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Sample records for eutherian sex chromosomes

  1. Plant sex chromosome evolution.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    It is now well established that plants have an important place in studies of sex chromosome evolution because of the repeated independent evolution of separate sexes and sex chromosomes. There has been considerable recent progress in studying plant sex chromosomes. In this review, I focus on how these recent studies have helped clarify or answer several important questions about sex chromosome evolution, and I shall also try to clarify some common misconceptions. I also outline future work that will be needed to make further progress, including testing some important ideas by genetic, molecular, and developmental approaches. Systems with different ages can clearly help show the time course of events during changes from an ancestral co-sexual state (hermaphroditism or monoecy), and I will also explain how different questions can be studied in lineages whose dioecy or sex chromosomes evolved at different times in the past. PMID:23125359

  2. Plant Sex Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Deborah

    2016-04-29

    Although individuals in most flowering plant species, and in many haploid plants, have both sex functions, dioecious species-in which individuals have either male or female functions only-are scattered across many taxonomic groups, and many species have genetic sex determination. Among these, some have visibly heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and molecular genetic studies are starting to uncover sex-linked markers in others, showing that they too have fully sex-linked regions that are either too small or are located in chromosomes that are too small to be cytologically detectable from lack of pairing, lack of visible crossovers, or accumulation of heterochromatin. Detailed study is revealing that, like animal sex chromosomes, plant sex-linked regions show evidence for accumulation of repetitive sequences and genetic degeneration. Estimating when recombination stopped confirms the view that many plants have young sex-linked regions, making plants of great interest for studying the timescale of these changes. PMID:26653795

  3. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  4. DAX1/NR0B1 was expressed during mammalian gonadal development and gametogenesis before it was recruited to the eutherian X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Stickels, Robert; Clark, Kevin; Heider, Thomas N; Mattiske, Deidre M; Renfree, Marilyn B; Pask, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 1 (NR0B1) gene is an orphan nuclear receptor that is X-linked in eutherian mammals and plays a critical role in the establishment and function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-gonadal axis. Duplication or overexpression of NR0B1 in eutherian males causes male to female sex reversal, and mutation and deletions of NR0B1 cause testicular defects. Thus, gene dosage is critical for the function of NR0B1 in normal gonadogenesis. However, NR0B1 is autosomal in all noneutherian vertebrates, including marsupials and monotreme mammals, and two active copies of the gene are compatible with both male and female gonadal development. In the current study, we examined the evolution and expression of autosomal NR0B1 during gonadal development in a marsupial (the tammar wallaby) as compared to the role of its X-linked orthologues in a eutherian (the mouse). We show that NR0B1 underwent rapid evolutionary change when it relocated from its autosomal position in the nonmammalian vertebrates, monotremes, and marsupials to an X-linked location in eutherian mammals. Despite the acquisition of a novel genomic location and a unique N-terminal domain, NR0B1 protein distribution was remarkably similar between mice and marsupials both throughout gonadal development and during gamete formation. A conserved accumulation of NR0B1 protein was observed in developing oocytes, where its function appears to be critical in the early embryo, prior to zygotic genome activation. Together these findings suggest that NR0B1 had a conserved role in gonadogenesis that existed long before it moved to the X chromosome and despite undergoing significant evolutionary change. PMID:25395677

  5. Sex chromosome drive.

    PubMed

    Helleu, Quentin; Gérard, Pierre R; Montchamp-Moreau, Catherine

    2015-02-01

    Sex chromosome drivers are selfish elements that subvert Mendel's first law of segregation and therefore are overrepresented among the products of meiosis. The sex-biased progeny produced then fuels an extended genetic conflict between the driver and the rest of the genome. Many examples of sex chromosome drive are known, but the occurrence of this phenomenon is probably largely underestimated because of the difficulty to detect it. Remarkably, nearly all sex chromosome drivers are found in two clades, Rodentia and Diptera. Although very little is known about the molecular and cellular mechanisms of drive, epigenetic processes such as chromatin regulation could be involved in many instances. Yet, its evolutionary consequences are far-reaching, from the evolution of mating systems and sex determination to the emergence of new species. PMID:25524548

  6. Genomics of Sex and Sex Chromosomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sex chromosomes are distinctive, not only because of their gender determining role, but also for genomic features that reflect their evolutionary history. The genomic sequences in the ancient sex chromosomes of humans and in the incipient sex chromosomes of medaka, stickleback, and papaya exhibit u...

  7. SEX CHROMOSOMES IN FLOWERING PLANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sex chromosomes in dioecious and polygamous plants evolved as a mechanism for ensuring outcrossing to increase genetic variation in the offspring. Sex specificity has evolved in 75% of plant families by male sterile or female sterile mutations, but well defined heteromorphic sex chromosomes are know...

  8. Did sex chromosome turnover promote divergence of the major mammal groups?: De novo sex chromosomes and drastic rearrangements may have posed reproductive barriers between monotremes, marsupials and placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Graves, Jennifer A M

    2016-08-01

    Comparative mapping and sequencing show that turnover of sex determining genes and chromosomes, and sex chromosome rearrangements, accompany speciation in many vertebrates. Here I review the evidence and propose that the evolution of therian mammals was precipitated by evolution of the male-determining SRY gene, defining a novel XY sex chromosome pair, and interposing a reproductive barrier with the ancestral population of synapsid reptiles 190 million years ago (MYA). Divergence was reinforced by multiple translocations in monotreme sex chromosomes, the first of which supplied a novel sex determining gene. A sex chromosome-autosome fusion may have separated eutherians (placental mammals) from marsupials 160 MYA. Another burst of sex chromosome change and speciation is occurring in rodents, precipitated by the degradation of the Y. And although primates have a more stable Y chromosome, it may be just a matter of time before the same fate overtakes our own lineage. Also watch the video abstract. PMID:27334831

  9. Numerous Transitions of Sex Chromosomes in Diptera

    PubMed Central

    Vicoso, Beatriz; Bachtrog, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Many species groups, including mammals and many insects, determine sex using heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Diptera flies, which include the model Drosophila melanogaster, generally have XY sex chromosomes and a conserved karyotype consisting of six chromosomal arms (five large rods and a small dot), but superficially similar karyotypes may conceal the true extent of sex chromosome variation. Here, we use whole-genome analysis in 37 fly species belonging to 22 different families of Diptera and uncover tremendous hidden diversity in sex chromosome karyotypes among flies. We identify over a dozen different sex chromosome configurations, and the small dot chromosome is repeatedly used as the sex chromosome, which presumably reflects the ancestral karyotype of higher Diptera. However, we identify species with undifferentiated sex chromosomes, others in which a different chromosome replaced the dot as a sex chromosome or in which up to three chromosomal elements became incorporated into the sex chromosomes, and others yet with female heterogamety (ZW sex chromosomes). Transcriptome analysis shows that dosage compensation has evolved multiple times in flies, consistently through up-regulation of the single X in males. However, X chromosomes generally show a deficiency of genes with male-biased expression, possibly reflecting sex-specific selective pressures. These species thus provide a rich resource to study sex chromosome biology in a comparative manner and show that similar selective forces have shaped the unique evolution of sex chromosomes in diverse fly taxa. PMID:25879221

  10. Numerous transitions of sex chromosomes in Diptera.

    PubMed

    Vicoso, Beatriz; Bachtrog, Doris

    2015-04-01

    Many species groups, including mammals and many insects, determine sex using heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Diptera flies, which include the model Drosophila melanogaster, generally have XY sex chromosomes and a conserved karyotype consisting of six chromosomal arms (five large rods and a small dot), but superficially similar karyotypes may conceal the true extent of sex chromosome variation. Here, we use whole-genome analysis in 37 fly species belonging to 22 different families of Diptera and uncover tremendous hidden diversity in sex chromosome karyotypes among flies. We identify over a dozen different sex chromosome configurations, and the small dot chromosome is repeatedly used as the sex chromosome, which presumably reflects the ancestral karyotype of higher Diptera. However, we identify species with undifferentiated sex chromosomes, others in which a different chromosome replaced the dot as a sex chromosome or in which up to three chromosomal elements became incorporated into the sex chromosomes, and others yet with female heterogamety (ZW sex chromosomes). Transcriptome analysis shows that dosage compensation has evolved multiple times in flies, consistently through up-regulation of the single X in males. However, X chromosomes generally show a deficiency of genes with male-biased expression, possibly reflecting sex-specific selective pressures. These species thus provide a rich resource to study sex chromosome biology in a comparative manner and show that similar selective forces have shaped the unique evolution of sex chromosomes in diverse fly taxa. PMID:25879221

  11. Sex chromosome aneuploidy and aging.

    PubMed

    Stone, J F; Sandberg, A A

    1995-10-01

    Loss of an X chromosome in females and of the Y chromosome in males are phenomena associated with aging. X chromosome loss occurs in and may be limited to PHA stimulated peripheral lymphocytes. In males, the loss of the Y is most evident in bone marrow cells, but also occurs to a lesser extent in PHA stimulated peripheral lymphocytes. X chromosome loss is associated with premature centromere division leading to anaphase lag and elimination in micronuclei. The mechanism of Y chromosome loss has not been elucidated. No pathological consequence of either X or Y chromosome loss has been convincingly demonstrated. With the advent of FISH technology, measurement of sex chromosome aneuploidy may prove to be a convenient assay for cellular senecence and aging. PMID:7565866

  12. First description of multivalent ring structures in eutherian mammalian meiosis: new chromosomal characterization of Cormura brevirostris (Emballonuridae, Chiroptera).

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Ramon Everton Ferreira; Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko; da Costa, Marlyson Jeremias Rodrigues; Noronha, Renata Coelho Rodrigues; Rodrigues, Luís Reginaldo Ribeiro; Pieczarka, Julio César

    2016-08-01

    Twelve specimens of the bat Cormura brevirostris (Emballonuridae: Chiroptera) were collected from four localities in the Brazilian Amazon region and analyzed by classical and molecular cytogenetics. The diploid number and autosomal fundamental number were as previously reported (2n = 22 and FNa = 40, respectively). Fluorescence in situ hybridization using rDNA probes and silver nitrate technique demonstrated the presence of two NOR sites and the presence of internal telomeric sequences at pericentromeric regions of all chromosomes with exception of Y. Based on meiotic studies and chromosome banding we suggest that the sex chromosome pair of C. brevirostris was equivocally identified as it appears in the literature. Meiotic analysis demonstrated that at diplotene-diakinesis the cells had a ring conformation involving four chromosome pairs. This suggests the occurrence of multiple reciprocal translocations among these chromosomes, which is a very rare phenomenon in vertebrates, and has never been described in Eutheria. PMID:27300547

  13. The XXXXY Sex Chromosome Abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Barr, M. L.; Carr, D. H.; Pozsonyi, J.; Wilson, R. A.; Dunn, H. G.; Jacobson, T. S.; Miller, J. R.; Chown, B.

    1962-01-01

    The most common sex chromosome complex in sex chromatin-positive males with Klinefelter's syndrome is XXY. When the complex is XXYY or XXXY, the clinical findings do not seem to differ materially from those seen in XXY subjects, although more patients with these intersexual chromosome complements need to be studied to establish possible phenotypical expressions of the chromosomal variants. Two male children with an XXXXY sex chromosome abnormality are described. The data obtained from the study of these cases and five others described in the literature suggest that the XXXXY patient is likely to have congenital defects not usually seen in the common form of the Klinefelter syndrome. These include a triad of (1) skeletal anomalies (including radioulnar synostosis), (2) hypogenitalism (hypoplasia of penis and scrotum, incomplete descent of testes and defective prepubertal development of seminiferous tubules), and (3) greater risk of severe mental deficiency. That the conclusions are based on data from a small number of patients is emphasized, together with the need for a cytogenetic survey of a large control or unselected population. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10 PMID:13969480

  14. Conservation of sex chromosomes in lacertid lizards.

    PubMed

    Rovatsos, Michail; Vukić, Jasna; Altmanová, Marie; Johnson Pokorná, Martina; Moravec, Jiří; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2016-07-01

    Sex chromosomes are believed to be stable in endotherms, but young and evolutionary unstable in most ectothermic vertebrates. Within lacertids, the widely radiated lizard group, sex chromosomes have been reported to vary in morphology and heterochromatinization, which may suggest turnovers during the evolution of the group. We compared the partial gene content of the Z-specific part of sex chromosomes across major lineages of lacertids and discovered a strong evolutionary stability of sex chromosomes. We can conclude that the common ancestor of lacertids, living around 70 million years ago (Mya), already had the same highly differentiated sex chromosomes. Molecular data demonstrating an evolutionary conservation of sex chromosomes have also been documented for iguanas and caenophidian snakes. It seems that differences in the evolutionary conservation of sex chromosomes in vertebrates do not reflect the distinction between endotherms and ectotherms, but rather between amniotes and anamniotes, or generally, the differences in the life history of particular lineages. PMID:27037610

  15. Recent Origin of the Papaya Sex Chromosomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sex chromosomes in flowering plants, in contrast to those in animals, evolved relatively recently and only a few are heteromorphic. The sex chromosomes of papaya appear at the cytological level to be homomorphic but, at the molecular level, we are finding that the papaya Y chromosome shows features ...

  16. The X chromosome of monotremes shares a highly conserved region with the eutherian and marsupial X chromosomes despite the absence of X chromosome inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.M.; Spencer, J.A.; Graves, J.A.M. ); Riggs, A.D. )

    1990-09-01

    Eight genes, located on the long arm of the human X chromosome and present on the marsupial X chromosome, were mapped by in situ hybridization to the chromosomes of the platypus Ornithorhynchus anatinus, one of the three species of monotreme mammals. All were located on the X chromosome. The authors conclude that the long arm of the human X chromosome represents a highly conserved region that formed part of the X chromosome in a mammalian ancestor at least 150 million years ago. Since three of these genes are located on the long arm of the platypus X chromosome, which is G-band homologous to the Y chromosome and apparently exempt from X chromosome inactivation, the conservation of this region has evidently not depended on isolation by X-Y chromosome differentiation and X chromosome inactivation.

  17. Genetic conflict and sex chromosome evolution

    PubMed Central

    Meiklejohn, Colin D; Tao, Yun

    2009-01-01

    Chromosomal sex determination systems create the opportunity for the evolution of selfish genetic elements that increase the transmission of one sex chromosome at the expense of its homolog. Because such selfish elements on sex chromosomes can reduce fertility and distort the sex ratio of progeny, unlinked suppressors are expected to evolve, bringing different regions of the genome into conflict over the meiotic transmission of the sex chromosomes. Here we argue that recurrent genetic conflict over sex chromosome transmission is an important evolutionary force that has shaped a wide range of seemingly disparate phenomena including the epigenetic regulation of genes expressed in the germline, the distribution of genes in the genome, and the evolution of hybrid sterility between species. PMID:19931208

  18. The tilapias' chromosomes influencing sex determination.

    PubMed

    Cnaani, A

    2013-01-01

    The sex chromosomes of tilapias (family Cichlidae; genera Oreochromis, Sarotherodon and Tilapia) have been studied for over 50 years, which has gained interest from both agricultural and basic scientific perspectives. Several closely related tilapia species which can interbreed have been studied, and it has been repeatedly demonstrated that there is variation within and between species in the chromosomal sex-determination mechanism. Both male and female heterogametic sex-determination systems have been characterized, as well as epistatic and environmental influences on sex determination. Three different linkage groups (LG1, LG3 and LG23) have been identified as sex-associated chromosomes and have been subjected to further cytogenetic research and analyses of the genes located around the sex-determining region. Variation in the genetic and physical characteristics of the sex chromosomes makes tilapias an excellent model system for studying the evolution of vertebrate sex chromosomes. This review summarizes the progress made along 5 decades of research and the current knowledge of the tilapias' sex chromosomes. PMID:24107438

  19. Evolutionary stability of sex chromosomes in snakes.

    PubMed

    Rovatsos, Michail; Vukić, Jasna; Lymberakis, Petros; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2015-12-22

    Amniote vertebrates possess various mechanisms of sex determination, but their variability is not equally distributed. The large evolutionary stability of sex chromosomes in viviparous mammals and birds was believed to be connected with their endothermy. However, some ectotherm lineages seem to be comparably conserved in sex determination, but previously there was a lack of molecular evidence to confirm this. Here, we document a stability of sex chromosomes in advanced snakes based on the testing of Z-specificity of genes using quantitative PCR (qPCR) across 37 snake species (our qPCR technique is suitable for molecular sexing in potentially all advanced snakes). We discovered that at least part of sex chromosomes is homologous across all families of caenophidian snakes (Acrochordidae, Xenodermatidae, Pareatidae, Viperidae, Homalopsidae, Colubridae, Elapidae and Lamprophiidae). The emergence of differentiated sex chromosomes can be dated back to about 60 Ma and preceded the extensive diversification of advanced snakes, the group with more than 3000 species. The Z-specific genes of caenophidian snakes are (pseudo)autosomal in the members of the snake families Pythonidae, Xenopeltidae, Boidae, Erycidae and Sanziniidae, as well as in outgroups with differentiated sex chromosomes such as monitor lizards, iguanas and chameleons. Along with iguanas, advanced snakes are therefore another example of ectothermic amniotes with a long-term stability of sex chromosomes comparable with endotherms. PMID:26702042

  20. Independent evolution of transcriptional inactivation on sex chromosomes in birds and mammals.

    PubMed

    Livernois, Alexandra M; Waters, Shafagh A; Deakin, Janine E; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A; Waters, Paul D

    2013-01-01

    X chromosome inactivation in eutherian mammals has been thought to be tightly controlled, as expected from a mechanism that compensates for the different dosage of X-borne genes in XX females and XY males. However, many X genes escape inactivation in humans, inactivation of the X in marsupials is partial, and the unrelated sex chromosomes of monotreme mammals have incomplete and gene-specific inactivation of X-linked genes. The bird ZW sex chromosome system represents a third independently evolved amniote sex chromosome system with dosage compensation, albeit partial and gene-specific, via an unknown mechanism (i.e. upregulation of the single Z in females, down regulation of one or both Zs in males, or a combination). We used RNA-fluorescent in situ hybridization (RNA-FISH) to demonstrate, on individual fibroblast cells, inactivation of 11 genes on the chicken Z and 28 genes on the X chromosomes of platypus. Each gene displayed a reproducible frequency of 1Z/1X-active and 2Z/2X-active cells in the homogametic sex. Our results indicate that the probability of inactivation is controlled on a gene-by-gene basis (or small domains) on the chicken Z and platypus X chromosomes. This regulatory mechanism must have been exapted independently to the non-homologous sex chromosomes in birds and mammals in response to an over-expressed Z or X in the homogametic sex, highlighting the universal importance that (at least partial) silencing plays in the evolution on amniote dosage compensation and, therefore, the differentiation of sex chromosomes. PMID:23874231

  1. Autosomal location of genes from the conserved mammalian X in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus): implications for mammalian sex chromosome evolution.

    PubMed

    Waters, Paul D; Delbridge, Margaret L; Deakin, Janine E; El-Mogharbel, Nisrine; Kirby, Patrick J; Carvalho-Silva, Denise R; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall

    2005-01-01

    Mammalian sex chromosomes evolved from an ancient autosomal pair. Mapping of human X- and Y-borne genes in distantly related mammals and non-mammalian vertebrates has proved valuable to help deduce the evolution of this unique part of the genome. The platypus, a monotreme mammal distantly related to eutherians and marsupials, has an extraordinary sex chromosome system comprising five X and five Y chromosomes that form a translocation chain at male meiosis. The largest X chromosome (X1), which lies at one end of the chain, has considerable homology to the human X. Using comparative mapping and the emerging chicken database, we demonstrate that part of the therian X chromosome, previously thought to be conserved across all mammals, was lost from the platypus X1 to an autosome. This region included genes flanking the XIST locus, and also genes with Y-linked homologues that are important to male reproduction in therians. Since these genes lie on the X in marsupials and eutherians, and also on the homologous region of chicken chromosome 4, this represents a loss from the monotreme X rather than an additional evolutionary stratum of the human X. PMID:15973504

  2. Sex-biased gene expression at homomorphic sex chromosomes in emus and its implication for sex chromosome evolution

    PubMed Central

    Vicoso, Beatriz; Kaiser, Vera B.; Bachtrog, Doris

    2013-01-01

    Sex chromosomes originate from autosomes. The accumulation of sexually antagonistic mutations on protosex chromosomes selects for a loss of recombination and sets in motion the evolutionary processes generating heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Recombination suppression and differentiation are generally viewed as the default path of sex chromosome evolution, and the occurrence of old, homomorphic sex chromosomes, such as those of ratite birds, has remained a mystery. Here, we analyze the genome and transcriptome of emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) and confirm that most genes on the sex chromosome are shared between the Z and W. Surprisingly, however, levels of gene expression are generally sex-biased for all sex-linked genes relative to autosomes, including those in the pseudoautosomal region, and the male-bias increases after gonad formation. This expression bias suggests that the emu sex chromosomes have become masculinized, even in the absence of ZW differentiation. Thus, birds may have taken different evolutionary solutions to minimize the deleterious effects imposed by sexually antagonistic mutations: some lineages eliminate recombination along the protosex chromosomes to physically restrict sexually antagonistic alleles to one sex, whereas ratites evolved sex-biased expression to confine the product of a sexually antagonistic allele to the sex it benefits. This difference in conflict resolution may explain the preservation of recombining, homomorphic sex chromosomes in other lineages and illustrates the importance of sexually antagonistic mutations driving the evolution of sex chromosomes. PMID:23547111

  3. Sex-biased gene expression at homomorphic sex chromosomes in emus and its implication for sex chromosome evolution.

    PubMed

    Vicoso, Beatriz; Kaiser, Vera B; Bachtrog, Doris

    2013-04-16

    Sex chromosomes originate from autosomes. The accumulation of sexually antagonistic mutations on protosex chromosomes selects for a loss of recombination and sets in motion the evolutionary processes generating heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Recombination suppression and differentiation are generally viewed as the default path of sex chromosome evolution, and the occurrence of old, homomorphic sex chromosomes, such as those of ratite birds, has remained a mystery. Here, we analyze the genome and transcriptome of emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) and confirm that most genes on the sex chromosome are shared between the Z and W. Surprisingly, however, levels of gene expression are generally sex-biased for all sex-linked genes relative to autosomes, including those in the pseudoautosomal region, and the male-bias increases after gonad formation. This expression bias suggests that the emu sex chromosomes have become masculinized, even in the absence of ZW differentiation. Thus, birds may have taken different evolutionary solutions to minimize the deleterious effects imposed by sexually antagonistic mutations: some lineages eliminate recombination along the protosex chromosomes to physically restrict sexually antagonistic alleles to one sex, whereas ratites evolved sex-biased expression to confine the product of a sexually antagonistic allele to the sex it benefits. This difference in conflict resolution may explain the preservation of recombining, homomorphic sex chromosomes in other lineages and illustrates the importance of sexually antagonistic mutations driving the evolution of sex chromosomes. PMID:23547111

  4. Neo-sex chromosomes of Ronderosia bergi: insight into the evolution of sex chromosomes in grasshoppers.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Gimenez, O M; Marti, D A; Cabral-de-Mello, D C

    2015-09-01

    Sex chromosomes have evolved many times from morphologically identical autosome pairs, most often presenting several recombination suppression events, followed by accumulation of repetitive DNA sequences. In Orthoptera, most species have an X0♂ sex chromosome system. However, in the subfamily Melanoplinae, derived variants of neo-sex chromosomes (neo-XY♂ or neo-X1X2Y♂) emerged several times. Here, we examined the differentiation of neo-sex chromosomes in a Melanoplinae species with a neo-XY♂/XX♀ system, Ronderosia bergi, using several approaches: (i) classical cytogenetic analysis, (ii) mapping via fluorescent in situ hybridization of some selected repetitive DNA sequences and microdissected sex chromosomes, and (iii) immunolocalization of distinct histone modifications. The microdissected sex chromosomes were also used as sources for Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of RNA-coding multigene families, to study variants related to the sex chromosomes. Our data suggest that the R. bergi neo-Y has become differentiated after its formation by a Robertsonian translocation and inversions, and has accumulated repetitive DNA sequences. Interestingly, the ex autosomes incorporated into the neo-sex chromosomes retain some autosomal post-translational histone modifications, at least in metaphase I, suggesting that the establishment of functional modifications in neo-sex chromosomes is slower than their sequence differentiation. PMID:25605041

  5. Comparative genome maps of the pangolin, hedgehog, sloth, anteater and human revealed by cross-species chromosome painting: further insight into the ancestral karyotype and genome evolution of eutherian mammals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fengtang; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Li, Tangliang; Fu, Beiyuan; Dobigny, Gauthier; Wang, Jinghuan; Perelman, Polina L; Serdukova, Natalya A; Su, Weiting; O'Brien, Patricia Cm; Wang, Yingxiang; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Volobouev, Vitaly; Nie, Wenhui

    2006-01-01

    To better understand the evolution of genome organization of eutherian mammals, comparative maps based on chromosome painting have been constructed between human and representative species of three eutherian orders: Xenarthra, Pholidota, and Eulipotyphla, as well as between representative species of the Carnivora and Pholidota. These maps demonstrate the conservation of such syntenic segment associations as HSA3/21, 4/8, 7/16, 12/22, 14/15 and 16/19 in Eulipotyphla, Pholidota and Xenarthra and thus further consolidate the notion that they form part of the ancestral karyotype of the eutherian mammals. Our study has revealed many potential ancestral syntenic associations of human chromosomal segments that serve to link the families as well as orders within the major superordinial eutherian clades defined by molecular markers. The HSA2/8 and 7/10 associations could be the cytogenetic signatures that unite the Xenarthrans, while the HSA1/19p could be a putative signature that links the Afrotheria and Xenarthra. But caution is required in the interpretation of apparently shared syntenic associations as detailed analyses also show examples of apparent convergent evolution that differ in breakpoints and extent of the involved segments. PMID:16628499

  6. The genomics of plant sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Vyskot, Boris; Hobza, Roman

    2015-07-01

    Around six percent of flowering species are dioecious, with separate female and male individuals. Sex determination is mostly based on genetics, but morphologically distinct sex chromosomes have only evolved in a few species. Of these, heteromorphic sex chromosomes have been most clearly described in the two model species - Silene latifolia and Rumex acetosa. In both species, the sex chromosomes are the largest chromosomes in the genome. They are hence easily distinguished, can be physically separated and analyzed. This review discusses some recent experimental data on selected model dioecious species, with a focus on S. latifolia. Phylogenetic analyses show that dioecy in plants originated independently and repeatedly even within individual genera. A cogent question is whether there is genetic degeneration of the non-recombining part of the plant Y chromosome, as in mammals, and, if so, whether reduced levels of gene expression in the heterogametic sex are equalized by dosage compensation. Current data provide no clear conclusion. We speculate that although some transcriptome analyses indicate the first signs of degeneration, especially in S. latifolia, the evolutionary processes forming plant sex chromosomes in plants may, to some extent, differ from those in animals. PMID:26025526

  7. Meiosis and chromosome painting of sex chromosome systems in Ceboidea.

    PubMed

    Mudry, M D; Rahn, I M; Solari, A J

    2001-06-01

    The identity of the chromosomes involved in the multiple sex system of Alouatta caraya (Aca) and the possible distribution of this system among other Ceboidea were investigated by chromosome painting of mitotic cells from five species and by analysis of meiosis at pachytene in two species. The identity of the autosome #7 (X2) involved in the multiple system of Aca and its breakage points were demonstrated by both meiosis and chromosome painting. These features are identical to those described by Consigliere et al. [1996] in Alouatta seniculus sara (Assa) and Alouatta seniculus arctoidea (Asar). This multiple system was absent in the other four Ceboidea species studied here. However, data from the literature strongly suggest the presence of this multiple in other members of this genus. The presence of this multiple system among several species and subspecies that show high levels of chromosome rearrangements may suggest a special selective value of this multiple. The meiotic features of the sex systems of Aca and Cebus apella paraguayanus (Cap) are strikingly different at pachytene, as the latter system is similar to the sex pair of man and other primates. The relatively large genetic distances between species presently showing this multiple system suggest that its origin is not recent. Other members of the same genus should be investigated at meiosis and by chromosome painting in order to know the extent and distribution of this complex sex-chromosome system. PMID:11376445

  8. An apparent excess of sex- and reproduction-related genes on the human X chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Saifi, G M; Chandra, H S

    1999-01-01

    We describe here the results of a search of Mendelian inheritance in man, GENDIAG and other sources which suggest that, in comparison with autosomes 1, 2, 3, 4 and 11, the X chromosome may contain a significantly higher number of sex- and reproduction-related (SRR) genes. A similar comparison between X-linked entries and a subset of randomly chosen entries from the remaining autosomes also indicates an excess of genes on the X chromosome with one or more mutations affecting sex determination (e.g. DAX1), sexual differentiation (e.g. androgen receptor) or reproduction (e.g. POF1). A possible reason for disproportionate occurrence of such genes on the X chromosome could be that, during evolution, the 'choice' of a particular pair of homomorphic chromosomes for specialization as sex chromosomes may be related to the number of such genes initially present in it or, since sex determination and sexual dimorphism are often gene dose-dependent processes, the number of such genes necessary to be regulated in a dose-dependent manner. Further analysis of these data shows that XAR, the region which has been added on to the short arm of the X chromosome subsequent to eutherian-marsupial divergence, has nearly as high a proportion of SRR genes as XCR, the conserved region of the X chromosome. These observations are consistent with current hypotheses on the evolution of sexually antagonistic traits on sex chromosomes and suggest that both XCR and XAR may have accumulated SRR traits relatively rapidly because of X linkage. PMID:10097393

  9. Female meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in chicken.

    PubMed

    Schoenmakers, Sam; Wassenaar, Evelyne; Hoogerbrugge, Jos W; Laven, Joop S E; Grootegoed, J Anton; Baarends, Willy M

    2009-05-01

    During meiotic prophase in male mammals, the heterologous X and Y chromosomes remain largely unsynapsed, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) leads to formation of the transcriptionally silenced XY body. In birds, the heterogametic sex is female, carrying Z and W chromosomes (ZW), whereas males have the homogametic ZZ constitution. During chicken oogenesis, the heterologous ZW pair reaches a state of complete heterologous synapsis, and this might enable maintenance of transcription of Z- and W chromosomal genes during meiotic prophase. Herein, we show that the ZW pair is transiently silenced, from early pachytene to early diplotene using immunocytochemistry and gene expression analyses. We propose that ZW inactivation is most likely achieved via spreading of heterochromatin from the W on the Z chromosome. Also, persistent meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) may contribute to silencing of Z. Surprisingly, gammaH2AX, a marker of DSBs, and also the earliest histone modification that is associated with XY body formation in mammalian and marsupial spermatocytes, does not cover the ZW during the synapsed stage. However, when the ZW pair starts to desynapse, a second wave of gammaH2AX accumulates on the unsynapsed regions of Z, which also show a reappearance of the DSB repair protein RAD51. This indicates that repair of meiotic DSBs on the heterologous part of Z is postponed until late pachytene/diplotene, possibly to avoid recombination with regions on the heterologously synapsed W chromosome. Two days after entering diplotene, the Z looses gammaH2AX and shows reactivation. This is the first report of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in a species with female heterogamety, providing evidence that this mechanism is not specific to spermatogenesis. It also indicates the presence of an evolutionary force that drives meiotic sex chromosome inactivation independent of the final achievement of synapsis. PMID:19461881

  10. Female Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation in Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Schoenmakers, Sam; Wassenaar, Evelyne; Hoogerbrugge, Jos W.; Laven, Joop S. E.; Grootegoed, J. Anton; Baarends, Willy M.

    2009-01-01

    During meiotic prophase in male mammals, the heterologous X and Y chromosomes remain largely unsynapsed, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) leads to formation of the transcriptionally silenced XY body. In birds, the heterogametic sex is female, carrying Z and W chromosomes (ZW), whereas males have the homogametic ZZ constitution. During chicken oogenesis, the heterologous ZW pair reaches a state of complete heterologous synapsis, and this might enable maintenance of transcription of Z- and W chromosomal genes during meiotic prophase. Herein, we show that the ZW pair is transiently silenced, from early pachytene to early diplotene using immunocytochemistry and gene expression analyses. We propose that ZW inactivation is most likely achieved via spreading of heterochromatin from the W on the Z chromosome. Also, persistent meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) may contribute to silencing of Z. Surprisingly, γH2AX, a marker of DSBs, and also the earliest histone modification that is associated with XY body formation in mammalian and marsupial spermatocytes, does not cover the ZW during the synapsed stage. However, when the ZW pair starts to desynapse, a second wave of γH2AX accumulates on the unsynapsed regions of Z, which also show a reappearance of the DSB repair protein RAD51. This indicates that repair of meiotic DSBs on the heterologous part of Z is postponed until late pachytene/diplotene, possibly to avoid recombination with regions on the heterologously synapsed W chromosome. Two days after entering diplotene, the Z looses γH2AX and shows reactivation. This is the first report of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in a species with female heterogamety, providing evidence that this mechanism is not specific to spermatogenesis. It also indicates the presence of an evolutionary force that drives meiotic sex chromosome inactivation independent of the final achievement of synapsis. PMID:19461881

  11. Psychoeducational Implications of Sex Chromosome Anomalies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wodrich, David L.; Tarbox, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Numerous anomalies involving the sex chromosomes (X or Y) have been documented and their impact on development, learning, and behavior studied. This article reviews three of these disorders, Turner syndrome, Klinefelter syndrome, and Lesch-Nyhan disease. Each of these three is associated with one or more selective impairments or behavioral…

  12. Plant sex chromosomes: molecular structure and function.

    PubMed

    Jamilena, M; Mariotti, B; Manzano, S

    2008-01-01

    Recent molecular and genomic studies carried out in a number of model dioecious plant species, including Asparagus officinalis, Carica papaya, Silene latifolia, Rumex acetosa and Marchantia polymorpha, have shed light on the molecular structure of both homomorphic and heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and also on the gene functions they have maintained since their evolution from a pair of autosomes. The molecular structure of sex chromosomes in species from different plant families represents the evolutionary pathway followed by sex chromosomes during their evolution. The degree of Y chromosome degeneration that accompanies the suppression of recombination between the Xs and Ys differs among species. The primitive Ys of A. officinalis and C. papaya have only diverged from their homomorphic Xs in a short male-specific and non-recombining region (MSY), while the heteromorphic Ys of S. latifolia, R. acetosa and M. polymorpha have diverged from their respective Xs. As in the Y chromosomes of mammals and Drosophila, the accumulation of repetitive DNA, including both transposable elements and satellite DNA, has played an important role in the divergence and size enlargement of plant Ys, and consequently in reducing gene density. Nevertheless, the degeneration process in plants does not appear to have reached the Y-linked genes. Although a low gene density has been found in the sequenced Y chromosome of M. polymorpha, most of its genes are essential and are expressed in the vegetative and reproductive organs in both male and females. Similarly, most of the Y-linked genes that have been isolated and characterized up to now in S. latifolia are housekeeping genes that have X-linked homologues, and are therefore expressed in both males and females. Only one of them seems to be degenerate with respect to its homologous region in the X. Sequence analysis of larger regions in the homomorphic X and Y chromosomes of papaya and asparagus, and also in the heteromorphic sex chromosomes

  13. Gonadal sex chromosome complement in individuals with sex chromosomal and/or gonadal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Bridge, J.A.; Sanger, W.G.; Seemayer, T.

    1994-09-01

    Gonadal abnormalities are characteristically seen in patients with sex chromosomal aneuploidy. Morphologically these abnormalities can be variable and are hypothesized to be dependent on the sex chromosomal consititution of the gonad (independent of the chromosomal complement of other tissues, such as peripheral blood lymphocytes). In this study, the gonadal sex chromosome complement was evaluated for potential mosaicism and correlated with the histopathology from 5 patients with known sex chromosomal and/or gonadal disorders. FISH techniques using X and Y chromosome specific probes were performed on nuclei extracted from paraffin embedded tissue. Gonadal tissue obtained from case 1 (a true hemaphroditic newborn) consisted of ovotestes and epididymis (left side) and ovary with fallopian tube (right side). Cytogenetic and FISH studies performed on blood, ovotestes and ovary revealed an XX complement. Cytogenetic analysis of blood from case 2, a 4-year-old with suspected Turner syndrome revealed 45,X/46,X,del(Y)(q11.21). FISH analysis of the resected gonads (histologically = immature testes) confirmed an X/XY mosaic complement. Histologically, the gonadal tissue was testicular. Severe autolysis prohibited successful analysis in the 2 remaining cases. In summary, molecular cytogenetic evaluation of gonadal tissue from individuals with sex chromosomal and/or gonadal disorders did not reveal tissue-specific anomalies which could account for differences observed pathologically.

  14. On the origin of sex chromosomes from meiotic drive.

    PubMed

    Úbeda, Francisco; Patten, Manus M; Wild, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    Most animals and many plants make use of specialized chromosomes (sex chromosomes) to determine an individual's sex. Best known are the XY and ZW sex-determination systems. Despite having evolved numerous times, sex chromosomes present something of an evolutionary puzzle. At their origin, alleles that dictate development as one sex or the other (primitive sex chromosomes) face a selective penalty, as they will be found more often in the more abundant sex. How is it possible that primitive sex chromosomes overcome this disadvantage? Any theory for the origin of sex chromosomes must identify the benefit that outweighs this cost and enables a sex-determining mutation to establish in the population. Here we show that a new sex-determining allele succeeds when linked to a sex-specific meiotic driver. The new sex-determining allele benefits from confining the driving allele to the sex in which it gains the benefit of drive. Our model requires few special assumptions and is sufficiently general to apply to the evolution of sex chromosomes in outbreeding cosexual or dioecious species. We highlight predictions of the model that can discriminate between this and previous theories of sex-chromosome origins. PMID:25392470

  15. The key role of repeated DNAs in sex chromosome evolution in two fish species with ZW sex chromosome system

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Despite substantial progress, there are still several gaps in our knowledge about the process of sex chromosome differentiation. The degeneration of sex-specific chromosome in some species is well documented, but it is not clear if all species follow the same evolutionary pathway. The accumulation of repetitive DNA sequences, however, is a common feature. To better understand this involvement, fish species emerge as excellent models because they exhibit a wide variety of sex chromosome and sex determining systems. Besides, they have much younger sex chromosomes compared to higher vertebrates, making it possible to follow early steps of differentiation. Here, we analyzed the arrangement of 9 repetitive DNA sequences in the W chromosomes of 2 fish species, namely Leporinus reinhardti and Triportheus auritus, which present well-differentiated ZZ/ZW sex system, but differ in respect to the size of the sex-specific chromosome. Both W chromosomes are almost fully heterochromatic, with accumulation of repeated DNAs in their heterochromatic regions. We found that microsatellites have strongly accumulated on the large W chromosome of L. reinhardti but not on the reduced-size W chromosome of T. auritus and are therefore important players of the W chromosome expansion. The present data highlight that the evolution of the sex chromosomes can diverge even in the same type of sex system, with and without the degeneration of the specific-sex chromosome, being more dynamic than traditionally appreciated. PMID:22658074

  16. The key role of repeated DNAs in sex chromosome evolution in two fish species with ZW sex chromosome system.

    PubMed

    de Bello Cioffi, Marcelo; Kejnovský, Eduard; Marquioni, Vinicius; Poltronieri, Juliana; Molina, Wagner Franco; Diniz, Débora; Bertollo, Luiz Antonio Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Despite substantial progress, there are still several gaps in our knowledge about the process of sex chromosome differentiation. The degeneration of sex-specific chromosome in some species is well documented, but it is not clear if all species follow the same evolutionary pathway. The accumulation of repetitive DNA sequences, however, is a common feature. To better understand this involvement, fish species emerge as excellent models because they exhibit a wide variety of sex chromosome and sex determining systems. Besides, they have much younger sex chromosomes compared to higher vertebrates, making it possible to follow early steps of differentiation. Here, we analyzed the arrangement of 9 repetitive DNA sequences in the W chromosomes of 2 fish species, namely Leporinus reinhardti and Triportheus auritus, which present well-differentiated ZZ/ZW sex system, but differ in respect to the size of the sex-specific chromosome. Both W chromosomes are almost fully heterochromatic, with accumulation of repeated DNAs in their heterochromatic regions. We found that microsatellites have strongly accumulated on the large W chromosome of L. reinhardti but not on the reduced-size W chromosome of T. auritus and are therefore important players of the W chromosome expansion. The present data highlight that the evolution of the sex chromosomes can diverge even in the same type of sex system, with and without the degeneration of the specific-sex chromosome, being more dynamic than traditionally appreciated. PMID:22658074

  17. Turnover of Sex Chromosomes in the Stickleback Fishes (Gasterosteidae)

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Joseph A.; Urton, James R.; Boland, Jessica; Shapiro, Michael D.; Peichel, Catherine L.

    2009-01-01

    Diverse sex-chromosome systems are found in vertebrates, particularly in teleost fishes, where different systems can be found in closely related species. Several mechanisms have been proposed for the rapid turnover of sex chromosomes, including the transposition of an existing sex-determination gene, the appearance of a new sex-determination gene on an autosome, and fusions between sex chromosomes and autosomes. To better understand these evolutionary transitions, a detailed comparison of sex chromosomes between closely related species is essential. Here, we used genetic mapping and molecular cytogenetics to characterize the sex-chromosome systems of multiple stickleback species (Gasterosteidae). Previously, we demonstrated that male threespine stickleback fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus) have a heteromorphic XY pair corresponding to linkage group (LG) 19. In this study, we found that the ninespine stickleback (Pungitius pungitius) has a heteromorphic XY pair corresponding to LG12. In black-spotted stickleback (G. wheatlandi) males, one copy of LG12 has fused to the LG19-derived Y chromosome, giving rise to an X1X2Y sex-determination system. In contrast, neither LG12 nor LG19 is linked to sex in two other species: the brook stickleback (Culaea inconstans) and the fourspine stickleback (Apeltes quadracus). However, we confirmed the existence of a previously reported heteromorphic ZW sex-chromosome pair in the fourspine stickleback. The sex-chromosome diversity that we have uncovered in sticklebacks provides a rich comparative resource for understanding the mechanisms that underlie the rapid turnover of sex-chromosome systems. PMID:19229325

  18. Evidence for Sex Chromosome Turnover in Proteid Salamanders.

    PubMed

    Sessions, Stanley K; Bizjak Mali, Lilijana; Green, David M; Trifonov, Vladimir; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    A major goal of genomic and reproductive biology is to understand the evolution of sex determination and sex chromosomes. Species of the 2 genera of the Salamander family Proteidae - Necturus of eastern North America, and Proteus of Southern Europe - have similar-looking karyotypes with the same chromosome number (2n = 38), which differentiates them from all other salamanders. However, Necturus possesses strongly heteromorphic X and Y sex chromosomes that Proteus lacks. Since the heteromorphic sex chromosomes of Necturus were detectable only with C-banding, we hypothesized that we could use C-banding to find sex chromosomes in Proteus. We examined mitotic material from colchicine-treated intestinal epithelium, and meiotic material from testes in specimens of Proteus, representing 3 genetically distinct populations in Slovenia. We compared these results with those from Necturus. We performed FISH to visualize telomeric sequences in meiotic bivalents. Our results provide evidence that Proteus represents an example of sex chromosome turnover in which a Necturus-like Y-chromosome has become permanently translocated to another chromosome converting heteromorphic sex chromosomes to homomorphic sex chromosomes. These results may be key to understanding some unusual aspects of demographics and reproductive biology of Proteus, and are discussed in the context of models of the evolution of sex chromosomes in amphibians. PMID:27351721

  19. Deciphering evolutionary strata on plant sex chromosomes and fungal mating-type chromosomes through compositional segmentation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ravi S; Azad, Rajeev K

    2016-03-01

    Sex chromosomes have evolved from a pair of homologous autosomes which differentiated into sex determination systems, such as XY or ZW system, as a consequence of successive recombination suppression between the gametologous chromosomes. Identifying the regions of recombination suppression, namely, the "evolutionary strata", is central to understanding the history and dynamics of sex chromosome evolution. Evolution of sex chromosomes as a consequence of serial recombination suppressions is well-studied for mammals and birds, but not for plants, although 48 dioecious plants have already been reported. Only two plants Silene latifolia and papaya have been studied until now for the presence of evolutionary strata on their X chromosomes, made possible by the sequencing of sex-linked genes on both the X and Y chromosomes, which is a requirement of all current methods that determine stratum structure based on the comparison of gametologous sex chromosomes. To circumvent this limitation and detect strata even if only the sequence of sex chromosome in the homogametic sex (i.e. X or Z chromosome) is available, we have developed an integrated segmentation and clustering method. In application to gene sequences on the papaya X chromosome and protein-coding sequences on the S. latifolia X chromosome, our method could decipher all known evolutionary strata, as reported by previous studies. Our method, after validating on known strata on the papaya and S. latifolia X chromosome, was applied to the chromosome 19 of Populus trichocarpa, an incipient sex chromosome, deciphering two, yet unknown, evolutionary strata. In addition, we applied this approach to the recently sequenced sex chromosome V of the brown alga Ectocarpus sp. that has a haploid sex determination system (UV system) recovering the sex determining and pseudoautosomal regions, and then to the mating-type chromosomes of an anther-smut fungus Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae predicting five strata in the non

  20. Autosomal origin of sex chromosome in a polyploid plant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While theory on sex chromosome evolution is well developed, evidence of the early stages of this process remains elusive, in part because this process unfolded in many animals so long ago. The relatively recent and repeated evolution of separate sexes (dioecy) and sex chromosomes in plants, however,...

  1. Learning Disabilities in Children with Sex Chromosome Anomalies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Bruce F.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Results obtained from 44 children (ages 7 through 16) with sex chromosome abnormalities and from 17 chromosomally normal siblings demonstrated that children in the former group have an increased risk of encountering learning problems. (MP)

  2. Conserved sex chromosomes across adaptively radiated Anolis lizards.

    PubMed

    Rovatsos, Michail; Altmanová, Marie; Pokorná, Martina; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2014-07-01

    Vertebrates possess diverse sex-determining systems, which differ in evolutionary stability among particular groups. It has been suggested that poikilotherms possess more frequent turnovers of sex chromosomes than homoiotherms, whose effective thermoregulation can prevent the emergence of the sex reversals induced by environmental temperature. Squamate reptiles used to be regarded as a group with an extensive variability in sex determination; however, we document how the rather old radiation of lizards from the genus Anolis, known for exceptional ecomorphological variability, was connected with stability in sex chromosomes. We found that 18 tested species, representing most of the phylogenetic diversity of the genus, share the gene content of their X chromosomes. Furthermore, we discovered homologous sex chromosomes in species of two genera (Sceloporus and Petrosaurus) from the family Phrynosomatidae, serving here as an outgroup to Anolis. We can conclude that the origin of sex chromosomes within iguanas largely predates the Anolis radiation and that the sex chromosomes of iguanas remained conserved for a significant part of their evolutionary history. Next to therian mammals and birds, Anolis lizards therefore represent another adaptively radiated amniote clade with conserved sex chromosomes. We argue that the evolutionary stability of sex-determining systems may reflect an advanced stage of differentiation of sex chromosomes rather than thermoregulation strategy. PMID:24433436

  3. A neo-sex-chromosome that drives post-zygotic sex determiniation in the Hessian fly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two nonoverlapping autosomal inversions defined unusual neo-sex chromosomes in the Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor). Like other neo-sex chromosomes, these were normally heterozygous, present only in one sex, and suppressed recombination around a sex-determining master switch. Their unusual propert...

  4. The X factor: X chromosome dosage compensation in the evolutionarily divergent monotremes and marsupials.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, Deanne J; Pask, Andrew J

    2016-08-01

    Marsupials and monotremes represent evolutionarily divergent lineages from the majority of extant mammals which are eutherian, or placental, mammals. Monotremes possess multiple X and Y chromosomes that appear to have arisen independently of eutherian and marsupial sex chromosomes. Dosage compensation of X-linked genes occurs in monotremes on a gene-by-gene basis, rather than through chromosome-wide silencing, as is the case in eutherians and marsupials. Specifically, studies in the platypus have shown that for any given X-linked gene, a specific proportion of nuclei within a cell population will silence one locus, with the percentage of cells undergoing inactivation at that locus being highly gene-specific. Hence, it is perhaps not surprising that the expression level of X-linked genes in female platypus is almost double that in males. This is in contrast to the situation in marsupials where one of the two X chromosomes is inactivated in females by the long non-coding RNA RSX, a functional analogue of the eutherian XIST. However, marsupial X chromosome inactivation differs from that seen in eutherians in that it is exclusively the paternal X chromosome that is silenced. In addition, marsupials appear to have globally upregulated X-linked gene expression in both sexes, thus balancing their expression levels with those of the autosomes, a process initially proposed by Ohno in 1967 as being a fundamental component of the X chromosome dosage compensation mechanism but which may not have evolved in eutherians. PMID:26806635

  5. Neo-sex chromosomes in the black muntjac recapitulate incipient evolution of mammalian sex chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qi; Wang, Jun; Huang, Ling; Nie, Wenhui; Wang, Jinhuan; Liu, Yan; Zhao, Xiangyi; Yang, Fengtang; Wang, Wen

    2008-01-01

    Background The regular mammalian X and Y chromosomes diverged from each other at least 166 to 148 million years ago, leaving few traces of their early evolution, including degeneration of the Y chromosome and evolution of dosage compensation. Results We studied the intriguing case of black muntjac, in which a recent X-autosome fusion and a subsequent large autosomal inversion within just the past 0.5 million years have led to inheritance patterns identical to the traditional X-Y (neo-sex chromosomes). We compared patterns of genome evolution in 35-kilobase noncoding regions and 23 gene pairs on the homologous neo-sex chromosomes. We found that neo-Y alleles have accumulated more mutations, comprising a wide variety of mutation types, which indicates cessation of recombination and is consistent with an ongoing neo-Y degeneration process. Putative deleterious mutations were observed in coding regions of eight investigated genes as well as cis-regulatory regions of two housekeeping genes. In vivo assays characterized a neo-Y insertion in the promoter of the CLTC gene that causes a significant reduction in allelic expression. A neo-Y-linked deletion in the 3'-untranslated region of gene SNX22 abolished a microRNA target site. Finally, expression analyses revealed complex patterns of expression divergence between neo-Y and neo-X alleles. Conclusion The nascent neo-sex chromosome system of black muntjacs is a valuable model in which to study the evolution of sex chromosomes in mammals. Our results illustrate the degeneration scenarios in various genomic regions. Of particular importance, we report - for the first time - that regulatory mutations were probably able to accelerate the degeneration process of Y and contribute to further evolution of dosage compensation. PMID:18554412

  6. Effects of sex chromosome dosage on corpus callosum morphology in supernumerary sex chromosome aneuploidies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Supernumerary sex chromosome aneuploidies (sSCA) are characterized by the presence of one or more additional sex chromosomes in an individual’s karyotype; they affect around 1 in 400 individuals. Although there is high variability, each sSCA subtype has a characteristic set of cognitive and physical phenotypes. Here, we investigated the differences in the morphometry of the human corpus callosum (CC) between sex-matched controls 46,XY (N =99), 46,XX (N =93), and six unique sSCA karyotypes: 47,XYY (N =29), 47,XXY (N =58), 48,XXYY (N =20), 47,XXX (N =30), 48,XXXY (N =5), and 49,XXXXY (N =6). Methods We investigated CC morphometry using local and global area, local curvature of the CC boundary, and between-landmark distance analysis (BLDA). We hypothesized that CC morphometry would vary differentially along a proposed spectrum of Y:X chromosome ratio with supernumerary Y karyotypes having the largest CC areas and supernumerary X karyotypes having significantly smaller CC areas. To investigate this, we defined an sSCA spectrum based on a descending Y:X karyotype ratio: 47,XYY, 46,XY, 48,XXYY, 47,XXY, 48,XXXY, 49,XXXXY, 46,XX, 47,XXX. We similarly explored the effects of both X and Y chromosome numbers within sex. Results of shape-based metrics were analyzed using permutation tests consisting of 5,000 iterations. Results Several subregional areas, local curvature, and BLDs differed between groups. Moderate associations were found between area and curvature in relation to the spectrum and X and Y chromosome counts. BLD was strongly associated with X chromosome count in both male and female groups. Conclusions Our results suggest that X- and Y-linked genes have differential effects on CC morphometry. To our knowledge, this is the first study to compare CC morphometry across these extremely rare groups. PMID:25780557

  7. Insights into the evolution of mammalian telomerase: Platypus TERT shares similarities with genes of birds and other reptiles and localizes on sex chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The TERT gene encodes the catalytic subunit of the telomerase complex and is responsible for maintaining telomere length. Vertebrate telomerase has been studied in eutherian mammals, fish, and the chicken, but less attention has been paid to other vertebrates. The platypus occupies an important evolutionary position, providing unique insight into the evolution of mammalian genes. We report the cloning of a platypus TERT (OanTERT) ortholog, and provide a comparison with genes of other vertebrates. Results The OanTERT encodes a protein with a high sequence similarity to marsupial TERT and avian TERT. Like the TERT of sauropsids and marsupials, as well as that of sharks and echinoderms, OanTERT contains extended variable linkers in the N-terminal region suggesting that they were present already in basal vertebrates and lost independently in ray-finned fish and eutherian mammals. Several alternatively spliced OanTERT variants structurally similar to avian TERT variants were identified. Telomerase activity is expressed in all platypus tissues like that of cold-blooded animals and murine rodents. OanTERT was localized on pseudoautosomal regions of sex chromosomes X3/Y2, expanding the homology between human chromosome 5 and platypus sex chromosomes. Synteny analysis suggests that TERT co-localized with sex-linked genes in the last common mammalian ancestor. Interestingly, female platypuses express higher levels of telomerase in heart and liver tissues than do males. Conclusions OanTERT shares many features with TERT of the reptilian outgroup, suggesting that OanTERT represents the ancestral mammalian TERT. Features specific to TERT of eutherian mammals have, therefore, evolved more recently after the divergence of monotremes. PMID:22655747

  8. Aplastic Anemia in Two Patients with Sex Chromosome Aneuploidies.

    PubMed

    Rush, Eric T; Schaefer, G Bradley; Sanger, Warren G; Coccia, Peter F

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosome aneuploidies range in incidence from rather common to exceedingly rare and have a variable phenotype. We report 2 patients with sex chromosome aneuploidies who developed severe aplastic anemia requiring treatment. The first patient had tetrasomy X (48,XXXX) and presented at 9 years of age, and the second patient had trisomy X (47,XXX) and presented at 5 years of age. Although aplastic anemia has been associated with other chromosomal abnormalities, sex chromosome abnormalities have not been traditionally considered a risk factor for this condition. A review of the literature reveals that at least one other patient with a sex chromosome aneuploidy (45,X) has suffered from aplastic anemia and that other autosomal chromosomal anomalies have been described. Despite the uncommon nature of each condition, it is possible that the apparent association is coincidental. A better understanding of the genetic causes of aplastic anemia remains important. PMID:26571231

  9. Patterns of Neutral Genetic Variation on Recombining Sex Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Mark; Guerrero, Rafael F.; Scarpino, Samuel V.

    2010-01-01

    Many animals and plants have sex chromosomes that recombine over much of their length. Here we develop coalescent models for neutral sites on these chromosomes. The emphasis is on expected coalescence times (proportional to the expected amount of neutral genetic polymorphism), but we also derive some results for linkage disequilibria between neutral sites. We analyze the standard neutral model, a model with polymorphic Y chromosomes under balancing selection, and the invasion of a neo-Y chromosome. The results may be useful for testing hypotheses regarding how new sex chromosomes originate and how selection acts upon them. PMID:20124026

  10. Homologous sex chromosomes in three deeply divergent anuran species.

    PubMed

    Brelsford, Alan; Stöck, Matthias; Betto-Colliard, Caroline; Dubey, Sylvain; Dufresnes, Christophe; Jourdan-Pineau, Hélène; Rodrigues, Nicolas; Savary, Romain; Sermier, Roberto; Perrin, Nicolas

    2013-08-01

    Comparative genomic studies are revealing that, in sharp contrast with the strong stability found in birds and mammals, sex determination mechanisms are surprisingly labile in cold-blooded vertebrates, with frequent transitions between different pairs of sex chromosomes. It was recently suggested that, in context of this high turnover, some chromosome pairs might be more likely than others to be co-opted as sex chromosomes. Empirical support, however, is still very limited. Here we show that sex-linked markers from three highly divergent groups of anurans map to Xenopus tropicalis scaffold 1, a large part of which is homologous to the avian sex chromosome. Accordingly, the bird sex determination gene DMRT1, known to play a key role in sex differentiation across many animal lineages, is sex linked in all three groups. Our data provide strong support for the idea that some chromosome pairs are more likely than others to be co-opted as sex chromosomes because they harbor key genes from the sex determination pathway. PMID:23888863

  11. Turnover of Sex Chromosomes in Celebensis Group Medaka Fishes.

    PubMed

    Myosho, Taijun; Takehana, Yusuke; Hamaguchi, Satoshi; Sakaizumi, Mitsuru

    2015-12-01

    Sex chromosomes and the sex-determining (SD) gene are variable in vertebrates. In particular, medaka fishes in the genus Oryzias show an extremely large diversity in sex chromosomes and the SD gene, providing a good model to study the evolutionary process by which they turnover. Here, we investigated the sex determination system and sex chromosomes in six celebensis group species. Our sex-linkage analysis demonstrated that all species had an XX-XY sex determination system, and that the Oryzias marmoratus and O. profundicola sex chromosomes were homologous to O. latipes linkage group (LG) 10, while those of the other four species, O. celebensis, O. matanensis, O. wolasi, and O. woworae, were homologous to O. latipes LG 24. The phylogenetic relationship suggested a turnover of the sex chromosomes from O. latipes LG 24 to LG 10 within this group. Six sex-linkage maps showed that the former two and the latter four species shared a common SD locus, respectively, suggesting that the LG 24 acquired the SD function in a common ancestor of the celebensis group, and that the LG 10 SD function appeared in a common ancestor of O. marmoratus and O. profundicola after the divergence of O. matanensis. Additionally, fine mapping and association analysis in the former two species revealed that Sox3 on the Y chromosome is a prime candidate for the SD gene, and that the Y-specific 430-bp insertion might be involved in its SD function. PMID:26497145

  12. Chromosome landmarks and autosome-sex chromosome translocations in Rumex hastatulus, a plant with XX/XY1Y2 sex chromosome system.

    PubMed

    Grabowska-Joachimiak, Aleksandra; Kula, Adam; Książczyk, Tomasz; Chojnicka, Joanna; Sliwinska, Elwira; Joachimiak, Andrzej J

    2015-06-01

    Rumex hastatulus is the North American endemic dioecious plant with heteromorphic sex chromosomes. It is differentiated into two chromosomal races: Texas (T) race characterised by a simple XX/XY sex chromosome system and North Carolina (NC) race with a polymorphic XX/XY1Y2 sex chromosome system. The gross karyotype morphology in NC race resembles the derived type, but chromosomal changes that occurred during its evolution are poorly understood. Our C-banding/DAPI and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments demonstrated that Y chromosomes of both races are enriched in DAPI-positive sequences and that the emergence of polymorphic sex chromosome system was accompanied by the break of ancestral Y chromosome and switch in the localization of 5S rDNA, from autosomes to sex chromosomes (X and Y2). Two contrasting domains were detected within North Carolina Y chromosomes: the older, highly heterochromatinised, inherited from the original Y chromosome and the younger, euchromatic, representing translocated autosomal material. The flow-cytometric DNA estimation showed ∼3.5 % genome downsizing in the North Carolina race. Our results are in contradiction to earlier reports on the lack of heterochromatin within Y chromosomes of this species and enable unambiguous identification of autosomes involved in the autosome-heterosome translocation, providing useful chromosome landmarks for further studies on the karyotype and sex chromosome differentiation in this species. PMID:25394583

  13. Cytogenetic Insights into the Evolution of Chromosomes and Sex Determination Reveal Striking Homology of Turtle Sex Chromosomes to Amphibian Autosomes.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Eugenia E; Badenhorst, Daleen; Lee, Ling S; Literman, Robert; Trifonov, Vladimir; Valenzuela, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Turtle karyotypes are highly conserved compared to other vertebrates; yet, variation in diploid number (2n = 26-68) reflects profound genomic reorganization, which correlates with evolutionary turnovers in sex determination. We evaluate the published literature and newly collected comparative cytogenetic data (G- and C-banding, 18S-NOR, and telomere-FISH mapping) from 13 species spanning 2n = 28-68 to revisit turtle genome evolution and sex determination. Interstitial telomeric sites were detected in multiple lineages that underwent diploid number and sex determination turnovers, suggesting chromosomal rearrangements. C-banding revealed potential interspecific variation in centromere composition and interstitial heterochromatin at secondary constrictions. 18S-NORs were detected in secondary constrictions in a single chromosomal pair per species, refuting previous reports of multiple NORs in turtles. 18S-NORs are linked to ZW chromosomes in Apalone and Pelodiscus and to X (not Y) in Staurotypus. Notably, comparative genomics across amniotes revealed that the sex chromosomes of several turtles, as well as mammals and some lizards, are homologous to components of Xenopus tropicalis XTR1 (carrying Dmrt1). Other turtle sex chromosomes are homologous to XTR4 (carrying Wt1). Interestingly, all known turtle sex chromosomes, except in Trionychidae, evolved via inversions around Dmrt1 or Wt1. Thus, XTR1 appears to represent an amniote proto-sex chromosome (perhaps linked ancestrally to XTR4) that gave rise to turtle and other amniote sex chromosomes. PMID:27423490

  14. Human postmeiotic sex chromatin and its impact on sex chromosome evolution.

    PubMed

    Sin, Ho-Su; Ichijima, Yosuke; Koh, Eitetsu; Namiki, Mikio; Namekawa, Satoshi H

    2012-05-01

    Sex chromosome inactivation is essential epigenetic programming in male germ cells. However, it remains largely unclear how epigenetic silencing of sex chromosomes impacts the evolution of the mammalian genome. Here we demonstrate that male sex chromosome inactivation is highly conserved between humans and mice and has an impact on the genetic evolution of human sex chromosomes. We show that, in humans, sex chromosome inactivation established during meiosis is maintained into spermatids with the silent compartment postmeiotic sex chromatin (PMSC). Human PMSC is illuminated with epigenetic modifications such as trimethylated lysine 9 of histone H3 and heterochromatin proteins CBX1 and CBX3, which implicate a conserved mechanism underlying the maintenance of sex chromosome inactivation in mammals. Furthermore, our analyses suggest that male sex chromosome inactivation has impacted multiple aspects of the evolutionary history of mammalian sex chromosomes: amplification of copy number, retrotranspositions, acquisition of de novo genes, and acquisition of different expression profiles. Most strikingly, profiles of escape genes from postmeiotic silencing diverge significantly between humans and mice. Escape genes exhibit higher rates of amino acid changes compared with non-escape genes, suggesting that they are beneficial for reproductive fitness and may allow mammals to cope with conserved postmeiotic silencing during the evolutionary past. Taken together, we propose that the epigenetic silencing mechanism impacts the genetic evolution of sex chromosomes and contributed to speciation and reproductive diversity in mammals. PMID:22375025

  15. Human postmeiotic sex chromatin and its impact on sex chromosome evolution

    PubMed Central

    Sin, Ho-Su; Ichijima, Yosuke; Koh, Eitetsu; Namiki, Mikio; Namekawa, Satoshi H.

    2012-01-01

    Sex chromosome inactivation is essential epigenetic programming in male germ cells. However, it remains largely unclear how epigenetic silencing of sex chromosomes impacts the evolution of the mammalian genome. Here we demonstrate that male sex chromosome inactivation is highly conserved between humans and mice and has an impact on the genetic evolution of human sex chromosomes. We show that, in humans, sex chromosome inactivation established during meiosis is maintained into spermatids with the silent compartment postmeiotic sex chromatin (PMSC). Human PMSC is illuminated with epigenetic modifications such as trimethylated lysine 9 of histone H3 and heterochromatin proteins CBX1 and CBX3, which implicate a conserved mechanism underlying the maintenance of sex chromosome inactivation in mammals. Furthermore, our analyses suggest that male sex chromosome inactivation has impacted multiple aspects of the evolutionary history of mammalian sex chromosomes: amplification of copy number, retrotranspositions, acquisition of de novo genes, and acquisition of different expression profiles. Most strikingly, profiles of escape genes from postmeiotic silencing diverge significantly between humans and mice. Escape genes exhibit higher rates of amino acid changes compared with non-escape genes, suggesting that they are beneficial for reproductive fitness and may allow mammals to cope with conserved postmeiotic silencing during the evolutionary past. Taken together, we propose that the epigenetic silencing mechanism impacts the genetic evolution of sex chromosomes and contributed to speciation and reproductive diversity in mammals. PMID:22375025

  16. Cretaceous park of sex determination: sex chromosomes are conserved across iguanas.

    PubMed

    Rovatsos, Michail; Pokorná, Martina; Altmanová, Marie; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2014-03-01

    Many poikilothermic vertebrate lineages, especially among amphibians and fishes, possess a rapid turnover of sex chromosomes, while in endotherms there is a notable stability of sex chromosomes. Reptiles in general exhibit variability in sex-determining systems; as typical poikilotherms, they might be expected to have a rapid turnover of sex chromosomes. However, molecular data which would enable the testing of the stability of sex chromosomes are lacking in most lineages. Here, we provide molecular evidence that sex chromosomes are highly conserved across iguanas, one of the most species-rich clade of reptiles. We demonstrate that members of the New World families Iguanidae, Tropiduridae, Leiocephalidae, Phrynosomatidae, Dactyloidae and Crotaphytidae, as well as of the family Opluridae which is restricted to Madagascar, all share homologous sex chromosomes. As our sampling represents the majority of the phylogenetic diversity of iguanas, the origin of iguana sex chromosomes can be traced back in history to the basal splitting of this group which occurred during the Cretaceous period. Iguanas thus show a stability of sex chromosomes comparable to mammals and birds and represent the group with the oldest sex chromosomes currently known among amniotic poikilothermic vertebrates. PMID:24598109

  17. Cretaceous park of sex determination: sex chromosomes are conserved across iguanas

    PubMed Central

    Rovatsos, Michail; Pokorná, Martina; Altmanová, Marie; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    Many poikilothermic vertebrate lineages, especially among amphibians and fishes, possess a rapid turnover of sex chromosomes, while in endotherms there is a notable stability of sex chromosomes. Reptiles in general exhibit variability in sex-determining systems; as typical poikilotherms, they might be expected to have a rapid turnover of sex chromosomes. However, molecular data which would enable the testing of the stability of sex chromosomes are lacking in most lineages. Here, we provide molecular evidence that sex chromosomes are highly conserved across iguanas, one of the most species-rich clade of reptiles. We demonstrate that members of the New World families Iguanidae, Tropiduridae, Leiocephalidae, Phrynosomatidae, Dactyloidae and Crotaphytidae, as well as of the family Opluridae which is restricted to Madagascar, all share homologous sex chromosomes. As our sampling represents the majority of the phylogenetic diversity of iguanas, the origin of iguana sex chromosomes can be traced back in history to the basal splitting of this group which occurred during the Cretaceous period. Iguanas thus show a stability of sex chromosomes comparable to mammals and birds and represent the group with the oldest sex chromosomes currently known among amniotic poikilothermic vertebrates. PMID:24598109

  18. Complex evolutionary trajectories of sex chromosomes across bird taxa.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi; Zhang, Jilin; Bachtrog, Doris; An, Na; Huang, Quanfei; Jarvis, Erich D; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Zhang, Guojie

    2014-12-12

    Sex-specific chromosomes, like the W of most female birds and the Y of male mammals, usually have lost most genes owing to a lack of recombination. We analyze newly available genomes of 17 bird species representing the avian phylogenetic range, and find that more than half of them do not have as fully degenerated W chromosomes as that of chicken. We show that avian sex chromosomes harbor tremendous diversity among species in their composition of pseudoautosomal regions and degree of Z/W differentiation. Punctuated events of shared or lineage-specific recombination suppression have produced a gradient of "evolutionary strata" along the Z chromosome, which initiates from the putative avian sex-determining gene DMRT1 and ends at the pseudoautosomal region. W-linked genes are subject to ongoing functional decay after recombination was suppressed, and the tempo of degeneration slows down in older strata. Overall, we unveil a complex history of avian sex chromosome evolution. PMID:25504727

  19. Multiple sex chromosome systems in howler monkeys (Platyrrhini, Alouatta)

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Eliana Ruth; Nieves, Mariela; Mudry, Marta Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In light of the multiple sex chromosome systems observed in howler monkeys (Alouatta Lacépède, 1799) a combined cladistic analysis using chromosomal and molecular characters was applied to discuss the possible origin of these systems. Mesoamerican and South American howlers were karyologically compared. FISH analysis using the chromosome painting probes for the #3 and #15 human chromosomes was applied to corroborate the homeology of the sexual systems. We found that the HSA3/15 syntenic association, present in the sex chromosome systems of South American Howlers, is not present in those of Mesoamerican ones. The autosomes involved in the translocation that formed the sexual systems in the Mesoamerican and South American species are different, thus suggesting an independent origin. Parsimony analysis resolved the phylogenetic relationships among howler species, demonstrating utility of the combined approach. A hypothesis for the origin of the multiple sex chromosome systems for the genus is proposed. PMID:24744833

  20. The unique sex chromosome system in platypus and echidna.

    PubMed

    Ferguson-Smith, M A; Rens, W

    2010-10-01

    A striking example of the power of chromosome painting has been the resolution of the male platypus karyotype and the pairing relationships of the chain often sex chromosomes. We have extended our analysis to the nine sex chromosomes of the male echidna. Cross-species painting with platypus shows that the first five chromosomes in the chain are identical in both, but the order of the remainder are different and, in each species, a different autosome replaces one of the five X chromosomes. As the therian X is homologous mainly to platypus autosome 6 and echidna 16, and as SRY is absent in both, the sex determination mechanism in monotremes is currently unknown. Several of the X and Y chromosomes contain genes orthologous to those in the avian Z but the significance of this is also unknown. It seems likely that a novel testis determinant is carried by a Y chromosome common to platypus and echidna. We have searched for candidates for this determinant among the many genes known to be involved in vertebrate sex differentiation. So far fourteen such genes have been mapped, eleven are autosomal in platypus, two map to the differential regions of X chromosomes, and one maps to a pairing segment and is likewise excluded. Search for the platypus testis-determining gene continues, and the extension of comparative mapping between platypus and birds and reptiles may shed light on the ancestral origin of monotreme sex chromosomes. PMID:21250543

  1. Evolution of sex chromosomes ZW of Schistosoma mansoni inferred from chromosome paint and BAC mapping analyses.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hirohisa; Hirai, Yuriko; LoVerde, Philip T

    2012-12-01

    Chromosomes of schistosome parasites among digenetic flukes have a unique evolution because they exhibit the sex chromosomes ZW, which are not found in the other groups of flukes that are hermaphrodites. We conducted molecular cytogenetic analyses for investigating the sex chromosome evolution using chromosome paint analysis and BAC clones mapping. To carry this out, we developed a technique for making paint probes of genomic DNA from a single scraped chromosome segment using a chromosome microdissection system, and a FISH mapping technique for BAC clones. Paint probes clearly identified each of the 8 pairs of chromosomes by a different fluorochrome color. Combination analysis of chromosome paint analysis with Z/W probes and chromosome mapping with 93 BAC clones revealed that the W chromosome of Schistosoma mansoni has evolved by at least four inversion events and heterochromatinization. Nine of 93 BAC clones hybridized with both the Z and W chromosomes, but the locations were different between Z and W chromosomes. The homologous regions were estimated to have moved from the original Z chromosome to the differentiated W chromosome by three inversions events that occurred before W heterohcromatinization. An inversion that was observed in the heterochromatic region of the W chromosome likely occurred after W heterochromatinization. These inversions and heterochromatinization are hypothesized to be the key factors that promoted the evolution of the W chromosome of S. mansoni. PMID:22831897

  2. Sex Chromosome Evolution in Amniotes: Applications for Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Janes, Daniel E.; Valenzuela, Nicole; Ezaz, Tariq; Amemiya, Chris; Edwards, Scott V.

