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Sample records for evaluate plasma activated

  1. Evaluation of the effects of a plasma activated medium on cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohades, S.; Laroussi, M.; Sears, J.; Barekzi, N.; Razavi, H.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of low temperature plasma with liquids is a relevant topic of study to the field of plasma medicine. This is because cells and tissues are normally surrounded or covered by biological fluids. Therefore, the chemistry induced by the plasma in the aqueous state becomes crucial and usually dictates the biological outcomes. This process became even more important after the discovery that plasma activated media can be useful in killing various cancer cell lines. Here, we report on the measurements of concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, a species known to have strong biological effects, produced by application of plasma to a minimum essential culture medium. The activated medium is then used to treat SCaBER cancer cells. Results indicate that the plasma activated medium can kill the cancer cells in a dose dependent manner, retain its killing effect for several hours, and is as effective as apoptosis inducing drugs.

  2. Evaluation of the effects of a plasma activated medium on cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mohades, S.; Laroussi, M. Sears, J.; Barekzi, N.; Razavi, H.

    2015-12-15

    The interaction of low temperature plasma with liquids is a relevant topic of study to the field of plasma medicine. This is because cells and tissues are normally surrounded or covered by biological fluids. Therefore, the chemistry induced by the plasma in the aqueous state becomes crucial and usually dictates the biological outcomes. This process became even more important after the discovery that plasma activated media can be useful in killing various cancer cell lines. Here, we report on the measurements of concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, a species known to have strong biological effects, produced by application of plasma to a minimum essential culture medium. The activated medium is then used to treat SCaBER cancer cells. Results indicate that the plasma activated medium can kill the cancer cells in a dose dependent manner, retain its killing effect for several hours, and is as effective as apoptosis inducing drugs.

  3. Evaluation of plasma enzyme activities using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry based steroid signatures.

    PubMed

    Ha, Young Wan; Moon, Ju-Yeon; Jung, Hyun-Jin; Chung, Bong Chul; Choi, Man Ho

    2009-12-15

    The simultaneous quantification of 65 plasma steroids, including 22 androgens, 15 estrogens, 15 corticoids and 13 progestins, was developed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The extraction efficiency of the catechol estrogens was improved by the addition of l-ascorbic acid in several steps. All steroids, as their trimethylsilyl derivatives, were well separated with good peak shapes within a 50min run. The devised method provided good linearity (correlation coefficient, r(2)>0.993), while the limit of quantification ranged from 0.2 to 2.0ngmL(-1). The precision (% CV) and accuracy (% bias) were 2.0-12.4% and 93.5-109.2%, respectively. The metabolic changes were evaluated by applying this method to plasma samples obtained from 26 healthy male subjects grouped according to the pre- and post-administration of dutasteride, which inhibits 5alpha-reductase isoenzyme types 1 and 2. The levels of three plasma steroids, such as dihydrotestosterone, 5alpha-androstanedione and allotetrahydrocortisol, were decreased significantly after drug administration, while the levels of testosterone and 5beta-androstane-3beta,17alpha-diol were increased. In addition, the ratios of the steroid precursors and their metabolites, which represent the activities of the related enzymes, were z-score transformed for visualization in heat maps generated using supervised hierarchical clustering analysis. These results validated the data transformation because 5alpha-reductase is an indicator for the biological actions of dutasteride. GC-MS base quantitative visualization might be found in the integration with the mining biomarkers in drug evaluations and hormone-dependent diseases. PMID:19939750

  4. Prospective evaluation of aminopeptidase activities in plasma and peripheral organs of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Zambotti-Villela, L; Yamasaki, S C; Villarroel, J S; Alponti, R F; Silveira, P F

    2008-06-01

    The cleavage of peptides by aminopeptidase enzyme types could be among the mechanisms related to certain disruptions on mediator and modulatory functions in diabetes mellitus. In order to examine this hypothesis, we measured representative aminopeptidase activities in tissues of peripheral organs of control and streptozotocin-diabetic rats. None of the examined aminopeptidase activities differed between diabetics and controls in plasma, ileum, stomach or lung. Soluble and membrane-associated alanyl, and membrane-associated cystyl aminopeptidase activities were higher in the kidney of diabetics. Decreased activity was observed in soluble and membrane-associated aspartyl and soluble dipeptidyl-peptidase IV, while increased activity was observed in soluble alanyl, arginyl, and cystyl aminopeptidases in the pancreas of diabetics. In the jejunum, soluble cystyl aminopeptidase increased in diabetics. Soluble arginyl and type-1-pyroglutamyl aminopeptidase and membrane-associated dipeptidyl-peptidase IV activities increased in the liver of diabetics. Membrane-associated dipeptidyl-peptidase IV and alanyl aminopeptidase activities in the spleen were higher in diabetics than in controls. Membrane-associated alanyl aminopeptidase activity also increased in the heart of diabetics. All these changes in streptozotocin-treated rats were avoided by the administration of insulin. Our comparative analysis of a diverse array of aminopeptidase activities supported the proposal that the regulation of peptide cleavage by these enzyme types is associated with the effects of streptozotocin-diabetes mellitus on peripheral organs. PMID:18591879

  5. Aerospatiale industrial thermal plasma activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrot, Maxime

    Details of nontransferred arc torches, plasma systems in industrial use and operational plasma applications are listed. A plasma application on a foundry cupola is detailed. The setting up of a plasma system is described. Research and development activities are summarized.

  6. Evaluation of neonatal exposure to cocaine on learning, activity, startle, scent marking, immobility, and plasma cocaine concentrations.

    PubMed

    Vorhees, C V; Inman-Wood, S L; Morford, L L; Reed, T M; Moran, M S; Pu, C; Cappon, G D

    2000-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine treatment produces equivocal effects on spatial learning and memory; however, no data are available on neonatal treatment as a model of human third-trimester exposure. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated on postnatal days (P) 1-10 or 11-20 with cocaine (15 mg/kg x 4 per day at 2-h intervals) or saline (P1-P20) and evaluated as adults in the Morris water maze and on tests of activity, startle, scent marking, swimming immobility, and sequential learning. Neonatal cocaine had no effect on mortality; however, early treatment reduced body weight, whereas later treatment did not. Neonatal cocaine had no effects on exploratory activity, swimming ability, sequential learning, multiday activity rhythms, scent marking, or swimming immobility, but augmented acoustic startle amplitude in the early-treated group. Neonatal cocaine also produced an interaction on spatial learning in which the cocaine early-treated males performed slightly more efficiently than controls. Plasma cocaine concentrations were significantly higher in the early-treated group than the later-treated group despite receiving the same weight-adjusted doses. It was concluded that neonatal cocaine, when administered during a stage of brain development analogous to human third trimester, induces few behavioral effects based on the assessments used in this study. PMID:10758355

  7. Evaluation of ADAMTS-13 activity in plasma using recombinant von Willebrand Factor A2 domain polypeptide as substrate.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Miguel A; Whitelock, Jody; Dong, Jing-fei

    2003-12-01

    The metalloprotease ADAMTS-13 cleaves von Willebrand factor (VWF), and is absent or severely reduced in the plasma of patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura (TTP). Under physiologic flowing conditions, the enzyme cleaves endothelial cell-derived ultra-large VWF multimers at the Y842/M843 peptide bond located in the A2 domain, where many mutations associated with Type 2A VWD cluster. These VWF mutants are more susceptible for cleavage activity, decreasing the large VWF multimers in the plasma. The susceptibility of a recombinant VWF-A2 domain to ADAMTS-13 and the potential application in detecting enzyme activity were investigated. In vitro, fluid phase cleavage of VWF by ADAMTS-13 requires denaturing conditions and prolonged incubation in order to estimate enzyme activity. We have measured ADAMTS-13 activity based on enzyme cleavage of a recombinant VWF-A2 domain under non-denaturing conditions. In our assay, enzyme activity was absent in plasma from congenital and acquired TTP patient, and blocked by each EDTA, monoclonal antibody VP-1 (peptide-specific antibody against residues 828-842 of VWF), and an ADAMTS-13 antibody purified from plasma of an acquired TTP patient. This novel recombinant VWF-A2 protein has potential utility as matrix for a rapid clinical measurement of plasma ADAMTS-13 activity. PMID:14652658

  8. Outreach Activities for Plasma Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, M.; Bannan, K.; Delooper, J.; Eastman, T.; Sweet, P.; Smith, T.

    1997-11-01

    The need for communication beyond experts from subfields of scientific inquiry has been long identified. In response to this need, new outreach activities for plasma science have begun to take shape and grow. One example of this increase in activity is the formation of the Coalition for Plasma Science. The focus of the Coalition's efforts is to enhance the understanding and support for plasma science in the scientific community, the education community, business and the general public. One of the Coalition's first activities was to coordinate the assembly of an eight panel exhibit entitled "Plasmas: Science and Technology for the 21st Century". The formation of the Coalition and the display will be described and some possible future activities will be outlined.

  9. The use of a dynamic hydrogen electrode as an electrochemical tool to evaluate plasma activated carbon as electrocatalyst support for direct methanol fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Carmo, Marcelo Roepke, Thorsten; Scheiba, Frieder; Roth, Christina; Moeller, Stephan; Fuess, Hartmut; Poco, Joao G.R.; Linardi, Marcelo

    2009-01-08

    The objectives of this study were to functionalize the carbon black surface by chemically introducing oxygenated groups using plasma technology. This should enable a better interaction of the carbon support with the metallic catalyst nanoparticles, hindering posterior support particle agglomeration and preventing loss of active surface. PtRu/C nanoparticles were anchored on the carbon supports by the impregnation method and direct reduction with hydrazine. Physical characterization of the materials was carried out using energy dispersive X-ray analysis and transmission electron microscopy. The screen printing technique was used to produce membrane electrode assemblies for single cell tests in methanol/air (DMFC). Tests were carried out using the dynamic hydrogen electrode as an electrochemical tool to evaluate the anode and cathode behavior separately.

  10. SAFE II: Large systems space plasma evaluation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruth, M. R., Jr.; Young, L. E.; Purvis, C. K.; Stevens, N. J.

    1983-01-01

    A shuttle flight experiment, the purpose of which is to obtain space data on the interaction of a high voltage solar array with the ambient space plasma is addressed. This flight experiment is a reflight of the solar array flight experiment, SAFE, except that three active solar array panels, electron release devices and plasma diagnostics are added. This experiment, SAFE 2, evaluates power loss due to parasitic current collected by the solar array, arcing on the solar array and perturbations to the plasma which may increase power loss and disturb plasma and charged particle science acquisition.

  11. Recombinant prolylcarboxypeptidase activates plasma prekallikrein.

    PubMed

    Shariat-Madar, Zia; Mahdi, Fakhri; Schmaier, Alvin H

    2004-06-15

    The serine protease prolylcarboxypeptidase (PRCP), isolated from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), is a plasma prekallikrein (PK) activator. PRCP cDNA was cloned in pMT/BIP/V5-HIS-C, transfected into Schneider insect (S2) cells, and purified from serum-free media. Full-length recombinant PRCP (rPRCP) activates PK when bound to high-molecular-weight kininogen (HK). Recombinant PRCP is inhibited by leupeptin, angiotensin II, bradykinin, anti-PRCP, diisopropyl-fluorophosphonate (DFP), phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), and Z-Pro-Proaldehyde-dimethyl acetate, but not by 1 mM EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid), bradykinin 1-5, or angiotensin 1-7. Corn trypsin inhibitor binds to prekallikrein to prevent rPRCP activation, but it does not directly inhibit the active site of either enzyme. Unlike factor XIIa, the ability of rPRCP to activate PK is blocked by angiotensin II, not by neutralizing antibody to factor XIIa. PRCP antigen is detected on HUVEC membranes using flow cytometry and laser scanning confocal microscopy. PRCP antigen does not colocalize with LAMP1 on nonpermeabilized HUVECs, but it partially colocalizes in permeabilized cells. PRCP colocalizes with all the HK receptors, gC1qR, uPAR, and cytokeratin 1 antigen, on nonpermeabilized HUVECs. PRCP activity and antigen expression on cultured HUVECs are blocked by a morpholino antisense oligonucleotide. These investigations indicate that rPRCP is functionally identical to isolated HUVEC PRCP and is a major HUVEC membrane-expressed, PK-activating enzyme detected in the intravascular compartment. PMID:14996700

  12. The Effect of Autologous Activated Platelet Rich Plasma (AA-PRP) Injection on Pattern Hair Loss: Clinical and Histomorphometric Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Cervelli, V.; Garcovich, S.; Bielli, A.; Cervelli, G.; Curcio, B. C.; Scioli, M. G.; Orlandi, A.; Gentile, P.

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the safety and clinical efficacy of AA-PRP injections for pattern hair loss. AA-PRP, prepared from a small volume of blood, was injected on half of the selected patients' scalps with pattern hair loss. The other half was treated with placebo. Three treatments were given for each patient, with intervals of 1 month. The endpoints were hair re-growth, hair dystrophy as measured by dermoscopy, burning or itching sensation, and cell proliferation as measured by Ki-67 evaluation. At the end of the 3 cycles of treatment, the patients presented clinical improvement in the mean number of hairs, with a mean increase of 18.0 hairs in the target area, and a mean increase in total hair density of 27.7 ( number of hairs/cm2) compared with baseline values. Microscopic evaluation showed the increase of epidermis thickness and of the number of hair follicles two weeks after the last AA-PRP treatment compared to baseline value (P < 0.05). We also observed an increase of Ki67+ keratinocytes of epidermis and of hair follicular bulge cells and a slight increase of small blood vessels around hair follicles in the treated skin compared to baseline (P < 0.05). PMID:24883322

  13. Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly Regeneration Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medlen, Amber; Abney, Morgan B.; Miller, Lee A.

    2011-01-01

    In April 2010 the Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) was delivered to the International Space Station (ISS). This technology requires hydrogen to recover oxygen from carbon dioxide. This results in the production of water and methane. Water is electrolyzed to provide oxygen to the crew. Methane is vented to space resulting in a loss of valuable hydrogen and unreduced carbon dioxide. This is not critical for ISS because of the water resupply from Earth. However, in order to have enough oxygen for long-term missions, it will be necessary to recover the hydrogen to maximize oxygen recovery. Thus, the Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) was designed to recover hydrogen from methane. During operation, the PPA produces small amounts of carbon that can ultimately reduce performance by forming on the walls and windows of the reactor chamber. The carbon must be removed, although mechanical methods are highly inefficient, thus chemical methods are of greater interest. The purpose of this effort was to determine the feasibility of chemically removing the carbon from the walls and windows of a PPA reactor using a pure carbon dioxide stream.

  14. Evaluation of a feline-specific multiplex, bead-based assay for detection of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and other immunologically active proteins in serum and plasma samples from cats.

    PubMed

    Halpin, Rachel E; Saunders, Rebecca S; Thompson, Beverly J; Rohde Newgent, Allison S; Amorim, Juliana; Melillo, Gabrielle N; DeClue, Amy E

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate a feline-specific multiplex, bead-based assay system for detection of recombinant and native proteins in serum samples and in EDTA-treated and heparinized plasma samples. SAMPLE Serum samples and EDTA-treated and heparinized plasma samples from 30 sick cats and 9 healthy client-owned cats and heparinized whole blood samples from 5 healthy purpose-bred cats. PROCEDURES Ability of the assay system to detect 19 recombinant and native immunologically active proteins in plasma and serum samples from healthy and purpose-bred cats was evaluated via spike-and-recovery tests, assessments of inter- and intra-assay variation, linearity results, and leukocyte stimulation. Effects of various concentrations of heparin and serum matrix solution on percentages of analytes recovered were also evaluated. Analyte concentrations in samples from healthy and sick cats were measured and compared between groups. RESULTS Percentages of analytes recovered were unsatisfactory for most assays. Serum and heparinized plasma samples yielded better recovery results than did EDTA-treated plasma samples. Use of serum matrix solution did not improve results. Use of heparin concentrations greater than the recommended range affected the results. Linearity of results was difficult to assess because of the poor recovery. For the analytes that were recovered sufficiently for assessment, linearity appeared to be reasonable despite the limited detection. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Poor percentages of analytes recovered and adverse effects of sample protein matrix limited the usefulness of the multiplex, bead-based assay system for measurement of immunologically active proteins in solutions with high protein content; however, recovery results were fairly linear, potentially allowing evaluation of feline plasma or serum samples with high analyte concentrations. PMID:27111017

  15. Stationary plasma thruster evaluation in Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.

    1992-01-01

    A team of electric propulsion specialists from U.S. government laboratories experimentally evaluated the performance of a 1.35-kW Stationary Plasma Thruster (SPT) at the Scientific Research Institute of Thermal Processes in Moscow and at 'Fakel' Enterprise in Kaliningrad, Russia. The evaluation was performed using a combination of U.S. and Russian instrumentation and indicated that the actual performance of the thruster appears to be close to the claimed performance. The claimed performance was a specific impulse of 16,000 m/s, an overall efficiency of 50 percent, and an input power of 1.35 kW, and is superior to the performance of western electric thrusters at this specific impulse. The unique performance capabilities of the stationary plasma thruster, along with claims that more than fifty of the 660-W thrusters have been flown in space on Russian spacecraft, attracted the interest of western spacecraft propulsion specialists. A two-phase program was initiated to evaluate the stationary plasma thruster performance and technology. The first phase of this program, to experimentally evaluate the performance of the thruster with U.S. instrumentation in Russia, is described in this report. The second phase objective is to determine the suitability of the stationary plasma thruster technology for use on western spacecraft. This will be accomplished by bringing stationary plasma thrusters to the U.S. for quantification of thruster erosion rates, measurements of the performance variation as a function of long-duration operation, quantification of the exhaust beam divergence angle, and determination of the non-propellant efflux from the thruster. These issues require quantification in order to maximize the probability for user application of the SPT technology and significantly increase the propulsion capabilities of U.S. spacecraft.

  16. BOOK REVIEW: Physics of Space Plasma Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, N. F.

    2007-11-01

    This book provides a timely review of our present understanding of plasma phenomena in magnetized terrestrial and solar space plasmas. The author's emphasis is on the fluid and particle modeling and interpretation of observed active processes in space plasmas, i.e. `the physical background of large plasma eruptions in space'. It is somewhat alarming for a plasma physicist to read that an emphasis on processes in spatially inhomogeneous plasmas means that the work `... excludes a considerable fraction of the available methods in space plasma physics, such as the theory of waves, instabilities and wave particle interactions on a homogeneous background', particularly in light of the fact that much of our knowledge of these plasmas is derived from observations of such waves. However, it is clear on reading the book that such a restriction is not a disadvantage, but allows the author to concentrate on the main theme of the book, namely the use of fluid and particle pictures to model the equilibrium and active states of space plasmas. There are many other books which cover the wave aspects of space plasmas, and would complement this book. The book's coverage is based on the extensive and profound research of the author and his colleagues in the area of fluid and particle modeling of space plasma structures. After an introduction to the physical setting of active plasmas, and a necessarily concise, but effective, discussion of the fluid and particle models to be used, the steady states of the magnetized plasmas of interest are treated, including the magnetosphere, solar plasmas and current sheets. Next the dynamics of unstable states is covered, including MHD and tearing instabilities, and nonlinear aspects, with a detailed discussion of magnetic reconnection. Finally, the models are applied to magnetospheric and solar observations. The book is attractively written and produced, and this reviewer managed to find a minimum number of errors. A particularly attractive

  17. Contact activation of blood-plasma coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golas, Avantika

    Surface engineering of biomaterials with improved hemocompatibility is an imperative, given the widespread global need for cardiovascular devices. Research summarized in this dissertation focuses on contact activation of FXII in buffer and blood plasma frequently referred to as autoactivation. The extant theory of contact activation imparts FXII autoactivation ability to negatively charged, hydrophilic surfaces. According to this theory, contact activation of plasma involves assembly of proteins comprising an "activation complex" on activating surfaces mediated by specific chemical interactions between complex proteins and the surface. This work has made key discoveries that significantly improve our core understanding of contact activation and unravel the existing paradigm of plasma coagulation. It is shown herein that contact activation of blood factor XII (FXII, Hageman factor) in neat-buffer solution exhibits a parabolic profile when scaled as a function of silanized-glass-particle activator surface energy (measured as advancing water adhesion tension t°a=g° Iv costheta in dyne/cm, where g°Iv is water interfacial tension in dyne/cm and theta is the advancing contact angle). Nearly equal activation is observed at the extremes of activator water-wetting properties --36 < t°a < 72 dyne/cm (O° ≤ theta < 120°), falling sharply through a broad minimum within the 20 < t°a < 40 dyne/cm (55° < theta < 75°). Furthermore, contact activation of FXII in buffer solution produces an ensemble of protein fragments exhibiting either procoagulant properties in plasma (proteolysis of blood factor XI or prekallikrein), amidolytic properties (cleavage of s-2302 chromogen), or the ability to suppress autoactivation through currently unknown biochemistry. The relative proportions of these fragments depend on activator surface chemistry/energy. We have also discovered that contact activation is moderated by adsorption of plasma proteins unrelated to coagulation through an

  18. Plasma etching a ceramic composite. [evaluating microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, David R.; Leonhardt, Todd A.; Sanders, William A.

    1992-01-01

    Plasma etching is found to be a superior metallographic technique for evaluating the microstructure of a ceramic matrix composite. The ceramic composite studied is composed of silicon carbide whiskers (SiC(sub W)) in a matrix of silicon nitride (Si3N4), glass, and pores. All four constituents are important in evaluating the microstructure of the composite. Conventionally prepared samples, both as-polished or polished and etched with molten salt, do not allow all four constituents to be observed in one specimen. As-polished specimens allow examination of the glass phase and porosity, while molten salt etching reveals the Si3N4 grain size by removing the glass phase. However, the latter obscures the porosity. Neither technique allows the SiC(sub W) to be distinguished from the Si3N4. Plasma etching with CF4 + 4 percent O2 selectively attacks the Si3N4 grains, leaving SiC(sub W) and glass in relief, while not disturbing the pores. An artifact of the plasma etching reaction is the deposition of a thin layer of carbon on Si3N4, allowing Si3N4 grains to be distinguished from SiC(sub W) by back scattered electron imaging.

  19. Biochar activated by oxygen plasma for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Dubey, Mukul; Kharel, Parashu; Gu, Zhengrong; Fan, Qi Hua

    2015-01-01

    Biochar, also known as black carbon, is a byproduct of biomass pyrolysis. As a low-cost, environmental-friendly material, biochar has the potential to replace more expensive synthesized carbon nanomaterials (e.g. carbon nanotubes) for use in future supercapacitors. To achieve high capacitance, biochar requires proper activation. A conventional approach involves mixing biochar with a strong base and baking at a high temperature. However, this process is time consuming and energy inefficient (requiring temperatures >900 °C). This work demonstrates a low-temperature (<150 °C) plasma treatment that efficiently activates a yellow pine biochar. Particularly, the effects of oxygen plasma on the biochar microstructure and supercapacitor characteristics are studied. Significant enhancement of the capacitance is achieved: 171.4 F g-1 for a 5-min oxygen plasma activation, in comparison to 99.5 F g-1 for a conventional chemical activation and 60.4 F g-1 for untreated biochar. This enhancement of the charge storage capacity is attributed to the creation of a broad distribution in pore size and a larger surface area. The plasma activation mechanisms in terms of the evolution of the biochar surface and microstructure are further discussed.

  20. U.S. BURNING PLASMA ORGANIZATION ACTIVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond J. Fonck

    2009-08-11

    The national U.S. Burning Plasma Organization (USBPO) was formed to provide an umbrella structure in the U.S. fusion science research community. Its main purpose is the coordination of research activities in the U.S. program relevant to burning plasma science and preparations for participation in the international ITER experiment. This grant provided support for the continuing development and operations of the USBPO in its first years of existence. A central feature of the USBPO is the requirement for broad community participation in and governance of this effort. We concentrated on five central areas of activity of the USBPO during this grant period. These included: 1) activities of the Director and support staff in continuing management and development of the USBPO activity; 2) activation of the advisory Council; 3) formation and initial research activities of the research community Topical Groups; 4) formation of Task Groups to perform specific burning plasma related research and development activities; 5) integration of the USBPO community with the ITER Project Office as needed to support ITER development in the U.S.

  1. Modulation of Erythrocyte Plasma Membrane Redox System Activity by Curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prabhakar; Kesharwani, Rajesh Kumar; Misra, Krishna; Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane redox system (PMRS) is an electron transport chain system ubiquitously present throughout all cell types. It transfers electron from intracellular substrates to extracellular acceptors for regulation of redox status. Curcumin, isolated from Curcuma longa, has modulatory effects on cellular physiology due to its membrane interaction ability and antioxidant potential. The present study investigates the effect of curcumin on PMRS activity of erythrocytes isolated from Wistar rats in vitro and in vivo and validated through an in silico docking simulation study using Molegro Virtual Docker (MVD). Effects of curcumin were also evaluated on level of glutathione (GSH) and the oxidant potential of plasma measured in terms of plasma ferric equivalent oxidative potentials (PFEOP). Results show that curcumin significantly (p < 0.01) downregulated the PMRS activity in a dose-dependent manner. Molecular docking results suggest that curcumin interacts with amino acids at the active site cavity of cytochrome b5 reductase, a key constituent of PMRS. Curcumin also increased the GSH level in erythrocytes and plasma while simultaneously decreasing the oxidant potential (PFEOP) of plasma. Altered PMRS activity and redox status are associated with the pathophysiology of several health complications including aging and diabetes; hence, the above finding may explain part of the role of curcumin in health beneficial effects. PMID:26904287

  2. Multiple plasma enzyme activities in liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, T.; Janota, I.; Smith, M. J. H.

    1961-01-01

    The measurement of the plasma activities of glutamic-oxaloacetic and glutamic-pyruvic transaminases, aldolase, cholinesterase, and isocitric, lactic, and phosphogluconic dehydrogenases in random samples of blood was found to be of no value in the differential diagnosis of hepatitis, obstructive jaundice, hepatic cirrhosis, and neoplastic conditions involving the liver. Serial determinations of the enzyme activities provided useful information about the course of certain hepatic disorders, particularly acute viral hepatitis. PMID:13711559

  3. Contact Activation of Blood Plasma Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Erwin A.; Siedlecki, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    This opinion identifies inconsistencies in the generally-accepted surface biophysics involved in contact activation of blood-plasma coagulation, reviews recent experimental work aimed at resolving inconsistencies, and concludes that this standard paradigm requires substantial revision to accommodate new experimental observations. Foremost among these new findings is that surface-catalyzed conversion of the blood zymogen factor XII (FXII, Hageman factor) to the enzyme FXIIa ( FXII→surfaceFXIIa, a.k.a. autoactivation) is not specific for anionic surfaces, as proposed by the standard paradigm. Furthermore, it is found that surface activation is moderated by the protein composition of the fluid phase in which FXII autoactivation occurs by what appears to be a protein adsorption-competition effect. Both of these findings argue against the standard view that contact activation of plasma coagulation is potentiated by assembly of activation-complex proteins (FXII, FXI, prekallikrein, and high-molecular-weight kininogen) directly onto activating surfaces (procoagulants) through specific protein/surface interactions. These new findings supplement the observation that adsorption behavior of FXII and FXIIa is not remarkably different from a wide variety of other blood proteins surveyed. Similarity in adsorption properties further undermines the idea that FXII and/or FXIIa are distinguished from other blood proteins by unusual adsorption properties resulting in chemically-specific interactions with activating anionic surfaces. PMID:19168215

  4. Electrochemical Evaluation of Pyrite Films Prepared by Plasma Spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, R.A.; Reinhardt, F.W.

    1998-10-30

    Thermally activated batteries use electrodes that are typically fabricated by cold pressing of powder. In the LiSi/FeS2 system, natural (mineral) pyrite is used for the cathode. In an effort to increase the energy density and specific energy of these batteries, flame and plasma spraying to form thin films of pyrite cathodes were evaluated. The films were deposited on a 304 stainless steel substrate (current collector) and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and x-ray dlfllaction. The films were electrochemically tested in single cells at 5000C and the petiormance compared to that of standard cells made with cold-pressed powders. The best results were obtained with material deposited by de-arc plasma spraying with a proprietq additive to suppress thermal decomposion of the pyrite.

  5. Relativistic plasma dielectric tensor evaluation based on the exact plasma dispersion functions concept

    SciTech Connect

    Castejon, F.; Pavlov, S. S.

    2006-07-15

    The fully relativistic plasma dielectric tensor for any wave and plasma parameter is estimated on the basis of the exact plasma dispersion functions concept. The inclusion of this concept allows one to write the tensor in a closed and compact form and to reduce the tensor evaluation to the calculation of those functions. The main analytical properties of these functions are studied and two methods are given for their evaluation. The comparison between the exact dielectric tensor with the weakly relativistic approximation, widely used presently in plasma waves calculations, is given as well as the range of plasma temperature, harmonic number, and propagation angle in which the weakly relativistic approximation is valid.

  6. Evaluation of Pulsed Plasma Thruster Micropulsing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, Lynn

    2004-01-01

    This paper evaluates the concept of pulsed plasma thruster (PPT) micropulsing. Micropulsing was a premise behind a power processing unit (PPU) and an energy storage unit (ESU) design that for certain mission profiles, it was advantageous to operate a PPT at lower energy but higher frequency rather than at a higher energy but lower frequency. This premise allows for reductions in the ESU volume and mass without paying a penalty in thrust. To complete the evaluation, an independent spark plug initiation unit, a high voltage power supply and a variety of mica foil capacitors at 2.6, 5, 10, and 20 capacitance were used to conduct a series of tests on a single PPT to map performance levels of thrust, impulse bit, efficiency and specific impulse over a comparable power range. Testing at NASA Glenn Research Center was conducted with breadboard PPT hardware. The test results showed that operating in the lower energy ESU micropulsing mode produced similar thrust levels to a higher energy ESU operating at high power level. Further testing however showed a reduction in specific impulse and efficiency when the smaller capacitances were used at the highest power levels. This would require more fuel mass for a mission that was predominately high power, potentially negating the ESU mass savings. Therefore, micropulsing is advantageous where most of a mission profile occurs at low power, but retains the ability to conduct high thrust maneuvers when necessary.

  7. Sex and storage affect cholinesterase activity in blood plasma of Japanese quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.

    1989-01-01

    Freezing at -25?C had confounding effects on cholinesterase (ChE) activity in blood plasma from breeding female quail, but did not affect ChE activity in plasma from males. Plasma ChE activity of control females increased consistently during 28 days of storage while both carbamate- and cidrotophos-inhibited ChE decreased. Refrigeration of plasma at 4?C for 2 days had little effect of ChE activity. Plasma ChE activity was averaged about 34% higher in breeding males than in females. Extreme caution should be exercised in use of blood plasma for evaluation of anti ChE exposure in free-living birds.

  8. [Plasma cholinesterase activity in hepatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Araoud, Manel; Mhenni, Hamida; Hellara, Ilhem; Hellara, Olfa; Neffati, Fadoua; Douki, Wahiba; Mili, Marwa; Saffar, Hammouda; Najjar, Mohamed Fadhel

    2013-01-01

    Plasma cholinesterase activity (ChE) may vary in some pathological circumstances. We studied the changes in activity of this enzyme according to the type of liver injury, to assess the interest of this parameter in the diagnosis of liver diseases. Our study was performed on 102 patients with different liver diseases and 53 healthy controls. The ChE activity was lower in patients compared to control group (p < 0.0001), and more pronounced in cirrhotic patients compared to those suffering from hepatitis. Elevated activities of AST, ALT, GGT and ALP and bilirubinemia, and decreased albuminemia were noted in patients compared to controls (p < 0.001). Hypoalbuminemia was significantly important in cirrhotic patients compared to those suffering from cholestasis or hepatitis. A correlation between ChE and bilirubin, albumin and serum protein was found in patients with cirrhosis or those with chronic hepatitis. A significantly lower activity of ChE was found in patients with hepatic insufficiency (HI). In case of suspicion of HI, the prescription of ChE activity could guide or confirm the diagnosis of the impairment. PMID:23747666

  9. Plasma-Activated Sintering of Aluminum Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, J. E.; Risbud, S. H.; Groza, J. R.; Yamazaki, K.

    1993-10-01

    The use of a new plasma- activated sintering (PAS) process to densify aluminum nitride (AIN) powders to nearly full theoretical density (97 to >99%) in 5 to 10 min was investigated. The process consists of a pulse activation step, followed by sintering at 1730 to 1800 °C using resistance heating in carbon dies. Submicron size (~0.44 μm) AIN powders of low oxygen content (<1 wt%) were consolidated to near full density in both air and vacuum with no sintering aids or binders. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination revealed an equiaxed, submicron grain structure (~0.77 μm) with no apparent pores or intergranular phases. X- ray powder diffraction revealed no secondary crystalline phases.

  10. Prolylcarboxypeptidase Independently Activates Plasma Prekallikrein (Fletcher Factor)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J.; Matafonov, A.; Madkhali, H.; Mahdi, F.; Watson, D.; Schmaier, A.H.; Gailani, D.; Shariat-Madar, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Prolylcarboxypeptidase isoform 1 (PRCP1) is capable of regulating numerous autocrines and hormones, such as angiotensin II, angiotensin III, αMSH1-13, and DesArg9 bradykinin. It does so by cleaving a C-terminal PRO-X bond. Recent work also indicates that the human PRCP1 activates plasma prekallikrein (PK) to kallikrein on endothelial cells through an uncharacterized mechanism. This study aims to identify PRCP1 binding interaction and cleavage site on PK. Recently, a cDNA encoding a novel splice variant of the human PRCP1 was identified. This isoform differed only in the N-terminal region of the deduced amino acid sequence. Using structural and functional studies, a combination of peptide mapping and site-directed mutagenesis approaches were employed to investigate the interaction of PRCP1 with PK. Three PRCP peptides, in decreasing order of potency, from 1) the N-terminus of the secreted protein, 2) spanning the opening of the active site pocket, and 3) in the dimerization region inhibit PRCP activation of PK on endothelial cells. Investigations also tested the hypothesis that PRCP cleavage site on PK is between its C-terminal Pro 637 (P637) and Ala 638 (A638). Recombinant forms of PK with C-terminal alanine mutagenesis or a stop codon is activated equally as wild type PK by PRCP. In conclusion, PRCP1 interacts with PK at multiple sites for PK activation. PRCP1 also enhances FXIIa activation of PK, suggesting that its activation site on PK is not identical to that of FXIIa. PMID:25324000

  11. Evaluating Guidance Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanborn, Marshall P.

    This report discusses one of the consistent problems in school counseling and guidance-that of furnishing concrete evidence concerning the effects of counseling and guidance activities on the development of children. The following causal factors are discussed: (1) the difficulty of pinning down abstractly stated goals in an operational manner at…

  12. Plasma catecholamine activity in chronic lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    deCastro, F.J.

    1990-04-01

    Plasma catecholamines where measured in 15 children with chronic lead poisoning and 15 matched controls by radioimmunassay. The data suggest that plasma catecholamines (norepinephrine and epinphrine) were significantly elevated in chronic lead poisoning. Plasma catecholamine elevation may well be important in the clinical finding of hyperactivity and hypertension associated with chronic lead poisoning.

  13. EVALUATION OF AN INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA, MULTICHANNEL SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    An inductively coupled plasma, multielement atomic emission spectrometric analysis system has been evaluated with respect to the Environmental Protection Agency's need for a rapid method for determination of trace elemental concentrations in water. Data are presented on detection...

