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Sample records for evaluate subjective impression

  1. Wettability changes in polyether impression materials subjected to immersion disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Shweta; Kamat, Giridhar; Shetty, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Disinfection of impression materials prevents cross-contamination; however, the disinfectants may alter the wettability property. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the wettability changes of polyether impression material after immersing in four different chemical disinfectant solutions for a period of 10 min and 30 min, respectively. Materials and Methods: A total of 45 samples of polyether dental impression material (Impregum soft, 3MESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) were randomly divided into nine groups with five specimens each. Each specimen was disc shaped, flat of 32 mm diameter and 3 mm thickness. The samples were immersed in four disinfectant solutions: 2% Glutaraldehyde, 5% sodium hypochlorite, 0.05% iodophor, and 5.25% phenol for 10 min and 30 min, respectively. The control was without disinfection. Wettability of the samples was assessed by measuring the contact angle by using the Telescopic Goniometer. Data were subjected to analysis of variance (Fisher's test) and Tukey's post hoc test for multiple comparisons at 5% level of significance. Results: The contact angle of 20.21° ± 0.22° were recorded in the control samples. After 10 min, the samples that were immersed in 5% sodium hypochlorite and 5.25% phenol showed significant statistical increase in the contact angle as compared to the control (P < 0.001). After 30 min of disinfection, only the samples immersed in 0.05% iodophor showed there were no significant changes in the contact angle, whereas the other disinfectants significantly increased the contact angle and decreased the wettability of the polyether material. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study, 2% glutaraldehyde proved safe for 10 min of immersion disinfection while 0.05% iodophor holds promise as an effective disinfectant without affecting the wettability of the material. PMID:24130593

  2. Evaluation of dimensional stability of autoclavable elastomeric impression material.

    PubMed

    Surendra, G P; Anjum, Ayesha; Satish Babu, C L; Shetty, Shilpa

    2011-03-01

    Impressions are important sources of cross contamination between patients and dental laboratories. As a part of infection control impressions contaminated with variety of micro-organisms via blood and oral secretions should be cleaned and disinfected or sterilized before being handled in dental laboratory. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of autoclaving on dimensional stability of elastomeric impression material (polyvinyl siloxane-Affinis). In this in vitro study standardized stainless steel die as per ADA specification number 19 was fabricated. Polyvinyl siloxane (Affinis) light body and putty viscosity elastomeric impression materials were used. A total of 40 impressions of the stainless steel die were made and numeric coding system was used to identify the samples. Measurements were made using a measuring microscope. Distance between the cross lines CD and C'D' reproduced in the impression were measured before autoclaving, immediately after autoclaving and 24 hours after autoclaving and dimensional change was calculated. The data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis. The mean difference in dimensional change between the three groups was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). However the results revealed that there was higher mean dimensional change immediately after autoclaving when compared to the other 2 time intervals. It is desirable to delay the casting of an autoclavable elastomeric impression material by about 24 hours. Though disinfection of impression is routinely followed autoclaving of impression is an effective method of sterilization. PMID:22379308

  3. Electronic evaluation for video commercials by impression index.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wanzeng; Zhao, Xinxin; Hu, Sanqing; Vecchiato, Giovanni; Babiloni, Fabio

    2013-12-01

    How to evaluate the effect of commercials is significantly important in neuromarketing. In this paper, we proposed an electronic way to evaluate the influence of video commercials on consumers by impression index. The impression index combines both the memorization and attention index during consumers observing video commercials by tracking the EEG activity. It extracts features from scalp EEG to evaluate the effectiveness of video commercials in terms of time-frequency-space domain. And, the general global field power was used as an impression index for evaluation of video commercial scenes as time series. Results of experiment demonstrate that the proposed approach is able to track variations of the cerebral activity related to cognitive task such as observing video commercials, and help to judge whether the scene in video commercials is impressive or not by EEG signals. PMID:24427225

  4. A Comparative Evaluation of the Linear Dimensional Accuracy of Four Impression Techniques using Polyether Impression Material.

    PubMed

    Manoj, Smita Sara; Cherian, K P; Chitre, Vidya; Aras, Meena

    2013-12-01

    There is much discussion in the dental literature regarding the superiority of one impression technique over the other using addition silicone impression material. However, there is inadequate information available on the accuracy of different impression techniques using polyether. The purpose of this study was to assess the linear dimensional accuracy of four impression techniques using polyether on a laboratory model that simulates clinical practice. The impression material used was Impregum Soft™, 3 M ESPE and the four impression techniques used were (1) Monophase impression technique using medium body impression material. (2) One step double mix impression technique using heavy body and light body impression materials simultaneously. (3) Two step double mix impression technique using a cellophane spacer (heavy body material used as a preliminary impression to create a wash space with a cellophane spacer, followed by the use of light body material). (4) Matrix impression using a matrix of polyether occlusal registration material. The matrix is loaded with heavy body material followed by a pick-up impression in medium body material. For each technique, thirty impressions were made of a stainless steel master model that contained three complete crown abutment preparations, which were used as the positive control. Accuracy was assessed by measuring eight dimensions (mesiodistal, faciolingual and inter-abutment) on stone dies poured from impressions of the master model. A two-tailed t test was carried out to test the significance in difference of the distances between the master model and the stone models. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for multiple group comparison followed by the Bonferroni's test for pair wise comparison. The accuracy was tested at α = 0.05. In general, polyether impression material produced stone dies that were smaller except for the dies produced from the one step double mix impression technique. The ANOVA revealed a highly

  5. Digitization of dental alginate impression: Three-dimensional evaluation of point cloud.

    PubMed

    Kim, So-Ri; Lee, Wan-Sun; Kim, Woong-Chul; Kim, Hea-Young; Kim, Ji-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the digitization of alginate impressions by analyzing differences between the scan data of two types of impressions (alginate and rubber) taken from the master die and the scan data for the master die. The master die and impressions were digitized using a dental laser scanner (7 series, Dental Wings, Montreal, Canada). The crown portion of the abutment teeth in the digital data of 20 impressions was divided into three regions: cervical surface, middle surface, and occlusal surface. An independent t-test showed a significant difference (p<0.05) in the mean difference for each experimental group (alginate and rubber). One-way ANOVA and Tukey's honest significant difference test revealed a significant difference (p<0.05) among the three regions in the rubber impression. The results of this study also carefully suggest the possibility of digitization of alginate impressions in the future. PMID:26632232

  6. Clinical Evaluation of Different Pre-impression Preparation Procedures of Dental Arch

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Nitin; Arora, Monika; Gupta, Naveen; Agarwal, Manisha; Verma, Rohit; Rathod, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bubbles and voids on the occlusal surface impede the actual intercuspation and pre-impression preparation aims to reduce the incidence of air bubbles and voids as well as influences the quality of occlusal reproduction and actual clinical intercuspation in the articulator. The study was undertaken to determine the influence of different pre-impression preparation procedures of antagonistic dental arch on the quality of the occlusal reproduction of the teeth in irreversible hydrocolloid impressions and to determine most reliable pre-impression preparation method to reduce the incidence of air bubbles. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 subjects were selected having full complement of mandibular teeth from second molar to second molar with well demarcated cusp height. 200 impressions were made with irreversible hydrocolloid material. The impressions were divided into five groups of 40 impressions each and each group had one specific type of pre-impression preparation. All the impressions were poured in die stone. A stereomicroscope with graduated eyepiece was used to count the number of bubbles on the occlusal surface of premolars and molars. The mean and standard deviations were calculated for each group. Mann–Whitney U-test was applied to find the significant difference between different groups. Results: Least bubbles were found in the group in which oral cavity was dried by saliva ejector and fluid hydrocolloid was finger painted onto the occlusal surfaces immediately before the placement of impression tray in the mouth. Conclusion: It was found that finger painting the tooth surfaces with fluid hydrocolloid immediately before the placement of loaded impression tray in the mouth was the most reliable method. The oral cavity can be cleared more easily of excess saliva by vacuum suction rather than by use of an astringent solution. PMID:26229376

  7. Evaluation of properties of irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials mixed with disinfectant liquids

    PubMed Central

    Amalan, Arul; Ginjupalli, Kishore; Upadhya, Nagaraja

    2013-01-01

    Background: Addition of disinfectant to irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials can eliminate the disinfection step to avoid dimensional changes associated with it. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of various disinfectant mixing liquids on the properties of commercially available irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials. Materials and Methods: Four commercially available irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials (Zelgan, Vignette, Tropicalgin, and Algitex) were mixed with disinfectant liquid containing chlorhexidine (0.1 and 0.2%) and sodium hypochlorite (0.1 and 0.5%). After mixing with disinfectant liquids, materials were evaluated for pH changes during gelation, gelation time, flow, gel strength, permanent deformation and detail reproduction. Results: Significant changes in gelation time were observed in irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials upon mixing with disinfectant liquids. In general, chlorhexidine increased the gelation time, whereas sodium hypochlorite reduced it. However, no significant changes in the flow were observed both with chlorhexidine and sodium hypochlorite. Gel strength was found to decrease when mixed with chlorhexidine, whereas an increase in gel strength was observed upon mixing with sodium hypochlorite. Permanent deformation of the most irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials was below the specification limit even after mixing with disinfectant liquids. Sodium hypochlorite significantly reduced the surface detail reproduction, whereas no change in detail reproduction was observed with chlorhexidine. Conclusion: Chlorhexidine solution can be used to mix irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials in regular dental practice as it did not significantly alter the properties. This may ensure effective disinfection of impressions. PMID:23878566

  8. First Impressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coen, Frank

    1969-01-01

    The unreliability of first impressions and subjective judgments is the subject of both Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" and Lionel Trilling's "Of This Time, Of That Place"; consequently, the works are worthwhile parallel studies for high school students. Austen, by means of irony and subtle characterization, dramatizes the need for constant…

  9. Evaluation of the Effect of Ultraviolet Disinfection on Dimensional Stability of the Polyvinyl Silioxane Impressions.” an in-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Godbole, Surekha R; Dahane, Trupti M; Nimonkar, Sharayu V

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Infection control is an important concept in the present day practice of dentistry. The prosthodontists are at an added risk of transmission because of the infection spreading through the contaminated lab equipments while working in the lab. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of UV light disinfection on dimensional stability of polyvinyl siloxane impressions. Materials and Methods : Impressions were made in perforated custom tray. After polymerization of impression, half the samples were disinfected in UV light and remaining samples were not subjected to disinfection and poured in die stone which served as control group. Linear dimensions were measured on the cast with travelling microscope of 0.001accuracy. Result : The result showed that UV light disinfectant showed no significant dimensional changes on impressions. Conclusion: Hence, it can be safely used to disinfect impressions in clinical prosthodontic procedures. PMID:25386528

  10. Method and apparatus for non-destructive evaluation of composite materials with cloth surface impressions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madras, Eric I. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method and related apparatus for nondestructive evaluation of composite materials by determination of the quantity known as Integrated Polar Backscatter, which avoids errors caused by surface texture left by cloth impressions by identifying frequency ranges associated with peaks in a power spectrum for the backscattered signal, and removing such frequency ranges from the calculation of Integrated Polar Backscatter for all scan sites on the composite material is presented.

  11. Accuracy of 3D white light scanning of abutment teeth impressions: evaluation of trueness and precision

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jin-Hun; Kim, Hae-Young; Kim, Ji-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of digitizing dental impressions of abutment teeth using a white light scanner and to compare the findings among teeth types. MATERIALS AND METHODS To assess precision, impressions of the canine, premolar, and molar prepared to receive all-ceramic crowns were repeatedly scanned to obtain five sets of 3-D data (STL files). Point clouds were compared and error sizes were measured (n=10 per type). Next, to evaluate trueness, impressions of teeth were rotated by 10°-20° and scanned. The obtained data were compared with the first set of data for precision assessment, and the error sizes were measured (n=5 per type). The Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to evaluate precision and trueness among three teeth types, and post-hoc comparisons were performed using the Mann-Whitney U test with Bonferroni correction (α=.05). RESULTS Precision discrepancies for the canine, premolar, and molar were 3.7 µm, 3.2 µm, and 7.3 µm, respectively, indicating the poorest precision for the molar (P<.001). Trueness discrepancies for teeth types were 6.2 µm, 11.2 µm, and 21.8 µm, respectively, indicating the poorest trueness for the molar (P=.007). CONCLUSION In respect to accuracy the molar showed the largest discrepancies compared with the canine and premolar. Digitizing of dental impressions of abutment teeth using a white light scanner was assessed to be a highly accurate method and provided discrepancy values in a clinically acceptable range. Further study is needed to improve digitizing performance of white light scanning in axial wall. PMID:25551007

  12. Impression Evaluation and Eye Movement Related to The Characteristic Expression as Elements in Abstract Paintings: Mondrian, Malewitsch and Rothko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Kiyomi

    This paper has the purpose to inspect differences regarding impression evaluation and eye movement by comparing characteristic expression as elements in abstract paintings. Malewitsch's paintings which emphasize oblique lines and inclined rectangles elicited impression evaluations such as “hard”, “irritable”, “dynamic” and “exciting”. Mondrian's paintings which emphasize vertical and horizontal line elicited impression evaluations such as “cheerful” and “light”. Rothko's paintings which are obscure outlines elicited impression evaluations such as “mild”, “comfortable”, “relaxing”, “static” and “tedious”. Paintings that have clear vertical and horizontal lines elicit a trend toward higher mean line-of-sight velocity. Paintings that have many distinctive expression elements elicit large frequency of long gaze point. This study indicates that vertical lines, horizontal lines, oblique lines, obscure outlines, and other expression elements in abstract paintings are influencing factors for impression evaluation and eye movement. This suggests that mutual interactions of components that constitute paintings cannot be disregarded. This study is inspection of common impression and perception caused by appreciation of paintings.

  13. A Comparative Evaluation of the Dimensional Stability of Three Different Elastomeric Impression Materials after Autoclaving – An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Thota, Kiran Kumar; Ravuri, Rajyalakshmi; Tella, Suchita

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the Study: The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of autoclaving on the dimensional stability of three different elastomeric impression materials at three different time intervals. Materials and Methods: Standardized stainless steel master die as per ADA specification number 19 was fabricated. The impression materials used for the study were condensation silicone (GP1), addition silicone (GP2) and polyether (GP3). A total of 45 samples of the stainless steel die were made (n = 45), that is 15 samples for each group. Impression materials were mixed according to the manufacturer’s instructions and were loaded into the mold to make an impression of the die. Impressions were identified with the help of numerical coding system and measurements were made using stereomicroscope (MAGNUS MSZ-Bi) of 0.65x magnification with the help of image analysis software (IMACE PRO-INSIGHT VERSION.The results were subjected to statistical analysis using one way analysis of variance and student t-test for comparison between the groups. Results: Within the limitations of the study statistically significant dimensional changes were observed for all the three impression materials at three different time intervals but this change was not clinically significant. Conclusion: It is well-known fact that all impressions should be disinfected to avoid possible transmission of infectious diseases either by direct contact or cross contamination. Immersion and spray disinfection as well as various disinfection solutions have been tested and proven to be effective for this purpose. But for elastomeric impression materials these methods have proven to be ineffective as they do not prevent cross contamination among the dental team. So autoclaving was one of the most effective sterilization procedure for condensation silicone and addition silicone. Since polyether is hydrophilic it is better to disinfect the impressions as recommended by the manufacturer or by immersion or spray

  14. Evaluation of oral scanning in comparison to impression using three-dimensional registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogle-Kim, Yur-Chung; Deyhle, Hans; Müller, Bert; Schulz, Georg; Bormann, Therese; Beckmann, Felix; Jäger, Kurt

    2012-10-01

    Crown and bridge restorations are one of the main treatment methods in fixed prosthodontics. The fabrication requires data on the patient's denture shape. This information is generally obtained as a hard copy from an impression mold. Alternatively, one can acquire the data electronically using oral optical three-dimensional (3D) imaging techniques, which determine the surface of the denture. The aim of the study was to quantitatively compare the accuracy of three dimensional scanning with that of conventional impressions and give a statement how far the scanner provides a clinical alternative with equal or better precision. Data from 10 teeth were acquired in the dental office with a polyether impression material and an oral scanner. Data from the impressions were digitalized by means of micro computed tomography. The data were then 3D registered to identify the potential differences between impression and optical scan. We could demonstrate that the oral scanner's data and the conventional impressions are comparable.

  15. Effects of accessibility and subjective relevance on the use of piecemeal and category information in impression formation.

    PubMed

    Köpetz, Catalina; Kruglanski, Arie W

    2008-05-01

    Three studies investigated the process by which categorical and individuating information impacts impression formation. The authors assumed that (a) both types of information are functionally equivalent in serving as evidence for interpersonal judgments and (b) their use is determined by their accessibility and perceived applicability to the impression's target. The first study constituted an extended replication of Pavelchak's experiment, and it showed that its results, initially interpreted to suggest the primacy in impression formation of category over trait information, may have been prompted by differential accessibility of the category versus trait information in some experimental conditions of the original research. Studies 2 and 3 additionally explored the role of informational accessibility manipulated in different ways. Study 3 demonstrated also that the effect of accessibility is qualified by the information's apparent relevance to the judgmental target. PMID:18308925

  16. Impression Management in the Ethical Self-Presentation of Offenders Undergoing Presentence Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Terrill R.; Boik, Robert J.

    1978-01-01

    Ethical choices were assessed for offenders instructed to produce favorable versus unfavorable impressions. Pronounced impression management effects were obtained for prosocial and antisocial responses, and high scores on a dimension of change defined by these variables were related to sociopathic features on the MMPI. (Author)

  17. Evaluation of accuracy of casts of multiple internal connection implant prosthesis obtained from different impression materials and techniques: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Pujari, Malesh; Garg, Pooja; Prithviraj, D R

    2014-04-01

    Movement of impression copings inside the impression material using a direct (open tray) impression technique during clinical and laboratory phases may cause inaccuracy in transferring the 3-dimensional spatial orientation of implants intraorally to the cast. Consequently, the prosthesis may require corrective procedures. This in vitro study evaluated the accuracy of 3 different impression techniques using polyether and vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) impression material to obtain a precise cast for multiple internal connection implants. A reference acrylic resin model with 4 internal connection implants was fabricated. Impressions of the reference model were made using 3 different techniques and 2 different impression materials. The study consisted of 24 specimens divided into 6 groups of 4 each. Impressions were poured with ADA type IV stone (Kalrock, Kalabhai Karson Pvt Ltd, Mumbai, India). All casts were evaluated for the positional accuracy (mm) of the implant replica heads using a profile projector. These measurements were compared to the measurements calculated on the reference resin model, which served as a control. Data were analyzed with 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Bonferroni multiple comparison procedures to evaluate group means. The results revealed significant difference for anterior implant distance between the 2 impression materials (P < .01) and also among the 3 different techniques (P < .05). The lowest mean variation was found with the polyether impression material and the splinted technique. For posterior implants, the results suggested no significant difference between the 2 impression materials (P ≥ .05). Although results were not statistically significant, the polyether impression material showed the lowest mean variation as compared to the VPS impression material. However, there was a significant difference among the 3 different techniques (P < .05). Among the 3 different techniques, the lowest mean variation between 2 posterior

  18. Good Impressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Geraldine; Pulsifer, Mary

    1986-01-01

    An art activity featuring ballerinas in classic poses and costumes was extended by a visit to an exhibit on Edgar Degas. Hearing impaired students shared their impressions of another traveling exhibit with French students via computers. (CL)

  19. Conjunctival impression cytology versus routine tear function tests for dry eye evaluation in contact lens wearers

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prachi; Bhargava, Rahul; Arora, Yogesh C.; Kaushal, Sidharth; Kumar, Manjushri

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Prolonged contact lens wear is often accompanied by dryness of the eyes. The aim of this study was to compare conjunctival impression cytology (CIC) and tear film tests such as tear film break up time (TBUT) and Schirmer test for dry eye evaluation in contact lens wearers and measure their correlation with dry eye symptoms. Setting: A case control study was done at three referral eye centers. Materials and Methods: The eyes of 230 contact lens users were compared to 250 eyes of age- and sex-matched controls. Participants were recruited based on their response to a questionnaire of dry eye symptoms, (Dry Eye Scoring System, DESS©) and measurements of TBUT, Schirmer test, and CIC was done. A correlation analysis between symptom severity and tear film tests was performed. Pearson's coefficient, R2 > 0.5 was considered significant. Results: As compared to controls (r2 = 0.010), Nelson grade correlated significantly with dry eye symptoms (r2 = 0.765), among cases. However, there was moderate correlation between dry eye symptoms, Schirmer test, and TBUT (r2 = 0.557 and 0.530, respectively) among cases and a weak correlation among controls (r2 = 0.130 and 0.054, respectively). The sensitivity of TBUT was 86.4%, specificity was 82.4%, positive likelihood ratio (LR) was 4.50 [95% confidence interval (CI) 3.46-5.85)], and negative LR was 0.09. The sensitivity of the Schirmer test was 48.2%, specificity 88%, LR 2.12 (95% CI 1.48-2.96), and negative LR 0.83. Conclusion: CIC correlates better than Schirmer and TBUT with dry eye symptoms. It may be the most appropriate test for dry-eye evaluation in contact lens wearers. PMID:26811575

  20. Good appearance of food gives an appetizing impression and increases cerebral blood flow of frontal pole in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Ken Ichiro; Amitani, Haruka; Adachi, Ryo; Morimoto, Toshiki; Kido, Megumi; Taruno, Yuka; Ogata, Keizaburo; Amitani, Marie; Asakawa, Akihiro; Inui, Akio

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of food appearance on appetite and on left-frontal pole blood flow in healthy young subjects. The iEat, a new form of foods with good appearance and greater softness was hypothesized to have the better effects to the subjects than blender-processed foods. The effect on appetite and left-frontal pole blood flow using hemoencephalography was assessed while participants were viewing the slideshows of two kinds of foods respectively. The slideshows were used to control the showing time and other variables. The pictures of iEat foods stimulated both of them more than the blender-processed ones. The measurement of cerebral blood flow could be a useful method to monitor the cognitive and emotional aspects of feeding behavior that are important for humans. Like iEat, the foods that look as good as ordinary food yet are softer can be used for people with poor appetite and eating difficulties to ordinary food. PMID:26653329

  1. Evaluation of shrinkage polymerization and temperature of different acrylic resins used to splinting transfer copings in indirect impression technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Ana Paula G. O.; Karam, Leandro Z.; Galvão, José R.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was evaluate the shrinkage polymerization and temperature of different acrylic resins used to splinting transfer copings in indirect impression technique. Two implants were placed in an artificial bone, with the two transfer copings joined with dental floss and acrylic resins; two dental resins are used. Measurements of deformation and temperature were performed with Fiber Braggs grating sensor for 17 minutes. The results revealed that one type of resin shows greater values of polymerization shrinkage than the other. Pattern resins did not present lower values of shrinkage, as usually reported by the manufacturer.

