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Sample records for ev emission band

  1. Origin of 3.45 eV Emission Line and Yellow Luminescence Band in GaN Nanowires: Surface Microwire and Defect.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pu; Zong, Hua; Shi, Jun-jie; Zhang, Min; Jiang, Xin-he; Zhong, Hong-xia; Ding, Yi-min; He, Ying-ping; Lu, Jing; Hu, Xiao-dong

    2015-09-22

    The physical origin of the strong emission line at 3.45 eV and broadening yellow luminescence (YL) band centered at 2.2 eV in GaN nanowire (NW) has been debated for many years. Here, we solve these two notable issues by using state-of-the-art first-principles calculations based on many-body perturbation theory combined with polarization-resolved experiments. We demonstrate that the ubiquitous surface "microwires" with amazing characteristics, i.e., the outgrowth nanocrystal along the NW side wall, are vital and offer a new perspective to provide insight into some puzzles in epitaxy materials. Furthermore, inversion of the top valence bands, in the decreasing order of crystal-field split-off hole (CH) and heavy/light hole, results in the optical transition polarized along the NW axis due to quantum confinement. The optical emission from bound excitons localized around the surface microwire to CH band is responsible for the 3.45 eV line with E∥c polarization. Both gallium vacancy and carbon-related defects tend to assemble at the NW surface layer, determining the broadening YL band. PMID:26301765

  2. Electronic crosstalk in Terra MODIS thermal emissive bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Junqiang; Madhavan, Sriharsha; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Wang, Menghua

    2015-09-01

    The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is a legacy Earth remote sensing instrument in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing System (EOS). The first MODIS instrument was launched in December 1999 on board the Terra spacecraft. MODIS has 36 bands, among which bands 20-25 and bands 27-36 are thermal emissive bands covering a wavelength range from 3.7μm to 14.2μm. It has been found that there are severe contaminations in Terra bands 27-30 (6.7 μm - 9.73 μm) due to crosstalk of signals among themselves. The crosstalk effect induces strong striping artifacts in the Earth View (EV) images and causes large long-term drifts in the EV brightness temperature (BT) in these bands. An algorithm using a linear approximation derived from on-orbit lunar observations has been developed to correct the crosstalk effect for them. It was demonstrated that the crosstalk correction can substantially reduce the striping noise in the EV images and significantly remove the long-term drifts in the EV BT in the Long Wave InfraRed (LWIR) water vapor channels (bands 27-28). In this paper, the crosstalk correction algorithm previously developed is applied to correct the crosstalk effect in the remaining LWIR bands 29 and 30. The crosstalk correction successfully reduces the striping artifact in the EV images and removes long-term drifts in the EV BT in bands 29-30 as was done similarly for bands 27-28. The crosstalk correction algorithm can thus substantially improve both the image quality and the radiometric accuracy of the Level 1B (L1B) products of the LWIR PV bands, bands 27-30. From this study it is also understood that other Terra MODIS thermal emissive bands are contaminated by the crosstalk effect and that the algorithm can be applied to these bands for crosstalk correction.

  3. Defect-induced emission band in CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, S.; Tanaka, A.; Takeda, F.; Matsuura, K.

    1994-04-01

    We report on a distinct correlation between the 1.47 eV emission band and the dislocation density in bulk CdTe. The 1.47 eV band intensifies around the high-dislocation area (lineage structure) and at the position just on dislocation bundle. On the other hand, the 1.47 eV band was hardly observed in the low-dislocation area (etch pit density less than 2 × 10 5 cm -2) or at the position away from the dislocation bundle. Furthermore, the 1.47 eV band was intensified by γ-ray irradiation of 1.7 × 10 7 Gy, which produced a great number of Frenkel defects. It was shown that the 1.47 eV band is related not only to an extended defect such as a dislocation, but also to a point defect such as a Frenkel defect. These results suggest that the strain field induced in the vicinity of the defects is responsible for the recombination center of the 1.47 eV band.

  4. Electron-impact excitation of the 31. 4-eV band in N sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    de Souza, G.G.B.; Bielschowsky, C.E.; Lucas, C.A.; Souza, A.C.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Generalized oscillator strengths (GOS) for the dipole-forbidden 31.4-eV band in N{sub 2} have been determined both experimentally and theoretically. The experimental values for the GOS were obtained using a crossed-beam electron spectrometer at 1-keV impact energy. The theoretical results were determined using the first Born approximation with {ital ab} {ital initio} configuration-interaction target wave functions.

  5. The origin of 2.7 eV luminescence and 5.2 eV excitation band in hafnium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Perevalov, T. V.; Aliev, V. Sh.; Gritsenko, V. A.; Saraev, A. A.; Kaichev, V. V.; Ivanova, E. V.; Zamoryanskaya, M. V.

    2014-02-17

    The origin of a blue luminescence band at 2.7 eV and a luminescence excitation band at 5.2 eV of hafnia has been studied in stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric hafnium oxide films. Experimental and calculated results from the first principles valence band spectra showed that the stoichiometry violation leads to the formation of the peak density of states in the band gap caused by oxygen vacancies. Cathodoluminescence in the non-stoichiometric film exhibits a band at 2.65 eV that is excited at the energy of 5.2 eV. The optical absorption spectrum calculated for the cubic phase of HfO{sub 2} with oxygen vacancies shows a peak at 5.3 eV. Thus, it could be concluded that the blue luminescence band at 2.7 eV and HfO{sub x} excitation peak at 5.2 eV are due to oxygen vacancies. The thermal trap energy in hafnia was estimated.

  6. Cyclotron side band emissions from magnetospheric electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, K.

    1975-01-01

    Very low frequency emissions with subharmonic cyclotron frequency from magnetospheric electrons were detected by the S(3)-A satellite (Explorer 45) whose orbit is close to the magnetic equatorial plane where the wave-particle interaction is most efficient. These emissions were observed during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm in the nightside of the magnetosphere outside of the plasmasphere. During the event of these side-band emissions, the pitch angle distributions of high energy electrons (greater than 50 keV) and of energetic protons (greater than 100 keV) showed remarkable changes with time, whereas those of low energy electrons and protons remained approximately isotropic. In this type of event, emissions consist essentially of two bands, the one below the equatorial electron gyrofrequency, and the other above. The emissions below are whistler mode, and the emissions above are electrostatic mode.

  7. Optical constants and related electronic energy bands of lithium triborate crystal in the 6{endash}12-eV region

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.; Tao, R.; Rife, J.C.; Hunter, W.R.

    1998-01-01

    Reflectance of lithium triborate crystal in the 6{endash}12-eV region is measured with synchrotron radiation, and the principal values of optical constants are derived. Six absorption peaks are found in both X- and Y-polarized spectra. Among them the five transitions of the Y-polarized peaks and three of the X-polarized peaks are identified. The measurement suggests that the energy of the lowest conducting band 4A{sub 2} is 7.3 eV rather than 7.57 eV, as previously reported. {copyright} 1998 Optical Society of America

  8. Periodic gamma-ray emissions from Geminga at or = 10(12) eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, R. K.; Rawat, H. S.; Sanecha, V. K.; Rannot, R. C.; Sapru, M.; Tickoo, A. K.; Qazi, R. A.; Bhat, C. L.; Razdan, H.; Tonwar, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    Analysis of data from an atmospheric Cerenkov telescope indicated the periodic emission of gamma rays of energy 10 to the 12th power eV, at 60.25 second period, from 2CG 195+4. The gamma ray flux at 99% confidence level is estimated to be 9.5 x 10 to 12 photons/sq cm/s.

  9. UNIDENTIFIED INFRARED EMISSION BANDS: PAHs or MAONs?

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Kwok; Yong Zhang

    2013-07-01

    We suggest that the carrier of the unidentified infrared emission (UIE) bands is an amorphous carbonaceous solid with mixed aromatic/aliphatic structures, rather than free-flying polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules. Through spectral fittings of the astronomical spectra of the UIE bands, we show that a significant amount of the energy is emitted by the aliphatic component, implying that aliphatic groups are an essential part of the chemical structure. Arguments in favor of an amorphous, solid-state structure rather than a gas-phase molecule as a carrier of the UIE are also presented.

  10. Optical emission generated by collisions of 5 eV O(3P) atoms with surface-absorbed hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orient, O. J.; Martus, K. E.; Chutjian, A.; Murad, E.

    1992-01-01

    Optical emission has been observed corresponding to vibrational bands in the NH (A 3Pi - X 3Sigma(-)) electronic transition during collisions of 5 eV, ground-state oxygen O(3P) atoms with MgF2 and Ni surfaces continuously exposed to a beam of hydrazine (N2H4). The NH emission intensity is observed to be about five times greater for MgF2 than for Ni. No dependence on temperature was observed for either surface in the range 240 - 340 K, implying that the NH-producing intermediate species is tightly bound. The half-lifetime for desorption of hydrazine from each surface was measured. This was found to be 120 min for the MgF2 surface at 240 K, and less than 20 min for Ni. After exposure, the surface composition was measured using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy on the exposed and unexposed areas of both targets.

  11. Interfacial Stresses and Strains Effect on Band-Gap Emission from Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedrabbo, Sufian; Fiory, Anthony

    Czochralski silicon wafer materials were interfaced with silica films formed by sol-gel deposition and thermal annealing. Under optimal annealing conditions (~700 °C), stresses in the silica films induce variations in elastic strains on the order of 1% in the silicon. Concomitantly, emission of band-gap photons at 1.1 eV observed by photoluminescence is increased by two orders of magnitude relative to unperturbed silicon. The enhancement in photon emission is produced by band-gap modulations estimated as ~0.1 eV. Elastic reversibility of the strains is inferred from recovery of relatively weak photon emission for annealing above the glass reflow temperature of deposited silica films (~950 °C). Films with largest stress variations exhibit enhanced absorption signatures in the infrared and broadening of Si-O-Si stretching vibrations. Examples of Si-based photonics based on the observed effect will be presented.

  12. Laboratory studies of UV emissions of H2 by electron impact - The Werner- and Lyman-band systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, J. M.; Srivastava, S. K.; Yung, Y. L.

    1982-01-01

    The vacuum ultraviolet electron-impact-induced fluorescence emissions of H2 were studied for the Lyman and Werner band systems in the range of 120-170 nm, using an optical system containing a photomultiplier and a spectrometer, over an energy range from threshold to 400 eV. The emission cross sections for the Lyman and Werner transitions at 100 eV are determined. The cross-section ratio is in excellent agreement with theoretical calculations and experimental data for the optical oscillator strengths. The cross-section for cascading to the B state is stated as a percentage of the total emission cross section at both 100 and 300 eV, increasing substantially at 20 eV. The vibrational population distribution of the B state is found to be a function of electron-impact energy as the importance of cascading relative to direct excitation changes with electron-impact energy.

  13. Nitric oxide gamma band emission in an aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, P. D.

    1976-01-01

    Emission of the NO gamma (1,0) band at 2150 A has been observed by a rocket-borne spectrophotometer in an IBC II(+) aurora. The nu-prime progression of the gamma-system does not appear in the spectrum. The observed emission rate of the 2150 A feature increases relative to N2(+) first negative band emission with increasing altitude. We suggest radiative recombination of NO(+) ions with electrons as a possible excitation mechanism compatible with the data.

  14. Photonic band-edge-induced enhancement in absorption and emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummer, Karikkuzhi Variyath; Vijaya, Ramarao

    2015-01-01

    An enhancement in photonic band-edge-induced absorption and emission from rhodamine-B dye doped polystyrene pseudo gap photonic crystals is studied. The band-edge-induced enhancement in absorption is achieved by selecting the incident angle of the excitation beam so that the absorption spectrum of the emitter overlaps the photonic band edge. The band-edge-induced enhancement in emission, on the other hand, is possible with and without an enhancement in band-edge-induced absorption, depending on the collection angle of emission. Through a simple set of measurements with suitably chosen angles for excitation and emission, we achieve a maximum enhancement of 70% in emission intensity with band-edge-induced effects over and above the intrinsic emission in the case of self-assembled opals. This is a comprehensive effort to interpret tunable lasing in opals as well as to predict the wavelength of lasing arising as a result of band-edge-induced distributed feedback effects.

  15. Frequency band broadening of magnetospheric VLF emissions near the equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, K.; Lin, C. S.

    1981-01-01

    The broadening of the whistler mode VLF emission band has frequently been observed by the equatorially orbiting S3-A (Explorer 45) satellite outside the midnight sector of the plasmasphere, during periods of geomagnetic disturbance. Prior to the broadening, the band of this emission is narrow with a sharp gap at the half electron gyrofrequency. The gradual broadening of the emission band on the low-frequency side is associated with the simultaneously observed spreading of the anisotropy of the ring current electrons to higher and wider energy ranges. Using the modeled distribution function, the linear growth rates of the cyclotron instability are calculated numerically. The results suggest that broadening of the VLF emission band near the plasmasphere can be caused by spreading of the ring current electron anisotropy toward higher energies.

  16. Subsurface banding poultry litter impacts greenhouse gas emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact subsurface banding poultry litter (PL) has on greenhouse gas emissions is limited. Thus, a study was conducted in established bermudagrass pastures located in Coastal Plain and Piedmont regions to determine the effects subsurface applying PL has on soil flux using two different band spaci...

  17. PAH Clusters and the Interstellar Infrared Emission Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricca, Alessandra; Roser, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (or PAHs) are the leading candidate for the emitters of the interstellar aromatic infrared emission bands. Some aspects of these emission bands indicate a contribution from PAH clusters. To better assess this contribution, we measured infrared absorption spectra of a series of homogeneous and heterogeneous PAH clusters using matrix isolation spectroscopy in solid argon and we performed theoretical calculations. The spectral shifts observed in the absorption spectra as a function of the PAH concentration can be related to preferred cluster structures forming in the argon matrix. Based upon our results, we predict that the large PAHs present in the interstellar medium are likely to have clusters with redshifted absorption bands in the C–H out-of-plane bending region. These clusters could contribute to a well-known red-shading observed in the profile of the interstellar 11.2 micron emission band.

  18. The infrared emission bands. III. Southern IRAS sources.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M; Tielens, A G; Bregman, J; Witteborn, F C; Rank, D M; Allamandola, L J; Wooden, D H; de Muizon, M

    1989-06-01

    We present airborne 5-8 micrometers spectra of southern IRAS sources which reveal strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features. The good correlation between the bands, in particular the dominant 6.2 and "7.7" micrometers features, strongly imply a common carrier, reinforcing the PAH hypothesis. However, small but detectable spectral variations exist. Planetaries have a distinctly different ratio of I(6.2)/I(7.7) than other nebulae, accompanied by a redward shift in the actual wavelength of the "7.7" micrometers peak. Further, we have detected a new feature, previously predicted from laboratory spectra of PAH molecules, at 5.2 micrometers in many of these sources. Spectra of two rare [WC 10] planetary nebular nuclei indicate a very prominent plateau of emission, linking the 6.2 and 7.7 micrometers bands. Several of our sources show definite evidence for emission structure between 14 and 23 micrometers in their IRAS Low-Resolution Spectral Atlas spectra: we attribute this structure to PAH bands. too. We have defined the "generic" spectrum of emission bands relating the mean intensities of each band to that of the strongest, near 7.7 micrometers. We have added three more planetary or protoplanetary nebulae to our correlation between 7.7 micrometers band intensity and nebular gas phase C/O ratio, namely NGC 6302, HR 4049, and the highly carbon-rich [WC 10] nucleus, CPD--56 degrees 8032. For the latter we have determined a ratio for C/O of approximately 4.8 from IUE observations. The good correlation between the intensity ratio of the "7.7" micrometers feature relative to the far-infrared dust continuum and nebular C/O also supports a carbonaceous carrier for these emission features. PMID:11542167

  19. Spectral imaging of the 3.3 and 11.3 micron emission bands in NGC 1333 - Discovery of spatially separate band emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Jesse; Rank, David; Sandford, Scott A.; Temi, Pasquale

    1993-01-01

    Spectral images in the 3.3 and 11.3 micron IR emission band around the star SVS 3 in NGC 1333 indicate that the two bands have their origin in different locations, rendering them useless in estimates of the sizes of the molecules emitting the bands. This is in keeping with the emission bands' generation by a mixture of variously sized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) whose smallest species have been dehydrogenated in the vicinity of SVS 3. Hot bands and overtone/combination bands may account for the 3.4-micron band, rather than molecular side-groups of the PAHs.

  20. The average GeV-band emission from gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, J.; Pohl, M.

    2013-03-01

    Aims: We analyze the emission in the 0.3-30 GeV energy range of gamma-ray bursts detected with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We concentrate on bursts that were previously only detected with the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor in the keV energy range. These bursts will then be compared to the bursts that were individually detected with the Large Area Telescope at higher energies. Methods: To estimate the emission of faint GRBs we used nonstandard analysis methods and sum over many GRBs to find an average signal that is significantly above background level. We used a subsample of 99 GRBs listed in the Burst Catalog from the first two years of observation. Results: Although most are not individually detectable, the bursts not detected by the Large Area Telescope on average emit a significant flux in the energy range from 0.3 GeV to 30 GeV, but their cumulative energy fluence is only 8% of that of all GRBs. Likewise, the GeV-to-MeV flux ratio is less and the GeV-band spectra are softer. We confirm that the GeV-band emission lasts much longer than the emission found in the keV energy range. The average allsky energy flux from GRBs in the GeV band is 6.4 × 10-4 erg cm-2 yr-1 or only ~4% of the energy flux of cosmic rays above the ankle at 1018.6 eV.

  1. 100 eV electron temperatures in the Maryland centrifugal experiment observed using electron Bernstein emission

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R. R.; Romero-Talamás, C. A.; Young, W. C.; Ellis, R. F.; Hassam, A. B.

    2014-06-15

    Thermal electron Bernstein emission has been observed at the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency at the mid-plane of the Maryland Centrifugal eXperiment. The emission is received in the X-mode polarization and coupled to the Bernstein wave by the B-X mode conversion process. The average B-X coupling efficiency is approximately 20%. The observed emission indicates thermal electron temperatures an excess of 100 eV in the core of the rotating plasma. The measured electron temperature is consistent with recent ion temperature measurements and indicates that the total energy confinement time exceeds 500 μs.

  2. Narrow band gap (1 eV) InGaAsSbN solar cells grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T. W.; Garrod, T. J.; Kim, K.; Lee, J. J.; LaLumondiere, S. D.; Sin, Y.; Lotshaw, W. T.; Moss, S. C.; Kuech, T. F.; Tatavarti, Rao; Mawst, L. J.

    2012-03-01

    Heterojunction solar cell structures employing InGaAsSbN (Eg ˜ 1 eV) base regions are grown lattice-matched to GaAs substrates using metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. Room temperature (RT) photoluminescence (PL) measurements indicate a peak spectral emission at 1.04 eV and carrier lifetimes of 471-576 ps are measured at RT from these structures using time-resolved PL techniques. Fabricated devices without anti-reflection coating demonstrate a peak efficiency of 4.58% under AM1.5 direct illumination. Solar cells with a 250 nm-thick InGaAsSbN base layer exhibit a 17% improvement in open circuit voltage (Voc), 14% improvement in fill factor, and 12% improvement in efficiency over the cells with a thicker (500 nm-thick) base layer.

  3. Cyclotron side-band emissions from ring-current electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, K.

    1976-01-01

    The paper examines temporal variations in electron energy spectra and pitch-angle distributions during a VLF-emission event observed by Explorer 45 in the main phase of a magnetic storm. It is noted that the observed event occurred outside the plasmasphere on the night side of the magnetosphere and that the dusk-side plasmapause had a double structure during the event. It is found that the VLF emissions consisted of two frequency bands, corresponding to the whistler and electrostatic modes, and that there was a sharp band of 'missing emissions' along frequencies equal to half the equatorial electron gyrofrequency. A peculiar pitch-angle distribution for high-energy electrons (50 to 350 keV) is noted. It is concluded that the VLF-producing particles were enhanced low-energy (about 5 keV) ring-current electrons which penetrated into the night side of the magnetosphere from the magnetotail plasma sheet and which drifted eastward after encountering the steep gradient of the geomagnetic field.

  4. Inference of a 7.75 eV lower limit in the ultraviolet pumping of interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon cations with resulting unidentified infrared emissions.

    PubMed

    Robinson, M S; Beegle, L W; Wdowiak, T J

    1997-01-01

    The discrete infrared features known as the unidentified infrared (UIR) bands originating in starburst regions of other galaxies, and in H II regions and planetary nebulae within the Milky Way, are widely thought to be the result of ultraviolet pumped infrared fluorescence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules and ions. These UIR emissions are estimated to account for 10%-30% of the total energy emitted by galaxies. Laboratory absorption spectra including the vacuum ultraviolet region, as described in this paper, show a weakening of the intensity of absorption features as the population of cations increases, suggesting that strong pi* <-- pi transitions are absent in the spectra of PAH cations. This implies a lower energy bound for ultraviolet photons that pump infrared emissions from such ions at 7.75 eV, an amount greater than previously thought. The implications include size and structure limitations on the PAH molecules and ions which are apparent constituents of the interstellar medium. Also, this might affect estimations of the population of early-type stars in regions of rapid star formation. PMID:11540592

  5. Inference of a 7.75 eV lower limit in the ultraviolet pumping of interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon cations with resulting unidentified infrared emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, M. S.; Beegle, L. W.; Wdowiak, T. J.

    1997-01-01

    The discrete infrared features known as the unidentified infrared (UIR) bands originating in starburst regions of other galaxies, and in H II regions and planetary nebulae within the Milky Way, are widely thought to be the result of ultraviolet pumped infrared fluorescence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules and ions. These UIR emissions are estimated to account for 10%-30% of the total energy emitted by galaxies. Laboratory absorption spectra including the vacuum ultraviolet region, as described in this paper, show a weakening of the intensity of absorption features as the population of cations increases, suggesting that strong pi* <-- pi transitions are absent in the spectra of PAH cations. This implies a lower energy bound for ultraviolet photons that pump infrared emissions from such ions at 7.75 eV, an amount greater than previously thought. The implications include size and structure limitations on the PAH molecules and ions which are apparent constituents of the interstellar medium. Also, this might affect estimations of the population of early-type stars in regions of rapid star formation.

  6. Indirect Band Gap Emission by Hot Electron Injection in Metal/MoS2 and Metal/WSe2 Heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Ezhilarasu, Goutham; Chatzakis, Ioannis; Dhall, Rohan; Chen, Chun-Chung; Cronin, Stephen

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), such as MoS2 and WSe2, are free of dangling bonds, therefore make more `ideal' Schottky junctions than bulk semiconductors, which produce recombination centers at the interface with metals, inhibiting charge transfer. Here, we observe a more than 10X enhancement in the indirect band gap PL of TMDCs deposited on various metals, while the direct band gap emission remains unchanged. We believe the main mechanism of light emission arises from photoexcited hot electrons in the metal that are injected into the conduction band of MoS2 and WSe2, and subsequently recombine radiatively with minority holes. Since the conduction band at the K-point is 0.5eV higher than at the Σ-point, a lower Schottky barrier of the Σ-point band makes electron injection more favorable. Also, the Σ band consists of the sulfur pz orbital, which overlaps more significantly with the electron wavefunctions in the metal. This enhancement only occurs for thick flakes, and is absent in monolayer and few-layer flakes. Here, the flake thickness must exceed the depletion width of the Schottky junction, in order for efficient radiative recombination to occur in the TMDC. The intensity of this indirect peak decreases at low temperatures. Reference: DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.5b00885

  7. MODIS thermal emissive band calibration stability derived from surface targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenny, B. N.; Xiong, X.; Dodd, J.

    2009-09-01

    The 16 MODIS Thermal Emissive Bands (TEB), with wavelengths covering from 3.7μm to 14.4μm, are calibrated using scan-by-scan observations of an on-orbit blackbody (BB). Select Earth surface targets can be used to track the long-term consistency, stability and relative bias between the two MODIS instruments currently in orbit. Measurements at Dome C, Antarctica have shown a relative bias of less than 0.01K over a 5 year period between Terra and Aqua MODIS Band 31 (11μm). Dome C surface temperatures are typically outside the MODIS BB calibration range. Sea surface temperature (SST) measurements from data buoys provide a useful reference at higher scene temperatures. This paper extends the techniques previously applied only to Band 31 to the remaining TEB using both Dome C and SST sites. The long-term calibration stability and relative bias between Terra and Aqua MODIS is discussed.

  8. Optical spectroscopy of IRAS sources with infrared emission bands. 1: IRAS 21282+5050 and the diffuse interstellar bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin; Jones, B. F.

    1987-01-01

    Spectroscopy of the starlike optical counterpart to IRAS 21282+5050, a source with the hydrocarbon infrared emission band spectrum, shows an 07(f)-(WC11) planetary nebula nucleus suffering an extinction of 5.7 mag. Emission line widths in the WC spectrum are only approx. 100 km/s, indicating a very slow stellar wind. Optical diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) are prominent. Five DIBs are strongly enhanced, namely lamda lamda 5797, 6196, 6203, 6283, and 6613. The presence of circumstellar hydrocarbon molecules may explain both the infrared emission bands and the enhanced DIBs.

  9. Status of the first NASA EV-I Project, Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Janz, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    TEMPO is the first NASA Earth Venture Instrument. It will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian tar sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution (2 km N/S × 4.5 km E/W at the center of its field of regard). The status of TEMPO including progress in instrument definition and implementation of the ground system will be presented. TEMPO provides a minimally-redundant measurement suite that includes all key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO will be delivered in 2017 for integration onto a NASA-selected GEO host spacecraft for launch as early as 2018. It will provide the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, substantially reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. Additional gases not central to air quality, including BrO, OClO, and IO will also be measured. TEMPO and its Asian (GEMS) and European (Sentinel-4) constellation partners make the first tropospheric trace gas measurements from GEO, building on the heritage of six spectrometers flown in low-earth-orbit (LEO). These LEO instruments measure the needed

  10. Source characteristics of Jovian narrow-band kilometric radio emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.; Manning, R.; Zarka, P.; Pedersen, B.-M.

    1993-07-01

    New observations of Jovian narrow-band kilometric (nKOM) radio emissions were made by the Unified Radio and Plasma Wave (URAP) experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft during the Ulysses-Jupiter encounter in early February 1992. These observations have demonstrated the unique capability of the URAP instrument for determining both the direction and polarization of nKOM radio sources. An important result is the discovery that nKOM radio emission originates from a number of distinct sources located at different Jovian longitudes and at the inner and outermost regions of the Io plasma torus. These sources have been tracked for several Jovian rotations, yielding their corotational lags, their spatial and temporal evolution, and their radiation characteristics at both low latitudes far from Jupiter and at high latitudes near the planet. Both right-hand and left-hand circularly polarized nKOM sources were observed. The polarizations observed for sources in the outermost regions of the torus seem to favor extraordinary mode emission.

  11. Excitonic emissions and above-band-gap luminescence in the single-crystal perovskite semiconductors CsPbB r3 and CsPbC l3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, M.; Peters, J. A.; Stoumpos, C. C.; Im, J.; Kostina, S. S.; Liu, Z.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Freeman, A. J.; Wessels, B. W.

    2015-12-01

    The ternary compounds CsPb X3 (X =Br or Cl) have perovskite structures that are being considered for optical and electronic applications such as lasing and gamma-ray detection. An above-band-gap excitonic photoluminescence (PL) band is seen in both CsPb X3 compounds. An excitonic emission peak centered at 2.98 eV, ˜ 0.1 eV above the room-temperature band gap, is observed for CsPbC l3 . The thermal quenching of the excitonic luminescence is well described by a two-step quenching model, yielding activation energies of 0.057 and 0.0076 eV for high- and low-temperature regimes, respectively. CsPbB r3 exhibits bound excitonic luminescence peaks located at 2.29 and 2.33 eV that are attributed to recombination involving Br vacancy centers. Activation energies for thermal quenching of the excitonic luminescence of 0.017 and 0.0007 eV were calculated for CsPbB r3 . Temperature-dependent PL experiments reveal unexpected blueshifts for all excitonic emission peaks in CsPb X3 compounds. A phonon-assisted step-up process leads to the blueshift in CsPbB r3 emission, while there is a contribution from band-gap widening in CsPbC l3 . The absence of significant deep level defect luminescence in these compounds makes them attractive candidates for high-resolution, room-temperature radiation detection.

  12. SAXES, a high resolution spectrometer for resonant x-ray emission in the 400-1600 eV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiringhelli, G.; Piazzalunga, A.; Dallera, C.; Trezzi, G.; Braicovich, L.; Schmitt, T.; Strocov, V. N.; Betemps, R.; Patthey, L.; Wang, X.; Grioni, M.

    2006-11-15

    We present a 5 m long spectrometer for soft x rays to be used at a synchrotron radiation beamline for resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering in the 400-1600 eV energy range. It is based on a variable line spacing spherical grating (average groove density of 3200 mm{sup -1}, R=58.55 m) and a charge coupled device two dimensional detector. With an x-ray spot on the sample of 10 {mu}m, the targeted resolving power is higher than 10 000 at all energies below 1100 eV and better than 7000 at 1500 eV. The off-line tests made with Al and Mg K{alpha}{sub 1,2} fluorescence emissions indicate that the spectrometer can actually work at 12 000 and 17 000 resolving power at the L{sub 3} edges of Cu (930 eV) and of Ti (470 eV), respectively. SAXES (superadvanced x-ray emission spectrometer) is mounted on a rotating platform allowing to vary the scattering angle from 25 degree sign to 130 degree sign . The spectrometer will be operational at the ADRESS (advanced resonant spectroscopies) beamline of the Swiss Light Source from 2007.

  13. Terahertz emission upon the band-to-band excitation of Group-IV semiconductors at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zakhar’in, A. O.; Bobylev, A. V.; Egorov, S. V.; Andrianov, A. V.

    2015-03-15

    Terahertz emission upon the band-to-band excitation of Group-IV semiconductors (Si:B and Ge:Ga) at room temperature by a semiconductor laser emitting in the visible range (660 nm) is observed and investigated. It is established that, as the crystal temperature is elevated above room temperature, the emission intensity increases considerably, while the emission spectrum shifts to higher frequencies. The terahertz-emission spectra of germanium and silicon are quite similar to each other. The pump-intensity dependence of the terahertz-emission intensity is nearly linear. The above features make it possible to attribute the observed terahertz emission to the effect of crystal heating by absorbed pump radiation.

  14. Indirect Band Gap Emission by Hot Electron Injection in Metal/MoS₂ and Metal/WSe₂ Heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Ezhilarasu, Goutham; Chatzakis, Ioannis; Dhall, Rohan; Chen, Chun-Chung; Cronin, Stephen B

    2015-06-10

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), such as MoS2 and WSe2, are free of dangling bonds and therefore make more "ideal" Schottky junctions than bulk semiconductors, which produce Fermi energy pinning and recombination centers at the interface with bulk metals, inhibiting charge transfer. Here, we observe a more than 10× enhancement in the indirect band gap photoluminescence of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) deposited on various metals (e.g., Cu, Au, Ag), while the direct band gap emission remains unchanged. We believe the main mechanism of light emission arises from photoexcited hot electrons in the metal that are injected into the conduction band of MoS2 and WSe2 and subsequently recombine radiatively with minority holes in the TMDC. Since the conduction band at the K-point is 0.5 eV higher than at the Σ-point, a lower Schottky barrier exists for the Σ-point band, making electron injection more favorable. Also, the Σ band consists of the sulfur pz orbital, which overlaps more significantly with the electron wave functions in the metal. This enhancement in the indirect emission only occurs for thick flakes of MoS2 and WSe2 (≥100 nm) and is completely absent in monolayer and few-layer (∼10 nm) flakes. Here, the flake thickness must exceed the depletion width of the Schottky junction, in order for efficient radiative recombination to occur in the TMDC. The intensity of this indirect peak decreases at low temperatures, which is consistent with the hot electron injection model. PMID:25993397

  15. Evaluation of Terra and Aqua MODIS thermal emissive band response versus scan angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenny, B. N.; Wu, A.; Madhavan, S.; Xiong, X.

    2014-10-01

    Terra and Aqua MODIS have operated near-continuously for over 14 and 12 years, respectively, and are key instruments for NASA's Earth Observing System. Observations from the 16 thermal emissive bands (TEB), covering wavelengths from 3.5 to 14.4 μm with a nadir spatial resolution of 1 km are used to regularly generate a variety of atmosphere, ocean and land science products. The TEB detectors are calibrated using scan-by-scan observations of an on-board blackbody (BB). The current response versus scan angle (RVS) of the scan mirror was derived using a spacecraft deep-space pitch maneuver for Terra MODIS and characterized during prelaunch for Aqua MODIS. Earth view (EV) data over the complete range of angles of incidence (AOI) can be used to evaluate the on-orbit performance of the TEB RVS over the mission lifetime. Three approaches for tracking the TEB RVS on-orbit using EV observations are formulated. The first approach uses the multiple daily observations of Dome C BT at different AOI and their trend relative to coincident measurements from a ground temperature sensor. The second approach uses brightness temperatures (BT) retrieved over the cloud-free ocean to derive the trends at 13 AOI over the mission lifetime. The third approach tracks the dn response (normalized to the BB AOI) across the full swath width for Antarctic granules with the Dome C site at nadir. The viability of the three approaches is assessed and the long-term stability of the TEB RVS for both MODIS instruments is determined.

  16. The O2 atmospheric 0-0 band and related emissions at night from Spacelab 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, M. R.; Torr, D. G.; Laher, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    A comparison of theoretically determined and measured O2 atmospheric (0-0) band intensities is presented. In view of suggestions that the O2 atmospheric emission and the atomic oxygen O(1S) emission both arise from the same intermediate state of O2, the measured 5577 A emission is also compared with theory; a similar comparison is made for the Herzberg bands of O2. It is concluded that the theories explaining these emissions do not yet provide a consistent picture.

  17. VLF-emissions from ring current electrons. An interpretation of the band of missing emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, K.; Smith, P. H.; Anderson, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    VLF-emissions associated with the enhancement of ring current electrons during magnetic storms and substorms which were detected by the equatorially orbiting S-A satellite (Explorer 45) are described. The emissions observed near the geomagnetic equator consist of essentially two frequency regimes, i.e., one above the electron gyrofrequency, f sub H at the equator and the other below f sub H. This is indicated as a part of the wide-band data obtained during the main phase of the December 17, 1971 magnetic storm. The upper figure is the ac-magnetic field data measured by the search-coil magnetometer with the upper cutoff of 3kHz and the lower figure is the ac-electric field data obtained by the electric field sensor with the upper cutoff of 10kHz. These figures show the time sequence of the observed emissions along the inbound orbit (No. 101) of the satellite as f sub H changes approximately from 3 kHz at 20 UT to 6 kHz at 21 UT. The emissions above f sub H are electrostatic mode, which peak near the frequencies of (n + 1/2) f sub H where n is positive integer, and sometimes emissions up to n = 10 are observed. The emissions below f sub H are whistler mode, which have a conspicuous gap along exactly half electron gyrofrequency, f sub H/2.

  18. MODIS on-orbit thermal emissive bands lifetime performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavan, Sriharsha; Wu, Aisheng; Chen, Na; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2016-05-01

    MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), a leading heritage sensor in the fleet of Earth Observing System for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is in space orbit on two spacecrafts. They are the Terra (T) and Aqua (A) platforms. Both instruments have successfully continued to operate beyond the 6 year design life time, with the T-MODIS currently functional beyond 15 years and the A-MODIS operating beyond 13 years respectively. The MODIS sensor characteristics include a spectral coverage from 0.41 μm - 14.4 μm, of which wavelengths ranging from 3.7 μm - 14. 4 μm cover the thermal infrared region also referred to as the Thermal Emissive Bands (TEBs). The TEBs is calibrated using a v-grooved BlackBody (BB) whose temperature measurements are traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology temperature scales. The TEBs calibration based on the onboard BB is extremely important for its high radiometric fidelity. In this paper, we provide a complete characterization of the lifetime instrument performance of both MODIS instruments in terms of the sensor gain, the Noise Equivalent difference Temperature, key instrument telemetry such as the BB lifetime trends, the instrument temperature trends, the Cold Focal Plane telemetry and finally, the total assessed calibration uncertainty of the TEBs.