    2011-01-01

    Variability among sex chromosome pairs in amniotes denotes a dynamic history. Since amniotes diverged from a common ancestor, their sex chromosome pairs and, more broadly, sex-determining mechanisms have changed reversibly and frequently. These changes have been studied and characterized through the use of many tools and experimental approaches but perhaps most effectively through applications for bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries. Individual BAC clones carry 100–200 kb of sequence from one individual of a target species that can be isolated by screening, mapped onto karyotypes, and sequenced. With these techniques, researchers have identified differences and similarities in sex chromosome content and organization across amniotes and have addressed hypotheses regarding the frequency and direction of past changes. Here, we review studies of sex chromosome evolution in amniotes and the ways in which the field of research has been affected by the advent of BAC libraries. PMID:20981143

  3. Ever-young sex chromosomes in European tree frogs.

    PubMed

    Stöck, Matthias; Horn, Agnès; Grossen, Christine; Lindtke, Dorothea; Sermier, Roberto; Betto-Colliard, Caroline; Dufresnes, Christophe; Bonjour, Emmanuel; Dumas, Zoé; Luquet, Emilien; Maddalena, Tiziano; Sousa, Helena Clavero; Martinez-Solano, Iñigo; Perrin, Nicolas

    2011-05-01

    Non-recombining sex chromosomes are expected to undergo evolutionary decay, ending up genetically degenerated, as has happened in birds and mammals. Why are then sex chromosomes so often homomorphic in cold-blooded vertebrates? One possible explanation is a high rate of turnover events, replacing master sex-determining genes by new ones on other chromosomes. An alternative is that X-Y similarity is maintained by occasional recombination events, occurring in sex-reversed XY females. Based on mitochondrial and nuclear gene sequences, we estimated the divergence times between European tree frogs (Hyla arborea, H. intermedia, and H. molleri) to the upper Miocene, about 5.4-7.1 million years ago. Sibship analyses of microsatellite polymorphisms revealed that all three species have the same pair of sex chromosomes, with complete absence of X-Y recombination in males. Despite this, sequences of sex-linked loci show no divergence between the X and Y chromosomes. In the phylogeny, the X and Y alleles cluster according to species, not in groups of gametologs. We conclude that sex-chromosome homomorphy in these tree frogs does not result from a recent turnover but is maintained over evolutionary timescales by occasional X-Y recombination. Seemingly young sex chromosomes may thus carry old-established sex-determining genes, a result at odds with the view that sex chromosomes necessarily decay until they are replaced. This raises intriguing perspectives regarding the evolutionary dynamics of sexually antagonistic genes and the mechanisms that control X-Y recombination. PMID:21629756

  4. Impact of the X Chromosome and sex on regulatory variation

    PubMed Central

    Kukurba, Kimberly R.; Parsana, Princy; Balliu, Brunilda; Smith, Kevin S.; Zappala, Zachary; Knowles, David A.; Favé, Marie-Julie; Davis, Joe R.; Li, Xin; Zhu, Xiaowei; Potash, James B.; Weissman, Myrna M.; Shi, Jianxin; Kundaje, Anshul; Levinson, Douglas F.; Awadalla, Philip; Mostafavi, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The X Chromosome, with its unique mode of inheritance, contributes to differences between the sexes at a molecular level, including sex-specific gene expression and sex-specific impact of genetic variation. Improving our understanding of these differences offers to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying sex-specific traits and diseases. However, to date, most studies have either ignored the X Chromosome or had insufficient power to test for the sex-specific impact of genetic variation. By analyzing whole blood transcriptomes of 922 individuals, we have conducted the first large-scale, genome-wide analysis of the impact of both sex and genetic variation on patterns of gene expression, including comparison between the X Chromosome and autosomes. We identified a depletion of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) on the X Chromosome, especially among genes under high selective constraint. In contrast, we discovered an enrichment of sex-specific regulatory variants on the X Chromosome. To resolve the molecular mechanisms underlying such effects, we generated chromatin accessibility data through ATAC-sequencing to connect sex-specific chromatin accessibility to sex-specific patterns of expression and regulatory variation. As sex-specific regulatory variants discovered in our study can inform sex differences in heritable disease prevalence, we integrated our data with genome-wide association study data for multiple immune traits identifying several traits with significant sex biases in genetic susceptibilities. Together, our study provides genome-wide insight into how genetic variation, the X Chromosome, and sex shape human gene regulation and disease. PMID:27197214

  5. Impact of the X Chromosome and sex on regulatory variation.

    PubMed

    Kukurba, Kimberly R; Parsana, Princy; Balliu, Brunilda; Smith, Kevin S; Zappala, Zachary; Knowles, David A; Favé, Marie-Julie; Davis, Joe R; Li, Xin; Zhu, Xiaowei; Potash, James B; Weissman, Myrna M; Shi, Jianxin; Kundaje, Anshul; Levinson, Douglas F; Awadalla, Philip; Mostafavi, Sara; Battle, Alexis; Montgomery, Stephen B

    2016-06-01

    The X Chromosome, with its unique mode of inheritance, contributes to differences between the sexes at a molecular level, including sex-specific gene expression and sex-specific impact of genetic variation. Improving our understanding of these differences offers to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying sex-specific traits and diseases. However, to date, most studies have either ignored the X Chromosome or had insufficient power to test for the sex-specific impact of genetic variation. By analyzing whole blood transcriptomes of 922 individuals, we have conducted the first large-scale, genome-wide analysis of the impact of both sex and genetic variation on patterns of gene expression, including comparison between the X Chromosome and autosomes. We identified a depletion of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) on the X Chromosome, especially among genes under high selective constraint. In contrast, we discovered an enrichment of sex-specific regulatory variants on the X Chromosome. To resolve the molecular mechanisms underlying such effects, we generated chromatin accessibility data through ATAC-sequencing to connect sex-specific chromatin accessibility to sex-specific patterns of expression and regulatory variation. As sex-specific regulatory variants discovered in our study can inform sex differences in heritable disease prevalence, we integrated our data with genome-wide association study data for multiple immune traits identifying several traits with significant sex biases in genetic susceptibilities. Together, our study provides genome-wide insight into how genetic variation, the X Chromosome, and sex shape human gene regulation and disease. PMID:27197214

  6. Functional significance of the sex chromosomes during spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yueh-Chiang; Namekawa, Satoshi H

    2015-06-01

    Mammalian sex chromosomes arose from an ordinary pair of autosomes. Over hundreds of millions of years, they have evolved into highly divergent X and Y chromosomes and have become increasingly specialized for male reproduction. Both sex chromosomes have acquired and amplified testis-specific genes, suggestive of roles in spermatogenesis. To understand how the sex chromosome genes participate in the regulation of spermatogenesis, we review genes, including single-copy, multi-copy, and ampliconic genes, whose spermatogenic functions have been demonstrated in mouse genetic studies. Sex chromosomes are subject to chromosome-wide transcriptional silencing in meiotic and postmeiotic stages of spermatogenesis. We also discuss particular sex-linked genes that escape postmeiotic silencing and their evolutionary implications. The unique gene contents and genomic structures of the sex chromosomes reflect their strategies to express genes at various stages of spermatogenesis and reveal the driving forces that shape their evolution.Free Chinese abstract: A Chinese translation of this abstract is freely available at http://www.reproduction-online.org/content/149/6/R265/suppl/DC1.Free Japanese abstract: A Japanese translation of this abstract is freely available at http://www.reproduction-online.org/content/149/6/R265/suppl/DC2. PMID:25948089

  7. Evolution of genomic structures on Mammalian sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Katsura, Yukako; Iwase, Mineyo; Satta, Yoko

    2012-04-01

    Throughout mammalian evolution, recombination between the two sex chromosomes was suppressed in a stepwise manner. It is thought that the suppression of recombination led to an accumulation of deleterious mutations and frequent genomic rearrangements on the Y chromosome. In this article, we review three evolutionary aspects related to genomic rearrangements and structures, such as inverted repeats (IRs) and palindromes (PDs), on the mammalian sex chromosomes. First, we describe the stepwise manner in which recombination between the X and Y chromosomes was suppressed in placental mammals and discuss a genomic rearrangement that might have led to the formation of present pseudoautosomal boundaries (PAB). Second, we describe ectopic gene conversion between the X and Y chromosomes, and propose possible molecular causes. Third, we focus on the evolutionary mode and timing of PD formation on the X and Y chromosomes. The sequence of the chimpanzee Y chromosome was recently published by two groups. Both groups suggest that rapid evolution of genomic structure occurred on the Y chromosome. Our re-analysis of the sequences confirmed the species-specific mode of human and chimpanzee Y chromosomal evolution. Finally, we present a general outlook regarding the rapid evolution of mammalian sex chromosomes. PMID:23024603

  8. Prospective studies on children with sex chromosome aneuploidy

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliffe, S.G.; Paul, N.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 selections. Some of the titles are: Growth and Development from Early to Midadolescence of Children with X and Y Chromosome Aneuploidy: The Toronto Study; Sex Chromomal Aneuploidy: Perspective and Longitudinal Studies; Psychologic Study of XYY and XXY Men; and Cellular and Molecular Studies in Human Chromosomal Diseases.

  9. Neo-sex chromosomes and adaptive potential in tortricid pests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes in genome architecture often have a significant effect on ecological specialization and speciation. This effect may be further enhanced by involvement of sex chromosomes playing a disproportionate role in reproductive isolation. We have physically mapped the Z chromosome of the major pome fr...

  10. Sex chromosome complement regulates expression of mood-related genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies on major depressive and anxiety disorders suggest dysfunctions in brain corticolimbic circuits, including altered gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and modulatory (serotonin and dopamine) neurotransmission. Interestingly, sexual dimorphisms in GABA, serotonin, and dopamine systems are also reported. Understanding the mechanisms behind these sexual dimorphisms may help unravel the biological bases of the heightened female vulnerability to mood disorders. Here, we investigate the contribution of sex-related factors (sex chromosome complement, developmental gonadal sex, or adult circulating hormones) to frontal cortex expression of selected GABA-, serotonin-, and dopamine-related genes. Methods As gonadal sex is determined by sex chromosome complement, the role of sex chromosomes cannot be investigated individually in humans. Therefore, we used the Four Core Genotypes (FCG) mouse model, in which sex chromosome complement and gonadal sex are artificially decoupled, to examine the expression of 13 GABA-related genes, 6 serotonin- and dopamine-related genes, and 8 associated signal transduction genes under chronic stress conditions. Results were analyzed by three-way ANOVA (sex chromosome complement × gonadal sex × circulating testosterone). A global perspective of gene expression changes was provided by heatmap representation and gene co-expression networks to identify patterns of transcriptional activities related to each main factor. Results We show that under chronic stress conditions, sex chromosome complement influenced GABA/serotonin/dopamine-related gene expression in the frontal cortex, with XY mice consistently having lower gene expression compared to XX mice. Gonadal sex and circulating testosterone exhibited less pronounced, more complex, and variable control over gene expression. Across factors, male conditions were associated with a tightly co-expressed set of signal transduction genes. Conclusions Under chronic stress conditions

  11. Sex chromosome evolution: life, death and repetitive DNA

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Nikita; Meller, Victoria H

    2014-01-01

    Dimorphic sex chromosomes create problems. Males of many species, including Drosophila, are heterogametic, with dissimilar X and Y chromosomes. The essential process of dosage compensation modulates the expression of X-linked genes in one sex to maintain a constant ratio of X to autosomal expression. This involves the regulation of hundreds of dissimilar genes whose only shared property is chromosomal address. Drosophila males dosage compensate by up regulating X-linked genes 2 fold. This is achieved by the Male Specific Lethal (MSL) complex, which is recruited to genes on the X chromosome and modifies chromatin to increase expression. How the MSL complex is restricted to X-linked genes remains unknown. Recent studies of sex chromosome evolution have identified a central role for 2 types of repetitive elements in X recognition. Helitrons carrying sites that recruit the MSL complex have expanded across the X chromosome in at least one Drosophila species.1 Our laboratory found that siRNA from an X-linked satellite repeat promotes X recognition by a yet unknown mechanism.2 The recurring adoption of repetitive elements as X-identify elements suggests that the large and mysterious fraction of the genome called “junk” DNA is actually instrumental in the evolution of sex chromosomes. PMID:25751570

  12. Sex chromosome evolution: life, death and repetitive DNA.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Nikita; Meller, Victoria H

    2014-01-01

    Dimorphic sex chromosomes create problems. Males of many species, including Drosophila, are heterogametic, with dissimilar X and Y chromosomes. The essential process of dosage compensation modulates the expression of X-linked genes in one sex to maintain a constant ratio of X to autosomal expression. This involves the regulation of hundreds of dissimilar genes whose only shared property is chromosomal address. Drosophila males dosage compensate by up regulating X-linked genes 2 fold. This is achieved by the Male Specific Lethal (MSL) complex, which is recruited to genes on the X chromosome and modifies chromatin to increase expression. How the MSL complex is restricted to X-linked genes remains unknown. Recent studies of sex chromosome evolution have identified a central role for 2 types of repetitive elements in X recognition. Helitrons carrying sites that recruit the MSL complex have expanded across the X chromosome in at least one Drosophila species. (1) Our laboratory found that siRNA from an X-linked satellite repeat promotes X recognition by a yet unknown mechanism. (2) The recurring adoption of repetitive elements as X-identify elements suggests that the large and mysterious fraction of the genome called "junk" DNA is actually instrumental in the evolution of sex chromosomes. PMID:25751570

  13. Impact of repetitive DNA on sex chromosome evolution in plants.

    PubMed

    Hobza, Roman; Kubat, Zdenek; Cegan, Radim; Jesionek, Wojciech; Vyskot, Boris; Kejnovsky, Eduard

    2015-09-01

    Structurally and functionally diverged sex chromosomes have evolved in many animals as well as in some plants. Sex chromosomes represent a specific genomic region(s) with locally suppressed recombination. As a consequence, repetitive sequences involving transposable elements, tandem repeats (satellites and microsatellites), and organellar DNA accumulate on the Y (W) chromosomes. In this paper, we review the main types of repetitive elements, their gathering on the Y chromosome, and discuss new findings showing that not only accumulation of various repeats in non-recombining regions but also opposite processes form Y chromosome. The aim of this review is also to discuss the mechanisms of repetitive DNA spread involving (retro) transposition, DNA polymerase slippage or unequal crossing-over, as well as modes of repeat removal by ectopic recombination. The intensity of these processes differs in non-recombining region(s) of sex chromosomes when compared to the recombining parts of genome. We also speculate about the relationship between heterochromatinization and the formation of heteromorphic sex chromosomes. PMID:26474787

  14. Evolutionary history of novel genes on the tammar wallaby Y chromosome: Implications for sex chromosome evolution.

    PubMed

    Murtagh, Veronica J; O'Meally, Denis; Sankovic, Natasha; Delbridge, Margaret L; Kuroki, Yoko; Boore, Jeffrey L; Toyoda, Atsushi; Jordan, Kristen S; Pask, Andrew J; Renfree, Marilyn B; Fujiyama, Asao; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall; Waters, Paul D

    2012-03-01

    We report here the isolation and sequencing of 10 Y-specific tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) BAC clones, revealing five hitherto undescribed tammar wallaby Y genes (in addition to the five genes already described) and several pseudogenes. Some genes on the wallaby Y display testis-specific expression, but most have low widespread expression. All have partners on the tammar X, along with homologs on the human X. Nonsynonymous and synonymous substitution ratios for nine of the tammar XY gene pairs indicate that they are each under purifying selection. All 10 were also identified as being on the Y in Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii; a distantly related Australian marsupial); however, seven have been lost from the human Y. Maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses of the wallaby YX genes, with respective homologs from other vertebrate representatives, revealed that three marsupial Y genes (HCFC1X/Y, MECP2X/Y, and HUWE1X/Y) were members of the ancestral therian pseudoautosomal region (PAR) at the time of the marsupial/eutherian split; three XY pairs (SOX3/SRY, RBMX/Y, and ATRX/Y) were isolated from each other before the marsupial/eutherian split, and the remaining three (RPL10X/Y, PHF6X/Y, and UBA1/UBE1Y) have a more complex evolutionary history. Thus, the small marsupial Y chromosome is surprisingly rich in ancient genes that are retained in at least Australian marsupials and evolved from testis-brain expressed genes on the X. PMID:22128133

  15. Evolutionary history of novel genes on the tammar wallaby Y chromosome: Implications for sex chromosome evolution

    PubMed Central

    Murtagh, Veronica J.; O'Meally, Denis; Sankovic, Natasha; Delbridge, Margaret L.; Kuroki, Yoko; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Toyoda, Atsushi; Jordan, Kristen S.; Pask, Andrew J.; Renfree, Marilyn B.; Fujiyama, Asao; Graves, Jennifer A. Marshall; Waters, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    We report here the isolation and sequencing of 10 Y-specific tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) BAC clones, revealing five hitherto undescribed tammar wallaby Y genes (in addition to the five genes already described) and several pseudogenes. Some genes on the wallaby Y display testis-specific expression, but most have low widespread expression. All have partners on the tammar X, along with homologs on the human X. Nonsynonymous and synonymous substitution ratios for nine of the tammar XY gene pairs indicate that they are each under purifying selection. All 10 were also identified as being on the Y in Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii; a distantly related Australian marsupial); however, seven have been lost from the human Y. Maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses of the wallaby YX genes, with respective homologs from other vertebrate representatives, revealed that three marsupial Y genes (HCFC1X/Y, MECP2X/Y, and HUWE1X/Y) were members of the ancestral therian pseudoautosomal region (PAR) at the time of the marsupial/eutherian split; three XY pairs (SOX3/SRY, RBMX/Y, and ATRX/Y) were isolated from each other before the marsupial/eutherian split, and the remaining three (RPL10X/Y, PHF6X/Y, and UBA1/UBE1Y) have a more complex evolutionary history. Thus, the small marsupial Y chromosome is surprisingly rich in ancient genes that are retained in at least Australian marsupials and evolved from testis–brain expressed genes on the X. PMID:22128133

  16. Mammalian X homolog acts as sex chromosome in lacertid lizards.

    PubMed

    Rovatsos, M; Vukić, J; Kratochvíl, L

    2016-07-01

    Among amniotes, squamate reptiles are especially variable in their mechanisms of sex determination; however, based largely on cytogenetic data, some lineages possess highly evolutionary stable sex chromosomes. The still very limited knowledge of the genetic content of squamate sex chromosomes precludes a reliable reconstruction of the evolutionary history of sex determination in this group and consequently in all amniotes. Female heterogamety with a degenerated W chromosome typifies the lizards of the family Lacertidae, the widely distributed Old World clade including several hundreds of species. From the liver transcriptome of the lacertid Takydromus sexlineatus female, we selected candidates for Z-specific genes as the loci lacking single-nucleotide polymorphisms. We validated the candidate genes through the comparison of the copy numbers in the female and male genomes of T. sexlineatus and another lacertid species, Lacerta agilis, by quantitative PCR that also proved to be a reliable technique for the molecular sexing of the studied species. We suggest that this novel approach is effective for the detection of Z-specific and X-specific genes in lineages with degenerated W, respectively Y chromosomes. The analyzed gene content of the Z chromosome revealed that lacertid sex chromosomes are not homologous with those of other reptiles including birds, but instead the genes have orthologs in the X-conserved region shared by viviparous mammals. It is possible that this part of the vertebrate genome was independently co-opted for the function of sex chromosomes in viviparous mammals and lacertids because of its content of genes involved in gonad differentiation. PMID:26980341

  17. Plant contributions to our understanding of sex chromosome evolution.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Deborah

    2015-10-01

    A minority of angiosperms have male and female flowers separated in distinct individuals (dioecy), and most dioecious plants do not have cytologically different (heteromorphic) sex chromosomes. Plants nevertheless have several advantages for the study of sex chromosome evolution, as genetic sex determination has evolved repeatedly and is often absent in close relatives. I review sex-determining regions in non-model plant species, which may help us to understand when and how (and, potentially, test hypotheses about why) recombination suppression evolves within young sex chromosomes. I emphasize high-throughput sequencing approaches that are increasingly being applied to plants to test for non-recombining regions. These data are particularly illuminating when combined with sequence data that allow phylogenetic analyses, and estimates of when these regions evolved. Together with comparative genetic mapping, this has revealed that sex-determining loci and sex-linked regions evolved independently in many plant lineages, sometimes in closely related dioecious species, and often within the past few million years. In reviewing recent progress, I suggest areas for future work, such as the use of phylogenies to allow the informed choice of outgroup species suitable for inferring the directions of changes, including testing whether Y chromosome-like regions are undergoing genetic degeneration, a predicted consequence of losing recombination. PMID:26053356

  18. Sex-chromosome turnovers induced by deleterious mutation load.

    PubMed

    Blaser, Olivier; Grossen, Christine; Neuenschwander, Samuel; Perrin, Nicolas

    2013-03-01

    In sharp contrast with mammals and birds, many cold-blooded vertebrates present homomorphic sex chromosomes. Empirical evidence supports a role for frequent turnovers, which replace nonrecombining sex chromosomes before they have time to decay. Three main mechanisms have been proposed for such turnovers, relying either on neutral processes, sex-ratio selection, or intrinsic benefits of the new sex-determining genes (due, e.g., to linkage with sexually antagonistic mutations). Here, we suggest an additional mechanism, arising from the load of deleterious mutations that accumulate on nonrecombining sex chromosomes. In the absence of dosage compensation, this load should progressively lower survival rate in the heterogametic sex. Turnovers should occur when this cost outweighs the benefits gained from any sexually antagonistic genes carried by the nonrecombining sex chromosome. We use individual-based simulations of a Muller's ratchet process to test this prediction, and investigate how the relevant parameters (effective population size, strength and dominance of deleterious mutations, size of nonrecombining segment, and strength of sexually antagonistic selection) are expected to affect the rate of turnovers. PMID:23461315

  19. Retrogenes Reveal the Direction of Sex-Chromosome Evolution in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Toups, Melissa A.; Hahn, Matthew W.

    2010-01-01

    The mosquito Anopheles gambiae has heteromorphic sex chromosomes, while the mosquito Aedes aegypti has homomorphic sex chromosomes. We use retrotransposed gene duplicates to show an excess of movement off the An. gambiae X chromosome only after the split with Ae. aegypti, suggesting that their ancestor had homomorphic sex chromosomes. PMID:20660646

  20. Chromosome

    MedlinePlus

    ... if you are born a boy or a girl (your gender). They are called sex chromosomes: Females have 2 X chromosomes. Males have 1 X and 1 Y chromosome. The mother gives an X chromosome to the ... baby is a girl or a boy. The remaining chromosomes are called ...

  1. Independent sex chromosome evolution in lower vertebrates: a molecular cytogenetic overview in the Erythrinidae fish family.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, M B; Liehr, T; Trifonov, V; Molina, W F; Bertollo, L A C

    2013-01-01

    The Erythrinidae fish family is an excellent model for analyzing the evolution of sex chromosomes. Different stages of sex chromosome differentiation from homomorphic to highly differentiated ones can be found among the species of this family. Here, whole chromosome painting, together with the cytogenetic mapping of repetitive DNAs, highlighted the evolutionary relationships of the sex chromosomes among different erythrinid species and genera. It was demonstrated that the sex chromosomes can follow distinct evolutionary pathways inside this family. Reciprocal hybridizations with whole sex chromosome probes revealed that different autosomal pairs have evolved as the sex pair, even among closely related species. In addition, distinct origins and different patterns of differentiation were found for the same type of sex chromosome system. These features expose the high plasticity of the sex chromosome evolution in lower vertebrates, in contrast to that occurring in higher ones. A possible role of this sex chromosome turnover in the speciation processes is also discussed. PMID:23919986

  2. Genome structure and primitive sex chromosome revealed in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Tuskan, Gerald A; Yin, Tongming; Gunter, Lee E; Blaudez, D

    2008-01-01

    We constructed a comprehensive genetic map for Populus and ordered 332 Mb of sequence scaffolds along the 19 haploid chromosomes in order to compare chromosomal regions among diverse members of the genus. These efforts lead us to conclude that chromosome XIX in Populus is evolving into a sex chromosome. Consistent segregation distortion in favor of the sub-genera Tacamahaca alleles provided evidence of divergent selection among species, particularly at the proximal end of chromosome XIX. A large microsatellite marker (SSR) cluster was detected in the distorted region even though the genome-wide distribute SSR sites was uniform across the physical map. The differences between the genetic map and physical sequence data suggested recombination suppression was occurring in the distorted region. A gender-determination locus and an overabundance of NBS-LRR genes were also co-located to the distorted region and were put forth as the cause for divergent selection and recombination suppression. This hypothesis was verified by using fine-scale mapping of an integrated scaffold in the vicinity of the gender-determination locus. As such it appears that chromosome XIX in Populus is in the process of evolving from an autosome into a sex chromosome and that NBS-LRR genes may play important role in the chromosomal diversification process in Populus.

  3. Sex-specific adaptation drives early sex chromosome evolution in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi; Bachtrog, Doris

    2012-07-20

    Most species' sex chromosomes are derived from ancient autosomes and show few signatures of their origins. We studied the sex chromosomes of Drosophila miranda, where a neo-Y chromosome originated only approximately 1 million years ago. Whole-genome and transcriptome analysis reveals massive degeneration of the neo-Y, that male-beneficial genes on the neo-Y are more likely to undergo accelerated protein evolution, and that neo-Y genes evolve biased expression toward male-specific tissues--the shrinking gene content of the neo-Y becomes masculinized. In contrast, although older X chromosomes show a paucity of genes expressed in male tissues, neo-X genes highly expressed in male-specific tissues undergo increased rates of protein evolution if haploid in males. Thus, the response to sex-specific selection can shift at different stages of X differentiation, resulting in masculinization or demasculinization of the X-chromosomal gene content. PMID:22822149

  4. Sequencing papaya X and Yh chromosomes reveals molecular basis of incipient sex chromosome evolution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianping; Na, Jong-Kuk; Yu, Qingyi; Gschwend, Andrea R; Han, Jennifer; Zeng, Fanchang; Aryal, Rishi; VanBuren, Robert; Murray, Jan E; Zhang, Wenli; Navajas-Pérez, Rafael; Feltus, F Alex; Lemke, Cornelia; Tong, Eric J; Chen, Cuixia; Wai, Ching Man; Singh, Ratnesh; Wang, Ming-Li; Min, Xiang Jia; Alam, Maqsudul; Charlesworth, Deborah; Moore, Paul H; Jiang, Jiming; Paterson, Andrew H; Ming, Ray

    2012-08-21

    Sex determination in papaya is controlled by a recently evolved XY chromosome pair, with two slightly different Y chromosomes controlling the development of males (Y) and hermaphrodites (Y(h)). To study the events of early sex chromosome evolution, we sequenced the hermaphrodite-specific region of the Y(h) chromosome (HSY) and its X counterpart, yielding an 8.1-megabase (Mb) HSY pseudomolecule, and a 3.5-Mb sequence for the corresponding X region. The HSY is larger than the X region, mostly due to retrotransposon insertions. The papaya HSY differs from the X region by two large-scale inversions, the first of which likely caused the recombination suppression between the X and Y(h) chromosomes, followed by numerous additional chromosomal rearrangements. Altogether, including the X and/or HSY regions, 124 transcription units were annotated, including 50 functional pairs present in both the X and HSY. Ten HSY genes had functional homologs elsewhere in the papaya autosomal regions, suggesting movement of genes onto the HSY, whereas the X region had none. Sequence divergence between 70 transcripts shared by the X and HSY revealed two evolutionary strata in the X chromosome, corresponding to the two inversions on the HSY, the older of which evolved about 7.0 million years ago. Gene content differences between the HSY and X are greatest in the older stratum, whereas the gene content and order of the collinear regions are identical. Our findings support theoretical models of early sex chromosome evolution. PMID:22869747

  5. Sequencing papaya X and Yh chromosomes reveals molecular basis of incipient sex chromosome evolution

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianping; Na, Jong-Kuk; Yu, Qingyi; Gschwend, Andrea R.; Han, Jennifer; Zeng, Fanchang; Aryal, Rishi; VanBuren, Robert; Murray, Jan E.; Zhang, Wenli; Navajas-Pérez, Rafael; Feltus, F. Alex; Lemke, Cornelia; Tong, Eric J.; Chen, Cuixia; Man Wai, Ching; Singh, Ratnesh; Wang, Ming-Li; Min, Xiang Jia; Alam, Maqsudul; Charlesworth, Deborah; Moore, Paul H.; Jiang, Jiming; Paterson, Andrew H.; Ming, Ray

    2012-01-01

    Sex determination in papaya is controlled by a recently evolved XY chromosome pair, with two slightly different Y chromosomes controlling the development of males (Y) and hermaphrodites (Yh). To study the events of early sex chromosome evolution, we sequenced the hermaphrodite-specific region of the Yh chromosome (HSY) and its X counterpart, yielding an 8.1-megabase (Mb) HSY pseudomolecule, and a 3.5-Mb sequence for the corresponding X region. The HSY is larger than the X region, mostly due to retrotransposon insertions. The papaya HSY differs from the X region by two large-scale inversions, the first of which likely caused the recombination suppression between the X and Yh chromosomes, followed by numerous additional chromosomal rearrangements. Altogether, including the X and/or HSY regions, 124 transcription units were annotated, including 50 functional pairs present in both the X and HSY. Ten HSY genes had functional homologs elsewhere in the papaya autosomal regions, suggesting movement of genes onto the HSY, whereas the X region had none. Sequence divergence between 70 transcripts shared by the X and HSY revealed two evolutionary strata in the X chromosome, corresponding to the two inversions on the HSY, the older of which evolved about 7.0 million years ago. Gene content differences between the HSY and X are greatest in the older stratum, whereas the gene content and order of the collinear regions are identical. Our findings support theoretical models of early sex chromosome evolution. PMID:22869747

  6. Retroposon insertions and the chronology of avian sex chromosome evolution.

    PubMed

    Suh, Alexander; Kriegs, Jan Ole; Brosius, Jürgen; Schmitz, Jürgen

    2011-11-01

    The vast majority of extant birds possess highly differentiated Z and W sex chromosomes. Nucleotide sequence data from gametologs (homologs on opposite sex chromosomes) suggest that this divergence occurred throughout early bird evolution via stepwise cessation of recombination between identical sex chromosomal regions. Here, we investigated avian sex chromosome differentiation from a novel perspective, using retroposon insertions and random insertions/deletions for the reconstruction of gametologous gene trees. Our data confirm that the CHD1Z/CHD1W genes differentiated in the ancestor of the neognaths, whereas the NIPBLZ/NIPBLW genes diverged in the neoavian ancestor and independently within Galloanserae. The divergence of the ATP5A1Z/ATP5A1W genes in galloanserans occurred independently in the chicken, the screamer, and the ancestor of duck-related birds. In Neoaves, this gene pair differentiated in each of the six sampled representatives, respectively. Additionally, three of our investigated loci can be utilized as universal, easy-to-use independent tools for molecular sexing of Neoaves or Neognathae. PMID:21633113

  7. Sex Chromosome Meiotic Drive in Stalk-Eyed Flies

    PubMed Central

    Presgraves, D. C.; Severance, E.; Wilkinson, G. S.

    1997-01-01

    Meiotically driven sex chromosomes can quickly spread to fixation and cause population extinction unless balanced by selection or suppressed by genetic modifiers. We report results of genetic analyses that demonstrate that extreme female-biased sex ratios in two sister species of stalk-eyed flies, Cyrtodiopsis dalmanni and C. whitei, are due to a meiotic drive element on the X chromosome (X(d)). Relatively high frequencies of X(d) in C. dalmanni and C. whitei (13-17% and 29%, respectively) cause female-biased sex ratios in natural populations of both species. Sex ratio distortion is associated with spermatid degeneration in male carriers of X(d). Variation in sex ratios is caused by Y-linked and autosomal factors that decrease the intensity of meiotic drive. Y-linked polymorphism for resistance to drive exists in C. dalmanni in which a resistant Y chromosome reduces the intensity and reverses the direction of meiotic drive. When paired with X(d), modifying Y chromosomes (Y(m)) cause the transmission of predominantly Y-bearing sperm, and on average, production of 63% male progeny. The absence of sex ratio distortion in closely related monomorphic outgroup species suggests that this meiotic drive system may predate the origin of C. whitei and C. dalmanni. We discuss factors likely to be involved in the persistence of these sex-linked polymorphisms and consider the impact of X(d) on the operational sex ratio and the intensity of sexual selection in these extremely sexually dimorphic flies. PMID:9383060

  8. The Staurotypus Turtles and Aves Share the Same Origin of Sex Chromosomes but Evolved Different Types of Heterogametic Sex Determination

    PubMed Central

    Kawagoshi, Taiki; Uno, Yoshinobu; Nishida, Chizuko; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles have a wide diversity of sex-determining mechanisms and types of sex chromosomes. Turtles exhibit temperature-dependent sex determination and genotypic sex determination, with male heterogametic (XX/XY) and female heterogametic (ZZ/ZW) sex chromosomes. Identification of sex chromosomes in many turtle species and their comparative genomic analysis are of great significance to understand the evolutionary processes of sex determination and sex chromosome differentiation in Testudines. The Mexican giant musk turtle (Staurotypus triporcatus, Kinosternidae, Testudines) and the giant musk turtle (Staurotypus salvinii) have heteromorphic XY sex chromosomes with a low degree of morphological differentiation; however, their origin and linkage group are still unknown. Cross-species chromosome painting with chromosome-specific DNA from Chinese soft-shelled turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) revealed that the X and Y chromosomes of S. triporcatus have homology with P. sinensis chromosome 6, which corresponds to the chicken Z chromosome. We cloned cDNA fragments of S. triporcatus homologs of 16 chicken Z-linked genes and mapped them to S. triporcatus and S. salvinii chromosomes using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Sixteen genes were localized to the X and Y long arms in the same order in both species. The orders were also almost the same as those of the ostrich (Struthio camelus) Z chromosome, which retains the primitive state of the avian ancestral Z chromosome. These results strongly suggest that the X and Y chromosomes of Staurotypus turtles are at a very early stage of sex chromosome differentiation, and that these chromosomes and the avian ZW chromosomes share the same origin. Nonetheless, the turtles and birds acquired different systems of heterogametic sex determination during their evolution. PMID:25121779

  9. Y Fuse? Sex Chromosome Fusions in Fishes and Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    Vamosi, Jana C.; Peichel, Catherine L.; Valenzuela, Nicole; Kitano, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal fusion plays a recurring role in the evolution of adaptations and reproductive isolation among species, yet little is known of the evolutionary drivers of chromosomal fusions. Because sex chromosomes (X and Y in male heterogametic systems, Z and W in female heterogametic systems) differ in their selective, mutational, and demographic environments, those differences provide a unique opportunity to dissect the evolutionary forces that drive chromosomal fusions. We estimate the rate at which fusions between sex chromosomes and autosomes become established across the phylogenies of both fishes and squamate reptiles. Both the incidence among extant species and the establishment rate of Y-autosome fusions is much higher than for X-autosome, Z-autosome, or W-autosome fusions. Using population genetic models, we show that this pattern cannot be reconciled with many standard explanations for the spread of fusions. In particular, direct selection acting on fusions or sexually antagonistic selection cannot, on their own, account for the predominance of Y-autosome fusions. The most plausible explanation for the observed data seems to be (a) that fusions are slightly deleterious, and (b) that the mutation rate is male-biased or the reproductive sex ratio is female-biased. We identify other combinations of evolutionary forces that might in principle account for the data although they appear less likely. Our results shed light on the processes that drive structural changes throughout the genome. PMID:25993542

  10. Y fuse? Sex chromosome fusions in fishes and reptiles.

    PubMed

    Pennell, Matthew W; Kirkpatrick, Mark; Otto, Sarah P; Vamosi, Jana C; Peichel, Catherine L; Valenzuela, Nicole; Kitano, Jun

    2015-05-01

    Chromosomal fusion plays a recurring role in the evolution of adaptations and reproductive isolation among species, yet little is known of the evolutionary drivers of chromosomal fusions. Because sex chromosomes (X and Y in male heterogametic systems, Z and W in female heterogametic systems) differ in their selective, mutational, and demographic environments, those differences provide a unique opportunity to dissect the evolutionary forces that drive chromosomal fusions. We estimate the rate at which fusions between sex chromosomes and autosomes become established across the phylogenies of both fishes and squamate reptiles. Both the incidence among extant species and the establishment rate of Y-autosome fusions is much higher than for X-autosome, Z-autosome, or W-autosome fusions. Using population genetic models, we show that this pattern cannot be reconciled with many standard explanations for the spread of fusions. In particular, direct selection acting on fusions or sexually antagonistic selection cannot, on their own, account for the predominance of Y-autosome fusions. The most plausible explanation for the observed data seems to be (a) that fusions are slightly deleterious, and (b) that the mutation rate is male-biased or the reproductive sex ratio is female-biased. We identify other combinations of evolutionary forces that might in principle account for the data although they appear less likely. Our results shed light on the processes that drive structural changes throughout the genome. PMID:25993542

  11. Cognitive and Academic Skills in Children with Sex Chromosome Abnormalities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Bruce G.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Follows 46 unselected children with various sex chromosome abnormalities using intellectual, language, and achievement testing. Notes that, although most children were not mentally retarded, most received special education help. Finds support for the inference that learning disorders were genetically mediated in this group. (RS)

  12. Cell-free DNA screening and sex chromosome aneuploidies.

    PubMed

    Mennuti, Michael T; Chandrasekaran, Suchitra; Khalek, Nahla; Dugoff, Lorraine

    2015-10-01

    Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) testing is increasingly being used to screen pregnant women for fetal aneuploidies. This technology may also identify fetal sex and can be used to screen for sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs). Physicians offering this screening will need to be prepared to offer comprehensive prenatal counseling about these disorders to an increasing number of patients. The purpose of this article is to consider the source of information to use for counseling, factors in parental decision-making, and the performance characteristics of cfDNA testing in screening for SCAs. Discordance between ultrasound examination and cfDNA results regarding fetal sex is also discussed. PMID:26088741

  13. Sex chromosome diversity in Armenian toad grasshoppers (Orthoptera, Acridoidea, Pamphagidae)

    PubMed Central

    Bugrov, Alexander G.; Jetybayev, Ilyas E.; Karagyan, Gayane H.; Rubtsov, Nicolay B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although previous cytogenetic analysis of Pamphagidae grasshoppers pointed to considerable karyotype uniformity among most of the species in the family, our study of species from Armenia has discovered other, previously unknown karyotypes, differing from the standard for Pamphagidae mainly in having unusual sets of sex chromosomes. Asiotmethis turritus (Fischer von Waldheim, 1833), Paranocaracris rubripes (Fischer von Waldheim, 1846), and Nocaracris cyanipes (Fischer von Waldheim, 1846) were found to have the karyotype 2n♂=16+neo-XY and 2n♀=16+neo-XX, the neo-X chromosome being the result of centromeric fusion of an ancient acrocentric X chromosome and a large acrocentric autosome. The karyotype of Paranothrotes opacus (Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1882) was found to be 2n♂=14+X1X2Y and 2n♀=14+X1X1X2X2., the result of an additional chromosome rearrangement involving translocation of the neo-Y and another large autosome. Furthermore, evolution of the sex chromosomes in these species has involved different variants of heterochromatinization and miniaturization of the neo-Y. The karyotype of Eremopeza festiva (Saussure, 1884), in turn, appeared to have the standard sex determination system described earlier for Pamphagidae grasshoppers, 2n♂=18+X0 and 2n♀=18+XX, but all the chromosomes of this species were found to have small second C-positive arms. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with 18S rDNA and telomeric (TTAGG)n DNA repeats to yield new data on the structural organization of chromosomes in the species studied, we found that for most of them, clusters of repeats homologous to 18S rDNA localize on two, three or four pairs of autosomes and on the X. In Eremopeza festiva, however, FISH with labelled 18S rDNA painted C-positive regions of all autosomes and the X chromosome; clusters of telomeric repeats localized primarily on the ends of the chromosome arms. Overall, we conclude that the different stages of neo-Y degradation revealed in

  14. Sex chromosome diversity in Armenian toad grasshoppers (Orthoptera, Acridoidea, Pamphagidae).

    PubMed

    Bugrov, Alexander G; Jetybayev, Ilyas E; Karagyan, Gayane H; Rubtsov, Nicolay B

    2016-01-01

    Although previous cytogenetic analysis of Pamphagidae grasshoppers pointed to considerable karyotype uniformity among most of the species in the family, our study of species from Armenia has discovered other, previously unknown karyotypes, differing from the standard for Pamphagidae mainly in having unusual sets of sex chromosomes. Asiotmethis turritus (Fischer von Waldheim, 1833), Paranocaracris rubripes (Fischer von Waldheim, 1846), and Nocaracris cyanipes (Fischer von Waldheim, 1846) were found to have the karyotype 2n♂=16+neo-XY and 2n♀=16+neo-XX, the neo-X chromosome being the result of centromeric fusion of an ancient acrocentric X chromosome and a large acrocentric autosome. The karyotype of Paranothrotes opacus (Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1882) was found to be 2n♂=14+X1X2Y and 2n♀=14+X1X1X2X2., the result of an additional chromosome rearrangement involving translocation of the neo-Y and another large autosome. Furthermore, evolution of the sex chromosomes in these species has involved different variants of heterochromatinization and miniaturization of the neo-Y. The karyotype of Eremopeza festiva (Saussure, 1884), in turn, appeared to have the standard sex determination system described earlier for Pamphagidae grasshoppers, 2n♂=18+X0 and 2n♀=18+XX, but all the chromosomes of this species were found to have small second C-positive arms. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with 18S rDNA and telomeric (TTAGG)n DNA repeats to yield new data on the structural organization of chromosomes in the species studied, we found that for most of them, clusters of repeats homologous to 18S rDNA localize on two, three or four pairs of autosomes and on the X. In Eremopeza festiva, however, FISH with labelled 18S rDNA painted C-positive regions of all autosomes and the X chromosome; clusters of telomeric repeats localized primarily on the ends of the chromosome arms. Overall, we conclude that the different stages of neo-Y degradation revealed in the

  15. SEX-DETector: A Probabilistic Approach to Study Sex Chromosomes in Non-Model Organisms.

    PubMed

    Muyle, Aline; Käfer, Jos; Zemp, Niklaus; Mousset, Sylvain; Picard, Franck; Marais, Gabriel Ab

    2016-01-01

    We propose a probabilistic framework to infer autosomal and sex-linked genes from RNA-seq data of a cross for any sex chromosome type (XY, ZW, and UV). Sex chromosomes (especially the non-recombining and repeat-dense Y, W, U, and V) are notoriously difficult to sequence. Strategies have been developed to obtain partially assembled sex chromosome sequences. Most of them remain difficult to apply to numerous non-model organisms, either because they require a reference genome, or because they are designed for evolutionarily old systems. Sequencing a cross (parents and progeny) by RNA-seq to study the segregation of alleles and infer sex-linked genes is a cost-efficient strategy, which also provides expression level estimates. However, the lack of a proper statistical framework has limited a broader application of this approach. Tests on empirical Silene data show that our method identifies 20-35% more sex-linked genes than existing pipelines, while making reliable inferences for downstream analyses. Approximately 12 individuals are needed for optimal results based on simulations. For species with an unknown sex-determination system, the method can assess the presence and type (XY vs. ZW) of sex chromosomes through a model comparison strategy. The method is particularly well optimized for sex chromosomes of young or intermediate age, which are expected in thousands of yet unstudied lineages. Any organisms, including non-model ones for which nothing is known a priori, that can be bred in the lab, are suitable for our method. SEX-DETector and its implementation in a Galaxy workflow are made freely available. PMID:27492231

  16. SEX-DETector: A Probabilistic Approach to Study Sex Chromosomes in Non-Model Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Muyle, Aline; Käfer, Jos; Zemp, Niklaus; Mousset, Sylvain; Picard, Franck; Marais, Gabriel AB

    2016-01-01

    We propose a probabilistic framework to infer autosomal and sex-linked genes from RNA-seq data of a cross for any sex chromosome type (XY, ZW, and UV). Sex chromosomes (especially the non-recombining and repeat-dense Y, W, U, and V) are notoriously difficult to sequence. Strategies have been developed to obtain partially assembled sex chromosome sequences. Most of them remain difficult to apply to numerous non-model organisms, either because they require a reference genome, or because they are designed for evolutionarily old systems. Sequencing a cross (parents and progeny) by RNA-seq to study the segregation of alleles and infer sex-linked genes is a cost-efficient strategy, which also provides expression level estimates. However, the lack of a proper statistical framework has limited a broader application of this approach. Tests on empirical Silene data show that our method identifies 20–35% more sex-linked genes than existing pipelines, while making reliable inferences for downstream analyses. Approximately 12 individuals are needed for optimal results based on simulations. For species with an unknown sex-determination system, the method can assess the presence and type (XY vs. ZW) of sex chromosomes through a model comparison strategy. The method is particularly well optimized for sex chromosomes of young or intermediate age, which are expected in thousands of yet unstudied lineages. Any organisms, including non-model ones for which nothing is known a priori, that can be bred in the lab, are suitable for our method. SEX-DETector and its implementation in a Galaxy workflow are made freely available. PMID:27492231

  17. Sex Determination in the Fly Megaselia Scalaris, a Model System for Primary Steps of Sex Chromosome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Traut, W.

    1994-01-01

    The fly Megaselia scalaris Loew possesses three homomorphic chromosome pairs; 2 is the sex chromosome pair in two wild-type laboratory stocks of different geographic origin (designated ``original'' sex chromosome pair in this paper). The primary male-determining function moves at a very low rate to other chromosomes, thereby creating new Y chromosomes. Random amplified polymorphic DNA markers obtained by polymerase chain reaction with single decamer primers and a few available phenotypic markers were used in testcrosses to localize the sex-determining loci and to define the new sex chromosomes. Four cases are presented in which the primary male-determining function had been transferred from the original Y chromosome to a new locus either on one of the autosomes or on the original X chromosome, presumably by transposition. In these cases, the sex-determining function had moved to a different locus without an obvious cotransfer of other Y chromosome markers. Thus, with Megaselia we are afforded an experimental system to study the otherwise hypothetical primary stages of sex chromosome evolution. An initial molecular differentiation is apparent even in the new sex chromosomes. Molecular differences between the original X and Y chromosomes illustrate a slightly more advanced stage of sex chromosome evolution. PMID:8005417

  18. Dosage compensation of the sex chromosomes and autosomes.

    PubMed

    Disteche, Christine M

    2016-08-01

    Males are XY and females are XX in most mammalian species. Other species such as birds have a different sex chromosome make-up: ZZ in males and ZW in females. In both types of organisms one of the sex chromosomes, Y or W, has degenerated due to lack of recombination with its respective homolog X or Z. Since autosomes are present in two copies in diploid organisms the heterogametic sex has become a natural "aneuploid" with haploinsufficiency for X- or Z-linked genes. Specific mechanisms have evolved to restore a balance between critical gene products throughout the genome and between males and females. Some of these mechanisms were co-opted from and/or added to compensatory processes that alleviate autosomal aneuploidy. Surprisingly, several modes of dosage compensation have evolved. In this review we will consider the evidence for dosage compensation and the molecular mechanisms implicated. PMID:27112542

  19. Chromosome mapping of repetitive sequences in Anostomidae species: implications for genomic and sex chromosome evolution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Members of the Anostomidae family provide an interesting model system for the study of the influence of repetitive elements on genome composition, mainly because they possess numerous heterochromatic segments and a peculiar system of female heterogamety that is restricted to a few species of the Leporinus genus. The aim of this study was to isolate and identify important new repetitive DNA elements in Anostomidae through restriction enzyme digestion, followed by cloning, characterisation and chromosome mapping of this fragment. To identify repetitive elements in other Leporinus species and expand on studies of repetitive elements in Anostomidae, hybridisation experiments were also performed using previously described probes of LeSpeI repetitive elements. Results The 628-base pair (bp) LeSpeII fragment was hybridised to metaphase cells of L. elongatus individuals as well as those of L. macrocephalus, L. obtusidens, L. striatus, L. lacustris, L. friderici, Schizodon borellii and S. isognathus. In L. elongatus, both male and female cells contained small clusters of LeSpeII repetitive elements dispersed on all of the chromosomes, with enrichment near most of the terminal portions of the chromosomes. In the female sex chromosomes of L. elongatus (Z2,Z2/W1W2), however, this repeated element was absent. In the remaining species, a dispersed pattern of hybridisation was observed on all chromosomes irrespective of whether or not they were sex chromosomes. The repetitive element LeSpeI produced positive hybridisations signals only in L. elongatus, L. macrocephalus and L. obtusidens, i.e., species with differentiated sex chromosomes. In the remaining species, the LeSpeI element did not produce hybridisation signals. Conclusions Results are discussed in terms of the effects of repetitive sequences on the differentiation of the Anostomidae genome, especially with respect to sex chromosome evolution. LeSpeII showed hybridisation patterns typical of Long Interspersed

  20. Female heterogamety in Madagascar chameleons (Squamata: Chamaeleonidae: Furcifer): differentiation of sex and neo-sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Rovatsos, Michail; Johnson Pokorná, Martina; Altmanová, Marie; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2015-01-01

    Amniotes possess variability in sex determining mechanisms, however, this diversity is still only partially known throughout the clade and sex determining systems still remain unknown even in such a popular and distinctive lineage as chameleons (Squamata: Acrodonta: Chamaeleonidae). Here, we present evidence for female heterogamety in this group. The Malagasy giant chameleon (Furcifer oustaleti) (chromosome number 2n = 22) possesses heteromorphic Z and W sex chromosomes with heterochromatic W. The panther chameleon (Furcifer pardalis) (2n = 22 in males, 21 in females), the second most popular chameleon species in the world pet trade, exhibits a rather rare Z1Z1Z2Z2/Z1Z2W system of multiple sex chromosomes, which most likely evolved from W-autosome fusion. Notably, its neo-W chromosome is partially heterochromatic and its female-specific genetic content has expanded into the previously autosomal region. Showing clear evidence for genotypic sex determination in the panther chameleon, we resolve the long-standing question of whether or not environmental sex determination exists in this species. Together with recent findings in other reptile lineages, our work demonstrates that female heterogamety is widespread among amniotes, adding another important piece to the mosaic of knowledge on sex determination in amniotes needed to understand the evolution of this important trait. PMID:26286647

  1. Female heterogamety in Madagascar chameleons (Squamata: Chamaeleonidae: Furcifer): differentiation of sex and neo-sex chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Rovatsos, Michail; Pokorná, Martina Johnson; Altmanová, Marie; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2015-01-01

    Amniotes possess variability in sex determining mechanisms, however, this diversity is still only partially known throughout the clade and sex determining systems still remain unknown even in such a popular and distinctive lineage as chameleons (Squamata: Acrodonta: Chamaeleonidae). Here, we present evidence for female heterogamety in this group. The Malagasy giant chameleon (Furcifer oustaleti) (chromosome number 2n = 22) possesses heteromorphic Z and W sex chromosomes with heterochromatic W. The panther chameleon (Furcifer pardalis) (2n = 22 in males, 21 in females), the second most popular chameleon species in the world pet trade, exhibits a rather rare Z1Z1Z2Z2/Z1Z2W system of multiple sex chromosomes, which most likely evolved from W-autosome fusion. Notably, its neo-W chromosome is partially heterochromatic and its female-specific genetic content has expanded into the previously autosomal region. Showing clear evidence for genotypic sex determination in the panther chameleon, we resolve the long-standing question of whether or not environmental sex determination exists in this species. Together with recent findings in other reptile lineages, our work demonstrates that female heterogamety is widespread among amniotes, adding another important piece to the mosaic of knowledge on sex determination in amniotes needed to understand the evolution of this important trait. PMID:26286647

  2. Sex-biased chromatin and regulatory cross-talk between sex chromosomes, autosomes, and mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Several autoimmune and neurological diseases exhibit a sex bias, but discerning the causes and mechanisms of these biases has been challenging. Sex differences begin to manifest themselves in early embryonic development, and gonadal differentiation further bifurcates the male and female phenotypes. Even at this early stage, however, there is evidence that males and females respond to environmental stimuli differently, and the divergent phenotypic responses may have consequences later in life. The effect of prenatal nutrient restriction illustrates this point, as adult women exposed to prenatal restrictions exhibited increased risk factors of cardiovascular disease, while men exposed to the same condition did not. Recent research has examined the roles of sex-specific genes, hormones, chromosomes, and the interactions among them in mediating sex-biased phenotypes. Such research has identified testosterone, for example, as a possible protective agent against autoimmune disorders and an XX chromosome complement as a susceptibility factor in murine models of lupus and multiple sclerosis. Sex-biased chromatin is an additional and likely important component. Research suggesting a role for X and Y chromosome heterochromatin in regulating epigenetic states of autosomes has highlighted unorthodox mechanisms of gene regulation. The crosstalk between the Y chromosomes and autosomes may be further mediated by the mitochondria. The organelles have solely maternal transmission and exert differential effects on males and females. Altogether, research supports the notion that the interaction between sex-biased elements might exert novel regulatory functions in the genome and contribute to sex-specific susceptibilities to autoimmune and neurological diseases. PMID:24422881

  3. Sequencing the mouse Y chromosome reveals convergent gene acquisition and amplification on both sex chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Y.Q. Shirleen; Alföldi, Jessica; Pyntikova, Tatyana; Brown, Laura G.; Graves, Tina; Minx, Patrick J.; Fulton, Robert S.; Kremitzki, Colin; Koutseva, Natalia; Mueller, Jacob L.; Rozen, Steve; Hughes, Jennifer F.; Owens, Elaine; Womack, James E.; Murphy, William J.; Cao, Qing; de Jong, Pieter; Warren, Wesley C.; Wilson, Richard K.; Skaletsky, Helen; Page, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We sequenced the MSY (Male-Specific region of the Y chromosome) of the C57BL/6J strain of the laboratory mouse Mus musculus. In contrast to theories that Y chromosomes are heterochromatic and gene poor, the mouse MSY is 99.9% euchromatic and contains about 700 protein-coding genes. Only two percent of the MSY derives from the ancestral autosomes that gave rise to the mammalian sex chromosomes. Instead, all but 50 of the MSY's genes belong to three acquired, massively amplified gene families that have no homologs on primate MSYs, but do have acquired, amplified homologs on the mouse X chromosome. The complete mouse MSY sequence brings to light dramatic forces in sex chromosome evolution: lineage-specific convergent acquisition and amplification of X-Y gene families, possibly fueled by antagonism between acquired X-Y homologs. The mouse MSY sequence presents opportunities for experimental studies of a sex-specific chromosome in its entirety, in a genetically tractable model organism. PMID:25417157

  4. Sequencing the mouse Y chromosome reveals convergent gene acquisition and amplification on both sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Soh, Y Q Shirleen; Alföldi, Jessica; Pyntikova, Tatyana; Brown, Laura G; Graves, Tina; Minx, Patrick J; Fulton, Robert S; Kremitzki, Colin; Koutseva, Natalia; Mueller, Jacob L; Rozen, Steve; Hughes, Jennifer F; Owens, Elaine; Womack, James E; Murphy, William J; Cao, Qing; de Jong, Pieter; Warren, Wesley C; Wilson, Richard K; Skaletsky, Helen; Page, David C

    2014-11-01

    We sequenced the MSY (male-specific region of the Y chromosome) of the C57BL/6J strain of the laboratory mouse Mus musculus. In contrast to theories that Y chromosomes are heterochromatic and gene poor, the mouse MSY is 99.9% euchromatic and contains about 700 protein-coding genes. Only 2% of the MSY derives from the ancestral autosomes that gave rise to the mammalian sex chromosomes. Instead, all but 45 of the MSY's genes belong to three acquired, massively amplified gene families that have no homologs on primate MSYs but do have acquired, amplified homologs on the mouse X chromosome. The complete mouse MSY sequence brings to light dramatic forces in sex chromosome evolution: lineage-specific convergent acquisition and amplification of X-Y gene families, possibly fueled by antagonism between acquired X-Y homologs. The mouse MSY sequence presents opportunities for experimental studies of a sex-specific chromosome in its entirety, in a genetically tractable model organism. PMID:25417157

  5. Deficit of mitonuclear genes on the human X chromosome predates sex chromosome formation.

    PubMed

    Dean, Rebecca; Zimmer, Fabian; Mank, Judith E

    2015-02-01

    Two taxa studied to date, the therian mammals and Caenorhabditis elegans, display underrepresentations of mitonuclear genes (mt-N genes, nuclear genes whose products are imported to and act within the mitochondria) on their X chromosomes. This pattern has been interpreted as the result of sexual conflict driving mt-N genes off of the X chromosome. However, studies in several other species have failed to detect a convergent biased distribution of sex-linked mt-N genes, leading to questions over the generality of the role of sexual conflict in shaping the distribution of mt-N genes. Here we tested whether mt-N genes moved off of the therian X chromosome following sex chromosome formation, consistent with the role of sexual conflict, or whether the paucity of mt-N genes on the therian X is a chance result of an underrepresentation on the ancestral regions that formed the X chromosome. We used a synteny-based approach to identify the ancestral regions in the platypus and chicken genomes that later formed the therian X chromosome. We then quantified the movement of mt-N genes on and off of the X chromosome and the distribution of mt-N genes on the human X and ancestral X regions. We failed to find an excess of mt-N gene movement off of the X. The bias of mt-N genes on ancestral therian X chromosomes was also not significantly different from the biases on the human X. Together our results suggest that, rather than conflict driving mt-N genes off of the mammalian X, random biases on chromosomes that formed the X chromosome could explain the paucity of mt-N genes in the therian lineage. PMID:25637223

  6. Modeling X Chromosome Data Using Random Forests: Conquering Sex Bias.

    PubMed

    Winham, Stacey J; Jenkins, Gregory D; Biernacka, Joanna M

    2016-02-01

    Machine learning methods, including Random Forests (RF), are increasingly used for genetic data analysis. However, the standard RF algorithm does not correctly model the effects of X chromosome single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), leading to biased estimates of variable importance. We propose extensions of RF to correctly model X SNPs, including a stratified approach and an approach based on the process of X chromosome inactivation. We applied the new and standard RF approaches to case-control alcohol dependence data from the Study of Addiction: Genes and Environment (SAGE), and compared the performance of the alternative approaches via a simulation study. Standard RF applied to a case-control study of alcohol dependence yielded inflated variable importance estimates for X SNPs, even when sex was included as a variable, but the results of the new RF methods were consistent with univariate regression-based approaches that correctly model X chromosome data. Simulations showed that the new RF methods eliminate the bias in standard RF variable importance for X SNPs when sex is associated with the trait, and are able to detect causal autosomal and X SNPs. Even in the absence of sex effects, the new extensions perform similarly to standard RF. Thus, we provide a powerful multimarker approach for genetic analysis that accommodates X chromosome data in an unbiased way. This method is implemented in the freely available R package "snpRF" (http://www.cran.r-project.org/web/packages/snpRF/). PMID:26639183

  7. Sex-chromosome differentiation and ‘sex races’ in the common frog (Rana temporaria)

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Nicolas; Vuille, Yvan; Loman, Jon; Perrin, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Sex-chromosome differentiation was recently shown to vary among common frog populations in Fennoscandia, suggesting a trend of increased differentiation with latitude. By rearing families from two contrasted populations (respectively, from northern and southern Sweden), we show this disparity to stem from differences in sex-determination mechanisms rather than in XY-recombination patterns. Offspring from the northern population display equal sex ratios at metamorphosis, with phenotypic sexes that correlate strongly with paternal LG2 haplotypes (the sex chromosome); accordingly, Y haplotypes are markedly differentiated, with male-specific alleles and depressed diversity testifying to their smaller effective population size. In the southern population, by contrast, a majority of juveniles present ovaries at metamorphosis; only later in development do sex ratios return to equilibrium. Even at these later stages, phenotypic sexes correlate only mildly with paternal LG2 haplotypes; accordingly, there are no recognizable Y haplotypes. These distinct patterns of gonadal development fit the concept of ‘sex races’ proposed in the 1930s, with our two populations assigned to the ‘differentiated’ and ‘semi-differentiated’ races, respectively. Our results support the suggestion that ‘sex races’ differ in the genetic versus epigenetic components of sex determination. Analysing populations from the ‘undifferentiated race’ with high-density genetic maps should help to further test this hypothesis. PMID:25833852

  8. An Allometric Analysis of Sex and Sex Chromosome Dosage Effects on Subcortical Anatomy in Humans.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Paul Kirkpatrick; Clasen, Liv; Giedd, Jay N; Blumenthal, Jonathan; Lerch, Jason P; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Raznahan, Armin

    2016-02-24

    Structural neuroimaging of humans with typical and atypical sex-chromosome complements has established the marked influence of both Yand X-/Y-chromosome dosage on total brain volume (TBV) and identified potential cortical substrates for the psychiatric phenotypes associated with sex-chromosome aneuploidy (SCA). Here, in a cohort of 354 humans with varying karyotypes (XX, XY, XXX, XXY, XYY, XXYY, XXXXY), we investigate sex and SCA effects on subcortical size and shape; focusing on the striatum, pallidum and thalamus. We find large effect-size differences in the volume and shape of all three structures as a function of sex and SCA. We correct for TBV effects with a novel allometric method harnessing normative scaling rules for subcortical size and shape in humans, which we derive here for the first time. We show that all three subcortical volumes scale sublinearly with TBV among healthy humans, mirroring known relationships between subcortical volume and TBV among species. Traditional TBV correction methods assume linear scaling and can therefore invert or exaggerate sex and SCA effects on subcortical anatomy. Allometric analysis restricts sex-differences to: (1) greater pallidal volume (PV) in males, and (2) relative caudate head expansion and ventral striatum contraction in females. Allometric analysis of SCA reveals that supernumerary X- and Y-chromosomes both cause disproportionate reductions in PV, and coordinated deformations of striatopallidal shape. Our study provides a novel understanding of sex and sex-chromosome dosage effects on subcortical organization, using an allometric approach that can be generalized to other basic and clinical structural neuroimaging settings. PMID:26911691

  9. Genetic mapping of sex determination in a wild strawberry, Fragaria virginiana reveals earliest form of sex chromosome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The evolution of separate sexes (dioecy) from hermaphroditism is one of the major evolutionary transitions in plants and this transition can be accompanied by the development of sex chromosomes. However, we are now just beginning to gain insight into the initial stages of sex chromosome evolution vi...

  10. Sexually Antagonistic “Zygotic Drive” of the Sex Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Rice, William R.; Gavrilets, Sergey; Friberg, Urban

    2008-01-01

    Genomic conflict is perplexing because it causes the fitness of a species to decline rather than improve. Many diverse forms of genomic conflict have been identified, but this extant tally may be incomplete. Here, we show that the unusual characteristics of the sex chromosomes can, in principle, lead to a previously unappreciated form of sexual genomic conflict. The phenomenon occurs because there is selection in the heterogametic sex for sex-linked mutations that harm the sex of offspring that does not carry them, whenever there is competition among siblings. This harmful phenotype can be expressed as an antagonistic green-beard effect that is mediated by epigenetic parental effects, parental investment, and/or interactions among siblings. We call this form of genomic conflict sexually antagonistic “zygotic drive”, because it is functionally equivalent to meiotic drive, except that it operates during the zygotic and postzygotic stages of the life cycle rather than the meiotic and gametic stages. A combination of mathematical modeling and a survey of empirical studies is used to show that sexually antagonistic zygotic drive is feasible, likely to be widespread in nature, and that it can promote a genetic “arms race” between the homo- and heteromorphic sex chromosomes. This new category of genomic conflict has the potential to strongly influence other fundamental evolutionary processes, such as speciation and the degeneration of the Y and W sex chromosomes. It also fosters a new genetic hypothesis for the evolution of enigmatic fitness-reducing traits like the high frequency of spontaneous abortion, sterility, and homosexuality observed in humans. PMID:19096519

  11. Unique sex chromosome systems in Ellobius: How do male XX chromosomes recombine and undergo pachytene chromatin inactivation?

    PubMed Central

    Matveevsky, Sergey; Bakloushinskaya, Irina; Kolomiets, Oxana

    2016-01-01

    Most mammalian species have heteromorphic sex chromosomes in males, except for a few enigmatic groups such as the mole voles Ellobius, which do not have the Y chromosome and Sry gene. The Ellobius (XX ♀♂) system of sex chromosomes has no analogues among other animals. The structure and meiotic behaviour of the two X chromosomes were investigated for males of the sibling species Ellobius talpinus and Ellobius tancrei. Their sex chromosomes, despite their identical G-structure, demonstrate short synaptic fragments and crossover-associated MLH1 foci in both telomeric regions only. The chromatin undergoes modifications in the meiotic sex chromosomes. SUMO-1 marks a small nucleolus-like body of the meiotic XX. ATR and ubiH2A are localized in the asynaptic area and the histone γH2AFX covers the entire XX bivalent. The distribution of some markers of chromatin inactivation differentiates sex chromosomes of mole voles from those of other mammals. Sex chromosomes of both studied species have identical recombination and meiotic inactivation patterns. In Ellobius, similar chromosome morphology masks the functional heteromorphism of the male sex chromosomes, which can be seen at meiosis. PMID:27425629

  12. Increased number of sex chromosomes affects height in a nonlinear fashion: a study of 305 patients with sex chromosome aneuploidy.

    PubMed

    Ottesen, Anne Marie; Aksglaede, Lise; Garn, Inger; Tartaglia, Nicole; Tassone, Flora; Gravholt, Claus H; Bojesen, Anders; Sørensen, Kaspar; Jørgensen, Niels; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Gerdes, Tommy; Lind, Anne-Marie; Kjaergaard, Susanne; Juul, Anders

    2010-05-01

    Tall stature and eunuchoid body proportions characterize patients with 47,XXY Klinefelter syndrome, whereas patients with 45,X Turner syndrome are characterized by impaired growth. Growth is relatively well characterized in these two syndromes, while few studies describe the growth of patients with higher grade sex chromosome aneuploidies. It has been proposed that tall stature in sex chromosome aneuploidy is related to an overexpression of SHOX, although the copy number of SHOX has not been evaluated in previous studies. Our aims were therefore: (1) to assess stature in 305 patients with sex chromosome aneuploidy and (2) to determine the number of SHOX copies in a subgroup of these patients (n = 255) these patients and 74 healthy controls. Median height standard deviation scores in 46,XX males (n = 6) were -1.2 (-2.8 to 0.3), +0.9 (-2.2 to +4.6) in 47,XXY (n = 129), +1.3 (-1.8 to +4.9) in 47,XYY (n = 44), +1.1 (-1.9 to +3.4) in 48,XXYY (n = 45), +1.8 (-2.0 to +3.2) in 48,XXXY (n = 9), and -1.8 (-4.2 to -0.1) in 49,XXXXY (n = 10). Median height standard deviation scores in patients with 45,X (n = 6) were -2.6 (-4.1 to -1.6), +0.7 (-0.9 to +3.2) in 47,XXX (n = 40), -0.6 (-1.9 to +2.1) in 48,XXXX (n = 13), and -1.0 (-3.5 to -0.8) in 49,XXXXX (n = 3). Height increased with an increasing number of extra X or Y chromosomes, except in males with five, and in females with four or five sex chromosomes, consistent with a nonlinear effect on height. PMID:20425825

  13. Comparative Sex Chromosome Genomics in Snakes: Differentiation, Evolutionary Strata, and Lack of Global Dosage Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Zektser, Yulia; Mahajan, Shivani; Bachtrog, Doris

    2013-01-01

    Snakes exhibit genetic sex determination, with female heterogametic sex chromosomes (ZZ males, ZW females). Extensive cytogenetic work has suggested that the level of sex chromosome heteromorphism varies among species, with Boidae having entirely homomorphic sex chromosomes, Viperidae having completely heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and Colubridae showing partial differentiation. Here, we take a genomic approach to compare sex chromosome differentiation in these three snake families. We identify homomorphic sex chromosomes in boas (Boidae), but completely heteromorphic sex chromosomes in both garter snakes (Colubridae) and pygmy rattlesnake (Viperidae). Detection of W-linked gametologs enables us to establish the presence of evolutionary strata on garter and pygmy rattlesnake sex chromosomes where recombination was abolished at different time points. Sequence analysis shows that all strata are shared between pygmy rattlesnake and garter snake, i.e., recombination was abolished between the sex chromosomes before the two lineages diverged. The sex-biased transmission of the Z and its hemizygosity in females can impact patterns of molecular evolution, and we show that rates of evolution for Z-linked genes are increased relative to their pseudoautosomal homologs, both at synonymous and amino acid sites (even after controlling for mutational biases). This demonstrates that mutation rates are male-biased in snakes (male-driven evolution), but also supports faster-Z evolution due to differential selective effects on the Z. Finally, we perform a transcriptome analysis in boa and pygmy rattlesnake to establish baseline levels of sex-biased expression in homomorphic sex chromosomes, and show that heteromorphic ZW chromosomes in rattlesnakes lack chromosome-wide dosage compensation. Our study provides the first full scale overview of the evolution of snake sex chromosomes at the genomic level, thus greatly expanding our knowledge of reptilian and vertebrate sex chromosomes

  14. Tracking the evolution of sex chromosome systems in Melanoplinae grasshoppers through chromosomal mapping of repetitive DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The accumulation of repetitive DNA during sex chromosome differentiation is a common feature of many eukaryotes and becomes more evident after recombination has been restricted or abolished. The accumulated repetitive sequences include multigene families, microsatellites, satellite DNAs and mobile elements, all of which are important for the structural remodeling of heterochromatin. In grasshoppers, derived sex chromosome systems, such as neo-XY♂/XX♀ and neo-X1X2Y♂/X1X1X2X2♀, are frequently observed in the Melanoplinae subfamily. However, no studies concerning the evolution of sex chromosomes in Melanoplinae have addressed the role of the repetitive DNA sequences. To further investigate the evolution of sex chromosomes in grasshoppers, we used classical cytogenetic and FISH analyses to examine the repetitive DNA sequences in six phylogenetically related Melanoplinae species with X0♂/XX♀, neo-XY♂/XX♀ and neo-X1X2Y♂/X1X1X2X2♀ sex chromosome systems. Results Our data indicate a non-spreading of heterochromatic blocks and pool of repetitive DNAs (C0t-1 DNA) in the sex chromosomes; however, the spreading of multigene families among the neo-sex chromosomes of Eurotettix and Dichromatos was remarkable, particularly for 5S rDNA. In autosomes, FISH mapping of multigene families revealed distinct patterns of chromosomal organization at the intra- and intergenomic levels. Conclusions These results suggest a common origin and subsequent differential accumulation of repetitive DNAs in the sex chromosomes of Dichromatos and an independent origin of the sex chromosomes of the neo-XY and neo-X1X2Y systems. Our data indicate a possible role for repetitive DNAs in the diversification of sex chromosome systems in grasshoppers. PMID:23937327

  15. Sex-specific adaptation drives early sex chromosome evolution in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qi; Bachtrog, Doris

    2014-01-01

    Most species’ sex chromosomes are derived from ancient autosomes and show few signatures of their origins. We studied the sex chromosomes of Drosophila miranda, where a neo-Y chromosome originated only about 1 million years (MY) ago. Whole genome and transcriptome analysis reveals massive degeneration of the neo-Y, that male-beneficial genes on the neo-Y are more likely to undergo accelerated protein-evolution, and that neo-Y genes evolve biased expression towards male-specific tissues, i.e. the shrinking gene content of the neo-Y becomes masculinized. In contrast, while older X chromosomes show a paucity of genes expressed in male tissues, neo-X genes highly expressed in male-specific tissues undergo increased rates of protein evolution if haploid in males. Thus, the response to sex-specific selection can shift at different stages of X differentiation, resulting in masculinization or demasculinization of the X-chromosomal gene content. PMID:22822149

  16. Using RAD-seq to recognize sex-specific markers and sex chromosome systems.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Tony

    2016-05-01

    Next-generation sequencing methods have initiated a revolution in molecular ecology and evolution (Tautz et al. ). Among the most impressive of these sequencing innovations is restriction site-associated DNA sequencing or RAD-seq (Baird et al. ; Andrews et al. ). RAD-seq uses the Illumina sequencing platform to sequence fragments of DNA cut by a specific restriction enzyme and can generate tens of thousands of molecular genetic markers for analysis. One of the many uses of RAD-seq data has been to identify sex-specific genetic markers, markers found in one sex but not the other (Baxter et al. ; Gamble & Zarkower ). Sex-specific markers are a powerful tool for biologists. At their most basic, they can be used to identify the sex of an individual via PCR. This is useful in cases where a species lacks obvious sexual dimorphism at some or all life history stages. For example, such tests have been important for studying sex differences in life history (Sheldon ; Mossman & Waser ), the management and breeding of endangered species (Taberlet et al. ; Griffiths & Tiwari ; Robertson et al. ) and sexing embryonic material (Hacker et al. ; Smith et al. ). Furthermore, sex-specific markers allow recognition of the sex chromosome system in cases where standard cytogenetic methods fail (Charlesworth & Mank ; Gamble & Zarkower ). Thus, species with male-specific markers have male heterogamety (XY) while species with female-specific markers have female heterogamety (ZW). In this issue, Fowler & Buonaccorsi () illustrate the ease by which RAD-seq data can generate sex-specific genetic markers in rockfish (Sebastes). Moreover, by examining RAD-seq data from two closely related rockfish species, Sebastes chrysomelas and Sebastes carnatus (Fig. ), Fowler & Buonaccorsi () uncover shared sex-specific markers and a conserved sex chromosome system. PMID:27213697

  17. Chromosomal Mapping of Repetitive DNAs in Characidium (Teleostei, Characiformes): Genomic Organization and Diversification of ZW Sex Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Scacchetti, Priscilla C; Utsunomia, Ricardo; Pansonato-Alves, José C; Vicari, Marcelo R; Artoni, Roberto F; Oliveira, Claudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    The speciose neotropical genus Characidium has proven to be a good model for cytogenetic exploration. Representatives of this genus often have a conserved diploid chromosome number; some species exhibit a highly differentiated ZZ/ZW sex chromosome system, while others do not show any sex-related chromosome heteromorphism. In this study, chromosome painting using a W-specific probe and comparative chromosome mapping of repetitive sequences, including ribosomal clusters and 4 microsatellite motifs - (CA)15, (GA)15, (CG)15, and (TTA)10 -, were performed in 6 Characidium species, 5 of which possessed a heteromorphic ZW sex chromosome system. The W-specific probe showed hybridization signals on the W chromosome of all analyzed species, indicating homology among the W chromosomes. Remarkably, a single major rDNA-bearing chromosome pair was found in all species. The 18S rDNA localized to the sex chromosomes in C. lanei, C. timbuiense and C. pterostictum, while the major rDNA localized to one autosome pair in C. vidali and C. gomesi. In contrast, the number of 5S rDNA-bearing chromosomes varied. Notably, minor ribosomal clusters were identified in the W chromosome of C. vidali. Microsatellites were widely distributed across almost all chromosomes of the karyotypes, with a greater accumulation in the subtelomeric regions. However, clear differences in the abundance of each motif were detected in each species. In addition, the Z and W chromosomes showed the differential accumulation of distinct motifs. Our results revealed variability in the distribution of repetitive DNA sequences and their possible association with sex chromosome diversification in Characidium species. PMID:26277929

  18. Mitogenomic analyses of eutherian relationships.

    PubMed

    Arnason, U; Janke, A

    2002-01-01

    Reasonably correct phylogenies are fundamental to the testing of evolutionary hypotheses. Here, we present phylogenetic findings based on analyses of 67 complete mammalian mitochondrial (mt) genomes. The analyses, irrespective of whether they were performed at the amino acid (aa) level or on nucleotides (nt) of first and second codon positions, placed Erinaceomorpha (hedgehogs and their kin) as the sister group of remaining eutherians. Thus, the analyses separated Erinaceomorpha from other traditional lipotyphlans (e.g., tenrecs, moles, and shrews), making traditional Lipotyphla polyphyletic. Both the aa and nt data sets identified the two order-rich eutherian clades, the Cetferungulata (comprising Pholidota, Carnivora, Perissodactyla, Artiodactyla, and Cetacea) and the African clade (Tenrecomorpha, Macroscelidea, Tubulidentata, Hyracoidea, Proboscidea, and Sirenia). The study corroborated recent findings that have identified a sister-group relationship between Anthropoidea and Dermoptera (flying lemurs), thereby making our own order, Primates, a paraphyletic assembly. Molecular estimates using paleontologically well-established calibration points, placed the origin of most eutherian orders in Cretaceous times, 70-100 million years before present (MYBP). The same estimates place all primate divergences much earlier than traditionally believed. For example, the divergence between Homo and Pan is estimated to have taken place approximately 10 MYBP, a dating consistent with recent findings in primate paleontology. PMID:12438776

  19. Rapid De Novo Evolution of X Chromosome Dosage Compensation in Silene latifolia, a Plant with Young Sex Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Deschamps, Clothilde; Mousset, Sylvain; Widmer, Alex; Marais, Gabriel A. B.

