as well as for the four clinical and autoantibody phenotypes studied separately. Imputation and regression analyses found that alleles comprising the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) 8.1 ancestral haplotype (AH8.1) defined essentially all the genetic risk in the phenotypes studied. Although the HLA DRB1*03:01 allele showed slightly stronger associations with adult and juvenile dermatomyositis, and HLA B*08:01 with polymyositis and anti-Jo-1 autoantibody-positive myositis, multiple alleles of AH8.1 were required for the full risk effects. Our findings establish that alleles of the AH8.1haplotype comprise the primary genetic risk factors associated with the major myositis phenotypes in geographically diverse Caucasian populations. PMID:26291516

  9. Genome-wide association study identifies HLA 8.1 ancestral haplotype alleles as major genetic risk factors for myositis phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Miller, F W; Chen, W; O'Hanlon, T P; Cooper, R G; Vencovsky, J; Rider, L G; Danko, K; Wedderburn, L R; Lundberg, I E; Pachman, L M; Reed, A M; Ytterberg, S R; Padyukov, L; Selva-O'Callaghan, A; Radstake, T R; Isenberg, D A; Chinoy, H; Ollier, W E R; Scheet, P; Peng, B; Lee, A; Byun, J; Lamb, J A; Gregersen, P K; Amos, C I

    2015-10-01

    Autoimmune muscle diseases (myositis) comprise a group of complex phenotypes influenced by genetic and environmental factors. To identify genetic risk factors in patients of European ancestry, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of the major myositis phenotypes in a total of 1710 cases, which included 705 adult dermatomyositis, 473 juvenile dermatomyositis, 532 polymyositis and 202 adult dermatomyositis, juvenile dermatomyositis or polymyositis patients with anti-histidyl-tRNA synthetase (anti-Jo-1) autoantibodies, and compared them with 4724 controls. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms showing strong associations (P<5×10(-8)) in GWAS were identified in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region for all myositis phenotypes together, as well as for the four clinical and autoantibody phenotypes studied separately. Imputation and regression analyses found that alleles comprising the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) 8.1 ancestral haplotype (AH8.1) defined essentially all the genetic risk in the phenotypes studied. Although the HLA DRB1*03:01 allele showed slightly stronger associations with adult and juvenile dermatomyositis, and HLA B*08:01 with polymyositis and anti-Jo-1 autoantibody-positive myositis, multiple alleles of AH8.1 were required for the full risk effects. Our findings establish that alleles of the AH8.1 comprise the primary genetic risk factors associated with the major myositis phenotypes in geographically diverse Caucasian populations. PMID:26291516

  10. Genetic relationships of Asians and Northern Europeans, revealed by Y-chromosomal DNA analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Zerjal, T; Dashnyam, B; Pandya, A; Kayser, M; Roewer, L; Santos, F R; Schiefenhövel, W; Fretwell, N; Jobling, M A; Harihara, S; Shimizu, K; Semjidmaa, D; Sajantila, A; Salo, P; Crawford, M H; Ginter, E K; Evgrafov, O V; Tyler-Smith, C

    1997-01-01

    We have identified a new T-->C transition on the human Y chromosome. C-allele chromosomes have been found only in a subset of the populations from Asia and northern Europe and reach their highest frequencies in Yakut, Buryats, and Finns. Examination of the microsatellite haplotypes of the C-allele chromosomes suggests that the mutation occurred recently in Asia. The Y chromosome thus provides both information about population relationships in Asia and evidence for a substantial paternal genetic contribution of Asians to northern European populations such as the Finns. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9150165

  11. The European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, M.; Bousson, S.; Calaga, R.; Danared, H.; Devanz, G.; Duperrier, R.; Eguia, J.; Eshraqi, M.; Gammino, S.; Hahn, H.; Jansson, A.; Oyon, C.; Pape-Møller, S.; Peggs, S.; Ponton, A.; Rathsman, K.; Ruber, R.; Satogata, T.; Trahern, G.

    2011-12-01

    In 2003 the joint European effort to design a European Spallation Source (ESS) resulted in a set of reports, and in May 2009 Lund was agreed to be the ESS site. The ESS Scandinavia office has since then worked on setting all the necessary legal and organizational matters in place so that the Design Update and construction can be started in January 2011, in collaboration with European partners. The Design Update phase is expected to end in 2012, to be followed by a construction phase, with first neutrons expected in 2018-2019.

  12. Conditional Allele Mouse Planner (CAMP): software to facilitate the planning and design of breeding strategies involving mice with conditional alleles.

    PubMed

    Hoffert, Jason D; Pisitkun, Trairak; Miller, R Lance

    2012-06-01

    Transgenic and conditional knockout mouse models play an important role in biomedical research and their use has grown exponentially in the last 5-10 years. Generating conditional knockouts often requires breeding multiple alleles onto the background of a single mouse or group of mice. Breeding these mice depends on parental genotype, litter size, transmission frequency, and the number of breeding rounds. Therefore, a well planned breeding strategy is critical for keeping costs to a minimum. However, designing a viable breeding strategy can be challenging. With so many different variables this would be an ideal task for a computer program. To facilitate this process, we created a Java-based program called Conditional Allele Mouse Planner (CAMP). CAMP is designed to provide an estimate of the number of breeders, amount of time, and costs associated with generating mice of a particular genotype. We provide a description of CAMP, how to use it, and offer it freely as an application. PMID:21870117

  13. Increasing long-term response by selecting for favorable minor alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term response of genomic selection can be improved by considering allele frequencies of selected markers or quantitative trait loci (QTLs). A previous formula to weight allele frequency of favorable minor alleles was tested, and 2 new formulas were developed. The previous formula used nonlinear...

  14. Allele Name Translation Tool and Update NomenCLature: software tools for the automated translation of HLA allele names between successive nomenclatures.

    PubMed

    Mack, S J; Hollenbach, J A

    2010-05-01

    In this brief communication, we describe the Allele Name Translation Tool (antt) and Update NomenCLature (uncl), free programs developed to facilitate the translation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele names recorded using the December 2002 version of the HLA allele nomenclature (e.g. A*01010101) to those recorded using the colon-delimited version of the HLA allele nomenclature (e.g. A*01:01:01:01) that was adopted in April 2010. In addition, the antt and uncl translate specific HLA allele-name changes (e.g. DPB1*0502 is translated to DPB1*104:01), as well as changes to the locus prefix for HLA-C (i.e. Cw* is translated to C*). The antt and uncl will also translate allele names that have been truncated to two, four, or six digits, as well as ambiguous allele strings. The antt is a locally installed and run application, while uncl is a web-based tool that requires only an Internet connection and a modern browser. The antt accepts a variety of HLA data-presentation and allele-name formats. In addition, the antt can translate using user-defined conversion settings (e.g. the names of alleles that encode identical peptide binding domains can be translated to a common 'P-code'), and can serve as a preliminary data-sanity tool. The antt is available for download, and uncl for use, at www.igdawg.org/software. PMID:20412076

  15. European PTTI report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordara, Franco; Grimaldi, Sabrina; Leschiutta, Sigfrido

    1994-01-01

    Time and frequency metrology in Europe presents some peculiar features in its three main components: research on clocks, comparisons and dissemination methods, and dissemination services. Apart from the usual activities of the national metrological laboratories, an increasing number of cooperation between the European countries are promoted inside some European organizations, such as the ECC, EFTA, EUROMET, and WECC. Cooperation between these organizations is covered. The present, evolving situation will be further influenced by the recent political changes in Eastern Europe.

  16. Investigator HDplex markers: allele frequencies and mutational events in a North Italian population.

    PubMed

    Turrina, Stefania; Ferrian, Melissa; Caratti, Stefano; De Leo, Domenico

    2015-07-01

    Autosomal short tandem repeats (STRs) analysis represents the method of election in forensic genetics and up to now, 23 STRs are available for these purposes. However, in particular circumstances such as human identification or complex kinship cases, examination of additional STRs may be required in order to obtain reliable conclusions. For this purpose, a new multiplex STR system, namely Investigator® HDplex kit (QIAGEN) that coamplifies a set of 12 autosomal loci, 9 of which, represents novel supplementary STRs, was recently developed. A population sample of 359 unrelated healthy subjects residing in North Italy was typed to determine allele frequencies, forensic parameters and genetic distances among European populations. Furthermore, to evaluate the suitability of the HDplex kit as an auxiliary tool for paternity testing, mutation rates were estimated on 84 confirmed family trios. The 12 loci resulted highly informative with a combined power of discrimination of 0.999998 and no departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were observed with the sole exception of locus D4S2366. From the comparison of our population sample and European reference populations, a single significant difference was revealed with the Poland population at D4S2366 locus. With regard to the mutation rate study, on a total of 2,016 meioses considered, six single-step mutational events were observed and the average mutation rate calculated was of 2.94 × 10(-3) per locus per generation (95% confidence interval, 1.08 × 10(-3)-6.39 × 10(-3)). PMID:25205546

  17. Shades of gray: A comparison of linkage disequilibrium between Hutterites and Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Emma E; Sun, Ying; Nicolae, Dan; Ober, Carole

    2014-01-01

    Founder or isolated populations have advantages for genetic studies due to decreased genetic and environmental heterogeneity. However, whereas longer range linkage disequilibrium (LD) in these populations is expected to facilitate gene localization, extensive LD may actually limit the ability for gene discovery. The North American Hutterite population is one of the best characterized young founder populations and members of this isolate have been the subjects of our studies of complex traits, including fertility, asthma and cardiovascular disease, for >20 years. Here, we directly assess the patterns and extent of global LD using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes with minor allele frequencies (MAFs) ≥5% from the Affymetrix GeneChip® Mapping 500K array in 60 relatively unrelated Hutterites and 60 unrelated Europeans (HapMap CEU). Although LD among some marker pairs extends further in the Hutterites than in Europeans, the pattern of LD and minor allele frequencies are surprisingly similar. These results indicate that 1) identifying disease genes should be no more difficult in the Hutterites than in outbred European populations, 2) the same common susceptibility alleles for complex diseases should be present in the Hutterites and outbred European populations, and 3) imputation algorithms based on HapMap CEU should be applicable to the Hutterites. PMID:19697328

  18. Allele frequencies and population data for 17 Y-STR loci (The AmpFlSTR® Y-filer™) in Casablanca resident population.

    PubMed

    Laouina, Adil; El Houate, Brahim; Yahia, Hakima; Azeddoug, Houssine; Boulouiz, Redouane; Chbel, Faiza

    2011-01-01

    Allele frequencies and population data for 17 Y-STR loci included in the AmpFlSTR® Y-filer™ PCR amplification kit (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, USA), that permit the simultaneous amplification of all the markers included in the actually used European "extended haplotype", DYS19, DYS189I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385I/II, DYS438, DYS439 and also DYS437, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635 and Y GATA H4, were obtained from a sample of 166 healthy unrelated males resident in Casablanca (from Morocco). A total of 166 haplotypes were identified, of which 142 were unique. The overall haplotype diversity for the 17 Y-STR loci reached 0.9974, and a discrimination capacity was 0.855. We report some non-standard situations, including duplications and microvariant alleles. PMID:21126935

  19. Direct evidence for positive selection of skin, hair, and eye pigmentation in Europeans during the last 5,000 y.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Sandra; Timpson, Adrian; Kirsanow, Karola; Kaiser, Elke; Kayser, Manfred; Unterländer, Martina; Hollfelder, Nina; Potekhina, Inna D; Schier, Wolfram; Thomas, Mark G; Burger, Joachim

    2014-04-01

    Pigmentation is a polygenic trait encompassing some of the most visible phenotypic variation observed in humans. Here we present direct estimates of selection acting on functional alleles in three key genes known to be involved in human pigmentation pathways--HERC2, SLC45A2, and TYR--using allele frequency estimates from Eneolithic, Bronze Age, and modern Eastern European samples and forward simulations. Neutrality was overwhelmingly rejected for all alleles studied, with point estimates of selection ranging from around 2-10% per generation. Our results provide direct evidence that strong selection favoring lighter skin, hair, and eye pigmentation has been operating in European populations over the last 5,000 y. PMID:24616518

  20. Direct evidence for positive selection of skin, hair, and eye pigmentation in Europeans during the last 5,000 y

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Sandra; Timpson, Adrian; Kirsanow, Karola; Kaiser, Elke; Kayser, Manfred; Unterländer, Martina; Hollfelder, Nina; Potekhina, Inna D.; Schier, Wolfram; Thomas, Mark G.; Burger, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Pigmentation is a polygenic trait encompassing some of the most visible phenotypic variation observed in humans. Here we present direct estimates of selection acting on functional alleles in three key genes known to be involved in human pigmentation pathways—HERC2, SLC45A2, and TYR—using allele frequency estimates from Eneolithic, Bronze Age, and modern Eastern European samples and forward simulations. Neutrality was overwhelmingly rejected for all alleles studied, with point estimates of selection ranging from around 2–10% per generation. Our results provide direct evidence that strong selection favoring lighter skin, hair, and eye pigmentation has been operating in European populations over the last 5,000 y. PMID:24616518

  1. Wheat gene bank accessions as a source of new alleles of the powdery mildew resistance gene Pm3: a large scale allele mining project

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the last hundred years, the development of improved wheat cultivars has led to the replacement of landraces and traditional varieties by modern cultivars. This has resulted in a decline in the genetic diversity of agriculturally used wheat. However, the diversity lost in the elite material is somewhat preserved in crop gene banks. Therefore, the gene bank accessions provide the basis for genetic improvement of crops for specific traits and and represent rich sources of novel allelic variation. Results We have undertaken large scale molecular allele mining to isolate new alleles of the powdery mildew resistance gene Pm3 from wheat gene bank accessions. The search for new Pm3 alleles was carried out on a geographically diverse set of 733 wheat accessions originating from 20 countries. Pm3 specific molecular tools as well as classical pathogenicity tests were used to characterize the accessions. Two new functional Pm3 alleles were identified out of the eight newly cloned Pm3 sequences. These new resistance alleles were isolated from accessions from China and Nepal. Thus, the repertoire of functional Pm3 alleles now includes 17 genes, making it one of the largest allelic series of plant resistance genes. The combined information on resistant and susceptible Pm3 sequences will allow to study molecular function and specificity of functional Pm3 alleles. Conclusions This study demonstrates that molecular allele mining on geographically defined accessions is a useful strategy to rapidly characterize the diversity of gene bank accessions at a specific genetic locus of agronomical importance. The identified wheat accessions with new resistance specificities can be used for marker-assisted transfer of the Pm3 alleles to modern wheat lines. PMID:20470444

  2. Chromosome 5 allele loss in human colorectal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Solomon, E; Voss, R; Hall, V; Bodmer, W F; Jass, J R; Jeffreys, A J; Lucibello, F C; Patel, I; Rider, S H

    That the sporadic and inherited forms of a particular cancer could both result from mutations in the same gene was first proposed by Knudson. He further proposed that these mutations act recessively at the cellular level, and that both copies of the gene must be lost for the cancer to develop. In sporadic cases both events occur somatically whereas in dominant familial cases susceptibility is inherited through a germline mutation and the cancer develops after a somatic change in the homologous allele. This model has since been substantiated in the case of retinoblastoma, Wilms tumour, acoustic neuroma and several other tumours, in which loss of heterozygosity was shown in tumour material compared to normal tissue from the same patient. The dominantly inherited disorder, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP, also called familial polyposis coli), which gives rise to multiple adenomatous polyps in the colon that have a relatively high probability of progressing to a malignant adenocarcinoma, provides a basis for studying recessive genes in the far more common colorectal carcinomas using this approach. Following a clue as to the location of the FAP gene given by a case report of an individual with an interstitial deletion of chromosome 5q, who had FAP and multiple developmental abnormalities, we have examined sporadic colorectal adenocarcinomas for loss of alleles on chromosome 5. Using a highly polymorphic 'minisatellite' probe which maps to chromosome 5q we have shown that at least 20% of this highly heterogeneous set of tumours lose one of the alleles present in matched normal tissue. This parallels the assignment of the FAP gene to chromosome 5 (see accompanying paper) and suggests that becoming recessive for this gene may be a critical step in the progression of a relatively high proportion of colorectal cancers. PMID:2886919

  3. Allelic frequencies and statistical data obtained from 15 STR loci in a population of the Goiás State.

    PubMed

    Vieira, T C; Silva, D M; Gigonzac, M A D; Ferreira, V L; Gonçalves, M W; da Cruz, A D

    2013-01-01

    Due to the miscegenation of the Brazilian population, the central region of Brazil was colonized by internal migration of individuals from different origins, who contributed to the genetic diversity existing in this population. The purpose of this study was to estimate population parameters based on the allele frequencies for 15 polymorphic autosomal short-tandem repeat (STR) loci present in the population of the State of Goiás in the central region of Brazil, and to compare the results with those of others from different Brazilian populations. DNA was obtained from a sample of 986 unrelated individuals by a commercial reagent kit and was quantified by spectrometry for later amplification in the thermocycler. These loci, commonly used in forensics and paternity testing, reflected Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in this population. The D18S51 and Penta E loci had the highest number of alleles, while the observed heterozygosity reached the highest rates in FGA (0.920), D7S820 (0.870), and vWA (0.867) markers. Genetic diversity reached the highest levels in Penta E (0.906), Penta D (0.873), and D18S51 (0.860) markers, and the investigated forensic parameters showed high average values, with 93% power of discrimination, polymorphism information content of 78%, gene diversity of 79%, and observed heterozygosity of 79%. Similar to the other populations of Brazil, the population of the Midwest is derived from the admixture of 3 main parental groups: Amerindian, European, particularly Portuguese, and Africans from sub-Saharan Africa. In this context, the overall distribution of allele frequencies in the STR markers of various Brazilian populations is quite similar to the data obtained in this study. PMID:23359020

  4. Analysis of the distribution of HLA-A alleles in populations from five continents.

    PubMed

    Middleton, D; Williams, F; Meenagh, A; Daar, A S; Gorodezky, C; Hammond, M; Nascimento, E; Briceno, I; Perez, M P

    2000-10-01

    The variation and frequency of HLA-A genotypes were established by PCR-SSOP typing in diverse geographically distributed populations: Brazilian, Colombian Kogui, Cuban, Mexican, Omani, Singapore Chinese, and South African Zulu. HLA-A allelic families with only one allele were identified for HLA-A*01, -A*23, -A*25, -A*31, -A*32, -A*36, -A*43, -A*69, -A*80; and with two alleles for HLA-A*03, -A*11, -A*26, -A*29, -A*33, -A*34, and -A*66. Greater variation was detected for HLA-A*02, -A*24, and -A*68 allele families. Colombian Kogui and Mexican Seris showed the least diversity with respect to HLA-A alleles, albeit with small numbers tested, with only four and five HLA-A alleles identified, respectively. It would appear by their presence in all populations studied, either rural or indigenous, that certain alleles are very important in pathogen peptide presentation. PMID:11082518

  5. A Fasting Insulin–Raising Allele at IGF1 Locus Is Associated with Circulating Levels of IGF-1 and Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Mannino, Gaia Chiara; Greco, Annalisa; De Lorenzo, Carlo; Andreozzi, Francesco; Marini, Maria A.; Perticone, Francesco; Sesti, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Background A meta-analysis of genome-wide data reported the discovery of the rs35767 polymorphism near IGF1 with genome-wide significant association with fasting insulin levels. However, it is unclear whether the effects of this polymorphism on fasting insulin are mediated by a reduced insulin sensitivity or impaired insulin clearance. We investigated the effects of the rs35767 polymorphism on circulating IGF-1 levels, insulin sensitivity, and insulin clearance. Methodology/Principal Findings Two samples of adult nondiabetic white Europeans were studied. In sample 1 (n=569), IGF-1 levels were lower in GG genotype carriers compared with A allele carriers (190±77 vs. 218±97 ng/ml, respectively; P=0.007 after adjusting for age, gender, and BMI). Insulin sensitivity assessed by euglycaemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp was lower in GG genotype carriers compared with A allele carriers (8.9±4.1 vs. 10.1±5.1 mg x Kg-1 free fat mass x min-1, respectively; P=0.03 after adjusting for age, gender, and BMI). The rs35767 polymorphism did not show significant association with insulin clearance. In sample 2 (n=859), IGF-1 levels were lower in GG genotype carriers compared with A allele carriers (155±60 vs. 164±63 ng/ml, respectively; P=0.02 after adjusting for age, gender, and BMI). Insulin sensitivity, as estimated by the HOMA index, was lower in GG genotype carriers compared with A allele carriers (2.8±2.2 vs. 2.5±1.3, respectively; P=0.03 after adjusting for age, gender, and BMI). Conclusion/Significance The rs35767 polymorphism near IGF1 was associated with circulating IGF-1 levels, and insulin sensitivity with carriers of the GG genotype exhibiting lower IGF-1 concentrations and insulin sensitivity as compared with subjects carrying the A allele. PMID:24392014

  6. European Education, European Citizenship? On the Role of Education in Constructing Europeanness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollikainen, Aaro

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the role of the European Union (EU) education programs in fostering a sense of European citizenship. Addresses the five meanings given to the concept of European citizenship: (1) recognition of European heritage; (2) EU loyalty; (3) right of free movement; (4) political participation; and (5) active citizenship. (CMK)

  7. Inferring the age of a fixed beneficial allele.

    PubMed

    Ormond, Louise; Foll, Matthieu; Ewing, Gregory B; Pfeifer, Susanne P; Jensen, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    Estimating the age and strength of beneficial alleles is central to understanding how adaptation proceeds in response to changing environmental conditions. Several haplotype-based estimators exist for inferring the age of segregating beneficial mutations. Here, we develop an approximate Bayesian-based approach that rather estimates these parameters for fixed beneficial mutations in single populations. We integrate a range of existing diversity, site frequency spectrum, haplotype- and linkage disequilibrium-based summary statistics. We show that for strong selective sweeps on de novo mutations the method can estimate allele age and selection strength even in nonequilibrium demographic scenarios. We extend our approach to models of selection on standing variation, and co-infer the frequency at which selection began to act upon the mutation. Finally, we apply our method to estimate the age and selection strength of a previously identified mutation underpinning cryptic colour adaptation in a wild deer mouse population, and compare our findings with previously published estimates as well as with geological data pertaining to the presumed shift in selective pressure. PMID:26576754

  8. Allele mining and enhanced genetic recombination for rice breeding.

    PubMed

    Leung, Hei; Raghavan, Chitra; Zhou, Bo; Oliva, Ricardo; Choi, Il Ryong; Lacorte, Vanica; Jubay, Mona Liza; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Gregorio, Glenn; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Ulat, Victor Jun; Borja, Frances Nikki; Mauleon, Ramil; Alexandrov, Nickolai N; McNally, Kenneth L; Sackville Hamilton, Ruaraidh

    2015-12-01

    Traditional rice varieties harbour a large store of genetic diversity with potential to accelerate rice improvement. For a long time, this diversity maintained in the International Rice Genebank has not been fully used because of a lack of genome information. The publication of the first reference genome of Nipponbare by the International Rice Genome Sequencing Project (IRGSP) marked the beginning of a systematic exploration and use of rice diversity for genetic research and breeding. Since then, the Nipponbare genome has served as the reference for the assembly of many additional genomes. The recently completed 3000 Rice Genomes Project together with the public database (SNP-Seek) provides a new genomic and data resource that enables the identification of useful accessions for breeding. Using disease resistance traits as case studies, we demonstrated the power of allele mining in the 3,000 genomes for extracting accessions from the GeneBank for targeted phenotyping. Although potentially useful landraces can now be identified, their use in breeding is often hindered by unfavourable linkages. Efficient breeding designs are much needed to transfer the useful diversity to breeding. Multi-parent Advanced Generation InterCross (MAGIC) is a breeding design to produce highly recombined populations. The MAGIC approach can be used to generate pre-breeding populations with increased genotypic diversity and reduced linkage drag. Allele mining combined with a multi-parent breeding design can help convert useful diversity into breeding-ready genetic resources. PMID:26606925

  9. A bird's eye view of a deleterious recessive allele.

    PubMed

    Ekblom, Robert

    2016-07-01

    In the endangered Scottish chough (Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax) population, a lethal blindness syndrome is found to be caused by a deleterious recessive allele. Photo: Gordon Yates. In Focus: Trask, A.E., Bignal, E.M., McCracken, D.I., Monaghan, P., Piertney, S.B. & Reid, J.M. (2016) Evidence of the phenotypic expression of a lethal recessive allele under inbreeding in a wild population of conservation concern. Journal of Animal Ecology, 85, 879-891. In this issue of Journal of Animal Ecology, Trask et al. () report on a strange, lethal, blindness that regularly affects chicks of an endangered bird population. The authors show that the inheritance mode of this blindness disease precisely matches the expectations of a recessive deleterious mutation. Intriguingly, there is also an indication that the disease-causing variant might be maintained in the population by balancing selection, due to a selective advantage for heterozygotes. Could this finding have consequences for conservation actions implemented for the population? PMID:27279331

  10. Assessment of PAX6 alleles in 66 families with aniridia.

    PubMed

    Bobilev, A M; McDougal, M E; Taylor, W L; Geisert, E E; Netland, P A; Lauderdale, J D

    2016-06-01

    We report on PAX6 alleles associated with a clinical diagnosis of classical aniridia in 81 affected individuals representing 66 families. Allelic variants expected to affect PAX6 function were identified in 61 families (76 individuals). Ten cases of sporadic aniridia (10 families) had complete (8 cases) or partial (2 cases) deletion of the PAX6 gene. Sequence changes that introduced a premature termination codon into the open reading frame of PAX6 occurred in 47 families (62 individuals). Three individuals with sporadic aniridia (three families) had sequence changes (one deletion, two run-on mutations) expected to result in a C-terminal extension. An intronic deletion of unknown functional significance was detected in one case of sporadic aniridia (one family), but not in unaffected relatives. Within these 61 families, single nucleotide substitutions accounted for 30/61 (49%), indels for 23/61 (38%), and complete deletion of the PAX6 locus for 8/61 (13%). In five cases of sporadic aniridia (five families), no disease-causing mutation in the coding region was detected. In total, 23 unique variants were identified that have not been reported in the Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD) database. Within the group assessed, 92% had sequence changes expected to reduce PAX6 function, confirming the primacy of PAX6 haploinsufficiency as causal for aniridia. PMID:26661695

  11. An allele of the crm gene blocks cyanobacterial circadian rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Joseph S.; Bordowitz, Juliana R.; Bree, Anna C.; Golden, Susan S.

    2013-01-01

    The SasA-RpaA two-component system constitutes a key output pathway of the cyanobacterial Kai circadian oscillator. To date, rhythm of phycobilisome associated (rpaA) is the only gene other than kaiA, kaiB, and kaiC, which encode the oscillator itself, whose mutation causes completely arrhythmic gene expression. Here we report a unique transposon insertion allele in a small ORF located immediately upstream of rpaA in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 termed crm (for circadian rhythmicity modulator), which results in arrhythmic promoter activity but does not affect steady-state levels of RpaA. The crm ORF complements the defect when expressed in trans, but only if it can be translated, suggesting that crm encodes a small protein. The crm1 insertion allele phenotypes are distinct from those of an rpaA null; crm1 mutants are able to grow in a light:dark cycle and have no detectable oscillations of KaiC phosphorylation, whereas low-amplitude KaiC phosphorylation rhythms persist in the absence of RpaA. Levels of phosphorylated RpaA in vivo measured over time are significantly altered compared with WT in the crm1 mutant as well as in the absence of KaiC. Taken together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that the Crm polypeptide modulates a circadian-specific activity of RpaA. PMID:23918383

  12. Allele frequency of CODIS 13 in Indonesian population.

    PubMed

    Untoro, Evi; Atmadja, Djaja Surya; Pu, Chang-En; Wu, Fang-Chi

    2009-04-01

    Since the first application of DNA technology in 1985 in forensic cases, and the acceptance of this technology in 1988 at court, the DNA typing is widely used in personal identification, parentage cases and tracing the source of biological samples found in the crime scene. The FBI on 1990 had recommended the forensic labs to used 13 loci of Short Tandem Repeats (STR), known as CODIS 13, as the loci of choice for forensic use. The research on the population DNA database on these loci is extremely important for calculating the Paternity Index as well as Matching Probability for forensic application of DNA technology. As many as 402 unrelated persons, consisted of 322 from western part of Indonesia and 80 from eastern part of Indonesia, were chosen as the respondents of this research, after signing the informed consent. The peripheral blood sample was taken using sterile lancets and dropped onto FTA classic cards. The DNA was extracted by FTA purification solution (3x) and TE(-1) (2x), and amplified by PCR mix, either Cofiler or Profiler Plus (Perkin Elmers), followed by sequencing using ABI Prism type 3100 Avant Genetic Analyzer. The analysis showed that the alleles frequencies of Indonesian is specific, different with the other Asian populations with some specific alleles and microvariant were found. PMID:19261522

  13. Cytochrome allelic variants and clopidogrel metabolism in cardiovascular diseases therapy.

    PubMed

    Jarrar, Mohammed; Behl, Shalini; Manyam, Ganiraju; Ganah, Hany; Nazir, Mohammed; Nasab, Reem; Moustafa, Khaled

    2016-06-01

    Clopidogrel and aspirin are among the most prescribed dual antiplatelet therapies to treat the acute coronary syndrome and heart attacks. However, their potential clinical impacts are a subject of intense debates. The therapeutic efficiency of clopidogrel is controlled by the actions of hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYPs) enzymes and impacted by individual genetic variations. Inter-individual polymorphisms in CYPs enzymes affect the metabolism of clopidogrel into its active metabolites and, therefore, modify its turnover and clinical outcome. So far, clinical trials fail to confirm higher or lower adverse cardiovascular effects in patients treated with combinations of clopidogrel and proton pump inhibitors, compared with clopidogrel alone. Such inconclusive findings may be due to genetic variations in the cytochromes CYP2C19 and CYP3A4/5. To investigate potential interactions/effects of these cytochromes and their allele variants on the treatment of acute coronary syndrome with clopidogrel alone or in combination with proton pump inhibitors, we analyze recent literature and discuss the potential impact of the cytochrome allelic variants on cardiovascular events and stent thrombosis treated with clopidogrel. The diversity of CYP2C19 polymorphisms and prevalence span within various ethnic groups, subpopulations and demographic areas are also debated. PMID:27072373

  14. WFPDB: European Plate Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, Milcho

    2007-08-01

    The Wide-Field Plate Database (WFPDB) gives an inventory of all wide-field (>~ 1 sq. deg) photographic observations archived in astronomical institutions over the world. So it facilitates and stimulates their use and preservation as a valuable source of information for future investigations in astronomy. At present WFPDB manages plate-index information for 25% of all existing plates providing on-line access from Sofia (http://www.skyarchive.org/search) and in CDS, Strasbourg. Here we present the new development of WFPDB as an instrument for searching of long term brightness variations of different sky objects stressing on the European photographic plate collections (from existing 2 million wide-field plates more than 55% are in Europe: Germany, Russia, Ukraine, Italy, Czech Republic, etc.). We comment examples of digitization (with flatbed scanners) of the European plate archives in Sonneberg, Pulkovo, Asiago, Byurakan, Bamberg, etc. and virtual links of WFPDB with European AVO, ADS, IBVS.

  15. European Universe Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, P.; Miley, G.; Westra van Holthe, F.; Schrier, W.; Reed, S.

    2011-10-01

    The European Universe Awareness (EU-UNAWE) programme uses the beauty and grandeur of the cosmos to encourage young children, particularly those from underprivileged backgrounds, to develop an interest in science and technology and to foster a sense of global citizenship. EU-UNAWE is already active in 40 countries and comprises a global network of almost 500 astronomers, teachers and other educators. The programme was recently awarded a grant of 1.9 million euros by the European Union so that it can be further developed in five European countries and South Africa. The grant will be used to organise teacher training workshops and to develop educational materials, such as an astronomy news service for children and games. During this presentation we will outline some of the biggest achievements of EU-UNAWE to date and discuss future plans for the programme.

  16. Null allele, allelic dropouts or rare sex detection in clonal organisms: simulations and application to real data sets of pathogenic microbes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pathogens and their vectors are organisms whose ecology is often only accessible through population genetics tools based on spatio-temporal variability of molecular markers. However, molecular tools may present technical difficulties due to the masking of some alleles (allelic dropouts and/or null alleles), which tends to bias the estimation of heterozygosity and thus the inferences concerning the breeding system of the organism under study. This is especially critical in clonal organisms in which deviation from panmixia, as measured by Wright’s FIS, can, in principle, be used to infer both the extent of clonality and structure in a given population. In particular, null alleles and allelic dropouts are locus specific and likely produce high variance of Wright’s FIS across loci, as rare sex is expected to do. In this paper we propose a tool enabling to discriminate between consequences of these technical problems and those of rare sex. Methods We have performed various simulations of clonal and partially clonal populations. We introduce allelic dropouts and null alleles in clonal data sets and compare the results with those that exhibit increasing rates of sexual recombination. We use the narrow relationship that links Wright’s FIS to genetic diversity in purely clonal populations as assessment criterion, since this relationship disappears faster with sexual recombination than with amplification problems of certain alleles. Results We show that the relevance of our criterion for detecting poorly amplified alleles depends partly on the population structure, the level of homoplasy and/or mutation rate. However, the interpretation of data becomes difficult when the number of poorly amplified alleles is above 50%. The application of this method to reinterpret published data sets of pathogenic clonal microbes (yeast and trypanosomes) confirms its usefulness and allows refining previous estimates concerning important pathogenic agents. Conclusion Our

  17. European security and France

    SciTech Connect

    deRose, A.

    1985-01-01

    A French authority on security argues for new European initiatives in the face of the ''danger represented by Soviet military power deployed in support of an imperialistic ideology.'' His proposals, including the strengthening of conventional forces without abandoning the option of the first use of nuclear weapons, are meant to give substance to President Mitterrand's declaration in 1983: ''The European nations now need to realize that their defense is also their responsibility....'' A part of the increasingly important debate in France over defense policy in Europe.

  18. Distribution of Mytilus taxa in European coastal areas as inferred from molecular markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijewski, T.; Śmietanka, B.; Zbawicka, M.; Gosling, E.; Hummel, H.; Wenne, R.

    2011-02-01

    The genetic constitution of mussels ( Mytilus spp.) was studied by means of three nuclear (Me 15/16, EF-bis, ITS) and one mtDNA (ND2-COIII) marker on a large European scale. In addition to a sharp cline between Atlantic and Mediterranean M. galloprovincialis, we observed a clear genetic distinction between the Black Sea and Mediterranean populations and a higher incidence of M. trossulus than reported so far in northern European populations. The frequency of M. galloprovincialis nuclear alleles was high along the Iberian Peninsula and decreased abruptly along the French coasts with a high frequency of M. edulis alleles in the Bay of Biscay, The Netherlands, Germany, Iceland, Barents and White Seas, and with little evidence of introgression between the two taxa. M. trossulus alleles were observed in the Baltic Sea and Danish Straits as expected. In addition, occurrence of M. trossulus alleles in cold waters of Iceland, Barents Sea and White Sea is reported for the first time.

  19. Effective marker alleles associated with type 2 resistance to Fusarium head blight infection in fields

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Luo, Meng; Zhang, Dadong; Wu, Di; Li, Lei; Bai, Guihua

    2016-01-01

    Molecular markers associated with known quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for type 2 resistance to Fusarium head blight (FHB) in bi-parental mapping population usually have more than two alleles in breeding populations. Therefore, understanding the association of each allele with FHB response is particularly important to marker-assisted enhancement of FHB resistance. In this paper, we evaluated FHB severities of 192 wheat accessions including landraces and commercial varieties in three field growing seasons, and genotyped this panel with 364 genome-wide informative molecular markers. Among them, 11 markers showed reproducible marker-trait association (p < 0.05) in at least two experiments using a mixed model. More than two alleles were identified per significant marker locus. These alleles were classified into favorable, unfavorable and neutral alleles according to the normalized genotypic values. The distributions of effective alleles at these loci in each wheat accession were characterized. Mean FHB severities increased with decreased number of favorable alleles at the reproducible loci. Chinese wheat landraces and Japanese accessions have more favorable alleles at the majority of the reproducible marker loci. FHB resistance levels of varieties can be greatly improved by introduction of these favorable alleles and removal of unfavorable alleles simultaneously at these QTL-linked marker loci. PMID:27436944

  20. Preferential Binding to Elk-1 by SLE-Associated IL10 Risk Allele Upregulates IL10 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Jennifer A.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Harley, John B.; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Alarcόn-Riquelme, Marta E.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle A.; Reveille, John D.; Vilá, Luis M.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Sivils, Kathy Moser; James, Judith A.; Kamen, Diane L.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Niewold, Timothy B.; Merrill, Joan T.; Scofield, R. Hal; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Stevens, Anne M.; Boackle, Susan A.; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Choi, Jiyoung; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Freedman, Barry I.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Martin, Javier; Yu, C. Yung; Chang, Deh-Ming; Song, Yeong Wook; Langefeld, Carl D.; Chen, Weiling; Grossman, Jennifer M.; Cantor, Rita M.; Hahn, Bevra H.; Tsao, Betty P.

    2013-01-01

    Immunoregulatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) is elevated in sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) correlating with disease activity. The established association of IL10 with SLE and other autoimmune diseases led us to fine map causal variant(s) and to explore underlying mechanisms. We assessed 19 tag SNPs, covering the IL10 gene cluster including IL19, IL20 and IL24, for association with SLE in 15,533 case and control subjects from four ancestries. The previously reported IL10 variant, rs3024505 located at 1 kb downstream of IL10, exhibited the strongest association signal and was confirmed for association with SLE in European American (EA) (P = 2.7×10−8, OR = 1.30), but not in non-EA ancestries. SNP imputation conducted in EA dataset identified three additional SLE-associated SNPs tagged by rs3024505 (rs3122605, rs3024493 and rs3024495 located at 9.2 kb upstream, intron 3 and 4 of IL10, respectively), and SLE-risk alleles of these SNPs were dose-dependently associated with elevated levels of IL10 mRNA in PBMCs and circulating IL-10 protein in SLE patients and controls. Using nuclear extracts of peripheral blood cells from SLE patients for electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we identified specific binding of transcription factor Elk-1 to oligodeoxynucleotides containing the risk (G) allele of rs3122605, suggesting rs3122605 as the most likely causal variant regulating IL10 expression. Elk-1 is known to be activated by phosphorylation and nuclear localization to induce transcription. Of interest, phosphorylated Elk-1 (p-Elk-1) detected only in nuclear extracts of SLE PBMCs appeared to increase with disease activity. Co-expression levels of p-Elk-1 and IL-10 were elevated in SLE T, B cells and monocytes, associated with increased disease activity in SLE B cells, and were best downregulated by ERK inhibitor. Taken together, our data suggest that preferential binding of activated Elk-1 to the IL10 rs3122605-G allele upregulates IL

  1. Characterization of 38 microsatellite loci in the European blackbird, Turdus merula (Turdidae, AVES).

    PubMed

    Simeoni, Michelle; Dawson, Deborah A; Gentle, Louise K; Coiffait, Lisette; Wolff, Kirsten; Evans, Karl L; Gaston, Kevin J; Hatchwell, Ben J

    2009-11-01

    We characterized 38 microsatellite loci in the European blackbird, Turdus merula. Thirty-seven loci were identified by testing 242 loci that had been originally isolated in other avian species. One additional locus was isolated from a European blackbird genomic library. All loci were characterized in 20-29 blackbirds from a population in the Czech Republic and displayed between two and 16 alleles, with observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.04 to 1.00. Thirty-seven loci could be assigned a chromosome location in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) genome based on sequence homology. PMID:21564948

  2. Teaching European Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raento, Pauliina

    2008-01-01

    The political, cultural and social make-up of Europe is changing fast. A new European identity is under construction, but old contradictions and diversity challenge its contents, forms and boundaries. Migration, the changing role of the nation-state and Europe's regions, the reshaping of politico-administrative and perceptional boundaries, the…

  3. The European VLBI network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schilizzi, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    The capabilities of the European very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) network are summarized. The range of baseline parameters, sensitivities, and recording and other equipment available are included. Plans for upgrading the recording facilities and the use of geostationary satellites for signal transfer and clock synchronization are discussed.

