Science.gov

Sample records for evacuated aerogel glazings

  1. Evacuated Window Glazing Research and Development: A Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D. K.; Tracy, C. E.; Jorgensen, G. J.

    1984-12-01

    This document summarizes progress during a nine-month period of an ongoing, exploratory research talk. The objective of the research is to evaluate the technical feasibility of a highly insulating, evacuated glazing for windows and other building apertures. Research includes engineering design and analysis of the glazing structure, materials development for its components, and the development of fabrication processes that could be used in the practical, mass production of such a glazing system. The targeted design performance goals are 70 percent solar weighted transmittance with less than 0.5 W/m2 K conductance (insulating R value greater than 12 F ft2 h/Btu) with an acceptable view quality.

  2. Energy performance of evacuated glazings in residential buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.; Beck, F.; arasteh, D.; Selkowitz, S.

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents the results of a study investigating the energy performance of evacuated glazings or glazings which maintain a vacuum between two panes of glass. Their performance is determined by comparing results to prototype highly insulated superwindows as well as a more conventional. insulating glass unit with a low-E coating and argon gas fill. We used the DOE2.1E energy analysis simulation program to analyze the annual and hourly heating energy use due to the windows of a prototypical single-story house located in Madison, Wisconsin. Cooling energy performance was also investigated. Our results show that for highly insulating windows, the solar heat gain coefficient is as important as the window`s U-factor in determining heating performance for window orientations facing west-south-east. For other orientations in which there is not much direct solar radiation, the window`s U-factor primarily governs performance. The vacuum glazings had lower heating requirements than the superwindows for most window orientations. The conventional low-E window outperformed the superwindows for southwest-south-southeast orientations These performance differences are directly related to the solar heat gain coefficients of the various windows analyzed. The cooling performance of the windows was inversely related to the heating performance. The lower solar heat gain coefficients of the superwindows resulted in the best cooling performance. However, we were able to mitigate the cooling differences of the windows by using an interior shading device that reduced the amount of solar gain at appropriate times.

  3. Energy performance of evacuated glazings in residential buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.; Beck, F.; Arasteh, D.; Selkowitz, S.

    1996-10-01

    This paper presents the results of a study investigating the energy performance of evacuated glazings or glazings which maintain a vacuum between two panes of glass. Their performance is determined by comparing results to prototype highly insulated superwindows as well as a more conventional insulating glass unit with a low-E coating and argon gas fill. The authors used the DOE-2.1E energy analysis simulation program to analyze the annual and hourly heating energy use due to the windows of a prototypical single-story house located in Madison, Wisconsin. Cooling energy performance was also investigated. The results show that for highly insulating windows, the solar heat gain coefficient is as important as the window`s U-factor in determining heating performance for window orientations facing west-south-east. For other orientations in which there is not much direct solar radiation, the window`s U-factor primarily governs performance. The vacuum glazings had lower heating requirements than the superwindows for most window orientations. The conventional low-E window outperformed the superwindows for southwest-south-southeast orientations. These performance differences are directly related to the solar heat gain coefficients of the various windows analyzed. The cooling performance of the windows was inversely related to the heating performance. The lower solar heat gain coefficients of the superwindows resulted in the best cooling performance. However, the authors were able to mitigate the cooling differences of the windows by using an interior shading device that reduced the amount of solar gain at appropriate times.

  4. Glaze poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    The harmful substances in glaze are: Hydrocarbons (including basalt, borax frit, and zinc oxide) Lead ... Gummin DD. Hydrocarbons. In: Adams JG, ed. Emergency Medicine . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 152. Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. ...

  5. Improved Aerogel Vacuum Thermal Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruemmele, Warren P.; Bue, Grant C.

    2009-01-01

    An improved design concept for aerogel vacuum thermal-insulation panels calls for multiple layers of aerogel sandwiched between layers of aluminized Mylar (or equivalent) poly(ethylene terephthalate), as depicted in the figure. This concept is applicable to both the rigid (brick) form and the flexible (blanket) form of aerogel vacuum thermal-insulation panels. Heretofore, the fabrication of a typical aerogel vacuum insulating panel has involved encapsulation of a single layer of aerogel in poly(ethylene terephthalate) and pumping of gases out of the aerogel-filled volume. A multilayer panel according to the improved design concept is fabricated in basically the same way: Multiple alternating layers of aerogel and aluminized poly(ethylene terephthalate) are assembled, then encapsulated in an outer layer of poly(ethylene terephthalate), and then the volume containing the multilayer structure is evacuated as in the single-layer case. The multilayer concept makes it possible to reduce effective thermal conductivity of a panel below that of a comparable single-layer panel, without adding weight or incurring other performance penalties. Implementation of the multilayer concept is simple and relatively inexpensive, involving only a few additional fabrication steps to assemble the multiple layers prior to evacuation. For a panel of the blanket type, the multilayer concept, affords the additional advantage of reduced stiffness.

  6. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOEpatents

    Selkowitz, Stephen E.; Arasteh, Dariush K.; Hartmann, John L.

    1991-01-01

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas.

  7. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOEpatents

    Selkowitz, S.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Hartmann, J.L.

    1988-04-05

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas. 2 figs.

  8. Glazes, the Final Touch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigrosh, Leon I.

    1977-01-01

    Have you ever wondered, after all the time and work, why your students' glazes did not come out of the kiln as well as those of a professional? One reason could be the glazes themselves. Describes where to find high quality packaged glazes and how to use them productively. (Author/RK)

  9. Aerogel waveplates.

    PubMed

    Bhupathi, Pradeep; Hwang, Jungseek; Martin, Rodica M; Blankstein, Jackson; Jaworski, Lukas; Mulders, Norbert; Tanner, David B; Lee, Yoonseok

    2009-06-22

    Optical transmission measurements were made on 98% porosity silica aerogel samples under various degrees of uniaxial strain. Uniaxially compressed aerogels exhibit large birefringence, proportional to the amount of compression, up to the 15% strain studied. The birefringence is mostly reversible and reproducible through multiple compression-decompression cycles. Our study demonstrates that uniaxially strained high porosity aerogels can be used as tunable waveplates in a broad spectral range. PMID:19550455

  10. Graphene aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pauzauskie, Peter J; Worsley, Marcus A; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr., Joe H; Biener, Juergen

    2015-03-31

    Graphene aerogels with high conductivity and surface areas including a method for making a graphene aerogel, including the following steps: (1) preparing a reaction mixture comprising a graphene oxide suspension and at least one catalyst; (2) curing the reaction mixture to produce a wet gel; (3) drying the wet gel to produce a dry gel; and (4) pyrolyzing the dry gel to produce a graphene aerogel. Applications include electrical energy storage including batteries and supercapacitors.

  11. Aerogel Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahai, Rashmi K.

    2005-01-01

    Aerogel is one of the most promising materials of the future. It's unique properties, including high porosity, transparency, very high thermal tolerance, and environmental friendliness give it the potential of replacing many different products used in society today. However, the market for aerogel is still very limited because of the cost of producing the material and its fragility. The principle objective of my project has been to find new ways to apply aerogel in order to increase its practicality and appeal to different aspects of society. More specifically, I have focused on finding different chemicals that will coat aerogel and increase its durability. Because aerogel is so fragile and will crumble under the pressure of most coatings this has been no easy task. However, by experimenting with many different coatings and combinations of aerogel properties, I have made several significant discoveries. Aerogel (ideally, high density and hydrophobic) can be coated with several acrylic polymers, including artist's gel and nail polish. These materials provide a protective layering around the aerogel and keep it from breaking as easily. Because fragility is one of the main reasons applications of aerogel are limited, these discoveries will hopefully aid in finding future applications for this extraordinary material.

  12. Spectrally selective glazings

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    Spectrally selective glazing is window glass that permits some portions of the solar spectrum to enter a building while blocking others. This high-performance glazing admits as much daylight as possible while preventing transmission of as much solar heat as possible. By controlling solar heat gains in summer, preventing loss of interior heat in winter, and allowing occupants to reduce electric lighting use by making maximum use of daylight, spectrally selective glazing significantly reduces building energy consumption and peak demand. Because new spectrally selective glazings can have a virtually clear appearance, they admit more daylight and permit much brighter, more open views to the outside while still providing the solar control of the dark, reflective energy-efficient glass of the past. This Federal Technology Alert provides detailed information and procedures for Federal energy managers to consider spectrally selective glazings. The principle of spectrally selective glazings is explained. Benefits related to energy efficiency and other architectural criteria are delineated. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application of spectrally selective glazing, and step-by-step instructions are given for estimating energy savings. Case studies are also presented to illustrate actual costs and energy savings. Current manufacturers, technology users, and references for further reading are included for users who have questions not fully addressed here.

  13. Double-Glazing Interferometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toal, Vincent; Mihaylova, Emilia M.

    2009-01-01

    This note describes how white light interference fringes can be seen by observing the Moon through a double-glazed window. White light interferometric fringes are normally observed only in a well-aligned interferometer whose optical path difference is less than the coherence length of the light source, which is approximately one micrometer for…

  14. Amazing Rainbow Glazing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenman, Geri

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the design for her advanced oil-painting class. In this class, high-school students created a self-portrait painting and learned a glazing technique. The author also describes the students' evaluation of the class.

  15. Process for forming transparent aerogel insulating arrays

    DOEpatents

    Tewari, Param H.; Hunt, Arlon J.

    1986-01-01

    An improved supercritical drying process for forming transparent silica aerogel arrays is described. The process is of the type utilizing the steps of hydrolyzing and condensing aloxides to form alcogels. A subsequent step removes the alcohol to form aerogels. The improvement includes the additional step, after alcogels are formed, of substituting a solvent, such as CO.sub.2, for the alcohol in the alcogels, the solvent having a critical temperature less than the critical temperature of the alcohol. The resulting gels are dried at a supercritical temperature for the selected solvent, such as CO.sub.2, to thereby provide a transparent aerogel array within a substantially reduced (days-to-hours) time period. The supercritical drying occurs at about 40.degree. C. instead of at about 270.degree. C. The improved process provides increased yields of large scale, structurally sound arrays. The transparent aerogel array, formed in sheets or slabs, as made in accordance with the improved process, can replace the air gap within a double glazed window, for example, to provide a substantial reduction in heat transfer. The thus formed transparent aerogel arrays may also be utilized, for example, in windows of refrigerators and ovens, or in the walls and doors thereof or as the active material in detectors for analyzing high energy elementry particles or cosmic rays.

  16. Process for forming transparent aerogel insulating arrays

    DOEpatents

    Tewari, P.H.; Hunt, A.J.

    1985-09-04

    An improved supercritical drying process for forming transparent silica aerogel arrays is described. The process is of the type utilizing the steps of hydrolyzing and condensing aloxides to form alcogels. A subsequent step removes the alcohol to form aerogels. The improvement includes the additional step, after alcogels are formed, of substituting a solvent, such as CO/sub 2/, for the alcohol in the alcogels, the solvent having a critical temperature less than the critical temperature of the alcohol. The resulting gels are dried at a supercritical temperature for the selected solvent, such as CO/sub 2/, to thereby provide a transparent aerogel array within a substantially reduced (days-to-hours) time period. The supercritical drying occurs at about 40/sup 0/C instead of at about 270/sup 0/C. The improved process provides increased yields of large scale, structurally sound arrays. The transparent aerogel array, formed in sheets or slabs, as made in accordance with the improved process, can replace the air gap within a double glazed window, for example, to provide a substantial reduction in heat transfer. The thus formed transparent aerogel arrays may also be utilized, for example, in windows of refrigerators and ovens, or in the walls and doors thereof or as the active material in detectors for analyzing high energy elementary particles or cosmic rays.

  17. Polyolefin-based aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Je Kyun (Inventor); Gould, Gerogle L. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to cross-linked polyolefin aerogels in simple and fiber-reinforced composite form. Of particular interest are polybutadiene aerogels. Especially aerogels derived from polybutadienes functionalized with anhydrides, amines, hydroxyls, thiols, epoxies, isocyanates or combinations thereof.

  18. Aerogel sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Begag, Redouane; Rhine, Wendell E; Dong, Wenting

    2016-04-05

    The current invention describes methods and compositions of various sorbents based on aerogels of various silanes and their use as sorbent for carbon dioxide. Methods further provide for optimizing the compositions to increase the stability of the sorbents for prolonged use as carbon dioxide capture matrices.

  19. Particle Tracks in Aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    In an experiment using a special air gun, particles are shot into aerogel at high velocities. Closeup of particles that have been captured in aerogel are shown here. The particles leave a carrot-shaped trail in the aerogel. Aerogel was used on the Stardust spacecraft to capture comet particles from Comet Wild 2.

  20. Surface modified aerogel monoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas (Inventor); Johnston, James C. (Inventor); Kuczmarski, Maria A. (Inventor); Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    This invention comprises reinforced aerogel monoliths such as silica aerogels having a polymer coating on its outer geometric surface boundary, and to the method of preparing said aerogel monoliths. The polymer coatings on the aerogel monoliths are derived from polymer precursors selected from the group consisting of isocyanates as a precursor, precursors of epoxies, and precursors of polyimides. The coated aerogel monoliths can be modified further by encapsulating the aerogel with the polymer precursor reinforced with fibers such as carbon or glass fibers to obtain mechanically reinforced composite encapsulated aerogel monoliths.

  1. Evacuation and Community Shelters

    MedlinePlus

    Evacuation and community shelters − Leave natural gas on unless local officials advise otherwise. Local government officials issue evacuation orders when disaster threatens. Listen to local radio and TV ...

  2. Edge conduction in vacuum glazing

    SciTech Connect

    Simko, T.M.; Collins, R.E.; Beck, F.A.; Arasteh, D.

    1995-03-01

    Vacuum glazing is a form of low-conductance double glazing using in internal vacuum between the two glass sheets to eliminate heat transport by gas conduction and convection. An array of small support pillars separates the sheets; fused solder glass forms the edge seal. Heat transfer through the glazing occurs by radiation across the vacuum gap, conduction through the support pillars, and conduction through the bonded edge seal. Edge conduction is problematic because it affects stresses in the edge region, leading to possible failure of the glazing; in addition, excessive heat transfer because of thermal bridging in the edge region can lower overall window thermal performance and decrease resistance to condensation. Infrared thermography was used to analyze the thermal performance of prototype vacuum glazings, and, for comparison, atmospheric pressure superwindows. Research focused on mitigating the edge effects of vacuum glazings through the use of insulating trim, recessed edges, and framing materials. Experimentally validated finite-element and finite-difference modeling tools were used for thermal analysis of prototype vacuum glazing units and complete windows. Experimental measurements of edge conduction using infrared imaging were found to be in good agreement with finite-element modeling results for a given set of conditions. Finite-element modeling validates an analytic model developed for edge conduction.

  3. Method and apparatus for an insulating glazing unit and compliant seal for an insulating glazing unit

    DOEpatents

    Francis, IV, William H.; Freebury, Gregg E.; Beidleman, Neal J.; Hulse, Michael

    2016-05-03

    A Vacuum Insulating Glazing Unit (VIGU) comprises two or more glass lites (panes) spaced apart from one another and hermetically bonded to an edge seal assembly therebetween. The resulting cavity between the lites is evacuated to create at least one insulating vacuum cavity within which are disposed a plurality of stand-off members to maintain separation between the lites. The edge seal assembly is preferably compliant in the longitudinal (i.e., edgewise) direction to allow longitudinal relative motion between the two lites (e.g., from thermal expansion). The longitudinal compliance may be obtained by imprinting a three-dimensional pattern into the edge seal material. The edge seal assembly is preferably bonded to the lites with a first bond portion that is hermetic and a second bond portion that is load-resistant. Methods for producing VIGUs and/or compliant edge seal assemblies and VIGU and edge seal apparatus are disclosed.

  4. Evacuation of the ICU

    PubMed Central

    Niven, Alexander S.; Beninati, William; Fang, Ray; Einav, Sharon; Rubinson, Lewis; Kissoon, Niranjan; Devereaux, Asha V.; Christian, Michael D.; Grissom, Colin K.; Christian, Michael D.; Devereaux, Asha V.; Dichter, Jeffrey R.; Kissoon, Niranjan; Rubinson, Lewis; Amundson, Dennis; Anderson, Michael R.; Balk, Robert; Barfield, Wanda D.; Bartz, Martha; Benditt, Josh; Beninati, William; Berkowitz, Kenneth A.; Daugherty Biddison, Lee; Braner, Dana; Branson, Richard D; Burkle, Frederick M.; Cairns, Bruce A.; Carr, Brendan G.; Courtney, Brooke; DeDecker, Lisa D.; De Jong, Marla J.; Dominguez-Cherit, Guillermo; Dries, David; Einav, Sharon; Erstad, Brian L.; Etienne, Mill; Fagbuyi, Daniel B.; Fang, Ray; Feldman, Henry; Garzon, Hernando; Geiling, James; Gomersall, Charles D.; Grissom, Colin K.; Hanfling, Dan; Hick, John L.; Hodge, James G.; Hupert, Nathaniel; Ingbar, David; Kanter, Robert K.; King, Mary A.; Kuhnley, Robert N.; Lawler, James; Leung, Sharon; Levy, Deborah A.; Lim, Matthew L.; Livinski, Alicia; Luyckx, Valerie; Marcozzi, David; Medina, Justine; Miramontes, David A.; Mutter, Ryan; Niven, Alexander S.; Penn, Matthew S.; Pepe, Paul E.; Powell, Tia; Prezant, David; Reed, Mary Jane; Rich, Preston; Rodriquez, Dario; Roxland, Beth E.; Sarani, Babak; Shah, Umair A.; Skippen, Peter; Sprung, Charles L.; Subbarao, Italo; Talmor, Daniel; Toner, Eric S.; Tosh, Pritish K.; Upperman, Jeffrey S.; Uyeki, Timothy M.; Weireter, Leonard J.; West, T. Eoin; Wilgis, John; Ornelas, Joe; McBride, Deborah; Reid, David; Baez, Amado; Baldisseri, Marie; Blumenstock, James S.; Cooper, Art; Ellender, Tim; Helminiak, Clare; Jimenez, Edgar; Krug, Steve; Lamana, Joe; Masur, Henry; Mathivha, L. Rudo; Osterholm, Michael T.; Reynolds, H. Neal; Sandrock, Christian; Sprecher, Armand; Tillyard, Andrew; White, Douglas; Wise, Robert; Yeskey, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the high risk for patient harm during unanticipated ICU evacuations, critical care providers receive little to no training on how to perform safe and effective ICU evacuations. We reviewed the pertinent published literature and offer suggestions for the critical care provider regarding ICU evacuation. The suggestions in this article are important for all who are involved in pandemics or disasters with multiple critically ill or injured patients, including front-line clinicians, hospital administrators, and public health or government officials. METHODS: The Evacuation and Mobilization topic panel used the American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) Guidelines Oversight Committee’s methodology to develop seven key questions for which specific literature searches were conducted to identify studies upon which evidence-based recommendations could be made. No studies of sufficient quality were identified. Therefore, the panel developed expert opinion-based suggestions using a modified Delphi process. RESULTS: Based on current best evidence, we provide 13 suggestions outlining a systematic approach to prepare for and execute an effective ICU evacuation during a disaster. Interhospital and intrahospital collaboration and functional ICU communication are critical for success. Pre-event planning and preparation are required for a no-notice evacuation. A Critical Care Team Leader must be designated within the Hospital Incident Command System. A three-stage ICU Evacuation Timeline, including (1) no immediate threat, (2) evacuation threat, and (3) evacuation implementation, should be used. Detailed suggestions on ICU evacuation, including regional planning, evacuation drills, patient transport preparation and equipment, patient prioritization and distribution for evacuation, patient information and tracking, and federal and international evacuation assistance systems, are also provided. CONCLUSIONS: Successful ICU evacuation during a disaster requires

  5. Medical and trauma evacuations.

    PubMed

    Neri, Myles; De Jongh, Rene

    2004-02-01

    Evacuating ill or injured expatriates on international assignments from globally challenging locations is a potent source of concern for individuals who are involved before, during, and after overseas assignments. It is essential to minimize the risk for such evacuations and to make the evacuations proceed as smoothly and safely as possible. The first half of this article addresses the planning and processes that are required to make inevitable medical evacuations as safe and smooth as possible. The second half reviews the non-medical consequences that medical and security evacuations can have for employees, dependents, and employers. PMID:15043365

  6. Aerogel in Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Though ghostly in appearance like an hologram, aerogel is very solid. It feels like hard styrofoam to the touch. Aerogel was used on the Stardust spacecraft to capture comet particles from Comet Wild 2.

  7. Technology reviews: Glazing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schuman, J.; Rubinstein, F.; Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

    1992-09-01

    We present a representative review of existing, emerging, and future technology options in each of five hardware and systems areas in envelope and lighting technologies: lighting systems, glazing systems, shading systems, daylighting optical systems, and dynamic curtain wall systems. The term technology is used here to describe any design choice for energy efficiency, ranging from individual components to more complex systems to general design strategies. The purpose of this task is to characterize the state of the art in envelope and lighting technologies in order to identify those with promise for advanced integrated systems, with an emphasis on California commercial buildings. For each technology category, the following activities have been attempted to the extent possible: Identify key performance characteristics and criteria for each technology; determine the performance range of available technologies; identify the most promising technologies and promising trends in technology advances; examine market forces and market trends; and develop a continuously growing in-house database to be used throughout the project. A variety of information sources have been used in these technology characterizations, including miscellaneous periodicals, manufacturer catalogs and cut sheets, other research documents, and data from previous computer simulations. We include these different sources in order to best show the type and variety of data available, however publication here does not imply our guarantee of these data. Within each category, several broad classes are identified, and within each class we examine the generic individual technologies that fag into that class.

  8. Polyimide Aerogel Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann; Guo, Haiquan

    2012-01-01

    Polyimide aerogels have been crosslinked through multifunctional amines. This invention builds on "Polyimide Aerogels With Three-Dimensional Cross-Linked Structure," and may be considered as a continuation of that invention, which results in a polyimide aerogel with a flexible, formable form. Gels formed from polyamic acid solutions, end-capped with anhydrides, and cross-linked with the multifunctional amines, are chemically imidized and dried using supercritical CO2 extraction to give aerogels having density around 0.1 to 0.3 g/cubic cm. The aerogels are 80 to 95% porous, and have high surface areas (200 to 600 sq m/g) and low thermal conductivity (as low as 14 mW/m-K at room temperature). Notably, the cross-linked polyimide aerogels have higher modulus than polymer-reinforced silica aerogels of similar density, and can be fabricated as both monoliths and thin films.

  9. Ambient Dried Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steven M.; Paik, Jong-Ah

    2013-01-01

    A method has been developed for creating aerogel using normal pressure and ambient temperatures. All spacecraft, satellites, and landers require the use of thermal insulation due to the extreme environments encountered in space and on extraterrestrial bodies. Ambient dried aerogels introduce the possibility of using aerogel as thermal insulation in a wide variety of instances where supercritically dried aerogels cannot be used. More specifically, thermoelectric devices can use ambient dried aerogel, where the advantages are in situ production using the cast-in ability of an aerogel. Previously, aerogels required supercritical conditions (high temperature and high pressure) to be dried. Ambient dried aerogels can be dried at room temperature and pressure. This allows many materials, such as plastics and certain metal alloys that cannot survive supercritical conditions, to be directly immersed in liquid aerogel precursor and then encapsulated in the final, dried aerogel. Additionally, the metalized Mylar films that could not survive the previous methods of making aerogels can survive the ambient drying technique, thus making multilayer insulation (MLI) materials possible. This results in lighter insulation material as well. Because this innovation does not require high-temperature or high-pressure drying, ambient dried aerogels are much less expensive to produce. The equipment needed to conduct supercritical drying costs many tens of thousands of dollars, and has associated running expenses for power, pressurized gasses, and maintenance. The ambient drying process also expands the size of the pieces of aerogel that can be made because a high-temperature, high-pressure system typically has internal dimensions of up to 30 cm in diameter and 60 cm in height. In the case of this innovation, the only limitation on the size of the aerogels produced would be in the ability of the solvent in the wet gel to escape from the gel network.

  10. Aerogel nanocomposite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, A.J.; Ayers, M.; Cao, W.

    1995-05-01

    Aerogels are porous, low density, nanostructured solids with many unusual properties including very low thermal conductivity, good transparency, high surface area, catalytic activity, and low sound velocity. This research is directed toward developing new nanocomposite aerogel materials for improved thermal insulation and several other applications. A major focus of the research has been to further increase the thermal resistance of silica aerogel by introducing infrared opacification agents into the aerogel to produce a superinsulating composite material. Opacified superinsulating aerogel permit a number of industrial applications for aerogel-based insulation. The primary benefits from this recently developed superinsulating composite aerogel insulation are: to extend the range of applications to higher temperatures, to provide a more compact insulation for space sensitive-applications, and to lower costs of aerogel by as much as 30%. Superinsulating aerogels can replace existing CFC-containing polyurethane in low temperature applications to reduce heat losses in piping, improve the thermal efficiency of refrigeration systems, and reduce energy losses in a variety of industrial applications. Enhanced aerogel insulation can also replace steam and process pipe insulation in higher temperature applications to substantially reduce energy losses and provide much more compact insulation.

  11. Solar Glazing Tips for School Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Glazing can be optimized to enhance passive solar heating and daylight harvesting by exceeding the prescriptive limits of the energy code. This savings can be garnered without the high cost of external overhangs or expensive glazing products. The majority of savings from solar glazing are attributable to the increase in solar heating and…

  12. An Imaginative Approach to Ceramic Glazing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varmecky, John A.

    1978-01-01

    Would you like to expand your selection of glazes easily and economically? By using imagination and combinations of pre-mixed glazes and toothbrush spattering, art teachers can discover new and exciting ranges of glaze decorations. Gives a dozen combinations for experimentation. (Author/RK)

  13. Polyolefin-Based Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Je Kyun; Gould, George

    2012-01-01

    An organic polybutadiene (PB) rubberbased aerogel insulation material was developed that will provide superior thermal insulation and inherent radiation protection, exhibiting the flexibility, resiliency, toughness, and durability typical of the parent polymer, yet with the low density and superior insulation properties associated with the aerogels. The rubbery behaviors of the PB rubber-based aerogels are able to overcome the weak and brittle nature of conventional inorganic and organic aerogel insulation materials. Additionally, with higher content of hydrogen in their structure, the PB rubber aerogels will also provide inherently better radiation protection than those of inorganic and carbon aerogels. Since PB rubber aerogels also exhibit good hydrophobicity due to their hydrocarbon molecular structure, they will provide better performance reliability and durability as well as simpler, more economic, and environmentally friendly production over the conventional silica or other inorganic-based aerogels, which require chemical treatment to make them hydrophobic. Inorganic aerogels such as silica aerogels demonstrate many unusual and useful properties. There are several strategies to overcoming the drawbacks associated with the weakness and brittleness of silica aerogels. Development of the flexible fiber-reinforced silica aerogel composite blanket has proven one promising approach, providing a conveniently fielded form factor that is relatively robust toward handling in industrial environments compared to silica aerogel monoliths. However, the flexible silica aerogel composites still have a brittle, dusty character that may be undesirable, or even intolerable, in certain applications. Although the cross-linked organic aerogels such as resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), polyisocyanurate, and cellulose aerogels show very high impact strength, they are also very brittle with little elongation (i.e., less rubbery). Also, silica and carbon aerogels are less efficient

  14. Cellulose-silica aerogels.

    PubMed

    Demilecamps, Arnaud; Beauger, Christian; Hildenbrand, Claudia; Rigacci, Arnaud; Budtova, Tatiana

    2015-05-20

    Aerogels based on interpenetrated cellulose-silica networks were prepared and characterised. Wet coagulated cellulose was impregnated with silica phase, polyethoxydisiloxane, using two methods: (i) molecular diffusion and (ii) forced flow induced by pressure difference. The latter allowed an enormous decrease in the impregnation times, by almost three orders of magnitude, for a sample with the same geometry. In both cases, nanostructured silica gel was in situ formed inside cellulose matrix. Nitrogen adsorption analysis revealed an almost threefold increase in pores specific surface area, from cellulose aerogel alone to organic-inorganic composite. Morphology, thermal conductivity and mechanical properties under uniaxial compression were investigated. Thermal conductivity of composite aerogels was lower than that of cellulose aerogel due to the formation of superinsulating mesoporous silica inside cellulose pores. Furthermore, composite aerogels were stiffer than each of reference aerogels. PMID:25817671

  15. Technical applications of aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Hrubesh, L.W.

    1997-08-18

    Aerogel materials posses such a wide variety of exceptional properties that a striking number of applications have developed for them. Many of the commercial applications of aerogels such as catalysts, thermal insulation, windows, and particle detectors are still under development and new application as have been publicized since the ISA4 Conference in 1994: e.g.; supercapacitors, insulation for heat storage in automobiles, electrodes for capacitive deionization, etc. More applications are evolving as the scientific and engineering community becomes familiar with the unusual and exceptional physical properties of aerogels, there are also scientific and technical application, as well. This paper discusses a variety of applications under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for which several types of aerogels are formed in custom sizes and shapes. Particular discussions will focus on the uses of aerogels for physics experiments which rely on the exceptional, sometimes unique, properties of aerogels.

  16. Method of casting aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Poco, J.F.

    1993-09-07

    The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm[sup 3] to 0.6 g/cm[sup 3]. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of aerogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent. 2 figures.

  17. Aerogel-supported filament

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Johnson, III, Coleman V.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is a thin filament embedded in a low density aerogel for use in radiation detection instruments and incandescent lamps. The aerogel provides a supportive matrix that is thermally and electrically nonconductive, mechanically strong, highly porous, gas-permeable, and transparent to ionizing radiation over short distances. A low density, open-cell aerogel is cast around a fine filament or wire, which allows the wire to be positioned with little or no tension and keeps the wire in place in the event of breakage. The aerogel support reduces the stresses on the wire caused by vibrational, gravitational, electrical, and mechanical forces.

  18. Aerogel-supported filament

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Tillotson, T.M.; Johnson, C.V. III

    1995-05-16

    The present invention is a thin filament embedded in a low density aerogel for use in radiation detection instruments and incandescent lamps. The aerogel provides a supportive matrix that is thermally and electrically nonconductive, mechanically strong, highly porous, gas-permeable, and transparent to ionizing radiation over short distances. A low density, open-cell aerogel is cast around a fine filament or wire, which allows the wire to be positioned with little or no tension and keeps the wire in place in the event of breakage. The aerogel support reduces the stresses on the wire caused by vibrational, gravitational, electrical, and mechanical forces. 6 Figs.

  19. Method of manufacturing aerogel composites

    DOEpatents

    Cao, Wanqing; Hunt, Arlon Jason

    1999-01-01

    Disclosed herewith is a process of forming an aerogel composite which comprises introducing a gaseous material into a formed aerogel monolith or powder, and causing decomposition of said gaseous material in said aerogel in amounts sufficient to cause deposition of the decomposition products of the gas on the surfaces of the pores of the said aerogel.

  20. Method of manufacturing aerogel composites

    DOEpatents

    Cao, W.; Hunt, A.J.

    1999-03-09

    Disclosed herewith is a process of forming an aerogel composite which comprises introducing a gaseous material into a formed aerogel monolith or powder, and causing decomposition of said gaseous material in said aerogel in amounts sufficient to cause deposition of the decomposition products of the gas on the surfaces of the pores of the said aerogel.

  1. Aerogel-clad optical fiber

    DOEpatents

    Sprehn, Gregory A.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Poco, John F.; Sandler, Pamela H.

    1997-01-01

    An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency.

  2. Aerogel-clad optical fiber

    DOEpatents

    Sprehn, G.A.; Hrubesh, L.W.; Poco, J.F.; Sandler, P.H.

    1997-11-04

    An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency. 4 figs.

  3. Comet Ejecta in Aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for annotated image

    This image shows a particle impact on the aluminum frame that holds the aerogel tiles. The debris from the impact shot into the adjacent aerogel tile producing the explosion pattern of ejecta framents captured in the material. A nice cratering experiment.

  4. Aerogels for electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Hrubesh, L.W.

    1994-10-01

    In addition to their other exceptional properties, aerogels also exhibit unusual dielectric and electronic properties due to their nano-sized structures and high porosities. For example, aerogels have the lowest dielectric constants measured for a solid material (having values approaching 1.0); they have exceptionally high dielectric resistivities and strengths (i.e., ability to insulate very high voltages); they exhibit low dielectric loss at microwave frequencies; and some aerogels are electrically conductive and photoconductive. These properties are being exploited to provide the next generation of materials for energy storage, low power consumption, and ultra-fast electronics. We are working toward adapting these unusual materials for microelectronic applications, particularly, making thin aerogel films for dielectric substrates and for energy storage devices such as supercapacitors. Measurements are presented in this paper for the dielectric and electronic properties of aerogels, including the dielectric constant, loss factor, dielectric and electrical conductivity, volume resistivity, and dielectric strength. We also describe methods to form and characterize thin aerogel films which are being developed for numerous electronic applications. Finally, some of the electronic applications proposed for aerogels are presented. Commercialization of aerogels for electronics must await further feasibility, prototype development, and cost studies, but they are one of the key materials and are sure to have a major impact on future electronics.

  5. Melamine-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, R.W.

    1992-01-14

    Organic aerogels that are transparent and essentially colorless are prepared from the aqueous, sol-gel polymerization of melamine with formaldehyde. The melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels have low densities, high surface areas, continuous porosity, ultrafine cell/pore sizes, and optical clarity. 3 figs.

  6. Melamine-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard Walter

    1992-01-01

    Organic aerogels that are transparent and essentially colorless are prepa from the aqueous, sol-gel polymerization of melamine with formaldehyde. The melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels have low densities, high surface areas, continuous porsity, ultrafine cell/pore sizes, and optical clarity.

  7. Method for producing hydrophobic aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Poco, John F.; Coronado, Paul R.

    1999-01-01

    A method for treating a dried monolithic aerogel containing non-dispersed particles, with an organometallic surface modifying agent to produce hydrophobic aerogels. The dried, porous hydrophobic aerogels contain a protective layer of alkyl groups, such as methyl groups, on the modified surfaces of the pores of the aerogel. The alkyl groups at the aerogel surface typically contain at least one carbon-metal bond per group.

  8. Epoxy Crosslinked Silica Aerogels (X-Aerogels)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    fabrizio, Eve; Ilhan, Faysal; Meador, Mary Ann; Johnston, Chris; Leventis, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    NASA is interested in the development of strong lightweight materials for the dual role of thermal insulator and structural component for space vehicles; freeing more weight for useful payloads. Aerogels are very-low density materials (0.010 to 0.5 g/cc) that, due to high porosity (meso- and microporosity), can be, depending on the chemical nature of the network, ideal thermal insulators (thermal conductivity approx. 15 mW/mK). However, aerogels are extremely fragile. For practical application of aerogels, one must increase strength without compromising the physical properties attributed to low density. This has been achieved by templated growth of an epoxy polymer layer that crosslinks the "pearl necklace" network of nanoparticles: the framework of a typical silica aerogel. The requirement for conformal accumulation of the epoxy crosslinker is reaction both with the surface of silica and with itself. After cross-linking, the strength of a typical aerogel monolith increases by a factor of 200, in the expense of only a 2-fold increase in density. Strength is increased further by coupling residual unreacted epoxides with diamine.

  9. Factors Affecting Hurricane Evacuation Intentions.

    PubMed

    Lazo, Jeffrey K; Bostrom, Ann; Morss, Rebecca E; Demuth, Julie L; Lazrus, Heather

    2015-10-01

    Protective actions for hurricane threats are a function of the environmental and information context; individual and household characteristics, including cultural worldviews, past hurricane experiences, and risk perceptions; and motivations and barriers to actions. Using survey data from the Miami-Dade and Houston-Galveston areas, we regress individuals' stated evacuation intentions on these factors in two information conditions: (1) seeing a forecast that a hurricane will hit one's area, and (2) receiving an evacuation order. In both information conditions having an evacuation plan, wanting to keep one's family safe, and viewing one's home as vulnerable to wind damage predict increased evacuation intentions. Some predictors of evacuation intentions differ between locations; for example, Florida respondents with more egalitarian worldviews are more likely to evacuate under both information conditions, and Florida respondents with more individualist worldviews are less likely to evacuate under an evacuation order, but worldview was not significantly associated with evacuation intention for Texas respondents. Differences by information condition also emerge, including: (1) evacuation intentions decrease with age in the evacuation order condition but increase with age in the saw forecast condition, and (2) evacuation intention in the evacuation order condition increases among those who rely on public sources of information on hurricane threats, whereas in the saw forecast condition evacuation intention increases among those who rely on personal sources. Results reinforce the value of focusing hurricane information efforts on evacuation plans and residential vulnerability and suggest avenues for future research on how hurricane contexts shape decision making. PMID:26299597

  10. Fusible glaze for technical ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Gerasimov, V.V.; Spirina, O.V.

    1986-05-01

    The aim of this work was to synthesize and investigate fusible borosilicate glazes with a high B/sub 2/O/sub 3/ concentration, and to develop a glaze composition with a firing temperature of 730-760/sup 0/ C for use in obtaining joints between platinum and the ceramic ''Sinoxal''. Nine glaze compositions were synthesized with increasing contents of B/sub 2/O/sub 3/ from 18.2 to 46.8, which corresponded to a reduction in the ratio SiO/sub 2/:B/sub 2/O/sub 3/ from 2.8 to 0.72. The components were ground, screened and batched. It was established that with an increase in the B/sub 2/O/sub 3/ content the loss in mass during boiling of the glass is at first reduced and then reaches a minimum (1%) with a content of 26-30% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The recommended fusible compositions, whose firing temperature is 720-760/sup 0/ C, are good wetting agents and adhere well to ceramic and platinum.

  11. Mechanical Properties of Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmenter, Kelly E.; Milstein, Frederick

    1995-01-01

    Aerogels are extremely low density solids that are characterized by a high porosity and pore sizes on the order of nanometers. Their low thermal conductivity and sometimes transparent appearance make them desirable for applications such as insulation in cryogenic vessels and between double paned glass in solar architecture. An understanding of the mechanical properties of aerogels is necessary before aerogels can be used in load bearing applications. In the present study, the mechanical behavior of various types of fiber-reinforced silica aerogels was investigated with hardness, compression, tension and shear tests. Particular attention was paid to the effects of processing parameters, testing conditions, storage environment, and age on the aerogels' mechanical response. The results indicate that the addition of fibers to the aerogel matrix generally resulted in softer, weaker materials with smaller elastic moduli. Furthermore, the testing environment significantly affected compression results. Tests in ethanol show an appreciable amount of scatter, and are not consistent with results for tests in air. In fact, the compression specimens appeared to crack and begin to dissolve upon exposure to the ethanol solution. This is consistent with the inherent hydrophobic nature of these aerogels. In addition, the aging process affected the aerogels' mechanical behavior by increasing their compressive strength and elastic moduli while decreasing their strain at fracture. However, desiccation of the specimens did not appreciably affect the mechanical properties, even though it reduced the aerogel density by removing trapped moisture. Finally, tension and shear test results indicate that the shear strength of the aerogels exceeds the tensile strength. This is consistent with the response of brittle materials. Future work should concentrate on mechanical testing at cryogenic temperatures, and should involve more extensive tensile tests. Moreover, before the mechanical response

  12. Advanced Aerogel Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steven

    2013-01-01

    The JPL Aerogel Laboratory has made aerogels for NASA flight missions, e.g., Stardust, 2003 Mars Exploration Rovers and the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory, as well as NASA research projects for the past 14 years. During that time it has produced aerogels of a range of shapes, sizes, densities and compositions. Research is ongoing in the development of aerogels for future sample capture and return missions and for thermal insulation for both spacecraft and scientific instruments. For the past several years, the JPL Aerogel Laboratory has been developing, producing and testing a new composite material for use as the high temperature thermal insulation in the Advanced Sterling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) being developed by Lockheed Martin and NASA. The composite is made up of a glass fiber felt, silica aerogel, Titania powder, and silica powder. The oxide powders are included to reduce irradiative heat transport at elevated temperatures. These materials have thermal conductivity values that are the same as the best commercially produced high temperature insulation materials, and yet are 40% lighter. By greatly reducing the amount of oxide powder in the composite, the density, and therefore for the value of the thermal conductivity, would be reduced. The JPL Aerogel Laboratory has experimented with using glass fiber felt, expanded glass fiber felt and loose fibers to add structural integrity to silica aerogels. However, this work has been directed toward high temperature applications. By conducting a brief investigation of the optimal combination of fiber reinforcement and aerogel density, a durable, extremely efficient thermal insulation material for ambient temperature applications would be produced. If a transparent thermal insulation is desired, then aerogel is an excellent candidate material. At typical ambient temperatures, silica aerogel prevents the transport of heat via convection and conduction due to its highly porous nature. To prevent irradiative thermal

  13. Establishing the value of advanced glazings

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E; Selkowitz, S.

    1999-01-01

    Numerous glazing technologies are under development worldwide to improve the performance of building facades. High-performance glazings can provide substantial energy and related environmental benefits, but often at greatly increased first cost when compared to conventional design solutions. To increase market viability, we discuss strategies to reduce the actual and owner-perceived costs associated with developing and producing advanced window systems, specifically switchable electrochromic glazings, and we also suggest marketing strategies designed to appeal to early adopter and mainstream purchasers. These strategies may be applicable to a broad range of advanced glazing materials.

  14. The effect of glaze on porcelain strength.

    PubMed

    Fairhurst, C W; Lockwood, P E; Ringle, R D; Thompson, W O

    1992-05-01

    The self-glazing technique provides an esthetic and hygienic surface for crowns and fixed partial dentures that use porcelain veneers. A study of the biaxial flexure strengths of polished vs. glazed specimens is needed to verify that current laboratory methods are appropriate for planned fatigue studies. Four groups of 50 porcelain disk specimens each were subjected to the following polishing and firing procedures: group one was fired, glazed-no hold, and polished; group two was fired, polished, and glazed-no hold; group three was fired, polished and glazed-1 min. hold; group four was fired, polished, and not glazed. The piston-on-three-ball method was used for testing biaxial flexure strengths. Significantly lower differences in biaxial flexure strengths were noted when group two values were compared with values from groups one, three and four. The results show that the Weibull distribution is an appropriate model for our studies. Differences in glaze thickness among the groups were noted in SEM examination; however, bulk (interior) microcrack density differences were absent. The specimens that were fired, polished to a 1 micron surface finish, and not glazed (group four) were significantly higher in flexure strength than groups one and three at the p less than 0.001 level. The hypothesis that glazing of porcelain surfaces improves the biaxial flexure strength of test specimens was rejected. PMID:1521711

  15. Method of patterning an aerogel

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Scott T.

    2012-07-24

    A method for producing a pattern in an aerogel disposed as a coating on a substrate comprises exposing the aerogel coating to the vapors of a hydrophobic silane compound, masking the aerogel coating with a shadow photomask and irradiating the aerogel coating with ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The exposure to UV through the shadow mask creates a pattern of hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions in the aerogel coating. Etching away the hydrophilic regions of the aerogel coating, preferably with a 1 molar solution of sodium hydroxide, leaves the unwetted and unetched hydrophobic regions of the aerogel layer on the substrate, replicating the pattern of the photomask. The hydrophobic aerogel pattern can be further exposed to UV irradiation if desired, to create a hydrophilic aerogel pattern.

  16. Transparent evacuated insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, R.E.; Fischer-Cripps, A.C.; Tang, J.Z. )

    1992-11-01

    Transparent evacuated insulation utilizes the same operating principles as the Dewar flask - gas conduction and convection are essentially eliminated by the evacuated space, and radiative heat transport is small because of internal low emittance coatings. These insulating structures consist of two flat sheets of glass with a hermetic edge seal. An array of support pillars is necessary to maintain the separation of the glass sheets under the influence of atmospheric pressure. The extensive literature on transparent evacuated insulation is reviewed. The design of these devices involves trade-offs between the heat flow through the pillars, and the mechanical stresses. A design methodology for determining the dimensions of the pillar array is developed. An analytic method is described for calculating the stresses and bending produced by a temperature difference across the structure. The results are in reasonable agreement with experimental measurements. The stresses within the structure are shown to be less than conventionally accepted levels over a wider range of operating conditions. Many samples of transparent evacuated insulation have been built and tested in which the heat transport through the evacuated space is due entirely to radiation, to the limit of resolution of the measuring device (0.2 W m{sup {minus}2}K{sup {minus}1}). No increase in heat transport has been observed over a period of 18 months. Much higher accuracy measurements have commenced. It appears likely that transparent evacuated insulation will achieve mid-plane insulating values of 0.6 W m{sup {minus}2}K{sup {minus}1}, and possibly somewhat lower.

  17. Disaster aeromedical evacuation.

    PubMed

    Lezama, Nicholas G; Riddles, Lawrence M; Pollan, William A; Profenna, Leonardo C

    2011-10-01

    Successful disaster aeromedical evacuation depends on applying the principles learned by moving patients since World War II, culminating in today's global patient movement system. This article describes the role of the Department of Defense patient movement system in providing defense support to civil authorities during the 2008 hurricane season and the international disaster response to the 2010 Haiti earthquake. Adapting and applying the principles of active partnerships, establishing patient movement requirements, patient preparation, and in-transit visibility have resulted in the successful aeromedical evacuation of over 1,600 patients since the federal response to Hurricane Katrina. PMID:22128647

  18. Silica aerogel core waveguide.

    PubMed

    Grogan, M D W; Leon-Saval, S G; England, R; Birks, T A

    2010-10-11

    We have selectively filled the core of hollow photonic crystal fibre with silica aerogel. Light is guided in the aerogel core, with a measured attenuation of 0.2 dB/cm at 1540 nm comparable to that of bulk aerogel. The structure guides light by different mechanisms depending on the wavelength. At long wavelengths the effective index of the microstructured cladding is below the aerogel index of 1.045 and guidance is by total internal reflection. At short wavelengths, where the effective cladding index exceeds 1.045, a photonic bandgap can guide the light instead. There is a small region of crossover, where both index- and bandgap-guided modes were simultaneously observed. PMID:20941148

  19. Evacuation under limited visibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Guillermo A.; Dorso, Claudio O.

    2015-06-01

    A multiplicity of situations can trigger off an evacuation of a room under panic conditions. For "normal" (with "normal" meaning absence of obstacles, perfect visibility, etc.) environmental conditions, the "faster is slower" effect dominates the dynamics of this process. It states that as the pedestrians desire to reach the exit increases, the clogging phenomena delays the time to get out of the room. But, environmental conditions are usually far from "normal." In this work, we consider that pedestrians have to find their way out under low visibility conditions. Some of them might switch to a herding-like behavior if they do not remember where the exit was. Others will just trust on their memory. Our investigation handles the herding and memory effects on the evacuation of a single exit room with no obstacles. We also include a section on how signaling devices affect the evacuation process. Unexpectedly, some low visibility situations may enhance the evacuation performance. This can be resumed as a second paradoxical result, since we demonstrated in an earlier investigation that "clever is not always better" G. A. Frank and C. O. Dorso, Physica A 390, 2135 (2011).

  20. Method of casting aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Poco, John F.

    1993-01-01

    The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm.sup.3 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of alcogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent.

  1. 49 CFR 238.421 - Glazing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... surface during all impact tests. The witness plate shall contain no marks from spalled glazing particles after any impact test; and (3) Be permanently marked, prior to installation, in such a manner that the... all impact tests. The witness plate shall contain no marks from spalled glazing particles after...

  2. 49 CFR 238.421 - Glazing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... surface during all impact tests. The witness plate shall contain no marks from spalled glazing particles after any impact test; and (3) Be permanently marked, prior to installation, in such a manner that the... all impact tests. The witness plate shall contain no marks from spalled glazing particles after...

  3. 49 CFR 238.421 - Glazing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... surface during all impact tests. The witness plate shall contain no marks from spalled glazing particles after any impact test; and (3) Be permanently marked, prior to installation, in such a manner that the... all impact tests. The witness plate shall contain no marks from spalled glazing particles after...

