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Sample records for eutectic salt mixtures

  1. CATALYTIC GASIFICATION OF COAL USING EUTECTIC SALT MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This progress report on the Department of Energy project DE-FG-97FT97263 entitled, ''Catalytic Gasification of Coal Using Eutectic Salt Mixtures,'' covers the period April-September 1998. The specific aims of the project for this period were to identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for the gasification of Illinois No.6 coal, evaluate various impregnation or catalyst addition methods to improve catalyst dispersion, and evaluate gasification performance in a bench-scale fixed bed reactor. The project is being conducted jointly by Clark Atlanta University (CAU), the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) and the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) with CAU as the prime contractor. Several single salt catalysts and binary and ternary eutectic catalysts were investigated at Clark Atlanta University. Physical mixing and incipient wetness methods were investigated as catalyst addition techniques. Gasification was carried out using TGA at CAU and UTSI and with a fixed-bed reactor at UTSI. The results showed better gasification activity in the presence of the catalysts tested. The eutectic salt studies showed clear agreement between the melting points of the prepared eutectics and reported literature values. The order of catalytic activity observed was ternary > binary > single salt. With the soluble single salt catalysts, the incipient wetness method was found to give better results than physical mixing technique. Also, catalyst preparation conditions such as catalyst loading, drying time and temperature were found to influence the gasification rate. Based on the Clark Atlanta University studies on Task 1, the project team selected the 43.5%Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-31.5%Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-25%K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} ternary eutectic and the 29%Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-71%K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and 2.3%KNO{sub 3}-97.7%K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} binary eutectic for the fixed bed studies at UTSI. The eutectic salts were found to be highly insoluble in aqueous medium. As a result the technique of adding the eutectic to the raw coal was found to be better than using wet methods. Also, addition of the catalyst to the raw coal appeared to give better gasification results than addition to pyrolyzed coal. In addition, eutectic catalysts added to the coal yielded better gasification rates than rates obtained by mixing the individual salts in the eutectic ratio with the coal. These results, especially with the eutectic catalysts are very significant since the use of the low melting eutectics will reduce the severity of gasification processes.

  2. CATALYTIC GASIFICATION OF COAL USING EUTECTIC SALT MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    2000-04-01

    This progress report on the Department of Energy project DE-FG-97FT97263 entitled, ''Catalytic Gasification of Coal Using Eutectic Salt Mixtures'', covers the period April-September 1998. The specific aims of the project for this period were to identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for the gasification of Illinois No.6 coal, evaluate various impregnation or catalyst addition methods to improve catalyst dispersion, and evaluate gasification performance in a bench-scale fixed bed reactor. The project is being conducted jointly by Clark Atlanta University (CAU), the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) and the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) with CAU as the prime contractor. Several single salt catalysts and binary and ternary eutectic catalysts were investigated at Clark Atlanta University. Physical mixing and incipient wetness methods were investigated as catalyst addition techniques. Gasification was carried out using TGA at CAU and UTSI and with a fixed-bed reactor at UTSI. The results showed better gasification activity in the presence of the catalysts tested. The eutectic salt studies showed clear agreement between the melting points of the prepared eutectics and reported literature values. The order of catalytic activity observed was ternary > binary > single salt. With the soluble single salt catalysts, the incipient wetness method was found to give better results than physical mixing technique. Also, catalyst preparation conditions such as catalyst loading, drying time and temperature were found to influence the gasification rate. Based on the Clark Atlanta University studies on Task 1, the project team selected the 43.5%Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-31.5%Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-25%K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} ternary eutectic and the 29%Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-71%K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and 2.3% KNO{sub 3}-97.7%K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} binary eutectic for the fixed bed studies at UTSI. The eutectic salts were found to be highly insoluble in aqueous medium. As a result the technique of adding the eutectic to the raw coal was found to be better than using wet methods. Also, addition of the catalyst to the raw coal appeared to give better gasification results than addition to pyrolyzed coal. In addition, eutectic catalysts added to the coal yielded better gasification rates than rates obtained by mixing the individual salts in the eutectic ratio with the coal. These results, especially with the eutectic catalysts are very significant since the use of the low melting eutectics will reduce the severity of gasification processes.

  3. Catalytic Gasification of Coal using Eutectic Salt Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Atul Sheth; Pradeep Agrawal; Yaw D. Yeboah

    1998-12-04

    The objectives of this study are to: identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for coal gasification; assess agglomeration tendency of catalyzed coal; evaluate various catalyst impregnation techniques to improve initial catalyst dispersion; evaluate effects of major process variables (such as temperature, system pressure, etc.) on coal gasification; evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts; and conduct an analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process. A review of the collected literature was carried out. The catalysts which have been used for gasification can be roughly classified under the following five groups: alkali metal salts; alkaline earth metal oxides and salts; mineral substances or ash in coal; transition metals and their oxides and salts; and eutectic salt mixtures. Studies involving the use of gasification catalysts have been conducted. However, most of the studies focused on the application of individual catalysts. Only two publications have reported the study of gasification of coal char in CO2 and steam catalyzed by eutectic salt mixture catalysts. By using the eutectic mixtures of salts that show good activity as individual compounds, the gasification temperature can be reduced possibly with still better activity and gasification rates due to improved dispersion of the molten catalyst on the coal particles. For similar metal/carbon atomic ratios, eutectic catalysts were found to be consistently more active than their respective single salts. But the exact roles that the eutectic salt mixtures play in these are not well understood and details of the mechanisms remain unclear. The effects of the surface property of coals and the application methods of eutectic salt mixture catalysts with coal chars on the reactivity of gasification will be studied. Based on our preliminary evaluation of the literature, a ternary eutectic salt mixture consisting of Li- Na- and K- carbonates has the potential as gasification catalyst. To verify the literature reported, melting points for various compositions consisting of these three salts and the temperature range over which the mixture remained molten were determined in the lab. For mixtures with different concentrations of the three salts, the temperatures at which the mixtures were found to be in complete molten state were recorded. By increasing the amount of Li2CO3, the melting temperature range was reduced significantly. In the literature, the eutectic mixtures of Li- Na- and K-carbonates are claimed to have a lower activation energy than that of K2CO3 alone and they remain molten at a lower temperature than pure K2CO3. The slow increase in the gasification rates with eutectics reported in the literature is believed to be due to a gradual penetration of the coals and coal char particles by the molten and viscous catalyst phase. The even spreading of the salt phase seems to increase the overall carbon conversion rate. In the next reporting period, a number of eutectic salts and methods of their application on the coal will be identified and tested.

  4. CATALYTIC GASIFICATION OF COAL USING EUTECTIC SALT MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    1999-10-01

    This is the progress report for the DOE grant DE-FG26-97FT97263 entitled, ''Catalytic Gasification of Coal Using Eutectic Salt Mixtures'' for the period April 1999 to October 1999. The project is being conducted jointly by Clark Atlanta University, the University of Tennessee Space Institute and Georgia Institute of Technology. The overall objectives of the project are to identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for coal gasification; assess agglomeration tendency of catalyzed coal; evaluate various catalyst impregnation techniques to improve initial catalyst dispersion; evaluate effects of major process variables (such as temperature and system pressure) on coal gasification; evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts; and conduct thorough analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process. During this reporting period, free swelling index measurements of the coal, fixed-bed gasification experiments, kinetic modeling of the catalyzed gasification, and X-ray diffraction analysis of catalyst and gasified char samples were undertaken. The gasification experiments were carried out using two different eutectic salt mixtures of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (LNK) system and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (NK) system. The gasification process followed a Langmuir-Hinshelwood type model. At 10 wt% of catalyst loading, the activation energy of the ternary catalyst system (LNK) was about half (98kJ/mol) the activation energy of the single catalyst system (K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}), which is about 170 kJ/ mole. The binary catalyst system (NK) showed activation energy of about 201 kJ/mol, which is slightly higher, compared to the K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} catalyst system. The ternary catalyst system was a much better eutectic catalyst system compared to the binary or single catalyst system. In general, a eutectic with a melting point less than the gasification temperature is a better substitute to the single alkali metal salts because they have good catalyst distribution and dispersion in the carbon matrix. The free selling index of the coal was about 1.5 (1 to 2) in comparison to 2.5 (2 to 3) for the coal samples with ternary eutectic. The results for the raw coal were consistent with those from the Penn State Coal Bank. The XRD characterization showed unidentified peaks in the spectra of some of the samples and require further studies to draw any conclusions at the point.

  5. CATALYTIC GASIFICATION OF COAL USING EUTECTIC SALT MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1999-04-01

    The project, ''Catalytic Gasification of Coal Using Eutectic Salt Mixtures'', is being conducted jointly by Clark Atlanta University (CAU), the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) and the Georgia Institute of Technology (GT). The aims of the project are to: identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for the gasification of Illinois No.6 coal; evaluate various impregnation or catalyst addition methods to improve catalyst dispersion; evaluate effects of major process variables (e.g., temperature, system pressure, etc.) on coal gasification; evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts in a bench-scale fixed bed reactor; and conduct thorough analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process. The eutectic catalysts increased gasification rate significantly. The methods of catalyst preparation and addition had significant effect on the catalytic activity and coal gasification. The incipient wetness method gave more uniform catalyst distribution than that of physical mixing for the soluble catalysts resulting in higher gasification rates for the incipient wetness samples. The catalytic activity increased by varying degrees with catalyst loading. The above results are especially important since the eutectic catalysts (with low melting points) yield significant gasification rates even at low temperatures. Among the ternary eutectic catalysts studied, the system 39% Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-38.5% Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-22.5% Rb{sub 2}CO{sub 3} showed the best activity and will be used for further bench scale fixed-bed gasification reactor in the next period. Based on the Clark Atlanta University studies in the previous reporting period, the project team selected the 43.5% Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-31.5% Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-25% K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} ternary eutectic and the 29% Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-71% K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} binary eutectic for the fixed-bed studies at UTSI during this reporting period. Temperature was found to have a significant effect on the rate of gasification of coal. The rate of gasification increased up to 1400 F. Pressure did not have much effect on the gasification rates. The catalyst loading increased the gasification rate and approached complete conversion when 10 wt% of catalyst was added to the coal. Upon further increasing the catalyst amount to 20-wt% and above, there was no significant rise in gasification rate. The rate of gasification was lower for a 2:1 steam to char molar ratio (60%) compared to gasification rates at 3.4:1 molar ratio of steam-to-char where the conversion approached 100%. The characterization results of Georgia Tech are very preliminary and inconclusive and will be made available in the next report.

  6. CATALYTIC GASIFICATION OF COAL USING EUTECTIC SALT MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Yaw D. Yeboah; Dr. Yong Xu; Dr. Atul Sheth; Dr. Pradeep Agrawal

    2001-12-01

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) estimates that by the year 2010, 40% or more of U.S. gas supply will be provided by supplements including substitute natural gas (SNG) from coal. These supplements must be cost competitive with other energy sources. The first generation technologies for coal gasification e.g. the Lurgi Pressure Gasification Process and the relatively newer technologies e.g. the KBW (Westinghouse) Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, U-Gas Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, British Gas Corporation/Lurgi Slagging Gasifier, Texaco Moving-Bed Gasifier, and Dow and Shell Gasification Processes, have several disadvantages. These disadvantages include high severities of gasification conditions, low methane production, high oxygen consumption, inability to handle caking coals, and unattractive economics. Another problem encountered in catalytic coal gasification is deactivation of hydroxide forms of alkali and alkaline earth metal catalysts by oxides of carbon (CO{sub x}). To seek solutions to these problems, a team consisting of Clark Atlanta University (CAU, a Historically Black College and University, HBCU), the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) and Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) proposed to identify suitable low melting eutectic salt mixtures for improved coal gasification. The research objectives of this project were to: Identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for coal gasification; Assess agglomeration tendency of catalyzed coal; Evaluate various catalyst impregnation techniques to improve initial catalyst dispersion; Determine catalyst dispersion at high carbon conversion levels; Evaluate effects of major process variables (such as temperature, system pressure, etc.) on coal gasification; Evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts; and Conduct an analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process.

  7. Emulsification Of Eutectic Salt Mixtures In Fluid Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderhoff, J. W.; El-Aasser, M. S.; Hawkins, T. W.

    1988-05-01

    High-internal-phase-volume emulsions of 75 volt 3/18/79 potassium iodide/sodium iodide/ urea model eutectic salt mixture in 83.5/16.5 Sartomer R-45HT hydroxy-terminated polybutadi-ene/Nujol mineral oil binder mixture were prepared at 60C using water-in-oil emulsifiers and cured with isophorone diisocyanate or Desmodur N-100. The Nujol mineral oil enhanced the emulsification with a negligible reduction in the tensile properties of the cured elastomer. The average emulsion droplet sizes were ca. 200 nm initially, but increased slowly during curing to 500-1000 nm. The coalescence of the emulsion droplets followed the second-order dependence predicted by the von Smoluchowski diffusion-controlled flocculation; the rate constants were 1.05x10-18 and 9.58x10-18 cc/droplet-sec for dirnethyldioctadecylammonium bromide and Span 85 sorbitan trioleate, respectively. The isophorone diisocyanate reacted with emulsifiers containing primary hydroxyl or amine groups, to give unstable emulsions or no emulsions at all. Dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide with no primary hydroxyl or amine groups, however, did not react with isocyanates and gave stable emulsions. The reaction of the R-45HT hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene with isophorone diisocyanate followed the expec-ted second-order kinetics with a rate constant of 3.42x10-4 liters/mole-sec at 60C. The tensile properties of the cured elastomers and emulsions generally increased with increasing NCO/OH ratio up to 1.6/1.0. With increasing volume fraction of dispersed phase, the maximum stress (tensile strength) decreased, the maximum strain (percent elongation) increased, and the initial modulus (tensile modulus) decreased, in contrast to the behavior of conventional filled polymer systems; however, the maximum stresses were in accord with theoretical values for a filled polymer in which the filler particles bear no load, the initial moduli were in accord with the predictions of an isostrain model, and the maximum strain increased with in-creasing volume fraction of dispersed phase; these unusual variations, which were attributed to the liquid nature of the emulsion droplets, were used to estimate the elastomer proper-ties required to give the desired properties: 60-100 psi maximum stress, 80-150% maximum strain, and 500-2000 psi initial modulus for an 88/12 eutectic salt/crosslinked polybutadi-ene composite containing 20% aluminum particles. The addition of 20% aluminum particles gave a modest improvement in tensile properties, and the addition of 2.5% or 3.5% submicroscopic carbon black particles gave a greater improvement; however, the tensile properties were still slightly short of the desired properties.

  8. CATALYTIC GASIFICATION OF COAL USING EUTECTIC SALT MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Atul Sheth; Chandramouli Sastry

    2001-03-31

    Most of the tasks on the project have successfully been completed and reported. A 12 month no-cost extension has been requested to complete the remaining tasks. This report summarizes the accomplishments of the first six months of the no-cost extensions period. The acetic acid extraction showed that acetic acid has more effect on the extraction of the ternary catalyst (LNK) ions than water. Based on the extraction results, the order of the recovery capability of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} using acetic acid, sulfuric acid and water extractions is sulfuric acid {ge} acetic acid > water; the order for K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} is sulfuric acid > water >acetic acid; and the order for Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} is acetic acid > sulfuric acid >water. A process flowsheet for the catalyst recovery process was proposed based on the results. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies showed most of the particles (coal) appear amorphous. Some coal particles are as large as 50-60 {micro}m, but most are smaller. One can also easily see a few crystalline particles (10-20 {micro}m) with sharp facets and corners. The electron micrographs of gasified char samples (reactor-aged) of the LNKcoal mixture showed that a dramatic change is obvious in the morphology and crystallinity of the sample and is consistent with the results obtained from the x-ray diffraction studies. XRD studies of reactor-aged samples showed a substantial increase in the sample crystallinity (due to the gasification of amorphous carbon). The eutectic salt presumably mostly converted to sulfates.

  9. Molten salt eutectics from atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Saivenkataraman; Thompson, Aidan P.; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole

    2011-09-01

    Despite their importance for solar thermal power applications, phase-diagrams of molten salt mixture heat transfer fluids (HTFs) are not readily accessible from first principles. We present a molecular dynamics scheme general enough to identify eutectics of any HTF candidate mixture. The eutectic mixture and temperature are located using the liquid mixture free energy and the pure component solid-liquid free energy differences. The liquid mixture free energy is obtained using thermodynamic integration over particle identity transmutations sampled with molecular dynamics at a single temperature. Drawbacks of conventional phase diagram mapping methodologies are avoided by not considering solid mixtures, thereby evading expensive computations of solid phase free energies. Numerical results for binary and ternary mixtures of alkali nitrates agree well with experimental measurements.

  10. Novel binary deep eutectic electrolytes for rechargeable Li-ion batteries based on mixtures of alkyl sulfonamides and lithium perfluoroalkylsulfonimide salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiculescu, O. E.; DesMarteau, D. D.; Creager, S. E.; Haik, O.; Hirshberg, D.; Shilina, Y.; Zinigrad, E.; Levi, M. D.; Aurbach, D.; Halalay, I. C.

    2016-03-01

    Ionic liquids (IL's) were proposed for use in Li-ion batteries (LIBs), in order to mitigate some of the well-known drawbacks of LiPF6/mixed organic carbonates solutions. However, their large cations seriously decrease lithium transference numbers and block lithium insertion sites at electrode-electrolyte interfaces, leading to poor LIB rate performance. Deep eutectic electrolytes (DEEs) (which share some of the advantages of ILs but possess only one cation, Li+), were then proposed, in order to overcome the difficulties associated with ILs. We report herein on the preparation, thermal properties (melting, crystallization, and glass transition temperatures), transport properties (specific conductivity and viscosity) and thermal stability of binary DEEs based on mixtures of lithium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide or lithium bis(fluoro)sulfonimide salts with an alkyl sulfonamide solvent. Promise for LIB applications is demonstrated by chronoamperometry on Al current collectors, and cycling behavior of negative and positive electrodes. Residual current densities of 12 and 45 nA cm-2 were observed at 5 V vs. Li/Li+ on aluminum, 1.5 and 16 nA cm-2 at 4.5 V vs. Li/Li+, respectively for LiFSI and LiTFSI based DEEs. Capacities of 220, 130, and 175 mAh· g-1 were observed at low (C/13 or C/10) rates, respectively for petroleum coke, LiMn1/3Ni1/3Co1/3O2 (a.k.a. NMC 111) and LiAl0.05Co0.15Ni0.8O2 (a.k.a. NCA).

  11. Thermodynamic Assessment of Hot Corrosion Mechanisms of Superalloys Hastelloy N and Haynes 242 in Eutectic Mixture of Molten Salts KF and ZrF4

    SciTech Connect

    Michael V. Glazoff

    2012-02-01

    The KF - ZrF4 system was considered for the application as a heat exchange agent in molten salt nuclear reactors (MSRs) beginning with the work carried out at ORNL in early fifties. Based on a combination of excellent properties such as thermal conductivity, viscosity in the molten state, and other thermo-physical and rheological properties, it was selected as one of possible candidates for the nuclear reactor secondary heat exchanger loop.

  12. Anthracene + Pyrene Solid Mixtures: Eutectic and Azeotropic Character

    PubMed Central

    Rice, James W.; Fu, Jinxia; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2010-01-01

    To better characterize the thermodynamic behavior of a binary polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon mixture, thermochemical and vapor pressure experiments were used to examine the phase behavior of the anthracene (1) + pyrene (2) system. A solid-liquid phase diagram was mapped for the mixture. A eutectic point occurs at 404 K at x1 = 0.22. A model based on eutectic formation can be used to predict the enthalpy of fusion associated with the mixture. For mixtures that contain x1 < 0.90, the enthalpy of fusion is near that of pure pyrene. This and X-ray diffraction results indicate that mixtures of anthracene and pyrene have pyrene-like crystal structures and energetics until the composition nears that of pure anthracene. Solid-vapor equilibrium studies show that mixtures of anthracene and pyrene form solid azeotropes at x1 of 0.03 and 0.14. Additionally, mixtures at x1 = 0.99 sublime at the vapor pressure of pure anthracene, suggesting that anthracene behavior is not significantly influenced by x2 = 0.01 in the crystal structure. PMID:21116474

  13. Anthracene + Pyrene Solid Mixtures: Eutectic and Azeotropic Character.

    PubMed

    Rice, James W; Fu, Jinxia; Suuberg, Eric M

    2010-09-01

    To better characterize the thermodynamic behavior of a binary polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon mixture, thermochemical and vapor pressure experiments were used to examine the phase behavior of the anthracene (1) + pyrene (2) system. A solid-liquid phase diagram was mapped for the mixture. A eutectic point occurs at 404 K at x(1) = 0.22. A model based on eutectic formation can be used to predict the enthalpy of fusion associated with the mixture. For mixtures that contain x(1) < 0.90, the enthalpy of fusion is near that of pure pyrene. This and X-ray diffraction results indicate that mixtures of anthracene and pyrene have pyrene-like crystal structures and energetics until the composition nears that of pure anthracene. Solid-vapor equilibrium studies show that mixtures of anthracene and pyrene form solid azeotropes at x(1) of 0.03 and 0.14. Additionally, mixtures at x(1) = 0.99 sublime at the vapor pressure of pure anthracene, suggesting that anthracene behavior is not significantly influenced by x(2) = 0.01 in the crystal structure. PMID:21116474

  14. Assessment of plant toxicity threshold of several heat transfer and storage fluids and eutectic salts

    SciTech Connect

    Nishita, H.

    1980-10-01

    Plant toxicity threshold levels of several heat transfer and storage fluids and eutectic salts were determined by using a modified Neubauer technique. Barley seed germination and seedling growth were used for the toxicity tests. The general order of toxicity of the fluids applied to three mineral soils was ethylene gloycol > Dow 200 much greater than Caloria HT43 > Therminol 66. The toxicity order of the fluids applied to an organic soil was ethylene glycol > Caloria HT43 > Dow 200 > Therminol 66. Thus, Therminol 66 was the least toxic among the fluids used. Among the eutectic salts tested Dupont HITEC was more toxic than 8.4 percent NaCl-86.3 percent NaNO/sub 3/-5.3 percent Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ mixture in three of the four soils used. In the fourth soil there was no apparent difference of toxicity between the two salt mixtures. Depending on the fluid and the salt mixture, the toxicity threshold levels for barley seedlings ranged from 4451 to 317,488 ppM in the soils used.

  15. Purification of used eutectic (LiCl-KCl) salt electrolyte from pyroprocessing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yung-Zun; Lee, Tae-Kyo; Eun, Hee-Chul; Choi, Jung-Hoon; Kim, In-Tae; Park, Geun-Il

    2013-06-01

    The separation characteristics of surrogate rare-earth fission products in a eutectic (LiCl-KCl) molten salt were investigated. This system is based on the eutectic salt used for the pyroprocessing treatment of used nuclear fuel (UNF). The investigation was performed using an integrated rare-earth separation apparatus comprising a precipitation reactor, a solid detachment device, and a layer separation device. To separate rare-earth fission products, a phosphate precipitation method using both Li3PO4 and K3PO4 as a precipitant was performed. The use of an equivalent phosphate precipitant composed of 0.408 molar ratio-K3PO4 and 0.592 molar ratio-Li3PO4 can preserve the original eutectic ratio, LiCl-0.592 molar ratio (or 45.2 wt%), as well as provide a high separation efficiency of over 99.5% under conditions of 550 C and Ar sparging when using La, Nd, Ce, and Pr chlorides. The mixture of La, Nd, Ce, and Pr phosphate had a typical monoclinic (or monazite) structure, which has been proposed as a reliable host matrix for the permanent disposal of a high-level waste form. To maximize the reusability of purified eutectic waste salt after rare-earth separation, the successive rare-earth separation process, which uses both phosphate precipitation and an oxygen sparging method, were introduced and tested with eight rare-earth (Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu and Gd) chlorides. In the successive rare-earth separation process, the phosphate reaction was terminated within 1 h at 550 C, and a 4-8 h oxygen sparging time were required to obtain over a 99% separation efficiency at 700-750 C. The mixture of rare-earth precipitates separated by the successive rare-earth separation process was found to be phosphate, oxychloride, and oxide. Through the successive rare-earth separation process, the eutectic ratio of purified salt maintained its original value, and impurity content including the residual precipitant of purified salt can be minimized.

  16. Synthesis of discrete aluminophosphate -CLO nanocrystals in a eutectic mixture.

    PubMed

    Tao, Shuo; Xu, Renshun; Li, Xiaolei; Li, Dawei; Ma, Huaijun; Wang, Donge; Xu, Yunpeng; Tian, Zhijian

    2015-08-01

    Extra-large-pore aluminophosphate -CLO (i.e., DNL-1) nanocrystals were synthesized in a eutectic mixture composed of diethylamine hydrochloride (DEAC) and ethylene glycol (EG) with 1-methylimidazole (1-MIm) as an additional amine using both conventional and microwave heating. The effects of the synthesis parameters, such as the amount of 1-MIm and the P/Al ratio, on the formation of DNL-1 nanocrystals were studied. The products were characterized using a variety of techniques. XRD, DLS, SEM and TEM results indicate that the as-synthesized DNL-1 nanocrystals have good crystallinity and narrow particle size distributions, and their average particle size was controlled in the 100-220nm range by simply adjusting the amount of 1-MIm. TG-DSC and N2 adsorption analyses reveal that the as-synthesized DNL-1 nanocrystals exhibit good thermal stability and the calcined samples possess high BET surface areas and large pore volumes. In addition, the cooperative structure-directing effects of 1-MIm and the eutectic mixture cation (DEA(+)) in the formation of DNL-1 nanocrystals were discussed. PMID:25897847

  17. Bonding of sapphire to sapphire by eutectic mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deluca, J. J. (inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An element comprising sapphire, ruby or blue sapphire can be bonded to another element of such material with a eutectic mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide. The bonding mixture may be applied in the form of a distilled water slurry or by electron beam vapor deposition. In one embodiment the eutectic is formed in situ by applying a layer of zirconium oxide and then heating the assembly to a temperature above the eutectic temperature and below the melting point of the material from which the elements are formed. The formation of a sapphire rubidium maser cell utilizing eutectic bonding is shown.

  18. Bonding of sapphire to sapphire by eutectic mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deluca, J. J. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    Bonding of an element comprising sapphire, ruby or blue sapphire to another element of such material with a eutectic mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide is discussed. The bonding mixture may be applied in the form of a distilled water slurry or by electron beam vapor deposition. In one embodiment the eutectic is formed in situ by applying a layer of zirconium oxide and then heating the assembly to a temperature above the eutectic temperature and below the melting point of the material from which the elements are formed. The formation of a sapphire rubidium maser cell utilizing eutectic bonding is shown.

  19. Deep Eutectic Salt Formulations Suitable as Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Raade, Justin; Roark, Thomas; Vaughn, John; Bradshaw, Robert

    2013-07-22

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities are comprised of many miles of fluid-filled pipes arranged in large grids with reflective mirrors used to capture radiation from the sun. Solar radiation heats the fluid which is used to produce steam necessary to power large electricity generation turbines. Currently, organic, oil-based fluid in the pipes has a maximum temperature threshold of 400 °C, allowing for the production of electricity at approximately 15 cents per kilowatt hour. The DOE hopes to foster the development of an advanced heat transfer fluid that can operate within higher temperature ranges. The new heat transfer fluid, when used with other advanced technologies, could significantly decrease solar electricity cost. Lower costs would make solar thermal electricity competitive with gas and coal and would offer a clean, renewable source of energy. Molten salts exhibit many desirable heat transfer qualities within the range of the project objectives. Halotechnics developed advanced heat transfer fluids (HTFs) for application in solar thermal power generation. This project focused on complex mixtures of inorganic salts that exhibited a high thermal stability, a low melting point, and other favorable characteristics. A high-throughput combinatorial research and development program was conducted in order to achieve the project objective. Over 19,000 candidate formulations were screened. The workflow developed to screen various chemical systems to discover salt formulations led to mixtures suitable for use as HTFs in both parabolic trough and heliostat CSP plants. Furthermore, salt mixtures which will not interfere with fertilizer based nitrates were discovered. In addition for use in CSP, the discovered salt mixtures can be applied to electricity storage, heat treatment of alloys and other industrial processes.

  20. Insight into the Li2CO3-K2CO3 eutectic mixture from classical molecular dynamics: Thermodynamics, structure, and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Corradini, Dario; Coudert, François-Xavier; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe

    2016-03-14

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the thermodynamics, structure, and dynamics of the Li2CO3-K2CO3 (62:38 mol. %) eutectic mixture. We present a new classical non-polarizable force field for this molten salt mixture, optimized using experimental and first principles molecular dynamics simulations data as reference. This simple force field allows efficient molecular simulations of phenomena at long time scales. We use this optimized force field to describe the behavior of the eutectic mixture in the 900-1100 K temperature range, at pressures between 0 and 5 GPa. After studying the equation of state in these thermodynamic conditions, we present molecular insight into the structure and dynamics of the melt. In particular, we present an analysis of the temperature and pressure dependence of the eutectic mixture's self-diffusion coefficients, viscosity, and ionic conductivity. PMID:26979697

  1. Estimated heats of fusion of fluoride salt mixtures suitable for thermal energy storage applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, A. K.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The heats of fusion of several fluoride salt mixtures with melting points greater than 973 K were estimated from a coupled analysis of the available thermodynamic data and phase diagrams. Simple binary eutectic systems with and without terminal solid solutions, binary eutectics with congruent melting intermediate phases, and ternary eutectic systems were considered. Several combinations of salts were identified, most notable the eutectics LiF-22CaF2 and NaF-60MgF2 which melt at 1039 and 1273 K respectively which posses relatively high heats of fusion/gm (greater than 0.7 kJ/g). Such systems would seemingly be ideal candidates for the light weight, high energy storage media required by the thermal energy storage unit in advanced solar dynamic power systems envisioned for the future space missions.

  2. Eutectic Salt Catalyzed Environmentally Benign and Highly Efficient Biginelli Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Najmadin; Dezfuli, Sahar; Hahsemi, Mohmmad Mahmoodi

    2012-01-01

    A simple deep eutectic solvent based on tin (II) chloride was used as a dual catalyst and environmentally benign reaction medium for an efficient synthesis of 3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-one derivatives, from aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes, 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds, and urea in good-to-excellent yields and short reaction time. This simple ammonium deep eutectic solvent, easily synthesized from choline chloride and tin chloride, is relatively inexpensive and recyclable, making it applicable for industrial applications. PMID:22649326

  3. Development of high temperature transport technology for LiCl-KCl eutectic salt in pyroprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung Ho; Lee, Hansoo; Kim, In Tae; Kim, Jeong-Guk

    2013-07-01

    The development of high-temperature transport technologies for molten salt is a prerequisite and a key issue in the industrialization of pyro-reprocessing for advanced fuel cycle scenarios. The solution of a molten salt centrifugal pump was discarded because of the high corrosion power of a high temperature molten salt, so the suction pump solution was selected. An apparatus for salt transport experiments by suction was designed and tested using LiC-KCl eutectic salt. The experimental results of lab-scale molten salt transport by suction showed a 99.5% transport rate (ratio of transported salt to total salt) under a vacuum range of 100 mtorr - 10 torr at 500 Celsius degrees. The suction system has been integrated to the PRIDE (pyroprocessing integrated inactive demonstration) facility that is a demonstrator using non-irradiated materials (natural uranium and surrogate materials). The performance of the suction pump for the transport of molten salts has been confirmed.

  4. Preparation of eutectic substrate mixtures for enzymatic conversion of ATC to L-cysteine at high concentration levels.

    PubMed

    Youn, Sung Hun; Park, Hae Woong; Choe, Deokyeong; Shin, Chul Soo

    2014-06-01

    High concentration eutectic substrate solutions for the enzymatic production of L-cysteine were prepared. Eutectic melting of binary mixtures consisting of D,L-2-amino-Δ(2)-thiazoline-4-carboxylic acid (ATC) as a substrate and malonic acid occurred at 39 °C with an ATC mole fraction of 0.5. Formation of eutectic mixtures was confirmed using SEM, SEM-EDS, and XPS surface analyses. Sorbitol, MnSO4, and NaOH were used as supplements for the enzymatic reactions. Strategies for sequential addition of five compounds, including a binary ATC mixture and supplements, during preparation of eutectic substrate solutions were established. Eutectic substrate solutions were stable for 24 h. After 6 h of enzymatic reactions, a 550 mM L-cysteine yield was obtained from a 670 mM eutectic ATC solution. PMID:24249216

  5. Densities of some molten fluoride salt mixtures suitable for heat storage in space power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1988-01-01

    Liquid densities were determined for a number of fluoride salt mixtures suitable for heat storage in space power applications, using a procedure that consisted of measuring the loss of weight of an inert bob in the melt. The density apparatus was calibrated with pure LiF and NaF at different temperatures. Density data for safe binary and ternary fluoride salt eutectics and congruently melting intermediate compounds are presented. In addition, a comparison was made between the volumetric heat storage capacity of different salt mixtures.

  6. Ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents in natural products research: mixtures of solids as extraction solvents.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yuntao; van Spronsen, Jaap; Witkamp, Geert-Jan; Verpoorte, Robert; Choi, Young Hae

    2013-11-22

    Mixtures of solid chemicals may become liquid under certain conditions. These liquids are characterized by the formation of strong ionic (ionic liquids) or hydrogen bonds (deep eutectic solvents). Due to their extremely low vapor pressure, they are now widely used in polymer chemistry and synthetic organic chemistry, yet little attention has been paid to their use as extraction solvents of natural products. This review summarizes the preparation of ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents with natural product components and recent progress in their applications to the extraction and analysis of natural products as well as the recovery of extracted compounds from their extracts. Additionally, various factors affecting extraction features of ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents, as well as potential useful technologies including microwave and ultrasound to increase the extraction efficiency, are discussed. PMID:24188074

  7. A novel group of quaternary ammonium salts as ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrow, Christopher R.

    2011-12-01

    A growing number of non-toxic and biodegradable deep eutectic solvents (DES) have been discovered in recent years. This group encompasses the solidified crystalline material 3-(2-aminopyrimidin-1-yl)propanoate (3-2AP), a primary ammonium cation that is a construct of a typical DES. Synthesis of 3-(2-aminopyrimidin-1-yl)propanoate by quarternerization of the amine in the aromatic ring creates a novel deep eutectic solvent. An additional alteration to the DES construct is observed with the formation of a zwitterion between the positively charged quartenary amine group and the negatively charged carboxylate counter ion. The molecular arrangement, or construct, of a deep eutectic solvent will determine both its structure and application in industry. This report describes the synthesis and characterization of an 80:20 urea/3-2AP eutectic mixture with a melting point of 50C, nearly 120C lower than the melting temperature of 3-2AP (172.5C). A cytotoxicity profile for 3-2AP exposed to A549 bronchoaveolar carcinoma cells revealed an LD50 of 337.65 mug/ml.

  8. Molecular and ionic diffusion in aqueous - deep eutectic solvent mixtures: probing inter-molecular interactions using PFG NMR.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, Carmine; Gladden, Lynn F; Mantle, Mick D; Abbott, Andrew P; Ahmed, Essa I; Al-Murshedi, Azhar Y M; Harris, Robert C

    2015-06-21

    Pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR has been used to probe self-diffusion of molecular and ionic species in aqueous mixtures of choline chloride (ChCl) based deep eutectic solvents (DESs), in order to elucidate the effect of water on motion and inter-molecular interactions between the different species in the mixtures, namely the Ch(+) cation and hydrogen bond donor (HBD). The results reveal an interesting and complex behaviour of such mixtures at a molecular level. In general, it is observed that the hydroxyl protons ((1)H) of Ch(+) and the hydrogen bond donor have diffusion coefficients significantly different from those measured for their parent molecules when water is added. This indicates a clear and significant change in inter-molecular interactions. In aqueous Ethaline, the hydroxyl species of Ch(+) and HBD show a stronger interaction with water as water is added to the system. In the case of Glyceline, water has little effect on both hydroxyl proton diffusion of Ch(+) and HBD. In Reline, it is likely that water allows the formation of small amounts of ammonium hydroxide. The most surprising observation is from the self-diffusion of water, which is considerably higher that expected from a homogeneous liquid. This leads to the conclusion that Reline and Glyceline form mixtures that are inhomogeneous at a microscopic level despite the hydrophilicity of the salt and HBD. This work shows that PFG NMR is a powerful tool to elucidate both molecular dynamics and inter-molecular interactions in complex liquid mixtures, such as the aqueous DES mixtures. PMID:25994171

  9. Preparation and valuation of a topical solution containing eutectic mixture of itraconazole and phenol.

    PubMed

    Park, Chun-Woong; Kim, Ju-Young; Rhee, Yun-Seok; Oh, Tack-Oon; Ha, Jung-Myung; Choi, Na-Young; Chi, Sang-Cheol; Park, Eun-Seok

    2012-11-01

    The purposes of this study were to prepare a topical solution containing itraconazole (ITR)-phenol eutectic mixture and to evaluate its ex vivo skin permeation, in vivo deposition and in vivo irritation. The eutectic mixture was prepared by agitating ITR and phenol (at a weight ratio of 1:1) together at room temperature. The effects of additives on the skin permeation of ITR were evaluated using excised hairless mouse skin. The in vivo skin deposition and skin irritation studies were performed in Sprague-Dawley rat and New Zealand white rabbit model. The permeability coefficient of ITR increased with addition of oleic acid in the topical solution. Otherwise, the permeability coefficient was inversely proportional to the concentration of the thickening agent, HPMC. The optimized topical solution contained 9 wt% of the ITR-phenol eutectic mixture, 9.0 wt% of oleic acid, 5.4 wt% of hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose and 76.6 wt% of benzyl alcohol. The steady-state flux and permeability coefficient of the optimized topical solution were 0.90 0.20 ?g/cm(2)h and 22.73 5.73 10(6) cm/h, respectively. The accumulated of ITR in the epidermis and dermis at 12 h was 49.83 9.02 ?g/cm(2). The topical solution did not cause irritation to the skins of New Zealand white rabbits. Therefore, the findings of this study indicate the possibilities for the topical application of ITR via an external preparation. PMID:23212635

  10. Zero-gravity growth of a sodium chloride-lithium fluoride eutectic mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, A. S.; Yeh, C. W.; Yue, B. K.

    1982-01-01

    Continuous and discontinuous lithium fluoride fibers embedded in a sodium chloride matrix were produced in space and on Earth, respectively. The production of continuous fibers in a eutectic mixture was attributed to the absence of convective current in the liquid during solidification in space. Image transmission and optical transmittance measurements of transverse sections of the space-grown and Earth-grown ingots were made with a light microscope and a spectrometer. It was found that better optical properties were obtained from samples grown in space. This was attributed to a better alignment of lithium fluoride fibers along the growth direction.

  11. Charge transport and structural dynamics in carboxylic-acid-based deep eutectic mixtures.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Philip J; Cosby, Tyler; Holt, Adam P; Benson, Roberto S; Sangoro, Joshua R

    2014-08-01

    Charge transport and structural dynamics in the 1:2 mol ratio mixture of lidocaine and decanoic acid (LID-DA), a model deep eutectic mixture (DEM), have been characterized over a wide temperature range using broad-band dielectric spectroscopy and depolarized dynamic light scattering. Additionally, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements were performed to assess the degree of proton transfer between the neutral parent molecules. From our detailed analysis of the dielectric spectra, we have determined that this carboxylic-acid-based DEM is approximately 25% ionic at room temperature. Furthermore, we have found that the characteristic diffusion rate of mobile charge carriers is practically identical to the rate of structural relaxation at all measured temperatures, indicating that fast proton transport does not occur in LID-DA. Our results demonstrate that while LID-DA exhibits the thermal characteristics of a DEM, its charge transport properties resemble those of a protic ionic liquid. PMID:25025600

  12. Mass-transfer characteristics of nitrate-based salt mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devan, J. H.; Tortorelli, P. F.

    1981-03-01

    Molten eutectic NaNO3-KNO3 was being circulated in three thermal convection loops constructed of alloy 800 and types 304L and 316 stainless steel. The loops were operated at a maximum salt temperature of 595 C and a salt temperature differential of 235 C. Corrosion specimens contained within each loop were withdrawn for periodic determinations of weight and microstructural changes. Salt samples were analyzed at selected intervals to monitor changes in the composition of the salt. Controlled potential voltammetry was also used. Results indicate low corrosion rates for the austenitic stainless steels in flowing NaNO3-KNO3.

  13. Materials corrosion in molten lithium fluoride-sodium fluoride-potassium fluoride eutectic salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Luke Christopher

    Static corrosion studies were undertaken to determine the compatibility of several candidate high temperature materials for a heat transfer loop in a molten alkali fluoride eutectic salt, LiF-NaF-KF: 46.5-11.5-42 mol % (commonly referred to as FLiNaK), as well as a molten chloride near eutectic salt, KCl-MgCl2: 68-32 mol %. Several high temperature alloys: Hastelloy-N, Hastelloy-X, Haynes-230, Inconel-617, and Incoloy-800H, Nb-1Zr, a nearly pure Ni alloy Ni-201, and a C/SiSiC ceramic were exposed to molten FLiNaK at 850°C for 500 h in sealed graphite crucibles under an argon cover gas. Corrosion occurred predominantly from dealloying of Cr from the Cr bearing alloys, an effect that was particularly pronounced at the grain boundaries. Corrosion was noted to occur from selective attack of the Si phase in the C/SiSiC ceramic. Alloy weight-loss/area due to molten fluoride salt exposure correlated with the initial Cr-content of the alloys, and was consistent with the Cr-content measured in the salts after corrosion tests. The alloys' weight-loss/area was also found to correlate to the concentration of carbon present in the nominally 20% Cr containing alloys, due to the formation of chromium carbide phases at the grain boundaries. The corrosion mechanisms for the chloride based salt were found to be similar to those observed in FLiNaK, but the chemical attack was found to be less aggressive. Sulfamate Ni electroplating and Mo plasma spraying of Fe-Ni-Cr alloy coupons was investigated to mitigate Cr dissolution. A chemical vapor deposited pyrolytic carbon and SiC coating was also investigated to protect the C/SiSiC composites. Results indicate that Ni-plating has the potential to provide protection against alloy corrosion in molten fluoride salts. Furthermore, the presence of a chromium-oxide interlayer at the interface of the Ni-plating and alloy substrate can further improve the efficacy of the Ni-plating. The pyrolytic carbon and SiC coating on the C/SiSiC composites was effective in eliminating the attack of the Si phase in the composites. Delamination of the Mo coating in FLiNaK prevented further investigation of this promising approach.

  14. Predicting viscosities of aqueous salt mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Zaltash, A.; Ally, M.R.

    1992-12-01

    Viscosity plays an important role in quantifying heat and mass transfer rates as depicted in theoretical and semi-empirical correlations. In practical problems where extreme temperatures and solute concentrations are encountered, viscosity data is usually unavailable. At these conditions, no dependable correlation appears to exist in the literature. This paper uses the hole type model to predict the viscosity of aqueous electrolytes containing single and mixed salts up to the molten salt regime. This model needs two parameters which can be evaluated from sparse data. For LiBr/water and (Li, K, na) NO{sub 3}/water mixtures, it is shown that the agreement between predicted and experimental values is very good over wide temperature and concentration ranges. The deviation between these two values was found to be less than 9%.

  15. Predicting viscosities of aqueous salt mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Zaltash, A.; Ally, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    Viscosity plays an important role in quantifying heat and mass transfer rates as depicted in theoretical and semi-empirical correlations. In practical problems where extreme temperatures and solute concentrations are encountered, viscosity data is usually unavailable. At these conditions, no dependable correlation appears to exist in the literature. This paper uses the hole type model to predict the viscosity of aqueous electrolytes containing single and mixed salts up to the molten salt regime. This model needs two parameters which can be evaluated from sparse data. For LiBr/water and (Li, K, na) NO[sub 3]/water mixtures, it is shown that the agreement between predicted and experimental values is very good over wide temperature and concentration ranges. The deviation between these two values was found to be less than 9%.

  16. Study on a regeneration process of LiCl-KCl eutectic based waste salt generated from the pyrochemical process

    SciTech Connect

    Eun, H.C.; Cho, Y.Z.; Choi, J.H.; Kim, J.H.; Lee, T.K.; Park, H.S.; Kim, I.T.; Park, G.I.

    2013-07-01

    A regeneration process of LiCl-KCl eutectic waste salt generated from the pyrochemical process of spent nuclear fuel has been studied. This regeneration process is composed of a chemical conversion process and a vacuum distillation process. Through the regeneration process, a high efficiency of renewable salt recovery can be obtained from the waste salt and rare earth nuclides in the waste salt can be separated as oxide or phosphate forms. Thus, the regeneration process can contribute greatly to a reduction of the waste volume and a creation of durable final waste forms. (authors)

  17. An optimal method for phosphorylation of rare earth chlorides in LiCl-KCl eutectic based waste salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eun, H. C.; Kim, J. H.; Cho, Y. Z.; Choi, J. H.; Lee, T. K.; Park, H. S.; Park, G. I.

    2013-11-01

    A study on an optimal method for the phosphorylation of rare earth chlorides in LiCl-KCl eutectic waste salt generated the pyrochemical process of spent nuclear fuel was performed. A reactor with a pitched four blade impeller was designed to create a homogeneous mixing zone in LiCl-KCl eutectic salt. A phosphorylation test of NdCl3 in the salt was carried out by changing the operation conditions (operation temperature, stirring rate, agent injection amount). Based on the results of the test, a proper operation condition (450 C, 300 rpm, 1 eq. of phosphorylation agent) for over a 0.99 conversion ratio of NdCl3 to NdPO4 was determined. Under this condition, multi-component rare earth (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Y) chlorides were effectively converted into phosphate forms. It was confirmed that the existing regeneration process of LiCl-KCl eutectic waste salt can be greatly improved and simplified through these phosphorylation test results.

  18. Characterization and comparison of lidocaine-tetracaine and lidocaine-camphor eutectic mixtures based on their crystallization and hydrogen-bonding abilities.

    PubMed

    Gala, Urvi; Chuong, Monica C; Varanasi, Ravi; Chauhan, Harsh

    2015-06-01

    Eutectic mixtures formed between active pharmaceutical ingredients and/or excipients provide vast scope for pharmaceutical applications. This study aimed at the exploration of the crystallization abilities of two eutectic mixtures (EM) i.e., lidocaine-tetracaine and lidocaine-camphor (1:1 w/w). Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) for degradation behavior whereas modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry (MTDSC) set in first heating, cooling, and second heating cycles, was used to qualitatively analyze the complex exothermic and endothermic thermal transitions. Raman microspectroscopy characterized vibrational information specific to chemical bonds. Prepared EMs were left at room temperature for 24 h to visually examine their crystallization potentials. The degradation of lidocaine, tetracaine, camphor, lidocaine-tetracaine EM, and lidocaine-camphor EM began at 196.56, 163.82, 76.86, 146.01, and 42.72C, respectively, which indicated that eutectic mixtures are less thermostable compared to their individual components. The MTDSC showed crystallization peaks for lidocaine, tetracaine, and camphor at 31.86, 29.36, and 174.02C, respectively (n?=?3). When studying the eutectic mixture, no crystallization peak was observed in the lidocaine-tetracaine EM, but a lidocaine-camphor EM crystallization peak was present at 18.81C. Crystallization occurred in lidocaine-camphor EM after being kept at room temperature for 24 h, but not in lidocaine-tetracaine EM. Certain peak shifts were observed in Raman spectra which indicated possible interactions of eutectic mixture components, when a eutectic mixture was formed. We found that if the components forming a eutectic mixture have crystallization peaks close to each other and have sufficient hydrogen-bonding capability, then their eutectic mixture is least likely to crystallize out (as seen in lidocaine-tetracaine EM) or vice versa (lidocaine-camphor EM). PMID:25370024

  19. Inorganic salt mixtures as electrolyte media in fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, Charles Austen (Inventor); Belieres, Jean-Philippe (Inventor); Francis-Gervasio, Dominic (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Fuel cell designs and techniques for converting chemical energy into electrical energy uses a fuel cell are disclosed. The designs and techniques include an anode to receive fuel, a cathode to receive oxygen, and an electrolyte chamber in the fuel cell, including an electrolyte medium, where the electrolyte medium includes an inorganic salt mixture in the fuel cell. The salt mixture includes pre-determined quantities of at least two salts chosen from a group consisting of ammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate, ammonium trifluoroacetate, and ammonium nitrate, to conduct charge from the anode to the cathode. The fuel cell includes an electrical circuit operatively coupled to the fuel cell to transport electrons from the cathode.

  20. Deep eutectic liquid organic salt as a new solvent for liquid-phase microextraction and its application in ligandless extraction and preconcentraion of lead and cadmium in edible oils.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mehdi; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Shabani, Ali Mohammad Haji; Tamaddon, Fatemeh; Azadi, Davood

    2015-11-01

    Deep eutectic liquid organic salt was used as the solvent and a liquid phase microextraction (DES-LPME) combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was developed for separation, preconcentration and determination of lead and cadmium in edible oils. A 4:1 mixture of deep eutectic solvent and 2% nitric acid (200 L) was added to an oil sample. The mixture was vortexed and transferred into a water bath at 50 C and stirred for 5 minutes. After the extraction was completed, the phases were separated by centrifugation, and the enriched analytes in the deep eutectic solvent phase were determined by ETAAS. Under optimized extraction conditions and for an oil sample of 28 g, enhancement factors of 198 and 195 and limits of detection (defined as 3 Sb/m) of 8 and 0. 2 ng kg(-1) were achieved for lead and cadmium respectively. The method was successfully applied to the determination of lead and cadmium in various edible oils. PMID:26452873

  1. Hydrated multivalent cations are new class of molten salt mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, C. A.

    1967-01-01

    Electrical conductance and activation energy measurements on mixtures of calcium and potassium nitrate show the hydrated form to be a new class of molten salt. The theoretical glass transition temperature of the hydrate varied in a manner opposite to that of the anhydrous system.

  2. Borohydride electro-oxidation in a molten alkali hydroxide eutectic mixture and a novel borohydride-periodate battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Andrew; Gyenge, Előd L.

    2015-05-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of BH4- in a molten NaOH-KOH eutectic mixture (0.515:0.485 mole fractions), is investigated for the first time by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Anodically oxidized Ni is electrocatalytically more active than Pt for BH4- oxidation in the molten alkali electrolyte as shown by the more than three times higher exchange current density (i.e. 15.8 mA cm-2 vs. 4.6 mA cm-2 at 185 °C). Next the proof-of-concept for a novel BH4-/IO4- molten alkali electrolyte battery is presented. Using oxidized Ni mesh anode and Pt mesh cathode a maximum power density of 63 mW cm-2 is achieved at 185 °C.

  3. Speciation, physical and electrolytic properties of eutectic mixtures based on CrCl?6H?O and urea.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Andrew P; Al-Barzinjy, Azeez A; Abbott, Paul D; Frisch, Gero; Harris, Robert C; Hartley, Jennifer; Ryder, Karl S

    2014-05-21

    The electrodeposition of chromium is a technologically vital process, which is principally carried out using aqueous chromic acid. In the current study, it is shown that eutectic mixtures of urea and hydrated chromium(III) chloride provide a liquid which reduces the toxicological issues associated with the current aqueous Cr(VI) electroplating solution. Using EXAFS, mass spectrometry and UV-Vis spectroscopy, it is shown that chromium is present predominantly as a cationic species. Conductivities are higher than for most comparable ionic liquids. It is shown that the electrodeposition of chromium is electrochemically reversible, with a current efficiency much higher than in aqueous electrolytes. Surface tension and density measurements indicate that hole theory is a valid model to describe transport properties in these liquids. Bulk Cr deposits are not macrocrystalline but they are generally crack-free. The deposits have a hardness of 600 10 Vickers and, as such, are comparable to deposits from aqueous systems. PMID:24695874

  4. Effects of metal salt mixtures on Daphnia magna reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Biesinger, K.E.; Christensen, G.M.; Fiandt, J.T.

    1986-02-01

    Three binary metal experiments were conducted using a complete block design; testing the chlorides of Cd, Hg, and Zn individually and in combinations of Cd-Hg, Cd-Zn, and Zn-Hg on Daphnia magna reproduction. These mixtures were tested at one-half, once, and twice the 16% reproductive impairment concentration previously determined for individual metals. The Cd-Hg, Cd-Zn, and Zn-Hg mixtures all showed significant reductions in reproduction at concentrations where the metal salts alone caused no significant effect.

  5. Deep eutectic solvents based on N-methylacetamide and a lithium salt as suitable electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Boisset, Aurlien; Menne, Sebastian; Jacquemin, Johan; Balducci, Andrea; Anouti, Mrim

    2013-12-14

    In this work, we present a study on the physical and electrochemical properties of three new Deep Eutectic Solvents (DESs) based on N-methylacetamide (MAc) and a lithium salt (LiX, with X = bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide, TFSI; hexafluorophosphate, PF6; or nitrate, NO3). Based on DSC measurements, it appears that these systems are liquid at room temperature for a lithium salt mole fraction ranging from 0.10 to 0.35. The temperature dependences of the ionic conductivity and the viscosity of these DESs are correctly described by using the Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher (VTF) type fitting equation, due to the strong interactions between Li(+), X(-) and MAc in solution. Furthermore, these electrolytes possess quite large electrochemical stability windows up to 4.7-5 V on Pt, and demonstrate also a passivating behavior toward the aluminum collector at room temperature. Based on these interesting electrochemical properties, these selected DESs can be classified as potential and promising electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). For this purpose, a test cell was then constructed and tested at 25 C, 60 C and 80 C by using each selected DES as an electrolyte and LiFePO4 (LFP) material as a cathode. The results show a good compatibility between each DES and LFP electrode material. A capacity of up to 160 mA h g(-1) with a good efficiency (99%) is observed in the DES based on the LiNO3 salt at 60 C despite the presence of residual water in the electrolyte. Finally preliminary tests using a LFP/DES/LTO (lithium titanate) full cell at room temperature clearly show that LiTFSI-based DES can be successfully introduced into LIBs. Considering the beneficial properties, especially, the cost of these electrolytes, such introduction could represent an important contribution for the realization of safer and environmentally friendly LIBs. PMID:24153449

  6. An innovative spraying setup to obtain uniform salt(s) mixture deposition to investigate hot corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannava, Venkateswararao; Swaminathan, A. Vignesh; Kamaraj, M.; Kottada, Ravi Sankar

    2016-02-01

    A hot corrosion study via molten salt deposition and its interaction with creep/fatigue play a critical role in predicting the life of gas turbine engine components. To do systematic hot corrosion studies, deposition of molten salts on specimens should be uniform with good adherence. Thus, the present study describes an in-house developed spraying setup that produces uniform and reliable molten salt deposition in a repeatable fashion. The efficacy of the present method was illustrated by depositing 90 wt. % Na2SO4 + 5 wt. % NaCl + 5 wt. % NaV O3 salt mixture on hot corrosion coupons and on creep specimens, and also by comparing with other deposition methods.

  7. An innovative spraying setup to obtain uniform salt(s) mixture deposition to investigate hot corrosion.

    PubMed

    Mannava, Venkateswararao; Swaminathan, A Vignesh; Kamaraj, M; Kottada, Ravi Sankar

    2016-02-01

    A hot corrosion study via molten salt deposition and its interaction with creep/fatigue play a critical role in predicting the life of gas turbine engine components. To do systematic hot corrosion studies, deposition of molten salts on specimens should be uniform with good adherence. Thus, the present study describes an in-house developed spraying setup that produces uniform and reliable molten salt deposition in a repeatable fashion. The efficacy of the present method was illustrated by depositing 90 wt. % Na2SO4 + 5 wt. % NaCl + 5 wt. % NaV O3 salt mixture on hot corrosion coupons and on creep specimens, and also by comparing with other deposition methods. PMID:26931891

  8. Sulfur-doped carbons prepared from eutectic mixtures containing hydroxymethylthiophene as metal-free oxygen reduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    López-Salas, Nieves; del Monte, Francisco; Tamayo, Aitana; Fierro, José Luís G; De Lacey, Antonio L; Ferrer, M Luisa; Gutiérrez, María C

    2014-12-01

    A template-free approach based on the use of eutectic mixtures composed of 2-hydroxymethylthiophene and furfuryl alcohol has been designed for the preparation of hierarchical sulfur-doped carbons (SPCs) in monolithic form. The temperature used for carbonization, for example, 600, 800, or 900 °C, determined most of the physicochemical properties of the resulting SPCs. Thus, the surface area increased from below 400 to up 775 m(2)  g(-1) , along with the carbonization temperature, whereas the sulfur content decreased from approximately 15 to 5 wt %. The oxygen reduction reaction performance in samples carbonized at 900 °C was good, with the four-electron-transfer reaction prevailing over the two-electron-transfer one. Interestingly, the methanol tolerance and stability of these SPCs were also remarkable, with less than 5% current decrease immediately after methanol addition, whereas, in terms of stability, the current decrease was below 8 % after 20000 s. This performance was in the range of that found not only for other SPCs, but also for many nitrogen-doped and even some dual-doped (S and N) ones. PMID:25318464

  9. Heat Capacity Uncertainty Calculation for the Eutectic Mixture of Biphenyl/Diphenyl Ether Used as Heat Transfer Fluid: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, J. C.; Glatzmaier, G. C.; Mehos, M.

    2012-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to calculate the uncertainty at 95% confidence for the experimental values of heat capacity of the eutectic mixture of biphenyl/diphenyl ether (Therminol VP-1) determined from 300 to 370 degrees C. Twenty-five samples were evaluated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to obtain the sample heat flow as a function of temperature. The ASTM E-1269-05 standard was used to determine the heat capacity using DSC evaluations. High-pressure crucibles were employed to contain the sample in the liquid state without vaporizing. Sample handling has a significant impact on the random uncertainty. It was determined that the fluid is difficult to handle, and a high variability of the data was produced. The heat capacity of Therminol VP-1 between 300 and 370 degrees C was measured to be equal to 0.0025T+0.8672 with an uncertainty of +/- 0.074 J/g.K (3.09%) at 95% confidence with T (temperature) in Kelvin.

  10. Separation of alcohol-water mixtures using salts

    SciTech Connect

    Card, J. C.; Farrell, L. M.

    1982-04-01

    Use of a salt (KF or Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) to induce phase separation of alcohol-water mixtures was investigated in three process flowsheets to compare operating and capital costs with a conventional distillation process. The process feed was the Clostridia fermentation product, composed of 98 wt % water and 2 wt % solvents (70% 1-butanol, 27% 2-propanol, and 3% ethanol). The design basis was 150 x 10/sup 6/ kg/y of solvents. Phase equilibria and tieline data were obtained from literature and experiments. Three separation-process designs were developed and compared by an incremental economic analysis (+-30%) with the conventional separation technique using distillation alone. The cost of salt recovery for recycle was found to be the critical feature. High capital and operating costs make recovery of salt by precipitation uneconomical; however, a separation scheme using multiple-effect evaporation for salt recovery has comparable incremental capital costs ($1.72 x 10/sup 6/ vs $1.76 x 10/sup 6/) and lower incremental operating costs ($2.14 x 10/sup 6//y vs $4.83 x 10/sup 6//y) than the conventional separation process.

  11. Eutectic modification in a low-chromium white cast iron by a mixture of titanium, rare earths, and bismuth: I. Effect on microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedolla-Jacuinde, A.; Aguilar, S. L.; Hernndez, B.

    2005-04-01

    The present work studies the effect of small additions of a mixture of Ti, rare earths (RE), and Bi on the eutectic solidification of a low-Cr white cast iron (WCI) commercially designed as Ni-Hard Class I Type B according to the ASTM A532. For this purpose, systematic additions of a mixture of ferrotitanium-rare earths-bismuth (Fe-Ti-RE-Bi) up to 2% were made to a low-Cr WCI. By means of these additions, a modified carbide structure was obtained. Eutectic carbides changed from a highly interconnected ledeburite structure to more isolated, finer blocky structure. This microstructural change caused variations in the mechanical behavior of the WCI. The decrease in size and reduced connectivity of the eutectic carbides increased fracture toughness as well as wear resistance under dry sliding conditions. The effect of the admixture on the microstructure and mechanical properties is discussed in terms of the segregation and refining effects of the elements that comprise the mixture.

  12. Ethylenediamine salt of 5-nitrotetrazole and preparation

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Kien-yin (Los Alamos, NM); Coburn, Michael D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1985-01-01

    Ethylenediamine salt of 5-nitrotetrazole and preparation. This salt has been found to be useful as an explosive alone and in eutectic mixtures with ammonium nitrate and/or other explosive compounds. Its eutectic with ammonium nitrate has been demonstrated to behave in a similar manner to a monomolecular explosive such as TNT, and is less sensitive than the pure salt. Moreover, this eutectic mixture, which contains 87.8 mol % of ammonium nitrate, is close to the CO.sub.2 -balanced composition of 90 mol %, and has a relatively low melting point of 110.5 C. making it readily castable. The ternary eutectic system containing the ethylenediamine salt of 5-nitrotetrazole, ammonium nitrate and ethylenediamine dinitrate has a eutectic temperature of 89.5 C. and gives a measured detonation pressure of 24.8 GPa, which is 97.6% of the calculated value. Both the pure ethylenediamine salt and its known eutectic compounds behave in substantially ideal manner. Methods for the preparation of the salt are described.

  13. Measurement of thermophysical properties of molten salts: Mixtures of alkaline carbonate salts

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, N.; Matsuura, M.; Makino, A.; Hirata, T.; Kato, Y.

    1988-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop measuring methods for the thermal diffusivity, the specific heat capacity, and the density of molten salts, as well as to measure these properties of mixtures of alkaline carbonate salts. The thermal diffusivity is measured by the stepwise heating method. The sample salt is poured into a thin container, and as a result, a three-layered cell is formed. The thermal diffusivity is obtained from the ratio of temperature rises at different times measured at the rear surface of the cell when the front surface is heated by the stepwise energy from an iodine lamp. The specific heat capacity is measured using an adiabatic scanning calorimeter. The density is measured by Archimedes' principle. Thermal conductivity is determined from the above properties. Measured samples are Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ (42.7-57.3, 50.0-50.0, and 62.0-38.0 mol%).

  14. Ethylenediamine salt of 5-nitrotetrazole and preparation

    DOEpatents

    Lee, K.; Coburn, M.D.

    1984-05-17

    The ethylenediamine salt of 5-nitrotetrazole has been found to be useful as an explosive alone and in eutectic mixtures with ammonium nitrate and/or other explosive compounds. Its eutectic with ammonium nitrate has been demonstrated to behave in a similar manner to a monomolecular explosive such as TNT, and is less sensitive than the pure salt. Moreover, this eutectic mixture, which contains 87.8 mol% of ammonium nitrate, is close to the CO/sub 2/-balanced composition of 90 mol%, and has a relatively low melting point of 110.5 C making it readily castable. The ternary eutectic system containing the ethylenediamine salt of 5-nitrotetrazole, ammonium nitrate and ethylenediamine dinitrate has a eutectic temperature of 89.5 C and gives a measured detonation pressure of 24.8 GPa, which is 97.6% of the calculated value. Both the pure ethylenediamine salt and its known eutectic compounds behave in substantially ideal manner. Methods for the preparation of the salt are described.

  15. Effects of selective adaptation on coding sugar and salt tastes in mixtures.

    PubMed

    Frank, Marion E; Goyert, Holly F; Formaker, Bradley K; Hettinger, Thomas P

    2012-10-01

    Little is known about coding of taste mixtures in complex dynamic stimulus environments. A protocol developed for odor stimuli was used to test whether rapid selective adaptation extracted sugar and salt component tastes from mixtures as it did component odors. Seventeen human subjects identified taste components of "salt + sugar" mixtures. In 4 sessions, 16 adapt-test stimulus pairs were presented as atomized, 150-?L "taste puffs" to the tongue tip to simulate odor sniffs. Stimuli were NaCl, sucrose, "NaCl + sucrose," and water. The sugar was 98% identified but the suppressed salt 65% identified in unadapted mixtures of 2 concentrations of NaCl, 0.1 or 0.05 M, and sucrose at 3 times those concentrations, 0.3 or 0.15 M. Rapid selective adaptation decreased identification of sugar and salt preadapted ambient components to 35%, well below the 74% self-adapted level, despite variation in stimulus concentration and adapting time (<5 or >10 s). The 96% identification of sugar and salt extra mixture components was as certain as identification of single compounds. The results revealed that salt-sugar mixture suppression, dependent on relative mixture-component concentration, was mutual. Furthermore, like odors, stronger and recent tastes are emphasized in dynamic experimental conditions replicating natural situations. PMID:22562765

  16. Separation of the isomers of benzene poly(carboxylic acid)s by quaternary ammonium salt via formation of deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yucui; Li, Jian; Ren, Shuhang; Niu, Muge; Wu, Weize

    2014-11-26

    Because of similar properties and very low volatility, isomers of benzene poly(carboxylic acid)s (BPCAs) are very difficult to separate. In this work, we found that isomers of BPCAs could be separated efficiently by quaternary ammonium salts (QASs) via formation of deep eutectic solvents (DESs). Three kinds of QASs were used to separate the isomers of BPCAs, including the isomers of benzene tricarboxylic acids (trimellitic acid, trimesic acid, and hemimellitic acid) and the isomers of benzene dicarboxylic acids (phthalic acid and isophthalic acid). Among the QASs, tetraethylammonium chloride was found to have the best performance, which could completely separate BPCA isomers in methyl ethyl ketone solutions. It was found that the hydrogen bond forming between QAS and BPCA results in the selective separation of BPCA isomers. QAS in DES was regenerated effectively by the antisolvent method, and the regenerated QAS was reused four times with the same high efficiency. PMID:25351281

  17. LOCALIZED CORROSION OF AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEELEXPOSED TO MIXTURES OF PLUTONIUM OXIDE AND CHLORIDE SALTS

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P; Kerry Dunn, K; Jonathan Duffey, J; Ron Livingston, R; Zane Nelson, Z

    2008-11-21

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted to investigate the corrosivity of moist plutonium oxide/chloride (PuO{sub 2}/Cl-) salt mixtures on 304L and 316L stainless steel coupons. The tests exposed flat coupons for pitting evaluation and 'teardrop' stressed coupons for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) evaluation at room temperature to various mixtures of PuO{sub 2} and chloride-bearing salts for periods up to 500 days. The two flat coupons were placed so that the solid oxide/salt mixture contacted about one half of the coupon surface. One teardrop coupon was placed in contact with solid mixture; the second teardrop was in contact with the headspace gas only. The mixtures were loaded with nominally 0.5 wt % water under a helium atmosphere. Observations of corrosion ranged from superficial staining to pitting and SCC. The extent of corrosion depended on the total salt concentration and on the composition of the salt. The most significant corrosion was found in coupons that were exposed to 98 wt % PuO{sub 2}, 2 wt % chloride salt mixtures that contained calcium chloride. SCC was observed in two 304L stainless steel teardrop coupons exposed in solid contact to a mixture of 98 wt % PuO{sub 2}, 0.9 wt % NaCl, 0.9 wt % KCl, and 0.2 wt % CaCl{sub 2}. The cracking was associated with the heat-affected zone of an autogenous weld that ran across the center of the coupon. Cracking was not observed in coupons exposed to the headspace gas, nor in coupons exposed to other mixtures with either 0.92 wt% CaCl{sub 2} or no CaCl{sub 2}. The corrosion results point to the significance of the interaction between water loading and the concentration of the hydrating salt CaCl{sub 2} in the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels to corrosion.

