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Sample records for european conference madrid

  1. European Conference on Health Economics.

    PubMed

    Malmivaara, Antti

    2010-12-01

    The biennial European Conference on Health Economics was held in Finland this year, at the Finlandia Hall in the centre of Helsinki. The European conferences rotate among European countries and fall between the biennial world congresses organized by the International Health Economics Association (iHEA). A record attendance of approximately 800 delegates from 50 countries around the world were present at the Helsinki conference. The theme of the conference was 'Connecting Health and Economics'. All major topics of health economics were covered in the sessions. For the first time, social care economics was included in the agenda of the European Conference as a session of its own. PMID:21155696

  2. Madrid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This ASTER image was acquired on July 5, 2000 and covers an area of 25 by 24 km over Madrid, Spain. A historic capital city, Madrid is renowned for its unique charm and its exhilarating cultural life. In the 10th century, a Moorish fortress called Magerit was first built on the site, a plateau 656 meters (2,150 feet) above sea level. Spanish Christians seized the city a century later, although Madrid remained relatively unimportant until 1561. It was then that the Spanish king Philip II chose it as the national capital, largely because of its geographic location in the very heart of the country. Some historic structures from this and later periods still grace the narrow streets of the old section of Madrid, although the Spanish Civil War exacted a heavy toll on the city. The image is located at 40.4 degrees north latitude and 3.7 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  3. Proceedings of the International Conference on Mobile Learning 2014. (10th, Madrid, Spain, February 28-March 2, 2014)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sánchez, Inmaculada Arnedillo, Ed.; Isaías, Pedro, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    These proceedings contain the papers of the 10th International Conference on Mobile Learning 2014, which was organised by the International Association for Development of the Information Society, in Madrid, Spain, February 28-March 2, 2014. The Mobile Learning 2014 International Conference seeks to provide a forum for the presentation and…

  4. Proceedings of the International Conference on Educational Data Mining (EDM) (8th, Madrid, Spain, June 26-29, 2015)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Olga Cristina, Ed.; Boticario, Jesus Gonzalez, Ed.; Romero, Cristobal, Ed.; Pechenizkiy, Mykola, Ed.; Merceron, Agathe, Ed.; Mitros, Piotr, Ed.; Luna, Jose Maria, Ed.; Mihaescu, Cristian, Ed.; Moreno, Pablo, Ed.; Hershkovitz, Arnon, Ed.; Ventura, Sebastian, Ed.; Desmarais, Michel, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    The 8th International Conference on Educational Data Mining (EDM 2015) is held under auspices of the International Educational Data Mining Society at UNED, the National University for Distance Education in Spain. The conference held in Madrid, Spain, July 26-29, 2015, follows the seven previous editions (London 2014, Memphis 2013, Chania 2012,…

  5. PREFACE: 31st European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendy, Richard

    2004-12-01

    This special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion comprises refereed papers contributed by invited speakers at the 31st European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics. The conference was jointly hosted by the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, by the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association and by Imperial College London, where it took place from 28 June to 2 July 2004. The overall agenda for this conference was set by the Board of the Plasma Physics Division of the European Physical Society, chaired by Friedrich Wagner (MPIPP, Garching) and his successor Jo Lister (CRPP, Lausanne). It built on developments in recent years, by further increasing the scientific diversity of the conference programme, whilst maintaining its depth and quality. A correspondingly diverse Programme Committee was set up, whose members are listed below. The final task of the Programme Committee has been the preparation of this special issue. In carrying out this work, as in preparing the scientific programme of the conference, the Programme Committee formed specialist subcommittees representing the different fields of plasma science. The chairmen of these subcommittees, in particular, accepted a very heavy workload on behalf of their respective research communities. It is a great pleasure to take this opportunity to thank: Emilia R Solano (CIEMAT, Madrid), magnetic confinement fusion; Jürgen Meyer-ter-Vehn (MPQ, Garching), laser-plasma interaction and beam plasma physics; and Jean-Luc Dorier (CRPP, Lausanne), dusty plasmas. The relatively few papers in astrophysical and basic plasma physics were co-ordinated by a small subcommittee which I led. Together with Peter Norreys (RAL, Chilton), we five constitute the editorial team for this special issue. The extensive refereeing load, compressed into a short time interval, was borne by the Programme Committee members and by many other experts, to whom this special issue owes much. We are also grateful to the Local Organizing Committee

  6. International Psychological Applications Conference and Trends (InPACT) Book of Proceedings (Madrid, Spain, April 26-28, 2013)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pracana, Clara, Ed.; Silva, Liliana, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    We are delighted to welcome you to the International Psychological Applications Conference and Trends 2013, taking place in Madrid, Spain, from 26 to 28 of April. Our efforts and active engagement can now be rewarded with these three days of exciting new developments about what we are passionate about: Psychology and its connections. We take pride…

  7. Creating Cultures of Peace: Pedagogical Thought and Practice. Selected Papers from the 10th Triennial World Conference (September 10-15, 2001, Madrid, Spain)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benton, Jean E., Ed.; Swami, Piyush, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    The 10th Triennial World Conference of the World Council for Curriculum and Instruction (WCCI) was held September 10-15, 2001 in Madrid, Spain. The theme of the conference was "Cultures of Peace." Thirty-four papers and presentations are divided into nine sections. Part I, Tributes to the Founders of WCCI, includes: (1) Tribute to Alice Miel…

  8. CONFERENCE ANNOUNCEMENT: European Conference on Complex Systems 2009 European Conference on Complex Systems 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-05-01

    The 2009 European Conference on Complex Systems will take place 21-25 September 2009 at the University of Warwick in the UK. Local Organising Committee Markus Kirkilionis (Warwick, Chair), Francois Kepes (Genopole, Programme Chair), Robert MacKay (Warwick), Robin Ball (Warwick), Jeff Johnson (Open University). International Steering Committee Markus Kirkilionis (Warwick; Chair 2008-10), Fatihcan Atay (Leipzig), Jürgen Jost (Leipzig), Scott Kirkpatrick (Jerusalem), David Lane (University of Modena and Reggio Emillia), Andreas Lorincz (Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Denise Pumain (Sorbonne), Felix Reed-Tsochas (Oxford), Eörs Szathmáry (Collegium Budapest, Hungary), Stephan Thurner (Wien), Paul Verschure (Barcelona), Alessandro Vespignani (Indiana, ISI), Riccardo Zecchina (Torino). Main tracks and Organisers Policy, Planning & Infrastructure: Jeff Johnson (Open University, Chair), Arnaud Banos (Strasbourg) Collective Human Behaviour and Society: Felix Reed-Tsochas (Oxford, Chair), Frances Griffiths (Warwick), Edmund Chattoe-Brown (Leicester) Interacting Populations and Environment: TBA Complexity and Computer Science: András Lörincz (Eötvös Loránd University), Paul Verschure (Zürich) From Molecules to Living Systems: Mark Chaplain (Dundee, Chair), Wolfgang Marwan (Magdeburg) Mathematics and Simulation: Holger Kantz (Dresden, Chair), Fatihcan Atay (Leipzig), Matteo Marsili (Trieste). Deadlines Paper submission: 31 March 2009 with decisions 15 May 2009. Paper submission deadline likely to be extended. See http://www.eccs09.info for more information. Meeting registration: early registration July 2009; last assured chance 1 Sept. Further information For contacts and the most up-to-date information visit http://www.eccs09.info.

  9. EERA and Its European Conferences on Educational Research: A Patchwork of Research on European Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keiner, Edwin; Hofbauer, Susann

    2014-01-01

    The process of Europeanisation is closely linked to the process of an emerging European Educational Research Area and an education research identity. The European Conferences on Educational Research (ECER), European Educational Research Association (EERA) and its networks are involved in new directions and strands of educational research in…

  10. European Telecommunications Conference. Strategic Planning for the 1990s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, J. F.

    1990-06-01

    The European Telecommunications Conference Strategic Planning for the 1990s provided information to delegates and their companies on strategic planning for the European market, particularly after the advent of the European Single Market at the end of 1992. The conference objective was to examine the impact of the initiatives of the European Commission (EC) and the changing attitudes to service provision by public and private sector organizations on industry and marketing. Organized by Blenheim Online and Logica, 40 delegates attended this conference, mainly from Europe, but with a few from the U.S. The papers were designed to illuminate such questions as emerging market sectors, impact of U.S telecommunications organizations in Europe, mergers and acquisition, standards, and value-added services.

  11. PREFACE: 6th European Thermal Sciences Conference (Eurotherm 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Daniel; Le Niliot, Christophe

    2012-11-01

    About EUROTHERM The aim of the EUROTHERM Committee (www.eurothermcommittee.eu) is to promote and foster European cooperation in Thermal Sciences and Heat Transfer by gathering together scientists and engineers working in specialized areas. The Committee consists of members representing and appointed by national bodies in the EU countries. The current President of EUROTHERM is Professor Anton van Steenhoven from the University of Eindhoven (The Netherlands). The Committee organizes and coordinates European scientific events such as the EUROTHERM Seminars (about 4 per year) and the European Thermal Sciences Conference (every 4 years). About the conference This sixth in the series of European Thermal Sciences Conferences (www.eurotherm2012.com) took place in France, in the Conference Centre of Poitiers, Futuroscope. We address special thanks to the 225 reviewers, coming from different European countries, who have evaluated these papers. We also thank the scientific committee, consisting of some EUROTHERM Committee members together with other internationally recognized experts. Their role has been to manage the evaluation of abstracts and the papers selection process as co-coordinators for specific topics. This conference is the joint effort of two laboratories: the PPRIME Institute in Poitiers and the IUSTI laboratory in Marseille. It could not be organized without the efficient help of our secretaries and our technician for the IT support. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 180 articles presented at the conference. Professor Daniel PETIT Chairman, PPRIME Poitiers, France Institut P'(UPR CNRS 3346) ENSMA 1 av. Clément Ader - BP40109 86961 Futuroscope-Chasseneuil France daniel.petit@ensma.fr Professor Christophe LE NILIOT Co-chairman, IUSTI Marseille, France Laboratoire IUSTI UMR CNRS 6595 Technopôle de Chateau-Gombert 5, rue Enrico Fermi 13 453 MARSEILLE CEDEX 13 France christophe.leniliot@polytech.univ-mrs.fr

  12. Targeted search for anticancer drugs--CNIO cancer conference. 16-18 March, Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Lacal, Juan-Carlos; Carnero, Amancio

    2003-05-01

    The Spanish National Cancer Center has launched a new series of cancer conferences devoted to timely themes in oncology. These meetings aim to bring together a maximum of 50 participants, including 20 to 25 speakers along with 25 to 30 participants for in-depth discussion of new results and ideas in frontline cancer research. There is no registration fee to attend, but participants must organize their own travel and accommodation expenses; free communications are presented as posters, but a few may be selected for short (15 min) oral presentations. This particular meeting was organized by Amancio Carnero and David H Beach, and was mostly devoted to state of the art methodologies for the identification of new targets for anticancer drug design, although the development of novel drugs was also discussed. PMID:12841206

  13. 1st Central and Eastern European Proteomic Conference and 3rd Czech Proteomic Conference.

    PubMed

    Kovarova, Hana; Gadher, Suresh Jivan; Archakov, Alexander

    2008-02-01

    The 1st Central and Eastern European Proteomic Conference was organized together with the 3rd Czech Proteomic Conference in the TOP Hotel, Prague in the Czech Republic from the 29th to the 31st October, 2007. The aim was to strengthen links with scientists from Central and Eastern Europe including Russia, which until now have been weak or nonexistent, and to highlight the emergence of excellent proteomic studies from various countries, which until now were not visible. PMID:18282121

  14. PREFACE: 7th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS '05)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Harald W.; Sauerzopf, Franz M.

    2006-07-01

    This issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains those contributed papers that were submitted to the Conference Proceedings of the 7th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS '05) on 11 - 15 September 2005. The plenary and invited papers were published in the journal Superconductor Science and Technology 19 2006 (March issue). The scientific aims of EUCAS '05 followed the tradition established at the preceding conferences in Göttingen, Edinburgh, Eindhoven, Sitges (Barcelona), Lyngby (Copenhagen) and finally Sorrento (Napoli). The focus was placed on the interplay between the most recent developments in superconductor research and the positioning of applications of superconductivity in the marketplace. Although initially founded as an exchange forum mainly for European scientists, it has gradually developed into a truly international meeting with significant attendance from the Far East and the United States. The Vienna conference attracted 813 participants in the scientific programme and 90 guests: of the particpants 59% were from Europe, 31% from the Far East, 6% from the United States and Canada and 4% from other nations worldwide. There were 32 plenary and invited lectures highlighting the state-of-the-art in the areas of materials, large-scale and small-scale applications, and 625 papers were contributed (556 of these were posters) demonstrating the broad range of exciting activities in all research areas of our field. A total of 27 companies presented their most recent developments in the field. This volume contains 349 papers, among them 173 on materials (49.6%), 90 on large scale applications (25.8%) and 86 on small scale applications (24.6%). EUCAS '05 generated a feeling of optimism and enthusiasm for this fascinating field of research and for its well established technological potential, especially among the numerous young researchers attending this Conference. We are grateful to all those who participated in the meeting and

  15. Leading European Intergovernmental Research Organisations at FP6 Launch Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    EIROforum at "European Research 2002" (Brussels, November 11-13, 2002) Go to the EIROforum website Last year, seven of Europe's leading intergovernmental research organisations set up a high-level co-ordination and collaboration group, known as EIROforum , cf. ESO PR 12/01. They include CERN (particle physics), EMBL (molecular biology), ESA (space activities), ESO (astronomy and astrophysics), ESRF (synchrotron radiation), ILL (neutron source) and EFDA (fusion). All of them have powerful research infrastructures and laboratories which are used by an extensive network of scientists. Together, they represent European spearheads in some of the most crucial basic and applied research fields. The EIROforum organisations will be highly visible at the upcoming EU-conference on "European Research 2002 - The European Research Area and the Framework Programme" , to be held on November 11-13, 2002, at the "Palais du Heysel" in Brussels (Belgium). This meeting will be attended by more than 8000 scientists and decision-makers from all over Europe and serves to launch the 6th EC Framework Programme (2002 - 2006), which will have an important impact on Europe's R&D landscape during the coming years. A joint 400 sq.m. exhibition , featuring the individual EIROforum organisations, their current programmes and many front-line achievements in their respective areas of activity, will be set up at Stand L in Hall 11 . It includes a central area, with a small cinema, displaying information about their current interactions via EIROforum. The stands will be manned throughout the conference by high-level representatives from the seven organisations. On Tuesday, November 12, 2002, 14:00 hrs, a Press Conference will take place at this exhibition stand, in the presence of the European Commissioner for Research, M. Phillippe Busquin, and most of the Directors General (or equivalent) of the EIROforum organisations. The main themes will be the increasingly intense interaction and co

  16. European Physical Society Conference on High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The European Physical Society Conference on High Energy Physics, organized by the High Energy and Particle Physics Division of the European Physical Society, is a major international conference that reviews biennially since 1971 the state of our knowledge of the fundamental constituents of matter and their interactions. The latest conferences in this series were held in Stockholm, Grenoble, Krakow, Manchester, Lisbon, and Aachen. Jointly organized by the Institute of High Energy Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the University of Vienna, the Vienna University of Technology, and the Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the 23rd edition of this conference took place in Vienna, Austria. Among the topics covered were Accelerators, Astroparticle Physics, Cosmology and Gravitation, Detector R&D and Data Handling, Education and Outreach, Flavour Physics and Fundamental Symmetries, Heavy Ion Physics, Higgs and New Physics, Neutrino Physics, Non-Perturbative Field Theory and String Theory, QCD and Hadronic Physics, as well as Top and Electroweak Physics.

  17. PREFACE: 8th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS'07)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoste, Serge; Ausloos, Marcel

    2008-03-01

    This issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains contributed papers presented at the 8th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS'07) that was held in Brussels, Belgium from 16-20 September 2007. The plenary and invited papers were published in the journal Superconductor Science and Technology. The scientific aims of EUCAS'07 followed the tradition established at the preceding conferences in Göttingen (Germany), Edinburgh (United Kingdom), Eindhoven (The Netherlands), Sitges (Spain), Lyngby (Denmark), Sorrento (Italy) and Vienna (Austria). The focus was placed on the interplay between the most recent developments in superconductor research and the positioning of applications of superconductivity in the marketplace. Although initially founded as an exchange forum mainly for European scientists, it has gradually developed into a truly international meeting with a very significant attendance from the Far East and the United States. Under the guidance of ESAS (the European Society for Applied Superconductivity) this Brussels conference was jointly organized by the University of Ghent and the University of Liege and attracted 795 participants to the scientific programme including a healthy number of 173 students. Participants from 46 countries included a considerable 30% attendance from the Far East and 7% from the United States and Canada. Thirty companies presented their latest developments in the field; 13 plenary and 28 invited lectures highlighted the state-of-the-art in the areas of materials, large-scale as well as small-scale applications were given. Based on a refereed evaluation of all the papers and posters submitted, 347 papers were selected for publication in the IOP electronic journal Journal of Physics: Conference Series and in Superconductor Science and Technology. EUCAS'07 spread a lot of optimism and enthusiasm for this fascinating field of research and for its well established technological potential, especially among the

  18. PREFACE: 11th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinon, Stefania; Pallecchi, Ilaria; Malagoli, Andrea; Lamura, Gianrico

    2014-05-01

    During the 11th edition of the European Conference on Applied Superconductivity, successfully held in Genoa from 15-19 September 2013, more than one thousand participants from over 40 countries were registered and contributions of 7 plenary lectures, 23 invited talks, 203 oral talks and 550 posters were presented. The present issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS) collects the 218 submitted papers that were peer reviewed and accepted in the Conference Proceedings. Similarly to the Superconductor Science and Technology Special issue: ''EUCAS 11th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity'' which contains some plenary and invited contributions, as well as some selected contributions, in this issue the papers are sorted according to the four traditional topics of interest of EUCAS, namely Materials (56 papers), Wires and Tapes (47 papers), Large Scale Applications (64 papers) and Electronics (51 papers). While the it Superconductors Science and Technology special issue focuses on the scientific and technological highlights of the conference, this collection provides an overall view of the worldwide research activity on applied superconductivity, mirroring the main guidelines and the hottest issues, which range from basic studies on newly discovered superconducting compounds to the state-of-the-art advances in large scale applications, wires and tapes fabrication and electronics. We would like to point out that, among the JPCS contributions, six papers present works financed by ongoing EU-Japan projects, three papers belong to the session on junctions and SQUIDs dedicated to the memory of Antonio Barone and one paper belongs to the session on pinning and flux dynamics dedicated to the memory of John Clem. Finally, we would like to thank all the people whose careful work contributed to the preparation of this JPCS issue, in particular the session chairs as well as the peer reviewers. The Editors Stefania Farinon (Editor in Chief, Large Scale

  19. EDITORIAL 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, Tito; Hidalgo, Carlos

    2010-12-01

    participants, and finally basic and astrophysical plasmas (BAP). New strategies are required to achieve a more balanced participation of these four areas of knowledge in future meetings, but the large number of participants and the overall high quality of the invited talks were particularly relevant this year. In the preparation of the Conference Programme we tried to present an updated view of plasma physics and to integrate suggestions coming from the scientific community, in particular through the use of the EPS PPD Open Forum. As mentioned, two evening sessions took place during the Conference. This year, the traditional evening on ITER was replaced by a session dedicated to inertial fusion, organized by D Batani, where the main installations and experiments on laser fusion around the world were presented and critically discussed. The other session, dedicated to plasma physics education, was organized by N Lopes-Cardoso, and discussed the specific educational issues of plasma physics and fusion, and presented the training programmes existing in Europe. As a concluding remark, we would like to thank our colleagues of the Programme Committee and, in particular, the coordinators of the subcommittees, Clarisse Bourdelle and Arthur Peters for MCF, Javier Honrubia for BPIF, Christoph Hollenstein for LTP, and Uli Stroth for BAP, for their generous help, suggestions and support. Due to the large number of participants, the smooth and efficient local organization, and the high overall quality of the plenary and invited presentations, the 37th EPS Conference on Plasma Physics can be considered an undeniable success. I hope you will find, in this special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion, an interesting and useful account of this event. Outstanding scientists honoured at the 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics During the Conference the EPS Plasma Physics Division rewarded researchers who have achieved outstanding scientific or technological results

  20. Conference Proceedings: 2nd European Conference of Rehabilitation International; Disability in the Family. (Brighton, England, September 18-21, 1978)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royal Association for Disability and Rehabilitation, London (England).

    The conference proceedings of the 2nd European Conference of Rehabilitation International (1978) on the theme disability in the family contains the agenda and approximately 80 papers. National presentations consider the theme in papers by representatives of Finland, Hungary, Belgium, The Netherlands, Portugal, Hong Kong, India, The German…

  1. Breaking the ground for the European research area - The conference "European research 2002"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, C.

    2002-12-01

    In the days November 11-13, about 9000 scientists, science administrators and policy makers gathered in Brussels to attend the Launch Conference for the ‘6th Framework Programme of the European Community for research, technological development and demonstration activities' - or for short, ‘FP-6'. While most participants came from the member states of the European Union, candidate countries and associated states, the meeting was in fact attended by people from 65 countries, demonstrating the wide scope and the importance of the process set in motion to create the European Research Area. Some 50 TV teams and 230 journalists from the print media covered the event, which El País, the leading Spanish newspaper, described as ‘The Science Summit in Brussels'. The strong media interest bears witness to the fact that science and technology (and with them, also education) are playing an increasingly important and visible role in the public sphere and that the organization and execution of research, as well as the exploitation of scientific results, are assuming importance in the mainstream political debate.

  2. A Multimedia Approach for Education and Training: The Case of EC Remote Areas. Conference Reader, European Multimedia Conference and Exhibition (Athens, Greece, September 26-27, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SATURN, Europe's Open Learning Network, Amsterdam (Netherlands).

    The European Multimedia Conference and Exhibition (EMCE) was triggered by the need to stimulate debate and advance awareness of multimedia, open education, distance education, and training on a European scale. Common concerns in the European Community (EC) were expressed. The following are conference sessions, topics, and presenters: (1) opening…

  3. EDITORIAL 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, Tito; Hidalgo, Carlos

    2010-12-01

    participants, and finally basic and astrophysical plasmas (BAP). New strategies are required to achieve a more balanced participation of these four areas of knowledge in future meetings, but the large number of participants and the overall high quality of the invited talks were particularly relevant this year. In the preparation of the Conference Programme we tried to present an updated view of plasma physics and to integrate suggestions coming from the scientific community, in particular through the use of the EPS PPD Open Forum. As mentioned, two evening sessions took place during the Conference. This year, the traditional evening on ITER was replaced by a session dedicated to inertial fusion, organized by D Batani, where the main installations and experiments on laser fusion around the world were presented and critically discussed. The other session, dedicated to plasma physics education, was organized by N Lopes-Cardoso, and discussed the specific educational issues of plasma physics and fusion, and presented the training programmes existing in Europe. As a concluding remark, we would like to thank our colleagues of the Programme Committee and, in particular, the coordinators of the subcommittees, Clarisse Bourdelle and Arthur Peters for MCF, Javier Honrubia for BPIF, Christoph Hollenstein for LTP, and Uli Stroth for BAP, for their generous help, suggestions and support. Due to the large number of participants, the smooth and efficient local organization, and the high overall quality of the plenary and invited presentations, the 37th EPS Conference on Plasma Physics can be considered an undeniable success. I hope you will find, in this special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion, an interesting and useful account of this event. Outstanding scientists honoured at the 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics During the Conference the EPS Plasma Physics Division rewarded researchers who have achieved outstanding scientific or technological results

  4. Contributions from the European and Third World GASAT Conference, (Jonkoping, Sweden, May, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonkoping Univ. (Sweden).

    This volume contains the 30 formal papers that were accepted for the European and Third World Gender and Science and Technology (GASAT) Conference. The theme of the conference was "Science and Technology, A Future for All?" The papers are presented in two parts and organized into four frames. Part one contains papers, reporting empirical research…

  5. EDITORIAL: 18th European Conference on Dynamics of Molecular Systems 18th European Conference on Dynamics of Molecular Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varandas, A. J. C.

    2011-08-01

    This special section of Comments on Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (CAMOP) in Physica Scripta collects some of the papers that have been presented at the 18th European Conference on Dynamics of Molecular Systems MOLEC 2010 held in September 2010 in Curia, Portugal, as part of a series of biennial MOLEC conferences. This started in 1976 in Trento, Italy, and has continued, visiting 17 cities in 11 countries, namely Denmark, The Netherlands, Israel, France, Italy, Germany, Czech Republic, Spain, United Kingdom, Turkey and Russia. Following the MOLEC tradition, the scientific programme of the Curia meeting focused on experimental and theoretical studies of molecular interactions, collision dynamics, spectroscopy, and related fields. It included invited speakers from 22 countries, who were asked to summarize the problems reported in their presentations with the objective of revealing the current thinking of leading researchers in atomic, molecular and optical physics. It is hoped that their authoritative contributions presented in this CAMOP special section will also appeal to non-specialists through their clear and broad introductions to the field as well as references to the accessible literature. This CAMOP special section comprises ten contributions, which cover theoretical studies on the electronic structure of molecules and clusters as well as dynamics of elastic, inelastic and reactive encounters between atoms, molecules, ions, clusters and surfaces. Specifically, it includes electronic structure calculations using the traditional coupled-cluster method (Barreto et al 028111), the electron-attached equation-of-motion coupled cluster method (Hansen et al 028110), the diffusion Monte Carlo method (López-Durán et al 028107) and the path-integral Monte Carlo method (Barragán et al 028109). The contributions on molecular dynamics include on-the-fly quasi-classical trajectories on a five-atom molecule (Yu 028104), quantum reaction dynamics on triatomics

  6. Changing Configurations of Adult Education in Transitional Times. Conference Proceedings of the Triennial European Research Conference of the European Society for Research on the Education of Adults (ESREA) (7th, Berlin, Germany, September 4-7, 2013)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Käpplinger, Bernd, Ed.; Lichte, Nina, Ed.; Haberzeth, Erik, Ed.; Kulmus, Claudia, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    This book assembles over 50 papers from the 7th Triennial European Research Conference of the European Society for Research on the Education of Adults (ESREA), which was held from the 4th to the 7th of September 2013 at Humboldt-University in Berlin. The title of the conference was "Changing Configurations of Adult Education in Transitional…

  7. European Dimension on Education and Training for an Aging Society. Conference Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Joanna

    1990-01-01

    A European conference sponsored by the Association for Educational Gerontology examined such issues as the right of older persons to education and training, the value of training older workers, motivations for educating older people (empowerment versus personal fulfillment), and the objectives and merit of preretirement education. (SK)

  8. Reading, Writing, Thinking: Proceedings of the 13th European Conference on Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandis, Meeli, Ed.; Ward, Angela, Ed.; Mathews, Samuel R., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This collection of papers presented at the 13th European Conference on Reading brings together a vast range of knowledge, research, and perspectives about literacy and its complex processes. The book explores topics including: (1) Literacy and critical thinking; (2) Working with learners at all levels, from young children to adolescents to…

  9. PREFACE: The 23rd EGAS Conference of the European Group for Atomic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łęgowski, S.

    1992-01-01

    The 23rd conference of the European Group for Atomic Physics took place in Toruń, Poland and was hosted by the Nicholas Copernicus University, from July 9-12th, 1991. Originally the conference was planned to be held in Vilnius, Lithuania but at the end of February the Board of EGAS decided to transfer the Conference to Poland. So the town Toruń where the famous astronomer Nicholas Copernicus was born became the host for the 23rd EGAS Conference. About 168 physicists from 16 countries all over the world met to discuss problems of pure and applied atomic and molecular spectroscopy and related topics. Ten of the invited lectures have been prepared for publication by the authors and are presented in this issue of Physica Scripta.

  10. Highlights from the Ninth European Breast Cancer Conference, Glasgow, 19–21 March 2014

    PubMed Central

    Munzone, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    The Ninth European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC-9), one of the largest breast cancer conferences in the world, was held in Glasgow in March 2014, and brought together the voices of doctors, researchers, nurses, and patients. All the major breast cancer advocacy groups and institutions were united in one forum (Europa Donna, the EORTC Breast Cancer group, and EUSOMA). The Scientific Programme for EBCC-9 highlighted a holistic picture of breast cancer, including research, prevention, treatment, advocacy, and care. Participants were able to discover the most up-to-date developments and findings within the field for implementation into daily practice. Improvements in treatment, as well as enhanced access to care, underlie the sustained decreases in breast cancer mortality seen in 30 European countries from 1989 to 2010. PMID:24834121

  11. 1st Joint European Conference on Therapeutic Targets and Medicinal Chemistry (TTMC 2015)

    PubMed Central

    Le Borgne, Marc; Haidar, Samer; Duval, Olivier; Wünsch, Bernhard; Jose, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The European Conference on Therapeutic Targets and Medicinal Chemistry is a new two-day meeting on drug discovery that is focused on therapeutic targets and the use of tools to explore all fields of drug discovery and drug design such as molecular modelling, bioorganic chemistry, NMR studies, fragment screening, in vitro assays, in vivo assays, structure activity relationships, autodisplay. Abstracts of keynote lectures, plenary lectures, junior lectures, flash presentations, and posters presented during the meeting are collected in this report. PMID:26712767

  12. 1st Joint European Conference on Therapeutic Targets and Medicinal Chemistry (TTMC 2015).

    PubMed

    Le Borgne, Marc; Haidar, Samer; Duval, Olivier; Wünsch, Bernhard; Jose, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The European Conference on Therapeutic Targets and Medicinal Chemistry is a new two-day meeting on drug discovery that is focused on therapeutic targets and the use of tools to explore all fields of drug discovery and drug design such as molecular modelling, bioorganic chemistry, NMR studies, fragment screening, in vitro assays, in vivo assays, structure activity relationships, autodisplay. Abstracts of keynote lectures, plenary lectures, junior lectures, flash presentations, and posters presented during the meeting are collected in this report. PMID:26712767

  13. Activities of the European Conference of Posts and Telecommunications (CEPT) special Group on Mobile Communications (GSM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, P.

    1986-09-01

    The group on mobile communications (GSM) of the European Conference of Posts and Telecommunications is in charge of specifying a harmonized mobile radio communication system adapted to the needs and to the technological environment of the coming decades. The means at the disposal of GSM, the objectives of the system, (basic requirements), the program, and time schedule are presented. The strength of GSM and the dangers which it must avoid are pointed out.

  14. Realizing the European Higher Education Area: Preamble to Communique of the Conference of Ministers Responsible for Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    On 19 June 1999, one year after the Sorbonne Declaration, ministers responsible for higher education from 29 European countries signed the Bologna Declaration. They agreed on important joint objectives for development of a coherent and cohesive European Higher Education Area by 2010. In the first follow-up conference, held in Prague on 19 May…

  15. PREFACE: 1st European Conference on Gas Micro Flows (GasMems 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frijns, Arjan; Valougeorgis, Dimitris; Colin, Stéphane; Baldas, Lucien

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the 1st European Conference on Gas Micro Flows is to advance research in Europe and worldwide in the field of gas micro flows as well as to improve global fundamental knowledge and to enable technological applications. Gas flows in microsystems are of great importance and touch almost every industrial field (e.g. fluidic microactuators for active control of aerodynamic flows, vacuum generators for extracting biological samples, mass flow and temperature micro-sensors, pressure gauges, micro heat-exchangers for the cooling of electronic components or for chemical applications, and micro gas analyzers or separators). The main characteristic of gas microflows is their rarefaction, which for device design often requires modelling and simulation both by continuous and molecular approaches. In such flows various non-equilibrium transport phenomena appear, while the role played by the interaction between the gas and the solid device surfaces becomes essential. The proposed models of boundary conditions often need an empirical adjustment strongly dependent on the micro manufacturing technique. The 1st European Conference on Gas Micro Flows is organized under the umbrella of the recently established GASMEMS network (www.gasmems.eu/) consisting of 13 participants and six associate members. The main objectives of the network are to structure research and train researchers in the fields of micro gas dynamics, measurement techniques for gaseous flows in micro experimental setups, microstructure design and micro manufacturing with applications in lab and industry. The conference takes place on June 6-8 2012, at the Skiathos Palace Hotel, on the beautiful island of Skiathos, Greece. The conference has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme FP7/2007-2013 under grant agreement ITN GASMEMS no. 215504. It owes its success to many people. We would like to acknowledge the support of all members of the Scientific Committee and of all

  16. PREFACE: 13th General Conference of the Condensed Matter Division of the European Physical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, H.; Klein, R.; Schwoerer, M.

    1993-01-01

    The 13th General Conference of the Condensed Matter Division of the European Physical Society was held in conjunction with the Frühjahrstagung des Arbeitskreises Festkörperphysik der Deutschen Physikalischen Gesellschaft from March 29 till April 2, 1993, in Regensburg. The programme comprised 3,134 contributions : 8 Plenary Talks, 171 Invited Talks, 1,480 Contributed Talks, 1,441 Poster Presentations, 1 Public Evening Talk and 33 Exhibitors Reports. The abstracts have been published as Europhysics Conference Abstracts, Volume 17A/Verhandlungen der Deutschen Physikalischen Gesellschaft 5/1993. The table (see PDF file) shows the distribution of the Plenary and Invited Speakers as well as of the participants according to countries within and outside of Europe. The conference was the largest meeting of physicists held in Germany to date. It was a manifestation of the enormous scientific activity in both basic and applied research in the fields of Condensed Matter Physics in Europe. Most of the research work, which was presented at the conference, was done by young physicists. They represent a large human capital in Europe. Most of the senior physicists and many of our young colleagues maintain scientific cooperations, and also personal friendships, which are and which have been almost independent of national barriers over the past three decades. The latter is to a large extent due to the European Physical Society which always cultivated these contacts, especially between the eastern and western parts of Europe. We would like to express our sincere thanks to the members of the Programme Committee. By their intensive work, which was free from national interests, a scientific programme was prepared, which covered the entire field of Condensed Matter Physics. About 70% of the Plenary and Invited Speakers came from 20 different foreign countries and about 30% from Germany. The meeting therefore has been a truly European Conference. For the young physicists, the number of

  17. Vocational Guidance and Counselling for Young People and Adults in the European Community. Findings of a Conference (Berlin, West Germany, December 7-8, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Vries, Heinz J., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This document reports on a conference centered around three topics: vocational guidance in the Member States of the European Community (EC), the "Europeanization" of vocational guidance, and approaches to cross-frontier vocational guidance. Among the recommendations of the conference participants are the following: the tasks of vocational guidance…

  18. The Second Conference of Ministers of Education of European Member States (Bucharest, 1973). International Bureau of Education Reference Service 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Bureau of Education, Geneva (Switzerland).

    A catalog of the computer-stored data and the SIRE microfiche series relating to the Second Conference of Ministers of Education of European Member States, held in Bucharest in 1973, is presented. Twenty-eight reports on the theme "Higher Education in Europe" are included in the catalog. The broad topics of correspondence courses, educational…

  19. Migrants' Education. Standing Conference of European Ministers of Education, Eleventh Session (The Haugue, June 10-13, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menendez-Pidal y Oliver, Juan A.

    The Standing Conference of European Ministers of Education prompted this report by their need to know about the impact of 1975 and 1977 official actions on various aspects of migrant education in their member countries. Answers to questionnaires sent to member countries and organizations in May 1978 are synthesized according to: (1) use of Council…

  20. Presented Papers of the European Division Mathematics & Science Conference (1st, Heidelberg, West Germany, February 28-March 2, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland Univ., College Park. Univ. Coll.

    This document contains the papers presented at a conference designed to provide a forum to discuss the European Division mathematics and science program and to allow an opportunity for professional development. Papers on approaches to teaching specific topics in the Maryland mathematics and science curriculum, as well as on other aspects of…

  1. 75 FR 67970 - Notice of Inquiry; An Analysis of the European Union Repeal of the Liner Conference Block Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... Notice of Inquiry; An Analysis of the European Union Repeal of the Liner Conference Block Exemption... Commission in its identification, analysis and evaluation of any consequences of the E.U.'s policy decision on U.S. trades, and will be incorporated into the Commission's research for An Analysis of the...

  2. Highlights from the Tenth European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC10), Amsterdam, 9–11 March 2016

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Joana; Cardoso, Maria João

    2016-01-01

    The Tenth European Breast Cancer Conference, EBCC 10, was held in Amsterdam in March 2016 with a total of 3061 participants from 95 different countries spread over five continents. The EBCC council is a joint venture of ESO, EORTC Breast Cancer Group, EUSOMA, and Europa Donna. The Scientific Programme for EBCC-10 tried to bring to the stage all the active participants in the diagnostic and treatment of breast cancer along with patients themselves. The need to achieve ‘patient’s access to high quality treatment’ through breast units that have been accredited through a European certification process was the basis of the EBCC 10 manifesto. The congress scientific programme allowed participants to review the most up-to-date knowledge in the breast cancer field presented by experts having in mind its application to every day practice. The purpose of this summary is to describe to the readers the results of the late-breaking and best abstracts presented at EBCC10. PMID:27350789

  3. PREFACE: International Conference on Optics of Excitons in Confined Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viña, Luis; Tejedor, Carlos; Calleja, José M.

    2010-01-01

    ), France (41), Spain (33), UK (24), Switzerland (21), Italy (14), The Netherlands (12), USA (11), other (23). The conference was made possible by generous sponsors, whom we thank earnestly: Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spanish Ministry of 'Educación y Ciencia', Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, European Union (ITN- 235114), Europhysics Letters, Semiconductor Science and Technology, Consolider Research Project 'Quantum Optical Information Technology', Lasing S A, Newport, Innova Scientific, Foundation Madrid-2016 and European Physical Society. We would like to acknowledge the members of the Organizing and Program Committees, who are responsible for the success of the Conference (names are listed below). Finally, the authors are thanked for the quality of their contributions. Luis Viña Carlos Tejedor José M Calleja EDITORS Organizing Committee Luis Viña-Chair, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid María D Martín-Scientific Secretary, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid José M Calleja, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid Luisa González, Instituto de Microelectrónica de Madrid Herko van der Meulen, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid Enrique Calleja, Instituto de Sistemas Optoelectrónicos y Microtecnología Madrid Daniele Sanvitto, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid Program Committee Carlos Tejedor-Chair, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid Israel Bar-Joseph, Weizmann Institute of Science Jeremy J Baumberg, Cambridge University Manfred Bayer, Universität Dortmund Jacqueline Bloch, Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures - CNRS Wolfgang Langbein, Cardiff University Marek Potemski, Grenoble High Magnetic Field Laboratory Antonio Quattropani, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne Salvatore Savasta, Università di Messina Vincenzo Savona, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne David Snoke, University of Pittsburgh Jerome Tignon, Ecole Normale Superieure Paris

  4. Selected papers from the 11th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdeghini, Carlo; Putti, Marina

    2014-04-01

    The 11th edition of the European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS) was held in Genoa (15-19 September 2013) and registered the participation of more than one thousand attendants from over 40 countries. During the conference seven plenary lectures, 23 invited, and 203 oral contributions and 550 posters have been presented, all focused on recent developments in the field of superconductivity applications. This issue of Superconductor Science Technology is a collection of some of the plenary and invited contributions. Moreover, the winners of the EUCAS prizes (the electronics prize dedicated to the memory of Antonio Barone), and the most significant oral contributions selected by the 125 chairs involved in the organization, have been invited to submit their papers. The remaining papers presented at the conference will be published in the Journal Physics Conference Series, edited by S Farinon, G Lamura, A Malagoli and I Pallecchi. The papers have been organized into the four traditional topics of interest of EUCAS, namely materials, wires and tapes, large scale applications, and electronics. The plenary lectures on these four topics have been collected: Potential of iron-based superconductors for practical materials in the future (J Shimoyama), Coated conductors for power applications: materials challenges (J Obradors), Challenges and status of ITER conductor production (A Devred), and the Impact of superconducting devices in imaging in neuroscience (G L Romani). We hope that this issue will let you taste the flavours, hear the sounds and see the colours of this exciting EUCAS edition. The very large participation in EUCAS 2013 has allowed debates on a wide range of topics, starting from the most basic studies on emergent materials up to the new developments in electronics and large scale applications. A round table on HTS Conductors was experimented for the first time gathering material scientists, wire manufacturers and device builders in a stimulating

  5. PREFACE: 23rd European Cosmic Ray Symposium (and 32nd Russian Cosmic Ray Conference)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlykin, A. D.; Kokoulin, R. P.; Lidvansky, A. S.; Meroshnichenko, L. I.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Panov, A. D.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    2013-02-01

    The 23rd European Cosmic Ray Symposium (ECRS) took place in Moscow at the Lomonosov Moscow State University (3-7 July 2012), and was excellently organized by the Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Lomonosov Moscow State University, with the help of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the Council on the Complex Problem of Cosmic Rays of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The first symposia were held in 1968 in Lodz, Poland (high energy, extensive air showers and astrophysical aspects) and in Bern (solar and heliospheric phenomena) and the two 'strands' joined together in 1976 with the meeting in Leeds. Since then the symposia, which have been very successful, have covered all the major topics with some emphasis on European collaborations and on meeting the demands of young scientists. Initially, a driving force was the need to overcome the divisions caused by the 'Cold War' but the symposia continued even when that threat ceased and they have shown no sign of having outlived their usefulness. 2012 has been an important year in the history of cosmic ray studies, in that it marked the centenary of the discovery of enigmatic particles in the perilous balloon ascents of Victor Hess. A number of conferences have taken place in Western Europe during the year, but this one took place in Moscow as a tribute to the successful efforts of many former USSR and other Eastern European scientists in discovering the secrets of the subject, often under very difficult conditions. The symposium covers a wide range of scientific issues divided into the following topics: PCR-IPrimary cosmic rays I (E < 1015 eV) PCR-IIPrimary cosmic rays II (E > 1015 eV) MNCosmic ray muons and neutrinos GAGeV and TeV gamma astronomy SHEnergetic particles in the heliosphere (solar and anomalous CRs and GCR modulation) GEOCosmic rays and geophysics (energetic particles in the atmosphere and magnetosphere of the Earth) On a personal note, as I step down as co-founder and chairman of the

  6. EDITORIAL: The 20th European Sectional Conference on Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases The 20th European Sectional Conference on Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Zoran Lj; Marić, Dragana; Malović, Gordana

    2011-03-01

    This special issue consists of papers that are associated with invited lectures, workshop papers and hot topic papers presented at the 20th European Sectional Conference on Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases (ESCAMPIG XX). This conference was organized in Novi Sad (Serbia) from 13 to 17 July 2010 by the Institute of Physics of the University of Belgrade. It is important to note that this is not a conference 'proceedings'. Following the initial selection process by the International Scientific Committee, all papers were submitted to the journal by the authors and have been fully peer reviewed to the standard required for publication in Plasma Sources Science and Technology (PSST). The papers are based on presentations given at the conference but are intended to be specialized technical papers covering all or part of the topic presented by the author during the meeting. The ESCAMPIG conference is a regular biennial Europhysics Conference of the European Physical Society focusing on collisional and radiative aspects of atomic and molecular physics in partially ionized gases as well as on plasma-surface interaction. The conference focuses on low-temperature plasma sciences in general and includes the following topics: Atomic and molecular processes in plasmas Transport phenomena, particle velocity distribution function Physical basis of plasma chemistry Plasma surface interaction (boundary layers, sheath, surface processes) Plasma diagnostics Plasma and discharges theory and simulation Self-organization in plasmas, dusty plasmas Upper atmospheric plasmas and space plasmas Low-pressure plasma sources High-pressure plasma sources Plasmas and gas flows Laser-produced plasmas During ESCAMPIG XX special sessions were dedicated to workshops on: Atomic and molecular collision data for plasma modeling, organized by Professors Z Lj Petrovic and N Mason Plasmas in medicine, organized by Dr N Puac and Professor G Fridman. The conference topics were represented in the

  7. PREFACE: Eucas '09: The 9th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (Dresden, Germany, 13-17 September 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Ludwig; Holzapfel, Bernhard

    2010-04-01

    During the 9th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity 6 plenary, 22 invited, 206 oral and 429 poster contributions were presented on recent developments in the field of applied superconductivity. This issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains all contributed papers that were accepted for the Conference Proceedings. The Dresden EUCAS conference with 712 participants from 43 countries continued the tradition of preceding EUCAS conferences of combining basic superconductivity research contributions with the discussion of recent material advances and new developments in large scale and electronic applications. In Dresden, contributions on the recently discovered Fe based superconductors were presented for the first time during a EUCAS conference and their potential for applications was intensively discussed. Finally we want to acknowledge the help of the International Advisory and National Committees in setting up the scientific program and especially we would like to express our gratitude to all members of the Local Organization Committee. Their enthusiastic and well organized work made this Dresden EUCAS conference a memorable event for all participants. Last but not least we are very grateful to W. Goldacker , S. Haindl, J. Hänisch, R. Hühne, M. Noe, P. Seidel and M. Siegel for their extraordinary help during the proceedings review process. Bernhard Holzapfel Ludwig Schultz Conference Chairmen The IW-SMI 2010 Organizing Committee: Masato Okada (University of Tokyo) Yoshiyuki Kabashima, General Chair (Tokyo Institute of Technology) Shin Ishii (Kyoto University) Jun-ichi Inoue, Publications Chair (Hokkaido University) Kazuyuki Tanaka (Tohoku University) Toshiyuki Tanaka, Vice-General Chair (Kyoto University)

  8. PREFACE: EUCAS '05: The 7th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (Vienna University of Technology, Austria, 11 15 September 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, Gordon; Weber, Harald W.; Sauerzopf, Franz M.

    2006-03-01

    This issue of Superconductor Science and Technology contains the plenary and invited papers presented at the 7th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS '05) that was held at the Vienna University of Technology from 11-15 September 2005. All those contributed papers that were submitted to the Conference Proceedings will be published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The scientific aims of EUCAS '05 followed the tradition established at the preceding conferences in Göttingen, Edinburgh, Eindhoven, Sitges (Barcelona), Lyngby (Copenhagen) and finally Sorrento (Napoli). The focus was placed on the interplay between the most recent developments in superconductor research and the positioning of applications of superconductivity in the marketplace. Although initially founded as an exchange forum mainly for European scientists, it has gradually developed into a truly international meeting with significant attendance from the Far East and the United States. The Vienna conference attracted 813 participants in the scientific programme and 90 accompanying persons. 59% of all participants came from Europe, 31% from the Far East, 6% from the United States and Canada as well as 4% from other nations worldwide. 27 companies presented their latest developments in the field. 32 plenary and invited lectures highlighted the state-of-the-art in the areas of materials, large-scale as well as small-scale applications; 625 contributed papers (among them 556 posters) demonstrated the broad range of exciting activities in all research areas of our field. EUCAS '05 spread a lot of optimism and enthusiasm for this fascinating field of research and for its well established technological potential, especially among the numerous young researchers attending this conference. We are grateful to all those who participated in the meeting and contributed to its success.

  9. Guidelines for the practical stability studies of anticancer drugs: a European consensus conference.

    PubMed

    Bardin, C; Astier, A; Vulto, A; Sewell, G; Vigneron, J; Trittler, R; Daouphars, M; Paul, M; Trojniak, M; Pinguet, F

    2011-07-01

    Stability studies performed by the pharmaceutical industry are only designed to fulfill licensing requirements. Thus, post-dilution or -reconstitution stability data are frequently limited to 24h only for bacteriological reasons regardless of the true chemical stability which could, in many cases, be longer. In practice, the pharmacy-based centralized preparation may require infusions to be made several days in advance to provide, for example, the filling of ambulatory devices for continuous infusions or batch preparations for dose banding. Furthermore, a non-justified limited stability for expensive products is obviously very costly. Thus, there is a compelling need for additional stability data covering practical uses of anticancer drugs. A European conference consensus was held in France, May 2010, under the auspices of the French Society of Oncology Pharmacy (SFPO) to propose adapted rules on stability in practical situations and guidelines to perform corresponding stability studies. For each anticancer drug, considering their therapeutic index, the pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) variability, specific clinical use and risks related to degradation products, the classical limit of 10% of degradation can be inappropriate. Therefore, acceptance limits must be clinically relevant and should be defined for each drug individually. Design of stability studies has to reflect the different needs of the clinical practice (preparation for the week-ends, outpatient transportations, implantable devices, dose banding…). It is essential to use validated stability-indicating methods, separating degradation products being formed in the practical use of the drug. Sequential temperature designs should be encouraged to replicate problems seen in daily practice such as rupture of the cold-chain or temperature-cycling between refrigerated storage and ambient in-use conditions. Stressed conditions are recommended to evaluate not only the role of classical variables (p

  10. PREFACE: EUCAS '09: The 9th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (Dresden, Germany, 13-17 September 2009) EUCAS '09: The 9th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (Dresden, Germany, 13-17 September 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzapfel, Bernhard; Schultz, Ludwig; Schlörb, Heike

    2010-03-01

    During the 9th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity, 6 plenary, 22 invited, 206 oral and 429 poster contributions were presented on recent developments in the field of applied superconductivity. This issue of Superconductor Science and Technology contains plenary, invited and a selection of contributed oral papers of the four main EUCAS areas: materials, wires and tapes, large scale applications and electronics. The remaining contributed papers that were selected for the conference proceedings will be published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The Dresden EUCAS conference, with 712 participants from 43 countries, continued the tradition of preceding EUCAS conferences of combining basic superconductivity research contributions with the discussion of recent material advances and new developments in large scale and electronic applications. In Dresden, contributions on the recently discovered Fe-based superconductors were presented for the first time during a EUCAS conference and their potential for applications was intensively discussed. Among all the high level papers of this issue we particularly want to highlight the plenary contribution of Praveen Chaudhari on grain boundaries in cuprate superconductors. In his paper Praveen discusses the Jc limitation in HTSC tapes and tunnelling spectroscopy in LSCO thin film bicrystals. Just a few weeks ago we received the sad news that Praveen had passed away on 13 January 2010. Already fighting with his serious illness, Praveen spent all his efforts last fall finishing his plenary talk and paper. This paper will remind us always of his contributions to basic and applied aspects of superconductivity in general and especially his important work on HTSC grain boundaries. Finally we want to acknowledge the help of the International Advisory and National Committees in setting up the scientific program and we would especially like to express our gratitude to all the members of the Local Organization

  11. From precision medicine to cancer care through the immunome: highlights from the European Society of Medical Oncology Congress, Madrid, 26–30th September 2014

    PubMed Central

    Curigliano, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The recognition that cancer is a ‘spectrum’ of diseases, and that medical oncologists should achieve ‘convergence’ from ‘divergence’ to treat cancer patients was the main theme of the 2014 European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) Congress. The meeting assembled 19,859 participants from nearly 134 countries worldwide. The educational content was centered on precision medicine in cancer care, from mutational burden to the immunome, through the epigenome and the proteome. Precision medicine has been defined as the tailoring of medical treatment to the characteristics of an individual patient. Knowing an individual’s genomics has created a remarkable and unprecedented opportunity to improve medical treatment and develop preventative strategies to preserve health. Clinical oncologists across the range of diseases recognise that for precision medicine to take hold, it will require intensive, rigorous validation that these new approaches do indeed improve patient outcomes. Not all molecular alterations are predictive of response to a specific targeted treatment nor are they all druggable, raising issues of cost–benefit, validation of specific biomarkers, and of managing patient expectations. Addressing all these issues will be essential for the medical community to embrace any given opportunities. Along with it, it will also require educational programmes that squarely address the knowledge chasm that currently exists for practicing physicians. The promise of genomic and precision medicine has created greater demands for both those providing the scientific expertise—bioinformatics, statisticians, molecular biologists—and those delivering clinical care—physicians, nurses, psychologists—to the patients. This ESMO 2014 report will highlight the major findings of this outstanding meeting. PMID:25374620

  12. PREFACE: EUCAS '07: The 8th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (Brussels Expo, Belgium, 16 20 September 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoste, Serge; Donaldson, Gordon; Ausloos, Marcel

    2008-03-01

    This issue of Superconductor Science and Technology (SuST) contains plenary and invited papers presented at the 8th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS '07) held in Brussels, Belgium between 16-20 September 2007. All the papers that were submitted to the Conference Proceedings and accepted by the referees are published in Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS). The scientific aims of EUCAS '07 followed the tradition established at the preceding conferences in Göttingen (Germany), Edinburgh (United Kingdom), Eindhoven (The Netherlands), Sitges (Spain), Lyngby (Denmark), Sorrento (Italy) and Vienna (Austria). The focus was on the interplay between the most recent developments in superconductor research and the positioning of applications of superconductivity in the marketplace. Although initially founded as an exchange forum mainly for European scientists, it has gradually developed into a truly international meeting with significant attendance from the Far East and the United States. Under the guidance of ESAS (the European Society for Applied Superconductivity), this Brussels conference was jointly organized by the University of Ghent and the University of Liège and attracted 795 participants to the scientific programme, including 173 students. Participants from 46 countries included considerable attendance from the Far East (30%) and from the United States and Canada (7%). The latest developments from 30 companies were presented, and 13 plenary and 28 invited lectures highlighted the state-of-the-art in the area of materials (large- as well as small-scale applications were presented). A total of 347 papers from those submitted were selected for publication in JPCS and SuST. EUCAS '07 stimulated optimism and enthusiasm for this fascinating field of research and its technological potential, especially among the numerous young researchers attending this conference. In addition, it gave the leading scientific authorities a forum in which

  13. Madrid space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahnestock, R. J.; Renzetti, N. A.

    1975-01-01

    The Madrid space station, operated under bilateral agreements between the governments of the United States and Spain, is described in both Spanish and English. The space station utilizes two tracking and data acquisition networks: the Deep Space Network (DSN) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Spaceflight Tracking and Data Network (STDN) operated under the direction of the Goddard Space Flight Center. The station, which is staffed by Spanish employees, comprises four facilities: Robledo 1, Cebreros, and Fresnedillas-Navalagamella, all with 26-meter-diameter antennas, and Robledo 2, with a 64-meter antenna.

  14. Proteomic landscape in Central and Eastern Europe: the 9th Central and Eastern European Proteomic Conference, Poznań, Poland.

    PubMed

    Gadher, Suresh Jivan; Marczak, Łukasz; Łuczak, Magdalena; Stobiecki, Maciej; Widlak, Piotr; Kovarova, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Every year since 2007, the Central and Eastern European Proteomic Conference (CEEPC) has excelled in representing state-of-the-art proteomics in and around Central and Eastern Europe, and linking it to international institutions worldwide. Its mission remains to contribute to all approaches of proteomics including traditional and often-revisited methodologies as well as the latest technological achievements in clinical, quantitative and structural proteomics with a view to systems biology of a variety of processes. The 9th CEEPC was held from June 15th to 18th, 2015, at the Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences in Poznań, Poland. The scientific program stimulated exchange of proteomic knowledge whilst the spectacular venue of the conference allowed participants to enjoy the cobblestoned historical city of Poznań. PMID:26558656

  15. Pistil-function breakdown in a new S-allele of European pear, S21*, confers self-compatibility.

    PubMed

    Sanzol, Javier

    2009-03-01

    European pear exhibits RNase-based gametophytic self-incompatibility controlled by the polymorphic S-locus. S-allele diversity of cultivars has been extensively investigated; however, no mutant alleles conferring self-compatibility have been reported. In this study, two European pear cultivars, 'Abugo' and 'Ceremeño', were classified as self-compatible after fruit/seed setting and pollen tube growth examination. S-genotyping through S-PCR and sequencing identified a new S-RNase allele in the two cultivars, with identical deduced amino acid sequence as S(21), but differing at the nucleotide level. Test-pollinations and analysis of descendants suggested that the new allele is a self-compatible pistil-mutated variant of S(21), so it was named S(21)*. S-genotypes assigned to 'Abugo' and 'Ceremeño' were S(10)S(21)* and S(21)*S(25) respectively, of which S(25) is a new functional S-allele of European pear. Reciprocal crosses between cultivars bearing S(21) and S(21)* indicated that both alleles exhibit the same pollen function; however, cultivars bearing S(21)* had impaired pistil-S function as they failed to reject either S(21) or S (21)* pollen. RT-PCR analysis showed absence of S(21)* -RNase gene expression in styles of 'Abugo' and 'Ceremeño', suggesting a possible origin for S(21)* pistil dysfunction. Two polymorphisms found within the S-RNase genomic region (a retrotransposon insertion within the intron of S(21)* and indels at the 3'UTR) might explain the different pattern of expression between S(21) and S(21)*. Evaluation of cultivars with unknown S-genotype identified another cultivar 'Azucar Verde' bearing S(21)*, and pollen tube growth examination confirmed self-compatibility for this cultivar as well. This is the first report of a mutated S-allele conferring self-compatibility in European pear. PMID:19096853

  16. Clinical evaluation of cardiovascular devices: principles, problems, and proposals for European regulatory reform. Report of a policy conference of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Alan G; Daubert, Jean-Claude; Van de Werf, Frans; Estes, N A Mark; Smith, Sidney C; Krucoff, Mitchell W; Vardas, Panos E; Komajda, Michel

    2011-07-01

    The European Commission announced in 2008 that a fundamental revision of the medical device directives is being considered in order to clarify and strengthen the current legal framework. The system for testing and approving devices in Europe was established >20 years ago as a 'New Approach' to a previously little-regulated industry. It is recognized by many that the regulatory system has not kept pace with technological advances and changing patterns of medical practice. New legislation will be drafted during 2011, but medical experts have been little involved in this important process. This context makes it an opportune time for a professional association to advise from both clinical and academic perspectives about changes which should be made to improve the safety and efficacy of devices used in clinical practice and to develop more appropriate systems for their clinical evaluation and post-marketing surveillance. This report summarizes how medical devices are regulated and it reviews some serious clinical problems that have occurred with cardiovascular devices. Finally, it presents the main recommendations from a Policy Conference on the Clinical Evaluation of Cardiovascular Devices that was held at the European Heart House in January 2011. PMID:21572115

  17. Conference of American and European Educators on Teaching and Learning about Each Other: The USA and Western Europe. Conference Report (Washington, DC, November 11-15, 1985). The CDCC's Teacher Bursaries Scheme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Cultural Cooperation, Strasbourg (France).

    Education for international understanding is the theme of this conference report. The introduction (by Maitland Stobart) discusses the first phase of the Council of Europe's work on education for international understanding devoted to improving communication and understanding among Europeans. The second, present phase, includes teaching about…

  18. Trip report: European Communities 1989 International Conference on Decommissioning of Nuclear Installations, Brussels, Belgium, October 24-27, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Rankin, W.N.

    1989-01-01

    The European community is conducting research on the decommissioning of nuclear installations. The prime objective is to develop effective techniques to ensure the protection of man and his environment against the potential hazards of nuclear installations that have been shut down. The results of the 1979--1983 research program were presented in a conference held in Luxembourg. This program was primarily concerned with decommissioning nuclear power plants. The 1984--1988 program was extended to all types of nuclear installations. Fuel fabrication, enrichment and reprocessing plants, and research and development facilities having fulfilled their useful purposes are also awaiting decommissioning. This Program has produced numerous scientific and technical achievements. Great progress has in particular been achieved in the reduction of metal waste arising from decommissioning, due to advances in areas such as the development of aggressive decontamination procedures and of techniques for melting and recycling low-level radioactive waste metal.

  19. European Heritage Landscapes. An Account of the Conference on Planning and Management in European Naturparke/Parcs Naturels/National Parks (U.K.) and Equivalent Category "C" Reserves (Losehill Hall, Castleton, England, September 26-30, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Roland

    Presented are the proceedings of the Conference on Planning and Management in European National Parks and equivalent Category "C" reserves held at the Peak National Park Study Center, Castleton, England, in 1977. Fifty-two representatives from 16 countries focused practical solutions to management and planning problems in national parks. (BT)

  20. Parks and People. A European Conference for Naturparke Parcs Naturels/National Parks (U.K.) and Equivalent Reserves (Losehill Hall, Castleton, England, September 25-29, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youel, Alex J.