  14. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: RETECH'S PLASMA CENTRIFUGAL FURNACE - VOLUME I

    EPA Science Inventory

    A demonstration of the Retech, Inc. Plasma Centrifugal Furnace (PCF) was conducted under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program at the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Component Development and Integration Facility in Butte, Montana. The furnace uses heat gen...

  15. Solar cell modules for plasma interaction evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A plasma interaction analysis in support of the solar electric propulsion subsystem examined the effects of a large high voltage solar array interacting with an ion thruster produced plasma. Two solar array test modules consisting of 36 large area wraparound contact solar cells welded to a flexible Kapton integrated circuit substrate were abricated. The modules contained certain features of the effects of insulation, din-holes, and bonding of the cell to the substrate and a ground plane. The possibility of a significant power loss occurring due to the collection of charged particles on the solar array interconnects was the focus of the research.

  16. AGE-DEPENDENT CHANGES IN ACTIVITY OF MALLARD PLASMA CHOLINESTERASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plasma acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butrylcholinesterase (BChE) activity was measured repeatedly in 27 mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings between 7 and 85 days of age to determine age-dependent changes in enzyme activity. Plasma AChE, BChe, and total cholinesterase (ChE) a...

  17. Numerical Investigation of Plasma Active Flow Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Baigang; Li, Feng; Zhang, Shanshan; Wang, Jingyu; Zhang, Lijuan; Zhao, Erlei

    2010-12-01

    Based on the theory of EHD (electronhydrodynamic), a simplified volume force model is applied to simulation to analyze the traits of plasma flow control in flow field, in which the cold plasma is generated by a DBD (dielectric-barrier-discharge) actuator. With the para-electric action of volume force in electric field, acceleration characteristics of the plasma flow are investigated for different excitation intensities of RF (radio frequency) power for the actuator. Furthermore, the plasma acceleration leads to an asymmetric distribution of flow field, and hence induces the deflection of jet plume, then results in a significant deflection angle of 6.26° thrust-vectoring effect. It appears that the plasma flow control technology is a new tentative method for the thrust-vectoring control of a space vehicle.

  18. Alternative pathways of thromboplastin-dependent activation of human factor X in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Marlar, R.A.; Griffin, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    To determine the interrelationships of the major coagulation pathways, the activation of 3H-labeled factor X in normal and various deficient human plasmas was evaluated when clotting was triggered by dilute rabbit or human thromboplastin. Various dilutions of thromboplastin and calcium were added to plasma samples containing 3H-factor X, and the time course of factor X activation was determined. At a 1/250 dilution of rabbit brain thromboplastin, the rate of factor X activation in plasmas deficient in factor VIII or factor IX was 10% of the activation rate of normal plasma or of factor XI deficient plasma. Reconstitution of the deficient plasmas with factors VIII or IX, respectively, reconstituted normal factor X activation. Similar results were obtained when various dilutions of human thromboplastin replaced the rabbit thromboplastin. From these plasma experiments, it is inferred that the dilute thromboplastin-dependent activation of factor X requires factors VII, IX, and VIII. An alternative extrinsic pathway that involves factors IX and VIII may be the physiologic extrinsic pathway and hence help to explain the consistent clinical observations of bleeding diatheses in patients deficient in factors IX or VIII.

  19. Comparison of Plasma Activation of Thin Water Layers by Direct and Remote Plasma Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Plasma activation of liquids is now being investigated for a variety of biomedical applications. The plasma sources used for this activation can be generally classified as direct (the plasma is in contact with the surface of the liquid) or remote (the plasma does not directly touch the liquid). The direct plasma source may be a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) where the surface of the liquid is a floating electrode or a plasma jet in which the ionization wave forming the plasma plume reaches the liquid. The remote plasma source may be a DBD with electrodes electrically isolated from the liquid or a plasma jet in which the ionization wave in the plume does not reach the liquid. In this paper, a comparison of activation of thin water layers on top of tissue, as might be encountered in wound healing, will be discussed using results from numerical investigations. We used the modeling platform nonPDPSIM to simulate direct plasma activation of thin water layers using DBDs and remote activation using plasma jets using up to hundreds of pulses. The DBDs are sustained in humid air while the plasma jets consist of He/O2 mixtures flowed into humid air. For similar number of pulses and energy deposition, the direct DBD plasma sources produce more acidification and higher production of nitrates/nitrites in the liquid. This is due to the accumulation of NxOy plasma jets, the convective flow removes many of these species prior to their diffusing into the water or reacting to form higher nitrogen oxides. This latter effect is sensitive to the repetition rate which determines whether reactive species formed during prior pulses overlap with newly produced reactive species. in the gas phase. In the plasma jets, the convective flow removes many of these species prior to their diffusing into the water or reacting to form higher nitrogen oxides. This latter effect is sensitive to the repetition rate which determines whether reactive species formed during prior pulses overlap with

  20. Responses of cells in plasma-activated medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Takeda, Keigo; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kano, Hiroyuki; Okazaki, Yasumasa; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-09-01

    Plasma consists of electrons, ions, radicals, and lights, and produces various reactive species in gas and liquid phase. Cells receive various inputs from their circumstances, and induce several physiological outputs. Our goal is to clarify the relationships between plasma inputs and physiological outputs. Plasma-activated medium (PAM) is a circumstance that plasma provides cells and our previous studies suggest that PAM is a promising tool for cancer therapy. However, the mode of actions remains to be elucidated. We propose survival and proliferation signaling networks as well as redox signaling networks are key factors to understand cellular responses of PAM-treated glioblastoma cells.

  1. Evaluation of a rapid method of determination of plasma fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Thomson, G W; McSherry, B J; Valli, V E

    1974-07-01

    An evaluation was made of a rapid semiautomated method of determining fibrinogen levels in bovine plasma. This method, the fibrometer method of Morse, Panek and Menga (8), is based on the principle that when thrombin is added to suitably diluted plasma the time of clotting is linearly related to the fibrinogen concentration. A standard curve prepared using bovine plasma had an r value of .9987 and analysis of variance showed there was no significant deviation from regression. A comparison of the fibrometer method and the biuret method of Ware, Guest and Seegers done on 158 bovine plasma samples showed good correlation between the two methods. It was concluded that the fibrometer method does measure bovine fibrinogen and has considerable merit for use in clinical diseases of cattle. PMID:4277474

  2. Plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition of silicon dioxide films using plasma-activated triisopropylsilane as a precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Ki-Moon; Shin, Jae-Su; Yun, Ju-Young; Jun Lee, Sang; Kang, Sang-Woo

    2014-05-15

    The plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) process was developed as a growth technique of SiO{sub 2} thin films using a plasma-activated triisopropylsilane [TIPS, ((iPr){sub 3}SiH)] precursor. TIPS was activated by an argon plasma at the precursor injection stage of the process. Using the activated TIPS, it was possible to control the growth rate per cycle of the deposited films by adjusting the plasma ignition time. The PEALD technique allowed deposition of SiO{sub 2} films at temperatures as low as 50 °C without carbon impurities. In addition, films obtained with plasma ignition times of 3 s and 10 s had similar values of root-mean-square surface roughness. In order to evaluate the suitability of TIPS as a precursor for low-temperature deposition of SiO{sub 2} films, the vapor pressure of TIPS was measured. The thermal stability and the reactivity of the gas-phase TIPS with respect to water vapor were also investigated by analyzing the intensity changes of the C–H and Si–H peaks in the Fourier-transform infrared spectrum of TIPS.

  3. Waves In Space Plasmas (WISP): A space plasma lab active experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredricks, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    The Waves in Space Plasmas (WISP) series of Spacelab Space Plasma Labs devoted to active experimentation, are introduced. Space Plasma Lab-1 is keyed to active probing of the ionosphere and magnetosphere using controlled wave injections by the WISP VLF and HF transmitters, supported by a free-flying plasma diagnostics package instrumented with wave receivers and particle probe diagnostics, designed to measure radiation and propagation of plasma waves, precipitated particle fluxes due to wave/particle interactions, and similar phenomena resulting from wave injectons. The VLF transmitter delivers up to 1 kW of RF power into the antenna terminals over the range from 0.3 to 30 kHz. The HF transmitter delivers up to 500 W to the antenna over the range from 1 to 30 MHz. A dipole antenna commandable to any extension up to 300 m tip-to-tip is available.

  4. Biological Studies in Childhood Schizophrenia: Plasma and RBC Cholinesterase Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Alexander R.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    A comparison of plasma (pseudo) cholinesterase and erythrocyte (true) cholinesterase activity in 16 male childhood schizophrenic patients and 16 male nonpsychotic hospitalized controls revealed no significant differences between the two groups. (Author)

  5. ISS Plasma Contactor Units Operations During Strong Geomagnetic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alred, J.; Mikatarian, R.; Barsamian, H.; Minow, J.; Koontz, S.

    2003-12-01

    The large structure and high voltage arrays of the ISS represent a complex system that interacts with the Earth's ionosphere. To mitigate spacecraft charging problems on the ISS, two Plasma Contactor Units discharge ionized xenon gas to "clamp" the potential of the ISS with respect to the low Earth orbit plasma. The Plasma Interaction Model, a model of ISS plasma interaction developed from the basic physics of the interaction phenomena, includes magnetic induction effects, plasma temperature and density effects, interaction of the high voltage solar arrays with ionospheric plasma, and accounts for other conductive areas on the ISS. To augment this model, the PCU discharge current has been monitored for the ISS in a variety of flight attitudes as well as during the annual seasons. A review of the PCU discharge currents shows a correlation to the geomagnetic activity. The variation in the PCU discharge current during strong geomagnetic activity will be presented. Also, the PCU discharge currents during periods of low geomagnetic activity will be discussed. The presentation will conclude with a comparison of satellite plasma measurements during different stages of geomagnetic activity.

  6. Plasma cathepsin D isoforms and their active metabolites increase after myocardial infarction and contribute to plasma renin activity.

    PubMed

    Naseem, R Haris; Hedegard, Wade; Henry, Timothy D; Lessard, Jennifer; Sutter, Kathryn; Katz, Stephen A

    2005-03-01

    Plasma renin activity (PRA) is often found to increase after myocardial infarction (MI). Elevated PRA may contribute to increased myocardial angiotensin II that is responsible for maladaptive remodeling of the myocardium after MI. We hypothesized that MI would also result in cardiac release of cathepsin D, a ubiquitous lysosomal enzyme with high renin sequence homology. Cathepsin D release from damaged myocardial tissue could contribute to angiotensin formation by acting as an enzymatic alternate to renin. We assessed circulating renin and cathepsin D from both control and MI patient plasma (7-20 hours after MI) using shallow gradient focusing that allowed for independent measurement of both enzymes. Cathepsin D was increased significantly in the plasma after MI (P < 0.001). Furthermore, circulating active cathepsin D metabolites were also significantly elevated after MI (P < 0.04), and contained the majority of cathepsin D activity in plasma. Spiking control plasma with cathepsin D resulted in a variable but significant (P = 0.005) increase in PRA using a clinical assay. We conclude that 7-20 hours after MI, plasma cathepsin D is significantly elevated and most of the active enzymatic activity is circulating as plasma metabolites. Circulating cathepsin D can falsely increase clinical PRA determinations, and may also provide an alternative angiotensin formation pathway after MI. PMID:15739123

  7. Active plasma resonance spectroscopy: eigenfunction solutions in spherical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberrath, J.; Brinkmann, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    The term active plasma resonance spectroscopy denotes a class of related techniques which utilize, for diagnostic purposes, the natural ability of plasmas to resonate on or near the electron plasma frequency ωpe: a radio frequent signal (in the GHz range) is coupled into the plasma via an antenna or probe, the spectral response is recorded, and a mathematical model is used to determine plasma parameters like the electron density. The mathematical model of an arbitrarily shaped probe-plasma system can be written in an abstract but very compact equation. It contains an appropriate operator, which describes the dynamical behavior and can be split into a conservative and a dissipative part. Based on the cold plasma model, this manuscript provides a solution strategy to determine the electrical admittance of a specific probe-plasma system derived from the abstract dynamical equation. Focusing on probes with a spherical-shaped probe tip the general admittance can be derived analytically. Therefore, the matrix representation of the resolvent of the dynamical operator is determined. This matrix representation is derived by means of the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the conservative operator. It can be shown that these eigenvalues represent the resonance frequencies of the probe-plasma system which are simply connected to the electron density. As an example, the result is applied to established probe designs: the spherical impedance probe and the multipole resonance probe.

  8. [Myeloperoxidase activity in blood plasma as a criterion of therapy for patients with cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Grigorieva, D V; Gorudko, I V; Kostevich, V A; Sokolov, A V; Buko, I V; Vasilyev, V B; Polonetsky, L Z; Panasenko, O M; Cherenkevich, S N

    2016-03-01

    A significant increase in the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity has been found in plasma of patients with stable angina and with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in comparison with the control group. MPO concentration was significantly increased in plasma of ACS patients. Reduced MPO activity in the treated ACS patients correlated with a favorable outcome of the disease. Generally, changes in plasma MPO concentration coincided with changes in lactoferrin concentration thus confirming the role of neutrophil degranulation in the increase of plasma concentrations of these proteins. The increase in MPO activity was obviously determined by modification of the MPO protein caused by reactive oxygen species and halogen in the molar ratio of 1 : 25 and 1 : 50. The decrease in plasma MPO activity may be associated with increased plasma concentrations of the physiological inhibitor of its activity, ceruloplasmin, and also with modification of the MPO protein with reactive oxygen species and halogen at their molar ratio of 1 : 100 and higher. Thus, MPO activity may be used for evaluation of effectiveness of the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27420626

  9. Evaluation of two-beam spectroscopy as a plasma diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Billard, B.D.

    1980-04-01

    A two-beam spectroscopy (TBS) system is evaluated theoretically and experimentally. This new spectroscopic technique uses correlations between components of emitted light separated by a small difference in angle of propagation. It is thus a non-perturbing plasma diagnostic which is shown to provide local (as opposed to line-of-sight averaged) information about fluctuations in the density of light sources within a plasma - information not obtainable by the usual spectroscopic methods. The present design is an improvement on earlier systems proposed in a thesis by Rostler.

  10. Core plasma behavior during sawtooth activities in highly-elongated ohmic/ECH tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Junghee; Lee, Seung Hun; Turri, G.; Weisen, H.; Choe, W.

    2008-11-01

    MHD instabilities arising from the combination of pressure and current profiles can deform the core plasma shape. The sawtoothing highly-elongated plasma shows various topological behaviors inside the q=1 surface. The irreversible topology-breaking of the core plasma occurs distinctively in highly-elongated ohmic plasma. On the contrary, the topological change does not occur in the ECH plasma under the same shaping factors because the increased conductivity results in the change of the current profile and thus affecting the Mercier criterion. In addition, the topology-breaking depends on the heating position. The ECH on the off-axis or the q=1 surface preserves the core topology during the crash. However, the intense on-axis ECH can change the core topology, which is reversible. The explanation for these activities is given by topological categorization and the stability analyses of the kink mode with pressure and current profiles.

  11. Cholesteryl ester transfer activity in hamster plasma: increase by fat and cholesterol rich diets.

    PubMed

    Stein, Y; Dabach, Y; Hollander, G; Stein, O

    1990-01-16

    We investigated the presence of cholesteryl ester transfer activity (CETA) in plasma of hamsters kept on various dietary regimens. In hamsters kept on a regular diet, CETA activity was about 5 units/4 mg protein of d greater than 1.21 g/ml fraction of plasma, as compared to about 35 units present in human d greater than 1.21 g/ml fraction. Addition of 15% margarine or butter alone or together with 2% cholesterol resulted in a 2-3-fold increase in plasma CETA. The increase in plasma CETA was correlated with plasma cholesterol levels (r = 0.78; P less than 0.001) and plasma triacylglycerol levels (r = 0.56, P less than 0.001). Hamsters consuming the cholesterol + butter-supplemented diets had the highest plasma CETA, cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels, while CETA in plasma of rats and mice remained nondetectable even after 4 weeks on the diet. The causal relation between hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and evaluation in CETA in hamsters remains to be elucidated. PMID:2297517

  12. Evaluation of Plasma Isoprostane in Patients with Oral Lichen Planus

    PubMed Central

    Amirchaghmaghi, Maryam; Hashemy, Seyed Isaac; Alirezaei, Banafsheh; Jahed Keyhani, Fereshteh; Kargozar, Sanaz; Vasigh, Samaneh; Gharaei, Shideh; Pakfetrat, Atessa

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problems Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory disease. Free radicals and reactive oxygen species play important roles in pathogenesis of oral lichen planus (OLP). Isoprostanes show oxidative stress and are formed by free-radical mediated lipid peroxidation of arachidonic acid and cell membrane phospholipids. Purpose This study was conducted to evaluate the plasma level of 8-isoprostane in patients suffering from erosive and non-erosive forms of OLP. Materials and Method In this case-control study, 31 patients with OLP and 30 control subjects were enrolled. Plasma samples were obtained and the level of 8-isoprostane was measured with Sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in both groups. The data were analyzed by using two-sample t-test, chi-square and ANOVA tests. Results The results showed significant increase in the plasma level of 8-isoprostane in OLP group compared with the control group. The results of independent t-test revealed no significant correlation between the plasma level of isoprostane and sex, smoking, or previous treatment. Conclusion Based on the findings of this study, oxidative stress was increased in patients with OLP, reflected by higher concentrations of 8-isoprostane in plasma. PMID:26966704

  13. Surface Plasma Source Electrode Activation by Surface Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim; Han, Baoxi; Johnson, Rolland P.; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P; Welton, Robert F

    2011-01-01

    In experiments with RF saddle antenna surface plasma sources (SPS), the efficiency of H- ion generation was increased by up to a factor of 5 by long time plasma electrode activation, without adding Cs from Cs supply, by heating the collar to high temperature using hot air flow and plasma discharge. Without cracking or heating the cesium ampoule, but likely with Cs recovery from impurities, the achieved energy efficiency was comparable to that of conventionally cesiated SNS RF sources with an external or internal Cs supply. In the experiments, perfect cesiation was produced (without additional Cs supply) by the collection and trapping of traces of remnant cesium compounds from SPS surfaces.

  14. Circulating plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein activity and blood pressure tracking in the community

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clinical trials using cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors to raise high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations reported an 'off-target' blood pressure (BP) raising effect. We evaluated the relations of baseline plasma CETP activity and longitudinal BP change. One tho...

  15. RACLETTE: a model for evaluating the thermal response of plasma facing components to slow high power plasma transients. Part II: Analysis of ITER plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federici, Gianfranco; Raffray, A. René

    1997-04-01

    The transient thermal model RACLETTE (acronym of Rate Analysis Code for pLasma Energy Transfer Transient Evaluation) described in part I of this paper is applied here to analyse the heat transfer and erosion effects of various slow (100 ms-10 s) high power energy transients on the actively cooled plasma facing components (PFCs) of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). These have a strong bearing on the PFC design and need careful analysis. The relevant parameters affecting the heat transfer during the plasma excursions are established. The temperature variation with time and space is evaluated together with the extent of vaporisation and melting (the latter only for metals) for the different candidate armour materials considered for the design (i.e., Be for the primary first wall, Be and CFCs for the limiter, Be, W, and CFCs for the divertor plates) and including for certain cases low-density vapour shielding effects. The critical heat flux, the change of the coolant parameters and the possible severe degradation of the coolant heat removal capability that could result under certain conditions during these transients, for example for the limiter, are also evaluated. Based on the results, the design implications on the heat removal performance and erosion damage of the variuos ITER PFCs are critically discussed and some recommendations are made for the selection of the most adequate protection materials and optimum armour thickness.

  16. Fission and activation of uranium by fusion-plasma neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F.; Mcfarland, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Fusion-fission hybrid reactors are discussed in terms of two main purposes: to breed fissile materials (Pu 233 and Th 233 from U 238 or Th 232) for use in low-reactivity breeders, and to produce tritium from lithium to refuel fusion plasma cores. Neutron flux generation is critical for both processes. Various methods for generating the flux are described, with attention to new geometries for multiple plasma focus arrays, e.g., hypocycloidal pinch and staged plasma focus devices. These methods are evaluated with reference to their applicability to D-D fusion reactors, which will ensure a virtually unlimited energy supply. Accurate observations of the neutron flux from such schemes are obtained by using different target materials in the plasma focus.

  17. Development of active porous medium filters based on plasma textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Ivan A.; Saveliev, Alexei V.; Rasipuram, Srinivasan; Kuznetsov, Andrey V.; Brown, Alan; Jasper, Warren

    2012-05-01

    Inexpensive, flexible, washable, and durable materials that serve as antimicrobial filters and self-decontaminating fabrics are needed to provide active protection to people in areas regularly exposed to various biohazards, such as hospitals and bio research labs working with pathogens. Airlines and cruise lines need such material to combat the spread of infections. In households these materials can be used in HVAC filters to fight indoor pollution, which is especially dangerous to people suffering from asthma. Efficient filtering materials are also required in areas contaminated by other types of hazardous dust particulates, such as nuclear dust. The primary idea that guided the undertaken study is that a microplasma-generating structure can be embedded in a textile fabric to generate a plasma sheath ("plasma shield") that kills bacterial agents coming in contact with the fabric. The research resulted in the development of a plasma textile that can be used for producing new types of self-decontaminating garments, fabrics, and filter materials, capable of activating a plasma sheath that would filter, capture, and destroy any bacteriological agent deposited on its surface. This new material relies on the unique antimicrobial and catalytic properties of cold (room temperature) plasma that is benign to people and does not cause thermal damage to many polymer textiles, such as Nomex and polypropylene. The uniqueness of cold plasma as a disinfecting agent lies in the inability of bacteria to develop resistance to plasma exposure, as they can for antibiotics. Plasma textiles could thus be utilized for microbial destruction in active antimicrobial filters (for continuous decontamination and disinfection of large amounts of air) as well as in self-decontaminating surfaces and antibacterial barriers (for example, for creating local antiseptic or sterile environments around wounds and burns).

  18. Development of active porous medium filters based on plasma textiles

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, Ivan A.; Saveliev, Alexei V.; Rasipuram, Srinivasan; Kuznetsov, Andrey V.; Brown, Alan; Jasper, Warren

    2012-05-15

    Inexpensive, flexible, washable, and durable materials that serve as antimicrobial filters and self-decontaminating fabrics are needed to provide active protection to people in areas regularly exposed to various biohazards, such as hospitals and bio research labs working with pathogens. Airlines and cruise lines need such material to combat the spread of infections. In households these materials can be used in HVAC filters to fight indoor pollution, which is especially dangerous to people suffering from asthma. Efficient filtering materials are also required in areas contaminated by other types of hazardous dust particulates, such as nuclear dust. The primary idea that guided the undertaken study is that a microplasma-generating structure can be embedded in a textile fabric to generate a plasma sheath (''plasma shield'') that kills bacterial agents coming in contact with the fabric. The research resulted in the development of a plasma textile that can be used for producing new types of self-decontaminating garments, fabrics, and filter materials, capable of activating a plasma sheath that would filter, capture, and destroy any bacteriological agent deposited on its surface. This new material relies on the unique antimicrobial and catalytic properties of cold (room temperature) plasma that is benign to people and does not cause thermal damage to many polymer textiles, such as Nomex and polypropylene. The uniqueness of cold plasma as a disinfecting agent lies in the inability of bacteria to develop resistance to plasma exposure, as they can for antibiotics. Plasma textiles could thus be utilized for microbial destruction in active antimicrobial filters (for continuous decontamination and disinfection of large amounts of air) as well as in self-decontaminating surfaces and antibacterial barriers (for example, for creating local antiseptic or sterile environments around wounds and burns).

  19. [THE IMMUNOMODULATORY ACTIVITY OF PLASMA OF PATIENTS INFECTED WITH HUMAN HIV VIRUS].

    PubMed

    Selimova, L M; Kalnina, L B; Serebrovskaya, L V; Ivanova, L A; Gulyaeva, A N; Nosik, D M

    2015-10-01

    The study was carried out to investigate impact of plasma of patients infected with human HIV virus receiving and not receiving highly active antiviral therapy on: expression of phenotypic markers of lymphocytes (CD3+, CD3+/CD4+, CD3+/CD8+, CD19+, CD3-/CD (16+56)+, CD3+/CD(16+56)+, CD3+/HLA-DR+, CD4+/CD62L+, CD8+/CD38+) in mononuclear cells of blood of donors and secretion of pro-inflammatory (interleukin-1β, interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-4 and interleukin-10) cytokines. After 24 hours of activation of mononuclear cells with plasmas it was demonstrated that as compared with control groups, in of plasmas of patients with highly active antiviral therapy increasing of number of CD4+ T-cells and decreasing of CD8+ T-cells is observed. The plasmas of patients with highly active antiviral therapy activate in most instances CD4+ T-cells whereas plasmas of patients without treatment--CD8+ T-cells. The results of detection of cytokines in blood indicate that in patients without treatment inflammatory potential is increased as compared with group of highly active antiviral therapy. The data concerning accumulation of interleukin-1β under cultivation of mononuclear cells with plasmas indicates at its role in preservation of vitality of natural killers. The analysis of immunomodulatory activity of plasma of patients infected with human HIV virus can be recommended as an additional technique of evaluation of functioning of immune system. PMID:26841673

  20. Deriving plasma densities in tenuous plasma regions, with the spacecraft potential under active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriopoulou, M.; Nakamura, R.; Torkar, K.; Baumjohann, W.; Hoelzl, B.

    2015-11-01

    Variations of the floating potential on spacecraft are often used to derive plasma densities, complementing the plasma instrument measurements. All spacecraft of the Cluster mission are equipped with Active Spacecraft POtential Control (ASPOC) instruments that control the spacecraft potential. Although the ASPOC operation increases the accuracy of electric field and plasma measurements, it prevents a direct use of the spacecraft potential variations to derive plasma densities. In this work we develop a new reconstruction method of uncontrolled spacecraft potential from controlled spacecraft potential data and a derived photoelectron curve, using multispacecraft observations. We assume that the same curve governs the plasma environment for the spacecraft with ASPOC on and off. The current work focuses on reconstructions in the magnetotail region. The period that was more extensively studied was the one from August to October 2003, when the spacecraft were close to each other, while results from the periods of August-October 2001, 2002, and 2004, when the Cluster spacecraft had their apogee in the magnetotail region, are also presented. In this way, we investigate how the photoelectron curve varies at different time intervals and also how the reconstruction results are modified when the distance between the spacecraft is increasing. Finally, by using the reconstructed results, we proceed by estimating the plasma densities and we discuss the uncertainties of such estimations. While, on average, spacecraft potential measurements are successfully reconstructed, plasma and solar activity variations on short timescales seem to affect the reconstructions, requiring in some cases more detailed analysis in order to achieve results with higher accuracy. Moreover, there are some limitations while deriving results in very tenuous plasma regions due to increased uncertainties in some of the scientific measurements used there. The results and the methods developed for this work

  1. Equilibrium and MHD Activity in PEGASUS Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garstka, G. D.

    2000-10-01

    The primary research goals of the PEGASUS toroidal experiment involve the exploration of MHD stability boundaries at high beta and extremely low aspect ratio. A novel nonlinear least-squares fitting technique is used to reconstruct equilibria; the more conventional TokaMac equilibrium code is used as well. The continuous resistive vacuum vessel is modeled as a set of inductively coupled coils for the purpose of the reconstructions. A variety of MHD phenomena have been observed on PEGASUS ohmic discharges. Internal reconnection events (IREs) are often seen. The characteristics of these events match those observed on other STs: they are observed more frequently when the machine is dirty and when the plasma is overdriven into the central column. An n=1 mode with a frequency of 3-8 kHz is often present throughout the discharge. This mode is associated with fast current ramps (> 30 MA/s) and can limit the discharge evolution. There is also substantial evidence of double tearing modes during fast current ramps. Present work involves the exploration of the edge kink stability boundary at near-unity aspect ratio.

  2. Surface Plasma Source Electrode Activation by Surface Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim; Johnson, Rolland P.; Han, B.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Stockli, Martin P.; Welton, R. F.

    2011-09-26

    In experiments with RF saddle antenna surface plasma sources (SPS), the efficiency of H{sup -} ion generation was increased by up to a factor of 5 by plasma electrode 'activation', without supplying additional Cs, by heating the collar to high temperature for several hours using hot air flow and plasma discharge. Without cracking or heating the cesium ampoule, but likely with Cs recovery from impurities, the achieved energy efficiency was comparable to that of conventionally cesiated SNS RF sources with an external or internal Cs supply. In the experiments, optimum cesiation was produced (without additional Cs) by the collection and trapping of traces of remnant cesium compounds from SPS surfaces. Such activation by accumulation of impurities on electrode surfaces can be a reason for H{sup -} emission enhancement in other so-called 'volume' negative ion sources.

  3. Oxidative stress in patients with hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatoma evaluated by plasma antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Y; Yamashita, S; Fujisawa, A; Kokura, S; Yoshikawa, T

    1998-06-01

    We have applied our method for the simultaneous detection of plasma ubiquinol-10 (reduced form) and ubiquinone-10 (oxidized form) (S. Yamashita and Y. Yamamoto, Anal. Biochem. 250, 66-73, 1997) to plasmas of normal subjects (n = 16) and patients with chronic active hepatitis (n = 28), liver cirrhosis (n = 16), and hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 20) to evaluate the pressure of oxidative stress in these patients. The average ubiquinone-10 percentages (+/- S.D.) in total ubiquinone-10 and ubiquinol-10 in the four groups were 6.4 +/- 3.3, 12.9 +/- 10.3, 10.6 +/- 6.8, and 18.9 +/- 11.1, respectively, indicating a significant increase in ubiquinone-10 percentage in patient groups in comparison to normal subjects. These results and a significant decrease in the plasma ascorbate level in patient groups indicate that oxidative stress is evident after the onset of hepatitis and the subsequent cirrhosis and liver cancer. PMID:9636673

  4. Features of the Active Evening Plasma Sheet from MMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Avanov, L. A.; Burch, J. L.; Coffey, V. N.; Ergun, R. E.; Fuselier, S. A.; Gershman, D. J.; Giles, B. L.; Lavraud, B.; MacDonald, E.; Mauk, B.; Mukai, T.; Nakamura, R.; Pollock, C. J.; Russell, C. T.; Saito, Y.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Torbert, R. B.; Yokota, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, consisting of four identical plasmas and fields observatories, was launched into a 12 RE elliptical equatorial orbit in March 2015 and was in the process of being commissioned through August 2015. During commissioning, the orbit apogee rotated from near midnight through the evening toward the dusk sector and occasionally captured new observations of the plasma sheet, its boundary layers, and the magnetospheric tail lobes. On 22-23 June, an especially active plasma sheet was involved in a major geospace storm that developed a ring current with 200 nT DST. We report on the ion kinetic and flow features of this active plasma sheet, comparing them with familiar observations from earlier missions, as an exercise in validating the MMS observations and assessing their capabilities to provide higher time resolution in multi-point views of thin, fast-moving structures. The observed features include but are not limited to cold lobal wind streams in the lobes, tailward flowing auroral beams and conics, hot earthward field-aligned flows and counter-flows, fast cross-field convection of some flows toward the neutral sheet, and the hot isotropic plasma sheet proper. Relationships between these features, the ionosphere, and the reconnecting magnetotail will be explored and discussed, seeking preliminary conclusions.

  5. Active Plasma Lensing for Relativistic Laser-Plasma-Accelerated Electron Beams.

    PubMed

    van Tilborg, J; Steinke, S; Geddes, C G R; Matlis, N H; Shaw, B H; Gonsalves, A J; Huijts, J V; Nakamura, K; Daniels, J; Schroeder, C B; Benedetti, C; Esarey, E; Bulanov, S S; Bobrova, N A; Sasorov, P V; Leemans, W P

    2015-10-30

    Compact, tunable, radially symmetric focusing of electrons is critical to laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) applications. Experiments are presented demonstrating the use of a discharge-capillary active plasma lens to focus 100-MeV-level LPA beams. The lens can provide tunable field gradients in excess of 3000 T/m, enabling cm-scale focal lengths for GeV-level beam energies and allowing LPA-based electron beams and light sources to maintain their compact footprint. For a range of lens strengths, excellent agreement with simulation was obtained. PMID:26565471

  6. Influence of plasma-activated compounds on melanogenesis and tyrosinase activity.

    PubMed

    Ali, Anser; Ashraf, Zaman; Kumar, Naresh; Rafiq, Muhammad; Jabeen, Farukh; Park, Ji Hoon; Choi, Ki Hong; Lee, SeungHyun; Seo, Sung-Yum; Choi, Eun Ha; Attri, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Many organic chemists around the world synthesize medicinal compounds or extract multiple compounds from plants in order to increase the activity and quality of medicines. In this work, we synthesized new eugenol derivatives (ED) and then treated them with an N2 feeding gas atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) to increase their utility. We studied the tyrosinase-inhibition activity (activity test) and structural changes (circular dichroism) of tyrosinase with ED and plasma activated eugenol derivatives (PAED) in a cell-free environment. Later, we used docking studies to determine the possible interaction sites of ED and PAED compounds with tyrosinase enzyme. Moreover, we studied the possible effect of ED and PAED on melanin synthesis and its mechanism in melanoma (B16F10) cells. Additionally, we investigated the structural changes that occurred in activated ED after plasma treatment using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Hence, this study provides a new perspective on PAED for the field of plasma medicine. PMID:26931617

  7. Influence of plasma-activated compounds on melanogenesis and tyrosinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Anser; Ashraf, Zaman; Kumar, Naresh; Rafiq, Muhammad; Jabeen, Farukh; Park, Ji Hoon; Choi, Ki Hong; Lee, SeungHyun; Seo, Sung-Yum; Choi, Eun Ha; Attri, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Many organic chemists around the world synthesize medicinal compounds or extract multiple compounds from plants in order to increase the activity and quality of medicines. In this work, we synthesized new eugenol derivatives (ED) and then treated them with an N2 feeding gas atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) to increase their utility. We studied the tyrosinase-inhibition activity (activity test) and structural changes (circular dichroism) of tyrosinase with ED and plasma activated eugenol derivatives (PAED) in a cell-free environment. Later, we used docking studies to determine the possible interaction sites of ED and PAED compounds with tyrosinase enzyme. Moreover, we studied the possible effect of ED and PAED on melanin synthesis and its mechanism in melanoma (B16F10) cells. Additionally, we investigated the structural changes that occurred in activated ED after plasma treatment using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Hence, this study provides a new perspective on PAED for the field of plasma medicine. PMID:26931617

  8. Hematology, plasma biochemistry, and tissue enzyme activities of invasive red lionfish captured off North Carolina, USA.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E T; Stoskopf, M K; Morris, J A; Clarke, E O; Harms, C A

    2010-12-01

    The red lionfish Pterois volitans is important not only in the aquarium trade but also as an invasive species in the western Atlantic. Introduced to waters off the southeastern coast of the United States, red lionfish have rapidly spread along much of the East Coast and throughout Bermuda, the Bahamas, and much of the Caribbean. Hematology and plasma biochemistry were evaluated in red lionfish captured from the offshore waters of North Carolina to establish baseline parameters for individual and population health assessment. Blood smears were evaluated for total and differential white blood cell counts, and routine clinical biochemical profiles were performed on plasma samples. To improve the interpretive value of routine plasma biochemistry profiles, tissue enzyme activities (alkaline phosphatase [ALP], alanine aminotransferase [ALT], aspartate aminotransferase [AST], gamma-glutamyl transferase [GGT], lactate dehydrogenase [LD], and creatine kinase [CK]) were analyzed from liver, kidney, skeletal muscle, gastrointestinal tract, and heart tissues from five fish. The hematological and plasma biochemical values were similar to those of other marine teleosts except that the estimated white blood cell counts were much lower than those routinely found in many species. The tissue enzyme activity findings suggest that plasma LD, CK, and AST offer clinical relevance in the assessment of red lionfish. PMID:21413511

  9. A theoretical evaluation of laser-sustained plasma thruster performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, San-Mou; Keefer, Dennis

    1987-01-01

    An extensive numerical experiment has been conducted to evaluate rocket thruster performance using a laser-sustained hydrogen plasma as the propellant. The plasma was sustained using a 30 kW CO2 laser beam operated at 10.6 microns focused inside the thruster. The steady-state Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the laser power absorption process have been solved numerically. A pressure based Navier-Stokes solver using body-fitted coordinate was used to calculate the laser-supported rocket flow which included both recirculating and transonic flow regions. The local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) assumption was used for the plasma thermophysical and optical properties. Geometric ray tracing was adopted to describe the laser beam. Several different throat size thrusters operated at 150 and 300 kPa chamber stagnation pressure were studied. It was found that the thruster performance (vacuum specific impulse) was highly dependent on the operating conditions, and a properly designed laser supported thruster can attain a specific impulse around 1500 secs. The heat loading on the thruster wall was also estimated and was in the range of that for a conventional chemical rocket.