  18. Hofmeister effect of salt mixtures on thermo-responsive poly(propylene oxide).

    PubMed

    Zajforoushan Moghaddam, Saeed; Thormann, Esben

    2015-03-01

    The Hofmeister series is a classification of ions regarding their ability to stabilize or destabilize aqueous solutions of proteins, polymers and other molecules which are partly miscible with water. In this study, we employ differential scanning calorimetry to investigate how the stability of aqueous solutions of poly(propylene oxide) is affected by mixtures of ions with different location in the Hofmeister series. Our results show that the Hofmeister effects of pure salt species are not always linearly additive and that the relative effect of some ions can be reversed depending on the composition of the salt mixture as well as by the absolute and relative concentration of the different species. We suggest that these results can lead to a better understanding of the potential role of the Hofmeister effect in regulation of biological processes, which does always take place in salt mixtures rather than solutions containing just single salt species. PMID:25648868

  19. Advanced salt receiver for solar power towers

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, M.; Sanchez, M.; Barrera, G.

    1995-11-01

    Falling Film receivers constitute an alternative to the traditional Salt in Tube receivers, widely used and tested in the Central Receiver Systems. This report presents an innovative concept of Internal Film Receiver (IFR), in which a film made of a eutectic mixture of molten salts flows down the back side of a stainless steel panel. The installation with 550 kW nominal power, molten salt inlet temperature 300 C and outlet temperature 550 C is described.

  20. Mass-transfer characteristics of nitrate-based salt mixtures. [Heat transfer fluid for solar thermal power systems

    SciTech Connect

    DeVan, J.H.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    1980-01-01

    Molten eutectic NaNO/sub 3/-KNO/sub 3/ is being circulated in three thermal-convection loops constructed of alloy 800 and types 304L and 316 stainless steel. The loops are operated at a maximum salt temperature of 595/sup 0/C and a salt temperature differential of 235/sup 0/C. Corrosion specimens contained within each loop are withdrawn for periodic determinations of weight and microstructural changes. Salt samples are analyzed at selected intervals to monitor changes in the composition of the salt. Controlled potential voltammetry is also used to follow changes in the oxidation potential of the salt. Preliminary results indicate low corrosion rates for the austenitic stainless steels in flowing NaNO/sub 3/-KNO/sub 3/. Corrosion rate data from these tests will be used to develop a kinetic model for the mass transfer of Cr, Ni, and Fe as a function of temperature gradient along the salt flow path.

  1. Materials corrosion in molten LiF-NaF-KF eutectic salt under different reduction-oxidation conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, R. S.; Cheng, W. J.; Anderson, M. H.; Sridharan, K.; Wang, C. J.; Allen, T. R.

    2012-07-01

    Molten fluoride salts such as FLiNaK (LiF-NaF-KF: 46.5-11.5-42 mol %) have been proposed for use as secondary reactor coolants, media for transfer of high temperature process heat from nuclear reactors to chemical plants, and for concentrated solar power thermal energy storage. In molten fluoride salts, passive oxide films are chemically unstable, and corrosion is driven largely by the thermodynamically driven dissolution of alloying elements into the molten salt environment. Two alloys, Hastelloy{sup R} N and 316L stainless steel were exposed to molten FLiNaK salt in a 316L stainless steel crucible under argon cover gas for 1000 hours at 850 deg. C. Graphite was present in some of the crucibles with the goal of studying corrosion behavior of relevant reactor material combinations. In addition, a technique to reduce alloy corrosion through modification of the reduction-oxidation state was tested by the inclusion of zirconium to the system. Corrosion of 316L stainless steel was noted to occur primarily through surface depletion of chromium, an effect that was enhanced by the presence of graphite. Hastelloy{sup R} N experienced weight gain through electrochemical plating of corrosion products derived from the 316L stainless steel crucible. In the presence of zirconium, both alloys gained weight through plating of zirconium and as a result formed intermetallic layers. (authors)

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Transport Properties of Molten Transuranic Salt Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baty, Austin; McIntyre, Peter; Sattarov, Akhdiyor; Sooby, Elizabeth

    2012-10-01

    The Accelerator Research Laboratory at Texas A&M is proposing a revolutionary design for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in molten salt (ADSMS), a system that destroys the transuranic elements in spent nuclear fuel. The transuranics are the most enduring hazard of nuclear power, since they contain high radiotoxicity and have half-lives of a thousand to a million years. The ADSMS core is fueled by a homogeneous chloride-based molten salt mixture containing the chlorides of the transuranics and NaCl. Knowledge of the density, heat capacity, thermal conductivity, etc. of the salt mixtures is needed to accurately model the complex ADSMS system. There is a lack of experimental data on the density and transport properties of such mixtures. Molecular dynamics simulations using polarizable ion potentials are used to determine the density and heat capacity of these melts as a function of temperature. Green-Kubo methods are employed to calculate the electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and viscosity of the salt using the outputs of the model. Results for pure molten salt systems are compared to experimental data when possible to validate the potentials used. Here we discuss potential salt systems, their neutronic behavior, and the calculated transport properties.

  3. Sorption and selective chromatographic properties of isomer-selective composite sorbent based on a eutectic mixture of nematic liquid crystals and perbenzoylated β-cyclodextrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onuchak, L. A.; Kapralova, T. S.; Kuraeva, Yu. G.; Belousova, Z. P.; Stepanova, R. F.

    2015-12-01

    Mesomorphic, sorption, and selective properties of a three-component sorbent based on a mixture of nematic ( N) liquid crystals of 4-methoxy-4'-ethoxyazoxybenzene (MEAB) and 4,4'-diethoxyazoxybenzene (azoxyphenetol, AOP) of an eutectic composition and heptakis-(2,3,6-tri- O-benzoyl)-β-cyclodextrin (Bz-β-CD) are studied. For 30 organic compounds of different classes with linear and cyclic molecular structures, including optical isomers of limonene, pinene, camphene, and butanediol-2,3, thermodynamic functions are determined for their gas-phase sorption using a three-component MEAB-AOP-Bz-β- CD sorbent (62: 28: 10 wt %). It is found that the investigated sorbent possesses high structural selectivity (αp/m = 1.128-1.059, 100-130°C, N) and moderate enantioselectivity (1.07-1.02) within a broad temperature range (95-170°C) including both mesomorphic and isotropic phases of the sorbent. It is shown that the enantioselectivity of the sorbent is apparent under conditions of both increasing retention when a chiral Bz-β-CD additive is introduced into the MEAB-AOP system (limonenes, pinenes, camphenes) and decreasing retention (butanediols-2,3).

  4. The Effects of Instrumental Touching on Infant Pain Perception and the Effects of Eutectic Mixture of Local Anesthetics (EMLA) on the Reduction of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kucukoglu, Sibel; Celebioglu, Ayda; Caner, Ibrahim; Ok, Gamze; Maden, Rukiye

    2015-01-01

    Background: Premature infants, who have to spend the first week of their lives in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), experience pain and stress in numerous cases, and they are exposed to many invasive interventions. The studies have shown that uncontrolled pain experienced during early life has negative and long-term side effects, such as distress, and such experiences negatively affect the development of the central nervous system Objectives: The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of touching on infant pain perception and the effects of eutectic mixture of local anesthetic (EMLA) on the reduction of pain. Patients and Methods: Data for the study were collected between March and August 2012 from the neonatal clinic of a university hospital located in eastern Turkey. The population of the study consisted of premature infants who were undergoing treatment, completed the first month and who were approved for Hepatitis B vaccine. The study consisted of two experimental groups and one control group. Information forms, intervention follow-up forms, and Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) were used to collect the data. EMLA cream was applied on the vastus lateralis muscles of the first experimental group before the vaccination. The second experimental group was vaccinated by imitation (placebo), without a needle tip or medicine. Vaccination was carried out using instrumental touch in this group. A routine vaccination was applied in the control group. Results: Mean pain scores of the group to which EMLA was applied were lower in a statistically significant way (P < 0.05) compared to the pain scores of the other groups. Moreover, it was determined that even though invasive intervention was not applied to the newborns, the touching caused them to feel pain just as in the placebo group (P < 0.005). Conclusions: The results demonstrated that EMLA was an effective method for reducing pain in premature newborns, and the use of instrumental touch for invasive intervention stimulated the pain perception in the newborns. PMID:26199711

  5. Homogeneous eutectic of Pb-Sb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, J. M., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Dendrite free eutectic mixture of Pb-Sb is expected to be superelastic material that can be used in formation of shaped charge liners for industrial explosive metal-forming processes and other applications.

  6. Mixtures of lecithin and bile salt can form highly viscous wormlike micellar solutions in water.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chih-Yang; Oh, Hyuntaek; Wang, Ting-Yu; Raghavan, Srinivasa R; Tung, Shih-Huang

    2014-09-01

    The self-assembly of biological surfactants in water is an important topic for study because of its relevance to physiological processes. Two common types of biosurfactants are lecithin (phosphatidylcholine) and bile salts, which are both present in bile and involved in digestion. Previous studies on lecithin-bile salt mixtures have reported the formation of short, rodlike micelles. Here, we show that lecithin-bile salt micelles can be further induced to grow into long, flexible wormlike structures. The formation of long worms and their resultant entanglement into transient networks is reflected in the rheology: the fluids become viscoelastic and exhibit Maxwellian behavior, and their zero-shear viscosity can be up to a 1000-fold higher than that of water. The presence of worms is further confirmed by data from small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering and from cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). We find that micellar growth peaks at a specific molar ratio (near equimolar) of bile salt:lecithin, which suggests a strong binding interaction between the two species. In addition, micellar growth also requires a sufficient concentration of background electrolyte such as NaCl or sodium citrate that serves to screen the electrostatic repulsion of the amphiphiles and to "salt out" the amphiphiles. We postulate a mechanism based on changes in the molecular geometry caused by bile salts and electrolytes to explain the micellar growth. PMID:25121460

  7. Debye-Hückel theory for mixtures of rigid rodlike ions and salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohinc, Klemen; Reščič, Jurij; Maset, Stefano; May, Sylvio

    2011-02-01

    Like-charged surfaces are able to attract each other if they are embedded in an electrolyte solution of multivalent rodlike ions, even if the rods are long. To reproduce this ability the Poisson-Boltzmann model has recently been extended so as to account for the rodlike structure of the mobile ions. Our model properly accounts for intraionic correlations but still neglects correlations between different rodlike ions. For sufficiently long rods, the model shows excellent agreement with Monte Carlo simulations and exhibits two minima - a depletion and a bridging minimum - in the interaction free energy. In the present work, we generalize the Poisson-Boltzmann model to systems with polydisperse rod lengths and arbitrary charge distributions along the rods, including the presence of salt. On the level of the linearized Debye-Hückel model we derive a general criterion for whether an electrolyte with given distribution of rodlike ions is able to mediate attraction between like-charged surfaces. We numerically analyze two special cases, namely the influence of salt on symmetric and asymmetric mixtures of monodisperse rodlike ions. The symmetric mixture is characterized by the presence of both negatively and positively charged (but otherwise identical) rodlike ions. For the asymmetric mixture, the system contains rodlike ions of only one type. We demonstrate that the addition of salt retains the depletion minimum but tends to eliminate the bridging minimum.

  8. The effect of antagonistic salt on a confined near-critical mixture.

    PubMed

    Pousaneh, Faezeh; Ciach, Alina

    2014-11-01

    We consider a near-critical binary mixture with addition of antagonistic salt (hydrophilic cations and hydrophobic anions) confined between weakly charged and selective surfaces. A mesoscopic functional for this system is developed from a microscopic description by a systematic coarse-graining procedure. The functional reduces to the Landau-Brazovskii functional for amphiphilic systems for a sufficiently large ratio between the correlation length in the critical binary mixture and the screening length. Our theoretical result agrees with the experimental observation [Sadakane et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2013, 139, 234905] that the antagonistic salt and the surfactant both lead to a similar mesoscopic structure. For very low salt concentration ?ion the Casimir potential is the same as in the presence of inorganic salt. For larger ?ion the Casimir potential takes a minimum followed by a maximum for separations of order of tens of nanometers, and exhibits an oscillatory decay very close to the critical point. For separations of tens of nanometers the potential between surfaces with a linear size of hundreds of nanometers can be of order of kBT. We have verified that in the experimentally studied samples [Sadakane et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2013, 139, 234905, Leys et al., Soft Matter, 2013, 9, 9326] the decay length is too small compared to the period of oscillations of the Casimir potential, but the oscillatory force could be observed closer to the critical point. PMID:25171785

  9. Electrolyte Solvation and Ionic Association. VI. Acetonitrile-Lithium Salt Mixtures: Highly Associated Salts Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Borodin, Oleg; Han, Sang D.; Daubert, James S.; Seo, D. M.; Yun, Sung-Hyun; Henderson, Wesley A.

    2015-01-14

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of acetonitrile (AN) mixtures with LiBF4, LiCF3SO3 and LiCF3CO2 provide extensive details about the molecular- and mesoscale-level solution interactions and thus explanations as to why these electrolytes have very different thermal phase behavior and electrochemical/physicochemical properties. The simulation results are in full accord with a previous experimental study of these (AN)n-LiX electrolytes. This computational study reveals how the structure of the anions strongly influences the ionic association tendency of the ions, the manner in which the aggregate solvates assemble in solution and the length of time in which the anions remain coordinated to the Li+ cations in the solvates which result in dramatic variations in the transport properties of the electrolytes.

  10. Glyme-lithium salt equimolar molten mixtures: concentrated solutions or solvate ionic liquids?

    PubMed

    Ueno, Kazuhide; Yoshida, Kazuki; Tsuchiya, Mizuho; Tachikawa, Naoki; Dokko, Kaoru; Watanabe, Masayoshi

    2012-09-13

    To demonstrate a new family of ionic liquids (ILs), i.e., "solvate" ionic liquids, the properties (thermal, transport, and electrochemical properties, Lewis basicity, and ionicity) of equimolar molten mixtures of glymes (triglyme (G3) and tetraglyme (G4)) and nine different lithium salts (LiX) were investigated. By exploring the anion-dependent properties and comparing them with the reported data on common aprotic ILs, two different classes of liquid regimes, i.e., ordinary concentrated solutions and "solvate" ILs, were found in the glyme-Li salt equimolar mixtures ([Li(glyme)]X) depending on the anionic structures. The class a given [Li(glyme)]X belonged to was governed by competitive interactions between the glymes and Li cations and between the counteranions (X) and Li cations. [Li(glyme)]X with weakly Lewis basic anions can form long-lived [Li(glyme)](+) complex cations. Thus, they behaved as typical ionic liquids. The lithium "solvate" ILs based on [Li(glyme)]X have many desirable properties for lithium-conducting electrolytes, including high ionicity, a high lithium transference number, high Li cation concentration, and high oxidative stability, in addition to the common properties of ionic liquids. The concept of "solvate" ionic liquids can be utilized in an unlimited number of combinations of other metal salts and ligands, and will thus open a new field of research on ionic liquids. PMID:22897246

  11. Influence of mixtures of calcium-chelating salts on the physicochemical properties of casein micelles.

    PubMed

    Kaliappan, S; Lucey, J A

    2011-09-01

    Calcium-chelating salts (CCS), such as phosphates and citrates, are often added to milk systems to modify physical properties like heat stability. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of binary CCS mixtures on the properties of casein (CN) micelles including the distribution of Ca between the soluble and CN-bound states. Six binary CCS mixtures were prepared from 4 different types of CCS [i.e., trisodium citrate (TSC), disodium phosphate (DSP), tetrasodium pyrophosphate (TSPP), and sodium hexameta phosphate (SHMP)] by combining 2 CCS at a time in 5 different proportions (8.3:91.7, 29.2:70.8, 50:50, 70.8:29.2, and 91.7:8.3). Different concentrations of these mixtures (0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, and 0.7% wt/wt) were added to milk protein concentrate solutions (5% wt/wt) at pH 5.8. The ability of CCS to disperse CN particles and its interaction with Ca were assessed from turbidity measurements, acid-base titration behavior, and the quantity of CN-bound Ca and inorganic phosphate (Pi). Turbidity and the buffering peak at pH ?5.0 during acid titration decreased with an increasing concentration of CCS. This was due to the chelation of Ca and the dispersion of CN micelles. The presence of TSC in mixtures decreased the amount of CN-bound Ca and Pi; however, the presence of TSPP in mixtures increased CN-bound Ca and Pi. When DSP was present at high proportions in mixtures of CCS, the CN-bound Ca and Pi slightly increased. When SHMP was used in mixtures of CCS, CN-bound Ca and Pi increased with the use of a low proportion of SHMP but decreased when SHMP was used at high proportions in the mixture. Combinations of DSP-TSPP used in the proportions 29.2:70.8, 50:50, and 70.8:29.2 resulted in the gelation of milk protein concentrates when the total CCS concentration was ?0.3%. These results indicated that the type of CCS present in a mixture modified CN properties by various mechanisms, including chelation of Ca, dispersion of CN micelles, and formation of new types of Ca-CCS complexes. The type of interaction between the newly formed Ca-CCS complexes and the dispersed CN depended on the proportion, concentration, and type of CCS present in the mixtures. This information is useful in understanding how mixtures of CCS affect CN properties. PMID:21854899

  12. Nanostructure of mixtures of protic ionic liquids and lithium salts: effect of alkyl chain length.

    PubMed

    Mndez-Morales, Trinidad; Carrete, Jess; Rodrguez, Julio R; Cabeza, scar; Gallego, Luis J; Russina, Olga; Varela, Luis M

    2015-02-21

    The bulk structure of mixtures of two protic ionic liquids, propylammonium nitrate and butylammonium nitrate, with a salt with a common anion, is analyzed at room temperature by means of small angle X-ray scattering and classical molecular dynamics simulations. The study of several structural properties, such as density, radial distribution functions, spatial distribution functions, hydrogen bonds, coordination numbers and velocity autocorrelation functions, demonstrates that increasing the alkyl chain length of the alkylammonium cation results in more segregated, better defined polar and apolar domains, the latter having a larger size. This increase, ascribed to the erosion of the H-bond network in the ionic liquid polar regions as salt is added, is confirmed by means of small angle X-ray scattering measurements, which show a clear linear increase of the characteristic spatial sizes of the studied protic ionic liquids with salt concentration, similar to that previously reported for ethylammonium nitrate (J. Phys. Chem. B, 2014, 118, 761-770). In addition, larger ionic liquid cations lead to a lower degree of hydrogen bonding and to more sparsely packed three-dimensional structures, which are more easily perturbed by the addition of lithium salts. PMID:25609558

  13. Thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures: Theoretical model supported by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Gheribi, Amen E; Chartrand, Patrice

    2016-02-28

    A theoretical model for the description of thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures as a function of composition and temperature is presented. The model is derived by considering the classical kinetic theory and requires, for its parametrization, only information on thermal conductivity of pure compounds. In this sense, the model is predictive. For most molten salt mixtures, no experimental data on thermal conductivity are available in the literature. This is a hindrance for many industrial applications (in particular for thermal energy storage technologies) as well as an obvious barrier for the validation of the theoretical model. To alleviate this lack of data, a series of equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations has been performed on several molten chloride systems in order to determine their thermal conductivity in the entire range of composition at two different temperatures: 1200 K and 1300 K. The EMD simulations are first principles type, as the potentials used to describe the interactions have been parametrized on the basis of first principle electronic structure calculations. In addition to the molten chlorides system, the model predictions are also compared to a recent similar EMD study on molten fluorides and with the few reliable experimental data available in the literature. The accuracy of the proposed model is within the reported numerical and/or experimental errors. PMID:26931711

  14. Thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures: Theoretical model supported by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheribi, Aïmen E.; Chartrand, Patrice

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical model for the description of thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures as a function of composition and temperature is presented. The model is derived by considering the classical kinetic theory and requires, for its parametrization, only information on thermal conductivity of pure compounds. In this sense, the model is predictive. For most molten salt mixtures, no experimental data on thermal conductivity are available in the literature. This is a hindrance for many industrial applications (in particular for thermal energy storage technologies) as well as an obvious barrier for the validation of the theoretical model. To alleviate this lack of data, a series of equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations has been performed on several molten chloride systems in order to determine their thermal conductivity in the entire range of composition at two different temperatures: 1200 K and 1300 K. The EMD simulations are first principles type, as the potentials used to describe the interactions have been parametrized on the basis of first principle electronic structure calculations. In addition to the molten chlorides system, the model predictions are also compared to a recent similar EMD study on molten fluorides and with the few reliable experimental data available in the literature. The accuracy of the proposed model is within the reported numerical and/or experimental errors.

  15. Explosion investigation of asphalt-salt mixtures in a reprocessing plant.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, K; Li, Y

    2000-12-15

    Cause investigation of a fire and explosion at the nuclear fuel waste reprocessing plant indicated that self-heating ignition of an asphalt-salt-waste, bituminized, mixture (AS) caused the disaster. A 220l drum was filled with the AS at a temperature of about 180 degrees C. About 20h later the drum ignited and burned as it was being cooled. It is estimated that the AS contained approximately 55wt.% blown asphalt, 25wt.% NaNO(3), 5wt.% NaNO(2), 8wt.% Na(2)CO(3), 2wt.% NaH(2)PO(4), 1wt.% Ba (OH)(2), 1wt.% K(4)[Fe(CN)(6)], and possibly 3wt.% of other materials. To determine the reaction promoting factors and pertinent chemical reaction rates, self-reaction of the AS has been investigated by the use of a C80D heat flux reaction calorimeter. The oxidizing reactions with asphalt are ruled by NaNO(2) rather than by NaNO(3), in spite of a lower concentration of NaNO(2). The kinetic rates of the interfacial reaction between salt particles and asphalt for the reaction controlled and diffusion controlled steps have been formulated as a function of salt particle size for both NaNO(2) and NaNO(3). Numerical solution of the heat balance equations formulating the heterogeneous reaction scheme indicates that a runaway reaction occurs when the AS-filling temperature is 208 degrees C for a drum filled with an AS mixture produced under standard operating conditions. Molecules containing intramolecular hydrogen, such as Na(2)HPO(4) and NaHCO(3), do not oxidize asphalt directly, however, their presence chemically promotes the oxidizing reaction of NaNO(2). Moreover, NaHCO(3) decomposition which produces gases creates many micro holes in the interior of the salt particles. This in turn promotes the oxidizing reactions that are diffusion controlled. Finally, the consequence of a runaway reaction at 180 degrees C or lower is qualitatively explained by taking into account the chemical effect of intramolecular hydrogen and the physical effect of the NaHCO(3) decomposition gases. PMID:11077162

  16. Eutectic modification in a low-chromium white cast iron by a mixture of titanium, rare earths, and bismuth: Part II. effect on the wear behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedolla-Jacuinde, A.; Aguilar, S. L.; Maldonado, C.

    2005-06-01

    In this work, we studied the wear behavior of a low-Cr white cast iron (WCI) modified with ferrotitanium-rare earths-bismuth (Fe-Ti-RE-Bi) up to 2%. These additions modified the eutectic carbide structure of the alloy from continuous ledeburite into a blocky, less interconnected carbide network. The modified structure was wear tested under pure sliding conditions against a hardened M2 steel counter-face using a load of 250 N. It was observed that wear resistance increased as the modifier admixture increased. The modified structure had smaller more isolated carbides than the WCI with no Fe-Ti-RE-Bi additions. It was observed that large carbides fracture during sliding, which destabilizes the structure and causes degradation in the wear behavior. A transition from abrasive to oxidative wear after 20 km sliding occurred for all alloys. In addition, the modified alloys exhibited higher values of hardness and fracture toughness. These results are discussed in terms of the modified eutectic carbide microstructure.

  17. Intermolecular interactions at early stage of protein/detergent particle association induced by salt/polyethylene glycol mixtures.

    PubMed

    Odahara, Takayuki; Odahara, Koji

    2016-04-01

    Mixtures of neutral salts and polyethylene glycol are used for various purposes in biological studies. Although the effects of each component of the mixtures are theoretically well investigated, comprehension of their integrated effects remains insufficient. In this work, their roles and effects as a precipitant were clarified by studying dependence of precipitation curves on salt concentration for integral membrane protein/detergent particles of different physicochemical properties. The dependence of precipitation curves was reasonably related to intermolecular interactions among relevant molecules such as protein, detergent and polyethylene glycol by considering their physicochemical properties. The obtained relationships are useful as basic information to learn the early stage of biological macromolecular associations. PMID:26705098

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of the structure and single-particle dynamics of mixtures of divalent salts and ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-González, Víctor; Docampo-Álvarez, Borja; Cabeza, Oscar; Fedorov, Maxim; Lynden-Bell, Ruth M.; Gallego, Luis J.; Varela, Luis M.

    2015-09-01

    We report a molecular dynamics study of the structure and single-particle dynamics of mixtures of a protic (ethylammonium nitrate) and an aprotic (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexaflurophosphate [BMIM][PF6]) room-temperature ionic liquids doped with magnesium and calcium salts with a common anion at 298.15 K and 1 atm. The solvation of these divalent cations in dense ionic environments is analyzed by means of apparent molar volumes of the mixtures, radial distribution functions, and coordination numbers. For the protic mixtures, the effect of salt concentration on the network of hydrogen bonds is also considered. Moreover, single-particle dynamics of the salt cations is studied by means of their velocity autocorrelation functions and vibrational densities of states, explicitly analyzing the influence of salt concentration, and cation charge and mass on these magnitudes. The effect of the valency of the salt cation on these properties is considered comparing the results with those for the corresponding mixtures with lithium salts. We found that the main structural and dynamic features of the local solvation of divalent cations in ionic liquids are similar to those of monovalent salts, with cations being localized in the polar nanoregions of the bulk mixture coordinated in monodentate and bidentate coordination modes by the [NO3]- and [PF6]- anions. However, stronger electrostatic correlations of these polar nanoregions than in mixtures with salts with monovalent cations are found. The vibrational modes of the ionic liquid (IL) are seen to be scarcely affected by the addition of the salt, and the effect of mass and charge on the vibrational densities of states of the dissolved cations is reported. Cation mass is seen to exert a deeper influence than charge on the low-frequency vibrational spectra, giving a red shift of the vibrational modes and a virtual suppression of the higher energy vibrational modes for the heavier Ca2+ cations. No qualitative difference with monovalent cations was found in what solvation is concerned, which suggests that no enhanced reduction of the mobility of these cations and their complexes in ILs respective to those of monovalent cations is to be expected.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of the structure and single-particle dynamics of mixtures of divalent salts and ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Gómez-González, Víctor; Docampo-Álvarez, Borja; Cabeza, Oscar; Fedorov, Maxim; Lynden-Bell, Ruth M; Gallego, Luis J; Varela, Luis M

    2015-09-28

    We report a molecular dynamics study of the structure and single-particle dynamics of mixtures of a protic (ethylammonium nitrate) and an aprotic (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexaflurophosphate [BMIM][PF6]) room-temperature ionic liquids doped with magnesium and calcium salts with a common anion at 298.15 K and 1 atm. The solvation of these divalent cations in dense ionic environments is analyzed by means of apparent molar volumes of the mixtures, radial distribution functions, and coordination numbers. For the protic mixtures, the effect of salt concentration on the network of hydrogen bonds is also considered. Moreover, single-particle dynamics of the salt cations is studied by means of their velocity autocorrelation functions and vibrational densities of states, explicitly analyzing the influence of salt concentration, and cation charge and mass on these magnitudes. The effect of the valency of the salt cation on these properties is considered comparing the results with those for the corresponding mixtures with lithium salts. We found that the main structural and dynamic features of the local solvation of divalent cations in ionic liquids are similar to those of monovalent salts, with cations being localized in the polar nanoregions of the bulk mixture coordinated in monodentate and bidentate coordination modes by the [NO3](-) and [PF6](-) anions. However, stronger electrostatic correlations of these polar nanoregions than in mixtures with salts with monovalent cations are found. The vibrational modes of the ionic liquid (IL) are seen to be scarcely affected by the addition of the salt, and the effect of mass and charge on the vibrational densities of states of the dissolved cations is reported. Cation mass is seen to exert a deeper influence than charge on the low-frequency vibrational spectra, giving a red shift of the vibrational modes and a virtual suppression of the higher energy vibrational modes for the heavier Ca(2+) cations. No qualitative difference with monovalent cations was found in what solvation is concerned, which suggests that no enhanced reduction of the mobility of these cations and their complexes in ILs respective to those of monovalent cations is to be expected. PMID:26429024

  20. CO2 capture from simulated fuel gas mixtures using semiclathrate hydrates formed by quaternary ammonium salts.

    PubMed

    Park, Sungwon; Lee, Seungmin; Lee, Youngjun; Seo, Yongwon

    2013-07-01

    In order to investigate the feasibility of semiclathrate hydrate-based precombustion CO2 capture, thermodynamic, kinetic, and spectroscopic studies were undertaken on the semiclathrate hydrates formed from a fuel gas mixture of H2 (60%) + CO2 (40%) in the presence of quaternary ammonium salts (QASs) such as tetra-n-butylammonium bromide (TBAB) and fluoride (TBAF). The inclusion of QASs demonstrated significantly stabilized hydrate dissociation conditions. This effect was greater for TBAF than TBAB. However, due to the presence of dodecahedral cages that are partially filled with water molecules, TBAF showed a relatively lower gas uptake than TBAB. From the stability condition measurements and compositional analyses, it was found that with only one step of semiclathrate hydrate formation with the fuel gas mixture from the IGCC plants, 95% CO2 can be enriched in the semiclathrate hydrate phase at room temperature. The enclathration of both CO2 and H2 in the cages of the QAS semiclathrate hydrates and the structural transition that results from the inclusion of QASs were confirmed through Raman and (1)H NMR measurements. The experimental results obtained in this study provide the physicochemical background required for understanding selective partitioning and distributions of guest gases in the QAS semiclathrate hydrates and for investigating the feasibility of a semiclathrate hydrate-based precombustion CO2 capture process. PMID:23718261

  1. Eutectic composite explosives containing ammonium nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Stinecipher, M.M.

    1981-01-01

    The eutectic of ammonium nitrate (AN), the ammonium salt of 3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole was prepared and its sensitivity and performance were studied. It was found that this AN formulation was unusual in that it performed ideally at small diameter, which indicated that it was a monomolecular explosive. Sensitivity tests included type 12 impact, Henkin thermal and wedge tests, and performance tests included rate stick/plate dent, cylinder, and aquarium tests. Results were compared with calculations, standard explosives, and another eutectic, ethylendiamine dinitrate (EDD)/AN.

  2. Nonaromatic hydrotropic cationic ammonium salts as a rheology modifier for an anionic/zwitterionic surfactant mixture.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kulbir; O'Toole, Zachary; McLachlan, Aleisha; Marangoni, D Gerrard

    2014-04-01

    In this article, we report additive-induced micellar growth and rheology modification for mixtures of anionic (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) and zwitterionic (N-alkylated glycine derivative, Empigen BB or EBB) surfactants. Two nonaromatic hydrotropic salts (hexyltrimethylammonium bromide, C6TAB, and/or dibutylenebis(dimethylbutylammonium bromide), 4-4-4) are used as novel additives to induce micellar growth in these systems. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the Weissenberg effect, and rheology measurements were employed to assess mixed micelle formation, micellar growth, and rheology modifications. Finally, the manner in which the surfactants and hydrotropes self-assemble into aggregates has also been deduced from 2D NMR NOESY measurements. In this study, both hydrotropic ions have been found to contribute to similar structural modifications in the mixed micelles of the anionic and zwitterionic surfactants. However, the extent of the rheology modification in solution is found to be quite different when the gemini hydrotrope (4-4-4) versus the monomeric hydrotrope (C6TAB) is employed. PMID:24625067

  3. Shifting the equilibrium mixture of gramicidin double helices toward a single conformation with multivalent cationic salts.

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, D A; Wallace, B A

    1998-01-01

    The conformation of the polypeptide antibiotic gramicidin is greatly influenced by its environment. In methanol, it exists as an equilibrium mixture of four interwound double-helical conformers that differ in their handedness, chain orientation, and alignment. Upon the addition of multivalent cationic salts, there is a shift in the equilibrium to a single conformer, which was monitored in this study by circular dichroism spectroscopy. With increasing concentrations of multivalent cations, both the magnitude of the entire spectrum and the ratio of the 229-nm to the 210-nm peak were increased. The spectral change is not related to the charge on the cation, but appears to be related to the cationic radius, with the maximum change in ellipticity occurring for cations with a radius of approximately 1 A. The effect requires the presence of an anion whose radius is greater than that of a fluoride ion, but is otherwise not a function of anion type. It is postulated that multivalent cations interact with a binding site in one of the conformers, known as species 1 (a left-handed, parallel, no stagger double helix), stabilizing a modified form of this type of structure. PMID:9675165

  4. Ternary eutectic growth of Ag-Cu-Sb alloy within ultrasonic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Wei; Hong, Zhenyu; Wei, Bingbo

    2007-08-01

    The liquid to solid transformation of ternary Ag42.4Cu21.6Sb36 eutectic alloy was accomplished in an ultrasonic field with a frequency of 35 kHz, and the growth mechanism of this ternary eutectic was examined. Theoretical calculations predict that the sound intensity in the liquid phase at the solidification interface increases gradually as the interface moves up from the sample bottom to its top. The growth mode of ( ? + ? + Sb) ternary eutectic exhibits a transition of divorced eutecticmixture of anomalous and regular structuresregular eutectic along the sample axis due to the inhomogeneity of sound field distribution. In the top zone with the highest sound intensity, the cavitation effect promotes the three eutectic phases to nucleate independently, while the acoustic streaming efficiently suppresses the coupled growth of eutectic phases. In the meantime, the ultrasonic field accelerates the solute transportation at the solid-liquid interface, which reduces the solute solubility of eutectic phases.

  5. Analysis of aqueous solutions by near-infrared spectrometry (NIRS) III. Binary mixtures of inorganic salts in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Volker J.; Molt, Karl

    1997-06-01

    It is shown that binary mixtures of inorganic salts in aqueous solutions can be analyzed quantitatively by near-infrared spectrometry (NIRS). Each component influences the structure of water by miscellaneous cation/anion-OH interactions causing specific effects in the NIR spectra which can be evaluated in a quantitative way. The calibrations described were performed using principle component regression (PCR) and optimised with respect to the standard error of analysis (SEA).

  6. Microbial stability and quality of seasoned cracked green Alorea table olives packed in diverse chloride salt mixtures.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Gallego, J; Arroyo-Lpez, F N; Romero-Gil, V; Rodrguez-Gmez, F; Garca-Garca, P; Garrido-Fernndez, A

    2013-11-01

    This work was conducted to determine the effect of the partial replacement of NaCl by KCl and CaCl2 (expressed as percentages, wt/vol) on the microbial stability and physicochemical characteristics of seasoned cracked olives using a simplex centroid mixture design. Neither Enterobacteriaceae nor lactic acid bacteria were found during the 50 days that olive packages were monitored. Therefore, microbial instability was considered due to the growth of yeasts, which were the only detected microorganisms; Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia membranifaciens were the most relevant species. Yeasts decreased during the first 21 to 30 days after packing, but their populations rose to 3.5 log CFU/ml by the end of the storage period, clearly causing product deterioration. The partial substitution of NaCl with the other chloride salts slightly altered the phase of microbial inhibition and regrowth. Most of the quality characteristics were not affected by the use of the alternative salt mixtures, but the pH values and Cl(-) concentrations in brine decreased as the CaCl2 concentration increased. Hence, seasoned cracked table olives can be produced using a lower proportion of NaCl without causing significant changes in the shelf life and product quality, although further detailed studies are necessary to guarantee the stability of products packed with specific salt mixtures. PMID:24215697

  7. Self-Assembly of PolyionSurfactant Ion Complex Salts in Mixtures with Water and n-Alcohols

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Phase behavior and structural features were investigated for complex salts, consisting of the cationic hexadecyltrimethylammonium (CTA) surfactant with polyacrylate (PAn, n = 30 or 6000) counterions, mixed with water and different n-alcohols (ethanol, butanol, hexanol, octanol, and decanol). The liquid crystalline structures formed were identified by small-angle X-ray scattering measurements, which provided information about the changes in the geometry of the aggregates as functions of the concentration and chain length of the added n-alcohol. The obtained results were compared with a previous work on similar ternary mixtures of the same cationic surfactant but with the monomeric bromide counterion, CTABr (Fontell, K.; Khan, A.; Lindstrm, B.; Maciejewska, D.; Puang-Ngern, S. Colloid Polym. Sci., 1991, 269, 727). In general, the same phases were detected in systems with the complex salts CTAPAn as in systems with CTABr, but the swelling of the various liquid crystalline phases by water was much more limited in the complex salt systems. An isotropic alcoholic phase was observed with all alcohols and the size of this region of the phase diagram increased for the shorter alcohols, except for ethanol. For mixtures with octanol and ethanol, in particular, the extensions of the disordered isotropic phases were larger for the complex salt with the shorter polyacrylate ions. PMID:21650463

  8. Consolidation, permeability, and strength of crushed salt/bentonite mixtures with application to the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant)

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifle, T.W. )

    1991-01-01

    Three tests were performed to measure the consolidation, permeability, and compressive strength of specimens prepared from bentonite/crushed salt mixtures. Each mixture comprised 30% bentonite and 70% crushed salt based on total dry weight. Brine was added to each mixture to adjust its water content to either 5 or 10% (nominal) of the total dry weight of the mixture. In the consolidation tests, each specimen was subjected to multiple stages of successively higher hydrostatic stress (pressure). During each stage, the pressure was maintained at a constant level and volumetric strain data were continuously logged. By using multiple stages, consolidation data were obtained at several pressures and the time required to consolidate the specimens to full saturation was reduced. Once full saturation was achieved, each specimen was subjected to a final test stage in which the hydrostatic stress was reduced and a permeability test performed. Permeability was measured using the steady flow of brine and was found to range between 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}17} and 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}17} m{sup 2}. After the final test stage, unconfined compressive strength was determined for each specimen and was found to range between 0.5 and 8.1 MPa. Two constitutive models were fitted to the consolidation data. One relatively simple model related volumetric strain to time while the other related instantaneous density to time, pressure, and initial density. 8 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. Eutectics as improved pharmaceutical materials: design, properties and characterization.

    PubMed

    Cherukuvada, Suryanarayan; Nangia, Ashwini

    2014-01-28

    Eutectics are a long known class of multi-component solids with important and useful applications in daily life. In comparison to other multi-component crystalline solids, such as salts, solid solutions, molecular complexes and cocrystals, eutectics are less studied in terms of molecular structure organization and bonding interactions. Classically, a eutectic is defined based on its low melting point compared to the individual components. In this article, we attempt to define eutectics not just based on thermal methods but from a structural organization view point, and discuss their microstructures and properties as organic materials vis-a-vis solid solutions and cocrystals. The X-ray crystal structure of a cocrystal is different from that of the individual components whereas the unit cell of a solid solution is similar to that of one of the components. Eutectics are closer to the latter species in that their crystalline arrangement is similar to the parent components but they are different with respect to the structural integrity. A solid solution possesses structural homogeneity throughout the structure (single phase) but a eutectic is a heterogeneous ensemble of individual components whose crystal structures are like discontinuous solid solutions (phase separated). Thus, a eutectic may be better defined as a conglomerate of solid solutions. A structural analysis of cocrystals, solid solutions and eutectics has led to an understanding that materials with strong adhesive (hetero) interactions between the unlike components will lead to cocrystals whereas those having stronger cohesive (homo/self) interactions will more often give rise to solid solutions (for similar structures of components) and eutectics (for different structures of components). We demonstrate that the same crystal engineering principles which have been profitably utilized for cocrystal design in the past decade can now be applied to make eutectics as novel composite materials, illustrated by stable eutectics of the hygroscopic salt of the anti-tuberculosis drug ethambutol as a case study. A current gap in the characterization of eutectic microstructure may be fulfilled through pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of X-ray diffraction data, which could be a rapid signature technique to differentiate eutectics from their components. PMID:24322207

  10. Fundamental Properties of Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Toni Y Gutknecht; Guy L Fredrickson

    2012-11-01

    Thermal properties of molten salt systems are of interest to electrorefining operations, pertaining to both the Fuel Cycle Research & Development Program (FCR&D) and Spent Fuel Treatment Mission, currently being pursued by the Department of Energy (DOE). The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely impacted by the build-up of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided, during electrorefining operations, include (i) fissile elements build up in the salt that might approach the criticality limits specified for the vessel, (ii) electrolyte freezing at the operating temperature of the electrorefiner due to changes in the liquidus temperature, and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution). The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can be monitored by studying the thermal characteristics of the molten salts as a function of impurity concentration. Simulated salt compositions consisting of the selected rare earth and alkaline earth chlorides, with a eutectic mixture of LiCl-KCl as the carrier electrolyte, were studied to determine the melting points (thermal characteristics) using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). The experimental data were used to model the liquidus temperature. On the basis of the this data, it became possible to predict a spent fuel treatment processing scenario under which electrorefining could no longer be performed as a result of increasing liquidus temperatures of the electrolyte.

  11. Latent energy storage with salt and metal mixtures for solar dynamic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, R. A.; Konstantinou, K. S.

    1988-01-01

    This paper examines three design alternatives for the development of a solar dynamic heat receiver as applied to power systems operating in low earth orbit. These include a base line design used for comparison in ongoing NASA studies, a system incorporating a salt energy storage system with the salt dispersed within a metal mesh and a hybrid system incorporating both a molten salt and molten metal for energy storage. Based on a typical low earth orbit condition, designs are developed and compared to determine the effect of resultant conductivity, heat capacity and heat of fusion on system size, weight, temperature gradients, cycle turbine inlet temperature and material utilization.

  12. Study of eutectic formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, W. R.; Eisa, G. F.; Baskaran, V.; Richardson, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    A theory was developed for the influence of convection on the microstructure of lamellar eutectics. Convection is predicted to produce a coarser microstructure, especially at low freezing rates and large volume fractions of the minority phase. Similary convection is predicted to lower the interfacial undercooling, especially at low freezing rates. Experiments using spin-up/spin-down were performed on the Mn-Bi eutectic. This stirring had a dramatic effect on the microstructure, not only making it coarser but at low freezing rates also changing the morphology of the MnBi. The coarsering persisted to moderately high freezing rates. At the lowest freezing rate, vigorous stirring caused the MnBi to be concentrated at the periphery of the ingot and absent along the center. Progress was made on developing a technique for revealing the three-dimensional microstructure of the MnBi eutectic by time-lapse videotaping while etching.

  13. Semiconductor eutectic solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, A. S.; Yu, J. G.

    1986-12-01

    Two-phase semiconducting eutectics are potential device-materials. Of these, the SnSe-SnSe2 eutectic was chosen for studies in detail because it consists of multi-p/n-layers of SnSe and SnSe2 semiconductors. Since plasma frequency has not been detected in its infrared reflectance spectrum up to 40 micrometers of wavelength, it suggests that the SnSe-SnSe2 eutectic is a nondegenerate semiconductor. As-grown SnSe2 single crystals have hexagonal crystallographic structure and show n-type conductivity. Polycrystalline SnSe and SnSe2 films have been successfully prepared in vacuum using a close-space-vapor transport technique.

  14. New eutectic alloys and their heats of transformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farkas, D.; Birchenall, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Eutectic compositions and congruently melting intermetallic compounds in binary and multicomponent systems among common elements such as Al, Ca, Cu, Mg, P, Si, and Zn may be useful for high temperature heat storage. In this work, heats of fusion of new multicomponent eutectics and intermetallic phases are reported, some of which are competitive with molten salts in heat storage density at high temperatures. The method used to determine unknown eutectic compositions combined results of differential thermal analysis, metallography, and microprobe analysis. The method allows determination of eutectic compositions in no more than three steps. The heats of fusion of the alloys were measured using commercial calorimeters, a differential thermal analyzer, and a differential scanning calorimeter.

  15. Performance of the gas bubble column in molten salt systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sada, E.; Katoh, S.; Nakanishi, A.; Yamanishi, T.; Yoshii, H.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental data on the gas holdup and the mean bubble size in a bubble column with a single nozzle was obtained for gas-molten salt systems of a eutectic mixture of LiCl (58 mol %)-KCl (42 mol %) and molten NaNO/sub 3/. The liquid-phase mass transfer coefficient K /SUB L/ was evaluated from the specific surface area a and the volumetric coefficient K /SUB L/ a data for oxygen and carbon dioxide absorption into molten NaNO/sub 3/. The dimensionless correlations of the performance of bubble columns for aqueous solutions can be extended to the gas-molten salt systems.

  16. Form and structure of self-assembling particles in monoolein-bile salt mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelm, R.P.; Schteingart, C.; Hoffmann, A.F.; Sivia, D.S.

    1995-11-02

    We studied particle morphology in the isotropic part of the bile salt-monoolein-water phase map using small-angle neutron scattering. The bile salts used in this work are cholylglycine and chenodeoxycholylglycine. These systems are models for particle form and molecular arrangement in intestinal content when bile components are replaced by hydrolysis products of dietary triglycerides. We found that the molecular arrangement of the particles present is qualitatively the same as that in the bile salt-phosphatidylcholine systems. This result indicated that the particle morphology is conserved when the products of dietary triglyceride hydrolysis are incorporated, suggesting that the form of bile particle morphology is retained. These observations suggested further that the bile salt and the presence of a hydrocarbon chain are the most important determinants of the functional form of the bile particles, as the monoglyceride is a single-tailed, nonionic surfactant, as opposed to the phosphatidylcholines, which are two-tailed, zwitterionic surfactants. 55 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Simple Cloud Chambers Using a Freezing Mixture of Ice and Cooking Salt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshinaga, Kyohei; Kubota, Miki; Kamata, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    We have developed much simpler cloud chambers that use only ice and cooking salt instead of the dry ice or ice gel pack needed for the cloud chambers produced in our previous work. The observed alpha-ray particle tracks are as clear as those observed using our previous cloud chambers. The tracks can be observed continuously for about 20?min, and…

  18. Simple Cloud Chambers Using a Freezing Mixture of Ice and Cooking Salt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshinaga, Kyohei; Kubota, Miki; Kamata, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    We have developed much simpler cloud chambers that use only ice and cooking salt instead of the dry ice or ice gel pack needed for the cloud chambers produced in our previous work. The observed alpha-ray particle tracks are as clear as those observed using our previous cloud chambers. The tracks can be observed continuously for about 20?min, and

  19. Lyotropic liquid crystal to soft mesocrystal transformation in hydrated salt-surfactant mixtures.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Cemal; Bar?m, Gzde; Dag, mer

    2013-10-25

    Hydrated CaCl2, LiI, and MgCl2 salts induce self-assembly in nonionic surfactants (such as C12H25(OCH2CH2)10OH) to form lyotropic liquid-crystalline (LLC) mesophases that undergo a phase transition to a new type of soft mesocrystal (SMC) under ambient conditions. The SMC samples can be obtained by aging the LLC samples, which were prepared as thin films by spin-coating, dip-coating, or drop-casting of a clear homogenized solution of water, salt, and surfactant over a substrate surface. The LLC mesophase exists up to a salt/surfactant mole ratio of 8, 10, and 4 (corresponding to 59, 68, and 40?wt% salt/surfactant) in the CaCl2, LiI, and MgCl2 mesophases, respectively. The SMC phase can transform back to a LLC mesophase at a higher relative humidity. The phase transformations have been monitored using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), polarized optical microscopy (POM), and FTIR techniques. The LLC mesophases only diffract at small angles, but the SMCs diffract at both small and wide angles. The broad surfactant features in the FTIR spectra of the LLC mesophases become sharp and well resolved upon SMC formation. The unit cell of the mesophases expands upon SMC transformation, in which the expansion is largest in the MgCl2 and smallest in the CaCl2 systems. The POM images of the SMCs display birefringent textures with well-defined edges, similar to crystals. However, the surface of the crystals is highly patterned, like buckling patterns, which indicates that these crystals are quite soft. This unusual phase behavior could be beneficial in designing new soft materials in the fields of phase-changing materials and mesostructured materials, and it demonstrates the richness of the phase behavior in the salt-surfactant mesophases. PMID:24105762

  20. Dielectric relaxation and underlying dynamics of electrolyte solutions and solvent-molten salt mixtures using terahertz time-domain transmission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaki, Melanie Lynette Thongs

    Terahertz (THz) transmission spectroscopy is used to obtain the frequency dependent complex dielectric constants of water, methanol, and propylene carbonate, and solutions of lithium salts in these solvents, as well as mixtures of acetonitrile and a room-temperature molten salt. The behavior of the pure solvents is modeled with either two (water and acetonitrile) or three (methanol and propylene carbonate) Debye relaxations. For solutions of lithium salts, the effects of ionic solvation on the relaxation behavior of the solvents is discussed in terms of modifications to the values of the Debye parameters of the pure solvents. In this way we obtain estimates for numbers of irrotationally bound solvent molecules, the numbers of bonds broken or formed, and the effects of ions on the higher frequency relaxations. The same information was obtained for molten salt-acetonitrile systems. In addition, it was determined that at low molten salt concentrations, the mixtures behave like electrolyte solutions of a crystalline salt dissolved in a solvent. At higher molten salt concentrations, the behavior is that of a mixture of two liquids.

  1. Ion specificity at a low salt concentration in water-methanol mixtures exemplified by a growth of polyelectrolyte multilayer.

    PubMed

    Long, Yunchao; Wang, Tao; Liu, Lvdan; Liu, Guangming; Zhang, Guangzhao

    2013-03-19

    By use of a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D), we have investigated the specific ion effect on the growth of poly(sodium 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonate)/poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) multilayer at a salt concentration as low as 2.0 mM in water-methanol mixtures. QCM-D results demonstrate that specific ion effect can be observed in methanol and water-methanol mixtures though it is negligible in water. Moreover, the specific ion effect is amplified as the molar fraction of methanol (xM) increases from 0% to 75% but is weakened again with the further increase of xM from 75% to 100%. Nuclear magnetic resonance measurements reveal that the counterion-polyelectrolyte segment interactions may not account for the observed ion specificity. By extending the Collins' concept of matching water affinities to methanol and water-methanol mixtures, we suggest that the ion-solvent interactions and the resulted counterion-charged group interactions are responsible for the occurrence of the specific ion effect. The conductivity measurements indicate that water and methanol molecules may form complexes, and the change of relative proportion of complexes with the xM causes the amplification or weakening of the specific ion effect. PMID:23425248

  2. Simple cloud chambers using a freezing mixture of ice and cooking salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaga, Kyohei; Kubota, Miki; Kamata, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    We have developed much simpler cloud chambers that use only ice and cooking salt instead of the dry ice or ice gel pack needed for the cloud chambers produced in our previous work. The observed alpha-ray particle tracks are as clear as those observed using our previous cloud chambers. The tracks can be observed continuously for about 20?min, and the preparation and operation are simple.

  3. The adiabatic compressibility of two-phase systems of salt mixture melts based on lithium fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, V. P.; Minchenko, V. I.

    2009-12-01

    The adiabatic compressibility coefficients of stratifying liquid lithium fluoride mixtures with potassium, rubidium, and cesium bromides and iodides were determined by the acoustic method with invoking density data. The difference of the compressibilities of phases along the saturation line was found to depend on the ratio between component bond energies. A compressibility jump was observed experimentally in the passage through the critical point.

  4. Extensive NMRD studies of Ni(II) salt solutions in water and water-glycerol mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kowalewski, J; Egorov, A; Kruk, D; Laaksonen, A; Nikkhou Aski, S; Parigi, G; Westlund, P-O

    2008-11-01

    Aqueous solutions of simple nickel(II) salts are a classical test case for theories of the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) and its dependence on the magnetic field (nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion, NMRD), going back to late fifties. We present here new experimental data, extending the NMRD range up to 21T (900 MHz). In addition to salt solutions in (acidified) water, we have also measured on solutions containing glycerol. The aqueous solution data do not show any significant changes compared to the earlier experiments. The interpretation, based on the general ("slow-motion") theory is also similar to the earlier work from our laboratory. The NMRD-data in mixed solvents are qualitatively different, indicating that the glycerol not only changes the solution viscosity, but may also enter the first coordination sphere of the metal ion, resulting in lower symmetry complexes, characterized by non-vanishing averaged zero-field splitting. This hypothesis is corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations. A strategy appropriate for interpreting the NMRD-data for the chemically complicated systems of this type is proposed. PMID:18809345

  5. Extensive NMRD studies of Ni(II) salt solutions in water and water glycerol mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewski, J.; Egorov, A.; Kruk, D.; Laaksonen, A.; Nikkhou Aski, S.; Parigi, G.; Westlund, P.-O.

    2008-11-01

    Aqueous solutions of simple nickel(II) salts are a classical test case for theories of the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) and its dependence on the magnetic field (nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion, NMRD), going back to late fifties. We present here new experimental data, extending the NMRD range up to 21 T (900 MHz). In addition to salt solutions in (acidified) water, we have also measured on solutions containing glycerol. The aqueous solution data do not show any significant changes compared to the earlier experiments. The interpretation, based on the general ("slow-motion") theory is also similar to the earlier work from our laboratory. The NMRD-data in mixed solvents are qualitatively different, indicating that the glycerol not only changes the solution viscosity, but may also enter the first coordination sphere of the metal ion, resulting in lower symmetry complexes, characterized by non-vanishing averaged zero-field splitting. This hypothesis is corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations. A strategy appropriate for interpreting the NMRD-data for the chemically complicated systems of this type is proposed.

  6. Effects of rice powder salt solution and milk-rice mixture on acute watery diarrhea in young children.

    PubMed

    Sirivichayakul, C; Chokejindachai, W; Vithayasai, N; Chanthavanich, P; Pengsaa, K; Wisetsing, P; Harikul, S; Rathvuth, H; Sabchareon, A

    2000-06-01

    A randomized pilot study was carried out to compare the safety and effectiveness of rice powder salt solution (RPSS) in combination with milk-rice mixture (RPSS-MR group, n = 17) with other two regimens, glucose-based oral rehydration solution (ORS) combined with MR (ORS-MR group, n = 17) and ORS combined with formula milk (ORS-milk group, n = 14) in the treatment of acute watery diarrhea with mild to moderate dehydration in 48 boys younger than 2 years. Results showed that in the first 24 hours patients in the RPSS-MR group had significantly smaller amounts of stool weight (32.7 g/kg) than those in the ORS-MR group (67.5 g/kg) and ORS-milk group (59.2 g/kg) (p< 0.05 for both measurements). Patients in the RPSS-MR group also had significantly shorter duration of diarrhea (29.6 hours) than the other two groups (43.8 hours and 49.6 hours, respectively) (p < 0.05 for both measurements). The stool weight and duration of diarrhea between the ORS-MR group and the ORS-milk group were not significantly different. The positive effect of milk rice mixture was not demonstrated in the study due to the significantly more severe diarrhea in the ORS-MR group. The effectiveness of the RPSS-MR is therefore likely due to mainly RPSS. PMID:11127339

  7. Intergranular tellurium cracking of nickel-based alloys in molten Li, Be, Th, U/F salt mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatiev, Victor; Surenkov, Alexander; Gnidoy, Ivan; Kulakov, Alexander; Uglov, Vadim; Vasiliev, Alexander; Presniakov, Mikhail

    2013-09-01

    In Russia, R&D on Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) are concentrated now on fast/intermediate spectrum concepts which were recognized as long term alternative to solid fueled fast reactors due to their attractive features: strong negative feedback coefficients, easy in-service inspection, and simplified fuel cycle. For high-temperature MSR corrosion of the metallic container alloy in primary circuit is the primary concern. Key problem receiving current attention include surface fissures in Ni-based alloys probably arising from fission product tellurium attack. This paper summarizes results of corrosion tests conducted recently to study effect of oxidation state in selected fuel salt on tellurium attack and to develop means of controlling tellurium cracking in the special Ni-based alloys recently developed for molten salt actinide recycler and tranforming (MOSART) system. Tellurium corrosion of Ni-based alloys was tested at temperatures up to 750 °C in stressed and unloaded conditions in molten LiF-BeF2 salt mixture fueled by about 20 mol% of ThF4 and 2 mol% of UF4 at different [U(IV)]/[U(III)] ratios: 0.7, 4, 20, 100 and 500. Following Ni-based alloys (in mass%): HN80М-VI (Mo—12, Cr—7.6, Nb—1.5), HN80МТY (Mo—13, Cr—6.8, Al—1.1, Ti—0.9), HN80МТW (Mo—9.4, Cr—7.0, Ti—1.7, W—5.5) and ЕМ-721 (W—25.2, Cr—5.7, Ti—0.17) were used for the study in the corrosion facility. If the redox state the fuel salt is characterized by uranium ratio [U(IV)]/[U(III)] < 1 the alloys' specimens get a more negative stationary electrode potential than equilibrium electrode potentials of some uranium intermetallic compounds and alloys with nickel and molybdenum. This leads to spontaneous behavior of alloy formation processes on the specimens' surface and further diffusion of uranium deep into the metallic phase. As consequence of this films of intermetallic compounds and alloys of nickel, molybdenum, tungsten with uranium are formed on the alloys specimens' surface, and intergranular corrosion does not take place. In the fuel salt with [U(IV)]/[U(III)] = 4-20 the potentials of uranium alloy formation with the main components of the tested alloys are not reached, that's why alloys and intermetallic compounds are not formed on the surface of the investigated chromium-nickel alloys. Under such conditions any intergranular tellurium corrosion of the selected alloys does not occur. In the fuel salt with [U(IV)/]/[U(III)] = 100 the potentials of uranium alloy formation with the main components of the tested alloys are not also reached. Under such redox conditions any traces intergranular tellurium IGC on the HN80MTY and H80M-VI alloys specimens are not found. Certain signs of incipient IGC in the form of tellurium presence on the grain boundaries in the HN80MTB and EM-721 alloys surface layer and formation of not too deep cracks on HN80MTB alloy surface were revealed at [U(IV)/]/[U(III)] = 100. With this uranium ratio in the presence of corrosion products on the surface of all of the alloys films, containing tellurium, metals of the construction alloys and carbon, are formed. In the melt with [U(IV)]/[U(III)] = 500 in all of the alloys tested the tellurium IGC took place. The HN80MTY alloy shows the maximum resistance to tellurium IGC. The intensity of tellurium IGC of the alloy (the K parameter) is by 3-5 times lower as compared to other alloys. The EM-721 alloy has the minimal resistance to tellurium IGC (K = 9200 pc m/cm, the depth of cracks is up to 434 μm). The studies have shown, that the intensity of the nickel alloys IGC is controlled by the [U(IV)]/[U(III)] ratio, and its dependence on this parameter is of threshold character. Providing the uranium ratio value's monitoring and regulation, it is possible to control the tellurium corrosion and in such a way to eliminate IGC completely or to minimize its value. The alloys strength characteristics and their structure were changed insignificantly after testing within the [U(IV)]/[U(III)] range from 0.7 tо 100. The changes are not linked with the influence of fuel salt, containing tellurium additions, but are stipulated by alloys structure, temperature factor, exposure time and mechanical loads. Significant effect of tellurium cracking on the alloys (excepting HN80MTY) strength characteristics was established after corrosion testing with [U(IV)]/[U(III)] = 500. In the absence of IGC all of the alloys investigated have a good ductility at high strength characteristics. The disrupture of specimens under mechanical tests both before and after corrosion tests of all alloys except for ЕМ-721 proceeds on a ductile mechanism. On the EM-721 alloy specimens, both in their initial state and after corrosion testing, clear signs of brittle destruction, caused by heterogeneity of its structure due to the presence of tungsten phase, are very clearly observed. The presence of such phases increases the alloy IGC and leads to reduction of the alloy resistance tellurium damage. The HN80MTY alloy has the best corrosion and mechanical properties. It does not undergo tellurium IGC in the molten 75LiF-5BeF2-20ThF4 salt mixture fueled by about 2 mol% of UF4 with [U(IV)]/[U(III)] ratio ⩽ 100. The alloy has high resistance to tellurium cracking at [U(IV)]/[U(III)] = 500. The alloy can be recommended as the main construction material for the fuel circuit with selected salt composition up to temperature 750 °С.

  8. Utilization of temporal dominance of sensations and time intensity methodology for development of low-sodium Mozzarella cheese using a mixture of salts.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, J F; Gonalves, C S; Pereira, R C; Carneiro, J D S; Pinheiro, A C M

    2014-01-01

    Evidence has linked excessive salt consumption to the development of chronic degenerative diseases. Therefore, special attention has been given to the consumption of healthier products with reduced sodium contents. This study aimed to develop a Mozzarella cheese with a reduced sodium content using a mixture of salts through acceptance testing and temporal sensory evaluation. The following 3 formulations of Mozzarella cheese were prepared: formulation A (control), which was produced only with NaCl (0% sodium reduction), formulation B (30% sodium reduction), and formulation C (54% sodium reduction). Every formulation was produced using a mixture of salts consisting of NaCl, KCl, and monosodium glutamate at different concentrations. The products underwent sensory acceptance tests, and the time intensity and temporal dominance of sensations were evaluated. The proportions of salts used did not cause strange or bad tastes but did result in lower intensities of saltiness. Mozzarella with low sodium content (B and C) had a sensory acceptance similar to that of traditional Mozzarella (A). Therefore, the use of a mixture of salts consisting of NaCl, KCl, and monosodium glutamate is a viable alternative for the production of Mozzarella, with up to a 54% reduction in the sodium content while still maintaining acceptable sensory quality. PMID:24881790

  9. Processing eutectics in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, F. C.; Galasso, S. F.

    1975-01-01

    The investigations of directional solidification have indicated the necessity of establishing a secure foundation in earth-based laboratory processing in order to properly assess low-gravity processing. Emphasis was placed on evaluating the regularity of microstructure of the rod-like eutectic Al-Al3Ni obtained under different conditions of growth involving the parameters of thermal gradient, solidification rate, and interfacial curvature. In the case of Al-Al3Ni, where the Al3Ni phase appears as facets rods, solidification rate was determined to be a controlling parameter. Zone melting of thin eutectic films showed that for films of the order of 10 to 20 micrometers thick, the extra surface energy appears to act to stabilize a regular microstructure. The results suggest that the role of low-gravity as provided in space-laboratory processing of materials is to be sought in the possibility of generating a higher thermal gradient in the solidifying ingot for a given power input-output arrangement than can be obtained under normal one-g processes.

  10. Coatings for directional eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rairden, J. R.; Jackson, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    Coatings developed to provide oxidation protection for the directionally-solidified eutectic alloy NiTaC-B (4.4 weight percent Cr) were evaluated. Of seven Co-, Fe- and Ni-base coatings that were initially investigated, best resistance to cyclic oxidation was demonstrated by duplex coatings fabricated by depositing a layer of NiCrAl(Y) by vacuum evaporation from an electron beam source followed by deposition of an Al overlayer using the pack cementation process. It was found that addition of carbon to the coating alloy substantially eliminated the problem of fiber denudation in TaC-type eutectic alloys. Burner rig cycled NiTaC-B samples coated with Ni-20Cr-5Al-0.1C-0.1Y+Al and rupture-tested at 1100 deg C performed as well as or better than uncoated, vacuum cycled and air-tested NiTaC-13; however, a slight degradation with respect to uncoated material was noted in air-stress rupture tests at 870 deg C for both cycled and uncycled samples.

  11. Eutectic Syntheses of Graphitic Carbon with High Pyrazinic Nitrogen Content.

    PubMed

    Fechler, Nina; Zussblatt, Niels P; Rothe, Regina; Schlögl, Robert; Willinger, Marc-Georg; Chmelka, Bradley F; Antonietti, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Mixtures of phenols/ketones and urea show eutectic behavior upon gentle heating. These mixtures possess liquid-crystalline-like phases that can be processed. The architecture of phenol/ketone acts as structure-donating motif, while urea serves as melting-point reduction agent. Condensation at elevated temperatures results in nitrogen-containing carbons with remarkably high nitrogen content of mainly pyrazinic nature. PMID:26178584

  12. Composition formulas of binary eutectics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y. P.; Dong, D. D.; Dong, C.; Luo, L. J.; Wang, Q.; Qiang, J. B.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-12-01

    The present paper addresses the long-standing composition puzzle of eutectic points by introducing a new structural tool for the description of short-range-order structural unit, the cluster-plus-glue-atom model. In this model, any structure is dissociated into a 1st-neighbor cluster and a few glue atoms between the clusters, expressed by a cluster formula [cluster]gluex. This model is applied here to establish the structural model for eutectic liquids, assuming that a eutectic liquid consist of two subunits issued from the relevant eutectic phases, each being expressed by the cluster formula for ideal metallic glasses, i.e., [cluster](glue atom)1 or 3. A structural unit is then composed of two clusters from the relevant eutectic phases plus 2, 4, or 6 glue atoms. Such a dual cluster formulism is well validated in all boron-containing (except those located by the extreme phase diagram ends) and in some commonly-encountered binary eutectics, within accuracies below 1 at.%. The dual cluster formulas vary extensively and are rarely identical even for eutectics of close compositions. They are generally formed with two distinctly different cluster types, with special cluster matching rules such as cuboctahedron plus capped trigonal prism and rhombidodecahedron plus octahedral antiprism.

  13. Composition formulas of binary eutectics.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y P; Dong, D D; Dong, C; Luo, L J; Wang, Q; Qiang, J B; Wang, Y M

    2015-01-01

    The present paper addresses the long-standing composition puzzle of eutectic points by introducing a new structural tool for the description of short-range-order structural unit, the cluster-plus-glue-atom model. In this model, any structure is dissociated into a 1(st)-neighbor cluster and a few glue atoms between the clusters, expressed by a cluster formula [cluster]gluex. This model is applied here to establish the structural model for eutectic liquids, assuming that a eutectic liquid consist of two subunits issued from the relevant eutectic phases, each being expressed by the cluster formula for ideal metallic glasses, i.e., [cluster](glue atom)1 or 3. A structural unit is then composed of two clusters from the relevant eutectic phases plus 2, 4, or 6 glue atoms. Such a dual cluster formulism is well validated in all boron-containing (except those located by the extreme phase diagram ends) and in some commonly-encountered binary eutectics, within accuracies below 1 at.%. The dual cluster formulas vary extensively and are rarely identical even for eutectics of close compositions. They are generally formed with two distinctly different cluster types, with special cluster matching rules such as cuboctahedron plus capped trigonal prism and rhombidodecahedron plus octahedral antiprism. PMID:26658618

  14. Composition formulas of binary eutectics

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Y. P.; Dong, D. D.; Dong, C.; Luo, L. J.; Wang, Q.; Qiang, J. B.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-01-01

    The present paper addresses the long-standing composition puzzle of eutectic points by introducing a new structural tool for the description of short-range-order structural unit, the cluster-plus-glue-atom model. In this model, any structure is dissociated into a 1st-neighbor cluster and a few glue atoms between the clusters, expressed by a cluster formula [cluster]gluex. This model is applied here to establish the structural model for eutectic liquids, assuming that a eutectic liquid consist of two subunits issued from the relevant eutectic phases, each being expressed by the cluster formula for ideal metallic glasses, i.e., [cluster](glue atom)1 or 3. A structural unit is then composed of two clusters from the relevant eutectic phases plus 2, 4, or 6 glue atoms. Such a dual cluster formulism is well validated in all boron-containing (except those located by the extreme phase diagram ends) and in some commonly-encountered binary eutectics, within accuracies below 1 at.%. The dual cluster formulas vary extensively and are rarely identical even for eutectics of close compositions. They are generally formed with two distinctly different cluster types, with special cluster matching rules such as cuboctahedron plus capped trigonal prism and rhombidodecahedron plus octahedral antiprism. PMID:26658618

  15. Rheology Of MonoSodium Titanate (MST) And Modified Mst (mMST) Mixtures Relevant To The Salt Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D. C.; Martino, C. J.; Shehee, T. C.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-07-31

    The Savannah River National Laboratory performed measurements of the rheology of suspensions and settled layers of treated material applicable to the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility. Suspended solids mixtures included monosodium titanate (MST) or modified MST (mMST) at various solid concentrations and soluble ion concentrations with and without the inclusion of kaolin clay or simulated sludge. Layers of settled solids were MST/sludge or mMST/sludge mixtures, either with or without sorbed strontium, over a range of initial solids concentrations, soluble ion concentrations, and settling times.