    Presented are the proceedings of the European Conference for National Parks and Equivalent Reserves held at the Peak National Park Study Centre, Castleton, England in 1978. Thirty-nine representatives from 10 countries focused on the relationship between the parks and the people connected with them (the local people, the visitors, and the park…

  1. Conference on European Co-operation in the Field of Vocational Guidance for Young People and Adults (Berlin, November 27-28, 1990). Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, A. G.

    1990-01-01

    A conference set the stage for the development of European Community (EC) policy in the field of vocational guidance and possible action. Discussion focused on the need for trans-frontier guidance and the need for communication and cooperation between guidance services to support educational and occupational mobility across the EC as a whole. The…

  2. Maintaining success, reducing treatment burden, focusing on survivorship: highlights from the third European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, J.; Albers, P.; Altena, R.; Aparicio, J.; Bokemeyer, C.; Busch, J.; Cathomas, R.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Clarke, N. W.; Claßen, J.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Dahl, A. A.; Daugaard, G.; De Giorgi, U.; De Santis, M.; De Wit, M.; De Wit, R.; Dieckmann, K. P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S. D.; Germá Lluch, J. R.; Gietema, J. A.; Gillessen, S.; Giwercman, A.; Hartmann, J. T.; Heidenreich, A.; Hentrich, M.; Honecker, F.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R. A.; Kliesch, S.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Krege, S.; Laguna, M. P.; Looijenga, L. H. J.; Lorch, A.; Lotz, J. P.; Mayer, F.; Necchi, A.; Nicolai, N.; Nuver, J.; Oechsle, K.; Oldenburg, J.; Oosterhuis, J. W.; Powles, T.; Rajpert-De Meyts, E.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Schrader, M.; Schweyer, S.; Sedlmayer, F.; Sohaib, A.; Souchon, R.; Tandstad, T.; Winter, C.; Wittekind, C.

    2013-01-01

    In November 2011, the Third European Consensus Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Germ-Cell Cancer (GCC) was held in Berlin, Germany. This third conference followed similar meetings in 2003 (Essen, Germany) and 2006 (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) [Schmoll H-J, Souchon R, Krege S et al. European consensus on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG). Ann Oncol 2004; 15: 1377–1399; Krege S, Beyer J, Souchon R et al. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part I. Eur Urol 2008; 53: 478–496; Krege S, Beyer J, Souchon R et al. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part II. Eur Urol 2008; 53: 497–513]. A panel of 56 of 60 invited GCC experts from all across Europe discussed all aspects on diagnosis and treatment of GCC, with a particular focus on acute and late toxic effects as well as on survivorship issues. The panel consisted of oncologists, urologic surgeons, radiooncologists, pathologists and basic scientists, who are all actively involved in care of GCC patients. Panelists were chosen based on the publication activity in recent years. Before the meeting, panelists were asked to review the literature published since 2006 in 20 major areas concerning all aspects of diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of GCC patients, and to prepare an updated version of the previous recommendations to be discussed at the conference. In addition, ∼50 E-vote questions were drafted and presented at the conference to address the most controversial areas for a poll of expert opinions. Here, we present the main recommendations and controversies of this meeting. The votes of the panelists are added as online supplements. PMID:23152360

  3. IL2RA and IL7RA genes confer susceptibility for multiple sclerosis in two independent European populations.

    PubMed

    Weber, F; Fontaine, B; Cournu-Rebeix, I; Kroner, A; Knop, M; Lutz, S; Müller-Sarnowski, F; Uhr, M; Bettecken, T; Kohli, M; Ripke, S; Ising, M; Rieckmann, P; Brassat, D; Semana, G; Babron, M-C; Mrejen, S; Gout, C; Lyon-Caen, O; Yaouanq, J; Edan, G; Clanet, M; Holsboer, F; Clerget-Darpoux, F; Müller-Myhsok, B

    2008-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common chronic inflammatory neurologic disorder diagnosed in young adults and, due to its chronic course, is responsible for a substantial economic burden. MS is considered to be a multifactorial disease in which both genetic and environmental factors intervene. The well-established human leukocyte antigen (HLA) association does not completely explain the genetic impact on disease susceptibility. However, identification and validation of non-HLA-genes conferring susceptibility to MS has proven to be difficult probably because of the small individual contribution of each of these genes. Recently, associations with two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IL2RA gene (rs12722489, rs2104286) and one SNP in the IL7RA gene (rs6897932) have been reported by several groups. These three SNPs were genotyped in a French and a German population of MS patients using the hME assay by the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight technology (Sequenom, San Diego, CA, USA). We show that these SNPs do contribute to the risk of MS in these two unrelated European MS patient populations with odds ratios varying from 1.1 to 1.5. The discovery and validation of new genetic risk factors in independent populations may help toward the understanding of MS pathogenesis by providing valuable information on biological pathways to be investigated. PMID:18354419

  4. Personalized management of atrial fibrillation: Proceedings from the fourth Atrial Fibrillation competence NETwork/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference.

    PubMed

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Breithardt, Günter; Aliot, Etienne; Al Khatib, Sana; Apostolakis, Stavros; Auricchio, Angelo; Bailleul, Christophe; Bax, Jeroen; Benninger, Gerlinde; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Boersma, Lucas; Boriani, Giuseppe; Brandes, Axel; Brown, Helen; Brueckmann, Martina; Calkins, Hugh; Casadei, Barbara; Clemens, Andreas; Crijns, Harry; Derwand, Roland; Dobrev, Dobromir; Ezekowitz, Michael; Fetsch, Thomas; Gerth, Andrea; Gillis, Anne; Gulizia, Michele; Hack, Guido; Haegeli, Laurent; Hatem, Stephane; Häusler, Karl Georg; Heidbüchel, Hein; Hernandez-Brichis, Jessica; Jais, Pierre; Kappenberger, Lukas; Kautzner, Joseph; Kim, Steven; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Lane, Deirdre; Leute, Angelika; Lewalter, Thorsten; Meyer, Ralf; Mont, Lluis; Moses, Gregory; Mueller, Markus; Münzel, Felix; Näbauer, Michael; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis; Oeff, Michael; Oto, Ali; Pieske, Burkert; Pisters, Ron; Potpara, Tatjana; Rasmussen, Lars; Ravens, Ursula; Reiffel, James; Richard-Lordereau, Isabelle; Schäfer, Herbert; Schotten, Ulrich; Stegink, Wim; Stein, Kenneth; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Szumowski, Lukasz; Tavazzi, Luigi; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Thomitzek, Karen; Van Gelder, Isabelle C; von Stritzky, Berndt; Vincent, Alphons; Werring, David; Willems, Stephan; Lip, Gregory Y H; Camm, A John

    2013-11-01

    The management of atrial fibrillation (AF) has seen marked changes in past years, with the introduction of new oral anticoagulants, new antiarrhythmic drugs, and the emergence of catheter ablation as a common intervention for rhythm control. Furthermore, new technologies enhance our ability to detect AF. Most clinical management decisions in AF patients can be based on validated parameters that encompass type of presentation, clinical factors, electrocardiogram analysis, and cardiac imaging. Despite these advances, patients with AF are still at increased risk for death, stroke, heart failure, and hospitalizations. During the fourth Atrial Fibrillation competence NETwork/European Heart Rhythm Association (AFNET/EHRA) consensus conference, we identified the following opportunities to personalize management of AF in a better manner with a view to improve outcomes by integrating atrial morphology and damage, brain imaging, information on genetic predisposition, systemic or local inflammation, and markers for cardiac strain. Each of these promising avenues requires validation in the context of existing risk factors in patients. More importantly, a new taxonomy of AF may be needed based on the pathophysiological type of AF to allow personalized management of AF to come to full fruition. Continued translational research efforts are needed to personalize management of this prevalent disease in a better manner. All the efforts are expected to improve the management of patients with AF based on personalized therapy. PMID:23981824

  5. Proceedings of the International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS) International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in Digital Age (CELDA) (Madrid, Spain, October 19-21, 2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Association for Development of the Information Society, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The IADIS CELDA 2012 Conference intention was to address the main issues concerned with evolving learning processes and supporting pedagogies and applications in the digital age. There had been advances in both cognitive psychology and computing that have affected the educational arena. The convergence of these two disciplines is increasing at a…

  6. European Conference 'Training, Employment and Integration of Disabled Persons' (Berlin, West Germany, June 19-20, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, Berlin (West Germany).

    This report summarizes contributions, discussions, results, and proposals from a conference focusing on the social and economic integration of the disabled. Introductory materials include the conference objectives and summaries of the opening, words of greeting, and introduction to conference objectives by Ernst Piehl, Henry Scicluna, and Tina…

  7. European Space Power Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Flood, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    Recent, rapid advances in a variety of solar cell technologies offer the potential for significantly enhancing, or enabling entirely new, mission capabilities. Thin film solar cells are of particular interest in that regard. A review is provided of the status of those thin film cell technologies of interest for space applications, and the issues to be resolved before mission planners can consider them. A short summary is also given of recent developments in concentrator and multijunction space solar cell and array technology.

  8. Lifelong Learning and Its Impact on Social and Regional Development. Contributions to the European Conference on Lifelong Learning (1st, Bremen, Germany, October 3-5, 1996). Collected Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alheit, Peter, Ed.; Kammler, Eva, Ed.

    This book contains 56 papers from a European conference. Representative papers include the following: "Adult Education, European Citizenship and the Role of the Regions" (Sussmuth); "Can Lifelong Learning Prevent the Breakdown of Society?" (Young); "Two Challenges to a Modern Concept of Lifelong Learning" (Alheit); "Widening Access to Higher…

  9. Eastern European Studies in the Secondary School Curriculum: Report of the Proceedings of a Conference (8th, University of Sussex, England, April 10, 1974). Curriculum Development Series No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Francis, Ed.

    Three components of a conference are reviewed to explore how teaching and learning about Eastern Europe might contribute to European Studies in British secondary schools. A series of lectures provided information about contemporary East European societies and broke down preconceptions of Eastern Europe as a monolithic block. Workshop sessions…

  10. News Conference: Physics brings the community together Training: CERN trains physics teachers Education: World conference fosters physics collaborations Lecture: Physics education live at ASE Prize: Physics teacher wins first Moore medal Festival: European presidents patronize Science on Stage festival Videoconference: Videoconference brings Durban closer to the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-03-01

    Conference: Physics brings the community together Training: CERN trains physics teachers Education: World conference fosters physics collaborations Lecture: Physics education live at ASE Prize: Physics teacher wins first Moore medal Festival: European presidents patronize Science on Stage festival Videoconference: Videoconference brings Durban closer to the classroom

  11. Highlights from the Student Council Symposium 2011 at the International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology and European Conference on Computational Biology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Student Council (SC) of the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) organized their annual symposium in conjunction with the Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology (ISMB) conference. This meeting report summarizes the scientific content of the Student Council Symposium 2011 as well as other activities organized by the Student Council in the context of ISMB. The symposium was held in Vienna, Austria on July 15th 2011.

  12. Comparison of road traffic emission models in Madrid (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borge, Rafael; de Miguel, Isabel; de la Paz, David; Lumbreras, Julio; Pérez, Javier; Rodríguez, Encarnación

    2012-12-01

    Many cities in Europe have difficulties to meet the air quality standards set by the European legislation, most particularly the annual mean Limit Value for NO2. Road transport is often the main source of air pollution in urban areas and therefore, there is an increasing need to estimate current and future traffic emissions as accurately as possible. As a consequence, a number of specific emission models and emission factors databases have been developed recently. They present important methodological differences and may result in largely diverging emission figures and thus may lead to alternative policy recommendations. This study compares two approaches to estimate road traffic emissions in Madrid (Spain): the COmputer Programme to calculate Emissions from Road Transport (COPERT4 v.8.1) and the Handbook Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA v.3.1), representative of the 'average-speed' and 'traffic situation' model types respectively. The input information (e.g. fleet composition, vehicle kilometres travelled, traffic intensity, road type, etc.) was provided by the traffic model developed by the Madrid City Council along with observations from field campaigns. Hourly emissions were computed for nearly 15 000 road segments distributed in 9 management areas covering the Madrid city and surroundings. Total annual NOX emissions predicted by HBEFA were a 21% higher than those of COPERT. The discrepancies for NO2 were lower (13%) since resulting average NO2/NOX ratios are lower for HBEFA. The larger differences are related to diesel vehicle emissions under "stop & go" traffic conditions, very common in distributor/secondary roads of the Madrid metropolitan area.In order to understand the representativeness of these results, the resulting emissions were integrated in an urban scale inventory used to drive mesoscale air quality simulations with the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modelling system (1 km2 resolution). Modelled NO2 concentrations were compared

  13. The Role of the Two Sides of Industry in Initial and Continuing Training. Documentation of the Conference Organized by the European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training (CEDEFOP) in Collaboration with the Commission of the European Communities and the Economic and Social Committee of the EC (Brussels, Belgium, November 8-9, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, Berlin (West Germany).

    This document reports the proceedings of a conference held in Brussels to take stock (on the basis of the studies conducted by the European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training and the analyses carried out in this field in all the European Community member states) of the work undertaken in the last few years and to present…

  14. Recasting Madrid and Its Characters in Munoz Molina's "Los misterios de Madrid"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Sheri Spaine

    2009-01-01

    "Los misterios de Madrid" (1992) provides a burlesque novelistic portrayal of the changing capital city and its inhabitants in the early 1990s. Spanish writer Antonio Munoz Molina creates vignettes of Madrid's people and places while showing the capital as a destination for both foreign-born immigrants and provincial Spaniards alike. In…

  15. Proceedings of the European Conference on Research in Rehabilitation (Second, Duesseldorf, West Germany, November 18-19, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Helga, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    These conference proceedings deal with an interdisciplinary approach to reducing handicapping conditions and ensuring integration of and equal participation by people with disabilities in all aspects of community life. Papers from plenary sessions cover such topics as psychological and social aspects of rehabilitation, research methodology in…

  16. Management of HSV, VZV and EBV infections in patients with hematological malignancies and after SCT: guidelines from the Second European Conference on Infections in Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Styczynski, J; Reusser, P; Einsele, H; de la Camara, R; Cordonnier, C; Ward, K N; Ljungman, P; Engelhard, D

    2009-05-01

    These guidelines on the management of HSV, VZV and EBV infection in patients with hematological malignancies and after SCT were prepared by the European Conference on Infections in Leukemia following a predefined methodology. A PubMed search was conducted using the appropriate key words to identify studies pertinent to management of HSV, VZV and EBV infections. References of relevant articles and abstracts from recent hematology and SCT scientific meetings were also reviewed. Prospective and retrospective studies identified from the data sources were evaluated, and all data deemed relevant were included in this analysis. The clinical and scientific background was described and discussed, and the quality of evidence and level of recommendation were graded according to the Centers for Disease Control criteria. PMID:19043458

  17. Fourth European Conference on Infections in Leukaemia (ECIL-4): Guidelines for Diagnosis and Treatment of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Parainfluenza Virus, Metapneumovirus, Rhinovirus, and Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Hans H.; Martino, Rodrigo; Ward, Katherine N.; Boeckh, Michael; Einsele, Hermann; Ljungman, Per

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired respiratory virus (CARV) infections have been recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with leukemia and those undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Progression to lower respiratory tract infection with clinical and radiological signs of pneumonia and respiratory failure appears to depend on the intrinsic virulence of the specific CARV as well as factors specific to the patient, the underlying disease, and its treatment. To better define the current state of knowledge of CARVs in leukemia and HSCT patients, and to improve CARV diagnosis and management, a working group of the Fourth European Conference on Infections in Leukaemia (ECIL-4) 2011 reviewed the literature on CARVs, graded the available quality of evidence, and made recommendations according to the Infectious Diseases Society of America grading system. Owing to differences in screening, clinical presentation, and therapy for influenza and adenovirus, ECIL-4 recommendations are summarized for CARVs other than influenza and adenovirus. PMID:23024295

  18. A roadmap to improve the quality of atrial fibrillation management: proceedings from the fifth Atrial Fibrillation Network/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference.

    PubMed

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Breithardt, Günter; Bax, Jeroen; Benninger, Gerlinde; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Boriani, Giuseppe; Brandes, Axel; Brown, Helen; Brueckmann, Martina; Calkins, Hugh; Calvert, Melanie; Christoffels, Vincent; Crijns, Harry; Dobrev, Dobromir; Ellinor, Patrick; Fabritz, Larissa; Fetsch, Thomas; Freedman, S Ben; Gerth, Andrea; Goette, Andreas; Guasch, Eduard; Hack, Guido; Haegeli, Laurent; Hatem, Stephane; Haeusler, Karl Georg; Heidbüchel, Hein; Heinrich-Nols, Jutta; Hidden-Lucet, Francoise; Hindricks, Gerd; Juul-Möller, Steen; Kääb, Stefan; Kappenberger, Lukas; Kespohl, Stefanie; Kotecha, Dipak; Lane, Deirdre A; Leute, Angelika; Lewalter, Thorsten; Meyer, Ralf; Mont, Lluis; Münzel, Felix; Nabauer, Michael; Nielsen, Jens C; Oeff, Michael; Oldgren, Jonas; Oto, Ali; Piccini, Jonathan P; Pilmeyer, Art; Potpara, Tatjana; Ravens, Ursula; Reinecke, Holger; Rostock, Thomas; Rustige, Joerg; Savelieva, Irene; Schnabel, Renate; Schotten, Ulrich; Schwichtenberg, Lars; Sinner, Moritz F; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Stoll, Monika; Tavazzi, Luigi; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Tse, Hung Fat; Van Gelder, Isabelle C; Vardas, Panagiotis E; Varpula, Timo; Vincent, Alphons; Werring, David; Willems, Stephan; Ziegler, André; Lip, Gregory Y H; Camm, A John

    2016-01-01

    At least 30 million people worldwide carry a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AF), and many more suffer from undiagnosed, subclinical, or 'silent' AF. Atrial fibrillation-related cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, including cardiovascular deaths, heart failure, stroke, and hospitalizations, remain unacceptably high, even when evidence-based therapies such as anticoagulation and rate control are used. Furthermore, it is still necessary to define how best to prevent AF, largely due to a lack of clinical measures that would allow identification of treatable causes of AF in any given patient. Hence, there are important unmet clinical and research needs in the evaluation and management of AF patients. The ensuing needs and opportunities for improving the quality of AF care were discussed during the fifth Atrial Fibrillation Network/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference in Nice, France, on 22 and 23 January 2015. Here, we report the outcome of this conference, with a focus on (i) learning from our 'neighbours' to improve AF care, (ii) patient-centred approaches to AF management, (iii) structured care of AF patients, (iv) improving the quality of AF treatment, and (v) personalization of AF management. This report ends with a list of priorities for research in AF patients. PMID:26481149

  19. Work, Disability and Rehabilitation. Papers on Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment of People with Disabilities presented at the European Conference on Research in Rehabilitation (1st, Edinburgh, Scotland, April 6-8, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornes, Paul, Ed.; Hunter, John, Ed.

    Fifteen author-contributed papers are presented from the 1983 First European Conference on Research in Rehabilitation. The following titles and authors are represented: "Disability in a Large Public Sector Work Force" (D. Walker); "The Accidents and Absence of Disabled People at Work" (M. Kettle); "Employment Rehabilitation of Production Workers…

  20. Conference Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-11-01

    Scientific Committee Silvia Arrese-Igor Irigoyen (CFM, CSIC - UPV/EHU, Donostia), Javier Campo (ICMA-CSIC, Zaragoza), Carlos Frontera (ICMAB-CSIC, Barcelona), Victoria García Sakai (ISIS, Chilton), Cristina Gómez-Polo (UPNa, Pamplona), Miguel Ángel González (ILL, Grenoble), Pedro Gorría (Universidad Oviedo), Jon Gutiérrez Echevarría (EHU/UPV, Bilbao), J. Iñaki Pérez Landazábal (UPNa, Pamplona), Vicente Recarte (UPNa, Pamplona), Jesús Ruíz Hervías (UPM, Madrid), Vicente Sánchez-Alarcos (UPNa, Pamplona), Antonio Urbina (UPC, Cartagena) Organizing Committee J. Iñaki Pérez Landazábal (Co-Chair), Vicente Recarte ( Co-Chair), Cristina Gómez-Polo, Silvia Larumbe Abuin, Vicente Sánchez-Alarcos Editors of the Proceedings J. Iñaki Pérez Landazábal, Vicente Recarte Plenary speakers Charles Simon (Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France), Miguel Angel Alario Franco (Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain), Dieter Richter (Jülich Centre for Neutron Science, Jülich, Germany), James Yeck (European Spallation Source, Lund, Sweden) Invited speakers Manu Barandiarán (BCMaterials & EHU/UPV), Arantxa Arbe (MFC, CSIC- UPV/EHU), José Luis Martínez (Consorcio ESS-Bilbao), Marta Castellote, IETcc-CSIC), Josep Lluis Tamarit (UPC), Diego Alba-Venero (ISIS), Elizabeth Castillo (CIC Energigune), Josu M. Igartua (EHU/UPV), Antonio Dos Santos (UPM), Alex Masalles (Museu Nacional d'Art de Catalunya), José Abad (UPCT), Claudia Mondelli (ILL), Oscar Fabelo (ILL), Aurora Nogales (IEM-CSIC), Jesús Rodríguez (UC), Gerardo

  1. Executive summary and conclusions from the European Hydration Institute Expert Conference on human hydration, health, and performance.

    PubMed

    Benton, D; Braun, H; Cobo, J C; Edmonds, C; Elmadfa, I; El-Sharkawy, A; Feehally, J; Gellert, R; Holdsworth, J; Kapsokefalou, M; Kenney, W L; Leiper, J B; Macdonald, I A; Maffeis, C; Maughan, R J; Shirreffs, S M; Toth-Heyn, P; Watson, P

    2015-09-01

    On April 7-8, 2014, the European Hydration Institute hosted a small group of experts at Castle Combe Manor House, United Kingdom, to discuss a range of issues related to human hydration, health, and performance. The meeting included 18 recognized experts who brought a wealth of experience and knowledge to the topics under review. Eight selected topics were addressed, with the key issues being briefly presented before an in-depth discussion. Presented here is the executive summary and conclusions from this meeting. PMID:26290300

  2. New Madrid Seismotectonic Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Buschbach, T.C.

    1986-06-01

    The New Madrid Seismotectonic Program was a large-scale multidisciplinary effort that was designed to define the structural setting and tectonic history of the New Madrid area in order to realistically evaluate earthquake risks in the siting of nuclear facilities. The tectonic model proposed to explain the New Madrid seismicity is the ''zone of weakness'' model, which suggests that an ancient rift complex formed a zone of weakness in the earth's crust along which regional stresses are relieved. The Reelfoot Rift portion of the proposed rift complex is currently seismically active, and it must be considered capable and likely to be exposed to large-magnitude earthquakes in the future. Earthquakes that occur in the Wabash Valley area are less abundant and generally have deeper hypocenters than earthquakes in the New Madrid area. The area of the Southern Indiana Arm must be considered to have seismic risk, although a lesser extent than the Reelfoot Rift. The east-west trending Rough Creek Graben is practically aseismic, probably in large part due to its orientation in the current stress field. The northwest-trending St. Louis Arm of the proposed rift complex includes a pattern of seismicity that extends from southern Illinois along the Mississippi River. This arm must be considered to have seismic risk, but because of the lack of development of a graben associated with the arm and the orientation of the arm in the current stress field, the risk appears to be less than in the Reelfoot Rift portion of the rift complex.

  3. Policy and Practice in Madrid Multilingual Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastor, Ana Maria Relano

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on Spain's most recent implementing of education policies designed to address the needs of immigrant students. It overviews how the latest education policies do not meet the needs of a diverse body of students, drawing on information provided in focus group interviews from several Madrid schools, as well as from other official…

  4. EDITORIAL: Instrumentation and Methods for Neutron Scattering—papers from the 4th European Conference on Neutron Scattering in Lund, Sweden, June 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennie, Adrian R.

    2008-03-01

    Neutron scattering is used as a tool to study problems in disciplines that include chemistry, materials science, biology and condensed matter physics as well as problems from neighbouring disciplines such as geology, environmental sciences and archaeology. Equipment for these studies is found at laboratories with research reactors or spallation neutron sources and there are many recent or current developments with new instruments and even entirely new facilities such as the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge, USA, the OPAL reactor at Lucas Heights, Australia and the second target station at the ISIS facility in the UK. Design and optimization of the instruments at these facilities involves work with many research laboratories and groups in universities. Every four years the European Conference on Neutron Scattering (ECNS) brings together both the specialists in neutron instrumentation and the community of users (in intervening years there are International and American conferences). In June 2007 about 700 delegates came to the 4th ECNS that was held in Lund, Sweden. There were more than 600 presentations as talks and posters. The opportunity to publish papers in Measurement Science and Technology that relate to neutron scattering instrumentation and method development was offered to the participants, and the papers that follow describe some of the recent activity in this field. Accounts of work on condensed matter science and the applications of neutron scattering appear separately in Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. There are, of course, many features of neutron instrumentation that are specific to this particular field of measurement. However, there are also many elements of apparatus and experiment design that can usefully be shared with a broader community. It is hoped that this issue with papers from ECNS will find a broad community of interest. Apart from descriptions of overall design of diffractometers and spectrometers there are accounts of new

  5. 20 cool facts about the New Madrid Seismic Zone-Commemorating the bicentennial of the New Madrid earthquake sequence, December 1811-February 1812 [poster

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.A.; McCallister, N.S.; Dart, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    This poster summarizes a few of the more significant facts about the series of large earthquakes that struck the New Madrid seismic zone of southeastern Missouri, northeastern Arkansas, and adjacent parts of Tennessee and Kentucky from December 1811 to February 1812. Three earthquakes in this sequence had a magnitude (M) of 7.0 or greater. The first earthquake occurred on December 16, 1811, at 2:15 a.m.; the second on January 23, 1812, at 9 a.m.; and the third on February 7, 1812, at 3:45 a.m. These three earthquakes were among the largest to strike North America since European settlement. The mainshocks were followed by many hundreds of aftershocks that occurred over the next decade. Many of the aftershocks were major earthquakes themselves. The area that was strongly shaken by the three main shocks was 2-3 times as large as the strongly shaken area of the 1964 M9.2 Alaskan earthquake and 10 times as large as that of the 1906 M7.8 San Francisco earthquake. Geologic studies show that the 1811-1812 sequence was not an isolated event in the New Madrid region. The 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquake sequence was preceded by at least two other similar sequences in about A.D. 1450 and A.D. 900. Research also indicates that other large earthquakes have occurred in the region surrounding the main New Madrid seismicity trends in the past 5,000 years or so.

  6. Slow-release carbohydrates: growing evidence on metabolic responses and public health interest. Summary of the symposium held at the 12th European Nutrition Conference (FENS 2015)

    PubMed Central

    Vinoy, Sophie; Laville, Martine; Feskens, Edith J M

    2016-01-01

    To draw attention to the necessity of considering differences in the digestibility of carbohydrates, and more specifically of starch, a symposium was held at the 12th European Nutrition Conference (FENS), which took place in Berlin from October 20 to 23, 2015. The purpose of this session was to present the consolidated knowledge and recent advances regarding the relationship between slow-release carbohydrates, metabolic responses, and public health issues. Three main topics were presented: 1) the definition of, sources of, and recognised interest in the glycaemic response to slowly digestible starch (SDS); 2) clinical evidence regarding the physiological effects of slow-release carbohydrates from cereal foods; and 3) interest in reducing the postprandial glycaemic response to help prevent metabolic diseases. Foods with the highest SDS content induce the lowest glycaemic responses, as the starch is protected from gelatinisation during processing. In humans, high-SDS food consumption induces slower glucose release, lower postprandial insulinaemia, and stimulation of gut hormones. Moreover, postprandial hyperglycaemia is an independent risk factor for type two diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore, given the plausible aetiologic mechanisms, we argue that postprandial glucose levels are relevant for health and disease and represent a meaningful target for intervention, for example, through dietary factors. This symposium was organised by Mondelez International R&D. PMID:27388153

  7. Second St. Gallen European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Gastrointestinal Cancer Conference: consensus recommendations on controversial issues in the primary treatment of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Manfred P; Zalcberg, John R; Glynne-Jones, Rob; Ruers, Theo; Ducreux, Michel; Arnold, Dirk; Aust, Daniela; Brown, Gina; Bujko, Krzysztof; Cunningham, Christopher; Evrard, Serge; Folprecht, Gunnar; Gerard, Jean-Pierre; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Haustermans, Karin; Holm, Torbjörn; Kuhlmann, Koert F; Lordick, Florian; Mentha, Gilles; Moehler, Markus; Nagtegaal, Iris D; Pigazzi, Alessio; Puciarelli, Salvatore; Roth, Arnaud; Rutten, Harm; Schmoll, Hans-Joachim; Sorbye, Halfdan; Van Cutsem, Eric; Weitz, Jürgen; Otto, Florian

    2016-08-01

    Primary treatment of rectal cancer was the focus of the second St. Gallen European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Gastrointestinal Cancer Conference. In the context of the conference, a multidisciplinary international expert panel discussed and voted on controversial issues which could not be easily answered using published evidence. Main topics included optimal pretherapeutic imaging, indication and type of neoadjuvant treatment, and the treatment strategies in advanced tumours. Here we report the key recommendations and summarise the related evidence. The treatment strategy for localised rectal cancer varies from local excision in early tumours to neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy (RCT) in combination with extended surgery in locally advanced disease. Optimal pretherapeutic staging is a key to any treatment decision. The panel recommended magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or MRI + endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) as mandatory staging modalities, except for early T1 cancers with an option for local excision, where EUS in addition to MRI was considered to be most important because of its superior near-field resolution. Primary surgery with total mesorectal excision was recommended by most panellists for some early tumours with limited risk of recurrence (i.e. cT1-2 or cT3a N0 with clear mesorectal fascia on MRI and clearly above the levator muscles), whereas all other stages were considered for multimodal treatment. The consensus panel recommended long-course RCT over short-course radiotherapy for most clinical situations where neoadjuvant treatment is indicated, with the exception of T3a/b N0 tumours where short-course radiotherapy or even no neoadjuvant therapy were regarded to be an option. In patients with potentially resectable tumours and synchronous liver metastases, most panel members did not see an indication to start with classical fluoropyrimidine-based RCT but rather favoured preoperative short-course radiotherapy with systemic

  8. Diagnosis and treatment of mucormycosis in patients with hematological malignancies: guidelines from the 3rd European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL 3)

    PubMed Central

    Skiada, Anna; Lanternier, Fanny; Groll, Andreas H.; Pagano, Livio; Zimmerli, Stephan; Herbrecht, Raoul; Lortholary, Olivier; Petrikkos, George L.

    2013-01-01

    Mucormycosis is an emerging cause of infectious morbidity and mortality in patients with hematologic malignancies. However, there are no recommendations to guide diagnosis and management. The European Conference on Infections in Leukemia assigned experts in hematology and infectious diseases to develop evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of mucormycosis. The guidelines were developed using the evidence criteria set forth by the American Infectious Diseases Society and the key recommendations are summarized here. In the absence of validated biomarkers, the diagnosis of mucormycosis relies on histology and/or detection of the organism by culture from involved sites with identification of the isolate at the species level (no grading). Antifungal chemotherapy, control of the underlying predisposing condition, and surgery are the cornerstones of management (level A II). Options for first-line chemotherapy of mucormycosis include liposomal amphotericin B and amphotericin B lipid complex (level B II). Posaconazole and combination therapy of liposomal amphotericin B or amphotericin B lipid complex with caspofungin are the options for second line-treatment (level B II). Surgery is recommended for rhinocerebral and skin and soft tissue disease (level A II). Reversal of underlying risk factors (diabetes control, reversal of neutropenia, discontinuation/taper of glucocorticosteroids, reduction of immunosuppressants, discontinuation of deferroxamine) is important in the treatment of mucormycosis (level A II). The duration of antifungal chemotherapy is not defined but guided by the resolution of all associated symptoms and findings (no grading). Maintenance therapy/secondary prophylaxis must be considered in persistently immunocompromised patients (no grading). PMID:22983580

  9. Growian 2 for more wind power and first European solar farm inaugurated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A wind power installation with a power of five megawatts to be used in the Federal Republic of Germany is described. The first European solar farm was inaugurated in Madrid, and its operation is discussed.

  10. Assessment for English Language Education on the Programs at the Agricultural Engineering School of Madrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Sinobas, Leonor; San José Martínez, Fernando; Hontoria, Kira; Adán, Angeles; Blanco, María; Calderón, Fernando; Carbonell, Victoria; Chaya, Carolina; Fondevila, Guillermo; González, Trinidad; Marín, Carmen; Mira, Sara; Molina, Antonio; Pereira, David; Quemada, Miguel; Ricote, Luis; Sánchez Monje, Rosa; Sanz, Alberto; Albir, Maria

    2014-05-01

    The convergence process among European academic degrees pursues the exchange of graduate students and the adaptation of university programs to social demand. Within the framework of the European Higher Education, European universities will need to be more competitive not only by increasing or maintaining the student enrolment, but also in their academic performance. Thus, the reinforcing of English language education within the University Programs might play an important role to reach these objectives. In this sense, a complete survey was accomplished at the Agricultural Egineering School of Madrid (ETSIA ) addressing issues such as: identification the needs for bilingual instruction at ETSIA, identification resources needed and interest and background in English language of students and professors (San José et al., 2013). The conclusions and recommendations to promote the bilingual instruction in the ETSIA, taking into account the approaches followed by other Spanish universities, are presented in this work.

  11. Future Priorities of the Humanities in Europe. What Have the Humanities to Offer?: Report of a Round Table Conference Held to Draft a Manifesto for the European Commissioner and Working Papers for the EC Working Party on Future Priorities for Humanities Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Humanities-based speakers and delegates to the European Commission conference on "Social Sciences and Humanities in Europe: New Challenges, New Opportunities" gathered at the end of the meeting to develop a proactive Humanities special interest group. The result was a round-table conference organized by the Humanities Higher Education Research…

  12. New Madrid seismic zone recurrence intervals

    SciTech Connect

    Schweig, E.S. Center for Earthquake Research and Information, Memphis, TN ); Ellis, M.A. )

    1993-03-01

    Frequency-magnitude relations in the New Madrid seismic zone suggest that great earthquakes should occur every 700--1,200 yrs, implying relatively high strain rates. These estimates are supported by some geological and GPS results. Recurrence intervals of this order should have produced about 50 km of strike-slip offset since Miocene time. No subsurface evidence for such large displacements is known within the seismic zone. Moreover, the irregular fault pattern forming a compressive step that one sees today is not compatible with large displacements. There are at least three possible interpretations of the observations of short recurrence intervals and high strain rates, but apparently youthful fault geometry and lack of major post-Miocene deformation. One is that the seismological and geodetic evidence are misleading. A second possibility is that activity in the region is cyclic. That is, the geological and geodetic observations that suggest relatively short recurrence intervals reflect a time of high, but geologically temporary, pore-fluid pressure. Zoback and Zoback have suggested such a model for intraplate seismicity in general. Alternatively, the New Madrid seismic zone is geologically young feature that has been active for only the last few tens of thousands of years. In support of this, observe an irregular fault geometry associated with a unstable compressive step, a series of en echelon and discontinuous lineaments that may define the position of a youthful linking fault, and the general absence of significant post-Eocene faulting or topography.

  13. The Western European Union Satellite Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasani, Bhupendra; Mara, Simon

    1993-06-01

    In January 1993, the FALCON consortium of 13 European companies, led by Cray Systems, won the contract to supply a turnkey satellite image processing facility to the Western European Union. The project started immediately and will be installed at WEU's Data Center in Torrejon near Madrid in December 1993. This paper discusses the development of an idea for a Regional Satellite Monitioring Agency (RSMA) which will be realized in December 1993 when the Center becomes fully operational.

  14. Reassessing the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, Gail; Bakun, Bill; Bodin, Paul; Boore, David; Camer, Chris; Frankel, Art; Gasperini, Paulo; Gomberg, Joan; Hanks, Tom; Hermann, Bob; Hough, Susan; Johnston, Arch; Kenner, Shelley; Langston, Chuck; Linker, Mark; Mayne, Paul; Petersen, Mark; Powell, Christine; Prescott, Will; Schweig, Eugene; Segall, Paul; Stein, Seth; Stuart, Bill; Tuttle, Martitia; VanArsdale, Roy

    The central enigma of the mid-continent region in the United States known as the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ; Figure 1) involves the mechanisms that give rise to recurrent great earthquakes far from plate boundaries. Given the lack of significant topographic relief that is the hallmark of tectonic activity in most actively deforming regions, most of us feel a need to “pinch ourselves to see if we're dreaming” when confronted with evidence that, at some probability levels, the earthquake hazard throughout the NMSZ is comparable to that estimated for the San Francisco Bay region.Although assessing the hazard in the NMSZ is in many ways more challenging than in the western United States, and the uncertainties are much greater, careful scientific study has led to a consensus on the issues most critical to seismic hazard assessment.

  15. Health effects associated with Madrid air pollution levels.

    PubMed

    Doadrio, A; Monzón, A; Moragues, A; Presas, M J

    1999-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the pollution levels recorded in Madrid and the number of hospital admissions made on the grounds of respiratory disorders. PMID:10535135

  16. Landslides in the New Madrid seismic zone

    SciTech Connect

    Jibson, R.W.; Keefer, D.K.

    1985-01-01

    During the New Madrid earthquakes of 1811-12, bluffs bordering the Mississippi alluvial plain in the epicentral region underwent large-scale landsliding. Between Cairo, Illinois and Memphis, Tennessee, the authors mapped 221 large landslides of three types: (1) old, eroded, coherent block slides and slumps; (2) old earth flows; and (3) young, fresh slumps that occur only along near-river bluffs and are the only landslides present along such bluffs. Historical accounts and field evidence indicate that most or all old coherent slides and earth flows date to the 1811-12 earthquakes and that the only currently active, large-scale landsliding in the area occurs along bluffs bordering the river. Analysis of old coherent slides and earth flows indicates that landslide distribution is most strongly affected by slope height, but that proximity to the hypocenters of the 1811-12 earthquakes also has a significant effect. Slope-stability analyses of an old coherent slide and an earth flow selected as representative of the principal kinds of landslides present indicate that both were stable in aseismic conditions even when water tables were at highest possible levels. However, a dynamic Newmark displacement analysis shows that ground shaking such as that in 1811-12 would cause large displacements leading to catastrophic failure in both slides. These results indicate that in large earthquakes landsliding in much of the study are is likely. Moderate earthquakes may also trigger landslides at some locations.

  17. Climate Projection Data base for Roads - CliPDaR: Design a guideline for a transnational database of downscaled climate projection data for road impact models - within the Conference's of European Directors of Roads (CEDR) TRANSNATIONAL ROAD RESEARCH PROG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matulla, Christoph; Namyslo, Joachim; Fuchs, Tobias; Türk, Konrad

    2013-04-01

    The European road sector is vulnerable to extreme weather phenomena, which can cause large socio-economic losses. Almost every year there occur several weather triggered events (like heavy precipitation, floods, landslides, high winds, snow and ice, heat or cold waves, etc.), that disrupt transportation, knock out power lines, cut off populated regions from the outside and so on. So, in order to avoid imbalances in the supply of vital goods to people as well as to prevent negative impacts on health and life of people travelling by car it is essential to know present and future threats to roads. Climate change might increase future threats to roads. CliPDaR focuses on parts of the European road network and contributes, based on the current body of knowledge, to the establishment of guidelines helping to decide which methods and scenarios to apply for the estimation of future climate change based challenges in the field of road maintenance. Based on regional scale climate change projections specific road-impact models are applied in order to support protection measures. In recent years, it has been recognised that it is essential to assess the uncertainty and reliability of given climate projections by using ensemble approaches and downscaling methods. A huge amount of scientific work has been done to evaluate these approaches with regard to reliability and usefulness for investigations on possible impacts of climate changes. CliPDaR is going to collect the existing approaches and methodologies in European countries, discuss their differences and - in close cooperation with the road owners - develops a common line on future applications of climate projection data to road impact models. As such, the project will focus on reviewing and assessing existing regional climate change projections regarding transnational highway transport needs. The final project report will include recommendations how the findings of CliPDaR may support the decision processes of European

  18. The International Multidisciplinary Consensus Conference on Multimodality Monitoring in Neurocritical Care: a list of recommendations and additional conclusions: a statement for healthcare professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Peter; Menon, David K; Citerio, Giuseppe; Vespa, Paul; Bader, Mary Kay; Brophy, Gretchen; Diringer, Michael N; Stocchetti, Nino; Videtta, Walter; Armonda, Rocco; Badjatia, Neeraj; Bösel, Julian; Chesnut, Randall; Chou, Sherry; Claassen, Jan; Czosnyka, Marek; De Georgia, Michael; Figaji, Anthony; Fugate, Jennifer; Helbok, Raimund; Horowitz, David; Hutchinson, Peter; Kumar, Monisha; McNett, Molly; Miller, Chad; Naidech, Andrew; Oddo, Mauro; Olson, DaiWai; O'Phelan, Kristine; Provencio, J Javier; Puppo, Corinna; Riker, Richard; Roberson, Claudia; Schmidt, Michael; Taccone, Fabio

    2014-12-01

    Careful patient monitoring using a variety of techniques including clinical and laboratory evaluation, bedside physiological monitoring with continuous or non-continuous techniques and imaging is fundamental to the care of patients who require neurocritical care. How best to perform and use bedside monitoring is still being elucidated. To create a basic platform for care and a foundation for further research the Neurocritical Care Society in collaboration with the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, the Society for Critical Care Medicine and the Latin America Brain Injury Consortium organized an international, multidisciplinary consensus conference to develop recommendations about physiologic bedside monitoring. This supplement contains a Consensus Summary Statement with recommendations and individual topic reviews as a background to the recommendations. In this article, we highlight the recommendations and provide additional conclusions as an aid to the reader and to facilitate bedside care. PMID:25501689

  19. Comprehensive risk reduction in patients with atrial fibrillation: emerging diagnostic and therapeutic options--a report from the 3rd Atrial Fibrillation Competence NETwork/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference.

    PubMed

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Lip, Gregory Y H; Van Gelder, Isabelle C; Bax, Jeroen; Hylek, Elaine; Kaab, Stefan; Schotten, Ulrich; Wegscheider, Karl; Boriani, Giuseppe; Brandes, Axel; Ezekowitz, Michael; Diener, Hans; Haegeli, Laurent; Heidbuchel, Hein; Lane, Deirdre; Mont, Luis; Willems, Stephan; Dorian, Paul; Aunes-Jansson, Maria; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Borentain, Maria; Breitenstein, Stefanie; Brueckmann, Martina; Cater, Nilo; Clemens, Andreas; Dobrev, Dobromir; Dubner, Sergio; Edvardsson, Nils G; Friberg, Leif; Goette, Andreas; Gulizia, Michele; Hatala, Robert; Horwood, Jenny; Szumowski, Lukas; Kappenberger, Lukas; Kautzner, Josef; Leute, Angelika; Lobban, Trudie; Meyer, Ralf; Millerhagen, Jay; Morgan, John; Muenzel, Felix; Nabauer, Michael; Baertels, Christoph; Oeff, Michael; Paar, Dieter; Polifka, Juergen; Ravens, Ursula; Rosin, Ludger; Stegink, W; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Vardas, Panos; Vincent, Alphons; Walter, Maureen; Breithardt, Günter; Camm, A John

    2012-01-01

    While management of atrial fibrillation (AF) patients is improved by guideline-conform application of anticoagulant therapy, rate control, rhythm control, and therapy of accompanying heart disease, the morbidity and mortality associated with AF remain unacceptably high. This paper describes the proceedings of the 3rd Atrial Fibrillation NETwork (AFNET)/European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) consensus conference that convened over 60 scientists and representatives from industry to jointly discuss emerging therapeutic and diagnostic improvements to achieve better management of AF patients. The paper covers four chapters: (i) risk factors and risk markers for AF; (ii) pathophysiological classification of AF; (iii) relevance of monitored AF duration for AF-related outcomes; and (iv) perspectives and needs for implementing better antithrombotic therapy. Relevant published literature for each section is covered, and suggestions for the improvement of management in each area are put forward. Combined, the propositions formulate a perspective to implement comprehensive management in AF. PMID:21791573

  20. Comprehensive risk reduction in patients with atrial fibrillation: emerging diagnostic and therapeutic options—a report from the 3rd Atrial Fibrillation Competence NETwork/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference

    PubMed Central

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Bax, Jeroen; Hylek, Elaine; Kaab, Stefan; Schotten, Ulrich; Wegscheider, Karl; Boriani, Giuseppe; Brandes, Axel; Ezekowitz, Michael; Diener, Hans; Haegeli, Laurent; Heidbuchel, Hein; Lane, Deirdre; Mont, Luis; Willems, Stephan; Dorian, Paul; Aunes-Jansson, Maria; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Borentain, Maria; Breitenstein, Stefanie; Brueckmann, Martina; Cater, Nilo; Clemens, Andreas; Dobrev, Dobromir; Dubner, Sergio; Edvardsson, Nils G.; Friberg, Leif; Goette, Andreas; Gulizia, Michele; Hatala, Robert; Horwood, Jenny; Szumowski, Lukas; Kappenberger, Lukas; Kautzner, Josef; Leute, Angelika; Lobban, Trudie; Meyer, Ralf; Millerhagen, Jay; Morgan, John; Muenzel, Felix; Nabauer, Michael; Baertels, Christoph; Oeff, Michael; Paar, Dieter; Polifka, Juergen; Ravens, Ursula; Rosin, Ludger; Stegink, W.; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Vardas, Panos; Vincent, Alphons; Walter, Maureen; Breithardt, Günter; Camm, A. John

    2012-01-01

    While management of atrial fibrillation (AF) patients is improved by guideline-conform application of anticoagulant therapy, rate control, rhythm control, and therapy of accompanying heart disease, the morbidity and mortality associated with AF remain unacceptably high. This paper describes the proceedings of the 3rd Atrial Fibrillation NETwork (AFNET)/European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) consensus conference that convened over 60 scientists and representatives from industry to jointly discuss emerging therapeutic and diagnostic improvements to achieve better management of AF patients. The paper covers four chapters: (i) risk factors and risk markers for AF; (ii) pathophysiological classification of AF; (iii) relevance of monitored AF duration for AF-related outcomes; and (iv) perspectives and needs for implementing better antithrombotic therapy. Relevant published literature for each section is covered, and suggestions for the improvement of management in each area are put forward. Combined, the propositions formulate a perspective to implement comprehensive management in AF. PMID:21791573

  1. Bicentennial of the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquake sequence December 2011-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2010-01-01

    A series of earthquakes hit the New Madrid seismic zone of southeastern Missouri, northeastern Arkansas, and adjacent parts of Tennessee and Kentucky, in December 1811 to February 1812. Three earthquakes had a magnitude of 7.0 or greater. The first earthquake occurred December 16, 1811, at 2:15 a.m.; the second 9 a.m. on January 23, 1812; and the third on February 7, 1812, at 3:45 a.m. These three earthquakes were among the largest to strike North America since European settlement. The main shocks were followed by many hundreds of aftershocks that lasted for decades. Many of the aftershocks were major earthquakes themselves. The area that was strongly shaken by the three main shocks was 2-3 times as large as the strongly shaken area of the 1964 M9.2 Alaskan earthquake, and 10 times as large as that of the 1906 M7.8 San Francisco earthquake.

  2. Space Geodesy and the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalley, Robert; Ellis, Michael A.

    2008-07-01

    One of the most contentious issues related to earthquake hazards in the United States centers on the midcontinent and the origin, magnitudes, and likely recurrence intervals of the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquakes that occurred there. The stakeholder groups in the debate (local and state governments, reinsurance companies, American businesses, and the scientific community) are similar to the stakeholder groups in regions more famous for large earthquakes. However, debate about New Madrid seismic hazard has been fiercer because of the lack of two fundamental components of seismic hazard estimation: an explanatory model for large, midplate earthquakes; and sufficient or sufficiently precise data about the causes, effects, and histories of such earthquakes.

  3. Report from the European Prison Education Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behan, Cormac

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents updates on the recent activities of the European Prison Education Association. The main activity of the Association during the quarter has been the biennial conference, "Challenges for European Prison Education: Let's make the changes together," which was held in Sofia, Bulgaria. The conference was open to prison educators…

  4. Conference report on the 28th annual meeting of the European Musculo-Skeletal Oncology Society, 29 April–1 May 2015, Athens

    PubMed Central

    Leithner, Andreas; Andreou, Dimosthenis; Grimer, Robert; Ferrari, Stefano; Gosheger, Georg; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Bielack, Stefan S

    2015-01-01

    The 28th Annual Meeting of the European Musculo-Skeletal Oncology Society was organised in Athens by the local host Professor Papagelopoulos and his team. The main objective of the meeting was to focus on recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of bone and soft tissue sarcomas. The interdisciplinary nature of the meeting was of great value—surgeons, oncologists, pathologists, radiologists, and basic researchers discussed new strategies in the war on sarcoma. This report will highlight the major findings of this successful meeting. PMID:26284114

  5. Recurrent intraplate tectonism in the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zoback, M.D.; Hamilton, R.M.; Crone, A.J.; Russ, D.P.; McKeown, F.A.; Brockman, S.R.

    1980-01-01

    For the first time, New Madrid seismicity can be linked to specific structural features that have been reactivated through geologic time. Extensive seismic reflection profiling reveals major faults coincident with the main earthquake trends in the area and with structural deformation apparently caused by repeated episodes of igneous activity. Copyright ?? 1980 AAAS.

  6. Language Education and Institutional Change in a Madrid Multilingual School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pérez-Milans, Miguel; Patiño-Santos, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the institutional transformations of language-in-education programmes in Madrid, linked to wider socio-economic processes of change. Drawing on a research team's ethnographic revisit, we explore how wider processes are impacting everyday discursive practices in the Bridging Class (BC) programme, first implemented in 2003…

  7. ICCK Conference Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Green, William H.

    2013-05-28

    , since those two communities do not meet very often (it had been 6 years since the last time this conference had been held). The conference at MIT was so successful that European scientists decided to organize a similar conference (it will be held in Seville, Spain in July 2013). Almost 200 scientists participated, with more than 100 oral presentations and many poster presentations. A complete list of the presentations and their abstracts are given in the attachment. The conference led to many peer-reviewed papers published in several Special Issues of the International Journal of Chemical Kinetics in early 2012.

  8. European Music Year 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexanderson, Thomas; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Articles concerning music are included in this newsletter dedicated to cultural venture to be jointly carried out by the Council of Europe and the European communities. Many events will mark Music Year 1985, including concerts, dance performances, operas, publications, recordings, festivals, exhibitions, competitions, and conferences on musical…

  9. Report from the European Prison Education Association, September 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behan, Cormac

    2007-01-01

    The main activity of the European Prison Education Association (EPEA) since the last edition of the Journal was the 11th European Prison Education Association International Conference, which took place in Dublin, Ireland from June 13th to 17th. The conference, Learning for Liberation, was the largest EPEA conference to date with 180 participants…

  10. A multi-methodological approach to study the temporal and spatial distribution of air quality related to road transport emissions in Madrid, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Pedro; Miranda, Regina

    2013-04-01

    The traffic-related atmospheric emissions, composition and transport of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and air toxic pollutants (ATPs), are an important environmental problem that affect climate change and air pollution in Madrid, Spain. Carbon dioxide (CO2) affects the regional weather and particularly fine particle matter (PM) translocate to the people resulting in local health problems. As the main source of emissions comes from road transport, and subsequent combustion of fossil fuels, air quality deterioration may be elevated during weekdays and peak hours. We postulate that traffic-related air quality (CO2, methane CH4, PM, volatile organic compounds VOCs, nitrogen oxides NOx and carbon monoxide CO contents) impairs epidemiology in part via effects on health and disease development, likely increasing the external costs of transport in terms of climate change and air pollution. First, the paper intends to estimate the local air quality related to the road transport emissions of weeks over a domain covering Madrid (used as a case study). The local air quality model (LAQM) is based on gridded and shaped emission fields. The European Environmental Agency (EEA) COPERT modeling system will provide GHGs and ATPs gridded and shaped emission data and mobile source parameters, available for Madrid from preliminary emission inventory records of the Municipality of Madrid and from disaggregated traffic counts of the Traffic Engineering Company and the Metropolitan Company of Metro (METRO-Madrid). The paper intends to obtain estimates of GHGs and ATPs concentrations commensurate with available ground measurements, 24-hour average values, from the Municipality of Madrid. The comparison between estimated concentrations and measurements must show small errors (e.g. fractional error, fractional bias and coefficient of determination). The paper's expected results must determine spatial and temporal patterns in Madrid. The estimates will be used to cross check the primary local

  11. Frequency of alleles conferring resistance to Bt maize in French and US corn belt populations of the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis.

    PubMed

    Bourguet, D; Chaufaux, J; Séguin, M; Buisson, C; Hinton, J L; Stodola, T J; Porter, P; Cronholm, G; Buschman, L L; Andow, D A

    2003-05-01

    Farmers, industry, governments and environmental groups agree that it would be useful to manage transgenic crops producing insecticidal proteins to delay the evolution of resistance in target pests. The main strategy proposed for delaying resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis ( Bt) toxins in transgenic crops is the high-dose/refuge strategy. This strategy is based on the unverified assumption that resistance alleles are initially rare (<10(-3)). We used an F(2) screen on >1,200 isofemale lines of Ostrinia nubilalis Hübner (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) collected in France and the US corn belt during 1999-2001. In none of the isofemale lines did we detect alleles conferring resistance to Bt maize producing the Cry1Ab toxin. A Bayesian analysis of the data indicates that the frequency of resistance alleles in France was <9.20 x 10(-4) with 95% probability, and a detection probability of >80%. In the northern US corn belt, the frequency of resistance to Bt maize was <4.23 x 10(-4) with 95% probability, and a detection probability of >90%. Only 95 lines have been screened from the southern US corn belt, so these data are still inconclusive. These results suggest that resistance is probably rare enough in France and the northern US corn belt for the high-dose plus refuge strategy to delay resistance to Bt maize. PMID:12748773

  12. EuSANH workshop "Reasons behind the differences in national vaccination schedules for under-five", European Public Health pre-conference workshop, Malta, 8 November 2012.

    PubMed

    Theeten, H; Nohynek, H; Coenen, T M M

    2013-10-01

    Vaccination schedules for under-five children in the EU member states differ markedly, mainly as a consequence of differences in programme organization, decision making and history, and to a limited extent by epidemiological differences. There is little willingness towards unification since little evidence exists to prefer one schedule over the others, but the differences might impact on public confidence. Monitoring key determinants influencing individual decision making on immunization ('soft impacts') is thus as important as other existing monitoring systems of the 'hard' impacts of immunization programmes, and both should focus on the impact of these schedule differences. Harmonization of vaccination schedules is not the main issue, but the reasons behind the differences should be explained in an understandable and coherent way to the public. Scientists and advisory bodies should look over the country borders and communicate any crucial information, in order to improve scientific consensus on immunization schedules and programmes. These were the main conclusions of a members' experts panel of the European network of independent science advisory bodies on health (EuSANH), at a workshop in November 2012. PMID:23962536

  13. Management of the hypertensive patient with elevated heart rate: Statement of the Second Consensus Conference endorsed by the European Society of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Palatini, Paolo; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Casiglia, Edoardo; Chalmers, John; Ferrari, Roberto; Grassi, Guido; Inoue, Teruo; Jelakovic, Bojan; Jensen, Magnus T; Julius, Stevo; Kjeldsen, Sverre E; Mancia, Giuseppe; Parati, Gianfranco; Pauletto, Paolo; Stella, Andrea; Zanchetti, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    In June 2015, a panel of experts gathered in a consensus conference to plan updating recommendations on the management of the hypertensive patient with elevated heart rate (HR), previously released in 2006. The issues examined during that meeting and further discussed by the participants during the following months involved the assessment of HR, the relevance of HR as a cardiovascular risk factor, the definition of tachycardia and the treatment of the hypertensive patient with high HR. For the measurement of resting HR the panel experts recommended that scientific investigations focusing on HR should report information on length of resting period before measurement, information about temperature and environment, method of measurement, duration of measurement, number of readings, time interval between measurements, body position and type of observer. According to the panellists there is convincing evidence that HR is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and they suggest to routinely include HR measurement in the assessment of the hypertensive patient. Regarding the definition of tachycardia, the panellists acknowledged that in the absence of convincing data any threshold used to define tachycardia is arbitrary. Similarly, as there are no outcome studies of HR lowering in tachycardia hypertension, the panellists could not make practical therapeutic suggestions for the management of such patients. However, the experts remarked that absence of evidence does not mean evidence against the importance of tachycardia as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and that long-term exposure to a potentially important risk factor may impair the patient's prognosis. The main aims of the present document are to alert researchers and physicians about the importance of measuring HR in hypertensive patients, and to stimulate research to clarify unresolved issues. PMID:26982382

  14. Targeted therapy against multi-resistant bacteria in leukemic and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients: guidelines of the 4th European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-4, 2011)

    PubMed Central

    Averbuch, Diana; Cordonnier, Catherine; Livermore, David M.; Mikulska, Małgorzata; Orasch, Christina; Viscoli, Claudio; Gyssens, Inge C.; Kern, Winfried V.; Klyasova, Galina; Marchetti, Oscar; Engelhard, Dan; Akova, Murat

    2013-01-01

    The detection of multi-resistant bacterial pathogens, particularly those to carbapenemases, in leukemic and stem cell transplant patients forces the use of old or non-conventional agents as the only remaining treatment options. These include colistin/polymyxin B, tigecycline, fosfomycin and various anti-gram-positive agents. Data on the use of these agents in leukemic patients are scanty, with only linezolid subjected to formal trials. The Expert Group of the 4th European Conference on Infections in Leukemia has developed guidelines for their use in these patient populations. Targeted therapy should be based on (i) in vitro susceptibility data, (ii) knowledge of the best treatment option against the particular species or phenotype of bacteria, (iii) pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic data, and (iv) careful assessment of the risk-benefit balance. For infections due to resistant Gram-negative bacteria, these agents should be preferably used in combination with other agents that remain active in vitro, because of suboptimal efficacy (e.g., tigecycline) and the risk of emergent resistance (e.g., fosfomycin). The paucity of new antibacterial drugs in the near future should lead us to limit the use of these drugs to situations where no alternative exists. PMID:24323984

  15. Management of Epstein-Barr Virus infections and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-6) guidelines.

    PubMed

    Styczynski, Jan; van der Velden, Walter; Fox, Christopher P; Engelhard, Dan; de la Camara, Rafael; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per

    2016-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To better define current understanding of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in stem cell transplant patients, and to improve its diagnosis and management, a working group of the Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia 2015 reviewed the literature, graded the available quality of evidence, and developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis, prevention, prophylaxis and therapy of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders exclusively in the stem cell transplant setting. The key elements in diagnosis include non-invasive and invasive methods. The former are based on quantitative viral load measurement and imaging with positron emission tomography; the latter with tissue biopsy for histopathology and detection of Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder can be established on a proven or probable level. Therapeutic strategies include prophylaxis, preemptive therapy and targeted therapy. Rituximab, reduction of immunosuppression and Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell therapy are recommended as first-line therapy, whilst unselected donor lymphocyte infusions or chemotherapy are options as second-line therapy; other methods including antiviral drugs are discouraged. PMID:27365460

  16. Management of viral hepatitis in patients with haematological malignancy and in patients undergoing haemopoietic stem cell transplantation: recommendations of the 5th European Conference on Infections in Leukaemia (ECIL-5).