  10. Hollow cathode plasma source for active spacecraft charge control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deininger, William D.; Aston, Graeme; Pless, Lewis C.

    1987-01-01

    A prototype plasma source spacecraft discharge device has been developed to control overall and differential spacecraft surface charging. The plasma source is based on a unique hollow cathode discharge, where the plasma generation process is contained completely within the cathode. This device can be operated on argon, krypton, or xenon and has a rapid cold start time of less than 4 s. The discharge system design includes a spacecraft-discharge/net-charge sensing circuit which provides the ability to measure the polarity, magnitude, pulse shape, and time duration of a discharging event. Ion currents of up to 325 microA and electron currents ranging from 0.02 to 6.0 A have been extracted from the device. In addition, the spacecraft discharge device successfully discharged capacitively biased plates, from as high as + or - 2500 V, to ground potential, and discharged and clamped actively biased plates at +5 V with respect to ground potential during ground simulation testing.

  11. Plasma thymic hormone activity in patients with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, C. H.; Greenberg, Lynn E.; Chapman, S. W.; Goldstein, G.; Lewis, Verna M.; Twomey, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    To further characterize the immunological abnormalities in patients with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, the thymic hormone activity in their plasma was measured. Of the sixteen patients in the study, seven had chronic diffuse candidiasis, five had candidiasis with endocrinopathies and four had candidiasis with thymoma. Only one patient, an anergic child with chronic diffuse candidiasis had severe deficiency of plasma thymic hormone activity. Two patients, a woman with candidiasis and multiple endocrinopathies and an elderly man with metastatic epithelial thymoma had supranormal values. These studies indicate that the immunological deficit in most patients with these forms of chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis is not due to deficiency of a thymic inductive activity and suggest that an intrinsic defect exists in the maturation of antigen-responsive lymphoid cells. PMID:743805

  12. TAE modes and MHD activity in TFTR DT plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E.; Batha, S.; Bell, M.

    1995-03-01

    The high power deuterium and tritium experiments on TFTR have produced fusion a parameters similar to those expected on ITER. The achieved {beta}{sub {alpha}}/{beta} and the R{triangledown}{beta}{sub {alpha}} in TFRR D-T shots are 1/2 to 1/3 those predicted in the ITER EDA. Studies of the initial TFTR D-T plasmas find no evidence that the presence of the fast fusion {alpha} population has affected the stability of MHD, with the possible exception of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE`s). The initial TFTR DT plasmas had MHD activity similar to that commonly seen in deuterium plasmas. Operation of TFTR at plasma currents of 2.0--2.5 MA has greatly reduced the deleterious effects of MHD commonly observed at lower currents. Even at these higher currents, the performance of TFTR is limited by {beta}-limit disruptions. The effects of MHD on D-T fusion {alpha}`s was similar to effects observed on other fusion products in D only plasmas.

  13. Betaine increases the butyrylcholinesterase activity in rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Šišková, K; Dubničková, M; Pašková, Ľ; Rajdl, D; Ďuračková, Z; Muchová, J; Pauliková, I; Racek, J

    2016-03-14

    The physiological function of butyrylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.8, BChE) is not clearly understood, but a role was suggested in the fat utilization process, resulting in positive correlation between plasma triglyceride (TG) levels and BChE activity. Consequently we tested the hypothesis that regular intake of betaine, a natural compound intervening in the liver TG metabolism could influence the BChE activity. The BChE activity was estimated spectrophotometrically in plasma of rats fed with betaine enriched standard (B) or high-fat diet (HFB). The results confirmed decreased TG plasma levels after betaine treatment independently on the type of diet (0.15+/-0.03 (B) vs. 0.27+/-0.08 (control) mmol/l; p=0.003 and 0.13+/-0.03 (HFB) vs. 0.27+/-0.08 (control) mmol/l; p=0.005). The BChE activity increased significantly with betaine administration, however the change was more distinct in the HFB group (0.84+/-0.34 (HFB) vs. 0.22+/-0.04 (control) O.D./min/mg; p<0.001 and 0.41+/-0.11 (B) vs. 0.22+/-0.04 (control) O.D./min/mg; p=0.001). In conclusion, betaine intake led to elevated BChE activity in plasma and this effect was potentiated by the HF diet. Since betaine is in general used as a supplement in the treatment of liver diseases accompanied by TG overload, its impact on the BChE activity in the role of the liver function marker should be taken into account. PMID:26596326

  14. Evaluation of the potentials of humic acid removal in water by gas phase surface discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiecheng; Qu, Guangzhou; Ren, Jingyu; Yan, Qiuhe; Sun, Qiuhong; Liang, Dongli; Hu, Shibin

    2016-02-01

    Degradation of humic acid (HA), a predominant type of natural organic matter in ground water and surface waters, was conducted using a gas phase surface discharge plasma system. HA standard and two surface waters (Wetland, and Weihe River) were selected as the targets. The experimental results showed that about 90.9% of standard HA was smoothly removed within 40 min's discharge plasma treatment at discharge voltage 23.0 kV, and the removal process fitted the first-order kinetic model. Roles of some active species in HA removal were studied by evaluating the effects of solution pH and OH radical scavenger; and the results presented that O3 and OH radical played significant roles in HA removal. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and FTIR analysis showed that HA surface topography and molecular structure were changed during discharge plasma process. The mineralization of HA was analyzed by UV-Vis spectrum, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), specific UV absorbance (SUVA), UV absorption ratios, and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence. The formation of disinfection by-products during HA sample chlorination was also identified, and CHCl3 was detected as the main disinfection by-product, but discharge plasma treatment could suppress its formation to a certain extent. In addition, approximately 82.3% and 67.9% of UV254 were removed for the Weihe River water and the Wetland water after 40 min of discharge plasma treatment. PMID:26624519

  15. Plasma lysosomal enzyme activity in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Welman, E; Selwyn, A P; Peters, T J; Colbeck, J F; Fox, K M

    1978-02-01

    N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase (EC 3.2.1.30, recommended name beta-N-Acetylglucosaminidase) was found to be a constituent of human cardiac lysosomes. beta-glucuronidase was also found in this tissue, while lysozyme, an enzyme present in leucocyte lysosomes, was not detectable in the heart. The activities of both N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase and beta-glucuronidase were elevated in plasma during the first 24 h after the onset of chest pain in patients with acute myocardial infarction and the peak levels of N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase correlated well with those of creatine kinase. N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase showed a further rise in plasma activity which gave a peak at 72 h after the onset of chest pain and this was accompanied by a rise in lysozyme activity. It is suggested that lysosome disruption caused by myocardial cell necrosis was responsible for the initial rise in plasma lysosomal enzyme activity and that the subsequent inflammatory reaction gave rise to the second peak. PMID:647716

  16. Isolation of biologically active and morphologically intact exosomes from plasma of patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Chang-Sook; Funk, Sonja; Muller, Laurent; Boyiadzis, Michael; Whiteside, Theresa L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Isolation from human plasma of exosomes that retain functional and morphological integrity for probing their protein, lipid and nucleic acid content is a priority for the future use of exosomes as biomarkers. A method that meets these criteria and can be scaled up for patient monitoring is thus desirable. Methods Plasma specimens (1 mL) of patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) or a head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) were differentially centrifuged, ultrafiltered and fractionated by size exclusion chromatography in small disposable columns (mini-SEC). Exosomes were eluted in phosphate-buffered saline and were evaluated by qNano for particle size and counts, morphology by transmission electron microscopy, protein content, molecular profiles by western blots, and for ability to modify functions of immune cells. Results Exosomes eluting in fractions #3–5 had a diameter ranging from 50 to 200 nm by qNano, with the fraction #4 containing the bulk of clean, unaggregated exosomes. The exosome elution profiles remained constant for repeated runs of the same plasma. Larger plasma volumes could be fractionated running multiple mini-SEC columns in parallel. Particle concentrations per millilitre of plasma in #4 fractions of AML and HNSCC were comparable and were higher (p<0.003) than those in normal controls. Isolated AML exosomes co-incubated with normal human NK cells inhibited NKG2D expression levels (p<0.004), and HNSCC exosomes suppressed activation (p<0.01) and proliferation of activated T lymphocytes (p<0.03). Conclusions Mini-SEC allows for simple and reproducible isolation from human plasma of exosomes retaining structural integrity and functional activity. It enables molecular/functional analysis of the exosome content in serial specimens of human plasma for clinical applications. PMID:27018366

  17. Plasma catecholamines and renin activity in wrestlers following vigorous swimming.

    PubMed

    Vigas, M; Celko, J; Juránková, E; Jezová, D; Kvetnanský, R

    1998-01-01

    Cardiovascular and neuroendocrine responses to exercise in a physically fit and an untrained group of young healthy subjects were compared to study the significance of physical fitness for performance in a discipline for which the athletes were not trained. Ten wrestlers of national rank prepared for an international competition (age 18 years) and 9 untrained healthy males (age 21 years). Exercise consisted of 27-min swimming, freestyle, in water of 29 degrees C, with last 3 min increased to maximal effort. The blood pressure, heart rate and sublingual temperature were measured and blood samples were withdrawn before exercise, immediately after and after a 30 min period of rest. Catecholamines were analyzed by radioenzymatic method and plasma renin activity (PRA) using commercial kits. Systolic blood pressure and heart rate after swimming were increased comparably in the two groups, diastolic pressure was unchanged in the controls and decreased in the wrestlers. Plasma cortisol remained unchanged. Plasma glucose tended to increase in the controls and so decrease in wrestlers, with a significant difference between them after swimming (p < 0.05). However, plasma adrenaline was concomitantly increased in both groups (p < 0.01). Noradrenaline and PRA were increased after swimming in both the control and trained group. The increments of noradrenaline and PRA in wrestlers were significantly reduced compared to the control group (p < 0.01, p < 0.05, respectively). Higher physical fitness in athletes significantly reduced plasma noradrenaline and angiotensin responses to maximal exercise demanding special skill in work performance which had not been included in their training program. Training of wrestlers did not cause an exaggerated plasma adrenaline response to exercise. PMID:9803484

  18. Functional Implications of Plasma Membrane Condensation for T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Carmel M.; Engelhardt, Karin; Williamson, David; Grewal, Thomas; Jessup, Wendy; Harder, Thomas; Gaus, Katharina

    2008-01-01

    The T lymphocyte plasma membrane condenses at the site of activation but the functional significance of this receptor-mediated membrane reorganization is not yet known. Here we demonstrate that membrane condensation at the T cell activation sites can be inhibited by incorporation of the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol (7KC), which is known to prevent the formation of raft-like liquid-ordered domains in model membranes. We enriched T cells with 7KC, or cholesterol as control, to assess the importance of membrane condensation for T cell activation. Upon 7KC treatment, T cell antigen receptor (TCR) triggered calcium fluxes and early tyrosine phosphorylation events appear unaltered. However, signaling complexes form less efficiently on the cell surface, fewer phosphorylated signaling proteins are retained in the plasma membrane and actin restructuring at activation sites is impaired in 7KC-enriched cells resulting in compromised downstream activation responses. Our data emphasizes lipids as an important medium for the organization at T cell activation sites and strongly indicates that membrane condensation is an important element of the T cell activation process. PMID:18509459

  19. Are Evaluation Activities Worth the Effort?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Robert V.

    The casual approach to evaluation, the interface of evaluation and research, and various approaches subsumed within evaluation are addressed, and the dimensions that determine the worth of engaging in evaluation activities are examined. Additionally, a statement about the state-of-the-art in regard to the technology of conducting evaluation…

  20. CXCL13 is a plasma biomarker of germinal center activity.

    PubMed

    Havenar-Daughton, Colin; Lindqvist, Madelene; Heit, Antje; Wu, Jennifer E; Reiss, Samantha M; Kendric, Kayla; Bélanger, Simon; Kasturi, Sudhir Pai; Landais, Elise; Akondy, Rama S; McGuire, Helen M; Bothwell, Marcella; Vagefi, Parsia A; Scully, Eileen; Tomaras, Georgia D; Davis, Mark M; Poignard, Pascal; Ahmed, Rafi; Walker, Bruce D; Pulendran, Bali; McElrath, M Juliana; Kaufmann, Daniel E; Crotty, Shane

    2016-03-01

    Significantly higher levels of plasma CXCL13 [chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 13] were associated with the generation of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against HIV in a large longitudinal cohort of HIV-infected individuals. Germinal centers (GCs) perform the remarkable task of optimizing B-cell Ab responses. GCs are required for almost all B-cell receptor affinity maturation and will be a critical parameter to monitor if HIV bnAbs are to be induced by vaccination. However, lymphoid tissue is rarely available from immunized humans, making the monitoring of GC activity by direct assessment of GC B cells and germinal center CD4(+) T follicular helper (GC Tfh) cells problematic. The CXCL13-CXCR5 [chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 5] chemokine axis plays a central role in organizing both B-cell follicles and GCs. Because GC Tfh cells can produce CXCL13, we explored the potential use of CXCL13 as a blood biomarker to indicate GC activity. In a series of studies, we found that plasma CXCL13 levels correlated with GC activity in draining lymph nodes of immunized mice, immunized macaques, and HIV-infected humans. Furthermore, plasma CXCL13 levels in immunized humans correlated with the magnitude of Ab responses and the frequency of ICOS(+) (inducible T-cell costimulator) Tfh-like cells in blood. Together, these findings support the potential use of CXCL13 as a plasma biomarker of GC activity in human vaccine trials and other clinical settings. PMID:26908875

  1. Red wine activates plasma membrane redox system in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Idolo; Moccia, Stefania; Volpe, Silvestro; Alfieri, Giovanna; Strollo, Daniela; Bilotto, Stefania; Spagnuolo, Carmela; Di Renzo, Massimo; Aquino, Rita P; Russo, Gian Luigi

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we report that polyphenols present in red wine obtained by a controlled microvinification process are able to protect human erythrocytes from oxidative stress and to activate Plasma Membrane Redox System (PMRS). Human plasma obtained from healthy subjects was incubated in the presence of whole red wine at a concentration corresponding to 9.13-73 μg/ml gallic acid equivalents to verify the capacity to protect against hypochlorous acid (HOCl)-induced plasma oxidation and to minimize chloramine formation. Red wine reduced hemolysis and chloramine formation induced by HOCl of 40 and 35%, respectively. PMRS present on human erythrocytes transfers electrons from intracellular molecules to extracellular electron acceptors. We demonstrated that whole red wine activated PMRS activity in human erythrocytes isolated from donors in a dose-dependent manner with a maximum at about 70-100 μg/ml gallic acid equivalents. We also showed that red wine increased glutathione (GSH) levels and erythrocytic antioxidant capacity, measured by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) quenching assay. Furthermore, we reported that GSH played a crucial role in regulating PMRS activity in erythrocytes. In fact, the effect of iodoacetamide, an alkylating agent that induces depletion of intracellular GSH, was completely counteracted by red wine. Bioactive compounds present in red wine, such as gallic acid, resveratrol, catechin, and quercetin were unable to activate PMRS when tested at the concentrations normally present in aged red wines. On the contrary, the increase of PMRS activity was associated with the anthocyanin fraction, suggesting the capacity of this class of compounds to positively modulate PMRS enzymatic activity. PMID:26866566

  2. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen.

    PubMed

    Hamann, S; Börner, K; Burlacov, I; Spies, H-J; Strämke, M; Strämke, S; Röpcke, J

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH4, C2H2, HCN, and NH3). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined. PMID:26724023

  3. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, S. Röpcke, J.; Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J.; Strämke, M.; Strämke, S.

    2015-12-15

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, HCN, and NH{sub 3}). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  4. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, S.; Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J.; Strämke, M.; Strämke, S.; Röpcke, J.

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH4, C2H2, HCN, and NH3). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  5. Procoagulant activity on platelets adhered to collagen or plasma clot.

    PubMed

    Ilveskero, S; Siljander, P; Lassila, R

    2001-04-01

    In a new 2-stage assay of platelet procoagulant activity (PCA), we first subjected gel-filtered platelets to adhesion on collagen (as a model of primary hemostasis) or plasma clots (as a model of preformed thrombus) for 30 minutes, and then the adherent platelets were supplemented with pooled, reptilase-treated, diluted plasma. Defibrinated plasma provided coagulation factors for assembly on platelet membranes without uncontrolled binding of thrombin to fibrin(ogen). Platelet adhesion to both surfaces showed modest individual variation, which increased at platelet densities that allowed aggregation. However, adhesion-induced PCA varied individually and surface-independently >3-fold, suggesting a uniform platelet procoagulant mechanism. Permanently adhered platelets showed markedly enhanced PCA when compared with the platelet pool in suspension, even after strong activation. The rate of thrombin generation induced by clot-adherent platelets was markedly faster than on collagen-adherent platelets during the initial phase of coagulation, whereas collagen-induced PCA proceeded slowly, strongly promoted by tissue thromboplastin. Therefore at 10 minutes, after adjustment for adhered platelets, collagen supported soluble thrombin formation as much as 5 times that of the thrombin-retaining clots. Activation of platelets by their firm adhesion was accompanied by formation of microparticles, representing about one third of the total soluble PCA. Collagen-adhered platelets provide soluble thrombin and microparticles, whereas the preformed clot serves to localize and accelerate hemostasis at the injury site, with the contribution of retained thrombin and microparticles. PMID:11304482

  6. Calcium Modulation of Plant Plasma Membrane-Bound Atpase Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, C.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetic properties of barley enzyme are discussed and compared with those of other plants. Possibilities for calcium transport in the plasma membrane by proton pump and ATPase-dependent calcium pumps are explored. Topics covered include the ph phase of the enzyme; high affinity of barley for calcium; temperature dependence, activation enthalpy, and the types of ATPase catalytic sites. Attention is given to lipids which are both screened and bound by calcium. Studies show that barley has a calmodulin activated ATPase that is found in the presence of magnesium and calcium.

  7. Activity of thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor in the plasma of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Dubis, Joanna; Zuk, Natalia; Grendziak, Ryszard; Zapotoczny, Norbert; Pfanhauser, Monika; Witkiewicz, Wojciech

    2014-04-01

    Patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) experience impaired balance between fibrinolysis and coagulation, manifested by increased prothrombotic tendency and intensified inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the TAFI activity level (thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor) in the plasma of AAA patients. Plasma levels of PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1), urokinase-type plasminogen activator and uPAR (urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor) were measured as markers of fibrinolytic activity. The study showed that the activity of the thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor in the plasma of AAA patients was significantly lower than in the plasma of the control individuals (64.6 ± 10.1 vs. 54.2 ± 10.9%, P < 0.0001). TAFI activity positively correlated with the white blood cell count (r = 0.486, P < 0.005). The uPAR concentration in the AAA patients was statistically significantly higher than in the control group and positively correlated with TAFI activity (r = 0.409, P = 0.02). The levels of PAI-1 and D-dimers (fibrin fragments) were significantly higher in patients with AAA than in the control group (44.3 ± 17.5 vs. 21.7 ± 8.7 ng/ml and 1869.6 ± 1490.1 vs. 181.5 ± 188.6 ng/ml, respectively). Lowered activity of the fibrinolysis inhibitor TAFI may heighten the blood fibrinolytic potential in AAA patients and contribute to the development of comorbidities. Therefore, TAFI participation in AAA pathogenesis cannot be excluded. PMID:24378973

  8. DYNAMOMETER EVALUATION OF PLASMA-CATALYST FOR DIESEL NOX REDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Hoard, J; Schmieg, S; Brooks, D; Peden, C; Barlow, S; Tonkyn, R

    2003-08-24

    A three-stage plasma-catalyst system was developed and tested on an engine dynamometer. Previous laboratory testing suggested high NOx efficiency could be obtained. With hexene reductant added to the exhaust, over 90% NOx reduction was observed. However, with diesel or Fischer-Tropsch reductant the catalyst efficiency rapidly dropped off. Heating the catalyst in air removed brown deposit from the surface and restored conversion efficiency. Following the engine tests, the used catalysts were evaluated. BET surface area decreased, and TPD revealed significant storage. This storage appears to be partly unburned diesel fuel that can be removed by heating to around 250-300 C, and partly hydrocarbons bonded to the surface that remain in place until 450-500 C. Laboratory testing with propene reductant demonstrated that the catalyst regains efficiency slowly even when operating temperature does not exceed 300 C. This suggests that control strategies may be able to regenerate the catalyst by occasional moderate heating.

  9. Integrin activation by a cold atmospheric plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volotskova, Olga; Stepp, Mary Ann; Keidar, Michael

    2012-05-01

    Current breakthrough research on cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) demonstrates that CAP has great potential in various areas, including medicine and biology, thus providing a new tool for living tissue treatment. In this paper, we explore potential mechanisms by which CAP alters cell migration and influences cell adhesion. We focus on the study of CAP interaction with fibroblasts and corneal epithelial cells. The data show that fibroblasts and corneal epithelial cells have different thresholds (treatment times) required to achieve maximum inhibition of cell migration. Both cell types reduced their migration rates by ˜30-40% after CAP compared to control cells. Also, the impact of CAP treatment on cell migration and persistence of fibroblasts after integrin activation by MnCl2, serum starvation or replating cells onto surfaces coated with integrin ligands is assessed; the results show that activation by MnCl2 or starvation attenuates cells’ responses to plasma. Studies carried out to assess the impact of CAP treatment on the activation state of β1 integrin and focal adhesion size by using immunofluorescence show that fibroblasts have more active β1 integrin on their surface and large focal adhesions after CAP treatment. Based on these data, a thermodynamic model is presented to explain how CAP leads to integrin activation and focal adhesion assembly.

  10. Relationship between Physical Activity and Plasma Fibrinogen Concentrations in Adults without Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Marcos, Manuel A.; Recio-Rodríguez, José I.; Patino-Alonso, Maria C.; Martinez-Vizcaino, Vicente; Martin-Borras, Carme; de-la-Cal-dela-Fuente, Aventina; Sauras-Llera, Ines; Sanchez-Perez, Alvaro; Agudo-Conde, Cristina; García-Ortiz, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the relationship between regular physical activity, as assessed by accelerometer and 7-day physical activity recall (PAR), and plasma fibrinogen concentrations. Methods A cross-sectional study in a previously established cohort of healthy subjects was performed. This study analyzed 1284 subjects who were included in the EVIDENT study (mean age 55.0±13.6 years; 60.90% women). Fibrinogen concentrations were measured in blood plasma. Physical activity was assessed with a 7-day PAR (metabolic equivalents (METs)/hour/week) and GT3X ActiGraph accelerometer (counts/minute) for 7 days. Results Physical exercise, which was evaluated with both an accelerometer (Median: 237.28 counts/minute) and 7-day PAR (Median: 8 METs/hour/week). Physical activity was negatively correlated with plasma fibrinogen concentrations, which was evaluated by counts/min (r = −0.100; p<0.001) and METs/hour/week (r = −0.162; p<0.001). In a multiple linear regression analysis, fibrinogen concentrations of the subjects who performed more physical activity (third tertile of count/minute and METs/hour/week) respect to subjects who performed less (first tertile), maintained statistical significance after adjustments for age and others confounders (β = −0.03; p = 0.046 and β = −0.06; p<0.001, respectively). Conclusions Physical activity, as assessed by accelerometer and 7-day PAR, was negatively associated with plasma fibrinogen concentrations. This relation is maintained in subjects who performed more exercise even after adjusting for age and other confounders. PMID:24498413

  11. Purification of human plasma platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Stafforini, D.M.; Prescott, S.M.; McIntyre, T.M.

    1986-05-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF;1-0-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine is synthesized by a variety of cells. It induces hypotension, and activates platelets, neutrophils, and macrophages at nanomolar concentrations. Removal of the acetate abolishes biological activity, and is catalyzed by a specific PAF acetylhydrolase present in plasma and tissues. The authors developed a rapid assay, based on separation of (/sup 3/H)acetate from (/sup 3/H-acetyl)PAF by reversed-phase chromatography. In human plasma the enzyme exhibits an apparent Km of 5.7..mu..M, with a Vmax of 0.027..mu..mol/h/mg. Ultracentrifugation in density gradients showed that 30% of the activity is associated with high density lipoproteins (HDL) and 70% with low density lipoproteins (LDL). The enzyme was purified from LDL by precipitation with Na phosphotungstate and MgCl/sub 2/, solubilization with Tween 20, column chromatography and electrophoresis. This procedure resulted in a preparation that was 21,000-fold purified from plasma (spec. act. 575..mu..mol/h/mg) with a recovery of 10%. The purified enzyme has a molecular weight of about 43,000, a broad pH optimum (peak 7.5-8.0), and a pl of 4.6. It has greater activity when PAF is in a micellar, as compared to monomeric, and exhibits surface dilution kinetics, which may be important in vivo. The purification and characterization of this enzyme will allow detailed studies of its role in PAF metabolism.

  12. Plasma material interaction studies on low activation materials used for plasma facing or blanket component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y.; Yamauchi, Y.; Hashiba, M.; Kohyama, A.; Katoh, Y.; Lee, Y.; Jinushi, T.; Akiba, M.; Nakamura, K.; Yoshida, H.; Sengoku, S.; Tsuzuki, K.; Kusama, Y.; Yamaguchi, K.; Muroga, T.

    2004-08-01

    Numerous issues on the plasma material interactions were investigated for low activation materials. Co-deposited carbon dust was prepared and the deuterium concentration was measured. The concentration was approximately half of the present design value for ITER. For ferritic steel, the deuterium retention was observed to be comparable to that of stainless steel. Physical sputtering yield was roughly the same as that for stainless steel. For the reduction of absorption rate in vanadium alloy, titanium oxide coating was conducted, and the coating was observed to be very effective for reduction of hydrogen absorption. Helium gas permeability was measured for numerous SiC/SiC composites, and the SiC/SiC composite made by the NITE process showed quite low permeability. The SiC/SiC blanket may be able to be used without helium leakage into plasma.

  13. Analytical study of acoustically perturbed Brillouin active magnetized semiconductor plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Arun; Jat, K. L.

    2015-07-31

    An analytical study of acoustically perturbed Brillouin active magnetized semiconductor plasma has been reported. In the present analytical investigation, the lattice displacement, acousto-optical polarization, susceptibility, acousto-optical gain constant arising due to the induced nonlinear current density and acousto-optical process are deduced in an acoustically perturbed Brillouin active magnetized semiconductor plasma using the hydrodynamical model of plasma and coupled mode scheme. The influence of wave number and magnetic field has been explored. The analysis has been applied to centrosymmetric crystal. Numerical estimates are made for n-type InSb crystal duly irradiated by a frequency doubled 10.6 µm CO{sub 2} laser. It is found that lattice displacement, susceptibility and acousto-optical gain increase linearly with incident wave number and applied dc magnetic field, while decrease with scattering angle. The gain also increases with electric amplitude of incident laser beam. Results are found to be well in agreement with available literature.

  14. Significance of Plasma Dopamine β-Hydroxylase Activity as an Index of Sympathetic Neuronal Function

    PubMed Central

    Reid, John L.; Kopin, Irwin J.

    1974-01-01

    Plasma norepinephrine and dopamine β-hydroxylase (EC 1.14.17.1) activity were measured in rats. Adrenergic neuron blockade with bretylium for 4 hr and ganglion blockade with chlorisondamine for 72 hr lowered plasma norepinephrine. Neither treatment altered plasma dopamine β-hydroxylase activity. Phenoxybenzamine for up to 48 hr markedly raised plasma norepinephrine and transiently lowered plasma dopamine β-hydroxylase at 24 hr. Prolonged pharmacological modification of sympathetic nervous activity and plasma norepinephrine were not attended by parallel changes in circulating dopamine β-hydroxylase activity. Plasma dopamine β-hydroxylase activity does not appear to be a sensitive index of prolonged alterations in sympathetic neural activity. Norepinephrine in plasma, however, appears to reflect sensitively and accurately the rate of release of the neurotransmitter. PMID:4530990

  15. Active screen plasma surface modification of polycaprolactone to improve cell attachment.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xin; Sammons, Rachel L; Bertóti, Imre; Jenkins, Mike J; Dong, Hanshan

    2012-02-01

    To tailor polycaprolactone (PCL) surface properties for biomedical applications, film samples of PCL were surface modified by the active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) technique. The chemical composition and structure were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The wettability of the surface modified polymers was investigated by contact angle and surface energy methods. Biocompatibility of the prepared PCL samples was evaluated in vitro using MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells. The degradability was assessed by determining the self-degradation rate (catalyzed by lipase). The results show that ASPN surface modification can effectively improve osteoblast cell adhesion and spreading on the surface of PCL. The main change in chemical composition is the exchange of some carboxyl groups on the surface for hydroxyl groups. The active-screen plasma nitriding technique has been found to be an effective and practical method to effectively improve osteoblast cell adhesion and spreading on the PCL surface. Such changes have been attributed to the increase in wettablity and generation of new hydroxyl groups by plasma treatment. After active-screen plasma treatment, the PCL film is still degradable, but the enzymatic degradation rate is slower compared with untreated PCL film. PMID:22179939

  16. Alterations in the activities of hepatic plasma-membrane and microsomal enzymes during liver regeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Deliconstantinos, G; Ramantanis, G

    1983-01-01

    A marked increase in the activities of rat liver plasma-membrane (Na+ + K+)-stimulated ATPase and microsomal Ca2+-stimulated ATPase was observed 18h after partial hepatectomy. Lipid analyses for both membrane preparations reveal that in partially hepatectomized rats the cholesterol and sphingomyelin content are decreased with a subsequent decrease in the cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio compared with those of sham-operated animals. Changes in the allosteric properties of plasma-membrane (Na+ + K+)-stimulated ATPase by F- (as reflected by changes in the Hill coefficient) indicated a fluidization of the lipid bilayer of both membrane preparations in 18 h-regenerating liver. The amphipathic dodecyl glucoside incorporated into the hepatic plasma membranes evoked a marked increase in the (Na+ + K+)-stimulated ATPase and 5'-nucleotidase activities. The lack of effect of the glucoside on the Lubrol-PX-solubilized 5'-nucleotidase indicates that changes in the activities of the membrane-bound enzymes caused by the glucoside are due to modulation of the membrane fluidity. Dodecyl glucoside appears to increase the membrane fluidity, evaluated through changes in the Hill coefficient for plasma-membrane (Na+ + K+)-stimulated ATPase. The biological significance of these data is discussed in terms of the differences and changes in the interaction of membrane-bound enzymes with membrane lipids during liver regeneration. PMID:6309144

  17. Plasma Switch for High-Power Active Pulse Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-11-04

    Results are presented from experiments carried out at the Naval Research Laboratory X-band magnicon facility on a two-channel X-band active RF pulse compressor that employed plasma switches. Experimental evidence is shown to validate the basic goals of the project, which include: simultaneous firing of plasma switches in both channels of the RF circuit, operation of quasi-optical 3-dB hybrid directional coupler coherent superposition of RF compressed pulses from both channels, and operation of the X-band magnicon directly in the RF pulse compressor. For incident 1.2 ?s pulses in the range 0.63 ? 1.35 MW, compressed pulses of peak powers 5.7 ? 11.3 MW were obtained, corresponding to peak power gain ratios of 8.3 ? 9.3. Insufficient bakeout and conditioning of the high-power RF circuit prevented experiments from being conducted at higher RF input power levels.

  18. Plasma-activated medium induced apoptosis on tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Masaru; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Kano, Hiroyuki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2013-09-01

    The non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP) has attracted attention in cancer therapy. In this study, the fresh medium was treated with our developed NEAPP, ultra-high electron density (approximately 2 × 1016 cm-3). The medium called the plasma-activated medium (PAM) killed not normal cells but tumor cells through induction of apoptosis. Cell proliferation assays showed that the tumor cells were selectively killed by the PAM. Those cells induced apoptosis using an apoptotic molecular marker, cleaved Caspase3/7. The molecular mechanisms of PAM-mediated apoptosis in the tumor cells were also found that the PAM downregulated the expression of AKT kinase, a marker molecule in a survival signal transduction pathway. These results suggest that PAM may be a promising tool for tumor therapy by downregulating the survival signals in cancers.

  19. Plasma endotoxin activity in kangaroos with oral necrobacillosis (lumpy jaw disease) using an automated handheld testing system

    PubMed Central

    SOTOHIRA, Yukari; SUZUKI, Kazuyuki; SASAKI, Haruka; SANO, Tadashi; TSUCHIYA, Masakazu; SUZUKI, Yohko; SHIMAMORI, Toshio; TSUKANO, Kenji; SATO, Ayano; YOKOTA, Hiroshi; ASAKAWA, Mitsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the reliability and effectiveness of directly determining endotoxin activity in plasma samples from kangaroos with lumpy jaw disease (LJD, n=15) and healthy controls (n=12). Prior to the present study, the ability of the commercially available automated handheld portable test system (PTSTM) to detect endotoxin activity in kangaroo plasma was compared with that of the traditional LAL-kinetic turbidimetric (KT) assay. Plasma samples, which were obtained from endotoxin-challenged cattle, were diluted 1:20 in endotoxin-free water and heated to 80°C for 10 min. The performance of the PTSTM was not significantly different from that of the traditional LAL-based assay. The data obtained using PTSTM correlated with those using KT (r2=0.963, P<0.001). These findings indicated that the PTSTM is applicable as a simplified system to assess endotoxin activity in macropods. In the present study, we demonstrated the diagnostic value of plasma endotoxin activity in kangaroos with systemic inflammation caused by oral necrobacillosis and identified plasma endotoxin activity as a sensitive marker of systemic inflammation in kangaroos with LJD. Based on ROC curves, we proposed a diagnostic cut-off point for endotoxin activity of >0.22 EU/ml for the identification of LJD. Our results indicate that the assessment of plasma endotoxin activity is a promising diagnostic tool for determining the outcome of LJD in captive macropods. PMID:26902804

  20. Plasma endotoxin activity in kangaroos with oral necrobacillosis (lumpy jaw disease) using an automated handheld testing system.