  2. Dinosaur Impressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taquet, Philippe

    1998-09-01

    Perhaps you are a paleontologist or have always wondered what it is like to be one. Or you are fascinated by fossils and like to read about the origins and natural history of dinosaurs. Or maybe you are an avid traveler and reader of travelogues. If you are any of these things, then this book is for you. Originally published in 1994 in French, Dinosaur Impressions is the engaging account of thirty years of travel and paleontological exploration by Philippe Taquet, one of the world's most noted paleontologists. Dr. Taquet takes the reader on a surprisingly far-flung tour ranging from the Provence countryside to the Niger desert, from the Brazilian bush to the Mongolian Steppes, and from the Laos jungle to the Moroccan mountains in search of dinosaur bones and what they have to tell us about a vanished world. With wry humor and lively anecdotes, Dr. Taquet retraces the history of paleontological research, along the way discussing the latest theories of dinosaur existence and extinction. Elegantly translated by Kevin Padian, Dinosaur Impressions provides a unique, thoughtful perspective not often encountered in American- and English-language works. This insightful, first-hand account of an exceptional career is also a travelogue par excellence that will enthrall enthusiasts and general readers alike. Philippe Taquet is the Director of the National Museum of Natural History in Paris and is a member of the French Academy of Sciences. Kevin Padian is a professor in the Department of Integrative Biology and Curator of the Museum of Paleontology at the University of California, Berkeley. He is also the editor of The Beginning of the Age of Dinosaurs (Cambridge, 1986) and The Encyclopedia of Dinosaurs (1997).

  3. Ventral medial prefrontal cortex and person evaluation: forming impressions of others varying in financial and moral status.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Jasmin; Gyurovski, Ivo

    2014-10-15

    The current study investigated ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) activity during impression formation of individuals varying on distinct dimensions of social status. In a block-design functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment, participants were presented with photographs of faces paired with a colored background indicating their lower, same, or higher financial status, or lower, same, or higher moral status. Participants were asked to form an impression of the targets, but were not instructed to explicitly evaluate them based on social status. Building on previous findings (Cloutier, Ambady, Meagher, & Gabrieli, 2012), a region of interest analysis revealed the interaction of status dimension and level in VMPFC, finding not only preferential response to targets with higher compared to lower moral status as previously demonstrated, but also greater response to targets with lower compared to higher financial status. The implications of these results are discussed with an emphasis towards better understanding the impact of social status on social cognition and uncovering the neural substrates of person evaluation. PMID:24936688

  4. Subjective Evaluation Of A Perceptual Quality Metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Charles F.

    1981-12-01

    A major problem which has plagued image processing has been the lack of an effective image quality measure. It is well known that common measures which are mathematical and analytically tractable do not correlate with human subjective evaluation. This paper presents the results of a subjective evaluation on twelve versions of a black and white image (the SPIE GIRL) and the rank ordering obtained with three computational measures. It was found that a measure based on a model of the human visual system compared to the subjective evaluation with a correlation of .92.

  5. Evaluation of digital dental models obtained from dental cone-beam computed tomography scan of alginate impressions

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tingting; Lee, Sang-Mi; Hou, Yanan; Chang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the dimensional accuracy of digital dental models obtained from the dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan of alginate impressions according to the time elapse when the impressions are stored under ambient conditions. Methods Alginate impressions were obtained from 20 adults using 3 different alginate materials, 2 traditional alginate materials (Alginoplast and Cavex Impressional) and 1 extended-pour alginate material (Cavex ColorChange). The impressions were stored under ambient conditions, and scanned by CBCT immediately after the impressions were taken, and then at 1 hour intervals for 6 hours. After reconstructing three-dimensional digital dental models, the models were measured and the data were analyzed to determine dimensional changes according to the elapsed time. The changes within the measurement error were regarded as clinically acceptable in this study. Results All measurements showed a decreasing tendency with an increase in the elapsed time after the impressions. Although the extended-pour alginate exhibited a less decreasing tendency than the other 2 materials, there were no statistically significant differences between the materials. Changes above the measurement error occurred between the time points of 3 and 4 hours after the impressions. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that digital dental models can be obtained simply from a CBCT scan of alginate impressions without sending them to a remote laboratory. However, when the impressions are not stored under special conditions, they should be scanned immediately, or at least within 2 to 3 hours after the impressions are taken. PMID:27226958

  6. Comparison of two impression techniques for auricular prosthesis: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Kasim; Mani, U M; Seenivasan, M K; Vaidhyanathan, A K; Veeravalli, P T

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to compare the accuracy of a new impression technique, the triple-layer impression technique (TLIT), with the conventional impression technique (CIT) to fabricate an auricular prosthesis. Fifteen male subjects (aged 22-45 yr) were selected. Ten markings were made on the subject's ear (super aurale [sa], sub aurale [sba], pre aurale [pra], post aurale [poa], A, A1, B, B1, C, and C1) and five measurements (sa-sba, pra-poa, A-A1, B-B1, and C-C1) were made. Custom-made trays were used to record impression in CIT and TLIT. Impressions were made using alginate, and models were cast with type IV gypsum product. Markings were transferred on the cast. Measurements were rechecked on the models. Distribution analysis of difference in measurements between the two impression techniques and the subject's actual values was evaluated. Sign test was used to analyze the statistical significance. Statistically significant differences were found in measurements A-A1, B-B1, and C-C1 between the two techniques when compared with the subject's actual dimensions (p < 0.01). TLIT was found to produce accurate models when compared with CIT. The TLIT used in the study was cost effective, less technique sensitive, and tailor made to reduce chairside orientation time during wax try-in appointments for rehabilitating patients, especially those with unilateral auricular defects. PMID:24458893

  7. Comparative evaluation of dimensional accuracy of different polyvinyl siloxane putty-wash impression techniques-in vitro study.

    PubMed Central

    Dugal, Ramandeep; Railkar, Bhargavi; Musani, Smita

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dimensional accuracy when making impressions is crucial to the quality of fixed prosthodontic treatment, and the impression technique is a critical factor affecting this accuracy. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the dimensional accuracy of the casts obtained from one step double mix, two step double mix polyvinyl siloxane putty- wash impression techniques using three different spacer thicknesses (0.5mm, 1mm and 1.5mm), in order to determine the impression technique that displays the maximum linear dimensional accuracy. Materials & Methods: A Mild steel model with 2 abutment preparations was fabricated, and impressions were made 15 times with each technique. All impressions were made with an addition-reaction silicone impression material (Express, 3M ESPE) and customarily made perforated metal trays. The 1-step putty/light-body impressions were made with simultaneous use of putty and light-body materials. The 2-step putty/light-body impressions were made with 0.5-mm, 1mm and 1.5mm-thick metal-prefabricated spacer caps. The accuracy of the 4 different impression techniques was assessed by measuring 7 dimensions (intra- and inter abutment) (20-μm accuracy) on stone casts poured from the impressions of the mild steel model. The data were analyzed by one sample‘t’ test. Results: The stone dies obtained with all the techniques had significantly larger or smaller dimensions as compared to those of the mild steel model (P<0.05). The order for highest to lowest deviation from the mild steel model was: single step putty/light body, 2-step putty/light body with 0.5mm spacer thickness, 2-step putty/light body1.5mm spacer thickness, and 2-step putty/light body with 1mm spacer thickness. Significant differences among all of the groups for both absolute dimensions of the stone dies, and their standard deviations from the master model (P<0.05), were noted. Conclusions: The 2-step putty/light-body impression technique with 1mm spacer thickness was

  8. Can we undo our first impressions?: The role of reinterpretation in reversing implicit evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Thomas C.; Ferguson, Melissa J.

    2015-01-01

    Little work has examined whether implicit evaluations can be effectively “undone” after learning new revelations. Across 7 experiments, participants fully reversed their implicit evaluation of a novel target person after reinterpreting earlier information. Revision occurred across multiple implicit evaluation measures (Experiments 1a and 1b), and only when the new information prompted a reinterpretation of prior learning versus did not (Experiment 2). The updating required active consideration of the information, as it emerged only with at least moderate cognitive resources (Experiment 3). Self-reported reinterpretation predicted (Experiment 4) and mediated (Experiment 5) revised implicit evaluations beyond the separate influence of how thoughtfully participants considered the new information in general. Finally, the revised evaluations were durable three days later (Experiment 6). We discuss how these results inform existing theoretical models, and consider implications for future research. PMID:25798625

  9. Teaching Effectiveness, Impression Management, and Dysfunctional Behavior: Student Evaluation of Teaching Control Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crumbley, D. Larry; Reichelt, Kenneth J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Student evaluation of teaching (SET) questionnaires are used in many countries, although much current research questions the validity of these surveys. US research indicates that more than 90 percent of academic accounting departments use this performance measurement. This paper aims to focus on the validity of SET data.…

  10. A Sensitive Measurement for Estimating Impressions of Image-Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Mie; Matouge, Shingo; Mori, Toshifumi; Suzuki, Noboru; Kasuga, Masao

    We have investigated Kansei Content that appeals maker's intention to viewer's kansei. An SD method is a very good way to evaluate subjective impression of image-contents. However, because the SD method is performed after subjects view the image-contents, it is difficult to examine impression of detailed scenes of the image-contents in real time. To measure viewer's impression of the image-contents in real time, we have developed a Taikan sensor. With the Taikan sensor, we investigate relations among the image-contents, the grip strength and the body temperature. We also explore the interface of the Taikan sensor to use it easily. In our experiment, a horror movie is used that largely affects emotion of the subjects. Our results show that there is a possibility that the grip strength increases when the subjects view a strained scene and that it is easy to use the Taikan sensor without its circle base that is originally installed.

  11. Use of Clinical UV Chamber to Disinfect Dental Impressions: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sakshi; Kumar, Varun; Gupta, Neelu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Dental impressions are potential source of infection in a prosthodontic practice. Risk of transmission of infection through saliva, blood etc is considered as hazard for both dentist as well as dental auxiliary staff. A number of methods are currently employed for disinfecting the impressions which are technique sensitive and time consuming. This study focuses on disinfecting impression using dental UV chamber which is commonly employed for storing sterilized instruments. Aim The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate the use of clinical UV chamber to disinfect various impression materials at different time intervals and its comparison with 2% glutaraldehyde using standard immersion technique. Materials and Methods Total sample size of 180 specimens was taken from three different impression materials. The impressions were made from 30 dentulous subjects. A total of ten impressions were made for each impression material i.e. alginate, addition silicone and polyether impression material. Six punch samples were taken from each impression. Out of 6 punch sample, one was kept as control, second was disinfected by immersing in freshly prepared 2% glutaraldehyde solution for 10 minutes and remaining four were exposed to UV rays for 3 minutes, 6 minutes, 10 minutes and 15 minutes using dental UV chamber. Amount of disinfection achieved was evaluated by counting the colonies over the culture plates with the help of digital colony. Results The results showed that the mean CFUs for alginate were found to be i.e. 11797.40 ± 5989.73 (mean ± SD). The mean CFUs for addition silicone impression material was found 7095.40 with a standard deviation of 4268.83 and the mean CFUs for polyether impression material was found to be 2168.92 ± 1676 (mean ± SD). Conclusion For alginate and addition silicone impression material, disinfection was achieved on exposure to UV rays for a period of 10 minutes. However, for polyether impression material 3 minutes of exposure to

  12. [EVALUATION OF CHANGES OF GEOMETRICAL PARAMETERS OF ALGINATE DENTAL IMPRESSIONS DUE TO THE INFLUENCE OF CHEMICAL AND MICROWAVE DISINFECTION METHOD USING 3D TECHNOLOGIES].

    PubMed

    Nespraydko, V P; Shevchuk, V A; Michaylov, A A; Lyseyko, N V

    2015-01-01

    This clinical and laboratory study evaluated the effect of two methods of disinfection in different modes at the volume changes of alginate dental impressions and plaster models poured from them, as compared to the same parameters of plastic master models (PMM), using three-dimensional non-contact laser scanner and software. Immersion chemical disinfection for 15 min, microwave disinfection at 354 W for 10 minutes and combined disinfection with the power of 319 W for 4 minutes did not significantly affect the volumetric dimensional accuracy of the alginate impressions (P > 0.05). PMID:27491163

  13. [Potential of impression cytology in diagnosis and evaluation of efficacy of pharmacological correction of dry eye syndrome associated with contact lens wearing].

    PubMed

    Egorova, G B; Fedorova, A A; Mitichkina, T S

    2012-01-01

    Potential of impression cytology in diagnosis and evaluation of efficacy of pharmacological correction of dry eye syndrome (DES) associated with contact lens wearing was studied. When wearing contact lenses for a long time DES with tear film instability and reduction of tear production occurs in more than 50% patients. Morphological changes of epithelium of tarsal and bulbar conjunctiva manifest consequently. Impression cytology reveals structural damage of epithelium with keratinization signs and decrease of goblet cells density down to total absence. After tear substitution therapy tear break-up time increased by 65,3% and total tear production by 11,4%. In control impression cytology of tarsal and bulbar conjunctiva during tear substitution therapy the following changes were revealed: recovery of goblet cells density and differentiation, recovery of epithelial structure and reduction of epithelium keratinization. PMID:22741293

  14. Subjective evaluation of HEVC in mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Ray; Kalva, Hari

    2013-03-01

    Mobile compute environments provide a unique set of user needs and expectations that designers must consider. With increased multimedia use in mobile environments, video encoding methods within the smart phone market segment are key factors that contribute to positive user experience. Currently available display resolutions and expected cellular bandwidth are major factors the designer must consider when determining which encoding methods should be supported. The desired goal is to maximize the consumer experience, reduce cost, and reduce time to market. This paper presents a comparative evaluation of the quality of user experience when HEVC and AVC/H.264 video coding standards were used. The goal of the study was to evaluate any improvements in user experience when using HEVC. Subjective comparisons were made between H.264/AVC and HEVC encoding standards in accordance with Doublestimulus impairment scale (DSIS) as defined by ITU-R BT.500-13. Test environments are based on smart phone LCD resolutions and expected cellular bit rates, such as 200kbps and 400kbps. Subjective feedback shows both encoding methods are adequate at 400kbps constant bit rate. However, a noticeable consumer experience gap was observed for 200 kbps. Significantly less H.264 subjective quality is noticed with video sequences that have multiple objects moving and no single point of visual attraction. Video sequences with single points of visual attraction or few moving objects tended to have higher H.264 subjective quality.

  15. Calculating Clinically Significant Change: Applications of the Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) Scale to Evaluate Client Outcomes in Private Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Peter James

    2010-01-01

    The Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) scale is a therapist-rated measure of client outcome that has been widely used within the research literature. The current study aimed to develop reliable and clinically significant change indices for the CGI, and to demonstrate its application in private psychological practice. Following the guidelines…

  16. The effect of a range of disinfectants on the dimensional accuracy of some impression materials.

    PubMed

    Jagger, D C; Al Jabra, O; Harrison, A; Vowles, R W; McNally, L

    2004-12-01

    In this study the dimensional accuracy of two model materials; dental stone and plaster of Paris, reproduced from three commonly used impression materials; alginate, polyether and addition-cured silicone, retained by their adhesives in acrylic resin trays and exposed to four disinfectant solutions was evaluated. Ninety casts were used to investigate the effect of the four disinfectants on the dimensional accuracy of alginate, polyether and addition-cured silicone impression material. For each impression material 30 impressions were taken, half were poured in dental stone and half in plaster of Paris. The disinfectants used were Dimenol, Perform-ID, MD-520, and Haz-tabs. Measurements were carried out using a High Precision Reflex Microscope. For the alginate impressions only those disinfected by 5-minute immersion in Haz-tabs solution and in full-strength MD 520 were not adversely affected by the disinfection treatment. All polyether impressions subjected to immersion disinfection exhibited a clinically acceptable expansion. Disinfected addition-cured silicone impressions produced very accurate stone casts. Those disinfected by spraying with fill-strength Dimenol produced casts that were very similar to those left as controls, but those treated by immersion disinfection exhibited negligible and clinically acceptable expansion. The results of the studied demonstrated that the various disinfection treatments had different effects on the impression materials. It is important that an appropriate disinfectant is used for each type of impression material. PMID:15691188

  17. Subjective Evaluations of Motion Area and Velocity Characteristics of Dual Manipulator in Young and Elderly People

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoda, Mitsumasa; Yoda, Asako; Shiota, Yasuhito

    In this study, we conducted a subjective evaluation experiment of a dual manipulator, which exhibits different motion characteristics. There are three motion characteristics: two of which are age-related, and the third is a robot motion characteristic and is newly added to these two motions. The motions are evaluated from motion areas and motion velocities. Subjects are elderly and young people, and the impressions of the motions are compared in two of the different age groups by the Semantic Differential (SD) method. The obtained results indicate that there are age differences in the evaluation of three manipulator motion areas. The elderly people show a higher reliability and a higher familiarity in a robot motion area than in the other two motions. The elderly people seem to be more affected by the manipulator motion than the young people. Therefore, a careful consideration is required when planning the motion of a manipulator for elderly people.

  18. [Elastomeric impression materials].

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulos, T; Tsokas, K

    1990-01-01

    A review of the literature on elastomeric impression materials, is presented in this paper. The article mentions the composition and the most important properties of the elastomeric impression materials used in dental practice. The clinical significance of these materials, physical and mechanical properties are also emphasized. In addition some new elastomeric impression materials with improved properties and a new (experimental) light-cured impression material, are mentioned. Another part of this article is the biocompatibility of these materials. In the end the great significance of handling is outlined. PMID:2130039

  19. Cutoff score on the apathy evaluation scale in subjects with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Mel B; Burke, David T; O'Neil-Pirozzi, Therese; Goldstein, Richard; Jacob, Loyal; Kettell, Jennifer

    2002-06-01

    This cross-sectional study was designed to determine a cutoff score on the Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES) that predicts a clinician's designation of a subject with TBI as apathetic or not. Forty-five outpatients with TBI completed the AES-S, and 37 family members, friends, or significant others filled out the AES-I. Three clinicians prospectively gave their impressions of the presence or absence of apathy and retrospectively chose the degree of apathy on a 7-point subjective rating scale. The data was analysed by logistic regression and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. No cutoff score on the AES-S or AES-I was found to have reasonable sensitivity and specificity with respect to the ability to predict the clinician's designation of a subject as apathetic. The AES requires further study if it is to be used to measure apathy following TBI. PMID:12119086

  20. ETI: Our first impressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Albert A.; Johnson, Joel T.

    2000-06-01

    Despite scant or ambiguous information, people are capable of developing comprehensive and detailed impressions. Consequently, if the detection of an electromagnetically-active civilization is announced, many people will rapidly form impressions of what the extraterrestrials and their civilization are "like". First impressions are crucial, not only because of their immediate psychological, social, and political consequences on Earth, but because they can influence the future of interstellar communication. Initial impressions will rest less on hard data than on the nature and tone of the "evidence" that is gleaned from the transmission; the interpretation and dissemination of this evidence; and the hard wiring, psychological programming, cultural conditioning, and social influence processes that shape human perception. We consider how dispositional inferences, implicit theories of personality, negatively toned or adverse information, physical appearance, prior expectations, the confirmation bias, and thinking and unthinking approaches to attitude formation are likely to affect human impressions of ETI.

  1. Subjective impressions do not mirror online reading effort: concurrent EEG-eyetracking evidence from the reading of books and digital media.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Franziska; Pleimling, Dominique; Hosemann, Jana; Füssel, Stephan; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina; Schlesewsky, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    In the rapidly changing circumstances of our increasingly digital world, reading is also becoming an increasingly digital experience: electronic books (e-books) are now outselling print books in the United States and the United Kingdom. Nevertheless, many readers still view e-books as less readable than print books. The present study thus used combined EEG and eyetracking measures in order to test whether reading from digital media requires higher cognitive effort than reading conventional books. Young and elderly adults read short texts on three different reading devices: a paper page, an e-reader and a tablet computer and answered comprehension questions about them while their eye movements and EEG were recorded. The results of a debriefing questionnaire replicated previous findings in that participants overwhelmingly chose the paper page over the two electronic devices as their preferred reading medium. Online measures, by contrast, showed shorter mean fixation durations and lower EEG theta band voltage density--known to covary with memory encoding and retrieval--for the older adults when reading from a tablet computer in comparison to the other two devices. Young adults showed comparable fixation durations and theta activity for all three devices. Comprehension accuracy did not differ across the three media for either group. We argue that these results can be explained in terms of the better text discriminability (higher contrast) produced by the backlit display of the tablet computer. Contrast sensitivity decreases with age and degraded contrast conditions lead to longer reading times, thus supporting the conclusion that older readers may benefit particularly from the enhanced contrast of the tablet. Our findings thus indicate that people's subjective evaluation of digital reading media must be dissociated from the cognitive and neural effort expended in online information processing while reading from such devices. PMID:23405265

  2. Subjective Impressions Do Not Mirror Online Reading Effort: Concurrent EEG-Eyetracking Evidence from the Reading of Books and Digital Media

    PubMed Central

    Kretzschmar, Franziska; Pleimling, Dominique; Hosemann, Jana; Füssel, Stephan; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina; Schlesewsky, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    In the rapidly changing circumstances of our increasingly digital world, reading is also becoming an increasingly digital experience: electronic books (e-books) are now outselling print books in the United States and the United Kingdom. Nevertheless, many readers still view e-books as less readable than print books. The present study thus used combined EEG and eyetracking measures in order to test whether reading from digital media requires higher cognitive effort than reading conventional books. Young and elderly adults read short texts on three different reading devices: a paper page, an e-reader and a tablet computer and answered comprehension questions about them while their eye movements and EEG were recorded. The results of a debriefing questionnaire replicated previous findings in that participants overwhelmingly chose the paper page over the two electronic devices as their preferred reading medium. Online measures, by contrast, showed shorter mean fixation durations and lower EEG theta band voltage density – known to covary with memory encoding and retrieval – for the older adults when reading from a tablet computer in comparison to the other two devices. Young adults showed comparable fixation durations and theta activity for all three devices. Comprehension accuracy did not differ across the three media for either group. We argue that these results can be explained in terms of the better text discriminability (higher contrast) produced by the backlit display of the tablet computer. Contrast sensitivity decreases with age and degraded contrast conditions lead to longer reading times, thus supporting the conclusion that older readers may benefit particularly from the enhanced contrast of the tablet. Our findings thus indicate that people's subjective evaluation of digital reading media must be dissociated from the cognitive and neural effort expended in online information processing while reading from such devices. PMID:23405265

  3. Impression block with orientator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brilin, V. I.; Ulyanova, O. S.

    2015-02-01

    Tool review, namely the impression block, applied to check the shape and size of the top of fish as well as to determine the appropriate tool for fishing operation was realized. For multiple application and obtaining of the impress depth of 3 cm and more, the standard volumetric impression blocks with fix rods are used. However, the registered impress of fish is not oriented in space and the rods during fishing are in the extended position. This leads to rods deformation and sinking due to accidental impacts of impression block over the borehole irregularity and finally results in faulty detection of the top end of fishing object in hole. The impression blocks with copy rods and fixed magnetic needle allow estimating the object configuration and fix the position of magnetic needle determining the position of the top end of object in hole. However, the magnetic needle fixation is realized in staged and the rods are in extended position during fishing operations as well as it is in standard design. The most efficient tool is the impression block with copy rods which directs the examined object in the borehole during readings of magnetic needles data from azimuth plate and averaging of readings. This significantly increases the accuracy of fishing toll direction. The rods during fishing are located in the body and extended only when they reach the top of fishing object.