    PubMed

    Mallet, Vincent; van Bömmel, Florian; Doerig, Christopher; Pischke, Sven; Hermine, Olivier; Locasciulli, Anna; Cordonnier, Catherine; Berg, Thomas; Moradpour, Darius; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Ljungman, Per

    2016-05-01

    Viral hepatitis affects millions of people worldwide, and host immunity is the key determinant of patient outcome. Viral hepatitis can be life threatening in patients with haematological malignancy, including haemopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, because of the virus itself, or through a need to decrease the dose of chemotherapy. A past or currently infected haemopoietic stem cell donor could also transmit viral hepatitis. The burden of viral hepatitis in patients with haematological malignancies and the weak evidence on which previous guidelines are based has prompted the European Conference on Infection in Leukaemia (ECIL-5) to convene a group of experts in the fields of viral hepatitis and of haematological malignancy to specifically address previously unconsidered issues and grade the available quality of evidence according to the Infectious Diseases Society of America grading system. The group recommends that all patients should be screened for hepatotropic viruses before haematological treatment and that patients or haemopoietic stem cell donors with markers of past or current viral hepatitis should be assessed by an expert. Screening, vaccination, and treatment rules are reported in this Review. PMID:27599653

  17. Management of Epstein-Barr Virus infections and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-6) guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Styczynski, Jan; van der Velden, Walter; Fox, Christopher P.; Engelhard, Dan; de la Camara, Rafael; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To better define current understanding of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in stem cell transplant patients, and to improve its diagnosis and management, a working group of the Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia 2015 reviewed the literature, graded the available quality of evidence, and developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis, prevention, prophylaxis and therapy of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders exclusively in the stem cell transplant setting. The key elements in diagnosis include non-invasive and invasive methods. The former are based on quantitative viral load measurement and imaging with positron emission tomography; the latter with tissue biopsy for histopathology and detection of Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder can be established on a proven or probable level. Therapeutic strategies include prophylaxis, preemptive therapy and targeted therapy. Rituximab, reduction of immunosuppression and Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell therapy are recommended as first-line therapy, whilst unselected donor lymphocyte infusions or chemotherapy are options as second-line therapy; other methods including antiviral drugs are discouraged. PMID:27365460

  18. The International Multidisciplinary Consensus Conference on Multimodality Monitoring in Neurocritical Care: evidentiary tables: a statement for healthcare professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Peter; Menon, David K; Citerio, Giuseppe; Vespa, Paul; Bader, Mary Kay; Brophy, Gretchen; Diringer, Michael N; Stocchetti, Nino; Videtta, Walter; Armonda, Rocco; Badjatia, Neeraj; Bösel, Julian; Chesnut, Randall; Chou, Sherry; Claassen, Jan; Czosnyka, Marek; De Georgia, Michael; Figaji, Anthony; Fugate, Jennifer; Helbok, Raimund; Horowitz, David; Hutchinson, Peter; Kumar, Monisha; McNett, Molly; Miller, Chad; Naidech, Andrew; Oddo, Mauro; Olson, DaiWai; O'Phelan, Kristine; Provencio, J Javier; Puppo, Corinna; Riker, Richard; Roberson, Claudia; Schmidt, Michael; Taccone, Fabio

    2014-12-01

    A variety of technologies have been developed to assist decision-making during the management of patients with acute brain injury who require intensive care. A large body of research has been generated describing these various technologies. The Neurocritical Care Society (NCS) in collaboration with the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), and the Latin America Brain Injury Consortium (LABIC) organized an international, multidisciplinary consensus conference to perform a systematic review of the published literature to help develop evidence-based practice recommendations on bedside physiologic monitoring. This supplement contains a Consensus Summary Statement with recommendations and individual topic reviews on physiologic processes important in the care of acute brain injury. In this article we provide the evidentiary tables for select topics including systemic hemodynamics, intracranial pressure, brain and systemic oxygenation, EEG, brain metabolism, biomarkers, processes of care and monitoring in emerging economies to provide the clinician ready access to evidence that supports recommendations about neuromonitoring. PMID:25608916

  19. Gravity of the New Madrid seismic zone; a preliminary study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.

    1995-01-01

    In the winter of 1811-12, three of the largest historic earthquakes in the United States occurred near New Madrid, Mo. Seismicity continues to the present day throughout a tightly clustered pattern of epicenters centered on the bootheel of Missouri, including parts of northeastern Arkansas, northwestern Tennessee, western Kentucky, and southern Illinois. In 1990, the New Madrid seismic zone/Central United States became the first seismically active region east of the Rocky Mountains to be designated a priority research area within the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP). This Professional Paper is a collection of papers, some published separately, presenting results of the newly intensified research program in this area. Major components of this research program include tectonic framework studies, seismicity and deformation monitoring and modeling, improved seismic hazard and risk assessments, and cooperative hazard mitigation studies.

  20. The New Madrid Seismic Zone: not dead yet.

    PubMed

    Page, Morgan T; Hough, Susan E

    2014-02-14

    The extent to which ongoing seismicity in intraplate regions represents long-lived aftershock activity is unclear. We examined historical and instrumental seismicity in the New Madrid central U.S. region to determine whether present-day seismicity is composed predominantly of aftershocks of the 1811-1812 earthquake sequence. High aftershock productivity is required both to match the observation of multiple mainshocks and to explain the modern level of activity as aftershocks; synthetic sequences consistent with these observations substantially overpredict the number of events of magnitude ≥ 6 that were observed in the past 200 years. Our results imply that ongoing background seismicity in the New Madrid region is driven by ongoing strain accrual processes and that, despite low deformation rates, seismic activity in the zone is not decaying with time. PMID:24457216

  1. EDITORIAL: The 18th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics The 18th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Soto, Luis L.; Man'ko, Margarita A.

    2012-02-01

    decided that Physica Scripta could offer a poster prize (200 euros + certificate) for young scientists (less than 30 years old) at the annual CEWQO conference. A panel of experts was formed to judge the posters which included Apostol Vourdas, University of Bradford, UK (Chairman), Alberto Ibort, University Carlos III of Madrid, Spain, Andrei Klimov, University of Guadalajara, Mexico, Margarita A Man'ko, P N Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow, Russia and Antonino Messina, University of Palermo, Italy. The poster ''How can we check the uncertainty relation?'' by Vladimir Chernega, PhD student of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute, won the prize. The 19th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics will be held in Sinaia, Romania on 2-6 July 2012. It will be chaired by Professor Aurelian Isar from the Horia Hulubei National Institute for Research and Development in Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest.

  2. Consensus summary statement of the International Multidisciplinary Consensus Conference on Multimodality Monitoring in Neurocritical Care: a statement for healthcare professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Peter; Menon, David K; Citerio, Giuseppe; Vespa, Paul; Bader, Mary Kay; Brophy, Gretchen M; Diringer, Michael N; Stocchetti, Nino; Videtta, Walter; Armonda, Rocco; Badjatia, Neeraj; Böesel, Julian; Chesnut, Randall; Chou, Sherry; Claassen, Jan; Czosnyka, Marek; De Georgia, Michael; Figaji, Anthony; Fugate, Jennifer; Helbok, Raimund; Horowitz, David; Hutchinson, Peter; Kumar, Monisha; McNett, Molly; Miller, Chad; Naidech, Andrew; Oddo, Mauro; Olson, DaiWai; O'Phelan, Kristine; Provencio, J Javier; Puppo, Corinna; Riker, Richard; Robertson, Claudia; Schmidt, Michael; Taccone, Fabio

    2014-12-01

    Neurocritical care depends, in part, on careful patient monitoring but as yet there are little data on what processes are the most important to monitor, how these should be monitored, and whether monitoring these processes is cost-effective and impacts outcome. At the same time, bioinformatics is a rapidly emerging field in critical care but as yet there is little agreement or standardization on what information is important and how it should be displayed and analyzed. The Neurocritical Care Society in collaboration with the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, the Society for Critical Care Medicine, and the Latin America Brain Injury Consortium organized an international, multidisciplinary consensus conference to begin to address these needs. International experts from neurosurgery, neurocritical care, neurology, critical care, neuroanesthesiology, nursing, pharmacy, and informatics were recruited on the basis of their research, publication record, and expertise. They undertook a systematic literature review to develop recommendations about specific topics on physiologic processes important to the care of patients with disorders that require neurocritical care. This review does not make recommendations about treatment, imaging, and intraoperative monitoring. A multidisciplinary jury, selected for their expertise in clinical investigation and development of practice guidelines, guided this process. The GRADE system was used to develop recommendations based on literature review, discussion, integrating the literature with the participants' collective experience, and critical review by an impartial jury. Emphasis was placed on the principle that recommendations should be based on both data quality and on trade-offs and translation into clinical practice. Strong consideration was given to providing pragmatic guidance and recommendations for bedside neuromonitoring, even in the absence of high quality data. PMID:25208678

  3. Consensus summary statement of the International Multidisciplinary Consensus Conference on Multimodality Monitoring in Neurocritical Care : a statement for healthcare professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Peter; Menon, David K; Citerio, Giuseppe; Vespa, Paul; Bader, Mary Kay; Brophy, Gretchen M; Diringer, Michael N; Stocchetti, Nino; Videtta, Walter; Armonda, Rocco; Badjatia, Neeraj; Böesel, Julian; Chesnut, Randall; Chou, Sherry; Claassen, Jan; Czosnyka, Marek; De Georgia, Michael; Figaji, Anthony; Fugate, Jennifer; Helbok, Raimund; Horowitz, David; Hutchinson, Peter; Kumar, Monisha; McNett, Molly; Miller, Chad; Naidech, Andrew; Oddo, Mauro; Olson, DaiWai; O'Phelan, Kristine; Provencio, J Javier; Puppo, Corinna; Riker, Richard; Robertson, Claudia; Schmidt, Michael; Taccone, Fabio

    2014-09-01

    Neurocritical care depends, in part, on careful patient monitoring but as yet there are little data on what processes are the most important to monitor, how these should be monitored, and whether monitoring these processes is cost-effective and impacts outcome. At the same time, bioinformatics is a rapidly emerging field in critical care but as yet there is little agreement or standardization on what information is important and how it should be displayed and analyzed. The Neurocritical Care Society in collaboration with the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, the Society for Critical Care Medicine, and the Latin America Brain Injury Consortium organized an international, multidisciplinary consensus conference to begin to address these needs. International experts from neurosurgery, neurocritical care, neurology, critical care, neuroanesthesiology, nursing, pharmacy, and informatics were recruited on the basis of their research, publication record, and expertise. They undertook a systematic literature review to develop recommendations about specific topics on physiologic processes important to the care of patients with disorders that require neurocritical care. This review does not make recommendations about treatment, imaging, and intraoperative monitoring. A multidisciplinary jury, selected for their expertise in clinical investigation and development of practice guidelines, guided this process. The GRADE system was used to develop recommendations based on literature review, discussion, integrating the literature with the participants' collective experience, and critical review by an impartial jury. Emphasis was placed on the principle that recommendations should be based on both data quality and on trade-offs and translation into clinical practice. Strong consideration was given to providing pragmatic guidance and recommendations for bedside neuromonitoring, even in the absence of high quality data. PMID:25138226

  4. Development of GIS Database for New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birhanemeskel, Y. T.; Vlahovic, G.; Arroucau, P.; Malhotra, R.; Powell, C. A.

    2010-12-01

    The New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) of the central Mississippi river valley is currently the most seismically active region in the central and eastern United States. A number of earthquakes occurred in NMSZ between 1811 and 1812, of which three major earthquakes with magnitudes greater than 7 destroyed the town of New Madrid, Missouri. Intraplate seismicity like the New Madrid seismicity is difficult to explain in the framework of plate tectonics and requires analyzing various geological, geophysical and seismological data to better understand its causes. ArcGIS® 9.3.1 software with license type ArcEditor was used to build a geodatabase containing multiple layers that are useful for the study of intraplate seismicity. These layers include earthquake locations, gravity and magnetic anomalies, lithology, topography, velocity anomalies as resolved by arrival time tomography and geological structures like intrusions and faults. The data for these layers were obtained from the U.S Geological Survey, from the Center for Earthquake Research and Information at the University of Memphis, TN, and from paper maps. Zipped files of various formats (.xls, .shp, .txt, .tar, etc) were downloaded and converted to a format compatible with ArcGIS. To keep compatibility of the data, editing of the attribute table of the raw data was completed before importing the data to Arc Catalog. Geo-referencing and digitizing processes were also done to import layers of contour lines and geological structures with correct vector information from papers maps. Layers were clipped in order to make sure that they fit the spatial extent of the study area (from 34°S to 40°N in latitude and from 93°W to 86°W in longitude). The New Madrid seismicity will be analyzed by looking for possible relationships that exist between the data layers using various spatial and geostatistical tools. For example the distribution of earthquakes will be analyzed with respect to the potential field and velocity

  5. Rapid intraplate strain accumulation in the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, L.; Zoback, M.D.; Segall, P.

    1992-01-01

    Remeasurement of a triangulation network in the southern part of the New Madrid seismic zone with the Global Positioning System has revealed rapid crustal strain accumulation since the 1950s. This area experienced three large (moment magnitudes >8) earthquakes in 1811 to 1812. The orientation and sense of shear is consistent with right-lateral strike slip motion along a northeast-trending fault zone (as indicated by current seismicity). Detection of crustal strain accumulation may be a useful discriminant for identifying areas where potentially damaging intraplate earthquakes may occur despite the absence of large earthquakes during historic time.

  6. KAMEDO Report 90: terrorist attacks in Madrid, Spain, 2004.

    PubMed

    Bolling, Roger; Ehrlin, Ylva; Forsberg, Rebecca; Rüter, Anders; Soest, Vivian; Vikström, Tore; Ortenwall, Per; Brändström, Helge

    2007-01-01

    This is a descriptive study of the medical responses to the bombings by terrorists in Madrid on 11 March 2004. The nature of the event, the human damage, and the responses are described. It describes the: (1) nature and operations associated with the alarm; (2) assignment of responding units and personnel; (3) establishment and operations of casualty collection points; (4) medical transport and distribution of injured victims; (5) prioritization and command; (6) hospital care; (7) psychosocial care; (8) identification of the dead; and (9) police investigation and actions. Each of these descriptions is discussed in terms of what currently is known and the implications for future planning, preparedness, and response. PMID:17894223

  7. Active learning in the space engineering education at Technical University of Madrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Jacobo; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Lapuerta, Victoria; Ezquerro Navarro, Jose Miguel; Cordero-Gracia, Marta

    This work describes the innovative activities performed in the field of space education at the Technical University of Madrid (UPM), in collaboration with the center engaged by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Spain to support the operations for scientific experiments on board the International Space Station (E-USOC). These activities have been integrated along the last academic year of the Aerospatiale Engineering degree. A laboratory has been created, where the students have to validate and integrate the subsystems of a microsatellite by using demonstrator satellites. With the acquired skills, the students participate in a training process centered on Project Based Learning, where the students work in groups to perform the conceptual design of a space mission, being each student responsible for the design of a subsystem of the satellite and another one responsible of the mission design. In parallel, the students perform a training using a ground station, installed at the E-USOC building, which allow them to learn how to communicate with satellites, how to download telemetry and how to process the data. This also allows students to learn how the E-USOC works. Two surveys have been conducted to evaluate the impact of these techniques in the student engineering skills and to know the degree of satisfaction of students with respect to the use of these learning methodologies.

  8. MESON2000 Conference Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, T.

    2001-04-26

    This short contribution is a lite MESON2000 conference summary. As appropriate for the 600th anniversary of the Jagellonian University, it begins with a brief summary of the last 600 years of European history and its place in hadron physics. Next a ''physicist chirality'' order parameter PC is introduced. When applied to MESON2000 plenary speakers this order parameter illustrates the separation of hadron physicists into disjoint communities. The individual plenary talks in MESON2000 are next sorted according to the subconference associated with each of the 36 plenary speakers. Finally, I conclude with a previously unreported Feynman story regarding the use of models in hadron physics.

  9. Numerical photochemical modeling over Madrid (Spain) mesoscale urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Jose, Roberto; Ramirez-Montesinos, Arturo; Marcelo, Luis M.; Sanz, Miguel A.; Rodriguez, Luis M.

    1995-09-01

    Photochemical air quality models provide the most defensible method for relating future air quality to changes in emission, and hence are the foundation for determining the effectiveness of proposed control strategies. In this contribution, we will show results from different photochemical schemes under typical emission conditions for a summer day in the Madrid mesocsale urban area. We will show that complex numerical integrated urban mesoscale models are a powerful tool to predict the ozone levels on this area. The comparison of model simulations at different grid points show an acceptable preliminary behavior. The results presented in this paper are prepared for August 15th, 1991 and the predicted ozone values are compared with those measured at two stations of the Madrid city monitoring network. Results show that the shape is successfully predicted by using the NUFOMO (numerical photochemical model) model. Because of the computer limitations, we have limited the results to this case study. Further investigations will provide additional information to produce a statistical analysis of the results. However, preliminary results show that the NUFOMO model is able to reproduce the measured ozone values.

  10. Assessment of noise exposure during commuting in the Madrid subway.

    PubMed

    Tabacchi, M; Pavón, I; Ausejo, M; Asensio, C; Recuero, M

    2011-09-01

    Because noise-induced hearing impairment is the result not only of occupational noise exposure but also of total daily noise exposure, it is important to take the non-occupational exposure of individuals (during commuting to and from their jobs, at home, and during recreational activities) into account. Mass transit is one of the main contributors to non-occupational noise exposure. We developed a new methodology to estimate a representative commuting noise exposure. The methodology was put into practice for the Madrid subway because of all Spanish subway systems it covers the highest percentage of worker journeys (22.6%). The results of the application highlight that, for Madrid subway passengers, noise exposure level normalized to a nominal 8 hr (L(Ex,8h-cj) ) depends strongly on the type of train, the presence of squealing noise, and the public address audio system, ranging from 68.6 dBA to 72.8 dBA. These values play an important role in a more complete evaluation of a relationship between noise dose and worker health response. PMID:21830871

  11. Skills Needs Analysis. Conference on Continuing Vocational Training (Turin, Italy, November 9-10, 1998). Conclusions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Training Foundation, Turin (Italy).

    Participants in the Conference on Continuing Vocational Training (CVT) represented 13 countries from Central and Eastern Europe, Kyrgyzstan, Russian Federation, Uzbekistan, European Union (EU) countries, European Commission, and European Training Foundation. The conference aimed to increase awareness among policymakers and social partners on CVT's…

  12. Biomedical Conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    As a result of Biomedical Conferences, Vivo Metric Systems Co. has produced cardiac electrodes based on NASA technology. Frequently in science, one highly specialized discipline is unaware of relevant advances made in other areas. In an attempt to familiarize researchers in a variety of disciplines with medical problems and needs, NASA has sponsored conferences that bring together university scientists, practicing physicians and manufacturers of medical instruments.

  13. Diagenesis of Late Miocene micritic lacustrine carbonates, Madrid Basin, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, V. P.; Zarza, A. M. Alonso; Sanz, M. E.; Calvo, J. P.

    1997-12-01

    Mud-grade lacustrine limestones of Miocene age from the Madrid Basin, Spain, reveal varied and complex diagenetic histories. Microporous micrites occur as well as micrites with anhedral mosaics. The micrites have recrystallized from a metastable precursor, in part under sub-oxic meteoric diagenetic conditions probably before extensive karstification in the Pliocene. The absence of aragonite relics, their mainly micritic microfabric, low Sr content and covariant trend of Sr and Mg suggest that the micrites formed from mainly high-magnesian calcite muds. Lacustrine micrites can be compared to marine forms and criteria used to assess the composition of the marine precursor muds can be applied to lacustrine limestones to complement other techniques to identify original lake water compositions.

  14. Health impact assessment of traffic noise in Madrid (Spain).

    PubMed

    Tobías, Aurelio; Recio, Alberto; Díaz, Julio; Linares, Cristina

    2015-02-01

    The relationship between environmental noise and health has been examined in depth. In view of the sheer number of persons exposed, attention should be focused on road traffic noise. The city of Madrid (Spain) is a densely populated metropolitan area in which 80% of all environmental noise exposure is attributed to traffic. The aim of this study was to quantify avoidable deaths resulting from reducing the impact of equivalent diurnal noise levels (LeqD) on daily cardiovascular and respiratory mortality among people aged ≥65 years in Madrid. A health impact assessment of (average 24h) LeqD and PM2.5 levels was conducted by using previously reported risk estimates of mortality rates for the period 2003-2005: For cardiovascular causes: LeqD 1.048 (1.005, 1.092) and PM2.5 1.041(1.020, 1.062) and for respiratory causes: LeqD 1.060 (1.000, 1.123) and PM2.5 1.030 (1.000, 1.062). The association found between LeqD exposure and mortality for both causes suggests an important health effect. A reduction of 1dB(A) in LeqD implies an avoidable annual mortality of 284 (31, 523) cardiovascular- and 184 (0, 190) respiratory-related deaths in the study population. The magnitude of the health impact is similar to reducing average PM2.5 levels by 10µg/m(3). Regardless of air pollution, exposure to traffic noise should be considered an important environmental factor having a significant impact on health. PMID:25531818

  15. HLA genes in Amerindian immigrants to Madrid (Spain): epidemiology and a virtual transplantation waiting list: Amerindians in Madrid (Spain).

    PubMed

    Parga-Lozano, Carlos; Rey-Medrano, Diego; Gomez-Prieto, Pablo; Areces, Cristina; Moscoso, Juan; Abd-El-Fatah-Khalil, Sedeka; Moreno, Enrique; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2011-04-01

    Amerindians immigrated to Madrid (Spain) region are about 10% of the present day population. Amerindians are believed to be the first American inhabitants, before Na-Dene speakers, Aleuts and Eskimo. They may initially have arrived to America from Siberia and also from other parts of Pacific Sea (South Asia, Polynesia and Australia). Nowadays, they populate America from Canada to Tierra del Fuego (South America tip South). Most Amerindian immigrants to Madrid have come from Andean Countries in the last 10 years (mainly Ecuador, Bolivia, Peru and Colombia). They show an HLA profile with "quasi-specific alleles", which makes them different to the rest of the World. In the present work, we have aimed to determine the immigrants HLA profile in order to establish a virtual transplantation waiting list which may be useful for their therapeutic transplants, particularly bone marrow transplantation. This would be carried out together with Amerindian immigrants to other parts of Spain and with their own countries in order to build up transplantation programs. Specific epidemiology programs on HLA linked disease will also be established. Immigrant volunteer unrelated blood donors contributed to the present study. HLA typing was performed by standard methods and their HLA profile obtained and obtained and compared with 15,108 HLA chromosomes from the rest of the World, including Spaniards. The immigrants showed a typical Amerindian profile similar to isolated Amerindian ethnic groups and altogether different to other World inhabitants (including Spaniards). These are the first bases to set up transplantation and epidemiology studies in collaboration with their original population in America. Finally, the HLA profile found in these Amerindians does not indicate their American specific original area, as it is expected from previous studies, i.e.: they do not relate more with Andean than with other Amerindians in Neighbour Joining dendrograms or correspondence analyses. PMID

  16. Conference Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, Cait

    2009-01-01

    This article summarizes an original conference, organised by the Child Care Research Forum (http://www.qub.ac.uk/sites/ccrf/), which brought together experts from all over Northern Ireland to showcase some of the wealth of research with children and young people that is going on in the country today. Developed around the six high-level outcomes of…

  17. Thematic mapping, land use, geological structure and water resources in central Spain. [north of Madrid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delascuevas, N. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A method for a rapid updating of cartography at scale 1:200,000 was established. An annular tectonic structure was detected north of Madrid which was named Structural Halo of Guadalix, since its center is situated in the locality of Guadalix de la Sierra. This circular complex has from 30 to 40 km of radius and its influences at its most extreme edges reach Madrid.

  18. Project Based Learning experiences in the space engineering education at Technical University of Madrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Jacobo; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; del Cura, Juan M.; Ezquerro, José M.; Lapuerta, Victoria; Cordero-Gracia, Marta

    2015-10-01

    This work describes the innovation activities performed in the field of space education since the academic year 2009/10 at the Technical University of Madrid (UPM), in collaboration with the Spanish User Support and Operations Center (E-USOC), the center assigned by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Spain to support the operations of scientific experiments on board the International Space Station. These activities have been integrated within the last year of the UPM Aerospace Engineering degree. A laboratory has been created, where students have to validate and integrate the subsystems of a microsatellite using demonstrator satellites. In parallel, the students participate in a Project Based Learning (PBL) training process in which they work in groups to develop the conceptual design of a space mission. One student in each group takes the role of project manager, another one is responsible for the mission design and the rest are each responsible for the design of one of the satellite subsystems. A ground station has also been set up with the help of students developing their final thesis, which will allow future students to perform training sessions and learn how to communicate with satellites, how to receive telemetry and how to process the data. Several surveys have been conducted along two academic years to evaluate the impact of these techniques in engineering learning. The surveys evaluate the acquisition of specific and generic competences, as well as the students' degree of satisfaction with respect to the use of these learning methodologies. The results of the surveys and the perception of the lecturers show that PBL encourages students' motivation and improves their results. They not only acquire better technical training, but also improve their transversal skills. It is also pointed out that this methodology requires more dedication from lecturers than traditional methods.

  19. Multicriteria approach to interpret the variability of the levels of particulate matter and gaseous pollutants in the Madrid metropolitan area, during the 1999-2012 period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, P.; Artíñano, B.; Viana, M. M.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.

    2015-05-01

    The evolution of the mean levels of particulate matter (PM) and gaseous pollutants recorded in the Madrid metropolitan area from 1999 to 2012, were investigated focussing on the impact of mitigation strategies and economic scenarios. Temporal trends have shown that SO2, CO, NO, PM10 and NO2 levels at Madrid kerbside and urban-background sites have been decreasing over the 1999-2012 period, with statistical significance. A small contribution to the annual decreasing rates of SO2, NO and NO2 obtained at these sites could be attributed to the reduction in the regional background levels. The reduction in the emissions of atmospheric pollutants from specific sources of the urban agglomeration, explained most of the annual decreasing rates obtained at the kerbside and urban-background sites. From 1999 to 2007 a reduction of the emissions from road traffic and residential heating was produced, as a consequence of the implementation of a number of management strategies promoted and adopted by European and national public administrations. In contrast, from 2008 to 2012 a deep decrease in fuel consumption and a reduction of construction-demolition and roadwork activities took place in the Madrid metropolitan area, as a consequence of the economic recession. The expected overcoming of the economic crisis within the next few years, will presumably give rise to similar levels of PM and gaseous pollutants as those existing previously to the crisis period. The introduction of new Euro 6/VI vehicles which emit considerably less NOx than previous generation diesel vehicles, as well as the implementation of strategies aimed at reducing resuspended mineral dust from road traffic and construction-demolition activities are thus encouraged.

  20. Something going on in Milan: a review of the 4th International PhD Student Cancer Conference.

    PubMed

    Segré, C

    2010-01-01

    with other prestigious research centres and to create connections for future post docs or job experiences. And last but not least, it is a golden chance for penniless PhD students to spend a couple of extra days visiting a foreign country (this motivation will of course never be voiced to supervisors).The network of participating institutes has a three-nation core, made up of the Netherlands Cancer Institute, the Italian European School of Molecular Medicine (SEMM) and five UK Cancer Research Institutes (The London Research Institute, The Cambridge Research Institute, The Beatson Institute for Cancer Research in Glasgow, The Patterson Institute for Cancer Research in Manchester and the MRC Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology in Oxford).The conference is hosted and organised every year by one of the core institutes; the first was in Cambridge in 2007, Amsterdam in 2008 and London in 2009, this year was the turn of Milan.In addition to the core institutes, PhD students from several other high-profile institutes are invited to attend the conference. This year participants applied from the Spanish National Cancer Centre (CNIO, Madrid), the German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ, Heidelberg), the European Molecular Biology Labs (EMBL, Heidelberg) and the San Raffaele Institute (HSR, Milan). Moreover four 'special guests' from the National Centre for Biological Sciences of Bangalore (India) attended the conference in Milan. This represents a first step in widening the horizons beyond Europe into a global worldwide network of talented PhD students in life sciences.The conference spread over two and a half days (Wednesday 19th to Friday 21st May) and touched on a broad spectrum of topics: from basic biology to development, from cancer therapies to modelling and top-down new generation global approaches. The final selection of presentations has been a tough task for us organisers (Chiara Segré, Federica Castellucci, Francesca Milanesi, Gianluca Varetti and Gian

  1. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2006 Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yu-Gang; Wang, En-Ke; Cai, Xu; Huang, Huan-Zhong; Wang, Xin-Nian; Zhu, Zhi-Yuan

    2007-07-01

    scientific program of the conference began with an overview of high energy nuclear physics in China by Professor Wenqing Shen, vice president of the National Natural Science Foundation of China. Professor Shen highlighted many contributions made by the Chinese scientists in both theory and experiment. Dr Nick Samios, former director of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), gave a vivid account of the early years of RHIC and recent accomplishments. Highlights of the conference include new results from RHIC at BNL and SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research). Many experimental results reported at the conference support the notion that the quark-gluon matter at RHIC behaves like a perfect liquid with minimum viscosity to entropy ratio. There were 15 plenary sessions which covered 54 plenary talks, 12 parallel sessions and 1 poster session. A total of 320 abstracts were submitted to the conference out of which 124 were selected for oral presentation and the rest were assigned to the poster session. Talks and posters in the conference covered a broad range of experimental and theoretical progress in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, which includes new evidence of sQGP, jet quenching and heavy quark energy loss, heavy-ion collision phenomenology, quantum field theory at finite temperature and/or density, and relevant areas of astrophysics and plasma physics. The Quark Matter 2006 conference coincided with the 80th birthday of Professor T D Lee. A special reception was held in the banquet hall of the Shanghai Grand Theatre to celebrate Professor Lee's birthday and to honor his great contributions to physics, in particular, to the development of high energy nuclear physics research in China. We would like to thank the members of the International Advisory Committee for providing valuable advice on a variety of matters, from the general structure of the conference to the selection of the plenary speakers and selection of abstracts for

  2. Triggering of New Madrid seismicity by late-Pleistocene erosion.

    PubMed

    Calais, E; Freed, A M; Van Arsdale, R; Stein, S

    2010-07-29

    The spatiotemporal behaviour of earthquakes within continental plate interiors is different from that at plate boundaries. At plate margins, tectonic motions quickly reload earthquake ruptures, making the location of recent earthquakes and the average time between them consistent with the faults' geological, palaeoseismic and seismic histories. In contrast, what determines the activation of a particular mid-continental fault and controls the duration of its seismic activity remains poorly understood. Here we argue that the concentration of magnitude-7 or larger earthquakes in the New Madrid seismic zone of the central United States since the end of the last ice age results from the recent, climate-controlled, erosional history of the northern Mississippi embayment. We show that the upward flexure of the lithosphere caused by unloading from river incision between 16,000 and 10,000 years ago caused a reduction of normal stresses in the upper crust sufficient to unclamp pre-existing faults close to failure equilibrium. Models indicate that fault segments that have already ruptured are unlikely to fail again soon, but stress changes from sediment unloading and previous earthquakes may eventually be sufficient to bring to failure other nearby segments that have not yet ruptured. PMID:20671707

  3. Monoterpene field emission from Quercus ilex near Madrid (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, L.; Plaza, J.; Pujadas, M.; Pérez-Pastor, R.; García-Alonso, S.; Bezares, J. C.

    2003-04-01

    A great extension of Quercus ilex natural forest is found in the close vicinity to Madrid metropolitan area. This work presents the results obtained in a three-year field emission experimental study on this evergreen oak species (2000--02). Monoterpene emission has been documented during summer and early autumn seasons using a branch enclosure technique. Main features of this emission study focus on speciation, light and temperature dependence, and relationship with carbon assimilation and water stress. Severe soil water deficit induced a physiological depletion at high temperature in this sclerophyll and monoterpene non-storing oak species, reducing emission at minimum levels. In the opposite, if soil was enough wetted emission was reasonably well described by the isoprene model of Guenther although assimilation was reduced at high temperature. A field experiment designed to ascertain the role of air humidity on emission revealed no influence of this parameter under no soil water deficit conditions. Canopy emission fluxes were calculated from the modified Bowen-ratio technique using a micrometeorological tower deployed within the oak forest. A standard emission flux of 0.3 μg m-2s-1 according to the model of Guenther (30^oC and 1000 μmol m-2s-1 of PAR) was obtained (r^2= 0.67).

  4. The Quartzofeldspathic Fulgurite of Bustaviejo (Madrid): Cathodoluminescence and Raman Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Guinea, J.; Furio, M.; Fernandez-Hernan, M.; Bustillo, M. A.; Crespo-Feo, E.; Correcher, V.; Sanchez-Muñoz, L.; Matesanz, E.

    2009-08-01

    We discover and study a new quartzofeldspathic fulgurite, sized 12 cm in diameter in the main branch, of Bustarviejo (Madrid, Spain). Here we characterize fulgurite aliquots by Electron Probe Microanalysis (EPMA), Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy with a X-ray Dispersive Spectrometry and cathodoluminescence probes (ESEM-EDS-CL), in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD), Hyperspectral Raman Microscopy (Raman) and Thermoluminescence (TL). The fulgurite body was formed by lightning strike fusion on arkose sand during a fast process of volatilization and extreme reducing conditions at temperatures in excess of 2000 K. The fulgurite is composed of schocked quartz, neo-formed cristobalite, native Si-Fe-Al alloys and aluminum-silicate glass with spherical cavities. Both, the hyperspectral CL and Raman mappings highlight the cristobalite rim of the schocked quartz grains. The phase transition quartz-cristobalite preserves and enlarges the spectral CL structure, conversely the melting process forming glass phase destroys some CL defects remaining other structural centers, e.g., oxygen efficient centers, responsible of the 300 and 520 nm CL emission bands. In addition we also identify a nice description on quartzofeld-spathic fulgurite, labelled mazintarincan, in the medievaeal book, The Lapidary of King Alfonso X The Learned, written in the XII Century, at 1250.

  5. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2006 Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yu-Gang; Wang, En-Ke; Cai, Xu; Huang, Huan-Zhong; Wang, Xin-Nian; Zhu, Zhi-Yuan

    2007-07-01

    scientific program of the conference began with an overview of high energy nuclear physics in China by Professor Wenqing Shen, vice president of the National Natural Science Foundation of China. Professor Shen highlighted many contributions made by the Chinese scientists in both theory and experiment. Dr Nick Samios, former director of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), gave a vivid account of the early years of RHIC and recent accomplishments. Highlights of the conference include new results from RHIC at BNL and SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research). Many experimental results reported at the conference support the notion that the quark-gluon matter at RHIC behaves like a perfect liquid with minimum viscosity to entropy ratio. There were 15 plenary sessions which covered 54 plenary talks, 12 parallel sessions and 1 poster session. A total of 320 abstracts were submitted to the conference out of which 124 were selected for oral presentation and the rest were assigned to the poster session. Talks and posters in the conference covered a broad range of experimental and theoretical progress in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, which includes new evidence of sQGP, jet quenching and heavy quark energy loss, heavy-ion collision phenomenology, quantum field theory at finite temperature and/or density, and relevant areas of astrophysics and plasma physics. The Quark Matter 2006 conference coincided with the 80th birthday of Professor T D Lee. A special reception was held in the banquet hall of the Shanghai Grand Theatre to celebrate Professor Lee's birthday and to honor his great contributions to physics, in particular, to the development of high energy nuclear physics research in China. We would like to thank the members of the International Advisory Committee for providing valuable advice on a variety of matters, from the general structure of the conference to the selection of the plenary speakers and selection of abstracts for

  6. Next conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hexemer, Alexander; Toney, Michael F.

    2010-11-01

    After the successful conference on Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science (SRPS) in Rolduc Abbey (the Netherlands), we are now looking forward to the next meeting in this topical series started in 1995 by H G Zachmann, one of the pioneers of the use of synchrotron radiation techniques in polymer science. Earlier meetings were held in Hamburg (1995), Sheffield (2002), Kyoto (2006), and Rolduc (2009). In September of 2012 the Synchrotron Radiation and Polymer Science V conferences will be organized in a joint effort by the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory Advanced Light Source at LBL Advanced Light Source at LBL The conference will be organised in the heart of beautiful San Francisco. The program will consist of invited and contributed lectures divided in sessions on the use of synchrotron SAXS/WAXD, imaging and tomography, soft x-rays, x-ray spectroscopy, GISAXS and reflectivity, micro-beams and hyphenated techniques in polymer science. Poster contributions are more than welcome and will be highlighted during the poster sessions. Visits to both SLAC as well as LBL will be organised. San Francisco can easily be reached. It is served by two major international airports San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International Airport. Both are being served by most major airlines with easy connections to Europe and Asia as well as national destinations. Both also boast excellent connections to San Francisco city centre. We are looking forward to seeing you in the vibrant city by the Bay in September 2012. Golden gate bridge Alexander Hexemer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Michael F Toney Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Menlo Pk, CA 94025, USA E-mail: ahexemer@lbl.gov, mftoney@slac.stanford.edu

  7. Tick-borne encephalitis--a European health challenge. Conference report of the 8th meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-borne Encephalitis (ISW TBE).

    PubMed

    Kunze, Ursula

    2006-06-01

    The annual 2006 meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-borne Encephalitis (ISW TBE) raised the topic "Tick-borne Encephalitis--a European Health Challenge". TBE incidence has more or less increased in all European countries with a TBE risk in the last years (excepting Austria). Additionally, TBE has become an international public health problem because of increasing mobility of people travelling to risk areas. TBE vaccination should be recommended when people travel to endemic regions and come into contact with nature, regardless of the duration of the stay. As no clear recommendations for travellers exist, it will be one of the major future challenges of the ISW TBE to increase problem awareness outside endemic regions and create general recommendations, which are valid for at least all European countries. PMID:16944370

  8. Conferences revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radcliffe, Jonathan

    2008-08-01

    Way back in the mid-1990s, as a young PhD student, I wrote a Lateral Thoughts article about my first experience of an academic conference (Physics World 1994 October p80). It was a peach of a trip - most of the lab decamped to Grenoble for a week of great weather, beautiful scenery and, of course, the physics. A whole new community was there for me to see in action, and the internationality of it all helped us to forget about England's non-appearance in the 1994 World Cup finals.

  9. Conference Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, James, Jr.; Thomas, Valerie

    2000-01-01

    The MU-SPIN conference focused on showcasing successful experiences with information technology to enhance faculty and student development in areas of scientific and technical research and education. And it provided a forum for discussing increased participation of MU-SPIN schools in NASA Flight Missions and NASA Educational and Public Outreach activities. Opportunities for Involvement sessions focused on Space Science, Earth Science, Education, and Aeronautics. These sessions provided insight into the missions of NASA's enterprises and NASA's Education program. Presentations by NASA scientists, university Principal Investigators, and other affiliates addressed key issues for increased minority involvement.

  10. Proceedings of the international conference on MAGLEV and linear drives

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on levitated trains used in rapid transit systems. Topics considered at the conference included urban and regional applications, European systems, magnetically suspended high speed transport systems, the design of induction motors, operational safety consideration, electrodynamics, dynamic interactions between propulsion and suspension systems, power supplies, and superconducting magnets.

  11. Abstracts of Papers Read at Sixteenth Annual Conference on Linguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macris, James, Ed.

    Abstracts of 23 addresses given at the Sixteenth Annual Conference on Linguistics are presented in this report. The papers given at the conference deal with French, American English, English, Japanese, Cantonese, Latin, and Proto-Indo-European and cover a wide variety of topics, including dialectology, form classes, grammar, and semantics. The…

  12. European Mistletoe

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov Key References American mistletoe. Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Web site. Accessed at www.naturaldatabase.com on July 7, 2009. European mistletoe. Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Web site. Accessed at www.naturaldatabase.com on July ...

  13. A geochemical study of overbank sediments in an urban area (Madrid, Spain).

    PubMed

    Adánez Sanjuán, Paula; Llamas Borrajo, Juan F; Locutura Rupérez, Juan; García Cortés, Angel

    2014-12-01

    Overbank and stream sediments have been studied in the Community of Madrid. Four vertical profiles have been sampled corresponding to Guadarrama, Jarama, and finally Manzanares River, where two profiles have been studied upstream (El Pardo profile) and downstream (Rivas profile) Madrid city. Sieved samples (<63 µm) were subjected to total (ICP-MS/ICP-OES and INAA) and partial analysis (ICP-MS). AMS radiocarbon dating techniques revealed a young age (170 ± 40 years BP) at 2.40-2.65 m depth for Rivas profile. It has not been possible to detect pristine or pre-industrial overbank sediments, since in the rest of the studied profiles, anthropogenic wastes were found even in the lower levels. Three main sources of sediment have been detected in the area. Granitic and arkosic geology, located in the northern part of Madrid (U, Th, W, K, Na, or rare earth elements); clays located in the southeast of Madrid (Ni, Cr, or V), and finally an anthropogenic source has been identified (Au, Ag, Pb, Zn, or Sb) in Rivas profile. The influence of the anthropogenic activity has been established based on the contents distribution of contaminant elements in the profile. This can be associated to the growth of industrial activities and population in the city of Madrid during the last decades. The comparison of the profiles by a k-means cluster analysis showed some similarities for these samples that could have analogous sources (anthropogenic and geological). PMID:24969303

  14. The Conference Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolls, Blanche; Hartman, Linda; Corey, Linda; Marcoux, Betty; Jay, M. Ellen; England, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    Includes five articles on conference experiences: preplanning for a library conference; top ten reasons to attend an AASL (American Association of School Librarians) national conference; why should you bother to fill out a conference evaluation form; a case for conferences; and AASL tours. (LRW)

  15. European Community.

    PubMed

    1987-05-01

    The European Community was established in 1951 to reconcile France and Germany after World War II and to make possible the eventual federation of Europe. By 1986, there were 12 member countries: France, Italy, Belgium, the Federal Republic of Germany, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Denmark, Ireland, the United Kingdom, Greece, Spain, and Portugal. Principal areas of concern are internal and external trade, agriculture, monetary coordination, fisheries, common industrial and commercial policies, assistance, science and research, and common social and regional policies. The European Community has a budget of US$34.035 billion/year, funded by customs duties and 1.4% of each member's value-added tax. The treaties establishing the European Community call for members to form a common market, a common customs tariff, and common agricultural, transport, economic, and nuclear policies. Major European Community institutions include the Commission, Council of Ministers, European Parliament, Court of Justice, and Economic and Social Committee. The Community is the world's largest trading unit, accounting for 15% of world trade. The 2 main goals of the Community's industrial policy are to create an open internal market and to promote technological innovation in order to improve international competitiveness. The European Community aims to contribute to the economic and social development of Third World countries as well. PMID:12177941

  16. Chronic thought suppression and posttraumatic symptoms: data from the Madrid March 11, 2004 terrorist attack.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Carmelo; Hervás, Gonzalo; Pérez-Sales, Pau

    2008-12-01

    Although a considerable number of people either witnessed directly or in the mass media the traumatic scenes of the terrorist attack that took place on March 11th, 2004 in Madrid, only a fraction of Madrid citizens developed posttraumatic symptoms. In this study, posttraumatic stress-related symptoms, degree of exposure, coping strategies related to the attack, and chronic attempts to avoid intrusive thoughts (i.e., thought suppression) were assessed in a general population Madrid sample (N=503) 2-3 weeks after the attacks. Our results showed that participants with higher scores in chronic thought suppression exhibited higher levels of PTSD symptoms. Higher scores in chronic thought suppression also correlated positively with the use of avoidant coping strategies after the attacks. We discuss the possible common roots of avoidance of intrusive thoughts and avoidant coping strategies and the implications of this relationship for the emergence of stress-related symptoms as well as for public health policies. PMID:18329844

  17. A SYSTEM FOR CONTROL OF RIVER WATER QUALITY FOR THE COMMUNITY OF MADRID USING QUAL2E

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Stream Water Quality Model QUAL2E has been applied to the major rivers of the Comunidad de Madrid in Spain by Canal de Isabel II. anal de Isabel II is the company responsible for management of Madrid's water supply and waste treatment system. nitially, the model was applied i...

  18. Earthquake Hazard in the New Madrid Seismic Zone Remains a Concern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, A.D.; Applegate, D.; Tuttle, M.P.; Williams, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    There is broad agreement in the scientific community that a continuing concern exists for a major destructive earthquake in the New Madrid seismic zone. Many structures in Memphis, Tenn., St. Louis, Mo., and other communities in the central Mississippi River Valley region are vulnerable and at risk from severe ground shaking. This assessment is based on decades of research on New Madrid earthquakes and related phenomena by dozens of Federal, university, State, and consulting earth scientists. Considerable interest has developed recently from media reports that the New Madrid seismic zone may be shutting down. These reports stem from published research using global positioning system (GPS) instruments with results of geodetic measurements of strain in the Earth's crust. Because of a lack of measurable strain at the surface in some areas of the seismic zone over the past 14 years, arguments have been advanced that there is no buildup of stress at depth within the New Madrid seismic zone and that the zone may no longer pose a significant hazard. As part of the consensus-building process used to develop the national seismic hazard maps, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) convened a workshop of experts in 2006 to evaluate the latest findings in earthquake hazards in the Eastern United States. These experts considered the GPS data from New Madrid available at that time that also showed little to no ground movement at the surface. The experts did not find the GPS data to be a convincing reason to lower the assessment of earthquake hazard in the New Madrid region, especially in light of the many other types of data that are used to construct the hazard assessment, several of which are described here.

  19. Studying geodesy and earthquake hazard in and around the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyd, Oliver Salz; Magistrale, Harold

    2011-01-01

    Workshop on New Madrid Geodesy and the Challenges of Understanding Intraplate Earthquakes; Norwood, Massachusetts, 4 March 2011 Twenty-six researchers gathered for a workshop sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and FM Global to discuss geodesy in and around the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) and its relation to earthquake hazards. The group addressed the challenge of reconciling current geodetic measurements, which show low present-day surface strain rates, with paleoseismic evidence of recent, relatively frequent, major earthquakes in the region. The workshop presentations and conclusions will be available in a forthcoming USGS open-file report (http://pubs.usgs.gov).

  20. Studying geodesy and earthquake hazard in and around the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Oliver Salz; Magistrale, Harold

    2011-09-01

    Workshop on New Madrid Geodesy and the Challenges of Understanding Intraplate Earthquakes; Norwood, Massachusetts, 4 March 2011Twenty-six researchers gathered for a workshop sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and FM Global to discuss geodesy in and around the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) and its relation to earthquake hazards. The group addressed the challenge of reconciling current geodetic measurements, which show low present-day surface strain rates, with paleoseismic evidence of recent, relatively frequent, major earthquakes in the region. The workshop presentations and conclusions will be available in a forthcoming USGS open-file report (http://pubs.usgs.gov).

  1. ESMO-ESGO-ESTRO Consensus Conference on Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Nicoletta; Creutzberg, Carien; Amant, Frederic; Bosse, Tjalling; González-Martín, Antonio; Ledermann, Jonathan; Marth, Christian; Nout, Remi; Querleu, Denis; Mirza, Mansoor Raza; Sessa, Cristiana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The first joint European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), European SocieTy for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO) and European Society of Gynaecological Oncology (ESGO) consensus conference on endometrial cancer was held on 11–13 December 2014 in Milan, Italy, and comprised a multidisciplinary panel of 40 leading experts in the management of endometrial cancer. Before the conference, the expert panel prepared three clinically-relevant questions about endometrial cancer relating to the following four areas: prevention and screening, surgery, adjuvant treatment and advanced and recurrent disease. All relevant scientific literature, as identified by the experts, was reviewed in advance. During the consensus conference, the panel developed recommendations for each specific question and a consensus was reached. Results of this consensus conference, together with a summary of evidence supporting each recommendation, are detailed in this article. All participants have approved this final article. PMID:26645990

  2. NDVI statistical distribution of pasture areas at different times in the Community of Madrid (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Sotoca, Juan J.; Saa-Requejo, Antonio; Díaz-Ambrona, Carlos G. H.; Tarquis, Ana M.

    2015-04-01

    The severity of drought has many implications for society, including its impacts on the water supply, water pollution, reservoir management and ecosystem. However, its impacts on rain-fed agriculture are especially direct. Because of the importance of drought, there have been many attempts to characterize its severity, resulting in the numerous drought indices that have been developed (Niemeyer 2008). 'Biomass index' based on satellite image derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) has been used in countries like United States of America, Canada and Spain for pasture and forage crops for some years (Rao, 2010). This type of agricultural insurance is named as 'index-based insurance' (IBI). IBI is perceived to be substantially less costly to operate and manage than multiple peril insurance. IBI contracts pay indemnities based not on the actual yield (or revenue) losses experienced by the insurance purchaser but rather based on realized NDVI values (historical data) that is correlated with farm-level losses (Xiaohui Deng et al., 2008). Definition of when drought event occurs is defined on NDVI threshold values mainly based in statistical parameters, average and standard deviation that characterize a normal distribution. In this work a pasture area at the north of Community of Madrid (Spain) has been delimited. Then, NDVI historical data was reconstructed based on remote sensing imaging MODIS, with 500x500m2 resolution. A statistical analysis of the NDVI histograms at consecutives 46 intervals of that area was applied to search for the best statistical distribution based on the maximum likelihood criteria. The results show that the normal distribution is not the optimal representation when IBI is available; the implications in the context of crop insurance are discussed (Martín-Sotoca, 2014). References Kolli N Rao. 2010. Index based Crop Insurance. Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia 1, 193-203. Martín-Sotoca, J.J. (2014) Estructura Espacial

  3. Assessment of factors related to heavy metals distribution in abandoned mining soils in Madrid, central Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Manuel; Carral, Pilar; Alvarez, Ana M.; Hernández, Zulimar; Lorena, Recio-Vázquez; Marques, Maria J.; Almendros, Gonzalo

    2013-04-01

    Exploitation of metallic mineral deposits and its subsequent abandonment in last decades has lead to significant environmental hazard for natural systems. The present study concerns the distribution and mobility of heavy metals and trace elements mainly As, Cu, Cd, Co, Mn and V, in sulphide-rich soils. The site studied (Sierra de Guadarrama, Garganta de los Montes, Madrid) is at 1200 m asl. Soils are Humic and Dystric Cambisols (WRB) developed on gneisses; the main minerals consist of sulphides and include chalcopyrite, pyrite, marcasite, galena and arsenopyrite. Concentration data of the different species of heavy metals as dependent variables in addition to a series of independent variables mainly soil organic matter were subjected to multivariate chemometric treatments including multidimensional scaling (MDS), principal component analysis (PCA) and support vector machine (SVM) for a preliminary survey on the possible role of soil organic matter in the distribution and speciation of heavy metals in soils. The soil heavy metals speciation was determined using the BCR (Community Bureau of Reference, European Commission) sequential extraction procedure and analysed by ICP-MS. The total contents of these elements were calculated as the sum of the four BCR fractions. The results showed element concentrations decreasing with the distance from the source of pollution. The highest amounts of As and Mn, and Cu, Cd, Co and V were found at 10 and 100 m respectively. These values exceed the allowed limits of the environmental regulation. The percentages of extractable elements (step one of BCR) in relation to total elements show that Cu and Cd were significantly more easily extractable than the other elements. Metal availability in soils was generally controlled by total metal concentration. Data processing techniques coincided in pointing out the association of high levels of organic matter with the concentrations of elements extracted just in the most available forms: i

  4. Flash blizzards: two cases in the mountains of Madrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascón, E.; Sánchez, J. L.; Posada, R.; García-Ortega, E.; Marcos, J. L.; López, L.

    2012-04-01

    The sudden appearance of a blizzard is an open theme from the point of view of forecasting. When fallen precipitation greatly exceeds normal limits, it can produce problems in urban areas that are densely populated as well as their surrounding areas. In the last few years, Madrid has been experiencing at least one of these situations in the winter season. From these, we found two cases in which sudden snowfall affected transportation in the area. The vertical profile of temperature and humidity present using a microwave multichannel radiometer (MMR) shows abrupt changes when convection starts, with vertical creation of cloud ceilings superior to 10km in height. In both cases, a strong inversion of temperature of approximately 700 hPa was seen. By using the MM5, we also observed some common factors: the onset of precipitation is produced when the air masses that affect the various levels change abruptly, a strong advection of humidity in high and low levels, reaching as much as 80% humidity relative to 500 hPa and always coming from southwest winds. The re-analyses of the surface show us that this coming together of masses along with the entrance of an occluded front from the southwest of the peninsula. We can eliminate the presence of mountainous waves as a mechanism of onset in both cases, not observed in images of MSG nor using the calculation with the Froude number. The stability indices analyzed, such as the LI, TT, or KI, do not indicate any significant sign of instability in the atmosphere, calculated using the fifteen-minute measurements of data obtained using the MWR. The exits of the MM5 were analyzed in the areas of temperature, wind, IWV, LWP, LWC at different levels and the two situations found were characterized using mesoscales. Similarly, they were compared to data observed by the MWR and the MSGs. In both cases, we saw where there is an abrupt change in the air mass that affects every level. Acknowledgements This study was supported by the following

  5. Report from the European Prison Education Association, September 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behan, Cormac

    2006-01-01

    This article reports that the 11th European Prison Education Association International Conference will take place in Dublin, Ireland from June 13 to June 17, 2007. The conference, which was titled "Learning for Liberation," will focus on the exploration of what adult education can offer prison/correctional education. This article also presents the…

  6. Report from the European Prison Education Association, December 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behan, Cormac

    2006-01-01

    The main activity of the European Prison Education Association over the last number of months has been organizing the 11th EPEA conference in Dublin, Ireland in 2007. Application forms to attend the conference (13th-17th June 2007), are available to download at www.epea.org. Applications can be submitted online or by regular mail. The closing date…

  7. VETNET ECER 2002 Proceedings: Current Research in European Vocational Education and Human Resource Development. Proceedings of the Programme Presented by the Research Network on Vocational Education and Training (VETNET) at the European Conference of Educational Research (ECER) (5th, Lisbon, Portugual, September 11-14, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Sabine, Ed.; Griffiths, Toni, Ed.; Oliveira, Teresa, Ed.

    This document contains the papers from a conference on current research in vocational education and training (VET) and human resource development in Europe. The following papers are among those included: "The Contribution of the German Pilot Project 'New Learning Concepts within the Dual Vocational Education and Training System' towards the…

  8. Conference Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, David B.

    2014-07-01

    This conference on ``Multi-wavelength AGN Surveys and Studies'' has provided a detailed look at the explosive growth over the past decade, of available astronomical data from a growing list of large scale sky surveys, from radio-to-gamma rays. We are entering an era were multi-epoch (months to weeks) surveys of the entire sky, and near-instantaneous follow-up observations of variable sources, are elevating time-domain astronomy to where it is becoming a major contributor to our understanding of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). While we can marvel at the range of extragalactic phenomena dispayed by sources discovered in the original ``Markarian Survey'' - the first large-scale objective prism survey of the Northern Sky carried out at the Byurakan Astronomical Observtory almost a half-century ago - it is clear from the talks and posters presented at this meeting that the data to be be obtained over the next decade will be needed if we are to finally understand which phase of galaxy evolution each Markarian Galaxy represents.

  9. An analysis of seismic hazard in the Upper Rhine Graben enlightened by the example of the New Madrid seismic zone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubre, Cécile; Masson, Frédéric; Mazzotti, Stéphane; Meghraoui, Mustapha

    2014-05-01

    Seismic hazard in the "stable" continental regions and low-level deformation zones is one of the most difficult issues to address in Earth sciences. In these zones, instrumental and historical seismicity are not well known (sparse seismic networks, seismic cycle too long to be covered by the human history, episodic seismic activity) and many active structures remain poorly characterized or unknown. This is the case of the Upper Rhine Graben, the central segment of the European Cenozoic rift system (ECRIS) of Oligocene age, which extends from the North Sea through Germany and France to the Mediterranean coast over a distance of some 1100 km. Even if this region has already experienced some destructive earthquakes, its present-day seismicity is moderate and the deformation observed by geodesy is very small (below the current measurement accuracy). The strain rate does not exceed 10-10 and paleoseismic studies indicate an average return period of 2.5 to 3 103 ka for large earthquakes. The largest earthquake known for this zone is the 1356 Basel earthquake, with a magnitude generally estimated about 6.5 (Meghraoui et al., 2001) but recently re-evaluated between 6.7 and 7.1 (Fäh et al et al., 2009). A comparison of the Upper Rhine Graben with equivalent regions around the world could help improve our evaluation of seismic hazard of this region. This is the case of the New Madrid seismic zone, one of the best studied intraplate system in central USA, which experienced an M 7.0 - 7.5 earthquake in 1811-1812 and shares several characteristics with the Upper Rhine Graben, i.e. the general framework of inherited geological structures (reactivation of a failed rift / graben), seismicity patterns (spatial variability of small and large earthquakes), the null or low rate of deformation, and the location in a "stable" continental interior. Looking at the Upper Rhine Graben as an analogue of the New Madrid seismic zone, we can re-evaluate its seismic hazard and consider the

  10. Conference Scene

    PubMed Central

    Leeder, J Steven; Lantos, John; Spielberg, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge for clinicians, pharmaceutical companies and regulatory agencies is to better understand the relative contributions of ontogeny and genetic variation to observed variability in drug disposition and response across the pediatric age spectrum from preterm and term newborns, to infants, children and adolescents. Extrapolation of adult experience with pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine to pediatric patients of different ages and developmental stages, is fraught with many challenges. Compared with adults, pediatric pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics involves an added measure of complexity as variability owing to developmental processes, or ontogeny, is superimposed upon genetic variation. Furthermore, some pediatric diseases have no adult correlate or are more prevalent in children compared with adults, and several adverse drug reactions are unique to children, or occur at a higher frequency in children. The primary objective of this conference was to initiate an ongoing series of annual meetings on ‘Pediatric Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine’ organized by the Center for Personalized Medicine and Therapeutic Innovation and Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Medical Therapeutics at Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics in Kansas City, MO, USA. The primary goals of the inaugural meeting were: to bring together clinicians, basic and translational scientists and allied healthcare practitioners, and engage in a multi- and cross-disciplinary dialog aimed at implementing personalized medicine in pediatric settings; to provide a forum for the presentation and the dissemination of research related to the application of pharmacogenomic strategies to investigations of variability of drug disposition and response in children; to explore the ethical, legal and societal implications of pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine that are unique to children; and finally, to create networking opportunities for stimulating discussion

  11. Promoting Entrepreneurial Culture in the University: The Institutional Collaborative Model at the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Pablo, Isidro; Alfaro, Fernando; Rodriguez, Miriam; Valdes, Esperanza

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a case of collaboration between different types of public services and the private sector for the promotion of an entrepreneurial culture. This collaboration is achieved by means of a centre established and developed by the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, the Centro de Iniciativas Emprendedoras (the Centre for Entrepreneurial…

  12. Cultural Diversity in Compulsory Education: An Overview of the Context of Madrid (Spain)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaurena, Ines Gil

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines educational practices in Spain and in particular Madrid. With this contextual frame as the starting point the following issues are discussed: the "official" conceptualization of cultural diversity, educational policies and resolutions related to cultural diversity, and school programs and resources facilitated by educational…

  13. Spanish melons (Cucumis melo L.) of the Madrid provenance: A unique germplasm reservoir

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Melon (Cucumis melo L.) landraces of the Madrid provenance, Spain, have received national distinction for their high fruit quality and sensorial attributes. More specifically, a unique array of Group Inodorus landraces have been continuously cultivated and conserved by farmers in the municipality o...

  14. Schooling Transnational Speakers of the Societal Language: Language Variation Policy-Making in Madrid and Toronto

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schecter, Sandra R.; García Parejo, Isabel; Ambadiang, Théophile; James, Carl E.

    2014-01-01

    A cross-national comparative study in Toronto, Ontario, Canada and Madrid, Spain examines educational policies and practices that target immigrant students for whom the language variety normally spoken in the host country represents a second dialect. Policy contexts and schooling environments of the two urban centres were analyzed to gain deeper…

  15. Evidence for large prehistoric earthquakes in the northern New Madrid Seismic Zone, central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Y.; Schweig, E.S.; Tuttle, M.P.; Ellis, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    We surveyed the area north of New Madris, Missouri, for prehistoric liquefaction deposits and uncovered two new sites with evidence of pre-1811 earthquakes. At one site, located about 20 km northeast of New Madrid, Missouri, radiocarbon dating indicates that an upper sand blow was probably deposited after A.D. 1510 and a lower sand blow was deposited prior to A.D. 1040. A sand blow at another site about 45 km northeast of New Madrid, Missouri, is dated as likely being deposited between A.D.55 and A.D. 1620 and represents the northernmost recognized expression of prehistoric liquefaction likely related to the New Madrid seismic zone. This study, taken together with other data, supports the occurrence of at least two earthquakes strong enough to indcue liquefaction or faulting before A.D. 1811, and after A.D. 400. One earthquake probably occurred around AD 900 and a second earthquake occurred around A.D. 1350. The data are not yet sufficient to estimate the magnitudes of the causative earthquakes for these liquefaction deposits although we conclude that all of the earthquakes are at least moment magnitude M ~6.8, the size of the 1895 Charleston, Missouri, earthquake. A more rigorous estimate of the number and sizes of prehistoric earthquakes in the New Madrid sesmic zone awaits evaluation of additional sites.