  16. Electrochemical method of producing eutectic uranium alloy and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Horton, James A. (Livermore, CA); Hayden, H. Wayne (Oakridge, TN)

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method for continuous production of liquid uranium alloys through the electrolytic reduction of uranium chlorides. The apparatus includes an electrochemical cell formed from an anode shaped to form an electrolyte reservoir, a cathode comprising a metal, such as iron, capable of forming a eutectic uranium alloy having a melting point less than the melting point of pure uranium, and molten electrolyte in the reservoir comprising a chlorine or fluorine containing salt and uranium chloride. The method of the invention produces an eutectic uranium alloy by creating an electrolyte reservoir defined by a container comprising an anode, placing an electrolyte in the reservoir, the electrolyte comprising a chlorine or fluorine containing salt and uranium chloride in molten form, positioning a cathode in the reservoir where the cathode comprises a metal capable of forming an uranium alloy having a melting point less than the melting point of pure uranium, and applying a current between the cathode and the anode.

  17. Coatings for directional eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rairden, J. R.; Jackson, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the development of an environmentally stable coating for a very high strength, directionally solidified eutectic alloy designated NiTaC-13. Three duplex (two-layer) coatings survived 3,000 hours on a cyclic oxidation test (1,100 C to 90 C). These coatings were fabricated by first depositing a layer of NiCrAl(Y) by vacuum evaporation from an electron beam heated source, followed by depositing an aluminizing overlayer. The alloy after exposure with these coatings was denuded of carbide fibers at the substrate/coating interface. It was demonstrated that TaC fiber denudation can be greatly retarded by applying a carbon-bearing coating. The coating was applied by thermal spraying followed by aluminization. Specimens coated with NiCrAlCY+Al survived over 2,000 hours in the cyclic oxidation test with essentially no TaC denudation. Coating ductility was studied for coated and heat-treated bars, and stress rupture life at 871 C and 1,100 C was determined for coated and cycled bars.

  18. Functionalization of graphene using deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Hayyan, Maan; Abo-Hamad, Ali; AlSaadi, Mohammed AbdulHakim; Hashim, Mohd Ali

    2015-12-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have received attention in various applications because of their distinctive properties. In this work, DESs were used as functionalizing agents for graphene due to their potential to introduce new functional groups and cause other surface modifications. Eighteen different types of ammonium- and phosphonium-salt-based DESs were prepared and characterized by FTIR. The graphene was characterized by FTIR, STA, Raman spectroscopy, XRD, SEM, and TEM. Additional experiments were performed to study the dispersion behavior of the functionalized graphene in different solvents. The DESs exhibited both reduction and functionalization effects on DES-treated graphene. Dispersion stability was investigated and then characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and zeta potential. DES-modified graphene can be used in many applications, such as drug delivery, wastewater treatment, catalysts, composite materials, nanofluids, and biosensors. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on the use of DESs for graphene functionalization. PMID:26264683

  19. Functionalization of graphene using deep eutectic solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayyan, Maan; Abo-Hamad, Ali; AlSaadi, Mohammed AbdulHakim; Hashim, Mohd Ali

    2015-08-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have received attention in various applications because of their distinctive properties. In this work, DESs were used as functionalizing agents for graphene due to their potential to introduce new functional groups and cause other surface modifications. Eighteen different types of ammonium- and phosphonium-salt-based DESs were prepared and characterized by FTIR. The graphene was characterized by FTIR, STA, Raman spectroscopy, XRD, SEM, and TEM. Additional experiments were performed to study the dispersion behavior of the functionalized graphene in different solvents. The DESs exhibited both reduction and functionalization effects on DES-treated graphene. Dispersion stability was investigated and then characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and zeta potential. DES-modified graphene can be used in many applications, such as drug delivery, wastewater treatment, catalysts, composite materials, nanofluids, and biosensors. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on the use of DESs for graphene functionalization.

  20. The influence of ternary alloying elements on the Al-Si eutectic microstructure and the Si morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darlapudi, A.; McDonald, S. D.; Terzi, S.; Prasad, A.; Felberbaum, M.; StJohn, D. H.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the ternary alloying elements Cu, Mg and Fe on the Al-Si eutectic microstructure is investigated using a commercial purity Al-10 wt%Si alloy in unmodified and Sr-modified conditions. A change in the Al-Si eutectic microstructure was associated with a change in the nucleation density of the eutectic grains caused by the addition of ternary alloying elements. When the ternary alloying element addition resulted in an increase in the eutectic nucleation frequency, a fibrous to flake-like transition was observed within the eutectic grain. When the ternary alloying element addition decreased the eutectic nucleation frequency significantly, a change in the eutectic morphology from flake-like to a mixture of flake-like and fibrous morphologies was observed. The mechanism of Al-Si eutectic modification is discussed. The growth velocity of the eutectic grain - liquid interface and the constitutional driving force available for growth are proposed as important parameters that influence the degree of eutectic modification in Al-Si alloys.

  1. Accelerator-driven subcritical fission in molten salt core: Closing the nuclear fuel cycle for green nuclear energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Peter; Assadi, Saeed; Badgley, Karie; Baker, William; Comeaux, Justin; Gerity, James; Kellams, Joshua; McInturff, Al; Pogue, Nathaniel; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Sattarov, Akhdiyor; Simpson, Michael; Sooby, Elizabeth; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2013-04-01

    A technology for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS) is being developed as a basis for the destruction of the transuranics in used nuclear fuel. The molten salt fuel is a eutectic mixture of NaCl and the chlorides of the transuranics and fission products. The core is driven by proton beams from a strong-focusing cyclotron stack. This approach uniquely provides an intrinsically safe means to drive a core fueled only with transuranics, thereby eliminating competing breeding terms.

  2. Accelerator-driven subcritical fission in molten salt core: Closing the nuclear fuel cycle for green nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, Peter; Assadi, Saeed; Badgley, Karie; Baker, William; Comeaux, Justin; Gerity, James; Kellams, Joshua; McInturff, Al; Pogue, Nathaniel; Sattarov, Akhdiyor; Sooby, Elizabeth; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Simpson, Michael

    2013-04-19

    A technology for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS) is being developed as a basis for the destruction of the transuranics in used nuclear fuel. The molten salt fuel is a eutectic mixture of NaCl and the chlorides of the transuranics and fission products. The core is driven by proton beams from a strong-focusing cyclotron stack. This approach uniquely provides an intrinsically safe means to drive a core fueled only with transuranics, thereby eliminating competing breeding terms.

  3. Physical properties of liquid NaF-LiF-LaF3 and NaF-LiF-NdF3 eutectic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulavin, L.; Plevachuk, Yu.; Sklyarchuk, V.; Shtablavyy, I.; Faidiuk, N.; Savchuk, R.

    2013-02-01

    Electrical conductivity, thermoelectric power and viscosity measurements were carried out for the ionic liquid mixtures, formed after melting of the NaF-LiF-LaF3 and NaF-LiF-NdF3 eutectics in the wide temperature intervals above the melting points. It was found that temperature coefficient of the thermoelectric power of the both ionic mixtures changes a sign, at 948 ± 5 K in NaF-LiF-LaF3 and at 973 ± 5 K in NaF-LiF-NdF3. It was shown that temperature dependence of viscosity correlates with electrophysical data. The results can be used in choosing a blanket for the liquid salt reactor.

  4. A Comparative Study of the Corrosion Behavior of Three Stainless Steels in an Eutectic (Li,Na,K)2CO3 Melt with and without (Na,K)Cl Additives at 973K in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, C. L.; Liu, Y.

    2011-04-01

    The ternary carbonate eutectic mixture of Li2CO3, K2CO3 and Na2CO3 as a heat transfer and storage medium has excellent thermophysical properties, but with high viscidity as compared with some other inorganic salts such as chlorides and nitrates. The addition of chlorides or fluorides to molten carbonates may improve their fluidity, but possibly making the melt become more corrosive. In this study, the corrosion behavior of type 304, 310 and 316 stainless steels in an eutectic (Li,Na,K)2CO3 melt with and without an eutectic mixture of NaCl and KCl at 973K in air have been examined. The experimental results indicated that 310 steel shows a much better corrosion resistance in molten carbonates than both 304 and 316 steels, due to the formation of a continuous LiCrO2 scale. The addition of chlorides to carbonates melt accelerated the corrosion of the steels, especially 310 steel, producing scales with more porosity.

  5. Solvatochromic probe behavior within choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvents: effect of temperature and water.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ashish; Pandey, Siddharth

    2014-12-18

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have shown potential as promising environmentally friendly alternatives to conventional solvents. Many common and popular DESs are obtained by simply mixing a salt and a H-bond donor. Properties of such a DES depend on its constituents. Change in temperature and addition of water, a benign cosolvent, can change the physicochemical properties of DESs. The effect of changing temperature and addition of water on solvatochromic probe behavior within three DESs formed from choline chloride combined with 1,2-ethanediol, glycerol, and urea, respectively, in 1:2 mol ratios termed ethaline, glyceline, and reline is presented. Increase in temperature results in reduced H-bond donating acidity of the DESs. Dipolarity/polarizability and H-bond accepting basicity do not change with changing temperature of the DESs. The response of the fluorescence probe pyrene also indicates a decrease in the polarity of the DESs as temperature is increased. Addition of water to DES results in increased dipolarity/polarizability and a decrease in H-bond accepting basicity. Except for pyrene, solvatochromic probes exhibit responses close to those predicted from ideal-additive behavior with slight preferential solvation by DES within the aqueous mixtures. Pyrene response reveals significant preferential solvation by DES and/or the presence of solvent-solvent interactions, especially within aqueous mixtures of ethaline and glyceline, the DESs constituted of H-bond donors with hydroxyl functionalities. FTIR absorbance and Raman spectroscopic measurements of aqueous DES mixtures support the outcomes from solvatochromic probe responses. Aqueous mixtures of ethaline and glyceline possess relatively more interspecies H-bonds as compared to aqueous mixtures of reline, where interstitial accommodation of water within the reline molecular network appears to dominate. PMID:25418894

  6. Directional solidification of eutectic composites in space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, A. S.

    1972-01-01

    The Ni-Ni3Ta eutectic and a nickel-base alloy containing 30 wt pct Ta were solidified unidirectionally in an electron beam floating zone melting apparatus. It was found that the volume fraction of the Ni3Ta phase in the Ni-Ni3Ta eutectic mixture was increased from 7.6 to 36 volume pct in agreement with the theory as predicted. Tensile properties of the randomly solidified and unidirectionally solidified Ni-Ni3Ta eutectic were determined as function of solidification rate and temperature. It was found that the ultimate tensile strength decreased as both the test temperature and solidification rate increased. An elongation of 40 pct was obtained for a nickelbase alloy containing 30 wt at room temperature. This unusually large elongation was attributed to the superplastic behavior of the alloy. The critical currents versus the external fields at 2.5, 3.0, 3.5 and 4.2 deg for the unidirectionally solidified Pb-Sn eutectic were measured. The values of critical fields at zero critical currents were obtained by extrapolation.

  7. Devitrification studies of wollastonite-tricalcium phosphate eutectic glass.

    PubMed

    Magallanes-Perdomo, M; Pena, P; De Aza, P N; Carrodeguas, R G; Rodrguez, M A; Turrillas, X; De Aza, S; De Aza, A H

    2009-10-01

    The present paper describes and discusses the devitrification and crystallization process of wollastonite-tricalcium phosphate (W-TCP) eutectic glass. This process was studied in situ from room temperature up to 1375 degrees C, by neutron diffractometry in vacuum. The data obtained were combined and compared with those performed in ambient atmosphere by differential thermal analysis and with those of samples fired in air at selected temperatures, and then cooled down and subsequently studied by laboratory XRD and field emission scanning electron microscopy fitted with energy X-ray dispersive spectroscopy. The experimental evidence indicates that the devitrification of W-TCP eutectic glass begins at approximately 870 degrees C with the crystallization of a Ca-deficient apatite phase, followed by wollastonite-2M (CaSiO(3)) crystallization at approximately 1006 degrees C. At 1375 degrees C, the bio-glass-ceramic is composed of quasi-rounded colonies formed by a homogeneous mixture of pseudowollastonite (CaSiO(3)) and alpha-tricalcium phosphate (Ca(3)(PO(4))(2)). This microstructure corresponds to irregular eutectic structures. It was also found that it is possible to obtain from the eutectic composition of the wollastonite-tricalcium phosphate binary system a wide range of bio-glass-ceramics, with different crystalline phases present, through appropriate design of thermal treatments. PMID:19427932

  8. Salt-induced transition from a micellar to a lamellar liquid crystalline phase in dilute mixtures of anionic and nonionic surfactants in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sein, A.; Engberts, J.B.F.N. ); Linden, E. van der; Pas, J.C. van de )

    1993-07-01

    In dilute mixtures of anionic surfactant, sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (NaDoBS), and nonionic poly(ethylene oxide) alkylmonoether (C[sub 13-15]E[sub <7>]) a transition from a micellar to a lamellar phase is found at high salting-out electrolyte (NaCit) concentrations. With an increase of the salt concentration, different types of lamellar aggregates are formed. The existence of different types of aggregates is reflected by changes of the turbidity of the solutions. Light and fluorescence microscopy, freeze-fractured electron microscopy, confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM), and fluorescence depolarization were employed to characterize the aggregates and to induce a mechanism for the transition from a micellar to a lamellar phase. Surfactant aggregation is important in view of possible applications in enhanced oil recovery. 39 refs., 10 figs.

  9. Semiconductor eutectics for energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, A. S.

    1983-04-01

    Directionally-oriented two-phase semiconducting eutectics are potential device-materials. A comprehensive search of the literature gives a list of semiconducting eutectic systems. Among these, the SnSe-SnSe2 was chosen for studies in detail. The SnSe-SnSe2 eutectic grown by the Bridgman technique has a multi-P/N-junction lamellar microstructure. Since its plasma frequency has not been detected within the infrared reflectance spectrum up to 40 micrometers of wavelength, it is, therefore, concluded that the SnSe-SnSe2 eutectic is a non-degenerate semiconductor. SnSe single crystals grown from the vapor phase have a hole concentration of 9.72 x 10(17) cm(+3) and a mobility of 154 cm(2)/sec-v at room temperature. This mobility is proportional to T/sup -1/3/ for T 1300 K and T/sup -2.25/ for T 1300 K. The index of reflection for SnSe single crystal has been determined froma wavelength of micrometers to a wavelength of 40 micrometers and was found to be 3.120 at 3 microns and 3.095 at 15 microns. A current-voltage characteristic expressed as I = I0 exp (qv/2.08 KT) was measured on a SnSe diode, which exhibits a negative resistance after the breakdown.

  10. Fluoride salts and container materials for thermal energy storage applications in the temperature range 973 to 1400 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.; Whittenberger, J. Daniel

    1987-01-01

    Multicomponent fluoride salt mixtures were characterized for use as latent heat of fusion heat storage materials in advanced solar dynamic space power systems with operating temperatures in the range of 973 to 1400 K. The melting points and eutectic composition for many systems with published phase diagrams were verified, and several new eutectic compositions were identified. Additionally, the heats of fusion of several binary and ternary eutectics and congruently melting intermediate compounds were measured by differential scanning calorimetry. The extent of corrosion of various metals by fluoride melts was estimated from thermodynamic considerations, and equilibrium conditions inside a containment vessel were calculated as functions of the initial moisture content of the salt and free volume above the molten salt. Preliminary experimental data on the corrosion of commercial, high-temperature alloys in LiF-19.5CaF2 and NaF-27CaF2-36MgF2 melts are presented and compared to the thermodynamic predictions.

  11. Fluoride salts and container materials for thermal energy storage applications in the temperature range 973 - 1400 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.; Whittenberger, J. Daniel

    1987-01-01

    Multicomponent fluoride salt mixtures were characterized for use as latent heat of fusion heat storage materials in advanced solar dynamic space power systems with operating temperatures in the range of 973 to 1400 K. The melting points and eutectic composition for many systems with published phase diagrams were verified, and several new eutectic compositions were identified. Additionally, the heats of fusion of several binary and ternary eutectics and congruently melting intermediate compounds were measured by differential scanning calorimetry. The extent of corrosion of various metals by fluoride melts was estimated from thermodynamic considerations, and equilibrium conditions inside a containment vessel were calculated as functions of the initial moisture content of the salt and free volume above the molten salt. Preliminary experimental data on the corrosion of commercial, high-temperature alloys in LiF-19.5CaF2 and NaF-27CaF2-36MgF2 melts are presented and compared to the thermodynamic predictions.

  12. Fluoride salts and container materials for thermal energy storage applications in the temperature range 973 - 1400 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Ajay K.; Whittenberger, J. Daniel

    Multicomponent fluoride salt mixtures were characterized for use as latent heat of fusion heat storage materials in advanced solar dynamic space power systems with operating temperatures in the range of 973 to 1400 K. The melting points and eutectic composition for many systems with published phase diagrams were verified, and several new eutectic compositions were identified. Additionally, the heats of fusion of several binary and ternary eutectics and congruently melting intermediate compounds were measured by differential scanning calorimetry. The extent of corrosion of various metals by fluoride melts was estimated from thermodynamic considerations, and equilibrium conditions inside a containment vessel were calculated as functions of the initial moisture content of the salt and free volume above the molten salt. Preliminary experimental data on the corrosion of commercial, high-temperature alloys in LiF-19.5CaF2 and NaF-27CaF2-36MgF2 melts are presented and compared to the thermodynamic predictions.

  13. Eutectic Growth in Three Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    H. Walker; Shan Liu; J.H. Lee; R. Trivedi

    2007-07-01

    Critical experimental studies have been carried out to examine the stability of eutectic morphology in three-dimensional (3-D) samples under diffusive growth conditions. By directionally solidifying capillary samples of the well-characterized Al-Cu eutectic alloy, it is shown that the observed minimum spacing agrees with the value predicted by the Jackson and Hunt (JH) model, but the range of stable spacing is reduced significantly in three dimensions. The ratio of the maximum to minimum eutectic spacing in three dimensions is found to be only 1.2 compared to the predicted value of 2.0 in two dimensions. The narrow range of stable spacing is shown to be due to the instabilities in the third dimension that forms when the local spacing becomes larger than some critical spacing value, which corresponds to the maximum stable spacing. A new mechanism of lamellar creation in the third dimension is observed in which lamella with a local spacing larger than the critical value becomes unstable and forms a sidewise perturbation that becomes enlarged at the leading front and then propagates parallel to the lamella to create a new lamella. Alternately, an array of sidewise perturbations form, which then coalesce at their leading fronts and then become detached from the parent lamella to form a new lamella.

  14. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    SciTech Connect

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  15. Solidification of high temperature molten salts for thermal energy storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffield, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The solidification of phase change materials for the high temperature thermal energy storage system of an advanced solar thermal power system has been examined theoretically. In light of the particular thermophysical properties of candidate phase change high temperature salts, such as the eutectic mixture of NaF - MgF2, the heat transfer characteristics of one-dimensional inward solidification for a cylindrical geometry have been studied. The Biot number for the solidified salt is shown to be the critical design parameter for constant extraction heat flux. A fin-on-fin design concept of heat transfer surface augmentation is proposed in an effort to minimize the effects of the salt's low thermal conductivity and large volume change upon fusing.

  16. Io's surface composition based on reflectance spectra of sulfur/salt mixtures and proton-irradiation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, D. B.; Fanale, F. P.

    1977-01-01

    Available full-disk reflectance spectra of Io in the range 0.3 to 2.5 microns have been used to determine a surface compositional model for Io that is consistent with Io's other known chemical and physical properties. Results indicate that the surface of Io contains abundant dehydrated salts of high Na, Mg, and Fe(3+) content such as bloedite and ferrous iron sulfate. Experiments were performed studying the irradiation damage effects from low-energy proton bombardment, since Io is immersed in Jupiter's magnetosphere.

  17. Phase behavior of quinary mixtures of the type H/sub 2/O-oil-nonionic amphiphile-ionic amphiphile-salt

    SciTech Connect

    Kahlweit, M.; Strey, R.

    1988-03-24

    Five-component mixtures H/sub 2/O-oil-nonionic amphiphile-ionic amphiphile-salt may separate into three liquid phases. In this three-phase body one finds the highest mutual solubility between H/sub 2/O and oil, combined with the lowest interfacial tension between the aqueous and the oil-rich phase. The position of the three-phase body on the temperature scale as well as its extensions depends systematically on the nature of the components, on the ratio between the nonionic and ionic amphiphile, as well as on the brine concentration. An empirical description of the phase behavior is presented that permits qualitative predictions as to the temperature at which to find the three-phase body and what efficiency of the amphiphiles to expect.

  18. Interplay between structure and transport properties of molten salt mixtures of ZnCl2-NaCl-KCl: A molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Manga, Venkateswara Rao; Swinteck, Nichlas; Bringuier, Stefan; Lucas, Pierre; Deymier, Pierre; Muralidharan, Krishna

    2016-03-01

    Molten mixtures of network-forming covalently bonded ZnCl2 and network-modifying ionically bonded NaCl and KCl salts are investigated as high-temperature heat transfer fluids for concentrating solar power plants. Specifically, using molecular dynamics simulations, the interplay between the extent of the network structure, composition, and the transport properties (viscosity, thermal conductivity, and diffusion) of ZnCl2-NaCl-KCl molten salts is characterized. The Stokes-Einstein/Eyring relationship is found to break down in these network-forming liquids at high concentrations of ZnCl2 (>63 mol. %), while the Eyring relationship is seen with increasing KCl concentration. Further, the network modification due to the addition of K ions leads to formation of non-bridging terminal Cl ions, which in turn lead to a positive temperature dependence of thermal conductivity in these melts. This new understanding of transport in these ternary liquids enables the identification of appropriate concentrations of the network formers and network modifiers to design heat transfer fluids with desired transport properties for concentrating solar power plants. PMID:26957165

  19. Interplay between structure and transport properties of molten salt mixtures of ZnCl2-NaCl-KCl: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manga, Venkateswara Rao; Swinteck, Nichlas; Bringuier, Stefan; Lucas, Pierre; Deymier, Pierre; Muralidharan, Krishna

    2016-03-01

    Molten mixtures of network-forming covalently bonded ZnCl2 and network-modifying ionically bonded NaCl and KCl salts are investigated as high-temperature heat transfer fluids for concentrating solar power plants. Specifically, using molecular dynamics simulations, the interplay between the extent of the network structure, composition, and the transport properties (viscosity, thermal conductivity, and diffusion) of ZnCl2-NaCl-KCl molten salts is characterized. The Stokes-Einstein/Eyring relationship is found to break down in these network-forming liquids at high concentrations of ZnCl2 (>63 mol. %), while the Eyring relationship is seen with increasing KCl concentration. Further, the network modification due to the addition of K ions leads to formation of non-bridging terminal Cl ions, which in turn lead to a positive temperature dependence of thermal conductivity in these melts. This new understanding of transport in these ternary liquids enables the identification of appropriate concentrations of the network formers and network modifiers to design heat transfer fluids with desired transport properties for concentrating solar power plants.

  20. Deep eutectic solvents in countercurrent and centrifugal partition chromatography.

    PubMed

    Roehrer, Simon; Bezold, Franziska; Garca, Eva Marra; Minceva, Mirjana

    2016-02-19

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were evaluated as solvents in centrifugal partition chromatography, a liquid-liquid chromatography separation technology. To this end, the partition coefficients of ten natural compounds of different hydrophobicity were determined in non-aqueous biphasic systems containing DES. The influence of the composition of DESs and the presence of water in the biphasic system on the partition coefficient were also examined. In addition, several process relevant physical properties of the biphasic system, such as the density and viscosity of the phases, were measured. A mixture of three to four hydrophobic compounds was successfully separated in a centrifugal partition extractor using a heptane/ethanol/DES biphasic system. PMID:26810802

  1. Electrochemical method of producing eutectic uranium alloy and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Horton, J.A.; Hayden, H.W.

    1995-01-10

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for continuous production of liquid uranium alloys through the electrolytic reduction of uranium chlorides. The apparatus includes an electrochemical cell formed from an anode shaped to form an electrolyte reservoir, a cathode comprising a metal, such as iron, capable of forming a eutectic uranium alloy having a melting point less than the melting point of pure uranium, and molten electrolyte in the reservoir comprising a chlorine or fluorine containing salt and uranium chloride. The method of the invention produces an eutectic uranium alloy by creating an electrolyte reservoir defined by a container comprising an anode, placing an electrolyte in the reservoir, the electrolyte comprising a chlorine or fluorine containing salt and uranium chloride in molten form, positioning a cathode in the reservoir where the cathode comprises a metal capable of forming an uranium alloy having a melting point less than the melting point of pure uranium, and applying a current between the cathode and the anode. 2 figures.

  2. Carbon: Eutectic Syntheses of Graphitic Carbon with High Pyrazinic Nitrogen Content (Adv. Mater. 6/2016).

    PubMed

    Fechler, Nina; Zussblatt, Niels P; Rothe, Regina; Schlögl, Robert; Willinger, Marc-Georg; Chmelka, Bradley F; Antonietti, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Starting from a powder mixture of ketones/urea, gentle heating results in liquefaction below the melting point of the respective components. The back-cover image shows a polarized optical microscopy image of a liquid-crystalline eutectic mixture in the supercooled liquidus, as discussed on page 1287 by N. Fechler and co-workers. This indicates the coupling of the monomers toward larger, preorganized assemblies. From this precursor system, "C2N" carbon is synthesized. PMID:26849666

  3. Potentiometric Sensor for Real-Time Monitoring of Multivalent Ion Concentrations in Molten Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Peter A. Zink; Jan-Fong Jue; Brenda E. Serrano; Guy L. Fredrickson; Ben F. Cowan; Steven D. Herrmann; Shelly X. Li

    2010-07-01

    Electrorefining of spent metallic nuclear fuel in high temperature molten salt systems is a core technology in pyroprocessing, which in turn plays a critical role in the development of advanced fuel cycle technologies. In electrorefining, spent nuclear fuel is treated electrochemically in order to effect separations between uranium, noble metals, and active metals, which include the transuranics. The accumulation of active metals in a lithium chloride-potassium chloride (LiCl-KCl) eutectic molten salt electrolyte occurs at the expense of the UCl3-oxidant concentration in the electrolyte, which must be periodically replenished. Our interests lie with the accumulation of active metals in the molten salt electrolyte. The real-time monitoring of actinide concentrations in the molten salt electrolyte is highly desirable for controlling electrochemical operations and assuring materials control and accountancy. However, real-time monitoring is not possible with current methods for sampling and chemical analysis. A new solid-state electrochemical sensor is being developed for real-time monitoring of actinide ion concentrations in a molten salt electrorefiner. The ultimate function of the sensor is to monitor plutonium concentrations during electrorefining operations, but in this work gadolinium was employed as a surrogate material for plutonium. In a parametric study, polycrystalline sodium beta double-prime alumina (Na-ß?-alumina) discs and tubes were subject to vapor-phase exchange with gadolinium ions (Gd3+) using a gadolinium chloride salt (GdCl3) as a precursor to produce gadolinium beta double-prime alumina (Gd-ß?-alumina) samples. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and microstructural analysis were performed on the ion-exchanged discs to determine the relationship between ion exchange and Gd3+ ion conductivity. The ion-exchanged tubes were configured as potentiometric sensors in order to monitor real-time Gd3+ ion concentrations in mixtures of gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) in LiCl-KCl eutectic molten salts through measurement of the potential difference between a reference and working electrode.

  4. Enhanced electroanalysis in lithium potassium eutectic (LKE) using microfabricated square microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Damion K; Blair, Ewen O; Terry, Jonathan G; Walton, Anthony J; Mount, Andrew R

    2014-11-18

    Molten salts (MSs) are an attractive medium for chemical and electrochemical processing and as a result there is demand for MS-compatible analysis technologies. However, MSs containing redox species present a challenging environment in which to perform analytical measurements because of their corrosive nature, significant thermal convection and the high temperatures involved. This paper outlines the fabrication and characterization of microfabricated square microelectrodes (MSMs) designed for electrochemical analysis in MS systems. Their design enables precise control over electrode dimension, the minimization of stress because of differential thermal expansion through design for high temperature operation, and the minimization of corrosive attack through effective insulation. The exemplar MS system used for characterization was lithium chloride/potassium chloride eutectic (LKE), which has potential applications in pyrochemical nuclear fuel reprocessing, metal refining, molten salt batteries and electric power cells. The observed responses for a range of redox ions between 400 and 500 C (673 and 773 K) were quantitative and typical of microelectrodes. MSMs also showed the reduced iR drop, steady-state diffusion-limited response, and reduced sensitivity to convection seen for microelectrodes under ambient conditions and expected for these electrodes in comparison to macroelectrodes. Diffusion coefficients were obtained in close agreement with literature values, more readily and at greater precision and accuracy than both macroelectrode and previous microelectrode measurements. The feasibility of extracting individual physical parameters from mixtures of redox species (as required in reprocessing) and of the prolonged measurement required for online monitoring was also demonstrated. Together, this demonstrates that MSMs provide enhanced electrode devices widely applicable to the characterization of redox species in a range of MS systems. PMID:25284431

  5. Re-evaluation of the eutectic region of the LiBr-KBr-LiF system

    SciTech Connect

    Redey, L.; Guidotti, R.A.

    1996-05-01

    The separator pellet in a thermal battery consists of electrolyte immobilized by a binder (typically, MgO powder). The melting point of the electrolyte determines the effective operating window for its use in a thermal battery. The development of a two-hour thermal battery required the use of a molten salt that had a lower melting point and larger liquidus range than the LiCl-KCl eutectic which melts at 352 C. Several candidate eutectic electrolyte systems were evaluated for their suitability for this application. One was the LiCl-LiBr-KBr eutectic used at Argonne National Laboratories for high-temperature rechargeable batteries for electric-vehicle applications. Using a custom-designed high-temperature conductivity cell, the authors were able to readily determine the liquidus region for the various compositions studied around the original eutectic for the LiBr-KBr-LiF system. The actual eutectic composition was found to be 60.0 m/o LiBr-37.5 m/o KBr-2.5 m/o LiF with a melting point of 324 {+-} 0.5 C.

  6. Embedded Binary Eutectic Alloy Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzan, D. C.; Shin, S. J.; Guzman, J.; Yuan, C.-W.; Liao, C. Y.; Stone, P. R.; Boswell-Koller, C. N.; Sawyer, C. A.; Bustillo, K. C.; Sherburne, M. P.; Conry, T.; Lieten, R. R.; Dubon, O. D.; Minor, A. M.; Watanabe, M.; Beeman, J. W.; Yu, K. M.; Ager, J. W.; Haller, E. E.

    2012-10-01

    The properties of binary eutectic alloy nanostructures embedded within a matrix are discussed. It is demonstrated that GeAu and GeSn nanostructures embedded in SiO2 form in a bilobed structure as predicted by a simple theory. Upon heating, the nanostructures melt and assume a nominally compositionally homogeneous structure. Slow cooling of the liquid returns the nanostructure to its equilibrium bilobed morphology. Rapid quenching yields a kinetically limited, nearly compositionally homogeneous solid. Rapid thermal annealing can convert this metastable structure again into the bilobed structure. It is, therefore, possible to switch between the bilobed structure and the homogenous structure. The kinetics of the homogeneous composition to bilobe structure transformation depend on composition. Tuning the composition enables one to tune the transformation temperature. Possible technological applications of these nanostructures are discussed.

  7. COMPUTATIONAL THERMODYNAMIC MODELING OF HOT CORROSION OF ALLLOYS HAYNES 242 AND HASTELLOYTMN FOR MOLTEN SALT SERVICE

    SciTech Connect

    Michael V. Glazoff; Piyush Sabharwall; Akira Tokuhiro

    2014-09-01

    An evaluation of thermodynamic aspects of hot corrosion of the superalloys Haynes 242 and HastelloyTM N in the eutectic mixtures of KF and ZrF4 is carried out for development of Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR). This work models the behavior of several superalloys, potential candidates for the AHTR, using computational thermodynamics tool (ThermoCalc), leading to the development of thermodynamic description of the molten salt eutectic mixtures, and on that basis, mechanistic prediction of hot corrosion. The results from these studies indicated that the principal mechanism of hot corrosion was associated with chromium leaching for all of the superalloys described above. However, HastelloyTM N displayed the best hot corrosion performance. This was not surprising given it was developed originally to withstand the harsh conditions of molten salt environment. However, the results obtained in this study provided confidence in the employed methods of computational thermodynamics and could be further used for future alloy design efforts. Finally, several potential solutions to mitigate hot corrosion were proposed for further exploration, including coating development and controlled scaling of intermediate compounds in the KF-ZrF4 system.

  8. A Galinstan-Filled Capillary Probe for Thermal Conductivity Measurements and Its Application to Molten Eutectic {KNO}_3 -{NaNO}_3 -{NO}_2 (HTS) up to 700 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Brun, Niccol; Markides, Christos N.

    2015-10-01

    The successful measurement of the thermal conductivity of molten salts is a challenging undertaking due to the electrically conducting and possibly also aggressive nature of the materials, as well as the elevated temperatures at which these data are required. For accurate and reproducible measurements, it is important to develop a suitable experimental apparatus and methodology. In this study, we explore a modified version of the transient hot-wire method, which employs a molten-metal-filled capillary in order to circumvent some of the issues encountered in previous studies. Specifically, by using a novel flexible U-shaped quartz-capillary, filled with a eutectic mixture of gallium, indium and tin, commercially known as Galinstan, we proceed to measure the thermal conductivity of molten eutectic {KNO}_3 -{NaNO}_3 -{NaNO}_2 . The new probe is demonstrated as being able to measure the thermal conductivity of this molten salt, which is found to range from 0.48 {W}{\\cdot }{m}^{-1}{}{K}^{-1} at 500 K to 0.47 {W}{\\cdot }{m}^{-1}{\\cdot }{K}^{-1} at close to 700 K, with an overall expanded uncertainty (95 % confidence) of 3.1 %. The quartz is found to retain its electrically insulating properties and no current leakage is detected in the sample over the investigated temperature range. The thermal conductivity data reported in the present study are also used to elucidate a partial disagreement found in the literature for this material.

  9. A Galinstan-Filled Capillary Probe for Thermal Conductivity Measurements and Its Application to Molten Eutectic {KNO}_3-{NaNO}_3-{NO}_2 (HTS) up to 700 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Brun, Niccolò; Markides, Christos N.

    2015-11-01

    The successful measurement of the thermal conductivity of molten salts is a challenging undertaking due to the electrically conducting and possibly also aggressive nature of the materials, as well as the elevated temperatures at which these data are required. For accurate and reproducible measurements, it is important to develop a suitable experimental apparatus and methodology. In this study, we explore a modified version of the transient hot-wire method, which employs a molten-metal-filled capillary in order to circumvent some of the issues encountered in previous studies. Specifically, by using a novel flexible U-shaped quartz-capillary, filled with a eutectic mixture of gallium, indium and tin, commercially known as Galinstan, we proceed to measure the thermal conductivity of molten eutectic {KNO}_3-{NaNO}_3-{NaNO}_2. The new probe is demonstrated as being able to measure the thermal conductivity of this molten salt, which is found to range from 0.48 {W}{\\cdot }{m}^{-1}{\\cdot }{K}^{-1} at 500 K to 0.47 {W}{\\cdot }{m}^{-1}{\\cdot }{K}^{-1} at close to 700 K, with an overall expanded uncertainty (95 % confidence) of 3.1 %. The quartz is found to retain its electrically insulating properties and no current leakage is detected in the sample over the investigated temperature range. The thermal conductivity data reported in the present study are also used to elucidate a partial disagreement found in the literature for this material.

  10. Prebiotic Adenine Revisited: Eutectics and Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orgel, Leslie E.

    2004-08-01

    Recent studies support an earlier suggestion that, if adenine was formed prebiotically on the primitive earth, eutectic freezing of hydrogen cyanide solutions is likely to have been important. Here we revisit the suggestion that the synthesis of adenine may have involved the photochemical conversion of the tetramer of hydrogen cyanide in eutectic solution to 4-amino-5-cyano-imidazole. This would make possible a reaction sequence that does not require the presence of free ammonia. It is further suggested that the reaction of cyanoacetylene with cyanate in eutectic solution to give cytosine might have proceeded in parallel with adenine synthesis.

  11. Mixtures of L-amino acids as reaction medium for formation of iron nanoparticles: the order of addition into a ferrous salt solution matters.

    PubMed

    ikov, Karolna M; Machala, Libor; Tu?ek, Ji?i; Kalk, Josef; Mojze, Peter; Zbo?il, Radek

    2013-01-01

    Owing to Mssbauer spectroscopy, an advanced characterization technique for iron-containing materials, the present study reveals previously unknown possibilities using l-amino acids for the generation of magnetic particles. Based on our results, a simple choice of the order of l-amino acids addition into a reaction mixture containing ferrous ions leads to either superparamagnetic ferric oxide/oxyhydroxide particles, or magnetically strong Fe0-Fe2O3/FeOOH core-shell particles after chemical reduction. Conversely, when ferric salts are employed with the addition of selected l-amino acids, only Fe0-Fe2O3/FeOOH core-shell particles are observed, regardless of the addition order. We explain this phenomenon by a specific transient/intermediate complex formation between Fe2+ and l-glutamic acid. This type of complexation prevents ferrous ions from spontaneous oxidation in solutions with full air access. Moreover, due to surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy we show that the functional groups of l-amino acids are not destroyed during the borohydride-induced reduction. These functionalities can be further exploited for (i) attachment of l-amino acids to the as-prepared magnetic particles, and (ii) for targeted bio- and/or environmental applications where the surface chemistry needs to be tailored and directed toward biocompatible species. PMID:24071943

  12. Association constants in solutions of lithium salts in butyrolactone and a mixture of propylene carbonate with 1,2-dimethoxyethane (1 : 1), according to conductometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernozhuk, T. V.; Sherstyuk, Yu. S.; Novikov, D. O.; Kalugin, O. N.

    2016-02-01

    A conductometric study is performed with solutions of lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB) in γ-butyrolactone (γ-BL) at 278.15-388.15 K and lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI), LiBOB, and lithium tetrafluoroborate (LiBF4) in mixtures of propylene carbonate and 1,2-dimethoxyethane (PC + 1,2-DME) (1 : 1) at 278.15-348.15 K. Limiting molar electrical conductivities (LMECs) and association constants ( K a) in the studied solutions of electrolytes are determined using the Lee-Wheaton equation. The effect temperature, the nature of the solvent, and the properties of the anion have on the conductivity and interparticle interactions in solutions of lithium salts in γ-BL and PC + 1,2-DME (1 : 1) is established. It was concluded that the studied solutions are characterized by low values of their association constants. It was found that the BOB;- anion destroys the structure of the solvent.The thickness of the dynamic solvation shell of ions (Δ R) remains constant for both solvents over the studied range of temperatures, and Δ R is significantly greater for Li+ than for other ions.

  13. Aggregation behavior of sodium lauryl ether sulfate with a positively bicharged organic salt and effects of the mixture on fluorescent properties of conjugated polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yongqiang; Liu, Zhang; Zhu, Linyi; Han, Yuchun; Wang, Yilin

    2015-02-24

    The aggregation behavior of anionic single-chain surfactant sodium lauryl ether sulfate containing three ether groups (SLE3S) with positively bicharged organic salt 1,2-bis(2-benzylammoniumethoxy)ethane dichloride (BEO) has been investigated in aqueous solution, and the effects of the BEO/SLE3S aggregate transitions on the fluorescent properties of anionic conjugated polyelectrolyte MPS-PPV with a larger molecular weight and cationic conjugated oligoelectrolyte DAB have been evaluated. Without BEO, SLE3S does not affect the fluorescent properties of MPS-PPV and only affects the fluorescent properties of DAB at a higher SLE3S concentration. With the addition of BEO, SLE3S and BEO form gemini-like surfactant (SLE3S)2-BEO. When the BEO/SLE3S molar ratio is fixed at 0.25, with increasing the BEO/SLE3S concentration, the BEO/SLE3S mixture forms large, loosely arranged aggregates and then transforms to closely packed spherical aggregates and finally to long thread-like micelles. The photoluminescence (PL) intensity of MPS-PPV varies with the morphologies of the BEO/SLE3S aggregates, while the PL intensity of DAB is almost independent of the aggregate morphologies. The results demonstrate that gemini-like surfactants formed through intermolecular interactions can effectively adjust the fluorescent properties of conjugated polyelectrolytes. PMID:25641198

  14. The promise of eutectics for aircraft turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    The current status of the first generation eutectics, gamma/gamma transition - delta and NiTaC-13, is described in detail. Several second generation systems, such as gamma/gamma transition - alpha and NiTaC 3-116A, gamma - beta, and COTAC 74 are also reviewed with particular emphasis on their critical physical and mechanical properties, future research directions, and potential applications. Results of recent cost-benefit analyses of eutectic turbine blades are discussed.

  15. Eutectic experiment development for space processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    A ground base test plan and a specimen evaluation scheme have been developed for the aluminum-copper eutectic solidification experiment to be run in the M518 multipurpose electric furnace during the Skylab mission. Besides thermal and solidification studies a detailed description is given of the quantitative metallographic technique which is appropriate for characterizing eutectic structures. This method should prove a key tool for evaluating specimen microstructure which is the most sensitive indicator of changes produced during solidification. It has been recommended that single grain pre-frozen eutectic specimens be used to simplify microstructural evaluation and to eliminate any porosity in the as-cast eutectic specimens. High purity (99.999%) materials from one supplier should be employed for all experiments. Laboratory studies indicate that porosity occurs in the MRC as-cast eutectic ingots but that this porosity can be eliminated by directional freezing. Chemical analysis shows that the MRC ingots are slightly Al rich and contain about .03% impurity. Because of the impurity content the lower cooldown rate (1.2 C/min) should be used for eutectic freezing if MRC material is used in the M518 furnace.

  16. Hygroscopic properties of NaCl and NaNO3 mixture particles as reacted inorganic sea-salt aerosol surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, D.; Kim, H.; Park, G.; Li, X.; Eom, H.-J.; Ro, C.-U.

    2015-03-01

    NaCl in fresh sea-salt aerosol (SSA) particles can partially or fully react with atmospheric NOx/HNO3, so internally mixed NaCl and NaNO3 aerosol particles can co-exist over a wide range of mixing ratios. Laboratory-generated, micrometer-sized NaCl and NaNO3 mixture particles at 10 mixing ratios (mole fractions of NaCl (XNaCl) = 0.1 to 0.9) were examined systematically to observe their hygroscopic behavior, derive experimental phase diagrams for deliquescence and efflorescence, and understand the efflorescence mechanism. During the humidifying process, aerosol particles with the eutonic composition (XNaCl = 0.38) showed only one phase transition at their mutual deliquescence relative humidity (MDRH) of 67.9 (0.5)% On the other hand, particles with other mixing ratios showed two distinct deliquescence transitions; i.e., the eutonic component dissolved at MDRH, and the remainder in the solid phase dissolved completely at their DRHs depending on the mixing ratios, resulting in a phase diagram composed of four different phases, as predicted thermodynamically. During the dehydration process, NaCl-rich particles (XNaCl > 0.38) showed a two stage efflorescence transition: the first stage was purely driven by the homogeneous nucleation of NaCl and the second stage at the mutual efflorescence RH (MERH) of the eutonic components, with values in the range of 30.0-35.5%. Interestingly, aerosol particles with the eutonic composition (XNaCl = 0.38) also showed two-stage efflorescence, with NaCl crystallizing first followed by heterogeneous nucleation of the remaining NaNO3 on the NaCl seeds. NaNO3-rich particles (XNaCl ? 0.3) underwent single-stage efflorescence transitions at ERHs progressively lower than the MERH because of the homogeneous nucleation of NaCl and the almost simultaneous heterogeneous nucleation of NaNO3 on the NaCl seeds. SEM/EDX elemental mapping indicated that the effloresced NaCl-NaNO3 particles at all mixing ratios were composed of a homogeneously crystallized NaCl moiety in the center, surrounded either by the eutonic component (for XNaCl > 0.38) or NaNO3 (for XNaCl ? 0.38). During the humidifying or dehydration process, the amount of eutonic composed part drives particle/droplet growth or shrinkage at the MDRH or MERH (second ERH), respectively, and the amount of pure salts (NaCl or NaNO3 in NaCl- or NaNO3-rich particles, respectively) drives the second DRHs or first ERHs, respectively. Therefore, their behavior can be a precursor to the optical properties and direct radiative forcing for these atmospherically relevant mixture particles representing the coarse, reacted inorganic SSAs. In addition, the NaCl-NaNO3 mixture aerosol particles can maintain an aqueous phase over a wider RH range than pure NaCl particles as SSA surrogate, making their heterogeneous chemistry more probable.

  17. Hygroscopic properties of NaCl and NaNO3 mixture particles as reacted inorganic sea-salt aerosol surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, D.; Kim, H.; Park, G.; Li, X.; Eom, H.-J.; Ro, C.-U.

    2014-12-01

    NaCl in fresh sea-salt aerosol (SSA) particles can partially or fully react with atmospheric NOx / HNO3, so internally mixed NaCl and NaNO3 aerosol particles can co-exist over a wide range of mixing ratios. Laboratory-generated, micrometer-sized NaCl and NaNO3 mixture particles at ten mixing ratios (mole fractions of NaCl (XNaCl) = 0.1 to 0.9) were examined systematically to observe their hygroscopic behavior, derive experimental phase diagrams for deliquescence and efflorescence, and understand the efflorescence mechanism. During the humidifying process, aerosol particles with the eutonic composition (XNaCl = 0.38) showed only one phase transition at their mutual deliquescence relative humidity (MDRH) of 67.9( 0.5)%. On the other hand, particles with other mixing ratios showed two distinct deliquescence transitions, i.e., the eutonic component dissolved at MDRH and the remainder in the solid phase dissolved completely at their DRHs depending on the mixing ratios, resulting in a phase diagram composed of four different phases, as predicted thermodynamically. During the dehydration process, NaCl-rich particles (XNaCl > 0.38) showed two-stage efflorescence transitions: the first stage was purely driven by the homogeneous nucleation of NaCl and the second stage at the mutual efflorescence RH (MERH) of the eutonic components, with values in the range of 30.0-35.5%. Interestingly, aerosol particles with the eutonic composition (XNaCl = 0.38) also showed two-stage efflorescence with NaCl crystallizing first followed by heterogeneous nucleation of the remaining NaNO3 on the NaCl seeds. NaNO3-rich particles XNaCl ? 0.3) underwent single-stage efflorescence transitions at ERHs progressively lower than the MERH, because of the homogeneous nucleation of NaCl and the almost simultaneous heterogeneous nucleation of NaNO3 on the NaCl seeds. SEM/EDX elemental mapping indicated that the effloresced NaCl-NaNO3 particles at all mixing ratios were composed of a homogeneously crystallized NaCl moiety in the center, surrounded either by the eutonic component (for XNaCl > 0.38) or NaNO3 (for XNaCl ? 0.38). During the humidifying or dehydration process, the amount of eutonic composed part drives particle/droplet growth or shrinkage at the MDRH or MERH (second ERH), respectively, and the amount of remnant pure salts (NaCl or NaNO3 in NaCl- or NaNO3-rich particles, respectively) drives the second DRHs or first ERHs, respectively. Therefore, their behavior can be a precursor to the optical properties and direct radiative forcing for these atmospherically relevant mixture particles representing the coarse, reacted inorganic SSAs. In addition, the NaCl-NaNO3 mixture aerosol particles can maintain an aqueous phase over a wider RH range than the genuine SSA surrogate (i.e., pure NaCl particles), making their heterogeneous chemistry more probable.

  18. Electrochemical properties of molybdenum in individual molten alkali metal chlorides and their mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. B.; Volkovich, V. A.; Likhachev, P. Yu.; Vladykin, E. N.

    2015-02-01

    The behavior of molybdenum in chloride melts is studied, and the standard potentials of Mo are determined in the melts based on eutectic mixtures LiCl-KCl-CsCl (at 633-1173 K) and NaCl-CsCl (at 793-1023 K), an equimolar NaCl-KCl mixture at 973-1123 K, and individual LiCl, NaCl, KCl, RbCl, and CsCl at 1123 K. The change in the conventional standard Gibbs energy of molybdenum trichloride formation in the NaCl-KCl, NaCl-CsCl, and LiCl-KCl-CsCl melts is calculated. The effect of the cation composition of the salt solvent on the conventional standard electrode potential of molybdenum in the chloride melts is considered. The diffusion coefficients of Mo(III) ions in the LiCl-KCl-CsCl melt are determined.

  19. The binary eutectic of NSAIDS and two-phase liquid system for enhanced membrane permeation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xudong; Capomacchia, A C

    2005-01-01

    The eutectic properties of binary mixtures of some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with ibuprofen were studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and phase equilibrium diagrams. The melting points of selected NSAIDs were significantly depressed due to binary eutectic formation with ibuprofen. Ketoprofen and ibuprofen were selected to study the effect of eutectic formation on membrane permeation using Franz diffusion cells and snake skin as the model membrane. The presence of aqueous isopropyl alcohol (IPA) was necessary to completely transform the solid drugs into an oily state at ambient temperature. As much as the 99.6% of ibuprofen and the 88.8% of ketoprofen added were found in the oily phase of the two-phase liquid system formed when aqueous IPA was added to the eutectic mixture. Due to the high drug concentration in the oily phase, and maximum thermodynamic activity, the two-phase liquid system showed enhanced membrane permeation rates of ibuprofen (37.5 microg/cm2/hr) and ketoprofen (33.4 microg/cm2/hr) compared to other reference preparations used. PMID:15776808

  20. Flow strength of highly hydrated Mg- and Na-sulfate hydrate salts, pure and in mixtures with water ice, with application to Europa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kubo, T.; Kirby, S.H.

    2005-01-01

    We selected two Europan-ice-shell candidate highly hydrated sulfate salts for a laboratory survey of ductile flow properties: MgSO4 ?? 7H2O (epsomite) and Na2SO4 ?? 10H2O (mirabilite), called MS7 and NS10, respectively. Polycrystalline samples in pure form and in mixtures with water ice I were tested using our cryogenic high-pressure creep apparatus at temperatures 232 ??? T ??? 294 K, confining pressures P = 50 and 100 MPa, and strain rates 4 ?? 10-8 ??? ???dot;e ??? 7 ?? 10-5 s-1. Grain size of NS10 samples was > 100 ??m. The flow strength ?? of pure MS7 was over 100 times that of polycrystalline ice I at comparable conditions; that of pure NS10 over 20 times that of ice. In terms of the creep law ???dot;e = A??n e-Q/RT, where R is the gas constant, we determine parameter values of A = 1012.1 MPa-ns-1, n = 5.4, and Q = 128 kJ/mol for pure NS10. Composites of ice I and NS10 of volume fraction ?? NS10 have flow strength ??c = [??NS10??NS10J + (1 - ?? NS10)??iceIJ]1/J where J ??? -0.5, making the effect on the flow of ice with low volume fractions of NS10 much like that of virtually undeformable hard rock inclusions. Being much stronger and denser than ice, massive sulfate inclusions in the warmer, ductile layer of the Europan ice shell are less likely to be entrained in convective ice flow and more likely to be drawn to the base of the ice shell by gravitational forces and eventually expelled. With only smaller, dispersed sulfate inclusions, at probable sulfate ?? < 0.2, the shell may be treated rheologically as pure, polycrystalline ice, with boundary conditions perhaps influenced by the high density and low thermal conductivity of the hydrated salts. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Internal zone growth method for producing metal oxide metal eutectic composites

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Grady W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Holder, John D. (Knoxville, TN); Pasto, Arvid E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1980-01-01

    An improved method for preparing a cermet comprises preparing a compact having about 85 to 95 percent theoretical density from a mixture of metal and metal oxide powders from a system containing a eutectic composition, and inductively heating the compact in a radiofrequency field to cause the formation of an internal molten zone. The metal oxide particles in the powder mixture are effectively sized relative to the metal particles to permit direct inductive heating of the compact by radiofrequency from room temperature. Surface melting is prevented by external cooling or by effectively sizing the particles in the powder mixture.

  2. Resolving Issues of Content Uniformity and Low Permeability Using Eutectic Blend of Camphor and Menthol

    PubMed Central

    Gohel, M. C.; Nagori, S. A.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of present study were to arrest the problem of content uniformity without the use of harmful organic solvent and to improve ex vivo permeability of captopril, a low dose class III drug as per biological classification system. Eutectic mixture of camphor and menthol was innovatively used in the work. Captopril solution in eutectic mixture was blended with Avicel PH 102 and then the mixture was blended with mannitol in different ratios. Formulated batches were characterized for angle of repose and Carr's index. A selected batch was filled in hard gelatin capsule. Tablet dosage form was also developed. Capsules and tablets were characterized for in vitro drug release in 0.1N HCl. Additionally, the captopril tablets were analyzed for content uniformity and ex vivo drug permeation study using rat ileum in modified apparatus. The measurement of angle of repose and Carr's index revealed that the powder blend exhibited good flow property and compressibility. The captopril capsules and tablets exhibited immediate drug release in 0.1 N HCl. The captopril tablets passed content uniformity test as per IP 1996. Ex vivo permeation of captopril, formulated with eutectic mixture, was faster than control. The permeation was increased by 15% at the end of 3 h. Tablets and capsule exhibited reasonable short term stability with no considerable change in performance characteristics. PMID:20376214

  3. Reactive eutectic brazing of nitinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Ke-Bin

    Although NiTiNb alloys are well known as wide-hysteresis shape-memory alloys with important applications as coupling materials, the significance of one aspect of the Ni-Ti-Nb ternary system has not been fully appreciated. Based on the existence of a quasibinary NiTi-Nb eutectic isopleth in this ternary system, a novel braze method has been devised to fabricate metallurgical bonds between functional nitinol (NiTi) sections. When NiTi and pure Nb are brought into contact at temperatures above 1170C, spontaneous melting occurs, forming a liquid that is extremely reactive and not only wets NiTi surfaces, but also apparently dissolves oxide scales, obviating the need for fluxes and providing for efficient capillary flow into joint crevices. The melting process is diffusion-controlled and rate-limited by the diffusivity of Nb in the liquid. The braze liquid will subsequently solidify into microstructures containing predominantly ordered NiTi and disordered bcc-Nb. Mechanical tests revealed that the braze joints are strong, ductile, and biocompatible. With appropriate post-braze aging, the functional performance of the parent NiTi alloy can be restored. Micro-alloying the Nb fluer metal with Zr or tungsten showed great potential for solution-strengthening of the braze joints. For applications where biocompatibility is not an issue, Nb metal can be substituted by pure vanadium as the braze filler, which is demonstrated to possess tensile strengths that can be potentially superior to the Nb counterparts.

  4. Electronic absorption spectra of U3+ and U4+ in molten LiCl-RbCl eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, T.; Uehara, A.; Fujii, T.; Sato, N.; Yamana, H.

    2010-03-01

    In the non-aqueous reprocessing process of spent nuclear fuels by the pyro-electrochemical method, a spent fuel is dissolved into molten LiCl-KCl and NaCl-CsCl eutectics and dissolved uranium and plutonium are collected as either metal or oxide. However, the binary alkali chloride mixture with the lowest melting point is the LiCl-RbCl eutectic. In this study, electronic absorption spectra of U3+ and U4+ in molten LiCl-RbCl eutectic at various temperatures between 673 and 973 K were measured by the UV/Vis/NIR spectrophotometry. We confirmed that these spectra were similar to those in molten LiCl-KCl and NaCl-CsCl eutectics. The sensitive absorption bands of U4+ in LiCl-RbCl eutectic were found at 22000, 16500, 14900, 8600, and 4950 cm-1. The large absorption bands of U4+ over 25000 cm-1 increased with increasing melt temperature, while absorption peaks at 15500-4000 cm-1 decreased. The large absorption bands of U3+ in LiCl-RbCl eutectic were observed over 14000 cm-1. The sensitive absorption bands of U3+ at Vis/NIR region were found at 13300, 11500-11200, 9800-9400, and 8250 cm-1, and these peaks decreased with increasing temperature.

  5. Stability of eutectic interface during directional solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Han, S.H.

    1996-04-23

    Directional solidification of eutectic alloys shows different types of eutectic morphologies. These include lamellar, rod, oscillating and tilting modes. The growth of these morphologies occurs with a macroscopically planar interface. However, under certain conditions, the planar eutectic front becomes unstable and gives rise to a cellular or a dendritic structure. This instability leads to the cellular/dendritic structure of either a primary phase or a two-phase structure. The objective of this work is to develop a fundamental understanding of the instability of eutectic structure into cellular/dendritic structures of a single phase and of two-phases. Experimental studies have been carried out to examine the transition from a planar to two-phase cellular and dendritic structures in a ceramic system of Alumina-Zirconia (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2}) and in a transparent organic system of carbon tetrabromide and hexachloroethane (CBr{sub 4}-C{sub 2}Cl{sub 6}). Several aspects of eutectic interface stability have been examined.

  6. Dosimetry using silver salts

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-06-24

    The present invention provides a method for detecting ionizing radiation. Exposure of silver salt AgX to ionizing radiation results in the partial reduction of the salt to a mixture of silver salt and silver metal. The mixture is further reduced by a reducing agent, which causes the production of acid (HX) and the oxidized form of the reducing agent (R). Detection of HX indicates that the silver salt has been exposed to ionizing radiation. The oxidized form of the reducing agent (R) may also be detected. The invention also includes dosimeters employing the above method for detecting ionizing radiation.

  7. Solidification and microstructures of binary ice-I/hydrate eutectic aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, C.; Cooper, R.F.; Kirby, S.H.; Rieck, K.D.; Stern, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    The microstructures of two-phase binary aggregates of ice-I + salt-hydrate, prepared by eutectic solidification, have been characterized by cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (CSEM). The specific binary systems studied were H2O-Na2SO4, H2O-MgSO4, H2O-NaCl, and H2O-H2SO4; these were selected based on their potential application to the study of tectonics on the Jovian moon Europa. Homogeneous liquid solutions of eutectic compositions were undercooled modestly (??T - 1-5 ??C); similarly cooled crystalline seeds of the same composition were added to circumvent the thermodynamic barrier to nucleation and to control eutectic growth under (approximately) isothermal conditions. CSEM revealed classic eutectic solidification microstructures with the hydrate phase forming continuous lamellae, discontinuous lamellae, or forming the matrix around rods of ice-I, depending on the volume fractions of the phases and their entropy of dissolving and forming a homogeneous aqueous solution. We quantify aspects of the solidification behavior and microstructures for each system and, with these data articulate anticipated effects of the microstructure on the mechanical responses of the materials.

  8. Some physicochemical studies on organic eutectics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Singh, S. K.; Singh, R. A.

    2007-03-01

    The phase diagrams of phenothiazine with each of m-nitrobenzoic acid ( m-NBA) and m-dinitrobenzene ( m-DNB) have been studied by thaw-melt method. These materials have been characterized by X-ray diffraction. Growth behavior of the parent components, eutectic and charge transfer complex (CTC) studied by measuring the rate of movement of the growth front in a capillary suggests the applicability of Hillig-Turnbull equation for the system. Microstructure and electrical conductivities of congruent melting complexes and eutectics have been determined. The low electrical conductivities of these materials have been due to weak interaction and mixed stacking of donor and acceptor. Excess thermodynamics functions of the charge-transfer (CT) materials and eutectics have been determined.

  9. Directionally solidified eutectic alloy gamma-beta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.

    1977-01-01

    A pseudobinary eutectic alloy composition was determined by a previously developed bleed-out technique. The directionally solidified eutectic alloy with a composition of Ni-37.4Fe-10.0Cr-9.6Al (in wt%) had tensile strengths decreasing from 1,090 MPa at room temperature to 54 MPa at 1,100 C. The low density, excellent microstructural stability, and oxidation resistance of the alloy during thermal cycling suggest that it might have applicability as a gas turbine vane alloy while its relatively low high temperature strength precludes its use as a blade alloy. A zirconium addition increased the 750 C strength, and a tungsten addition was ineffective. The gamma=beta eutectic alloys appeared to obey a normal freezing relation.

  10. Lamellar eutectic growth with anisotropic interphase boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akamatsu, S.; Bottin-Rousseau, S.; Faivre, G.; Ghosh, S.; Plapp, M.

    2015-06-01

    We present a numerical study of the effect of a free-energy anisotropy of the solid- solid interphase boundaries on the formation of tilted lamellar microstructures during directional solidification of nonfaceted binary eutectic alloys. We used two different methods - phase-field (PF) and dynamic boundary-integral (BI) - to simulate the growth of periodic eutectic patterns in two dimensions. For a given Wulff plot of the interphase boundary, which characterizes a eutectic grain with a given relative orientation of the two solid phases, the lamellar tilt angle depends on the angle between the thermal axis z and a reference crystallographic axis. Both PF and BI results confirm the general validity of a recent approximate theory which assumes that, at the trijunctions, the surface tension vector of the interphase boundary is parallel to z. In particular, a crystallographic locking of the lamellae onto a direction close to a deep minimum in the Wulff plot is well reproduced in the simulations.

  11. Influence of freezing rate changes of MnBi-Bi eutectic microstructure. [effects of space processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, W. R.; Doddi, K.; Nair, M.; Larson, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    In an attempt to explain the influence of space processing on the microstructure of MnBi-Bi, eutectic mixtures were directionally solidified with a sudden change of translation rate. The MnBi fiber spacing was able to adapt to the changing freezing rate as predicted by heat transfer computations. Thus the microstructure adapts more rapidly than the freezing rate could be changed in the present experiments.

  12. Electrode potentials of uranium in the LiCl–KCl–CsCl eutectic melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltsev, D. S.; Volkovich, V. A.; Vladykin, E. N.; Vasin, B. D.

    2015-08-01

    The electrode potentials of uranium in the melt of the eutectic mixture of lithium, potassium, and cesium chlorides are measured in the temperature range 573-1073 K. Formal standard potentials E U * (III)/U and the main thermodynamic characteristics of uranium trichloride in the LiCl-KCl-CsCl melt are calculated, and the electronic absorption spectra of UCl 6 3- ions are measured.

  13. Alkaline extraction of polonium from liquid lead bismuth eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinitz, S.; Neuhausen, J.; Schumann, D.

    2011-07-01

    The production of highly radiotoxic polonium isotopes poses serious safety concerns for the development of future nuclear systems cooled by lead bismuth eutectic (LBE). In this paper it is shown that polonium can be extracted efficiently from LBE using a mixture of alkaline metal hydroxides (NaOH + KOH) in a temperature range between 180 and 350 C. The extraction ratio was analyzed for different temperatures, gas blankets and phase ratios. A strong dependence of the extraction performance on the redox properties of the cover gas was found. While hydrogen facilitates the removal of polonium, oxygen has a negative influence on the extraction. These findings open new possibilities to back up the safety of future LBE based nuclear facilities.

  14. The salts of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, B. C.; van Hart, D. C.

    1981-02-01

    Salt compounds are apparently an important component of the fine-grained regolith on Mars. Salt enrichment may be explained either as a secondary concentration of chemical weathering products or as direct incorporation of planetary released volatiles. Geochemical measurements and chemical relationships constrain the salt species and resultant physicochemical consequences. A likely assemblage is dominated by (Mg,Na)SO4, NaCl, and (Mg,Ca)CO3. Formation of brine in equilibrium with such a salt mixture is unlikely under the temperature and water-vapor restrictions prevalent over most, if not all, of the Martian surface. Acidic conditions, accompanying salt formation, favor the preferential destruction of susceptible igneous minerals.

  15. Pb-free Sn-Ag-Cu ternary eutectic solder

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, I.E.; Yost, F.G.; Smith, J.F.; Miller, C.M.; Terpstra, R.L.

    1996-06-18

    A Pb-free solder includes a ternary eutectic composition consisting essentially of about 93.6 weight % Sn-about 4.7 weight % Ag-about 1.7 weight % Cu having a eutectic melting temperature of about 217 C and variants of the ternary composition wherein the relative concentrations of Sn, Ag, and Cu deviate from the ternary eutectic composition to provide a controlled melting temperature range (liquid-solid ``mushy`` zone) relative to the eutectic melting temperature (e.g. up to 15 C above the eutectic melting temperature). 5 figs.

  16. Pb-free Sn-Ag-Cu ternary eutectic solder

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Yost, Frederick G. (Cedar Crest, NM); Smith, John F. (Ames, IA); Miller, Chad M. (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert L. (Ames, IA)

    1996-06-18

    A Pb-free solder includes a ternary eutectic composition consisting essentially of about 93.6 weight % Sn-about 4.7 weight % Ag-about 1.7 weight % Cu having a eutectic melting temperature of about 217.degree. C. and variants of the ternary composition wherein the relative concentrations of Sn, Ag, and Cu deviate from the ternary eutectic composition to provide a controlled melting temperature range (liquid-solid "mushy" zone) relative to the eutectic melting temperature (e.g. up to 15.degree. C. above the eutectic melting temperature).

  17. Assessing the toxicity and biodegradability of deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qing; Chen, Jing-Xin; Tang, Yu-Lin; Wang, Juan; Yang, Zhen

    2015-08-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have emerged as a new type of promising ionic solvents with a broad range of potential applications. Although their ecotoxicological profile is still poorly known, DESs are generally regarded as "green" because they are composed of ammonium salts and H-bond donors (HBDs) which are considered to be eco-friendly. In this work, cholinium-based DESs comprised of choline chloride (ChCl) and choline acetate (ChAc) as the salt and urea (U), acetamide (A), glycerol (G) and ethylene glycol (EG) as the HBD were evaluated for their toxic effects on different living organisms such as Escherichia coli (a bacterium), Allium sativum (garlic, a plant) and hydra (an invertebrate), and their biodegradabilities were assessed by means of closed bottle tests. These DESs possessed an anti-bacterial property and exhibited inhibitory effects on the test organisms adopted, depending on the composition and concentration of the DES. The mechanism for the impact of DESs and their components on different living organisms can be associated to their interactions with the cellular membranes. Not all DESs can be considered readily biodegradable. By extending the limited knowledge about the toxicity and biodegradation of this particular solvent family, this investigation on DESs provides insight into our structure-based understanding of their ecotoxicological behavior. PMID:25800513

  18. Synergism and separation factors in lanthanide extraction with mixtures of chelating extractant and amine salts in C{sub 6}H{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect

    Dukov, I.L.; Jordanov, V.M.

    1997-10-01

    The solvent extraction of Pr, Gd, and Yb with 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoylpyrazol-5-one (HP) and an amine salt (AmHA) has been studied. The composition of the extracted species has been determined as (AmH)[LnP{sub 4}]. The values of the synergistic coefficients and separation factors have been calculated. The effect of the amine salt on the extraction and separation of lanthanides has been discussed.

  19. Molten Salt Mixture Properties (KF-ZrF4 and KCl-MgCl2) for Use in RELAP5-3D for High Temperature Reactor Application

    SciTech Connect

    N. A. Anderson; P. Sabharwall

    2012-06-01

    Molten salt coolants are being investigated as primary coolants for a fluoride high-temperature reactor and as secondary coolants for high temperature reactors such as the next generation nuclear plant. This work provides a review of the thermophysical properties of candidate molten salt coolants for use as a secondary heat transfer medium from a high temperature reactor to a processing plant. The molten salts LiF-NaF-KF, KF-ZrF4 and KCl-MgCl2 were considered for use in the secondary coolant loop. The thermophysical properties necessary to add the molten salts KF-ZrF4 and KCl-MgCl2 to RELAP5-3D were gathered for potential modeling purposes. The properties of the molten salt LiF-NaF-KF were already available in RELAP5-3D. The effect that the uncertainty in individual properties had on the Nusselt number was evaluated. This uncertainty in the Nusselt number was shown to be nearly independent of the molten salt temperature.