  4. Eyeblinks in formation of impressions.

    PubMed

    Omori, Y; Miyata, Y

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of frequency of one's eyeblinks on creating a personal impression. The subjects, 102 males and 127 females, ages 15 to 60 years, rated on a 7-point semantic differential scale a rarely blinking person or a frequently blinking person described on a question-sheet. A factor analysis of the ratings yielded three factors, interpreted as Nervousness, Unfriendliness, and Lack of intelligence. The frequently blinking person was rated as more nervous and less intelligent than the rarely blinking person. Present results provided evidence that frequency of eyeblinks may play an important role on the formation of impressions. Further implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:8902035

  5. Age, Cumulative Trauma and Stressful Life Events, and Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms among Older Adults in Prison: Do Subjective Impressions Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maschi, Tina; Morgen, Keith; Zgoba, Kristen; Courtney, Deborah; Ristow, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aging prison population in the United States presents a significant public health challenge with high rates of trauma and mental health issues that the correctional system alone is ill-prepared to address. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of age, objective, and subjective measures of trauma and stressful…

  6. Subjective evaluation of higher dynamic range video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanhart, Philippe; Korshunov, Pavel; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2014-09-01

    High dynamic range (HDR) imaging is able to capture a wide range of luminance values, closer to what the human eye can perceive. However, for capture and display technologies, it is important to answer the question on the significance of higher dynamic range for user preference. This paper answers this question by investigating the added value of higher dynamic range via a rigorous set of subjective experiments using paired comparison methodology. Video sequences at four different peak luminance levels were displayed side-by-side on a Dolby Research HDR RGB backlight dual modulation display (aka `Pulsar'), which is capable of reliably displaying video content at 4000 cd=m2 peak luminance. The results of the subjective experiment demonstrate that the preference of an average viewer increases logarithmically with the increase in the maximum luminance level at which HDR content is displayed, with 4000 cd=m2 being the most attractive option.

  7. [Elastomeric impression materials].

    PubMed

    Levartovsky, S; Folkman, M; Alter, E; Pilo, R

    2011-04-01

    Elastomeric impression materials are in common use. The impression taken should be highly precise, thus, requiring specific care when manipulatingthese materials. There are 4 groups of elastomers; polysulfide, condensation silicone, addition silicone and polyether; each differ in their setting mechanism and their physical and chemical properties. This review elaborates the major properties of elastomers and its implications on their use. The impression material is inserted into the patient's mouth in a viscous state and transforms into viscoelastic state, upon withdrawal, influencing the residual deformation. The requirements are minimal residual deformation or maximal elastic recovery. As the mouth is a wet environment a major consideration is hydrophilicity. The wettability which is estimated by measuring either the contact angle of a droplet of water and the substrate post setting or the contact angle of a droplet of impression material and the wet tooth pre setting, determines the interaction of the material with both mouth fluids and gypsum. As the primary end target is to obtain a model depicting accurately the oral details, an attention to the impressions' compatibility with gypsum should also be given. Many studies were conducted to get a thorough understanding of the hydrophilic properties of each material, and the mechanism utilized, such as surfactants in hydrophilic PVS. Polyether is the only material that is truly hydrophilic; it exhibits the lowest contact angle, during and after setting. Recent studies show that during setting the Polyether hydrophilicity is increased compared to the condition after setting. Dimensional stability, a crucial property of the impression, is affected by the physical and chemical attributes of the material, such as its tear strength. Polysulfide has the highest tear strength. Tear Strength is affected by two major parameters, viscosity, a built-in property, and how fast the impression is pulled out of the mouth, the

  8. Comparative evaluation of pressure generated on a simulated maxillary oral analog by impression materials in custom trays of different spacer designs: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Sakshi; Gupta, Narendra Kumar; Tandan, Amrit; Dwivedi, Ravi; Gupta, Swati; Agarwal, Garima

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Literature reveals that masticatory load on denture bearing tissues through complete dentures should be maximum on primary stress bearing areas and least on relief area in accordance with the histology of underlying tissues. A study to validate the existing beliefs was planned to compare the pressure on mucosa using selective pressure technique and minimal pressure technique, with the incorporation of two different impression materials utilizing the pressure sensors during secondary impression procedure. Materials and Methods: The study was performed using a maxillary analog. Three pressure sensors were imbedded in the oral analog, one in the mid palatine area and the other two in the right and left ridge crest. Custom trays of two different configurations were fabricated. The two impression materials tested were light body and zinc oxide eugenol. A total of 40 impressions were made. A constant weight of 1 kg was placed, and the pressure was recorded as initial and end pressures. Results: A significant difference in the pressure produced using different impression materials was found (P < 0.001). Light body vinyl polysiloxane produced significantly lesser pressure than zinc oxide eugenol impression materials. The presence of relief did affect the magnitude of pressure at various locations. Conclusion: All impression materials produced pressure during maxillary edentulous impression making. Tray modification is an important factor in changing the amount of pressure produced. The impression materials used also had a significant role to play on the pressures acting on the tissues during impression procedure. Clinical Implication: Light body VPS impression material may be recommended to achieve minimal pressure on the denture bearing tissues in both selective as well as minimal pressure techniques. PMID:27041902

  9. Neurological Impress Method plus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flood, James; Lapp, Diane; Fisher, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of these two studies was to redirect interest to the Neurological Impress Method, a multisensory approach to reading instruction that occurs between a teacher and a student, which has been largely forgotten in mainstream and special education circles over the past decades. In addition to its emphasis on oral reading, we included a…

  10. Linking automatic evaluation to mood and information processing style: consequences for experienced affect, impression formation, and stereotyping.

    PubMed

    Chartrand, Tanya L; van Baaren, Rick B; Bargh, John A

    2006-02-01

    According to the feelings-as-information account, a person's mood state signals to him or her the valence of the current environment (N. Schwarz & G. Clore, 1983). However, the ways in which the environment automatically influences mood in the first place remain to be explored. The authors propose that one mechanism by which the environment influences affect is automatic evaluation, the nonconscious evaluation of environmental stimuli as good or bad. A first experiment demonstrated that repeated brief exposure to positive or negative stimuli (which leads to automatic evaluation) induces a corresponding mood in participants. In 3 additional studies, the authors showed that automatic evaluation affects information processing style. Experiment 4 showed that participants' mood mediates the effect of valenced brief primes on information processing. PMID:16478316

  11. A Comparative Evaluation of Dimensional Accuracy and Surface Detail Reproduction of Four Hydrophilic Vinyl Polysiloxane Impression Materials Tested Under Dry, Moist, and Wet Conditions-An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Nagrath, Rahul; Lahori, Manesh; Agrawal, Manjari

    2014-12-01

    Vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) impression materials have application in a wide variety of situations in both fixed and removable prosthodontics. A major limitation of VPS impression materials is their hydrophobicity. There are two aspects of this problem, the wettability of the polymerized impression by dental gypsum materials and the ability of the unpolymerized material to wet intraoral tissues. To address this problem, manufacturers have added surfactants and labelled these new products as "hydrophilic vinyl polysiloxane." The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare dimensional accuracy and surface detail reproduction of four hydrophilic VPS impression materials, when used under dry, moist, and wet conditions. A total of 180 samples were made of stainless steel die similar to as described in ADA sp. no. 19. The die was scored with three horizontal and two vertical lines. Impressions were made under dry, moist and wet conditions. Dimensional accuracy was measured by comparing the length of the middle horizontal line in each impression to the same line on the metal die, by using Universal Length Measuring machine. A 2-way ANOVA was performed on the percentage change data for measured lengths of the 4 impression materials under the 3 conditions to evaluate dimensional accuracy. Surface detail was evaluated in two ways: (1) by use of criteria similar to ADA sp. no. 19 for detail reproduction, and (2) by use of a method that categorized the impressions as satisfactory or unsatisfactory based on their surface characteristics: presence of pits, voids, or roughness. Pearson X2 (α = 0.05) was used to compare surface detail reproduction results. Conditions (dry, moist, and wet) did not cause significant adverse effects on the dimensional accuracy of all the four material. With both surface detail analyses, dry, moist, and wet conditions had a significant effect on the detail reproduction of all the four materials (P < 0.05). The study concluded that the

  12. Chemical enhancement of footwear impressions in blood deposited on fabric--evaluating the use of alginate casting materials followed by chemical enhancement.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kevin J; NicDaéid, Niamh; Savage, Kathleen A; Bandey, Helen

    2010-12-01

    Most footwear marks made in blood on a surface such as fabric tend to be enhanced in situ rather than physically recovered using a lifting technique prior to enhancement. This work reports on the use of an alginate material to recover the impressed footwear marks made in blood and deposited on a range of fabric types and colours. The lifted marks were then enhanced using acid black 1 and leuco crystal violet with excellent results. This presents a new method for the lifting and recovery of blood impressions in situ from crime scene followed by subsequent mark enhancement of the lifted impression. PMID:21075299

  13. Tool for Taking Clay Impressions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Clay impression of small parts taken with tool consisting of hollow tube closed at one end. Slots at other end admit part short distance into tube. Impression used to make silicone rubber mold for examination.

  14. Substance Use as Impression Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Mark J.; Getz, J. Greg

    1996-01-01

    Examines the function of substance use as an impression management tactic. Introductory psychology students (n=377) responded to a survey instrument measuring self-monitoring, perceived success in impression management, interaction anxiety, and self-esteem. Results suggest that alcohol use may serve an impression management function. (JPS)

  15. Dimensional Accuracy of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic VPS Impression Materials Using Different Impression Techniques - An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Pilla, Ajai; Pathipaka, Suman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The dimensional stability of the impression material could have an influence on the accuracy of the final restoration. Vinyl Polysiloxane Impression materials (VPS) are most frequently used as the impression material in fixed prosthodontics. As VPS is hydrophobic when it is poured with gypsum products, manufacturers added intrinsic surfactants and marketed as hydrophilic VPS. These hydrophilic VPS have shown increased wettability with gypsum slurries. VPS are available in different viscosities ranging from very low to very high for usage under different impression techniques. Aim To compare the dimensional accuracy of hydrophilic VPS and hydrophobic VPS using monophase, one step and two step putty wash impression techniques. Materials and Methods To test the dimensional accuracy of the impression materials a stainless steel die was fabricated as prescribed by ADA specification no. 19 for elastomeric impression materials. A total of 60 impressions were made. The materials were divided into two groups, Group1 hydrophilic VPS (Aquasil) and Group 2 hydrophobic VPS (Variotime). These were further divided into three subgroups A, B, C for monophase, one-step and two-step putty wash technique with 10 samples in each subgroup. The dimensional accuracy of the impressions was evaluated after 24 hours using vertical profile projector with lens magnification range of 20X-125X illumination. The study was analyzed through one-way ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey HSD test and unpaired t-test for mean comparison between groups. Results Results showed that the three different impression techniques (monophase, 1-step, 2-step putty wash techniques) did cause significant change in dimensional accuracy between hydrophilic VPS and hydrophobic VPS impression materials. One-way ANOVA disclosed, mean dimensional change and SD for hydrophilic VPS varied between 0.56% and 0.16%, which were low, suggesting hydrophilic VPS was satisfactory with all three impression techniques. However, mean

  16. Randomized controlled trial comparing direct intraoral digitization and extraoral digitization after impression taking.

    PubMed

    Quaas, Sebastian; Loos, René; Rudolph, Heike; Luthardt, Ralph G

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the correspondence of intraoral digitization (ID) with extraoral digitization (ED) after impression taking. One-stage putty-and wash impressions and ID were carried out in a randomized order for 10 subjects. The impressions were used to make casts, which were then subjected to ED. ID datasets were aligned to create computer-aided design reference models. Deviations between ID and ED were calculated. The mean positive and negative deviations were 37.7 and -48.4 µm, respectively, for one quadrant. The results showed that the ID system is well suited for the acquisition of single-tooth restorations and is of limited suitability for the acquisition of small multiple unit restorations. PMID:25588169

  17. Subjective comparison and evaluation of speech enhancement algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yi; Loizou, Philipos C.

    2007-01-01

    Making meaningful comparisons between the performance of the various speech enhancement algorithms proposed over the years, has been elusive due to lack of a common speech database, differences in the types of noise used and differences in the testing methodology. To facilitate such comparisons, we report on the development of a noisy speech corpus suitable for evaluation of speech enhancement algorithms. This corpus is subsequently used for the subjective evaluation of 13 speech enhancement methods encompassing four classes of algorithms: spectral subtractive, subspace, statistical-model based and Wiener-type algorithms. The subjective evaluation was performed by Dynastat, Inc. using the ITU-T P.835 methodology designed to evaluate the speech quality along three dimensions: signal distortion, noise distortion and overall quality. This paper reports the results of the subjective tests. PMID:18046463

  18. Dental impression materials.

    PubMed

    Perry, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    It is clear that many impression materials are available to the veterinary dentist. They each have different inherent properties, handling characteristics, and indications for use. A thorough understanding of these concepts is essential if the veterinarian and laboratory technician are to produce meaningful and accurate reproductions of oral structures. New products are constantly being introduced to the dental market, with fantastic claims for ease of use and reproduction of detail. The reader is urged to seek independent research findings when assessing such claims, and make decisions founded in the highest possible levels of evidence. PMID:24006720

  19. Statistical Analysis for Subjective and Objective Evaluations of Dental Drill Sounds.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomomi; Kuwano, Sonoko; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Hayashi, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    The sound produced by a dental air turbine handpiece (dental drill) can markedly influence the sound environment in a dental clinic. Indeed, many patients report that the sound of a dental drill elicits an unpleasant feeling. Although several manufacturers have attempted to reduce the sound pressure levels produced by dental drills during idling based on ISO 14457, the sound emitted by such drills under active drilling conditions may negatively influence the dental clinic sound environment. The physical metrics related to the unpleasant impressions associated with dental drill sounds have not been determined. In the present study, psychological measurements of dental drill sounds were conducted with the aim of facilitating improvement of the sound environment at dental clinics. Specifically, we examined the impressions elicited by the sounds of 12 types of dental drills in idling and drilling conditions using a semantic differential. The analysis revealed that the impressions of dental drill sounds varied considerably between idling and drilling conditions and among the examined drills. This finding suggests that measuring the sound of a dental drill in idling conditions alone may be insufficient for evaluating the effects of the sound. We related the results of the psychological evaluations to those of measurements of the physical metrics of equivalent continuous A-weighted sound pressure levels (LAeq) and sharpness. Factor analysis indicated that impressions of the dental drill sounds consisted of two factors: "metallic and unpleasant" and "powerful". LAeq had a strong relationship with "powerful impression", calculated sharpness was positively related to "metallic impression", and "unpleasant impression" was predicted by the combination of both LAeq and calculated sharpness. The present analyses indicate that, in addition to a reduction in sound pressure level, refining the frequency components of dental drill sounds is important for creating a comfortable sound

  20. The subjective evaluation of noise from light aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, K. P.

    1976-01-01

    A study was conducted in which subjects evaluated the sounds of a light aircraft and a motorcycle. Particular emphasis was placed on examining the duration of the sounds. Thirty subjects gave annoyance ratings to a total of 50 sounds, with peak levels between 65 and 85dB(A). It was found that aircraft and motorcycles have differing optimum duration corrections. The conventional duration correction used in the calculation of EPNL is far from being the optimum for light aircraft.

  1. Vibration Response Imaging: evaluation of rater agreement in healthy subjects and subjects with pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We evaluated pulmonologists variability in the interpretation of Vibration response imaging (VRI) obtained from healthy subjects and patients hospitalized for community acquired pneumonia. Methods The present is a prospective study conducted in a tertiary university hospital. Twenty healthy subjects and twenty three pneumonia cases were included in this study. Six pulmonologists blindly analyzed images of normal subjects and pneumonia cases and evaluated different aspects of VRI images related to the quality of data aquisition, synchronization of the progression of breath sound distribution and agreement between the maximal energy frame (MEF) of VRI (which is the maximal geographical area of lung vibrations produced at maximal inspiration) and chest radiography. For qualitative assessment of VRI images, the raters' evaluations were analyzed by degree of consistency and agreement. Results The average value for overall identical evaluations of twelve features of the VRI image evaluation, ranged from 87% to 95% per rater (94% to 97% in control cases and from 79% to 93% per rater in pneumonia cases). Inter-rater median (IQR) agreement was 91% (82-96). The level of agreement according to VRI feature evaluated was in most cases over 80%; intra-class correlation (ICC) obtained by using a model of subject/rater for the averaged features was overall 0.86 (0.92 in normal and 0.73 in pneumonia cases). Conclusions Our findings suggest good agreement in the interpretation of VRI data between different raters. In this respect, VRI might be helpful as a radiation free diagnostic tool for the management of pneumonia. PMID:20222975

  2. Investigation of Method for Changing Impression of Musical Piece by Changing its Tempo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, Makoto; Okamatsu, Keita; Matsuo, Kazuhisa

    We propose a simple method that changes impression of musical piece by changing its tempo and investigate psycho-physiological effects of the method with listening experiment. In the experiment, 8 subjects listened same musical pieces with various tempi, and analysis of heartbeat and Semantic-Differential method were used. In 6 out of 10 adjective pairs, inverted-U shapes were observed, and peak tempi of them were different. Moreover, “relaxed” evaluation might be related to listener's heart rate in rest. These results suggest possibility of constructing novel media player that changes impression of musical piece.

  3. Effectiveness of Professional Development Policies Based on Teachers' Subjective Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Donghai

    2010-01-01

    The results of a questionnaire-based investigation carried out across China regarding teachers' professional development were used to create an extensive database. Chinese teachers' subjective evaluation of a number of professional development policies was statistically analyzed. From their ratings, it is shown that in schools across China,…

  4. The neural networks of subjectively evaluated emotional conflicts.

    PubMed

    Rohr, Christiane S; Villringer, Arno; Solms-Baruth, Carolina; van der Meer, Elke; Margulies, Daniel S; Okon-Singer, Hadas

    2016-06-01

    Previous work on the neural underpinnings of emotional conflict processing has largely focused on designs that instruct participants to ignore a distracter which conflicts with a target. In contrast, this study investigated the noninstructed experience and evaluation of an emotional conflict, where positive or negative cues can be subjectively prioritized. To this end, healthy participants freely watched short film scenes that evoked emotional conflicts while their BOLD responses were measured. Participants' individual ratings of conflict and valence perception during the film scenes were collected immediately afterwards, and the individual ratings were regressed against the BOLD data. Our analyses revealed that (a) amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex were significantly involved in prioritizing positive or negative cues, but not in subjective evaluations of conflict per se, and (b) superior temporal sulcus (STS) and inferior parietal lobule (IPL), which have been implicated in social cognition and emotion control, were involved in both prioritizing positive or negative cues and subjectively evaluating conflict, and may thus constitute "hubs" or "switches" in emotional conflict processing. Psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analyses further revealed stronger functional connectivity between IPL and ventral prefrontal-medial parietal areas in prioritizing negative cues, and stronger connectivity between STS and dorsal-rostral prefrontal-medial parietal areas in prioritizing positive cues. In sum, our results suggest that IPL and STS are important in the subjective evaluation of complex conflicts and influence valence prioritization via prefrontal and parietal control centers. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2234-2246, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26991156

  5. Assessing the clarity of friction ridge impressions.

    PubMed

    Hicklin, R Austin; Buscaglia, JoAnn; Roberts, Maria Antonia

    2013-03-10

    The ability of friction ridge examiners to correctly discern and make use of the ridges and associated features in finger or palm impressions is limited by clarity. The clarity of an impression relates to the examiner's confidence that the presence, absence, and attributes of features can be correctly discerned. Despite the importance of clarity in the examination process, there have not previously been standard methods for assessing clarity in friction ridge impressions. We introduce a process for annotation, analysis, and interchange of friction ridge clarity information that can be applied to latent or exemplar impressions. This paper: (1) describes a method for evaluating the clarity of friction ridge impressions by using color-coded annotations that can be used by examiners or automated systems; (2) discusses algorithms for overall clarity metrics based on manual or automated clarity annotation; and (3) defines a method of quantifying the correspondence of clarity when comparing a pair of friction ridge images, based on clarity annotation and resulting metrics. Different uses of this approach include examiner interchange of data, quality assurance, metrics, and as an aid in automated fingerprint matching. PMID:23313600

  6. Evaluation of sleep quality in subjects with chronic nononcologic pain.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias-Gomez, Alfredo; Mendoza-Reyes, Jonathan J

    2013-08-01

    A survey conducted by the National Sleep Foundation found that 20% of Americans have sleep disorders and 45% experience chronic pain. Several authors evaluated the interrelationship between these functions using various instruments such the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and identified that 34% of subjects in the general population have a poor quality of sleep, but there are few studies that assess the quality of sleep in patients with chronic pain of nonmalignant origin. We undertook this study to evaluate the quality of sleep using the PSQI in patients with chronic pain unrelated to cancer. We conducted a clinical, nonrandomized, uncontrolled, descriptive, and prospective study, applying the PSQI through a direct one-time interview to 311 subjects with chronic pain unrelated to cancer. According to the categorization of the PSQI between good and poor sleepers, 89% of the subjects were poor sleepers (n = 276). There are significant differences in pain intensity according to the categorization of the PSQI, with a higher intensity shown in the "poor sleepers" (analysis of variance [ANOVA], P = .030). Using a linear regression model to estimate the curve, a higher score is rated on the PSQI global score (ANOVA, P = .000, R(2) = .46) with the increase of the intensity of the pain. We conclude that "poor sleepers" or those who considered their sleep as "poor quality" have significantly higher pain intensity. This suggests that intensity of pain plays a role in evaluating the quality of sleep in the subjective perception of sleep and instruments that assess quality. PMID:24004315

  7. Benefit From Directional Microphone Hearing Aids: Objective and Subjective Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee-Sung; Jin, Sun Hwa; Choi, Ji Eun; Cho, Yang-Sun; Hong, Sung Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to find and compare the effect of directional (DIR) processing of two different hearing aids via both subjective and objective methods, to determine the association between the results of the subjective and objective evaluations, and to find out individual predictive factors influencing the DIR benefit. Methods Twenty-six hearing aid users fitted unilaterally with each two different experimental hearing aid performed modified Korean Hearing in Noise Test (K-HINT) in three DIR conditions; omnidirectional (OMNI) mode, OMNI plus noise reduction feature, fixed DIR mode. In order to determine benefits from DIR benefit within a hearing aid and compare performance of the DIR processing between hearing aids, a subjective questionnaire was administrated on speech quality (SQ) and discomfort in noise (DN) domain. Correlation analysis of factors influencing DIR benefit was accomplished. Results Benefits from switching OMNI mode to DIR mode within both hearing aids in K-HINT were about 2.8 (standard deviation, 3.5) and 2.1 dB SNR (signal to ratio; SD, 2.5), but significant difference in K-HINT results between OMNI and OMNI plus noise reduction algorithm was not shown. The subjective evaluation resulted in the better SQ and DN scores in DIR mode than those in OMNI mode. However, the difference of scores on both SQ and DN between the two hearing aids with DIR mode was not statistically significant. Any individual factors did not significantly affect subjective and objective DIR benefits. Conclusion DIR benefit was found not only in the objective measurement performed in the laboratory but also in the subjective questionnaires, but the subjective results was failed to have significant correlation with the DIR benefit obtained in the K-HINT. Factors influencing individual variation in perceptual DIR benefit were still hard to explain. PMID:26330918

  8. The dimensional accuracy of polyvinyl siloxane impression materials using two different impression techniques: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Nirmala; Nandeeshwar, D. B.