  16. Terrorism in Two Cultures: Stress and Growth Following September 11 and the Madrid Train Bombings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steger, Michael F.; Frazier, Patricia A.; Zacchanini, Jose Luis

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we compared the prevalence of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and posttraumatic growth following the September 11, 2001, attacks in the United States and the March 11, 2004, Madrid, Spain train bombings. We also examined meaning in life as a correlate of posttrauma outcomes. A sample of midwestern college students (N = 188)…

  17. A seismic hazard uncertainty analysis for the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cramer, C.H.

    2001-01-01

    A review of the scientific issues relevant to characterizing earthquake sources in the New Madrid seismic zone has led to the development of a logic tree of possible alternative parameters. A variability analysis, using Monte Carlo sampling of this consensus logic tree, is presented and discussed. The analysis shows that for 2%-exceedence-in-50-year hazard, the best-estimate seismic hazard map is similar to previously published seismic hazard maps for the area. For peak ground acceleration (PGA) and spectral acceleration at 0.2 and 1.0 s (0.2 and 1.0 s Sa), the coefficient of variation (COV) representing the knowledge-based uncertainty in seismic hazard can exceed 0.6 over the New Madrid seismic zone and diminishes to about 0.1 away from areas of seismic activity. Sensitivity analyses show that the largest contributor to PGA, 0.2 and 1.0 s Sa seismic hazard variability is the uncertainty in the location of future 1811-1812 New Madrid sized earthquakes. This is followed by the variability due to the choice of ground motion attenuation relation, the magnitude for the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquakes, and the recurrence interval for M>6.5 events. Seismic hazard is not very sensitive to the variability in seismogenic width and length. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  18. Analyzing Bilingual Teaching and Learning in Madrid, Spain: A Fulbright Scholar Collaborative Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerena, Linda; Ramírez-Verdugo, M. Dolores

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out as an international cooperative research project supported by a Fulbright Scholar award to investigate attitudes and perceptions towards bilingual education, and to extract key findings on effective pedagogy in bilingual schools in the Region of Madrid, where expansion of bilingual programs has been rapidly increasing.…

  19. Tracking Identity: Academic Performance and Ethnic Identity among Ecuadorian Immigrant Teenagers in Madrid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucko, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This article examines Ecuadorian students' attempts to contest immigrant stereotypes and redefine their social identities in Madrid, Spain. I argue that academic tracking plays a pivotal role in the trajectory of students' emergent ethnic identity. To illustrate this process, I focus on students who abandon their academic and professional…

  20. The Commodification of English in "Madrid, Comunidad Bilingüe": Insights from the CLIL Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Relaño Pastor, Ana María

    2015-01-01

    This article analyzes how multilingual education in the Madrid region has been addressed through the medium of Spanish/English content and language integrated learning (CLIL) bilingual programs, widely implemented in public schools of this region in the last decade. By adopting a critical interpretive perspective (Tollefson in "Language…

  1. Inclusive Education in Spain: Developing Characteristics in Madrid, Extremadura and Andalusia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bermejo, Victor Santiuste; Castro, Florencio Vicente; Martinez, Francisco Miras; Gongora, David Padilla

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work is to analyse and communicate the "state of the art" in inclusive education for the Spanish communities of Madrid, Extremadura and Andalusia, as it is now more than 20 years since inclusive education was first adopted in Spain. The analysis is displayed in a twofold perspective: the basic standards inclusive education is…

  2. Genetic Diversity of Spanish Melons (Cucumis melo L.) of the Madrid Provenance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genetic diversity of five Group Inodorus landraces having a historic presence in the town of Villaconejos, Spain (near Madrid) and four reference accessions (one accession Group Flexuosus) (Lopez-Sese et al, 2002), was assessed using the allelic variation at 19 SSR loci. Seventy-two polymorphic...

  3. Habitos Alimentarios e Higiene Dental en una Poblacion Preescolar de Madrid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafarga, R. Tarazona; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Nutriment habits and oral hygiene in a preschool population in Madrid were studied by stratification in public or private schools. Significant differences were found only with regard to consumption of fish. Vegetable and fruit consumption was low in both groups, but not statistically significant. (SH)

  4. The European Centre for Leisure and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Convergence, 1969

    1969-01-01

    Supported by UNESCO, the European Centre for Leisure and Education is an establishment of the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences. The task of the Centre lies in the search for common trends of leisure and education in Europe, involving four types of activity: research, editorial, bibliographic, and documentary. It has sponsored conferences, and has…

  5. Report from the European Prison Education Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behan, Cormac

    2008-01-01

    This article presents several news stories from the European Prison Education Association (EPEA). These include: (1) The 7th International Conference for Directors of Prison Education held in Malmo, Sweden from September 11-14, 2008; (2) The visit of EPEA representatives to the Modern University of the Humanities (MUH) in Russia to examine how the…

  6. History of NAMES Conferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, Lev

    2013-03-01

    Franco-Russian NAMES Seminars are held for the purpose of reviewing and discussing actual developments in the field of materials science by researchers from Russia and from the Lorraine Region of France. In more precise terms, as set down by the organizers of the seminar (the Moscow Institute of Steel and Alloys and the Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine), the mission of the seminars is as follows: the development of scientific and academic contacts, giving a new impulse to joint fundamental research and technology transfer the development and consolidation of scientific, technical and business collaboration between the regions of Russia and Lorraine through direct contact between the universities, institutes and companies involved The first Seminar took place on 27-29 October 2004, at the Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine (on the premises of the Ecole Européenne d'Ingénieurs en Génie des Matériaux, Nancy, France). The number, variety and quality of the oral presentations given and posters exhibited at the first Seminar were of high international standard. 30 oral presentations were given and 72 posters were presented by 19 participants from five universities and three institutes of the Russian Academy of Sciences participants from 11 laboratories of three universities from the Lorraine region three industrial companies, including the European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company—EADS, and ANVAR (Agence Nationale de Valorisation de la Recherche) From 2005 onwards, it was decided to organize the Seminar every other year. The second Seminar convened on the occasion of the 75th Anniversary of the Moscow Institute of Steel and Alloys on 10-12 November 2005 in Moscow, Russia. The seminar demonstrated the efficiency of the scientific partnership founded between the research groups of Russia and France during the first Seminar. High productivity of the Franco-Russian scientific cooperation on the basis of the Research-Educational Franco

  7. Current Research in European Vocational Education and Human Resource Development. Proceedings of the Programme Presented By the Research Network on Vocational Education and Training (VETNET) at the European Conference of Educational Research (ECER) (3rd, Edinburgh, Scotland, September 20-23, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Sabine, Ed.; Raffe, David, Ed.

    These 24 papers represent the proceedings of a program presented by the research network on vocational education and training (VET). They include "School-Arranged or Market-Governed Workplace Training?" (Ulla Arnell-Gustafsson); "Prospects for Mutual Learning and Transnational Transfer of Innovative Practice in European VET" (Alan Brown, Jens…

  8. Current Research in European Vocational Education and Human Resource Development. Proceedings of the Programme Presented by the Research Network on Vocational Education and Training (VETNET) at the European Conference of Educational Research (ECER) (4th, Lille, France, September 5-8, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Sabine, Ed.; Dif, M'Hamed, Ed.

    These proceedings are comprised of 23 presentations on research in European vocational education and human resource development. Papers include "Developing Information and Communication Technology Capability in Higher Education in the United Kingdom (UK)" (Nick Boreham); "Methodological Issues in the Study of Organizational Learning, with…

  9. PREFACE: 30th EPS Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, R.; Lebedev, S.

    2003-12-01

    The 30th EPS Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics took place in St Petersburg, Russian Federation, on 7th--11th July 2003. It was jointly organized by the Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, the St Petersburg State Polytechnical University and Technical University Applied Physics Ltd, on behalf of the Plasma Physics Division of the European Physical Society (EPS). The members of the local organizing committee were drawn from these institutions: B Kuteev, Chair, Polytechnical University S Lebedev, Vice-Chair, Ioffe Institute A Lebedev, Scientific Secretary, Ioffe Institute V Bakharev, TUAP Ltd V Grigor'yants, Ioffe Institute V Sergeev, Polytechnical University N Zhubr, Ioffe Institute Over the years, the annual conference of the Plasma Physics Division of the European Physical Society has widened its scope. Contributions to the present conference covered widely diversified fields of plasma physics, ranging from magnetic and inertial fusion to low temperature plasmas. Plasma sizes under investigation ranged from tiny to astronomical. The topics covered during the conference were distributed over the following categories: tokamaks, stellarators, high intensity laser produced plasmas and inertial confinement, alternative magnetic confinement, plasma edge physics, plasma heating and current drive, diagnostics, basic plasma physics, astrophysical and geophysical plasmas and low temperature plasmas. The scientific programme and paper selection were the responsibility of the Programme Committee appointed by the Board of the EPS Plasma Physics Division. The committee was composed of: R Koch, Chairman, ERM/KMS Brussels, Belgium E Ascasibar, CIEMAT Madrid, Spain S Atzeni, Università di Roma, Italy G Bonhomme, LPMI Nancy, France C Chiuderi, Università di Firenze, Italy B Kuteev, St Petersburg State Polytechnical,University, Russian Federation M Mauel, Contact person APS-DPP, Columbia University New York, USA R A Pitts, EPFL/CRPP Lausanne, Switzerland R Salomaa

  10. History of NAMES Conferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, Lev

    2013-03-01

    Franco-Russian NAMES Seminars are held for the purpose of reviewing and discussing actual developments in the field of materials science by researchers from Russia and from the Lorraine Region of France. In more precise terms, as set down by the organizers of the seminar (the Moscow Institute of Steel and Alloys and the Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine), the mission of the seminars is as follows: the development of scientific and academic contacts, giving a new impulse to joint fundamental research and technology transfer the development and consolidation of scientific, technical and business collaboration between the regions of Russia and Lorraine through direct contact between the universities, institutes and companies involved The first Seminar took place on 27-29 October 2004, at the Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine (on the premises of the Ecole Européenne d'Ingénieurs en Génie des Matériaux, Nancy, France). The number, variety and quality of the oral presentations given and posters exhibited at the first Seminar were of high international standard. 30 oral presentations were given and 72 posters were presented by 19 participants from five universities and three institutes of the Russian Academy of Sciences participants from 11 laboratories of three universities from the Lorraine region three industrial companies, including the European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company—EADS, and ANVAR (Agence Nationale de Valorisation de la Recherche) From 2005 onwards, it was decided to organize the Seminar every other year. The second Seminar convened on the occasion of the 75th Anniversary of the Moscow Institute of Steel and Alloys on 10-12 November 2005 in Moscow, Russia. The seminar demonstrated the efficiency of the scientific partnership founded between the research groups of Russia and France during the first Seminar. High productivity of the Franco-Russian scientific cooperation on the basis of the Research-Educational Franco

  11. Application of WRF/Chem-MADRID and WRF/Polyphemus in Europe - Part 2: Evaluation of chemical concentrations and sensitivity simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Sartelet, K.; Zhu, S.; Wang, W.; Wu, S.-Y.; Zhang, X.; Wang, K.; Tran, P.; Seigneur, C.; Wang, Z.-F.

    2013-07-01

    An offline-coupled model (WRF/Polyphemus) and an online-coupled model (WRF/Chem-MADRID) are applied to simulate air quality in July 2001 at horizontal grid resolutions of 0.5° and 0.125° over Western Europe. The model performance is evaluated against available surface and satellite observations. The two models simulate different concentrations in terms of domainwide performance statistics, spatial distribution, temporal variations, and column abundance. WRF/Chem-MADRID at 0.5° gives higher values than WRF/Polyphemus for the domainwide mean and over polluted regions in Central and southern Europe for all surface concentrations and column variables except for the tropospheric ozone residual (TOR). Compared with observations, WRF/Polyphemus gives better statistical performance for daily HNO3, SO2, and NO2 at the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) sites, maximum 1 h O3 at the AirBase sites, PM2.5 at the AirBase sites, maximum 8 h O3 and PM10 composition at all sites, column abundance of CO, NO2, TOR, and aerosol optical depth (AOD), whereas WRF/Chem-MADRID gives better statistical performance for NH3, hourly SO2, NO2, and O3 at the AirBase and BDQA (Base de données de la qualité de l'air) sites, maximum 1 h O3 at the BDQA and EMEP sites, and PM10 at all sites. WRF/Chem-MADRID generally reproduces well the observed high hourly concentrations of SO2 and NO2 at most sites except for extremely high episodes at a few sites, and WRF/Polyphemus performs well for hourly SO2 concentrations at most rural or background sites where pollutant levels are relatively low, but it underpredicts the observed hourly NO2 concentrations at most sites. Both models generally capture well the daytime maximum 8 h O3 concentrations and diurnal variations of O3 with more accurate peak daytime and minimal nighttime values by WRF/Chem-MADRID, but neither model reproduces extremely low nighttime O3 concentrations at several urban and suburban sites due to underpredictions of

  12. The General Conference Mennonites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    General Conference Mennonites and Old Order Amish are compared and contrasted in the areas of physical appearance, religious beliefs, formal education, methods of farming, and home settings. General Conference Mennonites and Amish differ in physical appearance and especially in dress. The General Conference Mennonite men and women dress the same…

  13. Parent Conferences. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Roslyn; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Presents six workshop sessions on parent conferences: (1) "Parents' Perspectives on Conferencing" (R. Duffy); (2) "Three Way Conferences" (G. Zeller); (3) "Conferencing with Parents of Infants" (K. Albrecht); (4) "Conferencing with Parents of School-Agers" (L. G. Miller); (5) "Cross Cultural Conferences" (J. Gonzalez-Mena); and (6) "Working with…

  14. Analysis of the seismic origin of landslides: examples from the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jibson, R.W.; Keefer, D.K.

    1993-01-01

    By analyzing two landslides in the New Madrid seismic zone, we develop an approach for judging if a landslide or group of landslides of unknown origin was more likely to have formed as a result of earthquake shaking or in aseismic conditions. The two landslides analyzed are representative of two groups of land-slides that previous research on the geomorphology and regional distribution of landslides in this region indicates may have been triggered by the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquakes. Slope-stability models of aseismic conditions show that neither landslide is likely to have formed aseismically even in unrealistically high ground-water conditions. Our analysis yields a general relationship between Newmark landslide displacement, earthquake shaking intensity, and the critical acceleration of a landslide. -from Authors

  15. Geoarchaeological evidence of strong prehistoric earthquakes in the New Madrid (Missouri) seismic zone

    SciTech Connect

    Saucier, R.T. )

    1991-04-01

    Sand blows and fissures that cover >10,500 km{sup 2} in northeastern Arkansas and southeastern Missouri attest to the severity of the 1811-1812 earthquake series in the New Madrid seismic zone. However, except for one occurence near New Madrid, Missouri, the region has been devoid of any evidence of other major shocks for at least 1.3 ka prior to 1811 and possibly for >9 ka. Stratigraphic relations and radiocarbon dating at a recently excavated archaeological site near East Prairie, Missouri, have revealed liquifaction phenomena attributable to a shock dated to within about 100 yr prior to A.D. 539 and a probable second one dated between about A.D. 539 and 991.

  16. Happiness on the street: Overall happiness among homeless people in Madrid (Spain).

    PubMed

    Panadero, Sonia; Guillén, Ana Isabel; Vázquez, José Juan

    2015-07-01

    This article tests a hypothesized model of overall happiness among homeless people in Spain. The research was conducted based on a representative sample of homeless people in Madrid (n = 235), all adults, who had spent the night before the interview in a shelter for homeless people, on the street or in other places not initially designed for sleeping, or who were in supervised accommodation for homeless people at the time of the interview. Information was gathered using a structured interview. The results obtained show that around half of the homeless people in Madrid said that they were happy. A positive meta-stereotype and a better perceived general health were associated with a higher overall happiness, while feelings of loneliness were associated with a lower overall happiness. Happiness also showed a significant effect on future expectations. Disabilities and handicaps had a significant effect on perceived general health, which was in turn associated with overall happiness among homeless people. PMID:26167804

  17. Evaluation of the plan for surveillance and controlling of the effects of heat waves in Madrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culqui, Dante R.; Diaz, Julio; Simón, Fernando; Tobías, Aurelio; Linares, Cristina

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents evaluation of a plan for surveillance of and controlling the effects of heat-related mortality (PSCEHW), implemented in Madrid in 2004 through a time series analysis conducted with ARIMA modeling. From the public health point of view, prevention plans should be implemented as adaptive measures to heat waves. In 2003, the impact attributable to the heat wave was an increase in mortality per °C of 22.39 %. All heat waves since 2003 have been of lower intensity, and yet, in 2005 there was a heat wave of lower intensity that had a greater impact, i.e. an increase in mortality per °C of 45.71 %. With the methodology used here, we cannot say whether implementation of PSCEHW has resulted in a decrease of mortality attributable to high temperatures in the city of Madrid.

  18. CPT site characterization for seismic hazards in the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liao, T.; Mayne, P.W.; Tuttle, M.P.; Schweig, E.S.; Van Arsdale, R.B.

    2002-01-01

    A series of cone penetration tests (CPTs) were conducted in the vicinity of the New Madrid seismic zone in central USA for quantifying seismic hazards, obtaining geotechnical soil properties, and conducting studies at liquefaction sites related to the 1811-1812 and prehistoric New Madrid earthquakes. The seismic piezocone provides four independent measurements for delineating the stratigraphy, liquefaction potential, and site amplification parameters. At the same location, two independent assessments of soil liquefaction susceptibility can be made using both the normalized tip resistance (qc1N) and shear wave velocity (Vs1). In lieu of traditional deterministic approaches, the CPT data can be processed using probability curves to assess the level and likelihood of future liquefaction occurrence. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The congress that never was: the Madrid International Congress of Psychology (1936).

    PubMed

    Carpintero, Helio; Lafuente, Enrique

    2008-11-01

    The 11th International Congress of Psychology did not take place in Madrid in September 1936, as initially planned. Instead, it was held in Paris in July of the following year. The finding of a so-far unpublished correspondence between the main organizers of the event, the Spanish psychologists José Germain and Emilio Mira, and the Swiss psychologist Edouard Claparède, makes it possible to gain new insight into the circumstances preventing its celebration in Madrid. This paper aims at shedding some light on such circumstances by unraveling the social and political context alluded to in these letters, and connecting their contents with other significant events and documents on the various organizational aspects of the congress. PMID:19244832

  20. 8th Spacecraft Charging Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minor, J. L. (Compiler)

    2004-01-01

    The 8th Spacecraft Charging Technology Conference was held in Huntsville, Alabama, October 20-24, 2003. Hosted by NASA s Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program and co-sponsored by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and the European Space Agency (ESA), the 2003 conference saw attendance from eleven countries with over 65 oral papers and 18 poster papers. Presentation topics highlighted the latest in spacecraft charging mitigation techniques and on-orbit investigations, including: Plasma Propulsion and Tethers; Ground Testing Techniques; Interactions of Spacecraft and Systems With the Natural and Induced Plasma Environment; Materials Characterizations; Models and Computer Simulations; Environment Specifications; Current Collection and Plasma Probes in Space Plasmas; On-Orbit Investigations. A round-table discussion of international standards regarding electrostatic discharge (ESD) testing was also held with the promise of continued discussions in the off years and an official continuation at the next conference.

  1. [Implementation of a patient safety strategy in primary care of the Community of Madrid].

    PubMed

    Cañada Dorado, A; Drake Canela, M; Olivera Cañadas, G; Mateos Rodilla, J; Mediavilla Herrera, I; Miquel Gómez, A

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a patient safety strategy in primary care within the new organizational and functional structure that was created in October 2010 to cover the single primary health care area of the Community of Madrid. The results obtained in Patient Safety after the implementation of this new model over the first two years of its development are also presented. PMID:25638705

  2. Map showing locations of geophysical survey and modeling lines in the vicinity of New Madrid, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rhea, Susan; Wheeler, Russell L.

    1994-01-01

    This is one of a series of five seismotectonic maps of the seismically active New Madrid area in southeast Missouri and adjacent parts of Arkansas, Kentucky, and Tennessee (table 1). We cannot legibly show all the seismotectonic data on a single map, therefore each of the five maps in this series groups a different type of related information. Rhea and others (1994) summarized the background and purpose of the seismotectonic map folio.

  3. Seismological investigation of earthquakes in the New Madrid seismic zone and the northeastern extent of the New Madrid seismic zone: Final report, September 1981-December 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, R.B.; Taylor, K.; Nguyen, B.

    1988-07-01

    Earthquake activity in the Central Mississippi Valley has been monitored by an eight station seismograph network in the Wabash River Valley of southeastern Illinois and by a six station seismograph network in the New Madrid seismic zone. This network is a major component of a larger network in the region, jointly sponsored by the NRC, USGS, universities and states. During the time period of the contract, October 1981 through December 1986, 1206 earthquakes were located in the Central Mississippi Valley, of which 808 were in the New Madrid, Missouri area. Significant earthquakes studied in detail occurred in northeastern Ohio on January 31, 1986 and in southeastern Illinois on June 10, 1987. Focal mechanisms have been calculated for the 10 June 1987 southern Illinois earthquake using both P-wave first motions and long-period surface-wave spectral amplitude data. The long-period surface-wave and strong ground motion accelerogram recordings of the January 3, 1986, northeastern Ohio earthquake were used to estimate the focal mechanism and source time function of the source.reverse arrow

  4. Can current New Madrid seismicity be explained as a decaying aftershock sequence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, M. T.; Hough, S. E.; Felzer, K. R.

    2012-12-01

    It has been suggested that continuing seismicity in the New Madrid, central U.S. region is primarily composed of the continuing long-lived aftershock sequence of the 1811-1812 sequence, and thus cannot be taken as an indication of present-day strain accrual in the region. We examine historical and instrumental seismicity in the New Madrid region to determine if such a model is feasible given 1) the observed protracted nature of past New Madrid sequences, with multiple mainshocks with apparently similar magnitudes; 2) the rate of historically documented early aftershocks from the 1811-1812 sequence; and 3) plausible mainshock magnitudes and aftershock-productivity parameters. We use ETAS modeling to search for sub-critical sets of direct Omori parameters that are consistent with all of these datasets, given a realistic consideration of their uncertainties, and current seismicity in the region. The results of this work will help to determine whether or not future sequences are likely to be clusters of events like those in the past, a key issue for earthquake response planning.

  5. Analysing the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquakes with recent instrumentally recorded aftershocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, K.; Hough, S.E.; Bilham, R.

    2004-01-01

    Although dynamic stress changes associated with the passage of seismic waves are thought to trigger earthquakes at great distances, more than 60 per cent of all aftershocks appear to be triggered by static stress changes within two rupture lengths of a mainshock. The observed distribution of aftershocks may thus be used to infer details of mainshock rupture geometry. Aftershocks following large mid-continental earthquakes, where background stressing rates are low, are known to persist for centuries, and models based on rate-and-state friction laws provide theoretical support for this inference. Most past studies of the New Madrid earthquake sequence have indeed assumed ongoing microseismicity to be a continuing aftershock sequence. Here we use instrumentally recorded aftershock locations and models of elastic stress change to develop a kinematically consistent rupture scenario for three of the four largest earthquakes of the 1811-1812 New Madrid sequence. Our results suggest that these three events occurred on two contiguous faults, producing lobes of increased stress near fault intersections and end points, in areas where present-day microearthquakes have been hitherto interpreted as evidence of primary mainshock rupture. We infer that the remaining New Madrid mainshock may have occurred more than 200 km north of this region in the Wabash Valley of southern Indiana and Illinois-an area that contains abundant modern microseismicity, and where substantial liquefaction was documented by historic accounts. Our results suggest that future large midplate earthquake sequences may extend over a much broader region than previously suspected.

  6. Analysing the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquakes with recent instrumentally recorded aftershocks.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Karl; Hough, Susan E; Bilham, Roger

    2004-05-20

    Although dynamic stress changes associated with the passage of seismic waves are thought to trigger earthquakes at great distances, more than 60 per cent of all aftershocks appear to be triggered by static stress changes within two rupture lengths of a mainshock. The observed distribution of aftershocks may thus be used to infer details of mainshock rupture geometry. Aftershocks following large mid-continental earthquakes, where background stressing rates are low, are known to persist for centuries, and models based on rate-and-state friction laws provide theoretical support for this inference. Most past studies of the New Madrid earthquake sequence have indeed assumed ongoing microseismicity to be a continuing aftershock sequence. Here we use instrumentally recorded aftershock locations and models of elastic stress change to develop a kinematically consistent rupture scenario for three of the four largest earthquakes of the 1811-1812 New Madrid sequence. Our results suggest that these three events occurred on two contiguous faults, producing lobes of increased stress near fault intersections and end points, in areas where present-day microearthquakes have been hitherto interpreted as evidence of primary mainshock rupture. We infer that the remaining New Madrid mainshock may have occurred more than 200 km north of this region in the Wabash Valley of southern Indiana and Illinois--an area that contains abundant modern microseismicity, and where substantial liquefaction was documented by historic accounts. Our results suggest that future large mid-plate earthquake sequences may extend over a much broader region than previously suspected. PMID:15152249

  7. New Madrid Seismic Zone: a test case for naturally induced seismicity

    SciTech Connect

    Nava, S.J.

    1983-09-01

    Induced seismicity caused by man-made events, such as the filling of reservoirs has been well documented. In contrast, naturally induced seismicity has received little attention. It has been shown that a fluctuation of as little as several bars can trigger reservoir induced earthquakes. Naturally occurring phenomena generate similar fluctuations and could trigger earthquakes where the faults in ambient stress field are suitably oriented and close to failure. The New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) presents an ideal test case for the study of naturally induced seismicity. The ideal data set for a study of triggering effects must contain a statistically significant number of events, a constant accumulated strain, and a limited focal region. New Madrid earthquakes are well documented from 1974 to the present, down to a magnitude approx. 1.8. They lie in a distinct fault pattern and occur as a reaction to the regional stress regime. A statistical correlation was made between the earthquakes and a variety of different types of loads, to see if New Madrid seismicity could be triggered by natural fluctuations. The types of triggers investigated ranged from solid earth tides to variations in barometric pressure, rainfall, and stages of the Mississippi River. This analysis becomes complex because each factor investigated creates individual stresses, as well as having imbedded in it a reaction to other factors.

  8. ISMB Conference Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Teresa, Gaasterand; Martin, Vingron

    2011-07-01

    This special issue comprises the papers accepted for presentation at the 19th Annual International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology, joint with the 10th European Conference on Computational Biology, an official conference of the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB; http://www.iscb.org). ISMB/ECCB 2011 (http://www.iscb.org/ismb2011/) will take place in Vienna, Austria, from July 17 through July 19, 2011; preceded during July 14–16 by eight 1- or 2- day Special Interest Group (SIG) meetings, three satellite meetings and nine half-day tutorials; and followed by two additional satellite meetings. The 48 papers in this volume were selected from 258 submitted papers. Submitted papers were assigned to 13 areas. Area Chairs led each topic area by selecting their area's program committee and overseeing the reviewing process. Many Area Chairs were new compared to 2010, and two completely new areas were added in 2011, ‘Data Visualization’ and ‘Mass Spectrometry and Proteomics’. Six papers for which Area Chairs were in conflict were reviewed under a ‘Conflicts Management’ section headed by the Proceedings Chairs; one such paper was accepted in ‘Bioimaging’. Areas, co-chairs and acceptance information are listed in Table 1. Compared to prior years, five mature topic areas had steady submissions, ‘Evolution and Comparative Genomics’, ‘Gene Regulation and Transcriptomics’, ‘Protein Structure and Function’, ‘Sequence Analysis’, ‘Text Mining’. Two areas newer to ISMB were underrepresented this year, ‘Bioimaging’ and ‘Disease Models and Epidemiology’. One area doubled, ‘Applied Bioinformatics’, renamed from last year's ‘Other Bioinformatics Applications’; and one tripled, ‘Protein Interactions and Molecular Networks’. Across the areas, 326 members of the bioinformatics community provided reviews. Most papers received three reviews and several received four or more. There was

  9. FOREWORD: HELAS II International Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizon, Laurent; Roth, Markus

    2008-07-01

    Volume 118 (2008) of Journal of Physics: Conference Series provides a written record of the talks and posters presented at the HELAS II International Conference `Helioseismology, Asteroseismology and MHD Connections'. The conference was held during the week 20-24 August 2007 in Göttingen, Germany, jointly hosted by the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research and the Faculty of Physics of the University of Göttingen. A total of 140 scientists from all over the world attended. The Scientific Organizing Committee consisted of Conny Aerts, Annie Baglin, Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard, Thierry Corbard, Jadwiga Daszyńska-Daszkiewicz, Stefan Dreizler, Yvonne Elsworth, Laurent Gizon (Chairman), Wolfgang Glatzel, Frank Hill, Donald Kurtz, Oskar von der Lühe, Maria Pia Di Mauro, Mário Monteiro, Pere Pallé, Markus Roth, Philip Scherrer, Manfred Schüssler, and Michael Thompson. HELAS stands for the European Helio- and Asteroseismology Network, a Coordination Action supported by the sixth Framework Programme of the European Union. It aims to bring together researchers in the fields of solar and stellar oscillations. This volume consists of 91 articles organized into sections that reflect the scientific programme of the conference: 012001-07 Wave diagnostics in physics, geophysics and astrophysics 012008-09 Perspectives on helio- and asteroseismology 012010-17 Asteroseismology: Observations 012018-25 Asteroseismology: Theory 012026-32 Global helioseismology and solar models 012033-38 Local helioseismology and magnetic activity 012039-44 Future observational projects in helio- and asteroseismology 012045-91 Poster papers. The overwhelming majority of papers discuss the seismology of the Sun and stars. Papers in the first section provide a broader perspective on wave phenomena and techniques for probing other physical systems, from living beings to the universe as a whole. We were extremely fortunate to have particularly distinguished experts to cover these topics

  10. American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network, and International Myeloma Working Group Consensus Conference on Salvage Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients with Relapsed Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Giralt, Sergio; Garderet, Laurent; Durie, Brian; Cook, Gordon; Gahrton, Gosta; Bruno, Benedetto; Hari, Paremesweran; Lokhorst, Henk; McCarthy, Phillip; Krishnan, Amrita; Sonneveld, Pieter; Goldschmidt, Harmut; Jagannath, Sundar; Barlogie, Bart; Mateos, Maria; Gimsing, Peter; Sezer, Orhan; Mikhael, Joseph; Lu, Jin; Dimopoulos, Meletios; Mazumder, Amitabha; Palumbo, Antonio; Abonour, Rafat; Anderson, Kenneth; Attal, Michel; Blade, Joan; Bird, Jenny; Cavo, Michele; Comenzo, Raymond; de la Rubia, Javier; Einsele, Hermann; Garcia-Sanz, Ramon; Hillengass, Jens; Holstein, Sarah; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Joshua, Douglas; Koehne, Guenther; Kumar, Shaji; Kyle, Robert; Leleu, Xavier; Lonial, Sagar; Ludwig, Heinz; Nahi, Hareth; Nooka, Anil; Orlowski, Robert; Rajkumar, Vincent; Reiman, Anthony; Richardson, Paul; Riva, Eloisa; Miguel, Jesus San; Turreson, Ingemar; Usmani, Saad; Vesole, David; Bensinger, William; Qazilbash, Muzaffer; Efebera, Yvonne; Mohty, Mohamed; Gasparreto, Christina; Gajewski, James; LeMaistre, Charles F.; Bredeson, Chris; Moreau, Phillipe; Pasquini, Marcelo; Kroeger, Nicolaus; Stadtmauer, Edward

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the upfront setting in which the role of high-dose therapy with autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) as consolidation of a first remission in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) is well established, the role of high-dose therapy with autologous or allogeneic HCT has not been extensively studied in MM patients relapsing after primary therapy. The International Myeloma Working Group together with the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network, the American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation convened a meeting of MM experts to: (1) summarize current knowledge regarding the role of autologous or allogeneic HCT in MM patients progressing after primary therapy, (2) propose guidelines for the use of salvage HCT in MM, (3) identify knowledge gaps, (4) propose a research agenda, and (5) develop a collaborative initiative to move the research agenda forward. After reviewing the available data, the expert committee came to the following consensus statement for salvage autologous HCT: (1) In transplantation-eligible patients relapsing after primary therapy that did NOT include an autologous HCT, high-dose therapy with HCT as part of salvage therapy should be considered standard; (2) High-dose therapy and autologous HCT should be considered appropriate therapy for any patients relapsing after primary therapy that includes an autologous HCT with initial remission duration of more than 18 months; (3) High-dose therapy and autologous HCT can be used as a bridging strategy to allogeneic HCT; (4) The role of postsalvage HCT maintenance needs to be explored in the context of well-designed prospective trials that should include new agents, such as monoclonal antibodies, immune-modulating agents, and oral proteasome inhibitors; (5) Autologous HCT consolidation should be explored as a strategy to develop novel conditioning regimens or post-HCT strategies in patients with short

  11. American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network, and International Myeloma Working Group Consensus Conference on Salvage Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients with Relapsed Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Giralt, Sergio; Garderet, Laurent; Durie, Brian; Cook, Gordon; Gahrton, Gosta; Bruno, Benedetto; Hari, Paremesweran; Lokhorst, Henk; McCarthy, Phillip; Krishnan, Amrita; Sonneveld, Pieter; Goldschmidt, Harmut; Jagannath, Sundar; Barlogie, Bart; Mateos, Maria; Gimsing, Peter; Sezer, Orhan; Mikhael, Joseph; Lu, Jin; Dimopoulos, Meletios; Mazumder, Amitabha; Palumbo, Antonio; Abonour, Rafat; Anderson, Kenneth; Attal, Michel; Blade, Joan; Bird, Jenny; Cavo, Michele; Comenzo, Raymond; de la Rubia, Javier; Einsele, Hermann; Garcia-Sanz, Ramon; Hillengass, Jens; Holstein, Sarah; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Joshua, Douglas; Koehne, Guenther; Kumar, Shaji; Kyle, Robert; Leleu, Xavier; Lonial, Sagar; Ludwig, Heinz; Nahi, Hareth; Nooka, Anil; Orlowski, Robert; Rajkumar, Vincent; Reiman, Anthony; Richardson, Paul; Riva, Eloisa; San Miguel, Jesus; Turreson, Ingemar; Usmani, Saad; Vesole, David; Bensinger, William; Qazilbash, Muzaffer; Efebera, Yvonne; Mohty, Mohamed; Gasparreto, Christina; Gajewski, James; LeMaistre, Charles F; Bredeson, Chris; Moreau, Phillipe; Pasquini, Marcelo; Kroeger, Nicolaus; Stadtmauer, Edward

    2015-12-01

    In contrast to the upfront setting in which the role of high-dose therapy with autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) as consolidation of a first remission in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) is well established, the role of high-dose therapy with autologous or allogeneic HCT has not been extensively studied in MM patients relapsing after primary therapy. The International Myeloma Working Group together with the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network, the American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation convened a meeting of MM experts to: (1) summarize current knowledge regarding the role of autologous or allogeneic HCT in MM patients progressing after primary therapy, (2) propose guidelines for the use of salvage HCT in MM, (3) identify knowledge gaps, (4) propose a research agenda, and (5) develop a collaborative initiative to move the research agenda forward. After reviewing the available data, the expert committee came to the following consensus statement for salvage autologous HCT: (1) In transplantation-eligible patients relapsing after primary therapy that did NOT include an autologous HCT, high-dose therapy with HCT as part of salvage therapy should be considered standard; (2) High-dose therapy and autologous HCT should be considered appropriate therapy for any patients relapsing after primary therapy that includes an autologous HCT with initial remission duration of more than 18 months; (3) High-dose therapy and autologous HCT can be used as a bridging strategy to allogeneic HCT; (4) The role of postsalvage HCT maintenance needs to be explored in the context of well-designed prospective trials that should include new agents, such as monoclonal antibodies, immune-modulating agents, and oral proteasome inhibitors; (5) Autologous HCT consolidation should be explored as a strategy to develop novel conditioning regimens or post-HCT strategies in patients with short

  12. [Major milestones for European pharmaceutical policy].

    PubMed

    Sauer, Fernand

    2014-01-01

    Under the 1985 White Paper on the completion of the single market, several pharmaceutical harmonisation measures were unanimously adopted, in favor of biotech products and on pricing transparency, legal status of prescription, wholesale distribution and advertising. The European pharmaceutical harmonisation was extended to Norway and Iceland, to new accession member states and through major international conferences with the US and Japan (ICH). Starting in 1995, the European medicines agency has produced an efficient marketing authorisation system for new human and veterinary medicines. The system was extended to pediatric medicines and advanced therapies. The monitoring of drug adverse effects (pharmacovigilance) has been gradually strengthened. PMID:25668913

  13. Global WINDPOWER 2004 Conference Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    anon.

    2004-06-01

    Over 350 papers and presentations provided at the conference give the latest and most up-to-date information on wind energy. Over 40 organizations worldwide helped sponsor the event, with the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) and the European Wind Energy Association leading the way. The sessions were arranged in policy, technical, and business tracks, plus panel discussions. Examples of sessions include: Improvements in blade and low wind speed technology; Financing in developing countries and emerging markets; Forecasting challenges and solutions; Grid access and transmission; Wind energy for farms, homes, and small businesses; Hybrid system technology needs; Experience with market support mechanisms; Future applications (hydrogen, storage, desalination, etc.); Siting, permitting and NIMBY issues; Wind turbine loading: conditions, predictions and measurements; Offshore policy and experience; and Transmission and utilities: making it work.

  14. XXV IUPAP Conference on Computational Physics (CCP2013): Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-05-01

    XXV IUPAP Conference on Computational Physics (CCP2013) was held from 20-24 August 2013 at the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow, Russia. The annual Conferences on Computational Physics (CCP) present an overview of the most recent developments and opportunities in computational physics across a broad range of topical areas. The CCP series aims to draw computational scientists from around the world and to stimulate interdisciplinary discussion and collaboration by putting together researchers interested in various fields of computational science. It is organized under the auspices of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics and has been in existence since 1989. The CCP series alternates between Europe, America and Asia-Pacific. The conferences are traditionally supported by European Physical Society and American Physical Society. This year the Conference host was Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics. The Conference contained 142 presentations, and, in particular, 11 plenary talks with comprehensive reviews from airbursts to many-electron systems. We would like to take this opportunity to thank our sponsors: International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), European Physical Society (EPS), Division of Computational Physics of American Physical Society (DCOMP/APS), Russian Foundation for Basic Research, Department of Physical Sciences of Russian Academy of Sciences, RSC Group company. Further conference information and images from the conference are available in the pdf.

  15. EUNIS '99: Information Technology Shaping European Universities. Proceedings of the International European University Information Systems (5th, Espoo, Finland, June 7-9, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document presents the proceedings from the 5th International European University Information Systems (EUNIS) Conference on Information Technology that took place in Helsinki, Finland on June 7-9, 1999. Topics of the conference proceedings were divided into five tracks (A through E): Use of Information Technology in Learning and Teaching;…

  16. Interference from the Robledo DSN Transmitters to Central Madrid IMT-2000/UMTS System through Terrain Diffraction at S-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Christian M.; Sue, Miles K.; Peng, Ted K.; Smith, Ernest K.

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluates the possible interference from DSN Robledo 70-m transmitter with Madrid IMT-2000/UMTS wireless users in Spain as both systems will share the same frequency band. Using the effective earth radius, the 50 km terrain profile between Robledo and Madrid is modified and reconstructed. The diffraction propagation losses due to mountain peaks are calculated for the receivers in Madrid urban area. The mountains along the path are simplified into a rounded knife-edge and a rounded obstacle. The results show that for a near surface receiver (1.5 m above the ground) in Madrid, interference signal powers received are less than -135 dBm, which is far below the -109 dBm, the IMT-2000 wireless phone threshold. When a receiver is located at about 40 m above the ground (e.g., the top of Clock Tower of Cibeles Palace), diffraction will generate interference power less than -115 dBm. We find that our calculation results are basically consistent with those from the Longley-Rice model, while the latter has smaller loss because of the low resolution terrain profile used. As a comparison, we also find that the measurements of interference powers of -121.2 dBm at the top of Clock tower is in the range of the estimation. We conclude that the interference through the diffraction mechanism will not cause any problem to IMT-2000/UMTS users at near the surface of Madrid urban area.

  17. An Analysis of the Discourse and Actions of Reading Conferences with English Learners: A Situated Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sally

    2013-01-01

    In this article the author shares examples of reading conferences with 10 English learners over the course of a semester. The reading conferences are conducted by four monolingual, European-American teachers at a primary school in the Southeastern United States. Sociocultural and identity theories are used as a theoretical frame for the research…

  18. The Conference Proceedings of the 2003 Air Transport Research Society (ATRS) World Conference, Volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Brent (Editor); Gudmundsson, Sveinn (Editor); Oum, Tae (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    Volume 3 of the 2003 Air Transport Reserch Society (ATRS) World Conference includes papers on topics relevant to airline operations worldwide. Specific topics include: European Union and civil aviation regimens;simulating decision making in airline operations, passenger points of view on convenient airports; route monopolies and nonlinear pricing; cooperation among airports in Europe; fleet modernizaiton in Brazil;the effects of deregulation on the growth of air transportation in Europe and the United States.

  19. PREFACE: 6th Liquid Matter Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, Marjolein; van Roij, René; Vroege, Gert Jan; Lekkerkerker, Henk; Frenkel, Daan

    2005-11-01

    This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter contains the Proceedings of the 6th Liquid Matter Conference held in Utrecht, The Netherlands, 2-6 July 2005. The three-yearly Liquid Matter Conference is organized by the Liquids Section of the Condensed Matter Division of the European Physical Society. This series of meetings began in Lyon in 1990. The most recent meeting was held in 2003 in Konstanz. The aim of the Liquid Matter Conferences is to bring together scientists working on the liquid state of matter. This rapidly growing field includes the physics, chemistry, biology and chemical engineering of liquid matter as well as various applied research areas. In fact, the Utrecht meeting had, for the first time, a special session devoted to Fundamental Challenges in Applied Liquid Physics and Microfluidics. The Utrecht meeting had 760 registered participants from four continents. An important event at this meeting was the award of the First Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society to Professor Jean-Pierre Hansen FRS, of Cambridge University. In addition to a plenary speech by the recipient of the Liquid Matter Prize, the scientific programme consisted of 10 plenary lectures, 117 symposia talks, 25 of which were keynote lectures and some 650 poster contributions. The meeting also hosted a one-day symposium of the Division of Liquids and Interfaces of the Chemical Sciences division of NWO. This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter contains 61 of the oral communications. Liquid state physics is at the interface of many fields of research. As a consequence, many of the attendants come from adjacent fields and find in the Liquid Matter Conference a forum to meet experts from other areas of research. This aspect of the Liquid Matter Conference makes it an exciting meeting as it not only offers the participants an up-to-date picture of the status of research into the liquid state of matter, but it also allows them to establish new

  20. Evolution in the use of natural building stone in Madrid, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fort, R.; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Perez-Monserrat, E. M.; Varas-Muriel, M. J.; Gomez-Heras, M.; Freire, D. M.

    2012-04-01

    The first natural building stone used in Madrid was the flint, from the 9th to the 12th century. It was first used by the Arabs and there are some nice examples left, such as the Arab Wall in the very centre of Madrid. It was a hard and very resistant material, and the end of its use probably had more to do with the fact that was a really difficult stone to work, cut, shape and carve with due to its hardness and compactness, than with its suitability and availability as a building stone. This was the main reason to start using other type of materials, such as the Cretaceous limestones and dolostones- Redueña stone-; although their quarries were not as close to the city as the flintstones were, a Roman road made possible to bring this material to the city. The Redueña stone then became the most frequent used building stone in the city (used a longer time ago in the quarries areas): nice colour, easy to extract and to work and availability were some of the reasons for it, lasting its predominance until the 17th century. At the same time, more or less, the use of granitic materials started, abundant in the Central System range that limits the North of the Madrid province. This material - traditionally known as Berroqueña stone- never stopped to be used in built heritage since then. Although there are many different quarries, until the 17th century, granites from the Zarzalejo area (Center-West area of the Guadarrama mountain range) were most used, and also those from the Alpedrete area (Center-East area of the mentioned range) during mainly the 18th century It was not until this century when the advances in underground mining extraction and the construction of a bridge crossing the Tajo river, allowed the use of Colmenar stone in the city of Madrid, a limestone located at the Southeast of Madrid. It is a white, little porous and resistant material, which, together with the granite, became the traditional building stones of Madrid. This limestone shows excellent

  1. Special issue devoted to the ESSDERC'07 conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Jurriaan; Thewes, Roland

    2008-09-01

    This special issue of Solid-State Electronics is dedicated to topics discussed during the 37th European Solid-State Device Research Conference (ESSDERC) held in Munich in September 2007. It comprises seven plenary and invited papers written by eminent experts as well as 23 full-length contributed papers especially selected from a large number of ESSDERC'07 manuscripts.

  2. Acanthamoeba spp. in Contact Lenses from Healthy Individuals from Madrid, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Thiago dos Santos; Magnet, Angela; Izquierdo, Fernando; Vaccaro, Lucianna; Redondo, Fernando; Bueno, Sara; Sánchez, Maria Luisa; Angulo, Santiago; Fenoy, Soledad; Hurtado, Carolina; del Aguila, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is a painful and potentially blinding corneal infection caused by Acanthamoeba spp. In Madrid, environmental studies have demonstrated a high presence of these free-living amoebae in tap water. Since most of AK cases occur in contact lenses (CL) wearers with inadequate hygiene habits, the presence of Acanthamoeba in discarded CL has been studied and compared with other common etiological agents of keratitis, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Methods One hundred and seventy-seven healthy individuals from Madrid contributed their discarded CL and answered a questionnaire on hygiene habits. DNA was extracted from the CL solution and analyzed by real-time PCR for Acanthamoeba, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. These CL and their solutions were also cultured on non-nutrient agar to isolate Acanthamoeba. Results Among the 177 samples, Acanthamoeba DNA was detected in 87 (49.2%), P. aeruginosa DNA in 14 (7.9%) and S. aureus DNA in 19 (10.7%). Cultivable amoebae, however, were observed in only one sample (0.6%). This isolate was genotyped as T4. The habits reported by this CL owner included some recognized risk factors for AK, but in this study only the practice of “not cleaning the CL case” presented some statistical significant association with Acanthamoeba DNA presence. Detection of the investigated bacterial DNA did not demonstrate statistical significant association with the studied practices, but the presence of P. aeruginosa revealed a possible inhibition of Acanthamoeba in these samples. Conclusions The PCR results suggest a high presence of Acanthamoeba spp. in healthy CL wearers from Madrid, but we can assume that CL solutions are properly disinfecting the CL since only 1.1% of the positive PCR samples correspond to viable amoebae and, after four years, only one participant reported stronger ocular problems. Nevertheless, more studies are necessary to corroborate this hypothesis. PMID

  3. Perspectives on earthquake hazards in the New Madrid seismic zone, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thenhaus, P.C.

    1990-01-01

    A sequence of three great earthquakes struck the Central United States during the winter of 1811-1812 in the area of New Madrid, Missouri. they are considered to be the greatest earthquakes in the conterminous U.S because they were felt and caused damage at far greater distances than any other earthquakes in U.S history. The large population currently living within the damage area of these earthquakes means that widespread destruction and loss of life is likely if the sequence were repeated. In contrast to California, where the earthquakes are felt frequently, the damaging earthquakes that have occurred in the Easter U.S-in 155 (Cape Ann, Mass.), 1811-12 (New Madrid, Mo.), 1886 (Charleston S.C) ,and 1897 (Giles County, Va.- are generally regarded as only historical phenomena (fig. 1). The social memory of these earthquakes no longer exists. A fundamental problem in the Eastern U.S, therefore, is that the earthquake hazard is not generally considered today in land-use and civic planning. This article offers perspectives on the earthquake hazard of the New Madrid seismic zone through discussions of the geology of the Mississippi Embayment, the historical earthquakes that have occurred there, the earthquake risk, and the "tools" that geoscientists have to study the region. The so-called earthquake hazard is defined  by the characterization of the physical attributes of the geological structures that cause earthquakes, the estimation of the recurrence times of the earthquakes, the estimation of the recurrence times of the earthquakes, their potential size, and the expected ground motions. the term "earthquake risk," on the other hand, refers to aspects of the expected damage to manmade strctures and to lifelines as a result of the earthquake hazard.  

  4. Performance of building materials under load stresses: the case of Arroyo Meaques Bridge in Madrid, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mencías, David; Gomez-Heras, Miguel; Lopez-Gonzalez, Laura

    2015-04-01

    In most masonry structures analyzed by limit state models, it is not possible to determine where thrust lines are located or stress fields are defined. This is because very small modifications of the geometry can modify considerably a stress situation. Moreover, structural safety of this kind of construction is mainly established by equilibrium, and structural analysis is based on this premise. However, from the point of view of a stress model, the thrust line can be approximately positioned (either graphically or by analytical methods) only from a geometrical description and material properties and, therefore, determine the amount of stresses that masonry undergoes. This research tries to provide the relationship between geometry and thrust line analysis, applied to the 17th century Arroyo Meaques Bridge. This is a brick and stone bridge, located at the southwest edge of Casa de Campo in Madrid (Spain) and it actually sets up the limit of the municipality of Madrid. The bridge was designed by architect Francesco Sabatini as a part of a set of improvements of Madrid city center. Starting from a geometrical surveying and photogrammetric restitution, a 3-dimension CAD model is performed, in which all geometrical conditions are collected. At the same time, elastic properties, compactness and strength of bricks were determined by means of non-destructive techniques, such as Schmidt hammer and ultrasound pulse velocity. All this information is uploaded to a GIS and 2D maps are generated. Brick physical properties were compared to previously done thrust line analysis to understand the relationship between maximum stresses and brick performance. This technique may be a starting point for more specific analysis, once possible failure mechanisms are identified and can be a very simple method to identify how it can affect any geometrical changes. Research funded by Geomateriales 2 S2013/MIT-2914, CEI Moncloa (UPM, UCM, CSIC) through a PICATA contract and the foundation

  5. GUMNET - A new long-term monitoring initiative in the Guadarrama Mountains, Madrid, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, Volker; Fidel González Rouco, J.; Yagüe Anguis, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    We are announcing a new monitoring network in the Guadarrama Mountains north of Madrid, which is planned to be operational in early 2015. This network integrates atmospheric measurements as well as subsurface observations. It aims at improving the characterization of atmosphere-ground interactions in mountainous terrain, the hydrometeorology of the region, climatic change, and related research lines. It will also provide the meteorological and climate data which form the necessary background information for biological, agricultural and hydrological investigations in this area. Currently, the initiative is supported by research groups from the Complutense and Polytechnical Universities of Madrid (UCM and UPM), the Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), the Spanish National Meteorological Agency (AEMET), and finally the Parque Nacional de la Sierra de Guadarrama (PNSG). This infrastructure forms part of the Campus of Excellence Moncloa, and is supposed to become a focus of local as well as of international research. However, it is not associated with a particular project: data will in principle be available to the scientific and public communities. Also, the integration of new instruments (long or short term) will be welcome. The starting setup is as following: A group of WMO-compatible meteorological station in the central area of the massif will be installed, which include also a subsurface component of boreholes (≡20 m depth), where temperature and moisture will be measured. This core group is complemented by a reference site near El Escorial (including a fixed and a mobile tower for micrometeorological investigations). This setup is embedded in a network of meteorological stations run partly by AEMET and partly by the PNSG, which will provide the information necessary for the characterization of regional meteorology and climate. Finally, part of the data will be made available quasi-online on a central web server in

  6. Study on frozen nuclei in the winter season in the northern mountains of Madrid (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcos, J. L.; Sánchez, J. L.; Posada, R.; Gascón, E.; Fernández, S.; Hermida, L.; García-Ortega, E.; López, L.

    2012-04-01

    In the Framework of Studies that the Group for Atmospheric Physics from the University of León has been developing about winter precipitation in the mountains of Madrid, one of the experimental objectives consists of the measurement of concentration (L-1) of frozen nuclei (IN) at the ground level, using an isothermal cloud chamber. The Experimental Center is found in the reservoir in Sierra Guadarrama, located about 50 km north of Madrid, at a height of 1294 meters above sea level. The sample is of 234 days, of which 119 showed precipitation, corresponding to three winter seasons (2008/2009, 2009/2010 and 2010/2011). The chamber is capable of operating at different temperatures. Making use of past experiences, we set the working temperature at -23°C. The principle objectives of the study were, on one hand, to determine the distribution of nuclei concentrations, and on the other, to analyze if this distribution presented similar behaviour, extracting days with precipitation from the sample. The results show that the concentration of nuclei is low. To be exact, on 75% of the days analyzed, this statistic did not exceed 25 L-1. With respect to the second objective described, we saw that the distribution of the concentration stayed very similar in those days in which ground precipitation was registered. In other words, precipitation was not associated with an increase in the number of nuclei. Finally, given the relative proximity of the Experimental Center to the city of Madrid, we took measurements of aerosols to analyze their possible influence on the presence of the nuclei. The results did not allow us to infer a statistically significant relationship between both concentrations. Acknowledgements This study was supported by the following grants: CEN20091028; GRANIMETRO (CGL2010-15930); MICROMETEO (IPT-310000-2010-22 ) and LE220A11-2 (Junta de Castilla y León).

  7. The Council of Europe and Sport, 1966-1998. Volume IV: Texts of the European Convention on Spectator Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France).

    This document presents texts from the European Convention on Spectator Violence. The six parts are (1) "Texts Adopted by the Committee of Ministers"; (2) "Texts Adopted at Conferences, Working Parties, and Informal Meetings of European Ministers Responsible for Sport" and "Informal Working Parties/Informal Meeting of European Ministers Responsible…

  8. Workshop on New Madrid geodesy and the challenges of understanding intraplate earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyd, Oliver; Calais, Eric; Langbein, John; Magistrale, Harold; Stein, Seth; Zoback, Mark

    2013-01-01

    On March 4, 2011, 26 researchers gathered in Norwood, Massachusetts, for a workshop sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey and FM Global to discuss geodesy in and around the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) and its relation to earthquake hazard. The group addressed the challenge of reconciling current geodetic measurements, which show low present-day surface strain rates, with paleoseismic evidence of recent, relatively frequent, major earthquakes in the region. Several researchers were invited by the organizing committee to give overview presentations while all participants were encouraged to present their most recent ideas. The overview presentations appear in this report along with a set of recommendations.

  9. Support Vector Regression Algorithms in the Forecasting of Daily Maximums of Tropospheric Ozone Concentration in Madrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-García, E. G.; Salcedo-Sanz, S.; Pérez-Bellido, A. M.; Gascón-Moreno, J.; Portilla-Figueras, A.

    In this paper we present the application of a support vector regression algorithm to a real problem of maximum daily tropospheric ozone forecast. The support vector regression approach proposed is hybridized with an heuristic for optimal selection of hyper-parameters. The prediction of maximum daily ozone is carried out in all the station of the air quality monitoring network of Madrid. In the paper we analyze how the ozone prediction depends on meteorological variables such as solar radiation and temperature, and also we perform a comparison against the results obtained using a multi-layer perceptron neural network in the same prediction problem.

  10. Berroqueña stone of Madrid (Spain). A traditional and contemporary building stone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire Lista, David Martin; Fort, Rafael; Varas Muriel, Ma José

    2014-05-01

    In the Alpedrete monzogranite to granodiorite pluton (350 km2) at 45 km north of the city of Madrid, there are several quarries of Berroqueña stone.This stone has been widely used as building stone in well-preserved and significant buildings of the central area of Spain, such as the Nuestra Señora de la Asunción in Alpedrete (16th century), Royal Palace and Alcalá Gate in Madrid (18th century). This building stone is used, both for new construction and restoration work, like headquarter of the Banco de España in Madrid (19th century) and its restoration (20th century). Alpedrete granite is compositionally classified as monzogranite. Petrographically, it is a medium (1-5 mm) grained subidiomorphic, and equigranular. This mineralogy consists chiefly of quartz (2-3 mm and 40-50% vol.), plagioclase (1-3 mm and 25-30% vol.), K-feldspar (microcline; 2-4 mm and 10-15% vol.) and biotite (1- 2 mm and 10-15% vol.). Its accessory minerals are cordierite, apatite, zircon and monazite. This grey granite has low amount of cracks, its open porosity (accessible to water) is 0,8 % and accessible to mercury is 0,50 %, with a diameter ranging mostly from 0.01 to 0.1 µm. Water absortion is 0,3%. Its bulk density is 2668 kg/m3 and its anisotropy grade (dM) is 6,5 %. its ultrasound propagation velocity (Vp) is 4626 m/s and microhardness of Knoop test 4544 Mpa. Pressure strenght ,and flexure strength 136.9 Mpa and 8.88 Mpa, respectiverly. Measurements obtained of petrophysical properties make this granite a high quality building material. Petrological and petrophysical characteristics of Berroqueña stone, with which have been used for many buildings from 16th century to present, provide a good answer to the decay agents, and therefore durability, possibility of differents finishes and good cleaning. Currently widely used in restoration and paving streets, outdoor tiling and funerary art. Acknowledgments: Special thanks are given to the Geomaterials (S2009/MAT 1629) and CONSOLIDER

  11. Seismic-wave attenuation associated with crustal faults in the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, R.M.; Mooney, W.D.

    1990-01-01

    The attenuation of upper crustal seismic waves that are refracted with a velocity of about 6 kilometers per second varies greatly among profiles in the area of the New Madrid seismic zone in the central Mississippi Valley. The waves that have the strongest attenuation pass through the seismic trend along the axis of the Reelfoot rift in the area of the Blytheville arch. Defocusing of the waves in a low-velocity zone and/ or seismic scattering and absorption could cause the attenuation; these effects are most likely associated with the highly deformed rocks along the arch. Consequently, strong seismic-wave attenuation may be a useful criterion for identifying seismogenic fault zones.

  12. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis outbreak on an HIV ward--Madrid, Spain, 1991-1995.

    PubMed

    1996-04-26

    Beginning in 1990, outbreaks of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) have been reported in hospitals and prisons in the eastern United States (1). During June 1991-January 1995, MDR-TB was diagnosed in 47 patients and one health-care worker at a 120-bed, infectious disease referral hospital in urban Madrid; on April 19, 1995, the Spanish Field Epidemiology Training Program was asked to investigate this outbreak. This report summarizes the findings of this investigation, which suggested that nosocomial transmission of MDR-TB occurred on a hospital ward for patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. PMID:8602134

  13. [Modelling science. The ceroplastics of Ignacio Lacaba in the Colegio de Cirugía de San Carlos, Madrid].