  20. Phase transitions of sea-salt/water mixtures at low temperatures: Implications for ozone chemistry in the polar marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koop, Thomas; Kapilashrami, Abha; Molina, Luisa T.; Molina, Mario J.

    2000-11-01

    We present laboratory experiments employing differential scanning calorimetry as well as flow cell microscopy to study the microphysics of aqueous NaCl and sea-salt solutions and droplets at temperatures below 273 K. The freezing and melting points of ice and other precipitates were determined in NaCl and sea-salt bulk samples as well as in emulsion samples. Using flow cell microscopy, we have determined the deliquescence and efflorescence relative humidities of NaCl and sea-salt droplets at temperatures between 249 and 273 K, extending the existing room temperature data to polar conditions. Our measurements suggest that sea-salt aerosols will most likely be liquid most of the time under polar marine boundary conditions. In addition, we show that sea-salt aerosols or seawater spray deposited on the polar ice pack will remain partly liquid down to 230 K, with concentrations of Cl- and Br- increasing by more than an order of magnitude upon cooling when compared to normal seawater concentrations. This is likely to enhance the rate at which heterogeneous bromine activation reactions occur in the sea-salt deposits. Such reaction rate enhancements with decreasing temperatures are currently not implemented in chemical models, and might help explain the fast bromine activation and subsequent ozone destruction observed during ozone depletion events in the polar marine boundary layer in spring.

  1. H, not O or pressure, causes eutectic T depression in the Fe-FeS System to 8 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buono, Antonio S.; Walker, David

    2015-04-01

    The Fe-FeS system maintains a eutectic temperature of 990 10 C to at least 8 GPa if starting materials and pressure media are rigorously dehydrated. Literature reports of pressure-induced freezing point depression of the eutectic for the Fe-FeS system are not confirmed. Modest addition of oxygen alone is confirmed to cause negligible freezing point depression at 6 GPa. Addition of H alone causes a progressive decrease in the eutectic temperature with P in the Fe-FeS-H system to below 965 C at 6 GPa to below 950 C at 8 GPa. It is our hypothesis that moisture contamination in unrigorously dried experiments may be an H source for freezing point depression. O released from H2O disproportionation reacts with Fe and is sequestered as ferropericlase along the sample capsules walls, leaving the H to escape the system and/or enter the Fe-FeS mixture. The observed occurrence of ferropericlase on undried MgO capsule margins is otherwise difficult to explain, because an alternate source for the oxygen in the ferropericlase layer is difficult to identify. This study questions the use of pressure-depressed Fe-S eutectic temperatures and suggests that the lower eutectic temperatures sometimes reported are achieved by moving into the ternary Fe-S-H system. These results adjust slightly the constraints on eutectic temperatures allowed for partly solidified cores on small planets. H substantially diminishes the temperature extent of the melting interval in Fe-S by reducing the melting points of the crystalline phases more than it depresses the eutectic.

  2. Spectrophotometric and electrochemical study of neptunium ions in molten NaCl-CsCl eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Akihiro; Nagai, Takayuki; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Shirai, Osamu; Yamana, Hajimu

    2013-06-01

    The chemical oxidation states of NpO2+, Np4+ and Np3+ in NaCl-CsCl eutectic were controlled by using Cl2, O2, H2 and Ar gas mixtures, the redox behavior and electronic absorption properties of their Np ions were studied. The Np4+ was prepared from NpO2Cl by bubbling Cl2 gas into the melt in the presence of carbon rod. Np3+ was quantitatively prepared by bubbling H2-Ar gas mixture. The molar absorptivities of NpO2+, Np4+ and Np3+ were determined in molten NaCl-CsCl eutectic at 923 K and hypersensitive transitions of Np4+ and Np3+ ions were assigned. Since the polarizing ability of the cations in the NaCl-CsCl eutectic is lower than that in some other melts, it has been shown that the coordination symmetry of the Np-Cl complex is higher. In the electrochemical measurement of Np4+, the cathodic current for the reduction of Np4+ was found to be controlled by the diffusion of Np4+. The temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient between 823 and 923 K was formulated to be lnD=-4304/T-6.172. The formal redox potential of the Np4+|Np3+ couple depended on the temperature, this dependence was formulated as ENp|Np∘'=-1.313+6.210×10-4T V (vs. Cl2|Cl-).

  3. Modeling Solute Thermokinetics in LiCI-KCI Molten Salt for Nuclear Waste Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Dane; Eapen, Jacob

    2013-10-01

    Recovery of actinides is an integral part of a closed nuclear fuel cycle. Pyrometallurgical nuclear fuel recycling processes have been developed in the past for recovering actinides from spent metallic and nitride fuels. The process is essentially to dissolve the spent fuel in a molten salt and then extract just the actinides for reuse in a reactor. Extraction is typically done through electrorefining, which involves electrochemical reduction of the dissolved actinides and plating onto a cathode. Knowledge of a number of basic thermokinetic properties of salts and salt-fuel mixtures is necessary for optimizing present and developing new approaches for pyrometallurgical waste processing. The properties of salt-fuel mixtures are presently being studied, but there are so many solutes and varying concentrations that direct experimental investigation is prohibitively time consuming and expensive (particularly for radioactive elements like Pu). Therefore, there is a need to reduce the number of required experiments through modeling of salt and salt-fuel mixture properties. This project will develop first-principles-based molecular modeling and simulation approaches to predict fundamental thermokinetic properties of dissolved actinides and fission products in molten salts. The focus of the proposed work is on property changes with higher concentrations (up to 5 mol%) of dissolved fuel components, where there is still very limited experimental data. The properties predicted with the modeling will be density, which is used to assess the amount of dissolved material in the salt; diffusion coefficients, which can control rates of material transport during separation; and solute activity, which determines total solubility and reduction potentials used during electrorefining. The work will focus on La, Sr, and U, which are chosen to include the important distinct categories of lanthanides, alkali earths, and actinides, respectively. Studies will be performed using LiCl-KCl salt at the eutectic composition (58 mol% LiCl, 42 mol% KCl), which is used for treating spent EBR-II fuel. The same process being used for EBRII fuel is currently being studied for widespread international implementation. The methods will focus on first-principles and first- principles derived interatomic potential based simulations, primarily using molecular dynamics. Results will be validated against existing literature and parallel ongoing experimental efforts. The simulation results will be of value for interpreting experimental results, validating analytical models, and for optimizing waste separation by potentially developing new salt configurations and operating conditions.

  4. Two-stage eutectic metal brushes

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, John S

    2009-07-14

    A two-stage eutectic metal brush assembly having a slip ring rigidly coupled to a shaft, the slip ring being electrically coupled to first voltage polarity. At least one brush is rigidly coupled to a second ring and slidingly engaged to the slip ring. Eutectic metal at least partially fills an annulus between the second ring and a stationary ring. At least one conductor is rigidly coupled to the stationary ring and electrically coupled to a second voltage polarity. Electrical continuity is maintained between the first voltage polarity and the second voltage polarity. Periodic rotational motion is present between the stationary ring and the second ring. Periodic rotational motion is also present between the brush and the slip ring.

  5. Crystallography of Alumina-YAG-Eutectic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Serene C.; Sayir, Ali; Dickerson, Robert M.; Matson, Lawrence E.

    2000-01-01

    Multiple descriptions of the alumina-YAG eutectic crystallography appear in the ceramic literature. The orientation between two phases in a eutectic system has direct impact on residual stress, morphology, microstructural stability, and high temperature mechanical properties. A study to demonstrate that the different crystallographic relationships can be correlated with different growth constraints was undertaken. Fibers produced by Laser-Heated Float Zone (LHFZ) and Edge-defined Film-fed Growth (EFG) were examined. A map of the orientation relationship between Al2O3 and Y3Al5O12 and their relationship to the fiber growth axis as a function of pull rate are presented. Regions in which a single orientation predominates are identified.

  6. An enthalpy method for modeling eutectic solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Anirban; Kiran, Apoorva; Karagadde, Shyamprasad; Dutta, Pradip

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a new micro-scale model for solidification of eutectic alloys. The model is based on the enthalpy method and simulates the growth of adjacent ? and ? phases from a melt of eutectic composition in a two-dimensional Eulerian framework. The evolution of the two phases is obtained from the solution of volume averaged energy and species transport equations which are formulated using the nodal enthalpy and concentration potential values. The three phases are tracked using the ?-phase fraction and the liquid fraction values in all the computational nodes. Solutal convection flow field in the domain is obtained from the solution of volume-averaged momentum and continuity equations. The governing equations are solved using a coupled explicit-implicit scheme. The model is qualitatively validated with Jackson-Hunt theory. Results show expected eutectic growth pattern and proper species transfer and diffusion field ahead of the interface. Capabilities of the model such as lamella width selection, division of lamella into thinner lamellae and the presence of solutal convection are successfully demonstrated. The present model can potentially be incorporated into the existing framework of enthalpy based micro-scale dendritic solidification models thus leading to an efficient generalized microstructure evolution model.

  7. Removal of nanoaerosol during the bubbling of the salt melt of beryllium and lithium fluorides for the preparation of reactor radioisotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagnit'ko, A. V.; Chuvilin, D. Yu.

    2010-06-01

    The parameters of aerosol particles formed in the course of the spontaneous thermal condensation of vapors and bubbling a 66LiF-34BeF2 (mol %) eutectic salt mixture with helium have been studied. For this purpose, a vertical bubbling mode at T ? 900 K and an ampule device for obtaining reactor radioisotopes for medical applications were used. The rate of the bulk removal and the chemical composition of aerosols were measured. The size distribution of the aerosol particles was bimodal, and the mass concentration of the particles exceeded by far the maximum permissible concentration (MPC). The characteristics of regenerated nickel multilayer nanofilters for ultrahigh filtration of aerosols from the salt liquid melt were analyzed.

  8. New eutectic ionic liquids for lipase activation and enzymatic preparation of biodiesel

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Baker, Gary A.; Holmes, Shaletha

    2012-01-01

    The enzymatic preparation of biodiesel has been hampered by the lack of suitable solvents with desirable properties such as high lipase compatibility, low cost, low viscosity, high biodegradability, and ease of product separation. Recent interest in using ionic liquids (ILs) as advanced reaction media has led to fast reaction rates and high yields in the enzymatic synthesis of biodiesel. However, conventional (i.e., cationanion paired) ILs based on imidazolium and other quaternary ammonium salts remain too expensive for wide application at industrial scales. In this study, we report on newly-synthesized eutectic ILs derived from choline acetate or choline chloride coupled with biocompatible hydrogen-bond donors, such as glycerol. These eutectic solvents have favorable properties including low viscosity, high biodegradability, and excellent compatibility with Novozym 435, a commercial immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B. Furthermore, in a model biodiesel synthesis system, we demonstrate high reaction rates for the enzymatic transesterification of Miglyol oil 812 with methanol, catalyzed by Novozym 435 in choline acetate/glycerol (1 : 1.5 molar ratio). The high conversion (97%) of the triglyceride obtained within 3 h, under optimal conditions, suggests that these novel eutectic solvents warrant further exploration as potential media in the enzymatic production of biodiesel. PMID:21283901

  9. Solubilization of Genistein in Poly(Ethylene Glycol) via Eutectic Crystal Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buddhiranon, Sasiwimon; Kyu, Thein

    2012-02-01

    Genistein (5,7,4'-trihydroxyisoflavone) is a phytoestrogen found in soybean. It possesses various biological/pharmacological functions, e.g., tyrosine kinase inhibitory, anticarcinogenic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-microbial activities. However, genistein has poor water solubility and skin permeability, which have seemingly prohibited the progress to preclinical evaluation. Eutectic melting approach has been performed as a means of solubilizing genistein in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). Eutectic phase diagrams of blends containing genistein and PEG having three different molecular weights, i.e., 44k, 7k, and 500 g/mol, were established by means of DSC and compared with the theoretical liquidus and solidus lines, calculated self-consistently by taking into consideration all interactions including amorphous-amorphous, crystal-amorphous, amorphous-crystal, and crystal-crystal interactions. The eutectic temperatures were found to decrease with decreasing molecular weight of PEG. Guided by the phase diagram, it was found that genistein can be dissolved in PEG500 up to 7 wt% at room temperature. More importantly, the solubility of genistein in PEG can be improved to meet the end-use criteria of the PEG/genistein mixtures.

  10. Zero-gravity growth of NaF-NaCl eutectics in the NASA Skylab program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, A. S.; Allen, F. G.; Yu, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    Continuous and discontinuous NaF fibers, embedded in a NaCl matrix, were produced in space and on earth. The production of continuous fibers in a eutectic mixture is attributed to the absence of convection current in the liquid during solidification in space. Image transmission and optical transmittance measurements of transverse sections of the space-grown and earth-grown ingots were made with a light microscope and a spectrometer. It is shown that better optical properties were obtained from samples grown in space. This was attributed to a better alignment of NaF fibers along the ingot axis. A new concept is advanced to explain the phenomenon of transmittance versus far infrared wavelength of the directionally solidified NaCl-NaF eutectic in terms of the two-dimensional Bragg Scattering and the polarization effect of Rayleigh scattering. This concept can be applied to other eutectic systems as long as the index of refraction of the matrix over a range of wavelengths is known. Experimental data are in agreement with the theoretical prediction.

  11. A facile approach to prepare a dual functionalized DNA based material in a bio-deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Dibyendu; Bhatt, Jitkumar; Sharma, Mukesh; Chatterjee, Shruti; Prasad, Kamalesh

    2014-04-18

    DNA (Salmon testes) was functionalized by Fe3O4 nanoparticles and protonated layered dititanate sheets (H2·Ti2O5·H2O) in a mixture of choline chloride and ethylene glycol (a deep eutectic solvent) to yield a hybrid material having magnetic and antibacterial properties. Ti sheets were found to interact with the phosphate moieties, while Fe interacted with the base pair of DNA in the hybrid material. PMID:24609301

  12. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes in full- and low-sodium frankfurters at 4, 7, or 10C using spray-dried mixtures of organic acid salts.

    PubMed

    Sansawat, Thanikarn; Zhang, Lei; Jeong, Jong Y; Xu, Yanyang; Hessell, Gerald W; Ryser, Elliot T; Harte, Janice B; Tempelman, Robert; Kang, Iksoon

    2013-09-01

    In meat processing, powdered ingredients are preferred to liquids because of ease of handling, mixing, and storing. This study was conducted to assess Listeria monocytogenes inhibition and the physicochemical and organoleptic characteristics of frankfurters that were prepared with organic acid salts as spray-dried powders (sodium lactate-sodium acetate, sodium lactate-sodium acetate-sodium diacetate, and potassium acetate-potassium diacetate) or liquids (sodium lactate, sodium lactate-sodium diacetate, potassium lactate, and potassium lactate-sodium diacetate). Full-sodium (1.8% salt) and low-sodium (1.0% salt) frankfurters were prepared according to 10 and 5 different formulations (n = 3), respectively, and were dip inoculated with a six-strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes (?4 log CFU/g). Populations of Listeria and mesophilic aerobic bacteria were quantified during storage at 4, 7, and 10C for up to 90 days. Four powder and two liquid full-sodium formulations and one powder low-sodium formulation, all of which contained diacetate except for 1% sodium lactate-sodium acetate powder, completely inhibited Listeria growth at 4C. However, Listeria grew in full-sodium formulations at 10C and in low-sodium formulations at 7 and 10C except for the formulation containing 0.8% potassium acetate-0.2% potassium diacetate powder. All formulations were similar in terms of water activity, cooking yield, moisture, and protein content. Sodium content and pH were affected by the concentrations of sodium and diacetate, respectively. Frankfurter appearance, texture, flavor, and overall acceptability were similar (P > 0.05) regardless of the formulation, except for flavor and overall acceptability of the low-sodium formulation containing potassium acetate-potassium diacetate. Based on these findings, cosprayed powders appear to be a viable alternative to current liquid inhibitors for control of Listeria in processed meats. PMID:23992500

  13. Investigation of residual anode material after electrorefining uranium in molten chloride salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, M. A.; Williamson, M. A.; Willit, J.

    2015-12-01

    A buildup of material at uranium anodes during uranium electrorefining in molten chloride salts has been observed. Potentiodynamic testing has been conducted using a three electrode cell, with a uranium working electrode in both LiCl/KCl eutectic and LiCl each containing ∼5 mol% UCl3. The anodic current response was observed at 50° intervals between 450 °C and 650 °C in the eutectic salt. These tests revealed a buildup of material at the anode in LiCl/KCl salt, which was sampled at room temperature, and analyzed using ICP-MS, XRD and SEM techniques. Examination of the analytical data, current response curves and published phase diagrams has established that as the uranium anode dissolves, the U3+ ion concentration in the diffusion layer surrounding the electrode rises precipitously to levels, which may at low temperatures exceed the solubility limit for UCl3 or in the case of the eutectic salt for K2UCl5. The reduction in current response observed at low temperature in eutectic salt is eliminated at 650 °C, where K2UCl5 is absent due to its congruent melting and only simple concentration polarization effects are seen. In LiCl similar concentration effects are seen though significantly longer time at applied potential is required to effect a reduction in the current response as compared to the eutectic salt.

  14. Phase selection during crystallization of undercooled liquid eutectic lead-tin alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fecht, H. J.

    1991-01-01

    During rapid solidification substantial amounts of undercooling are in general required for formation of metastable phases. Crystallization at varying levels of undercooling and melting of metastable phases were studied during slow cooling and heating of emulsified PB-Sn alloys. Besides the experimental demonstration of the reversibility of metastable phase equilibra, two different principal solidification paths have been identified and compared with the established metastable phase diagram and predictions from classical nucleation theory. The results suggest that the most probable solidification path is described by the 'step rule' resulting in the formation of metastable phases at low undercooling, whereas the stable eutectic phase mixture crystallizes without metastable phase formation at high undercooling.

  15. Controlled Growth of Rubrene Nanowires by Eutectic Melt Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jeyon; Hyon, Jinho; Park, Kyung-Sun; Cho, Boram; Baek, Jangmi; Kim, Jueun; Lee, Sang Uck; Sung, Myung Mo; Kang, Youngjong

    2016-01-01

    Organic semiconductors including rubrene, Alq3, copper phthalocyanine and pentacene are crystallized by the eutectic melt crystallization. Those organic semiconductors form good eutectic systems with the various volatile crystallizable additives such as benzoic acid, salicylic acid, naphthalene and 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene. Due to the formation of the eutectic system, organic semiconductors having originally high melting point (Tm > 300 °C) are melted and crystallized at low temperature (Te = 40.8–133 °C). The volatile crystallizable additives are easily removed by sublimation. For a model system using rubrene, single crystalline rubrene nanowires are prepared by the eutectic melt crystallization and the eutectic-melt-assisted nanoimpinting (EMAN) technique. It is demonstrated that crystal structure and the growth direction of rubrene can be controlled by using different volatile crystallizable additives. The field effect mobility of rubrene nanowires prepared using several different crystallizable additives are measured and compared. PMID:26976527

  16. Solidification of eutectic system alloys in space (M-19)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohno, Atsumi

    1993-01-01

    It is well known that in the liquid state eutectic alloys are theoretically homogeneous under 1 g conditions. However, the homogeneous solidified structure of this alloy is not obtained because thermal convection and non-equilibrium solidification occur. The present investigators have clarified the solidification mechanisms of the eutectic system alloys under 1 g conditions by using the in situ observation method; in particular, the primary crystals of the eutectic system alloys never nucleated in the liquid, but instead did so on the mold wall, and the crystals separated from the mold wall by fluid motion caused by thermal convection. They also found that the equiaxed eutectic grains (eutectic cells) are formed on the primary crystals. In this case, the leading phase of the eutectic must agree with the phase of the primary crystals. In space, no thermal convection occurs so that primary crystals should not move from the mold wall and should not appear inside the solidified structure. Therefore no equiaxed eutectic grains will be formed under microgravity conditions. Past space experiments concerning eutectic alloys were classified into two types of experiments: one with respect to the solidification mechanisms of the eutectic alloys and the other to the unidirectional solidification of this alloy. The former type of experiment has the problem that the solidified structures between microgravity and 1 g conditions show little difference. This is why the flight samples were prepared by the ordinary cast techniques on Earth. Therefore it is impossible to ascertain whether or not the nucleation and growth of primary crystals in the melt occur and if primary crystals influence the formation of the equiaxed eutectic grains. In this experiment, hypo- and hyper-eutectic aluminum copper alloys which are near eutectic point are used. The chemical compositions of the samples are Al-32.4mass%Cu (Hypo-eutectic) and Al-33.5mass%Cu (hyper-eutectic). Long rods for the samples are cast by the Ohno Continuous Casting Process and they show the unidirectionally solidified structure. Each flight and ground sample was made of these same rods. The dimensions of all samples are 4.5 mm in diameter and 23.5 mm in length. Each sample is put in a graphite capsule and then vacuum sealed in a double silica ampoule. Then the ampoule is put in the tantalum cartridge and sealed by electron beam welding. For onbard experiments, a Continuous Heating Furnance (CHF) will be used for melting and solidifying samples under microgravity conditions. Six flight samples will be used. Four samples are hypo-eutectic and two are hyper-eutectic alloys. The surface of the two hypo-eutectic alloy samples are covered with aluminum oxide film to prevent Marangoni convection expected under microgravity conditions. Each sample will be heated to 700 C and held at that temperature for 5 min. After that the samples will be allowed to cool to 500 C in the furnace and they will be taken out of the furnace for He gas cooling. The heating and cooling diagrams for the flight experiments are shown. After collecting the flight samples, the solidified structures of the samples will be examined and the mechanisms of eutectic solidification under microgravity conditions will be determined. It is likely that successful flight experiment results will lead to production of high quality eutectic alloys and eutectic composite materials in space.

  17. Diffusionless crystal growth in a eutectic system during rapid solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Galenko, P. K. Herlach, D. M.

    2006-07-15

    Experiments on nonequilibrium rapid eutectic growth are surveyed. The applicability limits of the modern theoretical models describing rapid solidification of binary systems are assessed. A problem of rapid eutectic growth when the local equilibrium is violated in the solute diffusion field (in the bulk liquid and at the solid-liquid interface) is formulated. An analytical solution to the problem of rapid lamellar eutectic growth under local nonequilibrium conditions in the solute diffusion field is found. It is shown that the diffusion-limited growth of a eutectic pattern ceases as soon as a chemically homogeneous crystalline phase begins to grow when the critical point V=V{sub D} is achieved (V is the solid-liquid interface velocity and V{sub D} is the solute diffusion speed in the bulk liquid). At V {>=} V{sub D}, eutectic decomposition is suppressed and the nascent homogeneous crystalline phase has the initial (nominal) chemical composition of the binary system.

  18. Controlled Growth of Rubrene Nanowires by Eutectic Melt Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jeyon; Hyon, Jinho; Park, Kyung-Sun; Cho, Boram; Baek, Jangmi; Kim, Jueun; Lee, Sang Uck; Sung, Myung Mo; Kang, Youngjong

    2016-01-01

    Organic semiconductors including rubrene, Alq3, copper phthalocyanine and pentacene are crystallized by the eutectic melt crystallization. Those organic semiconductors form good eutectic systems with the various volatile crystallizable additives such as benzoic acid, salicylic acid, naphthalene and 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene. Due to the formation of the eutectic system, organic semiconductors having originally high melting point (Tm > 300 °C) are melted and crystallized at low temperature (Te = 40.8-133 °C). The volatile crystallizable additives are easily removed by sublimation. For a model system using rubrene, single crystalline rubrene nanowires are prepared by the eutectic melt crystallization and the eutectic-melt-assisted nanoimpinting (EMAN) technique. It is demonstrated that crystal structure and the growth direction of rubrene can be controlled by using different volatile crystallizable additives. The field effect mobility of rubrene nanowires prepared using several different crystallizable additives are measured and compared. PMID:26976527

  19. Cloud point extraction of Cu(II) using a mixture of Triton X-100 and dithizone with a salting-out effect and its application to visual determination.

    PubMed

    Sato, Nobuko; Mori, Masanobu; Itabashi, Hideyuki

    2013-12-15

    A method for the separation and concentration of trace copper(II) ion (Cu(II)) via cloud point extraction (CPE) using a nonionic surfactant with a salting-out effect was developed and applied as a technique for the visual determination of Cu(II). Triton X-100 (TX-100), which has a cloud point at 64-67 °C in aqueous solutions, was used as the nonionic surfactant for the CPE of Cu(II). Although CPE with TX-100 requires heating of the solution to separate the surfactant-rich phase from the aqueous phase, the new method achieves phase separation at 15-30 °C owing to the addition of a large amount of salt to the solution, which lowers the cloud point. The compound 1,5-diphenylthiocarbazone (dithizone) was selected as the chelating agent for complexation and transfer of Cu(II) to the surfactant-rich phase. The extractability of Cu(II) (initial concentration: 10 μM) was 96.6±2.1% when Na2SO4 was added to a 20% TX-100/4 μM dithizone solution (pH 2). Using this method, the visual determination of Cu(II) was possible for concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 10 μM. In addition, the extraction system was successfully applied to the visual determination of Cu(II) in a river water sample. PMID:24209356

  20. High temperature corrosion of spray-atomized FeAl (40 at.%) based alloys immersed in a molten salt mixture of V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Amaya, M.; Lavernia, E.J.; Martinez, L.

    1999-07-01

    The authors studied the high temperature corrosion of spray atomized and deposited FeAl40at% based intermetallic alloys immersed in a molten salt mixture of 80% V{sub 2}O{sub 5} + 20%Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}(wt%) over the temperature range of 600--900 C. Experiments were realized by the weight loss method and the potentiodynamic polarization electrochemical technique in three different samples: FeAl40at%, FeAl40+0.1at%B and FeAl40+0.1at%B+10at%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Measurements of weight loss and corrosion current density as a function of the molten salts temperature were obtained and discussed in terms of the passive layer morphology and corrosion products formed during the tests. It was found that the iron aluminide doped with boron and reinforced with alumina particulate was more corrosion resistant in the test temperature range. The weight loss experiments revealed that at 700 C all alloys developed maximum corrosion rate. This behavior was related with the dissolution of protective oxide layer on metal base due the formation of vanadate phases which are highly corrosive at this temperature.

  1. Continuous Crystallization of Urea-Water Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokamura, Taku; Ohkubo, Hidetoshi; Watanabe, Satoshi; Seki, Mitsuo; Murakoshi, Hiromichi

    Ice slurries have been used as environmentally-friendly secondary refrigerants. In addition to such ice slurries, aqueous solutions in slurry-state have also been put to practical use at temperatures below 0 oC. Urea-water mixture is a multi-component substance that has a eutectic point. If we can form a two-phase fluid substance by the liquid-solid phases at the eutectic point, it can be used as a fluid latent heat storage material, which will maintain the secondary refrigerant in a heat exchanger at constant temperature. In the present study, we propose a urea-water mixture as a novel functional thermal fluid that can be used as a fluid latent heat material. To demonstrate its feasibility, we first measured the latent heat and density of a urea-water mixture, and then used a counter-flow double tube heat exchanger to produce a liquid-solid two-phase flow of the urea-water mixture. This work demonstrates that it is possible to make a fluid latent heat storage material continuously from an aqueous solution at the eutectic point by flowing it through a double tube heat exchanger equipped with a stirrer.

  2. Deliquescence of NaClNaNO3, KNO3NaNO3, and NaClKNO3 salt mixtures from 90 to 120C

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Susan; Craig, Laura; Wolery, Thomas J

    2005-01-01

    We conducted reversed deliquescence experiments in saturated NaClNaNO3H2O, KNO3NaNO3H2O, and NaClKNO3H2O systems from 90 to 120C as a function of relative humidity and solution composition. NaCl, NaNO3, and KNO3 represent members of dust salt assemblages that are likely to deliquesce and form concentrated brines on high-level radioactive waste package surfaces in a repository environment at Yucca Mountain, NV. Discrepancy between model prediction and experiment can be as high as 8% for relative humidity and 50% for dissolved ion concentration. The discrepancy is attributed primarily to the use of 25C models for ClNO3 and KNO3 ion interactions in the current Yucca Mountain Project high-temperature Pitzer model to describe the nonideal behavior of these highly concentrated solutions.

  3. Production of chlorine from chloride salts

    DOEpatents

    Rohrmann, Charles A. (Kennewick, WA)

    1981-01-01

    A process for converting chloride salts and sulfuric acid to sulfate salts and elemental chlorine is disclosed. A chloride salt and sulfuric acid are combined in a furnace where they react to produce a sulfate salt and hydrogen chloride. Hydrogen chloride from the furnace contacts a molten salt mixture containing an oxygen compound of vanadium, an alkali metal sulfate and an alkali metal pyrosulfate to recover elemental chlorine. In the absence of an oxygen-bearing gas during the contacting, the vanadium is reduced, but is regenerated to its active higher valence state by separately contacting the molten salt mixture with an oxygen-bearing gas.

  4. Self-Assembly and Rheological Properties of a Pseudogemini Surfactant Formed in a Salt-Free Catanionic Surfactant Mixture in Water.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Hongguang; Chai, Jinling; Chen, Mengjun; Yang, Qiao; Hao, Jingcheng

    2015-10-20

    The surface and bulk properties of bola-type dicarboxylic acid (sebacic acid, SA) and zwitterionic surfactant tetradecyldimethylamine oxide (C14DMAO) mixtures in aqueous solutions were studied. Surface tension measurements indicate a pronounced synergistic effect between SA and C14DMAO. In bulk aqueous solutions, rich phase behavior was observed with a varied SA-to-C14DMAO ratio (ρ) and a total surfactant concentration. Typically at ρ = 0.5, a novel pseudogemini surfactant (C14-S-C14) forms, driven by electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bonding. The C14-S-C14/H2O system exhibits rich phase behavior induced by the transition of aggregates. With increasing concentration of C14-S-C14, one can observe a viscous L1 phase, an L1/Lα two-phase region where a birefringent Lα phase is on the top of an L1 phase, a single Lα phase, and finally a mixture of an Lα phase and a precipitate. Microstructures formed in the Lα phases were determined by freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy (FF-TEM) and cryogenic-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) observations. Polymorphic aggregation behavior was observed with the formation of a variety of bilayer structures including unilamellar vesicles, onions, and open and hyperbranched bilayers. Rheological measurements showed that the Lα phases are viscoelastic and sensitive to temperature where a quick loss of viscoelasticity was observed at elevated temperature. PMID:26406939

  5. The ionothermal synthesis of metal organic frameworks, Ln(C 9O 6H 3)((CH 3NH) 2CO) 2, using deep eutectic solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himeur, Farida; Stein, Irene; Wragg, David S.; Slawin, Alexandra M. Z.; Lightfoot, Philip; Morris, Russell E.

    2010-04-01

    Three new isostructural materials Ln(TMA)(DMU) 2 (Ln(C 9O 6H 3)((CH 3NH) 2CO) 2; Ln: La 1, Nd 2, Eu 3; TMA: trimesate, DMU: dimethylurea) have been synthesised ionothermally using a choline chloride/dimethylurea deep eutectic mixture as the solvent. Normally in ionothermal synthesis the urea portion of the deep eutectic solvent is unstable, breaking down to release ammonium cations that act as templates. In the case of 1- 3, however, the dimethylurea remains intact and is incorporated into the final structure.

  6. Directionally solidified iron-base eutectic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.

    1976-01-01

    Pseudobinary eutectic alloys with nominal compositions of Fe-25Ta-22Ni-10Cr and Fe-15.5Nb-14.5Ni-6.0Cr were directionally solidified at 0.5 centimeter per hour. Their microstructure consisted of the fcc, iron solid-solution, matrix phase reinforced by about 41-volume-percent, hcp, faceted Fe2Ta fibers and 41-volume-percent, hcp, Fe2Nb lamellae for the tantalum- and niobium-containing alloys, respectively. The microstructural stability under thermal cycling and the temperature dependence of tensile properties were investigated. These alloys showed low elevated-temperature strength and were not considered suitable for application in aircraft-gas-turbine blades although they may have applicability as vane materials.

  7. Non-Covalent Derivatives: Cocrystals and Eutectics.

    PubMed

    Stoler, Emily; Warner, John C

    2015-01-01

    Non-covalent derivatives (NCDs) are formed by incorporating one (or more) coformer molecule(s) into the matrix of a parent molecule via non-covalent forces. These forces can include ionic forces, Van der Waals forces, hydrogen bonding, lipophilic-lipophilic interactions and pi-pi interactions. NCDs, in both cocrystal and eutectic forms, possess properties that are unique to their supramolecular matrix. These properties include critical product performance factors such as solubility, stability and bioavailability. NCDs have been used to tailor materials for a variety of applications and have the potential to be used in an even broader range of materials and processes. NCDs can be prepared using little or no solvent and none of the reagents typical to synthetic modifications. Thus, NCDs represent a powerfully versatile, environmentally-friendly and cost-effective opportunity. PMID:26287141

  8. Double salt crystal structure of hexasodium hemiundecahydrogen ?-hexamolybdoplatinate(IV) heminonahydrogen ?-hexamolybdoplatinate(IV) nonacosahydrate: dihydrogen disordered-mixture double salt

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Hea-Chung; Park, Ki-Min; Lee, Uk

    2015-01-01

    The title double salt containing two distinct, differently protonated hexamolybdoplatinate(IV) polyanions, Na6[H5.5 ?-PtMo6O24][H4.5 ?-PtMo6O24]29H2O, has been synthesized by a hydrothermal reaction at ca pH 1.80. The positions of the H atoms in the polyanions were established from difference Fourier maps and confirmed by the interpolyanion hydrogen bonds, bond-distance elongation, and bond-valence sum (BVS) calculations. The fractional numbers of H atoms in each polyanion are required for charge balance and in order to avoid unrealistically short H?H distances in the interpolyanion hydrogen bonds. Considering the disorder, the refined formula of the title polyanion, {[H5.5 ?-PtMo6O24]; polyanion (A) and [H4.5 ?-PtMo6O24]; polyanion (B)}6?, can be rewritten as a set of real formula, viz. {[H6 ?-PtMo6O24]; polyanion (A). [H4 ?-PtMo6O24]; polyanion (B)}6? and {[H5 ?-PtMo6O24]; polyanion (A). [H5 ?-PtMo6O24]; polyanion (B)}6?. The polyanion pairs both form dimers of the same formula, viz. {[H10 ?-Pt2Mo12O48]}6? connected by seven interpolyanion OH?O hydrogen bonds. PMID:26594418

  9. Method for the production of uranium chloride salt

    DOEpatents

    Westphal, Brian R.; Mariani, Robert D.

    2013-07-02

    A method for the production of UCl.sub.3 salt without the use of hazardous chemicals or multiple apparatuses for synthesis and purification is provided. Uranium metal is combined in a reaction vessel with a metal chloride and a eutectic salt- and heated to a first temperature under vacuum conditions to promote reaction of the uranium metal with the metal chloride for the production of a UCl.sub.3 salt. After the reaction has run substantially to completion, the furnace is heated to a second temperature under vacuum conditions. The second temperature is sufficiently high to selectively vaporize the chloride salts and distill them into a condenser region.

  10. Deliquescence of NaCl-NaNO3, KNO3-NaNO3, and NaCl-KNO3 Salt Mixtures From 90 to 120?C

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, S A; Craig, L; Wolery, T J

    2004-10-20

    We conducted reversed deliquescence experiments in saturated NaCl-NaNO{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O, KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O, and NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O systems from 90 to 120 C as a function of relative humidity and solution composition. NaCl, NaNO{sub 3}, and KNO{sub 3} represent members of dust salt assemblages that are likely to deliquesce and form concentrated brines on high-level radioactive waste package surfaces in a repository environment at Yucca Mountain, NV, USA. Discrepancy between model prediction and experimental code can be as high as 8% for relative humidity and 50% for dissolved ion concentration. The discrepancy is attributed primarily to the use of 25 C models for Cl-NO{sub 3} and K-NO{sub 3} ion interactions in the current Yucca Mountain Project high-temperature Pitzer model to describe the non-ideal behavior of these highly concentrated solutions.

  11. Orientational Jumps in (Acetamide + Electrolyte) Deep Eutectics: Anion Dependence.

    PubMed

    Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit; Mukherjee, Biswaroop

    2015-08-27

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to investigate orientation jumps of acetamide molecules in three different ionic deep eutectics made of acetamide (CH3CONH2) and lithium salts of bromide (Br()), nitrate (NO3()) and perchlorate (ClO4()) at approximately 80:20 mole ratio and 303 K. Orientational jumps have been dissected into acetamideacetamide and acetamideion catagories. Simulated jump characteristics register a considerable dependence on the anion identity. For example, large angle jumps are relatively less frequent in the presence of NO3() than in the presence of the other two anions. Distribution of jump angles for rotation of acetamide molecules hydrogen bonded (H-bonded) to anions has been found to be bimodal in the presence of Br() and is qualitatively different from the other two cases. Estimated energy barrier for orientation jumps of these acetamide molecules (H-bonded to anions) differ by a factor of ?2 between NO3() and ClO4(), the barrier height for the latter being lower and ?0.5kBT. Relative radial and angular displacements during jumps describe the sequence ClO(4) > NO3() > Br() and follow a reverse viscosity trend. Jump barrier for acetamideacetamide pairs reflects weak dependence on anion identity and remains closer to the magnitude (?0.7kBT) found for orientation jumps in molten acetamide. Jump time distributions exhibit a power law dependence of the type, P(tjump) ? A(tjump/?)(??), with both ? and ? showing substantial anion dependence. The latter suggests the presence of dynamic heterogeneity in these systems and supports earlier conclusions from time-resolved fluorescence measurements. PMID:26131593

  12. Use of Microgravity to Control the Microstructure of Eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox. William R.; Regel, Liya L.

    1999-01-01

    This grant began in June of 1996. Its long term goal is to be able to control the microstructure of directionally solidified eutectic alloys, through an improved understanding of the influence of convection. The primary objective of the projects in the present grant is to test hypotheses for the reported influence of microgravity on the microstructure of eutectics. The prior experimental results on the influence of microgravity on the microstructure of eutectics have been contradictory. With lamellar eutectics, microgravity had a negligible effect on the microstructure. Microgravity experiments with fibrous eutectics sometimes showed a finer microstructure and sometimes a coarser microstructure. Most research has been done on the MnBi/Bi rod-like eutectic. Larson and Pirich obtained a two-fold finer microstructure both from microgravity and by use of a magnetic field to quench buoyancy-driven convection. Smith, on the other hand, observed no change in microgravity. Prior theoretical work at Clarkson University showed that buoyancy-driven convection in the vertical Bridgman configuration is not vigorous enough to alter the concentration field in front of a growing eutectic sufficiently to cause a measurable change in microstructure. We assumed that the bulk melt was at the eutectic composition and that freezing occurred at the extremum, i.e. with minimum total undercooling at the freezing interface. There have been four hypotheses attempting to explain the observed changes in microstructure of fibrous eutectics caused by convection: I .A fluctuating freezing rate, combined with unequal kinetics for fiber termination and branching. 2. Off-eutectic composition, either in the bulk melt due to an off-eutectic feed or at the freezing interface because of departure from the extremum condition. 3. Presence of a strong habit modifying impurity whose concentration at the freezing interface would be altered by convection. At the beginning of the present grant, we favored the first of these hypotheses and set out to test it both experimentally and theoretically. We planned the following approaches: I .Pass electric current pulses through the MnBi/Bi eutectic during directional solidification in order to produce an oscillatory freezing rate. 2. Directionally solidify the MnBi/Bi eutectic on Mir using the QUELD II gradient freeze furnace developed by Professor Smith at Queen's University. 3. Select another fibrous eutectic system for investigation using the Accelerated Crucible Rotation Technique to introduce convection. 4. Develop theoretical models for eutectic solidification with an oscillatory freezing rate. Because of the problems with Mir, we substituted ground-based experiments at Queen's University with QUELD II vertical and horizontal, with and without vibration of the furnace. The Al-Si system was chosen for the ACRT experiments. Three related approaches were used to model eutectic solidification with an oscillatory freezing rate. A sharp interface model was used to calculate composition oscillations at the freezing interface in response to imposed freezing rate oscillations.

  13. Macrosegregation in undercooled Pb-Sn eutectic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Groh, H. C., III; Laxmanan, V.

    1988-01-01

    A novel technique resulting in large undercoolings in bulk samples (23g) of lead-tin eutectic alloy is described. Samples of eutectic composition were processed with undercoolings ranging from 4 to 20 K and with cooling rates varying between 0.04 to 4 K/sec. The final macrostructure of undercooled samples depends on both the initial undercooling of the melt and the cooling rate. Gravity-driven segregation is found to increase with increasing undercooling. A eutectic Pb-Sn alloy undercooled at 20 K and cooled at 4 K/sec had a composition of about Pb-72 wt pct Sn at the top and 55 pct Sn at the bottom. Macrosegregation in these undercooled lead-tin eutectic alloys is shown to be primarily due to a sink/float mechanism caused by the difference in density of the solid and liquid phases and the undercooling and nucleation behavior of the alloy.

  14. Influence of convection on rod spacing of eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caram, R.; Chandrasekhar, S.; Wilcox, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a three-dimensional numerical model to study the influence of convection on the rod-like microstructure of an eutectic system. This model is based on a central finite difference approach. By applying it, the average concentration near the solid/liquid interface of a growing rod-like eutectic was determined for eutectic compositions C(e) of 0.03, 0.05, and 0.10. Following Jackson and Hunt (1966), the average interfacial composition was converted to a change of undercooling at the interface and, finally, to spacing between the rods. The change in rod spacing with increasing intensity of convection was calculated assuming the eutectic grows at minimum interfacial undercooling. It was confirmed that an increase in convection should coarsen the microstructure (i.e., the rod spacing increases with increasing intensity of stirring).

  15. Origin of the low-viscosity of [emim][(FSO2)2N] ionic liquid and its lithium salt mixture: experimental and theoretical study of self-diffusion coefficients, conductivities, and intermolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Tsuzuki, Seiji; Hayamizu, Kikuko; Seki, Shiro

    2010-12-16

    The temperature-dependent viscosity, ionic conductivity, and self-diffusion coefficients of an ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide ([emim][FSA]), and its Li salt mixture were studied with reference to emim bis(trifluoromethyl-sulfonyl)amide ([emim][TFSA]) systems. The stabilization energies for the formation of the FSA(-) complexes with emim(+) and Li(+) were calculated by the MP2/6-311G** level ab initio method. The stabilization energies calculated for the FSA(-) complexes with emim(+) and Li(+) (-77.0 and -134.3 kcal/mol) were smaller than those for the corresponding TFSA(-) complexes (-78.8 and -137.2 kcal/mol). The weaker electrostatic and induction interactions are the causes of the smaller interaction energies for the FSA(-) complexes. The weaker interaction between the FSA(-) and emim(+) can be one of the causes of the lower viscosity of the [emim][FSA] ionic liquid compared with that of the [emim][TFSA] ionic liquid. The weaker interaction between the FSA(-) and Li(+) compared with that between the TFSA(-) and Li(+) explains the fact that the addition of Li salt to the [emim][FSA] ionic liquid induces a little increase of the viscosity and a little decrease of the ionic conductivity and self-diffusion coefficients of ions. The FSA(-) in the Li[FSA] complex prefers the cis form due to the stronger attraction and smaller deformation energy of the cis-FSA(-) compared with the trans-FSA(-). PMID:21080680

  16. Preparation of directionally solidified eutectics in some oxohalide systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chemekova, T.Yu.; Udalov, Yu.P.

    1987-09-01

    Directionally solidified eutectics of systems formed by oxides and halides can be employed for developing materials with anisotropic properties. Preparation of directionally solidified eutectics by the method of zone melting with a heater submerged in the melt makes it possible to monitor visually the entire growth process. This method is apparently optimal, since it makes it possible to control the temperature gradient and the solidification rate over wide limits.

  17. The microstructure of MnBi/Bi eutectic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravishankar, P. S.; Wilcox, W. R.; Larson, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    Directionally solidified eutectic alloys of the system MnBi/Bi have been investigated with reference to the dependence of the fiber spacing on the growth rate and the interfacial temperature gradient. It is found that the fiber spacing varies as the inverse square root of the growth rate and does not depend on the temperature gradient in contrast to the claims that all faceted/non-faceted eutectics should show a temperature gradient influence.

  18. Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, Anoop

    2013-08-14

    A key technological issue facing the success of future Concentrating Solar Thermal Power (CSP) plants is creating an economical Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system. Current TES systems use either sensible heat in fluids such as oil, or molten salts, or use thermal stratification in a dual-media consisting of a solid and a heat-transfer fluid. However, utilizing the heat of fusion in inorganic molten salt mixtures in addition to sensible heat , as in a Phase change material (PCM)-based TES, can significantly increase the energy density of storage requiring less salt and smaller containers. A major issue that is preventing the commercial use of PCM-based TES is that it is difficult to discharge the latent heat stored in the PCM melt. This is because when heat is extracted, the melt solidifies onto the heat exchanger surface decreasing the heat transfer. Even a few millimeters of thickness of solid material on heat transfer surface results in a large drop in heat transfer due to the low thermal conductivity of solid PCM. Thus, to maintain the desired heat rate, the heat exchange area must be large which increases cost. This project demonstrated that the heat transfer coefficient can be increase ten-fold by using forced convection by pumping a hyper-eutectic salt mixture over specially coated heat exchanger tubes. However,only 15% of the latent heat is used against a goal of 40% resulting in a projected cost savings of only 17% against a goal of 30%. Based on the failure mode effect analysis and experience with pumping salt at near freezing point significant care must be used during operation which can increase the operating costs. Therefore, we conclude the savings are marginal to justify using this concept for PCM-TES over a two-tank TES. The report documents the specialty coatings, the composition and morphology of hypereutectic salt mixtures and the results from the experiment conducted with the active heat exchanger along with the lessons learnt during experimentation.

  19. RETRACTED: Neoteric FT-IR investigation on the functional groups of phosphonium-based deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Aissaoui, Tayeb; AlNashef, Inas M; Hayyan, Maan; Hashim, Mohd Ali

    2015-10-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are novel solvent media that are currently under investigation as an alternative to ionic liquids and conventional solvents. The physical properties of DESs as well as their mild environmental footprint and potentially critical industrial application necessitate understanding the interaction of functional groups on both the salt and hydrogen bond donor (HBD). In this study, four DESs were prepared by mixing triethylenglycol, diethylenglycol, ethylenglycol, and glycerol as HBDs with methyltriphenylphosphonium bromide as a salt at a molar ratio of 1:4. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was conducted to highlight the chemical structure and mechanism of the combination of the four DESs. New spectra illustrating the combination of the functional groups of the HBDs and salt were observed and interpreted. This study is the first to investigate the properties of neoteric phosphonium-based DESs. PMID:25985123

  20. Lamellar coupled growth in the neopentylglycol-(D)camphor eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witusiewicz, V. T.; Sturz, L.; Hecht, U.; Rex, S.

    2014-01-01

    Lamellar eutectic growth was investigated in the transparent organic alloy neopentylglycol-(D)camphor of eutectic composition (NPG-45.3 wt% DC) using bulk (3D) and thin (2D) samples. Two types of eutectic grains were observed in the polycrystalline samples, either with lamellae well aligned to the direction of solidification or inclined at an angle of 21.51.5. The well aligned grains were used for determining lamellar spacing as function of growth velocity V and temperature gradient G. Based on these data the Jackson-Hunt constant was evaluated to be KJH=1.600.15 ?m3 s-1. For low growth velocity experiments the contact angles for (DC) and (NPG) lamellae at eutectic triple junctions were also evaluated, being ?(DC)=50.94.1 and ?(NPG)=41.84.7, respectively. Using these values, as well as phase diagram data and the Gibbs-Thomson coefficients, the chemical coefficient of diffusion of (D)camphor in the eutectic liquid at eutectic temperature 53 C was estimated to be DL=9715 ?m2 s-1.

  1. Ultrasound in lead-bismuth eutectic

    SciTech Connect

    Dierckx, M.; Van Dyck, D.

    2011-07-01

    The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK.CEN) is in the process of designing MYRRHA, a new multi-purpose irradiation facility to replace the ageing BR2. MYRRHA is a fast spectrum reactor cooled with lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE). As liquid metal is opaque to visual light, ultrasonic measurement techniques are selected to fulfill essential tasks that, according to our assessment, will be demanded by licensing authorities, in particular: fuel assembly identification and localization of a lost fuel assembly. To that end, a considerable research effort at SCK.CEN is devoted to study ultrasonic propagation in LBE. As ultrasonic experiments in LBE are elaborate and expensive to set up, we are particularly interested in to what extent experiments in water can be extrapolated to LBE - one of the main focuses of this article. We describe and present results of a first experiment with this goal which shows that the signal to noise ratio is better in LBE and that we even see small diffuse reflections up to 40 deg. off normal. On the other hand, we do not see internal reflections in stainless steel objects in LBE which we do in water. Therefore, we conclude that experiments in water can be used to validate algorithms for LBE on the condition that they do not rely on internal reflections. We also present solutions to tackle the essential tasks: fuel assembly identification and lost object localization. The requirements for the ultrasonic equipment implementing these solutions are also discussed. (authors)

  2. Molten Salt Thermal Energy Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maru, H. C.; Dullea, J. F.; Kardas, A.; Paul, L.; Marianowski, L. G.; Ong, E.; Sampath, V.; Huang, V. M.; Wolak, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of storing thermal energy at temperatures of 450 C to 535 C in the form of latent heat of fusion was examined for over 30 inorganic salts and salt mixtures. Alkali carbonate mixtures were chosen as phase-change storage materials in this temperature range because of their relatively high storage capacity and thermal conductivity, moderate cost, low volumetric expansion upon melting, low corrosivity, and good chemical stability. Means of improving heat conduction through the solid salt were explored.

  3. Molten Salt Fuel Version of Laser Inertial Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE)

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R W; Shaw, H F; Caro, A; Kaufman, L; Latkowski, J F; Powers, J; Turchi, P A

    2008-10-24

    Molten salt with dissolved uranium is being considered for the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) fission blanket as a backup in case a solid-fuel version cannot meet the performance objectives, for example because of radiation damage of the solid materials. Molten salt is not damaged by radiation and therefore could likely achieve the desired high burnup (>99%) of heavy atoms of {sup 238}U. A perceived disadvantage is the possibility that the circulating molten salt could lend itself to misuse (proliferation) by making separation of fissile material easier than for the solid-fuel case. The molten salt composition being considered is the eutectic mixture of 73 mol% LiF and 27 mol% UF{sub 4}, whose melting point is 490 C. The use of {sup 232}Th as a fuel is also being studied. ({sup 232}Th does not produce Pu under neutron irradiation.) The temperature of the molten salt would be {approx}550 C at the inlet (60 C above the solidus temperature) and {approx}650 C at the outlet. Mixtures of U and Th are being considered. To minimize corrosion of structural materials, the molten salt would also contain a small amount ({approx}1 mol%) of UF{sub 3}. The same beryllium neutron multiplier could be used as in the solid fuel case; alternatively, a liquid lithium or liquid lead multiplier could be used. Insuring that the solubility of Pu{sup 3+} in the melt is not exceeded is a design criterion. To mitigate corrosion of the steel, a refractory coating such as tungsten similar to the first wall facing the fusion source is suggested in the high-neutron-flux regions; and in low-neutron-flux regions, including the piping and heat exchangers, a nickel alloy, Hastelloy, would be used. These material choices parallel those made for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at ORNL. The nuclear performance is better than the solid fuel case. At the beginning of life, the tritium breeding ratio is unity and the plutonium plus {sup 233}U production rate is {approx}0.6 atoms per 14.1 MeV neutron.

  4. Shear Strength of Eutectic Sn-Bi Lead-Free Solders After Corrosion Testing and Thermal Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostofizadeh, Milad; Pippola, Juha; Frisk, Laura

    2014-05-01

    Low-cost manufacturing in the electronics industry is becoming more demanding, particularly in the production of consumer electronics. Such manufacturing processes require reliable and low-cost lead-free solders. Among the low temperature lead-free solders, eutectic Sn-Bi solder has attracted a great deal of interest since it offers good reliability comparable to that of Sn-Pb solders. In this paper, the shear strength of eutectic 42Sn-58Bi (wt.%) lead-free solder was studied using combinations of environmental tests including thermal aging at 100 C, salt spray test, and a sequential combination of these tests. Microstructural studies on samples were performed at different time intervals of testing. To study the effect of salt spray and thermal aging on the mechanical reliability, shear testing was performed on the samples. Failure analysis including fractography on samples was conducted at different time intervals using a scanning electron microscope. Considerable corrosion was observed after the salt spray test. This was found to have a significant effect on the shear strength of the solder joints. Additionally, thermal aging was found to cause coarsening and to increase the thickness of intermetallic layers. This was also found to adversely affect the shear strength. The combination test was found to have the most significant effect, as the lowest shear strengths were seen after this testing.

  5. Innovative mixture of salts in the quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe method for the extraction of residual macrolides in milk followed by analysis with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Rafaela Pinto; Spisso, Bernardete Ferraz; Pereira, Mararlene Ulberg; Monteiro, Mychelle Alves; Ferreira, Rosana Gomes; da Nbrega, Armi Wanderley

    2015-11-01

    A simple extraction technique has been developed for seven macrolide antibiotics in milk. The procedure involves a modified quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe method based on acetonitrile extraction, followed by the addition of a mixture of salts (sodium sulfate, sodium chloride, and potassium carbonate) not yet reported in literature. The method was validated for tylosin and was selective, free of matrix effect, and linear in the range of 0.78-18.75 ng/mL in the final extract, corresponding to 0.125-3 times the maximum residue limit. The limit of detection, limit of quantification, decision limit, and detection capability were, respectively, 0.84, 2.79, 58.4, and 71.7 ?g/kg. The overall average recovery at 25, 50, and 75 ?g/kg ranged from 89-97%. Repeatability and intermediate precision expressed by relative standard deviations were below 10.5 and 12%, respectively. The extension of the validation for spiramycin, throleandomycin, oleandomycin, roxithromycin, erythromycin, and clarithromycin is under consideration since the procedure proved to be able to efficiently extract all studied macrolides, with recoveries from 74-104% at 50 ?g/kg for tylosin, erythromycin, spiramycin, and oleandomycin and 20 ?g/kg for throleandomycin, roxithromycin, and clarithromycin. PMID:26340418

  6. Salt tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Talbot, C.J.; Jackson, M.P.A.

    1988-01-01

    Salt deposits have economic significance because of their importance as oil and gas traps and their potential as radioactive waste disposal sites. This article reviews the formation of salt domes, beginning with a description of the formation of salt deposits as evaporites and a discussion of early attempts to model the development of salt domes. Current work on tectonics of salt dome formation and related tectonics is then discussed in detail.

  7. Applicability evaluation of Deep Eutectic Solvents-Cellulase system for lignocellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Gunny, Ahmad Anas Nagoor; Arbain, Dachyar; Nashef, Enas Muen; Jamal, Parveen

    2015-04-01

    Deep Eutectic Solvents (DESs) have recently emerged as a new generation of ionic liquids for lignocellulose pretreatment. However, DESs contain salt components which tend to inactivate cellulase in the subsequent saccharification process. To alleviate this problem, it is necessary to evaluate the applicability of the DESs-Cellulase system. This was accomplished in the present study by first studying the stability of cellulase in the presence of selected DESs followed by applicability evaluation based on glucose production, energy consumption and kinetic performance. Results showed that the cellulase was able to retain more than 90% of its original activity in the presence of 10% (v/v) for glycerol based DES (GLY) and ethylene glycol based DES (EG). Furthermore, both DESs system exhibited higher glucose percentage enhancement and lower energy consumption as compared to diluted alkali system. Among the two DESs studied, EG showed comparatively better kinetic performance. PMID:25661309

  8. Effect of additives on performance on hydrated-salt TES systems

    SciTech Connect

    MacCracken, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    Calmac's objectives under this contract will be to evaluate a gelling agent, developed by Calor, Ltd. of England, as a means of preventing stratification in sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate and Glauber salt eutectic phase change materials; to determine techniques for the field filling and to develop repair procedures for systems incorporating the Calor gel; to study the effects of ethylene glycol and glycerin on the thermal performance of sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate and Glauber salt eutectic PCM; and to evaluate the effect of pH modification of sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate, specifically with regard to subcooling behavior. Progress is reported.

  9. Explosive double salts and preparation

    DOEpatents

    Cady, Howard H. (Los Alamos, NM); Lee, Kien-yin (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01

    Applicants have discovered a new composition of matter which is an explosive addition compound of ammonium nitrate (AN) and diethylenetriamine trinitrate (DETN) in a 50:50 molar ratio. The compound is stable over extended periods of time only at temperatures higher than 46.degree. C., decomposing to a fine-grained eutectic mixture (which is also believed to be new) of AN and DETN at temperatures lower than 46.degree. C. The compound of the invention has an x-ray density of 1.61 g/cm.sup.3, explodes to form essentially only gaseous products, has higher detonation properties (i.e., detonation velocity and pressure) than those of any mechanical mixture having the same density and composition as the compound of the invention, is a quite insensitive explosive material, can be cast at temperatures attainable by high pressure steam, and is prepared from inexpensive ingredients. Methods of preparing the compound of the invention and the fine-grained eutectic composition of the invention are given.

  10. Thermochemical and microstructural studies on binary organic eutectics and complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Singh, R. A.

    2004-06-01

    The phase diagram, solidification kinetics and differential scanning calorimetry of a few charge-transfer (CT) complexes of pyrene with p-benzoquinone, m-dinitrobenzene and m-nitrobenzoic acid have been studied. These materials have been characterized by X-ray diffraction. Microstructure and electrical conductivities of congruent melting complexes and eutectics have been determined. The data indicate that side-by-side nucleation of donor and acceptor results both in eutectic as well as CT complex formation under the present experimental conditions. This explains low electrical conductivities of these materials due to weak interaction and mixed stacking of donor and acceptor. Excess thermodynamics functions of the CT materials and eutectics have been determined and results have been discussed in the light of electron donor-acceptor interactions between the components.

  11. Directionally solidified eutectic gamma-gamma nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, M. R. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A directionally solidified multivariant eutectic gamma-gamma prime nickel-base superalloy casting having improved high temperature properties was developed. The alloy is comprised of a two phase eutectic structure consisting essentially of on a weight percent base, 6.0 to 9.0 aluminum, 5.0 to 17.0 tantalum, 0-10 cobalt, 0-6 vanadium, 0-6 rhenium, 2.0-6.0 tungsten, and the balance being nickel, subject to the proviso that the sum of the atomic percentages of aluminum plus tantalum is within the range of from 19-22, and the ratio of atomic percentages of tantalum to aluminum plus tantalum is within the range of from 0.12 to 0.23. Embedded within the gamma nickel-base matrix are aligned eutectic gamma prime phase (primarily nickel-aluminum-tantalum) reinforcing fibers.

  12. Ternary eutectic dendrites: Pattern formation and scaling properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rtkai, Lszl; Szlls, Attila; Pusztai, Tams; Mohri, Tetsuo; Grnsy, Lszl

    2015-04-01

    Extending previous work [Pusztai et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 032401 (2013)], we have studied the formation of eutectic dendrites in a model ternary system within the framework of the phase-field theory. We have mapped out the domain in which two-phase dendritic structures grow. With increasing pulling velocity, the following sequence of growth morphologies is observed: flat front lamellae ? eutectic colonies ? eutectic dendrites ? dendrites with target pattern ? partitionless dendrites ? partitionless flat front. We confirm that the two-phase and one-phase dendrites have similar forms and display a similar scaling of the dendrite tip radius with the interface free energy. It is also found that the possible eutectic patterns include the target pattern, and single- and multiarm spirals, of which the thermal fluctuations choose. The most probable number of spiral arms increases with increasing tip radius and with decreasing kinetic anisotropy. Our numerical simulations confirm that in agreement with the assumptions of a recent analysis of two-phase dendrites [Akamatsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 105502 (2014)], the Jackson-Hunt scaling of the eutectic wavelength with pulling velocity is obeyed in the parameter domain explored, and that the natural eutectic wavelength is proportional to the tip radius of the two-phase dendrites. Finally, we find that it is very difficult/virtually impossible to form spiraling two-phase dendrites without anisotropy, an observation that seems to contradict the expectations of Akamatsu et al. Yet, it cannot be excluded that in isotropic systems, two-phase dendrites are rare events difficult to observe in simulations.

  13. Ternary eutectic dendrites: Pattern formation and scaling properties

    SciTech Connect

    Rtkai, Lszl; Szlls, Attila; Pusztai, Tams; Mohri, Tetsuo; Grnsy, Lszl

    2015-04-21

    Extending previous work [Pusztai et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 032401 (2013)], we have studied the formation of eutectic dendrites in a model ternary system within the framework of the phase-field theory. We have mapped out the domain in which two-phase dendritic structures grow. With increasing pulling velocity, the following sequence of growth morphologies is observed: flat front lamellae ? eutectic colonies ? eutectic dendrites ? dendrites with target pattern ? partitionless dendrites ? partitionless flat front. We confirm that the two-phase and one-phase dendrites have similar forms and display a similar scaling of the dendrite tip radius with the interface free energy. It is also found that the possible eutectic patterns include the target pattern, and single- and multiarm spirals, of which the thermal fluctuations choose. The most probable number of spiral arms increases with increasing tip radius and with decreasing kinetic anisotropy. Our numerical simulations confirm that in agreement with the assumptions of a recent analysis of two-phase dendrites [Akamatsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 105502 (2014)], the Jackson-Hunt scaling of the eutectic wavelength with pulling velocity is obeyed in the parameter domain explored, and that the natural eutectic wavelength is proportional to the tip radius of the two-phase dendrites. Finally, we find that it is very difficult/virtually impossible to form spiraling two-phase dendrites without anisotropy, an observation that seems to contradict the expectations of Akamatsu et al. Yet, it cannot be excluded that in isotropic systems, two-phase dendrites are rare events difficult to observe in simulations.

  14. Evidence of self-aggregation of cationic surfactants in a choline chloride+glycerol deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Pal, Mahi; Singh, Ranjan K; Pandey, Siddharth

    2015-08-24

    Based on fluorescence probe, electrical conductivity, surface tension, small-angle X-ray/dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy experiments, we present the first clear lines of evidence for self-aggregation of cationic surfactants of the n-alkyltrimethylammonium family within an archetypical deep eutectic solvent comprised of a 1:2 molar mixture of choline chloride and glycerol. Estimated thermodynamic parameters suggest this self-aggregation process to be less entropically driven than that in water. These novel water-free self-assemblies might serve as dynamic soft templates to direct the growth of size- or shape-tailored nanoparticles within water-restricted media. PMID:26080073

  15. Surfactant Behavior of Sodium Dodecylsulfate in Deep Eutectic Solvent Choline Chloride/Urea.

    PubMed

    Arnold, T; Jackson, A J; Sanchez-Fernandez, A; Magnone, D; Terry, A E; Edler, K J

    2015-12-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DES) resemble ionic liquids but are formed from an ionic mixture instead of being a single ionic compound. Here we present some results that demonstrate that surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) remains surface-active and shows self-assembly phenomena in the most commonly studied DES, choline chloride/urea. X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) suggest that the behavior is significantly different from that in water. Our SANS data supports our determination of the critical micelle concentration using surface-tension measurements and suggests that the micelles formed in DES do not have the same shape and size as those seen in water. Reflectivity measurements have also demonstrated that the surfactants remain surface-active below this concentration. PMID:26540438

  16. Lead-bismuth eutectic technology for Hyperion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Kapernick, R. J.; McClure, P. R.; Trapp, T. J.

    2013-10-01

    A small lead-bismuth eutectic-cooled reactor concept (referred to as the Hyperion reactor concept) is being studied at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Hyperion Power Generation. In this report, a critical assessment of the lead-bismuth eutectic technology for Hyperion reactor is presented based on currently available knowledge. Included are: material compatibility, oxygen control, thermal hydraulics, polonium control. The key advances in the technology and their applications to Hyperion reactor design are analyzed. Also, the near future studies in main areas of the technology are recommended for meeting the design requirements.

  17. Selecting Resolving Agents with Respect to Their Eutectic Compositions.

    PubMed

    Szeleczky, Zsolt; Semsey, Sndor; Bagi, Pter; Plovics, Emese; Faigl, Ferenc; Fogassy, Elemr

    2016-03-01

    In order to develop a resolution procedure for a given racemic compound, the first and the most important step is finding the most suitable resolving agent. We studied 18 individual resolutions that were carried out with resolving agents having high eutectic composition. We found that very high enantiomeric excess values were obtained in all cases. We assume that the eutectic composition of a given resolving agent is one of the most important properties that should always be considered during the search for the most efficient resolving agent. Chirality 28:230-234, 2016. 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26797938

  18. Development of media for dynamic latent heat storage for the low-temperature range. Part 1: Thermal analyses of selected salt hydrate systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanwischer, H.; Tamme, R.

    1985-01-01

    Phase change temperatures and phase change enthalpies of seventeen salt hydrates, three double salts, and four eutectics were measured thermodynamically and the results reported herein. Good results were obtained, especially for congruently melting salt hydrates. Incongruently melting salt hydrates appear less suitable for heat storage applications. The influence of the second phase - water, acid and hydroxide - to the latent heat is described. From these results, basic values of the working temperatures and storage capabilities of various storage media compositions may be derived.

  19. Development of media for dynamic latent heat storage for the low temperature range. Part 1: Thermal analysis of selected salt hydrate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanwischer, H.; Tamme, R.

    1983-12-01

    Phase change temperatures and phase change enthalpies of seventeen salt hydrates, three double salts, and four eutectics were measured thermodynamically and the results reported herein. Good results were obtained, especially for congruently melting salt hydrates. Incongruently melting salt hydrates appear less suitable for heat storage applications. The influence of the second phase - water, acid, and hydroxide - to the latent heat is described. From these results, basic values of the working temperatures and storage capabilities of various storage media compositions may be derived.

  20. Following the electroreduction of uranium dioxide to uranium in LiCl-KCl eutectic in situ using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, L. D.; Abdulaziz, R.; Jervis, R.; Bharath, V. J.; Atwood, R. C.; Reinhard, C.; Connor, L. D.; Simons, S. J. R.; Inman, D.; Brett, D. J. L.; Shearing, P. R.

    2015-09-01

    The electrochemical reduction of uranium dioxide to metallic uranium has been investigated in lithium chloride-potassium chloride eutectic molten salt. Laboratory based electrochemical studies have been coupled with in situ energy dispersive X-ray diffraction, for the first time, to deduce the reduction pathway. No intermediate phases were identified using the X-ray diffraction before, during or after electroreduction to form ?-uranium. This suggests that the electrochemical reduction occurs via a single, 4-electron-step, process. The rate of formation of ?-uranium is seen to decrease during electrolysis and could be a result of a build-up of oxygen anions in the molten salt. Slow transport of O2- ions away from the UO2 working electrode could impede the electrochemical reduction.

  1. Refinement of Eutectic Silicon Phase of Aluminum A356 Alloy Using High-Intensity Ultrasonic Vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Jian, Xiaogang; Han, Qingyou

    2006-01-01

    The eutectic silicon in A356 alloy can be refined and modified using either chemical, quench, or superheating modification. We observed, for the first time, that the eutectic silicon can also be significantly refined using high-intensity ultrasonic vibration. Rosette-like eutectic silicon is formed during solidification of specimen treated with high-intensity ultrasonic vibration.

  2. Mixing of zeolite powders and molten salt

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, C.; Zyryanov, V.N.; Lewis, M.A.; Ackerman, J.P.