  4. European Music Year 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexanderson, Thomas; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Articles concerning music are included in this newsletter dedicated to cultural venture to be jointly carried out by the Council of Europe and the European communities. Many events will mark Music Year 1985, including concerts, dance performances, operas, publications, recordings, festivals, exhibitions, competitions, and conferences on musical…

  5. Multilingualism in European Workplaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunnarsson, Britt-Louise

    2014-01-01

    This state-of-the-art article includes a review of past and recent studies on multilingualism at work in European environments. One aim is to provide the reader with a cross-cultural picture of workplace studies on various languages in Europe, another to discuss both positive and problem-based accounts of multilingualism at work. The overview…

  6. European Civilization. Teacher's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leppert, Ella C.; Halac, Dennis

    The instructional materials in this teaching guide for Course II, Unit IV, follow and build upon a previous sequential course described in SO 003 169 offering ninth grade students a study on the development of Western European Civilization. Focus is upon four periods of high development: The High Middle Ages (12th Century), The Renaissance (15th…

  7. Allelic diversity at the DLA-88 locus in Golden Retriever and Boxer breeds is limited.

    PubMed

    Ross, P; Buntzman, A S; Vincent, B G; Grover, E N; Gojanovich, G S; Collins, E J; Frelinger, J A; Hess, P R

    2012-08-01

    In the dog, previous analyses of major histocompatibility complex class I genes suggest a single polymorphic locus, dog leukocyte antigen (DLA)-88. While 51 alleles have been reported, estimates of prevalence have not been made. We hypothesized that, within a breed, DLA-88 diversity would be restricted, and one or more dominant alleles could be identified. Accordingly, we determined allele usage in 47 Golden Retrievers and 39 Boxers. In each population, 10 alleles were found; 4 were shared. Seven novel alleles were identified. DLA-88*05101 and *50801 predominated in Golden Retrievers, while most Boxers carried *03401. In these breeds, DLA-88 polymorphisms are limited and largely non-overlapping. The finding of highly prevalent alleles fulfills an important prerequisite for studying canine CD8+ T-cell responses. PMID:22571293

  8. An Allele Real-Coded Quantum Evolutionary Algorithm Based on Hybrid Updating Strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Xian; Qian, Xiao-Yi; Peng, Hui-Deng; Wang, Jian-Hui

    2016-01-01

    For improving convergence rate and preventing prematurity in quantum evolutionary algorithm, an allele real-coded quantum evolutionary algorithm based on hybrid updating strategy is presented. The real variables are coded with probability superposition of allele. A hybrid updating strategy balancing the global search and local search is presented in which the superior allele is defined. On the basis of superior allele and inferior allele, a guided evolutionary process as well as updating allele with variable scale contraction is adopted. And H ε gate is introduced to prevent prematurity. Furthermore, the global convergence of proposed algorithm is proved by Markov chain. Finally, the proposed algorithm is compared with genetic algorithm, quantum evolutionary algorithm, and double chains quantum genetic algorithm in solving continuous optimization problem, and the experimental results verify the advantages on convergence rate and search accuracy. PMID:27057159

  9. An Allele Real-Coded Quantum Evolutionary Algorithm Based on Hybrid Updating Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Xian; Qian, Xiao-Yi; Peng, Hui-Deng; Wang, Jian-Hui

    2016-01-01

    For improving convergence rate and preventing prematurity in quantum evolutionary algorithm, an allele real-coded quantum evolutionary algorithm based on hybrid updating strategy is presented. The real variables are coded with probability superposition of allele. A hybrid updating strategy balancing the global search and local search is presented in which the superior allele is defined. On the basis of superior allele and inferior allele, a guided evolutionary process as well as updating allele with variable scale contraction is adopted. And Hε gate is introduced to prevent prematurity. Furthermore, the global convergence of proposed algorithm is proved by Markov chain. Finally, the proposed algorithm is compared with genetic algorithm, quantum evolutionary algorithm, and double chains quantum genetic algorithm in solving continuous optimization problem, and the experimental results verify the advantages on convergence rate and search accuracy. PMID:27057159

  10. Two classes of deleterious recessive alleles in a natural population of zebrafish, Danio rerio.

    PubMed Central

    McCune, Amy R.; Houle, David; McMillan, Kyle; Annable, Rebecca; Kondrashov, Alexey S.

    2004-01-01

    Natural populations carry deleterious recessive alleles which cause inbreeding depression. We compared mortality and growth of inbred and outbred zebrafish, Danio rerio, between 6 and 48 days of age. Grandparents of the studied fish were caught in the wild. Inbred fish were generated by brother-sister mating. Mortality was 9% in outbred fish, and 42% in inbred fish, which implies at least 3.6 lethal equivalents of deleterious recessive alleles per zygote. There was no significant inbreeding depression in the growth, perhaps because the surviving inbred fish lived under less crowded conditions. In contrast to alleles that cause embryonic and early larval mortality in the same population, alleles responsible for late larval and early juvenile mortality did not result in any gross morphological abnormalities. Thus, deleterious recessive alleles that segregate in a wild zebrafish population belong to two sharply distinct classes: early-acting, morphologically overt, unconditional lethals; and later-acting, morphologically cryptic, and presumably milder alleles. PMID:15451692

  11. Allelic diversity at the DLA-88 locus in Golden Retriever and Boxer breeds is limited

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Peter; Buntzman, Adam S.; Vincent, Benjamin G.; Grover, Elise N.; Gojanovich, Gregory S.; Collins, Edward J.; Frelinger, Jeffrey A.; Hess, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    In the dog, previous analyses of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I genes suggest a single polymorphic locus, Dog Leukocyte Antigen (DLA)-88. While 51 alleles have been reported, estimates of prevalence have not been made. We hypothesized that, within a breed, DLA-88 diversity would be restricted, and one or more dominant alleles could be identified. Accordingly, we determined allele usage in 47 Golden Retrievers and 39 Boxers. In each population, 10 alleles were found; 4 were shared. Seven novel alleles were identified. DLA-88*05101 and *50801 predominated in Golden Retrievers, while most Boxers carried *03401. In these breeds DLA-88 polymorphisms are limited and largely non-overlapping. The finding of highly prevalent alleles fulfills an important prerequisite for studying canine CD8+ T-cell responses. PMID:22571293

  12. Introgressive hybridization: brown bears as vectors for polar bear alleles.

    PubMed

    Hailer, Frank

    2015-03-01

    The dynamics and consequences of introgression can inform about numerous evolutionary processes. Biologists have therefore long been interested in hybridization. One challenge, however, lies in the identification of nonadmixed genotypes that can serve as a baseline for accurate quantification of admixture. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Cahill et al. (2015) analyse a genomic data set of 28 polar bears, eight brown bears and one American black bear. Polar bear alleles are found to be introgressed into brown bears not only near a previously identified admixture zone on the Alaskan Admiralty, Baranof and Chichagof (ABC) Islands, but also far into the North American mainland. Elegantly contrasting admixture levels at autosomal and X chromosomal markers, Cahill and colleagues infer that male-biased dispersal has spread these introgressed alleles away from the Late Pleistocene contact zone. Compared to a previous study on the ABC Island population in which an Alaskan brown bear served as a putatively admixture-free reference, Cahill et al. (2015) utilize a newly sequenced Swedish brown bear as admixture baseline. This approach reveals that brown bears have been impacted by introgression from polar bears to a larger extent (up to 8.8% of their genome), than previously known, including the bear that had previously served as admixture baseline. No evidence for introgression of brown bear into polar bear is found, which the authors argue could be a consequence of selection. Besides adding new exciting pieces to the puzzle of polar/brown bear evolutionary history, the study by Cahill and colleagues highlights that wildlife genomics is moving from analysing single genomes towards a landscape genomics approach. PMID:25775930

  13. Waxy genes from spelt wheat: new alleles for modern wheat breeding and new phylogenetic inferences about the origin of this species

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, Carlos; Caballero, Leonor; Martín, Luis M.; Alvarez, Juan B.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Waxy proteins are responsible for amylose synthesis in wheat seeds, being encoded by three waxy genes (Wx-A1, Wx-B1 and Wx-D1) in hexaploid wheat. In addition to their role in starch quality, waxy loci have been used to study the phylogeny of wheat. The origin of European spelt (Triticum aestivum ssp. spelta) is not clear. This study compared waxy gene sequences of a Spanish spelt collection with their homologous genes in emmer (T. turgidum ssp. dicoccum), durum (T. turgidum ssp. durum) and common wheat (T. aestivum ssp. aestivum), together with other Asian and European spelt that could be used to determine the origin of European spelt. Methods waxy genes were amplified and sequenced. Geneious Pro software, DNAsp and MEGA5 were used for sequence, nucleotide diversity and phylogenetic analysis, respectively. Key Results Three, four and three new alleles were described for the Wx-A1, Wx-B1 and Wx-D1 loci, respectively. Spelt accessions were classified into two groups based on the variation in Wx-B1, which suggests that there were two different origins for the emmer wheat that has been found to be part of the spelt genetic make-up. One of these groups was only detected in Iberian material. No differences were found between the rest of the European spelt and the Asiatic spelt, which suggested that the Iberian material had a different origin from the other spelt sources. Conclusions The results suggested that the waxy gene variability present in wheat is undervalued. The evaluation of this variability has permitted the detection of ten new waxy alleles that could affect starch quality and thus could be used in modern wheat breeding. In addition, two different classes of Wx-B1 were detected that could be used for evaluating the phylogenetic relationships and the origins of different types of wheat. PMID:22984164

  14. Allelic Spectra of Risk SNPs Are Different for Environment/Lifestyle Dependent versus Independent Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Amos, Christopher I.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have generated sufficient data to assess the role of selection in shaping allelic diversity of disease-associated SNPs. Negative selection against disease risk variants is expected to reduce their frequencies making them overrepresented in the group of minor (<50%) alleles. Indeed, we found that the overall proportion of risk alleles was higher among alleles with frequency <50% (minor alleles) compared to that in the group of major alleles. We hypothesized that negative selection may have different effects on environment (or lifestyle)-dependent versus environment (or lifestyle)-independent diseases. We used an environment/lifestyle index (ELI) to assess influence of environmental/lifestyle factors on disease etiology. ELI was defined as the number of publications mentioning “environment” or “lifestyle” AND disease per 1,000 disease-mentioning publications. We found that the frequency distributions of the risk alleles for the diseases with strong environmental/lifestyle components follow the distribution expected under a selectively neutral model, while frequency distributions of the risk alleles for the diseases with weak environmental/lifestyle influences is shifted to the lower values indicating effects of negative selection. We hypothesized that previously selectively neutral variants become risk alleles when environment changes. The hypothesis of ancestrally neutral, currently disadvantageous risk-associated alleles predicts that the distribution of risk alleles for the environment/lifestyle dependent diseases will follow a neutral model since natural selection has not had enough time to influence allele frequencies. The results of our analysis suggest that prediction of SNP functionality based on the level of evolutionary conservation may not be useful for SNPs associated with environment/lifestyle dependent diseases. PMID:26201053

  15. Sex differences in the JAK2V617F allele burden in chronic myeloproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Brady L.; Williams, Donna M.; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Rogers, Ophelia; Isaacs, Mary Ann; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Spivak, Jerry L.; Moliterno, Alison R.

    2010-01-01

    Background The JAK2V617F allele burden is a variable measure, determined by the frequency of mitotic recombination events and the expansion of JAK2V617F clones. Since variability in the JAK2V617F allele burden is partly responsible for the distinct phenotypes seen in the myeloproliferative disorders, the objective of this study was to identify modifiers of the allele burden. Design and Methods Blood samples were obtained between May 2005 and January 2009 from 272 patients with essential thrombocytosis, polycythemia vera, and myelofibrosis. The JAK2V617F allele burden was measured by an allele-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction using DNA from purified neutrophils. Repeated measures, on average 2 years apart, were available for 104 patients. Results Sex, age at diagnosis, and disease duration all independently influenced the JAK2V617F allele burden. When considering all patients with myeloproliferative disorders, women had significantly lower allele burdens than men (P=0.04). In those patients with repeated measures, the increase in allele burden per year between the first and second evaluations was significantly less in females than in males. Among those who experienced disease evolution, females were 4.5 times more likely to have evolution from essential thrombocytosis to polycythemia vera, but 0.23 times as likely to have evolution from essential thrombocytosis to myelofibrosis. Conclusions Sex is an independent factor accounting for variability in the JAK2V617F allele burden. We speculate that lower allele burdens in females reflect a lower frequency of mitotic recombination events in females than in males, and should be considered when evaluating the relationship of allele burden to disease phenotype and also in evaluating responses to JAK2V617F-inhibitors. Because sex may influence genotype and/or clonal expansion, underpinning the variability in JAK2V617F allele burden, it will be important to explore factors that determine susceptibility to

  16. Association of apolipoprotein E allele {epsilon}4 with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lucotte, G.; David, F.; Berriche, S.

    1994-09-15

    Apolipoprotein E, type {epsilon}4 allele (ApoE {epsilon}4), is associated with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease (AD) in French patients. The association is highly significant (0.45 AD versus 0.12 controls for {epsilon}4 allele frequencies). These data support the involvement of ApoE {epsilon}4 allele as a very important risk factor for the clinical expression of AD. 22 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  17. Identification of alleles of carotenoid pathway genes important for zeaxanthin accumulation in potato tubers

    PubMed Central

    Uitdewilligen, Jan G. A. M. L.; Kloosterman, Bjorn A.; Hutten, Ronald C. B.; Visser, Richard G. F.; van Eck, Herman J.

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the genetics and molecular biology of orange flesh colour in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). To this end the natural diversity in three genes of the carotenoid pathway was assessed by SNP analyses. Association analysis was performed between SNP haplotypes and flesh colour phenotypes in diploid and tetraploid potato genotypes. We observed that among eleven beta-carotene hydroxylase 2 (Chy2) alleles only one dominant allele has a major effect, changing white into yellow flesh colour. In contrast, none of the lycopene epsilon cyclase (Lcye) alleles seemed to have a large effect on flesh colour. Analysis of zeaxanthin epoxidase (Zep) alleles showed that all (diploid) genotypes with orange tuber flesh were homozygous for one specific Zep allele. This Zep allele showed a reduced level of expression. The complete genomic sequence of the recessive Zep allele, including the promoter, was determined, and compared with the sequence of other Zep alleles. The most striking difference was the presence of a non-LTR retrotransposon sequence in intron 1 of the recessive Zep allele, which was absent in all other Zep alleles investigated. We hypothesise that the presence of this large sequence in intron 1 caused the lower expression level, resulting in reduced Zep activity and accumulation of zeaxanthin. Only genotypes combining presence of the dominant Chy2 allele with homozygosity for the recessive Zep allele produced orange-fleshed tubers that accumulated large amounts of zeaxanthin. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11103-010-9647-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20490894

  18. Scientists attack European MRI rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Margaret

    2010-08-01

    A report by the European Science Foundation (ESF) has sharply criticized a European Union (EU) directive on electromagnetic fields, arguing that limits on workers' exposure will have "potentially disastrous" consequences for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

  19. HLA Allele Frequencies in 5802 Koreans: Varied Allele Types Associated with SJS/TEN According to Culprit Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Jung; Kim, Young Joo; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Junho; Park, Kyung Hee; Park, Jung-Won

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are very serious forms of drug-induced cutaneous adverse reaction. SJS/TEN induced by certain drug is well known to be associated with some human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene type. We aimed to explore HLA allele frequencies and their association with SJS/TEN according to culprit drugs in Korea. Materials and Methods We enrolled 5802 subjects who had results of HLA typing test from August 2005 to July 2014. Total 28 SJS/TEN patients were categorized based on culprit drugs (allopurinol, lamotrigine, carbamazepine) and identified the presence of HLA-B*58:01, HLA-B*44:03, HLA-B*15:02, and HLA-A*31:01. Results HLA-A*24:02 (20.5%), HLA-B*44:03 (10.0%), and HLA-Cw*01:02 (17.1%) were the most frequent type in HLA-A, -B, and -C genes, respectively. Allele frequencies of HLA-B*58:01, HLA-B*44:03, HLA-A*31:01, and HLA-B*15:02 were 7.0%, 10.0%, 5.0%, and 0.3%, respectively. In 958 allopurinol users, 9 subjects (0.9%) were diagnosed with SJS/TEN. Among them, 8 subjects possessed HLA-B*58:01 allele. SJS/TEN induced by allopurinol was more frequently developed in subjects with HLA-B*58:01 than in subjects without it [odds ratio: 57.4; confidence interval (CI) 7.12-463.50; p<0.001]. Allopurinol treatment, based on screening by HLA-B*58:01 genotyping, could be more cost-effective than that not based on screening. HLA-B*44:03 may be associated with lamotrigine-induced SJS/TEN (odds ratio: 12.75; CI 1.03-157.14; p=0.053). Among carbamazepine users, only two patients experienced SJS/TEN and possessed neither HLA-B*15:02 nor HLA-A*31:03. Conclusion HLA gene frequencies varied in Korea. Screening of HLA-B*58:01 before the use of allopurinol might be needed to anticipate probability of SJS/TEN. PMID:26632391

  20. Are ‘Endurance’ Alleles ‘Survival’ Alleles? Insights from the ACTN3 R577X Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Fiuza-Luces, Carmen; Ruiz, Jonatan R.; Rodríguez-Romo, Gabriel; Santiago, Catalina; Gómez-Gallego, Félix; Yvert, Thomas; Cano-Nieto, Amalia; Garatachea, Nuria

    2011-01-01

    Exercise phenotypes have played a key role for ensuring survival over human evolution. We speculated that some genetic variants that influence exercise phenotypes could be associated with exceptional survival (i.e. reaching ≥100years of age). Owing to its effects on muscle structure/function, a potential candidate is the Arg(R)577Ter(X) polymorphism (rs1815739) in ACTN3, the structural gene encoding the skeletal muscle protein α-actinin-3. We compared the ACTN3 R577X genotype/allele frequencies between the following groups of ethnically-matched (Spanish) individuals: centenarians (cases, n = 64; 57 female; age range: 100–108 years), young healthy controls (n = 283, 67 females, 216 males; 21±2 years), and humans who are at the two end-points of exercise capacity phenotypes, i.e. muscle endurance (50 male professional road cyclists) and muscle power (63 male jumpers/sprinters). Although there were no differences in genotype/allele frequencies between centenarians (RR:28.8%; RX:47.5%; XX:23.7%), and controls (RR:31.8%; RX:49.8%; XX:18.4%) or endurance athletes (RR:28.0%; RX:46%; XX:26.0%), we observed a significantly higher frequency of the X allele (P = 0.019) and XX genotype (P = 0.011) in centenarians compared with power athletes (RR:47.6%; RX:36.5%;XX:15.9%). Notably, the frequency of the null XX (α-actinin-3 deficient) genotype in centenarians was the highest ever reported in non-athletic Caucasian populations. In conclusion, despite there were no significant differences with the younger, control population, overall the ACTN3 genotype of centenarians resembles that of world-class elite endurance athletes and differs from that of elite power athletes. Our preliminary data would suggest a certain ‘survival’ advantage brought about by α-actinin-3 deficiency and the ‘endurance’/oxidative muscle phenotype that is commonly associated with this condition. PMID:21407828

  1. The CCR5Δ32 allele is not a major predisposing factor for severe H1N1pdm09 infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Host genetic factors are thought to modulated the severity of disease caused by infection with the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus (H1N1pdm09). The human CCR5 gene encodes a cytokine receptor important for cell-mediated immune response against H1N1pdm09. A 32-bp polymorphic deletion in the coding sequence of CCR5, the so-called CCR5Δ32 allele, segregates in populations of European ancestry with a frequency of 8-15%. A high proportion of CCR5Δ32 heterozygotes was reported in a sample of white Canadian critically-ill H1N1pdm09 infected subjects, suggesting an association with disease severity. Methods We recruited 29 H1N1pdm09 infected subjects from Southern Europe (mostly Italians) with a wide clinical spectrum of disease symptoms; the sample included 7 subjects who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The CCR5Δ32 variant was genotyped in all subjects. Results The CCR5Δ32 allele was found in one single subject, who developed a very mild form and was not hospitalized. Conclusions The CCR5Δ32 allele was not found to be associated with the risk of H1N1pdm09 infection or with a severe disease course. PMID:25100510

  2. Allele-specific enzymatic amplification of. beta. -globin genomic DNA for diagnosis of sickle cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.Y.; Ugozzoli, L.; Pal, B.K.; Wallace, B. )

    1989-04-01

    A rapid nonradioactive approach to the diagnosis of sickle cell anemia is described based on an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (ASPCR). This method allows direct detection of the normal or the sickle cell {beta}-globin allele in genomic DNA without additional steps of probe hybridization, ligation, or restriction enzyme cleavage. Two allele-specific oligonucleotide primers, one specific for the sickle cell allele and one specific for the normal allele, together with another primer complementary to both alleles were used in the polymerase chain reaction with genomic DNA templates. The allele-specific primers differed from each other in their terminal 3{prime} nucleotide. Under the proper annealing temperature and polymerase chain reaction conditions, these primers only directed amplification on their complementary allele. In a single blind study of DNA samples from 12 individuals, this method correctly and unambiguously allowed for the determination of the genotypes with no false negatives or positives. If ASPCR is able to discriminate all allelic variation (both transition and transversion mutations), this method has the potential to be a powerful approach for genetic disease diagnosis, carrier screening, HLA typing, human gene mapping, forensics, and paternity testing.

  3. How-To-Do-It: Multiple Allelic Frequencies in Populations at Equilibrium: Algorithms and Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nussbaum, Francis, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Presents an algorithm for solving problems related to multiple allelic frequencies in populations at equilibrium. Considers sample problems and provides their solution using this tabular algorithm. (CW)

  4. Rare HLA Drive Additional HIV Evolution Compared to More Frequent Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, David W.; Listgarten, Jennifer; Maley, Stephen N.; Kadie, Carl; Learn, Gerald H.; Nickle, David C.; Heckerman, David E.; Deng, Wenjie; Brander, Christian; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Coovadia, Hoosen; Goulder, Philip J.R.; Korber, Bette T.; Walker, Bruce D.; Mullins, James I.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract HIV-1 can evolve HLA-specific escape variants in response to HLA-mediated cellular immunity. HLA alleles that are common in the host population may increase the frequency of such escape variants at the population level. When loss of viral fitness is caused by immune escape variation, these variants may revert upon infection of a new host who does not have the corresponding HLA allele. Furthermore, additional escape variants may appear in response to the nonconcordant HLA alleles. Because individuals with rare HLA alleles are less likely to be infected by a partner with concordant HLA alleles, viral populations infecting hosts with rare HLA alleles may undergo a greater amount of evolution than those infecting hosts with common alleles due to the loss of preexisting escape variants followed by new immune escape. This hypothesis was evaluated using maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees of each gene from 272 full-length HIV-1 sequences. Recent viral evolution, as measured by the external branch length, was found to be inversely associated with HLA frequency in nef (p < 0.02), env (p < 0.03), and pol (p ≤ 0.05), suggesting that rare HLA alleles provide a disproportionate force driving viral evolution compared to common alleles, likely due to the loss of preexisting escape variants during early stages postinfection. PMID:19327049

  5. The European Mobile System (EMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jongejans, A.; Rogard, R.; Mistretta, I.; Ananasso, F.

    1993-01-01

    The European Space Agency is presently procuring an L band payload in order to promote a regional European L band system coping with the specific needs of the European market. The payload, and the two communications systems to be supported, are described below. The potential market for EMS in Europe is discussed.

  6. Education and European integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, John

    1992-11-01

    The main purpose of this article is to discuss the implications for education and training of the movement towards integration in Europe in the historic context of the creation of a single market within the European Community (EC) and the end of the Communist regimes in Central and Eastern Europe. The experience of the EC is used to illustrate trends and problems in the development of international cooperation in education and training. Common concerns and priorities throughout the new Europe are then identified and discussed. These include the pursuit of quality in schooling, efforts to serve the interests of disadvantaged learners, and the treatment of European Studies in the curriculum, including the improvement of the teaching of foreign languages.

  7. Telemedicine and European law.

    PubMed

    Callens, Stefaan

    2003-01-01

    A Directive of the European Union was first published in 2000, which dealt with telemedicine as part of its provisions. This E-Commerce Directive, as it became known, was subjected to further study which revealed some problems relative to the practice of telemedicine. Among the subjects discussed in this paper are those of privacy, data protection, free movement of services, the impact of electronic communication and ethical issues. PMID:15074761

  8. The European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, S; Eshraqi, M; Hahn, H; Jansson, A; Lindroos, M; Ponton, A; Rathsman, K; Trahern, G; Bousso, S; Calaga, R; Devanz, G; Duperrier, R D; Eguia, J; Gammino, S; Moller, S P; Oyon, C; Ruber, R.J.M.Y.; Satogata, T

    2011-03-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a 5 MW, 2.5 GeV long pulse proton linac, to be built and commissioned in Lund, Sweden. The Accelerator Design Update (ADU) project phase is under way, to be completed at the end of 2012 by the delivery of a Technical Design Report. Improvements to the 2003 ESS design will be summarised, and the latest design activities will be presented.

  9. Disagreement in genotyping results of drug resistance alleles of the Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) gene by allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) assays and Sanger sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Divya; Lather, Manila; Dykes, Cherry L; Dang, Amita S; Adak, Tridibes; Singh, Om P

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of antimalarial drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum over the past few decades has necessitated intensive monitoring of such resistance for an effective malaria control strategy. P. falciparum dihydropteroate synthase (Pfdhps) and P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) genes act as molecular markers for resistance against the antimalarial drugs sulphadoxine and pyrimethamine, respectively. Resistance to pyrimethamine which is used as a partner drug in artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) is associated with several mutations in the Pfdhfr gene, namely A16V, N51I, C59R, S108N/T and I164L. Therefore, routine monitoring of Pfdhfr-drug-resistant alleles in a population may help in effective drug resistance management. Allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) is one of the commonly used methods for molecular genotyping of these alleles. In this study, we genotyped 55 samples of P. falciparum for allele discrimination at four codons of Pfdhfr (N51, C59, S108 and I164) by ASPCR using published methods and by Sanger's DNA sequencing method. We found that the ASPCR identified a significantly higher number of mutant alleles as compared to the DNA sequencing method. Such discrepancies arise due to the non-specificity of some of the allele-specific primer sets and due to the lack of sensitivity of Sanger's DNA sequencing method to detect minor alleles present in multiple clone infections. This study reveals the need of a highly specific and sensitive method for genotyping and detecting minor drug-resistant alleles present in multiple clonal infections. PMID:26407876

  10. Population based allele frequencies of disease associated polymorphisms in the Personalized Medicine Research Project

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is a lack of knowledge regarding the frequency of disease associated polymorphisms in populations and population attributable risk for many populations remains unknown. Factors that could affect the association of the allele with disease, either positively or negatively, such as race, ethnicity, and gender, may not be possible to determine without population based allele frequencies. Here we used a panel of 51 polymorphisms previously associated with at least one disease and determined the allele frequencies within the entire Personalized Medicine Research Project population based cohort. We compared these allele frequencies to those in dbSNP and other data sources stratified by race. Differences in allele frequencies between self reported race, region of origin, and sex were determined. Results There were 19544 individuals who self reported a single racial category, 19027 or (97.4%) self reported white Caucasian, and 11205 (57.3%) individuals were female. Of the 11,208 (57%) individuals with an identifiable region of origin 8337 or (74.4%) were German. 41 polymorphisms were significantly different between self reported race at the 0.05 level. Stratification of our Caucasian population by self reported region of origin revealed 19 polymorphisms that were significantly different (p = 0.05) between individuals of different origins. Further stratification of the population by gender revealed few significant differences in allele frequencies between the genders. Conclusions This represents one of the largest population based allele frequency studies to date. Stratification by self reported race and region of origin revealed wide differences in allele frequencies not only by race but also by region of origin within a single racial group. We report allele frequencies for our Asian/Hmong and American Indian populations; these two minority groups are not typically selected for population allele frequency detection. Population wide allele frequencies are

  11. Apolipoprotein E alleles in Alzheimer`s and Parkinson`s patients

    SciTech Connect

    Poduslo, S.E.; Schwankhaus, J.D.

    1994-09-01

    A number of investigators have found an association between the apolipoprotein E4 allele and Alzheimer`s disease. The E4 allele appears at a higher frequency in late onset familial Alzheimer`s patients. In our studies we obtained blood samples from early and late onset familial and sporadic Alzheimer`s patients and spouses, as well as from Parkinson`s patients. The patients were diagnosed as probable Alzheimer`s patients after a neurological examination, extensive blood work, and a CAT scan. The diagnosis was made according to the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria. The apolipoprotein E4 polymorphism was detected after PCR amplification of genomic DNA, restriction enzyme digestion with Hhal, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Ethidium bromide-stained bands at 91 bp were designated as allele 3, at 83 bp as allele 2, and at 72 bp as allele 4. Of the 84 probable Alzheimer`s patients (all of whom were Caucasian), 47 were heterozygous and 13 were homozygous for the E4 allele. There were 26 early onset patients; 13 were heterozygous and 7 homozygous for the E4 allele. The frequencies for the E4 allele for late onset familial patients was 0.45 and for sporadic patients was 0.37. We analyzed 77 spouses with an average age of 71.9 {plus_minus} 7.4 years as controls, and 15 were heterozygous for the E4 allele for an E4 frequency of 0.097. Of the 53 Parkinson`s patients, 11 had the E4 allele for a frequency of 0.113. Thus our findings support the association of the ApoE4 allele with Alzheimer`s disease.

  12. Origins, distribution and expression of the Duarte-2 (D2) allele of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Amanda E.; Sanders, Rebecca D.; Garza, Kerry R.; McGaha, Lee Anne; Bean, Lora J. H.; Coffee, Bradford W.; Thomas, James W.; Cutler, David J.; Kurtkaya, Natalie L.; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L.

    2009-01-01

    Duarte galactosemia is a mild to asymptomatic condition that results from partial impairment of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). Patients with Duarte galactosemia demonstrate reduced GALT activity and carry one profoundly impaired GALT allele (G) along with a second, partially impaired GALT allele (Duarte-2, D2). Molecular studies reveal at least five sequence changes on D2 alleles: a p.N314D missense substitution, three intronic base changes and a 4 bp deletion in the 5′ proximal sequence. The four non-coding sequence changes are unique to D2. The p.N314D substitution, however, is not; it is found together with a silent polymorphism, p.L218(TTA), on functionally normal Duarte-1 alleles (D1, also called Los Angeles or LA alleles). The HapMap database reveals that p.N314D is a common human variant, and cross-species comparisons implicate D314 as the ancestral allele. The p.N314D substitution is also functionally neutral in mammalian cell and yeast expression studies. In contrast, the 4 bp 5′ deletion characteristic of D2 alleles appears to be functionally impaired in reporter gene transfection studies. Here we present allele-specific qRT–PCR evidence that D2 alleles express less mRNA in vivo than their wild-type counterparts; the difference is small but statistically significant. Furthermore, we characterize the prevalence of the 4 bp deletion in GG, NN and DG populations; the deletion appears exclusive to D2 alleles. Combined, these data strongly implicate the 4 bp 5′ deletion as a causal mutation in Duarte galactosemia and suggest that direct tests for this deletion, as proposed here, could enhance or supplant current tests, which define D2 alleles on the basis of the presence and absence of linked coding sequence polymorphisms. PMID:19224951

  13. HLA-B allele dropout in PCR sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe typing due to intronic polymorphism in the novel B*58:01:01:02 allele.

    PubMed

    He, Y; Wang, W; Han, Z; He, J; Chen, N; Dong, L; Tao, S; Zhang, W; He, J; Zhu, F; Lv, H

    2016-06-01

    Currently, Luminex technology based on the PCR sequence-specific oligonucleotide (SSO) probe method has been widely used for HLA genotyping in the immunogenetics laboratories. Here, we reported a case with HLA-B allele dropout by Luminex technology. The initial HLA-B result of the Luminex method with a commercial agent kit was inconclusive, and then, the result of PCR-SBT technology indicated the dropout as a HLA-B*58 allele. Subsequently, the full-length sequence of HLA-B allele was determined by TOPO-TA cloning, and a novel allele B*58:01:01:02 was identified in the individual. Compared with HLA-B*58:01:01:01, the novel allele showed some nucleotides difference at 509 C>T, 521 T>G and CCC insertion in position 503 of intron 2. According to the full-length sequence, the new mutations of intron 2 were contributed to HLA-B locus allele dropout in the sample. Our results indicated multiplatform should be used to improve the HLA typing accuracy when a conclusive HLA genotype cannot be determined. PMID:27016176

  14. Cognitive and neural correlates of the 5-repeat allele of the dopamine D4 receptor gene in a population lacking the 7-repeat allele.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Tomita, Hiroaki; Taki, Yasuyuki; Kikuchi, Yoshie; Ono, Chiaki; Yu, Zhiqian; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Nouchi, Rui; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Iizuka, Kunio; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Shinada, Takamitsu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Kunitoki, Keiko; Sassa, Yuko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2015-04-15

    The 5-repeat allele of a common length polymorphism in the gene that encodes the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) is robustly associated with the risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and substantially exists in Asian populations, which have a lower ADHD prevalence. In this study, we investigated the effect of this allele on microstructural properties of the brain and on its functional activity during externally directed attention-demanding tasks and creative performance in the 765 Asian subjects. For this purpose, we employed diffusion tensor imaging, N-back functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigms, and a test to measure creativity by divergent thinking. The 5-repeat allele was significantly associated with increased originality in the creative performance, increased mean diffusivity (the measure of how the tissue includes water molecules instead of neural and vessel components) in the widespread gray and white matter areas of extensive areas, particularly those where DRD4 is expressed, and reduced task-induced deactivation in the areas that are deactivated during the tasks in the course of both the attention-demanding working memory task and simple sensorimotor task. The observed neural characteristics of 5-repeat allele carriers may lead to an increased risk of ADHD and behavioral deficits. Furthermore, the increased originality of creative thinking observed in the 5-repeat allele carriers may support the notion of the side of adaptivity of the widespread risk allele of psychiatric diseases. PMID:25659462

  15. Association between rs2431697 T allele on 5q33.3 and systemic lupus erythematosus: case-control study and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhao-Ming; Wang, Ping; Chang, Pan-Pan; Hasahya, Tony; Xing, Hui; Wang, Jin-Ping; Hu, Li-Hua

    2015-11-01

    rs2431697 is located on 5q33.3, between pituitary tumor-transforming gene 1 and miR-146a. Several studies have estimated the association between rs2431697 and systemic lupus erythematosus risk. However, the results were inconsistent. A case-control study was carried out to explore the association between rs2431697 and systemic lupus erythematosus risk in a central Chinese population. Meta-analyses combining present with previous studies were conducted to further explore the association. Our case-control study included 322 cases and 353 controls. rs2431697 T allele was associated with increased risk of systemic lupus erythematosus (odds ratios (ORs) = 1.461, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.091-1.957, P = 0.011). The association was stronger between T allele and the risk of anti-double-stranded DNA (dsDNA)-positive systemic lupus erythematosus (OR = 2.510, 95% CI 1.545-4.077, P < 0.001). The meta-analyses included 8648 systemic lupus erythematosus patients and 10947 controls. rs2431697 T allele had an overall OR of 1.262 (95% CI 1.205-1.323, P < 0.001) under fixed-effects model. After stratified by ethnicity, I (2) reduced from 24.3 to 0 %. T allele had an OR of 1.213 (95% CI 1.145-1.284, P < 0.001) in European descendant and 1.365 (95% CI 1.259-1.480, P < 0.001) in Asian under fixed-effects model. Data on women were also extracted, and T allele had an OR of 1.337 (95% CI 1.162-1.539, P < 0.001) under random-effects model. The pooled ORs were not influenced by each study in sensitivity analyses. There were no publication biases observed in these analyses. The results from our case-control study and the meta-analyses indicate that rs2431697 T allele significantly associates with the increased risk of systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:26251230

  16. Mitochondrial DNA genetic diversity and LCT-13910 and deltaF508 CFTR alleles typing in the medieval sample from Poland.

    PubMed

    Płoszaj, T; Jerszyńska, B; Jędrychowska-Dańska, K; Lewandowska, M; Kubiak, D; Grzywnowicz, K; Masłowska, A; Witas, H W

    2015-06-01

    We attempted to confirm the resemblance of a local medieval population and to reconstruct their contribution to the formation of the modern Polish population at the DNA level. The HVR I mtDNA sequence and two nuclear alleles, LCT-13910C/T SNP and deltaF508 CFTR, were chosen as markers since the distribution of selected nuclear alleles varies among ethnic groups. A total of 47 specimens were selected from a medieval cemetery in Cedynia (located in the western Polish lowland). Regarding the HVR I profile, the analyzed population differed from the present-day population (P = 0.045, F(st) = 0.0103), in contrast to lactase persistence (LP) based on the LCT-13910T allele, thus indicating the lack of notable frequency changes of this allele during the last millennium (P = 0.141). The sequence of the HVR I mtDNA fragment allowed to identify six major haplogroups including H, U5, T, K, and HV0 within the medieval population of Cedynia which are common in today's central Europe. An analysis of haplogroup frequency and its comparison with modern European populations shows that the studied medieval population is more closely related to Finno-Ugric populations than to the present Polish population. Identification of less common haplogroups, i.e., Z and U2, both atypical of the modern Polish population and of Asian origin, provides evidence for some kind of connections between the studied and foreign populations. Furthermore, a comparison of the available aDNA sequences from medieval Europe suggests that populations differed from one another and a number of data from other locations are required to find out more about the features of the medieval gene pool profile. PMID:25896719

  17. Detection of 549 new HLA alleles in potential stem cell donors from the United States, Poland and Germany.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Frederick, C J; Cereb, N; Giani, A S; Ruppel, J; Maraszek, A; Pingel, J; Sauter, J; Schmidt, A H; Yang, S Y

    2016-01-01

    We characterized 549 new human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II alleles found in newly registered stem cell donors as a result of high-throughput HLA typing. New alleles include 101 HLA-A, 132 HLA-B, 105 HLA-C, 2 HLA-DRB1, 89 HLA-DQB1 and 120 HLA-DPB1 alleles. Mainly, new alleles comprised single nucleotide variations when compared with homologous sequences. We identified nonsynonymous nucleotide mutations in 70.7% of all new alleles, synonymous variations in 26.4% and nonsense substitutions in 2.9% (null alleles). Some new alleles (55, 10.0%) were found multiple times, HLA-DPB1 alleles being the most frequent among these. Furthermore, as several new alleles were identified in individuals from ethnic minority groups, the relevance of recruiting donors belonging to such groups and the importance of ethnicity data collection in donor centers and registries is highlighted. PMID:26812061

  18. Pharmacogenetics of drug metabolizing enzymes in the United Kingdom population: review of current knowledge and comparison with selected European populations.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ann K

    2015-09-01

    Data on frequency of pharmacogenetic polymorphisms in the UK population are limited. However, availability of whole genome sequencing data on 94 UK controls of European ethnicity from the 1000 genomes project together with similar data on other populations provides a valuable new source of data in this area and allows direct comparison of allele frequencies with those for other European populations. The ethnic diversity of the UK population also needs to be considered, and 1000 genomes includes data on South Asians, the most common ethnic group in the UK after White Europeans. Allele frequencies for polymorphisms in genes relevant to phase I and phase II drug metabolism for UK, Finnish, Spanish and South Asian populations were obtained from the literature and 1000 genomes. Generally there was good agreement between the literature and 1000 genomes reports. CYP2D6*4, the most common CYP2D6 poor metabolizer allele among Europeans, appears more common in the UK than in Spain and Finland, whereas, as suggested previously, CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C9*2 appear more common in Finland and Spain, respectively, than in the UK. South Asians show low frequencies of CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C19*17 but higher frequencies of CYP2C19*2 compared with UK residents of European ethnicity. Though personalizing drug treatment on the basis of individual genotype rather than ethnicity may be more appropriate, differences in allele frequencies across continents should be considered when designing clinical trials of new drugs. PMID:25803091

  19. Comparison of Prion Allele Frequency found in Suffolk and Targhee Sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scrapie is a class of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy that affects sheep and goats. The objective of this study was to compare genotypic and allelic frequencies among USSES Targhee and Suffolk sheep. A total of 122 sheep were genotyped for codon 171 with allele specific primers in 2 separate...

  20. Molecular detection and identification of intimin alleles in pathogenic Escherichia coli by multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Reid, S D; Betting, D J; Whittam, T S

    1999-08-01

    A multiplex PCR was designed to detect the eae gene and simultaneously identify specific alleles in pathogenic Escherichia coli. The method was tested on 87 strains representing the diarrheagenic E. coli clones. The results show that the PCR assay accurately detects eae and resolves alleles encoding the alpha, beta, and gamma intimin variants. PMID:10405431

  1. Molecular Detection and Identification of Intimin Alleles in Pathogenic Escherichia coli by Multiplex PCR

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Sean D.; Betting, David J.; Whittam, Thomas S.