    PubMed

    Morente, Maribel

    2016-01-01

    Models made of wax had enormous diffusion in the anatomical teaching of the 18th century. It transcended the borders of a science that impregnated with scientific knowledge the artistic expression of beauty. Based on this premise, the San Carlos Royal College of Surgery created in Madrid a large collection of anatomical models, which is currently maintained by the Javier Puerta Anatomy Museum in the School of Medicine at Madrid Complutense University. The collection began in 1786 with Ignacio Lacaba, the first dissector of the Surgery College of Madrid, whose artistic sensibility and deep knowledge of anatomy contributed and facilitated harmonization between the work of the wax sculptors and language and anatomical expression. PMID:27363243

  14. From Conference to Journal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Robert; Tenenberg, Josh

    2008-01-01

    Revising and extending conference articles for journal publication benefits both authors and readers. The new articles are more complete, and benefit from peer review, feedback from conference presentation, and greater editorial consistency. For those articles that are appropriate, we encourage authors to do this, and present two examples of such…

  15. The Effective Clinical Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wink, Diane M.

    1995-01-01

    Examines the common problems with clinical conferences and suggests approaches to maximize student learning. Suggests that an effective clinical conference has three characteristics: (1) it is a group event; (2) it contributes to the achievement of course and clinical objectives; and (3) it provides a setting for students to explore personal…

  16. The Learning Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravn, Ib

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to call attention to the fact that conferences for professionals rely on massive one-way communication and hence produce little learning for delegates--and to introduce an alternative, the "learning conference", that involves delegates in fun and productive learning processes. Design/methodology/approach: A…

  17. Conference Planning Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermont Library Association, Burlington.

    Intended as a useful aid for organizing its annual spring meeting, this general conference planning manual developed by the Vermont Library Association provides a blueprint for planners on the responsibilities of the planning committee, the conference chair, and others; site selection and local arrangements; program and sessions planning;…

  18. Adolescent Prejudice Reduction Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketroser, Heidi

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the fifth annual Dr. Curtis C. Melnick Adolescent Prejudice Reduction Conference sponsored by the Greater Chicago (Illinois) Regional Office of the Anti-Defamation League of the B'nai B'rith. The day-long conference addressed issues of prejudice and allowed students and staff from various high schools to explore their concerns with…

  19. Lyndon Johnson's Press Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Stephen

    Because President Lyndon Johnson understood well the publicity value of the American news media, he sought to exploit them. He saw reporters as "torch bearers" for his programs and policies and used the presidential press conference chiefly for promotional purposes. Although he met with reporters often, his press conferences were usually…

  20. ASE Annual Conference 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCune, Roger

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the ASE Annual Conference 2010 which was held at Nottingham after a gap of 22 years. As always, the main conference was preceded by International Day, an important event for science educators from across the world. There were two strands to the programme: (1) "What works for me?"--sharing new ideas and tried…

  1. District Leadership Conference Planner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Coordinating Council for Occupational Education, Olympia.

    This manual provides usable guidelines and planning forms and materials for planning district leadership conferences, which were designed and initiated in Washington State to meet the problems in student enrollment and, consequently, Distributive Education Clubs of America membership. The conferences have become a useful means to increase…

  2. Developing a Learning Workforce. An International Conference (Leeds, England, United Kingdom, July 12-14, 1993). Conference Proceedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrester, Keith, Ed.; And Others

    The nine papers in this volume represent a majority of the presentations at a conference that examined in detail employee development (ED) initiatives from Europe and North America. An introduction provides a contextual background to the vocational training and education debates characterizing policy development in the European and North American…

  3. Conference Report: Advancing the Science of Developmental Neurotoxicity (DNT) Testing for Better Safety Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Introduction The 3rd International Conference on Alternatives for Developmental Neurotoxicity Testing (DNT3), organized by the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM), the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, was held from May 10 -13, 20...

  4. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  5. People and Technology: Investing in Training for Europe's Future. A Joint EEC and MSC Conference Report. Volume I. EUROTECHNET Series No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Janet, Ed.

    The conference "People and Technology: Investing in Training for Europe's Future" was the largest combined conference and exhibition ever launched by the European Community in the field of vocational training. The major themes discussed during the course of the conference were the future of training and work in light of technological change;…

  6. CONFERENCE NOTE: Conference on Precision Electromagnetic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-01-01

    The next Conference on Precision Electromagnetic Measurements (CPEM), will be held from 9 to 12 June 1992 at the Centre des Nouvelles Industries et Technologies (CNIT), La Défense, Paris, France. This conference, which is held every two years and whose importance and high level, confirmed by thirty years' experience, are recognized throughout the world, can be considered as a forum in which scientists, metrologists and professionals will have the opportunity to present and compare their research results on fundamental constants, standards and new techniques of precision measurement in the electromagnetic domain. Topics The following topics are regarded as the most appropriate for this conference: realization of units and fundamental constants d.c. a.c. and high voltage time and frequency radio-frequency and microwaves dielectrics, antennas, fields lasers, fibre optics advanced instrumentation, cryoelectronics. There will also be a session on international cooperation. Conference Language The conference language will be English. No translation will be provided. Organizers Société des Electriciens et des Electroniciens (SEE). Bureau National de Métrologie (BNM) Sponsors Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Instrumentation & Measurement Society Union Radio Scientifique Internationale United States National Institute of Standards and Technology Centre National d'Etudes des Télécommunications Mouvement Français pour la Qualité, Section Métrologie Comité National Français de Radioélectricité Scientifique Contact Jean Zara, CPEM 92 publicity, Bureau National de Métrologie, 22, rue Monge, 75005 Paris Tel.: (33) 1 46 34 48 16, Fax: (33) 1 46 34 48 63

  7. Public Administration Education in a Continental European Legalistic Setting: The Hungarian Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellén, Márton

    2014-01-01

    The Trans-European Dialogue in 2013 was dedicated to the revisiting of the research undertaken by György Hajnal in 2003 (Hajnal, 2003) on public administration education in Europe. As part of the preparations to the conference, Hajnal also revisited his research after 10 years. The findings presented on the conference offer a theoretical framework…

  8. Crustal deformation in the New Madrid seismic zone and the role of postseismic processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyd, Oliver; Robert Smalley, Jr; Zeng, Yuehua

    2015-01-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System data across the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) in the central United States over the period from 2000 through 2014 are analyzed and modeled with several deformation mechanisms including the following: (1) creep on subsurface dislocations, (2) postseismic frictional afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation from the 1811–1812 and 1450 earthquakes in the NMSZ, and (3) regional strain. In agreement with previous studies, a dislocation creeping at about 4 mm/yr between 12 and 20 km depth along the downdip extension of the Reelfoot fault reproduces the observations well. We find that a dynamic model of postseismic frictional afterslip from the 1450 and February 1812 Reelfoot fault events can explain this creep. Kinematic and dynamic models involving the Cottonwood Grove fault provide minimal predictive power. This is likely due to the smaller size of the December 1811 event on the Cottonwood Grove fault and a distribution of stations better suited to constrain localized strain across the Reelfoot fault. Regional compressive strain across the NMSZ is found to be less than 3 × 10−9/yr. If much of the present-day surface deformation results from afterslip, it is likely that many of the earthquakes we see today in the NMSZ are aftershocks from the 1811–1812 New Madrid earthquakes. Despite this conclusion, our results are consistent with observations and models of intraplate earthquake clustering. Given this and the recent paleoseismic history of the region, we suggest that seismic hazard is likely to remain significant.

  9. Geomorphic evidence of deformation in the northern part of the New Madrid seismic zone

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, K.J.; Schumm, S.A. )

    1993-03-01

    A geomorphic evaluation of the northern portion of the New Madrid seismic zone between Hickman, KY and Osceola, AR has identified several locations where anomalous geomorphic conditions indicate possible surface deformation. For example, the slope, course, sinuosity and dimensions of the Mississippi River have been affected by the Lake County uplift and Tertiary-age sediments are exposed in its channel. Also, anomalous channel behavior near Caruthersville, MO and Barfield, AR suggests that these two reaches of the Mississippi River are structurally controlled. The Black River northeast of Pocahontas follows a peculiar angular course that suggests fracture control, and course changes of the Black, St. Francis, and Little Rivers may be related to subsurface faulting, uplift, or downwarping, as well as to differential compaction or the effects of groundwater withdrawal. The topography of Crowley's Ridge suggests that, between Jonesboro and Castor River, it is composed of at least three structural blocks, that are bounded by northeast-southwest trending faults. Near Jonesboro, river patterns appear to be affected by the Jonesboro, AR pluton. The geomorphic evaluation has identified anomalous surface features in the New Madrid seismic zone. Some can be directly linked to mapped structures in the region, whereas others may result from previously unidentified areas of surface deformation. The identification of these anomalies should provide direction for scientists who are employing subsurface techniques in order to locate tectonic deformation in the area.

  10. A joint local and teleseismic tomography study of the Mississippi Embayment and New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyamwandha, Cecilia A.; Powell, Christine A.; Langston, Charles A.

    2016-05-01

    Detailed, upper mantle P and S wave velocity (Vp and Vs) models are developed for the northern Mississippi Embayment (ME), a major physiographic feature in the Central United States (U.S.) and the location of the active New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ). This study incorporates local earthquake and teleseismic data from the New Madrid Seismic Network, the Earthscope Transportable Array, and the FlexArray Northern Embayment Lithospheric Experiment stations. The Vp and Vs solutions contain anomalies with similar magnitudes and spatial distributions. High velocities are present in the lower crust beneath the NMSZ. A pronounced low-velocity anomaly of ~ -3%--5% is imaged at depths of 100-250 km. High-velocity anomalies of ~ +3%-+4% are observed at depths of 80-160 km and are located along the sides and top of the low-velocity anomaly. The low-velocity anomaly is attributed to the presence of hot fluids upwelling from a flat slab segment stalled in the transition zone below the Central U.S.; the thinned and weakened ME lithosphere, still at slightly higher temperatures from the passage of the Bermuda hotspot in mid-Cretaceous, provides an optimal pathway for the ascent of the fluids. The observed high-velocity anomalies are attributed to the presence of mafic rocks emplaced beneath the ME during initial rifting in the early Paleozoic and to remnants of the depleted, lower portion of the lithosphere.

  11. Reconciling short recurrence intervals with minor deformation in the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schweig, E.S.; Ellis, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    At least three great earthquakes occurred in the New Madrid seismic zone in 1811 and 1812. Estimates of present-day strain rates suggest that such events may have a repeat time of 1000 years or less. Paleoseismological data also indicate that earthquakes large enough to cause soil liquefaction have occurred several times in the past 5000 years. However, pervasive crustal deformation expected from such a high frequency of large earthquakes is not observed. This suggests that the seismic zone is a young feature, possibly as young as several tens of thousands of years old and no more than a few million years old.At least three great earthquakes occurred in the New Madrid seismic zone in 1811 and 1812. Estimates of present-day strain rates suggest that such events may have a repeat time of 1000 years or less. Paleoseismological data also indicate that earthquakes large enough to cause soil liquefaction have occurred several times in the past 5000 years. However, pervasive crustal deformation expected from such a high frequency of large earthquakes is not observed. This suggests that the seismic zone is a young feature, possibly as young as several tens of thousands of years old and no more than a few million years old.

  12. Kinematics of the New Madrid seismic zone, central United States, based on stepover models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pratt, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    Seismicity in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) of the central United States is generally attributed to a stepover structure in which the Reelfoot thrust fault transfers slip between parallel strike-slip faults. However, some arms of the seismic zone do not fit this simple model. Comparison of the NMSZ with an analog sandbox model of a restraining stepover structure explains all of the arms of seismicity as only part of the extensive pattern of faults that characterizes stepover structures. Computer models show that the stepover structure may form because differences in the trends of lower crustal shearing and inherited upper crustal faults make a step between en echelon fault segments the easiest path for slip in the upper crust. The models predict that the modern seismicity occurs only on a subset of the faults in the New Madrid stepover structure, that only the southern part of the stepover structure ruptured in the A.D. 1811–1812 earthquakes, and that the stepover formed because the trends of older faults are not the same as the current direction of shearing.

  13. Estimation of earthquake effects associated with a great earthquake in the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hopper, Margaret G.; Algermissen, Sylvester Theodore; Dobrovolny, Ernest E.

    1983-01-01

    Estimates have been made of the effects of a large Ms = 8.6, Io = XI earthquake hypothesed to occur anywhere in the New Madrid seismic zone. The estimates are based on the distributions of intensities associated with the earthquakes of 1811-12, 1843 and 1895 although the effects of other historical shocks are also considered. The resulting composite type intensity map for a maximum intensity XI is believed to represent the upper level of shaking likely to occur. Specific intensity maps have been developed for six cities near the epicentral region taking into account the most likely distribution of site response in each city. Intensities found are: IX for Carbondale, IL; VIII and IX for Evansville, IN; VI and VIII for Little Rock, AR; IX and X for Memphis, TN; VIII, IX, and X for Paducah, KY; and VIII and X for Poplar Bluff, MO. On a regional scale, intensities are found to attenuate from the New Madrid seismic zone most rapidly to the west and southwest sides of the zone, most slowly to the northwest along the Mississippi River, on the northeast along the Ohio River, and on the southeast toward Georgia and South Carolina. Intensities attenuate toward the north, east, and south in a more normal fashion. Known liquefaction effects are documented but much more research is needed to define the liquefaction potential.

  14. Sociodemographic characteristics and HIV risk behaviour patterns of male sex workers in Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Belza, M J; Llácer, A; Mora, R; Morales, M; Castilla, J; de la Fuente, L

    2001-10-01

    This paper describes the sociodemographic and work characteristics, prevalence of HIV infection and associated risk behaviours among male sex workers (MSWs) in Madrid (Spain). Using an anonymous semi-structured questionnaire, educators attached to a mobile unit under a street-based prostitution programme surveyed 84 MSWs from several Madrid areas. Of the total surveyed: 35% were immigrants, mean age was 23 years, mean period in prostitution was four years; 21% had no primary education; 16% had injected drugs at some time; 11% reported private sexual relationships exclusively with women; 89% always used condoms in anal practices with clients; and 41% were in sexual relationships with their partners. Only 11% had ever used fortified condoms. In the preceding month, 37% had experienced condom failure, 82% without having used any lubricant. In all, 67% reported having undergone HIV testing, with a higher percentage of positive results among injecting (60%) versus non-injecting drug users (17%). Immigrants had a lower level of education, made less use of condoms, had more condom failures and, in their private lives, a greater proportion reported sexual relationships exclusively with women. In Spain, MSWs should be included in HIV prevention programmes, which ought to be specifically adapted to immigrants. Priority should be given to reducing the condom failure rate in anal intercourse, by improving access to fortified condoms. PMID:11571014

  15. The European SL-9/JUPITER Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-02-01

    During the past six months, many astronomers - observational as well theoretical - have been busy interpreting the many data taken during the impacts and thereafter. This is a very labour-intensive task and although the first conclusions have begun to emerge, it has also become obvious that extensive consultations between the various groups are necessary before it will be possible to understand the very complex processes during the impacts and thereafter. In order to further the interaction among the involved scientists, it has been decided to hold a three-day "European SL-9/Jupiter Workshop" at the Headquarters of the European Southern Observatory. More than 100 astronomers will meet on February 13-15, 1995, and close to 100 reports will be delivered on this occasion. Although most come from European countries, the major groups on other continents are also well represented. This meeting will give the participants the opportunity to exchange information about their individual programmes and will serve to establish future collaborative efforts. SL-9/JUPITER PRESS CONFERENCE In this connection, ESO is pleased to invite the media to a Press Conference: Wednesday, February 15, 1995, 17:30 CET ESO Headquarters, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching, Germany This conference will be held at the end of the Workshop and will provide a thorough overview of the latest results, as presented during the meeting. Media representatives who are interested in participating in this Press Conference are requested to register with the ESO Information Service (Mrs. E. Völk, Tel.: +49-89-32006276; Fax: +49-89-3202362), at the latest on Friday, February 10, 1995. ESO Press Information is made available on the World-Wide Web (URL: http://www.hq.eso.org/) and on CompuServe (space science and astronomy area, GO SPACE).

  16. Climate and environments during Marine Isotope Stage 11 in the central Iberian Peninsula: the herpetofaunal assemblage from the Acheulean site of Áridos-1, Madrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, Hugues-Alexandre; Santonja, Manuel; Pérez-González, Alfredo; Panera, Joaquin; Rubio-Jara, Susana

    2014-06-01

    The interglacial episodes of the Quaternary Period are currently the focus of a great deal of attention within the scientific community, primarily because they can help us to understand how the climate of the current interglacial may have evolved without human intervention and to assess the impact of these climate changes on ecological systems. In the central Iberian Peninsula, the archaeological site of Áridos-1 (Arganda, Madrid), with numeric dates of 379.7 ± 45 ka obtained by AAR for the upper part of the sedimentological unit of Arganda I, in combination with the evolved state of the small mammals, has been chronologically attributed to Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11. Given the diversified faunal assemblages delivered by the 1976 excavations, Áridos-1 is probably one of the best terrestrial candidates for an understanding of the climatic and environmental conditions that prevailed in central Spain during the MIS 11 interglacial. In consequence, the fossil amphibians and squamate reptiles stored in the collections of the Museo Arqueológico Nacional of Madrid have been newly described and quantified in order to apply the mutual climatic range and habitat weighting methods for estimating quantitative data. The Mediterranean climate is shown to have been warmer and wetter than today in central Spain during MIS 11, with the mean annual temperature 1.7 °C higher and mean annual precipitation 223.9 mm higher than at present. The monthly climatic reconstruction shows differences in the distribution of precipitation over the course of the year, with more abundant precipitation during the winter months, at the beginning of spring and at the end of fall (from October to March) and less precipitation than today during the summer months and at the end of spring (from May to August), suggesting stronger rainfall seasonality between winter and summer than currently occurs. Such climate reconstruction is consistent with other European MIS 11 paleoclimatic records. The

  17. Contribucion al estudio de la semantica de los verbos modales en espanol (con ejemplos del habla de Madrid). The Contribution of Spanish Modal Verbs to the Study of Semantics (with Evidence from Madrid Speech).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirbu-Dumitrescu, Domnita

    1988-01-01

    Spanish modal verbs may express necessity, obligation, probability, and possibility, in either their personal or impersonal modes. Analysis is based on examples of contemporary Madrid speech. Four modals, "poder,""deber (de)," tener que," and "haber que," are placed within a tripartite structure defined by semantic categories, "imminente"…

  18. Future directions for arms control and nonproliferation. Conference summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-06

    This report provides a summary of the presentations and discussions at the Spring 1994 CNSN-Wilton Park Conference. The Conference was one of a series on US-European security cooperation organized by The Center for National Security Negotiations (CNSN) of Science Applications International Corporation. These conferences bring together government and non-government experts, primarily from the United States and Europe, to discuss a range of regional and global security issues. The conferences provide an opportunity to explore, in a frank and off-the-record environment, common interests and concerns, as well as differences in approach that affect trans-Atlantic cooperation. This report is divided into the following three areas: (1) implementation of existing and pending agreements; (2) non-proliferation: prospects for trans-Atlantic cooperation; and (3) future directions in arms control.

  19. 47 CFR 1.248 - Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. 1.248 Section 1.248 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Hearing Proceedings Prehearing Procedures § 1.248 Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR...

  20. 47 CFR 1.248 - Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. 1.248 Section 1.248 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Hearing Proceedings Prehearing Procedures § 1.248 Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. (a)...

  1. 76 FR 64083 - Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference Take notice... reliability of the Bulk-Power System. The conference will explore the progress made on the priorities for addressing risks to reliability that were identified in earlier Commission technical conferences....

  2. 10 CFR 501.32 - Conferences (other than prepetition conferences).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SANCTIONS Written Comments, Public Hearings and Conferences During Administrative Proceedings § 501.32 Conferences (other than prepetition conferences). (a) At any time following commencement of a proceeding... proceeding. Conferences held after the commencement of an administrative proceeding before OFE shall...

  3. Aircraft Engine Emissions. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A conference on a aircraft engine emissions was held to present the results of recent and current work. Such diverse areas as components, controls, energy efficient engine designs, and noise and pollution reduction are discussed.

  4. Insider conference tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennant, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Attending an educator conference and its associated exhibit hall can be a rewarding experience for your brain. But if you keep in mind these insider's tips, your feet, arms, stomach, and wallet will also thank you.

  5. Lunar & Planetary Science Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Jeffrey L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Summaries of different topics discussed at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference are presented to provide updated information to nonplanetologists. Some topics include Venus, isotopes, chondrites, creation science, cosmic dust, cratering, moons and rings, igneous rocks, and lunar soil. (DC)

  6. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cook-Deegan, R.M.; Venter, J.C.; Gilbert, W.; Mulligan, J.; Mansfield, B.K.

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  7. Involvement of citizens in hazardous waste management and use of recycling centres in the city of Madrid (Spain).

    PubMed

    Díaz, María José; Martínez, Elvira; Piñeiro, Concepción; Palavecinos, Mireya; Benayas, Javier; Toribio, M Angeles

    2012-07-01

    In Spain, hazardous household waste management by citizens occurs via fixed recycling centres (FRC) and mobile recycling centres (MRC) which usually depend on local governments. This paper addresses a request by the Madrid City Council, in an attempt to improve the service it provides to the city of Madrid. The aim of the study involved analysing the information people possess in relation to hazardous waste and to the use of available equipment, and conducting a post-evaluation of the effectiveness of an environmental communication campaign conducted by the Madrid City Council and aimed at providing awareness of the existence of new FRCs and MRCs. To this end, a questionnaire was conducted with 5644 inhabitants of the city of Madrid. Qualitative data was categorized using content analysis followed by chi-squared tests, considering some socio-demographic characteristics of the sample, such as age or place of residence (district). Communication campaigns influenced citizen awareness of what constituted hazardous waste, of how to properly separate waste and of the existence of FRCs and MRCs. However, few citizens actually used FRCs or MRC (18% across four districts), a fact that might be related to a lack of knowledge of downstream waste treatment issues, or to self-limiting hindrances to householders, such as distance to recycling centres. It is recommended that future communication campaigns investigate householder needs and pre-conceptions in relation to recycling, as well as tailored education aimed at addressing the barriers, perceived or otherwise, facing citizens. PMID:22452955

  8. Multiphoton processes: conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Lambropoulos, P.; Smith, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The chapters of this volume represent the invited papers delivered at the conference. They are arranged according to thermatic proximity beginning with atoms and continuing with molecules and surfaces. Section headings include multiphoton processes in atoms, field fluctuations and collisions in multiphoton process, and multiphoton processes in molecules and surfaces. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  9. The Impressive 1811-1812 New Madrid Earthquake Sequence and the Geologic Record of at Least Two Other Sequences in the Last 1000 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    The currently active New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) was the source of a series of major earthquakes and hundreds of aftershocks that began on December 16, 1811 and continued through 1812. At the time, the region was sparsely populated but today it is home to about 12 million people. Four earthquakes in this 1811-1812 sequence had magnitudes (M) from about 6.8-8.0 and were felt widely across the eastern U.S. as far as the Atlantic seaboard 1,700 km away. About a dozen aftershocks in the M5.0-6.3 range were also felt widely across the eastern U.S. The first earthquake occurred December 16, 1811, at 2:15 a.m. followed by the largest aftershock in the sequence (M6.8-7.0) at about 7:15 a.m.; the second main shock at 9 a.m. on January 23, 1812; and the third main shock on February 7, 1812, at 3:45 a.m. These four principle shocks were among the largest to strike North America since European settlement. Because of low seismic attenuation in the eastern U.S., the area of strong shaking of the December 16 main shock was about 10 times larger than that of the 1906 M7.8 San Francisco earthquake. The NMSZ produced large earthquakes in the M6.0-6.6 range in 1843 and 1895 and currently generates about 150 earthquakes annually in the M1.5-4 range. Though no instrumental data for the 1811-1812 earthquakes exist, first-hand accounts indicate that the mainshocks were followed by hundreds of aftershocks that lasted for months. They caused general alarm from Detroit (800 km) to New Orleans (700 km). In the epicentral region, Memphis, Tenn. was not yet established, but many homes were damaged in the 5500-inhabitant town of St. Louis, Mo. (250 km). The frontier trading towns of Little Prairie (now Caruthersville) and New Madrid, Mo., were severely damaged and temporarily evacuated. The 1811-1812 sequence left its mark on the landscape that endures today. During the earthquake, witnesses reported that the ground rose, fell, and cracked, and that trees snapped. Large landslides were

  10. PREFACE: International Conference on Inverse Problems 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Yiu-Chung; Ling, Leevan

    2011-03-01

    Following the first International Conference on Inverse Problems - Recent Theoretical Development and Numerical Approaches held at the City University of Hong Kong in 2002, the fifth International Conference was held again at the City University during December 13-17, 2010. This fifth conference was jointly organized by Professor Yiu-Chung Hon (Co-Chair, City University of Hong Kong, HKSAR), Dr Leevan Ling (Co-Chair, Hong Kong Baptist University, HKSAR), Professor Jin Cheng (Fudan University, China), Professor June-Yub Lee (Ewha Womans University, South Korea), Professor Gui-Rong Liu (University of Cincinnati, USA), Professor Jenn-Nan Wang (National Taiwan University, Taiwan), and Professor Masahiro Yamamoto (The University of Tokyo, Japan). It was agreed to alternate holding the conference among the above places (China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and Hong Kong) once every two years. The next conference has been scheduled to be held at the Southeast University (Nanjing, China) in 2012. The purpose of this series of conferences is to establish a strong collaborative link among the universities of the Asian-Pacific regions and worldwide leading researchers in inverse problems. The conference addressed both theoretical (mathematics), applied (engineering) and developmental aspects of inverse problems. The conference was intended to nurture Asian-American-European collaborations in the evolving interdisciplinary areas and it was envisioned that the conference would lead to long-term commitments and collaborations among the participating countries and researchers. There was a total of more than 100 participants. A call for the submission of papers was sent out after the conference, and a total of 19 papers were finally accepted for publication in this proceedings. The papers included in the proceedings cover a wide scope, which reflects the current flourishing theoretical and numerical research into inverse problems. Finally, as the co-chairs of the Inverse Problems

  11. Modified Mercalli intensities (MMI) for large earthquakes near New Madrid, Missouri, in 1811-1812 and near Charleston, South Carolina, in 1886

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bakun, W.H.; Johnston, A.C.; Hopper, M.G.

    2002-01-01

    Large historical earthquakes occurred in the eastern United States on December 16, 1811 near New Madrid, MO, on January 23, 1812 near New Madrid, MO, on February 7, 1812 near New Madrid, MO, and on September 1, 1886 near Charleston, SC. Modified Mercalli Intensity (MMI) assignments for these earthquakes were used by Bakun et al. (submitted) to estimate the location and moment magnitude M of these earthquakes from MMI observations. The MMI assignments used by Bakun et al. (submitted) are listed in this report.

  12. The impact of drug-related deaths on mortality among young adults in Madrid.

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, L; Barrio, G; Vicente, J; Bravo, M J; Santacreu, J

    1995-01-01

    The trend from 1983 to 1990 of drug-related mortality (defined as the sum of deaths from acute drug reactions and the acquired immuno-deficiency syndrome [AIDS] in drug users) among the population 15 to 39 years of age in Madrid, Spain, was studied and compared with mortality from all causes. All of the mortality rates increased from 1983 to 1990: all causes, from 101/100,000 to 148/100,000; acute drug reactions, from 3/100,000 to 15/100,000; and AIDS, from 0 to 20/100,000. Drug-related mortality represented 60% of the increase in the rate from all causes in males and 170% of the increase in females. The increases in drug-related mortality are likely to continue in the future. PMID:7832243

  13. Neotectonic structure in the central new madrid seismic zone: Evidence from multimode seismic-reflection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woolery, E.W.; Street, R.L.; Wang, Z.; Harris, J.B.; McIntyre, J.

    1999-01-01

    Approximately 14.5 km of conventional P-wave and 2.2 km of horizontally polarized shear-wave seismic-reflection data acquired in the Kentucky Bend area of the central New Madrid Seismic Zone provide evidence of extensive neotectonic near-surface structure. The style and geometry of the deformation are consistent with documented historical geomorphic features, contemporary geomorphic features, and contemporary seismicity. The data image high-angle transpressional faults that strike between N30??W and N50??W. The fault planes exhibit apparent northeast and southwest dips. The opposing high-angle planes represent secondary splay or imbricate faults that responded to torsional bending of a lower-angle master fault.

  14. GPS constraints on M 7-8 earthquake recurrence times for the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuart, W.D.

    2001-01-01

    Newman et al. (1999) estimate the time interval between the 1811-1812 earthquake sequence near New Madrid, Missouri and a future similar sequence to be at least 2,500 years, an interval significantly longer than other recently published estimates. To calculate the recurrence time, they assume that slip on a vertical half-plane at depth contributes to the current interseismic motion of GPS benchmarks. Compared to other plausible fault models, the half-plane model gives nearly the maximum rate of ground motion for the same interseismic slip rate. Alternative models with smaller interseismic fault slip area can satisfy the present GPS data by having higher slip rate and thus can have earthquake recurrence times much less than 2,500 years.

  15. Blast injuries from Madrid terrorist bombing attacks on March 11, 2004.

    PubMed

    Martí, Milagros; Parrón, Manuel; Baudraxler, Franziska; Royo, Aranzazu; Gómez León, Nieves; Alvarez-Sala, Rodolfo

    2006-12-01

    Blast injuries after terrorist attacks are seen with increasing frequency worldwide. Thousands of victims were attended in the hospitals of Madrid, Spain, on March 11, 2004 after the bombing attacks against the commuter trains. Thirty-six patients were attended in our institution. Seventeen of them suffered from severe or life-threatening injuries, and 19 had mild injuries. The most common lesions were thoracic trauma and blast lung injury, acoustic trauma, and orbital and paranasal sinus fractures. Other findings were hepatic and splenic lacerations, and vertebral and limb fractures. Emergency radiology had an important role in the correct management of the victims. Prompt radiological diagnoses of these complex lesions are crucial to efficient treatment. Therefore, radiologists have to become familiar with the injury patterns and specific lesions caused by blast wave. PMID:17103009

  16. Shaded Relief and Radar Image with Color as Height, Madrid, Spain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The white, mottled area in the right-center of this image from NASA's Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) is Madrid, the capital of Spain. Located on the Meseta Central, a vast plateau covering about 40 percent of the country, this city of 3 million is very near the exact geographic center of the Iberian Peninsula. The Meseta is rimmed by mountains and slopes gently to the west and to the series of rivers that form the boundary with Portugal. The plateau is mostly covered with dry grasslands, olive groves and forested hills.

    Madrid is situated in the middle of the Meseta, and at an elevation of 646 meters (2,119 feet) above sea level is the highest capital city in Europe. To the northwest of Madrid, and visible in the upper left of the image, is the Sistema Central mountain chain that forms the 'dorsal spine' of the Meseta and divides it into northern and southern subregions. Rising to about 2,500 meters (8,200 feet), these mountains display some glacial features and are snow-capped for most of the year. Offering almost year-round winter sports, the mountains are also important to the climate of Madrid.

    Three visualization methods were combined to produce this image: shading and color coding of topographic height and radar image intensity. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the northwest-southeast direction. North-facing slopes appear bright and south-facing slopes appear dark. Color coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow and brown to white at the highest elevations. The shade image was combined with the radar intensity image in the flat areas.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was

  17. A decision support system for water quality issues in the Manzanares River (Madrid, Spain).

    PubMed

    Paredes, Javier; Andreu, Joaquín; Solera, Abel

    2010-05-15

    The Manzanares River, located in Madrid (Spain), is the main water supplier of a highly populated region, and it also receives wastewater from the same area. The effluents of eight Waste Water Treatment Plants (WWTPs) downstream of the river, which represent 90% of the flow in the middle and lower parts of the river, are the primary sources of water pollution. Although the situation has improved slightly in the last two years, the water in the river is highly polluted, making it uninhabitable for aquatic life. Water quality modelling is typically used to assess the effect of treatment improvements in water bodies. In this work, the GESCAL module of the Aquatool Decision Support System Shell was used to simulate water quality in the Manzanares River. GESCAL is appropriate for modelling in an integrated way water quality for whole water resources systems, including reservoirs and rivers. A model was built that simulates conductivity, phosphorous, carbonaceous organic matter, dissolved oxygen, organic nitrogen, ammonia, and nitrates. The period from October 2006 to September 2008 was selected for calibration due to the many treatment modifications that occurred during this time. An earlier and longer period, from October 2000 to September 2006, was used for validation. In addition, a daily model was used to analyse the robustness of the GESCAL model. Once the GESCAL model was validated, different scenarios were considered and simulated. First, different combinations of nutrient elimination among the different WWTPs were simulated, leading to the conclusion that investments have to focus on three of the proposed WWTPs. Moreover, these treatments will not be sufficient to maintain fish habitat conditions at all times. Additional measures, such as the increment of the flow in the river or oxygen injection, were simulated. Incrementing the flow of the Manzanares River has been shown to be an efficient means of increasing water quality, but this implies an increment in the

  18. Community Velocity Model for the New Madrid Region, Central U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, O. S.

    2008-12-01

    In 1811-1812, a series of three major earthquakes struck the Central United States in the New Madrid Seismic Zone. Having magnitudes near 7.5 and being located within the relatively stable interior of the North American Continent, these events produced widespread strong shaking. If these events were to occur today, there would be substantial devastation to people, buildings and transportation and communication infrastructure. To better understand this threat and in preparation for the upcoming bicentennial, the US Geological Survey is planning to produce and support sophisticated numerical simulations of earthquake rupture and seismic wave propagation due to a repeat of these events. To kick off this effort, the USGS began the development and construction of a community seismic velocity model for use in these numerical simulations. We have collected existing research regarding the p- and s-wave velocities, impedance contrasts and densities of the lithosphere in the New Madrid region and synthesized these results into a single model that can be used in earthquake simulations. We have identified areas of missing or incomplete information for further study. The region covers an area of approximately 600,000 km2 from Little Rock, Arkansas across to Nashville Tennessee, up to St Louis, Missouri. The model has currently been gridded at 3 km lateral resolution and from 5-m resolution near the surface to 10-km resolution at 100 km depth. Less but still substantial uncertainty exists for the Mississippi Embayment where a majority of the research has been done. Newer regional models such as those by van der Lee and others and Liang and Langston have improved regional resolution beyond a 1-dimensional model, but for ground motion simulations, greater resolution outside the Embayment is desired.

  19. Influence of the ozone profile above Madrid (Spain) on Brewer estimation of ozone air mass factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antón, M.; López, M.; Costa, M. J.; Serrano, A.; Bortoli, D.; Bañón, M.; Vilaplana, J. M.; Silva, A. M.

    2009-08-01

    The methodology used by Brewer spectroradiometers to estimate the ozone column is based on differential absorption spectroscopy. This methodology employs the ozone air mass factor (AMF) to derive the total ozone column from the slant path ozone amount. For the calculating the ozone AMF, the Brewer algorithm assumes that the ozone layer is located at a fixed height of 22 km. However, for a real specific site the ozone presents a certain profile, which varies spatially and temporally depending on the latitude, altitude and dynamical conditions of the atmosphere above the site of measurements. In this sense, this work address the reliability of the mentioned assumption and analyses the influence of the ozone profiles measured above Madrid (Spain) in the ozone AMF calculations. The approximated ozone AMF used by the Brewer algorithm is compared with simulations obtained using the libRadtran radiative transfer model code. The results show an excellent agreement between the simulated and the approximated AMF values for solar zenith angle lower than 75°. In addition, the relative differences remain lower than 2% at 85°. These good results are mainly due to the fact that the altitude of the ozone layer assumed constant by the Brewer algorithm for all latitudes notably can be considered representative of the real profile of ozone above Madrid (average value of 21.7±1.8 km). The operational ozone AMF calculations for Brewer instruments are limited, in general, to SZA below 80°. Extending the usable SZA range is especially relevant for Brewer instruments located at high mid-latitudes.

  20. HIV practitioners in Madrid and New York improving inclusion of underrepresented populations in research.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Rogério M; Giménez, Silvia; Spector, Anya Y; Choi, Jean; Martinez, Omar J D; Wall, Melanie

    2015-09-01

    Practitioners have frequent contact with populations underrepresented in scientific research--ethnic/racial groups, sexual minorities and others at risk for poor health and whose low participation in research does not reflect their representation in the general population. Practitioners aspire to partner with researchers to conduct research that benefits underrepresented groups. However, practitioners are often overlooked as a work force that can help erase inclusion disparities. We recruited (n = 282) practitioners (e.g. physicians, social workers, health educators) to examine associations between their attitudes toward research purposes, risks, benefits and confidentiality and their involvement in recruitment, interviewing and intervention facilitation. Participants worked in community-based agencies in Madrid and New York City (NYC), two large and densely populated cities. We used cross-sectional data and two-sample tests to compare attitudes toward research and practitioner involvement in recruiting, interviewing and facilitating interventions. We fit logistic regression models to assess associations between practitioner attitudes toward ethical practices and recruitment, interviewing and facilitating interventions. The likelihood of recruiting, interviewing and facilitating was more pronounced among practitioners agreeing more strongly with ethical research practices. Though Madrid practitioners reported stronger agreement with ethical research practices, NYC practitioners were more involved in recruiting, interviewing and facilitating interventions. Practitioners can be trained to improve attitudes toward ethical practices and increase inclusion of underrepresented populations in research. Funders and researchers are encouraged to offer opportunities for practitioner involvement by supporting research infrastructure development in local agencies. Practices that promise to facilitate inclusion herein may be used in other countries. PMID:24676278

  1. Assessment of the pregnancy education programme with ‘EDUMA2’ questionnaire in Madrid (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Fernández y Fernández-Arroyo, Matilde; Muñoz, Isabel; Torres, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives The prenatal education promotes the empowerment of parents during pregnancy and postnatal period. This study aimed to assess the quality of educational sessions held in the third trimester of pregnancy as part of the parenting education programme for Spanish National Health System in Madrid. Methods The design is a cross-sectional study in 41 primary care centres in the autonomous community of Madrid, which is one of the 17 autonomous communities that constitute the Spanish State, each wick medical responsibilities. The participants are a representative probability sample of 928 attendees to the programme. The assessment instrument is ‘EDUMA2’ questionnaire (Cronbach's alpha = 0.829) of 56 variables. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed using SPSS. The project was approved by the Research and Ethics Committees of the University Hospital of La Paz. Results The uptake efficiency immigration risk is 14.7%, and lack of social support is 8.7%. The functionality in organization, teaching and methodology is high in 90.5%. The learning effectiveness of health habits, care and techniques is significant and greater than 60% in the 14 parameters studied. Satisfaction is very high at 67.5%. The immediate impact in terms of control or safety increase is significant and greater than 71% and significantly greater than 40% and for increasing the bonding with the baby. Conclusions No jobs found with which to compare. The assessment of the programme with adequate psychometric characteristics questionnaire allows designing strategies and research to improve the quality of prenatal education. PMID:24819555

  2. Stress development in heterogenetic lithosphere: Insights into earthquake processes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Y.; Gregg, P. M.; Hou, G.

    2015-12-01

    The New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) in the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) is the site of several major M 6.8-8 earthquakes in 1811-1812, and remains seismically active. Although extensive investigations have been carried out, the ultimate controls on earthquake initiation and the duration of the seismicity remains unclear. Especially ambiguous is the role of a heterogenetic lithosphere in the development and propagation of stress throughout the crust in intraplate settings. In this study, we develop a finite element model to conduct a series of numerical experiments, the goal of which is to determine the impact of heterogeneity in the Upper Crust, the Lower Crust, and the Mantle on earthquake nucleation and rupture processes. Results indicate that when the differential stresses are built up from boundary displacements, similar to tectonic loading, the stresses below the Reelfoot Rift in the NMSZ are highly concentrated, whereas the stresses below the geologically similar Midcontinent Rift System are low, corresponding with the earthquakes distribution. By comparing the results with three reference models, we argue that the extensive Mantle Low Velocity Zone (MLVZ) beneath the NMSZ produces differential stress localization in the layers above. Furthermore, the relatively strong crust in this region, exhibited by high seismic velocity, enables the elevated stress to extend to the bottom of the ancient rift system, reactivating fossil rifting faults and therefore triggering earthquakes. Although our numerical models focus on loading by a far-field stress source, they explain why the New Madrid inevitably became the most earthquake susceptible region in the CEUS since a heterogeneous lithosphere. Specifically, the presence of the MLVZ will further concentrate stresses resulting from other unloading process, such as melting of the ice sheets or sudden river incision.

  3. Spatially resolved MAXDOAS measurements of Nitrogen Dioxide and Formaldehyde at Madrid (41°N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puentedura, Olga; Yela, Margarita; Navarro-Comas, Monica; Gomez-Martin, Laura; Garcia-Nieto, David; Benavent, Nuria; Wang, Shanshan; Anguas, Monica; Cuevas, Carlos A.; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso

    2016-04-01

    A multi-instrumental campaign has been carried out at a polluted environment in the city of Madrid (Spain, 41°N) in order to determinate the distribution of NO2 and HCHO in a South-North axis of the city. The instrumentation was deployed at the terrace of the ICA-CSIC (Institute of Agrarian Sciences) premises located in the North-East part of city which height provides free-horizon observations. The campaign was held during the end of September and beginning of October 2015, being in its most part characterized by a high pressure system located over Madrid with clear skies although at the end of the campaign broken clouds during the late evening and rain was also observed. The instruments involved in the campaign were two MAXDOAS spectrometers, observing towards North and South axis respectively. A CIMEL to obtain AOD total column, a NOx in situ monitor in order to provide NO2 concentration at the level of the observations and a weather station. During the beginning and in the middle of the campaign, both MAXDOAS spectrometers were deployed to observe the same air-mass in order to assess the consistency of measurements when both instruments are observing different air-masses. Observations show a different daily pattern in the South-North axis of the city probably related to the distribution of population, the industrial activities and traffic. Observed columns at the level of the observations are always greater towards South, except during the weekend, when an increasing on NO2 columns is observed northwards. A more detailed discussion of the differences in the North-South observations in HCHO and NO2 is presented in this work.

  4. Strong ground motion inferred from liquefaction caused by the 1811-1812 New Madrid, Missouri, earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, Thomas L.; Noce, Thomas E.; Bennett, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Peak ground accelerations (PGAs) in the epicentral region of the 1811–1812 New Madrid, Missouri, earthquakes are inferred from liquefaction to have been no greater than ∼0.35g. PGA is inferred in an 11,380  km2 area in the Lower Mississippi Valley in Arkansas and Missouri where liquefaction was extensive in 1811–1812. PGA was inferred by applying liquefaction probability curves, which were originally developed for liquefaction hazard mapping, to detailed maps of liquefaction by Obermeier (1989). The low PGA is inferred because both a shallow (1.5 m deep) water table and a large moment magnitude (M 7.7) earthquake were assumed in the analysis. If a deep (5.0 m) water table and a small magnitude (M 6.8) earthquake are assumed, the maximum inferred PGA is 1.10g. Both inferred PGA values are based on an assumed and poorly constrained correction for sand aging. If an aging correction is not assumed, then the inferred PGA is no greater than 0.22g. A low PGA value may be explained by nonlinear site response. Soils in the study area have an averageVS30 of 220±15  m/s. A low inferred PGA is consistent with PGA values estimated from ground‐motion prediction equations that have been proposed for the New Madrid seismic zone when these estimates are corrected for nonlinear soil site effects. This application of liquefaction probability curves demonstrates their potential usefulness in paleoseismology.

  5. Progress report on new antiepileptic drugs: A summary of the Twelfth Eilat Conference (EILAT XII).

    PubMed

    Bialer, Meir; Johannessen, Svein I; Levy, René H; Perucca, Emilio; Tomson, Torbjörn; White, H Steve

    2015-03-01

    The Twelfth Eilat Conference on New Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) - EILAT XII, took place in Madrid, Spain from August 31st to September 3rd 2014. About 130 basic scientists, clinical pharmacologists and neurologists from 22 countries attended the conference, whose main themes included "Conquering pharmacoresistant epilepsy", "Innovative emergency treatments", "Progress report on second-generation treatment" and "New methods and formulations". Consistent with previous formats of this conference, a large part of the program was devoted to a review of AEDs in development, as well as updates on AEDs introduced since 2004. Like the EILAT X and EILAT XI reports, the current article focuses on the preclinical and clinical pharmacology of AEDs that are currently in development. These include adenosine-releasing silk, allopregnanolone (SAGE-547), AMP-X-0079, brivaracetam, bumetanide, cannabidiol, cannabidivarin, 2-deoxy-glucose, everolimus, ganaxolone, huperzine A, imepitoin, minocycline, NAX 801-2, pitolisant, PRX 0023, SAGE-217, valnoctamide and its homologue sec-butyl-propylacetamide (SPD), and VLB-01. Since the previous Eilat conference, perampanel has been introduced into the market and twelve novel potential epilepsy treatments are presented for the first time. PMID:25769377

  6. Summaries of the Regional Conferences Held in Preparation for the Second International Congress on Technical and Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    UNEVOC Info, 1999

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, five regional conferences were held in preparation for the Second International Congress on Technical and Vocational Education (TVE). The Asia-Pacific regional conference focused on challenges of the 21st century, demands of the world of work, and changing patterns in the delivery of training programs. The European symposium covered five…

  7. Major Conference about Astronomical Technology in Munich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-03-01

    Press Conference on Monday, March 27, 2000 Which are the latest astronomical discoveries made with the new 8-10 metre class astronomical telescopes? Will it be possible to construct even more powerful instruments on the ground and in space to explore the near and distant Universe at all wavelengths from gamma-rays to radio waves? Which research areas in this dynamical science are likely to achieve break-throughs with emerging new technologies? These are some of the central themes that will be discussed by more than 600 specialists from all over the world at an international conference in Munich (Germany), "Astronomical Telescopes and Instruments 2000" , beginning on Monday, March 27, 2000. During five days, the modern architecture of the new International Congress Center in the Bavarian capital will be the scene of lively exchanges about recent progress at the world's top-class astronomical research facilities and the presentation of inspired new ideas about future technological opportunities. The conference will be accompanied by numerous on-site exhibition stands by the major industries and research organisations in this wide field. This meeting is the latest in a series, organised every second year, alternatively in the USA and Europe by the International Society for Optical Engineering (SPIE) , this year with the European Southern Observatory (ESO) as co-sponsor and host institution. The conference will be opened in the morning of March 27 by the Bavarian Minister of Science, Research and Arts, Hans Zehetmair . His address will be followed by keynote speeches by Massimo Tarenghi (European Southern Observatory), James B. Breckenridge (National Science Foundation, USA), Harvey Butcher (Netherlands Foundation for Research in Astronomy) and Albrecht Ruediger (Max Planck Institut für Quantenoptik, Germany). The conference is subtitled "Power Telescopes and Instrumentation into the New Millennium" and will be attended by leading scientists and engineers from all

  8. PREFACE: Rutherford Centennial Conference on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Sean

    2012-09-01

    , Rutherford's great-granddaughter, and Professor Stephen Watts, Head of the School of Physics and Astronomy at Manchester, for opening the exhibition as part of the welcome reception for the conference. The reception was only possible with support from Canberra Industries. We are grateful to His Excellency Mr Derek Leask, New Zealand High Commissioner to the United Kingdom, to Professor Rod Coombs, Deputy President of The University of Manchester, and to Professor David Phillips, the President of the Royal Society of Chemistry, for their contributions to the formal opening of the conference. Manchester City Council kindly supported a civic reception hosted by the Lord Mayor of the City of Manchester, Councillor Harry Lyons JP, at Manchester Town Hall. The Ogden Trust helped support the conference dinner and Professor George Dracoulis provided an entertaining after dinner speech. Thank you for these contributions to the social programme of the conference. In addition to the exhibition at the Museum, which was open to the public until October 2011, the conference programme also included a series of public evening lectures and we are grateful both to the speakers (David Jenkins, Alan Perkins and John Roberts) and to those providing support for the public engagement activities (the Institute of Physics Nuclear Physics Group, the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine, the Nuclear Institute and the Science and Technology Facilities Council). We would also like to thank the European Physical Society for providing conference travel grants to a number of young scientists. I would like to take this opportunity to thank the other members of the UK Organising Committee for their help in making the conference a success and for their work in putting these proceedings together. In addition, the International Advisory Committee provided essential advice that contributed to the selection of the plenary speakers who were without exception engaging, interesting and entertaining

  9. Conference -- summary and comment.

    PubMed

    Fairweather, D

    1974-01-01

    500 delegates met at the IPPF twenty-first Anniversary Conference which was held in Brighton on October 22-27, 1973. The theme of the conference was Planning for the Future. In his welcoming speech Dr. Fernando Tamayo, IPPF President, noted that the quality of life is everybody's business. Mr. Rafael Salas, UNFPA Executive Director, gave the keynote speech pointing out the need for a comprehensive approach to the problem of rapid population growth. The motto of the World Population Year 1974, "1 world for all," should be the goal. "A Survey of Unmet Needs in Family Planning," which was the result of family planning studies in 209 countries, was the background document of the conference. Other important papers of the conference were Dr. Thorsten Sjovall's paper "Human Rights and Welfare Aspects," Dr. Bernard Berelson's paper "Contribution of Family Planning to Demographic, Economic and Social Goals"; Rodney Shearman's "New Possibilities for Fertility Control"; Dr. Alexander Kessler's report "Barriers between Contraceptive Services and the Consumer"; papers on social and economic change and planned parenthood; a discussion by Professor Francis Okediji on "Social and Cultural Values affecting Fertility and the Adoption of Family Planning in Africa," following a speech by Mrs. Nani Soewondo on the influence of legislation and policy in improving the status of women; and the final paper by Mrs. Wendy Marson entitled "A View for the Future." At the final session of the conference Professor Brian Abel-Smith presented a summary of the proceedings. The writer believes that energy was generated by the exchange of views at the conference and that energy must be harnessed and driven forward by the IPPF Governing Body and Management Planning Committee. A major degree of flexibility in outlook and action must be maintained. PMID:12178347

  10. PREFACE: Adapting to the Atmosphere Conference 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-04-01

    These proceedings, for the ''Adapting to the Atmosphere'' conference, Durham University, 2014, address the field of optical turbulence profiling of the Earth's atmosphere for astronomical observatory site selection, and the applications of Adaptive Optics and Optical Astronomical Instrumentation for small observatories as well as the future Extremely Large Telescope scales. This conference concentrated on the future of the community in an era of change. Optical turbulence profiling and remote sensing is required for the next generation of sophisticated adaptive optics systems and enables many of the proposed instruments and technologies which are necessary for the operation of large to extremely large telescopes. The successful design and operation of these complex systems demands an increasingly detailed understanding of the nature of atmospheric optical turbulence, as well as improvements in our ability to monitor and forecast its properties. This conference has the endorsement of the International Astronomical Union (working group on site testing instrumentation) and has received funding from the European Southern Observatory, the Thirty Meter Telescope and the Optical Infrared Co-ordination Network (OPTICON).

  11. PREFACE: XVII International Scientific Conference ''RESHETNEV READINGS''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-01-01

    The International Scientific Conference ''RESHETNEV READINGS'' is dedicated to the memory of Mikhail Reshetnev, an outstanding scientist, chief-constructor of space-rocket systems and communication satellites. The current volume represents selected proceedings of the main conference materials which were published by XVII International Scientific Conference ''RESHETNEV READINGS'' held on November 12 - 14, 2013. Plenary sessions, round tables and forums will be attended by famous scientists, developers and designers representing the space technology sector, as well as professionals and experts in the IT industry. A number of outstanding academic figures expressed their interest in an event of such a level including Jaures Alferov, Vice-president of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Academician of RAS, Nobel laureate, Dirk Bochar, General Secretary of the European Federation of National Engineering Associates (FEANI), Prof. Yuri Gulyaev, Academician of RAS, Member of the Presidium of RAS, President of the International Union of Scientific and Engineering Associations, Director of the Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics of RAS, as well as rectors of the largest universities in Russia, chief executives of well-known research enterprises and representatives of big businesses. We would like to thank our main sponsors such as JSC ''Reshetnev Information Satellite Systems'', JSC ''Krasnoyarsk Engineering Plant'', Central Design Bureau ''Geophysics'', Krasnoyarsk Region Authorities. These enterprises and companies are leading ones in the aerospace branch. It is a great pleasure to cooperate and train specialists for them.

  12. EPRI electric vehicle conference

    SciTech Connect

    Pfleeger, D.

    1999-10-01

    Lower operating and maintenance costs, quiet and clean operation appear the main factors in choosing electric over the typical internal combustion powered equipment. The Conference was sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). EPRI is a cooperative effort by major electric companies across the USA, founded in 1973 and headquartered in Palo Alto, CA. Featured at the Conference were presentations on regulatory issues, lift truck technologies, automotive advances and other industrial applications to include automated guided vehicles, personnel carriers and electric bicycles. Approximately 25 exhibitors displayed components, subassemblies and complete vehicles.

  13. European Science Notes. Volume 39, number 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, L. E.

    1985-12-01

    Progress in European science and technology is reported. Topics discussed in this issue include: bioelectromagnetic featured at ONRL Minisymposium on the influence of electric and electromagnetic fields on organized biological structures; neurobiology research at the universities of Stockholm, Lund, and Goeteborg (Sweden); conference on parallel computing; General Electric Co. (UK) research at Hirst and Marconi; research centres--information technology, image processing and analysis, radars communications, and semiconductors; and fatigue research at the Univ. of Vienna on short crack (less than 0.5 mm).

  14. The Conference Proceedings of the 1998 Air Transport Research Group (ATRG) of the WCTR Society. Volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oum, Tae Hoon (Editor); Bowen, Brent D. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    Thirteen papers (presentations) from the 8th World Conference on Transportation Research are presented. Topics include European Airline competition, cost analyses, performance evaluations, deregulation; aviation policy in Southeast Asia; corporate involvement in European business transportation; and cycles in the airline industry.

  15. Papers in Language Policy from the Language Policy Conference (Roskilde, Denmark, January 29, 1996). ROLIG Papir No. 56.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakmand, Bente, Ed.; And Others

    The papers included in this issue are from a conference on language policy. The papers are: "Why Promote European Multilingualism? French Experience" (Claude Truchot); "German Attitudes to European Language Policy" (Ulrich Ammon); "Minority Language Rights in Contemporary Europe" (Tove Skutnabb-Kangas); "Teacher Identities in Britain and Denmark…

  16. 78 FR 27963 - Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference Take notice that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission will hold a Technical Conference on Tuesday, July 9, 2013 from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m....

  17. PREFACE: 25th IUPAP Conference on Computational Physics (CCP2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchur, Lev N.; Barash, Lev Yu

    2014-05-01

    Participants of the XXV IUPAP Conference on Computational physics came to Moscow at the end of the August during a hot period. It was not a hot period because of the summer; in fact, the weather was quite comfortable. It was a hot period for the atmosphere amidst scientific society in Russia, especially for scientists working for the Russian Academy of Sciences. Four years ago, the C20 IUPAP Commission on Computational Physics and Computational Physics Group of the European Physical Society chose Moscow for several reasons. The first reason was connected to the high level and deep traditions of computational physics in Russia. It is known from experience at the former CCP conferences that native participants contribute about half of the presentations which form the solid scientific background of the conference, and the good level of domestic science makes the conference interesting and successful. The second reason was due to the fact that for the last twenty years there were not many IUPAP conferences in Russia, and it was a time to open more places for information exchange and intensify scientific collaboration. Thirdly, it was common opinion four years ago that the situation in Russia had become stable enough after the transition to a modern society, which took almost a quarter of a century. The conference preface is continued in the pdf.

  18. [Biobanks European infrastructure].

    PubMed

    Kinkorová, Judita; Topolčan, Ondřej

    2016-01-01

    Biobanks are structured repositories of human tissue samples connected with specific information. They became an integral part of personalized medicine in the new millennium. At the European research area biobanks are isolated not well coordinated and connected to the network. European commission supports European infrastructure BBMRI-ERIC (Biobanks and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure European Research Infrastructure Consortium), consortium of 54 members with more than 225 associated organizations, largely biobanks from over 30 countries. The aim is to support biomedical research using stored samples. Czech Republic is a member of the consortium as a national node BBMRI_CZ, consisting of five partners. PMID:27256149

  19. Declining Enrollment Conference Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

    This report summarizes the results of a conference on declining enrollment sponsored by the Arizona State Department of Education. Topics covered include school closing, budget implications of declining enrollment, staffing problems and reduction in force, board of education and community support, problems of small school districts, and…

  20. A Conference of Hope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Printing House for the Blind, Louisville, KY. Dept. of Educational Research.

    Presented are the proceedings of the First Historic Helen Keller World Conference on Services to Deaf-Blind Youths and Adults, held in New York City in September, 1977 on the theme "The Deaf-Blind Person in the Community." Reports have the following titles and authors: "Definition, Demography, Causes and Prevention of Deaf-Blindness; Finding and…

  1. Open Mind Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Alexander H.

    1995-01-01

    Open Mind, The Association for the achievement of diversity in higher education, met in conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico, between October 16 and 18, 1992. A number of workgroups met to discuss the goals, structure, and generally evaluate the Association and its achievements. A summary of the workgroup sessions and their minutes are included.

  2. APPA 2011 Conference Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Facilities Manager, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article presents highlights of APPA conference that was held on July 16-18, 2011. The highlights feature photos of 2011-2012 board of directors, outgoing senior regional representatives to the board, meritorious service award, APPA fellow, president's recognition and gavel exchange, and diamond business partner award.

  3. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engineering Education, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Presents the abstracts of 158 papers presented at the American Society for Engineering Education's annual conference at Knoxville, Tennessee, June 14-17, 1976. Included are engineering topics covering education, aerospace, agriculture, biomedicine, chemistry, computers, electricity, acoustics, environment, mechanics, and women. (SL)

  4. Grammar! A Conference Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Lid, Ed.; Boaks, Peter, Ed.

    Papers from a conference on the teaching of grammar, particularly in second language instruction, include: "Grammar: Acquisition and Use" (Richard Johnstone); "Grammar and Communication" (Brian Page); "Linguistic Progression and Increasing Independence" (Bernardette Holmes); "La grammaire? C'est du bricolage!" ("Grammar? That's Hardware!") (Barry…

  5. Microbicides 2006 conference

    PubMed Central

    Ramjee, Gita; Shattock, Robin; Delany, Sinead; McGowan, Ian; Morar, Neetha; Gottemoeller, Megan

    2006-01-01

    Current HIV/AIDS statistics show that women account for almost 60% of HIV infections in Sub-Saharan Africa. HIV prevention tools such as male and female condoms, abstinence and monogamy are not always feasible options for women due to various socio-economic and cultural factors. Microbicides are products designed to be inserted in the vagina or rectum prior to sex to prevent HIV acquisition. The biannual Microbicides conference took place in Cape Town, South Africa from 23–26 April 2006. The conference was held for the first time on the African continent, the region worst affected by the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The conference brought together a record number of 1,300 scientists, researchers, policy makers, healthcare workers, communities and advocates. The conference provided an opportunity for an update on microbicide research and development as well as discussions around key issues such as ethics, acceptability, access and community involvement. This report discusses the current status of microbicide research and development, encompassing basic and clinical science, social and behavioural science, and community mobilisation and advocacy activities. PMID:17038196

  6. Knowledge Sharing at Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Vries, Bregje; Pieters, Jules

    2007-01-01

    To improve the quality in teaching and learning, opportunities need to be provided where practitioners and researchers meet and share visions, disseminate findings, co-construct ideas, and set research agendas together. Visiting a conference is one well-known and established way to do this. But are they effective? A survey was conducted among the…

  7. Government Quality Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Government Quality Conference was an attempt to bring together executive organizations and senior individuals in the Federal Government that have a desire to improve productivity. It was designed to provide an exchange of ideas based on experience, and to encourage individual management initiatives to tap the capabilities of Federal employees.

  8. International waste management conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the international waste management conference. Topics covered include: Quality assurance in the OCR WM program; Leading the spirit of quality; Dept. of Energy hazardous waste remedial actions program; management of hazardous waste projects; and System management and quality assurance.

  9. REGIONAL CONFERENCE SUMMARIES, 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    AN AVERAGE OF 200 TEACHER EDUCATORS, STATE DIRECTORS, LAYMEN, AND REPRESENTATIVES OF VARIOUS AGENCIES ATTENDED EACH OF NINE REGIONAL CONFERENCES CONDUCTED THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES TO DISCUSS THE INFLUENCE OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CHANGES AND PROBLEMS IN PLANNING AND CONDUCTING VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS. MAJOR SPEECHES PRESENTED…

  10. 2002 NASPSA Conference Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Contains abstracts from the 2002 conference of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity. The publication is divided into three sections: the preconference workshop, "Effective Teaching Methods in the Classroom;" symposia (motor development, motor learning and control, and sport psychology); and free…

  11. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Engineering Education, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Includes abstracts of papers presented at the 80th Annual Conference of the American Society for Engineering Education. The broad areas include aerospace, affiliate and associate member council, agricultural engineering, biomedical engineering, continuing engineering studies, chemical engineering, civil engineering, computers, cooperative…

  12. IATUL Conference 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information Services and Use, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Summarizes presentations at conference on theme "The future of information resources for science and technology and role of libraries": industrial and commercial use of national, regional, and university resources; balance between public- and private-sector resources; local access in national and regional context; access to information in…

  13. Metabolic Engineering X Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, Evan

    2015-05-07

    The International Metabolic Engineering Society (IMES) and the Society for Biological Engineering (SBE), both technological communities of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), hosted the Metabolic Engineering X Conference (ME-X) on June 15-19, 2014 at the Westin Bayshore in Vancouver, British Columbia. It attracted 395 metabolic engineers from academia, industry and government from around the globe.

