Science.gov

Sample records for evaluate pharmacokinetics safety

  1. Pharmacokinetics and preliminary safety evaluation of azithromycin in adult horses.

    PubMed

    Leclere, M; Magdesian, K G; Cole, C A; Szabo, N J; Ruby, R E; Rhodes, D M; Edman, J; Vale, A; Wilson, W D; Tell, L A

    2012-12-01

    Azithromycin is widely used in foals but has not been studied in adult horses. The goals of this study were to determine the pharmacokinetic profile and to make a preliminary assessment of the safety of azithromycin in adult horses. Azithromycin was administered intravenously (5 mg/kg) and intragastrically (10 mg/kg) to six healthy mares in a crossover design. Serial plasma samples, blood neutrophils, and pulmonary macrophages were collected for the measurement of azithromycin concentrations. Azithromycin was also administered orally (10 mg/kg) once a day for 5 days to five healthy mares for preliminary evaluation of safety in adult horses. The bioavailability of azithromycin following intragastric administration was 45 ± 12%. Concentrations within peripheral neutrophils and bronchoalveolar macrophages were several fold higher than that of plasma. Mild decreases in appetite (n = 3) and alterations in fecal consistency (n = 3) were noted following repeated oral administration. The pharmacokinetic profiles of azithromycin in adult horses, especially the slow elimination rate and intraneutrophil and intrapulmonary macrophage accumulation, demonstrate that it is conducive to use in this age group. Because of the gastrointestinal alterations noted, further studies are warranted before azithromycin can be recommended for use in adult horses. PMID:22136612

  2. FRAMEWORK FOR EVALUATION OF PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS FOR USE IN SAFETY OR RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Proposed applications of increasingly sophisticated biologically-based computational models, such as physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models, raise the issue of how to evaluate whether the models are adequate for proposed uses including safety or risk ...

  3. Nanodrugs: pharmacokinetics and safety.

    PubMed

    Onoue, Satomi; Yamada, Shizuo; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2014-01-01

    To date, various nanodrug systems have been developed for different routes of administration, which include dendrimers, nanocrystals, emulsions, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, micelles, and polymeric nanoparticles. Nanodrug systems have been employed to improve the efficacy, safety, physicochemical properties, and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile of pharmaceutical substances. In particular, functionalized nanodrug systems can offer enhanced bioavailability of orally taken drugs, prolonged half-life of injected drugs (by reducing immunogenicity), and targeted delivery to specific tissues. Thus, nanodrug systems might lower the frequency of administration while providing maximized pharmacological effects and minimized systemic side effects, possibly leading to better therapeutic compliance and clinical outcomes. In spite of these attractive pharmacokinetic advantages, recent attention has been drawn to the toxic potential of nanodrugs since they often exhibit in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, and genotoxicity. A better understanding of the pharmacokinetic and safety characteristics of nanodrugs and the limitations of each delivery option is necessary for the further development of efficacious nanodrugs with high therapeutic potential and a wide safety margin. This review highlights the recent progress in nanodrug system development, with a focus on the pharmacokinetic advantages and safety challenges. PMID:24591825

  4. Impact of inter-individual differences in drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics on safety evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dorne, J L C M

    2004-12-01

    Safety evaluation aims to assess the dose-response relationship to determine a dose/level of exposure for food contaminants below which no deleterious effect is measurable that is 'without appreciable health risk' when consumed daily over a lifetime. These safe levels, such as the acceptable daily intake (ADI) have been derived from animal studies using surrogates for the threshold such as the no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL). The extrapolation from the NOAEL to the human safe intake uses a 100-fold uncertainty factor, defined as the product of two 10-fold factors allowing for human variability and interspecies differences. The 10-fold factor for human variability has been further subdivided into two factors of 10(0.5) (3.16) to cover toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics and this subdivsion allows for the replacement of an uncertainty factor with a chemical-specific adjustment factor (CSAF) when compound-specific data are available. Recently, an analysis of human variability in pharmacokinetics for phase I metabolism (CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, CYP3A4, hydrolysis, alcohol dehydrogenase), phase II metabolism (N-acetyltransferase, glucuronidation, glycine conjugation, sulphation) and renal excretion was used to derive pathway-related uncertainty factors in subgroups of the human population (healthy adults, effects of ethnicity and age). Overall, the pathway-related uncertainty factors (99th centile) were above the toxicokinetic uncertainty factor for healthy adults exposed to xenobiotics handled by polymorphic metabolic pathways (and assuming the parent compound was the proximate toxicant) such as CYP2D6 poor metabolizers (26), CYP2C19 poor metabolizers (52) and NAT-2 slow acetylators (5.2). Neonates were the most susceptible subgroup of the population for pathways with available data [CYP1A2 and glucuronidation (12), CYP3A4 (14), glycine conjugation (28)]. Data for polymorphic pathways were not available in neonates but uncertainty factors

  5. Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of biapenem against pneumonia in the elderly and a study on its pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Karino, Fumi; Deguchi, Naoko; Kanda, Hibiki; Ohe, Miki; Kondo, Keiichi; Tada, Mitsuhiro; Kuraki, Takashige; Nishimura, Nobuhiro; Moriyama, Hidehiko; Ikawa, Kazuro; Morikawa, Norifumi; Isobe, Takeshi

    2013-02-01

    Although biapenem is used in the treatment of pneumonia, the clinical data on elderly patients are yet insufficient. Therefore, the purpose of this study was evaluating the efficacy and safety of biapenem against pneumonia in the elderly and its pharmacokinetics. The subjects were patients 65 years of age or older with pneumonia. Biapenem (300 mg) was administered once to three times per day. For some cases, the drug concentrations in plasma were measured chronologically. The clinical efficacy was evaluated in reference to the improvement in subjective symptoms and objective opinion. The primary outcome was efficacy rate at the end of treatment. Biapenem was effective in 17 of 20 subject cases (85.0 %). Regarding safety, although 4 cases experienced hepatic dysfunction and 1 case had nausea, these effects were not severe in all cases and administration was continued. There was no deterioration of renal function associated with biapenem. In 13 cases in which the trough value of biapenem was measured, there were no unacceptable side effects and the trough values were generally low. It is believed that biapenem (300 mg once to three times a day), even when taken by elderly people, does not accumulate and that the dosage is safe and appropriate. The changes in the predicted concentrations calculated with the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) software, which is based on previously reported population pharmacokinetic parameters, and those in the measured concentrations approximately matched. It is useful to plan biapenem administration using the PK-PD software when performing antibiotic chemical treatment. PMID:22926665

  6. The pharmacokinetics of phenylethyl alcohol (PEA): safety evaluation comparisons in rats, rabbits, and humans.

    PubMed

    Politano, Valerie T; Diener, Robert M; Christian, Mildred S; Hawkins, David R; Ritacco, Gretchen; Api, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    The present studies were conducted to compare the dermal absorption, plasma pharmacokinetics, and excretion of phenylethyl alcohol (PEA) by pregnant and nonpregnant rats, rabbits, and humans. The PEA is a natural fragrance material that is widely used in perfumes, soaps, and lotions and is a major ingredient of natural rose oil. Following dermal (430, 700, or 1400 mg/kg body weight [bw]), gavage (430 mg/kg bw), or dietary (430 mg/kg bw) administration of PEA to rats, plasma concentrations of PEA were found to be low regardless of the route of administration. The plasma concentrations of phenylacetic acid (PAA, the major metabolite of PEA) greatly exceeded the concentrations of PEA and were highest after gavage, followed by dermal then dietary administration. Absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion were compared following topical application of ¹⁴C-labeled PEA to rats, rabbits, and humans (specific activities of dosing solutions: 58-580, 164, and 50 µCi/mL, respectively). In rabbits, the plasma concentration-time profile for PAA was markedly prolonged compared to rats or humans. In humans, only 7.6% of the applied dose of PEA was absorbed, versus 77% in rats and 50% in rabbits. Based on a human dermal systemic exposure of 0.3 mg/kg per day from the use of multiple consumer personal care products containing PEA, a rat dermal no observed adverse effect level of 70 mg/kg per day, and the percentage of dose absorbed in humans, the margin of safety exceeds 2600 concluding that, under normal fragrance use conditions, PEA is not a developmental toxicity hazard for humans. PMID:23385160

  7. Evaluation of Herbal Medicines: Value Addition to Traditional Medicines Through Metabolism, Pharmacokinetic and Safety Studies.

    PubMed

    Thelingwani, Roslyn; Masimirembwa, Collen

    2014-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of herbal medicines remain major issues of concern especially in the developing world where the use is high. The World Health Organisation estimates up to 80% of the population in Africa relies on herbal medicines for treatment of many diseases. Minimum safety evaluations need to be done for both the herbal and conventional drugs, in particular when there is a high likelihood of co-administration. This is particularly important in Africa where there is increased access to antiretrovirals in the treatment of HIV/AIDS, which are being used in a population background characterized by rampant use of herbal medicines. Many techniques used in the discovery and evaluation of conventional drugs can be adapted to herbal medicines. Such evaluations will add value to herbal medicines as doctors and patients will be better informed on which drugs and herbal medicines to take or not take together. This can also lead to the adoption of guidelines by regulatory agents such as the European Medicines Agency (EMA), Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and governmental agencies controlling the use of medicines. Of current interest is the evaluation of drug-herb interactions (DHI) involving the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of medicines where there is a promising possibility to adopt the current FDA and EMA guidelines on the evaluation of herbal medicines for drug-drug interactions (DDI). In this review we demonstrate progress made so far in DHI and point to possible future developments that will contribute to the safe use of herbal medicines. PMID:25658125

  8. Evaluation of the effect of multiple doses of rifampin on the pharmacokinetics and safety of ponatinib in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Narayana I; Dorer, David J; Davis, Jeffrey; Turner, Christopher D; Sonnichsen, Daryl

    2015-09-01

    Ponatinib, an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor with significant activity in heavily pretreated patients with chronic myeloid leukemia, is a CYP3A4 substrate. This open-label, nonrandomized, fixed-order crossover study evaluated the effect of multiple oral doses of rifampin, a strong CYP3A4 inducer, on the pharmacokinetics of ponatinib (45 mg, single dose). Twenty healthy adults received ponatinib on day 1, rifampin 600 mg alone on days 8-13, 15, and 16, and rifampin 600 mg with ponatinib on day 14. Rifampin decreased maximum plasma concentration (Cmax ) and area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) from time zero to time of last measurable concentration (AUC0-t ) and from time zero to infinity (AUC0-∞ ) of ponatinib by 42%, 59%, and 63%, respectively, with no effect on time to Cmax . The limits of the 90% confidence intervals of the estimated geometric mean ratios of ponatinib Cmax , AUC0-t , and AUC0-∞ did not fall within the 80-125% margins for equivalence, suggesting a statistically significant interaction. Coadministration of ponatinib with strong CYP3A4 inducers should be avoided unless the benefit outweighs the possible risk of ponatinib underexposure, because the safety of ponatinib dose increases has not been studied in this context. PMID:27137144

  9. Single-dose safety and pharmacokinetic evaluation of fluorocoxib A: pilot study of novel cyclooxygenase-2-targeted optical imaging agent in a canine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cekanova, Maria; Uddin, Md. Jashim; Legendre, Alfred M.; Galyon, Gina; Bartges, Joseph W.; Callens, Amanda; Martin-Jimenez, Tomas; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2012-11-01

    We evaluated preclinical single-dose safety, pharmacokinetic properties, and specific uptake of the new optical imaging agent fluorocoxib A in dogs. Fluorocoxib A, N-[(5-carboxy-X-rhodaminyl)but-4-yl]-2-[1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl]acetamide, selectively binds and inhibits the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme, which is overexpressed in many cancers. Safety pilot studies were performed in research dogs following intravenous (i.v.) administration of 0.1 and 1 mg/kg fluorocoxib A. Blood and urine samples collected three days after administration of each dose of fluorocoxib A revealed no evidence of toxicity, and no clinically relevant adverse events were noted on physical examination of exposed dogs over that time period. Pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed in additional research dogs from plasma collected at several time points after i.v. administration of fluorocoxib A using high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. The pharmacokinetic studies using 1 mg/kg showed a peak of fluorocoxib A (92±28 ng/ml) in plasma collected at 0.5 h. Tumor specific uptake of fluorocoxib A was demonstrated using a dog diagnosed with colorectal cancer expressing COX-2. Our data support the safe single-dose administration and in vivo efficacy of fluorocoxib A, suggesting a high potential for successful translation to clinical use as an imaging agent for improved tumor detection in humans.

  10. Applied Pharmacokinetics: Course Description and Retrospective Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Diane E.

    1984-01-01

    An applied course designed to allow students to formulate pharmacokinetic recommendations individually for actual patient data and compare their recommendations to those of a pharmacokinetic consulting service is described and evaluated, and an objective student evaluation method is outlined. (MSE)

  11. Evaluation of the pharmacokinetic equivalence and 54-week efficacy and safety of CT-P13 and innovator infliximab in Japanese patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Sakurai, Takeo; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Ohtsubo, Hideo; Lee, Sang Joon; Nambu, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To demonstrate the pharmacokinetic equivalence of CT-P13 and its innovator infliximab (IFX) in Japanese patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to compare the efficacy and safety of these drugs, administered for 54 weeks. Methods. In a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, multicenter study, 3 mg/kg of CT-P13 or IFX, in combination with methotrexate (MTX) (6–16 mg/week), was administered for 54 weeks to Japanese active RA patients with an inadequate response to MTX, to demonstrate the pharmacokinetic equivalence, based on the area under the curve (AUCτ) (weeks 6–14) and Cmax (week 6) of these drugs, and to compare their efficacy and safety. Results. The CT-P13-to-IFX ratios (90% confidence intervals) of the geometric mean AUCτ and Cmax values in patients negative for antibodies to infliximab at week 14 were 111.62% (100.24–124.29%) and 104.09% (92.12–117.61%), respectively, demonstrating the pharmacokinetic equivalence of these drugs. In the full analysis set, CT-P13 and IFX showed comparable therapeutic effectiveness, as measured by the American College of Rheumatology, Disease Activity Score in 28 joints, the European League Against Rheumatism, and other efficacy criteria, at weeks 14 and 30. The incidence of adverse events was similar for these drugs. Conclusion. CT-P13 and IFX, administered at a dose of 3 mg/kg in combination with MTX to active RA patients, were pharmacokinetically equivalent and comparable in efficacy and safety. PMID:25736355

  12. A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of Single, Escalating Oral Doses of JDTic.

    PubMed

    Buda, Jeffrey J; Carroll, F I; Kosten, Thomas R; Swearingen, Dennis; Walters, Bradford B

    2015-08-01

    Animal studies suggest that kappa opioid receptor antagonists (KORAn) potentially could treat a wide variety of addictive and depressive disorders. We assessed the KORAn JDTic for safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial evaluating single oral doses in healthy adult males. Predose and postdose safety assessments included orthostatic vital signs; 6-lead continuous telemetry monitoring (approximately 16 h predose to 24 h postdose); 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs); clinical chemistry, hematology, coagulation, and urinalysis; psychomotor functioning (using the Wayne Saccadic Fixator (WSF)); and adverse events. As a potential indicator of JDTic effects on affect, the POMS Standard instrument was administered predose and daily postdose Days 1-6. At 1 mg, 2 of the 6 JDTic (and 0/6 placebo) subjects experienced a single, asymptomatic event of multiple beats of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT). Their events were temporally similar with respect to time postdose (and the postdose timing of an NSVT event in a monkey). These events triggered a study stopping rule. No differences were observed between the placebo and JDTic subjects with respect to clinical chemistry, hematology, coagulation, urinalysis, orthostatic vital signs, WSF, or 12-lead ECG parameters. Plasma JDTic levels were below the lower limit of quantitation (0.1 nM) in all subjects. There were no significant differences in POMS scores between the placebo and JDTic groups. Although the evidence is circumstantial, it suggests that NSVT is a potential JDTic toxicity in humans. Given the therapeutic potential of KORAn, further investigation is needed to determine whether a significant JDTic human cardiac effect indeed exists, and if so, whether it is specific to JDTic or represents a KORAn class effect. PMID:25628006

  13. A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of Single, Escalating Oral Doses of JDTic

    PubMed Central

    Buda, Jeffrey J; Carroll, F I; Kosten, Thomas R; Swearingen, Dennis; Walters, Bradford B

    2015-01-01

    Animal studies suggest that kappa opioid receptor antagonists (KORAn) potentially could treat a wide variety of addictive and depressive disorders. We assessed the KORAn JDTic for safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial evaluating single oral doses in healthy adult males. Predose and postdose safety assessments included orthostatic vital signs; 6-lead continuous telemetry monitoring (approximately 16 h predose to 24 h postdose); 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs); clinical chemistry, hematology, coagulation, and urinalysis; psychomotor functioning (using the Wayne Saccadic Fixator (WSF)); and adverse events. As a potential indicator of JDTic effects on affect, the POMS Standard instrument was administered predose and daily postdose Days 1–6. At 1 mg, 2 of the 6 JDTic (and 0/6 placebo) subjects experienced a single, asymptomatic event of multiple beats of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT). Their events were temporally similar with respect to time postdose (and the postdose timing of an NSVT event in a monkey). These events triggered a study stopping rule. No differences were observed between the placebo and JDTic subjects with respect to clinical chemistry, hematology, coagulation, urinalysis, orthostatic vital signs, WSF, or 12-lead ECG parameters. Plasma JDTic levels were below the lower limit of quantitation (0.1 nM) in all subjects. There were no significant differences in POMS scores between the placebo and JDTic groups. Although the evidence is circumstantial, it suggests that NSVT is a potential JDTic toxicity in humans. Given the therapeutic potential of KORAn, further investigation is needed to determine whether a significant JDTic human cardiac effect indeed exists, and if so, whether it is specific to JDTic or represents a KORAn class effect. PMID:25628006

  14. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Intravitreal Caspofungin

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ying-Cheng; Liang, Chiao-Ying; Wang, Chun-Yuan; Lin, Keng-Hung; Hsu, Min-Yen; Yuen, Hon-Leung

    2014-01-01

    Caspofungin exhibits potent antifungal activities against Candida and Aspergillus species. The elimination rate and retinal toxicity of caspofungin were determined in this study to assess its pharmacokinetics and safety in the treatment of fungal endophthalmitis. Intravitreal injections of 50 μg/0.1 ml of caspofungin were administered to rabbits. Levels of caspofungin in the vitreous and aqueous humors were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) at selected time intervals (10 min and 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 48 h), and the half-lives were calculated. Eyes were intravitreally injected with caspofungin to obtain concentrations of 10 μg/ml, 50 μg/ml, 100 μg/ml, and 200 μg/ml. Electroretinograms were recorded 4 weeks after injections, and the injected eyes were examined histologically. The concentrations of intravitreal caspofungin at various time points exhibited an exponential decay with a half-life of 6.28 h. The mean vitreous concentration was 6.06 ± 1.76 μg/ml 1 h after intravitreal injection, and this declined to 0.47 ± 0.15 μg/ml at 24 h. The mean aqueous concentration showed undetectable levels at all time points. There were no statistical differences in scotopic a-wave and b-wave responses between control eyes and caspofungin-injected eyes. No focal necrosis or other abnormality in retinal histology was observed. Intravitreal caspofungin injection may be considered to be an alternative treatment for fungal endophthalmitis based on its antifungal activity, lower retinal toxicity, and lower elimination rate in the vitreous. More clinical data are needed to determine its potential role as primary therapy for fungal endophthalmitis. PMID:25246398

  15. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Solithromycin in Subjects with Hepatic Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ciric, Sabrina; Fernandes, Prabhavathi

    2015-01-01

    Solithromycin, a new macrolide and the first fluoroketolide, is in late-stage clinical development and, like older macrolides, is primarily metabolized and excreted through liver-dependent mechanisms. This study evaluated the safety and pharmacokinetics of solithromycin in patients with chronic liver disease. This open-label, multiple-dose study in subjects with hepatic impairment and in healthy control subjects (matched for age, weight, and sex) enrolled 8 Child-Pugh class A (mild), 8 class B (moderate), and 8 class C (severe) patients and 9 healthy controls. Subjects (n = 33) received one 800-mg dose on day 1 followed by once-daily doses of 400 mg on days 2 through 5. The most commonly reported adverse events were mild diarrhea and mild headache, and no significant differences were noted between hepatically impaired subjects and healthy controls. The pharmacokinetics of plasma solithromycin in subjects with mild and moderate impairment was similar to that in control subjects. In subjects with severe impairment, total exposure to solithromycin at steady state (area under the plasma concentration-time curve [AUC0–tau]) was decreased compared to that in control subjects, which may have been related to the higher body mass index of individuals in this group. No greater accumulation was noted in any hepatically impaired cohort on day 5 compared to that in control subjects. No decrease in dosage is therefore needed when administering solithromycin to patients with mild, moderate, or severe hepatic impairment. Solithromycin was well tolerated in this patient population, and no significant differences in safety, compared to healthy controls, were noted. PMID:25870056

  16. Evaluation of the Safety and Pharmacokinetic Profile of a New, Pasteurized, Human Tetanus Immunoglobulin Administered as Sham, Postexposure Prophylaxis of Tetanus

    PubMed Central

    Forrat, Rémi; Dumas, Rafaele; Seiberling, Michael; Merz, Michael; Lutsch, Charles; Lang, Jean

    1998-01-01

    In a monocentric, double-blind, randomized trial, we examined the safety and pharmacokinetic profile of a new, pasteurized, human tetanus immunoglobulin (P-HTIG). As part of the purification process, P-HTIG has undergone a heat treatment step (10 h at 60°C) and the removal of Merthiolate. Forty-eight adults with a history of tetanus vaccination were randomized into four groups (n = 12 per group) to receive one of two different batches of this P-HTIG simultaneously with either tetanus-diphtheria (Td) vaccine (sham, postexposure prophylaxis of tetanus) or placebo. Local reactions at the injection site were followed for the first 3 days after injection, and systemic reactions were followed during the entire study period, i.e., up to 42 days posttreatment. Blood samples for tetanus antibody titer determination (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method) were drawn prior to treatment on day 0 and on days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42. A normalization of tetanus antibody titers (subtraction of the day 0 value for each subject at each time period) was performed to assess the additive effect of P-HTIG on tetanus antibody titers. The pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by both a compartmental analysis (modelization) and a noncompartmental analysis. No severe adverse reactions were reported. The rate of local reactions at the P-HTIG injection site was 27%. All local reactions were mild and resolved within 2 days. In contrast, local reactions at the vaccine injection site were seen in 79% of the subjects. The rate of systemic reactions was similar in the P-HTIG plus Td vaccine group (33%) and in the P-HTIG plus placebo group (21%), and all these reactions were mild. In the P-HTIG plus placebo group, tetanus antibody titers rose to a maximum of 0.313 ± 2.49 IU/ml after 4.4 days; in the P-HTIG plus Td vaccine group, a maximum concentration of 15.2 ± 2.42 IU/ml was reached 19 days postinjection. In both groups, 100% of the patients had seroprotective levels of

  17. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of fosaprepitant dimeglumine

    PubMed Central

    Colon-Gonzalez, Francheska; Kraft, Walter K.

    2011-01-01

    Importance of the field Chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is a common complication in the treatment of patients with cancer. The introduction of the first in class neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist aprepitant provided additive control on CINV in combination to existing antiemetics. Due to formulation issues, aprepitant is only available for oral administration. Fosaprepitant, a prodrug of aprepitant, was introduced to the market in 2008 as an intravenous bioequivalent to aprepitant. Areas covered in this review This review examines the chemical development of fosaprepitant, its pharmacokinetic properties, approved uses, and potential applications. What the reader will gain The reader will get up-to-date information on the pharmacology and clinical uses of fosaprepitant. Clinical studies have demonstrated pharmacokinetic bioequivalence of aprepitant 125-mg to fosaprepitant 115-mg, as well as comparable efficacy in prevention of acute and delayed emesis following the first day of chemotherapy regimens. Take home message Fosaprepitant is an IV pro-drug of aprepitant that offers a new alternative to patients with CINV. Currently, fosaprepitant can substitute oral aprepitant in the first day of a 3-day regimen. Current studies show that a single-day fosaprepitant regimen is also bioequivalent to the 3-day aprepitant regimen, this could significantly simplify the care for CINV patients in the future. PMID:20795794

  18. [Tetrahydrocannabinol pharmacokinetics; new synthetic cannabinoids; road safety and cannabis].

    PubMed

    Goullé, Jean-Perre; Guerbet, Michel

    2014-03-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis, a drug which is commonly smoked This paper focuses on the pharmacokinetics of THC. The average THC content in cannabis plant material has risen by a factor offour over the past 20 years, from 4% to 16%. This increase has important implications not only for the pharmacokinetics but also for the pharmacology of THC The mean bioavailability of THC in smoked cannabis is about 25%. In a cigarette containing 3.55% of THC, a peak plasma level of about 160 ng/mL occurs approximately 10 min after inhalation. THC is quickly cleared from plasma in a multiphasic manner and is widely distributed to tissues, leading to its pharmacologic effects. Body fat is a long-term storage site. This particular pharmacokinetic behavior explains the lack of correlation between the THC blood level and clinical effects, contrary to ethanol. The main THC metabolites are 11-OH-THC (the only active metabolite) and THC-COOH, which is eliminated in feces and urine over several weeks. Therefore, abstinence can be established by analyzing THC-COOH in urine, while blood THC analysis is used to confirm recent exposure. Cannabis is the main illicit drug found among vehicle drivers. Various traffic safety studies indicate that recent use of this drug at least doubles the risk of causing an accident, and that simultaneous alcohol consumption multiplies this risk by afactor of 14. Since 2009, synthetic cannabinoids have emerged on the illicit drug market. These substances act on the same CB1 receptors as THC, but with higher afinity. Their pharmacokinetics differs from that of THC, as they are metabolized into multiple derivatives, most of which are more active than THC itself. PMID:26427296

  19. Erythropoietin for Neuroprotection in Neonatal Encephalopathy: Safety and Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Larry A.; Ballard, Roberta A.; Ferriero, Donna M.; Glidden, David V.; Mayock, Dennis E.; Chang, Taeun; Durand, David J.; Song, Dongli; Bonifacio, Sonia L.; Gonzalez, Fernando F.; Glass, Hannah C.; Juul, Sandra E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the safety and pharmacokinetics of erythropoietin (Epo) given in conjunction with hypothermia for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). We hypothesized that high dose Epo would produce plasma concentrations that are neuroprotective in animal studies (ie, maximum concentration = 6000–10 000 U/L; area under the curve = 117 000–140 000 U*h/L). METHODS: In this multicenter, open-label, dose-escalation, phase I study, we enrolled 24 newborns undergoing hypothermia for HIE. All patients had decreased consciousness and acidosis (pH < 7.00 or base deficit ≥ 12), 10-minute Apgar score ≤ 5, or ongoing resuscitation at 10 minutes. Patients received 1 of 4 Epo doses intravenously: 250 (N = 3), 500 (N = 6), 1000 (N = 7), or 2500 U/kg per dose (N = 8). We gave up to 6 doses every 48 hours starting at <24 hours of age and performed pharmacokinetic and safety analyses. RESULTS: Patients received mean 4.8 ± 1.2 Epo doses. Although Epo followed nonlinear pharmacokinetics, excessive accumulation did not occur during multiple dosing. At 500, 1000, and 2500 U/kg Epo, half-life was 7.2, 15.0, and 18.7 hours; maximum concentration was 7046, 13 780, and 33 316 U/L, and total Epo exposure (area under the curve) was 50 306, 131 054, and 328 002 U*h/L, respectively. Drug clearance at a given dose was slower than reported in uncooled preterm infants. No deaths or serious adverse effects were seen. CONCLUSIONS: Epo 1000 U/kg per dose intravenously given in conjunction with hypothermia is well tolerated and produces plasma concentrations that are neuroprotective in animals. A large efficacy trial is needed to determine whether Epo add-on therapy further improves outcome in infants undergoing hypothermia for HIE. PMID:23008465

  20. [Research progress on current pharmacokinetic evaluation of Chinese herbal medicines].

    PubMed

    Li, Guofu; Zhao, Haoru; Yang, Jin

    2011-03-01

    In order to prove safety and efficacy, herbal medicines must undergo the rigorous scientific researches such as pharmacokinetic and bioavailability, before they are put on the market in the foreign countries. Botanical Drug Products promulgated by the US FDA could guide industry sponsors to develop herbal drugs, which was also an important reference for investigating Chinese herbal medicines. This paper reviews and discusses novel approaches for how to assess systemic exposure and pharmacokinetic of Chinese herbal medicines, which were in line with FDA guidance. This mainly focus on identifying pharmacokinetic markers of botanical products, integral pharmacokinetic study of multiple components, Biopharmaceutics drug disposition classification system, and population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic study in herb-drug interaction. PMID:21657088

  1. Pharmacokinetics and safety of oral almotriptan in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    McEwen, J; Salva, M; Jansat, J M; Cabarrocas, X

    2004-10-01

    Almotriptan (LAS 31416) is a new, oral, specific 5-hydroxytryptamine(1B/1D) receptor agonist for the treatment of migraine. The pharmacokinetics and safety of a range of oral doses were assessed in 23 healthy male volunteers. Peak plasma concentrations were reached between 1.5 and 4 h after dosing. The maximum plasma concentration and area under the curve showed dose proportionality over the dose range 5-200 mg. The elimination half-life was constant at approximately 3 h across all dose levels. A substantial proportion of the initial dose was excreted in urine (27%-39%) during 12 h post-dose and the main excretory product was unchanged drug. Three major urinary metabolites were detected, all of which were pharmacologically inactive. The most common events following almotriptan administration were headache, tiredness and mild nausea. Nine events (18%) were classed as probably related to almotriptan and these were all at the highest dose level of 200 mg. The maximum tolerated dose of almotriptan was, therefore, determined as 150 mg. In conclusion, almotriptan is well tolerated following single, oral doses up to 150 mg and has predictable pharmacokinetics. PMID:15386481

  2. Evaluation of the safety, immunogenicity, and pharmacokinetic profile of a new, highly purified, heat-treated equine rabies immunoglobulin, administered either alone or in association with a purified, Vero-cell rabies vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lang, J; Attanath, P; Quiambao, B; Singhasivanon, V; Chanthavanich, P; Montalban, C; Lutsch, C; Pepin-Covatta, S; Le Mener, V; Miranda, M; Sabchareon, A

    1998-07-30

    A clinical evaluation of a new, purified, heat-treated equine rabies immunoglobulin (PHT-Erig), F(ab')2 preparation, was carried out in Thailand and in the Philippines-two countries where rabies is endemic. An initial prospective, randomised, controlled trial (Study 1), compared the safety and pharmacokinetics (serum concentrations of rabies antibodies) after administration either of PHT-Erig or of a commercially-available, equine rabies immune globulin (Erig PMC). A second trial (Study 2) simulated post-exposure rabies prophylaxis by using a reference cell culture vaccine, the purified Vero-cell rabies vaccine (PVRV), administered in association with either Erig PMC or PHT-Erig. In Study 1, 27 healthy, Thai adults received a 40 IU kg(-1) dose of either Erig PMC (n = 12) or PHT-Erig (n = 15) via the intramuscular (i.m.) route; half of the dose was injected into the deltoid area and the other half into the buttocks. Serum for rabies antibody determination and F(ab')2 concentration was collected at hours (H) 0, 6 and 12, and on day (D) 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 and 15. Both products were safe, with no serious adverse events, and in particular, no anaphylactic reactions or serum sickness was reported. A statistical comparison of the pharmacokinetic parameters did not demonstrate bioequivalence of the two products. Nonetheless, the relative bioavailability of 93% and the similar absorption rates suggest the pharmacokinetic profiles of Erig and PHT-Erig are similar. The antibody level in either group were low throughout the 15-day study period. The geometric mean titer (GMT) values ranged from group 0.027-0.117 IU ml(-1) in the Erig group and from 0.029 to 0.072 IU ml(-1) in the PHT-Erig. There was no significant difference between the evolution of GMT values for the two groups. In Study 2, 71 healthy volunteers received 40 IU kg(-1) via the intramuscular route of either Erig PMC (n = 36) or PHT-Erig (n = 35) on D0, in association with five doses of PVRV on D0, D3, D7, D14

  3. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of voriconazole in immunocompromised children.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Thomas J; Driscoll, Timothy; Milligan, Peter A; Wood, Nolan D; Schlamm, Haran; Groll, Andreas H; Jafri, Hasan; Arrieta, Antonio C; Klein, Nigel J; Lutsar, Irja

    2010-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics of voriconazole in children receiving 4 mg/kg intravenously (i.v.) demonstrate substantially lower plasma exposures (as defined by area under the concentration-time curve [AUC]) than those in adults receiving the same therapeutic dosage. These differences in pharmacokinetics between children and adults limit accurate prediction of pediatric voriconazole exposure based on adult dosages. We therefore studied the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of higher dosages of an i.v.-to-oral regimen of voriconazole in immunocompromised children aged 2 to <12 years in two dosage cohorts for the prevention of invasive fungal infections. The first cohort received 4 mg/kg i.v. every 12 h (q12h), then 6 mg/kg i.v. q12h, and then 4 mg/kg orally (p.o.) q12h; the second received 6 mg/kg i.v. q12h, then 8 mg/kg i.v. q12h, and then 6 mg/kg p.o. q12h. The mean values for the AUC over the dosing interval (AUCτ) for 4 mg/kg and 6 mg/kg i.v. in cohort 1 were 11,827 and 22,914 ng.h/ml, respectively, whereas the mean AUCτ values for 6 mg/kg and 8 mg/kg i.v. in cohort 2 were 17,249 and 29,776 ng.h/ml, respectively. High interpatient variability was observed. The bioavailability of the oral formulation in children was approximately 65%. The safety profiles were similar in the two cohorts and age groups. The most common treatment-related adverse event was increased gamma glutamyl transpeptidase levels. There was no correlation between adverse events and voriconazole exposure. In summary, voriconazole was tolerated to a similar degree regardless of dosage and age; the mean plasma AUCτ for 8 mg/kg i.v. in children approached that for 4 mg/kg i.v. in adults, thus representing a rationally selected dosage for the pediatric population. PMID:20660687

  4. Randomized clinical trial: pharmacokinetics and safety of multimatrix mesalamine for treatment of pediatric ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Cuffari, Carmen; Pierce, David; Korczowski, Bartosz; Fyderek, Krzysztof; Van Heusen, Heather; Hossack, Stuart; Wan, Hong; Edwards, Alena YZ; Martin, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Background Limited data are available on mesalamine (5-aminosalicylic acid; 5-ASA) use in pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC). Aim To evaluate pharmacokinetic and safety profiles of 5-ASA and metabolite acetyl-5-ASA (Ac-5-ASA) after once-daily, oral administration of multimatrix mesalamine to children and adolescents with UC. Methods Participants (5–17 years of age; 18–82 kg, stratified by weight) with UC received multi-matrix mesalamine 30, 60, or 100 mg/kg/day once daily (to 4,800 mg/day) for 7 days. Blood samples were collected pre-dose on days 5 and 6. On days 7 and 8, blood and urine samples were collected and safety was evaluated. 5-ASA and Ac-5-ASA plasma and urine concentrations were analyzed by non-compartmental methods and used to develop a population pharmacokinetic model. Results Fifty-two subjects (21 [30 mg/kg]; 22 [60 mg/kg]; 9 [100 mg/kg]) were randomized. On day 7, systemic exposures of 5-ASA and Ac-5-ASA exhibited a dose-proportional increase between 30 and 60 mg/kg/day cohorts. For 30, 60, and 100 mg/kg/day doses, mean percentages of 5-ASA absorbed were 29.4%, 27.0%, and 22.1%, respectively. Simulated steady-state exposures and variabilities for 5-ASA and Ac-5-ASA (coefficient of variation approximately 50% and 40%–45%, respectively) were similar to those observed previously in adults at comparable doses. Treatment-emergent adverse events were reported by ten subjects. Events were similar among different doses and age groups with no new safety signals identified. Conclusion Children and adolescents with UC receiving multimatrix mesalamine demonstrated 5-ASA and Ac-5-ASA pharmacokinetic profiles similar to historical adult data. Multimatrix mesalamine was well tolerated across all dose and age groups. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01130844. PMID:26893546

  5. The Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Efficacy of Intraocular Celecoxib

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Stephen J.; Toma, Hassanain; Shah, Rohan; Kompella, Uday B.; Vooturi, Sunil K.; Sheng, Jinsong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine safety, pharmacokinetics, and anti-inflammatory effects of intraocular celecoxib. Methods. The right eye of animals was injected with 1.5, 3, or 6 mg celecoxib prepared in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Left eyes served as controls and received 0.1 mL DMSO. Electroretinograms (ERG) were obtained at baseline and at 1, 4, and 12 weeks, and eyes were enucleated afterward for histopathologic analysis. For pharmacokinetics, 3 mg celecoxib was injected, and vitreous and retina/choroid drug levels were then analyzed at specific time points. For efficacy, 1 μg lipopolysaccharide was injected to induce inflammation; the right eye was then injected with 3 mg celecoxib (six eyes) or 2 mg triamcinolone acetonide (six eyes) and the left eye with saline. Twenty-four hours later, aqueous fluid was removed, and total leukocyte concentration and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentration were determined. Results. Histologic and ERG studies demonstrated no signs of retinal or optic nerve toxicity. After a single 3-mg injection, vitreous (0.06 μg/mL) and retina/choroid (132.31 μg/g) celecoxib concentrations at 8 weeks exceeded median inhibitory concentration. Treatment with celecoxib and triamcinolone significantly reduced total leukocyte count by 40% (P = 0.02) and 31% (P = 0.01), respectively. Reduction in PGE2 levels paralleled reduction in leukocyte counts (P < 0.05). There was no increase in intraocular pressure, but cataract formation was observed at higher concentrations. Conclusions. Intraocular injection of celecoxib appeared to be nontoxic and demonstrated excellent penetration into the retina/choroid and sustained drug levels out to 8 weeks. Celecoxib demonstrated potent anti-inflammatory effects, but there was an association with cataract formation at higher doses. PMID:24458149

  6. Clinical Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Efficacy of Ambrisentan Therapy in Children With Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Takatsuki, Shinichi; Rosenzweig, Erika B.; Zuckerman, Warren; Brady, Daniela; Calderbank, Michelle; Ivy, D. Dunbar

    2012-01-01

    Summary Recent trials in adult PAH revealed the efficacy of ambrisentan. However, in children with PAH, the clinical safety and pharmacokinetics of ambrisentan has not been well studied. Our aim was to investigate the clinical safety, pharmacokinetics, tolerability, and efficacy of endothelin receptor antagonist therapy with ambrisentan in children with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). This retrospective cohort study provides clinical data from pediatric patients with PAH receiving ambrisentan as add-on therapy or transition from bosentan. Safety included evaluation of adverse events including aminotransferase abnormalities. The clinical impact was evaluated by improvement from baseline in clinical variables. A total of 38 pediatric patients with PAH received ambrisentan. Fifteen of 38 patients were switched from bosentan to ambrisentan. The remaining 23 children were treated with ambrisentan as an add-on therapy due to disease progression. In both transition and add-on cases, mean pulmonary artery pressure significantly improved (transition; 55 ± 18 vs. 45 ± 20 mmHg, n = 13, P = 0.04, add-on; 52 ± 17 vs. 45 ± 19 mmHg, n = 13, P = 0.03) during the follow-up. World Health Organization functional class improved in 31% of patients, but one patient required an atrial septostomy due to disease progression during the follow-up period (median, range; 20, 4–44 months). Five patients (13%) discontinued ambrisentan due to severe headache, lack of clinical efficacy, or near syncope. Ten patients (26%) had side effects associated with ambrisentan treatment, including nasal congestion, headache, and flushing. However, no patients had aminotransferase abnormalities and there were no deaths after initiation of ambrisentan during follow-up. Pharmacokinetics were evaluated in sixteen children treated with ambrisentan from 2.5 mg to 10.0 mg; the mean peak plasma concentration was 738 ± 452 ng/ml, mean time to peak plasma concentration was 3.2 ± 2.1 hours, and mean area

  7. Clinical safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of ambrisentan therapy in children with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Takatsuki, Shinichi; Rosenzweig, Erika B; Zuckerman, Warren; Brady, Daniela; Calderbank, Michelle; Ivy, D Dunbar

    2013-01-01

    Recent trials in adult PAH revealed the efficacy of ambrisentan. However, in children with PAH, the clinical safety and pharmacokinetics of ambrisentan has not been well studied. Our aim was to investigate the clinical safety, pharmacokinetics, tolerability, and efficacy of endothelin receptor antagonist therapy with ambrisentan in children with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). This retrospective cohort study provides clinical data from pediatric patients with PAH receiving ambrisentan as add-on therapy or transition from bosentan. Safety included evaluation of adverse events including aminotransferase abnormalities. The clinical impact was evaluated by improvement from baseline in clinical variables. A total of 38 pediatric patients with PAH received ambrisentan. Fifteen of 38 patients were switched from bosentan to ambrisentan. The remaining 23 children were treated with ambrisentan as an add-on therapy due to disease progression. In both transition and add-on cases, mean pulmonary artery pressure significantly improved (transition; 55 ± 18 vs. 45 ± 20 mmHg, n = 13, P = 0.04, add-on; 52 ± 17 vs. 45 ± 19 mmHg, n = 13, P = 0.03) during the follow-up. World Health Organization functional class improved in 31% of patients, but one patient required an atrial septostomy due to disease progression during the follow-up period (median, range; 20, 4-44 months). Five patients (13%) discontinued ambrisentan due to severe headache, lack of clinical efficacy, or near syncope. Ten patients (26%) had side effects associated with ambrisentan treatment, including nasal congestion, headache, and flushing. However, no patients had aminotransferase abnormalities and there were no deaths after initiation of ambrisentan during follow-up. Pharmacokinetics were evaluated in sixteen children treated with ambrisentan from 2.5 mg to 10.0 mg; the mean peak plasma concentration was 738 ± 452 ng/ml, mean time to peak plasma concentration was 3.2 ± 2.1 hours, and mean area under the

  8. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of MP-376 (Levofloxacin Inhalation Solution) in Cystic Fibrosis Subjects▿

    PubMed Central

    Geller, David E.; Flume, Patrick A.; Griffith, David C.; Morgan, Elizabeth; White, Dan; Loutit, Jeffery S.; Dudley, Michael N.

    2011-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and tolerability of nebulized MP-376 (levofloxacin inhalation solution [Aeroquin]) were determined in cystic fibrosis (CF) subjects. Ten CF subjects received single 180-mg doses of two formulations of MP-376, followed by a multiple-dose phase of 240 mg once daily for 7 days. Serum and expectorated-sputum samples were assayed for levofloxacin content. Safety was evaluated following the single- and multiple-dose study phases. Nebulized MP-376 produced high concentrations of levofloxacin in sputum. The mean maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) ranged between 2,563 and 2,932 mg/liter for 180-mg doses of the 50- and 100-mg/ml formulations, respectively. After 7 days of dosing, the mean Cmax for the 240-mg dose was 4,691 mg/liter. The mean serum levofloxacin Cmax ranged between 0.95 and 1.28 for the 180-mg doses and was 1.71 for the 240-mg dose. MP-376 was well tolerated. Nebulized MP-376 produces high sputum and low serum levofloxacin concentrations. The pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability were similar for the two formulations. MP-376 240 mg (100 mg/ml) is being advanced into late-stage clinical development. PMID:21444699

  9. Pharmacokinetic and Safety Analyses of Tenofovir and Tenofovir-Emtricitabine Vaginal Tablets in Pigtailed Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Lara E.; Friend, David R.; Garber, David A.; McNicholl, Janet M.; Hendry, R. Michael; Doncel, Gustavo F.

    2014-01-01

    Vaginal rapidly disintegrating tablets (RDTs) containing tenofovir (TFV) or TFV and emtricitabine (FTC) were evaluated for safety and pharmacokinetics in pigtailed macaques. Two separate animal groups (n = 4) received TFV (10 mg) or TFV-FTC (10 mg each) RDTs, administered near the cervix. A third group (n = 4) received 1 ml TFV gel. Blood plasma, vaginal tissue biopsy specimens, and vaginal fluids were collected before and after product application at 0, 0.5, 1, 4, and 24 h. A disintegration time of <30 min following vaginal application of the RDTs was noted, with negligible effects on local inflammatory cytokines, vaginal pH, and microflora. TFV pharmacokinetics were generally similar for both RDTs and gel, with peak median concentrations in vaginal tissues and vaginal secretions being on the order of 104 to 105 ng/g (147 to 571 μM) and 106 ng/g (12 to 34 mM), respectively, at 1 to 4 h postdose. At 24 h, however, TFV vaginal tissue levels were more sustained after RDT dosing, with median TFV concentrations being approximately 1 log higher than those with gel dosing. FTC pharmacokinetics after combination RDT dosing were similar to those of TFV, with peak median vaginal tissue and fluid levels being on the order of 104 ng/g (374 μM) and 106 ng/g (32 mM), respectively, at 1 h postdose with levels in fluid remaining high at 24 h. RDTs are a promising alternative vaginal dosage form, delivering TFV and/or FTC at levels that would be considered inhibitory to simian-human immunodeficiency virus in the macaque vaginal microenvironment over a 24-h period. PMID:24566178

  10. Formulation and pharmacokinetics evaluation of puerarin nanocrystals for intravenous delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yancai; Ma, Yi; Ma, Yingying; Du, Yongli; Liu, Zhaoping; Zhang, Dianrui; Zhang, Qiang

    2012-08-01

    Puerarin is a very widely used drug for treating coronary heart disease. Owing to its poor water solubility and the adverse drug reactions caused by cosolvents having been confirmed by SFDA, the aim of present study was to construction and evaluation the puerarin nanocrystals in vitro and in vivo. The nanocrystals prepared were characterized using PCS, AFM, TEM, SEM and DSC. For the assessment of the pharmacokinetic parameters the developed formulations have been intravenous administered to beagle dogs. Results revealed that a narrow size distributed nanocrystals composed of crystallized spherical particles with a mean particle size of 423.6 +/- 17.3 nm, a poly-dispersity index of 0.13 +/- 0.07 and a negative charges around -30 mV was obtained. Puerarin dissolution velocity and saturation solubility were enhanced by the nanocrystals. DSC analysis revealed that the crystallinity of the puerarin was preserved during the high pressure homogenization and freeze-drying processes. Administration of the nanocrystals led to a mean plasma profile with almost similarly low variations in comparison to the reference solution, however with no initial blood peak as observed with the solution formulation. The puerarin nanocrystals exhibited a significantly (P < 0.05) reduced Cmax and clearance, and a significantly (P < 0.05) greater MRT, clearance and elimination half-life compared to the puerarin solution. These results revealed the opportunity to formulate puerarin in nanocrystals for intravenous delivery with higher safety. PMID:22962724

  11. Study to Evaluate the Effect of Rifampicin, Ketoconazole, and Omeprazole on the Pharmacokinetics of Sativex

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-13

    Evaluation of Pharmacokinetics of Sativex in the Absence and Presence of a Known Inducer of CYP3A4; Evaluation of Pharmacokinetics of Sativex in the Absence and Presence of a Potent Inhibitor of CYP3A4; Evaluation of Pharmacokinetics of Sativex in the Absence and Presence of a CYP2C19 Inhibitor.

  12. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of lesinurad, a selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor, in healthy adult males.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zancong; Rowlings, Colin; Kerr, Brad; Hingorani, Vijay; Manhard, Kimberly; Quart, Barry; Yeh, Li-Tain; Storgard, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Lesinurad is a selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor under investigation for the treatment of gout. Single and multiple ascending dose studies were conducted to evaluate pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of lesinurad in healthy males. Lesinurad was administered as an oral solution between 5 mg and 600 mg (single ascending dose; N=34) and as an oral solution or immediate-release capsules once daily (qday) between 100 mg and 400 mg for 10 days under fasted or fed condition (multiple ascending dose; N=32). Following single doses of lesinurad solution, absorption was rapid and exposure (maximum observed plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration-time curve) increased in a dose-proportional manner. Following multiple qday doses, there was no apparent accumulation of lesinurad. Urinary excretion of unchanged lesinurad was generally between 30% and 40% of dose. Increases in urinary excretion of uric acid and reductions in serum uric acid correlated with dose. Following 400 mg qday dosing, serum uric acid reduction was 35% at 24 hours post-dose, supporting qday dosing. A relative bioavailability study in healthy males (N=8) indicated a nearly identical pharmacokinetic profile following dosing of tablets or capsules. Lesinurad was generally safe and well tolerated. PMID:26170627

  13. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of lesinurad, a selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor, in healthy adult males

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zancong; Rowlings, Colin; Kerr, Brad; Hingorani, Vijay; Manhard, Kimberly; Quart, Barry; Yeh, Li-Tain; Storgard, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Lesinurad is a selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor under investigation for the treatment of gout. Single and multiple ascending dose studies were conducted to evaluate pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of lesinurad in healthy males. Lesinurad was administered as an oral solution between 5 mg and 600 mg (single ascending dose; N=34) and as an oral solution or immediate-release capsules once daily (qday) between 100 mg and 400 mg for 10 days under fasted or fed condition (multiple ascending dose; N=32). Following single doses of lesinurad solution, absorption was rapid and exposure (maximum observed plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration–time curve) increased in a dose-proportional manner. Following multiple qday doses, there was no apparent accumulation of lesinurad. Urinary excretion of unchanged lesinurad was generally between 30% and 40% of dose. Increases in urinary excretion of uric acid and reductions in serum uric acid correlated with dose. Following 400 mg qday dosing, serum uric acid reduction was 35% at 24 hours post-dose, supporting qday dosing. A relative bioavailability study in healthy males (N=8) indicated a nearly identical pharmacokinetic profile following dosing of tablets or capsules. Lesinurad was generally safe and well tolerated. PMID:26170627

  14. PHARMACOKINETIC EVALUATION OF PERFLUOROOCTANOIC ACID IN THE MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pharmacokinetic evaluation of perfluorooctanoic acid in the mouse.

    1C. Lau, 2M.J. Strynar, 2A.B. Lindstrom, 1R.G. Hanson, 1J.R. Thibodeaux and 3H.A. Barton.

    1Reproductive Toxicology Division, 3Experimental Toxicology Division, NHEERL, 2Human Exposure and Atmospheric...

  15. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Ofloxacin in Children with Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Heather R.; Thee, Stephanie; Dooley, Kelly E.; McIlleron, Helen M.; Seddon, James A.; Wiesner, Lubbe; Castel, Sandra; Schaaf, H. Simon; Hesseling, Anneke C.

    2015-01-01

    Ofloxacin is widely used for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Data on its pharmacokinetics and safety in children are limited. It is not known whether the current internationally recommended pediatric dosage of 15 to 20 mg/kg of body weight achieves exposures reached in adults with tuberculosis after a standard 800-mg dose (adult median area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h [AUC0–24], 103 μg · h/ml). We assessed the pharmacokinetics and safety of ofloxacin in children <15 years old routinely receiving ofloxacin for MDR-TB treatment or preventive therapy. Plasma samples were collected predose and at 1, 2, 4, 8, and either 6 or 11 h after a 20-mg/kg dose. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using noncompartmental analysis. Children with MDR-TB disease underwent long-term safety monitoring. Of 85 children (median age, 3.4 years), 11 (13%) were HIV infected, and of 79 children with evaluable data, 14 (18%) were underweight. The ofloxacin mean (range) maximum concentration (Cmax), AUC0–8, and half-life were 8.97 μg/ml (2.47 to 14.4), 44.2 μg · h/ml (12.1 to 75.8), and 3.49 h (1.89 to 6.95), respectively. The mean AUC0–24, estimated in 72 participants, was 66.7 μg · h/ml (range, 18.8 to 120.7). In multivariable analysis, AUC0–24 was increased by 1.46 μg · h/ml for each 1-kg increase in body weight (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.44 to 2.47; P = 0.006); no other assessed variable contributed to the model. No grade 3 or 4 events at least possibly attributed to ofloxacin were observed. Ofloxacin was safe and well tolerated in children with MDR-TB, but exposures were well below reported adult values, suggesting that dosage modification may be required to optimize MDR-TB treatment regimens in children. PMID:26195507

  16. The efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of biapenem administered thrice daily for the treatment of pneumonia in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Namkoong, Ho; Kameyama, Youjyu; Yasuda, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Sohei; Kaneko, Hiroshi; Kawashima, Chieko; Terajima, Tomoko; Maezawa, Kayoko; Hayashi, Takeshi; Sandoh, Mitsuru; Ishii, Makoto; Tasaka, Sadatomo; Kanayama, Akiko; Kobayashi, Intetsu; Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Kizu, Junko; Iwata, Satoshi; Sato, Yoshitake; Hasegawa, Naoki

    2014-06-01

    Biapenem has been widely used to treat bacterial pneumonia; however, there is little information concerning its efficacy and safety in elderly patients. Based on pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic theory, administration of biapenem thrice rather than twice daily would be expected to be more effective because of longer time above the minimum inhibitory concentration. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of biapenem (300 mg) administered thrice daily in pneumonic patients aged 65 years or older. Biapenem was effective in 22 of 25 patients, as assessed by the improvement in clinical symptoms and/or the eradication of the causative organisms, and caused no serious adverse events. The pharmacokinetic profile was established based on simulations using a modeling program. Among 17 patients whose causative organisms were detected, time above the minimum inhibitory concentration was estimated to be 100% in 16 patients, all of whom showed clinical improvement. The results of this study confirmed the efficacy and safety of 300 mg of biapenem administered thrice daily for the treatment of pneumonia in elderly patients. PMID:24725621

  17. Safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic evaluation of single- and multiple-ascending doses of a novel kappa opioid receptor antagonist LY2456302 and drug interaction with ethanol in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Stephen L; Wong, Conrad J; Witcher, Jennifer; Gonzales, Celedon R; Dickinson, Gemma L; Bell, Robert L; Rorick-Kehn, Linda; Weller, MaryAnn; Stoltz, Randall R; Royalty, Jane; Tauscher-Wisniewski, Sitra

    2014-09-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that selective antagonism of kappa opioid receptors may provide therapeutic benefit in the treatment of major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, and substance use disorders. LY2456302 is a high-affinity, selective kappa opioid antagonist that demonstrates >30-fold functional selectivity over mu and delta opioid receptors. The safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics (PK) of LY2456302 were investigated following single oral doses (2-60 mg), multiple oral doses (2, 10, and 35 mg), and when co-administered with ethanol. Plasma concentrations of LY2456302 were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Safety analyses were conducted on all enrolled subjects. LY2456302 doses were well-tolerated with no clinically significant findings. No safety concerns were seen on co-administration with ethanol. No evidence for an interaction between LY2456302 and ethanol on cognitive-motor performance was detected. LY2456302 displayed rapid oral absorption and a terminal half-life of approximately 30-40 hours. Plasma exposure of LY2456302 increased proportionally with increasing doses and reached steady state after 6-8 days of once-daily dosing. Steady-state PK of LY2456302 were not affected by coadministration of a single dose of ethanol. No clinically important changes in maximum concentration (Cmax ) or AUC of ethanol (in the presence of LY2456302) were observed. PMID:24619932

  18. Safety and pharmacokinetics of dicloxacillin in healthy Chinese volunteers following single and multiple oral doses

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guolan; Zheng, Yunliang; Zhou, Huili; Hu, Xingjiang; Liu, Jian; Zhai, You; Zhu, Meixiang; Wu, Lihua; Shentu, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Background Dicloxacillin, a semisynthetic isoxazolyl penicillin antibiotic, has antimicrobial activity against a wide variety of gram-positive bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumonia, Streptococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus viridans, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Neisseria meningitidis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetic profile of dicloxacillin after single and multiple oral dose in healthy Chinese volunteers. Methods A single-center, open-label, randomized, two-phase study was conducted in 16 subjects. In the single-dose phase, subjects were randomly assigned to receive single doses of 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 g of dicloxacillin sodium capsule in a 4-way crossover design with a 5-day washout period between administrations. In the multiple-dose phase, subjects were assigned to receive 0.25 or 0.5 g every 6 hours for 3 days in a 2-way crossover design. Plasma and urine pharmacokinetic samples were assayed by a validated high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated and analyzed statistically. Safety assessments were conducted throughout the study. Results Following a single oral dose of 0.25–2.0 g dicloxacillin sodium, the maximum plasma drug concentration (Cmax) and the corresponding values for the area under the concentration– time curve from 0 to 10 hours (AUC0–10 h) increased in a dose-proportional manner. The mean elimination half-life (t1/2) was in the range of 1.38–1.71 hours. Dicloxacillin was excreted in its unchanged form via the kidney, with no tendency of accumulation, and varied from 38.65% to 50.10%. No appreciable accumulation of drug occurred with multiple oral doses of dicloxacillin. No serious adverse events were reported. Adverse events were generally mild. Conclusion Dicloxacillin was safe and well tolerated in the volunteers and displayed linear increases in the Cmax and AUC0–10

  19. Single-Dose Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Ziprasidone in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sallee, Floyd R.; Miceli, Jeffrey J.; Tensfeldt, Thomas; Robarge, Lisa; Wilner, Keith; Patel, Nick C.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to provide single-dose pharmacokinetic, safety, and tolerability data for ziprasidone in youths with tic disorder, for comparison to adult studies to discern whether ziprasidone pediatric dosing could be modeled from adult data. Method: A single-dose, open-label study of ziprasidone was conducted in youths…

  20. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and biologic effects of azithromycin in extremely preterm infants at risk for ureaplasma colonization and bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Hazem E; Othman, Ahmed A; Eddington, Natalie D; Duffy, Lynn; Xiao, Li; Waites, Ken B; Kaufman, David A; Fairchild, Karen D; Terrin, Michael L; Viscardi, Rose M

    2011-09-01

    Ureaplasma spp. respiratory tract colonization is a significant risk factor for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a chronic lung disorder in preterm infants. As an initial step preparatory to future clinical trials to evaluate the clinical efficacy of azithromycin to prevent BPD, the authors characterized the pharmacokinetics, safety, and biological effects of a single intravenous dose of azithromycin (10 mg/kg) in preterm neonates (n = 12) 24 to 28 weeks gestation at risk for Ureaplasma infection and BPD. A 2-compartment structural model with the clearance and volume of peripheral compartment (V2) allometrically scaled on body weight (WT) best described the pharmacokinetics of azithromycin in preterm neonates. The estimated parameters were clearance [0.18 L/h × WT(kg)(0.75)], intercompartmental clearance [1.0 L/h], volume of distribution of central compartment [0.93 L], and V2 [14.2 L × WT(kg)]. There were no serious adverse events attributed to azithromycin. A single dose of azithromycin did not suppress inflammatory cytokines or myeloperoxidase activity in tracheal aspirates. These results demonstrated the safety of azithromycin and developed a pharmacokinetic model that is useful for future simulation-based clinical trials for eradicating Ureaplasma and preventing BPD in preterm neonates. PMID:21098694

  1. Safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of udenafil, a novel PDE-5 inhibitor, in healthy young Korean subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bo-Hyung; Lim, Hyeong-Seok; Chung, Jae-Yong; Kim, Jung-Ryul; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Sohn, Dong-Ryul; Cho, Joo-Youn; Yu, Kyung-Sang; Shin, Sang-Goo; Paick, Jae-Seung; Jang, In-Jin

    2008-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics (PK) of udenafil, a novel phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor. METHODS A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, dose-rising, parallel-group, single- and multiple-dose study was conducted in healthy Korean subjects. The subjects were allocated to single-dose groups of 25, 50, 100, 200 or 300 mg (eight subjects in each dose group, including two placebos), or to multiple-dose groups of 100 or 200 mg (once-daily dosing for 7 days; nine subjects in each dose group, including three placebos). Serial samples of blood and urine were collected after oral administration and the drug concentrations in plasma and urine were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Safety and tolerability were evaluated by monitoring clinical laboratory parameters and adverse events. RESULTS Udenafil reached peak plasma concentrations at 0.8–1.3 h, and then declined mono-exponentially with a terminal half-life of 7.3–12.1 h in the single-dose study. The area under the time–concentration curves (AUC) and maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax) increased supraproportionally with increasing dose in the single-dose study. During multiple dosing, a steady state was reached at 5 days and little accumulation occurred after repeated dosing for 7 days. Udenafil was generally well tolerated in these healthy subjects, and no serious adverse events occurred. CONCLUSIONS Udenafil was safe and well tolerated in healthy volunteers. The AUC and Cmax of udenafil increased supraproportionally with increasing dose upon single administration, but there was no significant drug accumulation upon multiple administrations. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT The phosphodiesterase (PDE) type 5 inhibitor is a widely used agent that facilitates penile erection. Udenafil is newly developed as a PDE-5 inhibitor. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS This is the first study to determine the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of udenafil in

  2. Effect of renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of apixaban.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ming; Yu, Zhigang; Shenker, Andrew; Wang, Jessie; Pursley, Janice; Byon, Wonkyung; Boyd, Rebecca A; LaCreta, Frank; Frost, Charles E

    2016-05-01

    This open-label study evaluated apixaban pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety in subjects with mild, moderate, or severe renal impairment and in healthy subjects following a single 10-mg oral dose. The primary analysis determined the relationship between apixaban AUC∞ and 24-hour creatinine clearance (CLcr ) as a measure of renal function. The relationships between 24-hour CLcr and iohexol clearance, estimated CLcr (Cockcroft-Gault equation), and estimated glomerular filtration rate (modification of diet in renal disease [MDRD] equation) were also assessed. Secondary objectives included assessment of safety and tolerability as well as international normalized ratio (INR) and anti-factor Xa activity as pharmacodynamic endpoints. The regression analysis showed that decreasing renal function resulted in modestly increased apixaban exposure (AUC∞ increased by 44% in severe impairment with a 24-hour CLcr of 15 mL/min, compared with subjects with normal renal function), but it did not affect Cmax or the direct relationship between apixaban plasma concentration and anti-factor Xa activity or INR. The assessment of renal function measured by iohexol clearance, Cockcroft-Gault, and MDRD was consistent with that determined by 24-hour CLcr . Apixaban was well tolerated in this study. These results suggest that dose adjustment of apixaban is not required on the basis of renal function alone. PMID:26358690

  3. Safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of the histamine H3 receptor antagonist, ABT-288, in healthy young adults and elderly volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Ahmed A; Haig, George; Florian, Hana; Locke, Charles; Zhang, Jun; Dutta, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Aim The objective of this work was to characterize the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of ABT-288, a highly selective histamine H3 receptor antagonist, in healthy young adults and elderly subjects following single and multiple dosing in a phase 1 setting. Methods Single doses (0.1, 0.3, 1, 3, 10, 20 and 40 mg ABT-288) and multiple doses (0.5, 1.5, 3 and 6 mg ABT-288 once-daily for 14 days) were evaluated in young adults and multiple doses (0.5, 1.5, 3 and 5 mg ABT-288 once-daily for 12 days) were evaluated in elderly subjects using randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalating study designs. The effect of food on ABT-288 pharmacokinetics (5 mg single dose) was evaluated using an open label, randomized, crossover design. Results ABT-288 safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics were comparable in young and elderly subjects. Single doses up to 40 mg and multiple doses up to 3 mg once-daily were generally safe and well tolerated. The most frequently reported adverse events were hot flush, headache, abnormal dreams, insomnia, nausea and dizziness. ABT-288 exposure (AUC) was dose-proportional over the evaluated dose ranges. The mean elimination half-life ranged from 40 to 61 h across dose groups. Steady state was achieved by day 10 of once-daily dosing with 3.4- to 4.2-fold accumulation. Food did not have a clinically meaningful effect on ABT-288 exposure. Conclusions Based on the above results, 1 and 3 mg once-daily doses of ABT-288 were advanced to phase 2 evaluation in Alzheimer's patients. PMID:23016924

  4. Pharmacokinetics and safety study of posaconazole intravenous solution administered peripherally to healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Kersemaekers, Wendy M; van Iersel, Thijs; Nassander, Ulla; O'Mara, Edward; Waskin, Hetty; Caceres, Maria; van Iersel, Marlou L P S

    2015-02-01

    This study evaluated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of a posaconazole i.v. (intravenous) solution. This was a single-center, 2-part, randomized, rising single- and multiple-dose study in healthy adults. In part 1, subjects received 0 (vehicle), 50, 100, 200, 250, or 300 mg posaconazole in a single dose i.v. by 30-min peripheral infusion (6 cohorts of 12 subjects each [9 active and 3 placebo], making a total of 72 subjects). Blood samples were collected until 168 h postdose. In part 2, subjects were to receive 2 peripheral infusions at a 12-h interval on day 1 followed by once-daily infusion for 9 days. However, part 2 was terminated early because of high rates of infusion site reactions with multiple dosing at the same infusion site. The pharmacokinetics results for part 1 (n=45 subjects) showed that the mean posaconazole exposure (area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity [AUC0-∞]) ranged from 4,890 to 46,400 ng · h/ml (range of coefficient of variation values, 26 to 50). The dose-proportionality slope estimate (90% confidence interval) for AUC0-∞ was 1.30 (1.19 to 1.41), indicating a greater-than-dose-proportional increase. The data for safety in part 1 show that 29/72 subjects had ≥1 adverse event. Infusion site reactions were reported in 2/9 vehicle subjects, 0/18 placebo subjects, and 7/45 i.v. posaconazole subjects. The data for safety in part 2 show that infusion site reactions were reported in 1/4 (25%) placebo subjects, 3/9 (33%) vehicle control subjects, and 4/5 (80%) i.v. posaconazole (100 mg) subjects (3 posaconazole recipients subsequently developed thrombophlebitis and were discontinued from treatment). In conclusion, the posaconazole i.v. solution showed a greater-than-dose-proportional increase in exposure, primarily at doses below 200 mg. When administered peripherally at the same infusion site, multiple dosing of i.v. posaconazole led to unacceptably high rates of infusion site reactions. Intravenous

  5. Pharmacokinetics and Safety Study of Posaconazole Intravenous Solution Administered Peripherally to Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kersemaekers, Wendy M.; van Iersel, Thijs; Nassander, Ulla; O'Mara, Edward; Caceres, Maria; van Iersel, Marlou L. P. S.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of a posaconazole i.v. (intravenous) solution. This was a single-center, 2-part, randomized, rising single- and multiple-dose study in healthy adults. In part 1, subjects received 0 (vehicle), 50, 100, 200, 250, or 300 mg posaconazole in a single dose i.v. by 30-min peripheral infusion (6 cohorts of 12 subjects each [9 active and 3 placebo], making a total of 72 subjects). Blood samples were collected until 168 h postdose. In part 2, subjects were to receive 2 peripheral infusions at a 12-h interval on day 1 followed by once-daily infusion for 9 days. However, part 2 was terminated early because of high rates of infusion site reactions with multiple dosing at the same infusion site. The pharmacokinetics results for part 1 (n = 45 subjects) showed that the mean posaconazole exposure (area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity [AUC0–∞]) ranged from 4,890 to 46,400 ng · h/ml (range of coefficient of variation values, 26 to 50). The dose-proportionality slope estimate (90% confidence interval) for AUC0–∞ was 1.30 (1.19 to 1.41), indicating a greater-than-dose-proportional increase. The data for safety in part 1 show that 29/72 subjects had ≥1 adverse event. Infusion site reactions were reported in 2/9 vehicle subjects, 0/18 placebo subjects, and 7/45 i.v. posaconazole subjects. The data for safety in part 2 show that infusion site reactions were reported in 1/4 (25%) placebo subjects, 3/9 (33%) vehicle control subjects, and 4/5 (80%) i.v. posaconazole (100 mg) subjects (3 posaconazole recipients subsequently developed thrombophlebitis and were discontinued from treatment). In conclusion, the posaconazole i.v. solution showed a greater-than-dose-proportional increase in exposure, primarily at doses below 200 mg. When administered peripherally at the same infusion site, multiple dosing of i.v. posaconazole led to unacceptably high rates of infusion site reactions

  6. The pharmacokinetics of glycyrrhizic acid evaluated by physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Ploeger, B; Mensinga, T; Sips, A; Seinen, W; Meulenbelt, J; DeJongh, J

    2001-05-01

    Glycyrrhizic acid is widely applied as a sweetener in food products and chewing tobacco. In addition, it is of clinical interest for possible treatment of chronic hepatitis C. In some highly exposed subjects, side effects such as hypertension and symptoms associated with electrolyte disturbances have been reported. To analyze the relationship between the pharmacokinetics of glycyrrhizic acid in its toxicity, the kinetics of glycyrrhizic acid and its biologically active metabolite glycyrrhetic acid were evaluated. Glycyrrhizic acid is mainly absorbed after presystemic hydrolysis as glycyrrhetic acid. Because glycyrrhetic acid is a 200-1000 times more potent inhibitor of 11-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase compared to glycyrrhizic acid, the kinetics of glycyrrhetic acid are relevant in a toxicological perspective. Once absorbed, glycyrrhetic acid is transported, mainly taken up into the liver by capacity-limited carriers, where it is metabolized into glucuronide and sulfate conjugates. These conjugates are transported efficiently into the bile. After outflow of the bile into the duodenum, the conjugates are hydrolyzed to glycyrrhetic acid by commensal bacteria; glycyrrhetic acid is subsequently reabsorbed, causing a pronounced delay in the terminal plasma clearance. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling indicated that, in humans, the transit rate of gastrointestinal contents through the small and large intestines predominantly determines to what extent glycyrrhetic acid conjugates will be reabsorbed. This parameter, which can be estimated noninvasively, may serve as a useful risk estimator for glycyrrhizic-acid-induced adverse effects, because in subjects with prolonged gastrointestinal transit times, glycyrrhetic acid might accumulate after repeated intake. PMID:11495500

  7. Challenges of safety evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wiesner, Jacqueline

    2014-12-01

    Each application for authorisation of a medicinal product must be accompanied by the particulars and documents referred to in Directive 2001/83/EC on the Community code relating to medicinal products for human use. Details on the documentation needed for traditional herbal medicinal products (THMP) are given in article 16c of the above mentioned Directive. It is pointed out that a bibliographic review of safety data together with an expert report and additional data, if necessary, are required. The Committee on Herbal Medicinal Products (HMPC) provides in its "Guideline on the use of the CTD format in the preparation of a registration application for traditional herbal medicinal products" (EMA/HMPC/71049/2007 Rev. 1) guidance on how to present the information and the dossier needed for an application. There, in agreement with the Directive 2001/83/EC, a bibliographical review of safety data is required within the "Non-clinical Overview". However, it is assumable that for such products, with a long tradition of usage bibliographical information relating to non-clinical safety are available, even if incomplete or not in accordance with today׳s state of the art. In the "Guideline on non-clinical documentation for herbal medicinal products in applications for marketing authorisation (bibliographical and mixed applications) and in applications for simplified registration" (EMEA/HMPC/32116/2005) it is reflected how to deal with such an incomplete set of data for traditional herbal medicinal products and crucial information are highlighted. This article will focus on the explanation of the requirements needed for the non-clinical safety evaluation of THMPs and some detailed explanations of the performance and interpretation of the mutagenicity studies. PMID:25150528

  8. Safety and pharmacokinetics of oral delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in healthy older subjects: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Amir I A; van den Elsen, Geke A H; Colbers, Angela; van der Marck, Marjolein A; Burger, David M; Feuth, Ton B; Rikkert, Marcel G M Olde; Kramers, Cornelis

    2014-09-01

    There is a great concern about the safety of THC-based drugs in older people (≥65 years), as most of THC-trials did not include such group. In this phase 1, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial, we evaluated the safety and pharmacokinetics of three oral doses of Namisol(®), a novel THC in tablet form, in older subjects. Twelve healthy older subjects (6 male; mean age 72±5 years) randomly received a single oral dose of 3mg, 5mg, or 6.5mg of THC or matching placebo, in a crossover manner, on each intervention day. The data for 11 subjects were included in the analysis. The data of 1 subject were excluded due to non-compliance to study medication. THC was safe and well tolerated. The most frequently reported adverse events (AEs) were drowsiness (27%) and dry mouth (11%). Subjects reported more AEs with THC 6.5mg than with 3mg (p=0.048), 5mg (p=0.034) and placebo (p=0.013). There was a wide inter-individual variability in plasma concentrations of THC. Subjects for whom the Cmax fell within the sampling period (over 2h), Cmax was 1.42-4.57ng/mL and Tmax was 67-92min. The AUC0-2h (n=11) was 1.67-3.51ng/mL. Overall, the pharmacodynamic effects of THC were smaller than effects previously reported in young adults. In conclusion, THC appeared to be safe and well tolerated by healthy older individuals. Data on safety and effectiveness of THC in frail older persons are urgently required, as this population could benefit from the therapeutic applications of THC. PMID:25035121

  9. Pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of triflusal and its main active metabolite HTB in healthy Chinese subjects.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Zhang, Q; Huang, M; Zong, S; Hua, W; Zhou, W

    2014-05-01

    Triflusal presents comparable antiplatelet activity to aspirin while presenting a more favourable safety profile, and is used in the treatment of thrombosis. The study aimed to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and safety of triflusal and its major metabolite 2-(hydroxyl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)- benzoic acid (HTB) in healthy Chinese subjects.30 healthy subjects were recruited in this randomized, single-center, and open-label, parallel, single ascending doses (300, 600, 900 mg) and multiple doses (600 mg, once daily for 7 days) study. Plasma samples were analyzed with a validated liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method. Safety was assessed by adverse events, ECG, laboratory testing, and vital signs.Triflusal was safe and well tolerated. After single-dose administration, triflusal was rapidly absorbed with a mean Tmax of 0.55-0.92 h and a mean t1/2 kel of 0.35-0.65 h, HTB was absorbed with a mean Tmax of 2.35-3.03 h and a mean t1/2 kel of 52.5-65.57 h. Cmax and AUC for triflusal and HTB were approximately dose proportional over the 300-900 mg dose range. In the steady state, the accumulation index (R) indicated that the exposure of triflusal increased slightly with repeated dosing, and the exposure of HTB increased obviously. 3 adverse events certainly related to the investigational drugs occurred in the multiple-dose phase.Following oral dosing under fasting condition, triflusal is promptly absorbed and rapidly depleted from the systemic circulation. HTB is quickly generated from triflusal and slowly eliminated. Triflusal accumulates slightly in the body. HTB plasma concentration builds up progressively toward steady-state. PMID:24105106

  10. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamic effects of naloxegol at peripheral and central nervous system receptors in healthy male subjects: A single ascending-dose study.