    2012-01-01

    Silene latifolia is a dioecious plant with heteromorphic sex chromosomes that have originated only ∼10 million years ago and is a promising model organism to study sex chromosome evolution in plants. Previous work suggests that S. latifolia XY chromosomes have gradually stopped recombining and the Y chromosome is undergoing degeneration as in animal sex chromosomes. However, this work has been limited by the paucity of sex-linked genes available. Here, we used 35 Gb of RNA-seq data from multiple males (XY) and females (XX) of an S. latifolia inbred line to detect sex-linked SNPs and identified more than 1,700 sex-linked contigs (with X-linked and Y-linked alleles). Analyses using known sex-linked and autosomal genes, together with simulations indicate that these newly identified sex-linked contigs are reliable. Using read numbers, we then estimated expression levels of X-linked and Y-linked alleles in males and found an overall trend of reduced expression of Y-linked alleles, consistent with a widespread ongoing degeneration of the S. latifolia Y chromosome. By comparing expression intensities of X-linked alleles in males and females, we found that X-linked allele expression increases as Y-linked allele expression decreases in males, which makes expression of sex-linked contigs similar in both sexes. This phenomenon is known as dosage compensation and has so far only been observed in evolutionary old animal sex chromosome systems. Our results suggest that dosage compensation has evolved in plants and that it can quickly evolve de novo after the origin of sex chromosomes. PMID:22529744

  20. Recent gene-capture on the UV sex chromosomes of the moss Ceratodon purpureus

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Stuart F.; Neubig, Kurt M.; Payton, Adam C.; Quatrano, Ralph S.; Cove, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Sex chromosomes evolve from ordinary autosomes through the expansion and subsequent degeneration of a region of suppressed recombination that is inherited through one sex. Here we investigate the relative timing of these processes in the UV sex chromosomes of the moss Ceratodon purpureus using molecular population genetic analyses of eight newly discovered sex-linked loci. In this system recombination is suppressed on both the female-transmitted (U) sex chromosome and the male-transmitted (V) chromosome. Genes on both chromosomes therefore should show the deleterious effects of suppressed recombination and sex-limited transmission, while purifying selection should maintain homologs of genes essential for both sexes on both sex chromosomes. Based on analyses of eight sex-linked loci, we show that the non-recombining portions of the U and V-chromosomes expanded in at least two events (~0.6 – 1.3 MYA and ~2.8 – 3.5 MYA), after the divergence of C. purpureus from its dioecious sister species, Trichodon cylindricus and Cheilothela chloropus. Both U and V-linked copies showed reduced nucleotide diversity and limited population structure, compared to autosomal loci, suggesting that the sex chromosomes experienced more recent selective sweeps that the autosomes. Collectively these results highlight the dynamic nature of gene composition and molecular evolution on non-recombining portions of the U and V sex chromosomes. PMID:24094335

  1. Coexistence of Y, W, and Z sex chromosomes in Xenopus tropicalis

    PubMed Central

    Roco, Álvaro S.; Olmstead, Allen W.; Degitz, Sigmund J.; Amano, Tosikazu; Zimmerman, Lyle B.; Bullejos, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    Homomorphic sex chromosomes and rapid turnover of sex-determining genes can complicate establishing the sex chromosome system operating in a given species. This difficulty exists in Xenopus tropicalis, an anuran quickly becoming a relevant model for genetic, genomic, biochemical, and ecotoxicological research. Despite the recent interest attracted by this species, little is known about its sex chromosome system. Direct evidence that females are the heterogametic sex, as in the related species Xenopus laevis, has yet to be presented. Furthermore, X. laevis’ sex-determining gene, DM-W, does not exist in X. tropicalis, and the sex chromosomes in the two species are not homologous. Here we identify X. tropicalis’ sex chromosome system by integrating data from (i) breeding sex-reversed individuals, (ii) gynogenesis, (iii) triploids, and (iv) crosses among several strains. Our results indicate that at least three different types of sex chromosomes exist: Y, W, and Z, observed in YZ, YW, and ZZ males and in ZW and WW females. Because some combinations of parental sex chromosomes produce unisex offspring and other distorted sex ratios, understanding the sex-determination systems in X. tropicalis is critical for developing this flexible animal model for genetics and ecotoxicology. PMID:26216983

  2. Coexistence of Y, W, and Z sex chromosomes in Xenopus tropicalis.

    PubMed

    Roco, Álvaro S; Olmstead, Allen W; Degitz, Sigmund J; Amano, Tosikazu; Zimmerman, Lyle B; Bullejos, Mónica

    2015-08-25

    Homomorphic sex chromosomes and rapid turnover of sex-determining genes can complicate establishing the sex chromosome system operating in a given species. This difficulty exists in Xenopus tropicalis, an anuran quickly becoming a relevant model for genetic, genomic, biochemical, and ecotoxicological research. Despite the recent interest attracted by this species, little is known about its sex chromosome system. Direct evidence that females are the heterogametic sex, as in the related species Xenopus laevis, has yet to be presented. Furthermore, X. laevis' sex-determining gene, DM-W, does not exist in X. tropicalis, and the sex chromosomes in the two species are not homologous. Here we identify X. tropicalis' sex chromosome system by integrating data from (i) breeding sex-reversed individuals, (ii) gynogenesis, (iii) triploids, and (iv) crosses among several strains. Our results indicate that at least three different types of sex chromosomes exist: Y, W, and Z, observed in YZ, YW, and ZZ males and in ZW and WW females. Because some combinations of parental sex chromosomes produce unisex offspring and other distorted sex ratios, understanding the sex-determination systems in X. tropicalis is critical for developing this flexible animal model for genetics and ecotoxicology. PMID:26216983

  3. Lack of Dosage Compensation Accompanies the Arrested Stage of Sex Chromosome Evolution in Ostriches

    PubMed Central

    Adolfsson, Sofia; Ellegren, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Sex chromosome evolution is usually seen as a process that, once initiated, will inevitably progress toward an advanced stage of degeneration of the nonrecombining chromosome. However, despite evidence that avian sex chromosome evolution was initiated >100 Ma, ratite birds have been trapped in an arrested stage of sex chromosome divergence. We performed RNA sequencing of several tissues from male and female ostriches and assembled the transcriptome de novo. A total of 315 Z-linked genes fell into two categories: those that have equal expression level in the two sexes (for which Z–W recombination still occurs) and those that have a 2-fold excess of male expression (for which Z–W recombination has ceased). We suggest that failure to evolve dosage compensation has constrained sex chromosome divergence in this basal avian lineage. Our results indicate that dosage compensation is a prerequisite for, not only a consequence of, sex chromosome evolution. PMID:23329687

  4. Lack of dosage compensation accompanies the arrested stage of sex chromosome evolution in ostriches.

    PubMed

    Adolfsson, Sofia; Ellegren, Hans

    2013-04-01

    Sex chromosome evolution is usually seen as a process that, once initiated, will inevitably progress toward an advanced stage of degeneration of the nonrecombining chromosome. However, despite evidence that avian sex chromosome evolution was initiated >100 Ma, ratite birds have been trapped in an arrested stage of sex chromosome divergence. We performed RNA sequencing of several tissues from male and female ostriches and assembled the transcriptome de novo. A total of 315 Z-linked genes fell into two categories: those that have equal expression level in the two sexes (for which Z-W recombination still occurs) and those that have a 2-fold excess of male expression (for which Z-W recombination has ceased). We suggest that failure to evolve dosage compensation has constrained sex chromosome divergence in this basal avian lineage. Our results indicate that dosage compensation is a prerequisite for, not only a consequence of, sex chromosome evolution. PMID:23329687

  5. Empirical evidence for large X-effects in animals with undifferentiated sex chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Dufresnes, Christophe; Majtyka, Tomasz; Baird, Stuart J. E.; Gerchen, Jörn F.; Borzée, Amaël; Savary, Romain; Ogielska, Maria; Perrin, Nicolas; Stöck, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive isolation is crucial for the process of speciation to progress. Sex chromosomes have been assigned a key role in driving reproductive isolation but empirical evidence from natural population processes has been restricted to organisms with degenerated sex chromosomes such as mammals and birds. Here we report restricted introgression at sex-linked compared to autosomal markers in a hybrid zone between two incipient species of European tree frog, Hyla arborea and H. orientalis, whose homologous X and Y sex chromosomes are undifferentiated. This large X-effect cannot result from the dominance or faster-X aspects of Haldane’s rule, which are specific to degenerated sex chromosomes, but rather supports a role for faster-heterogametic-sex or faster-male evolutionary processes. Our data suggest a prominent contribution of undifferentiated sex chromosomes to speciation. PMID:26868373

  6. Empirical evidence for large X-effects in animals with undifferentiated sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Dufresnes, Christophe; Majtyka, Tomasz; Baird, Stuart J E; Gerchen, Jörn F; Borzée, Amaël; Savary, Romain; Ogielska, Maria; Perrin, Nicolas; Stöck, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive isolation is crucial for the process of speciation to progress. Sex chromosomes have been assigned a key role in driving reproductive isolation but empirical evidence from natural population processes has been restricted to organisms with degenerated sex chromosomes such as mammals and birds. Here we report restricted introgression at sex-linked compared to autosomal markers in a hybrid zone between two incipient species of European tree frog, Hyla arborea and H. orientalis, whose homologous X and Y sex chromosomes are undifferentiated. This large X-effect cannot result from the dominance or faster-X aspects of Haldane's rule, which are specific to degenerated sex chromosomes, but rather supports a role for faster-heterogametic-sex or faster-male evolutionary processes. Our data suggest a prominent contribution of undifferentiated sex chromosomes to speciation. PMID:26868373

  7. Searching for sex-reversals to explain population demography and the evolution of sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Wedekind, Claus

    2010-05-01

    Sex determination can be purely genetic (as in mammals and birds), purely environmental (as in many reptiles), or genetic but reversible by environmental factors during a sensitive period in life, as in many fish and amphibians (Wallace et al. 1999; Baroiller et al. 2009a; Stelkens & Wedekind 2010). Such environmental sex reversal (ESR) can be induced, for example, by temperature changes or by exposure to hormone-active substances. ESR has long been recognized as a means to produce more profitable single-sex cultures in fish farms (Cnaani & Levavi-Sivan 2009), but we know very little about its prevalence in the wild. Obviously, induced feminization or masculinization may immediately distort population sex ratios, and distorted sex ratios are indeed reported from some amphibian and fish populations (Olsen et al. 2006; Alho et al. 2008; Brykov et al. 2008). However, sex ratios can also be skewed by, for example, segregation distorters or sex-specific mortality. Demonstrating ESR in the wild therefore requires the identification of sex-linked genetic markers (in the absence of heteromorphic sex chromosomes) followed by comparison of genotypes and phenotypes, or experimental crosses with individuals who seem sex reversed, followed by sexing of offspring after rearing under non-ESR conditions and at low mortality. In this issue, Alho et al. (2010) investigate the role of ESR in the common frog (Rana temporaria) and a population that has a distorted adult sex ratio. They developed new sex-linked microsatellite markers and tested wild-caught male and female adults for potential mismatches between phenotype and genotype. They found a significant proportion of phenotypic males with a female genotype. This suggests environmental masculinization, here with a prevalence of 9%. The authors then tested whether XX males naturally reproduce with XX females. They collected egg clutches and found that some had indeed a primary sex ratio of 100% daughters. Other clutches seemed to

  8. Incidental Prenatal Diagnosis of Sex Chromosome Aneuploidies: Health, Behavior, and Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Pieters, J. J. P. M.; Kooper, A. J. A.; van Kessel, A. Geurts; Braat, D. D. M.; Smits, A. P. T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To assess the diagnostic relevance of incidental prenatal findings of sex chromosome aneuploidies. Methods. We searched with medical subject headings (MeSHs) and keywords in Medline and the Cochrane Library and systematically screened publications on postnatally diagnosed sex chromosomal aneuploidies from 2006 to 2011 as well as publications on incidentally prenatally diagnosed sex chromosomal aneuploidies from 1980 to 2011. Results. Postnatally diagnosed sex chromosomal aneuploidies demonstrated three clinical relevant domains of abnormality: physical (22–100%), behavior (0–56%), and reproductive health (47–100%), while incidentally prenatally diagnosed sex chromosomal aneuploidies demonstrated, respectively, 0–33%, 0–40%, and 0–36%. Conclusion. In the literature incidental prenatal diagnosis of sex chromosomal aneuploidies is associated with normal to mildly affected phenotypes. This contrasts sharply with those of postnatally diagnosed sex chromosomal aneuploidies and highlights the importance of this ascertainment bias towards the prognostic value of diagnosis of fetal sex chromosomal aneuploidies. This observation should be taken into account, especially when considering excluding the sex chromosomes in invasive prenatal testing using Rapid Aneuploidy Detection. PMID:22191050

  9. Cell-autonomous sex determination outside of the gonad

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Arthur P.; Chen, Xuqi; Link, Jenny C.; Itoh, Yuichiro; Reue, Karen

    2013-01-01

    The classic model of sex determination in mammals states that the sex of the individual is determined by the type of gonad that develops, which in turn determines the gonadal hormonal milieu that creates sex differences outside of the gonads. However, XX and XY cells are intrinsically different because of the cell-autonomous sex-biasing action of X and Y genes. Recent studies of mice, in which sex chromosome complement is independent of gonadal sex, reveal that sex chromosome complement has strong effects contributing to sex differences in phenotypes such as metabolism. Adult mice with two X chromosomes (relative to mice with one X chromosome) show dramatically greater increases in body weight and adiposity after gonadectomy, irrespective of their gonadal sex. When fed a high fat diet, XX mice develop striking hyperinsulinemia and fatty liver, relative to XY mice. The sex chromosome effects are modulated by the presence of gonadal hormones, indicating an interaction of the sex-biasing effects of gonadal hormones and sex chromosome genes. Other cell-autonomous sex chromosome effects are detected in mice in many phenotypes. Birds (relative to eutherian mammals) are expected to show more widespread cell-autonomous sex determination in non-gonadal tissues, because of ineffective sex chromosome dosage compensation mechanisms. PMID:23361913

  10. Ultrastructural characterization of the sex chromosomes during spermatogenesis of spiders having holocentric chromosomes and a long diffuse stage.

    PubMed

    Benavente, R; Wettstein, R

    1980-01-01

    An ultrastructural study has been made of spermatogenesis in two species of primitive spiders having holocentric chromosomes (Dysdera crocata, male X0 and Sergestria florentia X1X2O). Analysis of the meiotic prophase shows a scarcity or absence of typical leptotene to pachytene stages. Only in D. crocata have synaptonemal complex (SC) remnants been seen, and these occurred in nuclei with an extreme chromatin decondensation. In both species typical early prophase stages have been replaced by nuclei lacking SC and with their chromatin almost completely decondensed, constituting a long and well-defined diffuse stage. Only nucleoli and the condensed sex chromosomes can be identified. - In S. florentina paired non-homologous sex chromosomes lack a junction lamina and thus clearly differ from the sex chromosomes of more evolved spiders with an X1X20 male sex determination mechanism. In the same species, sex chromosomes can be recognized during metaphase I due to their special structural details, while in D. crocata the X chromosome is not distinguishable from the autosomes at this stage. - The diffuse stage and particularly the structural characteristics of the sex chromosomes during meiotic prophase are reviewed and discussed in relation to the meiotic process in other arachnid goups. PMID:7371451

  11. Occupational risk factors and frequency of sex chromosome disomy.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Michał; Jurewicz, Joanna; Radwan, Paweł; Ulańska, Anna; Jakubowski, Lucjusz; Hanke, Wojciech

    2015-09-01

    Possible reproductive toxicants such as occupational factors may affect the normal disjunction of chromosomes during meiosis, thereby altering the number of chromosomes in sperm nuclei. The purpose of the present analysis was to determine whether exposure to occupational factors existing in a contemporary work setting affected sperm aneuploidy. The study population consisted of 212 men who attended the infertility clinic for diagnostic purposes. The men either had a normal semen concentration of 20-300 million/ml or slight oligozoospermia (semen concentration of 15-20 million/ml) ( WHO 1999 ). All participants were interviewed and provided a semen sample. Sperm aneuploidy was assessed using multicolor FISH. After adjustment for potential confounders, positive associations were found between disomy XY18, 18, and sex chromosome disomy and exposure to mechanical vibrations (p = 0.03, p = 0.04, p = 0.03, respectively). In addition, sitting for more than 6 h at work increased X and Y disomy (p = 0.03, p = 0.04, respectively). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to show a significant effect of occupational factors on sperm aneuploidy. As such, the results need to be confirmed in larger studies. PMID:25687408

  12. Double-strand break repair on sex chromosomes: challenges during male meiotic prophase

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lin-Yu; Yu, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    During meiotic prophase, DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair-mediated homologous recombination (HR) occurs for exchange of genetic information between homologous chromosomes. Unlike autosomes or female sex chromosomes, human male sex chromosomes X and Y share little homology. Although DSBs are generated throughout male sex chromosomes, homologous recombination does not occur for most regions and DSB repair process is significantly prolonged. As a result, male sex chromosomes are coated with many DNA damage response proteins and form a unique chromatin structure known as the XY body. Interestingly, associated with the prolonged DSB repair, transcription is repressed in the XY body but not in autosomes, a phenomenon known as meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), which is critical for male meiosis. Here using mice as model organisms, we briefly summarize recent progress on DSB repair in meiotic prophase and focus on the mechanism and function of DNA damage response in the XY body. PMID:25565522

  13. Sex chromosome variation and cytotaxonomy of the onchocerciasis vector Simulium squamosum in Cameroon and Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Traore-Lamizana, M; Somiari, S; Mafuyai, H B; Vajime, C G; Post, R J

    2001-06-01

    On the basis of sex chromosome variation, three cytotypes of Simulium squamosum (Enderlein) (Diptera: Simuliidae) are described from Cameroon and Nigeria. Simulium squamosum A is the typical form as originally described by Vajime & Dunbar (1975) with chromosome I as the sex chromosome. It occurs throughout most of Cameroon and south-east Nigeria. A second cytotype, S. squamosum B, is described from the river Sanaga (Cameroon). It also has chromosome I as the sex chromosome, but the nature of the sex differential region is different. Simulium squamosum C has no sex-linked chromosomal rearrangements. It is widespread in Nigeria and occurs near Mount Cameroon, where it seems to hybridize with S. squamosum A. PMID:11434559

  14. Interchromosomal Duplications on the Bactrocera oleae Y Chromosome Imply a Distinct Evolutionary Origin of the Sex Chromosomes Compared to Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Gabrieli, Paolo; Gomulski, Ludvik M.; Bonomi, Angelica; Siciliano, Paolo; Scolari, Francesca; Franz, Gerald; Jessup, Andrew; Malacrida, Anna R.; Gasperi, Giuliano

    2011-01-01

    Background Diptera have an extraordinary variety of sex determination mechanisms, and Drosophila melanogaster is the paradigm for this group. However, the Drosophila sex determination pathway is only partially conserved and the family Tephritidae affords an interesting example. The tephritid Y chromosome is postulated to be necessary to determine male development. Characterization of Y sequences, apart from elucidating the nature of the male determining factor, is also important to understand the evolutionary history of sex chromosomes within the Tephritidae. We studied the Y sequences from the olive fly, Bactrocera oleae. Its Y chromosome is minute and highly heterochromatic, and displays high heteromorphism with the X chromosome. Methodology/Principal Findings A combined Representational Difference Analysis (RDA) and fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) approach was used to investigate the Y chromosome to derive information on its sequence content. The Y chromosome is strewn with repetitive DNA sequences, the majority of which are also interdispersed in the pericentromeric regions of the autosomes. The Y chromosome appears to have accumulated small and large repetitive interchromosomal duplications. The large interchromosomal duplications harbour an importin-4-like gene fragment. Apart from these importin-4-like sequences, the other Y repetitive sequences are not shared with the X chromosome, suggesting molecular differentiation of these two chromosomes. Moreover, as the identified Y sequences were not detected on the Y chromosomes of closely related tephritids, we can infer divergence in the repetitive nature of their sequence contents. Conclusions/Significance The identification of Y-linked sequences may tell us much about the repetitive nature, the origin and the evolution of Y chromosomes. We hypothesize how these repetitive sequences accumulated and were maintained on the Y chromosome during its evolutionary history. Our data reinforce the idea that the

  15. [Role of transposons in origin and evolution of plant XY sex chromosomes].

    PubMed

    Shufen, Li; Sha, Li; Chuanliang, Deng; Longdou, Lu; Wujun, Gao

    2015-02-01

    The XY sex-determination system is crucial for plant reproduction. However, little is known about the mechanism of the origin and evolution of the XY sex chromosomes. It has been believed that a pair of autosomes is evolved to produce young sex chromosomes (neo-X chromosome and neo-Y chromosome) by loss of function or gain of function mutation, which influences the development of pistil or stamen. With the aggravation of the recombination suppression between neo-X and neo-Y and consequent expanding of the non-recombination region, the proto-sex chromosomes were finally developed to heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Accumulation of repetitive sequences and DNA methylation were probably involved in this process. Transposons, as the most abundant repetitive sequences in the genome, might be the initial motivation factors for the evolution of sex chromosome. Moreover, transposons may also increase heterochromatin expansion and recombination suppression of sex chromosome by local epigenetics modification. In this review, we summarize the function of transposon accumulation and the relationship between transposon and heterochromatization in the evolution of plant sex chromosome. PMID:25665642

  16. Sex chromosomes and karyotype of the (nearly) mythical creature, the Gila monster, Heloderma suspectum (Squamata: Helodermatidae).

    PubMed

    Johnson Pokorná, Martina; Rovatsos, Michail; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    A wide variety of sex determination systems exist among squamate reptiles. They can therefore serve as an important model for studies of evolutionary transitions among particular sex determination systems. However, we still have only a limited knowledge of sex determination in certain important lineages of squamates. In this respect, one of the most understudied groups is the family Helodermatidae (Anguimorpha) encompassing the only two venomous species of lizards which are potentially lethal to human beings. We uncovered homomorphic ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes in the Gila monster (Heloderma suspectum) with a highly heterochromatic W chromosome. The sex chromosomes are morphologically similar to the ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes of monitor lizards (Varanidae). If the sex chromosomes of helodermatids and varanids are homologous, female heterogamety may be ancestral for the whole Anguimorpha group. Moreover, we found that the karyotype of the Gila monster consists of 2n = 36 chromosomes (14 larger metacentric chromosomes and 22 acrocentric microchromosomes). 2n = 36 is the widely distributed chromosomal number among squamates. In his pioneering works representing the only previous cytogenetic examination of the family Helodermatidae, Matthey reported the karyotype as 2n = 38 and suggested a different chromosomal morphology for this species. We believe that this was probably erroneously. We also discovered a strong accumulation of telomeric sequences on several pairs of microchromosomes in the Gila monster, which is a trait documented relatively rarely in vertebrates. These new data fill an important gap in our understanding of the sex determination and karyotype evolution of squamates. PMID:25119263

  17. Back to the roots: segregation of univalent sex chromosomes in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Fabig, Gunar; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Paliulis, Leocadia V

    2016-06-01

    In males of many taxa, univalent sex chromosomes normally segregate during the first meiotic division, and analysis of sex chromosome segregation was foundational for the chromosome theory of inheritance. Correct segregation of single or multiple univalent sex chromosomes occurs in a cellular environment where every other chromosome is a bivalent that is being partitioned into homologous chromosomes at anaphase I. The mechanics of univalent chromosome segregation vary among animal taxa. In some, univalents establish syntelic attachment of sister kinetochores to the spindle. In others, amphitelic attachment is established. Here, we review how this problem of segregation of unpaired chromosomes is solved in different animal systems. In addition, we give a short outlook of how mechanistic insights into this process could be gained by explicitly studying model organisms, such as Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:26511278

  18. Sex-determining mechanisms in insects based on imprinting and elimination of chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, L

    2014-01-01

    As a rule, the sex of an individual is fixed at fertilization, and the chromosomal constitution of the zygote is a direct consequence of the chromosomal constitution of the gametes. However, there are cases in which the chromosomal differences determining sex are brought about by elimination or inactivation of chromosomes in the embryo. In Sciaridae insects, all zygotes start with the XXX constitution; the loss of either 1 or 2 X chromosomes determines whether the zygote becomes XX (female) or X0 (male). In Cecydomyiidae and Collembola insects, all zygotes start with the XXXX constitution. If the embryo does not eliminate any X chromosome, this remains XXXX and develops as female, whereas if 2 X chromosomes are eliminated, the embryo becomes XX0 and develops as a male. In the coccids (scale insects), the chromosomal differences between the sexes result from either the elimination or the heterochromatinization (inactivation) of half of the chromosomes giving rise to haploid males and diploid females. The chromosomes that are eliminated or inactivated are those inherited from the father. Therefore, in the formation of the sex-determining chromosomal signal in those insects, a marking ('imprinting') process must occur in one of the parents, which determines that the chromosomes to be eliminated or inactivated are of paternal origin. In this article, the sex determination mechanism of these insects and the associated imprinting process are reviewed. PMID:24296911

  19. Sex differences in body fluid homeostasis: Sex chromosome complement influences on bradycardic baroreflex response and sodium depletion induced neural activity.

    PubMed

    Vivas, L; Dadam, F M; Caeiro, X E

    2015-12-01

    Clinical and basic findings indicate that angiotensin II (ANG II) differentially modulates hydroelectrolyte and cardiovascular responses in male and female. But are only the activational and organizational hormonal effects to blame for such differences? Males and females not only differ in their sex (males are born with testes and females with ovaries) but also carry different sex chromosome complements and are thus influenced throughout life by different genomes. In this review, we discuss our recent studies in order to evaluate whether sex chromosome complement is in part responsible for gender differences previously observed in ANG II bradycardic-baroreflex response and sodium depletion-induced sodium appetite and neural activity. To test the hypothesis that XX or XY contributes to the dimorphic ANG II bradycardic-baroreflex response, we used the four core genotype mouse model, in which the effects of gonadal sex (testes or ovaries) and sex chromosome complement (XX or XY) are dissociated. The results indicate that ANG II bradycardic-baroreflex sexual dimorphic response may be ascribed to differences in sex chromosomes, indicating an XX-sex chromosome complement facilitatory bradycardic-baroreflex control of heart rate. Furthermore, we evaluated whether genetic differences within the sex chromosome complement may differentially modulate the known sexually dimorphic sodium appetite as well as basal or induced brain activity due to physiological stimulation of the renin-angiotensin system by furosemide and low-sodium treatment. Our studies demonstrate an organizational hormonal effect on sexually dimorphic induced sodium intake in mice, while at the brain level (subfornical organ and area postrema) we showed a sex chromosome complement effect in sodium-depleted mice, suggesting a sex chromosome gene participation in the modulation of neural pathways underlying regulatory response to renin-angiotensin stimulation. PMID:26260434

  20. Novel sex-determining genes in fish and sex chromosome evolution.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2013-04-01

    Although the molecular mechanisms underlying many developmental events are conserved across vertebrate taxa, the lability at the top of the sex-determining (SD) cascade has been evident from the fact that four master SD genes have been identified: mammalian Sry; chicken DMRT1; medaka Dmy; and Xenopus laevis DM-W. This diversity is thought to be associated with the turnover of sex chromosomes, which is likely to be more frequent in fishes and other poikilotherms than in therian mammals and birds. Recently, four novel candidates for vertebrate SD genes were reported, all of them in fishes. These include amhy in the Patagonian pejerrey, Gsdf in Oryzias luzonensis, Amhr2 in fugu and sdY in rainbow trout. These studies provide a good opportunity to infer patterns from the seemingly chaotic picture of sex determination systems. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the master SD genes in fishes. PMID:23335327

  1. Patterns of molecular evolution of an avian neo-sex chromosome.

    PubMed

    Pala, Irene; Hasselquist, Dennis; Bensch, Staffan; Hansson, Bengt

    2012-12-01

    Newer parts of sex chromosomes, neo-sex chromosomes, offer unique possibilities for studying gene degeneration and sequence evolution in response to loss of recombination and population size decrease. We have recently described a neo-sex chromosome system in Sylvioidea passerines that has resulted from a fusion between the first half (10 Mb) of chromosome 4a and the ancestral sex chromosomes. In this study, we report the results of molecular analyses of neo-Z and neo-W gametologs and intronic parts of neo-Z and autosomal genes on the second half of chromosome 4a in three species within different Sylvioidea lineages (Acrocephalidea, Timaliidae, and Alaudidae). In line with hypotheses of neo-sex chromosome evolution, we observe 1) lower genetic diversity of neo-Z genes compared with autosomal genes, 2) moderate synonymous and weak nonsynonymous sequence divergence between neo-Z and neo-W gametologs, and 3) lower GC content on neo-W than neo-Z gametologs. Phylogenetic reconstruction of eight neo-Z and neo-W gametologs suggests that recombination continued after the split of Alaudidae from the rest of the Sylvioidea lineages (i.e., after ~42.2 Ma) and with some exceptions also after the split of Acrocephalidea and Timaliidae (i.e., after ~39.4 Ma). The Sylvioidea neo-sex chromosome shares classical evolutionary features with the ancestral sex chromosomes but, as expected from its more recent origin, shows weaker divergence between gametologs. PMID:22826461

  2. Differentiation of Sex Chromosomes and Karyotype Characterisation in the Dragonsnake Xenodermus javanicus (Squamata: Xenodermatidae).

    PubMed

    Rovatsos, Michail; Johnson Pokorná, Martina; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2015-01-01

    Highly differentiated heteromorphic ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes with a heterochromatic W are a basic principle among advanced snakes of the lineage Colubroidea, while other snake lineages generally lack these characteristics. For the first time, we cytogenetically examined the dragonsnake, Xenodermus javanicus, a member of the family Xenodermatidae, which is phylogenetically nested between snake lineages with and without differentiated sex chromosomes. Although most snakes have a karyotype with a stable chromosomal number of 2n = 36, the dragonsnake has an unusual, derived karyotype with 2n = 32 chromosomes. We found that heteromorphic ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes with a heterochromatic W are present in the dragonsnake, which suggests that the emergence of a highly differentiated W sex chromosome within snakes predates the split of Xenodermatidae and the clade including families Pareatidae, Viperidae, Homalopsidae, Lamprophiidae, Elapidae, and Colubridae. Although accumulations of interstitial telomeric sequences have not been previously reported in snakes, by using FISH with a telomeric probe we discovered them in 6 pairs of autosomes as well as in the W sex chromosome of the dragonsnake. Similarly to advanced snakes, the sex chromosomes of the dragonsnake have a significant accumulation of repeats containing a (GATA)n sequence. The results facilitate the dating of the differentiation of sex chromosomes within snakes back to the split between Xenodermatidae and other advanced snakes, i.e. around 40-75 mya. PMID:26575989

  3. The Program of Sex Chromosome Pairing in Meiosis Is Highly Conserved Across Marsupial Species

    PubMed Central

    Page, Jesús; Berríos, Soledad; Parra, María Teresa; Viera, Alberto; Suja, José Ángel; Prieto, Ignacio; Barbero, José Luis; Rufas, Julio S.; Fernández-Donoso, Raúl

    2005-01-01

    Marsupials present a series of genetic and chromosomal features that are highly conserved in very distant species. One of these features is the absence of a homologous region between X and Y chromosomes. According to this genetic differentiation, sex chromosomes do not synapse during the first meiotic prophase in males, and a special structure, the dense plate, maintains sex chromosome association. In this report we present results on the process of meiotic sex chromosome pairing obtained from three different species, Thylamys elegans, Dromiciops gliroides, and Rhyncholestes raphanurus, representing the three orders of American marsupials. We have investigated the relationships between the axial structures organized along sex chromosomes and the formation of the dense plate. We found that in the three species the dense plate arises as a modification of sex chromosomal axial elements, but without the involvement of other meiotic axial structures, such as the cohesin axes. Considering the phylogenetic relationships among the marsupials studied here, our data reinforce the idea that the dense plate emerged early in marsupial evolution as an efficient mechanism to ensure the association of the nonhomologous sex chromosomes. This situation could have influenced the further evolution of sex chromosomes in marsupials. PMID:15802509

  4. Effects of Sex Chromosome Aneuploidies on Brain Development: Evidence from Neuroimaging Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenroot, Rhoshel K.; Lee, Nancy Raitano; Giedd, Jay N.

    2009-01-01

    Variation in the number of sex chromosomes is a relatively common genetic condition, affecting as many as 1/400 individuals. The sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) are associated with characteristic behavioral and cognitive phenotypes, although the degree to which specific individuals are affected can fall within a wide range. Understanding the…

  5. The dragon lizard Pogona vitticeps has ZZ/ZW micro-sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Ezaz, Tariq; Quinn, Alexander E; Miura, Ikuo; Sarre, Stephen D; Georges, Arthur; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A

    2005-01-01

    The bearded dragon, Pogona vitticeps (Agamidae: Reptilia) is an agamid lizard endemic to Australia. Like crocodilians and many turtles, temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) is common in agamid lizards, although many species have genotypic sex determination (GSD). P. vitticeps is reported to have GSD, but no detectable sex chromosomes. Here we used molecular cytogenetic and differential banding techniques to reveal sex chromosomes in this species. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), GTG- and C-banding identified a highly heterochromatic microchromosome specific to females, demonstrating female heterogamety (ZZ/ZW) in this species. We isolated the P. vitticeps W chromosome by microdissection, re-amplified the DNA and used it to paint the W. No unpaired bivalents were detected in male synaptonemal complexes at meiotic pachytene, confirming male homogamety. We conclude that P. vitticeps has differentiated previously unidentifable W and Z micro-sex chromosomes, the first to be demonstrated in an agamid lizard. Our finding implies that heterochromatinization of the heterogametic chromosome occurred during sex chromosome differentiation in this species, as is the case in some lizards and many snakes, as well as in birds and mammals. Many GSD reptiles with cryptic sex chromosomes may also prove to have micro-sex chromosomes. Reptile microchromosomes, long dismissed as non-functional minutiae and often omitted from karyotypes, therefore deserve closer scrutiny with new and more sensitive techniques. PMID:16331408

  6. Genetic architecture of sexual dimorphism in a subdioecious plant with a proto-sex chromosome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sexual dimorphism is thought to arise once sexually antagonistic genes accumulate on sex chromosomes early in their evolution. Yet because the earliest stages of sex chromosome evolution are elusive, we lack empirical evidence supporting this theory. In this study, we shed first light on the genetic...

  7. Loss of sex chromosomes in the hematopoietic disorders: Questions, concerns and data interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Slovak, M.L.

    1994-09-01

    The significance of sex chromosome aberrations in the hematopoietic disorders has not yet been defined. Interpretive problems stem from (1) the loss of a sex chromosome associated with aging, (2) sex chromosome loss as the sole aberration in leukemia is rare, (3) random -(X or Y) is observed frequently in bone marrow samples, and (4) constitutional sex chromosome anomalies must be ruled out in cancer and follow-up may not be possible. The COH database identified 41 patients (pts) with sex chromosome loss. Loss of a sex chromosome was common in myeloid disorders (21/41). In t(8;21) leukemia (n=10), -(X or Y) was a common secondary karyotypic change. Additionally, -Y was associated with clonal evolution in 2 Ph + CML pts. In 2 elderly pts with myeloid disorders, -(X or Y) was observed in complex karyotypes with dmins; however, in the lymphoproliferative disorders -(X or Y) was noted in elderly pts without apparent pathogenetic significance. Three pts had constitutional sex chromosome aberrations: CML in 45,X; ALL in 47, XXY; and RAEB-IT in mos45,X/46,XX. In the mos45,X/46,XX pt, the leukemic clone was associated with the 45,X line without other karyotypic changes. Non-clonal aberrations were observed in 11 cases; in 3 cases these non-clonal losses were observed in serial samples. In a sex-mismatched BMT case, -(X or Y) in 4 cells was one of the first pathogenetic signs of leukemia relapse. These data suggest (1) interpretation of sex chromosome loss in leukemia must be made with caution and after a baseline sample, (2) non-clonal aberrations should be recorded, and (3) -(X or Y) appears to have pathogenetic significance in the myeloid disorders. Multi-institutional studies are needed to define (1) the incidence of leukemia in pts with constitutional sex chromosome anomalies and (2) the incidence and significance of sex chromosome aberrations as the primary (sole) cytogenetic aberration in leukemia.

  8. Sex differences in the brain-an interplay of sex steroid hormones and sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Grgurevic, Neza; Majdic, Gregor

    2016-09-01

    Although considerable progress has been made in our understanding of brain function, many questions remain unanswered. The ultimate goal of studying the brain is to understand the connection between brain structure and function and behavioural outcomes. Since sex differences in brain morphology were first observed, subsequent studies suggest different functional organization of the male and female brains in humans. Sex and gender have been identified as being a significant factor in understanding human physiology, health and disease, and the biological differences between the sexes is not limited to the gonads and secondary sexual characteristics, but also affects the structure and, more crucially, the function of the brain and other organs. Significant variability in brain structures between individuals, in addition to between the sexes, is factor that complicates the study of sex differences in the brain. In this review, we explore the current understanding of sex differences in the brain, mostly focusing on preclinical animal studies. PMID:27433022

  9. Sex chromosome recombination failure, apoptosis, and fertility in male mice.

    PubMed

    Faisal, Imrul; Kauppi, Liisa

    2016-06-01

    Lack of crossing-over in meiosis can trigger an apoptotic response at metaphase I by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). In contrast to females, segregation of sex chromosomes in males poses a particular challenge as recombination and chiasma formation is restricted to the pseudoautosomal region, the small region of homology between X and Y chromosomes. Existing data indicate that low levels of crossover failure in male meiosis can be tolerated without compromising fertility, while high levels of X-Y dissociation (in ≥70 % of cells) result in widespread apoptosis and subsequent infertility, demonstrated earlier, e.g., in Spo11β-only mice. Here, we explore the threshold of X-Y recombination failure frequency that is compatible with fertility. We show that in Spo11β-only(mb) mice with a mixed genetic background, in contrast to Spo11β-only mice with a C57BL/6 background, X-Y pairing fails in ~50 % of cells but this still allows for sperm production without any overt impact on fertility. We also review data on apoptosis and fertility from other achiasmate mouse models and propose that the incidence of homolog dissociation that can be tolerated in vivo without compromising male fertility lies between 50 and 70 %. PMID:26440410

  10. A rare sex chromosome aneuploidy: 48,XXYY syndrome.

    PubMed

    Atik, Tahir; Çoğulu, Özgür; Özkınay, Ferda

    2016-06-01

    48,XXYY syndrome is a rare sex chromosome abnormality. Although some physical features are similar to Klinefelter syndrome(47,XXY), 48,XXYY is typically associated with different neuropsyhciatric symptoms and phenotypic findings. Approximately 100 cases with 48,XXYY have been reported to date. In this report, a patient who was diagnosed with 48,XXYY syndrome with clincal evaluation and cytogenetic analysis is presented. A 6-year old male patient was hospitalized due to recurrent respiratory tract infections, recurrent abdominal distention and dyspepsia. He was the first and only child of nonconsanguineous parents. He had a history of mild developmental retardation. In his history, it was learned that he received treatment for gastroesophageal reflux and his symptoms improved with treatment. On physical examination, his weight was found to be 31 kg (>97 centile) and his height was found to be 123 cm (90 centile). He had upslanted palpebral fissures, depressed nasal bridge, long philtrum, incomplete cleft lip and micrognathia. Clinodactilia was found in the fifth fingers in both hands and large big toes and adduction in the second and third toes were found in both feet. Karyotype analysis showed a chromosomal composition of 48,XXYY. The patient presented here is the second Turkish case of 48,XXYY syndrome. PMID:27489468

  11. A rare sex chromosome aneuploidy: 48,XXYY syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Atik, Tahir; Çoğulu, Özgür; Özkınay, Ferda

    2016-01-01

    48,XXYY syndrome is a rare sex chromosome abnormality. Although some physical features are similar to Klinefelter syndrome(47,XXY), 48,XXYY is typically associated with different neuropsyhciatric symptoms and phenotypic findings. Approximately 100 cases with 48,XXYY have been reported to date. In this report, a patient who was diagnosed with 48,XXYY syndrome with clincal evaluation and cytogenetic analysis is presented. A 6-year old male patient was hospitalized due to recurrent respiratory tract infections, recurrent abdominal distention and dyspepsia. He was the first and only child of nonconsanguineous parents. He had a history of mild developmental retardation. In his history, it was learned that he received treatment for gastroesophageal reflux and his symptoms improved with treatment. On physical examination, his weight was found to be 31 kg (>97 centile) and his height was found to be 123 cm (90 centile). He had upslanted palpebral fissures, depressed nasal bridge, long philtrum, incomplete cleft lip and micrognathia. Clinodactilia was found in the fifth fingers in both hands and large big toes and adduction in the second and third toes were found in both feet. Karyotype analysis showed a chromosomal composition of 48,XXYY. The patient presented here is the second Turkish case of 48,XXYY syndrome. PMID:27489468

  12. The number of x chromosomes causes sex differences in adiposity in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuqi; McClusky, Rebecca; Chen, Jenny; Beaven, Simon W; Tontonoz, Peter; Arnold, Arthur P; Reue, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism in body weight, fat distribution, and metabolic disease has been attributed largely to differential effects of male and female gonadal hormones. Here, we report that the number of X chromosomes within cells also contributes to these sex differences. We employed a unique mouse model, known as the "four core genotypes," to distinguish between effects of gonadal sex (testes or ovaries) and sex chromosomes (XX or XY). With this model, we produced gonadal male and female mice carrying XX or XY sex chromosome complements. Mice were gonadectomized to remove the acute effects of gonadal hormones and to uncover effects of sex chromosome complement on obesity. Mice with XX sex chromosomes (relative to XY), regardless of their type of gonad, had up to 2-fold increased adiposity and greater food intake during daylight hours, when mice are normally inactive. Mice with two X chromosomes also had accelerated weight gain on a high fat diet and developed fatty liver and elevated lipid and insulin levels. Further genetic studies with mice carrying XO and XXY chromosome complements revealed that the differences between XX and XY mice are attributable to dosage of the X chromosome, rather than effects of the Y chromosome. A subset of genes that escape X chromosome inactivation exhibited higher expression levels in adipose tissue and liver of XX compared to XY mice, and may contribute to the sex differences in obesity. Overall, our study is the first to identify sex chromosome complement, a factor distinguishing all male and female cells, as a cause of sex differences in obesity and metabolism. PMID:22589744

  13. Description of the pre-reductional sex chromosome during male meiosis of Pachylis laticornis (Heteroptera: Coreidae).

    PubMed

    Banho, C A; Alevi, K C C; Pereira, L L V; Souza-Firmino, T S; Itoyama, M M

    2016-01-01

    In Heteroptera, the division of sex chromosomes is well defined as post-reductional for most of species, i.e., the first meiotic division is equational and the second is reductional. However, in some species pre-reductional division has been observed, whereby the first meiotic division is reductional and the second is equational. These include Anisops fieberi (Notonectidae), Ectrychotes disparate (Reduviidae), Dictyonota tricornis (Tingidae), and Archimerus alternatus (Coreidae), as well as other species of the genus Pachylis, in the family Coreidae. Thus, this study aimed to characterize the meiotic behavior of Pachylis laticornis, in order to consider whether this species also undergoes pre-reduction division for the sex chromosomes. Cytogenetic analysis of meiosis in P. laticornis made it possible to characterize the holocentric nature of the chromosomes, the chromosome number of this species [2n = 15 (2m + 12A + X0)], the chromosomal system of sex X0 type, and the presence of m-chromosomes. Furthermore, the analysis of anaphase I, telophase I and II allowed pre-reductional meiotic behavior to be observed for this sex chromosome. Thus, this meiotic behavior was confirmed for another species of Heteroptera, stressing the importance of more cytogenetic studies of meiosis to increase our understanding of variation in the behavior of sex chromosomes during spermatogenesis in heteropterans. Therefore, the present study describes the chromosomal number, the system of sex determination, and meiotic behavior of P. laticornis, corroborating the relationship of this species with others of the same genus. PMID:27173284

  14. Genetic architecture of sexual dimorphism in a subdioecious plant with a proto-sex chromosome.

    PubMed

    Spigler, Rachel B; Lewers, Kim S; Ashman, Tia-Lynn

    2011-04-01

    The rise of sexual dimorphism is thought to coincide with the evolution of sex chromosomes. Yet because sex chromosomes in many species are ancient, we lack empirical evidence of the earliest stages of this transition. We use QTL analysis to examine the genetic architecture of sexual dimorphism in subdioecious octoploid Fragaria virginiana. We demonstrate that the region housing the male-function locus controls the majority of quantitative variation in proportion fruit set, confirming the existence of a proto-sex chromosome, and houses major QTL for eight additional sexually dimorphic traits, consistent with theory and data from animals and plants with more advanced sex chromosomes. We also detected autosomal QTL, demonstrating contributions to phenotypic variation in sexually dimorphic traits outside the sex-determining region. Moreover, for proportion seed set we found significant epistatic interactions between autosomal QTL and the male-function locus, indicating sex-limited QTL. We identified linked QTL reflecting trade-offs between male and female traits expected from theory and positive integration of male traits. These findings indicate the potential for the evolution of greater sexual dimorphism. Involvement of linkage groups homeologous to the proto-sex chromosome in these correlations reflects the polyploid origin of F. virginiana and raises the possibility that chromosomes in this homeologous group were predisposed to become the sex chromosome. PMID:21062281

  15. The genetic contribution to sex determination and number of sex chromosomes vary among populations of common frogs (Rana temporaria).

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, N; Vuille, Y; Brelsford, A; Merilä, J; Perrin, N

    2016-07-01

    The patterns of sex determination and sex differentiation have been shown to differ among geographic populations of common frogs. Notably, the association between phenotypic sex and linkage group 2 (LG2) has been found to be perfect in a northern Swedish population, but weak and variable among families in a southern one. By analyzing these populations with markers from other linkage groups, we bring two new insights: (1) the variance in phenotypic sex not accounted for by LG2 in the southern population could not be assigned to genetic factors on other linkage groups, suggesting an epigenetic component to sex determination; (2) a second linkage group (LG7) was found to co-segregate with sex and LG2 in the northern population. Given the very short timeframe since post-glacial colonization (in the order of 1000 generations) and its seemingly localized distribution, this neo-sex chromosome system might be the youngest one described so far. It does not result from a fusion, but more likely from a reciprocal translocation between the original Y chromosome (LG2) and an autosome (LG7), causing their co-segregation during male meiosis. By generating a strict linkage between several important genes from the sex-determination cascade (Dmrt1, Amh and Amhr2), this neo-sex chromosome possibly contributes to the 'differentiated sex race' syndrome (strictly genetic sex determination and early gonadal development) that characterizes this northern population. PMID:27071845

  16. The origin and evolution of vertebrate sex chromosomes and dosage compensation

    PubMed Central

    Livernois, A M; Graves, J A M; Waters, P D

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, birds, snakes and many lizards and fish, sex is determined genetically (either male XY heterogamy or female ZW heterogamy), whereas in alligators, and in many reptiles and turtles, the temperature at which eggs are incubated determines sex. Evidently, different sex-determining systems (and sex chromosome pairs) have evolved independently in different vertebrate lineages. Homology shared by Xs and Ys (and Zs and Ws) within species demonstrates that differentiated sex chromosomes were once homologous, and that the sex-specific non-recombining Y (or W) was progressively degraded. Consequently, genes are left in single copy in the heterogametic sex, which results in an imbalance of the dosage of genes on the sex chromosomes between the sexes, and also relative to the autosomes. Dosage compensation has evolved in diverse species to compensate for these dose differences, with the stringency of compensation apparently differing greatly between lineages, perhaps reflecting the concentration of genes on the original autosome pair that required dosage compensation. We discuss the organization and evolution of amniote sex chromosomes, and hypothesize that dosage insensitivity might predispose an autosome to evolving function as a sex chromosome. PMID:22086077

  17. Sex chromosome elimination, X chromosome inactivation and reactivation in the southern brown bandicoot Isoodon obesulus (Marsupialia: Peramelidae).

    PubMed

    Johnston, P G; Watson, C M; Adams, M; Paull, D J

    2002-01-01

    Cytogenetic studies have shown that bandicoots (family Peramelidae) eliminate one X chromosome in females and the Y chromosome in males from some somatic tissues at different stages during development. The discovery of a polymorphism for X-linked phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK-1) in a population of Isoodon obesulus from Mount Gambier, South Australia, has allowed us to answer a number of long standing questions relating to the parental source of the eliminated X chromosome, X chromosome inactivation and reactivation in somatic and germ cells of female bandicoots. We have found no evidence of paternal PGK-1 allele expression in a wide range of somatic tissues and cell types from known female heterozygotes. We conclude that paternal X chromosome inactivation occurs in bandicoots as in other marsupial groups and that it is the paternally derived X chromosome that is eliminated from some cell types of females. The absence of PGK-1 paternal activity in somatic cells allowed us to examine the state of X chromosome activity in germ cells. Electrophoresis of germ cells from different aged pouch young heterozygotes showed only maternal allele expression in oogonia whereas an additional paternally derived band was observed in pre-dictyate oocytes. We conclude that reactivation of the inactive X chromosome occurs around the onset of meiosis in female bandicoots. As in other mammals, late replication is a common feature of the Y chromosome in male and the inactive X chromosome in female bandicoots. The basis of sex chromosome loss is still not known; however later timing of DNA synthesis is involved. Our finding that the paternally derived X chromosome is eliminated in females suggests that late DNA replication may provide the imprint for paternal X inactivation and the elimination of sex chromosomes in bandicoots. PMID:12900554

  18. A unique sex chromosome system in the knifefish Gymnotus bahianus with inferences about chromosomal evolution of Gymnotidae.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Josivanda S; Migues, Vitor H; Diniz, Débora; Affonso, Paulo Roberto A M

    2015-01-01

    Cytogenetic studies in Neotropical electric knifefish of genus Gymnotus have shown a remarkable interspecific variability, including distinct sex chromosome systems. In this study, we present the first chromosomal data in Gymnotus bahianus from Contas River basin, northeastern South America. Based on extensive analyses, the modal diploid values were 2n = 36 (30m/sm + 6st) for females and 2n = 37 (32m/sm + 5st) for males. Therefore, a novel XX/XY1Y2 sex chromosome system is described for the genus. Single nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) interspersed to GC-rich sites were detected on a subtelocentric pair (7th) for both sexes and confirmed by fluorescent in situ hybridization with 18S rDNA probes. Heterochromatin was detected at pericentromeric regions of all chromosomes and interspersed to NORs on pair 7 and 5S rDNA cistrons on pair 9. The highly differentiated karyotype of Gymnoytus bahianus, with low diploid numbers and a unique XX/XY1Y2 system, reinforces the independent origin of sex chromosomes in Gymnotiformes and seems to reflect the particular evolutionary history of this species in a small and isolated drainage system. Moreover, in spite of morphological similarities, the present results indicate a remarkable chromosomal divergence in relation to closely related species such as G. sylvius and G. carapo. PMID:25596613

  19. The fragile Y hypothesis: Y chromosome aneuploidy as a selective pressure in sex chromosome and meiotic mechanism evolution.

    PubMed

    Blackmon, Heath; Demuth, Jeffery P

    2015-09-01

    Loss of the Y-chromosome is a common feature of species with chromosomal sex determination. However, our understanding of why some lineages frequently lose Y-chromosomes while others do not is limited. The fragile Y hypothesis proposes that in species with chiasmatic meiosis the rate of Y-chromosome aneuploidy and the size of the recombining region have a negative correlation. The fragile Y hypothesis provides a number of novel insights not possible under traditional models. Specifically, increased rates of Y aneuploidy may impose positive selection for (i) gene movement off the Y; (ii) translocations and fusions which expand the recombining region; and (iii) alternative meiotic segregation mechanisms (achiasmatic or asynaptic). These insights as well as existing evidence for the frequency of Y-chromosome aneuploidy raise doubt about the prospects for long-term retention of the human Y-chromosome despite recent evidence for stable gene content in older non-recombining regions. PMID:26200104

  20. Sex chromosome complement influences operant responding for a palatable food in mice.

    PubMed

    Seu, E; Groman, S M; Arnold, A P; Jentsch, J D

    2014-07-01

    The procurement and consumption of palatable, calorie-dense foods is influenced by the nutritional and hedonic value of foods. Although many factors can influence the control over behavior by foods rich in sugar and fat, emerging evidence indicates that biological sex may play a particularly crucial role in the types of foods individuals seek out, as well as the level of motivation individuals will exert to obtain those foods. However, a systematic investigation of food-seeking and consumption that disentangles the effects of the major sex-biasing factors, including sex chromosome complement and organizational and activational effects of sex hormones, has yet to be conducted. Using the four core genotypes mouse model system, we separated and quantified the effects of sex chromosome complement and gonadal sex on consumption of and motivation to obtain a highly palatable solution [sweetened condensed milk (SCM)]. Gonadectomized mice with an XY sex chromosome complement, compared with those with two X chromosomes, independent of gonadal sex, appeared to be more sensitive to the reward value of the SCM solution and were more motivated to expend effort to obtain it, as evidenced by their dramatically greater expended effort in an instrumental task with progressively larger response-to-reward ratios. Gonadal sex independently affected free consumption of the solution but not motivation to obtain it. These data indicate that gonadal and chromosomal sex effects independently influence reward-related behaviors, contributing to sexually dimorphic patterns of behavior related to the pursuit and consumption of rewards. PMID:24861924

  1. Dynamics of vertebrate sex chromosome evolution: from equal size to giants and dwarfs.

    PubMed

    Schartl, Manfred; Schmid, Michael; Nanda, Indrajit

    2016-06-01

    The Y and W chromosomes of mammals and birds are known to be small because most of their genetic content degenerated and were lost due to absence of recombination with the X or Z, respectively. Thus, a picture has emerged of ever-shrinking Ys and Ws that may finally even fade into disappearance. We review here the large amount of literature on sex chromosomes in vertebrate species and find by taking a closer look, particularly at the sex chromosomes of fishes, amphibians and reptiles where several groups have evolutionary younger chromosomes than those of mammals and birds, that the perception of sex chromosomes being doomed to size reduction is incomplete. Here, sex-determining mechanisms show a high turnover and new sex chromosomes appear repeatedly. In many species, Ys and Ws are larger than their X and Z counterparts. This brings up intriguing perspectives regarding the evolutionary dynamics of sex chromosomes. It can be concluded that, due to accumulation of repetitive DNA and transposons, the Y and W chromosomes can increase in size during the initial phase of their differentiation. PMID:26715206

  2. The X Chromosome of Hemipteran Insects: Conservation, Dosage Compensation and Sex-Biased Expression

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Arka; Vicoso, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Insects of the order Hemiptera (true bugs) use a wide range of mechanisms of sex determination, including genetic sex determination, paternal genome elimination, and haplodiploidy. Genetic sex determination, the prevalent mode, is generally controlled by a pair of XY sex chromosomes or by an XX/X0 system, but different configurations that include additional sex chromosomes are also present. Although this diversity of sex determining systems has been extensively studied at the cytogenetic level, only the X chromosome of the model pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum has been analyzed at the genomic level, and little is known about X chromosome biology in the rest of the order. In this study, we take advantage of published DNA- and RNA-seq data from three additional Hemiptera species to perform a comparative analysis of the gene content and expression of the X chromosome throughout this clade. We find that, despite showing evidence of dosage compensation, the X chromosomes of these species show female-biased expression, and a deficit of male-biased genes, in direct contrast to the pea aphid X. We further detect an excess of shared gene content between these very distant species, suggesting that despite the diversity of sex determining systems, the same chromosomal element is used as the X throughout a large portion of the order. PMID:26556591

  3. The X Chromosome of Hemipteran Insects: Conservation, Dosage Compensation and Sex-Biased Expression.

    PubMed

    Pal, Arka; Vicoso, Beatriz

    2015-12-01

    Insects of the order Hemiptera (true bugs) use a wide range of mechanisms of sex determination, including genetic sex determination, paternal genome elimination, and haplodiploidy. Genetic sex determination, the prevalent mode, is generally controlled by a pair of XY sex chromosomes or by an XX/X0 system, but different configurations that include additional sex chromosomes are also present. Although this diversity of sex determining systems has been extensively studied at the cytogenetic level, only the X chromosome of the model pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum has been analyzed at the genomic level, and little is known about X chromosome biology in the rest of the order.In this study, we take advantage of published DNA- and RNA-seq data from three additional Hemiptera species to perform a comparative analysis of the gene content and expression of the X chromosome throughout this clade. We find that, despite showing evidence of dosage compensation, the X chromosomes of these species show female-biased expression, and a deficit of male-biased genes, in direct contrast to the pea aphid X. We further detect an excess of shared gene content between these very distant species, suggesting that despite the diversity of sex determining systems, the same chromosomal element is used as the X throughout a large portion of the order. PMID:26556591

  4. First Description of the Karyotype and Sex Chromosomes in the Komodo Dragon (Varanus komodoensis).

    PubMed

    Johnson Pokorná, Martina; Altmanová, Marie; Rovatsos, Michail; Velenský, Petr; Vodička, Roman; Rehák, Ivan; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2016-01-01

    The Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) is the largest lizard in the world. Surprisingly, it has not yet been cytogenetically examined. Here, we present the very first description of its karyotype and sex chromosomes. The karyotype consists of 2n = 40 chromosomes, 16 macrochromosomes and 24 microchromosomes. Although the chromosome number is constant for all species of monitor lizards (family Varanidae) with the currently reported karyotype, variability in the morphology of the macrochromosomes has been previously documented within the group. We uncovered highly differentiated ZZ/ZW sex microchromosomes with a heterochromatic W chromosome in the Komodo dragon. Sex chromosomes have so far only been described in a few species of varanids including V. varius, the sister species to Komodo dragon, whose W chromosome is notably larger than that of the Komodo dragon. Accumulations of several microsatellite sequences in the W chromosome have recently been detected in 3 species of monitor lizards; however, these accumulations are absent from the W chromosome of the Komodo dragon. In conclusion, although varanids are rather conservative in karyotypes, their W chromosomes exhibit substantial variability at the sequence level, adding further evidence that degenerated sex chromosomes may represent the most dynamic genome part. PMID:27450879

  5. Physical chromosome mapping of repetitive DNA sequences in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus: evidences for a differential distribution of repetitive elements in the sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Irani A; Martins, Cesar

    2008-06-01

    Repetitive DNAs have been extensively applied as physical chromosome markers on comparative studies, identification of chromosome rearrangements and sex chromosomes, chromosome evolution analysis, and applied genetics. Here we report the characterization of repetitive DNA sequences from the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) genome by construction and screening of plasmid library enriched with repetitive DNAs, analysis of a BAC-based physical map, and hybridization to chromosomes. The physical mapping of BACs enriched with repetitive sequences and C(o)t-1 DNA (DNA enriched for highly and moderately repetitive DNA sequences) to chromosomes using FISH showed a predominant distribution of repetitive elements in the centromeric and telomeric regions and along the entire length of the largest chromosome pair (X and Y sex chromosomes) of the species. The distribution of repetitive DNAs differed significantly between the p arm of X and Y chromosomes. These findings suggest that repetitive DNAs have had an important role in the differentiation of sex chromosomes. PMID:17395473

  6. Sex chromosome system ZZ/ZW in Apareiodon hasemani Eigenmann, 1916 (Characiformes, Parodontidae) and a derived chromosomal region.

    PubMed

    Bellafronte, Elisangela; Schemberger, Michelle Orane; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Filho, Orlando Moreira; Vicari, Marcelo Ricardo

    2012-12-01

    Parodontidae fish show few morphological characteristics for the identification of their representatives and chromosomal analyses have provided reliable features for determining the interrelationships in this family. In this study, the chromosomes of Apareiodon hasemani from the São Francisco River basin, Brazil, were analyzed and showed a karyotype with 2n = 54 meta/submetacentric chromosomes, and a ZZ/ZW sex chromosome system. The study revealed active NORs located on pair 11 and additional 18S rDNA sites on pairs 7 and 22. The 5S rDNA locus was found in pair 14. It showed a pericentric inversion regarding the ancestral condition. The satellite DNA pPh2004 was absent in the chromosomes of A. hasemani, a shared condition with most members of Apareiodon. The WAp probe was able to detect the amplification region of the W chromosome, corroborating the common origin of the system within Parodontidae. These chromosomal data corroborate an origin for the ZW system of Parodontidae and aid in the understanding of the differentiation of sex chromosome systems in Neotropical fishes. PMID:23271937

  7. Identification of a novel retrotransposon with sex chromosome-specific distribution in Silene latifolia.

    PubMed

    Kralova, Tereza; Cegan, Radim; Kubat, Zdenek; Vrana, Jan; Vyskot, Boris; Vogel, Ivan; Kejnovsky, Eduard; Hobza, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Silene latifolia is a dioecious plant species with chromosomal sex determination. Although the evolution of sex chromosomes in S. latifolia has been the subject of numerous studies, a global view of X chromosome structure in this species is still missing. Here, we combine X chromosome microdissection and BAC library screening to isolate new X chromosome-linked sequences. Out of 8 identified BAC clones, only BAC 86M14 showed an X-preferential signal after FISH experiments. Further analysis revealed the existence of the Athila retroelement which is enriched in the X chromosome and nearly absent in the Y chromosome. Based on previous data, the Athila retroelement belongs to the CL3 group of most repetitive sequences in the S. latifolia genome. Structural, transcriptomics and phylogenetic analyses revealed that Athila CL3 represents an old clade in the Athila lineage. We propose a mechanism responsible for Athila CL3 distribution in the S. latifolia genome. PMID:24751661

  8. GRB10 imprinting is eutherian mammal specific.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Jessica M; Suzuki, Shunsuke; Pask, Andrew J; Shaw, Geoff; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2012-12-01

    GRB10 is an imprinted gene differently expressed from two promoters in mouse and human. Mouse Grb10 is maternally expressed from the major promoter in most tissues and paternally expressed from the brain-specific promoter within specific regions of the fetal and adult central nervous system. Human GRB10 is biallelically expressed from the major promoter in most tissues except in the placental villus trophoblast where it is maternally expressed, whereas the brain-specific promoter is paternally expressed in the fetal brain. This study characterized the ortholog of GRB10 in a marsupial, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) to investigate the origin and evolution of imprinting at this locus. The protein coding exons and predicted amino acid sequence of tammar GRB10 were highly conserved with eutherian GRB10. The putative first exon, which is located in the orthologous region to the eutherian major promoter, was found in the tammar, but no exon was found in the downstream region corresponding to the eutherian brain-specific promoter, suggesting that marsupials only have a single promoter. Tammar GRB10 was widely expressed in various tissues including the brain but was not imprinted in any of the tissues examined. Thus, it is likely that GRB10 imprinting evolved in eutherians after the eutherian-marsupial divergence approximately 160 million years ago, subsequent to the acquisition of a brain-specific promoter, which resides within the imprinting control region in eutherians. PMID:22787282

  9. Effects of Sex Chromosome Aneuploidies on Brain Development: Evidence From Neuroimaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lenroot, Rhoshel K.; Lee, Nancy Raitano; Giedd, Jay N.

    2010-01-01

    Variation in the number of sex chromosomes is a relatively common genetic condition, affecting as many as 1/400 individuals. The sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) are associated with characteristic behavioral and cognitive phenotypes, although the degree to which specific individuals are affected can fall within a wide range. Understanding the effects of different dosages of sex chromosome genes on brain development may help to understand the basis for functional differences in affected individuals. It may also be informative regarding how sex chromosomes contribute to typical sexual differentiation. Studies of 47,XXY males make up the bulk of the current literature of neuroimaging studies in individuals with supernumerary sex chromosomes, with a few small studies or case reports of the other SCAs. Findings in 47,XXY males typically include decreased gray and white matter volumes, with most pronounced effects in the frontal and temporal lobes. Functional studies have shown evidence of decreased lateralization. Although the hypogonadism typically found in 47,XXY males may contribute to the decreased brain volume, the observation that 47,XXX females also show decreased brain volume in the presence of normal pubertal maturation suggests a possible direct dosage effect of X chromosome genes. Additional X chromosomes, such as in 49,XXXXY males, are associated with more markedly decreased brain volume and increased incidence of white matter hyperintensities. The limited data regarding effects of having two Y chromosomes (47,XYY) do not find significant differences in brain volume, although there are some reports of increased head size. PMID:20014372

  10. Effects of sex chromosome aneuploidies on brain development: evidence from neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Lenroot, Rhoshel K; Lee, Nancy Raitano; Giedd, Jay N

    2009-01-01

    Variation in the number of sex chromosomes is a relatively common genetic condition, affecting as many as 1/400 individuals. The sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) are associated with characteristic behavioral and cognitive phenotypes, although the degree to which specific individuals are affected can fall within a wide range. Understanding the effects of different dosages of sex chromosome genes on brain development may help to understand the basis for functional differences in affected individuals. It may also be informative regarding how sex chromosomes contribute to typical sexual differentiation. Studies of 47,XXY males make up the bulk of the current literature of neuroimaging studies in individuals with supernumerary sex chromosomes, with a few small studies or case reports of the other SCAs. Findings in 47,XXY males typically include decreased gray and white matter volumes, with most pronounced effects in the frontal and temporal lobes. Functional studies have shown evidence of decreased lateralization. Although the hypogonadism typically found in 47,XXY males may contribute to the decreased brain volume, the observation that 47,XXX females also show decreased brain volume in the presence of normal pubertal maturation suggests a possible direct dosage effect of X chromosome genes. Additional X chromosomes, such as in 49,XXXXY males, are associated with more markedly decreased brain volume and increased incidence of white matter hyperintensities. The limited data regarding effects of having two Y chromosomes (47,XYY) do not find significant differences in brain volume, although there are some reports of increased head size. PMID:20014372

  11. Sex Chromosomes and Karyotype of the (Nearly) Mythical Creature, the Gila Monster, Heloderma suspectum (Squamata: Helodermatidae)

    PubMed Central

    Pokorná, Martina Johnson; Rovatsos, Michail; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    A wide variety of sex determination systems exist among squamate reptiles. They can therefore serve as an important model for studies of evolutionary transitions among particular sex determination systems. However, we still have only a limited knowledge of sex determination in certain important lineages of squamates. In this respect, one of the most understudied groups is the family Helodermatidae (Anguimorpha) encompassing the only two venomous species of lizards which are potentially lethal to human beings. We uncovered homomorphic ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes in the Gila monster (Heloderma suspectum) with a highly heterochromatic W chromosome. The sex chromosomes are morphologically similar to the ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes of monitor lizards (Varanidae). If the sex chromosomes of helodermatids and varanids are homologous, female heterogamety may be ancestral for the whole Anguimorpha group. Moreover, we found that the karyotype of the Gila monster consists of 2n = 36 chromosomes (14 larger metacentric chromosomes and 22 acrocentric microchromosomes). 2n = 36 is the widely distributed chromosomal number among squamates. In his pioneering works representing the only previous cytogenetic examination of the family Helodermatidae, Matthey reported the karyotype as 2n = 38 and suggested a different chromosomal morphology for this species. We believe that this was probably erroneously. We also discovered a strong accumulation of telomeric sequences on several pairs of microchromosomes in the Gila monster, which is a trait documented relatively rarely in vertebrates. These new data fill an important gap in our understanding of the sex determination and karyotype evolution of squamates. PMID:25119263

  12. Children with sex chromosome trisomies: parental disclosure of genetic status.

    PubMed

    Gratton, Nikki C; Myring, Jessica; Middlemiss, Prisca; Shears, Deborah; Wellesley, Diana; Wynn, Sarah; Bishop, Dorothy Vm; Scerif, Gaia

    2016-05-01

    Sex chromosome trisomies (SCTs) are frequently diagnosed, both prenatally and postnatally, but the highly variable childhood outcomes can leave parents at a loss on whether, when and how to disclose genetic status. In two complementary studies, we detail current parental practices, with a view to informing parents and their clinicians. Study 1 surveyed detailed qualitative data from focus groups of parents and affected young people with either Trisomy X or XYY (N=34 families). These data suggested that decisions to disclose were principally affected by the child's level of cognitive, social and emotional functioning. Parents reported that they were more likely to disclose when a child was experiencing difficulties. In Study 2, standardised data on cognitive, social and emotional outcomes in 126 children with an SCT and 63 sibling controls highlighted results that converged with Study 1: logistic regression analyses revealed that children with the lowest levels of functioning were more likely to know about their SCT than those children functioning at a higher level. These effects were also reflected in the likelihood of parents to disclose to unaffected siblings, schools and general practitioners. In contrast, specific trisomy type and the professional category of the clinician providing the original diagnosis did not affect likelihood of disclosure. Our study emphasises the complex weighing up of costs and benefits that parents engage in when deciding whether to disclose a diagnosis. PMID:26306644

  13. The mating-type chromosome in the filamentous ascomycete Neurospora tetrasperma represents a model for early evolution of sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Menkis, Audrius; Jacobson, David J; Gustafsson, Tim; Johannesson, Hanna

    2008-03-01

    We combined gene divergence data, classical genetics, and phylogenetics to study the evolution of the mating-type chromosome in the filamentous ascomycete Neurospora tetrasperma. In this species, a large non-recombining region of the mating-type chromosome is associated with a unique fungal life cycle where self-fertility is enforced by maintenance of a constant state of heterokaryosis. Sequence divergence between alleles of 35 genes from the two single mating-type component strains (i.e. the homokaryotic mat A or mat a-strains), derived from one N. tetrasperma heterokaryon (mat A+mat a), was analyzed. By this approach we were able to identify the boundaries and size of the non-recombining region, and reveal insight into the history of recombination cessation. The non-recombining region covers almost 7 Mbp, over 75% of the chromosome, and we hypothesize that the evolution of the mating-type chromosome in this lineage involved two successive events. The first event was contemporaneous with the split of N. tetrasperma from a common ancestor with its outcrossing relative N. crassa and suppressed recombination over at least 6.6 Mbp, and the second was confined to a smaller region in which recombination ceased more recently. In spite of the early origin of the first "evolutionary stratum", genealogies of five genes from strains belonging to an additional N. tetrasperma lineage indicate independent initiations of suppressed recombination in different phylogenetic lineages. This study highlights the shared features between the sex chromosomes found in the animal and plant kingdoms and the fungal mating-type chromosome, despite fungi having no separate sexes. As is often found in sex chromosomes of plants and animals, recombination suppression of the mating-type chromosome of N. tetrasperma involved more than one evolutionary event, covers the majority of the mating-type chromosome and is flanked by distal regions with obligate crossovers. PMID:18369449

  14. Repetitive DNA Sequences and Evolution of ZZ/ZW Sex Chromosomes in Characidium (Teleostei: Characiformes)

    PubMed Central

    Pansonato-Alves, José Carlos; da Costa Silva, Guilherme José; Vicari, Marcelo Ricardo; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Oliveira, Claudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    Characidium constitutes an interesting model for cytogenetic studies, since a large degree of karyotype variation has been detected in this group, like the presence/absence of sex and supernumerary chromosomes and variable distribution of repetitive sequences in different species/populations. In this study, we performed a comparative cytogenetic analysis in 13 Characidium species collected at different South American river basins in order to investigate the karyotype diversification in this group. Chromosome analyses involved the karyotype characterization, cytogenetic mapping of repetitive DNA sequences and cross-species chromosome painting using a W-specific probe obtained in a previous study from Characidium gomesi. Our results evidenced a conserved diploid chromosome number of 2n = 50, and almost all the species exhibited homeologous ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes in different stages of differentiation, except C. cf. zebra, C. tenue, C. xavante and C. stigmosum. Notably, some ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes showed 5S and/or 18S rDNA clusters, while no U2 snDNA sites could be detected in the sex chromosomes, being restricted to a single chromosome pair in almost all the analyzed species. In addition, the species Characidium sp. aff. C. vidali showed B chromosomes with an inter-individual variation of 1 to 4 supernumerary chromosomes per cell. Notably, these B chromosomes share sequences with the W-specific probe, providing insights about their origin. Results presented here further confirm the extensive karyotype diversity within Characidium in contrast with a conserved diploid chromosome number. Such chromosome differences seem to constitute a significant reproductive barrier, since several sympatric Characidium species had been described during the last few years and no interespecific hybrids were found. PMID:26372604

  15. Dynamics of sex expression and chromosome diversity in Cucurbitaceae: a story in the making.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Biplab Kumar; Jha, Sumita

    2015-12-01

    The family Cucurbitaceae showcases a wide range of sexual phenotypes being variedly regulated by biological and environmental factors. In the present context, we have tried to assemble reports of cytogenetic investigations carried out in cucurbits accompanied by information on sex expression diversities and chromosomal or molecular basis of sex determination in dioecious (or other sexual types, if reported) taxa known so far. Most of the Cucurbitaceae tribes have mixed sexual phenotypes with varying range of chromosome numbers and hence, ancestral conditions become difficult to probe. Occurrence of polyploidy is rare in the family and has no influence on sexual traits. The sex determination mechanisms have been elucidated in some well-studied taxa like Bryonia,Coccinia and Cucumis showing interplay of genic, biochemical, developmental and sometimes chromosomal determinants. Substantial knowledge about genic and molecular sex differentiation has been obtained for genera like Momordica, Cucurbita and Trichosanthes. The detailed information on sex determination schemes, genomic sequences and molecular phylogenetic relationships facilitate further comprehensive investigations in the tribe Bryonieae. The discovery of organ identity genes and sex-specific sequences regulating sexual behaviour in Coccinia,Cucumis and Cucurbita opens up opportunities of relevant investigations to answer yet unaddressed questions pertaining to floral unisexuality, dioecy and chromosome evolution in the family. The present discussion brings the genera in light, previously recognized under subfamily Nhandiroboideae, where the study of chromosome cytology and sex determination mechanisms can simplify our understanding of sex expression pathways and its phylogenetic impacts. PMID:26690537

  16. High-density sex-specific linkage maps of a European tree frog (Hyla arborea) identify the sex chromosome without information on offspring sex.