  19. Inhomogeneous broadening and peak shift of the 7.6 eV optical absorption band of oxygen vacancies in SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kajihara, Koichi; Skuja, Linards; Hosono, Hideo

    2014-10-21

    The peak parameters of radiation-induced 7.6 eV optical absorption band of oxygen vacancies (Si-Si bonds) were examined for high-purity synthetic α-quartz and amorphous SiO{sub 2} (a‐SiO{sub 2}) exposed to {sup 60}Co γ-rays. The peak shape is asymmetric with the steeper edge at the lower energy side both in α-quartz and a‐SiO{sub 2}, and the peak energy is larger for α-quartz than that for a‐SiO{sub 2}. The full width at half maximum for a‐SiO{sub 2} is larger by ∼40-60% than that for α-quartz, and it increases with an increase in the disorder of the a‐SiO{sub 2} network, which is enhanced by raising the temperature of preannealing before irradiation, i.e., fictive temperature. These data are interpreted from the viewpoint of the site-to-site distribution of the Si-Si bond length in a‐SiO{sub 2}.

  20. Performance of MODIS Thermal Emissive Bands On-orbit Calibration Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Chang, T.

    2009-01-01

    Two nearly identical copies of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are currently operated on-board the Terra and Aqua spacecrafts, launched in December 1999 and May 2002, respectively. Together, they have produced an unprecedented amount of science data products, which are widely used for the studies of changes in the Earth's system of land, oceans, and atmosphere. MODIS is a cross-track scanning radiometer, which uses a two-sided scan mirror and collects data continuously over a wide scan angle range (+/-55 degree relative to the instrument nadir) each scan of 1.47 seconds. It has 36 spectral bands with wavelengths ranging from visible (VIS) to long-wave infrared (LWIR). MODIS bands 1-19 and 26 are the reflective solar bands (RSB) and bands 20-25 and 27-36 are the thermal emissive bands (TEB). MODIS was developed and designed with improvements made over its heritage sensors (such as AVHRR and Landsat) and, in particular, with more stringent calibration requirements. Because of this, MODIS was built with a set of state-of-art on-board calibrators (OBC), which include a solar diffuser (SD), a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM), a blackbody (BB), a spectroradiometric calibration assembly (SRCA), and a space view (SV) port. With the exception of view angle differences, MODIS OBC measurements and the Earth View (EV) observations are made via the same optical path. MODIS TEB have a total of 160 individual TEB detectors (10 per band), which are located on two cold focal plane assemblies (CFPA). For nominal on-orbit operation, the CFPA temperature is controlled at 83K via a passive radiative cooler. For the TEB, the calibration requirements at specified typical scene radiances are less than or equal to 1% with an exception for the fire detection (low gain) band. MODIS TEB on-orbit calibration is performed on a scan-by-scan basis using a quadratic calibration algorithm, and data collected from sensor responses to the onboard BB and SV. The BB

  1. Sub-band gap photo-enhanced secondary electron emission from high-purity single-crystal chemical-vapor-deposited diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yater, J. E.; Shaw, J. L.; Pate, B. B.; Feygelson, T. I.

    2016-02-01

    Secondary-electron-emission (SEE) current measured from high-purity, single-crystal (100) chemical-vapor-deposited diamond is found to increase when sub-band gap (3.06 eV) photons are incident on the hydrogenated surface. Although the light does not produce photoemission directly, the SEE current increases by more than a factor of 2 before saturating with increasing laser power. In energy distribution curves (EDCs), the emission peak shows a corresponding increase in intensity with increasing laser power. However, the emission-onset energy in the EDCs remains constant, indicating that the bands are pinned at the surface. On the other hand, changes are observed on the high-energy side of the distribution as the laser power increases, with a well-defined shoulder becoming more pronounced. From an analysis of this feature in the EDCs, it is deduced that upward band bending is present in the near-surface region during the SEE measurements and this band bending suppresses the SEE yield. However, sub-band gap photon illumination reduces the band bending and thereby increases the SEE current. Because the bands are pinned at the surface, we conclude that the changes in the band levels occur below the surface in the electron transport region. Sample heating produces similar effects as observed with sub-band gap photon illumination, namely, an increase in SEE current and a reduction in band bending. However, the upward band bending is not fully removed by either increasing laser power or temperature, and a minimum band bending of ˜0.8 eV is established in both cases. The sub-band gap photo-excitation mechanism is under further investigation, although it appears likely at present that defect or gap states play a role in the photo-enhanced SEE process. In the meantime, the study demonstrates the ability of visible light to modify the electronic properties of diamond and enhance the emission capabilities, which may have potential impact for diamond-based vacuum electron

  2. Direct band gap optical emission from compressively strained Ge films grown on relaxed Si{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 0.5} substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Aluguri, R.; Manna, S.; Ray, S. K.

    2013-10-14

    Compressively strained Ge films have been grown on relaxed Si{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 0.5} virtual substrate in ultra high vacuum using molecular beam epitaxy. Structural characterization has shown that the Ge films are compressively strained with partial strain relaxation in a film thicker than 3.0 nm, due to onset of island nucleation. Photoluminescence spectra exhibit the splitting of degenerate Ge valence band into heavy hole and light hole bands with a broad direct band gap emission peak around 0.81 eV. Temperature and excitation power dependent emission characteristics have been studied to investigate the mechanism of luminescence quenching at high temperatures and the role of non-radiative recombination centers.

  3. Using Lunar Observations to Assess Terra MODIS Thermal Emissive Bands Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Chen, Hongda

    2010-01-01

    MODIS collects data in both the reflected solar and thermal emissive regions using 36 spectral bands. The center wavelengths of these bands cover the3.7 to 14.24 micron region. In addition to using its on-board calibrators (OBC), which include a full aperture solar diffuser (SD) and a blackbody (BB), lunar observations have been scheduled on a regular basis to support both Terra and Aqua MODIS on-orbit calibration and characterization. This paper provides an overview of MODIS lunar observations and their applications for the reflective solar bands (RSB) and thermal emissive bands (TEB) with an emphasis on potential calibration improvements of MODIS band 21 at 3.96 microns. This spectral band has detectors set with low gains to enable fire detection. Methodologies are proposed and examined on the use of lunar observations for the band 21 calibration. Also presented in this paper are preliminary results derived from Terra MODIS lunar observations and remaining challenging issues.

  4. A search for nitric oxide gamma band emission in an aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beiting, E. J., III; Feldman, P. D.

    1978-01-01

    A strong emission feature at 2150 A has been observed by a rocket-borne spectrophotometer in an IBC II(+) aurora. This feature, commonly identified with the NO gamma (1,0) band, is comparable in intensity to the nearby N2 Vegard-Kaplan bands. Comparison of the observed spectra with a theoretically produced synthetic spectrum allows all but this feature to be assigned to N2 transitions. No bands of the v prime = 0 or 2 progressions or any other bands from v prime = 1 appear, casting serious doubt on the identification of this feature as the NO gamma (1,0) band.

  5. RFID Transponders' RF Emissions in Aircraft Communication and Navigation Radio Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Koppen Sandra V.; Fersch, Mariatheresa S.

    2008-01-01

    Radiated emission data in aircraft communication and navigation bands are presented for several active radio frequency identification (RFID) tags. The individual tags are different in design, operation and transmitting frequencies. The process for measuring the tags emissions in a reverberation chamber is discussed. Measurement issues dealing with tag interrogation, low level measurement in the presence of strong transmissions, and tags low duty factors are discussed. The results show strong emissions, far exceeding aircraft emission limits and can be of potential interference risks.

  6. Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1--x}N/GaN band offsets determined by deep-level emission

    SciTech Connect

    Hang, D. R.; Chen, C. H.; Chen, Y. F.; Jiang, H. X.; Lin, J. Y.

    2001-08-15

    We present studies of the compositional dependence of the optical properties of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N(0band changes from yellow (2.2 eV) to blue (2.6 eV). The shift was less than that of the band gap. Together with previously published studies, it implies that the deep acceptor level is pinned to a common reference level to both materials, thus the deep level responsible for the yellow emission is used as a common reference level to determine the band alignment in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN heterojunctions. Combining with the near-band-edge modulation spectra, the estimated ratio of conduction-to-valence band discontinuity is 65:35. Our results are close to the values obtained from PL measurements on Al{sub 0.14}Ga{sub 0.86}N/GaN quantum wells and those calculated by linear muffin-tin orbital method and linearized augmented plane wave method. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  7. Defect-Band Emission Photoluminescence Imaging on Multi-Crystalline Si Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, F.; Johnston, S.; Zaunbrecher, K.; Al-Jassim, M.; Sidelkheir, O.; Blosse, A.

    2011-07-01

    Defect-band photoluminescence (PL) imaging with an InGaAs camera was applied to multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) wafers, which were taken from different heights of different Si bricks. Neighboring wafers were picked at six different processing steps, from as-cut to post-metallization. By using different cut-off filters, we were able to separate the band-to-band emission images from the defect-band emission images. On the defect-band emission images, the bright regions that originate from the grain boundaries and defect clusters were extracted from the PL images. The area fraction percentage of these regions at various processing stages shows a correlation with the final cell electrical parameters.

  8. Defect-Band Emission Photoluminescence Imaging on Multi-Crystalline Si Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, F.; Johnston, S.; Zaunbrecher, K.; Al-Jassim, M.; Sidelkheir, O.; Blosse, A.

    2011-01-01

    Defect-band photoluminescence (PL) imaging with an InGaAs camera was applied to multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) wafers, which were taken from different heights of different Si bricks. Neighboring wafers were picked at six different processing steps, from as-cut to post-metallization. By using different cut-off filters, we were able to separate the band-to-band emission images from the defect-band emission images. On the defect-band emission images, the bright regions that originate from the grain boundaries and defect clusters were extracted from the PL images. The area fraction percentage of these regions at various processing stages shows a correlation with the final cell electrical parameters.

  9. C-H Hot Bands in the Near-IR Emission Spectra of Leonids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, F. T.; Scoville, J.; Holm, R.; Seelemann, R.; Freund, M. M.

    2002-01-01

    The reported infrared (IR) emission spectra from 1999 Leonid fireballs show a 3.4 micron C-H emission band and unidentified bands at longer wavelengths. Upon atmospheric entry, the Leonid meteorites were flash-heated to temperatures around 2400K, which would destroy any organics on the surface of the meteorite grains. We propose that the nu(sub )CH emission band in the Leonid emission spectra arises from matrix-embedded C(sub n)-H-O entities that are protected from instant pyrolysis. Our model is based on IR absorption nu(sub )CH bands, which we observed in laboratory-grown MgO and natural olivine single crystals, where they arise from C(sub n)-H-O units imbedded in the mineral matrix, indicative of aliphatic -CH2- and -CH3 organics. Instead of being pyrolyzed, the C(sub n)-H-O entities in the Leonid trails become vibrationally excited to higher levels n = 1, 2, 3 etc. During de-excitation they emit at 3.4 microns, due to the (0 => 1) transition, and at longer wavelengths, due to hot bands. As a first step toward verifying this hypothesis we measured the C-H vibrational manifold of hexane (C6H14). The calculated positions of the (2 => l ) , (3 => 2), and possibly (4 => 3) hot bands agree with the Leonid emission bands at 3.5, 3.8 and 4.l microns.

  10. Nature of the emission band of Dergaon meteorite in the region 5700-6700 Å

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Gohain Barua, A.; Konwer, R.; Changmai, R.; Baruah, G. D.

    2004-06-01

    An emission band system in the region 5700--6700 Å from Dergaon stoney iron meteorite which fell at Dergaon, India on March 2, 16.40 local time (2001) was excited with the help of a continuous 500 mW Ar^+ laser. The band system is attributed to silicate (olivine), a major component of the meteorite.

  11. Si3N4 emissivity and the unidentified infrared bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Ray W.; Chatelain, M. A.; Hecht, James H.; Stephens, John R.

    1989-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy of warm (about 150 to 750 K), dusty astronomical sources has revealed a structured emission spectrum which can be diagnostic of the composition, temperature, and in some cases, even size and shape of the grains giving rise to the observed emission. The identifications of silicate emission in oxygen rich objects and SiC in carbon rich object are two examples of this type of analysis. Cometary spectra at moderate resolution have similarly revealed silicate emission, tying together interstellar and interplanetary dust. However, Goebel has pointed out that some astronomical sources appear to contain a different type of dust which results in a qualitatively different spectral shape in the 8 to 13 micron region. The spectra shown make it appear unlikely that silicon nitride can be identified as the source of the 8 to 13 micron emission in either NGC 6572 or Nova Aql 1982. The similarity between the general wavelength and shape of the 10 micron emission from some silicates and that from the two forms of silicon nitride reported could allow a mix of cosmic grains which include some silicon nitride if only the 8 to 13 micron data are considered.

  12. Are the Isomers of C2H4O Responsible for the Unidentified Infrared Emission Bands and Continuum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Lawrence; Lynch, D. K.

    2009-05-01

    We suggest that ethylene oxide (EO, c-C2H4O) and its isomers, acetaldehyde (AC, CH3CHO) and vinyl alcohol (VA, CH2CHOH) may be the source of the unidentified infrared bands (UIR) and their underlying continuum. Microwave transitions of all three isomers have been observed in many astronomical objects, all of which show the UIR bands. We show that the fundamental and overtone vibrational frequencies of EO correlate well with the major UIR bands at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.2 μm. Two additional UIR features at 12.7 and 16.4 μm are consistent with vibrationally excited EO, which is not collisionally quenched in space because the collision rate is negligible compared to the photon emission rate. In our mechanism, a vibrationally and rotationally cold AC molecule absorbs a 9 eV UV photon to produce vibrationally hot and rotationally cold AC in an excited electronic state. The excited AC either (1) undergoes isomerization to form vibrationally hot and rotationally cold EO in an excited electronic state, or (2) undergoes dissociation to form vibrationally and rotationally hot molecular products in excited electronic states. The electronically excited EO emits a UV photon to produce vibrationally hot and rotationally cold EO in its ground electronic state. This EO then emits its vibrational energy in the infrared (IR) and gives rise to the UIR bands. The electronically excited dissociation products also emit UV photons to produce vibrationally and rotationally hot molecules in their ground electronic states. These daughter molecules also emit in the IR and give rise to the UIR continuum. While EO and its isomers are plausible candidates for the source of the UIR spectrum, we have also found that the fundamental vibrational frequencies of cyclopropenylidene (c-C3H2) also match well with the UIR spectral bands, perhaps indicating that more than one small carbonaceous molecule (SCM) is involved.

  13. Techniques to minimize adjacent band emissions from Earth Exploration Satellites to protect the Space Research (Category B) Earth Stations in the 8400-8450 MHz band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Charles C.; Sue, Miles K.; Manshadi, Farzin

    2004-01-01

    The Earth Exploration Satellites operating in the 8025-8400 MHz band can have strong adjacent band emissions on the8400-8450 MHz band which is allocated for Space Research (Category-B). The unwanted emission may exceed the protection criterion establish by the ITU-R for the protection of the Space Research (Category B) earth stations, i.e., deep-space earth stations. An SFCG Action Item (SF 23/14) was created during the 23rd SFCG meeting to explore technical and operational techniques to reduce the adjacent band emissions. In response to this action item, a study was conducted and results are presented in this document.

  14. Discovery of SiO Band Emission from Galactic B[e] Supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, M.; Oksala, M. E.; Cidale, L. S.; Arias, M. L.; Torres, A. F.; Borges Fernandes, M.

    2015-02-01

    B[e] supergiants (B[e]SGs) are evolved massive stars in a short-lived transition phase. During this phase, these objects eject large amounts of material, which accumulate in a circumstellar disk-like structure. The expelled material is typically dense and cool, providing the cradle for molecule and dust condensation and for a rich, ongoing chemistry. Very little is known about the chemical composition of these disks, beyond the emission from dust and CO revolving around the star on Keplerian orbits. As massive stars preserve an oxygen-rich surface composition throughout their life, other oxygen-based molecules can be expected to form. As SiO is the second most stable oxygen compound, we initiated an observing campaign to search for first-overtone SiO emission bands. We obtained high-resolution near-infrared L-band spectra for a sample of Galactic B[e]SGs with reported CO band emission. We clearly detect emission from the SiO first-overtone bands in CPD-52 9243 and indications for faint emission in HD 62623, HD 327083, and CPD-57 2874. From model fits, we find that in all these stars the SiO bands are rotationally broadened with a velocity lower than observed in the CO band forming regions, suggesting that SiO forms at larger distances from the star. Hence, searching for and analyzing these bands is crucial for studying the structure and kinematics of circumstellar disks, because they trace complementary regions to the CO band formation zone. Moreover, since SiO molecules are the building blocks for silicate dust, their study might provide insight in the early stage of dust formation. Based on observations collected with the ESO VLT Paranal Observatory under program 093.D-0248(A).

  15. Origin of multi-band emission from the microquasar Cygnus X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jianfu; Lu, Jufu; Xu, Bing

    2014-06-20

    We study the origin of non-thermal emissions from the Galactic black hole X-ray binary Cygnus X-1, which is a confirmed high-mass microquasar. By analogy with the methods used in studies of active galactic nuclei, we propose a two-dimensional, time-dependent radiation model from the microquasar Cygnus X-1. In this model, the evolution equation for relativistic electrons in a conical jet are numerically solved by including escape, adiabatic, and various radiative losses. The radiative processes involved are synchrotron emission, its self-Compton scattering, and inverse Compton scatterings of an accretion disk and its surrounding stellar companion. This model also includes an electromagnetic cascade process of an anisotropic γ-γ interaction. We study the spectral properties of electron evolution and its emission spectral characteristic at different heights of the emission region located in the jet. We find that radio data from Cygnus X-1 are reproduced by the synchrotron emission, the Fermi Large Area Telescope measurements by the synchrotron emission and Comptonization of photons of the stellar companion, and the TeV band emission fluxes by the Comptonization of the stellar photons. Our results show the following. (1) The radio emission region extends from the binary system scales to the termination of the jet. (2) The GeV band emissions should originate from the distance close to the binary system scales. (3) The TeV band emissions could be inside the binary system, and these emissions could be probed by the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array. (4) The MeV tail emissions, which produce a strongly linearly polarized signal, are emitted inside the binary system. The location of the emissions is very close to the inner region of the jet.

  16. CO Cameron band and CO2+ UV doublet emissions in the dayglow of Venus: Role of CO in the Cameron band production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Jain, Sonal Kumar

    2013-06-01

    The present study deals with the model calculations of CO Cameron band and CO2+ ultraviolet doublet emissions in the dayglow of Venus. The overhead and limb intensities of CO Cameron band and CO2+ UV doublet emissions are calculated for low, moderate, and high solar activity conditions. Using updated cross sections, the impact of different e-CO cross sections for Cameron band production is estimated. The electron impact on CO is the major source mechanism of Cameron band, followed by electron and photon impact dissociation of CO2. The overhead intensities of CO Cameron band and CO2+UV doublet emissions are about a factor of 2 higher in solar maximum than those in solar minimum condition. The effect of solar EUV flux models on the emission intensity is ˜30-40% in solar minimum condition and ˜2-10% in solar maximum condition. At the altitude of emission peak (˜135 km), the model predicted limb intensity of CO Cameron band and CO2+ UV doublet emissions in moderate (F10.7=130) solar activity condition is about 2400 and 300 kR, respectively, which is in agreement with the very recently published SPICAV/Venus Express observation. The model limb intensity profiles of CO Cameron band and CO2+UV doublet are compared with SPICAV observation. We also calculated intensities of N2Vegard-Kaplan UV bands and O I 2972 Å emissions during moderate and high solar activity conditions.

  17. Fourier Transform Emission Spectra of the (000)-(000) Band of the λ4051.6 Band of C3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabashi, A.; Hirao, T.; Amano, T.; Bernath, P. F.

    2005-05-01

    The (000)-(000) band of the 4051.6 Å group (A˜1Πu-X˜1Σ+g) of C3 was recorded in emission with a Bruker IFS 120HR Fourier transform (FT) spectrometer at the University of Waterloo. The band was excited by a microwave discharge in isopropanol (less than a few mtorr) diluted in helium (2 torr). Our new FT data provide more reliable and accurately calibrated transition wavenumbers than those from the grating spectra given by Gausset and coworkers. Analysis of our new spectrum combined with the data by McCall and coworkers confirmed that the lower J levels in the A˜ state were strongly perturbed, as reported by Gausset and coworkers. The unidentified lines observed by McCall and coworkers could be attributed to extra transitions to an unknown perturbing state.

  18. Narrow-band tunable terahertz emission from ferrimagnetic Mn3-xGa thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awari, N.; Kovalev, S.; Fowley, C.; Rode, K.; Gallardo, R. A.; Lau, Y.-C.; Betto, D.; Thiyagarajah, N.; Green, B.; Yildirim, O.; Lindner, J.; Fassbender, J.; Coey, J. M. D.; Deac, A. M.; Gensch, M.

    2016-07-01

    Narrow-band terahertz emission from coherently excited spin precession in metallic ferrimagnetic Mn3-xGa Heusler alloy nanofilms has been observed. The efficiency of the emission, per nanometer film thickness, is comparable or higher than that of classical laser-driven terahertz sources based on optical rectification. The center frequency of the emission from the films can be tuned precisely via the film composition in the range of 0.20-0.35 THz, making this type of metallic film a candidate for efficient on-chip terahertz emitters. Terahertz emission spectroscopy is furthermore shown to be a sensitive probe of magnetic properties of ultra-thin films.

  19. Unidirectional total variation destriping using difference curvature in MODIS emissive bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mi; Zheng, Xinghui; Pan, Jun; Wang, Bin

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a method of unidirectional total variation destriping using difference curvature in MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) emissive bands. First, difference curvature is utilized to extract spatial information at each pixel; and the spatially weighted parameters that constructed by extracted spatial information are incorporated into the unidirectional total variation model to adaptively adjust the destriping strength for achieving a better destriping result and preserving the detail information meantime. Second, the split Bregman iteration method is employed to optimize the proposed model. Finally, experimental results from MODIS emissive bands and comparisons with other methods demonstrate the potential of the presented method for MODIS image destriping.

  20. Measurement of the pressure dependence of the direct band gap of In0.53Ga0.47As using stimulated emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    People, R.; Jayaraman, A.; Wecht, K. W.; Sivco, D. L.; Cho, A. Y.

    1988-06-01

    Stimulated emission, obtainable at high optical pumping levels, has been used to follow the pressure dependence of the Γ-band gap of molecular beam epitaxial In0.53Ga0.47As on (001)InP. Hydrostatic pressure was generated using a diamond anvil cell, and all measurements were made at room temperature. The gap varies sublinearly with pressure for P≳10 kbar, having an initial slope of 12.44 meV/kbar. The deviation from a linear behavior is largely due to nonlinearities in the equation of state at higher pressures. The deformation potential (Ξd+ (1)/(3) Ξu-a) =-(7.79±0.4)eV, for the Γ-band gap.

  1. N2 triplet band emissions in the dayglow of Venus, Mars, and Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sonal Kumar; Bhardwaj, Anil

    2012-07-01

    Vegard-Kaplan (VK) and Second Positive emissions of N_2 are common features in the terrestrial dayglow and aurora and have been studied extensively. Recent discoveries of N_2 triplet band emissions on Mars by SPICAM/Mars-Express and on Titan by Cassini UVIS have led planetary scientists to look for the processes governing the N_2 triplet band emissions in different planetary atmospheres. Present work deals with the modeling of N_2 triplet band emission on Mars, Venus, and Titan. A model for N_2 triplet band emissions has been developed and used to explain the recent observations of N_2 Vegard-Kaplan (VK) (A^3Σ_u^+ - X^1Σ^+_g ) band on Mars and Titan. Steady state photoelectron fluxes and volume excitation rates have been calculated using the Analytical Yield Spectra technique. Since interstate cascading is important for triplet states of N_2, the population of any given level of N_2 triplet states is calculated under statistical equilibrium considering direct excitation, cascading, and quenching effects. Relative population of all vibrational levels of each triplet state is calculated in the model. Line of sight intensities and height-integrated overhead intensities have been calculated for VK, First Positive ( B^3Π_g - A^3Σ^+_u ), Second Positive ( C^3Π_u - B^3Π_g ), Wu-Benesch (W^3Δ_u - B^3Π_g), Reverse First Positive, Herman--Kaplan (E → A), E → B, and E → C bands of N_2. The N_2 VK band span wavelength range from far ultraviolet to visible, and some transitions even originate at wavelength more than 1000 nm . Our calculations show that the overhead intensity of VK bands in the wavelength range 400--800, 300--190, 200--300, and 150--200 nm are 22%, 39%, 35%, and 4% of the total VK band emission. Emissions between 600 and 800 nm wavelength consist of about 50% of the total First Positive band system. Major portion of Second Positive band emissions lie in wavelengths between 300 and 400 nm, which is more than 90% of the total Second Positive band

  2. Analysis of multi-band pyrometry for emissivity and temperature measurements of gray surfaces at ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, António

    2016-05-01

    A multi-band pyrometry model is developed to evaluate the potential of measuring temperature and emissivity of assumably gray target surfaces at 300 K. Twelve wavelength bands between 2 and 60 μm are selected to define the spectral characteristics of the pyrometers. The pyrometers are surrounded by an enclosure with known background temperature. Multi-band pyrometry modeling results in an overdetermined system of equations, in which the solution for temperature and emissivity is obtained through an optimization procedure that minimizes the sum of the squared residuals of each system equation. The Monte Carlo technique is applied to estimate the uncertainties of temperature and emissivity, resulting from the propagation of the uncertainties of the pyrometers. Maximum reduction in temperature uncertainty is obtained from dual-band to tri-band systems, a small reduction is obtained from tri-band to quad-band, with a negligible reduction above quad-band systems (a reduction between 6.5% and 12.9% is obtained from dual-band to quad-band systems). However, increasing the number of bands does not always reduce uncertainty, and uncertainty reduction depends on the specific band arrangement, indicating the importance of choosing the most appropriate multi-band spectral arrangement if uncertainty is to be reduced. A reduction in emissivity uncertainty is achieved when the number of spectral bands is increased (a reduction between 6.3% and 12.1% is obtained from dual-band to penta-band systems). Besides, emissivity uncertainty increases for pyrometers with high wavelength spectral arrangements. Temperature and emissivity uncertainties are strongly dependent on the difference between target and background temperatures: uncertainties are low when the background temperature is far from the target temperature, tending to very high values as the background temperature approaches the target temperature.

  3. Near band edge emission characteristics of sputtered nano-crystalline ZnO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunj, Saurabh; Sreenivas, K.

    2016-05-01

    Sputtered zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films deposited on unheated glass substrate under different sputtering gas mixtures (Ar+O2) have been investigated using X-ray diffraction and photo luminescence spectroscopy. Earlier reported studies on ZnO films prepared by different techniques exhibit either a sharp/broad near band edge (NBE) emission peak depending on the crystalline quality of the film. In the present study zinc oxide films, grown on unheated substrates, are seen to possess a preferred (002) orientation with a microstructure consisting of clustered nano-sized crystallites. The splitting in the near band edge emission (NBE) into three characteristic peaks is attributed to quantum confinement effect, and is observed specifically under an excitation of 270 nm. Deep level emission (DLE) in the range 400 to 700 nm is not observed indicating absence of deep level radiative defects.

  4. RFID Transponders' Radio Frequency Emissions in Aircraft Communication and Navigation Radio Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Williams, Reuben A.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Salud, Maria Theresa P.

    2006-01-01

    Radiated emissions in aircraft communication and navigation bands are measured from several active radio frequency identification (RFID) tags. The individual tags are different in design and operations. They may also operate in different frequency bands. The process for measuring the emissions is discussed, and includes tag interrogation, reverberation chamber testing, and instrument settings selection. The measurement results are described and compared against aircraft emission limits. In addition, interference path loss for the cargo bays of passenger aircraft is measured. Cargo bay path loss is more appropriate for RFID tags than passenger cabin path loss. The path loss data are reported for several aircraft radio systems on a Boeing 747 and an Airbus A320.

  5. Characteristics of banded chorus-like emission measured by the TC-1 Double Star spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macúšová, Eva; Santolík, Ondřej; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, Nicole; Yearby, Keith

    2013-04-01

    We present a study of the spatio-temporal characteristics of banded whistler-mode emissions. It covers the full operational period of the TC-1 spacecraft, between January 2004 and the end of September 2007. The analyzed data set has been visually selected from the onboard-analyzed time-frequency spectrograms of magnetic field fluctuations below 4 kHz measured by the STAFF/DWP wave instrument situated onboard the TC-1 spacecraft with a low inclination elliptical equatorial orbit. This orbit covers magnetic latitudes between -39o and 39o. The entire data set has been collected between L=2 and L=12. Our results show that almost all intense emissions (above a threshold of 10-5nT2Hz-1) occur at L-shells from 6 to 12 and in the MLT sector from 2 to 11 hours. This is in a good agreement with previous observations. We determine the bandwidth of the observed emission by an automatic procedure based on the measured spectra. This allows us to reliably calculate the integral amplitudes of the measured signals. The majority of the largest amplitudes of chorus-like emissions were found closer to the Earth. The other result is that the upper band chorus-like emissions (above one half of the electron cyclotron frequency) are much less intense than the lower band chorus-like emissions (below one half of the electron cyclotron frequency) and are usually observed closer to the Earth than the lower band. This work has received EU support through the FP7-Space grant agreement n 284520 for the MAARBLE collaborative research project.

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and the unidentified infrared emission bands - Auto exhaust along the Milky Way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Barker, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The unidentified infrared emission features (UIR bands) are attributed to a collection of partially hydrogenated, positively charged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This assignment is based on a spectroscopic analysis of the UIR bands. Comparison of the observed interstellar 6.2 and 7.7-micron bands with the laboratory measured Raman spectrum of a collection of carbon-based particulates (auto exhaust) shows a very good agreement, supporting this identification. The infrared emission is due to relaxation from highly vibrationally and electronically excited states. The excitation is probably caused by UV photon absorption. The infrared fluorescence of one particular, highly vibrationally excited PAH (chrysene) is modeled. In this analysis the species is treated as a molecule rather than bulk material and the non-thermodynamic equilibrium nature of the emission is fully taken into account. From a comparison of the observed ratio of the 3.3 to 11.3-micron UIR bands with the model calculations, the average number of carbon atoms per molecule is estimated to be about 20. The abundance of interstellar PAHs is calculated to be about 2 x 10 to the -7th with respect to hydrogen.

  7. Field emission analysis of band bending in donor/acceptor heterojunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Yingjie; Li, Shuai; Wang, Guiwei; Zhao, Tianjiao; Zhang, Gengmin

    2016-06-01

    The donor/acceptor heterojunction plays an important role in organic solar cells. An investigation of band bending in the donor/acceptor heterojunction is helpful in analysis of the charge transport behavior and for the improvement of the device performance. In this work, we report an approach for detection of band bending in a donor/acceptor heterojunction that has been prepared on a small and sharp tungsten tip. In situ field emission measurements are performed after the deposition process, and a linear Fowler-Nordheim plot is obtained from the fresh organic film surface. The thickness-dependent work function is then measured in the layer-by-layer deposited heterojunction. Several different types of heterojunction (zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc)/C60, copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic bisbenzimidazole, and CuPc/C60) are fabricated and analyzed. The different charge transfer directions in the heterojunctions are distinguished by field emission measurements. The calculation method used to determine the band bending is then discussed in detail. A triple layer heterojunction (C60/ZnPc/CuPc) is also analyzed using this method. A small amount of band bending is measured in the outer CuPc layer. This method provides an independent reference method for determination of the band bending in an organic heterojunction that will complement photoemission spectroscopy and current-voltage measurement methods.

  8. Calculations of N 2 triplet states vibrational populations and band emissions in venusian dayglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Jain, Sonal Kumar

    2012-02-01

    A model for N 2 triplet states band emissions in the venusian dayglow has been developed for low and high solar activity conditions. Steady state photoelectron fluxes and volume excitation rates for N 2 triplet states have been calculated using the Analytical Yield Spectra (AYS) technique. Model calculated photoelectron flux is in good agreement with Pioneer Venus Orbiter-observed electron flux. Since inter-state cascading is important for the triplet states of N 2, populations of different levels of N 2 triplet states are calculated under statistical equilibrium considering direct electron impact excitation, and cascading and quenching effects. Densities of all vibrational levels of each triplet state are calculated in the model. Height-integrated overhead intensities of N 2 triplet band emissions are calculated, the values for Vegard-Kaplan (A3Σu+-X1Σg+), First Positive (B3Πg-A3Σu+), Second Positive ( C3Π u - B3Π g), and Wu-Benesch ( W3Δ u - B3Π g) bands of N 2, are 1.9 (3.2), 3 (6), 0.4 (0.8), and 0.5 (1.1) kR, respectively, for solar minimum (maximum) conditions. The intensities of the three strong Vegard-Kaplan bands (0, 5), (0, 6), and (0, 7) are 94 (160), 120 (204), and 114 (194) R, respectively, for solar minimum (maximum) conditions. Limb profiles are calculated for VK (0, 4), (0, 5), (0, 6) and (0, 7) bands. The calculated intensities on Venus are about a factor 10 higher than those on Mars. The present study provides a motivation for a search of N 2 triplet band emissions in the dayglow of Venus.

  9. Dayglow emissions of the O2 Herzberg bands and the Rayleigh backscattered spectrum of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, J. E.; Abrams, R. B.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that numerous fluorescent emissions from the Herzberg bands of molecular oxygen lie in the spectral region 242-300 nm. This coincides with the wavelength range used by orbiting spectrometers that observe the Rayleigh backscattered spectrum of the earth for the purpose of monitoring the vertical distribution of stratospheric ozone. Model calculations suggest that Herzberg band emissions in the dayglow could provide significant contamination of the ozone measurements if the quenching rate of O2(A3Sigma) is sufficiently small. It is noted that this is especially true near 255 nm, where the most intense fluorescent emissions relative to the Rayleigh scattered signal are located and where past satellite measurements have shown a persistent excess radiance above that expected for a pure ozone absorbing and molecular scattering atmosphere. Very small quenching rates, however, are adequate to reduce the dayglow emission to negligible levels. Noting that available laboratory data have not definitely established the quenching on the rate of O2(A3Sigma) as a function of vibration level, it is emphasized that such information is required before the Herzberg band contributions can be evaluated with confidence.

  10. Modeled and observed N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield band emissions: A comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastes, R. W.; Murray, D. J.; Aksnes, A.; Budzien, S. A.; Daniell, R. E.; Krywonos, A.

    2011-12-01

    A thorough understanding of how the N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) band emissions vary with altitude is essential to the use of this emission by space-based remote sensors. In this paper, model-to-model comparisons are first performed to elucidate the influence of the solar irradiance spectrum, intrasystem cascade excitation, and O2 photoabsorption on the limb profile. Next, the observed LBH emissions measured by the High resolution Ionospheric and Thermospheric Spectrograph aboard the Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite are compared with modeled LBH limb profiles to determine which combination of parameters provides the best agreement. The analysis concentrates on the altitude dependence of the LBH (1,1) band, the brightest LBH emission in the observations. In the analysis, satellite drag data are used to constrain the neutral densities used for the data-to-model comparisons. For the average limb profiles on two of the three days analyzed (28, 29, and 30 July 2001), calculations using direct excitation alone give slightly better agreement with the observations than did calculations with cascading between the singlet electronic N2 states (a1Πg, a‧Σ-u, and w1Δu) however, the differences between the observed profiles and either model are possibly greater than the differences between the models. Nevertheless, both models give excellent agreement with the observations, indicating that current models provide an adequate description of the altitude variation of the N2 LBH (1,1) band emissions. Consequently, when using the LBH bands to remotely sense thermospheric temperatures, which can be used to provide an unprecedented view of the thermosphere, the temperatures derived have a negligible dependence on the model used.