    PubMed

    Eldon, Michael A; Kugler, Alan R; Medve, Robert A; Bui, Khanh; Butler, Kathleen; Sostek, Mark

    2015-11-01

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, ascending-dose, crossover study evaluated single oral doses of naloxegol (NKTR-118; 8, 15, 30, 60, 125, 250, 500, and 1000 mg), a PEGylated derivative of naloxone, for safety and tolerability, antagonism of peripheral and central nervous system (CNS) effects of intravenous morphine, and pharmacokinetics. Healthy men were randomized 1:1 to naloxegol or naloxegol-matching placebo administered with morphine and lactulose in a 2-period crossover design. Periods were separated by a 5- to 7-day washout. Assessments included safety, tolerability, orocecal transit time (OCTT), pupillary miosis, and pharmacokinetics. The study was completed by 46 subjects. The most common adverse events were somnolence, dizziness, headache, and nausea. Greater reversal of morphine-induced delay in OCTT occurred with increasing naloxegol dose, demonstrating dose-ordered antagonism of morphine's peripheral gastrointestinal effects. Forty-four subjects showed no reversal of pupillary miosis; 2 showed potential partial reversal at 250 and 1000 mg, indicating negligible antagonism of morphine's CNS effects at doses ≤ 125 mg. Rapid absorption, linear pharmacokinetics up to 1000 mg, and low to moderate between-subject pharmacokinetic variability was observed. The pharmacokinetics of morphine or its glucuronide metabolites were unaltered by concurrent naloxegol administration. Naloxegol was generally safe and well tolerated at single doses up to 1000 mg. PMID:27137715

  11. Rapid pharmacokinetic evaluation of topical drug formulations.

    PubMed

    Garzouzi, V L

    1999-01-01

    A new in vitro test system was developed to efficiently determine the effect of formulation on topical drug delivery. Sheets of viable, excised pig skin were sandwiched betwween two standard 24-well plates. The lower wells contained receptor fluid and a magnetic stirrer. The upper wells were opened to the atmosphere for formulation application. Using 14C-salicylic acid as a model compound, eight different formulations were evaluated representing hydrophilic and lipophilic solutions, a suspension and o/w and w/o emulsions. Formulations were applied to the skin surface in six different wells on three sets of plates. Twenty-four hours after application, excess drug was wiped from the skin surface and assayed for radiolabel. The stratum corneum was removed by tape stripping. Radiolabel contained in the remaining epidermis, dermis and receptor fluid was also determined. Statistical analysis (ANOVA, Student-Newman-Keuls multiple-range test, p=0.05) of radiolabel penetrating into the dermis and receptor fluid revealed the following order of formulations: ethanol= aqueous surfactant less than o/w emulsion = w/o emulsion less than lipophilic solution. These results demonstrate the importance of vehicle in directing drug delivery using a test system capable of simultaneously evaluating a large number of formulations. PMID:23985716

  12. Pharmacokinetics, Safety, and Tolerability of Metformin in Healthy Elderly Subjects.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kyungho; Chung, Hyewon; Yoon, Jang-Soo; Moon, Seol-Joo; Yoon, Seo Hyun; Yu, Kyung-Sang; Kim, Kwangil; Chung, Jae-Yong

    2016-09-01

    Age-related physiological changes are known to alter the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of drugs. Metformin is commonly used as first-line medication for management of diabetes in elderly patients. However, the PK and PD of metformin have not been sufficiently studied in elderly subjects. Here, 12 elderly subjects, aged 65 to 85 years, and 20 younger healthy volunteers were orally administered 750 mg of metformin 2 hours after dinner, followed by administration of a second dose (500 mg) 12 hours later. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed 2 hours after the second dose, with 75 g of glucose administered. Blood samples were collected at specific time points after the second metformin dose for the assessment of PK and the glucose-lowering effect of metformin. Elderly subjects exhibited 1.7 and 2.0 times higher average Cmax and AUC∞ than the younger subjects, respectively (P = .007 and .001, respectively), and t1/2 was comparable between the elderly and younger subjects. However, relative glucose level changes from baseline after metformin administration tended to be lower in elderly subjects. Systemic exposure to metformin was elevated by 50% or more in elderly subjects, whereas the glucose-lowering effect was similar compared to younger subjects after 2 doses of metformin. PMID:26710683

  13. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Lisinopril in Pediatric Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Trachtman, Howard; Frymoyer, Adam; Lewandowski, Andrew; Greenbaum, Larry A.; Feig, Daniel I.; Gipson, Debbie S.; Warady, Bradley A.; Goebel, Jens W.; Schwartz, George J.; Lewis, Kenneth; Anand, Ravinder; Patel, Uptal D.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension in pediatric kidney transplant recipients contributes to long-term graft loss, yet treatment options—including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors—are poorly characterized in this vulnerable population. We conducted a multicenter, open-label pharmacokinetic (PK) study of daily oral lisinopril in 22 children (ages 7–17 years) with stable kidney transplant function. Standard non-compartmental PK analyses were performed at steady state. Effects on blood pressure were examined in lisinopril-naïve patients (n=13). Oral clearance declined in proportion to underlying kidney function; however, in patients with low estimated glomerular filtration rate (30–59 ml/min per 1.73m2), exposure (standardized to 0.1 mg/kg/day dose) was within the range reported previously in children without a kidney transplant. In lisinopril-naïve patients, 85% and 77% had a ≥6 mmHg reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively. Lisinopril was well tolerated. Our study provides initial insight on lisinopril use in children with a kidney transplant, including starting dose considerations. PMID:25807932

  14. Comparison of Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Voriconazole Intravenous-to-Oral Switch in Immunocompromised Children and Healthy Adults ▿

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Timothy A.; Yu, Lolie C.; Frangoul, Haydar; Krance, Robert A.; Nemecek, Eneida; Blumer, Jeffrey; Arrieta, Antonio; Graham, Michael L.; Bradfield, Scott M.; Baruch, Alice; Liu, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Voriconazole pharmacokinetics are not well characterized in children despite prior studies. To assess the appropriate pediatric dosing, a study was conducted in 40 immunocompromised children aged 2 to <12 years to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and safety of voriconazole following intravenous (IV)-to-oral (PO) switch regimens based on a previous population pharmacokinetic modeling: 7 mg/kg IV every 12 h (q12h) and 200 mg PO q12h. Area under the curve over the 12-h dosing interval (AUC0–12) was calculated using the noncompartmental method and compared to that for adults receiving approved dosing regimens (6→4 mg/kg IV q12h, 200 mg PO q12h). On average, the AUC0–12 in children receiving 7 mg/kg IV q12h on day 1 and at IV steady state were 7.85 and 21.4 μg·h/ml, respectively, and approximately 44% and 40% lower, respectively, than those for adults at 6→4 mg/kg IV q12h. Large intersubject variability was observed. At steady state during oral treatment (200 mg q12h), children had higher average exposure than adults, with much larger intersubject variability. The exposure achieved with oral dosing in children tended to decrease as weight and age increased. The most common treatment-related adverse events were transient elevated liver function tests. No clear threshold of voriconazole exposure was identified that would predict the occurrence of treatment-related hepatic events. Overall, voriconazole IV doses higher than 7 mg/kg are needed in children to closely match adult exposures, and a weight-based oral dose may be more appropriate for children than a fixed dose. Safety of voriconazole in children was consistent with the known safety profile of voriconazole. PMID:21968355

  15. Safety and pharmacokinetics of multiple doses of aclidinium bromide administered twice daily in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Lasseter, K; Dilzer, S; Jansat, J M; Garcia Gil, E; Caracta, C F; Ortiz, S

    2012-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by progressive airway obstruction and increased cholinergic tone. The global initiative for chronic obstructive lung disease (GOLD) guidelines recommend long-acting anticholinergics for COPD maintenance treatment. Aclidinium bromide is a novel, long-acting muscarinic antagonist developed for the treatment of COPD. A phase I, randomized, single-blind, multiple-dose clinical trial was conducted to assess the safety and pharmacokinetics (PK) of multiple doses of twice-daily (BID) aclidinium in healthy subjects. Thirty healthy male and female subjects received aclidinium 200 μg, 400 μg, 800 μg, or placebo twice daily for 7 days. Subjects were randomized to 1 of 3 cohorts and 10 subjects in each cohort were randomized (8:2) to either aclidinium or placebo groups. Safety was assessed via adverse events (AEs), laboratory evaluations, vital signs, and ECGs. Plasma samples were obtained at multiple time points throughout the study and analyzed for aclidinium and its inactive acid and alcohol metabolites using a fully validated method of liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 9 treatment-emergent AEs were reported (1, placebo; 3, aclidinium 400 μg; 5, aclidinium 800 μg), all of which were mild in severity. No serious AEs were reported. There were no clinically meaningful changes in laboratory parameters or vital signs. PK parameters on Day 7 following BID dosing of aclidinium showed that steady state was achieved for aclidinium and its metabolites. On Days 1 and 7, maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax) of aclidinium were generally observed at the first PK time point (5 min postdose) and rapidly declined, with plasma concentrations generally less than 10% of Cmax by 6 h postdose in all aclidinium groups. Mean effective t(½) after the evening dose on Day 7 ranged from 4.6 to 7.0 h for aclidinium 400 μg and 800 μg, similar to the terminal t(½) observed on Day 1 (4.5-5.9 h

  16. No clinically relevant pharmacokinetic and safety interactions of ambrisentan in combination with tadalafil in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Spence, Rebecca; Mandagere, Arun; Harrison, Brooke; Dufton, Christopher; Boinpally, Ramesh

    2009-12-01

    Ambrisentan is a nonsulfonamide, ET(A)-selective endothelin receptor antagonist (ERA) approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), and tadalafil is a phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitor under investigation for treatment of PAH. Due to the potential combination use, the pharmacokinetic (PK) interactions between these two drugs were assessed in a crossover study in 26 healthy adults. Single-dose PK of ambrisentan (10 mg) and its metabolite, 4-hydroxymethyl ambrisentan, were determined in the absence and presence of multiple doses of tadalafil (40 mg QD). Similarly, single-dose PK of tadalafil (40 mg) were evaluated in the absence and presence of multiple doses of ambrisentan (10 mg QD). In the presence of tadalafil, ambrisentan maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) was similar (105.0% [90% CI: 95.9-115.0%]) and systemic exposure (AUC(0-infinity)) was slightly decreased (87.5% [84.0-91.2%]), compared with ambrisentan alone. Similar changes were observed with 4-hydroxymethyl ambrisentan. Tadalafil C(max) (100.6% [94.4-107.1%]) and AUC(0-infinity) (100.2% [92.6-108.4%]) showed no difference in the absence and presence of ambrisentan. The safety profile of the drugs combined was similar to that of either drug alone. No dose adjustments should be necessary when these drugs are coadministered. These results are in contrast to previous reports that the sulfonamide-based ERA bosentan can cause marked decreases in the exposure of tadalafil. PMID:19455620

  17. The pharmacokinetics and safety of idelalisib in subjects with moderate or severe hepatic impairment.

    PubMed

    Jin, Feng; Robeson, Michelle; Zhou, Huafeng; Hisoire, Grace; Ramanathan, Srini

    2015-08-01

    Idelalisib, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase delta (PI3Kδ) inhibitor, is metabolized primarily by aldehyde oxidase to form GS-563117, an inactive metabolite, and is metabolized to a lesser extent by cytochrome P450 3A and uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase 1A4. In a mass balance study, the orally administered idelalisib dose was recovered mainly in feces (∼78%). This study evaluated the pharmacokinetics and safety of a single 150-mg dose of idelalisib in subjects with moderate or severe hepatic impairment and in age-, sex-, and weight-matched, healthy controls. The idelalisib maximum observed plasma concentration was generally comparable in subjects with moderate or severe hepatic impairment versus healthy controls, whereas the mean area under the curve was higher (58% to 59%). GS-563117 exposures were lower in impaired versus healthy control subjects, likely because of lower formation in the setting of liver impairment. Exploratory analyses indicated no relevant relationships between idelalisib or GS-563117 plasma exposures and Child-Pugh-Turcotte scores. Single oral doses of idelalisib 150 mg were well tolerated, with most treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) and laboratory abnormalities being grades 1 or 2 in severity. As such, no dose adjustment was required when initiating idelalisib treatment in patients with mild or moderate hepatic impairment, although close monitoring for potential AEs is recommended. PMID:25821156

  18. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of belimumab in Japanese patients with mild-to-moderate systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Masanori; Akita, Mikio; Nakagawa, Tomofumi; Takahashi, Naoki; Endo, Akira; Yoshida, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Belimumab, an anti-B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) human monoclonal antibody, was approved in the United States, Canada and European Union for the treatment of the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, belimumab had not been evaluated in Japanese patients. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the safety and tolerability of belimumab in Japanese patients with SLE, as well as to investigate the pharmacokinetics (PK) and biological activity of belimumab in this population. Methods A total of 12 Japanese patients were enrolled in a randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ascending design study. A dosing regimen of a single intravenous infusion over 1 hour of belimumab (1 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg) was employed. Patients were followed for 84 days after dosing to assess adverse events, pharmacokinetics, biomarkers and SLE disease activity. Clinical trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov identifier is NCT01381536. Results Belimumab (1 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg) demonstrated a favorable clinical safety and tolerability profile in Japanese patients with SLE. The incidence of adverse events was similar among the two belimumab groups and placebo group. The PK profile of single-dose belimumab was approximately dose proportional, and the long terminal elimination half-life (12.4–15.7 days), low clearance (3.55–4.65 mL/day/kg), and small volume of distribution (76.2–80.1 mL/kg) were consistent with a fully humanized antibody. Effects of belimumab on B cells suggested biological activity effects expected as an inhibitor of BLyS. Limitation The small sample size and single dose design of this study prevent definitive conclusions regarding the safety, pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics of belimumab in a Japanese population being made. Conclusions The preliminary safety, PK profile, and observed biological activity of belimumab support further evaluation of its safety and efficacy in Japanese patient with SLE.

  19. Safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of oral and intravenous administration of GSK1322322, a peptide deformylase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Naderer, Odin J; Jones, Lori S; Zhu, John; Kurtinecz, Milena; Dumont, Etienne

    2013-11-01

    GSK1322322 is the first in a new class of antibiotics that targets peptide deformylase (PDF), an essential bacterial enzyme required for protein maturation. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, eight-cohort phase I trial enrolled 62 healthy volunteers to assess safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic profiles of GSK1322322. GSK1322322 was administered as a single oral or intravenous (IV) dose, escalating from 500 to 3,000 mg or repeat IV doses escalating from 500 to 1,500 mg twice daily. Upon repeat IV administration, GSK1322322 exhibits linear pharmacokinetics over time upon repeat doses as shown by time-invariant pharmacokinetics. A dose-proportional increase in area under concentration-time curve was observed after single or repeat IV dosing, whereas clearance at steady state remained generally unchanged across doses. There was minimal accumulation of GSK1322322 after repeat IV twice-daily administration. After oral tablet doses of GSK1322322 1,000 and 1,500 mg, absolute bioavailability was 69% and 56%, respectively. GSK1322322 administration at single and repeat IV doses and at supratherapeutic single IV doses of 2,000 and 3,000 mg was associated with mild-to-moderate drug-related adverse events. On the basis of the pharmacokinetics and tolerability demonstrated in this study, GSK1322322 has the potential to become the first-in-class PDF inhibitor for clinical use. PMID:23907665

  20. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of exenatide once weekly in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Kazuya; Nasu, Risa; Yamamura, Ayuko; Kothare, Prajakti A; Mace, Kenneth; Wolka, Anne M; Linnebjerg, Helle

    2009-01-01

    This randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel study assessed the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of exenatide once weekly (QW) in 30 Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) suboptimally controlled by diet and exercise alone or combined with biguanide, sulfonylurea, thiazolidinedione, or combinations of these agents (58.6% male; 58+/-9 years; body mass index 26.3+/-2.9 kg/m(2); hemoglobin A(1c) [HbA(1c)] 7.4+/-0.8%; fasting plasma glucose [FPG] 156.1+/-29.1 mg/dL; duration of T2D 6+/-5 years; means +/- SD). Patients were randomized in a 1:1:1 ratio to subcutaneous placebo QW, exenatide QW 0.8 mg, or exenatide QW 2.0 mg for 10 weeks. All evaluable patients were analyzed (placebo QW, n=10; exenatide QW 0.8 mg, n=10; exenatide QW 2.0 mg, n=9), unless otherwise stated. Steady-state plasma exenatide concentrations were observed by Week 8 of the study. For the evaluable pharmacokinetic population, geometric mean (90% confidence interval) steady-state plasma concentrations (pg/mL) were 81.2 (68.3-96.4) and 344.5 (256.5-462.7) with exenatide QW 0.8 mg (n=8) and exenatide QW 2.0 mg (n=5), respectively. Baseline-to-Week 10 glycemic improvements with placebo QW, exenatide QW 0.8 mg, and exenatide QW 2.0 mg, respectively, were: HbA(1c) (%): -0.4+/-0.3, -1.0+/-0.7, and -1.5+/-0.7; FPG (mg/dL): -20.5+/-20.4, -25.2+/-10.9, and -50.8+/-27.8; and 2-hour postprandial plasma glucose excursions (mg/dL): -8.8+/-26.9, -50.0+/-41.1, and -59.7+/-26.8 (means +/- SD). No serious adverse events (AEs) were reported and no AEs led to study discontinuation in any group. The most frequent AE observed was mild-to-moderate injection site induration. No serious hypoglycemia was reported. Exenatide QW for 10 weeks was well tolerated and improved short-term glycemic control in Japanese patients with suboptimally controlled T2D. PMID:19706990

  1. Pharmacokinetics, Safety, and Biologic Effects of Azithromycin in Extremely Preterm Infants at Risk for Ureaplasma Colonization and Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Hazem E.; Othman, Ahmed A.; Eddington, Natalie D.; Duffy, Lynn; Xiao, Li; Waites, Ken B.; Kaufman, David A.; Fairchild, Karen D.; Terrin, Michael L.; Viscardi, Rose M.

    2014-01-01

    Ureaplasma spp. respiratory tract colonization is a significant risk factor for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a chronic lung disorder in preterm infants. As an initial step preparatory to future clinical trials to evaluate the clinical efficacy of azithromycin to prevent BPD, we characterized the pharmacokinetics, safety, and biological effects of a single intravenous dose of azithromycin (10 mg/kg) in preterm neonates (n=12) 24–28 weeks gestation at risk for Ureaplasma infection and BPD. A two-compartment structural model with the clearance and volume of peripheral compartment (V2) allometrically scaled on body weight (WT) best described the pharmacokinetics of azithromycin in preterm neonates. The estimated parameters were: clearance [0.18 L/h × WT(Kg)0.75], intercompartmental clearance [1.0 L/h], volume of distribution of central compartment [0.93 L] and V2 [14.2 L × WT(Kg)]. There were no serious adverse events attributed to azithromycin. A single dose of azithromycin did not suppress inflammatory cytokines or myeloperoxidase activity in tracheal aspirates. Our results demonstrated the safety of azithromycin and developed a PK model that is useful for future simulation-based clinical trials for eradicating Ureaplasma and preventing BPD in preterm neonates. PMID:21098694

  2. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of compound SFDAC by intranasal administration of multiple escalating dose in healthy male subjects.

    PubMed

    Thennati, Rajamannar; Khanna, Aman; Khanna, Mallika; Sonaiya, Tushar; Mehta, Tejas; Mehta, Kalpana; Shahi, Pradeep; Patel, Jigneshkumar

    2014-11-01

    A novel corticosteroid compound (short form of IUPAC name: SFDAC) has been discovered by Sun Pharma Advanced Research Company (SPARC) Ltd. A randomized, observer-blind, active-controlled, parallel-groups, intranasal multiple escalating dose study was conducted in healthy male subjects to assess safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of compound SFDAC formulated as an aqueous suspension for intranasal administration. Intranasal sprays of SFDAC, active control fluticasone propionate (FP) and placebo were administered once in a day for 14 days as per randomization. Various clinical evaluations including 24-hour serum cortisol and urinary free cortisol (UFC) profiles were carried out. Blood samples were collected at pre-defined time-points and analyzed using a validated chromatographic method for estimation of SFDAC and its metabolite. The results of the study indicate that multiple dose of SFDAC intranasal spray upto 3,200 µg is safe and tolerated. Clinically significant suppression of hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis was not observed. The plasma concentration of SFDAC was found to be below the lower limit of quantification (LLQ) at most time-points for all subjects. SFDAC M1 metabolite was detected only at picogram level in plasma. The safety and pharmacokinetic characteristics of SFDAC observed in this study support further clinical development of the SFDAC nasal spray. PMID:27129118

  3. Safety and pharmacokinetics of the CIME combination of drugs and their metabolites after a single oral dosing in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Lenuzza, Natacha; Duval, Xavier; Nicolas, Grégory; Thévenot, Etienne; Job, Sylvie; Videau, Orianne; Narjoz, Céline; Loriot, Marie-Anne; Beaune, Philippe; Becquemont, Laurent; Mentré, France; Funck-Brentano, Christian; Alavoine, Loubna; Arnaud, Philippe; Delaforge, Marcel; Bénech, Henri

    2016-04-01

    This phase I, pilot clinical study was designed to evaluate the safety and the pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles of the CIME (Metabolic Identity Card) combination of ten drugs, with a view to its use as a phenotyping cocktail. Ten healthy Caucasian subjects were orally dosed with the CIME combination (caffeine-CYP1A2, repaglinide-CYP2C8, tolbutamide-CYP2C9, omeprazole-CYP2C19, dextromethorphan-CYP2D6, midazolam-CYP3A, acetaminophen-UGT1A1, 6&9 and 2B15, digoxin-P-gp, rosuvastatin-OATP1B1&3 and memantine-active renal transport). Blood was collected over 3 days and on day 7. CIME probes and relevant metabolites were assayed by LC-MS/MS and PK parameters were calculated. Main results were: (1) good safety with reversible mild or moderate adverse effects, (2) an analytical method able to quantify simultaneously the 10 probes and the major metabolites, (3) calculation of PK parameters for all probes in general agreed with published values, and (4) identification of the low CYP2D6 metabolizer. This pilot study showed that the CIME combination was well tolerated and that its pharmacokinetics could be accurately measured in healthy volunteers. This combination can now confidently be checked for sensitivity and specificity and for lack of interaction to be validated as a phenotyping cocktail. PMID:25465228

  4. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of XOMA 3AB, a Novel Mixture of Three Monoclonal Antibodies against Botulinum Toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, S. U.; Griffiss, J. M.; McKenzie, R.; Fuchs, E. J.; Jurao, R. A.; An, A. T.; Ahene, A.; Tomic, M.; Hendrix, C. W.

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A is a category A bioterrorism agent. Current antitoxin therapies are scarce and produce adverse reactions. XOMA 3AB consists of 3 IgG1 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), each with a distinct human or humanized variable region, which bind to distinct epitopes on botulinum neurotoxin serotype A. This first-in-human study evaluated the safety and pharmacokinetics (PK) of escalating doses of XOMA 3AB administered intravenously (i.v.) to healthy adults. In this double-blind placebo-controlled dose escalation study, 3 cohorts of 8 healthy subjects received a single intravenous dose of XOMA 3AB or placebo at a 3:1 ratio. Follow-up examinations included physical examinations, hematology and chemistry blood tests, electrocardiograms, and pharmacokinetics. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using noncompartmental methods. There were no infusion discontinuations or hypersensitivity reactions. Two or more subjects experienced headache, hyperglycemia, or anemia; none was dose related. All adverse events (AEs) were mild to moderate except for an episode of exercise-induced elevation of a subject's creatine phosphokinase (CPK) level, unrelated to XOMA 3AB. Concentration-time plots demonstrated a peak in MAb concentrations 1 to 2 h after completion of the infusion, after which the levels declined in a biexponential decay pattern for all analytes. For each MAb, the maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax) and the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to infinity (AUCinf) increased as the dose increased. Clearance of the humanized mouse MAb was more rapid than that of the two fully human MAbs, particularly at the lowest dose. None of the MAbs was immunogenic. At the doses administered, XOMA 3AB was well tolerated. These safety findings support further investigation of XOMA 3AB as a potential agent for botulism treatment and postexposure prophylaxis. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01357213.) PMID

  5. Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics of Single Rising TAK-438 (Vonoprazan) Doses in Healthy Male Japanese/non-Japanese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Yuuichi; Nishimura, Akira; Kennedy, Gale; Hibberd, Mark; Jenkins, Richard; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Yoneyama, Tomoki; Jenkins, Helen; Ashida, Kiyoshi; Irie, Shin; Täubel, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of TAK-438 (vonoprazan, a potassium-competitive acid blocker) in healthy male subjects. METHODS: In two phase I, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single rising-dose studies, healthy male subjects (Japan N=84; UK N=63) received a single TAK-438 dose (1–120 mg in Japan and 1–40 mg in the UK). Assessments included safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics (intragastric pH). RESULTS: Plasma concentration–time profiles of TAK-438 at all dose levels showed rapid absorption (median Tmax up to 2 h). Estimated mean elimination half-life was up to 9 h. Exposure was slightly greater than dose proportional. No clear difference in TAK-438 pharmacokinetics was observed between Japanese and non-Japanese subjects. Acid suppression was dose dependent and similar in both studies. The 24-h intragastric pH ≥4 holding time ratio with 40 mg TAK-438 was 92% in Japan and 87% in the UK. TAK-438 was well tolerated, with no adverse events reported in Japanese subjects; 10 of 63 UK subjects experienced 12 treatment-emergent adverse events (non-serious). Increases in serum gastrin and pepsinogen I and II concentrations were observed at doses ≥10 mg, but there were no changes in alanine aminotransferase concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: Single oral doses of TAK-438 20–120 mg caused rapid, profound, and 24-h suppression of gastric acid secretion in healthy male subjects, regardless of geographical region, and TAK-438 was well tolerated at all doses studied, making it a potential alternative to proton pump inhibitors for the treatment of acid-related disorders. PMID:26111126

  6. Safety and pharmacokinetics of XOMA 3AB, a novel mixture of three monoclonal antibodies against botulinum toxin A.

    PubMed

    Nayak, S U; Griffiss, J M; McKenzie, R; Fuchs, E J; Jurao, R A; An, A T; Ahene, A; Tomic, M; Hendrix, C W; Zenilman, J M

    2014-09-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A is a category A bioterrorism agent. Current antitoxin therapies are scarce and produce adverse reactions. XOMA 3AB consists of 3 IgG1 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), each with a distinct human or humanized variable region, which bind to distinct epitopes on botulinum neurotoxin serotype A. This first-in-human study evaluated the safety and pharmacokinetics (PK) of escalating doses of XOMA 3AB administered intravenously (i.v.) to healthy adults. In this double-blind placebo-controlled dose escalation study, 3 cohorts of 8 healthy subjects received a single intravenous dose of XOMA 3AB or placebo at a 3:1 ratio. Follow-up examinations included physical examinations, hematology and chemistry blood tests, electrocardiograms, and pharmacokinetics. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using noncompartmental methods. There were no infusion discontinuations or hypersensitivity reactions. Two or more subjects experienced headache, hyperglycemia, or anemia; none was dose related. All adverse events (AEs) were mild to moderate except for an episode of exercise-induced elevation of a subject's creatine phosphokinase (CPK) level, unrelated to XOMA 3AB. Concentration-time plots demonstrated a peak in MAb concentrations 1 to 2 h after completion of the infusion, after which the levels declined in a biexponential decay pattern for all analytes. For each MAb, the maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax) and the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to infinity (AUCinf) increased as the dose increased. Clearance of the humanized mouse MAb was more rapid than that of the two fully human MAbs, particularly at the lowest dose. None of the MAbs was immunogenic. At the doses administered, XOMA 3AB was well tolerated. These safety findings support further investigation of XOMA 3AB as a potential agent for botulism treatment and postexposure prophylaxis. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01357213.). PMID

  7. Pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of miglustat in the treatment of pediatric patients with GM2 gangliosidosis.

    PubMed

    Maegawa, Gustavo H B; van Giersbergen, Paul L M; Yang, Sandra; Banwell, Brenda; Morgan, Christopher P; Dingemanse, Jasper; Tifft, Cynthia J; Clarke, Joe T R

    2009-08-01

    GM2 gangliosidosis (GM2g) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by deficiency of lysosomal beta-hexosaminidase A, resulting in accumulation of GM2 ganglioside, principally in the brain. Substrate reduction therapy is currently under investigation as a treatment. The study investigated the pharmacokinetics and safety of miglustat given as single and multiple doses in infantile and juvenile GM2g patients for 6- and 24-months, respectively. Eleven patients with infantile (n = 6) and juvenile (n = 5) GM2g received oral miglustat at 30-200 mg t.i.d. adjusted to the body surface area. Patients underwent pharmacokinetic assessments on day 1 and at month 3. The pharmacokinetics of miglustat were described by a 2-compartmental model with a lag time, median time to maximum concentration of 2.5 h, and terminal half-life of about 10 h. The pharmacokinetics were time-independent, and did not differ between infantile and juvenile cohorts. The accumulation index was 1.7. Among infantile GM2g patients, the major drug-related adverse events (DRAEs) were abdominal discomfort and flatulence. In the juvenile group, however, the major DRAEs observed were diarrhea and weight loss. One juvenile patient developed peripheral neuropathy, and others showed progression of already established neuropathy, which was judged to be part of the natural progression of the disease. Some mild laboratory abnormalities observed were either transient or attributable to concomitant medications. Miglustat showed similar pharmacokinetic parameters in all patients, with no specific difference between infantile and juvenile forms. Miglustat was shown to be a safe drug, with mild to moderate diarrhea, as an age-dependent DRAE, which was controlled by dietary modification. PMID:19447653

  8. Evaluating a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for predicting the pharmacokinetics of midazolam in Chinese after oral administration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-yun; Chen, Xia; Jiang, Ji; Shi, Jun; Hu, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the SimCYP simulator ethnicity-specific population model for predicting the pharmacokinetics of midazolam, a typical CYP3A4/5 substrate, in Chinese after oral administration. Methods: The physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for midazolam was developed using a SimCYP population-based simulator incorporating Chinese population demographic, physiological and enzyme data. A clinical trial was conducted in 40 Chinese subjects (the half was females) receiving a single oral dose of 15 mg midazolam. The subjects were separated into 4 groups based on age (20–50, 51–65, 66–75, and above 76 years), and the pharmacokinetics profiles of each age- and gender-group were determined, and the results were used to verify the PBPK model. Results: Following oral administration, the simulated profiles of midazolam plasma concentrations over time in virtual Chinese were in good agreement with the observed profiles, as were AUC and Cmax. Moreover, for subjects of varying ages (20–80 years), the ratios of predicted to observed clearances were between 0.86 and 1.12. Conclusion: The SimCYP PBPK model accurately predicted the pharmacokinetics of midazolam in Chinese from youth to old age. This study may provide novel insight into the prediction of CYP3A4/5-mediated pharmacokinetics in the Chinese population relative to Caucasians and other ethnic groups, which can support the rational design of bridging clinical trials. PMID:26592516

  9. Efficacy, Safety, and Pharmacokinetics of Intravenous Peramivir in Children with 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Influenza A Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kohno, Shigeru; Ishibashi, Toru; Wajima, Toshihiro; Takahashi, Takao

    2012-01-01

    Peramivir is a new neuraminidase inhibitor for intravenous administration that was first introduced in clinical practice in Japan. We conducted a multicenter, open-label, uncontrolled study in children with influenza virus infection ranging in age from ≥28 days to <16 years during the 2009 pandemic A (H1N1) influenza epidemic to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of peramivir in children after intravenous infusion of 10 mg/kg (600 mg maximum) once daily. Among the 106 children (125 days to 15 years old) confirmed to have been infected with the pH1N1 virus by the PCR who were treated with peramivir, the median time to alleviation of symptoms was 29.1 h (95% confidence interval = 22.1 to 32.4), and the proportion of the 106 children who were virus positive was 78.2% on day 2 after the start of treatment and had decreased to 7.1% on day 6. The results of the safety evaluation among 117 patients enrolled in this study showed that adverse events and adverse drug reactions were reported in 62.4 and 29.1%, respectively, of the patients. All of the adverse events and adverse drug reactions resolved or improved rapidly. A population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed on the basis of 297 observed plasma concentration data obtained from 115 children with influenza virus infection. Peramivir exposure in children was within the range of levels within which the efficacy and safety was confirmed in adults, and it is considered that peramivir is clinically and virologically effective and safe in children with pH1N1 virus infection. PMID:22024821

  10. Pre-formulation characterization and pharmacokinetic evaluation of resveratrol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson-Barnes, Keila Delores

    Resveratrol, a natural compound found in grapes has potential chemotherapy effects but very low oral bioavailability in humans. The objectives of this study are to quantitatively characterized and understand the physiochemical properties and the pharmacokinetic evaluation of resveratrol. Solubility of resveratrol was measured in 10 common solvents at 25°C using HPLC. The solution state pH stability of resveratrol was assessed in various USP buffers ranging from pH 2-10 for 24 hours at 37 °C. Human plasma protein binding was determined using ultracentrifugation technique. Stability of resveratrol in human and rat plasma was also assessed at 37°C. Aliquots of blank plasma were spiked with a standard drug concentration to yield final plasma concentration of 50 mug/mL. Samples were analyzed for resveratrol concentration up to 96 hours. A group (n=8) of jugular vein-cannulated adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were evaluated and received intravenous dose of 20 mg/kg resveratrol. Serial blood samples were collected up to 8 hours after the dose. Plasma concentrations of resveratrol were measured by an established LC-MS/MS method. Pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed using noncompartmental methods. Resveratrol is more soluble in alcohol and PEG-400, and stable in acidic pH. It binds highly to plasma proteins, and degrades slower in human then rat plasma. Resveratrol exhibits bioexponential disposition after intravenous administration and has a short elimination half-life. Resveratrol displays bioexponential disposition following intravenous administration. The estimated mean maximum concentration was 1045.5 ng/mL and rapidly dropped below 100 ng/mL within 30 minutes. The area under the concentration time curve (AUC) for resveratrol was 13888.7 min*ng/mL The mean terminal elimination half-life was 50.9 minutes. The mean total body clearance (Cl) and volume of distribution of trans-resveratrol were 1711.9mL/min/kg and 91087.8 mL/kg, respectively. Pre

  11. Safety, tolerance, and pharmacokinetics of atevirdine mesylate (U-87201E) in asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed Central

    Been-Tiktak, A M; Vrehen, H M; Schneider, M M; van der Feltz, M; Branger, T; Ward, P; Cox, S R; Harry, J D; Borleffs, J C

    1995-01-01

    Atevirdine mesylate (U-87201E) is a new nonnucleoside (bisheteroarylpiperazine) inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase. In a double-blind, escalating single-dose study the safety, tolerance, and pharmacokinetics of atevirdine mesylate were investigated in 24 asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive male patients. Each patient received one single oral dose of atevirdine mesylate and placebo separated by an interval of 1 to 3 weeks. For each dose level (400, 800, 1,200, and 1,600 mg) six patients received drug and placebo on separate occasions. Blood samples were collected before dosing and at intervals afterward for safety evaluation and estimation of atevirdine and metabolite levels. The concentrations of atevirdine and its principal metabolite (U-89255) in serum were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The results of the study showed that atevirdine mesylate is well tolerated at all dose levels. No clinically significant effects on vital signs, electrocardiograms, or laboratory tests were observed. Occasional headache and nausea were reported both in the drug group and in the placebo group. The times to peak values were relatively short (0.5 to 1.0 h), suggesting a rapid absorption. The maximum concentrations of drug in serum were 1.4 microM (400 mg), 4.2 microM (800 mg), 7.3 microM (1,200 mg), and 5.8 microM (1,600 mg). The values of the pharmacokinetic parameters for atevirdine were found to have relatively large intersubject variabilities, and consequently, the study had little power to detect dose-dependent changes in the values of the pharmacokinetic parameters. The oral clearance of atevirdine tended to increase by 90% as the atevirdine mesylate doses increased from 400 to 1,600 mg, but this change in oral clearance was not statistically significant. The values of the pharmacokinetic parameters determined in the study were similar to those found in a previous single-dose study in healthy

  12. Ascending-dose study of noribogaine in healthy volunteers: pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety, and tolerability.

    PubMed

    Glue, Paul; Lockhart, Michelle; Lam, Fred; Hung, Noelyn; Hung, Cheung-Tak; Friedhoff, Lawrence

    2015-02-01

    Noribogaine is the active metabolite of the naturally occurring psychoactive substance ibogaine, and may help suppress withdrawal symptoms in opioid-dependent subjects. The objectives of this Phase I study were to assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic profiles of noribogaine. In this ascending single-dose, placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group study in 36 healthy drug-free male volunteers, 4 cohorts (n = 9) received oral doses of 3, 10, 30, or 60 mg or matching placebo, with intensive safety and pharmacokinetic assessments out to 216 hours, along with pharmacodynamic assessments sensitive to the effects of mu-opioid agonists. Noribogaine was rapidly absorbed, with peak concentrations occurring 2-3 hours after oral dosing, and showed dose-linear increases of area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) and Cmax between 3 and 60 mg. The drug was slowly eliminated, with mean half-life estimates of 28-49 hours across dose groups. Apparent volume of distribution was high (mean 1417-3086 L across dose groups). No safety or tolerability issues were identified in any cohort. No mu-opioid agonist pharmacodynamic effects were noted in pupillometry or cold-pressor testing. Single oral doses of noribogaine 3-60 mg were safe and well tolerated in healthy volunteers. PMID:25279818

  13. Multiple-dose pharmacokinetics and safety of ciprofloxacin in normal volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, M A; Uribe, F; Moisen, S D; Fuster, A P; Selen, A; Welling, P G; Painter, B

    1984-01-01

    The multiple-dose pharmacokinetics and safety of ciprofloxacin, a new quinoline carboxylic acid derivative, were evaluated in normal volunteers. The drug was administered orally every 12 h during successive 7-day periods at doses of 250, 500, and 750 mg. Samples of serum, urine, and saliva obtained after the first dose on days 1, 4, and 7 of each dosing period were assayed by microbiological methods. Peak concentrations of ciprofloxacin in serum were achieved generally from 1 to 1.5 h after administration. Mean peak serum levels were 1.35 to 1.42 micrograms/ml after the 250-mg dose, 2.60 to 2.89 micrograms/ml after the 500-mg dose, and 3.41 to 4.21 micrograms/ml after the 750-mg dose. Terminal serum half-lives ranged from 3.8 to 4.3, 4.5 to 4.9, and 3.9 to 6.6 h after the 250-, 500-, and 750-mg doses, respectively. Mean concentrations of ciprofloxacin in urine samples collected 0 to 2 h after dosing were 205 to 261, 255 to 518, and 243 to 846 micrograms/ml after the 250-, 500-, and 750-mg doses, respectively. Between 30 and 45% of the dose was recovered in urine 0 to 12 h after drug administration. Mean concentrations of ciprofloxacin in saliva at 2 h after dosing were 0.43, 1.23, and 1.45 micrograms/ml after the 250-, 500-, and 750-mg doses, respectively. These levels were 30 to 45% of the peak levels in serum and between 40 and 65% of the levels in serum measured 2 h after dosing. Ciprofloxacin was well tolerated. PMID:6517556

  14. Safety, tolerance, and pharmacokinetics of amphotericin B lipid complex in children with hepatosplenic candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Walsh, T J; Whitcomb, P; Piscitelli, S; Figg, W D; Hill, S; Chanock, S J; Jarosinski, P; Gupta, R; Pizzo, P A

    1997-09-01

    The safety, tolerance, and pharmacokinetics of amphotericin B lipid complex (ABLC) were studied in a cohort of pediatric cancer patients. Six children with hepatosplenic candidiasis (HSC) received 2.5 mg of ABLC/kg of body weight/day for 6 weeks for a total dosage of 105 mg/kg. Mean serum creatinine (0.85 +/- 0.12 mg/dl at baseline) was stable at the end of therapy at 0.85 +/- 0.18 mg/dl and at 1-month follow-up at 0.72 +/- 0.12 mg/dl. There was no increase in hepatic transaminases. Mean plasma concentrations over the dosing interval (C(ave)) and area under the curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC(0-24h)) increased between the first and seventh doses but were similar between doses 7 and 42, suggesting that steady state was achieved by day 7 of therapy. Following the final (42nd) dose of ABLC, mean AUC(0-24h) was 11.9 +/- 2.6 microg h/ml, C(ave) was 0.50 +/- 0.11 microg/ml, maximum concentration of the drug in whole blood was 1.69 +/- 0.75 microg/ml, and clearance was 3.64 +/- 0.78 ml/min/kg. Response of hepatic and splenic lesions was monitored by serial computerized tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging scans. The five evaluable patients responded to ABLC with complete or partial resolution of physical findings and of lesions of HSC. During the course of ABLC infusions and follow-up, there was no progression of HSC, breakthrough fungemia, or posttherapy recurrence. Hepatic lesions continued to resolve after the completion of administration of ABLC. Thus, ABLC administered in multiple doses to children was safe, was characterized by a steady state attainable within 1 week of therapy, and was effective in treatment of HSC. PMID:9303390

  15. EVALUATING A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR USE IN RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EVALUATING A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR USE IN RISK ASSESSMENT. L H Clark1, H A Barton1, and R W Setzer1. 1US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, ETD, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.

    Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are increasingly being used in eva...

  16. Safety, bioavailability, and pharmacokinetics of VGX-1027-A novel oral anti-inflammatory drug in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jessica C; Menacherry, Stanley; Diehl, Malissa C; Giffear, Mary D; White, C Jo; Juba, Rob; Bagarazzi, Mark L; Muthumani, Karuppiah; Boyer, Jean; Agarwal, Vipin; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Bart, Stephen; Kim, J Joseph; Weiner, David B; Sardesai, Niranjan Y

    2016-03-01

    VGX-1027, a novel oral immune modulator, is under development for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of single (1-800 mg) and multiple (40-400 mg) oral doses were evaluated in 2 clinical studies. The doses were well tolerated up to 800 mg in a single dose and 200 mg twice daily in multiple doses. Adverse events were mild to moderate in severity with no identifiable dose-related pattern. There were no clinically significant physical or laboratory findings. The pharmacokinetic data indicated that increases in Cmax and AUC0-inf were dose-proportional, and AUC0- τ was approximately dose-proportional. For the single-dose study, median Tmax ranged from 0.5 to 2 hours and mean t1/2 ranged from 4.9 to 8.7 hours. For the multiple-dose study, median Tmax ranged from 0.5 to 2.0 hours and mean t1/2 ranged from 7.05 to 10.05 hours. No accumulation of the drug was observed after day 1, indicating that steady-state concentrations were attained with single and multiple dosing for 5 days. Approximately 90% of the administered dose was excreted in urine as unchanged drug. PMID:27138022

  17. Evaluation of effect of impaired renal function on lamivudine pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Bouazza, Naïm; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Ghosn, Jade; Hirt, Déborah; Benaboud, Sihem; Foissac, Frantz; Viard, Jean-Paul; Urien, Saik

    2014-01-01

    Aims This study aimed to describe lamivudine pharmacokinetics in patients with impaired renal function and to evaluate the consistency of current dosing recommendations. Methods A total of 244 patients, ranging in age from 18 to 79 years (median 40 years) and in bodyweight from 38 to 117 kg (median 71 kg), with 344 lamivudine plasma concentrations, were analysed using a population pharmacokinetic analysis. Serum creatinine clearance (CLCR) was calculated using the Cockcroft–Gault formula; 177 patients had normal renal function (CLCR > 90 ml min−1), 50 patients had mild renal impairment (CLCR = 60–90 ml min−1), 20 patients had moderate renal impairment (CLCR = 30–60 ml min−1), and five patients had severe renal impairment (CLCR < 30 ml min−1). Results A two-compartment model adequately described the data. Typical population estimates (percentage interindividual variability) of the apparent clearance (CL/F), central (Vc/F) and peripheral volumes of distribution (Vp/F), intercompartmental clearance (Q/F) and absorption rate constant (Ka) were 29.7 l h−1 (32%), 68.2 l, 114 l, 10.1 l h−1 (85%) and 1 h−1, respectively. Clearance increased significantly and gradually with CLCR. Our simulations showed that a dose of 300 mg day−1 in patients with mild renal impairment could overexpose them. A dose of 200 mg day−1 maintained an exposure close to that of adults with normal renal function. However, the current US Food and Drug Administration recommendations for lamivudine in other categories of patients (from severe to moderate renal impairment) provided optimal exposures. Conclusions Lamivudine elimination clearance is related to renal function. To provide optimal exposure, patients with mild renal impairment should receive 200 mg day−1 instead of 300 mg day−1. PMID:24750102

  18. Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of Intravenous Nemonoxacin in Healthy Chinese Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Guo-ying; Zhang, Ying-yuan; Guo, Bei-ning; Yu, Ji-cheng; Wu, Xiao-jie; Chen, Yuan-cheng; Wu, Ju-Fang; Shi, Yao-guo

    2014-01-01

    Nemonoxacin (TG-873870) is a novel nonfluorinated quinolone with potent broad-spectrum activity against Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and atypical pathogens, including vancomycin-nonsusceptible methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), quinolone-resistant MRSA, quinolone-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae, and erythromycin-resistant S. pneumoniae. This first-in-human study was aimed at assessing the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic properties of intravenous nemonoxacin in healthy Chinese volunteers. The study comprised a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose escalating safety and tolerability study in 92 subjects and a randomized, single-dose, open-label, 3-period Latin-square crossover pharmacokinetic study in 12 subjects. The study revealed that nemonoxacin infusion was well tolerated up to the maximum dose of 1,250 mg, and the acceptable infusion rates ranged from 0.42 to 5.56 mg/min. Drug-related adverse events (AEs) were mild, transient, and confined to local irritation at the injection site. The pharmacokinetic study revealed that after the administration of 250, 500, and 750 mg of intravenous nemonoxacin, the maximum plasma drug concentration (Cmax) values were 4.826 μg/ml, 7.152 μg/ml, and 11.029 μg/ml, respectively. The corresponding values for the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 72 hours (AUC0–72 h) were 17.05 μg · h/ml, 39.30 μg · h/ml, and 61.98 μg · h/ml. The mean elimination half-life (t1/2) was 11 h, and the mean cumulative drug excretion rate within 72 h ranged from 64.93% to 77.17%. Volunteers treated with 250 to 750 mg nemonoxacin exhibited a linear dose-response relationship between the AUC0–72 h and AUC0–∞. These findings provide further support for the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic properties of intravenous nemonoxacin. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01944774.) PMID:25092690

  19. Effect of food on the pharmacokinetics of TAS-102 and its efficacy and safety in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Takayuki; Kojima, Takashi; Bando, Hideaki; Yamazaki, Tomoko; Naito, Yoichi; Mukai, Hirofumi; Fuse, Nozomu; Goto, Koichi; Ito, Yuko; Doi, Toshihiko; Ohtsu, Atsushi

    2016-05-01

    TAS-102, a novel oral antitumor agent, consists of trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride (molar ratio, 1:0.5). We investigated the effects of food on trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride. The efficacy and safety of TAS-102 were evaluated in patients with advanced solid tumors. We analyzed drug pharmacokinetics using a randomized, single-dose, two-treatment (fed versus fasting), two-period, two-sequence cross-over design, followed by repeated administration. Patients were given single doses of TAS-102 (35 mg/m(2) ) in the pharmacokinetic phase and received twice-daily doses of TAS-102 in 28-day cycles in the repeated administration phase for evaluating efficacy and safety. Food showed no effect on the area under the curve from 0 to 12 h or 0 h-infinity values of trifluridine following administration of TAS-102 under fasting and fed conditions, whereas those of tipiracil hydrochloride decreased by approximately 40%. Maximum concentrations of both drugs decreased by approximately 40%, indicating that food influenced the absorption and bioavailability of trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride, respectively. During the repeated administration, stable disease was observed in nine patients with rectal, small-cell lung, breast, thymic, duodenal, and prostate cancers. Major adverse events were neutropenia, leukopenia, anemia, and nausea. Postprandial administration was optimal for TAS-102 because trifluridine's area under the curve was not changed by food, indicating that its clinical efficacy would not be affected. Additionally, postprandial administration was reasonable because the maximum concentration of trifluridine decreased in neutrophils, which correlated with previous studies. These results suggest that TAS-102 would be an effective treatment for small-cell lung, thymic, and colorectal cancers. This trial is registered with the Japan Pharmaceutical Information Center (no. JapicCTI-111482). PMID:26918279

  20. Dose comparison of conivaptan (Vaprisol®) in patients with euvolemic or hypervolemic hyponatremia – efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Biff F; Rock, Amy D; Woodward, Emily J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of 20 and 40 mg/day conivaptan (Vaprisol®) in patients with hypervolemic or euvolemic hyponatremia. Methods Hyponatremic patients – serum sodium (sNa) ≤130 mEq/L – received either 20 or 40 mg/day of conivaptan for 4 days, following an initial 20 mg loading dose. Efficacy was evaluated by the magnitude and extent of change in sNa. Safety was evaluated by the incidence of adverse events, changes in vital signs and laboratory parameters, rate of sNa correction, and frequency of infusion-site reactions. Pharmacokinetic parameters were also measured. Results A total of 37 patients received 20 mg/day and 214 patients received 40 mg/day conivaptan. Baseline-adjusted sNa-area under the concentration–time curve increased by an average of 753.8±499.9 mEq·hr/L (20 mg/day) and 689.2±417.3 mEq·hr/L (40 mg/day) over the course of the 4-day treatment period. The majority of patients in both treatment groups achieved a 4 mEq/L increase in sNa over baseline in ~24 hours (82.5%). Average increase in sNa after 4 days was ~10 mEq/L, varying with dosage level and baseline volume status. Treatment success (normal sNa or increase of ≥6 mEq/L) was attained by 70.3% of patients in the 20 mg/day group and 72.0% in the 40 mg/day group. Conclusion Both 20 and 40 mg/day doses of conivaptan are efficacious in increasing sNa over 4 days of treatment with no observed increase in the frequency of adverse events or specific infusion-site reactions using the higher dose. The pharmacokinetic parameters of both doses were similar to what has been reported previously, exhibiting greater-than-dose-proportional plasma concentrations. PMID:26848258

  1. Preparation, Pharmacokinetics, Biodistribution, Antitumor Efficacy and Safety of Lx2-32c-Containing Liposome

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Guangyao; Ma, Jinbo; Ma, Pengkai; Du, Guangying; Wang, Zongliang; Tian, Jingwei; Fang, Weishuo; Fu, Fenghua

    2014-01-01

    Lx2-32c is a novel taxane that has been demonstrated to have robust antitumor activity against different types of tumors including several paclitaxel-resistant neoplasms. Since the delivery vehicles for taxane, which include cremophor EL, are all associated with severe toxic effects, liposome-based Lx2-32c has been developed. In the present study, the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, antitumor efficacy and safety characteristics of liposome-based Lx2-32c were explored and compared with those of cremophor-based Lx2-32c. The results showed that liposome-based Lx2-32c displayed similar antitumor effects to cremophor-based Lx2-32c, but with significantly lower bone marrow toxicity and cardiotoxicity, especially with regard to the low ratio of hypersensitivity reaction. In comparing these two delivery modalities, targeting was superior using the Lx2-32c liposome formulation; it achieved significantly higher uptake in tumor than in bone marrow and heart. Our data thus suggested that the Lx2-32c liposome was a novel alternative formulation with comparable antitumor efficacy and a superior safety profiles to cremophor-based Lx2-32c, which might be related to the improved pharmacokinetic and biodistribution characteristics. In conclusion, the Lx2-32c liposome could be a promising alternative formulation for further development. PMID:25506928

  2. Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: a review on pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety and tolerability

    PubMed Central

    Usach, Iris; Melis, Virginia; Peris, José-Esteban

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type-1 non-nucleoside and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are key drugs of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the clinical management of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)/HIV infection. Discussion First-generation NNRTIs, nevirapine (NVP), delavirdine (DLV) and efavirenz (EFV) are drugs with a low genetic barrier and poor resistance profile, which has led to the development of new generations of NNRTIs. Second-generation NNRTIs, etravirine (ETR) and rilpivirine (RPV) have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration and European Union, and the next generation of drugs is currently being clinically developed. This review describes recent clinical data, pharmacokinetics, metabolism, pharmacodynamics, safety and tolerability of commercialized NNRTIs, including the effects of sex, race and age differences on pharmacokinetics and safety. Moreover, it summarizes the characteristics of next-generation NNRTIs: lersivirine, GSK 2248761, RDEA806, BILR 355 BS, calanolide A, MK-4965, MK-1439 and MK-6186. Conclusions This review presents a wide description of NNRTIs, providing useful information for researchers interested in this field, both in clinical use and in research. PMID:24008177

  3. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation of linagliptin in African American patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Christian; Glund, Stephan; Lionetti, Dominick; Kissling, C James; Righetti, Julian; Patel, Sanjay; Graefe-Mody, Ulrike; Retlich, Silke; Woerle, Hans-Juergen

    2013-01-01

    Aim This was an open label, multicentre phase I trial to study the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor linagliptin in African American patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods Forty-one African American patients with T2DM were included in this study. Patients were admitted to a study clinic and administered 5 mg linagliptin once daily for 7 days, followed by 7 days of outpatient evaluation. Results Primary endpoints were area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC), maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and plasma DPP-4 trough inhibition at steady-state. Linagliptin geometric mean AUC was 194 nmol l−1 h (geometric coefficient of variation, 26%), with a Cmax of 16.4 nmol l−1 (41%). Urinary excretion was low (0.5% and 4.4% of the dose excreted over 24 h, days 1 and 7). The geometric mean DPP-4 inhibition at steady-state was 84.2% at trough and 91.9% at maximum. The exposure range and overall pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile of linagliptin in this study of African Americans with T2DM was comparable with that in other populations. Laboratory data, vital signs and physical examinations did not show any relevant findings. No safety concerns were identified. Conclusions The results of this study in African American patients with T2DM support the use of the standard 5 mg dose recommended in all populations. PMID:23331248

  4. A phase I safety and pharmacokinetic study of ATX-101: injectable, synthetic deoxycholic acid for submental contouring.

    PubMed

    Walker, Patricia; Fellmann, Jere; Lizzul, Paul F

    2015-03-01

    ATX-101 (deoxycholic acid [DCA] injection) is a proprietary formulation of pure synthetic DCA. When injected into subcutaneous fat, ATX-101 results in focal adipocytolysis, the targeted destruction of fat cells. ATX-101 is undergoing investigation as an injectable drug for contouring the submental area by reducing submental fat (SMF). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics (PK) of the maximal therapeutic dose of ATX-101 (100 mg total dose). Following PK evaluation of endogenous DCA, subjects (N=24) received subcutaneous injections of ATX-101 (2 mg/cm2, with or without 0.9% benzyl alcohol) into SMF; PK evaluation was repeated periodically over 24 hours. Endogenous DCA plasma concentrations measured prior to injection were highly variable within and between subjects. Similarly, following ATX-101 injection, DCA plasma concentrations were highly variable, peaked rapidly, and returned to the range observed for endogenous values by 24 hours postdose. All subjects experienced at least 1 adverse event (AE). No death, serious AE, or AE-related discontinuations occurred. The majority of AEs were transient, associated with the area treated, and of mild or moderate severity. No clinically significant changes were reported for laboratory test results, vital signs, or Holter electrocardiograms postdosing. These data support the favorable safety and efficacy observations of ATX-101 as an injectable drug to reduce SMF. PMID:25738850

  5. LNG Safety Assessment Evaluation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Muna, Alice Baca; LaFleur, Angela Christine

    2015-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories evaluated published safety assessment methods across a variety of industries including Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), hydrogen, land and marine transportation, as well as the US Department of Defense (DOD). All the methods were evaluated for their potential applicability for use in the LNG railroad application. After reviewing the documents included in this report, as well as others not included because of repetition, the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Safety Plan Checklist is most suitable to be adapted to the LNG railroad application. This report was developed to survey industries related to rail transportation for methodologies and tools that can be used by the FRA to review and evaluate safety assessments submitted by the railroad industry as a part of their implementation plans for liquefied or compressed natural gas storage ( on-board or tender) and engine fueling delivery systems. The main sections of this report provide an overview of various methods found during this survey. In most cases, the reference document is quoted directly. The final section provides discussion and a recommendation for the most appropriate methodology that will allow efficient and consistent evaluations to be made. The DOE Hydrogen Safety Plan Checklist was then revised to adapt it as a methodology for the Federal Railroad Administration’s use in evaluating safety plans submitted by the railroad industry.

  6. Recombinant human tripeptidyl peptidase-1 infusion to the monkey CNS: Safety, pharmacokinetics, and distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Vuillemenot, Brian R.; Kennedy, Derek; Reed, Randall P.; Boyd, Robert B.; Butt, Mark T.; Musson, Donald G.; Keve, Steve; Cahayag, Rhea; Tsuruda, Laurie S.; O'Neill, Charles A.

    2014-05-15

    CLN2 disease is caused by deficiency in tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1), leading to neurodegeneration and death. The safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and CNS distribution of recombinant human TPP1 (rhTPP1) were characterized following a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intrathecal-lumbar (IT-L) infusion to cynomolgus monkeys. Animals received 0, 5, 14, or 20 mg rhTPP1, ICV, or 14 mg IT-L, in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) vehicle. Plasma and CSF were collected for PK analysis. Necropsies occurred at 3, 7, and 14 days post-infusion. CNS tissues were sampled for rhTPP1 distribution. TPP1 infusion was well tolerated and without effect on clinical observations or ECG. A mild increase in CSF white blood cells (WBCs) was detected transiently after ICV infusion. Isolated histological changes related to catheter placement and infusion were observed in ICV treated animals, including vehicle controls. The CSF and plasma exposure profiles were equivalent between animals that received an ICV or IT-L infusion. TPP1 levels peaked at the end of infusion, at which point the enzyme was present in plasma at 0.3% to 0.5% of CSF levels. TPP1 was detected in brain tissues with half-lives of 3–14 days. CNS distribution between ICV and IT-L administration was similar, although ICV resulted in distribution to deep brain structures including the thalamus, midbrain, and striatum. Direct CNS infusion of rhTPP1 was well tolerated with no drug related safety findings. The favorable nonclinical profile of ICV rhTPP1 supports the treatment of CLN2 by direct administration to the CNS. - Highlights: • TPP1 enzyme replacement therapy to the CNS is in development for CLN2 disease. • Toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and CNS distribution were assessed in monkeys. • TPP1 infusion directly to the brain did not result in any safety concerns. • A positive pharmacokinetic and distribution profile resulted from TPP1 infusion. • This study demonstrates the feasibility of ICV administered

  7. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of apixaban in subjects with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoli; Tirucherai, Giridhar; Marbury, Thomas C; Wang, Jessie; Chang, Ming; Zhang, Donglu; Song, Yan; Pursley, Janice; Boyd, Rebecca A; Frost, Charles

    2016-05-01

    An open-label, parallel-group, single-dose study was conducted to assess the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of apixaban in 8 subjects with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis compared with 8 subjects with normal renal function. A single oral 5-mg dose of apixaban was administered once to healthy subjects and twice to subjects with ESRD, separated by ≥7 days: 2 hours before (on hemodialysis) and immediately after a 4-hour hemodialysis session (off hemodialysis). Blood samples were collected for determination of apixaban pharmacokinetic parameters, measures of clotting (prothrombin time, international normalized ratio, activated partial thromboplastin time), and anti-factor Xa (FXa) activity. Compared with healthy subjects, apixaban Cmax and AUCinf were 10% lower and 36% higher, respectively, in subjects with ESRD off hemodialysis. Hemodialysis in subjects with ESRD was associated with reductions in apixaban Cmax and AUCinf of 13% and 14%, respectively. The percent change from baseline in clotting measures was similar in healthy subjects and subjects with ESRD, and differences in anti-FXa activity were similar to differences in apixaban concentration. A single 5-mg oral dose of apixaban was well tolerated in both groups. In conclusion, ESRD resulted in a modest increase (36%) in apixaban AUC and no increase in Cmax , and hemodialysis had a limited impact on apixaban clearance. PMID:26331581

  8. Integration of efficacy, pharmacokinetic and safety assessment of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in a preclinical model of arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zuurmond, Anne-Marie; Koudijs, Angela; van El, Benno; Doornbos, Robert P; van Manen-Vernooij, Babs C T; Bastiaans, Jacqueline H M W; Penninks, André H; van Bilsen, Jolanda H M; Cnubben, Nicole H P; Degroot, Jeroen

    2011-04-01

    Pharmacokinetic properties and safety profile of a drug are likely influenced by the disease state of a patient. In this study, we investigated the influence of arthritic processes on pharmacokinetics and immunotoxicity of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (Anakinra) in the rat adjuvant arthritis model. Anakinra dose-dependently suppressed joint inflammation and degradation as demonstrated by reduced clinical arthritis score, paw thickness, synovial infiltration and bone degradation. In addition, plasma levels of chemokines MCP-1 and GRO/KC were reduced. Pharmacokinetic behaviour of Anakinra was influenced by disease state of the rats as judged from a decrease in C(max) and an increase of the MRT as the disease progressed at a dose of 24 and 72 mg Anakinra/kg body weight. The pharmacokinetic parameters increased dose-dependently, but non-proportionally with increasing dose. Low level anti-Anakinra antibody formation was observed at prolonged exposure to the biologic. Safety parameters, including haematology, splenic lymphocyte subset analysis, ex vivo stimulation of spleen cells and histopathology of immune system organs were affected by the disease itself to such extent that no additional effects of Anakinra could be observed. In conclusion, we demonstrated that pharmacokinetic behaviour of Anakinra was influenced by the arthritis background of the rats resulting in decreased internal exposure. PMID:21300126

  9. Relative bioavailability, food effect, and safety of the single-dose pharmacokinetics of omecamtiv mecarbil following administration of different modified-release formulations in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Palaparthy, Rameshraja; Banfield, Christopher; Alvarez, Paco; Yan, Lucy; Smith, Brian; Johnson, Jessica; Monsalvo, Maria Laura; Malik, Fady

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Omecamtiv mecarbil is a novel small molecule that directly activates cardiac myosin and increases cardiac contractility without increasing cardiac myocyte intracellular calcium. This study evaluated the relative bioavailability, food effect, and safety of several modified-release (MR) formulations of omecamtiv mecarbil. Methods: This was a phase 1, randomized, open-label, 4-way crossover, incomplete block-design study evaluating 5 MR formulations of omecamtiv mecarbil vs. an immediate-release (IR) formulation. Materials: Healthy subjects were randomized to 1 of 30 possible sequences: within each sequence, subjects were assigned to receive a single 25-mg dose of 2 of the 6 possible formulations in the fasting and/or fed states. Results: 65 subjects were screened and enrolled; 5 were replacement subjects. Pharmacokinetic and safety data were analyzed from 62 and 63 subjects in the fasting and fed states, respectively. Compared with the IR formulation, median tmax was longer (0.5 vs. 2 – 10 hours), and mean Cmax was lower for all 5 MR formulations (262 vs. 34 – 78 ng/mL); t1/2,z was similar (18 – 21 hours). The relative bioavailability was high (> 75%) for three MR formulations but lower (< 65%) for the other two. Overall, the effect of food on omecamtiv mecarbil pharmacokinetics was minimal for four of the MR formulations. The pharmacokinetics of the inactive metabolites M3 and M4 were similar across all formulations. Conclusions: The relative bioavailability of omecamtiv mecarbil was high (> 75%) for 3 of the five MR formulations. Food had a marginal, nonclinically meaningful effect on the pharmacokinetics of the MR formulations of omecamtiv mecarbil. PMID:26709596

  10. Pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and safety of ticagrelor in Asian patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Hiasa, Y; Teng, R; Emanuelsson, H

    2014-10-01

    This randomized, active-controlled, double-blind study assessed the pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and safety of ticagrelor in Japanese patients and a smaller cohort of non-Japanese Asian patients. The study recruited patients aged 20-80 years who had received aspirin 75-100 mg/day for ≥2 weeks and had percutaneous coronary intervention or acute coronary syndrome >3 months previously. Patients received 4 weeks' treatment with ticagrelor 45 mg bid, ticagrelor 90 mg bid or clopidogrel 75 mg qd (all with aspirin). The inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA, final-extent) and pharmacokinetics of ticagrelor were assessed on days 1 and 28. Overall, 139 Asian patients were randomized (ticagrelor 45 mg bid, n = 50; ticagrelor 90 mg bid, n = 43; clopidogrel, n = 46) of whom 118 were Japanese. Mean final-extent IPA was greater with ticagrelor 90 mg bid versus ticagrelor 45 mg bid and with both ticagrelor doses versus clopidogrel. At the end of the dosing interval on day 28, mean final-extent IPA was 10.0% higher (95% confidence interval 0.5-19.5%) for ticagrelor 90 mg bid versus ticagrelor 45 mg bid, 15.1% higher (5.8-24.4%) for ticagrelor 45 mg bid versus clopidogrel, and 25.1% higher (15.5-34.7%) for ticagrelor 90 mg bid versus clopidogrel. In Japanese patients, exposure to ticagrelor and its active metabolite AR-C124910XX increased dose-proportionally. The safety profile of ticagrelor was consistent with previous studies. Ticagrelor was associated with enhanced IPA versus clopidogrel in Japanese patients. PMID:24935072

  11. Pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of the novel, selective mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist finerenone - results from first-in-man and relative bioavailability studies.

    PubMed

    Lentini, Silvia; Heinig, Roland; Kimmeskamp-Kirschbaum, Nina; Wensing, Georg

    2016-04-01

    The safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of the selective nonsteroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist finerenone were evaluated in healthy male volunteers in two randomized, single-centre studies. Study 1 was a first-in-man, single-blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, dose-escalation study. Fasted participants (n = 45) received single oral doses of finerenone 1-40 mg polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution or placebo. Study 2 was a relative bioavailability study comparing a finerenone 10 mg immediate-release (IR) tablet with finerenone 10 mg PEG solution in the fasted state, investigating the effect of a high-fat/high-calorie meal on the pharmacokinetics of the IR tablet and assessing a further dose escalation to finerenone 80 mg (eight × finerenone 10 mg IR tablets), in an open-label, fourfold crossover design (n = 15). Finerenone was rapidly absorbed from PEG solution (median time to maximum plasma concentration [tmax ]: 0.500-1.00 h), exhibited dose-linear pharmacokinetics and was rapidly eliminated from plasma (geometric mean terminal half-life [t½ ]: 1.70-2.83 h). Finerenone IR tablets demonstrated similar pharmacokinetics (median tmax : 0.750-2.50 h; geometric mean t½ : 1.89-4.29 h) with, however, enhanced bioavailability versus PEG solution (least-squares mean tablet/solution ratio of 187% for area under the plasma-concentration curve [AUC] and maximum plasma concentration [Cmax ]). High-fat/high-calorie food affected the rate but not the extent of finerenone absorption. Finerenone was well tolerated and did not influence clinical laboratory parameters, blood pressure, heart rate, urinary electrolytes or neurohormones, including serum aldosterone and angiotensin II. In conclusion, finerenone has favourable pharmacokinetics and tolerability in healthy men, and is suitable for dosing independent of food intake. PMID:26604072

  12. Pharmacokinetics and risk evaluation of DNA vaccine against Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Feng; Li, Wei; Lu, Ming-Bo; Yu, Long-Jiang

    2013-01-01

    DNA plasmid immunization is a novel approach of preventive and therapeutic vaccine. More than 100 DNA vaccines have been on preclinical or clinical phase trials, and four kinds of DNA vaccines for livestock have been approved by USDA, CFIA, and APVMA. Schistosomiasis is a worldwide parasitic disease, and vaccine immunization is supposed to be a promising approach to control the health crisis. On the basis of former preclinical studies, we further focused on the pharmacokinetics and risk evaluation of DNA vaccine in vivo. In the present study, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) report gene was fused with Schistosoma japonicum 23 kDa transmembrane protein antigen gene (Sj23) and constructed into DNA vaccine pVIVO2-Sj23.EGFP. After intramuscularly injecting 100 μg of purified DNA vaccine plasmid to immunizate BALB/c mice, we studied the tissue distribution of DNA plasmid and expressed Sj23.EGFP antigen, the persistence time of elicited antibodies, and the risk of DNA vaccine transferred into intestinal microorganisms. The results showed that DNA vaccine plasmid could be distributed into all tissues of the body after injection; however, only few organs including the injected muscle were detected DNA vaccine at postimmunization until the 100 days by PCR technology; the detection of green fluorescence protein displayed that DNA vaccine could be expressed in almost every tissue and organs; the ELISA assay indicated the immune antibody against Sj23 could persist over 70 days; and the DNA vaccine transferring intestinal flora results was negative. The results indicated that the DNA vaccine has systemic protection and long-lasting effectivity and is safe to intestinal flora. PMID:22990210

  13. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of rotigotine transdermal system in healthy Japanese and Caucasian subjects following multiple-dose administration.

    PubMed

    Cawello, Willi; Kim, Seong Ryul; Braun, Marina; Elshoff, Jan-Peer; Masahiro, Takeuchi; Ikeda, Junji; Funaki, Tomoo

    2016-08-01

    Rotigotine is a dopamine receptor agonist indicated for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and moderate-to-severe restless legs syndrome. Continuous transdermal delivery of rotigotine via a silicon-based patch maintains stable plasma concentrations over 24 h. The objective of the study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of a multiple-dose schedule of rotigotine transdermal patch in Japanese and Caucasian subjects. In this open-label, repeated-dose, parallel-group study (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01854216), healthy male and female subjects of Japanese or Caucasian ethnic origin were matched by gender, body mass index, and age. Subjects underwent a 9-day patch application period. 12 Japanese and 12 Caucasian subjects were included in the pharmacokinetic analyses. Mean apparent doses (actual amount of drug delivered) increased proportionally with rotigotine nominal dosages (1, 2, and 4 mg/24 h) and were similar for both ethnic groups, with large inter-individual variability. Mean plasma concentration-time profiles for unconjugated rotigotine were similar in both ethnic groups at day 3 for each dosage. Peak concentrations (C max,ss) and area under the concentration-time curves from pre-dose to the concentration measured 24 h after administration of patch (AUC(0-24,ss)) showed similar exposure in both groups; higher values in Japanese subjects were explained by differences in body weight. For total rotigotine, C max,ss and AUC(0-24,ss) values were higher in Caucasian subjects and could be explained by small differences in apparent dose. Rotigotine was generally well tolerated following multiple applications up to 4 mg/24 h. These findings suggest similar dosage requirements for rotigotine transdermal system in Japanese and Caucasian populations. PMID:25773763

  14. Phase I study of the safety and pharmacokinetics of trabectedin with docetaxel in patients with advanced malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Bookman, Michael; Meropol, Neal J.; Weiner, Louis M.; Sherman, Eric; Li, Jinhui; Knoblauch, Roland; Parekh, Trilok; Cohen, Roger B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Combination therapy with trabectedin and docetaxel was evaluated in patients with advanced malignancies. Methods In this open-label phase 1 study, docetaxel (60 or 75 mg/m2; 1-h intravenous infusion) was given on day 1 of a 21-day cycle in combination with escalating doses of trabectedin (0.4–1.3 mg/m2 by 3-h intravenous infusion, 1 h after docetaxel) and prophylactic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Maximum tolerated dose (MTD) as primary objective and safety, plasma pharmacokinetics, and antitumor activity as secondary objectives were assessed. Results Patients (N = 49) received a median of four cycles of treatment. MTD was 1.3 mg/m2 trabectedin and 60 mg/m2 docetaxel for patients with limited and 1.1 mg/m2 trabectedin and 60 mg/m2 docetaxel for patients with unlimited prior chemotherapy. Dose-limiting toxicities (during cycle 1) included elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and fatigue in patients with limited prior chemotherapy and elevated ALT and febrile neutropenia in those with unlimited prior chemotherapy. The most common drug-related adverse events were nausea (65 %), fatigue (63 %), and neutropenia (53 %). One patient achieved a complete response. Thirty patients had stable disease, and 11 had stable disease for ≥6 months. Pharmacokinetic results for trabectedin plus docetaxel were similar to those previously reported for the single agents. Conclusion In patients with previously treated, advanced malignancies, the combination of therapeutic doses of trabectedin and docetaxel showed clinical activity and was tolerable with prophylactic G-CSF, with no evidence of clinically important drug interactions. PMID:25791363

  15. Pharmacokinetics, Safety, and 48-Week Efficacy of Oral Raltegravir in HIV-1–Infected Children Aged 2 Through 18 Years

    PubMed Central

    Nachman, Sharon; Zheng, Nan; Acosta, Edward P.; Teppler, Hedy; Homony, Brenda; Graham, Bobbie; Fenton, Terence; Xu, Xia; Wenning, Larissa; Spector, Stephen A.; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Alvero, Carmelita; Worrell, Carol; Handelsman, Edward; Wiznia, Andrew; Moultrie, Harry; Kindra, Gurpreet; Sanders, Margaret Ann; Williams, Ruth; Jensen, Jennifer; Acevedo, Midnela; Fabregas, Lizbeth; Jurgrau, Andrea; Foca, Marc; Higgins, Alice; Deville, Jaime G.; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; Carter, Michele F.; Swetnam, John; Wilson, Joan; Donnelly, Margaret; Akleh, Siham; Rigaud, Mona; Kaul, Aditya; Patel, Nehali; Gaur, Aditya; Utech, L. Jill; Cardoso, Edmundo; Moreira, Ana Maria; Santos, Breno; Bobat, Raziya; Mngqibisa, Rosie; Burey, Marlene; Abadi, Jacob; Rosenberg, Michael; Luzuriaga, Katherine; Picard, Donna; Pagano-Therrien, Jessica; Dittmer, Sylvia; Ndiweni, Hilda Ntatule; Patel, Amisha; DelRey, Michelle; McMullen-Jackson, Chivon; Paul, Mary E.; Melvin, Ann; Venema-Weiss, Corry; Lane, Jenna; Beneri, Christy; Ferraro, Denise; Infanzon, Erin; McAuley, James B; Aziz, Mariam; McNichols, Maureen; Pelton, Stephen; McLaud, Deb; Clarke, Diana; Zeichner, Steven; Akar, Arezou; Thompson, Deidre; Douglas, Steven D.; Rutstein, Richard M.; Vincent, Carol A.; Vachon, Mary Elizabeth; Cavallo, Martha; Purswani, Murli Udharam; Masheto, Gaerolwe; Ogwu, Anthony; Kakhu, Tebogo; Viani, Rolando M.; Darcey, Anita,; Norris, Kimberly; Burchett, Sandra K.; Kneut, Catherine; Karthas, Nancy; Casey, Denise; Emmanuel, Patricia; Lujan-Zilbermann, Jorge; Rana, Sohail; Houston, Patricia; Mengistab, Mulu; Rathore, Mobeen; Mirza, Ayesha; Gayton, Tabetha; Barr, Emily; Dunn, Jennifer; Hahn, Kerry; Eysallenne, Zulma; Howard, F. Sholar; Graham, Kathleen; Negra, Marinella Della; Queiroz, Wladimir; Lian, Yu Ching; Wara, Diane; Ruel, Ted; VanDyke, Russell; Reilly, Patricia; Bradford, Sheila; van Rensburg, Anita Janse; Dobbels, Els; Bester, Marietjie; Bamji, Mahrukh; Paul, Santa; Sarza, Mirala; Kovacs, Andrea; Homans, James; Spencer, LaShonda; Hofer, Cristna; Abreu, Thalita; Oliveira, Ricardo; Joao, Esau C.; Pinto, Jorge; Ferreira, Flavia; Kakehasi, Fabiana; Cervi, Maria Celia; Isaac, Marcia De Lima; Losso, Marcelo H.; Stankievich, Erica; Foradori, Irene; Tucker, Diane; Church, Joseph; Belzer, Marvin; Hopkins, Johns; Ellen, Jonathan; Agwu, Allison; Laurel, Borkovic

    2014-01-01

    Background. IMPAACT P1066 is a phase I/II open-label multicenter trial to evaluate pharmacokinetics, safety, tolerability, and efficacy of multiple raltegravir formulations in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected youth. Methods. Dose selection for each cohort (I: 12 to <19 years; II: 6 to <12 years; and III: 2 to <6 years) was based on review of short-term safety (4 weeks) and intensive pharmacokinetic evaluation. Safety data through weeks 24 and 48, and grade ≥3 or serious adverse events (AEs) were assessed. The primary virologic endpoint was achieving HIV RNA <400 copies/mL or ≥1 log10 reduction between baseline and week 24. Results. The targeted pharmacokinetic parameters (AUC0-12h and C12h) were achieved for each cohort, allowing dose selection for 2 formulations. Of 96 final dose subjects, there were 15 subjects with grade 3 or higher clinical AEs (1 subject with drug-related [DR] psychomotor hyperactivity and insomnia); 16 subjects with grade 3 or higher laboratory AEs (1 with DR transaminase elevation); 14 subjects with serious clinical AEs (1 with DR rash); and 1 subjects with serious laboratory AEs (1 with DR transaminase increased). There were no discontinuations due to AEs and no DR deaths. Favorable virologic responses at week 48 were observed in 79.1% of patients, with a mean CD4 increase of 156 cells/µL (4.6%). Conclusions. Raltegravir as a film-coated tablet 400 mg twice daily (6 to <19 years, and ≥25 kg) and chewable tablet 6 mg/kg (maximum dose 300 mg) twice daily (2 to <12 years) was well tolerated and showed favorable virologic and immunologic responses. Clinical Trials Registration NCT00485264. PMID:24145879

  16. Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Safety of High Doses of Ceforanide (BL-S786R) and Cefazolin

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Robert D.; Pfeffer, Morris; Donald, Aaron Glick; Van Harken, R.; Hottendorf, Girard H.