    PubMed

    Brelsford, A; Dufresnes, C; Perrin, N

    2016-02-01

    Identifying homology between sex chromosomes of different species is essential to understanding the evolution of sex determination. Here, we show that the identity of a homomorphic sex chromosome pair can be established using a linkage map, without information on offspring sex. By comparing sex-specific maps of the European tree frog Hyla arborea, we find that the sex chromosome (linkage group 1) shows a threefold difference in marker number between the male and female maps. In contrast, the number of markers on each autosome is similar between the two maps. We also find strongly conserved synteny between H. arborea and Xenopus tropicalis across 200 million years of evolution, suggesting that the rate of chromosomal rearrangement in anurans is low. Finally, we show that recombination in males is greatly reduced at the centers of large chromosomes, consistent with previous cytogenetic findings. Our research shows the importance of high-density linkage maps for studies of recombination, chromosomal rearrangement and the genetic architecture of ecologically or economically important traits. PMID:26374238

  17. Weird mammals provide insights into the evolution of mammalian sex chromosomes and dosage compensation.

    PubMed

    Graves, Jennifer A Marshall

    2015-12-01

    The deep divergence of mammalian groups 166 and 190 million years ago (MYA) provide genetic variation to explore the evolution of DNA sequence, gene arrangement and regulation of gene expression in mammals. With encouragement from the founder of the field, Mary Lyon, techniques in cytogenetics and molecular biology were progressively adapted to characterize the sex chromosomes of kangaroos and other marsupials, platypus and echidna-and weird rodent species. Comparative gene mapping reveals the process of sex chromosome evolution from their inception 190 MYA (they are autosomal in platypus) to their inevitable end (the Y has disappeared in two rodent lineages). Our X and Y are relatively young, getting their start with the evolution of the sex-determining SRY gene, which triggered progressive degradation of the Y chromosome. Even more recently, sex chromosomes of placental mammals fused with an autosomal region which now makes up most of the Y. Exploration of gene activity patterns over four decades showed that dosage compensation via X-chromosome inactivation is unique to therian mammals, and that this whole chromosome control process is different in marsupials and absent in monotremes and reptiles, and birds. These differences can be exploited to deduce how mammalian sex chromosomes and epigenetic silencing evolved. PMID:26690510

  18. Transition in sexual system and sex chromosome evolution in the tadpole shrimp Triops cancriformis.

    PubMed

    Mathers, T C; Hammond, R L; Jenner, R A; Hänfling, B; Atkins, J; Gómez, A

    2015-07-01

    Transitions in sexual system and reproductive mode may affect the course of sex chromosome evolution, for instance by altering the strength of sexually antagonistic selection. However, there have been few studies of sex chromosomes in systems where such transitions have been documented. The European tadpole shrimp, Triops cancriformis, has undergone a transition from dioecy to androdioecy (a sexual system where hermaphrodites and males coexist), offering an excellent opportunity to test the impact of this transition on the evolution of sex chromosomes. To identify sex-linked markers, to understand mechanisms of sex determination and to investigate differences between sexual systems, we carried out a genome-wide association study using restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) of 47 males, females and hermaphrodites from one dioecious and one androdioecious population. We analysed 22.9 Gb of paired-end sequences and identified and scored >3000 high coverage novel genomic RAD markers. Presence-absence of markers, single-nucleotide polymorphism association and read depth identified 52 candidate sex-linked markers. We show that sex is genetically determined in T. cancriformis, with a ZW system conserved across dioecious and androdioecious populations and that hermaphrodites have likely evolved from females. We also show that the structure of the sex chromosomes differs strikingly, with a larger sex-linked region in the dioecious population compared with the androdioecious population. PMID:25757406

  19. Role of Testis-Specific Gene Expression in Sex-Chromosome Evolution of Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Dean A.; Russell, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression in Anopheles gambiae shows a deficiency of testis-expressed genes on the X chromosome associated with an excessive movement of retrogene duplication. We suggest that the degeneration of sex chromosomes in this monandrous species is likely the result of pressures from X inactivation, dosage compensation, and sexual antagonism. PMID:21890740

  20. Untangling the Contributions of Sex-Specific Gene Regulation and X-Chromosome Dosage to Sex-Biased Gene Expression in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Maxwell; Rao, Prashant; Ercan, Sevinc

    2016-09-01

    Dosage compensation mechanisms equalize the level of X chromosome expression between sexes. Yet the X chromosome is often enriched for genes exhibiting sex-biased, i.e., imbalanced expression. The relationship between X chromosome dosage compensation and sex-biased gene expression remains largely unexplored. Most studies determine sex-biased gene expression without distinguishing between contributions from X chromosome copy number (dose) and the animal's sex. Here, we uncoupled X chromosome dose from sex-specific gene regulation in Caenorhabditis elegans to determine the effect of each on X expression. In early embryogenesis, when dosage compensation is not yet fully active, X chromosome dose drives the hermaphrodite-biased expression of many X-linked genes, including several genes that were shown to be responsible for hermaphrodite fate. A similar effect is seen in the C. elegans germline, where X chromosome dose contributes to higher hermaphrodite X expression, suggesting that lack of dosage compensation in the germline may have a role in supporting higher expression of X chromosomal genes with female-biased functions in the gonad. In the soma, dosage compensation effectively balances X expression between the sexes. As a result, somatic sex-biased expression is almost entirely due to sex-specific gene regulation. These results suggest that lack of dosage compensation in different tissues and developmental stages allow X chromosome copy number to contribute to sex-biased gene expression and function. PMID:27356611

  1. Sex chromosome complement determines sex differences in aromatase expression and regulation in the stria terminalis and anterior amygdala of the developing mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Cisternas, Carla D; Tome, Karina; Caeiro, Ximena E; Dadam, Florencia M; Garcia-Segura, Luis M; Cambiasso, María J

    2015-10-15

    Aromatase, which converts testosterone in estradiol, is involved in the generation of brain sex dimorphisms. Here we used the "four core genotypes" mouse model, in which the effect of gonadal sex and sex chromosome complement is dissociated, to determine if sex chromosomes influence the expression of brain aromatase. The brain of 16 days old XY mouse embryos showed higher aromatase expression in the stria terminalis and the anterior amygdaloid area than the brain of XX embryos, independent of gonadal sex. Furthermore, estradiol or dihydrotestosterone increased aromatase expression in cultures of anterior amygdala neurons derived from XX embryos, but not in those derived from XY embryos. This effect was also independent of gonadal sex. The expression of other steroidogenic molecules, estrogen receptor-α and androgen receptor was not influenced by sex chromosomes. In conclusion, sex chromosomes determine sex dimorphisms in aromatase expression and regulation in the developing mouse brain. PMID:26231585

  2. Deciphering neo-sex and B chromosome evolution by the draft genome of Drosophila albomicans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Drosophila albomicans is a unique model organism for studying both sex chromosome and B chromosome evolution. A pair of its autosomes comprising roughly 40% of the whole genome has fused to the ancient X and Y chromosomes only about 0.12 million years ago, thereby creating the youngest and most gene-rich neo-sex system reported to date. This species also possesses recently derived B chromosomes that show non-Mendelian inheritance and significantly influence fertility. Methods We sequenced male flies with B chromosomes at 124.5-fold genome coverage using next-generation sequencing. To characterize neo-Y specific changes and B chromosome sequences, we also sequenced inbred female flies derived from the same strain but without B's at 28.5-fold. Results We assembled a female genome and placed 53% of the sequence and 85% of the annotated proteins into specific chromosomes, by comparison with the 12 Drosophila genomes. Despite its very recent origin, the non-recombining neo-Y chromosome shows various signs of degeneration, including a significant enrichment of non-functional genes compared to the neo-X, and an excess of tandem duplications relative to other chromosomes. We also characterized a B-chromosome linked scaffold that contains an actively transcribed unit and shows sequence similarity to the subcentromeric regions of both the ancient X and the neo-X chromosome. Conclusions Our results provide novel insights into the very early stages of sex chromosome evolution and B chromosome origination, and suggest an unprecedented connection between the births of these two systems in D. albomicans. PMID:22439699

  3. The intricate relationship between sexually antagonistic selection and the evolution of sex chromosome fusions.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tomotaka; Kitano, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Sex chromosomes are among the most evolutionarily labile features in some groups of animals. One of the mechanisms causing structural changes of sex chromosomes is fusion with an autosome. A recent study showed that the establishment rates of Y chromosome-autosome fusions are much higher than those of other fusions (i.e., X-autosome, W-autosome, and Z-autosome fusions) in fishes and reptiles. Although sexually antagonistic selection may be one of the most important driving forces of sex chromosome-autosome fusions, a previous theoretical analysis showed that sexually antagonistic selection alone cannot explain the excess of Y-autosome fusions in these taxa. This previous analysis, however, is based on the assumption that sexually antagonistic selection is symmetric, sexually antagonistic alleles are maintained only by selection-drift balance (i.e., no supply of mutation), and only one type of fusion arises within a population. Here, we removed these assumptions and made an individual-based model to simulate the establishment of sex chromosome-autosome fusions. Our simulations showed that the highest establishment rate of Y-autosome fusion can be achieved when the fusion captures a rare male-beneficial allele, if the recurrent mutation rates are high enough to maintain the polymorphism of alleles with asymmetric, sexually antagonistic effects. Our results demonstrate that sexually antagonistic selection can influence the dynamics of sex chromosome structural changes, but the type of fusion that becomes the most common depends on fusion rates, recurrent mutation rates, and selection regimes. Because the evolutionary fate of sex chromosome-autosome fusions is highly parameter-sensitive, further attempts to empirically measure these parameters in natural populations are essential for a better understanding of the roles of sexually antagonistic selection in sex chromosome evolution. PMID:27259387

  4. Independent fusions and recent origins of sex chromosomes in the evolution and diversification of glass knife fishes (Eigenmannia)

    PubMed Central

    Henning, F; Moysés, C B; Calcagnotto, D; Meyer, A; de Almeida-Toledo, L F

    2011-01-01

    The genus Eigenmannia comprises several species groups that display a surprising variety of diploid chromosome numbers and sex-determining systems. In this study, hypotheses regarding phylogenetic relationships and karyotype evolution were investigated using a combination of molecular and cytogenetic methods. Phylogenetic relationships were analyzed for 11 cytotypes based on sequences from five mitochondrial DNA regions. Parsimony-based character mapping of sex chromosomes confirms previous suggestions of multiple origins of sex chromosomes. Molecular cytogenetic analyses involved chromosome painting using probes derived from whole sex chromosomes from two taxa that were hybridized to metaphases of their respective sister cytotypes. These analyses showed that a multiple XY system evolved recently (<7 mya) by fusion. Furthermore, one of the chromosomes that fused to form the neo-Y chromosome is fused independently to another chromosome in the sister cytotype. This may constitute an efficient post-mating barrier and might imply a direct function of sex chromosomes in the speciation processes in Eigenmannia. The other chromosomal sex-determination system investigated is shown to have differentiated by an accumulation of heterochromatin on the X chromosome. This has occurred in the past 0.6 my, and is the most recent chromosomal sex-determining system described to date. These results show that the evolution of sex-determining systems can proceed very rapidly. PMID:20571513

  5. Simultaneous detection of multiple STR loci on sex chromosomes for forensic testing of sex and identity.

    PubMed

    Tun, Z; Honda, K; Nakatome, M; Nakamura, M; Shimada, S; Ogura, Y; Kuroki, H; Yamazaki, M; Terada, M; Matoba, R

    1999-07-01

    The forensic usefulness of X and Y chromosomal STR loci has recently been demonstrated. One quadruplex-PCR, using 2 X- and 2 Y-STRs (STRX1/HPRTB and DYS390/ DYS393), and 2 duplex-PCRs, each using an X- and a Y-STR (ARA/DYS390 and ARA/DYS393), and detection of PCR products by using an automated DNA sequencer are reported herein. This approach allows us to determine not only the sex of the donor of a sample, but also the X- and/or Y-STR genotypes of the sample. A male biological specimen yields 4 amplified products in quadruplex-PCR and 2 amplified fragments in duplex-PCRs, whereas a female biological specimen yields only 2 amplified fragments of X-STR in quadruplex-PCR and one fragment, also of X-STR, in duplex-PCRs. Our study thus provides useful information for many activities in forensic practice, such as identity testing, paternity testing, especially of deficiency cases, compilation of population data, and sex determination of a biological sample from a single PCR. PMID:10432611

  6. Amplification of microsatellite repeat motifs is associated with the evolutionary differentiation and heterochromatinization of sex chromosomes in Sauropsida.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Kazumi; O'Meally, Denis; Azad, Bhumika; Georges, Arthur; Sarre, Stephen D; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall; Matsuda, Yoichi; Ezaz, Tariq

    2016-03-01

    The sex chromosomes in Sauropsida (reptiles and birds) have evolved independently many times. They show astonishing diversity in morphology ranging from cryptic to highly differentiated sex chromosomes with male (XX/XY) and female heterogamety (ZZ/ZW). Comparing such diverse sex chromosome systems thus provides unparalleled opportunities to capture evolution of morphologically differentiated sex chromosomes in action. Here, we describe chromosomal mapping of 18 microsatellite repeat motifs in eight species of Sauropsida. More than two microsatellite repeat motifs were amplified on the sex-specific chromosome, W or Y, in five species (Bassiana duperreyi, Aprasia parapulchella, Notechis scutatus, Chelodina longicollis, and Gallus gallus) of which the sex-specific chromosomes were heteromorphic and heterochromatic. Motifs (AAGG)n and (ATCC)n were amplified on the W chromosome of Pogona vitticeps and the Y chromosome of Emydura macquarii, respectively. By contrast, no motifs were amplified on the W chromosome of Christinus marmoratus, which is not much differentiated from the Z chromosome. Taken together with previously published studies, our results suggest that the amplification of microsatellite repeats is tightly associated with the differentiation and heterochromatinization of sex-specific chromosomes in sauropsids as well as in other taxa. Although some motifs were common between the sex-specific chromosomes of multiple species, no correlation was observed between this commonality and the species phylogeny. Furthermore, comparative analysis of sex chromosome homology and chromosomal distribution of microsatellite repeats between two closely related chelid turtles, C. longicollis and E. macquarii, identified different ancestry and differentiation history. These suggest multiple evolutions of sex chromosomes in the Sauropsida. PMID:26194100

  7. Sex Chromosome Dosage Compensation in Heliconius Butterflies: Global yet Still Incomplete?

    PubMed Central

    Walters, James R.; Hardcastle, Thomas J.; Jiggins, Chris D.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of heterogametic sex chromosomes is often—but not always—accompanied by the evolution of dosage compensating mechanisms that mitigate the impact of sex-specific gene dosage on levels of gene expression. One emerging view of this process is that such mechanisms may only evolve in male-heterogametic (XY) species but not in female-heterogametic (ZW) species, which will consequently exhibit “incomplete” sex chromosome dosage compensation. However, recent results suggest that at least some Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) may prove to be an exception to this prediction. Studies in bombycoid moths indicate the presence of a chromosome-wide epigenetic mechanism that effectively balances Z chromosome gene expression between the sexes by reducing Z-linked expression in males. In contrast, strong sex chromosome dosage effects without any reduction in male Z-linked expression were previously reported in a pyralid moth, suggesting a lack of any such dosage compensating mechanism. Here we report an analysis of sex chromosome dosage compensation in Heliconius butterflies, sampling multiple individuals for several different adult tissues (head, abdomen, leg, mouth, and antennae). Methodologically, we introduce a novel application of linear mixed-effects models to assess dosage compensation, offering a unified statistical framework that can estimate effects specific to chromosome, to sex, and their interactions (i.e., a dosage effect). Our results show substantially reduced Z-linked expression relative to autosomes in both sexes, as previously observed in bombycoid moths. This observation is consistent with an increasing body of evidence that some lepidopteran species possess an epigenetic dosage compensating mechanism that reduces Z chromosome expression in males to levels comparable with females. However, this mechanism appears to be imperfect in Heliconius, resulting in a modest dosage effect that produces an average 5–20% increase in male expression

  8. Comparative genetic mapping in Fragaria virginiana reveals autosomal origin of sex chromosome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although most flowering plants are hermaphrodite, separate sexes (dioecy) have evolved repeatedly. The evolution of sex chromosomes from autosomes can often, but not always, accompany this transition. Thus, many have argued that plant genera that contain both hermaphroditic and dioecious members pro...

  9. Male only progeny in Anastrepha suspensa by RNAi-induced sex reversion of chromosomal females

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Tephritidae sex determination is established by orthologs to the Drosophila melanogaster transformer and transformer-2 genes. In contrast, primary signals for sex determination are different in these species corresponding to the number of X chromosomes (XSE) in Drosophilidae species and to the pr...

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF SEX CHROMOSOME MOLECULAR MARKERS USING RAPDS AND FLUORESCENT IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION IN RAINBOW TROUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this work is to identify molecular markers associated with the sex chromosomes in rainbow trout to study the mode of sex determination mechanisms in this species. Using the RAPD assay and bulked segregant analysis, two markers were identified that generated polymorphi...

  11. Molecular Cytogenetic Characterization of the Dioecious Cannabis sativa with an XY Chromosome Sex Determination System

    PubMed Central

    Divashuk, Mikhail G.; Alexandrov, Oleg S.; Razumova, Olga V.; Kirov, Ilya V.; Karlov, Gennady I.

    2014-01-01

    Hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) was karyotyped using by DAPI/C-banding staining to provide chromosome measurements, and by fluorescence in situ hybridization with probes for 45 rDNA (pTa71), 5S rDNA (pCT4.2), a subtelomeric repeat (CS-1) and the Arabidopsis telomere probes. The karyotype has 18 autosomes plus a sex chromosome pair (XX in female and XY in male plants). The autosomes are difficult to distinguish morphologically, but three pairs could be distinguished using the probes. The Y chromosome is larger than the autosomes, and carries a fully heterochromatic DAPI positive arm and CS-1 repeats only on the less intensely DAPI-stained, euchromatic arm. The X is the largest chromosome of all, and carries CS-1 subtelomeric repeats on both arms. The meiotic configuration of the sex bivalent locates a pseudoautosomal region of the Y chromosome at the end of the euchromatic CS-1-carrying arm. Our molecular cytogenetic study of the C. sativa sex chromosomes is a starting point for helping to make C. sativa a promising model to study sex chromosome evolution. PMID:24465491

  12. Triploid plover female provides support for a role of the W chromosome in avian sex determination.

    PubMed

    Küpper, Clemens; Augustin, Jakob; Edwards, Scott; Székely, Tamás; Kosztolányi, András; Burke, Terry; Janes, Daniel E

    2012-10-23

    Two models, Z Dosage and Dominant W, have been proposed to explain sex determination in birds, in which males are characterized by the presence of two Z chromosomes, and females are hemizygous with a Z and a W chromosome. According to the Z Dosage model, high dosage of a Z-linked gene triggers male development, whereas the Dominant W model postulates that a still unknown W-linked gene triggers female development. Using 33 polymorphic microsatellite markers, we describe a female triploid Kentish plover Charadrius alexandrinus identified by characteristic triallelic genotypes at 14 autosomal markers that produced viable diploid offspring. Chromatogram analysis showed that the sex chromosome composition of this female was ZZW. Together with two previously described ZZW female birds, our results suggest a prominent role for a female determining gene on the W chromosome. These results imply that avian sex determination is more dynamic and complex than currently envisioned. PMID:22647929

  13. Triploid plover female provides support for a role of the W chromosome in avian sex determination

    PubMed Central

    Küpper, Clemens; Augustin, Jakob; Edwards, Scott; Székely, Tamás; Kosztolányi, András; Burke, Terry; Janes, Daniel E.

    2012-01-01

    Two models, Z Dosage and Dominant W, have been proposed to explain sex determination in birds, in which males are characterized by the presence of two Z chromosomes, and females are hemizygous with a Z and a W chromosome. According to the Z Dosage model, high dosage of a Z-linked gene triggers male development, whereas the Dominant W model postulates that a still unknown W-linked gene triggers female development. Using 33 polymorphic microsatellite markers, we describe a female triploid Kentish plover Charadrius alexandrinus identified by characteristic triallelic genotypes at 14 autosomal markers that produced viable diploid offspring. Chromatogram analysis showed that the sex chromosome composition of this female was ZZW. Together with two previously described ZZW female birds, our results suggest a prominent role for a female determining gene on the W chromosome. These results imply that avian sex determination is more dynamic and complex than currently envisioned. PMID:22647929

  14. [Sex chromosomes at early meiosis in three wood mice species of the genus Apodemus (Rodentia, Muridae)].

    PubMed

    Safronova, L D; Cherepanova, E V

    2007-06-01

    The prophase of the first meiotic division was studied in field mice of the species Apodemus (Sylvaemus) flavicollis, A. (S.) ponticus, and A. (S.) uralensis by light and electron microscopy. The karyotypes of the species were described on the base of electron microscopy of synaptonemal complexes in spermatocytes I. The axial elements of the sex chromosomes at early-middle pachytene can synapse along the major portion of the Y axis; at late pachytene-early diplotene, the synapsis region shrinks; and at diakinesis-metaphase I, X and Y chromosomes associate tail-to-tail in all species studied. The behavior of sex chromosomes in the synapsis in the species studied was quite uniform. The results are discussed in the context of earlier data on the behavior of sex chromosomes in various rodent species in meiosis prophase I and their banding. PMID:17853806

  15. Reduced representation genome sequencing suggests low diversity on the sex chromosomes of tonkean macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ben J; Zeng, Kai; Esselstyn, Jacob A; Charlesworth, Brian; Melnick, Don J

    2014-09-01

    In species with separate sexes, social systems can differ in the relative variances of male versus female reproductive success. Papionin monkeys (macaques, mangabeys, mandrills, drills, baboons, and geladas) exhibit hallmarks of a high variance in male reproductive success, including a female-biased adult sex ratio and prominent sexual dimorphism. To explore the potential genomic consequences of such sex differences, we used a reduced representation genome sequencing approach to quantifying polymorphism at sites on autosomes and sex chromosomes of the tonkean macaque (Macaca tonkeana), a species endemic to the Indonesian island of Sulawesi. The ratio of nucleotide diversity of the X chromosome to that of the autosomes was less than the value (0.75) expected with a 1:1 sex ratio and no sex differences in the variance in reproductive success. However, the significance of this difference was dependent on which outgroup was used to standardize diversity levels. Using a new model that includes the effects of varying population size, sex differences in mutation rate between the autosomes and X chromosome, and GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC) or selection on GC content, we found that the maximum-likelihood estimate of the ratio of effective population size of the X chromosome to that of the autosomes was 0.68, which did not differ significantly from 0.75. We also found evidence for 1) a higher level of purifying selection on genic than nongenic regions, 2) gBGC or natural selection favoring increased GC content, 3) a dynamic demography characterized by population growth and contraction, 4) a higher mutation rate in males than females, and 5) a very low polymorphism level on the Y chromosome. These findings shed light on the population genomic consequences of sex differences in the variance in reproductive success, which appear to be modest in the tonkean macaque; they also suggest the occurrence of hitchhiking on the Y chromosome. PMID:24987106

  16. Flow sorting of the Y sex chromosome in the dioecious plant Melandrium album

    SciTech Connect

    Veuskens, J.; Jacobs, M.; Negrutiu, I.

    1995-12-01

    The preparation of stable chromosome suspensions and flow cytometric sorting of both the Y sex chromosome of the white campion, Melandrium album, and the deleted Y chromosome of an asexual mutant, 5K63, is described. The principle has been to maintain transformed roots in vitro, synchronize and block mitosis, reduce cells to protoplasts, and lyse these to release chromosomes. Such in vitro material, unlike many cell suspensions, showed a stable karyotype. Factors critical to producing high-quality chromosome suspensions from protoplasts include osmolality of isolation solutions and choice of spindle toxin and of lysis buffer. Agrobacterium rhizogenes transformed young growing root cultures were synchronized at G1/S with 50 {mu}M aphidicolin for 24 h and released to a mitotic block with 30 {mu}M oryzalin for 11 h. Protoplast preparations from such tissue routinely had metaphase indices reaching 15%. Suspensions of intact metaphase chromosomes, with few chromatids, were obtained by lysing swollen mitotic protoplasts in a citric acid/disodium phosphate buffer. Except for the presence of clumps of autosomal chromosomes near the X and Y chromosome zones, monoparametric histograms of fluorescence intensities of suspensions stained with 4{prime},6-diamidino-2-phenylindole showed profiles similar to theoretical flow karyotypes. Two types of Y chromosomes, one full-length and one partially deleted (from the asexual mutant), could be sorted at 90% purity (21-fold enrichment of Y). These results are discussed in the context of sex determination and differentiation in higher plants. 45 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Genomes of Ellobius species provide insight into the evolutionary dynamics of mammalian sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Mulugeta, Eskeatnaf; Wassenaar, Evelyne; Sleddens-Linkels, Esther; van IJcken, Wilfred F J; Heard, Edith; Grootegoed, J Anton; Just, Walter; Gribnau, Joost; Baarends, Willy M

    2016-09-01

    The X and Y sex chromosomes of placental mammals show hallmarks of a tumultuous evolutionary past. The X Chromosome has a rich and conserved gene content, while the Y Chromosome has lost most of its genes. In the Transcaucasian mole vole Ellobius lutescens, the Y Chromosome including Sry has been lost, and both females and males have a 17,X diploid karyotype. Similarly, the closely related Ellobius talpinus, has a 54,XX karyotype in both females and males. Here, we report the sequencing and assembly of the E. lutescens and E. talpinus genomes. The results indicate that the loss of the Y Chromosome in E. lutescens and E. talpinus occurred in two independent events. Four functional homologs of mouse Y-Chromosomal genes were detected in both female and male E. lutescens, of which three were also detected in the E. talpinus genome. One of these is Eif2s3y, known as the only Y-derived gene that is crucial for successful male meiosis. Female and male E. lutescens can carry one and the same X Chromosome with a largely conserved gene content, including all genes known to function in X Chromosome inactivation. The availability of the genomes of these mole vole species provides unique models to study the dynamics of sex chromosome evolution. PMID:27510564

  18. An Optimized Method for Accurate Fetal Sex Prediction and Sex Chromosome Aneuploidy Detection in Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haibo; Ding, Jie; Wen, Ping; Zhang, Qin; Xiang, Jingjing; Li, Qiong; Xuan, Liming; Kong, Lingyin; Mao, Yan; Zhu, Yijun; Shen, Jingjing; Liang, Bo; Li, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) combined with bioinformatic analysis has been widely applied to detect fetal chromosomal aneuploidies such as trisomy 21, 18, 13 and sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) by sequencing cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) from maternal plasma, so-called non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). However, many technical challenges, such as dependency on correct fetal sex prediction, large variations of chromosome Y measurement and high sensitivity to random reads mapping, may result in higher false negative rate (FNR) and false positive rate (FPR) in fetal sex prediction as well as in SCAs detection. Here, we developed an optimized method to improve the accuracy of the current method by filtering out randomly mapped reads in six specific regions of the Y chromosome. The method reduces the FNR and FPR of fetal sex prediction from nearly 1% to 0.01% and 0.06%, respectively and works robustly under conditions of low fetal DNA concentration (1%) in testing and simulation of 92 samples. The optimized method was further confirmed by large scale testing (1590 samples), suggesting that it is reliable and robust enough for clinical testing. PMID:27441628

  19. An Optimized Method for Accurate Fetal Sex Prediction and Sex Chromosome Aneuploidy Detection in Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; He, Quanze; Li, Haibo; Ding, Jie; Wen, Ping; Zhang, Qin; Xiang, Jingjing; Li, Qiong; Xuan, Liming; Kong, Lingyin; Mao, Yan; Zhu, Yijun; Shen, Jingjing; Liang, Bo; Li, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) combined with bioinformatic analysis has been widely applied to detect fetal chromosomal aneuploidies such as trisomy 21, 18, 13 and sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) by sequencing cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) from maternal plasma, so-called non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). However, many technical challenges, such as dependency on correct fetal sex prediction, large variations of chromosome Y measurement and high sensitivity to random reads mapping, may result in higher false negative rate (FNR) and false positive rate (FPR) in fetal sex prediction as well as in SCAs detection. Here, we developed an optimized method to improve the accuracy of the current method by filtering out randomly mapped reads in six specific regions of the Y chromosome. The method reduces the FNR and FPR of fetal sex prediction from nearly 1% to 0.01% and 0.06%, respectively and works robustly under conditions of low fetal DNA concentration (1%) in testing and simulation of 92 samples. The optimized method was further confirmed by large scale testing (1590 samples), suggesting that it is reliable and robust enough for clinical testing. PMID:27441628

  20. Neural Activation During Mental Rotation in Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome: The Influence of Sex Hormones and Sex Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    van Hemmen, Judy; Veltman, Dick J; Hoekzema, Elseline; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Dessens, Arianne B; Bakker, Julie

    2016-03-01

    Sex hormones, androgens in particular, are hypothesized to play a key role in the sexual differentiation of the human brain. However, possible direct effects of the sex chromosomes, that is, XX or XY, have not been well studied in humans. Individuals with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS), who have a 46,XY karyotype but a female phenotype due to a complete androgen resistance, enable us to study the separate effects of gonadal hormones versus sex chromosomes on neural sex differences. Therefore, in the present study, we compared 46,XY men (n = 30) and 46,XX women (n = 29) to 46,XY individuals with CAIS (n = 21) on a mental rotation task using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Previously reported sex differences in neural activation during mental rotation were replicated in the control groups, with control men showing more activation in the inferior parietal lobe than control women. Individuals with CAIS showed a female-like neural activation pattern in the parietal lobe, indicating feminization of the brain in CAIS. Furthermore, this first neuroimaging study in individuals with CAIS provides evidence that sex differences in regional brain function during mental rotation are most likely not directly driven by genetic sex, but rather reflect gonadal hormone exposure. PMID:25452569

  1. Dgcr8 and Dicer are essential for sex chromosome integrity during meiosis in males

    PubMed Central

    Modzelewski, Andrew J.; Hilz, Stephanie; Crate, Elizabeth A.; Schweidenback, Caterina T. H.; Fogarty, Elizabeth A.; Grenier, Jennifer K.; Freire, Raimundo; Cohen, Paula E.; Grimson, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Small RNAs play crucial roles in regulating gene expression during mammalian meiosis. To investigate the function of microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) during meiosis in males, we generated germ-cell-specific conditional deletions of Dgcr8 and Dicer in mice. Analysis of spermatocytes from both conditional knockout lines revealed that there were frequent chromosomal fusions during meiosis, always involving one or both sex chromosomes. RNA sequencing indicates upregulation of Atm in spermatocytes from miRNA-deficient mice, and immunofluorescence imaging demonstrates an increased abundance of activated ATM kinase and mislocalization of phosphorylated MDC1, an ATM phosphorylation substrate. The Atm 3′UTR contains many potential microRNA target sites, and, notably, target sites for several miRNAs depleted in both conditional knockout mice were highly effective at promoting repression. RNF8, a telomere-associated protein whose localization is controlled by the MDC1–ATM kinase cascade, normally associates with the sex chromosomes during pachytene, but in both conditional knockouts redistributed to the autosomes. Taken together, these results suggest that Atm dysregulation in microRNA-deficient germ lines contributes to the redistribution of proteins involved in chromosomal stability from the sex chromosomes to the autosomes, resulting in sex chromosome fusions during meiotic prophase I. PMID:25934699

  2. Plasticity in the Meiotic Epigenetic Landscape of Sex Chromosomes in Caenorhabditis Species.

    PubMed

    Larson, Braden J; Van, Mike V; Nakayama, Taylor; Engebrecht, JoAnne

    2016-08-01

    During meiosis in the heterogametic sex in some species, sex chromosomes undergo meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), which results in acquisition of repressive chromatin and transcriptional silencing. In Caenorhabditis elegans, MSCI is mediated by MET-2 methyltransferase deposition of histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation. Here we examined the meiotic chromatin landscape in germ lines of four Caenorhabditis species; C. remanei and C. brenneri represent ancestral gonochorism, while C. briggsae and C. elegans are two lineages that independently evolved hermaphroditism. While MSCI is conserved across all four species, repressive chromatin modifications are distinct and do not correlate with reproductive mode. In contrast to C. elegans and C. remanei germ cells where X chromosomes are enriched for histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation, X chromosomes in C. briggsae and C. brenneri germ cells are enriched for histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation. Inactivation of C. briggsae MET-2 resulted in germ-line X chromosome transcription and checkpoint activation. Further, both histone H3 lysine 9 di- and trimethylation were reduced in Cbr-met-2 mutant germ lines, suggesting that in contrast to C. elegans, H3 lysine 9 di- and trimethylation are interdependent. C. briggsae H3 lysine 9 trimethylation was redistributed in the presence of asynapsed chromosomes in a sex-specific manner in the related process of meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin. However, these repressive marks did not influence X chromosome replication timing. Examination of additional Caenorhabditis species revealed diverse H3 lysine 9 methylation patterns on the X, suggesting that the sex chromosome epigenome evolves rapidly. PMID:27280692

  3. Detection of sex chromosomal aneuploidies X-X, Y-Y, and X-Y in human sperm using two-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Robbins, W.A. |; Pinkel, D.; Weier, H.U.; Mehraein, Y. |

    1994-10-15

    Sex chromosome aneuploidy is the most common numerical chromosomal abnormality in humans at birth and a substantial portion of these abnormalities involve paternal chromosomes. An efficient method is presented for using air-dried smears of human semen to detect the number of X and Y chromosomes in sperm chromatin using two-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization. Air-dried semen smears were pre-treated with dithiothreitol and 3,4-diiodosalicylate salt to decondense the sperm chromatin and then were hybridized with repetitive sequence DNA probes that had been generated by PCR and differentially labeled. Hybridizations with X and Y specific probes showed the expected ratio of 50%X:50%Y bearing sperm. Sperm carrying extra fluorescence domains representing disomy for the X or Y chromosomes occurred at frequencies of {approximately} 4 per 10,000 sperm each. Cells carrying both X and Y fluorescence domains occurred at a frequency of {approximately} 6/10,000. Thus, the overall frequency of sperm that carried an extra sex chromosome was 1.4/1,000. The frequencies of sperm carrying sex chromosome aneuploidies determined by hybridization did not differ statistically from those reported from the same laboratory using the human-sperm/hamster-egg cytogenetic technique. Multi-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization to sperm is a promising method for assessing sex-ratio alterations in human semen and for determining the fraction of sperm carrying sex or other chromosome aneuploidies which may be transmissible to offspring. 44 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  4. Sex chromosome loss and aging: In situ hybridization studies on human interphase nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Guttenbach, M.; Koschorz, B.; Bernthaler, U.

    1995-11-01

    A total of 1,000 lymphocyte interphase nuclei per proband from 90 females and 138 males age 1 wk to 93 years were analyzed by in situ hybridization for loss of the X and Y chromosomes, respectively. Both sex chromosomes showed an age-dependent loss. In males, Y hypoploidy was very low up to age 15 years (0.05%) but continuously increased to a frequency of 1.34% in men age 76-80 years. In females, the baseline level for X chromosome loss is much higher than that seen for the Y chromosome in males. Even prepubertal females show a rate of X chromosome loss on the order of 1.5%-2.5%, rising to {approximately}4.5%-5% in women older than 75 years. Dividing the female probands into three biological age groups on the basis of sex hormone function (<13 years, 13-51 years, and >51 years), a significant correlation of X chromosome loss versus age could clearly be demonstrated in women beyond age 51 years. Females age 51-91 years showed monosomy X at a rate from 3.2% to 5.1%. In contrast to sex chromosomal loss, the frequency of autosomal monosomies does not change during the course of aging: chromosome 1 and chromosome 17 monosomic cells were found with a constant incidence of 1.2% and 1%, respectively. These data also indicate that autosome loss in interphase nuclei is not a function of chromosome size. 34 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Differentiated ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes in Apareiodon ibitiensis (Teleostei, Parodontidae): cytotaxonomy and biogeography.

    PubMed

    Bellafronte, E; Vicari, M R; Artoni, R F; Margarido, V P; Moreira-Filho, O

    2009-12-01

    Conventional and molecular chromosomal analyses were carried out on three populations of Apareiodon ibitiensis sampled from the hydrographic basins of the São Francisco River and Upper Paraná River (Brazil). The results reveal a conserved diploid number (2n = 54 chromosomes), a karyotype formula consisting of 50 m-sm + 4st and a ZZ/ZW sex chromosome system that has not been previously identified for the species. C-banding analysis with propidium iodide staining revealed centromeric and terminal bands located in the chromosomes of the specimens from the three populations and allowed the identification of heteromorphism of heterochromatin regions in the Z and W chromosomes. The number of 18S sites located through fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) varied between the populations of the São Francisco and Upper Paraná Rivers. The location of 5S rDNA sites proved comparable in one pair of metacentric chromosomes. Thus, the present study proposes a ZZ/ZW sex chromosome system for A. ibitiensis among the Parodontidae, and a hypothesis is presented regarding possible W chromosome differentiation stages in this species through DNA accumulation, showing geographical variations for this characteristic, possibly as a consequence of geographical reproductive isolation. PMID:20738689

  6. A ZZ-ZW sex chromosome system in the finless eel Dalophis imberbis (Anguilliformes, Ophichtidae).

    PubMed

    Salvadori, S; Coluccia, E; Cannas, R; Cau, A; Deiana, A M

    2009-04-01

    The karyotype of the finless eel Dalophis imberbis was investigated by conventional (C and replication banding, CMA(3) fluorescence) and molecular (FISH with 45S rDNA probe) techniques. The diploid chromosome number was 2n = 46 and the karyotype consisted of four pairs of meta-submetacentric and 18 pairs of subtelo-acrocentric autosomes and a pair of sex chromosomes heteromorphic in females, composed by a large subtelocentric Z, and a medium sized acrocentric W chromosome; in males this pair was composed by two large subtelocentric ZZ chromosomes. Multiple NORs have been localized by FISH and have been found to be CMA(3) positive; one of the NORs was located on the W chromosome and it was found transcriptionally active by silver staining. The Z chromosome contained distinct intercalar C-positive heterochromatin and W was almost completely heterochromatic. Our report contributes to the knowledge to the cytotaxonomy of Anguilliformes where differentiated sex chromosomes are reported in about a quarter of the species: both male and female heterogamety as well as a multiple chromosome system have been reported. Moreover, this is the first anguilliform species in which multiple NORs have been reported. PMID:18500652

  7. Karyological characterization of the endemic Iberian rock lizard, Iberolacerta monticola (Squamata, Lacertidae): insights into sex chromosome evolution.

    PubMed

    Rojo, V; Giovannotti, M; Naveira, H; Nisi Cerioni, P; González-Tizón, A M; Caputo Barucchi, V; Galán, P; Olmo, E; Martínez-Lage, A

    2014-01-01

    Rock lizards of the genus Iberolacerta constitute a promising model to examine the process of sex chromosome evolution, as these closely related taxa exhibit remarkable diversity in the degree of sex chromosome differentiation with no clear phylogenetic segregation, ranging from cryptic to highly heteromorphic ZW chromosomes and even multiple chromosome systems (Z1Z1Z2Z2/Z1Z2W). To gain a deeper insight into the patterns of karyotype and sex chromosome evolution, we performed a cytogenetic analysis based on conventional staining, banding techniques and fluorescence in situ hybridization in the species I. monticola, for which previous cytogenetic investigations did not detect differentiated sex chromosomes. The karyotype is composed of 2n = 36 acrocentric chromosomes. NORs and the major ribosomal genes were located in the subtelomeric region of chromosome pair 6. Hybridization signals of the telomeric sequences (TTAGGG)n were visualized at the telomeres of all chromosomes and interstitially in 5 chromosome pairs. C-banding showed constitutive heterochromatin at the centromeres of all chromosomes, as well as clear pericentromeric and light telomeric C-bands in several chromosome pairs. These results highlight some chromosomal markers which can be useful to identify species-specific diagnostic characters, although they may not accurately reflect the phylogenetic relationships among the taxa. In addition, C-banding revealed the presence of a heteromorphic ZW sex chromosome pair, where W is smaller than Z and almost completely heterochromatic. This finding sheds light on sex chromosome evolution in the genus Iberolacerta and suggests that further comparative cytogenetic analyses are needed to understand the processes underlying the origin, differentiation and plasticity of sex chromosome systems in lacertid lizards. PMID:24296524

  8. The fate of W chromosomes in hybrids between wild silkmoths, Samia cynthia ssp.: no role in sex determination and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Yoshido, A; Marec, F; Sahara, K

    2016-05-01

    Moths and butterflies (Lepidoptera) have sex chromosome systems with female heterogamety (WZ/ZZ or derived variants). The maternally inherited W chromosome is known to determine female sex in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. However, little is known about the role of W chromosome in other lepidopteran species. Here we describe two forms of the W chromosome, W and neo-W, that are transmitted to both sexes in offspring of hybrids from reciprocal crosses between subspecies of wild silkmoths, Samia cynthia. We performed crosses between S. c. pryeri (2n=28, WZ/ZZ) and S. c. walkeri (2n=26, neo-Wneo-Z/neo-Zneo-Z) and examined fitness and sex chromosome constitution in their hybrids. The F1 hybrids of both reciprocal crosses had reduced fertility. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed not only the expected sex chromosome constitutions in the backcross and F2 hybrids of both sexes but also females without the W (or neo-W) chromosome and males carrying the W (or neo-W) chromosome. Furthermore, crosses between the F2 hybrids revealed no association between the presence or absence of W (or neo-W) chromosome and variations in the hatchability of their eggs. Our results clearly suggest that the W (or neo-W) chromosome of S. cynthia ssp. plays no role in sex determination and reproduction, and thus does not contribute to the formation of reproductive barriers between different subspecies. PMID:26758188

  9. Whole-genome sequence of a flatfish provides insights into ZW sex chromosome evolution and adaptation to a benthic lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Songlin; Zhang, Guojie; Shao, Changwei; Huang, Quanfei; Liu, Geng; Zhang, Pei; Song, Wentao; An, Na; Chalopin, Domitille; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Hong, Yunhan; Li, Qiye; Sha, Zhenxia; Zhou, Heling; Xie, Mingshu; Yu, Qiulin; Liu, Yang; Xiang, Hui; Wang, Na; Wu, Kui; Yang, Changgeng; Zhou, Qian; Liao, Xiaolin; Yang, Linfeng; Hu, Qiaomu; Zhang, Jilin; Meng, Liang; Jin, Lijun; Tian, Yongsheng; Lian, Jinmin; Yang, Jingfeng; Miao, Guidong; Liu, Shanshan; Liang, Zhuo; Yan, Fang; Li, Yangzhen; Sun, Bin; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Jing; Zhu, Ying; Du, Min; Zhao, Yongwei; Schartl, Manfred; Tang, Qisheng; Wang, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Genetic sex determination by W and Z chromosomes has developed independently in different groups of organisms. To better understand the evolution of sex chromosomes and the plasticity of sex-determination mechanisms, we sequenced the whole genomes of a male (ZZ) and a female (ZW) half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis). In addition to insights into adaptation to a benthic lifestyle, we find that the sex chromosomes of these fish are derived from the same ancestral vertebrate protochromosome as the avian W and Z chromosomes. Notably, the same gene on the Z chromosome, dmrt1, which is the male-determining gene in birds, showed convergent evolution of features that are compatible with a similar function in tongue sole. Comparison of the relatively young tongue sole sex chromosomes with those of mammals and birds identified events that occurred during the early phase of sex-chromosome evolution. Pertinent to the current debate about heterogametic sex-chromosome decay, we find that massive gene loss occurred in the wake of sex-chromosome 'birth'. PMID:24487278

  10. Instability of Multiple Sex Chromosomes Systems in Fish: The Case of Erythrinus erythrinus (Bloch & Schneider, 1801) (Characiformes, Erythrinidae).

    PubMed

    Bueno, Vanessa; Moresco, Rafaela Maria; Konerat, Jocicléia Thums; Moreira-Filho, Orlando; Margarido, Vladimir Pavan

    2016-02-01

    The fish species Erythrinus erythrinus belongs to the family Erythrinidae (order Characiformes, superorder Teleostei) and is considered a species complex because of the considerable differences between the karyotypes of analyzed populations. Whereas some populations present a sex chromosome system with male heterogamety, others do not show differentiated sex chromosomes. In this article, two novel karyotypes of E. erythrinus with the occurrence of male and female heterogamety are described, and a discussion of the stability of multiple sex chromosome systems is provided. A possible cause for sex chromosomes instability is that the Robertsonian rearrangements that originated the multiple systems did not prevent recombination with ancestral chromosomes, which also did not pass through a heterochromatinization process, the opposite of what usually happens with simple systems, especially of the ZZ/ZW or XX/XY type. It is suggested that multiple sex chromosome systems would not act as an effective postzygotic barrier, especially when there are hybridization zones between distinct karyomorphs that bear and that do not bear sex chromosome systems, allowing the generation of hybrids. This finding is important both for the comprehension of sex chromosomes evolution in fish and for conservation biology since the contact between populations with and without multiple sex chromosomes may compromise the regional biodiversity. PMID:26618235

  11. A retroposon-based view on the temporal differentiation of sex chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Retroposon presence/absence patterns in orthologous genomic loci are known to be strong and almost homoplasy-free phylogenetic markers of common ancestry. This is evidenced by the comprehensive reconstruction of various species trees of vertebrate lineages in recent years, as well as the inference of the evolution of genes via retroposon-based gene trees of paralogous genes. Recently, it has been shown that retroposon markers are also suitable for the inference of differentiation events of gametologous genes, i.e., homologous genes on opposite sex chromosomes. This is because sex chromosomes evolved via stepwise cessation of recombination, making the presence or absence of a particular retroposon insertion among the two different gametologs in more or less closely related species a clear-cut indicator of the timing of differentiation events. Here, I examine the advantages and current limitations of this novel perspective for understanding avian sex chromosome evolution, compare the retroposon-based and sequence-based insights into gametolog differentiation and show that retroposons promise to be equally applicable to other sex chromosomal systems, such as the human X and Y chromosomes. PMID:23061025

  12. The hierarchical relation between X-chromosomes and autosomal sex determining genes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Steinmann-Zwicky, Monica; Nöthiger, Rolf

    1985-01-01

    The classical balance concept of sex determination in Drosophila states that the X-chromosome carries dispersed female-determining factors. Besides, a number of autosomal genes are known that, when mutant, transform chromosomal females (XX) into pseudomales (tra), or intersexes (ix, dsx, dsxD). To test whether large duplications of the X-chromosome have a feminizing effect on the sexual phenotype of these mutants, we constructed flies that were mutant for ix, dsx, dsxD or tra and had two X-chromosomes plus either a distal or a proximal half of an X-chromosome. These or even smaller X-chromosomal fragments had a strong feminizing effect when added to triploid intersexes (XX; AAA). In the mutants, however, no shift towards femaleness was apparent. We conclude that enhancing the female determining signal is ineffective in flies that are mutant for an autosomal sex determining gene, and therefore, that these genes are under hierarchical control of the signal given by the X:A ratio. Parallels between sex-determining and homeotic genes are drawn. ImagesFig. 3. PMID:16453598

  13. Counseling parents before prenatal diagnosis: do we need to say more about the sex chromosome aneuploidies?

    PubMed

    Lalatta, Faustina; Tint, G Stephen

    2013-11-01

    Sex chromosome trisomies (SCT), an extra X chromosome in females (triple X, XXX), males with an extra X chromosome (Klinefelter syndrome, XXY) or an extra Y chromosome (XYY) occur because of errors during meiosis and are relatively frequent in humans. Their identification has never been the goal of prenatal diagnosis (PD) but they almost never escape detection by any of the methods commonly in use. Despite recommendations and guide-lines which emphasize the importance of structured counseling before and after PD, most women remain unaware that testing for serious genetic abnormalities is more likely to uncover these trisomies. With the increasing use of PD more and more prospective parents receive a diagnosis of sex chromosome trisomies and are faced with the dilemma of whether to terminate the pregnancy or to carry it to term. Despite the dramatic and emotionally devastating consequences of having to make such a decision, they have little opportunity to consider in advance the possible outcomes of such a pregnancy and, rather than relying on their own feelings and judgements, are forced to depend on the advice of counseling professionals who may or may not themselves be fully aware of what having an extra sex chromosome can mean to the development of a child. We address here the principles of reproductive autonomy together with an analysis of the major issues that ought to be discussed with the parents before a PD is carried out in order to minimize detrimental effects caused by this unexpected finding. PMID:24115600

  14. Postzygotic isolation involves strong mitochondrial and sex-specific effects in Tigriopus californicus, a species lacking heteromorphic sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Foley, B R; Rose, C G; Rundle, D E; Leong, W; Edmands, S

    2013-11-01

    Detailed studies of the genetics of speciation have focused on a few model systems, particularly Drosophila. The copepod Tigriopus californicus offers an alternative that differs from standard animal models in that it lacks heteromorphic chromosomes (instead, sex determination is polygenic) and has reduced opportunities for sexual conflict, because females mate only once. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping was conducted on reciprocal F2 hybrids between two strongly differentiated populations, using a saturated linkage map spanning all 12 autosomes and the mitochondrion. By comparing sexes, a possible sex ratio distorter was found but no sex chromosomes. Although studies of standard models often find an excess of hybrid male sterility factors, we found no QTL for sterility and multiple QTL for hybrid viability (indicated by non-Mendelian adult ratios) and other characters. Viability problems were found to be stronger in males, but the usual explanations for weaker hybrid males (sex chromosomes, sensitivity of spermatogenesis, sexual selection) cannot fully account for these male viability problems. Instead, higher metabolic rates may amplify deleterious effects in males. Although many studies of standard speciation models find the strongest genetic incompatibilities to be nuclear-nuclear (specifically X chromosome-autosome), we found the strongest deleterious interaction in this system was mito-nuclear. Consistent with the snowball theory of incompatibility accumulation, we found that trigenic interactions in this highly divergent cross were substantially more frequent (>6×) than digenic interactions. This alternative system thus allows important comparisons to studies of the genetics of reproductive isolation in more standard model systems. PMID:23860232

  15. Sex ratio in normal and disomic sperm: Evidence that the extra chromosome 21 preferentially segregates with the Y chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, D.K.; Millie, E.A.; Hassold, T.J. |

    1996-11-01

    In humans, deviations from a 1:1 male:female ratio have been identified in both chromosomally normal and trisomic live births: among normal newborns there is a slight excess of males, among trisomy 18 live borns a large excess of females, and among trisomy 21 live borns an excess of males. These differences could arise from differential production of or fertilization by Y- or X-bearing sperm or from selection against male or female conceptions. To examine the proportion of Y- and X- bearing sperm in normal sperm and in sperm disomic for chromosomes 18 or 21, we used three-color FISH (to the X and Y and either chromosome 18 or chromosome 21) to analyze > 300,000 sperm from 24 men. In apparently normal sperm, the sex ratio was nearly 1:1 (148,074 Y-bearing to 148,657 X-bearing sperm), and the value was not affected by the age of the donor. Certain of the donors, however, had significant excesses of Y- or X-bearing sperm. In disomy 18 sperm, there were virtually identical numbers of Y- and X-bearing sperm; thus, the excess of females in trisomy 18 presumably is due to selection against male trisomic conceptions. In contrast, we observed 69 Y-bearing and 44 X-bearing sperm disomic for chromosome 21. This is consistent with previous molecular studies, which have identified an excess of males among paternally derived cases of trisomy 21, and suggests that some of the excess of males among Down syndrome individuals is attributable to a nondisjunctional mechanism in which the extra chromosome 21 preferentially segregates with the Y chromosome. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. Evolutionary dynamics of Anolis sex chromosomes revealed by sequencing of flow sorting-derived microchromosome-specific DNA.

    PubMed

    Kichigin, Ilya G; Giovannotti, Massimo; Makunin, Alex I; Ng, Bee L; Kabilov, Marsel R; Tupikin, Alexey E; Barucchi, Vincenzo Caputo; Splendiani, Andrea; Ruggeri, Paolo; Rens, Willem; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Trifonov, Vladimir A

    2016-10-01

    Squamate reptiles show a striking diversity in modes of sex determination, including both genetic (XY or ZW) and temperature-dependent sex determination systems. The genomes of only a handful of species have been sequenced, analyzed and assembled including the genome of Anolis carolinensis. Despite a high genome coverage, only macrochromosomes of A. carolinensis were assembled whereas the content of most microchromosomes remained unclear. Most of the Anolis species have homomorphic XY sex chromosome system. However, some species have large heteromorphic XY chromosomes (e.g., A. sagrei) and even multiple sex chromosomes systems (e.g. A. pogus), that were shown to be derived from fusions of the ancestral XY with microautosomes. We applied next generation sequencing of flow sorting-derived chromosome-specific DNA pools to characterize the content and composition of microchromosomes in A. carolinensis and A. sagrei. Comparative analysis of sequenced chromosome-specific DNA pools revealed that the A. sagrei XY sex chromosomes contain regions homologous to several microautosomes of A. carolinensis. We suggest that the sex chromosomes of A. sagrei are derived by fusions of the ancestral sex chromosome with three microautosomes and subsequent loss of some genetic content on the Y chromosome. PMID:27431992

  17. Sex Chromosomes Regulate Nighttime Sleep Propensity during Recovery from Sleep Loss in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pinckney, Lennisha; Paul, Ketema N.

    2013-01-01

    Sex differences in spontaneous sleep amount are largely dependent on reproductive hormones; however, in mice some sex differences in sleep amount during the active phase are preserved after gonadectomy and may be driven by non-hormonal factors. In this study, we sought to determine whether or not these sex differences are driven by sex chromosome complement. Mice from the four core genotype (FCG) mouse model, whose sex chromosome complement (XY, XX) is independent of phenotype (male or female), were implanted with electroencephalographic (EEG) and electromyographic (EMG) electrodes for the recording of sleep-wake states and underwent a 24-hr baseline recording followed by six hours of forced wakefulness. During baseline conditions in mice whose gonads remained intact, males had more total sleep and non-rapid eye movement sleep than females during the active phase. Gonadectomized FCG mice exhibited no sex differences in rest-phase sleep amount; however, during the mid-active-phase (nighttime), XX males had more spontaneous non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep than XX females. The XY mice did not exhibit sex differences in sleep amount. Following forced wakefulness there was a change in the factors regulating sleep. XY females slept more during their mid-active phase siestas than XX females and had higher NREM slow wave activity, a measure of sleep propensity. These findings suggest that the process that regulates sleep propensity is sex-linked, and that sleep amount and sleep propensity are regulated differently in males and females following sleep loss. PMID:23658713

  18. An Asymmetric Chromosome Pair Undergoes Synaptic Adjustment and Crossover Redistribution During Caenorhabditis elegans Meiosis: Implications for Sex Chromosome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Henzel, Jonathan V.; Nabeshima, Kentaro; Schvarzstein, Mara; Turner, B. Elizabeth; Villeneuve, Anne M.; Hillers, Kenneth J.

    2011-01-01

    Heteromorphic sex chromosomes, such as the X/Y pair in mammals, differ in size and DNA sequence yet function as homologs during meiosis; this bivalent asymmetry presents special challenges for meiotic completion. In Caenorhabditis elegans males carrying mnT12, an X;IV fusion chromosome, mnT12 and IV form an asymmetric bivalent: chromosome IV sequences are capable of pairing and synapsis, while the contiguous X portion of mnT12 lacks a homologous pairing partner. Here, we investigate the meiotic behavior of this asymmetric neo-X/Y chromosome pair in C. elegans. Through immunolocalization of the axis component HIM-3, we demonstrate that the unpaired X axis has a distinct, coiled morphology while synapsed axes are linear and extended. By showing that loci at the fusion-proximal end of IV become unpaired while remaining synapsed as pachytene progresses, we directly demonstrate the occurrence of synaptic adjustment in this organism. We further demonstrate that meiotic crossover distribution is markedly altered in males with the asymmetric mnT12/+ bivalent relative to controls, resulting in greatly reduced crossover formation near the X;IV fusion point and elevated crossovers at the distal end of the bivalent. In effect, the distal end of the bivalent acts as a neo-pseudoautosomal region in these males. We discuss implications of these findings for mechanisms that ensure crossover formation during meiosis. Furthermore, we propose that redistribution of crossovers triggered by bivalent asymmetry may be an important driving force in sex chromosome evolution. PMID:21212235

  19. The Amylase gene cluster on the evolving sex chromosomes of Drosophila miranda.

    PubMed

    Steinemann, S; Steinemann, M

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of chromosomal homology, the Amylase gene cluster in Drosophila miranda must be located on the secondary sex chromosome pair, neo-X (X2) and neo-Y, but is autosomally inherited in all other Drosophila species. Genetic evidence indicates no active amylase on the neo-Y chromosome and the X2-chromosomal locus already shows dosage compensation. Several lines of evidence strongly suggest that the Amy gene cluster has been lost already from the evolving neo-Y chromosome. This finding shows that a relatively new neo-Y chromosome can start to lose genes and hence gradually lose homology with the neo-X. The X2-chromosomal Amy1 is intact and Amy2 contains a complete coding sequence, but has a deletion in the 3'-flanking region. Amy3 is structurally eroded and hampered by missing regulatory motifs. Functional analysis of the X2-chromosomal Amy1 and Amy2 regions from D. miranda in transgenic D. melanogaster flies reveals ectopic AMY1 expression. AMY1 shows the same electrophoretic mobility as the single amylase band in D. miranda, while ectopic AMY2 expression is characterized by a different mobility. Therefore, only the Amy1 gene of the resident Amy cluster remains functional and hence Amy1 is the dosage compensated gene. PMID:9872956

  20. Postzygotic isolation involves strong mitochondrial and sex-specific effects in Tigriopus californicus, a species lacking heteromorphic sex chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Foley, B R; Rose, C G; Rundle, D E; Leong, W; Edmands, S

    2013-01-01

    Detailed studies of the genetics of speciation have focused on a few model systems, particularly Drosophila. The copepod Tigriopus californicus offers an alternative that differs from standard animal models in that it lacks heteromorphic chromosomes (instead, sex determination is polygenic) and has reduced opportunities for sexual conflict, because females mate only once. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping was conducted on reciprocal F2 hybrids between two strongly differentiated populations, using a saturated linkage map spanning all 12 autosomes and the mitochondrion. By comparing sexes, a possible sex ratio distorter was found but no sex chromosomes. Although studies of standard models often find an excess of hybrid male sterility factors, we found no QTL for sterility and multiple QTL for hybrid viability (indicated by non-Mendelian adult ratios) and other characters. Viability problems were found to be stronger in males, but the usual explanations for weaker hybrid males (sex chromosomes, sensitivity of spermatogenesis, sexual selection) cannot fully account for these male viability problems. Instead, higher metabolic rates may amplify deleterious effects in males. Although many studies of standard speciation models find the strongest genetic incompatibilities to be nuclear–nuclear (specifically X chromosome–autosome), we found the strongest deleterious interaction in this system was mito–nuclear. Consistent with the snowball theory of incompatibility accumulation, we found that trigenic interactions in this highly divergent cross were substantially more frequent (>6 × ) than digenic interactions. This alternative system thus allows important comparisons to studies of the genetics of reproductive isolation in more standard model systems. PMID:23860232

  1. Lack of global meiotic sex chromosome inactivation, and paucity of tissue-specific gene expression on the Drosophila X chromosome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Paucity of male-biased genes on the Drosophila X chromosome is a well-established phenomenon, thought to be specifically linked to the role of these genes in reproduction and/or their expression in the meiotic male germline. In particular, meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) has been widely considered a driving force behind depletion of spermatocyte-biased X-linked genes in Drosophila by analogy with mammals, even though the existence of global MCSI in Drosophila has not been proven. Results Microarray-based study and qRT-PCR analyses show that the dynamics of gene expression during testis development are very similar between X-linked and autosomal genes, with both showing transcriptional activation concomitant with meiosis. However, the genes showing at least ten-fold expression bias toward testis are significantly underrepresented on the X chromosome. Intriguingly, the genes with similar expression bias toward tissues other than testis, even those not apparently associated with reproduction, are also strongly underrepresented on the X. Bioinformatics analysis shows that while tissue-specific genes often bind silencing-associated factors in embryonic and cultured cells, this trend is less prominent for the X-linked genes. Conclusions Our data show that the global meiotic inactivation of the X chromosome does not occur in Drosophila. Paucity of testis-biased genes on the X appears not to be linked to reproduction or germline-specific events, but rather reflects a general underrepresentation of tissue-biased genes on this chromosome. Our analyses suggest that the activation/repression switch mechanisms that probably orchestrate the highly-biased expression of tissue-specific genes are generally not efficient on the X chromosome. This effect, probably caused by dosage compensation counteracting repression of the X-linked genes, may be the cause of the exodus of highly tissue-biased genes to the autosomes. PMID:21542906

  2. Unraveling the Sex Chromosome Heteromorphism of the Paradoxical Frog Pseudis tocantins.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Kaleb Pretto; Busin, Carmen Silvia; Lourenço, Luciana Bolsoni

    2016-01-01

    The paradoxical frog Pseudis tocantins is the only species in the Hylidae family with known heteromorphic Z and W sex chromosomes. The Z chromosome is metacentric and presents an interstitial nucleolar organizer region (NOR) on the long arm that is adjacent to a pericentromeric heterochromatic band. In contrast, the submetacentric W chromosome carries a pericentromeric NOR on the long arm, which is adjacent to a clearly evident heterochromatic band that is larger than the band found on the Z chromosome and justify the size difference observed between these chromosomes. Here, we provide evidence that the non-centromeric heterochromatic bands in Zq and Wq differ not only in size and location but also in composition, based on comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and an analysis of the anuran PcP190 satellite DNA. The finding of PcP190 sequences in P. tocantins extends the presence of this satellite DNA, which was previously detected among Leptodactylidae and Hylodidae, suggesting that this family of repetitive DNA is even older than it was formerly considered. Seven groups of PcP190 sequences were recognized in the genome of P. tocantins. PcP190 probes mapped to the heterochromatic band in Wq, and a Southern blot analysis indicated the accumulation of PcP190 in the female genome of P. tocantins, which suggests the involvement of this satellite DNA in the evolution of the sex chromosomes of this species. PMID:27214234

  3. Unraveling the Sex Chromosome Heteromorphism of the Paradoxical Frog Pseudis tocantins

    PubMed Central

    Gatto, Kaleb Pretto; Busin, Carmen Silvia; Lourenço, Luciana Bolsoni

    2016-01-01

    The paradoxical frog Pseudis tocantins is the only species in the Hylidae family with known heteromorphic Z and W sex chromosomes. The Z chromosome is metacentric and presents an interstitial nucleolar organizer region (NOR) on the long arm that is adjacent to a pericentromeric heterochromatic band. In contrast, the submetacentric W chromosome carries a pericentromeric NOR on the long arm, which is adjacent to a clearly evident heterochromatic band that is larger than the band found on the Z chromosome and justify the size difference observed between these chromosomes. Here, we provide evidence that the non-centromeric heterochromatic bands in Zq and Wq differ not only in size and location but also in composition, based on comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and an analysis of the anuran PcP190 satellite DNA. The finding of PcP190 sequences in P. tocantins extends the presence of this satellite DNA, which was previously detected among Leptodactylidae and Hylodidae, suggesting that this family of repetitive DNA is even older than it was formerly considered. Seven groups of PcP190 sequences were recognized in the genome of P. tocantins. PcP190 probes mapped to the heterochromatic band in Wq, and a Southern blot analysis indicated the accumulation of PcP190 in the female genome of P. tocantins, which suggests the involvement of this satellite DNA in the evolution of the sex chromosomes of this species. PMID:27214234

  4. Sex-biased gene expression and evolution of the x chromosome in nematodes.

    PubMed

    Albritton, Sarah Elizabeth; Kranz, Anna-Lena; Rao, Prashant; Kramer, Maxwell; Dieterich, Christoph; Ercan, Sevinç

    2014-07-01

    Studies of X chromosome evolution in various organisms have indicated that sex-biased genes are nonrandomly distributed between the X and autosomes. Here, to extend these studies to nematodes, we annotated and analyzed X chromosome gene content in four Caenorhabditis species and in Pristionchus pacificus. Our gene expression analyses comparing young adult male and female mRNA-seq data indicate that, in general, nematode X chromosomes are enriched for genes with high female-biased expression and depleted of genes with high male-biased expression. Genes with low sex-biased expression do not show the same trend of X chromosome enrichment and depletion. Combined with the observation that highly sex-biased genes are primarily expressed in the gonad, differential distribution of sex-biased genes reflects differences in evolutionary pressures linked to tissue-specific regulation of X chromosome transcription. Our data also indicate that X dosage imbalance between males (XO) and females (XX) is influential in shaping both expression and gene content of the X chromosome. Predicted upregulation of the single male X to match autosomal transcription (Ohno's hypothesis) is supported by our observation that overall transcript levels from the X and autosomes are similar for highly expressed genes. However, comparison of differentially located one-to-one orthologs between C. elegans and P. pacificus indicates lower expression of X-linked orthologs, arguing against X upregulation. These contradicting observations may be reconciled if X upregulation is not a global mechanism but instead acts locally on a subset of tissues and X-linked genes that are dosage sensitive. PMID:24793291

  5. Sex-Biased Gene Expression and Evolution of the X Chromosome in Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Albritton, Sarah Elizabeth; Kranz, Anna-Lena; Rao, Prashant; Kramer, Maxwell; Dieterich, Christoph; Ercan, Sevinç

    2014-01-01

    Studies of X chromosome evolution in various organisms have indicated that sex-biased genes are nonrandomly distributed between the X and autosomes. Here, to extend these studies to nematodes, we annotated and analyzed X chromosome gene content in four Caenorhabditis species and in Pristionchus pacificus. Our gene expression analyses comparing young adult male and female mRNA-seq data indicate that, in general, nematode X chromosomes are enriched for genes with high female-biased expression and depleted of genes with high male-biased expression. Genes with low sex-biased expression do not show the same trend of X chromosome enrichment and depletion. Combined with the observation that highly sex-biased genes are primarily expressed in the gonad, differential distribution of sex-biased genes reflects differences in evolutionary pressures linked to tissue-specific regulation of X chromosome transcription. Our data also indicate that X dosage imbalance between males (XO) and females (XX) is influential in shaping both expression and gene content of the X chromosome. Predicted upregulation of the single male X to match autosomal transcription (Ohno’s hypothesis) is supported by our observation that overall transcript levels from the X and autosomes are similar for highly expressed genes. However, comparison of differentially located one-to-one orthologs between C. elegans and P. pacificus indicates lower expression of X-linked orthologs, arguing against X upregulation. These contradicting observations may be reconciled if X upregulation is not a global mechanism but instead acts locally on a subset of tissues and X-linked genes that are dosage sensitive. PMID:24793291

  6. Genome structure and emerging evidence of an incipient sex chromosome in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Tongming; DiFazio, Stephen P; Gunter, Lee E; Zhang, Xinye; Sewell, Mitchell; Woolbright, Dr. Scott; Allan, Dr. Gery; Kelleher, Colin; Douglas, Carl; Wang, Prof. Mingxiu; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2008-01-01

    The genus Populus consists of dioecious woody species with largely unknown genetic mechanisms for gender determination. We have discovered genetic and genomic features in the peritelomeric region of chromosome XIX that suggest this region of the Populus genome is in the process of developing characteristics of a sex chromosome. We have identified a gender-associated locus that consistently maps to this region. Furthermore, comparison of genetic maps across multiple Populus families reveals consistently distorted segregation within this region. We have intensively characterized this region using an F1 interspecific cross involving the female genotype that was used for genome sequencing. This region shows suppressed recombination and high divergence between the alternate haplotypes, as revealed by dense map-based genome assembly using microsatellite markers. The suppressed recombination, distorted segregation, and haplotype divergence were observed only for the maternal parent in this cross. Furthermore, the progeny of this cross showed a strongly male-biased sex ratio, in agreement with Haldane's rule that postulates that the heterogametic sex is more likely to be absent, rare, or sterile in interspecific crosses. Together, these results support the role of chromosome XIX in sex determination and suggest that sex determination in Populus occurs through a ZW system in which the female is the heterogametic gender.

  7. Genome structure and emerging evidence of an incipient sex chromosome in Populus

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Tongming; DiFazio, Stephen P.; Gunter, Lee E.; Zhang, Xinye; Sewell, Michell M.; Woolbright, Scott A.; Allan, Gery J.; Kelleher, Collin T.; Douglas, Carl J.; Wang, Mingxiu; Tuskan, Gerald A.