  4. Indoor Recreational Places as Glazed Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cold, Birgit

    This paper describes how creation of a varied, imaginative, and cultivated environment can recreate the pleasure of learning. The development of an indoor-outdoor, public-private, and half-climatized glazed (glass covered) space at the University of Dragvoll in Trondheim, Norway, is described. Well-planned glazed spaces can increase social…

  5. Photon-Refracting Aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    A threshold aerogel Cherenkov detector is being constructed at CUA to allow for the study of kaons in experiments at the Jefferson Laboratory. These subatomic particles move faster than light through the aerogel material, emitting Cherenkov radiation. Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs) convert the photons from the Cherenkov radiation into electrons and multiply the electrons sufficiently to get a readable electronic signal, which can be analyzed. An important part of a threshold aerogel Cherenkov detector is its use of aerogel material of several refractive indices to cover the full dynamic range over which one wants to detect the particles of interest (in this case the kaon). Uniform coverage in refractive index is important as the location of the incoming particle will not be constant throughout the testing. In addition to testing for uniform coverage, we must also verify these refractive indices to ensure that the particles we are detecting are in fact kaons. The last test on the aerogel that needs to be performed is the measurement of transparency. Although aerogel is highly transparent, it is still necessary to find the amount of light being absorbed, reflected, or scattered versus how much will actually be measured by the PMTs used.

  6. Solar absorption in thick and multilayered glazings

    SciTech Connect

    Powles, Rebecca; Curcija, Dragan; Kohler, Christian

    2002-02-01

    Thick and multilayered glazings generally have a nonuniform distribution of absorbed solar radiation which is not taken into account by current methods for calculating the center of glass solar gain and thermal performance of glazing systems. This paper presents a more accurate method for calculating the distribution of absorbed solar radiation inside thick and multilayered glazings and demonstrates that this can result in a small but significant difference in steady-state temperature profile and Solar Heat Gain Coefficient for some types of glazing systems when compared to the results of current methods. This indicates that a more detailed approach to calculating the distribution of absorbed solar radiation inside glazings and resulting thermal performance may be justified for certain applications.

  7. Compression molding of aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, R.W.; Hrubesh, L.W.

    1998-03-24

    An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner is disclosed. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50--800 kg/m{sup 3} (0.05--0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization. 4 figs.

  8. Compression molding of aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard W.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    1998-03-24

    An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50-800 kg/m.sup.3 (0.05-0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization.

  9. Topographic characterization of glazed surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröberg, Linda; Hupa, Leena

    2008-01-01

    Detailed characterization of surface microstructure, i.e. phase composition and surface geometry, has become an important criterion of glazed ceramics. Topographic characterization is an important parameter in, e.g. estimating the influence of additional films on the average roughness of a surface. Also, the microscaled and nanoscaled roughnesses correlate with the cleanability and the self-cleaning properties of the surfaces. In this work the surface geometry of several matte glazes were described by topography and roughness as given by whitelight confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Different measuring parameters were compared to justify the usefulness of the techniques in giving a comprehensive description of the surface microstructure. The results suggest that confocal microscopy is well suited for giving reliable topographical parameters for matte surfaces with microscaled crystals in the surfaces. Atomic force microscopy was better suited for smooth surfaces or for describing the local topographic parameters of closely limited areas, e.g. the surroundings of separate crystals in the surface.

  10. Aerogels Insulate Against Extreme Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    In 1992, NASA started to pursue the development of aerogel for cryogenic insulation. Kennedy Space Center awarded Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts to Aspen Systems Inc., of Marlborough, Massachusetts, that resulted in a new manufacturing process and a new flexible, durable, easy-to-use form of aerogel. Aspen Systems formed Aspen Aerogels Inc., in Northborough, Massachusetts, to market the product, and by 2009, the company had become the leading provider of aerogel in the United States, producing nearly 20 million square feet per year. With an array of commercial applications, the NASA-derived aerogel has most recently been applied to protect and insulate people s hands and feet.

  11. Determination of arsenic leaching from glazed and non-glazed Turkish traditional earthenware.

    PubMed

    Henden, Emur; Cataloglu, Rengin; Aksuner, Nur

    2011-07-01

    Glazed and non-glazed earthenware is traditionally and widely used in Turkey and most of the Mediterranean and the Middle East countries for cooking and conservation of foodstuff. Acid-leaching tests have been carried out to determine whether the use of glazed and non-glazed earthenware may constitute a human health hazard risk to the consumers. Earthenware was leached with 4% acetic acid and 1% citric acid solutions, and arsenic in the leachates was measured using hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Arsenic concentrations in the leach solution of non-glazed potteries varied from 30.9 to 800 μg L⁻¹, while the glazed potteries varied generally from below the limit of detection (0.5 μg L⁻¹) to 30.6 μg L⁻¹, but in one poorly glazed series it reached to 110 μg L⁻¹. Therefore, the risk of arsenic poisoning by poorly glazed and non-glazed potteries is high enough to be of concern. It appears that this is the first study reporting arsenic release from earthenware into food. PMID:21669332

  12. Bonding aerogels with polyurethanes

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, F.M.; Hoffman, D.M.

    1989-11-01

    Aerogels, porous silica glasses with ultra-fine cell size (30nm), are made by a solution gelation (sol-gel) process. The resulting gel is critical point dried to densities from 0.15--0.60 g/cc. This material is machinable, homogeneous, transparent, coatable and bondable. To bond aerogel an adhesive should have long cure time, no attack on the aerogel structure, and high strength. Several epoxies and urethanes were examined to determine if they satisfied these conditions. Bond strengths above 13 psi were found with double bubble and DP-110 epoxies and XI-208/ODA-1000 and Castall U-2630 urethanes. Hardman Kalex Tough Stuff'' A-85 hardness urethane gave 18 psi bond strength. Hardman A-85, Tuff-Stuff'' was selected for further evaluation because it produced bond strengths comparable to the adherend cohesive strength. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Coated Aerogel Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littman, Howard (Inventor); Plawsky, Joel L. (Inventor); Paccione, John D. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for coating particulate material are provided. The apparatus includes a vessel having a top and a bottom, a vertically extending conduit having an inlet in the vessel and an outlet outside of the vessel, a first fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a transfer fluid, a second fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a coating fluid, and a fluid outlet from the vessel. The method includes steps of agitating a material, contacting the material with a coating material, and drying the coating material to produce a coated material. The invention may be adapted to coat aerogel beads, among other materials. A coated aerogel bead and an aerogel-based insulation material are also disclosed.

  14. Laser glazing of lanthanum magnesium hexaaluminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanfei; Wang, Yaomin; Jarligo, Maria Ophelia; Zhong, Xinghua; Li, Qin; Cao, Xueqiang

    2008-08-01

    Lanthanum magnesium hexaalumminate (LMA) is an important candidate for thermal barrier coatings due to its thermal stability and low thermal conductivity. On the other hand, laser glazing method can potentially make thermal barrier coatings impermeable, resistant to corrosion on the surface and porous at bulk. LMA powder was synthesized at 1600 °C by solid-state reaction, pressed into tablet and laser glazed with a 5-kW continuous wave CO2 laser. Dendritic structures were observed on the surface of the laser-glazed specimen. The thicker the tablet, the easier the sample cracks. Cracking during laser glazing is attributed to the low thermal expansion coefficient and large thickness of the sample.

  15. Heat Transfar Properties of Flat-Panel Evacuated Porous Insrlators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneno, Hirosyi; Yamamoto, Ryoichi

    Flat Panel evacuated porous insulators have been produced by filling powder or fiber (such as perlite powder, diatomaceous earth powder, silica aerogel powder, g lass fiber and ceramic fiber) in film-like laminated plastic container and by evacuating to form vacuum in it is interior. Heat transfer properties of these evacuated insulators have been studied under various conditions (such as particle diameter, surface area, packing density, solid volume fraction and void dimension). The apparent mean thermal conductivity has been measured for the boundary surface temperature at cold face temperature 13°C and hot face temperature 35°. The effect of air pressure ranging from 1 Pa to one atomosphere (105 Pa) was examined. The results were as follows. (1) For each powder the apparent mean thermal conductivity decreases with decreasing residual air pressure, and at very low pressure bellow 1 -103 Pa the conductivity becomes indeqendent of pressure. The thermal conductivity at 1.3Pa is 0.0053 W/mK for perlite powder, 0.0048W/mK for diatomaceous earth powder, 0.0043 W/mK for silica aerogel powder and 0.0029W/mK for glass fiber. (2) With decreasing particle size, the apparent mean thermal conductivity is constant independent of residual air pressure in higher pressure region. It is that void dimension continues to decrease with particle size and the mean free path of air becomes comparable with void dimension. (3) In the range of minor solid volume fraction, the apparent mean thermal conductivity at very low precreases with decreasing particle size. This shows the thermal contact resistance of the solid particle increases with decreasing particle size.

  16. The energy performance of prototype holographic glazings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Furler, R.; Lee, E. S.; Selkowitz, S.; Rubin, M.

    1993-02-01

    We report on the simulation of the energy performance of prototype holographic glazings in commercial office buildings in a California climate. These prototype glazings, installed above conventional side windows, are designed to diffract the transmitted solar radiation and reflect it off the ceiling, providing adequate daylight illumination for typical office tasks up to 10m from the window. In this study, we experimentally determined a comprehensive set of solar-optical properties and characterized the contribution of the prototype holographic glazings to workplane illuminance in a scale model of a typical office space. We then used the scale model measurements to simulate the energy performance of the holographic glazings over the course of an entire year for four window orientations (North, East, South and West) for the inland Los Angeles climate, using the DOE-2.lD building energy analysis computer program. The results of our experimental analyses indicate that these prototype holographic glazings diffract only a small fraction of the incident light. The results of this study indicate that these prototype holographic glazings will not save energy in commercial office buildings. Their performance is very similar to that of clear glass, which, through side windows, cannot efficiently illuminate more than a 4-6 m depth of a building's perimeter, because the cooling penalties due to solar heat gain are greater than the electric lighting savings due to daylighting.

  17. Medical evacuations from offshore structures.

    PubMed

    Norman, J N; Ballantine, B N; Brebner, J A; Brown, B; Gauld, S J; Mawdsley, J; Roythorne, C; Valentine, M J; Wilcock, S E

    1988-09-01

    A retrospective study was carried out on medical evacuations from the installations of four major oil or gas producing companies, or both, operating offshore on the United Kingdom continental shelf. The study covered 1976-84 during which 2162 evacuations were recorded. Of these, 137 (7.7%) required the use of a chartered helicopter. In the earlier years of the study there were substantially more injuries sustained than episodes of illness recorded but from 1980 onwards the cases of illness equalled those of injury. Using the International Classification of Diseases, the digestive system was responsible for most evacuations for illness and of those, about half (115 evacuations) were for dental problems. Suspected fractures were responsible for about one third of those evacuated for an injury but injuries of hands and eye conditions were particularly common, accounting for 25% of all evacuations. As the age of the evacuee increased the proportion of evacuations for injury decreased and that for illness increased. The mean age for evacuation for injury was 28.3 years and for illness 34.4 years. Few evacuations were required for those aged over 45. PMID:3179237

  18. Aerogel Fingerprint Media

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Fred S.; Andresen, Brian D.

    1999-09-21

    A fingerprint medium which is made of an aerogel having a predetermined density. The fingerprint medium may have a midrange density for forming plates or may be crushed forming a powder. The fingerprint medium may further include at least one of a metal and metal oxide to enhance characteristics desirable in a fingerprint medium.

  19. Mechanically Strong, Polymer Cross-linked Aerogels (X-Aerogels)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    Aerogels comprise a class of low-density, high porous solid objects consisting of dimensionally quasi-stable self-supported three-dimensional assemblies of nanoparticles. Aerogels are pursued because of properties above and beyond those of the individual nanoparticles, including low thermal conductivity, low dielectric constant and high acoustic impedance. Possible applications include thermal and vibration insulation, dielectrics for fast electronics, and hosting of functional guests for a wide variety of optical, chemical and electronic applications. Aerogels, however, are extremely fragile materials, hence they have found only limited application in some very specialized environments, for example as Cerenkov radiation detectors in certain types of nuclear reactors, aboard spacecraft as collectors of hypervelocity particles (refer to NASA's Stardust program) and as thermal insulators on planetary vehicles on Mars (refer to Sojourner Rover in 1997 and Spirit and Opportunity in 2004). Along these lines, the X-Aerogel is a new NASA-developed strong lightweight material that has resolved the fragility problem of traditional (native) aerogels. X-Aerogels are made by applying a conformal polymer coating on the surfaces of the skeletal nanoparticles of native aerogels (see Scanning Electron Micrographs). Since the relative amounts of the polymeric crosslinker and the backbone are comparable, X-Aerogels can be viewed either as aerogels modified by the templated accumulation of polymer on the skeletal nanoparticles, or as nanoporous polymers made by remplated casting of polymer on a nanostructured framework. The most striking feature of X-Aerogels is that for a nominal 3-fold increase in density (still a ultralighweight material), the mechanical strength can be up to 300 times higher than the strength of the underlying native aerogel. Thus, X-Aerogels combine a multiple of the specific compressive strength of steel, with the the thermal conductivity of styrofoam. X-Aerogels

  20. Polymer glazing for silver mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Neidlinger, H H; Schissel, P

    1985-07-01

    This paper reports on an evaluation and modification of polymeric glazings to protect silver mirrors. The mirrors were made using Corning 7809 glass as a substrate onto which a thin silver film is deposited. The modified polymeric films are then cast from solution onto the silver. The mirrors were characterized by measuring the hemispherical reflectance and the specular reflectance at 660 nm and selected acceptance angles (7.5 mrad or 3.5 mrad). The mirrors were exposed to environmental degradation using accelerated weathering devices and outdoor exposure. Empirical evidence has demonstrated that polymethylmethacrylate is a stable polymer in a terrestrial environment, but the polymer does not provide adequate protection for the silver reflector. The crucial role in degradation played by ultraviolet (uv) light is shown by several experimental results. It has been demonstrated that uv stabilizers added to the polymer improve the weatherability of mirrors. The relative effectiveness of different stabilizers will be discussed in terms of the weathering modes, retention of optical properties, and effectiveness of the additives. The process for silver deposition influences the reflectance of silver mirrors, and the optical properties depend on subtle relationships between the metallization and the dielectric (polymeric) films that are in contact with the silver.

  1. Predicted thermal performance of triple vacuum glazing

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Yueping; Hyde, Trevor J.; Hewitt, Neil

    2010-12-15

    The simulated triple vacuum glazing (TVG) consists of three 4 mm thick glass panes with two vacuum gaps, with each internal glass surface coated with a low-emittance coating with an emittance of 0.03. The two vacuum gaps are sealed by an indium based sealant and separated by a stainless steel pillar array with a height of 0.12 mm and a pillar diameter of 0.3 mm spaced at 25 mm. The thermal transmission at the centre-of-glazing area of the TVG was predicted to be 0.26 W m{sup -2} K{sup -1}. The simulation results show that although the thermal conductivity of solder glass (1 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1}) and indium (83.7 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1}) are very different, the difference in thermal transmission of TVGs resulting from the use of an indium and a solder glass edge seal was 0.01 W m{sup -2} K{sup -1}. This is because the edge seal is so thin (0.12 mm), consequently there is a negligible temperature drop across it irrespective of the material that the seal is made from relative to the total temperature difference across the glazing. The results also show that there is a relatively large increase in the overall thermal conductance of glazings without a frame when the width of the indium edge seal is increased. Increasing the rebate depth in a solid wood frame decreased the heat transmission of the TVG. The overall heat transmission of the simulated 0.5 m by 0.5 m TVG was 32.6% greater than that of the 1 m by 1 m TVG, since heat conduction through the edge seal of the small glazing has a larger contribution to the total glazing heat transfer than that of the larger glazing system. (author)

  2. Effective leadership for crowd evacuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yi; Yuen, Richard Kwok Kit; Lee, Eric Wai Ming

    2016-05-01

    Evacuation leaders (individuals guiding the crowd) can make crowd evacuation more efficient. Selecting their number and positions within the crowd is particularly important when the other evacuees are not familiar with the internal layout of the building. This paper investigates the effects of leadership on crowd evacuation in rooms with limited visibility range by an extended social force model. We find that, (i) For a large evacuees crowd, a small proportion of the evacuation leaders is already sufficient to guide the whole crowd efficiently, even if the visibility range of the room is very limited. And the smaller the crowd size, the larger the proportion of the leaders is needed to achieve a satisfactory evacuation guidance. (ii) The optimal proportion or number (i.e., the proportion or number that is necessary for guiding the crowd) of the leaders in an evacuees crowd to achieve a satisfactory guidance is related to the visibility range of the room and the distribution range of the evacuees crowd. (iii) Leadership is not always positive to the crowd evacuation. It may have a negative effect on crowd evacuation when the visibility range of the room and the size of the evacuees crowd are large enough. The findings provide a new insight into the effects of leadership on crowd evacuation.

  3. Canadian Evacuation and Nisei Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makabe, Tomoko

    1980-01-01

    Japanese Canadians were interviewed to determine the effect of World War II evacuation on their ethnic identity. Older respondents deemphasized issues related to evacuation when discussing their ethnic identity. Younger Japanese Canadians are aware of this "cloud" as part of their ethnic heritage but are unaware of its exact origin. (MK)

  4. Thermal performance analysis of an electrochromic vacuum glazing with low emittance coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Yueping; Hyde, Trevor; Hewitt, Neil; Eames, Philip C.; Norton, Brian

    2010-04-15

    Thermal performance of an electrochromic (EC) vacuum glazing (VG) was modelled under ASTM standard winter conditions. The EC VG comprised three 0.5 m by 0.5 m glass panes with a 0.12 mm wide evacuated space between two 4 mm thick panes sealed contiguously by a 6 mm wide indium based edge seal with either one or two low-emittance (low-e) coatings supported by a 0.32 mm diameter square pillar grid spaced at 25 mm. The third glass pane on which the 0.1 mm thick EC layer was deposited was sealed to the evacuated glass unit. The whole unit was rebated by 10 mm within a solid wood frame. The low-e coating absorbed 10% of solar energy incident on it. With the EC VG installed with the EC component facing the outdoor environment, for an incident solar radiation of 300 W m{sup -2}, simulations demonstrated that when the EC layer is opaque for winter conditions, the temperature of the inside glass pane is higher than the indoor air temperature, due to solar radiation absorbed by the low-e coatings and the EC layer, the EC VG is a heat source with heat transferred from the glazing to the interior environment. When the emittance was lower to 0.02, the outdoor and indoor glass pane temperatures of the glazing with single and two low-e coatings are very close to each other. For an insolation of 1000 W m{sup -2}, the outdoor glass pane temperature exceeds the indoor glass pane temperature, consequentially the outdoor glass pane transfers heat to the indoor glass pane. (author)

  5. 46 CFR 116.1010 - Safety glazing materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ARRANGEMENT Window Construction and Visibility § 116.1010 Safety glazing materials. Glass and other glazing material used in windows must be of material that will not break into dangerous fragments if fractured....

  6. Vacuum window glazings for energy-efficient buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.K.; Smith, L.K.; Tracy, C.E.; Potter, T.; Christensen, C. ); Soule, D.E. )

    1990-05-01

    The technical feasibility of a patented, laser-welded, evacuated insulating window was studied. The window has two edge-sealed sheets of glass separated by 0.5-mm glass spheres spaced 30 mm apart in a regular array. A highly insulating frame is required and several designs were analyzed. The vacuum window's combination of high solar transmittance and low thermal conductance makes it superior to many other windows in cold climates. In the US Pacific Northwest, the vacuum window could save about 6 MJ of heating energy annually per square meter of window in comparison to conventional, double-glazed windows. A large, vacuum laser-welding facility was designed and installed to conduct glass welding experiments and to fabricate full-sized vacuum windows. Experiments confirmed the feasibility of laser-sealing glass in vacuum but identified two difficulties. Under some circumstances, bubbles of dissolved gases form during welding and weaken the seal. Glass also vaporizes and contaminates the laser beam steering mirror. A novel moving metal foil mirror was developed to circumvent the contamination problem, but it has not yet been used to complete welding experiments and fabricate full-sized vacuum windows. 63 refs., 53 figs., 19 tabs.

  7. Organic aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Kong, Fung-Ming; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1999-01-01

    Organic aerogel microspheres which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonsticky gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  8. Organic aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Kong, F.M.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1999-06-01

    Organic aerogel microspheres are disclosed which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonstick gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  9. Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. The objective of this task is to quantify lifetimes through measurement of the optical and mechanical stability of candidate polymeric glazing and absorber materials. Polycarbonate sheet glazings, as proposed by two industry partners, have been tested for resistance to UV radiation with three complementary methods. Incorporation of a specific 2-mil thick UV-absorbing screening layer results in glazing lifetimes of at least 15 years; improved screens promise even longer lifetimes. Proposed absorber materials were tested for creep and embrittlement under high temperature, and appear adequate for planned ICS absorbers.

  10. The energy performance of thermochromic glazing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamantouros, Pavlos

    This study investigated the energy performance of thermochromic glazing. It was done by simulating the model of a small building in a highly advanced computer program (EnergyPlus - U.S. DOE). The physical attributes of the thermochromic samples examined came from actual laboratory samples fabricated in UCL's Department of Chemistry (Prof I. P. Parkin). It was found that they can substantially reduce cooling loads while requiring the same heating loads as a high end low-e double glazing. The reductions in annual cooling energy required were in the 20%-40% range depending on sample, location and building layout. A series of sensitivity analyses showed the importance of switching temperature and emissivity factor in the performance of the glazing. Finally an ideal pane was designed to explore the limits this technology has to offer.

  11. 24 CFR 3280.113 - Glass and glazed openings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... requirements of Consumer Product Safety Commission 16 CFR part 1201, or Standard for Safety Glazing Materials... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glass and glazed openings. 3280.113... Glass and glazed openings. Link to an amendment published at 78 FR 73981, Dec. 9, 2013. (a) Windows...

  12. Simulating the energy performance of holographic glazings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Furler, Reto; Lee, E. S.; Selkowitz, Steven E.; Rubin, Michael

    1994-09-01

    The light diffraction properties of holographic diffractive structures present an opportunity to improve the daylight performance in side-lit office spaces by redirecting and reflecting sunlight off the ceiling, providing adequate daylight illumination up to 30 ft (9.14 m) from the window wall. Prior studies of prototypical holographic glazings, installed above conventional `view' windows, have shown increased daylight levels over a deeper perimeter area than clear glass, for selected sun positions. In this study, we report on the simulation of the energy performance of prototypical holographic glazings assuming a commercial office building in the inland Los Angeles climate. The simulation of the energy performance involved determination of both luminous and thermal performance. Since the optical complexity of holographic glazings prevented the use of conventional algorithms for the simulation of their luminous performance, we used a newly developed method that combines experimentally determined directional workplane illuminance coefficients with computer-based analytical routines to determine a comprehensive set of daylight factors for many sun positions. These daylight factors were then used within the DOE-2.1D energy simulation program to determine hourly daylight and energy performance over the course of an entire year for four window orientations. Since the prototypical holographic diffractive structures considered in this study were applied on single pane clear glass, we also simulated the performance of hypothetical glazings, assuming the daylight performance of the prototype holographic glazings and the thermal performance of double-pane and low-e glazings. Finally, we addressed various design and implementation issues towards potential performance improvement.

  13. Metal Nanoparticle Aerogel Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Sibille, Laurent; Ignont, Erica; Snow, Lanee; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have fabricated sol-gels containing gold and silver nanoparticles. Formation of an aerogel produces a blue shift in the surface plasmon resonance as a result of the decrease in the dielectric constant of the matrix upon supercritical extraction of the solvent. However, as a result of chemical interface damping this blue shift does not obey effective medium theories. Annealing the samples in a reducing atmosphere at 400 C eliminates this discrepancy and results in narrowing and further blue shifting of the plasmon resonance. Metal particle aggregation also results in a deviation from the predictions of effective medium theories, but can be controlled through careful handling and by avoiding the use of alcohol. By applying effective medium theories to the heterogeneous interlayer surrounding each metal particle, we extend the technique of immersion spectroscopy to inhomogeneous materials characterized by spatially dependent dielectric constants, such as aerogels. We demonstrate that the shift in the surface plasmon wavelength provides the average fractional composition of each component (air and silica) in this inhomogeneous layer, i.e. the porosity of the aerogel or equivalently, for these materials, the catalytic dispersion. Additionally, the kinetics suggest that collective particle interactions in coagulated metal clusters are perturbed during silica gelation resulting in a change in the aggregate geometry.

  14. Search for glazed surfaces on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Pascal; Helfenstein, Paul; Veverka, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    The paper summarizes arguments leading to suggestions that Triton's icy surface may be unusual in texture, sith special attention given to the hypothesis of the existence of glazed areas on Triton. Results are presented of a search for an evidence of specular reflection diagnostic of 'glazed' icy surfaces on Triton, using high-resolution Voyager 2 images of three regions on Triton: the South Polar Cap Mottled Unit, the Bright Fringe, and the Frost Band. No such evidence was found in these three different terrains.

  15. Production of hollow aerogel microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhye, R.S.; Henning, S.A.

    1990-12-31

    A method is described for making hollow aerogel microspheres of 800--1200{mu} diameter and 100--300{mu} wall thickness by forming hollow alcogel microspheres during the sol/gel process in a catalytic atmosphere and capturing them on a foam surface containing catalyst. Supercritical drying of the formed hollow alcogel microspheres yields hollow aerogel microspheres which are suitable for ICF targets.

  16. Production of hollow aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Henning, Sten A.

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for making hollow aerogel microspheres of 800-1200 .mu. diameter and 100-300 .mu. wall thickness by forming hollow alcogel microspheres during the sol/gel process in a catalytic atmosphere and capturing them on a foam surface containing catalyst. Supercritical drying of the formed hollow alcogel microspheres yields hollow aerogel microspheres which are suitable for ICF targets.

  17. Aerogel/polymer composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Smith, Trent M. (Inventor); Fesmire, James E. (Inventor); Roberson, Luke B. (Inventor); Clayton, LaNetra M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The invention provides new composite materials containing aerogels blended with thermoplastic polymer materials at a weight ratio of aerogel to thermoplastic polymer of less than 20:100. The composite materials have improved thermal insulation ability. The composite materials also have better flexibility and less brittleness at low temperatures than the parent thermoplastic polymer materials.

  18. Chemical Agents: Facts about Evacuation

    MedlinePlus

    ... to evacuate You will hear from the local police, emergency coordinators, or government on the radio and/ ... school will put them, and you, at increased risk. The emergency shelter will have most supplies that ...

  19. Protective Skins for Aerogel Monoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas; Johnston, James C.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Meador, Ann B.

    2007-01-01

    A method of imparting relatively hard protective outer skins to aerogel monoliths has been developed. Even more than aerogel beads, aerogel monoliths are attractive as thermal-insulation materials, but the commercial utilization of aerogel monoliths in thermal-insulation panels has been inhibited by their fragility and the consequent difficulty of handling them. Therefore, there is a need to afford sufficient protection to aerogel monoliths to facilitate handling, without compromising the attractive bulk properties (low density, high porosity, low thermal conductivity, high surface area, and low permittivity) of aerogel materials. The present method was devised to satisfy this need. The essence of the present method is to coat an aerogel monolith with an outer polymeric skin, by painting or spraying. Apparently, the reason spraying and painting were not attempted until now is that it is well known in the aerogel industry that aerogels collapse in contact with liquids. In the present method, one prevents such collapse through the proper choice of coating liquid and process conditions: In particular, one uses a viscous polymer precursor liquid and (a) carefully controls the amount of liquid applied and/or (b) causes the liquid to become cured to the desired hard polymeric layer rapidly enough that there is not sufficient time for the liquid to percolate into the aerogel bulk. The method has been demonstrated by use of isocyanates, which, upon exposure to atmospheric moisture, become cured to polyurethane/polyurea-type coats. The method has also been demonstrated by use of commercial epoxy resins. The method could also be implemented by use of a variety of other resins, including polyimide precursors (for forming high-temperature-resistant protective skins) or perfluorinated monomers (for forming coats that impart hydrophobicity and some increase in strength).

  20. Nanoencapsulated aerogels produced by monomer vapor deposition and polymerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Thomas A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Polymer coated aerogel comprising aerogel substrate comprising a substantially uniform polymer coating. In an embodiment, the polymer coated aerogel is comprised of a porosity and has a compressive modulus greater than the compressive modulus of the aerogel substrate.

  1. Chemical resistance and cleanability of glazed surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hupa, Leena; Bergman, Roger; Fröberg, Linda; Vane-Tempest, Stina; Hupa, Mikko; Kronberg, Thomas; Pesonen-Leinonen, Eija; Sjöberg, Anna-Maija

    2005-06-01

    Adhesion of soil on glazed surfaces and their cleanability depends on chemical composition, phase composition, and roughness of the surface. The surface can be glossy consisting mainly of a smooth glassy phase. A matt and rough surface consists of a glassy phase and one or more crystalline phases. The origin and composition of the crystalline phases affect the chemical resistance and the cleanability of the surface. Fifteen experimental glossy and matt glazes were soaked in a slightly alkaline cleaning agent solution. The surfaces were spin-coated with sebum, i.e. a soil component typical for sanitary facilities. After wiping out the soil film in a controlled manner, the surface conditions and the soil left were evaluated with colour measurements, SEM/EDXA and COM. The results show that wollastonite-type crystals in the glaze surfaces were attacked in aqueous solutions containing typical cleaning agents. This corrosion led to significant decrease in the cleanability of the surface. The other crystal types observed, i.e. diopside and quartz crystals were not corroded, and the cleanability of glazes containing only these crystals was not changed in the cleaning agent exposures. Also the glassy phase was found to be attacked in some formulations leading to a somewhat decreased cleanability. The repeated soiling and cleaning procedures indicated that soil is accumulated on rough surfaces and surfaces which were clearly corroded by the cleaning agent.

  2. Repairing high-temperature glazed tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecord, G. M.; Schomburg, C.

    1981-01-01

    Tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) mixture fills chips and cracks in glazed tile surface. Filler is made by mixing hydrolyzed TEOS, silicon tetraboride powder, and pulverized tile material. Repaired tiles survived testing by intense acoustic emissions, arc jets, and intense heat radiation. Repair is reliable and rapid, performed in 1-1 1/2 hours with tile in any or orientation.

  3. Aerogel Projects Ongoing in MSFC's Engineering Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shular, D. A.; Smithers, G. A.; Plawsky, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    When we speak of an aerogel material, we are referring more to process and structure than to a specific substance. Aerogel, considered the lightest solid material, has been made from silica for seventy years. Resorcinol-formaldehyde, organic aerogels have been developed more recently. However, aerogel can be made from almost any type of substance, even lead. Because an aerogel is mostly air (about 99%), the solid substance used will affect the weight very little. The problem with aerogels is their low tensile strength and lack of elasticity. Therefore, the challenge is to find ways to make the stronger or ways to circumvent the strength issue. Organic aerogels have slightly higher strength than base silica aerogels, while the carbonized version has three to five times the break strength of the base aerogel.

  4. Optothermal nonlinearity of silica aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braidotti, Maria Chiara; Gentilini, Silvia; Fleming, Adam; Samuels, Michiel C.; Di Falco, Andrea; Conti, Claudio

    2016-07-01

    We report on the characterization of silica aerogel thermal optical nonlinearity, obtained by z-scan technique. The results show that typical silica aerogels have nonlinear optical coefficient similar to that of glass (≃10-12 m2/W), with negligible optical nonlinear absorption. The nonlinear coefficient can be increased to values in the range of 10-10 m2/W by embedding an absorbing dye in the aerogel. This value is one order of magnitude higher than that observed in the pure dye and in typical highly nonlinear materials like liquid crystals.

  5. Transportation Networks for Emergency Evacuations

    SciTech Connect

    Franzese, Oscar; Liu, Cheng

    2008-01-01

    Evacuation modeling systems (EMS) have been developed to facilitate the planning, analysis, and deployment of emergency evacuation of populations at risk. For any EMS, data such as road network maps, traffic control characteristics, and population distribution play critical roles in delineating emergency zones, estimating population at risk, and determining evacuation routes. There are situations in which it is possible to plan in advance for an emergency evacuation including, for example, an explosion at a chemical processing facility or a radiological accident at a nuclear plant. In these cases, if an accident or a terrorist attack were to happen, then the best evacuation plan for the prevailing network and weather conditions would be deployed. In other instances -for example, the derailment of a train transporting hazardous materials-, there may not be any previously developed plan to be implemented and decisions must be made ad-hoc on if and how to identify and proceed with the best course of action to minimize losses. Although both cases require as a starting point the development of a transportation network model of the area at risk, which must include road capacity and topology, in the latter the available time to generate this network is extremely limited. This time constraint precludes the use of any traditional data gathering methodology and the network generation process has to rely on the use of GIS and stochastic modeling techniques. The generation of these transportation networks in real time is the focus of this entry.

  6. Super-hydrophobic fluorine containing aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Coronado, Paul R.; Poco, John F.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2007-05-01

    An aerogel material with surfaces containing fluorine atoms which exhibits exceptional hydrophobicity, or the ability to repel liquid water. Hydrophobic aerogels are efficient absorbers of solvents from water. Solvents miscible with water are separated from it because the solvents are more volatile than water and they enter the porous aerogel as a vapor across the liquid water/solid interface. Solvents that are immisicble with water are separated from it by selectively wetting the aerogel. The hydrophobic property is achieved by formulating the aerogel using fluorine containing molecules either directly by addition in the sol-gel process, or by treating a standard dried aerogel using the vapor of fluorine containing molecules.

  7. Monolayer coated aerogels and method of making

    SciTech Connect

    Zemanian, Thomas Samuel; Fryxell, Glen; Ustyugov, Oleksiy A.

    2006-03-28

    Aerogels having a monolayer coating are described. The aerogel and a monolayer forming precursor are provided in a supercritical fluid, whereupon the aerogel and the monolayer forming precursor are reacted in said supercritical fluid to form a covalent bond between the aerogel and the monolayer forming precursor. Suitable aerogels are ceramic oxides such as silica, alumina, aluminosilicate, and combinations thereof. Suitable monolayer forming precursors include alkyl silanes, chlorosilanes, boranes, chloroboranes, germanes, and combinations thereof. The method may also include providing a surface preparation agent such as water, or hydroetching an aerogel to enhance the coating of the monolayer.

  8. Aerogel: From Aerospace to Apparel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Aspen Systems Inc. developed an aerogel-manufacturing process solved the handling problems associated with aerogel-based insulation products. Their aerogels can now be manufactured into blankets, thin sheets, beads, and molded parts; and may be transparent, translucent, or opaque. Aspen made the material effective for window and skylight insulation, non-flammable building insulation, and inexpensive firewall insulation that will withstand fires in homes and buildings, and also assist in the prevention of forest fires. Another Aspen product is Spaceloft(TM); an inexpensive, flexible blanket that incorporates a thin layer of aerogel embedded directly into the fabric. Spaceloft, is incorporated into jackets intended for wear in extremely harsh conditions and activities, such as Antarctic expeditions.

  9. Hybrid Multifoil Aerogel Thermal Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Paik, Jong-Ah; Jones, Steven; Nesmith, Bill

    2008-01-01

    This innovation blends the merits of multifoil insulation (MFI) with aerogel-based insulation to develop a highly versatile, ultra-low thermally conductive material called hybrid multifoil aerogel thermal insulation (HyMATI). The density of the opacified aerogel is 240 mg/cm3 and has thermal conductivity in the 20 mW/mK range in high vacuum and 25 mW/mK in 1 atmosphere of gas (such as argon) up to 800 C. It is stable up to 1,000 C. This is equal to commercially available high-temperature thermal insulation. The thermal conductivity of the aerogel is 36 percent lower compared to several commercially available insulations when tested in 1 atmosphere of argon gas up to 800 C.

  10. Solid evacuated microspheres of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Turnbull, Robert J.; Foster, Christopher A.; Hendricks, Charles D.

    1982-01-01

    A method is provided for producing solid, evacuated microspheres comprised of hydrogen. The spheres are produced by forming a jet of liquid hydrogen and exciting mechanical waves on the jet of appropriate frequency so that the jet breaks up into drops with a bubble formed in each drop by cavitation. The drops are exposed to a pressure less than the vapor pressure of the liquid hydrogen so that the bubble which is formed within each drop expands. The drops which contain bubbles are exposed to an environment having a pressure just below the triple point of liquid hydrogen and they thereby freeze giving solid, evacuated spheres of hydrogen.

  11. Aerogel Composites: Strong and Waterproof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan; Hsu, Ming-ta; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Aerogels are exotic materials having superior thermal and physical properties with great potential for both space and industrial uses. Although aerogels are excellent low-density insulators with unique acoustic and optical properties, their commercialization potential is currently limited by moisture absorption, fragility, and cost. This paper describes useful, easily scaled-up solutions to the first two of these three problems. The waterproofing and water-repellent method described here is a cheaper and simpler improvement over previous permanent methods.

  12. Improved Silica Aerogel Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Jong-Ah; Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Jones, Steven

    2008-01-01

    A family of aerogel-matrix composite materials having thermal-stability and mechanical- integrity properties better than those of neat aerogels has been developed. Aerogels are known to be excellent thermal- and acoustic-insulation materials because of their molecular-scale porosity, but heretofore, the use of aerogels has been inhibited by two factors: (1) Their brittleness makes processing and handling difficult. (2) They shrink during production and shrink more when heated to high temperatures during use. The shrinkage and the consequent cracking make it difficult to use them to encapsulate objects in thermal-insulation materials. The underlying concept of aerogel-matrix composites is not new; the novelty of the present family of materials lies in formulations and processes that result in superior properties, which include (1) much less shrinkage during a supercritical-drying process employed in producing a typical aerogel, (2) much less shrinkage during exposure to high temperatures, and (3) as a result of the reduction in shrinkage, much less or even no cracking.

  13. μ-PIXE mapping of archeological glazed pottery from Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadek, H.

    2015-03-01

    μ-PIXE has been successfully applied in analysis of archaeological materials, it has many advantages. In this work μ-PIXE used in analysis of ancient Egyptian glazed pottery from Al-Fustat excavation repository have been chosen to represent different chemical compositions (fluxes and colorants) of glaze depending on its color. The chemical compositions with deterioration factors (humidity and temperature) worked together to make chemical changes on the surface of glaze.

  14. Hypervelocity capture of particles in aerogel: Dependence on aerogel properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchell, M. J.; Fairey, S. A. J.; Foster, N. J.; Cole, M. J.

    2009-01-01

    Capture of high-speed (hypervelocity) particles in aerogel at ambient temperatures of 175-763 K is reported. This extends previous work which has mostly focussed on conducting experiments at ambient laboratory temperatures, even though aerogels are intended for use in cosmic dust capture cells in space environments which may experience a range of temperatures (e.g., the NASA Stardust mission which collected dust at 1.81 AU and putative Mars atmospheric sampling missions). No significant change in track length (normalised to impactor size) was found over the range 175-600 K, although at 763 K a significant reduction (30%) was found. By contrast, entrance hole diameter remained constant only up to 400 K, above this sudden changes of up to 50% were observed. Experiments were also carried out at normal laboratory temperature using a wide range of aerogel densities and particle sizes. It was found that track length normalised to particle size varies inversely with aerogel density. This is a power law dependence and not linear as previously reported, with longer tracks at lower densities. Glass projectiles (up to 100 μm size) were found to undergo a variety of degrees of damage during capture. In addition to the well known acquisition of a coating (partial or complete) of molten aerogel the mechanical damage includes pitting and meridian fractures. Larger (500 μm diameter) stainless steel spheres also showed damage during capture. In this case melting and ablation occurs, suggesting surficial temperatures during impact in excess of 1400 °C. The response of the aerogel itself to passage of particles through it is reported. The presence of fan-like fractures around the tracks is attributed to cone cracking similar to that in glasses of normal density, with the difference that here it is a repetitive process as the particles pass through the aerogel.

  15. Disaster Manual: Emergency, Evacuation, Recovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koplowitz, Brad; And Others

    This manual outlines the responsibilities of the director of the Oklahoma Department of Libraries in the event of a disaster as well as the functions of the emergency recovery team (ERT) in the coordination of recovery, and emergency action steps to be taken. The evacuation and emergency plan provided for the Allen Wright Memorial Library Building…

  16. Stationary surgical smoke evacuation systems.

    PubMed

    2001-03-01

    Two types of systems are available for evacuating the surgical smoke created by electrosurgery and laser surgery: portable and stationary surgical smoke evacuation systems. While portable systems dominate the market today, stationary systems are an alternative worth considering--even though they are still in their infancy, with fewer than 90 systems installed to date. Stationary systems represent a major commitment on the part of the healthcare facility. Several system components must be installed as part of the physical plant (for instance, within the walls), making the system a permanent fixture in the surgical suite. Installation of these systems is often carried out during building construction or major renovation--although the systems can be cost-effective even if no renovations are planned. For this Evaluation, we tested three stationary systems. All three are adequate to capture surgical smoke and evacuate it from the operating room. These systems are easy to use, are quietter than their portable counterparts, and require minimal user maintenance. They represent an excellent option for most hospitals actively evacuating surgical smoke. In this article, we discuss the factors to consider when selecting from among these systems. We also offer guidance on choosing between stationary systems and portable ones. PMID:11321758

  17. Composition containing aerogel substrate loaded with tritium

    DOEpatents

    Ashley, Carol S.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Ellefson, Robert E.; Gill, John T.; Reed, Scott; Walko, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The invention provides a process for loading an aerogel substrate with tritium and the resultant compositions. According to the process, an aerogel substrate is hydrolyzed so that surface OH groups are formed. The hydrolyzed aerogel is then subjected to tritium exchange employing, for example, a tritium-containing gas, whereby tritium atoms replace H atoms of surface OH groups. OH and/or CH groups of residual alcohol present in the aerogel may also undergo tritium exchange.

  18. Aerogel composites and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Cao, Wanqing; Hunt, Arlon Jason

    1999-01-01

    Disclosed herewith is a process of forming an aerogel composite which comprises introducing a gaseous material into a formed aerogel monolith or powder, and causing decomposition of said gaseous material in said aerogel in amounts sufficient to cause deposition of the decomposition products of the gas on the surfaces of the pores of the said aerogel. Also disclosed are the composites made by the process.

  19. Slotted Polyimide-Aerogel-Filled-Waveguide Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez-Solis, Rafael A.; Pacheco, Hector L.; Miranda, Felix A.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    2013-01-01

    This presentation discussed the potential advantages of developing Slotted Waveguide Arrays using polyimide aerogels. Polyimide (PI) aerogels offer great promise as an enabling technology for lightweight aerospace antenna systems. PI aerogels are highly porous solids possessing low density and low dielectric permittivity combined with good mechanical properties. For slotted waveguide array applications, there are significant advantages in mass that more than compensate for the slightly higher loss of the aerogel filled waveguide when compared to state of practice commercial waveguide.

  20. Improvements to the Synthesis of Polyimide Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Nguyen, Baochau N.; Guo, Haiquan; Vivod, Stephanie; He, Zuhui; Malow, Ericka; Silva, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Cross-linked polyimide aerogels are viable approach to higher temperature, flexible insulation for inflatable decelerators. Results indicate that the all-polyimide aerogels are as strong or stronger than polymer reinforced silica aerogels at the same density. Currently, examining use of carbon nanofiber and clay nanoparticles to improve performance. Flexible, polyimide aerogels have potential utility in other applications such as space suits, habitats, shelter applications, etc. where low dusting is desired

  1. Aerogel Cherenkov detectors in colliding beam experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilyuk, A. F.; Kononov, S. A.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.

    2015-05-01

    This review discusses the application of aerogel Cherenkov detectors in colliding beam experiments. Such detectors are used for charged particle identification at velocities at which other methods are ineffective. The paper examines aerogel production technology and how the aerogel optical parameters are measured. Data on threshold Cherenkov counters with direct light collection and on those using wavelength shifters are evaluated. Also presented are data on Ring Image Cherenkov detectors with single and multilayer focusing aerogel radiators.

  2. Investigation of surface water behavior during glaze ice accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Turnock, Stephen R.

    1988-01-01

    Microvideo observations of glaze ice accretions on 1-in-diameter cylinders in a closed-loop refrigerated wind tunnel were obtained to study factors controlling the behavior of unfrozen surface water during glaze ice accretion. Three zones of surface water behavior were noted, each with a characteristic roughness. The effect of substrate thermal and roughness properties on ice accretions was also studied. The contact angle and hysteresis were found to increase sharply at temperatures just below 0 C, explaining the high resistance to motion of water beads observed on accreting glaze ice surfaces. Based on the results, a simple multizone modification to the current glaze ice accretion model is proposed.

  3. 14 CFR 25.803 - Emergency evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... evacuation. (a) Each crew and passenger area must have emergency means to allow rapid evacuation in crash... must be shown by actual demonstration using the test criteria outlined in appendix J of this...

  4. 14 CFR 25.803 - Emergency evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... evacuation. (a) Each crew and passenger area must have emergency means to allow rapid evacuation in crash... must be shown by actual demonstration using the test criteria outlined in appendix J of this...

  5. 21 CFR 182.1711 - Silica aerogel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Silica aerogel. 182.1711 Section 182.1711 Food and... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1711 Silica aerogel. (a) Product. Silica aerogel as a finely powdered microcellular silica foam having a minimum silica content of...

  6. 21 CFR 582.1711 - Silica aerogel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Silica aerogel. 582.1711 Section 582.1711 Food and....1711 Silica aerogel. (a) Product. Silica aerogel as a finely powdered microcellular silica foam having a minimum silica content of 89.5 percent. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  7. 21 CFR 582.1711 - Silica aerogel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Silica aerogel. 582.1711 Section 582.1711 Food and....1711 Silica aerogel. (a) Product. Silica aerogel as a finely powdered microcellular silica foam having a minimum silica content of 89.5 percent. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  8. 21 CFR 182.1711 - Silica aerogel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Silica aerogel. 182.1711 Section 182.1711 Food and....1711 Silica aerogel. (a) Product. Silica aerogel as a finely powdered microcellular silica foam having a minimum silica content of 89.5 percent. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  9. 21 CFR 582.1711 - Silica aerogel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Silica aerogel. 582.1711 Section 582.1711 Food and....1711 Silica aerogel. (a) Product. Silica aerogel as a finely powdered microcellular silica foam having a minimum silica content of 89.5 percent. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  10. 21 CFR 582.1711 - Silica aerogel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Silica aerogel. 582.1711 Section 582.1711 Food and....1711 Silica aerogel. (a) Product. Silica aerogel as a finely powdered microcellular silica foam having a minimum silica content of 89.5 percent. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  11. 21 CFR 182.1711 - Silica aerogel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Silica aerogel. 182.1711 Section 182.1711 Food and....1711 Silica aerogel. (a) Product. Silica aerogel as a finely powdered microcellular silica foam having a minimum silica content of 89.5 percent. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  12. 21 CFR 182.1711 - Silica aerogel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Silica aerogel. 182.1711 Section 182.1711 Food and....1711 Silica aerogel. (a) Product. Silica aerogel as a finely powdered microcellular silica foam having a minimum silica content of 89.5 percent. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  13. Tapered fibers embedded in silica aerogel.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Limin; Grogan, Michael D W; Leon-Saval, Sergio G; Williams, Rhys; England, Richard; Wadsworth, Willam J; Birks, Tim A

    2009-09-15

    We have embedded thin tapered fibers (with diameters down to 1 microm) in silica aerogel with low loss. The aerogel is rigid but behaves refractively like air, protecting the taper without disturbing light propagation along it. This enables a new class of fiber devices exploiting volume evanescent interactions with the aerogel itself or with dopants or gases in the pores. PMID:19756084

  14. 21 CFR 582.1711 - Silica aerogel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Silica aerogel. 582.1711 Section 582.1711 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1711 Silica aerogel. (a) Product. Silica aerogel as a finely powdered microcellular silica foam...