    1979-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and safety of ceforanide and cefazolin were compared in normal subjects after 30-min intravenous infusions of 2-, 3-, and 4-g single doses and 4-g twice-daily doses for 10 days. No significant differences were observed in plasma-renal pharmacokinetic parameters between single and multiple doses of ceforanide. Half-life (t½, 2.8 h), plasma clearance (Clp, 48 ml/min per 1.73 m2), and renal clearance (Cl0−12hr, 47 ml/min per 1.73 m2; tubular secretion, 44%, and glomerular filtration, 56%) did not change with increased dose or on multiple dosing. No significant change was observed in t½ (1.9 h), area under the plasma concentration-time curve, Clr (60 ml/min per 1.73 m2; tubular secretion, 80%, and glomerular filtration, 20%), or Clp (75 ml/min per 1.73 m2) for 4-g single doses compared with twice-daily administration of cefazolin. A small increase in cefazolin clearance was observed when plasma concentrations were greater than 100 μg/ml, when the single dose was increased from 2 to 4 g; this was a result of the decrease in percentage of plasma protein binding and increased renal clearance due to increased glomerular filtration. The increase in renal clearance resulted in a lack of linear proportionality of the plasma area under the curve with dose over a range of 2 to 4 for both cephalosporins, although this effect was much less marked with ceforanide. Both compounds were well tolerated both locally and systemically. There was no evidence of any change in renal function based on clearances of drug, p-aminohippuric acid, or creatinine, and other standard clinical parameters. PMID:526003

  17. Phase I Safety and Pharmacokinetics Study of Micronized Atovaquone in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Infants and Children

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Walter; Dorenbaum, Alejandro; Yogev, Ram; Beauchamp, Belinda; Xu, Jing; McNamara, James; Moye, John; Purdue, Lynette; van Dyke, Russell; Rogers, Michael; Sadler, Brian; Group, The Pediatric Aids Clinical Trials

    1998-01-01

    A phase I dose-escalating safety and pharmacokinetic study evaluated an oral suspension of micronized atovaquone (m-atovaquone) in infants and children stratified into age groups from 1 month to 12 years of age. Dosages of 10, 30, and 45 mg/kg of body weight/day were evaluated as single daily doses over a period of 12 days. Steady-state concentrations in plasma were determined on day 12, and single postdose concentrations were measured on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 13, 15, 18, 21, and 24. Prior studies with adults suggest that the average plasma atovaquone concentration of 15 μg/ml is associated with therapeutic success in more than 95% of patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonitis. The results showed m-atovaquone to be safe and well tolerated. Dosages of 30 mg/kg/day were adequate to achieve an average steady-state concentration of greater than 15 μg/ml in children ages 1 to 3 months and 2 to 12 years, but a dosage of 45 mg/kg/day was needed to reach this concentration in infants 3 to 24 months of age. The oral suspension of atovaquone is safe and well tolerated in children. A single daily dose of 30 mg/kg provides bioavailability considered adequate for therapy of P. carinii pneumonia, but infants between 3 and 24 months of age may require a dosage of 45 mg/kg/day. PMID:9624466

  18. Evaluation of the effect of naproxen on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of apixaban

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Charles; Shenker, Andrew; Gandhi, Mohit D; Pursley, Janice; Barrett, Yu Chen; Wang, Jessie; Zhang, Donglu; Byon, Wonkyung; Boyd, Rebecca A; LaCreta, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Aim To assess pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between naproxen (a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) and apixaban (an oral, selective, direct factor-Xa inhibitor). Method In this randomized, three period, two sequence study, 21 healthy subjects received a single oral dose of apixaban 10 mg, naproxen 500 mg or co-administration of both. Blood samples were collected for determination of apixaban and naproxen pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (anti-Xa activity, international normalized ratio [INR] and arachidonic acid–induced platelet aggregation [AAI-PA]). Adverse events, bleeding time and routine safety assessments were also evaluated. Results Apixaban had no effect on naproxen pharmacokinetics. However, following co-administration, apixaban AUC(0,∞), AUC(0,t) and Cmax were 54% (geometric mean ratio 1.537; 90% confidence interval (CI) 1.394, 1.694), 55% (1.549; 90% CI 1.400, 1.713) and 61% (1.611; 90% CI 1.417, 1.831) higher, respectively. Mean (standard deviation [SD]) anti-Xa activity at 3 h post-dose was approximately 60% higher following co-administration compared with apixaban alone, 4.4 [1.0] vs. 2.7 [0.7] IU ml−1, consistent with the apixaban concentration increase following co-administration. INR was within the normal reference range after all treatments. AAI-PA was reduced by approximately 80% with naproxen. Co-administration had no impact beyond that of naproxen. Mean [SD] bleeding time was higher following co-administration (9.1 [4.1] min) compared with either agent alone (5.8 [2.3] and 6.9 [2.6] min for apixaban and naproxen, respectively). Conclusion Co-administration of naproxen with apixaban results in higher apixaban exposure and appears to occur through increased apixaban bioavailability. The effects on anti-Xa activity, INR and inhibition of AAI-PA observed in this study were consistent with the individual pharmacologic effects of apixaban and naproxen. PMID:24697979

  19. Treatment of gastrointestinal cytomegalovirus infection with twice-daily foscarnet: a pilot study of safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics in patients with AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Dieterich, D T; Poles, M A; Lew, E A; Martin-Munley, S; Johnson, J; Nix, D; Faust, M J

    1997-01-01

    Ten patients with AIDS and cytomegalovirus (CMV) gastrointestinal infection were included in an open-label study to evaluate the safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of 90 mg of intravenous foscarnet/kg of body weight twice daily accompanied by (pre)hydration of 500 to 750 ml. Efficacy was documented endoscopically, while safety was evaluated clinically by patient reports and physical and laboratory observation. The pharmacokinetics of foscarnet was evaluated after the first dose and following approximately 20 days of therapy. Nine patients (90%) responded histopathologically, nine (90%) responded endoscopically, and nine (90%) responded symptomatically to foscarnet therapy. Adverse events resulted in discontinuance of medication in the case of one patient. The mean maximal concentration was 621 microM following the first dose and 687 microM at steady state (P = 0.11). The apparent elimination rate constant and elimination half-life were not different between dose 1 and steady state. There were no significant changes in foscarnet excretion or renal clearance between dose 1 and steady state. The steady-state volume of distribution was 23.4 liters following the first dose and 19.0 liters at steady state (P < 0.002). Twice-daily foscarnet appeared to be safe and efficacious in the treatment of CMV gastrointestinal disease in this study, resulting in endoscopic or histologic improvement in 9 of the 10 (90%) patients. Minor changes in clearance and volume of distribution noted at steady state compared to single-dose administration are readily explained by study design, known information about foscarnet pharmacokinetics, and changes in body weight and creatinine clearance in the patients. PMID:9174175

  20. Safety and pharmacokinetics of oral cannabidiol when administered concomitantly with intravenous fentanyl in humans

    PubMed Central

    Manini, Alex F.; Yiannoulos, Georgia; Bergamaschi, Mateus M.; Hernandez, Stephanie; Olmedo, Ruben; Barnes, Allan J.; Winkel, Gary; Sinha, Rajita; Jutras-Aswad, Didier; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Hurd, Yasmin L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Cannabidiol (CBD) is hypothesized as a potential treatment for opioid addiction, with safety studies an important first step for medication development. We determined CBD safety and pharmacokinetics when administered concomitantly with a high-potency opioid in healthy subjects. Methods This double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study of CBD co-administered with intravenous fentanyl, was conducted at the Clinical Research Center in Mount Sinai Hospital, a tertiary care medical center in New York City. Participants were healthy volunteers aged 21–65 years with prior opioid exposure, regardless of route. Blood samples were obtained before and after 400 or 800 mg CBD pretreatment, followed by a single 0.5 (Session 1) or 1.0mcg/Kg (Session 2) intravenous fentanyl dose. The primary outcome was the Systematic Assessment for Treatment Emergent Events (SAFTEE) to assess safety and adverse effects. CBD peak plasma concentrations, time to reach peak plasma concentrations (tmax), and area under the curve (AUC) were measured. Results SAFTEE data were similar between groups without respiratory depression or cardiovascular complications during any test session. Following low dose CBD, tmax occurred at 3 and 1.5h (Sessions 1 and 2, respectively). Following high dose CBD, tmax occurred at 3 and 4h in Sessions 1 and 2, respectively. There were no significant differences in plasma CBD or cortisol (AUC p=NS) between sessions. Conclusions CBD does not exacerbate adverse effects associated with intravenous fentanyl administration. Co-administration of CBD and opioids was safe and well tolerated. These data provide the foundation for future studies examining CBD as a potential treatment for opioid abuse. PMID:25748562

  1. Pharmacokinetics and safety of voriconazole intravenous-to-oral switch regimens in immunocompromised Japanese pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Kato, Koji; Maeda, Naoko; Fukushima, Keitaro; Goto, Hiroaki; Inoue, Masami; Muto, Chieko; Okayama, Akifumi; Watanabe, Kenichi; Liu, Ping

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of voriconazole following intravenous-to-oral switch regimens used with immunocompromised Japanese pediatric subjects (age 2 to <15 years) at high risk for systemic fungal infection. Twenty-one patients received intravenous-to-oral switch regimens based on a recent population pharmacokinetic modeling; they were given 9 mg/kg of body weight followed by 8 mg/kg of intravenous (i.v.) voriconazole every 12 h (q12h), and 9 mg/kg (maximum, 350 mg) of oral voriconazole q12h (for patients age 2 to <12 or 12 to <15 years and <50 kg) or 6 mg/kg followed by 4 mg/kg of i.v. voriconazole q12h and 200 mg of oral voriconazole q12h (for patients age 12 to <15 years and ≥50 kg). The steady-state area under the curve over the 12-h dosing interval (AUC0-12,ss) was calculated using the noncompartmental method and compared with the predicted exposures in Western pediatric subjects based on the abovementioned modeling. The geometric mean (coefficient of variation) AUC0-12,ss values for the intravenous and oral regimens were 51.1 μg · h/ml (68%) and 45.8 μg·h/ml (90%), respectively; there was a high correlation between AUC0-12,ss and trough concentration. Although the average exposures were higher in the Japanese patients than those in the Western pediatric subjects, the overall voriconazole exposures were comparable between these two groups due to large interindividual variability. The exposures in the 2 cytochrome P450 2C19 poor metabolizers were among the highest. Voriconazole was well tolerated. The most common treatment-related adverse events were photophobia and abnormal hepatic function. These recommended doses derived from the modeling appear to be appropriate for Japanese pediatric patients, showing no additional safety risks compared to those with adult patients. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01383993.). PMID:25451051

  2. Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Tolerability of Melissa officinalis Extract which Contained Rosmarinic Acid in Healthy Individuals: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi-Shinohara, Moeko; Ono, Kenjiro; Hamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Iwasa, Kazuo; Nagai, Toshitada; Kobayashi, Shoko; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of single dose of Melissa officinalis extract which contained rosmarinic acid, including food-effects in healthy individuals. A total of eleven healthy individuals were randomly assigned to treatment arms in the two studies [Study 1 (fasted state) and Study 2 (fed state)]. Rosmarinic acid in serum was measured by a coulometric detection method using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography electrochemical detector. The serum concentration of total rosmarinic acid peaked at 1 hour after administration of Melissa officinalis extract containing 500mg rosmarinic acid in fasted state, with a maximum serum concentration 162.20 nmol/ L. The area under the curve for intact rosmarinic acid was calculated from the serum concentration-time profile to be 832.13 nmol • hour/ L. Food intake increases area under the curve and delayed time at which the maximum serum concentration. Rosmarinic acid supplementation did not affect liver, kidney, or blood cell function parameters. No adverse event was reported by any of the participants due to the study treatment. Single dose of Melissa officinalis extract containing 500 mg rosmarinic acid appears to be safe and tolerable in healthy individuals. Food intake increased the exposure of rosmarinic acid and delayed absorption of rosmarinic acid in healthy individuals. Trial Registration Trial Registration: UMIN-CTR UMIN000004997 PMID:25978046

  3. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of the novel γ-secretase modulator, E2212, in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanke; Logovinsky, Veronika; Schuck, Edgar; Kaplow, June; Chang, Min-Kun; Miyagawa, Takehiko; Wong, Nancy; Ferry, Jim

    2014-05-01

    E2212, a novel γ-secretase modulator, is under development for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. The safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of single ascending oral doses (10-250 mg, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized) of E2212 were evaluated. In this phase I clinical trial, E2212 was found to be well tolerated in single doses. Maximum tolerated dose was not achieved up to 250 mg. Most AEs were mild to moderate in severity with no identifiable dose related pattern. There were no clinically significant findings on physical and ophthalmologic examinations as well as vital signs, laboratory, ECG and C-SSRS assessments. E2212 was rapidly absorbed, with median tmax values ranging from 0.5 to 1.0 h. E2212 exhibited biphasic disposition with the terminal t1/2 of 12.5-19.0 h. Renal excretion was the minor pathway for E2212 elimination. Increased PD response (reduction in plasma concentrations of Aβ(x-42)) was observed with increasing doses. The maximum PD response was observed in the highest dose 250 mg cohort, with ΔAUAC(0-24 h) of 44.1% and Amax of 53.6%. These results support further clinical development of E2212. PMID:24343761

  4. Safety climate and attitude as evaluation measures of organizational safety.

    PubMed

    Isla Díaz, R; Díaz Cabrera, D

    1997-09-01

    The main aim of this research is to develop a set of evaluation measures for safety attitudes and safety climate. Specifically it is intended: (a) to test the instruments; (b) to identify the essential dimensions of the safety climate in the airport ground handling companies; (c) to assess the quality of the differences in the safety climate for each company and its relation to the accident rate; (d) to analyse the relationship between attitudes and safety climate; and (e) to evaluate the influences of situational and personal factors on both safety climate and attitude. The study sample consisted of 166 subjects from three airport companies. Specifically, this research was centered on ground handling departments. The factor analysis of the safety climate instrument resulted in six factors which explained 69.8% of the total variance. We found significant differences in safety attitudes and climate in relation to type of enterprise. PMID:9316712

  5. Pharmacokinetics, Safety, and Tolerability of Faldaprevir in Patients with Renal Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Moschetti, Viktoria; Lang, Benjamin; Halabi, Atef; Petersen-Sylla, Marc; Yong, Chan-Loi; Elgadi, Mabrouk

    2014-01-01

    Faldaprevir is a potent hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3/4A protease inhibitor with negligible urinary excretion. We assessed the pharmacokinetics and safety of a single oral dose of faldaprevir (480 mg) in 32 HCV-negative subjects with renal impairment or normal renal function. Compared with subjects with normal renal function, the adjusted geometric mean ratios (90% confidence intervals in parentheses) for overall exposure area under the concentration-time curve from zero to infinity (AUC0–∞) were 113.6% (41.6 to 310.2%), 178.3% (85.2 to 373.0%), and 169.2% (73.2 to 391.2%) for subjects with mild, moderate, and severe renal impairment, respectively. Overall, 5/8 (63%) subjects with normal renal function and 20/24 (83%) subjects with renal impairment reported adverse events, with gastrointestinal events being the most common. No severe or serious adverse events or deaths were reported. These results suggest that moderate or severe renal impairment can result in a modest increase in faldaprevir exposure. The increase in exposure may be related to decrease in the activity of the liver uptake transporter OATP1B1 as a result of renal impairment. Given this relatively slight increase in exposure, a dose adjustment in HCV patients with renal impairment is not warranted. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT01957657.) PMID:25348520

  6. Single-dose safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of the antibiotic GSK1322322, a novel peptide deformylase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Naderer, Odin J; Dumont, Etienne; Zhu, John; Kurtinecz, Milena; Jones, Lori S

    2013-05-01

    GSK1322322 is a potent inhibitor of peptide deformylase, an essential bacterial enzyme required for protein maturation. GSK1322322 is active against community-acquired skin and respiratory tract pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, and atypical pathogens. This phase I, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2-part, single-dose, dose escalation study (first time in humans) evaluated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of GSK1322322 (powder-in-bottle formulation) in healthy volunteers. In part A, dose escalation included GSK1322322 doses of 100, 200, 400, 800, and 1,500 mg under fasting conditions and 800 mg administered with a high-fat meal. In part B, higher doses of GSK1322322 (2,000, 3,000, and 4,000 mg) were evaluated under fasting conditions. Of the 39 volunteers enrolled in the study, 29 and 10 volunteers were treated with GSK1322322 and placebo, respectively. Upon single-dose administration, GSK1322322 was absorbed rapidly, with median times to maximum plasma concentration (T(max)) ranging from 0.5 to 1.0 h. The maximum observed plasma concentration (C(max)) and exposure (area under the concentration-time curve [AUC]) of GSK1322322 were greater than dose proportional between 100 and 1,500 mg and less than dose proportional between 1,500 and 4,000 mg. Administration of the drug with a high-fat meal reduced the rate of absorption (reduced C(max) and delayed T(max)) without affecting the extent of absorption (no effect on AUC). GSK1322322 was generally well tolerated, with all adverse events being mild to moderate in intensity during both parts of the study. The most frequently reported adverse event was headache. Data from this study support further evaluation of GSK1322322. PMID:23403431

  7. Discovery of a Potent and Selective ROMK Inhibitor with Pharmacokinetic Properties Suitable for Preclinical Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A new subseries of ROMK inhibitors exemplified by 28 has been developed from the initial screening hit 1. The excellent selectivity for ROMK inhibition over related ion channels and pharmacokinetic properties across preclinical species support further preclinical evaluation of 28 as a new mechanism diuretic. Robust pharmacodynamic effects in both SD rats and dogs have been demonstrated. PMID:26191360

  8. Preclinical Studies on the Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Toxicology of Oxfendazole: Toward First in Human Studies

    PubMed Central

    Codd, Ellen E.; Ng, Hanna H.; McFarlane, Claire; Riccio, Edward S.; Doppalapudi, Rupa; Mirsalis, Jon C.; Horton, R. John; Gonzalez, Armando E.; Garcia, H. Hugo; Gilman, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    A two-week study in rats identified target organs of oxfendazole toxicity to be bone marrow, epididymis, liver, spleen, testis, and thymus. Female rats had greater oxfendazole exposure and exhibited toxicities at lower doses than did males. Decreased WBC levels, a class effect of benzimidazole anthelminthics, returned to normal during the recovery period. The NOAEL was determined to be >5 but < 25 mg/kg/d and the MTD 100 mg/kg/d. The highest dose, 200 mg/kg/d resulted in significant toxicity and mortality, leading to euthanization of the main study animals in this group after seven days. Oxfendazole did not exhibit genetic toxicology signals in standard Ames bacterial, mouse lymphoma or rat micronucleus assays, nor did it provoke safety concerns when evaluated for behavioral effects in rats or cardiovascular safety effects in dogs. These results support the transition of oxfendazole to First in Human safety studies preliminary to its evaluation in human helminth diseases. PMID:25701764

  9. A one-year prospective study of the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of the highest available dose of paliperidone palmitate in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There are no previous reports of paliperidone palmitate's (PP) long term tolerability or pharmacokinetics of the highest dose in patients with schizophrenia. This study evaluates safety and tolerability, as well as pharmacokinetics, of the highest marketed dose of PP (150 mg eq. [234 mg]) in stable patients with schizophrenia over a 1-year period. Methods In this 1-year prospective study, eligible patients (aged 18-65 years; Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale's total score ≤ 70) received an initial deltoid injection of PP 150 mg eq. The second injection one week later and subsequent once-monthly injections were deltoid or gluteal. All injections were to be PP 150 mg eq. Patients willing to participate in intensive pharmacokinetic sampling were classified as Treatment A. Patients unwilling to undergo intensive pharmacokinetic sampling or unable to tolerate the 150 mg eq. dose (consequently receiving flexible doses of 50, 100 or 150 mg eq.) were classified as Treatment B. Results Of the 212 patients (safety analysis set), 73% were men; 45% white; 20% black; 34% Asians; mean (SD) age 41 (10.2) years, and mean (SD) baseline Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale total score 54.9 (9.03). A total of 53% (n = 113) patients completed the study and 104 received PP 150 mg eq. throughout. Mean (SD) mode dose of PP was 144.8 (19.58) mg eq. The dosing initiation regimen resulted in rapidly achieved and maintained therapeutic paliperidone levels over the study (average concentrations during the dosing interval were 34.7, 40.0, and 47.8 ng/mL after the 2nd, 8th, and 14th injection respectively). Most frequent (≥ 10%) treatment-emergent adverse events were nasopharyngitis (n = 37), insomnia (n = 32), injection-site pain (n = 32), headache (n = 28), and tachycardia (n = 27). Akathisia (n = 19) and tremor (n = 11) were the most common extrapyramidal adverse events. 33 patients had an SAE and 27 discontinued due to treatment-emergent adverse events. No deaths were

  10. Pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of caspofungin in Japanese pediatric patients with invasive candidiasis and invasive aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masaaki; Imaizumi, Masue; Ishiwada, Naruhiko; Kaneko, Takashi; Goto, Hiroaki; Kato, Koji; Hara, Junichi; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Koike, Kazutoshi; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Maeda, Naoko; Yoshinari, Tomoko; Kishino, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Kenichi; Kawahara, Shizuko; Kartsonis, Nicholas A; Komada, Yoshihiro

    2015-06-01

    The antifungal agents approved in Japan for pediatric use are limited and many unapproved drugs are actually used without clear instruction for dosage. We investigated the pharmacokinetics of caspofungin for the treatment of invasive candidiasis and invasive aspergillosis in 20 Japanese pediatric patients using a pediatric-specific dosage based on body surface area. Caspofungin was administered intravenously over 60 min as 70 mg/m(2) on Day 1, followed by 50 mg/m(2) per day. Five or 4 point blood sampling were done in 15 patients on Day 4-5 to calculate AUC0-24 h. The geometric means (95% confidence interval) of C24 h and AUC0-24 h in the pediatric patients were 3.3(2.5, 4.4) μg/mL and 175.1 (139.3, 220.1) μg hr/mL, respectively, which were comparable to those in Japanese adult patients [3.2 (2.8, 3.5) μg/mL and 144.9 (131.7, 159.3) μg hr/mL, respectively]. Among the 20 patients, 10 (50%) had at least 1 drug-related adverse event which was considered related to caspofungin therapy. No drug-related serious adverse event and no death occurred. The most common drug-related adverse events were events relating to hepatic function (mainly increases in ALT and AST). The overall success in efficacy was observed in 13 of 20 patients. In conclusion, once daily administration of caspofungin (70 mg/m(2) on Day 1, followed by 50 mg/m(2) [maximum daily dose not to exceed 70 mg]), which is the same dosage being used in overseas, achieved sufficient drug exposure and a favorable efficacy and acceptable safety profile in Japanese pediatric patients with invasive fungal infections. PMID:25701307

  11. Pharmacokinetic, partial pharmacodynamic and initial safety analysis of (−)-Epicatechin in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Christopher F.; Moreno-Ulloa, Aldo; Shiva, Sruti; Ramirez-Sanchez, Israel; Taub, Pam R.; Su, Yongxuan; Ceballos, Guillermo; Dugar, Sundeep; Schreiner, George; Villarreal, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    (−)-Epicatechin ((−)-EPI), a naturally occurring flavanol has emerged as a likely candidate for cocoa-based product reported reductions in cardiometabolic risk. The present study aimed to determine the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of purified (−)-EPI administered to healthy volunteers. In this phase I, open-label, two-part single- and multiple-dose study subjects received either a single dose (n=9) of 50, 100 or 200 mg or multiple doses (n=8) of 50 mg daily (q.d.) or twice daily (b.i.d) for 5 days. Blood was collected at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 6 hrs after (−)-EPI administration in the single and multiple dose groups (blood collection repeated in day 5). Samples were analyzed by HPLC-HR-ESI-MS for EPI and metabolites quantification. In the q.d. and b.i.d. groups, blood samples were analyzed for NO surrogates, follistatin, platelet mitochondrial complex I, V and citrate synthase level determinations. (−)-EPI was well tolerated and readily absorbed with further phase 2 metabolism. On day 5, in the q.d. and b.i.d. groups, there were significant increases in plasma nitrite of 30 % and 17 %, respectively. In the q.d. group on day 5 vs. day 1, platelet mitochondria complexes I, IV and citrate synthase activities demonstrated a significant increase of ~ 92, 62 and 8 %, respectively. Average day 5 follistatin AUC levels were ~2.5 fold higher vs. day 1 AUC levels in the b.i.d. group. (−)-EPI was safe with no observed adverse effects and our findings suggest that increases in NO metabolites, mitochondrial enzyme function and plasma follistatin levels may underlie some of the beneficial effects of cocoa products or (−)-EPI as reported in other studies. PMID:25598082

  12. Switching Opioid-Dependent Patients From Methadone to Morphine: Safety, Tolerability, and Methadone Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Glue, Paul; Cape, Gavin; Tunnicliff, Donna; Lockhart, Michelle; Lam, Fred; Gray, Andrew; Hung, Noelyn; Hung, C Tak; Harland, Sarah; Devane, Jane; Howes, John; Weis, Holger; Friedhoff, Lawrence

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to switch patients established on methadone opioid substitution therapy (OST) to morphine over 1 week. Subjects established on daily methadone OST (mean dose 60 mg/day) were switched to morphine slow-release capsules, dosed at 4× the previous total daily methadone dose, for 6 days, then given morphine syrup dosed q3h. All 27 subjects enrolled in this study completed the switch from methadone to morphine. Opioid withdrawal symptoms (OWS) peaked within 12-24 hours of starting morphine, and 24/27 subjects required higher daily morphine doses (mean 5.2× multiple). Pharmacokinetic evaluation showed that 91% of methadone was cleared during this time, with a mean elimination half-life of 59 hours. The most frequent treatment-emergent non-OWS adverse events were headache, nausea, constipation, and neck pain. The method described here appears to be a safe and acceptable approach to switch subjects from methadone to morphine. PMID:26763764

  13. Evaluation of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ticagrelor co-administered with aspirin in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Teng, Renli; Maya, Juan; Butler, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    The results of two independent, randomized, two-period crossover, single-center studies, conducted to assess the pharmacokinetics of ticagrelor ± aspirin, inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA) with ticagrelor/aspirin vs. clopidogrel/aspirin, and safety, tolerability, and bleeding times are reported here. In Study A (open-label), 16 volunteers received ticagrelor (50 mg bid Days 1-5; 200 mg bid Days 6-9; one 200 mg dose on Day 10) ± 300 mg qd aspirin (Days 1-10). In Study B (double-blind, double-dummy), 16 volunteers received aspirin (300 mg loading dose/75 mg qd Days 2-9) with either ticagrelor (200 mg bid Days 4-8, one 200 mg dose on Day 9) or clopidogrel (300 mg loading dose Day 4, 75 mg qd Days 5-9). At steady-state ticagrelor (50 mg bid, or 200 mg bid), concomitant aspirin (300 mg qd) had no effect on mean maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), median time to Cmax (tmax), or mean area under the plasma concentration-time curve for the dosing interval (AUC0-τ) for ticagrelor and its primary metabolite, AR-C124910XX. Following 200 mg bid ticagrelor, mean Cmax and AUC0-τ for both parent and metabolite were comparable with co-administration of aspirin at 75 mg and 300 mg qd. Aspirin (300 mg qd) had no effect on IPA (ADP-induced) by ticagrelor. However, aspirin and ticagrelor had an additive effect on IPA (collagen-induced). Ticagrelor/aspirin increased bleeding times vs. baseline. Ticagrelor/aspirin co-administration was well tolerated at all dose combinations evaluated. In summary, the findings of this study demonstrate that co-administration of aspirin (300 mg qd) with ticagrelor (50 mg bid, or 200 mg bid) had no effect on ticagrelor pharmacokinetics or IPA (ADP-induced) by ticagrelor. PMID:23249161

  14. Safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of single and multiple doses of a novel sigma-1 receptor antagonist in three randomized phase I studies

    PubMed Central

    Abadias, Montserrat; Escriche, Marisol; Vaqué, Anna; Sust, Mariano; Encina, Gregorio

    2013-01-01

    AIM To assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics in healthy subjects of a novel, highly selective, sigma-1 receptor antagonist (S1RA). METHODS Three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials evaluated single oral doses (5–500 mg, study 101; 500–800 mg, study 106) and multiple doses (50–400 mg once daily for 8 days, study 102) of S1RA. Safety and tolerability were assessed by adverse event reporting, clinical laboratory, physical examinations, vital signs and electrocardiography, including Holter monitoring. Pharmacodynamic assessments included computerized cognitive testing. Plasma samples were analyzed using validated HPLC-MS/MS methods. RESULTS One hundred and seventy-five subjects were enrolled. Single and multiple doses were safe and well tolerated, with no serious adverse events. The most common side effects were headache and dizziness. The highest single doses were associated with some mild to moderate transient CNS effects. The maximum tolerated dose was not reached. There were no clinically significant changes in the electrocardiogram (ECG), 24 h Holter monitoring, or in vital signs and laboratory assessments. Subjective CNS pharmacodynamics evaluations showed no relevant differences vs. placebo. Cognitive testing showed no effects on visual memory, executive function, attention or somnolence, while revealing some transient slowing of response for simple reaction time and choice reaction time at 2 h following the administration of higher doses. A fast absorption, rapid distribution and slow elimination were observed (tmax 0.75–2.0 h, t1/2 compatible with once a day administration) and steady-state was reached. No gender differences were observed. CONCLUSIONS S1RA exhibited an acceptable safety, tolerability, pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profile in healthy subjects over the dose range studied. PMID:22607269

  15. Criticality safety evaluation - an endusers's perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S T

    1999-05-06

    This paper presents criticality safety evaluations from an enduser's perspective. Overall issues related to a criticality safety evaluation in an operations support setting are discussed. A work flow process is presented which shows the key steps in conducting an effective criticality evaluation. Finally, a few suggestions are given to assist newcomers to this field.

  16. Safety and pharmacokinetics of motesanib in combination with gemcitabine for the treatment of patients with solid tumours.

    PubMed

    Price, T J; Lipton, L; McGreivy, J; McCoy, S; Sun, Y-N; Rosenthal, M A

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this open-label phase 1b study was to assess the safety and pharmacokinetics of motesanib in combination with gemcitabine in patients with advanced solid tumours. Eligible patients with histologically or cytologically documented solid tumours or lymphoma were enroled in three sequential, dose-escalating cohorts to receive motesanib 50 mg once daily (QD), 75 mg two times daily (BID), or 125 mg QD in combination with gemcitabine (1000 mg m(-2)). The primary end point was the incidence of dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs). Twenty-six patients were enroled and received motesanib and gemcitabine. No DLTs occurred. The 75 mg BID cohort was discontinued early; therefore, 125 mg QD was the maximum target dose. Sixteen patients (62%) experienced motesanib-related adverse events, most commonly lethargy (n=6), diarrhoea (n=4), fatigue (n=3), headache (n=3), and nausea (n=3). The pharmacokinetics of motesanib and of gemcitabine were not markedly affected after combination therapy. The objective response rate was 4% (1 of 26), and 27% (7 of 26) of patients achieved stable disease. In conclusion, treatment with motesanib plus gemcitabine was well tolerated, with adverse event and pharmacokinetic profiles similar to that observed in monotherapy studies. PMID:18971935

  17. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of an interleukin-2 agonist among HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Davey, Richard T; Pertel, Peter E; Benson, Alice; Cassell, Delanie J; Gazzard, Brian G; Holodniy, Mark; Lalezari, Jacob P; Levy, Yves; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T; Palella, Frank J; Pollard, Richard B; Rajagopalan, Prabhu; Saag, Michael S; Salata, Robert A; Sha, Beverly E; Choudhri, Shurjeel

    2008-02-01

    We sought to determine the safety, maximum tolerated dose, optimal dose, and preliminary dose efficacy of intermittent subcutaneously (s.c.) administered BAY 50-4798 among patients with HIV infection receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) compared with patients receiving HAART alone. A phase I/II randomized, double-blind, dose-escalation study was conducted of the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of s.c. BAY 50-4798 administered to HIV-infected patients already receiving stable HAART. There were no unexpected safety findings in a population of HIV-infected patients receiving HAART plus SC BAY 50-4798 as adjunctive therapy. BAY 50-4798 exhibited nearly dose-proportional pharmacokinetics, and accumulation was minimal during multiple-dose treatment. Limited efficacy data indicated that treatment with BAY 50-4798 caused at least a transient increase in CD4(+) T cell counts in some recipients, particularly at the early time points. In general, this effect appeared to increase with increasing dose. Bay 50-4798 was generally well tolerated across the dose range tested, but a lack of potent, sustained immunologic activity suggests that further optimization of dose and schedule will be necessary. PMID:18279104

  18. Pharmacokinetics and Preliminary Safety Study of Pod-Intravaginal Rings Delivering Antiretroviral Combinations for HIV Prophylaxis in a Macaque Model

    PubMed Central

    Moss, John A.; Srinivasan, Priya; Smith, Thomas J.; Butkyavichene, Irina; Lopez, Gilbert; Brooks, Amanda A.; Martin, Amy; Dinh, Chuong T.; Smith, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Preexposure prophylaxis using oral regimens involving the HIV nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) and emtricitabine (FTC) demonstrated efficacy in three clinical trials. Adherence was determined to be a key parameter for success. Incorporation of the TDF-FTC combination into intravaginal rings (IVRs) for sustained mucosal delivery could increase product adherence and efficacy compared with those of oral and vaginal gel formulations. A novel pod-IVR technology capable of delivering multiple drugs is described; this constitutes the first report of an IVR delivering TDF and FTC, as well as a triple-combination IVR delivering TDF, FTC, and the entry inhibitor maraviroc (MVC). The pharmacokinetics and preliminary local safety of the two combination pod-IVRs were evaluated in the pig-tailed macaque model. The devices exhibited sustained release at controlled rates over the 28-day study period. Median steady-state drug levels in vaginal tissues in the TDF-FTC group were 30 μg g−1 (tenofovir [TFV], in vivo hydrolysis product of TDF) and 500 μg g−1 (FTC) and in the TDF-FTC-MVC group were 10 μg g−1 (TFV), 150 μg g−1 (FTC), and 20 μg g−1 (MVC). No adverse events were observed, and there were no toxicological findings. Mild-to-moderate increases in inflammatory infiltrates were observed in the vaginal tissues of some animals in both the presence and the absence of the IVRs. The IVRs did not disturb the vaginal microbiota, and levels of proinflammatory cytokines remained stable throughout the study. Pod-IVR candidates based on the TDF-FTC combination have potential for the prevention of vaginal HIV acquisition and merit clinical investigation. PMID:24936594

  19. First assessment in humans of the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and ex vivo pharmacodynamic antimalarial activity of the new artemisinin derivative artemisone.

    PubMed

    Nagelschmitz, Johannes; Voith, Barbara; Wensing, Georg; Roemer, Axel; Fugmann, Burkhard; Haynes, Richard K; Kotecka, Barbara M; Rieckmann, Karl H; Edstein, Michael D

    2008-09-01

    In preclinical studies, artemisone (BAY 44-9585), a new artemisinin derivative, was shown to possess enhanced efficacy over artesunate, and it does not possess the neurotoxicity characteristic of the current artemisinins. In a phase I program with double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, single and multiple ascending oral-dose studies, we evaluated the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and ex vivo pharmacodynamic antimalarial activity of artemisone. Single doses (10, 20, 30, 40, and 80 mg) and multiple doses (40 and 80 mg daily for 3 days) of artemisone were administered orally to healthy subjects. Plasma concentrations of artemisone and its metabolites were measured by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS). Artemisone was well tolerated, with no serious adverse events and no clinically relevant changes in laboratory and vital parameters. The pharmacokinetics of artemisone over the 10- to 80-mg range demonstrated dose linearity. After the single 80-mg dose, artemisone had a geometric mean maximum concentration of 140.2 ng/ml (range, 86.6 to 391.0), a short elimination half-life (t(1/2)) of 2.79 h (range, 1.56 to 4.88), a high oral clearance of 284.1 liters/h (range, 106.7 to 546.7), and a large volume of distribution of 14.50 liters/kg (range, 3.21 to 51.58). Due to artemisone's short t(1/2), its pharmacokinetics were comparable after single and multiple dosing. Plasma samples taken after multiple dosing showed marked ex vivo pharmacodynamic antimalarial activities against two multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum lines. Artemisone equivalent concentrations measured by bioassay revealed higher activity than artemisone measured by LC/MS-MS, confirming the presence of active metabolites. Comparable to those of other artemisinin's, artemisone's t(1/2) is well suited for artemisinin-based combination therapy for the treatment of P. falciparum malaria. PMID:18559649

  20. First Assessment in Humans of the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Ex Vivo Pharmacodynamic Antimalarial Activity of the New Artemisinin Derivative Artemisone▿

    PubMed Central

    Nagelschmitz, Johannes; Voith, Barbara; Wensing, Georg; Roemer, Axel; Fugmann, Burkhard; Haynes, Richard K.; Kotecka, Barbara M.; Rieckmann, Karl H.; Edstein, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    In preclinical studies, artemisone (BAY 44-9585), a new artemisinin derivative, was shown to possess enhanced efficacy over artesunate, and it does not possess the neurotoxicity characteristic of the current artemisinins. In a phase I program with double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, single and multiple ascending oral-dose studies, we evaluated the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and ex vivo pharmacodynamic antimalarial activity of artemisone. Single doses (10, 20, 30, 40, and 80 mg) and multiple doses (40 and 80 mg daily for 3 days) of artemisone were administered orally to healthy subjects. Plasma concentrations of artemisone and its metabolites were measured by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS). Artemisone was well tolerated, with no serious adverse events and no clinically relevant changes in laboratory and vital parameters. The pharmacokinetics of artemisone over the 10- to 80-mg range demonstrated dose linearity. After the single 80-mg dose, artemisone had a geometric mean maximum concentration of 140.2 ng/ml (range, 86.6 to 391.0), a short elimination half-life (t1/2) of 2.79 h (range, 1.56 to 4.88), a high oral clearance of 284.1 liters/h (range, 106.7 to 546.7), and a large volume of distribution of 14.50 liters/kg (range, 3.21 to 51.58). Due to artemisone's short t1/2, its pharmacokinetics were comparable after single and multiple dosing. Plasma samples taken after multiple dosing showed marked ex vivo pharmacodynamic antimalarial activities against two multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum lines. Artemisone equivalent concentrations measured by bioassay revealed higher activity than artemisone measured by LC/MS-MS, confirming the presence of active metabolites. Comparable to those of other artemisinin's, artemisone's t1/2 is well suited for artemisinin-based combination therapy for the treatment of P. falciparum malaria. PMID:18559649

  1. Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Oral Dantrolene in the Dog

    PubMed Central

    Haraschak, Jenica L.; Langston, Vernon C.; Wang, Ran; Riggs, Caitlin; Fellman, Claire; Ross, Matthew K.; Bulla, Camilo; Lunsford, Kari; Mackin, Andrew; Archer, Todd

    2014-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of dantrolene and its active metabolite, 5-hydroxydantrolene, after a single oral dose of either 5 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg of dantrolene were determined. The effects of exposure to dantrolene and 5-hydroxydantrolene on activated whole blood gene expression of the cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) were also investigated. When dantrolene was administered at a 5 mg/kg dose, peak plasma concentration (Cmax) was 0.43 µg/ml, terminal half-life (t1/2) was 1.26 hrs, and area under the time-concentration curve (AUC) was 3.87 µg hr/mL. For the 10 mg/kg dose, Cmax was 0.65 µg/ml, t1/2 was 1.21 hrs, and AUC was 5.94 µg hr/mL. For all calculated parameters, however, there were large standard deviations and wide ranges noted between and within individual dogs: t1/2, for example, ranged from 0.43 to 6.93 hrs, Cmax ratios ranged from 1.05 to 3.39, and relative bioavailability (rF) values ranged from 0.02 to 1.56. While activated whole blood expression of IL-2 and IFN-γ as measured by qRT-PCR was markedly suppressed following exposure to very high concentrations (30 µg/mL and 50 µg/mL, respectively) of both dantrolene and 5-hydroxydantrolene, biologically and therapeutically relevant suppression of cytokine expression did not occur at the much lower drug concentrations achieved with oral dantrolene dosing. PMID:24219828

  2. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Fluconazole in Young Infants Supported with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Kevin M.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Cheifetz, Ira M.; Moorthy, Ganesh; Wade, Kelly C.; Smith, P. Brian; Brouwer, Kim L. R.; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background Candida infections are a leading cause of infectious disease-related death in infants supported with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The ECMO circuit can alter drug pharmacokinetics (PK), thus standard fluconazole dosing in children on ECMO may result in suboptimal drug exposure. This study determined the PK of fluconazole in infants on ECMO. Methods Infants <120 days old received either intravenous fluconazole prophylaxis (25 mg/kg once a week) or treatment (12 mg/kg daily) while on ECMO. Paired plasma samples were collected pre- and post-oxygenator around doses 1 and 2 to calculate PK indices and describe oxygenator extraction. A 1-compartment model was fit to the data using non-linear regression. Surrogate pharmacodynamic targets for efficacy were evaluated. Results Ten infants were enrolled. After dose 1 (n=9), the median clearance was 17 mL/kg/h, the median volume of distribution was 1.5 L/kg, and the median exposure in the first 24 hours (AUC0–24) was 322 h*mg/L. After multiple doses (n=7), the median clearance was 22 mL/kg/h, the median volume of distribution was 1.9 L/kg, and the AUC0–24 was 352 h*mg/L. After dose 1, 78% of infants achieved the prophylaxis target, while only 11% achieved the therapeutic target. Oxygenator extraction of fluconazole was minimal (−2.0%, standard deviation 15.0), and extraction was not correlated with age of the ECMO circuit (rho= − 0.05). There were no adverse events related to fluconazole. Conclusions Infants on ECMO had higher volume of distribution but similar clearance when compared with historical controls not on ECMO. In infants on ECMO, a fluconazole dose of 25 mg/kg weekly provides adequate exposure for prophylaxis against Candida infections. However, higher doses may be needed for treatment. PMID:22627870

  3. Pharmacokinetics, Safety, and Tolerability of Fevipiprant (QAW039), a Novel CRTh2 Receptor Antagonist: Results From 2 Randomized, Phase 1, Placebo-Controlled Studies in Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Erpenbeck, Veit J; Vets, Eva; Gheyle, Lien; Osuntokun, Wande; Larbig, Michael; Neelakantham, Srikanth; Sandham, David; Dubois, Gerald; Elbast, Walid; Goldsmith, Paul; Weiss, Markus

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated the pharmacokinetics (PK), safety, and tolerability of a novel oral CRTh2 antagonist, fevipiprant (QAW039), in healthy subjects. Peak concentrations of fevipiprant in plasma were observed 1-3 hours postdosing. Concentrations declined in a multiexponential manner, followed by an apparent terminal phase (t1/2 , ∼20 hours). Steady state was achieved in 4 days with <2-fold accumulation. Elimination was partly by renal excretion (≤30% of the dose) and glucuronidation. Food had minimal impact on the PK of fevipiprant, and it was well tolerated at single and multiple oral doses up to 500 mg/day. No dose-dependent adverse events were observed, and all the events were mild or moderate in severity. Systemic concentrations were sufficiently high to achieve relevant target occupancy, considering in vitro pharmacology data. In summary, the data support further development as a once-daily oral therapy for allergic diseases. PMID:27310331

  4. Comparison of pharmacokinetic and safety profiles between Bemfola(®) and Gonal-f(®) after subcutaneous application.

    PubMed

    Wolzt, Michael; Gouya, Ghazeleh; Sator, Michael; Hemetsberger, Thomas; Irps, Charlotte; Rettenbacher, Manfred; Vcelar, Brigitta

    2016-06-01

    Recombinant human follicle stimulating hormone (r-hFSH) is effective and safe for controlled ovarian stimulation. Bemfola(®) (Finox AG, Burgdorf, Switzerland), a new biosimilar r-hFSH, has proven comparable non-clinical pharmacological profiles to those of the widely used Gonal-f(®) (Serono Pharma S.p.A., Bari, Italy). The objective of this study was to show that Bemfola(®) yields comparable clinical pharmacokinetic (PK) and safety profiles to Gonal-f(®) in healthy female subjects. In this randomized, Phase I trial conducted in healthy female volunteers (N = 32), a 2-period, balanced 2-treatment crossover design was used. A single subcutaneous dose of 225 IU Bemfola(®) or Gonal-f(®) was administered in each treatment period per sequence. Blood was collected for pharmacokinetic analysis until 10 days after each r-hFSH treatment. For down-regulation of endogenous FSH subjects were given a depot injection with leuprolide acetate prior to the study drug in either sequence. Pharmacokinetic data was available for 23 subjects. No appreciable differences in key PK parameters were detected between the r-hFSH products as per non-compartmental PK analysis [i.e. for Bemfola(®) and Gonal-f(®) respectively AUC0-192 424.90 and 432.75 IU h/L, C max 0.98 and 0.95 IU/L, T max 24.0 h (range 6.0-24.0) and 24.0 h (range 9.0-24.0), t 1/2 43.58 h [standard deviation (SD 14.17)] and 42.58 h (SD 16.47), and K e 0.0075 1/h (SD 0.003) and 0.0077 1/h (SD 0.002)]. Subgroup analysis for estradiol (E2) response was similar for Bemfola(®) and Gonal f(®) (AUC(0--120) p = 0.21 and C max p = 0.82). No major safety issues were identified and no immunogenic reaction to r-hFSH was observed. The results of this study indicate that a single dose of Bemfola(®) exhibits pharmacokinetic and safety profiles comparable to Gonal-f(®) in healthy young women. PMID:25633239

  5. Pharmacokinetics, thrombogenicity and safety of a double viral inactivated factor IX concentrate compared with a prothrombin complex concentrate.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sáez, A; Hong, A; Arguello, A; Echenagucia, M; Boadas, A; Fabbrizzi, F; Minichilli, F; Bosch, N B

    2005-11-01

    Therapeutic options for developing countries have to assure an optimum safety and efficacy and low-cost antihaemophilic concentrates. A single blind randomized crossover study was carried out in 12 previously treated HB patients, comparing the pharmacokinetics (PK), thrombogenicity (TG) and safety of two plasma-derived double-inactivated (solvent/detergent heating at 100 degrees C, 30 min) factor IX (FIX) concentrates, UMAN COMPLEX DI (product A) [plasma-derived prothrombin concentrates (PCC)] and a high purity FIX concentrate AIMAFIX DI (product B, HPFIX). In a non-bleeding state, they received one single intravenous dose 50 IU FIX kg(-1) of PCC or HPFIX, and after a wash-out period of 14 days, the other product. We evaluated acute tolerance and determined PK parameters based on FIX levels measured over a 50 h postinfusion period. We studied fibrinogen, platelets, antithrombin, F1 + 2, TAT, D-dimer, over a 360 min postinfusion period. Ten cases remained in on-demand treatment for 6 months, five with PCC and five with HPFIX. PK and anti-FIX inhibitors were repeated at 3 and 6 months. No inhibitors were detected. PK values (PCC vs. HPFIX): clearence (CL; mL h(-1) kg(-1)) 5.2 +/- 1.4 vs. 6.5 +/- 1.4; the volume of distribution at steady state (mL kg(-1)) 154.9 +/- 54.9 vs. 197.5 +/- 72.5; mean residence time (h) 29.7 +/- 8.1 vs. 30.7 +/- 9.2; T(1/2) (h) 22.3 +/- 7 vs. 23.5 +/- 12.3; incremental recovery (IR; U dL(-1) U(-1) kg(-1)) 0.96 +/- 0.17 vs. 0.76 +/- 0.13. HPFIX showed significant lower IR and higher CL. There were no differences in PK at 3 and 6 months. In TG, significant increments in TAT and F1 + 2 at 30 min and 6 h were found with PCC. Product B PK results agrees with reported results for other HPFIX preparations. Use of PCC product A has to consider its thrombogenic activity. PMID:16236107

  6. Dimethyl fumarate in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: rationale, mechanisms of action, pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Duvyanshu; Kieseier, Bernd C; Hartung, Hans P; Hemmer, Bernhard; Warnke, Clemens; Menge, Til; Miller-Little, William A; Stuve, Olaf

    2015-04-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF), a fumaric acid ester, is a new orally available disease-modifying agent that was recently approved by the US FDA and the EMA for the management of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Fumaric acid has been used for the management of psoriasis, for more than 50 years. Because of the known anti-inflammatory properties of fumaric acid ester, DMF was brought into clinical development in MS. More recently, neuroprotective and myelin-protective mechanism actions have been proposed, making it a possible candidate for MS treatment. Two Phase III clinical trials (DEFINE, CONFIRM) have evaluated the safety and efficacy of DMF in patients with relapsing-remitting MS. Being an orally available agent with a favorable safety profile, it has become one of the most commonly prescribed disease-modifying agents in the USA and Europe. PMID:25800129

  7. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of single-dose intravenous daptomycin in patients with thermal burn injury.

    PubMed

    Mohr, John F; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Wainright, David J; Parks, Donald H; Hollenbeck, Timothy C; Ericsson, Charles D

    2008-05-01

    Daptomycin pharmacokinetics were evaluated for burn patients. Burn patients had decreases in the maximum concentration of the drug in serum (44%) and the area under the concentration-time curve (47%) and increases in the volume of distribution (64%) and total clearance (77%) compared to healthy volunteers. In burn patients, daptomycin at 10 to 12 mg/kg of body weight/day would be required to achieve drug exposures similar to those for healthy volunteers receiving 6 mg/kg. PMID:18299410

  8. [Pharmacokinetics and safety of aripiprazole long-acting injection, following multiple deltoid administrations in schizophrenia patients in Japan].

    PubMed

    Ishigooka, Jun; Noda, Takamasa; Nishiyama, Kosuke; Tamaru, Noriko; Shima, Tomoko; Yamasaki, Yumiko; Tadori, Yoshihiro

    2016-06-01

    Aripiprazole once-monthly (AOM) was previously approved for treatment of schizophrenia as monthly injections in the gluteal muscle. The deltoid muscle provides a more accessible injection site. The present study was conducted in Japanese schizophrenia patients as a 24-week, open-label trial that assessed the pharmacokinetics and safety of 5 sequential doses of AOM 400 mg (AOM 400) once every 4 weeks administered in the deltoid muscle. Patients treated with an oral atypical antipsychotic (other than aripiprazole) continued to receive their pre-study medication up to 14 days after the first AOM 400 injection. The completion rate was 76.5% (n = 13/17). Mean aripiprazole plasma C(min) almost reached steady-state by the fourth AOM 400 injection. After the fifth AOM 400 injection, mean aripiprazole AUC(28d), C(max) and C(min) were 165 μg x h/ml, 331 ng/ml and 201 ng/ml, respectively, which were similar to previously published pharmacokinetic parameters after the fifth gluteal injection of AOM 400. The most common treatment-emergent adverse event (TEAE) was injection site pain (35.3%). Most TEAEs were classified as mild in intensity. In conclusion, the deltoid injection of AOM can be considered an alternative route of administration, as deltoid and gluteal injections are interchangeable in terms of aripiprazole plasma concentrations, with no additional safety issues. PMID:27506082

  9. Human plasma-derived FVIII/VWD concentrate (Biostate): a review of experimental and clinical pharmacokinetic, efficacy and safety data

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Paul; Favaloro, Emmanuel J.; Curtin, Julie; Barnes, Chris; Dunkley, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Human plasma-derived factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex concentrates are used to control bleeding in patients with von Willebrand disease (VWD) or haemophilia A (HA). The properties of these haemostatic factor concentrates vary widely, which can have significant clinical implications. This review provides an extensive overview of the molecular properties, in addition to pharmacokinetic, efficacy and safety data, and case studies of clinical experience of one such concentrate, Biostate. These data are discussed in the context of various therapeutic applications and compared with other factor concentrate products. Data are presented from data on file from the manufacturer; product information and published experimental and clinical pharmacokinetic, safety and efficacy study data; and example case studies of clinical experience. The data discussed herein demonstrate that Biostate has well-established efficacy profiles in the treatment of patients with VWD or HA, with the control of bleeding rated as ‘excellent’, ‘good’ or ‘moderate’ in >90% of patients. In an immune-tolerance induction setting, 73% of patients achieved a complete response following treatment with Biostate. Biostate was generally well tolerated in patients with HA or VWD, with infrequent minor adverse events reported and no reported cases of clinically relevant thrombosis. PMID:27114741

  10. Effectiveness, Safety, and Pharmacokinetics of Quetiapine in Aggressive Children with Conduct Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findling, Robert L.; Reed, Michael D.; O'Riordan, Mary Ann; Demeter, Christine A.; Stansbrey, Robert J.; McNamara, Nora K.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To provide an initial description of the effectiveness and pharmacokinetics (PK) of quetiapine in aggressive children with conduct disorder (CD). Method: This 8-week, open-label outpatient trial, enrolled patients ages 6 to 12 years with CD. Outcome measures included the Rating of Aggression Against People and/or Property Scale…

  11. Single-Dose Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Abacavir (1592U89), Zidovudine, and Lamivudine Administered Alone and in Combination in Adults with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Laurene H.; Chittick, Gregory E.; McDowell, James A.

    1999-01-01

    Abacavir (1592U89), a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor with in vitro activity against human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1), has been evaluated for efficacy and safety in combination regimens with other nucleoside analogs, including zidovudine (ZDV) and lamivudine (3TC). To evaluate the potential pharmacokinetic interactions between these agents, 15 HIV-1-infected adults with a median CD4+ cell count of 347 cells/mm3 (range, 238 to 570 cells/mm3) were enrolled in a randomized, seven-period crossover study. The pharmacokinetics and safety of single doses of abacavir (600 mg), ZDV (300 mg), and 3TC (150 mg) were evaluated when each drug was given alone or when any two or three drugs were given concurrently. The concentrations of all drugs in plasma and the concentrations of ZDV and its 5′-glucuronide metabolite, GZDV, in urine were measured for up to 24 h postdosing, and pharmacokinetic parameter values were calculated by noncompartmental methods. The maximum drug concentration (Cmax), the area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity (AUC0–∞), time to Cmax (Tmax), and apparent elimination half-life (t1/2) of abacavir in plasma were unaffected by coadministration with ZDV and/or 3TC. Coadministration of abacavir with ZDV (with or without 3TC) decreased the mean Cmax of ZDV by approximately 20% (from 1.5 to 1.2 μg/ml), delayed the median Tmax for ZDV by 0.5 h, increased the mean AUC0–∞ for GZDV by up to 40% (from 11.8 to 16.5 μg · h/ml), and delayed the median Tmax for GZDV by approximately 0.5 h. Coadministration of abacavir with 3TC (with or without ZDV) decreased the mean AUC0–∞ for 3TC by approximately 15% (from 5.1 to 4.3 μg · h/ml), decreased the mean Cmax by approximately 35% (from 1.4 to 0.9 μg/ml), and delayed the median Tmax by approximately 1 h. While these changes were statistically significant, they are similar to the effect of food intake (for ZDV) or affect an inactive metabolite (for GZDV) or are

  12. Randomised clinical trial: safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of repeated doses of TAK-438 (vonoprazan), a novel potassium-competitive acid blocker, in healthy male subjects

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, H; Sakurai, Y; Nishimura, A; Okamoto, H; Hibberd, M; Jenkins, R; Yoneyama, T; Ashida, K; Ogama, Y; Warrington, S

    2015-01-01

    Background TAK-438 (vonoprazan) is a potassium-competitive acid blocker that reversibly inhibits gastric H+, K+-ATPase. Aim To evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of TAK-438 in healthy Japanese and non-Japanese men. Methods In two Phase I, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, healthy men (Japan N = 60; UK N = 48) received TAK-438 10–40 mg once daily at a fixed dose level for 7 consecutive days. Assessments included safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (intragastric pH). Results Plasma concentration–time profiles of TAK-438 at all dose levels showed rapid absorption (median Tmax ≤2 h). Mean elimination half-life was up to 9 h. Exposure was slightly greater than dose proportional, with no apparent time-dependent inhibition of metabolism. There was no important difference between the two studies in AUC0-tau on Day 7. TAK-438 caused dose-dependent acid suppression. On Day 7, mean 24-h intragastric pH>4 holding time ratio (HTR) with 40 mg TAK-438 was 100% (Japan) and 93.2% (UK), and mean night-time pH>4 HTR was 100% (Japan) and 90.4% (UK). TAK-438 was well tolerated. The frequency of adverse events was similar at all dose levels and there were no serious adverse events. There were no important increases in serum alanine transaminase activity. Serum gastrin and pepsinogen I and II concentrations increased with TAK-438 dose. Conclusions TAK-438 in multiple rising oral dose levels of 10–40 mg once daily for 7 days was safe and well tolerated in healthy men and caused rapid, profound and sustained suppression of gastric acid secretion throughout each 24-h dosing interval. Clinicaltrials.gov identifiers: NCT02123953 and NCT02141711. PMID:25707624

  13. Oral ciprofloxacin in the treatment of serious soft tissue and bone infections. Efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Nix, D E; Cumbo, T J; Kuritzky, P; DeVito, J M; Schentag, J J

    1987-04-27

    Forty-eight patients were enrolled in a clinical study of oral ciprofloxacin for the treatment of soft tissue or bone infections. Patients received 500 to 750 mg of ciprofloxacin every 12 hours. In the predominantly older population studied, there were 13 patients with osteomyelitis, 24 diabetic patients with soft tissue infection and probable osteomyelitis, and 11 patients with other soft tissue infections. Infecting pathogens included Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 25 patients, Serratia species in nine patients, Staphylococcus aureus in 13 patients, and other aerobic gram-negative rods in 21 patients. Clinical response (defined as resolution or improvement) was noted in 84 percent of patients with non-diabetic osteomyelitis, in 79 percent of patients with diabetic infections, and in 91 percent of patients with soft tissue infections. Microbiologic outcome was very favorable in 75 percent of cases, and Pseudomonas responded as well as any other pathogen. Pharmacokinetic properties of ciprofloxacin were evaluated in 12 patients, and the data were analyzed using both compartmental and non-compartmental analyses. Mean values for compartmental rate constants (hours-1) were as follows: absorption rate constant = 1.15; intercompartmental rate constants, k12 = 0.48, and k21 = 0.58; elimination rate constant = 0.46; distribution rate constant = 1.31; and terminal elimination rate constant = 0.19. The apparent volume of distribution at steady state/bioavailability was 196 liters and total body clearance/bioavailability was 45.9 liters/hour. The mean time to peak concentration was 1.3 hours. The mean peak concentration as determined by compartmental fitting (2.4 micrograms/ml) underestimated the observed peak (3.2 micrograms/ml) by 24.8 percent. Clearance of ciprofloxacin was similar regardless of the method used to fit the data, whereas the volume of distribution was significantly different when the two analysis techniques were compared. Ciprofloxacin was well tolerated, with

  14. EVALUATION OF MULTIPLE PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING STRUCTURES FOR TRICHLOROETHYLENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of PBPK models were developed for trichloroethylene (TCE) to evaluate biological processes that may affect the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of TCE and its metabolites.

  15. Pharmacokinetic properties of IB1001, an investigational recombinant factor IX, in patients with haemophilia B: repeat pharmacokinetic evaluation and sialylation analysis.

    PubMed

    Martinowitz, U; Shapiro, A; Quon, D V; Escobar, M; Kempton, C; Collins, P W; Chowdary, P; Makris, M; Mannucci, P M; Morfini, M; Valentino, L A; Gomperts, E; Lee, M

    2012-11-01

    IB1001 trenacog alfa is an investigational recombinant factor IX (FIX) for the treatment and prevention of bleeding in individuals with haemophilia B. To compare the pharmacokinetics (PK) of IB1001 with nonacog alfa in individuals with haemophilia B and to assess the relationship between sialylation and PK of IB1001 (NCT00768287). A randomized, double-blind, non-inferiority, cross-over study conducted in participants aged ≥ 12 years weighing ≥ 40 kg, with severe or moderately severe haemophilia B (FIX activity ≤ 2 IU dL (-1) ). PK parameters were derived using observed FIX concentration levels and actual PK sampling times, and repeated in a subset of participants who had received IB1001 prophylaxis for 4-18 months. A retrospective analysis was conducted in subgroups according to the sialylation levels of IB1001 (50.8, 57.8-59.0%, or 71.7%). In the 32 adolescent and adult males evaluated, there were no clinically meaningful differences in PK parameters between those receiving IB1001 75 IU kg(-1) or nonacog alfa. The lower limit of the one-sided 95% confidence interval for the ratio of AUC(0-t) and AUC(0-∞) (IB1001/nonacog alfa) was 0.90, establishing non-inferiority. Terminal phase half-lives were similar (29.7 ± 18.2 h for IB1001 and 33.4 ± 21.2 h for nonacog alfa). The PK results were stable for up to 18 months of IB1001 exposure; the impact of sialylation levels was not clinically meaningful. There were no clinically meaningful PK differences between IB1001 and nonacog alfa. IB1001 was well tolerated and without safety concerns. The non-inferiority of IB1001 to nonacog alfa supports IB1001 becoming a useful alternative recombinant agent for the management of haemophilia B. PMID:22764744

  16. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of losmapimod following a single intravenous or oral dose in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, April M; Sarov-Blat, Lea; Cai, Gengqian; Fossler, Michael J; Sprecher, Dennis L; Graggaber, Johann; McGeoch, Adam T; Maison, Jo; Cheriyan, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Aims The purpose of this study was to establish safety and tolerability of a single intravenous (IV) infusion of a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor, losmapimod, to obtain therapeutic levels rapidly for a potential acute coronary syndrome indication. Pharmacokinetics (PK) following IV dosing were characterized, and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) relationships between losmapimod and phosphorylated heat shock protein 27 (pHSP27) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were explored. Methods Healthy volunteers received 1 mg losmapimod IV over 15 min (n = 4) or 3 mg IV over 15 min followed by a washout period and then 15 mg orally (PO; n = 12). Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by noncompartmental methods. The PK/PD relationships were explored using modelling and simulation. Results There were no deaths, nonfatal serious adverse events or adverse events leading to withdrawal. Headache was the only adverse event reported more than once (n = 3 following oral dosing). Following 3 mg IV and 15 mg PO, Cmax was 59.4 and 45.9 μg l−1 and AUC0–∞ was 171.1 and 528.0 μg h l−1, respectively. Absolute oral bioavailability was 0.62 [90% confidence interval (CI) 0.56, 0.68]. Following 3 mg IV and 15 mg PO, maximal reductions in pHSP27 were 44% (95% CI 38%, 50%) and 55% (95% CI 50%, 59%) occurring at 30 min and 4 h, respectively. There was a 17% decrease (95% CI 9%, 24%) in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein 24 h following oral dosing. A direct-link maximal inhibitory effect model related plasma concentrations to pHSP27 concentrations. Conclusions A single IV infusion of losmapimod in healthy volunteers was safe and well tolerated, and may potentially serve as an initial loading dose in acute coronary syndrome as rapid exposure is achieved. PMID:23215699

  17. EVALUATING RISK IN OLDER ADULTS USING PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rapid growth in the number of older Americans has many implications for public health, including the need to better understand the risks posed by environmental exposures to older adults. An important element for evaluating risk is the understanding of the doses of environment...

  18. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of APF530 (extended-release granisetron) in patients receiving moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy: results of two Phase II trials

    PubMed Central

    Gabrail, Nashat; Yanagihara, Ronald; Spaczyński, Marek; Cooper, William; O’Boyle, Erin; Smith, Carrie; Boccia, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite advances with new therapies, a significant proportion of patients (>30%) suffer delayed-onset chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) despite use of antiemetics. APF530 is a sustained-release subcutaneous (SC) formulation of granisetron for preventing CINV. APF530 pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy were studied in two open-label, single-dose Phase II trials (C2005-01 and C2007-01, respectively) in patients receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy or highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Methods In C2005-01, 45 patients received APF530 250, 500, or 750 mg SC (granisetron 5, 10, or 15 mg, respectively). In C2007-01, 35 patients were randomized to APF530 250 or 500 mg SC. Injections were given 30 to 60 minutes before single-day moderately emetogenic chemotherapy or highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Plasma granisetron was measured from predose to 168 hours after study drug administration. Safety and efficacy were also evaluated. Results APF530 pharmacokinetics were dose proportional, with slow absorption and elimination of granisetron after a single SC dose. Median time to maximum plasma concentration and half-life were similar for APF530 250 and 500 mg in both trials, with no differences between the groups receiving moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Exposure to granisetron was maintained at a therapeutic level over the delayed-onset phase, at least 168 hours. Adverse events in both trials were as expected for granisetron; injection site reactions (eg, erythema and induration) were predominantly mild and seen in ≤20% of patients. Complete responses (no emesis, with no rescue medication) were obtained in the acute, delayed, and overall phases in ≥80% and ≥75% of patients in both trials with the 250 and 500 mg doses, respectively. Conclusion After a single injection of APF530, there were dose-proportional pharmacokinetics and sustained concentrations of granisetron over 168 hours. The 250 and 500 mg doses were well tolerated

  19. Development of a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Preterm Neonates: Evaluation with In Vivo Data.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Karina; Thelen, Kirstin; Coboeken, Katrin; Gaub, Thomas; Lippert, Jorg; Allegaert, Karel; Willmann, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Among pediatric patients, preterm neonates and newborns are the most vulnerable subpopulation. Rapid developmental changes of physiological factors affecting the pharmacokinetics of drug substances in newborns require extreme care in dose and dose regimen decisions. These decisions could be supported by in silico methods such as physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. In a comprehensive literature search, the physiological information of preterm neonates that is required to establish a PBPK model has been summarized and implemented into the database of a generic PBPK software. Physiological parameters include the organ weights and blood flow rates, tissue composition, as well as ontogeny information about metabolic and elimination processes in the liver and kidney. The aim of this work is to evaluate the model's accuracy in predicting the pharmacokinetics following intravenous administration of two model drugs with distinct physicochemical properties and elimination pathways based on earlier reported in vivo data. To this end, PBPK models of amikacin and paracetamol have been set up to predict their plasma levels in preterm neonates. Predicted plasma concentration-time profiles were compared to experimentally obtained in vivo data. For both drugs, plasma concentration time profiles following single and multiple dosing were appropriately predicted for a large range gestational and postnatal ages. In summary, PBPK simulations in preterm neonates appear feasible and might become a useful tool in the future to support dosing decisions in this special patient population. PMID:26323410

  20. Psychomotor effects, pharmacokinetics and safety of the orexin receptor antagonist suvorexant administered in combination with alcohol in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong; Yee, Ka Lai; Gill, Sean; Liu, Wen; Li, Xiaodong; Panebianco, Deborah; Mangin, Eric; Morrison, Dennis; McCrea, Jacqueline; Wagner, John A; Troyer, Matthew D

    2015-11-01

    A double-blind crossover study investigated psychomotor effects, pharmacokinetics, and safety of the orexin receptor antagonist suvorexant with and without alcohol. Healthy adults (n=31) were randomized to receive placebo or suvorexant (40 mg) plus placebo solution or alcohol (0.7 g/kg) in each of four treatments (single doses; morning administration). The US Food and Drug Administration approved suvorexant dose is 10 mg (up to 20 mg) daily. Pharmacodynamic effects were assessed using tests of digit vigilance (DVT; primary endpoint), choice reaction time, digit symbol substitution, numeric working memory, immediate/delayed word recall, body sway and subjective alertness. Suvorexant alone did not significantly affect DVT reaction time, but did impact some pharmacodynamic tests. Suvorexant with alcohol increased reaction time versus either alone (mean difference at 2 h: 44 ms versus suvorexant, p<0.001; 24 ms, versus alcohol, p<0.05) and had additive negative effects on tests of vigilance, working/episodic memory, postural stability and alertness. No effects of suvorexant alone or with alcohol were observed by 9 h. No important changes in pharmacokinetic parameters were observed upon co-administration. All treatments were generally well tolerated without serious adverse events. In conclusion, co-administration of 40 mg suvorexant and 0.7 g/kg alcohol had additive negative psychomotor effects. Patients are advised not to consume alcohol with suvorexant. PMID:26464455

  1. Moxifloxacin Pharmacokinetic Profile and Efficacy Evaluation in Empiric Treatment of Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Hardlei, Tore Forsingdal; Brock, Birgitte; Jensen-Fangel, Søren; Kragh Thomsen, Marianne; Petersen, Eskild; Kreilgaard, Mads

    2015-01-01

    When antimicrobials are used empirically, pathogen MICs equal to clinical breakpoints or epidemiological cutoff values must be considered. This is to ensure that the most resistant pathogen subpopulation is appropriately targeted to prevent emergence of resistance. Accordingly, we determined the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of moxifloxacin at 400 mg/day in 18 patients treated empirically for community-acquired pneumonia. We developed a population pharmacokinetic model to assess the potential efficacy of moxifloxacin and to simulate the maximal MICs for which recommended pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) estimates are obtained. Moxifloxacin plasma concentrations were determined the day after therapy initiation using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography. Peak drug concentrations (Cmax) and area under the free drug concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (fAUC0–24) values predicted for each patient were evaluated against epidemiological cutoff MIC values for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Legionella pneumophila. PK-PD targets adopted were a Cmax/MIC of ≥12.2 for all pathogens, an fAUC0–24/MIC of >34 for S. pneumoniae, and an fAUC0–24/MIC of >75 for H. influenzae and L. pneumophila. Individual predicted estimates for Cmax/MIC and fAUC0–24/MIC as well as simulated maximal MICs resulting in target attainment for oral and intravenous administration of the drug were suitable for S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae but not for L. pneumophila. These results indicate that caution must be taken when moxifloxacin is used as monotherapy to treat community-acquired pneumonia caused by L. pneumophila. In conclusion, this report reveals key information relevant to the empirical treatment of community-acquired pneumonia while highlighting the robust and flexible nature of this population pharmacokinetic model to predict therapeutic success. (Clinical Trials Registration no. NCT01983839.) PMID:25666151

  2. Bioactive Markers Based Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Extracts of a Traditional Medicinal Plant, Piper sarmentosum

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Khalid; Ismail, Zhari; Sadikun, Amirin; Ibrahim, Pazillah

    2011-01-01

    In vitro assays are economical and easy to perform but to establish relevance of their results to real clinical outcome in animals or human, pharmacokinetics is prerequisite. Despite various in vitro pharmacological activities of extracts of Piper sarmentosum, there is no report of pharmacokinetics. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate ethanol extract of fruit of the plant in dose of 500 mg kg−1 orally for pharmacokinetics. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into groups 1, 2, and 3 (each n = 6) to study absorption, distribution and excretion, respectively. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet detection was applied to quantify pellitorine, sarmentine and sarmentosine in plasma, tissues, feces and urine to calculate pharmacokinetic parameters. Pellitorine exhibited maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) 34.77 ng mL−1 ± 1.040, time to achieve Cmax (Tmax) 8 h, mean resident time (MRT) 26.00 ± 0.149 h and half life (t1/2) 18.64 ± 1.65 h. Sarmentine showed Cmax 191.50 ± 12.69 ng mL−1, Tmax 6 h, MRT 11.12 ± 0.44 h and t1/2 10.30 ± 1.98 h. Sarmentosine exhibited zero oral bioavailability because it was neither detected in plasma nor in tissues, and in urine. Pellitorine was found to be distributed in intestinal wall, liver, lungs, kidney, and heart, whereas sarmentine was found only in intestinal wall and heart. The cumulative excretion of pellitorine, sarmentine and sarmentosine in feces in 72 h was 0.0773, 0.976, and 0.438 μg, respectively. This study shows that pellitorine and sarmentine have good oral bioavailability while sarmentosine is not absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:19770264

  3. A Phase 1 Randomized, Open Label, Rectal Safety, Acceptability, Pharmacokinetic, and Pharmacodynamic Study of Three Formulations of Tenofovir 1% Gel (the CHARM-01 Study)

    PubMed Central

    Mcgowan, Ian; Cranston, Ross D.; Duffill, Kathryn; Siegel, Aaron; Engstrom, Jarret C.; Nikiforov, Alexyi; Jacobson, Cindy; Rehman, Khaja K.; Elliott, Julie; Khanukhova, Elena; Abebe, Kaleab; Mauck, Christine; Spiegel, Hans M. L.; Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Rohan, Lisa C.; Marzinke, Mark A.; Hiruy, Hiwot; Hendrix, Craig W.; Richardson-Harman, Nicola; Anton, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The CHARM-01 study characterized the safety, acceptability, pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmacodynamics (PD) of three tenofovir (TFV) gels for rectal application. The vaginal formulation (VF) gel was previously used in the CAPRISA 004 and VOICE vaginal microbicide Phase 2B trials and the RMP-02/MTN-006 Phase 1 rectal safety study. The reduced glycerin VF (RGVF) gel was used in the MTN-007 Phase 1 rectal microbicide trial and is currently being evaluated in the MTN-017 Phase 2 rectal microbicide trial. A third rectal specific formulation (RF) gel was also evaluated in the CHARM-01 study. Methods Participants received 4 mL of the three TFV gels in a blinded, crossover design: seven daily doses of RGVF, seven daily doses of RF, and six daily doses of placebo followed by one dose of VF, in a randomized sequence. Safety, acceptability, compartmental PK, and explant PD were monitored throughout the trial. Results All three gels were found to be safe and acceptable. RF and RGVF PK were not significantly different. Median mucosal mononuclear cell (MMC) TFV-DP trended toward higher values for RF compared to RGVF (1136 and 320 fmol/106 cells respectively). Use of each gel in vivo was associated with significant inhibition of ex vivo colorectal tissue HIV infection. There was also a significant negative correlation between the tissue levels of TFV, tissue TFV-DP, MMC TFV-DP, rectal fluid TFV, and explant HIV-1 infection. Conclusions All three formulations were found to be safe and acceptable. However, the safety profile of the VF gel was only based on exposure to one dose whereas participants received seven doses of the RGVF and RF gels. There was a trend towards higher tissue MMC levels of TFV-DP associated with use of the RF gel. Use of all gels was associated with significant inhibition of ex vivo tissue HIV infection. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01575405 PMID:25942472

  4. Safety, pharmacokinetics and neutralization of the broadly neutralizing HIV-1 human monoclonal antibody VRC01 in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Ledgerwood, J E; Coates, E E; Yamshchikov, G; Saunders, J G; Holman, L; Enama, M E; DeZure, A; Lynch, R M; Gordon, I; Plummer, S; Hendel, C S; Pegu, A; Conan-Cibotti, M; Sitar, S; Bailer, R T; Narpala, S; McDermott, A; Louder, M; O'Dell, S; Mohan, S; Pandey, J P; Schwartz, R M; Hu, Z; Koup, R A; Capparelli, E; Mascola, J R; Graham, B S

    2015-12-01

    VRC-HIVMAB060-00-AB (VRC01) is a broadly neutralizing HIV-1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) isolated from the B cells of an HIV-infected patient. It is directed against the HIV-1 CD4 binding site and is capable of potently neutralizing the majority of diverse HIV-1 strains. This Phase I dose-escalation study in healthy adults was conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center (Bethesda, MD, USA). Primary objectives were the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics (PK) of VRC01 intravenous (i.v.) infusion at 5, 20 or 40 mg/kg, given either once (20 mg/kg) or twice 28 days apart (all doses), and of subcutaneous (s.c.) delivery at 5 mg/kg compared to s.c. placebo given twice, 28 days apart. Cumulatively, 28 subjects received 43 VRC01 and nine received placebo administrations. There were no serious adverse events or dose-limiting toxicities. Mean 28-day serum trough concentrations after the first infusion were 35 and 57 μg/ml for groups infused with 20 mg/kg (n = 8) and 40 mg/kg (n = 5) doses, respectively. Mean 28-day trough concentrations after the second infusion were 56 and 89 μg/ml for the same two doses. Over the 5-40 mg/kg i.v. dose range (n = 18), the clearance was 0.016 l/h and terminal half-life was 15 days. After infusion VRC01 retained expected neutralizing activity in serum, and anti-VRC01 antibody responses were not detected. The human monoclonal antibody (mAb) VRC01 was well tolerated when delivered i.v. or s.c. The mAb demonstrated expected half-life and pharmacokinetics for a human immunoglobulin G. The safety and PK results support and inform VRC01 dosing schedules for planning HIV-1 prevention efficacy studies. PMID:26332605

  5. Safety and Population Pharmacokinetic Analysis of Intravenous Acetaminophen in Neonates, Infants, Children, and Adolescents With Pain or Fever

    PubMed Central

    Zuppa, Athena F.; Hammer, Gregory B.; Barrett, Jeffrey S.; Kenney, Brian F.; Kassir, Nastya; Mouksassi, Samer; Royal, Mike A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The administration of acetaminophen via the oral and rectal routes may be contraindicated in specific clinical settings. Intravenous administration provides an alternative route for fever reduction and analgesia. This phase 1 study of intravenous acetaminophen (Ofirmev, Cadence Pharmaceuticals, Inc., San Diego, CA) in inpatient pediatric patients with pain or fever requiring intravenous therapy was designed to assess the safety and pharmacokinetics of repeated doses over 48 hours. METHODS Neonates (full-term to 28 days) received either 12.5 mg/kg every 6 hours or 15 mg/kg every 8 hours. Infants (29 days to <2 years), children (2 to <12 years) and adolescents (≥12 years) received either 12.5 mg/kg every 4 hours or 15 mg/kg every 6 hours. Both noncompartmental and population nonlinear mixed-effects modeling approaches were used. Urinary metabolite data were analyzed, and safety and tolerability were assessed. RESULTS Pharmacokinetic parameters of acetaminophen were estimated using a two-compartment disposition model with weight allometrically expressed on clearances and central and peripheral volumes of distribution (Vds). Postnatal age, with a maturation function, was a significant covariate on clearance. Total systemic normalized clearance was 18.4 L/hr per 70 kg, with a plateau reached at approximately 2 years. Total central and peripheral Vds of acetaminophen were 16 and 59.5 L/70 kg, respectively. The drug was well tolerated based on the incidence of adverse events. The primary and minor pathways of elimination were acetaminophen glucuronidation, sulfation, and glutathione conjugate metabolites across all age groups. CONCLUSIONS Intravenous acetaminophen in infants, children, and adolescents was well tolerated and achieved plasma concentrations similar to those achieved with labeled 15 mg/kg body weight doses by oral or rectal administration. PMID:22768009

  6. Single dose pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, tolerability and safety of BAY 60–5521, a potent inhibitor of cholesteryl ester transfer protein

    PubMed Central

    Boettcher, Michael-Friedrich; Heinig, Roland; Schmeck, Carsten; Kohlsdorfer, Christian; Ludwig, Matthias; Schaefer, Anja; Gelfert-Peukert, Sabine; Wensing, Georg; Weber, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    AIMS To determine pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), tolerability and safety of BAY 60–5521, a potent inhibitor of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). METHODS The first in man (FIM) study investigated the safety, tolerability, pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics in healthy male subjects following administration of single oral doses. The study was performed using a randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, single dose-escalation design. Thirty-eight young healthy male subjects (aged 20–45 years) received an oral dose of 5, 12.5, 25 or 50 mg BAY 60–5521 (n = 28) or were treated with a placebo (n = 10). RESULTS In all four dose steps, only one adverse event (25 mg; mild skin rash) was considered drug related. Clinical laboratory parameters showed no clinically relevant changes. A clear dose-dependent CETP inhibition could be demonstrated starting at a dose of 5 mg. At a dose of 25 mg, a CETP inhibition >50% over 18 h was observed. After 50 mg, CETP inhibition >50% lasted more than 50 h. Twenty-four h after administration mean HDL-C-values showed a nearly dose-proportional increase. Following administration of 50 mg, a significant HDL-C increase of about 30% relative to baseline values was found. BAY 60–5521 was slowly absorbed reaching maximum concentrations in plasma after 4 to 6 h. The disposition in plasma was multi-exponential with an estimated mean terminal half-life of 76 to 144 h. CONCLUSIONS BAY 60–5521 was clinically safe and well tolerated. No effects on heart rate, blood pressure and ECG recordings were observed during the study. A clear pharmacodynamic effect on CETP inhibition and HDL could be demonstrated. PMID:21838789

  7. Prospective safety performance evaluation on construction sites.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianguo; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Limao; Skibniewski, Miroslaw J; Wang, Yanhong

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a systematic Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) based approach for Prospective Safety Performance Evaluation (PSPE) on construction sites, with causal relationships and interactions between enablers and the goals of PSPE taken into account. According to a sample of 450 valid questionnaire surveys from 30 Chinese construction enterprises, a SEM model with 26 items included for PSPE in the context of Chinese construction industry is established and then verified through the goodness-of-fit test. Three typical types of construction enterprises, namely the state-owned enterprise, private enterprise and Sino-foreign joint venture, are selected as samples to measure the level of safety performance given the enterprise scale, ownership and business strategy are different. Results provide a full understanding of safety performance practice in the construction industry, and indicate that the level of overall safety performance situation on working sites is rated at least a level of III (Fair) or above. This phenomenon can be explained that the construction industry has gradually matured with the norms, and construction enterprises should improve the level of safety performance as not to be eliminated from the government-led construction industry. The differences existing in the safety performance practice regarding different construction enterprise categories are compared and analyzed according to evaluation results. This research provides insights into cause-effect relationships among safety performance factors and goals, which, in turn, can facilitate the improvement of high safety performance in the construction industry. PMID:25746166

  8. Pharmacokinetics and safety of recombinant anti-RhD in healthy RhD-negative male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Bichler, J; Spycher, M O; Amstutz, H-P; Andresen, I; Gaede, K; Miescher, S

    2004-04-01

    In this first-in-man study, we assessed the pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of MonoRho, a human recombinant monoclonal anti-RhD immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) antibody. Eighteen RhD-negative healthy male volunteers were randomized in two groups to receive a single administration of 300 micro g of MonoRho either intravenously or intramuscularly. There were no symptoms of allergic or anaphylactic type reaction in any subject, and there was no evidence of any MonoRho-related changes in laboratory safety parameters. None of the subjects mounted a detectable immune response to MonoRho. Serum samples were obtained up to 91 days after injection to measure anti-D IgG concentrations by flow cytometry. After intramuscular administration of MonoRho, anti-D IgG concentrations gradually increased reaching peak levels after a mean of 3.4 days. After 3 weeks, the mean anti-D IgG concentrations after intravenous and intramuscular administration became virtually equal to each other and remained so thereafter. In both the treatment groups, the mean elimination half-life was about 18 days and thus similar to that described for plasma-derived anti-D IgG. The bioavailability of MonoRho after intramuscular administration was estimated as 46%. The excellent tolerability and safety of MonoRho as well as its expected elimination half-life supports the continued clinical development of this compound. PMID:15113381

  9. Population pharmacokinetics of arbekacin in different infectious disease settings and evaluation of dosing regimens.

    PubMed

    Hagihara, Mao; Kato, Hideo; Hamada, Yukihiro; Hirai, Jun; Sakanashi, Daisuke; Suematsu, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Naoya; Koizumi, Yusuke; Yamagishi, Yuka; Matsuura, Katsuhiko; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2016-07-01

    The efficacy of arbekacin in patients with MRSA infections is influenced by the peak concentration (Cpeak)/MIC ratio (≧8). A daily arbekacin dose of 4-6 mg/kg is primarily used for the treatment of MRSA infection. However, clinical pharmacokinetic studies of arbekacin that evaluate changes in patients with different infectious diseases have been limited. This study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of arbekacin in different infectious diseases and to evaluate its dosing regimens. This work describes a single-centre, retrospective study. The pharmacokinetic parameters of arbekacin were calculated from individual serum-concentration data using WinNonlin ver. 6.3. A total of 331 serum samples were obtained from 170 patients. Our drug concentration-time data were well described by a two-compartment open model. The final model showed that drug clearance was related to creatinine clearance and that the total distribution volume (Vd) was related to actual body weight and the presence of bacteremia. The individual Vd in bacteremia patients was significantly higher than those of other patients (bacteremia: 29.7 ± 0.5 L, pneumonia: 20.8 ± 0.4 L, other infections: 21.4 ± 0.4 L; p < 0.05). Additionally, Monte Carlo simulation showed that target (Cpeak/MIC ≧ 8) attainment was only 10.1%, even at a dose of 6 mg/kg, especially for MRSA bacteremia patients with an arbekacin MIC = 2 μg/mL. In conclusion, our study revealed that the Vd may be higher in bacteremia patients than in patients with other infectious diseases. Therefore, an increase in the daily dose of arbekacin should be considered for bacteremia patients. PMID:27260679

  10. Plutonium Finishing Plant safety evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) previously known as the Plutonium Process and Storage Facility, or Z-Plant, was built and put into operation in 1949. Since 1949 PFP has been used for various processing missions, including plutonium purification, oxide production, metal production, parts fabrication, plutonium recovery, and the recovery of americium (Am-241). The PFP has also been used for receipt and large scale storage of plutonium scrap and product materials. The PFP Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) was prepared by WHC to document the hazards associated with the facility, present safety analyses of potential accident scenarios, and demonstrate the adequacy of safety class structures, systems, and components (SSCs) and operational safety requirements (OSRs) necessary to eliminate, control, or mitigate the identified hazards. Documented in this Safety Evaluation Report (SER) is DOE`s independent review and evaluation of the PFP FSAR and the basis for approval of the PFP FSAR. The evaluation is presented in a format that parallels the format of the PFP FSAR. As an aid to the reactor, a list of acronyms has been included at the beginning of this report. The DOE review concluded that the risks associated with conducting plutonium handling, processing, and storage operations within PFP facilities, as described in the PFP FSAR, are acceptable, since the accident safety analyses associated with these activities meet the WHC risk acceptance guidelines and DOE safety goals in SEN-35-91.

  11. A pharmacokinetic and safety study of a fixed oral dose of enzastaurin HCl in native Chinese patients with refractory solid tumors and lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Su; Zhang, Weijing; Yang, Nong; Cui, Yimin; Huang, He; Cai, Ruiqing; Lin, Xiaoting; Fu, Xiaohong; Hong, Huangming; Lin, Tongyu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to assess the pharmacokinetics and safety of enzastaurin in native Chinese patients with refractory solid tumors and lymphoma. Methods Eligible patients received 500 mg of enzastaurin orally once daily. The pharmacokinetics of enzastaurin and its metabolites were assessed on days 14 to 18. Patients were allowed to continue receiving the agent in a safety extension phase until disease progression or presentation with unacceptable toxicity. Results Twenty-five patients received at least 1 dose of enzastaurin, and twenty-one patients completed the pharmacokinetic phase. Fifteen patients entered the safety extension phase. Except for transient, asymptomatic grade 3 QT interval prolongation in one patient who had baseline grade 2 QT prolongation, other adverse events were of grade 1 to 2. The t1/2, Cav, ss, and AUCτ, ss for enzastaurin and its primary active metabolite LSN326020 were 14 and 42 h, 1,210 and 907 nmol/L, and 29,100 and 21,800 nmol•h/L, respectively. One patient with relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma achieved a partial response that lasted for 8.1 months. Conclusions The pharmacokinetics of enzastaurin in Chinese cancer patients were consistent with those observed in previous studies abroad. Enzastaurin 500 mg daily was well tolerated by Chinese patients. We recommend 500 mg daily as the phase II dose in this population. Its efficacy in lymphoma deserves further investigation. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01432951 PMID:26942463

  12. Recombinant human pentraxin-2 therapy in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: safety, pharmacokinetics and exploratory efficacy.