    2008-01-01

    The genus Populus consists of dioecious woody species with largely unknown genetic mechanisms for gender determination. We have discovered genetic and genomic features in the peritelomeric region of chromosome XIX that suggest this region of the Populus genome is in the process of developing characteristics of a sex chromosome. We have identified a gender-associated locus that consistently maps to this region. Furthermore, comparison of genetic maps across multiple Populus families reveals consistently distorted segregation within this region. We have intensively characterized this region using an F1 interspecific cross involving the female genotype that was used for genome sequencing. This region shows suppressed recombination and high divergence between the alternate haplotypes, as revealed by dense map-based genome assembly using microsatellite markers. The suppressed recombination, distorted segregation, and haplotype divergence were observed only for the maternal parent in this cross. Furthermore, the progeny of this cross showed a strongly male-biased sex ratio, in agreement with Haldane’s rule that postulates that the heterogametic sex is more likely to be absent, rare, or sterile in interspecific crosses. Together, these results support the role of chromosome XIX in sex determination and suggest that sex determination in Populus occurs through a ZW system in which the female is the heterogametic gender. PMID:18256239

  8. Sex-specific Trans-regulatory Variation on the Drosophila melanogaster X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Stocks, Michael; Dean, Rebecca; Rogell, Björn; Friberg, Urban

    2015-01-01

    The X chromosome constitutes a unique genomic environment because it is present in one copy in males, but two copies in females. This simple fact has motivated several theoretical predictions with respect to how standing genetic variation on the X chromosome should differ from the autosomes. Unmasked expression of deleterious mutations in males and a lower census size are expected to reduce variation, while allelic variants with sexually antagonistic effects, and potentially those with a sex-specific effect, could accumulate on the X chromosome and contribute to increased genetic variation. In addition, incomplete dosage compensation of the X chromosome could potentially dampen the male-specific effects of random mutations, and promote the accumulation of X-linked alleles with sexually dimorphic phenotypic effects. Here we test both the amount and the type of genetic variation on the X chromosome within a population of Drosophila melanogaster, by comparing the proportion of X linked and autosomal trans-regulatory SNPs with a sexually concordant and discordant effect on gene expression. We find that the X chromosome is depleted for SNPs with a sexually concordant effect, but hosts comparatively more SNPs with a sexually discordant effect. Interestingly, the contrasting results for SNPs with sexually concordant and discordant effects are driven by SNPs with a larger influence on expression in females than expression in males. Furthermore, the distribution of these SNPs is shifted towards regions where dosage compensation is predicted to be less complete. These results suggest that intrinsic properties of dosage compensation influence either the accumulation of different types of trans-factors and/or their propensity to accumulate mutations. Our findings document a potential mechanistic basis for sex-specific genetic variation, and identify the X as a reservoir for sexually dimorphic phenotypic variation. These results have general implications for X chromosome

  9. Sex chromosomes and male ornaments: a comparative evaluation in ray-finned fishes

    PubMed Central

    Mank, Judith E; Hall, David W; Kirkpatrick, Mark; Avise, John C

    2005-01-01

    Theory predicts that the mechanism of genetic sex determination can substantially influence the evolution of sexually selected traits. For example, female heterogamety (ZZ/ZW) can favour the evolution of extreme male traits under Fisher's runaway model of sexual selection. We empirically test whether the genetic system of sex determination has played a role in the evolution of exaggerated male ornaments in actinopterygiian fishes, a clade in which both female-heterogametic and male-heterogametic systems of sex determination have evolved multiple times. Using comparative methods both uncorrected and corrected for phylogenetic non-independence, we detected no significant correlation between sex-chromosome systems and sexually selected traits in males. Results suggest that sex-determination mechanism is at best a relatively minor factor affecting the outcomes of sexual selection in ray-finned fishes. PMID:16555792

  10. Rearrangement hotspots in the sex chromosome of the Palearctic black fly Simulium bergi (Diptera, Simuliidae)

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Peter H.; Yildirim, Alparslan; Onder, Zuhal; Tasci, G. Taskin; Duzlu, Onder; Arslan, M. Ozkan; Ciloglu, Arif; Sari, Baris; Parmaksizoglu, Nilgun; Inci, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Abstract An extreme example of nonrandom rearrangements, especially inversion breaks, is described in the polytene chromosomes of the black fly Simulium bergi Rubtsov, 1956 from Armenia and Turkey. A total of 48 rearrangements was discovered, relative to the standard banding sequence for the subgenus Simulium Latreille, 1802. One rearrangement, an inversion (IIS-C) in the short arm of the second chromosome, was fixed. Six (12.5%) of the rearrangements were autosomal polymorphisms, and the remaining 41 (85.4%) were sex linked. More than 40 X- and Y-linked rearrangements, predominantly inversions, were clustered in the long arm of the second chromosome (IIL), representing about 15% of the total complement. The pattern conforms to a nonrandom model of chromosome breakage, perhaps associated with an underlying molecular mechanism. PMID:27551350

  11. Sex Chromosome-wide Transcriptional Suppression and Compensatory Cis-Regulatory Evolution Mediate Gene Expression in the Drosophila Male Germline.

    PubMed

    Landeen, Emily L; Muirhead, Christina A; Wright, Lori; Meiklejohn, Colin D; Presgraves, Daven C

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes has repeatedly resulted in the evolution of sex chromosome-specific forms of regulation, including sex chromosome dosage compensation in the soma and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in the germline. In the male germline of Drosophila melanogaster, a novel but poorly understood form of sex chromosome-specific transcriptional regulation occurs that is distinct from canonical sex chromosome dosage compensation or meiotic inactivation. Previous work shows that expression of reporter genes driven by testis-specific promoters is considerably lower-approximately 3-fold or more-for transgenes inserted into X chromosome versus autosome locations. Here we characterize this transcriptional suppression of X-linked genes in the male germline and its evolutionary consequences. Using transgenes and transpositions, we show that most endogenous X-linked genes, not just testis-specific ones, are transcriptionally suppressed several-fold specifically in the Drosophila male germline. In wild-type testes, this sex chromosome-wide transcriptional suppression is generally undetectable, being effectively compensated by the gene-by-gene evolutionary recruitment of strong promoters on the X chromosome. We identify and experimentally validate a promoter element sequence motif that is enriched upstream of the transcription start sites of hundreds of testis-expressed genes; evolutionarily conserved across species; associated with strong gene expression levels in testes; and overrepresented on the X chromosome. These findings show that the expression of X-linked genes in the Drosophila testes reflects a balance between chromosome-wide epigenetic transcriptional suppression and long-term compensatory adaptation by sex-linked genes. Our results have broad implications for the evolution of gene expression in the Drosophila male germline and for genome evolution. PMID:27404402

  12. Sex Chromosome-wide Transcriptional Suppression and Compensatory Cis-Regulatory Evolution Mediate Gene Expression in the Drosophila Male Germline

    PubMed Central

    Landeen, Emily L.; Muirhead, Christina A.; Meiklejohn, Colin D.; Presgraves, Daven C.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes has repeatedly resulted in the evolution of sex chromosome-specific forms of regulation, including sex chromosome dosage compensation in the soma and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in the germline. In the male germline of Drosophila melanogaster, a novel but poorly understood form of sex chromosome-specific transcriptional regulation occurs that is distinct from canonical sex chromosome dosage compensation or meiotic inactivation. Previous work shows that expression of reporter genes driven by testis-specific promoters is considerably lower—approximately 3-fold or more—for transgenes inserted into X chromosome versus autosome locations. Here we characterize this transcriptional suppression of X-linked genes in the male germline and its evolutionary consequences. Using transgenes and transpositions, we show that most endogenous X-linked genes, not just testis-specific ones, are transcriptionally suppressed several-fold specifically in the Drosophila male germline. In wild-type testes, this sex chromosome-wide transcriptional suppression is generally undetectable, being effectively compensated by the gene-by-gene evolutionary recruitment of strong promoters on the X chromosome. We identify and experimentally validate a promoter element sequence motif that is enriched upstream of the transcription start sites of hundreds of testis-expressed genes; evolutionarily conserved across species; associated with strong gene expression levels in testes; and overrepresented on the X chromosome. These findings show that the expression of X-linked genes in the Drosophila testes reflects a balance between chromosome-wide epigenetic transcriptional suppression and long-term compensatory adaptation by sex-linked genes. Our results have broad implications for the evolution of gene expression in the Drosophila male germline and for genome evolution. PMID:27404402

  13. Dosage Effects of X and Y Chromosomes on Language and Social Functioning in Children with Supernumerary Sex Chromosome Aneuploidies: Implications for Idiopathic Language Impairment and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Nancy Raitano; Wallace, Gregory L.; Adeyemi, Elizabeth I.; Lopez, Katherine C.; Blumenthal, Jonathan D.; Clasen, Liv S.; Giedd, Jay N.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Supernumerary sex chromosome aneuploidies (X/Y-aneuploidies), the presence of extra X and/or Y chromosomes, are associated with heightened rates of language impairments and social difficulties. However, no single study has examined different language domains and social functioning in the same sample of children with tri-, tetra-, and…

  14. The role of sex chromosomes in mammalian germ cell differentiation: can the germ cells carrying X and Y chromosomes differentiate into fertile oocytes?

    PubMed Central

    Taketo, Teruko

    2015-01-01

    The sexual differentiation of germ cells into spermatozoa or oocytes is strictly regulated by their gonadal environment, testis or ovary, which is determined by the presence or absence of the Y chromosome, respectively. Hence, in normal mammalian development, male germ cells differentiate in the presence of X and Y chromosomes, and female germ cells do so in the presence of two X chromosomes. However, gonadal sex reversal occurs in humans as well as in other mammalian species, and the resultant XX males and XY females can lead healthy lives, except for a complete or partial loss of fertility. Germ cells carrying an abnormal set of sex chromosomes are efficiently eliminated by multilayered surveillance mechanisms in the testis, and also, though more variably, in the ovary. Studying the molecular basis for sex-specific responses to a set of sex chromosomes during gametogenesis will promote our understanding of meiotic processes contributing to the evolution of sex determining mechanisms. This review discusses the fate of germ cells carrying various sex chromosomal compositions in mouse models, the limitation of which may be overcome by recent successes in the differentiation of functional germ cells from embryonic stem cells under experimental conditions. PMID:25578929

  15. Evolution of sex chromosomes prior to speciation in the dioecious Phoenix species.

    PubMed

    Cherif, E; Zehdi-Azouzi, S; Crabos, A; Castillo, K; Chabrillange, N; Pintaud, J-C; Salhi-Hannachi, A; Glémin, S; Aberlenc-Bertossi, F

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the driving forces and molecular processes underlying dioecy and sex chromosome evolution, leading from hermaphroditism to the occurrence of male and female individuals, is of considerable interest in fundamental and applied research. The genus Phoenix, belonging to the Arecaceae family, consists uniquely of dioecious species. Phylogenetic data suggest that the genus Phoenix has diverged from a hermaphroditic ancestor which is also shared with its closest relatives. We have investigated the cessation of recombination in the sex-determination region within the genus Phoenix as a whole by extending the analysis of P. dactylifera SSR sex-related loci to eight other species within the genus. Phylogenetic analysis of a date palm sex-linked PdMYB1 gene in these species has revealed that sex-linked alleles have not clustered in a species-dependent way but rather in X and Y-allele clusters. Our data show that sex chromosomes evolved from a common autosomal origin before the diversification of the extant dioecious species. PMID:27118680

  16. The Sex Chromosome Trisomy mouse model of XXY and XYY: metabolism and motor performance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Klinefelter syndrome (KS), caused by XXY karyotype, is characterized by low testosterone, infertility, cognitive deficits, and increased prevalence of health problems including obesity and diabetes. It has been difficult to separate direct genetic effects from hormonal effects in human studies or in mouse models of KS because low testosterone levels are confounded with sex chromosome complement. Methods In this study, we present the Sex Chromosome Trisomy (SCT) mouse model that produces XXY, XYY, XY, and XX mice in the same litters, each genotype with either testes or ovaries. The independence of sex chromosome complement and gonadal type allows for improved recognition of sex chromosome effects that are not dependent on levels of gonadal hormones. All mice were gonadectomized and treated with testosterone for 3 weeks. Body weight, body composition, and motor function were measured. Results Before hormonal manipulation, XXY mice of both sexes had significantly greater body weight and relative fat mass compared to XY mice. After gonadectomy and testosterone replacement, XXY mice (both sexes) still had significantly greater body weight and relative fat mass, but less relative lean mass compared to XY mice. Liver, gonadal fat pad, and inguinal fat pad weights were also higher in XXY mice, independent of gonadal sex. In several of these measures, XX mice also differed from XY mice, and gonadal males and females differed significantly on almost every metabolic measure. The sex chromosome effects (except for testis size) were also seen in gonadally female mice before and after ovariectomy and testosterone treatment, indicating that they do not reflect group differences in levels of testicular secretions. XYY mice were similar to XY mice on body weight and metabolic variables but performed worse on motor tasks compared to other groups. Conclusions We find that the new SCT mouse model for XXY and XYY recapitulates features found in humans with these aneuploidies

  17. Sex, rebellion and decadence: the scandalous evolutionary history of the human Y chromosome.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Costa, Paulo

    2012-12-01

    It can be argued that the Y chromosome brings some of the spirit of rock&roll to our genome. Equal parts degenerate and sex-driven, the Y has boldly rebelled against sexual recombination, one of the sacred pillars of evolution. In evolutionary terms this chromosome also seems to have adopted another of rock&roll's mottos: living fast. Yet, it appears to have refused to die young. In this manuscript the Y chromosome will be analyzed from the intersection between structural, evolutionary and functional biology. Such integrative approach will present the Y as a highly specialized product of a series of remarkable evolutionary processes. These led to the establishment of a sex-specific genomic niche that is maintained by a complex balance between selective pressure and the genetic diversity introduced by intrachromosomal recombination. Central to this equilibrium is the "polish or perish" dilemma faced by the male-specific Y genes: either they are polished by the acquisition of male-related functions or they perish via the accumulation of inactivating mutations. Thus, understanding to what extent the idiosyncrasies of Y recombination may impact this chromosome's role in sex determination and male germline functions should be regarded as essential for added clinical insight into several male infertility phenotypes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Molecular Genetics of Human Reproductive Failure. PMID:22542510

  18. Effect of separating bull semen into X and Y chromosome-bearing fractions on the sex ratio of resulting embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Hagele, W C; Hare, W C; Singh, E L; Grylls, J L; Abt, D A

    1984-01-01

    Seventy-six, day 12 to day 15 bovine embryos, collected from 14 donors which had been inseminated with either X or Y chromosome-bearing spermatozoa fractions of semen separated by a thermal convection counterstreaming sedimentation and forced convection galvanization process, were processed for sexing by chromosomal analysis. Fifty-seven embryos were sexed; 20 from Y chromosome-bearing and 37 from X chromosome-bearing fractions of semen. Statistical analysis of the sexing data indicated that there was no significant difference in the male: female ratio for donors receiving male fractions compared to those receiving female fractions. The Y chromosome-bearing fractions produced a male: female ratio that was indistinguishable from the expected 1:1 ratio. However, the X chromosome-bearing fractions of semen produced a highly significant deviation from the expected 1:1 ratio towards the male. PMID:6478299

  19. Effect of separating bull semen into X and Y chromosome-bearing fractions on the sex ratio of resulting embryos.

    PubMed

    Hagele, W C; Hare, W C; Singh, E L; Grylls, J L; Abt, D A

    1984-07-01

    Seventy-six, day 12 to day 15 bovine embryos, collected from 14 donors which had been inseminated with either X or Y chromosome-bearing spermatozoa fractions of semen separated by a thermal convection counterstreaming sedimentation and forced convection galvanization process, were processed for sexing by chromosomal analysis. Fifty-seven embryos were sexed; 20 from Y chromosome-bearing and 37 from X chromosome-bearing fractions of semen. Statistical analysis of the sexing data indicated that there was no significant difference in the male: female ratio for donors receiving male fractions compared to those receiving female fractions. The Y chromosome-bearing fractions produced a male: female ratio that was indistinguishable from the expected 1:1 ratio. However, the X chromosome-bearing fractions of semen produced a highly significant deviation from the expected 1:1 ratio towards the male. PMID:6478299

  20. Platypus chain reaction: directional and ordered meiotic pairing of the multiple sex chromosome chain in Ornithorhynchus anatinus.

    PubMed

    Daish, Tasman; Casey, Aaron; Grützner, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Monotremes are phylogenetically and phenotypically unique animals with an unusually complex sex chromosome system that is composed of ten chromosomes in platypus and nine in echidna. These chromosomes are alternately linked (X1Y1, X2Y2, ...) at meiosis via pseudoautosomal regions and segregate to form spermatozoa containing either X or Y chromosomes. The physical and epigenetic mechanisms involved in pairing and assembly of the complex sex chromosome chain in early meiotic prophase I are completely unknown. We have analysed the pairing dynamics of specific sex chromosome pseudoautosomal regions in platypus spermatocytes during prophase of meiosis I. Our data show a highly coordinated pairing process that begins at the terminal Y5 chromosome and completes with the union of sex chromosomes X1Y1. The consistency of this ordered assembly of the chain is remarkable and raises questions about the mechanisms and factors that regulate the differential pairing of sex chromosomes and how this relates to potential meiotic silencing mechanisms and alternate segregation. PMID:19874721

  1. Laser microdissection-based analysis of the Y sex chromosome of the Antarctic fish Chionodraco hamatus (Notothenioidei, Channichthyidae)

    PubMed Central

    Cocca, Ennio; Petraccioli, Agnese; Morescalchi, Maria Alessandra; Odierna, Gaetano; Capriglione, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Microdissection, DOP-PCR amplification and microcloning were used to study the large Y chromosome of Chionodraco hamatus, an Antarctic fish belonging to the Notothenioidei, the dominant component of the Southern Ocean fauna. The species has evolved a multiple sex chromosome system with digametic males showing an X1YX2 karyotype and females an X1X1X2X2 karyotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization, performed with a painting probe made from microdissected Y chromosomes, allowed a deeper insight on the chromosomal rearrangement, which underpinned the fusion event that generated the Y. Then, we used a DNA library established by microdissection and microcloning of the whole Y chromosome of Chionodraco hamatus for searching sex-linked sequences. One clone provided preliminary information on the presence on the Y chromosome of the CHD1 gene homologue, which is sex-linked in birds but in no other vertebrates. Several clones from the Y-chromosome mini-library contained microsatellites and transposable elements, one of which mapped to the q arm putative fusion region of the Y chromosome. The findings confirm that interspersed repetitive sequences might have fostered chromosome rearrangements and the emergence of the Y chromosome in Chionodraco hamatus. Detection of the CHD1 gene in the Y sex-determining region could be a classical example of convergent evolution in action. PMID:25893071

  2. A Role for the X Chromosome in Sex Differences in Variability in General Intelligence?

    PubMed

    Johnson, Wendy; Carothers, Andrew; Deary, Ian J

    2009-11-01

    There is substantial evidence that males are more variable than females in general intelligence. In recent years, researchers have presented this as a reason that, although there is little, if any, mean sex difference in general intelligence, males tend to be overrepresented at both ends of its overall distribution. Part of the explanation could be the presence of genes on the X chromosome related both to syndromal disorders involving mental retardation and to population variation in general intelligence occurring normally. Genes on the X chromosome appear overrepresented among genes with known involvement in mental retardation, which is consistent with a model we developed of the population distribution of general intelligence as a mixture of two normal distributions. Using this model, we explored the expected ratios of males to females at various points in the distribution and estimated the proportion of variance in general intelligence potentially due to genes on the X chromosome. These estimates provide clues to the extent to which biologically based sex differences could be manifested in the environment as sex differences in displayed intellectual abilities. We discuss these observations in the context of sex differences in specific cognitive abilities and evolutionary theories of sexual selection. PMID:26161735

  3. Stroke sensitivity in the aged: sex chromosome complement vs. gonadal hormones

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Louise D.; Mirza, Mehwish A.; Xu, Yan; Bentivegna, Kathryn; Steffens, Eleanor B.; Ritzel, Rodney; Liu, Fudong

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a sexually dimorphic disease. Elderly women not only have higher stroke incidence than age-matched men, but also have poorer recovery and higher morbidity and mortality after stroke. In older, post-menopausal women, gonadal hormone levels are similar to that of men. This suggests that tissue damage and functional outcomes are influenced by biologic sex (XX vs. XY) rather than the hormonal milieu at older ages. We employed the Four Core Genotype (FCG) mouse model to study the contribution of sex chromosome complement and gonadal hormones to stroke sensitivity in aged mice in which the testis determining gene (Sry) is removed from the Y chromosome, allowing for the generation of XX males and XY females. XXF, XXM, XYF, XYM and XYwt aged mice were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). XXF and XXM mice had significantly larger infarct volumes than XYF and XYM cohorts respectively. There was no significant difference in hormone levels among aged FCG mice. XXF/XXM mice also had more robust microglial activation and higher serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines than XYF/XYM cohort respectively. We concluded that the sex chromosome complement contributes to ischemic sensitivity in aged animals and leads to sex differences in innate immune responses. PMID:27405096

  4. Evidence for a Common Origin of Homomorphic and Heteromorphic Sex Chromosomes in Distinct Spinacia Species

    PubMed Central

    Fujito, Satoshi; Takahata, Satoshi; Suzuki, Reimi; Hoshino, Yoichiro; Ohmido, Nobuko; Onodera, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The dioecious genus Spinacia is thought to include two wild relatives (S. turkestanica Ilj. and S. tetrandra Stev.) of cultivated spinach (S. oleracea L.). In this study, nuclear and chloroplast sequences from 21 accessions of Spinacia germplasm and six spinach cultivars or lines were subjected to phylogenetic analysis to define the relationships among the three species. Maximum-likelihood sequence analysis suggested that the Spinacia plant samples could be classified into two monophyletic groups (Group 1 and Group 2): Group 1 consisted of all accessions, cultivars, and lines of S. oleracea L. and S. turkestanica Ilj. and two of five S. tetrandra Stev. accessions, whereas Group 2 was composed of the three remaining S. tetrandra Stev. accessions. By using flow cytometry, we detected a distinct difference in nuclear genome size between the groups. Group 2 also was characterized by a sexual dimorphism in inflorescence structure, which was not observed in Group 1. Interspecific crosses between the groups produced hybrids with drastically reduced pollen fertility and showed that the male is the heterogametic sex (XY) in Group 2, as is the case in S. oleracea L. (Group 1). Cytogenetic and DNA marker analyses suggested that Group 1 and Group 2 have homomorphic and heteromorphic sex chromosome pairs (XY), respectively, and that the sex chromosome pairs of the two groups evolved from a common ancestral pair. Our data suggest that the Spinacia genus may serve as a good model for investigation of evolutionary mechanisms underlying the emergence of heteromorphic sex chromosome pairs from ancestral homomorphic pairs. PMID:26048564

  5. Evidence for a Common Origin of Homomorphic and Heteromorphic Sex Chromosomes in Distinct Spinacia Species.

    PubMed

    Fujito, Satoshi; Takahata, Satoshi; Suzuki, Reimi; Hoshino, Yoichiro; Ohmido, Nobuko; Onodera, Yasuyuki

    2015-08-01

    The dioecious genus Spinacia is thought to include two wild relatives (S. turkestanica Ilj. and S. tetrandra Stev.) of cultivated spinach (S. oleracea L.). In this study, nuclear and chloroplast sequences from 21 accessions of Spinacia germplasm and six spinach cultivars or lines were subjected to phylogenetic analysis to define the relationships among the three species. Maximum-likelihood sequence analysis suggested that the Spinacia plant samples could be classified into two monophyletic groups (Group 1 and Group 2): Group 1 consisted of all accessions, cultivars, and lines of S. oleracea L. and S. turkestanica Ilj. and two of five S. tetrandra Stev. accessions, whereas Group 2 was composed of the three remaining S. tetrandra Stev. accessions. By using flow cytometry, we detected a distinct difference in nuclear genome size between the groups. Group 2 also was characterized by a sexual dimorphism in inflorescence structure, which was not observed in Group 1. Interspecific crosses between the groups produced hybrids with drastically reduced pollen fertility and showed that the male is the heterogametic sex (XY) in Group 2, as is the case in S. oleracea L. (Group 1). Cytogenetic and DNA marker analyses suggested that Group 1 and Group 2 have homomorphic and heteromorphic sex chromosome pairs (XY), respectively, and that the sex chromosome pairs of the two groups evolved from a common ancestral pair. Our data suggest that the Spinacia genus may serve as a good model for investigation of evolutionary mechanisms underlying the emergence of heteromorphic sex chromosome pairs from ancestral homomorphic pairs. PMID:26048564

  6. Sexually dimorphic actions of glucocorticoids: beyond chromosomes and sex hormones.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Matthew; Ramamoorthy, Sivapriya; Cidlowski, John A

    2014-05-01

    Sexual dimorphism is a well-documented phenomenon that is observed at all levels of the animal kingdom. Historically, sex hormones (testosterone and estrogen) have been implicated as key players in a wide array of pathologies displaying sexual dimorphism in their etiology and progression. While these hormones clearly contribute to sexually dimorphic diseases, other factors may be involved in this phenomenon as well. In particular, the stress hormone cortisol exerts differential effects in both males and females. The underlying molecular basis for the sexually dimorphic actions of glucocorticoids is unknown but clearly important to understand, since synthetic glucocorticoids are the most widely prescribed medication for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases and hematological cancers in humans. PMID:24739020

  7. Sequence and gene content of a large fragment of a lizard sex chromosome and evaluation of candidate sex differentiating gene R-spondin 1

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Scant genomic information from non-avian reptile sex chromosomes is available, and for only a few lizards, several snakes and one turtle species, and it represents only a small fraction of the total sex chromosome sequences in these species. Results We report a 352 kb of contiguous sequence from the sex chromosome of a squamate reptile, Pogona vitticeps, with a ZZ/ZW sex microchromosome system. This contig contains five protein coding genes (oprd1, rcc1, znf91, znf131, znf180), and major families of repetitive sequences with a high number of copies of LTR and non-LTR retrotransposons, including the CR1 and Bov-B LINEs. The two genes, oprd1 and rcc1 are part of a homologous syntenic block, which is conserved among amniotes. While oprd1 and rcc1 have no known function in sex determination or differentiation in amniotes, this homologous syntenic block in mammals and chicken also contains R-spondin 1 (rspo1), the ovarian differentiating gene in mammals. In order to explore the probability that rspo1 is sex determining in dragon lizards, genomic BAC and cDNA clones were mapped using fluorescence in situ hybridisation. Their location on an autosomal microchromosome pair, not on the ZW sex microchromosomes, eliminates rspo1 as a candidate sex determining gene in P. vitticeps. Conclusion Our study has characterized the largest contiguous stretch of physically mapped sex chromosome sequence (352 kb) from a ZZ/ZW lizard species. Although this region represents only a small fraction of the sex chromosomes of P. vitticeps, it has revealed several features typically associated with sex chromosomes including the accumulation of large blocks of repetitive sequences. PMID:24344927

  8. Rapid and early determination of sex using trophoblast biopsy specimens and Y chromosome specific DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Vergnaud, G; Kaplan, L; Weissenbach, J; Dumez, Y; Berger, R; Tiollais, P; Guellaen, G

    1984-07-14

    The feasibility of determining sex by analysing deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) with two probes specific for Y chromosomes was shown using DNA obtained from samples of blood from 30 non-related males and females of different ethnic origin. The DNA was spotted on nitrocellulose filters and hybridised with both a repetitive (P1) and a unique (49f) sequence specific for the human Y chromosome. A strong positive signal with both probes indicated the presence of male DNA. The sex of 12 fetuses was then similarly determined by molecular characterisation of DNA from trophoblast biopsy specimens. Chorionic samples were obtained in seven cases before termination of pregnancy in the first trimester and the aborted embryos subjected to karyotyping and sex chromatin analysis. In the five other cases samples were obtained from placentas obtained during caesarean section. Results of hybridisation were compared with those from cytogenic studies and actual sex at birth. The sex of all 12 fetuses was determined correctly by hybridisation. PMID:6428684

  9. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of monoecious hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) cultivars reveals its karyotype variations and sex chromosomes constitution.

    PubMed

    Razumova, Olga V; Alexandrov, Oleg S; Divashuk, Mikhail G; Sukhorada, Tatiana I; Karlov, Gennady I

    2016-05-01

    Hemp (Cannabis sativa L., 2n = 20) is a dioecious plant. Sex expression is controlled by an X-to-autosome balance system consisting of the heteromorphic sex chromosomes XY for males and XX for females. Genetically monoecious hemp offers several agronomic advantages compared to the dioecious cultivars that are widely used in hemp cultivation. The male or female origin of monoecious maternal plants is unknown. Additionally, the sex chromosome composition of monoecious hemp forms remains unknown. In this study, we examine the sex chromosome makeup in monoecious hemp using a cytogenetic approach. Eight monoecious and two dioecious cultivars were used. The DNA of 210 monoecious plants was used for PCR analysis with the male-associated markers MADC2 and SCAR323. All monoecious plants showed female amplification patterns. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with the subtelomeric CS-1 probe to chromosomes plates and karyotyping revealed a lack of Y chromosome and presence of XX sex chromosomes in monoecious cultivars with the chromosome number 2n = 20. There was a high level of intra- and intercultivar karyotype variation detected. The results of this study can be used for further analysis of the genetic basis of sex expression in plants. PMID:26149370

  10. Insights into Sex Chromosome Evolution and Aging from the Genome of a Short-Lived Fish.

    PubMed

    Reichwald, Kathrin; Petzold, Andreas; Koch, Philipp; Downie, Bryan R; Hartmann, Nils; Pietsch, Stefan; Baumgart, Mario; Chalopin, Domitille; Felder, Marius; Bens, Martin; Sahm, Arne; Szafranski, Karol; Taudien, Stefan; Groth, Marco; Arisi, Ivan; Weise, Anja; Bhatt, Samarth S; Sharma, Virag; Kraus, Johann M; Schmid, Florian; Priebe, Steffen; Liehr, Thomas; Görlach, Matthias; Than, Manuel E; Hiller, Michael; Kestler, Hans A; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Schartl, Manfred; Cellerino, Alessandro; Englert, Christoph; Platzer, Matthias

    2015-12-01

    The killifish Nothobranchius furzeri is the shortest-lived vertebrate that can be bred in the laboratory. Its rapid growth, early sexual maturation, fast aging, and arrested embryonic development (diapause) make it an attractive model organism in biomedical research. Here, we report a draft sequence of its genome that allowed us to uncover an intra-species Y chromosome polymorphism representing-in real time-different stages of sex chromosome formation that display features of early mammalian XY evolution "in action." Our data suggest that gdf6Y, encoding a TGF-β family growth factor, is the master sex-determining gene in N. furzeri. Moreover, we observed genomic clustering of aging-related genes, identified genes under positive selection, and revealed significant similarities of gene expression profiles between diapause and aging, particularly for genes controlling cell cycle and translation. The annotated genome sequence is provided as an online resource (http://www.nothobranchius.info/NFINgb). PMID:26638077

  11. Sex chromosomes in mitotic and polytene tissues of Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera, Tephritidae) from Argentina: a review.

    PubMed

    Giardini, María Cecilia; Milla, Fabián H; Lanzavecchia, Silvia; Nieves, Mariela; Cladera, Jorge L

    2015-01-01

    Cytogenetics, which is considered a fundamental tool to understand basic genetic and genomic issues of species, has greatly contributed to the description of polymorphisms both at inter- and intra-specific level. In fact, cytogenetics was one of the first approaches used to propose Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera: Tephritidae) as a complex of cryptic species. Different morphological variants of sex chromosomes have been reported among Argentinean populations of Anastrepha fraterculus. However, since this high structural variability in sex chromosomes does not pose a reproductive barrier, their role in speciation is yet to be unveiled. This review provides an update on general aspects of cytogenetics in Argentinean Anastrepha fraterculus populations, focused on the prevalence of X-Y arrangements. PMID:26798255

  12. Sex chromosomes in mitotic and polytene tissues of Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera, Tephritidae) from Argentina: a review

    PubMed Central

    Giardini, María Cecilia; Milla, Fabián H.; Lanzavecchia, Silvia; Nieves, Mariela; Cladera, Jorge L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cytogenetics, which is considered a fundamental tool to understand basic genetic and genomic issues of species, has greatly contributed to the description of polymorphisms both at inter- and intra-specific level. In fact, cytogenetics was one of the first approaches used to propose Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera: Tephritidae) as a complex of cryptic species. Different morphological variants of sex chromosomes have been reported among Argentinean populations of Anastrepha fraterculus. However, since this high structural variability in sex chromosomes does not pose a reproductive barrier, their role in speciation is yet to be unveiled. This review provides an update on general aspects of cytogenetics in Argentinean Anastrepha fraterculus populations, focused on the prevalence of X-Y arrangements. PMID:26798255

  13. Triangulating the sexually dimorphic brain through high-resolution neuroimaging of murine sex chromosome aneuploidies.

    PubMed

    Raznahan, Armin; Lue, YanHe; Probst, Frank; Greenstein, Deanna; Giedd, Jay; Wang, Christina; Lerch, Jason; Swerdloff, Ronald

    2015-11-01

    Murine sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) provide powerful models for charting sex chromosome influences on mammalian brain development. Here, building on prior work in X-monosomic (XO) mice, we use spatially non-biased high-resolution imaging to compare and contrast neuroanatomical alterations in XXY and XO mice relative to their wild-type XX and XY littermates. First, we show that carriage of a supernumerary X chromosome in XXY males (1) does not prevent normative volumetric masculinization of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and medial amygdala, but (2) causes distributed anatomical alterations relative to XY males, which show a statistically unexpected tendency to be co-localized with and reciprocal to XO-XX differences in anatomy. These overlaps identify the lateral septum, BNST, ventral group thalamic nuclei and periaqueductal gray matter as regions with replicable sensitivity to X chromosome dose across two SCAs. We then harness anatomical variation across all four karyotype groups in our study--XO, XX, XY and XXY--to create an agnostic data-driven segmentation of the mouse brain into five distributed clusters which (1) recover fundamental properties of brain organization with high spatial precision, (2) define two previously uncharacterized systems of relative volume excess in females vs. males ("forebrain cholinergic" and "cerebelo-pontine-thalamo-cortical"), and (3) adopt stereotyped spatial motifs which delineate ordered gradients of sex chromosome and gonadal influences on volumetric brain development. Taken together, these data provide a new framework for the study of sexually dimorphic influences on brain development in health and disrupted brain development in SCA. PMID:25146308

  14. Triangulating the sexually dimorphic brain through high-resolution neuroimaging of murine sex chromosome aneuploidies

    PubMed Central

    Lue, YanHe; Probst, Frank; Greenstein, Deanna; Giedd, Jay; Wang, Christina; Lerch, Jason; Swerdloff, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Murine sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) provide powerful models for charting sex chromosome influences on mammalian brain development. Here, building on prior work in X-monosomic (XO) mice, we use spatially non-biased high-resolution imaging to compare and contrast neuroanatomical alterations in XXY and XO mice relative to their wild-type XX and XY littermates. First, we show that carriage of a supernumerary X chromosome in XXY males (1) does not prevent normative volumetric masculinization of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and medial amygdala, but (2) causes distributed anatomical alterations relative to XY males, which show a statistically unexpected tendency to be colocalized with and reciprocal to XO-XX differences in anatomy. These overlaps identify the lateral septum, BNST, ventral group thalamic nuclei and periaqueductal gray matter as regions with replicable sensitivity to X chromosome dose across two SCAs. We then harness anatomical variation across all four karyotype groups in our study—XO, XX, XY and XXY—to create an agnostic data-driven segmentation of the mouse brain into five distributed clusters which (1) recover fundamental properties of brain organization with high spatial precision, (2) define two previously uncharacterized systems of relative volume excess in females vs. males (“forebrain cholinergic” and “cerebelo-pontine-thalamo-cortical”), and (3) adopt stereotyped spatial motifs which delineate ordered gradients of sex chromosome and gonadal influences on volumetric brain development. Taken together, these data provide a new framework for the study of sexually dimorphic influences on brain development in health and disrupted brain development in SCA. PMID:25146308

  15. New approach data in electric fish (Teleostei: Gymnotus): sex chromosome evolution and repetitive DNA.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Maelin; Matoso, Daniele Aparecida; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Feldberg, Eliana

    2014-12-01

    Antagonist sexual selection is the driving force behind the origin and diversification of sex chromosomes such as XX/XY and ZZ/ZW. However, chromosome mobility, mainly in fishes, may result in the formation of chromosomes of recent origin, a process known as turnover. The family Gymnotidae, which is composed of the genera Electrophorus+Gymnotus, presents a multiple system of the type X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y, which has been described for Gymnotus pantanal. This article describes the karyotype of three Amazon Gymnotus species, revealing the presence of both simple and multiple systems: Gymnotus carapo "Catalão" 2n=40 XX/XY, Gymnotus coropinae 2n=49♂/50♀ X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y, and Gymnotus sp. "Negro" 2n=50 XX/XY. Our hypothesis is that the simple system present in G. carapo "Catalão" is ancestral in relation to G. pantanal's multiple system and that the diversification of the subsequent multiple system occurred after the final separation of the Amazon and Paraná basins. Moreover, G. coropinae's multiple system may have originated from the simple system present in Gymnotus sp. "Negro." The distant position between the species in the Gymnotidae family's phylogeny in addition to differences in sex chromosome formula and number between Clade G1 G. coropinae and G. sp. "Negro" species and "Carapo" Clade. G. carapo and G. pantanal species suggest that both sequences of sexual systems occurred independently, supporting other proposed models and highlighting the fact that species of the genus Gymnotus may serve as a model for studying sex chromosome turnover. PMID:25264714

  16. Increased prevalence of sex chromosome aneuploidies in specific language impairment and dyslexia

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Nuala H; Addis, Laura; Brandler, William M; Slonims, Vicky; Clark, Ann; Watson, Jocelynne; Scerri, Thomas S; Hennessy, Elizabeth R; Bolton, Patrick F; Conti-Ramsden, Gina; Fairfax, Benjamin P; Knight, Julian C; Stein, John; Talcott, Joel B; O'Hare, Anne; Baird, Gillian; Paracchini, Silvia; Fisher, Simon E; Newbury, Dianne F; Consortium, SLI

    2014-01-01

    Aim Sex chromosome aneuploidies increase the risk of spoken or written language disorders but individuals with specific language impairment (SLI) or dyslexia do not routinely undergo cytogenetic analysis. We assess the frequency of sex chromosome aneuploidies in individuals with language impairment or dyslexia. Method Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping was performed in three sample sets: a clinical cohort of individuals with speech and language deficits (87 probands: 61 males, 26 females; age range 4 to 23 years), a replication cohort of individuals with SLI, from both clinical and epidemiological samples (209 probands: 139 males, 70 females; age range 4 to 17 years), and a set of individuals with dyslexia (314 probands: 224 males, 90 females; age range 7 to 18 years). Results In the clinical language-impaired cohort, three abnormal karyotypic results were identified in probands (proband yield 3.4%). In the SLI replication cohort, six abnormalities were identified providing a consistent proband yield (2.9%). In the sample of individuals with dyslexia, two sex chromosome aneuploidies were found giving a lower proband yield of 0.6%. In total, two XYY, four XXY (Klinefelter syndrome), three XXX, one XO (Turner syndrome), and one unresolved karyotype were identified. Interpretation The frequency of sex chromosome aneuploidies within each of the three cohorts was increased over the expected population frequency (approximately 0.25%) suggesting that genetic testing may prove worthwhile for individuals with language and literacy problems and normal non-verbal IQ. Early detection of these aneuploidies can provide information and direct the appropriate management for individuals. PMID:24117048

  17. Multiple marker screening test: identification of fetal cystic hygroma, hydrops, and sex chromosome aneuploidy.

    PubMed

    Wenstrom, K D; Boots, L R; Cosper, P C

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine if the multiple marker screening test (maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein, unconjugated estriol, human chorionic gonadotrophin, and maternal age) detects fetal Turner syndrome or just cystic hygroma/hydrops. Multiple marker screening tests from 4 groups were compared: 1) Turner syndrome with hydrops/ hygroma group (n = 10) = fetuses with cystic hygroma/hydrops and a 45X karyotype, 2) Turner syndrome without hydrops/hygroma (n = 9) = sonographically unremarkable fetal Turner syndrome or Turner mosaic, 3) hydrops group (n = 8) = all cases of fetal cystic hygroma/hydrops excluding Turner syndrome, 4) sex chromosome aneuploidy group (n = 16) = other sonographically normal fetal sex chromosome aneuploidies. Positive screening tests (Down syndrome risk > or = 1:190 or MSAFP > or = 2.5 MOM) were found in 60% (6/10) of the Turner syndrome with hydrops/hygroma group, but only 11% (1/9) of the Turner syndrome without hydrops/hygroma group (P = .04). The incidence of positive screening tests in the Hydrops group was 75% (6/8), while it was only 12.5% (2/16) in the other sex chromosome aneuploidy group. We conclude that the multiple marker screening test identifies fetuses with cystic hygroma/hydrops, and may do so independently of the etiology of the hydrops. PMID:8796763

  18. Mapping the stability of human brain asymmetry across five sex-chromosome aneuploidies.

    PubMed

    Lin, Amy; Clasen, Liv; Lee, Nancy Raitano; Wallace, Gregory L; Lalonde, Francois; Blumenthal, Jonathan; Giedd, Jay N; Raznahan, Armin

    2015-01-01

    The human brain displays stereotyped and early emerging patterns of cortical asymmetry in health. It is unclear if these asymmetries are highly sensitive to genetic and environmental variation or fundamental features of the brain that can survive severe developmental perturbations. To address this question, we mapped cortical thickness (CT) asymmetry in a group of genetically defined disorders known to impact CT development. Participants included 137 youth with one of five sex-chromosome aneuploidies [SCAs; XXX (n = 28), XXY (n = 58), XYY (n = 26), XXYY (n = 20), and XXXXY (n = 5)], and 169 age-matched typically developing controls (80 female). In controls, we replicated previously reported rightward inferior frontal and leftward lateral parietal CT asymmetry. These opposing frontoparietal CT asymmetries were broadly preserved in all five SCA groups. However, we also detected foci of shifting CT asymmetry with aneuploidy, which fell almost exclusively within regions of significant CT asymmetry in controls. Specifically, X-chromosome aneuploidy accentuated normative rightward inferior frontal asymmetries, while Y-chromosome aneuploidy reversed normative rightward medial prefrontal and lateral temporal asymmetries. These findings indicate that (1) the stereotyped normative pattern of opposing frontoparietal CT asymmetry arises from developmental mechanisms that can withstand gross chromosomal aneuploidy and (2) X and Y chromosomes can exert focal, nonoverlapping and directionally opposed influences on CT asymmetry within cortical regions of significant asymmetry in health. Our study attests to the resilience of developmental mechanisms that support the global patterning of CT asymmetry in humans, and motivates future research into the molecular bases and functional consequences of sex chromosome dosage effects on CT asymmetry. PMID:25568109

  19. Mapping the Stability of Human Brain Asymmetry across Five Sex-Chromosome Aneuploidies

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Amy; Clasen, Liv; Lee, Nancy Raitano; Wallace, Gregory L.; Lalonde, Francois; Blumenthal, Jonathan; Giedd, Jay N.

    2015-01-01

    The human brain displays stereotyped and early emerging patterns of cortical asymmetry in health. It is unclear if these asymmetries are highly sensitive to genetic and environmental variation or fundamental features of the brain that can survive severe developmental perturbations. To address this question, we mapped cortical thickness (CT) asymmetry in a group of genetically defined disorders known to impact CT development. Participants included 137 youth with one of five sex-chromosome aneuploidies [SCAs; XXX (n = 28), XXY (n = 58), XYY (n = 26), XXYY (n = 20), and XXXXY (n = 5)], and 169 age-matched typically developing controls (80 female). In controls, we replicated previously reported rightward inferior frontal and leftward lateral parietal CT asymmetry. These opposing frontoparietal CT asymmetries were broadly preserved in all five SCA groups. However, we also detected foci of shifting CT asymmetry with aneuploidy, which fell almost exclusively within regions of significant CT asymmetry in controls. Specifically, X-chromosome aneuploidy accentuated normative rightward inferior frontal asymmetries, while Y-chromosome aneuploidy reversed normative rightward medial prefrontal and lateral temporal asymmetries. These findings indicate that (1) the stereotyped normative pattern of opposing frontoparietal CT asymmetry arises from developmental mechanisms that can withstand gross chromosomal aneuploidy and (2) X and Y chromosomes can exert focal, nonoverlapping and directionally opposed influences on CT asymmetry within cortical regions of significant asymmetry in health. Our study attests to the resilience of developmental mechanisms that support the global patterning of CT asymmetry in humans, and motivates future research into the molecular bases and functional consequences of sex chromosome dosage effects on CT asymmetry. PMID:25568109

  20. [Determination of fetal sex by amplification of Y-chromosome-specific DNA].

    PubMed

    Huang, S Z

    1989-08-01

    This paper describes a rapid and highly sensitive method for determination of fetal sex. Y-chromosome-specific sequences as well as Alu-specific sequences were amplified with polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Then fetal sex was determined by comparison of the two amplified DNA sequences. Polymerase chain reaction can be performed on lysed amniotic fluid cells or chorionic villus samples or dried blood spots on filter paper blot without prior DNA extraction. The analysis of the amplified DNA was performed immediately by agarose gel electrophoresis without DNA hybridization with radioactive probe. By using this method, determination of sex was performed on 3 fetuses at risk for DMD, and on 2 fetuses at risk for hemophilia, prenatal detection was confirmed by examination of the neonates. PMID:2620273

  1. Sex chromosome linked genetic variance and the evolution of sexual dimorphism of quantitative traits.

    PubMed

    Husby, Arild; Schielzeth, Holger; Forstmeier, Wolfgang; Gustafsson, Lars; Qvarnström, Anna

    2013-03-01

    Theory predicts that sex chromsome linkage should reduce intersexual genetic correlations thereby allowing the evolution of sexual dimorphism. Empirical evidence for sex linkage has come largely from crosses and few studies have examined how sexual dimorphism and sex linkage are related within outbred populations. Here, we use data on an array of different traits measured on over 10,000 individuals from two pedigreed populations of birds (collared flycatcher and zebra finch) to estimate the amount of sex-linked genetic variance (h(2)z ). Of 17 traits examined, eight showed a nonzero h(2)Z estimate but only four were significantly different from zero (wing patch size and tarsus length in collared flycatchers, wing length and beak color in zebra finches). We further tested how sexual dimorphism and the mode of selection operating on the trait relate to the proportion of sex-linked genetic variance. Sexually selected traits did not show higher h(2)Z than morphological traits and there was only a weak positive relationship between h(2)Z and sexual dimorphism. However, given the relative scarcity of empirical studies, it is premature to make conclusions about the role of sex chromosome linkage in the evolution of sexual dimorphism. PMID:23461313

  2. Placental contribution to the origins of sexual dimorphism in health and diseases: sex chromosomes and epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Gabory, Anne; Roseboom, Tessa J; Moore, Tom; Moore, Lorna G; Junien, Claudine

    2013-01-01

    Sex differences occur in most non-communicable diseases, including metabolic diseases, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, psychiatric and neurological disorders and cancer. In many cases, the susceptibility to these diseases begins early in development. The observed differences between the sexes may result from genetic and hormonal differences and from differences in responses to and interactions with environmental factors, including infection, diet, drugs and stress. The placenta plays a key role in fetal growth and development and, as such, affects the fetal programming underlying subsequent adult health and accounts, in part for the developmental origin of health and disease (DOHaD). There is accumulating evidence to demonstrate the sex-specific relationships between diverse environmental influences on placental functions and the risk of disease later in life. As one of the few tissues easily collectable in humans, this organ may therefore be seen as an ideal system for studying how male and female placenta sense nutritional and other stresses, such as endocrine disruptors. Sex-specific regulatory pathways controlling sexually dimorphic characteristics in the various organs and the consequences of lifelong differences in sex hormone expression largely account for such responses. However, sex-specific changes in epigenetic marks are generated early after fertilization, thus before adrenal and gonad differentiation in the absence of sex hormones and in response to environmental conditions. Given the abundance of X-linked genes involved in placentogenesis, and the early unequal gene expression by the sex chromosomes between males and females, the role of X- and Y-chromosome-linked genes, and especially those involved in the peculiar placenta-specific epigenetics processes, giving rise to the unusual placenta epigenetic landscapes deserve particular attention. However, even with recent developments in this field, we still know little about the mechanisms

  3. Placental contribution to the origins of sexual dimorphism in health and diseases: sex chromosomes and epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sex differences occur in most non-communicable diseases, including metabolic diseases, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, psychiatric and neurological disorders and cancer. In many cases, the susceptibility to these diseases begins early in development. The observed differences between the sexes may result from genetic and hormonal differences and from differences in responses to and interactions with environmental factors, including infection, diet, drugs and stress. The placenta plays a key role in fetal growth and development and, as such, affects the fetal programming underlying subsequent adult health and accounts, in part for the developmental origin of health and disease (DOHaD). There is accumulating evidence to demonstrate the sex-specific relationships between diverse environmental influences on placental functions and the risk of disease later in life. As one of the few tissues easily collectable in humans, this organ may therefore be seen as an ideal system for studying how male and female placenta sense nutritional and other stresses, such as endocrine disruptors. Sex-specific regulatory pathways controlling sexually dimorphic characteristics in the various organs and the consequences of lifelong differences in sex hormone expression largely account for such responses. However, sex-specific changes in epigenetic marks are generated early after fertilization, thus before adrenal and gonad differentiation in the absence of sex hormones and in response to environmental conditions. Given the abundance of X-linked genes involved in placentogenesis, and the early unequal gene expression by the sex chromosomes between males and females, the role of X- and Y-chromosome-linked genes, and especially those involved in the peculiar placenta-specific epigenetics processes, giving rise to the unusual placenta epigenetic landscapes deserve particular attention. However, even with recent developments in this field, we still know little about the mechanisms

  4. Environmental exposure to pyrethroids and sperm sex chromosome disomy: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of environmental pesticide exposures, such as pyrethroids, and their relationship to sperm abnormalities are not well understood. This study investigated whether environmental exposure to pyrethroids was associated with altered frequency of sperm sex chromosome disomy in adult men. Methods A sample of 75 subjects recruited through a Massachusetts infertility clinic provided urine and semen samples. Individual exposures were measured as urinary concentrations of three pyrethroid metabolites ((3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3PBA), cis- and trans- 3-(2,2-Dichlorovinyl)-1-methylcyclopropane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid (CDCCA and TDCCA)). Multiprobe fluorescence in situ hybridization for chromosomes X, Y, and 18 was used to determine XX, YY, XY, 1818, and total sex chromosome disomy in sperm nuclei. Poisson regression analysis was used to examine the association between aneuploidy rates and pyrethroid metabolites while adjusting for covariates. Results Between 25-56% of the sample were above the limit of detection (LOD) for the pyrethroid metabolites. All sex chromosome disomies were increased by 7-30% when comparing men with CDCCA and TDCCA levels above the LOD to those below the LOD. For 3PBA, compared to those below the LOD, those above the LOD had YY18 disomy rates 1.28 times higher (95% CI: 1.15, 1.42) whereas a reduced rate was seen for XY18 and total disomy (IRR = 0.82; 95% CI: 0.77, 0.87; IRR = 0.93; 95% CI: 0.87-0.97), and no association was seen for XX18 and 1818. Conclusions Our findings suggest that urinary concentrations of CDCCA and TDCCA above the LOD were associated with increased rates of aneuploidy. However the findings for 3BPA were not consistent. This is the first study to examine these relationships, and replication of our findings is needed before the association between pyrethroid metabolites and aneuploidy can be fully defined. PMID:24345058

  5. Sex preselection in mammals. Separation of sperm bearing Y and O chromosomes in the vole Microtus oregoni

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkel, D.; Gledhill, B.L.; Lake, S.; Stephenson, D.; Van Dilla, M.A.

    1982-11-26

    The two sex determining sperm populations of the vole Microtus oregoni were separated according to DNA content by use of flow sorting instrumentation. Although the sperm were not viable, they should be useful for addressing the question of haploid expression of genes linked to sex chromosomes and for efficiently searching for biochemical markers that differentiate the two populations.

  6. Distribution of constitutive heterochromatin in species of triatomines with fragmentation of sex chromosomes X.

    PubMed

    Guerra, A L; Alevi, K C C; Rosa, J A; Azeredo-Oliveira, M T V

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetic analyses of triatomines are considered to be important taxonomic tools. Thus, we analyzed the pattern of constitutive heterochromatin in 7 species of triatomine with fragmentation of the sex chromosome X, focusing on the cytotaxonomy of these triatomines. The species analyzed included Triatoma vitticeps, Triatoma melanocephala, Triatoma tibiamaculata, Triatoma protracta, Meccus pallidipennis, Panstrongylus megistus, and Panstrongylus lignarius. The seminiferous tubules of the adult males were subjected to C-banding. P. megistus and P. lignarius showed differences in chromosome number and disposition of constitutive heterochromatin, as only P. lignarius showed C-blocks in autosomes. C-banding can differentiate these species, since one of the sex chromosome (X) is heterochromatic in T. vitticeps. T. protracta showed C-blocks in both ends of all autosomes, T. tibiamaculata showed terminal C-dots in some autosomal pairs and M. pallidipennis did not show constitutive heterochromatin in autosomes. Thus, we confirmed the heterochromatic pattern of 7 species of insects and emphasized the importance of cytogenetic techniques for C-banding for taxonomy studies of the triatomines, which are important vectors of Chagas disease. PMID:25501239

  7. Chromosome

    MedlinePlus

    ... genes . It is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist ... come in pairs. Normally, each cell in the human body has 23 pairs of chromosomes (46 total chromosomes). ...

  8. Epidemiology of double aneuploidies involving chromosome 21 and the sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, Natalia V; Mutton, David E

    2005-04-01

    The chance of two chromosome abnormalities occurring in one conceptus is very small. However, some authors have suggested that double aneuplodies (DAs) might be more common than the product of their individual frequencies. The nonrandomness of such DA events was considered to be evidence that nondisjunction (NDJ) may be genetically determined. Data collected from the National Down syndrome Cytogenetic Register (NDSCR) in England and Wales and from the literature indicate that the frequencies of all nonmosaic DAs, except for 48,XXY,+21, are lower than expected, probably because of strong intrauterine selection against such pregnancies. Collectively, we identified 52 cases of nonmosaic 48,XXY,+21; 28 cases of 48,XYY,+21; and 14 cases of 48,XXX,+21 in liveborns and 13 cases of 48,XXY,+21; four cases of 48,XYY,+21; and two cases of 48,XXX,+21 after prenatal diagnoses. Among these cases, analysis of the published unbiased cytogenetic surveys of liveborn DS revealed 24 cases of 48,XXY,+21; nine cases of 48,XYY,+21; and seven cases of 48,XXX,+21. These figures are different from the expected proportion of 1:1:1 (P < 0.001), with carriers of XXY overrepresented in the group of carriers of DA. Mechanisms put forth to account for the higher occurrence of 48,XXY,+21 may include greater accessibility of disomic ovum to Y-carrying sperm, and promotion of NDJ in ovum by Y-bearing sperm. 48,XXY,+21 DA was found to be age-dependent, as the proportion of mothers over age 35 (x = 33.0) was increased over the general population. This is in contrast to the apparently age-independent 48,XYY,+21 DA, with a mean maternal age of 24.7 (P < 0.001). Paternal ages were also remarkably different between the groups, with a mean age of 37.9 in 48,XXY,+21 cases and a mean age of 27.9 in 48,XYY,+21 cases (P < 0.01). Maternal age-related factors, rather than genetic predisposition, may play a more important role in the etiology of the most common DA, 48,XXY,+21. PMID:15704133

  9. Evolutionary Strata on the X Chromosomes of the Dioecious Plant Silene latifolia: Evidence From New Sex-Linked Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bergero, Roberta; Forrest, Alan; Kamau, Esther; Charlesworth, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    Despite its recent evolutionary origin, the sex chromosome system of the plant Silene latifolia shows signs of progressive suppression of recombination having created evolutionary strata of different X–Y divergence on sex chromosomes. However, even after 8 years of effort, this result is based on analyses of five sex-linked gene sequences, and the maximum divergence (and thus the age of this plant's sex chromosome system) has remained uncertain. More genes are therefore needed. Here, by segregation analysis of intron size variants (ISVS) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we identify three new Y-linked genes, one being duplicated on the Y chromosome, and test for evolutionary strata. All the new genes have homologs on the X and Y chromosomes. Synonymous divergence estimated between the X and Y homolog pairs is within the range of those already reported. Genetic mapping of the new X-linked loci shows that the map is the same in all three families that have been studied so far and that X–Y divergence increases with genetic distance from the pseudoautosomal region. We can now conclude that the divergence value is saturated, confirming the cessation of X–Y recombination in the evolution of the sex chromosomes at ∼10–20 MYA. PMID:17287532

  10. Impaired imprinted X chromosome inactivation is responsible for the skewed sex ratio following in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kun; An, Lei; Miao, Kai; Ren, Likun; Hou, Zhuocheng; Tao, Li; Zhang, Zhenni; Wang, Xiaodong; Xia, Wei; Liu, Jinghao; Wang, Zhuqing; Xi, Guangyin; Gao, Shuai; Sui, Linlin; Zhu, De-Sheng; Wang, Shumin; Wu, Zhonghong; Bach, Ingolf; Chen, Dong-Bao; Tian, Jianhui

    2016-03-22

    Dynamic epigenetic reprogramming occurs during normal embryonic development at the preimplantation stage. Erroneous epigenetic modifications due to environmental perturbations such as manipulation and culture of embryos during in vitro fertilization (IVF) are linked to various short- or long-term consequences. Among these, the skewed sex ratio, an indicator of reproductive hazards, was reported in bovine and porcine embryos and even human IVF newborns. However, since the first case of sex skewing reported in 1991, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We reported herein that sex ratio is skewed in mouse IVF offspring, and this was a result of female-biased peri-implantation developmental defects that were originated from impaired imprinted X chromosome inactivation (iXCI) through reduced ring finger protein 12 (Rnf12)/X-inactive specific transcript (Xist) expression. Compensation of impaired iXCI by overexpression ofRnf12to up-regulateXistsignificantly rescued female-biased developmental defects and corrected sex ratio in IVF offspring. Moreover, supplementation of an epigenetic modulator retinoic acid in embryo culture medium up-regulatedRnf12/Xistexpression, improved iXCI, and successfully redeemed the skewed sex ratio to nearly 50% in mouse IVF offspring. Thus, our data show that iXCI is one of the major epigenetic barriers for the developmental competence of female embryos during preimplantation stage, and targeting erroneous epigenetic modifications may provide a potential approach for preventing IVF-associated complications. PMID:26951653

  11. Chromosomal Redistribution of Male-Biased Genes in Mammalian Evolution with Two Bursts of Gene Gain on the X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong E.; Vibranovski, Maria D.; Landback, Patrick; Marais, Gabriel A. B.; Long, Manyuan

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian X chromosomes evolved under various mechanisms including sexual antagonism, the faster-X process, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). These forces may contribute to nonrandom chromosomal distribution of sex-biased genes. In order to understand the evolution of gene content on the X chromosome and autosome under these forces, we dated human and mouse protein-coding genes and miRNA genes on the vertebrate phylogenetic tree. We found that the X chromosome recently acquired a burst of young male-biased genes, which is consistent with fixation of recessive male-beneficial alleles by sexual antagonism. For genes originating earlier, however, this pattern diminishes and finally reverses with an overrepresentation of the oldest male-biased genes on autosomes. MSCI contributes to this dynamic since it silences X-linked old genes but not X-linked young genes. This demasculinization process seems to be associated with feminization of the X chromosome with more X-linked old genes expressed in ovaries. Moreover, we detected another burst of gene originations after the split of eutherian mammals and opossum, and these genes were quickly incorporated into transcriptional networks of multiple tissues. Preexisting X-linked genes also show significantly higher protein-level evolution during this period compared to autosomal genes, suggesting positive selection accompanied the early evolution of mammalian X chromosomes. These two findings cast new light on the evolutionary history of the mammalian X chromosome in terms of gene gain, sequence, and expressional evolution. PMID:20957185

  12. Homomorphic ZW chromosomes in a wild strawberry show distinctive recombination heterogeneity but a small sex-determining region.

    PubMed

    Tennessen, Jacob A; Govindarajulu, Rajanikanth; Liston, Aaron; Ashman, Tia-Lynn

    2016-09-01

    Recombination in ancient, heteromorphic sex chromosomes is typically suppressed at the sex-determining region (SDR) and proportionally elevated in the pseudoautosomal region (PAR). However, little is known about recombination dynamics of young, homomorphic plant sex chromosomes. We examine male and female function in crosses and unrelated samples of the dioecious octoploid strawberry Fragaria chiloensis in order to map the small and recently evolved SDR controlling both traits and to examine recombination patterns on the incipient ZW chromosome. The SDR of this ZW system is located within a 280 kb window, in which the maternal recombination rate is lower than the paternal one. In contrast to the SDR, the maternal PAR recombination rate is much higher than the rates of the paternal PAR or autosomes, culminating in an elevated chromosome-wide rate. W-specific divergence is elevated within the SDR and a single polymorphism is observed in high species-wide linkage disequilibrium with sex. Selection for recombination suppression within the small SDR may be weak, but fluctuating sex ratios could favor elevated recombination in the PAR to remove deleterious mutations on the W. The recombination dynamics of this nascent sex chromosome with a modestly diverged SDR may be typical of other dioecious plants. PMID:27102236

  13. Beyond 2/3 and 1/3: The Complex Signatures of Sex-Biased Admixture on the X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Amy; Rosenberg, Noah A.

    2015-01-01

    Sex-biased demography, in which parameters governing migration and population size differ between females and males, has been studied through comparisons of X chromosomes, which are inherited sex-specifically, and autosomes, which are not. A common form of sex bias in humans is sex-biased admixture, in which at least one of the source populations differs in its proportions of females and males contributing to an admixed population. Studies of sex-biased admixture often examine the mean ancestry for markers on the X chromosome in relation to the autosomes. A simple framework noting that in a population with equally many females and males, two-thirds of X chromosomes appear in females, suggests that the mean X-chromosomal admixture fraction is a linear combination of female and male admixture parameters, with coefficients 2/3 and 1/3, respectively. Extending a mechanistic admixture model to accommodate the X chromosome, we demonstrate that this prediction is not generally true in admixture models, although it holds in the limit for an admixture process occurring as a single event. For a model with constant ongoing admixture, we determine the mean X-chromosomal admixture, comparing admixture on female and male X chromosomes to corresponding autosomal values. Surprisingly, in reanalyzing African-American genetic data to estimate sex-specific contributions from African and European sources, we find that the range of contributions compatible with the excess African ancestry on the X chromosome compared to autosomes has a wide spread, permitting scenarios either without male-biased contributions from Europe or without female-biased contributions from Africa. PMID:26209245

  14. Low rates of pregnancy termination for prenatally diagnosed Klinefelter syndrome and other sex chromosome polysomies.

    PubMed

    Meschede, D; Louwen, F; Nippert, I; Holzgreve, W; Miny, P; Horst, J

    1998-12-01

    Over the past 9 years we counseled 55 couples whose unborn child was found to carry a sex chromosome polysomy. We performed a survey of postcounseling parental decisions about continuation or termination of these pregnancies. Of the 55 embryos or fetuses, 23 had the karyotype 47,XXY, 10 had 47,XYY, and 12 had 47,XXX. In addition, there were 10 instances of true mosaicism, i.e. 47,XXY/46,XY (n = 5), 47,XYY/46,XY (n = 2), or 47,XXX/46,XX (n = 3). Mean gestational age (+/-standard deviation) at diagnosis was 18.3+/-3.0 weeks. After comprehensive genetic counseling 48 (87.3%) of these pregnancies were carried to term. In seven cases (12.7%) the parents elected a pregnancy termination. Two of 31 pregnancies (6.5%) primarily ascertained at our center were aborted, whereas amongst the 24 referred cases, 5 couples (20.8%) opted for a termination. The mean gestational age of the terminated pregnancies was 19.7 weeks. The overall termination rate of 12.7% appears low in comparison with literature data. Most reports from other institutions present termination rates between 32 and 66%. The reason for the low rate of induced abortions in our study cohort is not clear. Cultural differences in parental perception of sex chromosomal polysomies may be of importance, and peculiarities of genetic counseling at our institution could also play a role. Although counseling was nondirective, we did put emphasis on providing prospective parents with information from unbiased follow-up studies of children with Klinefelter syndrome and other sex chromosome polysomies. PMID:9856559

  15. Expansion of the Pseudo-autosomal Region and Ongoing Recombination Suppression in the Silene latifolia Sex Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Bergero, Roberta; Qiu, Suo; Forrest, Alan; Borthwick, Helen; Charlesworth, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    There are two very interesting aspects to the evolution of sex chromosomes: what happens after recombination between these chromosome pairs stops and why suppressed recombination evolves. The former question has been intensively studied in a diversity of organisms, but the latter has been studied largely theoretically. To obtain empirical data, we used codominant genic markers in genetic mapping of the dioecious plant Silene latifolia, together with comparative mapping of S. latifolia sex-linked genes in S. vulgaris (a related hermaphrodite species without sex chromosomes). We mapped 29 S. latifolia fully sex-linked genes (including 21 newly discovered from transcriptome sequencing), plus 6 genes in a recombining pseudo-autosomal region (PAR) whose genetic map length is ∼25 cM in both male and female meiosis, suggesting that the PAR may contain many genes. Our comparative mapping shows that most fully sex-linked genes in S. latifolia are located on a single S. vulgaris linkage group and were probably inherited from a single autosome of an ancestor. However, unexpectedly, our maps suggest that the S. latifolia PAR region expanded through translocation events. Some genes in these regions still recombine in S. latifolia, but some genes from both addition events are now fully sex-linked. Recombination suppression is therefore still ongoing in S. latifolia, and multiple recombination suppression events have occurred in a timescale of few million years, much shorter than the timescale of formation of the most recent evolutionary strata of mammal and bird sex chromosomes. PMID:23733786

  16. A Sex Chromosomal Restriction-Fragment-Length Marker Linked to Melanoma-Determining Tu Loci in Xiphophorus

    PubMed Central

    Schartl, M.

    1988-01-01

    In Xiphophorus, the causative genetic information for melanoma formation has been assigned by classical genetics to chromosomal loci, which are located on the sex chromosomes. In our attempts to molecularly clone these melanoma-determining loci, named Tu, we have looked for restriction-fragment-length markers (RFLMs) linked to the Tu loci. These RFLMs should be useful in obtaining a physical map of a Tu locus, which will aid in the cloning of the corresponding sequences. DNA samples from various Xiphophorus strains and hybrids including those bearing different Tu wild-type, deletion and translocation chromosomes, were screened for the presence of random RFLMs using homologous or heterologous sequences as hybridization probes. We find an EcoRI restriction fragment which shows limited crosshybridization to the v-erb B gene--but not representing the authentic c-erb B gene of Xiphophorus--to be polymorphic with respect to different sex chromosomes. Linkage analysis revealed that a 5-kb fragment is linked to the Tu-Sd locus on the X chromosome, a 7-kb fragment is linked to the Tu-Sr locus on the Y chromosome, both of Xiphophorus maculatus, and that a 12-kb fragment is linked to the Tu-Li locus on the X chromosome of Xiphophorus variatus. Using different chromosomal mutants this RFLM has been mapped to a frequent deletion/translocation breakpoint of the X chromosome, less than 0.3 cM apart from the Tu locus. PMID:2841190

  17. A sex chromosomal restriction-fragment-length marker linked to melanoma-determining Tu loci in Xiphophorus.

    PubMed

    Schartl, M

    1988-07-01

    In Xiphophorus, the causative genetic information for melanoma formation has been assigned by classical genetics to chromosomal loci, which are located on the sex chromosomes. In our attempts to molecularly clone these melanoma-determining loci, named Tu, we have looked for restriction-fragment-length markers (RFLMs) linked to the Tu loci. These RFLMs should be useful in obtaining a physical map of a Tu locus, which will aid in the cloning of the corresponding sequences. DNA samples from various Xiphophorus strains and hybrids including those bearing different Tu wild-type, deletion and translocation chromosomes, were screened for the presence of random RFLMs using homologous or heterologous sequences as hybridization probes. We find an EcoRI restriction fragment which shows limited crosshybridization to the v-erb B gene--but not representing the authentic c-erb B gene of Xiphophorus--to be polymorphic with respect to different sex chromosomes. Linkage analysis revealed that a 5-kb fragment is linked to the Tu-Sd locus on the X chromosome, a 7-kb fragment is linked to the Tu-Sr locus on the Y chromosome, both of Xiphophorus maculatus, and that a 12-kb fragment is linked to the Tu-Li locus on the X chromosome of Xiphophorus variatus. Using different chromosomal mutants this RFLM has been mapped to a frequent deletion/translocation breakpoint of the X chromosome, less than 0.3 cM apart from the Tu locus. PMID:2841190

  18. Conservation and de novo acquisition of dosage compensation on newly evolved sex chromosomes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Alekseyenko, Artyom A.; Ellison, Christopher E.; Gorchakov, Andrey A.; Zhou, Qi; Kaiser, Vera B.; Toda, Nick; Walton, Zaak; Peng, Shouyong; Park, Peter J.; Bachtrog, Doris; Kuroda, Mitzi I.

    2013-01-01

    Dosage compensation has arisen in response to the evolution of distinct male (XY) and female (XX) karyotypes. In Drosophila melanogaster, the MSL complex increases male X transcription approximately twofold. X-specific targeting is thought to occur through sequence-dependent binding to chromatin entry sites (CESs), followed by spreading in cis to active genes. We tested this model by asking how newly evolving sex chromosome arms in Drosophila miranda acquired dosage compensation. We found evidence for the creation of new CESs, with the analogous sequence and spacing as in D. melanogaster, providing strong support for the spreading model in the establishment of dosage compensation. PMID:23630075

  19. Use of laser microdissection for the construction of Humulus japonicus Siebold et Zuccarini, 1846 (Cannabaceae) sex chromosome-specific DNA library and cytogenetics analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yakovin, Nickolay A.; Divashuk, Mikhail G.; Razumova, Olga V.; Soloviev, Alexander A.; Karlov, Gennady I.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Dioecy is relatively rare among plant species, and distinguishable sex chromosomes have been reported in few dioecious species. The multiple sex chromosome system (XX/XY1Y2) of Humulus japonicus Siebold et Zuccarini, 1846 differs from that of other members of the family Cannabaceae, in which the XX/XY chromosome system is present. Sex chromosomes of Humulus japonicus were isolated from meiotic chromosome spreads of males by laser microdissection with the P.A.L.M. MicroLaser system. The chromosomal DNA was directly amplified by degenerate oligonucleotide primed polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR). Fast fluorescence in situ hybridization (FAST-FISH) using a labeled, chromosome-specific DOP-PCR product as a probe showed preferential hybridization to sex chromosomes. In addition, the DOP-PCR product was used to construct a short-insert, Humulus japonicus sex chromosomes-specific DNA library. The randomly sequenced clones showed that about 12% of them have significant homology to Humulus lupulus and 88% to Cannabis sativa Linnaeus, 1753 sequences from GenBank database. Forty-four percent of the sequences show homology to plant retroelements. It was concluded that laser microdissection is a useful tool for isolating the DNA of sex chromosomes of Humulus japonicus and for the construction of chromosome-specific DNA libraries for the study of the structure and evolution of sex chromosomes. The results provide the potential for identifying unique or sex chromosome-specific sequence elements in Humulus japonicus and could aid in the identification of sex chromosome-specific repeat and coding regions through chromosome isolation and genome complexity reduction. PMID:25610546

  20. Brain organization in a reptile lacking sex chromosomes: effects of gonadectomy and exogenous testosterone.

    PubMed

    Crews, D; Coomber, P; Baldwin, R; Azad, N; Gonzalez-Lima, F

    1996-12-01

    In mammals, males and females differ both genetically and hormonally, making it difficult to assess the relative contributions of genetic constitution and fetal environment in the process of sexual differentiation. Many reptiles lack sex chromosomes, relying instead on the temperature of incubation to determine sex. In the leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius), an incubation temperature of 26 degrees C produces all females, whereas 32.5 degrees C results in mostly males. Incubation temperature is the primary determinant of differences both within and between the sexes in growth, physiology, and sociosexual behavior, as well as the volume and metabolic capacity of specific brain nuclei. To determine if incubation temperature organizes the brain directly rather than via gonadal sex hormones, the gonads of male and female leopard geckos from the two incubation temperatures were removed and, in some instances, animals were given exogenous testosterone. In vertebrates with sex chromosomes, the size of sexually dimorphic nuclei are sensitive to hormone levels in adulthood, but in all species studied to date, these changes are restricted to the male. Therefore, after behavior tests, morphometrics of certain limbic and nonlimbic brain areas were determined. Because nervous system tissue depends on oxidative metabolism for energy production and the level of cytochrome oxidase activity is coupled to the functional level of neuronal activity, cytochrome oxidase histochemistry also was performed on the same brains. Hormonal manipulation had little effect on the volume of the preoptic area or ventromedial hypothalamus in geckos from the all-female incubation temperature, but significantly influenced the volumes of these brain areas in males and females from the male-biased incubation temperature. A similar relationship was found for cytochrome oxidase activity of the anterior hypothalamus, amygdala, dorsal ventricular ridge, and septum. The only sex difference observed was

  1. Dosage effects of X and Y chromosomes on language and social functioning in children with supernumerary sex chromosome aneuploidies: Implications for idiopathic language impairment and autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nancy Raitano; Wallace, Gregory L.; Adeyemi, Elizabeth I.; Lopez, Katherine C.; Blumenthal, Jonathan D.; Clasen, Liv S.; Giedd, Jay N.