  15. 21 CFR 182.1711 - Silica aerogel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Silica aerogel. 182.1711 Section 182.1711 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1711 Silica aerogel. (a) Product. Silica aerogel as a finely powdered microcellular silica foam...

  16. Structure and properties of "nematically ordered" aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadchikov, V. E.; Askhadullin, R. Sh.; Volkov, V. V.; Dmitriev, V. V.; Kitaeva, N. K.; Martynov, P. N.; Osipov, A. A.; Senin, A. A.; Soldatov, A. A.; Chekrygina, D. I.; Yudin, A. N.

    2015-04-01

    The microstructure, specific area, and mechanical properties of various samples of "nematically ordered" aerogels whose strands are almost parallel to each other at macroscopic distances have been studied. The strong anisotropy of such aerogels distinguishes them from standard aerogels, which are synthesized by solgel technology, and opens new possibilities for physical experiments.

  17. Composite Aerogel Multifoil Protective Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    New technologies are needed to survive the temperatures, radiation, and hypervelocity particles that exploration spacecraft encounter. Multilayer insulations (MLIs) have been used on many spacecraft as thermal insulation. Other materials and composites have been used as micrometeorite shielding or radiation shielding. However, no material composite has been developed and employed as a combined thermal insulation, micrometeorite, and radiation shielding. By replacing the scrims that have been used to separate the foil layers in MLIs with various aerogels, and by using a variety of different metal foils, the overall protective performance of MLIs can be greatly expanded to act as thermal insulation, radiation shielding, and hypervelocity particle shielding. Aerogels are highly porous, low-density solids that are produced by the gelation of metal alkoxides and supercritical drying. Aerogels have been flown in NASA missions as a hypervelocity particle capture medium (Stardust) and as thermal insulation (2003 MER). Composite aerogel multifoil protective shielding would be used to provide thermal insulation, while also shielding spacecraft or components from radiation and hypervelocity particle impacts. Multiple layers of foil separated by aerogel would act as a thermal barrier by preventing the transport of heat energy through the composite. The silica aerogel would act as a convective and conductive thermal barrier, while the titania powder and metal foils would absorb and reflect the radiative heat. It would also capture small hypervelocity particles, such as micrometeorites, since it would be a stuffed, multi-shock Whipple shield. The metal foil layers would slow and break up the impacting particles, while the aerogel layers would convert the kinetic energy of the particles to thermal and mechanical energy and stop the particles.

  18. Ultralight multiwalled carbon nanotube aerogel.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jianhua; Liu, Jianhua; Karakoti, Ajay Singh; Kumar, Amit; Joung, Daeha; Li, Qiang; Khondaker, Saiful I; Seal, Sudipta; Zhai, Lei

    2010-12-28

    Ultralight multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) aerogel is fabricated from a wet gel of well-dispersed pristine MWCNTs. On the basis of a theoretical prediction that increasing interaction potential between CNTs lowers their critical concentration to form an infinite percolation network, poly(3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl methacrylate) (PTMSPMA) is used to disperse and functionalize MWCNTs where the subsequent hydrolysis and condensation of PTMSPMA introduces strong and permanent chemical bonding between MWCNTs. The interaction is both experimentally and theoretically proven to facilitate the formation of a MWCNT percolation network, which leads to the gelation of MWCNT dispersion at ultralow MWCNT concentration. After removing the liquid component from the MWCNT wet gel, the lightest ever free-standing MWCNT aerogel monolith with a density of 4 mg/cm(3) is obtained. The MWCNT aerogel has an ordered macroporous honeycomb structure with straight and parallel voids in 50-150 μm separated by less than 100 nm thick walls. The entangled MWCNTs generate mesoporous structures on the honeycomb walls, creating aerogels with a surface area of 580 m(2)/g which is much higher than that of pristine MWCNTs (241 m(2)/g). Despite the ultralow density, the MWCNT aerogels have an excellent compression recoverable property as demonstrated by the compression test. The aerogels have an electrical conductivity of 3.2 × 10(-2) S·cm(-1) that can be further increased to 0.67 S·cm(-1) by a high-current pulse method without degrading their structures. The excellent compression recoverable property, hierarchically porous structure with large surface area, and high conductivity grant the MWCNT aerogels exceptional pressure and chemical vapor sensing capabilities. PMID:21090673

  19. Aerogel Derived Nanostructured Thermoelectric Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wendell E Rhine, PI; Dong, Wenting; Greg Caggiano, PM

    2010-10-08

    America’s dependence on foreign sources for fuel represents a economic and security threat for the country. These non renewable resources are depleting, and the effects of pollutants from fuels such as oil are reaching a problematic that affects the global community. Solar concentration power (SCP) production systems offer the opportunity to harness one of the United States’ most under utilized natural resources; sunlight. While commercialization of this technology is increasing, in order to become a significant source of electricity production in the United States the costs of deploying and operating SCP plants must be further reduced. Parabolic Trough SCP technologies are close to meeting energy production cost levels that would raise interest in the technology and help accelerate its adoption as a method to produce a significant portion of the Country’s electric power needs. During this program, Aspen Aerogels will develop a transparent aerogel insulation that can replace the costly vacuum insulation systems that are currently used in parabolic trough designs. During the Phase I program, Aspen Aerogels will optimize the optical and thermal properties of aerogel to meet the needs of this application. These properties will be tested, and the results will be used to model the performance of a parabolic trough HCE system which uses this novel material in place of vacuum. During the Phase II program, Aspen Aerogels will scale up this technology. Together with industry partners, Aspen Aerogels will build and test a prototype Heat Collection Element that is insulated with the novel transparent aerogel material. This new device will find use in parabolic trough SCP applications.

  20. Polyurea-Based Aerogel Monoliths and Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Je Kyun

    2012-01-01

    aerogel insulation material was developed that will provide superior thermal insulation and inherent radiation protection for government and commercial applications. The rubbery polyureabased aerogel exhibits little dustiness, good flexibility and toughness, and durability typical of the parent polyurea polymer, yet with the low density and superior insulation properties associated with aerogels. The thermal conductivity values of polyurea-based aerogels at lower temperature under vacuum pressures are very low and better than that of silica aerogels. Flexible, rubbery polyurea-based aerogels are able to overcome the weak and brittle nature of conventional inorganic and organic aerogels, including polyisocyanurate aerogels, which are generally prepared with the one similar component to polyurethane rubber aerogels. Additionally, with higher content of hydrogen in their structures, the polyurea rubber-based aerogels will also provide inherently better radiation protection than those of inorganic and carbon aerogels. The aerogel materials also demonstrate good hydrophobicity due to their hydrocarbon molecular structure. There are several strategies to overcoming the drawbacks associated with the weakness and brittleness of silica aerogels. Development of the flexible fiber-reinforced silica aerogel composite blanket has proven to be one promising approach, providing a conveniently fielded form factor that is relatively robust in industrial environments compared to silica aerogel monoliths. However, the flexible, silica aerogel composites still have a brittle, dusty character that may be undesirable, or even intolerable, in certain application environments. Although the cross - linked organic aerogels, such as resorcinol- formaldehyde (RF), polyisocyanurate, and cellulose aerogels, show very high impact strength, they are also very brittle with little elongation (i.e., less rubbery). Also, silica and carbon aerogels are less efficient radiation shielding materials due

  1. 14 CFR 23.803 - Emergency evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Emergency evacuation. 23.803 Section 23.803... Cargo Accommodations § 23.803 Emergency evacuation. (a) For commuter category airplanes, an evacuation.... The demonstration must be conducted under simulated night conditions using only the emergency exits...

  2. 14 CFR 25.803 - Emergency evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Emergency evacuation. 25.803 Section 25.803... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Emergency Provisions § 25.803 Emergency evacuation. (a) Each crew and passenger area must have emergency means to allow rapid evacuation in...

  3. 14 CFR 29.803 - Emergency evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Emergency evacuation. 29.803 Section 29.803... Emergency evacuation. (a) Each crew and passenger area must have means for rapid evacuation in a crash landing, with the landing gear (1) extended and (2) retracted, considering the possibility of fire....

  4. 24 CFR 3280.113 - Glass and glazed openings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glass and glazed openings. 3280.113... Glass and glazed openings. (a) Windows and sliding glass doors. All windows and sliding glass doors shall meet the requirements of § 3280.403 the “Standard for Windows and Sliding Glass Doors Used...

  5. 24 CFR 3280.113 - Glass and glazed openings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glass and glazed openings. 3280.113... Glass and glazed openings. (a) Windows and sliding glass doors. All windows and sliding glass doors shall meet the requirements of § 3280.403 the “Standard for Windows and Sliding Glass Doors Used...

  6. 24 CFR 3280.113 - Glass and glazed openings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glass and glazed openings. 3280.113... Glass and glazed openings. (a) Windows and sliding glass doors. All windows and sliding glass doors shall meet the requirements of § 3280.403 the “Standard for Windows and Sliding Glass Doors Used...

  7. 24 CFR 3280.113 - Glass and glazed openings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glass and glazed openings. 3280.113... Glass and glazed openings. (a) Windows and sliding glass doors. All windows and sliding glass doors shall meet the requirements of § 3280.403 the “Standard for Windows and Sliding Glass Doors Used...

  8. Production and characterization of glazed tiles containing incinerated sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Lin, D F; Chang, W C; Yuan, C; Luo, H L

    2008-01-01

    In this article, glaze with different colorants was applied to tile specimens manufactured by incinerated sewage sludge ash (ISSA) and clay. Improvements using different amounts of colorants, and glaze components and concentrations on tile bodies were investigated. Four different proportions of clay (by weight ratio) were replaced by ISSA. Tiles of size 12 cm x 6 cm x 1 cm were made and left in an electric furnace to make biscuit tiles at 800 degrees C. Afterwards, four colorants, Fe2O3 (red), V2O5 (yellow), CoCO3 (blue), and MnO2 (purple), and four different glaze concentrations were applied on biscuit tile specimens. These specimens were later sintered into glazed tiles at 1050 degrees C. The study shows that replacement of clay by sludge ash had adverse effects on properties of tiles. Water absorption increased and bending strength reduced with increased amounts of ash. However, both water absorption and bending strength improved for glazed ash tiles. Abrasion of grazed tiles reduced noticeably from 0.001 to 0.002 g. This implies glaze can enhance abrasion resistance of tiles. Effects like lightfastness and acid-alkali resistance improved as different glazes were applied on tiles. In general, red glazed tiles showed the most stable performance, followed by blue, yellow, and purple. PMID:17433656

  9. 46 CFR 116.1010 - Safety glazing materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Safety glazing materials. 116.1010 Section 116.1010 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE... ARRANGEMENT Window Construction and Visibility § 116.1010 Safety glazing materials. Glass and other...

  10. Management control of aeromedical evacuation systems.

    PubMed

    Barbash, G I; Ribak, J; Revach, M; Swedenburg, M G; Dolev, E

    1988-02-01

    Aeromedical evacuation has been extensively used by military forces for evacuation of wartime casualties, but has also proven useful in civilian disaster response. In contrast to the broad coverage of the clinical aspects of the aeromedical evacuation, the operational and management control issues have rarely been addressed. The sophisticated battlefield of the 1980s has had an impact also in air evacuation, adding to the factors to be considered before launching an evacuation mission. The professional control of aeromedical evacuation is, therefore, crucial to the efficient and smooth operation of this high-cost resource. In an attempt to shed light on some of the operational perspectives of military air evacuation, the Israeli experience in the management control of such systems is discussed. PMID:3345180

  11. Synergistic hybrid organic-inorganic aerogels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Jana, Sadhan C

    2013-07-10

    A class of inorganic-organic hybrid mesoporous aerogel structure was synthesized by growing gel in a gel. In Type 1, silica gels were grown inside the macropores of thermoreversible syndiotactic polystyrene (sPS) gel, while Type 2 hybrid aerogels were obtained by thermoreversible gelation of sPS chains in the mesopores of preformed silica gel. The hybrid gels were converted into aerogels by exchanging the solvent with liquid carbon dioxide followed by supercritical drying. The hybrid aerogels presented cocontinuous networks of pearl-necklace silica particles and crystalline strands of sPS and exhibited the "petal effect" due to the presence of superhydrophobic sPS and hygroscopic silica. The compressive modulus and compressive strain show large enhancements over sPS and silica aerogels indicating synergy, although Type 1 hybrid aerogels were found to be more robust. The hybrid aerogels showed fast absorption and high absorption capacity for a representative hydrocarbon liquid. PMID:23773123

  12. Formation of nanoporous aerogels from wheat starch.

    PubMed

    Ubeyitogullari, Ali; Ciftci, Ozan N

    2016-08-20

    Biodegradable nanoporous aerogels were obtained from wheat starch using a simple and green method based on supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) drying. Effects of processing parameters (temperature, wheat starch concentration and mixing rate during gelatinization; temperature, pressure, and flow rate of CO2, during SC-CO2 drying) on the aerogel formation were investigated, and optimized for the highest surface area and smallest pore size of the aerogels. At the optimized conditions, wheat starch aerogels had surface areas between 52.6-59.7m(2)/g and densities ranging between 0.05-0.29g/cm(3). The average pore size of the starch aerogels was 20nm. Starch aerogels were stable up to 280°C. Due to high surface area and nanoporous structure, wheat starch aerogels are promising carrier systems for bioactives and drugs in food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:27178916

  13. Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Lindquist, C.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-11-01

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. We have begun evaluation of several new UV-screened polycarbonate sheet glazing constructions. This has involved interactions with several major polymer industry companies to obtain improved candidate samples. Proposed absorber materials were tested for UV resistance, and appear adequate for unglazed ICS absorbers.

  14. Glazed lunar rocks: origin by impact.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J W; Laul, J C; Ganapathy, R; Anders, E

    1971-05-01

    The glassy coating of lunar rock 12017 is enriched in 15 trace elements relative to the crystalline interior. It apparently consists chiefly of shock-melted rock, somewhat richer in rare earth elements and alkali metals than rock 12017 itself. The glass has been contaminated by about 0.5 percent carbonaceous-chondrite-like material or, alternatively, by a mixture of 0.06 to 0.3 percent fractionated meteoritic material and approximately 10 to 15 percent local soil. The glazing seems to represent molten material splashed from a nearby meteorite impact and not in situ melting by a sudden increase in solar luminosity. PMID:17802215

  15. Polyimide Cellulose Nanocrystal Composite Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Baochau N.; Meador, Mary Ann; Rowan, Stuart; Cudjoe, Elvis; Sandberg, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Polyimide (PI) aerogels are highly porous solids having low density, high porosity and low thermal conductivity with good mechanical properties. They are ideal for various applications including use in antenna and insulation such as inflatable decelerators used in entry, decent and landing operations. Recently, attention has been focused on stimuli responsive materials such as cellulose nano crystals (CNCs). CNCs are environmentally friendly, bio-renewable, commonly found in plants and the dermis of sea tunicates, and potentially low cost. This study is to examine the effects of CNC on the polyimide aerogels. The CNC used in this project are extracted from mantle of a sea creature called tunicates. A series of polyimide cellulose nanocrystal composite aerogels has been fabricated having 0-13 wt of CNC. Results will be discussed.

  16. Biodegradable pectin/clay aerogels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Bing; Chiou, Bor-Sen; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Schiraldi, David A

    2013-03-13

    Biodegradable, foamlike materials based on renewable pectin and sodium montmorillonite clay were fabricated through a simple, environmentally friendly freeze-drying process. The addition of multivalent cations (Ca(2+) and Al(3+)) resulted in apparent cross-linking of the polymer and enhancement of aerogel properties. The compressive properties increased as the solid contents (both pectin and clay) increased; moduli in the range of 0.04-114 MPa were obtained for materials with bulk densities ranging from 0.03 g/cm(3) to 0.19 g/cm(3), accompanied by microstructural changes from a lamellar structure to a cellular structure. Biodegradability of the aerogels was investigated by detecting CO2 release for 4 weeks in compost media. The results revealed that pectin aerogels possess higher biodegradation rates than wheat starch, which is often used as a standard for effective biodegradation. The addition of clay and multivalent cations surprisingly increased the biodegradation rates. PMID:23406325

  17. Some aspects of the characterization of decorations on ceramic glazes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Arantegui, J.; Larrea, A.; Molera, J.; Pradell, T.; Vendrell-Saz, M.

    From antiquity, glazes have been one of the techniques used for decorating ceramics. Potters took advantage of the optical properties of these glazes to improve the quality of the object, especially to obtain an appearance or some characteristics that had commercial success. This is why it is important to know the reasons of the visual appearance of glazes. In this paper we present some aspects of the characterization of lustre, one of the on-glaze decorations that results in a more spectacular visual effect, as a microstructure, its composition, its raw materials and some technological aspects of its production. Lustre is a three-dimensional heterogeneous structure, where copper and silver nanoparticles play the most important role, but also alkali elements in the glaze and other components of raw lustre pigments. Lustre properties are determined by copper and silver composition and by distribution and dimension of these metallic nanocrystals in the decoration layer.

  18. High surface area silicon carbide-coated carbon aerogel

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A; Kuntz, Joshua D; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr, Joe H

    2014-01-14

    A metal oxide-carbon composite includes a carbon aerogel with an oxide overcoat. The metal oxide-carbon composite is made by providing a carbon aerogel, immersing the carbon aerogel in a metal oxide sol under a vacuum, raising the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to atmospheric pressure, curing the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol at room temperature, and drying the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to produce the metal oxide-carbon composite. The step of providing a carbon aerogel can provide an activated carbon aerogel or provide a carbon aerogel with carbon nanotubes that make the carbon aerogel mechanically robust. Carbon aerogels can be coated with sol-gel silica and the silica can be converted to silicone carbide, improved the thermal stability of the carbon aerogel.

  19. Biodegradable Pectin/clay Aerogels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodegradable, foamlike materials based on renewable pectin and sodium montmorillonite clay were fabricated through a simple, environmentally friendly freeze-drying process. Addition of multivalent cations (Ca2+ and Al3+) resulted in apparent crosslinking of the polymer, and enhancement of aerogel p...

  20. Desalination with carbon aerogel electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.C.; Richardson, J.H.; Fix, D.V.

    1996-10-21

    An electrically regenerated electrosorption process known as carbon aerogel CDI was developed for continuously removing ionic impurities from aqueous streams. A salt solution flows in a channel formed by pairs of parallel carbon aerogel electrodes. Each electrode has a very high BET surface area and very low resistivity. After polarization, anions and cations are removed from electrolyte by the electric field and electrosorbed onto the carbon aerogel. The solution is thus separated into two streams, brine and water. Based on this, carbon aerogel CDI appears to be an energy-efficient alternative to evaporation, electrodialysis, and reverse osmosis. The energy required by this process is about QV/2, plus losses. Estimated energy requirement for sea water desalination is 18-27 Wh gal{sup -1}, depending on cell voltage and flow rate. The requirement for brackish water desalination is less, 1.2-2.5 Wh gal{sup -1} at 1600 ppM. This is assuming that stored electrical energy is reclaimed during regeneration.

  1. Studying the Properties of Aerogel at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Scientists at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have been studying the properties of Aerogel for several years. Aerogel, the lightest solid known to man, has displayed a high quality for insulation. Because of its smoky countenance, it has yet to be used as an insulation on windows, but has been used in the space program on the rover Sojourner, and has been used as insulation in the walls of houses and in automobile engine compartments. As heat is applied to Aerogel, scientist Dr. David Noever of Space Sciences Laboratory, Principal Investigator of Aerogel, studies for its properties trying to uncover the secret to making Aerogel a clear substance. Once found, Aerogel will be a major component in the future of glass insulation.

  2. Method for producing metal oxide aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Tillotson, T.M.; Poco, J.F.; Hrubesh, L.W.; Thomas, I.M.

    1995-04-25

    A two-step hydrolysis-condensation method was developed to form metal oxide aerogels of any density, including densities of less than 0.003g/cm{sup 3} and greater than 0.27g/cm{sup 3}. High purity metal alkoxide is reacted with water, alcohol solvent, and an additive to form a partially condensed metal intermediate. All solvent and reaction-generated alcohol is removed, and the intermediate is diluted with a nonalcoholic solvent. The intermediate can be stored for future use to make aerogels of any density. The aerogels are formed by reacting the intermediate with water, nonalcoholic solvent, and a catalyst, and extracting the nonalcoholic solvent directly. The resulting monolithic aerogels are hydrophobic and stable under atmospheric conditions, and exhibit good optical transparency, high clarity, and homogeneity. The aerogels have high thermal insulation capacity, high porosity, mechanical strength and stability, and require shorter gelation times than aerogels formed by conventional methods. 8 figs.

  3. Method for producing metal oxide aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Tillotson, Thomas M.; Poco, John F.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Thomas, Ian M.

    1995-01-01

    A two-step hydrolysis-condensation method was developed to form metal oxide aerogels of any density, including densities of less than 0.003g/cm.sup.3 and greater than 0.27g/cm.sup.3. High purity metal alkoxide is reacted with water, alcohol solvent, and an additive to form a partially condensed metal intermediate. All solvent and reaction-generated alcohol is removed, and the intermediate is diluted with a nonalcoholic solvent. The intermediate can be stored for future use to make aerogels of any density. The aerogels are formed by reacting the intermediate with water, nonalcoholic solvent, and a catalyst, and extracting the nonalcoholic solvent directly. The resulting monolithic aerogels are hydrophobic and stable under atmospheric conditions, and exhibit good optical transparency, high clarity, and homogeneity. The aerogels have high thermal insulation capacity, high porosity, mechanical strength and stability, and require shorter gelation times than aerogels formed by conventional methods.

  4. An expert system for window glazing design

    SciTech Connect

    Foss, R.V. ); Droste, D.H.

    1990-01-01

    An integrated expert system was developed to facilitate the design of window glass for structural strength, hydrostatic loads, sound attenuation, and solar control. The integrated software consists of a text-based interface, a rule-based expert system, and two neural networks. The text of a glazing design guide is linked by related topics and concepts. The software's design feature lets the user enter design parameters for the window choice via an interactive consultation in to a rule-based expert system that critiques the design. The technical aspects of the glass's structural strength are based primarily on linear methods published by the American Architectural Manufacturers Association Statistical correlations for the new nonlinear failure prediction for glass strength are used to automatically design for the minimum glass thickness required to withstand a specified load. Neural networks estimate values for sound attenuation and solar transmission characteristics from laboratory test data on selected glass constructions.

  5. Ultralight and highly compressible graphene aerogels.

    PubMed

    Hu, Han; Zhao, Zongbin; Wan, Wubo; Gogotsi, Yury; Qiu, Jieshan

    2013-04-18

    Chemically converted graphene aerogels with ultralight density and high compressibility are prepared by diamine-mediated functionalization and assembly, followed by microwave irradiation. The resulting graphene aerogels with density as low as 3 mg cm(-3) show excellent resilience and can completely recover after more than 90% compression. The ultralight graphene aerogels possessing high elasticity are promising as compliant and energy-absorbing materials. PMID:23418081

  6. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-01

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction. PMID:26861680

  7. Sorption Properties of Aerogel in Liquid Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wesley L.

    2006-01-01

    Aerogel products are now available as insulation materials of the future. The Cryogenics Test Laboratory at the NASA Kennedy Space Center is developing aerogel-based thermal insulation systems for space launch applications. Aerogel beads (Cabot Nanogel ) and aerogel blankets (Aspen Aerogels Spaceloft ) have outstanding ambient pressure thermal performance that makes them useful for applications where sealing is not possible. Aerogel beads are open-celled silicone dioxide and have tiny pores that run throughout the body of the bead. It has also recently been discovered that aerogel beads can be used as a filtering device for aqueous compounds at room temperature. With their hydrophobic covering, the beads absorb any non-polar substance and they can be chemically altered to absorb hot gases. The combination of the absorption and cryogenic insulating properties of aerogel beads have never been studied together. For future cryogenic insulation applications, it is crucial to know how the beads react while immersed in cryogenic liquids, most notably liquid nitrogen. Aerogel beads in loose-fill situation and aerogel blankets with composite fiber structure have been tested for absorption properties. Depending on the type of aerogel used and the preparation, preliminary results show the material can absorb up to seven times its own weight of liquid nitrogen, corresponding to a volumetric ratio of 0.70 (unit volume nitrogen per unit volume aerogel). These tests allow for an estimate on how much insulation is needed in certain situations. The theory behind the different processes of sorption is necessary for a better understanding of the preparation of the beads before they are used in an insulation system.

  8. Aerogels Insulate Missions and Consumer Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Aspen Aerogels, of Northborough, Massachusetts, worked with NASA through an SBIR contract with Kennedy Space Center to develop a robust, flexible form of aerogel for cryogenic insulation for space shuttle launch applications. The company has since used the same manufacturing process developed under the SBIR award to expand its product offerings into the more commercial realms, making the naturally fragile aerogel available for the first time as a standard insulation that can be handled and installed just like standard insulation.

  9. Energy efficiency of a dynamic glazing system

    SciTech Connect

    Lollini, R.; Danza, L.; Meroni, I.

    2010-04-15

    The reduction of air-conditioning energy consumptions is one of the main indicators to act on when improving the energy efficiency in buildings. In the case of advanced technological buildings, a meaningful contribution to the thermal loads and the energy consumptions reduction could depend on the correct configuration and management of the envelope systems. In recent years, the architectural trend toward highly transparent all-glass buildings presents a unique challenge and opportunity to advance the market for emerging, smart, dynamic window and dimmable daylighting control technologies (). A prototype dynamic glazing system was developed and tested at ITC-CNR; it is aimed at actively responding to the external environmental loads. Both an experimental campaign and analyses by theoretical models were carried out, aimed at evaluating the possible configurations depending on different weather conditions in several possible places. Therefore, the analytical models of the building-plant system were defined by using a dynamic energy simulation software (EnergyPlus). The variables that determine the system performance, also influenced by the boundary conditions, were analysed, such as U- and g-value; they concern both the morphology of the envelope system, such as dimensions, shading and glazing type, gap airflow thickness, in-gap airflow rate, and management, in terms of control algorithm parameters tuning fan and shading systems, as a function of the weather conditions. The configuration able to provide the best performances was finally identified by also assessing such performances, integrating the dynamic system in several building types and under different weather conditions. The dynamic envelope system prototype has become a commercial product with some applications in facade systems, curtain walls and windows. The paper describes the methodological approach to prototype development and the main results obtained, including simulations of possible applications on

  10. How We 3D-Print Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    2015-04-23

    A new type of graphene aerogel will make for better energy storage, sensors, nanoelectronics, catalysis and separations. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have made graphene aerogel microlattices with an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The research appears in the April 22 edition of the journal, Nature Communications. The 3D printed graphene aerogels have high surface area, excellent electrical conductivity, are lightweight, have mechanical stiffness and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90 percent compressive strain). In addition, the 3D printed graphene aerogel microlattices show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials and much better mass transport.

  11. Aerogel commercialization pilot project. Final program report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-13

    Aerogels are extremely light weight, high surface area, very insulative materials that offer many potential improvements to commercial products. Aerogels have been the subject of extensive research at Department of Energy Laboratories and have been considered one of the technology most ready for commercialization. However, commercialization of the technology had been difficult for the National Laboratories since end users were not interested in the high temperature and high pressure chemical processes involved in manufacturing the raw material. Whereas, Aerojet as a supplier of rocket fuels, specialty chemicals and materials had the manufacturing facilities and experience to commercially produce aerogel-type products. Hence the TRP provided a link between the technology source (National Laboratories), the manufacturing (Aerojet) and the potential end users (other TRP partners). The program successfully produced approximately 500 ft{sup 2} of organic aerogel but failed to make significant quantities of silica aerogel. It is significant that this production represents both the largest volume and biggest pieces of organic aerogel ever produced. Aerogels, available from this program, when tested in several prototype commercial products were expected to improve the products performance, but higher than expected projected production costs for large scale manufacture of aerogels has limited continued commercial interest from these partners. Aerogels do, however, offer potential as a specialty material for some high value technology and defense products.

  12. Aerogel: Tile Composites Toughen a Brittle Superinsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan; Rasky, Daniel; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Pure aerogels, though familiar in the laboratory for decades as exotic lightweight insulators with unusual physical properties, have had limited industrial applications due to their low strength and high brittleness. Composites formed of aerogels and the ceramic fiber matrices like those used as space shuttle tiles bypass the fragility of pure aerogels and can enhance the performance of space shuttle tiles in their harsh operating environment. Using a layer of aerogel embedded in a tile may open up a wide range of applications where thermal insulation, gas convection control and mechanical strength matter.

  13. Pedestrian Evacuation Analysis for Tsunami Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. M.; Ng, P.; Wood, N. J.

    2014-12-01

    Recent catastrophic tsunamis in the last decade, as well as the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Alaskan event, have heightened awareness of the threats these natural hazards present to large and increasing coastal populations. For communities located close to the earthquake epicenter that generated the tsunami, strong shaking may also cause significant infrastructure damage, impacting the road network and hampering evacuation. There may also be insufficient time between the earthquake and first wave arrival to rely on a coordinated evacuation, leaving at-risk populations to self-evacuate on foot and across the landscape. Emergency managers evaluating these coastal risks need tools to assess the evacuation potential of low-lying areas in order to discuss mitigation options, which may include vertical evacuation structures to provide local safe havens in vulnerable communities. The U.S. Geological Survey has developed the Pedestrian Evacuation Analyst software tool for use by researchers and emergency managers to assist in the assessment of a community's evacuation potential by modeling travel times across the landscape and producing both maps of travel times and charts of population counts with corresponding times. The tool uses an anisotropic (directionally dependent) least cost distance model to estimate evacuation potential and allows for the variation of travel speed to measure its effect on travel time. The effectiveness of vertical evacuation structures on evacuation time can also be evaluated and compared with metrics such as travel time maps showing each structure in place and graphs displaying the percentage change in population exposure for each structure against the baseline. Using the tool, travel time maps and at-risk population counts have been generated for some coastal communities of the U.S. Pacific Northwest and Alaska. The tool can also be used to provide valuable decision support for tsunami vertical evacuation siting.

  14. Alumina microstructural sample preparation using a borate glaze

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, C.; Hill, S.; Hosmer, K.

    1986-03-01

    A method was developed for preparing alumina surfaces for microstructural analysis. Samples were polished using a sodium borate glaze, which produced a smooth surface with the grain boundaries accented.

  15. Chromogenic switchable glazing: Towards the development of the smart window

    SciTech Connect

    Lampert, C.M.

    1995-06-01

    The science and technology of chromogenic materials for switchable glazings in building applications is discussed. These glazings can be used for dynamic control of solar and visible energy. Currently many researchers and engineers are involved with the development of products in this field. A summary of activities in Japan, Europe, Australia, USA and Canada is made. The activities of the International Energy Agency are included. Both non-electrically activated and electrically activated glazings are discussed. Technologies covered in the first category are photochromics, and thermochromics and thermotropics. A discussion of electrically activated chromogenic glazings includes dispersed liquid crystals, dispersed particles and electrochromics. A selection of device structures and performance characteristics are compared. A discussion of transparent conductors is presented. Technical issues concerning large-area development of smart windows are discussed.

  16. 14 CFR 29.803 - Emergency evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Emergency evacuation. 29.803 Section 29.803 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations § 29.803 Emergency evacuation. (a)...

  17. 14 CFR 25.803 - Emergency evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Emergency evacuation. 25.803 Section 25.803 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Emergency Provisions § 25.803 Emergency evacuation. (a) Each crew...

  18. 14 CFR 29.803 - Emergency evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Emergency evacuation. 29.803 Section 29.803 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations § 29.803 Emergency evacuation. (a)...

  19. 14 CFR 25.803 - Emergency evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Emergency evacuation. 25.803 Section 25.803 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Emergency Provisions § 25.803 Emergency evacuation. (a) Each crew...

  20. Ultra-Scale Computing for Emergency Evacuation

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaduri, Budhendra L; Nutaro, James J; Liu, Cheng; Zacharia, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Emergency evacuations are carried out in anticipation of a disaster such as hurricane landfall or flooding, and in response to a disaster that strikes without a warning. Existing emergency evacuation modeling and simulation tools are primarily designed for evacuation planning and are of limited value in operational support for real time evacuation management. In order to align with desktop computing, these models reduce the data and computational complexities through simple approximations and representations of real network conditions and traffic behaviors, which rarely represent real-world scenarios. With the emergence of high resolution physiographic, demographic, and socioeconomic data and supercomputing platforms, it is possible to develop micro-simulation based emergency evacuation models that can foster development of novel algorithms for human behavior and traffic assignments, and can simulate evacuation of millions of people over a large geographic area. However, such advances in evacuation modeling and simulations demand computational capacity beyond the desktop scales and can be supported by high performance computing platforms. This paper explores the motivation and feasibility of ultra-scale computing for increasing the speed of high resolution emergency evacuation simulations.

  1. Visual quality assessment of electrochromic and conventional glazings

    SciTech Connect

    Moeck, M.; Lee, E.S.; Rubin, M.D.; Sullivan, R.; Selkowitz, S.E.

    1996-09-01

    Variable transmission, ``switchable`` electrochromic glazings are compared to conventional static glazings using computer simulations to assess the daylighting quality of a commercial office environment where paper and computer tasks are performed. RADIANCE simulations were made for a west-facing commercial office space under clear and overcast sky conditions. This visualization tool was used to model different glazing types, to compute luminance and illuminance levels, and to generate a parametric set of photorealistic images of typical interior views at various times of the day and year. Privacy and visual display terminal (VDT) visibility is explored. Electrochromic glazings result in a more consistent glare-free daylit environment compared to their static counterparts. However, if the glazing is controlled to minimize glare or to maintain low interior daylight levels for critical visual tasks (e.g, VDT), occupants may object to the diminished quality of the outdoor view due to its low transmission (Tv = 0.08) during those hours. RADIANCE proved to be a very powerful tool to better understand some of the design tradeoffs of this emerging glazing technology. The ability to draw specific conclusions about the relative value of different technologies or control strategies is limited by the lack of agreed upon criteria or standards for lighting quality and visibility.

  2. [Air medical evacuation on modern stage].

    PubMed

    Belevitin, A B; Shelepov, A M; Bochenkov, A A; Iamenskov, V V; Grebeniuk, S A; Peshkov, V V

    2010-01-01

    There was effectuated an analyze of using of aircrafts for medical air evacuation of ill and wounded persons, was shown it's place in system of treatment-evacuation measures during the war and peaceful time in course of liquidation of consequences of natural disasters. The article presents main clinical-physiological aspects of medical air evacuation, peculiarities of organization of delivery of health care aboard aircraft, state of medical air evacuation for now-days. The article presents characteristics of purposes and supply of created sanitary planes and helicopters: Mi-8MB "Bisectrix", An-26M "Saver", Il-76MD "Bistoury". There elaborated recommendations upon organization of medical air evacuation during war and peaceful time. PMID:20536037

  3. Necessity of guides in pedestrian emergency evacuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Dong, Hairong; Yao, Xiuming; Sun, Xubin; Wang, Qianling; Zhou, Min

    2016-01-01

    The role of guide who is in charge of leading pedestrians to evacuate in the case of emergency plays a critical role for the uninformed people. This paper first investigates the influence of mass behavior on evacuation dynamics and mainly focuses on the guided evacuation dynamics. In the extended crowd model proposed in this paper, individualistic behavior, herding behavior and environment influence are all considered for pedestrians who are not informed by the guide. According to the simulation results, herding behavior makes more pedestrians evacuate from the room in the same period of time. Besides, guided crowd demonstrates the same behavior of group dynamics which is characterized by gathering, conflicts and balance. Moreover, simulation results indicate guides with appropriate initial positions and quantity are more conducive to evacuation under a moderate initial density of pedestrians.

  4. A software utility for regional evacuation (SURE)

    SciTech Connect

    Venigalla, M.M. . Transportation Center); Rathi, A.K. )

    1992-01-01

    Regional evacuation is often a viable safeguard against natural catastrophes such as hurricanes and volcano eruptions, and man-made disasters such as toxic gas release into the atmosphere. Several computer programs exist for modeling regional evacuation on a given road network. As would be expected, these models are data intensive. In this paper, the development of a PC-based interactive computer model, Software Utility for Regional Evacuation (SURE), to create input to IDYNEV (for Interactive DYNamic EVacuation model) and analyze its output is discussed. The preprocessor module of SURE substantially reduces the time required to create input files to IDYNEV and the post-processor module summarizes the simulated results from the usually huge IDYNEV output files. The model also illustrates the evacuation network graphically and highlights problem links and intersections at selected intervals. SURE is being used extensively for evaualation studies under the US Army's Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness (CSEP) program.

  5. A software utility for regional evacuation (SURE)

    SciTech Connect

    Venigalla, M.M.; Rathi, A.K.

    1992-09-01

    Regional evacuation is often a viable safeguard against natural catastrophes such as hurricanes and volcano eruptions, and man-made disasters such as toxic gas release into the atmosphere. Several computer programs exist for modeling regional evacuation on a given road network. As would be expected, these models are data intensive. In this paper, the development of a PC-based interactive computer model, Software Utility for Regional Evacuation (SURE), to create input to IDYNEV (for Interactive DYNamic EVacuation model) and analyze its output is discussed. The preprocessor module of SURE substantially reduces the time required to create input files to IDYNEV and the post-processor module summarizes the simulated results from the usually huge IDYNEV output files. The model also illustrates the evacuation network graphically and highlights problem links and intersections at selected intervals. SURE is being used extensively for evaualation studies under the US Army`s Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness (CSEP) program.

  6. Statistical Analysis to Select Evacuation Route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musyarof, Z.; Sutarto, D. Y.; Atika, D. R.; Fajriya Hakim, R. B.

    2015-06-01

    Each country should be responsible for the safety of people, especially responsible for the safety of people living in disaster-prone areas. One of those services is provides evacuation route for them. But all this time, the selection of evacuation route is seem does not well organized, it could be seen that when a disaster happen, there will be many accumulation of people on the steps of evacuation route. That condition is dangerous to people because hampers evacuation process. By some methods in Statistical analysis, author tries to give a suggestion how to prepare evacuation route which is organized and based on people habit. Those methods are association rules, sequential pattern mining, hierarchical cluster analysis and fuzzy logic.

  7. Spatial game in cellular automaton evacuation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Schantz, Anton; Ehtamo, Harri

    2015-11-01

    For numerical simulations of crowd dynamics in an evacuation we need a computationally light environment, such as the cellular automaton model (CA). By choosing the right model parameters, different types of crowd behavior and collective effects can be produced. But the CA does not answer why, when, and how these different behaviors and collective effects occur. In this article, we present a model, where we couple a spatial evacuation game to the CA. In the game, an agent chooses its strategy by observing its neighbors' strategies. The game matrix changes with the distance to the exit as the evacuation conditions develop. In the resulting model, an agent's strategy choice alters the parameters that govern its behavior in the CA. Thus, with our model, we are able to simulate how evacuation conditions affect the behavior of the crowd. Also, we show that some of the collective effects observed in evacuations are a result of the simple game the agents play.

  8. Thermal properties of organic and modified inorganic aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.; Hrubesh, L.W.

    1992-08-01

    Aerogels are open-cell foams that have already been shown to be among the best thermal insulating solid materials known. Improvements in the thermal insulating properties of aerogels are possible by synthesizing new organic varieties, by using additives within existing aerogel matrix, and by optimizing their nanostructures. We discuss these approaches and give some examples of aerogels which demonstrate the improvements.

  9. Nonflammable, Hydrophobic Aerogel Composites for Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redouane, Begag

    2005-01-01

    Aerogel composites that are both nonflammable and hydrophobic have been developed for use as lightweight thermal- insulation materials for cryogenic systems. Aerogels are well known in the industry for their effectiveness as thermal insulators under cryogenic conditions, but the treatments used heretofore to render them hydrophobic also make them flammable. Nonflammability would make it safer to use aerogel insulation, especially in oxygen-rich environments and on cryogenic systems that contain liquid oxygen. A composite of this type is a silica aerogel reinforced with fibers. In comparison with unreinforced aerogels, the aerogel composite is about ten times as stiff and strong, better able to withstand handling, and more amenable to machining to required shapes. The composite can be made hydrophobic and nonflammable by appropriate design of a sol-gel process used to synthesize the aerogel component. In addition to very low thermal conductivity needed for insulation, aerogel composites of this type have been found to exhibit high resistance to moisture and nonflammability in oxygen-rich atmospheres: Samples floating on water for months gained no weight and showed no signs of deterioration. Samples were found to be nonflammable, even in pure oxygen at atmospheric pressure [14.7 psia (0.10 MPa)

  10. Chemical Analyses of Silicon Aerogel Samples

    SciTech Connect

    van der Werf, I.; Palmisano, F.; De Leo, Raffaele; Marrone, Stefano

    2008-04-01

    After five years of operating, two Aerogel counters: A1 and A2, taking data in Hall A at Jefferson Lab, suffered a loss of performance. In this note possible causes of degradation have been studied. In particular, various chemical and physical analyses have been carried out on several Aerogel tiles and on adhesive tape in order to reveal the presence of contaminants.

  11. Preparation of Biopolymer Aerogels Using Green Solvents.

    PubMed

    Subrahmanyam, Raman; Gurikov, Pavel; Meissner, Imke; Smirnova, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Although the first reports on aerogels made by Kistler(1) in the 1930s dealt with aerogels from both inorganic oxides (silica and others) and biopolymers (gelatin, agar, cellulose), only recently have biomasses been recognized as an abundant source of chemically diverse macromolecules for functional aerogel materials. Biopolymer aerogels (pectin, alginate, chitosan, cellulose, etc.) exhibit both specific inheritable functions of starting biopolymers and distinctive features of aerogels (80-99% porosity and specific surface up to 800 m(2)/g). This synergy of properties makes biopolymer aerogels promising candidates for a wide gamut of applications such as thermal insulation, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, drug delivery systems, functional foods, catalysts, adsorbents and sensors. This work demonstrates the use of pressurized carbon dioxide (5 MPa) for the ionic cross linking of amidated pectin into hydrogels. Initially a biopolymer/salt dispersion is prepared in water. Under pressurized CO2 conditions, the pH of the biopolymer solution is lowered to 3 which releases the crosslinking cations from the salt to bind with the biopolymer yielding hydrogels. Solvent exchange to ethanol and further supercritical CO2 drying (10 - 12 MPa) yield aerogels. Obtained aerogels are ultra-porous with low density (as low as 0.02 g/cm(3)), high specific surface area (350 - 500 m(2)/g) and pore volume (3 - 7 cm(3)/g for pore sizes less than 150 nm). PMID:27403649

  12. Long term experience with semi-conductive glaze high voltage post insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, A.C.; Maney, J.W.; Szilagyi, Z. )

    1990-01-01

    Insulators using semi-conductive glaze have long been known for their superior contamination performance. Early glazes for this type however were not stable and successful use of semi-conductive glazed porcelain insulators was delayed many years until tin-antimony oxide glazes were developed. Service experience of eighteen years is now available for line and station post insulators with this type of glaze. Based on this experience, the aging characteristics of tin-antimony oxide semi-conductive glazes are described and quantified. Several different applications of these insulators are also described.

  13. Solid phase microextraction device using aerogel

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Fred S.; Andresen, Brian D.

    2005-06-14

    A sample collection substrate of aerogel and/or xerogel materials bound to a support structure is used as a solid phase microextraction (SPME) device. The xerogels and aerogels may be organic or inorganic and doped with metals or other compounds to target specific chemical analytes. The support structure is typically formed of a glass fiber or a metal wire (stainless steel or kovar). The devices are made by applying gel solution to the support structures and drying the solution to form aerogel or xerogel. Aerogel particles may be attached to the wet layer before drying to increase sample collection surface area. These devices are robust, stable in fields of high radiation, and highly effective at collecting gas and liquid samples while maintaining superior mechanical and thermal stability during routine use. Aerogel SPME devices are advantageous for use in GC/MS analyses due to their lack of interfering background and tolerance of GC thermal cycling.

  14. High specific surface area aerogel cryoadsorber for vacuum pumping applications

    DOEpatents

    Hill, Randal M.; Fought, Eric R.; Biltoft, Peter J.

    2000-01-01

    A cryogenic pumping system is provided, comprising a vacuum environment, an aerogel sorbent formed from a carbon aerogel disposed within the vacuum environment, and cooling means for cooling the aerogel sorbent sufficiently to adsorb molecules from the vacuum environment onto the aerogel sorbent. Embodiments of the invention include a liquid refrigerant cryosorption pump, a compressed helium cryogenic pump, a cryopanel and a Meissner coil, each of which uses carbon aerogel as a sorbent material.

  15. High Specific Surface area Aerogel Cryoadsorber for Vacuum Pumping Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Randal M.; Fought, Eric R.; Biltoft, Peter J.

    1998-12-22

    A cryogenic pumping system is provided, comprising a vacuum environment, an aerogel sorbent formed from a carbon aerogel disposed within the vacuum environment, and cooling means for cooling the aerogel sorbent sufficiently to adsorb molecules from the vacuum environment onto the aerogel sorbent. Embodiments of the invention include a liquid refrigerant cryosorption pump, a compressed helium cryogenic pump, a cryopanel and a Meissner coil, each of which uses carbon aerogel as a sorbent material.

  16. Physics of Interplanetary Dust Collection with Aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, William W.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the results of research undertaken to study various problems associated with hypervelocity capture of dust particles in aerogel. The primary topics investigated were the properties of shocked aerogel and the requirements for reliable capture of particles on the STARDUST mission. In particular, the viscosity of shocked aerogel has been an open question. The results presented here suggest that the viscosity of aerogel at high impact velocities is negligible, although there remains some uncertainty about lower velocities. The model adopted for viscosity treats the mixture of polymeric silica and decomposition products and finds that, for particle velocities of 6-7 km/s, the viscosity is similar to that typical of light gasses at STP. Expressions for the Hugoniot of aerogel as a function of density were also obtained from the available data. All aerogels of interest for cosmic dust collectors have very similar shock velocity-particle velocity Hugoniot curves. The strength behavior of aerogel for low-speed penetration was measured, but further work is needed to study the proper way to apply this to the issue of terminal deceleration of a dust particle. Preliminary calculations designed to maximize the penetration depths were performed to determine the required density of aerogel to reliably stop a particle in a 3 cm thickness of aerogel (the path length expected for a normal impact into the STARDUST collector). In order to stop a particle of density rho(sub p) and diameter d(sub p), the mean density of the aerogel collector should be no less than that given by the expression bar rho(sub 0) = 1.085 X 10(exp -4 )rho(sub p)d(sub p), for densities measured in g/ cu cm and the particle diameter measured in micrometers.

  17. The efficiency of night insulation using aerogel-filled polycarbonate panels during the heating season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelsberger, Kathleen

    Energy is the basis for modern life. All modern technology from a simple coffee maker to massive industrial facilities is powered by energy. While the demand for energy is increasing, our planet is suffering from the consequences of using fossil fuels to generate electricity. Therefore, the world is looking at clean energy and solar power to minimize this effect on our environment. However, saving energy is extremely important even for clean energy. The more we save the less we have to generate. Heat retention in buildings is one step towards achieving passive heating. Therefore, efforts are made to prevent heat from escaping buildings through the glass during cold nights. Movable insulation is a way to increase the insulation value of the glass to reduce heat loss towards the outdoor. This thesis examines the performance of the aerogel-filled polycarbonate movable panels in the Ecohawks building, a building located on the west campus of The University of Kansas. Onsite tests were performed using air and surface temperature sensors to determine the effectiveness of the system. Computer simulations were run by Therm 7.2 simulation software to explore alternative design options. A cost analysis was also performed to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing movable insulation to reduce the heating bills during winter. Results showed that sealed movable insulation reduces heat loss through the glazing by 67.5%. Replacing aerogel with XPS panels reduces this percentage to 64.3%. However, it reduces the cost of the insulation material by 98%.