    PubMed

    Sotohira, Yukari; Suzuki, Kazuyuki; Sasaki, Haruka; Sano, Tadashi; Tsuchiya, Masakazu; Suzuki, Yohko; Shimamori, Toshio; Tsukano, Kenji; Sato, Ayano; Yokota, Hiroshi; Asakawa, Mitsuhiko

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the reliability and effectiveness of directly determining endotoxin activity in plasma samples from kangaroos with lumpy jaw disease (LJD, n=15) and healthy controls (n=12). Prior to the present study, the ability of the commercially available automated handheld portable test system (PTS(TM)) to detect endotoxin activity in kangaroo plasma was compared with that of the traditional LAL-kinetic turbidimetric (KT) assay. Plasma samples, which were obtained from endotoxin-challenged cattle, were diluted 1:20 in endotoxin-free water and heated to 80°C for 10 min. The performance of the PTS(TM) was not significantly different from that of the traditional LAL-based assay. The data obtained using PTS(TM) correlated with those using KT (r(2)=0.963, P<0.001). These findings indicated that the PTS(TM) is applicable as a simplified system to assess endotoxin activity in macropods. In the present study, we demonstrated the diagnostic value of plasma endotoxin activity in kangaroos with systemic inflammation caused by oral necrobacillosis and identified plasma endotoxin activity as a sensitive marker of systemic inflammation in kangaroos with LJD. Based on ROC curves, we proposed a diagnostic cut-off point for endotoxin activity of >0.22 EU/ml for the identification of LJD. Our results indicate that the assessment of plasma endotoxin activity is a promising diagnostic tool for determining the outcome of LJD in captive macropods. PMID:26902804

  1. Factors Associated with Evaluating Public Relations Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElreath, Mark P.

    More than 150 public relations practitioners responded to a survey designed to identify and clarify factors associated with evaluative research in public relations. Responses indicated that (1) no more than half the practitioners formally evaluate their public relations activities on a regular basis; (2) the majority of evaluation is done…

  2. Evaluation of fatty acid oxidation by reactive oxygen species induced in liquids using atmospheric-pressure nonthermal plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Atsushi; Fukui, Satoshi; Ikawa, Satoshi; Kitano, Katsuhisa

    2015-10-01

    We investigated fatty acid oxidation by atmospheric-pressure nonthermal helium plasma using linoleic acid, an unsaturated fatty acid, together with evaluating active species induced in liquids. If the ambient gas contains oxygen, direct plasma such as plasma jets coming into contact with the liquid surface supplies various active species, such as singlet oxygen, ozone, and superoxide anion radicals, to the liquid. The direct plasma easily oxidizes linoleic acid, indicating that fatty acid oxidation will occur in the direct plasma. In contrast, afterglow flow, where the plasma is terminated in a glass tube and does not touch the surface of the liquid sample, supplies mainly superoxide anion radicals. The fact that there was no clear observation of linoleic acid oxidation using the afterglow reveals that it may not affect lipids, even in an atmosphere containing oxygen. The afterglow flow can potentially be used for the sterilization of aqueous solutions using the reduced pH method, in medical and dental applications, because it provides bactericidal activity in the aqueous solution despite containing a smaller amount of active species.

  3. New approaches to evaluate sympathoadrenal system activity in experiments on Earth and in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvetnansky, R.; Noskov, V. B.; Blazicek, P.; Macho, L.; Grigoriev, A. I.; Goldstein, D. S.; Kopin, I. J.

    In previous studies the activity of the sympathoadrenal system (SAS) in cosmonauts during space flights was evaluated by measuring plasma catecholamines (CA) levels and urinary CA and their metabolites concentrations. Plasma CA levels are accepted indicators of SAS activity, however, they are determined by the plasma clearances as well as the rates of CA release (spillover-SO) into the bloodstream. Nowadays methods are available which evaluate not only plasma levels of CA but also their release, spillover, uptake, reuptake, degradation and also CA synthesis in vivo measured by plasma levels of dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA). Plasma concentrations of DOPA, the CA noradrenaline (NE), adrenaline (ADR), and dopamine (DA), the deaminated catechol metabolites dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG) and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and the O-methylated metabolites methoxyhydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) and homovanillic acid (HVA) were measured during immobilization stress (IMO) in conscious rats. Radiotracer methods were used to measure NE SO. IMO markedly increased arterial NE levels but NE SO was less elevated bacause the NE clearance was slightly reduced in IMO rats. Simultaneous measurements of plasma CA and their metabolites provide another means to obtain information about SAS function. For instance, dissociation between changes of plasma DHPG and NE levels can indicate changes in neuronal reuptake of NE. We found marked parallel increases in plasma NE and DHPG levels during acute IMO; however after repeated IMO, plasma NE levels were increased but DHPG responses were less pronounced suggesting a reduced NE reuptake. DOPA, the CA precursor, circulates in plasma at a concentration higher than NE. During stress, increased sympathoneural outflow stimulates DOPA synthesis and release into the circulation supporting the view that changes in plasma DOPA levels during stress reflect in vivo changes in the rate of CA synthesis. We propose to measure the new plasma indicators of SAS

  4. Cytokine-release kinetics of platelet-rich plasma according to various activation protocols

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Y. H.; Kim, W.; Park, K. U.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to evaluate the cytokine-release kinetics of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) according to different activation protocols. Methods Two manual preparation procedures (single-spin (SS) at 900 g for five minutes; double-spin (DS) at 900 g for five minutes and then 1500 g for 15 minutes) were performed for each of 14 healthy subjects. Both preparations were tested for platelet activation by one of three activation protocols: no activation, activation with calcium (Ca) only, or calcium with a low dose (50 IU per 1 ml PRP) of thrombin. Each preparation was divided into four aliquots and incubated for one hour, 24 hours, 72 hours, and seven days. The cytokine-release kinetics were evaluated by assessing PDGF, TGF, VEGF, FGF, IL-1, and MMP-9 concentrations with bead-based sandwich immunoassay. Results The concentration of cytokine released from PRP varied over time and was influenced by various activation protocols. Ca-only activation had a significant effect on the DS PRPs (where the VEGF, FGF, and IL-1 concentrations were sustained) while Ca/thrombin activation had effects on both SS and DS PRPs (where the PDGF and VEGF concentrations were sustained and the TGF and FGF concentrations were short). The IL-1 content showed a significant increase with Ca-only or Ca/thrombin activation while these activations did not increase the MMP-9 concentration. Conclusion The SS and DS methods differed in their effect on cytokine release, and this effect varied among the cytokines analysed. In addition, low dose of thrombin/calcium activation increased the overall cytokine release of the PRP preparations over seven days, relative to that with a calcium-only supplement or non-activation. Cite this article: Professor J. H. Oh. Cytokine-release kinetics of platelet-rich plasma according to various activation protocols. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:37–45. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.52.2000540 PMID:26862077

  5. How to Patch Active Plasma and Collisionless Sheath: Practical Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, Igor D.

    2002-08-22

    Most plasmas have a very thin sheath compared with the plasma dimension. This necessitates separate calculations of the plasma and sheath. The Bohm criterion provides the boundary condition for calculation of plasma profiles. To calculate sheath properties, a value of electric field at the plasma-sheath interface has to be specified in addition to the Bohm criterion. The value of the boundary electric field and robust procedure to approximately patch plasma and collisionless sheath with a very good accuracy are reported.

  6. Plasma lipid levels in active and sedentary premenopausal females.

    PubMed

    Perry, A C; Shaw, M H; Hsia, L; Nash, M S; Kaplan, T; Signorile, J F; Appleyate, B

    1992-04-01

    Cross-sectional data on 19 long-distance runners (LD), 17 aerobic dancers (AD), 19 recreational joggers (RJ), and 15 inactive controls (IC) were examined for cardiovascular endurance and determination of plasma lipoproteins. Subjects included premenopausal eumenorrheic females who were non-smokers and presently not using oral contraceptives. Results indicated that all groups were similar in age, height and weight. Only the AD group had a significantly lower percent body fat (p less than .001) than the other groups. The LD, AD and RJ groups had a significantly higher VO2max than the IC group (p less than .05), and the LD and AD groups had a significantly higher VO2max than the RJ group (p less than .05). Analysis of a one-day food log indicated that the only difference in diet among the groups was a significantly lower intake of total and monounsaturated fat in the AD group (p less than .05) and a significantly lower intake of carbohydrates in the IC group than the AD group (p less than .05). Analysis of plasma lipids revealed no significant differences in any lipid variables among the groups. These findings indicate that healthy premenopausal eumenorrheic females with similar physical characteristics also have similar plasma lipid profiles regardless of their physical activity level. PMID:1601555

  7. Plasma Beta Above a Solar Active Region: Rethinking the Paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we present a model of the plasma beta above an active region and discuss its consequences in terms of coronal magnetic field modeling. The beta-plasma model is representative and derived from a collection of sources. The resulting beta variation with height is used to emphasize the assumption that the magnetic pressure dominates over the plasma pressure must be carefully considered depending on what part of the solar atmosphere is being considered. This paper points out (1) that the paradigm that the coronal magnetic field can be constructed from a force-free magnetic field must be used in the correct context, since the forcefree region is sandwiched between two regions which have beta greater than 1, (2) that the chromospheric MgIICIV magnetic measurements occur near the beta-minimum, and (3) that, moving from the photosphere upwards, beta can return to 1 at relatively low coronal heights, e.g. R approximately 1.2R(sub)s.

  8. Photosynthesis Activates Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase via Sugar Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Masaki; Inoue, Shin-Ichiro; Kuwata, Keiko; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2016-05-01

    Plant plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase acts as a primary transporter via proton pumping and regulates diverse physiological responses by controlling secondary solute transport, pH homeostasis, and membrane potential. Phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine and the subsequent binding of 14-3-3 proteins in the carboxyl terminus of the enzyme are required for H(+)-ATPase activation. We showed previously that photosynthesis induces phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine in the nonvascular bryophyte Marchantia polymorpha However, (1) whether this response is conserved in vascular plants and (2) the process by which photosynthesis regulates H(+)-ATPase phosphorylation at the plasma membrane remain unresolved issues. Here, we report that photosynthesis induced the phosphorylation and activation of H(+)-ATPase in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves via sugar accumulation. Light reversibly phosphorylated leaf H(+)-ATPase, and this process was inhibited by pharmacological and genetic suppression of photosynthesis. Immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses indicated that light-induced phosphorylation of H(+)-ATPase occurred autonomously in mesophyll cells. We also show that the phosphorylation status of H(+)-ATPase and photosynthetic sugar accumulation in leaves were positively correlated and that sugar treatment promoted phosphorylation. Furthermore, light-induced phosphorylation of H(+)-ATPase was strongly suppressed in a double mutant defective in ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and triose phosphate/phosphate translocator (adg1-1 tpt-2); these mutations strongly inhibited endogenous sugar accumulation. Overall, we show that photosynthesis activated H(+)-ATPase via sugar production in the mesophyll cells of vascular plants. Our work provides new insight into signaling from chloroplasts to the plasma membrane ion transport mechanism. PMID:27016447

  9. Evaluating the binding selectivity of transthyretin amyloid fibril inhibitors in blood plasma

    PubMed Central

    Purkey, Hans E.; Dorrell, Michael I.; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2001-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) tetramer dissociation and misfolding facilitate assembly into amyloid fibrils that putatively cause senile systemic amyloidosis and familial amyloid polyneuropathy. We have previously discovered more than 50 small molecules that bind to and stabilize tetrameric TTR, inhibiting amyloid fibril formation in vitro. A method is presented here to evaluate the binding selectivity of these inhibitors to TTR in human plasma, a complex biological fluid composed of more than 60 proteins and numerous small molecules. Our immunoprecipitation approach isolates TTR and bound small molecules from a biological fluid such as plasma, and quantifies the amount of small molecules bound to the protein by HPLC analysis. This approach demonstrates that only a small subset of the inhibitors that saturate the TTR binding sites in vitro do so in plasma. These selective inhibitors can now be tested in animal models of TTR amyloid disease to probe the validity of the amyloid hypothesis. This method could be easily extended to evaluate small molecule binding selectivity to any protein in a given biological fluid without the necessity of determining or guessing which other protein components may be competitors. This is a central issue to understanding the distribution, metabolism, activity, and toxicity of potential drugs. PMID:11344299

  10. Influence of low and high pressure baroreceptors on plasma renin activity in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, A. L.; Abboud, F. M.; Fitz, A. E.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of low and high pressure baroreceptors on plasma renin activity (immunoassay) were evaluated using graded lower body suction (LBS) in six healthy men. LBS at -10 and -20 mmHg for 10 min decreased central venous pressure without changing arterial pressure and thereby presumably reduced low but not high pressure baroreceptor inhibition of renin release. LBS at these levels produced forearm vasoconstriction, but did not increase renin. LBS at -40 mmHG decreased central venous and arterial pulse pressure and thus reduced both low and high pressure baroreceptor inhibition. LBS at this level produced forearm vasoconstriction and tachycardia and increased renin. In summary, reduction in low pressure baroreceptor inhibition in humans did not increase renin in the presence of physiological tonic inhibition from high pressure baroreceptors. Increases in renin did not occur until there was combined reduction of high and low pressure baroreceptor inhibition on plasma renin activity.

  11. Evaluating Metacognitive Scaffolding in Guided Invention Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roll, Ido; Holmes, Natasha G.; Day, James; Bonn, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Invention and Productive Failure activities ask students to generate methods that capture the important properties of some given data (e.g., uncertainty) before being taught the expert solution. Invention and Productive Failure activities are a class of scientific inquiry activities in that students create, implement, and evaluate mathematical…

  12. Identifying signatures of plasma waves and reconnection associated with Kelvin-Helmholtz activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas Wesley

    The magnetopause marks the boundary between the shocked solar wind and magnetospheric plasma. Understanding the dynamics of the plasma processes at the magnetopause boundary is crucial to the study of plasma transport into the magnetosphere. Previous studies have shown that there exists a temperature asymmetry in the plasma sheet. During northward IMF, the cold component ions are 30-40% hotter in the dawn flank plasma sheet compared to the dusk flank. However, the mechanisms responsible are still not entirely clear. Recent work has shown that reconnection in Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices can transport plasma into the magnetosphere. Previous studies have also shown that mode conversion at the magnetopause can generate kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) activity. Both magnetic reconnection and plasma wave activity can heat plasma. In this thesis we look for new cases of Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability (KHI) from Cluster spacecraft data and search for signatures of associated magnetic reconnection and plasma wave activity.

  13. Micro-Biocidal Activity of Yeast Cells by Needle Plasma Irradiation at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurumi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Taima, Tomohito; Suzuki, Kaoru; Hirose, Hideharu; Masutani, Shigeyuki

    In this study, we report on the biocidal activity technique by needle helium plasma irradiation at atmospheric pressure using borosilicate capillary nozzle to apply for the oral surgery. The diameter of needle plasma was less than 50 µm, and temperature of plasma irradiated area was less than body temperature. Needle plasma showed emission due to OH and O radical. Raman spectra and methylene blue stain showed yeast cells were inactivated by needle plasma irradiation.

  14. Effect of clofibrate on the enzyme activity of rat liver plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Renaud, G; Foliot, A; Marais, J; Infante, R

    1980-03-15

    The activity of 3 plasma membranes marker enzymes (5'-nucleotidase, Mg++-ATPase and alkaline phosphodiesterase-I) was determined in plasma membranes isolated from liver of control and of clofibrate-treated rats. A complete indentity of plasma membranes enzyme activity in the 2 groups of experimental animals was observed for the 3 enzymes studied. PMID:6102923

  15. Changes in Plasma IL-6, Plasma VEGF and Serum YKL-40 During Treatment with Etanercept and Methotrexate or Etanercept Alone in Patients with Active Rheumatoid Arthritis Despite Methotrexate Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Lene Surland; Hetland, Merete Lund; Johansen, Julia Sidenius; Skjødt, Henrik; Peters, Niels Daugaard; Colic, Ada; Grau, Karin; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2009-01-01

    Changes in plasma IL-6, plasma VEGF and serum YKL-40 were determined in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients during treatment with etanercept alone or in combination with methotrexate. Twenty-five patients with active RA (DAS28 ≥ 3.2) were randomized to receive etanercept (25 mg sc. biweekly) plus methotrexate (n = 12) or etanercept alone (n = 13). Plasma IL-6, plasma VEGF and serum YKL-40 were determined by ELISA. The 3 biomarkers and DAS28 scores were evaluated at baseline and after 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks of treatment. At inclusion all patients had significantly (p < 0.001) elevated plasma IL-6, plasma VEGF and serum YKL-40 compared to healthy subjects. Eighteen patients responded to treatment (pooled data from both treatment groups), and they had significant (p < 0.05 to p < 0.001) decreases in plasma IL-6, plasma VEGF, serum YKL-40, ESR and DAS28 after 4 weeks of treatment and throughout the study (except serum YKL-40 at week 16). Plasma IL-6 showed the largest reductions. Non-responders had unchanged biomarkers. At week 16 the patients with DAS28 < 3.2 had lower levels compared to baseline values in plasma IL-6 (p = 0.005), plasma VEGF (p = 0.014), and ESR (p = 0.024). Plasma IL-6, plasma VEGF and serum YKL-40, which reflect different aspects of the inflammatory process, may provide useful information regarding early differentiation of responders from non-responders. PMID:20029652

  16. Crystal Structure of Human Plasma Platelet-Activating Factor Acetylhydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, U.; Bahnson, B

    2008-01-01

    Human plasma platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase functions by reducing PAF levels as a general anti-inflammatory scavenger and is linked to anaphylactic shock, asthma, and allergic reactions. The enzyme has also been implicated in hydrolytic activities of other pro-inflammatory agents, such as sn-2 oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. This plasma enzyme is tightly bound to low and high density lipoprotein particles and is also referred to as lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A{sub 2}. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been solved from x-ray diffraction data collected to a resolution of 1.5{angstrom}. It has a classic lipase {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase fold, and it contains a catalytic triad of Ser{sup 273}, His{sup 351}, and Asp{sup 296}. Two clusters of hydrophobic residues define the probable interface-binding region, and a prediction is given of how the enzyme is bound to lipoproteins. Additionally, an acidic patch of 10 carboxylate residues and a neighboring basic patch of three residues are suggested to play a role in high density lipoprotein/low density lipoprotein partitioning. A crystal structure is also presented of PAF acetylhydrolase reacted with the organophosphate compound paraoxon via its active site Ser{sup 273}. The resulting diethyl phosphoryl complex was used to model the tetrahedral intermediate of the substrate PAF to the active site. The model of interface binding begins to explain the known specificity of lipoprotein-bound substrates and how the active site can be both close to the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface and at the same time be accessible to the aqueous phase.

  17. Using the Tritium Plasma Experiment to evaluate ITER PFC safety. [Plasma-Facing Components

    SciTech Connect

    Longhurst, G.R.; Anderl, R.A. ); Bartlit, J.R. ); Causey, R.A. ); Haines, J.R. )

    1993-01-01

    The Tritium Plasma Experiment was assembled at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore to investigate interactions between dense plasmas at low energies and plasma-facing component materials. This apparatus has the unique capability of replicating plasma conditions in a tokamak divertor with particle flux densities of 2 [times] 10[sup 19] ions/cm[sup 2] [center dot] s and a plasma temperature of about 15 eV using a plasma that includes tritium. With the closure of the Tritium Research Laboratory at Livermore, the experiment was moved to the Tritium Systems Test Assembly facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. An experimental program has been initiated there using the Tritium Plasma Experiment to examine safety issues related to tritium in plasma-facing components, particularly the ITER divertor. Those issues include tritium retention and release characteristics, tritium permeation rates and transient times to coolant streams, surface modification and erosion by the plasma, the effects of thermal loads and cycling, and particulate production. A considerable lack of data exists in these areas for many of the materials, especially beryllium, being considered for use in ITER. Not only will basic material behavior with respect to safety issues in the divertor environment be examined, but innovative techniques for optimizing performance with respect to tritium safety by material modification and process control will be investigated. Supplementary experiments will be carried out at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory to expand and clarify results obtained on the Tritium Plasma Experiment.

  18. Computer modeling of active experiments in space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollens, Ross John

    1993-01-01

    Our understanding of space plasmas is expanding rapidly. This is, in large part, due to the ambitious efforts of scientists from around the world who are performing large scale active experiments in the space plasma surrounding the earth. One such effort was designated the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE) and consisted of a series of plasma releases that were completed during 1984 and 1985. What makes the AMPTE experiments particularly interesting was the occurrence of a dramatic anomaly that was completely unpredicted. During the AMPTE experiment, three satellites traced the solar wind flow into the earth's magnetosphere. One satellite, built by West Germany, released a series of barium and lithium canisters that were detonated and subsequently photoionized via solar radiation, thereby creating an artificial comet. Another satellite, built by Great Britain and in the vicinity during detonation, carried, as did the first satellite, a comprehensive set of magnetic field, particle, and wave instruments. Upon detonation, what was observed by the satellites, as well as by aircraft and ground-based observers, was quite unexpected. The initial deflection of the ion clouds was not in the ambient solar wind's flow direction (V) but rather in the direction transverse to the solar wind and the background magnetic field (V x B). This result was not predicted by any existing theories or simulation models; it is the main subject discussed in this dissertation. A large three dimensional computer simulation was produced to demonstrate that this transverse motion can be explained in terms of a rocket effect. Due to the extreme computer resources utilized in producing this work, the computer methods used to complete the calculation and the visualization techniques used to view the results are also discussed.

  19. [Evaluation of miR-122 level in the plasma of chronically HCV infected patients].

    PubMed

    Gholami, M; Ravanshad, M; Alavian, S-M; Baesi, K; Moallemi, S

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules, which have an important function in regulating RNA stability and gene expression. They also can circulate in a cell-free form in the blood thatmakes them potential disease markers. The liver contains various classes of miRNAs in which miR-122 accounts for about 70% of all miRNAs and it has been proved that its level increases in case of liver damage. Here, we investigated plasma levels of miR-122 as a useful disease parameter in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infection. Thirty five hemophilia and thalassemia patients with CHC were studied. The total RNA was extracted from plasma samples, and miR-122 levels were measured by qPCR and then compared with the specific liver markers. The plasma levels of alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase(AST) were correlated with plasma miR-122 level in CHC patients, and the level of circulating miR-122 in healthy individual groups were rarely lower than those of patients with CHC. In our study, miR-122 levels correlated well with markers of liver inflammatory activity. Plasma miR-122 can be assumed to be another marker in liver similar to the currently used specific markers such as ALT and AST for evaluation of liver damage in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients. Moreover, the correlation between miR-122 and ALT was shown to be higher than between miR-122 and AST. PMID:27239848

  20. Fitzgerald factor (high molecular weight kininogen) clotting activity in human plasma in health and disease in various animal plasmas.

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Goldsmith, G; Waldmann, R

    1976-12-01

    Fitzgerald factor (high molecular weight kininogen) is an agent in normal human plasma that corrects the impaired in vitro surface-mediated plasma reactions of blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and kinin generation observed in Fitzgerald trait plasma. To assess the possible pathophysiologic role of Fitzgerald factor, its titer was measured by a functional clot-promoting assay. Mean +/- SD in 42 normal adults was 0.99+/-0.25 units/ml, one unit being the activity in 1 ml of normal pooled plasma. No difference in titer was noted between normal men and women, during pregnancy, or after physical exercise. Fitzgerald factor activity was significantly reduced in the plasmas of eight patients with advanced hepatic cirrhosis (0.40+/-0.09 units/ml) and of ten patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation (0.60+/-0.30 units/ml), but was normal in plasmas of patients with other congenital clotting factor deficiencies, nephrotic syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, or sarcoidosis, or under treatment with warfarin. The plasmas of 21 mammalian species tested appeared to contain Fitzgerald factor activity, but those of two avian, two repitilian, and one amphibian species did not correct the coagulant defect in Fitzgerald trait plasmas. PMID:1000085

  1. Influence of decavanadate on rat synaptic plasma membrane ATPases activity.

    PubMed

    Krstić, Danijela; Colović, Mirjana; Bosnjaković-Pavlović, Nada; Spasojević-De Bire, Anne; Vasić, Vesna

    2009-09-01

    The in vitro influence of decameric vanadate species on Na+/K+-ATPase, plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA)-calcium pump and ecto-ATPase activity, using rat synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) as model system was investigated, whereas the commercial porcine cerebral cortex Na+/K+-ATPase served as a reference. The thermal behaviour of the synthesized decavanadate (V10) has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis, while the type of polyvanadate anion was identified using the IR spectroscopy. The concentration-dependent responses to V10 of all enzymes were obtained. The half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) of the enzyme activity was achieved at (4.74 +/- 1.15) x 10(-7) mol/l for SPM Na+/K+-ATPase, (1.30 +/- 0.10) x 10(-6) mol/l for commercial Na+/K+-ATPase and (3.13 +/- 1.70) x 10(-8) mol/l for Ca2+-ATPase, while ecto-ATPase is significantly less sensitive toward V10 (IC50 = (1.05 +/- 0.10) x 10(-4) mol/l) than investigated P-type ATPases. Kinetic analysis showed that V10 inhibited Na+/K+-ATPase by reducing the maximum enzymatic velocity and apparent affinity for ATP (increasing K(m) value), implying a mixed mode of interaction between V10 and P-type ATPases. PMID:20037196

  2. Evaluation of plasma inflammatory cytokine concentrations in racing sled dogs.

    PubMed

    von Pfeil, Dirsko J F; Cummings, Bethany P; Loftus, John P; Levine, Corri B; Mann, Sabine; Downey, Robert L; Griffitts, Caroline; Wakshlag, Joseph J

    2015-12-01

    In human athletes significant changes in cytokine concentrations secondary to exercise have been observed. This prospective study evaluated the effect of a multi-day stage sled dog race on plasma concentrations of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and interleukin-10 (IL-10). Samples from 20 dogs were harvested prior to and on days 2 and 8 of an 8-day race. Exercise resulted in significantly decreased TNF-α and IL-8 as well as increases of MCP-1, IL-6, and IL-10 concentrations (P-value between 0.01 and < 0.0001 for all parameters). The proportion of values for IL-2 that were below the detection limit increased from 40% on day 0 to 75% on day 2 and decreased on day 8 to 40% (P = 0.04). Racing sled dogs show cytokine-concentration changes that are different from those in humans. PMID:26663920

  3. High quality actively cooled plasma facing components for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nygren, R.

    1993-12-31

    This paper interweaves some suggestions for developing actively-cooled PFCs (plasma facing components) for future fusion devices with supporting examples taken from the design, fabrication and operation of Tore Supra`s Phase III Outboard Pump Limiter (OPL). This actively-cooled midplane limiter, designed for heat and particle removal during long pulse operation, has been operated in essentially thermally steady state conditions. From experience with testing to identify braze flaws in the OPL, recommendations are made to analyze the impact of joining flaws on thermal-hydraulic performance of PFCs and to validate a method of inspection for such flaws early in the design development. Capability for extensive in-service monitoring of future PFCs is also recommended and the extensive calorimetry and IR thermography used to confirm and update safe operating limits for power handling of the OPL are reviewed.

  4. Controlled deposition of plasma activated coatings on zirconium substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhavan, Behnam; Bilek, Marcela

    2015-12-01

    Zirconium-based alloys are promising materials for orthopedic prostheses due to their low toxicity, superb corrosion resistivity, and favorable mechanical properties. The integration of such bio-implantable devices with local host tissues can strongly be improved by the development of a plasma polymerized acetylene and nitrogen (PPAN) that immobilizes bio-active molecules. The surface chemistry of PPAN is critically important as it plays a key role in affecting the surface free energy that alters the functionality of bio-active molecules at the surface. The cross-linking degree of PPAN is another key property that directly influences the water-permeability and thus also the stability of films in aqueous media. In this study we demonstrate that by simply tuning the zirconium bias voltage, control over the surface chemistry and cross-linking degree of PANN is achieved.

  5. Active travel intervention and physical activity behaviour: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Norwood, Patricia; Eberth, Barbara; Farrar, Shelley; Anable, Jillian; Ludbrook, Anne

    2014-07-01

    A physically active lifestyle is an important contributor to individual health and well-being. The evidence linking higher physical activity levels with better levels of morbidity and mortality is well understood. Despite this, physical inactivity remains a major global risk factor for mortality and, consequently, encouraging individuals to pursue physically active lifestyles has been an integral part of public health policy in many countries. Physical activity promotion and interventions are now firmly on national health policy agendas, including policies that promote active travel such as walking and cycling. This study evaluates one such active travel initiative, the Smarter Choices, Smarter Places programme in Scotland, intended to encourage uptake of walking, cycling and the use of public transport as more active forms of travel. House to house surveys were conducted before and after the programme intervention, in May/June 2009 and 2012 (12,411 surveys in 2009 and 9542 in 2012), for the evaluation of the programme. This paper analyses the physical activity data collected, focussing on what can be inferred from the initiative with regards to adult uptake of physical activity participation and whether, for those who participated in physical activity, the initiative impacted on meeting recommended physical activity guidelines. The results suggest that the initiative impacted positively on the likelihood of physical activity participation and meeting the recommended physical activity guidelines. Individuals in the intervention areas were on average 6% more likely to meet the physical activity guidelines compared to individuals in the non intervention areas. However, the absolute prevalence of physical activity participation declined in both intervention and control areas over time. Our evaluation of this active transport initiative indicates that similar programmes may aid in contributing to achieving physical activity targets and adds to the international

  6. IAEA activities on atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction data for fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braams, Bastiaan J.; Chung, Hyun-Kyung

    2013-09-01

    The IAEA Atomic and Molecular Data Unit (http://www-amdis.iaea.org/) aims to provide internationally evaluated and recommended data for atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction (A+M+PMI) processes in fusion research. The Unit organizes technical meetings and coordinates an A+M Data Centre Network (DCN) and a Code Centre Network (CCN). In addition the Unit organizes Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs), for which the objectives are mixed between development of new data and evaluation and recommendation of existing data. In the area of A+M data we are placing new emphasis in our meeting schedule on data evaluation and especially on uncertainties in calculated cross section data and the propagation of uncertainties through structure data and fundamental cross sections to effective rate coefficients. Following a recent meeting of the CCN it is intended to use electron scattering on Be, Ne and N2 as exemplars for study of uncertainties and uncertainty propagation in calculated data; this will be discussed further at the presentation. Please see http://www-amdis.iaea.org/CRP/ for more on our active and planned CRPs, which are concerned with atomic processes in core and edge plasma and with plasma interaction with beryllium-based surfaces and with irradiated tungsten.

  7. Evaluating SPP/APR Improvement Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center (NECTAC), 2009

    2009-01-01

    This document is intended to assist State Education Agency (SEA) and Lead Agency (LA) staff and technical assistance providers in designing a meaningful evaluation for the State Performance Plan (SPP)/Annual Performance Report (APR) improvement activities. It provides: (1) information about the relevance of evaluation in the context of improvement…

  8. Atomic Oxygen Durability Evaluation of Protected Polymers Using Thermal Energy Plasma Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Degroh, Kim K.; Stidham, Curtis R.; Gebauer, Linda; Lamoreaux, Cynthia M.

    1995-01-01

    The durability evaluation of protected polymers intended for use in low Earth orbit (LEO) has necessitated the use of large-area, high-fluence, atomic oxygen exposure systems. Two thermal energy atomic oxygen exposure systems which are frequently used for such evaluations are radio frequency (RF) plasma ashers and electron cyclotron resonance plasma sources. Plasma source testing practices such as ample preparation, effective fluence prediction, atomic oxygen flux determination, erosion measurement, operational considerations, and erosion yield measurements are presented. Issues which influence the prediction of in-space durability based on ground laboratory thermal energy plasma system testing are also addressed.

  9. Evaluation of plasma-based transmit coils for magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Webb, A G; Aussenhofer, S A

    2015-12-01

    In this work a new concept for designing transmit coils for magnetic resonance using a plasma is introduced. Unlike conventional coils, a plasma can be turned on and off, eliminating electrical interactions between coils, and enabling radiofrequency-invisibility when desired. A surfatron has been designed to produce a surface-mode wave which propagates along the inner surface of a commercial fluorescent lighting tube. NMR spectra and images have been produced using the plasma as the transmit coil and a copper-based monopole to receive the signal. The transmit efficiency of the plasma tube was estimated, and is currently much lower than that of an equivalently-sized metal-based structure: however, there are many potential methods for increasing the efficiency using a custom-built plasma tube. PMID:26529202

  10. Evaluation of bactericidal effects of low-temperature nitrogen gas plasma towards application to short-time sterilization.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Kumiko; Sakuma, Ayaka; Nakamura, Yuka; Oguri, Tomoko; Sato, Natsumi; Kido, Nobuo

    2012-07-01

    To develop a novel low-temperature plasma sterilizer using pure N(2) gas as a plasma source, we evaluated bactericidal ability of a prototype apparatus provided by NGK Insulators. After determination of the sterilizing conditions without the cold spots, the D value of the BI of Geobacillus stearothermophilus endospores on the filter paper was determined as 1.9 min. However, the inactivation efficiency of BI carrying the same endospores on SUS varied to some extent, suggesting that the bactericidal effect might vary by materials of sterilized instruments. Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli were also exposed to the N(2) gas plasma and confirmed to be inactivated within 30 min. Through the evaluation of bactericidal efficiency in a sterilization bag, we concluded that the UV photons in the plasma and the high-voltage pulse to generate the gas plasma were not concerned with the bactericidal effect of the N(2) gas plasma. Bactericidal effect might be exhibited by activated nitrogen atoms or molecular radicals. PMID:22469251

  11. Implementation and Evaluation of Active Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Jill; McGill, Peter; Stretton, Rachel; Kelly-Pike, Amanda; Moore, Jane; Macdonald, Susan; Eastop, Zoe; Marks, Bob

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: Active support was implemented in three community houses (active support houses), with 11 service users with severe learning disabilities. Methods: This was evaluated with reference to changes in levels of engagement, challenging behaviour (major and minor) and staff contact, measured against three comparison services (non-active…

  12. Simple Evaluation Method of Atmospheric Plasma Irradiation Dose using pH of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Kazunori; Sarinont, Thapanut; Amano, Takaaki; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Nakatsu, Yoshimichi; Tanaka, Akiyo; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric discharge plasmas are promising for agricultural productivity improvements and novel medical therapies, because plasma provides high flux of short-lifetime reactive species at low temperature, leading to low damage to living body. For the plasma-bio applications, various kinds of plasma systems are employed, thus common evaluation methods are needed to compare plasma irradiation dose quantitatively among the systems. Here we offer simple evaluation method of plasma irradiation dose using pH of water. Experiments were carried out with a scalable DBD device. 300 μl of deionized water was prepared into the quartz 96 microwell plate at 3 mm below electrode. The pH value has been measured just after 10 minutes irradiation. The pH value was evaluated as a function of plasma irradiation dose. Atmospheric air plasma irradiation decreases pH of water with increasing the dose. We also measured concentrations of chemical species such as nitrites, nitrates and H2O2. The results indicate our method is promising to evaluate plasma irradiation dose quantitatively.