    PubMed

    van den Blink, Bernt; Dillingh, Marlous R; Ginns, Leo C; Morrison, Lake D; Moerland, Matthijs; Wijsenbeek, Marlies; Trehu, Elizabeth G; Bartholmai, Brian J; Burggraaf, Jacobus

    2016-03-01

    Abnormal fibrogenic repair response upon alveolar injury is believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). PRM-151 (recombinant human pentraxin-2, also known as serum amyloid P), has been shown to reduce fibrosis in preclinical lung fibrosis models, and was well tolerated with a favourable pharmacokinetic profile in an earlier single-dose phase I study.A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multiple ascending dose trial was performed to assess the tolerability and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of multiple doses of PRM-151 in IPF patients. Subjects in three successive cohorts (1, 5, or 10 mg·kg(-1) versus placebo) received intravenous study drug on days 1, 3, 5, 8 and 15, and were followed-up to day 57.PRM-151 was well tolerated at all dose levels, with no serious adverse reactions. Administration of PRM-151 resulted in two- to eight-fold dose-dependent increases in circulating pentraxin-2 levels. Forced vital capacity and 6-min walk test showed trends towards improvement in the combined PRM-151 dose groups. On high-resolution computed tomography scans, stable or improved lung volume unoccupied by interstitial lung abnormality was noted in some PRM-151 subjects compared to placebo subjects on day 57.The efficacy of PRM-151 in IPF remains to be investigated in dedicated future trials. PMID:26869678

  13. Intranasal Abuse Potential, Pharmacokinetics, and Safety of Once-Daily, Single-Entity, Extended-Release Hydrocodone (HYD) in Recreational Opioid Users

    PubMed Central

    Cipriano, Alessandra; Colucci, Salvatore V.; Kapil, Ram P.; Geoffroy, Pierre; Hopyan, Talar; Levy-Cooperman, Naama

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. A once-daily, extended-release hydrocodone bitartrate tablet with abuse-deterrent properties (Hysingla ER® [HYD]) is available for the treatment of chronic pain in appropriate patients. This study evaluated the intranasal abuse potential and pharmacokinetics of HYD coarse and fine particles vs hydrocodone powder or placebo. Design. Single-center, double-blind, positive- and placebo-controlled, randomized, four-treatment crossover study. Subjects. Healthy adult, nondependent, recreational opioid users with a history of intranasal abuse. Methods. During four treatment periods, subjects (N = 31) received hydrocodone powder 60 mg, HYD coarse particles 60 mg, HYD fine particles 60 mg, or placebo, with five-to-seven-day washouts between treatments. Measures over 36 hours postdose included drug-liking and willingness to take drug again, assessed using visual analog scales (VASs), pupillometry, intranasal irritation, and pharmacokinetics. Results. Insufflation of both HYD coarse and fine particles led to lower “At this Moment” Drug Liking VAS peak values compared with hydrocodone powder, but higher values compared with placebo (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). Similar results were observed for Overall Drug Liking VAS, Take Drug Again VAS, and Subjective Drug Value. Compared with hydrocodone, insufflation of HYD particles led to reduced miosis and increased nasal irritation. Mean hydrocodone Cmax following insufflation of HYD coarse particles, HYD fine particles, and hydrocodone powder was 27.5, 36.5, and 105.8 ng/mL, respectively; median Tmax was ≥2-fold longer with either HYD particle size than hydrocodone powder; and (Cmax/Tmax) was 9.5, 13.4, and 82.0 ng/mL/h, respectively. Safety was consistent with that of opioid agonists. Conclusions. HYD demonstrated reduced intranasal abuse potential compared with hydrocodone powder. PMID:26814240

  14. Evaluation and optimisation of propofol pharmacokinetic parameters in cats for target-controlled infusion.

    PubMed

    Cattai, A; Pilla, T; Cagnardi, P; Zonca, A; Franci, P

    2016-05-14

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a pharmacokinetic model-driven infusion of propofol in premedicated cats. In a first step, propofol (10 mg/kg) was administered intravenously over 60 seconds to induce anaesthesia for the elective neutering of seven healthy cats, premedicated intramuscularly with 0.3 mg/kg methadone, 0.01 mg/kg medetomidine and 2 mg/kg ketamine. Venous blood samples were collected over 240 minutes, and propofol concentrations were measured via a validated high-performance liquid chromatography assay. Selected pharmacokinetic parameters, determined by a three-compartment open linear model, were entered into a computer-controlled infusion pump (target-controlled infusion-1 (TCI-1)). In a second step, TCI-1 was used to induce and maintain general anaesthesia in nine cats undergoing neutering. Predicted and measured plasma concentrations of propofol were compared at specific time points. In a third step, the pharmacokinetic parameters were modified according to the results from the use of TCI-1 and were evaluated again in six cats. For this TCI-2 group, the median values of median performance error and median absolute performance error were -1.85 per cent and 29.67 per cent, respectively, indicating that it performed adequately. Neither hypotension nor respiratory depression was observed during TCI-1 and TCI-2. Mean anaesthesia time and time to extubation in the TCI-2 group were 73.90 (±20.29) and 8.04 (±5.46) minutes, respectively. PMID:27044652

  15. Concurrent administration of donepezil HCl and sertraline HCl in healthy volunteers: assessment of pharmacokinetic changes and safety following single and multiple oral doses

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Christa F; Kumar, Dinesh; Perdomo, Carlos A; Wason, Suman; Cullen, Edward I; Pratt, Raymond D

    2004-01-01

    Aim This study evaluated the safety and pharmacokinetics (PK) of donepezil HCl and sertraline HCl when administered separately and in combination. Methods This was a randomized, open-label, three-period crossover study. In consecutive dosing periods separated by washout periods of ≥3 weeks, healthy volunteers received either oral donepezil HCI 5 mg once daily for 15 days, oral sertraline HCl 50 mg once daily for 5 days followed by 10 days of once-daily sertraline HCl 100 mg, or the simultaneous administration of oral donepezil HCl and sertraline HCl. Plasma donepezil and sertraline concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Safety was evaluated by physical and laboratory evaluations and the monitoring of adverse events (AEs). Results A total of 19 volunteers (16 male and three female) were enrolled. Three male subjects withdrew from the study prematurely due to AEs (one case of nausea/stomach cramps and one case of eosinophilia during combination treatment, and one upper respiratory tract infection during treatment with sertraline HCl alone). In subjects who completed all three treatment periods (n = 16), the concurrent administration of donepezil HCl and sertraline HCl did not alter the steady-state (day 15) PK parameters of donepezil HCl. A small (<12%) but statistically significant (P = 0.02) increase in donepezil Cmax was seen after single doses of sertraline HCl and donepezil HCl on day 1 but this was not thought to be clinically meaningful. No significant differences in the tmax or AUC0–24 h of donepezil were observed between the donepezil HCl only or donepezil HCl plus sertraline HCl groups on day 1. No significant changes in sertraline PK parameters were observed either on day 1 (single dose) or on day 15 (steady state) when sertraline HCl was co-administered with donepezil HCl. Generally, the concurrent administration of donepezil HCl and sertraline HCl was well tolerated, with no serious AEs reported

  16. Safety Pharmacology Evaluation of Biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Amouzadeh, Hamid R; Engwall, Michael J; Vargas, Hugo M

    2015-01-01

    Biotechnology-derived pharmaceuticals or biopharmaceuticals (BPs) are molecules such as monoclonal antibodies, soluble/decoy receptors, hormones, enzymes, cytokines, and growth factors that are produced in various biological expression systems and are used to diagnose, treat, or prevent various diseases. Safety pharmacology (SP) assessment of BPs has evolved since the approval of the first BP (recombinant human insulin) in 1982. This evolution is ongoing and is informed by various international harmonization guidelines. Based on these guidelines, the potential undesirable effect of every drug candidate (small molecule or BP) on the cardiovascular, central nervous, and respiratory systems, referred to as the "core battery," should be assessed prior to first-in-human administration. However, SP assessment of BPs poses unique challenges such as choice of test species and integration of SP parameters into repeat-dose toxicity studies. This chapter reviews the evolution of SP assessment of BPs using the approval packages of marketed BPs and discusses the past, current, and new and upcoming approach and methods that can be used to generate high-quality data for the assessment of SP of BPs. PMID:26091648

  17. Improved Safety, Bioavailability and Pharmacokinetics of Zidovudine through Lactoferrin Nanoparticles during Oral Administration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    C., Bhaskar; Golla, Kishore; Kondapi, Anand K.

    2015-01-01

    Zidovudine (AZT) is one of the most referred antiretroviral drug. In spite of its higher bioavailability (50–75%) the most important reason of its cessation are bone marrow suppression, anemia, neutropenia and various organs related toxicities. This study aims at the improvement of oral delivery of AZT through its encapsulation in lactoferrin nanoparticles (AZT-lactonano). The nanoparticles (NPs) are of 50–60 nm in size and exhibit 67% encapsulation of the AZT. They are stable in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids. Anti-HIV-1 activity of AZT remains unaltered in nanoformulation in acute infection. The bioavailability and tissue distribution of AZT is higher in blood followed by liver and kidney. AZT-lactonano causes the improvement of pharmacokinetic profile as compared to soluble AZT; a more than 4 fold increase in AUC and AUMC in male and female rats. The serum Cmax for AZT-lactonano was increased by 30%. Similarly there was nearly 2-fold increase in Tmax and t1/2. Our in vitro study confirms that, the endosomal pH is ideal for drug release from NPs and shows constant release from up to 96h. Bone marrow micronucleus assay show that nanoformulation exhibits approximately 2fold lower toxicity than soluble form. Histopathological and biochemical analysis further confirms that less or no significant organ toxicities when nanoparticles were used. AZT-lactonano has shown its higher efficacy, low organs related toxicities, improved pharmacokinetics parameter while keeping the antiviral activity intact. Thus, the nanoformulation are safe for the target specific drug delivery. PMID:26461917

  18. Effect of multiple doses of omeprazole on the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of a single dose of rivaroxaban.

    PubMed

    Moore, Kenneth Todd; Plotnikov, Alexei Nikolaevich; Thyssen, An; Vaccaro, Nicole; Ariyawansa, Jay; Burton, Paul Bryan

    2011-12-01

    Many patients with acute coronary syndrome receive chronic dual antiplatelet therapy (acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel) for secondary event prophylaxis, and new oral anticoagulants are being investigated as adjunctive therapy in this indication. Gastrointestinal side effects such as bleeding are commonly associated with antiplatelet use; accordingly, many patients receive proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) to mitigate this. PPIs can reduce the antiplatelet activity of clopidogrel through cytochrome P450 2C19 inhibition, and pantoprazole reduces the bioavailability of dabigatran, a direct thrombin inhibitor that acts via cytochrome P450 2C19-independent mechanisms. These observations support the investigation of potential pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between PPIs and anticoagulants. We evaluated the influence of administering once-daily omeprazole 40 mg for 5 days on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a single 20-mg dose of the oral direct factor Xa inhibitor, rivaroxaban, in a randomized, open-label, 2-way, crossover, drug-drug interaction study in healthy subjects. No clinically meaningful interactions were observed; geometric mean ratios were 101%, 101%, and 93.5% for rivaroxaban area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time 0 to the time of the last quantifiable concentration (AUClast), or until infinity (AUC∞), and maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), respectively. Prothrombin time increased similarly in both treatment groups, with maximal values observed approximately 4 hours post rivaroxaban administration. A single 20-mg rivaroxaban dose appears well tolerated when administered alone or after 5 days of once-daily omeprazole 40 mg administration. PMID:21822144

  19. A Randomized Pilot Study of L-Arginine Infusion in Severe Falciparum Malaria: Preliminary Safety, Efficacy and Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Tsin W.; Lampah, Daniel A.; Rooslamiati, Indri; Gitawati, Retno; Tjitra, Emiliana; Kenangalem, Enny; Price, Ric N.; Duffull, Stephen B.; Anstey, Nicholas M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Decreased nitric oxide (NO) and hypoargininemia are associated with severe falciparum malaria and may contribute to severe disease. Intravenous L-arginine increases endothelial NO in moderately-severe malaria (MSM) without adverse effects. The safety, efficacy and pharmacokinetics of L-arginine or other agents to improve NO bioavailability in severe malaria have not been assessed. Methods In an open-label pilot study of L-arginine in adults with severe malaria (ARGISM-1 Study), patients were randomized to 12 g L-arginine hydrochloride or saline over 8 hours together with intravenous artesunate. Vital signs, selected biochemical measures (including blood lactate and L-arginine) and endothelial NO bioavailability (using reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry [RH-PAT]) were assessed serially. Pharmacokinetic analyses of L-arginine concentrations were performed using NONMEM. Results Six patients received L-arginine and two saline infusions. There were no deaths in either group. There were no changes in mean systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) or other vital signs with L-arginine, although a transient but clinically unimportant mean maximal decrease in SBP of 14 mmHg was noted. No significant changes in mean potassium, glucose, bicarbonate, or pH were seen, with transient mean maximal increases in plasma potassium of 0.3 mmol/L, and mean maximal decreases in blood glucose of 0.8 mmol/L and bicarbonate of 2.3 mEq/L following L-arginine administration. There was no effect on lactate clearance or RH-PAT index. Pharmacokinetic modelling (n = 4) showed L-arginine concentrations 40% lower than predicted from models developed in MSM. Conclusion In the first clinical trial of an adjunctive treatment aimed at increasing NO bioavailability in severe malaria, L-arginine infused at 12 g over 8 hours was safe, but did not improve lactate clearance or endothelial NO bioavailability. Future studies may require increased doses of L-arginine. Trial

  20. Formulation and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Microcapsules Containing Pravastatin Sodium Using Rats.

    PubMed

    Puttegowda, Venkatesh Dinnekere; Karki, Roopa; Goli, Divakar; Jha, Sajal Kumar; Mudagal, Manjunatha Panduranga

    2016-01-01

    Pravastatin Sodium has a cholesterol lowering agent. It has shorter half-life and undergoes first-pass metabolism. Frequent dose is required in case of conventional dosage form. The purpose of the study is to formulate and evaluate microcapsules containing Pravastatin Sodium by complex with cholestyramine resins coated with Eudragit RLPO and Eudragit RSPO polymers for achieving control release. Complexation of drug on resin was carried out by batch method. Microencapsulation was carried out by nonaqueous solvent evaporation method. Pharmacokinetic studies were done by using rats. The intermediate stability studies were carried out on the most satisfactory formulations. FTIR, X-ray diffraction, and DSC spectra of drug, drug-resinates, and polymers revealed no chemical interaction. The % DEE and % yield were observed for formulations of f1 to f7 that were varied from 97.1 ± 0.8 to 98.9 ± 0.5% and 95.0 ± 3.25 to 98.8 ± 7.1%, respectively. Most satisfactory formulation, f6, showed drug release up to 72.6%. No changes in % DEE and % CDR were observed after stability studies. Microcapsules of f6 formulation achieved best performance regarding in vitro drug release and from pharmacokinetic evaluation mean residence time was found to be 6.3 h, thus indicated, Pravastatin Sodium microcapsules were released and absorbed slowly over a prolonged period of time. PMID:27595040

  1. Formulation and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Microcapsules Containing Pravastatin Sodium Using Rats

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Roopa; Goli, Divakar; Mudagal, Manjunatha Panduranga

    2016-01-01

    Pravastatin Sodium has a cholesterol lowering agent. It has shorter half-life and undergoes first-pass metabolism. Frequent dose is required in case of conventional dosage form. The purpose of the study is to formulate and evaluate microcapsules containing Pravastatin Sodium by complex with cholestyramine resins coated with Eudragit RLPO and Eudragit RSPO polymers for achieving control release. Complexation of drug on resin was carried out by batch method. Microencapsulation was carried out by nonaqueous solvent evaporation method. Pharmacokinetic studies were done by using rats. The intermediate stability studies were carried out on the most satisfactory formulations. FTIR, X-ray diffraction, and DSC spectra of drug, drug-resinates, and polymers revealed no chemical interaction. The % DEE and % yield were observed for formulations of f1 to f7 that were varied from 97.1 ± 0.8 to 98.9 ± 0.5% and 95.0 ± 3.25 to 98.8 ± 7.1%, respectively. Most satisfactory formulation, f6, showed drug release up to 72.6%. No changes in % DEE and % CDR were observed after stability studies. Microcapsules of f6 formulation achieved best performance regarding in vitro drug release and from pharmacokinetic evaluation mean residence time was found to be 6.3 h, thus indicated, Pravastatin Sodium microcapsules were released and absorbed slowly over a prolonged period of time. PMID:27595040

  2. Liraglutide's Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics in Pediatric Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Battelino, Tadej; Chatterjee, D.J.; Jacobsen, Lisbeth V.; Hale, Paula M.; Arslanian, Silva

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in youth is increasing. Treatment options beyond metformin and insulin are needed. The safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of liraglutide once daily in youth (10–17 years old) with T2D were investigated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Subjects and Methods: Youth treated with diet/exercise alone or with metformin and having a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level of 6.5–11% were randomized to liraglutide (n=14) or placebo (n=7). Starting at 0.3 mg/day, doses were escalated weekly to 0.6, 0.9, 1.2, and 1.8 mg/day (or placebo equivalent) for 5 weeks. Results: Nineteen participants completed the trial. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups, with mean (SD) values for age of 14.8 (2.2) years, weight of 113.2 (35.6) kg (range, 57–214 kg), diabetes duration of 1.7 (1.4) years, and HbA1c level of 8.1% (1.2%). No serious adverse events (AEs), including severe hypoglycemia, occurred. Transient gastrointestinal AEs were most common at lower liraglutide doses during dose escalation. No significant changes in safety and tolerability parameters occurred. There was no evidence of pancreatitis or lipase elevations above three times the upper normal limit; calcitonin levels remained within the normal range. For liraglutide 1.8 mg, mean half-life was 12 h, and clearance was 1.7 L/h. After 5 weeks, the decline in HbA1c level was greater with liraglutide versus placebo (−0.86 vs. 0.04%, P=0.0007), whereas mean body weight remained stable (−0.50 vs. −0.54 kg, P=0.9703). Conclusions: Liraglutide was well tolerated in youth with T2D, with safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic profiles similar to profiles in adults. PMID:25036533

  3. A randomised study in healthy volunteers to investigate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of idarucizumab, a specific antidote to dabigatran.

    PubMed

    Glund, Stephan; Moschetti, Viktoria; Norris, Stephen; Stangier, Joachim; Schmohl, Michael; van Ryn, Joanne; Lang, Benjamin; Ramael, Steven; Reilly, Paul

    2015-05-01

    Idarucizumab, a monoclonal antibody fragment that binds dabigatran with high affinity, is in development as a specific antidote for dabigatran. In this first-in-human, single-rising-dose study, we investigated the pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of idarucizumab. Healthy male volunteers aged 18-45 years received between 20 mg and 8 g idarucizumab as a 1-hour intravenous infusion in 10 sequential dose groups, or 1, 2 or 4 g idarucizumab as a 5-minute infusion. Subjects within each dose group were randomised 3:1 to idarucizumab or placebo. A total of 110 randomised subjects received study drug (27 placebo, 83 idarucizumab). Peak and total exposure to idarucizumab increased proportionally with dose. Maximum plasma concentrations were achieved near the end of infusion, followed by a rapid decline, with an initial idarucizumab half-life of ~45 minutes. For the 5-minute infusions, this resulted in a reduction of plasma concentrations to less than 5 % of peak within 4 hours. Idarucizumab (in the absence of dabigatran) had no effect on coagulation parameters or endogenous thrombin potential. Overall adverse event (AE) frequency was similar for idarucizumab and placebo, and no relationship with idarucizumab dose was observed. Drug-related AEs (primary endpoint) were rare (occurring in 2 placebo and 3 idarucizumab subjects) and were mostly of mild intensity; none of them resulted in study discontinuation. In conclusion, the pharmacokinetic profile of idarucizumab meets the requirement for rapid peak exposure and rapid elimination, with no effect on pharmacodynamic parameters. Idarucizumab was safe and well tolerated in healthy males. PMID:25789661

  4. Pharmacokinetics and safety of oseltamivir in patients with end-stage renal disease treated with automated peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kashyap; Rayner, Craig R; Giraudon, Mylène; Kamal, Mohamed A; Morcos, Peter N; Robson, Richard; Kirkpatrick, Carl M

    2015-01-01

    AIMS Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are at increased risk of developing complications associated with influenza infection. Oseltamivir is indicated for influenza treatment in ESRD patients, but the disposition is poorly understood in this patient population. This study aimed to characterize the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of oseltamivir in automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) and construct a pharmacokinetic model to assist with optimized dosing. METHODS Ten adults with ESRD were prescribed an aggressive APD regimen consisting of three continuous cycler-assisted peritoneal dialysis (CCPD) sessions during the day and two continuous ambulatory (CAPD) sessions overnight. Oseltamivir was administered as a single 75 mg dose, immediately before APD treatment. RESULTS Oseltamivir was rapidly eliminated via first-pass metabolism, with most of the dose (Fraction metabolized = 0.964) reaching the circulation as the active metabolite, oseltamivir carboxylate. This metabolite was cleared slowly and was quantifiable throughout the sampling interval. The disposition of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate was described by a two- and a one-compartment model, respectively. Metabolite clearance by CCPD [0.32 l h−1 (70 kg)−1] was 1.9-fold faster than via CAPD [0.17 l h−1 (70 kg)−1], with renal elimination being dominant in patients with residual urine production. Model simulations showed that a single 75 mg dose attained target exposures in patients with negligible or low urine clearance. However, higher doses are recommended for further investigation in patients with high residual renal function. In all patients, oseltamivir was well tolerated. CONCLUSIONS In APD patients with anuria or low residual renal elimination, a single 75 mg dose of oseltamivir produced exposures at the upper end of the safety margin. PMID:25289522

  5. Pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and safety of GSK2190915, a novel oral anti‐inflammatory 5‐lipoxygenase‐activating protein inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Gretchen; King, Christopher D.; Schaab, Kevin; Rewolinski, Melissa; Norris, Virginia; Ambery, Claire; Bentley, Jane; Yamada, Masanori; Santini, Angelina M.; van de Wetering de Rooij, Jeroen; Stock, Nicholas; Zunic, Jasmine; Hutchinson, John H.; Evans, Jilly F.

    2013-01-01

    Aim To assess the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety and tolerability of the 5‐lipoxygenase‐activating protein inhibitor, GSK2190915, after oral dosing in two independent phase I studies, one in Western European and one in Japanese subjects, utilizing different formulations. Method Western European subjects received single (50–1000 mg) or multiple (10–450 mg) oral doses of GSK2190915 or placebo in a dose‐escalating manner. Japanese subjects received three of four GSK2190915 doses (10–200 mg) plus placebo once in a four period crossover design. Blood samples were collected for GSK2190915 concentrations and blood and urine were collected to measure leukotriene B4 and leukotriene E4, respectively, as pharmacodynamic markers of drug activity. Results There was no clear difference in adverse events between placebo and active drug‐treated subjects in either study. Maximum plasma concentrations of GSK2190915 and area under the curve increased in a dose‐related manner and mean half‐life values ranged from 16–34 h. Dose‐dependent inhibition of blood leukotriene B4 production was observed and near complete inhibition of urinary leukotriene E4 excretion was shown at all doses except the lowest dose. The EC50 values for inhibition of LTB4 were 85 nm and 89 nm in the Western European and Japanese studies, respectively. Conclusion GSK2190915 is well‐tolerated with pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in Western European and Japanese subjects that support once daily dosing for 24 h inhibition of leukotrienes. Doses of ≥50 mg show near complete inhibition of urinary leukotriene E4 at 24 h post‐dose, whereas doses of ≥150 mg are required for 24 h inhibition of blood LTB4. PMID:22803688

  6. Pharmacokinetics in Drug Discovery: An Exposure-Centred Approach to Optimising and Predicting Drug Efficacy and Safety.

    PubMed

    Reichel, Andreas; Lienau, Philip

    2016-01-01

    The role of pharmacokinetics (PK) in drug discovery is to support the optimisation of the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) properties of lead compounds with the ultimate goal to attain a clinical candidate which achieves a concentration-time profile in the body that is adequate for the desired efficacy and safety profile. A thorough characterisation of the lead compounds aiming at the identification of the inherent PK liabilities also includes an early generation of PK/PD relationships linking in vitro potency and target exposure/engagement with expression of pharmacological activity (mode-of-action) and efficacy in animal studies. The chapter describes an exposure-centred approach to lead generation, lead optimisation and candidate selection and profiling that focuses on a stepwise generation of an understanding between PK/exposure and PD/efficacy relationships by capturing target exposure or surrogates thereof and cellular mode-of-action readouts in vivo. Once robust PK/PD relationship in animal PD models has been constructed, it is translated to anticipate the pharmacologically active plasma concentrations in patients and the human therapeutic dose and dosing schedule which is also based on the prediction of the PK behaviour in human as described herein. The chapter outlines how the level of confidence in the predictions increases with the level of understanding of both the PK and the PK/PD of the new chemical entities (NCE) in relation to the disease hypothesis and the ability to propose safe and efficacious doses and dosing schedules in responsive patient populations. A sound identification of potential drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (DMPK)-related development risks allows proposing of an effective de-risking strategy for the progression of the project that is able to reduce uncertainties and to increase the probability of success during preclinical and clinical development. PMID:26330260

  7. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, Safety, and Clinical Activity of Multiple Doses of RCT-18 in Chinese Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qian; Chen, Xia; Hou, Yong; Jiang, Ji; Zhong, Wen; Yao, Xuejing; Wang, Wenxiang; Li, Lin; Fang, Jianmin; Zhang, Fengchun; Hu, Pei

    2016-08-01

    RCT-18 is a novel recombinant fusion protein that blocks the activity of a B-lymphocyte stimulator and a proliferation-inducing ligand. This was a randomized, single-blind, and placebo-controlled phase 1 study in 12 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Eligible patients were randomized 3:1 to receive multiple subcutaneous doses of RCT-18 for 4 weeks (180 mg, once weekly) or placebo and monitored over an 84-day observation period for pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, immunogenicity, safety, and clinical activity. After multiple-dose RCT-18, the maximal serum concentration (Cmax ) of total and free RCT-18 was reached within 1 to 2 days. Mean elimination half-life for total RCT-18 and free RCT-18 was 11.4 to 26.4 days and 2.4 to 26.5 days, respectively. Slight accumulation was found after multiple subcutaneous administrations. The average accumulation ratios of AUC and Cmax after the fourth administration of RCT-18 were 2.0 and 1.7 for total RCT-18, and 1.8 and 1.6 for free RCT-18. The formation and elimination of BLyS-RCT-18 complex were much slower, with a time to Cmax of 14 to 46 days. Pharmacokinetic characteristics of RCT-18 in SLE patients were similar to those in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. No positive reaction was detected in the immunogenicity assessments. RCT-18 was biologically active, according to serum immunoglobulin and B-cell levels. Treatment-related IgM and IgA reduction was found during this study. CD19(+) , IgD(+) , and CD27(+) B-cell counts were increased after administration and decreased subsequently. SLE patients treated with RCT-18 were more prone to infections, including moderate and severe infections. Lower dosages of RCT-18 should be considered in further clinical development. PMID:26634642

  8. A chemical tuned strategy to develop novel irreversible EGFR-TK inhibitors with improved safety and pharmacokinetic profiles.

    PubMed

    Xia, Guangxin; Chen, Wenteng; Zhang, Jing; Shao, Jiaan; Zhang, Yong; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Leduo; Qi, Weixing; Sun, Xing; Li, Bojun; Xiang, Zhixiong; Ma, Chen; Xu, Jia; Deng, Hailin; Li, Yufeng; Li, Ping; Miao, Hong; Han, Jiansheng; Liu, Yanjun; Shen, Jingkang; Yu, Yongping

    2014-12-11

    Gatekeeper T790 M mutation in EGFR is the most prevalent factor underlying acquired resistance. Acrylamide-bearing quinazoline derivatives are powerful irreversible inhibitors for overcoming resistance. Nevertheless, concerns about the risk of nonspecific covalent modification have motivated the development of novel cysteine-targeting inhibitors. In this paper, we demonstrate that fluoro-substituted olefins can be tuned to alter Michael addition reactivity. Incorporation of these olefins into the quinazoline templates produced potent EGFR inhibitors with improved safety and pharmacokinetic properties. A lead compound 5a was validated against EGFR(WT), EGFR(T790M) as well as A431 and H1975 cancer cell lines. Additionally, compound 5a displayed a weaker inhibition against the EGFR-independent cancer cell line SW620 when compared with afatinib. Oral administration of 5a at a dose of 30 mg/kg induced tumor regression in a murine-EGFR(L858R/T790M) driven H1975 xenograft model. Also, 5a exhibited improved oral bioavailability and safety as well as favorable tissue distribution properties and enhanced brain uptake. These findings provide the basis of a promising strategy toward the treatment of NSCLC patients with drug resistance. PMID:25409491

  9. The Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel's Galileo safety evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.C.; Gray, L.B.; Huff, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    The safety evaluation report (SER) for Galileo was prepared by the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel (INSRP) coordinators in accordance with Presidential directive/National Security Council memorandum 25. The INSRP consists of three coordinators appointed by their respective agencies, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). These individuals are independent of the program being evaluated and depend on independent experts drawn from the national technical community to serve on the five INSRP subpanels. The Galileo SER is based on input provided by the NASA Galileo Program Office, review and assessment of the final safety analysis report prepared by the Office of Special Applications of the DOE under a memorandum of understanding between NASA and the DOE, as well as other related data and analyses. The SER was prepared for use by the agencies and the Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the Present for use in their launch decision-making process. Although more than 20 nuclear-powered space missions have been previously reviewed via the INSRP process, the Galileo review constituted the first review of a nuclear power source associated with launch aboard the Space Transportation System.

  10. Preparation, characterization and pharmacokinetics evaluation of clarithromycin-loaded Eudragit(®) L-100 microspheres.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinghua; Li, Wei; Liu, Zhuo; Li, Jinghan; Zhao, Xiaoyun; Li, DongYang; Guo, Shuang; Zhang, Xiangrong

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare pH-dependent clarithromycin microsphere formulation by emulsion solvent evaporation method, employing Eudragit(®) L-100. Prepared microspheres were evaluated by carrying out in vitro release and in vivo pharmacokinetics studies. Drug-polymer interactions were studied by differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffractometry analyses and results showed that clarithromycin was molecularly dispersed in the polymer. The particle size distribution of microspheres was found over the range of 10~50 μm. The drug is hardly released in the HCl solution pH 1.2 in the first 2 h, but is rapidly released in phosphate buffer pH 7.2, and the cumulated release reached 98.1 % at 8 h. The pharmacokinetic profiles were conducted open, randomized, two-period crossover design with a 7-day interval between doses in healthy beagle dogs. The results indicated that the extent of absorption of the clarithromycin-load microspheres was the same as pure drug, but different in the rate of drug absorption in vivo. PMID:25652786

  11. Design, synthesis, and pharmacokinetic evaluation of a chemical delivery system for drug targeting to lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Saah, M; Wu, W M; Eberst, K; Marvanyos, E; Bodor, N

    1996-05-01

    We espouse the application of a novel chemical delivery system (CDS) approach to a delivery mechanism for drug targeting to lung tissue using the 1,2-dithiolane-3-pentyl moiety of lipoic acid as the "targetor moiety". The synthesis and the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic evaluation of a CDS modeling the lipoyl and other ester derivatives of chlorambucil (an antineoplastic agent) and cromolyn (a bischromone used in antiasthma prophylaxis) as compared with their respective parent drugs are described. The chlorambucil CDS was synthesized by esterifying the alcohol derivative of lipoic acid with chlorambucil using dicyclohexylcarbodiimide as the coupling agent. The cromolyn CDS was prepared by a multistep synthetic procedure culminating in the reaction of the alkyl bromide derivative of lipoic acid with the disodium salt of the bischromone compound. All the esters were highly lipophilic unlike the parent compounds. The in-vitro kinetic and in-vivo pharmacokinetic studies showed that the respective CDSs were sufficiently stable in buffer and biological media, hydrolyzed rapidly into the respective active parent drugs, and significantly enhanced delivery and retention of the active compound to lung tissue in comparison with the underivatized parent compounds used in conventional therapy. PMID:8742941

  12. Clinical trial simulation to evaluate population pharmacokinetics and food effect: capturing abiraterone and nilotinib exposures.

    PubMed

    Li, Claire H; Sherer, Eric A; Lewis, Lionel D; Bies, Robert R

    2015-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine (1) the accuracy with which individual patient level exposure can be determined and (2) whether a known food effect can be identified in a trial simulation of a typical population pharmacokinetic trial. Clinical trial simulations were undertaken using NONMEM VII to assess a typical oncology pharmacokinetic trial design. Nine virtual trials for each compound were performed for combinations of different levels of between-occasion variability, number of patients in the trial, and magnitude of a food covariate on oral clearance. Less than 5% and 20% bias and precision were obtained in individual clearance estimated for both abiraterone and nilotinib using this design. This design resulted in biased and imprecise population clearance estimates for abiraterone. The between-occasion variability in most trials was captured with less than 30% of percent bias and precision. The food effect was detectable as a statistically significant covariate on oral clearance for abiraterone and nilotinib with percent bias and precision of the food covariate less than 20%. These results demonstrate that clinical trial simulation can be used to explore the ability of specific trial designs to evaluate the power to identify individual and population level exposures, covariate, and variability effects. PMID:25511575

  13. Clinical Trial Simulation to Evaluate Population Pharmacokinetics and Food Effect: Capturing Abiraterone and Nilotinib Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Sherer, Eric A.; Lewis, Lionel D.; Bies, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine (1) the accuracy with which individual patient level exposure can be determined and (2) whether a known food effect can be identified in a trial simulation of a typical population pharmacokinetic trial. Clinical trial simulations were undertaken using NONMEM VII to assess a typical oncology pharmacokinetic trial design. Nine virtual trials for each compound were performed for combinations of different level of between-occasion variability, number of patients in the trial and magnitude of a food covariate on oral clearance. Less than 5% and 20% bias and precision were obtained in individual clearance estimated for both abiraterone and nilotinib using this design. This design resulted biased and imprecise population clearance estimates for abiraterone. The between-occasion variability in most trials was captured with less than 30% of percent bias and precision. The food effect was detectable as a statistically significant covariate on oral clearance for abiraterone and nilotinib with percent bias and precision of the food covariate less than 20%. These results demonstrate that clinical trial simulation can be used to explore the ability of specific trial designs to evaluate the power to identify individual and population level exposures,covariate and variability effects. PMID:25511575

  14. Pharmacokinetics and safety of recently approved drugs used to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in infants, children and adults.

    PubMed

    Gostelow, Martyn; Gonzalez, Daniel; Smith, P Brian; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) remains a significant cause of morbidity in hospitalized infants. Over the past 15 years, several drugs have been approved for the treatment of S. aureus infections in adults (linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin, daptomycin, telavancin, tigecycline and ceftaroline). The use of the majority of these drugs has extended into the treatment of MRSA infections in infants, frequently with minimal safety or dosing information. Only linezolid is approved for use in infants, and pharmacokinetic data in infants are limited to linezolid and daptomycin. Pediatric trials are underway for ceftaroline, telavancin, and daptomycin; however, none of these studies includes infants. Here, we review current pharmacokinetic, safety and efficacy data of these drugs with a specific focus in infants. PMID:24716805

  15. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Safety of Lisinopril in Pediatric Kidney Transplant Patients: Implications for Starting Dose Selection.

    PubMed

    Trachtman, H; Frymoyer, A; Lewandowski, A; Greenbaum, L A; Feig, D I; Gipson, D S; Warady, B A; Goebel, J W; Schwartz, G J; Lewis, K; Anand, R; Patel, U D

    2015-07-01

    Hypertension in pediatric kidney transplant recipients contributes to long-term graft loss, yet treatment options--including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors--are poorly characterized in this vulnerable population. We conducted a multicenter, open-label pharmacokinetic (PK) study of daily oral lisinopril in 22 children (ages 7-17 years) with stable kidney transplant function. Standard noncompartmental PK analyses were performed at steady state. Effects on blood pressure were examined in lisinopril-naïve patients (n = 13). Oral clearance declined in proportion to underlying kidney function; however, in patients with low estimated glomerular filtration rate (30-59 ml/min per 1.73m(2)), exposure (standardized to 0.1 mg/kg/day dose) was within the range reported previously in children without a kidney transplant. In lisinopril-naïve patients, 85% and 77% had a ≥ 6 mmHg reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively. Lisinopril was well tolerated. Our study provides initial insight on lisinopril use in children with a kidney transplant, including starting dose considerations. PMID:25807932

  16. Safety and Upper Respiratory Pharmacokinetics of the Hemagglutinin Stalk-Binding Antibody VIS410 Support Treatment and Prophylaxis Based on Population Modeling of Seasonal Influenza A Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Wollacott, Andrew M.; Boni, Maciej F.; Szretter, Kristy J.; Sloan, Susan E.; Yousofshahi, Mona; Viswanathan, Karthik; Bedard, Sylvain; Hay, Catherine A.; Smith, Patrick F.; Shriver, Zachary; Trevejo, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Seasonal influenza is a major public health concern in vulnerable populations. Here we investigated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of a broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody (VIS410) against Influenza A in a Phase 1 clinical trial. Based on these results and preclinical data, we implemented a mathematical modeling approach to investigate whether VIS410 could be used prophylactically to lessen the burden of a seasonal influenza epidemic and to protect at-risk groups from associated complications. Methods Using a single-ascending dose study (n = 41) at dose levels from 2 mg/kg–50 mg/kg we evaluated the safety as well as the serum and upper respiratory pharmacokinetics of a broadly-neutralizing antibody (VIS410) against influenza A (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02045472). Our primary endpoints were safety and tolerability of VIS410 compared to placebo. We developed an epidemic microsimulation model testing the ability of VIS410 to mitigate attack rates and severe disease in at risk-populations. Findings VIS410 was found to be generally safe and well-tolerated at all dose levels, from 2–50 mg/kg. Overall, 27 of 41 subjects (65.9%) reported a total of 67 treatment emergent adverse events (TEAEs). TEAEs were reported by 20 of 30 subjects (66.7%) who received VIS410 and by 7 of 11 subjects (63.6%) who received placebo. 14 of 16 TEAEs related to study drug were considered mild (Grade 1) and 2 were moderate (Grade 2). Two subjects (1 subject who received 30 mg/kg VIS410 and 1 subject who received placebo) experienced serious AEs (Grade 3 or 4 TEAEs) that were not related to study drug. VIS410 exposure was approximately dose-proportional with a mean half-life of 12.9 days. Mean VIS410 Cmax levels in the upper respiratory tract were 20.0 and 25.3 μg/ml at the 30 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg doses, respectively, with corresponding serum Cmax levels of 980.5 and 1316 μg/mL. Using these pharmacokinetic data, a microsimulation model showed

  17. Tolerability and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Inhaled Dry Powder Tobramycin Free Base in Non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hagedoorn, Paul; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C.; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Frijlink, Henderik W.; de Boer, Anne H.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Bronchiectasis is a condition characterised by dilated and thick-walled bronchi. The presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in bronchiectasis is associated with a higher hospitalisation frequency and a reduced quality of life, requiring frequent and adequate treatment with antibiotics. Objectives To assess local tolerability and the pharmacokinetic parameters of inhaled excipient free dry powder tobramycin as free base administered with the Cyclops dry powder inhaler to participants with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. The free base and absence of excipients reduces the inhaled powder dose. Methods Eight participants in the study were trained in handling the device and inhaling correctly. During drug administration the inspiratory flow curve was recorded. Local tolerability was assessed by spirometry and recording adverse events. Serum samples were collected before, and 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 105, 120 min; 4, 8 and 12 h after inhalation. Results and Discussion Dry powder tobramycin base was well tolerated and mild tobramycin-related cough was reported only once. A good drug dose-serum concentration correlation was obtained. Relatively small inhaled volumes were computed from the recorded flow curves, resulting in presumably substantial deposition in the central airways—i.e., at the site of infection. Conclusions In this first study of inhaled dry powder tobramycin free base in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis patients, the free base of tobramycin and the administration with the Cyclops dry powder device were well tolerated. Our data support further clinical studies to evaluate safety and efficacy of this compound in this population. PMID:26959239

  18. Safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of TV-1380, a novel mutated butyrylcholinesterase treatment for cocaine addiction, after single and multiple intramuscular injections in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Barak, Orit; Wildeman, Jacqueline; van de Wetering, Jeroen; Hettinga, Judith; Schuilenga-Hut, Petra; Gross, Aviva; Clark, Shane; Bassan, Merav; Gilgun-Sherki, Yossi; Mendzelevski, Boaz; Spiegelstein, Ofer

    2015-05-01

    Human plasma butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) contributes to cocaine metabolism and has been considered for use in treating cocaine addiction and cocaine overdose. TV-1380 is a recombinant protein composed of the mature form of human serum albumin fused at its amino terminus to the carboxy-terminus of a truncated and mutated BChE. In preclinical studies, TV-1380 has been shown to rapidly eliminate cocaine in the plasma thus forestalling entry of cocaine into the brain and heart. Two randomized, blinded phase I studies were conducted to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of TV-1380, following single and multiple administration in healthy subjects. TV-1380 was found to be safe and well tolerated with a long half-life (43-77 hours) and showed a dose-proportional increase in systemic exposure. Consistent with preclinical results, the ex vivo cocaine hydrolysis, TV-1380 activity clearly increased upon treatment in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, there was a direct relationship between ex vivo cocaine hydrolysis (kel ) and TV-1380 serum concentrations. There was no evidence that TV-1380 affected heart rate, the uncorrected QT interval, or the heart-rate-corrected QTcF interval. TV-1380, therefore, offers a safe once-weekly therapy to increase cocaine hydrolysis. PMID:25524052

  19. Safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of TV-1380, a novel mutated butyrylcholinesterase treatment for cocaine addiction, after single and multiple intramuscular injections in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Barak, Orit; Wildeman, Jacqueline; van de Wetering, Jeroen; Hettinga, Judith; Schuilenga-Hut, Petra; Gross, Aviva; Clark, Shane; Bassan, Merav; Gilgun-Sherki, Yossi; Mendzelevski, Boaz; Spiegelstein, Ofer

    2015-01-01

    Human plasma butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) contributes to cocaine metabolism and has been considered for use in treating cocaine addiction and cocaine overdose. TV-1380 is a recombinant protein composed of the mature form of human serum albumin fused at its amino terminus to the carboxy-terminus of a truncated and mutated BChE. In preclinical studies, TV-1380 has been shown to rapidly eliminate cocaine in the plasma thus forestalling entry of cocaine into the brain and heart. Two randomized, blinded phase I studies were conducted to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of TV-1380, following single and multiple administration in healthy subjects. TV-1380 was found to be safe and well tolerated with a long half-life (43–77 hours) and showed a dose-proportional increase in systemic exposure. Consistent with preclinical results, the ex vivo cocaine hydrolysis, TV-1380 activity clearly increased upon treatment in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, there was a direct relationship between ex vivo cocaine hydrolysis (kel) and TV-1380 serum concentrations. There was no evidence that TV-1380 affected heart rate, the uncorrected QT interval, or the heart-rate-corrected QTcF interval. TV-1380, therefore, offers a safe once-weekly therapy to increase cocaine hydrolysis. PMID:25524052

  20. Pharmacokinetics and safety of posaconazole delayed-release tablets for invasive fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Wiederhold, Nathan P

    2016-01-01

    Posaconazole is a broad-spectrum triazole antifungal agent with potent activity against various pathogenic fungi, including yeast and moulds. Clinical studies have demonstrated that this agent is efficacious as prophylaxis against invasive fungal infections in patients at high risk, and may also be useful as salvage therapy against invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis. However, the bioavailability of posaconazole following administration by oral suspension, which was the only formulation clinically available for many years, is highly variable and negatively influenced by several factors. Because of this, many patients had subtherapeutic or undetectable posaconazole levels when the oral suspension was used. To overcome this limitation, a delayed-release tablet was developed and is now available for clinical use. Hot-melt extrusion technology is used to combine a pH-sensitive polymer with posaconazole to produce a formulation that releases the drug in the elevated pH of the intestine where absorption occurs rather than in the low-pH environment of the stomach. This results in enhanced bioavailability and increased posaconazole exposure. Studies in healthy volunteers have demonstrated significantly higher and more consistent exposures with the tablet formulation compared to the oral suspension. In addition, pharmacokinetic parameters following administration of the tablets were not significantly affected by medications that raise gastric pH or increase gastric motility, and the tablets could also be administered without regard to food. Similar results have also been found in patients at high risk for invasive fungal infections who have received posaconazole tablets. The tablet formulation also appears to be well tolerated to date, although data regarding clinical efficacy are needed. PMID:26730212

  1. Pharmacokinetics, Serum Inhibitory and Bactericidal Activity, and Safety of Telavancin in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, J. P.; Seroogy, J.; Kaniga, K.; Higgins, D. L.; Kitt, M.; Barriere, S.

    2005-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics, tolerability, and serum inhibitory and bactericidal titers of telavancin, a new rapidly bactericidal lipoglycopeptide with multiple mechanisms of action against gram-positive pathogens, were assessed in a two-part, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, ascending-dose study with 54 healthy men. In part 1, single ascending intravenous doses of 0.25 to 15 mg/kg of body weight were studied. In part 2, multiple ascending doses (30-min infusions of 7.5 to 15 mg/kg/day) were studied over 7 days. Following the administration of multiple doses, steady state was achieved by days 3 to 4. At day 7 after the administration of telavancin at 7.5, 12.5, and 15 mg/kg/day, peak concentrations in plasma were 96.7, 151.3, and 202.5 μg/ml, respectively, and steady-state area-under-the-curve values were 700, 1,033, and 1,165 μg · h/ml, respectively. The elimination half-life ranged from 6.9 to 9.1 h following the administration of doses ≥5 mg/kg. Most adverse events were mild in severity. At 24 h postinfusion, serum from subjects given telavancin demonstrated potent bactericidal activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae strains. The results suggest that telavancin may be an effective once-daily therapy for serious bacterial infections caused by these pathogens. PMID:15616296

  2. Pharmacokinetics and safety of posaconazole delayed-release tablets for invasive fungal infections

    PubMed Central

    Wiederhold, Nathan P

    2016-01-01

    Posaconazole is a broad-spectrum triazole antifungal agent with potent activity against various pathogenic fungi, including yeast and moulds. Clinical studies have demonstrated that this agent is efficacious as prophylaxis against invasive fungal infections in patients at high risk, and may also be useful as salvage therapy against invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis. However, the bioavailability of posaconazole following administration by oral suspension, which was the only formulation clinically available for many years, is highly variable and negatively influenced by several factors. Because of this, many patients had subtherapeutic or undetectable posaconazole levels when the oral suspension was used. To overcome this limitation, a delayed-release tablet was developed and is now available for clinical use. Hot-melt extrusion technology is used to combine a pH-sensitive polymer with posaconazole to produce a formulation that releases the drug in the elevated pH of the intestine where absorption occurs rather than in the low-pH environment of the stomach. This results in enhanced bioavailability and increased posaconazole exposure. Studies in healthy volunteers have demonstrated significantly higher and more consistent exposures with the tablet formulation compared to the oral suspension. In addition, pharmacokinetic parameters following administration of the tablets were not significantly affected by medications that raise gastric pH or increase gastric motility, and the tablets could also be administered without regard to food. Similar results have also been found in patients at high risk for invasive fungal infections who have received posaconazole tablets. The tablet formulation also appears to be well tolerated to date, although data regarding clinical efficacy are needed. PMID:26730212

  3. Safety evaluations of longwall roof supports

    SciTech Connect

    Barczak, T.M.

    1989-01-01

    State-of-the-art longwall roof supports provide effective strata control, but failures of these support systems still occur. To identify failure mechanism and the impact these failures have on the safety of the support system, the U .S. Bureau of Mines has been conducting research on shield mechanics in the Bureau's unique mine roof simulator, as well as field studies of in situ support loading and investigations of longwall failures. Three types of failures are discussed: (1) inadequate support capacity, (2) structural failure, and (3) instability. Hypothetical situations with proposed courses of action and case studies of actual longwall failures are described. This information is intended to assist the Mine Safety and Health Administration and industry mining personnel in safety evaluations of longwall roof support systems.

  4. In-vivo dermal pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of skin targeting nanoparticles for corticosteroid treatment of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Muhammad Irfan; Katas, Haliza; Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd; Ng, Shiow-Fern; Zulfakar, Mohd Hanif; Jamil, Adawiyah

    2016-06-30

    The objective of this study was to investigate the in-vivo behavior of topically applied cationic polymeric chitosan nanoparticles (CSNPs) loaded with anti-inflammatory (hydrocortisone, HC) and antimicrobial (hydroxytyrosol, HT) drugs, to elucidate their skin targeting potential for the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD). Compared to the commercial formulation, the HC-HT loaded CSNPs showed significantly improved drug penetration into the epidermal and dermal layers of albino Wistar rat skin without saturation. Dermal pharmacokinetic of CSNPs with a size of 228.5±7nm and +39±5mV charges revealed that they penetrated 2.46-fold deeper than the commercial formulation did, and had greater affinity at the skin target site without spreading to the surrounding tissues, thereby providing substantial safety benefits. In repeated dermal application toxicity studies, the HC-HT CSNPs showed no evidence of toxicity compared to the commercial formulation, which induced skin atrophy and higher liver enzyme levels. In conclusion, the positively charged HC-HT CSNP formulation exhibited promising local delivery and virtually no treatment-related toxicities, suggesting it may be an efficient and viable alternative for commercially available AD treatments. PMID:27154252

  5. Intra-articular administration of lidocaine in anaesthetized dogs: pharmacokinetic profile and safety on cardiovascular and nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Di Salvo, A; Bufalari, A; De Monte, V; Cagnardi, P; Marenzoni, M L; Catanzaro, A; Vigorito, V; Della Rocca, G

    2015-08-01

    The intra-articular administration of lidocaine is a frequent practice in human orthopaedic surgical procedures, but an eventual absorption of the drug into the bloodstream can lead to toxicity, mainly concerning the central nervous system and the cardiovascular systems. The purpose of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetic profile and the safety, in terms of cardiovascular and CNS toxicity, of lidocaine after intra-articular administration to anesthetized dogs undergoing arthroscopy. Lidocaine 2% was administered to eight dogs before surgery in differing amounts, depending on the volume of the joints involved, and blood samples were taken at predetermined time points. The maximum serum concentration of lidocaine ranged from 0.50 to 3.01 μg/mL (mean ± SD: 2.18 ± 0.91 μg/mL), and the time to reach it was 28.75 ± 15.74 min. No signs of cardiac toxicity were detected during the entire procedure, and possible signs of CNS toxicity were masked by the anaesthesia. However, concentrations reported in literature as responsible for neurotoxicity in dog were achieved in three of eight investigated subjects. Pending further studies, veterinarians should consider the possibility of side effects occurring following the intra-articular administration of local anaesthetics. PMID:25428796

  6. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of a Single Intravenous Dose of myo-Inositol in Preterm Infants of 23 to 29 weeks

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, Dale L.; Ward, Robert M.; Williams, Rick L.; Watterberg, Kristi L.; Laptook, Abbot R.; Wrage, Lisa A.; Nolen, Tracy L.; Fennell, Timothy R.; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Poindexter, Brenda B.; Cotten, C. Michael; Hallman, Mikko K.; Frantz, Ivan D.; Faix, Roger G.; Zaterka-Baxter, Kristin M.; Das, Abhik; Ball, M. Bethany; O’Shea, T. Michael; Lacy, Conra Backstrom; Walsh, Michele C.; Shankaran, Seetha; Sánchez, Pablo J.; Bell, Edward F.; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Myo-inositol given to preterm infants with respiratory distress has reduced death, increased survival without bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and reduced severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in 2 randomized trials. Pharmacokinetic (PK) studies in extremely preterm infants are needed prior to efficacy trials. Methods Infants of 23–29 weeks gestation were randomized to a single intravenous (IV) dose of inositol at 60 or 120 mg/kg or placebo. Over 96 h, serum levels (sparse sampling population PK) and urine inositol excretion were determined. Population PK models were fit using a nonlinear mixed effects approach. Safety outcomes were recorded. Results A 1-compartment model that included factors for endogenous inositol production, allometric size based on weight, gestational age (GA) strata and creatinine clearance fit the data best. The central volume of distribution was 0.5115 l/kg, the clearance 0.0679 l/kg/h, endogenous production 2.67 mg/kg/h and the half life 5.22 h when modeled without the covariates. During the first 12 h renal inositol excretion quadrupled in the 120 mg/kg group, returning to near baseline after 48 h. There was no diuretic side-effect. No significant differences in adverse events occurred between the 3 groups (p > 0.05). Conclusions A single compartment model accounting for endogenous production satisfactorily described the PK of IV inositol. PMID:24067395

  7. Pharmacokinetics and safety of a new solution of vitamin K1(20) in children with cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Amédée-Manesme, O; Lambert, W E; Alagille, D; De Leenheer, A P

    1992-02-01

    In cholestatic diseases, the absorption of fat-soluble compounds, including vitamin K1(20), is low and periodic administration of vitamin K1(20) is often necessary. Due to the low absorption of vitamin K1(20) from the Konakion formulation, late hemorrhagic disease of the newborn also occurs especially after oral vitamin K1(20) prophylaxis with Konakion. We investigated the pharmacokinetics and the safety of a new formulation of vitamin K1(20) in a mixed micelles (MM) solution. Compared to the old formulation (Konakion) using Cremophor EL as a solubilizer, the higher vitamin K1(20) levels (as measured by HPLC) in serum obtained after oral administration of the MM formulation clearly demonstrate a superiority of this new formulation. Additionally, the elimination of Cremophor EL as well as of propylene glycol from the formulation avoids possible adverse effects associated with intravenous or intramuscular administration. Furthermore, in most cases, the discomfort of parenteral injections can be overcome by simple oral administration even in children with severe cholestasis. PMID:1593370

  8. Safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of 2-pyridylacetic acid, a major metabolite of betahistine, in a phase 1 dose escalation study in subjects with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Ganesh; Sallee, Floyd; Gabbita, Prasad; Zemlan, Frank; Sallans, Larry; Desai, Pankaj B

    2015-10-01

    Betahistine, a potent histamine H3 receptor antagonist, is being developed for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) that manifests with symptoms such as hyperactivity, impulsivity and inattention. This study describes the pharmacokinetics of betahistine in ADHD subjects at doses higher than 50 mg. These assessments were made during a randomized, placebo-controlled, single blind, dose escalation study to determine the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of once daily doses of 50 mg, 100 mg and 200 mg of betahistine in subjects with ADHD. Plasma levels of 2-pyridylacetic acid (2-PAA), a major metabolite of betahistine were quantified using a validated LC-MS/MS method and used for pharmacokinetic analysis and dose proportionality of betahistine. A linear relationship was observed in Cmax and AUC0-4 of 2-PAA with the betahistine dose (R2 0.9989 and 0.9978, respectively) and dose proportionality coefficients (β) for the power model were 0.8684 (Cmax) and 1.007 (AUC0-4). A population pharmacokinetic model with first-order absorption of betahistine and metabolism to 2-PAA, followed by a first-order elimination of 2-PAA provides estimates of clearance that underscored the linear increase in systemic exposure with dose. There were no serious adverse events reported in the study, betahistine was safe and well tolerated at all the dose levels tested. PMID:25904220

  9. Safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacogenomics and QT concentration-effect modelling of the SirT1 inhibitor selisistat in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Westerberg, Goran; Chiesa, Joseph A; Andersen, Claus A; Diamanti, Daniela; Magnoni, Letizia; Pollio, Giuseppe; Darpo, Borje; Zhou, Meijian

    2015-01-01

    Aim Selisistat (SEN0014196), a first-in-class SirT1 inhibitor, is being developed as a disease-modifying therapy for Huntington's disease. This first-in-human study investigated the safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenomics of single and multiple doses of selisistat in healthy male and female subjects. Method In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study, seven cohorts of eight subjects received a single dose of selisistat at dose levels of 5, 25, 75, 150, 300 and 600 mg and four cohorts of eight subjects were administered 100, 200 and 300 mg once daily for 7 days. Blood sampling and safety assessments were conducted throughout the study. Results Selisistat was rapidly absorbed and systemic exposure increased in proportion to dose in the 5–300 mg range. Steady-state plasma concentrations were achieved within 4 days of repeated dosing. The incidence of drug related adverse events showed no correlation with dose level or number of doses received and was comparable with the placebo group. No serious adverse events were reported and no subjects were withdrawn due to adverse events. There were no trends in clinical laboratory parameters or vital signs. No trends in heart rate or ECG parameters, including the QTc interval and T-wave morphology, were observed. There were no findings in physical or neurological examinations or postural control. Transcriptional alteration was observed in peripheral blood. Conclusion Selisistat was safe and well tolerated by healthy male and female subjects after single doses up to 600 mg and multiple doses up to 300 mg day−1. PMID:25223836

  10. Comparing the cardiovascular therapeutic indices of glycopyrronium and tiotropium in an integrated rat pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and safety model.

    PubMed

    Trifilieff, Alexandre; Ethell, Brian T; Sykes, David A; Watson, Kenny J; Collingwood, Steve; Charlton, Steven J; Kent, Toby C

    2015-08-15

    Long acting inhaled muscarinic receptor antagonists, such as tiotropium, are widely used as bronchodilator therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although this class of compounds is generally considered to be safe and well tolerated in COPD patients the cardiovascular safety of tiotropium has recently been questioned. We describe a rat in vivo model that allows the concurrent assessment of muscarinic antagonist potency, bronchodilator efficacy and a potential for side effects, and we use this model to compare tiotropium with NVA237 (glycopyrronium bromide), a recently approved inhaled muscarinic antagonist for COPD. Anaesthetized Brown Norway rats were dosed intratracheally at 1 or 6h prior to receiving increasing doses of intravenous methacholine. Changes in airway resistance and cardiovascular function were recorded and therapeutic indices were calculated against the ED50 values for the inhibition of methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction. At both time points studied, greater therapeutic indices for hypotension and bradycardia were observed with glycopyrronium (19.5 and 28.5 fold at 1h; >200 fold at 6h) than with tiotropium (1.5 and 4.2 fold at 1h; 4.6 and 5.5 fold at 6h). Pharmacokinetic, protein plasma binding and rat muscarinic receptor binding properties for both compounds were determined and used to generate an integrated model of systemic M2 muscarinic receptor occupancy, which predicted significantly higher M2 receptor blockade at ED50 doses with tiotropium than with glycopyrronium. In our preclinical model there was an improved safety profile for glycopyrronium when compared with tiotropium. PMID:26026369

  11. Evaluation of Factor Xa-Specific Chromogenic Substrate Assays and the Determination of Pharmacokinetics of Fondaparinux.

    PubMed

    Yuri, Maiko; Tabe, Yoko; Tsuchiya, Koji; Sadatsuki, Ryo; Aoki, Jun; Horii, Takashi; Iba, Toshiaki; Ohsaka, Akimichi

    2016-07-01

    Fondaparinux (FPX), a synthesized factor Xa inhibitor, is one of the most popular anticoagulants for the prevention of postoperative venous thromboembolism (VTE). Although routine monitoring is not required, the bleeding adverse events cannot be neglected, and the measurement of anti-Xa activity is expected to be monitored. The primary purpose of this study is to evaluate the performances of 2 chromogenic assays for the detection of anti-Xa activity. Furthermore, the pharmacokinetics of FPX was examined using chromogenic assays. Anti-Xa activity was measured using 2 FPX-based chromogenic substrates (S2222 and STA-Liquid Anti-Xa). The reproducibility, detection limits, linearity, and correlations between the substrates were examined using normal plasma doped with low and high concentrations of FPX formulation. In addition, anti-Xa activity in 235 clinical samples from 164 cases treated was measured, and the pharmacokinetics of FPX was evaluated. Both of the tested substrates were capable of accurately measuring the anti-Xa activity of FPX, with a lower limit of 0.05 μg/mL and a coefficient of variation of less than 10%. The repeated administration of FPX induced a gradual but significant increase in the anti-Xa activity, which was negatively correlated with body weight and estimated glomerular filtration rate. No significant correlation between the anti-Xa activity and the occurrence of postoperative VTE or bleeding event was observed. Anti-Xa activity can be successfully determined using 2 chromogenic assays and automated biochemical analyzers. The clinical significance of anti-Xa activity monitoring should be examined in the future study. PMID:26177660

  12. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Amprenavir (141W94), a Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Type 1 Protease Inhibitor, following Oral Administration of Single Doses to HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, Brian M.; Hanson, Cynthia D.; Chittick, Gregory E.; Symonds, William T.; Roskell, Neil S.

    1999-01-01

    We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel, dose-escalation trial to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and safety of single, oral doses of amprenavir (141W94; formerly VX-478), a potent inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 protease, administered as hard gelatin capsules in 12 HIV-infected subjects. The doses of amprenavir evaluated were 150, 300, 600, 900, and 1,200 mg. Amprenavir was rapidly absorbed, with the time to maximum concentration occurring within 1 to 2 h after dosing. On the basis of power model analysis, the increase in the maximum concentration of amprenavir in plasma (Cmax) was less than dose proportional, and the increase in the area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity (AUC0–∞) was greater than dose proportional; mean slopes (with 90% confidence intervals) were 1.25 (1.16 to 1.35) and 0.78 (0.78 to 0.86) for AUC0–∞ and Cmax, respectively. Amprenavir was eliminated slowly, with a terminal-phase half-life of 8 h. A second study was conducted to determine the bioavailability of the hard gelatin capsule relative to that of a subsequently developed soft gelatin capsule. The capsules were bioequivalent in terms of AUC0–∞ but not in terms of Cmax; geometric-least-squares means ratios (with 90% confidence intervals) were 1.03 (0.92 to 1.14) and 1.25 (1.03 to 1.53) for AUC0–∞ and Cmax, respectively. Administration of soft gelatin capsules of amprenavir with a high-fat breakfast resulted in a 14% decrease in the mean AUC0–∞ (from 9.58 to 8.26 μg · h/ml), which is not likely to be clinically significant. The most common adverse events related to amprenavir were headache, nausea, and hypesthesia. Amprenavir appears to be safe and well tolerated over the dose range of 150 to 1200 mg. On the basis of the present single-dose studies, amprenavir is an HIV protease inhibitor with favorable absorption and clearance pharmacokinetics that are only minimally affected by administration with food

  13. Comparing the cardiovascular therapeutic indices of glycopyrronium and tiotropium in an integrated rat pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and safety model

    SciTech Connect

    Trifilieff, Alexandre; Ethell, Brian T.; Sykes, David A.; Watson, Kenny J.; Collingwood, Steve; Charlton, Steven J.; Kent, Toby C.

    2015-08-15

    Long acting inhaled muscarinic receptor antagonists, such as tiotropium, are widely used as bronchodilator therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although this class of compounds is generally considered to be safe and well tolerated in COPD patients the cardiovascular safety of tiotropium has recently been questioned. We describe a rat in vivo model that allows the concurrent assessment of muscarinic antagonist potency, bronchodilator efficacy and a potential for side effects, and we use this model to compare tiotropium with NVA237 (glycopyrronium bromide), a recently approved inhaled muscarinic antagonist for COPD. Anaesthetized Brown Norway rats were dosed intratracheally at 1 or 6 h prior to receiving increasing doses of intravenous methacholine. Changes in airway resistance and cardiovascular function were recorded and therapeutic indices were calculated against the ED{sub 50} values for the inhibition of methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction. At both time points studied, greater therapeutic indices for hypotension and bradycardia were observed with glycopyrronium (19.5 and 28.5 fold at 1 h; > 200 fold at 6 h) than with tiotropium (1.5 and 4.2 fold at 1 h; 4.6 and 5.5 fold at 6 h). Pharmacokinetic, protein plasma binding and rat muscarinic receptor binding properties for both compounds were determined and used to generate an integrated model of systemic M{sub 2} muscarinic receptor occupancy, which predicted significantly higher M{sub 2} receptor blockade at ED{sub 50} doses with tiotropium than with glycopyrronium. In our preclinical model there was an improved safety profile for glycopyrronium when compared with tiotropium. - Highlights: • We use an in vivo rat model to study CV safety of inhaled muscarinic antagonists. • We integrate protein and receptor binding and PK of tiotropium and glycopyrrolate. • At ED{sub 50} doses for bronchoprotection we model systemic M{sub 2} receptor occupancy. • Glycopyrrolate demonstrates lower M

  14. Adult and paediatric poor metabolisers of desloratadine: an assessment of pharmacokinetics and safety.

    PubMed

    Prenner, Bruce; Kim, Kenneth; Gupta, Samir; Khalilieh, Sauzanne; Kantesaria, Bhavna; Manitpisitkul, Prasarn; Lorber, Richard; Wang, Zaiqi; Lutsky, Barry

    2006-03-01

    Antihistamines are widely used to treat allergic rhinitis (AR) and chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) in adults and children. Desloratadine is a once-daily oral antihistamine with a favourable sedation profile that is approved for the treatment of AR and CIU. Phenotypic polymorphism in the metabolism of desloratadine has been observed, such that some individuals have a decreased ability to form 3-hydroxydesloratadine, the major metabolite of desloratadine; such individuals are termed 'poor metabolisers of desloratadine'. This review describes the prevalence of poor metabolisers of desloratadine, quantifies the exposure to desloratadine in poor metabolisers and demonstrates that the increased exposure in poor metabolisers is independent of age when administered at age-appropriate doses. Furthermore, this review demonstrates that the increased exposure to desloratadine in poor metabolisers is not associated with any changes in the safety and tolerability profile of desloratadine, including cardiovascular safety. PMID:16503743

  15. Hemodialysis safety: Evaluation of clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Fadili, Wafaa; Adnouni, Adil; Laouad, Inass

    2016-05-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) safety has become a clinical priority; therefore, the use of checklists for making the dialysis session safe is now widely adopted. The aim of our study was to assess different shortcomings in the clinical practice of nurses working in different Moroccan dialysis centers and to discuss the interest of using such checklists. This cross-sectional study was performed in 13 chronic HD centers. Clinical practice of nurses was evaluated through checklists used in European outpatient dialysis units. We noted several deficiencies mainly related to the clinical evaluation of dialysis patients and to aspects related to hygiene and protection measures against contamination. Optimal safety of dialysis sessions requires the use of simple and reproducible means that improve clinical skills of the health staff. PMID:27215249

  16. Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Sulfamethoxazole at 800 Milligrams Once Daily in the Treatment of Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Alsaad, N; Dijkstra, J A; Akkerman, O W; de Lange, W C M; van Soolingen, D; Kosterink, J G W; van der Werf, T S; Alffenaar, J W C

    2016-07-01

    For treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), there is a scarcity of antituberculosis drugs. Co-trimoxazole is one of the available drug candidates, and it is already frequently coprescribed for TB-HIV-coinfected patients. However, only limited data are available on the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) parameters of co-trimoxazole in TB patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the PK parameters and in vitro PD data on the effective part of co-trimoxazole: sulfamethoxazole. In a prospective PK study in patients infected with drug-susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis (drug-susceptible TB patients) (age, >18), sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (SXT) was administered orally at a dose of 960 mg once daily. One-compartment population pharmacokinetic modeling was performed using MW\\Pharm 3.81 (Mediware, Groningen, The Netherlands). The area under the concentration-time curve for the free, unbound fraction of a drug (ƒAUC)/MIC ratio and the period in which the free concentration exceeded the MIC (fT > MIC) were calculated. Twelve patients received 960 mg co-trimoxazole in addition to first-line drugs. The pharmacokinetic parameters of the population model were as follows (geometric mean ± standard deviation [SD]): metabolic clearance (CLm), 1.57 ± 3.71 liters/h; volume of distribution (V), 0.30 ± 0.05 liters · kg lean body mass(-1); drug clearance/creatinine clearance ratio (fr), 0.02 ± 0.13; gamma distribution rate constant (ktr_po), 2.18 ± 1.14; gamma distribution shape factor (n_po), 2.15 ± 0.39. The free fraction of sulfamethoxazole was 0.3, but ranged between 0.2 and 0.4. The median value of the MICs was 9.5 mg/liter (interquartile range [IQR], 4.75 to 9.5), and that of theƒAUC/MIC ratio was 14.3 (IQR, 13.0 to 17.5). The percentage of ƒT > MIC ranged between 43 and 100% of the dosing interval. The PK and PD data from this study are useful to explore a future dosing regimen of co-trimoxazole for MDR-TB treatment. (This

  17. Evaluation of the Transport, In Vitro Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics of Salvinorin A, a Potent Hallucinogen

    PubMed Central

    Teksin, Zeynep S.; Lee, Insong J.; Nemieboka, Noble N.; Othman, Ahmed A.; Upreti, Vijay V.; Hassan, Hazem E.; Syed, Shariq S.; Prisinzano, Thomas E.; Eddington, Natalie D.

    2009-01-01

    Salvinorin A is an unregulated potent hallucinogen isolated from the leaves of Salvia divinorum. It is the only known non-nitrogenous kappa-opioid selective agonist and rivals synthetic lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in potency. This objective of this study was to characterize the in vitro transport, in vitro metabolism, and pharmacokinetic properties of Salvinorin A. The transport characteristics of Salvinorin A were assessed using MDCK-MDR1 cell monolayers. The P-glycoprotein (P-gp) affinity status was assessed by the P-gp ATPase assay. In vitro metabolism studies were performed with various specific human CYP450 isoforms and UGT2B7 to assess the metabolic characteristics of Salvinorin A. Cohorts (n=3) of male Sprague Dawley rats were used to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and brain distribution of Salvinorin A (10 mg/kg, intraperitonal (i.p.) over a 240 min period. A validated UV-HPLC and LC/MS/MS method was used to quantify the hallucinogen concentrations obtained from the in vitro and in vivo studies, respectively. Salvinorin A displayed a high secretory transport in the MDCK-MDR1 cells (4.07±1.34 × 10-5 cm/s). Salvinorin A also stimulated the P-gp ATPase activity in a concentration (5-10 μm) dependent manner, suggesting that it may be a substrate of P-gp. A significant decrease in Salvinorin A concentration ranging from 14.7±0.80 % to 31.1±1.20 % was observed after incubation with CYP2D6, CYP1A1, CYP2C18, and CYP2E1, respectively. A significant decrease was also observed after incubation with UGT2B7. These results suggest that Salvinorin A may be a substrate of UGT2B7, CYP2D6, CYP1A1, CYP2E1 and CYP2C18. The in vivo pharmacokinetic study showed a relatively fast elimination with a half-life (t1/2) of 75 min and a clearance (Cl/F) of 26 L/h/kg. The distribution was extensive (Vd of 47.1 L/kg), however the brain to plasma ratio was 0.050. Accordingly, the brain half life was relatively short, 36 min. Salvinorin A is rapidly eliminated after i.p. dosing

  18. A Phase 1 Study of 131I-CLR1404 in Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors: Dosimetry, Biodistribution, Pharmacokinetics, and Safety

    PubMed Central

    Grudzinski, Joseph J.; Titz, Benjamin; Kozak, Kevin; Clarke, William; Allen, Ernest; Trembath, LisaAnn; Stabin, Michael; Marshall, John; Cho, Steve Y.; Wong, Terence Z.; Mortimer, Joanne; Weichert, Jamey P.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction 131I-CLR1404 is a small molecule that combines a tumor-targeting moiety with a therapeutic radioisotope. The primary aim of this phase 1 study was to determine the administered radioactivity expected to deliver 400 mSv to the bone marrow. The secondary aims were to determine the pharmacokinetic (PK) and safety profiles of 131I-CLR1404. Methods Eight subjects with refractory or relapsed advanced solid tumors were treated with a single injection of 370 MBq of 131I-CLR1404. Whole body planar nuclear medicine scans were performed at 15–35 minutes, 4–6, 18–24, 48, 72, 144 hours, and 14 days post injection. Optional single photon emission computed tomography imaging was performed on two patients 6 days post injection. Clinical laboratory parameters were evaluated in blood and urine. Plasma PK was evaluated on 127I-CLR1404 mass measurements. To evaluate renal clearance of 131I-CLR1404, urine was collected for 14 days post injection. Absorbed dose estimates for target organs were determined using the RADAR method with OLINDA/EXM software. Results Single administrations of 370 MBq of 131I-CLR1404 were well tolerated by all subjects. No severe adverse events were reported and no adverse event was dose-limiting. Plasma 127I-CLR1404 concentrations declined in a bi-exponential manner with a mean t½ value of 822 hours. Mean Cmax and AUC(0-t) values were 72.2 ng/mL and 15753 ng•hr/mL, respectively. An administered activity of approximately 740 MBq is predicted to deliver 400 mSv to marrow. Conclusions Preliminary data suggest that 131I-CLR1404 is well tolerated and may have unique potential as an anti-cancer agent. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00925275 PMID:25402488

  19. Candesartan cilexetil loaded solid lipid nanoparticles for oral delivery: characterization, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dudhipala, Narendar; Veerabrahma, Kishan

    2016-01-01

    Candesartan cilexetil (CC) is used in the treatment of hypertension and heart failure. It has poor aqueous solubility and low oral bioavailability. In this work, CC loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (CC-SLNs) were developed to improve the oral bioavailability. Components of the SLNs include either of trimyristin/tripalmitin/tristearin, and surfactants (Poloxamer 188 and egg lecithin E80). The CC loaded nanoparticles were prepared by hot homogenization followed by ultrasonication method. The physicochemical properties, morphology of CC-SLNs were characterized, the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic behaviour of CC-SLNs were evaluated in rats. Stable CC-SLNs having a mean particle size of 180-220 nm with entrapment efficiency varying in between 91-96% were developed. The physical stability of optimized formulation was studied at refrigerated and room temperature for 3 months. Further, freeze drying was tried for improving the physical stability. DSC and XRD analyses indicated that the drug incorporated into SLN was in amorphous form but not in crystalline state. The SLN-morphology was found to be nearly spherical by electron microscopic studies. Pharmacokinetic results indicated that the oral bioavailability of CC was improved over 2.75-fold after incorporation into SLNs. Pharmacodynamic study of SLNs in hypertensive rats showed a decrease in systolic blood pressure for 48 h, while suspension showed a decrease in systolic blood pressure for only 2 h. Taken together, these effects are due to enhanced bioavailability coupled with sustained action of CC in SLN formulation. Thus, the results conclusively demonstrated the role of CC-SLNs for a significant enhancement in oral bioavailability along with improved pharmacodynamic effect. PMID:24865287

  20. Pharmacodynamic evaluation of biapenem in peritoneal fluid using population pharmacokinetic modelling and Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Ikawa, Kazuro; Morikawa, Norifumi; Ikeda, Kayo; Ohge, Hiroki; Sueda, Taijiro

    2008-10-01

    This study evaluated the pharmacodynamics of biapenem in peritoneal fluid (PF). Biapenem (300 or 600mg) was administered via a 0.5-h infusion to 19 patients before abdominal surgery. Venous blood and PF samples were obtained after 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6h. Drug concentration data (108 plasma samples and 105 PF samples) were analysed using population pharmacokinetic modelling. A three-compartment model fits the data, with creatinine clearance (CL(Cr)) as the most significant covariate: CL (L/h)=0.036 x CL(Cr)+4.88, V1 (L)=6.95, Q2 (L/h)=2.05, V2 (L)=3.47, Q3 (L/h)=13.7 and V3 (L)=5.91, where CL is the clearance, Q2 and Q3 are the intercompartmental clearances, and V1, V2 and V3 are the volumes of distribution of the central, peripheral and peritoneal compartments, respectively. A Monte Carlo simulation using the pharmacokinetic model showed the probabilities of attaining the bactericidal exposure target (30% of the time above the minimum inhibitory concentration (T>MIC)) in PF were greater than or equal to those in plasma. In the cases of CL(Cr)=90 and 60mL/min, the site-specific pharmacodynamic-derived breakpoints (the highest MIC values at which the probabilities of target attainment in PF were >or=90%) were 2microg/mL for 300mg every 12h, 4microg/mL for biapenem 300mg every 8h (q8h) and 8microg/mL for 600mg q8h. Thus, these results should support the clinical use of biapenem as a treatment for intra-abdominal infections and facilitate the design of the dosing regimen. PMID:18602798

  1. Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Improved Oral Bioavailability of Valsartan: Proliposomes Versus Self-Nanoemulsifying Drug Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Nekkanti, Vijaykumar; Wang, Zhijun; Betageri, Guru V

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to develop proliposomes and self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) for a poorly bioavailable drug, valsartan, and to compare their in vivo pharmacokinetics. Proliposomes were prepared by thin-film hydration method using different lipids such as soy phosphatidylcholine (SPC), hydrogenated soy phosphatidylcholine (HSPC), distearyl phosphatidylcholine (DSPC), dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), and dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol sodium (DMPG) and cholesterol in various ratios. SNEDDS formulations were prepared using varying concentrations of capmul MCM, labrafil M 2125, and Tween 80. Both proliposomes and SNEDDS were evaluated for particle size, zeta potential, in vitro drug release, in vitro permeability, and in vivo pharmacokinetics. In vitro drug release was carried out in purified water and 0.1 N HCl using USP type II dissolution apparatus. In vitro drug permeation was studied using parallel artificial membrane permeation assay (PAMPA) and everted rat intestinal permeation techniques. Among the formulations, the proliposomes with drug/DMPG/cholesterol in the ratio of 1:1:0.5 and SNEDDS with capmul MCM (16.0% w/w), labrafil M 2125 (64.0% w/w), and Tween 80 (18.0% w/w) showed the desired particle size and zeta potential. Enhanced drug release was observed with proliposomes and SNEDDS as compared to pure valsartan. Valsartan permeability across PAMPA and everted rat intestinal permeation models was significantly higher with proliposomes and SNEDDS. Following single oral administration of proliposomes and SNEDDS, a relative bioavailability of 202.36 and 196.87%, respectively, was achieved compared to pure valsartan suspension. The study results indicated that both proliposomes and SNEDDS formulations are comparable in improving the oral bioavailability of valsartan. PMID:26381913

  2. Single, Escalating Dose Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Food Effects of a New Oral Androgen Dimethandrolone Undecanoate in Man: A prototype oral male hormonal contraceptive

    PubMed Central

    Swerdloff, Ronald S.; Nya-Ngatchou, Jean Jacques; Liu, Peter Y.; Amory, John K.; Leung, Andrew; Hull, Laura; Blithe, Diana L.; Woo, Jason; Bremner, William J.; Wang, Christina

    2014-01-01

    The novel androgen, dimethandrolone (DMA) has both androgenic and progestational activities, properties that may maximize gonadotropin suppression. We assessed the pharmacokinetics of dimethandrolone undecanoate (DMAU), an orally bioavailable, longer-acting ester of DMA, for male contraceptive development. Our objective was to examine the safety and pharmacokinetics of single, escalating doses of DMAU (powder in capsule formulation) administered orally with or without food in healthy men. We conducted a randomized, double-blind Phase 1 study. For each dose of DMAU (25 to 800 mg), ten male volunteers received DMAU and two received placebo at two academic medical centers. DMAU was administered both fasting and after a high fat meal (200–800 mg doses). Serial serum samples were collected over 24h following each dose. DMAU was well tolerated without significant effects on vital signs, safety laboratory tests or electrocardiograms. When administered while fasting, serum DMA (active compound) was detectable in only 4/10 participants after the 800mg dose. When administered with a 50% fat meal, serum DMA was detectable in all participants given 200mg DMAU and showed a dose-incremental increase up to 800mg, with peak levels 4 to 8h after taking the dose. Serum gonadotropins and sex hormone concentrations were significantly suppressed 12h after DMAU administration with food at doses above 200mg. This first-in-man study demonstrated that a single, oral dose of DMAU up to 800 mg is safe. A high-fat meal markedly improved DMAU/DMA pharmacokinetics. PMID:24789057

  3. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of FV-100, a Novel Oral Anti-Herpes Zoster Nucleoside Analogue, Administered in Single and Multiple Doses to Healthy Young Adult and Elderly Adult Volunteers▿

    PubMed Central

    Pentikis, Helen S.; Matson, Mark; Atiee, George; Boehlecke, Brian; Hutchins, Jeff T.; Patti, Joseph M.; Henson, Geoffrey W.; Morris, Amy

    2011-01-01

    FV-100 is the prodrug of the highly potent anti-varicella zoster virus bicyclic nucleoside analogue CF-1743. To characterize the pharmacokinetics and safety of oral FV-100, 3 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials were conducted: (i) a single-ascending-dose study in 32 healthy subjects aged 18 to 55 years (100-, 200-, 400-, and 800-mg doses) with an evaluation of the food effect in the 400-mg group; (ii) a multiple-ascending-dose study in 48 subjects aged 18 to 55 years (100 mg once daily [QD], 200 mg QD, 400 mg QD, 400 mg twice a day, and 800 mg QD for 7 days); and (iii) a 2-part study in subjects aged 65 years and older with a single 400-mg dose in 15 subjects and a 400-mg QD dosing regimen for 7 days in 12 subjects. FV-100 was rapidly and extensively converted to CF-1743, the concentration of which remained above that required to reduce viral activity by 50% for the 24-hour dosing period. Renal excretion of CF-1743 was very low. A high-fat meal reduced exposure to CF-1743; a low-fat meal did not. Pharmacokinetic parameters for the elderly subjects were comparable to those for the younger subjects. FV-100 was well tolerated by all subjects. The pharmacokinetic and safety profiles of FV-100 support its continued investigation for the treatment of herpes zoster and prevention of postherpetic neuralgia with once-daily dosing and without dose modifications for elderly or renally impaired patients. PMID:21444712

  4. Combination Pod-Intravaginal Ring Delivers Antiretroviral Agents for HIV Prophylaxis: Pharmacokinetic Evaluation in an Ovine Model.

    PubMed

    Moss, John A; Butkyavichene, Irina; Churchman, Scott A; Gunawardana, Manjula; Fanter, Rob; Miller, Christine S; Yang, Flora; Easley, Jeremiah T; Marzinke, Mark A; Hendrix, Craig W; Smith, Thomas J; Baum, Marc M

    2016-06-01

    Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) against HIV using oral regimens based on the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) has been effective to various degrees in multiple clinical trials, and the CCR5 receptor antagonist maraviroc (MVC) holds potential for complementary efficacy. The effectiveness of HIV PrEP is highly dependent on adherence. Incorporation of the TDF-MVC combination into intravaginal rings (IVRs) for sustained mucosal delivery could increase product adherence and efficacy compared with oral and vaginal gel formulations. A novel pod-IVR technology capable of delivering multiple drugs is described. The pharmacokinetics and preliminary local safety characteristics of a novel pod-IVR delivering a combination of TDF and MVC were evaluated in the ovine model. The device exhibited sustained release at controlled rates over the 28-day study and maintained steady-state drug levels in cervicovaginal fluids (CVFs). Dilution of CVFs during lavage sample collection was measured by ion chromatography using an inert tracer, allowing corrected drug concentrations to be measured for the first time. Median, steady-state drug levels in vaginal tissue homogenate were as follows: for tenofovir (TFV; in vivo hydrolysis product of TDF), 7.3 × 10(2) ng g(-1) (interquartile range [IQR], 3.0 × 10(2), 4.0 × 10(3)); for TFV diphosphate (TFV-DP; active metabolite of TFV), 1.8 × 10(4) fmol g(-1) (IQR, 1.5 × 10(4), 4.8 × 10(4)); and for MVC, 8.2 × 10(2) ng g(-1) (IQR, 4.7 × 10(2), 2.0 × 10(3)). No adverse events were observed. These findings, together with previous pod-IVR studies, have allowed several lead candidates to advance into clinical evaluation. PMID:27067321

  5. Efficacy, Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Once-Daily Saquinavir Soft-Gelatin Capsule/Ritonavir in Antiretroviral-Naive, HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Montaner, Julio S.G.; Schutz, Malte; Schwartz, Robert; Jayaweera, Dushyantha T.; Burnside, Alfred F.; Walmsley, Sharon; Saag, Michael S.