  11. Review of Terra MODIS thermal emissive band L1B radiometric performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, Chris; Menzel, W. P.; Quinn, Greg

    2014-09-01

    The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Earth Observing System Terra satellite, launched into orbit on 18 December 1999, will have a "first light" 15th anniversary on 24 February 2015. For nearly 15 years the MODIS instrument has provided radiances in all spectral bands. Though some detectors have fallen below SNR thresholds, the vast majority of spectral bands continue to provide high quality L1B measurements for use in L2 science algorithms supporting global climate research. Radiometric accuracy of the Terra MODIS thermal emissive bands (TEBs) in the C6 L1B product has been assessed using various approaches over the nearly 15 year Terra MODIS data record, including comparisons with instruments on the ground, in aircraft under-flights, and on other satellites. All of these approaches contribute to the understanding of the Terra MODIS radiometric L1B performance. Early in the lifetime of Terra, ground-based measurements and NASA ER-2 aircraft under-flights revealed that TEBs in the infrared window ("window" bands) are well calibrated and performing within accuracy specifications. The ER-2 under-flights also suggested that many atmospheric bands may be performing outside of specification, especially LWIR CO2 sensitive bands that are subject to optical crosstalk, although analysis uncertainties are larger for atmospheric bands. Beginning in 2007, MetOp-A IASI observations were used to evaluate Terra MODIS TEB performance through Simultaneous Nadir Overpass (SNO) comparisons. These inter-satellite comparisons largely affirm the early aircraft and ground-based evaluations, showing that all Terra MODIS window bands have small biases, minimal trending, and minor detector and mirror side striping over the 2007-2013 timeframe. Most atmospheric bands are performing satisfactorily near to specification; however, biases, striping and trending are large and significantly out of specification in the water vapor sensitive band 27 and ozone sensitive

  12. High brightness field emission from printed carbon nanotubes in an S-band microwave gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qilong; Li, Xiangkun; Di, Yusong; Yu, Cairu; Zhang, Xiaobing; Li, Ming; Lei, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Printed carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were applied as cold cathode and placed into an S-band microwave gun operating at 2856 MHz with the pulse duration of 2.8 μs. High brightness field emission was demonstrated and the current density achieves the value more than 4.2 A/cm2. The emittance of field emission beam is calculated to be nearly 21 μm based on the beam profile of emission electrons monitored via yttrium aluminum garnet screen. The infrared image of printed CNTs confirms that the emitters in the center contributed more electrons and the heat generated during the large current density field emission. The results in the paper imply that randomly distributed printed CNTs have the potential to be applied as the high brightness electron sources for free electron lasers.

  13. Band limited emission with central frequency around 2 Hz accompanying powerful cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troitskaia, V. A.; Shepetnov, K. S.; Dvobnia, B. D.

    1992-01-01

    It has been found that powerful cyclones are proceeded, accompanied and followed by narrow band electromagnetic emission with central frequency around 2 Hz. It is shown that the signal from this emission is unique and clearly distinguishable from known types of magnetic pulsations, spectra of local thunderstorms, and signals from industrial sources. This emission was first observed during an unusually powerful cyclone with tornadoes in the western European part of the Soviet Union, which passed by the observatory of Borok from south to north-east. The emission has been confirmed by analysis of similar events in Antarctica. The phenomenon described presents a new aspect of interactions of processes in the lower atmosphere and the ionosphere.

  14. Investigation of narrow-band thermal emission from intersubband transitions in quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    De Zoysa, M.; Asano, T.; Inoue, T.; Mochizuki, K.; Noda, S.

    2015-09-14

    We investigate thermal emission from n-doped GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells (QWs). Emission peaks with Lorentzian shapes (linewidth 11∼19 meV) that reflect transitions between the first and second conduction subbands are observed in the mid-infrared range. It is demonstrated that the emission characteristics can be tuned by modifying the QW parameters. The peak emissivity is increased from 0.3 to 0.9 by modifying the doping density, and the peak wavelength is tuned from 6 to 10 μm by changing the well width. The obtained results are useful for the design of narrow-band thermal emitters.

  15. The influence of deformation bands upon fluid flow using profile permeametry and positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvie, S. R.; Orribo, J. M.; Glover, P. W. J.

    Cataclastic deformation bands are significant discontinuities in sandstone reservoirs since they have dramatically reduced porosity and permeability relative to their host rock, despite their mm-scale displacements. Consequently, these discontinuities often have a large impact upon the flow of fluids at both micro and macro-scales. The effect of this impact in highly porous sandstone has been analyzed using a range of novel and conventional techniques, including pressure decay profile permeametry (PDPK) and positron emission tomography (PET). There are greater reductions in PDPK permeability in deformation bands relative to their host rock compared to conventional nitrogen permeametry measurements. This apparent discrepancy is the outcome of the higher spatial resolution of PDPK technique in measurements of much smaller rock volumes. There are greater porosity reductions using image analysis than conventional core techniques. These changes are reflected in a significant increase in irreducible water saturations (Swi) in deformation bands indicating much reduced fluid storage capacities. PET was used to monitor fluid flow as a function of pore volume of a sandstone plug containing deformation bands, demonstrating the direct effect of deformation bands as a potential barrier to fluid flow. The results of this study provide a detailed characterization of deformation bands at high resolution, which can be included in advanced reservoir simulation models.

  16. VIIRS thermal emissive bands on-orbit calibration coefficient performance using vicarious calibration results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, D.; Moeller, C.; De Luccia, F.

    2013-09-01

    The Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), a primary sensor on-board the Suomi-National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) spacecraft, was launched October 28, 2011. It has 22 bands: 7 thermal emissive bands (TEBs), 14 reflective solar bands (RSBs) and a Day Night Band (DNB). The TEBs cover the spectral wavelengths between 3.7 to 12 μm and have two 371 m and five 742 m spatial resolution bands. A VIIRS Key Performance Parameter (KPP) is the sea surface temperature (SST) which uses bands M12 (3.7 μm), M15 (10.8 μm) and M16's (12.0 μm) calibrated Science Data Records (SDRs). The TEB SDRs rely on pre-launch calibration coefficients used in a quadratic algorithm to convert the detector's response to calibrated radiance. This paper will evaluate the performance of these prelaunch calibration coefficients using vicarious calibration information from the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) also onboard the SNPP spacecraft and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on-board the Meteorological Operational (MetOp) satellite. Changes to the pre-launch calibration coefficients' offset term c0 to improve the SDR's performance at cold scene temperatures will also be discussed.

  17. Nitric oxide delta band emission in the earth's atmosphere - Comparison of a measurement and a theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rusch, D. W.; Sharp, W. E.

    1981-01-01

    Attention is given to the altitude dependent emission rate in the delta-bands of nitric oxide as measured in the earth's atmosphere at night by a scanning ultraviolet spectrometer. It is noted that the reaction responsible is the two-body association of nitrogen and oxygen atoms. The measurements show a vertical intensity beneath the layer for the delta-band system of 19 R. The horizontal emission rate is found to increase from 70 R at 117 km to 140 R at 150 km. The data are analyzed with a one-dimensional, time-dependent, vertical-transport model of odd nitrogen photochemistry. The calculated and measured intensities agree so long as the quenching of N(2D) by atomic oxygen is near 5 x 10 to the -13 cu cm/sec.

  18. L to X-band scatter and emission measurements of vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueppi, R.; Schanda, E.

    1986-08-01

    A broad-band H and V polarization radiometer was combined with a noise transmitter to an instrument for measuring active and passive microwave signatures at seven frequencies between L and X band. This radiometer-scatterometer is operated from a cherry picker over agricultural fields. During the growing seasons the development of sugar-beet, wheat, and corn was measured. The geometrical structure of the vegetation cover was described by recording the crop type, the distances between the plants, and the canopy height. The soil underneath was characterized by moisture, temperature profile, and dielectric constant. Another variable was the seasonal change in water content of the plants. Relating these parameters to the microwave signatures reveals the interaction of scatter and emission processes between soil and vegetation. Significant differences of the emission and scattering behavior for the measured crops are found.

  19. Anomalous Series of Bands in the Edge Emission Spectra of CdS(О)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, N. K.; Kanakhin, A. A.; Galstyan, V. G.; Shnitnikov, A. S.

    2015-02-01

    The region of the edge emission spectrum of CdS(O) single crystals with cadmium excess is examined. An anomalous series of equidistant bands with leading line at 514 nm and phonon replicas has been revealed. These bands grow in intensity with increase of the excitation density up to 1026-1027 cm-3ṡs-1 at 80 K, and the leading line of the series is observed even at 300 K. It is shown that luminescence is conditioned by the exciton spectrum in perfect bulk single-crystals of CdO. Some characteristics of this spectrum are presented, in particular, the dependence on temperature, excitation intensity, composition and size of the crystals, and the LO interaction. The results experimentally confirm the theoretically calculated magnitude of the direct band gap of CdO.

  20. Photoconvertible Behavior of LSSmOrange Applicable for Single Emission Band Optical Highlighting.

    PubMed

    De Keersmaecker, Herlinde; Fron, Eduard; Rocha, Susana; Kogure, Takako; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Hofkens, Johan; Mizuno, Hideaki

    2016-09-01

    Photoswitchable fluorescent proteins are capable of changing their spectral properties upon light irradiation, thus allowing one to follow a chosen subpopulation of molecules in a biological system. Recently, we revealed a photoinduced absorption band shift of LSSmOrange, which was originally engineered to have a large energy gap between excitation and emission bands. Here, we evaluated the performance of LSSmOrange as a fluorescent tracer in living cells. The absorption maximum of LSSmOrange in HeLa cells shifted from 437 nm to 553 nm upon illumination with a 405-, 445-, 458-, or 488-nm laser on a laser-scanning microscope, whereas the emission band remained same (∼570 nm). LSSmOrange behaves as a freely diffusing protein in living cells, enabling the use of the protein as a fluorescence tag for studies of protein dynamics. By targeting LSSmOrange in mitochondria, we observed an exchange of soluble molecules between the matrices upon mitochondrial fusion. Since converted and unconverted LSSmOrange proteins have similar emission spectra, this tracer offers unique possibilities for multicolor imaging. The fluorescence emission from LSSmOrange was spectrally distinguishable from that of eYFP and mRFP, and could be separated completely by applying linear unmixing. Furthermore, by using a femtosecond laser at 850 nm, we showed that a two-photon process could evoke a light-induced red shift of the absorption band of LSSmOrange, providing a strict confinement of the conversion volume in a three-dimensional space. PMID:27602729

  1. Electron emission from conduction band of heavily phosphorus doped diamond negative electron affinity surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Takatoshi; Masuzawa, Tomoaki; Mimura, Hidenori; Okano, Ken

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen (H)-terminated surfaces of diamond have attracted significant attention due to their negative electron affinity (NEA), suggesting high-efficiency electron emitters. Combined with n-type doping technique using phosphorus (P) as donors, the unique NEA surface makes diamond a promising candidate for vacuum cold-cathode applications. However, high-electric fields are needed for the electron emission from the n-type doped diamond with NEA. Here we have clarified the electron emission mechanism of field emission from P-doped diamond having NEA utilizing combined ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy/field emission spectroscopy (UPS/FES). An UP spectrum has confirmed the NEA of H-terminated (1 1 1) surface of P-doped diamond. Despite the NEA, electron emission occurs only when electric field at the surface exceeds 4.2  ×  106 V cm-1. Further analysis by UPS/FES has revealed that the emitted energy level is shifted, indicating that the electron emission mechanism of n-type diamond having NEA surface does not follow a standard field emission theory, but is dominated by potential barrier formed within the diamond due to upward band bending. The reduction of internal barrier is the key to achieve high-efficiency electron emitters using P-doped diamond with NEA, of which application ranges from high-resolution electron spectroscopy to novel vacuum nanoelectronics devices.

  2. Bandwidths and amplitudes of chorus-like banded emissions measured by the TC-1 Double Star spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macúšová, E.; Santolík, O.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Yearby, K. H.

    2015-02-01

    Characteristics of banded whistler-mode emissions are derived from a database of chorus-like events obtained from the complete data set of the wave measurements provided by the Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuation-Digital Wave Processing (STAFF-DWP) wave instrument on board the TC-1 Double Star spacecraft. Our study covers the full operational period of this spacecraft (almost 4 years). Our entire data set has been collected within 30° of geomagnetic latitude at L shells between 2 and 12 and below 4 kHz. All events have been processed automatically to accurately determine their power spectral density (PSD), bandwidth, and amplitude. We found most cases of chorus-like banded emissions at L≤10 on the dawnside and dayside. The upper band emissions (above one half of the equatorial electron cyclotron frequency) occur almost 20 times less often than the lower band, and their average amplitude is almost 3 times smaller than for the lower band. Intense upper band emissions cover smaller L shell, magnetic local time (MLT), and magnetic latitudes regions than intense lower band emissions. The intense nightside and dawnside chorus-like banded emissions were observed at low magnetic latitudes, while the intense dayside and duskside emissions were mostly found at higher magnetic latitudes. The amplitudes of dayside lower band waves slightly increase as they propagate away from the geomagnetic equator and are smaller than chorus amplitudes on nightside and dawnside. The PSD, the amplitude of the lower band, its frequency bandwidth, and its occurrence rate significantly increase with increasing geomagnetic activity, while all these parameters for the upper band are not so strongly dependent on the geomagnetic activity.

  3. Excitation temperatures determined from H{sup +}{sub 3} hot band emission in the Jovian ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Jagod, M.F.; Oka, T.; Geballe, T.R.

    1996-12-31

    Since the observation of the 3.544 {mu}m 2v{sup 0}{sub 2} {r_arrow} v{sub 2} (J = 9, K = 9 {r_arrow} J = 8, G = 9, U = 1) hot band transition of H{sup +}{sub 3} in the polar regions of Jupiter, the authors have pursued the simultaneous detection of additional hot band transitions with fundamental band transitions in order to derive well determined H+ excitation temperatures. The authors report 9 additional resolved 2{nu}{sub 2}{sup 2} {r_arrow} {nu}{sub 2} and {nu}{sub 1} + {nu}{sub 2} {r_arrow} {nu}{sub 1} hot band transitions observed in emission at 3.52, 3.63, 3.66, and 3.84 {mu}m. The hot band transitions have thus far only been detected in the polar regions, with the occasional exception being the 3.544 {mu}m 2{nu}{sup 0}{sub 2} {r_arrow} {nu}{sub 2} transition around 45{degrees}S latitude during the 1994 Comet Shoemaker Levy-9 encounter. Temporal and spatial variation of the excitation temperatures as well as their dependence on vibrational mode will be presented. Anomalous line intensities, e.g. {sup r}R(3,3){sup -b} will also be discussed. All observations were made with the CGS4 spectrometer at the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii.

  4. Epitaxy, phase separation and band-edge emission of spontaneously formed InGaN nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Arpan; Shivaprasad, S. M.

    2016-09-01

    An In-flux dependent study of the nature of epitaxy, compositional phase separation and band-edge emission of spontaneously formed c-oriented InGaN nanorods on c-sapphire is performed. At higher In flux-rates, m-faceted thick nanorods (≈700 nm) form with two in-plane epitaxial orientations, and display compositional phases with In composition varying from 14 to 63%. In these rods, photo-luminescent (PL) emission is seen to originate only from the localized high-In phase (63%) that is embedded in the low-In (14%) InGaN matrix. As the In flux-rate is reduced, nanorods of smaller diameter (≈60 nm) and a coalesced nanorod network are formed, with In incorporation of 15% and 9%, respectively. These faceted, c-aligned thinner nanorods are of a single compositional phase and epitaxy and display room-temperature PL emission. Optical absorption and emission properties of these nanostructures follow Vegard’s law of band-gaps, and the observed bowing parameter and Stokes shifts correlate to the observed compositional inhomogeneity and carrier localization.

  5. Origin of the low-energy emission band in epitaxially grown para-sexiphenyl nanocrystallites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadashchuk, A.; Schols, S.; Heremans, P.; Skryshevski, Yu.; Piryatinski, Yu.; Beinik, I.; Teichert, C.; Hernandez-Sosa, G.; Sitter, H.; Andreev, A.; Frank, P.; Winkler, A.

    2009-02-01

    A comparative study of steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence of para-sexiphenyl (PSP) films grown by organic molecular beam epitaxy (OMBE) and hot wall epitaxy (HWE) under comparable conditions is presented. Using different template substrates [mica(001) and KCl(001) surfaces] as well as different OMBE growth conditions has enabled us to vary greatly the morphology of the PSP crystallites while keeping their chemical structure virtually untouched. We prove that the broad redshifted emission band has a structure-related origin rather than being due to monomolecular oxidative defects. We conclude that the growth conditions and type of template substrate impacts substantially on the film morphology (measured by atomic force microscopy) and emission properties of the PSP films. The relative intensity of the defect emission band observed in the delayed spectra was found to correlate with the structural quality of PSP crystallites. In particular, the defect emission has been found to be drastically suppressed when (i) a KCl template substrate was used instead of mica in HWE-grown films, and (ii) in the OMBE-grown films dominated by growth mounds composed of upright standing molecules as opposed to the films consisting of crystallites formed by molecules lying parallel to the substrate.

  6. Origin of the low-energy emission band in epitaxially grown para-sexiphenyl nanocrystallites

    SciTech Connect

    Kadashchuk, A.; Schols, S.; Heremans, P.; Skryshevski, Yu.; Piryatinski, Yu.; Beinik, I.; Teichert, C.; Hernandez-Sosa, G.; Sitter, H.; Andreev, A.; Frank, P.; Winkler, A.

    2009-02-28

    A comparative study of steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence of para-sexiphenyl (PSP) films grown by organic molecular beam epitaxy (OMBE) and hot wall epitaxy (HWE) under comparable conditions is presented. Using different template substrates [mica(001) and KCl(001) surfaces] as well as different OMBE growth conditions has enabled us to vary greatly the morphology of the PSP crystallites while keeping their chemical structure virtually untouched. We prove that the broad redshifted emission band has a structure-related origin rather than being due to monomolecular oxidative defects. We conclude that the growth conditions and type of template substrate impacts substantially on the film morphology (measured by atomic force microscopy) and emission properties of the PSP films. The relative intensity of the defect emission band observed in the delayed spectra was found to correlate with the structural quality of PSP crystallites. In particular, the defect emission has been found to be drastically suppressed when (i) a KCl template substrate was used instead of mica in HWE-grown films, and (ii) in the OMBE-grown films dominated by growth mounds composed of upright standing molecules as opposed to the films consisting of crystallites formed by molecules lying parallel to the substrate.

  7. The microwave emission and transmission characters of deciduous forest at L-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongjun; Yuan, Yu; Zheng, Xingming; Zhu, Xiaoming; Fu, Xiuli

    2014-11-01

    Forest covers about 30% of earth surface, which plays an important role in global forecast and carbon cycle. Monitoring forest biomass, and retrieving soil moisture at forest area, are the main goals of most passive microwave sensors on satellite missions. L-band is the most sensitive frequency among all the frequencies due to its good penetration ability. Because of its variety of the size of scattering components, the complicated structures and species of forest, it is difficult to describe the scattering and attenuation characters of forest in modeling microwave emission at forest area. In this paper, we studied the emissivity and transmissivity of deciduous forest at L(1.4GHz) by model simulation and field experiment. The microwave emission model was based on Matrix-Doubling algorithm. The comparison between simulated emissivity and measured data collected during an experiment at Maryland, USA in 2007 was good. Since theoretical model like Matrix-Doubling is too complicated to be used in retrial application, we mapped the results of Matrix-Doubling to a simple 0th-order model, also called ω-τ model, by setting the simulated emissivity to be the emissivity of 0th-order model at the same environment, which 2 unknown variables---opacity τ and effective single scattering albedo ω need to be determined. To valited τ (transmissivity of forest) simulated by Matrix-Doubling, we took an deciduous forest experiment by an L band microwave radiometer under trees at JingYueTan area, Changchun, Jilin Province in April to June in 2014. Thus the ω of forest can be determined. The matching results are presented in this paper. The relationship between LAI and forest microwave characters are discussed.

  8. Multiyear On-orbit Calibration and Performance of Terra MODIS Thermal Emissive Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Chiang, Kwo-Fu; Wu, Aisheng; Barnes, William; Guenther, Bruce; Salomonson, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    Since launch in December 1999, Terra MODIS has been making continuous Earth observations for more than seven years. It has produced a broad range of land, ocean, and atmospheric science data products for improvements in studies of global climate and environmental change. Among its 36 spectral bands, there are 20 reflective solar bands (RSB) and 16 thermal emissive bands (TEB). MODIS thermal emissive bands cover the mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) spectral regions with wavelengths from 3.7 to 14.4pm. They are calibrated on-orbit using an on-board blackbody (BB) with its temperature measured by a set of thermistors on a scan-by-scan basis. This paper will provide a brief overview of MODIS TEB calibration and characterization methodologies and illustrate on-board BB functions and TEB performance over more than seven years of on-orbit operation and calibration. Discussions will be focused on TEB detector short-term stability and noise characterization, and changes in long-term response (or system gain). Results show that Terra MODIS BB operation has been extremely stable since launch. When operated at its nominal controlled temperature of 290K, the BB temperature variation is typically less than +0.30mK on a scan-by-scan basis and there has been no time-dependent temperature drift. In addition to excellent short-term stability, most TEB detectors continue to meet or exceed their specified noise characterization requirements, thus enabling calibration accuracy and science data product quality to be maintained. Excluding the noisy detectors identified pre-launch and those that occurred post-launch, the changes in TEB responses have been less than 0.7% on an annual basis. The optical leak corrections applied to bands 32-36 have been effective and stable over the entire mission

  9. EXAMINING THE BROADBAND EMISSION SPECTRUM OF WASP-19b: A NEW z-BAND ECLIPSE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, George; Bayliss, Daniel D. R.; Kedziora-Chudczer, Lucyna; Bailey, Jeremy

    2013-09-10

    WASP-19b is one of the most irradiated hot-Jupiters known. Its secondary eclipse is the deepest of all transiting planets and has been measured in multiple optical and infrared bands. We obtained a z-band eclipse observation with a measured depth of 0.080% {+-} 0.029%, using the 2 m Faulkes Telescope South, which is consistent with the results of previous observations. We combined our measurement of the z-band eclipse with previous observations to explore atmosphere models of WASP-19b that are consistent with its broadband spectrum. We use the VSTAR radiative transfer code to examine the effect of varying pressure-temperature profiles and C/O abundance ratios on the emission spectrum of the planet. We find that models with super-solar carbon enrichment best match the observations, which is consistent with previous model retrieval studies. We also include upper atmosphere haze as another dimension in the interpretation of exoplanet emission spectra and find that particles <0.5 {mu}m in size are unlikely to be present in WASP-19b.

  10. Acoustic Emissions, Velocities And Permeability Evolution During Formation Of Compaction Bands In Sandstone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, J.; Stanchits, S.; Dresen, G.; Schubnel, A.; Gueguen, Y.

    2004-12-01

    Compaction bands are zones of localized deformation observed in high porosity rock (Mollema et al. [1996], Klein et al. [2001], Fortin et al. [2003]). These planar bands form perpendicular to the direction of maximum compression. Compaction bands display significantly reduced porosity and are potentially important permeability barriers in reservoir rocks and aquifers. To investigate localized compaction and changes in physical properties of porous sandstone, we performed triaxial tests on Bleurswiller sandstone, (50% quartz 30% feldspars and 20% clay, 25% porosity), on Fontainebleau sandstone (100% quartz, 25% porosity) and on Flechtingen sandstone (65-75% quartz, calcite and illite 15%, porosity 5.5-7%). Experiments were performed under wet conditions at a pore pressure of 10 MPa. Thirteen experiments were performed at the Laboratoire de Geologie (Ecole Normal Superieur Paris) and at GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam. Evolution of volumetric strain, elastic wave velocities and permeability were recorded at confining pressures of 12 and 180 MPa. Acoustic Emission (AE) characteristics during deformation were studied at GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam. To monitor velocity change and microcracking of sandstone, 10 P-wave sensors and 8 polarized S-wave piezoelectric sensors were glued to the cylindrical surface of the samples. To monitor fracture-induced anisotropy, two additional P sensors were installed in axial direction. Fully digitized waveforms were recorded by 10 MHz/16bit Data Acquisition System with an accuracy of AE hypocenters determination of about 2.5 mm. Location of acoustic emission events reveal the evolution of localized compaction bands in sandstone subjected to axial compression. The formation of the bands depends on rock type and effective pressure. Our experiments show a reduction of permeability across compaction bands by about one to two orders of magnitude (Vajdova et al. [2004]; Holcomb et al., [2003]) suggesting that the bands may act as barriers to

  11. Emission line shape of B850 band of light-harvesting complex II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Praveen; Jang, Seogjoo

    2011-03-01

    A theoretical framework is developed for the emission line shape of the single complex spectroscopy (SCS). The quantum mechanical characteristics of the single complex emission line shapes for the model B850 band of the light harvesting complex 2 of purple bacteria are studied including both static and quasi-static disorders within the exciton Hamiltonian. The bath is modeled as an infinite sum of harmonic oscillators. For the Gaussian type of disorder, we examined the dependencies of the spectral line shapes on the temperature, polarization of the radiation, and on the type of exciton-bath coupling. Theoretically obtained emission profile is also compared with the absorption profile in the frequency domain. It is observed that emission profile contains an extra inhomogeneous term coming from the entanglement of the system and bath degrees of freedom in the initial equilibrium density operator. Contribution of this term to the overall emission line shape is studied in detail. This research was supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  12. Dielectric properties and emissivity of seawater at C-band microwave frequency.

    PubMed

    Murugkar, A G; Joshi, A S; Kurtadikar, M L

    2012-10-01

    Microwave remote sensing applications over ocean using radar and radiometers, a precise knowledge of emissivity and reflectivity, are required. Emissivity of ocean surface is a function of the surface configuration, frequency of radiation, temperature and its dielectric properties. The emissivity of a smooth ocean surface at a particular wavelength is determined by its complex dielectric properties. In present study, laboratory measurements of complex dielectric properties, real part epsilon', and imaginary part epsilon", of surface seawater samples collected from Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea are carried out. Measurements of these seawater samples are done at 5 GHz and 30 degrees C using an automated C-band microwave bench set up. The salinity of samples is also measured using autosalinometer. The salinity values are used to determine epsilon' and epsilon" using the Debye equations. The normal incidence emissivity and brightness temperature values for smooth sea surface are reported for surface samples. The dielectric constant epsilon' decreases and dielectric loss increases with increase in salinity at 5 GHz and 30 degrees C. At normal incidence, emissivity is almost constant for varying salinities. PMID:25151713

  13. [Research on the emission spectrum of NO molecule's γ-band system by corona discharge].

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xiao-dong; Ding, Yan-jun; Peng, Zhi-min; Luo, Rui

    2012-05-01

    The optical emission spectrum of the gamma-band system of NO molecule, A2 sigma+ --> X2 pi(r), has been analyzed and calculated based on the energy structure of NO molecule' doublet states. By employing the theory of diatomic molecular Spectra, some key parameters of equations for the radiative transition intensity were evaluated theoretically, including the potentials of the doublet states of NO molecule's upper and lower energy levels, the electronic transition moments calculated by using r-centroid approximation method, and the Einstein coefficient of different vibrational and rotational levels. The simulated spectrum of the gamma-band system was calculated as a function of different vibrational and rotational temperature. Compared to the theoretical spectroscopy, the measured results were achieved from corona discharge experiments of NO and N2. The vibrational and rotational temperatures were determined approximately by fitting the measured spectral intensities with the calculated ones. PMID:22827043

  14. Studies of collision-induced emission in the fundamental vibration-rotation band of H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caledonia, G. E.; Krech, R. H.; Wilkerson, T.; Taylor, R. L.; Birnbaum, G.

    Measurements are presented of the collision induced emission (CIE) from the fundamental vibration-rotation band of H2 taken over the temperature range of 900-3000 K. The spectral shape and strength of this IR band centered about 2.4 microns has been measured behind reflected shocks in mixtures of H2/Ar. The observed radiation at elevated temperatures is found to be dominantly in the Q branch. The results, compared with theory, show that radiation at elevated temperatures is primarily the result of an induced dipole moment in H2 induced by the overlap between the H2 and Ar electron clouds during collision. The strength of this interaction has been evaluated by an analysis of the measured temperature dependence of the absolute bandstrengths.

  15. Development of a L-band ocean emissivity electromagnetic model using observations from the Aquarius Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejazin, Y.; Jones, W.; El-Nimri, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Aquarius/SAC-D ocean salinity measurement mission was launched into polar orbit during the summer of 2011. The prime sensor is an L-band radiometer/scatterometer developed jointly by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This paper deals with the development of an ocean emissivity model using AQ radiometer brightness temperature (Tb) observations. This model calculates the ocean surface emissivity as a function of ocean salinity, sea surface temperature, surface wind speed and direction. One unique aspect of this model is that it calculates ocean emissivity over wide ranges of Earth incidence angles (EIAs) from nadir to > 60°and ocean wind speeds from 0 m/s to > 70 m/s. This physical electromagnetic model with empirical coefficients follows the form of Stogryn [1967] that treats the ocean as a mixture of foam and clean rough water. The CFRSL ocean surface emissivity (ɛocean) is modeled as a linear sum of foam (ɛfoam) and foam-free seawater (ɛrough) emissivities, according to ɛocean = FF * ɛfoam + (1 - FF) * ɛrough (1) where FF is the fractional area coverage by foam. The foam emissivity is modeled as ɛfoam = Q(freq, U10, EIA) (2) where Q( ) is the empirical dependence of foam emissivity on radiometer frequency, the 10-m neutral stability wind speed and EIA according to El-Nimri [2010]. Following Stogryn, the foam-free seawater emissivity (ɛrough) is modeled ɛrough = ɛsmooth +Δɛexcess (3) where ɛsmooth = (1 - Γ) is the smooth surface emissivity, Γ is the Fresnel power reflection coefficient, and Δɛexcess is the wind-induced excess emissivity, given by Δɛexcess = G(freq, U10, WDir, EIA) (4) Where G( ) is the empirical signature of foam-free rough ocean, which depends upon the surface wind speed and wind direction. This function is determined empirically from measured AQ radiometer Tb's associated with surface wind vector from collocated NOAA GDAS numerical weather model. Ocean emissivity calculations are compared

  16. Band-limited Green's Functions for Quantitative Evaluation of Acoustic Emission Using the Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, William P.; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo; Leser, William P.

    2013-01-01

    A method of numerically estimating dynamic Green's functions using the finite element method is proposed. These Green's functions are accurate in a limited frequency range dependent on the mesh size used to generate them. This range can often match or exceed the frequency sensitivity of the traditional acoustic emission sensors. An algorithm is also developed to characterize an acoustic emission source by obtaining information about its strength and temporal dependence. This information can then be used to reproduce the source in a finite element model for further analysis. Numerical examples are presented that demonstrate the ability of the band-limited Green's functions approach to determine the moment tensor coefficients of several reference signals to within seven percent, as well as accurately reproduce the source-time function.

  17. Quantum simulation of the yellow emission band of CsXe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tellinghuisen, J.; Exton, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Quantum spectral simulations of the yellow excimer emission band of CsXe are presented. Synthetic spectra as a function of wave number are calculated for the 2 Sigma 1/2 + (7s) - 2 Sigma 1/2 + (6s) transition by the use of the equation of Tellinghuisen et al. (1976) with a theoretical potential for the ground state and a Morse potential curve with an electron frequency of 32/cm for the excited state. Results based on emission studies at 450 K and 200 and 800 torr, are found to be consistent with absorption studies. The undulatory structure observed in the spectrum is attributed not to the vibrational spacing in the excited state, but rather to a characteristic reflection structure associated with nearly parallel upper and lower potential curves.

  18. The solar wind control of Jupiter's broad-band kilometric radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrow, C. H.; Leblanc, Y.; Desch, M. D.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of the solar wind close to Jupiter are compared with the broad-band kilometric radio emission (bKOM), using data recorded by Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 during 1979. The lower bKOM frequencies, less than about 300 kHz, are found to correlate with the solar wind density and pressure and with the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) magnitude during periods when there is a well-defined magnetic sector structure. The results suggest that lower frequency bKOM events are most likely to occur after a sector boundary has passed Jupiter during the period when the solar wind density and the IMF magnitude are increasing towards the sector center. The average bKOM energy per Jovian rotation tends to have lower values soon after the sector center has passed. Higher-frequency/higher-energy bKOM emission may be contaminated by hectometric emission (HOM) and differently correlated with solar activity. The solar wind control may also be obscured by some stronger control. It is suggested that electron density fluctuations in the Io torus, where the source is believed to be located, may be responsible for variations in the beaming and hence variations in the observed emission.

  19. Emission from the Local Galactic Halo in the 1/4 keV Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juda, M.

    1994-12-01

    Pointed observations with the ROSAT PSPC toward clouds at high galactic latitude provide a unique opportunity to probe emission from the local galactic halo in the 1/4 keV band. I present data from five fields toward clouds at |b| > 60(deg) identified through their IRAS 100 microns emission, two in the north galactic hemisphere and three in the south. In four of the five fields significant shadows are detected (2 north, 2 south). The derivation of the brightness of the shadowed component depends strongly on the assumed location and amount of absorbing material. Scaling the IRAS 100 microns emission by 10(20) H atom cm(-2) /MJy sr(-1) and correcting for the difference from the observed average 21 cm derived column density, the implied brightness of the distant emitting component is the same for the two northern latitude fields at { ~ 1.2*E(-3) counts s(-1) arcmin(-2}) ; this brightness is lower than that seen in the direction of Draco (Burrows & Mendenhall 1991, Snowden et al. 1991) and higher than in Ursa Major (Snowden et al. 1994). The two southern fields also have the same derived distant brightness at nearly the same level as the northern fields, { ~ 1.0*E(-3) counts s(-1) arcmin(-2}) . Approximately 20% of this emission may be attributed to an extragalactic background (Hasinger et al. 1993). The remaining emission, { ~ 0.8*E(-3) counts s(-1) arcmin(-2}) , would be provided by the local galactic halo. If these x-rays arise from a collisionally excited plasma at a temperature of 10(6) K the required emission measure is { ~ 0.0033 cm(-6) pc}. Burrows & Mendenhall 1991, Nature, 351, 629. Hasinger et al. 1993, A&A, 275, 1. Snowden et al. 1991, Science, 252, 1529. Snowden et al. 1994, ApJ, 430, 601.

  20. High Resolution Emission Spectroscopy of the Alpha Pi-1 - Chi Sigma-1(+) Fourth Positive Band System of CO from Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beegle, Luther W.; Ajello, Joseph M.; James, Geoffrey K.; Alvarez, Marcos; Dziczek, Dariusz

    2000-01-01

    We report electron-impact induced fluorescence spectra [300 mA full width at half maximum (FWHM)] of CO for 20 and 100 eV impact energies of the spectral region of 1300 to 2050 A and high resolution spectra (FWHM) of the v'=5 to v"=l and the v'=3 to v"=O bands showing that the rotational structure of the band system are modeled accurately. The excitation function of the (0,1) band (1597 A) was measured from electron impact in the energy range from threshold to 750 eV and placed on an absolute scale from modem calibration standards.

  1. Terra and Aqua MODIS Thermal Emissive Bands On-Orbit Calibration and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Wu, Aisheng; Wenny, Brian N.; Madhavan, Sriharsha; Wang, Zhipeng; Li, Yonghong; Chen, Na; Barnes, William L.; Salomonson, Vincent V.

    2015-01-01

    Since launch, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments on the Terra and Aqua spacecraft have operated successfully for more than 14 and 12 years, respectively. A key instrument for National Aeronautics and Space Administration Earth Observing System missions, MODIS was designed to make continuous observations for studies of Earth's land, ocean, and atmospheric properties and to extend existing data records from heritage Earth observing sensors. The 16 thermal emissive bands (TEBs) (3.75-14.24 micrometers) are calibrated on orbit using a temperature controlled blackbody (BB). Both Terra and Aqua MODIS BBs have displayed minimal drift over the mission lifetime, and the seasonal variations of the BB temperature are extremely small in Aqua MODIS. The long-term gain and noise equivalent difference in temperature performance of the 160 TEB detectors on both MODIS instruments have been well behaved and generally very stable. Small but noticeable variations of Aqua MODIS bands 33-36 (13.34-14.24 micrometer) response in recent years are primarily due to loss of temperature control margin of its passive cryoradiative cooler. As a result, fixed calibration coefficients, previously used by bands when the BB temperature is above their saturation temperatures, are replaced by the focal-plane-temperature-dependent calibration coefficients. This paper presents an overview of the MODIS TEB calibration, the on-orbit performance, and the challenging issues likely to impact the instruments as they continue operating well past their designed lifetime of six years.