  18. Aerogel Projects Ongoing in MSFC's Engineering Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shular, David A.; Smithers, Gweneth A.; Plawsky, Joel L.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    When we speak of an aerogel material, we are referring more to process and structure am to a specific substance. Aerogel, considered the lightest solid material, has been made from silica for seventy years. Resorcinol-formaldehyde, organic aerogels have been developed more recently. However, aerogel can be made from almost any type of substance, even lead. Because an aerogel is mostly air (about 99 %), the solid substance used will affect the weight very little. The term "aerogel" connotes the sol-gel process used to manufacture the material. The aerogel begins as a liquid "sol," becomes a solid "alcogel," and is then dried to become an "aerogel." The final product has a unique structure, useful for exploitation. It is an "open pore" system with nano-sized particles and pores, has very high surface area, and is highly interconnected. Besides low weight, aerogels have ultimate (lowest) values in other properties: thermal conductivity, refractive index, sound speed, and dielectric constant. Aerogels were first prepared in 1931 by Steven Kistler, who used a supercritical drying step to replace the liquid in a gel with air, preserving the structure (1). Kistler's procedure involved a water-to-alcohol exchange step; in the 1970's, this step was eliminated when a French investigator introduced the use of tetramethylorthosilicate. Still, alcohol drying involved dangerously high temperatures and pressures. In the 1980's, the Microstructured Materials Group at Berkeley Laboratory found that the alcohol in the gel could be replaced with liquid carbon dioxide before supercritical drying, which greatly improved safety (2). 'Me most recent major contribution has been that of Deshpande, Smith and Brinker in New Mexico, who are working to eliminate the supercritical drying step (3). When aerogels were first being developed, they were evaporatively dried. However, the wet gel, when dried, underwent severe shrinkage and cracking; this product was termed "xerogel." When the

  19. Aerogels for Thermal Insulation of Thermoelectric Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Snyder, Jeffrey; Jones, Steven; Caillat, Thierry

    2006-01-01

    Silica aerogels have been shown to be attractive for use as thermal-insulation materials for thermoelectric devices. It is desirable to thermally insulate the legs of thermoelectric devices to suppress lateral heat leaks that degrade thermal efficiency. Aerogels offer not only high thermal- insulation effectiveness, but also a combination of other properties that are especially advantageous in thermoelectric- device applications. Aerogels are synthesized by means of sol-gel chemistry, which is ideal for casting insulation into place. As the scale of the devices to be insulated decreases, the castability from liquid solutions becomes increasingly advantageous: By virtue of castability, aerogel insulation can be made to encapsulate devices having any size from macroscopic down to nanoscopic and possibly having complex, three-dimensional shapes. Castable aerogels can permeate voids having characteristic dimensions as small as nanometers. Hence, practically all the void space surrounding the legs of thermoelectric devices could be filled with aerogel insulation, making the insulation highly effective. Because aerogels have the lowest densities of any known solid materials, they would add very little mass to the encapsulated devices. The thermal-conductivity values of aerogels are among the lowest reported for any material, even after taking account of the contributions of convection and radiation (in addition to true thermal conduction) to overall effective thermal conductivities. Even in ambient air, the contribution of convection to effective overall thermal conductivity of an aerogel is extremely low because of the highly tortuous nature of the flow paths through the porous aerogel structure. For applications that involve operating temperatures high enough to give rise to significant amounts of infrared radiation, opacifiers could be added to aerogels to reduce the radiative contributions to overall effective thermal conductivities. One example of an opacifier is

  20. Energy and daylight performance of angular selective glazings

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.; Beltran,; Lee, E.S.; Rubin, M.; Selkowitz, S.E.

    1998-11-01

    This paper presents the results of a study investigating the energy and daylight performance of anisotropic angular selective glazings. The DOE-2.1E energy simulation program was used to determine the annual cooling, lighting and total electricity use, and peak electric demand. RADIANCE, a lighting simulation program, was used to determine daylight illuminance levels and distribution. We simulated a prototypical commercial office building module located in Blythe, California. We chose three hypothetical conventional windows for comparison: a single-pane tinted window, a double-pane low-E window, and a double-pane spectrally selective window. Daylighting controls were used. No interior shades were modeled in order to isolate the energy effects of the angular selective glazing. Our results show that the energy performance of the prototype angular selective windows is about the same as conventional windows for a 9.14 m (30 ft) deep south-facing perimeter zone with a large-area window in the hot, sunny climate of Blythe. It is theoretically possible to tune the angular selectivity of the glazing to achieve annual cooling energy reductions of 18%, total electricity use reductions of 15%, and peak electric demand reductions of 11% when compared to a conventional glazing with the same solar-optical properties at normal incidence. Angular selective glazings can provide more uniformly distributed daylight, particularly in the area next to the window, which will result in a more visually comfortable work environment.

  1. Wildland fire evacuation/relocation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this plan is to ensure that appropriate actions are taken to provide for the safety of LBL employees by minimizing their exposure to the effects of an urban-wildland fire threatening the Laboratory. This plan has the following objectives: Provide a continuous assessment of the urban-wildland fire threat to LBL. Provide the mechanisms for alerting employees, visitors, and the Emergency Management Team when fire threatens the Laboratory. Provide guidelines for the Emergency Management Team to determine when to relocate or evacuate employees. Outline the communications pathways used to issue and control evacuations. Describe the options for the Emergency Management Team to consider during evacuation. Outline the specific responsibilities of the Emergency Response Organization when implementing an evacuation or relocation.

  2. Aerogel Blanket Insulation Materials for Cryogenic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffman, B. E.; Fesmire, J. E.; White, S.; Gould, G.; Augustynowicz, S.

    2009-01-01

    Aerogel blanket materials for use in thermal insulation systems are now commercially available and implemented by industry. Prototype aerogel blanket materials were presented at the Cryogenic Engineering Conference in 1997 and by 2004 had progressed to full commercial production by Aspen Aerogels. Today, this new technology material is providing superior energy efficiencies and enabling new design approaches for more cost effective cryogenic systems. Aerogel processing technology and methods are continuing to improve, offering a tailor-able array of product formulations for many different thermal and environmental requirements. Many different varieties and combinations of aerogel blankets have been characterized using insulation test cryostats at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Detailed thermal conductivity data for a select group of materials are presented for engineering use. Heat transfer evaluations for the entire vacuum pressure range, including ambient conditions, are given. Examples of current cryogenic applications of aerogel blanket insulation are also given. KEYWORDS: Cryogenic tanks, thermal insulation, composite materials, aerogel, thermal conductivity, liquid nitrogen boil-off

  3. Evacuation of institutionalized and specialized populations

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, B.M. )

    1990-02-01

    The purpose of this research was to assess the needs of organizations caring for institutional and specialized populations when faced with a threat or hazard requiring an evacuation. Individuals within specialized populations are unlike other victims of disaster because of their inherent dependency on organizational care givers and require different management strategies on the part of organizations and agencies in an evacuation. The research sought to identify those aspects of coping strategies that have been used successfully to manage an emergency evacuation. To identify special populations that have evacuated from institutions and similar facilities over a four-year period, a computerized search was conducted of media accounts describing such events. The search yielded a total of 1024 accounts from which four major subgroups were identified: nursing homes and related care facilities, hospitals, educational institutions, and correctional facilities. A miscellaneous group including housing for the elderly, apartments and other building complexes, workplaces and factories, public facilities, and places occupied by transient populations, such as transportation units and recreational facilities, could be used for future study. Among the factors found to affect evacuations were the extent of organizational resources (such as the number of staff or other individuals available at the time of the event), the type and number of clientele, and such community characteristics as population density. The study focuses on selected organizational characteristics of health care facilities (nursing homes and related care facilities and hospitals) which have recently experienced either a partial or complete evacuation of their facilities. 165 refs., 13 tabs.

  4. 46 CFR 199.145 - Marine evacuation system launching arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... from any projections of the vessel's structure or equipment. (4) The marine evacuation system's passage... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. 199.145....145 Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. (a) Arrangements. Each marine evacuation...

  5. 46 CFR 199.145 - Marine evacuation system launching arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. 199.145....145 Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. (a) Arrangements. Each marine evacuation system... from the marine evacuation system platform by a person either in the liferaft or on the platform;...

  6. 46 CFR 199.145 - Marine evacuation system launching arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. 199.145....145 Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. (a) Arrangements. Each marine evacuation system... from the marine evacuation system platform by a person either in the liferaft or on the platform;...

  7. 46 CFR 199.145 - Marine evacuation system launching arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. 199.145....145 Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. (a) Arrangements. Each marine evacuation system... from the marine evacuation system platform by a person either in the liferaft or on the platform;...

  8. 46 CFR 199.145 - Marine evacuation system launching arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. 199.145....145 Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. (a) Arrangements. Each marine evacuation system... from the marine evacuation system platform by a person either in the liferaft or on the platform;...

  9. Method for nanoencapsulation of aerogels and nanoencapsulated aerogels produced by such method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Thomas A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method for increasing the compressive modulus of aerogels comprising: providing aerogel substrate comprising a bubble matrix in a chamber; providing monomer to the chamber, the monomer comprising vapor phase monomer which polymerizes substantially free of polymerization byproducts; depositing monomer from the vapor phase onto the surface of the aerogel substrate under deposition conditions effective to produce a vapor pressure sufficient to cause the vapor phase monomer to penetrate into the bubble matrix and deposit onto the surface of the aerogel substrate, producing a substantially uniform monomer film; and, polymerizing the substantially uniform monomer film under polymerization conditions effective to produce polymer coated aerogel comprising a substantially uniform polymer coating substantially free of polymerization byproducts.Polymer coated aerogel comprising aerogel substrate comprising a substantially uniform polymer coating, said polymer coated aerogel comprising porosity and having a compressive modulus greater than the compressive modulus of the aerogel substrate, as measured by a 100 lb. load cell at 1 mm/minute in the linear range of 20% to 40% compression.

  10. Filament-strung stand-off elements for maintaining pane separation in vacuum insulating glazing units

    DOEpatents

    Bettger, Kenneth J; Stark, David H

    2013-08-20

    A vacuum insulating glazing unit (VIGU) comprises first and second panes of transparent material, first and second anchors, a plurality of filaments, a plurality of stand-off elements, and seals. The first and second panes of transparent material have edges and inner and outer faces, are disposed with their inner faces substantially opposing one another, and are separated by a gap having a predetermined height. The first and second anchors are disposed at opposite edges of one pane of the VIGU. Each filament is attached at one end to the first anchor and at the other end to the second anchor, and the filaments are collectively disposed between the panes substantially parallel to one another. The stand-off elements are affixed to each filament at predetermined positions along the filament, and have a height substantially equal to the predetermined height of the gap such that the each stand-off element touches the inner surfaces of both panes. The seals are disposed about the edges of the panes, enclosing the stand-off elements within a volume between the panes from which the atmosphere may be evacuated to form a partial vacuum.

  11. Modeling of surface roughness effects on glaze ice accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Yamaguchi, Keiko; Berkowitz, Brian; Potapczuk, M.

    1989-01-01

    The cause and effects of roughness on accreting glaze ice surfaces were studied with microvideo observations. Distinct zones of surface water behavior were observed, including a smooth wet zone in the stagnation region with a uniform water film, a rough zone where surface tension effects caused coalescence of surface water into stationary beads, and a zone where roughness elements grow into horn shapes. In addition, a zone where surface water ran back as rivulets and a dry zone where rime feathers formed were observed. The locations and behaviors of these zones are discussed. A simple multizone modification to the glaze ice accretion model is proposed to include spatial variability in surface roughness. Two test cases using the multizone model showed significant improvements for the prediction of glaze ice shapes.

  12. Persian turquoise glazed bodies: reproduction and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesbahinia, Alimohammad; Rashidi-Huyeh, Majid; Shafiee Afarani, Mahdi

    2015-03-01

    Ancient turquoise Persian glazed ceramics, which are well known as Khar-Mohreh, belonged to several centuries ago. In this research, reproduction of ancient glazed bodies was performed, and the products were studied by different techniques. Experimental evaluations were focused on elemental, structural, morphological, and colorimetric characteristics. SEM micrographs illustrated a thin (10 μm) uniform composite glazed layer on a porous composite thicker layer (500 μm). The layers consist of microneedle-shaped and nanospherical particles of copper oxide distributed in an amorphous silicate medium. Modeling of this architecture was used for determination of the visual aspect of the ceramic via the reflectance coefficient. Structural and colorimetric results showed that the shape and distribution of copper oxide particles do not play a crucial role on the color of these ceramics.

  13. Carbon aerogel electrodes for direct energy conversion

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Pekala, R.W.

    1997-02-11

    A direct energy conversion device, such as a fuel cell, using carbon aerogel electrodes is described, wherein the carbon aerogel is loaded with a noble catalyst, such as platinum or rhodium and soaked with phosphoric acid, for example. A separator is located between the electrodes, which are placed in a cylinder having plate current collectors positioned adjacent the electrodes and connected to a power supply, and a pair of gas manifolds, containing hydrogen and oxygen positioned adjacent the current collectors. Due to the high surface area and excellent electrical conductivity of carbon aerogels, the problems relative to high polarization resistance of carbon composite electrodes conventionally used in fuel cells are overcome. 1 fig.

  14. Carbon aerogel electrodes for direct energy conversion

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Kaschmitter, James L.; Pekala, Richard W.

    1997-01-01

    A direct energy conversion device, such as a fuel cell, using carbon aerogel electrodes, wherein the carbon aerogel is loaded with a noble catalyst, such as platinum or rhodium and soaked with phosphoric acid, for example. A separator is located between the electrodes, which are placed in a cylinder having plate current collectors positioned adjacent the electrodes and connected to a power supply, and a pair of gas manifolds, containing hydrogen and oxygen positioned adjacent the current collectors. Due to the high surface area and excellent electrical conductivity of carbon aerogels, the problems relative to high polarization resistance of carbon composite electrodes conventionally used in fuel cells are overcome.

  15. Composite Silica Aerogels Opacified with Titania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Jon-Ah; Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Jones, Steven; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; DiStefano, Salvador; Nesmith, Bill

    2009-01-01

    A further improvement has been made to reduce the high-temperature thermal conductivities of the aerogel-matrix composite materials described in Improved Silica Aerogel Composite Materials (NPO-44287), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 9 (September 2008), page 50. Because the contribution of infrared radiation to heat transfer increases sharply with temperature, the effective high-temperature thermal conductivity of a thermal-insulation material can be reduced by opacifying the material to reduce the radiative contribution. Therefore, the essence of the present improvement is to add an opacifying constituent material (specifically, TiO2 powder) to the aerogel-matrix composites.

  16. Ruthenium / aerogel nanocomposits via Atomic Layer Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Baumann, T F; Wang, Y; Nelson, E J; Kucheyev, S O; Hamza, A V; Kemell, M; Ritala, M; Leskela, M

    2006-08-28

    We present a general approach to prepare metal/aerogel nanocomposites via template directed atomic layer deposition (ALD). In particular, we used a Ru ALD process consisting of alternating exposures to bis(cyclopentadienyl)ruthenium (RuCp{sub 2}) and air at 350 C to deposit metallic Ru nanoparticles on the internal surfaces of carbon and silica aerogels. The process does not affect the morphology of the aerogel template and offers excellent control over metal loading by simply adjusting the number of ALD cycles. We also discuss the limitations of our ALD approach, and suggest ways to overcome these.

  17. Low density, resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, R.W.

    1989-10-10

    The polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde under alkaline conditions results in the formation of surface functionalized polymer clusters. The covalent crosslinking of these clusters produces gels which when processed under supercritical conditions, produce low density, organic aerogels (density [<=]100 mg/cc; cell size [<=]0.1 microns). The aerogels are transparent, dark red in color and consist of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters of about 100 [angstrom]. These aerogels may be further carbonized to form low density carbon foams with cell size of about 0.1 micron.

  18. Low density, resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard W.

    1991-01-01

    The polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde under alkaline conditions results in the formation of surface functionalized polymer "Clusters". The covalent crosslinking of these "clusters" produces gels which when processed under supercritical conditions, produce low density, organic aerogels (density.ltoreq.100 mg/cc; cell size .ltoreq.0.1 microns). The aerogels are transparent, dark red in color and consist of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters of about 100.circle.. These aerogels may be further carbonized to form low density carbon foams with cell size of about 0.1 micron.

  19. Low density, resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, R.W.

    1988-05-26

    The polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde under alkaline conditions results in the formation of surface functionalized polymer ''clusters''. The covalent crosslinking of these ''clusters'' produces gels which when processed under supercritical conditions, produce low density, organic aerogels (density less than or equal to100 mg/cc; cell size less than or equal to0.1 microns). The aerogels are transparent,dark red in color and consist of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters of about 100 A/degree/. These aerogels may be further carbonized to form low density carbon foams with cell size of about 0.1 micron. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. Low density, resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard W.

    1989-01-01

    The polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde under alkaline conditions results in the formation of surface functionalized polymer "clusters". The covalent crosslinking of these "clusters" produces gels which when processed under supercritical conditions, produce low density, organic aerogels (density .ltoreq.100 mg/cc; cell size .ltoreq.0.1 microns). The aerogels are transparent, dark red in color and consist of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters of about 100 .ANG.. These aerogels may be further carbonized to form low density carbon foams with cell size of about 0.1 micron.

  1. Waterproofing Nanostructured Aerogel-Ceramic Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan; Hsu, Ming Ta; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Aerogels are nanoporous materials which can be used to enhance the transport properties of ceramic fiber materials, to exploit their unique properties such as high porosity, large surface area, low density and low thermal conductivity. Numerous applications have been investigated. major obstacle to commercialization is that the structure of aerogels collapses due to the adsorption of water. simple and relatively cheap process has been developed to waterproof silica, alumina and alumina-silica and carbon aerogels and composites incorporating them. Previous waterproofing methods are short lived or expensive and time consuming.

  2. The impact of shadow evacuation on evacuation time estimates for nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Weinisch, Kevin; Brueckner, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A shadow evacuation is the voluntary evacuation of people from areas outside a declared evacuation area. Shadow evacuees can congest roadways and inhibit the egress of those evacuating from an area at risk. Federal regulations stipulate that nuclear power plant (NPP) licensees in the United States must conduct an Evacuation Time Estimate (ETE) study after each decennial census. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published federal guidance for conducting ETE studies in November 2011. This guidance document recommends the consideration of a Shadow Region which extends 5 miles radially beyond the existing 10-mile Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) for NPPs. The federal guidance also suggests the consideration of the evacuation of 20 percent of the permanent resident population in the Shadow Region in addition to 100 percent of the declared evacuation region within the EPZ when conducting ETE studies. The 20 percent recommendation was questioned in a March 2013 report prepared by the US Government Accountability Office. This article discusses the effects on ETE of increasing the shadow evacuation from 20 to 60 percent for 48 NPPs in the United States. Only five (10 percent) of the 48 sites show a significant increase (30 minutes or greater) in 90th percentile ETE (time to evacuate 90 percent of the population in the EPZ), while seven (15 percent) of the 48 sites show a significant increase in 100th percentile ETE (time to evacuate all population in the EPZ). Study areas that are prone to a significant increase in ETE due to shadow evacuation are classified as one of four types; case studies are presented for one plant of each type to explain why the shadow evacuation significantly affects ETE. A matrix of the four case types can be used by emergency management personnel to predict during planning stages whether the evacuated area is prone to a significant increase in ETE due to shadow evacuation. Potential mitigation tactics that reduce demand (public information

  3. Design and evaluation of daylighting applications of holographic glazings

    SciTech Connect

    Papamichael, K.; Ehrlich, C.; Ward, G.

    1996-12-01

    According to the contractual agreement, BTP would develop a computer model of the POC holographic structures and then simulate the performance of alternative designs using the RADIANCE lighting and rendering computer program [Ward 1990]. The RADIANCE model would then be used to evaluate the daylight performance of alternative designs of holographic glazings in a prototypical office space. The simulation process would be validated against actual photometric measurements of holographic glazing samples developed by POC. The results would be used to evaluate the potential for increased electric lighting savings through increased daylight illuminance levels at distances more than 15 ft--20 ft (4.6 m--6.1 m ) from the window wall.

  4. Potential flow analysis of glaze ice accretions on an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaguli, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    The results of an analytical/experimental study of the flow fields about an airfoil with leading edge glaze ice accretion shapes are presented. Tests were conducted in the Icing Research Tunnel to measure surface pressure distributions and boundary layer separation reattachment characteristics on a general aviation wing section to which was affixed wooden ice shapes which approximated typical glaze ice accretions. Comparisons were made with predicted pressure distributions using current airfoil analysis codes as well as the Bristow mixed analysis/design airfoil panel code. The Bristow code was also used to predict the separation reattachment dividing streamline by inputting the appropriate experimental surface pressure distribution.

  5. Highly Insulating Glazing Systems using Non-Structural Center Glazing Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, Christian; Arasteh, Dariush; Goudey, Howdy; Kohler, Christian

    2008-04-09

    Three layer insulating glass units with two low-e coatings and an effective gas fill are known to be highly insulating, with center-of-glass U-factors as low as 0.57 W/m{sup 2}-K (0.10 Btu/h-ft{sup 2}- F). Such units have historically been built with center layers of glass or plastic which extend all the way through the spacer system. This paper shows that triple glazing systems with non-structural center layers which do not create a hermetic seal at the edge have the potential to be as thermally efficient as standard designs, while potentially removing some of the production and product integration issues that have discouraged the use of triples.

  6. Sound velocity of liquid 4He in aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koichi; Arai, Osamu; Okuda, Yuichi; Tajiri, Koji

    2000-07-01

    The sound velocity and attenuation of liquid 4He in 93.7% and 94.6% porosity aerogels were measured for a frequency of 10 MHz. The sound velocity in 93.7% aerogel was larger than that in bulk 4He, whereas that in 94.6% was smaller. A model of the aerogel- 4He composite gave satisfactory agreement with the dependence of the sound velocity on the temperature and the aerogel density. This shows that the normal fluid is clamped to aerogel strands, although the viscous penetration depth is comparable to the typical size of a void in the aerogel.

  7. Structure-property relationships of carbon aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.; Alviso, C.T.; Kong, F.M.

    1993-12-01

    Of the organic reactions in sol-gel polymerizations, the most studied reaction is the aqueous polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde; the resulting crosslinked gels are supercritically dried from CO{sub 2} to give resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels. These aerogels can be pyrolyzed to form vitreous carbon monoliths with black color, high porosity, ultrafine cell/pore size, high surface area, and interconnected particles of the organic precursor. The structure and properties of the carbon aerogels depend on R/C (resorcinol/catalyst) ratio of starting solution, pyrolysis temperature, and chemical activation. Each variable is discussed. Carbon aerogels provide an almost ideal electrode material (in double-layer capacitors) owing to low electrical resistivity (<40 mohm-cm), controllable pore size distribution (5--500 {angstrom}), and high volumetric surface areas ({approximately}500 m{sup 2}/cm{sup 3}).

  8. Tortuosity of 4He Films on Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Ashton, C. E.; Golov, A. I.; Mulders, N.

    2006-09-07

    A torsional oscillator has been used to study the flow of liquid 4He through silica aerogel. The tortuosity and dissipation of the flow in the fractal aerogel environment has been measured, for both capillary condensed films and a fully saturated cell. The scaling of tortuosity as a function of filling fraction has been investigated. We compare the results of our 88%-porous aerogel to a 92%-porous sample where a transverse sound technique was used. Our more sensitive technique has reduced the scatter in both the frequency and dissipation data. Like in the previous transverse sound experiment, we find tortuosity as a function of filling fraction to scale with an exponent of {approx} -1.1. Further experiments are planned, to find the dependence of the exponent on the fractal dimension and porosity of aerogel.

  9. Fibrous-Ceramic/Aerogel Composite Insulating Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan M.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    Fibrous-ceramic/aerogel composite tiles have been invented to afford combinations of thermal-insulation and mechanical properties superior to those attainable by making tiles of fibrous ceramics alone or aerogels alone. These lightweight tiles can be tailored to a variety of applications that range from insulating cryogenic tanks to protecting spacecraft against re-entry heating. The advantages and disadvantages of fibrous ceramics and aerogels can be summarized as follows: Tiles made of ceramic fibers are known for mechanical strength, toughness, and machinability. Fibrous ceramic tiles are highly effective as thermal insulators in a vacuum. However, undesirably, the porosity of these materials makes them permeable by gases, so that in the presence of air or other gases, convection and gas-phase conduction contribute to the effective thermal conductivity of the tiles. Other disadvantages of the porosity and permeability of fibrous ceramic tiles arise because gases (e.g., water vapor or cryogenic gases) can condense in pores. This condensation contributes to weight, and in the case of cryogenic systems, the heat of condensation undesirably adds to the heat flowing to the objects that one seeks to keep cold. Moreover, there is a risk of explosion associated with vaporization of previously condensed gas upon reheating. Aerogels offer low permeability, low density, and low thermal conductivity, but are mechanically fragile. The basic idea of the present invention is to exploit the best features of fibrous ceramic tiles and aerogels. In a composite tile according to the invention, the fibrous ceramic serves as a matrix that mechanically supports the aerogel, while the aerogel serves as a low-conductivity, low-permeability filling that closes what would otherwise be the open pores of the fibrous ceramic. Because the aerogel eliminates or at least suppresses permeation by gas, gas-phase conduction, and convection, the thermal conductivity of such a composite even at

  10. Method for making monolithic metal oxide aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Droege, M.W.; Coronado, P.R.; Hair, L.M.

    1995-03-07

    Transparent, monolithic metal oxide aerogels of varying densities are produced using a method in which a metal alkoxide solution and a catalyst solution are prepared separately and reacted. The resulting hydrolyzed-condensed colloidal solution is gelled, and the wet gel is contained within a sealed, but gas permeable, containment vessel during supercritical extraction of the solvent. The present invention is especially advantageous for making metal oxides other than silica that are prone to forming opaque, cracked aerogels. 6 figs.

  11. Silica Aerogel Captures Cosmic Dust Intact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1994-01-01

    The mesostructure of silica aerogel resembles stings of grapes, ranging in size from 10 to 100 angstrom. This fine mesostructure transmits nearly 90 percent of incident light in the visible, while providing sufficiently gentle dissipation of the kinetric energy of hypervelocity cosmic dust particles to permit their intact capture. We introduced silica aerogel in 1987 as capture medium to take advantage of its low density, fine mesostruicture and most importantly, its transparency, allowing optical location of captured micron sized particles.

  12. Optical shock waves in silica aerogel.

    PubMed

    Gentilini, S; Ghajeri, F; Ghofraniha, N; Di Falco, A; Conti, C

    2014-01-27

    Silica aerogels are materials well suited for high power nonlinear optical applications. In such regime, the non-trivial thermal properties may give rise to the generation of optical shock waves, which are also affected by the structural disorder due to the porous solid-state gel. Here we report on an experimental investigation in terms of beam waist and input power, and identify various regimes of the generation of wave-breaking phenomena in silica aerogels. PMID:24515173

  13. Method for making monolithic metal oxide aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Droege, Michael W.; Coronado, Paul R.; Hair, Lucy M.

    1995-01-01

    Transparent, monolithic metal oxide aerogels of varying densities are produced using a method in which a metal alkoxide solution and a catalyst solution are prepared separately and reacted. The resulting hydrolyzed-condensed colloidal solution is gelled, and the wet gel is contained within a sealed, but gas permeable, containment vessel during supercritical extraction of the solvent. The present invention is especially advantageous for making metal oxides other than silica that are prone to forming opaque, cracked aerogels.

  14. Process for preparing polymer reinforced silica aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Capadona, Lynn A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Process for preparing polymer-reinforced silica aerogels which comprises a one-pot reaction of at least one alkoxy silane in the presence of effective amounts of a polymer precursor to obtain a silica reaction product, the reaction product is gelled and subsequently subjected to conditions that promotes polymerization of the precursor and then supercritically dried to obtain the polymer-reinforced monolithic silica aerogels.

  15. Experimental analysis of thermal performance of flat plate and evacuated tube solar collectors in stationary standard and daily conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zambolin, E.; Del Col, D.

    2010-08-15

    New comparative tests on two different types of solar collectors are presented in this paper. A standard glazed flat plate collector and an evacuated tube collector are installed in parallel and tested at the same working conditions; the evacuated collector is a direct flow through type with external compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) reflectors. Efficiency in steady-state and quasi-dynamic conditions is measured following the standard and it is compared with the input/output curves measured for the whole day. The first purpose of the present work is the comparison of results in steady-state and quasi-dynamic test methods both for flat plate and evacuated tube collectors. Besides this, the objective is to characterize and to compare the daily energy performance of these two types of collectors. An effective mean for describing and analyzing the daily performance is the so called input/output diagram, in which the collected solar energy is plotted against the daily incident solar radiation. Test runs have been performed in several conditions to reproduce different conventional uses (hot water, space heating, solar cooling). Results are also presented in terms of daily efficiency versus daily average reduced temperature difference: this allows to represent the comparative characteristics of the two collectors when operating under variable conditions, especially with wide range of incidence angles. (author)

  16. Visual analysis of situationally aware building evacuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guest, Jack; Eaglin, Todd; Subramanian, Kalpathi; Ribarsky, William

    2013-01-01

    Rapid evacuation of large urban structures (campus buildings, arenas, stadiums, etc.) is a complex operation and of prime interest to emergency responders and planners. Although there is a considerable body of work in evacuation algorithms and methods, most of these are impractical to use in real-world scenarios (non real-time, for instance) or have difficulty handling scenarios with dynamically changing conditions. Our goal in this work is towards developing computer visualizations and real-time visual analytic tools for building evacuations, in order to provide situational awareness and decision support to first responders and emergency planners. We have augmented traditional evacuation algorithms in the following important ways, (1) facilitate real-time complex user interaction with first responder teams, as information is received during an emergency, (2) visual reporting tools for spatial occupancy, temporal cues, and procedural recommendations are provided automatically and at adjustable levels, and (3) multi-scale building models, heuristic evacuation models, and unique graph manipulation techniques for producing near real-time situational awareness. We describe our system, methods and their application using campus buildings as an example. We also report the results of evaluating our system in collaboration with our campus police and safety personnel, via a table-top exercise consisting of 3 different scenarios, and their resulting assessment of the system.

  17. High Temperature Aerogels for Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.; Mbah, Godfrey C.

    2008-01-01

    High temperature aerogels in the Al2O3-SiO2 system are being investigated as possible constituents for lightweight integrated thermal protection system (TPS) designs for use in supersonic and hypersonic applications. Gels are synthesized from ethoxysilanes and AlCl3.6H2O, using an epoxide catalyst. The influence of Al:Si ratio, solvent, water to metal and water to alcohol ratios on aerogel composition, morphology, surface area, and pore size distribution were examined, and phase transformation on heat treatment characterized. Aerogels have been fabricated which maintain porous, fractal structures after brief exposures to 1000 C. Incorporation of nanofibers, infiltration of aerogels into SiC foams, use of polymers for crosslinking the aerogels, or combinations of these, offer potential for toughening and integration of TPS with composite structure. Woven fabric composites having Al2O3-SiO2 aerogels as a matrix also have been fabricated. Continuing work is focused on reduction in shrinkage and optimization of thermal and physical properties.

  18. Aerogel Composites for Aerospace Thermal Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Aerogel composites formed by infiltrating organic and/or inorganic aerogels into fiber matrix materials enable us to exploit the low thermal conductivity and low density of aerogels while maintaining the strength, structure and other useful properties of a porous fiber matrix. New materials for extreme heating ranges are needed to insulate future spacecraft against the extreme heat of planetary atmospheric entry, but the insulation mass must be minimized in order to maximize the payload. A reusable system passively insulates to survive heating unchanged for relatively low heating. Ablators, which sacrifice mass to control heating, are used to protect vehicles against more extreme heating for a single use thermal protection system (TPS). Aerogel composites were fabricated and tested for spacecraft thermal protection. The high-temperaturey high heat flux tests described in this paper were performed in NASA Ames arc-jet facilities to simulate spacecraft atmospheric entry, and include heating conditions predicted for the forebody and backshell of the Mars Science Lander (MSL) entry probe. The aerogel composites tested showed excellent thermal performance in the arc-jet tests, functioning both as reusuable insulation under lower heat fluxes, and as ablative aerogels under the extreme heating predicted for the MSL forebody.

  19. Cytochrome C stabilization and immobilization in aerogels.

    PubMed

    Harper-Leatherman, Amanda S; Wallace, Jean Marie; Rolison, Debra R

    2011-01-01

    Sol-gel-derived aerogels are three-dimensional, nanoscale materials that combine large surface areas and high porosities. These traits make them useful for any rate-critical chemical process, particularly sensing or electrochemical applications, once physical or chemical moieties are incorporated into the gels to add their functionality into the ultraporous scaffold. Incorporating biomolecules into aerogels has been challenging due to the inability of most biomolecules to remain structurally intact within the gels during the necessary supercritical fluid processing. However, the heme protein cytochrome c (cyt. c) forms self-organized superstructures around gold (or silver) nanoparticles in buffer that can be encapsulated within silica and processed to form aerogels in which cyt. c retains its characteristic visible absorption. The gold (or silver) nanoparticle-nucleated superstructures protect the majority of the protein from the harsh physicochemical conditions necessary to form an aerogel. The Au∼cyt. c superstructures exhibit rapid gas-phase recognition of nitric oxide (NO) within the aerogel matrix, as facilitated by the high-quality pore structure of the aerogel, and remain viable for weeks at room temperature. PMID:20865398

  20. Pore morphology study of silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, D.W.; Anderson, J.; Haereid, S.; Smith, D.M.

    1994-12-31

    Silica aerogels have numerous properties which suggest applications such as ultra high efficiency thermal insulation. These properties relate directly to the aerogel`s pore size distribution. The micro and meso pore size ranges can be investigated by normal small angle x-ray scattering and possibly, nitrogen adsorption. However, the measurement of larger pores (> 250 {angstrom}) is more difficult. Due to their limited mechanical strength, mercury porosimetry and nitrogen condensation can disrupt the gel structure and electron microscopy provides only limited large scale structure information. The use of small angle light scattering techniques seems to have promise, the only hurdle is that aerogels exhibit significant multiple scattering. This can be avoided if one observes the gels in the wet stage since the structure of the aerogel should be very similar to the wet gel (as the result of supercritical drying). Thus, if one can match the refractive index, the morphology can be probed. The combination of certain alcoholic solvents fit this index matching criteria. Preliminary results for the gel network (micron range) and primary particle structure (manometer) are reported by using small angle light scattering and ultra-small angle x-ray scattering. The effects on structure over the length scale range of <1 nm to >5 {mu}m under different conditions (precursors, pH, etc.) are presented. The change in structure of an aerogel during isostatic compaction to 228 MPa (to simulate drying from wetting solvents) are also discussed.

  1. Resorcinol-formaldehyde and carbon aerogel microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Alviso, C.T.; Pekela, R.W.; Gross, J.; Lu, X.; Caps, R.; Fricke, J

    1996-04-01

    Aerogels are a unique class of materials possessing an open-cell structure with ultrafine cells/pores (<100nm), high surface area (400--1100 m{sup 2}/g), and a solid matrix composed of interconnected particles, fibers, or platelets with characteristic dimensions of 10nm. Although monolithic aerogels are ideal candidates for many applications (e.g. transparent window insulation), current processing methods have limited their introduction into the commercial marketplace. Our research focuses on the formation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogel microspheres which offer an attractive alternative to monolith production. An inverse emulsion polymerization is used to produce these spherical gel particles which undergo solvent exchange followed by supercritical drying with carbon dioxide. This process yields aerogel microspheres (10--80{mu} diameter) which can be used as loosely packed powders, compression molded into near-net shapes using a polymer binder, or used as additives in conventional foaming operations to produce new aerogel composites with superior thermal properties. The emulsification procedure, thermal characterization, mechanical properties, and potential applications of RF aerogel microspheres will be discussed.

  2. Ambient pressure process for preparing aerogel thin films reliquified sols useful in preparing aerogel thin films

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, Charles Jeffrey; Prakash, Sai Sivasankaran

    1999-01-01

    A method for preparing aerogel thin films by an ambient-pressure, continuous process. The method of this invention obviates the use of an autoclave and is amenable to the formation of thin films by operations such as dip coating. The method is less energy intensive and less dangerous than conventional supercritical aerogel processing techniques.

  3. 10. INTERIOR KITCHEN UTILITY AREA SHOWING PARTITION, PANELED AND GLAZED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. INTERIOR KITCHEN UTILITY AREA SHOWING PARTITION, PANELED AND GLAZED REAR DOOR, AND ROW OF 6-LIGHT OVER 1-LIGHT, DOUBLE-HUNG, WOOD-FRAMED WINDOWS AROUND EAST CORNER OF HOUSE. VIEW TO EAST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  4. 46 CFR 127.410 - Safety-glazing materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Safety-glazing materials. 127.410 Section 127.410 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Construction of Windows, Visibility, and Operability of Coverings § 127.410...

  5. 46 CFR 127.410 - Safety-glazing materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Safety-glazing materials. 127.410 Section 127.410 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Construction of Windows, Visibility, and Operability of Coverings § 127.410...

  6. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE PANTRY. SHOWING GLAZED UPPER CABINETS. NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF THE PANTRY. SHOWING GLAZED UPPER CABINETS. NOTE THE FLOUR BIN IN FOREGROUND (SLIGHTLY AJAR) AND THE WINDOWS AT THE TOP OF THE EXTERIOR WALL. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST. - Hickam Field, Fort Kamehameha Officers' Housing Type Z, 19 Worchester Avenue, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  7. Interior view, detail to show the gold painted and glazed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view, detail to show the gold painted and glazed ceiling of the main entry lobby on Fourteenth Street; bronze chandeliers hang from this ceiling - United States Department of Commerce, Bounded by Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and E streets and Constitution Avenue, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  8. 46 CFR 127.410 - Safety-glazing materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Safety-glazing materials. 127.410 Section 127.410 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Construction of Windows, Visibility, and Operability of Coverings § 127.410...

  9. Modeling of surface roughness effects on glaze ice accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Yamaguchi, Keiko; Berkowitz, Brian M.; Potapczuk, Mark

    1990-01-01

    A series of experimental investigations focused on studying the cause and effect of roughness on accreting glaze ice surfaces were conducted. Detailed microvideo observations were made of glaze ice accretions on 1 to 4 inch diameter cylinders in three icing wind tunnels (the Data Products of New England six inch test facility, the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel, and the B. F. Goodrich Ice Protection Research Facility). Infrared thermal video recordings were made of accreting ice surfaces in the Goodrich facility. Distinct zones of surface water behavior were observed; a smooth wet zone in the stagnation region with a uniform water film; a rough zone where surface tension effects caused coalescence of surface water into stationary beads; a horn zone where roughness elements grow into horn shapes; a runback zone where surface water ran back as rivulets; and a dry zone where rime feathers formed. The location of the transition from the smooth to the rough zone was found to migrate with time towards the stagnation point. The behavior of the transition appeared to be controlled by boundary layer transition and bead formation mechanisms at the interface between the smooth and rough zones. Regions of wet ice growth and enhanced heat transfer were clearly visible in the infrared video recordings of glaze ice surfaces. A simple multi-zone modification to the current glaze ice accretion model was proposed to include spatial variability in surface roughness.

  10. Investigation of surface water behavior during glaze ice accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Turnock, Stephen R.

    1990-01-01

    A series of experimental investigations that focused on isolating the primary factors that control the behavior of unfrozen surface water during glaze ice accretion were conducted. Detailed microvideo observations were made of glaze ice accretions on 2.54 cm diam cylinders in a closed-loop refrigerated wind tunnel. Distinct zones of surface water behavior were observed; a smooth wet zone in the stagnation region with a uniform water film, a rough zone where surface tension effects caused coalescence of surface water into stationary beads, and a zone where surface water ran back as rivulets. The location of the transition from the smooth to the rough zone was found to migrate towards the stagnation point with time. Comparative tests were conducted to study the effect of the substrate thermal and roughness properties on ice accretion. The importance of surface water behavior was evaluated by the addition of a surface tension reducing agent to the icing tunnel water supply, which significantly altered the accreted glaze ice shape. Measurements were made to determine the contact angle behavior of water droplets on ice. A simple multizone modification to current glaze ice accretion models was proposed to include the observed surface roughness behavior.

  11. Technical Support Document for a Proposed IECC Glazing Orientation Restriction

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Zachary T.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes a proposed revision to the International Energy Conservation Code that would restrict the amount of west-facing glazing permitted on low-rise residential buildings. The purpose and structure of the proposed change are discussed and its potential impacts on energy consumption and cooling peak load are quantified based on hour-by-hour building energy simulation.

  12. 49 CFR 393.60 - Glazing in specified openings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Safety Standard (FMVSS) No. 205 in effect on the date of manufacture of the motor vehicle. The glazing material shall be marked in accordance with FMVSS No. 205 (49 CFR 571.205, S6). (b) Windshields required.... Exceptions: (1) Coloring or tinting which meets the requirements of paragraph (d) of this section; (2)...

  13. 49 CFR 393.60 - Glazing in specified openings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Safety Standard (FMVSS) No. 205 in effect on the date of manufacture of the motor vehicle. The glazing material shall be marked in accordance with FMVSS No. 205 (49 CFR 571.205, S6). (b) Windshields required.... Exceptions: (1) Coloring or tinting which meets the requirements of paragraph (d) of this section; (2)...

  14. Increasing the frost resistance of facade glazed tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Egerev, V.M.; Zotov, S.N.; Romanova, G.P.

    1986-09-01

    The authors investigate the protective properties of a coating of boron oxides and zirconium oxides applied as a glaze to ceramic tiles by conducting a series of tests to determine the frost resistance, the propensity to absorb water, the moisture expansion coefficient, the fracture behavior, and the effect of thermal cycling on the oxides. Results are graphed and tabulated.

  15. 46 CFR 177.1010 - Safety glazing materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Safety glazing materials. 177.1010 Section 177.1010 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Window Construction and Visibility § 177.1010 Safety...

  16. 46 CFR 177.1010 - Safety glazing materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Safety glazing materials. 177.1010 Section 177.1010 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Window Construction and Visibility § 177.1010 Safety...

  17. 46 CFR 177.1010 - Safety glazing materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Safety glazing materials. 177.1010 Section 177.1010 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Window Construction and Visibility § 177.1010 Safety...

  18. 46 CFR 177.1010 - Safety glazing materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Safety glazing materials. 177.1010 Section 177.1010 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Window Construction and Visibility § 177.1010 Safety...

  19. 46 CFR 177.1010 - Safety glazing materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Safety glazing materials. 177.1010 Section 177.1010 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Window Construction and Visibility § 177.1010 Safety...

  20. 28. LINEN CLOSET ON THIRD FLOOR, SHOWING GLAZED OPENINGS WHICH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. LINEN CLOSET ON THIRD FLOOR, SHOWING GLAZED OPENINGS WHICH GIVE LIGHT TO THE MAIN HALL Photograph DC-133-27 was taken from the arched opening to the left. - Woodrow Wilson House, 2340 South S Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  1. Compliance with surgical smoke evacuation guidelines: implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Ball, Kay

    2010-08-01

    Surgical smoke presents a serious health hazard, but perioperative nurses' compliance with smoke evacuation recommendations is not consistent. I investigated key indicators for compliance with electrosurgical smoke evacuation recommendations based on nurses' individual innovativeness characteristics, perceptions of the attributes of smoke evacuation recommendations, and organizational innovativeness characteristics. The study findings provide implications for improving nurses' compliance with smoke evacuation recommendations. Individual innovativeness characteristics, including nurses' knowledge and training, were most strongly linked to smoke evacuation compliance. The key indicators that promote surgical smoke evacuation can provide direction to guide the content of education programs and help identify the personnel and settings that are most in need of this information. Barriers to compliance included lack of equipment, physician resistance, noise, and staff member complacency. Vendor demonstrations on the ease of smoke evacuation device use can show nurses that smoke evacuation is compatible with nursing practice. Facility leaders should provide smoke evacuation policies that are easy to understand and should enforce these policies. PMID:20678603

  2. Compliance with surgical smoke evacuation guidelines: implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Ball, Kay

    2012-03-01

    Surgical smoke presents a serious health hazard, but perioperative nurses' compliance with smoke evacuation recommendations is not consistent. I investigated key indicators for compliance with electrosurgical smoke evacuation recommendations based on nurses' individual innovativeness characteristics, perceptions of the attributes of smoke evacuation recommendations, and organizational innovativeness characteristics. The study findings provide implications for improving nurses' compliance with smoke evacuation recommendations. Individual innovativeness characteristics, including nurses' knowledge and training, were most strongly linked to smoke evacuation compliance. The key indicators that promote surgical smoke evacuation can provide direction to guide the content of education programs and help identify the personnel and settings that are most in need of this information. Barriers to compliance included lack of equipment, physician resistance, noise, and staff member complacency. Vendor demonstrations on the ease of smoke evacuation device use can show nurses that smoke evacuation is compatible with nursing practice. Facility leaders should provide smoke evacuation policies that are easy to understand and should enforce these policies. PMID:22783605

  3. Pet Ownership and Evacuation Prior to Hurricane Irene

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Melissa G.; Bogue, Kelsey; Rohrbaugh, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Simple Summary Ninety pet owners and 27 non-pet owners who lived in mandatory evacuation zones during the 2011 Hurricane Irene were surveyed about whether or not they evacuated and about their experiences during the hurricane. Although pet-ownership was not statistically associated with evacuation failure, many pet owners who chose not to evacuate still claimed that they did not evacuate because of difficulties with evacuating their pet. These findings suggest that more work needs to be done in order to make evacuating with a pet easier. Abstract Pet ownership has historically been one of the biggest risk factors for evacuation failure prior to natural disasters. The forced abandonment of pets during Hurricane Katrina in 2005 made national headlines and led to the passage of the Pet Evacuation and Transportation Standards Act (PETS, 2006) which mandated local authorities to plan for companion animal evacuation. Hurricane Irene hit the East Coast of the United States in 2011, providing an excellent opportunity to examine the impact of the PETS legislation on frequency and ease of evacuation among pet owners and non-pet owners. Ninety pet owners and 27 non-pet owners who lived in mandatory evacuation zones completed questionnaires assessing their experiences during the hurricane and symptoms of depression, PTSD, dissociative experiences, and acute stress. Pet ownership was not found to be a statistical risk factor for evacuation failure. However, many pet owners who failed to evacuate continue to cite pet related reasons. PMID:26487162

  4. Durable polymer-aerogel based superhydrophobic coatings, a composite material

    DOEpatents

    Kissel, David J; Brinker, Charles Jeffrey

    2014-03-04

    Provided are polymer-aerogel composite coatings, devices and articles including polymer-aerogel composite coatings, and methods for preparing the polymer-aerogel composite. The exemplary article can include a surface, wherein the surface includes at least one region and a polymer-aerogel composite coating disposed over the at least one region, wherein the polymer-aerogel composite coating has a water contact angle of at least about 140.degree. and a contact angle hysteresis of less than about 1.degree.. The polymer-aerogel composite coating can include a polymer and an ultra high water content catalyzed polysilicate aerogel, the polysilicate aerogel including a three dimensional network of silica particles having surface functional groups derivatized with a silylating agent and a plurality of pores.

  5. Durable polymer-aerogel based superhydrophobic coatings: a composite material

    DOEpatents

    Kissel, David J.; Brinker, Charles Jeffrey

    2016-02-02

    Provided are polymer-aerogel composite coatings, devices and articles including polymer-aerogel composite coatings, and methods for preparing the polymer-aerogel composite. The exemplary article can include a surface, wherein the surface includes at least one region and a polymer-aerogel composite coating disposed over the at least one region, wherein the polymer-aerogel composite coating has a water contact angle of at least about 140.degree. and a contact angle hysteresis of less than about 1.degree.. The polymer-aerogel composite coating can include a polymer and an ultra high water content catalyzed polysilicate aerogel, the polysilicate aerogel including a three dimensional network of silica particles having surface functional groups derivatized with a silylating agent and a plurality of pores.