  14. The interparliamentary conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this conference was to provide a forum for exchange of information on environmental problems with global origins and consequences. The areas of major concern included the following: global climate change; deforestation and desertification; preservation of biological diversity; safeguarding oceans and water resources; population growth; destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer; and sustainable development.

  15. Conference summary - Personal views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lub, J.

    2016-05-01

    This is a collection of remarks on the three and a half days of the RR Lyrae 2015 Conference, limited only by my own lack of attention and understanding. I end with some personal recollections on my complete failure, even though doing the necessary calculations, to spot the importance and the possible application of Fourier amplitudes and phases of the RR Lyrae light curves.

  16. PREFACE: 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmsson, Hans

    1982-01-01

    second one to (3) Fusion and (4) Laboratory Plasmas. The 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics was organized by Chalmers University of Technology. It gathered about 500 participants from 40 countries. Large delegations came from the USA, France, West Germany, Japan, the USSR, and India, the number of participants from these countries ranging from 100 to 20. Sweden had about 50 participating scientists. There were a total of about 20 from the other Scandinavian countries. The principal sponsor of the conference was IUPAP, the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics. The conference also had a number of co-sponsors like IAU, the International Astronomical Union, URSI, the International Union of Radio Science, EPS, the European Physical Society, and EURATOM-FUSION. The conference was supported by Swedish Industry and Swedish Research Boards. The previous ICPP, held in Nagoya two years ago, was the first attempt to combine two types of conferences: the Plasma Theory Conference, first held in Kiev in the Soviet Union in 1971, and the Waves and Instabilities Congress, held for the first time in Innsbruck, Austria in 1973. As a consequence of the success of the Nagoya conference it was decided by the International Organizing Committee of the ICPP that the 1982 conference should also be of the combined type. The 1982 ICPP in Göteborg was thus a Joint Conference of the Fifth Kiev International Conference in Plasma Theory and the Fifth International Congress on Waves and Instabilities in Plasmas. During the conference in Göteborg the International Organizing Committee had a meeting and it was decided that also the next International Conference on Plasma Physics will be of the combined type. It will be held in Lausanne, Switzerland in 1984. The International Organizing Committee on the 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics comprised about 40 plasma physics scientists from all over the world, who represented various sections of plasma physics. I would

  17. Geophysical setting of the Reelfoot Rift and relations between rift structures and the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildenbrand, T.G.; Hendricks, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    In the winter of 1811-12, three of the largest historic earthquakes in the United States occurred near New Madrid, Missouri. Seismicity continues to the present day throughout a tightly clustered pattern of epicenters centered on the bootheel of Missouri, including parts of northeastern Arkansas, northwestern Tennessee, western Kentucky, and southern Illinois. In 1990, the New Madrid seismic zone/Central United States became the first seismically active region east of the Rocky Mountains to be designated a priority research area within the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP). This Professional Paper is a collection of papers, some published separately, presenting results of the newly intensified research program in this area. Major components of this research program include tectonic framework studies, seismicity and deformation monitoring and modeling, improved seismic hazard and risk assessments, and cooperative hazard mitigation studies.

  18. A search for paleoliquefaction and evidence bearing on the recurrence behavior of the great 1811-12 New Madrid earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wesnousky, S.G.; Leffler, L.M.

    1994-01-01

    In the winter of 1811-12, three of the largest historic earthquakes in the United States occurred near New Madrid, Missouri. Seismicity continues to the present day throughout a tightly clustered pattern of epicenters centered on the bootheel of Missouri, including parts of northeastern Arkansas, northwestern Tennessee, western Kentucky, and southern Illinois. In 1990, the New Madrid seismic zone/central United States became the first seismically active region east of the Rocky Mountains to be designated a priority research area within the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP). This professional paper is a collection of papers, some published separately, presenting results of the newly intensified research program in this area. Major components of this research program include tectonic framework studies, seismicity and deformation monitoring and modeling, improved seismic hazard and risk assessments, and cooperative hazard mitigation studies.

  19. Evidences of Paleoearthquakes in Palaeolithic settlements within fluvial sequences of the Tagus Basin (Madrid, Central Spain).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Pablo G.; Rodríguez Pascua, M. A.; Pérez López, R.; Giner Robles, J. L.; Roquero, E.; Tapias, F.; López Recio, M.; Rus, I.; Morin, J.

    2010-05-01

    Multiple evidences of soft-sediment to brittle deformation within the Pleistocene fluvial terraces of the Tagus, Jarama, Tajuña and Manzanares river valleys have been described since the middle 20th Century. Cryoturbation, hydroplastic deformations due to underlying karstic collapses or halokinesis on the substratum of neogene gypsums, and seismic shaking have been proposed to interpret these structures. These deformations are typically concentrated in the +18-20 m terrace levels, and closely linked to well-known Palaeolithic sites, in some cases overlaying and/or affecting true prehistoric settlements (i.e. Arganda, Arriaga and Tafesa sites) within the Jarama and Manzanares valleys. The affected settlements typically display acheulian lithic industry linked to the scavenging of large Pleistocene mammals (i.e. Elephas antiquus). Commonly, deformational structures are concentrated in relatively thin horizons (10-50 cm thick) bracketed by undeformed fluvial sands and gravels. The soft-sediment deformations usually consist on medium to fine sized sands injected and protruded in overlaying flood-plain clayey silts, showing a wide variety of convolutes, injections, sand-dikes, dish and pillar structures, mud volcanoes, faults and folds, some times it is possible to undertake their 3D geometrical analysis due to the exceptional conservation of the structures (Tafesa). Recent geo-archaeological prospecting on the for the Palaeolithic Site of Arriaga (South Madrid City) conducted during the year 2009, let to find out an exceptional horizon of deformation of about 1.20 m thick. It consisted on highly disturbed and pervasively liquefacted sands, which hardly can be attributed to no-seismic processes. The acheulian lithic industry of the Madrid Region have been classically attributed the Late Middle Pleistocene (< 350 kyr BP), but recent OSL dating indicate that the basal horizons of the +18-20 m fluvial terraces hold ages younger than c.a. 120-100 kyr BP in this zone. All

  20. Near-surface structural model for deformation associated with the February 7, 1812, New Madrid, Missouri, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Odum, J.K.; Stephenson, W.J.; Shedlock, K.M.; Pratt, T.L.

    1998-01-01

    The February 7, 1812, New Madrid, Missouri, earthquake (M [moment magnitude] 8) was the third and final large-magnitude event to rock the northern Mississippi Embayment during the winter of 1811-1812. Although ground shaking was so strong that it rang church bells, stopped clocks, buckled pavement, and rocked buildings up and down the eastern seaboard, little coseismic surface deformation exists today in the New Madrid area. The fault(s) that ruptured during this event have remained enigmatic. We have integrated geomorphic data documenting differential surficial deformation (supplemented by historical accounts of surficial deformation and earthquake-induced Mississippi River waterfalls and rapids) with the interpretation of existing and recently acquired seismic reflection data, to develop a tectonic model of the near-surface structures in the New Madrid, Missouri, area. This model consists of two primary components: a northnorthwest-trending thrust fault and a series of northeast-trending, strike-slip, tear faults. We conclude that the Reelfoot fault is a thrust fault that is at least 30 km long. We also infer that tear faults in the near surface partitioned the hanging wall into subparallel blocks that have undergone differential displacement during episodes of faulting. The northeast-trending tear faults bound an area documented to have been uplifted at least 0.5 m during the February 7, 1812, earthquake. These faults also appear to bound changes in the surface density of epicenters that are within the modern seismicity, which is occurring in the stepover zone of the left-stepping right-lateral strike-slip fault system of the modern New Madrid seismic zone.

  1. Understanding differences in the local food environment across countries: A case study in Madrid (Spain) and Baltimore (USA).

    PubMed

    Díez, Julia; Bilal, Usama; Cebrecos, Alba; Buczynski, Amanda; Lawrence, Robert S; Glass, Thomas; Escobar, Francisco; Gittelsohn, Joel; Franco, Manuel

    2016-08-01

    Places where we buy food influence dietary patterns, making local food environments a good example of a mass influence on population diets. Cross-cultural studies, using reliable methods, may help understanding the relationship between food environments and diet-related health outcomes. We aimed to understand cross-national differences in the local food environment between Madrid and Baltimore by comparing an average neighborhood in each city in terms of food store types, healthy food availability, and residents' pedestrian access. During 2012-2013, we assessed one neighborhood (~15,000 residents) in each city selecting median areas in terms of socio-demographic characteristics (segregation, education, aging, and population density). We collected on-field data on (a) number and types of all food stores, (b) overall healthy food availability and (c) specific availability of fruits & vegetables. Throughout a street network analysis (200m, 400m and 800m) of food stores with high healthy food availability, we estimated residents' pedestrian accessibility. We found 40 stores in Madrid and 14 in Baltimore. Small food stores carrying fresh foods in Madrid contrasted with the high presence of corner and chain convenience stores in Baltimore. In Madrid, 77% of the residents lived within less than 200m from a food store with high healthy food availability. In contrast, 95% of Baltimore's residents lived further than 400m from these stores. Our results may help promoting interventions from local city agencies to allocate resources to existing small-sized food stores, and to improve walkable urban environments. These actions may influence food choices, especially for those residents lacking access to private vehicles. PMID:27311334

  2. PREFACE: International Conference on Fundamentals and Applications of HIPIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehiasarian, Arutiun; Bandorf, Ralf

    2012-09-01

    .hipp-cost.eu). COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) is one of the longest-running European frameworks supporting cooperation among scientists and researchers across Europe (www.cost.eu). The COST Action MP0804 HIPP processes focuses on the fundamentals and the industrial implementation of highly ionized pulse plasmas, where HIPIMS is the most prominent and most mature technology, today. Over 50 high level contributions, divided in 37 oral and 14 poster presentations were highly appreciated by the professional audience. The message from 2011 was that HIPIMS technology has now reached industry. In the opening session of the conference representatives from different companies reported on the latest developments in industrialization. Using HIPIMS technology, the lifetime of mills using a state of the art coating can be extended by 50%. Comparable deposition rates for coating cutting inserts on the different faces are reported. The ice-free window for automotive application is one solution just becoming available by HIPIMS technology. The talks from international experts covered a range from fundamental physics, experimental investigations, theoretically modeling to several applications and made the international conference on fundamentals and applications a success story to be continued in the following years. Arutiun Ehiasarian and Ralf Bandorf (Conference Chairmen of HIPIMS 2010 and 2011, respectively) Organising Committee (2010 and 2011) - Affiliations Professor Dr Papken Hovsepian (Sheffield Hallam University, Nanotechnology Center for PVD Research, UK) Professor Dr Günter Bräuer (Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films IST/ Network of Competence INPLAS, Braunschweig, DE) Professor Dr Arutiun P. Ehiasarian (Sheffield Hallam University, Materials Research Institute, UK) Dr Ralf Bandorf (Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films IST, Braunschweig, DE) Main Sponsor Society of Vacuum Coaters SVC Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA

  3. Fourth National Conference on Citizenship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC.

    The proceedings contain the papers given and digests of group topics discussed at the 1949 National Conference on Citizenship held in New York. An introduction by the chairman of the conference committee identified the conference theme as "Responsible American Citizens" and noted that discussion would center on citizens in politics, in the world,…

  4. PRACTICAL GUIDE TO CONFERENCE LEADERSHIP.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MORGAN, JOHN S.

    THIS GUIDE TO CONFERENCE LEADERSHIP BEGINS WITH A CHAPTER ON LEADERSHIP PSYCHOLOGY AND GOES ON TO PRESENT OUTLINES FOR RUNNING CONFERENCES. THE LEADER PREPARES FOR THE MEETING BY COLLECTING FACTS ON THE SUBJECT, PREPARING AN OUTLINE, KNOWING THE PARTICIPANTS, MAKING PHYSICAL ARRANGEMENTS, AND WRITING THE TENTATIVE SUMMARY. IN THE CONFERENCE HE…

  5. ALA Conference 2009: Chicago Hope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2009-01-01

    There is joy among those who have the funds to go to Chicago for the American Library Association (ALA) annual conference, July 9-15. Every librarian knows there is nothing better than a Chicago gathering, with the city's wonderful haunts, museums, restaurants, and fine memories of past conferences. The conference program covers nearly every…

  6. Conference scene: pharmacogenomics: from cell to clinic (part 2).

    PubMed

    Siest, Gérard; Medeiros, Rui; Melichar, Bohuslav; Stathopoulou, Maria; Van Schaik, Ron Hn; Cacabelos, Ramon; Abt, Peter Meier; Monteiro, Carolino; Gurwitz, David; Queiroz, Jao; Mota-Filipe, Helder; Ndiaye, Ndeye Coumba; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie

    2014-04-01

    Second International ESPT Meeting Lisbon, Portugal, 26-28 September 2013 The second European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Theranostics (ESPT) conference was organized in Lisbon, Portugal, and attracted 250 participants from 37 different countries. The participants could listen to 50 oral presentations, participate in five lunch symposia and were able to view 83 posters and an exhibition. Part 1 of this Conference Scene was presented in the previous issue of Pharmacogenomics. This second part will focus on: clinical implementation of pharmacogenomics tests; transporters and pharmacogenomics; stem cells and other new tools for pharmacogenomics and drug discovery; from system pharmacogenomics to personalized medicine; and, finally, we will discuss the Posters and Awards that were presented at the conference. PMID:24897282

  7. An Operational Alert System for the European-Mediterranean Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazet-Roux, G.; Bossu, R.; Carreno, E.; Guilbert, J.; Godey, S.

    2003-12-01

    The European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre (EMSC) has been running for several years an operational alert system for potentially damaging earthquakes which occur in the European-Mediterranean region. This alert system, - sub-part of the EMSC real time information service available on the web site (www.emsc-csem.org) - is based on parametric data provided through the Internet by 40 different networks representing 800 stations in the Euro.-Med. region. In case of potentially damaging earthquake, the seismologist on duty connects to EMSC facilities, merges and processes all available data and, as soon as a reliable solution is available, disseminates alert messages by fax and email. Alert messages are sent by fax to official organisations (e.g., Civil Protection Agency, rescue teams, Council of Europe, ECHO, etc.), to the seismological community and to the public by emails (800 emails). Furthermore, data and results are made automatically available in real time on the web. In case of technical problems or maintenance activities, the duty is taken over by IGN (Madrid, Spain), which runs full back-up procedures. EMSC commits itself to a maximum dissemination time (time lag between the occurrence of the earthquake and the messages' dissemination) of 1 hour. This delay is respected in the vast majority of cases with a median dissemination time of less than 40 minutes. We will give an overview of this system and its performances and put a special emphasis on the processing of the recent earthquake in Algeria.

  8. Use of archaeology to date liquefaction features and seismic events in the new madrid seismic zone, Central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuttle, M.P.; Lafferty, R. H., III; Guccione, M.J.; Schweig, E. S., III; Lopinot, N.; Cande, R.F.; Dyer-Williams, K.; Haynes, M.

    1996-01-01

    Prehistoric earthquake-induced liquefaction features occur in association with Native American occupation horizons in the New Madrid seismic zone. Age control of these liquefaction features, including sand-blow deposits, sand-blow craters, and sand dikes, can be accomplished by extensive sampling and flotation processing of datable materials as well as archaeobotanical analysis of associated archaeological horizons and pits. This approach increases both the amount of carbon for radiocarbon dating and the precision dating of artifact assemblages. Using this approach, we dated liquefaction features at four sites northwest of Blytheville, Arkansas, and found that at least one significant earthquake occurred in the New Madrid seismic zone between A.D. 1180 and 1400, probably about A.D. 1300 ?? 100 yr. In addition, we found three buried sand blows that formed between 3340 B.C. and A.D. 780. In this region where very large to great earthquakes appear to be closely timed, archaeology is helping to develop a paleoearthquake chronology for the New Madrid seismic zone. ?? 1996 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. Magnitudes and locations of the 1811-1812 New Madrid, Missouri, and the 1886 Charleston, South Carolina, earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bakun, W.H.; Hopper, M.G.

    2004-01-01

    We estimate locations and moment magnitudes M and their uncertainties for the three largest events in the 1811-1812 sequence near New Madrid, Missouri, and for the 1 September 1886 event near Charleston, South Carolina. The intensity magnitude M1, our preferred estimate of M, is 7.6 for the 16 December 1811 event that occurred in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) on the Bootheel lineament or on the Blytheville seismic zone. M1, is 7.5 for the 23 January 1812 event for a location on the New Madrid north zone of the NMSZ and 7.8 for the 7 February 1812 event that occurred on the Reelfoot blind thrust of the NMSZ. Our preferred locations for these events are located on those NMSZ segments preferred by Johnston and Schweig (1996). Our estimates of M are 0.1-0.4 M units less than those of Johnston (1996b) and 0.3-0.5 M units greater than those of Hough et al. (2000). M1 is 6.9 for the 1 September 1886 event for a location at the Summerville-Middleton Place cluster of recent small earthquakes located about 30 km northwest of Charleston.

  10. Magnitude Uncertainty and Ground Motion Simulations of the 1811-1812 New Madrid Earthquake Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez Guzman, L.; Graves, R. W.; Olsen, K. B.; Boyd, O. S.; Hartzell, S.; Ni, S.; Somerville, P. G.; Williams, R. A.; Zhong, J.

    2011-12-01

    We present a study of a set of three-dimensional earthquake simulation scenarios in the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ). This is a collaboration among three simulation groups with different numerical modeling approaches and computational capabilities. The study area covers a portion of the Central United States (~400,000 km2) centered on the New Madrid seismic zone, which includes several metropolitan areas such as Memphis, TN and St. Louis, MO. We computed synthetic seismograms to a frequency of 1Hz by using a regional 3D velocity model (Ramirez-Guzman et al., 2010), two different kinematic source generation approaches (Graves et al., 2010; Liu et al., 2006) and one methodology where sources were generated using dynamic rupture simulations (Olsen et al., 2009). The set of 21 hypothetical earthquakes included different magnitudes (Mw 7, 7.6 and 7.7) and epicenters for two faults associated with the seismicity trends in the NMSZ: the Axial (Cottonwood Grove) and the Reelfoot faults. Broad band synthetic seismograms were generated by combining high frequency synthetics computed in a one-dimensional velocity model with the low frequency motions at a crossover frequency of 1 Hz. Our analysis indicates that about 3 to 6 million people living near the fault ruptures would experience Mercalli intensities from VI to VIII if events similar to those of the early nineteenth century occurred today. In addition, the analysis demonstrates the importance of 3D geologic structures, such as the Reelfoot Rift and the Mississippi Embayment, which can channel and focus the radiated wave energy, and rupture directivity effects, which can strongly amplify motions in the forward direction of the ruptures. Both of these effects have a significant impact on the pattern and level of the simulated intensities, which suggests an increased uncertainty in the magnitude estimates of the 1811-1812 sequence based only on historic intensity reports. We conclude that additional constraints such as

  11. GuMNet - A high altitude monitoring network in the Sierra de Guadarrama (Madrid, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santolaria-Canales, Edmundo

    2016-04-01

    The Guadarrama Monitoring Network (GuMNet) is an observational infrastructure focused on monitoring the state of the atmosphere and the ground in the Sierra de Guadarrama, 50 km NW of the city of Madrid. The network is composed of10 stations ranging from low altitude (900 m a.s.l.) to high mountain climate (2400 m a.s.l.). The atmospheric instrumentation includes sensors for air temperature, air humidity, 4-component net radiation, precipitation, snow height and wind speed and direction. The surface and subsurface infrastructure includes temperature and humidity sensors distributed in 9 trenches up to a maximum of 1 m depth and additionally temperature sensors in 15 PVC cased boreholes down to 20 m and 2 m with a higher vertical resolution close to the surface. All stations are located in exposed open areas except for one site that is in a forested area for measuring air-ground fluxes under forest conditions. High altitude sites are focused on periglacial areas and lower altitude sites have emphasis on pastures. One of the low altitude sites is equipped with a 10 m high tower with 3D sonic anemometers and a CO2/H2O analyzer that will allow the sampling of wind profiles and H2O and CO2 eddy covariance fluxes, important for estimation of CO2 and energy exchanges over complex vegetated surfaces. The network is connected via general packet radio service to the central lab in the Campus of Excellence of Moncloa and management software has been developed to handle the operation of the infrastructure. The data provided by GuMNet will help to improve the characterization of atmospheric variability from turbulent scales to meteorology and climate at high mountain areas, as well as land-atmosphere interactions. The network information aims at meeting the needs of accuracy to be used for biological, agricultural, hydrological, meteorological and climatic investigations in this area with relevance for ecosystem oriented studies. This setup will complement the broader network

  12. Human papillomavirus genotypes in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with anal pathology in Madrid, Spain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We studied anal specimens to determine the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes and co-infection occurrence. This information will contribute to the knowledge of HPV genotype distributions and provide an estimate of the prevalence of different oncogenic HPV genotypes found in patients in Madrid (Spain). Methods We studied a total of 82 anal biopsies from the Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón of Madrid. These included 4 specimens with benign lesions, 52 specimens with low-grade anal squamous intraepithelial lesion, 24 specimens with high-grade anal squamous intraepithelial lesions and 2 specimens with invasive anal carcinoma. HPV genotyping was performed with PCR amplification and reverse dot blot hybridization. Results We detected 33 different HPV genotypes, including 16 HPVs associated with a high risk of carcinogenesis, 3 HPVs associated with a highly likely risk of carcinogenesis and 14 HPVs associated with a low-risk of carcinogenesis. In two specimens, an uncharacterized HPV genotype was detected. The most frequent HPV genotypes found were HPV-16 (10.3%; 95% CI: 6.6%-15.1%), HPV-52 (8.5%; 95% CI: 5.2%-13%) and HPV-43/44 (7.6%; 95% CI: 4.5%-11.9%). HPV-18 was only detected in 0.9% (95% CI: 0.1%-3.2%) of the total viruses detected in all lesions. HPV co-infections were found in 83.9% of all types of lesions. The majority of cases (90.2%) were concomitantly infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Conclusion The prevalence of high-risk carcinogenic genotypes in anal pathological samples was remarkable. Therefore, further studies that include a greater number of samples, particularly invasive carcinoma cases are needed to evaluate the potential influence of these HPV genotypes in the appearance of anal carcinomas. Also, the influence of other accompanying infections should be evaluated clarify the appearance of this type of carcinoma. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here

  13. Statistical analysis of factors affecting landslide distribution in the new Madrid seismic zone, Tennessee and Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jibson, R.W.; Keefer, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    More than 220 large landslides along the bluffs bordering the Mississippi alluvial plain between Cairo, Ill., and Memphis, Tenn., are analyzed by discriminant analysis and multiple linear regression to determine the relative effects of slope height and steepness, stratigraphic variation, slope aspect, and proximity to the hypocenters of the 1811-12 New Madrid, Mo., earthquakes on the distribution of these landslides. Three types of landslides are analyzed: (1) old, coherent slumps and block slides, which have eroded and revegetated features and no active analogs in the area; (2) old earth flows, which are also eroded and revegetated; and (3) young rotational slumps, which are present only along near-river bluffs, and which are the only young, active landslides in the area. Discriminant analysis shows that only one characteristic differs significantly between bluffs with and without young rotational slumps: failed bluffs tend to have sand and clay at their base, which may render them more susceptible to fluvial erosion. Bluffs having old coherent slides are significantly higher, steeper, and closer to the hypocenters of the 1811-12 earthquakes than bluffs without these slides. Bluffs having old earth flows are likewise higher and closer to the earthquake hypocenters. Multiple regression analysis indicates that the distribution of young rotational slumps is affected most strongly by slope steepness: about one-third of the variation in the distribution is explained by variations in slope steepness. The distribution of old coherent slides and earth flows is affected most strongly by slope height, but the proximity to the hypocenters of the 1811-12 earthquakes also significantly affects the distribution. The results of the statistical analyses indicate that the only recently active landsliding in the area is along actively eroding river banks, where rotational slumps formed as bluffs are undercut by the river. The analyses further indicate that the old coherent slides

  14. European auxiliary propulsion, 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holcomb, L. B.

    1972-01-01

    The chemical and electric auxiliary propulsion technology of the United Kingdom, France, and West Germany is discussed in detail, and the propulsion technology achievements of Italy, India, Japan, and Russia are reviewed. A comparison is presented of Shell 405 catalyst and a European spontaneous hydrazine catalyst called CNESRO I. Finally, conclusions are drawn regarding future trends in European auxiliary propulsion technology development.

  15. Lab-on-a-Chip European Congress 2010.

    PubMed

    Becker, Holger

    2010-09-01

    On 25 and 26 May 2010, the fourth Lab-on-a-Chip European Congress took place in Dublin, Ireland. This article reviews some key presentations as well as the overall trends observed in the field of microfluidics as presented in this conference. While, as in most microfluidic conferences, no spectacular innovations have been presented indicating a certain maturing of the technology, the widening impact of microfluidics technology in a large variety of application fields can be observed. This was reflected in the multitude of applications presented covering fields as diverse as sport science, protein crystallisation, biosensors in a large variety, cell-based assays and point-of-care diagnostics. PMID:22823263

  16. European Frequency Management and the Role of CRAF for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel, W.; Spoelstra, T. A. Th.

    2004-06-01

    In Europe, radio frequency regulation is managed by the CEPT, the Conference of European Posts and Telecommunications Administrations (under an MoU with the European Commission). The CEPT develops guidelines and provides national Administrations with tools for harmonised European frequency management. In frequency management matters, the European radio astronomy community is represented by CRAF, the Committee on Radio Astronomy Frequencies of the ESF, the European Science Foundation. CRAF at present has members from 17 CEPT countries and a number of international organisations and it employs a full-time pan-European spectrum manager. Like several other non-government organis-ations, CRAF participates actively in this process through collaboration and communication with national Administrations and at CEPT level. CRAF has an observer status within the CEPT and is a Sector Member of the ITU-R, allowing it to participate in its own right in European and global fora dealing with radio frequency management.

  17. Mississippi Climate & Hydrology Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Lawford, R.; Huang, J.

    2002-05-01

    The GEWEX Continental International Project (GCIP), which started in 1995 and completed in 2001, held its grand finale conference in New Orleans, LA in May 2002. Participants at this conference along with the scientists funded through the GCIP program are invited to contribute a paper to a special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR). This special JGR issue (called GCIP3) will serve as the final report on scientific research conducted by GCIP investigators. Papers are solicited on the following topical areas, but are not limited to, (1) water energy budget studies; (2) warm season precipitation; (3) predictability and prediction system; (4) coupled land-atmosphere models; (5) climate and water resources applications. The research areas cover observations, modeling, process studies and water resources applications.

  18. NSI conference support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaron, Susan

    1991-01-01

    One of the many services NSI provides as an extension of customer/user support is to attend major scientific conferences. The conference effort provides NASA/OSSA scientists with many benefits: (1) scientist get to see NSI in action; they utilize the network to read email, and have recently begun to demonstrate their scientific research to their colleagues; (2) scientist get an opportunity to meet and interact with NSI Staff, which gives scientists a chance to get status on their requirements, ask about network status, get acquainted with our procedures, and learn about services; and (3) scientists are exposed to networking in a larger sense; particularly by knowing about other NASA groups who provide valuable scientific resources over the Internet.

  19. Metabolic Engineering VII Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Korpics

    2012-12-04

    The aims of this Metabolic Engineering conference are to provide a forum for academic and industrial researchers in the field; to bring together the different scientific disciplines that contribute to the design, analysis and optimization of metabolic pathways; and to explore the role of Metabolic Engineering in the areas of health and sustainability. Presentations, both written and oral, panel discussions, and workshops will focus on both applications and techniques used for pathway engineering. Various applications including bioenergy, industrial chemicals and materials, drug targets, health, agriculture, and nutrition will be discussed. Workshops focused on technology development for mathematical and experimental techniques important for metabolic engineering applications will be held for more in depth discussion. This 2008 meeting will celebrate our conference tradition of high quality and relevance to both industrial and academic participants, with topics ranging from the frontiers of fundamental science to the practical aspects of metabolic engineering.

  20. IEEE conference record -- Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This conference covers the following areas: computational plasma physics; vacuum electronic; basic phenomena in fully ionized plasmas; plasma, electron, and ion sources; environmental/energy issues in plasma science; space plasmas; plasma processing; ball lightning/spherical plasma configurations; plasma processing; fast wave devices; magnetic fusion; basic phenomena in partially ionized plasma; dense plasma focus; plasma diagnostics; basic phenomena in weakly ionized gases; fast opening switches; MHD; fast z-pinches and x-ray lasers; intense ion and electron beams; laser-produced plasmas; microwave plasma interactions; EM and ETH launchers; solid state plasmas and switches; intense beam microwaves; and plasmas for lighting. Separate abstracts were prepared for 416 papers in this conference.

  1. Energy Conferences and Symposia; (USA)

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, J.H.; Simpson, W.F. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Energy Conferences and Symposia, a monthly publication, was instituted to keep scientists, engineers, managers, and related energy professionals abreast of meetings sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and by other technical associations. Announcements cover conference, symposia, workshops, congresses, and other formal meetings pertaining to DOE programmatic interests. Complete meeting information, including title, sponsor, and contact, is presented in the main section, which is arranged alphabetically by subject area. Within a subject, citations are sorted by beginning data of the meeting. New listings are indicated by a bullet after the conference number and DOE-sponsored conferences are indicated by a star. Two indexes are provided for cross referencing conference information. The Chronological Index lists conference titles by dates and gives the subject area where complete information they may be found. The Location Index is alphabetically sorted by the city where the conference will be held.

  2. The European Ideal of a University: Portugal's Views from the 1950s and 1960s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandão, Tiago

    2015-01-01

    This study stems from research on the "Standing Conferences of Rectors and Vice-Chancellors of the European Universities" (1948-), an experimental initiative for co-operation among European universities, emphasising the reformative ideal that appeared in international circles in the years following the Second World War. These conceptions…

  3. SAARC Conference on Children.

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    In September 1992, in Colombo, Sri Lanka, ministry representatives attended the 2nd South Asian Ministerial Conference on Children to discuss child survival and safe motherhood, maternal and child nutrition, basic education, safe water, sanitation, the environment, child rights, and sociopolitical strategy to reach goals and to reduce poverty. To achieve the 7 major goals and essential supportive goals for the region, each country must define tasks in manageable terms based on country-specific and community-specific needs and importance while at the same time countries should cooperate to strengthen prospects of achieving goals emerging as priorities. The Conference called for countries to reinforce their National Plans of Action with a regional perspective and to consider representative goals in primary education, diarrhea control, iodine deficiency disorders, reducing gender disparity, family size, child labor, drinking water, guinea worm disease, immunization, maternal mortality, and nutrition. The Conference emphasized that the strategy for reaching child-centered goals should be integrated with the total development strategy and be a holistic approach. For example, governments need to expand social safety programs for children and women because of structural adjustments in the economy. The resolution also called on governments to allow community-led local planning. A working group at the conference made recommendations for supporting/sectoral goals on water supply, sanitation, and environment. For example, it called for universal access to potable water and sanitary means of excreta disposal by 2000 and for adequate shelter and services to improve the living environment of children in South Asia. Some recommended strategies to achieve these goals were community participation; decentralization; promotion of self-reliance, cost-sharing, and sustainability; and special training for women. Other areas they addressed were home gardens for vegetables and fruits

  4. Moldova. Historic regional conference.

    PubMed

    Moshin, V

    1995-05-01

    The Directorate of Maternal and Child Health and the Family Planning Association of Moldova organized a regional conference, which was held October 18-19, 1994, in Kishinev, Moldova, with the support of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the World Health Organization (WHO), and the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF). The conference,"Problems of Family Planning in Eastern Europe," was attended by approximately 400 Moldovan delegates of governmental and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and by 25 delegates from Romania, Russia, Belarus, the Ukraine, and Georgia. The President of Moldova and the Ministry of Public Health of Moldova gave their approval. The main objectives of the conference were to inform the public about the recommendations of the ICPD, to analyze the status of women's reproductive health and family planning in Eastern Europe, and to find ways of implementing the ICPD Plan of Action. Major problems identified during the conference were: 1) the social and economic problems facing most families; 2) the high rate of morbidity and mortality; 3) the decrease in birth rate; 4) the increase in abortions; 5) the rising incidence of venereal disease; and 6) the absence of an effective family planning system. It was agreed that cooperation between governments and NGOs is essential in designing population programs for each country. The following goals were set: 1) to provide populations with sufficient contraceptives; 2) to actively promote family planning concepts through the mass media; 3) to train specialists and to open family planning offices and centers; 4) to introduce sex education in the curricula of Pedagogical Institutes; and 5) to create national and regional statistical and sociological databases on population issues. PMID:12222268

  5. 1999 IEEE radar conference

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-01

    This conference addresses the stringent radar technology demands facing the next century: target detection, tracking and identification; changing target environment; increased clutter mitigation techniques; air traffic control; transportation; drug smuggling; remote sensing, and other consumer oriented applications. A timely discussion covers how to minimize costs for these emerging areas. Advanced radar technology theory and applications are also presented. Topics covered include: signal processing; space time adaptive processing/antennas; surveillance technology; radar systems; dual use; and phenomenology.

  6. Groundwater storage variations in Madrid (Central Spain) from InSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béjar-Pizarro, Marta; Ezquerro, Pablo; Herrera, Gerardo; Tomás, Roberto; Guardiola-Albert, Carolina; Ruiz-Hernandez, Jose M.; Fernandez-Merodo, Jose A.; Marchamalo, Miguel; Martinez, Ruben

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater resources are decreasing in many regions of the world and the future water supply for many populations is threatened. Future climatic conditions and population growth are expected to intensify the problem. Identifying where groundwater storage loss is occurring and understanding the factors that control this process is crucial to mitigate its adverse consequences. In this work, we apply satellite-based measurements of ground deformation over the Tertiary detritic aquifer of Madrid (TDAM), Central Spain, to infer the spatio-temporal evolution of water levels and identify areas vulnerable to groundwater storage loss. Using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data during the period 1992-2010 and piezometric time series on 19 well sites covering the period 1997-2010, we model groundwater levels and estimate reservoir capacity variations during the study period. This information is used to quantify groundwater storage loss and identify vulnerable areas. Our results reveal a region of ~200 km² where groundwater storage loss occurred in two different periods, 1991-1999 and 2005-2010. A combination of factors including the occurrence of two severe droughts and the existence of multiple private wells exploited by local entities and individuals for water supply, are probably controlling the inferred groundwater storage loss. This study illustrates how InSAR data can be used to detect vulnerable areas with a tendency to loss storage so that measures can be implemented to mitigate its adverse consequences in future drought periods.

  7. Shear Wave Splitting from Local Earthquakes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P.; Arroucau, P.; Vlahovic, G.

    2012-12-01

    In this study we investigate crustal anisotropy in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ), by analyzing shear wave splitting from local earthquake data. The NMSZ is centrally located in the United States, spanning portions of western Tennessee, northeastern Arkansas, and southeastern Missouri. The NMSZ is also the location in which three of the largest known earthquakes took place in North America, occurring in 1811-1812. Although many seismic studies have been performed in this region, there is no consensus about which driving mechanism could satisfy both the current observations, as well as the historically observed seismicity. Therefore, it is important to continue investigating the NMSZ, to gain a better understanding of its seismicity, and the possible mechanisms that drive it. The automated technique developed by Savage et al. (2010) is used to perform the shear wave splitting measurements at 120 seismic stations within the NMSZ. The Center for Earthquake Research and Information (CERI) at the University of Memphis provided data for 1151 earthquakes spanning the years 2003-2011. The initial event selection was reduced to 245 earthquakes ranging in magnitude from 2.0 to 4.6, which fell within the shear wave window of one or more of the stations. The results of this study provide information about orientation of microcracks in the upper portion of the crust; future work will include analysis for temporal and spatial variations in order to assess the state of stress in the region.

  8. Survey of emission-line galaxies: Universidad Complutense de Madrid list

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamorano, J.; Rego, Gallego, J.; Gallego, J. G.; Vitores, A. G.RA, R.; Gonzalez-Riestra, R..; Rodriguez-Caderot, G.

    1994-01-01

    A low-dispersion objective-prism survey for low-redshift emission-line galaxies (ELGs) is being carried out by the University Complutense de Madrid with the Schmidt telescope at the German-Spanish Observatory of Calar Alto (Almeria, Spain). A 4 deg full aperture prism, which provides a dispersion of 1950 A/mm, and IIIaF emulsion combination has been used to search for ELGs selected by the presence of H-alpha emission in their spectra. Our survey has proved to be able to recover objects already found by similar surveys with different techniques and, what is more important, to discover new objects not previously cataloged. A compilation of descriptions and positions, along with finding charts when necessary, is presented for 160 extragalactic emission-line objects. This is the first list, which contains objects located in a region of the sky covering 270 sq deg in 10 fields near alpha = 0(sup h) and delta = 20 deg.

  9. Monitoring and analysis of land subsidence caused by groundwater withdrawal in Madrid (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezquerro, Pablo; Herrera, Gerardo; Bejar, Marta; Marchamalo, Miguel; Martinez, Ruben; Tomás, Roberto

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the land subsidence induced by groundwater withdrawal affecting the North area of Madrid City (Spain) using Persistent Scatterers Interferometry technique (PSI), in particular the so-called PSP-IFSAR. This technique is capable of estimating deformation velocity maps of the ground surface and displacement time series from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images. Two datasets acquired between April 1992 and November 2000 from ERS-1 and ERS-2 and between August 2002 and September 2010 from ENVISAT sensors have been processed. Maximum measured subsidence displacements are about 80 mm in the nearest well field area being negligible from 7 Km. PSI timeseries analysis shows a close relationship between subsidence and piezometric level evolution and a perfect elastic behavior in which soil practically recovers the negative displacements (subsidence) accumulated during extraction. Furthermore displacements and piezometer timeseries corresponding to the 1998-2000 period have been used to calibrate an elastic one-dimensional model. This model has been used to predict the ground surface movements during the 1997-2010 period. Despite the simplicity of the model, it shows a great accuracy with only a 13% of average error.

  10. Hygroscopic Properties of Atmospheric Aerosol Measured with an HTDMA in an Urban Background Site in Madrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Blanco, E.; Gómez-Moreno, F. J.; Becerril, M.; Coz, E.; Artíñano, B.

    2015-12-01

    The observation of high aerosol hygroscopic growth in Madrid is mainly limited to specific atmospheric conditions, such as local stagnation episodes, which take place in winter time. One of these episodes was identified in December 2014 and the hygroscopic growth factor (GF) measurements obtained in such episode were analysed in order to know the influence of the meteorological conditions on aerosol hygroscopic properties. The prevailing high atmospheric stability triggered an increase of the particle total concentration during the study period, with several peaks that exceeded 4.0 104 particles cm-3, as well as an increase in the inorganic fraction of the aerosol, the NO3- concentration, which in this case corresponded to 25% of the total PM1 non-refractory composition. The aerosol hygroscopic growth distribution was bimodal during the episode, with an average GF around 1.2 for the five dry particle sizes measured and an average GF spread ≥ 0.15. In addition, it is important to note that when a reduction in the concentrations of NO3- is observed, it coincides with a decrease of the GF and its spread. These data suggest, on the one hand, a high degree of external mixing state of the aerosol during the episode and, on the other hand, a notable association between the GF and the inorganic fraction of the aerosol.

  11. Recordings from the deepest borehole in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Z.; Woolery, E.W.

    2006-01-01

    The recordings at the deepest vertical strong-motion array (VSAS) from three small events, the 21 October 2004 Tiptonville, Tennessee, earthquake; the 10 February 2005 Arkansas earthquake; and the 2 June 2005 Ridgely, Tennessee, earthquake show some interesting wave-propagation phenomena through the soils: the S-wave is attenuated from 260 m to 30 m depth and amplified from 30 m to the surface. The S-wave arrival times from the three events yielded different shear-wave velocity estimates for the soils. These different estimates may be the result of different incident angles of the S-waves due to different epicentral distances. The epicentral distances are about 22 km, 110 km, and 47 km for the Tiptonville, Arkansas, and Ridgely earthquakes, respectively. These recordings show the usefulness of the borehole strong-motion array. The vertical strong-motion arrays operated by the University of Kentucky have started to accumulate recordings that will provide a database for scientists and engineers to study the effects of the near-surface soils on the strong ground motion in the New Madrid Seismic Zone. More information about the Kentucky Seismic and Strong-Motion Network can be found at www.uky.edu/KGS/geologichazards. The digital recordings are available at ftp://kgsweb.uky.edu.

  12. Energy saving due to natural ventilation in housing blocks in Madrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Lezcano, RA; Hormigos-Jiménez, S.

    2016-07-01

    Getting a healthy and comfortable indoor environment in homes in southern Europe is a complicated task. In continental climates, with very cold temperatures in winter and very hot in summer, energy consumption greatly increases with air conditioning significant spending. To propose action guidelines for use of natural ventilation and to develop effective design strategies is essential. Therefore, and given a specific building type block of flats in Madrid, this article focuses on establishing what periods of the year natural ventilation is required to reduce energy consumption in air conditioning, also considering the quality of the outdoor environment and the design of the building. To develop this, a statistical study of the chosen type, that allows studying the direction and the wind speed in the area, is performed. Analysis of wind pressures in holes in the facade is performed by means of numerical simulations of fluid flow (CFD) inside to later infer in the natural ventilation rate required within policy parameters. With the data obtained, a study of energy saving is made as a function of natural ventilation rate established for the building type.

  13. Intensity of Love in a Community Sample of Spanish Couples in the Region of Madrid.

    PubMed

    Cuenca-Montesino, María Luisa; Graña, José Luis; O'Leary, K Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Intensity of love was examined in a representative community sample of 2,988 couples, from the Region of Madrid (Spain). Gender differences revealed no significant differences in intensity of love. Twenty-five percent of the participants who were in a relationship of less than 10 years and eleven percent of the participants in a relationship of more than 30 years reported being "very intensely in love" F(3, 5.972) = 191.32, p < .001, ηp 2 = 0.08. The cognitive variables, thinking positively about the partner and thinking about the partner when apart, were significant predictors of the intensity of long-term love for both men and women. Affection was also positively associated with intense love for men (r = .47, p < .001) and women (r = .52, p < .001); sexual intercourse was for women (r = .36, p < .001) but not for men. Wanting to know the whereabouts of partner was associated with the intensity of love for women (r = .15, p < .05), but not for men. Engaging in novel activities with partner was not associated with intense love for male or females. As predicted, love declined significantly in the first decade of marriage, but not much after that. The percentage of men and women who reported being intensely in love was lower than that obtained in the U.S. PMID:26459102

  14. Could wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) be reservoirs for Leishmania infantum in the focus of Madrid, Spain?

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Maribel; González, Estela; Martín-Martín, Inés; Hernández, Sonia; Molina, Ricardo

    2014-05-28

    Xenodiagnosis has previously proved that hares (Lepus granatensis) from a focus of leishmaniasis in the southwestern Madrid region (Spain) are infective to Phlebotomus perniciosus, the only vector in the area, thus playing a probable role as active reservoirs in a sylvatic transmission cycle linked to the usual domestic one. Although actions have been taken to reduce the population of this lagomorph, a high population of wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is present in the area, which shows detectable anti-Leishmania infantum antibodies and a large number of individuals with DNA of this parasite. With the aim to elucidate the role of this lagomorph in the focus, xenodiagnostic studies carried out with wild rabbits captured in the area demonstrate that they are able to transmit L. infantum to P. perniciosus. Moreover, the study of blood meal preferences of P. perniciosus caught in the focus during and entomological survey shows strong evidence that rabbits are contributing to the maintenance of a high sand fly population in the area. These findings suggest that wild rabbits could play some role in Leishmania transmission. PMID:24774435

  15. Evidence of Leishmania infantum infection in rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) in a natural area in Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    García, Nerea; Moreno, Inmaculada; Alvarez, Julio; de la Cruz, María Luisa; Navarro, Alejandro; Pérez-Sancho, Marta; García-Seco, Teresa; Rodríguez-Bertos, Antonio; Conty, María Luisa; Toraño, Alfredo; Prieto, Antonio; Domínguez, Lucas; Domínguez, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is one of the most important neglected zoonosis and remains endemic in at least 88 developing countries in the world. In addition, anthropogenic environmental changes in urban areas are leading to its emergency world wide. Zoonotic leishmaniasis control might only be achieved by an integrated approach targeting both the human host and the animal reservoirs, which in certain sylvatic cycles are yet to be identified. Recently, hares have been pointed out as competent reservoirs of Leishmania infantum in Spain, but the role of other lagomorphs has not been clarified. Here, 69 rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) from a natural area in Madrid in which a high density was present were analyzed using indirect (immunofluorescence antibody test, IFAT) and direct (PCR, culture) techniques. Fifty-seven (82.6%) of the animals were positive to at least one technique, with IFAT yielding the highest proportion of positive samples. L. infantum was isolated in 13% animals demonstrating the occurrence of infection in this setting. Our results suggest that rabbits could play a role of competent reservoir of L. infantum and demonstrate that the prevalence of infection is high in the analyzed area. PMID:24724079

  16. Evidence of Leishmania infantum Infection in Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) in a Natural Area in Madrid, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Alejandro; Pérez-Sancho, Marta; García-Seco, Teresa; Rodríguez-Bertos, Antonio; Conty, María Luisa; Toraño, Alfredo; Prieto, Antonio; Domínguez, Lucas; Domínguez, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is one of the most important neglected zoonosis and remains endemic in at least 88 developing countries in the world. In addition, anthropogenic environmental changes in urban areas are leading to its emergency world wide. Zoonotic leishmaniasis control might only be achieved by an integrated approach targeting both the human host and the animal reservoirs, which in certain sylvatic cycles are yet to be identified. Recently, hares have been pointed out as competent reservoirs of Leishmania infantum in Spain, but the role of other lagomorphs has not been clarified. Here, 69 rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) from a natural area in Madrid in which a high density was present were analyzed using indirect (immunofluorescence antibody test, IFAT) and direct (PCR, culture) techniques. Fifty-seven (82.6%) of the animals were positive to at least one technique, with IFAT yielding the highest proportion of positive samples. L. infantum was isolated in 13% animals demonstrating the occurrence of infection in this setting. Our results suggest that rabbits could play a role of competent reservoir of L. infantum and demonstrate that the prevalence of infection is high in the analyzed area. PMID:24724079

  17. Instituto de Astrofísica de Madrid: science fiction or top science?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, J. A.

    2015-05-01

    In Spain, there is an Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias in Tenerife, an Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía in Granada and an Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya in Barcelona. However, there is not an Instituto de Astrofísica de Madrid (IAM). Actually, Madrilenian astronomers are spread over a number of institutions of quite different origin, size and funding source. The IAM, if it existed, would be a catalyzer of ideas and collaborations, an international meeting point, an engine for high-technology industry in the region, and an excellence centre. Furthermore, the IAM would maximise the efficiency in the use of resources, offer a place for finding synergies between research groups and, especially, have a critical mass for embarking in very large projects in the ground and space. I will expose how, in a smooth and democratic way, an IAM might be built step by step. The process may take decades and, thus, young Madrilenian astronomers shall play a rôle on it.

  18. The spectral amplification effect of clouds to the night sky radiance in Madrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubé, M.; Kocifaj, M.; Zamorano, J.; Solano Lamphar, H. A.; Sanchez de Miguel, A.

    2016-09-01

    Artificial Light at Night (ALAN) may have various environmental impacts ranging from compromising the visibility of astronomical objects to the perturbation of circadian cycles in animals and humans. In the past much research has been carried out to study the impact of ALAN on the radiance of the night sky during clear sky conditions. This was mainly justified by the need for a better understanding of the behavior of ALAN propagation into the environment in order to protect world-class astronomical facilities. More recently, alongside to the threat to the natural starry sky, many issues have emerged from the biological science community. It has been shown that, nearby or inside cities, the presence of cloud cover generally acts as an amplifier for artificial sky radiance while clouds behave as attenuators for remote observers. In this paper we show the spectral behavior of the zenith sky radiance amplification factor exerted by clouds inside a city. We compare in-situ measurements made with the spectrometer SAND-4 with a numerical model applied to the specific geographical context of the Universidad Complutense de Madrid in Spain.

  19. A classification of morphoseismic features in the New Madrid seismic zone

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, R.; Stewart, D. . Dept. of Geosciences)

    1993-03-01

    The New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) contains thousands of surface features distributed over 5,000 square miles in four states. These are attributable to some combination of (1) seismically-induced liquefaction (SIL), (2) secondary deformation, and (3) seismically-induced slope failures. Most of these features were produced by the 1811--12 series of great earthquakes, but some predate and some postdate 1811--12. Subsequent non-seismic factors, such as hydrologically-induced liquefaction (HIL), mechanically-induced liquefaction (MIL), human activities, mass wasting, eolian and fluvial processes have modified all of these features. Morphoseismic features are new landforms produced by earthquakes, or are pre-existing landforms modified by them. Involved are complex interrelationships among several variables, including: (1) intensity and duration of seismic ground motion, (2) surface wave harmonics, (3) depth to water table, (4) depth to basement, (5) particle size, composition, and sorting of sediment making up the liquefied (LZ) and non-liquefied zones (NLZ), (6) topographic parameters, and (7) attitudes of beds and lenses susceptible to liquefaction. Morphoseismic features are depicted as results of a time-flow sequence initiated by primary basement disturbances which produce three major categories of surface response: secondary deformation, liquefaction and slope failure. Nine subcategories incorporate features produced by or resulting in: extruded sand, intruded sand, lateral spreading, faulting, subsidence of large areas, uplift of large areas, altered streams, coherent landslides, and incoherent landslides. The total morphoseismic features identified by this classification are 34 in number.

  20. Seismic Readings from the Deepest Borehole in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Woolery, Edward W; Wang, Zhenming; Sturchio, Neil C

    2006-03-01

    Since the 1980s, the research associated with the UK network has been primarily strong-motion seismology of engineering interest. Currently the University of Kentucky operates a strong-motion network of nine stations in the New Madrid Seismic Zone. A unique feature of the network is the inclusions of vertical strong-motion arrays, each with one or two downhole accelerometers. The deepest borehole array is 260 m below the surfaces at station VASA in Fulton County, Kentucky. A preliminary surface seismic refraction survey was conducted at the site before drilling the hole at VSAS (Woolery and Wang, 2002). The depth to the Paleozoic bedrock at the site was estimated to be approximately 595 m, and the depth to the first very stiff layer (i.e. Porters Creek Clay) was found to be about 260 m. These depths and stratigraphic interpretation correlated well with a proprietary seismic reflection line and the Ken-Ten Oil Exploration No. 1 Sanger hole (Schwalb, 1969), as well as our experience in the area (Street et al., 1995; Woolery et al., 1999).

  1. Group Violence and Migration Experience among Latin American Youths in Justice Enforcement Centers (Madrid, Spain).

    PubMed

    Martínez García, José Manuel; Martín López, María Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Group violence among Latin American immigrant youth has led to ongoing debates in political, legal, and media circles, yet none of those many perspectives has arrived at a solid, empirically supported definition for the phenomenon. This study aims to explore the relationship between the immigrant experience and violent group behavior in youths from Latin America serving prison sentences in Justice Enforcement Centers in the Community of Madrid. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 juveniles, and content analysis was applied to the resulting transcripts, employing Grounded Theory to create an axial codification of intra- and inter-categorical contents, and Delphi panels for quality control. The research team delved into 62 topics, addressing participants' perceptions of the immigrant experience and its effects on five socialization settings (neighborhood, school, family, peer group, and significant other), and each one's relationship to violent behavior. The results led us to believe the young people's immigration experiences had been systematically examined. Their personal and social development was influenced by negative socioeconomic conditions, ineffective parental supervision, maladjustment and conflict at school, and experiences of marginalization and xenophobia. All those conditions favored affiliation with violent groups that provided them instrumental (economic and material), expressive, or affective support. PMID:26514376

  2. The enigma of the New Madrid earthquakes of 1811-1812

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, A.C.; Schweig, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    Continental North America's greatest earthquake sequence struck on the western frontier of the United States. The frontier was not then California but the valley of the continent's greatest river, the Mississippi, and the sequence was the New Madrid earthquakes of the winter of 1811-1812. Their described impacts on the land and the river were so dramatic as to produce widespread modern disbelief. However, geological, geophysical, and historical research, carried out mostly in the past two decades, has verified much in the historical accounts. The sequence included at least six (possibly nine) events of estimated moment magnitude M ??? 7 and two of M ??? 8. The faulting was in the intruded crust of a failed intracontinental rift, beneath the saturated alluvium of the river valley, and its violent shaking resulted in massive and extensive liquefaction. The largest earthquakes ruptured at least six (and possibly more than seven) intersecting fault segments, one of which broke the surface as a thrust fault that disrupted the bed of the Mississippi River in at least 2 (and possibly four) places.

  3. Moving Ahead in Madrid: Aspirations and Expectations in the Spanish Second Generation1

    PubMed Central

    Portes, Alejandro; Aparicio, Rosa; Haller, William; Vickstrom, Erik

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines determinants of aspirations and expectations among children of immigrants based on a statistically representative sample of 3,375 second generation youths interviewed in 101 public and private secondary schools in metropolitan Madrid. We review the past literature on status attainment in general and aspirations and expectations, in particular, and draw from it a set of six hypotheses to guide the analysis. Most theoretical statements in this field have been developed on the basis of U.S. data; studies in other immigrant-receiving countries, especially outside the Anglophone world, have been scarce. The study thus provides an opportunity to test and refine existing hypotheses in a different national context. We present breakdowns of educational and occupational aspirations and expectations by gender, parental education and type of school attended. This is followed by multivariate regressions of all four dependent variables on these three plus other predictors suggested by the research literature. This analysis ends with structural equation models – recursive and non-recursive – that provide an integrated theoretical statement of the causal structure of ambition in the Spanish context. Implications of our findings for theory and policy are examined. Suggestions for future research in this field are discussed. PMID:22904591

  4. Significant motions between GPS sites in the New Madrid region: implications for seismic hazard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, Arthur; Smalley, Robert; Paul, J.

    2012-01-01

    Position time series from Global Positioning System (GPS) stations in the New Madrid region were differenced to determine the relative motions between stations. Uncertainties in rates were estimated using a three‐component noise model consisting of white, flicker, and random walk noise, following the methodology of Langbein, 2004. Significant motions of 0.37±0.07 (one standard error) mm/yr were found between sites PTGV and STLE, for which the baseline crosses the inferred deep portion of the Reelfoot fault. Baselines between STLE and three other sites also show significant motion. Site MCTY (adjacent to STLE) also exhibits significant motion with respect to PTGV. These motions are consistent with a model of interseismic slip of about 4  mm/yr on the Reelfoot fault at depths between 12 and 20 km. If constant over time, this rate of slip produces sufficient slip for an M 7.3 earthquake on the shallow portion of the Reelfoot fault, using the geologically derived recurrence time of 500 years. This model assumes that the shallow portion of the fault has been previously loaded by the intraplate stress. A GPS site near Little Rock, Arkansas, shows significant southward motion of 0.3–0.4  mm/yr (±0.08  mm/yr) relative to three sites to the north, indicating strain consistent with focal mechanisms of earthquake swarms in northern Arkansas.

  5. The role of green infrastructure in creating safe urban environments: the case study of Madrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, Pedro; Iglesias, Ana; Garrote, Luis

    2016-04-01

    The size and number of cities is growing at an unprecedented speed in the 21st century. Whereas in 1900 only a 10% of the global population lived in cities, 2010 marked the point in which more than halve of the world moved urban and, according to the United Nations' estimations, more than 70% of humanity will be living in urban agglomerations by 2050. Covering about the 2% of the Earth surface, cities consume vast extensions of forests, farmland, and other landscapes, polluting rivers, oceans and soils, and account for as much as the 70% of greenhouse gas emissions, all of them making urbanization the main driver for the changes in the Earth surface. Designing urban systems that reduce the negative impacts of this urbanization process and improve their resilience is crucial for creating a safe operating space for humanity. Cities must identify sustainable development policies because today's investment will be locked in for hundreds of years due to the difficulty of reversing most of the planning decisions. This study analyzes the role of green infrastructure in creating a healthier urban milieu more resilient and with a smaller impact on the environment through the case study of the city of Madrid, a city that faces climate risks derived of extreme heat and drought. Green infrastructure can reduce urban heat island, regulate storm water overflow and moderate energy consumption, while favoring a healthier lifestyle.

  6. Tectonic geomorphology of the New Madrid seismic zone based on imaging of digital topographic data

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Topographic analysis using digital elevation data of the New Madrid region focuses on topographic features that occur at several spatial scales and can be used to delineate distinct anomalies. In this region, topographic anomalies occur as domal or elongate uplifts and bowl-shaped depressions approximately 1--10 km in size, topographic lineaments, and differences in topographic blocking across 50 km long boundaries. In order to fully explain these topographic anomalies, tectonic processes may be required. Imaging is based on digital topographic data from USGS 30 arc-second, 3 arc-second, and 30 m resolutions. Imaging of these data uses standard imaging processing techniques to examine topography within the contexts of geomorphological hypothesis testing. A good example is the use of thresholding to highlight areas of unusually high elevation given the hypothesis of fluvial landscape architecture. Thresholding delineates topographic features such as the Tiptonville dome which is strongly believed to be tectonic in origin. To determine the pattern of topographic blocking, defined as a pattern that topography assumes when constrained by active forces other than erosion alone, low frequency passing spatial convolutions are used as filters and the resulting data are sliced into blocks according to pseudoelevations that produce a stable block pattern. The resultant blocks are analyzed according to its structural pattern of block size and block orientation. This analysis suggests that a topographic boundary cuts across the Mississippi embayment from near the Newport pluton on the west, to the area south of Memphis on east.

  7. Thallium occurrence and partitioning in soils and sediments affected by mining activities in Madrid province (Spain).

    PubMed

    Gomez-Gonzalez, M A; Garcia-Guinea, J; Laborda, F; Garrido, F

    2015-12-01

    Thallium (Tl) and its compounds are toxic to biota even at low concentrations but little is known about Tl concentration and speciation in soils. An understanding of the source, mobility, and dispersion of Tl is necessary to evaluate the environmental impact of Tl pollution cases. In this paper, we examine the Tl source and dispersion in two areas affected by abandoned mine facilities whose residues remain dumped on-site affecting to soils and sediments of natural water courses near Madrid city (Spain). Total Tl contents and partitioning in soil solid phases as determined by means of a sequential extraction procedure were also examined in soils along the riverbeds of an ephemeral and a permanent streams collecting water runoff and drainage from the mines wastes. Lastly, electronic microscopy and cathodoluminescence probe are used as a suitable technique for Tl elemental detection on thallium-bearing phases. Tl was found mainly bound to quartz and alumino-phyllosilicates in both rocks and examined soils. Besides, Tl was also frequently found associated to organic particles and diatom frustules in all samples from both mine scenarios. These biogenic silicates may regulate the transfer of Tl into the soil-water system. PMID:26218566

  8. An empirical method to estimate shear wave velocity of soils in the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wei, B.-Z.; Pezeshk, S.; Chang, T.-S.; Hall, K.H.; Liu, Huaibao P.

    1996-01-01

    In this study, a set of charts are developed to estimate shear wave velocity of soils in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ), using the standard penetration test (SPT) N values and soil depths. Laboratory dynamic test results of soil samples collected from the NMSZ showed that the shear wave velocity of soils is related to the void ratio and the effective confining pressure applied to the soils. The void ratio of soils can be estimated from the SPT N values and the effective confining pressure depends on the depth of soils. Therefore, the shear wave velocity of soils can be estimated from the SPT N value and the soil depth. To make the methodology practical, two corrections should be made. One is that field SPT N values of soils must be adjusted to an unified SPT N??? value to account the effects of overburden pressure and equipment. The second is that the effect of water table to effective overburden pressure of soils must be considered. To verify the methodology, shear wave velocities of five sites in the NMSZ are estimated and compared with those obtained from field measurements. The comparison shows that our approach and the field tests are consistent with an error of less than of 15%. Thus, the method developed in this study is useful for dynamic study and practical designs in the NMSZ region. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Limited.