  2. The GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager: detector spectral response effects on thermal emissive band calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, Aaron J.; Padula, Francis; Cao, Changyong; Wu, Xiangqian

    2015-10-01

    The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) will be aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-Series (GOES-R) to supply data needed for operational weather forecasts and long-term climate variability studies, which depend on high quality data. Unlike the heritage operational GOES systems that have two or four detectors per band, ABI has hundreds of detectors per channel requiring calibration coefficients for each one. This increase in number of detectors poses new challenges for next generation sensors as each detector has a unique spectral response function (SRF) even though only one averaged SRF per band is used operationally to calibrate each detector. This simplified processing increases computational efficiency. Using measured system-level SRF data from pre-launch testing, we have the opportunity to characterize the calibration impact using measured SRFs, both per detector and as an average of detector-level SRFs similar to the operational version. We calculated the spectral response impacts for the thermal emissive bands (TEB) theoretically, by simulating the ABI response viewing an ideal blackbody and practically, with the measured ABI response to an external reference blackbody from the pre-launch TEB calibration test. The impacts from the practical case match the theoretical results using an ideal blackbody. The observed brightness temperature trends show structure across the array with magnitudes as large as 0.1 K for and 12 (9.61 µm), and 0.25 K for band 14 (11.2 µm) for a 300 K blackbody. The trends in the raw ABI signal viewing the blackbody support the spectral response measurements results, since they show similar trends in bands 12 (9.61µm), and 14 (11.2 µm), meaning that the spectral effects dominate the response differences between detectors for these bands. We further validated these effects using the radiometric bias calculated between calibrations using the external blackbody and

  3. Aminorhodamine (ARh): A Bichromophore with Three Emission Bands in Low Temperature Glasses.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Thomas Just; Kilså, Kristine; Laursen, Bo W

    2015-06-01

    At first glance, aminorhodamine (ARh) is a typical pH responsive fluorescent, rhodamine-type dye. However, hidden under the typical rhodamine absorption band, ARh has another electronic transition of similar energy, but polarized orthogonal to that of the rhodamine chromophore. This transition-assigned to an arylpyrylium type chromophore contained in the system-is responsible for the sensor action of the dye. ARh is non-fluorescent, while protonation of a donor amino group turn on a strong rhodamine-type emission. At low temperature in frozen solution emission from both electronic subsystems of ARh are observed. In order to achieve more complete understanding of the photophysical mechanisms in this type of fluorescent probes, ARh and its protonated counterpart HARh were studied by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, computational chemistry, and at low temperatures in solid solution. Results from fluorescence anisotropy and time-resolved fluorescence spectra establish a bichromophore model and suggest that a remarkable weak coupling between the two nearly isoenergetic excited states in ARh enables the dual emission. All the complicated properties observed for ARh was accounted for by a bichromophore model describing the electronic system of ARh as a bichromophore constituted by a rhodamine and an arylpyrylium subsystem. PMID:25916892

  4. Probing the Ionization States of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons via the 15-20 μm Emission Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, M. J.; Stock, D. J.; Peeters, E.

    2015-10-01

    We report new correlations between ratios of band intensities of the 15-20 μm emission bands of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a sample of 57 sources observed with the Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph. This sample includes Large Magellanic Cloud point sources from the SAGE-Spec survey, nearby galaxies from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey survey, two Galactic interstellar medium cirrus sources, and the spectral maps of the Galactic reflection nebulae NGC 2023 and NGC 7023. We find that the 16.4, 17.4, and 17.8 μm band intensities are inter-correlated in all environments. In NGC 2023 and NGC 7023 these bands also correlate with the 11.0 and 12.7 μm band intensities. The 15.8 μm band correlates only with the 15-18 μm plateau and the 11.2 μm emission. We examine the spatial morphology of these bands and introduce radial cuts. We find that these bands can be spatially organized into three sets: the 12.7, 16.4, and 17.8 μm bands; the 11.2, 15.8 μm bands and the 15-18 μm plateau; and the 11.0 and 17.4 μm bands. We also find that the spatial distribution of the 12.7, 16.4, and 17.8 μm bands can be reconstructed by averaging the spatial distributions of the cationic 11.0 μm and neutral 11.2 μm bands. We conclude that the 17.4 μm band is dominated by cations, the 15.8 μm band by neutral species, and the 12.7, 16.4, and 17.8 μm bands by a combination of the two. These results highlight the importance of PAH ionization for spatially differentiating sub-populations by their 15-20 μm emission variability.

  5. Leaf Level Chlorophyll Fluorescence Emission Spectra: Narrow Band versus Full 650-800 nm Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, E.; Zhang, Q.; Campbell, P. K.; Huemmrich, K. F.; Corp, L.; Cheng, Y.

    2012-12-01

    nm (r2 = 0.88, RMSE = 7.54 x 107). When perfect retrievals were assumed (0% noise), retrievals remained good in the low emission regions on either side of the peaks-- those associated with the H alpha line at 655 nm (r2 = 0.83, RMSE =8.87 x 107) and the far-NIR wavelengths recently utilized for satellite retrievals: a K line at 770 nm (r2 = 0.85, RMSE = 8.36 x 107) and the 750-770 nm interval (r2 = 0.88, RMSE = 6.92 x 107). However, the atmosphere and satellite observations are expected to add noise to retrievals. Adding 5% random error to these relationships did not seriously impair the retrieval successes in the red and far-red peaks (r2 ~ 0.85, RMSEs = 6.31 x 107). A greater impact occurred (reducing retrieval success by ~10%) when adding 5% noise for the far-NIR narrow band at 770 nm (r2 ~ 0.70, RMSE ~ 8.5 x 107). When a 10% random error was added, the retrieval successes fell to ~68 ± 7% for all retrieval wavebands, and RMSEs increased by a factor of 10. This laboratory approach will be critical to calibrate space borne retrievals, but additional information across plant species is needed. Furthermore, this experiment indicates that ChlF retrievals from space should include information from the red and far-red peak emission regions, since the true total fluorescence signal is the desired parameter for Earth carbon and energy budgets.

  6. Observational studies on the near-infrared unidentified emission bands in galactic H II regions

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Tamami I.; Onaka, Takashi; Sakon, Itsuki; Ohsawa, Ryou; Bell, Aaron C.; Ishihara, Daisuke; Shimonishi, Takashi

    2014-03-20

    Using a large collection of near-infrared spectra (2.5-5.4 μm) of Galactic H II regions and H II region-like objects, we perform a systematic investigation of astronomical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features. Thirty-six objects were observed using the infrared camera on board the AKARI satellite as a part of a director's time program. In addition to the well known 3.3-3.6 μm features, most spectra show a relatively weak emission feature at 5.22 μm with sufficient signal-to-noise ratios, which we identify as the PAH 5.25 μm band (previously reported). By careful analysis, we find good correlations between the 5.25 μm band and both the aromatic hydrocarbon feature at 3.3 μm and the aliphatic hydrocarbon features at around 3.4-3.6 μm. The present results give us convincing evidence that the astronomical 5.25 μm band is associated with C-H vibrations, as suggested by previous studies, and show its potential to probe the PAH size distribution. The analysis also shows that the aliphatic-to-aromatic ratio of I {sub 3.4-3.6} {sub μm}/I {sub 3.3} {sub μm} decreases against the ratio of the 3.7 μm continuum intensity to the 3.3 μm band, I {sub cont,} {sub 3.7} {sub μm}/I {sub 3.3} {sub μm}, which is an indicator of the ionization fraction of PAHs. The midinfrared color of I {sub 9} {sub μm}/I {sub 18} {sub μm} also declines steeply against the ratio of the hydrogen recombination line Brα at 4.05 μm to the 3.3 μm band, I {sub Brα}/I {sub 3.3} {sub μm}. These facts indicate possible dust processing inside or at the boundary of ionized gas.

  7. Observational Studies on the Near-infrared Unidentified Emission Bands in Galactic H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Tamami I.; Onaka, Takashi; Sakon, Itsuki; Ishihara, Daisuke; Shimonishi, Takashi; Ohsawa, Ryou; Bell, Aaron C.

    2014-03-01

    Using a large collection of near-infrared spectra (2.5-5.4 μm) of Galactic H II regions and H II region-like objects, we perform a systematic investigation of astronomical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features. Thirty-six objects were observed using the infrared camera on board the AKARI satellite as a part of a director's time program. In addition to the well known 3.3-3.6 μm features, most spectra show a relatively weak emission feature at 5.22 μm with sufficient signal-to-noise ratios, which we identify as the PAH 5.25 μm band (previously reported). By careful analysis, we find good correlations between the 5.25 μm band and both the aromatic hydrocarbon feature at 3.3 μm and the aliphatic hydrocarbon features at around 3.4-3.6 μm. The present results give us convincing evidence that the astronomical 5.25 μm band is associated with C-H vibrations, as suggested by previous studies, and show its potential to probe the PAH size distribution. The analysis also shows that the aliphatic-to-aromatic ratio of I 3.4-3.6 μm/I 3.3 μm decreases against the ratio of the 3.7 μm continuum intensity to the 3.3 μm band, I cont, 3.7 μm/I 3.3 μm, which is an indicator of the ionization fraction of PAHs. The midinfrared color of I 9 μm/I 18 μm also declines steeply against the ratio of the hydrogen recombination line Brα at 4.05 μm to the 3.3 μm band, I Brα/I 3.3 μm. These facts indicate possible dust processing inside or at the boundary of ionized gas.

  8. Impact of Conifer Forest Litter on Microwave Emission at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurum, Mehmet; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Lang, Roger H.; Cosh, Michael H.; Joseph, Alicia T.; Jackson, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    This study reports on the utilization of microwave modeling, together with ground truth, and L-band (1.4-GHz) brightness temperatures to investigate the passive microwave characteristics of a conifer forest floor. The microwave data were acquired over a natural Virginia Pine forest in Maryland by a ground-based microwave active/passive instrument system in 2008/2009. Ground measurements of the tree biophysical parameters and forest floor characteristics were obtained during the field campaign. The test site consisted of medium-sized evergreen conifers with an average height of 12 m and average diameters at breast height of 12.6 cm. The site is a typical pine forest site in that there is a surface layer of loose debris/needles and an organic transition layer above the mineral soil. In an effort to characterize and model the impact of the surface litter layer, an experiment was conducted on a day with wet soil conditions, which involved removal of the surface litter layer from one half of the test site while keeping the other half undisturbed. The observations showed detectable decrease in emissivity for both polarizations after the surface litter layer was removed. A first-order radiative transfer model of the forest stands including the multilayer nature of the forest floor in conjunction with the ground truth data are used to compute forest emission. The model calculations reproduced the major features of the experimental data over the entire duration, which included the effects of surface litter and ground moisture content on overall emission. Both theory and experimental results confirm that the litter layer increases the observed canopy brightness temperature and obscure the soil emission.

  9. Photonic Crystal and Photonic Band-Gap Structures for Light Extraction and Emission Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Rue, Richard M.

    Research into photonic crystal (PhC) and photonic band-gap (PBG) structures has been motivated, from the start, by their possible use in controlling, modifying and enhancing the light emission process from high refractive index solid materials. This chapter considers the possible role of such structures when incorporated into semiconductor diode based light-emitting devices. Both light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and lasers will be considered. In order to provide a proper framework for discussion and analysis, space is devoted to the historical development of III-V semiconductor based LEDs — and to competing alternative approaches that have been demonstrated for enhanced light extraction. The possible advantages of photonic quasi-crystal (PQC) structures over regularly periodic photon crystal structures for advanced LED designs are also considered. Photonic crystal structures potentially provide major enhancements in the performance of laser diodes (LDs) — and progress towards this performance enhancement will be reviewed.

  10. On-orbit Characterization of RVS for MODIS Thermal Emissive Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, X.; Salomonson, V.; Chiang, K.; Wu, A.; Guenther, B.; Barnes, W.

    2004-01-01

    Response versus scan angle (RVS) is a key calibration parameter for remote sensing radiometers that make observations using a scanning optical system, such as a scan mirror in MODIS and GLI or a rotating telescope in SeaWiFS and VIIRS, since the calibration is typically performed at a fixed viewing angle while the Earth scene observations are made over a range of viewing angles. Terra MODIS has been in operation for more than four years since its launch in December 1999. It has 36 spectral bands covering spectral range from visible (VIS) to long-wave infrared (LWIR). It is a cross-track scanning radiometer using a two-sided paddle wheel scan mirror, making observations over a wide field of view (FOV) of +/-55 deg from the instrument nadir. This paper describes on-orbit characterization of MODIS RVS for its thermal emissive bands (TEB), using the Earth view data collected during Terra spacecraft deep space maneuvers (DSM). Comparisons with pre-launch analysis and early on-orbit measurements are also provided.

  11. CH^+ Spectrum and Diffuse Interstellar Bands Toward Herschel 36 Excited by Dust Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlstrom, Julie; Oka, Takeshi; Johnson, Sean; Welty, Daniel E.; Hobbs, Lew M.; York, Donald G.

    2012-06-01

    All electronic CH^+ interstellar absorption lines so far observed had been limited to the R(0) transition starting from the J = 0 ground level; this is because of the very rapid J = 1 → 0 spontaneous emission with the life time of ˜ 140 s. We have observed the R(1) and Q(1) lines of the A^1π ← X^1Σ band from the excited J = 1 level 40.08 K (27.86 cm-1) above the J = 0 level toward Herschel 36 indicating high radiative temperature of T_r = 17.5 K. The high temperature is most likely due to far infrared dust emission from the Her 36 SE. We have also observed the R_1(3/2) line of CH starting from the excited fine structure level J = 3/2 which is 25.76 - 25.57 K above the J = 1/2 level. The effect of high radiative temperature is also noticed as unique lineshapes of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) observed toward Her 36. We have examined seven DIBs including λ 5780.5, λ 5797.1, λ 6190.0, and λ 6613.0 that are correlated with each other with correlation coefficients > 0.93. While for ordinary sightlines the lineshapes of these DIBs are more or less symmetric, those toward Her 36 show a long tail toward the red. This is due to far infrared pumping of high J rotational levels of polar carriers of the DIBs by the dust emission. We have developed a model calculation of relaxation taking into account of both radiative and collisional processes. A linear molecule with about 6 carbon atoms can explain some of the DIBs. For the DIBs we have examined, probably the carriers are of this size since we cannot explain the large difference between the DIBs toward ordinary sightlines and toward Her 36 with larger molecules. Goto, M., Stecklum, B., Linz, H., Feldt, M., Henning, Th., Pascucci, I., and Usuda, T. 2006, ApJ, {649} 299.

  12. Use of IRI to Model the Effect of Ionosphere Emission on Earth Remote Sensing at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Saji; LeVine, David M.

    2004-01-01

    Microwave remote sensing in the window at 1.413 GHz (L-band) set aside for passive use only is important for monitoring sea surface salinity and soil moisture. These parameters are important for understanding ocean dynamics and energy exchange between the surface and atmosphere, and both NASA and ESA plan to launch satellite sensors to monitor these parameters at L-band (Aquarius, Hydros and SMOS). The ionosphere is an important source of error for passive remote sensing at this frequency. In addition to Faraday rotation, emission from the ionosphere is also a potential source of error at L-band. As an aid for correcting for emission, a regression model is presented that relates ionosphere emission to the integrated electron density (TEC). The goal is to use TEC from sources such as TOPEX, JASON or GPS to obtain estimates of emission over the oceans where the electron density profiles needed to compute emission are not available. In addition, data will also be presented to evaluate the use of the IRI for computing emission over the ocean.

  13. Impact of surface roughness on L-band emissivity of the sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miernecki, M.; Kaleschke, L.; Hendricks, S.; Søbjærg, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    In March 2014 a joint experiment IRO2/SMOSice was carried out in the Barents Sea. R/V Lance equipped with meteorological instruments, electromagnetic sea ice thickness probe and engine monitoring instruments, was performing a series of tests in different ice conditions in order to validate the ice route optimization (IRO) system, advising on his route through pack ice. In parallel cal/val activities for sea ice thickness product obtained from SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission) L-band radiometer were carried out. Apart from helicopter towing the EMbird thickness probe, Polar 5 aircraft was serving the area during the experiment with L-band radiometer EMIRAD2 and Airborne Laser Scanner (ALS) as primary instruments. Sea ice Thickness algorithm using SMOS brightness temperature developed at University of Hamburg, provides daily maps of thin sea ice (up to 0.5-1 m) in polar regions with resolution of 35-50 km. So far the retrieval method was not taking into account surface roughness, assuming that sea ice is a specular surface. Roughness is a stochastic process that can be characterized by standard deviation of surface height σ and by shape of the autocorrelation function R to estimate it's vertical and horizontal scales respectively. Interactions of electromagnetic radiation with the surface of the medium are dependent on R and σ and they scales with respect to the incident wavelength. During SMOSice the radiometer was observing sea ice surface at two incidence angles 0 and 40 degrees and simultaneously the surface elevation was scanned with ALS with ground resolution of ~ 0.25 m. This configuration allowed us to calculate σ and R from power spectral densities of surface elevation profiles and quantify the effect of surface roughness on the emissivity of the sea ice. First results indicate that Gaussian autocorrelation function is suitable for deformed ice, for other ice types exponential function is the best fit.

  14. The Ground-based H-, K-, and L-band Absolute Emission Spectra of HD 209458b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellem, Robert T.; Griffith, Caitlin A.; Deroo, Pieter; Swain, Mark R.; Waldmann, Ingo P.

    2014-11-01

    Here we explore the capabilities of NASA's 3.0 m Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) and SpeX spectrometer and the 5.08 m Hale telescope with the TripleSpec spectrometer with near-infrared H-, K-, and L-band measurements of HD 209458b's secondary eclipse. Our IRTF/SpeX data are the first absolute L-band spectroscopic emission measurements of any exoplanet other than the hot Jupiter HD 189733b. Previous measurements of HD 189733b's L band indicate bright emission hypothesized to result from non-LTE CH4 ν3 fluorescence. We do not detect a similar bright 3.3 μm feature to ~3σ, suggesting that fluorescence does not need to be invoked to explain HD 209458b's L-band measurements. The validity of our observation and reduction techniques, which decrease the flux variance by up to 2.8 orders of magnitude, is reinforced by 1σ agreement with existent Hubble/NICMOS and Spitzer/IRAC1 observations that overlap the H, K, and L bands, suggesting that both IRTF/SpeX and Palomar/TripleSpec can measure an exoplanet's emission with high precision.

  15. The ground-based H-, K-, and L-band absolute emission spectra of HD 209458b

    SciTech Connect

    Zellem, Robert T.; Griffith, Caitlin A.; Deroo, Pieter; Swain, Mark R.; Waldmann, Ingo P.

    2014-11-20

    Here we explore the capabilities of NASA's 3.0 m Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) and SpeX spectrometer and the 5.08 m Hale telescope with the TripleSpec spectrometer with near-infrared H-, K-, and L-band measurements of HD 209458b's secondary eclipse. Our IRTF/SpeX data are the first absolute L-band spectroscopic emission measurements of any exoplanet other than the hot Jupiter HD 189733b. Previous measurements of HD 189733b's L band indicate bright emission hypothesized to result from non-LTE CH{sub 4} ν{sub 3} fluorescence. We do not detect a similar bright 3.3 μm feature to ∼3σ, suggesting that fluorescence does not need to be invoked to explain HD 209458b's L-band measurements. The validity of our observation and reduction techniques, which decrease the flux variance by up to 2.8 orders of magnitude, is reinforced by 1σ agreement with existent Hubble/NICMOS and Spitzer/IRAC1 observations that overlap the H, K, and L bands, suggesting that both IRTF/SpeX and Palomar/TripleSpec can measure an exoplanet's emission with high precision.

  16. The sensitivity of land emissivity estimates from AMSR-E at C and X bands to surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzi, H.; Temimi, M.; Rossow, W. B.; Pearl, C.; Azarderakhsh, M.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2011-06-01

    Microwave observations at low frequencies exhibit more sensitivity to surface and subsurface properties with little interference from the atmosphere. The objective of this study is to develop a global land emissivity product using passive microwave observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) and to investigate its sensitivity to land surface properties. The developed product complements existing land emissivity products from SSM/I and AMSU by adding land emissivity estimates at two lower frequencies, 6.9 and 10.65 GHz (C- and X-band, respectively). Observations at these low frequencies penetrate deeper into the soil layer. Ancillary data used in the analysis, such as surface skin temperature and cloud mask, are obtained from International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). Atmospheric properties are obtained from the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) observations to determine the small upwelling and downwelling atmospheric emissions as well as the atmospheric transmission. A sensitivity test confirms the small effect of the atmosphere but shows that skin temperature accuracy can significantly affect emissivity estimates. Retrieved emissivities at C- and X-bands and their polarization differences exhibit similar patterns of variation with changes in land cover type, soil moisture, and vegetation density as seen at SSM/I-like frequencies (Ka and Ku bands). The emissivity maps from AMSR-E at these higher frequencies agree reasonably well with the existing SSM/I-based product. The inherent but small discrepancy introduced by the difference between SSM/I and AMSR-E frequencies and incidence angles has been examined and found to be small. Large differences between emissivity estimates from ascending and descending overpasses were found at the lower frequencies due to the inconsistency between the thermal IR skin temperatures and passive microwave brightness temperatures which can come from below the

  17. 2D XANES-XEOL mapping: observation of enhanced band gap emission from ZnO nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Guo, Xiaoxuan; Sham, Tsun-Kong

    2014-05-01

    Using 2D XANES-XEOL spectroscopy, it is found that the band gap emission of ZnO nanowire arrays is substantially enhanced i.e. that the intensity ratio between the band gap and defect emissions increases by more than an order of magnitude when the excitation energy is scanned across the O K-edge. Possible mechanisms are discussed.Using 2D XANES-XEOL spectroscopy, it is found that the band gap emission of ZnO nanowire arrays is substantially enhanced i.e. that the intensity ratio between the band gap and defect emissions increases by more than an order of magnitude when the excitation energy is scanned across the O K-edge. Possible mechanisms are discussed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: XEOL spectra with different excitation energies. X-ray attenuation length vs. photon energy. Details of surface defects in ZnO NWs. The second O K-edge and Zn L-edge 2D XANES-XEOL maps. Comparison of the first and second TEY at O K-edge and Zn L-edge scans, respectively. Raman spectra of the ZnO NWs with different IBGE/IDE ratios. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01049c

  18. The origin of yellow band emission and cathodoluminescence of Au-catalyzed wurtzite GaN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R. S.; Jiao, J. F.; Wu, X.

    2016-06-01

    GaN nanowires with large yield are directly synthesized by simply ammoniating the gallium oxide powders in the presence of ammonia gas at 1000 °C, under the assistance of Au nanocatalysts. The microstructure and crystallinity of as-synthesized GaN nanowires are well studied by using high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) and some structural defects such as stacking faults are found in the GaN nano-crystal. Cathodoluminescence measurement shows that a strong near-band-edge (NBE) emission band centered at 384 nm and a broad yellow band in the range of 500-800 nm are observed. Finally, the growth mechanism and possible optical emission process of GaN nanowires are discussed.

  19. The sensitivity of land emissivity estimates from AMSR-E at C and X bands to surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzi, H.; Temimi, M.; Rossow, W. B.; Pearl, C.; Azarderakhsh, M.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2011-11-01

    Microwave observations at low frequencies exhibit more sensitivity to surface and subsurface properties with little interference from the atmosphere. The objective of this study is to develop a global land emissivity product using passive microwave observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) and to investigate its sensitivity to land surface properties. The developed product complements existing land emissivity products from SSM/I and AMSU by adding land emissivity estimates at two lower frequencies, 6.9 and 10.65 GHz (C- and X-band, respectively). Observations at these low frequencies penetrate deeper into the soil layer. Ancillary data used in the analysis, such as surface skin temperature and cloud mask, are obtained from International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). Atmospheric properties are obtained from the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) observations to determine the small upwelling and downwelling atmospheric emissions as well as the atmospheric transmission. A sensitivity test confirms the small effect of the atmosphere but shows that skin temperature accuracy can significantly affect emissivity estimates. Retrieved emissivities at C- and X-bands and their polarization differences exhibit similar patterns of variation with changes in land cover type, soil moisture, and vegetation density as seen at SSM/I-like frequencies (Ka and Ku bands). The emissivity maps from AMSR-E at these higher frequencies agree reasonably well with the existing SSM/I-based product. The inherent discrepancy introduced by the difference between SSM/I and AMSR-E frequencies, incidence angles, and calibration has been assessed. Significantly greater standard deviation of estimated emissivities compared to SSM/I land emissivity product was found over desert regions. Large differences between emissivity estimates from ascending and descending overpasses were found at lower frequencies due to the inconsistency

  20. Measurement of the 238U neutron-capture cross section and gamma-emission spectra from 10 eV to 100 keV using the DANCE detector at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, John L; Couture, A J; Keksis, A L; Vieira, D J; O' Donnell, J M; Jandel, M; Haight, R C; Rundberg, R S; Kawano, T; Chyzh, A; Baramsai, B; Wu, C Y; Mitchell, G E; Becker, J A; Krticka, M

    2010-01-01

    A careful new measurement of the {sup 238}U(n,{gamma}) cross section from 10 eV to 100 keV has been made using the DANCE detector at LANSCE. DANCE is a 4{pi} calorimetric scintillator array consisting of 160 BaF{sub 2} crystals. Measurements were made on a 48 mg/cm{sup 2} depleted uranium target. The cross sections are in general good agreement with previous measurements. The gamma-ray emission spectra, as a function of gamma multiplicity, were also measured and compared to model calculations.

  1. Out-of-band emission suppression techniques based on a generalized OFDM framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Zihao; Fang, Juan; Lu, I.-Tai

    2014-12-01

    Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM)-based cognitive radio (CR) systems suffer from the large out-of-band emission (OOBE) that may interfere with other users. Since most existing OFDM OOBE suppression schemes are derived on the base of an original OFDM system without any other scheme, we first propose a generalized OFDM framework that is capable of describing these schemes no matter whether any one or more of the schemes is applied. Then, according to the place where these schemes are implemented in our framework, they are classified into three groups, namely symbol mapping techniques, precoding techniques, and time-domain techniques. Finally, based on the proposed framework, we propose three new schemes by combining a precoding scheme named singular value decomposition (SVD) precoding with three other schemes from the three groups, namely spectral precoding, N-continuous symbol mapping, and filtering. Numerical results show the power spectral density (PSD), peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR), and bit error rate (BER) performances of the three proposed schemes. Since the individual schemes have complementary characteristics, the three proposed combined schemes are constructed to maintain the merits and avoid the drawbacks of the individual schemes involved. Thus, it is demonstrated that the proposed framework can be employed to develop other new combined OOBE suppression schemes tailoring to some specific practical needs.

  2. Thin-walled boron nitride microtubes exhibiting intense band-edge UV emission at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yang; Bando, Yoshio; Tang, Chengchun; Zhi, Chunyi; Terao, Takeshi; Dierre, Benjamin; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Golberg, Dmitri

    2009-02-25

    Boron nitride (BN) microtubes were synthesized in a vertical induction furnace using Li(2)CO(3) and B reactants. Their structures and morphologies were investigated using x-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The microtubes have diameters of 1-3 microm, lengths of up to hundreds of micrometers, and well-structured ultrathin walls only approximately 50 nm thick. A mechanism combining the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) and template self-sacrificing processes is proposed to explain the formation of these novel one-dimensional microstructures, in which the Li(2)O-B(2)O(3) eutectic reaction plays an important role. Cathodoluminescence studies show that even at room temperature the thin-walled BN microtubes can possess an intense band-edge emission at approximately 216.5 nm, which is distinct compared with other BN nanostructures. The study suggests that the thin-walled BN microtubes should be promising for constructing compact deep UV devices and find potential applications in microreactors and microfluidic and drug delivery systems. PMID:19417466

  3. Unoccupied-electronic-band structure of graphite studied by angle-resolved secondary-electron emission and inverse photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, F.; Takahashi, T.; Ohsawa, H.; Suzuki, S.; Suematsu, H.

    1988-03-01

    Angle-resolved inverse photoemission spectroscopy (ARIPES) and angle-resolved secondary-electron emission spectroscopy (ARSEES) have been performed for graphite to establish experimentally the unoccupied-electronic-band structure as well as to study the difference between the two techniques. Remarkable differences have been found in the experimental two-dimensional band structures obtained by the two methods. The experimental results have been compared with the two different band calculations by R. C. Tatar and S. Rabii [Phys. Rev. B 25, 4126 (1982)] and by N. A. W. Holzwarth, S. G. Louie, and S. Rabii [Phys. Rev. B 26, 5382 (1982)] with special attention to the energy position of the three-dimensional interlayer band. The possible origin of the difference between ARIPES and ARSEES has also been discussed.

  4. C{sub 2} swan band emission intensity as a function of C{sub 2} density.

    SciTech Connect

    Goyette, A. N.; Lawler, J. E.; Anderson, L. W.; Gruen, D. M.; McCauley, T. G.; Zhou, D.; Krauss, A. R.; Univ. of Wisconsin

    1998-05-01

    We report the systematic comparison of the optical emission intensity of the d {sup 3}{Pi} {yields} a {sup 3}{Pi} (0, 0) vibrational band of the C{sub 2} Swan system with the absolute C{sub 2} concentration in Ar/H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} and Ar/H{sub 2}/C{sub 60} microwave plasmas used in the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond. The absolute C{sub 2} concentration is obtained using white-light absorption spectroscopy. Emission intensity correlates linearly with C{sub 2} density for variations of several plasma parameters and across two decades of species concentration. Although optical emission intensity generally is not an accurate quantitative diagnostic for gas phase species concentrations, these results confirm the reliability of the (0,0) Swan band for relative determination of C{sub 2} density with high sensitivity under conditions used for hydrogen-deficient plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of diamond.

  5. Passive L-Band H Polarized Microwave Emission During the Corn Growth Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, A. T.; van der Velde, R.; O'Neill, P. E.; Kim, E. J.; Lang, R. H.; Gish, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    Hourly L-band (1.4 GHz) horizontally (H) polarized brightness temperatures (TB's) measured during five episodes (more than two days of continuous measurements) of the 2002 corn growth cycle are analyzed. These TB measurements were acquired as a part of a combined active/passive microwave field campaign, and were obtained at five incidence and three azimuth angles relative to the row direction. In support of this microwave data collection, intensive ground sampling took place once a week. Moreover, the interpretation of the hourly TB's could also rely on the data obtained using the various automated instruments installed in the same field. In this paper, the soil moisture and temperature measured at fixed time intervals have been employed as input for the tau-omega model to reproduce the hourly TB. Through the calibration of the vegetation and surface roughness parameterizations, the impact of the vegetation morphological changes on the microwave emission and the dependence of the soil surface roughness parameter, hr, on soil moisture are investigated. This analysis demonstrates that the b parameter, appearing in the representation of the canopy opacity, has an angular dependence that varies throughout the growing period and also that the parameter hr increases as the soil dries in a portion of the dry-down cycle. The angular dependence of the b parameter imposes the largest uncertainty on TB simulations near senescence as the response of b to the incidence is also affected by the crop row orientation. On the other hand, the incorporation of a soil moisture dependent hr parameterization was responsible for the largest error reduction of TB simulations in the early growth cycle. A.T. Joseph, R. Van der Velde, P.E. O'Neill, R.H. Lang, and T. Gish, "Soil moisture retrieval during a corn growth cycle using L-band (1.6 GHz) radar observations", IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, vol. 46, DOI:10.1109/TGRS.2008.917214, Aug. 2008. M.C. Dobson, F.T. Ulaby, M

  6. Variability in the high energy gamma ray emission from Cyg X-3 over a two-year period (1983 - 1984) at E 4 x 10(11) eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cawley, M. F.; Fegan, D. J.; Gibbs, K.; Gorham, P. W.; Lamb, R. C.; Liebing, D. F.; Porter, N. A.; Stenger, V. J.; Weekes, T. C.; Williams, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Cygnus X-3 is observed to emit gamma rays with energies in excess of 4 x 10 to the 11th power eV during two out of 9 observational categories over an 18 month time span. The emissions are observed at the 0.6 phase of the characteristic 4.8 hr light curve for this binary system. We estimate a peak flux at phase 0.6 of 5 x 10 to the minus 10th power photons cm-2s-1 at a software threshold of 8 x 10 to the 11th power eV for Oct/Nov 1983. A flux for the June 84 effect cannot be reliably calculated at present due to lack of Monte Carlo simulations for the energy range and spectral region. For the other 7 observational categories the observations are consistent with zero source emission. The light curve would appear to be variable on a time scale of a couple of weeks at these categories. Selection of compact images in accordance with Monte Carlo simulations combined with empirical optimization techniques have led to an enriched gamma ray light curve for the Oct/Nov 1983 data. Selection on the basis of shower orientation, however, has not led to any notable enhancement of the gamma ray content. Individual Cherenko images can be reliably sorted on an event by event basis into either proton-induced or photon-induced showers.

  7. Hydrogenation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as a factor affecting the cosmic 6.2 micron emission band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beegle, L. W.; Wdowiak, T. J.; Harrison, J. G.

    2001-01-01

    While many of the characteristics of the cosmic unidentified infrared (UIR) emission bands observed for interstellar and circumstellar sources within the Milky Way and other galaxies, can be best attributed to vibrational modes of the variants of the molecular family known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), there are open questions that need to be resolved. Among them is the observed strength of the 6.2 micron (1600 cm(-1)) band relative to other strong bands, and the generally low strength for measurements in the laboratory of the 1600 cm(-1) skeletal vibration band of many specific neutral PAH molecules. Also, experiments involving laser excitation of some gas phase neutral PAH species while producing long lifetime state emission in the 3.3 micron (3000 cm(-1)) spectral region, do not result in significant 6.2 micron (1600 cm(-1)) emission. A potentially important variant of the neutral PAH species, namely hydrogenated-PAH (H(N)-PAH) which exhibit intriguing spectral correlation with interstellar and circumstellar infrared emission and the 2175 A extinction feature, may be a factor affecting the strength of 6.2 micron emission. These species are hybrids of aromatic and cycloalkane structures. Laboratory infrared absorption spectroscopy augmented by density function theory (DFT) computations of selected partially hydrogenated-PAH molecules, demonstrates enhanced 6.2 micron (1600 cm(-1)) region skeletal vibration mode strength for these molecules relative to the normal PAH form. This along with other factors such as ionization or the incorporation of nitrogen or oxygen atoms could be a reason for the strength of the cosmic 6.2 micron (1600 cm(-1)) feature.

  8. DETECTION OF K{sub S} -BAND THERMAL EMISSION FROM WASP-3b

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Ming; Wright, Jason; Milburn, Jennifer; Hinkley, Sasha; Barman, Travis; Swain, Mark R.; Monnier, John D.

    2012-03-20

    We report the detection of thermal emission from the hot Jupiter WASP-3b in the K{sub S} band, using a newly developed guiding scheme for the WIRC instrument at the Palomar Hale 200 inch telescope. Our new guiding scheme has improved the telescope guiding precision by a factor of {approx}5-7, significantly reducing the correlated systematics in the measured light curves. This results in the detection of a secondary eclipse with depth of 0.181% {+-} 0.020% (9{sigma})-a significant improvement in WIRC's photometric precision and a demonstration of the capability of Palomar/WIRC to produce high-quality measurements of exoplanetary atmospheres. Our measured eclipse depth cannot be explained by model atmospheres with heat redistribution but favors a pure radiative equilibrium case with no redistribution across the surface of the planet. Our measurement also gives an eclipse phase center of 0.5045 {+-} 0.0020, corresponding to an ecos {omega} of 0.0070 {+-} 0.0032. This result is consistent with a circular orbit, although it also suggests that the planet's orbit might be slightly eccentric. The possible non-zero eccentricity provides insight into the tidal circularization process of the star-planet system, but might also have been caused by a second low-mass planet in the system, as suggested by a previous transit timing variation study. More secondary eclipse observations, especially at multiple wavelengths, are necessary to determine the temperature-pressure profile of the planet's atmosphere and shed light on its orbital eccentricity.

  9. Methane oxidation behind reflected shock waves: Ignition delay times measured by pressure and flame band emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brabbs, T. A.; Robertson, T. F.

    1986-01-01

    Ignition delay data were recorded for three methane-oxygen-argon mixtures (phi = 0.5, 1.0, 2.0) for the temperature range 1500 to 1920 K. Quiet pressure trances enabled us to obtain delay times for the start of the experimental pressure rise. These times were in good agreement with those obtained from the flame band emission at 3700 A. The data correlated well with the oxygen and methane dependence of Lifshitz, but showed a much stronger temperature dependence (phi = 0.5 delta E = 51.9, phi = 1.0 delta = 58.8, phi = 2.0 delta E = 58.7 Kcal). The effect of probe location on the delay time measurement was studied. It appears that the probe located 83 mm from the reflecting surface measured delay times which may not be related to the initial temperature and pressure. It was estimated that for a probe located 7 mm from the reflecting surface, the measured delay time would be about 10 microseconds too short, and it was suggested that delay times less than 100 microsecond should not be used. The ignition period was defined as the time interval between start of the experimental pressure rise and 50 percent of the ignition pressure. This time interval was measured for three gas mixtures and found to be similar (40 to 60 micro sec) for phi = 1.0 and 0.5 but much longer (100 to 120) microsecond for phi = 2.0. It was suggested that the ignition period would be very useful to the kinetic modeler in judging the agreement between experimental and calculated delay times.