    2012-01-01

    Background Supernumerary sex chromosome aneuploidies (X/Y-aneuploidies), the presence of extra X- and/or Y-chromosomes, are associated with heightened rates of language impairments and social difficulties. However, no single study has examined different language domains and social functioning in the same sample of children with tri-, tetra-, and pentasomy X/Y-aneuploidy. The current research sought to fill this gap in the literature and to examine dosage effects of X- and Y-chromosomes on language and social functioning. Methods Participants included 110 youth with X/Y-aneuploidies (32 female) and 52 with typical development (25 female) matched on age (mean~12 years; range 4–22) and maternal education. Participants completed the Wechsler intelligence scales and parents completed the Children’s Communication Checklist-2 and the Social Responsiveness Scale to assess language skills and autistic traits, respectively. Results Both supernumerary X- and Y-chromosomes were related to depressed structural and pragmatic language skills and increased autistic traits. The addition of a Y-chromosome had a disproportionately greater impact on pragmatic language; the addition of one or more X-chromosomes had a disproportionately greater impact on structural language. Conclusions Given that we link extra X-chromosomes with structural language impairments and an extra Y-chromosome with pragmatic language impairments, X/Y-aneuploidies may provide clues to genetic mechanisms contributing to idiopathic language impairment and autism spectrum disorders. PMID:22827287

  2. First evidence for (TTAGG)n telomeric sequence and sex chromosome post-reduction in Coleorrhyncha (Insecta, Hemiptera)

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Valentina G.; Grozeva, Snejana M.; Hartung, Viktor; Anokhin, Boris A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Telomeric repeats are general and significant structures of eukaryotic chromosomes. However, nothing is known about the molecular structure of telomeres in the enigmatic hemipteran suborder Coleorrhyncha (moss bugs) commonly considered as the sister group to the suborder Heteroptera (true bugs). The true bugs are known to differ from the rest of the Hemiptera in that they display an inverted sequence of sex chromosome divisions in male meiosis, the so-called sex chromosome post-reduction. To date, there has been no information about meiosis in Coleorrhyncha. Here we report a cytogenetic observation of Peloridium pomponorum, a representative of the single extant coleorrhynchan family Peloridiidae, using the standard chromosome staining and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a (TTAGG)n telomeric probe. We show that Peloridium pomponorum displays 2n = 31 (30A + X) in males, the classical insect (TTAGG)n telomere organization and sex chromosome post-reduction during spermatocyte meiosis. The plesiomorphic insect-type (TTAGG)n telomeric sequence is suggested to be preserved in Coleorrhyncha and in a basal heteropteran infraorder Nepomorpha, but absent (lost) in the advanced heteropteran lineages Cimicomorpha and Pentatomomorpha. The telomere structure in other true bug infraorders is currently unknown. We consider here the inverted sequence of sex chromosome divisions as a synapomorphy of the group Coleorrhyncha + Heteroptera. PMID:26753072

  3. Silencing of X-Linked MicroRNAs by Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Royo, Hélène; Seitz, Hervé; ElInati, Elias; Peters, Antoine H. F. M.; Stadler, Michael B.; Turner, James M. A.

    2015-01-01

    During the pachytene stage of meiosis in male mammals, the X and Y chromosomes are transcriptionally silenced by Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation (MSCI). MSCI is conserved in therian mammals and is essential for normal male fertility. Transcriptomics approaches have demonstrated that in mice, most or all protein-coding genes on the X chromosome are subject to MSCI. However, it is unclear whether X-linked non-coding RNAs behave in a similar manner. The X chromosome is enriched in microRNA (miRNA) genes, with many exhibiting testis-biased expression. Importantly, high expression levels of X-linked miRNAs (X-miRNAs) have been reported in pachytene spermatocytes, indicating that these genes may escape MSCI, and perhaps play a role in the XY-silencing process. Here we use RNA FISH to examine X-miRNA expression in the male germ line. We find that, like protein-coding X-genes, X-miRNAs are expressed prior to prophase I and are thereafter silenced during pachynema. X-miRNA silencing does not occur in mouse models with defective MSCI. Furthermore, X-miRNAs are expressed at pachynema when present as autosomally integrated transgenes. Thus, we conclude that silencing of X-miRNAs during pachynema in wild type males is MSCI-dependent. Importantly, misexpression of X-miRNAs during pachynema causes spermatogenic defects. We propose that MSCI represents a chromosomal mechanism by which X-miRNAs, and other potential X-encoded repressors, can be silenced, thereby regulating genes with critical late spermatogenic functions. PMID:26509798

  4. X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y sex chromosome systems in the Neotropical Gymnotiformes electric fish of the genus Brachyhypopomus.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Adauto Lima; Pieczarka, Julio Cesar; Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko

    2015-05-01

    Several types of sex chromosome systems have been recorded among Gymnotiformes, including male and female heterogamety, simple and multiple sex chromosomes, and different mechanisms of origin and evolution. The X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y systems identified in three species of this order are considered homoplasic for the group. In the genus Brachyhypopomus, only B. gauderio presented this type of system. Herein we describe the karyotypes of Brachyhypopomus pinnicaudatus and B. n. sp. FLAV, which have an X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y sex chromosome system that evolved via fusion between an autosome and the Y chromosome. The morphology of the chromosomes and the meiotic pairing suggest that the sex chromosomes of B. gauderio and B. pinnicaudatus have a common origin, whereas in B . n. sp. FLAV the sex chromosome system evolved independently. However, we cannot discard the possibility of common origin followed by distinct processes of differentiation. The identification of two new karyotypes with an X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y sex chromosome system in Gymnotiformes makes it the most common among the karyotyped species of the group. Comparisons of these karyotypes and the evolutionary history of the taxa indicate independent origins for their sex chromosomes systems. The recurrent emergence of the X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y system may represent sex chromosomes turnover events in Gymnotiformes. PMID:26273225

  5. Diversity of Sex Chromosome Systems in Ancistrini (Loricariidae, Hypostominae): ZZ/ZW in Ancistrus taunayi Miranda Ribeiro, 1918.

    PubMed

    Thums Konerat, Jocicléia; Bueno, Vanessa; Margarido, Vladimir P; Portela-Castro, Ana L B; Martins-Santos, Isabel C

    2015-01-01

    The karyotype of the Ancistrini catfish Ancistrus taunayi was analyzed by conventional (Giemsa staining, AgNOR staining and C-banding) and molecular cytogenetic (5S and 18S rDNA-FISH) methods. The diploid chromosome number was 2n = 50 (22 metacentrics + 10 submetacentrics + 10 subtelocentrics + 8 acrocentrics) for both sexes. A single NOR-bearing acrocentric chromosome pair (No. 24) was detected after Ag-staining and 18S rDNA-FISH, while 5S rDNA was found only in the subtelocentric pair No. 21. Conspicuous GC-rich heterochromatin blocks corresponded to the NOR sites and were also observed in the distal regions of the acrocentric chromosome pairs Nos. 22 and 25. Chromosome pair No. 22 differed between males and females; in males, only a small interstitial block of GC-rich heterochromatin was present in both chromosomes, whereas in females, 2 blocks of GC-rich heterochromatin flanked a euchromatic region in one of the homologues, suggesting the occurrence of a ZZ/ZW sex chromosome system. Two mechanisms for the origin and evolution of this simple ZZ/ZW sex chromosome system in A. taunayi are proposed: (1) a paracentric inversion followed by amplification of the proximal heterochromatin and (2) amplification of the interstitial heterochromatin followed by a paracentric inversion. Although ZZ/ZW systems have already been described for other Ancistrus species, our results do not show the same pattern, suggesting an independent origin. PMID:26523437

  6. Is the rate of insertion and deletion mutation male biased?: Molecular evolutionary analysis of avian and primate sex chromosome sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Sundström, Hannah; Webster, Matthew T; Ellegren, Hans

    2003-01-01

    The rate of mutation for nucleotide substitution is generally higher among males than among females, likely owing to the larger number of DNA replications in spermatogenesis than in oogenesis. For insertion and deletion (indel) mutations, data from a few human genetic disease loci indicate that the two sexes may mutate at similar rates, possibly because such mutations arise in connection with meiotic crossing over. To address origin- and sex-specific rates of indel mutation we have conducted the first large-scale molecular evolutionary analysis of indels in noncoding DNA sequences from sex chromosomes. The rates are similar on the X and Y chromosomes of primates but about twice as high on the avian Z chromosome as on the W chromosome. The fact that indels are not uncommon on the nonrecombining Y and W chromosomes excludes meiotic crossing over as the main cause of indel mutation. On the other hand, the similar rates on X and Y indicate that the number of DNA replications (higher for Y than for X) is also not the main factor. Our observations are therefore consistent with a role of both DNA replication and recombination in the generation of short insertion and deletion mutations. A significant excess of deletion compared to insertion events is observed on the avian W chromosome, consistent with gradual DNA loss on a nonrecombining chromosome. PMID:12750337

  7. Sex differences in diurnal rhythms of food intake in mice caused by gonadal hormones and complement of sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuqi; Wang, Lixin; Loh, Dawn H; Colwell, Christopher S; Taché, Yvette; Reue, Karen; Arnold, Arthur P

    2015-09-01

    We measured diurnal rhythms of food intake, as well as body weight and composition, while varying three major classes of sex-biasing factors: activational and organizational effects of gonadal hormones, and sex chromosome complement (SCC). Four Core Genotypes (FCG) mice, comprising XX and XY gonadal males and XX and XY gonadal females, were either gonad-intact or gonadectomized (GDX) as adults (2.5months); food intake was measured second-by-second for 7days starting 5weeks later, and body weight and composition were measured for 22weeks thereafter. Gonadal males weighed more than females. GDX increased body weight/fat of gonadal females, but increased body fat and reduced body weight of males. After GDX, XX mice had greater body weight and more fat than XY mice. In gonad-intact mice, males had greater total food intake and more meals than females during the dark phase, but females had more food intake and meals and larger meals than males during the light phase. GDX reduced overall food intake irrespective of gonad type or SCC, and eliminated differences in feeding between groups with different gonads. Diurnal phase of feeding was influenced by all three sex-biasing variables. Gonad-intact females had earlier onset and acrophase (peak) of feeding relative to males. GDX caused a phase-advance of feeding, especially in XX mice, leading to an earlier onset of feeding in GDX XX vs. XY mice, but earlier acrophase in GDX males relative to females. Gonadal hormones and SCC interact in the control of diurnal rhythms of food intake. PMID:26226656

  8. Microparasites and Placental Invasiveness in Eutherian Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Capellini, Isabella; Nunn, Charles L.; Barton, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Placental invasiveness—the number of maternal tissue layers separating fetal tissues from maternal blood—is variable across mammalian species. Although this diversity is likely to be functionally important, variation in placental invasiveness remains unexplained. Here we test the hypothesis that increased risk of transplacental transmission of pathogens from the mother to the fetus promotes the evolution of non-invasive placentation, the most likely derived condition in eutherian mammals. Specifically, we predict that non-invasive placentation is associated with increased microparasite species richness relative to more invasive placental types, based on the assumption that higher numbers of microparasites in a population reflects greater risk of transplacental transmission to fetuses. As predicted, higher bacteria species richness is associated with non-invasive placentation. Protozoa species richness, however, shows the opposite pattern. Because invasive placentae facilitate the transfer of maternal antibodies to the fetus, we propose that the ancestral condition of invasive placentation is retained under selection for protection of newborns from higher risk of postnatal protozoan infection. Hence, our findings suggest that a tradeoff exists between protection against bacterial infection prenatally and protozoan infection postnatally. Future studies are needed to investigate how maternal prevalence of infection and the relative pre- versus postnatal risk of fetal infection by different microparasite groups vary among mammalian hosts in relation to placental invasiveness. PMID:26168031

  9. A new physical mapping approach refines the sex-determining gene positions on the Silene latifolia Y-chromosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazama, Yusuke; Ishii, Kotaro; Aonuma, Wataru; Ikeda, Tokihiro; Kawamoto, Hiroki; Koizumi, Ayako; Filatov, Dmitry A.; Chibalina, Margarita; Bergero, Roberta; Charlesworth, Deborah; Abe, Tomoko; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    Sex chromosomes are particularly interesting regions of the genome for both molecular genetics and evolutionary studies; yet, for most species, we lack basic information, such as the gene order along the chromosome. Because they lack recombination, Y-linked genes cannot be mapped genetically, leaving physical mapping as the only option for establishing the extent of synteny and homology with the X chromosome. Here, we developed a novel and general method for deletion mapping of non-recombining regions by solving “the travelling salesman problem”, and evaluate its accuracy using simulated datasets. Unlike the existing radiation hybrid approach, this method allows us to combine deletion mutants from different experiments and sources. We applied our method to a set of newly generated deletion mutants in the dioecious plant Silene latifolia and refined the locations of the sex-determining loci on its Y chromosome map.

  10. A new physical mapping approach refines the sex-determining gene positions on the Silene latifolia Y-chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Kazama, Yusuke; Ishii, Kotaro; Aonuma, Wataru; Ikeda, Tokihiro; Kawamoto, Hiroki; Koizumi, Ayako; Filatov, Dmitry A.; Chibalina, Margarita; Bergero, Roberta; Charlesworth, Deborah; Abe, Tomoko; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    Sex chromosomes are particularly interesting regions of the genome for both molecular genetics and evolutionary studies; yet, for most species, we lack basic information, such as the gene order along the chromosome. Because they lack recombination, Y-linked genes cannot be mapped genetically, leaving physical mapping as the only option for establishing the extent of synteny and homology with the X chromosome. Here, we developed a novel and general method for deletion mapping of non-recombining regions by solving “the travelling salesman problem”, and evaluate its accuracy using simulated datasets. Unlike the existing radiation hybrid approach, this method allows us to combine deletion mutants from different experiments and sources. We applied our method to a set of newly generated deletion mutants in the dioecious plant Silene latifolia and refined the locations of the sex-determining loci on its Y chromosome map. PMID:26742857

  11. Intragenic sex-chromosomal crossovers of Xmrk oncogene alleles affect pigment pattern formation and the severity of melanoma in Xiphophorus.

    PubMed Central

    Gutbrod, H; Schartl, M

    1999-01-01

    The X and Y chromosomes of the platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus) contain a region that encodes several important traits, including the determination of sex, pigment pattern formation, and predisposition to develop malignant melanoma. Several sex-chromosomal crossovers were identified in this region. As the melanoma-inducing oncogene Xmrk is the only molecularly identified constituent, its genomic organization on both sex chromosomes was analyzed in detail. Using X and Y allele-specific sequence differences a high proportion of the crossovers was found to be intragenic in the oncogene Xmrk, concentrating in the extracellular domain-encoding region. The genetic and molecular data allowed establishment of an order of loci over approximately 0.6 cM. It further revealed a sequence located within several kilobases of the extracellular domain-encoding region of Xmrk that regulates overexpression of the oncogene. PMID:9927468

  12. Local mechanisms in sex specific morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Drews, U

    2000-01-01

    Sex determination in mammals occurs on three levels. Segregation of sex chromosomes determines the chromosomal sex. Sry on the Y chromosome induces formation of a testis which in turn regulates via AMH and testosterone the development of the genital tract and the external phenotype. Recently a number of new factors have been described, which affect sexual development but have not yet found a place in the above canonical scheme of sex determination. For the purpose of this review, the factors are aligned according to their quality as transcription factors, steroid hormones, or growth factors. In this web of regulatory factors, the classical sex determining factors have evolved as master mechanisms while others function as slaves, or were totally suppressed. In this context, androgens acquired a dominant role in mammalian development. Androgens determine the morphogenesis of the genital tract. The effects of androgens are mediated by local cellular interactions. In the cranial section of the Wolffian duct the androgen receptor appears in the epithelium and mediates maintenance of the duct via an epithelial factor. In the caudal section of the duct the androgen receptor is expressed in the embryonic mesenchyme. Vesicular glands are induced via a morphogenetically active mesenchymal condensation, while the epithelial buds are primarily AR androgen receptor negative. The dominant role of androgens and formation of a vagina evolved together at the transition to eutherian mammals. Under this aspect, the role of androgens in the development of the vagina is analyzed. PMID:11173834

  13. Unusual distribution of Zfy and Zfx sequences on the sex chromosomes of the wood lemming, a species exhibiting XY sex reversal.

    PubMed

    Lau, Y F; Yang-Feng, T L; Elder, B; Fredga, K; Wiberg, U H

    1992-01-01

    Sex reversal occurs naturally in the wood lemming (Myopus schisticolor) due to the presence in populations of this species of a variant (mutated) X chromosome, designated X*. Thus, X*Y animals develop into females, whereas XY animals develop into normal males. Chromosome mapping by in situ hybridization of DNA sequences homologous to the human ZFY gene localized the wood lemming Zfx sequences to region p12----p11 on both the wild-type X and the mutated X* chromosomes, at or proximal to a presumed breakpoint (Xp12) involved in the generation of the X* chromosome from the normal X, and Zfy sequences along the entire short arm of the Y chromosome. Differences between Zfx and Zfx* were readily detected by Southern blot analysis. However, both the Zfx and Zfx* genes expressed similarly sized transcripts in all adult somatic tissues investigated. Although the precise molecular difference between the Zfx and Zfx* genes is still unknown, their chromosomal location suggests that either Zfx or some other closely linked gene(s) on the X chromosome may be a major X-linked sex-determining gene, Tdx, which in the X* chromosome fails to interact properly with the Y-linked testis-determining gene, Tdy, thus causing X*Y embryos to develop into females. At least 15 copies of wood lemming Zfy sequences are distributed along the short arm of the Y chromosome. Northern hybridization analyses of adult tissues and somatic cell lines indicated that these Zfy repeats were transcriptionally inactive. Normally, 3-kb Zfy (ZFY) transcripts are readily detected in mouse and human testes, especially in the germ cells. It has therefore been postulated that expression of the Zfy (ZFY) gene may be important for spermatogenesis. Whether the lack of sufficient Zfy transcripts in the testis of the adult wood lemming has any impact on spermatogenesis in this species is still to be elucidated by further studies. PMID:1349859

  14. Fine structure and meiotic behaviour of the male multiple sex chromosomes in the genus Alouatta.

    PubMed

    Solari, A J; Rahn, M I

    2005-01-01

    The meiotic cytology and fine structure of the sex multiples in males from two species of the genus Alouatta are presented and compared with descriptions from other species of this genus. As shown in pachytene by synaptonemal complex analysis and in metaphase I by spreading, there is a quadrivalent in male meiosis in A. caraya, which is formed by an X(1)X(2)Y(1)Y(2) complex, while in A. palliata there is a trivalent formed by an X(1)X(2)Y(1) complex. Chromosome painting with human probes shows that A. caraya sex multiples share the same components as those of A. seniculus sara and A. seniculus arctoidea. However, as shown here for A. palliata and by others in A. fusca, there are differences among the multiples of some species. It is shown that in this genus there are several varieties of sex multiples that share some features, and that the origin of these multiples is most probably a primitive development in the genus Alouatta. PMID:15545739

  15. FAST-FISH with laser beam microdissected DOP-PCR probe distinguishes the sex chromosomes of Silene latifolia.

    PubMed

    Hobza, Roman; Lengerova, Martina; Cernohorska, Halina; Rubes, Jiri; Vyskot, Boris

    2004-01-01

    We present an improved FISH strategy for differentiating the sex chromosomes of the dioecious model plant, Silene latifolia. Fixed mitotic protoplasts were dropped on a polyethylene naphthalate membrane, the X or Y chromosomes were isolated using nitrogen laser beam microdissection, catapulted by laser pressure, and amplified by DOP-PCR. A modified FAST-FISH protocol based on a short hybridization time combined with a low concentration of probe was used. The success of this approach is demonstrated by the differential labeling of the X and Y chromosomes and it could represent a quick method for comparing organization of plant genomes. PMID:15125638

  16. The mammary gland-specific marsupial ELP and eutherian CTI share a common ancestral gene

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The marsupial early lactation protein (ELP) gene is expressed in the mammary gland and the protein is secreted into milk during early lactation (Phase 2A). Mature ELP shares approximately 55.4% similarity with the colostrum-specific bovine colostrum trypsin inhibitor (CTI) protein. Although ELP and CTI both have a single bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI)-Kunitz domain and are secreted only during the early lactation phases, their evolutionary history is yet to be investigated. Results Tammar ELP was isolated from a genomic library and the fat-tailed dunnart and Southern koala ELP genes cloned from genomic DNA. The tammar ELP gene was expressed only in the mammary gland during late pregnancy (Phase 1) and early lactation (Phase 2A). The opossum and fat-tailed dunnart ELP and cow CTI transcripts were cloned from RNA isolated from the mammary gland and dog CTI from cells in colostrum. The putative mature ELP and CTI peptides shared 44.6%-62.2% similarity. In silico analyses identified the ELP and CTI genes in the other species examined and provided compelling evidence that they evolved from a common ancestral gene. In addition, whilst the eutherian CTI gene was conserved in the Laurasiatherian orders Carnivora and Cetartiodactyla, it had become a pseudogene in others. These data suggest that bovine CTI may be the ancestral gene of the Artiodactyla-specific, rapidly evolving chromosome 13 pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (PTI), spleen trypsin inhibitor (STI) and the five placenta-specific trophoblast Kunitz domain protein (TKDP1-5) genes. Conclusions Marsupial ELP and eutherian CTI evolved from an ancestral therian mammal gene before the divergence of marsupials and eutherians between 130 and 160 million years ago. The retention of the ELP gene in marsupials suggests that this early lactation-specific milk protein may have an important role in the immunologically naïve young of these species. PMID:22681678

  17. Genomic Diversity in Two Related Plant Species with and without Sex Chromosomes - Silene latifolia and S. vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Cegan, Radim; Vyskot, Boris; Kejnovsky, Eduard; Kubat, Zdenek; Blavet, Hana; Šafář, Jan; Doležel, Jaroslav; Blavet, Nicolas; Hobza, Roman

    2012-01-01

    Background Genome size evolution is a complex process influenced by polyploidization, satellite DNA accumulation, and expansion of retroelements. How this process could be affected by different reproductive strategies is still poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed differences in the number and distribution of major repetitive DNA elements in two closely related species, Silene latifolia and S. vulgaris. Both species are diploid and possess the same chromosome number (2n = 24), but differ in their genome size and mode of reproduction. The dioecious S. latifolia (1C = 2.70 pg DNA) possesses sex chromosomes and its genome is 2.5× larger than that of the gynodioecious S. vulgaris (1C = 1.13 pg DNA), which does not possess sex chromosomes. We discovered that the genome of S. latifolia is larger mainly due to the expansion of Ogre retrotransposons. Surprisingly, the centromeric STAR-C and TR1 tandem repeats were found to be more abundant in S. vulgaris, the species with the smaller genome. We further examined the distribution of major repetitive sequences in related species in the Caryophyllaceae family. The results of FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) on mitotic chromosomes with the Retand element indicate that large rearrangements occurred during the evolution of the Caryophyllaceae family. Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate that the evolution of genome size in the genus Silene is accompanied by the expansion of different repetitive elements with specific patterns in the dioecious species possessing the sex chromosomes. PMID:22393373

  18. Gonadal malignancy in 202 female patients with disorders of sex development containing Y-chromosome material.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian-Fa; Xue, Wei; Deng, Yan; Tian, Qin-Jie; Sun, Ai-Jun

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to examine risks for gonadal malignancy in a large sample of adult female patients with disorders of sex development (DSD). A retrospective-observational study was conducted from July 1992 to March 2015 and 202 women with DSD were enrolled. Tumor risks for different types of DSD were measured. We found that the patients' total gonadal-malignancy risk was 18.3% (37/202). Tumors included gonadoblastoma (n = 11), seminoma (n = 8), dysgerminoma (n = 5), choriocarcinoma (n = 1), sertoli cell tumors (n = 11), and leydig cell tumors (n = 1). The incidence of gonadal malignancy in patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS), pure 46, XY gonadal dysgenesis, 45 X/46 XY mixed gonadal dysgenesis, 17α-hydroxylase/17, 20-lyase deficiency and partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS) were 27.1% (13/48), 22.4% (15/67), 10.9% (5/46), 10% (2/20) and 9.5% (2/21), respectively. Our results suggest that the incidence of gonadal malignancy increases with age for female patients with Y-chromosome material. Upon diagnoses, immediate, prophylactic gonadectomies should be considered for adult female patients with DSD containing Y chromosome material if they cannot receive regular follow-ups. PMID:26608236

  19. Separate effects of sex hormones and sex chromosomes on brain structure and function revealed by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and spatial navigation assessment of the Four Core Genotype mouse model.

    PubMed

    Corre, Christina; Friedel, Miriam; Vousden, Dulcie A; Metcalf, Ariane; Spring, Shoshana; Qiu, Lily R; Lerch, Jason P; Palmert, Mark R

    2016-03-01

    Males and females exhibit several differences in brain structure and function. To examine the basis for these sex differences, we investigated the influences of sex hormones and sex chromosomes on brain structure and function in mice. We used the Four Core Genotype (4CG) mice, which can generate both male and female mice with XX or XY sex chromosome complement, allowing the decoupling of sex chromosomes from hormonal milieu. To examine whole brain structure, high-resolution ex vivo MRI was performed, and to assess differences in cognitive function, mice were trained on a radial arm maze. Voxel-wise and volumetric analyses of MRI data uncovered a striking independence of hormonal versus chromosomal influences in 30 sexually dimorphic brain regions. For example, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the parieto-temporal lobe of the cerebral cortex displayed steroid-dependence while the cerebellar cortex, corpus callosum, and olfactory bulbs were influenced by sex chromosomes. Spatial learning and memory demonstrated strict hormone-dependency with no apparent influence of sex chromosomes. Understanding the influences of chromosomes and hormones on brain structure and function is important for understanding sex differences in brain structure and function, an endeavor that has eventual implications for understanding sex biases observed in the prevalence of psychiatric disorders. PMID:25445841

  20. Analysis of HLA and disease susceptibility: Chromosome 6 genes and sex influence long-QT phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Weitkamp, L.R.; Moss, A.J.; Hall, W.J.; Robinson, J.L.; Guttormsen, S.A.; Lewis, R.A.; MacCluer, J.W.; Schwartz, P.J.; Locati, E.H.; Tzivoni, D.

    1994-12-01

    The long-QT (LQT) syndrome is a genetically complex disorder that is characterized by syncope and fatal ventricular arrhythmias. LQT syndrome, as defined by a prolonged electrocardiographic QT interval, has a higher incidence in females than in males and does not exhibit Mendelian transmission patterns in all families. Among those families that are nearly consistent with Mendelian transmission, linkage between a locus for LQT syndrome and the H-ras-1 locus on the short arm of chromosome 11 has been reported in some families but not in others. Earlier analyses suggesting that LQT syndrome might be caused by a gene in the HLA region of chromosome 6 were not confirmed by standard linkage analyses. Here, we present an analysis of HLA haplotype sharing among affected pedigree members, showing an excess of haplotype sharing in a previously published Japanese pedigree and possibly also in 15 families of European descent. The haplotypes shared by affected individuals derive from both affected and unaffected parents. In an analysis of independent (unrelated) HLA haplotypes, we also found a nonrandom distribution of HLA-DR genes in LQT syndrome patients compared with controls, suggesting an association between the LQT phenotype and specific HLA-DR genes. Our data indicate that DR2 has a protective effect and, particularly in males, that DR7 may increase susceptibility to the LQT syndrome. Thus, LQT syndrome may be influenced by genes on chromosomes 11 and 6, possibly with a sex-specific effect. These results provide a model for an effect of HLA-region genes inherited from either parent on the expression of an illness that may be determined principally by alleles at loci not linked to HLA.

  1. Neurocognitive Outcomes of Individuals with a Sex Chromosome Trisomy: XXX, XYY, or XXY--A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leggett, Victoria; Jacobs, Patricia; Nation, Kate; Scerif, Gaia; Bishop, Dorothy V. M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To review systematically the neurodevelopmental characteristics of individuals with sex chromosome trisomies (SCTs). Method: A bibliographic search identified English-language articles on SCTs. The focus was on studies unbiased by clinical referral, with power of at least 0.69 to detect an effect size of 1.0. Results: We identified 35…

  2. Social Deficits in Male Children and Adolescents with Sex Chromosome Aneuploidy: A Comparison of XXY, XYY, and XXYY Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordeiro, Lisa; Tartaglia, Nicole; Roeltgen, David; Ross, Judith

    2012-01-01

    We compare social skills in three groups of males with sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) using the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS). Participants included males with XXY (N = 102, M = 10.08 years), XYY (N = 40, M = 9.93 years), and XXYY (N = 32, M = 11.57 years). XXY had lower (better) SRS scores compared to XYY and XXYY. Scores were not…

  3. In Situ Gene Mapping of Two Genes Supports Independent Evolution of Sex Chromosomes in Cold-Adapted Antarctic Fish

    PubMed Central

    Ghigliotti, Laura; Cheng, C.-H. Christina; Bonillo, Céline; Coutanceau, Jean-Pierre; Pisano, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Two genes, that is, 5S ribosomal sequences and antifreeze glycoprotein (AFGP) genes, were mapped onto chromosomes of eight Antarctic notothenioid fish possessing a X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y sex chromosome system, namely, Chionodraco hamatus and Pagetopsis macropterus (family Channichthyidae), Trematomus hansoni, T. newnesi, T. nicolai, T. lepidorhinus, and Pagothenia borchgrevinki (family Nototheniidae), and Artedidraco skottsbergi (family Artedidraconidae). Through fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), we uncovered distinct differences in the gene content of the Y chromosomes in the eight species, with C. hamatus and P. macropterus standing out among others in bearing 5S rDNA and AFGP sequences on their Y chromosomes, respectively. Both genes were absent from the Y chromosomes of any analyzed species. The distinct patterns of Y and non-Y chromosome association of the 5S rDNA and AFGP genes in species representing different Antarctic fish families support an independent origin of the sex heterochromosomes in notothenioids with interesting implications for the evolutionary/adaptational history of these fishes living in a cold-stable environment. PMID:23509694

  4. Karyotype, Sex Determination, and Meiotic Chromosome Behavior in Two Pholcid (Araneomorphae, Pholcidae) Spiders: Implications for Karyotype Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Golding, Adriana E.; Paliulis, Leocadia V.

    2011-01-01

    There are 1,111 species of pholcid spiders, of which less than 2% have published karyotypes. Our aim in this study was to determine the karyotypes and sex determination mechanisms of two species of pholcids: Physocyclus mexicanus (Banks, 1898) and Holocnemus pluchei (Scopoli, 1763), and to observe sex chromosome behavior during meiosis. We constructed karyotypes for P. mexicanus and H. pluchei using information from both living and fixed cells. We found that P. mexicanus has a chromosome number of 2n = 15 in males and 2n = 16 in females with X0-XX sex determination, like other members of the genus Physocyclus. H. pluchei has a chromosome number of 2n = 28 in males and 2n = 28 in females with XY-XX sex determination, which is substantially different from its closest relatives. These data contribute to our knowledge of the evolution of this large and geographically ubiquitous family, and are the first evidence of XY-XX sex determination in pholcids. PMID:21931842

  5. Indirect effects of ploidy suggest X chromosome dose, not the X:A ratio, signals sex in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Erickson, James W; Quintero, Jerome J

    2007-12-01

    In the textbook view, the ratio of X chromosomes to autosome sets, X:A, is the primary signal specifying sexual fate in Drosophila. An alternative idea is that X chromosome number signals sex through the direct actions of several X-encoded signal element (XSE) proteins. In this alternative, the influence of autosome dose on X chromosome counting is largely indirect. Haploids (1X;1A), which possess the male number of X chromosomes but the female X:A of 1.0, and triploid intersexes (XX;AAA), which possess a female dose of two X chromosomes and the ambiguous X:A ratio of 0.67, represent critical tests of these hypotheses. To directly address the effects of ploidy in primary sex determination, we compared the responses of the signal target, the female-specific SxlPe promoter of the switch gene Sex-lethal, in haploid, diploid, and triploid embryos. We found that haploids activate SxlPe because an extra precellular nuclear division elevates total X chromosome numbers and XSE levels beyond those in diploid males. Conversely, triploid embryos cellularize one cycle earlier than diploids, causing premature cessation of SxlPe expression. This prevents XX;AAA embryos from fully engaging the autoregulatory mechanism that maintains subsequent Sxl expression, causing them to develop as sexual mosaics. We conclude that the X:A ratio predicts sexual fate, but does not actively specify it. Instead, the instructive X chromosome signal is more appropriately seen as collective XSE dose in the early embryo. Our findings reiterate that correlations between X:A ratios and cell fates in other organisms need not implicate the value of the ratio as an active signal. PMID:18162044

  6. Asymmetry of cerebral gray and white matter and structural volumes in relation to sex hormones and chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Savic, Ivanka

    2014-01-01

    Whilst many studies show sex differences in cerebral asymmetry, their mechanisms are still unknown. This report describes the potential impact of sex hormones and sex chromosomes by comparing MR data from 39 male and 47 female controls and 33 men with an extra X-chromosome (47,XXY). Methods: Regional asymmetry in gray and white matter volumes (GMV and WMV) was calculated using voxel based moprhometry (SPM5), by contrasting the unflipped and flipped individual GMV and WMV images. In addition, structural volumes were calculated for the thalamus, caudate, putamen, amygdala, and hippocampus, using the FreeSurfer software. Effects of plasma testosterone and estrogen on the GMV and WMV, as well on the right/left ratios of the subcortical volumes were tested by multi-regression analysis. Results: All three groups showed a leftward asymmetry in the motor cortex and the planum temporale, and a rightward asymmetry of the middle occipital cortex. Both asymmetries were more pronounced in 46,XY males than 46,XX females and 47,XXY males, and were positively correlated with testosterone levels. There was also a rightward asymmetry of the vermis and leftward GMV asymmetry in the cerebellar hemispheres in all groups. Notably, cerebellar asymmetries were larger in 46,XX females and 47,XXY males, but were not related to sex hormone levels. No asymmetry differences between 46,XX females and 47,XXY males, and no overall effects of brain size were detected. Conclusion: The asymmetry in the planum temporale area and the occipital cortex seem related to processes associated with testosterone, whereas the observed cerebellar asymmetries suggest a link with X-chromosome escapee genes. Sex differences in cerebral asymmetry are moderated by sex hormones and X-chromosome genes, in a regionally differentiated manner. PMID:25505869

  7. Pseudosynapsis and Decreased Stringency of Meiotic Repair Pathway Choice on the Hemizygous Sex Chromosome of Caenorhabditis elegans Males

    PubMed Central

    Checchi, Paula M.; Lawrence, Katherine S.; Van, Mike V.; Larson, Braden J.; Engebrecht, JoAnne

    2014-01-01

    During meiosis, accurate chromosome segregation relies on homology to mediate chromosome pairing, synapsis, and crossover recombination. Crossovers are dependent upon formation and repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination (HR). In males of many species, sex chromosomes are largely hemizygous, yet DSBs are induced along nonhomologous regions. Here we analyzed the genetic requirements for meiotic DSB repair on the completely hemizygous X chromosome of Caenorhabditis elegans males. Our data reveal that the kinetics of DSB formation, chromosome pairing, and synapsis are tightly linked in the male germ line. Moreover, DSB induction on the X is concomitant with a brief period of pseudosynapsis that may allow X sister chromatids to masquerade as homologs. Consistent with this, neither meiotic kleisins nor the SMC-5/6 complex are essential for DSB repair on the X. Furthermore, early processing of X DSBs is dependent on the CtIP/Sae2 homolog COM-1, suggesting that as with paired chromosomes, HR is the preferred pathway. In contrast, the X chromosome is refractory to feedback mechanisms that ensure crossover formation on autosomes. Surprisingly, neither RAD-54 nor BRC-2 are essential for DSB repair on the X, suggesting that unlike autosomes, the X is competent for repair in the absence of HR. When both RAD-54 and the structure-specific nuclease XPF-1 are abrogated, X DSBs persist, suggesting that single-strand annealing is engaged in the absence of HR. Our findings indicate that alteration in sister chromatid interactions and flexibility in DSB repair pathway choice accommodate hemizygosity on sex chromosomes. PMID:24939994

  8. ZZ/ZW sex chromosome system in the endangered fish Lignobrycon myersi Miranda-Ribeiro, 1956 (Teleostei, Characiformes, Triportheidae)

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Alexandre dos Santos; Medrado, Aline Souza; Diniz, Débora; Oliveira, Claudio; Affonso, Paulo Roberto Antunes de Mello

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lignobrycon myersi is an endemic fish species from a few coastal rivers in northeastern Brazil. Based on molecular evidence, Lignobrycon myersi and genera Triportheus Cope, 1872, Agoniates Müller & Troschel, 1845, Clupeacharax Pearson, 1924 and Engraulisoma Castro, 1981 were placed in the family Triportheidae. In the present work, we report the first cytogenetic data for Lignobrycon myersi to test the hypothesis that Lignobrycon and Triportheus are closely related. Studied specimens presented 2n=52 with 28 metacentric (m), 18 submetacentric (sm) and six subtelocentric (st) chromosomes for males and 27 m, 19 sm and 6 st for females, characterizing a ZZ/ZW sex chromosome system. The Z chromosome corresponds to the largest chromosome in karyotype while the W is about 50% smaller than the Z and largely heterochromatic. Terminal nucleolus organizer regions, GC-rich sites and 18S rDNA signals were detected on pair 14. However, additional 18S rDNA sites were observed in the W chromosome. The 5S rDNA was mainly detected on long arms of pair 7. The apparent synapomorphic chromosomal traits of Triportheus and Lignobrycon myersi reinforce their close phylogenetic relationship, suggesting that the ZZ/ZW chromosome system in both genera has arisen before cladogenic events. PMID:27551346

  9. ZZ/ZW sex chromosome system in the endangered fish Lignobrycon myersi Miranda-Ribeiro, 1956 (Teleostei, Characiformes, Triportheidae).

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Alexandre Dos Santos; Medrado, Aline Souza; Diniz, Débora; Oliveira, Claudio; Affonso, Paulo Roberto Antunes de Mello

    2016-01-01

    Lignobrycon myersi is an endemic fish species from a few coastal rivers in northeastern Brazil. Based on molecular evidence, Lignobrycon myersi and genera Triportheus Cope, 1872, Agoniates Müller & Troschel, 1845, Clupeacharax Pearson, 1924 and Engraulisoma Castro, 1981 were placed in the family Triportheidae. In the present work, we report the first cytogenetic data for Lignobrycon myersi to test the hypothesis that Lignobrycon and Triportheus are closely related. Studied specimens presented 2n=52 with 28 metacentric (m), 18 submetacentric (sm) and six subtelocentric (st) chromosomes for males and 27 m, 19 sm and 6 st for females, characterizing a ZZ/ZW sex chromosome system. The Z chromosome corresponds to the largest chromosome in karyotype while the W is about 50% smaller than the Z and largely heterochromatic. Terminal nucleolus organizer regions, GC-rich sites and 18S rDNA signals were detected on pair 14. However, additional 18S rDNA sites were observed in the W chromosome. The 5S rDNA was mainly detected on long arms of pair 7. The apparent synapomorphic chromosomal traits of Triportheus and Lignobrycon myersi reinforce their close phylogenetic relationship, suggesting that the ZZ/ZW chromosome system in both genera has arisen before cladogenic events. PMID:27551346

  10. Identification of Novel Candidate Gene Loci and Increased Sex Chromosome Aneuploidy among Infants with Conotruncal Heart Defects

    PubMed Central

    Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Iovannisci, David M.; Lin, Bin; Parodi, Christina; Schultz, Kathleen; Shaw, Gary M.; Lammer, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital heart defects are common malformations, affecting 4–8 per 1,000 total births. Conotruncal defects are an important pathogenetic subset of congenital heart defects, comprising nearly 20 percent of the total. Although both environmental and genetic factors are known to contribute to the occurrence of conotruncal defects, the causes remain unknown for most. To identify novel candidate genes/loci, we used array comparative genomic hybridization to detect chromosomal microdeletions/duplications. From a population base of 974,579 total births born during 1999–2004, we screened 389 California infants born with tetralogy of Fallot or d-transposition of the great arteries. We found that 1.7% (5/288) of males with a conotruncal defect had sex chromosome aneuploidy, a seven-fold increased frequency (relative risk = 7.0; 95% confidence interval 2.9–16.9). We identified eight chromosomal microdeletions/duplications for conotruncal defects. From these duplications and deletions, we found five high priority candidate genes (GATA4, CRKL, BMPR1A, SNAI2 and ZFHX4). This is the initial report that sex chromosome aneuploidy is associated with conotruncal defects among boys. These chromosomal microduplications/deletions provide evidence that GATA4, SNAI2 and CRKL are highly dosage sensitive genes involved in outflow tract development. Genome wide screening for copy number variation can be productive for identifying novel genes/loci contributing to nonsyndromic common malformations. PMID:24127225

  11. A Gradual Process of Recombination Restriction in the Evolutionary History of the Sex Chromosomes in Dioecious Plants

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    To help understand the evolution of suppressed recombination between sex chromosomes, and its consequences for evolution of the sequences of Y-linked genes, we have studied four X-Y gene pairs, including one gene not previously characterized, in plants in a group of closely related dioecious species of Silene which have an X-Y sex-determining system (S. latifolia, S. dioica, and S. diclinis). We used the X-linked copies to build a genetic map of the X chromosomes, with a marker in the pseudoautosomal region (PAR) to orient the map. The map covers a large part of the X chromosomes—at least 50 centimorgans. Except for a recent rearrangement in S. dioica, the gene order is the same in the X chromosomes of all three species. Silent site divergence between the DNA sequences of the X and Y copies of the different genes increases with the genes' distances from the PAR, suggesting progressive restriction of recombination between the X and Y chromosomes. This was confirmed by phylogenetic analyses of the four genes, which also revealed that the least-diverged X-Y pair could have ceased recombining independently in the dioecious species after their split. Analysis of amino acid replacements vs. synonymous changes showed that, with one possible exception, the Y-linked copies appear to be functional in all three species, but there are nevertheless some signs of degenerative processes affecting the genes that have been Y-linked for the longest times. Although the X-Y system evolved quite recently in Silene (less than 10 million years ago) compared to mammals (about 320 million years ago), our results suggest that similar processes have been at work in the evolution of sex chromosomes in plants and mammals, and shed some light on the molecular mechanisms suppressing recombination between X and Y chromosomes. PMID:15630476

  12. Effect of sex chromosome complement on sodium appetite and Fos-immunoreactivity induced by sodium depletion.

    PubMed

    Dadam, Florencia M; Caeiro, Ximena E; Cisternas, Carla D; Macchione, Ana F; Cambiasso, María J; Vivas, Laura

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies indicate a sex chromosome complement (SCC) effect on the angiotensin II-sexually dimorphic hypertensive and bradycardic baroreflex responses. We sought to evaluate whether SCC may differentially modulate sexually dimorphic-induced sodium appetite and specific brain activity due to physiological stimulation of the rennin angiotensin system. For this purpose, we used the "four core genotype" mouse model, in which the effect of gonadal sex and SCC is dissociated, allowing comparisons of sexually dimorphic traits between XX and XY females as well as in XX and XY males. Gonadectomized mice were sodium depleted by furosemide (50 mg/kg) and low-sodium diet treatment; control groups were administered with vehicle and maintained on normal sodium diet. Twenty-one hours later, the mice were divided into two groups: one group was submitted to the water-2% NaCl choice intake test, while the other group was perfused and their brains subjected to the Fos-immunoreactivity (FOS-ir) procedure. Sodium depletion, regardless of SCC (XX or XY), induced a significantly lower sodium and water intake in females than in males, confirming the existence in mice of sexual dimorphism in sodium appetite and the organizational involvement of gonadal steroids. Moreover, our results demonstrate a SCC effect on induced brain FOS-ir, showing increased brain activity in XX-SCC mice at the paraventricular nucleus, nucleus of the solitary tract, and lateral parabrachial nucleus, as well as an XX-SCC augmented effect on sodium depletion-induced brain activity at two circumventricular organs, the subfornical organ and area postrema, nuclei closely involved in fluid and blood pressure homeostasis. PMID:24259464

  13. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor- and acetylcholine-mediated relaxation: essential contribution of female sex hormones and chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Pessôa, Bruno Sevá; Slump, Denise E; Ibrahimi, Khatera; Grefhorst, Aldo; van Veghel, Richard; Garrelds, Ingrid M; Roks, Anton J M; Kushner, Steven A; Danser, A H Jan; van Esch, Joep H M

    2015-08-01

    Angiotensin-induced vasodilation, involving type 2 receptor (AT2R)-induced generation of nitric oxide (NO; by endothelial NO synthase) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors, may be limited to women. To distinguish the contribution of female sex hormones and chromosomes to AT2R function and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated vasodilation, we made use of the four-core genotype model, where the testis-determining Sry gene has been deleted (Y(-)) from the Y chromosome, allowing XY(-) mice to develop a female gonadal phenotype. Simultaneously, by incorporating the Sry gene onto an autosome, XY(-)Sry and XXSry transgenic mice develop into gonadal male mice. Four-core genotype mice underwent a sham or gonadectomy (GDX) operation, and after 8 weeks, iliac arteries were collected to assess vascular function. XY(-)Sry male mice responded more strongly to angiotensin than XX female mice, and the AT2R antagonist PD123319 revealed that this was because of a dilator AT2R-mediated effect occurring exclusively in XX female mice. The latter could not be demonstrated in XXSry male and XY(-) female mice nor in XX female mice after GDX, suggesting that it depends on both sex hormones and chromosomes. Indeed, treating C57bl/6 GDX male mice with estrogen could not restore angiotensin-mediated, AT2R-dependent relaxation. To block acetylcholine-induced relaxation of iliac arteries obtained from four-core genotype XX mice, both endothelial NO synthase and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor inhibition were required, whereas in four-core genotype XY animals, endothelial NO synthase inhibition alone was sufficient. These findings were independent of gonadal sex and unaltered after GDX. In conclusion, AT2R-induced relaxation requires both estrogen and the XX chromosome sex complement, whereas only the latter is required for endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors. PMID:26056343

  14. Sex-determining chromosomes and sexual dimorphism: insights from genetic mapping of sex expression in a natural hybrid Fragaria × ananassa subsp. cuneifolia

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajulu, R; Liston, A; Ashman, T-L

    2013-01-01

    We studied the natural hybrid (Fragaria × ananassa subsp. cuneifolia) between two sexually dimorphic octoploid strawberry species (Fragaria virginiana and Fragaria chiloensis) to gain insight into the dynamics of sex chromosomes and the genesis of sexual dimorphism. Male sterility is dominant in both the parental species and thus will be inherited maternally, but the chromosome that houses the sex-determining region differs. Thus, we asked whether (1) the cytotypic composition of hybrid populations represents one or both maternal species, (2) the sex-determining chromosome of the hybrid reflects the location of male sterility within the maternal donor species and (3) crosses from the hybrid species show less sexual dimorphism than the parental species. We found that F. × ananassa subsp. cuneifolia populations consisted of both parental cytotypes but one predominated within each population. Genetic linkage mapping of two crosses showed dominance of male sterility similar to the parental species, however, the map location of male sterility reflected the maternal donor in one cross, but not the other. Moreover, female function mapped to a single region in the first cross, but to two regions in the second cross. Aside from components of female function (fruit set and seed set), other traits that have been found to be significantly sexually dimorphic in the pure species were either not dimorphic or were dimorphic in the opposite direction to the parental species. These results suggest that hybrids experience some disruption of dimorphism in secondary sexual traits, as well as novel location and number of quantitative trait locus (QTL) affecting sex function. PMID:23169558

  15. Sex-determining chromosomes and sexual dimorphism: insights from genetic mapping of sex expression in a natural hybrid Fragaria × ananassa subsp. cuneifolia.

    PubMed

    Govindarajulu, R; Liston, A; Ashman, T-L

    2013-05-01

    We studied the natural hybrid (Fragaria × ananassa subsp. cuneifolia) between two sexually dimorphic octoploid strawberry species (Fragaria virginiana and Fragaria chiloensis) to gain insight into the dynamics of sex chromosomes and the genesis of sexual dimorphism. Male sterility is dominant in both the parental species and thus will be inherited maternally, but the chromosome that houses the sex-determining region differs. Thus, we asked whether (1) the cytotypic composition of hybrid populations represents one or both maternal species, (2) the sex-determining chromosome of the hybrid reflects the location of male sterility within the maternal donor species and (3) crosses from the hybrid species show less sexual dimorphism than the parental species. We found that F. × ananassa subsp. cuneifolia populations consisted of both parental cytotypes but one predominated within each population. Genetic linkage mapping of two crosses showed dominance of male sterility similar to the parental species, however, the map location of male sterility reflected the maternal donor in one cross, but not the other. Moreover, female function mapped to a single region in the first cross, but to two regions in the second cross. Aside from components of female function (fruit set and seed set), other traits that have been found to be significantly sexually dimorphic in the pure species were either not dimorphic or were dimorphic in the opposite direction to the parental species. These results suggest that hybrids experience some disruption of dimorphism in secondary sexual traits, as well as novel location and number of quantitative trait locus (QTL) affecting sex function. PMID:23169558

  16. The behavior of the X- and Y-chromosomes in the oocyte during meiotic prophase in the B6.Y(TIR)sex-reversed mouse ovary.

    PubMed

    Alton, Michelle; Lau, Mau Pan; Villemure, Michele; Taketo, Teruko

    2008-02-01

    Sexual differentiation of the germ cells follows gonadal differentiation, which is determined by the presence or the absence of the Y-chromosome. Consequently, oogenesis and spermatogenesis take place in the germ cells with XX and XY sex chromosomal compositions respectively. It is unclear how sexual dimorphic regulation of meiosis is associated with the sex-chromosomal composition. In the present study, we examined the behavior of the sex chromosomes in the oocytes of the B6.Y(TIR) sex-reversed female mouse, in comparison with XO and XX females. As the sex chromosomes fail to pair in both XY and XO oocytes during meiotic prophase, we anticipated that the pairing failure may lead to excessive oocyte loss. However, the total number of germ cells, identified by immunolabeling of germ cell nuclear antigen 1 (GCNA1), did not differ between XY and XX ovaries or XO and XX ovaries up to the day of delivery. The progression of meiotic prophase, assessed by immunolabeling of synaptonemal complex components, was also similar between the two genotypes of ovaries. These observations suggest that the failure in sex-chromosome pairing is not sufficient to cause oocyte loss. On the other hand, labeling of phosphorylated histone gammaH2AX, known to be associated with asynapsis and transcriptional repression, was seen over the X-chromosome but not over the Y-chromosome in the majority of XY oocytes at the pachytene stage. For comparison, gammaH2AX labeling was seen only in the minority of XX oocytes at the same stage. We speculate that the transcriptional activity of sex chromosomes in the XY oocyte may be incompatible with ooplasmic maturation. PMID:18239052

  17. Brown fat in a protoendothermic mammal fuels eutherian evolution.

    PubMed

    Oelkrug, Rebecca; Goetze, Nadja; Exner, Cornelia; Lee, Yang; Ganjam, Goutham K; Kutschke, Maria; Müller, Saskia; Stöhr, Sigrid; Tschöp, Matthias H; Crichton, Paul G; Heldmaier, Gerhard; Jastroch, Martin; Meyer, Carola W

    2013-01-01

    Endothermy has facilitated mammalian species radiation, but the sequence of events leading to sustained thermogenesis is debated in multiple evolutionary models. Here we study the Lesser hedgehog tenrec (Echinops telfairi), a phylogenetically ancient, 'protoendothermic' eutherian mammal, in which constantly high body temperatures are reported only during reproduction. Evidence for nonshivering thermogenesis is found in vivo during periodic ectothermic-endothermic transitions. Anatomical studies reveal large brown fat-like structures in the proximity of the reproductive organs, suggesting physiological significance for parental care. Biochemical analysis demonstrates high mitochondrial proton leak catalysed by an uncoupling protein 1 ortholog. Strikingly, bioenergetic profiling of tenrec uncoupling protein 1 reveals similar thermogenic potency as modern mouse uncoupling protein 1, despite the large phylogenetic distance. The discovery of functional brown adipose tissue in this 'protoendothermic' mammal links nonshivering thermogenesis directly to the roots of eutherian evolution, suggesting physiological importance prior to sustained body temperatures and migration to the cold. PMID:23860571

  18. Brown fat in a protoendothermic mammal fuels eutherian evolution

    PubMed Central

    Oelkrug, Rebecca; Goetze, Nadja; Exner, Cornelia; Lee, Yang; Ganjam, Goutham K.; Kutschke, Maria; Müller, Saskia; Stöhr, Sigrid; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Crichton, Paul G.; Heldmaier, Gerhard; Jastroch, Martin; Meyer, Carola W.

    2013-01-01

    Endothermy has facilitated mammalian species radiation, but the sequence of events leading to sustained thermogenesis is debated in multiple evolutionary models. Here we study the Lesser hedgehog tenrec (Echinops telfairi), a phylogenetically ancient, ‘protoendothermic’ eutherian mammal, in which constantly high body temperatures are reported only during reproduction. Evidence for nonshivering thermogenesis is found in vivo during periodic ectothermic–endothermic transitions. Anatomical studies reveal large brown fat-like structures in the proximity of the reproductive organs, suggesting physiological significance for parental care. Biochemical analysis demonstrates high mitochondrial proton leak catalysed by an uncoupling protein 1 ortholog. Strikingly, bioenergetic profiling of tenrec uncoupling protein 1 reveals similar thermogenic potency as modern mouse uncoupling protein 1, despite the large phylogenetic distance. The discovery of functional brown adipose tissue in this ‘protoendothermic’ mammal links nonshivering thermogenesis directly to the roots of eutherian evolution, suggesting physiological importance prior to sustained body temperatures and migration to the cold. PMID:23860571

  19. Mammalian mitogenomic relationships and the root of the eutherian tree

    PubMed Central

    Arnason, Ulfur; Adegoke, Joseph A.; Bodin, Kristina; Born, Erik W.; Esa, Yuzine B.; Gullberg, Anette; Nilsson, Maria; Short, Roger V.; Xu, Xiufeng; Janke, Axel

    2002-01-01

    The strict orthology of mitochondrial (mt) coding sequences has promoted their use in phylogenetic analyses at different levels. Here we present the results of a mitogenomic study (i.e., analysis based on the set of protein-coding genes from complete mt genomes) of 60 mammalian species. This number includes 11 new mt genomes. The sampling comprises all but one of the traditional eutherian orders. The previously unrepresented order Dermoptera (flying lemurs) fell within Primates as the sister group of Anthropoidea, making Primates paraphyletic. This relationship was strongly supported. Lipotyphla (“insectivores”) split into three distinct lineages: Erinaceomorpha, Tenrecomorpha, and Soricomorpha. Erinaceomorpha was the basal eutherian lineage. Sirenia (dugong) and Macroscelidea (elephant shrew) fell within the African clade. Pholidota (pangolin) joined the Cetferungulata as the sister group of Carnivora. The analyses identified monophyletic Pinnipedia with Otariidae (sea lions, fur seals) and Odobenidae (walruses) as sister groups to the exclusion of Phocidae (true seals). PMID:12034869

  20. Mammalian mitogenomic relationships and the root of the eutherian tree.

    PubMed

    Arnason, Ulfur; Adegoke, Joseph A; Bodin, Kristina; Born, Erik W; Esa, Yuzine B; Gullberg, Anette; Nilsson, Maria; Short, Roger V; Xu, Xiufeng; Janke, Axel

    2002-06-11

    The strict orthology of mitochondrial (mt) coding sequences has promoted their use in phylogenetic analyses at different levels. Here we present the results of a mitogenomic study (i.e., analysis based on the set of protein-coding genes from complete mt genomes) of 60 mammalian species. This number includes 11 new mt genomes. The sampling comprises all but one of the traditional eutherian orders. The previously unrepresented order Dermoptera (flying lemurs) fell within Primates as the sister group of Anthropoidea, making Primates paraphyletic. This relationship was strongly supported. Lipotyphla ("insectivores") split into three distinct lineages: Erinaceomorpha, Tenrecomorpha, and Soricomorpha. Erinaceomorpha was the basal eutherian lineage. Sirenia (dugong) and Macroscelidea (elephant shrew) fell within the African clade. Pholidota (pangolin) joined the Cetferungulata as the sister group of Carnivora. The analyses identified monophyletic Pinnipedia with Otariidae (sea lions, fur seals) and Odobenidae (walruses) as sister groups to the exclusion of Phocidae (true seals). PMID:12034869

  1. Elephant Transcriptome Provides Insights into the Evolution of Eutherian Placentation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Zhuo-Cheng; Sterner, Kirstin N.; Romero, Roberto; Than, Nandor Gabor; Gonzalez, Juan M.; Weckle, Amy; Xing, Jun; Benirschke, Kurt; Goodman, Morris; Wildman, Derek E.

    2012-01-01

    The chorioallantoic placenta connects mother and fetus in eutherian pregnancies. In order to understand the evolution of the placenta and provide further understanding of placenta biology, we sequenced the transcriptome of a term placenta of an African elephant (Loxodonta africana) and compared these data with RNA sequence and microarray data from other eutherian placentas including human, mouse, and cow. We characterized the composition of 55,910 expressed sequence tag (i.e., cDNA) contigs using our custom annotation pipeline. A Markov algorithm was used to cluster orthologs of human, mouse, cow, and elephant placenta transcripts. We found 2,963 genes are commonly expressed in the placentas of these eutherian mammals. Gene ontology categories previously suggested to be important for placenta function (e.g., estrogen receptor signaling pathway, cell motion and migration, and adherens junctions) were significantly enriched in these eutherian placenta–expressed genes. Genes duplicated in different lineages and also specifically expressed in the placenta contribute to the great diversity observed in mammalian placenta anatomy. We identified 1,365 human lineage–specific, 1,235 mouse lineage–specific, 436 cow lineage–specific, and 904 elephant-specific placenta-expressed (PE) genes. The most enriched clusters of human-specific PE genes are signal/glycoprotein and immunoglobulin, and humans possess a deeply invasive human hemochorial placenta that comes into direct contact with maternal immune cells. Inference of phylogenetically conserved and derived transcripts demonstrates the power of comparative transcriptomics to trace placenta evolution and variation across mammals and identified candidate genes that may be important in the normal function of the human placenta, and their dysfunction may be related to human pregnancy complications. PMID:22546564

  2. Has gene duplication impacted the evolution of Eutherian longevity?

    PubMed

    Doherty, Aoife; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2016-10-01

    One of the greatest unresolved questions in aging biology is determining the genetic basis of interspecies longevity variation. Gene duplication is often the key to understanding the origin and evolution of important Eutherian phenotypes. We systematically identified longevity-associated genes in model organisms that duplicated throughout Eutherian evolution. Longevity-associated gene families have a marginally significantly higher rate of duplication compared to non-longevity-associated gene families. Anti-longevity-associated gene families have significantly increased rate of duplication compared to pro-longevity gene families and are enriched in neurodegenerative disease categories. Conversely, duplicated pro-longevity-associated gene families are enriched in cell cycle genes. There is a cluster of longevity-associated gene families that expanded solely in long-lived species that is significantly enriched in pathways relating to 3-UTR-mediated translational regulation, metabolism of proteins and gene expression, pathways that have the potential to affect longevity. The identification of a gene cluster that duplicated solely in long-lived species involved in such fundamental processes provides a promising avenue for further exploration of Eutherian longevity evolution. PMID:27378378

  3. Divergence and Functional Degradation of a Sex Chromosome-like Supergene.

    PubMed

    Tuttle, Elaina M; Bergland, Alan O; Korody, Marisa L; Brewer, Michael S; Newhouse, Daniel J; Minx, Patrick; Stager, Maria; Betuel, Adam; Cheviron, Zachary A; Warren, Wesley C; Gonser, Rusty A; Balakrishnan, Christopher N

    2016-02-01

    A major challenge in biology is to understand the genetic basis of adaptation. One compelling idea is that groups of tightly linked genes (i.e., "supergenes" [1, 2]) facilitate adaptation in suites of traits that determine fitness. Despite their likely importance, little is known about how alternate supergene alleles arise and become differentiated, nor their ultimate fate within species. Herein we address these questions by investigating the evolutionary history of a supergene in white-throated sparrows, Zonotrichia albicollis. This species comprises two morphs, tan and white, that differ in pigmentation and components of social behavior [3-5]. Morph is determined by alternative alleles at a balanced >100-Mb inversion-based supergene, providing a unique system for studying gene-behavior relationships. Using over two decades of field data, we document near-perfect disassortative mating among morphs, as well as the fitness consequences of rare assortative mating. We use de novo whole-genome sequencing coupled with population- and phylogenomic data to show that alternate supergene alleles are highly divergent at over 1,000 genes and that these alleles originated prior to the split of Z. albicollis from its sister species and may be polymorphic in Z. albicollis due to a past hybridization event. We provide evidence that the "white" allele may be degrading, similar to neo-Y/W sex chromosomes. We further show that the "tan" allele has surprisingly low levels of genetic diversity yet does not show several canonical signatures of recurrent positive selection. We discuss these results in the context of the origin, molecular evolution, and possible fate of this remarkable polymorphism. PMID:26804558

  4. "How should I tell my child?" Disclosing the diagnosis of sex chromosome aneuploidies.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Anna; Howell, Susan; Cordeiro, Lisa; Tartaglia, Nicole

    2015-02-01

    To date, the disclosure of a sex chromosome aneuploidy (SCA) diagnosis to an affected individual has not been explored. This study aimed to assess the timing and content revealed to an affected child by his or her parent(s), resources accessed in preparation, parental feelings of preparedness, common parental concerns, and recommendations for disclosure approaches. Two online surveys were created: 1) for parents of a child with a diagnosis and 2) for individuals with a diagnosis. One-hundred thirty-nine parent surveys (XXY n = 68, XXX n = 21, XYY n = 9, other SCAs n = 41) and 67 individual surveys (XXY n = 58, XXX n = 9) were analyzed. Parents most frequently discussed the topics of learning disabilities (47 %) and genetics (45 %) with their child during the initial disclosure. A significantly greater proportion of parent respondents reported feeling prepared vs. unprepared for disclosure, regardless of their child's diagnosis (z-test of proportions, all p's < 0.001). Both prepared and unprepared parents most frequently accessed resources such as websites, support groups, and discussion with the child's physician prior to disclosure, with unprepared parents accessing fewer resources (M = 2.0 ± 1.41) than prepared parents [M = 2. ± 1.56; t(101) =-2.02, p < 0.05]. Common parental concerns included making the conversation age-appropriate, discussing infertility, and possible impact on the child's self-esteem. Both parent and individual respondents endorsed being honest with the child, disclosing the diagnosis early and before puberty, and discussing the diagnosis gradually over time. These results provide recommendations for parents, and suggest benefits from additional resources and supports to alleviate concerns when approaching diagnosis disclosure. PMID:25179748

  5. Sex-dependent mechanisms for expansions and contractions of the CAG repeat on affected Huntington disease chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, B.; Theilmann, J.; Spence, N.

    1995-08-01

    A total of 254 affected parent-child pairs with Huntington disease (HD) and 440 parent-child pairs with CAG size in the normal range were assessed to determine the nature and frequency of intergenerational CAG changes in the HD gene. Intergenerational CAG changes are extremely rare (3/440 [0.68%]) on normal chromosomes. In contrast, on HD chromosomes, changes in CAG size occur in {approximately}70% of meioses on HD chromosomes, with expansions accounting for 73% of these changes. These intergenerational CAG changes make a significant but minor contribution to changes in age at onset (r{sup 2}=.19). The size of the CAG repeat influenced larger intergenerational expansions (>7 CAG repeats), but the likelihood of smaller expansions or contractions was not influenced by CAG size. Large expansions (>7 CAG repeats) occur almost exclusively through paternal transmission (0.96%; P<10{sub -7}), while offspring of affected mothers are more likely to show no change (P=.01) or contractions in CAG size (P=.002). This study demonstrates that sex of the transmitting parent is the major determinant for CAG intergenerational changes in the HD gene. Similar paternal sex effects are seen in the evolution of new mutations for HD from intermediate alleles and for large expansions on affected chromosomes. Affected mothers almost never transmit a significantly expanded CAG repeat, despite the fact that many have similar large-sized alleles, compared with affected fathers. The sex-dependent effects of major expansion and contractions of the CAG repeat in the HD gene implicate different effects of gametogenesis, in males versus females, on intergenerational CAG repeat stability. 22 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Sex chromosome analysis in Turner Syndrome by a pentaplex PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Pelotti, S; Bini, C; Ceccardi, S; Ferri, G; Abbondanza, A; Greggio, N A; Ponzano, E; Caenazzo, L

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we describe a pentaplex PCR to determine the parental origin of the X chromosome and the presence of mosaicism, via amplification of four polymorphic markers located along the X chromosome (DXS10011, DXS6807, HUMARA, DXS101) and the X-Y amelogenin marker, in 41 families having a daughter with Turner Syndrome. Our results confirmed the cytogenetic findings and we found that the parental origin of the single X chromosome to be maternal in 84% of cases. PMID:14642001

  7. An evolutionary conserved early replicating segment on the sex chromosomes of man and the great apes.

    PubMed

    Weber, B; Schempp, W; Wiesner, H

    1986-01-01

    Replication studies on prometaphase chromosomes of man, the chimpanzee, the pygmy chimpanzee, the gorilla, and the orangutan reveal great interspecific homologies between the autosomes. The early replicating X chromosomes clearly show a high degree of conservation of both the pattern and the time course of replication. An early replicating segment on the short arm of the X chromosomes of man (Xp22.3) which escapes inactivation can be found on the X chromosomes of the great apes as well. Furthermore, the most early replicating segment on the Y chromosomes of all species tested appears to be homologous to this segment on the X chromosomes. Therefore, these early replicating segments in the great apes may correspond to the pseudoautosomal segment proposed to exist in man. From further cytogenetic characterization of the Y chromosomes it is evident that structural alterations have resulted in an extreme divergence in both the euchromatic and heterochromatic parts. It is assumed, therefore, that, in contrast to the X chromosomes, the Y chromosomes have undergone a rapid evolution within the higher primates. PMID:3096642

  8. Age-associated micronuclei, kinetochores and sex chromosome loss in men

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, J.; Hando, J.; Tucker, J.D.

    1995-11-01

    Studies on aneuploidy have shown a significant increase in the loss of chromosomes in both males and females with age and also a significant increase in micronucleus formation in lymphocytes with age. This study attempted (1) to ascertain whether the age-associated increase in Y chromosome loss and micronucleus formation are related. (2) to determine whether there is a correlation between Y chromosome-negative metaphase cells and Y chromosome-positive micronuclei from the same donors, and (3) to determine the relationships among the kinetochore status of micronuclei, Y chromosome-positive micronuclei, and age. Blood samples were obtained from thirty-five healthy males ranging in age from 22 to 79 years, and from the umbilical cords of eighteen newborn males. Two thousand binucleated cells were scored per sample. The kinetochore status of each micronucleus was recorded. Slides were then hybridized with the Y chromosome specific probe pHY10, labeled with biotinylated dUTP, and visualized with fluorescein conjugated avidin. All micronucleated cells were relocated and scored as Y+ or Y- depending on their Y probe status. A total of 303 micronuclei were scored, of which 41 (13.5%) contained the Y chromosome. ANOVA shows a significant increase in the number of Y chromosome-positive micronuclei with age (p<0.001). Of the 41 Y+ micronuclei 36 (87.8%) were kinetochore negative, suggesting a relationship between the absence of kinetochore function and micronucleus formation. Also, 500 metaphase spreads per sample were scored for the Y chromosome, showing an increase in Y-cells with age (p<0.001). A correlation analysis between Y chromosome-positive micronuclei and Y chromosome-negative metaphase cells resulted in a correlation coefficient of 0.71 (p.005).

  9. How to become a parasite without sex chromosomes: a hypothesis for the evolution of Strongyloides spp. and related nematodes.

    PubMed

    Streit, Adrian

    2014-09-01

    Parasitic lifestyles evolved many times independently. Just within the phylum Nematoda animal parasitism must have arisen at least four times. Switching to a parasitic lifestyle is expected to lead to changes in various life history traits including reproductive strategies. Parasitic nematode worms of the genus Strongyloides represent an interesting example to study these processes because they are still capable of forming facultative free-living generations in between parasitic ones. The parasitic generation consists of females only, which reproduce parthenogenetically. The sex in the progeny of the parasitic worms is determined by environmental cues, which control a, presumably ancestral, XX/XO chromosomal sex determining system. In some species the X chromosome is fused with an autosome and one copy of the X-derived sequences is removed by sex-specific chromatin diminution in males. Here I propose a hypothesis for how today's Strongyloides sp. might have evolved from a sexual free-living ancestor through dauer larvae forming free-living and facultative parasitic intermediate stages. PMID:24829037

  10. Neo-sex Chromosomes in the Maculipennis Species Group (Dichroplus: Acrididae, Melanoplinae): The Cases of D. maculipennis and D. vittigerum.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Elio R D; Taffarel, Alberto; Mariottini, Yanina; Fernández-Arhex, Valeria; Martí, Dardo A; Bidau, Claudio J

    2016-06-01

    South American melanopline grasshoppers display a disproportionate number of derived karyotypes, including many cases of neo-sex chromosome systems. This is especially true of the genus Dichroplus and its Maculipennis species group. We analyzed the karyotype and neo-sex chromosomes in mitosis and meiosis of Dichroplus maculipennis and D. vittigerum from Argentina using conventional and fluorescent cytogenetic protocols in order to elucidate the behavior and origin of these neo-XY systems in relation to the current phylogeny of this group. Our results showed that D. maculipennis (2n = 22♂/22♀; neoXY/neoXX) and D. vittigerum, whose karyotype is described here for the first time (2n = 18♂/18♀; neoXY/neoXX), show highly evolved neo-XY systems, although with significant differences between them. Furthermore, both species differ for two autosomal fixed Robertsonian fusions present in D. vittigerum. Analysis of karyotypic character state optimization strongly suggests the independent origin and evolution of neo-sex systems within this species group. PMID:27268985

  11. AGO4 regulates entry into meiosis and influences silencing of sex chromosomes in the male mouse germ line

    PubMed Central

    Modzelewski, Andrew J.; Holmes, Rebecca J.; Hilz, Stephanie; Grimson, Andrew; Cohen, Paula E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The four mammalian Argonaute family members are thought to share redundant functions in the microRNA pathway, yet only AGO2 possesses the catalytic “slicer” function required for RNA interference. Whether AGO1, AGO3, or AGO4 possess specialized functions remains unclear. Here we show that AGO4 localizes to spermatocyte nuclei during meiotic prophase I, specifically at sites of asynapsis and the transcriptionally silenced XY sub-domain, the sex body. We generated Ago4 knockout mice and show that Ago4−/− spermatogonia initiate meiosis early, resulting from premature induction of retinoic acid-response genes. During prophase I, the sex body assembles incorrectly in Ago4−/− mice, leading to disrupted meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). This is associated with a dramatic loss of microRNAs, >20% of which arise from the X chromosome. Thus, AGO4 regulates meiotic entry and MSCI in mammalian germ cells, implicating small RNA pathways in these processes. PMID:22863743

  12. Cytogenetics of nine species of mediterranean blennies and additional evidence for an unusual multiple sex-chromosome system in Parablennius tentacularis (Perciformes, Blenniidae).

    PubMed

    Caputo, V; Machella, N; Nisi-Cerioni, P; Olmo, E

    2001-01-01

    The chromosomal complements of nine species of Blenniidae (Aidablennius sphylnx, Blennius ocellaris, Lypophris adriaticus, L. pavo, L. trigloides, Parcablennius gattorugine, P. ponticus, P. sanguinolentus, P. tentacularis) from the Adriatic Sea were analysed with several banding methods and in-situ hybridization. In all species, the diploid set consists of 48 mostly acrocentric chromosomes and has a similar location (terminal centromeric) of NORs, except for L. pavo (interstitial pericentric) and P. ponticus (terminal on the long arm). There are major differences in karyotype with regard to the amount and distribution of heterochromatin. Parablennius tentacularis shows a distinctive sex-chromosome system involving 2n = 48 males with a large totally heterochromatic Y chromosome, and males with 2n = 47. This difference is likely to be the consequence of a translocation of an autosome on the original Y. This finding constitutes an additional instance of the great variability in origins of multiple sex chromosome systems in vertebrates. PMID:11272790

  13. Potential use of buccal smears for rapid diagnosis of autosomal trisomy or chromosomal sex in newborn infants using DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, C.; Clark, K.; Lazarski, K.; Wilkerson, C.; Meisner, L. |

    1994-12-01

    Buccal smears from 3 women and 1 man were probed with alpha satellite DNA probes for chromosomes 8, 18, X, and Y. Buccal smears were also collected from an adolescent phenotypic female with uterine agenesis, as well as from newborn infants with suspected trisomy 18 and trisomy 21. The clinical cases were confirmed with conventional cytogenetic studies of peripheral lymphocytes. Overall probe efficiency at detecting expected chromosome number in interphase cells was found to be 71% {+-} 6.8%. Higher than expected n-1 signal numbers may be due to karyopyknotic intermediate epithelial cells present in all collected samples. Overall probe efficiency was found to be consistent using alpha satellite and cosmid probes, both of which accurately reflected the modal copy number of the target chromosomes. False trisomy was less than 1%. This study suggests DNA probes can be used in buccal smears for rapid diagnosis of trisomies and chromosomal sex in newborns, but because of high rates of false hydropoploid signals, probed buccal smear specimens may not be accurate at diagnosing mosaicism. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Social deficits in male children and adolescents with sex chromosome aneuploidy: a comparison of XXY, XYY, and XXYY syndromes.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Lisa; Tartaglia, Nicole; Roeltgen, David; Ross, Judith

    2012-01-01

    We compare social skills in three groups of males with sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) using the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS). Participants included males with XXY (N=102, M=10.08 years), XYY (N=40, M=9.93 years), and XXYY (N=32, M=11.57 years). XXY had lower (better) SRS scores compared to XYY and XXYY. Scores were not significantly different between XYY and XXYY. In all groups, there were significantly more with SRS scores in the severe range compared to the SRS normative sample. All groups scored lowest (better) on Social Motivation. Relationships between SRS scores and demographic and clinical variables were examined. Results describe the social skills in males with SCA, and suggest that an additional Y chromosome may contribute to increased risk of autistic behaviors. PMID:22502852

  15. Rapid rise and fall of selfish sex-ratio X chromosomes in Drosophila simulans: spatiotemporal analysis of phenotypic and molecular data.