    1999-01-01

    A multiplex PCR was designed to detect the eae gene and simultaneously identify specific alleles in pathogenic Escherichia coli. The method was tested on 87 strains representing the diarrheagenic E. coli clones. The results show that the PCR assay accurately detects eae and resolves alleles encoding the α, β, and γ intimin variants. PMID:10405431

  2. Retention of agronomically important variation in germplasm core collections: implications for allele mining

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The primary targets of allele mining efforts are loci of agronomic importance. Agronomic loci typically exhibit patterns of allelic diversity consistent with a history of natural or artificial selection. Natural or artificial selection causes the distribution of genetic diversity at such loci to d...

  3. Fixation probability and the crossing time in the Wright-Fisher multiple alleles model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Wonpyong

    2009-08-01

    The fixation probability and crossing time in the Wright-Fisher multiple alleles model, which describes a finite haploid population, were calculated by switching on an asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape with a positive asymmetric parameter, r, such that the reversal allele of the optimal allele has higher fitness than the optimal allele. The fixation probability, which was evaluated as the ratio of the first arrival time at the reversal allele to the origination time, was double the selective advantage of the reversal allele compared with the optimal allele in the strong selection region, where the fitness parameter, k, is much larger than the critical fitness parameter, kc. The crossing time in a finite population for r>0 and kallele in the first generation should be greater than one individual in an asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape. It was also found that the crossing time in a finite population for r>0 and k≫kc scaled as a power law in the fitness parameter with a similar scaling exponent as the crossing time in an infinite population for r=0, and that the critical fitness parameter decreased with increasing sequence length with a fixed population size.

  4. An Updated Collection of Sequence Barcoded Temperature-Sensitive Alleles of Yeast Essential Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kofoed, Megan; Milbury, Karissa L.; Chiang, Jennifer H.; Sinha, Sunita; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Hieter, Philip; Stirling, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Systematic analyses of essential gene function using mutant collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been conducted using collections of heterozygous diploids, promoter shut-off alleles, through alleles with destabilized mRNA, destabilized protein, or bearing mutations that lead to a temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype. We previously described a method for construction of barcoded ts alleles in a systematic fashion. Here we report the completion of this collection of alleles covering 600 essential yeast genes. This resource covers a larger gene repertoire than previous collections and provides a complementary set of strains suitable for single gene and genomic analyses. We use deep sequencing to characterize the amino acid changes leading to the ts phenotype in half of the alleles. We also use high-throughput approaches to describe the relative ts behavior of the alleles. Finally, we demonstrate the experimental usefulness of the collection in a high-content, functional genomic screen for ts alleles that increase spontaneous P-body formation. By increasing the number of alleles and improving the annotation, this ts collection will serve as a community resource for probing new aspects of biology for essential yeast genes. PMID:26175450

  5. An Updated Collection of Sequence Barcoded Temperature-Sensitive Alleles of Yeast Essential Genes.

    PubMed

    Kofoed, Megan; Milbury, Karissa L; Chiang, Jennifer H; Sinha, Sunita; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Hieter, Philip; Stirling, Peter C

    2015-09-01

    Systematic analyses of essential gene function using mutant collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been conducted using collections of heterozygous diploids, promoter shut-off alleles, through alleles with destabilized mRNA, destabilized protein, or bearing mutations that lead to a temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype. We previously described a method for construction of barcoded ts alleles in a systematic fashion. Here we report the completion of this collection of alleles covering 600 essential yeast genes. This resource covers a larger gene repertoire than previous collections and provides a complementary set of strains suitable for single gene and genomic analyses. We use deep sequencing to characterize the amino acid changes leading to the ts phenotype in half of the alleles. We also use high-throughput approaches to describe the relative ts behavior of the alleles. Finally, we demonstrate the experimental usefulness of the collection in a high-content, functional genomic screen for ts alleles that increase spontaneous P-body formation. By increasing the number of alleles and improving the annotation, this ts collection will serve as a community resource for probing new aspects of biology for essential yeast genes. PMID:26175450

  6. Sporadic inclusion body myositis: HLA-DRB1 allele interactions influence disease risk and clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Mastaglia, Frank L; Needham, Merrilee; Scott, Adrian; James, Ian; Zilko, Paul; Day, Timothy; Kiers, Lynette; Corbett, Alastair; Witt, Campbell S; Allcock, Richard; Laing, Nigel; Garlepp, Michael; Christiansen, Frank T

    2009-11-01

    Susceptibility to sIBM is strongly associated with the HLA-DRB1*03 allele and the 8.1 MHC ancestral haplotype (HLA-A1, B8, DRB1*03) but little is known about the effects of allelic interactions at the DRB1 locus or disease-modifying effects of HLA alleles. HLA-A, B and DRB1 genotyping was performed in 80 Australian sIBM cases and the frequencies of different alleles and allele combinations were compared with those in a group of 190 healthy controls. Genotype-phenotype correlations were also investigated. Amongst carriers of the HLA-DRB1*03 allele, DRB1*03/*01 heterozygotes were over-represented in the sIBM group (p<0.003) while. DRB1*03/*04 heterozygotes were under-represented (p<0.008). The mean age-at-onset (AAO) was 6.5 years earlier in DRB1*03/*01 heterozygotes who also had more severe quadriceps muscle weakness than the rest of the cohort. The findings indicate that interactions between the HLA-DRB1*03 allele and other alleles at the DRB1 locus can influence disease susceptibility and the clinical phenotype in sIBM. PMID:19720533

  7. Allelic effects of mouse Pas1 candidate genes in human lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Galbiati, Federica; Pettinicchio, Angela; Dragani, Tommaso A; Manenti, Giacomo

    2006-12-01

    Four of the six genes constituting the mouse Pulmonary adenoma susceptibility 1 (Pas1) locus haplotype carry amino acid variants: Lrmp, Casc1, Ghiso, and Lmna-rs1. In vitro colony formation assay of human lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H520 transfected with the allelic variants of the four genes revealed allele-specific modulations of colony numbers by Lmna-rs1 and Casc1, but not by Lrmp or Ghiso. In A549 and NCI-H520 cells, the A/J allele of Lmna-rs1 produced approximately 4- and approximately 2-fold, respectively, more transfectants than did the C57BL/6J allele, whereas the A/J allele of Casc1 produced approximately 6- and approximately 5-fold fewer transfectants, respectively, as compared to the C57BL/6J allele. Inhibition of clonogenicity by allelic forms of Pas1 candidate genes was not mediated by induction of apoptosis. These findings provide evidence that allelic variants of mouse Pas1 candidate genes differentially modulate growth of human cancer cells. PMID:16458428

  8. A Computer Simulation Study of Vntr Population Genetics: Constrained Recombination Rules Out the Infinite Alleles Model

    PubMed Central

    Harding, R. M.; Boyce, A. J.; Martinson, J. J.; Flint, J.; Clegg, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    Extensive allelic diversity in variable numbers of tandem repeats (VNTRs) has been discovered in the human genome. For population genetic studies of VNTRs, such as forensic applications, it is important to know whether a neutral mutation-drift balance of VNTR polymorphism can be represented by the infinite alleles model. The assumption of the infinite alleles model that each new mutant is unique is very likely to be violated by unequal sister chromatid exchange (USCE), the primary process believed to generate VNTR mutants. We show that increasing both mutation rates and misalignment constraint for intrachromosomal recombination in a computer simulation model reduces simulated VNTR diversity below the expectations of the infinite alleles model. Maximal constraint, represented as slippage of single repeats, reduces simulated VNTR diversity to levels expected from the stepwise mutation model. Although misalignment rule is the more important variable, mutation rate also has an effect. At moderate rates of USCE, simulated VNTR diversity fluctuates around infinite alleles expectation. However, if rates of USCE are high, as for hypervariable VNTRs, simulated VNTR diversity is consistently lower than predicted by the infinite alleles model. This has been observed for many VNTRs and accounted for by technical problems in distinguishing alleles of neighboring size classes. We use sampling theory to confirm the intrinsically poor fit to the infinite alleles model of both simulated VNTR diversity and observed VNTR polymorphisms sampled from two Papua New Guinean populations. PMID:8293988

  9. Identification of novel alleles of the rice blast resistance gene Pi54

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K.

    2015-10-01

    Rice blast is one of the most devastating rice diseases and continuous resistance breeding is required to control the disease. The rice blast resistance gene Pi54 initially identified in an Indian cultivar confers broad-spectrum resistance in India. We explored the allelic diversity of the Pi54 gene among 885 Indian rice genotypes that were found resistant in our screening against field mixture of naturally existing M. oryzae strains as well as against five unique strains. These genotypes are also annotated as rice blast resistant in the International Rice Genebank database. Sequence-based allele mining was used to amplify and clone the Pi54 allelic variants. Nine new alleles of Pi54 were identified based on the nucleotide sequence comparison to the Pi54 reference sequence as well as to already known Pi54 alleles. DNA sequence analysis of the newly identified Pi54 alleles revealed several single polymorphic sites, three double deletions and an eight base pair deletion. A SNP-rich region was found between a tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site and the nucleotide binding site (NBS) domain. Together, the newly identified Pi54 alleles expand the allelic series and are candidates for rice blast resistance breeding programs.

  10. Sensitivity of Allelic Divergence to Genomic Position: Lessons from the Drosophila tan Gene

    PubMed Central

    John, Alisha V.; Sramkoski, Lisa L.; Walker, Elizabeth A.; Cooley, Arielle M.; Wittkopp, Patricia J.

    2016-01-01

    To identify genetic variants underlying changes in phenotypes within and between species, researchers often utilize transgenic animals to compare the function of alleles in different genetic backgrounds. In Drosophila, targeted integration mediated by the ΦC31 integrase allows activity of alternative alleles to be compared at the same genomic location. By using the same insertion site for each transgene, position effects are generally assumed to be controlled for because both alleles are surrounded by the same genomic context. Here, we test this assumption by comparing the activity of tan alleles from two Drosophila species, D. americana and D. novamexicana, at five different genomic locations in D. melanogaster. We found that the relative effects of these alleles varied among insertion sites, with no difference in activity observed between them at two sites. One of these sites simply silenced both transgenes, but the other allowed expression of both alleles that was sufficient to rescue a mutant phenotype yet failed to reveal the functional differences between the two alleles. These results suggest that more than one insertion site should be used when comparing the activity of transgenes because failing to do so could cause functional differences between alleles to go undetected. PMID:27449514

  11. Identification of novel alleles of the rice blast resistance gene Pi54

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K.

    2015-01-01

    Rice blast is one of the most devastating rice diseases and continuous resistance breeding is required to control the disease. The rice blast resistance gene Pi54 initially identified in an Indian cultivar confers broad-spectrum resistance in India. We explored the allelic diversity of the Pi54 gene among 885 Indian rice genotypes that were found resistant in our screening against field mixture of naturally existing M. oryzae strains as well as against five unique strains. These genotypes are also annotated as rice blast resistant in the International Rice Genebank database. Sequence-based allele mining was used to amplify and clone the Pi54 allelic variants. Nine new alleles of Pi54 were identified based on the nucleotide sequence comparison to the Pi54 reference sequence as well as to already known Pi54 alleles. DNA sequence analysis of the newly identified Pi54 alleles revealed several single polymorphic sites, three double deletions and an eight base pair deletion. A SNP-rich region was found between a tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site and the nucleotide binding site (NBS) domain. Together, the newly identified Pi54 alleles expand the allelic series and are candidates for rice blast resistance breeding programs. PMID:26498172

  12. Salmonella Typhi shdA: pseudogene or allelic variant?

    PubMed

    Urrutia, I M; Fuentes, J A; Valenzuela, L M; Ortega, A P; Hidalgo, A A; Mora, G C

    2014-08-01

    ShdA from Salmonella Typhimurium (ShdASTm) is a large outer membrane protein that specifically recognizes and binds to fibronectin. ShdASTm is involved in the colonization of the cecum and the Peyer's patches of terminal ileum in mice. On the other hand, shdA gene from Salmonella Typhi (shdASTy) has been considered a pseudogene (i.e. a nonfunctional sequence of genomic DNA) due to the presence of deletions and mutations that gave rise to premature stop codons. In this work we show that, despite the deletions and mutations, shdASTy is fully functional. S. Typhi ΔshdA mutants presented an impaired adherence and invasion of HEp-2 pre-treated with TGF-β1, an inducer of fibronectin production. Moreover, shdA from S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium seem to be equivalent since shdASTm restored the adherence and invasion of S. Typhi ΔshdA mutant to wild type levels. In addition, anti-FLAG mAbs interfered with the adherence and invasion of the S. Typhi shdA-3xFLAG strain. Finally, shdASTy encodes a detectable protein when heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli DH5α. The data presented here show that shdASTy is not a pseudogene, but a different functional allele compared with shdASTm. PMID:24859062

  13. Immunoglobulin light chain allelic inclusion in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Louise D; Zhao, Yuan; Lutalo, Pamela M K; D'Cruz, David P; Cason, John; Silva, Joselli S; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K; Nayar, Saba; Cope, Andrew P; Spencer, Jo

    2015-08-01

    The principles of allelic exclusion state that each B cell expresses a single light and heavy chain pair. Here, we show that B cells with both kappa and lambda light chains (Igκ and Igλ) are enriched in some patients with the systemic autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but not in the systemic autoimmune disease control granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Detection of dual Igκ and Igλ expression by flow cytometry could not be abolished by acid washing or by DNAse treatment to remove any bound polyclonal antibody or complexes, and was retained after two days in culture. Both surface and intracytoplasmic dual light chain expression was evident by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. We observed reduced frequency of rearrangements of the kappa-deleting element (KDE) in SLE and an inverse correlation between the frequency of KDE rearrangement and the frequency of dual light chain expressing B cells. We propose that dual expression of Igκ and Igλ by a single B cell may occur in some patients with SLE when this may be a consequence of reduced activity of the KDE. PMID:26036683

  14. alpha1-antitrypsin (PI) alleles as markers of Westeuropean influence in the Baltic Sea region.

    PubMed

    Beckman, L; Sikström, C; Mikelsaar, A; Krumina, A; Kucinskas, V; Beckman, G

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of alpha1-antitrypsin (PI) alleles was studied in an attempt to elucidate migrations and admixture between populations in the Baltic Sea region. The frequency of the PI Z allele, a typically Northwesteuropean marker gene, showed a highly significant regional variation in the Baltic Sea region. The highest frequency (4.5%) was found in the western part of Latvia (Courland). The PI S allele, another marker of Westeuropean influence, also showed an increased frequency in the Courland population. These results indicate that among the populations east of the Baltic Sea the Curonian population has the most pronounced Westeuropean influence. Archaeological data have shown that from the 7th century and for several hundreds of years Courland received immigrations from mainland Sweden and the island of Gotland. We speculate that the increased frequencies of the PI Z alleles and S alleles in Courland may have been caused by these migrations. PMID:9858859

  15. Global distribution of allele frequencies at the human dopamine D4 receptor locus

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, F.M.; Kidd, J.R.; Livak, K.J.

    1994-09-01

    The dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) is a candidate gene for schizophrenia because the dopaminergic system has been implicated in this neuropsychiatric disorder. Several research groups have reported an association between allelic variants at DRD4 and schizophrenia, while others have been unable to replicate that finding. Knowledge of the appropriate gene frequencies in the underlying populations may resolve these inconsistencies. We have determined the frequencies of 8 different alleles of the 48 bp imperfect tandem repeat of exon 3 at the DRD4 locus in samples from 33 populations around the world. The frequencies vary considerably in the different populations with the most common allele ranging from 16% to 95%. Frequencies and Fst values will be presented for the 3 most common alleles (4-, 7-, and 2- repeat) by continental groupings, but the individual populations vary significantly around the averages. The populations averaged 4.3 alleles (range 2 to 7).

  16. Biophotonics: a European perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, Thierry; Cochard, Jacques; Breussin, Frédéric

    2013-03-01

    The objective of the present work is to determine the opportunities and challenges for Biophotonics business development in Europe for the next five years with a focus on sensors and systems: for health diagnostics and monitoring; for air, water and food safety and quality control. The development of this roadmap was initiated and supported by EPIC (The European Photonics Industry Consortium). We summarize the final roadmap data: market application segments and trends, analysis of the market access criteria, analysis of the technology trends and major bottlenecks and challenges per application.

  17. Eastern European risk management

    SciTech Connect

    Honey, J.A. )

    1992-01-01

    Here the authors assess Eastern European risk management practices through the evaluation of the nuclear power plants in the region. This evaluation is limited to the Soviet-designed and -built VVER-440 pressurized water reactors (PWRs) that are currently operating in Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Russia, and the Ukraine and until recently operated at Greifswald in the former East Germany. This evaluation is based on the basic design of the plants, a safety evaluation of the Greifswald facility by representatives from the Federal Republic of Germany and personal visits by the author to Greifswald and Loviisa.

  18. The functional importance of sequence versus expression variability of MHC alleles in parasite resistance.

    PubMed

    Axtner, Jan; Sommer, Simone

    2012-12-01

    Understanding selection processes driving the pronounced allelic polymorphism of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes and its functional associations to parasite load have been the focus of many recent wildlife studies. Two main selection scenarios are currently debated which explain the susceptibility or resistance to parasite infections either by the effects of (1) specific MHC alleles which are selected frequency-dependent in space and time or (2) a heterozygote or divergent allele advantage. So far, most studies have focused only on structural variance in co-evolutionary processes although this might not be the only trait subject to natural selection. In the present study, we analysed structural variance stretching from exon1 through exon3 of MHC class II DRB genes as well as genotypic expression variance in relation to the gastrointestinal helminth prevalence and infection intensity in wild yellow-necked mice (Apodemus flavicollis). We found support for the functional importance of specific alleles both on the sequence and expression level. By resampling a previously investigated study population we identified specific MHC alleles affected by temporal shifts in parasite pressure and recorded associated changes in allele frequencies. The allele Apfl-DRB*23 was associated with resistance to infections by the oxyurid nematode Syphacia stroma and at the same time with susceptibility to cestode infection intensity. In line with our expectation, MHC mRNA transcript levels tended to be higher in cestode-infected animals carrying the allele Apfl-DRB*23. However, no support for a heterozygote or divergent allele advantage on the sequence or expression level was detected. The individual amino acid distance of genotypes did not explain individual differences in parasite loads and the genetic distance had no effect on MHC genotype expression. For ongoing studies on the functional importance of expression variance in parasite resistance, allele

  19. Distribution of repeat unit differences between alleles at tandem repeat microsatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, L. |; Zhong, Y.; Chakraborty, R.

    1994-09-01

    PCR-based assays of tandemly repeated microsatellite loci detect genetic variation from which alleles may be scored by their repeat unit lengths. Comparison of allele sizes from such data yields a probability distribution (P{sub k}) of repeat unit differences (k) between alleles segregating in a population. We show that this distribution (P{sub k}; k = 0, 1,2,...) provides insight regarding the mechanism of production of new alleles at such loci and the demographic history of populations, far better than that obtained from other summary measures (e.g., heterozygosity, number of alleles, and the range of allele sizes). The distributions of P{sub k} under multi-step stepwise models of mutation are analytically derived, which show that when a population is at equilibrium under the mutation-drift balance, the distribution of repeat unit differences between alleles is positively skewed with a mode larger than zero. However, when the heterozygosity at a locus is low (say, less than 40%), P{sub k} is a monotonically decreasing function of k. Applications of this theory to data on repeat unit sizes at over 1,240 microsatellite loci from the Caucasians, categorized by the average heterozygosity of loci, indicate that at most microsatellite loci new alleles are produced by stepwise mutations, and this is consistent with the replication slippage mechanism of mutations. The repeat size changes of mutants are probably within one or two units of alleles from which the mutants arise. Distributions of P{sub k} at microsatellite loci located within genes show evidence of allele size constraints. No significant evidence of recent expansion of population sizes in the Caucasians is detected by the distribution of P{sub k}.

  20. Distinct allelic patterns of nanog expression impart embryonic stem cell population heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jincheng; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S

    2013-01-01

    Nanog is a principal pluripotency regulator exhibiting a disperse distribution within stem cell populations in vivo and in vitro. Increasing evidence points to a functional role of Nanog heterogeneity on stem cell fate decisions. Allelic control of Nanog gene expression was reported recently in mouse embryonic stem cells. To better understand how this mode of regulation influences the observed heterogeneity of NANOG in stem cell populations, we assembled a multiscale stochastic population balance equation framework. In addition to allelic control, gene expression noise and random partitioning at cell division were considered. As a result of allelic Nanog expression, the distribution of Nanog exhibited three distinct states but when combined with transcriptional noise the profile became bimodal. Regardless of their allelic expression pattern, initially uniform populations of stem cells gave rise to the same Nanog heterogeneity within ten cell cycles. Depletion of NANOG content in cells switching off both gene alleles was slower than the accumulation of intracellular NANOG after cells turned on at least one of their Nanog gene copies pointing to Nanog state-dependent dynamics. Allelic transcription of Nanog also raises issues regarding the use of stem cell lines with reporter genes knocked in a single allelic locus. Indeed, significant divergence was observed in the reporter and native protein profiles depending on the difference in their half-lives and insertion of the reporter gene in one or both alleles. In stem cell populations with restricted Nanog expression, allelic regulation facilitates the maintenance of fractions of self-renewing cells with sufficient Nanog content to prevent aberrant loss of pluripotency. Our findings underline the role of allelic control of Nanog expression as a prime determinant of stem cell population heterogeneity and warrant further investigation in the contexts of stem cell specification and cell reprogramming. PMID:23874182

  1. Dopamine Receptor Gene DRD4 7-Repeat Allele X Maternal Sensitivity Interaction on Child Externalizing Behavior Problems: Independent Replication of Effects at 18 Months

    PubMed Central

    King, Anthony P.; Muzik, Maria; Hamilton, Lindsay; Taylor, Alexander B.; Rosenblum, Katherine L.; Liberzon, Israel

    2016-01-01

    The DRD4 VNTR has been associated with child behavior problems in interaction with maternal insensitivity in European and American cohorts of preschoolers, with the 7-repeat (7R) allele associated with greater problems. We sought to replicate and expand these findings by examining effects on reports of child behavior problems at 18 months. A 63 family sample with data for observed maternal sensitivity ratings, DRD4 VNTR genotype, and maternal report of child behavior problems at 18-months was used in this preliminary analysis. Maternal sensitivity was measured at 6-months of age using laboratory observational measures (free-play and a teaching task). Maternal report of toddler behavior was obtained at 18-months via the standard Child Behavior Checklist, and infant genotype on the DRD4 VNTR was obtained using PCR. Infants carrying the DRD4 7R allele showed greater effects of maternal insensitivity than non-carriers for behavioral problems at 18-months. We replicated previous findings of association of infant DRD4 x maternal sensitivity interactions with child Externalizing problems in the European-ancestry sample (N = 42) in a median split of maternal sensitivity (p = .00011, eta2 = .329) and in regression analyses controlling for maternal age, maternal depression, and child gender in European ancestry (B = -3.4, SE 1.33, p = .01) and the total sample (B = -2.2, SE 1.02, p = .02). Exploratory analyses also found evidence of DRD4 x maternal sensitivity interaction with the CBCL ADHD scale. These findings replicate in an independent cohort DRD4 x maternal insensitivity interaction effect on child externalizing behavior problems at 18 months, further supporting the role of the DRD4 genotype in differential sensitivity to parenting. PMID:27494520

  2. Dopamine Receptor Gene DRD4 7-Repeat Allele X Maternal Sensitivity Interaction on Child Externalizing Behavior Problems: Independent Replication of Effects at 18 Months.

    PubMed

    King, Anthony P; Muzik, Maria; Hamilton, Lindsay; Taylor, Alexander B; Rosenblum, Katherine L; Liberzon, Israel

    2016-01-01

    The DRD4 VNTR has been associated with child behavior problems in interaction with maternal insensitivity in European and American cohorts of preschoolers, with the 7-repeat (7R) allele associated with greater problems. We sought to replicate and expand these findings by examining effects on reports of child behavior problems at 18 months. A 63 family sample with data for observed maternal sensitivity ratings, DRD4 VNTR genotype, and maternal report of child behavior problems at 18-months was used in this preliminary analysis. Maternal sensitivity was measured at 6-months of age using laboratory observational measures (free-play and a teaching task). Maternal report of toddler behavior was obtained at 18-months via the standard Child Behavior Checklist, and infant genotype on the DRD4 VNTR was obtained using PCR. Infants carrying the DRD4 7R allele showed greater effects of maternal insensitivity than non-carriers for behavioral problems at 18-months. We replicated previous findings of association of infant DRD4 x maternal sensitivity interactions with child Externalizing problems in the European-ancestry sample (N = 42) in a median split of maternal sensitivity (p = .00011, eta2 = .329) and in regression analyses controlling for maternal age, maternal depression, and child gender in European ancestry (B = -3.4, SE 1.33, p = .01) and the total sample (B = -2.2, SE 1.02, p = .02). Exploratory analyses also found evidence of DRD4 x maternal sensitivity interaction with the CBCL ADHD scale. These findings replicate in an independent cohort DRD4 x maternal insensitivity interaction effect on child externalizing behavior problems at 18 months, further supporting the role of the DRD4 genotype in differential sensitivity to parenting. PMID:27494520

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk Allele PTPRC Is Also Associated With Response to Anti–Tumor Necrosis Factor α Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jing; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Thomson, Brian; Padyukov, Leonid; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H. M.; Nititham, Joanne; Hughes, Laura B.; de Vries, Niek; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Alfredsson, Lars; Askling, Johan; Wedrén, Sara; Ding, Bo; Guiducci, Candace; Wolbink, Gert Jan; Crusius, J. Bart A.; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E.; Herenius, Marieke; Weinblatt, Michael E.; Shadick, Nancy A.; Worthington, Jane; Batliwalla, Franak; Kern, Marlena; Morgan, Ann W.; Wilson, Anthony G.; Isaacs, John D.; Hyrich, Kimme; Seldin, Michael F.; Moreland, Larry W.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Allaart, Cornelia F.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Tak, Paul P.; Bridges, S. Louis; Toes, Rene E. M.; Barton, Anne; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K.; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Anti–tumor necrosis factor α (anti-TNF) therapy is a mainstay of treatment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study was to test established RA genetic risk factors to determine whether the same alleles also influence the response to anti-TNF therapy. Methods A total of 1,283 RA patients receiving etanercept, infliximab, or adalimumab therapy were studied from among an international collaborative consortium of 9 different RA cohorts. The primary end point compared RA patients with a good treatment response according to the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response criteria (n = 505) with RA patients considered to be nonresponders (n = 316). The secondary end point was the change from baseline in the level of disease activity according to the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (ΔDAS28). Clinical factors such as age, sex, and concomitant medications were tested as possible correlates of treatment response. Thirty-one single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the risk of RA were genotyped and tested for any association with treatment response, using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. Results Of the 31 RA-associated risk alleles, a SNP at the PTPRC (also known as CD45) gene locus (rs10919563) was associated with the primary end point, a EULAR good response versus no response (odds ratio [OR] 0.55, P = 0.0001 in the multivariate model). Similar results were obtained using the secondary end point, the ΔDAS28 (P = 0.0002). There was suggestive evidence of a stronger association in autoantibody-positive patients with RA (OR 0.55, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.39–0.76) as compared with autoantibody-negative patients (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.41–1.99). Conclusion Statistically significant associations were observed between the response to anti-TNF therapy and an RA risk allele at the PTPRC gene locus. Additional studies will be required to replicate this finding in additional patient collections

  4. EAC: The European Astronauts Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripoll, Andres

    The newly established European Astronauts Centre (EAC) in Cologne represents the European Astronauts Home Base and will become a centre of expertise on European astronauts activities. The paper gives an overview of the European approach to man-in-space, describes the European Astronauts Policy and presents the major EAC roles and responsibilities including the management of selection, recruitment and flight assignment of astronauts; the astronauts support and medical surveillance; the supervision of the astronauts' non-flight assignments; crew safety; the definition of the overall astronauts training programme; the scheduling and supervision of the training facilities; the implementation of Basic Training; the recruitment, training and certification of instructors, and the interface to NASA in the framework of the Space Station Freedom programme. An overview is given on the organisation of EAC, and on the European candidate astronauts selection performed in 1991.

  5. Microsatellite allele dose and configuration establishment (MADCE): an integrated approach for genetic studies in allopolyploids

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic studies in allopolyploid plants are challenging because of the presence of similar sub-genomes, which leads to multiple alleles and complex segregation ratios. In this study, we describe a novel method for establishing the exact dose and configuration of microsatellite alleles for any accession of an allopolyploid plant species. The method, named Microsatellite Allele Dose and Configuration Establishment (MADCE), can be applied to mapping populations and pedigreed (breeding) germplasm in allopolyploids. Results Two case studies are presented to demonstrate the power and robustness of the MADCE method. In the mapping case, five microsatellites were analysed. These microsatellites amplified 35 different alleles based on size. Using MADCE, we uncovered 30 highly informative segregating alleles. A conventional approach would have yielded only 19 fully informative and six partially informative alleles. Of the ten alleles that were present in all progeny (and thereby ignored or considered homozygous when using conventional approaches), six were found to segregate by dosage when analysed with MADCE. Moreover, the full allelic configuration of the mapping parents could be established, including null alleles, homozygous loci, and alleles that were present on multiple homoeologues. In the second case, 21 pedigreed cultivars were analysed using MADCE, resulting in the establishment of the full allelic configuration for all 21 cultivars and a tracing of allele flow over multiple generations. Conclusions The procedure described in this study (MADCE) enhances the efficiency and information content of mapping studies in allopolyploids. More importantly, it is the first technique to allow the determination of the full allelic configuration in pedigreed breeding germplasm from allopolyploid plants. This enables pedigree-based marker-trait association studies the use of algorithms developed for diploid crops, and it may increase the effectiveness of LD

  6. Confounded by sequencing depth in association studies of rare alleles.

    PubMed

    Garner, Chad

    2011-05-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing technologies are facilitating large-scale association studies of rare genetic variants. The depth of the sequence read coverage is an important experimental variable in the next-generation technologies and it is a major determinant of the quality of genotype calls generated from sequence data. When case and control samples are sequenced separately or in different proportions across batches, they are unlikely to be matched on sequencing read depth and a differential misclassification of genotypes can result, causing confounding and an increased false-positive rate. Data from Pilot Study 3 of the 1000 Genomes project was used to demonstrate that a difference between the mean sequencing read depth of case and control samples can result in false-positive association for rare and uncommon variants, even when the mean coverage depth exceeds 30× in both groups. The degree of the confounding and inflation in the false-positive rate depended on the extent to which the mean depth was different in the case and control groups. A logistic regression model was used to test for association between case-control status and the cumulative number of alleles in a collapsed set of rare and uncommon variants. Including each individual's mean sequence read depth across the variant sites in the logistic regression model nearly eliminated the confounding effect and the inflated false-positive rate. Furthermore, accounting for the potential error by modeling the probability of the heterozygote genotype calls in the regression analysis had a relatively minor but beneficial effect on the statistical results. PMID:21328616

  7. Carriage of One or Two FMR1 Premutation Alleles Seems to Have No Effect on Illness Severity in a FXTAS Female with an Autozygous FMR1 Premutation Allele.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Revenga, Laia; Pagonabarraga, Javier; Gómez-Anson, Beatriz; López-Mourelo, Olga; Izquierdo, Silvia; Alvarez-Mora, Maria Isabel; Granell, Esther; Madrigal, Irene; Milà, Montserrat

    2016-10-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder that occurs in FMR1 premutation carriers. The prevalence of FMR1 premutation carriers in the general population is relatively high, and although rare, a premutation in both X chromosomes may occur in females inheriting a premutation allele from each of both parent carriers. Here, we report the first female with an autozygous (homozygous by descendent) FMR1 premutation allele, who fulfills neurological and radiological FXTAS findings/criteria. Molecular characterization included CGG repeat length, AGG interruption pattern, FMR1 messenger RNA (mRNA), fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) level quantification, and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray. Neuroradiological assessment of 3-T magnetic resonance imaging and neurological and cognitive/neuropsychological evaluations were performed. Neurological and neuroradiological examination of the female with the same FMR1 allele in the premutation range (77 CGGs) demonstrated FXTAS features. Further familial evaluation showed a similar neuropsychiatric profile, with impairments in cognitive flexibility and visuospatial function, mainly. A unique family with an autozygous FMR1 premutation female is presented. Neurological/cognitive and neuroradiological examinations revealed FXTAS-specific findings in the female with the autozygous FMR1 premutation allele. The consistent molecular and cognitive/psychiatric phenotype in family members suggests that carrying one or two FMR1 premutation alleles has no effect on illness severity. PMID:27315125

  8. European Conference on Health Economics.

    PubMed

    Malmivaara, Antti

    2010-12-01

    The biennial European Conference on Health Economics was held in Finland this year, at the Finlandia Hall in the centre of Helsinki. The European conferences rotate among European countries and fall between the biennial world congresses organized by the International Health Economics Association (iHEA). A record attendance of approximately 800 delegates from 50 countries around the world were present at the Helsinki conference. The theme of the conference was 'Connecting Health and Economics'. All major topics of health economics were covered in the sessions. For the first time, social care economics was included in the agenda of the European Conference as a session of its own. PMID:21155696

  9. Sequence-Level Analysis of the Major European Huntington Disease Haplotype

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Min; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Shin, Aram; Chao, Michael J.; Abu Elneel, Kawther; Gillis, Tammy; Mysore, Jayalakshmi Srinidhi; Kaye, Julia A.; Zahed, Hengameh; Kratter, Ian H.; Daub, Aaron C.; Finkbeiner, Steven; Li, Hong; Roach, Jared C.; Goodman, Nathan; Hood, Leroy; Myers, Richard H.; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Gusella, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) reflects the dominant consequences of a CAG-repeat expansion in HTT. Analysis of common SNP-based haplotypes has revealed that most European HD subjects have distinguishable HTT haplotypes on their normal and disease chromosomes and that ∼50% of the latter share the same major HD haplotype. We reasoned that sequence-level investigation of this founder haplotype could provide significant insights into the history of HD and valuable information for gene-targeting approaches. Consequently, we performed whole-genome sequencing of HD and control subjects from four independent families in whom the major European HD haplotype segregates with the disease. Analysis of the full-sequence-based HTT haplotype indicated that these four families share a common ancestor sufficiently distant to have permitted the accumulation of family-specific variants. Confirmation of new CAG-expansion mutations on this haplotype suggests that unlike most founders of human disease, the common ancestor of HD-affected families with the major haplotype most likely did not have HD. Further, availability of the full sequence data validated the use of SNP imputation to predict the optimal variants for capturing heterozygosity in personalized allele-specific gene-silencing approaches. As few as ten SNPs are capable of revealing heterozygosity in more than 97% of European HD subjects. Extension of allele-specific silencing strategies to the few remaining homozygous individuals is likely to be achievable through additional known SNPs and discovery of private variants by complete sequencing of HTT. These data suggest that the current development of gene-based targeting for HD could be extended to personalized allele-specific approaches in essentially all HD individuals of European ancestry. PMID:26320893

  10. Sequence-Level Analysis of the Major European Huntington Disease Haplotype.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Min; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Shin, Aram; Chao, Michael J; Abu Elneel, Kawther; Gillis, Tammy; Mysore, Jayalakshmi Srinidhi; Kaye, Julia A; Zahed, Hengameh; Kratter, Ian H; Daub, Aaron C; Finkbeiner, Steven; Li, Hong; Roach, Jared C; Goodman, Nathan; Hood, Leroy; Myers, Richard H; MacDonald, Marcy E; Gusella, James F

    2015-09-01

    Huntington disease (HD) reflects the dominant consequences of a CAG-repeat expansion in HTT. Analysis of common SNP-based haplotypes has revealed that most European HD subjects have distinguishable HTT haplotypes on their normal and disease chromosomes and that ∼50% of the latter share the same major HD haplotype. We reasoned that sequence-level investigation of this founder haplotype could provide significant insights into the history of HD and valuable information for gene-targeting approaches. Consequently, we performed whole-genome sequencing of HD and control subjects from four independent families in whom the major European HD haplotype segregates with the disease. Analysis of the full-sequence-based HTT haplotype indicated that these four families share a common ancestor sufficiently distant to have permitted the accumulation of family-specific variants. Confirmation of new CAG-expansion mutations on this haplotype suggests that unlike most founders of human disease, the common ancestor of HD-affected families with the major haplotype most likely did not have HD. Further, availability of the full sequence data validated the use of SNP imputation to predict the optimal variants for capturing heterozygosity in personalized allele-specific gene-silencing approaches. As few as ten SNPs are capable of revealing heterozygosity in more than 97% of European HD subjects. Extension of allele-specific silencing strategies to the few remaining homozygous individuals is likely to be achievable through additional known SNPs and discovery of private variants by complete sequencing of HTT. These data suggest that the current development of gene-based targeting for HD could be extended to personalized allele-specific approaches in essentially all HD individuals of European ancestry. PMID:26320893

  11. Does the parasite-mediated selection drive the MHC class IIB diversity in wild populations of European chub (Squalius cephalus)?