  10. L-Band H Polarized Microwave Emission During the Corn Growth Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, A. T.; va der Velde, R.; O'Neill, P. E.; Kim, E.; Lang, R. H.; Gish, T.

    2012-01-01

    Hourly L-band (1.4 GHz) horizontally (H) polarized brightness temperatures (T(sub B))'s measured during five episodes (more than two days of continuous measurements) of the 2002 corn growth cycle are analyzed. These T(sub B)'s measurements were acquired as a part of a combined active/passive microwave field campaign, and were obtained at five incidence and three azimuth angles relative to the row direction. In support of this microwave data collection, intensive ground sampling took place once a week. Moreover, the interpretation of the hourly T(sub B)'s could also rely on the data obtained using the various automated instruments installed in the same field. In this paper, the soil moisture and temperature measured at fixed time intervals have been employed as input for the tau-omega model to reproduce the hourly T(sub B). Through the calibration of the vegetation and surface roughness parameterizations, the impact of the vegetation morphological changes on the microwave emission and the dependence of the soil surface roughness parameter, h(sub r), on soil moisture are investigated. This analysis demonstrates that the b parameter, appearing in the representation of the canopy opacity, has an angular dependence that varies throughout the growing period and also that the parameter hr increases as the soil dries in a portion of the dry-down cycle. The angular dependence of the b parameter imposes the largest uncertainty on T(sub B) simulations near senescence as the response of b to the incidence is also affected by the crop row orientation. On the other hand, the incorporation of a soil moisture dependent h(sub r) parameterization was responsible for the largest error reduction of T(sub B) simulations in the early growth cycle.

  11. Effect of N2 and H2 plasma treatments on band edge emission of ZnO microrods

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Joana; Holz, Tiago; Fath Allah, Rabie; Gonzalez, David; Ben, Teresa; Correia, Maria R.; Monteiro, Teresa; Costa, Florinda M.

    2015-01-01

    ZnO microrods were grown by laser assisted flow deposition technique in order to study their luminescence behaviour in the near band edge spectral region. Transmission electron microscopy analysis put in evidence the high crystallinity degree and microrod’s compositional homogeneity. Photoluminescence revealed a dominant 3.31 eV emission. The correlation between this emission and the presence of surface states was investigated by performing plasma treatments with hydrogen and nitrogen. The significant modifications in photoluminescence spectra after the plasma treatments suggest a connexion between the 3.31 eV luminescence and the surface related electronic levels. PMID:26027718

  12. Estimating net rainfall, evaporation and water storage of a bare soil from sequential L-band emissivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroosnijder, L.; Lascano, R. J.; Newton, R. W.; Vanbavel, C. H. M.

    1984-01-01

    A general method to use a time series of L-band emissivities as an input to a hydrological model for continuously monitoring the net rainfall and evaporation as well as the water content over the entire soil profile is proposed. The model requires a sufficiently accurate and general relation between soil emissivity and surface moisture content. A model which requires the soil hydraulic properties as an additional input, but does not need any weather data was developed. The method is shown to be numerically consistent.

  13. Nightglow emissions of OH/X 2 pi/ - Comparison of theory and measurements in the /9-3/ band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, J. E.; Rusch, D. W.; Liu, S. C.

    1978-01-01

    The visible airglow experiments on the Atmosphere Explorer C and E satellites have viewed the (9-3) band nightglow emission of the excited hydroxyl radical in the lower thermosphere at tropical latitudes. The surface brightnesses observed at similar local times vary by approximately a factor of 2. Comparison of the measurements with time-dependent photochemical calculations shows reasonable agreement and indicates that temporal changes in atmospheric transport processes are the most likely explanation of the nightglow variations.

  14. Emission of direct-gap band in germanium with Ge-GeSn layers on one-dimensional structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhong-Mei; Huang, Wei-Qi; Liu, Shi-Rong; Dong, Tai-Ge; Wang, Gang; Wu, Xue-Ke; Qin, Cao-Jian

    2016-04-01

    In our experiment, it was observed that the emission of direct-gap band in germanium with Ge-GeSn layers on one-dimensional (1D) structure. The results of experiment and calculation demonstrate that the uniaxial tensile strain in the (111) and (110) direction can efficiently transform Ge to a direct bandgap material with the bandgap energy useful for technological application. It is interested that under the tensile strain from Ge-GeSn layers on 1D structure in which the uniaxial strain could be obtained by curved layer (CL) effect, the two bandgaps EΓg and ELg in the (111) direction become nearly equal at 0.83 eV related to the emission of direct-gap band near 1500 nm in the experiments. It is discovered that the red-shift of the peaks from 1500 nm to 1600 nm occurs with change of the uniaxial tensile strain, which proves that the peaks come from the emission of direct-gap band.

  15. Emission of direct-gap band in germanium with Ge-GeSn layers on one-dimensional structure.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhong-Mei; Huang, Wei-Qi; Liu, Shi-Rong; Dong, Tai-Ge; Wang, Gang; Wu, Xue-Ke; Qin, Cao-Jian

    2016-01-01

    In our experiment, it was observed that the emission of direct-gap band in germanium with Ge-GeSn layers on one-dimensional (1D) structure. The results of experiment and calculation demonstrate that the uniaxial tensile strain in the (111) and (110) direction can efficiently transform Ge to a direct bandgap material with the bandgap energy useful for technological application. It is interested that under the tensile strain from Ge-GeSn layers on 1D structure in which the uniaxial strain could be obtained by curved layer (CL) effect, the two bandgaps EΓg and ELg in the (111) direction become nearly equal at 0.83 eV related to the emission of direct-gap band near 1500 nm in the experiments. It is discovered that the red-shift of the peaks from 1500 nm to 1600 nm occurs with change of the uniaxial tensile strain, which proves that the peaks come from the emission of direct-gap band. PMID:27097990

  16. Emission of direct-gap band in germanium with Ge-GeSn layers on one-dimensional structure

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhong-Mei; Huang, Wei-Qi; Liu, Shi-Rong; Dong, Tai-Ge; Wang, Gang; Wu, Xue-Ke; Qin, Cao-Jian

    2016-01-01

    In our experiment, it was observed that the emission of direct-gap band in germanium with Ge-GeSn layers on one-dimensional (1D) structure. The results of experiment and calculation demonstrate that the uniaxial tensile strain in the (111) and (110) direction can efficiently transform Ge to a direct bandgap material with the bandgap energy useful for technological application. It is interested that under the tensile strain from Ge-GeSn layers on 1D structure in which the uniaxial strain could be obtained by curved layer (CL) effect, the two bandgaps EΓg and ELg in the (111) direction become nearly equal at 0.83 eV related to the emission of direct-gap band near 1500 nm in the experiments. It is discovered that the red-shift of the peaks from 1500 nm to 1600 nm occurs with change of the uniaxial tensile strain, which proves that the peaks come from the emission of direct-gap band. PMID:27097990

  17. Research on effect of emission uniformity on X-band relativistic backward oscillator using conformal PIC code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zaigao

    2016-07-01

    Explosive emission cathodes (EECs) are adopted in relativistic backward wave oscillators (RBWOs) to generate intense relativistic electron beam. The emission uniformity of the EEC can render saturation of the power generation unstable and the output mode impure. However, the direct measurement of the plasma parameters on the cathode surface is quite difficult and there are very few related numerical study reports about this issue. In this paper, a self-developed three-dimensional conformal fully electromagnetic particle in cell code is used to study the effect of emission uniformity on the X-band RBWO; the electron explosive emission model and the field emission model are both implemented in the same cathode surface, and the local field enhancement factor is also considered in the field emission model. The RBWO with a random nonuniform EEC is thoroughly studied using this code; the simulation results reveal that when the area ratio of cathode surface for electron explosive emission is 80%, the output power is unstable and the output mode is impure. When the annular EEC does not emit electron in the angle range of 30°, the RBWO can also operate normally.

  18. Wavelength Shifts of the 7.7 Micron Emission Band in Reflection Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Jesse; Temi, Pasquale

    2003-01-01

    Using spatial-spectral data cubes of reflection nebulae obtained by ISOCAM, we have observed a shift in the central wavelength of the 7.7 micron band within several reflection nebulae. The band shifts progressively from approx. 7.8 microns near the edge of the nebulae to approx. 7.6 microns towards the center of the nebulae. The ratio of the 11.3/7.7 micron bands also changes with distance from the central star, first rising from the center towards the edge of the nebula, then falling at the largest distances from the star, consistent with the 11.3/7.7 micron band ratio being controlled by the PAH ionization state. The behavior of the 7.7 micron band center can be explained either by assuming that anions are the origin of the 7.85 micron band and cations the 7.65 micron band, or that the band center wavelength depends on the chemical nature of the PAHs.

  19. Calculated hydroxyl A2 sigma --> X2 pi (0, 0) band emission rate factors applicable to atmospheric spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cageao, R. P.; Ha, Y. L.; Jiang, Y.; Morgan, M. F.; Yung, Y. L.; Sander, S. P.

    1997-01-01

    A calculation of the A2 sigma --> X2 pi (0, 0) band emission rate factors and line center absorption cross sections of OH applicable to its measurement using solar resonant fluorescence in the terrestrial atmosphere is presented in this paper. The most accurate available line parameters have been used. Special consideration has been given to the solar input flux because of its highly structured Fraunhofer spectrum. The calculation for the OH atmospheric emission rate factor in the solar resonant fluorescent case is described in detail with examples and intermediate results. Results of this calculation of OH emission rate factors for individual rotational lines are on average 30% lower than the values obtained in an earlier work.

  20. The circumstellar dust envelopes of red giant stars. I - M giant stars with the 10-micron silicate emission band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashimoto, O.; Nakada, Y.; Onaka, T.; Kamijo, F.; Tanabe, T.

    1990-01-01

    Spherical dust envelope models of red giant stars are constructed by solving the radiative transfer equations of the generalized two-stream Eddington approximation. The IRAS observations of M giant stars which show the 10-micron silicate emission band in IRAS LRS spectra are explained by the models with the dirty silicate grains with K proportional to lambda exp -1.5 for lambda greather than 28 microns. Under the assumption of steady mass flow in the envelope, this model analysis gives the following conclusions: (1) the strength of the silicate emission peak at 10 microns is a good indicator of the mass loss rate of the star, (2) no stars with the 10-microns silicate emission feature are observed in the range of mass loss rate smaller than 7 x 10 to the -8th solar mass/yr, and (3) the characteristic time of the mass loss process of M stars does not exceed a few 10,000 years.

  1. Mass composition of 10{sup 17}- to 10{sup 18}-eV primary cosmic rays according to data on the lateral distribution of radio emission from extensive air showers

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmykov, N. N. Konstantinov, A. A.; Vedeneev, O. V.

    2012-12-15

    Experimental data obtained for the lateral distribution of radio emission from extensive air showers (EAS) at the array of Moscow State University (30-34 MHz) and the LOPES array (40-80 MHz) were comparedwith the results of calculations performed within amicroscopic approach based on aMonte Carlo simulation of EAS (CORSIKA code). The same experimental data were used to reconstruct the distribution of the depth of the EAS maximum at cosmic-ray energies in the range of 1017-1018 eV. The energy dependence of the depth of the EAS maximum was constructed for the case of data from the LOPES array, and the mass composition of cosmic rays was estimated for this case. From the resulting dependences, it follows that the mass composition shows a trend toward becoming lighter in the energy range being considered.

  2. Disorder-induced exciton scattering in the light-harvesting systems of purple bacteria: Influence on the anisotropy of emission and band-->band transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumble, Ranjit; Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    1998-07-01

    A time-domain analysis of the effects of pigment inhomogeneity upon the dynamics of optical excitations within bacterial light-harvesting complexes is presented. We focus upon examining the manifestation of disorder scattering in polarized femtosecond spectroscopy and the degree to which exciton delocalization is revealed in emission and transient absorption anisotropy measurements. The time evolution of states prepared by impulsive excitation of a statically disordered circular aggregate model for LH2 antenna complexes have been calculated exactly for varying degrees of pigment inhomogeneity. For a Gaussian distribution of site energies, the dynamics of coherence-loss (scattering) is explored as a function of the ratio of the standard deviation (σ) of the distribution to the intersite interaction energy (β). It is found that modest degrees of disorder (σ/β˜0.4) are sufficient to cause scattering on a sub-100 fs time scale. Results from model calculations of the pump-probe anisotropy strongly suggest that the initial ultrafast emission depolarization component reported for LH1 and LH2 antenna complexes by several groups represents the decay of an initially delocalized exciton, prepared by coherent excitation of eigenstates that become partially localized due to inhomogeneity. A novel approach to studying exciton coherence is proposed based on measurement of the anisotropy of band→band transient absorption transitions, which exhibit a pronounced sensitivity to exciton delocalization.

  3. High-power, narrow-band, high-repetition-rate, 5.9 eV coherent light source using passive optical cavity for laser-based angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Omachi, J; Yoshioka, K; Kuwata-Gonokami, M

    2012-10-01

    We demonstrate a scheme for efficient generation of a 5.9 eV coherent light source with an average power of 23 mW, 0.34 meV linewidth, and 73 MHz repetition rate from a Ti: sapphire picosecond mode-locked laser with an output power of 1 W. Second-harmonic light is generated in a passive optical cavity by a BiB(3)O(6) crystal with a conversion efficiency as high as 67%. By focusing the second-harmonic light transmitted from the cavity into a β-BaB(2)O(4) crystal, we obtain fourth-harmonic light at 5.9 eV. This light source offers stable operation for at least a week. We discuss the suitability of the laser light source for high-resolution angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy by comparing it with other sources (synchrotron radiation facilities and gas discharge lamp). PMID:23188317

  4. The ALI-ARMS Code for Modeling Atmospheric non-LTE Molecular Band Emissions: Current Status and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutepov, A. A.; Feofilov, A. G.; Manuilova, R. O.; Yankovsky, V. A.; Rezac, L.; Pesnell, W. D.; Goldberg, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    The Accelerated Lambda Iteration (ALI) technique was developed in stellar astrophysics at the beginning of 1990s for solving the non-LTE radiative transfer problem in atomic lines and multiplets in stellar atmospheres. It was later successfully applied to modeling the non-LTE emissions and radiative cooling/heating in the vibrational-rotational bands of molecules in planetary atmospheres. Similar to the standard lambda iterations ALI operates with the matrices of minimal dimension. However, it provides higher convergence rate and stability due to removing from the iterating process the photons trapped in the optically thick line cores. In the current ALI-ARMS (ALI for Atmospheric Radiation and Molecular Spectra) code version additional acceleration of calculations is provided by utilizing the opacity distribution function (ODF) approach and "decoupling". The former allows replacing the band branches by single lines of special shape, whereas the latter treats non-linearity caused by strong near-resonant vibration-vibrational level coupling without additional linearizing the statistical equilibrium equations. Latest code application for the non-LTE diagnostics of the molecular band emissions of Earth's and Martian atmospheres as well as for the non-LTE IR cooling/heating calculations are discussed.

  5. DOMEX-2 Ground-Based Antarctic L-Band Emission Measurements: a Contribution to Smos Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drinkwater, M. R.; Macelloni, G.; Brogioni, M.; Pettinato, S.

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, interest has grown in the remote sensing community for using the Antarctic ice sheet for calibrating and validating data from low-frequency satellite-borne microwave radiometers such as SMOS, Aquarius and SMAP. In particular, the East Antarctic Plateau Dome-C region around the Concordia Station appears to be particularly suited for this purpose. The specific characteristics of this region of interest are its size, structure, spatial homogeneity and thermal stability as well as frequent overpasses of these polar-orbiting satellites. In-situ measurements indicate that the roughness is limited with respect to other Antarctic areas and the temperature of the firn below 10 m remains stable on multiyear timescales. This attribute is particularly interesting for low-frequency microwave radiometers since, due to the low extinction of dry snow, the upper ice sheet layer is almost transparent and the brightness temperature (Tb) variability therefore predicted to be extremely small. At the year-round Italian-French base of Concordia ancillary data such as atmospheric parameters and snow temperature at different depths are routinely acquired as a basis for the analysis and the interpretation of satellite microwave data. Meanwhile, a first pilot experiment, called DOMEX-1 carried out an austral summer Antarctic campaign in November 2004- December 2005 to demonstrate the short-term brightness temperature stability at monthly scale. With the November 2009 launch of the European Space Agency’s SMOS satellite, a corresponding second experiment called DOMEX-2 was initiated in the Austral summer 2008-2009 with the goal to verify the assumption of year-round stability and suitability of the ice sheet as an external calibration reference target. The primary objectives of DOMEX-2 are to provide an independent source of stable reference data for SMOS satellite calibration and in particular: continuous acquisition of a calibrated time series of microwave (L-band) and

  6. Remote monitoring of a multi-component liquid-phase organic synthesis by infrared emission spectroscopy: the recovery of pure component emissivities by band-target entropy minimization.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shuying; Tjahjono, Martin; Rajarathnam, D; Chuanzhao, Li; Lyapkalo, Ilya; Chen, David; Garland, Marc

    2007-10-01

    A liquid-phase cycloaddition reaction near ambient temperature involving dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate (DMAD) and cyclopentadiene (CP) as reactants was measured using a conventional Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer with an emission accessory. Two semi-batch experiments were performed and a total of 55 spectra were collected using a DTGS detector. Band-target entropy minimization (BTEM), a pure component spectral reconstruction technique, was applied to analyze the data set to retrieve the pure component emission spectrum from the reaction system. The estimated emission spectra of the solvent chloroform, DMAD, CP, and product, namely dimethyl bicyclo[2.2.1]-2,5-heptadiene-2,3-dicarboxylate, were all reconstructed with rather good quality. The estimated emission spectra are similar to independent FT-IR spectra of the same cycloaddition reaction. Using a least squares fit, the relative concentration profiles of the species are obtained. Because this appears to be the first time that a liquid-phase reaction has been monitored by infrared emission spectroscopy, further improvements and opportunities for general multi-phase liquid reaction monitoring are discussed. PMID:17958955

  7. Initial Results from a Search for Lunar Radio Emission from Interactions of >= 10(exp 19) eV Neutrinos and Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorham, P. W.; Liewer, K. M.; Naudet, C. J.

    2000-01-01

    Using the NASA Goldstone 70m antenna DSS 14 both singly and in coincidence with the 34 m antenna DSS 13 (21.7 km to the southeast), we have acquired approximately 12 hrs of livetime in a search for predicted pulsed radio emission from extremely-high energy cascades induced by neutrinos or cosmic rays in the lunar regolith. In about 4 hrs of single antenna observations, we reduced our sensitivity to impulsive terrestrial interference to a negligible level by use of a veto afforded by the unique capability of DSS 14. In the 8 hrs of dual-antenna observations, terrestrial interference is eliminated as a background. In both observing modes the thermal noise floor limits the sensitivity. We detected no events above statistical background. We report here initial limits based on these data which begin to constrain several predictions of the flux of EHE neutrinos.

  8. Narrow Red Emission Band Fluoride Phosphor KNaSiF6:Mn(4+) for Warm White Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ye; Fang, Mu-Huai; Grinberg, Marek; Mahlik, Sebastian; Lesniewski, Tadeusz; Brik, M G; Luo, Guan-Yu; Lin, Jauyn Grace; Liu, Ru-Shi

    2016-05-11

    Red phosphors AMF6:Mn(4+) (A = Na, K, Cs, Ba, Rb; M = Si, Ti, Ge) have been widely studied due to the narrow red emission bands around 630 nm. The different emission of the zero-phonon line (ZPL) may affect the color rendering index of white light-emitting diodes (WLED). The primary reason behind the emergence and intensity of ZPL, taking KNaSiF6:Mn(4+) as an example, was investigated here. The effects of pressure on crystal structure and luminescence were determined experimentally and theoretically. The increase of band gap, red shift of emission spectrum and blue shift of excitation spectrum were observed with higher applied pressure. The angles of ∠FMnF and ∠FMF(M = Si, Ti, Ge) were found clearly distorted from 180° in MF6(2-) octahedron with strong ZPL intensity. The larger distorted SiF6(2-) octahedron, the stronger ZPL intensity. This research provides a new perspective to address the ZPL intensity problem of the hexafluorosilicate phosphors caused by crystal distortion and pressure-dependence of the luminescence. The efficacy of the device featuring from Y3Al5O12:Ce(3+) (YAG) and KNaSiF6:Mn(4+) phosphor was 118 lm/W with the color temperature of 3455 K. These results reveal that KNaSiF6:Mn(4+) presents good luminescent properties and could be a potential candidate material for application in back-lighting systems. PMID:27104357

  9. THE 217.5 nm BAND, INFRARED ABSORPTION, AND INFRARED EMISSION FEATURES IN HYDROGENATED AMORPHOUS CARBON NANOPARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Duley, W. W.; Hu, Anming E-mail: a2hu@uwaterloo.ca

    2012-12-20

    We report on the preparation of hydrogenated amorphous carbon nanoparticles whose spectral characteristics include an absorption band at 217.5 nm with the profile and characteristics of the interstellar 217.5 nm feature. Vibrational spectra of these particles also contain the features commonly observed in absorption and emission from dust in the diffuse interstellar medium. These materials are produced under ''slow'' deposition conditions by minimizing the flux of incident carbon atoms and by reducing surface mobility. The initial chemistry leads to the formation of carbon chains, together with a limited range of small aromatic ring molecules, and eventually results in carbon nanoparticles having an sp {sup 2}/sp {sup 3} ratio Almost-Equal-To 0.4. Spectroscopic analysis of particle composition indicates that naphthalene and naphthalene derivatives are important constituents of this material. We suggest that carbon nanoparticles with similar composition are responsible for the appearance of the interstellar 217.5 nm band and outline how these particles can form in situ under diffuse cloud conditions by deposition of carbon on the surface of silicate grains. Spectral data from carbon nanoparticles formed under these conditions accurately reproduce IR emission spectra from a number of Galactic sources. We provide the first detailed fits to observational spectra of Type A and B emission sources based entirely on measured spectra of a carbonaceous material that can be produced in the laboratory.

  10. Production of N2 Vegard-Kaplan and other triplet band emissions in the dayglow of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Jain, Sonal Kumar

    2012-04-01

    Recently the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has revealed the presence of N2 Vegard-Kaplan (VK) band A3Σu+-X1Σg+ emissions in Titan's dayglow limb observation. We present model calculations for the production of various N2 triplet states (viz., A3Σu+,B3Πg,C3Πu,E3Σu,W3Δu, and B3Σu ) in the upper atmosphere of Titan. The Analytical Yield Spectra technique is used to calculate steady state photoelectron fluxes in Titan's atmosphere, which are in agreement with those observed by the Cassini's CAPS instrument. Considering direct electron impact excitation, inter-state cascading, and quenching effects, the population of different levels of N2 triplet states are calculated under statistical equilibrium. Densities of all vibrational levels of each triplet state and volume production rates for various triplet states are calculated in the model. Vertically integrated overhead intensities for the same date and lighting conditions as reported by the UVIS observations for N2 Vegard-Kaplan A3Σu+-X1Σg+, First Positive B3Πg-A3Σu+, Second Positive (C3Πu - B3Πg), Wu-Benesch (W3Δu - B3Πg), and Reverse First Positive bands of N2 are found to be 132, 114, 19, 22, and 22 R, respectively. Overhead intensities are calculated for each vibrational transition of all the triplet band emissions of N2, which span a wider spectrum of wavelengths from ultraviolet to infrared. The calculated limb intensities of total and prominent transitions of VK band are presented. The model limb intensity of VK emission within the 150-190 nm wavelength region is in good agreement with the Cassini UVIS observed limb profile. An assessment of the impact of solar EUV flux on the N2 triplet band emission intensity has been made by using three different solar flux models, viz., Solar EUV Experiment (SEE), SOLAR2000 (S2K) model of Tobiska (Tobiska, W.K. [2004]. Adv. Space Res. 34, 1736-1746), and HEUVAC model of Richards et al. (Richards, P.G., Woods, T.N., Peterson, W.K. [2006]. Adv

  11. Relations between broad-band linear polarization and Ca II H and K emission in late-type dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huovelin, Juhani; Saar, Steven H.; Tuominen, Ilkka

    1988-01-01

    Broadband UBV linear polarization data acquired for a sample of late-type dwarfs are compared with contemporaneous measurements of Ca II H and K line core emission. A weighted average of the largest values of the polarization degree is shown to be the best parameter for chromospheric activity diagnosis. The average maximum polarization in the UV is found to increase from late-F to late-G stars. It is noted that polarization in the U band is considerably more sensitive to activity variations than that in the B or V bands. The results indicate that stellar magnetic fields and the resulting saturation in the Zeeman-sensitive absorption lines are the most probably source of linear polarization in late-type main-sequence stars.

  12. Band-tunable color cone lasing emission based on a dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystal film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chia-Rong; Lin, S.-H.; Yeh, H.-C.; Ji, T.-D.; Liu, J.-H.; Yang, P.-C.; Mo, T.-S.; Huang, S.-Y.; Kuo, C.-T.; Lo, K.-Y.; Fuh, Andy Y.

    2010-02-01

    This investigation reports for the first time a novel phenomenon, called band-tunable color cone lasing emission (CCLE), based on a single-pitched one-dimensional photonic crystal-like dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystal (DDCLC) cell. The lasing wavelength in the CCLE pattern is distributed continuously at 676.7-595.6 nm as the oblique angle increases continuously from 0° to 50° relative to the helical axis. The variation of the lasing wavelength in the CCLE with the oblique angle is consistent with that of the wavelength at the long-wavelength edge (LWE) of the CLC reflection band (CLCRB) with the oblique angle. Simulation results obtained utilizing Berreman's 4×4 matrix method show that, at each oblique angle, the associated group velocity and density of photonic state (DOS) are near zero and large at the shortwavelength edge (SWE) and LWE of the CLCRB, respectively, and are in good agreement with experimental results. The particularly strong lasing ring emission at a cone angle of ~35° can be explained to be likely due to a special effect that, under the condition of overlap between the LWE of the CLCRB measured at 35° and the SWE of the CLCRB measured at 0°, the LWE and SWE fluorescence propagating along 35° and 0°, respectively, may indirectly enhance each other due to individual enhanced rate of spontaneous emission. Furthermore, the lasing band of the CCLE can be tuned from long-wavelength (deep red~orange) to short-wavelength (orange~green) regions by changing the concentration of the chiral or by the photo-irradiation on a DDCLC cell with a photoisoemerizable chiral dopant.

  13. Enhanced tunable narrow-band THz emission from laser-modulated electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D.; Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2009-06-19

    We propose and analyze a scheme to generate enhanced narrow-band terahertz (THz) radiation through down-conversion of the frequency of optical lasers using laser-modulated electron beams. In the scheme the electron beam is first energy modulated by two lasers with wave numbers k{sub 1} and k2, respectively. After passing through a dispersion section, the energy modulation is converted to density modulation. Due to the nonlinear conversion process, the beam will have density modulation at wave number k = nk{sub 1} + mk{sub 2}, where n and m are positive or negative integers. By properly choosing the parameters for the lasers and dispersion section, one can generate density modulation at THz frequency in the beam using optical lasers. This density-modulated beam can be used to generate powerful narrow-band THz radiation. Since the THz radiation is in tight synchronization with the lasers, it should provide a high temporal resolution for the optical-pump THz-probe experiments. The central frequency of the THz radiation can be easily tuned by varying the wavelength of the two lasers and the energy chirp of the electron beam. The proposed scheme is in principle able to generate intense narrow-band THz radiation covering the whole THz range and offers a promising way towards the tunable intense narrow-band THz sources.

  14. Parametric exponentially correlated surface emission model for L-band passive microwave soil moisture retrieval

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface soil moisture is an important parameter in hydrology and climate investigations. Current and future satellite missions with L-band passive microwave radiometers can provide valuable information for monitoring the global soil moisture. A factor that can play a significant role in the modeling...

  15. Detection of CO Cameron band emission in comet P/Hartley 2 (1991 XV) with the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, H. A.; Feldman, P. D.; McPhate, J. B.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Arpigny, C.; Smith, T. E.

    1994-02-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) spectra of comet P/Hartley 2 (1991 XV) taken with the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 1991 September reveal several bands of the Cameron system of CO (a 3 Pi-X 1 Sigma). These band are most likely due to 'prompt' emission from CO2 and, thus, provide a direct tracer of the CO2 abundance in the nucleus. Photodissociative excitation of CO2 is probably the largest contributor to the Cameron band emission, but significant contributions from electron impact excitation of CO, electron impact dissociation of CO2, and dissociative recombination of CO2(+), are also possible. Using our estimate that photodissociative excitation is responsible for approximately 60% of the total excitation of the Cameron system, we derive QCO2 approximately 2.6 x 1027 molecules/s, which implies CO2/H20 approximately 4%. If all of the Cameron band emission is due to photodissociative excitation, then CO2/H2O = 7 +/- 2%. For the largest possible contributions from the other excitation mechanisms considered, the CO2 abundance could be as a small as aproximately 2-3%. We did not detect CO Fourth Positive Group emission in our data and derive an upper limit of CO/H2O less than or equal to 1% (3 sigma) for CO coming directly from the nucleus. Comparison of the relative CO2 and CO abundances in P/Hartley 2 to those in P/Halley (CO2/H2O approximately 3%-4%, CO/H20 approximately 4% for the nucleus source) indicates that selective devolatilization of the nucleus may have occurred for P/Hartley 2. A relatively large CO2/CO ratio (i.e., approximately greater than 1) seems to be a common property of cometary nuclei. Since gas phase chemistry, in either the solar nebula or the interstellar medium (ISM), appears incapable of producing large relative CO2 abundances, the CO2 in cometary nuclei is probably produced either by UV and/or cosmic ray irradiation of ISM grains prior to the formation of the Solar System, or by condensation fractionation in the

  16. Detection of CO Cameron band emission in comet P/Hartley 2 (1991 XV) with the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, H. A.; Feldman, P. D.; Mcphate, J. B.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Arpigny, C.; Smith, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) spectra of comet P/Hartley 2 (1991 XV) taken with the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 1991 September reveal several bands of the Cameron system of CO (a 3 Pi-X 1 Sigma). These band are most likely due to 'prompt' emission from CO2 and, thus, provide a direct tracer of the CO2 abundance in the nucleus. Photodissociative excitation of CO2 is probably the largest contributor to the Cameron band emission, but significant contributions from electron impact excitation of CO, electron impact dissociation of CO2, and dissociative recombination of CO2(+), are also possible. Using our estimate that photodissociative excitation is responsible for approximately 60% of the total excitation of the Cameron system, we derive Q(sub CO2) approximately 2.6 x 10(exp 27) molecules/s, which implies CO2/H20 approximately 4%. If all of the Cameron band emission is due to photodissociative excitation, then CO2/H2O = 7 +/- 2%. For the largest possible contributions from the other excitation mechanisms considered, the CO2 abundance could be as a small as aproximately 2-3%. We did not detect CO Fourth Positive Group emission in our data and derive an upper limit of CO/H2O less than or equal to 1% (3 sigma) for CO coming directly from the nucleus. Comparison of the relative CO2 and CO abundances in P/Hartley 2 to those in P/Halley (CO2/H2O approximately 3%-4%, CO/H20 approximately 4% for the nucleus source) indicates that selective devolatilization of the nucleus may have occurred for P/Hartley 2. A relatively large CO2/CO ratio (i.e., approximately greater than 1) seems to be a common property of cometary nuclei. Since gas phase chemistry, in either the solar nebula or the interstellar medium (ISM), appears incapable of producing large relative CO2 abundances, the CO2 in cometary nuclei is probably produced either by UV and/or cosmic ray irradiation of ISM grains prior to the formation of the Solar System, or by condensation

  17. Ultrafast carrier dynamics in band edge and broad deep defect emission ZnSe nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othonos, Andreas; Lioudakis, Emmanouil; Philipose, U.; Ruda, Harry E.

    2007-12-01

    Ultrafast carrier dynamics of ZnSe nanowires grown under different growth conditions have been studied. Transient absorption measurements reveal the dependence of the competing effects of state filling and photoinduced absorption on the probed energy states. The relaxation of the photogenerated carriers occupying defect states in the stoichiometric and Se-rich samples are single exponentials with time constants of 3-4ps. State filling is the main contribution for probe energies below 1.85eV in the Zn-rich grown sample. This ultrafast carrier dynamics study provides an important insight into the role that intrinsic point defects play in the observed photoluminescence from ZnSe nanowires.

  18. Auroral recombination of N and O - A possible source for emission in the gamma and delta bands of NO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wofsy, S. C.; Mcelroy, M. B.

    1977-01-01

    Radiative recombination of N and O provides a significant source for auroral emission in the gamma and delta bands of NO with selective population of vibrational levels in the A 2 Sigma(+) and C 2 Pi states. This mechanism may account for emissions detected near 2150 A. Models are derived for the auroral ionosphere and include estimates for the concentrations of N and NO. The concentration of NO is estimated to have a value of about 100 million per cu cm near 140 km in an IBC III aurora. The corresponding density for N is about 50 million per cu cm, and the concentration ratio NO(+)/O2(+) has a value of about 5.5.

  19. Soil moisture, dielectric permittivity and emissivity of soil: effective depth of emission measured by the L-band radiometer ELBARA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usowicz, Boguslaw; Lukowski, Mateusz; Marczewski, Wojciech; Usowicz, Jerzy; Lipiec, Jerzy; Rojek, Edyta; Slominska, Ewa; Slominski, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Due to the large variation of soil moisture in space and in time, obtaining soil water balance with an aid of data acquired from the surface is still a challenge. Microwave remote sensing is widely used to determine the water content in soil. It is based on the fact that the dielectric constant of the soil is strongly dependent on its water content. This method provides the data in both local and global scales. Very important issue that is still not solved, is the soil depth at which radiometer "sees" the incoming radiation and how this "depth of view" depends on water content and physical properties of soil. The microwave emission comes from its entire profile, but much of this energy is absorbed by the upper layers of soil. As a result, the contribution of each layer to radiation visible for radiometer decreases with depth. The thickness of the surface layer, which significantly contributes to the energy measured by the radiometer is defined as the "penetration depth". In order to improve the physical base of the methodology of soil moisture measurements using microwave remote sensing and to determine the effective emission depth seen by the radiometer, a new algorithm was developed. This algorithm determines the reflectance coefficient from Fresnel equations, and, what is new, the complex dielectric constant of the soil, calculated from the Usowicz's statistical-physical model (S-PM) of dielectric permittivity and conductivity of soil. The model is expressed in terms of electrical resistance and capacity. The unit volume of soil in the model consists of solid, water and air, and is treated as a system made up of spheres, filling volume by overlapping layers. It was assumed that connections between layers and spheres in the layer are represented by serial and parallel connections of "resistors" and "capacitors". The emissivity of the soil surface is calculated from the ratio between the brightness temperature measured by the ELBARA radiometer (GAMMA Remote

  20. High Resolution Emission Spectroscopy of the Vibration-Rotation Bands of Hbo and Hbs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Ram, R. S.; Hargreaves, R. J.; Bernath, P. F.; Li, H.

    2012-06-01

    The vibration-rotation spectra of HBO and HBS have been investigated at high resolution using a Fourier transform spectrometer. The HBO molecules were produced in a high temperature furnace from the reaction of H2O vapor with boron by heating a mixture of crystalline boron and boron oxide (B2O3) at a temperature ˜1350°C. The spectra were recorded in the 1100-2200 cm-1 and 1700-4000 cm-1 wavenumber regions covering the ν3 and ν1 fundamentals, respectively. In total 24 vibrational bands involving 30 vibrational levels of H11BO and 12 bands involving 18 levels of H10BO have been rotationally analyzed. After combining the existing microwave and infrared measurements, the absolute term values have been determined for a number of vibrationally-excited states of H11BO and H10BO. The HBS molecules were formed by the reaction of CS2 and water vapor with crystalline boron at a temperature ˜1300°C. The spectra were recorded in the 850-1500 cm-1 and 1750-4000 cm-1 wavenumber regions covering the ν3 and ν1 frequency regions. In total 29 vibrational bands involving 33 vibrationally-excited levels of H11BS and 9 bands involving 12 vibrational levels of H10BS have been analyzed. The fitted spectroscopic parameters agree very well with the results of our {ab initio} calculations. {L}-resonance interactions observed between the 0200 (Σ) and 0220 (Δ) levels of HBO and HBS were analyzed using a 2×2 matrix to yield deperturbed constants.

  1. No detection of L-band radio emission from SN 2007gr by GMRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Alak K.