    1996-05-01

    Transuranics and fission products in a molten salt can be incorporated into zeolite A by an ion exchange process and by a batch mixing or blending process. The zeolite is then mixed with glass and consolidated into a monolithic waste form for geologic disposal. Both processes require mixing of zeolite powders with molten salt at elevated temperatures (>700 K). Complete occlusion of salt and a uniform distribution of chloride and fission products are desired for incorporation of the powders into the final waste form. The relative effectiveness of the blending process was studied over a series of temperature, time, and composition profiles. The major criteria for determining the effectiveness of the mixing operations were the level and uniformity of residual free salt in the mixtures. High operating temperatures (>775 K) improved salt occlusion. Reducing the chloride levels in the mixture to below 80% of the full salt capacity of the zeolite significantly reduced the free salt level in the final product.

  3. Microstructural evolution of eutectic Au-Sn solder joints

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Ho Geon

    2002-05-31

    Current trends toward miniaturization and the use of lead(Pb)-free solder in electronic packaging present new problems in the reliability of solder joints. This study was performed in order to understand the microstructure and microstructural evolution of small volumes of nominally eutectic Au-Sn solder joints (80Au-20Sn by weight), which gives insight into properties and reliability.

  4. Spontaneous vesicle formation in a deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Saffron J; Atkin, Rob; Warr, Gregory G

    2016-02-14

    Solvent penetration experiments and small-angle X-ray scattering reveal that phospholipids dissolved in a deep eutectic solvent (DES) spontaneously self-assemble into vesicles above the lipid chain melting temperature. This means DESs are one of the few nonaqueous solvents that mediate amphiphile self-assembly, joining a select set of H-bonding molecular solvents and ionic liquids. PMID:26701210

  5. Eutectic alloys. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, P.

    1980-01-01

    These 250 abstracts from the international literature provide summaries of the preparation, treatments, composition and structure, and properties of eutectic alloys. Techniques for directional solidification and treatments including glazing, coating, and fiber reinforcement are discussed. In addition to the mechanical and thermal properties, the superconducting, corrosion, resistance, and thermionic emission and adsorption properties are described.

  6. Improving agar electrospinnability with choline-based deep eutectic solvents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One percent agar (% wt) was dissolved in the deep eutectic solvent (DES), (2-hydroxyethyl) trimethylammonium chloride/urea at a 1:2 molar ratio, and successfully electrospun into nanofibers. An existing electrospinning set-up, operated at 50 deg C, was adapted for use with an ethanol bath to collect...

  7. Use of Microgravity to Control the Microstructure of Eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.; Regel, Liya L.; Smith, Reginald W.

    1998-01-01

    This grant began in June of 1996. Its long term goal is to be able to control the microstructure of directionally solidified eutectic alloys, through an improved understanding of the influence of convection. The primary objective of the present projects is to test hypotheses for the reported influence of microgravity on the microstructure of three fibrous eutectics (MnBi-Bi, InSb-NiSb, Al3Ni-Al). A secondary objective is to determine the influence of convection on the microstructure of other eutectic alloys. Two doctoral students and a masters student supported as a teaching assistant were recruited for this research. Techniques were developed for directional solidification of MnBi-Bi eutectics with periodic application of current pulses to produce an oscillatory freezing rate. Image analysis techniques were developed to obtain the variation in MnBi fiber spacing, which was found to be normally distributed. The mean and standard deviation of fiber spacing were obtained for several freezing conditions. Eighteen ampoules were prepared for use in the gradient freeze furnace QUELD developed at Queen's University for use in microgravity. Nine of these ampoules will be solidified soon at Queen's in a ground-based model. We hope to solidify the other nine in the QUELD that is mounted on the Canadian Microgravity Isolation Mount on MIR. Techniques are being developed for directional solidification of the Al-Si eutectic at different freezing rates, with and without application of accelerated crucible rotation to induce convection. For the first time, theoretical methods are being developed to analyze eutectic solidification with an oscillatory freezing rate. In a classical sharp-interface model, we found that an oscillatory freezing rate increases the deviation of the average interfacial composition from the eutectic, and increases the undercooling of the two phases by different amounts. This would be expected to change the volume fraction solidifying and the fiber spacing. Because of difficulties in tracking the freezing interfaces of the two solid phases, a phase-field model is also being developed. A paper demonstrating application of phase field methods to periodic structures has been submitted for publication.

  8. The microstructures and creep and attenuation behaviors of ice-iodine and ice/hydrate eutectic aggregates at planetary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Christine

    2009-12-01

    The solidification behavior, microstructure and mechanical response of several two-phase aggregates of ice-I + salt hydrates were experimentally and theoretically studied; the binary systems explored were selected based on their potential application to the study of tectonics and heat flow on the Jovian moon Europa. Eutectic solidification of systems H2O-Na 2SO4, H2O-MgSO4, H2O-Na 2CO3, and H2O-H2SO4 was analyzed from a theromodynamic and kinetic perspective and the resulting microstructures by cryogenic scanning electron microscope. Classical eutectic microstructures---fine (mum)-scale intergrowths of ice and hydrate arranged in colonies---are formed in each system, the intergrowth morphology of which can be predicted from the volume fraction of the phase having the highest partial molar entropy of solution and from the magnitude of that entropy. The mechanical testing of ice-I and MgSO4·11H2O ("MS11"; chosen because it has been suggested as a better fit to the near-infrared spectral data of Europa) has shown that the microstructure of the eutectic---in particular the high volume of phase and colony boundaries---endows the aggregate with mechanical properties distinctly different from that of pure ice. In creep, the finely dispersed hydrate, which is distinctly stronger than ice, suppresses significantly the glide of dislocations; the result is a material both stronger and more brittle than pure ice. The eutectic rheology thus opens the possibility for semi-brittle flow in a two-phase, hydrate-ice planetary shell, affecting the tectonic responses. Attenuation in pure polycrystalline ice is effected by diffusional dissipation on low-angle (subgrain) boundaries augmented by non-linear losses wrought by glide of lattice dislocations. Grain boundaries can become significant in the attenuation response under dynamic conditions where a dislocation rheology dictates creep dynamics and the grain size is approximately equal to the subgrain size. In the absence of cracking in the hydrate phase, specifically at modest differential stresses (≤1 MPa) for the materials studied here (colony sizes ≤500 mum; hydrate ice lamellar spacing ≤20 mum), the attenuation response of ice-I/MS11 eutectic aggregates is little different than that of pure polycrystalline ice.

  9. Growth and scintillation properties of Eu doped BaCl2/LiF eutectic scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Kei; Hishinuma, Kosuke; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Yamaji, Akihiro; Shoji, Yasuhiro; Pejchal, Jan; Yokota, Yuui; Ohashi, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2015-12-01

    Eu doped BaCl2/LiF eutectics were grown by the micro-pulling down method and their directionally solidified eutectic (DSE) system has been investigated. The grown eutectic showed main phases of cubic LiF and orthorhombic BaCl2. In these eutectics, the 399 nm emission of Eu2+ 4f5d was obtained. It shows the intrinsic decay time of about 410 ns. The light yield of the 1-mm-thick eutectic showed 7000 ph/5.5 MeV alpha-ray.

  10. Molten salt pyrolysis of latex. [synthetic hydrocarbon fuel production using the Guayule shrub

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, A. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Latex-rich plants such as Guayule or extracts thereof are pyrolyzed in an inert nitrogen atmosphere inorganic salt melts such as a LiCl/KCl eutectic at a temperature of about 500 C. The yield is over 60% of a highly aromatic, combustible hydrocarbon oil suitable for use as a synthetic liquid fuel.

  11. Salt Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Liming; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2002-01-01

    Studying salt stress is an important means to the understanding of plant ion homeostasis and osmo-balance. Salt stress research also benefits agriculture because soil salinity significantly limits plant productivity on agricultural lands. Decades of physiological and molecular studies have generated a large body of literature regarding potential salt tolerance determinants. Recent advances in applying molecular genetic analysis and genomics tools in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana are shading light on the molecular nature of salt tolerance effectors and regulatory pathways. PMID:22303210

  12. Plastic and Anelastic Responses of Ice-I/Magnesium Sulfate Hydrate Eutectic Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, C.; Cooper, R. F.; Goldsby, D. L.; Kirby, S. H.; Durham, W. B.

    2006-12-01

    The presence of non-ice material (e.g. salt-hydrate) on the surface of icy satellites requires that we consider the influence of a second phase on the mechanical properties of ice. We are investigating experimentally the flow-strength and relaxation response (attenuation) of two-phase aggregates of magnesium sulfate hydrate and ice-I through compression creep tests (T = 240-250K; ? = 0.9-9.0 MPa) in a 1-atm, dead-weight, deformation apparatus modified for cryogenic use. All samples in our study crystallize from a homogeneous liquid solution that produces a classical eutectic microstructure. A misting and hot-pressing technique allows us to control grain size, or more accurately, colony size, in the samples. The steady-state (secondary) creep response of the ice/hydrate aggregate reveals that it has a viscosity that is at least an order of magnitude greater than that of pure polycrystalline ice at the same stress and temperature in what appears to be a dislocation creep regime. Since heterophase boundaries are found to be an effective barrier to dislocation motion, we attribute the increase in strength to the high volume of incoherent interfaces that the eutectic microstructure provides. We are also examining the transient (primary) creep in the strain response; this relaxation is an indication of the dissipative quality of the material from which we may begin to understand how mechanical energy (such as that from tidal loading) could be absorbed (dissipated) in the crust as heat. Information gleaned from these experiments can help constrain models of crustal thickness and surface dynamics on Europa.

  13. Alcohol based-deep eutectic solvent (DES) as an alternative green additive to increase rotenone yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Zetty Shafiqa; Hassan, Nur Hasyareeda; Zubairi, Saiful Irwan

    2015-09-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are basically molten salts that interact by forming hydrogen bonds between two added components at a ratio where eutectic point reaches a melting point lower than that of each individual component. Their remarkable physicochemical properties (similar to ionic liquids) with remarkable green properties, low cost and easy handling make them a growing interest in many fields of research. Therefore, the objective of pursuing this study is to analyze the potential of alcohol-based DES as an extraction medium for rotenone extraction from Derris elliptica roots. DES was prepared by a combination of choline chloride, ChCl and 1, 4-butanediol at a ratio of 1/5. The structure of elucidation of DES was analyzed using FTIR, 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR. Normal soaking extraction (NSE) method was carried out for 14 hours using seven different types of solvent systems of (1) acetone; (2) methanol; (3) acetonitrile; (4) DES; (5) DES + methanol; (6) DES + acetonitrile; and (7) [BMIM] OTf + acetone. Next, the yield of rotenone, % (w/w), and its concentration (mg/ml) in dried roots were quantitatively determined by means of RP-HPLC. The results showed that a binary solvent system of [BMIM] OTf + acetone and DES + acetonitrile was the best solvent system combination as compared to other solvent systems. It contributed to the highest rotenone content of 0.84 0.05% (w/w) (1.09 0.06 mg/ml) and 0.84 0.02% (w/w) (1.03 0.01 mg/ml) after 14 hours of exhaustive extraction time. In conclusion, a combination of the DES with a selective organic solvent has been proven to have a similar potential and efficiency as of ILs in extracting bioactive constituents in the phytochemical extraction process.

  14. High temperature molten salt storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, J.; Newcomb, J. C.; Pard, A. G.

    1985-10-01

    The design of a high-temperature molten salt thermal energy storage (TES) concept, including some materials testing, was developed by Rockwell International's Rocketdyne Division (RD), under contract to SERI, and is described in this document. The main features of the concept are a conical hot tank with a liner and internal insulation that allows unrestricted relative thermal expansion and the use of cathodic protection (impressed voltage) to inhibit corrosion. The RD design uses two tanks and ternary eutectic lithium-sodium-potassium carbonates for sensible heat storage. The tanks were sized for 6 h of storage at a discharge rate of 300 MW, giving 1800 MWh total usable thermal storage capacity. The molten carbonate storage medium is cycled between 425 and 900C. From the design study, no definitive statement can be made as to the cost-effectiveness of cathodic protection. Several anode design issues need to be resolved before cathodic protection can significantly reduce corrosion where the liner comes in contact with molten salts. However, where the tank is exposed to salt vapor, the large corrosion allowance required for the liner without cathodic protection results in a much thicker liner wall and shorter liner life than originally perceived, which affects system costs significantly.

  15. Recent advances in the molten salt technology for the destruction of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhye, R.S.; Watkins, B.E.; Pruneda, C.O.

    1995-11-01

    The DOE has thousands of pounds of energetic materials which result from dismantlement operations at the Pantex Plant. The authors have demonstrated the Molten Salt Destruction (MSD) Process for the treatment of explosives and explosive-containing wastes on a 1.5 kilogram of explosive per hour scale and are currently building a 5 kilogram per hour unit. MSD converts the organic constituents of the waste into non-hazardous substances such as carbon dioxide, nitrogen and water. Any inorganic constituents of the waste, such as binders and metallic particles, are retained in the molten salt. The destruction of energetic material waste is accomplished by introducing it, together with air, into a crucible containing a molten salt, in this case a eutectic mixture of Na, K, and Li carbonates. The following pure component DOE and DoD explosives have been destroyed in LLNL`s experimental unit at their High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF): ammonium picrate, HMX, K-6, NQ, NTO, PETN, RDX, TATB, and TNT. In addition, the following formulations were also destroyed: Comp B, LX-10, LX-16, LX-17, PBX-9404, and XM46, a US Army liquid gun propellant. In this 1.5 kg/hr unit, the fractions of carbon converted to CO and of chemically bound nitrogen converted to NOx were found to be well below 1T. In addition to destroying explosive powders and molding powders the authors have also destroyed materials that are typical of real world wastes. These include shavings from machined pressed parts of plastic bonded explosives and sump waste containing both explosives and non-explosive debris. Based on the information obtained on the smaller unit, the authors have constructed a 5 kg/hr MSD unit, incorporating LLNL`s advanced chimney design. This unit is currently under shakedown tests and evaluation.

  16. 21 CFR 1310.12 - Exempt chemical mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-Acetylanthranilic acid, its salts and esters 8522 20% by Weight Concentration based on any combination of N... Concentration is based on any combination of anthranilic acid and its salts and esters. Benzaldehyde 8256 50% by... not considered a mixture. Concentration is based on ethylamine in the mixture and not the...

  17. 21 CFR 1310.12 - Exempt chemical mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...-Acetylanthranilic acid, its salts and esters 8522 20% by Weight Concentration based on any combination of N... Concentration is based on any combination of anthranilic acid and its salts and esters. Benzaldehyde 8256 50% by... not considered a mixture. Concentration is based on ethylamine in the mixture and not the...

  18. Recent advances in the molten salt destruction of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pruneda, C. O., LLNL

    1996-09-01

    We have demonstrated the use of the Molten Salt Destruction (MSD) Process for destroying explosives, liquid gun propellant, and explosives-contaminated materials on a 1.5 kg of explosive/hr bench- scale unit (1, 2, 3, 4, 5). In our recently constructed 5 kg/hr pilot- scale unit we have also demonstrated the destruction of a liquid gun propellant and simulated wastes containing HMX (octogen). MSD converts the organic constituents of the waste into non-hazardous substances such as carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and water. Any inorganic constituents of the waste, such as metallic particles, are retained in the molten salt. The destruction of energetic materials waste is accomplished by introducing it, together with air, into a vessel containing molten salt (a eutectic mixture of sodium, potassium, and lithium carbonates). The following pure explosives have been destroyed in our bench-scale experimental unit located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF): ammonium picrate, HMX, K- 6 (keto-RDX), NQ, NTO, PETN, RDX, TATB, and TNT. In addition, the following compositions were also destroyed: Comp B, LX- IO, LX- 1 6, LX- 17, PBX-9404, and XM46 (liquid gun propellant). In this 1.5 kg/hr bench-scale unit, the fractions of carbon converted to CO and of chemically bound nitrogen converted to NO{sub x} were found to be well below 1%. In addition to destroying explosive powders and compositions we have also destroyed materials that are typical of residues which result from explosives operations. These include shavings from machined pressed parts of plastic-bonded explosives and sump waste containing both explosives and non-explosive debris. Based on the process data obtained on the bench-scale unit we designed and constructed a next-generation 5 kg/hr pilot-scale unit, incorporating LLNL`s advanced chimney design. The pilot unit has completed process implementation operations and explosives safety reviews. To date, in this pilot unit we have successfully destroyed liquid gun propellant and dimethylsulfoxide containing HMX in continuous, long-duration runs.

  19. Three-dimensional reconstruction of anomalous eutectic in laser remelted Ni-30 wt.% Sn alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yong-Qing; Lin, Xin; Wang, Zhi-Tai; Wang, Li-Lin; Song, Meng-Hua; Yang, Hai-Ou; Huang, Wei-Dong

    2015-12-01

    Laser remelting has been performed on Ni-30 wt.% Sn hypoeutectic alloy. An anomalous eutectic formed at the bottom of the molten pool when the sample was remelted thoroughly. 3D morphologies of the ?-Ni and Ni3Sn phases in the anomalous eutectic region were obtained and investigated using serial sectioning reconstruction technology. It is found that the Ni3Sn phase has a continuous interconnected network structure and the ?-Ni phase is distributed as separate particles in the anomalous eutectic, which is consistent with the electron backscatter diffraction pattern examinations. The ?-Ni particles in the anomalous eutectic are supersaturated with Sn element as compared with the equilibrium phase diagram. Meanwhile, small wavy lamella eutectics coexist with anomalous eutectics. The TrivediMagninKurz model was used to estimate undercooling with lamellar spacing. The results suggest that the critical undercooling found in undercooling solidification is not a sufficient condition for anomalous eutectic formation. Besides, ?-Ni particles in the anomalous eutectic do not exhibit a completely random misorientation and some neighboring ?-Ni particles have the same orientation. It is shown that both the coupled and decoupled growth of the eutectic two phases can generate the ?-Ni + Ni3Sn anomalous eutectic structure.

  20. Experimental and Modeling Studies of the Lamellar Eutectic Growth of Mg-Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Shou-Mei; Wu, Meng-Wu

    2012-01-01

    Directionally solidified samples of Mg-32.3 wt pct Al eutectic alloy were produced under an argon atmosphere in a vacuum Bridgman-type furnace to study the eutectic growth with different growth velocities. Typical features such as steady-state lamellar eutectic growth, lamellar branching at the quenching interface, and the formation of colony structures due to the impurity of the Mg-Al binary alloy were observed using a JEOL 6301F scanning electron microscope (JEOL Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). The lamellar spacing of the two eutectic phases was measured on the transverse sections of the samples. It was found that the relationship between the measured lamellar spacing and growth velocity agreed well with the prediction of the Jackson-Hunt model. Subsequent studies of Mg-Al eutectic growth were conducted using a numerical model based on the cellular automaton (CA) method. Taking account of the solute diffusion, constitutional undercooling, and curvature undercooling, modeling of steady-state lamellar eutectic growth was achieved. A systematic investigation of the eutectic growth morphology and lamellar spacing of the Mg-Al eutectic was carried out under directional solidification with different undercoolings, initial lamellar spacings, temperature gradients, and growth velocities. The results showed that under the interaction between solute diffusion and surface energy, the adjustment of eutectic lamellar spacing was accomplished by nucleation, lamellar branching, lamellar termination, and overgrowth. The simulated results were consistent with both the experimental results and the Jackson-Hunt eutectic theory.

  1. Nucleation and Growth of Eutectic Si in Al-Si Alloys with Na Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. H.; Barrirero, J.; Engstler, M.; Aboulfadl, H.; Mücklich, F.; Schumacher, P.

    2015-03-01

    Al-5 wt pct Si-based alloys with Na additions (19 and 160 ppm) have been produced by controlled sand casting and melt spinning. Entrained droplet technique and differential scanning calorimetry were employed to investigate the nucleation behavior of eutectic Si. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography were used to investigate the distribution of Na atoms within eutectic Si and at the interfaces between eutectic Si and eutectic Al. It was found that (i) only 19 ppm Na addition results into a high undercooling (49 K (49 °C)) of the entrained eutectic droplet. However, further increasing Na addition up to 160 ppm exerts no positive effect on the nucleation of eutectic Si, instead a decreased undercooling (29 K (29 °C)) was observed. (ii) Na addition suppresses the growth of eutectic Si due to the Na segregation at the interface between eutectic Si and eutectic Al, and (iii) Na addition promotes significant multiple Si twins, which can be attributed to the proposed adsorption of Na atoms at the intersection of Si twins and along the <112>Si growth direction of Si. The present investigation demonstrates, for the first time, a direct observation on the distribution of Na atoms within eutectic Si and thereby provides strong experimental supports to the well-accepted impurity-induced twinning growth mechanism and poisoning of the twin plane re-entrant edge growth mechanism.

  2. Corrosion of ODS steels in lead bismuth eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosemann, P.; Thau, H. T.; Johnson, A. L.; Maloy, S. A.; Li, N.

    2008-02-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels are advanced materials being developed for high temperature applications. Their properties (high temperature strength, creep resistance, corrosion/oxidation resistance) make them potentially usable for high temperature applications in liquid metal cooled systems like liquid lead-bismuth eutectic cooled reactors and spallation sources. Corrosion tests on five different ODS alloys were performed in flowing liquid lead-bismuth eutectic in the DELTA Loop at the Los Alamos National Laboratory at 535 C for 200 h and 600 h. The tested materials were chromium alloyed ferritic/martensitic steels (12YWT, 14YWT, MA957) and Cr-Al alloyed steels (PM2000, MA956). It was shown that the Al alloyed ODS steel above 5.5 wt% Al (PM2000) is highly resistant to corrosion and oxidation in the conditions examined, and that the corrosion properties of the ODS steels depend strongly on their grain size.

  3. Coatings for directional eutectics. [for corrosion and oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felten, E. J.; Strangman, T. E.; Ulion, N. E.

    1974-01-01

    Eleven coating systems based on MCrAlY overlay and diffusion aluminide prototypes were evaluated to determine their capability for protecting the gamma/gamma prime-delta directionally solidified eutectic alloy (Ni-20Cb-6Cr-2.5Al) in gas turbine engine applications. Furnace oxidation and hot corrosion, Mach 0.37 burner-rig, tensile ductility, stress-rupture and thermomechanical fatigue tests were used to evaluate the coated gamma/gamma prime-delta alloy. The diffusion aluminide coatings provided adequate oxidation resistance at 1144 K (1600 F) but offered very limited protection in 114 K (1600 F) hot corrosion and 1366 K (2000 F) oxidation tests. A platinum modified NiCrAlY overlay coating exhibited excellent performance in oxidation testing and had no adverse effects upon the eutectic alloy.

  4. Embedded Binary Eutectic Alloy Nanostructures as Phase Change Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzan, D. C.; Shin, S. J.; Guzman, J.; Yuan, C. W.; Liao, C. Y.; Boswell-Koller, C. N.; Stone, P. R.; Dubon, O. D.; Minor, A. M.; Watanabe, M.; Beeman, J. W.; Yu, K. M.; Ager, J. W., III; Haller, E. E.

    2010-03-01

    Phase change materials are essential components of both optical data storage and emerging static random access memory technologies. We suggest a new approach to development of phase change memory materials: embedded binary eutectic-alloy nanostructures. The approach exploits the unique properties binary eutectic-alloys that emerge when they are embedded within nanoscale voids. The equilibrium, as-grown, morphology of GeSn nanostructures within SiO2 is a phase separated, bi-crystalline, bi-lobed state. The rapid cooling following pulsed laser melting stabilizes an amorphous, homogeneously mixed state. Subsequent annealing recrystallizes the bi-lobed state. Further, the composition of the alloy can be used to tune the recrystallization temperature over the range of temperatures between 150C and 500C. Thus these nanostructures display the requisite crystalline-amorphous-crystalline transition, and enable tuning of the relevant transformation temperatures.

  5. Eutectic bonding of boron-aluminum structural components. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, J. T.; Garrett, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    Eutectic bonding is a diffusion brazing process developed for fabricating boron-aluminum components from composite monolayer. This process relies on the diffusion of a thin surface film of copper into the aluminum matrix to form a liquid phase when heated above the copper-aluminum eutectic temperature of 1018 F. This type of fabrication offers design flexibility in that skin thickness may be varied, the stiffness geometry and orientation can be varied, and local reinforcement can be added. In addition, this type of boron-aluminum structure offers high efficiency. Also, this method of construction can be cost-comparative with complex titanium shapes; simple tooling permits easy layup, bonding is a one-step operation, and little finish machining is required.

  6. 21 CFR 1310.12 - Exempt chemical mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... acid, its salts and esters 8522 20% by Weight Concentration based on any combination of N... Concentration is based on any combination of anthranilic acid and its salts and esters. Benzaldehyde 8256 50% by... Ethylamine or its salts in an inert carrier solvent is not considered a mixture. Concentration is based...

  7. Salt assault

    SciTech Connect

    Duey, R.

    1999-12-01

    If the offshore arena is the last great frontier for oil and gas exploration and development, then salt may very well be the last great barrier to exploring that frontier. In the game of seismic acquisition, salt refuses to follow the rules. Its relatively low density coupled with high velocity and structural complexity plays havoc with seismic imaging, rendering data acquired from beneath the salt virtually useless without massive processing and interpretation efforts. Additionally, salt's amazing mobility means surrounding sediments also are mobile. This makes exploration in salt provinces particularly challenging. So understanding where the salt is, and how and why it got there, is becoming increasingly important, and research is under way around the world to get a better handle on this tricky substance. Hart's E&P went to the experts--academics who work at universities or in consulting capacities to study salt deposition and tectonics--and asked them about their research and its impact on oil and gas exploration. The paper discusses the latest findings, modeling, practical applications, and questions that remain.

  8. An approximate formula for recalescence in binary eutectic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohsaka, K.; Trinh, E. H.

    1993-01-01

    In alloys, solidification takes place along various paths which may be ascertained via phase diagrams; while there would be no single formula applicable to all alloys, an approximate formula for a specific solidification path would be useful in estimating the fraction of the solid formed during recalescence. A formulation is here presented of recalescence in binary eutectic alloys. This formula is applied to Ag-Cu alloys which are of interest in containerless solidification, due to their formation of supersaturated solutions.

  9. Carcinogenic mixtures.

    PubMed

    Krewski, D; Thomas, R D

    1992-03-01

    Human populations are generally exposed simultaneously to a number of toxicants present in the environment, including complex mixtures of unknown and variable origin. While scientific methods for evaluating the potential carcinogenic risks of pure compounds are relatively well established, methods for assessing the risks of complex mixtures are somewhat less developed. This article provides a report of a recent workshop on carcinogenic mixtures sponsored by the Committee on Toxicology of the U.S. National Research Council, in which toxicological, epidemiological, and statistical approaches to carcinogenic risk assessment for mixtures were discussed. Complex mixtures, such as diesel emissions and tobacco smoke, have been shown to have carcinogenic potential. Bioassay-directed fractionation based on short-term screening test for genotoxicity has also been used in identifying carcinogenic components of mixtures. Both toxicological and epidemiological studies have identified clear interactions between chemical carcinogens, including synergistic effects at moderate to high doses. To date, laboratory studies have demonstrated over 900 interactions involving nearly 200 chemical carcinogens. At lower doses, theoretical arguments suggest that risks may be near additive. Thus, additivity at low doses has been invoked as as a working hypothesis by regulatory authorities in the absence of evidence to the contrary. Future studies of the joint effects of carcinogenic agents may serve to elucidate the mechanisms by which interactions occur at higher doses. PMID:1574610

  10. Regular rod-like eutectic spacing selection during directional solidified NiAl-9Mo eutectic in situ composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianfei; Shen, Jun; Shang, Zhao; Feng, Zhourong; Wang, Lingshui; Fu, Hengzhi

    2011-08-01

    NiAl-9Mo (at%) eutectic alloy was produced by a Bridgman type crystal growing facility with Zone Melting Liquid Metal Cooling technique at the growth rate range from 60 to 200 ?m/s. The variation of rod eutectic spacing with growth rates was characterized. Statistical distributions of spacings at each growth rate were also determined. It was confirmed that the relationship between growth rate V and rod spacing ? follows the Jackson and Hunt equation under high growth rates and can be obtained as ?2V=33.94 ?m 3/s. In addition, a narrow distribution curve of the rod spacing was obtained for a given growth rate. And the width of the distribution decreases as the growth rate increases. It is probable that the capillarity effect, the high value of entropy of fusion constituent phase NiAl and the convection effect are responsible for the existence of the narrow band of the rod spacing.

  11. Development of green betaine-based deep eutectic solvent aqueous two-phase system for the extraction of protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Wang, Yuzhi; Xu, Kaijia; Huang, Yanhua; Wen, Qian; Ding, Xueqin

    2016-05-15

    Six kinds of new type of green betaine-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been synthesized. Deep eutectic solvent aqueous two-phase systems (DES-ATPS) were established and successfully applied in the extraction of protein. Betaine-urea (Be-U) was selected as the suitable extractant. Single factor experiments were carried out to determine the optimum conditions of the extraction process, such as the salt concentration, the mass of DES, the separation time, the amount of protein, the temperature and the pH value. The extraction efficiency could achieve to 99.82% under the optimum conditions. Mixed sample and practical sample analysis were discussed. The back extraction experiment was implemented and the back extraction efficiency could reach to 32.66%. The precision experiment, repeatability experiment and stability experiment were investigated. UV-vis, FT-IR and circular dichroism (CD) spectra confirmed that the conformation of protein was not changed during the process of extraction. The mechanisms of extraction were researched by dynamic light scattering (DLS), the measurement of the conductivity and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). DES-protein aggregates and embraces phenomenon play considerable roles in the separation process. All of these results indicated that betaine-based DES-ATPS may provide a potential substitute new method for the separation of proteins. PMID:26992491

  12. Bath Salts

    MedlinePLUS

    ... feel paranoid, and develop a psychosis that resembles schizophrenia. Other long-term effects include: physical exhaustion insomnia ... in them. The mix of chemicals and these unknown ingredients can cause dangerous side effects. Bath salts ...

  13. Bath Salts

    MedlinePLUS

    ... decreased ability to think clearly mood disturbances and psychosis Like other stimulants, bath salts also can affect ... hallucinations, hear voices, feel paranoid, and develop a psychosis that resembles schizophrenia. Other long-term effects include: ...

  14. The UC2-x - Carbon eutectic: A laser heating study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manara, D.; Boboridis, K.; Morel, S.; De Bruycker, F.

    2015-11-01

    The UC2-x - carbon eutectic has been studied by laser heating and fast multi-wavelength pyrometry under inert atmosphere. The study has been carried out on three compositions, two of which close to the phase boundary of the UC2-x - C miscibility gap (with C/U atomic ratios 2 and 2.1), and one, more crucial, with a large excess of carbon (C/U = 2.82). The first two compositions were synthesised by arc-melting. This synthesis method could not be applied to the last composition, which was therefore completed directly by laser irradiation. The U - C - O composition of the samples was checked by using a combustion method in an ELTRA® analyser. The eutectic temperature, established to be 2737 K ± 20 K, was used as a radiance reference together with the cubic - tetragonal (α → β) solid state transition, fixed at 2050 K ± 20 K. The normal spectral emissivity of the carbon-richer compounds increases up to 0.7, whereas the value 0.53 was established for pure hypostoichiometric uranium dicarbide at the limit of the eutectic region. This increase is analysed in the light of the demixing of excess carbon, and used for the determination of the liquidus temperature (3220 K ± 50 K for UC2.82). Due to fast solid state diffusion, also fostered by the cubic - tetragonal transition, no obvious signs of a lamellar eutectic structure could be observed after quenching to room temperature. The eutectic surface C/UC2-x composition could be qualitatively, but consistently, followed during the cooling process with the help of the recorded radiance spectra. Whereas the external liquid surface is almost entirely constituted by uranium dicarbide, it gets rapidly enriched in demixed carbon upon freezing. Demixed carbon seems to quickly migrate towards the inner bulk during further cooling. At the α → β transition, uranium dicarbide covers again the almost entire external surface.

  15. Metastable Eutectic Equilibrium in Natural Environments: Recent Development and Research Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Jablonska, Mariola; Karner, James M.

    2000-01-01

    Chemical ordering at metastable eutectics was recognized in non-equilibrium gas-to- solid condensation experiments to constrain 'silicate' dust formation in O-rich circumstellar environments. The predictable metastable eutectic behavior successfully predicted the observed ferromagnesiosilica compositions of circumstellar dust presolar and solar nebula grains in the matrix of the collected aggregate IDPs (Interplanetary Dust Particles). Many of the experimentally determined metastable eutectic solids match the fundamental building blocks of common rock-forming layer silicates: this could have implications for the origin of Life. The physical conditions conducive to metastable eutectic behavior, i.e. high temperature and (ultra) fast quenching, lead to unique amorphous, typically nano- to micrometer-sized, materials. The new paradigm of metastable eutectic behavior opens the door to new and exciting research opportunities in uncovering the many implications of these unique amorphous, and typically nano-to micrometer-sized, metastable eutectic materials.

  16. Metastable Eutectic Equilibrium in Natural Environments: Recent Developments and Research Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Fans J. M.; Nuth, Joseph A., II; Jablonska, Mariola; Karner, James M.

    2000-01-01

    Chemical ordering at metastable eutectics was recognized in non-equilibrium gas-to- solid condensation experiments to constrain 'silicate' dust formation in O-rich circumstellar environments. The predictable metastable eutectic behavior successfully predicted the observed ferromagnesiosilica, compositions of circumstellar dust, presolar and solar nebula grains in the matrix of the collected aggregate IDPs. Many of the experimentally determined metastable eutectic solids match the fundamental building blocks of common rock-forming layer silicates: this could have implications for the origin of Life. The physical conditions conducive to metastable eutectic behavior, i.e. high temperature and (ultra)fast quenching, lead to unique amorphous, typically nano- to micrometer-sized, materials. The new paradigm of metastable eutectic behavior opens the door to new and exciting research opportunities in uncovering the many implications of these unique amorphous and typically nano- to micrometer-sized, metastable eutectic materials.

  17. Molten salt destruction of energetic waste materials

    DOEpatents

    Brummond, W.A.; Upadhye, R.S.; Pruneda, C.O.

    1995-07-18

    A molten salt destruction process is used to treat and destroy energetic waste materials such as high explosives, propellants, and rocket fuels. The energetic material is pre-blended with a solid or fluid diluent in safe proportions to form a fluid fuel mixture. The fuel mixture is rapidly introduced into a high temperature molten salt bath. A stream of molten salt is removed from the vessel and may be recycled as diluent. Additionally, the molten salt stream may be pumped from the reactor, circulated outside the reactor for further processing, and delivered back into the reactor or cooled and circulated to the feed delivery system to further dilute the fuel mixture entering the reactor. 4 figs.

  18. Molten salt destruction of energetic waste materials

    DOEpatents

    Brummond, William A. (Livermore, CA); Upadhye, Ravindra S. (Pleasanton, CA); Pruneda, Cesar O. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A molten salt destruction process is used to treat and destroy energetic waste materials such as high explosives, propellants, and rocket fuels. The energetic material is pre-blended with a solid or fluid diluent in safe proportions to form a fluid fuel mixture. The fuel mixture is rapidly introduced into a high temperature molten salt bath. A stream of molten salt is removed from the vessel and may be recycled as diluent. Additionally, the molten salt stream may be pumped from the reactor, circulated outside the reactor for further processing, and delivered back into the reactor or cooled and circulated to the feed delivery system to further dilute the fuel mixture entering the reactor.

  19. Micro-to-nano-scale deformation mechanisms of a bimodal ultrafine eutectic composite

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seoung Wan; Kim, Jeong Tae; Hong, Sung Hwan; Park, Hae Jin; Park, Jun-Young; Lee, Nae Sung; Seo, Yongho; Suh, Jin Yoo; Eckert, Jrgen; Kim, Do Hyang; Park, Jin Man; Kim, Ki Buem

    2014-01-01

    The outstading mechanical properties of bimodal ultrafine eutectic composites (BUECs) containing length scale hierarchy in eutectic structure were demonstrated by using AFM observation of surface topography with quantitative height measurements and were interpreted in light of the details of the deformation mechanisms by three different interface modes. It is possible to develop a novel strain accommodated eutectic structure for triggering three different interface-controlled deformation modes; (I) rotational boundary mode, (II) accumulated interface mode and (III) individual interface mode. A strain accommodated microstructure characterized by the surface topology gives a hint to design a novel ultrafine eutectic alloys with excellent mechanical properties. PMID:25265897

  20. Micro-to-nano-scale deformation mechanisms of a bimodal ultrafine eutectic composite.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seoung Wan; Kim, Jeong Tae; Hong, Sung Hwan; Park, Hae Jin; Park, Jun-Young; Lee, Nae Sung; Seo, Yongho; Suh, Jin Yoo; Eckert, Jrgen; Kim, Do Hyang; Park, Jin Man; Kim, Ki Buem

    2014-01-01

    The outstading mechanical properties of bimodal ultrafine eutectic composites (BUECs) containing length scale hierarchy in eutectic structure were demonstrated by using AFM observation of surface topography with quantitative height measurements and were interpreted in light of the details of the deformation mechanisms by three different interface modes. It is possible to develop a novel strain accommodated eutectic structure for triggering three different interface-controlled deformation modes; (I) rotational boundary mode, (II) accumulated interface mode and (III) individual interface mode. A strain accommodated microstructure characterized by the surface topology gives a hint to design a novel ultrafine eutectic alloys with excellent mechanical properties. PMID:25265897

  1. A new technique for direct traceability of contact thermometry Co-C eutectic cells to the ITS-90

    SciTech Connect

    Failleau, G.; Deuz, T.; Bourson, F.; Briaudeau, S.; Sadli, M.

    2013-09-11

    The eutectic Co-C melting point is a promising system to serve as a thermometric fixed-point in the temperature range above 1084.62 C (copper freezing point). During the last decade, LNE-Cnam has developed and characterized some fixed-point devices, based on eutectic Co-C alloy, for applications to contact and radiation thermometry. Above 962 C, the ITS-90 is realized by radiation thermometry by the extrapolation from a Ag, Au or Cu fixed point using the Planck law for radiation. So the only way for assigning a temperature in the scale to a Co-C cell (?1324 C) is by radiation thermometry. An indirect method is commonly used to assign a temperature to a high-temperature fixed point (HTFP) cell designed for contact thermometry is to fill a pyrometric cell with the same mixture as the contact thermometry cell. In this case, the temperature assigned to the pyrometric cell is attributed to the contact cell. This paper describes a direct method allowing the determination of the melting temperature realized by a 'contact thermometry' Co-C cell by comparison to a 'radiation thermometry' Co-C cell whose melting temperature was assigned in accordance to the scale by extrapolation from the Cu point. In addition, the same Co-C cell is studied with a standard Pt/Pd thermocouple.

  2. Electrochemical fabrication of nanoporous copper films in choline chloride-urea deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q B; Abbott, Andrew P; Yang, C

    2015-06-14

    Nanoporous copper films were fabricated by a facile electrochemical alloying/dealloying process without the need of a template. A deep eutectic solvent made from choline chloride (ChCl) and urea was used with zinc oxide as the metal salt. Cyclic voltammetry was used to characterise the electrochemical reduction of zinc and follow Cu-Zn alloy formation on the copper substrate at elevated temperatures from 353 to 393 K. The alloy formation was confirmed by X-ray diffraction spectra. 3D, open and bicontinuous nanoporous copper films were obtained by in situ electrochemically etching (dealloying) of the zinc component in the Cu-Zn surface alloys at an appropriate potential (-0.4 V vs. Ag). This dealloying process was found to be highly temperature dependent and surface diffusion controlled, which involved the self-assembly of copper atoms at the alloy/electrolyte interface. Additionally, the effects of the deposition parameters, including deposition temperature, current density as well as total charge density on resulting the microstructure were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscope. PMID:25972227

  3. Synthesis and thermo-physical properties of deep eutectic solvent-based graphene nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Y. K.; Osama, M.; Rashmi, W.; Shahbaz, K.; Khalid, M.; Mjalli, F. S.; Farid, M. M.

    2016-02-01

    This study introduces a new class of heat transfer fluids by dispersing functionalised graphene oxide nanoparticles (GNPs) in ammonium and phosphonium-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) without the aid of a surfactant. Different molar ratios of salts and hydrogen bond donors (HBD) were used to synthesise DESs for the preparation of different concentrations of graphene nanofluids (GNFs). The concentrations of GNPs were 0.01 wt%, 0.02 wt% and 0.05 wt %. Homogeneous and stable suspensions of nanofluids were obtained by high speed homogenisation and an ultrasonication process. The stability of the GNFs was determined through visual observation for 4 weeks followed by a centrifugal process (5000–20 000 rpm) for 30 min in addition to zeta potential studies. Dispersion of the GNPs in DES was observed using an optical microscope. The synthesised DES-based GNFs showed no particle agglomeration and formation of sediments in the nanofluids. Thermo-physical properties such as thermal conductivity and specific heat of the nanofluids were also investigated in this research. The highest thermal conductivity enhancement of 177% was observed. The findings of this research provide a new class of engineered fluid for heat transfer applications as a function of temperature, type and composition DESs as well as the GNPs concentration.

  4. Prebiotic chemistry in eutectic solutions at the water-ice matrix.

    PubMed

    Menor-Salvn, Csar; Marn-Yaseli, Margarita R

    2012-08-21

    A crystalline ice matrix at subzero temperatures can maintain a liquid phase where organic solutes and salts concentrate to form eutectic solutions. This concentration effect converts the confined reactant solutions in the ice matrix, sometimes making condensation and polymerisation reactions occur more favourably. These reactions occur at significantly high rates from a prebiotic chemistry standpoint, and the labile products can be protected from degradation. The experimental study of the synthesis of nitrogen heterocycles at the ice-water system showed the efficiency of this scenario and could explain the origin of nucleobases in the inner Solar System bodies, including meteorites and extra-terrestrial ices, and on the early Earth. The same conditions can also favour the condensation of monomers to form ribonucleic acid and peptides. Together with the synthesis of these monomers, the ice world (i.e., the chemical evolution in the range between the freezing point of water and the limit of stability of liquid brines, 273 to 210 K) is an under-explored experimental model in prebiotic chemistry. PMID:22660387

  5. Enhancing cellulose accessibility of corn stover by deep eutectic solvent pretreatment for butanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guo-Chao; Ding, Ji-Cai; Han, Rui-Zhi; Dong, Jin-Jun; Ni, Ye

    2016-03-01

    In this study, an effective corn stover (CS) pretreatment method was developed for biobutanol fermentation. Deep eutectic solvents (DESs), consisted of quaternary ammonium salts and hydrogen donors, display similar properties to room temperature ionic liquid. Seven DESs with different hydrogen donors were facilely synthesized. Choline chloride:formic acid (ChCl:formic acid), an acidic DES, displayed excellent performance in the pretreatment of corn stover by removal of hemicellulose and lignin as confirmed by SEM, FTIR and XRD analysis. After optimization, glucose released from pretreated CS reached 17.0gL(-1) and yield of 99%. The CS hydrolysate was successfully utilized in butanol fermentation by Clostridium saccharobutylicum DSM 13864, achieving butanol titer of 5.63gL(-1) with a yield of 0.17gg(-1) total sugar and productivity of 0.12gL(-1)h(-1). This study demonstrates DES could be used as a promising and biocompatible pretreatment method for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into biofuel. PMID:26597485

  6. Synthesis and thermo-physical properties of deep eutectic solvent-based graphene nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Fang, Y K; Osama, M; Rashmi, W; Shahbaz, K; Khalid, M; Mjalli, F S; Farid, M M

    2016-02-19

    This study introduces a new class of heat transfer fluids by dispersing functionalised graphene oxide nanoparticles (GNPs) in ammonium and phosphonium-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) without the aid of a surfactant. Different molar ratios of salts and hydrogen bond donors (HBD) were used to synthesise DESs for the preparation of different concentrations of graphene nanofluids (GNFs). The concentrations of GNPs were 0.01 wt%, 0.02 wt% and 0.05 wt %. Homogeneous and stable suspensions of nanofluids were obtained by high speed homogenisation and an ultrasonication process. The stability of the GNFs was determined through visual observation for 4 weeks followed by a centrifugal process (5000-20 000 rpm) for 30 min in addition to zeta potential studies. Dispersion of the GNPs in DES was observed using an optical microscope. The synthesised DES-based GNFs showed no particle agglomeration and formation of sediments in the nanofluids. Thermo-physical properties such as thermal conductivity and specific heat of the nanofluids were also investigated in this research. The highest thermal conductivity enhancement of 177% was observed. The findings of this research provide a new class of engineered fluid for heat transfer applications as a function of temperature, type and composition DESs as well as the GNPs concentration. PMID:26766874

  7. Effect of Freeze Concentration of Various Salt Solutions on the Denaturation of Carp Myofibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Katsuaki; Inoue, Norio; Shinano, Haruo

    The apparent rate constants of freeze inactivation (KF) at different storage temperatures for various salts were calculated. Comparisons were then made among salts with relation to storage temperature and ionic strength of unfrozen salt solutions. For three kinds of sulfates with high eutectic points,hardly any change occured in relation to the storage temperature and ionic strength. The reason was thought to be the weaker action of sulfates to protein denaturation. The KF values of six kinds of salts (namely NH4Cl, NaNO3, Mg(NO3)3, BaCl2, CaCl2 and MgCl2 ) were highest in the temperature range of - 6~-14 °C. The extent of denaturation in the KF value differed for each salt,although,no relationship was found between maximum KF value and eutectic point. A possible explanation for the above results relates to the amount and ionic strength of unfrozen salt solution. The log KF increased with an increase in ionic strength,and reached a maximum at about 0.9 due to the effect of salt concentration. However,above an ionic strength of 0.9, the log KF decreased with an increase in ionic strength due to the decrease of unfrozen salt solution.

  8. Synthesis of cerium rich intermetallics using molten metal eutectics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Patricia Christine

    Metal eutectic fluxes are useful for exploratory synthesis of new intermetallic phases. In this work the use of cerium/transition metal eutectics such as: Ce/Co, Ce/Ni, and Ce/Fe have yielded many new synthetically and magnetically complex phases. Structural units that were previously observed in phases grown in La/Ni eutectic reactions have also been observed in new structures and analogs grown from cerium/transition metal eutectics. These structural units include a main group element coordinated by 9 rare-earth atoms (such as the Al Ce9 clusters seen in Ce31.0(2)Fe11.8(5)Al6.5(6) B13C4), trigonal planar FeC3 units (also seen in Ce31.0(2)Fe11.8(5)Al6.5(6)B 13C4), iron clusters capped by light elements (Fe4C 6 frustrated tetrahedral in Ce21Fe8M7C 14, and larger Fe clusters in Ce33Fe14B25 C34). Variants of these building blocks were observed in Ce10Co2B7C16 with square Co units and chains of B and C connected to them, Fe2C8 units observed in Ce7Fe2C9, and FeC4 observed in Ce4FeGa0.85Al0.15C4 and Ce4FeAlC4. Two new phases were grown from Ce/Fe eutectic, Ce33Fe 14B25C34 and Ce33Fe13B 18C34 which exhibits very similar structures, but significantly different magnetic behavior. Structurally these two phases are similar. Both crystallize in the Im-3m space group, but differ by the centering of the Fe clusters. Ce33Fe14B25C34 contains Fe clusters centered by B atoms and Al doped on the Fe2 site. In Ce33Fe13B18C34, the Fe cluster is a perfect cuboctahedron. Ce33Fe14B25 C34 exhibits mixed valent behavior of cerium at 75K and no magnetic moment on iron, where-as Ce33Fe13B18C 34 exhibits tetravalent cerium and its iron clusters undergo a ferromagnetic transition at 180K. Another borocarbide, Ce10Co2B7C 16 was synthesized from Ce/Co eutectic flux. This structure features squares of Co surrounded by chains of C and B and a sea of cerium atoms. Temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements at 1 Tesla were fit to a modified Curie-Weiss law and a moment per Ce was calculated to be 2.70microB. Field dependent data were collected at 200K and 2K. Paramagnetic behavior dominated at 200K and at 2K, ferromagnetic behavior was observed. XPS measurements were used to confirm that Ce is in the 3+ oxidation state. Intermetallics containing different Fe clusters (Y5Mg 5Fe4AlSi, La6Fe10Al3Si, Ce21Fe8Al7-xSixC12, and Ce33Fe13.1Al1.1B24.8C 34) were explored as potential catalysts for conversion of methane to Carbon Nanotubes (CNT). Different growth temperatures were explored. At 690ºC, Ce33Fe14B25C34 catalyzed the growth of single walled carbon nanotubes, Ce21Fe8Al7-x SixC12 multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and all other structures did not catalyze the growth of CNT.

  9. Refinement of Promising Coating Compositions for Directionally Cast Eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangman, T. E.; Felten, E. J.; Benden, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    The successful application of high creep strength, directionally solidified gamma/gamma prime-delta (Ni-19.7Cb-6Cr-2.5Al) eutectic superalloy turbine blades requires the development of suitable coatings for airfoil, root and internal blade surfaces. In order to improve coatings for the gamma/gamma prime-delta alloy, the current investigation had the goals of (1) refining promising coating compositions for directionally solidified eutectics, (2) evaluating the effects of coating/ substrate interactions on the mechanical properties of the alloy, and (3) evaluating diffusion aluminide coatings for internal surfaces. Burner rig cyclic oxidation, furnace cyclic hot corrosion, ductility, and thermal fatigue tests indicated that NiCrAlY+Pt(63 to 127 micron Ni-18Cr-12Al-0.3Y + 6 micron Pt) and NiCrAlY(63 to 127 micron Ni-18Cr-12Al-0.3Y) coatings are capable of protecting high temperature gas path surfaces of eutectic alloy airfoils. Burner rig (Mach 0.37) testing indicated that the useful coating life of the 127 micron thick coatings exceeded 1000 hours at 1366 K (2000 deg F). Isothermal fatigue and furnance hot corrosion tests indicated that 63 micron NiCrAlY, NiCrAlY + Pt and platinum modified diffusion aluminide (Pt + Al) coating systems are capable of protecting the relatively cooler surfaces of the blade root. Finally, a gas phase coating process was evaluated for diffusion aluminizing internal surfaces and cooling holes of air-cooled gamma/gamma prime-delta turbine blades.

  10. Facile and scalable synthesis of Ti5Si3 nanoparticles in molten salts for metal-matrix nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Estruga, Marc; Girard, Steven N; Ding, Qi; Chen, Lianyi; Li, Xiaochun; Jin, Song

    2014-02-11

    We report a novel synthesis of Ti5Si3 nanoparticles (NPs) via the magnesio-reduction of TiO2 NPs and SiO2 in eutectic LiCl-KCl molten salts at 700 C. The Ti5Si3 particle size (?25 nm) is confined to the nanoscale due to the partial dissolution of Mg and silica in the molten salts and a subsequent heterogeneous reduction on the surface of the TiO2 NPs. PMID:24352506

  11. Microstructure of directionally solidified CrAs/GaAs eutectic

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, D.E.; Koo, L.Y.

    1995-04-01

    The microstructure of the CrAs/GaAs eutectic directionally solidified by both the Czochralski (Cz) and vertical Bridgman (VB) methods consists of arrays of CrAs rods oriented along the axis of solidification in a GaAs matrix. Microdefects in Cz material including striations, terminations and nucleations, coalescence and branching, and oscillatory instabilities are prevalent and are the result of dynamic morphological adjustment under fluctuating conditions of microscopic solidification. In contrast, selected regions of VB material exhibit near-ideal hexagonal packing of circular rods in the matrix. Cause-effect relationships between microstructure and conditions of solidification were determined and are presented and discussed.

  12. Composition gradients in electrolyzed LiCl-KCl eutectic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallet, C. E.; Heatherly, D. E.; Braunstein, J.

    1983-12-01

    Analysis of transport in a mixed electrolyte has previously predicted significant composition gradients in the LiCl-KCl electrolyte of high temperature LiS/ batteries. Composition gradients in quenched electrolyzed LiCl-KCl eutectic contained in yttria felt are measured with high distance resolution by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The reported results include composition profiles of LiCl-KCl coontained in porous Y2O3 and electrolyzed in three cells, two with solid Li-Al electrodes and one with a porous Li-Al anode.

  13. Directional solidification of Pb-Sn eutectic with vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caram, Rubens; Banan, Mohsen; Wilcox, William R.

    1991-01-01

    Pb-Sn eutectic alloy was directionally solidified at 1.4 to 3.2 cm/hr with forced convection induced by axial vibration of the growth ampoule with a frequency of 10 to 40 Hz and an amplitude of 0.5 to 1.0 mm. To determine the exact growth rate, an interface demarcation technique was applied. The lamellar spacing was increased 10 to 40 percent in ingots solidified with vibration compared to those solidified without vibration. The average intensity of convection in the melt under axial vibration of the ampoule was estimated by comparing the experimental results with a theoretical model.

  14. Divorced Eutectic Solidification of Mg-Al Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monas, Alexander; Shchyglo, Oleg; Kim, Se-Jong; Yim, Chang Dong; Hche, Daniel; Steinbach, Ingo

    2015-08-01

    We present simulations of the nucleation and equiaxed dendritic growth of the primary hexagonal close-packed -Mg phase followed by the nucleation of the -phase in interdendritic regions. A zoomed-in region of a melt channel under eutectic conditions is investigated and compared with experiments. The presented simulations allow prediction of the final properties of an alloy based on process parameters. The obtained results give insight into the solidification processes governing the microstructure formation of Mg-Al alloys, allowing their targeted design for different applications.

  15. Pattern formation and growth kinetics in eutectic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Jing

    Growth patterns during liquid/solid phase transformation are governed by simultaneous effects of heat and mass transfer mechanisms, creation of new interfaces, jump of the crystallization units from liquid to solid and their rearrangement in the solid matrix. To examine how the above processes influence the scale of microstructure, two eutectic systems are chosen for the study: a polymeric system polyethylene glycol-p-dibromobenzene (PEG-DBBZ) and a simple molecular system succinonitrile (SCN)-camphor. The scaling law for SCN-camphor system is found to follow the classical Jackson-Hunt model of circular rod eutectic, where the diffusion in the liquid and the interface energy are the main physics governing the two-phase pattern. In contrast, a significantly different scaling law is observed for the polymer system. The interface kinetics of PEG phase and its solute concentration dependence thus have been critically investigated for the first time by directional solidification technique. A model is then proposed that shows that the two-phase pattern in polymers is governed by the interface diffusion and the interface kinetics. In SCN-camphor system, a new branch of eutectic, elliptical shape rod, is found in thin samples where only one layer of camphor rods is present. It is found that the orientation of the ellipse can change from the major axis in the direction of the thickness to the direction of the width as the velocity and/or the sample thickness is decreased. A theoretical model is developed that predicts the spacing and orientation of the elliptical rods in a thin sample. The single phase growth patterns of SCN-camphor system were also examined with emphasis on the three-dimensional single cell and cell/dendrite transition. For the 3D single cell in a capillary tube, the entire cell shape ahead of the eutectic front can be described by the Saffmann-Taylor finger only at extremely low growth rate. A 3D directional solidification model is developed to characterize the cell shape and tip undercooling and the experimental results are compared with the predictions of the model. From the investigation of cell/dendrite transition, a model is proposed, from which the condition for the onset of the transition can be obtained.

  16. Pattern Formation and Growth Kinetics in Eutectic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jing Teng

    2007-12-01

    Growth patterns during liquid/solid phase transformation are governed by simultaneous effects of heat and mass transfer mechanisms, creation of new interfaces, jump of the crystallization units from liquid to solid and their rearrangement in the solid matrix. To examine how the above processes influence the scale of microstructure, two eutectic systems are chosen for the study: a polymeric system polyethylene glycol-p-dibromobenzene (PEG-DBBZ) and a simple molecular system succinonitrile (SCN)-camphor. The scaling law for SCN-camphor system is found to follow the classical Jackson-Hunt model of circular rod eutectic, where the diffusion in the liquid and the interface energy are the main physics governing the two-phase pattern. In contrast, a significantly different scaling law is observed for the polymer system. The interface kinetics of PEG phase and its solute concentration dependence thus have been critically investigated for the first time by directional solidification technique. A model is then proposed that shows that the two-phase pattern in polymers is governed by the interface diffusion and the interface kinetics. In SCN-camphor system, a new branch of eutectic, elliptical shape rodl, is found in thin samples where only one layer of camphor rods is present. It is found that the orientation of the ellipse can change from the major axis in the direction of the thickness to the direction of the width as the velocity and/or the sample thickness is decreased. A theoretical model is developed that predicts the spacing and orientation of the elliptical rods in a thin sample. The single phase growth patterns of SCN-camphor system were also examined with emphasis on the three-dimensional single cell and cell/dendrite transition. For the 3D single cell in a capillary tube, the entire cell shape ahead of the eutectic front can be described by the Saffmann-Taylor finger only at extremely low growth rate. A 3D directional solidification model is developed to characterize the cell shape and tip undercooling and the experimental results are compared with the predictions of the model. From the investigation of cell/dendrite transition, a model is proposed, from which the condition for the onset of the transition can be obtained.

  17. Development of high temperature fasteners using directionally solidified eutectic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, F. D.

    1972-01-01

    The suitability of the eutectics for high temperature fasteners was investigated. Material properties were determined as a function of temperature, and included shear parallel and perpendicular to the growth direction and torsion parallel to it. Techniques for fabricating typical fastener shapes included grinding, creep forming, and direct casting. Both lamellar Ni3Al-Ni3Nb and fibrous (Co,Cr,Al)-(Cr,Co)7C3 alloys showed promise as candidate materials for high temperature fastener applications. A brief evaluation of the performance of the best fabricated fastener design was made.

  18. Creep in Directionally Solidified NiAl-Mo Eutectics

    SciTech Connect

    Dudova, Marie; Kucharova, Kveta; Bartak, Tomas; Bei, Hongbin; George, Easo P; Somsen, Ch.; Dlouhy, A.

    2011-01-01

    A directionally solidified NiAl-Mo eutectic and an NiAl intermetallic, having respective nominal compositions Ni-45.5Al-9Mo and Ni-45.2Al (at.%), were loaded in compression at 1073 and 1173 K. Formidable strengthening by regularly distributed Mo fibres (average diameter 600 nm, volume fraction 14%) was observed. The fibres can support compression stresses transferred from the plastically deforming matrix up to a critical stress of the order of 2.5 GPa, at which point they yield. Microstructural evidence is provided for the dislocation-mediated stress transfer from the NiAl to the Mo phase.

  19. 3D Synchrotron Imaging of a Directionally Solidified Ternary Eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennstedt, Anne; Helfen, Lukas; Steinmetz, Philipp; Nestler, Britta; Ratke, Lorenz

    2016-03-01

    For the first time, the microstructure of directionally solidified ternary eutectics is visualized in three dimensions, using a high-resolution technique of X-ray tomography at the ESRF. The microstructure characterization is conducted with a photon energy, allowing to clearly discriminate the three phases Ag2Al, Al2Cu, and α-Aluminum solid solution. The reconstructed images illustrate the three-dimensional arrangement of the phases. The Ag2Al lamellae perform splitting and merging as well as nucleation and disappearing events during directional solidification.

  20. Examination of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L

    2014-01-01

    The need for high efficiency power conversion and energy transport systems is increasing as world energy use continues to increase, petroleum supplies decrease, and global warming concerns become more prevalent. There are few heat transport fluids capable of operating above about 600oC that do not require operation at extremely high pressures. Liquid fluoride salts are an exception to that limitation. Fluoride salts have very high boiling points, can operate at high temperatures and low pressures and have very good heat transfer properties. They have been proposed as coolants for next generation fission reactor systems, as coolants for fusion reactor blankets, and as thermal storage media for solar power systems. In each case, these salts are used to either extract or deliver heat through heat exchange equipment, and in order to design this equipment, liquid salt heat transfer must be predicted. This paper discusses the heat transfer characteristics of liquid fluoride salts. Historically, heat transfer in fluoride salts has been assumed to be consistent with that of conventional fluids (air, water, etc.), and correlations used for predicting heat transfer performance of all fluoride salts have been the same or similar to those used for water conventional fluids an, water, etc). A review of existing liquid salt heat transfer data is presented, summarized, and evaluated on a consistent basis. Less than 10 experimental data sets have been found in the literature, with varying degrees of experimental detail and measured parameters provided. The data has been digitized and a limited database has been assembled and compared to existing heat transfer correlations. Results vary as well, with some data sets following traditional correlations; in others the comparisons are less conclusive. This is especially the case for less common salt/materials combinations, and suggests that additional heat transfer data may be needed when using specific salt eutectics in heat transfer equipment designs. All of the data discussed above were taken under forced convective conditions (both laminar and turbulent). Some recent data taken at ORNL under free convection conditions are also presented and results discussed. This data was taken using a simple crucible experiment with an instrumented nickel heater inserted in the salt to induce natural circulation within the crucible. The data was taken over a temperature range of 550oC to 650oC in FLiNaK salt. This data covers both laminar and turbulent natural convection conditions, and is compared to existing forms of natural circulation correlations.

  1. Fluoride salts as phase change materials for thermal energy storage in the temperature range 1000-1400 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1988-01-01

    Eutectic compositions and congruently melting intermediate compounds in binary and ternary fluoride salt systems were characterized for potential use as latent heat of fusion phase change materials to store thermal energy in the temperature range 1000-1400 K. The melting points and eutectic compositions for many systems with published phase diagrams were experimentally verified and new eutectic compositions having melting points between 1000 and 1400 K were identified. Heats of fusion of several binary and ternary eutectics and congruently melting compounds were experimentally measured by differential scanning calorimetry. For a few systems in which heats of mixing in the melts have been measured, heats of fusion of the eutectics were calculated from thermodynamic considerations and good agreement was obtained between the measured and calculated values. Several combinations of salts with high heats of fusion per unit mass (greater than 0.7 kJ/g) have been identified for possible use as phase change materials in advanced solar dynamic space power applications.

  2. Thermophysical properties of reconsolidating crushed salt.

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Stephen J.; Urquhart, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    Reconsolidated crushed salt is being considered as a backfilling material placed upon nuclear waste within a salt repository environment. In-depth knowledge of thermal and mechanical properties of the crushed salt as it reconsolidates is critical to thermal/mechanical modeling of the reconsolidation process. An experimental study was completed to quantitatively evaluate the thermal conductivity of reconsolidated crushed salt as a function of porosity and temperature. The crushed salt for this study came from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). In this work the thermal conductivity of crushed salt with porosity ranging from 1% to 40% was determined from room temperature up to 300oC, using two different experimental methods. Thermal properties (including thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat) of single-crystal salt were determined for the same temperature range. The salt was observed to dewater during heating; weight loss from the dewatering was quantified. The thermal conductivity of reconsolidated crushed salt decreases with increasing porosity; conversely, thermal conductivity increases as the salt consolidates. The thermal conductivity of reconsolidated crushed salt for a given porosity decreases with increasing temperature. A simple mixture theory model is presented to predict and compare to the data developed in this study.

  3. Use of formulations based on choline chloride-malonic acid deep eutectic solvent for back end of line cleaning in integrated circuit fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubert, Jenny

    Interconnection layers fabricated during back end of line processing in semiconductor manufacturing involve dry etching of a low-k material and deposition of copper and metal barriers to create copper/dielectric stacks. After plasma etching steps used to form the trenches and vias in the dielectric, post etch residues (PER) that consist of organic polymer, metal oxides and fluorides, form on top of copper and low-k dielectric sidewalls. Currently, most semiconductor companies use semi aqueous fluoride (SAF) based formulations containing organic solvent(s) for PER removal. Unfortunately, these formulations adversely impact the environmental health and safety (EHS) requirements of the semiconductor industry. Environmentally friendly "green" formulations, free of organic solvents, are preferred as alternatives to remove PER. In this work, a novel low temperature molten salt system, referred as deep eutectic solvent (DES) has been explored as a back end of line cleaning (BEOL) formulation. Specifically, the DES system comprised of two benign chemicals, malonic acid (MA) and choline chloride (CC), is a liquid at room temperature. In certain cases, the formulation was modified by the addition of glacial acetic acid (HAc). Using these formulations, selective removal of three types of PER generated by timed CF4/O2 etching of DUV PR films on Cu was achieved. Type I PER was mostly organic in character (fluorocarbon polymer type) and had a measured thickness of 160 nm. Type II PER was much thinner (25 nm) and consisted of a mixture of organic and inorganic compounds (copper fluorides). Further etching generated 17 nm thick Type III PER composed of copper fluorides and oxides. Experiments were also conducted on patterned structures. Cleaning was performed by immersing samples in a temperature controlled (30 or 40° C) double jacketed vessel for a time between 1 and 5 minutes. Effectiveness of cleaning was characterized using SEM, XPS and single frequency impedance measurements. Type II and III residues, which contained copper compounds were removed in CC/MA DES within five minutes through dissolution and subsequent complexation of copper by malonic acid. Removal of Type I PER required the addition of glacial acetic acid to the DES formulation. Single frequency impedance measurement appears to be a good in situ method to follow the removal of the residues. High water solubility of the components of the system in conjunction with their environmental friendly nature, make the DES an attractive alternative to SAF.

  4. Eutectic Morphology of Al-7Si-0.3Mg Alloys with Scandium Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandee, Phromphong; Gourlay, C. M.; Belyakov, S. A.; Ozaki, Ryota; Yasuda, Hideyuki; Limmaneevichitr, Chaowalit

    2014-09-01

    The mechanisms of Al-Si eutectic refinement due to scandium (Sc) additions have been studied in an Al-7Si-0.3Mg foundry alloy. The evolution of eutectic microstructure is studied by thermal analysis and interrupted solidification, and the distribution of Sc is studied by synchrotron micro-XRF mapping. Sc is shown to cause significant refinement of the eutectic silicon. The results show that Sc additions strongly suppress the nucleation of eutectic silicon due to the formation of ScP instead of AlP. Sc additions change the macroscopic eutectic growth mode to the propagation of a defined eutectic front from the mold walls opposite to the heat flux direction similar to past work with Na, Ca, and Y additions. It is found that Sc segregates to the eutectic aluminum and AlSi2Sc2 phases and not to eutectic silicon, suggesting that impurity-induced twinning does not operate. The results suggest that Sc refinement is mostly caused by the significantly reduced silicon nucleation frequency and the resulting increase in mean interface growth rate.

  5. Stabilization of charged and neutral colloids in salty mixtures.

    PubMed

    Samin, Sela; Tsori, Yoav

    2013-12-28

    We present a mechanism for the stabilization of colloids in liquid mixtures without use of surfactants or polymers. When a suitable salt is added to a solvent mixture, the coupling of the colloid's surface chemistry and the preferential solvation of ions leads to a repulsive force between colloids that can overcome van der Waals attraction. This repulsive force is substantial in a large range of temperatures, mixture composition, and salt concentrations. The increased repulsion due to addition of salt occurs even for charged colloids. This mechanism may be useful in experimental situations where steric stabilization with surfactants or polymers is undesired. PMID:24387394

  6. Salt Tolerance of Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI)

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Ayanna U.; Talaty, Nari; Cooks, R G; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2007-01-01

    Suppression of ion intensity in the presence of high salt matrices is common in most mass spectrometry ionization techniques. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) is an ionization method that exhibits salt tolerance, and this is investigated. DESI analysis was performed on three different drug mixtures in the presence of 0, 0.2, 2, 5, 10, and 20% NaCl:KCl weight by volume from seven different surfaces. At physiological concentrations individual drugs in each mixture were observed with each surface. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) was used to provide additional confirmation for select compounds. Multiple stage experiments, to MS5, were performed for select compounds. Even in the absence of added salt, the benzodiazepine containing mixture yielded sodium and potassium adducts of carbamazepine which masked the ions of interest. These adducts were eliminated by adding 0.1% 7M ammonium acetate to the standard methanol:water (1:1) spray solvent. Comparison of the salt tolerance of DESI with that of electrospray ionization (ESI) demonstrated much better signal/noise characteristics for DESI in this study. The salt tolerance of DESI was also studied by performing limit of detection and dynamic range experiments. Even at a salt concentration significantly above physiological concentrations, select surfaces were effective in providing spectra that allowed the ready identification of the compounds of interest. The already high salt tolerance of DESI can be optimized further by appropriate choices of surface and spray solution.