    PubMed

    Seifertová, Mária; Jarkovský, Jiří; Šimková, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    The genes of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) provide an excellent opportunity to study host-parasite relationships because they are expected to evolve in response to parasites and variation in parasite communities. In this study, we investigated the potential role of parasite-mediated selection acting on MHC class IIB (DAB) genes in European chub (Squalius cephalus) natural populations. We found significant differences between populations in metazoan parasites, neutral and adaptive genetic diversities. The analyses based on pairwise data revealed that populations with dissimilar MHC allelic profiles were geographically distant populations with significantly different diversity in microsatellites and a dissimilar composition of parasite communities. The results from the generalized estimating equations method (GEE) on the level of individuals revealed that metazoan parasite load in European chub was influenced by the diversity of DAB alleles as well as by the diversity of neutral genetic markers and host traits reflecting condition and immunocompetence. The multivariate co-inertia analysis showed specific associations between DAB alleles and parasite species. DAB1-like alleles were more involved in associations with ectoparasites, while DAB3-like alleles were positively associated with endoparasites which could suggest potential differences between DAB genes caused by different selection pressure. Our study revealed that parasite-mediated selection is not the only variable affecting MHC diversity in European chub; however, we strongly support the role of neutral processes as the main driver of DAB diversity across populations. In addition, our study contributes to the understanding of the evolution of MHC genes in wild living fish. PMID:26693717

  12. Recent Positive Selection Drives the Expansion of a Schizophrenia Risk Nonsynonymous Variant at SLC39A8 in Europeans.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Wu, Dong-Dong; Yao, Yong-Gang; Huo, Yong-Xia; Liu, Jie-Wei; Su, Bing; Chasman, Daniel I; Chu, Audrey Y; Huang, Tao; Qi, Lu; Zheng, Yan; Luo, Xiong-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Natural selection has played important roles in optimizing complex human adaptations. However, schizophrenia poses an evolutionary paradox during human evolution, as the illness has strongly negative effects on fitness, but persists with a prevalence of ~0.5% across global populations. Recent studies have identified numerous risk variations in diverse populations, which might be able to explain the stable and high rate of schizophrenia morbidity in different cultures and regions, but the questions about why the risk alleles derived and maintained in human gene pool still remain unsolved. Here, we studied the evolutionary pattern of a schizophrenia risk variant rs13107325 (P < 5.0 × 10(-8) in Europeans) in the SLC39A8 gene. We found the SNP is monomorphic in Asians and Africans with risk (derived) T-allele totally absent, and further evolutionary analyses showed the T-allele has experienced recent positive selection in Europeans. Subsequent exploratory analyses implicated that the colder environment in Europe was the likely selective pressures, ie, when modern humans migrated "out of Africa" and moved to Europe mainland (a colder and cooler continent than Africa), new alleles derived due to positive selection and protected humans from risk of hypertension and also helped them adapt to the cold environment. The hypothesis was supported by our pleiotropic analyses with hypertension and energy intake as well as obesity in Europeans. Our data thus provides an intriguing example to illustrate a possible mechanism for maintaining schizophrenia risk alleles in the human gene pool, and further supported that schizophrenia is likely a product caused by pleiotropic effect during human evolution. PMID:26006263

  13. A uniform survey of allele-specific binding and expression over 1000-Genomes-Project individuals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jieming; Rozowsky, Joel; Galeev, Timur R; Harmanci, Arif; Kitchen, Robert; Bedford, Jason; Abyzov, Alexej; Kong, Yong; Regan, Lynne; Gerstein, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale sequencing in the 1000 Genomes Project has revealed multitudes of single nucleotide variants (SNVs). Here, we provide insights into the functional effect of these variants using allele-specific behaviour. This can be assessed for an individual by mapping ChIP-seq and RNA-seq reads to a personal genome, and then measuring 'allelic imbalances' between the numbers of reads mapped to the paternal and maternal chromosomes. We annotate variants associated with allele-specific binding and expression in 382 individuals by uniformly processing 1,263 functional genomics data sets, developing approaches to reduce the heterogeneity between data sets due to overdispersion and mapping bias. Since many allelic variants are rare, aggregation across multiple individuals is necessary to identify broadly applicable 'allelic elements'. We also found SNVs for which we can anticipate allelic imbalance from the disruption of a binding motif. Our results serve as an allele-specific annotation for the 1000 Genomes variant catalogue and are distributed as an online resource (alleledb.gersteinlab.org). PMID:27089393

  14. MICB Allele Genotyping on Microarrays by Improving the Specificity of Extension Primers

    PubMed Central

    Baek, In-Cheol; Jang, Jung-Pil; Choi, Eun-Jeong; Kim, Tai-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I chain-related gene B (MICB) encodes a ligand for activating NKG2D that expressed in natural killer cells, γδ T cells, and αβ CD8+ T cells, which is associated with autoimmune diseases, cancer, and infectious diseases. Here, we have established a system for genotyping MICB alleles using allele-specific primer extension (ASPE) on microarrays. Thirty-six high quality, allele-specific extension primers were evaluated using strict and reliable cut-off values using mean fluorescence intensity (MFI), whereby an MFI >30,000 represented a positive signal and an MFI <10,000 represented a negative signal. Eight allele-specific extension primers were found to be false positives, five of which were improved by adjusting their length, and three of which were optimized by refractory modification. The MICB alleles (*002:01, *003, *005:02/*010, *005:03, *008, *009N, *018, and *024) present in the quality control panel could be exactly defined by 22 allele-specific extension primers. MICB genotypes that were identified by ASPE on microarrays were in full concordance with those identified by PCR-sequence-based typing. In conclusion, we have developed a method for genotyping MICB alleles using ASPE on microarrays; which can be applicable for large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism typing studies of population and disease associations. PMID:26569110

  15. Preferential Allele Expression Analysis Identifies Shared Germline and Somatic Driver Genes in Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Halabi, Najeeb M.; Martinez, Alejandra; Al-Farsi, Halema; Mery, Eliane; Puydenus, Laurence; Pujol, Pascal; Khalak, Hanif G.; McLurcan, Cameron; Ferron, Gwenael; Querleu, Denis; Al-Azwani, Iman; Al-Dous, Eman; Mohamoud, Yasmin A.; Malek, Joel A.; Rafii, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Identifying genes where a variant allele is preferentially expressed in tumors could lead to a better understanding of cancer biology and optimization of targeted therapy. However, tumor sample heterogeneity complicates standard approaches for detecting preferential allele expression. We therefore developed a novel approach combining genome and transcriptome sequencing data from the same sample that corrects for sample heterogeneity and identifies significant preferentially expressed alleles. We applied this analysis to epithelial ovarian cancer samples consisting of matched primary ovary and peritoneum and lymph node metastasis. We find that preferentially expressed variant alleles include germline and somatic variants, are shared at a relatively high frequency between patients, and are in gene networks known to be involved in cancer processes. Analysis at a patient level identifies patient-specific preferentially expressed alleles in genes that are targets for known drugs. Analysis at a site level identifies patterns of site specific preferential allele expression with similar pathways being impacted in the primary and metastasis sites. We conclude that genes with preferentially expressed variant alleles can act as cancer drivers and that targeting those genes could lead to new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26735499

  16. Preferential Allele Expression Analysis Identifies Shared Germline and Somatic Driver Genes in Advanced Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Halabi, Najeeb M; Martinez, Alejandra; Al-Farsi, Halema; Mery, Eliane; Puydenus, Laurence; Pujol, Pascal; Khalak, Hanif G; McLurcan, Cameron; Ferron, Gwenael; Querleu, Denis; Al-Azwani, Iman; Al-Dous, Eman; Mohamoud, Yasmin A; Malek, Joel A; Rafii, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Identifying genes where a variant allele is preferentially expressed in tumors could lead to a better understanding of cancer biology and optimization of targeted therapy. However, tumor sample heterogeneity complicates standard approaches for detecting preferential allele expression. We therefore developed a novel approach combining genome and transcriptome sequencing data from the same sample that corrects for sample heterogeneity and identifies significant preferentially expressed alleles. We applied this analysis to epithelial ovarian cancer samples consisting of matched primary ovary and peritoneum and lymph node metastasis. We find that preferentially expressed variant alleles include germline and somatic variants, are shared at a relatively high frequency between patients, and are in gene networks known to be involved in cancer processes. Analysis at a patient level identifies patient-specific preferentially expressed alleles in genes that are targets for known drugs. Analysis at a site level identifies patterns of site specific preferential allele expression with similar pathways being impacted in the primary and metastasis sites. We conclude that genes with preferentially expressed variant alleles can act as cancer drivers and that targeting those genes could lead to new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26735499

  17. A uniform survey of allele-specific binding and expression over 1000-Genomes-Project individuals

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jieming; Rozowsky, Joel; Galeev, Timur R.; Harmanci, Arif; Kitchen, Robert; Bedford, Jason; Abyzov, Alexej; Kong, Yong; Regan, Lynne; Gerstein, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale sequencing in the 1000 Genomes Project has revealed multitudes of single nucleotide variants (SNVs). Here, we provide insights into the functional effect of these variants using allele-specific behaviour. This can be assessed for an individual by mapping ChIP-seq and RNA-seq reads to a personal genome, and then measuring ‘allelic imbalances' between the numbers of reads mapped to the paternal and maternal chromosomes. We annotate variants associated with allele-specific binding and expression in 382 individuals by uniformly processing 1,263 functional genomics data sets, developing approaches to reduce the heterogeneity between data sets due to overdispersion and mapping bias. Since many allelic variants are rare, aggregation across multiple individuals is necessary to identify broadly applicable ‘allelic elements'. We also found SNVs for which we can anticipate allelic imbalance from the disruption of a binding motif. Our results serve as an allele-specific annotation for the 1000 Genomes variant catalogue and are distributed as an online resource (alleledb.gersteinlab.org). PMID:27089393

  18. Quantifying the transcriptional output of single alleles in single living mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Yunger, Sharon; Rosenfeld, Liat; Garini, Yuval; Shav-Tal, Yaron

    2013-01-01

    Transcription kinetics of actively transcribing genes in vivo have generally been measured using tandem gene arrays. However, tandem arrays do not reflect the endogenous state of genome organization where genes appear as single alleles. We present here a robust technique for the quantification of mRNA synthesis from a single allele in real-time, in single living mammalian cells. The protocol describes how to generate cell clones harboring a tagged allele and how to detect in vivo transcription from this tagged allele at high spatial and temporal resolution throughout the cell cycle. Quantification of nascent mRNAs produced from the single tagged allele is performed using RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and live-cell imaging. Subsequent analyses and data modeling detailed in the protocol include measurements of: transcription rates of RNA polymerase II; determining the number of polymerases recruited to the tagged allele; and measuring the spacing between polymerases. Generating the cells containing the single tagged alleles should take up to a month; RNA FISH or live-cell imaging will require an additional week. PMID:23424748

  19. Allelic association of the D2 dopamine receptor gene with cocaine dependence.

    PubMed

    Noble, E P; Blum, K; Khalsa, M E; Ritchie, T; Montgomery, A; Wood, R C; Fitch, R J; Ozkaragoz, T; Sheridan, P J; Anglin, M D

    1993-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine allelic prevalence of the D2 dopamine receptor (DRD2) gene in male cocaine-dependent (CD) Caucasian (non-Hispanic) subjects and to determine the relationship of DRD2 alleles to family history and selected behavioral measures. The prevalence of the A1 allele in CD subjects (n = 53) was 50.9%. It was significantly higher than either the 16.0% prevalence (P < 10(-4)) in non-substance abusing controls (n = 100) or the 30.9% prevalence (P < 10(-2)) in population controls (n = 265) wherein substance abusers were not excluded. Similarly, a significantly higher prevalence (P < 10(-2)) of the B1 allele was found in CD subjects (n = 52) compared with non-substance abusing controls (n = 53); 38.5% vs. 13.2%. Logistic regression analysis of CD subjects identified potent routes of cocaine use and the interaction of early deviant behaviors and parental alcoholism as significant risk factors associated with the A1 allele. The cumulative number of these three risk factors in CD subjects was positively and significantly (P < 10(-3)) related to A1 allelic prevalence. The data showing a strong association of the minor alleles (A1 and B1) of the DRD2 with cocaine dependence suggest that a gene, located on the q22-q23 region of chromosome 11, confers susceptibility to this drug disorder. PMID:8261891

  20. Dynamic variation in allele-specific gene expression of Paraoxonase-1 in murine and human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Parker-Katiraee, Layla; Bousiaki, Eleni; Monk, David; Moore, Gudrun E.; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Scherer, Stephen W.

    2008-01-01

    Differential allelic expression has been shown to be common in mice, humans and maize, and variability in the expression of polymorphic alleles has been associated with human disease. Here, we describe the differential expression pattern of Paraoxonase-1, a gene involved in lipid metabolism and implicated in the formation of atherosclerotic lesions. We measured the expression of the murine Paraoxonase-1 gene (Pon1) in livers at different stages of embryonic development using F1 hybrid crosses and quantified the transcriptional level of both parental alleles. Using human foetal tissues, we analysed the expression of the human orthologue (PON1) and found monoallelic or preferential allelic expression in 6/7 and 4/4 samples from liver and pancreas, respectively. We observed that Pon1 does not show a parent-of-origin preference in its allelic expression, but has dramatic variations in allele-specific expression occurring throughout development. This study has important repercussions in the analysis of haplotypes at disease loci, since it implies that the expression of polymorphic alleles can be unequal and dynamic. PMID:18678600

  1. Allele dependent silencing of COL1A2 using small interfering RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, Katarina; Rubin, Carl-Johan; Kindmark, Andreas; Ljunggren, Östen

    2008-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is generally caused by a dominant mutation in Collagen I, encoded by the genes COL1A1 and COL1A2. To date there is no satisfactory therapy for OI, but inactivation of the mutant allele through small interfering RNAs (siRNA) is a promising approach, as siRNAs targeting each allele of a polymorphism could be used for allele-specific silencing irrespective of the location of the actual mutations. In this study we examined the allele dependent effects of several tiled siRNAs targeting a region surrounding an exonic COL1A2 T/C polymorphism (rs1800222) in heterozygous primary human bone cells. Relative abundances of COL1A2 alleles were determined by cDNA sequencing and overall COL1A2 abundance was analyzed by quantitative PCR. One of the siRNAs decreased overall COL1A2 abundance by 71% of which 75% was due to silencing of the targeted T-allele. In conclusion, allele-preferential silencing of Collagen type I genes may be a future therapeutic approach for OI. PMID:19015742

  2. A New Impetus for European Youth. European Commission White Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium).

    Despite their highly divergent situations, young people largely share the same values, ambitions, and difficulties. Despite the more complex social and economic context in which young Europeans are currently living, they are well equipped to adapt. National and European policymakers must facilitate this process of change by making young people…

  3. Amyloid mediates the association of apolipoprotein E e4 allele to cognitive function in older people

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, D; Schneider, J; Wilson, R; Bienias, J; Berry-Kravis, E; Arnold, S

    2005-01-01

    Background: The neurobiological changes underlying the association of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) e4 allele with level of cognition are poorly understood. Objective: To test the hypothesis that amyloid load can account for (mediate) the association of the APOE e4 allele with level of cognition assessed proximate to death. Methods: There were 44 subjects with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease and 50 without dementia, who had participated in the Religious Orders Study. They underwent determination of APOE allele status, had comprehensive cognitive testing in the last year of life, and brain autopsy at death. The percentage area of cortex occupied by amyloid beta and the density of tau positive neurofibrillary tangles were quantified from six brain regions and averaged to yield summary measures of amyloid load and neurofibrillary tangles. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine whether amyloid load could account for the effect of allele status on level of cognition, controlling for age, sex, and education. Results: Possession of at least one APOE e4 allele was associated with lower level of cognitive function proximate to death (p = 0.04). The effect of the e4 allele was reduced by nearly 60% and was no longer significant after controlling for the effect of amyloid load, whereas there was a robust inverse association between amyloid and cognition (p = 0.001). Because prior work had suggested that neurofibrillary tangles could account for the association of amyloid on cognition, we next examined whether amyloid could account for the effect of allele status on tangles. In a series of regression analyses, e4 was associated with density of tangles (p = 0.002), but the effect of the e4 allele was reduced by more than 50% and was no longer significant after controlling for the effect of amyloid load. Conclusion: These findings are consistent with a sequence of events whereby the e4 allele works through amyloid deposition and subsequent tangle formation to

  4. Extensive Allelic Diversity of MHC Class I in Wild Mallard Ducks.

    PubMed

    Fleming-Canepa, Ximena; Jensen, Shawna M; Mesa, Christine M; Diaz-Satizabal, Laura; Roth, Alexa J; Parks-Dely, Julie A; Moon, Debra A; Wong, Janet P; Evseev, Danyel; Gossen, Desolie A; Tetrault, David G; Magor, Katharine E

    2016-08-01

    MHC class I is critically involved in defense against viruses, and diversity from polygeny and polymorphism contributes to the breadth of the immune response and health of the population. In this article, we examine MHC class I diversity in wild mallard ducks, the natural host and reservoir of influenza A viruses. We previously showed domestic ducks predominantly use UAA, one of five MHC class I genes, but whether biased expression is also true for wild mallards is unknown. Using RT-PCR from blood, we examined expressed MHC class I alleles from 38 wild mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and identified 61 unique alleles, typically 1 or 2 expressed alleles in each individual. To determine whether expressed alleles correspond to UAA adjacent to TAP2 as in domestic ducks, we cloned and sequenced genomic UAA-TAP2 fragments from all mallards, which matched transcripts recovered and allowed us to assign most alleles as UAA Allelic differences are primarily located in α1 and α2 domains in the residues known to interact with peptide in mammalian MHC class I, suggesting the diversity is functional. Most UAA alleles have unique residues in the cleft predicting distinct specificity; however, six alleles have an unusual conserved cleft with two cysteine residues. Residues that influence peptide-loading properties and tapasin involvement in chicken are fixed in duck alleles and suggest tapasin independence. Biased expression of one MHC class I gene may make viral escape within an individual easy, but high diversity in the population places continual pressure on the virus in the reservoir species. PMID:27342841

  5. Complex and multi-allelic copy number variation in human disease

    PubMed Central

    McCarroll, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Hundreds of copy number variants are complex and multi-allelic, in that they have many structural alleles and have rearranged multiple times in the ancestors who contributed chromosomes to current humans. Not only are the relationships of these multi-allelic CNVs (mCNVs) to phenotypes generally unknown, but many mCNVs have not yet been described at the basic levels—alleles, allele frequencies, structural features—that support genetic investigation. To date, most reported disease associations to these variants have been ascertained through candidate gene studies. However, only a few associations have reached the level of acceptance defined by durable replications in many cohorts. This likely stems from longstanding challenges in making precise molecular measurements of the alleles individuals have at these loci. However, approaches for mCNV analysis are improving quickly, and some of the unique characteristics of mCNVs may assist future association studies. Their various structural alleles are likely to have different magnitudes of effect, creating a natural allelic series of growing phenotypic impact and giving investigators a set of natural predictions and testable hypotheses about the extent to which each allele of an mCNV predisposes to a phenotype. Also, mCNVs’ low-to-modest correlation to individual single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may make it easier to distinguish between mCNVs and nearby SNPs as the drivers of an association signal, and perhaps, make it possible to preliminarily screen candidate loci, or the entire genome, for the many mCNV–disease relationships that remain to be discovered. PMID:26163405

  6. Allelic variation in the squirrel monkey x-linked color vision gene: biogeographical and behavioral correlates.

    PubMed

    Cropp, Susan; Boinski, Sue; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2002-06-01

    Most Neotropical primate species possess a polymorphic X-linked and a monomorphic autosomal color vision gene. Consequently, populations are composed of both dichromatics and trichromatics. Most theories on the maintenance of this genetic system revolve around possible advantages for foraging ecology. To examine the issue from a different angle, we compared the numbers and relative frequencies of alleles at the X-linked locus among three species of Saimiri representing a wide range of geographical and behavioral variation in the genus. Exons 3, 4, and 5 of the X-linked opsin gene were sequenced for a large number of X chromosomes for all three species. Several synonymous mutations were detected in exons 4 and 5 for the originally reported alleles but only a single nonsynonymous change was detected. Two alleles were found that appeared to be the result of recombination events. The low occurrence of recombinant alleles and absence of mutations in the amino acids critical for spectral tuning indicates that stabilizing selection acts to maintain the combinations of critical sites specific to each allele. Allele frequencies were approximately the same for all Saimiri species, with a slight but significant difference between S. boliviensis and S. oerstedii. No apparent correlation exists between allele frequencies and behavioral or biogeographical differences between species, casting doubt on the speculation that the spectral sensitivities of the alleles have been maintained because they are specifically well-tuned to Saimiri visual ecology. Rather, the spectral tuning peaks might have been maintained because they are as widely spaced as possible within the limited range of middlewave to longwave spectra useful to all primates. This arrangement creates a balance between maximizing the distance between spectral tuning peaks (allowing the color opponency of the visual system to distinguish between peaks) and maximizing the number of alleles within a limited range (yielding

  7. APOL1 Null Alleles from a Rural Village in India Do Not Correlate with Glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Duncan B.; Shegokar, Vijay; Nihalani, Deepak; Rathore, Yogendra Singh; Mallik, Leena; Ashish; Zare, Vasant; Ikizler, H. Omer; Powar, Rajaram; Holzman, Lawrence B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Among African-Americans, genome wide association revealed a strong correlation between the G1 and G2 alleles of APOL1 (apolipoproteinL1, also called trypanolytic factor) and kidney diseases including focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis, HIV-associated nephropathy and hypertensive nephrosclerosis. In the prevailing hypothesis, heterozygous APOL1 G1 and G2 alleles increase resistance against Trypanosoma that cause African sleeping sickness, resulting in positive selection of these alleles, but when homozygous the G1 and G2 alleles predispose to glomerulosclerosis. While efforts are underway to screen patients for G1 and G2 alleles and to better understand “APOL1 glomerulopathy,” no data prove that these APOL1 sequence variants cause glomerulosclerosis. G1 and G2 correlate best with glomerulosclerosis as recessive alleles, which suggests a loss of function mutation for which proof of causality is commonly tested with homozygous null alleles. This test cannot be performed in rodents as the APOL gene cluster evolved only in primates. However, there is a homozygous APOL1 null human being who lives in a village in rural India. This individual and his family offer a unique opportunity to test causality between APOL1 null alleles and glomerulosclerosis. Methods and Findings We obtained clinical data, blood and urine from this APOL1 null patient and 50 related villagers. Based on measurements of blood pressure, BUN, creatinine, albuminuria, genotyping and immunoblotting, this APOL1 null individual does not have glomerulosclerosis, nor do his relatives who carry APOL1 null alleles. Conclusions This small study cannot provide definitive conclusions but the absence of glomerulosclerosis in this unique population is consistent with the possibility that African-American glomerulosclerosis is caused, not by loss of APOL1 function, but by other mechanisms including a subtle gain of function or by the “genetic hitchhiking” of deleterious mutations in a gene

  8. Switching of a Mating-Type a Mutant Allele in Budding Yeast SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    PubMed Central

    Klar, Amar J. S.; Fogel, Seymour; Radin, David N.

    1979-01-01

    Aimed at investigating the recovery of a specific mutant allele of the mating type locus (MAT) by switching a defective MAT allele, these experiments provide information bearing on several models proposed for MAT interconversion in bakers yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Hybrids between heterothallic (ho) cells carrying a mutant MATa allele, designated mata-2, and MATα ho strains show a high capacity for mating with MATa strains. The MATα/mata-2 diploids do not sporulate. However, zygotic clones obtained by mating MATα homothallic (HO) cells with mata-2 ho cells are unable to mate and can sporulate. Tetrad analysis of such clones revealed two diploid (MATα/MATa):two haploid segregants. Therefore, MAT switches occur in MATα/mata-2 HO/ho cells to produce MATα/MATa cells capable of sporulation. In heterothallic strains, the mata-2 allele can be switched to a functional MATα and subsequently to a functional MATa. Among 32 MATα to MATa switches tested, where the MATα was previously derived from the mata-2 mutant, only one mata-2 like isolate was observed. However, the recovered allele, unlike the parental allele, conplements the matα ste1–5 mutant, suggesting that these alleles are not identical and that the recovered allele presumably arose as a mutation of the MATα locus. No mata-2 was recovered by HO-mediated switching of MATα (previously obtained from mata-2 by HO) in 217 switches analyzed. We conclude that in homothallic and heterothallic strains, the mata-2 allele can be readily switched to a functional MATα and subsequently to a functional MATa locus. Overall, the results are in accord with the cassette model (Hicks, Strathern and Herskowitz 1977b) proposed to explain MAT interconversions. PMID:395020

  9. Effects of sequence variation on differential allelic transcription factor occupancy and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Timothy E; Gertz, Jason; Pauli, Florencia; Kucera, Katerina S; Varley, Katherine E; Newberry, Kimberly M; Marinov, Georgi K; Mortazavi, Ali; Williams, Brian A; Song, Lingyun; Crawford, Gregory E; Wold, Barbara; Willard, Huntington F; Myers, Richard M

    2012-05-01

    A complex interplay between transcription factors (TFs) and the genome regulates transcription. However, connecting variation in genome sequence with variation in TF binding and gene expression is challenging due to environmental differences between individuals and cell types. To address this problem, we measured genome-wide differential allelic occupancy of 24 TFs and EP300 in a human lymphoblastoid cell line GM12878. Overall, 5% of human TF binding sites have an allelic imbalance in occupancy. At many sites, TFs clustered in TF-binding hubs on the same homolog in especially open chromatin. While genetic variation in core TF binding motifs generally resulted in large allelic differences in TF occupancy, most allelic differences in occupancy were subtle and associated with disruption of weak or noncanonical motifs. We also measured genome-wide differential allelic expression of genes with and without heterozygous exonic variants in the same cells. We found that genes with differential allelic expression were overall less expressed both in GM12878 cells and in unrelated human cell lines. Comparing TF occupancy with expression, we found strong association between allelic occupancy and expression within 100 bp of transcription start sites (TSSs), and weak association up to 100 kb from TSSs. Sites of differential allelic occupancy were significantly enriched for variants associated with disease, particularly autoimmune disease, suggesting that allelic differences in TF occupancy give functional insights into intergenic variants associated with disease. Our results have the potential to increase the power and interpretability of association studies by targeting functional intergenic variants in addition to protein coding sequences. PMID:22300769

  10. Clarifying the Relationship between Average Excesses and Average Effects of Allele Substitutions.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Castro, José M; Yang, Rong-Cai

    2012-01-01

    Fisher's concepts of average effects and average excesses are at the core of the quantitative genetics theory. Their meaning and relationship have regularly been discussed and clarified. Here we develop a generalized set of one locus two-allele orthogonal contrasts for average excesses and average effects, based on the concept of the effective gene content of alleles. Our developments help understand the average excesses of alleles for the biallelic case. We dissect how average excesses relate to the average effects and to the decomposition of the genetic variance. PMID:22509178

  11. Systematic Functional Interrogation of Rare Cancer Variants Identifies Oncogenic Alleles | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer genome characterization efforts now provide an initial view of the somatic alterations in primary tumors. However, most point mutations occur at low frequency, and the function of these alleles remains undefined. We have developed a scalable systematic approach to interrogate the function of cancer-associated gene variants. We subjected 474 mutant alleles curated from 5,338 tumors to pooled in vivo tumor formation assays and gene expression profiling. We identified 12 transforming alleles, including two in genes (PIK3CB, POT1) that have not been shown to be tumorigenic.

  12. PCSK9 polymorphism in a Tunisian cohort: identification of a new allele, L8, and association of allele L10 with reduced coronary heart disease risk.

    PubMed

    Slimani, Afef; Hrira, Mohamed Yahia; Najah, Mohamed; Jomaa, Walid; Maatouk, Faouzi; Hamda, Khaldoun Ben; Abifadel, Marianne; Rabès, Jean-Pierre; Boileau, Catherine; Rouis, Mustapha; Slimane, Mohamed Naceur; Varret, Mathilde

    2015-02-01

    The c.61_63dupCTG (L10) allele of rs72555377 polymorphism in PCSK9 has been reported to be associated with low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels and with a decreased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). We investigated the effect of two known alleles for rs72555377, L10 and L11, on the risk of CAD in a Tunisian cohort (218 patients diagnosed by angiography and 125 control subjects). Two subgroups of patients were defined by their level of stenosis: ≥50% for CAD and <50% for no-CAD. The genotypes were obtained by the size measurement of fluorescent-labeled PCR products. We identified a novel allele for the rs72555377 polymorphism: an in-frame deletion, c.61_63delCTG (L8). The frequency of the L10 allele was significantly higher in the no-CAD subgroup than in the CAD subgroup (0.210 vs 0.114, p = 0.045), and than in the subgroup of CAD patients presenting a stenosis ≥50% in two or three major coronary arteries (0.210 vs 0.125, p = 0.028). Multiple regression analysis showed that the L10 allele was significantly associated with a reduced risk of CAD (p = 0.049, OR = 0.51[0.26-1.00]), and with its reduced severity (p = 0.045, OR = 0.44[0.20-0.98]). The L10 allele is associated with a reduced risk and severity of CAD, seemingly independently of its LDL-lowering effect, suggesting a direct effect of PCSK9 on atherogenesis. PMID:25239117

  13. Global diversity and genetic contributions of chicken populations from African, Asian and European regions.

    PubMed

    Lyimo, C M; Weigend, A; Msoffe, P L; Eding, H; Simianer, H; Weigend, S

    2014-12-01

    Genetic diversity and population structure of 113 chicken populations from Africa, Asia and Europe were studied using 29 microsatellite markers. Among these, three populations of wild chickens and nine commercial purebreds were used as reference populations for comparison. Compared to commercial lines and chickens sampled from the European region, high mean numbers of alleles and a high degree of heterozygosity were found in Asian and African chickens as well as in Red Junglefowl. Population differentiation (FST ) was higher among European breeds and commercial lines than among African, Asian and Red Junglefowl populations. Neighbour-Net genetic clustering and structure analysis revealed two main groups of Asian and north-west European breeds, whereas African populations overlap with other breeds from Eastern Europe and the Mediterranean region. Broilers and brown egg layers were situated between the Asian and north-west European clusters. structure analysis confirmed a lower degree of population stratification in African and Asian chickens than in European breeds. High genetic differentiation and low genetic contributions to global diversity have been observed for single European breeds. Populations with low genetic variability have also shown a low genetic contribution to a core set of diversity in attaining maximum genetic variation present from the total populations. This may indicate that conservation measures in Europe should pay special attention to preserving as many single chicken breeds as possible to maintain maximum genetic diversity given that higher genetic variations come from differentiation between breeds. PMID:25315897

  14. The HLA-DRB1 allele polymorphisms and nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huimin; Yu, Kaihui; Zhang, Ruoheng; Li, Jiatong; Wei, Xiaomou; Zhang, Yuening; Zhang, Chengdong; Xiao, Feifan; Zhao, Dong; Lin, Xuandong; Wu, Huayu; Yang, Xiaoli

    2016-06-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1 has been reported to influence individual's susceptibility to nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) by many studies in recent years; however, these studies provided controversial results. The meta-analysis was thus conducted here to estimate the relationship between HLA-DRB1 polymorphisms and NPC. After an extensive review of journals from various databases (PubMed, the Web of Science, Embase, China National Knowledge Internet (CNKI), and Wanfang Database), 8 out of 69 case-control studies, including 778 cases and 1148 controls, were extracted. The results showed that 4 of 13 polymorphisms allele are statistically significantly associated with NPC, among them, HLA-DRB1*3, HLA-DRB1*9, and HLA-DRB1*10 may increase the risk of NPC while HLA-DRB1*01 has the opposite effect. The pooled odds ratio and 95 % confidence interval (CI) were 1.702 [95 % CI (1.047, 2.765)], 1.363 [95 % CI (1.029, 1.806)], 1.989 [95 % CI (1.042, 3.799)], and 0.461 [95 % CI (0.315, 0.676)], respectively. In a further ethnicity-based subgroup analysis, HLA-DRB1*08, HLA-DRB1*11, and HLA-DRB1*16 were found to be linked with NPC in Asian, Tunisian, and Caucasian, respectively. In Asian, HLA-DRB1*03, 08, and 10 may elevate the risk whereas HLA-DRB1*09 could lower it. In Tunisian, HLA-DRB1*01 and 11 are the protective factors while HLA-DRB1*03 is the only risk factor. In Caucasian, HLA-DRB1*01 and 03 increase the risk and HLA-DRB1*16 lowers it. The most frequent statistically associated gene is found to be HLA-DRB1*03 which has protective influence on Asian and Tunisian. In conclusion, HLA-DRB1*01, DRB1*03, DRB1*09, and DRB1*10 are related with NPC susceptibility, and the association of HLA-DRB1*08, DRB1*11, and DRB1*16 with NPC risk are significantly different in different ethnicities. PMID:27059731

  15. Selection and Reduced Population Size Cannot Explain Higher Amounts of Neandertal Ancestry in East Asian than in European Human Populations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bernard Y.; Lohmueller, Kirk E.

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the greater proportion of Neandertal ancestry in East Asians than in Europeans is due to the fact that purifying selection is less effective at removing weakly deleterious Neandertal alleles from East Asian populations. Using simulations of a broad range of models of selection and demography, we have shown that this hypothesis cannot account for the higher proportion of Neandertal ancestry in East Asians than in Europeans. Instead, more complex demographic scenarios, most likely involving multiple pulses of Neandertal admixture, are required to explain the data. PMID:25683122

  16. No association between an allele at the D sub 2 dopamine receptor gene (DRD2) and alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Gelernter, J.; Krystal, J.; Kennedy, J.L. West Haven Dept. of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, CT ); O'Malley, S.; Risch, N.; Merikangas, K.; Kidd, K.K. ); Kranzler, H.R. )

    1991-10-02

    The author attempted to replicate a positive allelic association between the A1 allele of DRD2 (the D{sub 2} dopamine receptor locus) and alcoholism that has been reported. They compared allele frequencies at the previously described Taq I restriction fragment length polymorphism system of DRD2 in alcoholics and random population controls.

  17. European Schoolnet: Enabling School Networking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scimeca, Santi; Dumitru, Petru; Durando, Marc; Gilleran, Anne; Joyce, Alexa; Vuorikari, Riina

    2009-01-01

    School networking is increasingly important in a globalised world, where schools themselves can be actors on an international stage. This article builds on the activities and experience of the longest established European initiative in this area, European Schoolnet (EUN), a network of 31 Ministries of Education. First, we offer an introduction…

  18. What Audience for European Television?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendelbo, Harald Arni

    This discussion of the audience for European television argues that satellite television has taken an upside-down approach, i.e., it has begun by focusing on the hardware, and then the software, before checking to see if there would be a user at the end of the line willing to pay for the whole operation. "European television" is then defined as…

  19. The European Dimension in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France). Directorate of Education, Culture and Sport, Documentation Section.

    This paper addresses concerns about a European dimension in education that has been created by the enlargement of the European Union (EU) (the inclusion of Austria, Finland, and Sweden) and the gradual transformations of institutions into a future federal state. Sections of the paper include: (1) "Introduction"; (2) "Defining the European…

  20. An American Construction of European Education Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silova, Iveta; Brehm, William C.

    2010-01-01

    The construction of the European education space has typically been attributed to European education policy makers, institutions, and networks. Rarely do scholars consider the role of outside, non-European actors in shaping the terrain of European education thought and practice. This article considers the construction of the European education…

  1. Genome-wide Association Study of Subtype-Specific Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Risk Alleles Using Pooled DNA

    PubMed Central

    Earp, Madalene A.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Swenerton, Kenneth D.; Chenevix–Trench, Georgia; Lu, Yi; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fasching, Peter A.; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Rossing, Mary Anne; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Friel, Grace; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Lurie, Galina; Goodman, Marc T.; Carney, Michael E.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Leminen, Arto; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Butzow, Ralf; Bunker, Clareann H.; Modugno, Francesmary; Edwards, Robert P.; Ness, Roberta B.; du Bois, Andreas; Heitz, Florian; Schwaab, Ira; Harter, Philipp; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Jensen, Allan; Kjær, Susanne K.; Høgdall, Claus K.; Høgdall, Estrid; Lundvall, Lene; Sellers, Thomas A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Goode, Ellen L.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Southey, Melissa C.; Liang, Dong; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Levine, Douglas A.; Bisogna, Maria; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Berchuck, Andrew; Cramer, Daniel W.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Chandran, Urmila; Orlow, Irene; Olson, Sara H.; Wik, Elisabeth; Salvesen, Helga B.; Bjorge, Line; Halle, Mari K.; van Altena, Anne M.; Aben, Katja K.H.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie T.; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Garcia–Closas, Montserrat; Dicks, Ed; Dennis, Joe; Easton, Douglas F.; Song, Honglin; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Eccles, Diana; Campbell, Ian G.; Whittemore, Alice S.; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Flanagan, James M.; Paul, James; Brown, Robert; Phelan, Catherine M.; Risch, Harvey A.; McLaughlin, John R.; Narod, Steven A.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Gayther, Simon A.; Ramus, Susan J.; Wu, Anna H.; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Szafron, Lukasz M; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Cook, Linda S.; Le, Nhu D.; Brooks–Wilson, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a heterogeneous cancer with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Variants influencing the risk of developing the less-common EOC subtypes have not been fully investigated. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of EOC according to subtype by pooling genomic DNA from 545 cases and 398 controls of European descent, and testing for allelic associations. We evaluated for replication 188 variants from the GWAS (56 variants for mucinous, 55 for endometrioid and clear cell, 53 for low malignant potential (LMP) serous, and 24 for invasive serous EOC), selected using pre-defined criteria. Genotypes from 13,188 cases and 23,164 controls of European descent were used to perform unconditional logistic regression under the log-additive genetic model; odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals are reported. Nine variants tagging 6 loci were associated with subtype-specific EOC risk at P<0.05, and had an OR that agreed in direction of effect with the GWAS results. Several of these variants are in or near genes with a biological rationale for conferring EOC risk, including ZFP36L1 and RAD51B for mucinous EOC (rs17106154, OR=1.17, P=0.029, n=1,483 cases), GRB10 for endometrioid and clear cell EOC (rs2190503, P=0.014, n=2,903 cases), and C22orf26/BPIL2 for LMP serous EOC (rs9609538, OR=0.86, P=0.0043, n=892 cases). In analyses that included the 75 GWAS samples, the association between rs9609538 (OR=0.84, P=0.0007) and LMP serous EOC risk remained statistically significant at P<0.0012 adjusted for multiple testing. Replication in additional samples will be important to verify these results for the less-common EOC subtypes. PMID:24190013

  2. A Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Novel Alleles Associated with Hair Color and Skin Pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jiali; Kraft, Peter; Nan, Hongmei; Guo, Qun; Chen, Constance; Qureshi, Abrar; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hu, Frank B.; Duffy, David L.; Zhao, Zhen Zhen; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Thomas, Gilles; Hoover, Robert N.; Chanock, Stephen; Hunter, David J.

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study of natural hair color in more than 10,000 men and women of European ancestry from the United States and Australia. An initial analysis of 528,173 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped on 2,287 women identified IRF4 and SLC24A4 as loci highly associated with hair color, along with three other regions encompassing known pigmentation genes. We confirmed these associations in 7,028 individuals from three additional studies. Across these four studies, SLC24A4 rs12896399 and IRF4 rs12203592 showed strong associations with hair color, with p = 6.0×10−62 and p = 7.46×10−127, respectively. The IRF4 SNP was also associated with skin color (p = 6.2×10−14), eye color (p = 6.1×10−13), and skin tanning response to sunlight (p = 3.9×10−89). A multivariable analysis pooling data from the initial GWAS and an additional 1,440 individuals suggested that the association between rs12203592 and hair color was independent of rs1540771, a SNP between the IRF4 and EXOC2 genes previously found to be associated with hair color. After adjustment for rs12203592, the association between rs1540771 and hair color was not significant (p = 0.52). One variant in the MATP gene was associated with hair color. A variant in the HERC2 gene upstream of the OCA2 gene showed the strongest and independent association with hair color compared with other SNPs in this region, including three previously reported SNPs. The signals detected in a region around the MC1R gene were explained by MC1R red hair color alleles. Our results suggest that the IRF4 and SLC24A4 loci are associated with human hair color and skin pigmentation. PMID:18483556

  3. Using multi-locus allelic sequence data to estimate genetic divergence among four Lilium (Liliaceae) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Shahin, Arwa; Smulders, Marinus J M; van Tuyl, Jaap M; Arens, Paul; Bakker, Freek T

    2014-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) may enable estimating relationships among genotypes using allelic variation of multiple nuclear genes simultaneously. We explored the potential and caveats of this strategy in four genetically distant Lilium cultivars to estimate their genetic divergence from transcriptome sequences using three approaches: POFAD (Phylogeny of Organisms from Allelic Data, uses allelic information of sequence data), RAxML (Randomized Accelerated Maximum Likelihood, tree building based on concatenated consensus sequences) and Consensus Network (constructing a network summarizing among gene tree conflicts). Twenty six gene contigs were chosen based on the presence of orthologous sequences in all cultivars, seven of which also had an orthologous sequence in Tulipa, used as out-group. The three approaches generated the same topology. Although the resolution offered by these approaches is high, in this case there was no extra benefit in using allelic information. We conclude that these 26 genes can be widely applied to construct a species tree for the genus Lilium. PMID:25368628

  4. Allelic imbalance within the E-cadherin gene is an infrequent event in prostate carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Murant, S J; Rolley, N; Phillips, S M; Stower, M; Maitland, N J

    2000-01-01

    By exploiting two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located within the E-cadherin gene, at 16q22, we have determined the frequency of allelic imbalance at this proposed tumor suppressor locus in a series of human prostatic carcinoma DNA samples. Whereas results with seven highly polymorphic microsatellite markers flanking the E-cadherin locus confirmed the existence of three separate loci on chromosome 16, at which allelic imbalance increased with increasing loss of tumor cell differentiation, no allelic imbalance within the E-cadherin gene was detected either by single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis or by direct sequencing. We conclude that the loss of E-cadherin function observed in prostate cancer is not a result of allelic deletion. Genes Chromosomes Cancer 27:104-109, 2000. PMID:10564592

  5. Reintroduction of a Homocysteine Level-Associated Allele into East Asians by Neanderthal Introgression.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ya; Ding, Qiliang; He, Yungang; Xu, Shuhua; Jin, Li

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present an analysis of Neanderthal introgression at the dipeptidase 1 gene, DPEP1. A Neanderthal origin for the putative introgressive haplotypes was demonstrated using an established three-step approach. This introgression was under positive natural selection, reached a frequency of >50%, and introduced a homocysteine level- and pigmentation-associated allele (rs460879-T) into East Asians. However, the same allele was also found in non-East Asians, but not from Neanderthal introgression. It is likely that rs460879-T was lost in East Asians and was reintroduced subsequently through Neanderthal introgression. Our findings suggest that Neanderthal introgression could reintroduce an important previously existing allele into populations where the allele had been lost. This study sheds new light on understanding the contribution of Neanderthal introgression to the adaptation of non-Africans. PMID:26392408

  6. Evidence for a genetic association between alleles of monoamine oxidase A gene and bipolar affective disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, L.C.C.; Sham, P.; Castle, D.

    1995-08-14

    We present evidence of a genetic association between bipolar disorder and alleles at 3 monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) markers, but not with alleles of a monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) polymorphism. The 3 MAOA markers, including one associated with low MAOA activity, show strong allelic association with each other but surprisingly not with MAOB. Our results are significantly only for females, though the number of males in our sample is too small to draw any definite conclusions. Our data is consistent with recent reports of reduced MAOA activity in patients with abnormal behavioral phenotypes. The strength of the association is weak, but significant, which suggests that alleles at the MAOA locus contribute to susceptibility to bipolar disorder rather than being a major determinant. 58 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  7. HLA-B27 allele frequency in Sri Lankan patients with spondyloarthritides.