  6. Contact-active antibacterial aerogels from cellulose nanofibrils.

    PubMed

    Henschen, Jonatan; Illergård, Josefin; Larsson, Per A; Ek, Monica; Wågberg, Lars

    2016-10-01

    The use of cellulose aerogels as antibacterial materials has been investigated by applying a contact-active layer-by-layer modification to the aerogel surface. Studying the adsorption of multilayers of polyvinylamine (PVAm) and polyacrylic acid to aerogels comprising crosslinked cellulose nanofibrils and monitoring the subsequent bacterial adhesion revealed that up to 26mgPVAmgaerogel(-1) was adsorbed without noticeably affecting the aerogel structure. The antibacterial effect was tested by measuring the reduction of viable bacteria in solution when the aerogels were present. The results show that >99.9% of the bacteria adhered to the surface of the aerogels. Microscopy further showed adherence of bacteria to the surfaces of the modified aerogels. These results indicate that it is possible to create materials with three-dimensional cellulose structures that adsorb bacteria with very high efficiency utilizing the high specific surface area of the aerogels in combination with their open structure. PMID:27391038

  7. Synthesis and characterization of a nanocrystalline diamond aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Pauzauskie, Peter J.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Worsley, Marcus A.; Laurence, Ted A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Wang, Yinmin; Willey, Trevor M.; Visbeck, Kenneth S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Evans, William J.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

    2011-07-06

    Aerogel materials have myriad scientific and technological applications due to their large intrinsic surface areas and ultralow densities. However, creating a nanodiamond aerogel matrix has remained an outstanding and intriguing challenge. Here we report the high-pressure, high-temperature synthesis of a diamond aerogel from an amorphous carbon aerogel precursor using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Neon is used as a chemically inert, near-hydrostatic pressure medium that prevents collapse of the aerogel under pressure by conformally filling the aerogel's void volume. Electron and X-ray spectromicroscopy confirm the aerogel morphology and composition of the nanodiamond matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements of recovered material reveal the formation of both nitrogen- and silicon- vacancy point-defects, suggesting a broad range of applications for this nanocrystalline diamond aerogel.

  8. Evacuation modeling near a chemical stockpile site

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, D.E.; Madore, M.A.; Jaske, R.T.

    1992-01-01

    Dynamic evacuation modeling was used as an aid in emergency response planning by Tooele County, Utah, location of the United States' largest stockpile of unitary chemical weapons. The use of traffic modeling was affected both by the characteristics of the hazard and the unique topography of the area. To address these constraints Argonne National Laboratory, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and Tooele County created a set of evacuation modeling scenarios to be stored in the county's emergency management information system. For use in planning, the scenarios enable the county to map out effective traffic management strategies. For us in exercises or emergency response the scenarios enable the county to quickly access data to make and implement evacuation decisions.

  9. Evacuation modeling near a chemical stockpile site

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, D.E.; Madore, M.A.; Jaske, R.T.

    1992-06-01

    Dynamic evacuation modeling was used as an aid in emergency response planning by Tooele County, Utah, location of the United States` largest stockpile of unitary chemical weapons. The use of traffic modeling was affected both by the characteristics of the hazard and the unique topography of the area. To address these constraints Argonne National Laboratory, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and Tooele County created a set of evacuation modeling scenarios to be stored in the county`s emergency management information system. For use in planning, the scenarios enable the county to map out effective traffic management strategies. For us in exercises or emergency response the scenarios enable the county to quickly access data to make and implement evacuation decisions.

  10. Panic evacuation of single pedestrians and couples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, G. A.; Dorso, C. O.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the timing requirements for evacuation of people has focused primarily on independent pedestrians rather than pedestrians emotionally connected. However, the main statistical effects observed in crowds, the so-called “faster is slower”, “clever is not always better” and the “low visibility enhancement”, cannot explain the overall behavior of a crowd during an evacuation process when correlated pedestrians due to, for example feelings, are present. Our research addresses this issue and examines the statistical behavior of a mixture of individuals and couples during a (panic) escaping process. We found that the attractive feeling among couples plays an important role in the time delays during the evacuation of a single exit room.

  11. System and method for suppressing sublimation using opacified aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeff S. (Inventor); Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor); Calliat, Thierry (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Jones, Steven M. (Inventor); Palk, Jong-Ah (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to a castable, aerogel-based, ultra-low thermal conductivity opacified insulation to suppress sublimation. More specifically, the present invention relates to an aerogel opacified with various opacifying or reflecting constituents to suppress sublimation and provide thermal insulation in thermoelectric modules. The opacifying constituent can be graded within the aerogel for increased sublimation suppression, and the density of the aerogel can similarly be graded to achieve optimal thermal insulation and sublimation suppression.

  12. Aerogels: A new material for emissive display applications

    SciTech Connect

    Glauser, S.A.C.; Lee, H.W.H.

    1997-03-01

    The remarkable optical and electronic properties of doped and undoped silica aerogels establish their utility as unique, multifunctional host materials for fluorescent dyes and other luminescent materials for display and imaging applications. We present results on the photoluminescence and absorption of undoped silica aerogels and aerogels doped with Er{sup 3+}, rhodamine 6G (R6G), and fluorescein. We also demonstrate evidence of Fowler-Nordheim tunneling of electrons in aerogels. 4 refs., 10 figs.

  13. Eureka! Aerogel capture of meteoroids in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlee, D. E.; Horz, F.; Hrubsch, L.; Mcdonnell, J. A. M.; Tsou, P.; Williams, J.

    1994-01-01

    Light gas gun studies have shown that 6 km/s solid mineral and glass test particles can be successively captured in 0.05 g cm(exp -3) aerogel without severe heating or fragmentation. In spite of this work, there has been uncertainty in the performance of aerogel for hypervelocity capture of real meteoroids. Natural impacts differ from simulations in that the particles are likely to be structurally weak and they typically impact at higher velocity that can be simulated in the laboratory. We are fortunate now to have had two successful capture experiments using aerogel exposed in space. These experiments provide fundamental data for the assessment of the value of silica aerogel for capture of hypervelocity meteoroids from spacecraft. The first experiment used 0.02 g cm(exp -3) aerogel flown on the lid of a Shuttle Get Away Special canister. During its 9 day exposure, the 0.165 m(exp 2) of aerogel in this Sample Return Experiment (SRE) captured two long 'carrot-shaped' tracks and one highly fractured bowl shaped 'crater'. The second collection was with 0.04 m(exp 2) of 0.05 g cm(exp -3) aerogel exposed on ESA's Eureca freeflying spacecraft that was exposed for 11 months before recovery by the Shuttle. The Eureca aerogel exposure consisted of four 10x10 cm module trays that were part of the TiCCE meteoroid collector built by the University of Kent at Canterbury. To date we have found ten 'carrot-shaped' tracks and two 'craters' on this experiment. The longest tracks in both exposures are over 2 mm long. Two of the TiCCE modules had a 0.1 micron Al film suspended a millimeter above the aerogel. On these modules several of the projectiles fragmented during passage through the film producing fields of carrot shaped tracks from the resulting miniature 'meteor' shower. Most of the tracks in these showers have observable particles at their ends. We have extracted one of the carrot track meteoroids and mounted it in epoxy for sectioning. So far the examination of these 14

  14. [Evacuation of patients from the North Sea].

    PubMed

    Freund, K G

    1989-06-10

    In 1986 and 1987 the department of orthopaedic surgery at the Central Hospital of Esbjerg dealt with 135 medical problems by radio-telephone contacts to persons at sea. Of these, 28% needed a chartered helicopter. This eguals one third of all chartered helicopter evacuations from Danish waters. 77% of the evacuations were from fishing boats and the rest from offshore structures or other kinds of ships. The mechanism of trauma and the diagnosis agreed with the findings in an earlier Danish publication. PMID:2749648

  15. Evacuate and backfill apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Oakley, D.J.; Groves, O.J.

    1984-06-27

    An apparatus and method as described for treatment of hollow articles by evacuating existing gas or gases therefrom and purging or backfilling the articles with a second gas such as helium. The apparatus includes a sealed enclosure having an article storage drum mounted therein. A multiplicity of such articles are fed singly into the enclosure and loaded into radial slots formed in the drum. The enclosure is successively evacuated and purged with helium to replace the existing gas in the articles with helium. The purged articles are then discharged singly from the drum and transported out of the enclosure.

  16. Evacuate and backfill apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Oakley, David J.; Groves, Oliver J.

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus and method for treatment of hollow articles by evacuating existing gas or gases therefrom and purging or backfilling the articles with a second gas such as helium. The apparatus includes a sealed enclosure having an article storage drum mounted therein. A multiplicity of such articles are fed singly into the enclosure and loaded into radial slots formed in the drum. The enclosure is successively evacuated and purged with helium to replace the existing gas in the articles with helium. The purged articles are then discharged singly from the drum and transported out of the enclosure.

  17. Carbon aerogels: An update on structure, properties, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.; Mayer, S.T.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Kong, F.M.

    1993-07-01

    Aerogels are unique porous materials whose composition, structure, and properties can be controlled at the nanometer scale. This paper examines the synthesis of organic aerogels and their carbonized derivatives. Carbon aerogels have low electrical resistivity, high surface area, and a tunable pore size. These materials are finding applications as electrodes in double layer capacitors.

  18. Material Properties for Fiber-Reinforced Silica Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan; Rouanet, Stephane; Moses, John; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Ceramic fiber-reinforced silica aerogels are novel materials for high performance insulation, including thermal protection materials. Experimental data are presented for the thermal and mechanical properties, showing the trends exhibited over a range of fiber loadings and silica aerogel densities. Test results are compared to that of unreinforced bulk aerogels.

  19. 30 CFR 75.1501 - Emergency evacuations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Mine Emergencies § 75.1501 Emergency evacuations. (a) For... by the mine operator to take charge during mine emergencies involving a fire, explosion, or gas...

  20. 30 CFR 75.1501 - Emergency evacuations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Mine Emergencies § 75.1501 Emergency evacuations. (a) For... by the mine operator to take charge during mine emergencies involving a fire, explosion, or gas...

  1. 30 CFR 75.1501 - Emergency evacuations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Mine Emergencies § 75.1501 Emergency evacuations. (a) For... by the mine operator to take charge during mine emergencies involving a fire, explosion, or gas...

  2. 30 CFR 75.1501 - Emergency evacuations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Mine Emergencies § 75.1501 Emergency evacuations. (a) For... by the mine operator to take charge during mine emergencies involving a fire, explosion, or gas...

  3. Safe Emergency Evacuation From Tall Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephan, E. S.

    1984-01-01

    Emergency egress system allows people to be evacuated quickly from tall structures. New emergency system applicable to rescues from fires in tall hotels and other buildings. System consists of basket on slide wire. Basket descends by gravity on sloped slide wire staked to ground.

  4. High resolution transmission electron microscopy of melamine-formaldehyde aerogels and silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Ruben, G.C. . Dept. of Biological Sciences)

    1991-09-01

    The goal of the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was to image the structure of two tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) and two melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels at the single polymer chain level{sup 1,2}. With this level of structural resolution we hoped to interrelate each aerogel's structure with its physical properties and its method of synthesis. Conventional single-step base catalysed TMOS aerogels show strings of spheroidal particles linked together with minimal necking. The spheroidal particles range from 86--132 {Angstrom} and average 113{plus minus}10 {Angstrom} in diameter{sup 2}. In contrast the TMOS aerogels reported on here were made by a two step method. After extended silica chains are grown in solution under acidic conditions with a substoichiometric amount of water, the reaction is stopped and the methanol hydrolysed from TMOS is removed. Then base catalysis and additional water are added to cause gel formation is a nonalcoholic solvent. The MF aerogels were prepared for HRTEM by fracturing them on a stereo microscope stage with razor knife so that fractured pieces with smooth flat surfaces could be selected for platinum-carbon replication. The two silica (TMOS) aerogels were both transparent and difficult to see. These aerogels were fractured on a stereo microscope stage with tweezers. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Aerogel/Particle Composites for Thermoelectric Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Jong-Ah; Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Jones, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Optimizing solution chemistry and the addition of titania and fumed silica powder reduces shrinkage. These materials would serve to increase thermal efficiency by providing thermal insulation to suppress lateral heat leaks. They would also serve to prolong operational lifetime by suppressing sublimation of certain constituents of thermoelectric materials (e.g., sublimation of Sb from CoSb3) at typical high operating temperatures. [The use of pure silica aerogels as cast-in-place thermal-insulation and sublimation-suppression materials was described in "Aerogels for Thermal Insulation of Thermoelectric Devices" (NPO-40630), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 7 (July 2006), page 50.] A silica aerogel is synthesized in a solgel process that includes preparation of a silica sol, gelation of the sol, and drying of the gel in a solvent at a supercritical temperature and pressure. The utility of pure silica aerogel is diminished by a tendency to shrink (and, therefore, also to crack) during the gelation and supercritical-drying stages. Moreover, to increase suppression of sublimation, it is advantageous to make an aerogel having greater density, but shrinkage and cracking tend to increase with density. A composite material of the type under investigation consists mostly of titania oxide powder particles and a small addition of fumed silica powder, which are mixed into the sol along with other ingredients prior to the gelation stage of processing. The silica aerogel and fumed silica act as a binder, gluing the titania particles together. It is believed that the addition of fumed silica stiffens the aerogel network and reduces shrinkage during the supercritical-drying stage. Minimization of shrinkage enables establishment of intimate contact between thermoelectric legs and the composite material, thereby maximizing the effectiveness of the material for thermal insulation and suppression of sublimation. To some extent, the properties of the composite can be tailored via the

  6. Extraction of Particles Impacted into Silica Aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, G. A.; Chater, R. J.; Kearsley, A. T.; Burchell, M. J.; Bradley, J. P.

    2003-04-01

    The capture of intact cosmic dust grains, wherein both volatile chemical components and the mineral stoichiometry have survived, has proven difficult to achieve. However, development of low-density silica aerogel capture cells has been stimulated by the preparation for the NASA Stardust mission. To see what material this mission has collected, the research community must wait until 2006 for the return of the spacecraft, currently en route to Comet Wild 2. This interim period between launch and sample return should be used to assess the capabilities and difficulties of aerogel use, with low Earth orbit (LEO) flight opportunities and the development of extraction and analysis protocols in the laboratory. The ground-based studies are particularly important as LEO opportunities are limited, the last space-flown aerogel capture cell was on the now de-orbited MIR space station. Despite the paucity of orbital data, it is possible to simulate the expected cometary encounter velocities of the Stardust collectors using light-gas-gun and Van de Graaff particle accelerators. We have carried out a series of hypervelocity impact experiments using aerogel targets, with a variety of aerogel densities and compositions. A range of projectiles were used, from simple single homogeneous minerals (e.g. olivine) to complex crushed heterogeneous meteorite powders. The impacted targets were subjected to preliminary characterisation using optical and Raman microscopy, to assess location, composition and mineralogy of the captured grains. We have previously reported successful extraction of individual grains, and tracks containing fragments, by use of a UV laser system (COSPAR, 2002). During the impact between the projectile and the aerogel target, a thin layer of denatured aerogel is deposited on the grain, our preliminary experiments have shown that this aerogel coating can be removed from the grain surface by use of in-situ focused ion beam (FIB) techniques. We are now developing the

  7. SiO_2-aerogel dense plasma properties in the energy range up to 65 kJ/g

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, Dmitry; Fortov, Vladimir; Filimonov, Aleksandr; Kvitov, Sergei; Ternovoi, Vladimir

    1999-06-01

    Aerogels is a new class of porous matherials, characterized by wide range of initial densities (up to 1mg/cc), high gomogenity and optical transparency. One of the widely-used is SiO_2-aerogel. The results of experiments on shock compression of SiO_2-aerogel are presented. Porosity of samples was 7.5, 10 and 330. Shock wave in evacuated sample was initiated by impact of flat stainless steel striker. For increasing of particle velosity striker was impacted with sample through the layer of plexiglas. Optical emission from shock front was registered by fast six-channel pyrometer Using of step-shaped samples and streak camera allowed to measure impactor.velosity. Hugoniot data in Us-Up coordinates for all initial densities can be fitted by single linear dependence. Data from VNIIEF for shock compression of aerosil (another form of porous SiO2) samples is also close to this dependence. In coordinates T-U^2/2 (U^2/2 is a total energy of shock compression per gramm, density-independent coordinate) temperatures, measured on Hugoniots for all initial densities also can be fitted by single linear dependence, but at temperature about 1 eV there is a flat region. It can be explained by dissociation of SiO2 molecules.

  8. The Pedestrian Evacuation Analyst: geographic information systems software for modeling hazard evacuation potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Jeanne M.; Ng, Peter; Wood, Nathan J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent disasters such as the 2011 Tohoku, Japan, earthquake and tsunami; the 2013 Colorado floods; and the 2014 Oso, Washington, mudslide have raised awareness of catastrophic, sudden-onset hazards that arrive within minutes of the events that trigger them, such as local earthquakes or landslides. Due to the limited amount of time between generation and arrival of sudden-onset hazards, evacuations are typically self-initiated, on foot, and across the landscape (Wood and Schmidtlein, 2012). Although evacuation to naturally occurring high ground may be feasible in some vulnerable communities, evacuation modeling has demonstrated that other communities may require vertical-evacuation structures within a hazard zone, such as berms or buildings, if at-risk individuals are to survive some types of sudden-onset hazards (Wood and Schmidtlein, 2013). Researchers use both static least-cost-distance (LCD) and dynamic agent-based models to assess the pedestrian evacuation potential of vulnerable communities. Although both types of models help to understand the evacuation landscape, LCD models provide a more general overview that is independent of population distributions, which may be difficult to quantify given the dynamic spatial and temporal nature of populations (Wood and Schmidtlein, 2012). Recent LCD efforts related to local tsunami threats have focused on an anisotropic (directionally dependent) path distance modeling approach that incorporates travel directionality, multiple travel speed assumptions, and cost surfaces that reflect variations in slope and land cover (Wood and Schmidtlein, 2012, 2013). The Pedestrian Evacuation Analyst software implements this anisotropic path-distance approach for pedestrian evacuation from sudden-onset hazards, with a particular focus at this time on local tsunami threats. The model estimates evacuation potential based on elevation, direction of movement, land cover, and travel speed and creates a map showing travel times to safety (a

  9. Aerogel Beads as Cryogenic Thermal Insulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.; Rouanet, S.; Thompson, Karen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An investigation of the use of aerogel beads as thermal insulation for cryogenic applications was conducted at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Steady-state liquid nitrogen boiloff methods were used to characterize the thermal performance of aerogel beads in comparison with conventional insulation products such as perlite powder and multilayer insulation (MLI). Aerogel beads produced by Cabot Corporation have a bulk density below 100 kilograms per cubic meter (kg/cubic m) and a mean particle diameter of 1 millimeter (mm). The apparent thermal conductivity values of the bulk material have been determined under steady-state conditions at boundary temperatures of approximately 293 and 77 kelvin (K) and at various cold vacuum pressures (CVP). Vacuum levels ranged from 10(exp -5) torr to 760 torr. All test articles were made in a cylindrical configuration with a typical insulation thickness of 25 mm. Temperature profiles through the thickness of the test specimens were also measured. The results showed the performance of the aerogel beads was significantly better than the conventional materials in both soft-vacuum (1 to 10 torr) and no-vacuum (760 torr) ranges. Opacified aerogel beads performed better than perlite powder under high-vacuum conditions. Further studies for material optimization and system application are in progress.

  10. Hydrogen crystallization in low-density aerogels.

    PubMed

    Kucheyev, S O; Van Cleve, E; Johnston, L T; Gammon, S A; Worsley, M A

    2015-04-01

    Crystallization of liquids confined in disordered low-density nanoporous scaffolds is poorly understood. Here, we use relaxation calorimetry to study the liquid-solid phase transition of H2 in a series of silica and carbon (nanotube- and graphene-based) aerogels with porosities ≳94%. Results show that freezing temperatures of H2 inside all the aerogels studied are depressed but do not follow predictions of the Gibbs-Thomson theory based on average pore diameters measured by conventional gas sorption techniques. Instead, we find that, for each material family investigated, the depression of average freezing temperatures scales linearly with the ratio of the internal surface area (measured by gas sorption) and the total pore volume derived from the density of aerogel monoliths. The slope of such linear dependences is, however, different for silica and carbon aerogels, which we attribute to microporosity of carbons and the presence of macropores in silica aerogels. Our results have important implications for the analysis of pore size distributions of low-density nanoporous materials and for controlling crystallization of fuel layers in targets for thermonuclear fusion energy applications. PMID:25781182

  11. Aerogel beads as cryogenic thermal insulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.; Rouanet, S.

    2002-05-01

    An investigation of the use of aerogel beads as thermal insulation for cryogenic applications was conducted at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Steady-state liquid nitrogen boiloff methods were used to characterize the thermal performance of aerogel beads in comparison with conventional insulation products such as perlite powder and multilayer insulation (MLI). Aerogel beads produced by Cabot Corporation have a bulk density below 100 kilograms per cubic meter (kg/m3) and a mean particle diameter of 1 millimeter (mm). The apparent thermal conductivity values of the bulk material have been determined under steady-state conditions at boundary temperatures of approximately 293 and 77 kelvin (K) and at various cold vacuum pressures (CVP). Vacuum levels ranged from 10-5 torr to 760 torr. All test articles were made in a cylindrical configuration with a typical insulation thickness of 25 mm. Temperature profiles through the thickness of the test specimens were also measured. The results showed the performance of the aerogel beads was significantly better than the conventional materials in both soft-vacuum (1 to 10 torr) and no-vacuum (760 torr) ranges. Opacified aerogel beads performed better than perlite powder under high-vacuum conditions. Further studies for material optimization and system application are in progress.

  12. Determination of Young's modulus of silica aerogels using holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikode, Prashant P.; Sabale, Sandip R.; Vhatkar, Rajiv S.

    2016-05-01

    Digital holographic interferometry technique is used to determine elastic modulus of silica aerogels. Tetramethoxysilane precursor based Silica aerogels were prepared by the sol-gel process followed by supercritical methanol drying. The alcogels were prepared by keeping the molar ratio of tetramethoxysilane: methyltrimethoxysilane: H2O constant at 1:0.6:4 while the methanol / tetramethoxysilane molar ratio (M) was varied systematically from 12 to 18. Holograms of translucent aerogel samples have been successfully recorded using the digital holographic interferometry technique. Stimulated digital interferograms gives localization of interference fringes on the aerogel surface and these fringes are used to determine the surface deformation and Young's modulus (Y) of the aerogels.

  13. 30 CFR 56.4330 - Firefighting, evacuation, and rescue procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Firefighting, evacuation, and rescue procedures... Fire Prevention and Control Firefighting Procedures/alarms/drills § 56.4330 Firefighting, evacuation, and rescue procedures. (a) Mine operators shall establish emergency firefighting, evacuation,...

  14. 30 CFR 56.4330 - Firefighting, evacuation, and rescue procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Firefighting, evacuation, and rescue procedures... Fire Prevention and Control Firefighting Procedures/alarms/drills § 56.4330 Firefighting, evacuation, and rescue procedures. (a) Mine operators shall establish emergency firefighting, evacuation,...

  15. 46 CFR 108.545 - Marine evacuation system launching arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... projections of the unit's structure or equipment. (3) The marine evacuation system's passage and platform... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. 108.545... DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment § 108.545 Marine evacuation system...

  16. 46 CFR 133.145 - Marine evacuation system launching arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... projections of the OSV's structure or equipment. (4) The marine evacuation system's passage and platform, when... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. 133.145... LIFESAVING SYSTEMS Requirements for All OSVs § 133.145 Marine evacuation system launching arrangements....

  17. 21 CFR 888.4220 - Cement monomer vapor evacuator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cement monomer vapor evacuator. 888.4220 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4220 Cement monomer vapor evacuator. (a) Identification. A cement monomer vapor evacuator is a device intended for use during surgery to contain or...

  18. 21 CFR 888.4220 - Cement monomer vapor evacuator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cement monomer vapor evacuator. 888.4220 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4220 Cement monomer vapor evacuator. (a) Identification. A cement monomer vapor evacuator is a device intended for use during surgery to contain or...

  19. 21 CFR 888.4220 - Cement monomer vapor evacuator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cement monomer vapor evacuator. 888.4220 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4220 Cement monomer vapor evacuator. (a) Identification. A cement monomer vapor evacuator is a device intended for use during surgery to contain or...

  20. 21 CFR 888.4220 - Cement monomer vapor evacuator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cement monomer vapor evacuator. 888.4220 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4220 Cement monomer vapor evacuator. (a) Identification. A cement monomer vapor evacuator is a device intended for use during surgery to contain or...

  1. 21 CFR 888.4220 - Cement monomer vapor evacuator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cement monomer vapor evacuator. 888.4220 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4220 Cement monomer vapor evacuator. (a) Identification. A cement monomer vapor evacuator is a device intended for use during surgery to contain or...

  2. 48 CFR 752.228-70 - Medical Evacuation (MEDEVAC) Services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Medical Evacuation... Clauses 752.228-70 Medical Evacuation (MEDEVAC) Services. As prescribed in 728.307-70, for use in all contracts requiring performance overseas: Medical Evacuation (MEDEVAC) Services (JUL 2007) (a)...

  3. 21 CFR 876.4370 - Gastroenterology-urology evacuator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gastroenterology-urology evacuator. 876.4370... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4370 Gastroenterology-urology evacuator. (a) Identification. A gastroenterology-urology evacuator is a device used to...

  4. 48 CFR 752.228-70 - Medical Evacuation (MEDEVAC) Services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medical Evacuation... Clauses 752.228-70 Medical Evacuation (MEDEVAC) Services. As prescribed in 728.307-70, for use in all contracts requiring performance overseas: Medical Evacuation (MEDEVAC) Services (JUL 2007) (a)...

  5. 48 CFR 752.228-70 - Medical Evacuation (MEDEVAC) Services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical Evacuation... Clauses 752.228-70 Medical Evacuation (MEDEVAC) Services. As prescribed in 728.307-70, for use in all contracts requiring performance overseas: Medical Evacuation (MEDEVAC) Services (JUL 2007) (a)...

  6. 48 CFR 752.228-70 - Medical Evacuation (MEDEVAC) Services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Medical Evacuation... Clauses 752.228-70 Medical Evacuation (MEDEVAC) Services. As prescribed in 728.307-70, for use in all contracts requiring performance overseas: Medical Evacuation (MEDEVAC) Services (JUL 2007) (a)...

  7. 46 CFR 133.145 - Marine evacuation system launching arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. 133.145... LIFESAVING SYSTEMS Requirements for All OSVs § 133.145 Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. (a) Arrangements. Each marine evacuation system must have the following arrangements: (1) Each marine...

  8. 46 CFR 108.545 - Marine evacuation system launching arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. 108.545... DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment § 108.545 Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. (a) Arrangements. Each marine evacuation system must have the following arrangements: (1)...

  9. 46 CFR 133.145 - Marine evacuation system launching arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. 133.145... LIFESAVING SYSTEMS Requirements for All OSVs § 133.145 Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. (a) Arrangements. Each marine evacuation system must have the following arrangements: (1) Each marine...

  10. 46 CFR 133.145 - Marine evacuation system launching arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. 133.145... LIFESAVING SYSTEMS Requirements for All OSVs § 133.145 Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. (a) Arrangements. Each marine evacuation system must have the following arrangements: (1) Each marine...

  11. 46 CFR 108.545 - Marine evacuation system launching arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. 108.545... DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment § 108.545 Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. (a) Arrangements. Each marine evacuation system must have the following arrangements: (1)...

  12. 46 CFR 133.145 - Marine evacuation system launching arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. 133.145... LIFESAVING SYSTEMS Requirements for All OSVs § 133.145 Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. (a) Arrangements. Each marine evacuation system must have the following arrangements: (1) Each marine...

  13. 46 CFR 108.545 - Marine evacuation system launching arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. 108.545... DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment § 108.545 Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. (a) Arrangements. Each marine evacuation system must have the following arrangements: (1)...

  14. 46 CFR 108.545 - Marine evacuation system launching arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. 108.545... DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment § 108.545 Marine evacuation system launching arrangements. (a) Arrangements. Each marine evacuation system must have the following arrangements: (1)...

  15. 21 CFR 876.4370 - Gastroenterology-urology evacuator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gastroenterology-urology evacuator. 876.4370... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4370 Gastroenterology-urology evacuator. (a) Identification. A gastroenterology-urology evacuator is a device used to...

  16. 30 CFR 57.4361 - Underground evacuation drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Underground evacuation drills. 57.4361 Section... Prevention and Control Firefighting Procedures/alarms/drills § 57.4361 Underground evacuation drills. (a) At least once every six months, mine evacuation drills shall be held to assess the ability of all...

  17. 30 CFR 57.4361 - Underground evacuation drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Underground evacuation drills. 57.4361 Section... Prevention and Control Firefighting Procedures/alarms/drills § 57.4361 Underground evacuation drills. (a) At least once every six months, mine evacuation drills shall be held to assess the ability of all...

  18. 30 CFR 57.4361 - Underground evacuation drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Underground evacuation drills. 57.4361 Section... Prevention and Control Firefighting Procedures/alarms/drills § 57.4361 Underground evacuation drills. (a) At least once every six months, mine evacuation drills shall be held to assess the ability of all...

  19. 30 CFR 57.4361 - Underground evacuation drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Underground evacuation drills. 57.4361 Section... Prevention and Control Firefighting Procedures/alarms/drills § 57.4361 Underground evacuation drills. (a) At least once every six months, mine evacuation drills shall be held to assess the ability of all...

  20. 30 CFR 57.4361 - Underground evacuation drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Underground evacuation drills. 57.4361 Section... Prevention and Control Firefighting Procedures/alarms/drills § 57.4361 Underground evacuation drills. (a) At least once every six months, mine evacuation drills shall be held to assess the ability of all...

  1. Synthesis and characterization of a nanocrystalline diamond aerogel

    PubMed Central

    Pauzauskie, Peter J.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Worsley, Marcus A.; Laurence, Ted A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Wang, Yinmin; Willey, Trevor M.; Visbeck, Kenneth S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Evans, William J.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Satcher, Joe H.

    2011-01-01

    Aerogel materials have myriad scientific and technological applications due to their large intrinsic surface areas and ultralow densities. However, creating a nanodiamond aerogel matrix has remained an outstanding and intriguing challenge. Here we report the high-pressure, high-temperature synthesis of a diamond aerogel from an amorphous carbon aerogel precursor using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Neon is used as a chemically inert, near-hydrostatic pressure medium that prevents collapse of the aerogel under pressure by conformally filling the aerogel’s void volume. Electron and X-ray spectromicroscopy confirm the aerogel morphology and composition of the nanodiamond matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements of recovered material reveal the formation of both nitrogen- and silicon- vacancy point-defects, suggesting a broad range of applications for this nanocrystalline diamond aerogel. PMID:21555550

  2. Fluorine-Free Oil Absorbents Made from Cellulose Nanofibril Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Mulyadi, Arie; Zhang, Zhe; Deng, Yulin

    2016-02-01

    Aerogels based on cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) have been of great interest as absorbents due to their high absorption capacity, low density, biodegradability, and large surface area. Hydrophobic aerogels have been designed to give excellent oil absorption tendency from water. Herein, we present an in situ method for CNF surface modification and hydrophobic aerogel preparation. Neither solvent exchange nor fluorine chemical is used in aerogel preparations. The as-prepared hydrophobic aerogels exhibit low density (23.2 mg/cm(-3)), high porosity (98.5%), good flexibility, and solvent-induced shape recovery property. Successful surface modification was confirmed through field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and water contact angle measurements. The hydrophobic aerogels show high absorption capacities for various oils, depending on liquid density, up to 47× their original weight but with low water uptake (<0.5 g/g aerogel). PMID:26761377

  3. Lead in the bones of prehistoric lead-glaze potters.

    PubMed

    Jarcho, S

    1964-01-01

    In 1932 Haury described lead-glaze pottery from the Southwest. In view of his report, it appeared desirable to find out whether the makers of such pottery suffered from lead poisoning. A series of 46 bone specimens from Kinishba, where lead-glaze pottery was made, and a control series of 33 specimens from Point of Pines, where such pottery is not known to have been made, were screened by X-ray and by X-ray diffraction. The 11 most promising specimens were then analyzed by atomic absorbtion spectrophotometry. Lead was found in quantities believed to be below the toxic range; concentrations in the control series from Point of Pines were, with few exceptions, higher than in the experimental series from Kinishba. PMID:19588573

  4. Fireplace insert and its parameters depend on the used glazing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papučík, Štefan; Čaja, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    The contribution deals with the analysis of the impact of using double glass to change the performance and emission parameters of the fireplace insert. Conventional fireplace inserts are equipped with heat-resistant glass, which is resistant to high temperatures. For this type of inserts are required to be radiant constituent maximized. Prevailing part of heat is into the interior gets just by radiation through the glazed part. The hot water fireplace inserts is the requirement that the radiant constituent to the environment to a minimum. Therefore, instead of a single glass using double glazing which is intended to reduce this part of heat transfer. The temperature in the furnace is increased, and transmitted most of the heat into the water.

  5. Self-glazing ceramic tiles based on acidic igneous glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Merkin, A.P.; Nanazashvili, V.I.

    1988-07-01

    A technology was derived to produce self-glazing ceramic tiles based on single-component systems of acidic igneous (volcanic) glasses. A weakly alkaline solution of NaOH or KOH was used as the sealing water to activate the sintering process. Tests conducted on the self-glazing ceramic tiles showed that their water absorption amounts to 2.5-8%, linear shrinkage is 3.2-7%, and frost resistance amounts to 35-70 cycles. The application of acidic igneous glasses as the main raw material for the production of ceramic facing tiles made it possible to widen the raw material base and simplify the technology for fabricating ceramic facing tiles at lower cost. The use of waste products when processing perlite-bearing rocks, when carrying out mining and cutting of tuffs, slags, and tuff breccia for recovering cut materials was recommended.

  6. Slotted Polyimide-Aerogel-Filled-Waveguide Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez-Solis, Rafael A.; Pacheco, Hector L.; Miranda, Felix A.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    2013-01-01

    Polyimide aerogels were considered to serve as a filling for millimeter-wave waveguides. While these waveguides present a slightly higher loss than hollow waveguides, they have less losses than Duroid substrate integrated waveguides (less than 0.15 dB at Ka-band, in a 20 mm section), and exhibit an order of magnitude of mass reduction when compared to commercial waveguides. A Ka-band slotted aerogel-filled-waveguide array was designed, which provided the same gain (9 dBi) as its standard waveguide counterpart, and a slotted aerogel-filled-waveguide array using folded-slots was designed for comparison, obtaining a gain of 9 dB and a bandwidth of 590 MHz.

  7. High strength air-dried aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

    2012-11-06

    A method for the preparation of high strength air-dried organic aerogels. The method involves the sol-gel polymerization of organic gel precursors, such as resorcinol with formaldehyde (RF) in aqueous solvents with R/C ratios greater than about 1000 and R/F ratios less than about 1:2.1. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be air dried at ambient temperatures and pressures. The method significantly reduces the time and/or energy required to produce a dried aerogel compared to conventional methods using either supercritical solvent extraction. The air dried gel exhibits typically less than 5% shrinkage.

  8. Carbon nanomaterials in silica aerogel matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Christopher E; Chavez, Manuel E; Duque, Juan G; Gupta, Gautam; Doorn, Stephen K; Dattelbaum, Andrew M; Obrey, Kimberly A D

    2010-01-01

    Silica aerogels are ultra low-density, high surface area materials that are extremely good thermal insulators and have numerous technical applications. However, their mechanical properties are not ideal, as they are brittle and prone to shattering. Conversely, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene-based materials, such as graphene oxide, have extremely high tensile strength and possess novel electronic properties. By introducing SWCNTs or graphene-based materials into aerogel matrices, it is possible to produce composites with the desirable properties of both constituents. We have successfully dispersed SWCNTs and graphene-based materials into silica gels. Subsequent supercritical drying results in monolithic low-density composites having improved mechanical properties. These nanocomposite aerogels have great potential for use in a wide range of applications.

  9. Variations in population exposure and evacuation potential to multiple tsunami evacuation phases on Alameda and Bay Farm Islands, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, J.

    2015-12-01

    Planning for a tsunami evacuation is challenging for California communities due to the variety of earthquake sources that could generate a tsunami. A maximum tsunami inundation zone is currently the basis for all tsunami evacuations in California, although an Evacuation Playbook consisting of specific event-based evacuation phases relating to flooding severity is in development. We chose to investigate the Evacuation Playbook approach for the island community of Alameda, CA since past reports estimated a significant difference in numbers of residents in the maximum inundation zone when compared to an event-based inundation zone. In order to recognize variations in the types of residents and businesses within each phase, a population exposure analysis was conducted for each of the four Alameda evacuation phases. A pedestrian evacuation analysis using an anisotropic, path distance model was also conducted to understand the time it would take for populations to reach high ground by foot. Initial results suggest that the two islands of the City of Alameda have different situations when it comes to the four tsunami evacuation phases. Pedestrian evacuation results suggest that Bay Farm Island would have more success evacuating by vehicle due to limited nearby high ground for pedestrians to reach safety. Therefore, agent-based traffic simulation software was used to model vehicle evacuation off Bay Farm Island. Initial results show that Alameda Island could face challenges evacuating numerous boat docks and a large beach for phases 1 and 2, whereas Bay Farm Island is unaffected at these phases but might be challenged with evacuating by vehicle for phases 3 and maximum due to congestion on limited egress routes. A better understanding of the population exposure within each tsunami Evacuation Playbook phase and the time it would take to evacuate out of each phase by foot or vehicle will help emergency managers implement the evacuation phases during an actual tsunami event.

  10. Gas impermeable glaze for sealing a porous ceramic surface

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Scott T.; Stone, Ronald G.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Trudell, Daniel E.; Thoma, Steven G.

    2004-04-06

    A process for fabricating a gas impermeable seal on a porous ceramic surface using a thin, glass-based, pinhole free glaze. The process can be used to fabricate gas impermeable end seals on porous alumina tubes used as filter media. The porous alumina tubes can have an inorganic microporous thin film separation membrane on the inner surface, which can be used for high temperature gas separation processes.

  11. Energy conservation by multiple glazing on heavy masonry buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, E. T.

    1981-08-01

    The BLAST-2 computer program was used to investigate multiple glazing as a means to reduce the energy consumption of two buildings of the Library Congress in Washington, DC. The Thomas Jefferson building is of very heavy masonry construction, and the John Adams building is of heavy masonry. The techniques of modeling the building load and air system performance are explained. The results are presented and discussed.

  12. Fourier analysis of conductive heat transfer for glazed roofing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Roslan, Nurhana Lyana; Bahaman, Nurfaradila; Almanan, Raja Noorliyana Raja; Ismail, Razidah; Zakaria, Nor Zaini

    2014-07-10

    For low-rise buildings, roof is the most exposed surface to solar radiation. The main mode of heat transfer from outdoor via the roof is conduction. The rate of heat transfer and the thermal impact is dependent on the thermophysical properties of roofing materials. Thus, it is important to analyze the heat distribution for the various types of roofing materials. The objectives of this paper are to obtain the Fourier series for the conductive heat transfer for two types of glazed roofing materials, namely polycarbonate and polyfilled, and also to determine the relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for these materials. Ambient and surface temperature data were collected from an empirical field investigation in the campus of Universiti Teknologi MARA Shah Alam. The roofing materials were installed on free-standing structures in natural ventilation. Since the temperature data are generally periodic, Fourier series and numerical harmonic analysis are applied. Based on the 24-point harmonic analysis, the eleventh order harmonics is found to generate an adequate Fourier series expansion for both glazed roofing materials. In addition, there exists a linear relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for both glazed roofing materials. Based on the gradient of the graphs, lower heat transfer is indicated through polyfilled. Thus polyfilled would have a lower thermal impact compared to polycarbonate.

  13. Fourier analysis of conductive heat transfer for glazed roofing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslan, Nurhana Lyana; Bahaman, Nurfaradila; Almanan, Raja Noorliyana Raja; Ismail, Razidah; Zakaria, Nor Zaini

    2014-07-01

    For low-rise buildings, roof is the most exposed surface to solar radiation. The main mode of heat transfer from outdoor via the roof is conduction. The rate of heat transfer and the thermal impact is dependent on the thermophysical properties of roofing materials. Thus, it is important to analyze the heat distribution for the various types of roofing materials. The objectives of this paper are to obtain the Fourier series for the conductive heat transfer for two types of glazed roofing materials, namely polycarbonate and polyfilled, and also to determine the relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for these materials. Ambient and surface temperature data were collected from an empirical field investigation in the campus of Universiti Teknologi MARA Shah Alam. The roofing materials were installed on free-standing structures in natural ventilation. Since the temperature data are generally periodic, Fourier series and numerical harmonic analysis are applied. Based on the 24-point harmonic analysis, the eleventh order harmonics is found to generate an adequate Fourier series expansion for both glazed roofing materials. In addition, there exists a linear relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for both glazed roofing materials. Based on the gradient of the graphs, lower heat transfer is indicated through polyfilled. Thus polyfilled would have a lower thermal impact compared to polycarbonate.

  14. Surface temperatures of insulated glazing units: Infrared thermography laboratory measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, B.T.; Tuerler, D.; Arasteh, D.

    1995-12-01

    Data are presented for the distribution of surface temperatures on the warm-side surface of seven different insulated glazing units. Surface temperatures are measured using infrared thermography and an external referencing technique. This technique allows detailed mapping of surface temperatures that is non-intrusive. The glazings were placed between warm and cold environmental chambers that were operated at conditions corresponding to standard design conditions for winter heating. The temperatures conditions are 2 1.1{degrees}C (70{degrees}F) and -17.8{degrees}C (0{degrees}F) on the warm and cold sides, respectively. Film coefficients varied somewhat with average conditions of about 7.6 W/m{sup 2}{circ}K (1.34 Btu/h-ft{sup 2}{circ}{degrees}F) for the warm-side and 28.9 W/m{sup 2}{circ}K (5.1 Btu/h{circ}ft{sup 2}{circ}{degrees}F) for the cold-side. Surface temperature data are plotted for the vertical distribution along the centerline of the IG and for the horizontal distribution along the centerline. This paper is part of larger collaborative effort that studied the same set of glazings.

  15. Incorporation of noble metals into aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Hair, L.M.; Sanner, R.D.; Coronado, P.R.

    1998-12-22

    Aerogels or xerogels containing atomically dispersed noble metals for applications such as environmental remediation are disclosed. New noble metal precursors, such as Pt--Si or Pd(Si--P){sub 2}, have been created to bridge the incompatibility between noble metals and oxygen, followed by their incorporation into the aerogel or xerogel through sol-gel chemistry and processing. Applications include oxidation of hydrocarbons and reduction of nitrogen oxide species, complete oxidation of volatile organic carbon species, oxidative membranes for photocatalysis and partial oxidation for synthetic applications.

  16. Incorporation of noble metals into aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Hair, Lucy M.; Sanner, Robert D.; Coronado, Paul R.

    1998-01-01

    Aerogels or xerogels containing atomically dispersed noble metals for applications such environmental remediation. New noble metal precursors, such as Pt--Si or Pd(Si--P).sub.2, have been created to bridge the incompatibility between noble metals and oxygen, followed by their incorporation into the aerogel or xerogel through sol-gel chemistry and processing. Applications include oxidation of hydrocarbons and reduction of nitrogen oxide species, complete oxidation of volatile organic carbon species, oxidative membranes for photocatalysis and partial oxidation for synthetic applications.

  17. Monolithic aerogels with nanoporous crystalline phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Christophe; Guerra, Gaetano

    2015-05-01

    High porosity monolithic aerogels with nanoporous crystalline phases can be obtained from syndiotactic polystyrene and poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene)oxide thermoreversible gels by removing the solvent with supercritical CO2. The presence of crystalline nanopores in the aerogels based on these polymers allows a high uptake associated with a high selectivity of volatile organic compounds from vapor phase or aqueous solutions even at very low activities. The sorption and the fast kinetics make these materials particularly suitable as sorption medium to remove traces of pollutants from water and moist air.

  18. Chemical durability of glaze on Zsolnay architectural ceramics (Budapest, Hungary) in acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baricza, Ágnes; Bajnóczi, Bernadett; May, Zoltán; Tóth, Mária; Szabó, Csaba

    2015-04-01

    Zsolnay glazed architectural ceramics are among the most famous Hungarian ceramics, however, there is no profound knowledge about the deterioration of these building materials. The present study aims to reveal the influence of acidic solutions in the deterioration of Zsolnay ceramics. The studied ceramics are glazed roof tiles, which originate from two buildings in Budapest: one is located in the densely built-up city centre with high traffic rate and another one is in a city quarter with moderate traffic and more open space. The roof tiles represent the construction and the renovation periods of the buildings. The ceramics were mainly covered by lead glazes in the construction period and mainly alkali glazes in the renovation periods. The glaze of the tiles were coloured with iron (for yellow glaze) or chromium/copper/iron (for green glazes) in the case of the building located in the city centre, whereas cobalt was used as colorant and tin oxide as opacifier for the blue glaze of the ceramics of the other building. Six tiles were selected from each building. Sulphuric acid (H2SO4) solutions of pH2 and pH4 were used to measure the durability of the glazes up to 14 days at room temperature. The surfaces of the glazed ceramics after the treatment were measured by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and SEM-EDS techniques to determine the precipitated phases on the surface of the glaze. Electron microprobe analysis was used to quantitatively characterise phases found and to determine the chemical composition of the treated glaze. The recovered sulphuric acid solutions were measured with ICP-OES technique in order to quantify the extent of the ion exchange between the glaze and the solutions. There is a significant difference in the dissolution rates in the treatments with sulphuric acid solutions of pH2 and pH4, respectively. The solution of pH2 induced greater ion exchange (approx. 7-10 times) from the glaze compared to the solution of pH4. Alkali and alkali earth

  19. [Preliminary Research on Bubble Characteristics of Ancient Glaze Using OCT Technology].

    PubMed

    Yan, Xin; Dong, Jun-qing; Li, Qing-hui; Guo, Mu-sen; Bu, Gong; Hu, Yong-qing

    2015-08-01

    The bubble is one of the most common feature in ancient glaze. The size and distribution of bubbles are closely associated with recipes of the raw materials for the body and glaze and the making process. To characterize the bubbles is essential for the study of ceramic production process, production places, times characteristics and so on. In order to explore the possibility of using the optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging technology to characterize the bubbles and the bubble distribution characteristic in glaze of ancient porcelain, sweep frequency OCT imaging system is used to detect five different types ancient porcelain chips. According to the two dimensional sectional images and three dimensional tomographic images of the transparent layer of glaze obtained by the OCT imaging system, the two dimensional sectional images characteristics and three dimensional slices characteristics of the bubbles in glaze are studied. The bubble characteristics in the glaze and its possible causes that gases in the body of the ceramic overflow to the glaze layer in the firing process are comprehensively analyzed. Meantime, the size of bubble is calculated according to the two dimensional sectional images based on pixel, and the result is compared with the traditional microscopic test result. The bubble size, two dimensional sectional characteristics and three dimensional tomographic image characteristics of opaque glaze are also studied. Experimental results show that the bubble characteristics in glaze of different ancient porcelain chips are obvious difference, the result of the bubble size calculated based on pixel coincides with the result of the bubble size observed by traditional microscope with ten times magnification, slices of the body near the body-glaze binding region based on OCT imaging technology three dimensional tomography can effectively reflect the bubble characteristics in glaze. The measurement of using OCT imaging technology to characterize bubble

  20. A disaster evacuation planning tool (ADEPT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeley, Terry; Ferguson, James; Hosch, Rebecca

    2010-04-01

    Natural disasters take hundreds of thousands of lives each year. They generate billions of dollars in financial losses annually. Some of these losses are inevitable due to the high population densities in areas at risk for earthquakes, tornados, hurricanes and other powerful forces in nature. However with improvements in weather forecasting, the emergence of better modeling and simulation tools, and the application of these tools to disaster preparation and recovery planning these losses in human life and infrastructure can be greatly mitigated. ADEPT is an application developed by Rite-Solutions that joins storm surge modeling with evacuation route planning. It can be used to train citizens and first responders in best disaster evacuation practices.