  13. Plasma-activated air mediates plasmid DNA delivery in vivo.

    PubMed

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Heller, Loree C; Malik, Muhammad A; Bulysheva, Anna; Heller, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-activated air (PAA) provides a noncontact DNA transfer platform. In the current study, PAA was used for the delivery of plasmid DNA in a 3D human skin model, as well as in vivo. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding luciferase to recellularized dermal constructs was enhanced, resulting in a fourfold increase in luciferase expression over 120 hours compared to injection only (P < 0.05). Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was confirmed in the epidermal layers of the construct. In vivo experiments were performed in BALB/c mice, with skin as the delivery target. PAA exposure significantly enhanced luciferase expression levels 460-fold in exposed sites compared to levels obtained from the injection of plasmid DNA alone (P < 0.001). Expression levels were enhanced when the plasma reactor was positioned more distant from the injection site. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding GFP to mouse skin was confirmed by immunostaining, where a 3-minute exposure at a 10 mm distance displayed delivery distribution deep within the dermal layers compared to an exposure at 3 mm where GFP expression was localized within the epidermis. Our findings suggest PAA-mediated delivery warrants further exploration as an alternative approach for DNA transfer for skin targets. PMID:27110584

  14. Status of the ITER plasma modeling activities in JAEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Junya; Honda, Mitsuru; Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Aiba, Nobuyuki; Toma, Mitsunori; Matsuyama, Akinobu; Naito, Osamu; Miyata, Yoshiaki; Inoue, Shizuo; Narita, Emi; Shimizu, Katsuhiro; Hamamatsu, Kiyotaka; Ide, Shunsuke; Yagi, Masatoshi

    2015-11-01

    JAEA has been contributing to the ITER plasma modeling in a wide range of research areas. Among them we report recent integrated modeling activities in JAEA. The integrated modeling is indispensable for predictive simulations of autonomous ITER plasmas, which exhibit multi-physics nature. JAEA has been developing an integrated modeling code, the TOPICS suite. The TOPICS suite has been incorporating many physics factors to enhance its prediction capability and has delivered many important findings on ITER plasm. A recent achievement is the success of predictive simulation of toroidal rotation in ITER. The TOPICS suite has been coupled with the 3D equilibrium code VMEC and the 3D drift-kinetic solver FORTEC-3D to compute the NTV, the radial electric field, and the resultant toroidal rotation self-consistently. Another achievement is the quantitative estimate of reduction of ELM energy loss by pellet injection in ITER. The TOPICS suite has been coupled with a new pellet model and with the MHD stability code MARG2D to calculate finite-n modes for modeling the ELM-enhanced diffusivities.

  15. Plasma composition in a sigmoidal anemone active region

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.; Van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Green, L. M.; Carlyle, J.; Brooks, D. H.; Démoulin, P.; Steed, K.

    2013-11-20

    Using spectra obtained by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) instrument onboard Hinode, we present a detailed spatially resolved abundance map of an active region (AR)-coronal hole (CH) complex that covers an area of 359'' × 485''. The abundance map provides first ionization potential (FIP) bias levels in various coronal structures within the large EIS field of view. Overall, FIP bias in the small, relatively young AR is 2-3. This modest FIP bias is a consequence of the age of the AR, its weak heating, and its partial reconnection with the surrounding CH. Plasma with a coronal composition is concentrated at AR loop footpoints, close to where fractionation is believed to take place in the chromosphere. In the AR, we found a moderate positive correlation of FIP bias with nonthermal velocity and magnetic flux density, both of which are also strongest at the AR loop footpoints. Pathways of slightly enhanced FIP bias are traced along some of the loops connecting opposite polarities within the AR. We interpret the traces of enhanced FIP bias along these loops to be the beginning of fractionated plasma mixing in the loops. Low FIP bias in a sigmoidal channel above the AR's main polarity inversion line, where ongoing flux cancellation is taking place, provides new evidence of a bald patch magnetic topology of a sigmoid/flux rope configuration.

  16. Plasma Composition in a Sigmoidal Anemone Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D.; Brooks, D. H.; Démoulin, P.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Green, L. M.; Steed, K.; Carlyle, J.

    2013-11-01

    Using spectra obtained by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) instrument onboard Hinode, we present a detailed spatially resolved abundance map of an active region (AR)-coronal hole (CH) complex that covers an area of 359'' × 485''. The abundance map provides first ionization potential (FIP) bias levels in various coronal structures within the large EIS field of view. Overall, FIP bias in the small, relatively young AR is 2-3. This modest FIP bias is a consequence of the age of the AR, its weak heating, and its partial reconnection with the surrounding CH. Plasma with a coronal composition is concentrated at AR loop footpoints, close to where fractionation is believed to take place in the chromosphere. In the AR, we found a moderate positive correlation of FIP bias with nonthermal velocity and magnetic flux density, both of which are also strongest at the AR loop footpoints. Pathways of slightly enhanced FIP bias are traced along some of the loops connecting opposite polarities within the AR. We interpret the traces of enhanced FIP bias along these loops to be the beginning of fractionated plasma mixing in the loops. Low FIP bias in a sigmoidal channel above the AR's main polarity inversion line, where ongoing flux cancellation is taking place, provides new evidence of a bald patch magnetic topology of a sigmoid/flux rope configuration.

  17. Plasma-activated air mediates plasmid DNA delivery in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Heller, Loree C; Malik, Muhammad A; Bulysheva, Anna; Heller, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-activated air (PAA) provides a noncontact DNA transfer platform. In the current study, PAA was used for the delivery of plasmid DNA in a 3D human skin model, as well as in vivo. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding luciferase to recellularized dermal constructs was enhanced, resulting in a fourfold increase in luciferase expression over 120 hours compared to injection only (P < 0.05). Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was confirmed in the epidermal layers of the construct. In vivo experiments were performed in BALB/c mice, with skin as the delivery target. PAA exposure significantly enhanced luciferase expression levels 460-fold in exposed sites compared to levels obtained from the injection of plasmid DNA alone (P < 0.001). Expression levels were enhanced when the plasma reactor was positioned more distant from the injection site. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding GFP to mouse skin was confirmed by immunostaining, where a 3-minute exposure at a 10 mm distance displayed delivery distribution deep within the dermal layers compared to an exposure at 3 mm where GFP expression was localized within the epidermis. Our findings suggest PAA-mediated delivery warrants further exploration as an alternative approach for DNA transfer for skin targets. PMID:27110584

  18. Evaluation of plasma alpha-2-macroglobulin and interactions with tumour necrosis factor-alpha in horses with endotoxemic signs.

    PubMed Central

    Coté, N; Trout, D R; Hayes, A M

    1996-01-01

    The electrophoretic position and behavior of the native and activated forms of equine plasma alpha-2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) were characterized and compared to human alpha 2M by nondenaturing polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Plasma alpha 2M was also compared between 6 normal horses and 6 horses with clinical signs of colic and endotoxemia due to volvulus or enteritis. Native and activated forms of alpha 2M were quantified by PAGE and densitometry. Binding of radio-labeled recombinant human tumour necrosis factor-alpha (125I-rhTNF-alpha) to native and activated forms of equine alpha 2M was also evaluated by autoradiography and densitometry of PAGE. Equine plasma alpha 2M migrated as a single band at a position equivalent to native human alpha 2M. Methylamine-reacted equine plasma samples resulted in faster migration of alpha 2M in a similar position to activated human alpha 2M. However, in methylamine-reacted equine plasma, an intermediate alpha 2M band was consistently present between the bands corresponding to native and activated alpha 2M. Amounts of plasma alpha 2M were similar in normal and endotoxemic horses, and remained in the electrophoretically slow or unreacted native form. The vast majority of 125I-rHuTNF-alpha did not bind to alpha 2M or other equine plasma proteins. 125I-rHuTNF-alpha bound weakly to both native and fast methylamine-reacted equine forms of alpha 2M, although binding was better to the activated form. This study indicates that: (1) equine plasma alpha 2M behaves similarly to human alpha 2M on PAGE, (2) plasma alpha 2M of horses can be activated to electrophoretically fast forms, but it is neither activated nor depleted during endotoxemia, and (3) the binding interactions between equine alpha 2M and TNF-alpha are too low to implicate equine alpha 2M as a regulator of TNF-alpha during endotoxemia in horses. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8785722

  19. Evaluation of compost activators for yard waste

    SciTech Connect

    Razvi, A.S.; Kramer, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    The evaluation of the efficiency of yard waste composting (grass clippm`gs/wood chip mixture) was studied for seven commercially available activators, two naturally occurring activators, and one control (absence of activator). The overall decomposition response for each activator was evaluated by comparing four indices of composting efficiency. These were weight loss, change in volume, loss of volatile solids, and oxygen uptake rate. Four experimental blocks were set up in the field, and two experimental blocks were set up in the laboratory. The physical/chemical characteristics were monitored for all samples as a function of time, and individual activators were evaluated so interrelationships between indices could be studied. Based on the four indices, grass clippings can be efficiently composted with natural activators such as Surface Soil or Mature Compost. Commercially available compost activators performed similar to the Control. The cost of commercially available activators was $1.37 to $9.36 per cubic yard of grass clippings to be composted. Naturally occurring activators such as Surface Soil and Mature Compost may be available at no cost to the backyard composter.

  20. Determination of human plasma xanthine oxidase activity by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Moriwaki, Y; Takahashi, S; Tsutsumi, Z; Yamakita, J; Nasako, Y; Hiroishi, K; Higashino, K

    1996-06-01

    An assay for human plasma xanthine oxidase activity was developed with pterin as the substrate and the separation of product (isoxanthopterin) by high-performance liquid chromatography with a fluorescence detector. The reaction mixture consists of 60 microliters of plasma and 240 microliters of 0.2 M Tris-HCl buffer (pH 9.0) containing 113 microM pterin. With this assay, the activity of plasma xanthine oxidase could be easily determined despite its low activity. As a result, it could be demonstrated that the intravenous administration of heparin or the oral administration of ethanol did not increase plasma xanthine oxidase activity in normal subjects, and also that plasma xanthine oxidase activity was higher in patients with hepatitis C virus infection than in healthy subjects or patients with gout. In addition, a single patient with von Gierke's disease showed a marked increase in the plasma activity of this enzyme, relative to that apparent in normal subjects. PMID:8811453

  1. Effects of topiroxostat and febuxostat on urinary albumin excretion and plasma xanthine oxidoreductase activity in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Murase, Takayo; Nampei, Mai; Morimoto, Nobutaka; Ashizawa, Naoki; Iwanaga, Takashi; Sakamoto, Ryusuke

    2016-06-01

    Topiroxostat, a xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) inhibitor, has been shown to decrease the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio compared with placebo in hyperuricemic patients with stage 3 chronic kidney disease. Thus, we aimed to ascertain the albuminuria-lowering effect of topiroxostat in diabetic mouse. Db/db mice were fed standard diets with or without topiroxostat (0.1, 0.3, 1, and 3mg/kg/day) and febuxostat (0.1, 0.3, and 1mg/kg/day) for four weeks. Urinary albumin and purine bodies levels, XOR activities, and drug concentrations in the liver, kidney, and plasma were measured. Moreover, the XOR inhibitory activity of each XOR inhibitor was evaluated with or without an exogenous protein in vitro. Topiroxostat decreased dose-dependently the urinary albumin excretion, but febuxostat did not show such a tendency. Treatment with topiroxostat inhibited plasma XOR activity with dose-dependent increase in plasma purine levels, which was not observed by febuxostat. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis revealed that topiroxostat and febuxostat concentration in each tissue showed a good correlation with both the hypouricemic effect and plasma drug concentration, whereas the change in albuminuria correlated neither with the change in uric acid nor with drug concentration in plasma. However, the change in urinary albumin and plasma XOR activity showed good correlation in topiroxostat group. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 value) of febuxostat against plasma XOR in vitro was 12-fold higher than that of topiroxostat, and increased by approximately 13-fold by interfering with an exogenous protein. Topiroxostat caused reduced urinary albumin excretion, in which potent inhibition of the plasma XOR activity might be involved. PMID:27038523

  2. Pair Plasmas in the Central Engine of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuruta, S.; Tritz, B. G.

    1993-01-01

    As the most promising model for the X-ray emission from a class of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) represented by radio-quiet quasars and Seyfert nuclei, here we introduce the non-thermal pair cascade model, where soft photons are Comptonized by non-thermal electron-positron pair plasmas produced by (gamma)-rays. After summarizing the simplest model of this kind, the "homogeneous spherical cascade model", our most recent work on the "surface cascade model" is presented, where a geometrical effect is introduced. Many characteristics of this model are qualitatively similar to the homogeneous cascade model. However, an important difference is that (gamma)-ray depletion is much more efficient in the surface cascade, and consequently this model naturally satisfies the severe observational constraint imposed by the (gamma)-ray background radiation.

  3. Central magnetohydrodynamic activity in pellet-fueled JT-60 plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kamada, Y.; Ozeki, T.; Azumi, M. )

    1992-01-01

    The central magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activities are strongly affected by hydrogen pellet injection. The change in the sawtooth characteristics (viz., crash time, crash mechanisms, and sawtooth period) seem to be dependent on the density (and pressure) peakedness. With deepening pellet penetration, the sawtooth frequency becomes longer. At the sawtooth emerging after the deep pellet penetration into high-{ital I}{sub {ital p}} limiter discharges, only a small amount of the central kinetic energy is released and the crash does not follow the fully reconnecting style. The sawtooth crash after the pellet injection tends to have more ideal-like characteristics for higher density and pressure peaking factors. At each sawtooth, the {ital m}=1 rotation frequency changes suddenly to the ion-diamagnetic direction or the codirection (parallel to the plasma current).

  4. Short and long time effects of low temperature Plasma Activated Media on 3D multicellular tumor spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Judée, Florian; Fongia, Céline; Ducommun, Bernard; Yousfi, Mohammed; Lobjois, Valérie; Merbahi, Nofel

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the regionalized antiproliferative effects of plasma-activated medium (PAM) on colon adenocarcinoma multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. PAM was generated by dielectric barrier plasma jet setup crossed by helium carrier gas. MCTS were transferred in PAM at various times after plasma exposure up to 48 hours and effect on MCTS growth and DNA damage were evaluated. We report the impact of plasma exposure duration and delay before transfer on MCTS growth and DNA damage. Local accumulation of DNA damage revealed by histone H2AX phosphorylation is observed on outermost layers and is dependent on plasma exposure. DNA damage is completely reverted by catalase addition indicating that H2O2 plays major role in observed genotoxic effect while growth inhibitory effect is maintained suggesting that it is due to others reactive species. SOD and D-mannitol scavengers also reduced DNA damage by 30% indicating that and OH* are involved in H2O2 formation. Finally, PAM is able to retain its cytotoxic and genotoxic activity upon storage at +4 °C or −80 °C. These results suggest that plasma activated media may be a promising new antitumor strategy for colorectal cancer tumors. PMID:26898904

  5. Short and long time effects of low temperature Plasma Activated Media on 3D multicellular tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judée, Florian; Fongia, Céline; Ducommun, Bernard; Yousfi, Mohammed; Lobjois, Valérie; Merbahi, Nofel

    2016-02-01

    This work investigates the regionalized antiproliferative effects of plasma-activated medium (PAM) on colon adenocarcinoma multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. PAM was generated by dielectric barrier plasma jet setup crossed by helium carrier gas. MCTS were transferred in PAM at various times after plasma exposure up to 48 hours and effect on MCTS growth and DNA damage were evaluated. We report the impact of plasma exposure duration and delay before transfer on MCTS growth and DNA damage. Local accumulation of DNA damage revealed by histone H2AX phosphorylation is observed on outermost layers and is dependent on plasma exposure. DNA damage is completely reverted by catalase addition indicating that H2O2 plays major role in observed genotoxic effect while growth inhibitory effect is maintained suggesting that it is due to others reactive species. SOD and D-mannitol scavengers also reduced DNA damage by 30% indicating that and OH* are involved in H2O2 formation. Finally, PAM is able to retain its cytotoxic and genotoxic activity upon storage at +4 °C or -80 °C. These results suggest that plasma activated media may be a promising new antitumor strategy for colorectal cancer tumors.

  6. Short and long time effects of low temperature Plasma Activated Media on 3D multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Judée, Florian; Fongia, Céline; Ducommun, Bernard; Yousfi, Mohammed; Lobjois, Valérie; Merbahi, Nofel

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the regionalized antiproliferative effects of plasma-activated medium (PAM) on colon adenocarcinoma multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. PAM was generated by dielectric barrier plasma jet setup crossed by helium carrier gas. MCTS were transferred in PAM at various times after plasma exposure up to 48 hours and effect on MCTS growth and DNA damage were evaluated. We report the impact of plasma exposure duration and delay before transfer on MCTS growth and DNA damage. Local accumulation of DNA damage revealed by histone H2AX phosphorylation is observed on outermost layers and is dependent on plasma exposure. DNA damage is completely reverted by catalase addition indicating that H2O2 plays major role in observed genotoxic effect while growth inhibitory effect is maintained suggesting that it is due to others reactive species. SOD and D-mannitol scavengers also reduced DNA damage by 30% indicating that O(2)(-)* and OH* are involved in H2O2 formation. Finally, PAM is able to retain its cytotoxic and genotoxic activity upon storage at +4 °C or -80 °C. These results suggest that plasma activated media may be a promising new antitumor strategy for colorectal cancer tumors. PMID:26898904

  7. Evaluating the effect of stressors on thiaminase activity in alewife

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lepak, J.M.; Kraft, C.E.; Honeyfield, D.C.; Brown, S.B.

    2008-01-01

    No consistent explanation has been found for the variability in the thiaminase activity of alewives Alosa pseudoharengus despite the role of alewife thiaminase in large-scale salmonine mortality in the Laurentian Great Lakes. We conducted experiments to evaluate the effect of two stressors, reduced salt content in the water and food limitation, on alewife thiaminase activity. Alewives were subjected to treatments in replicated tanks in which conductivity was lowered (<100 ??S/cm) for 8 d and feeding was limited for 39 d. Circulating white blood cells, plasma cortisol, plasma glucose, and whole-body thiaminase were measured in individual alewives to assess their response to these experimental treatments. Alewives from the controls had significantly larger numbers of circulating white blood cells than those in the salt-reduced and food-limited treatments (24,000 and 19,000 cells/??L and 11,000 and 9,000 cells/??L for alewives from the two control and salt-reduced treatment tanks, respectively, and 34,000 and 30,000 cells/??L and 21,000 and 16,000 cells/??L for alewives from the two control and food-limited treatment tanks). No significant differences in alewife thiaminase activity were found between treatment fish and their controls. The mean thiaminase activity in the alewives studied increased from 6,900 to 16,000 pmol??g -1??min-1 from the time of their collection in Cayuga Lake to the start of laboratory experiments 1.5-2.5 years later; the latter value was more than twice that of previously reported levels of thiaminase activity from alewives collected in the wild. These data suggest that the variability in alewife thiaminase is not related to stress from salt reduction or food limitation, but laboratory holding conditions significantly increased thiaminase through a mechanism not evaluated by our experimental treatments. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  8. The study of data collection method for the plasma properties collection and evaluation system from web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun-Hyoung; Song, Mi-Young; Plasma Fundamental Technology Research Team

    2015-09-01

    Plasma databases are necessarily required to compute the plasma parameters and high reliable databases are closely related with accuracy enhancement of simulations. Therefore, a major concern of plasma properties collection and evaluation system is to create a sustainable and useful research environment for plasma data. The system has a commitment to provide not only numerical data but also bibliographic data (including DOI information). Originally, our collection data methods were done by manual data search. In some cases, it took a long time to find data. We will be find data more automatically and quickly than legacy methods by crawling or search engine such as Lucene.

  9. Cathepsin G activity lowers plasma LDL and reduces atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Sjöberg, Sara; Tang, Ting-Ting; Öörni, Katariina; Wu, Wenxue; Liu, Conglin; Secco, Blandine; Tia, Viviane; Sukhova, Galina K.; Fernandes, Cleverson; Lesner, Adam; Kovanen, Petri T.; Libby, Peter; Cheng, Xiang; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Cathepsin G (CatG), a serine protease present in mast cells and neutrophils, can produce angiotensin-II (Ang-II) and degrade elastin. Here we demonstrate increased CatG expression in smooth muscle cells (SMCs), endothelial cells (ECs), macrophages, and T cells from human atherosclerotic lesions. In low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-deficient (Ldlr−/−) mice, the absence of CatG reduces arterial wall elastin degradation and attenuates early atherosclerosis when mice consume a Western diet for 3 months. When mice consume this diet for 6 months, however, CatG deficiency exacerbates atherosclerosis in aortic arch without affecting lesion inflammatory cell content or extracellular matrix accumulation, but raises plasma total cholesterol and LDL levels without affecting high-density lipoprotein (HDL) or triglyceride levels. Patients with atherosclerosis also have significantly reduced plasma CatG levels that correlate inversely with total cholesterol (r= −0.535, P<0.0001) and LDL cholesterol (r= −0.559, P<0.0001), but not with HDL cholesterol (P=0.901) or triglycerides (P=0.186). Such inverse correlations with total cholesterol (r= −0.504, P<0.0001) and LDL cholesterol (r= −0.502, P<0.0001) remain significant after adjusting for lipid lowering treatments among this patient population. Human CatG degrades purified human LDL, but not HDL. This study suggests that CatG promotes early atherogenesis through its elastinolytic activity, but suppresses late progression of atherosclerosis by degrading LDL without affecting HDL or triglycerides. PMID:25092171

  10. Plasma Hazards and Acceptance for International Space Station Extravehicular Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Extravehicular activity(EVA) is accepted by NASA and other space faring agencies as a necessary risk in order to build and maintain a safe and efficient laboratory in space. EVAs are used for standard construction and as contingency operations to repair critical equipment for vehicle sustainability and safety of the entire crew in the habitable volume. There are many hazards that are assessed for even the most mundane EVA for astronauts, and the vast majority of these are adequately controlled per the rules of the International Space Station Program. The need for EVA repair and construction has driven acceptance of a possible catastrophic hazard to the EVA crewmember which cannot currently be controlled adequately. That hazard is electrical shock from the very environment in which they work. This paper describes the environment, causes and contributors to the shock of EVA crewmembers attributed to the ionospheric plasma environment in low Earth orbit. It will detail the hazard history, and acceptance process for the risk associated with these hazards that give assurance to a safe EVA. In addition to the hazard acceptance process this paper will explore other factors that go into the decision to accept a risk including criticality of task, hardware design and capability, and the probability of hazard occurrence. Also included will be the required interaction between organizations at NASA(EVA Office, Environments, Engineering, Mission Operations, Safety) in order to build and eventually gain adequate acceptance rationale for a hazard of this kind. During the course of the discussion, all current methods of mitigating the hazard will be identified. This paper will capture the history of the plasma hazard analysis and processes used by the International Space Station Program to formally assess and qualify the risk. The paper will discuss steps that have been taken to identify and perform required analysis of the floating potential shock hazard from the ISS environment

  11. Plasma Components and Platelet Activation Are Essential for the Antimicrobial Properties of Autologous Platelet-Rich Plasma: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Drago, Lorenzo; Bortolin, Monica; Vassena, Christian; Romanò, Carlo L.; Taschieri, Silvio; Fabbro, Massimo Del

    2014-01-01

    Autologous platelet concentrates are successfully adopted in a variety of medical fields to stimulate bone and soft tissue regeneration. The rationale for their use consists in the delivery of a wide range of platelet-derived bioactive molecules that promotes wound healing. In addition, antimicrobial properties of platelet concentrates have been pointed out. In this study, the effect of the platelet concentration, of the activation step and of the presence of plasmatic components on the antimicrobial activity of pure platelet-rich plasma was investigated against gram positive bacteria isolated from oral cavity. The antibacterial activity, evaluated as the minimum inhibitory concentration, was determined through the microdilution two-fold serial method. Results seem to suggest that the antimicrobial activity of platelet-rich plasma against Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus oralis and Staphylococcus aureus is sustained by a co-operation between plasma components and platelet-derived factors and that the activation of coagulation is a fundamental step. The findings of this study may have practical implications in the modality of application of platelet concentrates. PMID:25232963

  12. Study on the role of active radicals on plasma sterilization inside small diameter flexible polymeric tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mstsuura, Hiroto; Fujiyama, Takatomo; Okuno, Yasuki; Furuta, Masakazu; Okuda, Shuichi; Takemura, Yuichiro

    2015-09-01

    Recently, atmospheric pressure discharge plasma has gathered attention in various fields. Among them, plasma sterilization with many types of plasma source has studied for decades and its mechanism is still an open question. If active radicals produced in plasma has main contribution of killing bacterias, direct contact of the so-called plasma flame might not be necessary. To confirm this, sterilization inside small diameter flexible polymeric tubes is studied in present work. DBD type plasma jet is produce by flowing helium gas in a glass tube. A long polymeric tube is connected and plasma jet is introduced into it. Plasma flame length depends on helium gas flow rate, but limited to about 10 cm in our experimental condition. E.colis set at the exit plasma source is easily killed during 10 min irradiation. At the tube end (about 20 cm away from plasma source exit), sterilization is possible with 30 min operation. This result shows that active radical is produced with helium plasma and mist contained in sample, and it can be transferred more than 20 cm during it life time. More plasma diagnostic data will also be shown at the conference. This work was partially supported by the ''ZE Research Program, IAE(ZE27B-4).

  13. Longitudinal photons in a relativistic magneto-active plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tsintsadze, N. L.; Rehman, Ayesha; Murtaza, G.; Shah, H. A.

    2007-10-15

    This paper presents some aspects of interaction of superstrong high-frequency electromagnetic waves with strongly magnetized plasmas. The case in which the photon-photon interaction dominates the photon-plasma particle interaction is considered. Strictly speaking, the photon and photon bunch interaction leads to the self-modulation of the photon gas. Assuming that the density of the plasma does not change, the dispersion relation, which includes relativistic self-modulation, is investigated. The existence of longitudinal photons in a strong magnetic field has the well-known Bogoliubov-type energy spectrum. The stability of the photon flow is investigated and an expression for Landau damping of the photons is obtained. Finally, it has been shown that the interaction of even a very strong electromagnetic radiation with a plasma does not always lead to instability, but causes only a change in plasma properties, whereby the plasma remains stable.

  14. Evaluation of plasma pressure of high current low inductance vacuum spark on cathode surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarantsev, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents evaluation of the plasma pressure in a high current, low inductance vacuum spark on the cathode surface (the electrode material is steel). Calculations are provided for the first half period of the discharge, wherein the cathode surface is subjected to the most severe impacts (micropinches are created resulting in high-energy plasma beams). The evaluations were made using the experimental data obtained on the Pion device. The data of electrical measurements of the discharge current, the average plasma flow values obtained with the multi-grid probe and the data from a cathode macrostructure study were used. The results are given for different values of the discharge current.

  15. Fuel injector utilizing non-thermal plasma activation

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, Don M.; Rosocha, Louis A.

    2009-12-01

    A non-thermal plasma assisted combustion fuel injector that uses an inner and outer electrode to create an electric field from a high voltage power supply. A dielectric material is operatively disposed between the two electrodes to prevent arcing and to promote the formation of a non-thermal plasma. A fuel injector, which converts a liquid fuel into a dispersed mist, vapor, or aerosolized fuel, injects into the non-thermal plasma generating energetic electrons and other highly reactive chemical species.

  16. Active region upflow plasma: its relation to small activity and the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandrini, Cristina H.; Culhane, J. Leonard; Cristiani, Germán; Vásquez, Alberto; Van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Baker, Deborah; Pick, Monique; Demoulin, Pascal; Nuevo, Federico

    Recent studies show that active region (AR) upflowing plasma, observed by the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS), can gain access to open field lines and be released into the solar wind via magnetic interchange reconnection occurring below the source surface at magnetic null-points in pseudo-streamer configurations. When only one simple bipolar AR is present on the Sun and it is fully covered by the separatrix of a streamer, like AR 10978 on December 2007, it seems unlikely that the upflowing AR plasma could find its way into the slow solar wind. However, signatures of plasma with AR composition at 1 AU that appears to originate from the West of AR 10978 were recently found by Culhane and coworkers. We present a detailed topology analysis of AR 10978 based on a linear force-free magnetic field model at the AR scale, combined with a global PFSS model. This allows us, on one hand, to explain the variations observed in the upflows to the West of the AR as the result of magnetic reconnection at quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs). While at a global scale, we show that reconnection, occurring in at least two main steps, first at QSLs and later at a high-altitude coronal null-point, allows the AR plasma to get around the topological obstacle of the streamer separatrix and be released into the solar wind.

  17. High-protein-PUFA supplementation, red blood cell membranes, and plasma antioxidant activity in volleyball athletes.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Marco; Baldini, Marta; Angeloni, Cristina; Biagi, Pierluigi; Hrelia, Silvana

    2008-06-01

    The authors evaluated the role of a high-protein, low-calorie, polyunsaturated fatty-acid (PUFA) -supplemented diet on anthropometric parameters, erythrocyte-membrane fatty-acid composition, and plasma antioxidant defenses of nonprofessional volleyball athletes. The athletes were divided in two groups: One (n = 5) followed the Mediterranean diet, and the other (n = 6) followed a high-protein, low-calorie diet with a 3-g/day fish-oil supplementation. All the athletes had anthropometric measurements taken, both at the beginning and at the end of the study, which lasted for 2 months. Body-mass index and total body fat were significantly diminished in the second group, while they remained unchanged in the first. Plasma total antioxidant activity (TAA) was significantly increased in the plasma of both groups, with no differences between the groups, suggesting that physical activity, not the different diets, is the main contributor to the increase of plasma TAA. The second group showed a significant increase in erythrocyte-membrane PUFA content and in the unsaturation index value (UI) because of the fish-oil supplementation.A high-protein, low-carbohydrate, fish-oil-supplemented diet seems to be useful only when the aim of the diet is to obtain weight loss in a short-term period. The significant increase in the UI of erythrocyte membranes indicates the potential for harm, because a high intake of PUFA might increase susceptibility to lipid peroxidation not counterbalanced by a higher increase in TAA. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet seems to be the better choice. PMID:18562771

  18. Evaluating Active U: an internet-mediated physical activity program

    PubMed Central

    Buis, Lorraine R; Poulton, Timothy A; Holleman, Robert G; Sen, Ananda; Resnick, Paul J; Goodrich, David E; Palma-Davis, LaVaughn; Richardson, Caroline R

    2009-01-01

    Background Engaging in regular physical activity can be challenging, particularly during the winter months. To promote physical activity at the University of Michigan during the winter months, an eight-week Internet-mediated program (Active U) was developed providing participants with an online physical activity log, goal setting, motivational emails, and optional team participation and competition. Methods This study is a program evaluation of Active U. Approximately 47,000 faculty, staff, and graduate students were invited to participate in the online Active U intervention in the winter of 2007. Participants were assigned a physical activity goal and were asked to record each physical activity episode into the activity log for eight weeks. Statistics for program reach, effectiveness, adoption, and implementation were calculated using the Re-Aim framework. Multilevel regression analyses were used to assess the decline in rates of data entry and goal attainment during the program, to assess the likelihood of joining a team by demographic characteristics, to test the association between various predictors and the number of weeks an individual met his or her goal, and to analyze server load. Results Overall, 7,483 individuals registered with the Active U website (≈16% of eligible), and 79% participated in the program by logging valid data at least once. Staff members, older participants, and those with a BMI < 25 were more likely to meet their weekly physical activity goals, and average rate of meeting goals was higher among participants who joined a competitive team compared to those who participated individually (IRR = 1.28, P < .001). Conclusion Internet-mediated physical activity interventions that focus on physical activity logging and goal setting while incorporating team competition may help a significant percentage of the target population maintain their physical activity during the winter months. PMID:19744311

  19. Temporal variations in plasma vitamin K and lipid concentrations and clotting factor activity in humans.

    PubMed

    Kamali, F; Edwards, C; Wood, P; Wynne, H A; Kesteven, P

    2001-11-01

    There is no information available on temporal variability in plasma vitamin K concentrations and its relationship to coagulation processes. We investigated the possible existence of temporal changes in plasma vitamin K and lipid concentrations and activity of clotting factors II, VII, IX, and X and relationships between these variables. Plasma vitamin K and lipid concentrations and clotting factor activity were measured at four-hour intervals for 28 hours in a group of healthy volunteers. Temporal variations existed in plasma vitamin K concentrations, with a mean maximum at 22:00 hr and a mean minimum (32% of the maximum) at 10:00 hr. Plasma triglycerol concentrations mirrored the changes in vitamin K concentrations. Mean factor VII activity was positively correlated with mean total plasma cholesterol concentrations (r = 0.714; P < 0.0001) and with mean plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations (r = 0.461; P < 0.0001). No distinct correlations were found between plasma vitamin K concentrations and either high density lipoprotein (HDL) or LDL cholesterol concentrations, or between triglycerol, HDL, or LDL cholesterol concentrations and functional activity of factors II, IX, and X. Plasma vitamin K concentrations did not correlate with the functional activity of any of the clotting factors. The presence of a correlation between plasma cholesterol concentrations and factor VII activity for blood samples collected at four-hour intervals suggests that plasma cholesterol concentrations may have a more acute effect on factor VII activity. Temporal variations in plasma vitamin K concentrations indicate that a single time point measurement may be an inappropriate method of establishing vitamin K status in an individual. PMID:11754396

  20. On the classification of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators: A comprehensive performance evaluation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriegseis, J.; Duchmann, A.; Tropea, C.; Grundmann, S.

    2013-08-01

    The increasing popularity and maturity of plasma actuators for many flow control applications requires a common standard for plasma actuator performance evaluation. In the present work, a comprehensive comparative study of existing and new evaluation measures is presented, based on results from identical plasma-actuator configurations. A power-flow diagram is introduced that covers the entire range of power stages from the energy source to the flow-control success. All individual power stages are explained, existing controversial definitions are clarified, and an evaluation guideline is applied to previously obtained data. Finally, the defined systematic analysis is applied to the results of a recently conducted plasma-actuator in-flight experiment.

  1. Modification of Pulsed Electric Field Conditions Results in Distinct Activation Profiles of Platelet-Rich Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Frelinger, Andrew L.; Gerrits, Anja J.; Garner, Allen L.; Torres, Andrew S.; Caiafa, Antonio; Morton, Christine A.; Berny-Lang, Michelle A.; Carmichael, Sabrina L.; Neculaes, V. Bogdan; Michelson, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Activated autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) used in therapeutic wound healing applications is poorly characterized and standardized. Using pulsed electric fields (PEF) to activate platelets may reduce variability and eliminate complications associated with the use of bovine thrombin. We previously reported that exposing PRP to sub-microsecond duration, high electric field (SMHEF) pulses generates a greater number of platelet-derived microparticles, increased expression of prothrombotic platelet surfaces, and differential release of growth factors compared to thrombin. Moreover, the platelet releasate produced by SMHEF pulses induced greater cell proliferation than plasma. Aims To determine whether sub-microsecond duration, low electric field (SMLEF) bipolar pulses results in differential activation of PRP compared to SMHEF, with respect to profiles of activation markers, growth factor release, and cell proliferation capacity. Methods PRP activation by SMLEF bipolar pulses was compared to SMHEF pulses and bovine thrombin. PRP was prepared using the Harvest SmartPreP2 System from acid citrate dextrose anticoagulated healthy donor blood. PEF activation by either SMHEF or SMLEF pulses was performed using a standard electroporation cuvette preloaded with CaCl2 and a prototype instrument designed to take into account the electrical properties of PRP. Flow cytometry was used to assess platelet surface P-selectin expression, and annexin V binding. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), endothelial growth factor (EGF) and platelet factor 4 (PF4), and were measured by ELISA. The ability of supernatants to stimulate proliferation of human epithelial cells in culture was also evaluated. Controls included vehicle-treated, unactivated PRP and PRP with 10 mM CaCl2 activated with 1 U/mL bovine thrombin. Results PRP activated with SMLEF bipolar pulses or thrombin had similar light scatter profiles, consistent with the

  2. [National evaluation of the diagnosis of activated protein C resistance].