    PubMed

    Kidnapillai, S; Sirisena, N D; Dissanayake, V H

    2016-06-01

    This preliminary study aims to describe the HLA-B27 allele frequency in Sri Lankan patients with spondyloarthritides (SA). An anonymised database of 373 Sri Lankan patients with SA referred for HLA-B27 testing was retrospectively analysed. Eighty five (22.8%) patients were positive for the HLA-B27 allele. A male preponderance was observed among the positives. The HLA-B27 allele frequency in this sample of patients with SA was relatively low compared to published studies in other populations. Further research is needed to identify the predominant subtypes of the allele to determine which subtypes are the most prevalent in a larger sample of Sri Lankan patients with SA, and to define their association with the specific types of SA. PMID:27423748

  8. Known unknowns for allele-specific expression and genomic imprinting effects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence for non-canonical imprinting effects that are associated with allele-specific expression biases at the tissue level in mice. These imprinting effects have features that are distinct from canonical imprinting effects that involve allele silencing. Here, I discuss some of the evidence for non-canonical imprinting effects in the context of random X-inactivation and epigenetic allele-specific expression effects on the autosomes. I propose several mechanisms that may underlie non-canonical imprinting effects and outline future directions and approaches to study these effects at the cellular level in vivo. The growing evidence for complex allele-specific expression effects that are cell- and developmental stage-specific has opened a new frontier for study. Currently, the function of these effects and the underlying regulatory mechanisms are largely unknown. PMID:25343032

  9. The IPD and IMGT/HLA database: allele variant databases

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, James; Halliwell, Jason A.; Hayhurst, James D.; Flicek, Paul; Parham, Peter; Marsh, Steven G. E.

    2015-01-01

    The Immuno Polymorphism Database (IPD) was developed to provide a centralized system for the study of polymorphism in genes of the immune system. Through the IPD project we have established a central platform for the curation and publication of locus-specific databases involved either directly or related to the function of the Major Histocompatibility Complex in a number of different species. We have collaborated with specialist groups or nomenclature committees that curate the individual sections before they are submitted to IPD for online publication. IPD consists of five core databases, with the IMGT/HLA Database as the primary database. Through the work of the various nomenclature committees, the HLA Informatics Group and in collaboration with the European Bioinformatics Institute we are able to provide public access to this data through the website http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ipd/. The IPD project continues to develop with new tools being added to address scientific developments, such as Next Generation Sequencing, and to address user feedback and requests. Regular updates to the website ensure that new and confirmatory sequences are dispersed to the immunogenetics community, and the wider research and clinical communities. PMID:25414341

  10. Multiple crm- mutations in familial hypercholesterolemia. Evidence for 13 alleles, including four deletions.

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, H H; Leitersdorf, E; Goldstein, J L; Brown, M S; Russell, D W

    1988-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors in fibroblasts from 132 subjects with the clinical syndrome of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia were analyzed by immunoprecipitation with an anti-LDL receptor monoclonal antibody. 16 of the 132 cell strains (12%) synthesized no immunodetectable LDL receptor protein, indicating the presence of two mutant genes that failed to produce cross-reacting material (crm- mutations). DNA and mRNA from 15 of the 16 crm- patients, representing 30 crm- genes, were available for further study. Haplotype analysis based on 10 restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) suggested that the 30 crm- genes represent 13 mutant alleles. Four of the alleles produced no mRNA. Three of these four mRNA- alleles had large deletions ranging from 6 to 20 kb that eliminated the promoter region of the gene. The fourth mRNA- allele did not contain any deletion or alteration in the promoter sequence; the reason for the mRNA- phenotype was not apparent. Nine alleles were positive for mRNAs, of which three encoded mRNAs of abnormal size. One of the abnormal mRNAs was produced by a gene harboring a deletion, and another was produced by a gene with a complex rearrangement. The third abnormal-sized mRNA (3.1 kb larger than normal) was produced by an allele that had no detectable alterations as judged by Southern blotting. The other six mRNA+ alleles appeared normal by Southern blotting and produced normal-sized mRNA but no receptor protein. The current studies demonstrate that mRNA analysis coupled with haplotype determination by Southern blot analysis can be used to classify crm- mutations at a genetic locus where multiple alleles exist. Images PMID:3343347

  11. Semiparametric Allelic Tests for Mapping Multiple Phenotypes: Binomial Regression and Mahalanobis Distance.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Arunabha; Witte, John S; Ghosh, Saurabh

    2015-12-01

    Binary phenotypes commonly arise due to multiple underlying quantitative precursors and genetic variants may impact multiple traits in a pleiotropic manner. Hence, simultaneously analyzing such correlated traits may be more powerful than analyzing individual traits. Various genotype-level methods, e.g., MultiPhen (O'Reilly et al. []), have been developed to identify genetic factors underlying a multivariate phenotype. For univariate phenotypes, the usefulness and applicability of allele-level tests have been investigated. The test of allele frequency difference among cases and controls is commonly used for mapping case-control association. However, allelic methods for multivariate association mapping have not been studied much. In this article, we explore two allelic tests of multivariate association: one using a Binomial regression model based on inverted regression of genotype on phenotype (Binomial regression-based Association of Multivariate Phenotypes [BAMP]), and the other employing the Mahalanobis distance between two sample means of the multivariate phenotype vector for two alleles at a single-nucleotide polymorphism (Distance-based Association of Multivariate Phenotypes [DAMP]). These methods can incorporate both discrete and continuous phenotypes. Some theoretical properties for BAMP are studied. Using simulations, the power of the methods for detecting multivariate association is compared with the genotype-level test MultiPhen's. The allelic tests yield marginally higher power than MultiPhen for multivariate phenotypes. For one/two binary traits under recessive mode of inheritance, allelic tests are found to be substantially more powerful. All three tests are applied to two different real data and the results offer some support for the simulation study. We propose a hybrid approach for testing multivariate association that implements MultiPhen when Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) is violated and BAMP otherwise, because the allelic approaches assume HWE

  12. Analysis of FBN1 allele expression by dermal fibroblasts from Marfan syndrome patients

    SciTech Connect

    Putman, E.A.; Cao, S.N.; Milewicz, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    Screening for mutations in the FBN1 cDNA from Marfan patient cell strains has detected mutations in only 10-15% of patients. In an attempt to explain this poor detection rate, we examined FBN1 allele expression and fibrillin synthesis by 26 cell strains from Marfan patients. DNA from the patients and 10 controls was assessed for the presence of a polymorphic Rsa I restriction site in the 3{prime} untranslated region of the FBN1 gene. Twelve of 26 patient and 5 of 10 control DNAs were heterozygous. Fibroblast RNA from the heterozygous cell strains was reverse-transcribed and subsequently PCR amplified using a [{sup 32}P]-labelled primer, digested with Rsa I and analyzed. Although 3 samples showed no transcript from one allele by ethidium bromide staining, a Betagen scanner detected low levels (10-15%) of that allele. In addition, there was unequal expression of the two alleles in three other patients; for example, only 30% expression from one allele. The remaining patients and the controls had equal expression of each allele. Fibrillin protein synthesis by fibroblasts from these heterozygous patients was also examined. After a 30 minute pulse with [{sup 35}S]-cysteine, cell lysates were collected and proteins analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The amount of fibrillin produced relative to a reference protein was determined using a Betagen scanner. Fibrillin protein synthesis was reduced in 2 of the 3 patients with very low RNA production from one of the FBN1 alleles. All other Marfan and control cell strains showed normal amounts of fibrillin synthesized. The low expression levels from one allele may contribute to, but not fully account for, the low detection rate of FBN1 mutations. Interestingly, protein synthesis levels were not affected in 4 of 6 cell strains demonstrating low levels of RNA expression.

  13. Co-selection and replacement of resistance alleles to Lysinibacillus sphaericus in a Culex quinquefasciatus colony.

    PubMed

    Chalegre, Karlos Diogo de Melo; Tavares, Daniella A; Romão, Tatiany P; de Menezes, Heverly Suzany G; Nascimento, Nathaly A; de Oliveira, Cláudia Maria F; de-Melo-Neto, Osvaldo P; Silva-Filha, Maria Helena N L

    2015-09-01

    The Cqm1 α-glucosidase, expressed within the midgut of Culex quinquefasciatus mosquito larvae, is the receptor for the Binary toxin (Bin) from the entomopathogen Lysinibacillus sphaericus. Mutations of the Cqm1 α-glucosidase gene cause high resistance levels to this bacterium in both field and laboratory populations, and a previously described allele, cqm1REC, was found to be associated with a laboratory-resistant colony (R2362). This study described the identification of a novel resistance allele, cqm1REC-2, that was co-selected with cqm1REC within the R2362 colony. The two alleles display distinct mutations but both generate premature stop codons that prevent the expression of midgut-bound Cqm1 proteins. Using a PCR-based assay to monitor the frequency of each allele during long-term maintenance of the resistant colony, cqm1REC was found to predominate early on but later was replaced by cqm1REC-2 as the most abundant resistance allele. Homozygous larvae for each allele were then generated that displayed similar high-resistance phenotypes with equivalent low levels of transcript and lack of protein expression for both cqm1REC and cqm1REC-2. In progeny from a cross of homozygous individuals for each allele at a 1 : 1 ratio, analyzed for ten subsequent generations, cqm1REC showed a higher frequency than cqm1REC-2. The replacement of cqm1REC by cqm1REC -2 observed in the R2362 colony, kept for 210 generations, indicates changes in fitness related to traits that are unknown but linked to these two alleles, and constitutes a unique example of evolution of resistance within a controlled laboratory environment. PMID:26131741

  14. PCR Strategies for Complete Allele Calling in Multigene Families Using High-Throughput Sequencing Approaches.

    PubMed

    Marmesat, Elena; Soriano, Laura; Mazzoni, Camila J; Sommer, Simone; Godoy, José A

    2016-01-01

    The characterization of multigene families with high copy number variation is often approached through PCR amplification with highly degenerate primers to account for all expected variants flanking the region of interest. Such an approach often introduces PCR biases that result in an unbalanced representation of targets in high-throughput sequencing libraries that eventually results in incomplete detection of the targeted alleles. Here we confirm this result and propose two different amplification strategies to alleviate this problem. The first strategy (called pooled-PCRs) targets different subsets of alleles in multiple independent PCRs using different moderately degenerate primer pairs, whereas the second approach (called pooled-primers) uses a custom-made pool of non-degenerate primers in a single PCR. We compare their performance to the common use of a single PCR with highly degenerate primers using the MHC class I of the Iberian lynx as a model. We found both novel approaches to work similarly well and better than the conventional approach. They significantly scored more alleles per individual (11.33 ± 1.38 and 11.72 ± 0.89 vs 7.94 ± 1.95), yielded more complete allelic profiles (96.28 ± 8.46 and 99.50 ± 2.12 vs 63.76 ± 15.43), and revealed more alleles at a population level (13 vs 12). Finally, we could link each allele's amplification efficiency with the primer-mismatches in its flanking sequences and show that ultra-deep coverage offered by high-throughput technologies does not fully compensate for such biases, especially as real alleles may reach lower coverage than artefacts. Adopting either of the proposed amplification methods provides the opportunity to attain more complete allelic profiles at lower coverages, improving confidence over the downstream analyses and subsequent applications. PMID:27294261

  15. Geographical patterns of turnover and nestedness-resultant components of allelic diversity among populations.

    PubMed

    Diniz-Filho, Jose Alexandre Felizola; Collevatti, Rosane Garcia; Soares, Thannya Nascimento; Telles, Mariana Pires de Campos

    2012-06-01

    The analysis of geographical patterns in population divergence has always been a powerful way to infer microevolutionary processes involved in population differentiation, and several approaches have been used to investigate such patterns. Most frequently, multivariate spatial patterns of population differentiation are analyzed by computing pairwise genetic distances or F(ST) (or related statistics, such as ϕ(ST) from AMOVA), which are then correlated with geographical distances or landscape features. However, when calculating distances, especially based on presence-absence of alleles in local populations, there would be a confounding effect of allelic richness differences in the population differentiation. Moreover, the relative magnitude of these components and their spatial patterns can help identifying microevolutionary processes driving population differentiation. Here we show how recent methodological advances in ecological community analyses that allows partitioning dissimilarity into turnover (turnover) and richness differences, or nestedness-resultant dissimilarity, can be applied to allelic variation data, using an endemic Cerrado tree (Dipteryx alata) as a case study. Individuals from 15 local populations were genotyped for eight microsatellite loci, and pairwise dissimilarities were computed based on presence-absence of alleles. The turnover of alleles among populations represented 69 % of variation in dissimilarity, but only the richness difference component shows a clear spatial structure, appearing as a westward decrease of allelic richness. We show that decoupling richness difference and turnover components of allelic variation reveals more clearly how similarity among populations reflects geographical patterns in allelic diversity that can be interpreted in respect to historical range expansion in the species. PMID:22886007

  16. No evidence for allelic association between bipolar disorder and monoamine oxidase A gene polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Craddock, N.; Daniels, J.; Roberts, E.

    1995-08-14

    We have tested the hypothesis that DNA markers in the MAOA gene show allelic association with bipolar affective disorder. Eighty-four unrelated Caucasian patients with DSM III-R bipolar disorder and 84 Caucasian controls were typed for three markers in MAOA: a dinucleotide repeat in intron 2, a VNTR in intron 1, and an Fnu4HI RFLP in exon 8. No evidence for allelic association was observed between any of the markers and bipolar disorder. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  17. Combination of Eight Alleles at Four Quantitative Trait Loci Determines Grain Length in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yuxiang; Ji, Zhijuan; Wen, Zhihua; Liang, Yan; Yang, Changdeng

    2016-01-01

    Grain length is an important quantitative trait in rice (Oryza sativa L.) that influences both grain yield and exterior quality. Although many quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for grain length have been identified, it is still unclear how different alleles from different QTLs regulate grain length coordinately. To explore the mechanisms of QTL combination in the determination of grain length, five mapping populations, including two F2 populations, an F3 population, an F7 recombinant inbred line (RIL) population, and an F8 RIL population, were developed from the cross between the U.S. tropical japonica variety ‘Lemont’ and the Chinese indica variety ‘Yangdao 4’ and grown under different environmental conditions. Four QTLs (qGL-3-1, qGL-3-2, qGL-4, and qGL-7) for grain length were detected using both composite interval mapping and multiple interval mapping methods in the mapping populations. In each locus, there was an allele from one parent that increased grain length and another allele from another parent that decreased it. The eight alleles in the four QTLs were analyzed to determine whether these alleles act additively across loci, and lead to a linear relationship between the predicted breeding value of QTLs and phenotype. Linear regression analysis suggested that the combination of eight alleles determined grain length. Plants carrying more grain length-increasing alleles had longer grain length than those carrying more grain length-decreasing alleles. This trend was consistent in all five mapping populations and demonstrated the regulation of grain length by the four QTLs. Thus, these QTLs are ideal resources for modifying grain length in rice. PMID:26942914

  18. Semi-parametric Allelic Tests For Mapping Multiple Phenotypes: Binomial Regression And Mahalanobis Distance

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Arunabha; Witte, John S.; Ghosh, Saurabh

    2016-01-01

    Binary phenotypes commonly arise due to multiple underlying quantitative precursors. Genetic variants may impact multiple traits in a pleiotropic manner. Hence, simultaneously analyzing such correlated traits may be more powerful than analyzing individual traits. Various genotype-level methods, e.g. MultiPhen [O'Reilly et al., 2012], have been developed to identify genetic factors underlying a multivariate phenotype. For univariate phenotypes, the usefulness and applicability of allele-level tests have been investigated. The test of allele frequency difference among cases and controls is commonly used for mapping case-control association. However, allelic methods for multivariate association mapping have not been studied much. We explore two allelic tests of multivariate association: one using a Binomial regression model based on inverted regression of genotype on phenotype (BAMP), and the other employing the Mahalanobis distance between two sample means of the multivariate phenotype vector for two alleles at a SNP (DAMP). These methods can incorporate both discrete and continuous phenotypes. Some theoretical properties for BAMP are studied. Using simulations, the power of the methods for detecting multivariate association are compared with the genotype-level test MultiPhen. The allelic tests yield marginally higher power than MultiPhen for multivariate phenotypes. For one/two binary traits under recessive mode of inheritance, allelic tests are found substantially more powerful. All three tests are applied to two real data and the results offer some support for the simulation study. Since the allelic approaches assume Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE), we propose a hybrid approach for testing multivariate association that implements MultiPhen when HWE is violated and BAMP otherwise. PMID:26493781

  19. European Citizenship and European Union Expansion: Perspectives on Europeanness and Citizenship Education from Britain and Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Chris; Busher, Hugh; Lawson, Tony; Acun, Ismail; Goz, Nur Leman

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses some perspectives on citizenship education in Turkey and Britain in the context of current contested discourses on the nature of European identity and of the European Union (EU). It is based on data collected during an EU-funded student teacher exchange programme between three universities in Turkey and Leicester University…

  20. Natural selection for the Duffy-null allele in the recently admixed people of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Jason A; Pickrell, Joseph K; Pearson, Laurel N; Quillen, Ellen E; Prista, António; Rocha, Jorge; Soodyall, Himla; Shriver, Mark D; Perry, George H

    2014-08-22

    While gene flow between distantly related populations is increasingly recognized as a potentially important source of adaptive genetic variation for humans, fully characterized examples are rare. In addition, the role that natural selection for resistance to vivax malaria may have played in the extreme distribution of the protective Duffy-null allele, which is nearly completely fixed in mainland sub-Saharan Africa and absent elsewhere, is controversial. We address both these issues by investigating the evolution of the Duffy-null allele in the Malagasy, a recently admixed population with major ancestry components from both East Asia and mainland sub-Saharan Africa. We used genome-wide genetic data and extensive computer simulations to show that the high frequency of the Duffy-null allele in Madagascar can only be explained in the absence of positive natural selection under extreme demographic scenarios involving high genetic drift. However, the observed genomic single nucleotide polymorphism diversity in the Malagasy is incompatible with such extreme demographic scenarios, indicating that positive selection for the Duffy-null allele best explains the high frequency of the allele in Madagascar. We estimate the selection coefficient to be 0.066. Because vivax malaria is endemic to Madagascar, this result supports the hypothesis that malaria resistance drove fixation of the Duffy-null allele in mainland sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24990677

  1. Association of DLA-DQB1 alleles with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in Pembroke Welsh Corgis.

    PubMed

    Evans, J M; Tsai, K L; Starr-Moss, A N; Steiner, J M; Clark, L A

    2015-08-01

    Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) is a digestive disorder resulting from the insufficient secretion of enzymes from the pancreas. In dogs, this condition is often attributed to pancreatic acinar atrophy, wherein the enzyme-producing acinar cells are believed to be destroyed through an autoimmune process. Although EPI affects many diverse breeds, to date, molecular studies have been limited to the German Shepherd dog. A recent study of major histocompatibility genes in diseased and healthy German Shepherd dogs identified both risk and protective haplotypes. Herein, we genotyped DLA-DQB1 in Pembroke Welsh Corgis to determine whether dog leukocyte antigen alleles contribute to the pathogenesis of EPI across dog breeds. We evaluated 14 affected and 43 control Pembroke Welsh Corgis, which were selected based on an age of onset similar to German Shepherd dogs. We identified one protective allele (odds ratio = 0.13, P-value = 0.044) and one risk allele (odds ratio = 3.8, P-value = 0.047). As in German Shepherd dogs, the risk allele is a duplication of DLA-DQB1 (alleles DQB1*013:03 and 017:01); however, Pembroke Welsh Corgis have acquired a single polymorphism on DQB1*017:01. Thus, the DLA-DQB1 duplication is a risk allele for EPI in at least two breeds. PMID:26095904

  2. How Old Is the Most Recent Ancestor of Two Copies of an Allele?

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Nick J.

    2005-01-01

    An important clue to the evolutionary history of an allele is the structure of the neighboring region of the genome, which we term the genomic background of the allele. Consider two copies of the allele. How similar we expect their genomic background to be is strongly influenced by the age of their most recent common ancestor (MRCA). We apply diffusion theory, first used by Motoo Kimura as a tool for predicting the changes in allele frequencies over time and developed by him in many articles in this journal, to prove a variety of new results on the age of the MRCA under the simplest demographic assumptions. In particular, we show that the expected age of the MRCA of two copies of an allele with population frequency f is just 2Nf generations, where N is the effective population size. Our results are a first step in running exact coalescent simulations, where we also simulate the history of the population frequency of an allele. PMID:15520271

  3. Novel alleles of the transforming growth factor β-1 regulatory region and exon 1.

    PubMed

    Arrieta-Bolaños, E; Madrigal, J A; Shaw, B E

    2015-06-01

    Transforming growth factor β-1, encoded by the TGFB1 gene, is a cytokine that plays a central role in many physiologic and pathogenic processes with pleiotropic effects. Regulatory activity for this gene has been shown for 3.0 kb between positions -2665 and +423 from its translational start site. At least 17 TGFB1 regulatory region and exon 1 alleles have been defined on the basis of 18 polymorphic sites. Polymorphisms in TGFB1's regulatory region have been associated with differential levels of expression of this cytokine and to genetic risk in cancer and transplantation. In this report, we present 19 novel TGFB1 regulatory region and exon 1 alleles: p018-p036. Amplification of TGFB1's regulatory region was performed with an in-house protocol, and novel alleles were defined by either allele-specific amplification and/or molecular cloning of the amplicons, followed by sequencing in isolation. Three of these novel alleles (p018, p019, and p020) are shown to be formed by novel combinations of the aforementioned known polymorphic positions. Another 16 novel alleles are shown to carry additional known and unknown single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Polymorphism in TGFB1's regulatory region could have an impact on important processes, including embryogenesis, hematopoiesis, carcinogenesis, angiogenesis, fibrosis, immune responses, and transplantation, making its characterization necessary. PMID:25808355

  4. Functional isogenic modeling of BRCA1 alleles reveals distinct carrier phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Cochran, Rory L.; Cidado, Justin; Kim, Minsoo; Zabransky, Daniel J.; Croessmann, Sarah; Chu, David; Wong, Hong Yuen; Beaver, Julia A.; Cravero, Karen; Erlanger, Bracha; Parsons, Heather; Heaphy, Christopher M.; Meeker, Alan K.; Lauring, Josh; Park, Ben Ho

    2015-01-01

    Clinical genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 is commonly performed to identify specific individuals at risk for breast and ovarian cancers who may benefit from prophylactic therapeutic interventions. Unfortunately, it is evident that deleterious BRCA1 alleles demonstrate variable penetrance and that many BRCA1 variants of unknown significance (VUS) exist. In order to further refine hereditary risks that may be associated with specific BRCA1 alleles, we performed gene targeting to establish an isogenic panel of immortalized human breast epithelial cells harboring eight clinically relevant BRCA1 alleles. Interestingly, BRCA1 mutations and VUS had distinct, quantifiable phenotypes relative to isogenic parental BRCA1 wild type cells and controls. Heterozygous cells with known deleterious BRCA1 mutations (185delAG, C61G and R71G) demonstrated consistent phenotypes in radiation sensitivity and genomic instability assays, but showed variability in other assays. Heterozygous BRCA1 VUS cells also demonstrated assay variability, with some VUS demonstrating phenotypes more consistent with deleterious alleles. Taken together, our data suggest that BRCA1 deleterious mutations and VUS can differ in their range of tested phenotypes, suggesting they might impart varying degrees of risk. These results demonstrate that functional isogenic modeling of BRCA1 alleles could aid in classifying BRCA1 mutations and VUS, and determining BRCA allele cancer risk. PMID:26246475

  5. A new DRB1 allele (DRB1*0811) identified in Native Americans

    SciTech Connect

    McAuley, J.D.; Williams, T.M.; Wu, J.; Foutz, T.; Troup, G.M.

    1994-12-31

    A novel DRB1 allele was identified in a potential bone marrow transplantation recipient and her father. Both are Native Americans of Navajo descent. Class II serologic typing of the patient demonstrated the presence of DR8, DR14, DR52, and DQ3. Sequence specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of genomic DNA was consistent with the DRB1 alleles *08 and *14. Direct DNA sequencing of PCR products prepared from genomic DNA demonstrated that the patient`s class II alleles included the novel allele, DRB1*1402, DRB3*0101, DQB1*0301, and DQB1*0402. Analysis of the siblings and the father of this individual revealed that the new allele was transmitted on the haplotype A2, Cw7, B39, DQB1*0402, while the DRB1*1402 allele was transmitted on the haplotype A24, Cw4, B35, DRB3*0101, DQB1*0301. 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Identification of the new HLA-DRB1{sup *}0812 allele detected by sequencing based typing

    SciTech Connect

    Versluis, L.F.; Zwan, A.W. van der; Tilanus, M.G.J.; Savelkoul, P.H.M.; Berg-Loonen, E.M. van den

    1996-12-31

    HLA-DRB typing by polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific priming (PCR-SSP) and sequencing based typing (SBT) was studied within the framework of the Antigen and Haplotype Society 11 and the Sequencing Based Typing Component of the Twelfth International HLA workshop. Sequencing was performed as described by McGinnis and co-workers in 1995 on coded samples, including most DR2 subtypes, resulting in high resolution HLA-DR typing. Sequences were compared with a database containing 107 DRB1, four DRB3, and five DRB5 alleles in a similar way as described for HLA-DPB. One sample showed a new DR8 sequence, indicating the presence of a new allele. This individual (4390) is of Indonesian origin. The specific amplification of the DR8 allele and subsequent sequencing resulted in a sequence which did not match the database and new polymorphism was identified. The complementary strand was sequenced and confirmed the presence of a new DRB1 allele. Cloning and subsequent sequencing of the polymerase chain reaction fragment resulted in confirmation of the direct sequence data. Later this variant was officially named DRB1{sup *}0812. The complete nucleotide sequence of exon 2 of this new allele is shown. This allele differs from DRB1{sup *}0810 by one nucleotide at codon 85, resulting in an alanine (GTT), whereas DRB1{sup *}0810 carries a valine (GCT). 5 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Functional isogenic modeling of BRCA1 alleles reveals distinct carrier phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Rory L; Cidado, Justin; Kim, Minsoo; Zabransky, Daniel J; Croessmann, Sarah; Chu, David; Wong, Hong Yuen; Beaver, Julia A; Cravero, Karen; Erlanger, Bracha; Parsons, Heather; Heaphy, Christopher M; Meeker, Alan K; Lauring, Josh; Park, Ben Ho

    2015-09-22

    Clinical genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 is commonly performed to identify specific individuals at risk for breast and ovarian cancers who may benefit from prophylactic therapeutic interventions. Unfortunately, it is evident that deleterious BRCA1 alleles demonstrate variable penetrance and that many BRCA1 variants of unknown significance (VUS) exist. In order to further refine hereditary risks that may be associated with specific BRCA1 alleles, we performed gene targeting to establish an isogenic panel of immortalized human breast epithelial cells harboring eight clinically relevant BRCA1 alleles. Interestingly, BRCA1 mutations and VUS had distinct, quantifiable phenotypes relative to isogenic parental BRCA1 wild type cells and controls. Heterozygous cells with known deleterious BRCA1 mutations (185delAG, C61G and R71G) demonstrated consistent phenotypes in radiation sensitivity and genomic instability assays, but showed variability in other assays. Heterozygous BRCA1 VUS cells also demonstrated assay variability, with some VUS demonstrating phenotypes more consistent with deleterious alleles. Taken together, our data suggest that BRCA1 deleterious mutations and VUS can differ in their range of tested phenotypes, suggesting they might impart varying degrees of risk. These results demonstrate that functional isogenic modeling of BRCA1 alleles could aid in classifying BRCA1 mutations and VUS, and determining BRCA allele cancer risk. PMID:26246475

  8. Natural selection for the Duffy-null allele in the recently admixed people of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Jason A.; Pickrell, Joseph K.; Pearson, Laurel N.; Quillen, Ellen E.; Prista, António; Rocha, Jorge; Soodyall, Himla; Shriver, Mark D.; Perry, George H.

    2014-01-01

    While gene flow between distantly related populations is increasingly recognized as a potentially important source of adaptive genetic variation for humans, fully characterized examples are rare. In addition, the role that natural selection for resistance to vivax malaria may have played in the extreme distribution of the protective Duffy-null allele, which is nearly completely fixed in mainland sub-Saharan Africa and absent elsewhere, is controversial. We address both these issues by investigating the evolution of the Duffy-null allele in the Malagasy, a recently admixed population with major ancestry components from both East Asia and mainland sub-Saharan Africa. We used genome-wide genetic data and extensive computer simulations to show that the high frequency of the Duffy-null allele in Madagascar can only be explained in the absence of positive natural selection under extreme demographic scenarios involving high genetic drift. However, the observed genomic single nucleotide polymorphism diversity in the Malagasy is incompatible with such extreme demographic scenarios, indicating that positive selection for the Duffy-null allele best explains the high frequency of the allele in Madagascar. We estimate the selection coefficient to be 0.066. Because vivax malaria is endemic to Madagascar, this result supports the hypothesis that malaria resistance drove fixation of the Duffy-null allele in mainland sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24990677

  9. Multiple and independent origins of short seeded alleles of GS3 in rice

    PubMed Central

    Takano-Kai, Noriko; Jiang, Hui; Powell, Adrian; McCouch, Susan; Takamure, Itsuro; Furuya, Naruto; Doi, Kazuyuki; Yoshimura, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    GRAIN SIZE 3 (GS3) is a cloned gene that is related to seed length. Here we report the discovery of new deletion alleles at the GS3 locus, each of which confer short seed. We selected ten short seeded cultivars from a collection of 282 diverse cultivars. Sequence analysis across the GS3 gene in these ten cultivars identified three novel alleles and a known allele that contain several independent deletion(s) in the fifth exon of GS. These independent deletion variants each resulted in a frameshift mutation that caused a premature stop codon, and they were functionally similar to one another. Each coded for a truncated gene product that behaved as an incomplete dominant allele and conferred a short seeded phenotype. Haplotype analysis of these sequence variants indicated that two of the variants were of japonica origin, and two were from indica. Transformation experiments demonstrated that one of the deletion alleles of GS3 decrease the cell number in the upper epidermis of the glume, resulting in a significant reduction in seed length. The multiple and independent origins of these short seeded alleles indicate that farmers and early breeders imposed artificial selection favoring short seeds. PMID:23641184

  10. Imprinting control regions (ICRs) are marked by mono-allelic bivalent chromatin when transcriptionally inactive

    PubMed Central

    Maupetit-Méhouas, Stéphanie; Montibus, Bertille; Nury, David; Tayama, Chiharu; Wassef, Michel; Kota, Satya K.; Fogli, Anne; Cerqueira Campos, Fabiana; Hata, Kenichiro; Feil, Robert; Margueron, Raphael; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Court, Franck; Arnaud, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Parental allele-specific expression of imprinted genes is mediated by imprinting control regions (ICRs) that are constitutively marked by DNA methylation imprints on the maternal or paternal allele. Mono-allelic DNA methylation is strictly required for the process of imprinting and has to be faithfully maintained during the entire life-span. While the regulation of DNA methylation itself is well understood, the mechanisms whereby the opposite allele remains unmethylated are unclear. Here, we show that in the mouse, at maternally methylated ICRs, the paternal allele, which is constitutively associated with H3K4me2/3, is marked by default by H3K27me3 when these ICRs are transcriptionally inactive, leading to the formation of a bivalent chromatin signature. Our data suggest that at ICRs, chromatin bivalency has a protective role by ensuring that DNA on the paternal allele remains unmethylated and protected against spurious and unscheduled gene expression. Moreover, they provide the proof of concept that, beside pluripotent cells, chromatin bivalency is the default state of transcriptionally inactive CpG island promoters, regardless of the developmental stage, thereby contributing to protect cell identity. PMID:26400168

  11. Differential utilization of poly (A) signals between DHFR alleles in CHL cells.

    PubMed Central

    Scotto, K W; Yang, H; Davide, J P; Melera, P W

    1992-01-01

    The Chinese hamster cell line, DC-3F, is heterozygous at the DHFR locus, and each allele can be distinguished on the basis of a unique DNA restriction pattern, protein isoelectric profile and in the abundancy of the DHFR mRNAs it expresses. Although each allele produces four transcripts, 1000, 1650 and 2150 nucleotides [corrected] in length, the relative distribution of these RNAs differs for each; the 2150 nt mRNA represents the major (60%) species generated from one allele, while the 1000 nt mRNA is the major species generated from the other. The allele that predominantly expresses the 2150 nt transcript is preferentially overexpressed when DC-3F cells are subjected to selection in methotrexate. We have analyzed the 3' ends of both DHFR alleles and have found that the three major mRNAs arise by readthrough of multiple polyadenylation signals. A four base deletion in one allele changes the consensus polyadenylation signal AAUAAA to AAUAAU, resulting in the utilization of a cryptic polyadenylation signal lying 21 bp upstream. Surprisingly, this mutation in the third polyadenylation signal appears to affect not only the utilization of this signal, but also the efficiency with which the first signal, located 1171 bp upstream from the third site, is utilized. Images PMID:1480480

  12. Rapid Microarray-Based Identification of Different mecA Alleles in Staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Elke; Schwarz, Stefan; Hotzel, Helmut; Ehricht, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    To screen isolates and to identify mecA alleles, published mecA sequences were analyzed, and a microarray for the rapid discrimination of mecA alleles was designed. A GenBank analysis yielded 135 full-length gene sequences annotated as mecA. These sequences clustered into 32 different alleles corresponding to 28 unique amino acid sequences and to 15 distinct hybridization patterns on this microarray. A collection of 78 clinical and veterinary isolates of Staphylococcus spp. was characterized using this assay. Nine of the 15 expected patterns, as well as one as-yet-unknown pattern, were identified. These patterns were detected in various epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains, in S. pseudintermedius, and in coagulase-negative species such as S. epidermidis, S. fleurettii, or S. haemolyticus. There was no correlation between the different mecA hybridization patterns and the SCCmec type. Determination of MICs showed that mecA alleles corresponding to only four of these nine patterns were associated with β-lactam resistance. The mecA alleles that did not confer β-lactam resistance were largely restricted to coagulase-negative staphylococci of animal origin, such as S. sciuri and S. vitulinus. Because of the diversity of sequences and the different impact on β-lactam susceptibility, the existence of different mecA alleles needs to be taken into account when designing diagnostic assays for the detection of mecA. PMID:22890767

  13. Europeans: an endangered species?

    PubMed

    Von Cube, A

    1986-10-01

    Below replacement fertility has become the norm in 21 of Europe's 27 countries. Their average total fertility rate is 1.69. This trend has raised concerns about insufficient numbers in the economically active population and prospective personnel shortages in the military. In the Federal Republic of Germany, fertility has been below replacement for the past 17 years and its 1985 total fertility rate of 1.28 is a record low. Only a few European countries (Bulgaria, France, and Romania) have explicitly pronatalist policies. Other nations (Belgium, Finland, Luxembourg, and the German Democratic Republic) have instituted a progressive system of child allowances, increasing payments with each additional birth. Ironically, policies that seek to promote social opportunities for women, such as participation in the labor force, are likely to reduce fertility even farther. Without increased services such as reasonably priced housing, child care centers, and economic incentives to compensate women for lost opportunity costs in the labor market, policies that seek to increase fertility will not succeed. Policy options that were once available to increase fertility (for example, prohibiting abortion) are no longer socially acceptable. New policies will have to be developed through research on the determinants of fertility behavior in postindustrial societies. PMID:12315251

  14. Genetic diversity comparison of the DQA gene in European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) populations.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Vanessa; Abrantes, Joana; Munõz-Pajares, Antonio Jesús; Esteves, Pedro J

    2015-10-01

    The European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) natural populations within the species native region, the Iberian Peninsula, are considered a reservoir of genetic diversity. Indeed, the Iberia was a Pleistocene refuge to the species and currently two subspecies are found in the peninsula (Oryctolagus cuniculus cuniculus and Oryctolagus cuniculus algirus). The genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) have been substantially studied in wild populations due to their exceptional variability, believed to be pathogen driven. They play an important function as part of the adaptive immune system affecting the individual fitness and population viability. In this study, the MHC variability was assessed by analysing the exon 2 of the DQA gene in several European rabbit populations from Portugal, Spain and France and in domestic breeds. Twenty-eight DQA alleles were detected, among which 18 are described for the first time. The Iberian rabbit populations are well differentiated from the French population and domestic breeds. The Iberian populations retained the higher allelic diversity with the domestic breeds harbouring the lowest; in contrast, the DQA nucleotide diversity was higher in the French population. Signatures of positive selection were detected in four codons which are putative peptide-binding sites and have been previously detected in other mammals. The evolutionary relationships showed instances of trans-species polymorphism. Overall, our results suggest that the DQA in European rabbits is evolving under selection and genetic drift. PMID:26307416

  15. The ADA*2 allele of the adenosine deaminase gene (20q13.11) and recurrent spontaneous abortions: an age-dependent association

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Daniela Prudente Teixeira; Spegiorin, Lígia Cosentino Junqueira Franco; de Mattos, Cinara Cássia Brandão; Oliani, Antonio Helio; Vaz-Oliani, Denise Cristina Mós; de Mattos, Luiz Carlos

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Adenosine deaminase acts on adenosine and deoxyadenosine metabolism and modulates the immune response. The adenosine deaminase G22A polymorphism (20q.11.33) influences the level of adenosine deaminase enzyme expression, which seems to play a key role in maintaining pregnancy. The adenosine deaminase 2 phenotype has been associated with a protective effect against recurrent spontaneous abortions in European Caucasian women. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the G22A polymorphism of the adenosine deaminase gene is associated with recurrent spontaneous abortions in Brazilian women. METHODS: A total of 311 women were recruited to form two groups: G1, with a history of recurrent spontaneous abortions (N = 129), and G2, without a history of abortions (N = 182). Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood with a commercial kit and PCR-RFLP analysis was used to identify the G22A genetic polymorphism. Fisher's exact test and odds ratio values were used to compare the proportions of adenosine deaminase genotypes and alleles between women with and without a history of recurrent spontaneous abortion (p<0.05). The differences between mean values for categorical data were calculated using unpaired t tests. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was assessed with a chi-square test. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences were identified for the frequencies of adenosine deaminase genotypes and alleles between the G1 and G2 groups when adjusted for maternal age. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that the adenosine deaminase *2 allele is associated with a low risk for recurrent spontaneous abortions, but this association is dependent on older age. PMID:22086524

  16. The Burden of JAK2V617F Mutated Allele in Turkish Patients With Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Yonal-Hindilerden, Ipek; Daglar-Aday, Aynur; Akadam-Teker, Basak; Yilmaz, Ceylan; Nalcaci, Meliha; Yavuz, Akif Selim; Sargin, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies regarding the impact of JAK2V617F allele burden on phenotypic properties and clinical course in Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph-negative MPNs) have reported variable results. We aimed to analyze the association of mutated JAK2V617F allele burden with laboratory characteristics and clinical phenotype in Turkish patients (107 essential thrombocythemia (ET) and 77 primary myelofibrosis (PMF)). Methods Peripheral blood samples of 184 patients with Ph-negative MPNs were analyzed for JAK2V617F allele status and burden. JAK2 MutaScreen assay (Ipsogen, Luminy Biotech, Marseille, France) was used to detect the JAK2V617F status and quantitative JAK2V617F allele burdens in genomic DNA using TaqMan allelic discrimination. Results Frequency of JAK2V617F-positive patients with high mutation load (allele burden > 50%) was higher in PMF compared to ET (23.4% and 4.7%, respectively; P = 0.001). We found significant association between ET patients with high JAK2V617F allele burden and lower hemoglobin (Hgb) and hematocrit (Hct), higher LDH levels and more prevalent massive splenomegaly (P = 0.001, P = 0.001, P = 0.012 and P = 0.015, respectively). ET patients with high mutation load displayed higher prevalence of bleeding compared to low mutation load and wild-type mutational status (P = 0.003). Rate of DVT was significantly higher in ET patients with mutant allele burden in upper half compared to lower half and wild-type (P = 0.029). We observed significant association between PMF patients with high JAK2V617F allele burden and higher Hgb, Hct levels and leukocyte counts (P = 0.003, P = 0.021 and P = 0.001, respectively). Conclusions Our study demonstrated JAK2V617F allele burden correlates with clinical features in ET and PMF. We conclude quantification of JAK2V617F mutation contributes to the workup of Ph-negative MPNs. PMID:25584101

  17. Factors Influencing Ascertainment Bias of Microsatellite Allele Sizes: Impact on Estimates of Mutation Rates

    PubMed Central

    Li, Biao; Kimmel, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellite loci play an important role as markers for identification, disease gene mapping, and evolutionary studies. Mutation rate, which is of fundamental importance, can be obtained from interspecies comparisons, which, however, are subject to ascertainment bias. This bias arises, for example, when a locus is selected on the basis of its large allele size in one species (cognate species 1), in which it is first discovered. This bias is reflected in average allele length in any noncognate species 2 being smaller than that in species 1. This phenomenon was observed in various pairs of species, including comparisons of allele sizes in human and chimpanzee. Various mechanisms were proposed to explain observed differences in mean allele lengths between two species. Here, we examine the framework of a single-step asymmetric and unrestricted stepwise mutation model with genetic drift. Analysis is based on coalescent theory. Analytical results are confirmed by simulations using the simuPOP software. The mechanism of ascertainment bias in this model is a tighter correlation of allele sizes within a cognate species 1 than of allele sizes in two different species 1 and 2. We present computations of the expected average allele size difference, given the mutation rate, population sizes of species 1 and 2, time of separation of species 1 and 2, and the age of the allele. We show that when the past demographic histories of the cognate and noncognate taxa are different, the rate and directionality of mutations affect the allele sizes in the two taxa differently from the simple effect of ascertainment bias. This effect may exaggerate or reverse the effect of difference in mutation rates. We reanalyze literature data, which indicate that despite the bias, the microsatellite mutation rate estimate in the ancestral population is consistently greater than that in either human or chimpanzee and the mutation rate estimate in human exceeds or equals that in chimpanzee with the rate

  18. Distribution of CC-chemokine receptor-5-∆32 allele among the tribal and caste population of Vidarbha region of Maharashtra state

    PubMed Central

    Chavhan, Arvind B.; Pawar, Santosh S.; Jadhao, Rajusing G.; Patil, Kishor G.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic relationships among the ethnic groups are not uniform across the geographical region. Considering this assumption, we analyzed the frequency of the CC-chemokine receptor-5 (CCR5)-∆32 allele of the CCR5 chemokine receptor, which is considered a Caucasian marker, in Bhil tribal and Brahmin caste sample sets from the population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 108 blood samples were collected from 6 tribe's populations and a caste population from the district of Vidarbha region. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The presence of low frequencies of CCR5-Δ32 in an individual of Bhil tribe (0.034, χ2 value 0.017) in the present study implies that these communities may have a better resistance toward human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) than the other studied tribe sample, as non-show such mutation. CONCLUSION: The marginal presence of the allele seen in the studied tribal population could be due to gene flow from the people of European descent. However, lack of the homozygous CCR5-Δ32 mutation and the low prevalence of heterozygous CCR5-Δ32 mutations suggest that the Indians are highly susceptible to HIV/AIDS, and this correlates with the highest number of HIV/AIDS infected individuals in India. PMID:23901195

  19. European Neutron Activation System.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-01-11

    Version 03 EASY-2010 (European Activation System) consists of a wide range of codes, data and documentation all aimed at satisfying the objective of calculating the response of materials irradiated in a neutron flux. The main difference from the previous version is the upper energy limit, which has increased from 20 to 60 MeV. It is designed to investigate both fusion devices and accelerator based materials test facilities that will act as intense sources of high-energymore » neutrons causing significant activation of the surrounding materials. The very general nature of the calculational method and the data libraries means that it is applicable (with some reservations) to all situations (e.g. fission reactors or neutron sources) where materials are exposed to neutrons below 60 MeV. EASY can be divided into two parts: data and code development tools and user tools and data. The former are required to develop the latter, but EASY users only need to be able to use the inventory code FISPACT and be aware of the contents of the EAF library (the data source). The complete EASY package contains the FISPACT-2007 inventory code, the EAF-2003, EAF-2005, EAF-2007 and EAF-2010 libraries, and the EASY User Interface for the Window version. The activation package EASY-2010 is the result of significant development to extend the upper energy range from 20 to 60 MeV so that it is capable of being used for IFMIF calculations. The EAF-2010 library contains 66,256 reactions, almost five times more than in EAF-2003 (12,617). Deuteron-induced and proton-induced cross section libraries are also included, and can be used with EASY to enable calculations of the activation due to deuterons and proton [2].« less

  20. European MEMS foundries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomon, Patric R.

    2003-01-01

    According to the latest release of the NEXUS market study, the market for MEMS or Microsystems Technology (MST) is predicted to grow to $68B by the year 2005, with systems containing these components generating even higher revenues and growth. The latest advances in MST/MEMS technology have enabled the design of a new generation of microsystems that are smaller, cheaper, more reliable, and consume less power. These integrated systems bring together numerous analog/mixed signal microelectronics blocks and MEMS functions on a single chip or on two or more chips assembled within an integrated package. In spite of all these advances in technology and manufacturing, a system manufacturer either faces a substantial up-front R&D investment to create his own infrastructure and expertise, or he can use design and foundry services to get the initial product into the marketplace fast and with an affordable investment. Once he has a viable product, he can still think about his own manufacturing efforts and investments to obtain an optimized high volume manufacturing for the specific product. One of the barriers to successful exploitation of MEMS/MST technology has been the lack of access to industrial foundries capable of producing certified microsystems devices in commercial quantities, including packaging and test. This paper discusses Multi-project wafer (MPW) runs, requirements for foundries and gives some examples of foundry business models. Furthermore, this paper will give an overview on MST/MEMS services that are available in Europe, including pure commercial activities, European project activities (e.g. Europractice), and some academic services.