  9. SALT Science Conference 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, David; Schroeder, Anja

    The Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) has seen great changes in the last years following the beginning of full time science operations in 2011. The three first generation instruments, namely the SALTICAM imager, the Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS) and its multiple modes and finally in 2014, the new High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS), have commissioned it. The SALT community now eagerly anticipate the installation and commissioning of the near-infrared arm of RSS, likely to commence in 2016. The the third "Science with SALT" conference was held at the Stellenbosch Institute of Advanced Study from 1-5 June 2015. The goals of this conference were to: -Present and discuss recent results from SALT observations; -Anticipate scientific programs that will be carried out with new SALT instrumentation such as RSS-NIR; -Provide a scientific environment in which to foster inter-institutional and inter-facility collaborations between scientists at the different SALT partners; -Provide an opportunity for students and postdocs to become more engaged in SALT science and operations; -Encourage the scientific strategic planning that will be necessary to insure an important role for SALT in an era of large astronomical facilities in the southern hemisphere such as MeerKAT, the SKA, LSST, and ALMA; -Consider options for future instrumentation and technical development of SALT; and, -Present, discuss, and engage in the SALT Collateral Benefits program led by SAAO. Conference proceedings editors: David Buckley and Anja Schroeder

  10. 2004 Mutagenesis Gordon Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sue Jinks-Robertson

    2005-09-16

    Mutations are genetic alterations that drive biological evolution and cause many, if not all, human diseases. Mutation originates via two distinct mechanisms: ''vertical'' variation is de novo change of one or few bases, whereas ''horizontal'' variation occurs by genetic recombination, which creates new mosaics of pre-existing sequences. The Mutagenesis Conference has traditionally focused on the generation of mutagenic intermediates during normal DNA synthesis or in response to environmental insults, as well as the diverse repair mechanisms that prevent the fixation of such intermediates as permanent mutations. While the 2004 Conference will continue to focus on the molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis, there will be increased emphasis on the biological consequences of mutations, both in terms of evolutionary processes and in terms of human disease. The meeting will open with two historical accounts of mutation research that recapitulate the intellectual framework of this field and thereby place the current research paradigms into perspective. The two introductory keynote lectures will be followed by sessions on: (1) mutagenic systems, (2) hypermutable sequences, (3) mechanisms of mutation, (4) mutation avoidance systems, (5) mutation in human hereditary and infectious diseases, (6) mutation rates in evolution and genotype-phenotype relationships, (7) ecology, mutagenesis and the modeling of evolution and (8) genetic diversity of the human population and models for human mutagenesis. The Conference will end with a synthesis of the meeting as the keynote closing lecture.

  11. The European Extremely Large Telescope: the Arne way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyromilio, J.

    2008-04-01

    The European Extremely Large telescope project is in phase B and scheduled to present a construction proposal to the ESO Council by the end of 2009 or early 2010. The telescope baseline is for a fully steerable 42-m, segmented primary, 5 mirror design, fully adaptive system with Nasmyth and coude foci. This paper describes the current state of affairs with the European ELT and, in view of this conference celebrating Arne Ardeberg's contributions to astronomy, contains the occasional, totally incomplete, retrospective to earlier work in the field focusing on a single paper by Ardeberg et al in 1996.

  12. PREFACE: Wake Conference 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barney, Andrew; Nørkær Sørensen, Jens; Ivanell, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    The 44 papers in this volume constitute the proceedings of the 2015 Wake Conference, held in Visby on the island of Gotland in Sweden. It is the fourth time this conference has been held. The Wake Conference series started in Visby, where it was held in 2009 and 2011. In 2013 it took place in Copenhagen where it was combined with the International Conference on Offshore Wind Energy and Ocean Energy. In 2015 it is back where it started in Visby, where it takes place at Uppsala University Campus Gotland, June 9th-11th. The global yearly production of electrical energy by wind turbines has grown tremendously in the past decade and it now comprises more than 3% of the global electrical power consumption. Today the wind power industry has a global annual turnover of more than 50 billion USD and an annual average growth rate of more than 20%. State-of-the-art wind turbines have rotor diameters of up to 150 m and 8 MW installed capacity. These turbines are often placed in large wind farms that have a total production capacity corresponding to that of a nuclear power plant. In order to make a substantial impact on one of the most significant challenges of our time, global warming, the industry's growth has to continue for a decade or two yet. This in turn requires research into the physics of wind turbine wakes and wind farms. Modern wind turbines are today clustered in wind farms in which the turbines are fully or partially influenced by the wake of upstream turbines. As a consequence, the wake behind the wind turbines has a lower mean wind speed and an increased turbulence level, as compared to the undisturbed flow outside the farm. Hence, wake interaction results in decreased total production of power, caused by lower kinetic energy in the wind, and an increase in the turbulence intensity. Therefore, understanding the physical nature of the vortices and their dynamics in the wake of a turbine is important for the optimal design of a wind farm. This conference is aimed

  13. The European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, M.; Bousson, S.; Calaga, R.; Danared, H.; Devanz, G.; Duperrier, R.; Eguia, J.; Eshraqi, M.; Gammino, S.; Hahn, H.; Jansson, A.; Oyon, C.; Pape-Møller, S.; Peggs, S.; Ponton, A.; Rathsman, K.; Ruber, R.; Satogata, T.; Trahern, G.

    2011-12-01

    In 2003 the joint European effort to design a European Spallation Source (ESS) resulted in a set of reports, and in May 2009 Lund was agreed to be the ESS site. The ESS Scandinavia office has since then worked on setting all the necessary legal and organizational matters in place so that the Design Update and construction can be started in January 2011, in collaboration with European partners. The Design Update phase is expected to end in 2012, to be followed by a construction phase, with first neutrons expected in 2018-2019.

  14. European Commission activities in eHealth.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Silas; Lymberis, Andreas; Whitehouse, Diane

    2004-12-01

    Health-care is an information-intensive and knowledge-demanding sector, which is why eHealth solutions are so important in this field. The European Commission (EC) has been initiating and funding research and development activities regarding Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) for health, or "eHealth", since 1988. These programmes covered priority topics like electronic health-care records, regional and national health networks, telemedicine in homecare and care-at-the-point-of-need to support continuity of care concepts, systems to support people to stay healthy, and systems and tools to support health professionals to work more efficiently and safely on patients. During the 15-year span of the programmes, the European Union (EU) has contributed about 500 million Euro to approximately 400 R&D projects, support activities, best practice and studies covering technical, clinical, ethical, legal, organisational and market issues. eHealth has shown proven benefits in application fields like improved access to care, care at the point-of-need, citizen-centred care, improved quality and cost containment. Such applications were on show at the EU High Level eHealth Conferences in Brussels, Belgium, in 2003, and in Cork, Ireland, in 2004. eHealth is now on the governmental agenda of EU Member States to be implemented on a broader scale. In line with this development, the Commission has taken a number of policy initiatives. A European Union Action Plan for a European eHealth Area was published by the Commission in April 2004 and endorsed by the EU health ministers in June 2004. This means that, for the first time, Europe has a coherent agenda for the implementation of eHealth. This report will concentrate on eHealth activities initiated by the Information Society Directorate-General of the European Commission. PMID:15709306

  15. The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) - 17th Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (June 8-11, 2016 - London, UK).

    PubMed

    Walker, G; Croasdell, G

    2016-06-01

    The 2016 Annual European Congress of Rheumatology, an annual conference organized by the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR), took place in London, U.K. Over 4,000 abstracts were submitted this year with over 199 sessions and poster tours on offer. The congress has become a major event in the field of rheumatology with participants attending from around the world. The oral sessions, poster displays and lectures cover a broad spectrum of topics, including the latest understanding of disease processes, as well as recent advances in diagnosis and patient care. PMID:27458612

  16. Conference report: trekking through receptor chemistry.

    PubMed

    Angeli, Piero; Del Bello, Fabio; Ambrosini, Dario

    2010-08-01

    The series of Camerino Symposia present the most recent knowledge and discoveries in the growing field of drug-receptor interactions and the design and mechanisms of drug action. Lead discovery, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and polypharmacology were the general subjects covered in this Tripartite European Meeting in Medicinal Chemistry chaired by Mario Giannella (University of Camerino, Italy). Specifically, the meeting focused on the selection criteria and application of computational methods and stem cell technology in/to lead discovery, as well as providing an update on targeting GPCRs. In addition, the importance of polypharmacology in drug discovery for many GPCRs was widely highlighted. Approximately 110 participants in an international audience composed principally of chemists, biochemists and pharmacologists spent the 5 days of the conference in the eye-catching medieval setting of the University of Camerino and enjoyed both the scientific and cultural programs. PMID:21426016

  17. European PTTI report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordara, Franco; Grimaldi, Sabrina; Leschiutta, Sigfrido

    1994-01-01

    Time and frequency metrology in Europe presents some peculiar features in its three main components: research on clocks, comparisons and dissemination methods, and dissemination services. Apart from the usual activities of the national metrological laboratories, an increasing number of cooperation between the European countries are promoted inside some European organizations, such as the ECC, EFTA, EUROMET, and WECC. Cooperation between these organizations is covered. The present, evolving situation will be further influenced by the recent political changes in Eastern Europe.

  18. Rural Energy Conference Project

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Witmer; Shannon Watson

    2008-12-31

    Alaska remains, even at the beginning of the 21st century, a place with many widely scattered, small, remote communities, well beyond the end of both the road system and the power grid. These communities have the highest energy costs of any place in the United States, despite the best efforts of the utilities that service them. This is due to the widespread dependence on diesel electric generators, which require small capital investments, but recent increases in crude oil prices have resulted in dramatic increases in the cost of power. In the enabling legislation for the Arctic Energy Office in 2001, specific inclusion was made for the study of ways of reducing the cost of electrical power in these remote communities. As part of this mandate, the University of Alaska has, in conjunction with the US Department of Energy, the Denali Commission and the Alaska Energy Authority, organized a series of rural energy conferences, held approximately every 18 months. The goal of these meeting was to bring together rural utility operators, rural community leaders, government agency representatives, equipment suppliers, and researchers from universities and national laboratories to discuss the current state of the art in rural power generation, to discuss current projects, including successes as well as near successes. Many of the conference presenters were from industry and not accustomed to writing technical papers, so the typical method of organizing a conference by requesting abstracts and publishing proceedings was not considered viable. Instead, the organizing committee solicited presentations from appropriate individuals, and requested that (if they were comfortable with computers) prepare Power point presentations that were collected and posted on the web. This has become a repository of many presentations, and may be the best single source of information about current projects in the state of Alaska.

  19. Natural cement in the nineteenth century city of Madrid. Identification of their application, conservation status and their compatibility with moderns cements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrochano, Cristina Mayo; Lasheras Merino, Felix; Sanz-Arauz, David

    2016-04-01

    Roman cement was patented in 1796 and it arrived to Spain in 1835. Although the natural cement used in Madrid came mainly from Guipúzcoa's factories, there were a few small factories producing natural cement in the area. In the south east of Madrid, in "Morata de Tajuña", are the marl quarries of the Madrid Community. Natural cement was extensively used to decorate buildings in Madrid during the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th. It was highly demanded in various sectors of civil engineering: sewerage, water supply, canals, ports and tunnels. In the building sector, at first the use of cements was limited to building foundations and masonry mortars, but never as render mortar because it was considered an unsightly and vulgar material. For renders still traditional lime mortar was used. And is not till the end of the 19th century when it was used in facade decorations for the first time. We have analysed 25 buildings in Madrid built in that period of time. It was used microscopy techniques for the identification of these cements, checking how many of them used natural cement, how they used it, what is its conservation status and their compatibility with modern cements.

  20. Networks Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tasaki, Keiji K. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The papers included in these proceedings represent the most interesting and current topics being pursued by personnel at GSFC's Networks Division and supporting contractors involved in Space, Ground, and Deep Space Network (DSN) technical work. Although 29 papers are represented in the proceedings, only 12 were presented at the conference because of space and time limitations. The proceedings are organized according to five principal technical areas of interest to the Networks Division: Project Management; Network Operations; Network Control, Scheduling, and Monitoring; Modeling and Simulation; and Telecommunications Engineering.

  1. LEAP 1992: Conference summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1992-12-01

    We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton ({bar p}) physics presented at the LEAP `92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, {bar N}N scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, {bar N} annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy {bar p}`s, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with {bar p} (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new {bar p} facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime ({ge} 2 GeV/c).

  2. LEAP 1992: Conference summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1992-12-01

    We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton ([bar p]) physics presented at the LEAP '92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, [bar N]N scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, [bar N] annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy [bar p]'s, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with [bar p] (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new [bar p] facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime ([ge] 2 GeV/c).

  3. Aerospace Environmental Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The mandated elimination of CFC's, Halons, TCA, and other ozone depleting chemicals and specific hazardous materials has required changes and new developments in aerospace materials and processes. The aerospace industry has been involved for several years in providing product substitutions, redesigning entire production processes, and developing new materials that minimize or eliminate damage to the environment. These activities emphasize replacement cleaning solvents and their application verifications, compliant coatings including corrosion protection systems, and removal techniques, chemical propulsion effects on the environment, and the initiation of modifications to relevant processing and manufacturing specifications and standards. The Executive Summary of this Conference is published as NASA CP-3297.

  4. PREFACE: Rutherford Centennial Conference on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Sean

    2012-09-01

    , Rutherford's great-granddaughter, and Professor Stephen Watts, Head of the School of Physics and Astronomy at Manchester, for opening the exhibition as part of the welcome reception for the conference. The reception was only possible with support from Canberra Industries. We are grateful to His Excellency Mr Derek Leask, New Zealand High Commissioner to the United Kingdom, to Professor Rod Coombs, Deputy President of The University of Manchester, and to Professor David Phillips, the President of the Royal Society of Chemistry, for their contributions to the formal opening of the conference. Manchester City Council kindly supported a civic reception hosted by the Lord Mayor of the City of Manchester, Councillor Harry Lyons JP, at Manchester Town Hall. The Ogden Trust helped support the conference dinner and Professor George Dracoulis provided an entertaining after dinner speech. Thank you for these contributions to the social programme of the conference. In addition to the exhibition at the Museum, which was open to the public until October 2011, the conference programme also included a series of public evening lectures and we are grateful both to the speakers (David Jenkins, Alan Perkins and John Roberts) and to those providing support for the public engagement activities (the Institute of Physics Nuclear Physics Group, the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine, the Nuclear Institute and the Science and Technology Facilities Council). We would also like to thank the European Physical Society for providing conference travel grants to a number of young scientists. I would like to take this opportunity to thank the other members of the UK Organising Committee for their help in making the conference a success and for their work in putting these proceedings together. In addition, the International Advisory Committee provided essential advice that contributed to the selection of the plenary speakers who were without exception engaging, interesting and entertaining

  5. Foliar Symptoms Triggered by Ozone Stress in Irrigated Holm Oaks from the City of Madrid, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Carlos Calderón; Günthardt-Goerg, Madeleine S.; Vollenweider, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite abatement programs of precursors implemented in many industrialized countries, ozone remains the principal air pollutant throughout the northern hemisphere with background concentrations increasing as a consequence of economic development in former or still emerging countries and present climate change. Some of the highest ozone concentrations are measured in regions with a Mediterranean climate but the effect on the natural vegetation is alleviated by low stomatal uptake and frequent leaf xeromorphy in response to summer drought episodes characteristic of this climate. However, there is a lack of understanding of the respective role of the foliage physiology and leaf xeromorphy on the mechanistic effects of ozone in Mediterranean species. Particularly, evidence about morphological and structural changes in evergreens in response to ozone stress is missing. Results Our study was started after observing ozone -like injury in foliage of holm oak during the assessment of air pollution mitigation by urban trees throughout the Madrid conurbation. Our objectives were to confirm the diagnosis, investigate the extent of symptoms and analyze the ecological factors contributing to ozone injury, particularly, the site water supply. Symptoms consisted of adaxial and intercostal stippling increasing with leaf age. Underlying stippling, cells in the upper mesophyll showed HR-like reactions typical of ozone stress. The surrounding cells showed further oxidative stress markers. These morphological and micromorphological markers of ozone stress were similar to those recorded in deciduous broadleaved species. However, stippling became obvious already at an AOT40 of 21 ppm•h and was primarily found at irrigated sites. Subsequent analyses showed that irrigated trees had their stomatal conductance increased and leaf life -span reduced whereas the leaf xeromorphy remained unchanged. These findings suggest a central role of water availability versus leaf xeromorphy

  6. Characteristic and Uncharacteristic Earthquakes as Possible Artifacts: Applied to the New Madrid and Wabash Seismic Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, S.; Newman, A. V.

    2003-12-01

    Generally, the largest events, characteristic earthquakes (CE), appear more often than expected from the Gutenberg-Richter relation. Whether this effect is real or apparent is an interesting question since apparent differences can arise from several possible situations. If the known history is shorter than or comparable to the recurrence time of largest events, apparent CEs can occur because sampling bias allows anomalous short recurrence to be observed more frequently (fractions of earthquakes cannot be observed). Alternatively, apparent CEs can occur if paleoseismic data overstimate magnitudes or underestimate recurrence. In the New Madrid Zone (NMSZ), simulations suggest that because the 2000 year paleoseismic record is 4x the accepted recurrence for CEs, there is a small probability of observing apparent CEs. A more significant effect is that paleoliquifaction data regionally appear to overestimate magnitudes. It is commonly assumed that the distribution of liquifaction, used for paleomagnitudes, near the NMSZ is smaller that seen globally. Liquefaction features extending 250 km from an earthquake in the NMSZ are interpreted as evidence for an M 8.3 event, rather than an M 7.6 as would be inferred from the global curve. This practice arose because the curve was calibrated assuming an M 8.3 for the 1811-12 events whereas more recent analysis finds M ˜7.4. Hence either the largest earthquakes are CEs or the paleoevents were smaller than those in 1811-12. The opposite effect occurs in the Wabash Valley Seismic zone, where the paleoearthquakes appear ``uncharacteristic'', less frequent than would be inferred from instrumental seismicity. The paleoseismic record is long enough that the discrepancy is unlikely to be a sampling artifact. Hence either the uncharacteristic behavior is real, or the paleoseismic record captures only a small fraction of the large preinstrumental earthquakes.

  7. Seismic reflection images of shallow faulting, northernmost Mississippi embayment, north of the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, J.H.; Nelson, W.J.

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution seismic reflection surveys document tectonic faults that displace Pleistocene and older strata just beyond the northeast termination of the New Madrid seismic zone, at the northernmost extent of the Mississippi embayment. These faults, which are part of the Fluorspar Area fault complex in southeastern Illinois, are directly in line with the northeast-trending seismic zone. The reflection data were acquired using an elastic weight-drop source recorded to 500 msec by a 48-geophone array (24-fold) with a 10-ft (??3.0m) station interval. Recognizable reflections were recorded to about 200 msec (100-150 m). The effects of multiple reflections, numerous diffractions, low apparent velocity (i.e., steeply dipping) noise, and the relatively low-frequency content of the recorded signal provided challenges for data processing and interpreting subtle fault offsets. Data processing steps that were critical to the detection of faults included residual statics, post-stack migration, deconvolution, and noise-reduction filtering. Seismic migration was crucial for detecting and mitigating complex fault-related diffraction patterns, which produced an apparent 'folding' of reflectors on unmigrated sections. Detected individual offsets of shallow reflectors range from 5 to 10 m for the top of Paleozoic bedrock and younger strata. The migrated sections generally indicate vertical to steeply dipping normal and reverse faults, which in places outline small horsts and/or grabens. Tilting or folding of stratal reflectors associated with faulting is also locally observed. At one site, the observed faulting is superimposed over a prominent antiformal structure, which may itself be a product of the Quaternary deformation that produced the steep normal and reverse faults. Our results suggest that faulting of the Paleozoic bedrock and younger sediments of the northern Mississippi embayment is more pervasive and less localized than previously thought.

  8. Paleomagnetic evidence of 1811--1812 liquefaction along the Reelfoot scarp, New Madrid seismic zone, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Salyards, S.L. . Southern California Earthquake Center)

    1992-01-01

    A trench excavated across the Reelfoot scarp revealed liquefaction features probably of seismic origin. Two prominent liquefaction bodies show diapiric structure but no sign of eruption onto the ground surface and no definitive stratigraphic control on age. Based upon the historic seismic record and the available stratigraphic relationships they interpreted these bodies as having been produced in the 1811--1812 New Madrid earthquakes. A paleomagnetic test of he age of these features was conducted to see if the magnetic directions agreed with the magnetic direction measured in St. Louis in 1819, supporting their origin in 1811--1812. Both features have magnetic directions consistent with this direction, but one of the sandbodies has a much better quality magnetic direction for 6 stable samples of 8 samples total. Rock-magnetic measurements indicate the magnetic remanence is carried by single-domain magnetite suggesting the mean magnetic direction is not a viscous remanent magnetic moment of the present field direction. That the mean direction is due to the present magnetic field is not considered likely but can not be ruled out. The magnetic susceptibility, NRM intensity, and saturation IRM all increase downward in the sandbody showing an increasing magnetite content. The reason for susceptibility increases is not yet determined but preferred explanations are (1) downward settling of magnetite during diapiric emplacement or (2) entrainment of increasing amounts of magnetite with transport of the liquefied sand. These results suggest that the sampled sandbodies were produced in the historic 1811--1812 earthquakes and that paleomagnetics provides a correlation tool useful in paleoseismological studies of prehistoric earthquakes.

  9. Microscale traffic simulation and emission estimation in a heavily trafficked roundabout in Madrid (Spain).

    PubMed

    Quaassdorff, Christina; Borge, Rafael; Pérez, Javier; Lumbreras, Julio; de la Paz, David; de Andrés, Juan Manuel

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the evaluation of emissions from vehicle operations in a domain of 300m×300m covering a complex urban roundabout with high traffic density in Madrid. Micro-level simulation was successfully applied to estimate the emissions on a scale of meters. Two programs were used: i) VISSIM to simulate the traffic on the square and to compute velocity-time profiles; and ii) VERSIT+micro through ENVIVER that uses VISSIM outputs to compute the related emissions at vehicle level. Data collection was achieved by a measurement campaign obtaining empirical data of vehicle flows and traffic intensities. Twelve simulations of different traffic situations (scenarios) were conducted, representing different hours from several days in a week and the corresponding NOX and PM10 emissions were estimated. The results show a general reduction on average speeds for higher intensities due to braking-acceleration patterns that contribute to increase the average emission factor and, therefore, the total emissions in the domain, especially on weekdays. The emissions are clearly related to traffic volume, although maximum emission scenario does not correspond to the highest traffic intensity due to congestion and variations in fleet composition throughout the day. These results evidence the potential that local measures aimed at alleviating congestion may have in urban areas to reduce emissions. In general, scenario-averaged emission factors estimated with the VISSIM-VERSIT+micro modelling system fitted well those from the average-speed model COPERT, used as a preliminary validation of the results. The largest deviations between these two models occur in those scenarios with more congestion. The design and resolution of the microscale modelling system allow to reflect the impact of actual traffic conditions on driving patterns and related emissions, making it useful for the design of mitigation measures for specific traffic hot-spots. PMID:27232968

  10. Is there a zone of weakness beneath the New Madrid and Wabash Valley Seismic Zones?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Gilbert, H. J.; Pavlis, G. L.; Hamburger, M. W.; Yang, X.; Marshak, S.; Larson, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    The US midcontinent contains several intraplate seismic zones, including the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) sitting above the Reelfoot Rift, and the Wabash Valley Seismic Zone (WVSZ), associated with a smaller Grayville Graben, stretching along the border between Illinois and Indiana. This study provides a new estimate of the velocity structure beneath the area based on observations from the Transportable Array and the OIINK (Ozarks-Illinois-INdiana-Kentucky) FlexArray experiment in the region. Numerous models, involving a zone of weakness either in the crust or the mantle, have been used to explain the seismicity in the NMSZ. Here we present a shear velocity model of the lithosphere beneath the midcontinent by inverting dispersion curves of fundamental mode Rayleigh waves, which are primarily sensitive to the shear wave speeds. We find no spatial correlation between the crustal velocity variations and the two seismic zones. But we do observe that low velocities (~ 4% lower than the measured average of the area) exist in the mantle beneath the NMSZ at depths between 90 and 125 km. The low upper mantle velocities extend to the north and reach the WVSZ, where they are about 3% lower than the average. Velocity variations can result from thermal or compositional heterogeneities, although a thermal perturbation is less likely in this area because no clear surface heat flow anomaly is observed. Compositional heterogeneities, such as the presence of hydrous minerals or contamination by enriched mantle from a plume can reduce seismic velocities as well as the mechanical strength of a region, which would produce a weak zone. The lithosphere beneath a failed rift which has already undergone an earlier phase of deformation is more susceptible to compositional modification and weakening compared to an intact part of a craton. Thus, the two seismic zones may mark locations where deformation has been localized in the crust above a weak mantle due to their lower integrated

  11. Local Wave Propagation in the Kachchh Basin, India: Synergy With the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langston, C. A.; Kang, D.; Bodin, P.; Horton, S.

    2002-12-01

    Aftershocks of the Mw7.6 Bhuj earthquake are used to infer velocity structure and the nature of wave propagation within the Kachchh Basin, India. The data were collected from a joint MAEC/ISTAR deployment of seismographs within 3 weeks of the main event and from existing broadband stations in the region under the India Meteorological Department. Waveforms are available from events that span the entire thickness of the crust and display a variety of wave propagation effects due to low-velocity near-surface site structure and larger structure of the Mesozoic Kachchh basin. These effects include near-site, high frequency reverberations in P and S waves, Sp and Ps mode conversions, PL waves within the Mesozoic basin, basin S multiples, and surface waves. Surface wave group velocity dispersion yields estimates of basin shear wave velocity, and when coupled to analysis of large observed Sp conversions, give a migrated image of stratigraphy within the Banni plains that agrees favorably with published stratigraphy. Identification of basin structure effects allows constraints to be placed on aftershock source depths that are needed in evaluating standard earthquake locations. Structure models are used to construct Green's functions for determining source parameters through waveform modeling. Although stations of the aftershock network were situated on a variety of sites that varied from consolidated Mesozoic bedrock to unconsolidated recent sediments, all stations show major wave propagation effects due to basin fill that must be included in source parameter estimation. These effects seen in India have many similarities to wave propagation effects observed within the Mississippi embayment from microearthquakes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) of the central U.S. Joint waveform studies are motivating new ways of understanding wave propagation and source processes within both areas.

  12. Three Dimensional velocity Structure in the New Madrid and Other SCR Seismic Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, C. A.

    2002-12-01

    Recent tomographic inversions of travel time data accumulated for active SCR seismic zones have revealed strong velocity contrasts that appear to control the distribution of seismicity. Velocity images have been obtained for the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ), the eastern Tennessee seismic zone (ETSZ), and the Charlevoix seismic zone (CSZ). We have also obtained a preliminary velocity model for the aftershock region associated with the Mw=7.7 January 26th Bhuj, India earthquake. Both P and S waves were inverted for velocity structure in the NMSZ. High velocity bodies were imaged and are interpreted to be intrusions associated with the axis and edge of the Reelfoot graben. Low velocities were imaged near the intersection of the long NE arm of seismicity and the NW trending arm; the low velocities are attributed to highly fractured, fluid saturated crust and are associated with shallow earthquake swarms. In general, earthquakes tend to avoid regions with higher than average velocities and concentrate in areas of low velocity or along the edges of high velocity zones. Similar results were obtained for both the ETSZ and the CSZ. A prominent low-velocity zone was detected in the ETSZ; most earthquakes occur in rocks that surround the lowest-velocity regions. An elongated, high velocity region is present at mid-crustal depths in the CSZ; earthquakes avoid the high velocity body and separate into two bands, one on either side of the feature. Larger earthquakes (exceeding magnitude 4) have occurred along the northern edge of the high velocity region. Our results suggest that earthquakes in SCR seismic zones tend to occur in rocks where strain energy is concentrating. This observation is consistent with results from high resolution tomographic images of fault zones in California.

  13. Stress development in heterogenetic lithosphere: Insights into earthquake processes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Yan; Hou, Guiting; Kusky, Timothy; Gregg, Patricia M.

    2016-03-01

    The New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) in the Midwestern United States was the site of several major M 6.8-8 earthquakes in 1811-1812, and remains seismically active. Although this region has been investigated extensively, the ultimate controls on earthquake initiation and the duration of the seismicity remain unclear. In this study, we develop a finite element model for the Central United States to conduct a series of numerical experiments with the goal of determining the impact of heterogeneity in the upper crust, the lower crust, and the mantle on earthquake nucleation and rupture processes. Regional seismic tomography data (CITE) are utilized to infer the viscosity structure of the lithosphere which provide an important input to the numerical models. Results indicate that when differential stresses build in the Central United States, the stresses accumulating beneath the Reelfoot Rift in the NMSZ are highly concentrated, whereas the stresses below the geologically similar Midcontinent Rift System are comparatively low. The numerical observations coincide with the observed distribution of seismicity throughout the region. By comparing the numerical results with three reference models, we argue that an extensive mantle low velocity zone beneath the NMSZ produces differential stress localization in the layers above. Furthermore, the relatively strong crust in this region, exhibited by high seismic velocities, enables the elevated stress to extend to the base of the ancient rift system, reactivating fossil rifting faults and therefore triggering earthquakes. These results show that, if boundary displacements are significant, the NMSZ is able to localize tectonic stresses, which may be released when faults close to failure are triggered by external processes such as melting of the Laurentide ice sheet or rapid river incision.

  14. Shear-wave splitting in Quaternary sediments: Neotectonic implications in the central New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    Determining the extent and location of surface/near-surface structural deformation in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) is very important for evaluating earthquake hazards. A shallow shear-wave splitting experiment, located near the crest of the Lake County uplift (LCU) in the central NMSZ, shows the presence of near-surface azimuthal anisotropy believed to be associated with neotectonic deformation. A shallow fourcomponent data set, recorded using a hammer and mass source, displayed abundant shallow reflection energy on records made with orthogonal source-receiver orientations, an indicator of shear-wave splitting. Following rotation of the data matrix by 40??, the S1 and S2 sections (principal components of the data matrix) were aligned with the natural coordinate system at orientations of N35??W and N55??E, respectively. A dynamic mis-tie of 8 ms at a two-way traveltime of 375 ms produced an average azimuthal anisotropy of ???2% between the target reflector (top of Quaternary gravel at a depth of 35 m) and the surface. Based on the shear-wave polarization data, two explanations for the azimuthal anisotropy in the study area are (1) fractures/cracks aligned in response to near-surface tensional stress produced by uplift of the LCU, and (2) faults/fractures oriented parallel to the Kentucky Bend scarp, a recently identified surface deformation feature believed to be associated with contemporary seismicity in the central NMSZ. In addition to increased seismic resolution by the use of shear-wave methods in unconsolidated, water-saturated sediments, measurement of near-surface directional polarizations, produced by shear-wave splitting, may provide valuable information for identifying neotectonic deformation and evaluating associated earthquake hazards.

  15. Occurrence of drugs of abuse and benzodiazepines in river waters from the Madrid Region (Central Spain).

    PubMed

    Mendoza, A; López de Alda, M; González-Alonso, S; Mastroianni, N; Barceló, D; Valcárcel, Y

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates, for the first time, the occurrence of 10 drugs of abuse, six metabolites, and three benzodiazepines in surface waters from the Jarama and Manzanares Rivers in the Madrid Region, the most densely populated area in Spain and one of the most densely populated in Europe. The results of this study have shown the presence of 14 out of the 19 compounds analyzed at concentrations ranging from 1.45 to 1020 ng L(-1). The most ubiquitous compounds, found in 100% of the samples, were the cocaine metabolite benzoylecgonine (BE), the amphetamine-like compound ephedrine (EPH), the opioids morphine (MOR), methadone (METH), and the METH metabolite 2-ethylene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), and the three investigated benzodiazepines alprazolam (ALP), diazepam (DIA) and lorazepam (LOR). Meanwhile, the largest concentrations observed corresponded to EPH (up to 1020 ng L(-1)), BE (823 ng L(-1)), EDDP (151 ng L(-1)), and LOR (167 ng L(-1)). The only not detected compounds were heroin (HER) and its metabolite 6-acetylmorphine (6ACM), lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and its metabolite 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-LSD (OH-LSD), and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Overall, the levels measured are comparatively higher than those previously reported in Europe. Comparison of the results obtained for samples collected on different days (Thursday and Sunday) did not show meaningful differences between weekdays and weekends. The lack of (eco)toxicological data does not permit to predict or disregard potential adverse effects on wildlife. Risk assessment in humans would require further knowledge, not currently available, on exposure to these compounds through other routes like drinking water and/or food. PMID:24083902

  16. From discovery to encounter: international conference on Saturn's moon Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    Christiaan Huygens, one of the leading European scientists of the 17th century, discovered Saturn's rings and its largest moon, Titan. Exploration of Saturn and its satellites is the main objective of the joint ESA/NASA mission Cassini/Huygens. The spacecraft arrives at Saturn on 1 July and the Huygens probe will descend into the atmosphere of Titan in January next year. The conference will bring together an international team of space scientists and historians to discuss topics such as: - Christiaan Huygens and his relations with other 17th century scientists, such as Cassini, Descartes and Newton; - observation of Saturn and its moons from the 17th century to today; - the scientific objectives of the Cassini/Huygens mission and its latest observations on the way to the Saturnian system. The conference opens on Tuesday 13 April at 13:30 hours with speeches by Jean-Jacques Dordain, ESA Director General, and Maria van der Hoeven, Dutch Minister for Education, Culture and Science. Members of the media wishing to attend the opening session and other parts of the conference should complete and return the attached form. Those interested in the scientific aspects of the Cassini/Huygens mission should consider the sessions on Thursday and Friday, 15/16 April, devoted to the exploration of Saturn and Titan. Those wishing to interview European and American scientists involved in the mission should indicate this on the registration form. A detailed programme of the conference can be found at: http://sci2.esa.int/huygens/conference

  17. The European Register for Clinical Chemists. (European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry, Working Group on Registration).

    PubMed

    Sanders, G T; Kelly, A M; Breuer, J; Kohse, K P; Mocarelli, P; Sachs, C

    1997-10-01

    To ensure freedom of movement in the European Union, a limited number of professions is regulated by a so-called Sectorial Directive; all other disciplines, including clinical chemistry, fall under a General Directive. However, clinical chemists in the EU wish their specialty to be more specifically regulated; this means that common standards of education, training, experience and compliance with continuing professional developments must be guaranteed. Therefore, the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry (EC4) is about to implement the European Register for clinical chemists, and has composed a guide to this Register. The document describes the conditions for entry to specialty training, the minimum standards for registration (university education and postgraduate vocational training with a minimum total of eight years), the competencies of those qualifying for registration, and the operation of the register. Registration guarantees professional and managerial competencies; the title conferred is "European Clinical Chemist". EC4 recognises the existing national registers as far as they are based on the minimal requirements as indicated. An EC4 Register Commission (EC4RC) will maintain and control the European Register, supported by National Clinical Chemistry Registration Committees (NCCRC). An NCCRC controls the quality of the education in each country and assesses candidates. An individual (EU citizen or non-EU citizen trained in an EU country) applies privately for the European Register to EC4RC and, where applicable, the application is accompanied by a document from the NCCRC of the country of registration, stating that the applicant has the necessary qualifications. For EU citizens trained outside the EU the final decision is with EC4RC; non-EU citizens not trained in an EU country are not eligible for registration. Registration is renewed once every five years. PMID:9368800

  18. Preparing Adolescents for the Twenty-First Century. Challenges Facing Europe and the United States. Johann Jacobs Foundation Conference Series, Volume 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takanishi, Ruby, Ed.; Hamburg, David A., Ed.

    This book contains 11 papers based on presentations at a 1994 conference held in Marbach, Germany, and a 1995 conference in Geneva, Switzerland, focusing on frontiers in the education of young adolescents in European countries and the United States. The following papers are included: "Foreword" (Klaus J. Jacobs); "Meeting the Essential…

  19. SVC 2003 Technical Conference Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter M.

    2003-07-01

    The 46th Annual Technical Conference of the Society of Vacuum Coaters was held in San Francisco May 2-8. All the world events apparently did not affect the attendance or the spirit of the attendees. The Conference was a huge success and very well attended. Many feel that it was the best Techcon yet. This year's Conference really raised the bar for the 47th Annual Technical Conference in Dallas next year. Congratulations go out to the program committee, board of directors, education committee, scholarship committee and Management Plus for a job well done. Excellent accommodations were provided by the San Francisco Marriott.

  20. Control Center Technology Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Conference papers and presentations are compiled and cover evolving architectures and technologies applicable to flight control centers. Advances by NASA Centers and the aerospace industry are presented.

  1. Comparing the New Madrid Seismic Zone with the Osning Thrust: implications for GIA-induced intraplate tectonics in northern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, Christian; Steffen, Holger; Wu, Patrick; Tanner, David; Winsemann, Jutta

    2013-04-01

    Continental intraplate tectonics is a widespread phenomenon that causes significant earthquakes. These earthquakes even occur in areas that are characterized by low strain rates and there are often long intervals between the individual seismic events (Gangopadhyay & Talwani, 2003) that result in a hazard potential. To better understand the controlling factors of intraplate plate earthquakes in northern Germany, we compare the Osning Thrust with the intensively-studied New Madrid Seismic Zone in the Midwest USA. Both areas share major similarities such as a failed rift-basin setting, the presence of intrusive magmatic bodies in the subsurface, tectonic reactivation during the Late Cretaceous, paleo- and historic seismicity and comparable fault parameters. In addition, both areas have a very similar Late Pleistocene deglaciation history. New Madrid was c. 340 km south of the Laurentide ice sheet and ice retreat started around 21 ka and was completed by 8.5 ka (Grollimund & Zoback, 2001). The Osning Thrust was c. 310 km south of the Scandinavian ice sheet and deglaciation began at 24 ka. Both areas show historic seismicity in a similar time frame (New Madrid Seismic Zone: 1811-1812, Johnston & Schweig, 1996); Osning Thrust: 1612 and 1767, Grünthal & Bosse, 1997). We use numerical simulations to identify the timing of potentially GIA-induced fault activity, which are based on the fault stability margin concept of Wu & Hasegawa (1996). From our modelling results it is evident that the fault stability margin changed to negative between 16 and 13 ka for the Osning Thrust, which matches the OSL data of fault-related growth strata (Brandes et al., 2012). For the New Madrid Seismic Zone, the fault stability margin becomes zero between 2.5 ka BP (before 1812) to about 2 ka after the 1812 event, depending on the parameters of the model. This indicates that for both seismic zones, seismicity due to deglaciation was and still is very likely. From this study it can be derived

  2. Enhancement of archaeological heritage. El Risco de las Cuevas at Perales de Tajuña, Madrid (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire-Lista, David Martin; Alvarez de Buergo, Mónica; Fort, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    Heritage conservation has a great impact on the economy of a country. The enhancement of archaeological sites is an investment that promotes tourism and culture. The interdisciplinary knowledge of heritage should be the basis of its management. Preventive actions, non-destructive analytical techniques and monitoring for the conservation of these assets should be promoted. "El Risco de las Cuevas" is a highly decayed and nearly vertical gypsum escarpment which contains a series of dwellings excavated during the Chalcolithic and much more recent times. It is located at Perales de Tajuña, 40 km southeast of Madrid, Spain. This monument is approximately 70 metres high and 500 metres wide. It was listed as a cultural and monumental heritage site by the regional government of Madrid in 1998. The gypsum escarpment housing the dwellings forms part of a lower Miocene unit (Madrid Basin). Debris cones with a mixture of debris from the lower, medium and upper units are found at the bottom of the rockwall. The vulnerability of this monument to atmospheric agents has been studied using "in situ" monitoring techniques of humidity, temperature and rate of rockfalls. Drones have been used for aerial photography in the highest areas of the escarpment and have provided an information network of fractures likely to cause rockfall. Gypsum artificial accelerated ageing has been carried out in the laboratory, including freeze/thaw, wet/dry, thermal shock and dissolution tests. To determine the response of these accelerated ageing processes, density, micro-roughness, ultrasound velocities (Vp and Vs), air permeability and microscopy measurements were made before, during and after ageing tests. Geomorphological studies, rates of decay, material characteristics and durability tests indicate that the decay is controlled by the mineralogy, clay content and porosity of the gypsum rock, as well as microclimate, temperature changes and rock fractures. Rockfalls are particularly relevant in the

  3. Asia. Vancouver Conference Review.

    PubMed

    Brown, T

    1997-02-01

    The 1997 International AIDS Conference in Vancouver gave relatively little attention to the rapid spread of HIV/AIDS in most of the developing world. The popular press reported mainly prevention success stories from Thailand and Uganda, and the successes realized in reducing viral loads with combination drug therapies using protease inhibitors. Societal efforts in Thailand have dramatically reduced the rate of new infections, slowing the growth of the epidemic substantially. Few heard from the conference about how the HIV/AIDS epidemic is spreading rapidly and largely unchecked in much of the world, especially in Asia. Thailand, India, Myanmar, and Cambodia are the most heavily affected countries. Thailand and India, as well as Japan, were therefore heavily represented in the scientific program, while most other countries presented far fewer reports. With the exception of one report on a training course in Fiji, the Pacific Island nations were absent from the program. Vietnam, Malaysia, China, and Hong Kong have rapidly-evolving situations, while Japan, the Philippines, Bangladesh, Nepal, Singapore, Indonesia, Taiwan, Laos, South Korea, Mongolia, and Pakistan should be watched closely. The Asian epidemics are constantly evolving over time. PMID:9155914

  4. STS-46 post flight press conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-08-01

    At a post flight press conference, the flight crew of the STS-46 mission (Cmdr. Loren Shriver, Pilot Andrew Allen, Mission Specialists Claude Nicollier (European Space Agency (ESA)), Marsha Ivins (Flight Engineer), Jeff Hoffman (Payload Commander), Franklin Chang-Dias, and Payload Specialist Franco Malerba (Italian Space Agency (ISA))) discussed their roles in and presented video footage, slides and still photographs of the different aspects of their mission. The primary objectives of the mission were the deployment of ESA's European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA) satellite and the joint NASA/ISA deployment and testing of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS). Secondary objectives included the IMAX Camera, the Limited Duration Space Environment Candidate Materials Exposure (LDVE), and the Pituitary Growth Hormone Cell Function (PHCF) experiments. Video footage of the EURECA and TSS deployment procedures are shown. Earth views were extensive and included Javanese volcanoes, Amazon basin forest ground fires, southern Mexico, southern Bolivian volcanoes, south-west Sudan and the Sahara Desert, and Melville Island, Australia. Questions from reporters and journalists from Johnson Space Center and Kennedy Space Center were discussed.

  5. Saharan dust and association between particulate matter and case-specific mortality: a case-crossover analysis in Madrid (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Saharan dust intrusions are a common phenomenon in the Madrid atmosphere, leading induce exceedances of the 50 μg/m3- EU 24 h standard for PM10. Methods We investigated the effects of exposure to PM10 between January 2003 and December 2005 in Madrid (Spain) on daily case-specific mortality; changes of effects between Saharan and non-Saharan dust days were assessed using a time-stratified case-crossover design. Results Saharan dust affected 20% of days in the city of Madrid. Mean concentration of PM10 was higher during dust days (47.7 μg/m3) than non-dust days (31.4 μg/m3). The rise of mortality per 10 μg/m3 PM10 concentration were always largely for Saharan dust-days. When stratifying by season risks of PM10, at lag 1, during Saharan dust days were stronger for respiratory causes during cold season (IR% = 3.34% (95% CI: 0.36, 6.41) versus 2.87% (95% CI: 1.30, 4.47)) while for circulatory causes effects were stronger during warm season (IR% = 4.19% (95% CI: 1.34, 7.13) versus 2.65% (95% CI: 0.12, 5.23)). No effects were found for cerebrovascular causes. Conclusions We found evidence of strongest effects of particulate matter during Saharan dust days, providing a suggestion of effect modification, even though interaction terms were not statistically significant. Further investigation is needed to understand the mechanism by which Saharan dust increases mortality. PMID:22401495

  6. Application of WRF/Chem-MADRID for real-time air quality forecasting over the Southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ming-Tung; Zhang, Yang; Kang, Daiwen

    2011-11-01

    A Real-Time Air Quality Forecast (RT-AQF) system that is based on a three-dimensional air quality model provides a powerful tool to forecast air quality and advise the public with proper preventive actions. In this work, a new RT-AQF system is developed based on the online-coupled Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF/Chem) with the Model of Aerosol Dynamics, Reaction, Ionization, and Dissolution (MADRID) (referred to as WRF/Chem-MADRID) and deployed in the southeastern U.S. during May-September, 2009. Max 1-h and 8-h average ozone (O 3) and 24-h average fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) are evaluated against surface observations from the AIRNow database in terms of spatial distribution, temporal variation, and domain-wide and region-specific discrete and categorical performance statistics. WRF/Chem-MADRID demonstrates good forecasting skill that is consistent with current RT-AQF models. The overpredictions of O 3 and underprediction of PM 2.5 are likely due to uncertainties in emissions such as those of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and ammonia, inaccuracies in simulated meteorological variables such as 2-m temperature, 10-m wind speed, and precipitation, and uncertainties in the boundary conditions. Sensitivity simulations show that the use of the online BVOC emissions can improve PM 2.5 forecast in areas with high BVOC emissions and adjusting lateral boundaries can improve domain-wide O 3 and PM 2.5 predictions. Several limitations and uncertainties are identified to further improve the model's forecasting skill.

  7. The Olmsted fault zone, southernmost Illinois: A key to understanding seismic hazard in the northern new Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bexfield, C.E.; McBride, J.H.; Pugin, Andre J.M.; Nelson, W.J.; Larson, T.H.; Sargent, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    Geological deformation in the northern New Madrid seismic zone, near Olmsted, Illinois (USA), is analyzed using integrated compressional-wave (P) and horizontally polarized-wave (SH) seismic reflection and regional and dedicated borehole information. Seismic hazards are of special concern because of strategic facilities (e.g., lock and dam sites and chemical plants on the Ohio River near its confluence with the Mississippi River) and because of alluvial soils subject to high amplification of earthquake shock. We use an integrated approach starting with lower resolution, but deeper penetration, P-wave reflection profiles to identify displacement of Paleozoic bedrock. Higher resolution, but shallower penetration, SH-wave images show deformation that has propagated upward from bedrock faults into Pleistocene loess. We have mapped an intricate zone more than 8 km wide of high-angle faults in Mississippi embayment sediments localized over Paleozoic bedrock faults that trend north to northeast, parallel to the Ohio River. These faults align with the pattern of epicenters in the New Madrid seismic zone. Normal and reverse offsets along with positive flower structures imply a component of strike-slip; the current stress regime favors right-lateral slip on northeast-trending faults. The largest fault, the Olmsted fault, underwent principal displacement near the end of the Cretaceous Period 65 to 70 million years ago. Strata of this age (dated via fossil pollen) thicken greatly on the downthrown side of the Olmsted fault into a locally subsiding basin. Small offsets of Tertiary and Quaternary strata are evident on high-resolution SH-wave seismic profiles. Our results imply recent reactivation and possible future seismic activity in a critical area of the New Madrid seismic zone. This integrated approach provides a strategy for evaluating shallow seismic hazard-related targets for engineering concerns. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The potential impacts of electric vehicles on air quality in the urban areas of Barcelona and Madrid (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soret, A.; Guevara, M.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    This work analyses the potential air quality improvements resulting from three fleet electrification scenarios (∼13, 26 and 40%) by replacing conventional vehicles with Electric Battery Vehicles (EBVs), Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs) and Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEVs). This study has been performed for the cities of Barcelona and Madrid (Spain), where road transport is the primary emission source. In these urban areas, several air quality problems are present, mainly related to NO2 and particulate matter. The WRF-ARW/HERMESv2/CMAQ model system has been applied at high spatial (1 × 1 km2) and temporal (1 h) resolution. The results show that fleet electrification offers a potential for emission abatement, especially related to NOx and CO. Regarding the more ambitious scenario (∼40% fleet electrification), reductions of 11% and 17% of the total NOx emissions are observed in Barcelona and Madrid respectively. These emissions reductions involve air quality improvements in NO2 maximum hourly values up to 16%: reductions up to 30 and 35 μg m-3 in Barcelona and Madrid, respectively. Furthermore, an additional scenario has been defined considering electric generation emissions associated with EBVs and PHEVs charging from a combined-cycle power plant. These charging emissions would produce slight NO2 increases in the downwind areas of <3 μg m-3. Thus, fleet electrification would improve urban air quality even when considering emissions associated with charging electric vehicles. However, two further points should be considered. First, fleet electrification cannot be considered a unique solution, and other management strategies may be defined. This is especially important with respect to particulate matter emissions, which are not significantly reduced by fleet electrification (<5%) due to the high weight of non-exhaust emissions. Second, a significant introduction of electric vehicles (26-40%) involving all vehicle categories is required to improve urban

  9. Calendar of Conferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-08-01

    8 - 18 August 1996 International Summer School on Plasma Physics and Technology La Jolla, CA, USA Contact: Mr V Stefan, Institute for Advanced Physics Studies, PO Box 2964, La Jolla, CA 92038, USA. Tel +1-619-456-5737. 26 - 30 August 1996 Joint Varenna - Lausanne International Workshop on Theory of Fusion Plasmas Villa Monastero, Varenna, Italy Contact: Centro di Cultura Villa Monastero, 1 Piazza Venini, 22050 Varenna (Lecco), Italy. Tel +39-341-831261, Fax +39-341-831281. Application and abstract deadline: 15 June 1996. 2 - 5 September 1996 EU - US Workshop on Transport in Fusion Plasmas Villa Monastero, Varenna, Italy Further information: G Gorini, ISPP, 16 Via Celoria, I-20133 Milano, Italy. Tel +39-2-2392637, Fax +39-2-2392205, E-mail ggorini@mi.infn.it. Administrative contact: Centro di Cultura Villa Monastero, 1 Piazza Venini, 22050 Varenna (Lecco), Italy. Tel +39-341-831261, Fax +39-341-831281. Application and abstract deadline: 15 June 1996. 9 - 13 September 1996 International Conference on Plasma Physics Nagoya, Japan Contact: Conference Secretariat, c/o Prof. Hiromu Momota, National Institute for Fusion Science, Nagoya 464-01, Japan. Tel +81-52-789-4260, Fax +81-52-789-1037, E-mail icpp96@nifs.ac.jp. Abstract deadline: 31 March 1996. 16 - 20 September 1996 19th Symposium on Fusion Technology Lisbon, Portugal Contact: Professor Carlos Varandas, Centro de Fusão Nuclear, 1096 Lisboa Codex, Portugal. Fax +351-1-8417819, E-mail cvarandas@cfn.ist.utl.pt. General information will be available via WWW with URL http://www.cfn.ist.utl.pt. 25 - 29 September 1996 Summer University of Plasma Physics Garching, Germany Contact: Ms Ch Stahlberg, Max-Planck-Institut für PlasmaPhysik, Boltzmannstr 2, D-85748 Garching, Germany. Tel +49-89-3299-2232, Fax +49-89-3299-1001. 11 - 15 November 1996 38th Annual Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics, APS Denver, CO, USA Contact: Dr Richard Hazeltine, University of Texas

  10. Conference Report: Power and Energy Society Annual Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagi, Hayao; Yokoyama, Akihiko

    The 17th Power & Energy Society Annual Conference was held on September 13-15, 2006 at University of the Ryukyus. There were 52 technical sessions and 453 papers. A panel discussion, technical exhibitions and technical tours were also organized. In this article, the outline of the conference is reported.

  11. Crisis or Conference! Master List for Conference Planners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Tony

    This conference organizer's guide contains 42 lists of ideas, reminders, things to check, and questions to ask when a person is planning an event such as a conference, workshop, or training session. Written from a British point of view, the guide is organized into four parts in chronological order: preplanning, planning, onsite, and…

  12. Conference report: the third BIRAX Regenerative Medicine Conference.

    PubMed

    Rooney, Alasdair G; Easterbrook, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    The third Britain/Israel Research and Academic Exchange Partnership Regenerative Medicine conference was recently held in Oxford (UK). This conference report summarizes highlights from the scientific program. There is a particular emphasis on internationally collaborative projects funded by this initiative, the young researchers' symposium, and a lively panel session focused on the relationships between industry and academia. PMID:27404395

  13. National Conference[s] on Career Education: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Joseph F.; And Others

    The report describes a series of conferences whose objective was to orient selected educational leaders to the implications of preparing educational personnel with a career education perspective. The first 32 pages of the report discuss project objectives and procedures, and detail participant profiles, pre- and post-conference career education…

  14. 48 CFR 6101.11 - Conferences; conference memorandum [Rule 11].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... agreements disposing of matters in dispute; or (6) Ways to expedite disposition of the case or to facilitate settlement of the dispute, including, if the parties and the Board agree, the use of alternative dispute... APPEALS, GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION CONTRACT DISPUTE CASES 6101.11 Conferences; conference...

  15. 48 CFR 6101.11 - Conferences; conference memorandum [Rule 11].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... agreements disposing of matters in dispute; or (6) Ways to expedite disposition of the case or to facilitate settlement of the dispute, including, if the parties and the Board agree, the use of alternative dispute... APPEALS, GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION CONTRACT DISPUTE CASES 6101.11 Conferences; conference...

  16. 10 CFR 2.329 - Prehearing conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... place for a conference or conferences before trial. A prehearing conference in a proceeding involving a... appropriate for the particular proceeding, a prehearing conference may be held to consider such matters as: (1... proceeding. (d) Reports. Prehearing conferences may be reported stenographically or by other means....

  17. 10 CFR 820.22 - Informal conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Informal conference. 820.22 Section 820.22 Energy... conference. The Director may convene an informal conference to discuss any situation that might be a... information. The Director may compel a person to attend the conference. This conference will not normally...

  18. Descriptive study of stigma associated with severe and persistent mental illness among the general population of Madrid (Spain).

    PubMed

    Crespo, María; Pérez-Santos, Eloísa; Muñoz, Manuel; Guillén, Ana I

    2008-12-01

    The aim is to analyze the stigma associated with severe and persistent mental illness in the general population of the community of Madrid, Spain, as a first step to promote strategies to fight against it. Participants (n = 439) showed adequate general knowledge about mental illness, but a high degree of confusion with mental retardation. Stigmatizing attitudes focusing mainly on the disposition to help and on pity. Moreover, there were some perception of contamination and pity toward other family members. Psychosis seems to shows more stigma attitudes than cancer and depression, but less than cocaine addiction and AIDS. PMID:18437569

  19. Ozone attributed to Madrid and Barcelona on-road transport emissions: Characterization of plume dynamics over the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Víctor; Pay, María T; Baldasano, José M

    2016-02-01

    Despite the ~30% emission decrease of the main tropospheric ozone (O3) precursors in Spain in the 2001-2012 period, the O3 concentration in summer still exceeds the target value for the protection of the human health of the Air Quality Directive (2008/50/EC). On-road transport is the main anthropogenic contributor to O3 precursor's emissions in Madrid and Barcelona metropolitan areas (65%/59% of NOx, 40%/33% of NMVOC, and 67%/85% of CO emissions) but this contribution to O3 formation is not well understood. The present work aims at increasing the understanding on the role of on-road transport emissions from main Spanish urban areas in O3 dynamics over Spain under typical circulation types. For that purpose, the Integrated Source Apportionment Method is used within the CALIOPE modelling system (WRF/CMAQ/HERMES/BSC-DREAM8b). The results indicate that the daily maximum O3 concentration attributed to the on-road transport emissions from Madrid (O3T-MAD) and Barcelona metropolitan areas (O3T-BCN) contribute up to 24% and 8% to total O3 concentration, respectively, within an area of influence of 200 km. The contribution of O3T-MAD and O3T-BCN is particularly significant (up to 80-100 μg m(-3) in an hour) to the O3 concentration peak during the central hours of the day in the high O3 concentration season (April-September). The maximum O3T-MAD concentration is calculated within the metropolitan area of Madrid but the plume, channelled by the Tajo and the Henares valleys, affects large areas of the Iberian Peninsula. The O3T-BCN plume is more driven by sea-land and mountain-valley breezes than by the synoptic advection and its maximum concentration is usually registered over the Mediterranean Sea. The O3 concentration transported long-range to the Iberian Peninsula is significant in the area of influence of Madrid and Barcelona, being maxima under cold (70-96%) and minima in warm circulation types (35-70%). PMID:26615485

  20. Review of recommendations on cervical cancer screening in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Patnick, J

    2003-08-01

    In 2000 the European Commission Advisory Committee on Cancer Prevention published a position paper on cancer screening with recommendations. This followed working party deliberations in 1998 and conference discussion in 1999. Scientific advances, particularly in knowledge about the relationship of HPV and cervical cancer and political developments with the enlargement of the European Union, mean that the position paper and recommendations may shortly need revising in the light of changed circumstances. PMID:14581854

  1. Employment Creation through Local Development Conference (Brussels, Belgium, July 7-8, 1988). LEDA Programme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium).

    These proceedings contain summaries of papers presented at a 1988 conference held to explore the Local Economic Development Action (LEDA) Program of the European Community. Titles and authors are as follows: "Opening Address" (George Yennimatas); "Getting to the Heart of Local Development" (Haris Martinos); "Les Baronnies: Fighting Emigration and…

  2. 78 FR 63221 - International Conference on Harmonisation; Guidance on Q4B Evaluation and Recommendation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... Organization, Health Canada, and the European Free Trade Area. In the Federal Register of July 19, 2010 (75 FR... ) made available in the Federal Register of February 21, 2008 (73 FR 9575). The annex will provide... Evaluation and Recommendation of Pharmacopoeial Texts for Use in the International Conference...

  3. Sixth Annual Conference on Computers, Freedom, and Privacy: The RealAudio Proceedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Barbara; Meernik, Mary

    1996-01-01

    Reviews the sixth Conference on Computers, Freedom, and Privacy (CFP) held in March 1996. Highlights include the Communications Decency Act, part of the 1996 Telecommunications Reform Act; European views; Internet service providers; limiting online speech on campus; cryptography; the global information infrastructure; copyright; and China and the…

  4. Innovative Alternatives in Learning Environments. CAE Fall Conference Proceedings (Amsterdam, Netherlands, November 7-10, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Sara

    This paper explains how ideas were exchanged between Americans and Europeans during a conference held by the Committee on Architecture for Education. The subject was the future of school design, including the shape of the school and the way that changing educational methods are affecting school buildings. Case studies presented during the…

  5. European Education, European Citizenship? On the Role of Education in Constructing Europeanness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollikainen, Aaro

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the role of the European Union (EU) education programs in fostering a sense of European citizenship. Addresses the five meanings given to the concept of European citizenship: (1) recognition of European heritage; (2) EU loyalty; (3) right of free movement; (4) political participation; and (5) active citizenship. (CMK)

  6. Alternative Assessment in Engineering Language Education: The Case of the Technical University of Madrid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Joana; Duran, Pilar; Ubeda, Paloma

    2011-01-01

    Engineering institutions across Europe are currently involved in a major process of reform and restructuring as a part of the Bologna Process, which stresses the role of competencies and outcomes in curriculum design. In the field of languages, the Council of Europe has developed the CEFR (Common European Framework of References) for languages,…

  7. PREFACE: Joint European Magnetic Symposia - JEMS 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spałek, Jozef

    2011-07-01

    Conference banner The Joint European Magnetic Symposia JEMS 2010 took place in the complex Auditorium Maximum of the Jagiellonian University in Kraków, Poland, between 23-28 August 2010. It followed the series of the conferences in Grenoble (2001), Dresden (2004), San Sebastian (2006), and Dublin (2008). The next Symposia will be held in 2012 in Parma (Italy). The Symposia cover a broad range of aspects of magnetism and magnetic materials, as well as providing a forum for the magnetism community to discuss new concepts, properties, and developments in all branches of fundamental and applied magnetism. The JEMS 2010 Symposia were organized by the Institute of Physics of Jagiellonian University, in cooperation with AGH University of Science and Technology (Kraków), Cracow University of Technology, Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Kraków, and the Silesian University in Katowice. I thank the Local Committee, and in particular Professor Krzysztof Tomala, for their hard work long before, during, and after the Conference. We dedicate this volume to Professor Henryk Szymczak from the Institute of Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences for his long lasting service to the magnetism community and the organizational effort in bringing this Conference to our community. Thank you Henryk! The Conference contained Plenary Sessions and 16 Symposia, which are listed below. Most of them had two chairpersons (also listed), one from abroad and one from Poland. I believe that a collective chairmanship of the Symposia is very helpful in both their organization, as well as in the reviewing process of the papers submitted to the Conference Proceedings. I would like to cordially thank all the persons listed below, who have contributed enormously to the success of our meeting. The Proceedings comprises 116 invited and contributed papers. I thank the Co-editors for their continuing work long after the Conference. Arrivederci in Parma! Jozef Spa

  8. European user support activities for ASTRO-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audard, M.; Ferrigno, C.; Guainazzi, M.; Kretschmar, P.; Lumb, D.; Paltani, S.