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the Study: To evaluate and compare the linear dimensional changes of the three representative polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impression materials and to compare the accuracy of single mix with double mix impression technique. Methodology: A study mold was prepared according to revised American Dental Association specification number 19 for nonaqueous elastic dental impression materials. Three PVS impression materials selected were Elite-HD, Imprint™ II Garant, Aquasil Ultra Heavy. Two impression techniques used were single mix and double mix impression technique. A total of 60 specimens were made and after 24 h the specimens were measured using profile projector. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed using one-way analyses of variance analysis and significant differences were separated using Student's Newman–Keul's test. Results: When all the three study group impression materials were compared for double mix technique, the statistically significant difference was found only between Imprint™ II Garantand Elite-HD (P < 0.05). Similarly, using single mix technique, statistically significant difference were found between Elite-HD and Imprint™ II Garant (P < 0.05) and also between Aquasil Ultra Heavy and Elite-HD (P < 0.05). When the linear dimensional accuracy of all three impression material in double mix impression technique and single mix impression technique were compared with the control group, Imprint™ II Garant showed the values more nearing to the values of master die, followed by Aquasil Ultra Heavy and Elite-HD respectively. Conclusion: Among the impression materials Imprint™ II Garant showed least dimensional change. Among the impression techniques, double mix impression technique showed the better results. PMID:26929515

  9. Subjective benefit of communication aids evaluated by postlingually deaf adults.

    PubMed

    Rihkanen, H

    1990-06-01

    Three groups of postlingually deaf adults were selected, trained and followed for about 2 years. The subjects with residual hearing were fitted with a powerful hearing aid (HA group, N = 10), the rest were given a single channel vibrotactile aid (V group, N = 8) or received a single channel cochlear implant (CI group, N = 10). The subjects were asked to evaluate the subjective benefit, disadvantage and magnitude of hearing impairment after the rehabilitation. Although the HA group achieved the highest scores in the audiological tests, the interviews revealed that the CI group found the implant quite beneficial in everyday life and in changing their attitude towards the handicap. After 2 years of use, this group reported the highest index of benefit, the best discrimination of everyday sounds and used the device most frequently. The V group were not as satisfied with their devices as the CI and HA groups. PMID:2364187

  10. Meteorologic factors and subjective sleep continuity: a preliminary evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Juhi; Grandner, Michael; Crittenden, Crista; Smith, Michael T.; Perlis, Michael L.

    2005-01-01

    Little research has been undertaken to evaluate whether environmental factors other than bright light influence the individual’s ability to initiate and maintain sleep. In the present analyses, nine meteorologic variables were evaluated for their possible relationship to self-reported sleep continuity in a sample of 43 subjects over a period of 105 days. In this preliminary analysis, high barometric pressure, low precipitation, and lower temperatures were significantly correlated with good sleep continuity. Interestingly, ambient light and lunar phase were not found to be strongly associated sleep diary measures.

  11. Meteorologic factors and subjective sleep continuity: a preliminary evaluation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Juhi; Grandner, Michael; Crittenden, Crista; Smith, Michael T; Perlis, Michael L

    2005-01-01

    Little research has been undertaken to evaluate whether environmental factors other than bright light influence the individual's ability to initiate and maintain sleep. In the present analyses, nine meteorologic variables were evaluated for their possible relationship to self-reported sleep continuity in a sample of 43 subjects over a period of 105 days. In this preliminary analysis, high barometric pressure, low precipitation, and lower temperatures were significantly correlated with good sleep continuity. Interestingly, ambient light and lunar phase were not found to be strongly associated sleep diary measures. PMID:15316762

  12. Rubrics for clinical evaluation: objectifying the subjective experience.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, Julie J; Stacy, Annette S

    2009-03-01

    Rubrics have historically been used in secondary and higher education to evaluate specific assignments or tasks. There is little mention of rubrics in the nursing literature, particularly in the area of clinical evaluation. A strong case can be made for expanding the traditional use of a rubric to include its validity with clinical evaluation. Clinical evaluation remains a challenge, even for seasoned faculty. Faculty and students often interpret clinical course objectives differently. Coupled with this concern is the subjectivity of the evaluation. The use of "novice" clinical faculty, who inevitably struggle with discerning and justifying anything but stellar student performance, further compounds these issues. Rubrics also facilitate the grading experience for faculty and students. Faculty often find themselves making repetitive written comments to students. These comments can be incorporated into the rubric, thus shortening grading time while increasing the quality and quantity of instructor feedback. When clarified in a rubric, course objectives become "real". Student benefits include increased critical thinking and a more realistic approach to self-evaluation. Clinical rubrics can be developed from existing course objectives. Though perhaps tedious in initial development, both faculty and student satisfaction with the clinical evaluation process can be enhanced with the use of rubrics. PMID:19083270

  13. Titrating and evaluating multi-drug regimens within subjects.

    PubMed

    Shih, Margaret; Gennings, Chris; Chinchilli, Vernon M; Carter, Walter H

    2003-07-30

    The dosing of combination therapies is commonly undertaken empirically by practising physicians, and a coherent algorithm to approach the problem of combination dosing is currently lacking. Current methods of evaluating multiple drug combinations in clinical trials fail to provide information regarding the location of more effective doses when the combination is not found to differ from the standard, even though the absence of a difference does not necessarily mean the new combination is ineffective. Moreover, in studies where the new combination is found more effective, often a large proportion of the study participants obtain no benefit from the trial. Even with early stopping rules, the time these subjects spend on inferior treatments can have lasting detrimental effects, leading to problems with patient enrolment and adherence to study protocol. This paper describes an evolutionary operation (EVOP) direct-search procedure to titrate combination doses within individual patients. The Nelder-Mead simplex direct-search algorithm is used to titrate combinations of drugs within individual subjects. Desirability functions are utilized to define the main response of interest and additional responses or constraints. Statistical methodology for determining whether the titrated treatment combination has resulted in an improvement in subject response and for evaluating for therapeutic synergism is developed. Inferences can then be made about the efficacy of the combination or about the individual drugs that comprise the combination. The advantages of this approach include affording every patient the potential to benefit from the combination under study and permitting the consideration of multiple endpoints simultaneously. PMID:12854092

  14. A subjective evaluation of synthesized STOL airplane noises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, C. A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A magnitude-estimation experiment was conducted to evaluate the subjective annoyance of the noise generated by possible future turbofan STOL aircraft as compared to that of several current CTOL aircraft. In addition, some of the units used to scale the magnitude of aircraft noise were evaluated with respect to their applicability to STOL noise. Twenty test subjects rated their annoyance to a total of 119 noises over a range of 75 PNdb to 105 PNdb. Their subjective ratings were compared with acoustical analysis of the noises in terms of 28 rating scale units. The synthesized STOL noises of this experiment were found to be slightly more annoying than the conventional CTOL noises at equal levels of PNL and EPNL. Over the range of levels investigated the scaling units, with a few exceptions, were capable of predicting the points of equal annoyance for all of the noises with plus or minus 3 dB. The inclusion of duration corrections, in general, improved the predictive capabilities of the various scaling units; however, tone corrections reduced their predictive capabilities.

  15. Subjective quality evaluation of low-bit-rate video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masry, Mark; Hemami, Sheila S.; Osberger, Wilfried M.; Rohaly, Ann M.

    2001-06-01

    A subjective quality evaluation was performed to qualify vie4wre responses to visual defects that appear in low bit rate video at full and reduced frame rates. The stimuli were eight sequences compressed by three motion compensated encoders - Sorenson Video, H.263+ and a Wavelet based coder - operating at five bit/frame rate combinations. The stimulus sequences exhibited obvious coding artifacts whose nature differed across the three coders. The subjective evaluation was performed using the Single Stimulus Continuos Quality Evaluation method of UTI-R Rec. BT.500-8. Viewers watched concatenated coded test sequences and continuously registered the perceived quality using a slider device. Data form 19 viewers was colleted. An analysis of their responses to the presence of various artifacts across the range of possible coding conditions and content is presented. The effects of blockiness and blurriness on perceived quality are examined. The effects of changes in frame rate on perceived quality are found to be related to the nature of the motion in the sequence.

  16. Subjective voice quality evaluation in a satellite communications environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinholt, E. V.; Lavalley, R. W.; Hardy, W. C.

    The development of a subjective test procedure for evaluating voice quality is described. The technical characteristics of the satellite communication system are analyzed in order to identify the factors that impair voice quality. The factors that affect the system are: (1) low volume, (2) constant noise, (3) busting noise, (4) noise on speech, (5) speech distortion, (6) incomplete words, (7) garbling, (8) mutual interpretation, and (9) echo. The communication system was rated by test callers based on the occurrence of each noise impairment, the effect of the impairments on the call quality, and the overall quality of the call. Analysis of the data reveals that it is feasible to develop a voice quality evaluation system based on electronic measurements of parameters that predict the occurrence and severity of the nine impairments.

  17. Objective and Subjective Evaluation of Reflecting and Diffusing Surfaces in Auditoria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Trevor John

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The performance of reflectors and diffusers used in auditoria have been evaluated both objectively and subjectively. Two accurate systems have been developed to measure the scattering from surfaces via the cross correlation function. These have been used to measure the scattering from plane panels, curved panels and quadratic residue diffusers (QRDs). The scattering measurements have been used to test theoretical prediction methods based on the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff integral equation. Accurate prediction methods were found for all surfaces tested. The limitations of the more approximate methods have been defined. The assumptions behind Schroeder's design of the QRD have been tested and the local reacting admittance assumption found to be valid over a wide frequency range. It was found that the QRD only produces uniform scattering at low frequencies. For an on-axis source the scattering from a curved panel was as good as from a QRD. For an oblique source the QRD produced much more uniform scattering than the curved panel. The subjective measurements evaluated the smallest perceivable change in the early sound field, the part most influenced by reflectors and diffusers. A natural sounding simulation of a concert hall field within an anechoic chamber was used. Standard objective parameters were reasonable values when compared to values found in real halls and subjective preference measurements. A difference limen was measured for early lateral energy fraction (.048 +/-.005); inter aural cross correlation (.075 +/-.008); clarity index (.67 +/-.13 dB); and centre time (8.6 +/- 1.6 ms). It was found that: (i) when changes are made to diffusers and reflectors, changes in spatial impression will usually be larger than those in clarity; and (ii) acousticians can gain most by paying attention to lateral sound in auditoria. It was also found that: (i) diffuse reflections in the early sound field

  18. Display Factors and Subjective Evaluation of Dynamic Text Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Joey C. Y.; Chan, Alan H. S.

    2009-01-01

    Communications technology has exploded in past decades, leading to the question of which display method is the best to deliver electronic text messages. Many of these systems employ cathode ray tubes, liquid crystal displays, gas plasma displays, or light-emitting diodes as the output device. In order to overcome the limitations of screen size of the display units, numerous means of presenting dynamic display on screens have been invented. There are many factors that affect the readability of electronic text. This paper reviews some related empirical studies concerning the various display methods of dynamic text presentation, such as text display type, character type, text display direction, and text/background color combination, highlighting method and validity of highlighting. The subjective evaluation questionnaire is also discussed. According to the readability and preference ratings of the subjects given under different conditions, the best display method and color for comprehending the delivered messages were investigated. General recommendations of displaying dynamic information are made for the large display units which have been widely used for delivering important messages.

  19. Statistical Analysis for Subjective and Objective Evaluations of Dental Drill Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Tomomi; Kuwano, Sonoko; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Hayashi, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    The sound produced by a dental air turbine handpiece (dental drill) can markedly influence the sound environment in a dental clinic. Indeed, many patients report that the sound of a dental drill elicits an unpleasant feeling. Although several manufacturers have attempted to reduce the sound pressure levels produced by dental drills during idling based on ISO 14457, the sound emitted by such drills under active drilling conditions may negatively influence the dental clinic sound environment. The physical metrics related to the unpleasant impressions associated with dental drill sounds have not been determined. In the present study, psychological measurements of dental drill sounds were conducted with the aim of facilitating improvement of the sound environment at dental clinics. Specifically, we examined the impressions elicited by the sounds of 12 types of dental drills in idling and drilling conditions using a semantic differential. The analysis revealed that the impressions of dental drill sounds varied considerably between idling and drilling conditions and among the examined drills. This finding suggests that measuring the sound of a dental drill in idling conditions alone may be insufficient for evaluating the effects of the sound. We related the results of the psychological evaluations to those of measurements of the physical metrics of equivalent continuous A-weighted sound pressure levels (LAeq) and sharpness. Factor analysis indicated that impressions of the dental drill sounds consisted of two factors: “metallic and unpleasant” and “powerful”. LAeq had a strong relationship with “powerful impression”, calculated sharpness was positively related to “metallic impression”, and “unpleasant impression” was predicted by the combination of both LAeq and calculated sharpness. The present analyses indicate that, in addition to a reduction in sound pressure level, refining the frequency components of dental drill sounds is important for creating

  20. Statistical analysis of barefoot impressions.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Robert B; Pressman, Irwin S; Chen, Sanping; Petersen, Peter H; Pressman, Ari E

    2003-01-01

    Comparison of the shapes of barefoot impressions from an individual with footprints or shoes linked to a crime may be useful as a means of including or excluding that individual as possibly being at the scene of a crime. The question of the distinguishability of a person's barefoot print arises frequently. This study indicates that measurements taken from the outlines of inked footprint impressions show a great degree of variability between donors and a great degree of similarity for multiple impressions taken from the same donor. The normality of the set of measurements on footprint outlines that we have selected for this study is confirmed. A statistical justification for the use of the product rule on individual statistical precisions is developed. PMID:12570199

  1. Auditory and visual spatial impression: Recent studies of three auditoria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Andy; Cabrera, Densil

    2004-10-01

    Auditory spatial impression is widely studied for its contribution to auditorium acoustical quality. By contrast, visual spatial impression in auditoria has received relatively little attention in formal studies. This paper reports results from a series of experiments investigating the auditory and visual spatial impression of concert auditoria. For auditory stimuli, a fragment of an anechoic recording of orchestral music was convolved with calibrated binaural impulse responses, which had been made with the dummy head microphone at a wide range of positions in three auditoria and the sound source on the stage. For visual stimuli, greyscale photographs were used, taken at the same positions in the three auditoria, with a visual target on the stage. Subjective experiments were conducted with auditory stimuli alone, visual stimuli alone, and visual and auditory stimuli combined. In these experiments, subjects rated apparent source width, listener envelopment, intimacy and source distance (auditory stimuli), and spaciousness, envelopment, stage dominance, intimacy and target distance (visual stimuli). Results show target distance to be of primary importance in auditory and visual spatial impression-thereby providing a basis for covariance between some attributes of auditory and visual spatial impression. Nevertheless, some attributes of spatial impression diverge between the senses.

  2. Reliability of the impression replica technique.

    PubMed

    Falk, Anders; Vult von Steyern, Per; Fransson, Håkan; Thorén, Margareta Molin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of the impression replica technique with a four-unit zirconia fixed dental prosthesis (FDP). Marginal and internal fit were measured by repeatedly placing the FDP on an epoxy cast using light-body silicone material corresponding to cement. All measured marginal and internal fit points showed varying values. The greatest variations were seen at the most distal margin (33 μm) and at the distal abutment of the FDP (77 μm). The results showed that the technique gives moderate variations and is a useful method to evaluate marginal and internal fit. PMID:25822305

  3. Odor Impression Prediction from Mass Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell arises from the perception of odors from chemicals. However, the relationship between the impression of odor and the numerous physicochemical parameters has yet to be understood owing to its complexity. As such, there is no established general method for predicting the impression of odor of a chemical only from its physicochemical properties. In this study, we designed a novel predictive model based on an artificial neural network with a deep structure for predicting odor impression utilizing the mass spectra of chemicals, and we conducted a series of computational analyses to evaluate its performance. Feature vectors extracted from the original high-dimensional space using two autoencoders equipped with both input and output layers in the model are used to build a mapping function from the feature space of mass spectra to the feature space of sensory data. The results of predictions obtained by the proposed new method have notable accuracy (R≅0.76) in comparison with a conventional method (R≅0.61). PMID:27326765

  4. Odor Impression Prediction from Mass Spectra.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Yuji; Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell arises from the perception of odors from chemicals. However, the relationship between the impression of odor and the numerous physicochemical parameters has yet to be understood owing to its complexity. As such, there is no established general method for predicting the impression of odor of a chemical only from its physicochemical properties. In this study, we designed a novel predictive model based on an artificial neural network with a deep structure for predicting odor impression utilizing the mass spectra of chemicals, and we conducted a series of computational analyses to evaluate its performance. Feature vectors extracted from the original high-dimensional space using two autoencoders equipped with both input and output layers in the model are used to build a mapping function from the feature space of mass spectra to the feature space of sensory data. The results of predictions obtained by the proposed new method have notable accuracy (R≅0.76) in comparison with a conventional method (R≅0.61). PMID:27326765

  5. Effects of Exposure to Advertisements on Audience Impressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Sato, Mie; Kasuga, Masao; Nagao, Yoshihide; Shono, Toru; Norose, Yuka; Oku, Ritsuya; Nogami, Akira; Miyazawa, Yoshitaka

    This study investigated effects of listening and/or watching commercial-messages (CMs) on audience impressions. We carried out experiments of TV advertisements presentation in conditions of audio only, video only, and audio-video. As results, we confirmed the following two effects: image-multiple effect, that is, the audience brings to mind various images that are not directly expressed in the content, and marking-up effect, that is, the audience concentrates on some images that are directly expressed in the content. The image-multiple effect, in particular, strongly appeared under the audio only condition. Next, we investigated changes in the following seven subjective responses; usage image, experience, familiarity, exclusiveness, feeling at home, affection, and willingness to buy, after exposure to advertisements under conditions of audio only and audio-video. As a result, noting that the image-multiple effect became stronger as the evaluation scores of the responses increased.

  6. Effects of Music on Image Impression and Relationship between Impression and Physical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Keiko; Mitsukura, Yasue

    Auditory information plays an integral role in AV media because even identical images are perceived differently when they are matched with different music. However, we now present a few studies in which the changes in subjective perceptions were analyzed on the basis of the physical properties of the perceived items. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of music on image impression in terms of the physical properties of images. In this paper, we first elucidate the changes in subjective impressions when the image is presented by itself and when it is presented with music. Secondly, to clarify the relation between the impression of an image or music and physical properties, we compare the different image or music perceptions with each other and also compare their respective physical properties, which include color information, structural information, and frequency characteristics. As a result, the color information of an image containing green or saturation colors and the power of the music were strongly correlated with adjectives expressing activity. Moreover, the entropy of saturation correlated with words expressing spatial extent.

  7. Harmony between Colors and Fragrances: Effect on Dimensions of Impressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Kumiko; Saito, Miho

    The objective of this study is to extract dimensions in impressions of colors and fragrances, and to examine their harmonious relationship. Experiment A: One hundred subjects were requested to describe their impressions of eight fragrances, and to select harmonious/disharmonious colors from color charts. Experiment B: One hundred subjects described their impression of 18 colors and each color's degree of harmonization with each of the eight fragrances. In addition, we combined the results of Experiment A and Experiment B, and conducted several analyses. The factor analysis revealed the MILD factor and CLEAR factor for the dimensions of each fragrance, color, and combination of color and fragrance. The multiple regression analysis revealed the following tendency: the smaller the distance between colors and fragrances on the dimensions, the greater is the rise in harmony; conversely, the greater the distance, the greater is the disharmony.

  8. 21 CFR 872.6570 - Impression tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... tube is a device consisting of a hollow copper tube intended to take an impression of a single tooth... material, such as wax, the remaining end is slipped over the tooth to make the impression....

  9. 21 CFR 872.6570 - Impression tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... tube is a device consisting of a hollow copper tube intended to take an impression of a single tooth... material, such as wax, the remaining end is slipped over the tooth to make the impression....

  10. 21 CFR 872.6570 - Impression tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... tube is a device consisting of a hollow copper tube intended to take an impression of a single tooth... material, such as wax, the remaining end is slipped over the tooth to make the impression....

  11. 21 CFR 872.6570 - Impression tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... tube is a device consisting of a hollow copper tube intended to take an impression of a single tooth... material, such as wax, the remaining end is slipped over the tooth to make the impression....

  12. 21 CFR 872.6570 - Impression tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... tube is a device consisting of a hollow copper tube intended to take an impression of a single tooth... material, such as wax, the remaining end is slipped over the tooth to make the impression....

  13. Intraoral Digital Impression Technique: A Review.

    PubMed

    Ting-Shu, Su; Jian, Sun

    2015-06-01

    With the techniques of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) being applied in the field of prosthodontics, a concept of intraoral digital impressions was put forward in the early 1980s. It has drawn comprehensive attention from dentists and has been used for dental prosthesis fabrication in a number of cases. This new digital impression technique is expected to bring about absolute digitization to the mode of prosthodontics. A few published articles have indicated that dental prostheses fabricated from intraoral digital impressions have exhibited remarkable advantages over those from conventional impressions in several respects. The present review discusses intraoral digital impression techniques in terms of the following aspects: (1) categories and principles of intraoral digital impression devices currently available; (2) operating characteristics of the devices; and (3) comparison of the manipulation, accuracy, and repeatability between intraoral digital impression and conventional impression. PMID:25220390

  14. Using Subjective Teacher Evaluations to Examine Principals' Personnel Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Master, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Teacher evaluation is at the center of current education policy reform. Most evaluation systems rely at least in part on principals' assessments of teachers, and their discretionary judgments carry substantial weight. However, we know relatively little about what they value when determining evaluations and high stakes personnel decisions. The…

  15. 21 CFR 872.3660 - Impression material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Impression material. 872.3660 Section 872.3660...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3660 Impression material. (a) Identification. Impression material is a device composed of materials such as alginate or polysulfide intended to be...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3660 - Impression material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Impression material. 872.3660 Section 872.3660...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3660 Impression material. (a) Identification. Impression material is a device composed of materials such as alginate or polysulfide intended to be...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3660 - Impression material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Impression material. 872.3660 Section 872.3660...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3660 Impression material. (a) Identification. Impression material is a device composed of materials such as alginate or polysulfide intended to be...

  18. Subjective evaluations of recent productions of television with stereophonic sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, P. S.

    1983-03-01

    A series of subjective tests were conducted to assess the improvement given by stereophonic sound with television in comparison to the conventional monophonic equivalent. The test material consisted of extracts from eight, recently produced, television stereo programs. They represented the wide range of BBC television program output and, since some types of program were new to television stereo, their production by this means was obviously experimental. Both technically and nontechnically qualified people took part in the tests but, with a few exceptions, they returned similar subjective responses. The tests showed a marked preference for the stereo presentation. Of the eight program extracts, five gained an average of two subjective grades of improvement. These items fell into the categories of music, sport and science fiction. The remaining program only benefitted marginally from stereo. The subjects' criticisms have suggested some modification of production techniques and it can be expected that as these are refined, viewers' enjoyment of television programs will be further enhanced by the television stereo presentation.

  19. How Sexual Orientation and Physical Attractiveness Affect Impressions of Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elman, Donald; And Others

    Stereotyped impressions of male homosexuals and the underlying importance of sexuality in social attraction and perceptions were investigated. Male (N=80) and female (N=80) college students responded to either an attractive or an unattractive photo of a male stimulus person, who was identified to half of the subjects as a homosexual. Compared to…

  20. Impressions of Counselors as a Function of Counselor Physical Attractiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Jean A.