    PubMed

    Montiel-Manzano, Guadalupe; de la Peña-Díaz, Aurora; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham; Cesarman-Maus, Gabriela; Corona-de la Peña, Norma; Cruz-Cruz, Donají; Gaminio, Elizabeth; Martínez-Murillo, Carlos; Mayagoitia, Teresa; Miranda-Peralta, Enrique; Poblete, Teresita; Quintana-Martínez, Sandra; Ramírez, Raúl; Razo, Daniel; Ruiz de Chávez-Ochoa, Adriana; Reyes-Núñez, Virginia Adriana; Salazar, Rosario; Vicencio-Santiago, Guadalupe Virginia; Villa, Rosario; Reyes-Núñez, Aurelia Virginia

    2003-01-01

    test evaluates the partially activated thromboplastin time (aPTT) in a plasma sample before and after adding activated PC. The result is reported as a standardized sensibility index: aPTT post-activated PC/aPTT pre-activated PC. The conclusions of this national reunion pretend to optimize the available resources in our country in order to allow a wide and less-expensive diagnosis of patients with thrombosis. PMID:14515684

  3. 2D surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components with modulated active pyrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Amiel, S.; Loarer, T.; Pocheau, C.; Roche, H.; Gauthier, E.; Aumeunier, M.-H.; Courtois, X.; Jouve, M.; Balorin, C.; Moncada, V.; Le Niliot, C.; Rigollet, F.

    2014-10-01

    In nuclear fusion devices, such as Tore Supra, the plasma facing components (PFC) are in carbon. Such components are exposed to very high heat flux and the surface temperature measurement is mandatory for the safety of the device and also for efficient plasma scenario development. Besides this measurement is essential to evaluate these heat fluxes for a better knowledge of the physics of plasma-wall interaction, it is also required to monitor the fatigue of PFCs. Infrared system (IR) is used to manage to measure surface temperature in real time. For carbon PFCs, the emissivity is high and known (ε ~ 0.8), therefore the contribution of the reflected flux from environment and collected by the IR cameras can be neglected. However, the future tokamaks such as WEST and ITER will be equipped with PFCs in metal (W and Be/W, respectively) with low and variable emissivities (ε ~ 0.1–0.4). Consequently, the reflected flux will contribute significantly in the collected flux by IR camera. The modulated active pyrometry, using a bicolor camera, proposed in this paper allows a 2D surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected fluxes and the emissivity. Experimental results with Tungsten sample are reported and compared with simultaneous measurement performed with classical pyrometry (monochromatic and bichromatic) with and without reflective flux demonstrating the efficiency of this method for surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected flux and the emissivity.

  4. An Overview of Science Education and Outreach Activities at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    J. DeLooper; A. DeMeo; P. Lucas; A. Post-Zwicker; C. Phillips; C. Ritter; J. Morgan; P. Wieser; A. Percival; E. Starkman; G. Czechowicz

    2000-11-07

    The U. S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has an energetic science education program and outreach effort. This overview describes the components of the programs and evaluates the changes that have occurred in this effort during the last several years. Efforts have been expanded to reach more students, as well as the public in general. The primary goal is to inform the public regarding the fusion and plasma research at PPPL and to excite students so that they can appreciate science and technology. A student's interest in science can be raised by tours, summer research experiences, in-classroom presentations, plasma expos, teacher workshops and web-based materials. The ultimate result of this effort is a better-informed public, as well as an increase in the number of women and minorities who choose science as a vocation. Measuring the results is difficult, but current metrics are reviewed. The science education and outreach programs are supported by a de dicated core group of individuals and supplemented by other members of the PPPL staff and consultants who perform various outreach and educational activities.

  5. An Overview of Science Education and Outreach Activities at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delooper, J.

    2005-10-01

    As a Department of Energy Laboratory, the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has an energetic science education program and outreach effort. This overview describes the components of the programs and evaluates this effort during the last several years. The primary goal is to inform the public regarding the fusion and plasma research at PPPL and to excite students so that they can appreciate science and technology. The public's interest in science can be raised by news media publicity, tours, summer research experiences, in-classroom presentations, plasma expos, teacher workshops, printed and web-based materials. The ultimate result of this effort is a better-informed public, as well as an increase in the number of women and minorities who choose science as a vocation. Measuring the results is difficult, but current metrics are reviewed. The science education and outreach programs are supported by a dedicated core group of individuals and supplemented by PPPL staff, friends and family members who help with various outreach and educational activities. Supported by U. S. DOE Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073/ab

  6. 2D surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components with modulated active pyrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiel, S.; Loarer, T.; Pocheau, C.; Roche, H.; Gauthier, E.; Aumeunier, M.-H.; Le Niliot, C.; Rigollet, F.; Courtois, X.; Jouve, M.; Balorin, C.; Moncada, V.

    2014-10-01

    In nuclear fusion devices, such as Tore Supra, the plasma facing components (PFC) are in carbon. Such components are exposed to very high heat flux and the surface temperature measurement is mandatory for the safety of the device and also for efficient plasma scenario development. Besides this measurement is essential to evaluate these heat fluxes for a better knowledge of the physics of plasma-wall interaction, it is also required to monitor the fatigue of PFCs. Infrared system (IR) is used to manage to measure surface temperature in real time. For carbon PFCs, the emissivity is high and known (ɛ ˜ 0.8), therefore the contribution of the reflected flux from environment and collected by the IR cameras can be neglected. However, the future tokamaks such as WEST and ITER will be equipped with PFCs in metal (W and Be/W, respectively) with low and variable emissivities (ɛ ˜ 0.1-0.4). Consequently, the reflected flux will contribute significantly in the collected flux by IR camera. The modulated active pyrometry, using a bicolor camera, proposed in this paper allows a 2D surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected fluxes and the emissivity. Experimental results with Tungsten sample are reported and compared with simultaneous measurement performed with classical pyrometry (monochromatic and bichromatic) with and without reflective flux demonstrating the efficiency of this method for surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected flux and the emissivity.

  7. CPEP Fusion/Plasma Physics Education Materials/Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightner, G. Samuel; Zaleskiewicz, T. P.; Reiland, Robert

    2001-10-01

    The Contemporary Physics Education Project (CPEP) is a not-for-profit organization of teachers, educators, and physicists (see http://cpepweb.org). The goals in its charter include the development and implementation of teaching materials about contemporary physics topics for use in the introductory courses. To this end, the CPEP Fusion/plasma group has produced the teaching chart, ``FUSION-Physics of a Fundamental Energy Source''. Ancillary materials including an Instructors Guide and a packet of classroom activities are under development. In order to promote effective classroom use of its educational materials, CPEP presents workshops for high school and college teachers. These workshops have been sponsored by or held in conjunction with a variety of organizations including; the APS/DPP, the AAPT, the Space Science Institute, the American Nuclear Science Teachers Association, The Allegheny Intermediate Unit, and the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg. The chart is available in wall-size, poster-size and student notebook-size, and has been translated into six languages. Laminated versions of the poster and notebook size charts are also available as well as an overhead transparency of the chart. For more information, visit the CPEP/Fusion website (http://FusEdWeb.llnl.gov/CPEP/Chart.html)

  8. CPEP Fusion/Plasma Physics Education Materials/Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightner, G. Samuel; Zaleskiewicz, Ted; Reiland, Robert

    1999-11-01

    The Contemporary Physics Education Project (CPEP) is a not-for-profit organization of teachers, educators, and physicists. The goals in its charter include the development and implementation of teaching materials about contemporary physics topics for use in the introductory courses. To this end, the CPEP Fusion/plasma group has produced the teaching chart, "FUSION-Physics of a Fundamental Energy Source". This chart is available in wall-size, poster-size and student notebook-size, and has been translated into six languages. Ancillary materials, including an Instructors Guide and a packet of classroom activities, are under development. In order to promote effective classroom use of its educational materials, CPEP presents workshops for high school and college teachers. These workshops have been sponsored by or held in conjuction with a variety of organizations including; the APS/DPP, the AAPT, the Space Science Institute, the American Nuclear Science Teachers Association, and the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg. For more information, visit the CPEP/Fusion website (http://FusEdWeb.pppl.gov/CPEP/Chart.html)

  9. CPEP Fusion/Plasma Physics Education Materials/Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightner, G. Samuel; Zaleskiewicz, P. T.; Reiland, Robert

    2000-10-01

    The Contemporary Physics Education Project (CPEP) is a not-for-profit organization of teachers, educators, and physicists (see http://cpepweb.org). The goals in its charter include the development and implementation of teaching materials about contemporary physics topics for use in the introductory courses. To this end, the CPEP Fusion/plasma group has produced the teaching chart, "FUSION-Physics of a Fundamental Energy Source". Ancillary materials including an Instructors Guide and a packet of classroom activities are under development. In order to promote effective classroom use of its educational materials, CPEP presents workshops for high school and college teachers. These workshops have been sponsored by or held in conjunction with a variety of organizations including; the APS/DPP, the AAPT, the Space Science Institute, the American Nuclear Science Teachers Association, and the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg. The chart is available in wall-size, poster-size and student notebook-size, and has been translated into six languages. Laminated versions of the poster and notebook size charts are also available as well as an overhead transparency of the chart. For more information, visit the CPEP/Fusion website (http://FusEdWeb.pppl.gov/CPEP/Chart.html)

  10. Effect of plasma activated water on the postharvest quality of button mushrooms, Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yingyin; Tian, Ying; Ma, Ruonan; Liu, Qinghong; Zhang, Jue

    2016-04-15

    Non-thermal plasma is a new approach to improving microbiological safety while maintaining the sensory attributes of the treated foods. Recent research has reported that plasma activated water (PAW) can also efficiently inactivate a wide variety of microorganisms. This study invested the effects of plasma-activated water soaking on the postharvest preservation of button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) over seven days of storage at 20°C. Plasma activated water reduced the microbial counts by 1.5 log and 0.5 log for bacteria and fungi during storage, respectively. Furthermore, the corresponding physicochemical and biological properties were assessed between plasma activated water soaking groups and control groups. The results for firmness, respiration rate and relative electrical conductivity suggested that plasma activated water soaking can delay mushroom softening. Meanwhile, no significant change was observed in the color, pH, or antioxidant properties of A. bisporus treated with plasma activated water. Thus, plasma activated water soaking is a promising method for postharvest fresh-keeping of A. bisporus. PMID:26616972

  11. Selenium levels and Glutathione peroxidase activity in the plasma of patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    González de Vega, Raquel; Fernández-Sánchez, María Luisa; Fernández, Juan Carlos; Álvarez Menéndez, Francisco Vicente; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2016-09-01

    Selenium, an essential trace element, is involved in the complex system of defense against oxidative stress through selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidases (GPx) and other selenoproteins. Because of its antioxidant properties, selenium or its selenospecies at appropriate levels could hinder oxidative stress and so development of diabetes. In this vein, quantitative speciation of selenium in human plasma samples from healthy and diabetic patients (controlled and non-controlled) was carried out by affinity chromatography (AF) coupled on-line to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and isotope dilution analysis (IDA). Similarly, it is well known that patients with diabetes who exhibit poor control of blood glucose show a decreased total antioxidant activity. Thus, we evaluated the enzymatic activity of GPx in diabetic and healthy individuals, using the Paglia and Valentine enzymatic method, observing a significant difference (p<0.05) between the three groups of assayed patients (healthy (n=24): 0.61±0.11U/ml, controlled diabetic (n=38): 0.40±0.12U/ml and non-controlled diabetic patients (n=40): 0.32±0.09U/ml). Our results show that hyperglycemia induces oxidative stress in diabetic patients compared with healthy controls. What is more, glycation of GPx experiments demonstrated that it is the degree of glycation of the selenoenzyme (another species of the Se protein) what actually modulates its eventual activity against ROS in type II diabetes mellitus patients. PMID:27473831

  12. Evaluation of spermicidal activity of MI-saponin A.

    PubMed

    Saha, P; Majumdar, S; Pal, D; Pal, B C; Kabir, S N

    2010-05-01

    The seed extracts of Madhuca latifolia were reported to have spermicidal activity. The current investigation identified the spermicidal component of the extracts and evaluated its spermicidal potential in vitro. As characterized by infrared, mass, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral analyses, Mi-saponin A (MSA) was found to be the most potent component among a mixture of saponins. The mean effective concentrations of MSA that induced irreversible immobilization were 320 microg/mL for rat and 500 microg/mL for human sperm, as against the respective concentrations of 350 and 550 microg/mL of nonoxynol 9 (N-9). The mode of spermicidal action was evaluated by a battery of tests including (a) double fluoroprobe staining for sperm viability, (b) hypoosmotic swelling test and, assays for 5' nucleotidase and acrosin for physiological integrity of sperm plasma membrane, (c) scanning and transmission electron microscopy for sperm membrane ultrastructure, and (d) plasma membrane lipid peroxidation (LPO). The observations, taken together, were interpreted to mean that the spermicidal effect of MSA involved increased membrane LPO leading to structural and functional disintegration of sperm plasma membrane and acrosomal vesicle. A comparative in vitro cytotoxicity study in human vaginal keratocyte (Vk2/E6E7) and endocervical (End/E6E7) cell lines demonstrated that the 50% cell cytotoxicity (CC(50)) values, and consequently the safety indices, for MSA were >or= 8-fold higher as compared to those of N-9. In conclusion, MSA is a potent spermicidal molecule that may be explored further for its suitability as an effective component of vaginal contraceptive. PMID:20220105

  13. Aerobic and resistance training do not influence plasma carnosinase content or activity in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Stegen, Sanne; Sigal, Ronald J; Kenny, Glen P; Khandwala, Farah; Yard, Benito; De Heer, Emile; Baelde, Hans; Peersman, Wim; Derave, Wim

    2015-10-01

    A particular allele of the carnosinase gene (CNDP1) is associated with reduced plasma carnosinase activity and reduced risk for nephropathy in diabetic patients. On the one hand, animal and human data suggest that hyperglycemia increases plasma carnosinase activity. On the other hand, we recently reported lower carnosinase activity levels in elite athletes involved in high-intensity exercise compared with untrained controls. Therefore, this study investigates whether exercise training and the consequent reduction in hyperglycemia can suppress carnosinase activity and content in adults with type 2 diabetes. Plasma samples were taken from 243 males and females with type 2 diabetes (mean age = 54.3 yr, SD = 7.1) without major microvascular complications before and after a 6-mo exercise training program [4 groups: sedentary control (n = 61), aerobic exercise (n = 59), resistance exercise (n = 63), and combined exercise training (n = 60)]. Plasma carnosinase content and activity, hemoglobin (Hb) A1c, lipid profile, and blood pressure were measured. A 6-mo exercise training intervention, irrespective of training modality, did not decrease plasma carnosinase content or activity in type 2 diabetic patients. Plasma carnosinase content and activity showed a high interindividual but very low intraindividual variability over the 6-mo period. Age and sex, but not Hb A1c, were significantly related to the activity or content of this enzyme. It can be concluded that the beneficial effects of exercise training on the incidence of diabetic complications are probably not related to a lowering effect on plasma carnosinase content or activity. PMID:26389600

  14. Plasma phospholipid mass transfer rate: relationship to plasma phospholipid and cholesteryl ester transfer activities and lipid parameters.

    PubMed

    Cheung, M C; Wolfbauer, G; Albers, J J

    1996-09-27

    Human plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) has been shown to facilitate the transfer of phospholipid from liposomes or isolated very low and low density lipoproteins to high density lipoproteins. Its activity in plasma and its physiological function are presently unknown. To elucidate the role of PLTP in lipoprotein metabolism and to delineate factors that may affect the rate of phospholipid transfer between lipoproteins, we determined the plasma phospholipid mass transfer rate (PLTR) in 16 healthy adult volunteers and assessed its relationship to plasma lipid levels, and to phospholipid transfer activity (PLTA) and cholesteryl ester transfer activity (CETA) measured by radioassays. The plasma PLTR in these subjects was 27.2 +/- 11.8 nmol/ml per h at 37 degrees C (mean +/- S.D.), and their PLTA and CETA were 13.0 +/- 1.7 mumol/ml per h and 72.8 +/- 15.7 nmol/ml per h, respectively. Plasma PLTR was correlated directly with total, non-HDL, and HDL triglyceride (rs = 0.76, P < 0.001), total and non-HDL phospholipid (rs > 0.53, P < 0.05), and inversely with HDL free cholesterol (rs = -0.54, P < 0.05), but not with plasma PLTA and CETA. When 85% to 96% of the PLTA in plasma was removed by polyclonal antibodies against recombinant human PLTP, phospholipid mass transfer from VLDL and LDL to HDL was reduced by 50% to 72%, but 80% to 100% of CETA could still be detected. These studies demonstrate that PLTP plays a major role in facilitating the transfer of phospholipid between lipoproteins, and suggest that triglyceride is a significant modulator of intravascular phospholipid transport. Furthermore, most of the PLTP and CETP in human plasma is associated with different particles. Plasma PLTA and CETA were also measured in mouse, rat, hamster, guinea pig, rabbit, dog, pig, and monkey. Compared to human, PLTA in rat and mouse was significantly higher and in rabbit and guinea pig was significantly lower while the remaining animal species had PLTA similar to humans. No

  15. Active interrogation of plasma-liquid boundary using 2D plasma-in-liquid apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Janis; Foster, John

    2015-09-01

    Plasma medicine and plasma-based water purification technologies rely on the production and transport of plasma-derived (direct or indirect) reactive species into the bulk medium. This interaction takes place at the interface between the gas phase plasma and the liquid medium. The nature of radical production and subsequent radical transport from this region or boundary layer is not well understood due to the difficulty of implementing diagnostics to interrogate this region. We present a 2-D plasma-in-liquid water apparatus that makes the interface region assessable to optical diagnostics. Using colorimetric chemical probes, acidification and oxidation fronts are tracked using high-speed imaging and spectroscopy. Additionally, observed, plasma-induced fluid dynamical effects are also discussed. Forces at the interface can play a key role in the transport of radicals into the bulk solution. The role of plasma-driven interfacial forces as well as that of the applied, local electric field on chemical front propagation velocity and induced circulation are also discussed. Supported by grants NSF CBET 1336375 and DOE DE-SC0001939.

  16. Evaluation of D-dimer and lactate dehydrogenase plasma levels in patients with relapsed acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    HU, WANGQIANG; WANG, XIAOXIA; YANG, RONGRONG

    2016-01-01

    Despite the outstanding advances made over the past decade regarding our knowledge of acute leukemia (AL), relapsed AL remains to be associated with a dismal prognosis. A better understanding of AL relapse and monitoring of the D-dimer and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) plasma levels following chemotherapy may aid clinicians in determining whether relapse may occur in the subsequent phases of the disease. The present study evaluated D-dimer and LDH levels in 204 patients with relapsed AL. Data were collected at the initial onset of AL, at complete remission (CR) and in patients with relapsed AL. D-dimer plasma levels were significantly increased in patients with initial AL and in patients with relapsed AL (P=0.005 and P=0.007, respectively) but not in those with CR. LDH levels were significantly increased in AL patients at the initial onset of disease and at relapse compared with patients achieving CR, irrespective of cell type. Plasma prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time and fibrinogen levels were not significantly different across patients (with the exception of acute promyelocytic leukemia patients) at the initial onset, relapsed AL or CR. Routine hematological parameters (white blood cell count, hemoglobin, platelet count) were significantly different at the initial onset of AL (P=0.002, P<0.001 and P=0.001, respectively) and during relapsed AL (P=0.009, P=0.003 and P<0.001, respectively) compared with patients achieving CR, suggesting an association between D-dimer, LDH and relapsed AL. These results also indicate that determination of D-dimer and LDH levels may be useful for predicting the probability of relapse during chemotherapy, but should also be combined with routine hematological parameters. PMID:27347185

  17. [Spectra and thermal analysis of the arc in activating flux plasma arc welding].

    PubMed

    Chai, Guo-Ming; Zhu, Yi-Feng

    2010-04-01

    In activating flux plasma arc welding the welding arc was analyzed by spectra analysis technique, and the welding arc temperature field was measured by the infrared sensing and computer image technique. The distribution models of welding arc heat flow density of activating flux PAW welding were developed. The composition of welding arc affected by activated flux was studied, and the welding arc temperature field was studied. The results show that the spectral lines of argon atom and ionized argon atom of primary ionization are the main spectra lines of the conventional plasma welding arc. The spectra lines of weld metal are inappreciable in the spectra lines of the conventional plasma welding arc. The gas particle is the main in the conventional plasma welding arc. The conventional plasma welding arc is gas welding arc. The spectra lines of argon atom and ionized argon atom of primary ionization are intensified in the activating flux plasma welding arc, and the spectra lines of Ti, Cr and Fe elements are found in the activating flux plasma welding arc. The welding arc temperature distribution in activating flux plasma arc welding is compact, the outline of the welding arc temperature field is narrow, the range of the welding arc temperature distribution is concentrated, the welding arc radial temperature gradient is large, and the welding arc radial temperature gradient shows normal Gauss distribution. PMID:20545181

  18. Enzyme activities in plasma, liver, and kidney of black ducks and mallards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    Activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), creatine phosphokinase (CPK), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were measured in plasma, liver, and kidney, and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) was measured in liver and kidney of black ducks (Anas rubripes). Activities of ALT, AST, GGT, and ornithine carbamyl transferase (OCT) were assayed in plasma, liver, and kidney of game-farm mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). Appreciable OCT and AST activity occurred in both liver and kidney. Activities of ALT, CPK, ALP and GGT were higher in kidney, while LDH was higher in liver, GGT was detected in plasma from one of four mallards.

  19. Evaluation of the Efficacy of the Plasma Pencil Against Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohades, Soheila; Barekzi, Nazir; Razavi, Hamid; Laroussi, Mounir

    2014-10-01

    The plasma pencil generates low temperature and atmospheric pressure plasma. To generate the plasma, high voltage pulses with short width (from nanosecond to microsecond) are applied to a noble gas. The working gas can be helium, argon or a mixture of these with air or oxygen. Generating plasma with helium provides a tolerable temperature for biological cells and tissues. Diagnostic measurements on the plasma plume has revealed the presence of active agents such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen reactive species (RNS), which are known to have biological implications. Recently, low temperature plasma has drawn attention to its potential in cancer therapy. In our lab, the plasma pencil has been used to treat leukemia, prostate and epithelial cancer cells. The cancer cell line used here is the SCaBER (ATCC®HTB3™) cell line originating from a human bladder cancer. The results indicate that specific species induce the molecular mechanisms associated with cell death. The death of cells after plasma treatment will be studied using assays, such as DNA laddering and Caspase-3 activation, to elucidate the mechanism of the apoptotic or necrotic pathways.

  20. Bactericidal Effects against S. aureus and Physicochemical Properties of Plasma Activated Water stored at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jin; Tian, Ying; Li, Yinglong; Ma, Ruonan; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Water activated by non-thermal plasma creates an acidified solution containing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, known as plasma-activated water (PAW). The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different storage temperatures (25 °C, 4 °C, ‑20 °C, ‑80 °C) on bactericidal activities against S. aureus and physicochemical properties of PAW up to 30 days. Interestingly, PAW stored at ‑80 °C yielded the best antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, 3~4 log reduction over a 30-day period after PAW generation; meanwhile, PAW stored at 25 °C, 4 °C, and ‑20 °C, respectively, yielded 0.2~2 log decrease in cell viability after the same exposure and storage time. These results were verified by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The physicochemical properties of PAW stored at different temperatures were evaluated, including pH, oxidation reduction potential (ORP), and hydrogen peroxide, nitrate, nitrite anion and NO radical levels. These findings suggested that bacterial activity of PAW stored at 25 °C, 4 °C, ‑20 °C decreased over time, and depended on three germicidal factors, specifically ORP, H2O2, and NO3‑. Moreover, PAW stored at ‑80 °C retained bactericidal activity, with NO2‑ contributing to bactericidal ability in association with H2O2. Our findings provide a basis for PAW storage and practical applications in disinfection and food preservation.

  1. Bactericidal Effects against S. aureus and Physicochemical Properties of Plasma Activated Water stored at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jin; Tian, Ying; Li, Yinglong; Ma, Ruonan; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Water activated by non-thermal plasma creates an acidified solution containing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, known as plasma-activated water (PAW). The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different storage temperatures (25 °C, 4 °C, -20 °C, -80 °C) on bactericidal activities against S. aureus and physicochemical properties of PAW up to 30 days. Interestingly, PAW stored at -80 °C yielded the best antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, 3~4 log reduction over a 30-day period after PAW generation; meanwhile, PAW stored at 25 °C, 4 °C, and -20 °C, respectively, yielded 0.2~2 log decrease in cell viability after the same exposure and storage time. These results were verified by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The physicochemical properties of PAW stored at different temperatures were evaluated, including pH, oxidation reduction potential (ORP), and hydrogen peroxide, nitrate, nitrite anion and NO radical levels. These findings suggested that bacterial activity of PAW stored at 25 °C, 4 °C, -20 °C decreased over time, and depended on three germicidal factors, specifically ORP, H2O2, and NO3(-). Moreover, PAW stored at -80 °C retained bactericidal activity, with NO2(-) contributing to bactericidal ability in association with H2O2. Our findings provide a basis for PAW storage and practical applications in disinfection and food preservation. PMID:27346695

  2. Bactericidal Effects against S. aureus and Physicochemical Properties of Plasma Activated Water stored at different temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jin; Tian, Ying; Li, Yinglong; Ma, Ruonan; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Water activated by non-thermal plasma creates an acidified solution containing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, known as plasma-activated water (PAW). The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different storage temperatures (25 °C, 4 °C, −20 °C, −80 °C) on bactericidal activities against S. aureus and physicochemical properties of PAW up to 30 days. Interestingly, PAW stored at −80 °C yielded the best antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, 3~4 log reduction over a 30-day period after PAW generation; meanwhile, PAW stored at 25 °C, 4 °C, and −20 °C, respectively, yielded 0.2~2 log decrease in cell viability after the same exposure and storage time. These results were verified by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The physicochemical properties of PAW stored at different temperatures were evaluated, including pH, oxidation reduction potential (ORP), and hydrogen peroxide, nitrate, nitrite anion and NO radical levels. These findings suggested that bacterial activity of PAW stored at 25 °C, 4 °C, −20 °C decreased over time, and depended on three germicidal factors, specifically ORP, H2O2, and NO3−. Moreover, PAW stored at −80 °C retained bactericidal activity, with NO2− contributing to bactericidal ability in association with H2O2. Our findings provide a basis for PAW storage and practical applications in disinfection and food preservation. PMID:27346695

  3. Mechanism of Growth Enhancement of Plants Induced by Active Species in Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya

    2015-09-01

    Plant growth enhances when seeds are irradiated by plasma. However the mechanism of the growth enhancement by plasma has not been clarified. In this study, growth enhancement of plants using various active species and variation of plant cells are investigated. RF plasma is generated under conditions where pressure is 60 Pa and input electrical power is 60 W. Irradiation period varies from 0 (control) to 75 min. Air plasma shows maximum growth of plants with irradiation period of 60 min on the other hand, oxygen plasma shows the maximum growth with irradiation period of 15 min. From change of gaseous species and pressure dependence, growth enhancing factor is expected to be active oxygen species produced in plasma. According to gene expression analysis of Arabidopsis, there are two speculated mechanism of plant growth enhancement. The first is acceleration of cell cycle by gene expressions of photosynthesis and glycolytic pathway, and the second is increase of cell size via plant hormone production.

  4. 76 FR 9849 - Comprehensive Environmental Evaluations for Antarctic Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... Comprehensive Environmental Evaluations for Antarctic Activities SUMMARY: The Department of State gives notice of the availability of two draft Comprehensive Environmental Evaluations (CEEs) for activities... Evaluation: Construction and Operation of Jang Bogo Antarctic Research Station, Terra Nova Bay,...

  5. Plasma parameters of an active cathode during relativistic magnetron operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadas, Y.; Kweller, T.; Sayapin, A.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Bernshtam, V.

    2009-09-01

    The results of time- and space-resolved spectroscopic studies of the plasma produced at the surface of the ferroelectric cathode during the operation of an S-band relativistic magnetron generating ˜50 MW microwave power at f =3005 MHz and powered by a linear induction accelerator (LIA) (150 kV, 1.5 kA, 250 ns) are presented. The surface plasma was produced by a driving pulse (3 kV, 150 ns) prior to the application of the LIA accelerating high-voltage pulse. The cathode plasma electron density and temperature were obtained by analyzing hydrogen Hα and Hβ, and carbon ions CII and CIII spectral lines, and using the results of nonstationary collision radiative modeling. It was shown that the microwave generation causes an increase in plasma ion and electron temperature up to ˜4 and ˜7 eV, respectively, and the plasma density increases up to ˜7×1014 cm-3. Estimates of the plasma transport parameters and its interaction with microwave radiation are also discussed.

  6. Effect of zinc concentration on the activity of angiotensin converting enzyme in human plasma and serum

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, P.G.; Carl, G.F.; Smith, D.K.; O'Dell, B.L.

    1986-03-05

    The activity of angiotensin converting enzyme is measured clinically to assist in the diagnosis of sarcoidosis and to monitor therapy with steroids, and with antihypertensive drugs that inhibit the enzyme. Even though it has been known for some time that ACE is a zinc dependent enzyme, it was discovered only recently that zinc, in addition to endogenous levels in the assay mixture, is required for maximal activity of rat serum ACE. The present experiment was designed to determine if additional zinc is required for maximal activation of ACE in plasma and serum of human subjects. Plasma or serum samples were incubated at 37/sup 0/ in a zinc-free medium, pH 7.4, containing hippurylglyclglycine as the substrate. The addition of 20 ..mu..M zinc significantly increased ACE activity in plasma (95.4 +/- 11.9 vs 192.8 +/- 24.3 U/L) and in serum (89.9 +/- 5.6 vs 195.7 +/- 9.3 U/L) compared to samples without added zinc. Enzyme activity was increased 2.4-fold when zinc was added to plasma from a patient with low plasma zinc. These data suggest that the endogenous level of zinc in the assay mixture resulting from the addition of an aliquot of plasma or serum is insufficient to obtain maximal activity of ACE. The addition of zinc to zinc deficient plasma increased ACE activity even more.

  7. Cilengitide restrains the osteoclast-like bone resorbing activity of myeloma plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Marco; Stucci, Stefania; Felici, Claudia; Cafforio, Paola; Resta, Leonardo; Rossi, Roberta; Silvestris, Franco

    2016-04-01

    Cilengitide (CLG) is an inhibitor of both αv β3 and αv β5 integrins, with a defined anti-tumour effect in glioblastoma. Pre-clinical studies demonstrate its ability to restrain the bone resorbing property of metastatic osteotropic tumours and we have previously shown that the disablement of αv β3 in multiple myeloma (MM) plasma cells results in exhaustion of their in vitro osteoclast (OC)-like activity on bone substrate. Here, we investigated the effect of CLG on this functional property of MM cells. Both αv β3 and αv β5 were measured on primary marrow MM cells from 19 patients, and the effect of CLG on proliferation, apoptosis and adhesion was investigated in parallel with MM cell lines and OCs from healthy donors. In addition, the effect of CLG on the capability of malignant plasma cells to produce erosive lacunae on calcium phosphate was explored in relation to the activation of intracellular kinases of molecular pathways of both integrins. Ultrastructural microscopy was used to evaluate the morphological changes in MM cells due to the effect of CLG on cell adhesion. The data from our study demonstrate that CLG restrains the bone resorbing function of MM cells by disabling their adhesion properties. Further investigations in pre-clinical studies of osteotropic tumours are warranted. PMID:26728969

  8. Inhibition of platelet-aggregating activity in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura plasma by normal adult immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed Central

    Lian, E C; Mui, P T; Siddiqui, F A; Chiu, A Y; Chiu, L L

    1984-01-01

    Plasma from patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) caused the aggregation of autologous and homologous platelets, and effect which was inhibited by normal plasma. IgG purified from seven normal adults at a concentration of 0.7 mg/ml completely inhibited the platelet aggregation induced by plasma obtained from two TTP patients with active disease. The inhibition of platelet aggregation by human adult IgG was concentration dependent, and the inhibitory activity of human IgG was neutralized by rabbit antihuman IgG. Fab fragments inhibited the TTP plasma-induced platelet aggregation as well as intact IgG, whereas Fc fragments had no effect. Platelet aggregation caused by ADP, collagen, epinephrine, or thrombin was not affected by purified human IgG. The prior incubation of IgG with TTP plasma caused a significantly greater reduction of platelet aggregation by TTP plasma than that of IgG and platelet suspension, suggesting that the IgG inhibits TTP plasma-induced platelet aggregation through direct interaction with platelet aggregating factor in TTP plasma. IgG obtained initially from five infants and young children under the age of 4 yr did not possess any inhibitory activity. When one of the children reached 3 yr of age, his IgG inhibited the aggregation induced by one TTP plasma, but not that caused by another plasma. The IgG procured from the same boy at 4 yr of age inhibited the aggregation induced by both TTP plasmas. The IgG purified from the TTP plasma during active disease failed to inhibit the aggregation caused by the same plasma. After recovery, however, the IgG effectively inhibited aggregation. These observations suggest that platelet-aggregating factors present in the TTP plasma are heterogeneous in nature and that the IgG present in the normal adult plasma, which inhibits the TTP plasma-induced platelet aggregation, may be partially responsible for the success of plasma infusion therapy in TTP. Images PMID:6538207

  9. Evaluating Teaching and Research Activities--Finding the Right Balance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidal, Javier; Mora, Jose-Gines

    2003-01-01

    Analyzes on a national, regional, and institutional level the evaluation systems used to assess teaching and research activities at Spanish universities. Also examines ways in which evaluation systems orient to promote research activities to the detriment of teaching activities. (SWM)

  10. Fusicoccin Binding to Its Plasma Membrane Receptor and the Activation of the Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    De Michelis, Maria Ida; Pugliarello, Maria Chiara; Rasi-Caldogno, Franca

    1989-01-01

    The characteristics of fusicoccin binding were investigated in microsomes from 24-h-old radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seedlings. The time course of fusicoccin binding depended on fusicoccin concentration: equilibrium was reached much faster at 10 nanomolar fusicoccin than at 0.3 nanomolar fusicoccin. Scatchard analysis of equilibrium binding as a function of fusicoccin concentration indicated a single class of receptor sites with a Kd of 1.8 nanomolar and a site density of 6.3 picomoles per milligram protein. Similar values (Kd 1.7 nanomolar and site density 7 picomoles per milligram protein) were obtained from the analysis of the dependence of equilibrium binding on membrane concentration at fixed fusicoccin concentrations. Fusicoccin binding comigrated with the plasma membrane H+-ATPase in an equilibrium sucrose density gradient: both activities formed a sharp peak (1.18 grams per milliliter) clearly distinct from that of markers of other membranes which all peaked at lower densities. The saturation profiles of fusicoccin binding and of fusicoccin-induced activation of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase, measured under identical conditions, were similar, supporting the view that fusicoccin-induced activation of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase is mediated by fusicoccin binding to its plasma membrane receptor. PMID:16666723

  11. Note: A single-chamber tool for plasma activation and surface functionalization in microfabrication

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Adam J.; Scherrer, Joseph R.; Reiserer, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple apparatus for improved surface modification of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices. A single treatment chamber for plasma activation and chemical/physical vapor deposition steps minimizes the time-dependent degradation of surface activation that is inherent in multi-chamber techniques. Contamination and deposition irregularities are also minimized by conducting plasma activation and treatment phases in the same vacuum environment. An inductively coupled plasma driver allows for interchangeable treatment chambers. Atomic force microscopy confirms that silane deposition on PDMS gives much better surface quality than standard deposition methods, which yield a higher local roughness and pronounced irregularities in the surface. PMID:26133881

  12. Note: A single-chamber tool for plasma activation and surface functionalization in microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Adam J.; Scherrer, Joseph R.; Reiserer, Ronald S.