    2006-01-01

    Context Once-daily HIV treatment regimens are being used in clinical practice with the objective of improving patient acceptance and adherence. Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of saquinavir-soft-gelatin capsule (SGC)/ritonavir combination (1600 mg/100 mg) vs efavirenz (600 mg) both once daily and combined with 2 nucleoside analogs twice daily. Setting Twenty-six centers in the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico. Patients A total of 171 antiretroviral naive HIV-infected individuals were enrolled in a 48-week, phase 3, open-label, randomized study. Main Outcome Measure Proportion of patients with HIV-RNA levels < 50 copies/mL. The pharmacokinetic profile of saquinavir-SGC was analyzed in a subset of randomly selected patients. Results In the primary intent-to-treat population at week 48, 51% (38/75) and 71% (55/77) of patients in the saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir and efavirenz groups, respectively, achieved HIV-RNA suppression < 50 copies/mL (P = .5392, 95% 1-sided confidence interval [CI] = −33.5%). In the on-treatment (OT) population, 73% (38/52) and 93% (54/58) of patients in the saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir and efavirenz groups, respectively, had effective viral suppression < 50 copies/mL (P = .5015, 95% 1-sided CI = −33.4%). Mean CD4+ cell counts increased by 239 and 204 cells/microliters (mcL), in the saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir and efavirenz groups, respectively, in the OT analysis (P = .058). Both regimens were reasonably well tolerated, although more gastrointestinal adverse events were reported with saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir. Pharmacokinetic profiles in 6 patients showed an observed median Cmin at 24 hours of 429 ng/mL (range, 68-1750 ng/mL). Conclusions Once-daily efavirenz was statistically superior to once-daily saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir. Gastrointestinal adverse effects were commonly associated with treatment failure in the saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir arm of the study. PMID:16926775

  6. Efficacy, Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Once-Daily Saquinavir Soft-Gelatin Capsule/Ritonavir in Antiretroviral-Naive, HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Context Once-daily HIV treatment regimens are being used in clinical practice with the objective of improving patient acceptance and adherence. Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of saquinavir-soft-gelatin capsule (SGC)/ritonavir combination (1600 mg/100 mg) vs efavirenz (600 mg) both once daily and combined with 2 nucleoside analogs twice daily. Setting Twenty-six centers in the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico. Patients A total of 171 antiretroviral naive HIV-infected individuals were enrolled in a 48-week, phase 3, open-label, randomized study. Main Outcome Measure Proportion of patients with HIV-RNA levels < 50 copies/mL. The pharmacokinetic profile of saquinavir-SGC was analyzed in a subset of randomly selected patients. Results In the primary intent-to-treat population at week 48, 51% (38/75) and 71% (55/77) of patients in the saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir and efavirenz groups, respectively, achieved HIV-RNA suppression < 50 copies/mL (P = .5392, 95% 1-sided confidence interval [CI] = -33.5%). In the on-treatment (OT) population, 73% (38/52) and 93% (54/58) of patients in the saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir and efavirenz groups, respectively, had effective viral suppression < 50 copies/mL (P = .5015, 95% 1-sided CI = -33.4%). Mean CD4+ cell counts increased by 239 and 204 cells/microliters (mcL), in the saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir and efavirenz groups, respectively, in the OT analysis (P = .058). Both regimens were reasonably well tolerated, although more gastrointestinal adverse events were reported with saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir. Pharmacokinetic profiles in 6 patients showed an observed median Cmin at 24 hours of 429 ng/mL (range, 681750 ng/mL). Conclusion Once-daily efavirenz was statistically superior to once-daily saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir. Gastrointestinal adverse effects were commonly associated with treatment failure in the saquinavir-SGC/ritonavir arm of the study.

  7. A probabilistic bridge safety evaluation against floods.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kuo-Wei; Muto, Yasunori; Chen, Wei-Lun; Wu, Bang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    To further capture the influences of uncertain factors on river bridge safety evaluation, a probabilistic approach is adopted. Because this is a systematic and nonlinear problem, MPP-based reliability analyses are not suitable. A sampling approach such as a Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) or importance sampling is often adopted. To enhance the efficiency of the sampling approach, this study utilizes Bayesian least squares support vector machines to construct a response surface followed by an MCS, providing a more precise safety index. Although there are several factors impacting the flood-resistant reliability of a bridge, previous experiences and studies show that the reliability of the bridge itself plays a key role. Thus, the goal of this study is to analyze the system reliability of a selected bridge that includes five limit states. The random variables considered here include the water surface elevation, water velocity, local scour depth, soil property and wind load. Because the first three variables are deeply affected by river hydraulics, a probabilistic HEC-RAS-based simulation is performed to capture the uncertainties in those random variables. The accuracy and variation of our solutions are confirmed by a direct MCS to ensure the applicability of the proposed approach. The results of a numerical example indicate that the proposed approach can efficiently provide an accurate bridge safety evaluation and maintain satisfactory variation. PMID:27386269

  8. Self nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) of rosuvastatin calcium: design, formulation, bioavailability and pharmacokinetic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Krishnamoorthy; Raghavan, Chellan Vijaya; selvan, Natarajan Tamil; prasad, Ranganathan Hari; Abdu, Siyad

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the present study is to improve solubility and bioavailability of Rosuvastatin calcium using self nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS). Self emulsifying property of various oils including essential oils was evaluated with suitable surfactants and co-surfactants. Ternary phase diagrams were constructed based on Rosuvastatin calcium solubility analysis for optimizing the system. The prepared formulations were evaluated for self emulsifying time, robustness to dilution, droplet size determination and zeta potential analysis. The system was found to be robust in different pH media and dilution volume. The globule size of the optimized system was less than 200nm which could be an acceptable nanoemulsion size range. The zeta potential of the selected CN 7 SNEDDS formulation (cinnamon oil 30%; labrasol 60%; Capmul MCM C8 10%) was -29.5±0.63 with an average particle size distribution of 122nm. In vitro drug release studies showed remarkable increase in dissolution of CN7 SNEDDS compared to marketed formulation. In house developed HPLC method for determination of Rosuvastatin calcium in rat plasma was used in the bioavailability and pharmacokinetic evaluation. The relative bioavailability of self nanoemulsified formulation showed an enhanced bioavailability of 2.45 times greater than that of drug in suspension. The obtained plasma drug concentration data was processed with PKSolver 2.0 and it was best fit into the one compartment model. PMID:24012665

  9. Preparation of codeine-resinate and chlorpheniramine-resinate sustained-release suspension and its pharmacokinetic evaluation in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huan-Xiang; Cheng, Gang; Pan, Wei-San; Zhong, Guo-Ping; Huang, Min

    2007-06-01

    the release rate of both drugs. But the release of codeine from its resinate beads was much more rapid than chlorpheniramine released from its resinate beads in the same ionic strength release medium. The drug release specification of the CCSS, where release mediums were 0.05 M KCl solution for codeine and 0.5 M KCl solution for chlorpheniramine, was established to be in conformance with in vivo performance. Relative bioavailability and pharmacokinetics evaluation of the CCSS, using commercial immediate-release tablets as the reference preparation, were performed following a randomized two-way crossover design in beagle dogs. The drug concentrations in plasma were measured by a validated LC-MS/MS method to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of CCSS. This LC-MS/MS method demonstrated high accuracy and precision for bioanalysis, and was proved quick and reliable for the pharmacokinetic studies. The results showed that the CCSS had the longer value of Tmax and the lower value of Cmax, which meant an obviously sustained release effect, and its relative bioavailability of codeine and chlorpheniramine were (103.6 +/- 14.6)% and (98.1 +/- 10.3)%, respectively, compared with the reference preparation. These findings indicated that a novel liquid sustained release suspension made by using IERs as carriers and subsequent fluidized bed coating might provide a constant plasma level of the active pharmaceutical ingredient being highly beneficial for various therapeutic reasons. PMID:17613029

  10. Single Ascending Dose Safety and Pharmacokinetics of CDRI-97/78: First-in-Human Study of a Novel Antimalarial Drug.

    PubMed

    Shafiq, N; Rajagopalan, S; Kushwaha, H N; Mittal, N; Chandurkar, N; Bhalla, A; Kaur, S; Pandhi, P; Puri, G D; Achuthan, S; Pareek, A; Singh, S K; Srivastava, J S; Gaur, S P S; Malhotra, S

    2014-01-01

    Background. CDRI 97/78 has shown efficacy in animal models of falciparum malaria. The present study is the first in-human phase I trial in healthy volunteers. Methods. The study was conducted in 50 healthy volunteers in a single, ascending dose, randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind design. The dose ranges evaluated were from 80 mg to 700 mg. Volunteers were assessed for clinical, biochemical, haematological, radiographic, and electrocardiographic parameters for any adverse events in an in-house facility. After evaluation of safety study results, another cohort of 16 participants were administered a single oral dose of 200 mg of the drug and a detailed pharmacokinetic analysis was undertaken. Results. The compound was found to be well tolerated. MTD was not reached. The few adverse events noted were of grade 2 severity, not requiring intervention and not showing any dose response relationship. The laboratory and electrocardiographic parameters showed statistically significant differences, but all were within the predefined normal range. These parameters were not associated with symptoms/signs and hence regarded as clinically irrelevant. Mean values of T 1/2, MRT, and AUC0-∞ of the active metabolite 97/63 were 11.85 ± 1.94 h, 13.77 ± 2.05 h, and 878.74 ± 133.15 ng·h/mL, respectively Conclusion. The novel 1,2,4 trioxane CDRI 97/78 is safe and will be an asset in malarial therapy if results are replicated in multiple dose studies and benefit is shown in confirmatory trials. PMID:24800100

  11. Single Ascending Dose Safety and Pharmacokinetics of CDRI-97/78: First-in-Human Study of a Novel Antimalarial Drug

    PubMed Central

    Shafiq, N.; Rajagopalan, S.; Kushwaha, H. N.; Mittal, N.; Chandurkar, N.; Bhalla, A.; Kaur, S.; Pandhi, P.; Puri, G. D.; Achuthan, S.; Pareek, A.; Singh, S. K.; Srivastava, J. S.; Gaur, S. P. S.; Malhotra, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background. CDRI 97/78 has shown efficacy in animal models of falciparum malaria. The present study is the first in-human phase I trial in healthy volunteers. Methods. The study was conducted in 50 healthy volunteers in a single, ascending dose, randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind design. The dose ranges evaluated were from 80 mg to 700 mg. Volunteers were assessed for clinical, biochemical, haematological, radiographic, and electrocardiographic parameters for any adverse events in an in-house facility. After evaluation of safety study results, another cohort of 16 participants were administered a single oral dose of 200 mg of the drug and a detailed pharmacokinetic analysis was undertaken. Results. The compound was found to be well tolerated. MTD was not reached. The few adverse events noted were of grade 2 severity, not requiring intervention and not showing any dose response relationship. The laboratory and electrocardiographic parameters showed statistically significant differences, but all were within the predefined normal range. These parameters were not associated with symptoms/signs and hence regarded as clinically irrelevant. Mean values of T1/2, MRT, and AUC0−∞ of the active metabolite 97/63 were 11.85 ± 1.94 h, 13.77 ± 2.05 h, and 878.74 ± 133.15 ng·h/mL, respectively Conclusion. The novel 1,2,4 trioxane CDRI 97/78 is safe and will be an asset in malarial therapy if results are replicated in multiple dose studies and benefit is shown in confirmatory trials. PMID:24800100

  12. Predicting neonatal pharmacokinetics from prior data using population pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Edginton, Andrea N; Avant, Debbie; Burckart, Gilbert J

    2015-10-01

    Selection of the first dose for neonates in clinical trials is very challenging. The objective of this analysis was to assess if a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model developed with data from infants to adults is predictive of neonatal clearance and to evaluate what age range of prior PK data is needed for informative modeling to predict neonate exposure. Two sources of pharmacokinetic data from 8 drugs were used to develop population models: (1) data from all patients > 2 years of age, and (2) data from all nonneonatal patients aged > 28 days. The prediction error based on the models using data from subjects > 2 years of age showed bias toward overprediction, with median average fold error (AFE) for CL predicted/CLobserved greater than 1.5. The bias for predicting neonatal PK was improved when using all prior PK data including infants as opposed to an assessment without infant PK data, with the median AFE 0.91. As an increased number of pediatric trials are conducted in neonates under the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act, dose selection should be based on the best estimates of neonatal pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics prior to conducting efficacy and safety studies in neonates. PMID:25907280

  13. Pharmacokinetics and safety of intravenous cidofovir for life-threatening viral infections in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Caruso Brown, Amy E; Cohen, Mindy N; Tong, Suhong; Braverman, Rebecca S; Rooney, James F; Giller, Roger; Levin, Myron J

    2015-07-01

    Children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are at risk for life-threatening viral infections. Cidofovir is often used as a first-line agent for adenovirus infections, despite the absence of randomized controlled trials with HSCT patients, and as a second-line agent for resistant herpesvirus infections. The frequency and severity of adverse effects, particularly nephrotoxicity, in pediatric HSCT recipients are unclear, and pharmacokinetics (PK) of cidofovir in children have not previously been reported. This study was an open-label, nonrandomized, single-dose pilot study to determine the safety and PK of cidofovir in pediatric HSCT recipients with symptomatic adenovirus, nucleoside-resistant cytomegalovirus (CMV) or herpes simplex virus (HSV), and/or human papovavirus infections. Subsequent dosing and frequency were determined by clinical response and side effects, as assessed by the treating physician. Blood and urine samples were obtained from patients for PK studies and assessment of toxicity and virologic response. Twelve patients were enrolled (median age, 9 years; 33.5 days posttransplantation). Four of seven patients with adenovirus infection were successfully treated and eventually cleared their infections. Four of twelve patients died of disseminated viral disease and multiorgan failure. Two of twelve patients had evidence of acute kidney injury after the first dose, and one of these patients developed chronic kidney disease; two other patients developed late nephrotoxicity. The mean drug half-life was 9.5 h. There was no correlation between nephrotoxicity and plasma maximum concentration, clearance, or half-life. PK were similar to those reported for adults, although the drug half-life was significantly longer than that for adults. Cidofovir was well tolerated in the majority of patients. However, effective therapeutic strategies are urgently needed to support patients until immune reconstitution is achieved. PMID:25733509

  14. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Intravenous Cidofovir for Life-Threatening Viral Infections in Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Mindy N.; Tong, Suhong; Braverman, Rebecca S.; Rooney, James F.; Giller, Roger; Levin, Myron J.

    2015-01-01

    Children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are at risk for life-threatening viral infections. Cidofovir is often used as a first-line agent for adenovirus infections, despite the absence of randomized controlled trials with HSCT patients, and as a second-line agent for resistant herpesvirus infections. The frequency and severity of adverse effects, particularly nephrotoxicity, in pediatric HSCT recipients are unclear, and pharmacokinetics (PK) of cidofovir in children have not previously been reported. This study was an open-label, nonrandomized, single-dose pilot study to determine the safety and PK of cidofovir in pediatric HSCT recipients with symptomatic adenovirus, nucleoside-resistant cytomegalovirus (CMV) or herpes simplex virus (HSV), and/or human papovavirus infections. Subsequent dosing and frequency were determined by clinical response and side effects, as assessed by the treating physician. Blood and urine samples were obtained from patients for PK studies and assessment of toxicity and virologic response. Twelve patients were enrolled (median age, 9 years; 33.5 days posttransplantation). Four of seven patients with adenovirus infection were successfully treated and eventually cleared their infections. Four of twelve patients died of disseminated viral disease and multiorgan failure. Two of twelve patients had evidence of acute kidney injury after the first dose, and one of these patients developed chronic kidney disease; two other patients developed late nephrotoxicity. The mean drug half-life was 9.5 h. There was no correlation between nephrotoxicity and plasma maximum concentration, clearance, or half-life. PK were similar to those reported for adults, although the drug half-life was significantly longer than that for adults. Cidofovir was well tolerated in the majority of patients. However, effective therapeutic strategies are urgently needed to support patients until immune reconstitution is achieved. PMID:25733509

  15. Safety pharmacology, toxicology and pharmacokinetic assessment of human Gc globulin (vitamin D binding protein).

    PubMed

    Pihl, Tina Holberg; Jørgensen, Charlotte Svaerke; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Leifsson, Páll Skúli; Hansen, Erik Wind; Laursen, Inga; Houen, Gunnar

    2010-11-01

    Gc globulin is an important protein of the plasma actin-scavenger system. As such, it has been shown to bind free actin and prevent hypercoagulation and shock in patients with massive actin release resulting from severe tissue injuries. Treatment of such patients with Gc globulin could therefore potentially be life-saving. This article presents pre-clinical toxicology experiments conducted on purified plasma-derived human Gc globulin. The Gc globulin formulation was shown to be stable for at least 4 years with full retention of actin-binding capacity. In vitro studies did not reveal activation of the kallikrein system or the complement system and cellular studies showed no toxic effects on a variety of human cell lines. In vivo studies showed no acute toxic effects in mice, rats or guinea pigs upon intravenous infusion. A 14-day local tolerance study in rabbits showed no adverse effects, and 14-day toxicity studies in rats and horses did not show any unwanted reactions. In a 14-day toxicology study in beagle dogs, formation of antibodies was seen and in the end of the study period, three out of four dogs showed clinical immunological reactions, which could be ascribed to the formation of antibodies. The half-life, T, for human Gc globulin was 12 hr in rats, 16 hr in horses and 30 hr in dogs. The safety profile of plasma-derived Gc globulin is concluded to be consistent to that required for use in man. PMID:20560927

  16. Methods and software tools for design evaluation in population pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Joakim; Bazzoli, Caroline; Ogungbenro, Kay; Aliev, Alexander; Leonov, Sergei; Duffull, Stephen; Hooker, Andrew C; Mentré, France

    2015-01-01

    Population pharmacokinetic (PK)-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) models are increasingly used in drug development and in academic research; hence, designing efficient studies is an important task. Following the first theoretical work on optimal design for nonlinear mixed-effects models, this research theme has grown rapidly. There are now several different software tools that implement an evaluation of the Fisher information matrix for population PKPD. We compared and evaluated the following five software tools: PFIM, PkStaMp, PopDes, PopED and POPT. The comparisons were performed using two models, a simple-one compartment warfarin PK model and a more complex PKPD model for pegylated interferon, with data on both concentration and response of viral load of hepatitis C virus. The results of the software were compared in terms of the standard error (SE) values of the parameters predicted from the software and the empirical SE values obtained via replicated clinical trial simulation and estimation. For the warfarin PK model and the pegylated interferon PKPD model, all software gave similar results. Interestingly, it was seen, for all software, that the simpler approximation to the Fisher information matrix, using the block diagonal matrix, provided predicted SE values that were closer to the empirical SE values than when the more complicated approximation was used (the full matrix). For most PKPD models, using any of the available software tools will provide meaningful results, avoiding cumbersome simulation and allowing design optimization. PMID:24548174

  17. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) SERF cask

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, W.S.

    1997-10-24

    This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) documents the ability of the Special Environmental Radiometallurgy Facility (SERF) Cask to meet the requirements of WHC-CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping, for transfer of Type B quantities (up to highway route controlled quantities) of radioactive material within the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. This document shall be used to ensure that loading, tie down, transport, and unloading of the SERF Cask are performed in accordance with WHC-CM-2-14. This SEP is valid until October 1, 1999. After this date, an update or upgrade to this document is required.

  18. Evaluation of the route dependency of the pharmacokinetics and neuro-pharmacokinetics of tramadol and its main metabolites in rats.

    PubMed

    Sheikholeslami, Behjat; Gholami, Mahdi; Lavasani, Hoda; Rouini, Mohammadreza

    2016-09-20

    Tramadol hydrochloride is a centrally acting analgesic used for the treatment of moderate-to-severe pain. It has three main metabolites: O-desmethyltramadol (M1), N-desmethyltramadol (M2), and N,O-didesmethyltramadol (M5). Because of the frequent use of tramadol by patients and drug abusers, the ability to determine the parent drug and its metabolites in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid is of great importance. In the present study, a pharmacokinetic approach was applied using two groups of five male Wistar rats administered a 20mg/kg dose of tramadol via intravenous (i.v.) or intraperitoneal (i.p.) routes. Plasma and CSF samples were collected at 5-360min following tramadol administration. Our results demonstrate that the plasma values of Cmax (C0 in i.v. group) and area under the curve (AUC)0-t for tramadol were 23,314.40±6944.85 vs. 3187.39±760.25ng/mL (Cmax) and 871.15±165.98 vs. 414.04±149.25μg·min/mL in the i.v. and i.p. groups, respectively (p<0.05). However, there were no significant differences between i.v. and i.p. plasma values for tramadol metabolites (p>0.05). Tramadol rapidly penetrated the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB) (5.00±0.00 vs. 10.00±5.77min in i.v. and i.p. groups, respectively). Tramadol and its metabolites (M1 and M2) were present to a lesser extent in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) than in the plasma. M5 hardly penetrated the CSF, owing to its high polarity. There was no significant difference between the AUC0-t of tramadol in plasma (414.04±149.25μg·min/mL) and CSF (221.81±83.02μg·min/mL) in the i.p. group. In addition, the amounts of metabolites (M1 and M2) in the CSF showed no significant differences following both routes of administration. There were also no significant differences among the Kp,uu,CSF(0-360) (0.51±0.12 vs. 0.63±0.04) and Kp,uu,CSF(0-∞) (0.61±0.10 vs. 0.62±0.02) for i.v. and i.p. pathways, respectively (p>0.05). Drug targeting efficiency (DTE) values of tramadol

  19. Model-based evaluation of the pharmacokinetic differences between adults and children for lopinavir and ritonavir in combination with rifampicin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Denti, Paolo; Decloedt, Eric H; Ren, Yuan; Karlsson, Mats O; McIlleron, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Aims Rifampicin profoundly reduces lopinavir concentrations. Doubled doses of lopinavir/ritonavir compensate for the effect of rifampicin in adults, but fail to provide adequate lopinavir concentrations in young children on rifampicin-based antituberculosis therapy. The objective of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model describing the pharmacokinetic differences of lopinavir and ritonavir, with and without rifampicin, between children and adults. Methods An integrated population pharmacokinetic model developed in nonmem 7 was used to describe the pharmacokinetics of lopinavir and ritonavir in 21 HIV infected adults, 39 HIV infected children and 35 HIV infected children with tuberculosis, who were established on lopinavir/ritonavir-based antiretroviral therapy with and without rifampicin-containing antituberculosis therapy. Results The bioavailability of lopinavir was reduced by 25% in adults whereas children on antituberculosis treatment experienced a 59% reduction, an effect that was moderated by the dose of ritonavir. Conversely, rifampicin increased oral clearance of both lopinavir and ritonavir to a lesser extent in children than in adults. Rifampicin therapy in administered doses increased CL of lopinavir by 58% in adults and 48% in children, and CL of ritonavir by 34% and 22% for adults and children, respectively. In children, the absorption half-life of lopinavir and the mean transit time of ritonavir were lengthened, compared with those in adults. Conclusions The model characterized important differences between adults and children in the effect of rifampicin on the pharmacokinetics of lopinavir and ritonavir. As adult studies cannot reliably predict their magnitude in children, drug–drug interactions should be evaluated in paediatric patient populations. PMID:23432610

  20. Preclinical safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and biodistribution studies with Ad35K++ protein: a novel rituximab cotherapeutic

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Maximilian; Yumul, Roma; Saydaminova, Kamola; Wang, Hongjie; Gough, Michael; Baldessari, Audrey; Cattaneo, Roberto; Lee, Frank; Wang, Chung-Huei Katherine; Jang, Haishan; Astier, Anne; Gopal, Ajay; Carter, Darrick; Lieber, André

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab is a mouse/human chimeric monoclonal antibody targeted toward CD20. It is efficient as first-line therapy of CD20-positive B-cell malignancies. However, a large fraction of treated patients relapse with rituximab-resistant disease. So far, only modest progress has been made in treatment options for rituximab refractory patients. One of the mechanisms for rituximab resistance involves the upregulation of CD46, which is a key cell surface protein that blocks the activation of complement. We have recently developed a technology that depletes CD46 from the cell surface and thereby sensitizes tumor cells to complement-dependent cytotoxicity. This technology is based on a small recombinant protein, Ad35K++ that binds with high affinity to CD46. In preliminary studies using a 6 × histidinyl tagged protein, we had demonstrated that intravenous Ad35K++ injection in combination with rituximab was safe and increased rituximab-mediated killing of CD20-positive target cells in mice and nonhuman primates (NHPs). The presence of the tag, while allowing for easy purification by Ni-NTA chromatography, has the potential to increase the immunogenicity of the recombinant protein. For clinical application, we therefore developed an Ad35K++ protein without His-tag. In the present study, we performed preclinical studies in two animal species (mice and NHPs) with this protein demonstrating its safety and efficacy. These studies estimated the Ad35K++ dose range and treatment regimen to be used in patients. Furthermore, we showed that intravenous Ad35K++ injection triggers the shedding of the CD46 extracellular domain in xenograft mouse tumor models and in macaques. Shed serum CD46 can be measured in the serum and can potentially be used as a pharmacodynamic marker for monitoring Ad35K++ activity in patient undergoing treatment with this agent. These studies create the basis for an investigational new drug application for the use of Ad35K++ in combination with rituximab in the

  1. Preclinical safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and biodistribution studies with Ad35K++ protein: a novel rituximab cotherapeutic.

    PubMed

    Richter, Maximilian; Yumul, Roma; Saydaminova, Kamola; Wang, Hongjie; Gough, Michael; Baldessari, Audrey; Cattaneo, Roberto; Lee, Frank; Wang, Chung-Huei Katherine; Jang, Haishan; Astier, Anne; Gopal, Ajay; Carter, Darrick; Lieber, André

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab is a mouse/human chimeric monoclonal antibody targeted toward CD20. It is efficient as first-line therapy of CD20-positive B-cell malignancies. However, a large fraction of treated patients relapse with rituximab-resistant disease. So far, only modest progress has been made in treatment options for rituximab refractory patients. One of the mechanisms for rituximab resistance involves the upregulation of CD46, which is a key cell surface protein that blocks the activation of complement. We have recently developed a technology that depletes CD46 from the cell surface and thereby sensitizes tumor cells to complement-dependent cytotoxicity. This technology is based on a small recombinant protein, Ad35K++ that binds with high affinity to CD46. In preliminary studies using a 6 × histidinyl tagged protein, we had demonstrated that intravenous Ad35K++ injection in combination with rituximab was safe and increased rituximab-mediated killing of CD20-positive target cells in mice and nonhuman primates (NHPs). The presence of the tag, while allowing for easy purification by Ni-NTA chromatography, has the potential to increase the immunogenicity of the recombinant protein. For clinical application, we therefore developed an Ad35K++ protein without His-tag. In the present study, we performed preclinical studies in two animal species (mice and NHPs) with this protein demonstrating its safety and efficacy. These studies estimated the Ad35K++ dose range and treatment regimen to be used in patients. Furthermore, we showed that intravenous Ad35K++ injection triggers the shedding of the CD46 extracellular domain in xenograft mouse tumor models and in macaques. Shed serum CD46 can be measured in the serum and can potentially be used as a pharmacodynamic marker for monitoring Ad35K++ activity in patient undergoing treatment with this agent. These studies create the basis for an investigational new drug application for the use of Ad35K++ in combination with rituximab in the

  2. 3-Methyl-methcathinone: Pharmacokinetic profile evaluation in pigs in relation to pharmacodynamics.

    PubMed

    Shimshoni, Jakob A; Britzi, Malka; Sobol, Eyal; Willenz, Udi; Nutt, David; Edery, Nir

    2015-06-01

    3-Methyl-methcathinone (3-MMC) is a novel, synthetic cathinone analog, recently linked to poisoning events among recreational users. The lack of pharmacological data on 3-MMC, prompted us to explore its pharmacokinetic profile as well as its effect on feeding behavior, weight gain, and serum biochemistry. 3-MMC was administered to male pigs (n=3, three months old) as a single intravenous dose (0.3 mg/kg), followed by a multiple oral dose administration (3 mg/kg) for five days and plasma and tissue concentrations determined. Concomitantly a control group consisting of two healthy male pigs received saline solution instead of 3-MMC according to the same administration schedule. 3-MMC effects on complete blood count, biochemistry, feed intake, and body weight were examined. The pigs were sacrificed and submitted to a pathological and histopathological examination. 3-MMC displayed rapid absorption with a peak concentration achieved within 5-10 min after oral ingestion and a plasma half-life of 0.8 h. The bioavailability was about 7%. 3-MMC tissue levels were below detectable levels 24 h after the last oral dosage. No treatment-related clinical signs were observed and no histopathological findings were detected. 3-MMC caused significant change in daily feed intake and weight gain over time. The animals treated with 3-MMC displayed a lower rate of increase in mean body weight. Caution needs to be practiced in terms of extrapolating the present data to human safety, due to the low sample size, low dosage, and the relatively short study duration as well as the lack of data on abuse potential of 3-MMC. PMID:25804420

  3. EVALUATION OF ORAL AND INTRAVENOUS ROUTE PHARMACOKINETICS, PLASMA PROTEIN BINDING AND UTERINE TISSUE DOSE METRICS OF BPA: A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a weakly estrogenic monomer used in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins, both of which are used in food contact applications. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of BPA pharmacokinetics in rats and humans was developed t...

  4. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of teduglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) analog, following multiple ascending subcutaneous administrations in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Marier, Jean-Francois; Beliveau, Martin; Mouksassi, Mohamad-Samer; Shaw, Paula; Cyran, Jane; Kesavan, Jothi; Wallens, John; Zahir, Hamim; Wells, David; Caminis, John

    2008-11-01

    Teduglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) analog, is currently being evaluated for the treatment of short-bowel syndrome, Crohn's disease, and other gastrointestinal disorders. The pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of teduglutide in healthy subjects (N = 64) were assessed following daily subcutaneous administrations for 8 days in a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, ascending-dose study. Teduglutide treatments were administered as a 50-mg/mL (10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 50, and 80 mg) or 20-mg/mL (20 mg) formulation. Blood samples were collected on days 1 and 8, and plasma concentrations of teduglutide were measured using a liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method. Mean systemic exposures to teduglutide were very similar on days 1 and 8, suggesting minimal, if any, accumulation following once-daily repeated administrations. The apparent clearance of teduglutide following administration of the 50-mg/mL formulation was constant over the dose range, with mean values in male and female subjects of 0.155 and 0.159 L/h/kg, respectively. Peak plasma concentrations and total exposure of teduglutide after subcutaneous injection of a 20-mg/mL formulation (1.0 mL) were approximately 15% and 78% higher than those observed with the 50-mg/mL formulation (0.4 mL), respectively. Teduglutide treatments were safe and well tolerated. All but 1 adverse event was assessed as mild or moderate in severity. No relationship between teduglutide treatments and frequency of adverse events was observed, with the exception of injection site pain, which increased as a function of dose and injected volume. Results from the current study will assist in the dose selection in future efficacy studies. PMID:18974283

  5. A Prospective, Multicenter, Phase I Matched-Comparison Group Trial of Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Preliminary Efficacy of Riluzole in Patients with Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fehlings, Michael G.; Frankowski, Ralph F.; Burau, Keith D.; Chow, Diana S.L.; Tator, Charles; Teng, Angela; Toups, Elizabeth G.; Harrop, James S.; Aarabi, Bizhan; Shaffrey, Christopher I.; Johnson, Michele M.; Harkema, Susan J.; Boakye, Maxwell; Guest, James D.; Wilson, Jefferson R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A prospective, multicenter phase I trial was undertaken by the North American Clinical Trials Network (NACTN) to investigate the pharmacokinetics and safety of, as well as obtain pilot data on, the effects of riluzole on neurological outcome in acute spinal cord injury (SCI). Thirty-six patients, with ASIA impairment grades A–C (28 cervical and 8 thoracic) were enrolled at 6 NACTN sites between April 2010 and June 2011. Patients received 50 mg of riluzole PO/NG twice-daily, within 12 h of SCI, for 14 days. Peak and trough plasma concentrations were quantified on days 3 and 14. Peak plasma concentration (Cmax) and systemic exposure to riluzole varied significantly between patients. On the same dose basis, Cmax did not reach levels comparable to those in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Riluzole plasma levels were significantly higher on day 3 than on day 14, resulting from a lower clearance and a smaller volume of distribution on day 3. Rates of medical complications, adverse events, and progression of neurological status were evaluated by comparison with matched patients in the NACTN SCI Registry. Medical complications in riluzole-treated patients occurred with incidences similar to those in patients in the comparison group. Mild-to-moderate increase in liver enzyme and bilirubin levels were found in 14–70% of patients for different enzymes. Three patients had borderline severe elevations of enzymes. No patient had elevated bilirubin on day 14 of administration of riluzole. There were no serious adverse events related to riluzole and no deaths. The mean motor score of 24 cervical injury riluzole-treated patients gained 31.2 points from admission to 90 days, compared to 15.7 points for 26 registry patients, a 15.5-point difference (p=0.021). Patients with cervical injuries treated with riluzole had more-robust conversions of impairment grades to higher grades than the comparison group. PMID:23859435

  6. Pharmacoscintigraphic and pharmacokinetic evaluation of tobramycin DPI formulations in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Pilcer, Gabrielle; Goole, Jonathan; Van Gansbeke, Bernard; Blocklet, Didier; Knoop, Christiane; Vanderbist, Francis; Amighi, Karim

    2008-02-01

    Tobramycin dry powder formulations were evaluated by gamma scintigraphy and pharmacokinetic methods. In an open single-dose, three-treatment, three-period, cross-over study, nine cystic fibrosis patients received both the two test products and the reference product Tobi (nebulizer solution) in order to assess lung deposition and systemic comparative bioavailability of the two investigational inhaled products versus the marketed inhaled comparator product. The percentage of dose (mean+/-SD) in the whole lung was 53.0+/-10.0% for the tobramycin Form 1, 34.1+/-12.4% for the tobramycin Form 2 and 7.6+/-2.7% for the comparator product Tobi. Lung deposition expressed as a percentage of the nominal dose was thus estimated to be 7.0 and 4.5 times higher for the Tobra Form 1 and Tobra Form 2 than for the Tobi, respectively. Furthermore, the systemic bioavailability (adjusted to correspond to the same drug dose as that of the comparator product deposited in the lung) was found to be 1.6 times higher for the comparator product Tobi than for the two DPI formulations. The principal advantages of the DPI formulations include reduced systemic availability and thus, side effects, and higher dose levels of the drug at the site of drug action. PMID:17574400

  7. Linear pharmacokinetic models for evaluating unusual work schedules, exposure limits and body burdens of pollutants.

    PubMed

    Saltzman, B E

    1988-05-01

    The adverse effects of workplace exposures to pollutants relate more accurately to the concentrations of pollutants in the body than in the environment. In many cases pharmacokinetic models may represent the external to internal concentration relationships with useful accuracy. Simplified equations are presented for stepwise calculations on a series of time-averaged, external concentrations to give a corresponding series of internal concentrations. Accurate results were obtained for averaging times not exceeding one-fourth of the biological half-life of the pollutant. A convenient measure of internal concentration is the external concentration that would be at in vivo equilibrium with it (termed biologically effective concentration). Three measures of damage burden are proposed, each appropriate for different toxic mechanisms. The calculations readily may be carried out on a programmable calculator or microcomputer. Illustrative examples show how unusual work schedules may be compared with an 8 hr/day, 5 days/week schedule and how appropriate short- and long-term exposure limits may be determined. Other examples, illustrated for lead, relate absorbed mass rates to body concentrations and body burdens in a two-compartment kinetic model. These calculations should provide a more accurate evaluation of fluctuating concentrations, which can be handled easily. PMID:3400585

  8. The use of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model to evaluate deconvolution measurements of systemic absorption

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, David G

    2003-01-01

    Background An unknown input function can be determined by deconvolution using the systemic bolus input function (r) determined using an experimental input of duration ranging from a few seconds to many minutes. The quantitative relation between the duration of the input and the accuracy of r is unknown. Although a large number of deconvolution procedures have been described, these routines are not available in a convenient software package. Methods Four deconvolution methods are implemented in a new, user-friendly software program (PKQuest, ). Three of these methods are characterized by input parameters that are adjusted by the user to provide the "best" fit. A new approach is used to determine these parameters, based on the assumption that the input can be approximated by a gamma distribution. Deconvolution methodologies are evaluated using data generated from a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model (PBPK). Results and Conclusions The 11-compartment PBPK model is accurately described by either a 2 or 3-exponential function, depending on whether or not there is significant tissue binding. For an accurate estimate of r the first venous sample should be at or before the end of the constant infusion and a long (10 minute) constant infusion is preferable to a bolus injection. For noisy data, a gamma distribution deconvolution provides the best result if the input has the form of a gamma distribution. For other input functions, good results are obtained using deconvolution methods based on modeling the input with either a B-spline or uniform dense set of time points. PMID:12659643

  9. Clinical impact of concomitant immunomodulators on biologic therapy: Pharmacokinetics, immunogenicity, efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenhua; Davis, Hugh M; Zhou, Honghui

    2015-03-01

    Immune-mediated inflammatory diseases encompass a variety of different clinical syndromes, manifesting as either common diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and psoriasis, or rare diseases such as cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes. The therapy for these diseases often involves the use of a wide range of drugs including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), glucocorticoids, immunomodulators, and biologic therapies. Due to the abundance of relevant clinical data, this article provides a general overview on the clinical impact of the concomitant use of immunomodulators and biologic therapies, with a focus on anti-tumor necrosis factor-α agents (anti-TNFα), for the treatment of RA and Crohn's disease (CD). Compared to biologic monotherapy, concomitant use of immunomodulators (methotrexate, azathioprine, and 6-mercaptopurine) often increases the systemic exposure of the anti-TNFα agent and decreases the formation of antibodies to the anti-TNFα agent, consequently enhancing clinical efficacy. Nevertheless, long-term combination therapy with immunomodulators and anti-TNFα agents may be associated with increased risks of serious infections and malignancies. Therefore, the determination whether combination therapy is suitable for a patient should always be based on an individualized benefit-risk evaluation. More research should be undertaken to identify and validate prognostic markers for predicting patients who would benefit the most and those who are at greater risk from combination therapy with immunomodulators and anti-TNFα agents. PMID:25707965

  10. High-heat tank safety issues evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, J.C.

    1993-05-10

    Subsection (b) of Public Law 101-510, Section 3137, {open_quotes}Safety Measures for Waste Tanks at Hanford Nuclear Reservation{close_quotes} (PL 101-510), requires the Secretary of Energy to {open_quotes}identify those tanks that may have a serious potential for release of high-level waste due to uncontrolled increase in temperature or pressure{close_quotes}. One of the tanks that has been identified to meet this criteria is single-shell tank (SST) 241-C-106 (Wilson and Reep 1991). This report presents the results of an evaluation of the safety issue associated with tank 241-C-106: the continued cooling required for high heat generation in tank 241-C-106. If tank 241-C-106 should start leaking, continued addition of water for cooling could possibly increase the amount of leakage to the soil column. In turn, if the current methods of cooling tank 241-C-106 are stopped, the sludge temperatures may exceed established temperature limits, the long term structural integrity of the tank liner and concrete would be jeopardized, leading to an unacceptable release to the environment. Among other conclusions, this evaluation has determined that tank 241-C-106 contains enough heat generating wastes to justify retaining this tank on the list {open_quotes}Single-Shell Tanks With High Heat Loads (>40,000 Btu/H){close_quotes} and that to confirm the structural integrity needed for the retrieval of the contents of tank 241-C-106, an updated structural analysis and thermal analysis need to be conducted. Other findings of this evaluation are also reported.

  11. Development and Evaluation of a Gentamicin Pharmacokinetic Model That Facilitates Opportunistic Gentamicin Therapeutic Drug Monitoring in Neonates and Infants.

    PubMed

    Germovsek, Eva; Kent, Alison; Metsvaht, Tuuli; Lutsar, Irja; Klein, Nigel; Turner, Mark A; Sharland, Mike; Nielsen, Elisabet I; Heath, Paul T; Standing, Joseph F

    2016-08-01

    Trough gentamicin therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is time-consuming, disruptive to neonatal clinical care, and a patient safety issue. Bayesian models could allow TDM to be performed opportunistically at the time of routine blood tests. This study aimed to develop and prospectively evaluate a new gentamicin model and a novel Bayesian computer tool (neoGent) for TDM use in neonatal intensive care. We also evaluated model performance for predicting peak concentrations and the area under the concentration-time curve from time 0 h to time t h (AUC0- t). A pharmacokinetic meta-analysis was performed on pooled data from three studies (1,325 concentrations from 205 patients). A 3-compartment model was used with the following covariates: allometric weight scaling, postmenstrual and postnatal age, and serum creatinine concentration. Final parameter estimates (standard errors) were as follows: clearance, 6.2 (0.3) liters/h/70 kg of body weight; central volume (V), 26.5 (0.6) liters/70 kg; intercompartmental disposition (Q), 2.2 (0.3) liters/h/70 kg; peripheral volume V2, 21.2 (1.5) liters/70 kg; intercompartmental disposition (Q2), 0.3 (0.05) liters/h/70 kg; peripheral volume V3, 148 (52.0) liters/70 kg. The model's ability to predict trough concentrations from an opportunistic sample was evaluated in a prospective observational cohort study that included data from 163 patients and 483 concentrations collected in five hospitals. Unbiased trough predictions were obtained; the median (95% confidence interval [CI]) prediction error was 0.0004 (-1.07, 0.84) mg/liter. Results also showed that peaks and AUC0- t values could be predicted (from one randomly selected sample) with little bias but relative imprecision, with median (95% CI) prediction errors being 0.16 (-4.76, 5.01) mg/liter and 10.8 (-24.9, 62.2) mg · h/liter, respectively. neoGent was implemented in R/NONMEM and in the freely available TDMx software. PMID:27270281

  12. Evaluation of residue drum storage safety risks

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, W.V.

    1994-06-17

    A study was conducted to determine if any potential safety problems exist in the residue drum backlog at the Rocky Flats Plant. Plutonium residues stored in 55-gallon drums were packaged for short-term storage until the residues could be processed for plutonium recovery. These residues have now been determined by the Department of Energy to be waste materials, and the residues will remain in storage until plans for disposal of the material can be developed. The packaging configurations which were safe for short-term storage may not be safe for long-term storage. Interviews with Rocky Flats personnel involved with packaging the residues reveal that more than one packaging configuration was used for some of the residues. A tabulation of packaging configurations was developed based on the information obtained from the interviews. A number of potential safety problems were identified during this study, including hydrogen generation from some residues and residue packaging materials, contamination containment loss, metal residue packaging container corrosion, and pyrophoric plutonium compound formation. Risk factors were developed for evaluating the risk potential of the various residue categories, and the residues in storage at Rocky Flats were ranked by risk potential. Preliminary drum head space gas sampling studies have demonstrated the potential for formation of flammable hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in some residue drums.

  13. Metabolite Profiling and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Hydrocortisone in a Perfused Three-Dimensional Human Liver Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Ujjal; Rivera-Burgos, Dinelia; Large, Emma M.; Hughes, David J.; Ravindra, Kodihalli C.; Dyer, Rachel L.; Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R.; Griffith, Linda G.

    2015-01-01

    Endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is known to cause liver injury primarily involving inflammatory cells such as Kupffer cells, but few in vitro culture models are applicable for investigation of inflammatory effects on drug metabolism. We have developed a three-dimensional human microphysiological hepatocyte–Kupffer cell coculture system and evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of glucocorticoids on liver cultures. LPS was introduced to the cultures to elicit an inflammatory response and was assessed by the release of proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α. A sensitive and specific reversed-phase–ultra high-performance liquid chromatography–quadrupole time of flight–mass spectrometry method was used to evaluate hydrocortisone disappearance and metabolism at near physiologic levels. For this, the systems were dosed with 100 nM hydrocortisone and circulated for 2 days; hydrocortisone was depleted to approximately 30 nM, with first-order kinetics. Phase I metabolites, including tetrahydrocortisone and dihydrocortisol, accounted for 8–10% of the loss, and 45–52% consisted of phase II metabolites, including glucuronides of tetrahydrocortisol and tetrahydrocortisone. Pharmacokinetic parameters, i.e., half-life, rate of elimination, clearance, and area under the curve, were 23.03 hours, 0.03 hour−1, 6.6 × 10−5 l⋅hour−1, and 1.03 (mg/l)*h, respectively. The ability of the bioreactor to predict the in vivo clearance of hydrocortisone was characterized, and the obtained intrinsic clearance values correlated with human data. This system offers a physiologically relevant tool for investigating hepatic function in an inflamed liver. PMID:25926431

  14. In vitro pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation of S-013420 against Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Homma, Tomoyuki; Hori, Toshihiko; Ohshiro, Merime; Maki, Hideki; Yamano, Yoshinori; Shimada, Jingoro; Kuwahara, Shogo

    2010-10-01

    The pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) parameters and the antibacterial activity of S-013420, a novel bicyclolide, against Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae, including macrolide-resistant isolates, were investigated using an in vitro PD model. Various time-concentration curves were artificially constructed by modifying the PK data obtained in phase I studies. The activity against H. influenzae was evaluated using two parameters, that is, the area above the killing curve (AAC) and the viable cell reduction at 24 h. The relationships between the antibacterial activity of S-013420 and the three PK/PD parameters were investigated by fitting the data to the sigmoid maximum effective concentration model. The square of the correlation coefficient (R(2)) values for AAC versus the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC(0-24))/MIC, the peak concentration (C(max))/MIC, and the cumulative percentage of a 24-h period that the drug concentration exceeded the MIC under steady-state PK conditions (%T(MIC)) were 0.92, 0.87, and 0.49, respectively. The R(2) values for viable cell reduction at 24 h versus AUC(0-24)/MIC, C(max)/MIC, and %T(MIC) were 0.93, 0.61, and 0.56, respectively. These results demonstrated that AUC(0-24)/MIC is the most significant parameter for evaluation of the antibacterial activity of S-013420. The values of AUC(0-24)/MIC required for maximum and static efficacy were 10.8 and 9.63, respectively, for H. influenzae and 16.3 to 22.3 and 4.66 to 9.01, respectively, for S. pneumoniae. This analysis is considered useful for determining the AUC value at the infection site, which would be required for efficacy in clinical use. PMID:20660692

  15. Safety evaluation of Simarouba glauca seed fat.

    PubMed

    Rout, P K; Rao, Y R; Jena, K S; Sahoo, D; Ali, Shakir

    2014-07-01

    Simarouba glauca DC is a tree of the family Simaroubaceae, which grows well up to 1,000 m above sea level in all types of well-drained soils (pH 5.5 to 8.0) and in places with 250 to 2,500 mm annual rainfall. The seed oil has been extracted both by mechanical expelling and solvent extraction. The fatty acid composition and iodine value of the oil indicate that it possesses saturated (40.8-42.6%), monounsaturated (52.9-55.0%), and polyunsaturated (2.5-3.4%) fatty acid in ratios close to that of palm oil. These characteristics are suitable for its use as edible oil. Acute oral toxicity and safety evaluation in a 13-week feeding trial on albino rats showed that the oil is comparable to groundnut oil in all the parameters. PMID:24966429

  16. Systematic safety evaluation on photoluminescent carbon dots

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Photoluminescent carbon dots (C-dots) were prepared using the improved nitric acid oxidation method. The C-dots were characterized by tapping-mode atomic force microscopy, and UV–vis absorption spectroscopy. The C-dots were subjected to systematic safety evaluation via acute toxicity, subacute toxicity, and genotoxicity experiments (including mouse bone marrow micronuclear test and Salmonella typhimurium mutagenicity test). The results showed that the C-dots were successfully prepared with good stability, high dispersibility, and water solubility. At all studied C-dot dosages, no significant toxic effect, i.e., no abnormality or lesion, was observed in the organs of the animals. Therefore, the C-dots are non-toxic to mice under any dose and have potential use in fluorescence imaging in vivo, tumor cell tracking, and others. PMID:23497260

  17. Systematic safety evaluation on photoluminescent carbon dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kan; Gao, Zhongcai; Gao, Guo; Wo, Yan; Wang, Yuxia; Shen, Guangxia; Cui, Daxiang

    2013-03-01

    Photoluminescent carbon dots (C-dots) were prepared using the improved nitric acid oxidation method. The C-dots were characterized by tapping-mode atomic force microscopy, and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The C-dots were subjected to systematic safety evaluation via acute toxicity, subacute toxicity, and genotoxicity experiments (including mouse bone marrow micronuclear test and Salmonella typhimurium mutagenicity test). The results showed that the C-dots were successfully prepared with good stability, high dispersibility, and water solubility. At all studied C-dot dosages, no significant toxic effect, i.e., no abnormality or lesion, was observed in the organs of the animals. Therefore, the C-dots are non-toxic to mice under any dose and have potential use in fluorescence imaging in vivo, tumor cell tracking, and others.

  18. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Intravenous Zanamivir Treatment in Hospitalized Adults With Influenza: An Open-label, Multicenter, Single-Arm, Phase II Study

    PubMed Central

    Marty, Francisco M.; Man, Choy Y.; van der Horst, Charles; Francois, Bruno; Garot, Denis; Máňez, Rafael; Thamlikitkul, Visanu; Lorente, José A.; Álvarez-Lerma, Francisco; Brealey, David; Zhao, Henry H.; Weller, Steve; Yates, Phillip J.; Peppercorn, Amanda F.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Intravenous zanamivir is a neuraminidase inhibitor suitable for treatment of hospitalized patients with severe influenza. Methods. Patients were treated with intravenous zanamivir 600 mg twice daily, adjusted for renal impairment, for up to 10 days. Primary outcomes included adverse events (AEs), and clinical/laboratory parameters. Pharmacokinetics, viral load, and disease course were also assessed. Results. One hundred thirty patients received intravenous zanamivir (median, 5 days; range, 1–11) a median of 4.5 days (range, 1–7) after onset of influenza; 83% required intensive care. The most common influenza type/subtype was A/H1N1pdm09 (71%). AEs and serious AEs were reported in 85% and 34% of patients, respectively; serious AEs included bacterial pulmonary infections (8%), respiratory failure (7%), sepsis or septic shock (5%), and cardiogenic shock (5%). No drug-related trends in safety parameters were identified. Protocol-defined liver events were observed in 13% of patients. The 14- and 28-day all-cause mortality rates were 13% and 17%. No fatalities were considered zanamivir related. Pharmacokinetic data showed dose adjustments for renal impairment yielded similar zanamivir exposures. Ninety-three patients, positive at baseline for influenza by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, showed a median decrease in viral load of 1.42 log10 copies/mL after 2 days of treatment. Conclusions. Safety, pharmacokinetic and clinical outcome data support further investigation of intravenous zanamivir. Clinical Trials Registration NCT01014988. PMID:23983212

  19. Photobiological safety evaluation of UV nail lamps.

    PubMed

    Dowdy, John C; Sayre, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated six UV nail lamps representative of major US manufacturers to evaluate radiant hazards as defined in ANSI/IESNA RP-27 Recommended Practice for Photobiological Safety. Lamps were evaluated at three positions, 1 cm above the inner surface approximating exposure to the hand and the 20 cm RP-27 non-general light source distance, oriented normal and 45° to the opening. Hazard to skin at intended use distance classified these devices into Risk Group 1 or 2 (Low to Moderate) with S(λ) weighted Actinic UV ranging 1.2-1.7 μW cm(-2) and 29.8-276.25 min permissible daily exposure. At 20 cm on center and 45° UV risk to skin and eyes were all within Exempt classification. Actinic UV ranged 0.001-0.078 μW cm(-2) and unweighted near UV (320-400 nm) ranged 0.001-0.483 mW cm(-2). Likewise the retinal photochemical blue light hazard and retinal thermal and cornea/lens IR were also Exempt. One device had aphakic eye hazard slightly rising into Risk Group 1 (Low). There were no other photobiological risks to normal individuals. Total exposure following programmed times and steps accumulate to only a small fraction of RP-27 permissible daily occupational exposure. These risks are further mitigated in realistic nonoccupational use scenarios as it is unlikely to be a daily occurrence. PMID:23550905

  20. Phase I Safety, Pharmacokinetic, and Pharmacodynamic Study of ENMD-2076, a Novel Angiogenic and Aurora Kinase Inhibitor, in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Jennifer R.; Bastos, Bruno R.; Hansen, Ryan J.; Gustafson, Daniel L.; Eckhardt, S. Gail; Kwak, Eunice L.; Pandya, Shuchi S.; Fletcher, Graham C.; Pitts, Todd M.; Kulikowski, Gillian N.; Morrow, Mark; Arnott, Jamie; Bray, Mark R.; Sidor, Carolyn; Messersmith, Wells; Shapiro, Geoffrey I.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose ENMD-2076 is a unique orally bioavailable Aurora kinase and VEGFR inhibitor. The purpose of this phase 1 study of ENMD-2076 was to determine the MTD, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic profiles and preliminary antitumor activity. Experimental Design Patients with refractory advanced solid malignancies were treated with ENMD-2076 orally with continuous once daily dosing. Doses from 60 to 200 mg/m2 were evaluated using a standard 3 (to 4) +3 design. Pharmacokinetic parameters were studied on days 1, 28, and 30 to 35 of cycle 1. Expanded MTD cohorts included patients with ovarian cancer, colorectal cancer, and refractory solid tumors. Results A total of 67 patients (46 F, 21M; ages 30–76) entered the study. Dose levels of 60, 80, 120, 200, and 160 mg/m2 were evaluated. Two patients experienced grade 3 hypertension at 200 mg/m2, and additional grade 3 neutropenia events limited tolerability at this dose. An intermediate dose of 160 mg/m2 was determined to be the MTD. The most common drug-related adverse events included hypertension, nausea/vomiting, and fatigue. The pharmacokinetics of ENMD-2076 were characterized by a rapid absorption phase (Tmax 3–7.8 hours), a t1/2 of 27.3 to 38.3 hours after a single dose, and dose proportional exposure. Decreased plasma sVEGFR2 was observed posttreatment. Two patients with platinum refractory/resistant ovarian cancer had RECIST partial responses. Conclusions ENMD-2076 was well tolerated, had a linear pharmacokinetic profile, and showed promising antitumor activity, particularly in ovarian cancer. The recommended phase 2 dose of ENMD-2076 is 160 mg/m2 administered orally once daily with continuous dosing. PMID:21131552

  1. Note on evaluating safety performance of road infrastructure to motivate safety competition.

    PubMed

    Han, Sangjin

    2016-01-01

    Road infrastructures are usually developed and maintained by governments or public sectors. There is no competitor in the market of their jurisdiction. This monopolic feature discourages road authorities from improving the level of safety with proactive motivation. This study suggests how to apply a principle of competition for roads, in particular by means of performance evaluation. It first discusses why road infrastructure has been slow in safety oriented development and management in respect of its business model. Then it suggests some practical ways of how to promote road safety between road authorities, particularly by evaluating safety performance of road infrastructure. These are summarized as decision of safety performance indicators, classification of spatial boundaries, data collection, evaluation, and reporting. Some consideration points are also discussed to make safety performance evaluation on road infrastructure lead to better road safety management. PMID:25374273

  2. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Quick-Dissolving Polymeric Vaginal Films Delivering the Antiretroviral IQP-0528 for Preexposure Prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Priya; Zhang, Jining; Martin, Amy; Kelley, Kristin; McNicholl, Janet M; Buckheit, Robert W; Smith, James M; Ham, Anthony S

    2016-07-01

    For human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention, microbicides or drugs delivered as quick-dissolving films may be more acceptable to women than gels because of their compact size, minimal waste, lack of an applicator, and easier storage and transport. This has the potential to improve adherence to promising products for preexposure prophylaxis. Vaginal films containing IQP-0528, a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, were evaluated for their pharmacokinetics in pigtailed macaques. Polymeric films (22 by 44 by 0.1 mm; providing 75% of a human dose) containing IQP-0528 (1.5%, wt/wt) with and without poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticle encapsulation were inserted vaginally into pigtailed macaques in a crossover study design (n = 6). With unencapsulated drug, the median (range) vaginal fluid concentrations of IQP-0528 were 160.97 (2.73 to 2,104), 181.79 (1.86 to 15,800), and 484.50 (8.26 to 4,045) μg/ml at 1, 4, and 24 h after film application, respectively. Median vaginal tissue IQP-0528 concentrations at 24 h were 3.10 (0.03 to 222.58) μg/g. The values were similar at locations proximal, medial, and distal to the cervix. The IQP-0528 nanoparticle-formulated films delivered IQP-0528 in vaginal tissue and secretions at levels similar to those obtained with the unencapsulated formulation. A single application of either formulation did not disturb the vaginal microflora or the pH (7.24 ± 0.84 [mean ± standard deviation]). The high mucosal IQP-0528 levels delivered by both vaginal film formulations were between 1 and 5 log higher than the in vitro 90% inhibitory concentration (IC90) of 0.146 μg/ml. The excellent coverage and high mucosal levels of IQP-0528, well above the IC90, suggest that the films may be protective and warrant further evaluation in a vaginal repeated low dose simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) transmission study in macaques and clinically in women. PMID:27139475

  3. Evaluation of the pharmacokinetics and cardiotoxicity of doxorubicin in rat receiving nilotinib

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhi-yong; Wan, Li-li; Yang, Quan-jun; Han, Yong-long; Li, Yan; Yu, Qi; Guo, Cheng; Li, Xiao

    2013-10-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a potent chemotherapy drug with a narrow therapeutic window. Nilotinib, a small-molecule Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was reported to reverse multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transmembrane transporters. The present study aimed to investigate nilotinib's affection on the steady-state pharmacokinetics, disposition and cardiotoxicity of DOX. A total of 24 male Sprague–Dawley rats were randomized into four groups (6 in each) and received the following regimens: saline, intravenous DOX (5 mg/kg) alone, and DOX co-administrated with either 20 or 40 mg/kg nilotinib. Blood was withdrawn at 12 time points till 72 h after DOX injection and the concentrations of DOX and its metabolite doxorubicinol (DOXol) in serum and cardiac tissue were assayed by LC–MS–MS method. To determine the cardiotoxicity, the following parameters were investigated: creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, malondialdehyde, and superoxide dismutase. Histopathological examination of heart section was carried out to evaluate the extent of cardiotoxicity after treatments. The results showed that pretreatment of 40 mg/kg nilotinib increased the AUC{sub 0–t} and C{sub max} of DOX and DOXol. However, their accumulation in cardiac tissue was significantly decreased when compared with the group that received DOX alone. In addition, biochemical and histopathological results showed that 40 mg/kg nilotinib reduced the cardiotoxicity induced by DOX administration. In conclusion, co-administration of nilotinib increased serum exposure, but significantly decreased the accumulation of DOX in cardiac tissue. Consistent with in vitro profile, oral dose of 40 mg/kg nilotinib significantly decreased the cardiotoxicity of DOX in rat by enhancing P-gp activity in the heart.

  4. Single and Multiple Dose Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Safety of the Novel Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 Enzyme Inhibitor Darapladib in Healthy Chinese Subjects: An Open Label Phase-1 Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chaoying; Tompson, Debra; Magee, Mindy; Chen, Qian; Liu, Yan Mei; Zhu, Wenjing; Zhao, Hongxin; Gross, Annette S.; Liu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Darapladib is a lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) inhibitor. This study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and safety of darapladib in healthy Chinese subjects. Methods Twenty-four subjects received darapladib 160 mg orally, approximately 1 hour after a standard breakfast, as a single dose and once daily for 28 days. Non-compartmental methods were used to determine the single and multiple dose pharmacokinetics of darapladib and its metabolite SB-553253. Repeat dose Lp-PLA2 activity and safety were evaluated. Results Systemic exposure (AUC(0-T), Cmax geometric mean (CVb%)) of darapladib was higher after multiple-dosing (519 ng.h/mL (33.3%), 34.4 ng/mL (49.9%)) compared to single-dose administration (153 ng.h/mL (69.0%), 17.9 ng/mL (55.2%). The steady-state accumulation ratio was less than unity (Rs = 0.80), indicating time-dependent pharmacokinetics of darapladib. Darapladib steady-state was reached by Day 14 of once daily dosing. Systemic exposure to SB-553253 was lower than darapladib with median (SB-553253: darapladib) ratios for AUC(0-τ) of 0.0786 for single dose and 0.0532 for multiple dose administration. On Day 28, pre-dose and maximum inhibition of Lp-PLA2 activity was approximately 70% and 75% relative to the baseline value, respectively and was dependent of darapladib concentration. The most common adverse events (≥ 21% subjects) were abnormal faeces, abnormal urine odour, diarrhoea and nasopharyngitis. Conclusion Darapladib 160 mg single and repeat doses were profiled in healthy Chinese subjects. Single dose systemic exposure to darapladib in healthy Chinese subjects was consistent with that observed previously in Western subjects whereas steady-state systemic exposure was approximately 65% higher in Chinese than Western subjects. The Lp-PLA2 activity and adverse event profile were similar in healthy Chinese and previous reports in Western subjects. Ethnic-specific dose adjustment of darapladib is

  5. The safety evaluation of monosodium glutamate.

    PubMed

    Walker, R; Lupien, J R

    2000-04-01

    L-Glutamic acid and its ammonium, calcium, monosodium and potassium salts were evaluated by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) in 1988. The Committee noted that intestinal and hepatic metabolism results in elevation of levels in systemic circulation only after extremely high doses given by gavage (>30mg/kg body weight). Ingestion of monosodium glutamate (MSG) was not associated with elevated levels in maternal milk, and glutamate did not readily pass the placental barrier. Human infants metabolized glutamate similarly to adults. Conventional toxicity studies using dietary administration of MSG in several species did not reveal any specific toxic or carcinogenic effects nor were there any adverse outcomes in reproduction and teratology studies. Attention was paid to central nervous system lesions produced in several species after parenteral administration of MSG or as a consequence of very high doses by gavage. Comparative studies indicated that the neonatal mouse was most sensitive to neuronal injury; older animals and other species (including primates) were less so. Blood levels of glutamate associated with lesions of the hypothalamus in the neonatal mouse were not approached in humans even after bolus doses of 10 g MSG in drinking water. Because human studies failed to confirm an involvement of MSG in "Chinese Restaurant Syndrome" or other idiosyncratic intolerance, the JECFA allocated an "acceptable daily intake (ADI) not specified" to glutamic acid and its salts. No additional risk to infants was indicated. The Scientific Committee for Food (SCF) of the European Commission reached a similar evaluation in 1991. The conclusions of a subsequent review by the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) and the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) did not discount the existence of a sensitive subpopulation but otherwise concurred with the safety evaluation of JECFA and the SCF. PMID:10736380

  6. Criticality Safety Evaluation of a LLNL Training Assembly for Criticality Safety (TACS)

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrichs, D P

    2006-06-26

    Hands-on experimental training in the physical behavior of multiplying systems is one of ten key areas of training required for practitioners to become qualified in the discipline of criticality safety as identified in DOE-STD-1135-99, ''Guidance for Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineer Training and Qualification''. This document is a criticality safety evaluation of the training activities (or operations) associated with HS-3200, ''Laboratory Class for Criticality Safety''. These activities utilize the Training Assembly for Criticality Safety (TACS). The original intent of HS-3200 was to provide LLNL fissile material handlers with a practical hands-on experience as a supplement to the academic training they receive biennially in HS-3100, ''Fundamentals of Criticality Safety'', as required by ANSI/ANS-8.20-1991, ''Nuclear Criticality Safety Training''. HS-3200 is to be enhanced to also address the training needs of nuclear criticality safety professionals under the auspices of the NNSA Nuclear Criticality Safety Program.

  7. A randomized, double blind, dose escalation, first time in human study to assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and antiviral activity of single doses of GSK2485852 in chronically infected hepatitis C subjects.

    PubMed

    Wilfret, David A; Walker, Jill; Voitenleitner, Christian; Baptiste-Brown, Sharon; Lovern, Mark; Kim, Joseph; Adkison, Kimberly; Shotwell, Brad; Mathis, Amanda; Moss, Lee; Lee, Daniel; Yu, Lou; Gan, Jianjun; Spaltenstein, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    This first-time-in-human, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation study assessed the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and antiviral activity of GSK2485852, a hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B inhibitor, in 27 chronically infected HCV genotype-1 subjects. Subjects received GSK2485852 70, 420, and 70 mg with a moderate fat/caloric meal. Safety, pharmacokinetics, antiviral activity, HCV genotype/phenotype, and interleukin 28B genotype were evaluated. A statistically significant reduction in HCV ribonucleic acid (RNA) was observed after a single dose of 420 mg GSK2485852 (-1.33 log10  IU/mL) compared with placebo (-0.09 log10  IU/mL) at 24 hours post-dose. Subjects receiving 70 mg GSK2485852 were exposed to concentrations above the protein-adjusted 90% effective concentration for a short time; none experienced a significant decline in HCV RNA (-0.47 log10  copies/mL). GSK2485852 was readily absorbed; however, the observed geometric mean maximum plasma concentration (Cmax ) and area under the curve (AUC) values were significantly lower than expected due to a higher-than-predicted-oral clearance. Co-administration with food reduced the AUC and Cmax of GSK2485852 by 40% and 70%, respectively. Two metabolites were detected in human blood with one having approximately 50% higher concentrations than those of the parent. GSK2485852 was well-tolerated and exhibited antiviral activity after a single 420 mg dose in HCV subjects. PMID:27129119

  8. Development and Evaluation of an Interactive Internet-Based Pharmacokinetic Teaching Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedaya, Mohsen A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes an Internet-based, interactive, learner-centered, asynchronous instructional module for pharmacokinetics that requires minimal computer knowledge to operate. Main components are concept presentation, a simulation exercise, and self-assessment questions. The module has been found effective in teaching the steady state concept at the…

  9. Evaluating Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Interactions with Computational Models in Cumulative Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Simultaneous or sequential exposure to multiple chemicals may cause interactions in the pharmacokinetics (PK) and/or pharmacodynamics (PD) of the individual chemicals. Such interactions can cause modification of the internal or target dose/response of one chemical in the mixture ...

  10. An evaluation of population pharmacokinetics in therapeutic trials. Part I. Comparison of methodologies.

    PubMed

    Grasela, T H; Antal, E J; Townsend, R J; Smith, R B

    1986-06-01

    NONMEM, a computer program that uses the method of extended least-squares analysis, has been advocated as a means of obtaining estimates of population pharmacokinetic parameters when only fragmentary information can be obtained from subjects. To assess the performance of this program, we compared NONMEM with traditional methods for the estimation of population pharmacokinetic parameters with data collected during a phase III clinical trial of alprazolam. NONMEM estimates of the population mean clearance and its coefficient of variation were identical to the estimates obtained with traditional pharmacokinetic techniques. Moreover, NONMEM estimates of these parameters remained stable even when a few as three data points were available per subject. NONMEM estimates of the mean volume of distribution and its coefficient of variation appear to be overestimated, apparently because of the sampling scheme used to generate data for the NONMEM analysis. Suggestions for the effective use of NONMEM in clinical trials, to maximize the benefits of this approach, are provided. Our results lend further support for the use of NONMEM to estimate population pharmacokinetic parameters of a drug from data generated during phase III clinical trials. PMID:3709024

  11. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of avicularin using a model-based development approach.

    PubMed

    Buqui, Gabriela Amaral; Gouvea, Dayana Rubio; Sy, Sherwin K B; Voelkner, Alexander; Singh, Ravi S P; da Silva, Denise Brentan; Kimura, Elza; Derendorf, Hartmut; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Diniz, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to use the pharmacokinetic information of avicularin in rats to project a dose for humans using allometric scaling. A highly sensitive and specific bioanalytical assay to determine avicularin concentrations in the plasma was developed and validated for UPLC-MS/MS. The plasma protein binding of avicularin in rat plasma determined by the ultrafiltration method was 64%. The pharmacokinetics of avicularin in nine rats was studied following an intravenous bolus administration of 1 mg/kg and was found to be best described by a two-compartment model using a nonlinear mixed effects modeling approach. The pharmacokinetic parameters were allometrically scaled by body weight and centered to the median rat weight of 0.23 kg, with the power coefficient fixed at 0.75 for clearance and 1 for volume parameters. Avicularin was rapidly eliminated from the systemic circulation within 1 h post-dose, and the avicularin pharmacokinetic was linear up to 5 mg/kg based on exposure comparison to literature data for a 5-mg/kg single dose in rats. Using allometric scaling and Monte Carlo simulation approaches, the rat doses of 1 and 5 mg/kg correspond to the human equivalent doses of 30 and 150 mg, respectively, to achieve comparable plasma avicularin concentrations in humans. PMID:25782034

  12. A Safety Index and Method for Flightdeck Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latorella, Kara A.

    2000-01-01

    If our goal is to improve safety through machine, interface, and training design, then we must define a metric of flightdeck safety that is usable in the design process. Current measures associated with our notions of "good" pilot performance and ultimate safety of flightdeck performance fail to provide an adequate index of safe flightdeck performance for design evaluation purposes. The goal of this research effort is to devise a safety index and method that allows us to evaluate flightdeck performance holistically and in a naturalistic experiment. This paper uses Reason's model of accident causation (1990) as a basis for measuring safety, and proposes a relational database system and method for 1) defining a safety index of flightdeck performance, and 2) evaluating the "safety" afforded by flightdeck performance for the purpose of design iteration. Methodological considerations, limitations, and benefits are discussed as well as extensions to this work.

  13. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of IPX066: Evaluation of Dose Proportionality and Effect of Food in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hsuan-Ming; Hsu, Ann; Gupta, Suneel; Modi, Nishit B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives IPX066 is an oral, extended-release capsule formulation of carbidopa-levodopa (CD-LD) available in 4 strengths. The goals of this investigation were to assess the dose proportionality of IPX066 and to study the effects of a high-fat, high-calorie meal and of sprinkling the capsule contents on applesauce on the pharmacokinetics of IPX066 in healthy volunteers. Methods Three open-label studies were conducted. In the first study, subjects received 1 capsule of each IPX066 strength (23.75–95, 36.25–145, 48.75–195, and 61.25–245 mg of CD-LD). In the second study, subjects received 1 and 2 capsules of IPX066 245-mg LD under fasting conditions. In the third study, subjects received 2 capsules of IPX066 245-mg LD under 3 conditions: fasting; following a high-fat, high-calorie breakfast; and with the capsule contents sprinkled on applesauce under fasting conditions. Results Peak plasma concentrations (Cmax) and systemic exposure (AUCt, AUCinf) for LD and CD increased dose-proportionally over the range of the IPX066 capsule strengths. Comparison of 1 and 2 IPX066 245-mg LD capsules showed dose-proportional pharmacokinetics for Cmax and AUCt. Sprinkling the capsule contents on applesauce did not affect the pharmacokinetics. A high-fat, high-calorie meal delayed the initial increase in LD concentration by approximately 1 to 2 hours, reduced Cmax by 21%, and increased AUCinf by 13% compared with the fasted state. Conclusions IPX066 shows dose-proportional pharmacokinetics. Sprinkling the capsule contents on applesauce does not affect the pharmacokinetics; a high-fat, high-calorie meal delayed absorption by 1 to 2 hours, slightly reduced Cmax, and slightly increased extent of absorption. PMID:26626430

  14. Dose study of the multikinase inhibitor, LY2457546, in patients with relapsed acute myeloid leukemia to assess safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wacheck, Volker; Lahn, Michael; Dickinson, Gemma; Füreder, Wolfgang; Meyer, Renata; Herndlhofer, Susanne; Füreder, Thorsten; Dorfner, Georg; Pillay, Sada; André, Valérie; Burkholder, Timothy P; Akunda, Jacqueline K; Flye-Blakemore, Leann; Van Bockstaele, Dirk; Schlenk, Richard F; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Valent, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a life-threatening malignancy with limited treatment options in chemotherapy-refractory patients. A first-in-human dose study was designed to investigate a safe and biologically effective dose range for LY2457546, a novel multikinase inhibitor, in patients with relapsed AML. Methods: In this nonrandomized, open-label, dose escalation Phase I study, LY2457546 was administered orally once a day. Safety, pharmacokinetics, changes in phosphorylation of target kinases in AML blasts, and risk of drug–drug interactions (DDI) were assessed. Results: Five patients were treated at the starting and predicted minimal biologically effective dose of 50 mg/day. The most commonly observed adverse events were febrile neutropenia, epistaxis, petechiae, and headache. The majority of adverse events (81%) were Grade 1 or 2. One patient had generalized muscle weakness (Grade 3), which was deemed to be a dose-limiting toxicity. Notably, the pharmacokinetic profile of LY2457546 showed virtually no elimination of LY2457546 within 24 hours, and thus prevented further dose escalation. No significant DDI were observed. Ex vivo flow cytometry studies showed downregulation of the phosphoproteins, pcKIT, pFLT3, and pS6, in AML blasts after LY2457546 administration. No medically relevant responses were observed in the five treated patients. Conclusion: No biologically effective dose could be established for LY2457546 in chemotherapy-resistant AML patients. Lack of drug clearance prevented safe dose escalation, and the study was terminated early. Future efforts should be made to develop derivatives with a more favorable pharmacokinetic profile. PMID:21625399

  15. The pharmacokinetics, efficacy, safety, and ease of use of a novel portable metered-dose cannabis inhaler in patients with chronic neuropathic pain: a phase 1a study.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Elon; Ogintz, Miri; Almog, Shlomo

    2014-09-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain is often refractory to standard pharmacological treatments. Although growing evidence supports the use of inhaled cannabis for neuropathic pain, the lack of standard inhaled dosing plays a major obstacle in cannabis becoming a "main stream" pharmacological treatment for neuropathic pain. The objective of this study was to explore the pharmacokinetics, safety, tolerability, efficacy, and ease of use of a novel portable thermal-metered-dose inhaler (tMDI) for cannabis in a cohort of eight patients suffering from chronic neuropathic pain and on a stable analgesic regimen including medicinal cannabis. In a single-dose, open-label study, patients inhaled a single 15.1 ± 0.1 mg dose of cannabis using the Syqe Inhaler device. Blood samples for Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-hydroxy-Δ(9)-THC were taken at baseline and up to 120 minutes. Pain intensity (0-10 VAS), adverse events, and satisfaction score were monitored following the inhalation. A uniform pharmacokinetic profile was exhibited across all participants (Δ(9)-THC plasma Cmax ± SD was 38 ± 10 ng/mL, Tmax ± SD was 3 ± 1 minutes, AUC₀→infinity ± SD was 607 ± 200 ng·min/mL). Higher plasma Cmax increase per mg Δ(9)-THC administered (12.3 ng/mL/mg THC) and lower interindividual variability of Cmax (25.3%), compared with reported alternative modes of THC delivery, were measured. A significant 45% reduction in pain intensity was noted 20 minutes post inhalation (P = .001), turning back to baseline within 90 minutes. Tolerable, lightheadedness, lasting 15-30 minutes and requiring no intervention, was the only reported adverse event. This trial suggests the potential use of the Syqe Inhaler device as a smokeless delivery system of medicinal cannabis, producing a Δ(9)-THC pharmacokinetic profile with low interindividual variation of Cmax, achieving pharmaceutical standards for inhaled drugs. PMID:25118789

  16. A food effect study and dose proportionality study to assess the pharmacokinetics and safety of bardoxolone methyl in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Teuscher, Nathan S; Kelley, Richard J; Dumas, Emily O; Klein, Cheri Enders; Awni, Walid M; Meyer, Colin J

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of food on the plasma pharmacokinetics of bardoxolone methyl, an antioxidant inflammation modulator, at a 20 mg dose, and the dose proportionality of bardoxolone methyl pharmacokinetics from 20 to 80 mg. It was a single-dose study conducted at a single center in 32 healthy volunteers aged 18-45 years using an amorphous spray-dried dispersion formulation of bardoxolone methyl. In Part A, 16 subjects received single 20 mg doses of bardoxolone methyl under fasting and non-fasting conditions. In Part B, 16 subjects received a single 60 or 80 mg dose of bardoxolone methyl and a matching placebo dose under fasting conditions. Blood samples for pharmacokinetic analysis were taken over 120 hours following dose administration. Single dose administration of 20, 60, and 80 mg bardoxolone methyl was safe and well-tolerated in healthy volunteers. Total bardoxolone methyl exposure was unchanged in the presence of food. However, doses of bardoxolone methyl above 20 mg appear to have a saturated dissolution or absorption process and are associated with less than proportional increases in drug exposure. PMID:27128838

  17. Application of Factor Restructuring Analysis in Enterprise Safety Culture Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yihong; Xia, Liming; Pan, Jinshuang; Zong, Hengheng

    The enterprise safety culture index system, which mainly consists of enterprise decision-making level, management level, implementation level, and external environmental factor, is constructed based on human errors theory. Then, a corresponding enterprise safety culture evaluation model adapting to the characteristics of this index system is presented with consideration of the constraint condition of data and by taking full use of the advantages of factor system restructuring analysis and principal component analysis in data processing; The model provides an operable way for evaluating the enterprise safety culture. Further, the model is to make up for the gaps of enterprise safety culture evaluation.

  18. Providing Nuclear Criticality Safety Analysis Education through Benchmark Experiment Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; David W. Nigg

    2009-11-01

    One of the challenges that today's new workforce of nuclear criticality safety engineers face is the opportunity to provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines without having received significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and/or the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) provides students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills.

  19. 78 FR 47010 - Proposed Safety Evaluation for Plant-Specific

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... COMMISSION Proposed Safety Evaluation for Plant-Specific Technical Specifications Task Force Traveler... requesting public comment on the proposed model safety evaluation (SE) for plant- specific adoption of... ``Begin Web- based ADAMS Search.'' For problems with ADAMS, please contact the NRC's Public Document...

  20. Design and Application of Microfluidic Systems for In Vitro Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Drug Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, T.J.; Novik, E.; Chao, P.; Barminko, J.; Nahmias, Y.; Yarmush, M.L.; Cheng, K.-C.

    2011-01-01

    One of the fundamental challenges facing the development of new chemical entities within the pharmaceutical industry is the extrapolation of key in vivo parameters from in vitro cell culture assays and animal studies. Development of microscale devices and screening assays incorporating primary human cells can potentially provide better, faster and more efficient prediction of in vivo toxicity and clinical drug performance. With this goal in mind, large strides have been made in the area of microfluidics to provide in vitro surrogates that are designed to mimic the physiological architecture and dynamics. More recent advancements have been made in the development of in vitro analogues to physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models – a mathematical model that represents the body as interconnected compartments specific for a particular organ. In this review we highlight recent advancements in human hepatocyte microscale culture, and describe the next generation of integrated devices, whose potential allows for the high throughput assessment of drug metabolism, distribution and pharmacokinetics. PMID:20166997

  1. Phase I and pharmacokinetic evaluation of floxuridine/leucovorin given on the Roswell Park weekly regimen.

    PubMed

    Creaven, P J; Rustum, Y M; Petrelli, N J; Meropol, N J; Raghavan, D; Rodriguez-Bigas, M; Levine, E G; Frank, C; Udvary-Nagy, S; Proefrock, A

    1994-01-01

    A phase I and pharmacokinetics study was carried out of floxuridine (FdUrd) modulated by leucovorin (LV) given on the Roswell Park regimen (LV given at 500 mg/m2 by 2-h infusion and FdUrd given by i.v. push at 1 h after the start of LV infusion, treatment being given weekly x 6). The dose-limiting toxicity was diarrhea; the MTD and recommended dose for phase II studies was 1,650 mg/m2 per week of FdUrd. The dose-response curve was steep, with 3/3 patients treated at a dose of 1,750 mg/m2 developing grade IV diarrhea. With this schedule there was no significant mucositis. Pharmacokinetic parameters showed very wide interpatient variability. Plasma decay was biphasic with a t1/2 beta of approximately 2 h. Plasma clearance was high (> 200 1 h-1). No correlation between pharmacokinetic parameters and toxicity could be identified. PMID:8004761

  2. Critically safety evaluation for K Basins sandfilters

    SciTech Connect

    Wittekind, W.D.

    1994-10-01

    Criticality safety for K Basins sandfilters was considered. No credible normal or off-normal scenarios were determined which could compromise criticality safety and result in a K{sub eff} {>=} 0.98. The conclusion is that, due to the physical form and isotopic distribution of the fissionable material, there is no possibility of a nuclear criticality in the sandfilter. For this reason, there is no need for a criticality alarm system for the K Basins sandfilters.