    1978-01-01

    Research assessed the effects of counselor physical attractiveness and inter-actions between attractiveness and counselor subject sex. It is suggested that sex of counselor and client may play a more important role independently and in conjunction with attractiveness than does attractiveness alone in influencing impressions and expectations.…

  1. 43 CFR 3420.1-1 - Lands subject to evaluation for leasing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Competitive Leasing § 3420.1-1 Lands subject to evaluation for leasing. All lands subject to coal leasing under the mineral leasing laws are subject to evaluation under this subpart (43 CFR 3400.2). .... 3420.1-1 Section 3420.1-1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands...

  2. 43 CFR 3420.1-1 - Lands subject to evaluation for leasing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Competitive Leasing § 3420.1-1 Lands subject to evaluation for leasing. All lands subject to coal leasing under the mineral leasing laws are subject to evaluation under this subpart (43 CFR 3400.2). .... 3420.1-1 Section 3420.1-1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands...

  3. Forming impressions: effects of facial expression and gender stereotypes.

    PubMed

    Hack, Tay

    2014-04-01

    The present study of 138 participants explored how facial expressions and gender stereotypes influence impressions. It was predicted that images of smiling women would be evaluated more favorably on traits reflecting warmth, and that images of non-smiling men would be evaluated more favorably on traits reflecting competence. As predicted, smiling female faces were rated as more warm; however, contrary to prediction, perceived competence of male faces was not affected by facial expression. Participants' female stereotype endorsement was a significant predictor for evaluations of female faces; those who ascribed more strongly to traditional female stereotypes reported the most positive impressions of female faces displaying a smiling expression. However, a similar effect was not found for images of men; endorsement of traditional male stereotypes did not predict participants' impressions of male faces. PMID:24897907

  4. Are Course Evaluations Subject to a Halo Effect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darby, Jenny A.

    2007-01-01

    Many course evaluations, including those used in schools by OfStEd, colleges and universities, employ a number of scales as a means of evaluating various aspects of the educational experience of the student. It tends to be assumed that students consider the scales independently. This article argues that students are influenced by a "halo effect"…

  5. Design, Implementation, and Opening to the Public of an Impression-Based Music Retrieval System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumamoto, Tadahiko; Ohta, Kimiko

    Impression-based music retrieval helps users in finding musical pieces that suit their preferences, feelings, or mental states from the huge volume of a music database. We have therefore developed an impression-based music retrieval system that enables this. Users are asked to select one or more pairs of impression words from the multiple pairs presented by the system and estimate each of the selected pairs on a seven-step scale in order to input their impressions into the system. For instance, if they want to locate musical pieces that will create a happy impression, they should check the radio button ``Happy'' in the impression scale, ``Very happy -- Happy -- A little happy -- Neutral -- A little sad -- Sad -- Very sad,'' where a pair of impression words with a seven-step scale is called an ``impression scale'' in this paper. The system would measure the distance between the impressions of every musical piece in a user-specified music database and the impressions inputted by the user, and determine candidate musical pieces to be presented as retrieval results. In this paper, we define the form of vectors that numerically express impressions of musical pieces, and propose a method of generating such a vector from a musical piece. The most significant attribute of this method is that it uses n-gram statistics of information on pitch, strength, and length of every tone in that musical piece as features extracted from it. We also present the results of evaluating the performance of the system.

  6. Body posture evaluations in subjects with internal temporomandibular joint derangement.

    PubMed

    Munhoz, Wagner Cesar; Marques, Amélia Pasqual

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to verify possible relationships between global body posture and temporomandibular joint internal derangement (TMJ-id), by comparing 30 subjects presenting typical TMJ-id signs to 20 healthy subjects. Body posture was assessed using the analysis of muscle chains on several photographs. Results show a higher frequency of lifted shoulders (p=0.04) and of changes in the antero-internal hip chain (p=0.02) in the test group, but no further differences were found significant between the control and test groups. The test group was then divided into three subgroups according to the Helkimo index of temporomandibular disorder severity. Again, no significant differences were found between the subgroups. However, there was a trend noticed in the group with the most severe dysfunction, to present a forward head and shoulders posture. Results are discussed in light of previous studies using the same sample. PMID:19891257

  7. Evaluating the Role of Content in Subjective Video Quality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Vrgovic, Petar

    2014-01-01

    Video quality as perceived by human observers is the ground truth when Video Quality Assessment (VQA) is in question. It is dependent on many variables, one of them being the content of the video that is being evaluated. Despite the evidence that content has an impact on the quality score the sequence receives from human evaluators, currently available VQA databases mostly comprise of sequences which fail to take this into account. In this paper, we aim to identify and analyze differences between human cognitive, affective, and conative responses to a set of videos commonly used for VQA and a set of videos specifically chosen to include video content which might affect the judgment of evaluators when perceived video quality is in question. Our findings indicate that considerable differences exist between the two sets on selected factors, which leads us to conclude that videos starring a different type of content than the currently employed ones might be more appropriate for VQA. PMID:24523643

  8. Malleability of social impressions of hyperactive children.

    PubMed

    Granger, D A; Whalen, C K; Henker, B

    1993-12-01

    The role of adults' social cognitions in mediating judgments of hyperactive children's medication-related behavior change was explored. Two hundred eight-eight undergraduates observed two videotaped excerpts of a hyperactive "target" boy playing a group game with two peers. Each target was taking either methylphenidate (0.6 mg/kg) during both excerpts, placebo during both excerpts, methylphenidate first followed by placebo, or placebo first followed by methylphenidate. Adults' cumulative social evaluations of the child were assessed after they viewed both video segments. Results indicated that observers combined their perceptions of the two behavior samples into composite impressions using an equal-weight averaging algorithm. Even for children whose behavior improved, adults' ratings of undercontrolled behaviors continued to meet or, in some cases exceed, research cutoff scores used to identify hyperactive children. The findings suggest that the actual behaviors of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) play a more influential role in shaping interpersonal impressions than do perceiver social-cognitive processes such as primacy, recency, or integration biases. PMID:8126317

  9. Evaluation of surface detail reproduction, dimensional stability and gypsum compatibility of monophase polyvinyl-siloxane and polyether elastomeric impression materials under dry and moist conditions

    PubMed Central

    Vadapalli, Sriharsha Babu; Atluri, Kaleswararao; Putcha, Madhu Sudhan; Kondreddi, Sirisha; Kumar, N. Suman; Tadi, Durga Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This in vitro study was designed to compare polyvinyl-siloxane (PVS) monophase and polyether (PE) monophase materials under dry and moist conditions for properties such as surface detail reproduction, dimensional stability, and gypsum compatibility. Materials and Methods: Surface detail reproduction was evaluated using two criteria. Dimensional stability was evaluated according to American Dental Association (ADA) specification no. 19. Gypsum compatibility was assessed by two criteria. All the samples were evaluated, and the data obtained were analyzed by a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Pearson's Chi-square tests. Results: When surface detail reproduction was evaluated with modification of ADA specification no. 19, both the groups under the two conditions showed no significant difference statistically. When evaluated macroscopically both the groups showed statistically significant difference. Results for dimensional stability showed that the deviation from standard was significant among the two groups, where Aquasil group showed significantly more deviation compared to Impregum group (P < 0.001). Two conditions also showed significant difference, with moist conditions showing significantly more deviation compared to dry condition (P < 0.001). The results of gypsum compatibility when evaluated with modification of ADA specification no. 19 and by giving grades to the casts for both the groups and under two conditions showed no significant difference statistically. Conclusion: Regarding dimensional stability, both impregum and aquasil performed better in dry condition than in moist; impregum performed better than aquasil in both the conditions. When tested for surface detail reproduction according to ADA specification, under dry and moist conditions both of them performed almost equally. When tested according to macroscopic evaluation, impregum and aquasil performed significantly better in dry condition compared to moist condition. In dry

  10. "Leer-ics" or Lyrics: Teenage Impressions of Rock 'n' Roll.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prinsky, Lorraine E.; Rosenbaum, Jill L.

    1987-01-01

    This study compared adults' impressions of rock music with those of teenagers and found vast differences. Youths reported hearing subjects relating to their lives such as "growing up" while adults heard more references to sex and violence. Perhaps the differing impressions reflect differences in learning, experience, and literary abilities. (VM)

  11. Automated Tools for Subject Matter Expert Evaluation of Automated Scoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, David M.; Bejar, Isaac I.; Sax, Anne

    2004-01-01

    As automated scoring of complex constructed-response examinations reaches operational status, the process of evaluating the quality of resultant scores, particularly in contrast to scores of expert human graders, becomes as complex as the data itself. Using a vignette from the Architectural Registration Examination (ARE), this article explores the…

  12. Users' subjective evaluation of electronic vision enhancement systems.

    PubMed

    Culham, Louise E; Chabra, Anthony; Rubin, Gary S

    2009-03-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to elicit the users' responses to four electronic head-mounted devices (Jordy, Flipperport, Maxport and NuVision) and (2) to correlate users' opinion with performance. Ten patients with early onset macular disease (EOMD) and 10 with age-related macular disease (AMD) used these electronic vision enhancement systems (EVESs) for a variety of visual tasks. A questionnaire designed in-house and a modified VF-14 were used to evaluate the responses. Following initial experience of the devices in the laboratory, every patient took home two of the four devices for 1 week each. Responses were re-evaluated after this period of home loan. No single EVES stood out as the strong preference for all aspects evaluated. In the laboratory-based appraisal, Flipperport typically received the best overall ratings and highest score for image quality and ability to magnify, but after home loan there was no significant difference between devices. Comfort of device, although important, was not predictive of rating once magnification had been taken into account. For actual performance, a threshold effect was seen whereby ratings increased as reading speed improved up to 60 words per minute. Newly diagnosed patients responded most positively to EVESs, but otherwise users' opinion could not be predicted by age, gender, diagnosis or previous CCTV experience. User feedback is essential in our quest to understand the benefits and shortcoming of EVESs. Such information should help guide both prescribing and future development of low vision devices. PMID:19236583

  13. Objective and subjective evaluation of the acoustic comfort in classrooms.

    PubMed

    Zannin, Paulo Henrique Trombetta; Marcon, Carolina Reich

    2007-09-01

    The acoustic comfort of classrooms in a Brazilian public school has been evaluated through interviews with 62 teachers and 464 pupils, measurements of background noise, reverberation time, and sound insulation. Acoustic measurements have revealed the poor acoustic quality of the classrooms. Results have shown that teachers and pupils consider the noise generated and the voice of the teacher in neighboring classrooms as the main sources of annoyance inside the classroom. Acoustic simulations resulted in the suggestion of placement of perforated plywood on the ceiling, for reduction in reverberation time and increase in the acoustic comfort of the classrooms. PMID:17202022

  14. Subjective preference evaluation of sound fields by performing singers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noson, Dennis

    2003-08-01

    A model of the auditory process is proposed for performing singers, which incorporates the added signal from bone conduction, as well as the psychological distance for subjective preference of the performer from the acoustic sound field of the stage. The explanatory power of previous scientific studies of vocal stage acoustics has been limited by a lack of an underlying theory of performer preference. Ando's theory, using the autocorrelation function (ACF) for parametrizing temporal factors, was applied to interpretation of singer sound field preference determined by the pair comparison method. Melisma style singing (no lyrics) was shown to increase the preferred delay time of reflections from a mean of 14 ms with lyrics to 23 ms without (p<0.05). The extent of the shift in preferred time delay was shown to be directly related to minima of the effective duration of the running ACF, (τe)min, calculated from each singer's voice. Voice matching experiments for singers demonstrated a strong overestimate of the voice outside the head compared with the singer's own voice (22.4 dB overestimate, p<0.01). Individual singer melisma singing delay preferences were compared for ``ah'' versus ``hum'' syllables, and the increased delay preference (41 ms) was shown to be correlated with (τe)min (r2<0.68, p<0.01). When the proposed bone conduction model was applied, using the measured overestimate of sound level of the singer's own voice for each singer (9.9 dB mean overestimate difference between ``ah'' and ``hum,'' p<0.01), the relationship of singer preference to (τe)min was improved (r2=0.97, p<0.01). Thesis advisor: Yoichi Ando Copies of this thesis are available from the author by inquiry at BRC Acoustics, 1741 First Avenue South, Seattle, WA 98134 USA. E-mail address: dnoson@brcacoustics.com

  15. Valence processing of first impressions in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex: a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chi-Lin; Wang, Min-Ying; Hu, Jon-Fan

    2016-05-25

    Previous studies have suggested that the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) plays a central role in processing first impressions; however, little is known about how dmPFC processes different valences of first impressions. Moreover, it is still unclear as to whether the dmPFC shows lateralization or only induces different levels of activation when processing positive and negative impressions. To address these questions in the present study, the brain activities for the impression judgments expressed by participants were measured with near-infrared spectroscopy. For each real facial picture, participants were asked to evaluate their first impressions on a scale from 'bad' to 'good' using a keyboard. The results showed that although the right dmPFC has a higher sensitivity in processing impressions, both the hemispheres of dmPFC showed a significant trend where the activation of positive impressions was higher than the negative ones. Accordingly, it is proposed that the dmPFC acts as a single mechanism responsible for delineating the processing of first impressions rather than two lateralized systems. Therefore, a 'positivity dominance hypothesis' is also proposed, which states that dmPFC in both hemispheres have a higher sensitivity and priority for positive impressions than negative ones. The present study provides valuable findings with respect to the role of the dmPFC in the processes of first impression formation. PMID:27035730

  16. 10 CFR 709.3 - Covered persons subject to a CI evaluation and polygraph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Covered persons subject to a CI evaluation and polygraph. 709.3 Section 709.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COUNTERINTELLIGENCE EVALUATION PROGRAM General Provisions § 709.3 Covered persons subject to a CI evaluation and polygraph. (a) Mandatory CI evaluation. Except as provided in § 709.5 of this part...

  17. Enhancing the authenticity of assessments through grounding in first impressions.

    PubMed

    Humă, Bogdana

    2015-09-01

    This article examines first impressions through a discursive and interactional lens. Until now, social psychologists have studied first impressions in laboratory conditions, in isolation from their natural environment, thus overseeing their discursive roles as devices for managing situated interactional concerns. I examine fragments of text and talk in which individuals spontaneously invoke first impressions of other persons as part of assessment activities in settings where the authenticity of speakers' stances might be threatened: (1) in activities with inbuilt evaluative components and (2) in sequential contexts where recipients have been withholding affiliation to speakers' actions. I discuss the relationship between authenticity, as a type of credibility issue related to intersubjective trouble, and the characteristics of first impression assessments, which render them useful for dealing with this specific credibility concern. I identify four features of first impression assessments which make them effective in enhancing authenticity: witness positioning (Potter, 1996, Representing reality: Discourse, rhetoric and social construction, Sage, London), (dis)location in time and space, automaticity, and extreme formulations (Edwards, 2003, Analyzing race talk: Multidisciplinary perspectives on the research interview, Cambridge University Press, New York). PMID:25346466

  18. Similarity to the self influences cortical recruitment during impression formation.

    PubMed

    Leshikar, Eric D; Cassidy, Brittany S; Gutchess, Angela H

    2016-04-01

    Prior work has shown that whether or not someone is similar to the self influences person memory--a type of self-reference effect for others. In this study, we were interested in understanding the neural regions supporting the generation of impressions and subsequent memory for targets who vary in similarity to the self. Participants underwent fMRI scanning while forming positive or negative impressions of face-behavior pairs. We tested participants' memory for their generated impressions and then back-sorted the impression trials (encoding) into different levels of self-similarity (high, medium, low) using a self-similarity posttest that came after recognition. Extending prior behavioral work, our data confirmed our hypothesis that memory would be highest for self-similar others and lowest for self-dissimilar others. Dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) activity increased with self-similarity (high > medium > low) to targets, regardless of later memory for them. An analysis of regions supporting impression memory revealed a double dissociation within medial temporal lobe regions: for similar others, amygdala recruitment supported memory, whereas for dissimilar others, hippocampal activation supported memory. These results suggest that self-similarity influences evaluation and memory for targets but also affects the underlying neural resources engaged when thinking about others who vary in self-similarity. PMID:26558615

  19. The impact of motivation on race-based impression formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianyi; Cardenas-Iniguez, Carlos; Correll, Joshua; Cloutier, Jasmin

    2016-01-01

    Affective biases toward racial out-group members, characterized by White perceivers' negative evaluations of Black individuals, prevail in U.S. culture. Such affective associations have been found to guide race-based impression formation. Accordingly, individuals may strive to resolve inconsistencies when perceiving targets violating their expectations. The current study focuses on the impact of evaluative incongruence on the activity of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) - a brain region previously shown to support impression formation. When asking participants to form impressions of positively and negatively evaluated Black and White individuals, we found preferential dmPFC activity in response to individuals paired with information that violates race-based affective associations. Importantly, individual differences in internal motivation to respond without prejudice (IMS) were found to shape the extent to which dmPFC activity indexes the interactive effects of race and affective associations during impression formation. Specifically, preferential dmPFC activity in response to evaluatively incongruent targets (i.e., Black-positive & White-negative) was present among participants with lower, but not those with higher, levels of IMS. Implications and future directions are discussed in the context of dmPFC involvement in social cognition. PMID:26302673

  20. 48 CFR 3052.216-70 - Evaluation of offers subject to an economic price adjustment clause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Evaluation of offers subject to an economic price adjustment clause. As prescribed in (HSAR) 48 CFR 3016.203... subject to an economic price adjustment clause. 3052.216-70 Section 3052.216-70 Federal Acquisition... Economic Price Adjustment Clause (JUN 2006) Offers shall be evaluated without adding an amount for...

  1. 48 CFR 1252.216-70 - Evaluation of offers subject to an economic price adjustment clause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Text of Provisions and Clauses 1252.216-70 Evaluation of offers subject to an economic price adjustment clause. As prescribed in (TAR) 48 CFR 1216.203-470, insert the following provision: Evaluation of Offers... subject to an economic price adjustment clause. 1252.216-70 Section 1252.216-70 Federal...

  2. 48 CFR 3052.216-70 - Evaluation of offers subject to an economic price adjustment clause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Evaluation of offers subject to an economic price adjustment clause. As prescribed in (HSAR) 48 CFR 3016.203... subject to an economic price adjustment clause. 3052.216-70 Section 3052.216-70 Federal Acquisition... Economic Price Adjustment Clause (JUN 2006) Offers shall be evaluated without adding an amount for...

  3. 48 CFR 3052.216-70 - Evaluation of offers subject to an economic price adjustment clause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Evaluation of offers subject to an economic price adjustment clause. As prescribed in (HSAR) 48 CFR 3016.203... subject to an economic price adjustment clause. 3052.216-70 Section 3052.216-70 Federal Acquisition... Economic Price Adjustment Clause (JUN 2006) Offers shall be evaluated without adding an amount for...

  4. 48 CFR 3052.216-70 - Evaluation of offers subject to an economic price adjustment clause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Evaluation of offers subject to an economic price adjustment clause. As prescribed in (HSAR) 48 CFR 3016.203... subject to an economic price adjustment clause. 3052.216-70 Section 3052.216-70 Federal Acquisition... Economic Price Adjustment Clause (JUN 2006) Offers shall be evaluated without adding an amount for...

  5. 48 CFR 1252.216-70 - Evaluation of offers subject to an economic price adjustment clause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Text of Provisions and Clauses 1252.216-70 Evaluation of offers subject to an economic price adjustment clause. As prescribed in (TAR) 48 CFR 1216.203-470, insert the following provision: Evaluation of Offers... subject to an economic price adjustment clause. 1252.216-70 Section 1252.216-70 Federal...

  6. 43 CFR 3420.1-1 - Lands subject to evaluation for leasing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lands subject to evaluation for leasing. 3420.1-1 Section 3420.1-1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued... under the mineral leasing laws are subject to evaluation under this subpart (43 CFR 3400.2)....

  7. 47 CFR 73.7001 - Services subject to evaluation by point system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Services subject to evaluation by point system... Educational Channels, and for Certain Applications for Noncommercial Educational Stations on Non-Reserved Channels § 73.7001 Services subject to evaluation by point system. (a) A point system will be used...

  8. 47 CFR 73.7001 - Services subject to evaluation by point system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Services subject to evaluation by point system... Educational Channels, and for Certain Applications for Noncommercial Educational Stations on Non-Reserved Channels § 73.7001 Services subject to evaluation by point system. (a) A point system will be used...

  9. 48 CFR 3052.216-70 - Evaluation of offers subject to an economic price adjustment clause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Evaluation of offers subject to an economic price adjustment clause. As prescribed in (HSAR) 48 CFR 3016.203... subject to an economic price adjustment clause. 3052.216-70 Section 3052.216-70 Federal Acquisition... Economic Price Adjustment Clause (JUN 2006) Offers shall be evaluated without adding an amount for...

  10. 48 CFR 1252.216-70 - Evaluation of offers subject to an economic price adjustment clause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Text of Provisions and Clauses 1252.216-70 Evaluation of offers subject to an economic price adjustment clause. As prescribed in (TAR) 48 CFR 1216.203-470, insert the following provision: Evaluation of Offers... subject to an economic price adjustment clause. 1252.216-70 Section 1252.216-70 Federal...

  11. 48 CFR 1252.216-70 - Evaluation of offers subject to an economic price adjustment clause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Text of Provisions and Clauses 1252.216-70 Evaluation of offers subject to an economic price adjustment clause. As prescribed in (TAR) 48 CFR 1216.203-470, insert the following provision: Evaluation of Offers... subject to an economic price adjustment clause. 1252.216-70 Section 1252.216-70 Federal...

  12. 48 CFR 1252.216-70 - Evaluation of offers subject to an economic price adjustment clause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Text of Provisions and Clauses 1252.216-70 Evaluation of offers subject to an economic price adjustment clause. As prescribed in (TAR) 48 CFR 1216.203-470, insert the following provision: Evaluation of Offers... subject to an economic price adjustment clause. 1252.216-70 Section 1252.216-70 Federal...

  13. Comparison of Dimensional Accuracies Using Two Elastomeric Impression Materials in Casting Three-dimensional Tool Marks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate two types of impression materials which were frequently used for casting three-dimensional tool marks in China, namely (i) dental impression material and (ii) special elastomeric impression material for tool mark casting. The two different elastomeric impression materials were compared under equal conditions. The parameters measured were dimensional accuracies, the number of air bubbles, the ease of use, and the sharpness and quality of the individual characteristics present on casts. The results showed that dental impression material had the advantage of special elastomeric impression material in casting tool marks in crime scenes; hence, it combined ease of use, dimensional accuracy, sharpness and high quality. PMID:27122422

  14. Comparison of intraoral scanning and conventional impression techniques using 3-dimensional superimposition

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Ye-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study is to evaluate the appropriate impression technique by analyzing the superimposition of 3D digital model for evaluating accuracy of conventional impression technique and digital impression. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty-four patients who had no periodontitis or temporomandibular joint disease were selected for analysis. As a reference model, digital impressions with a digital impression system were performed. As a test models, for conventional impression dual-arch and full-arch, impression techniques utilizing addition type polyvinylsiloxane for fabrication of cast were applied. 3D laser scanner is used for scanning the cast. Each 3 pairs for 25 STL datasets were imported into the inspection software. The three-dimensional differences were illustrated in a color-coded map. For three-dimensional quantitative analysis, 4 specified contact locations(buccal and lingual cusps of second premolar and molar) were established. For twodimensional quantitative analysis, the sectioning from buccal cusp to lingual cusp of second premolar and molar were acquired depending on the tooth axis. RESULTS In color-coded map, the biggest difference between intraoral scanning and dual-arch impression was seen (P<.05). In three-dimensional analysis, the biggest difference was seen between intraoral scanning and dual-arch impression and the smallest difference was seen between dual-arch and full-arch impression. CONCLUSION The two- and three-dimensional deviations between intraoral scanner and dual-arch impression was bigger than full-arch and dual-arch impression (P<.05). The second premolar showed significantly bigger three-dimensional deviations than the second molar in the three-dimensional deviations (P>.05). PMID:26816576

  15. A Consideration of Cognitive Complexity and Primacy - Recency Effects in Impression Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petronko, Michael R.; Perin, Charles T.