    2015-06-01

    We present a simple apparatus for improved surface modification of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices. A single treatment chamber for plasma activation and chemical/physical vapor deposition steps minimizes the time-dependent degradation of surface activation that is inherent in multi-chamber techniques. Contamination and deposition irregularities are also minimized by conducting plasma activation and treatment phases in the same vacuum environment. An inductively coupled plasma driver allows for interchangeable treatment chambers. Atomic force microscopy confirms that silane deposition on PDMS gives much better surface quality than standard deposition methods, which yield a higher local roughness and pronounced irregularities in the surface.

  13. Comparison of enzyme activities in plasma and leukocytes in dairy and beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Arai, Toshiro; Inoue, Akira; Takeguchi, Akira; Mizutani, Hisashi; Shimoo, Megumi; Sako, Toshinori; Yoshimura, Itaru; Kimura, Nobuhiro

    2003-11-01

    Concentrations of plasma glucose, immunoreactive insulin (IRI) and free fatty acid (FFA) and activities of enzymes related to energy metabolism and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isoenzyme pattern in plasma and leukocytes were investigated in lactating Holstein cows (dairy cattle) and fattening Japanese Black Wagyu x Holstein steers (beef cattle). IRI concentrations and LDH and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activities in the plasma of beef cattle were significantly higher than those in dairy cattle. The cytosolic ratio of MDH/LDH activity in the leukocytes of beef cattle was significantly higher than that of dairy cattle. These findings might be associated with the different energy metabolism between dairy and beef cattle. PMID:14665755

  14. Note: A single-chamber tool for plasma activation and surface functionalization in microfabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Adam J.; Scherrer, Joseph R.; Reiserer, Ronald S.

    2015-06-15

    We present a simple apparatus for improved surface modification of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices. A single treatment chamber for plasma activation and chemical/physical vapor deposition steps minimizes the time-dependent degradation of surface activation that is inherent in multi-chamber techniques. Contamination and deposition irregularities are also minimized by conducting plasma activation and treatment phases in the same vacuum environment. An inductively coupled plasma driver allows for interchangeable treatment chambers. Atomic force microscopy confirms that silane deposition on PDMS gives much better surface quality than standard deposition methods, which yield a higher local roughness and pronounced irregularities in the surface.

  15. NPA binding activity is peripheral to the plasma membrane and is associated with the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, D N; Muday, G K

    1994-01-01

    N-1-Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) binding activity is released into the supernatant when plasma membranes are subjected to high-salt treatment, indicating that this activity is peripherally associated with the membrane. Extraction of plasma membrane vesicles with Triton X-100 resulted in retention of NPA binding activity in the detergent-insoluble cytoskeletal pellet. Treatment of this pellet with KI released NPA binding activity, actin, and alpha-tubulin. Dialysis to remove KI led to the repolymerization of cytoskeletal elements and movement of NPA binding activity into an insoluble cytoskeletal pellet. NPA binding activity partitioned into the detergent-insoluble cytoskeletal pellet obtained from both zucchini and maize membranes and was released from these pellets by KI treatment. Treatment of a cytoskeletal pellet with cytochalasin B doubled NPA binding activity in the resulting supernatant. Together, these experiments indicate that NPA binding activity is peripherally associated with the plasma membrane and interacts with the cytoskeleton in vitro. PMID:11536654

  16. Association between arsenic exposure and plasma cholinesterase activity: a population based study in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Arsenic is a potent pollutant that has caused an environmental catastrophe in certain parts of the world including Bangladesh where millions of people are presently at risk due to drinking water contaminated by arsenic. Chronic arsenic exposure has been scientifically shown as a cause for liver damage, cancers, neurological disorders and several other ailments. The relationship between plasma cholinesterase (PChE) activity and arsenic exposure has not yet been clearly documented. However, decreased PChE activity has been found in patients suffering liver dysfunction, heart attack, cancer metastasis and neurotoxicity. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the PChE activity in individuals exposed to arsenic via drinking water in Bangladesh. Methods A total of 141 Bangladeshi residents living in arsenic endemic areas with the mean arsenic exposure of 14.10 ± 3.27 years were selected as study subjects and split into tertile groups based on three water arsenic concentrations: low (< 129 μg/L), medium (130-264 μg/L) and high (> 265 μg/L). Study subjects were further sub-divided into two groups (≤50 μg/L and > 50 μg/L) based on the recommended upper limit of water arsenic concentration (50 μg/L) in Bangladesh. Blood samples were collected from the study subjects by venipuncture and arsenic concentrations in drinking water, hair and nail samples were measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). PChE activity was assayed by spectrophotometer. Results Arsenic concentrations in hair and nails were positively correlated with the arsenic levels in drinking water. Significant decreases in PChE activity were observed with increasing concentrations of arsenic in water, hair and nails. The average levels of PChE activity in low, medium and high arsenic exposure groups were also significantly different between each group. Lower levels of PChE activity were also observed in the > 50 μg/L group compared to the ≤50 μg/L group. Moreover

  17. Heparin-enhanced plasma phospholipase A2 activity and prostacyclin synthesis in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, H; Kim, D K; Philbin, D M; Peterson, M B; Debros, F; Koski, G; Bonventre, J V

    1995-01-01

    Although eicosanoid production contributes to physiological and pathophysiological consequences of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), the mechanisms accounting for the enhanced eicosanoid production have not been defined. Plasma phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity, 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-keto-PGF1 alpha), and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) levels were measured at various times during cardiac surgery. Plasma PLA2 activity increased after systemic heparinization, before CPB. This was highly correlated with concurrent increases in plasma 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, TXB2 concentrations did not increase with heparin administration but did increase significantly after initiation of CPB. High plasma PLA2 activity, 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, and TXB2 concentrations were measured throughout the CPB period. Protamine, administered to neutralize the heparin, caused an acute reduction of both plasma PLA2 activity and plasma 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, but no change in plasma TXB2 concentrations. Thus the ratio of TXB2 to 6-keto-PGF1 alpha increased significantly after protamine administration. Enhanced plasma PLA2 activity was also measured in patients with lower doses of heparin used clinically for nonsurgical applications. Human plasma PLA2 was identified as group II PLA2 by its sensitivity to deoxycholate and dithiothreitol, its substrate specificity, and its elution characteristics on heparin affinity chromatography. Heparin addition to PMNs in vitro resulted in dose-dependent increases in cellular PLA2 activity and release of PLA2. The PLA2 released from the PMN had characteristics similar to those of post-heparin plasma PLA2. In conclusion, plasma PLA2 activity and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha concentrations are markedly enhanced with systemic heparinization. Part of the anticoagulant and vasodilating effects of heparin may be due to increased plasma prostacyclin (PGI2) levels. In addition the pulmonary vasoconstriction sometimes associated with protamine infusion during cardiac surgery might be due to decreased

  18. Boost of plasma current with active magnetic field shaping coils in rotamak discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xiaokang; Goss, Jermain; Kalaria, Dhara; Huang, Tian Sen

    2011-08-15

    A set of magnetic shaping coils is installed on the Prairie View (PV) rotamak for the study of active plasma shape control in the regimes with and without toroidal field (TF). In the spherical tokamak regime (with TF), plasma current I{sub p} can be boosted by 200% when all five shaping coils (connected in series) are energized. The enhancement of current drive efficiency is mainly attributed to the radial compression and the substantially axial extension of the plasma column; this in turn improves the impedance matching and thus increases antenna input power. In the field-reversed configuration (without TF), plasma current can be boosted by 100% when one middle coil is used; the appearance of radial shift mode limits the achievable value of I{sub p}. The experiments clearly demonstrate that the plasma shape control plays a role in effectively driving plasma current in rotamaks.

  19. Experimental Investigation of Active Feedback Control of Turbulent Transport in a Magnetized Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Mark Allen

    2013-07-07

    A new and unique basic plasma science laboratory device - the HelCat device (HELicon-CAThode) - has been constructed and is operating at the University of New Mexico. HelCat is a 4 m long, 0.5 m diameter device, with magnetic field up to 2.2 kG, that has two independent plasmas sources - an RF helicon source, and a thermionic cathode. These two sources, which can operate independently or simultaneously, are capable of producing plasmas with a wide range of parameters and turbulence characteristics, well suited to a variety of basic plasma physics experiments. An extensive set of plasma diagnostics is also operating. Experiments investigating the active feedback control of turbulent transport of particles and heat via electrode biasing to affect plasma ExB flows are underway, and ongoing.

  20. Body tissue activation using micro-spot atmospheric pressure plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Takumi; Hirata, Takamichi; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Akiya, Masahiro; Mori, Akira

    2012-10-01

    Experiments have been performed involving directly irradiating body tissues with atmospheric pressure plasma for various medical engineering applications of plasmas. Plasma irradiation was used to burn back dermis of rats. Then, healing and improvement of the scald areas were observed. Additionally, we devoted attention to the angiogenesis, which is a key component of the healing mechanism. Plasma irradiated rats and non treatment were performed an intravenous injection of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labelled tomato-lectin. The neo-vascular vessels were observed by a confocal laser scanning microscopy, and the quantities were calculated. Each quantity was the non treatment: 9.2 +/-- 0.77 and plasma irradiation: 18.4 +/-- 2.9. These data indicates that direct plasma irradiation involving ion/radical may promote angiogenesis, and it promotes living-body activation.

  1. Monocyte activation is a feature of common variable immunodeficiency irrespective of plasma lipopolysaccharide levels

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, R R; Silva, S P; Silva, S L; Tendeiro, R; Melo, A C; Pedro, E; Barbosa, M P; Santos, M C P; Victorino, R M M; Sousa, A E

    2012-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency disorders (CVID), the most frequent cause of symptomatic primary immunodeficiency, are defined by impaired antibody production. Notwithstanding, T cell activation and granulomatous manifestations represent the main causes of CVID morbidity even in patients receiving immunoglobulin (Ig) G replacement therapy. Additionally, gut pathology is a frequent feature of CVID. In this study, we investigated monocyte imbalances and their possible relationship with increased microbial translocation in CVID patients. Monocyte subsets were defined according to CD14 and CD16 expression levels and evaluated in terms of human leucocyte antigen D-related (HLA-DR), CD86 and programmed death-1 molecule ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression by flow cytometry, in parallel with the quantification of plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and serum levels of soluble CD14 (sCD14), LPS-binding protein (LBP) and anti-LPS antibodies. CVID patients (n = 31) featured significantly increased levels of serum sCD14 and an expansion of CD14brightCD16+ monocytes in direct correlation with T cell and B cell activation, the latter illustrated by the frequency of the CD21lowCD38low subset. Such alterations were not observed in patients lacking B cells due to congenital agammaglobulinaemia (n = 4). Moreover, we found no significant increase in circulating LPS or LBP levels in CVID patients, together with a relative preservation of serum anti-LPS antibodies, in agreement with their presence in commercial IgG preparations. In conclusion, CVID was associated with monocyte imbalances that correlated directly with T cell activation markers and with B cell imbalances, without an association with plasma LPS levels. The heightened monocyte activated state observed in CVID may represent an important target for complementary therapeutic strategies. PMID:22861366

  2. Determining the effect of storage conditions on prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time and fibrinogen concentration in rat plasma samples.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Vinod Kumar; Kakade, Somesh; Pandey, Santosh Kumar; Gothi, Anil Kalidas; Nirogi, Ramakrishna

    2015-10-01

    Coagulation parameters are usually included in clinical and preclinical safety studies to evaluate the effect of xenobiotics on the extrinsic or intrinsic pathways of coagulation. The analysis is generally performed at the time of terminal sacrifice where many activities are scheduled. Chances of delay in analysis are likely particularly when blood is collected for coagulation via the abdominal vena cava. This experiment was planned to assess the variations in coagulation parameters caused by delay in analysis as well as by storage conditions. Blood was collected from the posterior vena cava under isoflurane anesthesia, and the plasma was separated immediately. Coagulation parameters were evaluated at 0, 6, 24 and 48 h from the plasma stored at room temperature, as well as plasma stored under refrigerated and freezing conditions. Stability of the analytes in blood was also evaluated under refrigerated conditions for 6 h. All parameters were analyzed using a semi-automated coagulometer. Prothrombin time (PT) was stable under all three storage conditions for up to 6 h. Although statistically significant differences were observed for activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) at room and refrigeration temperatures for up to 6 h, the difference was clinically non-relevant. Fibrinogen was found to be the most stable parameter that showed consistency in results even up to 48 h under all three storage conditions. Plasma for PT can be stored and analyzed without any significant changes for up to 6 h from the actual blood collection, while fibrinogen level testing can be extended for up to 48 h after collection under any storage condition. For reliable APTT results, plasma samples should be run immediately after collection. PMID:26206586

  3. Temperature evaluation of a hyper-rapid plasma jet by the method of high-speed video recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rif, A. E.; Cherevko, V. V.; Ivashutenko, A. S.; Martyushev, N. V.; Nikonova, N. Ye

    2016-04-01

    In this paper the procedure of comparative evaluation of plasma temperature using high-speed video filming of fast processes is presented. It has been established that the maximum plasma temperature reaches the value exceeding 30 000 K for the hypervelocity electric-discharge plasma, generated by a coaxial magnetoplasma accelerator with the use of the 'Image J' software.

  4. Effect of capture stress on plasma enzyme activities in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bouck, G.R.; Cairns, M. A.; Christian, A. R.

    1978-01-01

    Four capture methods were used to collect domesticated rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri): angling, electroshocking, seining, and direct netting (control). Blood was sampled rapidly upon capture, usually within 2 min. No significant differences were noted within the time frame of the experiment between the four capture groups for plasma protein concentration, lactate dehydrogenase activity, or leucine aminonaphthylamidase activity. Creatine phosphokinase activity was elevated among electroshocked fish. Acid phosphatase activity was too low for accurate measurement. Hematocrits were significantly elevated by capture struggles. These results indicate that these capture methods do not preclude the use of plasma enzyme levels for investigating the health of wild fish. Key words: plasma enzyme, capture stress, physiology, plasma protein, rainbow trout, lactate dehydrogenase, leucine aminonaphthylamidase, creatine phosphokinase

  5. Depositon Of Silver On Plasma Activated Polypropylene Surface By Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radic, N.; Dojcinovic, B.; Obradovic, B. M.; Kuraica, M. M.; Cernák, M.

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this work is plasma activation and functionalisation by silver ions of nonwoven polypropylene. For analyzing prepared samples we used ICP-OES, SEM and AFM. In this paper we presented some preliminary results.

  6. Drift zonal plasma ionospheric in the Brazilian sector during a period of extreme low solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abalde Guede, Jose Ricardo; Tardelli-Coelho, Flavia Elaine

    2016-07-01

    The zonal drift velocities of the ionospheric plasma irregularities of large scale were analyzed; these irregularities were observed using optical emission techniques OI 630.0 nm obtained by photometers imagers installed in two locations on the campus of Urbanova UNIVAP in São José dos Campos - SP designated SJC and Campus ULBRA in Palmas - TO cited as PAL. Data were collected from five years, from 2006 to 2010, low solar activity period. Of the total of 337 nights in SJC and 329 nights in PAL analyzed were selected a total of 18 nights of significant plasma bubble occurrences, 9 nights in SJC and 9 nights in PAL, and studied under two conditions: considering fixed altitude of 280 km OI emission layer of 630.0 nm and calculating the height of this variable layer over each night analyzed. To find these varying altitudes along each night we were assisted with the analysis of CADI digital ionosonde data operating in conjunction with the imaging photometer in its observatory. The radio data available in digisonde allowed to do the analysis on 12 variables altitudes of 18 nights studied for fixed altitude; this occurred because of scattering present in ionograms for those nights and times, due to the presence of plasma bubbles in the study through the of the observatory zenith. Quantitative analysis determined the drift velocity zone for each of the analyzed bubbles 18 nights during the given fixed height and 12 nights evaluating varying altitudes along each night. The means were obtained nights analyzed in each observatory for both methods; SJC in the average velocities is derived from the plasma zone 9 nights bubbles analyzed in the method is fixed altitude 84 ± 18 m / s in the case of PAL the average velocities found is 87 ± 12 m / s. In the other case with variable altitude emission to SJC 8 nights analyzed, we reached a mean value of 87 ± 12 m / s, and for PAL, 4 of 9 nights initially selected, the average speed of the zonal drift plasma bubbles were found 85

  7. Evaluation of a rapid method of determination of plasma fibrinogen in swine.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, M; McSherry, B J; Valli, V E

    1977-04-01

    An evaluation was made of a rapid semiautomated method for determining fibrinogen level in swine plasma. This method, referred to as thrombin time method or fibrometer method, is based on the principle that when thrombin is added to suitably diluted plasma, the time of clotting is linearly related to the fibrinogen concentration. The linear regression model for the standard curve prepared using swine plasma had an r value of 0.998. A comparison between the fibrometer and the Grannis methods done on 189 swine plasma samples showed good correlation between these two mehtods (r value 0.847). It was concluded that although the fibrometer method may not be as precise as the Grannis method, it would still be acceptable for clinical use in swine. PMID:861838

  8. An improvement of Barter's method for assaying plasma cholesterol ester transfer activity: experimental and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Harvengt, C; Desager, J P; Mailleux, P; Heller, F R

    1989-01-01

    The use of a discontinuous density gradient and of a vertical rotor to separate plasma lipoproteins are modifications of Barter's described method for assaying cholesteryl ester transfer activity (CETA) in plasma. The original feature of our approach is the fast preparation of the labeled substrate by a physiologic-like process, which renders the assay easy and suitable for measurement of this activity in both man and animals. PMID:2730951

  9. Evaluation of methods to assess physical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenders, Nicole Y. J. M.

    Epidemiological evidence has accumulated that demonstrates that the amount of physical activity-related energy expenditure during a week reduces the incidence of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, and all-cause mortality. To further understand the amount of daily physical activity and related energy expenditure that are necessary to maintain or improve the functional health status and quality of life, instruments that estimate total (TDEE) and physical activity-related energy expenditure (PAEE) under free-living conditions should be determined to be valid and reliable. Without evaluation of the various methods that estimate TDEE and PAEE with the doubly labeled water (DLW) method in females there will be eventual significant limitations on assessing the efficacy of physical activity interventions on health status in this population. A triaxial accelerometer (Tritrac-R3D, (TT)), an uniaxial (Computer Science and Applications Inc., (CSA)) activity monitor, a Yamax-Digiwalker-500sp°ler , (YX-stepcounter), by measuring heart rate responses (HR method) and a 7-d Physical Activity Recall questionnaire (7-d PAR) were compared with the "criterion method" of DLW during a 7-d period in female adults. The DLW-TDEE was underestimated on average 9, 11 and 15% using 7-d PAR, HR method and TT. The underestimation of DLW-PAEE by 7-d PAR was 21% compared to 47% and 67% for TT and YX-stepcounter. Approximately 56% of the variance in DLW-PAEE*kgsp{-1} is explained by the registration of body movement with accelerometry. A larger proportion of the variance in DLW-PAEE*kgsp{-1} was explained by jointly incorporating information from the vertical and horizontal movement measured with the CSA and Tritrac-R3D (rsp2 = 0.87). Although only a small amount of variance in DLW-PAEE*kgsp{-1} is explained by the number of steps taken per day, because of its low cost and ease of use, the Yamax-stepcounter is useful in studies promoting daily walking. Thus, studies involving the

  10. Fatty acid composition of plasma lipids and erythrocyte membranes during simulated extravehicular activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skedina, M. A.; Katuntsev, V. P.; Buravkova, L. B.; Naidina, V. P.

    Ten subjects (from 27 to 41 years) have been participated in 32 experiments. They were decompressed from ground level to 40-35 kPa in altitude chamber when breathed 100% oxygen by mask and performed repeated cycles of exercises (3.0 Kcal/min). The intervals between decompressions were 3-5 days. Plasma lipid and erythrocyte membrane fatty acid composition was evaluated in the fasting venous blood before and immediately after hypobaric exposure. There were 7 cases decompression sickness (DCS). Venous gas bubbles (GB) were detected in 27 cases (84.4%). Any significant changes in the fatty acid composition of erythrocyte membranes and plasma didn't practically induce after the first decompression. However, by the beginning of the second decompression the total lipid level in erythrocyte membranes decreased from 54.6 mg% to 40.4 mg% in group with DCS symptoms and from 51.2 mg% to 35.2 mg% (p < 0.05) without DCS symptoms. In group with DCS symptoms a tendency to increased level of saturated fatty acids in erythrocyte membranes (16:0, 18:0), the level of the polyunsaturated linoleic fatty acid (18:2) and arachidonic acid (20:4) tended to be decreased by the beginning of the second decompression. Insignificant changes in blood plasma fatty acid composition was observed in both groups. The obtained biochemical data that indicated the simulated extravehicular activity (EVA) condition is accompanied by the certain changes in the blood lipid metabolism, structural and functional state of erythrocyte membranes, which are reversible. The most pronounced changes are found in subjects with DCS symptoms.

  11. Biochemical quantification of sympathetic nervous activity in humans using radiotracer methodology: fallibility of plasma noradrenaline measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Esler, M.; Leonard, P.; O'Dea, K.; Jackman, G.; Jennings, G.; Korner, P.

    1982-01-01

    We have developed radiotracer techniques for studying noradrenaline kinetics, to assess better sympathetic nervous system function in humans. Tritiated l-noradrenaline was infused intravenously (0.35 microCi/m2/min) to plateau plasma concentration. Noradrenaline plasma clearance was calculated from plasma tritiated noradrenaline concentration at steady state, and the rate of spillover of noradrenaline to plasma derived from plasma noradrenaline specific radioactivity. Mean noradrenaline spillover at rest in 34 normal subjects was 0.33 micrograms/m2/min (range 0.17-0.61 micrograms/m2/min). Predictably, noradrenaline spillover was reduced in patients with subnormal sympathetic nervous system activity, 0.16 +/- 0.09 micrograms/m2/min in eight patients with idiopathic peripheral autonomic insufficiency, and 0.11 +/- 0.07 micrograms/m2/min (mean +/- SD) in six patients with essential hypertension treated with clonidine (0.45 mg daily). Noradrenaline line plasma clearance in normal subjects was 1.32 +/- 0.28 L/m2/min. Clearance fell with age, causing the previously described rise in plasma noradrenaline concentration with aging. Unexpected effects of drugs were encountered, for example chronic beta-adrenergic blockade in patients with essential hypertension reduced noradrenaline clearance. Plasma noradrenaline concentration measurements were not in agreement with noradrenaline release rate values, and do not reliably indicate sympathetic nervous system activity, in instances such as these where noradrenaline clearance is abnormal.

  12. Chemotherapy modulates the biological activity of breast cancer patients plasma: the protective properties of black chokeberry extract.

    PubMed

    Kędzierska, Magdalena; Malinowska, Joanna; Kontek, Bogdan; Kołodziejczyk-Czepas, Joanna; Czernek, Urszula; Potemski, Piotr; Piekarski, Janusz; Jeziorski, Arkadiusz; Olas, Beata

    2013-03-01

    In breast cancer patients (before and during anti-cancer therapy) oxidative/nitrative damage to various molecules is observed. Furthermore, anti-cancer treatments may also influence the hemostatic properties of blood platelets and plasma. The aim of our study was to assess the effect of oxidative/nitrative stress (estimated by measurements of the levels of carbonyl groups and 3-nitrotyrosine in proteins--ELISA and C-ELISA methods, respectively; lipid peroxidation and total antioxidant level--TAS) on the selected parameters of hemostatic activity of plasma (the process of fibrin polymerization and lysis) collected from breast cancer patients after surgery and after various phases of chemotherapy (doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide). Subsequently, we also evaluated the level of oxidative/nitrative stress and hemostatic activity in plasma from these patients in the presence of the commercial extract of Aronia melanocarpa (Aronox®) in vitro. Patients were hospitalized in Department of Oncological Surgery and Department of Chemotherapy in Medical University of Lodz, Poland. We observed increased levels of biomarkers of oxidative/nitrative stress in plasma from patients with breast cancer (before or after surgery and after various phases of chemotherapy) in comparison to healthy group. Our further experiments demonstrated the hemostatic activity of plasma from the investigated patients differs from hemostatic properties of plasma obtained from healthy volunteers. We also recognize the existence of a relationship between oxidative stress (measured by the level of carbonyl groups) and changes of hemostasis in breast cancer patients after I and IV phases of chemotherapy. Moreover, the obtained results showed that the commercial extract from A. melanocarpa berries significantly reduced, in in vitro system, the oxidative/nitrative stress and hemostasis changes in plasma from breast cancer patients, after surgery and different phases of chemotherapy. Considering the data

  13. Increased Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor (suPAR) Levels in Plasma of Suicide Attempters

    PubMed Central

    Ventorp, Filip; Gustafsson, Anna; Träskman-Bendz, Lil; Westrin, Åsa; Ljunggren, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    The soluble form of the urokinase receptor, suPAR, has been suggested as a novel biomarker of low-grade inflammation. Activation of the immune system has been proposed to contribute to the development of depression and suicidal behavior. In order to identify depressed and suicidal individuals who could benefit from an anti-inflammatory treatment, a reliable biomarker of low-grade inflammation is vital. This study evaluates plasma suPAR levels as a biomarker of low-grade inflammation in patients with major depressive disorder and in patients who recently attempted suicide. The plasma suPAR and an established biomarker, C reactive protein (CRP) of suicide attempters (n = 54), depressed patients (n = 19) and healthy controls (n = 19) was analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The biomarker attributes of sensitivity and sensibility were evaluated using ROC curve analysis. Both the depressed patients and suicide attempters had increased plasma suPAR. The levels of suPAR discriminated better between controls and suicide attempters than did CRP. In the future, plasma suPAR might be a superior prognosticator regarding outcome of treatment applying conventional antidepressants in conjunction with anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:26451727

  14. Atmospheric oxygen plasma activation of silicon (100) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Habib, Sara B.; Gonzalez, Eleazar II; Hicks, Robert F.

    2010-05-15

    Silicon (100) surfaces were converted to a hydrophilic state with a water contact angle of <5 deg. by treatment with a radio frequency, atmospheric pressure helium, and oxygen plasma. A 2 in. wide plasma beam, operating at 250 W, 1.0 l/min O{sub 2}, 30 l/min He, and a source-to-sample distance of 3{+-}0.1 mm, was scanned over the sample at 100{+-}2 mm/s. Plasma oxidation of HF-etched silicon caused the dispersive component of the surface energy to decrease from 55.1 to 25.8 dyn/cm, whereas the polar component of the surface energy increased from 0.3 to 42.1 dyn/cm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the treatment generated a monolayer of covalently bonded oxygen on the Si(100) surface 0.15{+-}0.10 nm thick. The surface oxidation kinetics have been measured by monitoring the change in water contact angle with treatment time, and are consistent with a process that is limited by the mass transfer of ground-state oxygen atoms to the silicon surface.

  15. Plasma Membrane ATPase Activity following Reversible and Irreversible Freezing Injury 1

    PubMed Central

    Iswari, S.; Palta, Jiwan P.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma membrane ATPase has been proposed as a site of functional alteration during early stages of freezing injury. To test this, plasma membrane was purified from Solanum leaflets by a single step partitioning of microsomes in a dextran-polyethylene glycol two phase system. Addition of lysolecithin in the ATPase assay produced up to 10-fold increase in ATPase activity. ATPase activity was specific for ATP with a Km around 0.4 millimolar. Presence of the ATPase enzyme was identified by immunoblotting with oat ATPase antibodies. Using the phase partitioning method, plasma membrane was isolated from Solanum commersonii leaflets which had four different degrees of freezing damage, namely, slight (reversible), partial (partially reversible), substantial and total (irreversible). With slight (reversible) damage the plasma membrane ATPase specific activity increased 1.5- to 2-fold and its Km was decreased by about 3-fold, whereas the specific activity of cytochrome c reductase and cytochrome c oxidase in the microsomes were not different from the control. However, with substantial (lethal, irreversible) damage, there was a loss of membrane protein, decrease in plasma membrane ATPase specific activity and decrease in Km, while cytochrome c oxidase and cytochrome c reductase were unaffected. These results support the hypothesis that plasma membrane ATPase is altered by slight freeze-thaw stress. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:16666856

  16. Formation of tissue factor activity following incubation of recombinant human tissue factor apoprotein with plasma lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, T.; Kisiel, W. )

    1990-11-01

    Incubation of recombinant human tissue factor apoprotein (Apo-TF) with human plasma decreased the recalcified clotting time of this plasma in a time-and dose-dependent manner suggesting relipidation of the Apo-TF by plasma lipoproteins. Incubation of Apo-TF with purified preparations of human very low density, low density and high density lipoproteins resulted in tissue factor activity in a clotting assay. The order of effectiveness was VLDL greater than LDL much greater than HDL. Tissue factor activity generated by incubation of a fixed amount of Apo-TF with plasma lipoproteins was lipoprotein concentration-dependent and saturable. The association of Apo-TF with lipoprotein particles was supported by gel filtration studies in which {sup 125}I-Apo-TF coeluted with the plasma lipoprotein in the void volume of a Superose 6 column in the presence and absence of calcium ions. In addition, void-volume Apo-TF-lipoprotein fractions exhibited tissue factor activity. These results suggest that the factor VIII-bypassing activity of bovine Apo-TF observed in a canine hemophilic model may be due, in part, to its association with plasma lipoproteins and expression of functional tissue factor activity.

  17. Neomycin inhibits the phosphatidylinositol monophosphate and phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate stimulation of plasma membrane ATPase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qiuyun; Boss, W.F. )

    1991-05-01

    The inositol phospholipids, phosphatidylinositol monophosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}), have been shown to increase the vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity of plant plasma membranes. In this paper, the authors show the effect of various concentrations of phosphatidyinositol, PIP, and PIP{sub 2} on the plasma membrane vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity. PIP and PIP{sub 2} at concentrations at 10 nanomoles per 30 microgram membrane protein per milliliter of reaction mixture caused a twofold and 1.8-fold increase in the ATPase activity, respectively. The effect of these negatively charged phospholipids on the ATPase activity was inhibited by adding the positively charged aminoglycoside, neomycin. Neomycin did not affect the endogenous plasma membrane ATPase activity in the absence of exogenous lipids.

  18. Enzyme activities in plasma, kidney, liver, and muscle of five avian species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Murray, H.C.; Bunck, C.

    1985-01-01

    Activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), creatine phosphokinase (CPK), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined in plasma, kidney, liver, and muscle from five species of captive birds. Few differences occurred in plasma activities between sexes but considerable differences occurred between species. All five enzymes were detected in each of the tissues sampled. Relative enzyme activities in liver, kidney, and muscle were similar for each species. CPK activity was much higher in muscle than in liver or kidney and, of the five enzymes studied, may be the best indicator of muscle damage. Most of the other enzymes were more evenly distributed among the three tissues, and no organ-specific enzyme could be identified for liver or kidney. Because of interspecific variations in plasma enzyme activities, it is important to establish baseline values for each species to ensure accurate interpretation of results.

  19. Vampire bat salivary plasminogen activator is quiescent in human plasma in the absence of fibrin unlike human tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Gardell, S J; Hare, T R; Bergum, P W; Cuca, G C; O'Neill-Palladino, L; Zavodny, S M

    1990-12-15

    The vampire bat salivary plasminogen activator (Bat-PA) is a potent PA that exhibits remarkable selectivity toward fibrin-bound plasminogen (Gardell et al, J Biol Chem 256: 3568, 1989). Herein, we describe the activity of recombinant DNA-derived Bat-PA (rBat-PA) in a human plasma milieu. rBat-PA and recombinant human single-chain tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) are similarly efficacious at lysing plasma clots. In stark contrast to rt-PA, the addition of 250 nmol/L rBat-PA to plasma in the absence of a clot failed to deplete plasminogen, alpha 2-antiplasmin and fibrinogen. The lytic activities exhibited by finger-domain minus Bat-PA (F- rBat-PA) and finger and epidermal growth factor-like domains minus Bat-PA (FG- rBat-PA) were less than rBat-PA, especially at low concentrations of PA; nevertheless, these truncated forms also possessed a strict requirement for a fibrin cofactor. The loss of PA activity following the addition of rBat-PA to plasma was slower than that observed when either rt-PA or two-chain rt-PA was added. The efficacy, fibrin selectivity, and decreased susceptibility to inactivation exhibited by rBat-PA in vitro in a human plasma milieu suggests that rBat-PA may be superior to rt-PA for the treatment of thrombotic complications. PMID:2124935

  20. Plasma effects of active ion beam injections in the ionosphere at rocket altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnoldy, R. L.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Kintner, P. M.; Moore, T. E.; Pollock, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    Data from ARCS rocket ion beam injection experiments are primarily discussed. There are three results from this series of active experiments that are of particular interest in space plasma physics. These are the transverse acceleration of ambient ions in the large beam volume, the scattering of beam ions near the release payload, and the possible acceleration of electrons very close to the plasma generator which produce intense high frequency waves. The ability of 100 ma ion beam injections into the upper E and F regions of the ionosphere to produce these phenomena appear to be related solely to the process by which the plasma release payload and the ion beam are neutralized. Since the electrons in the plasma release do not convect with the plasma ions, the neutralization of both the payload and beam must be accomplished by large field-aligned currents (milliamperes/square meter) which are very unstable to wave growth of various modes.

  1. Evaluation of tungsten as a plasma-facing material for steady state magnetic fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirooka, Y.; Bourham, M.; Brooks, J. N.; Causey, R. A.; Chevalier, G.; Conn, R. W.; Eddy, W. H.; Gilligan, J.; Khandagle, M.; Ra, Y.

    1992-12-01

    Tungsten in the form of bulk-material, and relatively thick (1 mm) chemically deposited and plasma-sprayed coatings on molybdenum, has been evaluated as a plasma-facing material for near future steady state magnetic fusion devices, focusing on issues related to the divertor plate design. These issues are: (1) thermal outgassing; (2) plasma erosion; (3) deuterium retention; (4) disruption erosion; and (5) surface modifications. Total outgassing quantities from bulk tungsten and chemically deposited coatings are substantially smaller than those from graphites. Effects of redeposition and impurities on the erosion behavior due to deuterium plasma bombardment have been analyzed. Trace amounts of oxygen-containing impurities in the plasma can reduce the threshold energy for physical sputtering, affecting the overall erosion behavior of tungsten at energies below 500 eV. However, it has been found that at electron temperatures around 5 eV or lower, fragmentation of these impurities followed by positive ionization is significantly reduced, whereby plasma erosion data basically agree with sputtering theories and ion beam data. Thermal desorption measurements after plasma bombardment have indicated that the deuterium retention quantity in tungsten materials is of the order of 10 14-15 D atoms/cm 2. At simulated disruption with an energy deposition of 6 MJ/m 2, the effective heat deposition is found to be reduced to about 1%, due to a combined effect of molten layer protection and vapor shielding. Steady state plasma bombardment removes surface impurities and smooths the surface topography along with surface erosion whereas disruption causes microscopic cracking and surface melting.