  1. Diversity of immune genes and associated gill microbes of European plaice Pleuronectes platessa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, K. Mathias; Shama, Lisa N. S.; Kellnreitner, Florian; Pockberger, Moritz

    2012-08-01

    Genetic variability of marine fish species is much higher than in most other vertebrates. Nevertheless, some species with large population sizes including flatfish such as European plaice Pleuronectes platessa show signs of population collapse and inbreeding. Taking plaice as a flagship example for fisheries-induced genetic changes also affecting the Wadden Sea, we determined the amount of genetic variability at antigen-presenting genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) and its potential interaction with the microbiota associated to gill tissue using a next-generation parallel tag sequencing approach. Genetic variation at MHC class IIB genes was extremely large, with 97 alleles found in 40 fish from different age cohorts. Although a strong signal of positive selection was present (dN/dS = 4.01) and we found significantly higher allelic diversity in 0+ fish than in older age classes, the amount of genetic variation maintained within the population may not have exceeded neutral expectations derived from mitochondrial markers. Associated microbes revealed significant spatiotemporal structure with 0+ fish displaying the highest microbial diversity as well as the highest diversity of potentially pathogenic genera. Overall the correlation between MHC genotypes and bacterial abundance was weak, and only few alleles significantly correlated with certain bacterial genera. These associations all conferred susceptibility (i.e. presence of an allele correlated to higher number of bacteria), either suggesting age-dependent selection on common alleles or weak selection on resistance against these bacterial genera. Taken together, our data suggest that selection coefficients of balancing selection maintaining immunogenetic diversity may be relatively small in large marine populations. However, if population sizes are further reduced by overharvesting, the response to increasing balancing selection coefficients will be largely unpredictable and may also negatively

  2. [French European military haemovigilance guidelines].

    PubMed

    Sailliol, A; Clavier, B; Cap, A; Ausset, S

    2010-12-01

    European military transfusion services follow operational guidelines established by their respective national health systems and conform with European Union directives and NATO standards as applicable to member countries. Certain features are common to all of these standards, especially the pre-selection of volunteer, almost exclusively unpaid donors. NATO requirements are very close to European guidelines, with the exception that NATO permits the use of blood products collected in emergency conditions in theater when circumstances allow no better option. Blood product traceability exists for every country but is not always centralized or computerized. Serious adverse event reporting relies on national haemovigilance networks. Military considerations become important mainly in overseas operations, where the overall policy is to implement the relevant national, European or NATO guidelines with adjustments made for unique wartime circumstances and the risk/benefit ratio for the individual patient needing a transfusion. PMID:21051263

  3. HLA-DQA1/B1 alleles as putative susceptibility markers in congenital toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Paulo Tadashi; Targa, Lília Spaleta; Yamamoto, Lidia; Rodrigues, Jonatas Cristian; Kanunfre, Kelly Aparecida; Okay, Thelma Suely

    2016-05-18

    Host and parasite genotypes are among the factors associated with congenital toxoplasmosis pathogenesis. As HLA class II molecules play a key role in the immune system regulation, the aim of this study was to investigate whether HLA-DQA1/B1 alleles are associated with susceptibility or protection to congenital toxoplasmosis. One hundred and twenty-two fetuses with and 103 without toxoplasmosis were studied. The two study groups were comparable according to a number of socio-demographic and genetic variables. HLA alleles were typed by PCR-SSP. In the HLA-DQA1 region, the allele frequencies showed that *01:03 and *03:02 alleles could confer susceptibility (OR= 3.06, p = 0.0002 and OR= 9.60, p= 0.0001, respectively) as they were more frequent among infected fetuses. Regarding the HLA-DQB1 region, the *05:04 allele could confer susceptibility (OR = 6.95, p < 0.0001). Of the 122 infected fetuses, 10 presented susceptibility haplotypes contrasting with only one in the non-infected group. This difference was not statistically significant after correction for multiple comparison (OR = 9.37, p=0.011). In the casuistic, there were two severely damaged fetuses with high parasite loads determined in amniotic fluid samples and HLA-DQA1 susceptibility alleles. In the present study, a discriminatory potential of HLA-DQA1/B1 alleles to identify susceptibility to congenital toxoplasmosis and the most severe cases has been shown. PMID:26856406

  4. Allelic analysis of sheath blight resistance with association mapping in rice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Limeng; Yan, Wengui; Zhu, Chengsong; Agrama, Hesham A; Jackson, Aaron; Yeater, Kathleen; Li, Xiaobai; Huang, Bihu; Hu, Biaolin; McClung, Anna; Wu, Dianxing

    2012-01-01

    Sheath blight (ShB) caused by the soil-borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most devastating diseases in rice world-wide. Global attention has focused on examining individual mapping populations for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for ShB resistance, but to date no study has taken advantage of association mapping to examine hundreds of lines for potentially novel QTLs. Our objective was to identify ShB QTLs via association mapping in rice using 217 sub-core entries from the USDA rice core collection, which were phenotyped with a micro-chamber screening method and genotyped with 155 genome-wide markers. Structure analysis divided the mapping panel into five groups, and model comparison revealed that PCA5 with genomic control was the best model for association mapping of ShB. Ten marker loci on seven chromosomes were significantly associated with response to the ShB pathogen. Among multiple alleles in each identified loci, the allele contributing the greatest effect to ShB resistance was named the putative resistant allele. Among 217 entries, entry GSOR 310389 contained the most putative resistant alleles, eight out of ten. The number of putative resistant alleles presented in an entry was highly and significantly correlated with the decrease of ShB rating (r = -0.535) or the increase of ShB resistance. Majority of the resistant entries that contained a large number of the putative resistant alleles belonged to indica, which is consistent with a general observation that most ShB resistant accessions are of indica origin. These findings demonstrate the potential to improve breeding efficiency by using marker-assisted selection to pyramid putative resistant alleles from various loci in a cultivar for enhanced ShB resistance in rice. PMID:22427867

  5. Allele-Specific Deletions in Mouse Tumors Identify Fbxw7 as Germline Modifier of Tumor Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Losada, Jesus; Wu, Di; DelRosario, Reyno; Balmain, Allan; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful in finding associations between specific genetic variants and cancer susceptibility in human populations. These studies have identified a range of highly statistically significant associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and susceptibility to development of a range of human tumors. However, the effect of each SNP in isolation is very small, and all of the SNPs combined only account for a relatively minor proportion of the total genetic risk (5–10%). There is therefore a major requirement for alternative routes to the discovery of genetic risk factors for cancer. We have previously shown using mouse models that chromosomal regions harboring susceptibility genes identified by linkage analysis frequently exhibit allele-specific genetic alterations in tumors. We demonstrate here that the Fbxw7 gene, a commonly mutated gene in a wide range of mouse and human cancers, shows allele-specific deletions in mouse lymphomas and skin tumors. Lymphomas from three different F1 hybrids show 100% allele-specificity in the patterns of allelic loss. Parental alleles from 129/Sv or Spretus/Gla mice are lost in tumors from F1 hybrids with C57BL/6 animals, due to the presence of a specific non-synonymous coding sequence polymorphism at the N-terminal portion of the gene. A specific genetic test of association between this SNP and lymphoma susceptibility in interspecific backcross mice showed a significant linkage (p = 0.001), but only in animals with a functional p53 gene. These data therefore identify Fbxw7 as a p53-dependent tumor susceptibility gene. Increased p53-dependent tumor susceptibility and allele-specific losses were also seen in a mouse skin model of skin tumor development. We propose that analysis of preferential allelic imbalances in tumors may provide an efficient means of uncovering genetic variants that affect mouse and human tumor susceptibility. PMID:22348067

  6. The associations of HLA-A, -B, DRB1 alleles and haplotypes in Turkish lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Uçar, Fahri; Sönmez, Mehmet; Ermantaş, Nilay; Özbaş, Hasan Mücahit; Cansız, Abide; Balcı, Mustafa; Yılmazz, Mustafa

    2016-07-25

    A significant association between lymphomas and HLA alleles has been shown in previous studies. However, the frequency of HLA alleles and haplotypes has not been studied in Turkish lymphoma patients. We studied HLA-A, -B, -DRB1 alleles and haplotypes in 80 adult lymphomas and 360 unrelated normal subjects by PCR-SSOP method using Luminex technology. The allele frequencies of HLA-A*29, B*07, and DRB1*11 were higher in patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) compared with the controls [OR; 5.65 (95%CI; 2.16-14.81), P=0.001], [OR; 3.00 (95%CI; 1.50-5.99), P=0.003)], and [OR; 1.80 (95%CI; 1.08-3.01), P=0.002); respectively]. In patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) HLA-B*51 and DRB1*04 allele frequencies were higher than controls [OR; 2.25 (95%CI; 1.27-4.00), P=0.007] and [OR; 2.14 (95%CI; 1.20-3.78), P=0.01]. The most frequently observed haplotypes were A*02 B*35 DRB1*11 (7.50% vs. 1.89%) in HL patients, A*02 B*51 DRB1*11 (5.00% vs. 1.96%) in NHL patients, and A*02 B*35 DRB1*13 (2.19%) in the controls. We detected four haplotypes specific to NHL, five haplotypes to HL patients. Seven haplotypes were unique to controls. Our findings suggest that in HL patients, HLA-A*29, B*07, and DRB1*11 alleles, and in NHL patients, HLA-B*51 and DRB1*04 alleles might be presumptive predisposing factors. PMID:27063556

  7. PCR Strategies for Complete Allele Calling in Multigene Families Using High-Throughput Sequencing Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Marmesat, Elena; Soriano, Laura; Mazzoni, Camila J.; Sommer, Simone

    2016-01-01

    The characterization of multigene families with high copy number variation is often approached through PCR amplification with highly degenerate primers to account for all expected variants flanking the region of interest. Such an approach often introduces PCR biases that result in an unbalanced representation of targets in high-throughput sequencing libraries that eventually results in incomplete detection of the targeted alleles. Here we confirm this result and propose two different amplification strategies to alleviate this problem. The first strategy (called pooled-PCRs) targets different subsets of alleles in multiple independent PCRs using different moderately degenerate primer pairs, whereas the second approach (called pooled-primers) uses a custom-made pool of non-degenerate primers in a single PCR. We compare their performance to the common use of a single PCR with highly degenerate primers using the MHC class I of the Iberian lynx as a model. We found both novel approaches to work similarly well and better than the conventional approach. They significantly scored more alleles per individual (11.33 ± 1.38 and 11.72 ± 0.89 vs 7.94 ± 1.95), yielded more complete allelic profiles (96.28 ± 8.46 and 99.50 ± 2.12 vs 63.76 ± 15.43), and revealed more alleles at a population level (13 vs 12). Finally, we could link each allele’s amplification efficiency with the primer-mismatches in its flanking sequences and show that ultra-deep coverage offered by high-throughput technologies does not fully compensate for such biases, especially as real alleles may reach lower coverage than artefacts. Adopting either of the proposed amplification methods provides the opportunity to attain more complete allelic profiles at lower coverages, improving confidence over the downstream analyses and subsequent applications. PMID:27294261

  8. Fine Mapping of Dominant X-Linked Incompatibility Alleles in Drosophila Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Matute, Daniel R.; Gavin-Smyth, Jackie

    2014-01-01

    Sex chromosomes have a large effect on reproductive isolation and play an important role in hybrid inviability. In Drosophila hybrids, X-linked genes have pronounced deleterious effects on fitness in male hybrids, which have only one X chromosome. Several studies have succeeded at locating and identifying recessive X-linked alleles involved in hybrid inviability. Nonetheless, the density of dominant X-linked alleles involved in interspecific hybrid viability remains largely unknown. In this report, we study the effects of a panel of small fragments of the D. melanogaster X-chromosome carried on the D. melanogaster Y-chromosome in three kinds of hybrid males: D. melanogaster/D. santomea, D. melanogaster/D. simulans and D. melanogaster/D. mauritiana. D. santomea and D. melanogaster diverged over 10 million years ago, while D. simulans (and D. mauritiana) diverged from D. melanogaster over 3 million years ago. We find that the X-chromosome from D. melanogaster carries dominant alleles that are lethal in mel/san, mel/sim, and mel/mau hybrids, and more of these alleles are revealed in the most divergent cross. We then compare these effects on hybrid viability with two D. melanogaster intraspecific crosses. Unlike the interspecific crosses, we found no X-linked alleles that cause lethality in intraspecific crosses. Our results reveal the existence of dominant alleles on the X-chromosome of D. melanogaster which cause lethality in three different interspecific hybrids. These alleles only cause inviability in hybrid males, yet have little effect in hybrid females. This suggests that X-linked elements that cause hybrid inviability in males might not do so in hybrid females due to differing sex chromosome interactions. PMID:24743238

  9. Allelic associations of two polymorphic microsatellites in intron 40 of the human von Willebrand factor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, S.D.J.; De Souza, K.T. ); De Andrade, M.; Chakraborty, R. )

    1994-01-18

    At intron 40 of the von Willebrand factor (vWF) gene, two GATA-repeat polymorphic sites exist that are physically separated by 212 bp. At the first site (vWF1 locus), seven segregating repeat alleles were observed in a Brazilian Caucasian population, and at the second (vWF2 locus) there were eight alleles, detected through PCR amplifications of this DNA region. Haplotype analysis of individuals revealed 36 different haplotypes in a sample of 338 chromosomes examined. Allele frequencies between generations and gender at each locus were not significantly different, and the genotype frequencies were consistent with their Hardy-Weinberg expectations. Linkage disequilibrium between loci is highly significant with positive allele size association; that is, large alleles at the loci tend to occur together, and so do the same alleles. Variability at each locus appeared to have arisen in a stepwise fashion, suggesting replication slippage as a possible mechanism of production of new alleles. However, the authors observed an increased number of haplotypes, in contrast with the predictions of a stepwise production of variation in the entire region, suggesting some form of cooperative changes between loci that could be due to either gene conversion, or a common control mechanism of production of new variation at these repeat polymorphism sites. The high degree of polymorphism (gene diversity values of 72% and 78% at vWF1 and vWF2, respectively, and of 93% at the haplotype level) makes these markers informative for paternity testing, genetic counseling, and individual-identification purposes.

  10. A novel fluorescent quadruplex STR typing system and the allele frequency distributions in a Thai population.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Takashi; Yamamoto, Toshimichi; Mizutani, Masaki; Uchihi, Rieko; Ohtaki, Hiroyuki; Katsumata, Yoshinao; Waiyawuth, Worawee; Songsivilai, Sirirurg

    2003-01-01

    We have previously reported a new triplex amplification and typing system by silver staining for three short tandem repeat (STR) loci, 9q2h2 (D2S3020), D15S233, and D14S299 without "microvariant" alleles such as .1, .2, and, .3 alleles in the Japanese population. In the present study, we established a new quadruplex system with an additional locus D7S809 using primer sets labeled with fluorescent multi-color dyes. Using this system, we genotyped 183 Thai people, found only one "microvariant" allele (allele 20.2) at D7S809, and calculated allele frequencies and some statistical properties at these four STR loci. From these allele frequencies at four STR loci, we performed three statistical analyses including a homozygosity test, a likelihood ratio test, and an exact test for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). Deviations from HWE (p < 0.05) were observed only in the two tests at the locus D7S809. In the present study, we compared the allele frequencies at these four loci in the Thai population to those in the Japanese population described previously. Consequently, all observed heterozygosities and power of discrimination (PD) at those loci in the Thai population were higher than 0.8 and 0.9, respectively, and all statistical values for discriminating power in the Thai population were slightly higher than those in the Japanese population. The combined paternity exclusion rate (combined PE) in the Thai population (0.978) was almost the same as that in the Japanese population (0.971). Therefore, this novel PCR amplification and typing system for four STR loci would be a convenient and informative DNA profiling system in the forensic field. PMID:12570210

  11. Direct Fluorescence Detection of Allele-Specific PCR Products Using Novel Energy-Transfer Labeled Primers.

    PubMed

    Winn-Deen

    1998-12-01

    Background: Currently analysis of point mutations can be done by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by gel analysis or by gene-specific PCR followed by hybridization with an allele-specific probe. Both of these mutation detection methods require post-PCR laboratory time and run the risk of contaminating subsequent experiments with the PCR product liberated during the detection step. The author has combined the PCR amplification and detection steps into a single procedure suitable for closed-tube analysis. Methods and Results: Allele-specific PCR primers were designed as Sunrise energy-transfer primers and contained a 3' terminal mismatch to distinguish between normal and mutant DNA. Cloned normal (W64) and mutant (R64) templates of the beta3-adrenergic receptor gene were tested to verify amplification specificity and yield. A no-target negative control was also run with each reaction. After PCR, each reaction was tested for fluorescence yield by measuring fluorescence on a spectrofluorimeter or fluorescent microtitreplate reader. The cloned controls and 24 patient samples were tested for the W64R mutation by two methods. The direct fluorescence results with the Sunrise allele-specific PCR method gave comparable genotypes to those obtained with the PCR/ restriction digest/gel electrophoresis control method. No PCR artifacts were observed in the negative controls or in the PCR reactions run with the mismatched target. Conclusions: The results of this pilot study indicate good PCR product and fluorescence yield from allele-specific energy-transfer labeled primers, and the capability of distinguishing between normal and mutant alleles based on fluorescence alone, without the need for restriction digestion, gel electrophoresis, or hybridization with an allele-specific probe. PMID:10089280

  12. MHC class II alleles and haplotypes in patients with pemphigus vulgaris from India.

    PubMed

    Delgado, J C; Yunis, D E; Bozón, M V; Salazar, M; Deulofeut, R; Turbay, D; Mehra, N K; Pasricha, J S; Raval, R S; Patel, H; Shah, B K; Bhol, K; Alper, C A; Ahmed, A R; Yunis, E J

    1996-12-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a blistering disease of the skin and mucous membranes characterized by an autoantibody response against a keratinocyte adhesion molecule, desmoglein 3, causing acantholysis and blister formation. We compared high resolution MHC class II alleles and haplotype frequencies (HLA-DRB, DQA1 and DQB1) in 37 patients with PV to 89 haplotypes of normal relatives from New Delhi and Ahmedabad. We found that PV patients had significantly increased frequencies of DRB1*1404 (P < 0.0001), DQA1*0101 (P = 0.001), and DQB1*0503 (P < 0.0001). These associations were due to the increased frequencies of the haplotype HLA-DRB1*1404, DRB3*0202, DQA1*0101, DQB1*0503 in patients compared to control haplotypes (p < 0.0001). Also, patients from Ahmedabad had a significant increase in HLA-DQB1*0302 (p = 0.03). An identical amino acid sequence (Leu-Leu-Glu-Arg-Arg-Arg-Ala-Glu), in positions 67-74 of the beta domain of DRB alleles is restricted to some DR14 alleles. Therefore, there are three possible explanations for class II allele involvement in autoantibody in PV patients with class II haplotypes marked by HLA-DR14. First, the class II alleles could be markers for an unidentified susceptibility gene in linkage disequilibrium with them. Second, the primary association could be with DQB1*0503 and the association with HLA-DR14 alleles would be the result of linkage disequilibrium. Third, the HLA-DRB1 locus susceptibility could involve a specific amino acid sequence in the third hypervariable region shared by several HLA-DR14 alleles. PMID:9008309

  13. Allele-Specific Quantitative PCR for Accurate, Rapid, and Cost-Effective Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han B; Schwab, Tanya L; Koleilat, Alaa; Ata, Hirotaka; Daby, Camden L; Cervera, Roberto Lopez; McNulty, Melissa S; Bostwick, Hannah S; Clark, Karl J

    2016-06-01

    Customizable endonucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) enable rapid generation of mutant strains at genomic loci of interest in animal models and cell lines. With the accelerated pace of generating mutant alleles, genotyping has become a rate-limiting step to understanding the effects of genetic perturbation. Unless mutated alleles result in distinct morphological phenotypes, mutant strains need to be genotyped using standard methods in molecular biology. Classic restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) or sequencing is labor-intensive and expensive. Although simpler than RFLP, current versions of allele-specific PCR may still require post-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) handling such as sequencing, or they are more expensive if allele-specific fluorescent probes are used. Commercial genotyping solutions can take weeks from assay design to result, and are often more expensive than assembling reactions in-house. Key components of commercial assay systems are often proprietary, which limits further customization. Therefore, we developed a one-step open-source genotyping method based on quantitative PCR. The allele-specific qPCR (ASQ) does not require post-PCR processing and can genotype germline mutants through either threshold cycle (Ct) or end-point fluorescence reading. ASQ utilizes allele-specific primers, a locus-specific reverse primer, universal fluorescent probes and quenchers, and hot start DNA polymerase. Individual laboratories can further optimize this open-source system as we completely disclose the sequences, reagents, and thermal cycling protocol. We have tested the ASQ protocol to genotype alleles in five different genes. ASQ showed a 98-100% concordance in genotype scoring with RFLP or Sanger sequencing outcomes. ASQ is time-saving because a single qPCR without post-PCR handling suffices to score

  14. Allele-Specific Quantitative PCR for Accurate, Rapid, and Cost-Effective Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han B.; Schwab, Tanya L.; Koleilat, Alaa; Ata, Hirotaka; Daby, Camden L.; Cervera, Roberto Lopez; McNulty, Melissa S.; Bostwick, Hannah S.; Clark, Karl J.

    2016-01-01

    Customizable endonucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) enable rapid generation of mutant strains at genomic loci of interest in animal models and cell lines. With the accelerated pace of generating mutant alleles, genotyping has become a rate-limiting step to understanding the effects of genetic perturbation. Unless mutated alleles result in distinct morphological phenotypes, mutant strains need to be genotyped using standard methods in molecular biology. Classic restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) or sequencing is labor-intensive and expensive. Although simpler than RFLP, current versions of allele-specific PCR may still require post-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) handling such as sequencing, or they are more expensive if allele-specific fluorescent probes are used. Commercial genotyping solutions can take weeks from assay design to result, and are often more expensive than assembling reactions in-house. Key components of commercial assay systems are often proprietary, which limits further customization. Therefore, we developed a one-step open-source genotyping method based on quantitative PCR. The allele-specific qPCR (ASQ) does not require post-PCR processing and can genotype germline mutants through either threshold cycle (Ct) or end-point fluorescence reading. ASQ utilizes allele-specific primers, a locus-specific reverse primer, universal fluorescent probes and quenchers, and hot start DNA polymerase. Individual laboratories can further optimize this open-source system as we completely disclose the sequences, reagents, and thermal cycling protocol. We have tested the ASQ protocol to genotype alleles in five different genes. ASQ showed a 98–100% concordance in genotype scoring with RFLP or Sanger sequencing outcomes. ASQ is time-saving because a single qPCR without post-PCR handling suffices to score

  15. [European general practice research agenda].

    PubMed

    Mäntyselkä, Pekka; Koskela, Tuomas

    2014-01-01

    The EGPRN (European General Practice Research Network) research agenda is a review compiling the strengths and areas of development of European general practice, based on a systematic literature survey and its versatile analysis. The research agenda is a framework paper sharpening the definition and functions of general practice as well as its significance for researchers and decisionmakers. The agenda is useful in structuring the research, evaluation of research needs, strengthening of infrastructure and strategic planning of new research. PMID:24961062

  16. Genome-wide Ancestry Association Testing Identifies a Common European Variant on 6q14.1 as a Risk Factor for Asthma in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Torgerson, Dara G.; Capurso, Daniel; Ampleford, Elizabeth J.; Li, Xingnan; Moore, Wendy C.; Gignoux, Christopher R.; Hu, Donglei; Eng, Celeste; Mathias, Rasika A.; Busse, William W.; Castro, Mario; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Fitzpatrick, Anne M.; Gaston, Benjamin; Israel, Elliot; Jarjour, Nizar N.; Teague, W. Gerald; Wenzel, Sally E.; Rodríguez-Santana, José R.; Rodríguez-Cintrón, William; Avila, Pedro C.; Ford, Jean G.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Burchard, Esteban G.; Howard, Timothy D.; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Meyers, Deborah A.; Cox, Nancy J.; Ober, Carole; Nicolae, Dan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic variants that contribute to asthma susceptibility may be present at varying frequencies in different populations, which is an important consideration and advantage for performing genetic association studies in admixed populations. Objective To identify asthma-associated loci in African Americans. Methods We compared local African and European ancestry estimated from dense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotype data in African American adults with asthma and non-asthmatic controls. Allelic tests of association were performed within the candidate regions identified, correcting for local European admixture. Results We identified a significant ancestry association peak on chromosomes 6q. Allelic tests for association within this region identified a SNP (rs1361549) on 6q14.1 that was associated with asthma exclusively in African Americans with local European admixture (OR=2.2). The risk allele is common in Europe (42% in the HapMap CEU) but absent in West Africa (0% in the HapMap YRI), suggesting the allele is present in African Americans due to recent European admixture. We replicated our findings in Puerto Ricans and similarly found that the signal of association is largely specific to individuals who are heterozygous for African and non-African ancestry at 6q14.1. However, we found no evidence for association in European Americans or in Puerto Ricans in the absence of local African ancestry, suggesting that the association with asthma at rs1361549 is due to an environmental or genetic interaction. Conclusion We identified a novel asthma-associated locus that is relevant to admixed populations with African ancestry, and highlight the importance of considering local ancestry in genetic association studies of admixed populations. PMID:22607992

  17. Frequency and characterization of known and novel RHD variant alleles in 37 782 Dutch D-negative pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Stegmann, Tamara C; Veldhuisen, Barbera; Bijman, Renate; Thurik, Florentine F; Bossers, Bernadette; Cheroutre, Goedele; Jonkers, Remco; Ligthart, Peter; de Haas, Masja; Haer-Wigman, Lonneke; van der Schoot, C Ellen

    2016-05-01

    To guide anti-D prophylaxis, Dutch D- pregnant women are offered a quantitative fetal-RHD-genotyping assay to determine the RHD status of their fetus. This allowed us to determine the frequency of different maternal RHD variants in 37 782 serologically D- pregnant women. A variant allele is present in at least 0·96% of Dutch D- pregnant women The D- serology could be confirmed after further serological testing in only 54% of these women, which emphasizes the potential relevance of genotyping of blood donors. 43 different RHD variant alleles were detected, including 15 novel alleles (11 null-, 2 partial D- and 2 DEL-alleles). Of those novel null alleles, one allele contained a single missense mutation (RHD*443C>G) and one allele had a single amino acid deletion (RHD*424_426del). The D- phenotype was confirmed by transduction of human D- erythroblasts, consolidating that, for the first time, a single amino acid change or deletion causes the D- phenotype. Transduction also confirmed the phenotypes for the two new variant DEL-alleles (RHD*721A>C and RHD*884T>C) and the novel partial RHD*492C>A allele. Notably, in three additional cases the DEL phenotype was observed but sequencing of the coding sequence, flanking introns and promoter region revealed an apparently wild-type RHD allele without mutations. PMID:27018217

  18. Specific HLA-DQB and HLA-DRB1 alleles confer susceptibility to pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, S J; Freidmann, A; Steinman, L; Brautbar, C; Erlich, H A

    1989-01-01

    The autoimmune dermatologic disease pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is associated with the serotypes HLA-DR4 and HLA-DRw6. Based on nucleotide sequence and oligonucleotide probe analysis of enzymatically amplified DNA encoding HLA-DR beta chain (HLA-DRB) and HLA-DQ beta chain (HLA-DQB; henceforth HLA is omitted from designations), we showed previously that the DR4 susceptibility was associated with the Dw10 DRB1 allele [encoding the mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC)-defined Dw10 specificity]. The DRw6 susceptibility similarly was shown to be associated with a rare DQB allele (DQB1.3), which differed from another nonsusceptible allele by only a valine-to-aspartic acid substitution at position 57. Given the linkage disequilibrium that characterizes HLA haplotypes, it is difficult to assign disease susceptibility to a specific locus rather than to a closely linked gene(s) on the same haplotype. To address this problem, we have analyzed all of the polymorphic loci of the class II HLA region (DRB1, DRB3, DQA, DQB, and DPB) on the DRw6 haplotypes in patients and controls. In 22 PV patients, 4 different DRw6 haplotypes were found that encode the same DQ beta chain (DQB1.3) but contained silent nucleotide differences at the DQB locus as well as coding sequence differences in the DQA and DRB loci. These results, obtained by using a method for allele-specific polymerase chain reaction amplification, strongly support the hypothesis that the allele DQB1.3 confers susceptibility. This DQB allele is correlated with the MLC-defined Dw9 specificity and is associated with two different DRB1 alleles (the common "6A" associated with DRw13 and the rare "6B" associated with DRw14). Since 86% (19 of 22) of DRw6+ patients contain the DQB1.3 allele (vs. 3% of controls), whereas 64% (14 of 22) contain the DRB1 allele 6B (vs. 6% of the controls), we conclude that most of the DRw6 susceptibility to PV can be accounted for by the DQ beta chain. Images PMID:2503828

  19. Risk for ACPA-positive rheumatoid arthritis is driven by shared HLA amino acid polymorphisms in Asian and European populations.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yukinori; Kim, Kwangwoo; Han, Buhm; Pillai, Nisha E; Ong, Rick T-H; Saw, Woei-Yuh; Luo, Ma; Jiang, Lei; Yin, Jian; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Brown, Matthew A; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Xu, Huji; Teo, Yik-Ying; de Bakker, Paul I W; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2014-12-20

    Previous studies have emphasized ethnically heterogeneous human leukocyte antigen (HLA) classical allele associations to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) risk. We fine-mapped RA risk alleles within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in 2782 seropositive RA cases and 4315 controls of Asian descent. We applied imputation to determine genotypes for eight class I and II HLA genes to Asian populations for the first time using a newly constructed pan-Asian reference panel. First, we empirically measured high imputation accuracy in Asian samples. Then we observed the most significant association in HLA-DRβ1 at amino acid position 13, located outside the classical shared epitope (Pomnibus = 6.9 × 10(-135)). The individual residues at position 13 have relative effects that are consistent with published effects in European populations (His > Phe > Arg > Tyr ≅ Gly > Ser)--but the observed effects in Asians are generally smaller. Applying stepwise conditional analysis, we identified additional independent associations at positions 57 (conditional Pomnibus = 2.2 × 10(-33)) and 74 (conditional Pomnibus = 1.1 × 10(-8)). Outside of HLA-DRβ1, we observed independent effects for amino acid polymorphisms within HLA-B (Asp9, conditional P = 3.8 × 10(-6)) and HLA-DPβ1 (Phe9, conditional P = 3.0 × 10(-5)) concordant with European populations. Our trans-ethnic HLA fine-mapping study reveals that (i) a common set of amino acid residues confer shared effects in European and Asian populations and (ii) these same effects can explain ethnically heterogeneous classical allelic associations (e.g. HLA-DRB1*09:01) due to allele frequency differences between populations. Our study illustrates the value of high-resolution imputation for fine-mapping causal variants in the MHC. PMID:25070946

  20. SNPsplit: Allele-specific splitting of alignments between genomes with known SNP genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Felix; Andrews, Simon R.

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing reads overlapping polymorphic sites in diploid mammalian genomes may be assigned to one allele or the other. This holds the potential to detect gene expression, chromatin modifications, DNA methylation or nuclear interactions in an allele-specific fashion. SNPsplit is an allele-specific alignment sorter designed to read files in SAM/BAM format and determine the allelic origin of reads or read-pairs that cover known single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) positions. For this to work libraries must have been aligned to a genome in which all known SNP positions were masked with the ambiguity base 'N' and aligned using a suitable mapping program such as Bowtie2, TopHat, STAR, HISAT2, HiCUP or Bismark. SNPsplit also provides an automated solution to generate N-masked reference genomes for hybrid mouse strains based on the variant call information provided by the Mouse Genomes Project. The unique ability of SNPsplit to work with various different kinds of sequencing data including RNA-Seq, ChIP-Seq, Bisulfite-Seq or Hi-C opens new avenues for the integrative exploration of allele-specific data. PMID:27429743

  1. Diversity of lactase persistence alleles in Ethiopia: signature of a soft selective sweep.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bryony L; Raga, Tamiru O; Liebert, Anke; Zmarz, Pawel; Bekele, Endashaw; Danielsen, E Thomas; Olsen, Anders Krüger; Bradman, Neil; Troelsen, Jesper T; Swallow, Dallas M

    2013-09-01

    The persistent expression of lactase into adulthood in humans is a recent genetic adaptation that allows the consumption of milk from other mammals after weaning. In Europe, a single allele (-13910(∗)T, rs4988235) in an upstream region that acts as an enhancer to the expression of the lactase gene LCT is responsible for lactase persistence and appears to have been under strong directional selection in the last 5,000 years, evidenced by the widespread occurrence of this allele on an extended haplotype. In Africa and the Middle East, the situation is more complicated and at least three other alleles (-13907(∗)G, rs41525747; -13915(∗)G, rs41380347; -14010(∗)C, rs145946881) in the same LCT enhancer region can cause continued lactase expression. Here we examine the LCT enhancer sequence in a large lactose-tolerance-tested Ethiopian cohort of more than 350 individuals. We show that a further SNP, -14009T>G (ss 820486563), is significantly associated with lactose-digester status, and in vitro functional tests confirm that the -14009(∗)G allele also increases expression of an LCT promoter construct. The derived alleles in the LCT enhancer region are spread through several ethnic groups, and we report a greater genetic diversity in lactose digesters than in nondigesters. By examining flanking markers to control for the effects of mutation and demography, we further describe, from empirical evidence, the signature of a soft selective sweep. PMID:23993196

  2. Predicting Carriers of Ongoing Selective Sweeps without Knowledge of the Favored Allele

    PubMed Central

    Zakov, Shay; Rosenberg, Noah A.; Bafna, Vineet

    2015-01-01

    Methods for detecting the genomic signatures of natural selection have been heavily studied, and they have been successful in identifying many selective sweeps. For most of these sweeps, the favored allele remains unknown, making it difficult to distinguish carriers of the sweep from non-carriers. In an ongoing selective sweep, carriers of the favored allele are likely to contain a future most recent common ancestor. Therefore, identifying them may prove useful in predicting the evolutionary trajectory—for example, in contexts involving drug-resistant pathogen strains or cancer subclones. The main contribution of this paper is the development and analysis of a new statistic, the Haplotype Allele Frequency (HAF) score. The HAF score, assigned to individual haplotypes in a sample, naturally captures many of the properties shared by haplotypes carrying a favored allele. We provide a theoretical framework for computing expected HAF scores under different evolutionary scenarios, and we validate the theoretical predictions with simulations. As an application of HAF score computations, we develop an algorithm (PreCIOSS: Predicting Carriers of Ongoing Selective Sweeps) to identify carriers of the favored allele in selective sweeps, and we demonstrate its power on simulations of both hard and soft sweeps, as well as on data from well-known sweeps in human populations. PMID:26402243

  3. Detection of nucleotide-specific CRISPR/Cas9 modified alleles using multiplex ligation detection.

    PubMed

    Kc, R; Srivastava, A; Wilkowski, J M; Richter, C E; Shavit, J A; Burke, D T; Bielas, S L

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 genome-editing has emerged as a powerful tool to create mutant alleles in model organisms. However, the precision with which these mutations are created has introduced a new set of complications for genotyping and colony management. Traditional gene-targeting approaches in many experimental organisms incorporated exogenous DNA and/or allele specific sequence that allow for genotyping strategies based on binary readout of PCR product amplification and size selection. In contrast, alleles created by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair of double-stranded DNA breaks generated by Cas9 are much less amenable to such strategies. Here we describe a novel genotyping strategy that is cost effective, sequence specific and allows for accurate and efficient multiplexing of small insertion-deletions and single-nucleotide variants characteristic of CRISPR/Cas9 edited alleles. We show that ligation detection reaction (LDR) can be used to generate products that are sequence specific and uniquely detected by product size and/or fluorescent tags. The method works independently of the model organism and will be useful for colony management as mutant alleles differing by a few nucleotides become more prevalent in experimental animal colonies. PMID:27557703

  4. Allele-specific copy-number discovery from whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, WeiBo; Wang, Wei; Sun, Wei; Crowley, James J.; Szatkiewicz, Jin P.