    1970-01-01

    Classifies subjects as cognitively simple" or cognitively complex" and notes that the latter are much nore successful at reconciling inconsistent information than are the former, whose impressions are formed by the information which makes the greatest impact. (RW)

  16. A Teacher's Impressions of the Soviet Union.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Anne

    1987-01-01

    Reports the impressions of an 11th-grade world cultures teacher who visited European Russia and Uzbekistan in August, 1985. Ten major impressions are detailed, among them are (1) the poverty, (2) the sloppiness, (3) the pervasive presence of Lenin, and (4) the cultural importance of the Babushka, the Russian word for grandmother. (JDH)

  17. Effect of splinting in accuracy of two implant impression techniques.

    PubMed

    de Avila, Erica Dorigatti; de Matos Moraes, Fernanda; Castanharo, Sabrina Maria; Del'Acqua, Marcelo Antonialli; de Assis Mollo, Francisco

    2014-12-01

    Because there is no consensus in the literature about the need for a splint between copings, the aim of this study was to evaluate, in vitro, the accuracy of 2 impression techniques for implant-supported prostheses. A master cast was fabricated with four parallel implant abutment analogs and a passive framework. Two groups with 5 casts each were formed: Group 1 (squared impression copings with no splint: S) and Group 2 (splinted squared impression copings, using metal drill burs and Pattern resin: SS). The impression material used was polyvinyl siloxane with open trays for standard preparation of the casts. For each cast, the framework was positioned, and a titanium screw was tightened with 10 N·cm torque in analog A, after which measurements of the abutment-framework interface gaps were performed at analogs C and D. This process was repeated for analog D. These measurements were analyzed using software. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with a confidence interval of 95% was used to analyze the data. Significant differences were detected between S and SS in relation to the master cast (P ≤ 0.05). The median values of the abutment-framework interface gaps were as follows: master cast: 39.64 μm; squared impression copings with no splint: 205.86 μm; splinted squared impression copings: 99.19 μm. Under the limitations of this study, the technique presented for Group 2 produces better results compared with the technique used for Group 1. PMID:25506658

  18. Does immediate dentin sealing influence the polymerization of impression materials?

    PubMed Central

    Ghiggi, Paula Cristine; Steiger, Arno Kieling; Marcondes, Maurem Leitão; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Burnett, Luiz Henrique; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of the following study is to evaluate the interaction between the resin materials used in immediate dentin sealing (IDS) techniques and impression materials with two different techniques to eliminate the oxygen-inhibition layer. Materials and Methods: The occlusal dentin surface of 35 human molars was exposed. The teeth were used in two Groups: Group 1 – Impression with Express XT; Group 2 – Impression with Impregum. Groups 1 and 2 were divided into 14 subgroups: Groups 1a and 2a – Control groups; 1b and 2b – IDS with Clearfil SE Bond (CSE); 1c and 2c – IDS with CSE + additional polymerization with glycerin jelly; 1d and 2d – IDS with CSE + alcohol; 1e and 2e – IDS with CSE and Protect Liner F (PLF); 1f and 2f – IDS with CSE and PLF + additional polymerization with glycerin jelly; and 1g and 2g – IDS with CSE and PLF + alcohol. Five teeth were used in each experimental group, and the tooth surface was photographed using a digital camera. Results: Small quantity of unpolymerized impression material remained attached to the CSE or to the PLF in Groups 1b and 1e. Groups 1c and 1d prevented the interaction. Small quantity of polymerized impression material remained attached to the CSE or to the PLF for Groups 2b and 2e. The same interaction was observed for Groups 2c and 2d. For Groups 2c and 2f, no interactions were observed. Conclusion: Resin materials interacted with impression materials. The application of glycerin jelly and alcohol prevented the interaction of CSE with Express XT and PLF with Impregum; however, these treatments were not completely effective in preventing the interaction of CSE with Impregum and PLF with Express XT. PMID:25202218

  19. Impression Management Messages and Reactions to Organizational Reward Allocations: The Mediating Influence of Fairness and Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tata, Jasmine; Rhodes, Susan R.

    1996-01-01

    Examines relationships among impression-management messages, evaluations of reward allocations (fairness and responsibility), and reaction to rewards (anger, approval of manager, and overall job satisfaction). Finds that impression-management messages directly influence fairness and responsibility, and indirectly influence anger and approval. (SR)

  20. [Quality and subjectivity in the evaluation of health services and programs].

    PubMed

    Uchimura, Kátia Yumi; Bosi, Maria Lúcia Magalhães

    2002-01-01

    This essay focuses on the evaluation of health programs and services, emphasizing the subjectivity emerging from the evaluation process. The text is a theoretical construction that targets the various meanings of evaluation, the influence of the positivist paradigm on the field of health program and service evaluation, the polysemous nature of the term "quality", and its close overlapping with subjectivity. In addition, the authors highlight the importance of studies that incorporate the perspectives of social actors into the evaluation processes, recommending qualitative social research methodology as a productive instrument. PMID:12488882

  1. Effect of different impression materials and techniques on the dimensional accuracy of implant definitive casts

    PubMed Central

    Ebadian, Behnaz; Rismanchian, Mansor; Dastgheib, Badrosadat; Bajoghli, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Different factors such as impression techniques and materials can affect the passive fit between the superstructure and implant. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different impression materials and techniques on the dimensional accuracy of implant definitive casts. Materials and Methods: Four internal hex implants (Biohorizons Ø4 mm) were placed on a metal maxillary model perpendicular to the horizontal plane in maxillary lateral incisors, right canine and left first premolar areas. Three impression techniques including open tray, closed tray using ball top screw abutments and closed tray using short impression copings and two impression materials (polyether and polyvinyl siloxane) were evaluated (n = 60). The changes in distances between implant analogues in mediolateral (x) and anteroposterior (y) directions and analogue angles in x/z and y/z directions in the horizontal plane on the definitive casts were measured by coordinate measuring machine. The data were analyzed by multivariate two-way analysis of variance and one sample t-test (α = 0.05). Results: No statistical significant differences were observed between different impression techniques and materials. However, deviation and distortion of definitive casts had a significant difference with the master model when short impression copings and polyvinyl siloxane impression material were used (P < 0.05). In open tray technique, there was a significant difference in the rotation of analogs compared with the master model with both impression materials (P < 0.05). Conclusion: There was no difference between open and closed tray impression techniques; however, less distortion and deviation were observed in the open tray technique. In the closed tray impression technique, ball top screw was more accurate than short impression copings. PMID:25878678

  2. The effect of tray selection on the accuracy of elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    Gordon, G E; Johnson, G H; Drennon, D G

    1990-01-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of reproduction of stone casts made from impressions using different tray and impression materials. The tray materials used were an acrylic resin, a thermoplastic, and a plastic. The impression materials used were an additional silicone, a polyether, and a polysulfide. Impressions were made of a stainless steel master die that simulated crown preparations for a fixed partial denture and an acrylic resin model with cross-arch and anteroposterior landmarks in stainless steel that typify clinical intra-arch distances. Impressions of the fixed partial denture simulation were made with all three impression materials and all three tray types. Impressions of the cross-arch and anteroposterior landmarks were made by using all three tray types with only the addition reaction silicone impression material. Impressions were poured at 1 hour with a type IV dental stone. Data were analyzed by using ANOVA with a sample size of five. Results indicated that custom-made trays of acrylic resin and the thermoplastic material performed similarly regarding die accuracy and produced clinically acceptable casts. The stock plastic tray consistently produced casts with greater dimensional change than the two custom trays. PMID:2404101

  3. Does aging impair first impression accuracy? Differentiating emotion recognition from complex social inferences.

    PubMed

    Krendl, Anne C; Rule, Nicholas O; Ambady, Nalini

    2014-09-01

    Young adults can be surprisingly accurate at making inferences about people from their faces. Although these first impressions have important consequences for both the perceiver and the target, it remains an open question whether first impression accuracy is preserved with age. Specifically, could age differences in impressions toward others stem from age-related deficits in accurately detecting complex social cues? Research on aging and impression formation suggests that young and older adults show relative consensus in their first impressions, but it is unknown whether they differ in accuracy. It has been widely shown that aging disrupts emotion recognition accuracy, and that these impairments may predict deficits in other social judgments, such as detecting deceit. However, it is unclear whether general impression formation accuracy (e.g., emotion recognition accuracy, detecting complex social cues) relies on similar or distinct mechanisms. It is important to examine this question to evaluate how, if at all, aging might affect overall accuracy. Here, we examined whether aging impaired first impression accuracy in predicting real-world outcomes and categorizing social group membership. Specifically, we studied whether emotion recognition accuracy and age-related cognitive decline (which has been implicated in exacerbating deficits in emotion recognition) predict first impression accuracy. Our results revealed that emotion recognition accuracy did not predict first impression accuracy, nor did age-related cognitive decline impair it. These findings suggest that domains of social perception outside of emotion recognition may rely on mechanisms that are relatively unimpaired by aging. PMID:25244469

  4. Brief report: Impression formation in high-functioning autism: role of nonverbal behavior and stereotype activating information.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Caroline; Dratsch, Thomas; Vogeley, Kai; Bente, Gary

    2014-07-01

    Little is known about whether stereotypes influence social judgments of autistic individuals, in particular when they compete with tacit face-to-face cues. We compared impression formation of 17 subjects with high-functioning autism (HFA) and 17 age-, gender- and IQ-matched controls. Information about the profession of a job applicant served as stereotype activating information. The target person's nonverbal behavior was presented as a computer animation showing two virtual characters in interaction. Contrary to our hypothesis, HFA participants were as sensitive to nonverbal cues as controls. Moreover, HFA showed a tendency to evaluate persons more positively. This might indicate a routine HFA apply in impression formation in order to compensate for their deficit in intuitive understanding of nonverbal communication cues. PMID:24362848

  5. Subjective Performance Evaluation in the Public Sector: Evidence from School Inspections. CEE DP 135

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussain, Iftikhar

    2012-01-01

    Performance measurement in the public sector is largely based on objective metrics, which may be subject to gaming behaviour. This paper investigates a novel subjective performance evaluation system where independent inspectors visit schools at very short notice, publicly disclose their findings and sanction schools rated fail. First, I…

  6. Evaluating Interventions for Young Gifted Children Using Single-Subject Methodology: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Rosalind L.; Kemp, Coral

    2013-01-01

    Single-subject experimental designs have long been used in special education to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions for exceptional children. However, the design has not been used widely in gifted education. In this article, an overview of the main features of single-subject design is presented, and its potential for application in gifted…

  7. Impression Cytology of the Lid Wiper Area.

    PubMed

    Muntz, Alex; van Doorn, Kevin; Subbaraman, Lakshman N; Jones, Lyndon W

    2016-01-01

    Few reports on the cellular anatomy of the lid wiper (LW) area of the inner eyelid exist and only one report makes use of cytological methods. The optimization of a method of collecting, staining and imaging cells from the LW region using impression cytology (IC) is described in this study. Cells are collected from the inner surface of the upper eyelid of human subjects using hydrophilic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membranes, and stained with cytological dyes to reveal the presence of goblet cells, mucins, cell nuclei and various degrees of pre- and para-keratinization. Immunocytochemical dyes show cell esterase activity and compromised cell membranes by the use of a confocal scanning laser microscope. Up to 100 microscopic digital images are captured for each sample and stitched into a high-resolution, large scale image of the entire IC span. We demonstrate a higher sensitivity of IC than reported before, appropriate for identifying cellular morphologies and metabolic activity in the LW area. To our knowledge, this is the first time this selection of fluorescent dyes was used to image LW IC membranes. This protocol will be effective in future studies to reveal undocumented details of the LW area, such as assessing cellular particularities of contact lens wearers or patients with dry eye or lid wiper epitheliopathy. PMID:27584693

  8. Imaging first impressions: distinct neural processing of verbal and nonverbal social information.

    PubMed

    Kuzmanovic, Bojana; Bente, Gary; von Cramon, D Yves; Schilbach, Leonhard; Tittgemeyer, Marc; Vogeley, Kai

    2012-03-01

    First impressions profoundly influence our attitudes and behavior toward others. However, little is known about whether and to what degree the cognitive processes that underlie impression formation depend on the domain of the available information about the target person. To investigate the neural bases of the influence of verbal as compared to nonverbal information on interpersonal judgments, we identified brain regions where the BOLD signal parametrically increased with increasing strength of evaluation based on either short text vignettes or mimic and gestural behavior. While for verbal stimuli the increasing strength of subjective evaluation was correlated with increased neural activation of precuneus and posterior cingulate cortex (PC/PCC), a similar effect was observed for nonverbal stimuli in the amygdala. These findings support the assumption that qualitatively different cognitive operations underlie person evaluation depending upon the stimulus domain: while the processing of nonverbal person information may be more strongly associated with affective processing as indexed by recruitment of the amygdala, verbal person information engaged the PC/PCC that has been related to social inferential processing. PMID:22227133

  9. Evaluation of Subjective Measurement Systems with Focus on Workmanship Scratches and Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, Jesse

    2011-02-24

    The presence of workmanship defects at the Kansas City Plant (KCP) is not a new problem nor is it an easy one to remedy. The lack of well defined parameters, subjective evaluations, and operator dependency makes this problem difficult to analyze. At the time of project assignment, workmanship defects comprised approximately 50% of all non-conformance reports for internally produced products. Not all of these non-conformances result in product rejections, thus inferring that inconsistency in evaluations were present. The purpose of this study was to identify a method for evaluating an operator’s ability to properly characterize subjective defects. Since the scope of the project was limited to no funding, scratch depth was selected as the only criteria to evaluate. It was determined that the introduction of a reference standard coupled with a predefined gate-sorting technique approved by the customer can statistically improve an operators ability to perform subjective evaluations.

  10. 21 CFR 872.3660 - Impression material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3660 Impression material. (a) Identification... device is intended to provide models for study and for production of restorative prosthetic devices,...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3660 - Impression material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3660 Impression material. (a) Identification... device is intended to provide models for study and for production of restorative prosthetic devices,...

  12. The Objective and Subjective Evaluation of Multichannel Expansion in Wide Dynamic Range Compression Hearing Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plyler, Patrick N.; Lowery, Kristy J.; Hamby, Hilary M.; Trine, Timothy D.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The effects of multichannel expansion on the objective and subjective evaluation of 20 listeners fitted binaurally with 4-channel, digital in-the-ear hearing instruments were investigated. Method: Objective evaluations were conducted in quiet using the Connected Speech Test (CST) and in noise using the Hearing in Noise Test (HINT) at 40,…

  13. Preliminary impression techniques for microstomia patients.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K Aswini; Bhat, Vinaya; Nair, K Chandrasekheran; Suresh, Reshma

    2016-01-01

    The Prosthetic rehabilitation of microstomia patients presents difficulties at all the stages. The difficulty starts with the preliminary impression making. This is due to the tongue rigidity and the decreased oral opening. A maximum oral opening which is smaller than the size of the tray can make prosthetic treatment challenging. Due to the restricted mouth opening, insertion and removal of the impression trays is extremely cumbersome and various modifications of the trays have been used in the past. Among these are the flexible trays and the sectional trays used with different modes of reassembling the segments extra orally after the impression is made. This article reviews the literature published from 1971 to 2015 concerning preliminary impression techniques used in making impressions for patients with microstomia based on various tray designs. An electronic search was performed across three databases (PubMed, Science Direct and Google Scolar) for relevant citations. The keywords/combinations used for the search were microstomia, limited/constricted/restricted mouth opening/oral access, trismus, sectional trays, impressions and prosthetic/prosthodontic rehabilitation. The search was limited to papers written in English which resulted in a total of 45 related articles of which 17 articles were included for discussion of this review. PMID:27621540

  14. Influence of inner circular sealing area impression method on the retention of complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cun-Wei; Shao, Qi; Sun, Hui-Qiang; Mao, Meng-Yun; Zhang, Xin-Wei; Gong, Qi; Xiao, Guo-Ning

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to describe an impression method of "inner circular sealing area" and to evaluate the effect of the method on retention, aesthetics and comfort of complete dentures, which lack labial base for patients with maxillary protrusions. Three patients were subjected to the experiment, and two sets of complete maxillary dentures were made for each patient; the first set was made without labial base via an inner circular sealing area method (experimental group) and the second had an intact base that was made with conventional methods (control group). Retention force tests were implemented with a tensile strength assessment device to assess the retention and a visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to evaluate the comfort between the two groups. Results showed larger retention force, better aesthetics and more comfort in the experimental group. The improved two-step impression method formed an inner circular sealing area that prevented damage to the peripheral border seal effect of the denture caused by incomplete bases and obtained better denture retention. PMID:25831114

  15. Revisiting Superintendent Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPaola, Michael F.

    2007-01-01

    Superintendents' performance evaluations continue to be too frequently conducted through a highly informal, subjective process, based more on impressions than data. Several states require school boards to use student performance data in evaluating their superintendents. Student achievement data, focusing on continuous improvement, should certainly…

  16. A fuzzy MCDM model with objective and subjective weights for evaluating service quality in hotel industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoraghi, Nima; Amiri, Maghsoud; Talebi, Golnaz; Zowghi, Mahdi

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a fuzzy multi-criteria decision-making (FMCDM) model by integrating both subjective and objective weights for ranking and evaluating the service quality in hotels. The objective method selects weights of criteria through mathematical calculation, while the subjective method uses judgments of decision makers. In this paper, we use a combination of weights obtained by both approaches in evaluating service quality in hotel industries. A real case study that considered ranking five hotels is illustrated. Examples are shown to indicate capabilities of the proposed method.

  17. Accuracy of Digital vs. Conventional Implant Impressions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang J.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Gianneschi, Grace E.; Gallucci, German O.

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of digital impressions greatly influences the clinical viability in implant restorations. The aim of this study is to compare the accuracy of gypsum models acquired from the conventional implant impression to digitally milled models created from direct digitalization by three-dimensional analysis. Thirty gypsum and 30 digitally milled models impressed directly from a reference model were prepared. The models were scanned by a laboratory scanner and 30 STL datasets from each group were imported to an inspection software. The datasets were aligned to the reference dataset by a repeated best fit algorithm and 10 specified contact locations of interest were measured in mean volumetric deviations. The areas were pooled by cusps, fossae, interproximal contacts, horizontal and vertical axes of implant position and angulation. The pooled areas were statistically analysed by comparing each group to the reference model to investigate the mean volumetric deviations accounting for accuracy and standard deviations for precision. Milled models from digital impressions had comparable accuracy to gypsum models from conventional impressions. However, differences in fossae and vertical displacement of the implant position from the gypsum and digitally milled models compared to the reference model, exhibited statistical significance (p<0.001, p=0.020 respectively). PMID:24720423

  18. Giving the wrong impression: food and beverage brand impressions delivered to youth through popular movies

    PubMed Central

    Skatrud-Mickelson, Monica; Adachi-Mejia, Anna M.; MacKenzie, Todd A.; Sutherland, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Marketing on television showcases less-healthful options, with emerging research suggesting movies promote similar products. Given the obesity epidemic, understanding advertising to youth should be a public health imperative. The objective of this study was to estimate youth impressions to food and beverages delivered through movies. Methods Impressions were calculated by dividing US receipts annually into average movie ticket prices, then multiplying this by the number of brand appearances. Examination by ratings, product types and ages were conducted by Spearman rank correlation coefficient tests. Results Youth in the USA saw over 3 billion food, beverage or food–retail establishment (FRE) impressions on average, annually from 1996 to 2005. Those aged 12–18 viewed over half of all impressions, with PG-13-rated movies containing 61.5% of impressions. There were no significant trends in brand appearances by food, beverage or FRE impressions over the decade, although there was a decreasing trend in R-rated impressions for both foods (P< 0.01) and beverages (P< 0.01), but not FREs (P= 0.08). Conclusions Movies promote billions of food and beverage impressions annually to youth. Given the public health crisis of obesity, future research should further investigate these trends, as well as the potential association of these unhealthy exposures in youth. PMID:22076600

  19. Dimensional Changes of Alginate Dental Impression Materials-An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Thombare, Ram U

    2015-01-01

    Background Dentists are always looking ahead for more dimensionally stable material for accurate and successful fabrication of prosthesis in this competitive world. Arrival of newer materials and increased material market puts dentists in dilemma for selection of material. Aim The study evaluated the effect of variations in time of pour and temperature on dimensional stability of three brands of commercially available alginates. Materials and Methods Velplast, Marieflex & Zelgan alginate impression materials were evaluated by measuring dimensional accuracy of the master cast. A die was prepared and mounted on the apparatus for the ease of impression making. The prepared casts were categorized into five groups and made up of three brands of alginate impression material with variation in time of pour viz: immediate, 20&40 minutes interval and with varying temperature of 250C, 300C & 400C. Results Impressions showed least distortion at varying degrees of temperature for 20 minutes, but the values obtained by storing of alginate impressions for 20 minutes at 300C were found to be nearly accurate than the values obtained by storing of impression at 400C. However, storing showed shrinkage of impressions. Conclusion Marieflex showed better accuracy in comparison with other two materials. Maintenance of temperature and humidity play key role during storage & transport to prevent distortion. But the study suggests immediate pouring which will minimize the distortion. The manipulation instructions, temperature of mixing water, environment & water powder ratio also plays key role in minimizing the distortion. PMID:26436059

  20. Facial feedback effects on impression formation.

    PubMed

    Ohira, H; Kurono, K

    1993-12-01

    Two experiments were conducted to examine effects of facial expressions upon social cognitive processes in which the impression of another person is formed. In each experiment, 30 female college students were induced to display or conceal their facial reactions to a hypothetical target person whose behaviors were mildly hostile (Exp. 1) or mildly friendly (Exp. 2), or their facial expressions were not manipulated. Displaying the facial expressions shifted the impression into the congruent directions with hedonic values corresponding to the facial expressions. Concealing the facial expressions, however, did not influence impression formation. Also, the positive-negative asymmetry was observed in the facial feedback effects, that is, the negative facial expression had a stronger effect on social cognition than the positive one. PMID:8170774

  1. Comparative study of dimensional accuracy of different impression techniques using addition silicone impression material.