  7. Magnetic Fe-Co films electroplated in a deep-eutectic-solvent-based plating bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanai, T.; Shiraishi, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Ohgai, T.; Nakano, M.; Suzuki, K.; Fukunaga, H.

    2015-05-01

    We fabricated Fe-Co films from a deep eutectic solvent (DES)-based plating bath and investigated magnetic properties of the plated films. The plating baths were obtained by stirring the mixture of choline chloride, ethylene glycol, FeCl2.4H2O, and CoCl2.6H2O. The composition of the plated films depended on the amount of FeCl2.4H2O in the plating bath, and Fe content of the films was varied from 0 to 100 at. %. Depending on the Fe content, the saturation magnetization and the coercivity of the films varied. The Fe76Co24 film shows high saturation magnetization and smooth surface, and the change in the saturation magnetization shows good agreement with the expected change by the Slater-Pauling curve. High current efficiency (>90%) could be obtained in the wide film composition. From these results, we concluded that the DES-based plating bath is one of effective baths for the Fe-Co films with high current efficiency.

  8. Enzyme-Catalyzed Henry Reaction in Choline Chloride-Based Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xuemei; Zhang, Suoqin; Zheng, Liangyu

    2016-01-28

    The enzyme-catalyzed Henry reaction was realized using deep eutectic solvents (DESs) as a reaction medium. The lipase from Aspergillus niger (lipase AS) showed excellent catalytic activity toward the substrates aromatic aldehydes and nitromethane in choline chloride:glycerol at a molar ratio of 1:2. Addition of 30 vol% water to DES further improved the lipase activity and inhibited DES-catalyzed transformation. A final yield of 92.2% for the lipase AS-catalyzed Henry reaction was achieved under optimized reaction conditions in only 4 h. In addition, the lipase AS activity was improved by approximately 3-fold in a DES-water mixture compared with that in pure water, which produced a final yield of only 33.4%. Structural studies with fluorescence spectroscopy showed that the established strong hydrogen bonds between DES and water may be the main driving force that affects the spatial conformation of the enzyme, leading to a change in lipase activity. The methodology was also extended to the aza-Henry reaction, which easily occurred in contrast to that in pure water. The enantioselectivity of both Henry and aza-Henry reactions was not found. However, the results are still remarkable, as we report the first use of DES as a reaction medium in a lipase-catalyzed Henry reaction. PMID:26437947

  9. Folding and imaging of DNA nanostructures in anhydrous and hydrated deep-eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Gllego, Isaac; Grover, Martha A; Hud, Nicholas V

    2015-06-01

    There is great interest in DNA nanotechnology, but its use has been limited to aqueous or substantially hydrated media. The first assembly of a DNA nanostructure in a water-free solvent, namely a low-volatility biocompatible deep-eutectic solvent composed of a 4:1 mixture of glycerol and choline chloride (glycholine), is now described. Glycholine allows for the folding of a two-dimensional DNA origami at 20?C in six days, whereas in hydrated glycholine, folding is accelerated (?3?h). Moreover, a three-dimensional DNA origami and a DNA tail system can be folded in hydrated glycholine under isothermal conditions. Glycholine apparently reduces the kinetic traps encountered during folding in aqueous solvent. Furthermore, folded structures can be transferred between aqueous solvent and glycholine. It is anticipated that glycholine and similar solvents will allow for the creation of functional DNA structures of greater complexity by providing a milieu with tunable properties that can be optimized for a range of applications and nanostructures. PMID:25900011

  10. Self-aggregation of sodium dodecyl sulfate within (choline chloride + urea) deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Pal, Mahi; Rai, Rewa; Yadav, Anita; Khanna, Rajesh; Baker, Gary A; Pandey, Siddharth

    2014-11-11

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have shown tremendous promise as green solvents with low toxicity and cost. Understanding molecular aggregation processes within DESs will not only enhance the application potential of these solvents but also help alleviate some of the limitations associated with them. Among DESs, those comprising choline chloride and appropriate hydrogen-bond donors are inexpensive and easy to prepare. On the basis of fluorescence probe, electrical conductivity, and surface tension experiments, we present the first clear lines of evidence for self-aggregation of an anionic surfactant within a DES containing a small fraction of water. Namely, well-defined assemblies of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) apparently form in the archetype DES Reline comprising a 1:2 molar mixture of choline chloride and urea. Significant enhancement in the solubility of organic solvents that are otherwise not miscible in choline chloride-based DESs is achieved within Reline in the presence of SDS. The remarkably improved solubility of cyclohexane within SDS-added Reline is attributed to the presence of spontaneously formed cyclohexane-in-Reline microemulsions by SDS under ambient conditions. Surface tension, dynamic light scattering (DLS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), density, and dynamic viscosity measurements along with responses from the fluorescence dipolarity and microfluidity probes of pyrene and 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane are employed to characterize these aggregates. Such water-free oil-in-DES microemulsions are appropriately sized to be considered as a new type of nanoreactor. PMID:25314953

  11. Extraction of phenolic compounds from virgin olive oil by deep eutectic solvents (DESs).

    PubMed

    García, Aránzazu; Rodríguez-Juan, Elisa; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, Guillermo; Rios, José Julian; Fernández-Bolaños, Juan

    2016-04-15

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are "green" solvents, applied in this study for the extraction of phenolic compounds from virgin olive oil (VOO). Different combinations of DES consisting of choline chloride (ChCl) in various mixing ratios with sugars, alcohols, organic acids, and urea, as well as a mixture of three sugars were used. The yields of the DES extractions were compared with those from conventional 80% (v/v) methanol/water. DES showed a good solubility of phenolic compounds with different polarities. The two most abundant secoiridoid derivatives in olive oil, oleacein and oleocanthal, extracted with ChCl/xylitol and ChCl/1,2-propanediol showed an increase of 20-33% and 67.9-68.3% with respect to conventional extraction, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first time that phenolic compounds have been extracted from VOO oil using DES. Our results suggest that DES offers an efficient, safe, sustainable, and cost effective alternative to methanol for extraction of bioactive compounds from VOO. PMID:26616988

  12. Chlorate salts and solutions on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, Jennifer; Chevrier, Vincent F.; Berget, Deanna J.; Adams, Robert D.

    2012-04-01

    Chlorate (ClO3-) is an intermediate oxidation species between chloride (Cl-) and perchlorate (ClO4-), both of which were found at the landing site by the Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL). The chlorate ion is almost as stable as perchlorate, and appears to be associated with perchlorate in most terrestrial reservoirs (e.g. Atacama and Antarctica). It is possible that chlorate contributed to the ion sensor response on the WCL, yet was masked by the strong perchlorate signal. However, very little is known about chlorate salts and their effect on the stability of water. We performed evaporation rate experiments in our Mars simulation chamber, which enabled us to determine the activity of water for various concentrations. From this we constructed solubility diagrams for NaClO3, KClO3, Mg(ClO3)2 and Ca(ClO3)2, and determined the Pitzer parameters for each salt. Chlorate salt eutectic temperatures range from 270 K (KClO3) to 204 K (Mg(ClO3)2). Modeling the addition of chlorate to the initial WCL solutions shows that it precipitates in concentrations comparable to other common salts, such as gypsum and epsomite, and implies that chlorates may play an important role in the wet chemistry on Mars.

  13. Differential Microscopic Mobility of Components within a Deep Eutectic Solvent

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wagle, Durgesh V.; Baker, Gary A.; Mamontov, Eugene

    2015-07-13

    From macroscopic measurements of deep eutectic solvents such as glyceline (1:2 molar ratio of choline chloride to glycerol), the long-range translational diffusion of the larger cation (choline) is known to be slower compared to that of the smaller hydrogen bond donor (glycerol). However, when the diffusion dynamics are analyzed on the subnanometer length scale, we discover that the displacements associated with the localized diffusive motions are actually larger for choline. This counterintuitive diffusive behavior can be understood as follows. The localized diffusive motions confined in the transient cage of neighbor particles, which precede the cage-breaking long-range diffusion jumps, are moremore » spatially constrained for glycerol than for choline because of the stronger hydrogen bonds the former makes with chloride anions. The implications of differential localized mobility of the constituents should be especially important for applications where deep eutectic solvents are confined on the nanometer length scale and their long-range translational diffusion is strongly inhibited (e.g., within microporous media).« less

  14. Differential Microscopic Mobility of Components within a Deep Eutectic Solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Wagle, Durgesh V.; Baker, Gary A.; Mamontov, Eugene

    2015-07-13

    From macroscopic measurements of deep eutectic solvents such as glyceline (1:2 molar ratio of choline chloride to glycerol), the long-range translational diffusion of the larger cation (choline) is known to be slower compared to that of the smaller hydrogen bond donor (glycerol). However, when the diffusion dynamics are analyzed on the subnanometer length scale, we discover that the displacements associated with the localized diffusive motions are actually larger for choline. This counterintuitive diffusive behavior can be understood as follows. The localized diffusive motions confined in the transient cage of neighbor particles, which precede the cage-breaking long-range diffusion jumps, are more spatially constrained for glycerol than for choline because of the stronger hydrogen bonds the former makes with chloride anions. The implications of differential localized mobility of the constituents should be especially important for applications where deep eutectic solvents are confined on the nanometer length scale and their long-range translational diffusion is strongly inhibited (e.g., within microporous media).

  15. Differential Microscopic Mobility of Components within a Deep Eutectic Solvent.

    PubMed

    Wagle, Durgesh V; Baker, Gary A; Mamontov, Eugene

    2015-08-01

    From macroscopic measurements of deep eutectic solvents such as glyceline (1:2 molar ratio of choline chloride to glycerol), the long-range translational diffusion of the larger cation (choline) is known to be slower compared to that of the smaller hydrogen bond donor (glycerol). However, when the diffusion dynamics are analyzed on the subnanometer length scale, we find that the displacements associated with the localized diffusive motions are actually larger for choline. This counterintuitive diffusive behavior can be understood as follows. The localized diffusive motions confined in the transient cage of neighbor particles, which precede the cage-breaking long-range diffusion jumps, are more spatially constrained for glycerol than for choline because of the stronger hydrogen bonds the former makes with chloride anions. The implications of such differential localized mobility of the constituents should be especially important for applications where deep eutectic solvents are confined on the nanometer length scale and their long-range translational diffusion is strongly inhibited (e.g., within microporous media). PMID:26267182

  16. New insights into eutectic cream skin penetration enhancement.

    PubMed

    Fiala, Sarah; Roman, Marie; Inacio, Ricardo; Mashal, Sumaia; Brown, Marc B; Jones, Stuart A

    2016-02-29

    The manner in which the eutectic cream EMLA(®) enhances the percutaneous penetration of lidocaine and prilocaine into human skin is still not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate if the modification of drug aggregation played a role in the way EMLA(®) facilitates delivery. Light scattering analysis of lidocaine alone in water gave a critical aggregation concentration (CAC) of 572μM and a mean aggregate size of 58.8nm. The analysis of prilocaine in identical conditions gave a CAC of 1177μM and a mean aggregate size of 105.7±24.8nm. When the two drugs were mixed at their eutectic 1:1 ratio in water the CAC reduced to 165.8μM and the aggregate size was 43.82nm. This lidocaine-prilocaine interaction in water was further modified upon addition of polyoxyethylene hydrogenated castor oil, the surfactant in the EMLA aqueous phase, to produce aggregates of <20nm. The physical characterisation data suggested that it was the EMLA cream's surfactant that modified the drug molecular interactions in the aqueous continuous phase and caused a 6 fold higher drug penetration through human epidermal tissue compared to the oil formulations tested in this study. PMID:26732522

  17. Ternary eutectic growth of nanostructured thermoelectric Ag-Pb-Te materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hsin-jay; Chen, Sinn-wen; Foo, Wei-jian; Jeffrey Snyder, G.

    2012-07-09

    Nanostructured Ag-Pb-Te thermoelectric materials were fabricated by unidirectionally solidifying the ternary Ag-Pb-Te eutectic and near-eutectic alloys using the Bridgeman method. Specially, the Bridgman-grown eutectic alloy exhibited a partially aligned lamellar microstructure, which consisted of Ag{sub 5}Te{sub 3} and Te phases, with additional 200-600 nm size particles of PbTe. The self-assembled interfaces altered the thermal and electronic transport properties in the bulk Ag-Pb-Te eutectic alloy. Presumably due to phonon scattering from the nanoscale microstructure, a low thermal conductivity ({kappa} = 0.3 W/mK) was achieved of the eutectic alloy, leading to a zT peak of 0.41 at 400 K.

  18. Ternary eutectic growth of nanostructured thermoelectric Ag-Pb-Te materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hsin-jay; Foo, Wei-jian; Chen, Sinn-wen; Jeffrey Snyder, G.

    2012-07-01

    Nanostructured Ag-Pb-Te thermoelectric materials were fabricated by unidirectionally solidifying the ternary Ag-Pb-Te eutectic and near-eutectic alloys using the Bridgeman method. Specially, the Bridgman-grown eutectic alloy exhibited a partially aligned lamellar microstructure, which consisted of Ag5Te3 and Te phases, with additional 200-600 nm size particles of PbTe. The self-assembled interfaces altered the thermal and electronic transport properties in the bulk Ag-Pb-Te eutectic alloy. Presumably due to phonon scattering from the nanoscale microstructure, a low thermal conductivity (? = 0.3 W/mK) was achieved of the eutectic alloy, leading to a zT peak of 0.41 at 400 K.

  19. Evaluation of 2.25Cr-1Mo Alloy for Containment of LiCl/KCl Eutectic during the Pyrometallurgical Processing of Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    B.R. Westphal; S.X. Li; G.L. Fredrickson; D. Vaden; T.A. Johnson; J.C. Wass

    2011-03-01

    Recovery of uranium from the Mk-IV and Mk-V electrorefiner vessels containing a LiCl/KCl eutectic salt has been on-going for 14 and 12 years, respectively, during the pyrometallurgical processing of used nuclear fuel. Although austenitic stainless steels are typically utilized for LiCl/KCl salt systems, the presence of cadmium in the Mk-IV electrorefiner dictates an alternate material. A 2.25Cr-1Mo alloy (ASME SA-387) was chosen due to the absence of nickel in the alloy which has a considerable solubility in cadmium. Using the transition metal impurities (iron, chromium, nickel, molybdenum, and manganese) in the electrorefined uranium products, an algorithm was developed to derive values for the contribution of the transition metals from the various input sources. Weight loss and corrosion rate data for the Mk-V electrorefiner vessel were then generated based on the transition metal impurities in the uranium products. To date, the corrosion rate of the 2.25Cr-1Mo alloy in LiCl/KCl eutectic is outstanding assuming uniform (i.e. non-localized) conditions.

  20. Brines formed by multi-salt deliquescence

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, S; Rard, J; Alai, M; Staggs, K

    2005-11-04

    The FY05 Waste Package Environment testing program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory focused on determining the temperature, relative humidity, and solution compositions of brines formed due to the deliquescence of NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} and NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3}-Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} salt mixtures. Understanding the physical and chemical behavior of these brines is important because they define conditions under which brines may react with waste canister surfaces. Boiling point experiments show that NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} and NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3}-Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} salt mixtures form brines that transform to hydrous melts that do not truly 'dry out' until temperatures exceed 300 and 400 C, respectively. Thus a conducting solution is present for these salt assemblages over the thermal history of the repository. The corresponding brines form at lower relative humidity at higher temperatures. The NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture has a mutual deliquescence relative humidity (MDRH) of 25.9% at 120 C and 10.8% at 180 C. Similarly, the KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture has MDRH of 26.4% at 120 C and 20.0% at 150 C. The KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture salts also absorb some water (but do not appear to deliquesce) at 180 C and thus may also contribute to the transfer of electrons at interface between dust and the waste package surface. There is no experimental evidence to suggest that these brines will degas and form less deliquescent salt assemblages. Ammonium present in atmospheric and tunnel dust (as the chloride, nitrate, or sulfate) will readily decompose in the initial heating phase of the repository, and will affect subsequent behavior of the remaining salt mixture only through the removal of a stoichiometric equivalent of one or more anions. Although K-Na-NO{sub 3}-Cl brines form at high temperature and low relative humidity, these brines are dominated by nitrate, which is known to inhibit corrosion at lower temperature. Nitrate to chloride ratios of the NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture are about NO{sub 3}:Cl = 19:1. The role of nitrate on corrosion at higher temperatures is addressed in a companion report (Dixit et al., 2005).

  1. Protein aggregation in salt solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kastelic, Miha; Kalyuzhnyi, Yurij V.; Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Dill, Ken A.; Vlachy, Vojko

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation is broadly important in diseases and in formulations of biological drugs. Here, we develop a theoretical model for reversible protein–protein aggregation in salt solutions. We treat proteins as hard spheres having square-well-energy binding sites, using Wertheim’s thermodynamic perturbation theory. The necessary condition required for such modeling to be realistic is that proteins in solution during the experiment remain in their compact form. Within this limitation our model gives accurate liquid–liquid coexistence curves for lysozyme and γ IIIa-crystallin solutions in respective buffers. It provides good fits to the cloud-point curves of lysozyme in buffer–salt mixtures as a function of the type and concentration of salt. It than predicts full coexistence curves, osmotic compressibilities, and second virial coefficients under such conditions. This treatment may also be relevant to protein crystallization. PMID:25964322

  2. Modeling soluble salt assemblages on Mars: past aqueous history and present-day habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, J. D.; Catling, D. C.; Light, B.

    2014-12-01

    Soluble salt assemblages formed through aqueous processes are widespread on Mars. These minerals are important for understanding the past aqueous history of Mars and indicate critical habitability parameters such as pH, temperature, water activity, and salinity. Equilibrium models have been used to determine solution chemistry and salt precipitation sequences from aqueous chemical data; however, current models are limited by a lack of experimental data for low-temperature perchlorates, and some model predictions are clearly anomalous. To address the need for accurate equilibrium models, we have developed a comprehensive model for low-temperature perchlorate-rich brines using (1) previously neglected literature data, (2) experimental solubilities determined in low-temperature perchlorate solutions, and (3) solubility and heat capacity results determined using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Our resulting model is a significant improvement over existing models, such as FREZCHEM, particularly for perchlorate mixtures. We have applied our model to evaporation and freezing of a nominal Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) solution measured at the Phoenix site. For a freezing WCL solution, our model indicates that ice, KClO4, hydromagnesite (3MgCO3Mg(OH)23H2O), calcite (CaCO3), meridianiite (MgSO411H2O), MgCl212H2O, NaClO42H2O, and Mg(ClO4)26H2O form at the eutectic (209 K); whereas, KClO4, hydromagnesite, kieserite (MgSO4H2O), anhydrite (CaSO4), halite (NaCl), NaClO4H2O, and Mg(ClO4)26H2O form upon complete evaporation at 298 K. In general, evaporation yields more dehydrated mineral assemblages than salts produced by freezing. Hydrated phases that form during evaporation contain 0.3 wt. % water, which compares with 1.2 wt. % during freezing. Given independent evidence for the presence of calcite and minimum water contents in Martian soils of ~1.5 wt. %, salts at the Phoenix site, and possibly elsewhere, appear more likely to have formed during freezing. Furthermore, our model indicates that some minerals, such as halite, kieserite, epsomite, and mirabilite (Na2SO410H2O) form only under limited temperature and water activity conditions, and could be used to constrain the past aqueous history of Mars.

  3. Multicomponent diffusion in molten salt LiF-BeF2: Dynamical correlations and Maxwell-Stefan diffusivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Brahmananda; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.

    2015-06-01

    Applying Green-Kubo formalism and equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we have studied the dynamic correlation, Onsager coeeficients and Maxwell-Stefan (MS) Diffusivities of molten salt LiF-BeF2, which is used as coolant in high temperature reactor. All the diffusive flux correlations show back-scattering or cage dynamics which becomes pronouced at higher temperature. Although the MS diffusivities are expected to depend very lightly on the composition due to decoupling of thermodynamic factor, the diffusivity ?Li-F and ?Be-F decreases sharply for higher concentration of LiF and BeF2 respectively. Interestingly, all three MS diffusivities have highest magnitude for eutectic mixture at 1000K (except ?Be-F at lower LiF mole fraction) which is desirable from coolant point of view. Although the diffusivity for positive-positive ion pair is negative it is not in violation of the second law of thermodynamics as it satisfies the non-negative entropic constraints.

  4. Role of Sulfur on the Transition from Graphite to Cementite Eutectic in Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fra?, Edward; Grny, Marcin; Lopez, Hugo F.; Kawalec, Magdalena

    2013-06-01

    In the current study, an analytic solution is considered to explain the influence of sulfur on the transition from graphite to cementite eutectic in cast iron. The outcome from the current study indicates that this transition can be related to (a) the graphite nucleation potential (directly characterized by the cell count and indirectly by the nucleation coefficients; (b) the eutectic graphite growth rate coefficient; (c) the temperature range between the equilibrium temperature for graphite eutectic and the formation temperature for cementite eutectic; and (d) the liquid volume fraction, after pre-eutectic austenite solidification. In addition, the absolute and the relative chilling tendencies, as well as critical cooling rates including the chill width of the cast iron can be predicted from the current study. The analytic model was experimentally verified for castings with various sulfur contents. It is found that the main role of sulfur on the transition from graphite to cementite eutectic is through its effect on lowering the growth coefficient, and hence, the graphite eutectic growth rate. In addition, it is found that with the increasing sulfur content, the critical cooling rate is significantly reduced, thus increasing the absolute and the relative chilling tendency values, including the chill width.

  5. Deep eutectic solvent pretreatment and subsequent saccharification of corncob.

    PubMed

    Procentese, Alessandra; Johnson, Erin; Orr, Valerie; Garruto Campanile, Anna; Wood, Jeffery A; Marzocchella, Antonio; Rehmann, Lars

    2015-09-01

    Ionic liquid (ILs) pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass has attracted broad scientific interest, despite high costs, possible toxicity and energy intensive recycling. An alternative group of ionic solvents with similar physicochemical properties are deep eutectic solvents (DESs). Corncob residues were pretreated with three different DES systems: choline chloride and glycerol, choline chloride and imidazole, choline chloride and urea. The pretreated biomass was characterised in terms of lignin content, sugars concentration, enzymatic digestibility and crystallinity index. A reduction of lignin and hemicellulose content resulted in increased crystallinity of the pretreated biomass while the crystallinity of the cellulose fraction could be reduced, depending on DES system and operating conditions. The subsequent enzymatic saccharification was enhanced in terms of rate and extent. A total of 41 g fermentable sugars (27 g glucose and 14 g xylose) could be recovered from 100g corncob, representing 76% (86% and 63%) of the initially available carbohydrates. PMID:26005926

  6. Directional solidification of Pb-Sn eutectics with vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caram, Rubens; Banan, Mohsen; Wilcox, William R.

    1991-01-01

    Pb-Sn eutectic alloy was directionally solidified at 1.4 to 3.2 cm/hr with forced convection induced by axial vibration of the growth ampoule with a frequency of 10 to 40 Hz and an amplitude of 0.5 to 1.0 mm. To determine the exact growth rate, an interface demarcation technique was applied. The lamellar spacing was increased 10 to 40 percent in ingots solidified with vibration compared to those solidified without vibration. The number of grain boundaries was increased by vibration. The average intensity of convection in the melt under axial vibration of the ampoule was estimated by comparing the experimental results with a theoretical model.

  7. Double layer effects on metal nucleation in deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Andrew P; Barron, John C; Frisch, Gero; Gurman, Stephen; Ryder, Karl S; Fernando Silva, A

    2011-06-01

    The electrodeposition of zinc has been studied in two deep eutectic solvents. Unlike the metals studied to date in these liquids, zinc electrodeposition is not mass transport limited and the morphology of the deposit differs in the two liquids. This study shows that changing the concentration of solute affects the physical properties of the liquid to different extents although this is found to not effect the morphology of the metal deposited. EXAFS was used to show that the speciation of zinc was the same in both liquids. Double layer capacitance studies showed differences between the two liquids and these are proposed to be due to the adsorption of a species on the electrode which is thought to be chloride. The differences in zinc morphology is attributed to blocking of certain crystal faces leading to deposition of small platelet shaped crystals in the glycol based liquid. PMID:21519629

  8. Self Assembled Structures by Directional Solidification of Eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Frederick W.; Sayir, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Interest in ordered porous structures has grown because of there unique properties such as photonic bandgaps, high backing packing density and high surface to volume ratio. Inspired by nature, biometric strategies using self assembled organic molecules dominate the development of hierarchical inorganic structures. Directional solidification of eutectics (DSE) also exhibit self assembly characteristics to form hierarchical metallic and inorganic structures. Crystallization of diphasic materials by DSE can produce two dimensional ordered structures consisting of rods or lamella. By selective removal of phases, DSE is capable to fabricate ordered pore arrays or ordered pin arrays. Criteria and limitations to fabricate hierarchical structures will be presented. Porous structures in silicon base alloys and ceramic systems will be reported.

  9. Electroplated Fe films prepared from a deep eutectic solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanai, T.; Shiraishi, K.; Shimokawa, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Ohgai, T.; Nakano, M.; Suzuki, K.; Fukunaga, H.

    2014-05-01

    Electroplating of Fe films was carried out from choline chloride-ethylene glycol types of DES (Deep Eutectic Solvent). We investigated magnetic properties of the plated Fe films and evaluated the productivity for the electroplating process. Consequently, we found that surface morphology and current efficiency of the plated films were affected by the bath temperature. We obtained the Fe films with relatively smooth surface and high current efficiency in the bath temperature range from 70 to 110 C. The deposition rate for our process depended on the current density, and we obtained high deposition rate value of approximately 120 ?m/h. We also obtained high current efficiency values of approximately 90% in the wide range of plating time. These results indicate that the DES-based bath has industrial advantages for mass-producing Fe films. Therefore, we conclude that the DES-based bath is an attractive plating bath for Fe films.

  10. Critical temperature of the lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    2005-05-01

    Liquid metals such as Bi and Pb and Pb-Bi eutectic alloy are serious contenders for use as coolant in LMFBRs in lieu of sodium due to a number of attractive characteristics (high density, low moderation, low neutron absorption and activation, high boiling point and poor interaction with water and air, etc.). Analysis of hypothetical accidents is of relevance to predict the catastrophe involving loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in LMFBRs. One key parameter to take into account is the critical temperature data of the liquid metals for reactor safety analysis. This communication reports the application of a theoretical model called internal pressure approach to predict the critical temperature ( Tc) of the LBE alloy for the first time.

  11. On the phenomenology of tilted domains in lamellar eutectic growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caroli, B.; Caroli, C.; Fauve, S.

    1992-03-01

    We show that, due to the coupling between tilt (amplitude of the antisymmetric part of the font profile) and phase dynamics, the phenomenology of tilt domains of finite width proposed by Coullet et al. within the assumption of a subcritical homogeneous tilt bifurcation retains the same qualitative features when this bifurcation is direct, as is the case for lamellar eutectics. Nous montrons que, du fait du couplage entre les dynamiques d'inclinaison (amplitude de la partie impaire du profil de front) et de phase, la phnomnologie des domaines d'inclinaison de largeur finie propose par Coullet et al. pour le cas d'une bifurcation d'inclinaison homogne sous critique garde les mmes caractristiques qualitatives quand cette bifurcation est directe, comme c'est le cas pour la croissance eutectique lamellaire.

  12. Heat-resistant eutectic alloys with carbide-intermetallic strengthening

    SciTech Connect

    Kachanov, E.B.; Petrushin, N.V.; Svetlov, I.L.

    1995-09-01

    Some important characteristics of gas turbine engines (in the first place the thrust and the efficiency) depend on the gas temperature and hence are determined by the service life of the blades. Heat-resistant nickel alloys are used for casting blades that can work at maximum temperatures of 1050-1100{degrees}C. However, more efficient engines need materials with a higher operating temperature and high-temperature strength. The work concerns the principles of alloying and structure formation of eutectic heat-resistant alloys on a nickel base with carbide and intermetallic strengthening. Their main mechanical properties at high temperatures are analyzed in comparison with the characteristics of high-temperature single-crystal nickel alloys, and the possibility of using them for casting turbine blades of high-temperature gas-turbine engines is considered.

  13. The Effect of Carbon on the Transition from Graphite to Cementite Eutectic in Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fra?, Edward; Grny, M.; Lopez, Hugo F.

    2014-09-01

    In this work, an analytical solution is proposed to explain the influence of carbon on the transition from graphite to cementite eutectic in cast iron. The outcome from this work indicates that this transition can be related to (a) the graphite nucleation potential (directly characterized by the cell count, N and indirectly by the nucleation coefficients N s and b), (b) the eutectic graphite growth rate coefficient, ?, (c) the temperature range, ?T sc = T s - T c (where T s and T c are the equilibrium temperature for graphite eutectic and the formation temperature for cementite eutectic, respectively), and (d) the liquid volume fraction, f, after pre-eutectic austenite solidification. In addition, the absolute and the relative chilling tendencies, CT and CTr, respectively, as well as the critical cooling rate, Q cr, and the chill width, w, can be predicted from this work. The analytical model was experimentally verified for castings with various carbon contents. It was found that the carbon content increases the eutectic cell count, N while reducing the maximum degree of undercooling at the onset of graphite eutectic solidification, ?T m. From this work it is evident that the main role of carbon on the transition from graphite to cementite eutectic is through its effect on increasing the growth coefficient and hence, the graphite eutectic growth rate, u. Moreover, at increasing carbon contents the absolute and the relative chilling tendencies including the chill width, all are significantly reduced. Finally, the equations derived using theoretical arguments for the chill width are rather similar to expressions based on a statistical analysis of the experimental outcome.

  14. The Effect of Carbon on the Transition from Graphite to Cementite Eutectic in Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fra?, Edward; Grny, M.; Lopez, Hugo F.

    2014-11-01

    In this work, an analytical solution is proposed to explain the influence of carbon on the transition from graphite to cementite eutectic in cast iron. The outcome from this work indicates that this transition can be related to (a) the graphite nucleation potential (directly characterized by the cell count, N and indirectly by the nucleation coefficients N s and b), (b) the eutectic graphite growth rate coefficient, ?, (c) the temperature range, ?T sc = T s - T c (where T s and T c are the equilibrium temperature for graphite eutectic and the formation temperature for cementite eutectic, respectively), and (d) the liquid volume fraction, f, after pre-eutectic austenite solidification. In addition, the absolute and the relative chilling tendencies, CT and CTr, respectively, as well as the critical cooling rate, Q cr, and the chill width, w, can be predicted from this work. The analytical model was experimentally verified for castings with various carbon contents. It was found that the carbon content increases the eutectic cell count, N while reducing the maximum degree of undercooling at the onset of graphite eutectic solidification, ?T m. From this work it is evident that the main role of carbon on the transition from graphite to cementite eutectic is through its effect on increasing the growth coefficient and hence, the graphite eutectic growth rate, u. Moreover, at increasing carbon contents the absolute and the relative chilling tendencies including the chill width, all are significantly reduced. Finally, the equations derived using theoretical arguments for the chill width are rather similar to expressions based on a statistical analysis of the experimental outcome.

  15. A physical and chemical analysis of fast quenched particles of UO 2 and ZrO 2 mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Beong Tae; Song, Jin Ho; Park, Yang Soon; Kim, Jong Gu

    2006-11-01

    An interaction between molten fuel of a nuclear reactor, which is called corium and mainly consisted of UO 2 and ZrO 2, and sub-cooled water may result in a steam explosion. It is one of the outstanding reactor safety issues. To investigate the fundamental mechanism behind the recent experimental observation that the composition of the material highly affected the strength of the steam explosion, a physical and chemical analysis for the fast quenched particles of UO 2 and ZrO 2 mixture at different compositions was performed. Six cases were selected for the study, in which the melt composition was changed, while other initial and boundary conditions of the molten fuel and water interaction tests were maintained the same. It was observed that the cases at eutectic composition resulted in a spontaneous steam explosion, while the cases at non-eutectic composition did not result in a spontaneous steam explosion. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) was performed for fast quenched particles along a cross-section. Results demonstrated that the UO 2 and ZrO 2 mixtures formed a solid solution of U 1- xZr xO 2. The mechanism for the hydrogen generation during the molten material and water interaction was examined by thermogravity analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and hydrogen reduction analysis. It was demonstrated that the hydrogen generation was not directly related to the oxidation of UO 2. Morphologies observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that the particles from the eutectic mixture had many holes, while the particles at non-eutectic mixture did not. The existence of mush phase for the non-eutectic mixture is suggested to be the reason for the non-explosive nature.

  16. Eutectic superalloys by edge-defined, film-fed growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, G. F.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of producing directionally solidified eutectic alloy composites by edge-defined, film-fed growth (EFG) was carried out. The three eutectic alloys which were investigated were gamma + delta, gamma/gamma prime + delta, and a Co-base TaC alloy containing Cr and Ni. Investigations into the compatibility and wettability of these metals with various carbides, borides, nitrides, and oxides disclosed that compounds with the largest (negative) heats of formation were most stable but poorest wetting. Nitrides and carbides had suitable stability and low contact angles but capillary rise was observed only with carbides. Oxides would not give capillary rise but would probably fulfill the other wetting requirements of EFG. Tantalum carbide was selected for most of the experimental portion of the program based on its exhibiting spontaneous capillary rise and satisfactory slow rate of degradation in the liquid metals. Samples of all three alloys were grown by EFG with the major experimental effort restricted to gamma + delta and gamma/gamma prime + delta alloys. In the standard, uncooled EFG apparatus, the thermal gradient was inferred from the growth speed and was 150 to 200 C/cm. This value may be compared to typical gradients of less than 100 C/cm normally achieved in a standard Bridgman-type apparatus. When a stream of helium was directed against the side of the bar during growth, the gradient was found to improve to about 250 C/cm. In comparison, a theoretical gradient of 700 C/cm should be possible under ideal conditions, without the use of chills. Methods for optimizing the gradient in EFG are discussed, and should allow attainment of close to the theoretical for a particular configuration.

  17. Phase-field modeling of microelastically controlled eutectic lamellar growth in a Ti-Fe system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Z.; Rezende, J. L.; Kundin, J.

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a microelastical phase-field model to incorporate elastic energy and misfit stresses in eutectic growth. We apply the model to assess the formation of eutectic structures in Ti-Fe alloy, which exhibit high lattice mismatch owing to difference between lattice parameters of ?-Ti and FeTi phases. Numerical simulations of both directional and free eutectic growth are performed by applying cubic anisotropy to the Ti-Fe system. The resulted microstructures are presented and the corresponding stress distributions are evaluated.

  18. Microstructure and Strength of NiTi-Nb Eutectic Braze Joining NiTi Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liqiang; Wang, Cong; Dunand, David C.

    2015-04-01

    NiTi wires were brazed together via liquid eutectic formation between NiTi and Nb powders deposited at the wire contact region. The brazed region shows proeutectic NiTi(Nb) in contact with the wires, sandwiching a NiTi-Nb eutectic structure, whose microhardness and stiffness, as characterized via nanoindentation, are higher than the NiTi wires, while also showing signs of high ductility. NiTi-Nb eutectic bonding may thus be a viable approach for producing shape-memory NiTi scaffolds brazed from stacked, woven, or braided wires.

  19. High-strength Ti-base ultrafine eutectic with enhanced ductility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, J.; Kim, K. B.; Baier, F.; Lser, W.; Eckert, J.

    2005-10-01

    (Ti0.705Fe0.295)100-xSnx (x =0 and 3.85) ultrafine eutectics were prepared by slow cooling from the melt through cold crucible casting. The addition of 3.85 at. % Sn to the binary Ti-Fe eutectic decreases the strength slightly but considerably improves the plastic deformability under uniaxial compressive loading from ?f=2.1% to 9.6% strain to failure. The change in the morphology of the eutectic and the distribution of the FeTi phase are suggested as origin of the improvement of the mechanical properties.

  20. Characterization of alumina/yttrium-aluminum garnet and alumina/yttrium-aluminum perovskite eutectics

    SciTech Connect

    Matson, L.E.; Hay, R.S.; Mah, T.

    1990-08-01

    Alumina/yttrium-aluminum garnet (YAG) and alumina/yttrium-aluminum perovskite (YAP) eutectics were made by directional solidification. The two systems were characterized using transmitted polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The alumina/YAG system exhibited a degenerate eutectic with a Chinese script morphology, while the alumina/YAP eutectic had a rod/lamellae morphology. The c-axis of alumina was aligned perpendicular to the solidification direction, and elongated grains were aligned along the solidification direction in both systems. A single orientation relationship between alumina and YAG was observed. Several orientation relationships were observed in the alumina/YAP system. 5 refs.

  1. Effect of residual thermal stresses on the creep of eutectic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Svetlov, I.L.; Epishin, A.I.; Pirogov, E.N.

    1986-01-01

    A method is proposed for calculating the residual thermal stresses in eutectic composites within the framework of a volumetric stressstrain state. The authors constructed creep curves of a directional y/y'-NbC eutectic at different temperatures and stresses. It was shown that residual thermal stresses in the matrix are the reason for the lower ultimate strength of eutectic composites compared to commercial heat-resistant nickel alloys at moderate temperatures. The proposed method may also be used for synthetic composites, but only under certain conditions.

  2. 3D optical metamaterials formed by holographic assembly and directed solidification of eutectics (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Paul V.

    2015-09-01

    Nanoscale integration of materials in three dimensions is critical for the realization of a number of highly functional optical metamaterials. Starting with structures enabled via eutectic solidification and holographic lithography, our team is applying unique template-based and post-synthetic materials transformations in conjunction with powerful computational design tools to develop the scientific underpinnings of, and to produce, 3D metamaterials derived from directionally solidified eutectics. Our approach involves close interactions among computational design, photonic theory, eutectic materials development, template fabrication, materials chemistry, and optical characterization.

  3. Alloying of Mg/Mg2Ni eutectic by chosen non-hydride forming elements: Relation between segregation of the third element and hydride storage capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cermak, J.; Kral, L.

    2012-01-01

    Eutectic mixture Mg-11.3 at.% Ni was modified by elements X from the 13th (Al, Ga, In) and 14th group (Si, Ge, Sn and Pb). Phase analysis and distribution of X between primary solid solution Mg-Ni-X and Mg2Ni-X compound was carried out in stabilization annealed samples before hydrogen charging and in hydrided state. In the both states, it was found that X prefers Mg2Ni-X to Mg-Ni-X solid solution, and that the preference is stronger in the hydrided state. The effect is more pronounced for elements X from the 13th group. Suggested explanation was based on influence of X on the formation enthalpy of hydrides. It was observed that In increases the hydrogen storage capacity of the eutectic mixture. The most likely explanation is based on a strong segregation of In to phase Mg2Ni-X, and on a weak tendency of In to form phases with Mg and Ni.

  4. Electrodeposition of copper composites from deep eutectic solvents based on choline chloride.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Andrew P; El Ttaib, Khalid; Frisch, Gero; McKenzie, Katy J; Ryder, Karl S

    2009-06-01

    Here we describe for the first time the electrolytic deposition of copper and copper composites from a solution of the metal chloride salt in either urea-choline chloride, or ethylene glycol-choline chloride based eutectics. We show that the deposition kinetics and thermodynamics are quite unlike those in aqueous solution under comparable conditions and that the copper ion complexation is also different. The mechanism of copper nucleation is studied using chronoamperometry and it is shown that progressive nucleation leads to a bright nano-structured deposit. In contrast, instantaneous nucleation, at lower concentrations of copper ions, leads to a dull deposit. This work also pioneers the use of the electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) to monitor both current efficiency and the inclusion of inert particulates into the copper coatings. This technique allows the first in situ quantification or particulate inclusion. It was found that the composition of composite material was strongly dependent on the amount of species suspended in solution. It was also shown that the majority of material was dragged onto the surface rather than settling on to it. The distribution of the composite material was found to be even throughout the coating. This technology is important because it facilitates deposition of bright copper coatings without co-ligands such as cyanide. The incorporation of micron-sized particulates into ionic liquids has resulted, in one case, in a decrease in viscosity. This observation is both unusual and surprising; we explain this here in terms of an increase in the free volume of the liquid and local solvent perturbation. PMID:19458829

  5. A green deep eutectic solvent-based aqueous two-phase system for protein extracting.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kaijia; Wang, Yuzhi; Huang, Yanhua; Li, Na; Wen, Qian

    2015-03-15

    As a new type of green solvent, deep eutectic solvent (DES) has been applied for the extraction of proteins with an aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) in this work. Four kinds of choline chloride (ChCl)-based DESs were synthesized to extract bovine serum albumin (BSA), and ChCl-glycerol was selected as the suitable extraction solvent. Single factor experiments have been done to investigate the effects of the extraction process, including the amount of DES, the concentration of salt, the mass of protein, the shaking time, the temperature and PH value. Experimental results show 98.16% of the BSA could be extracted into the DES-rich phase in a single-step extraction under the optimized conditions. A high extraction efficiency of 94.36% was achieved, while the conditions were applied to the extraction of trypsin (Try). Precision, repeatability and stability experiments were studied and the relative standard deviations (RSD) of the extraction efficiency were 0.4246% (n=3), 1.6057% (n=3) and 1.6132% (n=3), respectively. Conformation of BSA was not changed during the extraction process according to the investigation of UV-vis spectra, FT-IR spectra and CD spectra of BSA. The conductivity, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to explore the mechanism of the extraction. It turned out that the formation of DES-protein aggregates play a significant role in the separation process. All the results suggest that ChCl-based DES-ATPS are supposed to have the potential to provide new possibilities in the separation of proteins. PMID:25732422

  6. Dissolution of Eutectic ?-Mg17Al12 Phase in Magnesium AZ91 Cast Alloy at Temperatures Close to Eutectic Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Tianping; Chen, Zhan W.; Gao, Wei

    2010-08-01

    Knowledge on the dissolution kinetics of ?-eut phase in cast Mg AZ91 alloy at temperatures close to the eutectic temperature is very useful for various processes of the alloy. In the present study, dissolution of ?-eut phase has been investigated experimentally and considered theoretically. Results have confirmed that the kinetics of ?-eut dissolution is basically diffusion controlled. Optimum times for dissolution heat treatment practice of different sizes of cast microstructure which are cooling rate dependant during casting could be suggested based on the present calculation. For fusion welding of the alloy, the present results indicate the difficulty of having a heating rate lower than the critical value (critical heating rate) for a significant reduction of the phase to avoid constitutional liquation.

  7. Molten salt battery having inorganic paper separator

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Jr., Robert D.

    1977-01-01

    A high temperature secondary battery comprises an anode containing lithium, a cathode containing a chalcogen or chalcogenide, a molten salt electrolyte containing lithium ions, and a separator comprising a porous sheet comprising a homogenous mixture of 2-20 wt.% chrysotile asbestos fibers and the remainder inorganic material non-reactive with the battery components. The non-reactive material is present as fibers, powder, or a fiber-powder mixture.

  8. Direct esterification of ammonium salts of carboxylic acids

    DOEpatents

    Halpern, Yuval (Skokie, IL)

    2003-06-24

    A non-catalytic process for producing esters, the process comprising reacting an ammonium salt of a carboxylic acid with an alcohol and removing ammonia from the reaction mixture. Selectivities for the desired ester product can exceed 95 percent.

  9. Alkali Metal/Salt Thermal-Energy-Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Wayne W.; Stearns, John W.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed thermal-energy-storage system based on mixture of alkali metal and one of its halide salts; metal and salt form slurry of two immiscible melts. Use of slurry expected to prevent incrustations of solidified salts on heat-transfer surfaces that occur where salts alone used. Since incrustations impede heat transfer, system performance improved. In system, charging heat-exchanger surface immersed in lower liquid, rich in halide-salt, phase-charge material. Discharging heat exchanger surface immersed in upper liquid, rich in alkali metal.

  10. Superconductor precursor mixtures made by precipitation method

    DOEpatents

    Bunker, Bruce C. (Albuquerque, NM); Lamppa, Diana L. (Albuquerque, NM); Voigt, James A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus for preparing highly pure homogeneous precursor powder mixtures for metal oxide superconductive ceramics. The mixes are prepared by instantaneous precipitation from stoichiometric solutions of metal salts such as nitrates at controlled pH's within the 9 to 12 range, by addition of solutions of non-complexing pyrolyzable cations, such as alkyammonium and carbonate ions.

  11. Effect of impurities in industrial salts on aluminum scrap melting

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, J.; Sahai, Y.; Revet, A.

    1996-10-01

    Aluminum scrap such as Used Beverage Containers (UBC) is melted under a protective molten salt cover. An appropriate salt protects metal from oxidation, promotes coalescence of molten droplets, and separates clean metal from the oxide contamination. Generally, the salt compositions for aluminum scrap recycling are based on equimolar mixtures of NaCl and KCl. A small amount of fluoride is also added in the salt. In the past, laboratory research at universities and industrial laboratories have been limited to pure salts. However, the industrial salts have impurities such as sulfates and other insoluble materials. These impurities have a pronounced effect on the efficiency of the scrap remelting process. In this paper, the role of impurities in industrial salts in terms of their chemical interactions with the metal are summarized. The efficiency of different industrial grade salts containing varying amounts of sulfates and other insoluble impurities for scrap recycling is compared.

  12. Effect of boron on the microstructure of near-eutectic Al-Si alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yuying . E-mail: wyy532001@163.com; Liu Xiangfa; Bian Xiufang

    2007-02-15

    The effect of boron on the microstructure of a near-eutectic Al-Si alloy (ZL109) was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron beam microprobe analysis (EPMA). It was found that {alpha}-Al dendrites and eutectic clusters were significantly refined by the addition of boron. Another interesting discovery is that the near-eutectic alloy exhibited hypereutectic structure characteristics when the level of boron added exceeds 0.3%, i.e., primary Si is precipitated in the eutectic microstructure. A new type of nucleation substrate for the primary Si is found, Al {sub x}Ca {sub m}B {sub n}Si. This appears to be the main reason for the precipitation of primary Si.

  13. Organic non-quaternary clathrate salts for petroleum separation

    SciTech Connect

    Boate, D.R.; Zaworotko, M.J.

    1993-06-15

    A method is described for separating hydrocarbon feed streams containing mixtures of aromatic hydrocarbons and non-aromatic hydrocarbons into aromatics lean raffinate streams and aromatics rich extract streams by contacting the hydrocarbon feed streams with an organic non-quaternary clathrate salt having less than 16 carbon atoms in the cation, whereby the clathrate salt selectively interacts with the aromatic component of the hydrocarbon feed mixture producing a raffinate phase of reduced aromatic content a hydrocarbon - salt clathrate and an extract phase of increased aromatic content containing the clathrate salt and combined aromatic hydrocarbon, separating the raffinate phase from the extract phase and releasing the aromatic hydrocarbon from the clathrate salt of the extract phase to recover an aromatics rich stream and the organic non-quaternary salt which is recycled for contact with fresh hydrocarbon feed.

  14. Electrochemistry and speciation of Au(+) in a deep eutectic solvent: growth and morphology of galvanic immersion coatings.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, Andrew D; Forrest, Gregory C H; Frisch, Gero; Hartley, Jennifer M; Ryder, Karl S

    2015-11-11

    In this study we compare the electrochemical and structural properties of three gold salts AuCl, AuCN and KAu(CN)2 in a Deep Eutectic Solvent (DES) electrolyte (Ethaline 200) in order to elucidate factors affecting the galvanic deposition of gold coatings on nickel substrates. A chemically reversible diffusion limited response was observed for AuCl, whereas AuCN and KAu(CN)2 showed much more complicated, kinetically limited responses. Galvanic exchange reactions were performed on nickel substrates from DES solutions of the three gold salts; the AuCN gave a bright gold coating, the KAu(CN)2 solution give a visibly thin coating, whilst the coating from AuCl was dull, friable and poorly adhesive. This behaviour was rationalised by the differing speciation for each of these compounds, as evidenced by EXAFS methods. Analysis of EXAFS data shows that AuCl forms the chlorido-complex [AuCl2](-), AuCN forms a mixed [AuCl(CN)](-) species, whereas KAu(CN)2 maintains its [Au(CN)2](-) structure. The more labile Cl(-) enables easier reduction of Au when compared to the tightly bound cyanide species, hence leading to slower kinetics of deposition and differing electrochemical behaviour. We conclude that metal speciation in DESs is a function of the initial metal salt and that this has a strong influence on the mechanism and rate of growth, as well as on the morphology of the metal deposit obtained. In addition, these coatings are also extremely promising from a technological perspective as Electroless Nickel Immersion Gold (ENIG) finishes in the printed circuit board (PCB) industry, where the elimination of acid in gold plating formulation could potentially lead to more reliable coatings. Consequently, these results are both significant and timely. PMID:26523806

  15. Eutectic structures in friction spot welding joint of aluminum alloy to copper

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Junjun Suhuddin, Uceu F. H.; Cardillo, Maria E. B.; Santos, Jorge F. dos

    2014-05-12

    A dissimilar joint of AA5083 Al alloy and copper was produced by friction spot welding. The Al-MgCuAl{sub 2} eutectic in both coupled and divorced manners were found in the weld. At a relatively high temperature, mass transport of Cu due to plastic deformation, material flow, and atomic diffusion, combined with the alloy system of AA5083 are responsible for the ternary eutectic melting.

  16. Eutectic structures in friction spot welding joint of aluminum alloy to copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Junjun; Suhuddin, Uceu F. H.; Cardillo, Maria E. B.; dos Santos, Jorge F.

    2014-05-01

    A dissimilar joint of AA5083 Al alloy and copper was produced by friction spot welding. The Al-MgCuAl2 eutectic in both coupled and divorced manners were found in the weld. At a relatively high temperature, mass transport of Cu due to plastic deformation, material flow, and atomic diffusion, combined with the alloy system of AA5083 are responsible for the ternary eutectic melting.

  17. In Vitro and In Vivo Toxicity Profiling of Ammonium-Based Deep Eutectic Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Hayyan, Maan; Looi, Chung Yeng; Hayyan, Adeeb; Wong, Won Fen; Hashim, Mohd Ali

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxic potential of ammonium-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) with four hydrogen bond donors, namely glycerine (Gl), ethylene glycol (EG), triethylene glycol (TEG) and urea (U) were investigated. The toxicity of DESs was examined using In Vitro cell lines and In Vivo animal model. IC50 and selectivity index were determined for the DESs, their individual components and their combinations as aqueous solutions for comparison purposes. The cytotoxicity effect of DESs varied depending on cell lines. The IC50 for the GlDES, EGDES, UDES and TEGDES followed the sequence of TEGDES< GlDES< EGDES< UDES for OKF6, MCF-7, A375, HT29 and H413, respectively. GlDES was selective against MCF-7 and A375, EGDES was selective against MCF-7, PC3, HepG2 and HT29, UDES was selective against MCF-7, PC3, HepG2 and HT29, and TEGDES was selective against MCF-7 and A375. However, acute toxicity studies using ICR mice showed that these DESs were relatively toxic in comparison to their individual components. DES did not cause DNA damage, but it could enhance ROS production and induce apoptosis in treated cancer cells as evidenced by marked LDH release. Furthermore, the examined DESs showed less cytotoxicity compared with ionic liquids. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that combined In Vitro and In Vivo toxicity profiles of DESs were being demonstrated, raising the toxicity issue of these neoteric mixtures and their potential applicability to be used for therapeutic purposes. PMID:25679975

  18. PC-SAFT Modeling of CO2 Solubilities in Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Zubeir, Lawien F; Held, Christoph; Sadowski, Gabriele; Kroon, Maaike C

    2016-03-10

    Perturbed-Chain Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (PC-SAFT), a physically based model that accounts for different molecular interactions explicitly, was applied to describe for the first time the phase behavior of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) with CO2 at temperatures from 298.15 to 318.15 K and pressures up to 2 MPa. DESs are mixtures of two solid compounds, a hydrogen bond donor (HBD) and a hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA), which form liquids upon mixing with melting points far below that of the individual compounds. In this work, the HBD is lactic acid and the HBAs are tetramethylammonium chloride, tetraethylammonium chloride, and tetrabutylammonium chloride. Two different modeling strategies were considered for the PC-SAFT modeling. In the first strategy, the so-called pseudo-pure component approach, a DES was considered as a pseudo-pure compound, and its pure-component parameters were obtained by fitting to pure DES density data. In the second strategy, the so-called individual-component approach, a DES was considered to consist of two individual components (HBA and HBD), and the pure-component parameters of the HBA and HBD were obtained by fitting to the density of aqueous solutions containing only the individual compounds of the DES. In order to model vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) of DES + CO2 systems, binary interaction parameters were adjusted to experimental data from the literature and to new data measured in this work. It was concluded that the individual-component strategy allows quantitative prediction of the phase behavior of DES + CO2 systems containing those HBD:HBA molar ratios that were not used for kij fitting. In contrast, applying the pseudo-pure component strategy required DES-composition specific kij parameters. PMID:26814164

  19. 21 CFR 172.863 - Salts of fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Multipurpose Additives § 172.863 Salts of fatty acids. The food additive salts of fatty acids may be safely... conditions: (a) The additive consists of one or any mixture of two or more of the aluminum, calcium... derived from tall oil fatty acids conforming with § 172.862. (b) The food additive is used or intended...

  20. Directionally solidified pseudo-binary eutectics of Ni-Cr-(Hf, Zr)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y. G.; Ashbrook, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    A pseudo-binary eutectic, in which the intermetallic Ni7Hf2 reinforces the Ni-Cr solid solution phase, was previously predicted in the Ni-Cr-Hf system by a computer analysis. The experimental determination of pseudo binary eutectic compositions and the directional solidification of the Ni-Cr-Hf, Zr, and Ni-Cr-Zr eutectic alloys are discussed. To determine unknown eutectics, chemical analyses were made of material bled from near eutectic ingots during incipient melting. Nominal compositions in weight percent of Ni-18.6Cr-24.0HF, Ni19.6Cr-12.8Zr-2.8Hf, and Ni-19.2Cr-14.8Zr formed aligned pseudo-binary eutectic structures. The melting points were about 1270 C. The reinforcing intermetallic phases were identified as noncubic (Ni,Cr)7Hf2 and (Ni,Cr)7(Hf,Zr)2, and face centered cubic (Ni,Cr)5Zr. The volume fraction of the reinforcing phases were about 0.5.

  1. Formation mechanism of primary phases and eutectic structures within undercooled Pb-Sb-Sn ternary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weili; Dai, Fuping; Wei, Bingbo

    2007-08-01

    The solidification characteristics of three types of Pb-Sb-Sn ternary alloys with different primary phases were studied under substantial undercooling conditions. The experimental results show that primary (Pb) and SbSn phases grow in the dendritic mode, whereas primary (Sb) phase exhibits faceted growth in the form of polygonal blocks and long strips. (Pb) solid solution phase displays strong affinity with SbSn intermetallic compound so that they produce various morphologies of pseudobinary eutectics, but it can only grow in the divorced eutectic mode together with (Sb) phase. Although (Sb) solid solution phase and SbSn intermetallic compound may grow cooperatively within ternary eutectic microstructures, they seldom form pseudobinary eutectics independently. The (Pb)+(Sb)+SbSn ternary eutectic structure usually shows lamellar morphology, but appears as anomalous eutectic when its volume fraction becomes small. EDS analyses reveal that all of the three primary (Pb), (Sb) and SbSn phases exhibit conspicuous solute trapping effect during rapid solidification, which results in the remarkable extension of solute solubility.

  2. Eutectic Bonding Utilizing Radio Frequency Induction Heating for Fabricating Vertical Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunmi; Kim, Areum; Cui, Yinhua; Chae, Su Jin; Nam, Minwoo; Kwon, Soon Hyeong; Cha, Yong Won; Pyo, Sung Gyu

    2015-11-01

    Vertical light-emitting diodes (VLEDs) have attracted considerable attention owing to their improved thermal, electrical, and optical performance compared to conventional LEDs. To fabricate VLEDs, a bonding technique is required following laser lift-off. Eutectic bonding techniques are preferred owing to their low-heat mechanism and production safety. However, the conventional resistance heating method for eutectic bonding process, the extremely longer process time becomes a problem such as cost rise, wapage. In this study, the thermal efficiency was measured according to the diameter of the coil in order to optimize the eutectic bonding of the RF induction heating method in order to solve this problem. We confirmed that successful eutectic bonding is possible with less than 30 min processing using Sn-Glass. In addition, Au (20 wt%)/Sn (80 wt%) alloy, a mainly used the eutectic bonding interlayer material for VLEDs, can also be used as an interlayer to provide void-free eutectic bonding in less than 30 min. PMID:26726547

  3. Spontaneous Formation of Eutectic Crystal Structures in Binary and Ternary Charged Colloids due to Depletion Attraction

    PubMed Central

    Toyotama, Akiko; Okuzono, Tohru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-01-01

    Crystallization of colloids has extensively been studied for past few decades as models to study phase transition in general. Recently, complex crystal structures in multi-component colloids, including alloy and eutectic structures, have attracted considerable attention. However, the fabrication of 2D area-filling colloidal eutectics has not been reported till date. Here, we report formation of eutectic structures in binary and ternary aqueous colloids due to depletion attraction. We used charged particles + linear polyelectrolyte systems, in which the interparticle interaction could be represented as a sum of the electrostatic, depletion, and van der Waals forces. The interaction was tunable at a lengthscale accessible to direct observation by optical microscopy. The eutectic structures were formed because of interplay of crystallization of constituent components and accompanying fractionation. An observed binary phase diagram, defined by a mixing ratio and inverse area fraction of the particles, was analogous to that for atomic and molecular eutectic systems. This new method also allows the adjustment of both the number and wavelengths of Bragg diffraction peaks. Furthermore, these eutectic structures could be immobilized in polymer gel to produce self-standing materials. The present findings will be useful in the design of the optical properties of colloidal crystals. PMID:26984298

  4. The roles of Eu during the growth of eutectic Si in Al-Si alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiehua; Hage, Fredrik; Wiessner, Manfred; Romaner, Lorenz; Scheiber, Daniel; Sartory, Bernhard; Ramasse, Quentin; Schumacher, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Controlling the growth of eutectic Si and thereby modifying the eutectic Si from flake-like to fibrous is a key factor in improving the properties of Al-Si alloys. To date, it is generally accepted that the impurity-induced twinning (IIT) mechanism and the twin plane re-entrant edge (TPRE) mechanism as well as poisoning of the TPRE mechanism are valid under certain conditions. However, IIT, TPRE or poisoning of the TPRE mechanism cannot be used to interpret all observations. Here, we report an atomic-scale experimental and theoretical investigation on the roles of Eu during the growth of eutectic Si in Al-Si alloys. Both experimental and theoretical investigations reveal three different roles: (i) the adsorption at the intersection of Si facets, inducing IIT mechanism, (ii) the adsorption at the twin plane re-entrant edge, inducing TPRE mechanism or poisoning of the TPRE mechanism, and (iii) the segregation ahead of the growing Si twins, inducing a solute entrainment within eutectic Si. This investigation not only demonstrates a direct experimental support to the well-accepted poisoning of the TPRE and IIT mechanisms, but also provides a full picture about the roles of Eu atoms during the growth of eutectic Si, including the solute entrainment within eutectic Si.

  5. Spontaneous Formation of Eutectic Crystal Structures in Binary and Ternary Charged Colloids due to Depletion Attraction.

    PubMed

    Toyotama, Akiko; Okuzono, Tohru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-01-01

    Crystallization of colloids has extensively been studied for past few decades as models to study phase transition in general. Recently, complex crystal structures in multi-component colloids, including alloy and eutectic structures, have attracted considerable attention. However, the fabrication of 2D area-filling colloidal eutectics has not been reported till date. Here, we report formation of eutectic structures in binary and ternary aqueous colloids due to depletion attraction. We used charged particles + linear polyelectrolyte systems, in which the interparticle interaction could be represented as a sum of the electrostatic, depletion, and van der Waals forces. The interaction was tunable at a lengthscale accessible to direct observation by optical microscopy. The eutectic structures were formed because of interplay of crystallization of constituent components and accompanying fractionation. An observed binary phase diagram, defined by a mixing ratio and inverse area fraction of the particles, was analogous to that for atomic and molecular eutectic systems. This new method also allows the adjustment of both the number and wavelengths of Bragg diffraction peaks. Furthermore, these eutectic structures could be immobilized in polymer gel to produce self-standing materials. The present findings will be useful in the design of the optical properties of colloidal crystals. PMID:26984298

  6. The roles of Eu during the growth of eutectic Si in Al-Si alloys.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiehua; Hage, Fredrik; Wiessner, Manfred; Romaner, Lorenz; Scheiber, Daniel; Sartory, Bernhard; Ramasse, Quentin; Schumacher, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the growth of eutectic Si and thereby modifying the eutectic Si from flake-like to fibrous is a key factor in improving the properties of Al-Si alloys. To date, it is generally accepted that the impurity-induced twinning (IIT) mechanism and the twin plane re-entrant edge (TPRE) mechanism as well as poisoning of the TPRE mechanism are valid under certain conditions. However, IIT, TPRE or poisoning of the TPRE mechanism cannot be used to interpret all observations. Here, we report an atomic-scale experimental and theoretical investigation on the roles of Eu during the growth of eutectic Si in Al-Si alloys. Both experimental and theoretical investigations reveal three different roles: (i) the adsorption at the intersection of Si facets, inducing IIT mechanism, (ii) the adsorption at the twin plane re-entrant edge, inducing TPRE mechanism or poisoning of the TPRE mechanism, and (iii) the segregation ahead of the growing Si twins, inducing a solute entrainment within eutectic Si. This investigation not only demonstrates a direct experimental support to the well-accepted poisoning of the TPRE and IIT mechanisms, but also provides a full picture about the roles of Eu atoms during the growth of eutectic Si, including the solute entrainment within eutectic Si. PMID:26328541

  7. Evaluation and modeling of the eutectic composition of various drug-polyethylene glycol solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Baird, Jared A; Taylor, Lynne S

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of which factors contribute to the eutectic composition of drug-polyethylene glycol (PEG) blends and to compare experimental values with predictions from the semi-empirical model developed by Lacoulonche et al. Eutectic compositions of various drug-PEG 3350 solid dispersions were predicted, assuming athermal mixing, and compared to experimentally determined eutectic points. The presence or absence of specific interactions between the drug and PEG 3350 were investigated using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The eutectic composition for haloperidol-PEG and loratadine-PEG solid dispersions was accurately predicted using the model, while predictions for aceclofenac-PEG and chlorpropamide-PEG were very different from those experimentally observed. Deviations in the model prediction from ideal behavior for the systems evaluated were confirmed to be due to the presence of specific interactions between the drug and polymer, as demonstrated by IR spectroscopy. Detailed analysis showed that the eutectic composition prediction from the model is interdependent on the crystal lattice energy of the drug compound (evaluated from the melting temperature and the heat of fusion) as well as the nature of the drug-polymer interactions. In conclusion, for compounds with melting points less than 200C, the model is ideally suited for predicting the eutectic composition of systems where there is an absence of drug-polymer interactions. PMID:20141502

  8. Edge Drift of Eutectic SnPb Lines: Electromigration of Flip Chip Solder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Y.-C.; Yoon, M.-S.; Ko, M.-K.; Kim, O.-H.; Kim, B.-N.; Park, Y.-B.

    2006-02-01

    We have investigated the characteristics of eutectic SnPb electromigration using edge drift structure. An incubation stage for the edge drift was observed in the eutectic SnPb electromigration, i.e. there was a time duration before an edge began to move. During the incubation stage for the edge drift, depletion of Pb at the cathode end was observed. From the change of resistance, the activation energies for the incubation stage and for edge movement stage were calculated to be 0.88 eV and 1.02 eV, respectively. Comparing the activation energies for each stage with the reported values of Pb in eutectic SnPb and those of Sn in Sn, Pb we found that during the incubation stage, Pb migrated before Sn, and the edge movement is resulted from migration of Sn. These results suggested that Pb depletion is a prerequisite for the electromigration-induced void nucleation in eutectic SnPb solder. Threshold current density of eutectic SnPb was measured as a function of line length, and it did not change with line lengths significantly. This result indicated that the Blech product in eutectic SnPb did not agree on that in Al interconnect.

  9. The roles of Eu during the growth of eutectic Si in Al-Si alloys

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiehua; Hage, Fredrik; Wiessner, Manfred; Romaner, Lorenz; Scheiber, Daniel; Sartory, Bernhard; Ramasse, Quentin; Schumacher, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the growth of eutectic Si and thereby modifying the eutectic Si from flake-like to fibrous is a key factor in improving the properties of Al-Si alloys. To date, it is generally accepted that the impurity-induced twinning (IIT) mechanism and the twin plane re-entrant edge (TPRE) mechanism as well as poisoning of the TPRE mechanism are valid under certain conditions. However, IIT, TPRE or poisoning of the TPRE mechanism cannot be used to interpret all observations. Here, we report an atomic-scale experimental and theoretical investigation on the roles of Eu during the growth of eutectic Si in Al-Si alloys. Both experimental and theoretical investigations reveal three different roles: (i) the adsorption at the intersection of Si facets, inducing IIT mechanism, (ii) the adsorption at the twin plane re-entrant edge, inducing TPRE mechanism or poisoning of the TPRE mechanism, and (iii) the segregation ahead of the growing Si twins, inducing a solute entrainment within eutectic Si. This investigation not only demonstrates a direct experimental support to the well-accepted poisoning of the TPRE and IIT mechanisms, but also provides a full picture about the roles of Eu atoms during the growth of eutectic Si, including the solute entrainment within eutectic Si. PMID:26328541

  10. Low-salt diet

    MedlinePLUS

    ... you cook, replace salt with other seasonings. Pepper, garlic, herbs, and lemon are good choices. Avoid packaged spice blends. They often contain salt. Use garlic and onion powder, not garlic and onion salt. ...

  11. Theoretical Investigation of Binary Eutectic Alloy Nanoscale Phase Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boswell-Koller, Cosima Nausikaa

    Recently, embedded binary eutectic alloy nanostructures (BEANs) have drawn some attention. A previously calculated equilibrium structure map predicts four possible nanocrystal alloy morphologies: phase-separated, bi-lobe, core-shell and inverse core-shell governed by two dimensionless interface energy parameters. The shape of the bilobe nanoparticles is obtained by finding the surface area of all interfaces that minimizes the overall energy, while also maintaining mechanical equilibrium at the triple point. Two representative alloy systems displaying eutectic phase diagrams and negligible solid solubility were chosen: GeSn and AuGe. GeSn samples were prepared by sequential implantation of Ge and Sn into SiO2. AuGe samples were prepared by implanting Ge within Au-doped silica films. Transmission electron microscopy images revealed bi-lobe nanocrystals in both samples. Therefore, the interface energies in both systems must be such that the dimensionless parameters lie in the region of bi-lobe stability. Careful analysis of the bi-lobe structure leads to the determination of two dimensionless length scales, which describe the bi-lobe independent of the size of the nanoparticle. These two parameters, eta 1 and eta 2 can be used to calculate contours of equal eta 1 and eta 2 over the entire range of bi-lobe stability. Experimental measurement and comparison to predicted structures leads to determination of acting dimensionless interface energies. Experimentally available wetting data is then used to calculate the remaining interface energies in the system. gamma Ge(s)/SiO2 was found to be between 0.82-0.99 J/m2 . gamma Ge0.22Sn0.78(l)/SiO2 and gamma Au0.53Ge0.47(l)/SiO2 are determined to be 1.20 and 0.94 J/m2 , respectively. To investigate the possibility of size effects at the nanoscale, size dependent phase diagrams for the AuGe and GeSn system are determined. This is done by the theoretical approach first outlined by Weissmueller et al., which takes into account the energy contribution of the various morphologies listed above. Results from this calculation are compared to those using the tangent line construction approach. The composition dependent surface energies of binary alloy liquids required in this calculation are determined using Butler's equation.