    2015-01-01

    Copy-number variants (CNVs) are a major form of genetic variation and a risk factor for various human diseases, so it is crucial to accurately detect and characterize them. It is conceivable that allele-specific reads from high-throughput sequencing data could be leveraged to both enhance CNV detection and produce allele-specific copy number (ASCN) calls. Although statistical methods have been developed to detect CNVs using whole-genome sequence (WGS) and/or whole-exome sequence (WES) data, information from allele-specific read counts has not yet been adequately exploited. In this paper, we develop an integrated method, called AS-GENSENG, which incorporates allele-specific read counts in CNV detection and estimates ASCN using either WGS or WES data. To evaluate the performance of AS-GENSENG, we conducted extensive simulations, generated empirical data using existing WGS and WES data sets and validated predicted CNVs using an independent methodology. We conclude that AS-GENSENG not only predicts accurate ASCN calls but also improves the accuracy of total copy number calls, owing to its unique ability to exploit information from both total and allele-specific read counts while accounting for various experimental biases in sequence data. Our novel, user-friendly and computationally efficient method and a complete analytic protocol is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/asgenseng/. PMID:25883151

  5. Allele-Independent Turnover of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class Ia Molecules.

    PubMed

    Prevosto, Claudia; Usmani, M Farooq; McDonald, Sarah; Gumienny, Aleksandra M; Key, Tim; Goodman, Reyna S; Gaston, J S Hill; Deery, Michael J; Busch, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) glycoproteins present cytosolic peptides to CD8+ T cells and regulate NK cell activity. Their heavy chains (HC) are expressed from up to three MHC gene loci (human leukocyte antigen [HLA]-A, -B, and -C in humans), whose extensive polymorphism maps predominantly to the antigen-binding groove, diversifying the bound peptide repertoire. Codominant expression of MHCI alleles is thus functionally critical, but how it is regulated is not fully understood. Here, we have examined the effect of polymorphism on the turnover rates of MHCI molecules in cell lines with functional MHCI peptide loading pathways and in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). Proteins were labeled biosynthetically with heavy water (2H2O), folded MHCI molecules immunoprecipitated, and tryptic digests analysed by mass spectrometry. MHCI-derived peptides were assigned to specific alleles and isotypes, and turnover rates quantified by 2H incorporation, after correcting for cell growth. MHCI turnover half-lives ranged from undetectable to a few hours, depending on cell type, activation state, donor, and MHCI isotype. However, in all settings, the turnover half-lives of alleles of the same isotype were similar. Thus, MHCI protein turnover rates appear to be allele-independent in normal human cells. We propose that this is an important feature enabling the normal function and codominant expression of MHCI alleles. PMID:27529174

  6. Detection of nucleotide-specific CRISPR/Cas9 modified alleles using multiplex ligation detection

    PubMed Central

    KC, R.; Srivastava, A.; Wilkowski, J. M.; Richter, C. E.; Shavit, J. A.; Burke, D. T.; Bielas, S. L.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 genome-editing has emerged as a powerful tool to create mutant alleles in model organisms. However, the precision with which these mutations are created has introduced a new set of complications for genotyping and colony management. Traditional gene-targeting approaches in many experimental organisms incorporated exogenous DNA and/or allele specific sequence that allow for genotyping strategies based on binary readout of PCR product amplification and size selection. In contrast, alleles created by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair of double-stranded DNA breaks generated by Cas9 are much less amenable to such strategies. Here we describe a novel genotyping strategy that is cost effective, sequence specific and allows for accurate and efficient multiplexing of small insertion-deletions and single-nucleotide variants characteristic of CRISPR/Cas9 edited alleles. We show that ligation detection reaction (LDR) can be used to generate products that are sequence specific and uniquely detected by product size and/or fluorescent tags. The method works independently of the model organism and will be useful for colony management as mutant alleles differing by a few nucleotides become more prevalent in experimental animal colonies. PMID:27557703

  7. White matter changes in basis pontis in small expansion FMR1 allele carriers with parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Loesch, D Z; Kotschet, K; Trost, N; Greco, C M; Kinsella, G; Slater, H R; Venn, A; Horne, M

    2011-06-01

    Examples of white matter hyperintensities (wmh) on magnetic resonance images in a basis pontis are presented in two male carriers, each of whom carry a small CGG expansion fragile X mental retardation (FMR1) allele. One carried a premutation (PM) allele of 85 CGG repeats and the other, a gray zone (GZ) allele of 47 repeats. Both were originally diagnosed with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (iPD). Similar changes are also shown in one PM carrier of 99 repeats affected with mild tremor and imbalance, who was ascertained through a fragile X syndrome family. These examples draw attention to the occurrence of wmh in a basis pontis in the carriers of small CGG expansions presenting with tremor and ataxia. Moreover, the presence of this change in GZ, as well as PM, allele carriers originally diagnosed with iPD supports our earlier suggestion that both these alleles may contribute to the neurodegenerative changes in this disorder which, in the examples presented, have been reflected by wmh, most prominent in the cerebellar peduncles and/or pontine area. PMID:21445959

  8. Allele-specific copy number profiling by next-generation DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Bell, John M; Zavala, Nicolas A; Ji, Hanlee P; Zhang, Nancy R

    2015-02-27

    The progression and clonal development of tumors often involve amplifications and deletions of genomic DNA. Estimation of allele-specific copy number, which quantifies the number of copies of each allele at each variant loci rather than the total number of chromosome copies, is an important step in the characterization of tumor genomes and the inference of their clonal history. We describe a new method, falcon, for finding somatic allele-specific copy number changes by next generation sequencing of tumors with matched normals. falcon is based on a change-point model on a bivariate mixed Binomial process, which explicitly models the copy numbers of the two chromosome haplotypes and corrects for local allele-specific coverage biases. By using the Binomial distribution rather than a normal approximation, falcon more effectively pools evidence from sites with low coverage. A modified Bayesian information criterion is used to guide model selection for determining the number of copy number events. Falcon is evaluated on in silico spike-in data and applied to the analysis of a pre-malignant colon tumor sample and late-stage colorectal adenocarcinoma from the same individual. The allele-specific copy number estimates obtained by falcon allows us to draw detailed conclusions regarding the clonal history of the individual's colon cancer. PMID:25477383

  9. Genetic factors required to maintain repression of a paramutagenic maize pl1 allele.

    PubMed Central

    Hollick, J B; Chandler, V L

    2001-01-01

    A genetic screen identified two novel gene functions required to maintain mitotically and meiotically heritable gene silencing associated with paramutation of the maize purple plant 1 (pl1) locus. Paramutation at pl1 leads to heritable alterations of pl1 gene regulation; the Pl-Rhoades (Pl-Rh) allele, which typically confers strong pigmentation to juvenile and adult plant structures, changes to a lower expression state termed Pl'-mahogany (Pl'). Paramutation spontaneously occurs at low frequencies in Pl-Rh homozygotes but always occurs when Pl-Rh is heterozygous with Pl'. We identified four mutations that caused increased Pl' pigment levels. Allelism tests revealed that three mutations identified two new maize loci, required to maintain repression 1 (rmr1) and rmr2 and that the other mutation represents a new allele of the previously described mediator of paramutation 1 (mop1) locus. RNA levels from Pl' are elevated in rmr mutants and genetic tests demonstrate that Pl' can heritably change back to Pl-Rh in rmr mutant individuals at variable frequencies. Pigment levels controlled by two pl1 alleles that do not participate in paramutation are unaffected in rmr mutants. These results suggest that RMR functions are intimately involved in maintaining the repressed expression state of paramutant Pl' alleles. Despite strong effects on Pl' repression, rmr mutant plants have no gross developmental abnormalities even after several generations of inbreeding, implying that RMR1 and RMR2 functions are not generally required for developmental homeostasis. PMID:11139517

  10. Female sticklebacks count alleles in a strategy of sexual selection explaining MHC polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Reusch, T B; Häberli, M A; Aeschlimann, P B; Milinski, M

    2001-11-15

    The origin and maintenance of polymorphism in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes in natural populations is still unresolved. Sexual selection, frequency-dependent selection by parasites and pathogens, and heterozygote advantage have been suggested to explain the maintenance of high allele diversity at MHC genes. Here we argue that there are two (non-exclusive) strategies for MHC-related sexual selection, representing solutions to two different problems: inbreeding avoidance and parasite resistance. In species prone to inadvertent inbreeding, partners should prefer dissimilar MHC genotypes to similar ones. But if the goal is to maximize the resistance of offspring towards potential infections, the choosing sex should prefer mates with a higher diversity of MHC alleles. This latter strategy should apply when there are several MHC loci, as is the case in most vertebrates. We tested the relative importance of an 'allele counting' strategy compared to a disassortative mating strategy using wild-caught three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) from an interconnected system of lakes. Here we show that gravid female fish preferred the odour of males with a large number of MHC class-IIB alleles to that of males with fewer alleles. Females did not prefer male genotypes dissimilar to their own. PMID:11713527

  11. Alleles versus genotypes: Genetic interactions and the dynamics of selection in sexual populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neher, Richard

    2010-03-01

    Physical interactions between amino-acids are essential for protein structure and activity, while protein-protein interactions and regulatory interactions are central to cellular function. As a consequence of these interactions, the combined effect of two mutations can differ from the sum of the individual effects of the mutations. This phenomenon of genetic interaction is known as epistasis. However, the importance of epistasis and its effects on evolutionary dynamics are poorly understood, especially in sexual populations where recombination breaks up existing combinations of alleles to produce new ones. Here, we present a computational model of selection dynamics involving many epistatic loci in a recombining population. We demonstrate that a large number of polymorphic interacting loci can, despite frequent recombination, exhibit cooperative behavior that locks alleles into favorable genotypes leading to a population consisting of a set of competing clones. As the recombination rate exceeds a certain critical value this ``genotype selection'' phase disappears in an abrupt transition giving way to ``allele selection'' - the phase where different loci are only weakly correlated as expected in sexually reproducing populations. Clustering of interacting sets of genes on a chromosome leads to the emergence of an intermediate regime, where localized blocks of cooperating alleles lock into genetic modules. Large populations attain highest fitness at a recombination rate just below critical, suggesting that natural selection might tune recombination rates to balance the beneficial aspect of exploration of genotype space with the breaking up of synergistic allele combinations.

  12. Accounting for genotype uncertainty in the estimation of allele frequencies in autopolyploids.

    PubMed

    Blischak, Paul D; Kubatko, Laura S; Wolfe, Andrea D

    2016-05-01

    Despite the increasing opportunity to collect large-scale data sets for population genomic analyses, the use of high-throughput sequencing to study populations of polyploids has seen little application. This is due in large part to problems associated with determining allele copy number in the genotypes of polyploid individuals (allelic dosage uncertainty-ADU), which complicates the calculation of important quantities such as allele frequencies. Here, we describe a statistical model to estimate biallelic SNP frequencies in a population of autopolyploids using high-throughput sequencing data in the form of read counts. We bridge the gap from data collection (using restriction enzyme based techniques [e.g. GBS, RADseq]) to allele frequency estimation in a unified inferential framework using a hierarchical Bayesian model to sum over genotype uncertainty. Simulated data sets were generated under various conditions for tetraploid, hexaploid and octoploid populations to evaluate the model's performance and to help guide the collection of empirical data. We also provide an implementation of our model in the R package polyfreqs and demonstrate its use with two example analyses that investigate (i) levels of expected and observed heterozygosity and (ii) model adequacy. Our simulations show that the number of individuals sampled from a population has a greater impact on estimation error than sequencing coverage. The example analyses also show that our model and software can be used to make inferences beyond the estimation of allele frequencies for autopolyploids by providing assessments of model adequacy and estimates of heterozygosity. PMID:26607217

  13. Genome Destabilizing Mutator Alleles Drive Specific Mutational Trajectories in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Stirling, Peter C.; Shen, Yaoqing; Corbett, Richard; Jones, Steven J. M.; Hieter, Philip

    2014-01-01

    In addition to environmental factors and intrinsic variations in base substitution rates, specific genome-destabilizing mutations can shape the mutational trajectory of genomes. How specific alleles influence the nature and position of accumulated mutations in a genomic context is largely unknown. Understanding the impact of genome-destabilizing alleles is particularly relevant to cancer genomes where biased mutational signatures are identifiable. We first created a more complete picture of cellular pathways that impact mutation rate using a primary screen to identify essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene mutations that cause mutator phenotypes. Drawing primarily on new alleles identified in this resource, we measure the impact of diverse mutator alleles on mutation patterns directly by whole-genome sequencing of 68 mutation-accumulation strains derived from wild-type and 11 parental mutator genotypes. The accumulated mutations differ across mutator strains, displaying base-substitution biases, allele-specific mutation hotspots, and break-associated mutation clustering. For example, in mutants of POLα and the Cdc13–Stn1–Ten1 complex, we find a distinct subtelomeric bias for mutations that we show is independent of the target sequence. Together our data suggest that specific genome-instability mutations are sufficient to drive discrete mutational signatures, some of which share properties with mutation patterns seen in tumors. Thus, in a population of cells, genome-instability mutations could influence clonal evolution by establishing discrete mutational trajectories for genomes. PMID:24336748

  14. Probe-free allele-specific copy number detection and analysis of tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ailin; Guan, Xiaowei; Gu, Xinbin; Xie, Guiqin

    2016-03-15

    Cancer development and progression frequently involve nucleotide mutations as well as amplifications and deletions of genomic segments. Quantification of allele-specific copy number is an important step in characterizing tumor genomes for precision medicine. Despite advances in approaches to high-throughput genomic DNA analysis, inexpensive and simple methods for analyzing complex nucleotide and copy number variants are still needed. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods for discovering and genotyping single nucleotide polymorphisms are becoming increasingly important in genetic analysis. In this study, we describe a simple, single-tube, probe-free method that combines SYBR Green I-based quantitative real-time PCR and quantitative melting curve analysis both to detect specific nucleotide variants and to quantify allele-specific copy number variants of tumors. The approach is based on the quantification of the targets of interest and the relative abundance of two alleles in a single tube. The specificity, sensitivity, and utility of the assay were demonstrated in detecting allele-specific copy number changes critical for carcinogenesis and therapeutic intervention. Our approach would be useful for allele-specific copy number analysis or precise genotyping. PMID:26743720

  15. Mutant alleles of the Drosophila trithorax gene produce common and unusual homeotic and other developmental phenotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Breen, T R

    1999-01-01

    trithorax (trx) encodes chromosome-binding proteins required throughout embryogenesis and imaginal development for tissue- and cell-specific levels of transcription of many genes including homeotic genes of the ANT-C and BX-C. trx encodes two protein isoforms that contain conserved motifs including a C-terminal SET domain, central PHD fingers, an N-terminal DNA-binding homology, and two short motifs also found in the TRX human homologue, ALL1. As a first step to characterizing specific developmental functions of TRX, I examined phenotypes of 420 combinations of 21 trx alleles. Among these are 8 hypomorphic alleles that are sufficient for embryogenesis but provide different levels of trx function at homeotic genes in imaginal cells. One allele alters the N terminus of TRX, which severely impairs larval and imaginal growth. Hypomorphic alleles that alter different regions of TRX equivalently reduce function at affected genes, suggesting TRX interacts with common factors at different target genes. All hypomorphic alleles examined complement one another, suggesting cooperative TRX function at target genes. Comparative effects of hypomorphic genotypes support previous findings that TRX has tissue-specific interactions with other factors at each target gene. Some hypomorphic genotypes also produce phenotypes that suggest TRX may be a component of signal transduction pathways that provide tissue- and cell-specific levels of target gene transcription. PMID:10224264

  16. ADZE: a rarefaction approach for counting alleles private to combinations of populations

    PubMed Central

    Szpiech, Zachary A.; Jakobsson, Mattias; Rosenberg, Noah A.

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Analysis of the distribution of alleles across populations is a useful tool for examining population diversity and relationships. However, sample sizes often differ across populations, sometimes making it difficult to assess allelic distributions across groups. Results: We introduce a generalized rarefaction approach for counting alleles private to combinations of populations. Our method evaluates the number of alleles found in each of a set of populations but absent in all remaining populations, considering equal-sized subsamples from each population. Applying this method to a worldwide human microsatellite dataset, we observe a high number of alleles private to the combination of African and Oceanian populations. This result supports the possibility of a migration out of Africa into Oceania separate from the migrations responsible for the majority of the ancestry of the modern populations of Asia, and it highlights the utility of our approach to sample size correction in evaluating hypotheses about population history. Availability: We have implemented our method in the computer pro-gram ADZE, which is available for download at http://rosenberglab.bioinformatics.med.umich.edu/adze.html. Contact: szpiechz@umich.edu PMID:18779233

  17. Allele-Independent Turnover of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class Ia Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Prevosto, Claudia; Usmani, M. Farooq; McDonald, Sarah; Gumienny, Aleksandra M.; Key, Tim; Goodman, Reyna S.; Gaston, J. S. Hill; Deery, Michael J.; Busch, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) glycoproteins present cytosolic peptides to CD8+ T cells and regulate NK cell activity. Their heavy chains (HC) are expressed from up to three MHC gene loci (human leukocyte antigen [HLA]-A, -B, and -C in humans), whose extensive polymorphism maps predominantly to the antigen-binding groove, diversifying the bound peptide repertoire. Codominant expression of MHCI alleles is thus functionally critical, but how it is regulated is not fully understood. Here, we have examined the effect of polymorphism on the turnover rates of MHCI molecules in cell lines with functional MHCI peptide loading pathways and in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). Proteins were labeled biosynthetically with heavy water (2H2O), folded MHCI molecules immunoprecipitated, and tryptic digests analysed by mass spectrometry. MHCI-derived peptides were assigned to specific alleles and isotypes, and turnover rates quantified by 2H incorporation, after correcting for cell growth. MHCI turnover half-lives ranged from undetectable to a few hours, depending on cell type, activation state, donor, and MHCI isotype. However, in all settings, the turnover half-lives of alleles of the same isotype were similar. Thus, MHCI protein turnover rates appear to be allele-independent in normal human cells. We propose that this is an important feature enabling the normal function and codominant expression of MHCI alleles. PMID:27529174

  18. Allele, phenotype and disease data at Mouse Genome Informatics: improving access and analysis.

    PubMed

    Bello, Susan M; Smith, Cynthia L; Eppig, Janan T

    2015-08-01

    A core part of the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) resource is the collection of mouse mutations and the annotation phenotypes and diseases displayed by mice carrying these mutations. These data are integrated with the rest of data in MGI and exported to numerous other resources. The use of mouse phenotype data to drive translational research into human disease has expanded rapidly with the improvements in sequencing technology. MGI has implemented many improvements in allele and phenotype data annotation, search, and display to facilitate access to these data through multiple avenues. For example, the description of alleles has been modified to include more detailed categories of allele attributes. This allows improved discrimination between mutation types. Further, connections have been created between mutations involving multiple genes and each of the genes overlapping the mutation. This allows users to readily find all mutations affecting a gene and see all genes affected by a mutation. In a similar manner, the genes expressed by transgenic or knock-in alleles are now connected to these alleles. The advanced search forms and public reports have been updated to take advantage of these improvements. These search forms and reports are used by an expanding number of researchers to identify novel human disease genes and mouse models of human disease. PMID:26162703

  19. Differential dopamine receptor D4 allele association with ADHD dependent of proband season of birth.

    PubMed

    Brookes, K J; Neale, B; Xu, X; Thapar, A; Gill, M; Langley, K; Hawi, Z; Mill, J; Taylor, E; Franke, B; Chen, W; Ebstein, R; Buitelaar, J; Banaschewski, T; Sonuga-Barke, E; Eisenberg, J; Manor, I; Miranda, A; Oades, R D; Roeyers, H; Rothenberger, A; Sergeant, J; Steinhausen, H C; Faraone, S V; Asherson, P

    2008-01-01

    Season of birth (SOB) has been associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in two existing studies. One further study reported an interaction between SOB and genotypes of the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) gene. It is important that these findings are further investigated to confirm or refute the findings. In this study, we investigated the SOB association with ADHD in four independent samples collected for molecular genetic studies of ADHD and found a small but significant increase in summer births compared to a large population control dataset. We also observed a significant association with the 7-repeat allele of the DRD4 gene variable number tandem repeat polymorphism in exon three with probands born in the winter season, with no significant differential transmission of this allele between summer and winter seasons. Preferential transmission of the 2-repeat allele to ADHD probands occurred in those who were born during the summer season, but did not surpass significance for association, even though the difference in transmission between the two seasons was nominally significant. However, following adjustment for multiple testing of alleles none of the SOB effects remained significant. We conclude that the DRD4 7-repeat allele is associated with ADHD but there is no association or interaction with SOB for increased risk for ADHD. Our findings suggest that we can refute a possible effect of SOB for ADHD. PMID:17525975

  20. Differential alleleic expression of the type II collagen gene (COL2A2) in osteoarthritic cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Loughlin, J.; Irven, C.; Sykes, B.; Athanasou, N.; Carr, A.

    1995-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common debilitating disease resulting from the degeneration of articular cartilage. The major protein of cartilage is type II collagen, which is encoded by the COL2A1 gene. Mutations at this locus have been discovered in several individuals with inherited disorders of cartilage. We have identified 27 primary OA patients who are heterozygous for sequence dimorphisms located in the coding region of COL2A1. These dimorphisms were used to distinguish the mRNA output from each of the two COL2A1 alleles in articular cartilage obtained from each patient. Three patients demonstrated differential allelic expression and produced <12% of the normal level of mRNA from one of their COL2A1 alleles. The same allele shows reduced expression in a well-defined OA population than in a control group, suggesting the possible existence of a rare COL2A1 allele that predisposes to OA. 31 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. A pseudodeficiency allele common in non-Jewish Tay-Sachs carriers: Implications for carrier screening

    SciTech Connect

    Triggs-Raine, B.L.; Akerman, B.R.; Gravel, R.A. ); Mules, E.H.; Thomas, G.H.; Dowling, C.E. ); Kaback, M.M.; Lim-Steele, J.S.T. ); Natowicz, M.R. ); Grebner, E.E. ); Navon, R.R. ); Welch, J.P. ); Greenberg, C.R. )

    1992-10-01

    Deficiency of [beta]-hexosaminidase A (Hex A) activity typically results in Tay-Sachs disease. However, healthy subjects found to be deficient in Hex A activity (i.e., pseudodeficient) by means of in vitro biochemical tests have been described. The authors analyzed the HEXA gene of one pseudodeficient subject and identified both a C[sub 739]-to-T substitution that changes Arg[sub 247][yields]Trp on one allele and a previously identified Tay-Sachs disease mutation of the second allele. Six additional pseudodeficient subjects were found to have the C[sub 739]-to-T but for none of 36 Jewish enzyme-defined carries who did not have one of three known mutations common to this group. The C[sub 739]-to-T allele, together with a [open quotes]true[close quotes] Tay-Sachs disease allele, causes Hex A pseudodeficiency. Given both the large proportion of non-Jewish carriers with this allele and that standard biochemical screening cannot differentiate between heterozygotes for the C[sub 739]-to-T mutations and Tay-Sachs disease carriers, DNA testing for this mutation in at-risk couples is essential. This could prevent unnecessary or incorrect prenatal diagnoses. 40 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Point Mutation in Essential Genes with Loss or Mutation of the Second Allele

    PubMed Central

    Beck-Engeser, Gabriele B.; Monach, Paul A.; Mumberg, Dominik; Yang, Farley; Wanderling, Sherry; Schreiber, Karin; Espinosa, Rafael; Le Beau, Michelle M.; Meredith, Stephen C.; Schreiber, Hans

    2001-01-01

    Antigens that are tumor specific yet retained by tumor cells despite tumor progression offer stable and specific targets for immunologic and possibly other therapeutic interventions. Therefore, we have studied two CD4+ T cell–recognized tumor-specific antigens that were retained during evolution of two ultraviolet-light–induced murine cancers to more aggressive growth. The antigens are ribosomal proteins altered by somatic tumor-specific point mutations, and the progressor (PRO) variants lack the corresponding normal alleles. In the first tumor, 6132A-PRO, the antigen is encoded by a point-mutated L9 ribosomal protein gene. The tumor lacks the normal L9 allele because of an interstitial deletion from chromosome 5. In the second tumor, 6139B-PRO, both alleles of the L26 gene have point mutations, and each encodes a different tumor-specific CD4+ T cell–recognized antigen. Thus, for both L9 and L26 genes, we observe “two hit” kinetics commonly observed in genes suppressing tumor growth. Indeed, reintroduction of the lost wild-type L9 allele into the 6132A-PRO variant suppressed the growth of the tumor cells in vivo. Since both L9 and L26 encode proteins essential for ribosomal biogenesis, complete loss of the tumor-specific target antigens in the absence of a normal allele would abrogate tumor growth. PMID:11489948

  3. Variation in lipoprotein(a) concentration associated with different apolipoprotein(a) alleles.

    PubMed Central

    Perombelon, Y F; Soutar, A K; Knight, B L

    1994-01-01

    Plasma lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) concentrations vary considerably between individuals. To examine the variation for products of the same and different apolipoprotein(a) (apo(a)) alleles, conditions were established whereby phenotyping immunoblots could be used to estimate the concentration of Lp(a) associated with the constituent apo(a) isoforms. In these studies 28 distinct isoforms were identified, each differing by a single kringle IV unit. Tracking the isoforms through 10 families showed that there could be up to 200-fold difference in the Lp(a) concentration associated with the same-sized isoform produced from different alleles. In contrast there was typically < 2.5-fold variation in the Lp(a) concentration associated with the same allele. However, there were four occasions where the concentration associated with a particular allele was reduced below the typical range from one generation to the next. A nonlinear, inverse trend with isoform size was apparently superimposed upon the other factors that determine Lp(a) concentration. Inheritance of familial hypercholesterolemia or familial-defective apoB100 had little consistent effect upon Lp(a) concentration. In both the families and in other unrelated individuals the distribution of isoforms and their associated concentrations provided evidence for the presence of at least two and possibly more subpopulations of apo(a) alleles with different sizes and expression. Images PMID:8163653

  4. Diploid male dynamics under different numbers of sexual alleles and male dispersal abilities.

    PubMed

    Faria, Luiz R R; Soares, Elaine Della Giustina; Carmo, Eduardo do; Oliveira, Paulo Murilo Castro de

    2016-09-01

    Insects in the order Hymenoptera (bees, wasps and ants) present an haplodiploid system of sexual determination in which fertilized eggs become females and unfertilized eggs males. Under single locus complementary sex-determination (sl-CSD) system, the sex of a specimen depends on the alleles at a single locus: when diploid, an individual will be a female if heterozygous and male if homozygous. Significant diploid male (DM) production may drive a population to an extinction scenario called "diploid male vortex". We aimed at studying the dynamics of populations of a sl-CSD organism under several combinations of two parameters: male flight abilities and number of sexual alleles. In these simulations, we evaluated the frequency of DM and a genetic diversity measure over 10,000 generations. The number of sexual alleles varied from 10 to 100 and, at each generation, a male offspring might fly to another random site within a varying radius R. Two main results emerge from our simulations: (i) the number of DM depends more on male flight radius than on the number of alleles; (ii) in large geographic regions, the effect of males flight radius on the allelic diversity turns out much less pronounced than in small regions. In other words, small regions where inbreeding normally appears recover genetic diversity due to large flight radii. These results may be particularly relevant when considering the population dynamics of species with increasingly limited dispersal ability (e.g., forest-dependent species of euglossine bees in fragmented landscapes). PMID:27067711

  5. SNPsplit: Allele-specific splitting of alignments between genomes with known SNP genotypes.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Felix; Andrews, Simon R

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing reads overlapping polymorphic sites in diploid mammalian genomes may be assigned to one allele or the other. This holds the potential to detect gene expression, chromatin modifications, DNA methylation or nuclear interactions in an allele-specific fashion. SNPsplit is an allele-specific alignment sorter designed to read files in SAM/BAM format and determine the allelic origin of reads or read-pairs that cover known single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) positions. For this to work libraries must have been aligned to a genome in which all known SNP positions were masked with the ambiguity base 'N' and aligned using a suitable mapping program such as Bowtie2, TopHat, STAR, HISAT2, HiCUP or Bismark. SNPsplit also provides an automated solution to generate N-masked reference genomes for hybrid mouse strains based on the variant call information provided by the Mouse Genomes Project. The unique ability of SNPsplit to work with various different kinds of sequencing data including RNA-Seq, ChIP-Seq, Bisulfite-Seq or Hi-C opens new avenues for the integrative exploration of allele-specific data. PMID:27429743

  6. Interaction of MC1R and PMEL alleles on solid coat colors in Highland cattle.

    PubMed

    Schmutz, Sheila M; Dreger, Dayna L

    2013-02-01

    Six solid colors occur in Highland cattle: black, dun, silver dun and red, yellow, and white. These six coat colors are explained by a non-epistatic interaction of the genotypes at the MC1R and PMEL genes. A three base pair deletion in the PMEL gene leading to the deletion of a leucine from the signal peptide is observed in dilute-colored Highland cattle (c.50_52delTTC, p.Leu18del). The mutant PMEL allele acts in a semi-dominant manner. Dun Galloway cattle also have one copy of the deletion allele, and silver dun Galloway cattle have two copies. The presence of two adjacent leucine residues at the site of this deletion is highly conserved in human, horse, mouse and chicken as well as in cattle with undiluted coat colors. Highland and Galloway cattle thus exhibit a similar dose-dependent dilution effect based on the number of PMEL :c.50_51delTTC alleles, as Charolais cattle with PMEL :c.64G>A alleles. The PMEL :c.64G>A allele was not found in Highland or Galloway cattle. PMID:22524257

  7. Allele-specific copy-number discovery from whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, WeiBo; Wang, Wei; Sun, Wei; Crowley, James J; Szatkiewicz, Jin P

    2015-08-18

    Copy-number variants (CNVs) are a major form of genetic variation and a risk factor for various human diseases, so it is crucial to accurately detect and characterize them. It is conceivable that allele-specific reads from high-throughput sequencing data could be leveraged to both enhance CNV detection and produce allele-specific copy number (ASCN) calls. Although statistical methods have been developed to detect CNVs using whole-genome sequence (WGS) and/or whole-exome sequence (WES) data, information from allele-specific read counts has not yet been adequately exploited. In this paper, we develop an integrated method, called AS-GENSENG, which incorporates allele-specific read counts in CNV detection and estimates ASCN using either WGS or WES data. To evaluate the performance of AS-GENSENG, we conducted extensive simulations, generated empirical data using existing WGS and WES data sets and validated predicted CNVs using an independent methodology. We conclude that AS-GENSENG not only predicts accurate ASCN calls but also improves the accuracy of total copy number calls, owing to its unique ability to exploit information from both total and allele-specific read counts while accounting for various experimental biases in sequence data. Our novel, user-friendly and computationally efficient method and a complete analytic protocol is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/asgenseng/. PMID:25883151

  8. Mechanisms for dominance: Adh heterodimer formation in heterozygotes between ENU or x-ray induced null alleles and normal alleles in drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J.C.; Lee, W.R.; Chang, S.H.; Silverman, H. )

    1992-01-01

    To study mechanisms for dominance of phenotype, eight ENU- and four x-ray-induced mutations at the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) locus were analyzed for partial dominance in their interaction with normal alleles. All ENU and one of the x-ray mutations were single base substitutions; the other three x-ray mutations were 9-21 base deletions. All but one of the 12 mutant alleles were selected for this study because they produced detectable mutant polypeptides, but seven of the 11 producing a peptide could not form dimers with the normal peptide and the enzyme activity of heterozygotes was about half that of normal homozygotes. Four mutations formed dimers with a decreased catalytic efficiency and two of these were near the limit of detectability; these two also inhibited the formation of normal homodimers. The mutant alleles therefore show multiple mechanisms leading to partial enzyme expression in heterozygotes and a wide range of dominance ranging from almost complete recessive to nearly dominant. All amino acid changes in mutant peptides that form dimers are located between amino acids 182 and 194, so this region is not critical for dimerization. It may, however, be an important surface domain for catalyzation. 34 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Analysis of novel sph (spherocytosis) alleles in mice reveals allele-specific loss of band 3 and adducin in α-spectrin–deficient red cells

    PubMed Central

    Robledo, Raymond F.; Lambert, Amy J.; Birkenmeier, Connie S.; Cirlan, Marius V.; Cirlan, Andreea Flavia M.; Campagna, Dean R.; Lux, Samuel E.

    2010-01-01

    Five spontaneous, allelic mutations in the α-spectrin gene, Spna1, have been identified in mice (spherocytosis [sph], sph1J, sph2J, sph2BC, sphDem). All cause severe hemolytic anemia. Here, analysis of 3 new alleles reveals previously unknown consequences of red blood cell (RBC) spectrin deficiency. In sph3J, a missense mutation (H2012Y) in repeat 19 introduces a cryptic splice site resulting in premature termination of translation. In sphIhj, a premature stop codon occurs (Q1853Stop) in repeat 18. Both mutations result in markedly reduced RBC membrane spectrin content, decreased band 3, and absent β-adducin. Reevaluation of available, previously described sph alleles reveals band 3 and adducin deficiency as well. In sph4J, a missense mutation occurs in the C-terminal EF hand domain (C2384Y). Notably, an equally severe hemolytic anemia occurs despite minimally decreased membrane spectrin with normal band 3 levels and present, although reduced, β-adducin. The severity of anemia in sph4J indicates that the highly conserved cysteine residue at the C-terminus of α-spectrin participates in interactions critical to membrane stability. The data reinforce the notion that a membrane bridge in addition to the classic protein 4.1-p55-glycophorin C linkage exists at the RBC junctional complex that involves interactions between spectrin, adducin, and band 3. PMID:20056793

  10. Preclinical memory profile in Alzheimer patients with and without allele APOE-epsilon4.

    PubMed

    Estévez-González, Armando; García-Sánchez, Carmen; Boltes, Anunciación; Otermín, Pilar; Baiget, Montserrat; Escartín, Antonio; del Rio, Elisabeth; Gironell, Alex; Kulisevsky, Jaime

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the association between APOE-epsilon4 allele and memory phenotype in the preclinical stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We compared an extensive preclinical memory profile at the baseline evaluation of 2 AD genotype groups: APOE-epsilon4 allele carriers and patients with APOE-epsilon3 homozygosity. Baseline memory performance was carried out at least 2 years (interval of 27.7 +/- 4 months) before AD diagnosis was established, and analysis included different modalities of working memory (visuoperceptive, visuospatial, digit span and processing speed), of declarative memory (recent, verbal learning, prospective and semantic) and of nondeclarative memory (procedural, incidental and priming). We found no significant differences: memory performance was similar in both genotype groups. The presence of the APOE-epsilon4 allele does not seem to be sufficient to cause a distinctive preclinical memory phenotype in AD patients. PMID:15159600

  11. [A Detection of Allelic Variants at Microsatellite Markers by Using Capillary and Traditional Electrophoresis].

    PubMed

    Rubtsova, G A; Ponomareva, E V; Afanasiev, K I; Shaikhaev, E G; Kholodova, M V; Pavlov, S D; Zhivotovsky, L A

    2016-04-01

    Microsatellite alleles are detected by PCR (polymerase chain reaction) that provides a manifold increase in the number of copies (amplification) of a given DNA fragment. The fragment visualization can be reached by two different methods. These are fragment analysis by capillary electrophoresis in denaturing gel and frag- ment separation in non-denaturing gel with subsequent gel staining. The first method is more accurate and automated, but expensive. The second method is much cheaper but less convenient. It requires manual pro- cessing and is presumably less accurate. In this study, we present the results of comparison of the allele typing at nine microsatellite loci using these two methods for one of the species of Pacific salmon, sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka Walbaum. In most cases, both methods give identical fragment sizes or a constant differ- ence if the alleles are relatively small (not larger than 200-220 bp). PMID:27529983

  12. Genomic analysis of hybrid rice varieties reveals numerous superior alleles that contribute to heterosis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xuehui; Yang, Shihua; Gong, Junyi; Zhao, Yan; Feng, Qi; Gong, Hao; Li, Wenjun; Zhan, Qilin; Cheng, Benyi; Xia, Junhui; Chen, Neng; Hao, Zhongna; Liu, Kunyan; Zhu, Chuanrang; Huang, Tao; Zhao, Qiang; Zhang, Lei; Fan, Danlin; Zhou, Congcong; Lu, Yiqi; Weng, Qijun; Wang, Zi-Xuan; Li, Jiayang; Han, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Exploitation of heterosis is one of the most important applications of genetics in agriculture. However, the genetic mechanisms of heterosis are only partly understood, and a global view of heterosis from a representative number of hybrid combinations is lacking. Here we develop an integrated genomic approach to construct a genome map for 1,495 elite hybrid rice varieties and their inbred parental lines. We investigate 38 agronomic traits and identify 130 associated loci. In-depth analyses of the effects of heterozygous genotypes reveal that there are only a few loci with strong overdominance effects in hybrids, but a strong correlation is observed between the yield and the number of superior alleles. While most parental inbred lines have only a small number of superior alleles, high-yielding hybrid varieties have several. We conclude that the accumulation of numerous rare superior alleles with positive dominance is an important contributor to the heterotic phenomena. PMID:25651972

  13. Confirmation of association between the e4 allele of apolipoprotein E and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Liddell, M; Williams, J; Bayer, A; Kaiser, F; Owen, M

    1994-01-01

    The Apo E genotype of 86 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 77 age matched controls was determined by digestion of Apo E PCR products with the restriction enzyme CfoI. The frequency of the e4 allele was significantly increased in the patient group (0.33) as compared with controls (0.12). This effect was seen in patients with a family history and in sporadic cases. The odds ratio in homozygotes for the e4 allele was 11.24 (95% confidence interval 2.45-51.50). There was no relationship between age of onset and Apo E genotype. There was no linkage disequilibrium between the apolipoprotein E locus and a TaqI polymorphism at the Apo CII locus, and no allelic association between Apo CII and AD. Images PMID:8014966

  14. Natural Selection VS. Random Drift: Evidence from Temporal Variation in Allele Frequencies in Nature

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Laurence D.; Barr, Lorraine G.; Ayala, Francisco J.

    1985-01-01

    We have obtained monthly samples of two species, Drosophila pseudoobscura and Drosophila persimilis, in a natural population from Napa County, California. In each species, about 300 genes have been assayed by electrophoresis for each of seven enzyme loci in each monthly sample from March 1972 to June 1975. Using statistical methods developed for the purpose, we have examined whether the allele frequencies at different loci vary in a correlated fashion. The methods used do not detect natural selection when it is deterministic (e.g., overdominance or directional selection), but only when alleles at different loci vary simultaneously in response to the same environmental variations. Moreover, only relatively large fitness differences (of the order of 15%) are detectable. We have found strong evidence of correlated allele frequency variation in 13–20% of the cases examined. We interpret this as evidence that natural selection plays a major role in the evolution of protein polymorphisms in nature. PMID:4054608

  15. Allelic association at the D14S43 locus in early onset Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Brice, A.; Tardieu, S.; Campion, D.; Martinez, M.

    1995-04-24

    The D14S43 marker is closely linked to the major gene for early onset autosomal dominant Alzheimer`s disease on chromosome 14. Allelic frequencies at the D14S43 locus were compared in 113 familial and isolated cases of early onset Alzheimer`s disease (<60 years of age at onset) (EOAD) and 109 unaffected individuals of the same geographic origin. Allele 7 was significantly (P = 0.033) more frequent in type 1 EOAD patients (13.2%), defined by the presence of at least another first degree relative with EOAD, than in controls (4.1%). Since an autosomal dominant gene is probably responsible for type 1 patients, allelic association may reflect linkage disequilibrium at the D14S43 locus. This would mean that some patients share a common ancestral mutation. However, since multiple tests were carried out, this result must be interpreted with caution, and needs confirmation in an independent sample. 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. Independent Emergence of the Plasmodium falciparum Kelch Propeller Domain Mutant Allele C580Y in Guyana.