  3. Safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of PTC124, a nonaminoglycoside nonsense mutation suppressor, following single- and multiple-dose administration to healthy male and female adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Hirawat, Samit; Welch, Ellen M; Elfring, Gary L; Northcutt, Valerie J; Paushkin, Sergey; Hwang, Seongwoo; Leonard, Eileen M; Almstead, Neil G; Ju, William; Peltz, Stuart W; Miller, Langdon L

    2007-04-01

    Nonsense (premature stop codon) mutations are causative in 5% to 15% of patients with monogenetic inherited disorders. PTC124, a 284-Dalton 1,2,4-oxadiazole, promotes ribosomal readthrough of premature stop codons in mRNA and offers therapeutic potential for multiple genetic diseases. The authors conducted 2 phase I studies of PTC124 in 62 healthy adult volunteers. The initial, single-dose study evaluated doses of 3 to 200 mg/kg and assessed fed-fasting status on pharmacokinetics following a dose of 50 mg/kg. The subsequent multiple-dose study evaluated doses from 10 to 50 mg/kg/dose twice per day (bid) for up to 14 days. PTC124 administered orally as a liquid suspension was palatable and well tolerated through single doses of 100 mg/kg. At 150 and 200 mg/kg, PTC124 induced mild headache, dizziness, and gastrointestinal events. With repeated doses through 50 mg/kg/dose bid, reversible transaminase elevations <2 times the upper limit of normal were sometimes observed. Immunoblot analyses of peripheral blood mononuclear cell extracts revealed no protein elongation due to nonspecific ribosomal readthrough of normal stop codons. PTC124 plasma concentrations exceeding the 2- to 10-microg/mL values associated with activity in preclinical genetic disease models were safely achieved. No sex-related differences in pharmacokinetics were seen. No drug accumulation with repeated dosing was apparent. Diurnal variation was observed, with greater PTC124 exposures after evening doses. PTC124 excretion in the urine was <2%. PTC124 pharmacokinetics were described by a 1-compartment model. Collectively, the data support initiation of phase II studies of PTC124 in patients with nonsense mutation-mediated cystic fibrosis and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:17389552

  4. A Phase I Safety, Pharmacokinetic, and Pharmacodynamic Presurgical Trial of Vitamin E δ-tocotrienol in Patients with Pancreatic Ductal Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Springett, Gregory M.; Husain, Kazim; Neuger, Anthony; Centeno, Barbara; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Hutchinson, Tai Z.; Lush, Richard M.; Sebti, Saïd; Malafa, Mokenge P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Vitamin E δ-tocotrienol (VEDT), a natural vitamin E from plants, has shown anti-neoplastic and chemoprevention activity in preclinical models of pancreatic cancer. Here, we investigated VEDT in patients with pancreatic ductal neoplasia in a window-of-opportunity preoperative clinical trial to assess its safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and apoptotic activity. Methods Patients received oral VEDT at escalating doses (from 200 to 3200 mg) daily for 13 days before surgery and one dose on the day of surgery. Dose escalation followed a three-plus-three trial design. Our primary endpoints were safety, VEDT pharmacokinetics, and monitoring of VEDT-induced neoplastic cell apoptosis (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00985777). Findings In 25 treated patients, no dose-limiting toxicity was encountered; thus no maximum-tolerated dose was reached. One patient had a drug-related adverse event (diarrhea) at a 3200-mg daily dose level. The effective half-life of VEDT was ~ 4 h. VEDT concentrations in plasma and exposure profiles were quite variable but reached levels that are bioactive in preclinical models. Biological activity, defined as significant induction of apoptosis in neoplastic cells as measured by increased cleaved caspase-3 levels, was seen in the majority of patients at the 400-mg to 1600-mg daily dose levels. Interpretation VEDT from 200 to 1600 mg daily taken orally for 2 weeks before pancreatic surgery was well tolerated, reached bioactive levels in blood, and significantly induced apoptosis in the neoplastic cells of patients with pancreatic ductal neoplasia. These promising results warrant further clinical investigation of VEDT for chemoprevention and/or therapy of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26844278

  5. Phase IA Clinical Trial Evaluating the Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Analgesic Efficacy of an Intrathecally Administered Neurotensin A Analogue in Central Neuropathic Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Sang, Christine N; Barnabe, Kate J; Kern, Steven E

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated CGX-1160 in a Phase Ia clinical trial to determine the safety of escalating doses in patients with central neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury (SCI). Our secondary objective was to detect a trend toward analgesic efficacy. Four subjects received 3 consecutive escalating doses of CGX-1160 starting at 25 μg/h over 6 hours until 2 consecutive subjects experienced any adverse effect; 2 of the 4 subjects received 2 sequences of 3 consecutive dose escalations. Maximum tolerated dose was defined by the development of diarrhea (900 μg/h over 6 hours). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood were collected for pharmacokinetic (PK) evaluation. The CSF concentration-versus-time data fit to a biexponential PK model, showing a rapid redistribution phase followed by a significantly slower terminal elimination phase. Incorporating an effect site delay into the model improved the fit to the data (concentration producing 50% of the maximum effect [C50 ], 58.7 ug/mL at the site of drug effect). Maximal reduction from the baseline pain intensity was 63%. In summary, CGX-1160 was generally well tolerated when administered intrathecally at doses up to 1000 μg/h. Peak analgesic effect occurred after the peak intrathecal concentration, indicating the presence of an effect site compartment to the PK model to represent the concentration and effect profiles for this unique compound. PMID:27310326

  6. Safety and pharmacokinetics of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate in adults with clinically stable schizophrenia: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of ascending multiple doses.

    PubMed

    Martin, Patrick; Dirks, Bryan; Gertsik, Lev; Walling, David; Stevenson, Annette; Corcoran, Mary; Raychaudhuri, Aparna; Ermer, James

    2014-12-01

    To assess the safety and pharmacokinetics of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX), a d-amphetamine prodrug, this double-blind study enrolled adults with clinically stable schizophrenia who were adherent (≥12 weeks) to antipsychotic pharmacotherapy. The participants received placebo or ascending LDX doses (50, 70, 100, 150, 200, and 250 mg) daily for 5 days at each dose (dose periods, 1-6; days, 1-5). Of the 31 enrolled participants, 27 completed the study (placebo, n = 6; LDX, n = 21). Treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) were reported by 4 participants receiving placebo and by 23 participants receiving LDX (all doses) with no serious AEs while on active treatment. For all periods, the mean postdose change on day 5 (up to 12 hours postdose) in systolic and diastolic blood pressure and pulse, respectively, ranged from -4.62 to 8.05 mm Hg, -3.67 to 4.43 mm Hg, and -3.57 to 14.43 beats per minute for placebo and -3.83 to 11.25 mm Hg, -1.55 to 5.80 mm Hg, and -0.36 to 21.26 beats per minute for LDX. With ascending LDX dose, the mean (SD) maximum plasma concentration for LDX-derived d-amphetamine ranged from 51.68 (10.28) to 266.27 (56.55) ng/mL. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve for 24 hours ranged from 801.8 (170.2) to 4397.9 (1085.9) ng[BULLET OPERATOR]h/mL. The d-amphetamine maximum plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration-time curve increased linearly with ascending LDX dose. Antipsychotic agents did not markedly affect d-amphetamine pharmacokinetics. Over a wide range of ascending doses, LDX safety profile in adults with schizophrenia was consistent with previous findings with no unexpected treatment-emergent AEs. Pulse tended to increase with LDX dose; overall, blood pressure did not increase with LDX dose. Consistent with previous studies, pharmacokinetic parameters increased linearly with increasing LDX dose. PMID:25310201

  7. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of paliperidone palmitate 3-month formulation in patients with schizophrenia: A phase-1, single-dose, randomized, open-label study.

    PubMed

    Ravenstijn, Paulien; Remmerie, Bart; Savitz, Adam; Samtani, Mahesh N; Nuamah, Isaac; Chang, Cheng-Tao; De Meulder, Marc; Hough, David; Gopal, Srihari

    2016-03-01

    This multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, phase-1 study assessed the pharmacokinetics (PK), safety, and tolerability of the investigational intramuscular paliperidone palmitate 3-month (PP3M) formulation in patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. A total of 328 patients (men or women, aged 18-65 years) were enrolled in 1 of 4 separately conducted panels (A to D). Each panel had 2 single-dose treatment periods (period 1, 1 mg intramuscular paliperidone immediate release [IR]; period 2, intramuscular PP3M 75-525 mg eq) separated by a washout of 7-21 days. Overall, 245 of 308 (79.5%) PP3M-dosed patients completed the study. Because the PK studies of panels A and C were compromised by incomplete injection in some patients, PK data from only panels B and D are presented. Safety data from all panels are presented. Peak paliperidone plasma concentration was achieved between 23 and 34 days, and apparent half-life was ∼2-4 months. Mean plasma AUC∞ and Cmax of paliperidone appeared to be dose-proportional. Relative bioavailability in comparison with paliperidone was ∼100% independent of the dose and injection site. Headache and nasopharyngitis were the most common (>7%) treatment-emergent adverse events. Overall, safety and tolerability were similar to those of the 1-month formulation. Results support a once-every-3-months dosing interval in patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. PMID:26189570

  8. Criticality safety benchmark evaluation project: Recovering the past

    SciTech Connect

    Trumble, E.F.

    1997-06-01

    A very brief summary of the Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company is provided in this paper. The purpose of the project is to provide a source of evaluated criticality safety experiments in an easily usable format. Another project goal is to search for any experiments that may have been lost or contain discrepancies, and to determine if they can be used. Results of evaluated experiments are being published as US DOE handbooks.

  9. The Evaluation of the Safety Benefits of Combined Passive and On-Board Active Safety Applications

    PubMed Central

    Page, Yves; Cuny, Sophie; Zangmeister, Tobias; Kreiss, Jens-Peter; Hermitte, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    One of the objectives of the European TRACE project (TRaffic Accident Causation in Europe, 2006–2008) was to estimate the proportion of injury accidents that could be avoided and/or the proportion of injury accidents where the severity could be mitigated for on-the-market safety applications, if 100 % of the car fleet would be equipped with them. We have selected for evaluation the Electronic Stability Control (ESC) and the Emergency Brake Assist (EBA) applications. As for passive safety systems, recent cars are designed to offer overall safety protection. Car structure, load limiters, front airbags, side airbags, knee airbags, pretensioners, padding and non aggressive structures in the door panel, the dashboard, the windshield, the seats, and the head rest also contribute to applying more protection. The whole safety package is very difficult to evaluate separately, one element independently segmented from the others. We decided to consider evaluating the effectivenessof the whole passive safety package, This package,, for the sake of simplicity, was the number of stars awarded at the Euro NCAP testing. The challenges were to compare the effectiveness of some safety configuration SC I, with the effectiveness of a different safety configuration SC II. A safety configuration is understood as a package of safety functions. Ten comparisons have been carried out such as the evaluation of the safety benefit of a fifth star given that the car has four stars and an EBA. The main outcome of this analysis is that any addition of a passive or active safety function selected in this analysis is producing increased safety benefits. For example, if all cars were five stars fitted with EBA and ESC, instead of four stars without ESC and EBA, injury accidents would be reduced by 47.2% for severe injuries and 69.5% for fatal injuries. PMID:20184838

  10. The evaluation of the safety benefits of combined passive and on-board active safety applications.

    PubMed

    Page, Yves; Cuny, Sophie; Zangmeister, Tobias; Kreiss, Jens-Peter; Hermitte, Thierry

    2009-10-01

    One of the objectives of the European TRACE project (TRaffic Accident Causation in Europe, 2006-2008) was to estimate the proportion of injury accidents that could be avoided and/or the proportion of injury accidents where the severity could be mitigated for on-the-market safety applications, if 100 % of the car fleet would be equipped with them. We have selected for evaluation the Electronic Stability Control (ESC) and the Emergency Brake Assist (EBA) applications. As for passive safety systems, recent cars are designed to offer overall safety protection. Car structure, load limiters, front airbags, side airbags, knee airbags, pretensioners, padding and non aggressive structures in the door panel, the dashboard, the windshield, the seats, and the head rest also contribute to applying more protection. The whole safety package is very difficult to evaluate separately, one element independently segmented from the others. We decided to consider evaluating the effectiveness of the whole passive safety package, This package,, for the sake of simplicity, was the number of stars awarded at the Euro NCAP testing. The challenges were to compare the effectiveness of some safety configuration SC I, with the effectiveness of a different safety configuration SC II. A safety configuration is understood as a package of safety functions. Ten comparisons have been carried out such as the evaluation of the safety benefit of a fifth star given that the car has four stars and an EBA. The main outcome of this analysis is that any addition of a passive or active safety function selected in this analysis is producing increased safety benefits. For example, if all cars were five stars fitted with EBA and ESC, instead of four stars without ESC and EBA, injury accidents would be reduced by 47.2% for severe injuries and 69.5% for fatal injuries. PMID:20184838

  11. Axitinib plasma pharmacokinetics and ethnic differences.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Suzuki, Akiyuki; Tortorici, Michael A; Garrett, May; LaBadie, Robert R; Umeyama, Yoshiko; Pithavala, Yazdi K

    2015-04-01

    Axitinib, a potent and selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1, 2, and 3, showed improved progression-free survival over sorafenib in patients previously treated for advanced renal cell carcinoma in the AXIS trial. Although a few studies had established the efficacy and safety of axitinib in Asian patients, additional evaluation was necessary to obtain regulatory approval in several Asian countries, especially in light of ethnic differences that are known to exist in genetic polymorphisms for metabolizing enzymes such as cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A5, CYP2C19 and uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1, which are involved in axitinib metabolism. Axitinib plasma pharmacokinetics following single or multiple administration of oral axitinib in Asian (Japanese or Chinese) healthy subjects as well as Asian patients with advanced solid tumors was compared with that obtained in Caucasians. Upon review, the data demonstrated that axitinib can be characterized as not sensitive to ethnic factors based on its pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Axitinib exhibited similar pharmacokinetics in Asian and non-Asian subjects. A pooled population pharmacokinetic analysis indicated lack of a clinically meaningful effect of ethnicity on axitinib disposition. Therefore, dose adjustment for axitinib on the basis of ethnicity is not currently warranted. PMID:25663295

  12. Uncertainty analysis for Ulysses safety evaluation report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Michael V.

    1991-01-01

    As part of the effort to review the Ulysses Final Safety Analysis Report and to understand the risk of plutonium release from the Ulysses spacecraft General Purpose Heat Source-Radioisotope Thermal Generator, the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel (INSRP) performed an integrated, quantitative analysis of the uncertainties of the calculated risk of plutonium release from Ulysses. Using state-of-art probabilistic risk assessment technology, the uncertainty analysis accounted for both variability and uncertainty of the key parameters of the risk analysis. The results show that INSRP had high confidence that risk of fatal cancers from potential plutonium release associated with calculated launch and deployment accident scenarios is low.

  13. Criticality Safety Evaluation of Hanford Tank Farms Facility

    SciTech Connect

    WEISS, E.V.

    2000-12-15

    Data and calculations from previous criticality safety evaluations and analyses were used to evaluate criticality safety for the entire Tank Farms facility to support the continued waste storage mission. This criticality safety evaluation concludes that a criticality accident at the Tank Farms facility is an incredible event due to the existing form (chemistry) and distribution (neutron absorbers) of tank waste. Limits and controls for receipt of waste from other facilities and maintenance of tank waste condition are set forth to maintain the margin subcriticality in tank waste.

  14. TA-55 Final Safety Analysis Report Comparison Document and DOE Safety Evaluation Report Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Bond

    2001-04-01

    This document provides an overview of changes to the currently approved TA-55 Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) that are included in the upgraded FSAR. The DOE Safety Evaluation Report (SER) requirements that are incorporated into the upgraded FSAR are briefly discussed to provide the starting point in the FSAR with respect to the SER requirements.

  15. A double-blind, placebo-controlled evaluation of the effect of oral doses of rizatriptan 10 mg on oral contraceptive pharmacokinetics in healthy female volunteers.

    PubMed

    Shadle, C R; Liu, G; Goldberg, M R

    2000-03-01

    Rizatriptan (MAXALT), a potent, oral 5-HT1B/1D agonist with a rapid onset of action, is available now for the acute treatment of migraine. This study examined the pharmacokinetic and clinical interaction between rizatriptan 10 mg and the components (ethinyl estradiol [EE] 35 micrograms and norethindrone [NET] 1.0 mg) of a well-established oral contraceptive combination product, ORTHO-NOVUM 1/35. Levels of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), a protein increased by EE to which NET binds, were also examined. In this two-period crossover study, 20 healthy young female subjects received a coadministration of 8 days of rizatriptan treatment (6 days of single-dose 10 mg rizatriptan and 2 days of multiple-dose rizatriptan, 10 mg q 4 hours for three doses, giving a total daily dose of 30 mg on Days 7 and 8) or matching placebo along with their daily dose (one tablet) of ORTHO-NOVUM 1/35 within their oral contraceptive cycle. Plasma was sampled for EE, NET, and SHBG concentrations. Safety evaluations included routine laboratory safety studies, physical examinations, and monitoring for ECG, vital signs, and adverse events. There were no statistically significant differences in any of the pharmacokinetic parameters of EE or NET between the rizatriptan and placebo treatment periods, thus indicating that rizatriptan had no meaningful effect on the disposition of either the EE or the NET component of ORTHO-NOVUM 1/35. The SHBG concentration did not change throughout the entire study. Clinically, coadministration of rizatriptan with ORTHO-NOVUM 1/35 was well tolerated. Blood pressure, heart rate, and temperature showed no consistent trend or clinically important changes. Adverse events following coadministration of rizatriptan with ORTHO-NOVUM 1/35 were similar to those reported when placebo was given with ORTHO-NOVUM 1/35. The findings of this study indicate that there is little potential for dosages as high as 30 mg/day, the maximum recommended dosing schedule, of rizatriptan

  16. Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of the Penetration of Antituberculosis Agents in Rabbit Pulmonary Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kjellsson, Maria C.; Via, Laura E.; Goh, Anne; Weiner, Danielle; Low, Kang Min; Kern, Steven; Pillai, Goonaseelan; Barry, Clifton E.

    2012-01-01

    Standard antituberculosis (anti-TB) therapy requires the use of multiple drugs for a minimum of 6 months, with variable outcomes that are influenced by a number of microbiological, pathological, and clinical factors. This is despite the availability of antibiotics that have good activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vitro and favorable pharmacokinetic profiles in plasma. However, little is known about the distribution of widely used antituberculous agents in the pulmonary lesions where the pathogen resides. The rabbit model of TB infection was used to explore the hypothesis that standard drugs have various abilities to penetrate lung tissue and lesions and that adequate drug levels are not consistently reached at the site of infection. Using noncompartmental and population pharmacokinetic approaches, we modeled the rate and extent of distribution of isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, and moxifloxacin in rabbit lung and lesions. Moxifloxacin reproducibly showed favorable partitioning into lung and granulomas, while the exposure of isoniazid, rifampin, and pyrazinamide in lesions was markedly lower than in plasma. The extent of penetration in lung and lesions followed different trends for each drug. All four agents distributed rapidly from plasma to tissue with equilibration half-lives of less than 1 min to an hour. The models adequately described the plasma concentrations and reasonably captured actual lesion concentrations. Though further refinement is needed to accurately predict the behavior of these drugs in human subjects, our results enable the integration of lesion-specific pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) indices in clinical trial simulations and in in vitro PK-PD studies with M. tuberculosis. PMID:21986820

  17. Opposite malaria and pregnancy effect on oral bioavailability of artesunate – a population pharmacokinetic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Kloprogge, Frank; McGready, Rose; Phyo, Aung Pyae; Rijken, Marcus J; Hanpithakpon, Warunee; Than, Hla Hla; Hlaing, Nathar; Zin, Naw Thida; Day, Nicholas P J; White, Nicholas J; Nosten, François; Tarning, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim was to compare the pharmacokinetic properties of artesunate and dihydroartemisinin in the same women: i) pregnant with acute uncomplicated malaria on day 1 and 2, ii) pregnant with convalescent malaria on day 7 and iii) in a healthy state 3 months post-partum on day 1, 2 and 7. Methods Non-linear mixed-effects modelling was used to compare plasma concentration–time profiles of artesunate and dihydroartemisinin over 7 days of treatment following oral and intravenous artesunate administration to pregnant women with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria during their second or third trimesters of pregnancy. The same women were restudied 3 months after delivery when fully recovered. Non-compartmental results of the same study have been published previously. Results Twenty pregnant patients on the Thailand-Myanmar border were studied and 15 volunteered to be restudied 3 months post-partum. Malaria and pregnancy had no effect on the pharmacokinetic properties of artesunate or dihydroartemisinin after intravenous artesunate administration. However, malaria and pregnancy had opposite effects on the absorption of orally administered artesunate. Malaria increased the absolute oral bioavailability of artesunate by 87%, presumably by inhibiting first pass effect, whereas pregnancy decreased oral bioavailability by 23%. Conclusions The population pharmacokinetic analysis demonstrated opposite effects of malaria and pregnancy on the bioavailability of orally administered artesunate. Lower drug exposures during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy may contribute to lower cure rates and thus the development of drug resistance. Dose optimization studies are required for artesunate containing artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) in later pregnancy. PMID:25877779

  18. Fluoxetine potentiation of omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect: evaluating pharmacokinetic and brain fatty acid-related aspects in rodents.

    PubMed

    Laino, Carlos Horacio; Garcia, Pilar; Podestá, María Fernanda; Höcht, Christian; Slobodianik, Nora; Reinés, Analía

    2014-10-01

    We previously reported that combined fluoxetine administration at antidepressant doses renders additive antidepressant effects, whereas non-antidepressant doses potentiate the omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate putative pharmacokinetic and brain omega-3 fatty acid-related aspects for fluoxetine potentiation of omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect in rats. Coadministration of omega-3 fatty acids with a non-antidepressant dose of fluoxetine (1 mg/kg day) failed to affect both brain fluoxetine concentration and norfluoxetine plasma concentration profile. Fluoxetine plasma concentrations remained below the sensitivity limit of the detection method. Either antidepressant (10 mg/kg day) or non-antidepressant (1 mg/kg day) doses of fluoxetine in combination with omega-3 fatty acids increased hippocampal docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, 22:5 omega-3) levels. Although individual treatments had no effects on DPA concentration, DPA increase was higher when omega-3 were combined with the non-antidepressant dose of fluoxetine. Chronic DPA administration exerted antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test while increasing hippocampal docosahexaenoic (22:6 omega-3) and DPA levels. Our results suggest no pharmacokinetic interaction and reveal specific hippocampal DPA changes after fluoxetine and omega-3 combined treatments in our experimental conditions. The DPA role in the synergistic effect of fluoxetine and omega-3 combined treatments will be for sure the focus of future studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 103:3316-3325, 2014. PMID:25174836

  19. Criticality safety evaluation report for K Basin filter cartridges

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, D.G., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-28

    A criticality safety evaluation of the K Basin filter cartridge assemblies was completed to support operations without criticality alarm system. The results show that for normal operation, the cartridge assembly is far below the safety limit of K eff = 0.95.

  20. Fire safety evaluation system for NASA office/laboratory buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, H. E.

    1986-11-01

    A fire safety evaluation system for office/laboratory buildings is developed. The system is a life safety grading system. The system scores building construction, hazardous areas, vertical openings, sprinklers, detectors, alarms, interior finish, smoke control, exit systems, compartmentation, and emergency preparedness.

  1. Evaluation of a Personal Safety Program with Latino Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Maureen C.; Wurtele, Sandy K.; Alonso, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated a personal safety educational program designed for Latino families attending preschools in a large metropolis. Seventy-eight children who participated in the Kids Learning About Safety program were compared to 45 control children. Compared with controls, participating children demonstrated enhanced ability to recognize…

  2. The Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Carprofen, Flunixin and Phenylbutazone in the Cape Vulture (Gyps coprotheres) following Oral Exposure.

    PubMed

    Fourie, Tamsyn; Cromarty, Duncan; Duncan, Neil; Wolter, Kerri; Naidoo, Vinny

    2015-01-01

    The following study evaluates the overt toxic potential of carprofen (CRP), flunixin (FXN) and phenylbutazone (PBZ) in Old world vultures in relation to historic toxicity data for diclofenac and ketoprofen, with the Cape vulture (Gyps coprotheres) being the indicator species. The toxic potential of a single oral dose of CRP (11.5 mg/kg), FXN (1 mg/kg),PBZ (1.7 mg/kg) or water was evaluated by means of a four-way parallel study (n = 2), as means of ascertaining if these drugs were as toxic as diclofenac in the vulture. No unscheduled deaths or pathological lesions were noted following exposure. Clinical signs of lethargy and depression were, however, noted in one CRP, two FXN and one PBZ treated birds. Mild reversible inhibition of UA excretion was evident in all three groups, although UA remained within the population reference interval in contrast to the effects previously described for diclofenac and ketoprofen. All treatment groups had a drug concentration responsive increase in alanine transferase activity. CRP, FXN and PBZ were characterised by a maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of 1051.8 ± 620.7 ng/ml, 335.9 ± 36.3 ng/ml and 11150 ± 2474.9 ng/ml at 4 ± 4.3, 0.45 ± 0.02 and 5.3 ± 5.2 hours (Tmax) respectively and a half-life of elimination of 13.3 ±5, 1.8±1 and 18.7 ±11.4 hours respectively. While we could not demonstrate a lethal effect of the tested substances, the presence of toxic clinical signs, clinical pathological changes and/or long half-lives of elimination suggests that all three drugs have a potential for toxicity in a larger population or on repeat administration. In conclusion while the studied substances were not as overtly toxic as diclofenac, they are of safety concern. PMID:26512724

  3. The Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Carprofen, Flunixin and Phenylbutazone in the Cape Vulture (Gyps coprotheres) following Oral Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Fourie, Tamsyn; Cromarty, Duncan; Duncan, Neil; Wolter, Kerri; Naidoo, Vinny

    2015-01-01

    The following study evaluates the overt toxic potential of carprofen (CRP), flunixin (FXN) and phenylbutazone (PBZ) in Old world vultures in relation to historic toxicity data for diclofenac and ketoprofen, with the Cape vulture (Gyps coprotheres) being the indicator species. The toxic potential of a single oral dose of CRP (11.5 mg/kg), FXN (1 mg/kg),PBZ (1.7 mg/kg) or water was evaluated by means of a four-way parallel study (n = 2), as means of ascertaining if these drugs were as toxic as diclofenac in the vulture. No unscheduled deaths or pathological lesions were noted following exposure. Clinical signs of lethargy and depression were, however, noted in one CRP, two FXN and one PBZ treated birds. Mild reversible inhibition of UA excretion was evident in all three groups, although UA remained within the population reference interval in contrast to the effects previously described for diclofenac and ketoprofen. All treatment groups had a drug concentration responsive increase in alanine transferase activity. CRP, FXN and PBZ were characterised by a maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of 1051.8 ± 620.7 ng/ml, 335.9 ± 36.3 ng/ml and 11150 ± 2474.9 ng/ml at 4 ± 4.3, 0.45 ± 0.02 and 5.3 ± 5.2 hours (Tmax) respectively and a half-life of elimination of 13.3 ±5, 1.8±1 and 18.7 ±11.4 hours respectively. While we could not demonstrate a lethal effect of the tested substances, the presence of toxic clinical signs, clinical pathological changes and/or long half-lives of elimination suggests that all three drugs have a potential for toxicity in a larger population or on repeat administration. In conclusion while the studied substances were not as overtly toxic as diclofenac, they are of safety concern. PMID:26512724

  4. Vitamin D: Pharmacokinetics and Safety When Used in Conjunction with the Pharmaceutical Drugs Used in Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Deborah A.; Cooley, Kieran; Skidmore, Becky; Fritz, Heidi; Campbell, Tara; Seely, Dugald

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D has reported anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties modulated through gene transcription and non-genomic signaling cascades. The purpose of this review was to summarize the available research on interactions and pharmacokinetics between vitamin D and the pharmaceutical drugs used in patients with cancer. Hypercalcemia was the most frequently reported side effect that occurred in high dose calcitriol. The half-life of 25(OH)D3 and/or 1,25(OH)2D3 was found to be impacted by cimetidine; rosuvastatin; prednisone and possibly some chemotherapy drugs. No unusual adverse effects in cancer patients; beyond what is expected from high dose 1,25(OH)2D3 supplementation, were revealed through this review. While sufficient evidence is lacking, supplementation with 1,25(OH)2D3 during chemotherapy appears to have a low risk of interaction. Further interactions with vitamin D3 have not been studied. PMID:24216707

  5. Evaluation of reliability assurance approaches to operational nuclear safety

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.J.; Bezella, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    This report discusses the results of research to evaluate existing and/or recommended safety/reliability assurance activities among nuclear and other high technology industries for potential nuclear industry implementation. Since the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident, there has been increased interest in the use of reliability programs (RP) to assure the performance of nuclear safety systems throughout the plant's lifetime. Recently, several Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) task forces or safety issue review groups have recommended RPs for assuring the continuing safety of nuclear reactor plants. 18 references.

  6. Problems of Safety Codes Evaluation in Practical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franeková, Mária; Rástočný, Karol

    The paper deals with a methodology of the safety codes evaluation used in the safety-related communication systems. The problems of determining the probability of undetected error of block detection codes generally used in praxis are mentioned in comparison with the theoretical knowledge. The main part is oriented at the description of the mathematical apparatus for determination of the residual error probabilities of the safety block codes. The practical part describes the results of modelling the failure effect cause by Electromagnetic Interferences (EMI) to safety of the closed industrial transmission system.

  7. Influence Map Methodology for Evaluating Systemic Safety Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    "Raising the bar" in safety performance is a critical challenge for many organizations, including Kennedy Space Center. Contributing-factor taxonomies organize information about the reasons accidents occur and therefore are essential elements of accident investigations and safety reporting systems. Organizations must balance efforts to identify causes of specific accidents with efforts to evaluate systemic safety issues in order to become more proactive about improving safety. This project successfully addressed the following two problems: (1) methods and metrics to support the design of effective taxonomies are limited and (2) influence relationships among contributing factors are not explicitly modeled within a taxonomy.

  8. Hyperspectral and multispectral imaging for evaluating food safety and quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spectral imaging technologies have been developed rapidly during the past decade. This paper presents hyperspectral and multispectral imaging technologies in the area of food safety and quality evaluation, with an introduction, demonstration, and summarization of the spectral imaging techniques avai...

  9. Evaluation of Oral and IntravenousRoute Pharmacokinetics, Plasma Protein Binding and Uterine Tissue Dose Metrics of Bisphenol A: A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Waechter, John M.; Clewell, III, H. J.; Covington, Tammie R.; Barton, H. A.

    2005-06-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a weakly estrogenic monomer used in the production of polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins, both of which are used in food contact and other applications. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of BPA pharmacokinetics in rats and humans was developed to provide a physiological context in which the processes controlling BPA pharmacokinetics (e.g. plasma protein binding, enterohepatic recirculation of the glucuronide (BPAG)) could be incorporated. A uterine tissue compartment was included to allow the correlation of simulated ER binding of BPA with increases in uterine wet weight (UWW) in rats. Intravenous and oral-route blood kinetics of BPA in rats and oral-route plasma and urinary elimination kinetics in humans were well described by the model. Simulations of rat oral-route BPAG pharmacokinetics were less exact, most likely the result of oversimplification of the GI tract compartment. Comparison of metabolic clearance rates derived from fitting rat i.v. and oral-route data implied that intestinal glucuronidation of BPA is significant. In rats but not humans, terminal elimination rates were strongly influenced by enterohepatic recirculation. In the absence of BPA binding to plasma proteins, simulations showed high ER occupancy at doses without uterine effects. Restricting free BPA to the measured unbound amount demonstrated the importance of including plasma binding in BPA kinetic models: the modeled relationship between ER occupancy and UWW increases was consistent with expectations for a receptor mediated response with low ER occupancy at doses with no response and increasing occupancy with larger increases in UWW.

  10. Pharmacokinetics and safety of subcutaneous immune globulin (human), 10% caprylate/chromatography purified in patients with primary immunodeficiency disease

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, R L; Irani, A-M; Tracy, J; Tsoukas, C; Stark, D; Levy, R; Chen, J; Sorrells, S; Roberts, R; Gupta, S

    2010-01-01

    Subcutaneous administration of intravenous immunoglobulin G (IgG) preparations provides an additional level of patient convenience and more options for patients with poor venous access or a history of intravenous IgG reactions. An open-label, pharmacokinetic trial (n = 32) determined the non-inferiority of the subcutaneous versus intravenous route of 10% caprylate/chromatography purified human immune globulin intravenous (IGIV-C; Gamunex®) administration by comparing the steady-state area under the concentration-versus-time curve (AUC) of total plasma IgG in patients with primary immunodeficiency disease. Patients on stable IGIV-C received two intravenous infusions (administered 3 or 4 weeks apart). Seven to 10 days after the second intravenous infusion, all patients switched to a weekly infusion of subcutaneous IGIV-C, with the dose equal to 137% of the previous weekly equivalent intravenous dose, for up to 24 weeks. Samples for pharmacokinetic analysis were collected during steady state for intravenous and subcutaneous IGIV-C treatments. The AUC0-τ geometric least-squares mean ratio was 0·89 (90% confidence interval, 0·86–0·92) and met the criteria for non-inferiority. The overall mean steady-state trough concentration of plasma total IgG with subcutaneous IGIV-C was 11·4 mg/ml, 18·8% higher than intravenous IGIV-C (9·6 mg/ml). Subcutaneous IGIV-C was safe and well tolerated. Subcutaneous IGIV-C infusion-site reactions were generally mild/moderate and the incidence decreased over time. No serious bacterial infections were reported. Weekly subcutaneous IGIV-C infusion using 137% of the weekly equivalent intravenous immunoglobulin dose provides an AUC comparable to intravenous administration, thus allowing patients to maintain the same IgG preparation/formulation if switching between intravenous and subcutaneous infusions. PMID:20550549

  11. Safety Evaluation Report of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Contact Handled (CH) Waste Documented Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-09-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report (SER) documents the Department of Energy’s (DOE's) review of Revision 9 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Contact Handled (CH) Waste Documented Safety Analysis, DOE/WIPP-95-2065 (WIPP CH DSA), and provides the DOE Approval Authority with the basis for approving the document. It concludes that the safety basis documented in the WIPP CH DSA is comprehensive, correct, and commensurate with hazards associated with CH waste disposal operations. The WIPP CH DSA and associated technical safety requirements (TSRs) were developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management, and DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

  12. Uncertainty analysis for Ulysses safety evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, M.V. )

    1991-01-01

    As part of the effort to review the Ulysses Final Safety Analysis Report and to understand the risk of plutonium release from the Ulysses spacecraft General Purpose Heat Source---Radioisotope Thermal Generator (GPHS-RTG), the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel (INSRP) and the author performed an integrated, quantitative analysis of the uncertainties of the calculated risk of plutonium release from Ulysses. Using state-of-art probabilistic risk assessment technology, the uncertainty analysis accounted for both variability and uncertainty of the key parameters of the risk analysis. The results show that INSRP had high confidence that risk of fatal cancers from potential plutonium release associated with calculated launch and deployment accident scenarios is low.

  13. Evaluation of utility of pharmacokinetic studies in phase I trials of two oncology drugs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kehua; House, Larry; Ramírez, Jacqueline; Seminerio, Michael J.; Ratain, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose There are many phase I trials of oncology drug combinations, very few of which report clinically significant pharmacokinetic interactions. We hypothesized that the utility of such pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction (DDI) studies is low in the absence of a mechanistic hypothesis. Experimental Design We retrospectively reviewed 152 phase I (2 drug) combination studies published in 2007–2011. Results Only 28 (18%) studies had an implicit or explicit rationale, either inhibition/induction of a drug metabolizing enzyme or transporter, co-substrates for the same enzyme or transporter, potential for end-organ toxicity, or protein binding. Only 12 (8%) studies demonstrated a statistically significant DDI, based on change in clearance (or area under the curve) of parent drug and/or active metabolite. There was a strong association between a rationale and a demonstrable drug interaction, as only 2% of studies without a rationale demonstrated a DDI, compared to 32% of studies with a rationale (Fisher’s exact test, p<10−6). Conclusion DDI studies should not be routinely performed as part of phase I trials of oncology combinations. PMID:24056785

  14. Evaluating Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Interactions with Computational Models in Supporting Cumulative Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yu-Mei; Clewell, Harvey; Campbell, Jerry; Andersen, Melvin

    2011-01-01

    Simultaneous or sequential exposure to multiple chemicals may cause interactions in the pharmacokinetics (PK) and/or pharmacodynamics (PD) of the individual chemicals. Such interactions can cause modification of the internal or target dose/response of one chemical in the mixture by other chemical(s), resulting in a change in the toxicity from that predicted from the summation of the effects of the single chemicals using dose additivity. In such cases, conducting quantitative cumulative risk assessment for chemicals present as a mixture is difficult. The uncertainties that arise from PK interactions can be addressed by developing physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to describe the disposition of chemical mixtures. Further, PK models can be developed to describe mechanisms of action and tissue responses. In this article, PBPK/PD modeling efforts conducted to investigate chemical interactions at the PK and PD levels are reviewed to demonstrate the use of this predictive modeling framework in assessing health risks associated with exposures to complex chemical mixtures. PMID:21655141

  15. Evaluation of different indirect measures of rate of drug absorption in comparative pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Lacey, L F; Keene, O N; Duquesnoy, C; Bye, A

    1994-02-01

    As indirect measures of rate of drug absorption (metrics), maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) is confounded by extent of drug absorption and the time to reach Cmax (tmax) is a discrete variable, dependent on blood sampling frequency. Building on the work of Endrenyi et al., we have compared different metrics, including Cmax/area under the curve of concentration versus time from time zero to infinity (AUC infinity), partial AUC from zero to tmax (AUCp), and Cmax.tmax with simulated experiments. Importantly, the performance of these metrics was assessed with the results of actual pharmacokinetic studies involving Glaxo drugs. The results of the simulated and real experiments were consistent and produced the following unambiguous findings: (1) Cmax/AUC infinity is a more powerful metric than Cmax in establishing bioequivalence when the formulations are truly bioequivalent; (2) Cmax/AUC infinity is more sensitive than Cmax at detecting differences in rate of absorption when they exist; and (3) the treatment ratios for AUCp, AUCp/AUC infinity, and Cmax.tmax are very imprecisely estimated and are of no practical value as measures of rate of absorption. Of the metrics examined, Cmax/AUC infinity is the most sensitive and powerful indirect measure of rate of drug absorption in comparative pharmacokinetic studies involving immediate-release dosage forms and should be used instead of Cmax in bioequivalence testing. PMID:8169791

  16. Population Pharmacokinetics, Tolerability, and Safety of Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine and Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine-Piperaquine in Pregnant and Nonpregnant Papua New Guinean Women

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, John M.; Moore, Brioni R.; Salman, Sam; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Tawat, Somoyang; Yadi, Gumal; Lorry, Lina; Siba, Peter M.; Batty, Kevin T.; Robinson, Leanne J.; Mueller, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    The tolerability, safety, and disposition of dihydroartemisinin (DHA) and piperaquine (PQ) were assessed in 32 pregnant (second/third trimester) and 33 nonpregnant Papua New Guinean women randomized to adult treatment courses of DHA-PQ (three daily doses) or sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP)-PQ (three daily PQ doses, single dose of SP). All dose adminstrations were observed, and subjects fasted for 2 h postdose. Plasma PQ was assayed by using high-performance liquid chromatography, and DHA was assessed by using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Compartmental pharmacokinetic models were developed using a population-based approach. Both regimens were well tolerated. There was an expected increase in the rate-corrected electrocardiographic QT interval which was independent of pregnancy and treatment. Two pregnant and two nonpregnant women had Plasmodium falciparum parasitemia which cleared within 48 h, and no other subject became slide positive for malaria during 42 days of follow-up. Of 30 pregnant women followed to delivery, 27 (90%) delivered healthy babies and 3 (10%) had stillbirths; these obstetric outcomes are consistent with those in the general population. The area under the plasma PQ concentration-time curve (AUC0–∞) was lower in the pregnant patients (median [interquartile range], 23,721 μg · h/liter [21,481 to 27,951 μg · h/liter] versus 35,644 μg · h/liter [29,546 to 39,541 μg · h/liter]; P < 0.001) in association with a greater clearance relative to bioavailability (73.5 liters/h [69.4 to 78.4] versus 53.8 liters/h [49.7 to 58.2]; P < 0.001), but pregnancy did not influence the pharmacokinetics of DHA. The apparent pharmacokinetic differences between the present study and results from other studies of women with uncomplicated malaria that showed no effect of pregnancy on the AUC0–∞ of PQ and greater bioavailability may reflect differences in postdose fat intake, proportions of women with malaria, and/or racial differences in drug

  17. Effects of strong CYP2D6 and 3A4 inhibitors, paroxetine and ketoconazole, on the pharmacokinetics and cardiovascular safety of tamsulosin

    PubMed Central

    Troost, Joachim; Tatami, Shinji; Tsuda, Yasuhiro; Mattheus, Michaela; Mehlburger, Ludwig; Wein, Martina; Michel, Martin C

    2011-01-01

    AIM To determine the effect of the strong CYP2D6 inhibitor paroxetine and strong CYP3A4 inhibitor ketoconazole on the pharmacokinetics and safety (orthostatic challenge) of tamsulosin. METHODS Two open-label, randomized, two-way crossover studies were conducted in healthy male volunteers (extensive CYP2D6 metabolizers). RESULTS Co-administration of multiple oral doses of 20 mg paroxetine once daily with a single oral dose of the 0.4 mg tamsulosin HCl capsule increased the adjusted geometric mean (gMean) values of Cmax and AUC(0,∞) of tamsulosin by factors of 1.34 (90% CI 1.21, 1.49) and 1.64 (90% CI 1.44, 1.85), respectively, and increased the terminal half-life (t1/2) of tamsulosin HCl from 11.4 h to 15.3 h. Co-administration of multiple oral doses of 400 mg ketoconazole once dailywith a single oral dose of the 0.4 mg tamsulosin increased the gMean values of Cmax and AUC(0,∞) of tamsulosin by a factor of 2.20 (90% CI 1.96, 2.45) and 2.80 (90% CI 2.56, 3.07), respectively. The terminal half-life was slightly increased from 10.5 h to 11.8 h. These pharmacokinetic changes were not accompanied by clinically significant alterations of haemodynamic responses during orthostatic stress testing. CONCLUSION The exposure to tamsulosin is increased upon co-administration of strong CYP2D6 inhibitors and even more so of strong 3A4 inhibitors, but neither PK alteration was accompanied by clinically significant haemodynamic changes during orthostatic stress testing. PMID:21496064

  18. Pharmacokinetics and safety of single doses of drisapersen in non-ambulant subjects with Duchenne muscular dystrophy: results of a double-blind randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Flanigan, Kevin M; Voit, Thomas; Rosales, Xiomara Q; Servais, Laurent; Kraus, John E; Wardell, Claire; Morgan, Allison; Dorricott, Susie; Nakielny, Joanna; Quarcoo, Naashika; Liefaard, Lia; Drury, Tom; Campion, Giles; Wright, Padraig

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive, lethal neuromuscular disorder caused by the absence of dystrophin protein due to mutations of the dystrophin gene. Drisapersen is a 2'-O-methyl-phosphorothioate oligonucleotide designed to skip exon 51 in dystrophin pre-mRNA to restore the reading frame of the mRNA. This study assessed safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of drisapersen after a single subcutaneous administration in non-ambulatory subjects. Eligible subjects were non-ambulant boys aged ⩾9years, in wheelchairs for ⩾1 to ⩽4years, with a diagnosis of DMD resulting from a mutation correctable by drisapersen treatment. Four dose cohorts were planned (3, 6, 9 and 12mg/kg), but study objectives were met with the 9mg/kg dose. Less than proportional increase in exposure was demonstrated over the 3-9mg/kg dose range, though post hoc analysis showed dose proportionality was more feasible over the 3-6mg/kg range. Single doses of drisapersen at 3 and 6mg/kg did not result in significant safety or tolerability concerns; however, at the 9mg/kg dose, pyrexia and transient elevations in inflammatory parameters were seen. The maximum tolerated dose of 6mg/kg drisapersen was identified for further characterization in multiple dose studies in the non-ambulant DMD population. PMID:24321374

  19. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of a new oral sustained release dosage form of tramadol

    PubMed Central

    Malonne, H; Sonet, B; Streel, B; Lebrun, S; De Niet, S; Sereno, A; Vanderbist, F

    2004-01-01

    Aims To compare the pharmacokinetic profile of a new modified release formulation of tramadol (Tramadol LP 200 mg, SMB Technology, Marche-en-Famenne, Belgium) with that of an immediate release capsule (Topalgic® 50 mg, Grünenthal, Aachen, Germany) after single and multiple dosing and to assess the potential effect of food on its relative bioavailability. Methods The first study had an open, single-dose, three-treatment, three-period, six-sequence, randomised, crossover design with at least a five-day wash-out. The second study had an open, steady-state, two-treatment, two-period, two-sequence, randomised crossover design with at least a seven-day wash-out. Both studies contained 30 healthy subjects. Both enantiomers of tramadol and O-demethyl-tramadol (the only active metabolite of tramadol) were assayed in the plasma using an LC-MS/MS method. AUC∞, AUCt, Cmax, Tmax, and T1/2 were estimated. Statistical analysis was performed using univariate anova, the Wilcoxon nonparametric method or Friedman's nonparametric anova where appropriate. Results Tramadol had a significantly lower Cmax and longer Tmax than the conventional formulation. Thus, the mean (± sd) Cmax of tramadol were 646 ± 192 and 300 ± 94 ng ml−1 for Topalgic® 4 × 50mg and Tramadol LP 200 mg, respectively (95% confidence interval on the difference expressed as a percentage 42–51). AUC of tramadol from both formulations was comparable (similar AUC∞ and AUCt). Thus, the mean AUC∞ of (+/–)tramadol obtained after multiple dosing were 4611 ± 1944 and 5105 ± 2101 ngh ml−1 after Topalgic® 4 × 50mg and Tramadol LP 200 mg, respectively (95%CI 102–123%). We also demonstrate that the pharmacokinetics of the drug are not influenced by the intake of food. Thus, the mean AUC∞ of (+/–) tramadol were 5444 ± 1637 and 5169 ± 1580 ngh ml−1 after Tramadol LP 200 mg given in the fasting and fed states, respectively (95%CI = 88–103%). Conclusions The new sustained release form of tramadol

  20. A pharmacokinetic and clinical evaluation of iron poly (sorbitol-gluconic acid) complex.

    PubMed

    Campbell, B C; Lawrence, J R; Sumner, D J; Kelman, A; Smith, A; Elliott, H L; Goldberg, A

    1980-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of iron poly (sorbitol-gluconic acid) complex (IPSG) were studied following a single intramuscular injection of 59Fe-labelled IPSG to 4 iron deficient-patients. The results showed a more rapid uptake of iron from the site of injection than that reported with iron dextran while there was a lower urinary excretion than found with iron sorbitol citrate. A clinical study was carried out in 11 patients with iron deficiency anaemia. Patients were allocated at random to receive IPSG as either 250 mg or 500 mg elemental iron per week for 8 weeks. A satisfactory response to therapy was obtained with each regimen whether measured by an increase in haemoglobin concentration or in serum ferritin concentration. Few side-effects were encountered but discomfort and staining at the injection site was found on the higher dose schedule. PMID:7208542

  1. Pharmacological Evaluation and Preliminary Pharmacokinetics Studies of a New Diclofenac Prodrug without Gastric Ulceration Effect

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Jean Leandro; Moreira, Vanessa; Campos, Michel Leandro; Chelucci, Rafael Consolin; Barbieri, Karina Pereira; de Castro Souto, Pollyana Cristina Maggio; Matsubara, Márcio Hideki; Teixeira, Catarina; Bosquesi, Priscila Longhin; Peccinini, Rosângela Gonçalves; Chin, Chung Man

    2012-01-01

    Long-term nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) therapy has been associated with several adverse effects such as gastric ulceration and cardiovascular events. Among the molecular modifications strategies, the prodrug approach is a useful tool to discover new safe NSAIDs. The 1-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)indolin-2-one is a diclofenac prodrug which demonstrated relevant anti-inflammatory properties without gastro ulceration effect. In addition, the prodrug decreases PGE2 levels, COX-2 expression and cellular influx into peritoneal cavity induced by carrageenan treatment. Preliminary pharmacokinetic studies have shown in vivo bioconversion of prodrug to diclofenac. This prodrug is a new nonulcerogenic NSAID useful to treat inflammatory events by long-term therapy. PMID:23203127

  2. Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Evaluation of AZD5847 in a Mouse Model of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, V.; Shandil, Radha; Gaonkar, Sheshagiri; Mahesh, K. N.; Reddy, Jitender; Deshpande, Abhijeet; Bharath, Sowmya; Kumar, Naveen; Wright, Lindsay; Melnick, David; Butler, Scott L.

    2014-01-01

    AZD5847, a novel oxazolidinone with an MIC of 1 μg/ml, exhibits exposure-dependent killing kinetics against extracellular and intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Oral administration of AZD5847 to mice infected with M. tuberculosis H37Rv in a chronic-infection model resulted in a 1.0-log10 reduction in the lung CFU count after 4 weeks of treatment at a daily area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of 105 to 158 μg · h/ml. The pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic parameter that best predicted success in an acute-infection model was an AUC for the free, unbound fraction of the drug/MIC ratio of ≥20. The percentage of time above the MIC in all of the efficacious regimens was 25% or greater. PMID:24820085

  3. Evaluation of drug loading, pharmacokinetic behavior, and toxicity of a cisplatin-containing hydrogel nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Kai, Marc P.; Keeler, Amanda W.; Perry, Jillian L.; Reuter, Kevin G.; Luft, J. Christopher; O’Neal, Sara K.; Zamboni, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is a cytotoxic drug used as a first-line therapy for a wide variety of cancers. However, significant renal and neurological toxicities limits it clinical use. It has been documented that drug toxicities can be mitigated through nanoparticle formulation, while simultaneously increasing tumor accumulation through the enhanced permeation and retention effect. Circulation persistence is a key characteristic for exploiting this effect, and to that end we have developed long-circulating, PEGylated, polymeric hydrogels using the Particle Replication In Non-wetting Templates (PRINT®) platform and complexed cisplatin into the particles (PRINT-Platin). Sustained release was demonstrated, and drug loading correlated to surface PEG density. A PEG Mushroom conformation showed the best compromise between particle pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters and drug loading (16 wt %). While the PK profile of PEG Brush was superior, the loading was poor (2 wt %). Conversely, the drug loading in non-PEGylated particles was better (20 wt %), but the PK was not desirable. We also showed comparable cytotoxicity to cisplatin in several cancer cell lines (non-small cell lung, A549; ovarian, SKOV-3; breast, MDA-MB-468) and a higher MTD in mice (10 mg/kg versus 5 mg/kg). The pharmacokinetic profiles of drug in plasma, tumor, and kidney indicate improved exposure in the blood and tumor accumulation, with concurrent renal protection, when cisplatin was formulated in a nanoparticle. PK parameters were markedly improved: a 16.4-times higher area-under-the-curve (AUC), a reduction in clearance (CL) by a factor of 11.2, and a 4.20-times increase in the volume of distribution (Vd). Additionally, non-small cell lung and ovarian tumor AUC was at least twice that of cisplatin in both models. These findings suggest the potential for PRINT-Platin to improve efficacy and reduce toxicity compared to current cisplatin therapies. PMID:25744827

  4. Preparation of finasteride capsules-loaded drug nanoparticles: formulation, optimization, in vitro, and pharmacokinetic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tarek A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, optimized freeze-dried finasteride nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared from drug nanosuspension formulation that was developed using the bottom–up technique. The effects of four formulation and processing variables that affect the particle size and solubility enhancement of the NPs were explored using the response surface optimization design. The optimized formulation was morphologically characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Physicochemical interaction among the studied components was investigated. Crystalline change was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). Crystal growth of the freeze-dried NPs was compared to the corresponding aqueous drug nanosuspension. Freeze-dried NPs formulation was subsequently loaded into hard gelatin capsules that were examined for in vitro dissolution and pharmacokinetic behavior. Results revealed that in most of the studied variables, some of the quadratic and interaction effects had a significant effect on the studied responses. TEM image illustrated homogeneity and shape of the prepared NPs. No interaction among components was noticed. XRPD confirmed crystalline state change in the optimized NPs. An enhancement in the dissolution rate of more than 2.5 times from capsules filled with optimum drug NPs, when compared to capsules filled with pure drug, was obtained. Crystal growth, due to Ostwald ripening phenomenon and positive Gibbs free energy, was reduced following lyophilization of the nanosuspension formulation. Pharmacokinetic parameters from drug NPs were superior to that of pure drug and drug microparticles. In conclusion, freeze-dried NPs based on drug nanosuspension formulation is a successful technique in enhancing stability, solubility, and in vitro dissolution of poorly water-soluble drugs with possible impact on the drug bioavailability. PMID:26893559

  5. Preparation of finasteride capsules-loaded drug nanoparticles: formulation, optimization, in vitro, and pharmacokinetic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Tarek A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, optimized freeze-dried finasteride nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared from drug nanosuspension formulation that was developed using the bottom-up technique. The effects of four formulation and processing variables that affect the particle size and solubility enhancement of the NPs were explored using the response surface optimization design. The optimized formulation was morphologically characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Physicochemical interaction among the studied components was investigated. Crystalline change was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). Crystal growth of the freeze-dried NPs was compared to the corresponding aqueous drug nanosuspension. Freeze-dried NPs formulation was subsequently loaded into hard gelatin capsules that were examined for in vitro dissolution and pharmacokinetic behavior. Results revealed that in most of the studied variables, some of the quadratic and interaction effects had a significant effect on the studied responses. TEM image illustrated homogeneity and shape of the prepared NPs. No interaction among components was noticed. XRPD confirmed crystalline state change in the optimized NPs. An enhancement in the dissolution rate of more than 2.5 times from capsules filled with optimum drug NPs, when compared to capsules filled with pure drug, was obtained. Crystal growth, due to Ostwald ripening phenomenon and positive Gibbs free energy, was reduced following lyophilization of the nanosuspension formulation. Pharmacokinetic parameters from drug NPs were superior to that of pure drug and drug microparticles. In conclusion, freeze-dried NPs based on drug nanosuspension formulation is a successful technique in enhancing stability, solubility, and in vitro dissolution of poorly water-soluble drugs with possible impact on the drug bioavailability. PMID:26893559

  6. RMP-02/MTN-006: A Phase 1 Rectal Safety, Acceptability, Pharmacokinetic, and Pharmacodynamic Study of Tenofovir 1% Gel Compared with Oral Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate

    PubMed Central

    Cranston, Ross D.; Kashuba, Angela; Hendrix, Craig W.; Bumpus, Namandjé N.; Richardson-Harman, Nicola; Elliott, Julie; Janocko, Laura; Khanukhova, Elena; Dennis, Robert; Cumberland, William G.; Ju, Chuan; Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Mauck, Christine; McGowan, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This study was designed to assess the safety, acceptability, pharmacokinetic (PK), and pharmacodynamic (PD) responses to rectal administration of tenofovir (TFV) 1% vaginally formulated gel and oral tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF). This study was designed as a phase 1, randomized, two-site (United States), double-blind, placebo-controlled study of sexually abstinent men and women. Eighteen participants received a single 300-mg exposure of oral TDF and were then randomized 2:1 to receive a single and then seven daily exposures of rectal TFV or hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) placebo gel. Safety endpoints included clinical adverse events (AEs) and mucosal safety parameters. Blood and colonic biopsies were collected for PK analyses and ex vivo HIV-1 challenge. No serious AEs were reported. However, AEs were significantly increased with 7-day TFV gel use, most prominently with gastrointestinal AEs (p=0.002). Only 25% of participants liked the TFV gel. Likelihood of use “if somewhat protective” was ∼75% in both groups. Indices of mucosal damage showed minimal changes. Tissue TFV diphosphate (TFV-DP) Cmax 30 min after single rectal exposure was 6–10 times greater than single oral exposure; tissue TFV-DP was 5.7 times greater following 7-day versus single rectal exposure. In vivo exposure correlated with significant ex vivo tissue infectibility suppression [single-rectal: p=0.12, analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) p=0.006; 7-day rectal: p=0.02, ANCOVA p=0.005]. Tissue PK–PD was significantly correlated (p=0.002). We conclude that rectal dosing with TFV 1% gel resulted in greater TFV-DP tissue detection than oral dosing with reduced ex vivo biopsy infectibility, enabling PK–PD correlations. On the basis of increased gastrointestinal AEs, rectally applied, vaginally formulated TFV was not entirely safe or acceptable, suggesting the need for alternative rectal-specific formulations. PMID:22943559

  7. Infusion of Reconstituted High-Density Lipoprotein, CSL112, in Patients With Atherosclerosis: Safety and Pharmacokinetic Results From a Phase 2a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tricoci, Pierluigi; D’Andrea, Denise M; Gurbel, Paul A; Yao, Zhenling; Cuchel, Marina; Winston, Brion; Schott, Robert; Weiss, Robert; Blazing, Michael A; Cannon, Louis; Bailey, Alison; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Gille, Andreas; Shear, Charles L; Wright, Samuel D; Alexander, John H

    2015-01-01

    Background CSL112 is a new formulation of human apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) being developed to reduce cardiovascular events following acute coronary syndrome. This phase 2a, randomized, double-blind, multicenter, dose-ranging trial represents the first clinical investigation to assess the safety and pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of a CSL112 infusion among patients with stable atherosclerotic disease. Methods and Results Patients were randomized to single ascending doses of CSL112 (1.7, 3.4, or 6.8 g) or placebo, administered over a 2-hour period. Primary safety assessments consisted of alanine aminotransferase or aspartate aminotransferase elevations >3× upper limits of normal and study drug–related adverse events. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic assessments included apoA-I plasma concentration and measures of the ability of serum to promote cholesterol efflux from cells ex vivo. Of 45 patients randomized, 7, 12, and 14 received 1.7-, 3.4-, and 6.8-g CSL112, respectively, and 11 received placebo. There were no clinically significant elevations (>3× upper limit of normal) in alanine aminotransferase or aspartate aminotransferase. Adverse events were nonserious and mild and occurred in 5 (71%), 5 (41%), and 6 (43%) patients in the CSL112 1.7-, 3.4-, and 6.8-g groups, respectively, compared with 3 (27%) placebo patients. The imbalance in adverse events was attributable to vessel puncture/infusion-site bruising. CSL112 resulted in rapid (Tmax≈2 hours) and dose-dependent increases in apoA-I (145% increase in the 6.8-g group) and total cholesterol efflux (up to 3.1-fold higher than placebo) (P<0.001). Conclusions CSL112 infusion was well tolerated in patients with stable atherosclerotic disease. CSL112 immediately raised apoA-I levels and caused a rapid and marked increase in the capacity of serum to efflux cholesterol. This potential novel approach for the treatment of atherosclerosis warrants further investigation. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http

  8. Infliximab therapy for intestinal, neurological, and vascular involvement in Behcet disease: Efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics in a multicenter, prospective, open-label, single-arm phase 3 study.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Toshifumi; Hirohata, Shunsei; Kikuchi, Hirotoshi; Tateishi, Ukihide; Sato, Noriko; Ozaki, Kunihiko; Kondo, Kazuoki; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki

    2016-06-01

    Behçet disease (BD) is a multisystem disease associated with a poor prognosis in cases of gastrointestinal, neurological, or vascular involvement. We conducted a multicenter, prospective, open-label, single-arm phase 3 study to determine the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of infliximab (IFX) in BD patients with these serious complications who had displayed poor response or intolerance to conventional therapy.IFX at 5 mg/kg was administered to 18 patients (11 intestinal BD, 3 neurological BD [NBD], and 4 vascular BD [VBD]) at weeks 0, 2, and 6 and every 8 weeks thereafter until week 46. In patients who showed inadequate responses to IFX after week 30, the dose was increased to 10 mg/kg. We then calculated the percentage of complete responders according to the predefined criteria depending on the symptoms and results of examinations (ileocolonoscopy, brain magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography angiography, positron emission tomography, cerebrospinal fluid, or serum inflammatory markers), exploring the percentage of complete responders at week 30 (primary endpoint).The percentage of complete responders was 61% (11/18) at both weeks 14 and 30 and remained the same until week 54. Intestinal BD patients showed improvement in clinical symptoms along with decrease in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels after week 2. Consistently, scarring or healing of the principal ulcers was found in more than 80% of these patients after week 14. NBD patients showed improvement in clinical symptoms, imaging findings, and cerebrospinal fluid examinations. VBD patients showed improvement in clinical symptoms after week 2 with reductions in CRP levels and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Imaging findings showed reversal of inflammatory changes in 3 of the 4 VBD patients. Irrespective of the type of BD, all patients achieved improvement in quality of life, leading to the dose reduction or withdrawal of steroids. IFX dose was increased to 10 mg/kg in 3 intestinal BD

  9. Pharmacokinetics and safety of resveratrol derivatives in humans after oral administration of melinjo (Gnetum gnemon L.) seed extract powder.

    PubMed

    Tani, Hiroko; Hikami, Susumu; Iizuna, Sanae; Yoshimatsu, Maiko; Asama, Takashi; Ota, Hidetaka; Kimura, Yuka; Tatefuji, Tomoki; Hashimoto, Ken; Higaki, Kazutaka

    2014-02-26

    Fruits and seeds of melinjo (Gnetum gnemon L.) are resveratrol derivative-rich materials. Pharmacokinetics of resveratrol derivatives in healthy volunteers after oral administration of 1000 mg of melinjo seed extract (MSE) powder were assessed and compared with those after oral dosing of trans-resveratrol (tRV) powder containing 4.8 mg of tRV only, equivalent to the content in 1000 mg MSE powder. Plasma tRV concentrations with enzymatic hydrolysis were maintained over 24 h, with a tmax of 12 h and a mean residence time (MRT) of 14 h, 5 and 2 times higher than those for tRV powder intake, respectively. Gnetin C, a resveratrol dimer, with hydrolysis was maintained in plasma for >96 h with a 36 h MRT. With repeated doses once daily for 28 days, plasma tRV and gnetin C concentrations with hydrolysis were in good agreement with the theoretical curves. MSE powder was well tolerated up to the oral dosing of 5000 mg with no serious adverse events. PMID:24495149

  10. Safety evaluation of a hydrogen fueled transit bus

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D.A.; Thomas, J.K.; Hovis, G.L.; Wu, T.T.

    1997-12-31

    Hydrogen fueled vehicle demonstration projects must satisfy management and regulator safety expectations. This is often accomplished using hazard and safety analyses. Such an analysis has been completed to evaluate the safety of the H2Fuel bus to be operated in Augusta, Georgia. The evaluation methods and criteria used reflect the Department of Energy`s graded approach for qualifying and documenting nuclear and chemical facility safety. The work focused on the storage and distribution of hydrogen as the bus motor fuel with emphases on the technical and operational aspects of using metal hydride beds to store hydrogen. The safety evaluation demonstrated that the operation of the H2Fuel bus represents a moderate risk. This is the same risk level determined for operation of conventionally powered transit buses in the United States. By the same criteria, private passenger automobile travel in the United States is considered a high risk. The evaluation also identified several design and operational modifications that resulted in improved safety, operability, and reliability. The hazard assessment methodology used in this project has widespread applicability to other innovative operations and systems, and the techniques can serve as a template for other similar projects.

  11. An Evaluation Tool for Agricultural Health and Safety Mobile Applications.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Iris; Ellis, Tammy; Yoder, Aaron; Keifer, Matthew C

    2016-01-01

    As the use of mobile devices and their software applications, or apps, becomes ubiquitous, use amongst agricultural working populations is expanding as well. The smart device paired with a well-designed app has potential for improving workplace health and safety in the hands of those who can act upon the information provided. Many apps designed to assess workplace hazards and implementation of worker protections already exist. However, the abundance and diversity of such applications also presents challenges regarding evaluation practices and assignation of value. This is particularly true in the agricultural workspace, as there is currently little information on the value of these apps for agricultural safety and health. This project proposes a framework for developing and evaluating apps that have potential usefulness in agricultural health and safety. The evaluation framework is easily transferable, with little modification for evaluation of apps in several agriculture-specific areas. PMID:27494309

  12. SAFETY EVALUATION OF RENOVATED WASTEWATER FROM A POULTRY PROCESSING PLANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A three-phase evaluation of reclaimed process wastewater for reuse was undertaken at the Sterling Processing Corporation plant in Oakland, Maryland. The main objective was to evaluate the safety for human consumption of poultry exposed during processing to an average 50 percent m...

  13. A phase I, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic evaluation of the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-fuoro-2′-deoxycytidine, administered with tetrahydrouridine

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Robert J.; Kummar, Shivaani; Beumer, Jan H.; Blanchard, M. Suzette; Ruel, Christopher; El-Khoueiry, Anthony B.; Carroll, Mary I.; Hou, Jessie M.; Li, Chun; Lenz, Heinz J.; Eiseman, Julie L.; Doroshow, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Inhibitors of DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferases (DNMT) are active antineoplastic agents. We conducted the first-in-human phase I trial of 5-fluoro-2′-deoxycytidine (FdCyd), a DNMT inhibitor stable in aqueous solution, in patients with advanced solid tumors. Objectives were to establish the safety, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of FdCyd + tetrahydrouridine (THU). Methods FdCyd + THU were administered by 3 h IV infusion on days 1–5 every 3 weeks, or days 1–5 and 8–12 every 4 weeks. FdCyd was administered IV with a fixed 350 mg/m2/day dose of THU to inhibit deamination of FdCyd. Pharmacokinetics of FdCyd, downstream metabolites and THU were assessed by LC–MS/MS. RBC γ-globin expression was evaluated as a pharmacodynamics biomarker. Results Patients were enrolled on the 3-week schedule at doses up to 80 mg/m2/day without dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) prior to transitioning to the 4-week schedule, which resulted in an MTD of 134 mg/m2/day; one of six patients had a first-cycle DLT (grade 3 colitis). FdCyd ≥40 mg/m2/day produced peak plasma concentrations >1 μM. Although there was inter-patient variability, γ-globin mRNA increased during the first two treatment cycles. One refractory breast cancer patient experienced a partial response (PR) of >90 % decrease in tumor size, lasting over a year. Conclusions The MTD was established at 134 mg/m2 FdCyd + 350 mg/m2 THU days 1–5 and 8–12 every 4 weeks. Based on toxicities observed over multiple cycles, good plasma exposures, and the sustained PR observed at 67 mg/m2/day, the phase II dose for our ongoing multi-histology trial is 100 mg/m2/day FdCyd with 350 mg/m2/day THU. PMID:25567350

  14. Safety of Disposable Diaper Materials: Extensive Evaluations Validate Use.

    PubMed

    Dey, Swatee; Helmes, C Tucker; White, Jeffrey C; Zhou, Shaoying

    2014-06-24

    Disposable diapers are primarily composed of polymers, such as cellulose, polypropylene, polyester, and polyethylene, which are biologically inert and not bioavailable. They are used in clothes, fabrics, personal hygiene products, and other materials that are commonly in contact with the skin. Each component used throughout the production process must undergo rigorous safety evaluations and assessments and are proven to be well tolerated and safe for their intended uses. No materials are incorporated into a diaper until their safety is confirmed through robust assessments, and additional factors are integrated into the process to compensate for the uncertainty associated with extrapolating toxicity data. After a thorough assessment of the materials and final product, extensive skin compatibility evaluations are conducted as appropriate. This rigorous safety process provides reassurance that consumers can rely on the safety of these diapers. PMID:24961774

  15. Economic evaluation in patient safety: a literature review of methods.

    PubMed

    de Rezende, Bruna Alves; Or, Zeynep; Com-Ruelle, Laure; Michel, Philippe

    2012-06-01

    Patient safety practices, targeting organisational changes for improving patient safety, are implemented worldwide but their costs are rarely evaluated. This paper provides a review of the methods used in economic evaluation of such practices. International medical and economics databases were searched for peer-reviewed publications on economic evaluations of patient safety between 2000 and 2010 in English and French. This was complemented by a manual search of the reference lists of relevant papers. Grey literature was excluded. Studies were described using a standardised template and assessed independently by two researchers according to six quality criteria. 33 articles were reviewed that were representative of different patient safety domains, data types and evaluation methods. 18 estimated the economic burden of adverse events, 3 measured the costs of patient safety practices and 12 provided complete economic evaluations. Healthcare-associated infections were the most common subject of evaluation, followed by medication-related errors and all types of adverse events. Of these, 10 were selected that had adequately fulfilled one or several key quality criteria for illustration. This review shows that full cost-benefit/utility evaluations are rarely completed as they are resource intensive and often require unavailable data; some overcome these difficulties by performing stochastic modelling and by using secondary sources. Low methodological transparency can be a problem for building evidence from available economic evaluations. Investing in the economic design and reporting of studies with more emphasis on defining study perspectives, data collection and methodological choices could be helpful for strengthening our knowledge base on practices for improving patient safety. PMID:22396602

  16. Antibacterial efficacy and pharmacokinetic evaluation of sanguinarine in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) following a single intraperitoneal administration.

    PubMed

    Ling, F; Wu, Z-Q; Jiang, C; Liu, L; Wang, G-X

    2016-08-01

    Sanguinarine (SA), with antimicrobial and antiparasitic activities against fish pathogens, exhibits great potential commercial use in aquaculture. However, little information on pharmacokinetics of SA restricts further application in aquaculture. In this study, pharmacokinetics of SA in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) following a single intraperitoneal administration [10 mg kg(-1) BW (body weight)] was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The peak concentration (Cmax ) of SA in kidney was 11.8 μg g(-1) , which was higher than in other tissues and plasma. The terminal half-life in fish tissue and plasma was as follows: 42.3 h (kidney) > 37.2 h (liver) > 20.1 h (gill) > 18.8 h (muscle) > 10.9 h (spleen) > 10.0 h (plasma). Additionally, we determined the bacterial loads in tissues of common carp infected with Aeromonas hydrophila after i.p. administration of SA at 0, 5, 10 and 20 mg kg(-1) BW. The results showed that i.p. administration of SA at 10 mg kg(-1) BW significantly enhanced antibacterial efficacy against A. hydrophila, where the antibacterial ratio in the gill, kidney, spleen and liver on day 5 was 95.13%, 93.33%, 90.09% and 92.82%, respectively. Overall, these results suggested the potential of SA to treat A. hydrophila infection in common carp farming industry. PMID:26763075

  17. Population pharmacokinetics of rifampicin, pyrazinamide and isoniazid in children with tuberculosis: in silico evaluation of currently recommended doses

    PubMed Central

    Zvada, Simbarashe P.; Denti, Paolo; Donald, Peter R.; Schaaf, H. Simon; Thee, Stephanie; Seddon, James A.; Seifart, Heiner I.; Smith, Peter J.; McIlleron, Helen M.; Simonsson, Ulrika S. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe the population pharmacokinetics of rifampicin, pyrazinamide and isoniazid in children and evaluate the adequacy of steady-state exposures. Patients and methods We used previously published data for 76 South African children with tuberculosis to describe the population pharmacokinetics of rifampicin, pyrazinamide and isoniazid. Monte Carlo simulations were used to predict steady-state exposures in children following doses in fixed-dose combination tablets in accordance with the revised guidelines. Reference exposures were derived from an ethnically similar adult population with tuberculosis taking currently recommended doses. Results The final models included allometric scaling of clearance and volume of distribution using body weight. Maturation was included for clearance of isoniazid and clearance and absorption transit time of rifampicin. For a 2-year-old child weighing 12.5 kg, the estimated typical oral clearances of rifampicin and pyrazinamide were 8.15 and 1.08 L/h, respectively. Isoniazid typical oral clearance (adjusted for bioavailability) was predicted to be 4.44, 11.6 and 14.6 L/h for slow, intermediate and fast acetylators, respectively. Higher oral clearance values in intermediate and fast acetylators also resulted from 23% lower bioavailability compared with slow acetylators. Conclusions Simulations based on our models suggest that with the new WHO dosing guidelines and utilizing available paediatric fixed-dose combinations, children will receive adequate rifampicin exposures when compared with adults, but with a larger degree of variability. However, pyrazinamide and isoniazid exposures in many children will be lower than in adults. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings in children administered the revised dosages and to optimize pragmatic approaches to dosing. PMID:24486870

  18. Pharmacokinetic modeling: Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of bisphenol A in monkeys with extrapolation to humans

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Jeffrey W. Twaddle, Nathan C.; Vanlandingham, Michelle; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2011-11-15

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for bisphenol A (BPA) in adult rhesus monkeys using intravenous (iv) and oral bolus doses of 100 {mu}g d6-BPA/kg (). This calibrated PBPK adult monkey model for BPA was then evaluated against published monkey kinetic studies with BPA. Using two versions of the adult monkey model based on monkey BPA kinetic data from and , the aglycone BPA pharmacokinetics were simulated for human oral ingestion of 5 mg d16-BPA per person (Voelkel et al., 2002). Voelkel et al. were unable to detect the aglycone BPA in plasma, but were able to detect BPA metabolites. These human model predictions of the aglycone BPA in plasma were then compared to previously published PBPK model predictions obtained by simulating the Voelkel et al. kinetic study. Our BPA human model, using two parameter sets reflecting two adult monkey studies, both predicted lower aglycone levels in human serum than the previous human BPA PBPK model predictions. BPA was metabolized at all ages of monkey (PND 5 to adult) by the gut wall and liver. However, the hepatic metabolism of BPA and systemic clearance of its phase II metabolites appear to be slower in younger monkeys than adults. The use of the current non-human primate BPA model parameters provides more confidence in predicting the aglycone BPA in serum levels in humans after oral ingestion of BPA. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A bisphenol A (BPA) PBPK model for the infant and adult monkey was constructed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hepatic metabolic rate of BPA increased with age of the monkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The systemic clearance rate of metabolites increased with age of the monkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gut wall metabolism of orally administered BPA was substantial across all ages of monkeys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aglycone BPA plasma concentrations were predicted in humans orally given oral doses of deuterated BPA.

  19. Bioanalytical method for evaluating the pharmacokinetics of the GCP-II inhibitor 2-phosphonomethyl pentanedioic acid (2-PMPA).

    PubMed

    Rais, Rana; Rojas, Camilo; Wozniak, Krystyna; Wu, Ying; Zhao, Ming; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Rudek, Michelle A; Slusher, Barbara S

    2014-01-01

    2-Phosphonomethyl pentanedioic acid (2-PMPA) is a potent and selective inhibitor of glutamate carboxypeptidase-II, an enzyme which catabolizes the abundant neuropeptide N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG) to N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and glutamate. 2-PMPA demonstrates robust efficacy in numerous animal models of neurological disease, however its pharmacokinetics has not yet been fully described. 2-PMPA is a highly polar compound with multiple negative charges causing significant challenges for analysis in biological matrices. Here we report a derivatization method for the acidic groups that involved protein precipitation with acetonitrile followed by reaction with N-tert-butyldimethysilyl-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). The silylated analyte with transitions (683→551.4) and the internal standard (669→537.2) were monitored by tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray positive ionization mode. The method was subsequently used to evaluate 2-PMPA pharmacokinetics in rats. Intraperitoneal administration of 100mg/kg 2-PMPA resulted in maximum concentration in plasma of 275μg/mL at 0.25h. The half-life, area under the curve, apparent clearance, and volume of distribution were 0.64h, 210μg×h/mL, 7.93mL/min/kg, and 0.44L/kg, respectively. The tissue/plasma ratios in brain, sciatic nerve and dorsal root ganglion were 0.018, 0.120 and 0.142, respectively. In summary, a sensitive analytical method for 2-PMPA is reported that can be employed for similarly charged molecules. PMID:24055700

  20. Concurrent administration of donepezil HCl and levodopa/carbidopa in patients with Parkinson's disease: assessment of pharmacokinetic changes and safety following multiple oral doses

    PubMed Central

    Okereke, Chukwuemeka S; Kirby, Louis; Kumar, Dinesh; Cullen, Edward I; Pratt, Raymond D; Hahne, William A

    2004-01-01

    Aim The use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for the treatment of comorbid Alzheimer's disease in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients stabilized on a levodopa regimen may potentially disrupt cholinergic balance. This randomized, double-blind, crossover study investigated the safety of, and possible drug–drug interaction between, donepezil HCl and levodopa/carbidopa. Methods Twenty-five patients with PD who were taking physician-optimized doses of levodopa/carbidopa (with daytime dosing intervals of 4–8 h) were administered once-daily doses of either donepezil HCl (5 mg) or placebo for 15 days, in two treatment periods, separated by a washout of at least 2 weeks. Some patients took a second dose of levodopa/carbidopa after 4 h, therefore subanalysis of the levodopa/carbidopa data was conducted up to 4 h and 8 h after dosing. Twenty-six healthy matched controls received open-label donepezil HCl only, for a single 15-day period. Blood samples were collected before, during and after the 15 doses of donepezil HCl for pharmacokinetic (PK) assessments. Pharmacokinetic parameters included maximum attained plasma drug concentration (Cmax), time at which Cmax is attained (tmax), plasma drug concentration at steady state (Css), and area under the drug concentration–time curve over the dosing interval. Safety assessments included monitoring adverse events, and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor examination. Results The mean age of all subjects was 72.6 ± 1.3 years. Donepezil PK assessments of PD patients receiving levodopa/carbidopa were similar to the PK results from healthy controls who received donepezil HCl only (mean AUC0–12 h = 281.6 ± 17.6 and 268.6 ± 19.9 ng·h ml−1, respectively). Carbidopa PK were not significantly altered by the concomitant administration of multiple doses of donepezil HCl, compared with when PD patients received placebo (mean AUC0–8 h = 921.8 ± 160 and 821.8 ± 113 ng·h ml−1, respectively). Four hours

  1. Evaluation of a simulation-based surrogate safety metric.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Stamatiadis, Nikiforos

    2014-10-01

    The development of surrogate safety measures is essential due to the problems of availability and quality of historical crash data. The Aggregate Conflict Propensity Metric (ACPM) is a surrogate metric recently proposed and it is based on conflict studies and traffic simulations. ACPM is expected to be capable of assessing the relative safety levels of traffic facilities and/or treatments in order to help traffic engineers to select appropriate treatments based on traffic safety estimates. This paper presents three experimental tests conducted to evaluate the reliability of ACPM. In each test, ACPM is compared to a traditional conflict indicator in terms of identifying and ranking safety of traffic conditions under various traffic volumes based on traffic simulations. ACPM shows its strength and reliability in all three tests, as it provides results highly consistent with the Highway Safety Manual. The experimental tests indicate that ACPM is a promising surrogate safety measure that can appropriately identify relative safety among traffic treatments and/or facilities and provide traffic engineers with useful information on potential safety impact. PMID:24892875

  2. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of the anticancer prodrug simmitecan in different experimental animals

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhe-yi; Li, Xiu-xue; Du, Fei-fei; Yang, Jun-ling; Niu, Wei; Xu, Fang; Wang, Feng-qing; Li, Chuan; Sun, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the pharmacokinetics and disposition of simmitecan (L-P) that was a water-soluble ester prodrug of chimmitecan (L-2-Z) with potent anti-tumor activities in different experimental animals, and to assess its drug-drug interaction potential. Methods: SD rats were injected with a single iv bolus doses of L-P (3.75, 7.5 and 15 mg/kg). The pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, excretion and metabolism of L-P and its active metabolite L-2-Z were studied through quantitative measurements and metabolite profiling with LC/MS. The binding of L-P and L-2-Z to rat plasma proteins was examined using an ultrafiltration method. Systemic exposures of beagle dogs to L-P as well as drug distribution in tumors of the nude mice xenograft model of human hepatic cancer SMMC-7721 cells were also examined. The metabolism of L-P by liver mcirosomal carboxylesterase in vitro was investigated in different species. The effects of L-P and L-2-Z on cytochrome P450 enzymes were examined using commercial screening kits. Results: The in vivo biotransformation of L-P to L-2-Z showed a significant species difference, with a mean elimination half-life t1/2 of approximately 1.4 h in rats and 1.9 h in dogs. The systemic exposure levels of L-P and L-2-Z were increased in a dose-dependent manner. In rats, approximately 66% of L-P and 79% of L-2-Z were bound to plasma proteins. In rats and the nude mice bearing human hepatic cancers, most organ tissues had significantly higher concentrations of L-P than the corresponding plasma levels. In the tumor tissues, the L-P levels were comparable to those of plasma, whereas the L-2-Z levels were lower than the L-P levels. In rats, L-P was eliminated mainly via biliary excretion, but metabolism played an important role in elimination of the intact L-P. Finally, L-P and L-2-Z exerted moderate inhibition on the activity of CYP3A4 in vitro. Conclusion: L-P and L-2-Z have relatively short elimination half-lives and L-P is mainly eliminated via

  3. Bioavailability, pharmacokinetics, and safety of riociguat given as an oral suspension or crushed tablet with and without food

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Reiner; Becker, Corina; Unger, Sigrun; Wensing, Georg; Mück, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Riociguat is approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Some patients have difficulty swallowing tablets; therefore, 2 randomized, nonblinded, crossover studies compared the relative bioavailability of riociguat oral suspensions and immediate-release (IR) tablet and of crushed-tablet preparations versus whole IR tablet. In study 1, 30 healthy subjects received 5 single riociguat doses: 0.3 and 2.4 mg (0.15 mg/mL suspensions), 0.15 mg (0.03 mg/mL), and 1.0 mg (whole IR tablet) under fasted conditions and 2.4 mg (0.15 mg/mL) after a high-fat, high-calorie American-style breakfast. In study 2, 25 healthy men received 4 single 2.5-mg doses: whole IR tablet and crushed IR tablet suspended in applesauce and water, respectively, under fasted conditions, and whole IR tablet after a continental breakfast. In study 1, dose-normalized pharmacokinetics of riociguat oral suspensions and 1.0-mg whole IR tablet were similar in fasted conditions; 90% confidence intervals for riociguat area under the curve (AUC) to dose and mean maximum concentration (Cmax) to dose were within bioequivalence criteria. After food, dose-normalized AUC and Cmax decreased by 15% and 38%, respectively. In study 2, riociguat exposure was similar for all preparations; AUC ratios for crushed-IR-tablet preparations to whole IR tablet were within bioequivalence criteria. The Cmax increased by 17% for crushed IR tablet in water versus whole IR tablet. Food intake decreased Cmax of the whole tablet by 16%, with unaltered AUC versus fasted conditions. Riociguat bioavailability was similar between the oral suspensions and the whole IR tablet; exposure was similar between whole IR tablet and crushed-IR-tablet preparations. Minor food effects were observed. Results suggest that riociguat formulations are interchangeable. PMID:27162630

  4. In vitro activity, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, safety and pharmacoeconomics of ceftriaxone compared with third and fourth generation cephalosporins: review.