    2007-08-01

    Sayan Chakraborti (Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, (TIFR)), Poonam Chandra (Univ Virginia and National Radio Astronomical Observatory, Charlottesville), Nirupam Roy (National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (NCRA-TIFR), Pune, and Alak Ray (TIFR) report on the Target of Opportunity observation of SN 2007gr on 2007 Aug 24 by the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) in the L-band between UT 0200 to 0400.

  2. Band edge emission enhancement by quadrupole surface plasmon-exciton coupling using direct-contact Ag/ZnO nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Zang, Yashu; He, Xu; Li, Jing; Yin, Jun; Li, Kongyi; Yue, Chuang; Wu, Zhiming; Wu, Suntao; Kang, Junyong

    2013-01-21

    Periodic Ag nanoball (NB) arrays on ZnO hollow nanosphere (HNS) supporting structures were fabricated in a large area by a laser irradiation method. The optimized laser power and spherical supporting structure of ZnO with a certain size and separation were employed to aggregate a sputtering-deposited Ag nano-film into an ordered, large-area, and two dimensional Ag NB array. A significant band edge (BE) emission enhancement of ZnO HNSs was achieved on this Ag NB/ZnO HNS hybrid structure and the mechanism was revealed by further experimental and theoretical analyses. With successfully fabricating the direct-contact structure of a Ag NB on the top of each ZnO HNS, the highly localized quadrupole mode surface plasmon resonance (SPR), realized on the metal NBs in the ultraviolet region, can effectively improve the BE emission of ZnO through strong coupling with the excitons of ZnO. Compared with the dipole mode SPR, the quadrupole mode SPR is insensitive to the metal nanoparticle's size and has a resonance frequency in the BE region of the wide band gap materials, hence, it can be potentially applied in related optoelectronic devices. PMID:23196786

  3. HITEMP derived spectral database for the prediction of jet engine exhaust infrared emission using a statistical band model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindermeir, E.; Beier, K.

    2012-08-01

    The spectroscopic database HITEMP 2010 is used to upgrade the parameters of the statistical molecular band model which is part of the infrared signature prediction code NIRATAM (NATO InfraRed Air TArget Model). This band model was recommended by NASA and is applied in several codes that determine the infrared emission of combustion gases. The upgrade regards spectral absorption coefficients and line densities of the gases H2O, CO2, and CO in the spectral region 400-5000 cm-1 (2-25μm) with a spectral resolution of 5 cm-1. The temperature range 100-3000 K is covered. Two methods to update the database are presented: the usually applied method as provided in the literature and an alternative, more laborious procedure that employs least squares fitting. The achieved improvements resulting from both methods are demonstrated by comparisons of radiance spectra obtained from the band model to line-by-line results. The performance in a realistic scenario is investigated on the basis of measured and predicted spectra of a jet aircraft plume in afterburner mode.

  4. Spectral modification of the laser emission of a terahertz quantum cascade laser induced by broad-band double pulse injection seeding

    SciTech Connect

    Markmann, Sergej Nong, Hanond Hekmat, Negar; Jukam, Nathan; Pal, Shovon; Scholz, Sven; Kukharchyk, Nadezhda; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D.; Dhillon, Sukhdeep; Tignon, Jérôme; Marcadet, Xavier; Bock, Claudia; Kunze, Ulrich

    2015-09-14

    We demonstrate by injection seeding that the spectral emission of a terahertz (THz) quantum cascade laser (QCL) can be modified with broad-band THz pulses whose bandwidths are greater than the QCL bandwidth. Two broad-band THz pulses delayed in time imprint a modulation on the single THz pulse spectrum. The resulting spectrum is used to injection seed the THz QCL. By varying the time delay between the THz pulses, the amplitude distribution of the QCL longitudinal modes is modified. By applying this approach, the QCL emission is reversibly switched from multi-mode to single mode emission.

  5. MAPPING H-BAND SCATTERED LIGHT EMISSION IN THE MYSTERIOUS SR21 TRANSITIONAL DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Follette, Katherine B.; Close, Laird; Tamura, Motohide; Hashimoto, Jun; Kwon, Jungmi; Kandori, Ryo; Whitney, Barbara; Grady, Carol; Andrews, Sean M.; Wisniewski, John; Brandt, Timothy D.; Dong, Ruobing; Mayama, Satoshi; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Feldt, Markus; Carson, Joseph; Currie, Thayne; Egner, Sebastian E.; Goto, Miwa; and others

    2013-04-10

    We present the first near infrared (NIR) spatially resolved images of the circumstellar transitional disk around SR21. These images were obtained with the Subaru HiCIAO camera, adaptive optics, and the polarized differential imaging technique. We resolve the disk in scattered light at H-band for stellocentric 0.''1 {<=} r {<=} 0.''6 (12 {approx}< r {approx}< 75 AU). We compare our results with previously published spatially resolved 880 {mu}m continuum Submillimeter Array images that show an inner r {approx}< 36 AU cavity in SR21. Radiative transfer models reveal that the large disk depletion factor invoked to explain SR21's sub-mm cavity cannot be 'universal' for all grain sizes. Even significantly more moderate depletions ({delta} = 0.1, 0.01 relative to an undepleted disk) than those that reproduce the sub-mm cavity ({delta} {approx} 10{sup -6}) are inconsistent with our H-band images when they are assumed to carry over to small grains, suggesting that surface grains scattering in the NIR either survive or are generated by whatever mechanism is clearing the disk midplane. In fact, the radial polarized intensity profile of our H-band observations is smooth and steeply inwardly-increasing (r {sup -3}), with no evidence of a break at the 36 AU sub-mm cavity wall. We hypothesize that this profile is dominated by an optically thin disk envelope or atmosphere component. We also discuss the compatibility of our data with the previously postulated existence of a sub-stellar companion to SR21 at r {approx} 10-20 AU, and find that we can neither exclude nor verify this scenario. This study demonstrates the power of multiwavelength imaging of transitional disks to inform modeling efforts, including the debate over precisely what physical mechanism is responsible for clearing these disks of their large midplane grains.

  6. Mapping H-band Scattered Light Emission in the Mysterious SR21Transitional Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Follette, Katherine B.; Motohide, Tamura; Hashimoto, Jun; Whitney, Barbara; Grady, Carol; Close, Laird; Andrews, Sean M.; Kwon, Jungmi; Wisniewski, John; Brandt, Timothy D.; Mayama, Satoshi; Kandori, Ryo; Dong, Ruobing; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Carson, Joseph; Currie, Thayne; Egner, Sebastian E.; Feldt, Markus; Goto, Miwa; Guyon, Olivier.; Hayano, Yutaka; McElwain, Michael W.; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko

    2013-01-01

    We present the first near infrared (NIR) spatially resolved images of the circumstellar transitional disk around SR21. These images were obtained with the Subaru HiCIAO camera, adaptive optics, and the polarized differential imaging technique. We resolve the disk in scattered light at H-band for stellocentric 0.1 < or approx. r < or approx. 0.6 (12 < or approx. r < or approx. 75AU). We compare our results with previously published spatially resolved 880 micron continuum Submillimeter Array images that show an inner r < or approx. 36AU cavity in SR21. Radiative transfer models reveal that the large disk depletion factor invoked to explain SR21's sub-mm cavity cannot be "universal" for all grain sizes. Even significantly more moderate depletions (delta = 0.1, 0.01 relative to an undepleted disk) than those that reproduce the sub-mm cavity (delta approx. 10(exp -6) are inconsistent with our H-band images when they are assumed to carry over to small grains, suggesting that surface grains scattering in the NIR either survive or are generated by whatever mechanism is clearing the disk midplane. In fact, the radial polarized intensity profile of our H-band observations is smooth and steeply inwardly-increasing (r(sup -3), with no evidence of a break at the 36AU sub-mm cavity wall. We hypothesize that this profile is dominated by an optically thin disk envelope or atmosphere component.We also discuss the compatibility of our data with the previously postulated existence of a sub-stellar companion to SR21 at r approx. 10-20AU, and find that we can neither exclude nor verify this scenario. This study demonstrates the power of multiwavelength imaging of transitional disks to inform modeling efforts, including the debate over precisely what physical mechanism is responsible for clearing these disks of their large midplane grains.

  7. Relative spectral response corrected calibration inter-comparison of S-NPP VIIRS and Aqua MODIS thermal emissive bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremova, Boryana; Wu, Aisheng; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2014-09-01

    The S-NPP Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument is built with strong heritage from EOS MODIS, and has very similar thermal emissive bands (TEB) calibration algorithm and on-board calibrating source - a V-grooved blackbody. The calibration of the two instruments can be assessed by comparing the brightness temperatures retrieved from VIIRS and Aqua MODIS simultaneous nadir observations (SNO) from their spectrally matched TEB. However, even though the VIIRS and MODIS bands are similar there are still relative spectral response (RSR) differences and thus some differences in the retrieved brightness temperatures are expected. The differences depend on both the type and the temperature of the observed scene, and contribute to the bias and the scatter of the comparison. In this paper we use S-NPP Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) data taken simultaneously with the VIIRS data to derive a correction for the slightly different spectral coverage of VIIRS and MODIS TEB bands. An attempt to correct for RSR differences is also made using MODTRAN models, computed with physical parameters appropriate for each scene, and compared to the value derived from actual CrIS spectra. After applying the CrIS-based correction for RSR differences we see an excellent agreement between the VIIRS and Aqua MODIS measurements in the studied band pairs M13-B23, M15-B31, and M16- B32. The agreement is better than the VIIRS uncertainty at cold scenes, and improves with increasing scene temperature up to about 290K.

  8. Ocean Surface Emissivity at L-band (1.4 GHz): The Dependence on Salinity and Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Lang, R.; Wentz, F.; Messiner, T.

    2012-01-01

    A characterization of the emissivity of sea water at L-band is important for the remote sensing of sea surface salinity. Measurements of salinity are currently being made in the radio astronomy band at 1.413 GHz by ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission and NASA's Aquarius instrument aboard the Aquarius/SAC-D observatory. The goal of both missions is accuracy on the order of 0.1 psu. This requires accurate knowledge of the dielectric constant of sea water as a function of salinity and temperature and also the effect of waves (roughness). The former determines the emissivity of an ideal (i.e. flat) surface and the later is the major source of error from predictions based on a flat surface. These two aspects of the problem of characterizing the emissivity are being addressed in the context of the Aquarius mission. First, laboratory measurements are being made of the dielectric constant of sea water. This is being done at the George Washington University using a resonant cavity. In this technique, sea water of known salinity and temperature is fed into the cavity along its axis through a narrow tube. The sea water changes the resonant frequency and Q of the cavity which, if the sample is small enough, can be related to the dielectric constant of the sample. An extensive set of measurements have been conducted at 1.413 GHz to develop a model for the real and imaginary part of the dielectric constant as a function of salinity and temperature. The results are compared to the predictions of models based on parameterization of the Debye resonance of the water molecule. The models and measurements are close; however, the differences are significant for remote sensing of salinity. This is especially true at low temperatures where the sensitivity to salinity is lowest.

  9. Origin of the visible emission of black silicon microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbri, Filippo; Lin, Yu-Ting; Bertoni, Giovanni; Rossi, Francesca; Smith, Matthew J.; Gradečak, Silvija; Mazur, Eric; Salviati, Giancarlo

    2015-07-01

    Silicon, the mainstay semiconductor in microelectronics, is considered unsuitable for optoelectronic applications due to its indirect electronic band gap that limits its efficiency as light emitter. Here, we univocally determine at the nanoscale the origin of visible emission in microstructured black silicon by cathodoluminescence spectroscopy and imaging. We demonstrate the formation of amorphous silicon oxide microstructures with a white emission. The white emission is composed by four features peaking at 1.98 eV, 2.24 eV, 2.77 eV, and 3.05 eV. The origin of such emissions is related to SiOx intrinsic point defects and to the sulfur doping due to the laser processing. Similar results go in the direction of developing optoelectronic devices suitable for silicon-based circuitry.

  10. The electrosphere of macroscopc ""nuclei"": diffuse emissions in the MeV band from dark antimatter

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, Michael Mcneil; Lawson, Kyle; Zhitnitsky, Ariel R

    2009-01-01

    Using a Thomas-Fermi model, we calculate the structure of the electrosphere of the quark antimatter nuggets postulated to comprise much of the dark matter. This provides a single self-consistent density profile from ultra-rel ativistic densities to the non-relativistic Boltzmann regime. We use this to present a microscopically justified calculation of several properties of the nuggets, including their net charge, and the ratio of MeV to 511 keV emissions from electron annihilation. We find that the calculated parameters agree with previous phenomenological estimates based on the observational supposition that the nuggets are a source of several unexplained diffuse emissions from the galaxy. This provides another nontrivial verification of the dark matter proposal. The structure of the electrosphere is quite general and will also be valid at the surface of strange-quark stars, should they exist.

  11. Analysis of GeV-band γ-ray emission from supernova remnant RX J1713.7-3946

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federici, S.; Pohl, M.; Telezhinsky, I.; Wilhelm, A.; Dwarkadas, V. V.

    2015-05-01

    Context. RX J1713.7-3946 is the brightest shell-type supernova remnant (SNR) of the TeV γ-ray sky. Earlier Fermi-LAT results on low energy γ-ray emission suggested that, despite large uncertainties in the background determination, the spectrum is inconsistent with a hadronic origin. Aims: We update the GeV-band spectra using improved estimates for the diffuse Galactic γ-ray emission and more than double the volume of data. We further investigate the viability of hadronic emission models for RX J1713.7-3946. Methods: We produced a high-resolution map of the diffuse Galactic γ-ray background corrected for the HI self-absorption and used it in the analysis of more than five years worth of Fermi-LAT data. We used hydrodynamic scaling relations and a kinetic transport equation to calculate the acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays in SNR. We then determined spectra of hadronic γ-ray emission from RX J1713.7-3946, separately for the SNR interior and the cosmic-ray precursor region of the forward shock, and computed flux variations that would allow us to test the model with observations. Results: We find that RX J1713.7-3946 is now detected by Fermi-LAT with very high statistical significance, and the source morphology is best described by that seen in the TeV band. The measured spectrum of RX J1713.7-3946 is hard with index γ = 1.53 ± 0.07, and the integral flux above 500 MeV is F = (5.5 ± 1.1) × 10-9 photons cm-2 s-1. We demonstrate that scenarios based on hadronic emission from the cosmic-ray precursor region are acceptable for RX J1713.7-3946, and we predict a secular flux increase at a few hundred GeV at the level of around 15% over ten years, which may be detectable with the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory.

  12. Extreme Emission Line Galaxies in CANDELS: Broad-Band Selected, Star-Bursting Dwarf Galaxies at Z greater than 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDerWel, A.; Straughn, A. N.; Rix, H.-W.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Weiner, B. J.; Wuyts, S.; Bell, E. F.; Faber, S. M.; Trump, J. R.; Koo, D.; Ferguson, H. C.; Scarlata, C.; Hathi, N. P.; Dunlop, J. S.; Newman, J. A.; Kocevski, D. D.; Lai, K.; Grogin, N. A.; Rodney, S. A.; Lee, K.-S.; Guo, Y.

    2011-01-01

    We identify an abundant population of extreme emission line galaxies at redshift z=1.6 - 1.8 in the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) imaging from Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3). 69 candidates are selected by the large contribution of exceptionally bright emission lines to their near-infrared, broad-band fluxes. Supported by spectroscopic confirmation of strong [OIII] emission lines - with equivalent widths approximately 1000A - in the four candidates that have HST/WFC3 grism observations, we conclude that these objects are dwarf galaxies with approximately 10(exp 8) solar mass in stellar mass, undergoing an enormous star-burst phase with M*/M* of only approximately 10 Myr. The star formation activity and the co-moving number density (3.7 x 10(exp -4) Mpc(exp -3)) imply that strong, short-lived bursts play a significant, perhaps even dominant role in the formation and evolution of dwarf galaxies at z greater than 1. The observed star formation activity can produce in less than 5 Gyr the same amount of stellar mass density as is presently contained in dwarf galaxies. Therefore, our observations provide a strong indication that the stellar populations of present-day dwarf galaxies formed mainly in strong, short-lived bursts, mostly at z greater than 1.

  13. Extreme Emission Line Galaxies in CANDELS: Broad-Band Selected, Star-Bursting Dwarf Galaxies at Z greater than 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanderWel, A.; Straughn, A. N.; Rix, H.-W.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Weiner, B. J.; Wuyts, S.; Bell, E. F.; Faber, S. M.; Trump, J. R.; Koo, D. C.; Ferguson, H. C.; Scarlata, C.; Hathi, N. P.; Dunlop, J. S.; Newman, J. A.; Dickinson, M.; Jahnke, K.; Salmon, B. W.; deMello, D. F.; Kkocevski, D. D.; Lai, K.; Grogin, N. A.; Rodney, S. A.; Guo, Yicheng

    2012-01-01

    We identify an abundant population of extreme emission line galaxies (EELGs) at redshift z approx. 1.7 in the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) imaging from Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3). 69 EELG candidates are selected by the large contribution of exceptionally bright emission lines to their near-infrared broad-band magnitudes. Supported by spectroscopic confirmation of strong [OIII] emission lines . with rest-frame equivalent widths approx. 1000A in the four candidates that have HST/WFC3 grism observations, we conclude that these objects are galaxies with approx.10(exp 8) Solar Mass in stellar mass, undergoing an enormous starburst phase with M*/M* of only approx. 15 Myr. These bursts may cause outflows that are strong enough to produce cored dark matter profiles in low-mass galaxies. The individual star formation rates and the co-moving number density (3.7x10(exp -4) Mpc(sup -3) can produce in approx.4 Gyr much of the stellar mass density that is presently contained in 10(exp 8) - 10(exp 9) Solar Mass dwarf galaxies. Therefore, our observations provide a strong indication that many or even most of the stars in present-day dwarf galaxies formed in strong, short-lived bursts, mostly at z > 1.

  14. Broad band simulation of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) prompt emission in presence of an external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziaeepour, Houri; Gardner, Brian

    2011-12-01

    The origin of prompt emission in GRBs is not yet well understood. The simplest and most popular model is Synchrotron Self-Compton (SSC) emission produced by internal shocks inside an ultra-relativistic jet. However, recent observations of a delayed high energy component by the Fermi-LAT instrument have encouraged alternative models. Here we use a recently developed formulation of relativistic shocks for GRBs to simulate light curves and spectra of synchrotron and self-Compton emissions in the framework of internal shock model. This model takes into account the evolution of quantities such as densities of colliding shells, and fraction of kinetic energy transferred to electrons and to induced magnetic field. We also extend this formulation by considering the presence of a precessing external magnetic field. These simulations are very realistic and present significant improvement with respect to previous phenomenological GRB simulations. They reproduce light curves of separate peaks of real GRBs and variety of spectral slopes at E > Epeak observed by the Fermi-LAT instrument. The high energy emission can be explained by synchrotron emission and a subdominant contribution from inverse Compton. We also suggest an explanation for extended tail emission and relate it to the screening of the magnetic field and/or trapping of accelerated electrons in the electromagnetic energy structure of the plasma in the shock front. Spectral slopes of simulated bursts at E << Epeak are consistent with theoretical prediction and at E < Epeak can be flatter if the spectrum of electrons is roughly flat or has a shallow slope at low energies. The observed flat spectra at soft gamma-ray and hard x-ray bands is the evidence that there is a significant contribution at E < Epeak from lower Lorentz factor wing of electron distribution which have a roughly random acceleration rather than being thermal. This means that the state of matter in the jet at the time of ejection is most probably

  15. Annealing effect on the near-band edge emission of ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomyak, V. V.; Slyotov, M. M.; Shtepliuk, I. I.; Lashkarev, G. V.; Slyotov, O. M.; Marianchuk, P. D.; Kosolovskiy, V. V.

    2013-02-01

    ZnO thin films have been grown on the sapphire (с-Al2O3) substrates at the temperature of 250 °C by means of the direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering technique. The crystal structure and surface morphology of the deposited films were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The optical transmission, reflection and luminescence spectra at 300 K were analyzed for both the as-grown and post-annealed ZnO films. Using the λ-modulation method gives the possibility to reveal the main features of the energy band structure and the nature of the radiative transitions causing the ultraviolet (UV) luminescence.

  16. Nitric Oxide Measurements Between 80 and 200 km From ISAAC Observations of NO Gamma Band Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minschwaner, K.; Bishop, J.; Budzien, S.; Dymond, K.; Siskind, D.; Stevens, M.

    2002-12-01

    Ultraviolet dayglow observed by the ISAAC (Ionospheric Spectroscopy and Atmospheric Chemistry) instrument has been analyzed to provide vertical profile measurements of nitric oxide (NO) in the upper mesosphere and thermosphere. ISAAC was launched in February 1999 onboard ARGOS, the Air Force Advanced Research and Global Observing Satellite. This study considers ISAAC dayside data obtained during November and December 1999, between 40°N and 70°S latitude. The analysis includes constraints on instrument sensitivity, and in-flight assessments of stray light and solar scattered background contributions. Residual spectra contain strong dayglow signatures of the NO gamma bands, which are used for inversion of measured radiances to absolute NO concentrations. We compare these observations with photochemical calculations that incorporate the latest O2 and temperature data contained in the NRLMSISE-00 model.

  17. Search for CO2/CO Band Emission in Active Asteroid 324P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mommert, Michael; Hora, Joseph L.; Hsieh, Henry H.; Trilling, David E.; Sheppard, Scott S.

    2015-10-01

    Until a few decades ago, the distinction between asteroids and comets seemed to be simple: comets exhibit activity in the form of a coma and/or a tail as a result of the sublimation of surface ices, whereas asteroids are inactive, rocky bodies. The separation between the two groups became less clear with the discovery of asteroidal bodies that exhibit comet-like dust activity - the active asteroids. For some of those objects, disruption or mass loss due to rotational destabilization or recent collisions are the most likely processes causing the activity. Other objects display recurrent dust activity near perihelion that seems to be caused by the sublimation of ices, but gases have never been directly measured in them. We propose the first Spitzer observations of recurrently active asteroid 324P to search for emission from CO2 or CO. Our observations will detect emission from either gas with unprecedented sensitivity and provide the first ever confirmed detection of volatiles in an active asteroid. We will measure the CO2/CO gas production rates - or put upper-limits on them in the case of a lack of emission. The detection of sublimation-driven activity in active asteroids provide important constraints on the volatile inventory of the inner Solar System and Solar System formation models, gives insight into volatile preservation/retention in asteroidal bodies, and may be relevant to primordial terrestrial water delivery scenarios, as well as future asteroid resource utilization. This proposal conforms with the Spitzer Cycle 12 focus on planetary science programs observing targets in our Solar System.

  18. The effects of soil moisture, surface roughness, and vegetation on L-band emission and backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, James R.; Shiue, J. C.; Engman, Edwin T.; Schmugge, Thomas J.; Mo, Tsan

    1987-01-01

    Measurements performed with SIR-B at 1.28 GHz and an airborne multiple-beam push-broom radiometer at 1.4 GHz over agricultural fields near Fresno, California are examined. A theoretical model (Kirchhoff approximation) was used to assess the effects of surface roughness and vegetation (alfalfa and lettuce) with respect to the responses of microwave emission and backscatter to soil-moisture variations. It is found that the surface roughness plays a dominant role compared to the vegetation cover in the microwave backscatter.

  19. MBE growth, structural and transport properties of alternately-strained ZnSSe/CdSe superlattices with effective band-gap 2.5-2.6 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, S. V.; Gronin, S. V.; Evropeytsev, E. A.; Sedova, I. V.; Toropov, A. A.; Ivanov, S. V.

    2015-09-01

    Short-period ZnSySe1-y/CdSe superlattices (SLs) with an effective energy gap Eg=2.5-2.6 eV (T=300 K) are grown by molecular beam epitaxy pseudomorphically on GaAs (001), and their structural properties are studied by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy. Both sulfur content and thickness of the ZnSySe1-y SL barriers have been determined via analysis of the XRD curves, taking account of the thickness of the CdSe SL layers estimated independently from the low-temperature (T=77 K) PL spectra of the single CdSe quantum dot (QD) layer (nominal thickness of 2.8 monolayer) embedded into each SL. The evaluated SL parameters are shown to be in good agreement with the intended ones. The efficient non-equilibrium carrier transport in the SLs along the growth direction at 300 K is demonstrated by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy through the relative temperature variation of the intensities of the PL peaks originated from the buried CdSe/ZnSe QD layers and the ZnSSe/CdSe SLs.

  20. Narrow-band light emission from a single carbon nanotube p-n diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Megumi; Mueller, Thomas; Steiner, Mathias; Perebeinos, Vasili; Bol, Ageeth; Farmer, Damon; Avouris, Phaedon

    2010-03-01

    We present the first observation of electroluminescence from electrostatically-generated carbon nanotube (CNT) p-n junctions[1]. While CNT optoelectronics has made much progress in recent years, observations of emission from electrically excited CNT devices have been limited to the high-bias regime and with low efficiency. Furthermore, the resulting broad linewidths are broad, making it difficult to investigate electronic levels and carrier dynamics. We find that p-n junctions allow for better carrier control at lower power inputs, resulting in emission with near-zero threshold, low self-heating and efficiency two to three orders of magnitude greater compared to previous device configurations. This yields higher signal-to-noise ratio and narrower linewidths (down to ˜35 meV) that allows us to identify localized excitonic transitions that have previously been observed only in photoluminescent studies. [1] T. Mueller, M. Kinoshita, M. Steiner, V. Perebeinos, A. Bol, D. Farmer, and Ph. Avouris, Nature Nanotech., web publication, November 15 2009.

  1. Revealing the surface origin of green band emission from ZnO nanostructures by plasma immersion ion implantation induced quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.; Sun, X. W.; Tay, B. K.; Cao, Peter H. T.; Wang, J. X.; Zhang, X. H.

    2008-03-15

    Surface defect passivation for ZnO nanocombs (NCBs), random nanowires (RNWs), and aligned nanowires (ANWs) was performed through a metal plasma immersion ion implantation with low bias voltages ranging from 0 to 10 kV, where Ni was used as the modification ion. The depth of surface-originated green band (GB) emission is thus probed, revealing the surface origin of the GB. It is also found that the GB is closely related to oxygen gas content during growth of the nanostructures. The GB origin of NCBs and RNWs grown with higher oxygen content is shallower ({approx}0.5 nm), which can be completely quenched with no bias applied. However, the GB origin of ANWs grown at lower oxygen content is much deeper ({approx}7 nm) with a complete quenching bias of 10 kV. Quenching of the GB can be attributed to passivation of the surface hole or electron trapping sites (oxygen vacancies) by Ni ions.

  2. Spontaneous emission from a two-level atom in anisotropic one-band photonic crystals: A fractional calculus approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.-N.; Huang, C.-H.; Cheng, S.-C.; Hsieh, W.-F.

    2010-02-15

    Spontaneous emission (SE) from a two-level atom in an anisotropic photonic crystal (PC) is investigated by the fractional calculus. Physical phenomena of the SE are studied analytically by solving the fractional kinetic equations of the SE. There is a dynamical discrepancy between the SE of anisotropic and isotropic PCs. We find that, contrary to the SE phenomenon of the isotropic PC, the SE near the band edge of an anisotropic PC shows no photon-atom bound state. It is consistent with the experimental results of Barth, Schuster, Gruber, and Cichos [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 243902 (2006)] that the anisotropic property of the system enhances the SE. We also study effects of dispersion curvatures on the changes of the photonic density of states and the appearance of the diffusion fields in the SE.

  3. A reciprocal band-limited Green's function approach for modelling acoustic emission using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naber, R. R.; Bahai, H.; Jones, B. E.

    2006-05-01

    The ability to model acoustic emission (AE) plays an important role in advancing the reliability of AE source characterisation. In this paper, an efficient numerical approach is proposed for modelling AE waves in isotropic solids. The approach is based on evaluating the reciprocal band-limited Green's functions using the finite element (FE) method. In the first section, known analytical solutions of the Green's function for an elastic isotropic infinite plate subjected to point monopole surface loading are used to validate the approach. Then, a study investigating the effects of the spatial resolution of the FE model on the accuracy of the numerical solutions is presented. Furthermore, comparisons between numerical calculations and experimental measurements are presented for a glass plate subjected to two known AE sources (pencil lead break and ball impact). Finally, the reciprocal relation between the source and the receiver is confirmed using numerical simulations of a plane stress model of an elastic isotropic plate.

  4. Photoluminescence between 3.36 eV and 3.41 eV from GaN epitaxial layers

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, R.; Gaspar, C.; Monteiro, T.; Pereira, E.; Poisson, M.A.; Beaumont, B.

    1999-07-01

    GaN, its alloys, QWs and MQWs have gained an important place among short-wavelength optical emitters and high temperature electronic devices. The performance of such devices is limited by the presence of native and impurity defects. The understanding of the optical properties of the basic material allows them to improve its quality and thus increase the performance of these materials. In non intentionally doped (nid) hexagonal good quality GaN layers grown on sapphire, 6H-SiC or Si, free exciton (FXC, FXB, FXA), donor bound exciton (DX), acceptor bound exciton (AX) and donor-acceptor pair (DAP) transitions have been reported by several authors. Besides these typical emissions, emission lines in the range 3.3--3.44 eV have been observed in nid and intentionally doped hexagonal GaN layers. However, the nature of these recombinations is not completely clarified. Some authors assigned them to a superposition of LO phonon assisted transitions of DX and FX, excitons bound to neutral donors with deeper donor levels, band to impurity transitions and/or free to bound emission involving oxygen, DAP transitions, shallow bound excitons of cubic phases, excitons bound to structural defects and Zn related recombinations. In this work the authors analyze the luminescence between 3.36 eV and 3.41 eV of nid hexagonal GaN samples grown on sapphire. They found sample dependent emission lines with no DAP behavior. From the data they are able to identify different kinds of recombination processes in the same spectral region.

  5. WIDE-BAND SUZAKU ANALYSIS OF THE PERSISTENT EMISSION FROM SGR 0501+4516 DURING THE 2008 OUTBURST

    SciTech Connect

    Enoto, T.; Makishima, K.; Nakazawa, K.; Yamada, S.; Rea, N.; Nakagawa, Y. E.; Sakamoto, T.; Esposito, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Tiengo, A.; Goetz, D.; Israel, G. L.; Stella, L.; Kokubun, M.; Murakami, H.; Turolla, R.; Yamaoka, K.; Yoshida, A.; Zane, S.

    2010-05-20

    We observed the soft gamma repeater SGR 0501+4516 with Suzaku for {approx}51 ks on 2008 August 26-27, about 4 days after its discovery. Following the first paper, which reported on the persistent soft X-ray emission and the wide-band spectrum of an intense short burst, this paper presents an analysis of the persistent broadband (1-70 keV) spectra of this source in outburst, taken with the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) and the Hard X-ray Detector (HXD). Pulse-phase folding in the 12-35 keV HXD-PIN data on an ephemeris based on multi-satellite timing measurements at soft X-rays revealed the pulsed signals at {approx_gt}99% confidence in the hard X-ray band. The wide-band spectrum clearly consists of a soft component and a separate hard component, crossing over at {approx}7 keV. When the soft component is modeled by a blackbody plus a Comptonized blackbody, the hard component exhibits a 20-100 keV flux of 4.8{sup +0.8}{sub -0.6}(stat.){sup +0.8}{sub -0.4}(sys.) x 10{sup -11} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} and a photon index of {Gamma} = 0.79{sup +0.20}{sub -0.18}(stat.){sup +0.01}{sub -0.06}(sys.). The hard X-ray data are compared with those obtained by INTEGRAL about 1 day later. Combining the present results with those on other magnetars, we discuss a possible correlation between the spectral hardness of magnetars and their characteristic age and magnetic field strengths.

  6. Assessment of the NPP VIIRS RVS for the thermal emissive bands using the first pitch maneuver observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, A.; Xiong, X.; Chiang, K.; Sun, C.

    2012-09-01

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is a key sensor carried on Suomi NPP (National Polar-orbiting Partnership) satellite (http://npp.gsfc.nasa.gov/viirs.html) (launched in October 2011). VIIRS sensor design draws on heritage instruments including AVHRR, OLS, SeaWiFS and MODIS. It has on-board calibration components including a solar diffuser (SD) and a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM) for the reflective solar bands (RSB), a V-groove blackbody for the thermal emissive bands (TEB), and a space view (SV) port for background subtraction. These on-board calibrators are located at fixed scan angles. The VIIRS response versus scan angle (RVS) was characterized prelaunch in lab ambient conditions and is currently used to characterize the on-orbit response for all scan angles relative to the calibrator scan angle (SD for RSB and blackbody for TEB). Since the RVS is vitally important to the quality of calibrated radiance products, several independent studies were performed to analyze the prelaunch RVS measurement data. A spacecraft level pitch maneuver was scheduled during the first three months of intensive Cal/Val. The NPP pitch maneuver provided a rare opportunity for VIIRS to make observations of deep space over the entire range of scan angles, which can be used to characterize the TEB RVS. This study will provide our analysis of the pitch maneuver data and assessment of the derived TEB RVS. A comparison between the RVS determined by the pitch maneuver observations and prelaunch lab tests will be conducted for each band, detector, and half angle mirror (HAM) side.

  7. Spatially resolved band alignments at Au-hexadecanethiol monolayer-GaAs(001) interfaces by ballistic electron emission microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Junay, A.; Guézo, S. Turban, P.; Delhaye, G.; Lépine, B.; Tricot, S.; Ababou-Girard, S.; Solal, F.

    2015-08-28

    We study structural and electronic inhomogeneities in Metal—Organic Molecular monoLayer (OML)—semiconductor interfaces at the sub-nanometer scale by means of in situ Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy (BEEM). BEEM imaging of Au/1-hexadecanethiols/GaAs(001) heterostructures reveals the evolution of pinholes density as a function of the thickness of the metallic top-contact. Using BEEM in spectroscopic mode in non-short-circuited areas, local electronic fingerprints (barrier height values and corresponding spectral weights) reveal a low-energy tunneling regime through the insulating organic monolayer. At higher energies, BEEM evidences new conduction channels, associated with hot-electron injection in the empty molecular orbitals of the OML. Corresponding band diagrams at buried interfaces can be thus locally described. The energy position of GaAs conduction band minimum in the heterostructure is observed to evolve as a function of the thickness of the deposited metal, and coherently with size-dependent electrostatic effects under the molecular patches. Such BEEM analysis provides a quantitative diagnosis on metallic top-contact formation on organic molecular monolayer and appears as a relevant characterization for its optimization.

  8. Spatial variation of the 3.29 and 3.40 micron emission bands within reflection nebulae and the photochemical evolution of methylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Joblin, C; Tielens, A G; Allamandola, L J; Geballe, T R

    1996-02-20

    Spectra of 3 micrometers emission features have been obtained at several positions within the reflection nebulae NGC 1333 SVS3 and NGC 2023. Strong variations of the relative intensities of the 3.29 micrometers feature and its most prominent satellite band at 3.40 micrometers are found. It is shown that (i) the 3.40 micrometers band is too intense with respect to the 3.29 micrometers band at certain positions to arise from hot band emission alone, (ii) the 3.40 micrometers band can be reasonably well matched by new laboratory spectra of gas-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with alkyl (-CH3) side groups, and (iii) the variations in the 3.40 micrometers to 3.29 micrometers band intensity ratios are consistent with the photochemical erosion of alkylated PAHs. We conclude that the 3.40 micrometers emission feature is attributable to -CH3 side groups on PAH molecules. We predict a value of 0.5 for the peak intensity ratio of the 3.40 and 3.29 micrometers emission bands from free PAHs in the diffuse interstellar medium, which would correspond to a proportion of one methyl group for four peripheral hydrogens. We also compare the 3 micrometers spectrum of the proto-planetary nebula IRAS 05341+0852 with the spectrum of the planetary nebula IRAS 21282+5050. We suggest that a photochemical evolution of the initial aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon mixture formed in the outflow is responsible for the changes observed in the 3 micrometers emission spectra of these objects. PMID:11538557

  9. Spatial variation of the 3.29 and 3.40 micron emission bands within reflection nebulae and the photochemical evolution of methylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joblin, C.; Tielens, A. G.; Allamandola, L. J.; Geballe, T. R.