    PubMed

    Chenet, Stella M; Akinyi Okoth, Sheila; Huber, Curtis S; Chandrabose, Javin; Lucchi, Naomi W; Talundzic, Eldin; Krishnalall, Karanchand; Ceron, Nicolas; Musset, Lise; Macedo de Oliveira, Alexandre; Venkatesan, Meera; Rahman, Reyaud; Barnwell, John W; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2016-05-01

    Suspected artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum can be explored by examining polymorphisms in the Kelch (PfK13) propeller domain. Sequencing of PfK13 and other gene resistance markers was performed on 98 samples from Guyana. Five of these samples carried the C580Y allele in the PfK13 propeller domain, with flanking microsatellite profiles different from those observed in Southeast Asia. These molecular data demonstrate independent emergence of the C580Y K13 mutant allele in Guyana, where resistance alleles to previously used drugs are fixed. Therefore, in Guyana and neighboring countries, continued molecular surveillance and periodic assessment of the therapeutic efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapy are warranted. PMID:26690347

  17. Allele-Specific Reprogramming of Cancer Metabolism by the Long Non-coding RNA CCAT2.

    PubMed

    Redis, Roxana S; Vela, Luz E; Lu, Weiqin; Ferreira de Oliveira, Juliana; Ivan, Cristina; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Adamoski, Douglas; Pasculli, Barbara; Taguchi, Ayumu; Chen, Yunyun; Fernandez, Agustin F; Valledor, Luis; Van Roosbroeck, Katrien; Chang, Samuel; Shah, Maitri; Kinnebrew, Garrett; Han, Leng; Atlasi, Yaser; Cheung, Lawrence H; Huang, Gilbert Y; Monroig, Paloma; Ramirez, Marc S; Catela Ivkovic, Tina; Van, Long; Ling, Hui; Gafà, Roberta; Kapitanovic, Sanja; Lanza, Giovanni; Bankson, James A; Huang, Peng; Lai, Stephen Y; Bast, Robert C; Rosenblum, Michael G; Radovich, Milan; Ivan, Mircea; Bartholomeusz, Geoffrey; Liang, Han; Fraga, Mario F; Widger, William R; Hanash, Samir; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Ambrosio, Andre L B; Gomes Dias, Sandra M; Calin, George A

    2016-02-18

    Altered energy metabolism is a cancer hallmark as malignant cells tailor their metabolic pathways to meet their energy requirements. Glucose and glutamine are the major nutrients that fuel cellular metabolism, and the pathways utilizing these nutrients are often altered in cancer. Here, we show that the long ncRNA CCAT2, located at the 8q24 amplicon on cancer risk-associated rs6983267 SNP, regulates cancer metabolism in vitro and in vivo in an allele-specific manner by binding the Cleavage Factor I (CFIm) complex with distinct affinities for the two subunits (CFIm25 and CFIm68). The CCAT2 interaction with the CFIm complex fine-tunes the alternative splicing of Glutaminase (GLS) by selecting the poly(A) site in intron 14 of the precursor mRNA. These findings uncover a complex, allele-specific regulatory mechanism of cancer metabolism orchestrated by the two alleles of a long ncRNA. PMID:26853146

  18. Allelic Imbalance in Regulation of ANRIL through Chromatin Interaction at 9p21 Endometriosis Risk Locus

    PubMed Central

    Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Gurumurthy, Aishwarya; Hayano, Takahide; Ahmadloo, Somayeh; Omer, Waleed H; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Yamamoto, Akihito; Kurose, Keisuke; Enomoto, Takayuki; Akira, Shigeo; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Inoue, Ituro

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have discovered numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with human complex disorders. However, functional characterization of the disease-associated SNPs remains a formidable challenge. Here we explored regulatory mechanism of a SNP on chromosome 9p21 associated with endometriosis by leveraging “allele-specific” functional genomic approaches. By re-sequencing 1.29 Mb of 9p21 region and scrutinizing DNase-seq data from the ENCODE project, we prioritized rs17761446 as a candidate functional variant that was in perfect linkage disequilibrium with the original GWAS SNP (rs10965235) and located on DNase I hypersensitive site. Chromosome conformation capture followed by high-throughput sequencing revealed that the protective G allele of rs17761446 exerted stronger chromatin interaction with ANRIL promoter. We demonstrated that the protective allele exhibited preferential binding affinities to TCF7L2 and EP300 by bioinformatics and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses. ChIP assays for histone H3 lysine 27 acetylation and RNA polymerase II reinforced the enhancer activity of the SNP site. The allele specific expression analysis for eutopic endometrial tissues and endometrial carcinoma cell lines showed that rs17761446 was a cis-regulatory variant where G allele was associated with increased ANRIL expression. Our work illuminates the allelic imbalances in a series of transcriptional regulation from factor binding to gene expression mediated by chromatin interaction underlie the molecular mechanism of 9p21 endometriosis risk locus. Functional genomics on common disease will unlock functional aspect of genotype-phenotype correlations in the post-GWAS stage. PMID:27055116

  19. Dynamic characterization of HLA-B*44 Alleles: A comparative molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Pemra

    2016-06-01

    Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA) are highly polymorphic proteins that play a key role in the immune system. HLA molecule is present on the cell membrane of antigen-presenting cells of the immune system and presents short peptides, originating from the proteins of invading pathogens or self-proteins, to the T-cell Receptor (TCR) molecule of the T-cells. In this study, peptide-binding characteristics of HLA-B*44:02, 44:03, 44:05 alleles bound to three nonameric peptides were studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Polymorphisms among these alleles (Asp116Tyr and Asp156Leu) result in major differences in the allele characteristics. While HLA-B*44:02 (Asp116, Asp156) and HLA-B*44:03 (Asp116, Leu156) depend on tapasin for efficient peptide loading, HLA-B*44:05 (Tyr116, Asp156) is tapasin independent. On the other hand, HLA-B*44:02 and HLA-B*44:03 mismatch is closely related to transplant rejection and acute-graft-versus-host disease. In order to understand the dynamic characteristics, the simulation trajectories were analyzed by applying Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) and Root Mean Square Fluctuation (RMSF) calculations and hydrogen bonding analysis. Binding dynamics of the three HLA-B*44 alleles and peptide sequences are comparatively discussed. In general, peptide binding stability is found to depend on the peptide rather than the allele type for HLA-B*44 alleles. PMID:27016630

  20. Mining the human phenome using allelic scores that index biological intermediates.

    PubMed

    Evans, David M; Brion, Marie Jo A; Paternoster, Lavinia; Kemp, John P; McMahon, George; Munafò, Marcus; Whitfield, John B; Medland, Sarah E; Montgomery, Grant W; Timpson, Nicholas J; St Pourcain, Beate; Lawlor, Debbie A; Martin, Nicholas G; Dehghan, Abbas; Hirschhorn, Joel; Smith, George Davey

    2013-10-01

    It is common practice in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to focus on the relationship between disease risk and genetic variants one marker at a time. When relevant genes are identified it is often possible to implicate biological intermediates and pathways likely to be involved in disease aetiology. However, single genetic variants typically explain small amounts of disease risk. Our idea is to construct allelic scores that explain greater proportions of the variance in biological intermediates, and subsequently use these scores to data mine GWAS. To investigate the approach's properties, we indexed three biological intermediates where the results of large GWAS meta-analyses were available: body mass index, C-reactive protein and low density lipoprotein levels. We generated allelic scores in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, and in publicly available data from the first Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. We compared the explanatory ability of allelic scores in terms of their capacity to proxy for the intermediate of interest, and the extent to which they associated with disease. We found that allelic scores derived from known variants and allelic scores derived from hundreds of thousands of genetic markers explained significant portions of the variance in biological intermediates of interest, and many of these scores showed expected correlations with disease. Genome-wide allelic scores however tended to lack specificity suggesting that they should be used with caution and perhaps only to proxy biological intermediates for which there are no known individual variants. Power calculations confirm the feasibility of extending our strategy to the analysis of tens of thousands of molecular phenotypes in large genome-wide meta-analyses. We conclude that our method represents a simple way in which potentially tens of thousands of molecular phenotypes could be screened for causal relationships with disease without having to expensively measure

  1. ACE-II genotype and I allele predicts ischemic stroke among males in south India

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, Murali; Chinniah, Rathika; Ravi, Padma Malini; Mosses Joseph, Arun Kumar; Vellaiappan, Neethi Arasu; Krishnan, Jeyaram Illiayaraja; Karuppiah, Balakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Two hundred ischemic stroke patients and 193 age and sex matched healthy controls were studied for the presence of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion (ACE I/D) gene polymorphism. The PCR studies revealed that ACE ‘II’ (OR = 2.055; p = 0.004) genotype and ‘I’ (OR = 1.411; p = 0.018) alleles were significantly associated with IS patients. Gender specific analysis revealed a strong association of ‘II’ (OR = 2.044; p = 0.014) genotype and ‘I’ (OR = 1.531; p = 0.011) allele with male sex. Classification of patients based on TOAST criteria, revealed a significant association for ‘II’ genotype (OR = 1.713; p = 0.043) and ‘I’ (OR = 1.382; p = 0.039) allele in LVD patients only. When the data was stratified based on age and sex, a statistically significant association was observed for ACE ‘II’ genotype (OR = 2.288; p = 0.006) and ‘I’ allele (OR = 1.395; p = 0.054) in IS male patients of > 50 years of age. The ACE ‘D’ allele was found to be increased in controls (OR = 0.709; p = 0.018) than IS patients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that smoking and diabetes were the most powerful independent risk factor in LVD type of stroke. Thus, we presented here an evidence for a strong association of ACE ‘II’ genotype and ‘I’ allele compounded by factors such as smoking and diabetes among south Indian IS patients. PMID:25606450

  2. Topoisomerase inhibitors unsilence the dormant allele of Ube3a in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsien-Sung; Allen, John A.; Mabb, Angela M.; King, Ian F.; Miriyala, JayaLakshmi; Taylor-Blake, Bonnie; Sciaky, Noah; Dutton, J. Walter; Lee, Hyeong-Min; Chen, Xin; Jin, Jian; Bridges, Arlene S.; Zylka, Mark J.; Roth, Bryan L.; Philpot, Benjamin D.

    2011-01-01

    Angelman syndrome is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder caused by deletion or mutation of the maternal allele of the ubiquitin protein ligase E3A (Ube3a)1–3. In neurons, the paternal allele of Ube3a is intact but epigenetically silenced4–6, raising the possibility that Angelman syndrome could be treated by activating this silenced allele to restore functional UBE3A protein7,8. Using an unbiased, high-content screen in primary cortical neurons from mice, we identified twelve topoisomerase I inhibitors and four topoisomerase II inhibitors that unsilence the paternal Ube3a allele. These drugs included topotecan, irinotecan, etoposide, and dexrazoxane (ICRF-187). At nanomolar concentrations, topotecan upregulated catalytically active UBE3A in neurons from maternal Ube3a-null mice. Topotecan concomitantly downregulated expression of the Ube3a antisense transcript that overlaps the paternal copy of Ube3a9–11. These results suggest that topotecan unsilences Ube3a in cis by reducing transcription of an imprinted antisense RNA. When administered in vivo, topotecan unsilenced the paternal Ube3a allele in several regions of the nervous system, including neurons in the hippocampus, neocortex, striatum, cerebellum and spinal cord. Paternal expression of Ube3a remained elevated in a subset of spinal cord neurons for at least twelve weeks after cessation of topotecan treatment, suggesting transient topoisomerase inhibition can have enduring effects on gene expression. While potential off-target effects remain to be investigated, our findings suggest a therapeutic strategy for reactivating the functional but dormant allele of Ube3a in patients with Angelman syndrome. PMID:22190039

  3. Myotonic Dystrophy: Increased expression of the normal allele in CDM infants muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Radvanyi, H.H.; Gourdon, G.; Junien, C. |

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an autosomal dominant multisystemic disorder characterized by a highly variable clinical phenotype. The mutation has been identified as an unstable trinucleotide CTG repeat in the 3{prime} untranslated region of the myotonin-protein kinase (MT-PK) gene. Congenital myotonic dystrophy (CDM), which represents the most severe phenotype, is exclusively maternally inherited. Recent studies, analysis by Northern blots and RT-PCR provided apparently conflicting results on the mutated allele expression in samples from congenitally affected children. The level of expression of the mutant allele depends on the extent of the repeat in the adult form and is no longer expressed when over 800-1300 repeats, whether in adult forms or in CDM. Could this decrease account for the late onset forms? However, the differences between the two phenotypes cannot be explained by the same mechanism. Alternatively, these differences could be due to differences in expression of the normal allele. We analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR the expression of the MT-PK gene in muscle samples from four CDM infants and two aged-matched normal controls. In two of these, the mutant allele (3.3 and 8 kb) was undetectable on Northern blots. We observed an increased expression of the MT-PK gene (10- to 20-fold) in tissues of severely affected congenital patients which can be attributed to the normal allele. Since expression of the normal allele is either normal or slightly decreased in the adult form, the dramatic increase in the congenital form could reflect a disturbance in muscle differentiation. Expression studies of MT-PK at different stages of development and, especially after the 20th week, are therefore required.

  4. Comparative molecular dynamics analysis of tapasin-dependent and -independent MHC class I alleles.

    SciTech Connect

    Sieker, Florian; Springer, Sebastian; Zacharias, Martin W.

    2007-02-01

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. MHC class I molecules load antigenic peptides in the endoplasmic reticulum and present them at the cell surface. Efficiency of peptide loading depends on the class I allele and can involve interaction with tapasin and other proteins of the loading complex. Allele HLA-B*4402 (Asp at position 116) depends on tapasin for efficient peptide loading, whereas HLA-B*4405 (identical to B*4402 except for Tyr116) can efficiently load peptides in the absence of tapasin. Both alleles adopt very similar structures in the presence of the same peptide. Comparative unrestrained molecular dynamics simulations on the 1/2 peptide binding domains performed in the presence of bound peptides resulted in structures in close agreement with experiments for both alleles. In the absence of peptides, allele-specific conformational changes occurred in the first segment of the 2-helix that flanks the peptide C-terminal binding region (F-pocket) and contacts residue 116. This segment is also close to the proposed tapasin contact region. For B*4402, a shift toward an altered F-pocket structure deviating significantly from the bound form was observed. Subsequent free energy simulations on induced F-pocket opening in B*4402 confirmed a conformation that deviated significantly from the bound structure. For B*4405, a free energy minimum close to the bound structure was found. The simulations suggest that B*4405 has a greater tendency to adopt a peptide receptive conformation in the absence of peptide, allowing tapasin-independent peptide loading. A possible role of tapasin could be the stabilization of a peptide-receptive class I conformation for HLA-B*4402 and other tapasin-dependent alleles.

  5. Allelic Imbalance in Regulation of ANRIL through Chromatin Interaction at 9p21 Endometriosis Risk Locus.

    PubMed

    Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Gurumurthy, Aishwarya; Hayano, Takahide; Ahmadloo, Somayeh; Omer, Waleed H; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Yamamoto, Akihito; Kurose, Keisuke; Enomoto, Takayuki; Akira, Shigeo; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Inoue, Ituro

    2016-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have discovered numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with human complex disorders. However, functional characterization of the disease-associated SNPs remains a formidable challenge. Here we explored regulatory mechanism of a SNP on chromosome 9p21 associated with endometriosis by leveraging "allele-specific" functional genomic approaches. By re-sequencing 1.29 Mb of 9p21 region and scrutinizing DNase-seq data from the ENCODE project, we prioritized rs17761446 as a candidate functional variant that was in perfect linkage disequilibrium with the original GWAS SNP (rs10965235) and located on DNase I hypersensitive site. Chromosome conformation capture followed by high-throughput sequencing revealed that the protective G allele of rs17761446 exerted stronger chromatin interaction with ANRIL promoter. We demonstrated that the protective allele exhibited preferential binding affinities to TCF7L2 and EP300 by bioinformatics and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses. ChIP assays for histone H3 lysine 27 acetylation and RNA polymerase II reinforced the enhancer activity of the SNP site. The allele specific expression analysis for eutopic endometrial tissues and endometrial carcinoma cell lines showed that rs17761446 was a cis-regulatory variant where G allele was associated with increased ANRIL expression. Our work illuminates the allelic imbalances in a series of transcriptional regulation from factor binding to gene expression mediated by chromatin interaction underlie the molecular mechanism of 9p21 endometriosis risk locus. Functional genomics on common disease will unlock functional aspect of genotype-phenotype correlations in the post-GWAS stage. PMID:27055116

  6. The Rp3 disease resistance gene of maize: mapping and characterization of introgressed alleles.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Alferez, S; Richter, T E; Hulbert, S H; Bennetzen, J L

    1995-07-01

    The Rp3 locus of maize conditions race-specific resistance to a fungal rust pathogen, Puccinia sorghi. Both morphological and DNA markers were employed to characterize alleles of Rp3 and to accurately position Rp3 on the maize genetic map. DNA marker polymorphisms distinctive to each Rp3 allele were identified, allowing the identification of specific Rp3 alleles in cases where rust races that differentiate particular alleles are not available. In a population of 427 progeny, Rp3 and Rg1 were found to be completely linked, while Lg3 was approximately 3 cM proximal on the long arm of chromosome 3. In this same population, 12 RFLP markers were mapped relative to Rp3; the closest markers were UMC102 (about 1cM distal to Rp1) and NPI114 (1-2 cM proximal). These and additional DNA probes were used to characterize the nature and extent of flanking DNA that was carried along when six different Rp3 alleles were backcrossed into a single background. Depending upon the allele investigated, a minimum of 2-10cM of polymorphic DNA flanking the Rp3 locus was retained through the introgression process. In addition, many of the probes that map near Rp3 were found to detect an additional fragment in the Rp3 region, indicating that portions of this chromosomal segment have been tendemly duplicated. The materials and results generated will permit marker-assisted entry of Rp3 into different maize backgrounds and lay the foundation for the eventual map-based cloning of Rp3. PMID:24169663

  7. Catalogue of alleles of gliadin-coding loci in durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.).

    PubMed

    Melnikova, N V; Kudryavtseva, A V; Kudryavtsev, A M

    2012-02-01

    Gliadins are seed storage proteins which are characterized by high intervarietal polymorphism and can be used as genetic markers. As a result of our work, a considerably extended catalogue of allelic variants of gliadin component blocks was compiled for durum wheat; 74 allelic variants for four gliadin-coding loci were identified for the first time. The extended catalogue includes a total of 131 allelic variants: 16 for locus Gli-A1(d), 19 for locus Gli-B1(d), 41 for locus Gli-A2(d), and 55 for locus Gli-B2(d). The electrophoretic pattern of the standard cultivar and a diagram are provided for every block identified. The number of alleles per family is quite small for loci Gli-A1(d) and Gli-B1(d) of durum wheat, as contrasted to loci Gli-A2(d) and Gli-B2(d) that are characterized by large families including many alleles. The presence of large block families determines a higher diversity of durum wheat for loci Gli-A2(d) and Gli-B2(d) as compared to Gli-A1(d) and Gli-B1(d). The catalogue of allelic variants of gliadin component blocks can be used by seed farmers to identify durum wheat cultivars and evaluate their purity; by breeders, to obtain homogenous cultivars and control the initial stages of selection; by gene bank experts, to preserve native varieties and the original biotypic composition of cultivars. PMID:21946233

  8. Breed Distribution of SOD1 Alleles Previously Associated with Canine Degenerative Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, R; Coates, JR; Johnson, GC; Hansen, L; Awano, T; Kolicheski, A; Ivansson, E; Perloski, M; Lindblad-Toh, K; O'Brien, DP; Guo, J; Katz, ML; Johnson, GS

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous reports associated 2 mutant SOD1 alleles (SOD1:c.118A and SOD1:c.52T) with degenerative myelopathy in 6 canine breeds. The distribution of these alleles in other breeds has not been reported. Objective To describe the distribution of SOD1:c.118A and SOD1:c.52T in 222 breeds. Animals DNA from 33,747 dogs was genotyped at SOD1:c.118, SOD1:c.52, or both. Spinal cord sections from 249 of these dogs were examined. Methods Retrospective analysis of 35,359 previously determined genotypes at SOD1:c.118G>A or SOD1:c.52A>T and prospective survey to update the clinical status of a subset of dogs from which samples were obtained with a relatively low ascertainment bias. Results The SOD1:c.118A allele was found in cross-bred dogs and in 124 different canine breeds whereas the SOD1:c.52T allele was only found in Bernese Mountain Dogs. Most of the dogs with histopathologically confirmed degenerative myelopathy were SOD1:c.118A homozygotes, but 8 dogs with histopathologically confirmed degenerative myelopathy were SOD1:c.118A/G heterozygotes and had no other sequence variants in their SOD1 amino acid coding regions. The updated clinical conditions of dogs from which samples were obtained with a relatively low ascertainment bias suggest that SOD1:c.118A homozygotes are at a much higher risk of developing degenerative myelopathy than are SOD1:c.118A/G heterozygotes. Conclusions and Clinical Importance We conclude that the SOD1:c.118A allele is widespread and common among privately owned dogs whereas the SOD1:c.52T allele is rare and appears to be limited to Bernese Mountain Dogs. We also conclude that breeding to avoid the production of SOD1:c.118A homozygotes is a rational strategy. PMID:24524809

  9. Allelic background of LEPRE1 mutations that cause recessive forms of osteogenesis imperfecta in different populations

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, Melanie G; Schwarze, Ulrike; Singh, Virendra; Romana, Marc; Jones-LeCointe, Altheia; Byers, Peter H

    2013-01-01

    Biallelic mutations in LEPRE1 result in recessively inherited forms of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) that are often lethal in the perinatal period. A mutation (c.1080+1G>T, IVS5+1G>T) in African Americans has a carrier frequency of about 1/240. The mutant allele originated in West Africa in tribes of Ghana and Nigeria where the carrier frequencies are 2% and 5%. By examining 200 samples from an African-derived population in Tobago and reviewing hospital neonatal death records, we determined that the carrier frequency of c.1080+1G>T was about one in 200 and did not contribute to the neonatal deaths recorded over a 3-year period of time in Trinidad. In the course of sequence analysis, we found surprisingly high LEPRE1 allelic diversity in the Tobago DNA samples in which there were 11 alleles distinguished by a single basepair variant in or near exon 5. All the alleles found in the Tobago population that were within the sequence analysis region were found in the African American population in the Exome Variant Project. This diversity appeared to reflect the geographic origin of the original population in Tobago. In 44 individuals with biallelic LEPRE1 mutations identified by clinical diagnostic testing, we found the sequence alterations occurred on seven of the 11 variant alleles. All but one of the mutations identified resulted in mRNA or protein instability for the majority of the transcripts from the altered allele. These findings suggest that the milder end of the clinical spectrum could be due to as yet unidentified missense mutations in LEPRE1. PMID:24498616

  10. Characterization of new allele influencing flowering time in bread wheat introgressed from Triticum militinae.

    PubMed

    Ivaničová, Zuzana; Jakobson, Irena; Reis, Diana; Šafář, Jan; Milec, Zbyněk; Abrouk, Michael; Doležel, Jaroslav; Järve, Kadri; Valárik, Miroslav

    2016-09-25

    Flowering time variation was identified within a mapping population of doubled haploid lines developed from a cross between the introgressive line 8.1 and spring bread wheat cv. Tähti. The line 8.1 carried introgressions from tetraploid Triticum militinae in the cv. Tähti genetic background on chromosomes 1A, 2A, 4A, 5A, 7A, 1B and 5B. The most significant QTL for the flowering time variation was identified within the introgressed region on chromosome 5A and its largest effect was associated with the VRN-A1 locus, accounting for up to 70% of phenotypic variance. The allele of T. militinae origin was designated as VRN-A1f-like. The effect of the VRN-A1f-like allele was verified in two other mapping populations. QTL analysis identified that in cv. Tähti and cv. Mooni genetic background, VRN-A1f-like allele incurred a delay of 1.9-18.6 days in flowering time, depending on growing conditions. Sequence comparison of the VRN-A1f-like and VRN-A1a alleles from the parental lines of the mapping populations revealed major mutations in the promoter region as well as in the first intron, including insertion of a MITE element and a large deletion. The sequence variation allowed construction of specific diagnostic PCR markers for VRN-A1f-like allele determination. Identification and quantification of the effect of the VRN-A1f-like allele offers a useful tool for wheat breeding and for studying fine-scale regulation of flowering pathways in wheat. PMID:26899284

  11. Allelic Variation in a Willow Warbler Genomic Region Is Associated with Climate Clines

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Keith W.; Liedvogel, Miriam; Addison, BriAnne; Kleven, Oddmund; Laskemoen, Terje; Lifjeld, Jan T.; Lundberg, Max; Åkesson, Susanne; Bensch, Staffan

    2014-01-01

    Local adaptation is an important process contributing to population differentiation which can occur in continuous or isolated populations connected by various amounts of gene flow. The willow warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus) is one of the most common songbirds in Fennoscandia. It has a continuous breeding distribution where it is found in all forested habitats from sea level to the tree line and therefore constitutes an ideal species for the study of locally adapted genes associated with environmental gradients. Previous studies in this species identified a genetic marker (AFLP-WW1) that showed a steep north-south cline in central Sweden with one allele associated with coastal lowland habitats and the other with mountainous habitats. It was further demonstrated that this marker is embedded in a highly differentiated chromosome region that spans several megabases. In the present study, we sampled 2,355 individuals at 128 sites across all of Fennoscandia to study the geographic and climatic variables associated with the allele frequency distributions of WW1. Our results demonstrate that 1) allele frequency patterns significantly differ between mountain and lowland populations, 2) these allele differences coincide with extreme temperature conditions and the short growing season in the mountains, and milder conditions in coastal areas, and 3) the northern-allele or “altitude variant” of WW1 occurs in willow warblers that occupy mountainous habitat regardless of subspecies. Finally these results suggest that climate may exert selection on the genomic region associated with these alleles and would allow us to develop testable predictions for the distribution of the genetic marker based on climate change scenarios. PMID:24788148

  12. Susceptible and protective associations of HLA DRB1*/DQB1* alleles and haplotypes with ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Murali, V; Rathika, C; Ramgopal, S; Padma Malini, R; Arun Kumar, M J; Neethi Arasu, V; Jeyaram Illiayaraja, K; Balakrishnan, K

    2016-06-01

    Stroke has emerged as the second commonest cause of mortality worldwide and is a major public health problem. For the first time, we present here the association of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1*/DQB1* alleles and haplotypes with ischaemic stroke in South Indian patients. Ischaemic stroke (IS) cases and controls were genotyped for HLA-DRB1*/DQB1* alleles by polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) method. The frequencies of HLA class II alleles such as DRB1*04, DRB1*07, DRB1*11, DRB1*12, DRB1*13, DQB1*02 and DQB1*07 were high in IS patients than in the age- and gender-matched controls, suggesting that the individuals with these alleles are susceptible to ischaemic stroke in South India. The frequencies of alleles such as DRB1*03, DRB1*10, DRB1*14, DQB1*04 and DQB1*05 were less in IS cases than in the controls, suggesting a protective association. Haplotypes DRB1*04-DQB1*0301, DRB1*07-DQB1*02, DRB1*07-DQB1*0301, DRB1*11-DQB1*0301 and DRB1*13-DQB1*06 were found to be high in IS patients conferring susceptibility. The frequency of haplotype DRB1*10-DQB1*05 was high in controls conferring protection. IS-LVD and gender-stratified analysis too confirmed these susceptible and protective associations. Thus, HLA-DRB1*/DQB1* alleles and haplotypes strongly predispose South Indian population to ischaemic stroke. Further studies in different populations with large sample size or the meta-analysis are needed to explain the exact mechanism of associations of HLA gene(s) with IS. PMID:27105925

  13. Characterization of a novel MICA allele, MICA*012:05, by cloning and sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, W Y; Tian, W; Wang, F; Zhu, F M; Li, L X

    2016-08-01

    A new MICA allelic variant, MICA*012:05, has been identified in a Chinese Mongolian population. Following polymerase chain reaction-sequence-based typing (PCR-SBT), this new allele was further confirmed by cloning and sequencing. MICA*012:05 was linked to an HLA-A*24-C*01-B*55:02-DRB1*09 haplotype. MICA*012:05 differs from MICA*012:01 by a single synonymous C to T substitution at nucleotide position 269 in exon 3. PMID:27273902

  14. Testing Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium on allelic data from VNTR loci

    SciTech Connect

    Geisser, S. ); Johnson, W. )

    1992-11-01

    Several methods for testing independence of pairs of alleles in a population that are obtained from a VNTR locus are presented. The authors assume an exchangeable quasi-continuous distribution of the fragment lengths used to measure the allelic pairs. Bivariate-estimated quantiles computed from the quantiles of the entire data set are then utilized for testing independence. These methods have the advantage of being minimally susceptible to the criticism of (a) the inability of a technology to measure to a few small-sized or rather large-sized fragments and (b) inadequate estimation of the homozygotic proportion. 6 refs., 3 tabs.

  15. Characterization of Tn6238 with a New Allele of aac(6′)-Ib-cr

    PubMed Central

    Quiroga, María P.; Orman, Betina; Errecalde, Laura; Kaufman, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report that the genetic structure of Tn1331 remained conserved in Argentina from 1989 to 2013 (72 of 73 isolates), with the exception being the plasmid-borne Tn1331-like transposon Tn6238 containing a new aac(6′)-Ib-cr allele recovered from a colistin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolate. A bioinformatic analysis of aac(6′)-Ib-like gene cassettes suggests that this new aac(6′)-Ib-cr allele emerged through mutation or homologous recombination in the Tn1331 genetic platform. Tn6238 is a novel platform for the dissemination of aminoglycoside and fluoroquinolone resistance determinants. PMID:25691640

  16. Somatic Mutation Allelic Ratio Test Using ddPCR (SMART-ddPCR): An Accurate Method for Assessment of Preferential Allelic Imbalance in Tumor DNA.

    PubMed

    de Smith, Adam J; Walsh, Kyle M; Hansen, Helen M; Endicott, Alyson A; Wiencke, John K; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which heritable genetic variants can affect tumor development has yet to be fully elucidated. Tumor selection of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) risk alleles, a phenomenon called preferential allelic imbalance (PAI), has been demonstrated in some cancer types. We developed a novel application of digital PCR termed Somatic Mutation Allelic Ratio Test using Droplet Digital PCR (SMART-ddPCR) for accurate assessment of tumor PAI, and have applied this method to test the hypothesis that heritable SNPs associated with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may demonstrate tumor PAI. These SNPs are located at CDKN2A (rs3731217) and IKZF1 (rs4132601), genes frequently lost in ALL, and at CEBPE (rs2239633), ARID5B (rs7089424), PIP4K2A (rs10764338), and GATA3 (rs3824662), genes located on chromosomes gained in high-hyperdiploid ALL. We established thresholds of AI using constitutional DNA from SNP heterozygotes, and subsequently measured allelic copy number in tumor DNA from 19-142 heterozygote samples per SNP locus. We did not find significant tumor PAI at these loci, though CDKN2A and IKZF1 SNPs showed a trend towards preferential selection of the risk allele (p = 0.17 and p = 0.23, respectively). Using a genomic copy number control ddPCR assay, we investigated somatic copy number alterations (SCNA) underlying AI at CDKN2A and IKZF1, revealing a complex range of alterations including homozygous and hemizygous deletions and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity, with varying degrees of clonality. Copy number estimates from ddPCR showed high agreement with those from multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assays. We demonstrate that SMART-ddPCR is a highly accurate method for investigation of tumor PAI and for assessment of the somatic alterations underlying AI. Furthermore, analysis of publicly available data from The Cancer Genome Atlas identified 16 recurrent SCNA loci that contain heritable cancer risk SNPs associated with a

  17. Somatic Mutation Allelic Ratio Test Using ddPCR (SMART-ddPCR): An Accurate Method for Assessment of Preferential Allelic Imbalance in Tumor DNA

    PubMed Central

    de Smith, Adam J.; Walsh, Kyle M.; Hansen, Helen M.; Endicott, Alyson A.; Wiencke, John K.; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which heritable genetic variants can affect tumor development has yet to be fully elucidated. Tumor selection of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) risk alleles, a phenomenon called preferential allelic imbalance (PAI), has been demonstrated in some cancer types. We developed a novel application of digital PCR termed Somatic Mutation Allelic Ratio Test using Droplet Digital PCR (SMART-ddPCR) for accurate assessment of tumor PAI, and have applied this method to test the hypothesis that heritable SNPs associated with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may demonstrate tumor PAI. These SNPs are located at CDKN2A (rs3731217) and IKZF1 (rs4132601), genes frequently lost in ALL, and at CEBPE (rs2239633), ARID5B (rs7089424), PIP4K2A (rs10764338), and GATA3 (rs3824662), genes located on chromosomes gained in high-hyperdiploid ALL. We established thresholds of AI using constitutional DNA from SNP heterozygotes, and subsequently measured allelic copy number in tumor DNA from 19–142 heterozygote samples per SNP locus. We did not find significant tumor PAI at these loci, though CDKN2A and IKZF1 SNPs showed a trend towards preferential selection of the risk allele (p = 0.17 and p = 0.23, respectively). Using a genomic copy number control ddPCR assay, we investigated somatic copy number alterations (SCNA) underlying AI at CDKN2A and IKZF1, revealing a complex range of alterations including homozygous and hemizygous deletions and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity, with varying degrees of clonality. Copy number estimates from ddPCR showed high agreement with those from multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assays. We demonstrate that SMART-ddPCR is a highly accurate method for investigation of tumor PAI and for assessment of the somatic alterations underlying AI. Furthermore, analysis of publicly available data from The Cancer Genome Atlas identified 16 recurrent SCNA loci that contain heritable cancer risk SNPs associated with a

  18. Analysis of the inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor polymorphism in west Africa: description of a new allele, ITI*7.

    PubMed

    Caeiro, J L; Liste, I; Vogt, U; Ribeiro, J C

    1994-01-01

    Inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor (ITI) phenotypes were classified in the West African population of Cabo Verde by polyacrylamide gel isoelectric focusing, followed by immunofixation and silver staining. Gene frequencies of the alleles ITI*1, ITI*2, ITI*3, and ITI*4 were calculated to be 0.532, 0.153, 0.307 and 0.002, respectively. A new rare allele, ITI*7, was found, providing evidence for further genetic variability of the ITI protein. The ITI*7 allele frequency has been determined to 0.006. The assumption that allele ITI*3 may be used to characterize populations of African origin is supported by our data. PMID:7532128

  19. Human leukocyte antigen-G allele polymorphisms have evolved following three different evolutionary lineages based on intron sequences.

    PubMed

    Cervera, Isabel; Herraiz, Miguel Angel; Peñaloza, Jorge; Barbolla, Maria Luz; Jurado, Maria Luisa; Macedo, Jacqueline; Vidart, José Antonio; Martinez-Laso, Jorge

    2010-11-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G alleles follow a different pattern of polymorphism generation from those of the HLA classical I alleles. These polymorphisms have been defined as a result of random permitted point mutations in exons. However, this polymorphism maintenance could have an evolutionary specific pathways based on noncoding regions as introns, 14-bp deletion/insertion (exon 8), or promoter regions. Therefore a systematic sequencing study of HLA-G alleles was done obtaining the complete genomic sequence of 16 different HLA-G alleles: nine alleles were intron and exon confirmatory sequences, four were exon confirmatory and new intron described sequences, and three were new alleles. A 14-bp deletion/insertion polymorphism was also sequenced in these alleles. These sequences, together with those previously published, were compared, and phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary analyses were performed. Results showed the presence of three major specific evolutionary patterns, tentatively named lineages, and the other four as minor lineages (only one allele). The relative age of the major lineages could also be established based on the number of lineage-specific positions and the number of alleles of each lineage. Two main mechanisms are clearly defined in the generation of the lineages (introns), gene conversion, and/or convergent evolution following specific patterns. PMID:20650296

  20. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure Analysis of European Hexaploid Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Varieties

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Nanna Hellum; Backes, Gunter; Stougaard, Jens; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj; Jahoor, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Progress in plant breeding is facilitated by accurate information about genetic structure and diversity. Here, Diversity Array Technology (DArT) was used to characterize a population of 94 bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) varieties of mainly European origin. In total, 1,849 of 7,000 tested markers were polymorphic and could be used for population structure analysis. Two major subgroups of wheat varieties, GrI and GrII, were identified using the program STRUCTURE, and confirmed by principal component analysis (PCA). These subgroups were largely separated according to origin; GrI comprised varieties from Southern and Eastern Europe, whereas GrII contained mostly modern varieties from Western and Northern Europe. A large proportion of the markers contributing most to the genetic separation of the subgroups were located on chromosome 2D near the Reduced height 8 (Rht8) locus, and PCR-based genotyping suggested that breeding for the Rht8 allele had a major impact on subgroup separation. Consistently, analysis of linkage disequilibrium (LD) suggested that different selective pressures had acted on chromosome 2D in the two subgroups. Our data provides an overview of the allele composition of bread wheat varieties anchored to DArT markers, which will facilitate targeted combination of alleles following DArT-based QTL studies. In addition, the genetic diversity and distance data combined with specific Rht8 genotypes can now be used by breeders to guide selection of crossing parents. PMID:24718292

  1. Interactions between European Citizenship and Language Learning among Adolescent Europeans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennebry, Mairin

    2011-01-01

    Recent enlargement of the European Union (EU) has created debate as to the suitability of current structures and policies for effectively engaging citizens and developing social cohesion. Education and specifically modern foreign language (MFL) teaching are argued by the literature to play a key role in equipping young people to interact and…

  2. Genetic Variation in the Strongly Canalized Sex Pheromone Communication System of the European Corn Borer, Ostrinia Nubilalis Hubner (Lepidoptera; Pyralidae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, J.; Lofstedt, C.; Bengtsson, B. O.

    1996-01-01

    The major difference in pheromone production between the so-called E and Z strains of the European corn borer Ostrinia nubilalis is controlled by two alleles at a single autosomal locus. E-strain females produce an (E)-11-tetradecenyl acetate pheromone with 1-3% of the Z isomer, whereas Z-strain females produce the opposite blend. In laboratory-reared insects we found that F(1) females produced, on average, a 71:29 E/Z ratio, but the distribution was clearly bimodal. The variability in pheromone blend produced by heterozygous females could be explained by the existence of two different alleles in the Z strain which in combination with the E-strain allele for the major production locus cause the production of a component mixture either high or low in the E isomer. In addition, evidence was found for an independently inherited factor, existing in the E strain, with a dominant effect on the amount of E isomer produced by females homozygous for Z-alleles at the major production locus. Thus, the low variability normally found in the pheromone mixture produced by O. nubilalis and other moth females may, by canalization, hide a considerable amount of underlying genetic variation. PMID:8889536

  3. Genetic Heterogeneity within Electrophoretic "Alleles" of Xanthine Dehydrogenase in DROSOPHILA PSEUDOOBSCURA

    PubMed Central

    Singh, R. S.; Lewontin, R. C.; Felton, A. A.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental plan for an exhaustive determination of genic variation at structural gene loci is presented. In the initial steps of this program, 146 isochromosomal lines from 12 geographic populations of D. pseudoobscura were examined for allelic variation of xanthine dehydrogenase by the serial use of 4 different electrophoretic conditions and a heat stability test. The 5 criteria revealed a total of 37 allelic classes out of the 146 genomes examined where only 6 had been previously revealed by the usual method of gel electrophoresis. This immense increase in genic variation also showed previously unsuspected population differences between the main part of the species distribution and the isolated population of Bogotá, Colombia, in conformity with the known partial reproductive isolation of the Bogotá population. The average heterozygosity at the Xdh locus is at least 72% in natural populations. This result, together with the very large number of alleles segregating and the pattern of allelic frequencies, has implications for theories of genetic polymorphism which are discussed. PMID:1001881

  4. The Y-associated XY275 low allele is not restricted to indigenous African peoples.

    PubMed Central

    Spurdle, A; Ramsay, M; Jenkins, T

    1992-01-01

    The level of linkage disequilibrium between the XY275 MspI polymorphism and the X and Y boundaries was investigated in 21 different southern African populations. A full range of frequencies of the high allele was observed on the 1,013 X chromosomes studied, in keeping with published data. In previous studies fixation of the high allele on the Y chromosome was observed in all but two groups--a Pygmy and a Tsumkwe San population. However, in the present study of 673 Y chromosomes, the low allele was found to be associated with the Y chromosome in several different Bantu-speaking negroid groups, the Khoisan-speaking negroid Dama, the Khoisan, two groups of mixed ancestry, and the South African Asiatic-Indian population. The discovery of the low allele on Y chromosomes of caucasoid individuals suggests that more than one class of Y chromosome gave rise to the present-day non-African population. The data also fail to provide support for the theory that Africa is the site of origin of Homo sapiens, but they equally do not exclude it. Images Figure 2 PMID:1598910

  5. Allelic association of the D2 dopamine receptor gene with receptor-binding characteristics in alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, E.P.; Blum, K.; Ritchie, T.; Montgomery, A.; Sheridan, P.J. )

    1991-07-01

    The allelic