    PubMed

    Penaflor, C F; Semacio, R C; De Las Alas, L T; Uy, H G

    1998-01-01

    This study compared dimensional accuracy of the single, double with spacer, double with cut-out and double mix impression technique using addition silicone impression material. A typhodont containing Ivorine teeth model with six (6) full-crown tooth preparations were used as the positive control. Two stone replication models for each impression technique were made as test materials. Accuracy of the techniques were assessed by measuring four dimensions on the stone dies poured from the impression of the Ivorine teeth model. Results indicated that most of the measurements for the height, width and diameter slightly decreased and a few increased compared with the Ivorine teeth model. The double with cut-out and double mix technique presents the least difference from the master model as compared to the two latter impression techniques. PMID:10202524

  2. Towards high dynamic range extensions of HEVC: subjective evaluation of potential coding technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanhart, Philippe; Řeřábek, Martin; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports the details and results of the subjective evaluations conducted at EPFL to evaluate the responses to the Call for Evidence (CfE) for High Dynamic Range (HDR) and Wide Color Gamut (WCG) Video Coding issued by Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG). The CfE on HDR/WCG Video Coding aims to explore whether the coding efficiency and/or the functionality of the current version of HEVC standard can be signi_cantly improved for HDR and WCG content. In total, nine submissions, five for Category 1 and four for Category 3a, were compared to the HEVC Main 10 Profile based Anchor. More particularly, five HDR video contents, compressed at four bit rates by each proponent responding to the CfE, were used in the subjective evaluations. Further, the side-by-side presentation methodology was used for the subjective experiment to discriminate small differences between the Anchor and proponents. Subjective results shows that the proposals provide evidence that the coding efficiency can be improved in a statistically noticeable way over MPEG CfE Anchors in terms of perceived quality within the investigated content. The paper further benchmarks the selected objective metrics based on their correlations with the subjective ratings. It is shown that PSNR-DE1000, HDRVDP- 2, and PSNR-Lx can reliably detect visible differences between the proposed encoding solutions and current HEVC standard.

  3. Evaluation of Chair-Side Assays in High Microbiological Caries-Risk Subjects.

    PubMed

    Saravia, Marta Estela; Silva, Lea Assed Bezerra; Silva, Raquel Assed Bezerra; Lucisano, Marília Pacífico; Echevarría, Andrea Uribe; Echevarría, Jorge Uribe; Nelson-Filho, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the commercial chair-side assays Saliva-Check Mutans and ClinproTM Cario L-PopTM in high microbiological caries-risk dental students compared with conventional semi-quantitative colony counting culture-based technique as the reference method. Saliva samples from 93 subjects of both sexes aged 18-26 years were seeded (Köhler and Bratthall method) on plates containing SB-20M culture medium method and 12 subjects with high caries risk were selected. These 12 individuals were subjected to determination of caries risk using two commercial rapid detection chair-side assays (Saliva-Check Mutans and ClinproTM Cario L-PopTM) according to the manufacturers' instructions. The results were analyzed by the Kappa correlation test using SAS statistical software. There was a perfect agreement (Kappa=1) among the three caries risk evaluation methods - chair-side assays and semi-quantitative CFU count (control) - in all subjects. The results suggest that the commercial chair-side assays evaluated in this study may be practical and useful to identify high microbiological caries-risk subjects. PMID:26963201

  4. Testing thermal comfort of trekking boots: an objective and subjective evaluation.

    PubMed

    Arezes, P M; Neves, M M; Teixeira, S F; Leão, C P; Cunha, J L

    2013-07-01

    The study of the thermal comfort of the feet when using a specific type of shoe is of paramount importance, in particular if the main goal of the study is to attend to the needs of users. The main aim of this study was to propose a test battery for thermal comfort analysis and to apply it to the analysis of trekking boots. Methodologically, the project involves both objective and subjective evaluations. An objective evaluation of the thermal properties of the fabrics used in the boots was developed and applied. In addition, the thermal comfort provided when using the boots was also assessed both subjective and objectively. The evaluation of the thermal comfort during use, which was simulated in a laboratory environment, included the measurement of the temperature and moisture of the feet. The subjective assessment was performed using a questionnaire. From the results obtained, it was possible to define an optimal combination of fabrics to apply to trekking boots by considering the provided thermal insulation, air permeability and wicking. The results also revealed that the subjective perception of thermal comfort appears to be more related to the increase in temperature of the feet than to the moisture retention inside the boot. Although the evaluation of knits used in the boots indicated that a particular combination of fibres was optimal for use in the inner layer, the subjective and objective evaluation of thermal comfort revealed that the evaluation provided by users did not necessarily match the technical assessment data. No correlation was observed between the general comfort and specific thermal comfort assessments. Finally, the identification of thermal discomfort by specific foot areas would be useful in the process of designing and developing boots. PMID:23317756

  5. Subjective and objective evaluations of a scattered sound field in a scale model opera house.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jong Kwan; Jeon, Jin Yong

    2008-09-01

    Scattered sound fields in an opera house were objectively and subjectively evaluated through acoustical measurements in a 1:10 scale model and through auditory preference tests. Acoustical characteristics were measured in the stalls area with and without diffusers, both on the sidewalls close to the proscenium and in the soffit of the side balcony. Installed diffusers reduced the initial time delay gap and amplitude of the first reflected sound, and decreased sound pressure level (SPL), reverberation time (RT), and early decay time (EDT) at most seats due to the increased scattering and absorption. After diffuser installation, C(80) and 1-IACC(E3) increased at the front seats and decreased at the rear seats. Subjective evaluations showed that the preference of scattered sound fields correlates highly with loudness and reverberance. It was also found that EDT and SPL are dominant parameters describing subjective preference for scattered sounds in this experimental condition. PMID:19045645

  6. A single-subject approach to evaluating vehicle safety belt reminders: Back to basics

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Thomas D.; Geller, E. Scott

    1991-01-01

    A single-subject ABA reversal design was applied to evaluate the effectiveness of a limited 8-s safety belt reminder system and two modified reminder systems (a delayed and second reminder) to increase the safety belt use of 13 drivers. The research was conducted with a specially equipped research vehicle that permitted the manipulation of different safety belt reminder stimuli and the unobtrusive recording of a driver's belt use. For 2 subjects, the limited 8-s reminder increased safety belt use. For another 2 subjects, the second reminder markedly increased belt use. Some subjects were uninfluenced by the reminder systems presented; others always buckled up during both baseline and intervention conditions. The approach and results are discussed with regard to the application of behavior analysis methodologies (e.g., cumulative records) and principles (e.g., schedules of reinforcement) to advance the utility and investigation of safety belt reminder systems. PMID:16795740

  7. Pressures involved in making upper edentulous impressions.

    PubMed

    Rihani, A

    1981-12-01

    A study was made of the pressures exerted on the upper denture-bearing area in three patients each with a different type of palatal vault. A method of measuring the relative pressures in different regions of the upper denture bearing area was devised. These pressures were registered with the use of manometers while making an impression in close fitting acrylic resin special trays. The results indicated that the main pressure regions during impression making were near the center of the palate and these pressures diminished toward the buccal borders. PMID:7028974

  8. [Digital implant impression taking - an overview].

    PubMed

    Mahl, Dominik; Glenz, Fabienne; Marinello, Carlo P

    2014-01-01

    In dentist's daily practice, intraoral scanning systems are increased. Besides scanning of prepared teeth, also implants could be scanned intraorally. This clinical report describes the step-by-step techniques to scan digitally intraoral implants with two intraoral scanners (Lava™ C.O.S., 3M Espe and the CEREC AC connected with inLab MC XL, Sirona) for generating implant suprastructures without the use of impression materials, dental stone or implant impression copings. Different workflows, possibilities and limits by scanning dental implants are demonstrated. PMID:24585419

  9. Impression Testing of Self-Healing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Huber, Amy

    2005-01-01

    As part of the BIOSANT program (biologically-inspired smart nanotechnology), scientists at NASA-Langley have identified a "self-healing" plastic that spontaneously closes the hole left by the passage of a bullet. To understand and generalize the phenomenon in question, the mechanical properties responsible for this ability are being explored. Low-rate impression testing was chosen to characterize post-yield material properties, and it turned out that materials that heal following ballistic puncture also show up to 80% healing of the low-rate impression. Preliminary results on the effects of temperature and rate of puncture are presented.

  10. Forensic Child Sexual Abuse Evaluations: Assessing Subjectivity and Bias in Professional Judgements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everson, Mark D.; Sandoval, Jose Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Evaluators examining the same evidence often arrive at substantially different conclusions in forensic assessments of child sexual abuse (CSA). This study attempts to identify and quantify subjective factors that contribute to such disagreements so that interventions can be devised to improve the reliability of case decisions. Methods:…

  11. Educating Reflective Teachers for Teaching Culturally Valued Subjects: Evaluation of a Teacher-training Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shkedi, Asher

    2000-01-01

    Evaluated a teacher training project in Israel for teaching Jewish culturally valued subjects focusing on the practicum activities of the first year. Many of the 16 student teachers displayed a significant measure of reflectivity, but their critical reflection was almost completely undeveloped. Results suggest that the key to developing reflective…

  12. Evaluating lifting tasks using subjective and biomechanical estimates of stress at the lower back.

    PubMed

    Waikar, A; Lee, K; Aghazadeh, F; Parks, C

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate five different lifting tasks based on subjective and biomechanical estimates of stress at the lower back. Subjective estimates were obtained immediately after the subjects performed the lifting tasks. Rankings for different tasks were obtained according to the perceived level of stress at the lower back. A biomechanical model was used to predict the compressive force at the L5/S1 disc for the weight lifted considering link angles for the particular posture. The tasks were also ranked according to the compressive force loading at the L5/S1 disc. The weight lifted in these tasks for obtaining the subjective estimate of stress was the maximum acceptable weight of lift (MAWOL). This was determined separately for each subject using a psychophysical approach. Subjective estimates of stress were obtained for infrequent lifting, specifically for a single lift, as well as for lifting at a frequency of four lifts per min. The results showed that a lifting task acceptable from the biomechanical point of view may not be judged as a safe or acceptable task by the worker based on his subjective perception. This may result in a risk of the worker not performing the recommended task or not following the recommended method. PMID:2009848

  13. Normative Data of Thyroid Volume-Ultrasonographic Evaluation of 422 Subjects Aged 0-55 Years

    PubMed Central

    Aydıner, Ömer; Karakoç Aydıner, Elif; Akpınar, İhsan; Turan, Serap; Bereket, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To establish local normative data of thyroid volume assessed by ultrasonography in subjects aged 0-55 years living in İstanbul, Turkey. Methods: Subjects without any known history of thyroid disease, of major surgery and/or chronic disease were enrolled in the study and evaluated by physical examination and thyroid ultrasonography. Thyroid gland and isthmus at usual location, each lateral lobe volume with three dimensions, ectopic thyroid tissue and echogenicity of the gland were assessed. Results: Initially, 494 subjects were enrolled in the study. Subjects showing heterogeneous thyroid parenchyma (n=21) and/or nodule (n=51) in ultrasonography were excluded. Final analysis covered 422 subjects (216 males, 206 females). Thyroid volume was found to significantly correlate with height, weight, age and body surface area (r=0.661, r=0.712, r=0.772 and r=0.779, respectively; p<0.0001 for all). These correlations were even stronger in subjects younger than 18 years (r=0.758, r=0.800, r=0.815 and r=0.802, respectively; p<0.0001 for all). Conclusion: The study provides updated reference norms for thyroid volume in Turkish subjects which can be used in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with thyroid diseases. PMID:26316430

  14. Effect of Time on Gypsum-Impression Material Compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, John Boram

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compatibility of dental gypsum with three recently introduced irreversible hydrocolloid (alginate) alternatives. The test materials were Alginot® (Kerr™), Position Penta Quick® (3M ESPE™) and Silgimix ® (Sultan Dental™). The irreversible hydrocolloid impression material, Jeltrate Plus antimicrobial® (Dentsply Caulk™) served as the control. Materials and Methods: Testing of materials was conducted in accordance with ANSI/ADA Specification No. 18 for Alginate Impression Materials. Statistical Analysis: The 3-Way ANOVA test was used to analyze measurements between different time points at a significance level of (p < 0.05). Outcome: It was found that there was greater compatibility between gypsum and the alternative materials over time than the traditional irreversible hydrocolloid material that was tested. A statistically significant amount of surface change/incompatibility was found over time with the combination of the dental gypsum products and the control impression material (Jeltrate Plus antimicrobial®).

  15. An evaluation of growth and stability in untreated and treated subjects.

    PubMed

    Driscoll-Gilliland, J; Buschang, P H; Behrents, R G

    2001-12-01

    This retrospective longitudinal study compared skeletal and dental changes in orthodontically treated patients with changes in a comparable untreated group to evaluate the relationship between skeletal changes and mandibular incisor crowding. Cephalograms and models of 44 untreated subjects from the Broadbent-Bolton Growth Study and 43 treated patients were evaluated at "posttreatment" (14.3 +/- 1.5 and 15.2 +/- 1.1 years, respectively) and at "postretention" (23.2 +/- 3.4 and 28.9 +/- 3.6 years, respectively). Cranial base and mandibular superimpositions were used to measure cephalometric changes. Tooth-size-arch-length discrepancy, contact irregularity, and space irregularity were measured. In both groups, growth in the vertical dimension was twice that in the horizontal dimension. The untreated subjects, who were younger, exhibited greater yearly vertical growth increments than did the treated subjects. The treated subjects exhibited greater overjet and overbite increases than did the untreated subjects. Yearly changes in tooth-size-arch-length discrepancy were greater in the untreated than in the treated subjects, but there were no differences in the changes in irregularity between the 2 groups. A multivariate regression model, relating posterior facial height (Ar-Go) increase and lower incisor eruption to change in space irregularity, explained 42% of the variation in the untreated group (r = 0.64; P <.001). A weaker relationship was found in the treated group. Overjet change was negatively correlated with tooth-size-arch-length discrepancy. Changes in lower incisor crowding were related to growth in the vertical dimension and lower incisor eruption in both untreated (r = 0.64) and treated (r = 0.51) subjects. PMID:11742303

  16. The Trouble with Applicant Impression Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralston, Steven M.; Kirkwood, William G.

    1999-01-01

    Suggests that applicant impression management (AIM) is more harmful to employment interviewing than is currently suspected. Offers a conceptual model of AIM that is consistent with employment interviewing practice. Presents and critiques three arguments used to defend AIM. Examines a model for helping employers conduct interviews that minimize the…

  17. Personality Impressions Elicited by Accented English Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallois, Cynthia; Callan, Victor J.

    1981-01-01

    Australian born male and female students listened to tapes of accented English speech and were asked to relate their impressions and judgments of the speakers' personalities. Results indicated that the nationality and sex of the speakers were factors which influenced the judgments made about them by the Australian students. (Author/APM)

  18. Additivity of Clothing Cues in First Impressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennon, Sharron J.

    1986-01-01

    The theory of information integration was used to predict that in first impression situations, clothing/physical appearance cues have differential importance depending upon the type of judgment elicited. Female college students (N=104) viewed and responded to slides of colored line drawings of female stimulus persons. Multiple regression of data…

  19. Patterns of Vocalization and Impression Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Donald P.; Bouma, Gary D.

    1975-01-01

    This article discusses the interactive behavior that accompanies verbal exchange. It specifically describes a set of experiments designed to isolate an important subset of interactive behavior, the vocal (as opposed to the verbal) and to relate this information to a wide range of social impressions resulting from verbal exchange. (Available from…

  20. Impressive Subcutaneous Calcifications in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    DIMA, Alina; BERZEA, Ioana; BAICUS, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Dystrophic calcinosis cutis was commonly described in long-term dermatomyositis or systemic sclerosis, being rarely reported in other connective tissue diseases. We report the case of a 65-years old woman with an only 5-years history of systemic lupus erythematosus, who presents with multiple, impressive subcutaneous calcified masses and biological normal serum calcium and phosphate levels. PMID:26225152

  1. A Modified Impress Method for Beginning Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Russell W., Jr.

    A modified impress approach to teaching reading has been successfully used in a program involving first grade students. The program was multisensory and included aural, oral, visual, and kinesthetic learning experiences gained through listening, group discussions, dramatic play, art activities, audience reading, and recorded oral reading. These…

  2. Do first impressions count? Frailty judged by initial clinical impression predicts medium-term mortality in vascular surgical patients.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, B R; Batterham, A M; Hollingsworth, A C; Durrand, J W; Danjoux, G R

    2016-06-01

    Recognising frailty during pre-operative assessment is important. Frail patients experience higher mortality rates and are less likely to return to baseline functional status following the physiological insult of surgery. We evaluated the association between an initial clinical impression of frailty and all-cause mortality in 392 patients attending our vascular pre-operative assessment clinic. Prevalence of frailty assessed by the initial clinical impression was 30.6% (95% CI 26.0-35.2%). There were 133 deaths in 392 patients over a median follow-up period of 4 years. Using Cox regression, adjusted for age, sex, revised cardiac risk index and surgery (yes/no), the hazard ratio for mortality for frail vs. not-frail was 2.14 (95% CI 1.51-3.05). The time to 20% mortality was 16 months in the frail group and 33 months in the not-frail group. The initial clinical impression is a useful screening tool to identify frail patients in pre-operative assessment. PMID:27018374

  3. Three-dimensional laser scanning and reconstruction of ear canal impressions for optimal design of hearing aid shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tognola, Gabriella; Parazzini, Marta; Svelto, Cesare; Ravazzani, Paolo; Grandori, Ferdinando

    2003-05-01

    The hearing aid shell (or earmold) couples the hearing aid with the user ear. Proper fitting of the earmold to the subject ear canal is required to achieve satisfactory wearing comfort, reduction in acoustic feedback, and unwanted changes in the electroacoustic characteristics of the aid. To date, the hearing aid shell manufacturing process is fully manual: the shell is fabricated as a replica of the impression of the subject ear canal. The typical post-impression processes made on the ear impression modify the physical dimensions and the shape of the final shell thus affecting the overall performance of the hearing aid. In the proposed approach, the surface of the original ear impression is 3D laser scanned by a prototype equipment consisting of a pair of CCD cameras and a commercial He-Ne laser. The digitized surface is reconstructed by means of iterative deformations of a geometrical model of simple and regular shape. The triangular mesh thus obtained is smoothed by a non-shrinking low-pass spatial filter. With this approach, post-impression processes are no more needed because the digitally reconstructed impression can be directly fed to rapid prototyping equipments, thus achieving a better accuracy in obtaining an exact replica of the ear impression. Furthermore, digital reconstruction of the impression allows for simple and reliable storage and transmission of the model without handling a physical object.

  4. Effect of mixing techniques on bacterial attachment and disinfection time of polyether impression material

    PubMed Central

    Guler, Umut; Budak, Yasemin; Ruh, Emrah; Ocal, Yesim; Canay, Senay; Akyon, Yakut

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was 2-fold. The first aim was to evaluate the effects of mixing technique (hand-mixing or auto-mixing) on bacterial attachment to polyether impression materials. The second aim was to determine whether bacterial attachment to these materials was affected by length of exposure to disinfection solutions. Materials and Methods: Polyether impression material samples (n = 144) were prepared by hand-mixing or auto-mixing. Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used in testing. After incubation, the bacterial colonies were counted and then disinfectant solution was applied. The effect of disinfection solution was evaluated just after the polymerization of impression material and 30 min after polymerization. Differences in adherence of bacteria to the samples prepared by hand-mixing and to those prepared by auto-mixing were assessed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests. For evaluating the efficiency of the disinfectant, Kruskal-Wallis multiple comparisons test was used. Results: E. coli counts were higher in hand-mixed materials (P < 0.05); no other statistically significant differences were found between hand- and auto-mixed materials. According to the Kruskal-Wallis test, significant differences were found between the disinfection procedures (Z > 2.394). Conclusion: The methods used for mixing polyether impression material did not affect bacterial attachment to impression surfaces. In contrast, the disinfection procedure greatly affects decontamination of the impression surface. PMID:24966729

  5. Evaluation of an Indoor Sonic Boom Subjective Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loubeau, Alexandra; Rathsam, Jonathan; Klos, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    A sonic boom simulator at NASA Langley Research Center has been constructed for research on human response to low-amplitude sonic booms heard indoors. Research in this facility will ultimately lead to development of a psychoacoustic model for single indoor booms. The first subjective test was designed to explore indoor human response to variations in sonic boom rise time and amplitude. Another goal was to identify loudness level variability across listener locations within the facility. Finally, the test also served to evaluate the facility as a laboratory research tool for studying indoor human response to sonic booms. Subjects listened to test sounds and were asked to rate their annoyance relative to a reference boom. Measurements of test signals were conducted for objective analysis and correlation with subjective responses. Results confirm the functionality of the facility and effectiveness of the test methods and indicate that loudness level does not fully describe indoor annoyance to the selected sonic boom signals.

  6. Perceiving active listening activates the reward system and improves the impression of relevant experiences

    PubMed Central

    Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Sasaki, Akihiro T.; Sugawara, Sho K.; Tanabe, Hiroki C.; Shinohara, Ryoji; Sugisawa, Yuka; Tokutake, Kentaro; Mochizuki, Yukiko; Anme, Tokie; Sadato, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Although active listening is an influential behavior, which can affect the social responses of others, the neural correlates underlying its perception have remained unclear. Sensing active listening in social interactions is accompanied by an improvement in the recollected impressions of relevant experiences and is thought to arouse positive feelings. We therefore hypothesized that the recognition of active listening activates the reward system, and that the emotional appraisal of experiences that had been subject to active listening would be improved. To test these hypotheses, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on participants viewing assessments of their own personal experiences made by evaluators with or without active listening attitude. Subjects rated evaluators who showed active listening more positively. Furthermore, they rated episodes more positively when they were evaluated by individuals showing active listening. Neural activation in the ventral striatum was enhanced by perceiving active listening, suggesting that this was processed as rewarding. It also activated the right anterior insula, representing positive emotional reappraisal processes. Furthermore, the mentalizing network was activated when participants were being evaluated, irrespective of active listening behavior. Therefore, perceiving active listening appeared to result in positive emotional appraisal and to invoke mental state attribution to the active listener. PMID:25188354

  7. Perceiving active listening activates the reward system and improves the impression of relevant experiences.

    PubMed

    Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Sasaki, Akihiro T; Sugawara, Sho K; Tanabe, Hiroki C; Shinohara, Ryoji; Sugisawa, Yuka; Tokutake, Kentaro; Mochizuki, Yukiko; Anme, Tokie; Sadato, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Although active listening is an influential behavior, which can affect the social responses of others, the neural correlates underlying its perception have remained unclear. Sensing active listening in social interactions is accompanied by an improvement in the recollected impressions of relevant experiences and is thought to arouse positive feelings. We therefore hypothesized that the recognition of active listening activates the reward system, and that the emotional appraisal of experiences that had been subject to active listening would be improved. To test these hypotheses, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on participants viewing assessments of their own personal experiences made by evaluators with or without active listening attitude. Subjects rated evaluators who showed active listening more positively. Furthermore, they rated episodes more positively when they were evaluated by individuals showing active listening. Neural activation in the ventral striatum was enhanced by perceiving active listening, suggesting that this was processed as rewarding. It also activated the right anterior insula, representing positive emotional reappraisal processes. Furthermore, the mentalizing network was activated when participants were being evaluated, irrespective of active listening behavior. Therefore, perceiving active listening appeared to result in positive emotional appraisal and to invoke mental state attribution to the active listener. PMID:25188354

  8. Subjective evaluation of a concert hall's acoustics using a free-format-type questionnaire and comparison with objective measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Toshiyuki; Beranek, Leo L.