    PubMed

    Bijie, H; Kulpradist, S; Manalaysay, M; Soebandrio, A

    2005-02-01

    Due to their wide spectrum of activity, good pharmacokinetics, established clinical efficacy and high tolerability, cephalosporins are among the most widely used antibiotics worldwide. The third and fourth generation cephalosporins are predominantly parenteral agents, administered two or three times daily, used in the treatment of a wide range of moderate to severe infections. Ceftriaxone, a third generation cephalosporin, is unique in exhibiting an unusually long elimination half-life that allows for once-daily administration. Among third generation cephalosporins, ceftazidime and cefoperazone are unusual among cephalosporins in possessing activity, albeit moderate, against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, both of these agents also exhibit marked loss of activity against Gram-negative organisms producing high levels of Class A or C beta-lactamases. Sulperazone, a 1:1 combination of cefoperazone and the beta-lactamase inhibitor sulbactam, is more resistant to attack by Class A beta-lactamases but remains vulnerable to isolates producing Class C beta-lactamases. Ceftriaxone exhibits the widest antibacterial spectrum of third generation cephalosporins and this is reflected in clinical responses. Cefoperazone and sulperazone exhibit the poorest clinical responses. Although the fourth generation cephalosporins cefpirome and cefepime exhibit enhanced stability to bacterial beta-lactamases and marginally enhanced in vitro antibacterial activity over ceftriaxone, there is no clinical advantage in terms of clinical or bacteriological success. The cephalosporins are well tolerated, with few and generally transient adverse effects; the major exception being haematological abnormalities including blood coagulation disorders associated with cefoperazone. Several pharmacoeconomic studies indicate that the once-daily dosing regimen required for ceftriaxone is the major factor responsible for its cost-effectiveness over third and fourth generation cephalosporins. PMID:15828439

  5. Pharmacokinetics and safety of olodaterol administered with the Respimat Soft Mist inhaler in subjects with impaired hepatic or renal function

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Christina; Luedtke, Doreen; Unseld, Anna; Hamilton, Alan; Halabi, Atef; Wein, Martina; Formella, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In two trials, the influences of hepatic and renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics of olodaterol, a novel long-acting inhaled β2-agonist for treatment of COPD, were investigated. Subjects and methods The first trial included eight subjects with mild hepatic function impairment (Child–Pugh A), eight subjects with moderate impairment (Child–Pugh B), and 16 matched healthy subjects with normal hepatic function. The second trial included eight subjects with severe renal impairment (creatinine clearance <30 mL·min−1) and 14 matched healthy subjects with normal renal function. Subjects received single doses of 20 or 30 μg olodaterol administered with the Respimat Soft Mist inhaler. Results Olodaterol was well tolerated in all subjects. The geometric mean ratios and 90% confidence intervals of dose-normalized area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to 4 hours (AUC0–4) for subjects with mild and moderate hepatic impairment compared to healthy subjects were 97% (75%–125%) and 105% (79%–140%), respectively. Corresponding values for dose-normalized maximum concentration (Cmax) were 112% (84%–151%) (mild impairment) and 99% (73%–135%) (moderate impairment). The geometric mean ratio (90% confidence interval) of AUC0–4 for subjects with severe renal impairment compared to healthy subjects was 135% (94%–195%), and for Cmax was 137% (84%–222%). There was no significant relationship between creatinine clearance and AUC0–4 or Cmax. Renal clearance of olodaterol was reduced to 20% of normal in severe renal impairment. Conclusion Mild to moderate hepatic function impairment or severe renal function impairment did not result in a clinically relevant increase of olodaterol systemic exposure after a single inhaled dose. PMID:27051282

  6. Cytochrome P450 and Non-Cytochrome P450 Oxidative Metabolism: Contributions to the Pharmacokinetics, Safety, and Efficacy of Xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Foti, Robert S; Dalvie, Deepak K

    2016-08-01

    The drug-metabolizing enzymes that contribute to the metabolism or bioactivation of a drug play a crucial role in defining the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion properties of that drug. Although the overall effect of the cytochrome P450 (P450) family of drug-metabolizing enzymes in this capacity cannot be understated, advancements in the field of non-P450-mediated metabolism have garnered increasing attention in recent years. This is perhaps a direct result of our ability to systematically avoid P450 liabilities by introducing chemical moieties that are not susceptible to P450 metabolism but, as a result, may introduce key pharmacophores for other drug-metabolizing enzymes. Furthermore, the effects of both P450 and non-P450 metabolism at a drug's site of therapeutic action have also been subject to increased scrutiny. To this end, this Special Section on Emerging Novel Enzyme Pathways in Drug Metabolism will highlight a number of advancements that have recently been reported. The included articles support the important role of non-P450 enzymes in the clearance pathways of U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs over the past 10 years. Specific examples will detail recent reports of aldehyde oxidase, flavin-containing monooxygenase, and other non-P450 pathways that contribute to the metabolic, pharmacokinetic, or pharmacodynamic properties of xenobiotic compounds. Collectively, this series of articles provides additional support for the role of non-P450-mediated metabolic pathways that contribute to the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion properties of current xenobiotics. PMID:27298339

  7. Pharmacokinetics and safety of a novel recombinant human von Willebrand factor manufactured with a plasma-free method: a prospective clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio; Kempton, Christine; Millar, Carolyn; Romond, Edward; Shapiro, Amy; Birschmann, Ingvild; Ragni, Margaret V.; Gill, Joan Cox; Yee, Thynn Thynn; Klamroth, Robert; Wong, Wing-Yen; Chapman, Miranda; Engl, Werner; Turecek, Peter L.; Suiter, Tobias M.

    2013-01-01

    Safety and pharmacokinetics (PK) of recombinant von Willebrand factor (rVWF) combined at a fixed ratio with recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) were investigated in 32 subjects with type 3 or severe type 1 von Willebrand disease (VWD) in a prospective phase 1, multicenter, randomized clinical trial. rVWF was well tolerated and no thrombotic events, inhibitors, or serious adverse events were observed. The PK of rVWF ristocetin cofactor activity, VWF antigen, and collagen-binding activity were similar to those of the comparator plasma-derived (pd) VWF-pdFVIII. In vivo cleavage of ultra-large molecular-weight rVWF multimers by ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13; the endogenous VWF protease) and generation of characteristic satellite bands were demonstrated. In 2 subjects with specific nonneutralizing anti-VWF–binding antibodies already detectable before rVWF infusion, a reduction in VWF multimers and VWF activity was observed. Stabilization of endogenous FVIII was enhanced following post–rVWF-rFVIII infusion as shown by the difference in area under the plasma concentration curve compared with pdVWF-pdFVIII (AUC0-∞) (P < .01). These data support the concept of administering rVWF alone once a therapeutic level of endogenous FVIII is achieved. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00816660. PMID:23777763

  8. The Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Cyanidin-3-Glucoside after 2-Week Administration of Black Bean Seed Coat Extract in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sangil; Han, Seunghoon; Lee, Jongtae; Hong, Taegon

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the pharmacokinetics of C3G on data from twelve subjects, after 2-week multiple dosing of black bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, Cheongjakong-3-ho) seed coat extract, using the mixed effect analysis method (NONMEM, Ver. 6.2), as well as the conventional non-compartmental method. We also examined the safety and tolerability. The PK analysis used plasma concentrations of the C3G on day 1 and 14. There was no observed accumulation of C3G after 2-week multiple dosing of black bean seed coat extract. The typical point estimates of PK were CL (clearance)=3,420 l/h, V (volume)=7,280 L, Ka (absorption constant)=9.94 h-1, ALAG (lag time)=0.217 h. The black bean seed coat extract was well tolerated and there were no serious adverse events. In this study, we confirmed that a significant amount of C3G was absorbed in human after given the black bean seed coat extract. PMID:22915990

  9. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) disposable solid waste cask

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, B.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-20

    This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) evaluates and documents the ability of the Disposable Solid Waste Cask (DSWC) to meet the packaging requirements of HNF-CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping, for the onsite transfer of special form, highway route controlled quantity, Type B fissile radioactive material. This SEP evaluates five shipments of DSWCs used for the transport and storage of Fast Flux Test Facility unirradiated fuel to the Plutonium Finishing Plant Protected Area.

  10. Pharmaceutical and pharmacokinetic evaluation of a novel fast dissolving film formulation of flupentixol dihydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Abdelbary, Ahmed; Bendas, Ehab R; Ramadan, Afaf A; Mostafa, Dalia A

    2014-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop fast dissolving oral film of the antipsychotic drug, flupentixol dihydrochloride, to enhance its bioavailability, optimize its therapeutic effect when used to treat depression with anxiety, and increase the convenience and compliance by the mentally ill, developmentally disable, elderly, and pediatric patients. Six formulae were prepared with different concentrations of water-soluble polymers vis. hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC E5) and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) by solvent casting technique. The prepared films were subjected to characterization for folding endurance, weight variations, thickness, disintegration time, drug release pattern, and drug content. Physical compatibility between the drug and excipients was guaranteed in the selected formulation (2% HPMC) by means of differential scanning calorimetry analysis and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. This formulation revealed high stability after testing according to the International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines. In vivo studies based on single phase parallel design were carried out for the optimized formulation in healthy human volunteers. The concentration of flupentixol dihydrochloride in plasma samples was analyzed by a developed validated LC-MS/MS assay method and the pharmacokinetic parameters of the established formulation were compared with the commercially available oral tablets. Faster rate of absorption of flupentixol could be obtained from the oral film formulation and the relative bioavailability was found to be 151.06% compared to the marketed product. PMID:25142820

  11. [Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis in microbiology: a tool for the evaluation of the antimicrobial treatment].

    PubMed

    Canut Blasco, Andrés; Aguilar Alfaro, Lorenzo; Cobo Reinoso, Javier; Giménez Mestre, M José; Rodríguez-Gascón, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    The selection of multiresistant microorganisms, as a side-effect of the use of antimicrobials, together with the lack of new therapeutic drugs expected in the near future, forces to a rational use of antibiotics. The optimisation of antibacterial treatments based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis (PK/PD) may contribute to prolong the life of antibiotics and to contain the bacterial resistance to them. A review is made of the importance of the appropriateness of the dose regimen selected, the application of PK/PD analysis of antimicrobials, the Monte Carlo simulation, PK/PD indices for efficacy, and PK/PD cut-off points. PK/PD analysis is also applicable to the prevention of bacterial resistance. Different methods have been used to study the factors that lead to its emergence and spread, such as in vitro and animal models, and resistance prevention studies (mutant selection window). Although the PK/PD analysis is a very useful tool for the selection of the most appropriate dose regimen of antibiotics, several problems limit its use in clinical practice. PMID:23850188

  12. Synthesis and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Siderophore Biosynthesis Inhibitors for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Kathryn M.; Viswanathan, Kishore; Dawadi, Surendra; Duckworth, Benjamin P.; Boshoff, Helena I.; Barry, Clifton E.; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2015-01-01

    MbtA catalyzes the first committed biosynthetic step of the mycobactins, which are important virulence factors associated with iron acquisition in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. MbtA is a validated therapeutic target for antitubercular drug development. 5′-O-[N-(salicyl)sulfamoyl]adenosine (1) is a bisubstrate inhibitor of MbtA and exhibits exceptionally potent biochemical and antitubercular activity. However, 1 suffers from sub-optimal drug disposition properties resulting in a short half-life (t1/2), low exposure (AUC), and low bioavailability (F). Four strategies were pursued to address these liabilities including the synthesis of prodrugs, increasing the pKa of the acyl-sulfonyl moiety, modulation of the lipophilicity, and strategic introduction of fluorine into 1. Complete pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis of all compounds was performed. The most successful modifications involved fluorination of the nucleoside that provided substantial improvements in t1/2 and AUC. Increasing the pKa of the acyl-sulfonyl linker yielded incremental enhancements while modulation of the lipophilicity and prodrug approaches led to substantially poorer PK parameters. PMID:26110337

  13. Computerized evaluation of mean residence times in multicompartmental linear system and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Villalba, J M; Barbero, A J; Diaz-Sierra, R; Arribas, E; Garcia-Meseguer, M J; Garcia-Sevilla, F; Garcia-Moreno, M; De Labra, J A Vidal; Varon, R

    2011-04-15

    Deriving mean residence times (MRTs) is an important task both in pharmacokinetics and in multicompartmental linear systems. Taking as starting point the analysis of MRTs in open or closed (Garcia-Meseguer et al., Bull Math Biol 2003, 65, 279) multicompartmental linear systems, we implement a versatile software, using the Visual Basic 6.0 language for MS-Windows, that is easy to use and with a user-friendly format for the input of data and the output of results. For any multicompartmental linear system of up to 512 compartments, whether closed or open, with traps or without traps and with zero input in one or more of the compartments, this software allows the user to obtain the symbolic expressions, in the most simplified form, and/or the numerical values of the MRTs in any of its compartments, in the entire system or in a part of the system. As far as we known from the literature, such a software has not been implemented before. The advantage of the present software is that it reduces on the work time needed and minimizes the human errors that are frequent in compartmental systems even those that are relatively staightforward. The software bioCelTer, along with instructions, can be downloaded from http://oretano.iele-ab.uclm.es/~fgarcia/bioCelTer/. PMID:20960438

  14. Application of remote sensing image interpretation in seismic safety evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Wei, Wen-xia; Wang, Gang

    2005-10-01

    As one of essential design gist in important engineering projects, the seismic safety evaluation on choosing engineering site has been applied widely. Using remote sensing images, the analysis to regional seismotectonic environment can bring macroscopic, integrative, dynamic and high efficiency information, so the application of remote sensing technology in seismic safety evaluation of engineering site has fine prospect and will bring great benefit. In this paper, based on remote sensing interpretation to Landsat7 ETM images, also using GIS and field geological investigations, as a case study in Qingdao City, we analyze the physiognomy environment, new tectonic movement, faults activities, and the distributing of deleterious geological objects around the site. Then we find this method can provide good basic geological information for seismic safety evaluation.

  15. Reassessment of stiripentol pharmacokinetics in healthy adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Peigné, Sophie; Rey, Elisabeth; Le Guern, Marie-Emmanuelle; Dulac, Olivier; Chiron, Catherine; Pons, Gerard; Jullien, Vincent

    2014-07-01

    Because children who have been receiving stiripentol for the treatment of Dravet syndrome for more than 10 years are now becoming young adults, it is important to accurately characterize stiripentol pharmacokinetics in this age range. A double-blind placebo-controlled dose ranging study was therefore conducted to investigate the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of stiripentol in 12 healthy volunteers. Each subject received 3 single doses of stiripentol (500, 1000, and 2000 mg) separated by a wash-out period of 1 week. Pharmacokinetics of stiripentol was analyzed for each dose by non-compartmental analysis. Median area under the curve (AUC), terminal elimination half-life (t1/2,z) and maximal concentration (Cmax) were calculated for between-dose comparison. Safety was evaluated based on both clinical and biological criteria. Oppositely to previous results, there was no concentration rebounds in the elimination phase, which could be the consequence of the food intake. A more than proportional increase in the AUC was observed, associated with a significant increase in the t1/2,z, for increasing doses (median AUC of 8.3, 31 and 88 mgh/L, and median t1/2,z of 2, 7.7 and 10h for the 500, 1000, and 2000 mg doses respectively), which confirmed the Michaelis-Menten pharmacokinetics of Stiripentol. However, dose-normalized Cmax did not significantly vary between doses. Median Michaelis-Menten parameters were 117 mg/h for Vmax and 1.9 mg/L for Km. No safety concern was observed during the study. The present study allowed a better characterization of the disposition phase of stiripentol and confirmed its non-linear pharmacokinetic behaviour. Further pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies would be useful to determine the optimal dose of stiripentol for the treatment of Dravet patients in adulthood. PMID:24725808

  16. Reproductive safety evaluation of L-Ergothioneine.

    PubMed

    Forster, Roy; Spézia, François; Papineau, Dominique; Sabadie, Caroline; Erdelmeier, Irene; Moutet, Marc; Yadan, Jean-Claude

    2015-06-01

    L-Ergothioneine is a naturally occurring histidine-derived betaine (CAS No: 497-30-3) synthesized by bacteria and fungi, and found ubiquitously in plants and animals. It is present in many human foodstuffs. We evaluated the potential reproductive toxicity of L-Ergothioneine in Sprague-Dawley rats. L-Ergothioneine was administered at concentrations of 0.1, 0.3 or 0.9% in diet to F0 males (for 10 weeks before pairing and 3 weeks during pairing) and F0 females (for 13 weeks before pairing, during pairing and gestation, and until day 5 of lactation). Systemic exposure increased with dose-level, but not dose proportionally, suggesting saturation of uptake mechanisms. No clinical signs of toxicity were observed and there were no effects of L-Ergothioneine treatment on mating and reproductive performance or parameters of fertility. All animals mated within a similar number of days and pregnancy rates were uniformly high in control and treated groups. There were no effects of treatment with L-Ergothioneine on the duration of gestation, pre- and post-implantation losses, number of pups delivered and viability index, or on litter parameters (litter size, clinical signs, body weight or sex ratio) and the repartition of found dead/cannibalized pups. In conclusion, L-Ergothioneine was well tolerated and without adverse effects on the reproductive parameters evaluated. PMID:25736892

  17. FFTF railroad tank car safety evaluation for packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, T.

    1996-10-25

    This Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) provides evaluations necessary to approve transfer of the 8,000 gallon Liquid Waste Tank Car (LWTC) from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to the 200 Areas. This SEP will demonstrate that the transfer cif the LWTC will provide an equivalent degree of safety as would be provided by packages meeting U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) requirements. This fulfills onsite transportation requirements implemented in the Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping, WHC-CM-2-14.

  18. Effect of Coadministered Fat on the Tolerability, Safety, and Pharmacokinetic Properties of Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine in Papua New Guinean Children with Uncomplicated Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Moore, B. R.; Benjamin, J. M.; Salman, S.; Griffin, S.; Ginny, E.; Page-Sharp, M.; Robinson, L. J.; Siba, P.; Batty, K. T.; Mueller, I.

    2014-01-01

    Coadministration of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PQ) with fat may improve bioavailability and antimalarial efficacy, but it might also increase toxicity. There have been no studies of these potential effects in the pediatric age group. The tolerability, safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of DHA-PQ administered with or without 8.5 g fat were investigated in 30 Papua New Guinean children aged 5 to 10 years diagnosed with uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Three daily 2.5:11.5-mg-base/kg doses were given with water (n = 14, group A) or milk (n = 16, group B), with regular clinical/laboratory assessment and blood sampling over 42 days. Plasma PQ was assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection, and DHA was assayed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Compartmental pharmacokinetic models for PQ and DHA were developed using a population-based approach. DHA-PQ was generally well tolerated, and initial fever and parasite clearance were prompt. There were no differences in the areas under the concentration-time curve (AUC0–∞) for PQ (median, 41,906 versus 36,752 μg · h/liter in groups A and B, respectively; P = 0.24) or DHA (4,047 versus 4,190 μg · h/liter; P = 0.67). There were also no significant between-group differences in prolongation of the corrected electrocardiographic QT interval (QTc) initially during follow-up, but the QTc tended to be higher in group B children at 24 h (mean ± standard deviation [SD], 15 ± 10 versus 6 ± 15 ms0.5 in group A, P = 0.067) and 168 h (10 ± 18 versus 1 ± 23 ms0.5, P = 0.24) when plasma PQ concentrations were relatively low. A small amount of fat does not change the bioavailability of DHA-PQ in children, but a delayed persistent effect on ventricular repolarization cannot be excluded. PMID:25049242

  19. Azithromycin to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia in ureaplasma-infected preterm infants: pharmacokinetics, safety, microbial response, and clinical outcomes with a 20-milligram-per-kilogram single intravenous dose.

    PubMed

    Viscardi, Rose M; Othman, Ahmed A; Hassan, Hazem E; Eddington, Natalie D; Abebe, Elias; Terrin, Michael L; Kaufman, David A; Waites, Ken B

    2013-05-01

    Ureaplasma respiratory tract colonization is associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in preterm infants. Previously, we demonstrated that a single intravenous (i.v.) dose of azithromycin (10 mg/kg of body weight) is safe but inadequate to eradicate Ureaplasma spp. in preterm infants. We performed a nonrandomized, single-arm open-label study of the pharmacokinetics (PK) and safety of intravenous 20-mg/kg single-dose azithromycin in 13 mechanically ventilated neonates with a gestational age between 24 weeks 0 days and 28 weeks 6 days. Pharmacokinetic data from 25 neonates (12 dosed with 10 mg/kg i.v. and 13 dosed with 20 mg/kg i.v.) were analyzed using a population modeling approach. Using a two-compartment model with allometric scaling of parameters on body weight (WT), the population PK parameter estimates were as follows: clearance, 0.21 liter/h × WT(kg)(0.75) [WT(kg)(0.75) indicates that clearance was allometrically scaled on body weight (in kilograms) with a fixed exponent of 0.75]; intercompartmental clearance, 2.1 liters/h × WT(kg)(0.75); central volume of distribution (V), 1.97 liters × WT (kg); and peripheral V, 17.9 liters × WT (kg). There was no evidence of departure from dose proportionality in azithromycin exposure over the tested dose range. The calculated area under the concentration-time curve over 24 h in the steady state divided by the MIC90 (AUC24/MIC90) for the single dose of azithromycin (20 mg/kg) was 7.5 h. Simulations suggest that 20 mg/kg for 3 days will maintain azithromycin concentrations of >MIC50 of 1 μg/ml for this group of Ureaplasma isolates for ≥ 96 h after the first dose. Azithromycin was well tolerated with no drug-related adverse events. One of seven (14%) Ureaplasma-positive subjects and three of six (50%) Ureaplasma-negative subjects developed physiologic BPD. Ureaplasma was eradicated in all treated Ureaplasma-positive subjects. Simulations suggest that a multiple-dose regimen may be efficacious for microbial

  20. Preclinical pharmacokinetic evaluation of resveratrol trimethyl ether in sprague-dawley rats: the impacts of aqueous solubility, dose escalation, food and repeated dosing on oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hai-Shu; Ho, Paul C

    2011-10-01

    Resveratrol trimethyl ether (trans-3,5,4'-trimethoxystilbene, RTE) is a naturally occurring and pharmacologically active resveratrol derivative. To evaluate its suitability as a drug candidate, a pharmacokinetic study was carried out in Sprague-Dawley rats with the emphasis to identify the impact of aqueous solubility, dose escalation, food, and repeated dosing on its oral bioavailability. Upon single intravenous administration (5 mg/kg), RTE displayed moderate clearance (35.5 ± 5.3 mL/min/kg) and a fairly long terminal elimination half-life (511 ± 136 min); dose escalation (5-20 mg/kg) did not cause nonlinear pharmacokinetics. When given orally in suspension (60 mg/kg), RTE was poorly absorbed with negligible bioavailability (< 1.5%), fasting further decreased its bioavailability (<1%). However, when administered in a solution formulated with randomly methylated-β-cyclodextrin (15 mg/kg), RTE was rapidly absorbed with good bioavailability (46.5 ± 4.8%). Dose escalation resulted in increased bioavailability (64.6 ± 8.0%) at the dose of 60 mg/kg. Repeated RTE dosing (7 daily oral doses) did not alter the clearance, terminal elimination half-life and bioavailability. In summary, the aqueous solubility of RTE was a barrier to oral absorption; repeated RTE administrations did not alter its pharmacokinetic profiles; as RTE possessed appropriate pharmacokinetic profiles, further investigation on RTE as a drug candidate is warranted. PMID:21520090

  1. Synthesis and In Vivo Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Degradable Shell Crosslinked Polymer Nanoparticles with Poly(carboxybetaine) vs. Poly(ethylene glycol) Surface-grafted Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ang; Luehmann, Hannah P.; Sun, Guorong; Samarajeewa, Sandani; Zou, Jiong; Zhang, Shiyi; Zhang, Fuwu; Welch, Michael J.; Liu, Yongjian; Wooley, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles with tunable pharmacokinetics are desirable for various biomedical applications. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is well known to create “stealth” effects to stabilize and extend the blood circulation of nanoparticles. In this work, poly(carboxybetaine) (PCB), a new non-fouling polymer material, was incorporated as surface-grafted coatings, conjugated onto degradable shell crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticles (dSCKs) composed of poly(acrylic acid)- based shells and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) cores, to compare the in vivo pharmacokinetics to their PEG-functionalized analogs. A series of five dSCKs was prepared from amphiphilic block copolymers, having different numbers and lengths of either PEG or PCB grafts, by supramolecular assembly in water followed by shell crosslinking, and then studied by a lactate assay to confirm their core hydrolytic degradabilities. Each dSCK was also conjugated with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) macrocyclic chelators and tyramine moieties to provide for 64Cu and/or radiohalogen labeling. The high specific activity of 64Cu radiolabeling ensured nanogram administration of dSCKs for in vivo evaluation of their pharmacokinetics. Biodistribution studies demonstrated comparable in vivo pharmacokinetic profiles of PCB-grafted dSCKs to their PEG-conjugated counterparts. These results indicated that PCB-functionalized dSCKs have great potential as a theranostic platform for translational research. PMID:23043240

  2. Preliminary safety evaluation of the advanced burner test reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, F. E.; Fanning, T. H.; Cahalan, J. E.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2006-09-15

    Results of a preliminary safety evaluation of the Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) pre-conceptual design are reported. The ABTR safety design approach is described. Traditional defense-in-depth design features are supplemented with passive safety performance characteristics that include natural circulation emergency decay heat removal and reactor power reduction by inherent reactivity feedbacks in accidents. ABTR safety performance in design-basis and beyond-design-basis accident sequences is estimated based on analyses. Modeling assumptions and input data for safety analyses are presented. Analysis results for simulation of simultaneous loss of coolant pumping power and normal heat rejection are presented and discussed, both for the case with reactor scram and the case without reactor scram. The analysis results indicate that the ABTR pre-conceptual design is capable of undergoing bounding design-basis and beyond-design-basis accidents without fuel cladding failures. The first line of defense for protection of the public against release of radioactivity in accidents remains intact with significant margin. A comparison and evaluation of general safety design criteria for the ABTR conceptual design phase are presented in an appendix. A second appendix presents SASSYS-1 computer code capabilities and modeling enhancements implemented for ABTR analyses.

  3. A pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic model to evaluate the treatment effectiveness of danoprevir against chronic HCV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Canini, Laetitia; Chatterjee, Anushree; Guedj, Jeremie; Lemenuel-Diot, Annabelle; Brennan, Barbara; Smith, Patrick F.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2014-10-16

    Background—Viral kinetic models have proven useful to characterize treatment effectiveness during HCV therapy with interferon (IFN) or with direct acting antivirals (DAAs). Methods—We use a pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic (PK/VK) model to describe HCV RNA kinetics during treatment with danoprevir, a protease inhibitor. In a phase 1 study, danoprevir monotherapy was administered for 14 days in ascending doses ranging from 200 to 600 mg per day to 40 patients of whom 32 were treatment-naïve and 8 were non-responders to prior PEG-IFN-α/ribavirin treatment. Results—In most patients, a biphasic decline of HCV RNA during therapy was observed. A two-compartment PK model and a VKmore » model that considered treatment effectiveness to vary with the predicted danoprevir concentration inside the second compartment provided a good fit to the viral load data. A time-varying effectiveness model was also used to fit the viral load data. We found the antiviral effectiveness increased in a dose-dependent manner, with a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.95 at the lowest dose (100 mg bid) and 0.99 at the highest dose (200 mg tid). Prior IFN non-responders exhibited a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.98 (300 mg bid). Finally, the second phase decline showed two different behaviors, with 30% of patients exhibiting a rapid decline of HCV RNA, comparable to that seen with other protease inhibitors (>0.3 d-1), whereas the viral decline was slower in the other patients. Conclusions—Our results are consistent with the modest SVR rates from the INFORM-SVR study where patients were treated with a combination of mericitabine and ritonavir-boosted danoprevir.« less

  4. A pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic model to evaluate the treatment effectiveness of danoprevir against chronic HCV

    SciTech Connect

    Canini, Laetitia; Chatterjee, Anushree; Guedj, Jeremie; Lemenuel-Diot, Annabelle; Brennan, Barbara; Smith, Patrick F.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2014-10-16

    Background—Viral kinetic models have proven useful to characterize treatment effectiveness during HCV therapy with interferon (IFN) or with direct acting antivirals (DAAs). Methods—We use a pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic (PK/VK) model to describe HCV RNA kinetics during treatment with danoprevir, a protease inhibitor. In a phase 1 study, danoprevir monotherapy was administered for 14 days in ascending doses ranging from 200 to 600 mg per day to 40 patients of whom 32 were treatment-naïve and 8 were non-responders to prior PEG-IFN-α/ribavirin treatment. Results—In most patients, a biphasic decline of HCV RNA during therapy was observed. A two-compartment PK model and a VK model that considered treatment effectiveness to vary with the predicted danoprevir concentration inside the second compartment provided a good fit to the viral load data. A time-varying effectiveness model was also used to fit the viral load data. We found the antiviral effectiveness increased in a dose-dependent manner, with a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.95 at the lowest dose (100 mg bid) and 0.99 at the highest dose (200 mg tid). Prior IFN non-responders exhibited a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.98 (300 mg bid). Finally, the second phase decline showed two different behaviors, with 30% of patients exhibiting a rapid decline of HCV RNA, comparable to that seen with other protease inhibitors (>0.3 d-1), whereas the viral decline was slower in the other patients. Conclusions—Our results are consistent with the modest SVR rates from the INFORM-SVR study where patients were treated with a combination of mericitabine and ritonavir-boosted danoprevir.

  5. Evaluation of a Novel Nicotine Inhaler Device: Part 1—Arterial and Venous Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Hearn, Alex; Redfern, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In the United Kingdom, licensed nicotine-containing products can be recommended to reduce the harm associated with smoking. Many smokers find currently available nicotine replacement products unsatisfactory. The arterial and venous pharmacokinetics (PK) of nicotine delivered via a novel inhaler device were determined. Methods: Results are reported for Parts A (N = 18) and C (N = 18) of a 4-part (A–D) Phase I study. Participants (18–55 years, ≥10 cigarettes/day, smoking within 1hr of waking, expired carbon monoxide >10 ppm on screening) orally inhaled 2 single doses of nicotine (2 of 3 dose levels [0.22, 0.45, and 0.67 mg]) (Part A) and repeated hourly doses of 0.67mg nicotine for 12hr (Part C), via the novel device. Arterial and venous PK and tolerability were assessed. Results: In Part A, mean arterial plasma nicotine concentrations at 2min after the start of inhalation were 1.10, 2.06, and 2.59ng/mL for the 0.22, 0.45, and 0.67mg doses, respectively. Mean maximum arterial plasma nicotine concentrations (C max) were 2.11, 3.73, and 4.38ng/mL and mean times to C max were 10.2, 7.3, and 6.5min after the start of inhalation for the 0.22, 0.45, and 0.67mg doses, respectively. In Part C, the mean pre- and postdose venous plasma nicotine concentration increased steadily and fluctuated in the range 8–10mg/mL after 9hr. The novel device was well tolerated; most adverse events were mild. Conclusion: The novel inhaler device delivers nicotine rapidly into the systemic circulation and offers a viable alternative to cigarettes for those finding it difficult to quit the behavioral and sensorial aspects of smoking. PMID:25385878

  6. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics evaluation of a thermosensitive chitosan based hydrogel containing liposomal doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shuangxia; Dai, Yu; Li, Cuiyun; Qiu, Zhixia; Wang, Xin; Tian, Fengjie; Zhou, Sufeng; Liu, Qi; Xing, Han; Lu, Yang; Chen, Xijing; Li, Ning

    2016-09-20

    In situ gelling thermosensitive hydrogel formulation has been reported to effectively sustain the release of macromolecules for a long time. However, the low-molecular-weight hydrophilic drugs, such as doxorubicin (DOX), are not suitable for intratumoral injection because the release will complete within one day. In this study, liposomal doxorubicin (LipDOX) was added into the hydrogel to form a novel thermosensitive formulation which prolonged the sustained release of DOX. DOX+C/GP (doxorubicin in chitosan/β-glycerophosphate) was prepared to compare with LipDOX+C/GP (liposomal doxorubicin in chitosan/β-glycerophosphate hydrogel). The particle size of DOX-loaded liposome was 94.2nm and the encapsulation efficiency of DOX was near 98%. In vitro release experiments, the release of DOX in both DOX+C/GP group and LipDOX+C/GP group increased along with the increasing pH of buffers. However, the LipDOX+C/GP group with lower initial burst release had a much longer releasing duration than DOX+C/GP group (21days vs. 24h). In vitro and in vivo antitumor experiments demonstrated that LipDOX+C/GP group had better antineoplastic effect and less toxicity than DOX+C/GP group. Pharmacokinetics study showed LipDOX+C/GP exhibited a higher AUC0-t and longer MRT than DOX+C/GP in blood and tumor, which indicated that LipDOX+C/GP obtained an enhanced antitumor activity compared with DOX+C/GP. In addition, the lower distribution index (the ratio of AUC of normal tissue/AUC of tumor tissue) of the LipDOX+C/GP implied it had lower toxicity to normal tissues than DOX+C/GP. Therefore, the novel thermosensitive hydrogel formulation was potential for clinical application in cancer treatment. PMID:27388491

  7. Pharmacoscintigraphic and pharmacokinetic evaluation on healthy human volunteers of sustained-release floating minitablets containing levodopa and carbidopa.

    PubMed

    Goole, J; Van Gansbeke, B; Pilcer, G; Deleuze, Ph; Blocklet, D; Goldman, S; Pandolfo, M; Vanderbist, F; Amighi, K

    2008-11-19

    In this study, scintigraphic and pharmacokinetic studies were conducted on 10 healthy, fed volunteers. Two concepts of sustained-release floating minitablets--Levo-Form 1 (matrix) and 2 (coated)--were evaluated and compared to the marketed product Prolopa HBS 125. All the floating forms were radiolabelled with (111)In in order to evaluate their gastric residence time using gamma-scintigraphy. It was shown that the three formulations offered almost the same mean gastric residence time, which was about 240 min. Prolopa HBS 125 and Levo-Form 2 presented intragastric disintegration, which can lead to a more pronounced "peak & valley" effect on the plasma concentration-time profile of levodopa. In contrast, the plasma concentration-time profile of levodopa following the administration of Levo-Form 1 was more evenly distributed. Moreover, Levo-Form 1 provided the lowest variations between men and women in terms of AUC and C(max) values. Finally, when the same amount of inhibitors of extracerebral dopa decarboxylase--carbidopa and benserazide--had been administrated, the mean AUC, C(max) and T(max) values obtained for benserazide were lower than those obtained for carbidopa. PMID:18778758

  8. Pharmacokinetics and bone resorption evaluation of a novel Cathepsin K inhibitor (VEL-0230) in healthy adult horses.

    PubMed

    Hussein, H; Ishihara, A; Menendez, M; Bertone, A

    2014-12-01

    Plasma pharmacokinetic (PK) and bone resorption biomarker [carboxy-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX-1)] analyses were performed following single and multiple oral dose protocols of a Cathepsin K inhibitor (VEL-0230) in horses. Outcomes included plasma and urine drug and CTX-1 concentrations. In the dose range study, 2, 4, and 8 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) doses were administered in a Latin square design to three mares and evaluated for 1 week. Based on the PK characteristics of VEL-0230, 4 mg/kg b.w. was selected for the dose interval study in which 3.25 days (d) and 7 days dose intervals were evaluated over three administrations using four exercising horses in a Latin square design. The 3.25 days and 7 days dose intervals provided a rapid inhibition of bone resorption based on plasma CTX-1. CTX-1 inhibition prior to next dose administration was not different from baseline in the 3.25 days and 7 days protocols, and for the first 3 days but the sustained CTX-1 inhibition in the 7 days protocol along with the cost and logistic benefits for weekly administration made the 7 days protocol preferable. Weekly administration of VEL-0230 may provide effective inhibition of bone resorption in young exercising horses that returns to baseline within 7 days after drug withdrawal even after multiple doses. PMID:24731241

  9. Analysis techniques for airborne laser range safety evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsburg, M. S.; Jenkins, D. L.; Doerflein, R. D.

    1982-08-01

    Techniques to evaluate safety of airborne laser operations on the range are reported. The objectives of the safety evaluations were to (1) protect civilian and military personnel from the hazards associated with lasers, (2) provide users with the least restrictive constraints in which to perform their mission and still maintain an adequate degree of safety, and (3) develop a data base for the Navy in the event of suspected laser exposure of other related incidents involving military or civilian personnel. A microcomputer code, written in ASNI 77 FORTRAN, has been developed, which will provide safe flight profiles for airborne laser systems. The output of this code can also be used in establishing operating areas for ground based Lasers. Input to the code includes output parameters, NOHD and assigned buffer zone for the laser system, as well as parameters describing the geometry of the range.

  10. Facile synthesis, pharmacokinetic and systemic clearance evaluation, and positron emission tomography cancer imaging of 64Cu-Au alloy nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongfeng; Sultan, Deborah; Detering, Lisa; Luehmann, Hannah; Liu, Yongjian

    2014-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been widely used for oncological applications including diagnosis and therapy. However, the non-specific mononuclear phagocyte system accumulation and potential long-term toxicity have significantly limited clinical translation. One strategy to overcome these shortcomings is to reduce the size of gold nanoparticles to allow renal clearance. Herein, we report the preparation of 64Cu alloyed gold nanoclusters (64CuAuNCs) for in vivo evaluation of pharmacokinetics, systemic clearance, and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in a mouse prostate cancer model. The facile synthesis in acqueous solution allowed precisely controlled 64Cu incorporation for high radiolabeling specific activity and stability for sensitive and accurate detection. Through surface pegylation with 350 Da polyethylene glycol (PEG), the 64CuAuNCs-PEG350 afforded optimal biodistribution and significant renal and hepatobiliary excretion. PET imaging showed low non-specific tumor uptake, indicating its potential for active targeting of clinically relevant biomarkers in tumor and metastatic organs.Gold nanoparticles have been widely used for oncological applications including diagnosis and therapy. However, the non-specific mononuclear phagocyte system accumulation and potential long-term toxicity have significantly limited clinical translation. One strategy to overcome these shortcomings is to reduce the size of gold nanoparticles to allow renal clearance. Herein, we report the preparation of 64Cu alloyed gold nanoclusters (64CuAuNCs) for in vivo evaluation of pharmacokinetics, systemic clearance, and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in a mouse prostate cancer model. The facile synthesis in acqueous solution allowed precisely controlled 64Cu incorporation for high radiolabeling specific activity and stability for sensitive and accurate detection. Through surface pegylation with 350 Da polyethylene glycol (PEG), the 64CuAuNCs-PEG350 afforded optimal

  11. Treatment of hereditary angioedema with nanofiltered C1-esterase inhibitor concentrate (Cetor®): multi-center phase II and III studies to assess pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Hofstra, J J; Kleine Budde, I; van Twuyver, E; Choi, G; Levi, M; Leebeek, F W G; de Monchy, J G R; Ypma, P F; Keizer, R J; Huitema, A D R; Strengers, P F W

    2012-03-01

    From 1997, plasma-derived C1-inhibitor concentrate (Cetor®) has been available to HAE and AAE patients. Recently, a virus reducing 15 nm nanofiltration step has been introduced in the production process. A randomized, double-blind controlled cross-over study was performed to compare the pharmacokinetics (PK) of nanofiltered (C1-INH-NF) with conventional C1-inhibitor (C1-INH). Efficacy and safety were investigated in an open-label, on-demand and a prophylactic study. No differences in pharmacokinetic parameters between C1-INH and C1-INH-NF were found (13 non-symptomatic HAE patients). Both C1-inhibitor products equally increased plasma C4 levels. In the on-demand study, 14 acute angioedema attacks in 8 patients were analyzed. In the prophylactic study, 1 AAE and 5 HAE patients experienced in total 31 attacks during 748 observation days. In total 180,000 units of C1-INH-NF were administered. No product-related adverse events occurred, and no anti-C1-antibodies were induced. Nanofiltration in the production process of C1-inhibitor did not affect the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety. PMID:22197071

  12. Pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and biomarker evaluation of transforming growth factor-β receptor I kinase inhibitor, galunisertib, in phase 1 study in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodón, Jordi; Carducci, Michael; Sepulveda-Sánchez, Juan M; Azaro, Analía; Calvo, Emiliano; Seoane, Joan; Braña, Irene; Sicart, Elisabet; Gueorguieva, Ivelina; Cleverly, Ann; Pillay, N Sokalingum; Desaiah, Durisala; Estrem, Shawn T; Paz-Ares, Luis; Holdhoff, Matthias; Blakeley, Jaishri; Lahn, Michael M; Baselga, Jose

    2015-04-01

    Purpose Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling plays a key role in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumors, including malignant glioma. Small molecule inhibitors (SMI) blocking TGF-β signaling reverse EMT and arrest tumor progression. Several SMIs were developed, but currently only LY2157299 monohydrate (galunisertib) was advanced to clinical investigation. Design The first-in-human dose study had three parts (Part A, dose escalation, n = 39; Part B, safety combination with lomustine, n = 26; Part C, relative bioavailability study, n = 14). Results A preclinical pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model predicted a therapeutic window up to 300 mg/day and was confirmed in Part A after continuous PK/PD. PK was not affected by co-medications such as enzyme-inducing anti-epileptic drugs or proton pump inhibitors. Changes in pSMAD2 levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were associated with exposure indicating target-related pharmacological activity of galunisertib. Twelve (12/79; 15%) patients with refractory/relapsed malignant glioma had durable stable disease (SD) for 6 or more cycles, partial responses (PR), or complete responses (CR). These patients with clinical benefit had high plasma baseline levels of MDC/CCL22 and low protein expression of pSMAD2 in their tumors. Of the 5 patients with IDH1/2 mutation, 4 patients had a clinical benefit as defined by CR/PR and SD ≥6 cycles. Galunisertib had a favorable toxicity profile and no cardiac adverse events. Conclusion Based on the PK, PD, and biomarker evaluations, the intermittent administration of galunisertib at 300 mg/day is safe for future clinical investigation. PMID:25529192

  13. Recommendations for preparing the criticality safety evaluation of transportation packages

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, H.R.; Parks, C.V.

    1997-04-01

    This report provides recommendations on preparing the criticality safety section of an application for approval of a transportation package containing fissile material. The analytical approach to the evaluation is emphasized rather than the performance standards that the package must meet. Where performance standards are addressed, this report incorporates the requirements of 10 CFR Part 71. 12 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Pharmacokinetics & Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Andrew S.; Salpekar, Jay A.

    2009-01-01

    Medications administered in clinical practice obtain their therapeutic effect only to the extent that the drug is present in the appropriate concentration at the desired site. To achieve this goal, the prescribing clinician must be aware of how a drug may interact with the physiology of the patient. Pharmacokinetics is the study of this process…

  15. Nuclear criticality safety evaluation DWPF melter -- Batch 1

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, T.G.

    1993-12-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Nuclear Waste will be vitrified in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for long term storage and disposal. This is a preliminary safety evaluation for the Melt Cell of the DWPF vitrification process for Batch 1 waste. This evaluation demonstrates that the material in the Melt cell remains subcritical for the contents of Batch 1 which contains uranium with less than 1% by weight U-235.

  16. Safety Evaluation for Packaging (onsite) T Plant Canyon Items

    SciTech Connect

    OBRIEN, J.H.

    2000-07-14

    This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) evaluates and documents the ability to safely ship mostly unique inventories of miscellaneous T Plant canyon waste items (T-P Items) encountered during the canyon deck clean off campaign. In addition, this SEP addresses contaminated items and material that may be shipped in a strong tight package (STP). The shipments meet the criteria for onsite shipments as specified by Fluor Hanford in HNF-PRO-154, Responsibilities and Procedures for all Hazardous Material Shipments.

  17. A phase I dose‐escalation study to assess safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary efficacy of the dual mTORC1/mTORC2 kinase inhibitor CC‐223 in patients with advanced solid tumors or multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Bendell, Johanna C.; Kelley, Robin K.; Shih, Kent C.; Grabowsky, Jennifer A.; Bergsland, Emily; Jones, Suzanne; Martin, Thomas; Infante, Jeffrey R.; Mischel, Paul S.; Matsutani, Tomoo; Xu, Shuichan; Wong, Lilly; Liu, Yong; Wu, Xiaoling; Mortensen, Deborah S.; Chopra, Rajesh; Hege, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is essential for tumor development, yet mTOR inhibitors have yielded modest results. This phase 1 study investigated the mTORC1/mTORC2 inhibitor CC‐223 in patients with advanced cancer. METHODS Patients with advanced solid tumors or multiple myeloma received an initial dose of 7.5‐60 mg of CC‐223, followed by oral daily dosing in 28‐day cycles until disease progression. The primary objective was to determine the safety, tolerability, nontolerated dosage, maximum tolerated dosage (MTD), and preliminary pharmacokinetic profile. Secondary objectives were to evaluate pharmacodynamic effects and to describe preliminary efficacy. RESULTS Twenty‐eight patients were enrolled and received ≥1 dose of CC‐223. The most common treatment‐related grade 3 adverse events were hyperglycemia, fatigue, and rash. Four patients had dose‐limiting toxicities, including hyperglycemia, rash, fatigue, and mucositis. Therefore, 45 mg/d was determined to be the MTD. The pharmacokinetics of CC‐223 demonstrated a mean terminal half‐life ranging from 4.86 to 5.64 hours and maximum observed plasma concentration ranging from 269 to 480 ng/mL in patients who received CC‐223 ≥45 mg/d. Phosphorylation of mTORC1/mTORC2 pathway biomarkers in blood cells was inhibited by CC‐223 ≥30 mg/d with an exposure‐response relationship. Best responses included 1 partial response (breast cancer; response duration 220 days; 30‐mg/d cohort), stable disease (8 patients across ≥15 mg/d cohorts; response duration range, 36‐168 days), and progressive disease (12 patients). The disease control rate was 32%. CONCLUSIONS CC‐223 was tolerable, with manageable toxicities. Preliminary antitumor activity, including tumor regression, and evidence of mTORC1/mTORC2 pathway inhibition were observed. Cancer 2015;121:3435–43. © 2015 American Cancer Society. PMID:26177599

  18. Comparative pharmacokinetic evaluation and bioequivalence study of three different formulations of Imatinib Mesylate in CML patients

    PubMed Central

    Mohajeri, Ehsan; Kalantari-Khandani, Behjat; Pardakhty, Abbas; Safavi, Moeinadin; Ansari, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Imatinib is known as the drug of choice for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). For adults the recommended daily dosage of 400 mg requires simultaneous intake of up to four capsules or tablets each 100 mg. A new 400 mg film coated tablet developed due to the need to swallow multiple capsules or tablets per dose and that was a negative impact on treatment adherence. Subjects and Methods: A group of 36 patients were randomly assigned to receive Imatinib as 4×100 mg capsules, 4×100 mg tablets and 1×400 mg tablet. Blood sampling was performed for up to 48 h after first dosing. After that, subjects were monitored to assess drug related adverse events. Pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed using concentration-time curves for plasma Imatinib and its metabolite. Results: Mean area under the curve (AUC (0–∞)) values were 27011, 25811 and 25699 ng/ml for 4×100 mg capsules, 4×100 mg tablets and 1×400 mg tablets, respectively. Cmax values were 1548, 1605 and 1622 ng/ml and t1/2 values were 15.7, 15.8 and 15.6 h. The Test/Reference ratios for AUC (0–∞), AUC (0–48), and Cmax were 0.99, 0.99 and 1.02 for 4×100 mg tablets versus 4×100 mg capsules and 0.96, 0.96 and 0.99 for 1×400 mg tablet versus 4×100 mg capsules. The 95% confidence intervals were fully contained within the accepted interval. The mild and moderate adverse events considered to be drug related were reported. These events showed no clustering by type of dosage form and were of little to no clinical significance. Conclusion: Film coated (400 mg) tablet dosage formulations of Imatinib is bioequivalent to the commercial available 100 mg hard gelatin capsule, and is as safe and well tolerated. PMID:26865926

  19. The pharmacokinetics of meloxicam in vultures.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, V; Wolter, K; Cromarty, A D; Bartels, P; Bekker, L; McGaw, L; Taggart, M A; Cuthbert, R; Swan, G E

    2008-04-01

    Vulture populations across the Asian subcontinent have declined dramatically in the last 15 years and are now on the verge of extinction. Although the cause of the population decline was initially unknown, the decrease has recently been conclusively linked to the use of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac in cattle that inadvertently ended up in the vulture food chain. With the vulture numbers continuing to decline by up to 48% a year, the Indian, Nepali and Pakistan governments have recently banned the manufacture and importation of veterinary diclofenac. They have also suggested meloxicam as an alternate anti-inflammatory for use in cattle. This recommendation was based on extensive acute safety studies in the African White-backed vulture (Gyps africanus), which evaluated worst case scenarios of maximum intake based on a once in three day feeding pattern. However, the possible cumulative pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in vultures receiving multiple daily doses of meloxicam over time were not assessed. At present very little pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic information is available to add further support for the safety of meloxicam in this animal species. This article discusses the oral and intramuscular pharmacokinetics of meloxicam in Cape Griffon vultures (Gyps coprotheres). Therapeutic drug monitoring was also undertaken in White-backed, Egyptian (Neophron pernopterus) and one Lappet Faced vulture (Torgos tracheliotos). In all these species, meloxicam was characterized by a short half-life of elimination. The rapid metabolism of meloxicam in combination with a short duration of effect in the studied species Gyps vultures shown in this study makes it unlikely that the drug could accumulate. This confirms the safety of repeated exposure to meloxicam in vultures of this genus. PMID:18307504

  20. Comparative Inter-Species Pharmacokinetics of Phenoxyacetic Acid Herbicides and Related Organic Acids. Evidence that the Dog is Not a Relevant Species for Evaluation of Human Health Risk.

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Chuck

    2004-07-15

    Phenoxyacetic acids including 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) are widely utilized organic acid herbicides that have undergone extensive toxicity and pharmacokinetic analyses. The dog is particularly susceptible to the toxicity of phenoxyacetic acids and related organic acids relative to other species. Active renal clearance mechanisms for organic acids are ubiquitous in mammalian species, and thus a likely mechanism responsible for the increased sensitivity of the dog to these agents is linked to a lower capacity to secrete organic acids from the kidney. Using published data describing the pharmacokinetics of phenoxyacetic and structurally related organic acids in a variety of species including humans, inter-species comparative pharmacokinetics were evaluated using allometic parameter scaling. For both 2,4-D and MCPA the dog plasma half-life (t1/2) and renal clearance (Clr; ml hr-1) rates did not scale as a function of body weight across species; whereas for all other species evaluated, including humans, these pharmacokinetic parameters reasonably scaled. This exceptional response in the dog is clearly illustrated by comparing the plasma t1/2 at comparable doses of 2,4-D and MCPA, across several species. At a dosage of 5 mg/kg, in dogs the plasma t1/2 for 2,4-D and MCPA were {approx}92 - 106 hr and 63 hr, respectively, which is substantially longer than in the rat ({approx}1 and 6 hr, respectively) or in humans (12 and 11 hr, respectively). This longer t1/2, and slower elimination in the dog, results in substantially higher body burdens of these organic acids, at comparable doses, relative to other species. Although these results indicate the important role of renal transport clearance mechanisms as determinants of the clearance and potential toxicity outcomes of phenoxyacetic acid herbicides across several species, other contributing mechanisms such as reabsorption from the renal tubules is highly likely. These

  1. Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Clozapine in Concomitant Use of Radix Rehmanniae, Fructus Schisandrae, Radix Bupleuri, or Fructus Gardeniae in Rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Dan-Dan; Wang, Wei; Wang, Hua-Ning; Sze, Stephen Cho Wing; Zhang, Zhang-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Radix Rehmanniae, Fructus Schisandrae, Radix Bupleuri, and Fructus Gardeniae are often used alongside with clozapine (CLZ) for schizophrenia patients in order to reduce side effects and enhance therapeutic efficacy. However, worse outcomes were observed raising concern about a critical issue, herb-drug interactions, which were rarely reported when antipsychotics were included. This study aims to determine whether the concomitant use of these herbal medicines affects the pharmacokinetic characteristics of CLZ in rat models. Rats were given a single or multiple intraperitoneal injections of 10 mg/kg CLZ, either alone or with individual herbal water extracts administered orally. CLZ and its two inactive metabolites, norclozapine and clozapine N-oxide, were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. In the acute treatment, the formation of both metabolites was reduced, while no significant change was observed in the CLZ pharmacokinetics for any of the herbal extracts. In the chronic treatment, none of the four herbal extracts significantly influenced the pharmacokinetic parameters of CLZ and its metabolites. Renal and liver functions stayed normal after the 11-day combined use of herbal medicines. Overall, the four herbs had limited interaction effect on CLZ pharmacokinetics in the acute and chronic treatment. Herb-drug interaction includes both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms. This result gives us a hint that pharmacodynamic herb-drug interaction, instead of pharmacokinetic types, may exist and need further confirmation. PMID:27240333

  2. Preparation and pharmacokinetics evaluation of oral self-emulsifying system for poorly water-soluble drug Lornoxicam.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Song, Shuangshuang; Guo, Yingxin; Zhao, Qianqian; Zhang, Xuemei; Pan, Weisan; Yang, Xinggang

    2015-01-01

    The present work was performed aiming to develop a new solid self-emulsifying system (SMEDDS) for poorly water-soluble drug Lornoxicam and evaluate the bioavailability in Wister rats by oral gavage. Liquid SMEDDS of Lornoxicam was formulated with Labrafil M 1944 CS as oil phase, Kolliphor HS 15 as a surfactant and Transcutol HP as a cosurfactant after screening various vehicles. The microemulsion system selected from the phase diagram and optimized by central composite design (CCD) response surface method was transformed into solid-SMEDDS (S-SMEDDS) by lyophilization using sucrose as cryoprotectant. The formulations were further characterized by the particle size, poly dispersity index (PDI), self-emulsifying time, zeta potential, transmission electron microscope (TEM), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), in vitro drug release and in vivo pharmacokinetics. Results of DSC studies confirmed that the drug was incorporated in the S-SMEDDS. The in vitro drug release from Lornoxicam SMEDDS was found to be greatly higher in comparison with that from the commercial tablets. It was indicated that SMEDDS might be effective in reducing the effect of pH variability of Lornoxicam and improving the release performance of Lornoxicam. HPLC system was applied to study the concentration of Lornoxicam in the plasma of the Wister rats after oral administration of Lornoxicam SMEDDS and Lornoxicam commercial tablets. The pharmacokinetics parameters of the rats were C(max) 1065.91 ± 224.90 and 1855.22 ± 748.25 ngmL(-1), T(max) were 2.5 ± 0.4 h and 1.8 ± 0.5 h, and AUC(0∼t) were 5316.35 ± 323.62 and 7758.07 ± 241.57 ngmL(-1) h, respectively. Calculated by AUC(0∼∞), the relative bioavailability of Lornoxicam S-SMEDDS was 151.69 ± 15.32%. It suggested that this S-SMEDDS could be used as a successful oral solid dosage form to improve the solubility and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drug Lornoxicam as well. PMID:24524289

  3. Safety evaluation methodology for advanced coal extraction systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, W. F.

    1981-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative evaluation methods for coal extraction systems were developed. The analysis examines the soundness of the design, whether or not the major hazards have been eliminated or reduced, and how the reduction would be accomplished. The quantitative methodology establishes the approximate impact of hazards on injury levels. The results are weighted by peculiar geological elements, specialized safety training, peculiar mine environmental aspects, and reductions in labor force. The outcome is compared with injury level requirements based on similar, safer industries to get a measure of the new system's success in reducing injuries. This approach provides a more detailed and comprehensive analysis of hazards and their effects than existing safety analyses.

  4. Parenteral nanoemulsions as promising carriers for brain delivery of risperidone: Design, characterization and in vivo pharmacokinetic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Đorđević, Sanela M; Cekić, Nebojša D; Savić, Miroslav M; Isailović, Tanja M; Ranđelović, Danijela V; Marković, Bojan D; Savić, Saša R; Timić Stamenić, Tamara; Daniels, Rolf; Savić, Snežana D

    2015-09-30

    This paper describes design and evaluation of parenteral lecithin-based nanoemulsions intended for brain delivery of risperidone, a poorly water-soluble psychopharmacological drug. The nanoemulsions were prepared through cold/hot high pressure homogenization and characterized regarding droplet size, polydispersity, surface charge, morphology, drug-vehicle interactions, and physical stability. To estimate the simultaneous influence of nanoemulsion formulation and preparation parameters--co-emulsifier type, aqueous phase type, homogenization temperature--on the critical quality attributes of developed nanoemulsions, a general factorial experimental design was applied. From the established design space and stability data, promising risperidone-loaded nanoemulsions (mean size about 160 nm, size distribution <0.15, zeta potential around -50 mV), containing sodium oleate in the aqueous phase and polysorbate 80, poloxamer 188 or Solutol(®) HS15 as co-emulsifier, were produced by hot homogenization and their ability to improve risperidone delivery to the brain was assessed in rats. Pharmacokinetic study demonstrated erratic brain profiles of risperidone following intraperitoneal administration in selected nanoemulsions, most probably due to their different droplet surface properties (different composition of the stabilizing layer). Namely, polysorbate 80-costabilized nanoemulsion showed increased (1.4-7.4-fold higher) risperidone brain availability compared to other nanoemulsions and drug solution, suggesting this nanoemulsion as a promising carrier worth exploring further for brain targeting. PMID:26209070

  5. Development of a novel model for comparative evaluation of intranasal pharmacokinetics and effects of anti-allergic nasal sprays.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Daniel; Bachert, Claus; Högger, Petra

    2012-01-01

    For locally acting drugs, an extended residence time in the nasal cavity is desirable and related to a prolonged effect. We sought to develop a model for comparative determination of intranasal pharmacokinetics. We embedded human respiratory tissue into a solid matrix and coated the surface with artificial nasal fluid. Nasal spray suspensions of fluticasone propionate (FP) and budesonide (Bud) as well as a solution of azelastine hydrochloride (AZ) were applied onto the surface and removed after 30 min to simulate mucociliary clearance. As exemplary anti-inflammatory measure, we evaluated the inhibition of IL-8 release from epithelial cells. FP and Bud were initially bound to the same extent to the tissue gel while AZ displayed a more 4-fold higher binding than FP or Bud. After equilibrium with plasma, approximately 5-fold higher tissue concentrations of AZ compared to FP and 77-fold higher levels in relation to Bud were determined. This tissue retention revealed an excellent correlation with the volume of distribution of the respective drugs (r=0.9999, p ≤ 0.05). The inhibitory effect of FP on IL-8 release was approximately 5-fold more pronounced compared to AZ. The present model realistically mirrors conditions in vivo where solubility and tissue absorption of intranasally applied drugs compete with mucociliary clearance mechanisms. PMID:21945271

  6. Contrasting toxicokinetic evaluations and interspecies pharmacokinetic scaling approaches for small molecules and biologics: applicability to biosimilar development.

    PubMed

    Offman, Elliot; Edginton, Andrea N

    2013-06-01

    1. A 2-fold threshold typically used for prediction accuracy of interspecies scaling of clearance (CL) may be too liberal when using pharmacokinetic similarity in animals to advance biosimilar candidate selection for clinical testing. The purpose of this review is to identify interspecies scaling methods for use in de-risking biosimilar development prior to clinical testing. 2. Scaling approaches for predicting macromolecule CL were identified through literature review. Reports that evaluated predicted and observed human CLs for ≥5 individual compounds were considered. Absolute average fold-error (AAFE) was calculated for each method along with the proportion of compounds with individual fold-error values within a tighter threshold of 0.7-1.3. 3. Traditional simple allometry with a minimum of three species and the rule of exponents performed inconsistently with some groups of compounds resulting in a greater than 2-fold error (i.e. AAFE > 2). For monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), simplified allometric approaches employing a single species (monkey) with a fixed exponent of 0.85 consistently resulted in lower AAFEs and a higher proportion of compounds within the tighter range of 0.7-1.3. 4. For macromolecules, and particularly mAbs, employing single-species monkey "simplified" allometric approaches with a fixed exponent of 0.85 may be more appropriate than traditional allometric approaches. PMID:23244626

  7. Children's Agricultural Safety Network: Evaluating Organizational Effectiveness and Impacts.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Mary E; Wendl, Mary J

    2015-01-01

    Coalitions that are effectively organized and led are more likely to achieve their intended program outcomes and impacts, as well as achieve sustainability. External evaluation of the coalition's governance and leadership can help identify strengths and areas for improvement. This article describes the evaluation of the Children's Agricultural Safety Network (CASN)-a national coalition, or network of 45 organizational members. The conceptual framework, Internal Coalition Outcomes Hierarchy, guided the evaluation. We used a mixed-methods approach to answer study's primary objectives from the perspective of CASN members and leaders for (a) organizational effectiveness, (b) network impact, and (c) member benefits. We collected quantitative data using a survey and the Internal Coalition Effectiveness (ICE) instrument. Focused interviews were conducted by phone to gather rich data on examples. Combined findings showed that both members and leaders rated the CASN effective in all construct areas that define successful coalitions. Members feel as invested in CASN success as do leaders. The major impact of CASN has been as a national leader and clearinghouse for childhood safety issues, and the most frequently cited example of impact was the national tractor safety campaign. Members identified the benefits of CASN membership as networking, resource sharing, and opportunities to enhance their knowledge, skills, and practices in the area. Members also valued the national attention that CASN was able to bring to the important issues in childhood agricultural safety. Suggestions for improvement were to focus on more research to improve best practices and strengthen dissemination and implementation science. PMID:25906269

  8. First-in-humans study of the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of ACT-451840, a new chemical entity with antimalarial activity.

    PubMed

    Bruderer, Shirin; Hurst, Noémie; de Kanter, Ruben; Miraval, Tommaso; Pfeifer, Thomas; Donazzolo, Yves; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2015-02-01

    Emerging resistance to antimalarial agents raises the need for new drugs. ACT-451840 is a new compound with potent activity against sensitive and resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains. This was a first-in-humans single-ascending-dose study to investigate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of ACT-451840 across doses of 10, 50, 200, and 500 mg in healthy male subjects. In the 200- and 500-mg dose groups, the effect of food was investigated, and antimalarial activity was assessed using an ex vivo bioassay with P. falciparum. No (serious) adverse events leading to discontinuation were reported. At the highest dose level, the peak drug concentration (Cmax) and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from zero to infinity of ACT-451840 under fasted conditions reached 11.9 ng/ml and 100.6 ng·h/ml, respectively, and these were approximately 13-fold higher under fed conditions. Food did not affect the half-life (approximately 34 h) of the drug, while the Cmax was attained 2.0 and 3.5 h postdose under fasted and fed conditions, respectively. The plasma concentrations estimated by the bioassay were approximately 4-fold higher than those measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Several potentially active metabolites were also identified. ACT-451840 was well tolerated across all doses. Exposure to ACT-451840 significantly increased with food. The bioassay indicated the presence of circulating active metabolites. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT02186002.). PMID:25421475

  9. Pharmacokinetics, Safety, and Antiviral Effects of Hypericin, a Derivative of St. John's Wort Plant, in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Feinman, Lawrence; Liebes, Leonard; Ostrow, Nancy; Koslowski, Victoria; Tobia, Alfonso; Cabana, Bernard E.; Lee, Dong-Hun; Spritzler, John; Prince, Alfred M.

    2001-01-01

    Hypericin is a natural derivative of the common St. Johns wort plant, Hypericum perforatum. It has in vitro activity against several viruses, including bovine diarrhea virus, a pestivirus with structural similarities to hepatitis C virus (HCV). We conducted a phase I dose escalation study to determine the safety and antiviral activity of hypericin in patients with chronic HCV infection. The first 12 patients received an 8-week course of 0.05 mg of hypericin per kg of body weight orally once a day; 7 patients received an 8-week course of 0.10 mg/kg orally once a day. At the end of the 8-week period of treatment, no subject had a change of plasma HCV RNA level of more than 1.0 log10. Five of 12 subjects receiving the 0.05-mg/kg/day dosing schedule and 6 of 7 subjects receiving the 0.10-mg/kg/day dosing schedule developed phototoxic reactions. No other serious adverse events associated with hypericin use occurred. The pharmacokinetic data revealed a long elimination half-life (mean values of 36.1 and 33.8 h, respectively, for the doses of 0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg) and mean area under the curve determinations of 1.5 and 3.1 μg/ml × hr, respectively. In sum, hypericin given orally in doses of 0.05 and 0.10 mg/kg/d caused considerable phototoxicity and had no detectable anti-HCV activity in patients with chronic HCV infection. PMID:11158749

  10. First-in-Humans Study of the Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of ACT-451840, a New Chemical Entity with Antimalarial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bruderer, Shirin; Hurst, Noémie; de Kanter, Ruben; Miraval, Tommaso; Pfeifer, Thomas; Donazzolo, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Emerging resistance to antimalarial agents raises the need for new drugs. ACT-451840 is a new compound with potent activity against sensitive and resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains. This was a first-in-humans single-ascending-dose study to investigate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of ACT-451840 across doses of 10, 50, 200, and 500 mg in healthy male subjects. In the 200- and 500-mg dose groups, the effect of food was investigated, and antimalarial activity was assessed using an ex vivo bioassay with P. falciparum. No (serious) adverse events leading to discontinuation were reported. At the highest dose level, the peak drug concentration (Cmax) and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from zero to infinity of ACT-451840 under fasted conditions reached 11.9 ng/ml and 100.6 ng · h/ml, respectively, and these were approximately 13-fold higher under fed conditions. Food did not affect the half-life (approximately 34 h) of the drug, while the Cmax was attained 2.0 and 3.5 h postdose under fasted and fed conditions, respectively. The plasma concentrations estimated by the bioassay were approximately 4-fold higher than those measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Several potentially active metabolites were also identified. ACT-451840 was well tolerated across all doses. Exposure to ACT-451840 significantly increased with food. The bioassay indicated the presence of circulating active metabolites. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT02186002.) PMID:25421475

  11. Recommendations for safety pharmacology evaluations of oligonucleotide-based therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Berman, Cindy L; Cannon, Keri; Cui, Yi; Kornbrust, Douglas J; Lagrutta, Armando; Sun, Sunny Z; Tepper, Jeff; Waldron, Gareth; Younis, Husam S

    2014-08-01

    This document was prepared by the Safety Pharmacology Subcommittee of the Oligonucleotide Safety Working Group (OSWG), a group of industry and regulatory scientists involved in the development and regulation of therapeutic oligonucleotides. The mission of the Subcommittee was to develop scientific recommendations for the industry regarding the appropriate scope and strategies for safety pharmacology evaluations of oligonucleotides (ONs). These recommendations are the consensus opinion of the Subcommittee and do not necessarily reflect the current expectations of regulatory authorities. 1) Safety pharmacology testing, as described in the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) S7 guidance, is as applicable to ONs as it is to small molecule drugs and biotherapeutics. 2) Study design considerations for ONs are similar to those for other classes of drugs. In general, as with other therapeutics, studies should evaluate the drug product administered via the clinical route. Species selection should ideally consider relevance of the model with regard to the endpoints of interest, pharmacological responsiveness, and continuity with the nonclinical development program. 3) Evaluation of potential effects in the core battery (cardiovascular, central nervous, and respiratory systems) is recommended. In general: a. In vitro human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) testing does not provide any specific value and is not warranted. b. Emphasis should be placed on in vivo evaluation of cardiovascular function, typically in nonhuman primates (NHPs). c. Due to the low level of concern, neurologic and respiratory function can be assessed concurrently with cardiovascular safety pharmacology evaluation in NHPs, within repeat-dose toxicity studies, or as stand-alone studies. In the latter case, rodents are most commonly used. 4) Other dedicated safety pharmacology studies, beyond the core battery, may have limited value for ONs. Although ONs can accumulate in the kidney and liver

  12. Safety evaluations of longwall roof supports. Information circular/1989

    SciTech Connect

    Barczak, T.M.

    1988-01-01

    State-of-the-art longwall roof supports provide effective strata control, but failures of these support systems still occur. To identify failure mechanisms and the impact these failures have on the safety of the support system, the U.S. Bureau of Mines has been conducting research on shield mechanics in the Bureau's unique mine roof simulator, as well as field studies of in-situ support loading and investigations of longwall failures. Three types of failures are discussed: inadequate support capacity, structural failure, and instability. Hypothetical situations with proposed courses of action and case studies of actual longwall failures are described. The report will assist the Mine Safety and Health Administration and industry mining personnel in safety evaluations of longwall roof-support systems.

  13. Evaluating Models of Human Performance: Safety-Critical Systems Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feary, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is part of panel discussion on Evaluating Models of Human Performance. The purpose of this panel is to discuss the increasing use of models in the world today and specifically focus on how to describe and evaluate models of human performance. My presentation will focus on discussions of generating distributions of performance, and the evaluation of different strategies for humans performing tasks with mixed initiative (Human-Automation) systems. I will also discuss issues with how to provide Human Performance modeling data to support decisions on acceptability and tradeoffs in the design of safety critical systems. I will conclude with challenges for the future.

  14. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of novel glucokinase activator HMS5552: results from a first-in-human single ascending dose study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongrong; Sheng, Lei; Chen, Weili; Yuan, Fei; Yang, Mengjie; Li, Hui; Li, Xuening; Choi, John; Zhao, Guiyu; Hu, Tianxin; Li, Yongguo; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background HMS5552, a novel fourth-generation glucokinase (GK) activator, has demonstrated promising effects on glycemic control in preclinical models of type 2 diabetes. This single ascending dose study was conducted to investigate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmacodynamics (PD) of HMS5552 during its first-in-human exposure. Methods Sixty healthy subjects were enrolled. In each of six dose-cohorts (5, 10, 15, 25, 35, and 50 mg), ten subjects were randomized with eight subjects receiving the same cohort-dose of HMS5552 and two receiving placebo. Plasma HMS5552 exposure, glucose, and insulin were measured repeatedly during fasting and after a standardized meal. Assessment included safety, PK, and PD endpoints. Results HMS5552 showed dose-proportional increases in area under the curve 0 to the last quantifiable concentration (AUC0–t) and maximum plasma concentration (Cmax). Slopes estimated by linear regression for AUC0–t and Cmax were ~1.0 (0.932 and 0.933, respectively). Geometric mean elimination half-life ranged from 4.48 to 7.51 hours and apparent clearance ranged from 11.5 to 13.1 L/h across all doses. No significant sex effect was observed in PK parameters. HMS5552 also demonstrated dose-related PD responses in terms of maximum glucose change from baseline (%) and mean glucose area under effect curve 0–4 hours change from baseline (%) (P<0.001). Fifteen adverse events were reported by nine subjects (ten with HMS5552 and five with the placebo). All adverse events were mild in intensity and resolved without any treatment. Conclusion This first-in-human single ascending dose study provided predicted PK of HMS5552 with dose-proportional increases in AUC0–t and Cmax, as well as dose-related glucose-lowering effects over the range of 5–50 mg in healthy subjects. HMS5552 at doses up to 50 mg in healthy subjects was safe and well-tolerated. PMID:27274195

  15. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Isavuconazole as Antifungal Prophylaxis in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients with Neutropenia: Results of a Phase 2, Dose Escalation Study

    PubMed Central

    Cornely, Oliver A.; Böhme, Angelika; Schmitt-Hoffmann, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Isavuconazole is a novel broad-spectrum triazole antifungal agent. This open-label dose escalation study assessed the safety and pharmacokinetics of intravenous isavuconazole prophylaxis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia who had undergone chemotherapy and had preexisting/expected neutropenia. Twenty-four patients were enrolled, and 20 patients completed the study. The patients in the low-dose cohort (n = 11) received isavuconazole loading doses on day 1 (400/200/200 mg, 6 h apart) and day 2 (200/200 mg, 12 h apart), followed by once-daily maintenance dosing (200 mg) on days 3 to 28. The loading and maintenance doses were doubled in the high-dose cohort (n = 12). The mean ± standard deviation plasma isavuconazole areas under the concentration-time curves for the dosing period on day 7 were 60.1 ± 22.3 μg · h/ml and 113.1 ± 19.6 μg · h/ml for the patients in the low-dose and high-dose cohorts, respectively. The adverse events in five patients in the low-dose cohort and in eight patients in the high-dose cohort were considered to be drug related. Most were mild to moderate in severity, and the most common adverse events were headache and rash (n = 3 each). One patient in the high-dose cohort experienced a serious adverse event (unrelated to isavuconazole treatment), and two patients each in the low-dose and high-dose cohorts discontinued the study due to adverse events. Of the 20 patients who completed the study, 18 were classified as a treatment success. In summary, the results of this analysis support the safety and tolerability of isavuconazole administered at 200 mg and 400 mg once-daily as prophylaxis in immunosuppressed patients at high risk of fungal infections. (This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT00413439.) PMID:25624327

  16. Safety, Pharmacokinetic, and Functional Effects of the Nogo-A Monoclonal Antibody in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Randomized, First-In-Human Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Meininger, Vincent; Pradat, Pierre-François; Corse, Andrea; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Rix Brooks, Benjamin; Caress, James B.; Cudkowicz, Merit; Kolb, Stephen J.; Lange, Dale; Leigh, P. Nigel; Meyer, Thomas; Milleri, Stefano; Morrison, Karen E.; Orrell, Richard W.; Peters, Gary; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.; Shefner, Jeremy; Lavrov, Arseniy; Williams, Nicola; Overend, Phil; Price, Jeffrey; Bates, Stewart; Bullman, Jonathan; Krull, David; Berges, Alienor; Abila, Bams; Meno-Tetang, Guy; Wurthner, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The neurite outgrowth inhibitor, Nogo-A, has been shown to be overexpressed in skeletal muscle in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); it is both a potential biomarker and therapeutic target. We performed a double-blind, two-part, dose-escalation study, in subjects with ALS, assessing safety, pharmacokinetics (PK) and functional effects of ozanezumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against Nogo-A. In Part 1, 40 subjects were randomized (3∶1) to receive single dose intravenous ozanezumab (0.01, 0.1, 1, 5, or 15 mg/kg) or placebo. In Part 2, 36 subjects were randomized (3∶1) to receive two repeat doses of intravenous ozanezumab (0.5, 2.5, or 15 mg/kg) or placebo, approximately 4 weeks apart. The primary endpoints were safety and tolerability (adverse events [AEs], vital signs, electrocardiogram (ECG), and clinical laboratory tests). Secondary endpoints included PK, immunogenicity, functional endpoints (clinical and electrophysiological), and biomarker parameters. Overall, ozanezumab treatment (0.01–15 mg/kg) was well tolerated. The overall incidence of AEs in the repeat dose 2.5 mg/kg and 15 mg/kg ozanezumab groups was higher than in the repeat dose placebo group and repeat dose 0.5 mg/kg ozanezumab group. The majority were considered not related to study drug by the investigators. Six serious AEs were reported in three subjects receiving ozanezumab; none were considered related to study drug. No study drug-related patterns were identified for ECG, laboratory, or vital signs parameters. One subject (repeat dose 15 mg/kg ozanezumab) showed a weak, positive anti-ozanezumab-antibody result. PK results were generally consistent with monoclonal antibody treatments. No apparent treatment effects were observed for functional endpoints or muscle biomarkers. Immunohistochemical staining showed dose-dependent co-localization of ozanezumab with Nogo-A in skeletal muscle. In conclusion, single and repeat dose ozanezumab treatment was well tolerated and demonstrated co

  17. Comparison of the pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of two concentrations of a new liquid recombinant human growth hormone formulation versus the freeze-dried formulation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Somatropin is recombinant human growth hormone (GH) used for the treatment of growth failure in children and GH deficiency in adults. Two concentrations of a liquid formulation have been developed: 5.83 and 8.0 mg/mL. This trial compared the pharmacokinetics (PK), safety and tolerability of these two liquid concentrations against the freeze-dried (FD) formulation in healthy volunteers. Methods In an open-label, single-centre, three-way crossover study, volunteers (aged 18-45 years) were given subcutaneous injections of the reconstituted FD and two liquid formulations in random sequential order, each at 4 mg/dose, with a 1-week wash-out period between doses. To suppress endogenous GH secretion, intravenous somatostatin was infused continuously 1 hour before to 24 hours after each dose, achieving a cumulative dose of 3 mg. Primary PK endpoints were area under the serum concentration-time curve (AUC0-t) and maximum serum concentration (Cmax). For each of the two liquid formulations, bioequivalence with the FD formulation was concluded if the 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the estimated test/reference ratios of geometric means of AUC0-t and Cmax were within the standard pre-specified acceptance range (0.80-1.25). Results Fifteen men and 15 women enrolled (safety population, n = 30; PK population, n = 28). Bioequivalence with the FD formulation could be shown for both liquid formulations. The ratios of geometric means (95% CI) were 1.046 (0.980, 1.117) and 0.991 (0.929, 1.058) for AUC0-t and 0.954 (0.875, 1.040) and 0.955 (0.876, 1.041) for Cmax for the 5.83 and 8.0 mg/mL formulations, respectively. No significant differences between the three treatments in half-lives, time to reach Cmax, clearance or volume of distribution were observed. After injection, the most common side-effects were pain or injection-site reactions (all of mild intensity). There were no clinically significant abnormal vital signs, ECG or laboratory findings. There were 56 treatment

  18. Road network safety evaluation using Bayesian hierarchical joint model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Huang, Helai

    2016-05-01

    Safety and efficiency are commonly regarded as two significant performance indicators of transportation systems. In practice, road network planning has focused on road capacity and transport efficiency whereas the safety level of a road network has received little attention in the planning stage. This study develops a Bayesian hierarchical joint model for road network safety evaluation to help planners take traffic safety into account when planning a road network. The proposed model establishes relationships between road network risk and micro-level variables related to road entities and traffic volume, as well as socioeconomic, trip generation and network density variables at macro level which are generally used for long term transportation plans. In addition, network spatial correlation between intersections and their connected road segments is also considered in the model. A road network is elaborately selected in order to compare the proposed hierarchical joint model with a previous joint model and a negative binomial model. According to the results of the model comparison, the hierarchical joint model outperforms the joint model and negative binomial model in terms of the goodness-of-fit and predictive performance, which indicates the reasonableness of considering the hierarchical data structure in crash prediction and analysis. Moreover, both random effects at the TAZ level and the spatial correlation between intersections and their adjacent segments are found to be significant, supporting the employment of the hierarchical joint model as an alternative in road-network-level safety modeling as well. PMID:26945109

  19. [Cephalexin pharmacokinetics].