    1996-01-01

    Spectra of 3 micrometers emission features have been obtained at several positions within the reflection nebulae NGC 1333 SVS3 and NGC 2023. Strong variations of the relative intensities of the 3.29 micrometers feature and its most prominent satellite band at 3.40 micrometers are found. It is shown that (i) the 3.40 micrometers band is too intense with respect to the 3.29 micrometers band at certain positions to arise from hot band emission alone, (ii) the 3.40 micrometers band can be reasonably well matched by new laboratory spectra of gas-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with alkyl (-CH3) side groups, and (iii) the variations in the 3.40 micrometers to 3.29 micrometers band intensity ratios are consistent with the photochemical erosion of alkylated PAHs. We conclude that the 3.40 micrometers emission feature is attributable to -CH3 side groups on PAH molecules. We predict a value of 0.5 for the peak intensity ratio of the 3.40 and 3.29 micrometers emission bands from free PAHs in the diffuse interstellar medium, which would correspond to a proportion of one methyl group for four peripheral hydrogens. We also compare the 3 micrometers spectrum of the proto-planetary nebula IRAS 05341+0852 with the spectrum of the planetary nebula IRAS 21282+5050. We suggest that a photochemical evolution of the initial aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon mixture formed in the outflow is responsible for the changes observed in the 3 micrometers emission spectra of these objects.

  10. Optical study of the band structure of wurtzite GaP nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assali, S.; Greil, J.; Zardo, I.; Belabbes, A.; de Moor, M. W. A.; Koelling, S.; Koenraad, P. M.; Bechstedt, F.; Bakkers, E. P. A. M.; Haverkort, J. E. M.

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the optical properties of wurtzite (WZ) GaP nanowires by performing photoluminescence (PL) and time-resolved PL measurements in the temperature range from 4 K to 300 K, together with atom probe tomography to identify residual impurities in the nanowires. At low temperature, the WZ GaP luminescence shows donor-acceptor pair emission at 2.115 eV and 2.088 eV, and Burstein-Moss band-filling continuum between 2.180 and 2.253 eV, resulting in a direct band gap above 2.170 eV. Sharp exciton α-β-γ lines are observed at 2.140-2.164-2.252 eV, respectively, showing clear differences in lifetime, presence of phonon replicas, and temperature-dependence. The excitonic nature of those peaks is critically discussed, leading to a direct band gap of ˜2.190 eV and to a resonant state associated with the γ-line ˜80 meV above the Γ8C conduction band edge.

  11. A Balloon-borne Limb-Emission Sounder at 650-GHz band for Stratospheric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irimajiri, Yoshihisa; Ochiai, Satoshi

    We have developed a Balloon-borne Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (BSMILES) to observe stratospheric minor constituents like ozone, HCl etc. BSMILES carries a 300mm-diameter offset parabolic antenna, a 650-GHz heterodyne superconducting (SIS) low-noise receiver, and an acousto-optical spectrometer (AOS) with the bandwidth of 1GHz and the resolution of 1MHz. Gondola size is 1.35 m x 1.35 m x 1.26 m. Total weight is about 500 kg. Limb observations are made by scanning the antenna beam of about 0.12 degrees (FWHM) in vertical direction. A calibrated hot load (CHL) and elevation angle of 50 degrees are ob-served after each scan for calibration. The DSB system noise temperature of the SIS receiver is less than 460 K at 624-639 GHz with a best value of 330 K that is 11 times as large as the quantum limit. Data acquisition and antenna control are made by on-board PCs. Observed data are recorded to PC card with 2 GB capacity to collect after the observations from the sea, and HK data are transmitted to the ground. Gondola attitude is measured by three-axis fiber-optical gyroscope with accuracy less than 0.01 degrees, three-axis accelerometer, and a two-axis geoaspect sensor. Electric power is supplied by lithium batteries. Total power con-sumption is about 150W. Almost all systems are put in pressurized vessels for waterproofing, heat dissipation, and noise shield, etc. BSMILES was launched from Sanriku Balloon Center of Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), at the east coast of Japan, in the summer of 2003, 2004, and 2006. The gondola was carried to an altitude of 35 km by a balloon of 100,000 m3 in volume and the observations were made for 1.5 hours in 2004. All systems operated normally by keeping their temperature within the limit of operation by keeping gondola warm with styrene foam. After the observations, the gondola was dropped and splashed on the Pacific Ocean by a parachute and

  12. A Fluorescent Indicator for Imaging Lysosomal Zinc(II) with Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-Enhanced Photostability and a Narrow Band of Emission

    PubMed Central

    Sreenath, Kesavapillai; Yuan, Zhao; Allen, John R.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a strategy to transfer the zinc(II) sensitivity of a fluoroionophore with low photostability and a broad emission band to a bright and photostable fluorophore with a narrow emission band. The two fluorophores are covalently connected to afford an intramolecular Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) conjugate. The FRET donor in the conjugate is a zinc(II)-sensitive arylvinylbipyridyl fluoroionophore, the absorption and emission of which undergo bathochromic shifts upon zinc(II) coordination. When the FRET donor is excited, efficient intramolecular energy transfer occurs to result in the emission of the acceptor boron dipyrromethene (4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene or BODIPY) as a function of zinc(II) concentration. The broad emission band of the donor/zinc(II) complex is transformed into the strong, narrow emission band of the BODIPY acceptor in the FRET conjugates, which can be captured within the narrow emission window that is preferred for multicolor imaging experiments. In addition to competing with other nonradiative decay processes of the FRET donor, the rapid intramolecular FRET of the excited FRET-conjugate molecule protects the donor fluorophore from photobleaching, thus enhancing the photostability of the indicator. FRET conjugates 3 and 4 contain aliphatic amino groups, which selectively target lysosomes in mammalian cells. This subcellular localization preference was verified by using confocal fluorescence microscopy, which also shows the zinc(II)-enhanced emission of 3 and 4 in lysosomes. It was further shown using two-color structured illumination microscopy (SIM), which is capable of extending the lateral resolution over the Abbe diffraction limit by a factor of two, that the morpholino-functionalized compound 4 localizes in the interior of lysosomes, rather than anchoring on the lysosomal membranes, of live HeLa cells. PMID:25382395

  13. Ocean Surface Emissivity at L-band (1.4 GHz): The Dependence on Salinity and Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Vine, D. M.; Lang, R. H.; Wentz, F. J.; Meissner, T.

    2012-12-01

    A characterization of the emissivity of sea water at L-band is important for the remote sensing of sea surface salinity. Measurements of salinity are currently being made in the radio astronomy band at 1.413 GHz by ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission and NASA's Aquarius instrument aboard the Aquarius/SAC-D observatory. The goal of both missions is accuracy on the order of 0.2 psu. This requires accurate knowledge of the dielectric constant of sea water as a function of salinity and temperature and also the effect of waves (roughness). The former determines the emissivity of an ideal (i.e. flat) surface and the later is the major source of error from predictions based on a flat surface. These two aspects of the problem of characterizing the emissivity are being addressed in the context of the Aquarius mission. First, laboratory measurements are being made of the dielectric constant of sea water. This is being done at the George Washington University using a resonant cavity. In this technique, sea water of known salinity and temperature is fed into the cavity along its axis through a narrow tube. The sea water changes the resonant frequency and Q of the cavity which, if the sample is small enough, can be related to the dielectric constant of the sample. An extensive set of measurements have been conducted at 1.413 GHz to develop a model for the real and imaginary part of the dielectric constant as a function of salinity and temperature. The results are compared to the predictions of models based on parameterization of the Debye resonance of the water molecule. The models and measurements are close; however, the differences are significant for remote sensing of salinity. This is especially true at low temperatures where the sensitivity to salinity is lowest. Second, observations from Aquarius are being used to develop a model for the effect of wind-driven roughness (waves) on the emissivity in the open ocean. This is done by comparing the measured

  14. Determining Limits on the Intensity of the O2 0-0 Atmospheric Band Emission in the Venus Nightglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slanger, T. G.; Migliorini, A.; Gray, C.

    2011-12-01

    Recombination of oxygen atoms is the source of excited O2 states in the nighttime mesospheres of the terrestrial planets - Venus, Earth, and Mars. Emission in the O2 Atmospheric 0-0 band at 762 nm is one of the strongest features in the terrestrial visible/near-IR spectral region, with a typical intensity of 5 kR, although this emission does not reach the ground due to self-absorption. We inquire as to what intensity is expected at Venus, although there are no published spectra for either Venus or Mars in this spectral region. A recent estimated upper limit of 200 R for Venus has been given [Krasnopolsky, 2011]. The calculation requires knowledge of the temperature-dependent rate coefficients for three-body oxygen atom recombination in CO2 and for O2(b, v = 0) removal by CO2, as well as an estimate for the fraction of stabilized excited O2 molecules that reach b(v = 0). The resultant nadir intensity depends on [O(3P)]2, and for a value of [O(3P)] = 1.5 × 1011 cm-3, the 95-km intensity is of the order of 2 R, probably accurate to within a factor of two. Such a value is consistent with the lack of detection in recent Venus Express VIRTIS spectra, which include the 762 nm region. Measurements of the Venus nightglow with the 3.5-m telescope at Apache Point Observatory in December, 2010 also show no 762 nm emission, where in principle the 0.03 nm Doppler shift in the emission due to the relative velocities of Earth and Venus could have made observation possible. The principal differences between the Venus and Earth cases are (1) quenching of O2(b, v = 0) is more than two orders of magnitude faster by CO2 than by N2 (the terrestrial quencher) and (2) the densities in the ~95 km mesospheric nightglow region are two orders of magnitude higher at Venus. TGS acknowledge support for this work from the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program, Grant NNX08A0276. AM acknowledges ASI for support. Krasnopolsky, V.A., Planet. Space Sci. 59, 754-766, 2011.

  15. OBSERVATIONS OF THE NEAR- TO MID-INFRARED UNIDENTIFIED EMISSION BANDS IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Tamami I.; Sakon, Itsuki; Onaka, Takashi; Ohsawa, Ryou; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Umehata, Hideki E-mail: isakon@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of near- to mid-infrared slit spectroscopic observations (2.55-13.4 {mu}m) of the diffuse emission toward nine positions in the Large Magellanic Cloud with the infrared camera on board AKARI. The target positions are selected to cover a wide range of the intensity of the incident radiation field. The unidentified infrared bands at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 {mu}m are detected toward all the targets and ionized gas signatures; hydrogen recombination lines and ionic forbidden lines are detected toward three of them. We classify the targets into two groups: those without the ionized gas signatures (Group A) and those with the ionized signatures (Group B). Group A includes molecular clouds and photodissociation regions, whereas Group B consists of H II regions. In Group A, the band ratios of I{sub 3.3{mu}m}/I{sub 11.3{mu}m}, I{sub 6.2{mu}m}/I{sub 11.3{mu}m}, I{sub 7.7{mu}m}/I{sub 11.3{mu}m}, and I{sub 8.6{mu}m}/I{sub 11.3{mu}m} show positive correlation with the IRAS and AKARI colors, but those of Group B do not follow the correlation. We discuss the results in terms of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) model and attribute the difference to the destruction of small PAHs and an increase in the recombination due to the high electron density in Group B. In the present study, the 3.3 {mu}m band provides crucial information on the size distribution and/or the excitation conditions of PAHs and plays a key role in the distinction of Group A from B. The results suggest the possibility of the diagram of I{sub 3.3{mu}m}/I{sub 11.3{mu}m} versus I{sub 7.7{mu}m}/I{sub 11.3{mu}m} as an efficient diagnostic tool to infer the physical conditions of the interstellar medium.

  16. Making Waves—The VIIRS Day/Night Band Reveals Upper Atmospheric Gravity Wave via Sensitivity to Nightglow Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. D.; Straka, W. C.; Yue, J.; Smith, S. M.; Alexander, M. J.; Hoffmann, L.; Setvak, M.; Partain, P.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric gravity waves, which are disturbances to the atmospheric density structure with restoring forces of gravity and buoyancy, represent the principal form of energy exchange between the lower and upper atmosphere. Wave breaking drives the mean upper-atmospheric circulation, driving coupled processes that in turn influence weather and climate patterns throughout the atmosphere on various spatial and temporal scales. Very little is known about upper-level gravity wave characteristics, mainly for lack of global, high-resolution observations from satellite observing systems. Consequently, representations of wave-related processes in global models at present are crude, highly parameterized, and poorly constrained. Shortly after launch of the NOAA/NASA Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership environmental satellite instrument, it was discovered that its Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiomter Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB) was able to observe clouds on moonless nights using the reflection of downwelling nightglow—light emitted from a geometrically thin and tenuous emission layer residing near the mesopause (~85-95 km AMSL). Following this revelation, it was discovered that the DNB also held the further ability to resolve gravity structures within the nightglow direct emissions. On moonless nights, the DNB provides all-weather viewing of these waves at unprecedented 0.74 km horizontal resolution as they modulate the temperature and density structure (and hence brightness) of the nightglow layer. The waves are launched by a variety of physical mechanisms, ranging from terrain, to convective storms, to jet streams and strong wind shear, and even seismic and volcanic events. We cross-reference DNB imagery with thermal infrared imagery to discern nightglow wave structures and attribute their sources. The capability stands to advance our basic understanding of a critical yet poorly constrained driver of the general atmospheric circulation.

  17. Using the Moon to evaluate the radiometric calibration performance of S-NPP VIIRS thermal emissive bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhipeng; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Efremova, Boryana V.; Chen, Hongda

    2014-09-01

    The Suomi-NPP VIIRS thermal emissive bands (TEB) are radiometrically calibrated on-orbit with reference to a blackbody (BB) operated at a nominal temperature of approximately 292.5 K. The quality of the calibration can be evaluated at other temperature ranges using independent thermal sources. The thermal properties of the lunar surface are extremely stable over time, making it a feasible target for the TEB calibration stability assessment for the space-borne sensors with regular lunar observations. VIIRS is scheduled to view the Moon on a nearly monthly basis at approximately the same phase angle since January 2012, before the cryo-cooler door was open and TEB started to collect data. In this paper, the brightness temperatures (BT) of the lunar surface retrieved using the calibration coefficients derived from the BB calibration are trended for VIIRS TEB to examine the calibration stability. The lunar surface temperature varies greatly with location and also oscillates seasonally with the solar illumination geometry. Radiance from many lunar locations saturates TEB detectors. Therefore, the trending must base on the regions of the Moon that do not saturate the detectors at any lunar observation event and thus their BT can be consistently retrieved. To achieve that, a temporally dynamic spatial mask is built for each detector to clip the locations of the Moon that may saturate the detector at any lunar event. Results show the radiometric calibration of all TEB detectors has been stable within 1 K range since being functional.

  18. Comparison between ECMWF L-band brightness temperatures and SMOS observations using the Community Microwave Emission Modelling Platform (CMEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rosnay, Patricia; Muñoz Sabater, Joaquín; Dutra, Emanuel; Albergel, Clément; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Boussetta, Souhail; Isaksen, Lars

    2015-04-01

    Soil moisture initialisation is crucial for Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP). New generations of satellites, such as SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) and SMAP (Soil Moisture Active and Passive) provide highly suitable data from passive and active microwave sensors for soil moisture remote sensing. In order to make it possible to combine use of satellite, in situ and proxy observations to analyse soil moisture, ECMWF implemented an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) soil moisture analysis which is used for operational NWP in the ECMWF Integrated Forecasting System (IFS). The use of passive microwave sensors in the EKF soil moisture data assimilation requires an accurate radiative transfer model. In this poster we present ECMWF developments in radiative transfer modelling conducted to use SMOS and SMAP brightness temperature observations in the ECMWF data assimilation system. The ECMWF Community Microwave Emission Modelling Platform (CMEM) is described. CMEM input global fields, including soil moisture, soil temperature, snow depth and vegetation cover, were obtained from H-TESSEL land surface model simulations forced by ERA-Interim atmospheric conditions. CMEM multi-year simulations were performed using a land surface model configuration which is similar to the current operational IFS. In CMEM, combinations of three soil dielectric models, three vegetation opacity models and four soil roughness parametrizations were used, allowing comparing 36 different configurations of the microwave emission model. Global scale forward simulations of dual polarization L-band (1.4 GHz) brightness temperature were conducted at 40 degrees incidence angle for each radiative transfer model and evaluated using the SMOS near real time brightness temperature data for 2010. Best microwave emission model performances were obtained with the Wang and Schmugge dielectric model combined with the Wigneron vegetation opacity model and the simple Wigneron soil roughness parametrization. The

  19. Light Emission from Porous Silicon Photoetched in Aqueous Alkali Salt Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Sadao; Miyazaki, Takayuki; Inoue, Kazufumi; Sodezawa, Shingo

    2007-07-01

    An interband-transition model was applied to explain the emission mechanism in porous silicon (PSi) fabricated by photoetching in aqueous HF and salt (NaF and KF) solutions. The HF-formed samples show a yellow photoluminescence band at ˜2 eV. The salt-formed samples, on the other hand, show an ultraviolet (UV) emission peak at ˜3.3 eV with a spectral width of ˜0.1 eV, together with a broad emission band at ˜2.7 eV. The broad emission bands at ˜2 and ˜2.7 eV can be explained by the quantum-mechanical confinement effect, i.e., a relaxation of the momentum conservation at and above the indirect-absorption edge (supra-EgID emission). This effect may also lead to a change in the E1 critical point (CP) from the two-dimensional M0 to the zero-dimensional CP with decreasing nanocrystalline size. The change in the E1-CP dimensionality makes possible an emission in the UV region with a narrow spectral width.

  20. First detection of Mars atmospheric hydroxyl: CRISM Near-IR measurement versus LMD GCM simulation of OH Meinel band emission in the Mars polar winter atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd Clancy, R.; Sandor, Brad J.; García-Muñoz, Antonio; Lefèvre, Franck; Smith, Michael D.; Wolff, Michael J.; Montmessin, Franck; Murchie, Scott L.; Nair, Hari

    2013-09-01

    Visible and near-IR Meinel band emissions originate from excited OH in the terrestrial upper atmosphere (Meinel, I.A.B. [1950]. Astrophys. J. 111, 555. http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/145296), and have recently been detected in the Venus nightside upper mesosphere (Piccioni, G. et al. [2008]. Astron. Astrophys. 483, L29-L33. http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361:200809761). Meinel band observations support key studies of transport and photochemistry in both of these atmospheres. In the case of Mars, OH regulates the basic stability of the CO2 atmosphere to photolytic decomposition (to CO and O2, e.g. Parkinson, T.D., Hunten, D.M. [1972]. J. Atmos. Sci. 29, 1380-1390. http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/1520-0469(1972)029<1380:SAAOOO>2.0.CO;2), and yet has never been measured. We present the first detection of Mars atmospheric OH, associated with CRISM near-IR spectral limb observations of polar night Meinel band emissions centered at 1.45 and 2.9 μm. Meinel band (1-0), (2-1), and (2-0) average limb intensities of 990 ± 280, 1060 ± 480, and 200 ± 100 kiloRayleighs (kR), respectively, are determined for 70-90 NS polar winter latitudes over altitudes of 40-56 km. Additional OH bands, such as (3-2), (3-1), and (4-2), present ⩽1σ measurements. Uncertainty in the (4-2) band emission rate contributes to increased uncertainty in the determination of the O2(1Δg) (0-0)/(0-1) band emission ratio A00/A01=47-12+26. An average profile retrieval for Mars OH polar nightglow indicates 45-55 km altitude levels for volume emission rates (VER) of 0.4 (2-0) to 2 (1-0, 2-1) × 104 photons/(cm3 s). Similar to polar night O2(1Δg) emission (e.g. Clancy, R.T. et al. [2012]. J. Geophys. Res. (Planets) 117, E00J10. http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2011JE004018), Meinel OH band emission is supported by upper level, winter poleward transport of O and H in the deep Hadley solsticial circulations of Mars. The retrieved OH emission rates are compared to polar winter OH nightglow simulated by the LMD (Laboratoire

  1. First detection of Mars atmospheric hydroxyl: CRISM Near-IR measurement versus LMD GCM simulation of OH Meinel band emission in the Mars polar winter atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, R. Todd; Sandor, Brad J.; García-Muñoz, Antonio; Lefèvre, Franck; Smith, Michael D.; Wolff, Michael J.; Montmessin, Franck; Murchie, Scott L.; Nair, Hari

    2013-09-01

    Visible and near-IR Meinel band emissions originate from excited OH in the terrestrial upper atmosphere (Meinel, I.A.B. [1950]. Astrophys. J. 111, 555. http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/145296), and have recently been detected in the Venus nightside upper mesosphere (Piccioni, G. et al. [2008]. Astron. Astrophys. 483, L29-L33. http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361:200809761). Meinel band observations support key studies of transport and photochemistry in both of these atmospheres. In the case of Mars, OH regulates the basic stability of the CO2 atmosphere to photolytic decomposition (to CO and O2, e.g. Parkinson, T.D., Hunten, D.M. [1972]. J. Atmos. Sci. 29, 1380-1390. http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/1520-0469(1972)029<1380:SAAOOO>2.0.CO;2), and yet has never been measured. We present the first detection of Mars atmospheric OH, associated with CRISM near-IR spectral limb observations of polar night Meinel band emissions centered at 1.45 and 2.9 μm. Meinel band (1-0), (2-1), and (2-0) average limb intensities of 990 ± 280, 1060 ± 480, and 200 ± 100 kiloRayleighs (kR), respectively, are determined for 70-90 NS polar winter latitudes over altitudes of 40-56 km. Additional OH bands, such as (3-2), (3-1), and (4-2), present ⩽1σ measurements. Uncertainty in the (4-2) band emission rate contributes to increased uncertainty in the determination of the O2(1Δg) (0-0)/(0-1) band emission ratio A00/A01=47-12+26. An average profile retrieval for Mars OH polar nightglow indicates 45-55 km altitude levels for volume emission rates (VER) of 0.4 (2-0) to 2 (1-0, 2-1) × 104 photons/(cm3 s). Similar to polar night O2(1Δg) emission (e.g. Clancy, R.T. et al. [2012]. J. Geophys. Res. (Planets) 117, E00J10. http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2011JE004018), Meinel OH band emission is supported by upper level, winter poleward transport of O and H in the deep Hadley solsticial circulations of Mars. The retrieved OH emission rates are compared to polar winter OH nightglow simulated by the LMD (Laboratoire

  2. The emission and scattering of L-band microwave radiation from rough ocean surfaces and wind speed measurements from the Aquarius sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, Thomas; Wentz, Frank J.; Ricciardulli, Lucrezia

    2014-09-01

    In order to achieve the required accuracy in sea surface salinity (SSS) measurements from L-band radiometers such as the Aquarius/SAC-D or SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) mission, it is crucial to accurately correct the radiation that is emitted from the ocean surface for roughness effects. We derive a geophysical model function (GMF) for the emission and backscatter of L-band microwave radiation from rough ocean surfaces. The analysis is based on radiometer brightness temperature and scatterometer backscatter observations both taken on board Aquarius. The data are temporally and spatially collocated with wind speeds from WindSat and F17 SSMIS (Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder) and wind directions from NCEP (National Center for Environmental Prediction) GDAS (Global Data Assimilation System). This GMF is the basis for retrieval of ocean surface wind speed combining L-band H-pol radiometer and HH-pol scatterometer observations. The accuracy of theses combined passive/active L-band wind speeds matches those of many other satellite microwave sensors. The L-band GMF together with the combined passive/active L-band wind speeds is utilized in the Aquarius SSS retrieval algorithm for the surface roughness correction. We demonstrate that using these L-band wind speeds instead of NCEP wind speeds leads to a significant improvement in the SSS accuracy. Further improvements in the roughness correction algorithm can be obtained by adding VV-pol scatterometer measurements and wave height (WH) data into the GMF.

  3. A 1.1-1.9 GHz SETI SURVEY OF THE KEPLER FIELD. I. A SEARCH FOR NARROW-BAND EMISSION FROM SELECT TARGETS

    SciTech Connect

    Siemion, Andrew P. V.; Korpela, Eric; Werthimer, Dan; Cobb, Jeff; Lebofsky, Matt; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Demorest, Paul; Maddalena, Ron J.; Langston, Glen; Howard, Andrew W.; Tarter, Jill

    2013-04-10

    We present a targeted search for narrow-band (<5 Hz) drifting sinusoidal radio emission from 86 stars in the Kepler field hosting confirmed or candidate exoplanets. Radio emission less than 5 Hz in spectral extent is currently known to only arise from artificial sources. The stars searched were chosen based on the properties of their putative exoplanets, including stars hosting candidates with 380 K > T{sub eq} > 230 K, stars with five or more detected candidates or stars with a super-Earth (R{sub p} < 3 R{sub Circled-Plus }) in a >50 day orbit. Baseband voltage data across the entire band between 1.1 and 1.9 GHz were recorded at the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope between 2011 February and April and subsequently searched offline. No signals of extraterrestrial origin were found. We estimate that fewer than {approx}1% of transiting exoplanet systems host technological civilizations that are radio loud in narrow-band emission between 1 and 2 GHz at an equivalent isotropically radiated power (EIRP) of {approx}1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} erg s{sup -1}, approximately eight times the peak EIRP of the Arecibo Planetary Radar, and we limit the number of 1-2 GHz narrow-band-radio-loud Kardashev type II civilizations in the Milky Way to be <10{sup -6} M{sub Sun }{sup -1}. Here we describe our observations, data reduction procedures and results.

  4. A 1.1-1.9 GHz SETI Survey of the Kepler Field. I. A Search for Narrow-band Emission from Select Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemion, Andrew P. V.; Demorest, Paul; Korpela, Eric; Maddalena, Ron J.; Werthimer, Dan; Cobb, Jeff; Howard, Andrew W.; Langston, Glen; Lebofsky, Matt; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Tarter, Jill

    2013-04-01

    We present a targeted search for narrow-band (<5 Hz) drifting sinusoidal radio emission from 86 stars in the Kepler field hosting confirmed or candidate exoplanets. Radio emission less than 5 Hz in spectral extent is currently known to only arise from artificial sources. The stars searched were chosen based on the properties of their putative exoplanets, including stars hosting candidates with 380 K > T eq > 230 K, stars with five or more detected candidates or stars with a super-Earth (R p < 3 R ⊕) in a >50 day orbit. Baseband voltage data across the entire band between 1.1 and 1.9 GHz were recorded at the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope between 2011 February and April and subsequently searched offline. No signals of extraterrestrial origin were found. We estimate that fewer than ~1% of transiting exoplanet systems host technological civilizations that are radio loud in narrow-band emission between 1 and 2 GHz at an equivalent isotropically radiated power (EIRP) of ~1.5 × 1021 erg s-1, approximately eight times the peak EIRP of the Arecibo Planetary Radar, and we limit the number of 1-2 GHz narrow-band-radio-loud Kardashev type II civilizations in the Milky Way to be {<}10^{-6}\\ M^{-1}_\\odot. Here we describe our observations, data reduction procedures and results.

  5. Probing semiconductor band structures and heterojunction interface properties with ballistic carrier emission: GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs as a model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Wei; Narayanamurti, Venkatesh; Lu, Hong; Scarpulla, Michael A.; Gossard, Arthur C.

    2010-06-01

    Utilizing three-terminal tunnel emission of ballistic electrons and holes in a planar tunnel transistor with a Mott-barrier collector, we have developed a method to self-consistently determine the energy gap of a semiconductor and band discontinuities at a semiconductor heterojunction without using a priori material parameters. Measurements are performed on lattice-matched GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs (100) single-barrier double heterostructures with AlxGa1-xAs as the model ternary III-V compounds. Electronic band gaps of the AlGaAs alloys and band offsets at the GaAs/AlGaAs (100) interfaces are measured with a resolution of several meV at 4.2 K. The direct-gap Γ band offset ratio for the GaAs/AlGaAs (100) interface is found to be 59:41 (±3%) . Reexamination of our previous experiment [W. Yi , Appl. Phys. Lett. 95, 112102 (2009)10.1063/1.3224914] revealed that, in the indirect-gap regime, ballistic electrons from direct tunnel emissions probe the X valley in the conduction band, while those from Auger-like scattering processes in the metal base film probe the higher-lying L valley. Such selective electron collection may be explained by their different momentum distributions and parallel momentum conservation at the quasiepitaxial Al/GaAs (100) interface. We argue that the present method is in principle applicable to arbitrary type-I semiconductor heterostructures.

  6. Band gap and defect states of MgO thin films investigated using reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Sung; Cho, Eunseog; Lee, Hyung-Ik; Park, Gyeong Su; Kang, Hee Jae; Nagatomi, T.; Choi, Pyungho; Choi, Byoung-Deog

    2015-07-15

    The band gap and defect states of MgO thin films were investigated by using reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) and high-energy resolution REELS (HR-REELS). HR-REELS with a primary electron energy of 0.3 keV revealed that the surface F center (FS) energy was located at approximately 4.2 eV above the valence band maximum (VBM) and the surface band gap width (E{sub g}{sup S}) was approximately 6.3 eV. The bulk F center (F{sub B}) energy was located approximately 4.9 eV above the VBM and the bulk band gap width was about 7.8 eV, when measured by REELS with 3 keV primary electrons. From a first-principles calculation, we confirmed that the 4.2 eV and 4.9 eV peaks were F{sub S} and F{sub B}, induced by oxygen vacancies. We also experimentally demonstrated that the HR-REELS peak height increases with increasing number of oxygen vacancies. Finally, we calculated the secondary electron emission yields (γ) for various noble gases. He and Ne were not influenced by the defect states owing to their higher ionization energies, but Ar, Kr, and Xe exhibited a stronger dependence on the defect states owing to their small ionization energies.

  7. Ballistic-electron-emission spectroscopy of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}As/GaAs heterostructures: Conduction-band offsets, transport mechanisms, and band-structure effects

    SciTech Connect

    OShea, J.J.; Brazel, E.G.; Rubin, M.E.; Bhargava, S.; Chin, M.A.; Narayanamurti, V.

    1997-07-01

    We report an extensive investigation of semiconductor band-structure effects in single-barrier Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}As/GaAs heterostructures using ballistic-electron-emission spectroscopy (BEES). The transport mechanisms in these single-barrier structures were studied systematically as a function of temperature and Al composition over the full compositional range (0{le}x{le}1). The initial ({Gamma}) BEES thresholds for Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}As single barriers with 0{le}x{le}0.42 were extracted using a model which includes the complete transmission probability of the metal-semiconductor interface and the semiconductor heterostructure. Band offsets measured by BEES are in good agreement with previous measurements by other techniques which demonstrates the accuracy of this technique. BEES measurements at 77 K give the same band-offset values as at room temperature. When a reverse bias is applied to the heterostructures, the BEES thresholds shift to lower voltages in good agreement with the expected bias-induced band-bending. In the indirect band-gap regime ({ital x}{gt}0.45), spectra show a weak ballistic-electron-emission microscopy current contribution due to intervalley scattering through Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}As {ital X} valley states. Low-temperature spectra show a marked reduction in this intervalley current component, indicating that intervalley phonon scattering at the GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}As interface produces a significant fraction of this{ital X} valley current. A comparison of the BEES thresholds with the expected composition dependence of the Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}As {Gamma}, {ital L}, and {ital X} points yields good agreement over the entire composition range. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Prediction of CO Cameron band and atomic oxygen visible emissions in comets C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) and 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghuram, S.; Bhardwaj, A.

    2014-04-01

    The forbidden emissions of cometary species have special importance in the cometary spectra. The excited species which produce these forbidden emissions can not be populated by direct solar radiation excitation. These metastable species are produced mainly from dissociative excitation and ion-electron recombination reactions. Thus the observed emissions have been used as tracers of parent cometary species. The CO (a3 -X1) is a forbidden transition which produces Cameron band emission in the ultraviolet region during dissociative excitation of CObearing neutrals and the dissociative recombination of CO-ionic species in the cometary coma. Similarly, the forbidden transitions of metastable atomic oxygen 1S-3P (green, 5577 Å), and 1D-3P (red-doublet, 6300 and 6364 Å) produce line emissions in the visible region. These emissions have been used to probe H2O and CO2 abundances in the comets. We have developed a coupled chemistry-emission model to study various production and loss mechanisms of these excited metastable states. The model is applied to comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) which will have a close fly-by of Mars during mid October, 2014, when Indian Mars orbiter Mission and NASA's Maven, would be orbiting the planet. The model is also applied on ESA's Rosetta mission target comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko which will be useful for different observations over various heliocentric distances. The predicted intensities and quantitative analysis of these emissions can be a theoretical support for various space and ground-based observations.

  9. Telecommunication Wavelength-Band Single-Photon Emission from Single Large InAs Quantum Dots Nucleated on Low-Density Seed Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ze-Sheng; Ma, Ben; Shang, Xiang-Jun; He, Yu; Zhang, Li-Chun; Ni, Hai-Qiao; Wang, Jin-Liang; Niu, Zhi-Chuan

    2016-12-01

    Single-photon emission in the telecommunication wavelength band is realized with self-assembled strain-coupled bilayer InAs quantum dots (QDs) embedded in a planar microcavity on GaAs substrate. Low-density large QDs in the upper layer active for ~1.3 μm emission are fabricated by precisely controlling the indium deposition amount and applying a gradient indium flux in both QD layers. Time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) intensity suggested that the radiative lifetime of their exciton emission is 1.5~1.6 ns. The second-order correlation function of g (2)(0) < 0.5 which demonstrates a pure single-photon emission. PMID:27576522

  10. Two dimensional expansion effects on angular distribution of 13.5 nm in-band extreme ultraviolet emission from laser-produced Sn plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sequoia, K. L.; Tao, Y.; Yuspeh, S.; Burdt, R.; Tillack, M. S.

    2008-06-02

    The angular distribution of extreme ultraviolet emission at 13.5 nm within 2% bandwidth was characterized for laser irradiated, planar, Sn targets at prototypic conditions for a lithography system. We have found that two dimensional plasma expansion plays a key role in the distribution of in-band 13.5 nm emission under these conditions. The angular distribution was found to have two peaks at 45 deg. and 15 deg. This complex angular distribution arises from the shape of both the emitting plasma and the surrounding absorbing plasma. This research reveals that the detailed angular distribution can be important to the deduction of conversion efficiency.

  11. Optimization of excitation-emission band-pass filter for visualization of viable bacteria distribution on the surface of pork meat.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Ken; Nakamura, Kazuaki; Tsuta, Mizuki; Yoshimura, Masatoshi; Sugiyama, Junichi; Nakauchi, Shigeki

    2013-05-20

    A novel method of optically reducing the dimensionality of an excitation-emission matrix (EEM) by optimizing the excitation and emission band-pass filters was proposed and applied to the visualization of viable bacteria on pork. Filters were designed theoretically using an EEM data set for evaluating colony-forming units on pork samples assuming signal-to-noise ratios of 100, 316, or 1000. These filters were evaluated using newly measured EEM images. The filters designed for S/N = 100 performed the best and allowed the visualization of viable bacteria distributions. The proposed method is expected to be a breakthrough in the application of EEM imaging. PMID:23736477

  12. Unpolarized emissivity with shadow and multiple reflections from random rough surfaces with the geometric optics approximation: application to Gaussian sea surfaces in the infrared band.

    PubMed

    Bourlier, Christophe

    2006-08-20

    The emissivity from a stationary random rough surface is derived by taking into account the multiple reflections and the shadowing effect. The model is applied to the ocean surface. The geometric optics approximation is assumed to be valid, which means that the rough surface is modeled as a collection of facets reflecting locally the light in the specular direction. In particular, the emissivity with zero, single, and double reflections are analytically calculated, and each contribution is studied numerically by considering a 1D sea surface observed in the near infrared band. The model is also compared with results computed from a Monte Carlo ray-tracing method. PMID:16892130

  13. Absence of X-point band overlap in divalent hexaborides and variability of the surface chemical potential

    SciTech Connect

    Denlinger, Jonathan D.; Gweon, Gey-Hong; Mo, Sung-Kwan; Allen, James W.; Sarrao, John L.; Bianchi, Adrian D.; Fisk, Zachary

    2001-11-04

    Angle-resolved photoemission measurements of divalent hexaborides reveals a >1 eV X-point gap between the valence and conduction bands, in contradiction to the band overlap assumed in several models of their novel ferromagnetism. While the global ARPES band structure and gap size observed are consistent with the results of bulk-sensitive soft x-ray absorption and emission boron K-edge spectroscopy, the surface-sensitive photoemission measurements also show a variation with cation, surface and time of the position of the surface chemical potential in the band structure.

  14. Interaction of wide band gap single crystals with 248 nm excimer laser radiation. XII. The emission of negative atomic ions from alkali halides

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Kenichi; Langford, S. C.; Dickinson, J. T.