  12. Measurement of bile salt hydrolase activity from Lactobacillus acidophilus based on disappearance of conjugated bile salts.

    PubMed

    Corzo, G; Gilliland, S E

    1999-03-01

    Bile salt hydrolase activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus was measured based on the disappearance of sodium glycocholate and sodium taurocholate from the reaction mixture using HPLC. The amount of sodium glycocholate and sodium taurocholate that disappeared was proportional to the amount of sodium cholate that appeared in the mixture as detected by HPLC. Sodium glycocholate did not precipitate at the enzyme reaction conditions (37 degrees C and pH 5.4) for determining bile salt hydrolase activity. The bile salt hydrolase assay was insensitive to low oxidation-reduction potential when measuring bile salt hydrolase from L. acidophilus, an intestinal microorganism. However, EDTA and freezing temperatures were necessary to maintain stability of the partially purified enzyme during storage. PMID:10194663

  13. Al/Cl2 molten salt battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giner, J.

    1972-01-01

    Molten salt battery has been developed with theoretical energy density of 5.2 j/kg (650 W-h/lb). Battery, which operates at 150 C, can be used in primary mode or as rechargeable battery. Battery has aluminum anode and chlorine cathode. Electrolyte is mixture of AlCl3, NaCl, and some alkali metal halide such as KCl.

  14. Preliminary study of the electrolysis of aluminum sulfide in molten salts

    SciTech Connect

    Minh, N.Q.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    1983-02-01

    A preliminary laboratory-scale study of the electrolysis of aluminum sulfide in molten salts investigated the (1) solubility of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ in molten salts, (2) electrochemical behavior of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/, and (3) electrolysis of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ with the determination of current efficiency as a function of current density. The solubility measurements show that MgCl/sub 2/-NaCl-KCl eutectic electrolyte at 1023 K can dissolve up to 3.3 mol % sulfide. The molar ratio of sulfur to aluminum in the eutectic is about one, which suggests that some sulfur remains undissolved, probably in the form of MgS. The experimental data and thermodynamic calculations suggest that Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ dissolves in the eutectic to form AlS/sup +/ species in solution. Addition of AlCl/sub 3/ to the eutectic enhances the solubility of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/; the solubility increases with increasing AlCl/sub 3/ concentration. The electrode reaction mechanism for the electrolysis of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ was elucidated by using linear sweep voltammetry. The cathodic reduction of aluminum-ion-containing species to aluminum proceeds by a reversible, diffusion-controlled, three-electron reaction. The anodic reaction involves the two-electron discharge of sulfide-ion-containing species, followed by the fast dimerization of sulfur atoms to S/sub 2/. Electrolysis experiments show that Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ dissolved in molten MgCl/sub 2/-NaCl-KCl eutectic or in eutectic containing AlCl/sub 3/ can be electrolyzed to produce aluminum and sulfur. In the eutectic at 1023 K, the electrolysis can be conducted up to about 300 mA/cm/sup 2/ for the saturation solubility of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/. Although these preliminary results are promising, additional studies are needed to elucidate many critical operating parameters before the technical potential of the electrolysis can be accurately assessed. 20 figures, 18 tables.

  15. Lead lithium eutectic material database for nuclear fusion technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mas de les Valls, E.; Sedano, L. A.; Batet, L.; Ricapito, I.; Aiello, A.; Gastaldi, O.; Gabriel, F.

    2008-06-01

    Fully validated material databases are needed for coherent technological developments in any R&D field. For nuclear fusion technology (NFT), within a near-term perspective of qualification and licensing of nuclear components and systems, this goal is both compulsory and urgent. This mandatory requirement applies for the particular case of the Pb-Li eutectic database as fusion reactor material. Pb16Li is today a reference breeder material in diverse fusion R&D programs worldwide. Technical consensus on most part of the material database inputs seems a major technological objective. In this work Pb16Li material database inputs for NFT have been systematically reviewed. Database inputs (bulk, thermal, physical-chemistry properties, and H-isotopes transport) are discussed and extended to base magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) properties, values for non-dimensional parameters and pipe/channel correlations in 2-phases dispersion models. Ongoing efforts to develop the Pb16Li material database as a computing expert system are reported.

  16. Improving agar electrospinnability with choline-based deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana M M; Souza, Hilia K S; Uknalis, Joseph; Liu, Shih-Chuan; Gonalves, Maria P; Liu, LinShu

    2015-09-01

    Very recently our group has produced novel agar-based fibers by an electrospinning technique using water as solvent and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as co-blending polymer. Here, we tested the deep eutectic solvent (DES), (2-hydroxyethyl)trimethylammonium chloride/urea prepared at 1:2 molar ratio, as an alternative solvent medium for agar electrospinning. The electrospun materials were collected with an ethanol bath adapted to a previous electrospinning set-up. One weight percent agar-in-DES showed improved viscoelasticity and hence, spinnability, when compared to 1 wt% agar-in-water and pure agar nanofibers were successfully electrospun if working above the temperature of sol-gel transition (?80 C). By changing the solvent medium we decreased the PVA concentration (5 wt% starting solution) and successfully produced composite fibers with high agar contents (50/50 agar/PVA). Best composite fibers were formed with the 50/50 and 30/70 agar/PVA solutions. These fibers were mechanically resistant, showed tailorable surface roughness and diverse size distributions, with most of the diameters falling in the sub-micron range. Both nano and micro forms of agar fibers (used separately or combined) may have potential for the design of new and highly functional agar-based materials. PMID:26116384

  17. Microanalysis of an oxidized cobalt oxide: Zirconia eutectic

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, J.; McKernan, S.; Carter, C.B.; Revcolevschi, A.

    1993-12-31

    The compositions of CoO, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}, and Ca-stabilized cubic ZrO{sub 2} in an oxidized directionally solidified CoO-ZrO{sub 2} eutectic were determined by PEELS and EDS. An oxygen gradient exists across the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} with highest levels near the ZrO{sub 2} interface. Oxygen ELNES for CoO and Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} are quite different; published oxygen ELNES have been incorrectly attributed to CoO. Normalized Co-L{sub 23} white line intensity (WLI) ratios for CoO and Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} are similar (0.53 {plus_minus} 0.02) but L{sub 3}/L{sub 2} WLI ratios are 3.88 and 2.58, respectively. ELCE data suggest Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} has the inverse spinel structure.

  18. Distribution coefficients of vitamin B2 in hydrophilic organic solvent-aqueous salt solution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenman, Ya. I.; Mokshina, N. Ya.; Zykov, A. V.

    2010-03-01

    Distribution coefficients of vitamin B2 in hydrophilic solvent ( n-butanol, isopropanol, acetone, ethyl acetate, and their mixtures)-aqueous salt (potassium chloride, sodium fluoride, and ammonium sulfate salting-out agents) solution systems were calculated. The synergic effect and optimum proportions of components in the solvent mixture for efficient extraction of vitamin B2 from aqueous solutions were established.

  19. Microstructural evolution and thermal stability of aluminum-cerium-nickel ternary eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodran, Eric John

    The engineering community has identified several applications in which the use of a lightweight alloy for elevated temperature service, in substitution for current heavier and more costly alloys, would have a substantial benefit. This need for structural materials to perform at elevated temperatures has driven researchers to develop novel alloys as well as processing routes to manufacture them and obtain optimum microstructures. Previous studies on aluminum based binary eutectic systems have proven that the aluminum alloy system shows promising potential for satisfying this need. This has motivated the investigation of the solidification and thermal stability of the Al-12 wt% Ce-5 wt% Ni ternary eutectic performed in this investigation. The solidification behavior of the Al-Ce-Ni ternary eutectic was conducted via solidification of various compositions at and above the eutectic composition in a copper chill mold, thus allowing the observation of various solidification rates on a single ingot. Directional solidification of the ternary eutectic was also conducted to further study the unique microstructures forms. After casting the ingots were analyzed for the composition of phases in the microstructure via X-ray diffraction, and the distribution of the phases determined by scanning electron microscopy. The solidification of the ternary eutectic was found to occur much like that of a faceted/non-faceted binary couples growth. The thermal stability of the microstructure was also studied. Ternary eutectic microstructures were heat treated at various temperatures for time intervals up to 100 hours. The coupled growth microstructures were found to coarsen at temperature above 400°C, which was associated with a loss in hardness. Coarsening of the microstructures at elevated temperatures was also observed to occur by multiple mechanisms: an Ostwald ripening within the eutectic cell, and an accelerated coarsening at the cell boundaries due to increased diffusion at boundaries. Unique ternary eutectic structures were found to be comprised of a fine distribution of chains of alternating Al11Ce3 and Al3Ni intermetallics in an aluminum matrix. The unique microstructures formed are believed to be driven by the solute diffusion profile at the solid/liquid interface during solidification. This suggests that it may not be possible to generate a microstructure comprised of a homogeneous distribution of multiple product phases in a continuous matrix on solidification from a single parent phase, such as that of the solidification of ternary eutectics.

  20. Ammonia Solubility in High Concentration Salt Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    HEDENGREN, D.C.

    2000-02-01

    Solubility data for ammonia in water and various dilute solutions are abundant in the literature. However, there is a noticeable lack of ammonia solubility data for high salt, basic solutions of various mixtures of salts including those found in many of the Hanford Washington underground waste tanks. As a result, models based on solubility data for dilute salt solutions have been used to extrapolate to high salt solutions. These significant extrapolations need to be checked against actual laboratory data. Some indirect vapor measurements have been made. A more direct approach is to determine the ratio of solubility of ammonia in water to its solubility in high salt solutions. In various experiments, pairs of solutions, one of which is water and the other a high salt solution, are allowed to come to equilibrium with a common ammonia vapor pressure. The ratio of concentrations of ammonia in the two solutions is equal to the ratio of the respective ammonia solubilities (Henry's Law constants) at a given temperature. This information can then be used to refine the models that predict vapor space compositions of ammonia. Ammonia at Hanford is of concern because of its toxicity in the environment and its contribution to the flammability of vapor space gas mixtures in waste tanks.

  1. Do carboximide-carboxylic acid combinations form co-crystals? The role of hydroxyl substitution on the formation of co-crystals and eutectics.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Ramanpreet; Gautam, Raj; Cherukuvada, Suryanarayan; Guru Row, Tayur N

    2015-05-01

    Carboxylic acids, amides and imides are key organic systems which provide understanding of molecular recognition and binding phenomena important in biological and pharmaceutical settings. In this context, studies of their mutual interactions and compatibility through co-crystallization may pave the way for greater understanding and new applications of their combinations. Extensive co-crystallization studies are available for carboxylic acid/amide combinations, but only a few examples of carboxylic acid/imide co-crystals are currently observed in the literature. The non-formation of co-crystals for carboxylic acid/imide combinations has previously been rationalized, based on steric and computed stability factors. In the light of the growing awareness of eutectic mixtures as an alternative outcome in co-crystallization experiments, the nature of various benzoic acid/cyclic imide combinations is established in this paper. Since an additional functional group can provide sites for new intermolecular inter-actions and, potentially, promote supramolecular growth into a co-crystal, benzoic acids decorated with one or more hydroxyl groups have been systematically screened for co-crystallization with one unsaturated and two saturated cyclic imides. The facile formation of an abundant number of hydroxybenzoic acid/cyclic carboximide co-crystals is reported, including polymorphic and variable stoichiometry co-crystals. In the cases where co-crystals did not form, the combinations are shown invariably to result in eutectics. The presence or absence and geometric disposition of hydroxyl functionality on benzoic acid is thus found to drive the formation of co-crystals or eutectics for the studied carboxylic acid/imide combinations. PMID:25995843

  2. Density relaxation and particle motion characteristics in a non-ionic deep eutectic solvent (acetamide + urea): time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Das, Anuradha; Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-01-21

    Temperature dependent relaxation dynamics, particle motion characteristics, and heterogeneity aspects of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) made of acetamide (CH3CONH2) and urea (NH2CONH2) have been investigated by employing time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Three different compositions (f) for the mixture [fCH3CONH2 + (1 - f)NH2CONH2] have been studied in a temperature range of 328-353 K which is ∼120-145 K above the measured glass transition temperatures (∼207 K) of these DESs but much lower than the individual melting temperature of either of the constituents. Steady state fluorescence emission measurements using probe solutes with sharply different lifetimes do not indicate any dependence on excitation wavelength in these metastable molten systems. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements reveal near-hydrodynamic coupling between medium viscosity and rotation of a dissolved dipolar solute. Stokes shift dynamics have been found to be too fast to be detected by the time-resolution (∼70 ps) employed, suggesting extremely rapid medium polarization relaxation. All-atom simulations reveal Gaussian distribution for particle displacements and van Hove correlations, and significant overlap between non-Gaussian (α2) and new non-Gaussian (γ) heterogeneity parameters. In addition, no stretched exponential relaxations have been detected in the simulated wavenumber dependent acetamide dynamic structure factors. All these results are in sharp contrast to earlier observations for ionic deep eutectics with acetamide [Guchhait et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104514 (2014)] and suggest a fundamental difference in interaction and dynamics between ionic and non-ionic deep eutectic solvent systems. PMID:25612718

  3. Density relaxation and particle motion characteristics in a non-ionic deep eutectic solvent (acetamide + urea): Time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Anuradha; Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-01-21

    Temperature dependent relaxation dynamics, particle motion characteristics, and heterogeneity aspects of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) made of acetamide (CH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2}) and urea (NH{sub 2}CONH{sub 2}) have been investigated by employing time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Three different compositions (f) for the mixture [fCH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2} + (1 ? f)NH{sub 2}CONH{sub 2}] have been studied in a temperature range of 328-353 K which is ?120-145 K above the measured glass transition temperatures (?207 K) of these DESs but much lower than the individual melting temperature of either of the constituents. Steady state fluorescence emission measurements using probe solutes with sharply different lifetimes do not indicate any dependence on excitation wavelength in these metastable molten systems. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements reveal near-hydrodynamic coupling between medium viscosity and rotation of a dissolved dipolar solute. Stokes shift dynamics have been found to be too fast to be detected by the time-resolution (?70 ps) employed, suggesting extremely rapid medium polarization relaxation. All-atom simulations reveal Gaussian distribution for particle displacements and van Hove correlations, and significant overlap between non-Gaussian (?{sub 2}) and new non-Gaussian (?) heterogeneity parameters. In addition, no stretched exponential relaxations have been detected in the simulated wavenumber dependent acetamide dynamic structure factors. All these results are in sharp contrast to earlier observations for ionic deep eutectics with acetamide [Guchhait et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104514 (2014)] and suggest a fundamental difference in interaction and dynamics between ionic and non-ionic deep eutectic solvent systems.

  4. Directional solidification of Al2-Cu-Al and Al3-Ni-Al eutectics during TEXUS rocket flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Favier, J. J.; Degoer, J.

    1984-01-01

    One lamellar eutectic sample and one fiber-like eutectic sample were solidified directionally during the TEXUS-6 rocket flight. The microstructures and the results of the thermal analysis, obtained from the temperatures recorded on the cartridge skin, are compared. No appreciable modifications of the regularity of the eutectic structures were observed by passing from 1 g to 0.0001 g in these experiments. No steady state growth conditions were achieved in these experiments.

  5. Effect of salt treatments on survival and consumer acceptance of freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Post harvest acclimation of live freshwater prawns to a mixture of water and marine salt increases the consumer acceptability of the finished product. However, the high cost of marine salts prohibits their use in commercial practice. Therefore, the identification of successful, cost effective salt a...

  6. Pyrochemical process for extracting plutonium from an electrolyte salt

    DOEpatents

    Mullins, L.J.; Christensen, D.C.

    1982-09-20

    A pyrochemical process for extracting plutonium from a plutonium-bearing salt is disclosed. The process is particularly useful in the recovery of plutonium for electrolyte salts which are left over from the electrorefining of plutonium. In accordance with the process, the plutonium-bearing salt is melted and mixed with metallic calcium. The calcium reduces ionized plutonium in the salt to plutonium metal, and also causes metallic plutonium in the salt, which is typically present as finely dispersed metallic shot, to coalesce. The reduced and coalesced plutonium separates out on the bottom of the reaction vessel as a separate metallic phase which is readily separable from the overlying salt upon cooling of the mixture. Yields of plutonium are typically on the order of 95%. The stripped salt is virtually free of plutonium and may be discarded to low-level waste storage.

  7. Pyrochemical process for extracting plutonium from an electrolyte salt

    DOEpatents

    Mullins, Lawrence J. (Los Alamos, NM); Christensen, Dana C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01

    A pyrochemical process for extracting plutonium from a plutonium-bearing salt is disclosed. The process is particularly useful in the recovery of plutonium from electrolyte salts which are left over from the electrorefining of plutonium. In accordance with the process, the plutonium-bearing salt is melted and mixed with metallic calcium. The calcium reduces ionized plutonium in the salt to plutonium metal, and also causes metallic plutonium in the salt, which is typically present as finely dispersed metallic shot, to coalesce. The reduced and coalesced plutonium separates out on the bottom of the reaction vessel as a separate metallic phase which is readily separable from the overlying salt upon cooling of the mixture. Yields of plutonium are typically on the order of 95%. The stripped salt is virtually free of plutonium and may be discarded to low-level waste storage.

  8. Electrolyte salts for power sources

    DOEpatents

    Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

    1995-11-28

    Electrolyte salts are disclosed for power sources comprising salts of phenyl polysulfonic acids and phenyl polyphosphonic acids. The preferred salts are alkali and alkaline earth metal salts, most preferably lithium salts. 2 figs.

  9. Electrolyte salts for power sources

    DOEpatents

    Doddapaneni, Narayan (10516 Royal Birkdale, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Ingersoll, David (5824 Mimosa Pl., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

    1995-01-01

    Electrolyte salts for power sources comprising salts of phenyl polysulfonic acids and phenyl polyphosphonic acids. The preferred salts are alkali and alkaline earth metal salts, most preferably lithium salts.

  10. Deep eutectic solvent (DES) as a pretreatment for oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) in production of sugar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nor, Nur Atikah Md; Mustapha, Wan Aida Wan; Hassan, Osman

    2015-09-01

    Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch (OPEFB) was pretreated using Deep Eutectic Solvent (DES) at different parameters to enable a highest yield of sugar. DES is a combination of two or more cheap and safe components to form a eutectic mixture through hydrogen bond interaction, which has a melting point lower than that of each component. DES can be used to replace ionic liquids (ILs), which are more expensive and toxic. In this study, OPEFB was pretreated with DES mixture of choline chloride: urea in 1:2 molar ratio. The pretreatment was performed at temperature 110°C and 80°C for 4 hours and 1 hour. Pretreatment A (110°C, 4 hours), B (110°C, 1 hour), C (80°C, 4 hours) and D (80°C, 1 hour). Enzymatic hydrolysis was done by using the combination of two enzymes, namely, Cellic Ctec2 and Cellic Htec2. The treated fiber is tested for crystallinity using XRD and functional group analysis using FTIR, to check the effect of the pretreatment on the fiber and compared it with the untreated fiber. From XRD analysis, DES successfully gave an effect towards degree of crystallinity of cellulose. Pretreatment A (110°C, 4 hours) and B (110°C, 1 hour) successfully reduce the percentage of crystallinity while pretreatment C (80°C, 4 hours) and D (80°C, 1 hour) increased the percentage of crystallinity. From FTIR analysis, DES cannot remove the functional group of lignin and hemicellulose but it is believed that DES can expose the structure of cellulose. Upon enzymatic hydrolysis, DES-treated fiber successfully produced sugar but not significantly when compared with raw. Pretreatment A (110°C, 4 hours), B (110°C, 1 hour), C (80°C, 4 hours) and D (80°C, 1 hour) produced glucose at the amount of 60.47 mg/ml, 66.33 mg/ml, 61.96 mg/ml and 59.12 mg/ml respectively. However, pretreatment C gave the highest xylose (70.01 mg/ml) production compared to other DES pretreatments.

  11. Image matching technology in high power LED's eutectic welding.

    PubMed

    Ge, Peng; Yin, Peipei; Wang, Hong; Chang, Tianhai

    2014-06-01

    As the integration packaging density of high-power LED (Light Emitting Diode) chip modules become higher and higher, the accuracy and speed of visual inspection require higher demands correspondingly. The accurate position matching of substrates and flip-chip LEDs is one of the key technologies in the automatic eutectic welding process. In this paper we propose a method based on image features to complete the matching of the substrates and the flip-chip LEDs. Firstly, the substrate images and the flip-chip images are pre-processed respectively to obtain binary images. Then we apply Hough transformation to detect straight lines on the binary images, and find out the main linear directions to trigger the mechanical arms to adjust the positions of the substrate and the chip initially. Thirdly, we use eight neighbors interconnected domain algorithm for the first time to locate notable features of the substrate, and pass the located information to the control system to trigger the mechanical arm to adjust the substrate for the second time. At the same time, projection algorithm is applied to locate the anode of the flip-chip to drive the mechanical arm to adjust the position of the flip-chip again. Finally, the position information is used to trigger the mechanical arm to accomplish the matching of the substrate and the flip-chip. The proposed method improves the speed of matching on the basis of the accuracy of matching, which achieves these requirements of real-time and high accuracy applications. PMID:24921546

  12. Directional solidification of the alumina-zirconia ceramic eutectic system

    SciTech Connect

    Boldt, C.

    1994-07-27

    It is possible to produce alumina-zirconia ceramic samples through existing solidification techniques. The resulting microstructures typically consist of rods of zirconia in an alumina matrix, although a lamellar structure has been noted in some cases. In nearly all cases, colony growth was present which may possibly result from grain size, repeated nucleation events, and lamellar oscillations. In the same vein, it appears that the amount of impurities within the system might be the underlying cause for the colony growth. Colony growth was diminished through impurity control as the higher purity samples exhibited colony free behavior. In addition to colony formations, faceted alumina dendrites or nonfaceted zirconia dendrites may result in the ceramic if the sample is solidified out of the coupled zone. In all cases, for larger-sized Bridgman samples, a lower limit in the eutectic spacing was noted. The solidification model which includes the kinetic effect has been developed, although the effect appears to be negligible under present experimental conditions. A spacing limit might also occur due to the result of heat flow problems. Heat flow out of the ceramic is difficult to control, often causing radial and not axial growth. This behavior is exaggerated in the presence of impurities. Thus, higher purity powders should always be used. Higher purity samples, in addition to yielding a more microstructurally uniform ceramic, also showed increased directionality. In the future, the kinetic model needs to be examined in more detail, and further research needs to be accomplished in the area of molten ceramics. Once better system constants are in place, the kinetic model will give a better indication of the behavior in the alumina-zirconia system.

  13. A Molten Salt Lithium-Oxygen Battery.

    PubMed

    Giordani, Vincent; Tozier, Dylan; Tan, Hongjin; Burke, Colin M; Gallant, Betar M; Uddin, Jasim; Greer, Julia R; McCloskey, Bryan D; Chase, Gregory V; Addison, Dan

    2016-03-01

    Despite the promise of extremely high theoretical capacity (2Li + O2 ↔ Li2O2, 1675 mAh per gram of oxygen), many challenges currently impede development of Li/O2 battery technology. Finding suitable electrode and electrolyte materials remains the most elusive challenge to date. A radical new approach is to replace volatile, unstable and air-intolerant organic electrolytes common to prior research in the field with alkali metal nitrate molten salt electrolytes and operate the battery above the liquidus temperature (>80 °C). Here we demonstrate an intermediate temperature Li/O2 battery using a lithium anode, a molten nitrate-based electrolyte (e.g., LiNO3-KNO3 eutectic) and a porous carbon O2 cathode with high energy efficiency (∼95%) and improved rate capability because the discharge product, lithium peroxide, is stable and moderately soluble in the molten salt electrolyte. The results, supported by essential state-of-the-art electrochemical and analytical techniques such as in situ pressure and gas analyses, scanning electron microscopy, rotating disk electrode voltammetry, demonstrate that Li2O2 electrochemically forms and decomposes upon cycling with discharge/charge overpotentials as low as 50 mV. We show that the cycle life of such batteries is limited only by carbon reactivity and by the uncontrolled precipitation of Li2O2, which eventually becomes electrically disconnected from the O2 electrode. PMID:26871485

  14. Highlights of the Salt Extraction Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasalizadeh, Aida; Seetharaman, Seshadri; Teng, Lidong; Sridhar, Seetharaman; Grinder, Olle; Izumi, Yukari; Barati, Mansoor

    2013-11-01

    This article presents the salient features of a new process for the recovery of metal values from secondary sources and waste materials such as slag and flue dusts. It is also feasible in extracting metals such as nickel and cobalt from ores that normally are difficult to enrich and process metallurgically. The salt extraction process is based on extraction of the metals from the raw materials by a molten salt bath consisting of NaCl, LiCl, and KCl corresponding to the eutectic composition with AlCl3 as the chlorinating agent. The process is operated in the temperature range 973 K (700C) to 1173 K (900C). The process was shown to be successful in extracting Cr and Fe from electric arc furnace (EAF) slag. Electrolytic copper could be produced from copper concentrate based on chalcopyrite in a single step. Conducting the process in oxygen-free atmosphere, sulfur could be captured in the elemental form. The method proved to be successful in extracting lead from spent cathode ray tubes. In order to prevent the loss of AlCl3 in the vapor form and also chlorine gas emission at the cathode during the electrolysis, liquid aluminum was used. The process was shown to be successful in extracting Nd and Dy from magnetic scrap. The method is a highly promising process route for the recovery of strategic metals. It also has the added advantage of being environmentally friendly.

  15. The Effect of Temperature on Kinetics and Diffusion Coefficients of Metallocene Derivatives in Polyol-Based Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Bahadori, Laleh; Chakrabarti, Mohammed Harun; Manan, Ninie Suhana Abdul; Hashim, Mohd Ali; Mjalli, Farouq Sabri; AlNashef, Inas Muen; Brandon, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the density, dynamic viscosity and ionic conductivity of several deep eutectic solvents (DESs) containing ammonium-based salts and hydrogen bond donvnors (polyol type) are investigated. The temperature-dependent electrolyte viscosity as a function of molar conductivity is correlated by means of Walden's rule. The oxidation of ferrocene (Fc/Fc+) and reduction of cobaltocenium (Cc+/Cc) at different temperatures are studied by cyclic voltammetry and potential-step chronoamperometry in DESs. For most DESs, chronoamperometric transients are demonstrated to fit an Arrhenius-type relation to give activation energies for the diffusion of redox couples at different temperatures. The temperature dependence of the measured conductivities of DES1 and DES2 are better correlated with the Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher equation. The kinetics of the Fc/Fc+ and Cc+/Cc electrochemical systems have been investigated over a temperature range from 298 to 338 K. The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant is then calculated at different temperatures by means of a logarithmic analysis. The glycerol-based DES (DES5) appears suitable for further testing in electrochemical energy storage devices. PMID:26642045

  16. The Effect of Temperature on Kinetics and Diffusion Coefficients of Metallocene Derivatives in Polyol-Based Deep Eutectic Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Bahadori, Laleh; Chakrabarti, Mohammed Harun; Manan, Ninie Suhana Abdul; Hashim, Mohd Ali; Mjalli, Farouq Sabri; AlNashef, Inas Muen; Brandon, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the density, dynamic viscosity and ionic conductivity of several deep eutectic solvents (DESs) containing ammonium-based salts and hydrogen bond donvnors (polyol type) are investigated. The temperature-dependent electrolyte viscosity as a function of molar conductivity is correlated by means of Walden’s rule. The oxidation of ferrocene (Fc/Fc+) and reduction of cobaltocenium (Cc+/Cc) at different temperatures are studied by cyclic voltammetry and potential-step chronoamperometry in DESs. For most DESs, chronoamperometric transients are demonstrated to fit an Arrhenius-type relation to give activation energies for the diffusion of redox couples at different temperatures. The temperature dependence of the measured conductivities of DES1 and DES2 are better correlated with the Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher equation. The kinetics of the Fc/Fc+ and Cc+/Cc electrochemical systems have been investigated over a temperature range from 298 to 338 K. The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant is then calculated at different temperatures by means of a logarithmic analysis. The glycerol-based DES (DES5) appears suitable for further testing in electrochemical energy storage devices. PMID:26642045

  17. Solidification microstructure of Bridgman-grown Si-TaSi2 eutectic in situ composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xinyu; Zhang, Jun; Su, Haijun; Jie, Ziqi; Liu, Lin; Fu, Hengzhi

    2013-08-01

    Directionally solidified Si-TaSi2 eutectic in situ composite was fabricated by Bridgman growth technique with a high temperature gradient. The microstructure and solid/liquid interface morphology evolvement were systematically investigated. The grown Si-TaSi2 presents typical semiconductor-metal eutectic structure with the TaSi2 regularly and uniformly embedded into Si matrix. As the solidification rate increases from 6 to 150 m/s, the fiber diameter and eutectic spacing rapidly decrease, whereas the rod density increases. The eutectic spacing and solidification rate obey the relationship of ?V0.53=73.7 ?m1.53/s0.53. Under the optimal solidification parameter (V=100 m/s), the fiber diameter is 1.37 ?m, average eutectic spacing is 3.83 ?m, and rod density is 3106 rod/cm2, which well satisfy the requirement of Spindt field emission arrays. Furthermore, the solid/liquid interface undergoes an evolvement of planar-shallow cell-cell with the increase of solidification rate.

  18. The experimental study of the polonium-210 release from Li17-Pb83 eutectic

    SciTech Connect

    Schipakin, O.; Borisov, N.; Churkin, S.

    1994-12-31

    The polonium contamination hazard arise as a result of accidental Po-210 release from breeding blanket material - melted Li17Pb83 eutectic - in the environment. The experimental study of Po-210 release rates from eutectic were carry out in atmosphere of noble gases and air with different humidity in 1992-1993. In these experiments used method of carrier-gas flowing above melted eutectic surface. The main findings presented by RDIPE and Karpov Institute are: (1) The polonium-210 release rate strongly increase with eutectic temperature from 150 to 450{degrees}C. (2) The Po-210 release rate in the noble carrier-gas is in proportion with polonium concentration in eutectic in studied range from 10{sup {minus}7} to 10{sup {minus}4} Ci/g. (3) The Po-210 release rate in air remarkably effected by the surface oxide film also. (4) In these experiments for the first time were studied differently gaseous and aerosol polonium-210 fractions release rates. The experimental results and corresponding estimates showed needs the technological and accidental cleaning systems equipped by complex filters of gaseous and aerosols polonium-210 forms.

  19. PU/SS EUTECTIC ASSESSMENT IN 9975 PACKAGINGS IN A STORAGE FACILITY DURING EXTENDED FIRE

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N.

    2012-03-26

    In a radioactive material (RAM) packaging, the formation of eutectic at the Pu/SS (plutonium/stainless steel) interface is a serious concern and must be avoided to prevent of leakage of fissile material to the environment. The eutectic temperature for the Pu/SS is rather low (410 C) and could seriously impact the structural integrity of the containment vessel under accident conditions involving fire. The 9975 packaging is used for long term storage of Pu bearing materials in the DOE complex where the Pu comes in contact with the stainless steel containment vessel. Due to the serious consequences of the containment breach at the eutectic site, the Pu/SS interface temperature is kept well below the eutectic formation temperature of 410 C. This paper discusses the thermal models and the results for the extended fire conditions (1500 F for 86 minutes) that exist in a long term storage facility and concludes that the 9975 packaging Pu/SS interface temperature is well below the eutectic temperature.

  20. Construction and Characterization of Mini-ruthenium-Carbon Eutectic Cells for Industrial Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diril, A.; Bourson, F.; Parga, C.; Sadli, M.

    2015-09-01

    High-temperature eutectic fixed points have proved to be convenient tools for temperature scale dissemination and thermometer calibrations/checks at temperatures above 1100C. In order to investigate the feasibility of metal-carbon eutectic cells in industrial applications as a means for assessing the traceability of non-contact thermometers, a batch of cells was constructed at LNE-Cnam, NPL, and TUBITAK UME. Compared to the usual dimensions of high-temperature fixed point cells (45 mm in length 24 mm in diameter), a new cell design was created to fit with industrial applications. TUBITAK UME constructed and characterized five ruthenium-carbon (Ru-C) eutectic cells of dimensions 24 mm in length 24 mm in diameter. One of these cells has been selected and characterized at CEA premises. Ru-C eutectic cells have been evaluated in terms of short-term repeatability, reproducibility, furnace effect, sharp temperature ramps, and the effect of cell location. Measurements at TB?TAK UME have been performed with a transfer standard pyrometer calibrated at the copper point and a BB3500pg high-temperature blackbody furnace was used for construction and measurement. For the measurements at CEA, a Land StandardHIMERT S1 radiation thermometer and a VITI induction furnace were used. In this article results of the measurements at TB?TAK UME and CEA will be presented. The possible use of these mini-eutectic cells as industrial temperature standards will be discussed.

  1. Deformation and fracture of a directionally solidified NiAl-28Cr-6Mo eutectic alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, X. F.; Johnson, D. R.; Noebe, R. D.; Oliver, B. F.

    1995-01-01

    A directionally solidified alloy based on the NiAl-(Cr, Mo) eutectic was examined by transmission and scanning electron microscopy to characterize the microstructure and room temperature deformation and fracture behavior. The microstructure consisted of a lamellar morphology with a group of zone axes (111) growth direction for both the NiAl and (Cr, Mo) phases. The interphase boundary between the eutectic phases was semicoherent and composed of a well-defined dislocation network. In addition, a fine array of coherent NiAl precipitates was dispersed throughout the (Cr, Mo) phase. The eutectic morphology was stable at 1300 K with only coarsening of the NiAl precipitates occurring after heat treatment for 1.8 ks (500 h). Fracture of the aligned eutectic is characterized primarily by a crack bridging/renucleation mechanism and is controlled by the strength of the semicoherent interface between the two phases. However, contributions to the toughness of the eutectic may arise from plastic deformation of the NiAl phase and the geometry associated with the fracture surface.

  2. A quantitative study of factors influencing lamellar eutectic morphology during solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, W. F. S.

    1981-01-01

    The factors that influence the shape of the solid-liquid interface of a lamellar binary eutectic alloy are evaluated. Alloys of carbon tetrabromide and hexachloroethane which serve as a transparent analogue of lamellar metallic eutectics are used. The observed interface shapes are analyzed by computer-aided methods. The solid-liquid interfacial free energies of each of the individual phases comprising the eutectic system are measured as a function of composition using a 'grain boundary groove' technique. The solid-liquid interfacial free energy of the two phases are evaluated directly from the eutectic interface. The phase diagram for the system, the heat of fusion as a function of composition, and the density as a function of composition are measured. The shape of the eutectic interface is controlled mainly by the solid-liquid and solid-solid interfacial free energy relationships at the interface and by the temperature gradient present, rather than by interlamellar diffusion in the liquid at the interface, over the range of growth rates studied.

  3. Construction and Characterization of Mini-ruthenium-Carbon Eutectic Cells for Industrial Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diril, A.; Bourson, F.; Parga, C.; Sadli, M.

    2015-12-01

    High-temperature eutectic fixed points have proved to be convenient tools for temperature scale dissemination and thermometer calibrations/checks at temperatures above 1100°C. In order to investigate the feasibility of metal-carbon eutectic cells in industrial applications as a means for assessing the traceability of non-contact thermometers, a batch of cells was constructed at LNE-Cnam, NPL, and TUBITAK UME. Compared to the usual dimensions of high-temperature fixed point cells (45 mm in length × 24 mm in diameter), a new cell design was created to fit with industrial applications. TUBITAK UME constructed and characterized five ruthenium-carbon (Ru-C) eutectic cells of dimensions 24 mm in length × 24 mm in diameter. One of these cells has been selected and characterized at CEA premises. Ru-C eutectic cells have been evaluated in terms of short-term repeatability, reproducibility, furnace effect, sharp temperature ramps, and the effect of cell location. Measurements at TÜBİTAK UME have been performed with a transfer standard pyrometer calibrated at the copper point and a BB3500pg high-temperature blackbody furnace was used for construction and measurement. For the measurements at CEA, a Land Standard—HIMERT S1 radiation thermometer and a VITI induction furnace were used. In this article results of the measurements at TÜBİTAK UME and CEA will be presented. The possible use of these mini-eutectic cells as industrial temperature standards will be discussed.

  4. Characterization of potassium salts of 12-tungstophosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Holclajtner-Antunovic, I.; Mioc, U.B.; Todorovic, M.; Jovanovic, Z.; Davidovic, M.; Bajuk-Bogdanovic, D.; Lausevic, Z.

    2010-11-15

    Potassium salts of 12-tungstophosphoric acid with varying amounts of cation, K{sub x}H{sub 3-x}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} (x = 1, 2, 3) have been prepared and their characteristics investigated by thermal analyses, FT-IR and micro-Raman spectroscopy and SEM-EDS analysis. It was found that the number of replaced protons by potassium ions in the 12-tungstophosphoric acid structure has influence on the presence of different protonic species, their dynamic equilibrium and on the conductivity of salts. The results reported in this study have been applied to improve the structural model of insoluble acidic salts. It is shown that an acidic potassium salt presents a mixture of neutral salt and unreacted acid. The nature of this mixture depends on the number of replaced protons-oxonium ions by cations. Preliminary measurements with synthesized compounds as solid electrolytes in fuel cells have been done, too.

  5. Electrochemical studies and analysis of 1-10 wt% UCl3 concentrations in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Robert O.; Shaltry, Michael R.; Martin, Sean; Sridharan, Kumar; Phongikaroon, Supathorn

    2014-09-01

    Three electrochemical methods - cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronopotentiometry (CP), and anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) - were applied to solutions of up to 10 wt% UCl3 in the molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt at 500 °C to determine electrochemical properties and behaviors and to help provide a scientific basis for the development of an in situ electrochemical probe for determining the concentration of uranium in a used nuclear fuel electrorefiner. Diffusion coefficients of UCl4 and UCl3 were calculated to be (6.72 ± 0.360) × 10-6 cm2/s and (1.04 ± 0.17) × 10-5 cm2/s, respectively. Apparent standard reduction potentials were determined to be (-0.381 ± 0.013) V and (-1.502 ± 0.076) V vs. 5 mol% Ag/AgCl or (-1.448 ± 0.013) V and (-2.568 ± 0.076) V vs. Cl2/Cl- for the U(IV)/U(III) and U(III)/U redox couples, respectively. In comparing this data with supercooled thermodynamic data to determine activity coefficients, the thermodynamic database used was important with resulting activity coefficients ranging from 2.34 × 10-3 to 1.08 × 10-2 for UCl4 and 4.94 × 10-5 to 4.50 × 10-4 for UCl3. Of anodic stripping voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry anodic or cathodic peaks, the CV cathodic peak height divided by square root of scan rate was shown to be the most reliable method of determining UCl3 concentration in the molten salt.

  6. Mechanochemical synthesis of layered hydroxy salts

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Nygil

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ► Ultrafast synthesis method was developed for the synthesis of layered hydroxy salts. ► Preparation of hydroxy single salt by this method requires only one minute. ► Hydroxy salts with variable Ni/Zn ratio could be synthesized by varying the metal contents of the starting mixture. ► This synthesis method is solvent free and environment friendly. -- Abstract: A simple one minute synthesis method was adapted for the preparation of layered hydroxy salts of copper, zinc, nickel and cadmium by grinding the metal salts with sodium hydroxide in a mortar. This solvent free method is environment friendly and fast. This method could be extended to the preparation of Ni/Zn hydroxy double salts. The Ni/Zn ratio could be varied from 1.2 to 1.9 by varying the metal contents of the precursor salts without the formation of any impurities in the sample. The prepared compounds had similar characteristics as that of the samples prepared by precipitation route. No sign of carbonate contamination was observed in any of the prepared samples.

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of Processable Polyaniline Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul, Salma; Shah, Anwar-ul-Haq Ali; Bilal, Salma

    2013-06-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) is one of the most promising candidates for possible technological applications. PANI has potential applications in batteries, anion exchanger, tissue engineering, inhibition of steel corrosion, fuel cell, sensors and so on. However, its insolubility in common organic solvents limits its range of applications. In the present study an attempt has been made to synthesize soluble polyaniline salt via inverse polymerization pathway using benzoyl peroxide as oxidant and dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DBSA) as dopant as well as a surfactant. A mixture of chloroform and 2-butanol was used as dispersion medium for the first time. The influence of synthesis parameters such as concentration of aniline, benzoyl peroxide and DBSA on the yield and other properties of the resulting PANI salt was studied. The synthesized PANI salt was found to be completely soluble in DMSO, DMF, chloroform and in a mixture of toluene and 2-propanol. The synthesized polymer salt was also characterized with cyclic voltam-metry, SEM, XRD, UV-Vis spectroscopy and viscosity measurements. TGA was used to analyze the thermal properties of synthesized polymer. The extent of doping of the PANI salt was determined from UV-Vis spectra and TGA analysis. The activation energy for the degradation of the polymer was calculated with the help of TGA.

  8. Effect of preliminary deformation on heat of melting of superplastic eutectic alloy Bi-43 wt % Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshak, V. F.; Tkachenko, M. V.

    2013-11-01

    Studies have been performed on the effect of external compressive stress applied to samples of superplastic eutectic Bi-43 wt % Sn alloy during heating to a near-eutectic temperature on the specific heat of melting of the alloy. The alloy was prepared from chemically pure components by casting onto a massive copper substrate. After compression by 65% using a hydraulic press, the ingots were aged in air for approximately 7 months. The experiments were carried out using the method of differential thermal analysis. The samples were loaded using a specially designed device. A regular decrease in the specific heat of melting by 37% has been revealed while increasing the external pressure from 0 to 4.4 MPa. The experimental results are discussed using the available literature data on the heat of melting of the alloy and on the structure of the eutectic.

  9. Structural and phonon transmission study of Ge-Au-Ge eutectically bonded interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Knowlton, W.B. |

    1995-07-01

    This thesis presents a structural analysis and phonon transparency investigation of the Ge-Au-Ge eutectic bond interface. Interface development was intended to maximize the interfacial ballistic phonon transparency to enhance the detection of the dark matter candidate WIMPs. The process which was developed provides an interface which produces minimal stress, low amounts of impurities, and insures Ge lattice continuity through the interface. For initial Au thicknesses of greater than 1,000 {angstrom} Au per substrate side, eutectic epitaxial growth resulted in a Au dendritic structure with 95% cross sectional and 90% planar Au interfacial area coverages. In sections in which Ge bridged the interface, lattice continuity across the interface was apparent. Epitaxial solidification of the eutectic interface with initial Au thicknesses < 500 A per substrate side produced Au agglomerations thereby reducing the Au planar interfacial area coverage to as little as 30%. The mechanism for Au coalescence was attributed to lateral diffusion of Ge and Au in the liquid phase during solidification. Phonon transmission studies were performed on eutectic interfaces with initial Au thicknesses of 1,000 {angstrom}, 500 {angstrom}, and 300 {angstrom} per substrate side. Phonon imaging of eutectically bonded samples with initial Au thicknesses of 300 {angstrom}/side revealed reproducible interfacial percent phonon transmissions from 60% to 70%. Line scan phonon imaging verified the results. Phonon propagation TOF spectra distinctly showed the predominant phonon propagation mode was ballistic. This was substantiated by phonon focusing effects apparent in the phonon imaging data. The degree of interface transparency to phonons and resulting phonon propagation modes correlate with the structure of the interface following eutectic solidification. Structural studies of samples with initial Au thickness of 1,000 {angstrom}/side appear to correspond with the phonon transmission study.

  10. Process for cracking hydrocarbons utilizing a mist of molten salt in the reaction zone

    SciTech Connect

    Kawazoe, T.; Machida, Y.; Sakai, A.; Yamaguchi, F.; Yonemori, H.

    1980-08-12

    Hydrocarbons are cracked in the presence of a mist of molten salt containing of basic compounds of alkali and alkaline earth metals and mixtures thereof, the amount of the molten salt to hydrocarbon being, by weight, from 0.01:1 to 10:1 followed by quenching at a temperature not lower than the melting point of the molten salt, and separating the cracked gas from the molten salt.

  11. Salt: a sacred substance.

    PubMed

    De Santo, N G; Bisaccia, C; De Santo, R M; De Santo, L S; Petrelli, L; Gallo, L; Cirillo, M; Capasso, G

    1997-11-01

    Salt is the last relic of the ocean where life was born. Its presence has influenced the whole gamut of history and its name is linked to hundred of geographical locations. Its importance for nutrition is supported by the discovery of Aeneolithic salt cellars. Salt cellars and pyramids of salt have been included in paintings and other works of art. In Japan where salt was and still is obtained from the sea, a salt culture has developed that can be traced in the rituals of everyday life, including meal preparation, sports, and Shinto ceremonies. PMID:9350697

  12. Chemistry control and corrosion mitigation of heat transfer salts for the fluoride salt reactor (FHR)

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, B. C.; Sellers, S. R.; Anderson, M. H.; Sridharan, K.; Scheele, R. D.

    2012-07-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) was a prototype nuclear reactor which operated from 1965 to 1969 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The MSRE used liquid fluoride salts as a heat transfer fluid and solvent for fluoride based {sup 235}U and {sup 233}U fuel. Extensive research was performed in order to optimize the removal of oxide and metal impurities from the reactor's heat transfer salt, 2LiF-BeF{sub 2} (FLiBe). This was done by sparging a mixture of anhydrous hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen gas through the FLiBe at elevated temperatures. The hydrofluoric acid reacted with oxides and hydroxides, fluorinating them while simultaneously releasing water vapor. Metal impurities such as iron and chromium were reduced by hydrogen gas and filtered out of the salt. By removing these impurities, the corrosion of reactor components was minimized. The Univ. of Wisconsin - Madison is currently researching a new chemical purification process for fluoride salts that make use of a less dangerous cleaning gas, nitrogen trifluoride. Nitrogen trifluoride has been predicted as a superior fluorinating agent for fluoride salts. These purified salts will subsequently be used for static and loop corrosion tests on a variety of reactor materials to ensure materials compatibility for the new FHR designs. Demonstration of chemistry control methodologies along with potential reduction in corrosion is essential for the use of a fluoride salts in a next generator nuclear reactor system. (authors)

  13. Complexes of onium salts with aromatic amines

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, G.E.; Pavlyuk, G.V.

    1987-11-10

    The following onium salts were used as acceptor components in these studies: acridinium perchlorate and iodide, thioxanthilium perchlorate, xanthilium perchlorate, and triphenylmethyl perchlorate. The following amines were examined as potential donor components: aniline, p-toluidine, diphenylamine, N-benzylaniline, N,N-dimethylaniline, N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine, pyridine, ..gamma..-picoline, and 2-(p-dimethylaminostyryl)quinoline. The identification of complexes was carried out by measuring the changes in the electrical conductivity of solutions of onium salts and their mixtures with aromatic amines.

  14. One-step synthesis of hematite nanospindles from choline chloride/urea deep eutectic solvent with highly powerful storage versus lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Q. Q.; Tu, J. P.; Ge, X.; Wang, X. L.; Gu, C. D.

    2015-01-01

    Fe2O3 nanospindles assembled with nanoparticles as primary building blocks are directly synthesized by a versatile ionothermal strategy in the choline chloride/urea mixture-based deep eutectic solvent system. The proposed ionothermal protocol is attractive and environmental friendly because choline chloride and urea are both naturally biocompatible compounds. As an anode material for lithium-ion batteries, the resultant Fe2O3 nanospindles show high capacity and good cycle stability (921.7 mAh g-1 at a current density of 200 mA g-1 up to 50 cycles), as well as the excellent rate capability. The good electrochemical performance can be attributed to the nanospindle structure with high sufficient interfacial contact area between the active material and electrolyte, the short diffusion distance of Li ions. The environmentally benign strategy proposed in this study is expected to offer an attractive technique for the ionothermal synthesis of electrochemical energy storage materials.

  15. The influences of convection on directional solidification of eutectic Bi/MnBi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, David J., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Eutectic alloys of Bi-Mn were directionally solidified using the Bridgman-Stockbarger technique to determine the influences of gravitationally-driven thermo-solutal convection on the Bi-MnBi rod eutectic. Experiments were conducted that varied the level of convection by varying the growth parameters and growth orientation, by microgravity damping, by applied magnetic field damping, and by imposing forced convection. Peltier interface demarcation and in situ thermocouple measurements were used to monitor interface velocity and thermal gradient and to evaluate interface planarity.

  16. Numerical study: Iron corrosion-resistance in lead-bismuth eutectic coolant by molecular dynamics method

    SciTech Connect

    Arkundato, Artoto; Su'ud, Zaki; Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Widayani,; Celino, Massimo

    2012-06-06

    In this present work, we report numerical results of iron (cladding) corrosion study in interaction with lead-bismuth eutectic coolant of advanced nuclear reactors. The goal of this work is to study how the oxygen can be used to reduce the corrosion rate of cladding. The molecular dynamics method was applied to simulate corrosion process. By evaluating the diffusion coefficients, RDF functions, MSD curves of the iron and also observed the crystal structure of iron before and after oxygen injection to the coolant then we concluded that a significant and effective reduction can be achieved by issuing about 2% number of oxygen atoms to lead-bismuth eutectic coolant.

  17. Numerical study: Iron corrosion-resistance in lead-bismuth eutectic coolant by molecular dynamics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkundato, Artoto; Su'ud, Zaki; Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Widayani, Celino, Massimo

    2012-06-01

    In this present work, we report numerical results of iron (cladding) corrosion study in interaction with lead-bismuth eutectic coolant of advanced nuclear reactors. The goal of this work is to study how the oxygen can be used to reduce the corrosion rate of cladding. The molecular dynamics method was applied to simulate corrosion process. By evaluating the diffusion coefficients, RDF functions, MSD curves of the iron and also observed the crystal structure of iron before and after oxygen injection to the coolant then we concluded that a significant and effective reduction can be achieved by issuing about 2% number of oxygen atoms to lead-bismuth eutectic coolant.

  18. Solubility and excessive thermodynamic characteristics of Pr and Nd in the Ga–Sn eutectic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchakov, S. Yu.; Yamshchikov, L. F.; Osipenko, A. G.; Pozdeev, P. A.; Rusakov, M. A.

    2015-08-01

    The praseodymium and neodymium solubilities in the gallium-tin eutectic melt were measured for the first time in a temperature range of 423-1073 K using a high-temperature sampling technique. The data on the activity and solubility are used to calculate the activity coefficients, the excessive thermodynamic characteristics of α-praseodymium and α-neodymium in the Ga-Sn eutectic melts, and the separation factor for the Pr/Nd pair on gallium-tin electrodes in chloride melts.

  19. Salt tectonics on Venus

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, C.A.; Amsbury, D.

    1986-05-01

    The discovery of a surprisingly high deuterium/hydrogen ratio on Venus immediately led to the speculation that Venus may have once had a volume of surface water comparable to that of the terrestrial oceans. The authors propose that the evaporation of this putative ocean may have yielded residual salt deposits that formed various terrain features depicted in Venera 15 and 16 radar images. By analogy with models for the total evaporation of the terrestrial oceans, evaporite deposits on Venus should be at least tens to hundreds of meters thick. From photogeologic evidence and in-situ chemical analyses, it appears that the salt plains were later buried by lava flows. On Earth, salt diapirism leads to the formation of salt domes, anticlines, and elongated salt intrusions - features having dimensions of roughly 1 to 100 km. Due to the rapid erosion of salt by water, surface evaporite landforms are only common in dry regions such as the Zagros Mountains of Iran, where salt plugs and glaciers exist. Venus is far drier than Iran; extruded salt should be preserved, although the high surface temperature (470/sup 0/C) would probably stimulate rapid salt flow. Venus possesses a variety of circular landforms, tens to hundreds of kilometers wide, which could be either megasalt domes or salt intrusions colonizing impact craters. Additionally, arcurate bands seen in the Maxwell area of Venus could be salt intrusions formed in a region of tectonic stress. These large structures may not be salt features; nonetheless, salt features should exist on Venus.

  20. Study of local structure in hyper-eutectic Zr-Cu-Al bulk glassy alloys by positron annihilation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, T.; Ishii, K.; Yokoyama, Y.; Konno, T. J.; Iwase, A.; Hori, F.

    2016-01-01

    The Zr-Cu-Al bulk glassy (BG) alloy, which has amorphous structure, possesses various properties such as high strength and toughness with compositional dependence. In the present study, density, positron annihilation lifetime and coincidence Doppler Broadening measurement have been performed for various compositional hyper-eutectic Zr-Cu-Al BG alloys. The density of hyper-eutectic Zr-Cu-Al BG alloys increases with decreasing of Zr fraction. In contrast, positron lifetime for all compositional alloys is almost constant about 165 psec. In addition, the CDB ratio profile is almost the same for hyper-eutectic alloys. This unchanging trend of CDB ratio profile is quite different from that of hypo-eutectic BG alloys. These results reveal that different internal structure exists in hyper and hypo-eutectic BG alloys.

  1. Directionally solidified Eu doped CaF2/Li3AlF6 eutectic scintillator for neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Kei; Hishinuma, Kousuke; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Shoji, Yasuhiro; Pejchal, Jan; Ohashi, Yuji; Yokota, Yuui; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2015-12-01

    Eu doped CaF2/Li3AlF6 eutectics were grown by ?-PD method. The directionally solidified eutectic with well-aligned 600 nm diameter Eu:CaF2 scintillator fibers surrounded with Li3AlF6 was prepared. The grown eutectics showed an emission peak at 422 nm ascribed to Eu2+ 4f-5d transition from Eu:CaF2 scintillation fiber. Li concentration in the Eu:CaF2-Li3AlF6 eutectic is around 0.038 mol/cm3,which is two times higher than that of LiCaAlF6 single crystal (0.016 mol/cm3). The light yield of Eu:CaF2-Li3AlF6 eutectic was around 7000 ph/neutron. The decay time was about 550 ns (89%) and 1450 ns (11%).

  2. Numerical study of the effect of the shape of the phase diagram on the eutectic freezing temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ode, M.; Sasajima, N.; Yamada, Y.; Bloembergen, P.; Shimono, M.

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the reliability of metal-carbon eutectic systems as fixed points for the next generation of high-temperature standards the effect of thermodynamic properties related to the shape of eutectic phase diagram on the freezing temperature is investigated within the context of the numerical multi-phase-field model. The partition coefficient and liquidus slopes of the two solids involved in the eutectic reaction are varied deliberately and independently. The difference between the eutectic temperature and the freezing temperature is determined in dependence of the solid/liquid (s/l) interface shape and concentration. Where appropriate reference is made to the Jackson-Hunt analytical theory. It is shown that there are mainly two typical conditions to decrease the undercooling: 1) a small liquidus slope and 2) the associated difference between the eutectic composition and the liquid composition during solidification.

  3. Numerical study of the effect of the shape of the phase diagram on the eutectic freezing temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ode, M.; Shimono, M.; Sasajima, N.; Yamada, Y.; Bloembergen, P.

    2013-09-11

    To evaluate the reliability of metal-carbon eutectic systems as fixed points for the next generation of high-temperature standards the effect of thermodynamic properties related to the shape of eutectic phase diagram on the freezing temperature is investigated within the context of the numerical multi-phase-field model. The partition coefficient and liquidus slopes of the two solids involved in the eutectic reaction are varied deliberately and independently. The difference between the eutectic temperature and the freezing temperature is determined in dependence of the solid/liquid (s/l) interface shape and concentration. Where appropriate reference is made to the Jackson-Hunt analytical theory. It is shown that there are mainly two typical conditions to decrease the undercooling: 1) a small liquidus slope and 2) the associated difference between the eutectic composition and the liquid composition during solidification.

  4. Microstructural variations induced by gravity level during directional solidification of near-eutectic iron-carbon type alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, Doru M.; Fiske, Michael R.; Curreri, Peter A.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the microstructure of directionally solidified near-eutectic cast irons are studied, using a Bridgman-type automatic directional solidification furnace aboard a NASA KC-135 aircraft which flies parabolic arcs and generates alternating periods of low-g (0.01 to 0.001 g, 30 seconds long) and high-g (1.8 g, 1.5 minutes long). Results show a refinement of the interlamellar spacing of the eutectic during low-g processing of metastable Fe-C eutectic alloys. Low-g processing of stable Fe-C-Si eutectic alloys (lamellar or spheroidal graphic) results in a coarsening of the eutectic grain structure. Secondary dendrite arm spacing of austenite increases in low-g and decreases in high-g. The effectiveness of low-gravity in the removal of buoyancy-driven graphite phase segregation is demonstrated.

  5. Microtexture and macrotexture formation in the containerless solidification of undercooled Ni-18.7 at.% Sn eutectic melts

    SciTech Connect

    Li Mingjun . E-mail: li.mingjun@jaxa.jp; Nagashio, Kosuke; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Yoda, Shinichi; Kuribayashi, Kazuhiko

    2005-02-01

    The microscopic orientations of Ni-18.7 at.% Sn eutectics solidified from undercooled states, in particular, within an individual eutectic colony and among neighboring eutectic colonies, have been measured with respect to the eutectic Ni{sub 3}Sn and Ni phases; this was done using a scanning electron microscope equipped with the electron backscatter diffraction pattern (EBSP) mapping technique. The EBSPs and inverse pole figures indicate that the Ni{sub 3}Sn intermetallic compound is continuous and well oriented whereas the Ni solid solution is discontinuous and randomly oriented within an anomalous eutectic grain. Further examination reveals that although Ni particulates are random from an overall view, most neighboring Ni grains have small misorientations of less than 10 deg . The specific solidification sequence and the effect of released crystallization heat on subsequent crystallization are further considered, which enables the primary Ni phase to segment into individual grains whereas Ni{sub 3}Sn does not due to higher entropy of fusion. A little rotation or floating within the constrained framework of the crystallizing Ni{sub 3}Sn compound may yield small misorientation angles. The discontinuous Ni particulates and continuous Ni{sub 3}Sn network are of great significance in revealing the anomalous eutectic formation. The orientation among independent eutectic colonies is random owing to the random appearance of nuclei throughout the volume of undercooled melts. The macrotextures of pole figures (PFs) of two eutectic phases are also mapped versus melt undercooling, which can be interpreted well when considering the nucleation frequency, variation of eutectic colony size, microtexture within a single eutectic colony, and the overall microstructure evolution as a function of melt undercooling.

  6. Molten salt electrolyte separator

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D. (New Lenox, IL)

    1996-01-01

    A molten salt electrolyte/separator for battery and related electrochemical systems including a molten electrolyte composition and an electrically insulating solid salt dispersed therein, to provide improved performance at higher current densities and alternate designs through ease of fabrication.

  7. What Are Bath Salts?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Are bath salts becoming more popular? Marsha Lopez Hi, Lauren. Nope! Actually quite the opposite! This family ... and how dangerous for your body? Michelle Rankin Hi ParkerPanella - Bath salts are drugs known as synthetic ...

  8. Retrospective salt tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.P.A.

    1996-12-31

    The conceptual breakthroughs in understanding salt tectonics can be recognized by reviewing the history of salt tectonics, which divides naturally into three parts: the pioneering era, the fluid era, and the brittle era. The pioneering era (1856-1933) featured the search for a general hypothesis of salt diapirism, initially dominated by bizarre, erroneous notions of igneous activity, residual islands, in situ crystallization, osmotic pressures, and expansive crystallization. Gradually data from oil exploration constrained speculation. The effects of buoyancy versus orogeny were debated, contact relations were characterized, salt glaciers were discovered, and the concepts of downbuilding and differential loading were proposed as diapiric mechanisms. The fluid era (1933-{approximately}1989) was dominated by the view that salt tectonics resulted from Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in which a dense fluid overburden having negligible yield strength sinks into a less dense fluid salt layer, displacing it upward. Density contrasts, viscosity contrasts, and dominant wavelengths were emphasized, whereas strength and faulting of the overburden were ignored. During this era, palinspastic reconstructions were attempted; salt upwelling below thin overburdens was recognized; internal structures of mined diapirs were discovered; peripheral sinks, turtle structures, and diapir families were comprehended; flow laws for dry salt were formulated; and contractional belts on divergent margins and allochthonous salt sheets were recognized. The 1970s revealed the basic driving force of salt allochthons, intrasalt minibasins, finite strains in diapirs, the possibility of thermal convection in salt, direct measurement of salt glacial flow stimulated by rainfall, and the internal structure of convecting evaporites and salt glaciers. The 1980`s revealed salt rollers, subtle traps, flow laws for damp salt, salt canopies, and mushroom diapirs.

  9. Salt weathering on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, M. C.

    1974-01-01

    Mariner 9 photographs of Mars indicate that significant erosion has occurred on that planet. Although several possible erosion mechanisms have been proposed, most terrestrial weathering mechanisms cannot function in the present Martian environment. Salt weathering, believed to be active in the Antarctic dry valleys, is especially suited to Mars, given the presence of salts and small amounts of water. Volcanic salts are probably available, and the association of salts and water is likely from both thermodynamic and geologic considerations.

  10. Viscosity of multi-component molten nitrate salts : liquidus to 200 degrees C.

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, Robert W.

    2010-03-01

    The viscosity of molten salts comprising ternary and quaternary mixtures of the nitrates of sodium, potassium, lithium and calcium was determined experimentally. Viscosity was measured over the temperature range from near the relatively low liquidus temperatures of he individual mixtures to 200C. Molten salt mixtures that do not contain calcium nitrate exhibited relatively low viscosity and an Arrhenius temperature dependence. Molten salt mixtures that contained calcium nitrate were relatively more viscous and viscosity increased as the roportion of calcium nitrate increased. The temperature dependence of viscosity of molten salts containing calcium nitrate displayed curvature, rather than linearity, when plotted in Arrhenius format. Viscosity data for these mixtures were correlated by the Vogel-Fulcher- ammann-Hesse equation.

  11. Utah: Salt Lake Region

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Winter and Summer Views of the Salt Lake Region     ... Salt Lake City, Utah are captured in these winter and summer images from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) ... the obvious difference in snow cover between the winter and summer views, water color changes in parts of the Great Salt Lake are apparent ...

  12. Thermal stability and its effect on the mechanical properties of a directionally solidified yttrium aluminum garnet/alumina eutectic fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Deok-Yong

    During past years, oxide-oxide eutectic fibers have received considerable attention as potential reinforcements in the intermetallic and ceramic matrix composites for high temperature applications. The directionally solidified YAG/alumina eutectic fiber has been demonstrated as the most promising system due to the attractive combinations of its chemical, microstructural, mechanical, and thermal stability. Recently, the YAG/alumina eutectic fiber was successfully developed using laser heat floating zone (LHFZ) and edge-defined film-fed growth (EFG) techniques. In the present work, the thermal stability and coarsening behavior of the Y3Al5O12/Al2O3 eutectic fiber at the elevated temperatures were explored. The kinetics of coarsening and the rate-controlling mechanism were investigated by measuring the activation energy for coarsening of the Y3Al5O 12/Al2O3 eutectic fiber. The diffusion of O 2- ions through the Y3Al5O12 phase and Y3+ ions through the Al2O3 phase appeared to be the rate-controlling mechanism for the coarsening of the Y3Al5O12/Al2O3 eutectic fiber. It was found that the reciprocal of the interfacial areas between the Y3Al5O12 and Al2O 3 phases is linearly proportional to the heat treatment time. Also, the strength and fracture behaviors of a directionally solidified Y3Al5O12/Al2O3 eutectic fiber were studied. The degradation of the room-temperature tensile strength after heat treatment was attributed to the development of surface grooves at the surface of the fiber. The Y3Al5O12/Al 2O3 eutectic fiber exhibited a radial (Palmqvist) crack type and an anisotropic crack growth behavior. It was found that the Palmqvist crack length in the Y3Al5O12/Al2O 3 eutectic fiber is linearly proportional to the indentation load. The fracture behaviors of the (Y2O3)ZrO2/Al 2O3 eutectic fiber, the CeO2-doped and Pr 2O3-doped Y3Al5O12/Al 2O3 eutectic rods were investigated. The (Y2O 3)ZrO2/Al2O3 eutectic fiber, the CeO 2-doped and Pr2O3-doped Y3Al5 O12/Al2O3 eutectic rods showed the radial (Palmqvist) crack types and the orthotropic crack growth behaviors. The CeO2-doped Y3Al5O12/Al 2O3 eutectic rod was turned out to have the highest fracture toughness among another eutectic fiber/rods (the Y3Al5O 12/Al2O3 eutectic fiber, the (Y2O 3)ZrO2/Al2O3 eutectic fiber, and the Pr2O3-doped Y3Al5O12/Al 2O3 eutectic rod). Even though the addition of Pr2O 3 to the Y3Al5O12/Al2O 3 system resulted in the weakening of the microstructure, the Pr 2O3-doped Y3Al5O12/Al 2O3 eutectic rod showed the severe crack deflection along the phase boundary. Also, the addition of CeO2 to the Y3Al 5O12/Al2O3 system resulted in the increase of the fracture toughness.

  13. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  14. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  15. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  16. Deep eutectic solvents: sustainable media for nanoscale and functional materials.

    PubMed

    Wagle, Durgesh V; Zhao, Hua; Baker, Gary A

    2014-08-19

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) represent an alternative class of ionic fluids closely resembling room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), although, strictly speaking, they are distinguished by the fact that they also contain an organic molecular component (typically, a hydrogen bond donor like a urea, amide, acid, or polyol), frequently as the predominant constituent. Practically speaking, DESs are attractive alternatives to RTILs, sharing most of their remarkable qualities (e.g., tolerance to humidity, negligible vapor pressure, thermostability, wide electrochemical potential windows, tunability) while overcoming several limitations associated with their RTIL cousins. Particularly, DESs are typically, less expensive, more synthetically accessible (typically, from bulk commodity chemicals using solvent/waste-free processes), nontoxic, and biodegradable. In this Account, we provide an overview of DESs as designer solvents to create well-defined nanomaterials including shape-controlled nanoparticles, electrodeposited films, metal-organic frameworks, colloidal assemblies, hierarchically porous carbons, and DNA/RNA architectures. These breakthroughs illustrate how DESs can fulfill multiple roles in directing chemistry at the nanoscale: acting as supramolecular template, metal/carbon source, sacrificial agent (e.g., ammonia release from urea), and/or redox agent, all in the absence of formal stabilizing ligand (here, solvent and stabilizer are one and the same). The ability to tailor the physicochemical properties of DESs is central to controlling their interfacial behavior. The preorganized "supramolecular" nature of DESs provides a soft template to guide the formation of bimodal porous carbon networks or the evolution of electrodeposits. A number of essential parameters (viscosity, polarity, surface tension, hydrogen bonding), plus coordination with solutes/surfaces, all play significant roles in modulating species reactivity and mass transport properties governing the genesis of nanostructure. Furthermore, DES components may modulate nucleation and growth mechanisms by charge neutralization, modification of reduction potentials (or chemical activities), and passivation of particular crystal faces, dictating growth along preferred crystallographic directions. Broad operational windows for electrochemical reactions coupled with their inherent ionic nature facilitate the electrodeposition of alloys and semiconductors inaccessible to classical means and the use of cosolvents or applied potential control provide under-explored strategies for mediating interfacial interactions leading to control over film characteristics. The biocompatibility of DESs suggests intriguing potential for the construction of biomolecular architectures in these novel media. It has been demonstrated that nucleic acid structures can be manipulated in the ionic, crowded, dehydrating (low water activity) DES environment-including the adoption of duplex helical structures divergent from the canonical B form and parallel G-quadruplex DNA persisting near water's boiling point-challenging the misconception that water is a necessity for maintenance of nucleic acid structure/functionality and suggesting an enticing trajectory toward DNA/RNA-based nanocatalysis within a strictly anhydrous medium. DESs offer tremendous opportunities and open intriguing perspectives for generating sophisticated nanostructures within an anhydrous or low-water medium. We conclude this Account by offering our thoughts on the evolution of the field, pointing to areas of clear and compelling utility which will surely see fruition in the coming years. Finally, we highlight a few hurdles (e.g., need for a universal nomenclature, absence of water-immiscible, oriented-phase, and low-viscosity DESs) which, once navigated, will hasten progress in this area. PMID:24892971

  17. Eutectic melting temperature of the lowermost Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrault, D.; Lo Nigro, G.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Bouhifd, M.; Garbarino, G.; Mezouar, M.