    PubMed

    Koroleva, V G; Vasil'ev, V K; Danilova, V I; Firsov, A A

    1981-03-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cephalexin monohydrate after its oral administration in a single dose was studied on rats and dogs. The analysis of the pharmacokinetic data obtained with the one-compartmental model showed that the rate of the antibiotic absorption in the rats was higher than that in the dogs. The periods of the cephalexin half-absorption and maximum concentration were 0.2 and 1.1 hour in the rats and 0.64 and 1.9 hours in the dogs respectively. The period of the antibiotic half-life was almost the same in both animal species. Selective localization of cephalexin in the kidney and liver tissues was noted. The antibiotic was mainly excreted by the kidneys (98.8 per cent for 24 hours). PMID:7235651

  20. Modeling Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Bois, Frederic Y; Brochot, Céline

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics is the study of the fate of xenobiotics in a living organism. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models provide realistic descriptions of xenobiotics' absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion processes. They model the body as a set of homogeneous compartments representing organs, and their parameters refer to anatomical, physiological, biochemical, and physicochemical entities. They offer a quantitative mechanistic framework to understand and simulate the time-course of the concentration of a substance in various organs and body fluids. These models are well suited for performing extrapolations inherent to toxicology and pharmacology (e.g., between species or doses) and for integrating data obtained from various sources (e.g., in vitro or in vivo experiments, structure-activity models). In this chapter, we describe the practical development and basic use of a PBPK model from model building to model simulations, through implementation with an easily accessible free software. PMID:27311461

  1. A new goldfish model to evaluate pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects of drugs used for motion sickness in different gravity loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lathers, Claire M.; Mukai, Chiaki; Smith, Cedric M.; Schraeder, Paul L.

    2001-08-01

    This paper proposes a new goldfish model to predict pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic effects of drugs used to treat motion sickness administered in differing gravity loads. The assumption of these experiments is that the vestibular system is dominant in producing motion sickness and that the visual system is secondary or of small import in the production of motion sickness. Studies will evaluate the parameter of gravity and the contribution of vision to the role of the neurovestibular system in the initiation of motion sickness with and without pharmacologic agents. Promethazine will be studied first. A comparison of data obtained in different groups of goldfish will be done (normal vs. acutely and chronically bilaterally blinded vs. sham operated). Some fish will be bilaterally blinded 10 months prior to initiation of the experiment (designated the chronically bilaterally blinded group of goldfish) to evaluate the neuroplasticity of the nervous system and the associated return of neurovestibular function. Data will be obtained under differing gravity loads with and without a pharmacological agent for motion sickness. Experiments will differentiate pharmacological effects on vision vs. neurovestibular input to motion sickness. Comparison of data obtained in the normal fish and in acutely and chronically bilaterally blinded fish with those obtained in fish with intact and denervated otoliths will differentiate if the visual or neurovestibular system is dominant in response to altered gravity and/or drugs. Experiments will contribute to validation of the goldfish as a model for humans since plasticity of the central nervous system allows astronauts to adapt to the altered visual stimulus conditions of 0-g. Space motion sickness may occur until such an adaptation is achieved.

  2. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of technetium-99-metallothionein-conjugated mouse monoclonal antibody B72. 3 in rhesus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Burchiel, S.W.; Hadjian, R.A.; Hladik, W.B.; Drozynski, C.A.; Tolman, G.L.; Haber, S.B.; Gallagher, B.M. )

    1989-08-01

    These studies were conducted to determine the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of ({sup 99m}Tc)metallothionein-conjugated B72.3 ((Tc)MT-B72.3) in Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) that were performed as part of the preclinical evaluation of (Tc)MT-B72.3. The B72.3-MT conjugate was studied at three doses of B72.3 ranging from 0.03 mg/kg to 1 mg/kg to determine whether a relationship existed between the dose of total antibody administered intravenously and the biodistribution and clearance of the radiolabeled protein. Results indicated that (Tc)MT-B72.3 distributes rapidly to central body cavity organs and that there was no difference in the rate of blood elimination for the three doses of B72.3 studied. The terminal phase of blood elimination was found to be 26.2 +/- 6.1 hr for the combined groups of monkeys. Approximately one-half of injected {sup 99m}Tc activity was recovered in the urine within 24 hr. A second purpose of these studies was to evaluate the overall immunogenicity of the mouse monoclonal B72.3 IgG1 antibody in Rhesus monkeys. These results demonstrated that a single i.v. exposure to mouse monoclonal B72.3 at doses of 0.3 mg/kg or greater elicited antibody production to B72.3 in Rhesus monkeys within 3 wk. Analysis of (Tc)MT-B72.3 biodistribution and clearance in monkeys with circulating levels of antibodies to B72.3 (immunized monkeys) revealed that the liver was the primary site of clearance of the presumed immune complex and that blood elimination was greatly accelerated.

  3. Lecithin and PLGA-based self-assembled nanocomposite, Lecithmer: preparation, characterization, and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Seby Elsy; Fariya, Mayur K; Rajawat, Gopal Singh; Steiniger, Frank; Fahr, Alfred; Nagarsenker, Mangal S

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigates the drug delivery potential of polymer lipid hybrid nanocomposites (Lecithmer®) composed of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) and soya lecithin. Core-shell structure of Lecithmer was evident from cryo-TEM images. Daunorubicin (DNR) and lornoxicam (LNX)-incorporated Lecithmer nanocomposites were evaluated for anticancer and anti-inflammatory activity. DNR- and LNX-loaded Lecithmer had mean particle size of ∼335 and ∼282.7 nm, respectively. Lecithmer formulated with different cationic lipids resulted in lower particle size (∼120 nm) and positive zeta potential. Entrapment efficiency of DNR and LNX was 93.16 and 88.59 %, respectively. In vitro release of DNR from Lecithmer was slower compared to PLGA nanoparticles. DNR release from Lecithmer was significantly higher at pH 5.5 (80.96 %) as compared to pH 7.4 (55.95 %), providing advantage for selective tumor therapy. Similarly, sustained release of LNX (30 % in 10 h) was observed at pH 7.4. DNR in Lecithmer showed superior cytotoxicity on human erythroleukemic K562 cells. Pharmacokinetic study in Wistar rats with i.v. administered DNR-loaded Lecithmer showed higher volume of distribution, lower elimination rate constant, and longer half-life (81.68 L, 0.3535 h(-1), 1.96 h) as compared to DNR solution (57.46 L, 0.4237 h(-1), 1.635 h). Pharmacodynamic evaluation of orally administered LNX-loaded Lecithmer showed superior anti-inflammatory activity with maximum inhibition of 81.2 % vis-à-vis 53.57 % in case of LNX suspension. In light of these results, Lecithmer can be envisaged as a promising nanosystem for parenteral as well as oral drug delivery. PMID:27371394

  4. Tools to evaluate pharmacokinetics data for establishing maximum residue limits for approved veterinary drugs: examples from JECFA's work.

    PubMed

    Sanders, P; Henri, J; Laurentie, M

    2016-05-01

    Maximum residue limits (MRLs) for residues of veterinary drugs are the maximum concentrations of residues permitted in or on a food by national or regional legislation. In the process of MRLs recommendations by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), analysis of pharmacokinetic data describing the ADME process (absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) is a crucial step and requires the use of different pharmacokinetic tools. The results of animal metabolism studies are the prime determinants of the residue definition in food commodities. Substances labelled with radioactive isotopes are used so that the disposition of the residue can be followed as total residue and main metabolites concentrations. Residue depletion studies with radiolabelled parent drug will lead to the estimate of the time course of the total residue and to determine a marker residue. Depletion studies with an unlabelled drug provide more information on the time course of the marker residue in raw commodities after administration under approved practical conditions of use. By use of this information and after conversion with the total/residue marker ratio, MRLs are derived by comparison of the acceptable daily intake with the daily intakes calculated with different scenarios of dietary exposure. Progress in pharmacokinetic model such as physiologically based pharmacokinetics and population pharmacokinetics will drive the future research in this field to improved veterinary drug development. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27443212

  5. Phase 1 Study of Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of PTC299, an Inhibitor of Stress-Regulated Protein Translation.

    PubMed

    Weetall, Marla; Davis, Thomas; Elfring, Gary; Northcutt, Valerie; Cao, Liangxian; Moon, Young-Choon; Riebling, Peter; Dali, Mandar; Hirawat, Samit; Babiak, John; Colacino, Joseph; Almstead, Neil; Spiegel, Robert; Peltz, Stuart W

    2016-07-01

    PTC299 is a novel small molecule that specifically blocks the production of protein from selected mRNAs that under certain conditions use noncanonical ribosomal translational pathways. Hypoxia, oncogenic transformation, and viral infections limit normal translation and turn on these noncanonical translation pathways that are sensitive to PTC299. Vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) is an example of a transcript that is posttranscriptionally regulated. Single doses of PTC299 (0.03 to 3 mg/kg) were administered orally to healthy volunteers in a phase 1 single ascending-dose study. In a subsequent multiple ascending-dose study in healthy volunteers, multiple-dose regimens (0.3 to 1.2 mg/kg twice a day or 1.6 mg/kg 3 times a day for 7 days) were evaluated. PTC299 was well tolerated in these studies. As expected in healthy volunteers, mean plasma VEGF levels did not change. Increases in Cmax and AUC of PTC299 were dose-proportional. The target trough plasma concentration associated with preclinical efficacy was achieved within 7 days at doses of 0.6 mg/kg twice daily and above. These data demonstrate that PTC299 is orally bioavailable and well tolerated and support clinical evaluation of PTC299 in cancer, certain viral infections, or other diseases in which deregulation of translational control is a causal factor. PMID:27310330

  6. Using photographic interpretation to evaluate the safety of home environments.

    PubMed

    Lehna, Carlee; Twyman, Stephanie; Myers, John

    2016-12-01

    In the US there were 400,000 home fires resulting in 2755 deaths, 12,450 injuries, and $6.9B lost. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the content-validity of photographs taken in the home for use as an educational instrument to teach about "safe" and "unsafe" fire safety practice for adults and older adults. A total of 73 home fire safety experts were provided 27 photographs to evaluate home fire safety practice. Initially, a Krippendorff's alpha was calculated for the first 24 questions to evaluate inter-rater reliability, and differences in demographics were evaluated. Unique codes and themes for the last three questions were identified and inter-rater reliability examined. A majority of respondents were female (n = 43, 60.6%), college educated (n = 61, 83.6%), nurses (n = 25, 33.8%), or worked for a fire department (n = 21, 29.6%). Their mean age was 45.5 years and they had 11.05 years of experience. The first 24 questions had high inter-rater reliability (Krippendorff α = 0.831). No significant differences existed between the strata of the demographic variables (all p-values > 0.05). Similarly, based on the codes and themes identified, the last three questions had moderate-to-good inter-rater reliability (Krippendorff α = 0.764). Providing photographs as a 'seek-and-find' or 'What's wrong with this picture?' tools and simplified visual images is an excellent way to aid recognition of unsafe home fire safety environments. Education through non-traditional visual methods increases the possibility of change for diverse low-literacy populations. PMID:27617192

  7. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) depleted uranium waste boxes

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, W.A.

    1997-08-27

    This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) allows the one-time shipment of ten metal boxes and one wooden box containing depleted uranium material from the Fast Flux Test Facility to the burial grounds in the 200 West Area for disposal. This SEP provides the analyses and operational controls necessary to demonstrate that the shipment will be safe for the onsite worker and the public.

  8. Safety evaluation of MHTGR licensing basis accident scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Kroeger, P.G.

    1989-04-01

    The safety potential of the Modular High-Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR) was evaluated, based on the Preliminary Safety Information Document (PSID), as submitted by the US Department of Energy to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The relevant reactor safety codes were extended for this purpose and applied to this new reactor concept, searching primarily for potential accident scenarios that might lead to fuel failures due to excessive core temperatures and/or to vessel damage, due to excessive vessel temperatures. The design basis accident scenario leading to the highest vessel temperatures is the depressurized core heatup scenario without any forced cooling and with decay heat rejection to the passive Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). This scenario was evaluated, including numerous parametric variations of input parameters, like material properties and decay heat. It was found that significant safety margins exist, but that high confidence levels in the core effective thermal conductivity, the reactor vessel and RCCS thermal emissivities and the decay heat function are required to maintain this safety margin. Severe accident extensions of this depressurized core heatup scenario included the cases of complete RCCS failure, cases of massive air ingress, core heatup without scram and cases of degraded RCCS performance due to absorbing gases in the reactor cavity. Except for no-scram scenarios extending beyond 100 hr, the fuel never reached the limiting temperature of 1600/degree/C, below which measurable fuel failures are not expected. In some of the scenarios, excessive vessel and concrete temperatures could lead to investment losses but are not expected to lead to any source term beyond that from the circulating inventory. 19 refs., 56 figs., 11 tabs.

  9. Extended Evaluation of Virological, Immunological and Pharmacokinetic Endpoints of CELADEN: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Celgosivir in Dengue Fever Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Cynthia; Wei, Yuan; Watanabe, Satoru; Lee, How Sung; Khoo, Yok Moi; Fan, Lu; Rathore, Abhay P. S.; Chan, Kitti Wing-Ki; Choy, Milly M.; Kamaraj, Uma S.; Sessions, October M.; Aw, Pauline; de Sessions, Paola F.; Lee, Bernett; Connolly, John E.; Hibberd, Martin L.; Vijaykrishna, Dhanasekaran; Wijaya, Limin; Ooi, Eng Eong; Low, Jenny Guek-Hong

    2016-01-01

    CELADEN was a randomized placebo-controlled trial of 50 patients with confirmed dengue fever to evaluate the efficacy and safety of celgosivir (A study registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01619969). Celgosivir was given as a 400 mg loading dose and 200 mg bid (twice a day) over 5 days. Replication competent virus was measured by plaque assay and compared to reverse transcription quantitative PCR (qPCR) of viral RNA. Pharmacokinetics (PK) correlations with viremia, immunological profiling, next generation sequence (NGS) analysis and hematological data were evaluated as exploratory endpoints here to identify possible signals of pharmacological activity. Viremia by plaque assay strongly correlated with qPCR during the first four days. Immunological profiling demonstrated a qualitative shift in T helper cell profile during the course of infection. NGS analysis did not reveal any prominent signature that could be associated with drug treatment; however the phylogenetic spread of patients’ isolates underlines the importance of strain variability that may potentially confound interpretation of dengue drug trials conducted during different outbreaks and in different countries. Celgosivir rapidly converted to castanospermine (Cast) with mean peak and trough concentrations of 5727 ng/mL (30.2 μM) and 430 ng/mL (2.3 μM), respectively and cleared with a half-life of 2.5 (± 0.6) hr. Mean viral log reduction between day 2 and 4 (VLR2-4) was significantly greater in secondary dengue than primary dengue (p = 0.002). VLR2-4 did not correlate with drug AUC but showed a trend of greater response with increasing Cmin. PK modeling identified dosing regimens predicted to achieve 2.4 to 4.5 times higher Cmin. than in the CELADEN trial for only 13% to 33% increase in overall dose. A small, non-statistical trend towards better outcome on platelet nadir and difference between maximum and minimum hematocrit was observed in celgosivir-treated patients with secondary dengue

  10. Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of BPA in rats at different life stages using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaoxia Doerge, Daniel R.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2013-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) has received considerable attention throughout the last decade due to its widespread use in consumer products. For the first time a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed in neonatal and adult rats to quantitatively evaluate age-dependent pharmacokinetics of BPA and its phase II metabolites. The PBPK model was calibrated in adult rats using studies on BPA metabolism and excretion in the liver and gastrointestinal tract, and pharmacokinetic data with BPA in adult rats. For immature rats the hepatic and gastrointestinal metabolism of BPA was inferred from studies on the maturation of phase II enzymes coupled with serum time course data in pups. The calibrated model predicted the measured serum concentrations of BPA and BPA conjugates after administration of 100 μg/kg of d6-BPA in adult rats (oral gavage and intravenous administration) and postnatal days 3, 10, and 21 pups (oral gavage). The observed age-dependent BPA serum concentrations were partially attributed to the immature metabolic capacity of pups. A comparison of the dosimetry of BPA across immature rats and monkeys suggests that dose adjustments would be necessary to extrapolate toxicity studies from neonatal rats to infant humans. - Highlights: • A PBPK model predicts the kinetics of bisphenol A (BPA) in young and adult rats. • BPA metabolism within enterocytes is required for fitting of oral BPA kinetic data. • BPA dosimetry in young rats is different than adult rats and young monkeys.

  11. pkCSM: Predicting Small-Molecule Pharmacokinetic and Toxicity Properties Using Graph-Based Signatures

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Drug development has a high attrition rate, with poor pharmacokinetic and safety properties a significant hurdle. Computational approaches may help minimize these risks. We have developed a novel approach (pkCSM) which uses graph-based signatures to develop predictive models of central ADMET properties for drug development. pkCSM performs as well or better than current methods. A freely accessible web server (http://structure.bioc.cam.ac.uk/pkcsm), which retains no information submitted to it, provides an integrated platform to rapidly evaluate pharmacokinetic and toxicity properties. PMID:25860834

  12. pkCSM: Predicting Small-Molecule Pharmacokinetic and Toxicity Properties Using Graph-Based Signatures.

    PubMed

    Pires, Douglas E V; Blundell, Tom L; Ascher, David B

    2015-05-14

    Drug development has a high attrition rate, with poor pharmacokinetic and safety properties a significant hurdle. Computational approaches may help minimize these risks. We have developed a novel approach (pkCSM) which uses graph-based signatures to develop predictive models of central ADMET properties for drug development. pkCSM performs as well or better than current methods. A freely accessible web server (http://structure.bioc.cam.ac.uk/pkcsm), which retains no information submitted to it, provides an integrated platform to rapidly evaluate pharmacokinetic and toxicity properties. PMID:25860834

  13. Mixed nanomicelles as potential carriers for systemic delivery of Z-GP-Dox, an FAPα-based doxorubicin prodrug: formulation and pharmacokinetic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuchen; Zhang, Xingwang; Liu, Hongming; Cai, Shaohui; Wu, Baojian

    2015-01-01

    Z-GP-Dox, the FAPα (fibroblast activation protein-α)-based doxorubicin prodrug, demonstrates excellent tumor targeting effects and a favorable toxicokinetic profile. However, the insoluble nature of Z-GP-Dox becomes a significant barrier to drug administration, particularly when it comes to the clinical stage. Here we developed a nanomicelle system to facilitate the systemic delivery of Z-GP-Dox, and evaluated its disposition in rats following administration of the micelles using a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model. Z-GP-Dox-loaded mixed nanomicelles (ZGD-MNs) were prepared by dispersion of an ethanol solution of Z-GP-Dox, lecithin, and sodium oleate in water. The obtained ZGD-MNs were 86.6 nm in size with a drug loading of 14.03%. ZGD-MNs were fairly stable in phosphate-buffered saline and showed satisfactory physical and chemical stability over a 2-week observation period. Accumulative drug release was more than 56% within 24 hours. Further, the physiologically-based pharmacokinetic rat model consisting of various organs (ie, heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, and intestine) was fitted to the experimental data following administration of ZGD-loaded cosolvent (control) or micelles. Derived partition coefficient values revealed that the nanomicelles significantly altered the biodistribution of Z-GP-Dox. Of note, drug distribution to the lung, liver, and spleen was greatly enhanced and the fold change ranged from 2.4 to 33. In conclusion, this is the first report of a mixed micelle system being a viable carrier for delivery of Z-GP-Dox. Also, the pharmacokinetic behavior of Z-GP-Dox was satisfactorily described by the physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model. PMID:25759584

  14. Pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence evaluation of risperidone in healthy male subjects with different CYP2D6 genotypes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hea-Young; Lee, Yong-Bok

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioequivalence of risperidone in healthy male subjects representing different CYP2D6 genotypes with respect to risperidone, 9-hydroxyrisperidone (9-OH-risperidone), and active moiety. A total of 506 Korean subjects were genotyped for CYP2D6*10 by means of allele-specific polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Based on the genotype analysis, 24 subjects, 7 homozygous for CYP2D6*1, 10 for *10, and 7 heterozygous for *10, were recruited and received a single oral dose of 2 mg risperidone tablet in this study. Serum concentrations of risperidone and 9-OHrisperidone up to 48 h were simultaneously determined. There were no significant differences of the active moiety, risperidone, and 9-OH-risperidone between the two preparations in AUC0-proportinal to, and Cmax. The 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for the ratio of means of the log-transformed AUC0-proportional to. and Cmax for the active moiety, risperidone, and 9-OH-risperidone were all within the bioequivalence acceptance criteria of 0.80-1.25. The CYP2D6*10 allele particularly was associated with higher serum concentrations of risperidone and the risperidone/9-OH-risperidone ratio compared with the CYP2D6*1 allele. The results demonstrate that the two preparations of risperidone are bioequivalent and it can be assumed that they are therapeutically equivalent and exchangeable in clinical practice. Furthermore, the pharmacokinetic parameters of risperidone and the risperidone/9-OH-risperidone ratio are highly dependent on the CYP2D6 genotypes. PMID:16833023

  15. A pharmacokinetic approach to the evaluation of aerosol solutes for lung permeability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, D.L.; Weber, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution and clearance of inhaled radioactive aerosols prepared from five Tc-99m labelled derivatives of HIDA, Tc-99m DTPA and Tc-99m 04- were evaluated in Beagle dogs. The investigation was designed to develop new aerosol solutes and to obtain information on molecular transport across the alveolar capillary membrane by evaluating molecular structure versus biological activity relationships. Aerosols with an aerodynamic mean diameter of .48 microns (sigmag=1.50), produced in a jet nebulizer, were administered to anesthetized dogs through an endotrachial tube. Aerosols were evaluated twice in each of five dogs for three HIDA derivatives, pertechnetate, and DTPA. Two other HIDA derivatives were evaluated twice in one animal. Sixty min. quantitative gamma camera studies were obtained. ROI processing and functional mapping of images showed distribution and clearance of identically sized aerosols to have a strong dependance on chemical properties. Dimethyl HIDA, trimethylbromo HIDA, and DISIDA with capacity factors (k') of -0.24, 0.63, and 0.65 respectively gave mean lung clearance t1/2 times of 76.6, 206.7, and 97.3 min. 4-bromo HIDA and 3,5-dichloro HIDA were administered to one animal; t1/2 times were 80.0 and 330 min. Two hydro-philic compounds, Tc-99m DTPA and Tc-99m 04-, were examined; t1/2 times were 49.6 min. and 21.2 min. respectively. A trend is seen where t1/2 values increase with lipophilicity; this suggests that structure activity relationships could be built on lipophilicity. These studies support the contention that molecular transport in the lung is an intercellular mechanism.

  16. Preparation, In Vitro Characterization, and In Vivo Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Respirable Porous Microparticles Containing Rifampicin

    PubMed Central

    Kundawala, Aliasgar; Patel, Vishnu; Patel, Harsha; Choudhary, Dhaglaram

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to prepare and evaluate rifampicin microparticles for the lung delivery of rifampicin as respirable powder. The microparticles were prepared using chitosan by the spray-drying method and evaluated for aerodynamic properties and pulmonary drug absorption. To control the drug release, tripoly-phosphate in different concentrations 0.6, 0.9, 1.2, and 1.5 was employed to get a sustained drug release profile. The microparticles were evaluated for drug loading, % entrapment efficiency, tapped density, morphological characteristics, and in vitro drug release studies. Aerosol properties were determined using the Andersen cascade impactor. Porous microparticles with particle sizes (d0.5) less than 10 μm were obtained. The entrapment of rifampicin in microparticles was up to 72%. In vitro drug release suggested that the crosslinked microparticles showed sustained release for more than 12 hrs. The drug release rate was found to be decreased as the TPP concentration was increased. The microparticles showed a fine particle fraction in the range of 55–63% with mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) values below 3 μm. The in vivo pulmonary absorption of the chitosan microparticles suggested a sustained drug release profile up to 72 hrs with an elimination rate of 0.010 per hr. The studies revealed that the spray-dried porous microparticles have suitable properties to be used as respirable powder in rifampicin delivery to the lungs. PMID:25853075

  17. Safety evaluation of rebaudioside A produced by fermentation.

    PubMed

    Rumelhard, Mélina; Hosako, Hiromi; Eurlings, Irene M J; Westerink, Walter M A; Staska, Lauren M; van de Wiel, Jeanine A G; La Marta, James

    2016-03-01

    The safety of rebaudioside A, produced fermentatively by Yarrowia lipolytica encoding the Stevia rebaudiana metabolic pathway (fermentative Reb A), is based on several elements: first, the safety of steviol glycosides has been extensively evaluated and an acceptable daily intake has been defined; second, the use of Y. lipolytica, an avirulent yeast naturally found in foods and used for multiple applications; and third the high purity of fermentative Reb A and its compliance with internationally defined specifications. A bacterial reverse mutation assay and an in vitro micronucleus test conducted with fermentative Reb A provide evidence for its absence of mutagenicity, clastogenicity and aneugenicity. The oral administration of fermentative Reb A to Sprague-Dawley rats for at least 91 days did not lead to any adverse effects at consumption levels up to 2057 mg/kg bw/day for males and 2023 mg/kg bw/day for females, which were concluded to be the No Observed Adverse Effect Levels. The results were consistent with outcomes of previous studies conducted with plant-derived rebaudioside A, suggesting similar safety profiles for fermentative and plant-derived rebaudioside A. The results of the toxicity studies reported here support the safety of rebaudioside A produced fermentatively from Y. lipolytica, as a general purpose sweetener. PMID:26776281

  18. Evaluation Of Microdosing Strategies For Studies In Preclinical Drug Development: Demonstration Of Linear Pharmacokinetics In Dogs Of A Nucleoside Analogue Over A 50-Fold Dose Range

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, P; Vogel, J S; Rose, M J; Ubick, E A; Brunner, J E; Wallace, M A; Adelsberger, J K; Baker, M P; Henderson, P T; Pearson, P G; Baillie, T A

    2004-04-22

    (Stafford et al., 1984; Vogel et al., 1990; Smith et al., 1999) to its use as a bioanalytical tool for nutritional research (Buchholz et al., 1999; Deuker et al., 2000; Weaver and Liebman, 2002). Biomedical applications of AMS and its use in the arena of pharmaceutical research also have been detailed in review articles (Barker and Garner, 1999; Garner, 2000; Turteltaub and Vogel, 2000). To date, most studies on the metabolism and disposition of xenobiotics by AMS have focused on how carcinogens bind to DNA and proteins to form adducts (Turteltaub et al., 1990, 1997; Frantz et al., 1995; Dingley et al., 1999; Li et al., 2003). Its application to the field of pharmaceutical sciences has been limited to a few studies (Kaye et al., 1997; Young et al., 2001; Garner et al., 2002). However, the pharmaceutical industry is becoming increasingly aware of the potential benefits that may accrue from the ultra high sensitivity afforded by AMS in terms of evaluating the pharmacokinetics of lead drug candidates in early development. Specifically, AMS allows administration of sub-pharmacological doses (microdoses) of carbon-14 or tritium-labeled investigational drugs to animals or humans at radiologically insignificant levels with the goal of obtaining preliminary information regarding the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of test compounds (Turteltaub and Vogel, 2000). An unresolved issue, however, is whether the pharmacokinetics determined following a microdose are representative of those following a conventional (pharmacological) dose (Lappin and Garner, 2003). This paper examines the linearity of kinetics of an antiviral nucleoside analogue, Compound A, across sub-pharmacological and pharmacological dose ranges in the dog prior to initiation of a human microdose study. The specific objectives of this study, therefore, were (1) to assess the pharmacokinetics of Compound A in dogs by a conventional dosing approach utilizing LC-MS/MS for sample analysis, (2) to assess

  19. Phase I, Open-Label, Safety and Pharmacokinetic Study To Assess Bronchopulmonary Disposition of Intravenous Eravacycline in Healthy Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Connors, Kevin P.; Housman, Seth T.; Pope, J. Samuel; Russomanno, John; Salerno, Edward; Shore, Eric; Redican, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the pulmonary disposition of eravacycline in 20 healthy adult volunteers receiving 1.0 mg of eravacycline/kg intravenously every 12 h for a total of seven doses over 4 days. Plasma samples were collected at 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, and 12 h on day 4, with each subject randomized to undergo a single bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) at 2, 4, 6, or 12 h. Drug concentrations in plasma, BAL fluid, and alveolar macrophages (AM) were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and the urea correction method was used to calculate epithelial lining fluid (ELF) concentrations. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated by noncompartmental methods. Penetration for ELF and AM was calculated by using a ratio of the area under the concentration time curve (AUC0–12) for each respective parameter against free drug AUC (fAUC0–12) in plasma. The total AUC0–12 in plasma was 4.56 ± 0.94 μg·h/ml with a mean fAUC0–12 of 0.77 ± 0.14 μg·h/ml. The eravacycline concentrations in ELF and AM at 2, 4, 6, and 12 h were means ± the standard deviations (μg/ml) of 0.70 ± 0.30, 0.57 ± 0.20, 0.34 ± 0.16, and 0.25 ± 0.13 with a penetration ratio of 6.44 and 8.25 ± 4.55, 5.15 ± 1.25, 1.77 ± 0.64, and 1.42 ± 1.45 with a penetration ratio of 51.63, respectively. The eravacycline concentrations in the ELF and AM achieved greater levels than plasma by 6- and 50-fold, respectively, supporting further study of eravacycline for patients with respiratory infections. PMID:24468780

  20. Cardiovascular safety profile of dapoxetine during the premarketing evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kowey, Peter R; Mudumbi, Ramagopal V; Aquilina, Joseph W; DiBattiste, Peter M

    2011-01-01

    The cardiovascular safety profile of dapoxetine, a novel selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) developed as an on-demand oral treatment for premature ejaculation (PE) in men, is evaluated. The cardiovascular assessment of dapoxetine was conducted throughout all stages of drug development, with findings from preclinical safety pharmacology studies, phase I clinical pharmacology studies investigating the effect of dapoxetine on QT/corrected QT (QTc) intervals in healthy men, and phase III, randomized, placebo-controlled studies evaluating the safety (and efficacy) of the drug. Preclinical safety pharmacology studies did not suggest an adverse electrophysiologic or hemodynamic effect with concentrations of dapoxetine up to 2-fold greater than recommended doses. Phase I clinical pharmacology studies demonstrated that dapoxetine did not prolong the QT/QTc interval and had neither clinically significant electrocardiographic effects nor evidence of delayed repolarization or conduction effects, with dosing up to 4-fold greater than the maximum recommended dosage. Phase III clinical studies of dapoxetine in men with PE indicated that dapoxetine was generally safe and well tolerated with the dosing regimens used (30 mg and 60 mg as required). Events of syncope were reported during the clinical development program, with the majority occurring during study visits (on site) on day 1 following administration of the first dose when various procedures (e.g. orthostatic maneuvers, venipunctures) were performed, suggesting that the procedures contributed to the incidence of syncope. This was consistent with previous reports showing that these and similar factors contribute to or trigger vasovagal syncope. Findings of the dapoxetine development program demonstrate that dapoxetine is associated with vasovagal-mediated (neurocardiogenic) syncope. No other associated significant cardiovascular adverse events were identified. PMID:21410293

  1. METFORMIN: an efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetic study on the short-term and long-term use in obese children and adolescents – study protocol of a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of childhood obesity and insulin resistance is rising, increasing the risk of diabetes mellitus type 2. To prevent these complications, lifestyle intervention is the corner stone in treatment. However, long-term efficacy of lifestyle intervention is questionable. In addition to lifestyle intervention, pharmacological treatments have been explored. Metformin has been shown to be moderately effective to reduce BMI in obese adolescents with hyperinsulinemia. However, data on pharmacokinetics and long-term efficacy and safety are lacking as well as an evidence-based dosing regimen for this age group. The primary objective of the METFORMIN study is to determine the effect of adding metformin treatment to lifestyle intervention in reducing BMI in obese adolescents with insulin resistance. In addition, the pharmacokinetics of metformin in obese adolescents will be studied. Methods/design The METFORMIN study is a multi-centre prospective study that consists of two 18-month phases: a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial (part 1) and an open-label follow-up study (part 2). During part 1, the participants will be given metformin 1,000 mg or placebo twice daily and will be offered a lifestyle intervention programme; 144 participants will be included, 72 in each arm. Primary endpoints are reduction in body mass index, insulin resistance, and percentage body fat. Discussion This study will provide data on short- and long-term efficacy and safety of metformin and on the pharmacokinetics of metformin in obese adolescents. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT01487993; EudraCT nr. 2010-023980-17. Registration date: 06-01-2011 PMID:24899137

  2. 21 CFR 70.42 - Criteria for evaluating the safety of color additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Criteria for evaluating the safety of color additives. 70.42 Section 70.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL COLOR ADDITIVES Safety Evaluation § 70.42 Criteria for evaluating the safety of...

  3. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Model To Evaluate Intramuscular Tetracycline Treatment Protocols To Prevent Antimicrobial Resistance in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Amais; Græsbøll, Kaare; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Toft, Nils; Matthews, Louise

    2014-01-01

    High instances of antimicrobial resistance are linked to both routine and excessive antimicrobial use, but excessive or inappropriate use represents an unnecessary risk. The competitive growth advantages of resistant bacteria may be amplified by the strain dynamics; in particular, the extent to which resistant strains outcompete susceptible strains under antimicrobial pressure may depend not only on the antimicrobial treatment strategies but also on the epidemiological parameters, such as the composition of the bacterial strains in a pig. This study evaluated how variation in the dosing protocol for intramuscular administration of tetracycline and the composition of bacterial strains in a pig affect the level of resistance in the intestine of a pig. Predictions were generated by a mathematical model of competitive growth of Escherichia coli strains in pigs under specified plasma concentration profiles of tetracycline. All dosing regimens result in a clear growth advantage for resistant strains. Short treatment duration was found to be preferable, since it allowed less time for resistant strains to outcompete the susceptible ones. Dosing frequency appeared to be ineffective at reducing the resistance levels. The number of competing strains had no apparent effect on the resistance level during treatment, but possession of fewer strains reduced the time to reach equilibrium after the end of treatment. To sum up, epidemiological parameters may have more profound influence on growth dynamics than dosing regimens and should be considered when designing improved treatment protocols. PMID:25547361

  4. Evaluation of Approaches to Deal with Low-Frequency Nuisance Covariates in Population Pharmacokinetic Analyses.

    PubMed

    Lagishetty, Chakradhar V; Duffull, Stephen B

    2015-11-01

    Clinical studies include occurrences of rare variables, like genotypes, which due to their frequency and strength render their effects difficult to estimate from a dataset. Variables that influence the estimated value of a model-based parameter are termed covariates. It is often difficult to determine if such an effect is significant, since type I error can be inflated when the covariate is rare. Their presence may have either an insubstantial effect on the parameters of interest, hence are ignorable, or conversely they may be influential and therefore non-ignorable. In the case that these covariate effects cannot be estimated due to power and are non-ignorable, then these are considered nuisance, in that they have to be considered but due to type 1 error are of limited interest. This study assesses methods of handling nuisance covariate effects. The specific objectives include (1) calibrating the frequency of a covariate that is associated with type 1 error inflation, (2) calibrating its strength that renders it non-ignorable and (3) evaluating methods for handling these non-ignorable covariates in a nonlinear mixed effects model setting. Type 1 error was determined for the Wald test. Methods considered for handling the nuisance covariate effects were case deletion, Box-Cox transformation and inclusion of a specific fixed effects parameter. Non-ignorable nuisance covariates were found to be effectively handled through addition of a fixed effect parameter. PMID:26112250

  5. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model to evaluate intramuscular tetracycline treatment protocols to prevent antimicrobial resistance in pigs.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Amais; Græsbøll, Kaare; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Toft, Nils; Matthews, Louise; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2015-03-01

    High instances of antimicrobial resistance are linked to both routine and excessive antimicrobial use, but excessive or inappropriate use represents an unnecessary risk. The competitive growth advantages of resistant bacteria may be amplified by the strain dynamics; in particular, the extent to which resistant strains outcompete susceptible strains under antimicrobial pressure may depend not only on the antimicrobial treatment strategies but also on the epidemiological parameters, such as the composition of the bacterial strains in a pig. This study evaluated how variation in the dosing protocol for intramuscular administration of tetracycline and the composition of bacterial strains in a pig affect the level of resistance in the intestine of a pig. Predictions were generated by a mathematical model of competitive growth of Escherichia coli strains in pigs under specified plasma concentration profiles of tetracycline. All dosing regimens result in a clear growth advantage for resistant strains. Short treatment duration was found to be preferable, since it allowed less time for resistant strains to outcompete the susceptible ones. Dosing frequency appeared to be ineffective at reducing the resistance levels. The number of competing strains had no apparent effect on the resistance level during treatment, but possession of fewer strains reduced the time to reach equilibrium after the end of treatment. To sum up, epidemiological parameters may have more profound influence on growth dynamics than dosing regimens and should be considered when designing improved treatment protocols. PMID:25547361

  6. Evaluation of brain targeting efficiency of intranasal microemulsion containing olanzapine: pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic consideration.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rashmin B; Patel, Mrunali R; Bhatt, Kashyap K; Patel, Bharat G; Gaikwad, Rajiv V

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate olanzapine (OZP) -loaded microemulsions (OZPME) for intranasal delivery in the treatment of schizophrenia. The OZPME was formulated by the spontaneous microemulsification method and characterized for physicochemical parameters. Pharmacodynamic assessments (apomorphine - induced compulsive behavior and spontaneous locomotor activity) were performed using mice. All formulations were radiolabeled with technetium-99 ((99m)Tc), and biodistribution of drug in the brain was investigated using Swiss albino rats. Brain scintigraphy imaging in rabbits was performed to determine the uptake of the OZP into the brain. OZPME were found clear and stable with average globule size of 23.87 ± 1.07 nm. In pharmacodynamic assessments, significant (p < 0.05) difference in parameters estimated were found between the treated and control groups. (99m)Tc-labeled OZP solution (OZPS)/OZPME/OZP mucoadhesive microemulsion (OZPMME) were found to be stable and suitable for in vivo studies. Brain/blood ratio at all sampling points up to 8 h following intranasal administration of OZPMME compared to intravenous OZPME was found to be five to six times higher signifying larger extent of distribution of the OZP in brain. Drug targeting efficiency and direct drug transport were found to be highest for intranasal OZPMME, compared to intravenous OZPME. Furthermore, rabbit brain scintigraphy also demonstrated higher intranasal uptake of the OZP into the brain. This investigation demonstrates a prompt and larger extent of transport of OZP into the brain through intranasal OZPMME, which may prove beneficial for treatment of schizophrenia. PMID:24845478

  7. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the oral cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor AZD5438 when administered at intermittent and continuous dosing schedules in patients with advanced solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Boss, D. S.; Schwartz, G. K.; Middleton, M. R.; Amakye, D. D.; Swaisland, H.; Midgley, R. S.; Ranson, M.; Danson, S.; Calvert, H.; Plummer, R.; Morris, C.; Carvajal, R. D.; Chirieac, L. R.; Schellens, J. H. M.; Shapiro, G. I.

    2010-01-01

    Background: AZD5438 is an orally bioavailable inhibitor of cyclin E-cdk2, cyclin A-cdk2 and cyclin B-cdk1 complexes. Three phase I studies assessed the clinical safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of AZD5438 when administered in different dosing schedules. Patients and methods: AZD5438 was administered four times daily, once every 7 days (study 1), for 14 consecutive days followed by 7 days of rest (study 2), or continuously (study 3), to patients with advanced solid tumours. Dose escalation proceeded until the emergence of dose-limiting toxic effects. Results: Sixty-four patients were included across the three studies (19, 17 and 28, respectively). Nausea and vomiting were the most common adverse events. When dosed continuously, 40 mg four times daily was considered intolerable, and due to safety issues, all studies were terminated prematurely. Consequently, no intolerable dose was identified during the weekly schedule. Pharmacokinetics demonstrated dose-proportional exposure, high interpatient variability and accumulation after multiple doses. Skin biopsies indicated reduced retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation at cdk2 phospho-sites; other pharmacodynamic assessments did not reveal consistent trends. Conclusions: AZD5438 was generally well tolerated in a weekly dosing schedule, but not in continuous schedules. The clinical development programme for AZD5438 was discontinued owing to tolerability and exposure data from these studies. PMID:19825886

  8. 3S (Safeguards, Security, Safety) based pyroprocessing facility safety evaluation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, J.H.; Choung, W.M.; You, G.S.; Moon, S.I.; Park, S.H.; Kim, H.D.

    2013-07-01

    The big advantage of pyroprocessing for the management of spent fuels against the conventional reprocessing technologies lies in its proliferation resistance since the pure plutonium cannot be separated from the spent fuel. The extracted materials can be directly used as metal fuel in a fast reactor, and pyroprocessing reduces drastically the volume and heat load of the spent fuel. KAERI has implemented the SBD (Safeguards-By-Design) concept in nuclear fuel cycle facilities. The goal of SBD is to integrate international safeguards into the entire facility design process since the very beginning of the design phase. This paper presents a safety evaluation plan using a conceptual design of a reference pyroprocessing facility, in which 3S (Safeguards, Security, Safety)-By-Design (3SBD) concept is integrated from early conceptual design phase. The purpose of this paper is to establish an advanced pyroprocessing hot cell facility design concept based on 3SBD for the successful realization of pyroprocessing technology with enhanced safety and proliferation resistance.

  9. [Micronization of magnolia bark extract by RESS as well as dissolution and pharmacokinetics evaluation].

    PubMed

    He, Shuai; Lei, Zheng-jie; Zhang, Shou-yao; Zhang, Zhong-yi

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the feasibility and superiority of using rapid expansion of supercritical solution (RESS) technology in the field of traditional Chinese medicine. The extract of magnolia bark (EMB) was obtained by supercritical carbon dioxide (SCF-CO2) extraction technology. Microparticles of EMB were manufactured by RESS technology. The effects of operating temperature and pressure on the contents of the active ingredient in the particles were evaluated by HPLC. The effect of expansion conditions on the particle size distribution of EMB particles was investigated. The smallest sample (mean size: 4.7 microm) was obtained under the RESS condition: pressure of 25 MPa, temperature of 50 degrees C and a nozzle size of 100 microm. The characteristics of microparticles were also studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image analysis. The dissolution rate study showed that microparticles had a significantly faster dissolution rate than normal material particles. After oral raw EMB suspension, the mean areas under the plasma concentration-time curves (AUC(0-t)) of honokiol and magnolol were found to be (4.23 +/- 0.36) and (5.46 +/- 0.57) mg x h x L(-1), respectively, which were increased significantly, i.e. (5.41 +/- 0.63) and (7.24 +/- 0.83) mg x h x L(-1) when micronized EMB suspension was administered orally in SD rats (P < 0.05). Similarly, the mean maximum plasma concentrations of honokiol and magnolol increased from (1.55 +/- 0.22) and (2.35 +/- 0.14) mg x L(-1) (raw EMB) to (2.31 +/- 0.17) and (2.84 +/- 0.21) mg x L(-1) (micronized EMB), respectively. The results of t-test demonstrated that AUC(0-t) and Cmax value for honokiol and magnolol was significantly increased with the micronization compared to raw EBM (P < 0.05). This study demonstrated that the RESS was applicable for preparing microparticles of EMB at low operating temperature. The process was simple, free of environment pollution

  10. Evaluation of an Alaskan marine safety training program.

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, R

    1995-01-01

    The Alaska Marine Safety Education Association provides commercial fishermen with an intensive 18-24-hour course addressing emergency preparedness, emergency response, and survival training. This study is a retrospective evaluation of the effectiveness of the course in reducing drownings and hypothermia deaths among commercial fishermen from January 1, 1991, to December 31, 1994. None of the 114 fishermen who died during the study period were graduated from the course, and none of the 64 vessels on which a death occurred had an course-trained person on board. PMID:8570822

  11. Evaluation of the safety of epinephrine in digital nerve blockade

    PubMed Central

    Chapeskie, Henry; Juliao, Alexis; Payne, Sonja; Koichopolos, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the safety profile of lidocaine containing 1:200 000 to 1:100 000 epinephrine with concurrent tourniquet use in patients undergoing toe surgery. Design A retrospective case series analysis of toe procedures performed under digital blockade with adjuvant vasopressor from January 25, 2009, to May 31, 2014, was conducted. Exclusion criteria were limited to procedures performed without adjuvant vasopressor use. Setting A single clinic in Ontario. Participants A total of 1334 toe procedures performed in 937 patients. Main outcome measures The primary study outcome was the incidence of postoperative digital necrosis. Secondary outcomes included other postoperative complications including infection, reperfusion injury, persistent granulation, and damage to the nail matrix. Results In total, 1334 toe procedures were included in this study, of which 45 involved patients with a pre-existing diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. The overall incidence of postoperative complications was low (4.6%). No cases of digital ischemia or gangrenous necrosis were observed. Subgroup analysis of patients with and without diabetes showed no statistically significant difference in the rate of complications. Conclusion This study demonstrates the safety of adjuvant vasopressor use in digital nerve blockade of the toes within a large, diverse population. This study adds to a growing base of evidence on the safety of lidocaine with 1:200 000 to 1:100 000 epinephrine for digital anesthesia.

  12. Safety evaluation methodology for advanced coal extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, W.F.

    1981-07-15

    To be acceptable to the coal industry, an advanced extraction system must provide a significant improvement over conventional systems in cost, safety, environmental impact, and conservation of unmined coal. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation methodologies were developed to assist the designer in determining if a proposed extraction design will be safer than existing systems. The qualitative analysis is a process which tests the new system against regulations and hazards of existing similar systems. The analysis examines the soundness of the design, whether or not the major hazards have been eliminated or reduced, and how the reduction would be accomplished. The quantitative methodology provides the designer with a means of establishing the approximate impact of hazards on injury levels. The results are further weighted by peculiar geological elements, specialized safety training, peculiar mine environmental aspects, and reductions in labor force. The outcome is compared with injury level requirements based on similar, safer industries to get a measure of the new system's success in reducing injuries. This approach provides a more detailed and comprehensive analysis of hazards and their effects than existing safety analyses.

  13. Corporate Functional Management Evaluation of the LLNL Radiation Safety Organization

    SciTech Connect

    Sygitowicz, L S

    2008-03-20

    A Corporate Assess, Improve, and Modernize review was conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to evaluate the LLNL Radiation Safety Program and recommend actions to address the conditions identified in the Internal Assessment conducted July 23-25, 2007. This review confirms the findings of the Internal Assessment of the Institutional Radiation Safety Program (RSP) including the noted deficiencies and vulnerabilities to be valid. The actions recommended are a result of interviews with about 35 individuals representing senior management through the technician level. The deficiencies identified in the LLNL Internal Assessment of the Institutional Radiation Safety Program were discussed with Radiation Safety personnel team leads, customers of Radiation Safety Program, DOE Livermore site office, and senior ES&H management. There are significant issues with the RSP. LLNL RSP is not an integrated, cohesive, consistently implemented program with a single authority that has the clear roll and responsibility and authority to assure radiological operations at LLNL are conducted in a safe and compliant manner. There is no institutional commitment to address the deficiencies that are identified in the internal assessment. Some of these deficiencies have been previously identified and corrective actions have not been taken or are ineffective in addressing the issues. Serious funding and staffing issues have prevented addressing previously identified issues in the Radiation Calibration Laboratory, Internal Dosimetry, Bioassay Laboratory, and the Whole Body Counter. There is a lack of technical basis documentation for the Radiation Calibration Laboratory and an inadequate QA plan that does not specify standards of work. The Radiation Safety Program lack rigor and consistency across all supported programs. The implementation of DOE Standard 1098-99 Radiological Control can be used as a tool to establish this consistency across LLNL. The establishment of a site

  14. Curriculum and Evaluation Guide for Safety Education Programs. Research and Evaluation Report Series No. 40.00.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowry, Carlee S.

    Designed to assist Bureau of Indian Affairs school officials in the identification of safety education program needs, this evaluation guide focuses upon the basic operational components in a safety education program. The means for establishing an evaluation design for safety education are presented via a flexible model appropriate for most…

  15. Xingnaojing mPEG2000-PLA modified microemulsion for transnasal delivery: pharmacokinetic and brain-targeting evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ran; Zhang, Qing; Xu, Pan; Bai, Jie; Li, Pengyue; Du, Shouying; Lu, Yang

    2016-06-01

    Xingnaojing microemulsion (XNJ-M) administered intranasally is used for stroke treatment. In order to decrease the XNJ-M-induced mucosal irritation, XNJ-M modified by mPEG2000-PLA (XNJ-MM) were prepared in a previous work. The present work aimed to assess the impact of mPEG2000-PLA on pharmacokinetic features and brain-targeting ability of XNJ-M. The bioavailability and brain-target effects of borneol and geniposide in XNJ-M and XNJ-MM were compared in mice after intravenous (i.v.) and intranasal (i.n.) administrations. Gas chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, and ultra-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry methods were developed for the quantification of borneol and geniposide. Blood and brain samples were collected from mice at different time points after i.v. and i.n. treatments with borneol at 8.0 mg/kg, geniposide at 4.12 mg/kg. In addition, near-infrared fluorescence dye, 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethyl indotricarbocyanine iodide was loaded into microemulsions to evaluate the brain-targeting ability of XNJ-M and XNJ-MM by near-infrared fluorescence imaging in vivo and ex vivo. For XNJ-M and XNJ-MM, the relative brain targeted coefficients (Re) were 134.59% and 198.09% (borneol), 89.70% and 188.33% (geniposide), respectively. Besides, significant near-infrared fluorescent signal was detected in the brain after i.n. administration of microemulsions, compared with that of groups for i.v. administration. These findings indicated that mPEG2000-PLA modified microemulsion improved drug entry into blood and brain compared with normal microemulsion: the introduction of mPEG2000-PLA in microemulsion resulted in brain-targeting enhancement of both fat-soluble and water-soluble drugs. These findings provide a basis for the significance of mPEG2000-PLA addition in microemulsion, defining its effects on the drugs in microemulsion. PMID:26508078

  16. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 385 - Explanation of Safety Audit Evaluation Criteria

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Explanation of Safety Audit Evaluation Criteria A Appendix A to Part 385 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS SAFETY FITNESS PROCEDURES Pt. 385,...

  17. A Multi-centric Bioequivalence Trial in Ph+ Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients to Assess Bioequivalence and Safety Evaluation of Generic Imatinib Mesylate 400 mg Tablets

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Rachna; Sharma, Manju; Monif, Tausif; Iyer, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to characterize the pharmacokinetic profile and to assess bioequivalence of the sponsor’s test formulation (imatinib mesylate 400 mg tablets) with an innovator product (Gleevec 400 mg tablets, Novartis Pharmaceuticals) under fed conditions, in adult patients of Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myeloid leukemia (Ph+ CML) stabilized on imatinib mesylate 400 mg. In addition, the aim of this study was to monitor the safety profile of investigational medicinal products (IMPs). Materials and Methods A multicenter, randomized, open label, two-period, crossover, single dose bioequivalence study was designed for conduct under fed conditions in 42 adult Ph+ CML patients already stabilized on imatinib 400 mg tablets. Pharmacokinetic parameters Tmax, Cmax, and AUC0-24 were calculated using a non-compartmental model on validated WinNonlin software. Validated SAS software was used for statistical evaluation of data. The safety profile of investigational products was monitored during the course of study by applying a clinical process for recording observed untoward effects postadministration of investigational products. Results The 90% confidence intervals for the test/reference mean ratios of the ln-transformed PK variables Cmax (99.0%) and AUC0-24 (99.2%) were within an acceptable range of 80%-125%, as per bioequivalence assumptions. Both formulations were well tolerated after oral administration of IMPs. Conclusion The test product was found to be bioequivalent and safe, and thus can be used interchangeably in clinical practice. PMID:26875198

  18. Evaluation of Margins of Safety in Brazed Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury; Wang, Len; Powell, Mollie M.; Soffa, Matthew A.; Rommel, Monica L.

    2009-01-01

    One of the essential steps in assuring reliable performance of high cost critical brazed structures is the assessment of the Margin of Safety (MS) of the brazed joints. In many cases the experimental determination of the failure loads by destructive testing of the brazed assembly is not practical and cost prohibitive. In such cases the evaluation of the MS is performed analytically by comparing the maximum design loads with the allowable ones and incorporating various safety or knock down factors imposed by the customer. Unfortunately, an industry standard methodology for the design and analysis of brazed joints has not been developed. This paper provides an example of an approach that was used to analyze an AlBeMet 162 (38%Be-62%Al) structure brazed with the AWS BAlSi-4 (Al-12%Si) filler metal. A practical and conservative interaction equation combining shear and tensile allowables was developed and validated to evaluate an acceptable (safe) combination of tensile and shear stresses acting in the brazed joint. These allowables are obtained from testing of standard tensile and lap shear brazed specimens. The proposed equation enables the assessment of the load carrying capability of complex brazed joints subjected to multi-axial loading.

  19. Evaluation of the pharmacokinetics of oral amitriptyline and its active metabolite nortriptyline in fed and fasted Greyhound dogs.

    PubMed

    Norkus, C; Rankin, D; KuKanich, B

    2015-12-01

    This study reports the pharmacokinetics of oral amitriptyline and its active metabolite nortriptyline in Greyhound dogs. Five healthy Greyhound dogs were enrolled in a randomized crossover design. A single oral dose of amitriptyline hydrochloride (actual mean dose 8.1 per kg) was administered to fasted or fed dogs. Blood samples were collected at predetermined times from 0 to 24 h after administration, and plasma drug concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analyses were performed. Two dogs in the fasted group vomited following amitriptyline administration and were excluded from analysis. The range of amitriptyline CMAX for the remaining fasted dogs (n = 3) was 22.8-64.5 ng/mL compared to 30.6-127 ng/mL for the fed dogs (n = 5). The range of the amitriptyline AUCINF for the three fasted dogs was 167-720 h·ng/mL compared to 287-1146 h·ng/mL for fed dogs. The relative bioavailability of amitriptyline in fasted dogs compared to fed dogs was 69-91% (n = 3). The exposure of the active metabolite nortriptyline was correlated to amitriptyline exposure (R(2)  = 0.84). Due to pharmacokinetic variability and the small number of dogs completing this study, further studies are needed assessing the impact of feeding on oral amitriptyline pharmacokinetics. Amitriptyline may be more likely to cause vomiting in fasted dogs. PMID:25989225

  20. Identification of a novel selective H1-antihistamine with optimized pharmacokinetic properties for clinical evaluation in the treatment of insomnia.

    PubMed

    Moree, Wilna J; Li, Bin-Feng; Zamani-Kord, Said; Yu, Jinghua; Coon, Timothy; Huang, Charles; Marinkovic, Dragan; Tucci, Fabio C; Malany, Siobhan; Bradbury, Margaret J; Hernandez, Lisa M; Wen, Jianyun; Wang, Hua; Hoare, Samuel R J; Petroski, Robert E; Jalali, Kayvon; Yang, Chun; Sacaan, Aida; Madan, Ajay; Crowe, Paul D; Beaton, Graham

    2010-10-01

    Analogs of the known H(1)-antihistamine R-dimethindene with suitable selectivity for key GPCRs, P450 enzymes and hERG channel were assessed for metabolism profile and in vivo properties. Several analogs were determined to exhibit diverse metabolism. One of these compounds, 10a, showed equivalent efficacy in a rat EEG/EMG model to a previously identified clinical candidate and a potentially superior pharmacokinetic profile as determined from a human microdose study. PMID:20800486

  1. Recent progresses in the experimental methods and evaluation strategies of transporter functions for the prediction of the pharmacokinetics in humans.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Satoshi; Maeda, Kazuya; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2008-06-01

    Establishing the methods for the effective screening of compounds with optimal pharmacokinetic properties is of great importance to many scientists working in new drug discovery and development. This review deals with the methods by which in vivo pharmacokinetics in humans can be predicted from in vitro studies and from in vivo animal experiments. Direct extrapolation from animal studies to human pharmacokinetics is generally difficult because of species differences in the function of molecules involved in drug metabolism and transport. To overcome this problem, a "scaling factor," which relates in vivo animal studies with in vitro experiments, is often used for the accurate prediction. Several experimental systems for the functional analyses of membrane transporters have been developed and many reports have revealed that various transporters clearly govern the tissue dispositions of drugs in humans. This review covers the impact of membrane transporters on the pharmacokinetics, control of elimination pathways, and toxicity. Indeed, by utilizing transporter-deficient animals, some studies have clarified the importance of transporters in various types of tissue-specific toxicity. Transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions are one of the most important issues in clinical situation because some reports suggested that severe clinical incidents are caused by the inhibition of transporter-mediated uptake and efflux in clearance organs (liver and kidney) and at several barriers. The review also focuses on the clinical significance of genetic polymorphisms of transporters, as these can influence the plasma and tissue concentrations of some drugs. Finally, integrated information is presented based on multiple in vitro studies, including those on transporters. This should enable the prediction of the outcomes of drug exposure in cells, tissues, and individual organisms. PMID:18536908

  2. Guidelines for preparing criticality safety evaluations at Department of Energy non-reactor nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This document contains guidelines that should be followed when preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations that will be used to demonstrate the safety of operations performed at DOE non-reactor nuclear facilities. Adherence to these guidelines will provide consistency and uniformity in criticality safety evaluations (CSEs) across the complex and will document compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480.24.

  3. 29 CFR 1960.11 - Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance. 1960.11 Section 1960.11 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Administration § 1960.11 Evaluation of occupational safety...

  4. 29 CFR 1960.80 - Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... health programs. 1960.80 Section 1960.80 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Evaluation of Federal Occupational Safety and Health Programs § 1960.80 Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and...

  5. 29 CFR 1960.80 - Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... health programs. 1960.80 Section 1960.80 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Evaluation of Federal Occupational Safety and Health Programs § 1960.80 Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and...

  6. 29 CFR 1960.11 - Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance. 1960.11 Section 1960.11 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Administration § 1960.11 Evaluation of occupational safety...

  7. 29 CFR 1960.79 - Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs. 1960.79 Section 1960.79 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Evaluation of Federal Occupational Safety and Health...

  8. 29 CFR 1960.79 - Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs. 1960.79 Section 1960.79 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Evaluation of Federal Occupational Safety and Health...

  9. Evaluation of Sexual Dimorphism in the Efficacy and Safety of Simvastatin/Atorvastatin Therapy in a Southern Brazilian Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Smiderle, Lisiane; Lima, Luciana O.; Hutz, Mara Helena; der Sand, Cézar Roberto Van; der Sand, Luiz Carlos Van; Ferreira, Maria Elvira Wagner; Pires, Renan Canibal; Almeida, Silvana; Fiegenbaum, Marilu

    2014-01-01

    Background Dyslipidemia is the primary risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and statins have been effective in controlling lipid levels. Sex differences in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of statins contribute to interindividual variations in drug efficacy and toxicity. Objective To evaluate the presence of sexual dimorphism in the efficacy and safety of simvastatin/atorvastatin treatment. Methods Lipid levels of 495 patients (331 women and 164 men) were measured at baseline and after 6 ± 3 months of simvastatin/atorvastatin treatment to assess the efficacy and safety profiles of both drugs. Results Women had higher baseline levels of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) compared with men (p < 0.0001). After treatment, women exhibited a greater decrease in plasma TC and LDL-C levels compared with men. After adjustment for covariates, baseline levels of TC and LDL-C influenced more than 30% of the efficacy of lipid-lowering therapy (p < 0.001), regardless of sex. Myalgia [with or without changes in creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels] occurred more frequently in women (25.9%; p = 0.002), whereas an increase in CPK and/or abnormal liver function was more frequent in in men (17.9%; p = 0.017). Conclusions Our results show that baseline TC and LDL-C levels are the main predictors of simvastatin/atorvastatin therapy efficacy, regardless of sex. In addition, they suggest the presence of sexual dimorphism in the safety of simvastatin/atorvastatin. The effect of sex differences on receptors, transporter proteins, and gene expression pathways needs to be better evaluated and characterized to confirm these observations. PMID:25120083

  10. A Randomized Study of the Relative Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Safety of Alirocumab, a Fully Human Monoclonal Antibody to PCSK9, After Single Subcutaneous Administration at Three Different Injection Sites in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Lunven, Catherine; Paehler, Tobias; Poitiers, Franck; Brunet, Aurélie; Rey, Jacques; Hanotin, Corinne; Sasiela, William J

    2014-01-01

    Aims We investigated the relative pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitor alirocumab following injection at three different sites. Methods Sixty healthy subjects (39 male, 21 female; age 20–45 years) were randomized to receive a single subcutaneous injection of alirocumab 75 mg via 1-mL prefilled pen into the abdomen, upper arm, or thigh (NCT01785329). Subjects were followed for 85 days ± 2 days following study drug administration. Pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters for the systemic exposure of alirocumab were calculated, and levels of free PCSK9 were assessed. Percentage changes from baseline in LDL-C were compared between injection site groups using linear mixed-effects models. Results Alirocumab concentration–time profiles were similar, and free PCSK9 levels were reduced to approximately zero between Day 3 and Day 4 postinjection in all groups. LDL-C levels reached nadir on Day 15 postinjection in all groups with mean percentage reductions of 48.4% (abdomen), 39.5% (upper arm), and 45.6% (thigh) at this time point. A similar effect on LDL-C levels was seen across the entire time course of the study at all three injection sites. Treatment-emergent adverse events were experienced by 8/20 (abdomen), 11/20 (upper arm), and 13/20 (thigh) subjects. There were 2 mild/transient injection site reactions. There were no serious adverse events. Discussion A single subcutaneous administration of alirocumab 75 mg via prefilled pen was well tolerated with similar pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics when injected into the abdomen, upper arm, or thigh. Conclusion These results suggest that alirocumab can be interchangeably injected in the abdomen, upper arm, or thigh. PMID:25256660

  11. Population pharmacokinetic models for cefuroxime and metronidazole used in combination as prophylactic agents in colorectal surgery: Model-based evaluation of standard dosing regimens.

    PubMed

    Asín-Prieto, Eduardo; Soraluce, Amaia; Trocóniz, Iñaki F; Campo Cimarras, Eugenia; Sáenz de Ugarte Sobrón, Jaione; Rodríguez-Gascón, Alicia; Isla, Arantxazu

    2015-05-01

    The antibiotics used for prophylaxis in colorectal surgery must maintain appropriate plasma concentrations during the entire surgery to avoid surgical site infections caused by aerobes and anaerobes; cefuroxime plus metronidazole is one of the combinations used. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adequacy of cefuroxime plus metronidazole administration as prophylaxis in colorectal surgery. In total, 63 patients electively undergoing rectal or colon surgery were administered 1500mg of cefuroxime and 1500mg of metronidazole in 15-min and 1-h infusions, respectively, prior to surgery. Blood samples were withdrawn during and after surgery for determination of plasma concentrations by high-performance liquid chromatography. Population pharmacokinetic models were developed using NONMEM 7.2.0. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) simulations were performed to explore the ability of different dosage regimens to achieve the pharmacodynamic targets. Pharmacokinetics for both antibiotics were best described by a two-compartment model. Elimination of cefuroxime was conditioned by creatinine clearance (CLCr). The half-life of cefuroxime was 1.5h for patients with normal renal function and 4.9h in patients with renal impairment. Elimination and distribution of metronidazole were affected by patient body weight (BW). PK/PD analysis revealed that a single-dose protocol of 1500mg of cefuroxime and metronidazole is adequate in short surgeries (≤2h). However, for longer surgeries, recommendations are suggested depending on the patient's CLCr and BW. Additional doses of cefuroxime are needed for patients with moderate renal impairment or those presenting normal renal function. For metronidazole, an additional dose is needed for patients with a BW of 90kg. PMID:25758019

  12. Folic acid functionalized long-circulating co-encapsulated docetaxel and curcumin solid lipid nanoparticles: In vitro evaluation, pharmacokinetic and biodistribution in rats.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Harish; Surapaneni, Sunil Kumar; Tikoo, Kulbhushan; Singh, Charan; Burman, Rohani; Gill, Manjinder Singh; Suresh, Sarasija

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop folic acid functionalized long-circulating co-encapsulated docetaxel (DTX) and curcumin (CRM) solid lipid nanoparticles (F-DC-SLN) to improve the pharmacokinetic and efficacy of DTX therapy. F-DC-SLN was prepared by hot melt-emulsification method and optimized by face centered-central composite design (FC-CCD). The SLN was characterized in terms of size and size distribution, drug entrapment efficiency and release profile. The cytotoxicity and cell uptake of the SLN formulations were evaluated in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. The in vivo pharmacokinetic and biodistribution were studied in Wistar rats. F-DC-SLN exhibited 247.5 ± 3.40 nm particle size with 73.88 ± 1.08% entrapment efficiency and zeta potential of 14.53 ± 3.6 mV. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed spherical morphology of the SLN. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed the targeting efficacy of F-DC-SLN in MCF-7 cells. F-DC-SLN exhibited a significant increase in area under the curve (594.21 ± 64.34 versus 39.05 ± 7.41 μg/mL h) and mean residence time (31.14 ± 19.94 versus 7.24 ± 4.51 h) in comparison to Taxotere®. In addition, decreased DTX accumulation from F-DC-SLN in the heart and kidney in comparison to Taxotere may avoid to toxicity these vital organs. In conclusion, the F-DC-SLN improved the efficacy and pharmacokinetic profile of DTX exhibiting enhanced potential in optimizing breast cancer therapy. PMID:26878325

  13. Re-evaluation of the role of broad-spectrum cephalosporins against staphylococci by applying contemporary in-vitro results and pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic principles.

    PubMed

    Sader, H S; Bhavnani, S M; Ambrose, P G; Jones, R N; Pfaller, M A

    2007-02-01

    The potency of cefepime, ceftriaxone, and ceftazidime was assessed by CLSI broth microdilution methods against 41,644 S. aureus (63.2% oxacillin-susceptible) and 14,266 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS; 22.2% oxacillin-susceptible) through the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program database (1998-2004). Using normal volunteer pharmacokinetic data and a linear intermittent intravenous infusion model, and an animal-derived pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) target of > or = 40% time above MIC, expected probabilities of target attainment (PTA) for cephems were evaluated using Monte Carlo simulation. Current CLSI breakpoints would rank the tested agents cefepime > or = ceftriaxone > ceftazidime and by PK-PD PTA cefepime > ceftazidime > ceftriaxone. Cefepime has a potency advantage over ceftazidime (four- to eight-fold) and superiority at the usual dosing over ceftriaxone (22.7-66.1%) for oxacillin-susceptible staphylococci. Ceftazidime pharmacokinetic overcomes by-weight activity disadvantages, while a low proportion (<5%) of active free-drug penalizes ceftriaxone in the PTA calculations. PTA remained at > or = 0.9 to a breakpoint of 8 mg/L for cefepime (1 g q8 or 12 hours) and ceftazidime and to a breakpoint of 2 mg/L for ceftriaxone. Regardless of applied breakpoint (CLSI or PKPD), cefepime has the widest and most potent anti-staphylococcal activity among commonly used "third- or fourth-generation" cephems. When used at doses > or = 3 g/day, cefepime assures maximal coverage of oxacillin-susceptible staphylococci whether using existing (CLSI) or modified (PK-PD) breakpoints. Ceftriaxone should be used with caution. PMID:17309849

  14. SRTC criticality safety technical review: Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation 93-04 enriched uranium receipt

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbun, R.

    1993-10-13

    Review of NMP-NCS-930087, {open_quotes}Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation 93-04 Enriched Uranium Receipt (U), July 30, 1993, {close_quotes} was requested of SRTC (Savannah River Technology Center) Applied Physics Group. The NCSE is a criticality assessment to determine the mass limit for Engineered Low Level Trench (ELLT) waste uranium burial. The intent is to bury uranium in pits that would be separated by a specified amount of undisturbed soil. The scope of the technical review, documented in this report, consisted of (1) an independent check of the methods and models employed, (2) independent HRXN/KENO-V.a calculations of alternate configurations, (3) application of ANSI/ANS 8.1, and (4) verification of WSRC Nuclear Criticality Safety Manual procedures. The NCSE under review concludes that a 500 gram limit per burial position is acceptable to ensure the burial site remains in a critically safe configuration for all normal and single credible abnormal conditions. This reviewer agrees with that conclusion.

  15. Criticality safety evaluation report for K Basin filter cartridges

    SciTech Connect

    Schwinkendorf, K.N.

    1995-01-01

    A criticality safety evaluation of the K Basin filter cartridge assemblies has been completed to support operations without a criticality alarm system. The results show that for normal operation, the filter cartridge assembly is far below the safety limit of k{sub eff} = 0.95, which is applied to plutonium systems at the Hanford Site. During normal operating conditions, uranium, plutonium, and fission and corrosion products in solution are continually accumulating in the available void spaces inside the filter cartridge medium. Currently, filter cartridge assemblies are scheduled to be replaced at six month intervals in KE Basin, and at one year intervals in KW Basin. According to available plutonium concentration data for KE Basin and data for the U/Pu ratio, it will take many times the six-month replacement time for sufficient fissionable material accumulation to take place to exceed the safety limit of k{sub eff} = 0.95, especially given the conservative assumption that the presence of fission and corrosion products is ignored. Accumulation of sludge with a composition typical of that measured in the sand filter backwash pit will not lead to a k{sub eff} = 0.95 value. For off-normal scenarios, it would require at least two unlikely, independent, and concurrent events to take place before the k{sub eff} = 0.95 limit was exceeded. Contingencies considered include failure to replace the filter cartridge assemblies at the scheduled time resulting in additional buildup of fissionable material, the loss of geometry control from the filter cartridge assembly breaking apart and releasing the individual filter cartridges into an optimal configuration, and concentrations of plutonium at U/Pu ratios less than measured data for KE Basin, typically close to 400 according to extensive measurements in the sand filter backwash pit and plutonium production information.

  16. Evaluation of the Neurological Safety of Epidural Milnacipran in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seung Mo; Shin, Mee Ran; Kang, Kyung Ho; Kang, Hyun; Nahm, Francis Sahngun; Kim, Baek Hui; Lim, Young Jin; Lee, Sang Chul

    2012-01-01

    Background Milnacipran is a balanced serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor with minimal side effects and broad safety margin. It acts primarily on the descending inhibitory pain pathway in brain and spinal cord. In many animal studies, intrathecal administration of milnacipran is effective in neuropathic pain management. However, there is no study for the neurological safety of milnacipran when it is administered neuraxially. This study examined the neurotoxicity of epidural milnacipran by observing behavioral and sensory-motor changes with histopathological examinations of spinal cords in rats. Methods Sixty rats were divided into 3 groups, with each group receiving epidural administration of either 0.3 ml (3 mg) of milnacipran (group M, n = 20), 0.3 ml of 40% alcohol (group A, n = 20), or 0.3 ml of normal saline (group S, n = 20). Results There were no abnormal changes in the behavioral, sensory-motor, or histopathological findings in all rats of groups M and S over a 3-week observation period, whereas all rats in group A had abnormal changes. Conclusions Based on these findings, the direct epidural administration of milnacipran in rats did not present any evidence of neurotoxicity in behavioral, sensory-motor and histopathological evaluations. PMID:23091683

  17. Nuclear criticality safety evaluation of Spray Booth Operations in X-705, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Sheaffer, M.K.; Keeton, S.C.

    1993-09-20

    This report evaluates nuclear criticality safety for Spray Booth Operations in the Decontamination and Recovery Facility, X-705, at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. A general description of current procedures and related hardware/equipment is presented. Control parameters relevant to nuclear criticality safety are explained, and a consolidated listing of administrative controls and safety systems is developed. Based on compliance with DOE Orders and MMES practices, the overall operation is evaluated, and recommendations for enhanced safety are suggested.

  18. Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of SMT C1100, a 2-Arylbenzoxazole Utrophin Modulator, following Single- and Multiple-Dose Administration to Pediatric Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ricotti, Valeria; Spinty, Stefan; Roper, Helen; Hughes, Imelda; Tejura, Bina; Robinson, Neil; Layton, Gary; Davies, Kay

    2016-01-01

    Purpose SMT C1100 is a utrophin modulator being evaluated as a treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). This study, the first in pediatric DMD patients, reports the safety, tolerability and PK parameters of single and multiple doses of SMT C1100, as well as analyze potential biomarkers of muscle damage. Methods This multicenter, Phase 1 study enrolled 12 patients, divided equally into three groups (A–C). Group A were given 50 mg/kg on Days 1 and 11, and 50 mg/kg bid on Days 2 to 10. Group B and C received 100 mg/kg on Days 1 and 11; Group B and Group C were given 100 mg/kg bid and 100 mg/kg tid, respectively, on Days 2 to 10. A safety review was performed on all patients following the single dose and there was at least 2 weeks between each dose escalation, for safety and PK review. Adverse events (AEs) were monitored throughout the study. Results Most patients experienced mild AEs and there were no serious AEs. Two patients required analgesia for pain (headache, ear pain and toothache). One patient experienced moderate psychiatric AEs (abnormal behaviour and mood swings). Plasma concentrations of SMT C1100 at Days 1 and 11 indicated a high degree of patient variability regardless of dose. Unexpectedly the SMT C1100 levels were significantly lower than similar doses administered to healthy volunteers in an earlier clinical study. In general, individual baseline changes of creatine phosphokinase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase levels fell with SMT C1100 dosing. Conclusions SMT C1100 was well tolerated in pediatric DMD patients. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02383511 PMID:27055247

  19. Pharmacokinetic Comparability of a Biosimilar Trastuzumab Anticipated from Its Physicochemical and Biological Characterization.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Hernández, Mariana P; López-Morales, Carlos A; Piña-Lara, Nelly; Perdomo-Abúndez, Francisco C; Pérez, Néstor O; Revilla-Beltri, Jorge; Molina-Pérez, Aarón; Estrada-Marín, Larisa; Flores-Ortiz, Luis F; Ruiz-Argüelles, Alejandro; Medina-Rivero, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Comparability between a biosimilar and its reference product requires the evaluation of critical quality attributes that may impact on its pharmacological response. Herein we present a physicochemical characterization of a biosimilar trastuzumab focused on the attributes related to the pharmacokinetic response. Capillary isoelectrofocusing (cIEF) and cation exchange chromatography (CEX) were used to evaluate charge heterogeneity; glycosylation profiles were assessed through hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC); aggregates content was evaluated through size exclusion chromatography (SEC) while binding affinity to FcRn was evaluated using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The biosimilar trastuzumab and its reference product exhibited a high degree of similarity for the evaluated attributes. In regard to the pharmacokinetic parameters, randomized, double blind, and two-arm parallel and prospective study was employed after the administration of a single intravenous dose in healthy volunteers. No significant differences were found between the pharmacokinetic profiles of both products. Our results confirm that similarity of the critical quality attributes between a biosimilar product, obtained from a different manufacturing process, and the reference product resulted in comparable pharmacokinetic profiles, diminishing the uncertainty related to the biosimilar's safety and efficacy. PMID:26682224

  20. Pharmacokinetic Comparability of a Biosimilar Trastuzumab Anticipated from Its Physicochemical and Biological Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Hernández, Mariana P.; López-Morales, Carlos A.; Piña-Lara, Nelly; Perdomo-Abúndez, Francisco C.; Pérez, Néstor O.; Revilla-Beltri, Jorge; Molina-Pérez, Aarón; Estrada-Marín, Larisa; Flores-Ortiz, Luis F.; Ruiz-Argüelles, Alejandro; Medina-Rivero, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Comparability between a biosimilar and its reference product requires the evaluation of critical quality attributes that may impact on its pharmacological response. Herein we present a physicochemical characterization of a biosimilar trastuzumab focused on the attributes related to the pharmacokinetic response. Capillary isoelectrofocusing (cIEF) and cation exchange chromatography (CEX) were used to evaluate charge heterogeneity; glycosylation profiles were assessed through hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC); aggregates content was evaluated through size exclusion chromatography (SEC) while binding affinity to FcRn was evaluated using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The biosimilar trastuzumab and its reference product exhibited a high degree of similarity for the evaluated attributes. In regard to the pharmacokinetic parameters, randomized, double blind, and two-arm parallel and prospective study was employed after the administration of a single intravenous dose in healthy volunteers. No significant differences were found between the pharmacokinetic profiles of both products. Our results confirm that similarity of the critical quality attributes between a biosimilar product, obtained from a different manufacturing process, and the reference product resulted in comparable pharmacokinetic profiles, diminishing the uncertainty related to the biosimilar's safety and efficacy. PMID:26682224

  1. A phase 1 randomized study evaluating the effect of omeprazole on the pharmacokinetics of a novel 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 4 agonist, revexepride (SSP-002358), in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, David; Corcoran, Mary; Velinova, Maria; Hossack, Stuart; Hoppenbrouwers, Mieke; Martin, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background About 30% of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease continue to experience symptoms despite treatment with proton pump inhibitors. The 5-hydroxytryptamine 4 receptor agonist revexepride (SSP-002358) is a novel prokinetic that stimulates gastrointestinal motility, which has been suggested as a continued cause of symptoms in these patients. The aim of this study was to assess whether revexepride pharmacokinetics were affected by co-administration of omeprazole, in preparation for a proof-of-concept evaluation of revexepride added to proton pump inhibitor treatment. Methods In this phase 1, open-label, randomized, two-period crossover study, healthy adults aged 18–55 years were given a single dose of revexepride 1 mg or revexepride 1 mg + omeprazole 40 mg. Pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed for up to 48 hours after administration of the investigational product. Adverse events, clinical chemistry and hematology parameters, electrocardiograms, and vital signs were monitored. Results In total, 42 participants were enrolled and 40 completed the study. The median age was 24 years (18–54 years), 55% were women and 93% were white. The pharmacokinetic parameters of revexepride were similar without or with omeprazole co-administration. The mean area under the plasma concentration–time curve from time 0 to infinity (AUC0–∞) was 23.3 ng · h/mL (standard deviation [SD]: 6.33 ng · h/mL) versus 24.6 ng · h/mL (SD: 6.31 ng · h/mL), and maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax) were 3.89 ng/mL (SD: 1.30 ng/mL) and 4.12 ng/mL (SD: 1.29 ng/mL) in participants without and with omeprazole, respectively. For AUC0–∞ and Cmax, the 90% confidence intervals for the ratios of geometric least-squares means (with:without omeprazole) were fully contained within the pre-defined equivalence limits of 0.80–1.25. Mean apparent terminal phase half-life was 9.95 hours (SD: 2.06 hours) without omeprazole, and 11.0 hours (SD: 3.25 hours) with omeprazole. Conclusion

  2. Numerical Analysis for Structural Safety Evaluation of Butterfly Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Myung-Seob; Yoon, Joon-Yong; Park, Han-Yung

    2010-06-01

    Butterfly valves are widely used in current industry to control the fluid flow. They are used for both on-off and throttling applications involving large flows at relatively low operating pressure especially in large size pipelines. For the industrial application of butterfly valves, it must be ensured that the valve could be used safety under the fatigue life and the deformations produced by the pressure of the fluid. In this study, we carried out the structure analysis of the body and the valve disc of the butterfly valve and the numerical simulation was performed by using ANSYS v11.0. The reliability of valve is evaluated under the investigation of the deformation, the leak test and the durability of the valve.

  3. Clinical safety evaluation of a novel barrier protection cream.

    PubMed

    Slade, Herbert B; Fowler, Joseph; Reece, Barry T; Cargill, D Innes

    2008-10-01

    Patients with contact dermatitis require both preventive and therapeutic interventions to minimize their burden of disease. The ideal product would support resolution of inflamed skin without the use of glucocorticoids while protecting undamaged skin against further contact with irritants and antigens. COR806.805 (Tetrix Cream) is a novel barrier cream formulated for use on both lesional and nonlesional skin. Three clinical trials were conducted to evaluate the safety of this new product by studying sensitization, cumulative irritation, and effect on healing; a combined total of 265 participants completed the studies (210, 45, and 10, respectively), with no serious adverse events considered to be related to the product. Six mild adverse events were considered related or potentially related. As tested, COR806.805 is neither sensitizing nor irritating when applied to intact or lesional skin. Testing indicates that COR806.805 does not inhibit healing of allergic contact dermatitis lesions. PMID:19202672

  4. Safety evaluation of chemically modified beta-lactoglobulin administered intravaginally.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuetao; Qiu, Lixia; Wang, Yonghong; Wang, Yue; Meng, Yuanguang; Zhu, Yun; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Shibo

    2016-06-01

    Currently, there is no specific antiviral therapy for treatment of HPV infection. Jiang and colleagues previously reported that anhydride-modified proteins have inhibitory activities against multiple viruses including HPV. Here, we evaluated the safety of 3-hydroxyphthalic anhydride-modified bovine beta-lactoglobulin, designated JB01, vaginally applied in women infected by high-risk HPV. After the vaginal application of JB01 in 38 women for 3 months, no serious adverse events were reported, and normalization of the vaginal micro-environment has been observed. It can be concluded that JB01-BD is safe for vaginal use in HPV-infected women, suggesting its potential application for the treatment of HPV infection. J. Med. Virol. 88:1098-1101, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26629967

  5. Safety Evaluation for Hull Waste Treatment Process in JNC

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, H.; Kurakata, K.

    2002-02-26

    Hull wastes and some scrapped equipment are typical radioactive wastes generated from reprocessing process in Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP). Because hulls are the wastes remained in the fuel shearing and dissolution, they contain high radioactivity. Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has started the project of Hull Waste Treatment Facility (HWTF) to treat these solid wastes using compaction and incineration methods since 1993. It is said that Zircaloy fines generated from compaction process might burn and explode intensely. Therefore explosive conditions of the fines generated in compaction process were measured. As these results, it was concluded that the fines generated from the compaction process were not hazardous material. This paper describes the outline of the treatment process of hulls and results of safety evaluation.

  6. <