    2007-12-01

    Many wide band gap materials yield charged and neutral emissions when exposed to sub-band-gap laser radiation at power densities below the threshold for optical breakdown and plume formation. In this work, we report the observation of negative alkali ions from several alkali halides under comparable conditions. We observe no evidence for negative halogen ions, in spite of the high electron affinities of the halogens. Significantly, the positive and negative alkali ions show a high degree of spatial and temporal overlap. A detailed study of all the relevant particle emissions from potassium chloride (KCl) suggests that K{sup -} is formed by the sequential attachment of two electrons to K{sup +}.

  15. Site-selective laser-spectroscopy studies of the intrinsic 1.9-eV luminescence center in glassy SiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skuja, Linards; Suzuki, Toshio; Tanimura, Katsumi

    1995-12-01

    The intrinsic 1.9-eV photoluminescence band (the R band) in neutron-irradiated synthetic silica glass has been studied using site-selective photoluminescence excitation in the 2.0 eV absorption band and transient spectral hole-burning techniques. The measurements of the low-energy wing of the zero-phonon line intensity distribution function confirm the predicted nearly Gaussian shape with a peak at 1.93 eV and a half-width of 86 meV. The homogeneous shape of the emission contour (``single-site spectrum'') has been evaluated by a selective saturation method, revealing, a phonon sideband with a peak at 60 cm-1 and a width of approximately 500 cm-1. The total Huang-Rhys factor is estimated as 1.50+/-0.5 and the partial Huang-Rhys factor for the interaction with the 890 cm-1 local vibration is 0.08+/-0.04. The analysis of spectral parameters indicates that the R band cannot be due to peroxide or ozonide molecular ions and upholds the attribution of the center to the nonbridging oxygen hole center.

  16. Spectroscopy of Fe L-shell line emission from Fe XVII- XXIV in the 10--18 A wavelength band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Gregory Vallee

    2000-09-01

    The line emission from the L-shell, n --> 2, transitions in Fe XVII-XXIV falling in the ultra-soft x-ray regime from 10-18 Å has been measured using the Electron Beam Ion Trap located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The results of these measurements include wavelengths, relative intensities, and line identifications of over 150 features from Fe XVIII-XXIV. In addition, measurements of the intensity of the high- n L-shell transitions, i.e., n >= 5, in Fe XVII falling in the 9.8-11.5 Å wavelength band have been made. These measurements were done at single electron beam energies where the only population process is direct excitation followed by radiative cascades. Also presented in this work are the results of a systematic study of the relative and absolute cross sections of the 1s22s 22p1/22 p43/2 3d3/2J = 1 --> 1 s22s22p 6 J = 0 resonance to ls2 2s22 p21/2 2 p33/2 3d5/2J = 1 --> 1 s22s22p 6 J = 0 intercombination line in neon-like Fe XVII. This ratio was measured under conditions where different processes contribute to the line flux. The contributing processes are direct impact excitation followed by radiative cascades, blending with Fe XVI innershell satellites, and Fe XVI dielectronic recombination satellites involving capture into high- n levels. The measured ratio varies between 2.8 and 3.2 depending on the line formation processes. These values are higher than ratios measured in non-flaring active regions of the Sun. However, the measurements are significantly lower than values calculated with current atomic physics codes demonstrating that calculational methods are not yet accurate enough to provide relative intensities useful for comparative diagnostics. The results suggest that the relatively low ratio measured in non-flaring active regions may be a result of blending with innershell satellites of Fe XVI.

  17. GROUND-BASED DETECTIONS OF THERMAL EMISSION FROM THE DENSE HOT JUPITER WASP-43b IN THE H AND K{sub s} BANDS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Zhao, G.; Van Boekel, R.; Henning, Th.; Madhusudhan, N.; Chen, G.

    2013-06-10

    We report new detections of thermal emission from the transiting hot Jupiter WASP-43b in the H and K{sub s} bands as observed at secondary eclipses. The observations were made with the WIRCam instrument on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. We obtained a secondary eclipse depth of 0.103{sub -0.017}{sup +0.017}%$ and 0.194{sub -0.029}{sup +0.029} in the H and K{sub s} bands, respectively. The K{sub s}-band depth is consistent with the previous measurement in the narrow band centered at 2.09 {mu}m by Gillon et al. Our eclipse depths in both bands are consistent with a blackbody spectrum with a temperature of {approx}1850 K, slightly higher than the dayside equilibrium temperature without day-night energy redistribution. Based on theoretical models of the dayside atmosphere of WASP-43b, our data constrain the day-night energy redistribution in the planet to be {approx}< 15%-25%, depending on the metal content in the atmosphere. Combined with energy balance arguments, our data suggest that a strong temperature inversion is unlikely in the dayside atmosphere of WASP-43b. However, a weak inversion cannot be strictly ruled out at the current time. Future observations are required to place detailed constraints on the chemical composition of the atmosphere.

  18. Single Material Band Gap Engineering in GaAs Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Spirkoska, D.; Abstreiter, G.; Efros, A.; Conesa-Boj, S.; Morante, J. R.; Arbiol, J.; Fontcuberta i Morral, A.

    2011-12-23

    The structural and optical properties of GaAs nanowire with mixed zinc-blende/wurtzite structure are presented. High resolution transmission electron microscopy indicates the presence of a variety of shorter and longer segments of zinc-blende or wurtzite crystal phases. Sharp photoluminescence lines are observed with emission energies tuned from 1.515 eV down to 1.43 eV. The downward shift of the emission peaks can be understood by carrier confinement at the wurtzite/zinc-blende heterojunction, in quantum wells and in random short period superlattices existent in these nanowires, assuming the theoretical staggered band-offset between wurtzite and zinc-blende GaAs.

  19. How Do The EV Project Participants Feel About Their EVS?

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, James E.

    2015-02-01

    The EV Project is an infrastructure study that enrolled over 8,000 residential participants. These participants purchased or leased a Nissan Leaf battery electric vehicle (BEV) or Chevrolet Volt extended range electric vehicle (EREV) and were among the first to explore this new electric drive technology. Collectively, BEV, EREV, and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are called plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs). The EV Project participants were very cooperative and enthusiastic about their participation in the project and very supportive in providing feedback and information. The information and attitudes of these participants concerning their experience with their PEVs were solicited using a survey in June 2013. At that time, some had up to 3 years of experience with their PEVs.

  20. [Effect of oxygen partial pressure on the band-gap of the TiO2 films prepared by DC reactive sputtering].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qing-nan; Li, Chun-ling; Liu, Bao-shun; Zhao, Xiu-jian

    2004-05-01

    TiO2 films have been deposited on glass substrates using DC reactive magnetron sputtering at different oxygen partial pressures from 0.10 to 0.65 Pa. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the films were recorded. The results of the PL spectra showed that there were three emission peaks at 370, 472 and 514 nm for the films sputtered at 0.35 and 0.65 Pa, and there were two peaks at 370 and 490 nm for the films sputtered at 0.10 and 0.15 Pa. The band-gap for the films was 3.35 eV. For the films sputtered at 0.35 and 0.65 Pa there were two defect energy levels at 2.63 and 2.41 eV, corresponding to 0.72 and 0.94 eV below conduction band for the band-gap, respectively. For the films sputtered at 0.10 and 0.15 Pa, there was an energy band formed between 3.12 and 2.06 eV, corresponding to 0.23 and 1.29 eV below the conduction band. With increasing the oxygen partial pressure, the defect energy band changed to two energy levels, and the energy levels nearly disappeared for the film sputtered at 0.65 Pa of oxygen partial pressure. PMID:15769058

  1. Optical spectroscopy of IRAS sources with infrared emission bands. II. IRAS 04324+5106, 06114+1745, 20319+3958, and 22539+5758

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.; Jones, B.F.; Walker, H.J.; Lick Observatory, Santa Cruz, CA; Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence Institute, Los Altos, CA )

    1989-06-01

    The paper presents long-slit optical spectra and microwave CO spectra of four nebulous counterparts to IRAS sources showing PAH emission features: 04324+5106, 06114+1745, 20319+3958, and 22539+5758. IRAS 22539+5758 is associated with a bipolar nebula. All are allied with B-type stars that suffer appreciable circumstellar extinction, and whose environs show atomic emission lines; three represent mixed reflection/emission nebulosities. Three show spectroscopic evidence for outflows at about 100 km/s. One, 06114+1745, exhibits indications of enhanced diffuse interstellar bands. It is concluded that extinction alone is insufficient to yield enhanced DIBs and that peculiar circumstellar abundances and/or physical conditions must play a role. 20 refs.

  2. Enhancement of band gap and photoconductivity in gamma indium selenide due to swift heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sreekumar, R.; Jayakrishnan, R.; Sudha Kartha, C.; Vijayakumar, K. P.; Khan, S. A.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2008-01-15

    {gamma}-In{sub 2}Se{sub 3} thin films prepared at different annealing temperatures ranging from 100 to 400 deg. C were irradiated using 90 MeV Si ions with a fluence of 2x10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. X-ray diffraction analysis proved that there is no considerable variation in structural properties of the films due to the swift heavy ion irradiation. However, photosensitivity and sheet resistance of the samples increased due to irradiation. It was observed that the sample, which had negative photoconductivity, exhibited positive photoconductivity, after irradiation. The negative photoconductivity was due to the combined effect of trapping of photoexcited electrons, at traps 1.42 and 1.26 eV, above the valence band along with destruction of the minority carriers, created during illumination, through recombination. Photoluminescence study revealed that the emission was due to the transition to a recombination center, which was 180 meV above the valence band. Optical absorption study proved that the defects present at 1.42 and 1.26 eV were annealed out by the ion beam irradiation. This allowed photoexcited carriers to reach conduction band, which resulted in positive photoconductivity. Optical absorption study also revealed that the band gap of the material could be increased by ion beam irradiation. The sample prepared at 400 deg. C had a band gap of 2 eV and this increased to 2.8 eV, after irradiation. The increase in optical band gap was attributed to the annihilation of localized defect bands, near the conduction and valence band edges, on irradiation. Thus, by ion beam irradiation, one could enhance photosensitivity as well as the optical band gap of {gamma}-In{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, making the material suitable for applications such as window layer in solar cells.

  3. Enhancement of band gap and photoconductivity in gamma indium selenide due to swift heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreekumar, R.; Jayakrishnan, R.; Sudha Kartha, C.; Vijayakumar, K. P.; Khan, S. A.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2008-01-01

    γ-In2Se3 thin films prepared at different annealing temperatures ranging from 100to400°C were irradiated using 90MeV Si ions with a fluence of 2×1013ions/cm2. X-ray diffraction analysis proved that there is no considerable variation in structural properties of the films due to the swift heavy ion irradiation. However, photosensitivity and sheet resistance of the samples increased due to irradiation. It was observed that the sample, which had negative photoconductivity, exhibited positive photoconductivity, after irradiation. The negative photoconductivity was due to the combined effect of trapping of photoexcited electrons, at traps 1.42 and 1.26eV, above the valence band along with destruction of the minority carriers, created during illumination, through recombination. Photoluminescence study revealed that the emission was due to the transition to a recombination center, which was 180meV above the valence band. Optical absorption study proved that the defects present at 1.42 and 1.26eV were annealed out by the ion beam irradiation. This allowed photoexcited carriers to reach conduction band, which resulted in positive photoconductivity. Optical absorption study also revealed that the band gap of the material could be increased by ion beam irradiation. The sample prepared at 400°C had a band gap of 2eV and this increased to 2.8eV, after irradiation. The increase in optical band gap was attributed to the annihilation of localized defect bands, near the conduction and valence band edges, on irradiation. Thus, by ion beam irradiation, one could enhance photosensitivity as well as the optical band gap of γ-In2Se3, making the material suitable for applications such as window layer in solar cells.

  4. Seasonal and diurnal variation of ELF emission occurrences at 750-Hz band observed at geomagnetically conjugate stations

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Hiroyuki ); Sato, Natsuo )

    1987-06-01

    Statistical characteristics of emission occurrence are examined, using digital data of 750-Hz intensity records obtained at the conuugate pai of statins, Syowa Station in Antarrctica and Husafell in Iceland. The geographic local time at Syowa and Husafell is magnetic local time plus 3 hours and minur 1 hour, respectively. The following notable diurnal variations and seasonal variations were found: (1) The emissions were mostly observed during the daytime in the conjugate region. However, the magnetic local time when the emission occurrence rate reached maximum at Husafell was 2-3 hours later than that at Syowa. (2) The seasonal variations of emission occurrence showed the same tendency at the conjugate stations. The emission intensities showed a maximum during local summer and a minimum during local winter in both hemispheres. The ratio fo average emission intensity in each season to the intensity in winter is approximately 2.1-2.2 for summer, 1.7-1.9 for autumn, and 1.7 for spring. From these statistical characteristics, ELF emission intensity strongly depends on not only magnetic local time but also geographic local time and seasons, suggesting that ELF emissions observed on the ground are strongly controlled by the sunlight effects. The sunlight may affect the asymmetry of wave duct enhancement and wave propagation from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere in both hemisphers. Other effects are also discussed in this paper.

  5. Search for the OH (X(2)Pi) Meinel band emission in meteors as a tracer of mineral water in comets: detection of N(2)(+) (A-X)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Laux, Christophe O.

    2004-01-01

    We report the discovery of the N(2)(+) A-X Meinel band in the 780-840 nm meteor emission from two Leonid meteoroids that were ejected less than 1000 years ago by comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle. Our analysis indicates that the N(2)(+) molecule is at least an order of magnitude less abundant than expected, possibly as a result of charge transfer reactions with meteoric metal atoms. This new band was found while searching for rovibrational transitions in the X(2)Pi electronic ground state of OH (the OH Meinel band), a potential tracer of water bound to minerals in cometary matter. The electronic A-X transition of OH has been identified in other Leonid meteors. We did not detect this OH Meinel band, which implies that the excited A state is not populated by thermal excitation but by a mechanism that directly produces OH in low vibrational levels of the excited A(2)Sigma state. Ultraviolet dissociation of atmospheric or meteoric water vapor is such a mechanism, as is the possible combustion of meteoric organics.

  6. Complex organic matter in space: about the chemical composition of carriers of the Unidentified Infrared Bands (UIBs) and protoplanetary emission spectra recorded from certain astrophysical objects.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, Franco; Keheyan, Yeghis; Heymann, Dieter

    2004-02-01

    In this communication we present the basic concept that the pure PAHs (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons) can be considered only the ideal carriers of the UIBs (Unidentified Infrared Bands), the emission spectra coming from a large variety of astronomical objects. Instead we have proposed that the carriers of UIBs and of protoplanetary nebulae (PPNe) emission spectra are much more complex molecular mixtures possessing also complex chemical structures comparable to certain petroleum fractions obtained from the petroleum refining processes. The demonstration of our proposal is based on the comparison between the emission spectra recorded from the protoplanetary nebulae (PPNe) IRAS 22272+ 5435 and the infrared absorption spectra of certain 'heavy' petroleum fractions. It is shown that the best match with the reference spectrum is achieved by highly aromatic petroleum fractions. It is shown that the selected petroleum fractions used in the present study are able to match the band pattern of anthracite coal. Coal has been proposed previously as a model for the PPNe and UIBs but presents some drawbacks which could be overcome by adopting the petroleum fractions as model for PPNe and UIBs in place of coal. A brief discussion on the formation of the petroleum-like fractions in PPNe objects is included. PMID:14979641

  7. Discrete-variational Hartree-Fock-Slater calculation of polarized B K-emission band from hexagonal boron nitride thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidenori Kohzuki; Takahiro Kaneyoshi; Muneyuki Motoyama; Yoshiyuki Kowada; Yasuji Muramatsu; Jun Kawai; Fumikazu Kanamaru

    1997-03-01

    The B K X-ray emission spectrum of h-BN can be approximately reproduced by the DV-Xα calculation, using the two-dimensional model cluster constructed of a mono-layer of the planar hexagonal network. In order to verify the polarized B K X-ray emission spectrum of h-BN, the contributions of the σ, π and π ∗ subbands to its spectral feature were estimated at different take-off angles for the c axis of an h-BN crystal. The high-energy satellite band increases its intensity, remarkably, due to the contribution of the π ∗ subband with increase in take-off angle, whereas the low-energy satellite band decreases its intensity due to the contribution of the σ subband. The measured B K X-ray emission spectrum of the ion-plated h-BN thin film is in good agreement with the calculated one at a take-off angle of 90°.

  8. Near-band-edge photoluminescence emission in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}N under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, W.; Ager, J.W. III; Walukiewicz, W.; Haller, E.E.; Little, B.D.; Song, J.J.; Schurman, M.; Feng, Z.C.; Stall, R.A.; Goldenberg, B.

    1998-05-01

    We present results of pressure-dependent photoluminescence (PL) studies of single-crystal Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}N epitaxial films grown on sapphire substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. PL measurements were performed under hydrostatic pressure using the diamond-anvil-cell technique. PL spectra taken from the Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}N epitaxial films are dominated by strong near-band-edge luminescence emissions. The emission lines were found to shift linearly towards higher energy with increasing pressure. By examining the pressure dependence of the spectral features, the pressure coefficients for the PL emissions associated with the direct {Gamma} band gap of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}N were determined. Our results yield a pressure coefficient of 4.0{times}10{sup {minus}3}eV/kbar for Al{sub 0.05}Ga{sub 0.95}N and 3.6{times}10{sup {minus}3}eV/kbar for Al{sub 0.35}Ga{sub 0.65}N. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Temperature profile retrieval in axisymmetric combustion plumes using multilayer perceptron modeling and spectral feature selection in the infrared CO2 emission band.

    PubMed

    García-Cuesta, Esteban; de Castro, Antonio J; Galván, Inés M; López, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a methodology based on the combined use of a multilayer perceptron model fed using selected spectral information is presented to invert the radiative transfer equation (RTE) and to recover the spatial temperature profile inside an axisymmetric flame. The spectral information is provided by the measurement of the infrared CO2 emission band in the 3-5 μm spectral region. A guided spectral feature selection was carried out using a joint criterion of principal component analysis and a priori physical knowledge of the radiative problem. After applying this guided feature selection, a subset of 17 wavenumbers was selected. The proposed methodology was applied over synthetic scenarios. Also, an experimental validation was carried out by measuring the spectral emission of the exhaust hot gas plume in a microjet engine with a Fourier transform-based spectroradiometer. Temperatures retrieved using the proposed methodology were compared with classical thermocouple measurements, showing a good agreement between them. Results obtained using the proposed methodology are very promising and can encourage the use of sensor systems based on the spectral measurement of the CO2 emission band in the 3-5 μm spectral window to monitor combustion processes in a nonintrusive way. PMID:25061791

  10. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Engineering Test Report: Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A1, S/N 108 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, A.

    2000-01-01

    This is the Engineering Test Report, Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A1 SIN 108, for the Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A).

  11. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Engineering Test Report: Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A2, S/N 108, 08

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, A.

    2000-01-01

    This is the Engineering Test Report, Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A2, S/N 108, for the Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A).

  12. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Engineering Test Report: Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A1, S/N 109

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, A.

    2000-01-01

    This is the Engineering Test Report, Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A1, S/N 109, for the Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A).

  13. Probing substrate-induced perturbations on the band structure of graphene on Ni(1 1 1) by soft X-ray emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Vinogradov, Nikolay; Preobrajenski, Alexei; Butorin, Sergei; Zhu, Junfa; Guo, Jinghua

    2013-08-01

    The influence of substrate-induced perturbations on the band structure of graphene has been investigated by soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) for graphene on Ni(1 1 1). The band-dispersion features of graphene on Ni(1 1 1) are different from those of HOPG and 'quasi-freestanding' graphene (graphene/Cu) because of the strong interfacial interaction. By comparing the XES spectra excited with energy at the π∗ resonance of HOPG, graphene/Cu and graphene/Ni in detail, we find that the spectral shape change can be directly related to the different electronic states hybridization strength of graphene on metal substrates, supplying a feasible way for investigating the graphene-metal bonding strength.

  14. Using band engineering to tailor the emission spectra of trichromatic semipolar InGaN light-emitting diodes for phosphor-free polarized white light emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowsz, S. J.; Pynn, C. D.; Oh, S. H.; Farrell, R. M.; DenBaars, S. P.; Nakamura, S.

    2016-07-01

    We report a polarized white light-emitting device that monolithically integrates an electrically injected blue light-emitting diode grown on the (20 2 ¯ 1 ¯ ) face of a bulk GaN substrate and optically pumped InGaN quantum wells (QWs) with green and red light emission grown on the (20 2 ¯ 1 ) face. To overcome the challenges associated with growing high indium content InGaN QWs for long wavelength emission, a p-i-n doping profile was used to red-shift the emission wavelength of one of the optically pumped QWs by creating a built-in electric field in the same direction as the polarization-induced electric field. Emission peaks were observed at 450 nm from the electrically injected QW and at 520 nm and 590 nm from the optically pumped QWs, which were situated in n-i-n and p-i-n structures, respectively. The optically pumped QW in the p-i-n structure was grown at a growth temperature that was 10 °C colder compared to the QW in the n-i-n structure, so the emission from the QW in the p-i-n structure was red-shifted due to increased indium content as well as the built-in electric field. Modeling work confirmed that the built-in electric field made a greater contribution than the change in alloy composition to the red-shift in emission from the QW in the p-i-n structure. The combined emission from the red, green, and blue QWs resulted in white-light emission with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage x- and y-chromaticity coordinates of (0.33, 0.35) and an optical polarization ratio of 0.30.

  15. Study of band offsets at the Cu2SnS3/In2O3: Sn interface using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Sandra; Krupanidhi, S. B.

    2015-06-01

    Cu2SnS3 thins films were deposited onto In2O3: Sn coated soda lime glass substrates by spin coating technique. The films have been structurally characterized using x-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The morphology of the films was studied using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). The optical properties of the films were determined using UV-vis-NIR spectrophotometer. The electrical properties were measured using Hall effect measurements. The energy band offsets at the Cu2SnS3/In2O3: Sn interface were calculated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The valence band offset was found to be -3.4 ± 0.24 eV. From the valence band offset value, the conduction band offset is calculated to be -1.95 ± 0.34 eV. The energy band alignment indicates a type-II misaligned heterostructure formation.

  16. Electrostatic emissions between electron gyroharmonics in the outer magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, R. F.; Birmingham, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    A scheme was constructed and a theoretical model was developed to classify electrostatic emissions. All of the emissions appear to be generated by the same basic mechanism: an unstable electron plasma distribution consisting of cold electrons (less than 100 eV) and hot loss cone electrons (about 1 keV). Each emission class is associated with a particular range of model parameters; the wide band electric field data can thus be used to infer the density and temperature of the cold plasma component. The model predicts that gyroharmonic emissions near the plasma frequency require large cold plasma densities.

  17. Overcoming the high cost of EV batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, S.R.

    1995-07-01

    Electric Vehicles (EV`s) are a solution to three major problems facing the US today. The commercialization of EV`s will reduce the growing trade deficit, provide economic gains from a new electric automobile industry, and help alleviate the air pollution problems encountered in many of America`s largest cities. The existence of EV`s is not the answer; their increasing use is. This increase in deployment will largely depend on vehicle price and not range limitations as many would have you believe. The price of an EV will be determined by the auto makers with their economics determining the ultimate price to the consumer. The cost of EV batteries is considered to be a major hurdle in achieving an affordable EV. Prices of EV batteries at this time cannot be controlled by the auto manufacturers. How high is this cost hurdle and what measures can be taken to reduce this obstacle and facilitate the successful commercialization of EV`s? This paper discusses a variety of alternatives. Each sector of industry may favor a particular solution, but, in order for the EV industry to thrive, all sectors must agree to work together to provide for customer needs.

  18. Strong electroluminescence from direct band and defects in Ge n+/p shallow junctions at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guangyang; Wang, Chen; Li, Cheng; Chen, Chaowen; Huang, Zhiwei; Huang, Wei; Chen, Songyan; Lai, Hongkai; Jin, Chunyan; Sun, Jiaming

    2016-05-01

    Strong room temperature electroluminescence with two emission peaks at around 0.786 eV and 0.747 eV from Ge n+/p shallow junctions was reported. The peak at around 0.786 eV comes from direct band luminescence (DBL) in n + Ge regions, while the peak fixing at 0.747 eV is resulted from defects induced by ion implantation. Heavy n-type doping in Ge renders realization of strong defect-related luminescence (DRL) feasible. The peak intensity ratio of DRL/DBL decreases with increase of injection current since more electrons are filled in Γ valley. Above all, the Ge n+/p shallow junction is fully compatible with the source and drain in Ge metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors.

  19. On sky characterization of the BAORadio wide band digital backend. Search for HI emission in Abell85, Abell1205 and Abell2440 galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Campagne, J. E.; Colom, P.; Ferrari, C.; Magneville, Ch.; Martin, J. M.; Moniez, M.; Torrentó, A. S.

    2016-02-01

    We have observed regions of three galaxy clusters at z˜[0.06÷0.09] (Abell85, Abell1205, Abell2440) with the Nançay radiotelescope (NRT) to search for 21 cm emission and to fully characterize the FPGA based BAORadio digital backend. We have tested the new BAORadio data acquisition system by observing sources in parallel with the NRT standard correlator (ACRT) back-end over several months. BAORadio enables wide band instantaneous observation of the [1250,1500] MHz frequency range, as well as the use of powerful RFI mitigation methods thanks to its fine time sampling. A number of questions related to instrument stability, data processing and calibration are discussed. We have obtained the radiometer curves over the integration time range [0.01,10 000] seconds and we show that sensitivities of few mJy over most of the wide frequency band can be reached with the NRT. It is clearly shown that in blind line search, which is the context of H I intensity mapping for Baryon Acoustic Oscillations, the new acquisition system and processing pipeline outperforms the standard one. We report a positive detection of 21 cm emission at 3 σ-level from galaxies in the outer region of Abell85 at ≃1352 MHz (14400 km/s) corresponding to a line strength of ≃0.8 Jy km/s. We also observe an excess power around ≃1318 MHz (21600 km/s), although at lower statistical significance, compatible with emission from Abell1205 galaxies. Detected radio line emissions have been cross matched with optical catalogs and we have derived hydrogen mass estimates.

  20. Carbon-doped SiO(x) nanowires with a large yield of white emission.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Filippo; Rossi, Francesca; Negri, Marco; Tatti, Roberta; Aversa, Lucrezia; Dhanabalan, Sathish Chander; Verucchi, Roberto; Attolini, Giovanni; Salviati, Giancarlo

    2014-05-01

    The growth of SiOx nanowires (NWs) with intense white emission is reported. Due to carbon monoxide gas being used as a dopant precursor, carbon-doped under-stoichiometric silicon dioxide NWs are obtained. The doping of the NWs is studied by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which allows to assess the presence of carbon atoms in the silicon oxide amorphous structure. The light emission properties are studied by means of cathodoluminescence spectroscopy, which shows three main emission bands set at 2.7 eV (blue), 2.3 eV (green) and 1.9 eV (red), resulting in the white emission. PMID:24736107

  1. Photosensized Controlling Benzyl Methacrylate-Based Matrix Enhanced Eu3+ Narrow-Band Emission for Fluorescence Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jiann-Fong; Chen, Hsuen-Li; Lee, Geneh-Siang; Tseng, Shao-Chin; Lin, Mei-Hsiang; Liau, Wen-Bin

    2012-01-01

    This study synthesized a europium (Eu3+) complex Eu(DBM)3Cl-MIP (DBM = dibenzoyl methane; Cl-MIP = 2-(2-chlorophenyl)-1-methyl-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline) dispersed in a benzyl methacrylate (BMA) monomer and treated with ultraviolet (UV) light for polymerization. Spectral results showed that the europium complex containing an antenna, Cl-MIP, which had higher triplet energy into the Eu3+ energy level, was an energetically enhanced europium emission. Typical stacking behaviors of π–π interactions between the ligands and the Eu3+-ion were analyzed using single crystal X-ray diffraction. Regarding the luminescence performance of this europium composite, the ligand/defect emission was suppressed by dispersion in a poly-BMA (PBMA) matrix. The underlying mechanism of the effective enhancement of the pure Eu3+ emission was attributed to the combined effects of structural modifications, defect emissions, and carrier charge transfer. Fluorescence spectra were compared to the composite of optimized Eu3+ emission where they were subsequently chelated to four metal ions via carboxylate groups on the BMA unit. The optical enhanced europium composite clearly demonstrated highly efficient optical responses and is, therefore a promising application as an optical detection material. PMID:22489178

  2. Estimation of band gap of muscovite mineral using thermoluminescence (TL) analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, J. M.; Wary, G.

    2016-03-01

    In this article thermoluminescence (TL) mechanism in muscovite mineral has been reported in detail. The trap spectroscopy of the mineral has been studied from the TL glow curve of X-ray irradiated sample. A stable TL peak has been observed at around 347 K in the glow curve, however after annealing the sample above 573 K an additional peak is observed at around 408 K. In the TL emission spectra an emission peak has been observed at around 447 nm at TL peak maximum temperatures. The glow curves are analyzed by Tm-Tstop analysis, peak shape method and fractional glow technique. Analyses showed that there is a trap center and a radiative recombination center at depth around 0.71 and 2.78 eV from the conduction band. These two localized centers do not affected by annealing up to 773 K. However, annealing at 573 K (or above) a new electron trap center was found to generate at depth around 1.23 eV. This significant result has been confirmed with the help of phototransfer phenomena observed under UV irradiation. Due to UV irradiation on the excited sample, the transfer of trapped charges from the deeper trap level (1.23 eV) to the shallow level (0.71 eV) has been observed. Based on the analysis a schematic band diagram of muscovite crystal has been proposed. With the help of the band model, radiative as well as non-radiative recombination mechanisms have been discussed. The band gap of the material has been estimated to be around 5.09 eV and verified.

  3. Simultaneous K- and L-band Spectroscopy of Be Stars: Circumstellar Envelope Properties from Hydrogen Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granada, A.; Arias, M. L.; Cidale, L. S.

    2010-05-01

    We present medium-resolution K- and L-band spectra of a sample of eight Be stars, obtained with Gemini/NIRI. The IR K and L bands contain many lines of different hydrogen series that are used as a diagnosis to the physical conditions in the circumstellar environments. We make an analysis on the optical depths of the line-forming regions based on the intensity ratios of Pfγ and Brα lines, the behavior of Humphreys' series, and the fluxes of Brα and Brγ lines. All our targets show spectroscopic and photometric long-term variability; thus, time-resolved K- and L-band spectroscopy is an ideal tool for studying the structure and evolution of the innermost regions of the envelope and to test models on the disk-forming mechanism. We note that the instrumental configuration used allowed us to obtain good quality IR observations and to take profit of Gemini band 3 observing time (allocation time for ranked programs in which the observing conditions are relaxed). Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (USA), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (UK), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  4. Operation of an ungated diamond field-emission array cathode in a L-band radiofrequency electron source

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, P.; Brau, C. A.; Gabella, W. E.; Ivanov, B.; Mendenhall, M. H.; Choi, B. K.; Blomberg, B.; Mihalcea, D.; Panuganti, H.; Jarvis, J.; Prieto, P.; Reid, J.

    2014-06-30

    We report on the operation of a field-emitter-array cathode in a conventional L-band radio-frequency electron source. The cathode consisted of an array of ∼10{sup 6} diamond tips on pyramids. Maximum current on the order of 15 mA was reached and the cathode did not show appreciable signs of fatigue after weeks of operation. The measured Fowler-Nordheim characteristics, transverse beam density, and current stability are discussed.

  5. The first identification of C2 emission bands in comet Scorichenko-George (1989e1) spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Churyumov, Klim I.; Chorny, G. F.

    1992-01-01

    Wave lengths from 360 emissions within the spectral range lambda lambda 3380-6290 A in the spectrum of the comet Scorichenko-George, obtained with the help of the TV spectral scanner of a 6-meter reflector BTA (in Special AO) have been determined. The CN, C2, C3, NH, CH, CO, Na, NH2, N2(+), CO(+), CO2(+), H2O(+), and C2(-) emissions have been identified. For the first time, it has been shown that emissions of C2(-) (the transitions 0-0, 0-1, et al.) in the cometary spectrum possibly exist. Molecular ions C2(-) column density with cross-section 1 sq cm is N = 1.44 10(exp -12) cm(exp -2) and their upper limits of gas C2(-) productivity is Q(C2(-)) = 2 10(exp 28) c(exp -1).

  6. Electronic structure descriptor for the discovery of narrow-band red-emitting phosphors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Zhenbin; Chu, Iek -Heng; Zhou, Fei; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-05-09

    Narrow-band red-emitting phosphors are a critical component of phosphor-converted light-emitting diodes for highly efficient illumination-grade lighting. In this work, we report the discovery of a quantitative descriptor for narrow-band Eu2+-activated emission identified through a comparison of the electronic structures of known narrow-band and broad-band phosphors. We find that a narrow emission bandwidth is characterized by a large splitting of more than 0.1 eV between the two highest Eu2+ 4f7 bands. By incorporating this descriptor in a high-throughput first-principles screening of 2259 nitride compounds, we identify five promising new nitride hosts for Eu2+-activated red-emitting phosphors that are predicted to exhibit goodmore » chemical stability, thermal quenching resistance, and quantum efficiency, as well as narrow-band emission. Lastly, our findings provide important insights into the emission characteristics of rare-earth activators in phosphor hosts and a general strategy to the discovery of phosphors with a desired emission peak and bandwidth.« less

  7. The role of valence-band excitation in laser ablation of KCl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haglund, Richard F., Jr.; Tang, Kai; Bunton, Patrick H.; Wang, Ling-Jun

    1991-01-01

    We present recent measurements of excited-atom and ion emission from KCl surfaces illuminated by vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation (h-nu = 8-28 eV) and ultraviolet laser light (h-nu = 4 eV). At low intensities characteristic of the synchrotron experiments, excited atoms are desorbed by simple valence-band excitation process involving the metallization of the KCl surface. At the higher intensities typical of laser desorption and ablation, we observe a strong decrease in K emission as a function of the number of laser shots, but an essentially constant yield of Cl. K(+) and Cl(-) emission at high intensities show similar behavior. The energetics of these desorption phenomena can be treated in a bond-orbital model which shows that creation of a single valence hole is sufficient to excite an ion to an anti-bonding state.

  8. EV space suit gloves (passive)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, E. G.; Dodson, J. D.; Elkins, W.; Tickner, E. G.

    1975-01-01

    A pair of pressure and thermal insulating overgloves to be used with an Extravehicular (EV) suit assembly was designed, developed, fabricated, and tested. The design features extensive use of Nomex felt materials in lieu of the multiple layer insulation formerly used with the Apollo thermal glove. The glove theoretically satisfies all of the thermal requirements. The presence of the thermal glove does not degrade pressure glove tactility by more than the acceptable 10% value. On the other hand, the thermal glove generally degrades pressure glove mobility by more than the acceptable 10% value, primarily in the area of the fingers. Life cycling tests were completed with minimal problems. The thermal glove/pressure glove ensemble was also tested for comfort; the test subjects found no problems with the thermal glove although they did report difficulties with pressure points on the pressure glove which were independent of the thermal glove.

  9. First Operation of an Ungated Diamond Field-Emission Array Cathode in a L-Band Radiofrequency Electron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, P.; Brau, C. A.; Choi, B. K.; Blomberg, B.; Gabella, W. E.; Ivanov, B.; Jarvis, J.; Mendenhall, M. H.; Mihalcea, D.; Panuganti, S.; Prieto, P.; Reid, J.

    2014-06-30

    We report on the first successful operation of a field-emitter-array cathode in a conventional L-band radio-frequency electron source. The cathode consisted of an array of $\\sim 10^6$ diamond diamond tips on pyramids. Maximum current on the order of 15~mA were reached and the cathode did not show appreciable signs of fatigue after weeks of operation. The measured Fowler-Nordheim characteristics, transverse beam density, and current stability are discussed. Numerical simulations of the beam dynamics are also presented.

  10. Tunability of the optical band edge in thin PbS films chemically deposited on GaAs(100).

    PubMed

    Osherov, Anna; Makai, Janos P; Balazs, Janos; Horvath, Zsolt J; Gutman, Nadav; Sa'ar, Amir; Golan, Yuval

    2010-07-01

    The optical properties of chemical-solution-deposited thin films of lead sulfide (PbS) were investigated using infrared transmission and photoluminescence spectroscopies. The synthesized films are characterized by a wide range of microstructures, from 15 nm nanocrystals up to monocrystals. Energy bandgap values for bulk and nanostructured layers varied from 0.41 eV up to 0.48 eV, respectively. Blueshifts in both absorbance and emission peaks of the nanostructured layers were obtained due to quantum size effects. The optical properties of the films are shown to be size-dependent, with the band edge increasing with temperature. PMID:21386454