    PubMed

    Bastide, Héloïse; Cazemajor, Michel; Ogereau, David; Derome, Nicolas; Hospital, Frédéric; Montchamp-Moreau, Catherine

    2011-09-01

    Sex-ratio drive, which has been documented in several Drosophila species, is induced by X-linked segregation distorters. Contrary to Mendel's law of independent assortment, the sex-ratio chromosome (X(SR)) is inherited by more than half the offspring of carrier males, resulting in a female-biased sex ratio. This segregation advantage allows X(SR) to spread in populations, even if it is not beneficial for the carriers. In the cosmopolitan species D. simulans, the Paris sex-ratio is caused by recently emerged selfish X(SR) chromosomes. These chromosomes have triggered an intragenomic conflict, and their propagation has been halted over a large area by the evolution of complete drive suppression. Previous molecular population genetics analyses revealed a selective sweep indicating that the invasion of X(SR) chromosomes was very recent in Madagascar (likely less than 100 years ago). Here, we show that X(SR) chromosomes are now declining at this location as well as in Mayotte and Kenya. Drive suppression is complete in the three populations, which display little genetic differentiation and share swept haplotypes, attesting to a common and very recent ancestry of the X(SR) chromosomes. Patterns of DNA sequence variation also indicate a fitness cost of the segmental duplication involved in drive. The data suggest that X(SR) chromosomes started declining first on the African continent, then in Mayotte, and finally in Madagascar and strongly support a scenario of rapid cycling of X chromosomes. Once drive suppression has evolved, standard X(ST) chromosomes locally replace costly X(SR) chromosomes in a few decades. PMID:21498605

  16. Maternal serum free beta-hCG and PAPP-A in fetal sex chromosome defects in the first trimester.

    PubMed

    Spencer, K; Tul, N; Nicolaides, K H

    2000-05-01

    We have studied maternal serum free beta-hCG and PAPP-A, and fetal nuchal translucency (NT) in a series of 46 cases of fetal Turner's syndrome, 13 cases of other sex chromosomal anomalies and compared these with 947 control pregnancies in the first trimester. In cases of Turner's syndrome (45,X) the median fetal NT was significantly higher than in controls (4.76 MoM), the median PAPP-A was significantly lower (0.49 MoM), whilst the free beta-hCG was not significantly different (1.11 MoM). For NT, 93% (43/46) of cases were equal to or greater than the 95th centile of controls, for PAPP-A 35% (16/46) of cases were less than or equal to the 5th centile of controls and for free beta-hCG 15% (7/46) of cases were equal to or greater than the 95th centile of controls. For other sex chromosomal anomalies (47XXX, XXY, XYY) the median NT was increased (2.07 MoM) whilst PAPP-A was not significantly decreased (0.88 MoM) and free beta-hCG was not significantly different (1.07 MoM) from controls. Using a previously derived multivariate risk algorithm for trisomy 21, incorporating NT, PAPP-A, free beta-hCG and maternal age, 96% of the Turner's cases and 62% of the other sex chromosomal anomalies would have been identified. PMID:10820406

  17. Evolution of recombination in eutherian mammals: insights into mechanisms that affect recombination rates and crossover interference

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Joana; Ferretti, Luca; Ramos-Onsins, Sebastián; Capilla, Laia; Farré, Marta; Reis, Fernanda; Oliver-Bonet, Maria; Fernández-Bellón, Hugo; Garcia, Francisca; Garcia-Caldés, Montserrat; Robinson, Terence J.; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora

    2013-01-01

    Recombination allows faithful chromosomal segregation during meiosis and contributes to the production of new heritable allelic variants that are essential for the maintenance of genetic diversity. Therefore, an appreciation of how this variation is created and maintained is of critical importance to our understanding of biodiversity and evolutionary change. Here, we analysed the recombination features from species representing the major eutherian taxonomic groups Afrotheria, Rodentia, Primates and Carnivora to better understand the dynamics of mammalian recombination. Our results suggest a phylogenetic component in recombination rates (RRs), which appears to be directional, strongly punctuated and subject to selection. Species that diversified earlier in the evolutionary tree have lower RRs than those from more derived phylogenetic branches. Furthermore, chromosome-specific recombination maps in distantly related taxa show that crossover interference is especially weak in the species with highest RRs detected thus far, the tiger. This is the first example of a mammalian species exhibiting such low levels of crossover interference, highlighting the uniqueness of this species and its relevance for the study of the mechanisms controlling crossover formation, distribution and resolution. PMID:24068360

  18. Cytotaxonomy of Sirba form populations of the Simulium damnosum complex in west Africa: amendments to sex chromosomes and sibling status.

    PubMed

    Vajime, C G

    1989-12-01

    The banding pattern of larval salivary polytene chromosomes was analysed to re-examine the distribution, by sex and geography, of the sex linked inversion (IS-3) in "Sirba" form which was previously described as consisting of Simulium sirbanum and S. sudanense (Vajime and Dunbar, 1975). West African larval samples from seven countries within the Onchocerciasis Control Programme area and some adjacent locations were used. It was concluded that "Sirba" consists of two indisputable cytoforms, one distinguished by X0Y0 males and X0X0 females, the other by X1Y0 males and X1X1 females; and that the cytoforms are cytologically variable populations of a single cytospecies, S. sirbanum. It is argued that the species is in the process of incipient speciation. PMID:2623429

  19. Sex determination in platypus and echidna: autosomal location of SOX3 confirms the absence of SRY from monotremes.

    PubMed

    Wallis, M C; Waters, P D; Delbridge, M L; Kirby, P J; Pask, A J; Grützner, F; Rens, W; Ferguson-Smith, M A; Graves, J A M

    2007-01-01

    In eutherian ('placental') mammals, sex is determined by the presence or absence of the Y chromosome-borne gene SRY, which triggers testis determination. Marsupials also have a Y-borne SRY gene, implying that this mechanism is ancestral to therians, the SRY gene having diverged from its X-borne homologue SOX3 at least 180 million years ago. The rare exceptions have clearly lost and replaced the SRY mechanism recently. Other vertebrate classes have a variety of sex-determining mechanisms, but none shares the therian SRY-driven XX female:XY male system. In monotreme mammals (platypus and echidna), which branched from the therian lineage 210 million years ago, no orthologue of SRY has been found. In this study we show that its partner SOX3 is autosomal in platypus and echidna, mapping among human X chromosome orthologues to platypus chromosome 6, and to the homologous chromosome 16 in echidna. The autosomal localization of SOX3 in monotreme mammals, as well as non-mammal vertebrates, implies that SRY is absent in Prototheria and evolved later in the therian lineage 210-180 million years ago. Sex determination in platypus and echidna must therefore depend on another male-determining gene(s) on the Y chromosomes, or on the different dosage of a gene(s) on the X chromosomes. PMID:18185981

  20. Prevalence of sex chromosome loss in benign and malignant brain neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Al Saadi, A.

    1994-09-01

    Loss of gonosomes in a variety of benign and malignant neoplasms is well-documented, but the clinical and/or biological significance of such loss remains obscure. Loss of the Y chromosome from the leukocytes of elderly men is also well-known. In an attempt to elucidate the significance of the loss of gonosomes, we have determined the incidence of such loss in human brain tumors ranging from benign to highly malignant. Loss of the X or Y chromosomes were evaluated by karyotyping short-term cultures and by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on uncultured samples of 129 tumors. Loss of gonosomes was also evaluated in leukocytes from these patients. In glioblastoma multiforme (GM), the Y chromosome was lost from 64% and the X from 41% of 42 tumors. The Y chromosome was lost from 36% of 55 meningiomas (MA) and from 33% of other less malignant gliomas. Loss of the X chromosome was negligible in both MAs and the pre- or less malignant gliomas. Loss of the X or the Y in GM was the most common nonrandom abnormality and loss of the Y was the most nonrandom abnormality in all brain tumors, other than MA in which loss of chromosome 22 is the most common. There was insignificant difference in the detection of gonosomes loss by karyotyping or by FISH of interphase cells. There was no loss of gonosomes in the leukocytes of the studied patients. Although the significance of the X or Y loss is not clear, it appears that gonosomes play a role in the development of brain tumors. The gonosomes may carry genes involved in growth regulation. Although loss of the X or Y is nonrandom, loss of the X was limited to the malignant brain neoplasms whereas loss of the Y was noted in both benign and malignant tumors, which may suggest different functions in growth regulation of the two chromosomes.

  1. The origin of Eastern European Jews revealed by autosomal, sex chromosomal and mtDNA polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This study aims to establish the likely origin of EEJ (Eastern European Jews) by genetic distance analysis of autosomal markers and haplogroups on the X and Y chromosomes and mtDNA. Results According to the autosomal polymorphisms the investigated Jewish populations do not share a common origin, and EEJ are closer to Italians in particular and to Europeans in general than to the other Jewish populations. The similarity of EEJ to Italians and Europeans is also supported by the X chromosomal haplogroups. In contrast according to the Y-chromosomal haplogroups EEJ are closest to the non-Jewish populations of the Eastern Mediterranean. MtDNA shows a mixed pattern, but overall EEJ are more distant from most populations and hold a marginal rather than a central position. The autosomal genetic distance matrix has a very high correlation (0.789) with geography, whereas the X-chromosomal, Y-chromosomal and mtDNA matrices have a lower correlation (0.540, 0.395 and 0.641 respectively). Conclusions The close genetic resemblance to Italians accords with the historical presumption that Ashkenazi Jews started their migrations across Europe in Italy and with historical evidence that conversion to Judaism was common in ancient Rome. The reasons for the discrepancy between the biparental markers and the uniparental markers are discussed. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Damian Labuda (nominated by Jerzy Jurka), Kateryna Makova and Qasim Ayub (nominated by Dan Graur). PMID:20925954

  2. Inter- and intraspecies phylogenetic analyses reveal extensive X-Y gene conversion in the evolution of gametologous sequences of human sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Trombetta, Beniamino; Sellitto, Daniele; Scozzari, Rosaria; Cruciani, Fulvio

    2014-08-01

    It has long been believed that the male-specific region of the human Y chromosome (MSY) is genetically independent from the X chromosome. This idea has been recently dismissed due to the discovery that X-Y gametologous gene conversion may occur. However, the pervasiveness of this molecular process in the evolution of sex chromosomes has yet to be exhaustively analyzed. In this study, we explored how pervasive X-Y gene conversion has been during the evolution of the youngest stratum of the human sex chromosomes. By comparing about 0.5 Mb of human-chimpanzee gametologous sequences, we identified 19 regions in which extensive gene conversion has occurred. From our analysis, two major features of these emerged: 1) Several of them are evolutionarily conserved between the two species and 2) almost all of the 19 hotspots overlap with regions where X-Y crossing-over has been previously reported to be involved in sex reversal. Furthermore, in order to explore the dynamics of X-Y gametologous conversion in recent human evolution, we resequenced these 19 hotspots in 68 widely divergent Y haplogroups and used publicly available single nucleotide polymorphism data for the X chromosome. We found that at least ten hotspots are still active in humans. Hence, the results of the interspecific analysis are consistent with the hypothesis of widespread reticulate evolution within gametologous sequences in the differentiation of hominini sex chromosomes. In turn, intraspecific analysis demonstrates that X-Y gene conversion may modulate human sex-chromosome-sequence evolution to a greater extent than previously thought. PMID:24817545

  3. Sex-linked dominant

    MedlinePlus

    Inheritance - sex-linked dominant; Genetics - sex-linked dominant; X-linked dominant; Y-linked dominant ... one of the sex chromosomes, which are the X and Y chromosomes. Dominant inheritance occurs when an ...

  4. Sex-linked dominant

    MedlinePlus

    Inheritance - sex-linked dominant; Genetics - sex-linked dominant; X-linked dominant; Y-linked dominant ... type of chromosome that is affected (autosomal or sex chromosome). It also depends on whether the trait ...

  5. Microtus oeconomus (Rodentia), a useful mammal for studying the induction of sex-chromosome nondisjunction and diploid gametes in male germ cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tates, A D

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary data indicate that chemicals can also increase the frequency of sex-chromosome nondisjunction. Positive results--which certainly need further confirmation--have been obtained for MMS, p-fluorophenylalanine, vincristine, procarbazine, carbendazim, and bleomycin. Nocodazole, benomyl, colcemic, 6-mercaptopurine, and halothane were all negative at the concentrations tested. For the induction of diploid spermatids positive results were only obtained for MMS and parafluorophenylalanine. In view of the results obtained, the Microtus system is considered a very useful tool for analyzing factors contributing to the high frequency of aneuploidy and triploidy among abortuses and of aneuploidy in liveborn infants of men. A method is described for the detection of sex-chromosome nondisjunction and diploid spermatids in male germ cells of the field vole Microtus oeconomus. The method is based on the unique distribution pattern of heterochromatin in Microtus cells, which makes it possible to identify X and Y chromosomes in early spermatids with a simple C-banding procedure. Slide preparation is easy. Scoring of early spermatids for extra sex-chromosomes is simple and 2000-4000 cells per hour can be examined. With the Microtus system it has now been demonstrated that radiation of spermatocyte stages with doses of 50, 100 and 200 R results in a higher frequency of sex chromosome nondisjunction and of diploid gametes. Both types of aberrant gametes can be produced during the first and second meiotic division. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. PMID:387396

  6. Construction and Characterization of a Repetitive DNA Library in Parodontidae (Actinopterygii: Characiformes): A Genomic and Evolutionary Approach to the Degeneration of the W Sex Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Jordana Inácio Nascimento; Nogaroto, Viviane; Almeida, Mara Cristina; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Cestari, Marta Margarete; Moreira-Filho, Orlando; Vicari, Marcelo Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Repetitive DNA sequences, including tandem and dispersed repeats, comprise a large portion of eukaryotic genomes and are important for gene regulation, sex chromosome differentiation, and karyotype evolution. In Parodontidae, only the repetitive DNAs WAp and pPh2004 and rDNAs were previously studied using fluorescence in situ hybridization. This study aimed to build a library of repetitive DNA in Parodontidae. We isolated 40 clones using Cot-1; 17 of these clones exhibited similarity to repetitive DNA sequences, including satellites, minisatellites, microsatellites, and class I and class II transposable elements (TEs), from Danio rerio and other organisms. The physical mapping of the clones to chromosomes revealed the presence of a satellite DNA, a Helitron element, and degenerate short interspersed element (SINE), long interspersed element (LINE), and tc1-mariner elements on the sex chromosomes. Some clones exhibited dispersed signals; other sequences were not detected. The 5S rDNA was detected on an autosomal pair. These elements likely function in the molecular degeneration of the W chromosome in Parodontidae. Thus, the location of these elements on the chromosomes is important for understanding the function of these repetitive DNAs and for integrative studies with genome sequencing. The presented data demonstrate that an intensive invasion of TEs occurred during W sex chromosome differentiation in the Parodontidae. PMID:25122415

  7. Sex-linked recessive

    MedlinePlus

    ... through families through one of the X or Y chromosomes. X and Y are sex chromosomes. Dominant inheritance ... that X chromosome will cause the disease. The Y chromosome is the other half of the XY gene ...

  8. TWO SEX-CHROMOSOME-LINKED MICROSATELLITE LOCI SHOW GEOGRAPHIC VARIANCE AMONG NORTH AMERICAN OSTRINIA NUBILALIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A (GAAAAT)n repeat microsatellite was isolated from a partial Ostrinia nubilalis genomic library. Pedigree analysis indicated the marker was female specific, and referred to as Ostrinia nubilalis W-chromosome marker 1 (ONW1). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequence analysis indicated that ...

  9. Late Cretaceous relatives of rabbits, rodents, and other extant eutherian mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, J. David; Averianov, Alexander O.; Ekdale, Eric G.

    2001-11-01

    Extant eutherian mammals and their most recent common ancestor constitute the crown group Placentalia. This taxon, plus all extinct taxa that share a more recent common ancestor with placentals than they do with Metatheria (including marsupials), constitute Eutheria. The oldest well documented eutherian-dominated fauna in the world is Dzharakuduk, Uzbekistan. Among eutherians that it yields is Kulbeckia, an 85-90-Myr-old member of Zalambdalestidae (a family of Late Cretaceous Asian eutherians). This extends Zalambdalestidae back by some 10 million years from sites in the Gobi Desert, Mongolia. A phylogenetic analysis of well described Late Cretaceous eutherians strongly supports Zalambdalestidae, less strongly supports `Zhelestidae' (a Late Cretaceous clade related to Tertiary ungulates), but does not support Asioryctitheria (a group of Late Cretaceous Asian eutherians). A second analysis incorporating placentals from clades that include rodents (Tribosphenomys), lagomorphs (Mimotona) and archaic ungulates (Protungulatum and Oxyprimus) strongly supports Zalambdalestidae in a clade with Glires (rabbits, rodents and extinct relatives) and less strongly `Zhelestidae' within a clade that includes archaic ungulates (`condylarths'). This argues that some Late Cretaceous eutherians belong within the crown group Placentalia. The ages of these taxa are in line with molecularly based estimates of 64-104Myr ago (median 84Myr ago) for the superordinal diversification of some placentals, but provide no support for a Late Cretaceous diversification of extant placental orders.

  10. Eutherian-like reproductive specializations in a viviparous reptile

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, D.G.; Vitt, L.J.; Beuchat, C.A.

    1984-08-01

    The viviparous Brazilian scincid lizard Mabuya heathi exhibits a suite of reproductive specializations widely believed to be confined to the eutherian mammals. This skink ovulates the smallest known reptilian egg (similarly ordered 1.0 mm in diameter). Placental transport accounts for >99% of the dry mass of the periparturient fetus, representing a degree of placentotrophy proportionately greater than that reported in any other non-mammalian vertebrate. Placental morphology and the timing of fetal growth implicate the chorioallantoic placenta in maternal-fetal nutrient transfer. The yolk sac placenta regresses prior to any major increase in embryonic dry mass. Precocial gonadal maturation and postponement of reproductive investment until well after ovulation enables females to become pregnant at 3-4 months of age, long before attainment of full adult body size. 34 references, 3 tables.

  11. Can a Sex-Biased Human Demography Account for the Reduced Effective Population Size of Chromosome X in Non-Africans?

    PubMed Central

    Keinan, Alon; Reich, David

    2010-01-01

    Sex-biased demographic events can result in asymmetries in female and male effective population size that can lead to different patterns of genetic variation on chromosome X than are expected based on the patterns on the autosomes. Previous studies point to a period around the time of the dispersal of anatomically modern humans out of Africa when chromosome X experienced a significant reduction in effective population size relative to the autosomes. Here, we explore whether a sex-biased demographic history could explain these observations. We use coalescent simulations to show that a model of primarily male migration during the out-of-Africa dispersal can produce the striking patterns that are observed when comparing patterns of genetic variation on the autosomes and chromosome X. The model involves a history in which after the founder population of non-Africans lost much of its genetic diversity, subsequent mostly male gene flow from an African source brought new diversity into the population. We also explore two additional models, one of sex-biased generation time and one of a substructured population during the dispersal out of Africa with primarily female migration among demes. These latter models cannot account for the magnitude of the observed reduction in chromosome X effective population size, although it is plausible that they played a more minor role in producing the striking chromosome X/autosome patterns. PMID:20453016

  12. The eXtraordinarY Kids Clinic: an interdisciplinary model of care for children and adolescents with sex chromosome aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglia, Nicole; Howell, Susan; Wilson, Rebecca; Janusz, Jennifer; Boada, Richard; Martin, Sydney; Frazier, Jacqueline B; Pfeiffer, Michelle; Regan, Karen; McSwegin, Sarah; Zeitler, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Individuals with sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) are born with an atypical number of X and/or Y chromosomes, and present with a range of medical, developmental, educational, behavioral, and psychological concerns. Rates of SCA diagnoses in infants and children are increasing, and there is a need for specialized interdisciplinary care to address associated risks. The eXtraordinarY Kids Clinic was established to provide comprehensive and experienced care for children and adolescents with SCA, with an interdisciplinary team composed of developmental–behavioral pediatrics, endocrinology, genetic counseling, child psychology, pediatric neuropsychology, speech–language pathology, occupational therapy, nursing, and social work. The clinic model includes an interdisciplinary approach to care, where assessment results by each discipline are integrated to develop unified diagnostic impressions and treatment plans individualized for each patient. Additional objectives of the eXtraordinarY Kids Clinic program include prenatal genetic counseling, research, education, family support, and advocacy. Methods Satisfaction surveys were distributed to 496 patients, and responses were received from 168 unique patients. Results Satisfaction with the overall clinic visit was ranked as “very satisfied” in 85%, and as “satisfied” in another 9.8%. Results further demonstrate specific benefits from the clinic experience, the importance of a knowledgeable clinic coordinator, and support the need for similar clinics across the country. Three case examples of the interdisciplinary approach to assessment and treatment are included. PMID:26229481

  13. A rearrangement of the Z chromosome topology influences the sex-linked gene display in the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sex determination system of Lepidoptera is comprised of heterogametic females (ZW) and homogametic males (ZZ), where voltinism (Volt) and the male pheromone response traits (Resp) are controlled by genes housed on the Z-chromosome. Volt and Resp determine traits that lead to ecotype differentia...

  14. Y chromosome short arm-Sxr recombination in XSxr/Y males causes deletion of Rbm and XY female sex reversal.

    PubMed Central

    Laval, S H; Glenister, P H; Rasberry, C; Thornton, C E; Mahadevaiah, S K; Cooke, H J; Burgoyne, P S; Cattanach, B M

    1995-01-01

    We earlier described three lines of sex-reversed XY female mice deleted for sequences believed close to the testes-determining gene (Sry) on the Y chromosome short arm (Yp). The original sex-reversed females appeared among the offspring of XY males that carried the Yp duplication Sxr on their X chromosome. Earlier cytogenetic observations had suggested that the deletions resulted from asymmetrical meiotic recombination between the Y and the homologous Sxr region, but no direct evidence for this hypothesis was available. We have now analyzed the offspring of XSxr/Y males carrying an evolutionarily divergent Mus musculus domesticus Y chromosome, which permits detection and characterization of such recombination events. This analysis has enabled the derivation of a recombination map of Yp and Sxr, also demonstrating the orientation of Yp with respect to the Y centromere. The mapping data have established that Rbm, the murine homologue of a gene family cloned from the human Y chromosome, lies between Sry and the centromere. Analysis of two additional XY female lines shows that asymmetrical Yp-Sxr recombination leading to XY female sex reversal results in deletion of Rbm sequences. The deletions bring Sry closer to Y centromere, consistent with the hypothesis that position-effect inactivation of Sry is the basis for the sex reversal. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7479793

  15. Isolation of a homozygous X-linked translocation stock with two additional sex-chromosomes in the onion fly Hylemya antiqua Meigen.

    PubMed

    van Heemert, K

    1977-05-01

    The onion fly, Hylemya antiqua Meigen, was subjected to irradiation and selection based on observations of fertility and cytogenetics, in order to isolate structural chromosome mutations which might be used for genetic control of this species. To the present time, only a "simple" X-linked translocation could be obtained as a homozygous stock. Sibcrossing was carried out using translocation trisomics (TN + X) obtained from test-crossed translocation heterozygous females (TN) showing numerical nondisjunction. A homozygous stock was obtained with two additional sex-chromosomes. This is a unique case because normally an X-linked translocation can not be made homozygous in the male sex, which normally only carries one X-chromosome. PMID:24407169

  16. Chimeric Sex-Determining Chromosomal Regions and Dysregulation of Cell-Type Identity in a Sterile Zygosaccharomyces Allodiploid Yeast.

    PubMed

    Bizzarri, Melissa; Giudici, Paolo; Cassanelli, Stefano; Solieri, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Allodiploidization is a fundamental yet evolutionarily poorly characterized event, which impacts genome evolution and heredity, controlling organismal development and polyploid cell-types. In this study, we investigated the sex determination system in the allodiploid and sterile ATCC 42981 yeast, a member of the Zygosaccharomyces rouxii species complex, and used it to study how a chimeric mating-type gene repertoire contributes to hybrid reproductive isolation. We found that ATCC 42981 has 7 MAT-like (MTL) loci, 3 of which encode α-idiomorph and 4 encode a-idiomorph. Two phylogenetically divergent MAT expression loci were identified on different chromosomes, accounting for a hybrid a/α genotype. Furthermore, extra a-idimorph-encoding loci (termed MTLa copies 1 to 3) were recognized, which shared the same MATa1 ORFs but diverged for MATa2 genes. Each MAT expression locus was linked to a HML silent cassette, while the corresponding HMR loci were located on another chromosome. Two putative parental sex chromosome pairs contributed to this unusual genomic architecture: one came from an as-yet-undescribed taxon, which has the NCYC 3042 strain as a unique representative, while the other did not match any MAT-HML and HMR organizations previously described in Z. rouxii species. This chimeric rearrangement produces two copies of the HO gene, which encode for putatively functional endonucleases essential for mating-type switching. Although both a and α coding sequences, which are required to obtain a functional cell-type a1-α2 regulator, were present in the allodiploid ATCC 42981 genome, the transcriptional circuit, which regulates entry into meiosis in response to meiosis-inducing salt stress, appeared to be turned off. Furthermore, haploid and α-specific genes, such as MATα1 and HO, were observed to be actively transcribed and up-regulated under hypersaline stress. Overall, these evidences demonstrate that ATCC 42981 is unable to repress haploid α-specific genes and

  17. Chimeric Sex-Determining Chromosomal Regions and Dysregulation of Cell-Type Identity in a Sterile Zygosaccharomyces Allodiploid Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bizzarri, Melissa; Giudici, Paolo; Cassanelli, Stefano; Solieri, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Allodiploidization is a fundamental yet evolutionarily poorly characterized event, which impacts genome evolution and heredity, controlling organismal development and polyploid cell-types. In this study, we investigated the sex determination system in the allodiploid and sterile ATCC 42981 yeast, a member of the Zygosaccharomyces rouxii species complex, and used it to study how a chimeric mating-type gene repertoire contributes to hybrid reproductive isolation. We found that ATCC 42981 has 7 MAT-like (MTL) loci, 3 of which encode α-idiomorph and 4 encode a-idiomorph. Two phylogenetically divergent MAT expression loci were identified on different chromosomes, accounting for a hybrid a/α genotype. Furthermore, extra a-idimorph-encoding loci (termed MTLa copies 1 to 3) were recognized, which shared the same MATa1 ORFs but diverged for MATa2 genes. Each MAT expression locus was linked to a HML silent cassette, while the corresponding HMR loci were located on another chromosome. Two putative parental sex chromosome pairs contributed to this unusual genomic architecture: one came from an as-yet-undescribed taxon, which has the NCYC 3042 strain as a unique representative, while the other did not match any MAT-HML and HMR organizations previously described in Z. rouxii species. This chimeric rearrangement produces two copies of the HO gene, which encode for putatively functional endonucleases essential for mating-type switching. Although both a and α coding sequences, which are required to obtain a functional cell-type a1-α2 regulator, were present in the allodiploid ATCC 42981 genome, the transcriptional circuit, which regulates entry into meiosis in response to meiosis-inducing salt stress, appeared to be turned off. Furthermore, haploid and α-specific genes, such as MATα1 and HO, were observed to be actively transcribed and up-regulated under hypersaline stress. Overall, these evidences demonstrate that ATCC 42981 is unable to repress haploid α-specific genes and

  18. The use of molecular and cytogenetic methods as a valuable tool in the detection of chromosomal abnormalities in horses: a case of sex chromosome chimerism in a Spanish purebred colt.

    PubMed

    Demyda-Peyrás, S; Membrillo, A; Bugno-Poniewierska, M; Pawlina, K; Anaya, G; Moreno-Millán, M

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities associated to sex chromosomes are reported as a problem more common than believed to be in horses. Most of them remain undiagnosed due to the complexity of the horse karyotype and the lack of interest of breeders and veterinarians in this type of diagnosis. Approximately 10 years ago, the Spanish Purebred Breeders Association implemented a DNA paternity test to evaluate the pedigree of every newborn foal. All candidates who showed abnormal or uncertain results are routinely submitted to cytogenetical analysis to evaluate the presence of chromosomal abnormalities. We studied the case of a foal showing 3 and even 4 different alleles in several loci in the short tandem repeat (STR) -based DNA parentage test. To confirm these results, a filiation test was repeated using follicular hair DNA showing normal results. A complete set of conventional and molecular cytogenetic analysis was performed to determine their chromosomal complements. C-banding and FISH had shown that the foal presents a sex chimerism 64,XX/64,XY with a cellular percentage of approximately 70/30, diagnosed in blood samples. The use of a diagnostic approach combining routine parentage QF-PCR-based STR screening tested with classical or molecular cytogenetic analysis could be a powerful tool that allows early detection of foals that will have a poor or even no reproductive performance due to chromosomal abnormalities, saving time, efforts and breeders' resources. PMID:23735586

  19. A new Early Cretaceous eutherian mammal from the Sasayama Group, Hyogo, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kusuhashi, Nao; Tsutsumi, Yukiyasu; Saegusa, Haruo; Horie, Kenji; Ikeda, Tadahiro; Yokoyama, Kazumi; Shiraishi, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    We here describe a new Early Cretaceous (early Albian) eutherian mammal, Sasayamamylos kawaii gen. et sp. nov., from the ‘Lower Formation’ of the Sasayama Group, Hyogo Prefecture, Japan. Sasayamamylos kawaii is characterized by a robust dentary, a distinct angle on the ventral margin of the dentary at the posterior end of the mandibular symphysis, a lower dental formula of 3–4 : 1 : 4 : 3, a robust lower canine, a non-molariform lower ultimate premolar, and a secondarily reduced entoconid on the molars. To date, S. kawaii is the earliest known eutherian mammal possessing only four premolars, which demonstrates that the reduction in the premolar count in eutherians started in the late Early Cretaceous. The occurrence of S. kawaii implies that the relatively rapid diversification of eutherians in the mid-Cretaceous had already started by the early Albian. PMID:23536594

  20. Life history effects on the molecular clock of autosomes and sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Amster, Guy; Sella, Guy

    2016-02-01

    One of the foundational results in molecular evolution is that the rate at which neutral substitutions accumulate on a lineage equals the rate at which mutations arise. Traits that affect rates of mutation therefore also affect the phylogenetic "molecular clock." We consider the effects of sex-specific generation times and mutation rates in species with two sexes. In particular, we focus on the effects that the age of onset of male puberty and rates of spermatogenesis have likely had in hominids (great apes), considering a model that approximates features of the mutational process in mammals, birds, and some other vertebrates. As we show, this model can account for a number of seemingly disparate observations: notably, the puzzlingly low X-to-autosome ratios of substitution rates in humans and chimpanzees and differences in rates of autosomal substitutions among hominine lineages (i.e., humans, chimpanzees, and gorillas). The model further suggests how to translate pedigree-based estimates of human mutation rates into split times among extant hominoids (apes), given sex-specific life histories. In so doing, it largely bridges the gap reported between estimates of split times based on fossil and molecular evidence, in particular suggesting that the human-chimpanzee split may have occurred as recently as 6.6 Mya. The model also implies that the "generation time effect" should be stronger in short-lived species, explaining why the generation time has a major influence on yearly substitution rates in mammals but only a subtle one in human pedigrees. PMID:26811451

  1. Life history effects on the molecular clock of autosomes and sex chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Amster, Guy; Sella, Guy

    2016-01-01

    One of the foundational results in molecular evolution is that the rate at which neutral substitutions accumulate on a lineage equals the rate at which mutations arise. Traits that affect rates of mutation therefore also affect the phylogenetic “molecular clock.” We consider the effects of sex-specific generation times and mutation rates in species with two sexes. In particular, we focus on the effects that the age of onset of male puberty and rates of spermatogenesis have likely had in hominids (great apes), considering a model that approximates features of the mutational process in mammals, birds, and some other vertebrates. As we show, this model can account for a number of seemingly disparate observations: notably, the puzzlingly low X-to-autosome ratios of substitution rates in humans and chimpanzees and differences in rates of autosomal substitutions among hominine lineages (i.e., humans, chimpanzees, and gorillas). The model further suggests how to translate pedigree-based estimates of human mutation rates into split times among extant hominoids (apes), given sex-specific life histories. In so doing, it largely bridges the gap reported between estimates of split times based on fossil and molecular evidence, in particular suggesting that the human–chimpanzee split may have occurred as recently as 6.6 Mya. The model also implies that the “generation time effect” should be stronger in short-lived species, explaining why the generation time has a major influence on yearly substitution rates in mammals but only a subtle one in human pedigrees. PMID:26811451

  2. Comparative molecular phylogeny and evolution of sex chromosome DNA sequences in the family Canidae (Mammalia: Carnivora).

    PubMed

    Tsubouchi, Ayako; Fukui, Daisuke; Ueda, Miya; Tada, Kazumi; Toyoshima, Shouji; Takami, Kazutoshi; Tsujimoto, Tsunenori; Uraguchi, Kohji; Raichev, Evgeniy; Kaneko, Yayoi; Tsunoda, Hiroshi; Masuda, Ryuichi

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the molecular phylogeny and evolution of the family Canidae, nucleotide sequences of the zinc-finger-protein gene on the Y chromosome (ZFY, 924-1146 bp) and its homologous gene on the X chromosome (ZFX, 834-839 bp) for twelve canid species were determined. The phylogenetic relationships among species reconstructed by the paternal ZFY sequences closely agreed with those by mtDNA and autosomal DNA trees in previous reports, and strongly supported the phylogenetic affinity between the wolf-like canids clade and the South American canids clade. However, the branching order of some species differed between phylogenies of ZFY and ZFX genes: Cuon alpinus and Canis mesomelas were included in the wolf-like canid clades in the ZFY tree, whereas both species were clustered in a group of Chrysocyon brachyurus and Speothos venaticus in the ZFX tree. The topology difference between ZFY and ZFX trees may have resulted from the two-times higher substitution rate of the former than the latter, which was clarified in the present study. In addition, two types of transposable element sequence (SINE-I and SINE-II) were found to occur in the ZFY final intron of the twelve canid species examined. Because the SINE-I sequences were shared by all the species, they may have been inserted into the ZFY of the common ancestor before species radiation in Canidae. By contract, SINE-II found in only Canis aureus could have been inserted into ZFY independently after the speciation. The molecular diversity of SINE sequences of Canidae reflects evolutionary history of the species radiation. PMID:22379982

  3. Role of the pseudoautosomal region in sex-chromosome pairing during male meiosis: Meiotic studies in a man with a deletion of distal Xp

    SciTech Connect

    Mohandas, T.K.; Passage, M.B.; Yen, P.H.; Speed, R.M.; Chandley, A.C.; Shapiro, L.J. )

    1992-09-01

    Meiotic studies were undertaken in a 24-year-old male patient with short stature, chondrodysplasia punctata, ichthyosis, steroid sulfatase deficiency, and mild mental retardation with an inherited cytologically visible deletion of distal Xp. Molecular investigations showed that the pseudoautosomal region as well as the steroid sulfatase gene were deleted, but telomeric sequences were present at the pter on the deleted X chromosome. A complete failure of sex-chromosome pairing was observed in the primary spermatocytes of the patient. Telomeric approaches between the sex chromosomes were made at zygotene in some cells, but XY synaptonemal complex was formed. The sex chromosomes were present as univalents at metaphase I, and germ-cell development was arrested between metaphase I and metaphase II in the vast majority of cells, consistent with the azoospermia observed in the patient. The failure of XY pairing in this individual indicates that the pseudoautosomal sequences play an important role in initiating XY pairing and formation of synaptonemal complex at meiosis. 36 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Chromosomal localization of 45S rDNA, sex-specific C values, and heterochromatin distribution in Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Biplab Kumar; Yamamoto, Masashi; Jha, Sumita

    2016-01-01

    Coccinia grandis is a widely distributed dioecious cucurbit in India, with heteromorphic sex chromosomes and X-Y sex determination mode. The present study aids in the cytogenetic characterization of four native populations of this plant employing distribution patterns of 45S rDNA on chromosomes and guanine-cytosine (GC)-rich heterochromatin in the genome coupled with flow cytometric determination of genome sizes. Existence of four nucleolar chromosomes could be confirmed by the presence of four telomeric 45S rDNA signals in both male and female plants. All four 45S rDNA sites are rich in heterochromatin evident from the co-localization of telomeric chromomycin A (CMA)(+ve) signals. The size of 45S rDNA signal was found to differ between the homologues of one nucleolar chromosome pair. The distribution of heterochromatin is found to differ among the male and female populations. The average GC-rich heterochromatin content of male and female populations is 23.27 and 29.86 %, respectively. Moreover, the male plants have a genome size of 0.92 pg/2C while the female plants have a size of 0.73 pg/2C, reflecting a huge genomic divergence between the genders. The great variation in genome size is owing to the presence of Y chromosome in the male populations, playing a multifaceted role in sexual divergence in C. grandis. PMID:25795278

  5. A new species of Endecous Saussure, 1878 (Orthoptera, Gryllidae) from northeast Brazil with the first X1X20 chromosomal sex system in Gryllidae.

    PubMed

    Zefa, Edison; Redü, Darlan Rutz; Da Costa, Maria Kátia Matiotti; Fontanetti, Carmem S; Gottschalk, Marco Silva; Padilha, Giovanna Boff; Fernandes e Silva, Anelise; Martins, Luciano De P

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe a new species of Luzarinae cricket collected from the cave "Gruta de Ubajara, municipality of Ubajara, State of Ceará, Brazil, highlighting phallic sclerites morphology and chromosome complement as diagnostic characters. We presented meiotic and mitotic characterization in order to define the karyotype with 2n = 12 + X1X2♂/12 + X1X1X2X2♀. This represents the first record of X1X20 chromosomal sex system in Gryllidae. PMID:25112329

  6. Evolution of Klk4 and enamel maturation in eutherians.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Kazuhiko; Hu, Jan C-C; Simmer, James P

    2014-09-01

    Kallikrein-related peptidase 4 (KLK4) is a secreted serine protease that degrades residual enamel proteins to facilitate their removal by ameloblasts, which increases mineralization and hardens the enamel. Mutations in human KLK4 cause hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta. Enamel formed by Klk4 null mice is normal in thickness and prism structure, but the enamel layer retains proteins, is hypomineralized, and undergoes rapid attrition following tooth eruption. We searched multiple databases, retrieved Klk4 and Klk5 from various mammalian genomes, and identified Klk4 in 46 boreoeutherian genomes. In non-Boreoeutheria, Klk4 was detected in only one afrotherian genome (as a pseudogene), and not in the other six afrotherian, two xenarthran, or three marsupial genomes. In contrast, Klk5 was detected in both marsupial and eutherian mammals. Our phylogenetic and mutation rate analyses support the hypothesis that Klk4 arose from Klk5 by gene duplication near the divergence of Afrotheria, Xenarthra and Boreoeutheria, and that functionally-differentiated Klk4 survived only in Boreoeutheria. Afrotherian mammals share the feature of delayed dental eruption relative to boreoeutherian mammals. KLK4 shortens the time required for enamel maturation and could have alleviated negative selection following mutations that resulted in thicker enamel or earlier tooth eruption, without reducing enamel hardness or causing dental attrition. PMID:25153384

  7. Microcephaly genes evolved adaptively throughout the evolution of eutherian mammals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genes associated with the neurodevelopmental disorder microcephaly display a strong signature of adaptive evolution in primates. Comparative data suggest a link between selection on some of these loci and the evolution of primate brain size. Whether or not either positive selection or this phenotypic association are unique to primates is unclear, but recent studies in cetaceans suggest at least two microcephaly genes evolved adaptively in other large brained mammalian clades. Results Here we analyse the evolution of seven microcephaly loci, including three recently identified loci, across 33 eutherian mammals. We find extensive evidence for positive selection having acted on the majority of these loci not just in primates but also across non-primate mammals. Furthermore, the patterns of selection in major mammalian clades are not significantly different. Using phylogenetically corrected comparative analyses, we find that the evolution of two microcephaly loci, ASPM and CDK5RAP2, are correlated with neonatal brain size in Glires and Euungulata, the two most densely sampled non-primate clades. Conclusions Together with previous results, this suggests that ASPM and CDK5RAP2 may have had a consistent role in the evolution of brain size in mammals. Nevertheless, several limitations of currently available data and gene-phenotype tests are discussed, including sparse sampling across large evolutionary distances, averaging gene-wide rates of evolution, potential phenotypic variation and evolutionary reversals. We discuss the implications of our results for studies of the genetic basis of brain evolution, and explicit tests of gene-phenotype hypotheses. PMID:24898820

  8. Evolution of Klk4 and enamel maturation in eutherians

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Kazuhiko; Hu, Jan C.-C; Simmer, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Kallikrein-related peptidase 4 (KLK4) is a secreted serine protease that degrades residual enamel proteins to facilitate their removal by ameloblasts, which increases mineralization and hardens the enamel. Mutations in human KLK4 cause hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta. Enamel formed by Klk4 null mice is normal in thickness and prism structure, but the enamel layer retains proteins, is hypomineralized, and undergoes rapid attrition following tooth eruption. We searched multiple databases, retrieved Klk4 and Klk5 from various mammalian genomes, and identified Klk4 in 47 boreoeutherian genomes. In non-Boreoeutheria, Klk4 was detected in only one afrotherian genome (as a pseudogene), and not in the other six afrotherian, two xenarthran, or three marsupial genomes. In contrast, Klk5 was detected in both marsupial and eutherian mammals. Our phylogenetic and mutation rate analyses support the hypothesis that Klk4 arose from Klk5 by gene duplication near the divergence of Afrotheria, Xenarthra and Boreoeutheria, and that functionally- differentiated Klk4 survived only in Boreoeutheria. Afrotherian mammals share the feature of delayed dental eruption relative to boreoeutherian mammals. KLK4 shortens the time required for enamel maturation and could have alleviated negative selection following mutations that resulted in thicker enamel or earlier tooth eruption, without reducing enamel hardness or causing dental attrition. PMID:25153384

  9. Isolation of Dominant Xo-Feminizing Mutations in Caenorhabditis Elegans: New Regulatory Tra Alleles and an X Chromosome Duplication with Implications for Primary Sex Determination

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkin, J.; Albertson, D. G.

    1995-01-01

    A strain of Caenorhabditis elegans was constructed that permits selection of dominant or sex-linked mutations that transform XO animals (normally male) into fertile females, using a feminizing mutation, tra-2(e2046gf), which by itself does not sexually transform XO males. Twenty-three mutations were isolated after chemical mutagenesis and found to fall into both expected classes (four dominant tra-1 mutations and eight recessive xol-1 mutations) and novel classes. The novel mutations include 10 second-site mutations of tra-2, which are called eg mutations, for enhanced gain-of-function. The tra-2(gf, eg) alleles lead to complete dominant transformation of XO animals from fertile male into fertile female. Also isolated was a duplication of the left end of the X chromosome, eDp26, which has dominant XO lethal and feminizing properties, unlike all previously isolated duplications of the X chromosome. The properties of eDp26 indicate that it carries copies of one or more numerator elements, which act as part of the primary sex-determination signal, the X:A ratio. The eDp26 duplication is attached to the left tip of the X chromosome in inverted orientation and consequently can be used to generate unstable attached-X chromosomes. PMID:8647390

  10. Quantitative analysis of somatosensory cortex development in eutherians, with a comparison with metatherians and monotremes.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, Ken W S

    2015-01-01

    Extant eutherians exhibit a wide range of adult brain sizes and degree of cortical gyrification. Quantitative analysis of parietal isocortical sections held in museum collections was used to compare the pace of somatosensory cortex development relative to body size and pallial thickness among diverse eutherian embryos, foetuses, and neonates. Analysis indicated that, for most eutherians, cortical plate aggregation begins at about 6-18 mm greatest length or about 120-320 µm pallial thickness. Expansion of the proliferative compartment occurs at a similar pace in most eutherians, but exceptionally rapidly in hominoids. Involution of the pallial proliferative zones occurs over a wide range of body sizes (42 mm to over 500 mm greatest length) or when the cerebral cortex reaches a thickness of 1.2-9.8 mm depending on the eutherian group. Many of these values overlap with those for metatherians. The findings suggest that there is less evolutionary flexibility in the timing of cortical plate aggregation than in the rate of expansion of the pallial proliferative compartment and the duration of proliferative zone activity. PMID:25884290

  11. Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms in Children and Adolescents with Sex Chromosome Aneuploidy: XXY, XXX, XYY, and XXYY

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglia, Nicole R.; Ayari, Natalie; Hutaff-Lee, Christa; Boada, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Objective Attentional problems, hyperactivity, and impulsivity have been described as behavioral features associated with sex chromosome aneuploidy (SCA). In this study, the authors compare attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms in 167 participants aged 6 to 20 years with 4 types of SCA (XXY n = 56, XYY n = 33, XXX n = 25, and XXYY n = 53). They also evaluate factors associated with ADHD symptomatology (cognitive and adaptive scores, prenatal vs postnatal ascertainment) and describe the clinical response to psychopharmacologic medications in a subset of patients treated for ADHD. Methods Evaluation included medical and developmental history, cognitive and adaptive functioning assessment, and parent and teacher ADHD questionnaires containing DSM-IV criteria. Results In the total study group, 58% (96/167) met DSM-IV criteria for ADHD on parent-report questionnaires (36% in XXY, 52% in XXX, 76% in XYY, and 72% in XXYY). The Inattentive subtype was most common in XXY and XXX, whereas the XYY and XXYY groups were more likely to also have hyperactive/impulsive symptoms. There were no significant differences in Verbal, Performance, or Full Scale IQ between children with symptom scores in the ADHD range compared with those below the ADHD range. However, adaptive functioning scores were significantly lower in the group whose scores in the ADHD range were compared with those of the group who did not meet ADHD DSMIV criteria. Those with a prenatal diagnosis of XXY were less likely to meet criteria for ADHD compared with the postnatally diagnosed group. Psychopharmacologic treatment with stimulants was effective in 78.6% (66/84). Conclusions Children and adolescents with SCA are at increased risk for ADHD symptoms. Recommendations for ADHD evaluation and treatment in consideration of other aspects of the SCA medical and behavioral phenotype are provided. PMID:22333574

  12. Quantitative comparison of cerebral artery development in metatherians and monotremes with non-human eutherians.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Shulruf, Boaz

    2016-03-01

    A quantitative comparison of the internal diameters of cerebral feeder arteries (internal carotid and vertebral) and the aorta in developing non-human eutherians, metatherians and monotremes has been made, with the aim of determining if there are differences in cerebral arterial flow between the three infraclasses of mammals such as might reflect differences in metabolism of the developing brain. There were no significant differences between eutherians and metatherians in the internal radius of the aorta or the thickness of the aortic wall, but aortic internal radius was significantly smaller in developing monotremes than therians at the < 10 mm body length range. Aortic thickness in the developing monotremes also rose at a slower rate relative to body length than in metatherians or eutherians. The sums of the internal calibres of the internal carotid and vertebral arteries were significantly lower in metatherians as a group and monotremes compared with non-human eutherians at body lengths up to 20 mm and in metatherians at > 20 mm body length. The internal calibre of the internal carotids relative to the sum of all cerebral feeder arteries was also significantly lower in monotremes at < 10 mm body length compared with eutherians. It was noted that dasyurids differed from other metatherians in several measures of cerebral arterial calibre and aortic internal calibre. The findings suggest that: (i) both aortic outflow and cerebral arterial inflow may be lower in developing monotremes than in therians, particularly at small body size (< 20 mm); (ii) cerebral inflow may be lower in some developing metatherians than non-human eutherians; and (iii) dasyurids have unusual features of cerebral arteries possibly related to the extreme immaturity and small size at which they are born. The findings have implications for nutritional sourcing of the developing brain in the three infraclasses of mammals. PMID:26644330

  13. What was the ancestral function of decidual stromal cells? A model for the evolution of eutherian pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Arun Rajendra; Bhullar, Bhart-Anjan S; Wagner, Günter P

    2016-04-01

    In human and mouse, decidual stromal cells (DSC) are necessary for the establishment (implantation) and the maintenance of pregnancy by preventing inflammation and the immune rejection of the semi-allograft conceptus. DSC originated along the stem lineage of eutherian mammals, coincidental with the origin of invasive placentation. Surprisingly, in many eutherian lineages decidual cells are lost after the implantation phase of pregnancy, making it unlikely that DSC are necessary for the maintenance of pregnancy in these animals. In order to understand this variation, we review the literature on the fetal-maternal interface in all major eutherian clades Euarchontoglires, Laurasiatheria, Xenarthra and Afrotheria, as well as the literature about the ancestral eutherian species. We conclude that maintaining pregnancy may not be a shared derived function of DSC among all eutherian mammals. Rather, we propose that DSC originated to manage the inflammatory reaction associated with invasive implantation. We envision that this happened in a stem eutherian that had invasive placenta but still a short gestation. We further propose that extended gestation evolved independently in the major eutherian clades explaining why the major lineages of eutherian mammals differ with respect to the mechanisms maintaining pregnancy. PMID:27016782

  14. Chromosome painting in the manatee supports Afrotheria and Paenungulata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellogg, Margaret E.; Burkett, Sandra; Dennis, Thomas R.; Stone, Gary; Gray, Brian A.; McGuire, Peter M.; Zori, Roberto T.; Stanyon, Roscoe

    2007-01-01

    There are five derived chromosome traits that strongly link elephants with manatees in Tethytheria and give implicit support to Paenungulata: the associations 2/3, 3/13, 8/22, 18/19 and the loss of the ancestral eutherian 4/8 association. It would be useful to test these conclusions with chromosome painting in hyraxes. The manatee chromosome painting data confirm that the associations 1/19 and 5/21 phylogenetically link afrotherian species and show that Afrotheria is a natural clade. The association 10/12/22 is also ubiquitous in Afrotheria (clade I), present in Laurasiatheria (clade IV), only partially present in Xenarthra (10/12, clade II) and absent in Euarchontoglires (clade III). If Afrotheria is basal to eutherians, this association could be part of the ancestral eutherian karyotype. If afrotherians are not at the root of the eutherian tree, then the 10/12/22 association could be one of a suite of derived associations linking afrotherian taxa.

  15. The status of supergenes in the 21st century: recombination suppression in Batesian mimicry and sex chromosomes and other complex adaptations.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    I review theoretical models for the evolution of supergenes in the cases of Batesian mimicry in butterflies, distylous plants and sex chromosomes. For each of these systems, I outline the genetic evidence that led to the proposal that they involve multiple genes that interact during 'complex adaptations', and at which the mutations involved are not unconditionally advantageous, but show advantages that trade-off against some disadvantages. I describe recent molecular genetic studies of these systems and questions they raise about the evolution of suppressed recombination. Nonrecombining regions of sex chromosomes have long been known, but it is not yet fully understood why recombination suppression repeatedly evolved in systems in distantly related taxa, but does not always evolve. Recent studies of distylous plants are tending to support the existence of recombination-suppressed genome regions, which may include modest numbers of genes and resemble recently evolved sex-linked regions. For Batesian mimicry, however, molecular genetic work in two butterfly species suggests a new supergene scenario, with a single gene mutating to produce initial adaptive phenotypes, perhaps followed by modifiers specifically refining and perfecting the new phenotype. PMID:27087840

  16. The Y Chromosome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Y chromosome is of great interest to students and can be used to teach about many important biological concepts in addition to sex determination. This paper discusses mutation, recombination, mammalian sex determination, sex determination in general, and the evolution of sex determination in mammals. It includes a student activity that…

  17. Commentary: Unravelling the Effects of Additional Sex Chromosomes on Cognition and Communication--Reflections on Lee et al. (2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Dorothy V. M.

    2012-01-01

    Most people have 23 pairs of chromosomes; one set from the mother and one from the father. However, nondisjunction errors during meiosis can lead to a case of trisomy, where there are three rather than two chromosomes. Although such events are not uncommon, they are usually lethal, and account for a high proportion of spontaneous abortions. There…

  18. Insights into the preservation of the homomorphic sex-determining chromosome of Aedes aegypti from the discovery of a male-biased gene tightly linked to the M-locus.

    PubMed

    Hall, Andrew Brantley; Timoshevskiy, Vladimir A; Sharakhova, Maria V; Jiang, Xiaofang; Basu, Sanjay; Anderson, Michelle A E; Hu, Wanqi; Sharakhov, Igor V; Adelman, Zach N; Tu, Zhijian

    2014-01-01

    The preservation of a homomorphic sex-determining chromosome in some organisms without transformation into a heteromorphic sex chromosome is a long-standing enigma in evolutionary biology. A dominant sex-determining locus (or M-locus) in an undifferentiated homomorphic chromosome confers the male phenotype in the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti. Genetic evidence suggests that the M-locus is in a nonrecombining region. However, the molecular nature of the M-locus has not been characterized. Using a recently developed approach based on Illumina sequencing of male and female genomic DNA, we identified a novel gene, myo-sex, that is present almost exclusively in the male genome but can sporadically be found in the female genome due to recombination. For simplicity, we define sequences that are primarily found in the male genome as male-biased. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on A. aegypti chromosomes demonstrated that the myo-sex probe localized to region 1q21, the established location of the M-locus. Myo-sex is a duplicated myosin heavy chain gene that is highly expressed in the pupa and adult male. Myo-sex shares 83% nucleotide identity and 97% amino acid identity with its closest autosomal paralog, consistent with ancient duplication followed by strong purifying selection. Compared with males, myo-sex is expressed at very low levels in the females that acquired it, indicating that myo-sex may be sexually antagonistic. This study establishes a framework to discover male-biased sequences within a homomorphic sex-determining chromosome and offers new insights into the evolutionary forces that have impeded the expansion of the nonrecombining M-locus in A. aegypti. PMID:24398378

  19. Insights into the Preservation of the Homomorphic Sex-Determining Chromosome of Aedes aegypti from the Discovery of a Male-Biased Gene Tightly Linked to the M-Locus

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Andrew Brantley; Timoshevskiy, Vladimir A.; Sharakhova, Maria V.; Jiang, Xiaofang; Basu, Sanjay; Anderson, Michelle A.E.; Hu, Wanqi; Sharakhov, Igor V.; Adelman, Zach N.; Tu, Zhijian

    2014-01-01

    The preservation of a homomorphic sex-determining chromosome in some organisms without transformation into a heteromorphic sex chromosome is a long-standing enigma in evolutionary biology. A dominant sex-determining locus (or M-locus) in an undifferentiated homomorphic chromosome confers the male phenotype in the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti. Genetic evidence suggests that the M-locus is in a nonrecombining region. However, the molecular nature of the M-locus has not been characterized. Using a recently developed approach based on Illumina sequencing of male and female genomic DNA, we identified a novel gene, myo-sex, that is present almost exclusively in the male genome but can sporadically be found in the female genome due to recombination. For simplicity, we define sequences that are primarily found in the male genome as male-biased. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on A. aegypti chromosomes demonstrated that the myo-sex probe localized to region 1q21, the established location of the M-locus. Myo-sex is a duplicated myosin heavy chain gene that is highly expressed in the pupa and adult male. Myo-sex shares 83% nucleotide identity and 97% amino acid identity with its closest autosomal paralog, consistent with ancient duplication followed by strong purifying selection. Compared with males, myo-sex is expressed at very low levels in the females that acquired it, indicating that myo-sex may be sexually antagonistic. This study establishes a framework to discover male-biased sequences within a homomorphic sex-determining chromosome and offers new insights into the evolutionary forces that have impeded the expansion of the nonrecombining M-locus in A. aegypti. PMID:24398378

  20. Detecting Sex-Biased Gene Flow in African-Americans through the Analysis of Intra- and Inter-Population Variation at Mitochondrial DNA and Y- Chromosome Microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    Battaggia, C; Anagnostou, P; Bosch, I; Brisighelli, F; Destro-Bisol, G; Capocasa, M

    2012-01-01

    This study reports on variations at the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) hypervariable region 1 (HVR-1) and at seven Y-chromosome microsatellites in an African-American population sample from Chicago, IL, USA. Our results support the hypothesis that the population studied had undergone a European male-biased gene flow. We show that comparisons of intra-and inter-population diversity parameters between African-Americans, Europeans and Africans may help detect sex-biased gene flow, providing a complement to quantitative methods to estimate genetic admixture. PMID:24052726

  1. B-chromosome evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, J P; Sharbel, T F; Beukeboom, L W

    2000-01-01

    B chromosomes are extra chromosomes to the standard complement that occur in many organisms. They can originate in a number of ways including derivation from autosomes and sex chromosomes in intra- and interspecies crosses. Their subsequent molecular evolution resembles that of univalent sex chromosomes, which involves gene silencing, heterochromatinization and the accumulation of repetitive DNA and transposons. B-chromosome frequencies in populations result from a balance between their transmission rates and their effects on host fitness. Their long-term evolution is considered to be the outcome of selection on the host genome to eliminate B chromosomes or suppress their effects and on the B chromosome's ability to escape through the generation of new variants. Because B chromosomes interact with the standard chromosomes, they can play an important role in genome evolution and may be useful for studying molecular evolutionary processes. PMID:10724453

  2. Sex-Specific Placental Responses in Fetal Development

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The placenta is an ephemeral but critical organ for the survival of all eutherian mammals and marsupials. It is the primary messenger system between the mother and fetus, where communicational signals, nutrients, waste, gases, and extrinsic factors are exchanged. Although the placenta may buffer the fetus from various environmental insults, placental dysfunction might also contribute to detrimental developmental origins of adult health and disease effects. The placenta of one sex over the other might possess greater ability to respond and buffer against environmental insults. Given the potential role of the placenta in effecting the lifetime health of the offspring, it is not surprising that there has been a resurging interest in this organ, including the Human Placental Project launched by the National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development. In this review, we will compare embryological development of the laboratory mouse and human chorioallantoic placentae. Next, evidence that various species, including humans, exhibit normal sex-dependent structural and functional placental differences will be examined followed by how in utero environmental changes (nutritional state, stress, and exposure to environmental chemicals) might interact with fetal sex to affect this organ. Recent data also suggest that paternal state impacts placental function in a sex-dependent manner. The research to date linking placental maladaptive responses and later developmental origins of adult health and disease effects will be explored. Finally, we will focus on how sex chromosomes and epimutations may contribute to sex-dependent differences in placental function, the unanswered questions, and future directions that warrant further consideration. PMID:26241064

  3. Sex-Specific Placental Responses in Fetal Development.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Cheryl S

    2015-10-01

    The placenta is an ephemeral but critical organ for the survival of all eutherian mammals and marsupials. It is the primary messenger system between the mother and fetus, where communicational signals, nutrients, waste, gases, and extrinsic factors are exchanged. Although the placenta may buffer the fetus from various environmental insults, placental dysfunction might also contribute to detrimental developmental origins of adult health and disease effects. The placenta of one sex over the other might possess greater ability to respond and buffer against environmental insults. Given the potential role of the placenta in effecting the lifetime health of the offspring, it is not surprising that there has been a resurging interest in this organ, including the Human Placental Project launched by the National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development. In this review, we will compare embryological development of the laboratory mouse and human chorioallantoic placentae. Next, evidence that various species, including humans, exhibit normal sex-dependent structural and functional placental differences will be examined followed by how in utero environmental changes (nutritional state, stress, and exposure to environmental chemicals) might interact with fetal sex to affect this organ. Recent data also suggest that paternal state impacts placental function in a sex-dependent manner. The research to date linking placental maladaptive responses and later developmental origins of adult health and disease effects will be explored. Finally, we will focus on how sex chromosomes and epimutations may contribute to sex-dependent differences in placental function, the unanswered questions, and future directions that warrant further consideration. PMID:26241064

  4. Chromosomal Disorders and Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillberg, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on chromosomal aberrations in autism, especially possible gene markers. It notes that Chromosome 15 and numerical and structural abnormalities of the sex chromosomes have been most frequently reported as related to the genesis of autism. (Author/DB)

  5. A Tandem Duplicate of Anti-Müllerian Hormone with a Missense SNP on the Y Chromosome Is Essential for Male Sex Determination in Nile Tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minghui; Sun, Yunlv; Zhao, Jiue; Shi, Hongjuan; Zeng, Sheng; Ye, Kai; Jiang, Dongneng; Zhou, Linyan; Sun, Lina; Tao, Wenjing; Nagahama, Yoshitaka; Kocher, Thomas D.; Wang, Deshou

    2015-01-01

    Variation in the TGF-β signaling pathway is emerging as an important mechanism by which gonadal sex determination is controlled in teleosts. Here we show that amhy, a Y-specific duplicate of the anti-Müllerian hormone (amh) gene, induces male sex determination in Nile tilapia. amhy is a tandem duplicate located immediately downstream of amhΔ-y on the Y chromosome. The coding sequence of amhy was identical to the X-linked amh (amh) except a missense SNP (C/T) which changes an amino acid (Ser/Leu92) in the N-terminal region. amhy lacks 5608 bp of promoter sequence that is found in the X-linked amh homolog. The amhΔ-y contains several insertions and deletions in the promoter region, and even a 5 bp insertion in exonVI that results in a premature stop codon and thus a truncated protein product lacking the TGF-β binding domain. Both amhy and amhΔ-y expression is restricted to XY gonads from 5 days after hatching (dah) onwards. CRISPR/Cas9 knockout of amhy in XY fish resulted in male to female sex reversal, while mutation of amhΔ-y alone could not. In contrast, overexpression of Amhy in XX fish, using a fosmid transgene that carries the amhy/amhΔ-y haplotype or a vector containing amhy ORF under the control of CMV promoter, resulted in female to male sex reversal, while overexpression of AmhΔ-y alone in XX fish could not. Knockout of the anti-Müllerian hormone receptor type II (amhrII) in XY fish also resulted in 100% complete male to female sex reversal. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the duplicated amhy with a missense SNP is the candidate sex determining gene and amhy/amhrII signal is essential for male sex determination in Nile tilapia. These findings highlight the conserved roles of TGF-β signaling pathway in fish sex determination. PMID:26588702

  6. A Tandem Duplicate of Anti-Müllerian Hormone with a Missense SNP on the Y Chromosome Is Essential for Male Sex Determination in Nile Tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghui; Sun, Yunlv; Zhao, Jiue; Shi, Hongjuan; Zeng, Sheng; Ye, Kai; Jiang, Dongneng; Zhou, Linyan; Sun, Lina; Tao, Wenjing; Nagahama, Yoshitaka; Kocher, Thomas D; Wang, Deshou

    2015-11-01

    Variation in the TGF-β signaling pathway is emerging as an important mechanism by which gonadal sex determination is controlled in teleosts. Here we show that amhy, a Y-specific duplicate of the anti-Müllerian hormone (amh) gene, induces male sex determination in Nile tilapia. amhy is a tandem duplicate located immediately downstream of amhΔ-y on the Y chromosome. The coding sequence of amhy was identical to the X-linked amh (amh) except a missense SNP (C/T) which changes an amino acid (Ser/Leu92) in the N-terminal region. amhy lacks 5608 bp of promoter sequence that is found in the X-linked amh homolog. The amhΔ-y contains several insertions and deletions in the promoter region, and even a 5 bp insertion in exonVI that results in a premature stop codon and thus a truncated protein product lacking the TGF-β binding domain. Both amhy and amhΔ-y expression is restricted to XY gonads from 5 days after hatching (dah) onwards. CRISPR/Cas9 knockout of amhy in XY fish resulted in male to female sex reversal, while mutation of amhΔ-y alone could not. In contrast, overexpression of Amhy in XX fish, using a fosmid transgene that carries the amhy/amhΔ-y haplotype or a vector containing amhy ORF under the control of CMV promoter, resulted in female to male sex reversal, while overexpression of AmhΔ-y alone in XX fish could not. Knockout of the anti-Müllerian hormone receptor type II (amhrII) in XY fish also resulted in 100% complete male to female sex reversal. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the duplicated amhy with a missense SNP is the candidate sex determining gene and amhy/amhrII signal is essential for male sex determination in Nile tilapia. These findings highlight the conserved roles of TGF-β signaling pathway in fish sex determination. PMID:26588702

  7. Galectins: guardians of eutherian pregnancy at the maternal-fetal interface

    PubMed Central

    Than, NG; Romero, R; Kim, CJ; McGown, MR; Papp, Z; Wildman, DE

    2013-01-01

    Galectins are multifunctional regulators of fundamental cellular processes. They are also involved in innate and adaptive immune responses, and play a functional role in immune-endocrine crosstalk. Some galectins have attracted attention in the reproductive sciences because they are highly expressed at the maternal-fetal interface, their functional significance in eutherian pregnancies has been documented, and their dysregulated expression is observed in the ‘great obstetrical syndromes’. The evolution of these galectins has been linked to the emergence of eutherian mammals. Based on published evidence, galectins expressed at the maternal-fetal interface may serve as important proteins involved in maternal-fetal interactions, and the study of these galectins may facilitate the prediction, presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of pregnancy complications. PMID:22036528

  8. The obscure events contributing to the evolution of an incipient sex chromosome in Populus A retrospective working hypothesis.

    SciTech Connect

    Tuskan, Gerald A; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Chen, Jay; Labbe, Jessy L; Ranjan, Priya; DiFazio, Steven P; Slavov, Goncho T.; Yin, Tongming

    2012-01-01

    Genetic determination of gender is a fundamental developmental and evolutionary process in plants. Although it appears that dioecy in Populus is partially genetically controlled, the precise gender-determining systems remain unclear. The recently-released second draft assembly and annotated gene set of the Populus genome provided an opportunity to re-visit this topic. We hypothesized that over evolutionary time, selective pressure has reformed the genome structure and gene composition in the peritelomeric region of the chromosome XIX which has resulted in a distinctive genome structure and cluster of genes contributing to gender determination in Populus. Multiple lines of evidence support this working hypothesis. First, the peritelomeric region of the chromosome XIX contains significantly fewer single nucleotide polymorphisms than the rest of Populus genome and has a distinct evolutionary history. Second, the peritelomeric end of chromosome XIX contains the largest cluster of the nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) class of disease resistances genes in the entire Populus genome. Third, there is a high occurrence of small microRNAs on chromosome XIX coincident to the region containing the putative gender-determining locus and the major cluster of NBS-LRR genes. Further, by analyzing the metabolomic profiles of floral bud in male and female Populus trees using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, we found there are gender-specific accumulations of phenolic glycosides. Taken together, these findings provide new insights into the genetic control of gender determination in Populus.

  9. A radiation of arboreal basal eutherian mammals beginning in the Late Cretaceous of India

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Anjali; Prasad, Guntupalli V. R.; Upchurch, Paul; Boyer, Doug M.; Seiffert, Erik R.; Verma, Omkar; Gheerbrant, Emmanuel; Flynn, John J.

    2011-01-01

    India's Late Cretaceous fossil mammals include the only undisputed pre-Tertiary Gondwanan eutherians, such as Deccanolestes. Recent studies have suggested a relationship between Deccanolestes and African and European Paleocene adapisoriculids, which have been variably identified as stem euarchontans, stem primates, lipotyphlan insectivores, or afrosoricids. Support for a close relationship between Deccanolestes and any of these placental mammal clades would be unique in representing a confirmed Mesozoic record of a placental mammal. However, some paleogeographic reconstructions place India at its peak isolation from all other continents during the latest Cretaceous, complicating reconstructions of the biogeographic history of the placental radiation. Recent fieldwork in India has recovered dozens of better-preserved specimens of Cretaceous eutherians, including several new species. Here, we incorporate these new specimens into an extensive phylogenetic analysis that includes every clade with a previously hypothesized relationship to Deccanolestes. Our results support a robust relationship between Deccanolestes and Paleocene adapisoriculids, but do not support a close affinity between these taxa and any placental clade, demonstrating that Deccanolestes is not a Cretaceous placental mammal and reinforcing the sizeable gap between molecular and fossil divergence time estimates for the placental mammal radiation. Instead, our expanded data push Adapisoriculidae, including Deccanolestes, into a much more basal position than in earlier analyses, strengthening hypotheses that scansoriality and arboreality were prevalent early in eutherian evolution. This comprehensive phylogeny indicates that faunal exchange occurred between India, Africa, and Europe in the Late Cretaceous-Early Paleocene, and suggests a previously unrecognized ∼30 to 45 Myr “ghost lineage” for these Gondwanan eutherians. PMID:21930906

  10. Potential efficacy of mitochondrial genes for animal DNA barcoding: a case study using eutherian mammals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A well-informed choice of genetic locus is central to the efficacy of DNA barcoding. Current DNA barcoding in animals involves the use of the 5' half of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 gene (CO1) to diagnose and delimit species. However, there is no compelling a priori reason for the exclusive focus on this region, and it has been shown that it performs poorly for certain animal groups. To explore alternative mitochondrial barcoding regions, we compared the efficacy of the universal CO1 barcoding region with the other mitochondrial protein-coding genes in eutherian mammals. Four criteria were used for this comparison: the number of recovered species, sequence variability within and between species, resolution to taxonomic levels above that of species, and the degree of mutational saturation. Results Based on 1,179 mitochondrial genomes of eutherians, we found that the universal CO1 barcoding region is a good representative of mitochondrial genes as a whole because the high species-recovery rate (> 90%) was similar to that of other mitochondrial genes, and there were no significant differences in intra- or interspecific variability among genes. However, an overlap between intra- and interspecific variability was still problematic for all mitochondrial genes. Our results also demonstrated that any choice of mitochondrial gene for DNA barcoding failed to offer significant resolution at higher taxonomic levels. Conclusions We suggest that the CO1 barcoding region, the universal DNA barcode, is preferred among the mitochondrial protein-coding genes as a molecular diagnostic at least for eutherian species identification. Nevertheless, DNA barcoding with this marker may still be problematic for certain eutherian taxa and our approach can be used to test potential barcoding loci for such groups. PMID:21276253

  11. c-myc gene sequences and the phylogeny of bats and other eutherian mammals.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, M M; Porter, C A; Goodman, M

    2000-09-01

    The complete protein-coding sequences of the c-myc proto-oncogene were determined for five species of four new orders of eutherian (placental) mammals. These newly obtained sequences were aligned to each other and to other available orthologs for the phylogenetic estimation of eutherian interordinal relationships. Several measures of sequence difference and base composition were first calculated to assess the major evolutionary properties of the three codon positions and two protein-coding exons of the gene. On the basis of these calculations, different parsimony, distance, and maximum likelihood approaches were adopted, with the most sophisticated involving the separate, then combined, likelihood analyses of the third codon positions of exon 2 versus all other sites. These phylogenetic approaches provided clear support for the grouping of Chiroptera (bats) with Artiodactyla (ruminants, camels, and pigs) and Carnivora (cats, dogs, and their allies), an interordinal arrangement that receives strong corroboration from other lines of evidence including complete mitochondrial DNA sequences. In contrast, these analyses failed to provide strong to reasonable support for any other interordinal group. This study concludes with specific recommendations about sampling and other strategies for maximizing the phylogenetic contributions of the c-myc gene to the continued resolution of the eutherian ordinal tree. PMID:12116424

  12. Origin and domestication of papaya Yh chromosome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sex in papaya is controlled by a pair of nascent sex chromosomes. Females are XX, and two slightly different Y chromosomes distinguish males (XY) and hermaphrodites (XYh). The hermaphrodite-specific region of the Yh chromosome (HSY) and its X chromosome counterpart were sequenced and analyzed previo...

  13. Growth inhibition and chromosomal instability of cultured marsupial (opossum) cells after treatment with DNA polymerase α inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Masaharu; Kazama, Tomoko; Sakuma, Kurumi; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Oshima, Teruyoshi

    2011-01-01

    The DNA replication mechanism has been well established for eutherian mammals (placental mammals such as humans, mice, and cattle), but not, to date, for metatherian mammals (marsupials such as kangaroos, koalas, and opossums). In this study, we found that dehydroaltenusin, a selective inhibitor of mammalian (eutherian) DNA polymerase α, clearly suppressed the growth of metatherian (opossum and rat kangaroo) cultured cells. In cultured opossum (OK) cells, dehydroaltenusin also suppressed the progression of DNA replication. These results suggest that dehydroaltenusin inhibits metatherian as well as eutherian DNA replication. Dehydroaltenusin treatment of OK cells engendered fluctuations in the numbers of chromosomes in the OK cells as well as inhibition of cell growth and DNA replication. This suggests that partial inhibition of DNA replication by dehydroaltenusin causes chromosomal instability in cultured cells. PMID:21737927

  14. Chromosome studies in the red howler monkey, Alouatta seniculus stramineus (Platyrrhini, Primates): description of an X1X2Y1Y2/X1X1X2X2 sex-chromosome system and karyological comparisons with other subspecies.