    2009-12-01

    Partial melting of the Earth's deep mantle probably occurred at different stages of its formation as a consequence of meteoritic impacts and seismology suggests that it even continues today at the core-mantle boundary. Melts are important because they dominate the chemical evolution of the different Earth's reservoirs and more generally the dynamics of the whole planet. Unfortunately, the most critical parameter, that is the temperature profile inside the deep Earth, remains poorly constrained accross the planet history. Experimental investigations of the melting properties of materials representative of the deep Earth at relevant P-T conditions can provide anchor points to refine past and present temperature profiles and consequently determine the degree of melting at the different geological periods. Previous works report melting relations in the uppermost lower mantle region, using the multi-anvil press [1,2]. On the other hand, the pyrolite solidus was determined up to 65 GPa using optical observations in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC) [3]. Finally, the melting temperature of (Mg,Fe)2SiO4 olivine is documented at core-mantle boundary (CMB) conditions by shock wave experiments [4]. Solely based on these reports, experimental data remain too sparse to draw a definite melting curve for the lower mantle in the relevant 25-135 GPa pressure range. We reinvestigated melting properties of lower mantle materials by means of in-situ angle dispersive X-ray diffraction measurements in the LH-DAC at the ESRF [5]. Experiments were performed in an extended P-T range for two starting materials: forsterite and a glass with chondrite composition. In both cases, the aim was to determine the onset of melting, and thus the eutectic melting temperatures as a function of pressure. Melting was evidenced from drastic changes of diffraction peak shape on the image plate, major changes in diffraction intensities in the integrated pattern, disappearance of diffraction rings, and changes in the relation between sample-temperature and laser-power. In this work, we show that temperatures higher than 4000 K are necessary for melting mean mantle at the 135 GPa pressure found at the core mantle boundary (CMB). Such temperature is much higher than that from estimated actual geotherms. Therefore, melting at the CMB can only occur if (i) pyrolitic mantle resides for a very long time in contact with the outer core, (ii) the mantle composition is severely affected by additional elements depressing the solidus such as water or (iii) the temperature gradient in the D" region is amazingly steep. Other implications for the temperature state and the lower mantle properties will be presented. References (1) Ito et al., Phys. Earth Planet. Int., 143-144, 397-406, 2004 (2) Ohtani et al., Phys. Earth Planet. Int., 100, 97-114, 1997 (3) Zerr et al., Science, 281, 243-246, 1998 (4) Holland and Ahrens, Science, 275, 1623-1625, 1997 (5) Schultz et al., High Press. Res., 25, 1, 71-83, 2005.

  18. Integrated Salt Basin Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukla, P. A.

    2012-04-01

    Salt tectonics plays a major role in the development of many sedimentary basins. Basins containing salt thus frequently display a complex geodynamic evolution characterized by several phases of halokinesis and associated sedimentation. One classic area of salt tectonics is the Central European Basin System (CEBS). Here, the mobile Permian Zechstein salt formed a large number of salt structures such as anticlines, diapirs, pillows, sheets, stocks, and walls during an extended period of salt tectonic activity in Mesozoic and Cenozoic times. Major changes in sedimentation patterns and structural regimes are associated and common in this setting. Increasingly complex subsurface evaluation therefore requires an approach to study salt basins including analogue and numerical models, field studies and laboratory studies which combine seismic, structural and sedimentary studies with analysis of rheological properties, and geomechanic modelling. This concept can be demonstrated using case studies from Permian Salt Basins in Europe and the Late Neoproterozoic to Early Cambrian South Oman Salt Basin. There salt-influenced sedimentary responses to renewed phases of tectonism can be clearly discerned from detailed sequence analysis based on seismic and log data combined with retrodeformation modelling studies. High quality 3-D seismic data integrated with structural modelling improves the definition of the internal dynamics of salt structures and associated sediment architecture in salt-controlled sequences. Paleo-caprocks inside the diapirs point to long phases of dissolution. Salt wedges formed by extrusion and lateral flow of salt glaciers during periods of diapir emergence and reduced sediment accumulation can be accurately modelled. Although salt is widely regarded as a perfect seal, it can become permeable for one- or two-phase fluids under certain conditions of fluid pressure, temperature and deviatoric stress. The fluid pathways can be either along zones of diffuse grain boundary dilatancy, or along open fractures, depending on the fluid overpressure and deviatoric stress.

  19. Use of Eutectic Fixed Points to Characterize a Spectrometer for Earth Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, Saber G. R.; Fox, Nigel P.; Woolliams, Emma R.; Winkler, Rainer; Pegrum, Heather M.; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Ken T. V.

    2007-12-01

    A small palm-sized, reference spectrometer, mounted on a remote-controlled model helicopter is being developed and tested by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in conjunction with City University, London. The developed system will be used as a key element for field vicarious calibration of optical earth observation systems in the visible-near infrared (VNIR) region. The spectrometer is hand held, low weight, and uses a photodiode array. It has good stray light rejection and wide spectral coverage, allowing simultaneous measurements from 400 to 900 nm. The spectrometer is traceable to NPL’s primary standard cryogenic radiometer via a high-temperature metal-carbon eutectic fixed-point blackbody. Once the fixed-point temperature has been determined (using filter radiometry), the eutectic provides a high emissivity and high stability source of known spectral radiance over the emitted spectral range. All wavelength channels of the spectrometer can be calibrated simultaneously using the eutectic transition without the need for additional instrumentation. The spectrometer itself has been characterized for stray light performance and wavelength accuracy. Its long-term and transportation stability has been proven in an experiment that determined the “World’s Bluest Sky”—a process that involved 56 flights, covering 100,000 km in 72 days. This vicarious calibration methodology using a eutectic standard is presented alongside the preliminary results of an evaluation study of the spectrometer characteristics.

  20. Evaluation of magnesium-aluminum eutectic to improve combustion efficiency in low burning rate propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, B. G.; Sullivan, E. M.

    1973-01-01

    A previous investigation indicated that combustion efficiency of low burning-rate propellants could be improved if the aluminum fuel was replaced by aluminum particles coated with a magnesium-aluminum eutectic alloy (ALCAL). The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate the possibility of improving the combustion efficiency of these propellants by admixing the eutectic with the aluminum rather than coating the aluminum. Tests of three propellants similar in every respect except for the metal fuel were conducted in test motors with 4.54 kg (10 lbm) of propellant. The first propellant used aluminum fuel; the second contained aluminum admixed with magnesium-aluminum eutectic; the third used ALCAL. The test results show the the admixed fuel gave better low burning-rate combustion efficiency than the other two. The test results also showed that the ALCAL was deficient in that much, if not all, of the coating material could be found as the fine particles in a bimodal mix of aluminum and eutectic. The combustion efficiency of low burning-rate aluminized propellants can be significantly improved by mixing a small amount of magnesium-aluminum alloy with the aluminum fuel.

  1. A New Analytical Approach to Predict Spacing Selection in Lamellar and Rod Eutectic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Sen, Subhayu; Stefanescu, Doru M.

    2003-01-01

    The Jackson and Hunt (JH) theory has been modified to relax the assumption of isothermal solid liquid interface used in their treatment. Based on the predictions of this modified theory, the traditional definitions of regular and irregular eutectics are revised. For regular eutectics, the new model identifies a range of spacing within the limits defined by the minimum undercooling of the a and beta phases. For the irregular Al-Si eutectic system, two different spacing selection mechanisms were identified: (1) for a particular growth rate, a nearly isothermal interface can be achieved at a unique minimum spacing lambda (sub t); (2) the average spacing (lambda (sub av) greater than lambda (sub t) is essentially dictated by the undercooling of the faceted phase. Based on the modified theoretical model, a semiempirical expression has been developed to account for the influence of the temperature gradient, which is dominant in the irregular Al-Si system. The behavior of the Fe-Fe3C eutectic is also discussed. The theoretical calculations have been found to be in good agreement with the published experimental measurements.

  2. A New Analytical Approach to Predict Spacing Selection in Lamellar and Rod Eutectic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Sen, Subhayu; Stefanescu, D. M.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Jackson and Hunt (JH) theory has been modified to relax the assumption of isothermal solid/liquid interface(SLI) used in their treatment. Based on the predictions of this modified theory the traditional definitions of regular and irregular eutectics are revised. For regular eutectics the new model identifies a range of spacing within the limits defined by the minimum undercooling of the alpha and beta phase. For the irregular Al-Si eutectic system two different spacing selection mechanisms were identified: a) for a particular growth rate, a nearly isothermal interface can be achieved at a unique minimum spacing lambda(sub I); b) the average spacing (lambda(sub av) greater than lambda(sub I)) is essentially dictated by the undercooling of the faceted phase. Based on the modified theoretical model a semiempirical expression has been developed to account for the influence of the temperature gradient, which is dominant in the irregular Al-Si system. The behavior of the Fe-Fe3C eutectic is also discussed The theoretical calculations have been found to be in good agreement with the published experimental measurements.

  3. Experimental investigation of forced-convection heat-transfer characteristics of lead-bismuth eutectic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubarsky, Bernard

    1951-01-01

    The forced-convection heat-transfer characteristics of lead-bismuth eutectic were experimentally investigated. Experimental values of Nusselt number for lead-bismuth fell considerably below predicted values. The addition of a wetting agent did not change the heat transfer characteristics.

  4. Efficient continuous synthesis of high purity deep eutectic solvents by twin screw extrusion.

    PubMed

    Crawford, D E; Wright, L A; James, S L; Abbott, A P

    2016-03-01

    Mechanochemical synthesis has been applied to the rapid synthesis of Deep Eutectic Solvents (DESs), including Reline 200 (choline chloride?:?urea, 1?:?2), in a continuous flow methodology by Twin Screw Extrusion (TSE). This gave products in higher purity and with Space Time Yields (STYs), four orders of magnitude greater than for batch methods. PMID:26911554

  5. Deep eutectic solvents as novel extraction media for phenolic compounds from model oil.

    PubMed

    Gu, Tongnian; Zhang, Mingliang; Tan, Ting; Chen, Jia; Li, Zhan; Zhang, Qinghua; Qiu, Hongdeng

    2014-10-11

    Deep eutectic solvents (DES) as a new kind of green solvent were used for the first time to excellently extract phenolic compounds from model oil. It was also proved that DES could be used to extract other polar compounds from non-polar or weakly-polar solvents by liquid-phase microextraction. PMID:25144155

  6. Influence of Mg on Grain Refinement of Near Eutectic Al-Si Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, K. R.; Manivannan, S.; Phanikumar, G.; Murty, B. S.; Sundarraj, Suresh

    2011-07-01

    Although the grain-refinement practice is well established for wrought Al alloys, in the case of foundry alloys such as near eutectic Al-Si alloys, the underlying mechanisms and the use of grain refiners need better understanding. Conventional grain refiners such as Al-5Ti-1B are not effective in grain refining the Al-Si alloys due to the poisoning effect of Si. In this work, we report the results of a newly developed grain refiner, which can effectively grain refine as well as modify eutectic and primary Si in near eutectic Al-Si alloys. Among the material choices, the grain refining response with Al-1Ti-3B master alloy is found to be superior compared to the conventional Al-5Ti-1B master alloy. It was also found that magnesium additions of 0.2 wt pct along with the Al-1Ti-3B master alloy further enhance the near eutectic Al-Si alloy's grain refining efficiency, thus leading to improved bulk mechanical properties. We have found that magnesium essentially scavenges the oxygen present on the surface of nucleant particles, improves wettability, and reduces the agglomeration tendency of boride particles, thereby enhancing grain refining efficiency. It allows the nucleant particles to act as potent and active nucleation sites even at levels as low as 0.2 pct in the Al-1Ti-3B master alloy.

  7. Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behavior of Directionally Solidified NiAl-V Eutectic Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milenkovic, Srdjan; Caram, Rubens

    2015-02-01

    Directional solidification of eutectic alloys has been recognized as promising technique for producing in situ composite materials exhibiting balance of properties. Therefore, an in situ NiAl-V eutectic composite has been successfully directionally solidified using Bridgman technique. The mechanical behavior of the composite including fracture resistance, microhardness, and compressive properties at room and elevated temperatures was investigated. Damage evolution and fracture characteristics were also discussed. The obtained results indicate that the NiAl-V eutectic retains high yield strength up to 1073 K (800 °C), above which there is a rapid decrease in strength. Its yield strength is higher than that of binary NiAl and most of the NiAl-based eutectics. The exhibited fracture toughness of 28.5 MPa√m is the highest of all other NiAl-based systems investigated so far. The material exhibited brittle fracture behavior of transgranular type and all observations pointed out that the main fracture micromechanism was cleavage.

  8. A novel LiCl-BaCl2:Eu2+ eutectic scintillator for thermal neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuntao; Lukosi, Eric D.; Zhuravleva, Mariya; Lindsey, Adam C.; Melcher, Charles L.

    2015-10-01

    A natLiCl-BaCl2:Eu2+ eutectic scintillator was synthesized by the vertical Bridgman method aiming at the application of thermal neutron detection. The molar ratio of LiCl and BaCl2 was 75.1/24.9, which corresponds to the eutectic composition in the LiCl-BaCl2 system. The grown eutectic showed a periodic microstructure of BaCl2:Eu2+ and LiCl phases with 2-3 ?m thickness. The ?-particle induced radioluminescence spectrum of the scintillator showed an intense emission peak at 406 nm due to the Eu2+ 5d1?4f emission from the BaCl2:Eu2+ phase and an additional weak emission peak at 526 nm. The scintillation decay time was 412 ns. LiCl-BaCl2:Eu2+ eutectic samples exhibited non-correlated neutron detection efficiency and light yield as a function of crystal length, suggesting material non-uniformities within the boule. The relative light yield was equal to or greater than that of Nucsafe lithium glass. Gamma-ray exposures indicate that gamma/neutron threshold discrimination for higher energy gamma-rays will be limited.

  9. Banding due to temperature oscillations in the unidirectional solidification of eutectic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidron, A.

    1972-01-01

    Banding observed in unidirectional solidification of eutectic alloys is shown to be due to melting back of the freezing interface because of oscillations in the temperature of the furnace. General theoretical criteria as to the amplitude and frequency of the permissible temperature oscillations are given to ensure that banding will not occur.

  10. Free energy change of off-eutectic binary alloys on solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohsaka, K.; Trinh, E. H.; Lin, J.-C.; Perepezko, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    A formula for the free energy difference between the undercooled liquid phase and the stable solid phase is derived for off-eutectic binary alloys in which the equilibrium solid/liquid transition takes place over a certain temperature range. The free energy change is then evaluated numerically for a Bi-25 at. pct Cd alloy modeled as a sub-subregular solution.

  11. Metal-halide mixtures for latent heat energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, K.; Manvi, R.

    1981-01-01

    Some candidates for alkali metal and alkali halide mixtures suitable for thermal energy storage at temperatures 600 C are identified. A solar thermal system application which offer advantages such as precipitation of salt crystals away from heat transfer surfaces, increased thermal conductivity of phase change materials, corrosion inhibition, and a constant monotectic temperature, independent of mixture concentrations. By using the lighters, metal rich phase as a heat transfer medium and the denser, salt rich phase as a phase change material for latent heat storage, undesirable solidification on the heat transfer surface may be prevented, is presented.

  12. Injector nozzle for molten salt destruction of energetic waste materials

    DOEpatents

    Brummond, William A. (Livermore, CA); Upadhye, Ravindra S. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1996-01-01

    An injector nozzle has been designed for safely injecting energetic waste materials, such as high explosives, propellants, and rocket fuels, into a molten salt reactor in a molten salt destruction process without premature detonation or back burn in the injection system. The energetic waste material is typically diluted to form a fluid fuel mixture that is injected rapidly into the reactor. A carrier gas used in the nozzle serves as a carrier for the fuel mixture, and further dilutes the energetic material and increases its injection velocity into the reactor. The injector nozzle is cooled to keep the fuel mixture below the decomposition temperature to prevent spontaneous detonation of the explosive materials before contact with the high-temperature molten salt bath.

  13. Injector nozzle for molten salt destruction of energetic waste materials

    DOEpatents

    Brummond, W.A.; Upadhye, R.S.

    1996-02-13

    An injector nozzle has been designed for safely injecting energetic waste materials, such as high explosives, propellants, and rocket fuels, into a molten salt reactor in a molten salt destruction process without premature detonation or back burn in the injection system. The energetic waste material is typically diluted to form a fluid fuel mixture that is injected rapidly into the reactor. A carrier gas used in the nozzle serves as a carrier for the fuel mixture, and further dilutes the energetic material and increases its injection velocity into the reactor. The injector nozzle is cooled to keep the fuel mixture below the decomposition temperature to prevent spontaneous detonation of the explosive materials before contact with the high-temperature molten salt bath. 2 figs.

  14. Transient and steady state creep response of ice I and magnesium sulfate hydrate eutectic aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, C.; Cooper, R.F.; Goldsby, D.L.; Durham, W.B.; Kirby, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    Using uniaxial compression creep experiments, we characterized the transient and steady state deformation behaviors of eutectic aggregates of system ice I and MgSO4 11H2O (MS11; meridianiite), which has significance because of its likely presence on moons of the outer solar system. Synthetic samples of eutectic liquid bulk composition, which produce eutectic colonies containing 0.35-0.50 volume fraction MS11, were tested as functions of colony size and lamellar spacing, temperature (230-250 K), and confining pressure (0.1 and 50 MPa) to strains ???0.2. Up to a differential stress of 6 MPa, the ice I-MS11 aggregates display an order of magnitude higher effective viscosity and higher stress sensitivity than do aggregates of pure polycrystalline ice at the same conditions. The creep data and associated microstructural observations demonstrate, however, that the aggregates are additionally more brittle than pure ice, approaching rate-independent plasticity that includes rupture of the hydrate phase at 6-8 MPa, depending on the scale of the microstructure. Microstructures of deformed samples reveal forms of semibrittle flow in which the hydrate phase fractures while the ice phase deforms plastically. Semibrittle flow in the icy shell of a planetary body would truncate the lithospheric strength envelope and thereby decrease the depth to the brittle-ductile transition by 55% and reduce the failure limit for compressional surface features from 10 to ???6 MPa. A constitutive equation that includes eutectic colony boundary sliding and intracolony flow is used to describe the steady state rheology of the eutectic aggregates. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. On the nature of eutectic carbides in Cr-Ni white cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, G.; Nielsen, R. L.; MacMillan, N. H.

    1991-08-01

    The mechanical and tribological properties of white cast irons are strongly dependent on whether they contain M7C3 or M3C carbides (M = Fe, Cr, etc.). In an effort to improve the wear resistance of such materials, the United States Bureau of Mines has studied the effects of adding 0.3 to 2.3 wt pct (throughout) Si to hypoeutectic irons containing approximately 8.5 pct Cr and 6.0 pct Ni. The eutectic carbides formed were identified by electron microprobe analysis, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron (SEM) and optical microscopies. In addition, differential thermal analysis (DTA) was used to study the process of solidification. At Si contents of 0.3 and 1.2 pct, the eutectic carbides exhibited a duplex structure, consisting of cores of M7C3 surrounded by shells of M3C. Additionally, the microstructure contained ledeburite (M3C + ?Fe (austenite)). At the higher Si content of 1.6 pct, the eutectic carbides consisted entirely of M7C3, and some ledeburite remained. Last, when the Si content was raised to 2.3 pct, the eutectic carbides again consisted entirely of M7C3, but ledeburite was no longer formed. These observations can be explained in terms of the effects of Si and, to a lesser extent, of Ni on the shape of the liquidus surface of the metastable Fe-Cr-C phase diagram. The addition of Si reduces the roles played by the four-phase class II p reaction L + M7C3 ? M3C + ?Fe and the ledeburitic eutectic reaction L ? M3C + ?Fe in the overall process of solidification.

  16. Simulations of the Eutectic Transformations in the Platinum-Carbon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monas, A.; Bloembergen, P.; Dong, W.; Shchyglo, O.; Steinbach, I.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we present the simulation of the eutectic phase transitions in the Pt-C system, in terms of both freezing and melting, using the multi-phase-field model. The experimentally obtained heat-extraction and -injection rates associated with the induction of freezing and melting are converted into the corresponding rates for microstructure-scale simulations. In spite of the extreme differences in the volume fractions of the FCC-Pt-rich phase on the one hand and graphite (C) on the other, satisfactory results for the kinetics of solidification and melting have been obtained, involving reasonable offsets in temperature, inducing freezing and melting, with respect to the equilibrium eutectic temperature. For freezing in the simulations, the needle/rod-like morphology, as experimentally observed, was reproduced for different heat extraction rates. The seemingly anomalous peak characterizing the simulated freezing curves is ascribed to the speed up of the solidification process due to the curvature effect. Similarly, a peak is observed in the experimental freezing curves, also showing up more clearly with increasing freezing rates. Melting was simulated starting from a frozen structure produced by a freezing simulation. The simulations reproduce the experimental melting curves and, together with the simulated freezing curves, help to understand the phase transition of the Pt-C eutectic. Finally, the effect of metallic impurities was studied. As shown for Au, impurities affect the morphology of the eutectic structure, their impact increasing with the impurity content, i.e., they can act as modifiers of the structure, as earlier reported for irregular eutectics.

  17. Transient and steady state creep response of ice I and magnesium sulfate hydrate eutectic aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Christine; Cooper, Reid F.; Goldsby, David L.; Durham, William B.; Kirby, Stephen H.

    2011-04-01

    Using uniaxial compression creep experiments, we characterized the transient and steady state deformation behaviors of eutectic aggregates of system ice I and MgSO4 • 11H2O (MS11; meridianiite), which has significance because of its likely presence on moons of the outer solar system. Synthetic samples of eutectic liquid bulk composition, which produce eutectic colonies containing 0.35-0.50 volume fraction MS11, were tested as functions of colony size and lamellar spacing, temperature (230-250 K), and confining pressure (0.1 and 50 MPa) to strains ≤ 0.2. Up to a differential stress of 6 MPa, the ice I-MS11 aggregates display an order of magnitude higher effective viscosity and higher stress sensitivity than do aggregates of pure polycrystalline ice at the same conditions. The creep data and associated microstructural observations demonstrate, however, that the aggregates are additionally more brittle than pure ice, approaching rate-independent plasticity that includes rupture of the hydrate phase at 6-8 MPa, depending on the scale of the microstructure. Microstructures of deformed samples reveal forms of semibrittle flow in which the hydrate phase fractures while the ice phase deforms plastically. Semibrittle flow in the icy shell of a planetary body would truncate the lithospheric strength envelope and thereby decrease the depth to the brittle-ductile transition by 55% and reduce the failure limit for compressional surface features from 10 to ˜6 MPa. A constitutive equation that includes eutectic colony boundary sliding and intracolony flow is used to describe the steady state rheology of the eutectic aggregates.

  18. Natural deep eutectic solvents as new potential media for green technology.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yuntao; van Spronsen, Jaap; Witkamp, Geert-Jan; Verpoorte, Robert; Choi, Young Hae

    2013-03-01

    Developing new green solvents is one of the key subjects in Green Chemistry. Ionic liquids (ILs) and deep eutectic solvents, thus, have been paid great attention to replace current harsh organic solvents and have been applied to many chemical processing such as extraction and synthesis. However, current ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents have still limitations to be applied to a real chemical industry due to toxicity against human and environment and high cost of ILs and solid state of most deep eutectic solvents at room temperature. Recently we discovered that many plant abundant primary metabolites changed their state from solid to liquid when they were mixed in proper ratio. This finding made us hypothesize that natural deep eutectic solvents (NADES) play a role as alternative media to water in living organisms and tested a wide range of natural products, which resulted in discovery of over 100 NADES from nature. In order to prove deep eutectic feature the interaction between the molecules was investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. All the tested NADES show clear hydrogen bonding between components. As next step physical properties of NADES such as water activity, density, viscosity, polarity and thermal properties were measured as well as the effect of water on the physical properties. In the last stage the novel NADES were applied to the solubilization of wide range of biomolecules such as non-water soluble bioactive natural products, gluten, starch, and DNA. In most cases the solubility of the biomolecules evaluated in this study was greatly higher than water. Based on the results the novel NADES may be expected as potential green solvents at room temperature in diverse fields of chemistry. PMID:23427801

  19. Natural deep eutectic solvents as new potential media for green technology.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Dai Y; van Spronsen J; Witkamp GJ; Verpoorte R; Choi YH

    2013-03-05

    Developing new green solvents is one of the key subjects in Green Chemistry. Ionic liquids (ILs) and deep eutectic solvents, thus, have been paid great attention to replace current harsh organic solvents and have been applied to many chemical processing such as extraction and synthesis. However, current ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents have still limitations to be applied to a real chemical industry due to toxicity against human and environment and high cost of ILs and solid state of most deep eutectic solvents at room temperature. Recently we discovered that many plant abundant primary metabolites changed their state from solid to liquid when they were mixed in proper ratio. This finding made us hypothesize that natural deep eutectic solvents (NADES) play a role as alternative media to water in living organisms and tested a wide range of natural products, which resulted in discovery of over 100 NADES from nature. In order to prove deep eutectic feature the interaction between the molecules was investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. All the tested NADES show clear hydrogen bonding between components. As next step physical properties of NADES such as water activity, density, viscosity, polarity and thermal properties were measured as well as the effect of water on the physical properties. In the last stage the novel NADES were applied to the solubilization of wide range of biomolecules such as non-water soluble bioactive natural products, gluten, starch, and DNA. In most cases the solubility of the biomolecules evaluated in this study was greatly higher than water. Based on the results the novel NADES may be expected as potential green solvents at room temperature in diverse fields of chemistry.

  20. The fabrication of all-silicon micro gas chromatography columns using gold diffusion eutectic bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radadia, A. D.; Salehi-Khojin, A.; Masel, R. I.; Shannon, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Temperature programming of gas chromatography (GC) separation columns accelerates the elution rate of chemical species through the column, increasing the speed of analysis, and hence making it a favorable technique to speedup separations in microfabricated GCs (micro-GC). Temperature-programmed separations would be preferred in an all-silicon micro-column compared to a silicon-Pyrex® micro-column given that the thermal conductivity and diffusivity of silicon is 2 orders of magnitude higher than Pyrex®. This paper demonstrates how to fabricate all-silicon micro-columns that can withstand the temperature cycling required for temperature-programmed separations. The columns were sealed using a novel bonding process where they were first bonded using a gold eutectic bond, then annealed at 1100 °C to allow gold diffusion into silicon and form what we call a gold diffusion eutectic bond. The gold diffusion eutectic-bonded micro-columns when examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) and blade insertion techniques showed bonding strength comparable to the previously reported anodic-bonded columns. Gas chromatography-based methane injections were also used as a novel way to investigate proper sealing between channels. A unique methane elution peak at various carrier gas inlet pressures demonstrated the suitability of gold diffusion eutectic-bonded channels as micro-GC columns. The application of gold diffusion eutectic-bonded all-silicon micro-columns to temperature-programmed separations (120 °C min-1) was demonstrated with the near-baseline separation of n-C6 to n-C12 alkanes in 35 s.

  1. Simulations of the Eutectic Transformations in the Platinum-Carbon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monas, A.; Bloembergen, P.; Dong, W.; Shchyglo, O.; Steinbach, I.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present the simulation of the eutectic phase transitions in the Pt-C system, in terms of both freezing and melting, using the multi-phase-field model. The experimentally obtained heat-extraction and -injection rates associated with the induction of freezing and melting are converted into the corresponding rates for microstructure-scale simulations. In spite of the extreme differences in the volume fractions of the FCC-Pt-rich phase on the one hand and graphite (C) on the other, satisfactory results for the kinetics of solidification and melting have been obtained, involving reasonable offsets in temperature, inducing freezing and melting, with respect to the equilibrium eutectic temperature. For freezing in the simulations, the needle/rod-like morphology, as experimentally observed, was reproduced for different heat extraction rates. The seemingly anomalous peak characterizing the simulated freezing curves is ascribed to the speed up of the solidification process due to the curvature effect. Similarly, a peak is observed in the experimental freezing curves, also showing up more clearly with increasing freezing rates. Melting was simulated starting from a frozen structure produced by a freezing simulation. The simulations reproduce the experimental melting curves and, together with the simulated freezing curves, help to understand the phase transition of the Pt-C eutectic. Finally, the effect of metallic impurities was studied. As shown for Au, impurities affect the morphology of the eutectic structure, their impact increasing with the impurity content, i.e., they can act as modifiers of the structure, as earlier reported for irregular eutectics.

  2. Hygroscopic salts and the potential for life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Davila, Alfonso F; Duport, Luis Gago; Melchiorri, Riccardo; Jänchen, Jochen; Valea, Sergio; de Los Rios, Asunción; Fairén, Alberto G; Möhlmann, Diedrich; McKay, Christopher P; Ascaso, Carmen; Wierzchos, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Hygroscopic salts have been detected in soils in the northern latitudes of Mars, and widespread chloride-bearing evaporitic deposits have been detected in the southern highlands. The deliquescence of hygroscopic minerals such as chloride salts could provide a local and transient source of liquid water that would be available for microorganisms on the surface. This is known to occur in the Atacama Desert, where massive halite evaporites have become a habitat for photosynthetic and heterotrophic microorganisms that take advantage of the deliquescence of the salt at certain relative humidity (RH) levels. We modeled the climate conditions (RH and temperature) in a region on Mars with chloride-bearing evaporites, and modeled the evolution of the water activity (a(w)) of the deliquescence solutions of three possible chloride salts (sodium chloride, calcium chloride, and magnesium chloride) as a function of temperature. We also studied the water absorption properties of the same salts as a function of RH. Our climate model results show that the RH in the region with chloride-bearing deposits on Mars often reaches the deliquescence points of all three salts, and the temperature reaches levels above their eutectic points seasonally, in the course of a martian year. The a(w) of the deliquescence solutions increases with decreasing temperature due mainly to the precipitation of unstable phases, which removes ions from the solution. The deliquescence of sodium chloride results in transient solutions with a(w) compatible with growth of terrestrial microorganisms down to 252 K, whereas for calcium chloride and magnesium chloride it results in solutions with a(w) below the known limits for growth at all temperatures. However, taking the limits of a(w) used to define special regions on Mars, the deliquescence of calcium chloride deposits would allow for the propagation of terrestrial microorganisms at temperatures between 265 and 253 K, and for metabolic activity (no growth) at temperatures between 253 and 233 K. PMID:20735252

  3. Molten nitrate salt technology development status report

    SciTech Connect

    Carling, R.W.; Kramer, C.M.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Nissen, D.A.; Goods, S.H.; Mar, R.W.; Munford, J.W.; Karnowsky, M.M.; Biefeld, R.N.; Norem, N.J.

    1981-03-01

    Recognizing thermal energy storage as potentially critical to the successful commercialization of solar thermal power systems, the Department of Energy (DOE) has established a comprehensive and aggressive thermal energy storage technology development program. Of the fluids proposed for heat transfer and energy storage molten nitrate salts offer significant economic advantages. The nitrate salt of most interest is a binary mixture of NaNO/sub 3/ and KNO/sub 3/. Although nitrate/nitrite mixtures have been used for decades as heat transfer and heat treatment fluids the use has been at temperatures of about 450/sup 0/C and lower. In solar thermal power systems the salts will experience a temperature range of 350 to 600/sup 0/C. Because central receiver applications place more rigorous demands and higher temperatures on nitrate salts a comprehensive experimental program has been developed to examine what effects, if any, the new demands and temperatures have on the salts. The experiments include corrosion testing, environmental cracking of containment materials, and determinations of physical properties and decomposition mechanisms. This report details the work done at Sandia National Laboratories in each area listed. In addition, summaries of the experimental programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of New York, EIC Laboratories, Inc., and the Norwegian Institute of Technology on molten nitrate salts are given. Also discussed is how the experimental programs will influence the near-term central receiver programs such as utility repowering/industrial retrofit and cogeneration. The report is designed to provide easy access to the latest information and data on molten NaNO/sub 3//KNO/sub 3/ for the designers and engineers of future central receiver projects.

  4. Refinement of Eutectic Si in High Purity Al-5Si Alloys with Combined Ca and P Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Thomas Hartmut; Li, Jiehua; Schaffer, Paul Louis; Schumacher, Peter; Arnberg, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The effects of combined additions of Ca and P on the eutectic Si in a series of high purity Al-5 wt pct Si alloys have been investigated with the entrained droplet technique and complementary sets of conventional castings. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal analysis were used to investigate the eutectic droplet undercooling and the recalescence undercooling, respectively. Optical microscopy, SEM, EPMA, and TEM were employed to characterize the resultant microstructures. It was found that 250 ppm Ca addition to Al-5Si wt pct alloys with higher P contents leads to a significant increase of the eutectic droplet undercooling. For low or moderate cooling rates, the TEM results underline that Ca additions do not promote Si twinning. Thus, a higher twin density cannot be expected in Ca containing Al-Si alloys after, e.g., sand casting. Consequently, a refinement of the eutectic Si from coarse flake-like to fine plate-like structure, rather than a modification of the eutectic Si to a fibrous morphology, was achieved. This strongly indicates that the main purpose of Ca additions is to counteract the coarsening effect of the eutectic Si imposed by higher P concentrations. Significant multiple Si twinning was observed in melt-spun condition; however, this can be attributed to the higher cooling rate. After DSC heating (slow cooling), most of Si twins disappeared. Thus, the well-accepted impurity-induced twinning mechanism may be not valid in the case of Ca addition. The possible refinement mechanisms were discussed in terms of nucleation and growth of eutectic Si. We propose that the pre-eutectic Al2Si2Ca phase and preferential formation of Ca3P2 deactivate impurity particles, most likely AlP, poisoning the nucleation sites for eutectic Si.

  5. Investigation of the final stages of solidification and eutectic phase formation in Re and Ru containing nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckl, A.; Rettig, R.; Cenanovic, S.; Gken, M.; Singer, R. F.

    2010-07-01

    The microstructure resulting from the final stages of solidificationcommonly referred to as eutectic islandshas been analysed in detail for three nickel-base superalloys containing Re and Ru. Focused ion beam 3-D reconstruction and EBSD-analysis were used to clarify the origin of different eutectic structure types. One common type of parent 3-D eutectic structure was identified. The solidification process of the final solidifying liquid has been further investigated by electron probe microanalysis mappings along with DICTRA simulations. Two models for diffusion controlled phase transformations are shown to present a fair description of the solidification sequence.

  6. Low-melting mixtures based on choline ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Rengstl, Doris; Fischer, Veronika; Kunz, Werner

    2014-11-01

    In this article a strategy is proposed for the design of low toxic, room temperature liquid low-melting mixtures (LMMs) which are entirely composed of natural materials. From literature it is well known that, in general, deep eutectic solvents based on choline chloride and dicarboxylic acids are LMMs, but not liquids at room temperature, with one exception: a 1?:?1 molar mixture of malonic acid and choline chloride. Therefore, the starting point of this study was the decrease of the melting point of one of the components, namely the dicarboxylic acid, which is succinic, glutaric or adipic acid. For this purpose, one of the two protons of the acidic group was exchanged by a bulky unsymmetrical choline cation. The resulting ionic liquids (ILs) were still solid at room temperature, but have a reduced melting temperature compared to the corresponding acids. In the second step, mixtures of these ILs with choline chloride were prepared. It turned out that choline glutarate-choline chloride mixtures are liquids at room temperature at compositions containing 95-98 wt% of choline glutarate. Finally, urea was added as another hydrogen bond donor. Density, conductivity and viscosity measurements were performed for all obtained mixtures. Moreover, a Walden plot was drawn which indicates that all mixtures are liquids with fully dissociated ions moving independently. Therefore, they are considered as "good" ionic liquids and, thus, for example they can be used to exchange more toxic or less biodegradable ILs in application processes. A brief outlook containing application possibilities is given. It is demonstrated that choline dodecylsulfate is readily soluble in these mixtures, forming aggregates in the LMM at temperatures exceeding 55 C. PMID:25242504

  7. Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Hegde, Uday G.

    2012-01-01

    The subject presentation, entitled, Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) Experiment, was presented at the International Space Station (ISS) Increment 33/34 Science Symposium. This presentation provides an overview of an international collaboration between NASA and CNES to study the behavior of a dilute aqueous solution of Na2SO4 (5% w) at near-critical conditions. The Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) investigation, serves as important precursor work for subsequent Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) experiments. The SCWM investigation will be performed in DECLICs High Temperature Insert (HTI) for the purpose of studying critical fluid phenomena at high temperatures and pressures. The HTI includes a completely sealed and integrated test cell (i.e., Sample Cell Unit SCU) that will contain approximately 0.3 ml of the aqueous test solution. During the sequence of tests, scheduled to be performed in FY13, temperatures and pressures will be elevated to critical conditions (i.e., Tc = 374C and Pc = 22 MPa) in order to observe salt precipitation, precipitate agglomeration and precipitate transport in the presence of a temperature gradient without the influences of gravitational forces. This presentation provides an overview of the motivation for this work, a description of the DECLIC HTI hardware, the proposed test sequences, and a brief discussion of the scientific research objectives.

  8. Elaboration of garlic and salt spice with reduced sodium intake.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Jssica F; Junqueira, Gabriela; Gonalves, Carla S; Carneiro, Joo D S; Pinheiro, Ana Carla M; Nunes, Cleiton A

    2014-12-01

    Garlic and salt spice is widely used in Brazilian cookery, but it has a high sodium content; as high sodium intake has been strongly correlated to the incidence of chronic diseases. This study aimed to develop a garlic and salt spice with reduced sodium intake. Sensory evaluation was conducted by applying the spices to cooked rice. First, the optimal concentration of spice added during rice preparation was determined. Subsequently, seasonings (3:1) were prepared containing 0%, 50% and 25% less NaCl using a mixture of salts consisting of KCl and monosodium glutamate; a seasoning with a 0% NaCl reduction was established as a control. Three formulations of rice with different spices were assessed according to sensory testing acceptance, time-intensity and temporal domain of sensations. The proportions of salts used in the garlic and salt spice did not generate a strange or bad taste in the products; instead, the mixtures were less salty. However, the seasonings with lower sodium levels (F2 and F3) were better accepted in comparison to the traditional seasoning (F1). Therefore, a mixture of NaCl, KCl and monosodium glutamate is a viable alternative to develop a garlic and salt spice with reduced sodium intake. PMID:25590741

  9. Elaboration of garlic and salt spice with reduced sodium intake.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Jssica F; Junqueira, Gabriela; Gonalves, Carla S; Carneiro, Joo D S; Pinheiro, Ana Carla M; Nunes, Cleiton A

    2014-11-28

    Garlic and salt spice is widely used in Brazilian cookery, but it has a high sodium content; as high sodium intake has been strongly correlated to the incidence of chronic diseases. This study aimed to develop a garlic and salt spice with reduced sodium intake. Sensory evaluation was conducted by applying the spices to cooked rice. First, the optimal concentration of spice added during rice preparation was determined. Subsequently, seasonings (3:1) were prepared containing 0%, 50% and 25% less NaCl using a mixture of salts consisting of KCl and monosodium glutamate; a seasoning with a 0% NaCl reduction was established as a control. Three formulations of rice with different spices were assessed according to sensory testing acceptance, time-intensity and temporal domain of sensations. The proportions of salts used in the garlic and salt spice did not generate a strange or bad taste in the products; instead, the mixtures were less salty. However, the seasonings with lower sodium levels (F2 and F3) were better accepted in comparison to the traditional seasoning (F1). Therefore, a mixture of NaCl, KCl and monosodium glutamate is a viable alternative to develop a garlic and salt spice with reduced sodium intake. PMID:25424037

  10. Photochemistry of triarylsulfonium salts

    SciTech Connect

    Dektar, J.L.; Hacker, N.P. )

    1990-08-01

    The photolysis of triphenylsulfonium, tris(4-methylphenyl)sulfonium, tris(4-chlorophenyl)sulfonium, several monosubstituted (4-F, 4-Cl, 4-Me, 4-MeO, 4-PhS, and 4-PhCO), and disubstituted (4,4{prime}-Me{sub 2} and 4,4{prime}-(MeO){sub 2}) triphenylsulfonium salts was examined in solution. It was found that direct irradiation of triphenylsulfonium salts produced new rearrangement products, phenylthiobiphenyls, along with diphenyl sulfide, which had been previously reported. Similarly, the triarylsulfonium salts, with the exception of the (4-(phenylthio)phenyl)diphenylsulfonium salts produced new rearrangement products, phenylthiobiphenyls, along with diphenyl sulfide, which had been previously reported. Similarly, the triarylsulfonium salts, with the exception of the (4-(phenylthio)phenyl)diphenylsulfonium salts, gave the new rearrangement products. The mechanism for direct photolysis is proposed to occur from the singlet excited states to give a predominant heterolytic cleavage along with some homolytic cleavage.

  11. Volatility of atmospherically relevant alkylaminium carboxylate salts.

    PubMed

    Lavi, Avi; Segre, Enrico; Gomez-Hernandez, Mario; Zhang, Renyi; Rudich, Yinon

    2015-05-14

    Heterogeneous neutralization reactions of ammonia and alkylamines with sulfuric acid play an important role in aerosol formation and particle growth. However, little is known about the physical and chemical properties of alkylaminium salts of organic acids. In this work we studied the thermal stability and volatility of alkylaminium carboxylate salts of short aliphatic alkylamines with monocarboxylic and dicarboxylic acids. The enthalpy of vaporization and saturation vapor pressure at 298 K were derived using the kinetic model of evaporation and the Clausius-Clapeyron relation. The vapor pressure of alkylaminium dicarboxylate salts is ∼10(-6) Pa, and the vaporization enthalpy ranges from 73 to 134 kJ mol(-1). Alkylaminium monocarboxylate salts show high thermal stability, and their thermograms do not follow our evaporation model. Hence, we inferred their vapor pressure from their thermograms as comparable to that of ammonium sulfate (∼10(-9) Pa). Further characterization showed that alkylaminium monocarboxylates are room temperature protic ionic liquids (RTPILs) that are more hygroscopic than ammonium sulfate (AS). We suggest that the irregular thermograms result from an incomplete neutralization reaction leading to a mixture of ionic and nonionic compounds. We conclude that these salts are expected to contribute to new particle formation and particle growth under ambient conditions and can significantly enhance the CCN activity of mixed particles in areas where SO2 emissions are regulated. PMID:25549695

  12. Fluoridated salt in France.

    PubMed

    Hescot, P; Roland, E; Desfontaine, J

    1995-07-01

    Since November 28, 1985, fluoridated salt at a concentration of 250 mg KF per Kg has been authorized in food in France. It was introduced in the market at the end of 1986 and represented, in 1993, more than 60% of the market of salt. The effect of this Public Health measure will be shown. The efficiency is evaluated in epidemiological studies concerning DMF in the whole of France and in terms of safety by measurement of urinary excretion of fluoride in children who consume potassium fluoride in the salt and fluoride tablets. Last, the prevention policy in France will be described, including the use of fluoridated salt. PMID:7546136

  13. Worth its salt?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The idea that all underground salt deposits can serve as storage sites for toxic and nuclear waste does not always hold waterliterally. According to Daniel Ronen and Brian Berkowitz of Israel's Weizmann Institute of Science and Yoseph Yechieli of the Geological Survey of Israel, some buried salt layers are in fact highly conductive of liquids, suggesting that wastes buried in their confines could easily leech into groundwater and nearby soil.When drilling three wells into a 10,000-year-old salt layer near the Dead Sea, the researchers found that groundwater had seeped into the layer and had absorbed some of its salt.

  14. Microstructure evolution of eutectic Al-Cu strips by high-speed twin-roll strip casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Seshadev; Ghosh, Sudipto

    2015-10-01

    In the present investigation, microstructural evolutions of functionally graded eutectic Al-Cu strips prepared by high-speed twin-roll strip caster at different casting speeds and liquid melt superheats were studied. The as-cast sample was subjected to scanning electron microscope to study the evolution of microstructure of the strip at different casting speeds and liquid melt superheats. At different casting speeds, non-equilibrium eutectic structure observed on the Al-Cu eutectic strip consists of lamellar as well as wavy structure with a distinct boundary. The lamellar microstructure consists of alternating layers of well-bonded ?-Al phase and ?-Al2Cu phase. The globular flowery structure within the eutectic matrix was observed on the strip at different liquid melt superheats. The microhardness of the as-cast strip was studied by Vickers hardness tester, and it was found that hardness value increases with increasing casting speed and decreases with increasing liquid melt superheat.

  15. Growth and microstructure evolution of the Nb{sub 2}Al-Al{sub 3}Nb eutectic in situ composite

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, C.T.; Ferrandini, P.L.; Milenkovic, S.; Caram, R. . E-mail: rcaram@fem.unicamp.br

    2005-03-15

    In situ composite materials obtained by directional growth of eutectic alloys usually show improved properties, that make them potential candidates for high temperature applications. The eutectic alloy found in the Al-Nb system is composed of the two intermetallic phases Al{sub 3}Nb (D0{sub 22}) and Nb{sub 2}Al (D8{sub b}). This paper describes the directional solidification of an Al-Nb eutectic alloy using a Bridgman type facility at growth rates varying from 1.0 to 2.9 cm/h. Longitudinal and transverse sections of grown samples were characterized regarding the solidification microstructure by using optical and scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction. Despite both phases being intermetallic compounds, the eutectic microstructure obtained was very regular. The results obtained were discussed regarding the effect of the growth rate on the microstructure, lamellar-rod transition and variation of phase volume fraction.

  16. Automated detection and characterization of microstructural features: application to eutectic particles in single crystal Ni-based superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschopp, M. A.; Groeber, M. A.; Fahringer, R.; Simmons, J. P.; Rosenberger, A. H.; Woodward, C.

    2010-03-01

    Serial sectioning methods continue to produce an abundant amount of image data for quantifying the three-dimensional nature of material microstructures. Here, we discuss a methodology to automate detecting and characterizing eutectic particles taken from serial images of a production turbine blade made of a heat-treated single crystal Ni-based superalloy (PWA 1484). This method includes two important steps for unassisted eutectic particle characterization: automatically identifying a seed point within each particle and segmenting the particle using a region growing algorithm with an automated stop point. Once detected, the segmented eutectic particles are used to calculate microstructural statistics for characterizing and reconstructing statistically representative synthetic microstructures for single crystal Ni-based superalloys. The significance of this work is its ability to automate characterization for analysing the 3D nature of eutectic particles.

  17. Salt splitting using ceramic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kurath, D.E.

    1997-10-01

    Many radioactive aqueous wastes in the DOE complex have high concentrations of sodium that can negatively affect waste treatment and disposal operations. Sodium can decrease the durability of waste forms such as glass and is the primary contributor to large disposal volumes. Waste treatment processes such as cesium ion exchange, sludge washing, and calcination are made less efficient and more expensive because of the high sodium concentrations. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City UT) are developing an electrochemical salt splitting process based on inorganic ceramic sodium (Na), super-ionic conductor (NaSICON) membranes that shows promise for mitigating the impact of sodium. In this process, the waste is added to the anode compartment, and an electrical potential is applied to the cell. This drives sodium ions through the membrane, but the membrane rejects most other cations (e.g., Sr{sup +2}, Cs{sup +}). The charge balance in the anode compartment is maintained by generating H{sup +} from the electrolysis of water. The charge balance in the cathode is maintained by generating OH{sup {minus}}, either from the electrolysis of water or from oxygen and water using an oxygen cathode. The normal gaseous products of the electrolysis of water are oxygen at the anode and hydrogen at the cathode. Potentially flammable gas mixtures can be prevented by providing adequate volumes of a sweep gas, using an alternative reductant or destruction of the hydrogen as it is generated. As H{sup +} is generated in the anode compartment, the pH drops. The process may be operated with either an alkaline (pH>12) or an acidic anolyte (pH <1). The benefits of salt splitting using ceramic membranes are (1) waste volume reduction and reduced chemical procurement costs by recycling of NaOH; and (2) direct reduction of sodium in process streams, which enhances subsequent operations such as cesium ion exchange, calcination, and vitrification.

  18. Carburetor mixture control apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Dalke, A.E.

    1983-11-29

    A mixture control device is disclosed for automatically controlling the air to fuel mixture of a conventional carburetor involving a plurality of sloped radial vanes circumferentially located within the annulus formed by the booster venturi and the venturi tube. By inducing significant centrifugal motion in the air passing outside the booster venturi the problems associated with fuel to air mixture changes associated with changes in elevation and changes in seasonal temperatures are alleviated.

  19. Enhancement of coupled growth of off-eutectic alloys by ``stop-and-go'' technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frydman, S. S.; Courtney, T. H.

    1982-06-01

    The beneficial effect of solutal (gravity induced) or other convective segregation on promoting plane front growth in directionally solidified off-eutectic alloys has been investigated. Specifically, it has been found that halting directional solidification for periods of the order an hour frequently results in plane front growth after resumption of solidification in alloys which originally grow dendritically. This is attributed to liquid homogenization during the stop period. This homogenization produces a liquid with composition within the coupled growth region. The process has been analyzed and conditions under which this process is feasible are related to the alloy composition and phase diagram characteristics as well as the growth parameters, thermal gradient, and solidification rate. The process is illustrated by and the analysis compared with selected experiments in the Co-CoAl eutectic.

  20. Development of Ti/Ti{sub 3}Sn functionally gradient material produced by eutectic bonding method

    SciTech Connect

    Kirihara, S.; Takeda, M.; Tsujimoto, T.

    1996-07-15

    Although many materials which have a single function have been developed, future needs are anticipated to include materials which have various functions. A functionally gradient material (FGM) which has characteristics of two different materials is a promising candidate for multi-functional material. The present methods for production of FGM, however, are very complicated and costly. In this study the authors answer the serious problem of high production cost by fabricating the FGM by a eutectic bonding method. This fabrication method includes structural control of FGM by changing the cooling process. They describe Ti/Ti{sub 3}Sn FGM obtained by the eutectic bonding method, and tell how the structure of its composition gradient part is changed by controlling the cooling process.

  1. Real-Time X-Ray Microscopy of Al-Cu Eutectic Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William F.; Curreri, Peter A.; Sen, Subhayu

    1998-01-01

    Recent improvements in the resolution of the X-ray Transmission Microscope (XTM) for Solidification Studies provide microstructure feature detectability down to 5 micrometers during solidification. This presentation will show the recent results from observations made in real-time of the solid-liquid interfacial morphologies of the Al-CuAI2 eutectic alloy. Lamellar dimensions and spacings, transitions of morphology caused by growth rate changes, and eutectic grain structures are open to measurements. A unique vantage point viewing the face of the interface isotherm is possible for the first time with the XTM due to its infinite depth of field. A video of the solid-liquid interfaces seen in-situ and in real-time will be shown.

  2. In situ PM-IRRAS of a glassy carbon electrode/deep eutectic solvent interface.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Luciana; Schennach, Robert; Gollas, Bernhard

    2015-05-21

    The interface of a 1?:?2 molar choline chloride/ethylene glycol deep eutectic solvent with a glassy carbon electrode has been investigated by polarization modulation reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). Temporal spectral changes at open circuit potential show the experiments to be surface sensitive and indicate slow adsorption of electrolyte molecules on the electrode surface. In situ spectroelectrochemical PM-IRRAS measurements reveal characteristic potential-dependent changes of band intensities and wavenumber-shifts in the surface spectra. The potential dependent spectral changes are discussed in terms of adsorption, reduction, desorption and reorientation of choline cations at the interface. Analogies are drawn to the ionic layer structure proposed for the architecture of electrode/ionic liquid interfaces. The results show that in situ PM-IRRAS is generally applicable to glassy carbon electrodes and to electrode interfaces with deep eutectic solvents. PMID:25908481

  3. Phase field simulation of a directional solidification of a ternary eutectic Mo-Si-B Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, O.; Hasemann, G.; Krüger, M.; Halle, T.

    2016-03-01

    We present a eutectic Phase-Field Model for a Mo-Si-B alloy at ternary eutectic composition (Mo-17.5Si-8B), under a constant thermal gradient. The process parameters like cooling rate and thermal gradient were obtained directly from the experimental procedure of zone melting. The equilibrium interface geometries and interface mobility were calculated using an isotropic model. The phase equilibria and the other thermodynamic parameters are obtained by linearizing the Mo-Si-B ternary phase diagram. We have investigated the effect of process parameters on the lamellar growth pattern and lamella pattern stability with respect to the Jackson-Hunt minimum undercooling spacing theory. In order to examine the generated results by the model, they were validated with experimental observed microstructures and measurements and showed to be in a good agreement with the experimental observations.

  4. High temperature oxidation resistant coatings for the directionally solidified Ni-Nb-Cr-Al eutectic superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangman, T. E.; Ulion, N. E.; Felten, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    Protective coatings required for the Ni-Nb-Cr-Al directionally solidified eutectic superalloy were developed and evaluated on the basis of oxidation resistance, diffusional stability, thermal fatigue, and creep resistance. NiCrAlY+Pt and NiCrAlY physical vapor-deposition coating systems exhibited the best combination of properties. Burner-rig testing indicated that the useful life of a 127-micron-thick NiCrAlY+Pt coating exceeds 1000 h at 1366 K. Eutectic-alloy creep lives at 1311 K and a stress of 151.7 MN/sq m were greater for NiCrAlY+Pt-coated specimens than for uncoated specimens by a factor of two.

  5. Eutectic bonding of a Ti sputter coated, carbon aerogel wafer to a Ni foil

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A.F.; Hayes, J.P.; Kanna, R.L.

    1994-06-01

    The formation of high energy density, storage devices is achievable using composite material systems. Alternate layering of carbon aerogel wafers and Ni foils with rnicroporous separators is a prospective composite for capacitor applications. An inherent problem exists to form a physical bond between Ni and the porous carbon wafer. The bonding process must be limited to temperatures less than 1000{degrees}C, at which point the aerogel begins to degrade. The advantage of a low temperature eutectic in the Ni-Ti alloy system solves this problem. Ti, a carbide former, is readily adherent as a sputter deposited thin film onto the carbon wafer. A vacuum bonding process is then used to join the Ni foil and Ti coating through eutectic phase formation. The parameters required for successfld bonding are described along with a structural characterization of the Ni foil-carbon aerogel wafer interface.

  6. Superalloy eutectic composites with the VI A refractory elements - Cr, Mo and W

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, M. R.; Walter, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses the phase equilibria for the ternary systems NiAlCr, NiAlMo, and NiAlW, with emphasis on reactions from the liquid state, although some of the solid state reactions are mentioned. It is shown that eutectics in the Ni-Al-refractory element (Cr, Mo, W) systems offer the potential for high-temperature turbine blade and vane applications. In particular, it is shown that the phase diagrams of these ternary systems can be manipulated to alter the eutectic phases and morphologies by simple quaternary alloying modifications. The resultant combination of chemistry and structure can be controlled to ensure a behavior that is well-matched to hot section component materials requirements.

  7. Effects of temperature and strain rate on the mechanical properties of T91 material tested in liquid lead bismuth eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Bosch, J.; Sapundjiev, D.; Almazouzi, A.

    2006-09-01

    The effects of temperature and strain rate on the susceptibility of one of the most promising candidate materials for cladding and high temperature components for ADS, Ferritic/Martensitic steel (T91), to liquid metal embrittlement have been investigated in the temperature interval 150-450 C, at strain rates between 1 10 -3 s -1 and 1 10 -6 s -1. The effect of the liquid lead bismuth eutectic has been evaluated by comparison between tests in the liquid metal and in Ar with 5% H 2. Although the untreated T91 material did not undergo liquid metal embrittlement and there was no apparent change in trends of the tensile properties as function of temperature or strain rate due to the liquid metal, the pre-exposed T91, which was exposed to oxygen poor LBE at 450 C for 4000 h and tested at 450 C did show a decrease in total elongation. The total elongation of the untreated T91 specimens in liquid lead bismuth and in H 2/Ar-gas mixture followed the same dependence on the temperature up to 245 C. At temperatures above 375 C no results are available from testing in controlled gas environment however reference data measured on the same batch of steel in air are used for comparison. Varying the strain rate did not cause any deterioration in the tensile properties of the material in liquid metal compared to those in gas atmosphere. The results are discussed in terms of self-healing mechanism and crack initiation processes.

  8. A feasibility study of a diffusion barrier between Ni-Cr-Al coatings and nickel-based eutectic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, S. G.; Zellars, G. R.

    1978-01-01

    Coating systems have been proposed for potential use on eutectic alloy components in high-temperature gas turbine engines. In a study to prevent the deterioration of such systems by diffusion, a tungsten sheet 25 microns thick was placed between eutectic alloys and an Ni-Cr-Al layer. Layered test specimens were aged at 1100 C for as long as 500 h. Without the tungsten barrier the delta phase of the eutectic deteriorated by diffusion of niobium into the Ni-Cr-Al. Insertion of the tungsten barrier stopped the diffusion of niobium from the delta phase. Chromium diffusion from the Ni-Cr-Al into the gamma/gamma-prime phase of the eutectic was greatly reduced by the barrier. However, the barrier thickness decreased with time, and tungsten diffused into both the Ni-Cr-Al and the eutectic. When the delta platelets were aligned parallel rather than perpendicular to the Ni-Cr-Al layer, diffusion into the eutectic was reduced.

  9. Growth of sapphire and oxide eutectic fibers by the EFG technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurlov, V. N.; Stryukov, D. O.; Shikunova, I. A.

    2016-01-01

    Single-crystal sapphire and oxide binary (Al2O3-Y3Al5O12, Al2O3-Er3Al5O12, Al2O3- GdAlO3) and ternary (Al2O3-ZrO2(Y2O3)) eutectic fibers of 150-300 m in diameters were grown by the edge-defined film-fed growth (EFG) technique. Microstructure and some properties of fibers were investigated.

  10. A novel green approach for the chemical modification of silica particles based on deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Gu, Tongnian; Zhang, Mingliang; Chen, Jia; Qiu, Hongdeng

    2015-06-18

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs), as a novel class of green solvents, were successfully applied as eco-friendly and sustainable reaction media for fast surface modification of spherical porous silica, resulting in stationary phases for high-performance liquid chromatography. The new reaction media were advantageous over organic solvents in many aspects, such as the high dispersibility of silica spheres and their non-volatility. PMID:25985926

  11. Comparison of Co-C Eutectic-Point Cells for Thermocouple Calibration Between SP and NMIJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, H.; Holmsten, M.; Klason, P.

    2015-03-01

    As recently reported, the metal-carbon eutectic points seem to be useful as practical reference points for calibrating thermocouples. The melting temperature of the cobalt-carbon eutectic point (Co-C, is an ideal solution for a reference point being at approximately the middle between the freezing point of copper and the melting point of palladium . In this study, a comparison of reference Co-C cells used for thermocouple calibration service was performed between the Technical Institute of Sweden (SP) and the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) by means of two circulating Pt/Pd thermocouples and one circulating Co-C cell in order to investigate the reliability of thermocouple calibration at the Co-C eutectic point. The reference Co-C cell at SP was designed and constructed in the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), and provided to SP, while the reference Co-C cell at NMIJ as well as the circulating cell was designed and constructed at NMIJ. The melting temperature of the reference Co-C cells at SP and NMIJ were evaluated by using the calibrated radiation thermometers at NPL and NMIJ, respectively, prior to the circulation of the thermocouples and the cell between SP and NMIJ. The temperature difference between the reference cells of SP and NMIJ, as measured by means of the circulating thermocouples, was found to be within , while that measured by means of the circulating cell was found to be within . The temperature of reference cells at SP and NMIJ was found to agree within an expanded uncertainty in spite of different temperature traceability chains. This means that the calibration of thermocouples at the Co-C eutectic point was sufficiently reliable.

  12. Diffusion welding of a directionally solidified gamma/gamma prime - delta eutectic alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    Hot-press diffusion welding parameters were developed for a directionally solidified, gamma/gamma prime-delta eutectic alloy. Based on metallography, a good diffusion weld was achieved at 1100 C under 34.5 MPa (5 ksi) pressure for 1 hour. In addition, a dissimilar metal weld between gamma/gamma prime-delta and IN-100 was successfully made at 1100 C under 20.7 MPa (3 ksi) pressure for 1 hour.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of a lithium/sodium carbonate mixture.

    PubMed

    Ottochian, Alistar; Ricca, Chiara; Labat, Frederic; Adamo, Carlo

    2016-03-01

    The diffusion and ionic conductivity of Li x Na1-x CO3 salt mixtures were studied by means of Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, using the Janssen and Tissen model (Janssen and Tissen, Mol Simul 5:83-98; 1990). These salts have received particular attention due to their central role in fuel cells technology, and reliable numerical methods that could perform as important interpretative tool of experimental data are thus required but still lacking. The chosen computational model nicely reproduces the main structural behaviour of the pure Li2CO3, Na2CO3 and K2CO3 carbonates, but also of their Li/K and Li/Na mixtures. However, it fails to accurately describe dynamic properties such as activation energies of diffusion and conduction processes, outlining the need to develop more accurate models for the simulation of molten salt carbonates. PMID:26897519

  14. Utah: Salt Lake City

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title: Snow-Covered Peaks of the Wasatch and Uinta Mountains ... backdrops for the 2002 Winter Olympics, to be held in Salt Lake City, Utah. The mountains surrounding Salt Lake City are renowned for the dry, powdery snow that results from the arid climate and location at the western edge of the ...

  15. Integrated Salt Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urai, Janos L.; Kukla, Peter A.

    2015-04-01

    The growing importance of salt in the energy, subsurface storage, and chemical and food industries also increases the challenges with prediction of geometries, kinematics, stress and transport in salt. This requires an approach, which integrates a broader range of knowledge than is traditionally available in the different scientific and engineering disciplines. We aim to provide a starting point for a more integrated understanding of salt, by presenting an overview of the state of the art in a wide range of salt-related topics, from (i) the formation and metamorphism of evaporites, (ii) rheology and transport properties, (iii) salt tectonics and basin evolution, (iv) internal structure of evaporites, (v) fluid flow through salt, to (vi) salt engineering. With selected case studies we show how integration of these domains of knowledge can bring better predictions of (i) sediment architecture and reservoir distribution, (ii) internal structure of salt for optimized drilling and better cavern design, (iii) reliable long-term predictions of deformations and fluid flow in subsurface storage. A fully integrated workflow is based on geomechanical models, which include all laboratory and natural observations and links macro- and micro-scale studies. We present emerging concepts for (i) the initiation dynamics of halokinesis, (ii) the rheology and deformation of the evaporites by brittle and ductile processes, (iii) the coupling of processes in evaporites and the under- and overburden, and (iv) the impact of the layered evaporite rheology on the structural evolution.

  16. Molten salt electrolyte separator

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-09

    The patent describes a molten salt electrolyte/separator for battery and related electrochemical systems including a molten electrolyte composition and an electrically insulating solid salt dispersed therein, to provide improved performance at higher current densities and alternate designs through ease of fabrication. 5 figs.

  17. Mountain of Salt

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    This photo shows a road salt storage stockpile that is awaiting use for pavement deicing, Port of Milwaukee, WI. The use of salt to deice pavement can be harmful to aquatic life in urban streams. The USGS is involved in studies that focus on the influence of winter runoff on aquatic ecosystems....

  18. Seasonal flows on dark martian slopes, thermal condition for liquescence of salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossacki, Konrad J.; Markiewicz, Wojciech J.

    2014-05-01

    RSLs are narrow, dark albedo features on relatively steep slopes that appear during warm seasons and fade in the cold ones. So far they have only been observed in mid-latitudes where surface temperature is too high, periodically exceeding 300 K, for the presence of shallow ground ice. We attempt to determine what conditions are needed for the liquescence of salt to occur exactly when the RSLs are observed. If the eutectic temperature is exceeded, and humidity is high enough, salts may produce liquid brines through absorption of water vapor and liquescence. We calculate regolith temperature as a function of time and depth, for different macroscopic distributions of salt, for two different microphysical models of the distribution of salt on the regolith grains. Model parameters which are varied include surface albedo, thermal inertia of the dry regolith, the depths at which salt is present, and the salt content. We find that it is possible, for liquescence of magnesium perchlorate to occur where and when RSLs have been observed, but only within a very narrow range of parameters.

  19. Evolution of salt-related structures in compressional settings

    SciTech Connect

    Letouzey, J.; Colleta, B.; Vially, R.; Chermette, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    Sandbox experiments analyzed by computerized X-ray tomography provide relevant models of salt-related contractional structures and improve understanding of the relative importance of the many parameters influencing structural style. In front of thin-skinned fold and thrust belts, the salt layers provide decollement surfaces, which allow the horizontal strain to propagate far toward the edge of the foreland. As shortening increases, older structures forming in front of the system can be overtaken by out-of-sequence faulting and folding. The very low friction coefficient of salt layers induces a symmetric stress system. This promotes pop-up structures rather than asymmetric thrust faults. Salt extrusions are related to former salt ridges or salt walls squeezed by compression and dragged along thrust planes or to local low-pressure zones along crestal tear faults during folding. The salt that spreads out from the fault is rapidly dissolved. The resultant surface collapse structures are progressively filled by a mixture of Recent sediments and reprecipitated evaporates. Salt pinch-outs, either depositional or structural in origin, are a major controlling factor of the deformation geometry in fold and thrust belts. They trigger, either locally or regionally, contractional structures, including folds and thrusts, in rapidly prograding passive margins deforming by gravity gliding. In this structural context, salt pinch-outs also thicken due to differential loading and gravity spreading. The structural complexity in inverted grabens or in basement-involved orogenic belts where salt is present is the outcome of many factors. The salt thickness, the preexisting extensional structures, the synsalt and postsalt rifting, and the related distribution of older salt structures and sediments all localize folds and thrusts during later contraction.

  20. Perfect cellular eutectic growth in directionally solidified NiAl-Cr(Mo) hypereutectic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Zhao; Shen, Jun; Zhang, Jianfei; Wang, Lei; Fu, Hengzhi

    2012-09-01

    Cellular eutectic microstructures with fully lamellar morphology were observed in the directionally solidified Ni-31Al-32Cr-6Mo (at%) hypereutectic alloy at withdrawal rates of 15, 25 and 50 ?m/s, but the morphologies of cellular microstructures did not change consecutively with increasing withdrawal rate. The growth interfaces were deep cellular at withdrawal rates of 15 and 50 ?m/s, but it changed to be shallow cellular at rate of 25 ?m/s. The reason is that the interface undercooling comes to minimum at the middle rate of 25 ?m/s. If the interface undercooling decreases, the tendency of constitutional undercooling will be weaken. The small constitutional undercooling will increase the interface stability, so that the interface morphology changes from deep cellular to shallow cellular. The shallow cellular growth interface led to a perfect cellular eutectic microstructure, which was analogous to the planar eutectic microstructure. In this case, the widths of the intercellular regions were narrowest, no coarse or irregular plates existed at the cell boundaries, and the thicknesses of the lamellae were almost uniform. The properties of the alloy may be markedly improved.