    2014-07-01

    The Japanese mission ASTRO-H will be the next major X-ray satellite to operate after its launch in 2015. ASTRO-H will carry several instruments observing simultaneously that will provide broad-band coverage from 0.3 to 600 keV, while the Soft X-ray Spectrometer will offer high spectral resolution in the soft X-ray domain. Europe actively participates in the ASTRO-H mission, and European astronomers will have access to observing time. The European user support activities will be spread across two centers: The Science Operations Center (SOC), located at ESAC (Spain), and the European Science Support Center (ESSC), located at the University of Geneva (Switzerland). The tasks of the SOC will be focussed on supporting the European user community in the use of the allocated time for ASTRO-H, through handling annual calls for observing proposals and related activities. The tasks of the ESSC will be focussed on supporting the European scientific community with respect to the analysis of ASTRO-H data. The activities of the European ASTRO-H SOC and ESSC, together with a summary of ASTRO-H and its capabilities, will be presented at a booth at the X-ray Universe 2014 conference.

  9. Vague Language in Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutting, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This study examined abstracts for a British Association for Applied Linguistics conference and a Sociolinguistics Symposium, to define the genre of conference abstracts in terms of vague language, specifically universal general nouns (e.g. people) and research general nouns (e.g. results), and to discover if the language used reflected the level…

  10. The People of Color Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosnan, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Celebration, education, and community characterized the November 1998 People of Color Conference held in San Juan, Puerto Rico. The National Association of Independent Schools is considering whether such a conference is antithetical to diversity initiatives. Renewal of participants' responsibility for creating inclusive school communities may be a…

  11. The Employable Woman Conference Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeAngelo, Lois; Garcia, Bernice

    The conference proceedings relating to employment status and employment-related problems of women in general, and Montgomery County, Maryland, specifically, are highlighted in this report. The purpose of the conference was to establish a solid base for an on-going dialogue with educators, personnel experts, and affirmative action officers in the…

  12. Sixth National Conference on Citizenship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC.

    The document presents proceedings from the sixth in a series of annual national citizenship conferences. Held in Washington, D.C. in 1951, the conference served as a forum where educational, political, business, religious, labor, civic, and communications leaders could explore functions and duties of American citizenship. The theme of the…

  13. Conference Connections: Rewiring the Circuit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siemens, George; Tittenberger, Peter; Anderson, Terry

    2008-01-01

    Increased openness, two-way dialogue, and blurred distinctions between experts and amateurs have combined with numerous technology tools for dialogue, personal expression, networking, and community formation to "remake" conferences, influencing not only how attendees participate in but also how organizers host conferences today. (Contains 31…

  14. Adventures on the Conference Circuit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, Mac

    2010-01-01

    Conferences offer the chance to join forces with others in pursuit of a common goal. In most teachers' daily routines, this kind of collaboration is not a priority; in many cases, it is impossible. For this reason alone, the conference experience can be extremely beneficial--and that is before one takes into account the access to fresh research,…

  15. SLA at 100: Conference Preview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenstein, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    When School Library Association (SLA) convenes its annual conference in Washington, DC, June 14-17, 2009, the association will be celebrating its 100th birthday. This occasion allows for grand gestures--the SLA Salutes! Awards and Leadership Reception will be held in the Library of Congress's Great Hall. The conference also draws upon Washington…

  16. ARC Conference Showcases Telecommunications Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Fred D.

    1996-01-01

    The Appalachian Regional Commission's 1996 Conference, "Building Blocks for Using Telecommunications and Information Technology," held in Binghamton, New York, focused on the role of telecommunications in Appalachia in education and training, telemedicine, business, and government. Highlights conference presentations on special applications of…

  17. Writing Conferences Using the Microcomputer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pufahl, John

    1986-01-01

    Describes a teaching strategy using Apple IIe computers in a sequence of individual conferences. Includes asking questions while scrolling through the paper, showing students how to elaborate ideas by entering suggested changes and prompts in capital letters during the conference, and using a spelling checker to prompt revision (e.g., by compiling…

  18. Legitimate Talk in Feedback Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copland, Fiona

    2012-01-01

    Feedback on performance is a feature of professional training. Much feedback is delivered in post-observation conferences where a "trainer" will discuss the "trainee's" performance with him/her. What transpires in these conferences, however, is "hidden from view" (Heritage and Sefi 1992: 362) and the norms of interaction are largely unexamined in…

  19. Fifth National Conference on Citizenship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC.

    Presented are general session and discussion group reports from a citizenship conference held in Washington, D.C. in May, 1950. Sponsored by the National Citizenship Committee of the National Education Association and the United States Department of Justice, the conference provided a forum for examination of the functions and duties of American…

  20. Seventh National Conference on Citizenship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC.

    The document presents proceedings from the seventh in a series of annual national citizenship conferences. Held in Washington, D.C. in September, 1952, the conference served as a forum for more than 1,000 educational, political, business, religious, labor, civic, and communications leaders to explore functions and duties of American citizenship.…

  1. Proceedings of the Pittsburgh conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    These abstracts represent the state-of-the-art in Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy and should be a valuable addition to your technical files. This volume is distributed only to the registrants of the 1991 Pittsburgh Conference and Exposition and therefore does not constitute a publication. This volume is not for sale nor does the Pittsburgh Conference permit abstraction of its contents.

  2. First National Conference on Citizenship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC.

    Presented are general session and discussion group reports from a citizenship conference held in Philadelphia in May, 1946. Directed by the National Citizenship Committee of the National Education Association, the conference provided an opportunity for political, business, educational, and religious leaders to discuss benefits and responsibilities…

  3. Third National Conference on Citizenship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC.

    Presented are background information, discussion group reports, and addresses from a citizenship conference held in Washington, D.C. in May 1948. Sponsored by the Citizenship Committee of the National Education Association and the United States Department of Justice, the conference centered on the theme, "Citizenship: Rights and Responsibilities."…

  4. Second National Conference on Citizenship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC.

    Presented are speeches, group reports, and panel discussions from a citizenship conference held in Boston in May, 1947. Sponsored by the Citizenship Committee of the National Education Association, the conference provided an opportunity for political, business, educational and religious leaders to discuss the benefits and responsibilities of…

  5. Conference Report: Improving College Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, C. Douglas; Claxton, Charles S.

    The conference report includes an explanation of the conference plan, a description of the highlights, and descriptions of each session. Among the session topics are: faculty development; instructional improvement in the community college, with emphasis on developmental education; conditions that enhance learning; improving the lecture; evaluating…

  6. WFPDB: European Plate Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, Milcho

    2007-08-01

    The Wide-Field Plate Database (WFPDB) gives an inventory of all wide-field (>~ 1 sq. deg) photographic observations archived in astronomical institutions over the world. So it facilitates and stimulates their use and preservation as a valuable source of information for future investigations in astronomy. At present WFPDB manages plate-index information for 25% of all existing plates providing on-line access from Sofia (http://www.skyarchive.org/search) and in CDS, Strasbourg. Here we present the new development of WFPDB as an instrument for searching of long term brightness variations of different sky objects stressing on the European photographic plate collections (from existing 2 million wide-field plates more than 55% are in Europe: Germany, Russia, Ukraine, Italy, Czech Republic, etc.). We comment examples of digitization (with flatbed scanners) of the European plate archives in Sonneberg, Pulkovo, Asiago, Byurakan, Bamberg, etc. and virtual links of WFPDB with European AVO, ADS, IBVS.

  7. European Universe Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, P.; Miley, G.; Westra van Holthe, F.; Schrier, W.; Reed, S.

    2011-10-01

    The European Universe Awareness (EU-UNAWE) programme uses the beauty and grandeur of the cosmos to encourage young children, particularly those from underprivileged backgrounds, to develop an interest in science and technology and to foster a sense of global citizenship. EU-UNAWE is already active in 40 countries and comprises a global network of almost 500 astronomers, teachers and other educators. The programme was recently awarded a grant of 1.9 million euros by the European Union so that it can be further developed in five European countries and South Africa. The grant will be used to organise teacher training workshops and to develop educational materials, such as an astronomy news service for children and games. During this presentation we will outline some of the biggest achievements of EU-UNAWE to date and discuss future plans for the programme.

  8. SETI conference at Tallinn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, W. T.

    1982-04-01

    The search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) was the subject of the Dec. 1981 conference in Tallinn, U.S.S.R., with the Soviet papers, which constituted about 80 percent of the total, of rather low quality. A large number dealt with paleocontact, or establishing the long-past presence of extraterrestrials through archeological or astronomical means. There was insufficient discussion of which bands of electromagnetic radiation are optimum for SETI. The need to search for extrasolar planets was emphasized, noting recent SETI observations at Ohio State University and a NASA plan which would survey both nearby stars and the entire sky in the next few years. The key is a proposed spectrum analyzer that can detect and analyze signals from eight million frequency channels at once, each of which covers a very narrow bandwidth of typically 1-32 Hz.

  9. Eastern Pacific Ocean Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The promotion of interaction among investigators of all oceanographic disciplines studying the eastern Pacific Ocean was the goal of the 1990 Eastern Pacific Ocean Conference (EPOC), held October 17-19 on the snow-covered slopes of Mt. Hood, Oreg. Thirty oceanographers representing all disciplines attended.Dick Barber, Duke University Marine Lab, Beaufort, N.C., chaired a session on the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, emphasizing issues related to biological activity. Steve Ramp of the Naval Postgraduate School in Montery, Calif., chaired a session on recent results from northern and central California experiments. On October 19, following an early morning earthquake, a business meeting and discussions regarding a collaboration in future experiments were held.

  10. LEAP 96 Conference summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanet, Lucien

    1997-06-01

    The following pages represent a short summary of the many new results in low energy antiproton (p¯) physics presented and discussed at the LEAP 96 Conference. They cover a broad field of physics, from atomic physics to nuclear physics, from hadronic physics to parton physics. The impact of these results on "soft QCD", the part of strong interactions which we do not yet understand, and on the limits that we can establish to the "fundamental symmetries" which govern Nature are original and important. Within these twelve pages, I cannot do justice to all contributions. I present my apologizes for the omissions, hoping however that the serious reader will find the missing information in these proceedings.

  11. ABC1 Consensus Conference - a German Perspective: First International Consensus Conference on Advanced Breast Cancer (ABC1), Lisbon, November 5, 2011.

    PubMed

    Thomssen, Christoph; Marschner, Norbert; Untch, Michael; Decker, Thomas; Hegewisch-Becker, Susanna; Jackisch, Christian; Janni, Wolfgang; Hans-Joachim, Lück; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Scharl, Anton; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Tesch, Hans; Welt, Anja; Harbeck, Nadia

    2012-02-01

    A group of German breast cancer experts (medical oncologists and gynaecologists) reviewed and commented on the results of the first international 'Advanced Breast Cancer First Consensus Conference' (ABC1) for the diagnosis and treatment of advanced breast cancer. The ABC1 Conference is an initiative of the European School of Oncology (ESO) Metastatic Breast Cancer Task Force in cooperation with the EBCC (European Breast Cancer Conference), ESMO (European Society of Medical Oncology) and the American JNCI (Journal of the National Cancer Institute). The main focus of the ABC1 Conference was metastatic breast cancer (stage IV). The ABC1 consensus is based on the vote of 33 breast cancer experts from different countries and has been specified as a guideline for therapeutic practice by the German expert group. It is the objective of the ABC1 consensus as well as of the German comments to provide an internationally standardized and evidence-based foundation for qualified decision-making in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. PMID:22553474

  12. Personalized cancer care conference.

    PubMed

    Zänker, Kurt S; Mihich, Enrico; Huber, Hans-Peter; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise

    2013-01-01

    The Oslo University Hospital (Norway), the K.G. Jebsen Centre for Breast Cancer Research (Norway), The Radiumhospital Foundation (Norway) and the Fritz-Bender-Foundation (Germany) designed under the conference chairmen (E. Mihich, K.S. Zänker, A.L. Borresen-Dale) and advisory committee (A. Borg, Z. Szallasi, O. Kallioniemi, H.P. Huber) a program at the cutting edge of "PERSONALIZED CANCER CARE: Risk prediction, early diagnosis, progression and therapy resistance." The conference was held in Oslo from September 7 to 9, 2012 and the science-based presentations concerned six scientific areas: (1) Genetic profiling of patients, prediction of risk, late side effects; (2) Molecular profiling of tumors and metastases; (3) Tumor-host microenvironment interaction and metabolism; (4) Targeted therapy; (5) Translation and (6) Informed consent, ethical challenges and communication. Two satellite workshops on (i) Ion Ampliseq-a novel tool for large scale mutation detection; and (ii) Multiplex RNA ISH and tissue homogenate assays for cancer biomarker validation were additionally organized. The report concludes that individual risk prediction in carcinogenesis and/or metastatogenesis based on polygenic profiling may be useful for intervention strategies for health care and therapy planning in the future. To detect distinct and overlapping DNA sequence alterations in tumor samples and adjacent normal tissues, including point mutations, small insertions or deletions, copy number changes and chromosomal rearrangements will eventually make it possible to design personalized management plans for individualized patients. However, large individualized datasets need a new approach in bio-information technology to reduce this enormous data dimensionally to simply working hypotheses about health and disease for each individual. PMID:25562519

  13. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO{sub 2} corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  14. 38 CFR 39.33 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... THE ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF VETERANS CEMETERIES Establishment, Expansion, and Improvement Projects Grant Requirements and Procedures § 39.33 Conferences. (a) Predesign conference. A predesign conference is required for all Establishment, Expansion, and...

  15. 38 CFR 39.33 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... THE ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF VETERANS CEMETERIES Establishment, Expansion, and Improvement Projects Grant Requirements and Procedures § 39.33 Conferences. (a) Predesign conference. A predesign conference is required for all Establishment, Expansion, and...

  16. 38 CFR 39.33 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... THE ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF VETERANS CEMETERIES Establishment, Expansion, and Improvement Projects Grant Requirements and Procedures § 39.33 Conferences. (a) Predesign conference. A predesign conference is required for all Establishment, Expansion, and...

  17. 38 CFR 39.33 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... STATES FOR ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF VETERANS CEMETERIES Establishment, Expansion, and Improvement Projects Grant Requirements and Procedures § 39.33 Conferences. (a) Predesign conference. A predesign conference is required for all Establishment,...

  18. European security and France

    SciTech Connect

    deRose, A.

    1985-01-01

    A French authority on security argues for new European initiatives in the face of the ''danger represented by Soviet military power deployed in support of an imperialistic ideology.'' His proposals, including the strengthening of conventional forces without abandoning the option of the first use of nuclear weapons, are meant to give substance to President Mitterrand's declaration in 1983: ''The European nations now need to realize that their defense is also their responsibility....'' A part of the increasingly important debate in France over defense policy in Europe.

  19. A joint resolution conferring honorary citizenship of the United States on Bernardo de Galvez y Madrid, Viscount of Galveston and Count of Galvez.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Rubio, Marco [R-FL

    2014-06-04

    06/04/2014 Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.J.RES.105, which became Public Law 113-229 on 12/16/2014. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  20. The QBito CubeSat: Applications in Space Engineering Education at Technical University of Madrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Fraile, Jose Javier; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Calvo, Daniel; Moreno Benavides, Efren

    The QBito CubeSat is one of the 50 CubeSats that is being developed for the QB50 project. The project is funded by the 7 (th) Frame Program to launch 50 CubeSats in a ‘string-of-pearls’ configuration for multi-point, in-situ measurements in the lower thermosphere and re-entry research. The 50 CubeSats, developed by an international network of universities and research institutions, will comprise 40 double CubeSats with atmospheric sensors and 10 double or triple CubeSats for science and technology demonstration. It will be the first large-scale CubeSat constellation in orbit; a concept that has been under discussion for several years but not implemented up to now. This project has a high educational interest for universities; beyond the scientific and technological results, being part of an international group of over 90 universities all over the world working and sharing knowledge to achieve a successful mission represents an exciting opportunity. The QBito project main educational motivation is to educate students in space technologies and in space systems engineering. The Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM) is designing, developing, building and testing one of the double CubeSats carrying as payload a kit of atmospheric sensors from the consortium, and other payloads developed by the team such as an IR non-refrigerated sensor, a Phase Change Material (PCM) for thermal control applications, a Fuzzy Logic Attitude Control System and other technological developments such as an optimized antenna deployment mechanism, a lightweight multi-mission configurable structure, and an efficient Electric Power System (EPS) with a Maximum Peak Power Tracker (MPPT). This project has been integrated in the training of the Aerospatiale Engineering, Master and PhD degree students by involving them in the complete engineering process, from its conceptual design to the post-flight conclusions. Three subsystems have been selected for being developed from the conceptual design

  1. The New Madrid earthquakes; an engineering-geologic interpretation of relict liquefaction features

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Obermeier, Stephen F.

    1989-01-01

    Earthquake-induced sand blows and sand-filled fissures are present in a belt 40 to 60 km. wide that extends from near Charleston, Mo., southward to about 20 km. south of Marked Tree, Ark. This region of earthquake-induced sand blows and other liquefaction-related features is almost exclusively in the St. Francis Basin, an alluvial lowland that typically has a thin (2 to 8 m thick), clay-bearing topstratum underlain by about 30 to 60 m of unconsolidated sand (the substratum). Liquefaction of the substratum sands has made the sand blows. The sand blows and other liquefaction-related features on the ground surface in the St. Francis Basin are almost certainly results of the New Madrid earthquakes of 1811-12. In this report, geologic and engineering properties of the alluvium are used in combination with a map showing the bounds of the liquefaction-related features to locate approximately the epicentral zones for two of the major shocks: the earthquakes of December 16,1811, and February 7,1812. Properties used for the analysis included the Standard Penetration Resistance of the substratum sands, characteristics of the sand's grain size, thickness of the topstratum, and the thickness of the post-Tertiary alluvium. The method of analysis relies largely on the evaluation of the liquefaction potential of the sands. This is done by using the Standard Penetration Test blow counts and by devising a method that uses all possible combinations of liquefaction potential and a realistic relation between attenuation of earthquake accelerations and distance from the epicenter (or more correctly, energy-release center). Two interpreted 1811-12 energy-release centers generally agree well with zones of seismicity defined by modern, small earthquakes. Bounds on accelerations are placed at the limits of sand blows that were generated by the 1811-12 earthquakes in the St. Francis Basin. Conclusions show how the topstratum thickness, sand size of the substratum, and thickness of alluvium

  2. Mass size distributions of soluble sulfate, nitrate and ammonium in the Madrid urban aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza, J.; Pujadas, M.; Gómez-Moreno, F. J.; Sánchez, M.; Artíñano, B.

    2011-09-01

    This paper analyzes the mass size distribution of some inorganic species present in the atmospheric aerosol from a field campaign carried out in Madrid throughout a complete year (February 2007-February 2008). Samplings were performed by means of a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI). Ambient air was sampled during consecutive nocturnal and diurnal periods, and diurnal/nocturnal behaviors were compared for the twenty night-day sampling pairs that were gathered. Annual and seasonal averages were obtained, and some case studies under specific atmospheric conditions are discussed in the paper. Results have shown that the sulfate and ammonium mass was concentrated in the accumulation mode, between 0.18 and 0.56 μm, so that gas-phase and condensation processes for secondary aerosol formation prevailed during the sampling periods in this area. An exception to this behavior was found during a fog event when distributions for these two species were centered in the 0.56-1 and 1-1.8 μm size stages, corresponding to the droplet mode. In most of the samples, the ammonium mass measured in these size ranges was enough or almost enough to neutralize inorganic acidity by formation of ammonium sulfate and nitrate. However, a significant sulfate mass not neutralized by ammonium was found in the impactor backup quartz filter (aerodynamic diameter < 0.056 μm). The concentration of this sulfate and its contribution to the ultrafine fraction mass was higher under good dispersive conditions, prevailing in summer, when particle growth processes are not so favored due to the higher atmospheric dilution factors. The origin of this ultrafine sulfate has been attributed to direct emissions from traffic, associated to the nucleation mode. Regarding the nitrate concentration, it was found higher in the coarse mode than in the accumulation mode on an annual basis. The highest concentrations were measured in winter episodic situations. The marked seasonal variability shown in the

  3. ShakeMap/Hazus Scenario Projects and Support for the New Madrid 2011 National Level Exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bausch, D.

    2011-12-01

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have coordinated on the development of new products that support an extensive library of ShakeMap scenarios, largely based on the USGS National Hazard Map sources of earthquakes that are supporting Hazards U.S. (HAZUS) loss estimations. These scenarios are used to support a broad range of emergency management activities, including mitigation, recovery and preparedness planning, as well as exercises for response. We have successfully documented where these scenarios have led to risk reduction actions. To date these have been implemented as pilot studies under the National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (NEHRP) in Washington, Utah, Nevada and more recently in New England. As a result of these ShakeMap/HAZUS demonstration projects, we developed a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for producing standardized loss mapping templates. These maps and associated tables help translate earthquake loss information to support a broad range of emergency management activities. The SOP includes step by step instructions with standardized map templates, symbology and terminology, which was initiated in support of the New Madrid 2011 National Level Exercise. We developed enhancements to the integration of ShakeMap and Hazus based on the NLE scenarios that can be implemented for other scenarios, as well as real earthquake events. The NLE was especially challenging as 8 States were impacted. A new utility developed internally by FEMA (EQExport) greatly expedited the data flow by automatically exporting the SQL based results into compressed geodatabases, as well as implementing custom map templates, reports and Google Earth KML files. This free open source utility provides the basis for automating map and results production from the Hazus earthquake model. Another development for NLE was to display results data into FlexViewers both inside and outside of FEMA. We benefited from a new real

  4. Multifractal characteristics of NDVI maps in space and time in the Community of Madrid (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotoca, Juan J. Martin; Saa-Requejo, Antonio; Grau, Juan B.; Tarquis, Ana M.

    2015-04-01

    Satellite information has contributed to improve our understanding of the spatial variability of hydro-climatic and ecological processes. Vegetation activity is tightly coupled with climate, hydro-ecological fluxes, and terrain dynamics in river basins at a wide range of space-time scales (Scheuring and Riedi, 1994). Indices of vegetation activity are constructed using satellite information of reflectance of the relevant spectral bands which enhance the contribution of vegetation being Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) widely used. How can we study such a complex system? Multifractals and fractals are related techniques mainly used in physics to characterize the scaling behaviour of a system; they differ in that fractals look at the geometry of presence/absence patterns, while multifractals look at the arrangement of quantities such as population or biomass densities (Saravia et al., 2012). Scaling laws are an emergent general feature of ecological systems; they reflect constraints in their organization that can provide tracks about the underlying mechanisms (Solé and Bascompte, 2006). In this work, we have applied these techniques to study the spatial pattern through one year of NDVI maps. A rectangular area that includes the Community of Madrid and part of the surroundings, consisting of 300 x 280 pixels with a resolution of 500 x 500 m2 has been selected and monthly NDVI maps analyzed using the multifractal spectrum and the map of singularities (Cheng and Agterberg, 1996). The results show a cyclical pattern in the multifractal behaviour and singularity points related to river basin networks (Martín-Sotoca, 2014). References Cheng, Q. and Agterberg, F.P. (1996). Multifractal modeling and spatial statistics. Math. Geol. Vol 28, 1-16. Martín-Sotoca, J.J. (2014) Estructura Espacial de la Sequía en Pastos y sus Aplicaciones en el Seguro Agrario. Master Thesis, UPM (In Spanish). Saravia LA, Giorgi A, Momo F.: Multifractal growth in periphyton

  5. PREFACE: 2nd National Conference on Nanotechnology 'NANO 2008'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czuba, P.; Kolodziej, J. J.; Konior, J.; Szymonski, M.

    2009-03-01

    This issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains selected papers presented at the 2nd National Conference on Nanotechnology 'NANO2008', that was held in Kraków, Poland, 25-28 June 2008. It was organized jointly by the Polish Chemical Society, Polish Physical Society, Polish Vacuum Society, and the Centre for Nanometer-scale Science and Advanced Materials (NANOSAM) of the Jagiellonian University. The meeting presentations were categorized into the following topics: 1. Nanomechanics and nanotribology 2. Characterization and manipulation in nanoscale 3. Quantum effects in nanostructures 4. Nanostructures on surfaces 5. Applications of nanotechnology in biology and medicine 6. Nanotechnology in education 7. Industrial applications of nanotechnology, presentations of the companies 8. Nanoengineering and nanomaterials (international sessions shared with the fellows of Maria-Curie Host Fellowships within the 6th FP of the European Community Project 'Nano-Engineering for Expertise and Development, NEED') 9. Nanopowders 10. Carbon nanostructures and nanosystems 11. Nanoelectronics and nanophotonics 12. Nanomaterials in catalysis 13. Nanospintronics 14. Ethical, social, and environmental aspects of nanotechnology The Conference was attended by 334 participants. The presentations were delivered as 7 invited plenary lectures, 25 invited topical lectures, 78 oral and 108 poster contributions. Only 1/6 of the contributions presented during the Conference were submitted for publication in this Proceedings volume. From the submitted material, this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains 37 articles that were positively evaluated by independent referees. The Organizing Committee gratefully acknowledges all these contributions. We also thank all the referees of the papers submitted for the Proceedings for their timely and thorough work. We would like to thank all members of the National Program Committee for their work in the selection process of

  6. PREFACE: 6th EEIGM International Conference on Advanced Materials Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwat, David; Ayadi, Zoubir; Jamart, Brigitte

    2012-02-01

    The 6th EEIGM Conference on Advanced Materials Research (AMR 2011) was held at the European School of Materials Engineering (EEIGM) on the 7-8 November 2011 in Nancy, France. This biennial conference organized by the EEIGM is a wonderful opportunity for all scientists involved in the EEIGM programme, in the 'Erasmus Mundus' Advanced Materials Science and Engineering Master programme (AMASE) and the 'Erasmus Mundus' Doctoral Programme in Materials Science and Engineering (DocMASE), to present their research in the various fields of Materials Science and Engineering. This conference is also open to other universities who have strong links with the EEIGM and provides a forum for the exchange of ideas, co-operation and future orientations by means of regular presentations, posters and a round-table discussion. This edition of the conference included a round-table discussion on composite materials within the Interreg IVA project '+Composite'. Following the publication of the proceedings of AMR 2009 in Volume 5 of this journal, it is with great pleasure that we present this selection of articles to the readers of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. Once again it represents the interdisciplinary nature of Materials Science and Engineering, covering basic and applicative research on organic and composite materials, metallic materials and ceramics, and characterization methods. The editors are indebted to all the reviewers for reviewing the papers at very short notice. Special thanks are offered to the sponsors of the conference including EEIGM-Université de Lorraine, AMASE, DocMASE, Grand Nancy, Ville de Nancy, Region Lorraine, Fédération Jacques Villermaux, Conseil Général de Meurthe et Moselle, Casden and '+Composite'. Zoubir Ayadi, David Horwat and Brigitte Jamart

  7. FOREWORD: Proceedings of the Nordic Conference on Surface Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessa, V. M.; Nieminen, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    with the presentation at the Conference. There were 20 invited talks, 54 contributed poster papers, and 8 orally presented contributed papers. Of the 82 papers presented at the Conference 48 are included in these proceedings as full papers. The papers are written in the format usual for publication in Physica Scripta. In view of the wide selection and good quality of the papers presented, we believe that these proceedings will be useful not only to the participants but to a wide audience among those interested in surface science and its applications. The Conference was sponsored by the Finnish Physical Society, Academy of Finland, the Finnish Ministry of Education, the Finnish Vacuum Society, the Nordic Institute for Theoretical Atomic Physics (NORDITA), the U.S. Air Force (European Office of Aerospace Research and Development), and Neste Corporation (Finland). We are also grateful to Tampere University of Technology for providing excellent facilities.

  8. Building a panel data set on fuel stations located in the Spanish regional areas of Madrid and Barcelona.

    PubMed

    Balaguer, Jacint; Ripollés, Jordi

    2016-06-01

    The data described in this article were collected daily over the period June 10, 2010, to November 25, 2012, from the website of the Spanish Ministry of Industry, Energy and Tourism. The database includes information about fuel stations regarding to their prices (both gross and net of taxes), brand, location (latitude and longitude), and postal code in the Spanish provinces of Madrid and Barcelona. Moreover, obtaining the postal codes has allowed us to select those stations that are operating within the metropolitan areas of Madrid and Barcelona. By considering those fuel stations that uninterruptedly provided prices during the entire period, the data can be especially useful to explore the dynamics of prices in fuel markets. This is the case of Balaguer and Ripollés (2016), "Asymmetric fuel price responses under heterogeneity" [1], who, taking into account the presence of the potential heterogeneity of the behaviour of fuel stations, used this statistical information to perform an analysis on asymmetric fuel price responses. PMID:26933671

  9. Caresoil: A multidisciplinar Project to characterize, remediate, monitor and evaluate the risk of contaminated soils in Madrid (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Martín, Alfonso; Antón, Loreto; Granja, Jose Luis; Villarroya, Fermín; Montero, Esperanza; Rodríguez, Vanesa

    2016-04-01

    Soil contamination can come from diffuse sources (air deposition, agriculture, etc.) or local sources, these last being related to anthropogenic activities that are potentially soil contaminating activities. According to data from the EU, in Spain, and particularly for the Autonomous Community of Madrid, it can be considered that heavy metals, toxic organic compounds (including Non Aqueous Phases Liquids, NAPLs) and combinations of both are the main problem of point sources of soil contamination in our community. The five aspects that will be applied in Caresoil Program (S2013/MAE-2739) in the analysis and remediation of a local soil contamination are: 1) the location of the source of contamination and characterization of soil and aquifer concerned, 2) evaluation of the dispersion of the plume, 3) application of effective remediation techniques, 4) monitoring the evolution of the contaminated soil and 5) risk analysis throughout this process. These aspects involve advanced technologies (hydrogeology, geophysics, geochemistry,...) that require new developing of knowledge, being necessary the contribution of several researching groups specialized in the fields previously cited, as they are those integrating CARESOIL Program. Actually two cases concerning hydrocarbon spills, as representative examples of soil local contamination in Madrid area, are being studied. The first is being remediated and we are monitoring this process to evaluate its effectiveness. In the second location we are defining the extent of contamination in soil and aquifer to define the most effective remediation technique.

  10. Health Care Austerity Measures in Times of Crisis: The Perspectives of Primary Health Care Physicians in Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Heras-Mosteiro, Julio; Sanz-Barbero, Belén; Otero-Garcia, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The current financial crisis has seen severe austerity measures imposed on the Spanish health care system, including reduced public spending, copayments, salary reductions, and reduced services for undocumented migrants. However, the impacts have not been well-documented. We present findings from a qualitative study that explores the perceptions of primary health care physicians in Madrid, Spain. This article discusses the effects of austerity measures implemented in the public health care system and their potential impacts on access and utilization of primary health care services. This is the first study, to our knowledge, exploring the health care experiences during the financial crisis of general practitioners in Madrid, Spain. The majority of participating physicians disapproved of austerity measures implemented in Spain. The findings of this study suggest that undocumented migrants should regain access to health care services; copayments should be minimized and removed for patients with low incomes; and health care professionals should receive additional help to avoid burnout. Failure to implement these measures could result in the quality of health care further deteriorating and could potentially have long-term negative consequences on population health. PMID:26825100

  11. Testing sky brightness models against radial dependency: A dense two dimensional survey around the city of Madrid, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamorano, J.; Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Ocaña, F.; Pila-Díez, B.; Gómez Castaño, J.; Pascual, S.; Tapia, C.; Gallego, J.; Fernández, A.; Nievas, M.

    2016-09-01

    We present a study of the night sky brightness around the extended metropolitan area of Madrid using Sky Quality Meter (SQM) photometers. The map is the first to cover the spatial distribution of the sky brightness in the centre of the Iberian peninsula. These surveys are necessary to test the light pollution models that predict night sky brightness as a function of the location and brightness of the sources of light pollution and the scattering of light in the atmosphere. We describe the data-retrieval methodology, which includes an automated procedure to measure from a moving vehicle in order to speed up the data collection, providing a denser and wider survey than previous works with similar time frames. We compare the night sky brightness map to the nocturnal radiance measured from space by the DMSP satellite. We find that (i) a single source model is not enough to explain the radial evolution of the night sky brightness, despite the predominance of Madrid in size and population and (ii) that the orography of the region should be taken into account when deriving geo-specific models from general first-principles models. We show the tight relationship between these two luminance measures. This finding sets up an alternative roadmap to extended studies over the globe that will not require the local deployment of photometers or trained personnel.

  12. Mercury in air and plant specimens in herbaria: a pilot study at the MAF Herbarium in Madrid (Spain).

    PubMed

    Oyarzun, R; Higueras, P; Esbrí, J M; Pizarro, J

    2007-11-15

    We present data from a study of mercury concentrations in air and plant specimens from the MAF Herbarium in Madrid (Spain). Hg (gas) emissions from old plant collections treated with mercuric chloride (HgCl(2)) in herbaria may pose a health risk for staff working in installations of this type. This is an issue not yet properly addressed. Plants that underwent insecticide treatment with HgCl(2) at the MAF Herbarium until the mid 1970s have persistent high concentrations of Hg in the range 1093-11,967 microg g(-1), whereas untreated specimens are in the range of 1.2-4.3 microg g(-1). The first group induces high concentrations of Hg (gas) in the main herbarium room, with seasonal variations of 404-727 ng m(-3) (late winter) and 748-7797 ng m(-3) (early summer) (baseline for Hg: 8 ng m(-3)). A test survey at another herbarium in Madrid showed even higher concentrations of Hg (gas) above 40,000 ng m(-3). The World Health Organization guidelines for chronic exposure to Hg (gas) are estimated at a maximum of 1000 ng m(-3). While staff was aware of the existence of HgCl(2) treated plants (the plant specimen sheets are labelled as 'poisoned'), they had no knowledge of the presence of high Hg (gas) concentrations in the buildings, a situation that may be relatively common in herbaria. PMID:17590416

  13. Seismic-reflection profiles of the New Madrid seismic zone-data along the Mississippi River near Caruthersville, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crone, A.J.; Harding, S.T.; Russ, D.P.; Shedlock, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    Three major seismic-reflection programs have been conducted by the USGS in the New Madrid seismic zone. The first program consisted of 32 km of conventional Vibroseis profiling designed to investigate the subsurface structure associated with scarps and lineaments in northwestern Tennessee (Zoback, 1979). A second, more extensive Vibroseis program collected about 250 km of data from all parts of the New Madrid seismic zone in Missouri, Arkansas, and Tennessee (Hamilton and Zoback, 1979, 1982; Zoback and others, 1980). The profiles presented here are part of the third program that collected about 240 km of high-resolution seismic-reflection data from a boat along the Mississippi River between Osceola, Ark., and Wickliffe, Ky. (fig. 1). The data for profiles A, B, C, and D were collected between river miles 839-1/2 and 850-1/2 from near the Interstate-155 bridge to upstream of Caruthersville, Mo. (fig. 2). Profiles on this part of the river are important for three reasons: (1) they connect many of the land-based profiles on either side of the river, (2) they are near the northeast termination of a linear, 120km-long, northeast-southwest zone of seismicity that extends from northeast Arkansas to Caruthersville, Mo. (Stauder, 1982; fig. 1), and (3) they cross the southwesterly projection of the Cottonwood Grove fault (fig. 1), a fault having a substantial amount of vertical Cenozoic offset (Zoback and others, 1980).

  14. Landscape response to the intentional use of the Birds Point New Madrid Floodway on May 3, 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londoño, Ana C.; Hart, Megan L.

    2013-05-01

    During the spring of 2011 massive, coalescing storm fronts in the upper Mississippi, and Ohio River basins caused extreme weather conditions that flooded the bottleneck section of the Mississippi River in the vicinity of Cairo, IL. In order to alleviate the volume of floodwaters acting on downstream levees and to stop flooding near Cairo, IL, the US Army Corps. of Engineers activated the Birds Point New Madrid Floodway by intentionally breaching the Birds Point Levee, releasing floodwaters onto active agricultural fields. The impacts of floodwater on the landscape were regionally significant. Concentrated erosion generated deep scour holes, rills, and gullies in localized areas of the floodway. Inflow and outflow of waters formed large deposits of sands and gravels. Sand sheets of a few centimeters to a meter thick blanketed the vicinity of the impacted areas, and in some cases sand accumulations exhibited current ripples indicating multiple flow directions. This study directly addresses geomorphic changes in the New Madrid Floodway resulting from activation and the diversion of floodwaters from the Mississippi River. Results from this study can be used along with other field data to conduct a thorough flood damage assessment that includes the costs associated with geomorphic alteration within the floodway.

  15. Phylogenetic Analysis of Rubella Virus Strains from an Outbreak in Madrid, Spain, from 2004 to 2005 ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Torres, A. O.; Mosquera, M. M.; Sanz, J. C.; Ramos, B.; Echevarría, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    An outbreak of rubella affected 460 individuals in 2004 and 2005 in the community of Madrid, Spain. Most of the patients were nonvaccinated Latin American immigrants or Spanish males. This study presents the first data on rubella virus genotypes in Spain. Forty selected clinical samples (2 urine, 5 serum, 3 blood, 2 saliva, and 28 pharyngeal exudate samples) from 40 cases were collected. The 739-nucleotide sequence recommended by the World Health Organization obtained from viral RNA in these samples was analyzed by using the MEGA v4.0 software. Seventeen isolates were obtained from 40 clinical samples from the outbreak, including two isolated from congenital rubella syndrome cases. Only viral RNA of genotype 1j was detected in both isolates and clinical specimens. Two variations in amino acids, G253C and T394S, which are involved in neutralization epitopes arose during the outbreak, but apparently there was no positive selection of either of them. The origin of the outbreak remains unknown because of poor virologic surveillance in Latin America and the African countries neighboring Spain. On the other hand, this is the first report of this genotype in Europe. The few published sequences of genotype 1j indicate that it comes from Japan and the Philippines, but there are no epidemiological data supporting this as the origin of the Madrid outbreak. PMID:19020066

  16. Building a panel data set on fuel stations located in the Spanish regional areas of Madrid and Barcelona

    PubMed Central

    Balaguer, Jacint; Ripollés, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    The data described in this article were collected daily over the period June 10, 2010, to November 25, 2012, from the website of the Spanish Ministry of Industry, Energy and Tourism. The database includes information about fuel stations regarding to their prices (both gross and net of taxes), brand, location (latitude and longitude), and postal code in the Spanish provinces of Madrid and Barcelona. Moreover, obtaining the postal codes has allowed us to select those stations that are operating within the metropolitan areas of Madrid and Barcelona. By considering those fuel stations that uninterruptedly provided prices during the entire period, the data can be especially useful to explore the dynamics of prices in fuel markets. This is the case of Balaguer and Ripollés (2016), “Asymmetric fuel price responses under heterogeneity” [1], who, taking into account the presence of the potential heterogeneity of the behaviour of fuel stations, used this statistical information to perform an analysis on asymmetric fuel price responses. PMID:26933671

  17. El barrio de la Chueca of Madrid, Spain: an emerging epicenter of the global LGBT civil rights movement.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Omar; Dodge, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine and deconstruct the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) barrio (community) of Chueca in Madrid, Spain, from political and sociological perspectives. First, we develop a critical framework for understanding the historical, political, social, cultural, and economic changes that took place in Spain after Franco's death in relation to LGBT issues. Ethnographic research was conducted from May to July 2007 in the Spanish cities of Madrid, Barcelona, and Ibiza, and focused primarily on the community of Chueca. A social constructionist perspective was used to examine sociocultural issues in this ethnosexual community through an in-depth study of the dynamics of this barrio. The theoretical framework of intersectionality and the constitutive relations among social identities is exemplified in Chueca. Hence, individuals in Chueca and their intersectionality perspective reveal that their identities influence and shape their beliefs about gender and symbols. We describe how Chueca reflects recent progressive changes in LGBT-related laws and statutes drafted by the federal government and how these have influenced the high level of societal acceptance toward intimate same-sex relationships in Spain. Additionally, we exemplify and present Chueca as an enclave that has been affected by the globalization of the private market, "gay" identity, and enterprise, having a direct effect on cultural norms and social behaviors. Last, we examine the current state of the Chueca community relative to other developing LGBT Latino/a communities in the United States. PMID:20390991

  18. The controversial early brightening in the first half of 20th century: A contribution from pyrheliometer measurements in Madrid (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antón, M.; Vaquero, J. M.; Aparicio, A. J. P.

    2014-04-01

    A long-term decrease in downward surface solar radiation from the 1950s to the 1980s ("global dimming") followed by a multi-decadal increase up to the present ("brightening") has been detected in many regions worldwide. In addition, some researchers have suggested the existence of an "early brightening" period in the first half of the 20th century. However, this latter phenomenon is an open issue due to the opposite results found in literature and the scarcity of solar radiation data during this period. This paper contributes to this relevant discussion analyzing, for the first time in Southern Europe, the atmospheric column transparency derived from pyrheliometer measurements in Madrid (Spain) for the period 1911-1928. This time series is one of the three longest datasets during the first quarter of the 20th century in Europe. The results showed the great effects of the Katmai eruption (June 1912, Alaska) on transparency values during 1912-1913 with maximum relative anomalies around 8%. Outside the period affected by this volcano, the atmospheric transparency exhibited a stable behavior with a slight negative trend without any statistical significance on an annual and seasonal basis. Overall, there is no evidence of a possible early brightening period in direct solar radiation in Madrid. This phenomenon is currently an open issue and further research is needed using the few sites with available experimental records during the first half of the 20th century.

  19. Recognizing and dating prehistoric liquefaction features: Lessons learned in the New Madrid seismic zone, central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuttle, M.P.; Schweig, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    The New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ), which experienced severe liquefaction during the great New Madrid, Missouri, earthquakes of 1811 and 1812 as well as during several prehistoric earthquakes, is a superb laboratory for the study of world-class, arthquake-induced liquefaction features and their use in paleoseismology. In seismically active regions like the NMSZ, frequent large earthquakes can produce a complex record of liquefaction events that is difficult to interpret. Lessons learned studying liquefaction features in the NMSZ may help to unravel the paleoseismic record in other seismically active regions. Soil characteristics of liquefaction features, as well as their structural and sratigraphic relations to Native American occupation horizons and other cultural features, an help to distinguish prehistoric liquefaction features from historic features. In addition, analyses of artifact assemblages and botanical content of cultural horizons can help to narrow the age ranges of liquefaction features. Future research should focus on methods for defining source areas and estimating magnitudes of prehistoric earthquakes from liquefaction features. Also, new methods for dating liquefaction features are needed.

  20. Non-destructive analyses on a meteorite fragment that fell in the Madrid city centre in 1896.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Guinea, Javier; Tormo, Laura; Rubio Ordoñez, Alvaro; Garcia-Moreno, Olga

    2013-09-30

    The historical Madrid meteorite chondrite fell in 1896 showing thin melt veins with a 65% of brecciated forsterite fragments surrounded by a fine grained matrix formed by troilite, chromite and Fe-Ni blebs. It exhibits a delicate iron infill, neo-formation of troilite in pockets and shock veins and neo-formation of Na-feldspar formed at high temperature and fast quenching. The semi-quantitative mineral determinations were performed with IMAGEJ freeware and chemical mappings resulting in the following approximated compositions: olivine (~55%); augite (~10%); enstatite (~10%); plagioclase (~10%); chromite (~2%); troilite (~4%), kamacite-taenite α-γ-(Fe, Ni) (~7%) and merrillite (~7%). The specimen was also studied by computer tomography, micro-Raman spectroscopy and spectral cathodoluminescence. X-ray diffraction patterns were also recorded in non-destructive way on a polished surface because of the small size of the specimen. This combination of non-destructive techniques provides an improved knowledge on the Madrid-1896 meteorite compared to the previous study performed on the same specimen carried out twenty years ago by electron probe microanalysis and optical microscopy in destructive way. Limits of these techniques are the specimen's size in the analytical chambers and the threshold resolution of the microscopes analyzing shock veins micro-crystals. PMID:23953455

  1. Measuring the impact of pollution on property prices in Madrid: objective versus subjective pollution indicators in spatial models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mínguez, Román; Montero, José-María; Fernández-Avilés, Gema

    2013-04-01

    Much work has been done in the context of the hedonic price theory to estimate the impact of air quality on housing prices. Research has employed objective measures of air quality, but only slightly confirms the hedonic theory in the best of cases: the implicit price function relating housing prices to air pollution will, ceteris paribus, be negatively sloped. This paper compares the performance of a spatial Durbin model when using both objective and subjective measures of pollution. On the one hand, we design an Air Pollution Indicator based on measured pollution as the objective measure of pollution. On the other hand, the subjective measure of pollution employed to characterize neighborhoods is the percentage of residents who declare that the neighborhood has serious pollution problems, the percentage being referred to as residents' perception of pollution. For comparison purposes, the empirical part of this research focuses on Madrid (Spain). The study employs a proprietary database containing information about the price and 27 characteristics of 11,796 owner-occupied single family homes. As far as the authors are aware, it is the largest database ever used to analyze the Madrid housing market. The results of the study clearly favor the use of subjective air quality measures.

  2. Conference Report: 21st Power and Energy Society Annual Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goda, Tadahiro; Iba, Kenji

    The 21st Power and Energy Society Annual Conference was held on September 1-3, 2010 at Kyushu University. The total number of technical papers was 376, and technical sessions were 53 (52 oral sessions and 1 poster session). An invited lecture, a panel discussion, technical exhibitions and two technical tours were organized. All events were very well attended and the final enrollment attained to 969 registrations. The conference was successfully closed by the great contribution of all participants. The outline of the conference is reported in this article.

  3. Conference Report: 20th Power and Energy Society Annual Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Satoshi; Takao, Tomoaki

    The 20th Power and Energy Society Annual Conference was held on August 18-20, 2009 at Shibaura Institute of Technology. The total number of technical papers was 352, and technical sessions were 47 (46 oral sessions and 1 poster session). An invited lecture, a panel discussion, technical exhibitions and two technical tours were organized. All events were very well attended and the final enrollment attained to 881 registrations. The conference was successfully closed by the great contribution of all participants. The outline of the conference is reported in this article.

  4. Conference Report: Power and Energy Society Annual Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorino, Naoto; Mori, Hiroyuki

    The 19th Power & Energy Society Annual Conference was held on September 24-26, 2008 at Hiroshima University. The total number of technical papers was 415 and 53 sessions (52 oral sessions and 1 poster session) were organized. A panel discussion, a special lecture, technical exhibitions and technical tours were also organized. All events were very well attended and the final enrollment attained to 954 registrations. The conference has been successfully closed by the great contribution of all participants. In this article, the outline of the conference is reported.

  5. Computational Biology Support: RECOMB Conference Series (Conference Support)

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Waterman

    2006-06-15

    This funding was support for student and postdoctoral attendance at the Annual Recomb Conference from 2001 to 2005. The RECOMB Conference series was founded in 1997 to provide a scientific forum for theoretical advances in computational biology and their applications in molecular biology and medicine. The conference series aims at attracting research contributions in all areas of computational molecular biology. Typical, but not exclusive, the topics of interest are: Genomics, Molecular sequence analysis, Recognition of genes and regulatory elements, Molecular evolution, Protein structure, Structural genomics, Gene Expression, Gene Networks, Drug Design, Combinatorial libraries, Computational proteomics, and Structural and functional genomics. The origins of the conference came from the mathematical and computational side of the field, and there remains to be a certain focus on computational advances. However, the effective use of computational techniques to biological innovation is also an important aspect of the conference. The conference had a growing number of attendees, topping 300 in recent years and often exceeding 500. The conference program includes between 30 and 40 contributed papers, that are selected by a international program committee with around 30 experts during a rigorous review process rivaling the editorial procedure for top-rate scientific journals. In previous years papers selection has been made from up to 130--200 submissions from well over a dozen countries. 10-page extended abstracts of the contributed papers are collected in a volume published by ACM Press and Springer, and are available at the conference. Full versions of a selection of the papers are published annually in a special issue of the Journal of Computational Biology devoted to the RECOMB Conference. A further point in the program is a lively poster session. From 120-300 posters have been presented each year at RECOMB 2000. One of the highlights of each RECOMB conference is a

  6. Teaching European Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raento, Pauliina

    2008-01-01

    The political, cultural and social make-up of Europe is changing fast. A new European identity is under construction, but old contradictions and diversity challenge its contents, forms and boundaries. Migration, the changing role of the nation-state and Europe's regions, the reshaping of politico-administrative and perceptional boundaries, the…

  7. The European VLBI network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schilizzi, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    The capabilities of the European very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) network are summarized. The range of baseline parameters, sensitivities, and recording and other equipment available are included. Plans for upgrading the recording facilities and the use of geostationary satellites for signal transfer and clock synchronization are discussed.

  8. Multilingualism in European Workplaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunnarsson, Britt-Louise

    2014-01-01

    This state-of-the-art article includes a review of past and recent studies on multilingualism at work in European environments. One aim is to provide the reader with a cross-cultural picture of workplace studies on various languages in Europe, another to discuss both positive and problem-based accounts of multilingualism at work. The overview…

  9. European Civilization. Teacher's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leppert, Ella C.; Halac, Dennis

    The instructional materials in this teaching guide for Course II, Unit IV, follow and build upon a previous sequential course described in SO 003 169 offering ninth grade students a study on the development of Western European Civilization. Focus is upon four periods of high development: The High Middle Ages (12th Century), The Renaissance (15th…

  10. 33rd Actinide Separations Conference

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, L M; Wilk, P A

    2009-05-04

    Welcome to the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference hosted this year by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This annual conference is centered on the idea of networking and communication with scientists from throughout the United States, Britain, France and Japan who have expertise in nuclear material processing. This conference forum provides an excellent opportunity for bringing together experts in the fields of chemistry, nuclear and chemical engineering, and actinide processing to present and discuss experiences, research results, testing and application of actinide separation processes. The exchange of information that will take place between you, and other subject matter experts from around the nation and across the international boundaries, is a critical tool to assist in solving both national and international problems associated with the processing of nuclear materials used for both defense and energy purposes, as well as for the safe disposition of excess nuclear material. Granlibakken is a dedicated conference facility and training campus that is set up to provide the venue that supports communication between scientists and engineers attending the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference. We believe that you will find that Granlibakken and the Lake Tahoe views provide an atmosphere that is stimulating for fruitful discussions between participants from both government and private industry. We thank the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the United States Department of Energy for their support of this conference. We especially thank you, the participants and subject matter experts, for your involvement in the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference.

  11. PREFACE: The Irago Conference 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Adarsh; Okada, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    The Irago Conference 2012 - 360 degree outlook on critical scientific and technological challenges for a sustainable society Organized by the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS) at Toyohashi University of Technology, the Irago Conference, held recently (15-16 November) in Aichi, Japan, aimed to enhance mutual understanding between scientists, engineers and policymakers. Over 180 participants tackled topics ranging from energy and natural resources to public health and disaster prevention. The 360-degree outlook of the conference impressed speakers and guests. ''This conference has been extremely informative,'' noted Robert Gellar from the University of Tokyo. ''A unique conference with experts from a range of backgrounds,'' agreed Uracha Ruktanonchai from the National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC) in Thailand. Similarly, G P Li, professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of California Irvine commented that he had been ''able to think the unthinkable'' as a range of topics came together. The conference was streamed live on Ustream to ensure that researchers from across the world could benefit from thought-provoking presentations examining global issues such as energy, disaster mitigation and nanotechnology. ''This was wonderful,'' said Oussama Khatib from Stanford University, ''A good recipe of speakers from such a range of backgrounds.'' Manuscripts submitted to the organizers were peer-reviewed, and the papers in this proceedings were accepted for Journal of Physics: Conference Series. In addition to the formal speaker programme, graduate-student sessions provided a platform for graduate students to describe their latest findings as oral presentations. A series of excursions to relevant locations, such as the Tahara megasolar region under construction and a local car-manufacturing factory, gave participants the opportunity to further consider practical applications of their research in industry

  12. PREFACE: 3rd International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSQUARE 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-01-01

    The third International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSQUARE) took place at Madrid, Spain, from Thursday 28 to Sunday 31 August 2014. The Conference was attended by more than 200 participants and hosted about 350 oral, poster, and virtual presentations. More than 600 pre-registered authors were also counted. The third IC-MSQUARE consisted of different and diverging workshops and thus covered various research fields where Mathematical Modeling is used, such as Theoretical/Mathematical Physics, Neutrino Physics, Non-Integrable Systems, Dynamical Systems, Computational Nanoscience, Biological Physics, Computational Biomechanics, Complex Networks, Stochastic Modeling, Fractional Statistics, DNA Dynamics, Macroeconomics etc. The scientific program was rather heavy since after the Keynote and Invited Talks in the morning, three parallel oral sessions and one poster session were running every day. However, according to all attendees, the program was excellent with high level of talks and the scientific environment was fruitful, thus all attendees had a creative time. We would like to thank the Keynote Speaker and the Invited Speakers for their significant contribution to IC-MSQUARE. We also would like to thank the Members of the International Advisory and Scientific Committees as well as the Members of the Organizing Committee.

  13. PREFACE: International Conference on Magnetism (ICM 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goll, Gernot; Löhneysen, Hilbert v.; Loidl, Alois; Pruschke, Thomas; Richter, Manuel; Schultz, Ludwig; Sürgers, Christoph; Wosnitza, Jochen

    2010-11-01

    helped to run the conference. We are grateful for financial support to Universität Karlsruhe (TH) and Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (both institutions merged to form the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) as of 1 October 2009), International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), the City of Karlsruhe, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German National Science Foundation) and the European Commission through COST MPNS Action P16. Hilbert v Löhneysen Karlsruhe Institute of Technology Email address: hilbert.loehneysen@kit.edu Logo Conference Organization Chairperson Hilbert v Löhneysen, Karlsruhe Members of IUPAP Commission 9 Magnetism C Chang, TaipeiD Kaczorowski, Wroclaw khrouhou, SfaxP H Kes, Leiden M A Continentino, NiteróiS Maekawa, Sendai D E Dahlberg, MinnesotaI Mertig, Halle D Fiorani, RomaD McMorow, London M R Freeman, EdmontonS Rezende, Recife D Givord, GrenobleS Sanvito, Dublin A Granovsky, MoscowJ Xiaofeng, Shanghai International Advisory Board G Aeppli, UKM Gingras, Canada I Affleck, CanadaJ C Gomez Sal, Spain J Akimitsu, JapanP A Grünberg, Germany D Awschalom, USAB Heinrich, Canada S D Bader, USAT J Hicks, Australia E Baggio-Saitovitch, BrazilM R Ibarra, Spain M N Baibich, BrazilY H Jeong, Korea G Baskaran, IndiaB Keimer, Germany E Bauer, AustriaG Kotliar, USA R J Birgeneau, USAR B Laughlin, USA P Bruno, GermanyP A Lee, USA J Chapman, UKG G Lonzarich, UK Y Endoh, JapanA MacDonald, USA A Fert, FranceM B Maple, USA J Fink, GermanyA J Millis, USA Z Fisk, USAL W Molenkamp, Germany J Flouquet, FranceJ A Mydosh, Germany A J Freeman, USAY Maeno, Japan H Fukuyama, JapanK Miyake, Japan P Fulde, GermanyP Nordblad, Sweden H Ohno, JapanF Steglich, Germany H R Ott, SwitzerlandT Takabatake, Japan Y Onuki, JapanJ L Tholence, France S S P Parkin, USAY Tokura, Japan A P Ramirez, USAK Ueda, Japan T M Rice, SwitzerlandD Vollhardt, Germany Z X Shen, USAE F Wassermann, Germany S -C Shin, KoreaM K Wu, Taiwan T Shinjo, JapanD Y Xing, China J C Slonczewski, USAY D Yao

  14. DOE Workshop at Tapia Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Valerie

    2015-02-19

    The DE-SC0013568 DOE Grant, in the amount of $11,822.79, was used to support five doctoral students from underrepresented groups to attend the 2015 Richard Tapia Celebration of Diversity in Computing Conference, held February 18-21 in Boston, MA. Each scholarship was approximately $1200 to cover conference registration, travel, and lodging for the duration of the conference. The remaining $5,822.79 was used to support a DOE Breakfast Workshop during breakfast on Thursday, February 19. The Breakfast supported approximately 140 graduate students from underrepresented groups to learn about the different career opportunities at the different DOE National Laboratories.

  15. Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Poe, C.C. Jr.; Harris, C.E.

    1995-10-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at the Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference in Hampton, Virginia, December 6-8, 1994. This conference was the culmination of a 3-year program that was initiated by NASA late in 1990 to develop mechanics of textile composites in support of the NASA Advanced Composites Technology Program (ACT). The goal of the program was to develop mathematical models of textile preform materials and test methods to facilitate structural analysis and design. Participants in the program were from NASA, academia, and industry. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the database for articles from this conference.

  16. Topical conference: Opportunities in biology for physicists. Conference summary

    SciTech Connect

    2002-12-16

    The conference was aimed at early career physicists who were interested in exploring the possibilities of working at the interface between physics and biology, in particular, graduate students and postdocs considering applying the methods of physics to biological research. Areas of major importance were genomics and evolution, biological networks, biomolecular dynamics, high-resolution imaging of living cells, and technologies for biological investigation. A total of 205 persons attended the conference.

  17. Workplan for European Centre for Environment and Health: Report on a Working Group (Rome, Italy, October 29-31, October 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    After the European Charter on Environment and Health was approved at the Minsterial Conference in Frankfurt-am-Main, in December 1989, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Italian Government covened a working group to study the desirability and feasibility of setting up a European Centre on Environment and Health (ECEH). The main purpose of…

  18. Beyond Access. Diversity and Opportunity in Higher Education. Proceedings of the Annual European Access Network (EAN) Convention (5th, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, July 1-3, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Bie, Marloes, Ed.; Derks, Bas, Ed.; Suikjer, Firiel, Ed.

    This proceedings presents papers given at a 1996 European conference on access to higher education. Following two introductory papers are the following 13 plenary session papers: "A European Perspective" (James Wimberley); "An American Perspective--Diversity in American Higher Education and U.S. Federal Policy" (Tom Wolanin); "An Eastern European…

  19. Scientists attack European MRI rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Margaret

    2010-08-01

    A report by the European Science Foundation (ESF) has sharply criticized a European Union (EU) directive on electromagnetic fields, arguing that limits on workers' exposure will have "potentially disastrous" consequences for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

  20. Proceedings of the Seventh International Space University Alumni Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    The Seventh Alumni Conference of the International Space University, coordinated by the ISU U.S. Alumni Organization (IUSAO), was held at Cleveland State University in Cleveland, Ohio on Friday, July 24, 1998. These proceedings are a record of the presentations. The following topics are included: Remote sensing education in developing countries; Integrated global observing strategy; NASA's current earth science program; Europe's lunar initiative; Lunarsat: Searching for the South Polar cold traps; Asteroid hazards; ESA exobiological activities; Space testbed for photovoltaics; Teledesic Space infrastructure; Space instrument's concurrent design; NASA advanced fuel program; Mission preparation and training for the European Robotic Arm (ERA); and Global access to remote sensing systems.