    PubMed

    Lima, M M; Seuánez, H N

    1991-01-01

    In the red howler monkey, Alouatta seniculus stramineus (2n = 47, 48, or 49), variations in diploid chromosome number are due to different numbers of microchromosomes. Males exhibit a Y;autosome translocation involving the short arm of an individual biarmed autosome. Consequently, the sex-chromosome constitution in the male is X1X2Y1Y2, with X1 representing the original X chromosome, X2 the biarmed autosome (No. 7), Y1 the Y;7p translocation product, and Y2 the acrocentric homolog of 7q. In the first meiotic division, a quadrivalent with a chain configuration can be observed in spermatocytes. Females have an X1X1X2X2 sex-chromosome constitution. Chromosome heteromorphisms were observed in pair 13, due to a pericentric inversion, and pair 19, due to the presence of constitutive heterochromatin. Microchromosomes, which varied in number between individuals, were also heterochromatic. NOR-staining was observed at two separate sites on a single chromosome pair (No. 10). A comparison of A.s. stramineus with A.s. macconnelli shows that these two subspecies have identical diploid chromosome numbers (47, 48, or 49), again due to a varying number of microchromosomes, and that they share a similar sex-chromosome constitution. Their karyotypes, however, are not identical, but can be derived from each other by a reciprocal translocation. Further comparisons with other A. seniculus subspecies reported in the literature indicate that this taxon is not karyologically uniform and that substantial chromosome shuffling has occurred between populations that have been considered to be subspecies by taxonomic criteria based on their morphometric attributes. PMID:1914523

  15. Opossum carboxylesterases: sequences, phylogeny and evidence for CES gene duplication events predating the marsupial-eutherian common ancestor

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Carboxylesterases (CES) perform diverse metabolic roles in mammalian organisms in the detoxification of a broad range of drugs and xenobiotics and may also serve in specific roles in lipid, cholesterol, pheromone and lung surfactant metabolism. Five CES families have been reported in mammals with human CES1 and CES2 the most extensively studied. Here we describe the genetics, expression and phylogeny of CES isozymes in the opossum and report on the sequences and locations of CES1, CES2 and CES6 'like' genes within two gene clusters on chromosome one. We also discuss the likely sequence of gene duplication events generating multiple CES genes during vertebrate evolution. Results We report a cDNA sequence for an opossum CES and present evidence for CES1 and CES2 like genes expressed in opossum liver and intestine and for distinct gene locations of five opossum CES genes,CES1, CES2.1, CES2.2, CES2.3 and CES6, on chromosome 1. Phylogenetic and sequence alignment studies compared the predicted amino acid sequences for opossum CES with those for human, mouse, chicken, frog, salmon and Drosophila CES gene products. Phylogenetic analyses produced congruent phylogenetic trees depicting a rapid early diversification into at least five distinct CES gene family clusters: CES2, CES1, CES7, CES3, and CES6. Molecular divergence estimates based on a Bayesian relaxed clock approach revealed an origin for the five mammalian CES gene families between 328–378 MYA. Conclusion The deduced amino acid sequence for an opossum cDNA was consistent with its identity as a mammalian CES2 gene product (designated CES2.1). Distinct gene locations for opossum CES1 (1: 446,222,550–446,274,850), three CES2 genes (1: 677,773,395–677,927,030) and a CES6 gene (1: 677,585,520–677,730,419) were observed on chromosome 1. Opossum CES1 and multiple CES2 genes were expressed in liver and intestine. Amino acid sequences for opossum CES1 and three CES2 gene products revealed conserved

  16. Degeneration of a Nonrecombining Chromosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, William R.

    1994-01-01

    Comparative studies suggest that sex chromosomes begin as ordinary autosomes that happen to carry a major sex determining locus. Over evolutionary time the Y chromosome is selected to stop recombining with the X chromosome, perhaps in response to accumulation of alleles beneficial to the heterogametic but harmful to the homogametic sex. Population genetic theory predicts that a nonrecombining Y chromosome should degenerate. Here this prediction is tested by application of specific selection pressures to Drosophila melanogaster populations. Results demonstrate the decay of a nonrecombining, nascent Y chromosome and the capacity for recombination to ameliorate such decay.

  17. Congenital nevi versus metastatic melanoma in a newborn to a mother with malignant melanoma - diagnosis supported by sex chromosome analysis and Imaging Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alomari, Ahmed K; Glusac, Earl J; Choi, Jennifer; Hui, Pei; Seeley, Erin H; Caprioli, Richard M; Watsky, Kalman L; Urban, Jennifer; Lazova, Rossitza

    2015-10-01

    A 37-year-old pregnant woman presented with a 2-cm irregular reddish nodule on her left upper arm during pregnancy. A biopsy from the lesion showed a 2.2-mm thick malignant melanoma with intravascular invasion, 25 mitosis/mm(2) and no ulceration. Following induction of labor, the patient underwent re-excision with sentinel lymph node biopsy. This showed no residual melanoma and no lymph node metastasis. The newborn boy had multiple pigmented lesions on the trunk, some of which were large and irregular. Two were biopsied and histologic examination showed dense dermal proliferation of medium sized melanocytes with multiple mitotic figures and no maturation with their descent into the dermis, raising suspicion of transplacental metastases. Examination of the placenta failed to show metastatic lesions. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genotyping, including testing for amelogenin locus for sex chromosome determination, demonstrated the presence of Y chromosome material in the melanocytes of the newborn's lesions excluding maternal origin. A diagnosis of congenital nevi was rendered. Subsequently, Imaging Mass Spectrometric analysis of the mother's lesion showed proteomic signature expression indicative of malignant melanoma, whereas the two lesions in the newborn showed changes indicative of nevi. This case demonstrates the utility of genotyping and Mass Spectrometry analysis in this challenging clinical scenario. PMID:25989266

  18. Chelating resin-based extraction of DNA from dental pulp and sex determination from incinerated teeth with Y-chromosomal alphoid repeat and short tandem repeats.

    PubMed

    Tsuchimochi, Tsukasa; Iwasa, Mineo; Maeno, Yoshitaka; Koyama, Hiroyoshi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Isobe, Ichiro; Matoba, Ryoji; Yokoi, Motoo; Nagao, Masataka

    2002-09-01

    A procedure utilizing Chelex 100, chelating resin, was adapted to extract DNA from dental pulp. The procedure was simple and rapid, involved no organic solvents, and did not require multiple tube transfers. The extraction of DNA from dental pulp using this method was as efficient, or more so, than using proteinase K and phenol-chloroform extraction. In this study, the Chelex method was used with amplification and typing at Y-chromosomal loci to determine the effects of temperature on the sex determination of the teeth. The extracted teeth were incinerated in a dental furnace for 2 minutes at 100 degrees C, 200 degrees C, 300 degrees C, 400 degrees C, and 500 degrees C. After the isolation of DNA from the dental pulp by the Chelex method, alphoid repeats, and short tandem repeats, the human Y chromosome (DYZ3), DYS19, SYS389, DYS390, and DYS393 could be amplified and typed in all samples incinerated at up to 300 degrees C for 2 minutes. The DYS389 locus in some samples could not be amplified at 300 degrees C for 2 minutes. An autopsy case is described in which genotypings of DYS19, DYS390, and DYS393 from dental pulp obtained from a burned body were needed. The data presented in this report suggest that Chelex 100-based DNA extraction, amplification, and typing are possible in burned teeth in forensic autopsy cases. PMID:12198355

  19. Sex-linked recessive

    MedlinePlus

    Inheritance - sex-linked recessive; Genetics - sex-linked recessive; X-linked recessive ... X-linked recessive diseases usually occur in males. Males have only one X chromosome. A single recessive ...

  20. Forelimb Kinematics of Rats Using XROMM, with Implications for Small Eutherians and Their Fossil Relatives.

    PubMed

    Bonnan, Matthew F; Shulman, Jason; Varadharajan, Radha; Gilbert, Corey; Wilkes, Mary; Horner, Angela; Brainerd, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The earliest eutherian mammals were small-bodied locomotor generalists with a forelimb morphology that strongly resembles that of extant rats. Understanding the kinematics of the humerus, radius, and ulna of extant rats can inform and constrain hypotheses concerning typical posture and mobility in early eutherian forelimbs. The locomotion of Rattus norvegicus has been extensively studied, but the three-dimensional kinematics of the bones themselves remains under-explored. Here, for the first time, we use markerless XROMM (Scientific Rotoscoping) to explore the three-dimensional long bone movements in Rattus norvegicus during a normal, symmetrical gait (walking). Our data show a basic kinematic profile that agrees with previous studies on rats and other small therians: rats maintain a crouched forelimb posture throughout the step cycle, and the ulna is confined to flexion/extension in a parasagittal plane. However, our three-dimensional data illuminate long-axis rotation (LAR) movements for both the humerus and the radius for the first time. Medial LAR of the humerus throughout stance maintains an adducted elbow with a caudally-facing olecranon process, which in turn maintains a cranially-directed manus orientation (pronation). The radius also shows significant LAR correlated with manus pronation and supination. Moreover, we report that elbow flexion and manus orientation are correlated in R. norvegicus: as the elbow angle becomes more acute, manus supination increases. Our data also suggest that manus pronation and orientation in R. norvegicus rely on a divided system of labor between the ulna and radius. Given that the radius follows the flexion and extension trajectory of the ulna, it must rotate at the elbow (on the capitulum) so that during the stance phase its distal end lies medial to ulna, ensuring that the manus remains pronated while the forelimb is supporting the body. We suggest that forelimb posture and kinematics in Juramaia, Eomaia, and other basal

  1. Forelimb Kinematics of Rats Using XROMM, with Implications for Small Eutherians and Their Fossil Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Bonnan, Matthew F.; Shulman, Jason; Varadharajan, Radha; Gilbert, Corey; Wilkes, Mary; Horner, Angela; Brainerd, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The earliest eutherian mammals were small-bodied locomotor generalists with a forelimb morphology that strongly resembles that of extant rats. Understanding the kinematics of the humerus, radius, and ulna of extant rats can inform and constrain hypotheses concerning typical posture and mobility in early eutherian forelimbs. The locomotion of Rattus norvegicus has been extensively studied, but the three-dimensional kinematics of the bones themselves remains under-explored. Here, for the first time, we use markerless XROMM (Scientific Rotoscoping) to explore the three-dimensional long bone movements in Rattus norvegicus during a normal, symmetrical gait (walking). Our data show a basic kinematic profile that agrees with previous studies on rats and other small therians: rats maintain a crouched forelimb posture throughout the step cycle, and the ulna is confined to flexion/extension in a parasagittal plane. However, our three-dimensional data illuminate long-axis rotation (LAR) movements for both the humerus and the radius for the first time. Medial LAR of the humerus throughout stance maintains an adducted elbow with a caudally-facing olecranon process, which in turn maintains a cranially-directed manus orientation (pronation). The radius also shows significant LAR correlated with manus pronation and supination. Moreover, we report that elbow flexion and manus orientation are correlated in R. norvegicus: as the elbow angle becomes more acute, manus supination increases. Our data also suggest that manus pronation and orientation in R. norvegicus rely on a divided system of labor between the ulna and radius. Given that the radius follows the flexion and extension trajectory of the ulna, it must rotate at the elbow (on the capitulum) so that during the stance phase its distal end lies medial to ulna, ensuring that the manus remains pronated while the forelimb is supporting the body. We suggest that forelimb posture and kinematics in Juramaia, Eomaia, and other basal

  2. Evolutionary and preservational constraints on origins of biologic groups: divergence times of eutherian mammals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foote, M.; Hunter, J. P.; Janis, C. M.; Sepkoski, J. J. Jr

    1999-01-01

    Some molecular clock estimates of divergence times of taxonomic groups undergoing evolutionary radiation are much older than the groups' first observed fossil record. Mathematical models of branching evolution are used to estimate the maximal rate of fossil preservation consistent with a postulated missing history, given the sum of species durations implied by early origins under a range of species origination and extinction rates. The plausibility of postulated divergence times depends on origination, extinction, and preservation rates estimated from the fossil record. For eutherian mammals, this approach suggests that it is unlikely that many modern orders arose much earlier than their oldest fossil records.

  3. Xist Exon 7 Contributes to the Stable Localization of Xist RNA on the Inactive X-Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Norishige; Hasegawa, Yuko; Yue, Minghui; Hamada, Tomofumi; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Ogawa, Yuya

    2015-01-01

    To equalize X-linked gene dosage between the sexes in mammalian females, Xist RNA inactivates one of the two X-chromosomes. Here, we report the crucial function of Xist exon 7 in X-inactivation. Xist exon 7 is the second-largest exon with a well-conserved repeat E in eutherian mammals, but its role is often overlooked in X-inactivation. Although female ES cells with a targeted truncation of the Xist exon 7 showed no significant differences in their Xist expression levels and RNA stability from control cells expressing wild-type Xist, compromised localization of Xist RNA and incomplete silencing of X-linked genes on the inactive X-chromosome (Xi) were observed in the exon 7-truncated mutant cells. Furthermore, the interaction between the mutant Xist RNA and hnRNP U required for localization of Xist RNA to the Xi was impaired in the Xist exon 7 truncation mutant cells. Our results suggest that exon 7 of Xist RNA plays an important role for stable Xist RNA localization and silencing of the X-linked genes on the Xi, possibly acting through an interaction with hnRNP U. PMID:26244333

  4. A polymorphic and hypervariable locus in the pseudoautosomal region of the CBA/H mouse sex chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Fennelly, J.; Laval, S.; Wright, E.; Plumb, M.

    1996-04-01

    We have identified a genomic locus (DXYH1) that is polymorphic and hypervariable within the CBA/H colony. Using a panel of C57BL/6 x Mus spretus backcross offspring, it was mapped to the distal end of the X chromosome. Pseudoautosomal inheritance was demonstrated through three generations of CBA/H x CBA/H and CBA/H x C57BL/6 crosses and confirmed through linkage to the Sxr locus in X/Y Sxr x 3H1 crosses. Meiotic recombination frequencies place DXYH1 {approximately}28% into the pseudoautosomal region from the boundary. The de novo generation of CBA/H variant DXYH1 restriction fragment length polymorphisms during spermatogenesis is suggestive of the germline instability associated with hypermutable human minisatellites. The absence of DXY1-related sequences in Mus spretus provides DNA sequence evidence to support the observed failure of X-Y pairing during meiosis and consequent hybrid infertility in C57BL/6 x Mus spretus male F1 offspring. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Ornithorhynchus anatinus (platypus) links the evolution of immunoglobulin genes in eutherian mammals and nonmammalian tetrapods.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yaofeng; Cui, Huiting; Whittington, Camilla M; Wei, Zhiguo; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Ziding; Yu, Li; Ren, Liming; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Zhang, Yaping; Hellman, Lars; Belov, Katherine; Li, Ning; Hammarström, Lennart

    2009-09-01

    The evolutionary origins of mammalian immunoglobulin H chain isotypes (IgM, IgD, IgG, IgE, and IgA) are still incompletely understood as these isotypes differ considerably in structure and number from their counterparts in nonmammalian tetrapods. We report in this study that the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) Ig H chain constant region gene locus contains eight Ig encoding genes, which are arranged in an mu-delta-omicron-gamma2-gamma1-alpha1-epsilon-alpha2 order, spanning a total of approximately 200 kb DNA, encoding six distinct isotypes. The omicron (omicron for Ornithorhynchus) gene encodes a novel Ig H chain isotype that consists of four constant region domains and a hinge, and is structurally different from any of the five known mammalian Ig classes. This gene is phylogenetically related to upsilon (epsilon) and gamma, and thus appears to be a structural intermediate between these two genes. The platypus delta gene encodes ten heavy chain constant region domains, lacks a hinge region and is similar to IgD in amphibians and fish, but strikingly different from that in eutherian mammals. The platypus Ig H chain isotype repertoire thus shows a unique combination of genes that share similarity both to those of nonmammalian tetrapods and eutherian animals and demonstrates how phylogenetically informative species can be used to reconstruct the evolutionary history of functionally important genes. PMID:19675164

  6. Variation in growth form and precocity at birth in eutherian mammals.

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, J M; Pontier, D; Allaine, D; Loison, A; Herve, J C; Heizmann, A

    1997-01-01

    Using the flexible Chapman-Richards model for describing the growth curves from birth to adulthood of 69 species of eutherian mammals, we demonstrate that growth form differs among eutherian mammals. Thereby the commonly used Gompertz model can no longer be considered as the general model for describing mammalian growth. Precocial mammals have their peak growth rate earlier in the growth process than altricial mammals. However, the position on the altricial-precocial continuum accounts for most growth-form differences only between mammalian lineages. Within mammalian genera differences in growth form are not related to precocity at birth. This indicates that growth form may have been associated with precocity at birth early in mammalian evolution, when broad patterns of body development radiated. We discuss four non-exclusive interpretations to account for the role of precocity at birth on the observed variation in growth form among mammals. Precocial and altricial mammals could differ according to (i) the distribution of energy output by the mother, (ii) the ability of the young to assimilate the milk yield, (iii) the allocation of energy by the young between competing functions and (iv) the position of birth between conception and attainment of physical maturity. PMID:9225478

  7. A review of inter- and intraspecific variation in the eutherian placenta

    PubMed Central

    Gundling, William E.; Wildman, Derek E.

    2015-01-01

    The placenta is one of the most morphologically variable mammalian organs. Four major characteristics are typically discussed when comparing the placentas of different eutherian species: placental shape, maternal–fetal interdigitation, intimacy of the maternal–fetal interface and the pattern of maternal–fetal blood flow. Here, we describe the evolution of three of these features as well as other key aspects of eutherian placentation. In addition to interspecific anatomical variation, there is also variation in placental anatomy and function within a single species. Much of this intraspecific variation occurs in response to different environmental conditions such as altitude and poor maternal nutrition. Examinations of variation in the placenta from both intra- and interspecies perspectives elucidate different aspects of placental function and dysfunction at the maternal–fetal interface. Comparisons within species identify candidate mechanisms that are activated in response to environmental stressors ultimately contributing to the aetiology of obstetric syndromes such as pre-eclampsia. Comparisons above the species level identify the evolutionary lineages on which the potential for the development of obstetric syndromes emerged. PMID:25602076

  8. A review of inter- and intraspecific variation in the eutherian placenta.

    PubMed

    Gundling, William E; Wildman, Derek E

    2015-03-01

    The placenta is one of the most morphologically variable mammalian organs. Four major characteristics are typically discussed when comparing the placentas of different eutherian species: placental shape, maternal-fetal interdigitation, intimacy of the maternal-fetal interface and the pattern of maternal-fetal blood flow. Here, we describe the evolution of three of these features as well as other key aspects of eutherian placentation. In addition to interspecific anatomical variation, there is also variation in placental anatomy and function within a single species. Much of this intraspecific variation occurs in response to different environmental conditions such as altitude and poor maternal nutrition. Examinations of variation in the placenta from both intra- and interspecies perspectives elucidate different aspects of placental function and dysfunction at the maternal-fetal interface. Comparisons within species identify candidate mechanisms that are activated in response to environmental stressors ultimately contributing to the aetiology of obstetric syndromes such as pre-eclampsia. Comparisons above the species level identify the evolutionary lineages on which the potential for the development of obstetric syndromes emerged. PMID:25602076

  9. Multiplex PCR for 17 Y-Chromosome Specific Short Tandem Repeats (STR) to Enhance the Reliability of Fetal Sex Determination in Maternal Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Yuan; Gao, Jiajia; Jiang, Xinqiang; Zheng, Fang

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to demonstrate the influence of target gene and amplification product length on the performance of fetal gender determination systems using maternal plasma. A total of 40 pairs of plasma DNA samples from pregnant women and genomic DNA samples from maternal blood, amniotic fluid and paternal blood were isolated for gender determination by amplification of the amelogenin gene and 17 Y-chromosome STR loci, using three different commercial kits. The gender of the fetuses was confirmed by cytogenetic analysis or phenotype at birth. Both the AmpFℓSTR-Identifiler amplification kit and the Mini-STR Amplification kit for amelogenin gene detection were reliable in determining fetal gender (92.0% and 96.0%, respectively), but false negatives were present in both systems. AmpFℓSTR-Yfiler was found to be fully reliable as it amplified Y-STR in all cases of pregnancies with male fetuses and thus was 100% correct in determining fetal gender. The results demonstrated that multiple fluorescent PCR for 17 Y-STR loci was more reliable than AMELY gene testing in fetal sex determination with maternal plasma. We also found that the shorter amplification products could improve the performance of fetal gender determination systems. PMID:22754343

  10. Characterizing the chromosomes of the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus).

    PubMed

    McMillan, Daniel; Miethke, Pat; Alsop, Amber E; Rens, Willem; O'Brien, Patricia; Trifonov, Vladimir; Veyrunes, Frederic; Schatzkamer, Kyriena; Kremitzki, Colin L; Graves, Tina; Warren, Wesley; Grützner, Frank; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall

    2007-01-01

    Like the unique platypus itself, the platypus genome is extraordinary because of its complex sex chromosome system, and is controversial because of difficulties in identification of small autosomes and sex chromosomes. A 6-fold shotgun sequence of the platypus genome is now available and is being assembled with the help of physical mapping. It is therefore essential to characterize the chromosomes and resolve the ambiguities and inconsistencies in identifying autosomes and sex chromosomes. We have used chromosome paints and DAPI banding to identify and classify pairs of autosomes and sex chromosomes. We have established an agreed nomenclature and identified anchor BAC clones for each chromosome that will ensure unambiguous gene localizations. PMID:18185982

  11. An LTR Retrotransposon-Derived Gene Displays Lineage-Specific Structural and Putative Species-Specific Functional Variations in Eutherians.

    PubMed

    Irie, Masahito; Koga, Akihiko; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Amongst the 11 eutherian-specific genes acquired from a sushi-ichi retrotransposon is the CCHC type zinc-finger protein-encoding gene SIRH11/ZCCHC16. Its contribution to eutherian brain evolution is implied because of its involvement in cognitive function in mice, possibly via the noradrenergic system. Although, the possibility that Sirh11/Zcchc16 functions as a non-coding RNA still remains, dN/dS ratios in pairwise comparisons between its orthologs have provided supportive evidence that it acts as a protein. It became a pseudogene in armadillos (Cingulata) and sloths (Pilosa), the only two extant orders of xenarthra, which prompted us to examine the lineage-specific variations of SIRH11/ZCCHC16 in eutherians. We examined the predicted SIRH11/ZCCHC16 open reading frame (ORF) in 95 eutherian species based on the genomic DNA information in GenBank. A large variation in the SIRH11/ZCCHC16 ORF was detected in several lineages. These include a lack of a CCHC RNA-binding domain in its C-terminus, observed in gibbons (Hylobatidae: Primates) and megabats (Megachiroptera: Chiroptera). A lack of the N-terminal half, on the other hand, was observed in New World monkeys (Platyrrhini: Primates) and species belonging to New World and African Hystricognaths (Caviomorpha and Bathyergidae: Rodents) along with Cetacea and Ruminantia (Cetartiodactyla). Among the hominoids, interestingly, three out of four genera of gibbons have lost normal SIRH11/ZCCHC16 function by deletion or the lack of the CCHC RNA-binding domain. Our extensive dN/dS analysis suggests that such truncated SIRH11/ZCCHC16 ORFs are functionally diversified even within lineages. Combined, our results show that SIRH11/ZCCHC16 may contribute to the diversification of eutherians by lineage-specific structural changes after its domestication in the common eutherian ancestor, followed by putative species-specific functional changes that enhanced fitness and occurred as a consequence of complex natural selection events

  12. An LTR Retrotransposon-Derived Gene Displays Lineage-Specific Structural and Putative Species-Specific Functional Variations in Eutherians

    PubMed Central

    Irie, Masahito; Koga, Akihiko; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Amongst the 11 eutherian-specific genes acquired from a sushi-ichi retrotransposon is the CCHC type zinc-finger protein-encoding gene SIRH11/ZCCHC16. Its contribution to eutherian brain evolution is implied because of its involvement in cognitive function in mice, possibly via the noradrenergic system. Although, the possibility that Sirh11/Zcchc16 functions as a non-coding RNA still remains, dN/dS ratios in pairwise comparisons between its orthologs have provided supportive evidence that it acts as a protein. It became a pseudogene in armadillos (Cingulata) and sloths (Pilosa), the only two extant orders of xenarthra, which prompted us to examine the lineage-specific variations of SIRH11/ZCCHC16 in eutherians. We examined the predicted SIRH11/ZCCHC16 open reading frame (ORF) in 95 eutherian species based on the genomic DNA information in GenBank. A large variation in the SIRH11/ZCCHC16 ORF was detected in several lineages. These include a lack of a CCHC RNA-binding domain in its C-terminus, observed in gibbons (Hylobatidae: Primates) and megabats (Megachiroptera: Chiroptera). A lack of the N-terminal half, on the other hand, was observed in New World monkeys (Platyrrhini: Primates) and species belonging to New World and African Hystricognaths (Caviomorpha and Bathyergidae: Rodents) along with Cetacea and Ruminantia (Cetartiodactyla). Among the hominoids, interestingly, three out of four genera of gibbons have lost normal SIRH11/ZCCHC16 function by deletion or the lack of the CCHC RNA-binding domain. Our extensive dN/dS analysis suggests that such truncated SIRH11/ZCCHC16 ORFs are functionally diversified even within lineages. Combined, our results show that SIRH11/ZCCHC16 may contribute to the diversification of eutherians by lineage-specific structural changes after its domestication in the common eutherian ancestor, followed by putative species-specific functional changes that enhanced fitness and occurred as a consequence of complex natural selection events

  13. Strong Constraint on Human Genes Escaping X-Inactivation Is Modulated by their Expression Level and Breadth in Both Sexes.

    PubMed

    Slavney, Andrea; Arbiza, Leonardo; Clark, Andrew G; Keinan, Alon

    2016-02-01

    In eutherian mammals, X-linked gene expression is normalized between XX females and XY males through the process of X chromosome inactivation (XCI). XCI results in silencing of transcription from one ChrX homolog per female cell. However, approximately 25% of human ChrX genes escape XCI to some extent and exhibit biallelic expression in females. The evolutionary basis of this phenomenon is not entirely clear, but high sequence conservation of XCI escapers suggests that purifying selection may directly or indirectly drive XCI escape at these loci. One hypothesis is that this signal results from contributions to developmental and physiological sex differences, but presently there is limited evidence supporting this model in humans. Another potential driver of this signal is selection for high and/or broad gene expression in both sexes, which are strong predictors of reduced nucleotide substitution rates in mammalian genes. Here, we compared purifying selection and gene expression patterns of human XCI escapers with those of X-inactivated genes in both sexes. When we accounted for the functional status of each ChrX gene's Y-linked homolog (or "gametolog"), we observed that XCI escapers exhibit greater degrees of purifying selection in the human lineage than X-inactivated genes, as well as higher and broader gene expression than X-inactivated genes across tissues in both sexes. These results highlight a significant role for gene expression in both sexes in driving purifying selection on XCI escapers, and emphasize these genes' potential importance in human disease. PMID:26494842

  14. CHROMOSOMAL LOCATION AND GENE PAUCITY IN THE MALE SPECIFIC REGION ON PAPAYA Y CHROMOSOME

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sex chromosomes in flowering plants evolved recently and many of them remain homomorphic, including those in papaya. We investigated the chromosomal location of papaya’s small male specific region of the hermaphrodite Y (Yh) chromosome (MSY) and its genomic features. We conducted chromosome fluoresc...

  15. Human chromosomes: Structure, behavior, and effects

    SciTech Connect

    Therman, E.; Susman, M.

    1993-12-31

    The book `Human Chromosomes: Structure, Behavior, and Effects` covers the most important topics regarding human chromosomes and current research in cytogenetics. Attention is given both to structure and function of autosomes and sex chromosomes, as well as definitions and causes of chromosomal aberrations. This often involves discussion about various aspects of the cell cycle (both mitosis and meiosis). Methods and techniques involved in researching and mapping human chromosomes are also discussed.

  16. Identification of a novel PNMA-MS1 gene in marsupials suggests the LTR retrotransposon-derived PNMA genes evolved differently in marsupials and eutherians.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Sawa; Suzuki, Shunsuke; Pelekanos, Matthew; Clark, Helen; Ono, Ryuichi; Shaw, Geoff; Renfree, Marilyn B; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2013-10-01

    Two major gene families derived from Ty3/Gypsy long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons were recently identified in mammals. The sushi-ichi retrotransposon homologue (SIRH) family comprises 12 genes: 11 in eutherians including Peg10 and Peg11/Rtl1 that have essential roles in the eutherian placenta and 1 that is marsupial specific. Fifteen and 12 genes were reported in the second gene family, para-neoplastic antigen MA (PNMA), in humans and mice, respectively, although their biological functions and evolutionary history remain largely unknown. Here, we identified two novel candidate PNMA genes, PNMA-MS1 and -MS2 in marsupials. Like all eutherian-specific PNMA genes, they exhibit the highest homology to a Gypsy12_DR (DR, Danio rerio) Gag protein. PNMA-MS1 is conserved in both Australian and South American marsupial species, the tammar wallaby and grey short-tailed opossum. However, no PNMA-MS1 orthologue was found in eutherians, monotremes or non-mammalian vertebrates. PNMA-MS1 was expressed in the ovary, mammary gland and brain during development and growth in the tammar, suggesting that PNMA-MS1 may have acquired a marsupial-specific function. However, PNMA-MS2 seems to be a pseudogene. The absence of marsupial orthologues of eutherian PNMA genes suggests that the retrotransposition events of the Gypsy12_DR-related retrotransposons that gave rise to the PNMA family occurred after the divergence of marsupials and eutherians. PMID:23704700

  17. The Papaya Y Chromosome Evolved Recently and Shows Gene Paucity and DNA Sequence Expansion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sex chromosomes in flowering plants, in contrast to those in animals, evolved relatively recently and only a few are heteromorphic. At cytological level, the sex chromosomes of papaya appear homomorphic, nevertheless, we are finding the papaya Y chromosome shows features of incipient sex chromosome ...

  18. Conserved piRNA Expression from a Distinct Set of piRNA Cluster Loci in Eutherian Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Mei; Gerlach, Daniel; Yu, Michael; Berger, Bonnie; Naramura, Mayumi; Kile, Benjamin T.; Lau, Nelson C.

    2015-01-01

    The Piwi pathway is deeply conserved amongst animals because one of its essential functions is to repress transposons. However, many Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) do not base-pair to transposons and remain mysterious in their targeting function. The sheer number of piRNA cluster (piC) loci in animal genomes and infrequent piRNA sequence conservation also present challenges in determining which piC loci are most important for development. To address this question, we determined the piRNA expression patterns of piC loci across a wide phylogenetic spectrum of animals, and reveal that most genic and intergenic piC loci evolve rapidly in their capacity to generate piRNAs, regardless of known transposon silencing function. Surprisingly, we also uncovered a distinct set of piC loci with piRNA expression conserved deeply in Eutherian mammals. We name these loci Eutherian-Conserved piRNA cluster (ECpiC) loci. Supporting the hypothesis that conservation of piRNA expression across ~100 million years of Eutherian evolution implies function, we determined that one ECpiC locus generates abundant piRNAs antisense to the STOX1 transcript, a gene clinically associated with preeclampsia. Furthermore, we confirmed reduced piRNAs in existing mouse mutations at ECpiC-Asb1 and -Cbl, which also display spermatogenic defects. The Asb1 mutant testes with strongly reduced Asb1 piRNAs also exhibit up-regulated gene expression profiles. These data indicate ECpiC loci may be specially adapted to support Eutherian reproduction. PMID:26588211

  19. A motif of eleven amino acids is a structural adaptation that facilitates motor capability of eutherian prestin

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaodong; Pecka, Jason L.; Tang, Jie; Lovas, Sándor; Beisel, Kirk W.; He, David Z. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) alter their length in response to transmembrane voltage changes. This so-called electromotility is the result of conformational changes of membrane-bound prestin. Prestin-based OHC motility is thought to be responsible for cochlear amplification, which contributes to the exquisite frequency selectivity and sensitivity of mammalian hearing. Prestin belongs to an anion transporter family, the solute carrier protein 26A (SLC26A). Prestin is unique in this family in that it functions as a voltage-dependent motor protein manifested by two hallmarks, nonlinear capacitance and motility. Evidence suggests that prestin orthologs from zebrafish and chicken are anion exchangers or transporters with no motor function. We identified a segment of 11 amino acid residues in eutherian prestin that is extremely conserved among eutherian species but highly variable among non-mammalian orthologs and SLC26A paralogs. To determine whether this sequence represents a motif that facilitates motor function in eutherian prestin, we utilized a chimeric approach by swapping corresponding residues from the zebrafish and chicken with those of gerbil. Motility and nonlinear capacitance were measured from chimeric prestin-transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells using a voltage-clamp technique and photodiode-based displacement measurement system. We observed a gain of motor function with both of the hallmarks in the chimeric prestin without loss of transport function. Our results show, for the first time, that the substitution of a span of 11 amino acid residues confers the electrogenic anion transporters of zebrafish and chicken prestins with motor-like function. Thus, this motif represents the structural adaptation that assists gain of motor function in eutherian prestin. PMID:22399806

  20. A motif of eleven amino acids is a structural adaptation that facilitates motor capability of eutherian prestin.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaodong; Pecka, Jason L; Tang, Jie; Lovas, Sándor; Beisel, Kirk W; He, David Z Z

    2012-02-15

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) alter their length in response to transmembrane voltage changes. This so-called electromotility is the result of conformational changes of membrane-bound prestin. Prestin-based OHC motility is thought to be responsible for cochlear amplification, which contributes to the exquisite frequency selectivity and sensitivity of mammalian hearing. Prestin belongs to an anion transporter family, the solute carrier protein 26A (SLC26A). Prestin is unique in this family in that it functions as a voltage-dependent motor protein manifested by two hallmarks, nonlinear capacitance and motility. Evidence suggests that prestin orthologs from zebrafish and chicken are anion exchangers or transporters with no motor function. We identified a segment of 11 amino acid residues in eutherian prestin that is extremely conserved among eutherian species but highly variable among non-mammalian orthologs and SLC26A paralogs. To determine whether this sequence represents a motif that facilitates motor function in eutherian prestin, we utilized a chimeric approach by swapping corresponding residues from the zebrafish and chicken with those of gerbil. Motility and nonlinear capacitance were measured from chimeric prestin-transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells using a voltage-clamp technique and photodiode-based displacement measurement system. We observed a gain of motor function with both of the hallmarks in the chimeric prestin without loss of transport function. Our results show, for the first time, that the substitution of a span of 11 amino acid residues confers the electrogenic anion transporters of zebrafish and chicken prestins with motor-like function. Thus, this motif represents the structural adaptation that assists gain of motor function in eutherian prestin. PMID:22399806

  1. Genotoxic profile of inhibitors of topoisomerases I (camptothecin) and II (etoposide) in a mitotic recombination and sex-chromosome loss somatic eye assay of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Sortibrán, América Nitxin Castañeda; Téllez, María Guadalupe Ordaz; Rodríguez-Arnaiz, Rosario

    2006-04-30

    Genotoxic carcinogens which interact with DNA may produce double-strand breaks as normal intermediates of homologous mitotic recombination, and may give rise to structural chromosome aberrations and inter-chromosomal deletion-recombination. The genotoxic profile of two inhibitors of DNA topoisomerases were evaluated using an in vivo somatic w/w+ eye assay of Drosophila melanogaster for the detection of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) by homologous mitotic recombination, intra-chromosomal recombination and structural chromosomal aberrations. We studied camptothecin (CPT) as a topoisomerase-I-interactive agent and etoposide (ETOP) as a topoisomerase II inhibitor. These drugs act by stabilizing a ternary complex consisting of topoisomerases covalently linked to DNA at single-strand or at double-strand breaks, thereby preventing the relegation step of the breakage/rejoining reaction mediated by the enzyme. The genotoxic profiles were determined from the appearance of eye tissue in adult flies, in which LOH and expression of the reporter gene white produced light clones. The results demonstrated that both compounds were significantly genotoxic, with CPT being more effective than ETOP. Inter-chromosomal mitotic recombination was the major mechanism responsible for the induction of light spots by both compounds in XX females. Loss of the ring X chromosome (rX), was significantly enhanced by CPT, and this topoisomerase blocker also produced intra-chromosomal recombination (XY males). PMID:16529987

  2. A model describing the effect of sex-reversed YY fish in an established wild population: The use of a Trojan Y chromosome to cause extinction of an introduced exotic species.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Juan B; Teem, John L

    2006-07-21

    A novel means of inducing extinction of an exotic fish population is proposed using a genetic approach to shift the ratio of male to females within a population. In the proposed strategy, sex-reversed fish containing two Y chromosomes are introduced into a normal fish population. These YY fish result in the production of a disproportionate number of male fish in subsequent generations. Mathematical modeling of the system following introduction of YY fish at a constant rate reveals that female fish decline in numbers over time, leading to eventual extinction of the population. PMID:16406425

  3. X-Chromosome dosage compensation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Barbara J

    2005-01-01

    In mammals, flies, and worms, sex is determined by distinctive regulatory mechanisms that cause males (XO or XY) and females (XX) to differ in their dose of X chromosomes. In each species, an essential X chromosome-wide process called dosage compensation ensures that somatic cells of either sex express equal levels of X-linked gene products. The strategies used to achieve dosage compensation are diverse, but in all cases, specialized complexes are targeted specifically to the X chromosome(s) of only one sex to regulate transcript levels. In C. elegans, this sex-specific targeting of the dosage compensation complex (DCC) is controlled by the same developmental signal that establishes sex, the ratio of X chromosomes to sets of autosomes (X:A signal). Molecular components of this chromosome counting process have been defined. Following a common step of regulation, sex determination and dosage compensation are controlled by distinct genetic pathways. C. elegans dosage compensation is implemented by a protein complex that binds both X chromosomes of hermaphrodites to reduce transcript levels by one-half. The dosage compensation complex resembles the conserved 13S condensin complex required for both mitotic and meiotic chromosome resolution and condensation, implying the recruitment of ancient proteins to the new task of regulating gene expression. Within each C. elegans somatic cell, one of the DCC components also participates in the separate mitotic/meiotic condensin complex. Other DCC components play pivotal roles in regulating the number and distribution of crossovers during meiosis. The strategy by which C. elegans X chromosomes attract the condensin-like DCC is known. Small, well-dispersed X-recognition elements act as entry sites to recruit the dosage compensation complex and to nucleate spreading of the complex to X regions that lack recruitment sites. In this manner, a repressed chromatin state is spread in cis over short or long distances, thus establishing the

  4. Diversification of the eutherian placenta is associated with changes in the pace of life.

    PubMed

    Garratt, Michael; Gaillard, Jean-Michel; Brooks, Robert C; Lemaître, Jean-François

    2013-05-01

    Few mammalian organs vary as dramatically among species as the placenta. This variation is remarkable considering that the placenta's primary function--transfer of nutrients and waste between mother and offspring--does not differ among species. Evolutionary changes in placental morphology remain poorly understood, with suggestions that parent-offspring conflict or evolutionary changes in life history might drive placental evolution. Here we demonstrate that life history differences among eutherian mammals are associated with major transitions in maternofetal interdigitation and placental invasiveness. We show that the repeated evolution of villous interdigitation is associated with reduced offspring production early in life and an increased lifespan. Further changes in placental morphology that reestablish a larger surface area are also associated with a change back to greater offspring production. After controlling for these differences in interdigitation, we also show that the least invasive placental type is associated with a fast pace of life. We predict that selection for a faster pace of life intensifies parent-offspring conflict, and that the repeated evolution of less-invasive placental structures might have allowed mothers to wrest back control of gestation from the fetus and alter their relative allocation to offspring production across life. PMID:23610401

  5. Maternal-fetal unit interactions and eutherian neocortical development and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Montiel, Juan F.; Kaune, Heidy; Maliqueo, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The conserved brain design that primates inherited from early mammals differs from the variable adult brain size and species-specific brain dominances observed across mammals. This variability relies on the emergence of specialized cerebral cortical regions and sub-compartments, triggering an increase in brain size, areal interconnectivity and histological complexity that ultimately lies on the activation of developmental programs. Structural placental features are not well correlated with brain enlargement; however, several endocrine pathways could be tuned with the activation of neuronal progenitors in the proliferative neocortical compartments. In this article, we reviewed some mechanisms of eutherians maternal–fetal unit interactions associated with brain development and evolution. We propose a hypothesis of brain evolution where proliferative compartments in primates become activated by “non-classical” endocrine placental signals participating in different steps of corticogenesis. Changes in the inner placental structure, along with placenta endocrine stimuli over the cortical proliferative activity would allow mammalian brain enlargement with a concomitant shorter gestation span, as an evolutionary strategy to escape from parent-offspring conflict. PMID:23882189

  6. Chromosomal Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... 150 babies is born with a chromosomal condition. Down syndrome is an example of a chromosomal condition. Because ... all pregnant women be offered prenatal tests for Down syndrome and other chromosomal conditions. A screening test is ...

  7. Chromosomal Abnormalities and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    BASSETT, ANNE S.; CHOW, EVA W.C.; WEKSBERG, ROSANNA

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a common and serious psychiatric illness with strong evidence for genetic causation, but no specific loci yet identified. Chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia may help to understand the genetic complexity of the illness. This paper reviews the evidence for associations between chromosomal abnormalities and schizophrenia and related disorders. The results indicate that 22q11.2 microdeletions detected by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) are significantly associated with schizophrenia. Sex chromosome abnormalities seem to be increased in schizophrenia but insufficient data are available to indicate whether schizophrenia or related disorders are increased in patients with sex chromosome aneuploidies. Other reports of chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia have the potential to be important adjuncts to linkage studies in gene localization. Advances in molecular cytogenetic techniques (i.e., FISH) have produced significant increases in rates of identified abnormalities in schizophrenia, particularly in patients with very early age at onset, learning difficulties or mental retardation, or dysmorphic features. The results emphasize the importance of considering behavioral phenotypes, including adult onset psychiatric illnesses, in genetic syndromes and the need for clinicians to actively consider identifying chromosomal abnormalities and genetic syndromes in selected psychiatric patients. PMID:10813803

  8. The IL-9 receptor gene (IL9R): Genomic structure, chromosomal localization in the pseudoautosomal region of the long arm of sex chromosomes, and identification of IL9R pseudogenes at 9qter, 10pter, 16pter, 18pter

    SciTech Connect

    Kermouni, A.; Godelaine, D.; Lurquin, C.; Szikora, J.P.

    1995-09-20

    Cosmids containing the human IL-9 receptor (R) gene (IL9R) have been isolated from a genomic library using the IL9R cDNA as a probe. We have shown that the human IL9R gene is composed of 11 exons and 10 introns, stretching over {approx} 17 kb, and is located within the pseudoautosomal region of the Xq and Yq chromosome, in the vicinity of the telomere. Analysis of the 5` flanking region revealed multiple transcription initiation sites as well as potential binding motifs for AP1, AP2, AP3, Sp1, and NF-kB, although this region lacks a TATA box. Using the human IL9R cosmid as a probe to perform fluorescence in situ hybridization, additional signals were identified in the subtelomeric regions of chromosomes 9q, 10p, 16p, and 18p. IL9R homologs located on chromosomes 9 and 18 were partially characterized, while those located on chromosomes 16 and 10 were completely sequenced. Although they are similiar to the IL9R gene ({approx} 90% identity), none of these copies encodes a functional receptor: none of them contains sequences homologous to the 5` flanking region or exon 1 of the IL9R gene, and the remaining ORFs have been inactivated by various point mutations and deletions. Taken together, our results indicate that the IL9R gene is located at Xq28 and Yq12, in the long arm pseudoautosomal region, and that four IL9R pseudogenes are located on 9q34, 10p15, 16p13.3 and 18p11.3, probably dispersed as the result of translocations during evolution. 42 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. A new region of conservation is defined between human and mouse X chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Dinulos, M.B.; Disteche, C.M.; Bassi, M.T.

    1996-07-01

    Comparative mapping of the X chromosome in eutherian mammals have revealed distinct regions of conservation as well as evolutionary rearrangements between human and mouse. Recently, we and others mapped the murine homologue of CLCN4 (Chloride channel 4) to band F4 of the X chromosome in Mus spretus but to chromosome 7 in laboratory strains. We now report the mapping of the murine homologues of APXL (Apical protein Xenopus laevis-like) and OA1 (Ocular albinism type I), two genes that are located on the human X chromosome at band p22.3 and in close proximity to CLCN4. Interestingly, Oa1 and Apxl map to bands F2-F3 in both M. spretus and the laboratory strain C57BL/6J, defining a new rearrangement between human and mouse X chromosomes. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Mathematical glimpse on the Y chromosome degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, M. P.

    2006-04-01

    The Y chromosomes are genetically degenerate and do not recombine with their matching partners X. Non-recombination of XY pairs has been pointed out as the key factor for the degeneration of the Y chromosome. The aim here is to show that there is a mathematical asymmetry in sex chromosomes which leads to the degeneration of Y chromosomes even in the absence of XX and XY recombination. A model for sex-chromosome evolution in a stationary regime is proposed. The consequences of their asymmetry are analyzed and lead us to a couple of conclusions. First, Y chromosome degeneration shows up sqrt{2} more often than X chromosome degeneration. Second, if nature prohibits female mortalities from beeing exactly 50%, then Y chromosome degeneration is inevitable.

  11. An assessment of sex chromosome copy number in a phenotypic female patient with hypergonadtropic hypogonadism, primary amenorrhea and growth retardation by GTG-banding and FISH in peripheral blood and skin tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, I.M.D.; DeMoranville, B.; Grollino, M.G.

    1994-09-01

    The present report describes studies performed on an 18-year-old phenotypic female referred because of primary amenorrhea, hypergonadotropic hypoganadism and growth retardation. The clinical features raised the possibility of a gonadal dysgenesis. The ovaries were not identified on either side. Her testosterone was significantly elevated, with serum level at 48 ng/dl, and her free testosterone at 7 pg/ml. A GTG-banding analysis of 33 peripheral blood leukocytes revealed the modal number of chromosomes to be 46 per cell with a male sex constitution and normal appearing banding patterns (46,XY). In view of the clinical findings, additional cells were scored to rule out low percentage mosaicism. Out of 35 additional GTG-banded cells scored for the sex chromosomes, 4 cells (11.5%) were found to contain only one copy of the X chromosome. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using dual color biotinylated X and Y probes (Imagenetics) was subsequently performed. Out of approximately 500 cells scored, 87% were found to be XY and 9% were found to be positive for the X signal only, versus 7% and 3% X signal only for 2 XY controls, aged 61 and 46, respectively. As loss of the Y chromosome has been reported in elderly males as well as certain males with leukemia, the age of the controls was important to note. To unequivocally establish the presence of mosaicism, a skin biopsy was obtained for fibroblast culture. Out of 388 total cells scored, 286 (74%) were found to be XY and 46 (12%) were found to be X, versus 99% XY and <1% X in controls. GTG-banding analysis of the same fibroblast culture is currently in progress. Preliminary data on this specimen thus far corroborate results of the FISH study. The presence of XY cells, along with an increased testosterone level, raises the distinct possibility of a gonadoblastoma. In view of this increased risk, arrangements are being made for the patient to have a laparoscopy and surgical removal of her presumptive streak gonads.

  12. A domestic cat X chromosome linkage map and the sex-linked orange locus: mapping of orange, multiple origins and epistasis over nonagouti.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Küntzel, Anne; Nelson, George; David, Victor A; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Eizirik, Eduardo; Roelke, Melody E; Kehler, James S; Hannah, Steven S; O'Brien, Stephen J; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn

    2009-04-01

    A comprehensive genetic linkage map of the domestic cat X chromosome was generated with the goal of localizing the genomic position of the classic X-linked orange (O) locus. Microsatellite markers with an average spacing of 3 Mb were selected from sequence traces of the cat 1.9x whole genome sequence (WGS), including the pseudoautosomal region 1 (PAR1). Extreme variation in recombination rates (centimorgans per megabase) was observed along the X chromosome, ranging from a virtual absence of recombination events in a region estimated to be >30 Mb to recombination frequencies of 15.7 cM/Mb in a segment estimated to be <0.3 Mb. This detailed linkage map was applied to position the X-linked orange gene, placing this locus on the q arm of the X chromosome, as opposed to a previously reported location on the p arm. Fine mapping placed the locus between markers at positions 106 and 116.8 Mb in the current 1.9x-coverage sequence assembly of the cat genome. Haplotype analysis revealed potential recombination events that could reduce the size of the candidate region to 3.5 Mb and suggested multiple origins for the orange phenotype in the domestic cat. Furthermore, epistasis of orange over nonagouti was demonstrated at the genetic level. PMID:19189955

  13. A Domestic cat X Chromosome Linkage Map and the Sex-Linked orange Locus: Mapping of orange, Multiple Origins and Epistasis Over nonagouti

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Küntzel, Anne; Nelson, George; David, Victor A.; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Eizirik, Eduardo; Roelke, Melody E.; Kehler, James S.; Hannah, Steven S.; O'Brien, Stephen J.; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn

    2009-01-01

    A comprehensive genetic linkage map of the domestic cat X chromosome was generated with the goal of localizing the genomic position of the classic X-linked orange (O) locus. Microsatellite markers with an average spacing of 3 Mb were selected from sequence traces of the cat 1.9× whole genome sequence (WGS), including the pseudoautosomal region 1 (PAR1). Extreme variation in recombination rates (centimorgans per megabase) was observed along the X chromosome, ranging from a virtual absence of recombination events in a region estimated to be >30 Mb to recombination frequencies of 15.7 cM/Mb in a segment estimated to be <0.3 Mb. This detailed linkage map was applied to position the X-linked orange gene, placing this locus on the q arm of the X chromosome, as opposed to a previously reported location on the p arm. Fine mapping placed the locus between markers at positions 106 and 116.8 Mb in the current 1.9×-coverage sequence assembly of the cat genome. Haplotype analysis revealed potential recombination events that could reduce the size of the candidate region to 3.5 Mb and suggested multiple origins for the orange phenotype in the domestic cat. Furthermore, epistasis of orange over nonagouti was demonstrated at the genetic level. PMID:19189955

  14. Cognitive Function Related to the Sirh11/Zcchc16 Gene Acquired from an LTR Retrotransposon in Eutherians

    PubMed Central

    Irie, Masahito; Yoshikawa, Masanobu; Ono, Ryuichi; Iwafune, Hirotaka; Furuse, Tamio; Yamada, Ikuko; Wakana, Shigeharu; Yamashita, Yui; Abe, Takaya; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Gene targeting of mouse S ushi- i chi-related r etrotransposon h omologue 11 / Z inc finger CCHC domain-containing 16 (Sirh11/Zcchc16) causes abnormal behaviors related to cognition, including attention, impulsivity and working memory. Sirh11/Zcchc16 encodes a CCHC type of zinc-finger protein that exhibits high homology to an LTR retrotransposon Gag protein. Upon microdialysis analysis of the prefrontal cortex region, the recovery rate of noradrenaline (NA) was reduced compared with dopamine (DA) after perfusion of high potassium-containing artificial cerebrospinal fluid in knockout (KO) mice. These data indicate that Sirh11/Zcchc16 is involved in cognitive function in the brain, possibly via the noradrenergic system, in the contemporary mouse developmental systems. Interestingly, it is highly conserved in three out of the four major groups of the eutherians, euarchontoglires, laurasiatheria and afrotheria, but is heavily mutated in xenarthran species such as the sloth and armadillo, suggesting that it has contributed to brain evolution in the three major eutherian lineages, including humans and mice. Sirh11/Zcchc16 is the first SIRH gene to be involved in brain function, instead of just the placenta, as seen in the case of Peg10, Peg11/Rtl1 and Sirh7/Ldoc1. PMID:26402067

  15. Cognitive Function Related to the Sirh11/Zcchc16 Gene Acquired from an LTR Retrotransposon in Eutherians.

    PubMed

    Irie, Masahito; Yoshikawa, Masanobu; Ono, Ryuichi; Iwafune, Hirotaka; Furuse, Tamio; Yamada, Ikuko; Wakana, Shigeharu; Yamashita, Yui; Abe, Takaya; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko

    2015-09-01

    Gene targeting of mouse Sushi-ichi-related retrotransposon homologue 11/Zinc finger CCHC domain-containing 16 (Sirh11/Zcchc16) causes abnormal behaviors related to cognition, including attention, impulsivity and working memory. Sirh11/Zcchc16 encodes a CCHC type of zinc-finger protein that exhibits high homology to an LTR retrotransposon Gag protein. Upon microdialysis analysis of the prefrontal cortex region, the recovery rate of noradrenaline (NA) was reduced compared with dopamine (DA) after perfusion of high potassium-containing artificial cerebrospinal fluid in knockout (KO) mice. These data indicate that Sirh11/Zcchc16 is involved in cognitive function in the brain, possibly via the noradrenergic system, in the contemporary mouse developmental systems. Interestingly, it is highly conserved in three out of the four major groups of the eutherians, euarchontoglires, laurasiatheria and afrotheria, but is heavily mutated in xenarthran species such as the sloth and armadillo, suggesting that it has contributed to brain evolution in the three major eutherian lineages, including humans and mice. Sirh11/Zcchc16 is the first SIRH gene to be involved in brain function, instead of just the placenta, as seen in the case of Peg10, Peg11/Rtl1 and Sirh7/Ldoc1. PMID:26402067

  16. The mitochondrial DNA molecule of the aardvark, Orycteropus afer, and the position of the Tubulidentata in the eutherian tree.

    PubMed Central

    Arnason, U; Gullberg, A; Janke, A

    1999-01-01

    An outstanding problem in mammal phylogeny is the relationship of the aardvark (Orycteropus afer), the only living species of the order Tubulidentata, to the extant eutherian lineages. In order to examine this problem the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecule of the aardvark was sequenced and analysed. The aardvark tRNA-Ser (UCN) differs from that of other mammalian mtDNAs reported and appears to have reversed to the ancestral secondary structure of non-mammalian vertebrates and mitochondrial tRNAs in general. Phylogenetic analysis of 12 concatenated protein-coding genes (3325 amino acids) included the aardvark and 15 additional eutherians, two marsupials and a monotreme. The most strongly supported tree identified the aardvark as a sister group of a clade including the armadillo (Xenarthra) and the Cetferungulata (carnivores, perissodactyls, artiodactyls and cetaceans). By applying three molecular calibration points the divergence between the aardvark and armadillo-cetferungulates was estimated at ca. 90 million years before present. PMID:10097395

  17. Autosomal Degeneration as the Process for the Evolution of a Primitive Y Chromosome in Papaya

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant sex chromosomes, in contrast to those in animals, evolved recently and only a few are heteromorphic. Genomic analyses of the homomorphic sex chromosomes of papaya show features of the early stages of sex chromosome evolution. Sequence analysis of 20% of the male specific region (MSY) shows tha...

  18. Structure and function of eukaryotic chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hennig, W.

    1987-01-01

    Contents: Introduction; Polytene Chromosomel Giant Chromosomes in Ciliates; The sp-I Genes in the Balbiani Rings of Chironomus Salivary Glands; The White Locus of Drosophila Melanogaster; The Genetic and Molecular Organization of the Dense Cluster of Functionally Related Vital Genes in the DOPA Decarboxylase Region of the Drosophila melanogaster Genome; Heat Shock Puffs and Response to Environmental Stress; The Y Chromosomal Lampbrush Loops of Drosophila; Contributions of Electron Microscopic Spreading Preparations (''Miller Spreads'') to the Analysis of Chromosome Structure; Replication of DNA in Eukaryotic Chromosomes; Gene Amplification in Dipteran Chromosomes; The Significance of Plant Transposable Elements in Biologically Relevant Processes; Arrangement of Chromosomes in Interphase Cell Nuclei; Heterochromatin and the Phenomenon of Chromosome Banding; Multiple Nonhistone Protein-DNA Complexes in Chromatin Regulate the Cell- and Stage-Specific Activity of an Eukaryotic Gene; Genetics of Sex Determination in Eukaryotes; Application of Basic Chromosome Research in Biotechnology and Medicine. This book presents an overview of various aspects of chromosome research.

  19. What lies beneath: sub-articular long bone shape scaling in eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs suggests different locomotor adaptations for gigantism.

    PubMed

    Bonnan, Matthew F; Wilhite, D Ray; Masters, Simon L; Yates, Adam M; Gardner, Christine K; Aguiar, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs both evolved lineages of huge terrestrial herbivores. Although significantly more saurischian dinosaurs were giants than eutherians, the long bones of both taxa scale similarly and suggest that locomotion was dynamically similar. However, articular cartilage is thin in eutherian mammals but thick in saurischian dinosaurs, differences that could have contributed to, or limited, how frequently gigantism evolved. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that sub-articular bone, which supports the articular cartilage, changes shape in different ways between terrestrial mammals and dinosaurs with increasing size. Our sample consisted of giant mammal and reptile taxa (i.e., elephants, rhinos, sauropods) plus erect and non-erect outgroups with thin and thick articular cartilage. Our results show that eutherian mammal sub-articular shape becomes narrow with well-defined surface features as size increases. In contrast, this region in saurischian dinosaurs expands and remains gently convex with increasing size. Similar trends were observed in non-erect outgroup taxa (monotremes, alligators), showing that the trends we report are posture-independent. These differences support our hypothesis that sub-articular shape scales differently between eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs. Our results show that articular cartilage thickness and sub-articular shape are correlated. In mammals, joints become ever more congruent and thinner with increasing size, whereas archosaur joints remained both congruent and thick, especially in sauropods. We suggest that gigantism occurs less frequently in mammals, in part, because joints composed of thin articular cartilage can only become so congruent before stress cannot be effectively alleviated. In contrast, frequent gigantism in saurischian dinosaurs may be explained, in part, by joints with thick articular cartilage that can deform across large areas with increasing load. PMID:24130690

  20. Are homologies in vertebrate sex determination due to shared ancestry or to limited options?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The same candidate genes and the same autosomes are repeatedly used as sex chromosomes in vertebrates. Are these systems identical by descent, or are some genes or chromosomes intrinsically better at triggering the first steps of sex determination? PMID:20441602

  1. Sex Differences in Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Austad, Steven N; Fischer, Kathleen E

    2016-06-14

    Sex differences in longevity can provide insights into novel mechanisms of aging, yet they have been little studied. Surprisingly, sex-specific longevity patterns are best known in wild animals. Evolutionary hypotheses accounting for longevity patterns in natural populations include differential vulnerability to environmental hazards, differential intensity of sexual selection, and distinct patterns of parental care. Mechanistic hypotheses focus on hormones, asymmetric inheritance of sex chromosomes and mitochondria. Virtually all intensively studied species show conditional sex differences in longevity. Humans are the only species in which one sex is known to have a ubiquitous survival advantage. Paradoxically, although women live longer, they suffer greater morbidity particularly late in life. This mortality-morbidity paradox may be a consequence of greater connective tissue responsiveness to sex hormones in women. Human females' longevity advantage may result from hormonal influences on inflammatory and immunological responses, or greater resistance to oxidative damage; current support for these mechanisms is weak. PMID:27304504

  2. Genomic Dark Matter Illuminated: Anopheles Y Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Seth N; Neafsey, Daniel E

    2016-08-01

    Hall et al. have strategically used long-read sequencing technology to characterize the structure and highly repetitive content of the Y chromosome in Anopheles malaria mosquitoes. Their work confirms that this important but elusive heterochromatic sex chromosome is evolving extremely rapidly and harbors a remarkably small number of genes. PMID:27263828

  3. Chromosomal Flexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Scientists have shown that a genetic element on one chromosome may direct gene activity on another. Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) researchers report that a multitasking master-control region appears to over-see both a set of its own genes and a related gene on a nearby chromosome. The findings reinforce the growing importance of location…

  4. Degeneration of the Y chromosome in evolutionary aging models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, M. P.; Onody, R. N.

    2005-06-01

    The Y chromosomes are genetically degenerated and do not recombine with their matching partners X. Recombination of XX pairs is pointed out as the key factor for the Y chromosome degeneration. However, there is an additional evolutionary force driving sex-chromosomes evolution. Here we show this mechanism by means of two different evolutionary models, in which sex chromosomes with non-recombining XX and XY pairs of chromosomes is considered. Our results show three curious effects. First, we observed that even when both XX and XY pairs of chromosomes do not recombine, the Y chromosomes still degenerate. Second, the accumulation of mutations on Y chromosomes followed a completely different pattern then those accumulated on X chromosomes. And third, the models may differ with respect to sexual proportion. These findings suggest that a more primeval mechanism rules the evolution of Y chromosomes due exclusively to the sex-chromosomes asymmetry itself, i.e., the fact that Y chromosomes never experience female bodies. Over aeons, natural selection favored X chromosomes spontaneously, even if at the very beginning of evolution, both XX and XY pairs of chromosomes did not recombine.

  5. Why Chromosome Palindromes?

    PubMed Central

    Betrán, Esther; Demuth, Jeffery P.; Williford, Anna

    2012-01-01

    We look at sex-limited chromosome (Y or W) evolution with particular emphasis on the importance of palindromes. Y chromosome palindromes consist of inverted duplicates that allow for local recombination in an otherwise nonrecombining chromosome. Since palindromes enable intrachromosomal gene conversion that can help eliminate deleterious mutations, they are often highlighted as mechanisms to protect against Y degeneration. However, the adaptive significance of recombination resides in its ability to decouple the evolutionary fates of linked mutations, leading to both a decrease in degeneration rate and an increase in adaptation rate. Our paper emphasizes the latter, that palindromes may exist to accelerate adaptation by increasing the potential targets and fixation rates of incoming beneficial mutations. This hypothesis helps reconcile two enigmatic features of the “palindromes as protectors” view: (1) genes that are not located in palindromes have been retained under purifying selection for tens of millions of years, and (2) under models that only consider deleterious mutations, gene conversion benefits duplicate gene maintenance but not initial fixation. We conclude by looking at ways to test the hypothesis that palindromes enhance the rate of adaptive evolution of Y-linked genes and whether this effect can be extended to palindromes on other chromosomes. PMID:22844637

  6. Why chromosome palindromes?

    PubMed

    Betrán, Esther; Demuth, Jeffery P; Williford, Anna

    2012-01-01

    We look at sex-limited chromosome (Y or W) evolution with particular emphasis on the importance of palindromes. Y chromosome palindromes consist of inverted duplicates that allow for local recombination in an otherwise nonrecombining chromosome. Since palindromes enable intrachromosomal gene conversion that can help eliminate deleterious mutations, they are often highlighted as mechanisms to protect against Y degeneration. However, the adaptive significance of recombination resides in its ability to decouple the evolutionary fates of linked mutations, leading to both a decrease in degeneration rate and an increase in adaptation rate. Our paper emphasizes the latter, that palindromes may exist to accelerate adaptation by increasing the potential targets and fixation rates of incoming beneficial mutations. This hypothesis helps reconcile two enigmatic features of the "palindromes as protectors" view: (1) genes that are not located in palindromes have been retained under purifying selection for tens of millions of years, and (2) under models that only consider deleterious mutations, gene conversion benefits duplicate gene maintenance but not initial fixation. We conclude by looking at ways to test the hypothesis that palindromes enhance the rate of adaptive evolution of Y-linked genes and whether this effect can be extended to palindromes on other chromosomes. PMID:22844637

  7. X Chromosome and Autosome Dosage Responses in Drosophila melanogaster Heads.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen-Xia; Oliver, Brian

    2015-06-01

    X chromosome dosage compensation is required for male viability in Drosophila. Dosage compensation relative to autosomes is two-fold, but this is likely to be due to a combination of homeostatic gene-by-gene regulation and chromosome-wide regulation. We have baseline values for gene-by-gene dosage compensation on autosomes, but not for the X chromosome. Given the evolutionary history of sex chromosomes, these baseline values could differ. We used a series of deficiencies on the X and autosomes, along with mutations in the sex-determination gene transformer-2, to carefully measure the sex-independent X-chromosome response to gene dosage in adult heads by RNA sequencing. We observed modest and indistinguishable dosage compensation for both X chromosome and autosome genes, suggesting that the X chromosome is neither inherently more robust nor sensitive to dosage change. PMID:25850426

  8. The molecular genetics of sex determination and sex reversal in mammals.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Alexander; Koopman, Peter

    2012-10-01

    The process of sex determination in mammals normally unfolds in three distinct stages: (1) establishment of chromosomal sex at fertilization (XX or XY); (2) commitment to the appropriate pathway of gonadal differentiation with respect to chromosomal sex, through the action (or absence) of the Y chromosome gene SRY; and (3) correct development of secondary sexual characteristics, including internal and external genitalia, in accordance with gonadal sex. At any of these three steps, the process of sex determination can go awry, leading to disorders of sexual development. In this article, we review the typical mechanism and process of mammalian sex determination, with an emphasis on the well-characterized mouse and human models. We also consider aberrant mammalian sex determination, focusing on examples of sex reversal stemming from gene defects. PMID:23044871

  9. Brief Report: Non-Random X Chromosome Inactivation in Females with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talebizadeh, Z.; Bittel, D. C.; Veatch, O. J.; Kibiryeva, N.; Butler, M. G.

    2005-01-01

    Autism is a heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder with a 3-4 times higher sex ratio in males than females. X chromosome genes may contribute to this higher sex ratio through unusual skewing of X chromosome inactivation. We studied X chromosome skewness in 30 females with classical autism and 35 similarly aged unaffected female siblings as…

  10. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  11. Fragmented mitochondrial genomes in two suborders of parasitic lice of eutherian mammals (Anoplura and Rhynchophthirina, Insecta)

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Renfu; Barker, Stephen C; Li, Hu; Song, Simon; Poudel, Shreekanta; Su, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Parasitic lice (order Phthiraptera) infest birds and mammals. The typical animal mitochondrial (mt) genome organization, which consists of a single chromosome with 37 genes, was found in chewing lice in the suborders Amblycera and Ischnocera. The sucking lice (suborder Anoplura) known, however, have fragmented mt genomes with 9–20 minichromosomes. We sequenced the mt genome of the elephant louse, Haematomyzus elephantis – the first species of chewing lice investigated from the suborder Rhynchophthirina. We identified 33 mt genes in the elephant louse, which were on 10 minichromosomes. Each minichromosome is 3.5–4.2 kb in size and has 2–6 genes. Phylogenetic analyses of mt genome sequences confirm that the elephant louse is more closely related to sucking lice than to the chewing lice in the Amblycera and Ischnocera. Our results indicate that mt genome fragmentation is shared by the suborders Anoplura and Rhynchophthirina. Nine of the 10 mt minichromosomes of the elephant louse differ from those of the sucking lice (Anoplura) known in gene content and gene arrangement, indicating that distinct mt karyotypes have evolved in Anoplura and Rhynchophthirina since they diverged ~92 million years ago. PMID:26617060

  12. The subventricular zone is the developmental milestone of a 6-layered neocortex: comparisons in metatherian and eutherian mammals.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Amanda F P; Kondo, Shinichi; Abdel-Mannan, Omar; Chodroff, Rebecca A; Sirey, Tamara M; Bluy, Lisa E; Webber, Natalie; DeProto, Jamin; Karlen, Sarah J; Krubitzer, Leah; Stolp, Helen B; Saunders, Norman R; Molnár, Zoltán

    2010-05-01

    The major lineages of mammals (Eutheria, Metatheria, and Monotremata) diverged more than 100 million years ago and have undergone independent changes in the neocortex. We found that adult South American gray short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica) and tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) possess a significantly lower number of cerebral cortical neurons compared with the mouse (Mus musculus). To determine whether the difference is reflected in the development of the cortical germinal zones, the location of progenitor cell divisions was examined in opossum, tammar wallaby, and rat. The basic pattern of the cell divisions was conserved, but the emergence of a distinctive band of dividing cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) occurred relatively later in the opossum (postnatal day [P14]) and the tammar wallaby (P40) than in rodents. The planes of cell divisions in the ventricular zone (VZ) were similar in all species, with comparable mRNA expression patterns of Brn2, Cux2, NeuroD6, Tbr2, and Pax6 in opossum (P12 and P20) and mouse (embryonic day 15 and P0). In conclusion, the marsupial neurodevelopmental program utilizes an organized SVZ, as indicated by the presence of intermediate (or basal) progenitor cell divisions and gene expression patterns, suggesting that the SVZ emerged prior to the Eutherian-Metatherian split. PMID:19726493

  13. The value of eutherian-marsupial comparisons for understanding the function of glucocorticoids in female mammal reproduction.

    PubMed

    Fanson, Kerry V; Parrott, Marissa L

    2015-11-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "SBN 2014". Chronic stress is known to inhibit female reproductive function. Consequently, it is often assumed that glucocorticoid (GC) concentrations should be negatively correlated with reproductive success because of the role they play in stress physiology. In contrast, a growing body of evidence indicates that GCs play an active role in promoting reproductive function. It is precisely because GCs are so integral to the entire process that disruptions to adrenal activity have negative consequences for reproduction. The goal of this paper is to draw attention to the increasing evidence showing that increases in adrenal activity are important for healthy female reproduction. Furthermore, we outline several hypotheses about the functional role(s) that GCs may play in mediating reproduction and argue that comparative studies between eutherian and marsupial mammals, which exhibit some pronounced differences in reproductive physiology, may be particularly useful for testing different hypotheses about the functional role of GCs in reproduction. Much of our current thinking about GCs and reproduction comes from research involving stress-induced levels of GCs and has led to broad assumptions about the effects of GCs on reproduction. Unfortunately, this has left a gaping hole in our knowledge about basal GC levels and how they may influence reproductive function, thereby preventing a broader understanding of adrenal physiology and obscuring potential solutions for reproductive dysfunction. PMID:26065733

  14. Estimating Tempo and Mode of Y Chromosome Turnover: Explaining Y Chromosome Loss With the Fragile Y Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Blackmon, Heath; Demuth, Jeffery P.

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal sex determination is phylogenetically widespread, having arisen independently in many lineages. Decades of theoretical work provide predictions about sex chromosome differentiation that are well supported by observations in both XY and ZW systems. However, the phylogenetic scope of previous work gives us a limited understanding of the pace of sex chromosome gain and loss and why Y or W chromosomes are more often lost in some lineages than others, creating XO or ZO systems. To gain phylogenetic breadth we therefore assembled a database of 4724 beetle species’ karyotypes and found substantial variation in sex chromosome systems. We used the data to estimate rates of Y chromosome gain and loss across a phylogeny of 1126 taxa estimated from seven genes. Contrary to our initial expectations, we find that highly degenerated Y chromosomes of many members of the suborder Polyphaga are rarely lost, and that cases of Y chromosome loss are strongly associated with chiasmatic segregation during male meiosis. We propose the “fragile Y” hypothesis, that recurrent selection to reduce recombination between the X and Y chromosome leads to the evolution of a small pseudoautosomal region (PAR), which, in taxa that require XY chiasmata for proper segregation during meiosis, increases the probability of aneuploid gamete production, with Y chromosome loss. This hypothesis predicts that taxa that evolve achiasmatic segregation during male meiosis will rarely lose the Y chromosome. We discuss data from mammals, which are consistent with our prediction. PMID:24939995

  15. Estimating tempo and mode of Y chromosome turnover: explaining Y chromosome loss with the fragile Y hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Blackmon, Heath; Demuth, Jeffery P

    2014-06-01

    Chromosomal sex determination is phylogenetically widespread, having arisen independently in many lineages. Decades of theoretical work provide predictions about sex chromosome differentiation that are well supported by observations in both XY and ZW systems. However, the phylogenetic scope of previous work gives us a limited understanding of the pace of sex chromosome gain and loss and why Y or W chromosomes are more often lost in some lineages than others, creating XO or ZO systems. To gain phylogenetic breadth we therefore assembled a database of 4724 beetle species' karyotypes and found substantial variation in sex chromosome systems. We used the data to estimate rates of Y chromosome gain and loss across a phylogeny of 1126 taxa estimated from seven genes. Contrary to our initial expectations, we find that highly degenerated Y chromosomes of many members of the suborder Polyphaga are rarely lost, and that cases of Y chromosome loss are strongly associated with chiasmatic segregation during male meiosis. We propose the "fragile Y" hypothesis, that recurrent selection to reduce recombination between the X and Y chromosome leads to the evolution of a small pseudoautosomal region (PAR), which, in taxa that require XY chiasmata for proper segregation during meiosis, increases the probability of aneuploid gamete production, with Y chromosome loss. This hypothesis predicts that taxa that evolve achiasmatic segregation during male meiosis will rarely lose the Y chromosome. We discuss data from mammals, which are consistent with our prediction. PMID:24939995

  16. Everyday executive functions in Down syndrome from early childhood to young adulthood: evidence for both unique and shared characteristics compared to youth with sex chromosome trisomy (XXX and XXY).

    PubMed

    Lee, Nancy Raitano; Anand, Payal; Will, Elizabeth; Adeyemi, Elizabeth I; Clasen, Liv S; Blumenthal, Jonathan D; Giedd, Jay N; Daunhauer, Lisa A; Fidler, Deborah J; Edgin, Jamie O

    2015-01-01

    Executive functions (EF) are thought to be impaired in Down syndrome (DS) and sex chromosome trisomy (Klinefelter and Trisomy X syndromes; +1X). However, the syndromic specificity and developmental trajectories associated with EF difficulties in these groups are poorly understood. The current investigation (a) compared everyday EF difficulties in youth with DS, +1X, and typical development (TD); and (b) examined relations between age and EF difficulties in these two groups and a TD control group cro