  1. Evacuation mapping: the utility of guidelines.

    PubMed

    Dymon, U J; Winter, N L

    1993-03-01

    Maps provided to the public for preventive and protective evacuations should be an integral part of emergency plans. The map design criteria contained in the United States Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) guidelines for nuclear power plants were examined and compared with the content and design of evacuation maps found in the public information publications of thirteen United States nuclear power plants. Results indicated that the graphic and descriptive content of these maps varied considerably. Four characteristics related chiefly to the FEMA guidelines capture some of the findings from this study: 1) failure to comply with Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRQ/FEMA suggestions; 2) failure to comply with FEMA guidelines for map elements; 3) weaknesses present in the FEMA guidelines themselves; and 4) significant omissions in those guidelines. PMID:20958754

  2. Traffic congestion and dispersion in Hurricane evacuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Katsunori; Nagatani, Takashi; Hanaura, Hirotoshi

    2007-03-01

    We study the traffic congestion and dispersion of vehicles occurring on a single lane highway in Hurricane evacuation. The traffic congestion depends on both sensitivity and speed of the leading vehicle. When the leading vehicle moves with low speed, the vehicular traffic exhibits the stop and go-wave (oscillating congested traffic) for low sensitivity, while the traffic results in the homogeneous congested traffic for high sensitivity. The traffic dispersion is measured by the time difference between the leading and rear vehicles. The time difference fluctuates highly for the oscillating congestion traffic, while it keeps a constant value for the homogeneous congested traffic. The traffic states in Hurricane evacuation is connected to the phase diagram of conventional traffic.

  3. Pet Ownership and Evacuation Prior to Hurricane Irene.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Melissa G; Bogue, Kelsey; Rohrbaugh, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Pet ownership has historically been one of the biggest risk factors for evacuation failure prior to natural disasters. The forced abandonment of pets during Hurricane Katrina in 2005 made national headlines and led to the passage of the Pet Evacuation and Transportation Standards Act (PETS, 2006) which mandated local authorities to plan for companion animal evacuation. Hurricane Irene hit the East Coast of the United States in 2011, providing an excellent opportunity to examine the impact of the PETS legislation on frequency and ease of evacuation among pet owners and non-pet owners. Ninety pet owners and 27 non-pet owners who lived in mandatory evacuation zones completed questionnaires assessing their experiences during the hurricane and symptoms of depression, PTSD, dissociative experiences, and acute stress. Pet ownership was not found to be a statistical risk factor for evacuation failure. However, many pet owners who failed to evacuate continue to cite pet related reasons. PMID:26487162

  4. Optimization and planning of emergency evacuation routes considering traffic control.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo; Zhang, Lijun; Wang, Zhaohua

    2014-01-01

    Emergencies, especially major ones, happen fast, randomly, as well as unpredictably, and generally will bring great harm to people's life and the economy. Therefore, governments and lots of professionals devote themselves to taking effective measures and providing optimal evacuation plans. This paper establishes two different emergency evacuation models on the basis of the maximum flow model (MFM) and the minimum-cost maximum flow model (MC-MFM), and proposes corresponding algorithms for the evacuation from one source node to one designated destination (one-to-one evacuation). Ulteriorly, we extend our evaluation model from one source node to many designated destinations (one-to-many evacuation). At last, we make case analysis of evacuation optimization and planning in Beijing, and obtain the desired evacuation routes and effective traffic control measures from the perspective of sufficiency and practicability. Both analytical and numerical results support that our models are feasible and practical. PMID:24991636

  5. Optimization and Planning of Emergency Evacuation Routes Considering Traffic Control

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lijun; Wang, Zhaohua

    2014-01-01

    Emergencies, especially major ones, happen fast, randomly, as well as unpredictably, and generally will bring great harm to people's life and the economy. Therefore, governments and lots of professionals devote themselves to taking effective measures and providing optimal evacuation plans. This paper establishes two different emergency evacuation models on the basis of the maximum flow model (MFM) and the minimum-cost maximum flow model (MC-MFM), and proposes corresponding algorithms for the evacuation from one source node to one designated destination (one-to-one evacuation). Ulteriorly, we extend our evaluation model from one source node to many designated destinations (one-to-many evacuation). At last, we make case analysis of evacuation optimization and planning in Beijing, and obtain the desired evacuation routes and effective traffic control measures from the perspective of sufficiency and practicability. Both analytical and numerical results support that our models are feasible and practical. PMID:24991636

  6. Evacuation behavior and Three Mile Island.

    PubMed

    Cutter, S; Barnes, K

    1982-06-01

    The responses of the residents to the nuclear power plant arcident at Three Mile Island, Pennsylvania illustrate the factors influencing pre-impact coping responses of populations exposed to technological hazards. Confusion itnd ambiguous information influenced both the decision to evaluate and to remain in place. Proximity to the facility, stage in life cycle and the actions of friends and neighbors influenced the decision to evacuate. PMID:20958525

  7. Primary Intracerebral Haematoma Evacuation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Velnar, Tomaz; Bunc, Gorazd

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage is one of the most devastating types of stroke, leading to disability and high mortality rate. Besides blood pressure reduction and intensive medical and surgical treatment, immediate coagulopathy reversal is vital. On the other hand, the haemostatic disturbances may contribute to improve the recovery. We describe the evacuation of intracerebral hemorrhage with the insertion of external ventricular drainage in a patient suffering from deep hypertensive intracerebral haemorrhage and haematocephalus. PMID:27066398

  8. Simulated Aeromedical Evacuation Exacerbates Experimental Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Skovira, Jacob W; Kabadi, Shruti V; Wu, Junfang; Zhao, Zaorui; DuBose, Joseph; Rosenthal, Robert; Fiskum, Gary; Faden, Alan I

    2016-07-15

    Aeromedical evacuation, an important component in the care of many patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), particularly in war zones, exposes them to prolonged periods of hypobaria. The effects of such exposure on pathophysiological changes and outcome after TBI are largely unexplored. The objective of this study was to investigate whether prolonged hypobaria in rats subjected to TBI alters behavioral and histological outcomes. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent fluid percussion induced injury at 1.5-1.9 atmospheres of pressure. The effects of hypobaric exposure (6 h duration; equivalent to 0.75 atmospheres) at 6, 24, and 72 h, or 7 days after TBI were evaluated with regard to sensorimotor, cognitive, and histological changes. Additional groups were evaluated to determine the effects of two hypobaric exposures after TBI, representing primary simulated aeromedical evacuation (6 h duration at 24 h after injury) and secondary evacuation (10 h duration at 72 h after injury), as well as the effects of 100% inspired oxygen concentrations during simulated evacuation. Hypobaric exposure up to 7 days after injury significantly worsened cognitive deficits, hippocampal neuronal loss, and microglial/astrocyte activation in comparison with injured controls not exposed to hypobaria. Hyperoxia during hypobaric exposure or two exposures to prolonged hypobaric conditions further exacerbated spatial memory deficits. These findings indicate that exposure to prolonged hypobaria up to 7 days after TBI, even while maintaining physiological oxygen concentration, worsens long-term cognitive function and neuroinflammation. Multiple exposures or use of 100% oxygen further exacerbates these pathophysiological effects. PMID:26593382

  9. Air evacuation of critically burned patients.

    PubMed

    Santos, F X; Sanchez-Gabriel, J; Mayoral, E; Hamann, C

    1995-11-01

    We analyze the repercussions of air evacuation on the physiopathology of the critically burned patient based on the experience on 63 patients evacuated by air. Clinical repercussions are due to accelerations, vibrations, noise, and, primarily, to altitude. Accelerations are important during take-off and landing, and vibrations may be important in helicopter evacuations in the presence of craniofacial trauma. The noise, especially in helicopters, can interfere with diagnostic and therapeutic maneuvers in-flight. The altitude modifies atmospheric pressure, partial pressure of oxygen, and water concentration in inhaled air. In the aircraft we use, atmospheric pressure is between 550 and 532 mm Hg at the normal flight altitudes. This situation determines the expansion of body gases. Hypoxia seriously worsens any respiratory insufficiency, primarily in the presence of smoke inhalation. The decrease of water concentration in the inhaled air compels the increase of fluid perfusion. Pre-flight and in-flight measures are analyzed, especially with regard to smoke inhalation, pneumothorax, and parenteral perfusion. PMID:8538899

  10. An emerging platform for drug delivery: aerogel based systems.

    PubMed

    Ulker, Zeynep; Erkey, Can

    2014-03-10

    Over the past few decades, advances in "aerogel science" have provoked an increasing interest for these materials in pharmaceutical sciences for drug delivery applications. Because of their high surface areas, high porosities and open pore structures which can be tuned and controlled by manipulation of synthesis conditions, nanostructured aerogels represent a promising class of materials for delivery of various drugs as well as enzymes and proteins. Along with biocompatible inorganic aerogels and biodegradable organic aerogels, more complex systems such as surface functionalized aerogels, composite aerogels and layered aerogels have also been under development and possess huge potential. Emphasis is given to the details of the aerogel synthesis and drug loading methods as well as the influence of synthesis parameters and loading methods on the adsorption and release of the drugs. Owing to their ability to increase the bioavailability of low solubility drugs, to improve both their stability and their release kinetics, there are an increasing number of research articles concerning aerogels in different drug delivery applications. This review presents an up to date overview of the advances in all kinds of aerogel based drug delivery systems which are currently under investigation. PMID:24394377

  11. Effects of evacuation assistant’s leading behavior on the evacuation efficiency: Information transmission approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Lu; Guo, Wei; Zheng, Xiao-Ping

    2015-07-01

    Evacuation assistants are expected to spread the escape route information and lead evacuees toward the exit as quickly as possible. Their leading behavior influences the evacuees’ movement directly, which is confirmed to be a decisive factor of the evacuation efficiency. The transmission process of escape information and its function on the evacuees’ movement are accurately presented by the proposed extended dynamic communication field model. For evacuation assistants and evacuees, their sensitivity parameter of static floor field (SFF), , and , are fully discussed. The simulation results indicate that the appropriate is associated with the maximum of evacuees. The optimal combinations of and were found to reach the highest evacuation efficiency. There also exists an optimal value for evacuation assistants’ information transmission radius. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB706900), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 71225007 and 71203006), the National Key Technology Research and Development Program of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2012BAK13B06), the Humanities and Social Sciences Project of the Ministry of Education of China (Grant Nos. 10YJA630221 and 12YJCZH023), and the Beijing Philosophy and Social Sciences Planning Project of the Twelfth Five-Year Plan, China (Grant Nos. 12JGC090 and 12JGC098).

  12. Carbon Aerogels for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, T F; Worsley, M; Satcher, J H

    2008-08-11

    This effort is focused on the design of new nanostructured carbon-based materials that meet the DOE 2010 targets for on-board vehicle hydrogen storage. Carbon aerogels (CAs) are a unique class of porous materials that possess a number of desirable structural features for the storage of hydrogen, including high surface areas (over 3000 m{sup 2}/g), continuous and tunable porosities, and variable densities. In addition, the flexibility associated with CA synthesis allows for the incorporation of modifiers or catalysts into the carbon matrix in order to alter hydrogen sorption enthalpies in these materials. Since the properties of the doped CAs can be systematically modified (i.e. amount/type of dopant, surface area, porosity), novel materials can be fabricated that exhibit enhanced hydrogen storage properties. We are using this approach to design new H{sub 2} sorbent materials that can storage appreciable amounts of hydrogen at room temperature through a process known as hydrogen spillover. The spillover process involves the dissociative chemisorption of molecular hydrogen on a supported metal catalyst surface (e.g. platinum or nickel), followed by the diffusion of atomic hydrogen onto the surface of the support material. Due to the enhanced interaction between atomic hydrogen and the carbon support, hydrogen can be stored in the support material at more reasonable operating temperatures. While the spillover process has been shown to increase the reversible hydrogen storage capacities at room temperature in metal-loaded carbon nanostructures, a number of issues still exist with this approach, including slow kinetics of H{sub 2} uptake and capacities ({approx} 1.2 wt% on carbon) below the DOE targets. The ability to tailor different structural aspects of the spillover system (i.e. the size/shape of the catalyst particle, the catalyst-support interface and the support morphology) should provide valuable mechanistic information regarding the critical aspects of the

  13. Manufacturing complex silica aerogel target components

    SciTech Connect

    Defriend Obrey, Kimberly Ann; Day, Robert D; Espinoza, Brent F; Hatch, Doug; Patterson, Brian M; Feng, Shihai

    2008-01-01

    Aerogel is a material used in numerous components in High Energy Density Physics targets. In the past these components were molded into the proper shapes. Artifacts left in the parts from the molding process, such as contour irregularities from shrinkage and density gradients caused by the skin, have caused LANL to pursue machining as a way to make the components.

  14. View of a Cometary Impact Into Aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Closeup view of a cometary impact (upper right) into aerogel was inspected by scientists at a laboratory at the Johnson Space Center hours after the Stardust Sample Return Canister was delivered to the Johnson Space Center from the spacecraft's landing site in Utah.

  15. Mechanically Robust Polymer-Graphene Aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Heonjoo; Shanmuganathan, Kadhiravan; Ellison, Christopher

    2015-03-01

    Graphene has been intensely studied for the past several years due to its many attractive properties. Graphene oxide (GO) aerogels are particularly interesting due to their light weight and excellent performance in various applications, such as environmental remediation, super-hydrophobic and super-oleophilic materials, energy storage, etc. However, GO aerogels are generally weak and delicate which complicates their handling and potentially limits their application outside the research lab. The focus of this work is to synthesize mechanically stable aerogels that are robust and easy to handle without substantially sacrificing their low density. To overcome this challenge, we found that by intermixing a small amount of readily available and thermally crosslinkable polymer can enhance the mechanical properties without disrupting other characteristic intrinsic properties of the aerogel itself. This method is a simple straight-forward procedure that does not include any tedious chemical reactions or harsh chemicals. Furthermore, we will demonstrate the performance of these materials as a super-absorbent and pressure sensor.

  16. Aerogel Insulation Systems for Space Launch Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James E.

    2005-01-01

    New developments in materials science in the areas of solution gelation processes and nanotechnology have led to the recent commercial production of aerogels. Concurrent with these advancements has been the development of new approaches to cryogenic thermal insulation systems. For example, thermal and physical characterizations of aerogel beads under cryogenic-vacuum conditions have been performed at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of the NASA Kennedy Space Center. Aerogel-based insulation system demonstrations have also been conducted to improve performance for space launch applications. Subscale cryopumping experiments show the thermal insulating ability of these fully breathable nanoporous materials. For a properly executed thermal insulation system, these breathable aerogel systems are shown to not cryopump beyond the initial cooldown and thermal stabilization phase. New applications are being developed to augment the thermal protection systems of space launch vehicles, including the Space Shuttle External Tank. These applications include a cold-boundary temperature of 90 K with an ambient air environment in which both weather and flight aerodynamics are important considerations. Another application is a nitrogen-purged environment with a cold-boundary temperature of 20 K where both initial cooldown and launch ascent profiles must be considered. Experimental results and considerations for these flight system applications are discussed.

  17. Vanadium oxide/polypyrrole aerogel nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Dave, B.C.; Dunn, B.S.; Wong, H.P.; Leroux, F.; Nazar, L.F.

    1996-12-31

    Vanadium pentoxide/polypyrrole aerogel (ARG) nanocomposites were prepared by hydrolysis of VO(OC{sub 3}H{sub 7}){sub 3} using pyrrole/water/acetone mixtures. Monolithic green-black gels with polypyrrole/V ratios ranging from 0.15 to 1.0 resulted from simultaneously polymerization of the pyrrole and vanadium alkoxide precursors. Supercritical drying yielded high surface (150--200 m{sup 2}/g) aerogels, of sufficient mechanical integrity to allow them to be cut without fracturing. TEM studies of the aerogels show that they are comprised of fibers similar to that of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} ARG`s, but with a much shorter chain length. Evidence from IR that the inorganic and organic components strongly interact leads them to propose that this impedes the vanadium condensation process. The result is ARG`s that exhibit decreased electronic conductivity with increasing polymer content. Despite the unexpected deleterious effect of the conductive polymer on the bulk conductivity, at low polymer content, the nanocomposite materials show enhanced electrochemical properties for Li insertion compared to the pristine aerogel.

  18. Synchrotron radiation micro-XRD in the study of glaze technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradell, T.; Molera, J.; Salvadó, N.; Labrador, A.

    2010-05-01

    The production of glass represented an important technological achievement, and it was the starting point for the invention of a large variety of materials, produced by processes involving melting, partial or total, and precipitation of new crystalline compounds during cooling. In particular, those crystallites built-in the glaze due to partial or total insolubility of some elements originally present in the melt (for instance some colourants and opacifiers), as well as those crystallites formed in the glazes resulting from the interaction of the melt and the ceramic surface are subject of the highest interest in the study of glaze technology. Finally, devitrification and weathering gives rise to precipitation of new crystalline compounds closer to the surfaces and interfaces. SEM-EDX and WDX have been traditionally used to obtain the chemistry of the glazes and the identification of the crystalline compounds present. However, it has some limitations identifying minute crystallites (below 0.5 micrometers) and polymorphs, which are of the highest interest in the study of historical glazes. Synchrotron Radiation micro-X-ray Diffraction has a small beam size adequate to obtain the structural information of submicron crystalline compounds and high brilliance, optimal for determining the crystallites even when present in low amounts. In addition the spatial distribution of the crystalline compounds present in the glazes fundamental for the study of the interaction between the ceramic and the glaze may be easily obtained. The identification of the microcrystallites formed in the glazes and their distribution across the glazes gives direct information on trends of the technology of production, stability and weathering of ancient glazes. In this study a collection of Islamic glazes from the 9th to the 13th century AD from different origins and obtained with different raw materials and production routes are studied. Unreacted grains, reaction compounds, crystallisations and

  19. [Chemical composition and chromaticity characteristic of purple-gold glaze of Jingdezhen imperial kiln].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun-Ming; Li, Qi-Jiang; Zhang, Mao-Lin; Ding, Yin-Zhong; Cao, Jian-Wen; Liu, Xiao-Jing

    2014-03-01

    Color glaze is one of the four famous traditional ceramics of Jingdezhen, especially for the products from Ming and Qing Dynasties' official kilns which have rich connotation of technology and culture. The chemical composition and chromaticity characteristic of glaze and body of purple-gold glaze samples from Jingdezhen Ming and Qing Dynasties' official kilns were analyzed by energy dispersive X ray fluorescence (EDXRF) and colorimeter. Preliminary study on the composition, formula and chromaticity characteristic of glaze of purple-gold glaze samples of different period was carried out and the intrinsic causes of ifferences were discussed. The result shows that the concentration of magnesium and calcium in purple-gold glaze is different from the other glazes in Jingdezhen in the same time, probably due to the addition of auburn or brown limestone which is rich in magnesium. The purple-gold glaze sample of Ming Dynasty is darker chiefly because the concentration of magnesium and calcium is higher than the sample of Ming Dynasty which led to iron crystal separated, reducing the brightness and glossiness of glaze. In addition, the body of purple-gold glaze samples from Jingdezhen Ming and Qing Dynasties' official kilns has the characteristics of high silicon and low aluminum and the molar ratio of silicon to aluminum of samples from Ming Dynasty to Qing Dynasty declined, showing that the concentration of kaolin of sample's body of Ming dynasty was increased. The result of this experiment fill deficiency in the ceramic science and technology research in our country about purple-gold glaze from Ming and Qing Dynasties' official kilns and provides scientific material for comprehensive understanding of porcelain marking technology and intrinsic value of Jingdezhen official kiln. PMID:25208422

  20. Desalination with carbon aerogel electrodes. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.C.; Richardson, J.H.; Fix, D.V.; Thomson, S.L.; May, S.C.

    1996-12-04

    Electrically regenerated electrosorption process (carbon aerogel CDI) was developed by LLNL for continuously removing ionic impurities from aqueous streams. A salt solution flows in a channel formed by numerous pairs of parallel carbon aerogel electrodes. Each electrode has a very high BET surface area (2-5.4x10{sup 6}ft{sup 2}lb{sup -1} or 400-1100 m{sup 2}g{sup -1}) and very low electrical resistivity ({le}40 m{Omega}). Ions are removed from the electrolyte by the electric field and electrosorbed onto the carbon aerogel. It is concluded that carbon aerogel CDI may be an energy-efficient alternative to electrodialysis and reverse osmosis for desalination of brackish water ({le}5000 ppM). The intrinsic energy required by this process is about QV/2, where Q is the stored electrical charge and V is the voltage between the electrodes, plus losses. Estimated requirement for desalination of a 2000 ppM feed is -0.53-2.5 Wh/gal{sup -1} (0.5-2.4 kJ L{sup -1}), depending on voltage, flow rate, cell dimensions, aerogel density, recovery ratio, etc. This assumes that 50-70% of the stored electrical energy is reclaimed during regeneration (electrical discharge). Though the energy requirement for desalination of sea water is also low, this application will be much more difficult. Additional work will be required for desalination of streams that contain more than 5000 ppM total dissolved solids (2000 ppM will require electrochemical cells with extremely tight, demanding tolerances). At this present time, the process is best suited for streams with dilute impurities, as recently demonstrated during a field test at LLNL Treatment Facility C.

  1. Flexible aerogel composite for mechanical stability and process of fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Coronado, P.R.; Poco, J.F.

    1999-10-26

    A flexible aerogel and process of fabrication are disclosed. An aerogel solution is mixed with fibers in a mold and allowed to gel. The gel is then processed by supercritical extraction, or by air drying, to produce a flexible aerogel formed to the shape of the mold. The flexible aerogel has excellent thermal and acoustic properties, and can be utilized in numerous applications, such as for energy absorption, insulation (temperature and acoustic), to meet the contours of aircraft shapes, and where space is limited since an inch of aerogel is a 4--5 times better insulator than an inch of fiberglass. The flexible aerogel may be of an inorganic (silica) type or an organic (carbon) type, but containing fibers, such as glass or carbon fibers.

  2. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B; Golobic, Alexandra M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Spadaccini, Christopher M; Worsley, Marcus A

    2015-01-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young's moduli of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications. PMID:25902277

  3. Flexible aerogel composite for mechanical stability and process of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R.; Poco, John F.

    2000-01-01

    A flexible aerogel and process of fabrication. An aerogel solution is mixed with fibers in a mold and allowed to gel. The gel is then processed by supercritical extraction, or by air drying, to produce a flexible aerogel formed to the shape of the mold. The flexible aerogel has excellent thermal and acoustic properties, and can be utilized in numerous applications, such as for energy absorption, insulation (temperature and acoustic), to meet the contours of aircraft shapes, and where space is limited since an inch of aerogel is a 4-5 times better insulator than an inch of fiberglass. The flexible aerogel may be of an inorganic (silica) type or an organic (carbon) type, but containing fibers, such as glass or carbon fibers.

  4. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T. Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B.; Golobic, Alexandra M.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Worsley, Marcus A.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young's moduli of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications. PMID:25902277

  5. Flexible aerogel composite for mechanical stability and process of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R.; Poco, John F.

    1999-01-01

    A flexible aerogel and process of fabrication. An aerogel solution is mixed with fibers in a mold and allowed to gel. The gel is then processed by supercritical extraction, or by air drying, to produce a flexible aerogel formed to the shape of the mold. The flexible aerogel has excellent thermal and acoustic properties, and can be utilized in numerous applications, such as for energy absorption, insulation (temperature and acoustic), to meet the contours of aircraft shapes, and where space is limited since an inch of aerogel is a 4-5 times better insulator than an inch of fiberglass. The flexible aerogel may be of an inorganic (silica) type or an organic (carbon) type, but containing fibers, such as glass or carbon fibers.

  6. Evaluating Dimethyldiethoxysilane for use in Polyurethane Crosslinked Silica Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, Jason P.; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Jana, Sadhan C.

    2008-01-01

    Silica aerogels are highly porous materials which exhibit exceptionally low density and thermal conductivity. Their "pearl necklace" nanostructure, however, is inherently weak; most silica aerogels are brittle and fragile. The strength of aerogels can be improved by employing an additional crosslinking step using isocyanates. In this work, dimethyldiethoxysilane (DMDES) is evaluated for use in the silane backbone of polyurethane crosslinked aerogels. Approximately half of the resulting aerogels exhibited a core/shell morphology of hard crosslinked aerogel surrounding a softer, uncrosslinked center. Solid state NMR and scanning electron microscopy results indicate the DMDES incorporated itself as a conformal coating around the outside of the secondary silica particles, in much the same manner as isocyanate crosslinking. Response surface curves were generated from compression data, indicating levels of reinforcement comparable to that in previous literature, despite the core/shell morphology.

  7. Tailoring mechanical properties of aerogels for aerospace applications.

    PubMed

    Randall, Jason P; Meador, Mary Ann B; Jana, Sadhan C

    2011-03-01

    Silica aerogels are highly porous solid materials consisting of three-dimensional networks of silica particles and are typically obtained by removing the liquid in silica gels under supercritical conditions. Several unique attributes such as extremely low thermal conductivity and low density make silica aerogels excellent candidates in the quest for thermal insulation materials used in space missions. However, native silica aerogels are fragile at relatively low stresses. More durable aerogels with higher strength and stiffness are obtained by proper selection of silane precursors and by reinforcement with polymers. This paper first presents a brief review of the literature on methods of silica aerogel reinforcement and then discusses our recent activities in improving not only the strength but also the elastic response of polymer-reinforced silica aerogels. Several alkyl-linked bis-silanes were used in promoting flexibility of the silica networks in conjunction with polymer reinforcement by epoxy. PMID:21361281

  8. Catalytic graphitization of carbon aerogels by transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado-Hodar, F.J.; Moreno-Castilla, C.; Rivera-Utrilla, J.; Hanzawa, Y.; Yamada, Y.

    2000-05-02

    Carbon aerogels and Cr-, Fe-, Co-, and Ni-containing carbon aerogels were obtained by pyrolysis, at temperatures between 500 and 1,800 C, of the corresponding aerogels prepared by the sol-gel method from polymerization of resorcinol with formaldehyde. All samples were characterized by mercury porosimetry, nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and Raman spectroscopy. Results obtained show that carbon aerogels are, essentially, macroporous materials that maintain large pore volumes even after pyrolysis at 1,800 C. For pyrolysis at temperatures higher than 1,000 C, the presence of the transition metals produced graphitized areas with three-dimensional stacking order, as shown by HRTEM, XRD, and Raman spectroscopy. HRTEM also showed that the metal-carbon containing aerogels were formed by polyhedral structures. Cr and Fe seem to be the best catalysts for graphitization of carbon aerogels.

  9. Impact of polishing on the light scattering at aerogel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnyakov, A. Yu.; Barnyakov, M. Yu.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Danilyuk, A. F.; Katcin, A. A.; Kononov, S. A.; Kirilenko, P. S.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Kuyanov, I. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Ovtin, I. V.; Predein, A. Yu.; Protsenko, R. S.

    2016-07-01

    Particle identification power of modern aerogel RICH detectors strongly depends on optical quality of radiators. It was shown that wavelength dependence of aerogel tile transparency after polishing cannot be described by the standard Hunt formula. The Hunt formula has been modified to describe scattering in a thin layer of silica dust on the surface of aerogel tile. Several procedures of polishing of aerogel tile have been tested. The best result has been achieved while using natural silk tissue. The resulting block has optical smooth surfaces. The measured decrease of aerogel transparency due to surface scattering is about few percent. This result could be used for production of radiators for the Focusing Aerogel RICH detectors.

  10. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T. Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B.; Golobic, Alexandra M.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Worsley, Marcus A.

    2015-04-22

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young’s moduli of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Ultimately, adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications.

  11. Glazing materials for solar and architectural applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lampert, C.M.

    1994-09-01

    This report summarizes five collaborative research projects on glazings performed by participants in Subtask C of IEA Solar Heating and Cooling Programme (SHC) Task 10, Materials Research and Testing. The projects include materials characterization, optical and thermal measurements, and durability testing of several types of new glazings Three studies were completed on electrochromic and dispersed liquid crystals for smart windows, and two were completed for low-E coatings and transparent insulation materials for more conventional window and wall applications. In the area of optical switching materials for smart windows, the group developed more uniform characterization parameters that are useful to determine lifetime and performance of electrochromics. The detailed optical properties of an Asahi (Japan) prototype electrochromic window were measured in several laboratories. A one square meter array of prototype devices was tested outdoors and demonstrated significant cooling savings compared to tinted static glazing. Three dispersed liquid crystal window devices from Taliq (USA) were evaluated. In the off state, these liquid crystal windows scatter light greatly. When a voltage of about 100 V ac is applied, these windows become transparent. Undyed devices reduce total visible light transmittance by only .25 when switched, but this can be increased to .50 with the use of dyed liquid crystals. A wide range of solar-optical and emittance measurements were made on low-E coated glass and plastic. Samples of pyrolytic tin oxide from Ford glass (USA) and multilayer metal-dielectric coatings from Interpane (Germany) and Southwall (USA) were evaluated. In addition to optical characterization, the samples were exposure-tested in Switzerland. The thermal and optimal properties of two different types of transparent insulation materials were measured.

  12. Orthodontic bracket bonding to glazed full-contour zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Ji-Young; Jung, Hyo-Kyung; Choi, Il-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the effects of different surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of orthodontic brackets to glazed full-zirconia surfaces. Materials and Methods Glazed zirconia (except for the control, Zirkonzahn Prettau) disc surfaces were pre-treated: PO (control), polishing; BR, bur roughening; PP, cleaning with a prophy cup and pumice; HF, hydrofluoric acid etching; AA, air abrasion with aluminum oxide; CJ, CoJet-Sand. The surfaces were examined using profilometry, scanning electron microscopy, and electron dispersive spectroscopy. A zirconia primer (Z-Prime Plus, Z) or a silane primer (Monobond-S, S) was then applied to the surfaces, yielding 7 groups (PO-Z, BR-Z, PP-S, HF-S, AA-S, AA-Z, and CJ-S). Metal bracket-bonded specimens were stored in water for 24 hr at 37℃, and thermocycled for 1,000 cycles. Their bond strengths were measured using the wire loop method (n = 10). Results Except for BR, the surface pre-treatments failed to expose the zirconia substructure. A significant difference in bond strengths was found between AA-Z (4.60 ± 1.08 MPa) and all other groups (13.38 ± 2.57 - 15.78 ± 2.39 MPa, p < 0.05). For AA-Z, most of the adhesive remained on the bracket. Conclusions For bracket bonding to glazed zirconia, a simple application of silane to the cleaned surface is recommended. A zirconia primer should be used only when the zirconia substructure is definitely exposed. PMID:27200278

  13. Simulation of local tsunami and evacuation of urban areas, informed by population exposure analysis and studies of tsunami evacuation behaviour.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Stuart; Wood, Nathan; Johnston, David; Leonard, Graham

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate a methodology for the integration of hazard, population and evacuation modelling to optimise evacuation planning. Deterministic tsunami simulations are carried out to define the spatial and temporal evolution of tsunami inundation onshore in the several hours following local-source subduction zone earthquakes. Exposure of an urban population to the hazard and options for risk mitigation (specifically through evacuation) are then assessed, demonstrating how tsunami simulation and evacuation simulations can be combined for effective tsunami evacuation planning. The east coast of New Zealand is subject to significant local tsunami hazard due to the proximity of the Hikurangi subduction margin only 100 km offshore. Seismic, geodetic and paleo-tsunami studies have shown the potential for large subduction zone earthquakes (Mw 7.0 to > Mw 9.0) to occur on this margin, though none have been experienced in New Zealand's short European-recorded history. Deterministic simulation of earthquake-generated local tsunami indicates the variability in potential inundation extent and tsunami arrival time at Napier City, an urban centre located on the east coast of New Zealand. Maximum spatial extent of inundation is used to analyse the exposed population, while temporal evolution of inundation is implemented in GIS modelling of evacuation travel time. Exposure analysis reveals the spatial distribution of the urban population, including sub-populations with varying characteristics influencing their ability to evacuate effectively in the short time-frame available for a local tsunami. These include vulnerable groups such as those who are mobility-impaired, in the care of institutions (I.e. schools, prisons) and transient populations with little knowledge of local hazard or evacuation routes. Observations of evacuation behaviour in previous tsunami and research into awareness of appropriate evacuation behaviour in the Napier community are used to calibrate and validate

  14. Characterization of Low Firing Temperature Ceramic Glaze Using Phuket MSW and Soda Lime Cullet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketboonruang, P.; Jinawat, S.; Kashima, D. P.; Wasanapiarnpong, T.; Sujaridworakun, P.; Buggakuptav, W.; Traipol, N.; Jiemsirilers, S.

    2011-10-01

    The normal firing temperature of ceramic products is around 1200 °C. In order to reduce firing temperature, industrial wastes were utilized in ceramic glaze. Phuket municipal solid waste (MSW), soda lime cullet, and borax were used as raw materials for low firing temperature glazes. The glaze compositions were designed using a triaxial diagram. Stoneware ceramic body was glazed then fired at 1000 and 1150 °C for 15 minutes. Morphology and phase composition of glazes were analyzed by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Thermal expansion compatibility of Stoneware body and glazes were investigated using a dilatometer. Melting behaviour of selected glaze was analyzed by heating stage microscopy. Phuket MSW and Soda lime glass cullet can be used in high percentage as major raw materials for low firing temperature ceramic glaze that show good texture and vitrified at lower firing temperature without using any commercial ceramic frits. The firing temperature can be reduced up to 150 °C in this study.

  15. Flexible edge seal for vacuum insulating glazing units

    SciTech Connect

    Bettger, Kenneth J.; Stark, David H.

    2012-12-11

    A flexible edge seal is provided for a vacuum insulating glazing unit having a first glass pane and a second glass pane spaced-apart from the first. The edge seal comprises a seal member formed of a hermetically bondable material and having a first end, a second end and a center section disposed therebetween. The first end is hermetically bondable to a first glass pane. The second end is hermetically bondable to a second glass pane. The center section comprises a plurality of convolutes.

  16. Mechanically Strong Lightweight Materials for Aerospace Applications (x-aerogels)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    The X-Aerogel is a new NASA-developed strong lightweight material made by reacting the mesoporous surfaces of 3-D networks of inorganic nanoparticles with polymeric crosslinkers. Since the relative amount of the crosslinker and the backbone are comparable, X-Aerogels can be viewed either as aerogels modified by templated accumulation of polymer on the skeletal nanoparticles, or as nanoporous polymers made by templated casting of polymeric precursors on a nanostructured framework. The most striking feature of X-Aerogels is that for a nominal 3-fold increase in density (still a ultralightweight material), the mechanical strength can be up to 300 times higher than the strength of the underlying native aerogel. Thus, X-Aerogels combine a multiple of the specific compressive strength of steel, with the thermal conductivity of styrofoam. XAerogels have been demonstrated with several polymers such as polyurethanes/polyureas, epoxies and polyolefins, while crosslinking of approximately 35 different oxide aerogels yields a wide variety of dimensionally stable, porous lightweight materials with interesting structural, magnetic and optical properties. X-Aerogels are evaluated for cryogenic rocket fuel storage tanks and for Advanced EVA suits, where they will play the dual role of the thermal insulator/structural material. Along the same lines, major impact is also expected by the use of X-Aerogels in structural components/thermal protection for small satellites, spacecrafts, planetary vehicles and habitats.

  17. Multiscale Modeling of Heat Conduction in Carbon Nanotube Aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Feng; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios; Duong, Hai

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) aerogels have attracted a lot of interest due to their ultrahigh strength/weight and surface area/weight ratios. They are promising advanced materials used in energy storage systems, hydrogen storage media and weight-conscious devices such as satellites, because of their ultralight and highly porous quality. CNT aerogels can have excellent electrical conductivity and mechanical strength. However, the thermal conductivity of CNT aerogels are as low as 0.01-0.1 W/mK, which is five orders of magnitude lower than that of CNT (2000-5000 W/mK). To investigate the mechanisms for the low thermal conductivity of CNT aerogels, multiscale models are built in this study. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations are first carried out to investigate the heat transfer between CNT and different gases (e.g. nitrogen and hydrogen), and the thermal conductance at CNT-CNT interface. The interfacial thermal resistances of CNT-gas and CNT-CNT are estimated from the MD simulations. Mesoscopic modeling of CNT aerogels are then built using an off-lattice Monte Carlo (MC) simulations to replicate the realistic CNT aerogels. The interfacial thermal resistances estimated from MD simulations are used as inputs in the MC models to predict the thermal conductivity of CNT aerogels. The volume fractions and the complex morphologies of CNTs are also quantified to study their effects on the thermal conductivity of CNT aerogels. The quantitative findings may help researchers to obtain the CNT aerogels with expected thermal conductivity.

  18. Aerogel Materials by Evaporative Drying: Potential for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plawsky, Joel L.

    1999-01-01

    Aerogel wafers were made using an evaporative drying procedure. The main steps were sol formulation, gelation, aging, capping, and drying. Of these, the most critical step was drying. Both the rate of evaporation and temperature of the system must be controlled for best results. Aerogel materials should be benchmarked against more traditional foams and current systems may have to be redesigned to make best use of aerogel strengths. Finally, the flexibility of this procedure lends itself to producing aerogel materials for many uses other than insulation. Such uses may include catalysis, sensing, and composite materials.

  19. Thin aerogel films for optical, thermal, acoustic, and electronic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hrubesh, L.W.; Poco, J.F.

    1994-09-01

    Aerogels are a special class of continuously porous solid materials which are characterized by nanometer size particles and pores. Typically, aerogels are made using sol-gel chemistry to form a solvent filled, high porosity gel that is dried by removing the solvent without collapsing the tenuous solid phase. As bulk materials, aerogels are known to have many exceptional, and even some unique physical properties. Aerogels provide the highest thermal insulation and lowest dielectric constant of any other material known. However, some important applications require the aerogels in the form of thin films or sheets. For example, electronic applications require micrometer thin aerogel films bonded to a substrate, and others require thicker films, either on a substrate or as free standing sheets. Special methods are required to make aerogel thin films or sheets. In this paper, the authors discuss the special conditions needed to fabricate thin aerogel films and they describe methods to make films and thin sheets. They also give some specific applications for which aerogel films are being developed.

  20. Thio-,amine-,nitro-,and macrocyclic containing organic aerogels & xerogels

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Glenn A.; Tillotson, Thomas M.

    2005-08-02

    An organic aerogel or xerogel formed by a sol-gel reaction using starting materials that exhibit similar reactivity to the most commonly used resorcinol starting material. The new starting materials, including thio-, amine- and nitro-containing molecules and functionalized macrocyclic molecules will produce organic xerogels and aerogels that have improved performance in the areas of detection and sensor technology, as well as water stream remediation. Also, further functionalization of these new organic aerogels or xerogels will yield material that can be extracted with greater facility than current organic aerogels.

  1. Contoured insulation window for evacuated solar collector

    SciTech Connect

    Coppola, F. T.; Lentz, W. P.; Vandewoestine, R. V.

    1980-02-05

    An insulating contoured window is provided for use with an enclosed chamber such as an evacuated flat plate solar heat collector with the contoured solar window being of minimum thickness and supported solely about its peripheral edge portions. The window is contoured in both its longitudinal and transverse directions, such that in its longitudinal direction the window is composed of a plurality of sinusoidal corrugations whereas in its transverse direction the peaks of such corrugations are contoured in the form of paraboloids so that the structure may withstand the forces generated thereon by the atmosphere.

  2. Can cooperation slow down emergency evacuations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirillo, Emilio N. M.; Muntean, Adrian

    2012-09-01

    We study the motion of pedestrians through obscure corridors where the lack of visibility hides the precise position of the exits. Using a lattice model, we explore the effects of cooperation on the overall exit flux (evacuation rate). More precisely, we study the effect of the buddying threshold (of no exclusion per site) on the dynamics of the crowd. In some cases, we note that if the evacuees tend to cooperate and act altruistically, then their collective action tends to favor the occurrence of disasters.

  3. [Mass Spectrometric Methods for Colorative Mechanism Analysis of Yaozhou Porcelain Glaze].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuan-fang; He, Miao-hong; Zhang, Shu-di; Hang, Wei

    2015-09-01

    An in-house-built femtosecond laser ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (fs-LI-TOFMS) has been applied to the multi-elemental analysis of porcelain glaze from Yaozhou kiln. The samples are selected representing products of different dynasties, including Tang, Five, Song, Jin, and Ming Dynasty. For exploring the colorative mechanism of Yaozhou porcelain through the elemental analysis of the glaze, the effects of all potential coloring elements, especially transition elements, were considered. There was a speculation that the typical Co-Cr-Fe-Mn recipe was used in the fabrication of Yaozhou black glaze; the low content of Fe and high content of Ni resulted in the porcelain of white glaze; an increase content of P could lead the porcelain to be yellow-glazed. Undoubtedly, this research is an important supplement to the study of the colorative mechanism of the Yaozhou porcelain system. PMID:26669145

  4. [Chemical composition and chromaticity characteristic of Jilan glaze of Ming and Qing official kilns].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun-ming; Zhang, Mao-lin; Li, Qi-jiang; Wu, Juan; Quan, Kui-shan; Cao, Jian-wen

    2012-08-01

    Color glazes of Ming and Qing official kilns are excellent representatives of the famous ancient Chinese porcelains. The study of official ware with Jilan glaze has been an important topic. But it made slow progress due to the rarity of samples with strict production management and using system. The recipes, chemical composition and chromaticity characteristic of the Jilan samples excavated from official kilns in the Ming and Qing dynasties were first discussed by systematical testing with the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) and color difference meter. The results showed that the porcelain stone content in Jilan bodies of official kiln in the Ming dynasty is higher than the samples of the Qing dynasty. The manganese content in Jilan glazes of the Ming dynasty is higher than that in the Qing dynasty, while the glaze ash addition and the lightness value in the glaze are opposite. PMID:23156793

  5. Evacuation time estimate for total pedestrian evacuation using a queuing network model and volunteered geographic information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunwar, Bharat; Simini, Filippo; Johansson, Anders

    2016-02-01

    Estimating city evacuation time is a nontrivial problem due to the interaction between thousands of individual agents, giving rise to various collective phenomena, such as bottleneck formation, intermittent flow, and stop-and-go waves. We present a mean field approach to draw relationships between road network spatial attributes, the number of evacuees, and the resultant evacuation time estimate (ETE). Using volunteered geographic information, we divide 50 United Kingdom cities into a total of 704 catchment areas (CAs) which we define as an area where all agents share the same nearest exit node. 90% of the agents are within ≈6 ,847 m of CA exit nodes with ≈13 ,778 agents/CA. We establish a characteristic flow rate from catchment area attributes (population, distance to exit node, and exit node width) and a mean flow rate in a free-flow regime by simulating total evacuations using an agent based "queuing network" model. We use these variables to determine a relationship between catchment area attributes and resultant ETEs. This relationship could enable emergency planners to make a rapid appraisal of evacuation strategies and help support decisions in the run up to a crisis.

  6. Analysis of dynamic road risk for pedestrian evacuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nan; Huang, Hong; Su, Boni; Zhao, Jinlong

    2015-07-01

    Knowing the dynamic road risk for pedestrian evacuation and having an efficient evacuation plan play a very important role in the serious disasters such as earthquake, tsunami and hurricane. In this paper, the dynamic road risk for pedestrian evacuation in a densely populated area of Beijing was studied with consideration of different influencing factors. Firstly, the eight influencing factors including road width, node degree, safety betweenness, road resistor coefficient, building threat, pedestrian counterflow, illegal vehicle parking and traffic flow were considered to assess the road risk for pedestrian evacuation. Secondly, based on complex network theory, electric circuit theory and real situation of the roads, the comprehensive assessment function for road risk was developed quantitatively based on the eight influencing factors. Thirdly, we analyzed road risk for pedestrian evacuation considering different situations: current condition, regular condition, and optimal condition; the risk distribution maps were drawn to directly show the risk level. Through assessments, the roads with high risk for pedestrian evacuation were found, and an optimized evacuation plan was obtained and analyzed. This mathematical model can guide the emergency evacuation in real time. The process and the results are essential for improving the efficiency of evacuations which should considerably reduce the possibility of injuries, deaths and other losses in the disaster.

  7. Emergency evacuation orders: considerations and lessons from Hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Patrick D

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes the problems surrounding the execution of emergency evacuation orders by evaluating Hurricane Sandy and the emergency actions taken by the State of New Jersey and the City of Atlantic City New Jersey. The analysis provides an overview of the legal authority granting emergency powers to governors and mayors to issue evacuation proclamations in addition to an evaluation of the New Jersey's emergency evacuation mandate and subsequent compliance. The article concludes with provision of planning and preparedness recommendations for public managers facing similar hazards, including a recommendation for provision of emergency shelter contingencies within the threat zone in anticipation of citizen noncompliance evacuation orders. PMID:25062822

  8. A Generic Framework for Tsunami Evacuation Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheer, Stefan; Eftichidis, George; Guillande, Richard

    2010-05-01

    Coastal communities are vulnerable with regard to the devastating impacts tsunami waves may generate to life, lifelines, assets and economy. The risk is quantified by rather rare occurrence on one hand, and by high damage to be expected on the other hand. Hence a pure numerical calculation could easily become meaningless. Yet over-dramatizing the threat could become counter-productive taking into account social behaviour and human perception of potential risk of tsunami waves. Local communities would therefore rather act in a "silent" way by gradually improving the level of preparedness. The goal should be to create a concept of an emergency and evacuation plan that could easily be invoked if necessary. Obviously such concepts are based on a huge variety of parameters which can be set in an individual way considering local particularities, scopes and questions of applicability. Nevertheless guidance through all these parameters and their calculations is difficult to find. This abstract proposes a generic framework that summarizes the application of various steps to be taken, the interdependencies of these steps and the three phases of repetition due to generation, mid-term maintenance and long-term revision of such emergency and evacuation plans. The abstract represents the outcome of research work done as part of the EU-funded SCHEMA (scenarios for hazard-induced emergencies management) project.

  9. Physical Mechanisms of Glaze Ice Scallop Formations on Swept Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Reshotko, Eli

    1998-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to understand the physical mechanisms that lead to the formation of scallops on swept wings. Icing runs were performed on a NACA 0012 swept wing tip at 45 deg, 30 deg, and 15 deg sweep angles. A baseline case was chosen and direct measurements of scallop height and spacing, castings, video data and close-up photographic data were obtained. The results showed the scallops are made of glaze ice feathers that grow from roughness elements that have reached a minimum height and are located beyond a given distance from the attachment line. This distance depends on tunnel conditions and sweep angle, and is the critical parameter in the formation of scallops. It determines if complete scallops, incomplete scallops or no scallops are going to be formed. The mechanisms of growth for complete and incomplete scallops were identified. The effect of velocity, temperature and LWC on scallop formation was studied. The possibility that cross flow instability may be the physical mechanism that triggers the growth of roughness elements into glaze ice feathers is examined.

  10. Durability of Polymeric Glazing Materials for Solar Applications: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.; Brunold, S.; Carlsson, B.; Heck, M.; Kohl, M.; Moller, K.

    2003-09-01

    The economic viability of solar collector systems for domestic hot water (DHW) generation is strongly linked to the cost of such systems. Installation and hardware costs must be reduced by 50% to allow significant market penetration[1]. An attractive approach to cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less expensive, lighter-weight polymeric components. Weight reduction decreases the cost of shipping, handling, and installation. The use of polymeric materials also allows the benefits and cost savings associated with well established manufacturing processes, along with savings associated with improved fastening, reduced part count, and overall assembly refinements. A key challenge is to maintain adequate system performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. Results of preliminary and ongoing screening tests for a large number of candidate polymeric glazing materials are presented. Based on these results, two specific glazings are selected to demonstrate how a service lifetime methodology can be applied to accurately predict the optical performance of these materials during in-service use.