  2. Induction of plasma acetylcholinesterase activity in mice challenged with organophosphorus poisons

    SciTech Connect

    Duysen, Ellen G.; Lockridge, Oksana

    2011-09-01

    The restoration of plasma acetylcholinesterase activity in mice following inhibition by organophosphorus pesticides and nerve agents has been attributed to synthesis of new enzyme. It is generally assumed that activity levels return to normal, are stable and do not exceed the normal level. We have observed over the past 10 years that recovery of acetylcholinesterase activity levels in mice treated with organophosphorus agents (OP) exceeds pretreatment levels and remains elevated for up to 2 months. The most dramatic case was in mice treated with tri-cresyl phosphate and tri-ortho-cresyl phosphate, where plasma acetylcholinesterase activity rebounded to a level 250% higher than the pretreatment activity. The present report summarizes our observations on plasma acetylcholinesterase activity in mice treated with chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos oxon, diazinon, tri-ortho-cresyl phosphate, tri-cresyl phosphate, tabun thiocholine, parathion, dichlorvos, and diisopropylfluorophosphate. We have developed a hypothesis to explain the excess acetylcholinesterase activity, based on published observations. We hypothesize that acetylcholinesterase activity is induced when cells undergo apoptosis and that consequently there is a rise in the level of plasma acetylcholinesterase. - Highlights: > Acetylcholinesterase activity is induced by organophosphorus agents. > AChE induction is related to apoptosis. > Induction of AChE activity by OP is independent of BChE.

  3. Antibacterial activity of plasma from crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) against pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Siamese crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) is a critically endangered species of freshwater crocodiles. Crocodilians live with opportunistic bacterial infection but normally suffer no adverse effects. They are not totally immune to microbial infection, but their resistance thereto is remarkably effective. In this study, crude and purified plasma extracted from the Siamese crocodile were examined for antibacterial activity against clinically isolated, human pathogenic bacterial strains and the related reference strains. Methods Crude plasma was prepared from whole blood of the Siamese crocodile by differential sedimentation. The crude plasma was examined for antibacterial activity by the liquid growth inhibition assay. The scanning electron microscopy was performed to confirm the effect of crude crocodile plasma on the cells of Salmonella typhi ATCC 11778. Effect of crude crocodile plasma on cell viability was tested by MTT assay. In addition, the plasma was purified by anion exchange column chromatography with DEAE-Toyopearl 650 M and the purified plasma was tested for antibacterial activity. Results Crude plasma was prepared from whole blood of the Siamese crocodile and exhibited substantial antibacterial activities of more than 40% growth inhibition against the six reference strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi, Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus epidermidis, and the four clinical isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, and Vibrio cholerae. Especially, more than 80% growth inhibition was found in the reference strains of Salmonella typhi, Vibrio cholerae, and Staphylococcus epidermidis and in the clinical isolates of Salmonella typhi and Vibrio cholerae. The effect of the crude plasma on bacterial cells of Salmonella typhi, a certain antibacterial material probably penetrates progressively into the cytoplasmic space, perturbing and damaging bacterial

  4. Relationship between lipoprotein lipase activity and plasma sex steroid level in obese women.

    PubMed Central

    Iverius, P H; Brunzell, J D

    1988-01-01

    In obese women (n = 16) at their weight, fasting adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity, obtained by elution with serum and heparin at 4 degrees and 37 degrees C, was inversely correlated to plasma estradiol levels (r = -0.724; P = 0.002) and (r = -0.641; P = 0.010), respectively. Furthermore, fasting postheparin plasma LPL activity during a heparin infusion, showed an even stronger inverse correlation to plasma estradiol when measured at 60 min (r = -0.815; P less than 0.001). None of the above parameters was correlated to the body mass index. Postprandial LPL activity in postheparin plasma, measured 10 min after a heparin injection, showed a strong positive correlation with plasma free testosterone (r = 0.780; P = 0.001). Neither of these parameters was correlated with the body mass index. The origin of this LPL activity is presently unknown but could conceivably represent a pool of LPL from skeletal muscle. Since it has been shown convincingly that estrogen decreases adipose tissue LPL activity in the rat, the present studies strongly suggest that estradiol is a major negative regulator of fasting adipose tissue LPL activity in women. PMID:3417867

  5. Measurement of the phospholipase activity of endothelial lipase in mouse plasma.

    PubMed

    Basu, Debapriya; Lei, Xia; Josekutty, Joby; Hussain, M Mahmood; Jin, Weijun

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) is a major negative regulator of plasma HDL levels in mice, rabbits, and most probably, humans. Although this regulatory function is critically dependent on EL's hydrolysis of HDL phospholipids, as yet there is no phospholipase assay specific for EL in plasma. We developed such an assay for the mouse enzyme using a commercially available phospholipid-like fluorescent substrate in combination with an EL neutralizing antibody. The specificity of the assay was established using EL knockout mice and its utility demonstrated by detection of an increase in plasma EL phospholipase activity following exposure of wild-type mice to lipopolysaccharide. The assay revealed that murine pre-heparin plasma does not contain measurable EL activity, indicating that the hydrolysis of HDL phospholipids by EL in vivo likely occurs on the cell surface. PMID:23103358

  6. Detection of hydroxyl radicals during regeneration of granular activated carbon in dielectric barrier discharge plasma system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shoufeng; Lu, Na; Shang, Kefeng; Li, Jie; Wu, Yan

    2013-03-01

    To understand the reactions taking place in the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma system of activated carbon regeneration, the determination of active species is necessary. A method based on High Performance Liquid Chromatography with radical trapping by salicylic acid, has been developed to measure hydroxyl radical (•OH) in the DBD plasma reactor. The effects of applied voltage, treatment time, and gas flow rate and atmosphere were investigated. Experimental results indicated that increasing voltage, treatment time and air flow rate could enhance the formation of •OH. Oxygen atmosphere and a suitable GAC water content were contributed to •OH generation. The results give an insight into plasma chemical processes, and can be helpful to optimize the design and application for the plasma system.

  7. A quantitative evaluation of various deconvolution methods and their applications in the deconvolution of plasma spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yanwei; Shi, Yuejiang; Li, Yingying; Fu, Jia; Lu, Bo; Zhang, Hongming; Wang, Xiaoguang; Wang, Fudi; Shen, Yongcai

    2013-06-01

    A quantitative evaluation of various deconvolution methods and their applications in processing plasma emitted spectra was performed. The iterative deconvolution algorithms evaluated here include Jansson's method, Richardson-Lucy's method, the maximum a posteriori method and Gold's method. The evaluation criteria include minimization of the sum of squared errors and the sum of squared relative error of parameters, and their rate of convergence. After comparing deconvolved results using these methods, it was concluded that Jansson's and Gold's methods were able to provide good profiles that are visually close to the original spectra. Additionally, Gold's method generally gives the best results when considering all the criteria above. The applications to the actual plasma spectra obtained from the EAST tokamak with these methods are also presented in this paper. The deconvolution results with Gold's and Jansson's methods show that the effects of instruments can be satisfactorily eliminated and clear spectra are recovered.

  8. Evaluation of plasma H2S levels and H2S synthesis in streptozotocin induced Type-2 diabetes-an experimental study based on Swietenia macrophylla seeds

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Moumita; Biswas, Utpal Kumar; Chakraborty, Runu; Banerjee, Piyasa; Raychaudhuri, Utpal; Kumar, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the plasma H2S levels and H2S synthesis activity in streptozotocin induced type 2 diabetes rats compared to the healthy controls and also to observe the effect of the aqueous extract of Swietenia macrophylla (S. macrophylla) seeds on the experimental groups. Methods Seeds of S. macrophylla were separated, washed, shed-dried and finally extract was prepared. Thirty two wistar rats were selected for the experimental study. Streptozotocin was used for the induction of diabetes. H2S concentration in plasma was measured. H2S synthesizing activity in plasma was measured. Statistical analysis have done using Microsoft excel, Office 2003. Values were expressed by mean±SD. P<0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results Fasting blood glucose level (7.74±0.02) mmol/L was significantly increased in diabetic rats. The glucose levels are significantly lowered in the rats treated with metformin (5.48±0.03) mmol/L as well as with aqueous extract of S. macrophylla seeds (3.72±0.04) mmol/L. The HbA1c percentages in different groups of study subjects also indicate similar trends. Our study shows both the plasma H2S levels (22.07±0.73) mmol/L and plasma H2S synthesis activity (0.411±0.005 mmol/100 g) are significantly reduced in the streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Conclusions Although considering a small sample size, it can conclude that the fasting blood glucose levels are inversely related to plasma H2S levels as well as H2S synthesis activity in plasma and the extract of S. macrophylla is associated with increased plasma H2S levels with effective lowering of blood glucose in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. PMID:25183134

  9. Electrocatalytically Active Nickel-Based Electrode Coatings Formed by Atmospheric and Suspension Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghasibeig, M.; Mousavi, M.; Ben Ettouill, F.; Moreau, C.; Wuthrich, R.; Dolatabadi, A.

    2014-01-01

    Ni-based electrode coatings with enhanced surface areas, for hydrogen production, were developed using atmospheric plasma spray (APS) and suspension plasma spray (SPS) processes. The results revealed a larger electrochemical active surface area for the coatings produced by SPS compared to those produced by APS process. SEM micrographs showed that the surface microstructure of the sample with the largest surface area was composed of a large number of small cauliflower-like aggregates with an average diameter of 10 μm.

  10. Heating efficiency evaluation with mimicking plasma conditions of integrated fast-ignition experiment.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Zhang, Zhe; Morace, Alessio; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Nagai, Takahiro; Abe, Yuki; Kojima, Sadaoki; Sakata, Shohei; Inoue, Hiroaki; Utsugi, Masaru; Hattori, Shoji; Hosoda, Tatsuya; Lee, Seung Ho; Shigemori, Keisuke; Hironaka, Youichiro; Sunahara, Atsushi; Sakagami, Hitoshi; Mima, Kunioki; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Yamanoi, Kohei; Norimatsu, Takayoshi; Tokita, Shigeki; Nakata, Yoshiki; Kawanaka, Junji; Jitsuno, Takahisa; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    A series of experiments were carried out to evaluate the energy-coupling efficiency from heating laser to a fuel core in the fast-ignition scheme of laser-driven inertial confinement fusion. Although the efficiency is determined by a wide variety of complex physics, from intense laser plasma interactions to the properties of high-energy density plasmas and the transport of relativistic electron beams (REB), here we simplify the physics by breaking down the efficiency into three measurable parameters: (i) energy conversion ratio from laser to REB, (ii) probability of collision between the REB and the fusion fuel core, and (iii) fraction of energy deposited in the fuel core from the REB. These three parameters were measured with the newly developed experimental platform designed for mimicking the plasma conditions of a realistic integrated fast-ignition experiment. The experimental results indicate that the high-energy tail of REB must be suppressed to heat the fuel core efficiently. PMID:26172803

  11. Evaluation of a commercially available radioimmunoassay kit for measurement of doxorubicin in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Piall, E.; Aherne, G.W.; Marks, V.

    1982-01-01

    We evaluated a commercially available (Diagnostic Biochemistry Inc.) doxorubicin /sup 125/I radioimmunoassay kit. This kit gave a high apparent doxorubicin concentration (> 12 ..mu..g/L), which was not linearly related to dilution, for two pools of normal human serum and plasma and also for samples collected from patients before they received the drug. In contrast, a doxorubicin /sup 3/H radioimmunoassay developed by us gave a low blank (2 ..mu..g/L), which was linearly related to dilution, for the same pools and patients' samples. Doxorubicin concentrations in the plasma of patients receiving the drug were compared by the two methods; the kit gave results five- to 10-fold those obtained with our assay. High nonspecific interference by serum and plasma as measured by the /sup 125/I radioimmunoassay must therefore be borne in mind by users of the kit, and we suggest that results should be corrected for these nonspecific effects.

  12. Studies on the Interaction between Collagen and a Plasma Kallikrein-Like Activity EVIDENCE FOR A SURFACE-ACTIVE ENZYME SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Harpel, Peter C.

    1972-01-01

    This study has demonstrated that collagen particles, after exposure to platelet-poor human plasma and subsequent washing, generate a kinin-like agent when incubated with prekinin substrate. The binding of kinin-generating activity to collagen in the plasma collagen incubation mixture occurs rapidly, whereas the loss of this activity in the incubation mixture occurs relatively slowly. The Hageman factor appeared to be necessary for the surface-bound kinin-generating activity, as this activity was absent in collagen exposed to Hageman factor-deficient plasma. These studies have partially characterized the plasma-derived enzymatic activity bound to collagen. Incubation of collagen with plasma caused a concentration-dependent reduction in the kinin-producing activity which was generated by the addition of ellagic acid, a known activator of plasma kallikrein. The kinin-inducing activity bound to collagen is inhibited by soybean trypsin inhibitor, Trasylol, serum C1̄ inactivator and the plasma α2-macroglobulin, but not by lima bean trypsin inhibitor. An eluate prepared from plasma-treated collagen, when compared with purified plasma kallikrein, shared a similar inhibitor profile. Selective chemical blockage of the free carboxyl groups on the collagen molecule, or heat denaturation, inactivated the ability of the collagen to generate kinin-like activity after incubation with plasma. Removal of the collagen telopeptides or blockage of the free amino groups failed to affect the collagen-plasma interaction. The binding of partially purified plasma kallikrein to collagen was found to have similar structural and chemical requirements. These data indicate that there is a structural and chemical specificity for the activation and binding of plasma kallikrein-like activity by collagen. These studies suggest that a plasma kallikrein may function as a surface-bound enzyme system. PMID:4338122

  13. Sex hormones, sexual activity and plasma anticonvulsant levels in male epileptics.

    PubMed Central

    Toone, B K; Wheeler, M; Nanjee, M; Fenwick, P; Grant, R

    1983-01-01

    Testosterone, LH, FSH, PRL, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were measured in 72 male epileptic patients on chronic anticonvulsant drug regimes. Sexual activity was estimated and plasma anticonvulsants measured. Total testosterone (TT), LH, FSH, PRL, and SHBG were increased; free testosterone (FT) was decreased. Sexual activity appeared diminished particularly in relation to reduced FT. PMID:6413659

  14. Studies on the bioassayable growth hormone-like activity of plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S.; Vodian, M. A.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Evidence supporting the existence of bioassayable growth hormone-like activity in blood plasma distinct from the growth hormone measurable by radioimmunoassay and from somatomedin is presented. Tibial assays of the growth-hormone-like activity of injected, concentrated normal human and rat plasma in hypophysectomized rats reveal 200- and 50-fold activity excesses, respectively, with respect to the amount of growth hormone detected by radioimmunoassay. The origin of this bioassayable plasma hormone has been localized to the region of the pituitary, the origin of growth hormone, a distribution not followed by somatomedin C. Purification of the bioassayable agent indicates that is has a molecular weight of between 60,000 and 80,000, in contrast to that of growth hormone (20,000), and that the bioassayable activity is distinct from that of somatomedin C. Growth hormone-like activity detected in Cohn fraction IV as well as plasma activity, are found to be collectable on Dowex 50 resin, in contrast to somatomedin C and nonsuppressible insulin-like activity. The formation of bioassayable growth hormone-activity agents from radioimmunoassayable growth hormone and directly in the pituitary is suggested.

  15. Plasma volume, osmolality, vasopressin, and renin activity during graded exercise in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Keil, L. C.; Bernauer, E. M.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of work intensity on plasma volume, osmolality, vasopressin and renin activity and the interrelationships between these responses are investigated. Plasma volume, renin activity and osmotic, sodium and arginine vasopressin concentrations were measured in venous blood samples taken from 15 healthy male subjects before and after six minutes of bicycle ergometer exercise at 100, 175 and 225 W. Plasma volume is found to decrease significantly with increasing work intensity, while increases in Na(+) concentration, osmolality and vasopressin are only observed to be significant when the work intensity exceeds 40% maximal aerobic capacity and plasma resin activity increased linearly at all work levels. In addition, significant correlations are observed between plasma volume and osmolality and sodium changes, and between vasopressin and osmolality and sodium content changes. Data thus support the hypotheses that (1) vasopressin may be the primary controlling endocrine for fluid and electrolyte levels following exercise; (2) an exercise intensity greater than 40% maximal aerobic capacity is required to stimulate vasopressin release through changes in plasma osmolality; and (3) the stimulation of the renin-angiotensin system is a more general stress response.

  16. Evaluation of dietary patterns among Norwegian postmenopausal women using plasma carotenoids as biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Markussen, Marianne S; Veierød, Marit B; Sakhi, Amrit K; Ellingjord-Dale, Merete; Blomhoff, Rune; Ursin, Giske; Andersen, Lene F

    2015-02-28

    A number of studies have examined dietary patterns in various populations. However, to study to what extent such patterns capture meaningful differences in consumption of foods is of interest. In the present study, we identified important dietary patterns in Norwegian postmenopausal women (age 50-69 years, n 361), and evaluated these patterns by examining their associations with plasma carotenoids. Diet was assessed by a 253-item FFQ. These 253 food items were categorised into forty-six food groups, and dietary patterns were identified using principal component analysis. We used the partial correlation coefficient (r(adj)) and multiple linear regression analysis to examine the associations between the dietary patterns and the plasma carotenoids α-carotene, β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lutein, lycopene and zeaxanthin. Overall, four dietary patterns were identified: the 'Western'; 'Vegetarian'; 'Continental'; 'High-protein'. The 'Western' dietary pattern scores were significantly inversely correlated with plasma lutein, zeaxanthin, lycopene and total carotenoids (-0·25 ≤ r(adj) ≤ -0·13). The 'Vegetarian' dietary pattern scores were significantly positively correlated with all the plasma carotenoids (0·15 ≤ r(adj) ≤ 0·24). The 'Continental' dietary pattern scores were significantly inversely correlated with plasma lutein and α-carotene (r(adj) = -0·13). No significant association between the 'High-protein' dietary pattern scores and the plasma carotenoids was found. In conclusion, the healthy dietary pattern, the 'Vegetarian' pattern, is associated with a more favourable profile of the plasma carotenoids than our unhealthy dietary patterns, the 'Western' and 'Continental' patterns. PMID:25622727

  17. Antimicrobial activity of pure platelet-rich plasma against microorganisms isolated from oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Autologous platelet concentrates (PCs) have been extensively used in a variety of medical fields to promote soft and hard tissue regeneration. The significance behind their use lies in the abundance of growth factors in platelets α-granules that promotes wound healing. In addition, antibacterial properties of PCs against various bacteria have been recently pointed out. In this study, the antimicrobial effect of pure platelet-rich plasma (P-PRP) was evaluated against oral cavity microorganisms such as Enterococcus faecalis, Candida albicans, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus oralis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Blood samples were obtained from 17 patients who underwent oral surgery procedures involving the use of P-PRP. The antibacterial activity of P-PRP, evaluated as the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), was determined through the microdilution twofold serial method. Results P-PRP inhibited the growth of Enterococcus faecalis, Candida albicans, Streptococcus agalactiae and Streptococcus oralis, but not of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Conclusions P-PRP is a potentially useful substance in the fight against postoperative infections. This might represent a valuable property in adjunct to the enhancement of tissue regeneration. PMID:23442413

  18. Identification of the biologically active liquid chemistry induced by a nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

    PubMed

    Wende, Kristian; Williams, Paul; Dalluge, Joe; Gaens, Wouter Van; Aboubakr, Hamada; Bischof, John; von Woedtke, Thomas; Goyal, Sagar M; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Bogaerts, Annemie; Masur, Kai; Bruggeman, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of interaction of cold nonequilibrium plasma jets with mammalian cells in physiologic liquid is reported. The major biological active species produced by an argon RF plasma jet responsible for cell viability reduction are analyzed by experimental results obtained through physical, biological, and chemical diagnostics. This is complemented with chemical kinetics modeling of the plasma source to assess the dominant reactive gas phase species. Different plasma chemistries are obtained by changing the feed gas composition of the cold argon based RF plasma jet from argon, humidified argon (0.27%), to argon/oxygen (1%) and argon/air (1%) at constant power. A minimal consensus physiologic liquid was used, providing isotonic and isohydric conditions and nutrients but is devoid of scavengers or serum constituents. While argon and humidified argon plasma led to the creation of hydrogen peroxide dominated action on the mammalian cells, argon-oxygen and argon-air plasma created a very different biological action and was characterized by trace amounts of hydrogen peroxide only. In particular, for the argon-oxygen (1%), the authors observed a strong negative effect on mammalian cell proliferation and metabolism. This effect was distance dependent and showed a half life time of 30 min in a scavenger free physiologic buffer. Neither catalase and mannitol nor superoxide dismutase could rescue the cell proliferation rate. The strong distance dependency of the effect as well as the low water solubility rules out a major role for ozone and singlet oxygen but suggests a dominant role of atomic oxygen. Experimental results suggest that O reacts with chloride, yielding Cl2(-) or ClO(-). These chlorine species have a limited lifetime under physiologic conditions and therefore show a strong time dependent biological activity. The outcomes are compared with an argon MHz plasma jet (kinpen) to assess the differences between these (at least seemingly) similar plasma sources

  19. Evaluation of materials proposed for the construction of the plasma electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) on beamlet

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.; Robb, C.; DeYoreo, J.; Atherton, J.

    1992-11-01

    The proposed upgrade of the NOVA laser system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory employs a multipass architecture that requires an optical switch to emit the laser light at the appropriate fluence. This Pockels cell-based optical switch does not use traditional ring or thin-film electrodes because of the large aperture and high fluence of the laser system. Rather, it uses a plasma electrode Pockels cell with a KD*P crystal as the electro-optical medium. A discharge plasma is formed on each side of the electro-optic crystal and high voltage is applied across the crystal through the plasma electrode to initiate optical switching. In October 1991 we began evaluating materials suggested for the large aperture plasma electrode optical switch. Previous experiments suggested that switching performance could be significantly affected by the deterioration of cell materials. The final prototype switch tested used polyethylene for the switch body, Mykroy for the mid-plane and a silicone vulcanite to encapsulate the KD*P crystal. The encapsulant easily compensated for the effect of assembling the optical switch and we measured no strain-induced birefringence in the crystal after encapsulation. Oxygen was eventually added to the plasma to react with the sputtered carbon from the cathode and produce a gaseous effluent. As an added benefit, the production of ozone absorbed most of the ultra violet radiation affecting the encapsulant. All the materials tested decomposed and produced volatiles, although we have seen no change in the damage threshold of exposed optical surfaces tested to date. The following is an evaluation of the recommended materials for major cell components using published manufacturers data, experimental results from our Material Evaluation Apparatus, and outgassing performance and sputtering data produced at the Laboratory`s Vacuum Process Lab.

  20. Evaluation of Dielectric Properties of HTCC Alumina for Realization of Plasma Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, Martin; Persson, Anders; Thornell, Greger

    2015-10-01

    As the sensitivity of optogalvanic spectroscopy based on prototype microplasma sources increases, contamination from composite materials in the printed circuit board used starts to become a concern. In this paper, a transfer to high-temperature cofired alumina and platinum is made and evaluated. The high-purity alumina provides an inert plasma environment, and allows for temperatures above 1000°C, which is beneficial for future integration of a combustor. To facilitate the design of high-end plasma sources, characterization of the radio frequency (RF) parameters of the materials around 2.6 GHz is carried out. A RF resonator structure was fabricated in both microstrip and stripline configurations. These resonators were geometrically and electrically characterized, and ɛ r and tan were calculated using the RF waveguide design tool Wcalc. The resulting ɛ r for the microstrip and stripline was found to be 10.68 (±0.12) and 9.65 (±0.14), respectively. The average tan of all devices was found to be 0.0011 (±0.0007). With these parameters, a series of proof-of-concept plasma sources were fabricated and evaluated. Some problems in the fabrication stemmed from the lamination and difficulties with the screen-printing, but a functioning plasma source was demonstrated.

  1. How to Activate Teachers through Teacher Evaluation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuytens, Melissa; Devos, Geert

    2014-01-01

    There is a general doubt on whether teacher evaluation can contribute to teachers' professional development. Recently, standards-based teacher evaluation has been introduced in many countries to improve teaching practice. This study wants to investigate which teacher evaluation procedural, leadership, and teacher characteristics can stimulate…

  2. How to Activate Teachers through Teacher Evaluation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuytens, Melissa; Devos, Geert

    2014-01-01

    There is a general doubt on whether teacher evaluation can contribute to teachers' professional development. Recently, standards-based teacher evaluation has been introduced in many countries to improve teaching practice. This study wants to investigate which teacher evaluation procedural, leadership, and teacher characteristics can stimulate…

  3. Development of a new HPLC method using fluorescence detection without derivatization for determining purine nucleoside phosphorylase activity in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Patricia; Zuccarini, Mariachiara; Buccella, Silvana; Rossini, Margherita; D'Alimonte, Iolanda; Ciccarelli, Renata; Marzo, Matteo; Marzo, Antonio; Di Iorio, Patrizia; Caciagli, Francesco

    2016-01-15

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) activity is involved in cell survival and function, since PNP is a key enzyme in the purine metabolic pathway where it catalyzes the phosphorolysis of the nucleosides to the corresponding nucleobases. Its dysfunction has been found in relevant pathological conditions (such as inflammation and cancer), so the detection of PNP activity in plasma could represent an attractive marker for early diagnosis or assessment of disease progression. Thus the aim of this study was to develop a simple, fast and sensitive HPLC method for the determination of PNP activity in plasma. The separation was achieved on a Phenomenex Kinetex PFP column using 0.1% formic acid in water and methanol as mobile phases in gradient elution mode at a flow rate of 1ml/min and purine compounds were detected using UV absorption and fluorescence. The analysis was fast since the run was achieved within 13min. This method improved the separation of the different purines, allowing the UV-based quantification of the natural PNP substrates (inosine and guanosine) or products (hypoxanthine and guanine) and its subsequent metabolic products (xanthine and uric acid) with a good precision and accuracy. The most interesting innovation is the simultaneous use of a fluorescence detector (excitation/emission wavelength of 260/375nm) that allowed the quantification of guanosine and guanine without derivatization. Compared with UV, the fluorescence detection improved the sensitivity for guanine detection by about 10-fold and abolished almost completely the baseline noise due to the presence of plasma in the enzymatic reaction mixture. Thus, the validated method allowed an excellent evaluation of PNP activity in plasma which could be useful as an indicator of several pathological conditions. PMID:26720700

  4. Modulation of plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity differentially activates wound and pathogen defense responses in tomato plants.

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, A; Oecking, C

    1999-01-01

    Systemin is an important mediator of wound-induced defense gene activation in tomato plants, and it elicits a rapid alkalinization of the growth medium of cultured Lycopersicon peruvianum cells. A possible mechanistic link between proton fluxes across the plasma membrane and the induction of defense genes was investigated by modulating plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity. Inhibitors of H+-ATPase (erythrosin B, diethyl stilbestrol, and vanadate) were found to alkalinize the growth medium of L. peruvianum cell cultures and to induce wound response genes in whole tomato plants. Conversely, an activator of the H+-ATPase (fusicoccin) acidified the growth medium of L. peruvianum cell cultures and suppressed systemin-induced medium alkalinization. Likewise, in fusicoccin-treated tomato plants, the wound- and systemin-triggered accumulation of wound-responsive mRNAs was found to be suppressed. However, fusicoccin treatment of tomato plants led to the accumulation of salicylic acid and the expression of pathogenesis-related genes. Apparently, the wound and pathogen defense signaling pathways are differentially regulated by changes in the proton electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane. In addition, alkalinization of the L. peruvianum cell culture medium was found to depend on the influx of Ca2+ and the activity of a protein kinase. Reversible protein phosphorylation was also shown to be involved in the induction of wound response genes. The plasma membrane H+-ATPase as a possible target of a Ca2+-activated protein kinase and its role in defense signaling are discussed. PMID:9927643

  5. Effects of high ambient temperature on fish sperm plasma membrane integrity and mitochondrial activity - A flow cytometric study.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Szabolcs Tamás; Kakasi, Balázs; Pál, László; Havasi, Máté; Bercsényi, Miklós; Husvéth, Ferenc

    2016-06-01

    Local extreme climatic conditions occurring as a result of global climate change may interfere with the reproduction of animals. In the present study fish spermatozoa were incubated at different temperatures (20, 25, 30 and 40 °C) for 10 and 30 minutes, respectively and plasma membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential changes were evaluated with flow cytometry using SYBR-14/PI and Mitotracker Deep Red FM fluorescent dyes. No significant differences were found in plasma membrane integrity at either incubation temperatures or time points. Mitotracker Deep Red FM histogram profiles indicating mitochondrial activity showed significant (p < 0.001) alterations in all cases of higher (25, 30 and 40 °C) temperature treatments as compared to the samples incubated at 20 °C. Our results indicate that fish spermatozoa exposed to high temperatures suffer sublethal damage that cannot be detected with conventional, vital staining techniques. PMID:27165524

  6. Surface-confined activation of ultra low-k dielectrics in CO2 plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yiting; Krishtab, Mikhail; Mankelevich, Yuri; Zhang, Liping; De Feyter, Steven; Baklanov, Mikhail; Armini, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    An approach allowing surface-confined activation of porous organosilicate based low-k dielectrics is proposed and studied. By examining the plasma damage mechanism of low-k, we came up with an initial idea that the main requirements for the surface-confined modification would be the high reactivity and high recombination rate of the plasma species. Based on this concept, CO2 plasma was selected and benchmarked with several other plasmas. It is demonstrated that a short exposure of organosilicate low-k films to CO2 plasma enables high surface hydrophilicity with limited bulk modification. CO2+ ions predominantly formed in this plasma have high oxidation potential and efficiently remove surface -CH3 groups from low-k. At the same time, the CO2+ ions get easily discharged (deactivated) during their collisions with pore walls and therefore have very limited probability of penetration into the low-k bulk. Low concentration of oxygen radicals is another factor avoiding the bulk damage. The chemical reactions describing the interactions between CO2 plasma and low-k dielectrics are proposed.

  7. Degradation of triclosan in aqueous solution by dielectric barrier discharge plasma combined with activated carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Xin, Lu; Sun, Yabing; Feng, Jingwei; Wang, Jian; He, Dong

    2016-02-01

    The degradation of triclosan (TCS) in aqueous solution by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma with activated carbon fibers (ACFs) was investigated. In this study, ACFs and DBD plasma coexisted in a planar DBD plasma reactor, which could synchronously achieve degradation of TCS, modification and in situ regeneration of ACFs, enhancing the effect of recycling of ACFs. The properties of ACFs before and after modification by DBD plasma were characterized by BET and XPS. Various processing parameters affecting the synergetic degradation of TCS were also investigated. The results exhibited excellent synergetic effects in DBD plasma-ACFs system on TCS degradation. The degradation efficiency of 120 mL TCS with initial concentration of 10 mg L(-1) could reach 93% with 1 mm thick ACFs in 18 min at input power of 80 W, compared with 85% by single DBD plasma. Meanwhile, the removal rate of total organic carbon increased from 12% at pH 6.26-24% at pH 3.50. ACFs could ameliorate the degradation efficiency for planar DBD plasma when treating TCS solution at high flow rates or at low initial concentrations. A possible degradation pathway of TCS was investigated according to the detected intermediates, which were identified by liquid chromatography-hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) combined with theoretical calculation of Gaussian 09 program. PMID:26421625

  8. Evaluation of Ash Toxicity Generated From the Thermal Plasma Pyrolysis of Used Automobile Tires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J. S.; Novog, D. R.; Jamal, S.

    1996-10-01

    The disposal of used tires represents a severe environmental problem. As the heat content of the rubber tires is even higher than that of coal it should be considered as a future source of alternate fuel for power generation. There have been attempts to burn old tires directly in cofired boilers for production of electricity. However, there are several environmental concerns since the combustion flue gas may contain a significant concentration heavy metals (Fe, Zn, Cd, As, etc.). One technique currently being developed is the pyrolyzation of rubber tires by a thermal plasma to produce combustible gases. In this work, ashes generated during the plasma pyrolysis of used automobile tires using a DC Argon thermal plasma were analyzed using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) and produced syngas composition was analyzed by FT-IR.. The gas analysis indicates a significant quantity of combustible gases (CH4, C2H2, C2H4, CO, H2 etc..) was produced from the thermal plasma pyrolysis of used tires. The results also indicate that a majority of the heavy metals present in used tires were concentrated in the ashes deposited in reaction chamber wall and in the two-stage filtering system. Furthermore the heavy metal concentration decreases significantly with increasing distance from the plasma torch. Toxic components such as Zn, As and Cl were also collected in the filtering process.

  9. Improving mechanical properties of polyethylene orthopaedic implants by high frequency cold plasma surface activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudoran, Cristian D.; Vlad, Iulia E.; Dadarlat, Dorin N.; Anghel, Sorin D.

    2013-11-01

    Although a tremendous progress has been made in developing new methods and materials for manufacturing orthopaedic implants, the new technology still faces various problems. Polyethylene implants are relatively easy to manufacture and at lower cost compared to metallic or ceramic implants, but they present a fundamental problem: during usage and in time, due to their manufacturing technology, the material suffers from pitting and delamination which leads to crack propagation and finally to sudden fracture. Our studies and tests performed on polyethylene showed that, using cold plasma surface activation during the manufacturing process of the orthopaedic implants made from polyethylene can significantly increase their mechanical properties. The breaking tests revealed an increase of the tensile strength in the laminated polyethylene samples by a factor of 4 after plasma activation. "Aging" tests have been also performed to investigate how the cold plasma treated samples maintain their properties in time, after the surface activation process.

  10. Evaluation and Optimization of Electrode Configuration of Multi-Channel Corona Discharge Plasma for Dye-Containing Wastewater Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jingyu; Wang, Tiecheng; Qu, Guangzhou; Liang, Dongli; Hu, Shibin

    2015-12-01

    A discharge plasma reactor with a point-to-plane structure was widely studied experimentally in wastewater treatment. In order to improve the utilization efficiency of active species and the energy efficiency of this kind of discharge plasma reactor during wastewater treatment, the electrode configuration of the point-to-plane corona discharge reactor was studied by evaluating the effects of discharge spacing and adjacent point distance on discharge power and discharge energy density, and then dye-containing wastewater decoloration experiments were conducted on the basis of the optimum electrode configuration. The experimental results of the discharge characteristics showed that high discharge power and discharge energy density were achieved when the ratio of discharge spacing to adjacent point distance (d/s) was 0.5. Reactive Brilliant Blue (RBB) wastewater treatment experiments presented that the highest RBB decoloration efficiency was observed at d/s of 0.5, which was consistent with the result obtained in the discharge characteristics experiments. In addition, the biodegradability of RBB wastewater was enhanced greatly after discharge plasma treatment under the optimum electrode configuration. RBB degradation processes were analyzed by GC-MS and IC, and the possible mechanism for RBB decoloration was also discussed. supported by China's Postdoctoral Science Foundation (No. 2014M562460), the Initiative Funding Programs for Doctoral Research of Northwest A&F University (No. 2013BSJJ121), and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 21107085)