  11. Evacuation assistants: An extended model for determining effective locations and optimal numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolu; Zheng, Xiaoping; Cheng, Yuan

    2012-03-01

    The present research presents an extended evacuation field model for simulating crowd emergency evacuation processes under the control of evacuation assistants. Furthermore, a communication field for describing the escape information transmission process and its effect on evacuees is introduced. The effective locations and optimal numbers of evacuation assistants as generated through the model are proposed in an effort to verify as well as enhance existing models. Results show the following. (1) Locating evacuation assistants near exits reduces the time delay for pre-evacuation. (2) There is an optimal number of evacuation assistants for achieving evacuation efficiency; having excessive numbers of evacuation assistants does not improve the evacuation efficiency, and they may result in evacuation time delay and hinder the evacuation efficiency. (3) As the number of evacuees increases, the number of evacuation assistants needed decreases.

  12. Aerogel-Based Multilayer Insulation with Micrometeoroid Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begag, Redouane; White, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-low-density, highly hydrophobic, fiber-reinforced aerogel material integrated with MLI (aluminized Mylar reflectors and B4A Dacron separators) offers a highly effective insulation package by providing unsurpassed thermal performance and significant robustness, delivering substantial MMOD protection via the addition of a novel, durable, external aerogel layer. The hydrophobic nature of the aerogel is an important property for maintaining thermal performance if the material is exposed to the environment (i.e. rain, snow, etc.) during ground installations. The hybrid aerogel/MLI/MMOD solution affords an attractive alternative because it will perform thermally in the same range as MLI at all vacuum levels (including high vacuum), and offers significant protection from micrometeoroid damage. During this effort, the required low-density and resilient aerogel materials have been developed that are needed to optimize the thermal performance for space (high vacuum) cryotank applications. The proposed insulation/MMOD package is composed of two sections: a stack of interleaved aerogel layers and MLI intended for cryotank thermal insulation, and a 1.5- to 1-in. (.2.5- to 3.8- cm) thick aerogel layer (on top of the insulation portion) for MMOD protection. Learning that low-density aerogel cannot withstand the hypervelocity impact test conditions, the innovators decided during the course of the program to fabricate a high-density and strong material based on a cross-linked aerogel (X-aerogel; developed elsewhere by the innovators) for MMOD protection. This system has shown a very high compressive strength that is capable of withstanding high-impact tests if a proper configuration of the MMOD aerogel layer is used. It was learned that by stacking two X-aerogel layers [1.5-in. (.3.8-cm) thick] separated by an air gap, the system would be able to hold the threat at a speed of 5 km/s and gpass h the test. The first aerogel panel stopped the projectile from damaging the second

  13. Aerogel Keystones: Extraction Of Complete Hypervelocity Impact Events From Aerogel Collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Westphal, A J; Snead, C; Butterworth, A; Graham, G A; Bradley, J; Bajt, S; Grant, P G; Bench, G; Brennan, S; Piannetta, P

    2003-11-07

    In January 2006, the Stardust mission will return the first samples from a solid solar-system body since Apollo, and the first samples of contemporary interstellar dust ever collected. Although sophisticated laboratory instruments exist for the analysis of Stardust samples, techniques for the recovery of particles and particle residues from aerogel collectors remain primitive. Here we describe our recent progress in developing techniques for extracting small volumes of aerogel, which we have called ''keystones,'' which completely contain particle impacts but minimize the damage to the surrounding aerogel collector. These keystones can be fixed to custom-designed micromachined silicon fixtures (so-called ''microforklifts''). In this configuration the samples are self-supporting, which can be advantageous in situations in which interference from a supporting substrate is undesirable. The keystones may also be extracted and placed onto a substrate without a fixture. We have also demonstrated the capability of homologously crushing these unmounted keystones for analysis techniques which demand flat samples.

  14. Magnetic hydrophobic nanocomposites: Silica aerogel/maghemite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza Zélis, P.; Fernández van Raap, M. B.; Socolovsky, L. M.; Leyva, A. G.; Sánchez, F. H.

    2012-08-01

    Magnetic hydrophobic aerogels (MHA) in the form of nanocomposites of silica and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) were prepared by one step sol-gel procedure followed by supercritical solvent extraction. Silica alcogels were obtained from TEOS, MTMS, methanol and H2O, and Fe(III) nitrate as magnetic precursor. The hydrophobic property was achieved using the methytrimethoxysilane (MTMS) as co-precursor for surface modification. The so produced nanocomposite aerogels are monolithic, hydrophobic and magnetic. The interconnected porous structure hosts ∼6 nm size γ-Fe2O3 particles, has a mean pore diameter of 5 nm, and a specific surface area (SSA) of 698 m²/g. Medium range structure of MHA is determined by SAXS, which displays the typical fractal power law behavior with primary particle radius of ∼1 nm. Magnetic properties of the nanoparticle ensembles hosted in them are studied by means of dc-magnetometry.

  15. Organic aerogel microspheres and fabrication method therefor

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Kong, F.M.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1996-04-16

    Organic aerogel microspheres which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonsticky gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  16. High resolution patterning of silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Bertino, M.F.; Hund, J.F.; Sosa, J.; Zhang, G.; Sotiriou-Leventis, C.; Leventis, N.; Tokuhiro, A.T.; Terry, J.

    2008-10-30

    Three-dimensional metallic structures are fabricated with high spatial resolution in silica aerogels. In our method, silica hydrogels are prepared with a standard base-catalyzed route, and exchanged with an aqueous solution typically containing Ag{sup +} ions (1 M) and 2-propanol (0.2 M). The metal ions are reduced photolytically with a table-top ultraviolet lamp, or radiolytically, with a focused X-ray beam. We fabricated dots and lines as small as 30 x 70 {micro}m, protruding for several mm into the bulk of the materials. The hydrogels are eventually supercritically dried to yield aerogels, without any measurable change in the shape and spatial resolution of the lithographed structures. Transmission electron microscopy shows that illuminated regions are composed by Ag clusters with a size of several {micro}m, separated by thin layers of silica.

  17. Organic aerogel microspheres and fabrication method therefor

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Kong, Fung-Ming; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1996-01-01

    Organic aerogel microspheres which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonsticky gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  18. Transparent monolithic metal ion containing nanophase aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Risen, W. M., Jr.; Hu, X.; Ji, S.; Littrell, K.

    1999-12-01

    The formation of monolithic and transparent transition metal containing aerogels has been achieved through cooperative interactions of high molecular weight functionalized carbohydrates and silica precursors, which strongly influence the kinetics of gelation. After initial gelation, subsequent modification of the ligating character of the system, coordination of the group VIII metal ions, and supercritical extraction afford the aerogels. The structures at the nanophase level have been probed by photon and electron transmission and neutron scattering techniques to help elucidate the basis for structural integrity together with the small entity sizes that permit transparency in the visible range. They also help with understanding the chemical reactivities of the metal-containing sites in these very high surface area materials. These results are discussed in connection with new reaction studies.

  19. Method for making monolithic metal oxide aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R.

    1999-01-01

    Transparent, monolithic metal oxide aerogels of varying densities are produced using a method in which a metal alkoxide solution and a catalyst solution are prepared separately and reacted. The resulting hydrolyzed-condensed colloidal solution is gelled, and the wet gel is contained within a sealed, but gas permeable, containment vessel during supercritical extraction of the solvent. The containment vessel is enclosed within an aqueous atmosphere that is above the supercritical temperature and pressure of the solvent of the metal alkoxide solution.

  20. Carbonates Found in Stardust Aerogel Tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirick, S.; Leroux, H.; Tomeoka, K.; Zolensky, M.; Flynn, T.; Tyliszczak, T.; Butterworth, A.; Tomioka, N.; Ohnishi, I.; Messenger, K. Nakamura; Sandford, S.; Keller, L.; Jacobsen, C.

    2007-01-01

    Preliminary examination of particles collected from Comet Wild 2 suggest that this comet is chondritic and formed under multiple processes. The lack of any hydrated minerals strongly suggests that most, if not all of these processes were anhydrous [1,2,3]. However, carbonates were found in particles extracted from 4 different tracks in the aerogel. It is our belief that these carbonates have a terrestrial origin and are a contaminant in these samples.

  1. Method for making monolithic metal oxide aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Coronado, P.R.

    1999-09-28

    Transparent, monolithic metal oxide aerogels of varying densities are produced using a method in which a metal alkoxide solution and a catalyst solution are prepared separately and reacted. The resulting hydrolyzed-condensed colloidal solution is gelled, and the wet gel is contained within a sealed, but gas permeable, containment vessel during supercritical extraction of the solvent. The containment vessel is enclosed within an aqueous atmosphere that is above the supercritical temperature and pressure of the solvent of the metal alkoxide solution.

  2. Cutting Silica Aerogel for Particle Extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Glesias, R.; Grigoropoulos, C. P.; Weschler, M.

    2005-01-01

    The detailed laboratory analyses of extraterrestrial particles have revolutionized our knowledge of planetary bodies in the last three decades. This knowledge of chemical composition, morphology, mineralogy, and isotopics of particles cannot be provided by remote sensing. In order to acquire these detail information in the laboratories, the samples need be intact, unmelted. Such intact capture of hypervelocity particles has been developed in 1996. Subsequently silica aerogel was introduced as the preferred medium for intact capturing of hypervelocity particles and later showed it to be particularly suitable for the space environment. STARDUST, the 4th NASA Discovery mission to capture samples from 81P/Wild 2 and contemporary interstellar dust, is the culmination of these new technologies. In early laboratory experiments of launching hypervelocity projectiles into aerogel, there was the need to cut aerogel to isolate or extract captured particles/tracks. This is especially challenging for space captures, since there will be many particles/tracks of wide ranging scales closely located, even collocated. It is critical to isolate and extract one particle without compromising its neighbors since the full significance of a particle is not known until it is extracted and analyzed. To date, three basic techniques have been explored: mechanical cutting, lasers cutting and ion beam milling. We report the current findings.

  3. Structure and performance of carbon aerogel electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.; Mayer, S.T.; Poco, J.F.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1994-03-01

    The chemistry and physics of small clusters of atoms (1--100 nm) has received considerable attention in recent years because these assemblies often have properties between the molecular and bulk solid-state limits. The different properties can be explained in terms of the large fraction of atoms that are at the surface of a cluster as compared to the interior. Although the synthesis and properties of metal and. semiconductor clusters, metallocarbohedrenes, fullerenes, and nanotubes are the subject of extensive investigations, little attention has been paid to cluster-assembled porous materials. This oversight is of particular interest to us since we believe that aerogels are one of the few monolithic materials presently available where the benefits of cluster assembly can be demonstrated. In particular, the unique optical, thermal, acoustic, mechanical, and electrical properties of aerogels are directly related to their nanostructure, which is composed of interconnected particles (3--30 nm) with small interstitial pores (< 50 nm). This structure leads to extremely high surface areas (400--1100 m{sup 2}/g) with a large fraction of the atoms covering the surface of the interconnected particles. As a result of these structural features, carbon aerogels are finding applications as electrodes in supercapacitors with high energy and power densities.

  4. Computer Simulation of Fracture in Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.

    2006-01-01

    Aerogels are of interest to the aerospace community primarily for their thermal properties, notably their low thermal conductivities. While the gels are typically fragile, recent advances in the application of conformal polymer layers to these gels has made them potentially useful as lightweight structural materials as well. In this work, we investigate the strength and fracture behavior of silica aerogels using a molecular statics-based computer simulation technique. The gels' structure is simulated via a Diffusion Limited Cluster Aggregation (DLCA) algorithm, which produces fractal structures representing experimentally observed aggregates of so-called secondary particles, themselves composed of amorphous silica primary particles an order of magnitude smaller. We have performed multi-length-scale simulations of fracture in silica aerogels, in which the interaction b e e n two secondary particles is assumed to be described by a Morse pair potential parameterized such that the potential range is much smaller than the secondary particle size. These Morse parameters are obtained by atomistic simulation of models of the experimentally-observed amorphous silica "bridges," with the fracture behavior of these bridges modeled via molecular statics using a Morse/Coulomb potential for silica. We consider the energetics of the fracture, and compare qualitative features of low-and high-density gel fracture.

  5. Cellulose nanofibrils aerogels generated from jute fibers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jinyou; Yu, Liangbo; Tian, Feng; Zhao, Nie; Li, Xiuhong; Bian, Fenggang; Wang, Jie

    2014-08-30

    In this work, we report the cellulose nanofibrils extracted from the pristine jute fibers via the pretreatments followed by the TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical)-mediated oxidation and mechanical disintegration. The effects of pretreatments by using the NaOH solution and dimethyl sulfoxide solvent on the fiber morphology and macro/micro-structures were investigated by polarizing microscope and synchrotron radiation wide/small-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS/SAXS). The cellulose nanofibrils exhibit a diameter ranging from 5 nm to 20 nm and a length of several micrometers, which have been assembled into cellulose aerogels by the lyophilization of as-prepared nanofibrils dispersions with various concentrations. The results indicated that the hierarchical structures of as-prepared cellulose aerogels were dependent on the dispersion concentrations. The WAXS results show that the typical cellulose aerogels are coexistence of cellulose I and cellulose II, which has a great promise for many potential applications, such as pharmaceutical, liquid filtration, catalysts, bio-nanocomposites, and tissue engineering scaffolds. PMID:24815398

  6. Fiducial Marks for Location of Particles in Aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurewicz, A. J. G.; Tsapin, A. I.; Jones, S. M.

    2004-01-01

    If an extraterrestrial sample is captured in aerogel as a collection of particles, it is important to be able to consistently locate individual grains when changing instruments or laboratories. We report on a feasibility study for applying fiducial marks to aerogel nondestructively so that the marks can eventually be used with optical, X-ray or other (manual or automated) location techniques.

  7. Organic and composite aerogels through ring opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohite, Dhairyashil P.

    Aerogels are open-cell nanoporous materials, unique in terms of low density, low thermal conductivity, low dielectric constants and high acoustic attenuation. Those exceptional properties stem from their complex hierarchical solid framework (agglomerates of porous, fractal secondary nanoparticles), but they also come at a cost: low mechanical strength. This issue has been resolved by crosslinking silica aerogels with organic polymers. The crosslinking polymer has been assumed to form a conformal coating on the surface of the skeletal framework by covalent bridging elementary building blocks. However, "assuming" is not enough: for correlating nanostructure with bulk material properties, it is important to know the exact location of the polymer on the aerogel backbone. For that investigation, we synthesized a new norbornene derivative of triethoxysilane (Si-NAD) that can be attached to skeletal silica nanoparticles. Those norbornene-modified silica aerogels were crosslinked with polynorbornene by ring opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP). The detailed correlation between nanostructure and mechanical strength was probed with a wide array of characterization methods ranging from molecular to bulk through nano. Subsequently, it was reasoned that since the polymer dominates the exceptional mechanical properties of polymer crosslinked aerogels, purely organic aerogels with the same nanostructure and interparticle connectivity should behave similarly. That was explored and confirmed by: (a) synthesis of a difunctional nadimide monomer (bis-NAD), and preparation of robust polyimide aerogels by ROMP of its norbornene end-caps; and, (b) synthesis of dimensionally stable ROMP-derived polydicyclopentadiene aerogels by grafting the nanostructure with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) via free radical chemistry.

  8. Aerogel and xerogel composites for use as carbon anodes

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2008-08-12

    Disclosed herein are aerogel and xerogel composite materials suitable for use as anodes in fuel cells and batteries. Precursors to the aerogel and xerogel compounds are infused with inorganic polymeric materials or carbon particles and then gelled. The gels are then pyrolyzed to form composites with internal structural support.

  9. Electrosorption of inorganic salts from aqueous solution using carbon aerogels.

    PubMed

    Gabelich, Christopher J; Tran, Tri D; Suffet, I H Mel

    2002-07-01

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) with carbon aerogels has been shown to remove various inorganic species from aqueous solutions, though no studies have shown the electrosorption behavior of multisolute systems in which ions compete for limited surface area. Several experiments were conducted to determine the ion removal capacity and selectivity of carbon aerogel electrodes, using both laboratory and natural waters. Although carbon aerogel electrodes have been treated as electrical double-layer capacitors, this study showed that ion sorption followed a Langmuir isotherm, indicating monolayer adsorption. The sorption capacity of carbon aerogel electrodes was approximately 1.0-2.0 x 10(-4) equiv/g aerogel, with ion selectivity being based on ionic hydrated radius. Monovalent ions (e.g., sodium) with smaller hydrated radii were preferentially removed from solution over multivalent ions (e.g., calcium) on a percent or molar basis. Because of the relatively small average pore size (4-9 nm) of the carbon aerogel material, only 14-42 m2/g aerogel surface area was available for ion sorption. Natural organic matter may foul the aerogel surface and limit CDI effectiveness in treating natural waters. PMID:12144279

  10. Chemical modification of graphene aerogels for electrochemical capacitor applications.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jin-Yong; Wie, Jeong Jae; Xu, Yu; Park, Ho Seok

    2015-12-14

    Graphene aerogel is a relatively new type of aerogel that is ideal for energy storage applications because of its large surface area, high electrical conductivity and good chemical stability. Also, three dimensional interconnected macropores offer many advantages such as low density, fast ion and mass transfer, and easy access to storage sites. Such features allow graphene aerogels to be intensively applied for electrochemical capacitor applications. Despite the growing interest in graphene aerogel-based electrochemical capacitors, however, the graphene aerogels still suffer from their low capacitive performances and high fragility. Both relatively low capacitance and brittleness of physically crosslinked graphene aerogels remain a critical challenge. Until now, a number of alternative attempts have been devoted to overcome these shortcomings. In this perspective, we summarize the recent research progress towards the development of advanced graphene aerogel-based electrochemical capacitors according to the different approaches (e.g. porosity, composition and structure controls). Then, the recently proposed chemical strategies to improve the capacitive performances and mechanical durability of graphene aerogels for practical applications are highlighted. Finally, the current challenges and perspectives in this emerging material are also discussed. PMID:26536234

  11. Tailoring of morphology and surface properties of syndiotactic polystyrene aerogels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Jana, Sadhan C

    2013-05-01

    This study evaluates a method for rendering syndiotactic polystyrene (sPS) aerogels hydrophilic using polyethylene oxide (PEO) of different molecular weights. The highly porous sPS aerogels are inherently hydrophobic although applications involving absorption of moisture and removal of particulate solids may benefit from the high surface area of sPS aerogels provided some degree of hydrophilicity is induced in these materials. In this work, sPS gels are prepared by thermo-reversible gelation in tetrahydrofuran in the presence of PEO. The gels are dried under supercritical conditions to obtain aerogels. The aerogels are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen-adsorption porosimetry, helium pycnometry, and contact angle measurements. The data reveal that the pore structures and surface energy can be controlled by varying the concentration and molecular weight of PEO and using different cooling rates during thermo-reversible gelation. In the first case, sPS aerogels, aerogels containing PEO of a low molecular weight or low concentration show superhydrophobic surface presenting the "lotus effect". In the second case, PEO at a higher concentration or with higher molecular weight forms phase-separated domains yielding new hydrophilic macropores (>10 μm) in the aerogel structures. These macropores contribute to the superhydrophobic surface with the "petal effect". The cooling rate during gelation shows a strong influence on these two cases. PMID:23573990

  12. Aerogel tempelated ZnO dye-sensitized solar cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, T. W.; Martinson , A. B. E.; Elam, J. W.; Pellin, M. J.; Hupp, J. T.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.

    2008-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition is employed to conformally coat low density, high surface area aerogel films with ZnO. The ZnO/aerogel membranes are incorporated as photoanodes in dye-sensitized solar cells, which exhibit excellent power efficiencies of up to 2.4% under 100 mW cm{sup -2} light intensity.

  13. Acoustic Spectroscopy of Superfluid 3He in Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J. P.; Choi, H.; Pollanen, J.; Halperin, W. P.

    2006-09-07

    We have designed an experiment to study the role of global anisotropic quasiparticle scattering on the dirty aerogel superfluid 3He system. We observe significant regions of two stable phases at temperatures below the superfluid transition at a pressure of 25 bar for a 98% aerogel.

  14. Highly porous ceramic oxide aerogels having improved flexibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Nguyen, Baochau N. (Inventor); Guo, Haiquan (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic oxide aerogels having improved flexibility are disclosed. Preferred embodiments exhibit high modulus and other strength properties despite their improved flexibility. The gels may be polymer cross-linked via organic polymer chains to further improve strength properties, without substantially detracting from the improved flexibility. Methods of making such aerogels are also disclosed.

  15. 30 CFR 77.1101 - Escape and evacuation; plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Fire Protection § 77.1101 Escape and evacuation; plan. (a) Before September 30, 1971, each operator of... event of a fire. (b) All employees shall be instructed on current escape and evacuation plans, fire alarm signals, and applicable procedures to be followed in case of fire. (c) Plans for escape...

  16. 30 CFR 77.1101 - Escape and evacuation; plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Fire Protection § 77.1101 Escape and evacuation; plan. (a) Before September 30, 1971, each operator of... event of a fire. (b) All employees shall be instructed on current escape and evacuation plans, fire alarm signals, and applicable procedures to be followed in case of fire. (c) Plans for escape...

  17. 14 CFR 121.570 - Airplane evacuation capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.570 Airplane evacuation capability. (a) No person may cause an airplane carrying passengers to be moved on the surface, take off, or... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplane evacuation capability....

  18. 30 CFR 57.4363 - Underground evacuation instruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Underground evacuation instruction. 57.4363... NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire Prevention and Control Firefighting Procedures/alarms/drills § 57.4363 Underground evacuation instruction....

  19. Modeling Evacuation of a Hospital without Electric Power.

    PubMed

    Vugrin, Eric D; Verzi, Stephen J; Finley, Patrick D; Turnquist, Mark A; Griffin, Anne R; Ricci, Karen A; Wyte-Lake, Tamar

    2015-06-01

    Hospital evacuations that occur during, or as a result of, infrastructure outages are complicated and demanding. Loss of infrastructure services can initiate a chain of events with corresponding management challenges. This report describes a modeling case study of the 2001 evacuation of the Memorial Hermann Hospital in Houston, Texas (USA). The study uses a model designed to track such cascading events following loss of infrastructure services and to identify the staff, resources, and operational adaptations required to sustain patient care and/or conduct an evacuation. The model is based on the assumption that a hospital's primary mission is to provide necessary medical care to all of its patients, even when critical infrastructure services to the hospital and surrounding areas are disrupted. Model logic evaluates the hospital's ability to provide an adequate level of care for all of its patients throughout a period of disruption. If hospital resources are insufficient to provide such care, the model recommends an evacuation. Model features also provide information to support evacuation and resource allocation decisions for optimizing care over the entire population of patients. This report documents the application of the model to a scenario designed to resemble the 2001 evacuation of the Memorial Hermann Hospital, demonstrating the model's ability to recreate the timeline of an actual evacuation. The model is also applied to scenarios demonstrating how its output can inform evacuation planning activities and timing. PMID:25868416

  20. 14 CFR 125.189 - Demonstration of emergency evacuation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD... the emergency evacuation procedures for each type and model of airplane with a seating of more than 44 passengers, that is used in its passenger-carrying operations, allow the evacuation of the full...

  1. 14 CFR 125.189 - Demonstration of emergency evacuation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD... the emergency evacuation procedures for each type and model of airplane with a seating of more than 44 passengers, that is used in its passenger-carrying operations, allow the evacuation of the full...

  2. 14 CFR 125.189 - Demonstration of emergency evacuation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD... the emergency evacuation procedures for each type and model of airplane with a seating of more than 44 passengers, that is used in its passenger-carrying operations, allow the evacuation of the full...

  3. 14 CFR 125.189 - Demonstration of emergency evacuation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD... the emergency evacuation procedures for each type and model of airplane with a seating of more than 44 passengers, that is used in its passenger-carrying operations, allow the evacuation of the full...

  4. 14 CFR 125.189 - Demonstration of emergency evacuation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD... the emergency evacuation procedures for each type and model of airplane with a seating of more than 44 passengers, that is used in its passenger-carrying operations, allow the evacuation of the full...

  5. 14 CFR 121.570 - Airplane evacuation capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplane evacuation capability. 121.570... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.570 Airplane evacuation capability. (a) No person may cause an airplane carrying passengers to be moved on the surface, take off,...

  6. 14 CFR 121.570 - Airplane evacuation capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplane evacuation capability. 121.570... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.570 Airplane evacuation capability. (a) No person may cause an airplane carrying passengers to be moved on the surface, take off,...

  7. 14 CFR 121.570 - Airplane evacuation capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplane evacuation capability. 121.570... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.570 Airplane evacuation capability. (a) No person may cause an airplane carrying passengers to be moved on the surface, take off,...

  8. Getting out of harm's way - evacuation from tsunamis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Jeanne M.; Wood, Nathan J.; Gordon, Leslie C.

    2015-01-01

    Maps of travel time can be used by emergency managers and community planners to identify where to focus evacuation training and tsunami education. The tool can also be used to examine the potential benefits of vertical-evacuation structures, which are buildings or berms designed to provide a local high ground in low-lying areas of the hazard zone. 

  9. 14 CFR 121.570 - Airplane evacuation capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane evacuation capability. 121.570... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.570 Airplane evacuation capability. (a) No person may cause an airplane carrying passengers to be moved on the surface, take off,...

  10. 14 CFR 135.123 - Emergency and emergency evacuation duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Emergency and emergency evacuation duties. 135.123 Section 135.123 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Flight Operations § 135.123 Emergency and emergency evacuation duties. (a) Each certificate holder...

  11. 14 CFR 135.123 - Emergency and emergency evacuation duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Emergency and emergency evacuation duties. 135.123 Section 135.123 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Flight Operations § 135.123 Emergency and emergency evacuation duties. (a) Each certificate holder...

  12. Queuing network approach for building evacuation planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishak, Nurhanis; Khalid, Ruzelan; Baten, Md. Azizul; Nawawi, Mohd. Kamal Mohd.

    2014-12-01

    The complex behavior of pedestrians in a limited space layout can explicitly be modeled using an M/G/C/C state dependent queuing network. This paper implements the approach to study pedestrian flows through various corridors in a topological network. The best arrival rates and their impacts to the corridors' performances in terms of the throughput, blocking probability, expected number of occupants in the system and expected travel time were first measured using the M/G/C/C analytical model. These best arrival rates were then fed to its Network Flow Programming model to find the best arrival rates to source corridors and routes optimizing the network's total throughput. The analytical results were then validated using a simulation model. Various results of this study can be used to support the current Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) to efficiently and safely evacuate people in emergency cases.

  13. Glass heat pipe evacuated tube solar collector

    DOEpatents

    McConnell, Robert D.; Vansant, James H.

    1984-01-01

    A glass heat pipe is adapted for use as a solar energy absorber in an evacuated tube solar collector and for transferring the absorbed solar energy to a working fluid medium or heat sink for storage or practical use. A capillary wick is formed of granular glass particles fused together by heat on the inside surface of the heat pipe with a water glass binder solution to enhance capillary drive distribution of the thermal transfer fluid in the heat pipe throughout the entire inside surface of the evaporator portion of the heat pipe. Selective coatings are used on the heat pipe surface to maximize solar absorption and minimize energy radiation, and the glass wick can alternatively be fabricated with granular particles of black glass or obsidian.

  14. Glass heat pipe evacuated tube solar collector

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, R.D.; Vansant, J.H.

    1984-10-02

    A glass heat pipe is adapted for use as a solar energy absorber in an evacuated tube solar collector and for transferring the absorbed solar energy to a working fluid medium or heat sink for storage or practical use. A capillary wick is formed of granular glass particles fused together by heat on the inside surface of the heat pipe with a water glass binder solution to enhance capillary drive distribution of the thermal transfer fluid in the heat pipe throughout the entire inside surface of the evaporator portion of the heat pipe. Selective coatings are used on the heat pipe surface to maximize solar absorption and minimize energy radiation, and the glass wick can alternatively be fabricated with granular particles of black glass or obsidian.

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of a Nanocrystalline Thoria Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Reibold, R A; Satcher, Jr, J H; Baumann, T F; Simpson, R L; Poco, J F

    2004-02-04

    We report the synthesis and characterization for the first example of a low-density nanocrystalline thoria aerogel. The monolithic aerogels were prepared through the solgel polymerization of hydrated thorium nitrate in ethanol using ammonium hydroxide and propylene oxide as gelation initiators. The dried ThO{sub 2} aerogel was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analyses. The aerogel network was determined to be composed of spherical primary particles with features in the 5-20 nm range. These particles were also determined to be highly crystalline as evidenced by the higher magnification TEM examination. The thoria aerogel possesses high surface area (120 m{sup 2}/g) and pore diameters in the micro- and mesoporous range.

  16. Method for preparing a solid phase microextraction device using aerogel

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Fred S.; Andresen, Brian D.

    2006-10-24

    A sample collection substrate of aerogel and/or xerogel materials bound to a support structure is used as a solid phase microextraction (SPME) device. The xerogels and aerogels may be organic or inorganic and doped with metals or other compounds to target specific chemical analytes. The support structure is typically formed of a glass fiber or a metal wire (stainless steel or kovar). The devices are made by applying gel solution to the support structures and drying the solution to form aerogel or xerogel. Aerogel particles may be attached to the wet layer before drying to increase sample collection surface area. These devices are robust, stable in fields of high radiation, and highly effective at collecting gas and liquid samples while maintaining superior mechanical and thermal stability during routine use. Aerogel SPME devices are advantageous for use in GC/MS analyses due to their lack of interfering background and tolerance of GC thermal cycling.

  17. Composite ceria-coated aerogels and methods of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Eyring, Edward M; Ernst, Richard D; Turpin, Gregory C; Dunn, Brian C

    2013-05-07

    Ceria-coated aerogels can include an aerogel support material having a stabilized ceria coating thereon. The ceria coating can be formed by solution or vapor deposition of alcogels or aerogels. Additional catalytic metal species can also be incorporated into the coating to form multi-metallic compounds having improved catalytic activity. Further, the ceria coated aerogels retain high surface areas at elevated temperatures. Thus, improvements in catalytic activity and thermal stability can be achieved using these ceria-coated composite aerogels.

  18. Evacuation time of cryogenic pipes for superconducting power transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hirofumi; Sun, Jian; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Hamabe, Makoto; Kawahara, Toshio; Yamaguchi, Satarou

    2013-11-01

    The vacuum insulation has been used for the thermal insulation of cryogenic pipes for the superconducting power transmission to reduce the heat leak from the environment at the room temperature to the low temperature parts. Since the cryogenic pipes, in particular, those for long distance power transmission, are considered to be thin long pipes, it might take a long time for evacuation. To estimate the evacuation time of the long cryogenic pipes, model calculations have been performed. According to the calculations, it is found that there is an optimum condition between the pumping speed, the diameter of the outer pipe and the length of the cryogenic pipe for efficient evacuation. It is also found that, if the outgassing is suppressed enough, the evacuation can be possible within 1 week even for the long cryogenic pipe with the length of 10 km. The reduction of outgassing is particularly important for the efficient evacuation.

  19. Effective strategies of collective evacuation from an enclosed space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Zhi-Gang; Yang, Yan-Yan

    2015-06-01

    On the basis of fundamental principles of the Vicsek model and the leader-follower model, we develop an extended evacuation model of self-propelled particles system considering movable exits, and then propose effective strategies of self-organization evacuating from an enclosed space. It is found that placing exits in the corner is an effective strategy for evacuation via simulations. Furthermore, increasing the intensity of exit sign takes only effect in some extent. In addition, multi exits will make the evacuation more slowly. In general, one corner exit is the best choice for collective evacuation. Our results provide new insights into designing a safe passage in some enclosed places, such as the cinema and conference halls.

  20. In Vivo Ultrasonic Detection of Polyurea Crosslinked Silica Aerogel Implants

    PubMed Central

    Sabri, Firouzeh; Sebelik, Merry E.; Meacham, Ryan; Boughter, John D.; Challis, Mitchell J.; Leventis, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Background Polyurea crosslinked silica aerogels are highly porous, lightweight, and mechanically strong materials with great potential for in vivo applications. Recent in vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated the biocompatibility of this type of aerogel. The highly porous nature of aerogels allows for exceptional thermal, electric, and acoustic insulating capabilities that can be taken advantage of for non-invasive external imaging techniques. Sound-based detection of implants is a low cost, non-invasive, portable, and rapid technique that is routinely used and readily available in major clinics and hospitals. Methodology In this study the first in vivo ultrasound response of polyurea crosslinked silica aerogel implants was investigated by means of a GE Medical Systems LogiQe diagnostic ultrasound machine with a linear array probe. Aerogel samples were inserted subcutaneously and sub-muscularly in a) fresh animal model and b) cadaveric human model for analysis. For comparison, samples of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) were also imaged under similar conditions as the aerogel samples. Conclusion/significance Polyurea crosslinked silica aerogel (X-Si aerogel) implants were easily identified when inserted in either of the regions in both fresh animal model and cadaveric model. The implant dimensions inferred from the images matched the actual size of the implants and no apparent damage was sustained by the X-Si aerogel implants as a result of the ultrasonic imaging process. The aerogel implants demonstrated hyperechoic behavior and significant posterior shadowing. Results obtained were compared with images acquired from the PDMS implants inserted at the same location. PMID:23799093

  1. Vanadium dioxide nanomaterial for smart thermochromic glazing of windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoping; Chen, Sihai; Wang, Shuangbao; Lai, Jianjun; Chen, Changhong; Yi, Xinjian

    2004-02-01

    Nanostructural vanadium dioxide thin films are investigated as intelligent window coatings. The films are fabricated using reactive sputtering and post annealing. A reversible semiconductor to metal phase transition for as-deposited VO2 nanostructure films with grain size of ~8nm takes place at a temperature of 35°C, which lowers about 33°C in comparison with a phase transition temperature of 68°C in conventional VO2 films with a grain size of 1-2 μm. The results indicate that the nanostructural VO2 films are more suitable to the application for smart thermochromic glazing of windows than that of conventional VO2 films.

  2. Multiply glazed window and door assemblies with screened breathing passages

    SciTech Connect

    Chludil, S.T.

    1987-04-14

    This patent describes a multiply glazed, vented window or door assembly comprising: spaced apart glass panes sealably secured perimetrally in parallel side sash members and parallel upper and lower sash members. At least one of the sash members has in its outer surface, a linear groove perimetrally aligned with the space between the panes and further having a breathing port extending from the marginal wall of the groove through to the space between the panes; an elongate flat plate having fine perforations and parallel end flanges projecting generally perpendicularly therefrom, fitting into and sealing off the groove at spaced distances from the port to provide an air circulation manifold under the plate. The plate is sufficiently long to have sufficient perforations to provide a cross-sectional area which correlates with the cross-sectional area of the port; and means for securing the plate in place.

  3. Fabrication of hydrophobic, electrically conductive and flame-resistant carbon aerogels by pyrolysis of regenerated cellulose aerogels.

    PubMed

    Wan, Caichao; Lu, Yun; Jiao, Yue; Jin, Chunde; Sun, Qingfeng; Li, Jian

    2015-03-15

    In this paper, we reported miscellaneous carbon aerogels prepared by pyrolysis of regenerated cellulose aerogels that were fabricated by dissolution in a mild NaOH/PEG solution, freeze-thaw treatment, regeneration, and freeze drying. The as-prepared carbon aerogels were subsequently characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), nitrogen adsorption measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and water contact angle (WCA) tests. The results showed that the carbon aerogels with pore diameters of 1-60 nm maintained interconnected three-dimensional (3D) network after the pyrolysis, and showed type-IV adsorption isotherm. The pyrolysis process leaded to the decomposition of oxygen-containing functional groups, the destruction of cellulose crystalline structure, and the formation of highly disordered amorphous graphite. Moreover, the carbon aerogels also had strong hydrophobicity, electrical conductivity and flame retardance, which held great potential in the fields of waterproof, electronic devices and fireproofing. PMID:25542115

  4. Additional Results of Glaze Icing Scaling in SLD Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsao, Jen-Ching

    2016-01-01

    New guidance of acceptable means of compliance with the super-cooled large drops (SLD) conditions has been issued by the U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in its Advisory Circular AC 25-28 in November 2014. The Part 25, Appendix O is developed to define a representative icing environment for super-cooled large drops. Super-cooled large drops, which include freezing drizzle and freezing rain conditions, are not included in Appendix C. This paper reports results from recent glaze icing scaling tests conducted in NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) to evaluate how well the scaling methods recommended for Appendix C conditions might apply to SLD conditions. The models were straight NACA 0012 wing sections. The reference model had a chord of 72 in. and the scale model had a chord of 21 in. Reference tests were run with airspeeds of 100 and 130.3 kn and with MVD's of 85 and 170 micron. Two scaling methods were considered. One was based on the modified Ruff method with scale velocity found by matching the Weber number WeL. The other was proposed and developed by Feo specifically for strong glaze icing conditions, in which the scale liquid water content and velocity were found by matching reference and scale values of the nondimensional water-film thickness expression and the film Weber number Wef. All tests were conducted at 0 deg AOA. Results will be presented for stagnation freezing fractions of 0.2 and 0.3. For nondimensional reference and scale ice shape comparison, a new post-scanning ice shape digitization procedure was developed for extracting 2-D ice shape profiles at any selected span-wise location from the high fidelity 3-D scanned ice shapes obtained in the IRT.

  5. Surface snow chemistry across Antarctic wind glaze and antidune fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, D. A.; Mayewski, P. A.; Korotkikh, E.; Sneed, S. B.; Handley, M.; Introne, D.; Scambos, T. A.

    2011-12-01

    This is the first study to measure more than 25 chemical constituents in the surface snow and firn across extensive regions of Antarctica. We present major ion, trace element, heavy metal, rare earth element and oxygen isotope data from a series of surface snow samples and shallow firn sections collected along four US ITASE traverses across East and West Antarctica. In each sample we measure dissolved concentrations of Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, and MS- using ion chromatography and total concentrations of Sr, Cd, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Pb, Bi, U, As, Al, S, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Na, Mg, Li, and K using inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry. We also measure δ18O by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The 2002/2003 traverse began at Byrd Surface Camp, West Antarctica, and ended close to South Pole, East Antarctica. The 2003/2004 traverse began at South Pole, passed through AGO4 in central East Antarctica before turning north and finishing at Taylor Dome. The combined 2006/2007 and 2007/2008 traverses started out at Taylor Dome and headed south, passing through the Byrd Glacier drainage basin and ending at South Pole. In this study, we utilize satellite remote sensing measurements of microwave backscatter and grain size to assist in the identification of glaze/dune areas across Antarctica and show how chemical concentrations are higher in these areas, precluding them from containing useful high-resolution chemical climate records. The majority of the non-glaze/dune samples in this study exhibit similar, or lower, concentrations to those from previous studies. Consequently, the results presented here comprise a conservative baseline for Antarctic surface snow chemical concentrations.

  6. NUclear EVacuation Analysis Code (NUEVAC) : a tool for evaluation of sheltering and evacuation responses following urban nuclear detonations.

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

    2009-11-01

    The NUclear EVacuation Analysis Code (NUEVAC) has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories to support the analysis of shelter-evacuate (S-E) strategies following an urban nuclear detonation. This tool can model a range of behaviors, including complex evacuation timing and path selection, as well as various sheltering or mixed evacuation and sheltering strategies. The calculations are based on externally generated, high resolution fallout deposition and plume data. Scenario setup and calculation outputs make extensive use of graphics and interactive features. This software is designed primarily to produce quantitative evaluations of nuclear detonation response options. However, the outputs have also proven useful in the communication of technical insights concerning shelter-evacuate tradeoffs to urban planning or response personnel.

  7. Silica/Polymer and Silica/Polymer/Fiber Composite Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ou, Danny; Stepanian, Christopher J.; Hu, Xiangjun

    2010-01-01

    Aerogels that consist, variously, of neat silica/polymer alloys and silica/polymer alloy matrices reinforced with fibers have been developed as materials for flexible thermal-insulation blankets. In comparison with prior aerogel blankets, these aerogel blankets are more durable and less dusty. These blankets are also better able to resist and recover from compression . an important advantage in that maintenance of thickness is essential to maintenance of high thermal-insulation performance. These blankets are especially suitable as core materials for vacuum- insulated panels and vacuum-insulated boxes of advanced, nearly seamless design. (Inasmuch as heat leakage at seams is much greater than heat leakage elsewhere through such structures, advanced designs for high insulation performance should provide for minimization of the sizes and numbers of seams.) A silica/polymer aerogel of the present type could be characterized, somewhat more precisely, as consisting of multiply bonded, linear polymer reinforcements within a silica aerogel matrix. Thus far, several different polymethacrylates (PMAs) have been incorporated into aerogel networks to increase resistance to crushing and to improve other mechanical properties while minimally affecting thermal conductivity and density. The polymethacrylate phases are strongly linked into the silica aerogel networks in these materials. Unlike in other organic/inorganic blended aerogels, the inorganic and organic phases are chemically bonded to each other, by both covalent and hydrogen bonds. In the process for making a silica/polymer alloy aerogel, the covalent bonds are introduced by prepolymerization of the methacrylate monomer with trimethoxysilylpropylmethacrylate, which serves as a phase cross-linker in that it contains both organic and inorganic monomer functional groups and hence acts as a connector between the organic and inorganic phases. Hydrogen bonds are formed between the silanol groups of the inorganic phase and the

  8. 75 FR 79034 - Proposed Extension of Existing Information Collection; Escape and Evacuation Plans (Pertains to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ... Evacuation Plans (Pertains to Underground Metal and Nonmetal Mines) AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health... and evacuation plan specifically addressing the unique conditions of each underground metal...

  9. Surface modification of Raw and Frit glazes by non-thermal helium plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, M.; Sohbatzadeh, F.; Mirzanejhad, S.

    2015-06-01

    In this study, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was utilized to improve the adhesion of Raw and Frit glazes. These glazes are widely used in industry to make chinaware, decorative dishes and tiles applied at wall and floor. As they should be painted before use, increasing their adhesive properties leads to a better paint durability. Electrical and optical characteristics of the plasma jet are investigated to optimize for efficient treatment. Contact angle measurement and surface energy calculation demonstrate a drastic increase after the plasma treatment indicating wettability and paintability enhancement. Moreover, atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses were performed on the specimens to explore the influence of helium plasma jet on the physical and chemical properties of the glazes, microscopically. AFM analysis reveals surface etching resulted from the bombardment of the solid surfaces by the APPJ using helium fed gas. The process aims to enhance adhesive properties of glaze surfaces.

  10. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 223 - Certification of Glazing Materials

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...; (iii) the type or brand identification of the material. (3) Each individual unit of a glazing material...” material; (ii) the manufacturer of the material; (iii) the type or brand identification of the material....

  11. A multi-analytical approach for the chemical composition investigation of Byzantine and Mediaeval glazed pottery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Lighea; Caliri, Claudia; Santos, Hellen Cristine; Catalano, Roberto; Giannotta, Maria Teresa; Imperiale, Marco Leo; Rizzo, Francesca; Romano, Francesco Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Glazed pottery from the mediaeval site at "Cantiere Mitello" in Otranto (Italy) have been investigated by means of several portable and non invasive techniques: X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), Micro-X-Ray Fluorescence (micro-XRF) scanning and alpha Particle Induced X-ray Emission (alpha-PIXE). The results have been compared with some later sherds of Byzantine glazed pottery from the site of "Giuggianello" in Otranto (Italy). Results show that glazes present an high amount of Pb. Byzantine are also richer in Al compared to the first group. The color is generally given by Fe-Cu-Mn oxides. In general the mediaeval glazes can be considered to be in accordance with the Roman tradition. The presence of a consistent amount of SnO (3%) in a sample belonging to the first group, could suggest the use of tin as opacifier agent even at an early period.

  12. Chemical vapour deposition of thermochromic vanadium dioxide thin films for energy efficient glazing

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, Michael E.A.; Binions, Russell

    2014-06-01

    Vanadium dioxide is a thermochromic material that undergoes a semiconductor to metal transitions at a critical temperature of 68 °C. This phase change from a low temperature monoclinic structure to a higher temperature rutile structure is accompanied by a marked change in infrared reflectivity and change in resistivity. This ability to have a temperature-modulated film that can limit solar heat gain makes vanadium dioxide an ideal candidate for thermochromic energy efficient glazing. In this review we detail the current challenges to such glazing becoming a commercial reality and describe the key chemical vapour deposition technologies being employed in the latest research. - Graphical abstract: Schematic demonstration of the effect of thermochromic glazing on solar radiation (red arrow represents IR radiation, black arrow represents all other solar radiation). - Highlights: • Vanadium dioxide thin films for energy efficient glazing. • Reviews chemical vapour deposition techniques. • Latest results for thin film deposition for vanadium dioxide.

  13. Dynamic measurement of heat loss coefficients through Trombe wall glazing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    A Trombe wall presents a unique opportunity to measure the heat-loss coefficient through the glazing system because the wall itself can be used as a heat meter. Since the instantaneous heat flux through the outer wall surface can be determined, the heat loss coefficient at night can be calculated by dividing by the wall surface-to-ambient temperature difference. This technique has been used to determine heat-loss coefficients for Los Alamos test rooms during the winter of 1980-1981. Glazing systems studied include single and double glazing both with and without night insulation used in conjunction with a flat black paint, and both single and double glazing used in conjunction with a selective surface.

  14. Use of industrial waste and local raw materials for preparing low-temperature glazes

    SciTech Connect

    Fedin, A.A.; Korneeva, V.N.; Suslov, A.A.

    1985-07-01

    The aim of the present work was to obtain low-temperature, unfritted glaze coatings for facade finishing materials. The synthesis of the glazes was based on the use of waste from the production of colored TV sets in the form of mixtures of cone glass and screens, window and container glass; white burning, aluminum-oxide containing wastes formed during the etching of aluminum alloys, and tripoli from the Nizhnedevitsk locations. The chemical compositions of the raw components are shown. The presence of large reserves of natural raw materials and industrial waste products, the simplicity of preparation, the excellent physical and mechanical and chemical properties, and also the economic effectiveness prove that the authors can recommend the new glazes for industrial use. On the basis of glass cullet, alumina-containing waste, and tripoli, it is possible to obtain low-temperature brilliant glazes of beige color for ceramic articles without incorporating, additionally, pigments and opacifiers.

  15. Image Guided Endoscopic Evacuation of Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Chad M; Vespa, Paul; Saver, Jeffrey L; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Carmichael, Stanley T.; Alger, Jeffry; Frazee, John; Starkman, Sid; Liebeskind, David; Nenov, Valeriy; Elashoff, Robert; Martin, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Background Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating disease with high morbidity and mortality. ICH lacks an effective medical or surgical treatment despite the acknowledged pathophysiological benefits of achieved hemostasis and clot removal. Image guided stereotactic endoscopic hematoma evacuation is a promising minimally invasive approach designed to limit operative injury and maximize hematoma removal. Methods A single center randomized controlled trial was designed to assess the safety and efficacy of stereotactic hematoma evacuation compared to best medical management. Patients were randomized within 24 hours of hemorrhage in a 3:2 fashion to best medical management plus endoscopic hematoma evacuation or best medical management alone. Data was collected to assess efficacy and safety of hematoma evacuation and to identify procedural components requiring technical improvement. Results 10 patients have been enrolled and randomized to treatment. Six patients underwent endoscopic evacuation with a hematoma volume reduction of 80% +/−13 at 24 hours post procedure. The medical arm demonstrated a hematoma enlargement of 78% +/−142 during this same period. Rehemorrhage rates and deterioration rates were similar in the two groups. Mortality was 20% in the endoscopic group and 50% in the medical treatment cohort. The endoscopic technique was shown to be effective in identification and evacuation of hematomas while reduction in the number of endoscopic passes and maintenance of hemostasis require further study. Conclusion Image guided stereotactic endoscopic hematoma removal is a promising minimally invasive technique that is effective in immediate hematoma evacuation. This technique deserves further investigation to determine its role in ICH management. PMID:18424298

  16. Resident perception of volcanic hazards and evacuation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, D. K.; Gisladottir, G.; Dominey-Howes, D.

    2009-02-01

    Katla volcano, located beneath the Mýrdalsjökull ice cap in southern Iceland, is capable of producing catastrophic jökulhlaup. The Icelandic Civil Protection (ICP), in conjunction with scientists, local police and emergency managers, developed mitigation strategies for possible jökulhlaup produced during future Katla eruptions. These strategies were tested during a full-scale evacuation exercise in March 2006. A positive public response during a volcanic crisis not only depends upon the public's knowledge of the evacuation plan but also their knowledge and perception of the possible hazards. To improve the effectiveness of residents' compliance with warning and evacuation messages it is important that emergency management officials understand how the public interpret their situation in relation to volcanic hazards and their potential response during a crisis and apply this information to the ongoing development of risk mitigation strategies. We adopted a mixed methods approach in order to gain a broad understanding of residents' knowledge and perception of the Katla volcano in general, jökulhlaup hazards specifically and the regional emergency evacuation plan. This entailed field observations during the major evacuation exercise, interviews with key emergency management officials and questionnaire survey interviews with local residents. Our survey shows that despite living within the hazard zone, many residents do not perceive that their homes could be affected by a jökulhlaup, and many participants who perceive that their homes are safe, stated that they would not evacuate if an evacuation warning was issued. Alarmingly, most participants did not receive an evacuation message during the exercise. However, the majority of participants who took part in the exercise were positive about its implementation. This assessment of resident knowledge and perception of volcanic hazards and the evacuation plan is the first of its kind in this region. Our data can be used

  17. Synthesis and properties of Chitosan-silica hybrid aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Ayers, Michael R.; Hunt, Arlon J.

    2001-06-01

    Chitosan, a polymer that is soluble in dilute aqueous acid, is derived from chitin, a natural polyglucosamide. Aquagels where the solid phase consists of both chitosan and silica can be easily prepared by using an acidic solution of chitosan to catalyze the hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate. Gels with chitosan/TEOS mass ratios of 0.1-1.1 have been prepared by this method. Standard drying processes using CO{sub 2} give the corresponding aerogels. The amount of chitosan in the gel plays a role in the shrinkage of the aerogel during drying. Gels with the lowest chitosan/silica ratios show the most linear shrinkage, up to 24%, while those with the highest ratios show only a 7% linear shrinkage. Pyrolysis at 700 C under nitrogen produces a darkened aerogel due to the thermal decomposition of the chitosan, however, the aerogel retains its monolithic form. The pyrolyzed aerogels absorb slightly more infrared radiation in the 2-5 {micro}m region than the original aerogels. B.E.T. surface areas of these aerogels range from 470-750 m{sup 2}/g. Biocompatibility screening of this material shows a very high value for hemolysis, but a low value for cytotoxicity.

  18. Facile preparation of monolithic κ-carrageenan aerogels.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Kathirvel; Ratke, Lorenz

    2014-05-14

    To the best of our knowledge, it is the first study reporting the synthesis of monolithic κ-carrageenan aerogels with meso- and macroporous structures, being unique in physical and chemical properties. We demonstrate a novel method to synthesize κ-carrageenan aerogels in which potassium thiocyanate was used as the source of specific ions. Aerogels were characterized by envelope density analysis, scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis, X-ray powder diffractometry and IR spectroscopy. By varying the concentration of κ-carrageenan between 0.5 and 3 wt%, the envelope density can be linearly increased from 40 to 160 kg m⁻³. The sulphate functional groups in the wet gel and the specific ions are the key factors controlling the volume shrinkage of aerogels which average about 66%. The aerogels exhibit a fibrillar structure similar to cellulose aerogels. The fibril thickness was observed to be 10-15 nm and the specific surface area was about 230 m² g⁻¹. The existing meso- and macroporous structures were confirmed by nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The aerogels were completely pure, free of specific ions and confirmed to be amorphous by powder X-ray diffraction. Hence, these porous materials can provide a matrix with a chelating function which can be used as a host in many applications. PMID:24718695

  19. Synthesis and characterization of highly crystalline graphene aerogels.

    PubMed

    Worsley, Marcus A; Pham, Thang T; Yan, Aiming; Shin, Swanee J; Lee, Jonathan R I; Bagge-Hansen, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alex

    2014-10-28

    Aerogels are used in a broad range of scientific and industrial applications due to their large surface areas, ultrafine pore sizes, and extremely low densities. Recently, a large number of reports have described graphene aerogels based on the reduction of graphene oxide (GO). Though these GO-based aerogels represent a considerable advance relative to traditional carbon aerogels, they remain significantly inferior to individual graphene sheets due to their poor crystallinity. Here, we report a straightforward method to synthesize highly crystalline GO-based graphene aerogels via high-temperature processing common in commercial graphite production. The crystallization of the graphene aerogels versus annealing temperature is characterized using Raman and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy. Nitrogen porosimetry shows that the highly crystalline graphene macrostructure maintains a high surface area and ultrafine pore size. Because of their enhanced crystallinity, these graphene aerogels exhibit a ∼ 200 °C improvement in oxidation temperature and an order of magnitude increase in electrical conductivity. PMID:25283720

  20. Temperature and moisture dependence of dielectric constant for silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Hrubesh, L.H., LLNL

    1997-03-01

    The dielectric constants of silica aerogels are among the lowest measured for any solid material. The silica aerogels also exhibit low thermal expansion and are thermally stable to temperatures exceeding 500{degrees}C. However, due to the open porosity and large surface areas for aerogels, their dielectric constants are strongly affected by moisture and temperature. This paper presents data for the dielectric constants of silica aerogels as a function of moisture content at 25{degrees}C, and as a function of temperature, for temperatures in the range from 25{degrees}C to 450{degrees}C. Dielectric constant data are also given for silica aerogels that are heat treated in dry nitrogen at 500{degrees}C, then cooled to 25{degrees}C for measurements in dry air. All measurements are made on bulk aerogel spheres at 22GHz microwave frequency, using a cavity perturbation method. The results of the dependence found here for bulk materials can be inferred to apply also to thin films of silica aerogels having similar nano-structures and densities.

  1. Hypervelocity Capture of Meteoritic Particles in Nonsilica Aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    S Jones; G Flynn

    2011-12-31

    The Stardust mission captured particles from the comet 81P/Wild 2 in gradient density silica aerogel and returned the collected samples to earth in 2006. The analyses of these particles have revealed several new insights into the formation of our solar system. However, since the aerogel used as the capture material was silica, the elemental analyses of the silica-rich particles were made more complicated in certain ways due to the mixing of the silicon of the particles and that of the aerogel. By using a nonsilica aerogel, future elemental analyses of silica-rich particles captured in aerogel could be made more straightforward. Resorcinol/formaldehyde (RF), alumina, and zirconia aerogels were impact tested with meteoritic fragments and the captured fragments were mapped with synchrotron-based X-ray microprobe (XRM) and the particles were analyzed with X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The resorcinol/formaldehyde aerogel proved to be the best capture material, in that it could be keystoned and XRF could be used to locate and analyze particles that were less than 10 {micro}m.

  2. Flame Retardant Effect of Aerogel and Nanosilica on Engineered Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K.; Smith, Trent M.; Roberson, Luke B.; Yang, Feng; Nelson, Gordon L.

    2010-01-01

    Aerogels are typically manufactured vIa high temperature and pressure-critical-point drying of a colloidal metal oxide gel filled with solvents. Aerogel materials derived from silica materials represent a structural morphology (amorphous, open-celled nanofoams) rather than a particular chemical constituency. Aerogel is not like conventional foams in that it is a porous material with extreme microporosity and composed of individual features only a few nanometers in length with a highly porous dendriticlike structure. This unique substance has unusual properties such as low thermal conductivity, refractive index and sound suppression; in addition to its exceptional ability to capture fast moving dust. The highly porous nature of the aerogel's structure provides large amounts of surface area per unit weight. For instance, a silica aerogel material with a density of 100 kilograms per cubic meters can have surface areas of around 800 to 1500 square meters per gram depending on the precursors and process utilized to produce it. To take advantage of the unique properties of silica aerogels, especially the ultra light weight and low thermal conductivity, their composites with various engineering polymers were prepared and their flammability was investigated by Cone Calorimetry. The flammability of various polystyrene/silica aerogel nanocomposites were measured. The combination of these nanocomposites with a NASA patented flame retardant SINK were also studied. The results were compared with the base polymer to show the differences between composites with different forms of silica.

  3. Removal of carbonaceous contaminants from silica aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Hui-Ping; Gilmour, I.; Pillinger, C. T.; Zolensky, M. E.

    1993-01-01

    Capture of micrometeorite material from low Earth orbit or dust grains around active comets for return to terrestrial laboratories, capable of practicing the most up to date techniques of chemical isotopic and mineralogical analysis, will greatly enhance our knowledge of primitive material in the solar system. The next generation of space launched cosmic dust collectors will undoubtedly include extremely low density target materials such as silica aerogel as the decelerating and arresting medium. This material has been found to be clean from the point of view of inorganic elements and is thus acceptable for the purpose of harvesting grains to be studied by, for example PIXE, INAA, or SXRF. However, the process used in making aerogel leaves substantial carbon and hydrogen containing residues which would negate their suitability for collection and subsequent investigation of the very important CHON particles. Attempts to precondition aerogel by solvent extraction or heating at 500 C and 750 C in air for 24 hours or under a vacuum of 2(7)(exp -7) torr at 260 C were largely ineffective except that pyrolysis did reduce volatile species. In this investigation we have examined the use of supercritical fluids for the purpose of extracting organic residues. The logic of the new approach is that beyond the supercritical point a substance has the solvating properties of a liquid but the viscosity characteristics of a gas. For example carbon dioxide becomes supercritical at a pressure of 73 atmospheres and a temperature of 31 C; in consequence it can transform to a very powerful and ultraclean solvent. It can dissolve organic matter from low molecular weight up to molecules containing 90 carbon atoms. On release of pressure the fluid reverts to a gas which can easily be pumped away and removed from the substrate being extracted.

  4. Commentary on the Appropriate Radiation Level for Evacuations1

    PubMed Central

    Cuttler, Jerry M.

    2012-01-01

    This commentary reviews the international radiation protection policy that resulted in the evacuation of more than 90,000 residents from areas near the Fukushima Daiichi NPS and the enormous expenditures to protect them against a hypothetical risk of cancer. The basis for the precautionary measures is shown to be invalid; the radiation level chosen for evacuation is not conservative. The actions caused unnecessary fear and suffering. An appropriate level for evacuation is recommended. Radical changes to the ICRP recommendations are long overdue. PMID:23304099

  5. Aerogel Insulation Applications for Liquid Hydrogen Launch Vehicle Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Sass, J.

    2007-01-01

    Aerogel based insulation systems for ambient pressure environments were developed for liquid hydrogen (LH2) tank applications. Solutions to thermal insulation problems were demonstrated for the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) through extensive testing at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory. Demonstration testing was performed using a 1/10th scale ET LH2 intertank unit and liquid helium as the coolant to provide the 20 K cold boundary temperature. Cryopumping tests in the range of 20K were performed using both constant mass and constant pressure methods. Long-duration tests (up to 10 hours) showed that the nitrogen mass taken up inside the intertank is reduced by a factor of nearly three for the aerogel insulated case as compared to the un-insulated (bare metal flight configuration) case. Test results including thermal stabilization, heat transfer effectiveness, and cryopumping confirm that the aerogel system eliminates free liquid nitrogen within the intertank. Physisorption (or adsorption) of liquid nitrogen within the fine pore structure of aerogel materials was also investigated. Results of a mass uptake method show that the sorption ratio (liquid nitrogen to aerogel beads) is about 62 percent by volume. A novel liquid nitrogen production method of testing the liquid nitrogen physical adsorption capacity of aerogel beads was also performed to more closely approximate the actual launch vehicle cooldown and thermal stabilization effects within the aerogel material. The extraordinary insulating effectiveness of the aerogel material shows that cryopumping is not an open-cell mass transport issue but is strictly driven by thermal communication between warm and cold surfaces. The new aerogel insulation technology is useful to solve heat transfer problem areas and to augment existing thermal protection systems on launch vehicles. Examples are given and potential benefits for producing launch systems that are more reliable, robust, reusable, and efficient are outlined.

  6. Polyimide Aerogels with Three-Dimensional Cross-Linked Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, John

    2010-01-01

    Polyimide aerogels with three-dimensional cross-linked structure are made using linear oligomeric segments of polyimide, and linked with one of the following into a 3D structure: trifunctional aliphatic or aromatic amines, latent reactive end caps such as nadic anhydride or phenylethynylphenyl amine, and silica or silsesquioxane cage structures decorated with amine. Drying the gels supercritically maintains the solid structure of the gel, creating a polyimide aerogel with improved mechanical properties over linear polyimide aerogels. Lightweight, low-density structures are desired for acoustic and thermal insulation for aerospace structures, habitats, astronaut equipment, and aeronautic applications. Aerogels are a unique material for providing such properties because of their extremely low density and small pore sizes. However, plain silica aerogels are brittle. Reinforcing the aerogel structure with a polymer (X-Aerogel) provides vast improvements in strength while maintaining low density and pore structure. However, degradation of polymers used in cross-linking tends to limit use temperatures to below 150 C. Organic aerogels made from linear polyimide have been demonstrated, but gels shrink substantially during supercritical fluid extraction and may have lower use temperature due to lower glass transition temperatures. The purpose of this innovation is to raise the glass transition temperature of all organic polyimide aerogel by use of tri-, tetra-, or poly-functional units in the structure to create a 3D covalently bonded network. Such cross-linked polyimides typically have higher glass transition temperatures in excess of 300 400 C. In addition, the reinforcement provided by a 3D network should improve mechanical stability, and prevent shrinkage on supercritical fluid extraction. The use of tri-functional aromatic or aliphatic amine groups in the polyimide backbone will provide such a 3D structure.

  7. Polysaccharide-based aerogel microspheres for oral drug delivery.

    PubMed

    García-González, C A; Jin, M; Gerth, J; Alvarez-Lorenzo, C; Smirnova, I

    2015-03-01

    Polysaccharide-based aerogels in the form of microspheres were investigated as carriers of poorly water soluble drugs for oral administration. These bio-based carriers may combine the biocompatibility of polysaccharides and the enhanced drug loading capacity of dry aerogels. Aerogel microspheres from starch, pectin and alginate were loaded with ketoprofen (anti-inflammatory drug) and benzoic acid (used in the management of urea cycle disorders) via supercritical CO2-assisted adsorption. Amount of drug loaded depended on the aerogel matrix structure and composition and reached values up to 1.0×10(-3) and 1.7×10(-3) g/m(2) for ketoprofen and benzoic acid in starch microspheres. After impregnation, drugs were in the amorphous state in the aerogel microspheres. Release behavior was evaluated in different pH media (pH 1.2 and 6.8). Controlled drug release from pectin and alginate aerogel microspheres fitted Gallagher-Corrigan release model (R(2)>0.99 in both cases), with different relative contribution of erosion and diffusion mechanisms depending on the matrix composition. Release from starch aerogel microspheres was driven by dissolution, fitting the first-order kinetics due to the rigid starch aerogel structure, and showed different release rate constant (k1) depending on the drug (0.075 and 0.160 min(-1) for ketoprofen and benzoic acid, respectively). Overall, the results point out the possibilities of tuning drug loading and release by carefully choosing the polysaccharide used to prepare the aerogels. PMID:25498702

  8. Silica aerogel-polymer nanocomposites and new nanoparticle syntheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boday, Dylan Joseph

    Aerogels are extremely high surface area, low density materials with applications including thermal and acoustic insulators, radiation detectors and cometary dust particle traps. However, their low density and aggregate structure makes them extremely fragile and practically impossible to machine or handle without breaking. This has led to the development of aerogel composites with enhanced mechanical properties through the addition of polymers or surface modifiers. To date, attempts to strengthen aerogels have come with significant increases in density and processing time. Here I will describe our search for a solution to these problems with our invention using methyl cyanoacrylate chemical vapor deposition (CVD) to strengthen silica, aminated silica and bridged polysilsesquioxane aerogels. This approach led to a strength improvement of the composites within hours and the strongest composite prepared had a 100x strength improvement over the precursor aerogel. We also developed the first approach to control the molecular weight of the polymers that reinforce silica aerogels using surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). Although PMMA reinforcement of silica aerogels improved the mechanical properties, further strength improvements were achieved by cross-linking the grafted PMMA. Additionally, we developed the first silica aerogels reinforced with polyaniline nanofibers that were strong and electrically conductive. Reinforcing silica aerogels with polyaniline allowed them to be used as a sensor for the detection of protonating and deprotonating gaseous species. Finally we developed a new approach for the synthesis of silica and bridged polysilsesquioxane spheres using a surfactant free synthesis. This approach allowed for the first in-situ incorporation of base sensitive functionalities during the sol-gel polymerization.

  9. Floor tile glass-ceramic glaze for improvement of the resistance to surface abrasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajek, M.; Lis, J.; Partyka, J.; Wójczyk, M.

    2011-10-01

    The results of research aimed at the study on frits and glass-ceramic glazes for floor tiles, based on compositions located in the primary field of cordierite crystallization within the system MgO-Al2O3-SiO2, have been presented. The results comprise investigations on the frits crystallization abilities, stability of the crystallizing phase under conditions of single-stage a fast firing cycle (time below 60 minutes) depending on their chemical composition and the influence of the nucleation agents. The influence of the nucleating agents namely TiO2, ZrO2, V2O5 on phase composition of obtained crystalline glazes, mechanical parameters and microstructure, has been examined. The strength tests proved increased mechanical resistance of crystalline glazes. Obtained glazes are characterized by high microhardness in range 6~8 GPa, as well as the increased wear resistance measured by the loss of weight below 100 mg / 55 cm2 (PN-EN ISO 10545-7). Significant increase of these parameters as compared with non-crystalline glazes, where micro-hardness values range between 5~6 GPa and the wear resistance values range from 120 to 200 mg, has been proved. Starting glasses (frits) and glazes of the ternary system MgO-SiO2-Al2O3, were examined with use of DTA, XRD and SEM methods.

  10. Do Glazed Ceramic Pots in a Mexico-US Border City Still Contain Lead?

    PubMed Central

    Valles-Medina, Ana M.; Martinez-Cervantes, Maria Elena; Castillo-Fregoso, Maria Carmen

    2014-01-01

    In order to identify the presence of lead in glazed ceramic pots in a Mexico-US border city, 41 clay pots were sampled. The pots were purchased in several establishments located in different geographical areas of the city. The presence of lead was determined using LeadCheck Swabs. Most (58.5%) of the pots were from the State of Jalisco and 24.4% were of unknown origin. Only 4 pots did not contain varnish and were lead-negative. Thirty-seven (81.1%) of the glazed pots were lead positive. Among the lead-negative pots, 4 showed the label “this pot is lead-free.” Thus, if we consider the remaining 33 glazed pots without the “Lead-Free” label, 90.9% were lead-positive and only 9.1% were lead-negative. We also found that earthenware glazed utensils without the “Lead-Free” label were 1.6 times more likely to contain lead (OR: 1.6, 95% CI 1.0–2.5), P = 0.003. We concluded that lead was detected in almost all acquired food containers. Government interventions in Mexico have focused on training manufacturers to make lead-free glazed ceramics but it has been difficult to eradicate this practice. Educational interventions to make and acquire lead-free glazed ceramics should be targeted to both sellers and buyers. PMID:27379279

  11. Adsorption in sparse networks. 2: Silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, G.W.; Calas, S.; Sempere, R.

    1998-06-15

    The model developed in Part 1 is applied to nitrogen adsorption isotherms obtained for a series of silica aerogels whose densities are varied by partial sintering. The isotherms are adequately described by a cubic network model, with all of the pores falling in the mesopore range; the adsorption and desorption branches are fit by the same pore size distribution. For the least dense gels, a substantial portion of the pore volume is not detected by condensation. The model attributes this effect to the shape of the adsorbate/adsorptive interface, which can adopt zero curvature even in mesopores, because of the shape of the network.

  12. The Variable Scale Evacuation Model (VSEM): a new tool for simulating massive evacuation processes during volcanic crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero, J. M.; García, A.; Llinares, A.; Rodríguez-Losada, J. A.; Ortiz, R.

    2010-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions are among the most awesome and powerful displays of nature's force, constituting a major natural hazard for society (a single eruption can claim thousands of lives in an instant). Consequently, assessment and management of volcanic risk have become critically important goals of modern volcanology. Over recent years, numerous tools have been developed to evaluate volcanic risk and support volcanic crisis management: probabilistic analysis of future eruptions, hazard and risk maps, event trees, etc. However, there has been little improvement in the tools that may help Civil Defense officials to prepare Emergency Plans. Here we present a new tool for simulating massive evacuation processes during volcanic crisis: the Variable Scale Evacuation Model (VSEM). The main objective of the VSEM software is to optimize the evacuation process of Emergency Plans during volcanic crisis. For this, the VSEM allows the simulation of an evacuation considering different strategies depending on diverse impact scenarios. VSEM is able to calculate the required time for the complete evacuation taking into account diverse evacuation scenarios (number and type of population, infrastructure, road network, etc.) and to detect high-risk or "blackspots" of the road network. The program is versatile and can work at different scales, thus being capable of simulating the evacuation of small villages as well as huge cities.

  13. Medication supply for people evacuated during disasters.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Sae; Hodgson, Susan; Landeg, Owen; Mayner, Lidia; Murray, Virginia

    2015-02-01

    Medication loss is a major problem in disaster settings, and it is crucial for patients to bring their medication and healthcare items with them when they leave their homes during an evacuation. This article is based on a systematic literature review on medication loss, the objectives of which were to identify the extent and implications of medication loss, to identify the burden of prescription refill, and to make recommendations on effective preparedness. The review revealed that medication loss, prescription loss and refills, and the loss of medical aids are a significant burden on the medical relief teams. The medical aids are not limited to drugs, but include routine medications, medical/allergy records, devices for specific care and daily life, and emergency medications. One possible solution is to make a personal emergency pack and for people to carry this with them at all times. To ensure that patients are adequately prepared, stakeholders, especially health professionals, need to be actively involved in the preparation plans. Since our findings have little impact on disaster risk reduction unless shared broadly, we are now taking actions to spread our findings, such as presenting in conferences and via posters, in order to raise awareness among patients and healthcare professionals. As part of these activities, our findings were presented at the Evidence Aid Symposium on 20 September 2014, at Hyderabad, India. PMID:25594870

  14. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon aerogel spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Liu, Fengshou

    2014-03-01

    Activated carbon aerogel spheres (A-CAS) were successfully prepared by imposing KOH activation on aerogel spheres. It was found that the activation treatment did not destroy the order of the surface of the carbon aerogel spheres (CAS), but it improved the pore structure and adsorption performance of the products. With increasing burn-off, the amount of mesopores first decreased and then increased, with the amount of micropores continuously increasing. The highest measured BET surface area and micropore surface area reached 1198 and 786 m2/g, respectively. The adsorption capacity of benzene organic vapour on the A-CAS is more than eight times as large as that on CAS.

  15. Uncooled thin film pyroelectric IR detector with aerogel thermal isolation

    DOEpatents

    Ruffner, Judith A.; Bullington, Jeff A.; Clem, Paul G.; Warren, William L.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Tuttle, Bruce A.; Schwartz, Robert W.

    1999-01-01

    A monolithic infrared detector structure which allows integration of pyroelectric thin films atop low thermal conductivity aerogel thin films. The structure comprises, from bottom to top, a substrate, an aerogel insulating layer, a lower electrode, a pyroelectric layer, and an upper electrode layer capped by a blacking layer. The aerogel can offer thermal conductivity less than that of air, while providing a much stronger monolithic alternative to cantilevered or suspended air-gap structures for pyroelectric thin film pixel arrays. Pb(Zr.sub.0.4 Ti.sub.0.6)O.sub.3 thin films deposited on these structures displayed viable pyroelectric properties, while processed at 550.degree. C.

  16. Anisotropic phases of superfluid ^{3}he in compressed aerogel.

    PubMed

    Li, J I A; Zimmerman, A M; Pollanen, J; Collett, C A; Halperin, W P

    2015-03-13

    It has been shown that the relative stabilities of various superfluid states of ^{3}He can be influenced by anisotropy in a silica aerogel framework. We prepared a suite of aerogel samples compressed up to 30% for which we performed pulsed NMR on ^{3}He imbibed within the aerogel. We identified A and B phases and determined their magnetic field-temperature phase diagrams as a function of strain. From these results, we infer that the B phase is distorted by negative strain forming an anisotropic superfluid state more stable than the A phase. PMID:25815941

  17. Highly porous and mechanically strong ceramic oxide aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas (Inventor); Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Johnston, James C. (Inventor); Fabrizio, Eve F. (Inventor); Ilhan, Ulvi F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Structurally stable and mechanically strong ceramic oxide aerogels are provided. The aerogels are cross-linked via organic polymer chains that are attached to and extend from surface-bound functional groups provided or present over the internal surfaces of a mesoporous ceramic oxide particle network via appropriate chemical reactions. The functional groups can be hydroxyl groups, which are native to ceramic oxides, or they can be non-hydroxyl functional groups that can be decorated over the internal surfaces of the ceramic oxide network. Methods of preparing such mechanically strong ceramic oxide aerogels also are provided.

  18. Highly porous and mechanically strong ceramic oxide aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas (Inventor); Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Johnston, James C. (Inventor); Fabrizio, Eve F. (Inventor); Ilhan, Ulvi F. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Structurally stable and mechanically strong ceramic oxide aerogels are provided. The aerogels are cross-linked via organic polymer chains that are attached to and extend from surface-bound functional groups provided or present over the internal surfaces of a mesoporous ceramic oxide particle network via appropriate chemical reactions. The functional groups can be hydroxyl groups, which are native to ceramic oxides, or they can be non-hydroxyl functional groups that can be decorated over the internal surfaces of the ceramic oxide network. Methods of preparing such mechanically strong ceramic oxide aerogels also are provided.

  19. Characteristics of ancient Egyptian glazed ceramic objects from Fatimid and Mamluk periods as revealed by ion beam analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadek, Hamada; M, Abd El Hady M.

    2012-07-01

    Ion beam analysis (PIXE, μPIXE) has been successfully applied in analysis of archaeological materials, it has many advantages. In this work Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) used in analysis of ancient Egyptian glazed ceramic from 10th to the 16th centuries (Fatimid and Mamluk periods). Glazed ceramic samples from Al-Fustat Excavation store have been chosen to represent different colours (green, blue, brown, black ...etc), the colours of glaze depend on many factors such as oxides present in the glaze layer, fluxes and the conditions in which objects had been manufactured in the past. Ion Beam allows the identification of elemental composition of the glaze layer i.e., the information about colorants used in glaze, which is of great importance for compositional data play a key role in solving questions concerning dating, provenance, technology, use and the relationship between ancient cultures with the environment.

  20. Comprehensive emergency management: Evacuating threatened populations. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    The structure of emergency management is outlined and emergency management tasks including mitigation and preparedness activities, are addressed. Four actors in the emergency management system are described: local governments, state governments, Federal government, and private organizations. Man-made and natural disasters are compared and human response to three emergency situations is described: (1) the nuclear reaction incident at Three Mile Island, (2) the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mt. St. Helens volcano, and (3) a riverine flood. Citizen response comparisons among these disaster events is focused on: (1) the source and credibility of evacuation warnings; and (2) citizen evacuation decisions. Information is supplied on the way citizens make decisions in emergencies, social-psychological responses to emergencies, the context of evacuation planning in hazard management, and strategies for enhancing citizen compliance with evacuation warnings.

  1. Quartz crystals detect gas contaminants during vacuum chamber evacuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.

    1967-01-01

    Piezoelectric quartz crystals detect condensable gas contaminants backstreaming into a vacuum chamber when a pump is evacuating the chamber. One crystal acts as a thermometer, the other detects mass change. They are energized by electronic equipment which records frequency changes.

  2. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF EVACUATION MOVEMENT IN COMPOUND UNDERGROUND SPACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Masato; Ohno, Ryoma

    Evacuation movement of persons from an inundated underground space was investigated in this study. Numerical simulation was conducted under the two conditions; (1) the persons were guided to evacuate in a recommended manner or (2) they escaped through the nearest stairs without guide. Simulation was also conducted in order to make clear the effect of evacuation announcement. It was confirmed that the guide was effective to make an orderly and safe evacuation movement. And the announcement was also effective to make persons escape more rapidly to a ground level in case that it was made at just the right time. This kind of computation must be needed before we make a plan of the announcement.

  3. Constructal design of pedestrian evacuation from an area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lui, C. H.; Fong, N. K.; Lorente, S.; Bejan, A.; Chow, W. K.

    2013-01-01

    Pedestrian movement occurs in evolutionary patterns the effect of which is to facilitate the access of people into and out of living spaces (areas, volumes). In this paper, we rely on the philosophy of Constructal design as applied physics, in order to uncover two fundamental features of evolutionary design for pedestrian evacuation from rectangular areas (e.g., lecture halls with seated occupants). First, the paper shows analytically that the aspect ratio of the floor area can be selected such that the total evacuation time is minimal. Second, the shape of the floor area of each aisle can be tapered such that the total evacuation time is decreased further. These two architectural features are confirmed by means of extensive and systematic numerical simulations of pedestrian evacuation, by using two numerical packages (Simulex and FDS + Evac).

  4. Tsunami Evacuation Plan for the City of Tangier-Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benchekroun, Sabah; Omira, Rachid; Baptista, Maria Ana; Arbi Toto, El

    2016-04-01

    Tsunami evacuation plan is an important tool to mitigate the tsunami impact. It is the most efficient way to save human lives, well before the waves reach the threatened coastal area, by providing evacuation routes and appropriate shelters. In this study, we propose a tsunami evacuation plan for the city of Tangier-Morocco. This plan is designed considering the tsunami threat from the tsunamigenic sources located in the SW Iberia Margin and using the inundation maps of the worst case to define the limit of flooding area. The evacuation plan is elaborated through modelling the required time for the threatened coastal population to reach the shelters. Results of this study will be useful for decision makers and local authorities in preventing the community resiliency for tsunami hazard. This work received funding from collaborative project ASTARTE - Assessment Strategy and Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe Grant 603839, FP7.

  5. Preparation of silica aerogels using CTAB/SDS as template and their efficient adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wa, Li; Fengyun, Li; Fanlu, Zhuo; Mengjing, Cao; Qiang, Cai; Jue, Huang; Weijun, Zhang; Mingwei, Mu

    2015-10-01

    Silica aerogels have been successfully synthesized using cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as template. This study provides a novel approach to synthesize silica aerogels. The molar ratio of surfactant mixture was CTAB/SDS = 1.00. The obtained silica aerogels exhibit very low apparent density (0.044 g cm-3) and high specific surface area (856 m2 g-1). Surfactant packing parameter theory is used to explain the possible formation mechanism of the silica aerogels using mixed surfactant template. In addition, the adsorption capacity of Rhodamine B on the as-synthesized silica aerogels is as higher as that on the commercial silica aerogels.

  6. Lessons learned from the 2010 evacuations at Merapi volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Estuning Tyas Wulan; Lavigne, Franck; Picquout, Adrien; de Bélizal, Edouard; Brunstein, Daniel; Grancher, Delphine; Sartohadi, Junun; Cholik, Noer; Vidal, Céline

    2013-07-01

    The rapid onset and large magnitude of the 2010 eruption of Merapi posed significant challenges for evacuations and resulted in a peak number of almost 400,000 Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs). A pre-existing hazard map and an evacuation plan based on the relatively small magnitude of previous eruptions of the 20th century were utilized by emergency officials during the initial phase of the eruption (25 October-3 November, 2010). However, when the magnitude of the eruption increased greatly on 3-5 November 2010, the initial evacuation plan had to be abandoned as danger zones were expanded rapidly and the scale and pace of the evacuation increased dramatically. Fortunately, orders to evacuate were communicated quickly through a variety of communication methods and as a result many thousands of lives were saved. However, there were also problems that resulted from this rapid and larger-than-expected evacuation; and there were lessons learned that can improve future mass evacuations at Merapi and other volcanoes. We analyzed the results of 1969 questionnaires and conducted a series of interviews with community leaders and emergency officials. Results were compiled for periods both during and after the 2010 eruption. Our results show that: (1) trust in the Indonesian government and volcanologists was very high after the eruption; (2) multiple modes of communication were used to relay warnings and evacuation orders; (3) 50% to 70% of IDPs returned to the danger zone during the crisis despite evacuation orders; (4) preparation before the eruption was critical to the successes and included improvements to roads and education programs, (5) public education about hazards and evacuation protocols before the eruption was focused in the perceived highest danger zone where it was effective yet, confusion and loss of life in other areas demonstrated that education programs in all hazard zones are needed to prepare for larger-than-normal eruptions, and (6) improvements in

  7. Multifunctional electroactive heteroatom-doped carbon aerogels.

    PubMed

    You, Bo; Yin, Peiqun; An, Linna

    2014-11-12

    The design and synthesis of highly active, durable, and cheap nanomaterials for various renewable energy storage and conversion applications is extremely desirable but remains challenging. Here, a green and efficient strategy to produce CoOx nanoparticles and surface N-co-doped carbon aerogels (Co-N-CAs) is reported by multicomponent surface self-assembly of commercially melamine sponge (CMS). In the methodology, the CMS simultaneously function as green N precursor for surface N doping and 3D support. The resulting Co-N-CAs exhibit 3D hierarchical, interconnected macro- and bimodal meso-porosity (6.3 nm and <4 nm), high surface area (1383 m(2) g(-1)), and highly dispersed, semi-exposured CoOx nanoparticles (diameter of 12.5 nm). The surface doping of N, semi-exposured configuration of CoOx nanoparticles and the penetrated complementary pores (<4 nm) in the carbon walls provide highly accessibility between electroactive components and electrolytes to improve reactivity. With their tailored architecture, the Co-N-CAs show superior electrocatalytic oxygen reduction (ORR) activities comparable to the commercially Pt/C catalysts, high specific capacitance (433 F g(-1)), excellent lithium storage (938 mAh g(-1)), and outstanding durability, making them very promising for advanced energy conversion and storage. In addition, the presented strategy can be extended to fabricate other metal oxide- and N-co-doped carbon aerogels for diverse energy-related applications. PMID:25044991

  8. Temperature measurements of shocked silica aerogel foam

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Falk, K.; McCoy, C. A.; Fryer, C. L.; Greeff, C. W.; Hungerford, A. L.; Montgomery, D. S.; Schmidt, D. W.; Sheppard, D. G.; Williams, J. R.; Boehly, T. R.; et al

    2014-09-12

    We present recent results of equation-of-state (EOS) measurements of shocked silica (SiO2) aerogel foam at the OMEGA laser facility. Silica aerogel is an important low-density pressure standard used in many high energy density experiments, including the novel technique of shock and release. Due to its many applications, it has been a heavily studied material and has a well-known Hugoniot curve. This work then complements the velocity and pressure measurements with additional temperature data providing the full EOS information within the warm dense matter regime for the temperature interval of 1–15 eV and shock velocities between 10 and 40 km/s correspondingmore » to shock pressures of 0.3–2 Mbar. The experimental results were compared with hydrodynamic simulations and EOS models. We found that the measured temperature was systematically lower than suggested by theoretical calculations. As a result, simulations provide a possible explanation that the emission measured by optical pyrometry comes from a radiative precursor rather than from the shock front, which could have important implications for such measurements.« less

  9. Method for net-shaping using aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Ashey, Carol S.; Reed, Scott T.; Sriram, Chunangad S.; Harris, Thomas M.

    2001-01-01

    A method of net-shaping using aerogel materials is provided by first forming a sol, aging the sol to form a gel, with the gel having a fluid component and having been formed into a medium selected from the group consisting of a powder, bulk material, or granular aerobeads, derivatizing the surface of the gel to render the surface unreactive toward further condensation, removing a portion of the fluid component of the final shaped gel to form a partially dried medium, placing the medium into a cavity, wherein the volume of said medium is less that the volume of the cavity, and removing a portion of the fluid component of the medium. The removal, such as by heating at a temperature of approximately less than 50.degree. C., applying a vacuum, or both, causes the volume of the medium to increase and to form a solid aerogel. The material can be easily removed by exposing the material to a solvent, thereby reducing the volume of the material. In another embodiment, the gel is derivatized and then formed into a shaped medium, where subsequent drying reduces the volume of the shaped medium, forming a net-shaping material. Upon further drying, the material increases in volume to fill a cavity. The present invention is both a method of net-shaping and the material produced by the method.

  10. Temperature measurements of shocked silica aerogel foam.

    PubMed

    Falk, K; McCoy, C A; Fryer, C L; Greeff, C W; Hungerford, A L; Montgomery, D S; Schmidt, D W; Sheppard, D G; Williams, J R; Boehly, T R; Benage, J F

    2014-09-01

    We present recent results of equation-of-state (EOS) measurements of shocked silica (SiO_{2}) aerogel foam at the OMEGA laser facility. Silica aerogel is an important low-density pressure standard used in many high energy density experiments, including the novel technique of shock and release. Due to its many applications, it has been a heavily studied material and has a well-known Hugoniot curve. This work then complements the velocity and pressure measurements with additional temperature data providing the full EOS information within the warm dense matter regime for the temperature interval of 1-15 eV and shock velocities between 10 and 40 km/s corresponding to shock pressures of 0.3-2 Mbar. The experimental results were compared with hydrodynamic simulations and EOS models. We found that the measured temperature was systematically lower than suggested by theoretical calculations. Simulations provide a possible explanation that the emission measured by optical pyrometry comes from a radiative precursor rather than from the shock front, which could have important implications for such measurements. PMID:25314547

  11. Temperature measurements of shocked silica aerogel foam

    SciTech Connect

    Falk, K.; McCoy, C. A.; Fryer, C. L.; Greeff, C. W.; Hungerford, A. L.; Montgomery, D. S.; Schmidt, D. W.; Sheppard, D. G.; Williams, J. R.; Boehly, T. R.; Benage, J. F.

    2014-09-12

    We present recent results of equation-of-state (EOS) measurements of shocked silica (SiO2) aerogel foam at the OMEGA laser facility. Silica aerogel is an important low-density pressure standard used in many high energy density experiments, including the novel technique of shock and release. Due to its many applications, it has been a heavily studied material and has a well-known Hugoniot curve. This work then complements the velocity and pressure measurements with additional temperature data providing the full EOS information within the warm dense matter regime for the temperature interval of 1–15 eV and shock velocities between 10 and 40 km/s corresponding to shock pressures of 0.3–2 Mbar. The experimental results were compared with hydrodynamic simulations and EOS models. We found that the measured temperature was systematically lower than suggested by theoretical calculations. As a result, simulations provide a possible explanation that the emission measured by optical pyrometry comes from a radiative precursor rather than from the shock front, which could have important implications for such measurements.

  12. Multiscale Computer Simulation of Failure in Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.

    2008-01-01

    Aerogels have been of interest to the aerospace community primarily for their thermal properties, notably their low thermal conductivities. While such gels are typically fragile, recent advances in the application of conformal polymer layers to these gels has made them potentially useful as lightweight structural materials as well. We have previously performed computer simulations of aerogel thermal conductivity and tensile and compressive failure, with results that are in qualitative, and sometimes quantitative, agreement with experiment. However, recent experiments in our laboratory suggest that gels having similar densities may exhibit substantially different properties. In this work, we extend our original diffusion limited cluster aggregation (DLCA) model for gel structure to incorporate additional variation in DLCA simulation parameters, with the aim of producing DLCA clusters of similar densities that nevertheless have different fractal dimension and secondary particle coordination. We perform particle statics simulations of gel strain on these clusters, and consider the effects of differing DLCA simulation conditions, and the resultant differences in fractal dimension and coordination, on gel strain properties.

  13. Real-Time Traffic Information for Emergency Evacuations

    SciTech Connect

    Franzese, Oscar; Zhang, Li; Mahmoud, Anas M.

    2010-01-01

    There are many instances in which it is possible to plan ahead for an emergency evacuation (e.g., a chemical processing facility explosion). For those cases, if an accident were to happen, then the best evacuation plan for the prevailing network and weather conditions would be deployed. In other cases (e.g., the derailment of a train transporting hazardous materials), there may not be any previously developed plan to be implemented, and decisions must be made ad-hoc on how to proceed with an emergency evacuation. In both situations, the availability of real-time traffic information plays a critical role in the management of the evacuation operations. Due to cost constraints, only large urban areas have traffic sensor deployments that permit access to some sort of real-time traffic information; an evacuation taking place in other areas of the country would have to proceed without real-time traffic information. In order to improve operations during a vehicular emergency evacuation anywhere, a system of sensors that uses newly developed real-time traffic-information-gathering technologies to assess traffic conditions and to detect incidents on the main evacuation routes is presented in this paper. A series of tests, both in a controlled environment and in the field, were conducted to study the feasibility of such a system of traffic sensors and to assess its ability to provide real-time traffic information during an emergency evacuation. The results of these tests indicated that the prototype sensors are reliable and accurate for the type of application that is the focus of this paper.

  14. A Time-Aware Routing Map for Indoor Evacuation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haifeng; Winter, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of dynamic environments expires over time. Thus, using static maps of the environment for decision making is problematic, especially in emergency situations, such as evacuations. This paper suggests a fading memory model for mapping dynamic environments: a mechanism to put less trust on older knowledge in decision making. The model has been assessed by simulating indoor evacuations, adopting and comparing various strategies in decision making. Results suggest that fading memory generally improves this decision making. PMID:26797610

  15. 3D Building Evacuation Route Modelling and Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, W.; Armenakis, C.

    2014-11-01

    The most common building evacuation approach currently applied is to have evacuation routes planned prior to these emergency events. These routes are usually the shortest and most practical path from each building room to the closest exit. The problem with this approach is that it is not adaptive. It is not responsively configurable relative to the type, intensity, or location of the emergency risk. Moreover, it does not provide any information to the affected persons or to the emergency responders while not allowing for the review of simulated hazard scenarios and alternative evacuation routes. In this paper we address two main tasks. The first is the modelling of the spatial risk caused by a hazardous event leading to choosing the optimal evacuation route for a set of options. The second is to generate a 3D visual representation of the model output. A multicriteria decision making (MCDM) approach is used to model the risk aiming at finding the optimal evacuation route. This is achieved by using the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) on the criteria describing the different alternative evacuation routes. The best route is then chosen to be the alternative with the least cost. The 3D visual representation of the model displays the building, the surrounding environment, the evacuee's location, the hazard location, the risk areas and the optimal evacuation pathway to the target safety location. The work has been performed using ESRI's ArcGIS. Using the developed models, the user can input the location of the hazard and the location of the evacuee. The system then determines the optimum evacuation route and displays it in 3D.

  16. Selfishness- and Selflessness-based models of pedestrian room evacuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiao; Ma, Liang; Ma, Yaofei; Yang, Chen; Ji, Hang

    2016-04-01

    Some pedestrian evacuation studies have employed game strategy to deal with moving conflicts involving two or three pedestrians. However, most of these have simply presented game strategies for pedestrians without analyzing the reasons why they choose to defect or cooperate. We believe that selfish and selfless behaviors are two main factors that should be considered in evacuation. In addition to these behaviors, human emotions such as sympathy and behaviors such as vying were also taken into account to investigate their impacts on pedestrians' strategies. Moreover, an essential objective factor, the building design factor of door width was tested and analyzed. Experimental results showed that the sense of self leads to more defectors and a longer evacuation time. However, sympathy does some good, leading to more cooperators and a shorter evacuation time. Moreover, the exit door width is an essential factor of the evacuation efficiency. When the width was less than 6 cells in a rectangular room with a size greater than 50 × 50, the evacuation time greatly decreased when the width increased. However, this effect was less obvious when the width increased.

  17. Tsunami evacuation mathematical model for the city of Padang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusdiantara, R.; Hadianti, R.; Badri Kusuma, M. S.; Soewono, E.

    2012-05-01

    Tsunami is a series of wave trains which travels with high speed on the sea surface. This traveling wave is caused by the displacement of a large volume of water after the occurrence of an underwater earthquake or volcano eruptions. The speed of tsunami decreases when it reaches the sea shore along with the increase of its amplitudes. Two large tsunamis had occurred in the last decades in Indonesia with huge casualties and large damages. Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System has been installed along the west coast of Sumatra. This early warning system will give about 10-15 minutes to evacuate people from high risk regions to the safe areas. Here in this paper, a mathematical model for Tsunami evacuation is presented with the city of Padang as a study case. In the model, the safe areas are chosen from the existing and selected high rise buildings, low risk region with relatively high altitude and (proposed to be built) a flyover ring road. Each gathering points are located in the radius of approximately 1 km from the ring road. The model is formulated as an optimization problem with the total normalized evacuation time as the objective function. The constraints consist of maximum allowable evacuation time in each route, maximum capacity of each safe area, and the number of people to be evacuated. The optimization problem is solved numerically using linear programming method with Matlab. Numerical results are shown for various evacuation scenarios for the city of Padang.

  18. A Cellular Automata occupant evacuation model considering gathering behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Daoliang; Wang, Jinhui; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Wang, Xiaoqun

    2015-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) Cellular Automata (CA) random model is developed to simulate occupant evacuation considering gathering behavior. The movement process from random distribution to gathering state can be simulated based on the map of the position repulsive force. Evacuations with random distribution and gathering distribution are compared. Visual field means object area coverage considered by the individual in the current cell, representing by the radius of visual field, VR. The simulation results with VR = 1 and 2 have little difference while the simulation with VR = 3 can reasonably represent gathering process. When the occupant density is less than 0.64 people/m2, the time of gathering process increases very fast with the increase of density; when the density is larger than 1.28 people/m2, the time of gathering decreases with the increase of density. When the initial density is less than 1.44 people/m2, the evacuation times with random distribution are always less than those with gathering distribution. When the initial density is larger than 1.44 people/m2, the evacuation times with gathering or random distribution are almost the same. Our model can simulate the gathering and evacuation process with more than two rally points. The number and distribution of rally points can deeply affect the evacuation time.

  19. Tsunami evacuation mathematical model for the city of Padang

    SciTech Connect

    Kusdiantara, R.; Hadianti, R.; Badri Kusuma, M. S.; Soewono, E.

    2012-05-22

    Tsunami is a series of wave trains which travels with high speed on the sea surface. This traveling wave is caused by the displacement of a large volume of water after the occurrence of an underwater earthquake or volcano eruptions. The speed of tsunami decreases when it reaches the sea shore along with the increase of its amplitudes. Two large tsunamis had occurred in the last decades in Indonesia with huge casualties and large damages. Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System has been installed along the west coast of Sumatra. This early warning system will give about 10-15 minutes to evacuate people from high risk regions to the safe areas. Here in this paper, a mathematical model for Tsunami evacuation is presented with the city of Padang as a study case. In the model, the safe areas are chosen from the existing and selected high rise buildings, low risk region with relatively high altitude and (proposed to be built) a flyover ring road. Each gathering points are located in the radius of approximately 1 km from the ring road. The model is formulated as an optimization problem with the total normalized evacuation time as the objective function. The constraints consist of maximum allowable evacuation time in each route, maximum capacity of each safe area, and the number of people to be evacuated. The optimization problem is solved numerically using linear programming method with Matlab. Numerical results are shown for various evacuation scenarios for the city of Padang.

  20. Forecasting pedestrian evacuation times by using swarm intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo, J.; Montalvo, I.; Pérez, R.; Fuertes, V. S.

    2009-04-01

    Many models have been developed to provide designers with methods for forecasting the time required for evacuation from various places under a variety of conditions. Particularly for high traffic buildings or buildings of cultural, governmental, or industrial importance, it is of paramount importance to properly evaluate and plan for the necessary evacuation time. To address this need, a number of models for pedestrian simulation, either considering the system as a whole or studying the behavior and decisions of individual pedestrians and their interactions with other pedestrians, have been developed over the years. In this work, a model for evacuation simulation and for estimating evacuation times is proposed. It is inspired by the so-called Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO). The multi-agent-based simulation characteristics of PSO and the way this technique combines individual and collective intelligence make it suitable for this problem. The PSO-based model presented here allows for assessment of the behavioral patterns followed by individuals during a rapid evacuation event. Evaluation of these behaviors can address a variety of public safety concerns, such as architectural design, evacuation protocol definition, and regulation of public space.