    2002-11-01

    A free-format type of audiences' judgment of the acoustical properties of a hall and music critics' writings were used as the basis for this study. These subjective responses are related to the Dai-Ichi Seimei Hall in Tokyo. This hall is an oval-shaped, one-balcony space, seating 767 persons. Its primary use is for various types of chamber music and solo-instrument performances. Eight acoustical attributes were investigated, ''reverberation,'' ''clarity,'' ''loudness,'' ''intimacy,'' ''spaciousness,'' ''balance,'' ''localization,'' and ''timbre,'' plus ''general impression.'' Subjective comments about these attributes were obtained. Objective measurements were made in the hall and are compared with those made in several similar-sized halls of two shapes. In the rear seats of two oval-shaped halls the strength factor GE (determined in the first 80 ms of the impulse response) was greater than the GE found in the rear seats of similar-sized rectangular halls. The subjective results and the objective measurements were closely correlated, especially for reverberation, clarity, and warmth (a subcomponent of timbre). It was suggested that the greater strength GE in the rear seats made the hall seem smaller and thus more intimate. The subjective comments also confirmed the hall's wide applicability, indicating that the acoustical characteristics used for its design were well chosen.

  9. Comparative ultrasonographic evaluation of the Achilles paratenon in symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects: an imaging study.

    PubMed

    Stecco, A; Busoni, F; Stecco, C; Mattioli-Belmonte, M; Soldani, P; Condino, S; Ermolao, A; Zaccaria, M; Gesi, M

    2015-04-01

    Achilles tendon analysis represents one of the most frequently requested ultrasonographic evaluations, due to the high incidence of tendinopathy. Various authors have described inflammatory features of the paratenon recruited 22 subjects complaining of pain in the mid-portion of the Achilles tendon and 22 healthy subjects. Both groups underwent ultrasonographic examination and Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles questionnaire administration. It was found statistically significant inter-group differences of the paratenon (p = 0.0001) as well as tendon thickness (p < 0.0001). Our results show that Achilles symptoms could also be associated with an increase in the paratenon thickness. We suggest that clinicians should carefully analyze paratenon thickness when evaluating patients with Achillodynia using ultrasound. It may be that the paratenon, when thickened, may explain some of the painful symptoms reported by patients and it is associated with a tendinopathy process, hence we suggest careful analysis in patients with Achillodynia. PMID:25047541

  10. Subjective soundscapes qualitative research in the experience and evaluation of environmental noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flick, Uwe

    2001-05-01

    If the subjective experience and evaluation of environmental noise shall be considered and integrated into the current soundscape research, the use of qualitative research methods used in sociology and psychology will become necessary. A triangulation of research methods for measuring objective noise and for the subjective evaluation of noises and sounds on the background of subjective meanings of health and healthy living will be a fruitful way to a more comprehensive understanding of the phenomenon of soundscapes in the context of health and quality of life. In this contribution, a selection of qualitative research methods will be presented that allows for analyzing subjective experiences with environmental noise. Interviews focusing on narratives of episodes and situations (e.g., the episodic interview, Flick, 2002) will be outlined. Issues of how to assess the quality of qualitative research and its results will be addressed and finally the benefits and limits of the triangulation of different methods (e.g., interviews and focus groups or interviews and physical measures) will be discussed. Research experiences from the author's recent studies on health concepts of health professionals will be used for illustration.

  11. Subjectively Evaluated Effects of Domestic Violence on Well-Being in Clinical Populations

    PubMed Central

    Poutiainen, Marika; Holma, Juha

    2013-01-01

    Effects of domestic violence are reflected in victims' physical, psychological, and sexual health as well as in victims' subjective evaluations of health or subjective well-being. The principal aim of this study was to study the extent to which the consequences of domestic violence are reflected in patients' subjectively evaluated well-being, life management, and sense of security in an emergency department, a maternity department, and a reception unit of a psychiatric hospital. A questionnaire on the effects of domestic violence was administered to 530 patients. 61 patients reported either current or previous domestic violence that affected their current well-being and life management. Domestic violence was reported to have an effect on subjective well-being and sense of security: the more recent or frequent the experience of violence was, the greater was considered its impact on well-being and sense of security. Routine inquiry can uncover hidden cases of abuse and hence would be of great benefit in the healthcare context. Early identification of abuse victims can prevent further harm caused by violence. PMID:23476806

  12. Impression formation in children: influence of gender and expectancy.

    PubMed

    McAninch, C B; Manolis, M B; Milich, R; Harris, M J

    1993-10-01

    The effect of expectancy-congruent and -incongruent information on subsequent impression formation and recall of a target peer was examined. 64 boys and 50 girls (ages 8 to 12) were given an expectancy that a stimulus child was either shy or outgoing. Subjects rated the target on several dimensions (e.g., friendly, shy) and then watched a videotape of a boy or girl confederate acting out a script containing both expectancy-congruent and -incongruent information. Subjects then rated the target child again and freely recalled as much of what the target said as they could remember. Results revealed that when children are presented with both expectancy-congruent and -incongruent information, impression formation appears largely attribute based, and the influence of the initial expectancy appears mitigated. However, ratings of liking appeared to be more influenced by the initial expectancy than by subsequent behavioral information. In addition, the results indicated that many of Maccoby's conclusions regarding the effects of gender on social interactions also apply to children's social information processing, indicating a strong bias toward same-sex peers. PMID:8222885

  13. Subjective Sexual Well-Being in Chilean Adults: Evaluation of a Predictive Model.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Daniela; Lillo, Sebastián; Vera-Villarroel, Pablo

    2016-05-18

    Research on sexuality has traditionally focused on sexual satisfaction, with studies into subjective sexual well-being being a recent phenomenon. This study sought to evaluate the relationship between sexual behavior, happiness, health, and subjective sexual well-being. The data were collected from 862 people aged between 18 and 50 years in Santiago, Chile, and were analyzed by logistic regression analysis. The results showed that sexual behavioral indicators (sexual frequency, sexual caresses, and touching), happiness, and perception of health taken as a whole predicted 47.4% of subjective sexual well-being (SSWB). Analysis of the four items of subjective sexual well-being separately showed that the dimension of physical satisfaction was associated with three variables of sexual behavior indicators with a prediction percentage of 33.5%, whereas emotional satisfaction was associated with three variables of sexual behavior indicators and happiness, with a percentage of prediction of 43.3%. Satisfaction with sexual function was associated with perception of health and one sexual behavior indicator, with a prediction percentage of 29.2% of this variable. The importance of sex was associated with three sexual behavior variables that predicted 26.2% of this variable. The results confirm that subjective sexual well-being can be predicted and that its four dimensions present a different behavior compared to the study predictors. PMID:26020732

  14. Application of artificial neural network in simulating subjective evaluation of tumor segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Dongjiao; Deng, Xiang

    2011-03-01

    Systematic validation of tumor segmentation technique is very important in ensuring the accuracy and reproducibility of tumor segmentation algorithm in clinical applications. In this paper, we present a new method for evaluating 3D tumor segmentation using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and combined objective metrics. In our evaluation method, a three-layer feed-forwarding backpropagation ANN is first trained to simulate radiologist's subjective rating using a set of objective metrics. The trained neural network is then used to evaluate the tumor segmentation on a five-point scale in a way similar to expert's evaluation. The accuracy of segmentation evaluation is quantified using average correct rank and frequency of the reference rating in the top ranks of simulated score list. Experimental results from 93 lesions showed that our evaluation method performs better than individual metrics. The optimal combination of metrics from normalized volume difference, volume overlap, Root Mean Square symmetric surface distance and maximum symmetric surface distance showed the smallest average correct rank (1.43) and highest frequency of the reference rating in the top two places of simulated rating list (93.55%). Our results also demonstrate that the ANN based non-linear combination method showed better evaluation accuracy than linear combination method in all performance measures. Our evaluation technique has the potential to facilitate large scale segmentation validation study by predicting radiologists rating, and to assist development of new tumor segmentation algorithms. It can also be extended to validation of segmentation algorithms for other applications.

  15. Effect of disinfection of custom tray materials on adhesive properties of several impression material systems.

    PubMed

    Thompson, G A; Vermilyea, S G; Agar, J R

    1994-12-01

    The effects of impression tray disinfection procedures on the bond strength of impression-material adhesives to two types of resin trays were evaluated with a tensile test. Autopolymerizing acrylic resin and a visible light-curing resin were formed into one-half inch cubes. A screw eye was attached to each cube before polymerization. Perforated trays were fabricated with stops to maintain an even one-eighth inch of impression material over the resin block. Hooks on the opposite side permitted attachment of the metal plate to a mechanical testing machine. Before adhesive was applied, one third of the resin specimens were immersed in a 1:213 iodophor solution; one third in a 10% sodium hypochlorite solution, and one third were kept in the "as fabricated" condition. Polysulfide, polyether, and polyvinyl siloxane impression material-adhesive systems were evaluated. The resin-impression material-metal plate couples were attached to a mechanical testing machine and tensile forces were applied at a separation rate of 5 inches per minute. Mean values for adhesive strength ranged from 3.49 kg/cm2 for the autopolymerizing acrylic resin/iodophor/polyether combination to 10.55 kg/cm2 for the autopolymerizing acrylic resin/untreated/polyvinyl siloxane combination. Differences were detected among materials and disinfecting procedure. Clinically, disinfection of resin trays may adversely affect retention of the impression material to the tray. PMID:7853264

  16. Subjective evaluation of H.265/HEVC based dynamic adaptive video streaming over HTTP (HEVC-DASH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irondi, Iheanyi; Wang, Qi; Grecos, Christos

    2015-02-01

    The Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP (DASH) standard is becoming increasingly popular for real-time adaptive HTTP streaming of internet video in response to unstable network conditions. Integration of DASH streaming techniques with the new H.265/HEVC video coding standard is a promising area of research. The performance of HEVC-DASH systems has been previously evaluated by a few researchers using objective metrics, however subjective evaluation would provide a better measure of the user's Quality of Experience (QoE) and overall performance of the system. This paper presents a subjective evaluation of an HEVC-DASH system implemented in a hardware testbed. Previous studies in this area have focused on using the current H.264/AVC (Advanced Video Coding) or H.264/SVC (Scalable Video Coding) codecs and moreover, there has been no established standard test procedure for the subjective evaluation of DASH adaptive streaming. In this paper, we define a test plan for HEVC-DASH with a carefully justified data set employing longer video sequences that would be sufficient to demonstrate the bitrate switching operations in response to various network condition patterns. We evaluate the end user's real-time QoE online by investigating the perceived impact of delay, different packet loss rates, fluctuating bandwidth, and the perceived quality of using different DASH video stream segment sizes on a video streaming session using different video sequences. The Mean Opinion Score (MOS) results give an insight into the performance of the system and expectation of the users. The results from this study show the impact of different network impairments and different video segments on users' QoE and further analysis and study may help in optimizing system performance.

  17. ANIMAL ANALOGIES IN FIRST IMPRESSIONS OF FACES

    PubMed Central

    Zebrowitz, Leslie A.; Wadlinger, Heather A.; Luevano, Victor X.; White, Benjamin M.; Xing, Cai; Zhang, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Analogies between humans and animals based on facial resemblance have a long history. We report evidence for reverse anthropomorphism and the extension of facial stereotypes to lions, foxes, and dogs. In the stereotype extension, more positive traits were attributed to animals judged more attractive than con-specifics; more childlike traits were attributed to those judged more babyfaced. In the reverse anthropomorphism, human faces with more resemblance to lions, ascertained by connectionist modeling of facial metrics, were judged more dominant, cold, and shrewd, controlling attractiveness, babyfaceness, and sex. Faces with more resemblance to Labradors were judged warmer and less shrewd. Resemblance to foxes did not predict impressions. Results for lions and dogs were consistent with trait impressions of these animals and support the species overgeneralization hypothesis that evolutionarily adaptive reactions to particular animals are overgeneralized, with people perceived to have traits associated with animals their faces resemble. Other possible explanations are discussed. PMID:25339791

  18. What is healthy food? Objective nutrient profile scores and subjective lay evaluations in comparison.

    PubMed

    Bucher, T; Müller, B; Siegrist, M

    2015-12-01

    To date, it is unclear how consumers evaluate the healthiness of individual foods and meals and how consumers' perceptions are related to expert opinions. This knowledge is essential for efficient communication of nutrition information with the goal of promoting healthy eating. This study used the fake food buffet method to investigate health perceptions of selected meals and of 54 individual foods and beverages. Lay consumers' subjective healthiness evaluations of meals and foods were compared to objective nutrient profile scores, which were previously shown to correlate highly with expert opinions. The results show that nutrition profile scores and lay evaluations were highly correlated, which indicates that lay people used similar criteria as experts to evaluate the healthiness of foods. However, lay consumers tended to neglect the amount of saturated fat, protein and sodium for their judgments. Also, it was found that while lay consumers were quite able to evaluate single food products, they had difficulties in evaluating entire meals. Future interventions should focus particularly on educating the consumer about the negative effects of diets high in salt and saturated fat and they should improve the consumer's abilities to evaluate entire meals. PMID:26256557

  19. Muscle fatigue evaluation of astronaut upper limb based on sEMG and subjective assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Xiaoqi; Zhou, Qianxiang; Li, Yun

    2012-07-01

    All movements are driven by muscle contraction, and it is easy to cause muscle fatigue. Evaluation of muscle fatigue is a hot topic in the area of astronaut life support training and rehabilitation. If muscle gets into fatigue condition, it may reduce work efficiency and has an impact on psychological performance. Therefore it is necessary to develop an accurate and usable method on muscle fatigue evaluation of astronaut upper limb. In this study, we developed a method based on surface electromyography (sEMG) and subjective assessment (Borg scale) to evaluate local muscle fatigue. Fifteen healthy young male subjects participated in the experiment. They performed isometric muscle contractions of the upper limb. sEMG of the biceps brachii were recorded during the entire process of isotonic muscle contraction and Borg scales of muscle fatigue were collected in certain times. sEMG were divided into several parts, and then mean energy of each parts were calculated by the one-twelfth band octave method. Equations were derived based on the relationship between the mean energy of sEMG and Borg scale. The results showed that cubic curve could describe the degree of local muscle fatigue, and could be used to evaluate and monitor local muscle fatigue during the entire process.

  20. [Complications Resulting from Taking Ear Impressions].

    PubMed

    Sugiuchi, Tomoko; Kodera, Kazuoki; Zusho, Hiroyuki; Asano, Yoshikazu; Kanesada, Keiko; Hayashida, Mitsuhiro; Kanaya, Koichiro; Tokumaru, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    In 2012, we carried out a study in a large sample to understand the secondary injuries caused during the taking ear impressions for hearing aids. This study is a follow-up of previous research conducted in 1986 (285 medical institutions) and 1999 (98 medical institutions). We posted a questionnaire survey to the otolaryngology departments of 3,257 medical institutions. The response rate to the questionnaire was 62.9% (2,050 of the 3,257 institutions), and the results indicated that 301 of the 2050 institutions (14.7%) had experience with secondary injuries, with a total of 460 cases reported. In 342 of the 460 cases (74.3%), the secondary injuries occurred at hearing-aid dealerships, followed by 67 cases (14.6%) at affiliated medical institutions, and 51 cases (11.1%) in other locations, including other medical institutions, rehabilitation counseling centers, and educational institutions. The most common type of secondary injury (298 cases, 64.8%) was caused by the presence of foreign bodies in the ear, which in turn was a result of complications occurring during the removal of residual ear impression material. Of these 298 cases, 32 required excision of the foreign bodies and surgical intervention under general anesthesia. The remaining 10 cases exhibited isolated tympanic membrane perforation without foreign body-related complications. Furthermore, 146 cases (31.7%) developed bleeding and otitis externa following removal of the ear impression, and there were reports of cases with bleeding that required long-term outpatient care and treatment. Therefore, since retention of a foreign body in the ear and tympanic membrane perforation can occur even in patients without a history of surgery or prior otologic history, adjustment of hearing aids requires prior otorhinolaryngological examination. Furthermore, because of the risk of secondary injury when taking ear impressions, this procedure must be performed with caution under the guidance of an otolaryngologist. PMID

  1. Multilingual subjective methodology and evaluation of low-rate digital voice processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimolitsas, Spiros; Corcoran, Franklin L.; Baraniecki, Marion R.; Phipps, John G., Jr.

    The methodology and results for a multilingual evaluation of source encoding algorithms operating at 16 kbit/s are presented. The evaluation was conducted in three languages (English, French, and Madarin), using listener opinion subjective assessments to determine whether 'toll-quality' performance is possible at 16 kbit/s. The study demonstrated that toll-quality voice is indeed possible at 16 kbit/s, and that several of the methods evaluated are more robust under high bit error conditions than either 32- or 64-kbit/s encoding. Thus, 16-kbit/s voice coding technology is currently suitable for many applications with the public-switched telephone network, including the next generation of digital circuit multiplication equipment, and integrated services digital network videotelephony.

  2. Subjective and objective evaluation of sense of space for vehicle occupants based on anthropometric data.

    PubMed

    Hiamtoe, Pitarn; Steinhardt, Florian; Köhler, Uwe; Bengler, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    At present, the number of the vehicle requirements has been continuously increasing. These requirements can be related to the customer as well as the technical requirements. Among these, the "feeling of space" of the occupants inside the vehicles can be regarded as one of the most important factors. In this respect, the driver and passengers should be able to experience positive feeling of space inside the vehicle. There are numerous factors that can influence the sense of space inside the vehicle. These include geometry (vehicle dimensions), light exposure, ambient lights, colors, material selection and material surface. Depending on the selection, the sense of space can be dramatically influenced by these factors. In general, human feeling is subjective and cannot be measured by any instrument. The measure can nevertheless be carried out by utilizing the method of subjective evaluation. Throughout the experiments, the method of evaluation is developed and the factors which can influence the interior feeling are analyzed. In this process, psychological perception, architectural aspects and anthropometry are considered and knowledge from the other domains is transferred in the form of a multidisciplinary approach. The experiments with an aim to evaluate the overall sense of space in the vehicle are carried out based on the physical mock up of BMW 1 series (E87). The space perception with different interior dimensions and anthropometric data of test persons are also analyzed. The use of Computer Aided Technology was shown by CATIA V5, PCMAN and RAMSIS. The results show a good correlation between the subjective evaluation and the geometric values. PMID:22316731

  3. Subjective evaluation of MPEG-2 video with and without B frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cermak, Gregory W.; Tweedy, Ernest P.

    1999-11-01

    Two studies examined the effect of B-frames on subjective quality of MPEG-2 video. One study used consumer judgments in a variant of the standard CCIR Recommendation 500-5 procedure for collecting subjective evaluations. The other study used the judgments of a single expert in adjusting the bit rate necessary for MPEG-2 without B-frames to be subjectively equal to MPEG-2 with B-frames at a given bit rate. The results of the two studies were qualitatively similar. Summary of results: Picture quality improved with increase in bit rate until a saturation point was reached. The introduction of B-frames improved picture quality, especially for difficult source material. This was more noticeable at the lower bit rates (e.g., 3 Mb/s). The difference in bit rate between MPEG-2 with and without B-frames varied substantially with the source material. For example, for basketball, 5 Mb/s with B-frames was subjectively equal to 8 Mb/s without B-frames, but for other material the difference was near zero.

  4. The Importance of Subtextual Impression Management and Business Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaney, Lillian H.; Lyden, Julie A.

    1998-01-01

    College students (n=265) reported their impressions of business faculty's personal appearance, body language, behavior, and office appearance. Findings indicate that impression management is useful for professors who want to convey credibility, authority, and interest in students. (JOW)

  5. Extended stereopsis evaluation of professional and amateur soccer players and subjects without soccer background

    PubMed Central

    Paulus, Jan; Tong, Jie; Hornegger, Joachim; Schmidt, Michael; Eskofier, Björn; Michelson, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Stereopsis is one of several visual depth cues. It has been evaluated for athletes of different types of sports in the past. However, most studies do not cover the full range of stereopsis performance. Therefore, we propose computer-supported stereopsis tests that provide an extended assessment and analysis of stereopsis performance including stereo acuity and response times. By providing stationary and moving stimuli they cover static and dynamic stereopsis, respectively. The proposed stereopsis tests were used to compare professional and amateur soccer players with subjects without soccer background. The soccer players could not perform significantly (p ≤ 0.05) superior than the subjects without soccer background. However, the soccer players showed significantly (p ≤ 0.01) superior choice reaction times for monocular stimuli. The results are in congruence with previous findings in literature. PMID:25368596

  6. Multi-attribute subjective evaluations of manual tracking tasks vs. objective performance of the human operator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siapkaras, A.

    1977-01-01

    A computational method to deal with the multidimensional nature of tracking and/or monitoring tasks is developed. Operator centered variables, including the operator's perception of the task, are considered. Matrix ratings are defined based on multidimensional scaling techniques and multivariate analysis. The method consists of two distinct steps: (1) to determine the mathematical space of subjective judgements of a certain individual (or group of evaluators) for a given set of tasks and experimental conditionings; and (2) to relate this space with respect to both the task variables and the objective performance criteria used. Results for a variety of second-order trackings with smoothed noise-driven inputs indicate that: (1) many of the internally perceived task variables form a nonorthogonal set; and (2) the structure of the subjective space varies among groups of individuals according to the degree of familiarity they have with such tasks.

  7. Piloting a nationally disseminated, interactive human subjects protection program for community partners: Design, content and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Stephanie; Eakin, Brenda; Kirk, Rosalind; Piechowski, Patricia; Thomas, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Funders, institutions, and research organizations are increasingly recognizing the need for human subjects protections training programs for those engaged in academic research. Current programs tend to be online and directed towards an audience of academic researchers. Research teams now include many nonacademic members, such as community partners, who are less likely to respond to either the method or the content of current online trainings. A team at the CTSA-supported Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research at the University of Michigan developed a pilot human subjects protection training program for community partners that is both locally implemented and adaptable to local contexts, yet nationally consistent and deliverable from a central administrative source. Here the developers and the analysts of this program discuss its development, its content, and the results of its evaluation. PMID:24720288

  8. Investigating the visual inspection subjectivity on the contrast-detail evaluation in digital mammography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Maria A. Z.; Medeiros, Regina B.; Schiabel, Homero

    2014-03-01

    A major difficulty in the interpretation of mammographic images is the low contrast and, in the case of early detection of breast cancer, the reduced size of the features of malignancy on findings such as microcalcifications. Furthermore, image assessment is subject to significant reliance of the capacity of observation of the expert that will perform it, compromising the final diagnosis accuracy. Thinking about this aspect, this study evaluated the subjectivity of visual inspection to assess the contrast-detail in mammographic images. For this, we compared the human readings of images generated with the CDMAM phantom performed by four observers, enabling to determining a threshold of contrast visibility in each diameter disks present in the phantom. These thresholds were compared graphically and by statistical measures allowing us to build a strategy for use of contrast and detail (dimensions) as parameters of quality in mammography.

  9. Otologic complications caused by hearing aid mold impression material.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Cho, Hyong-Ho

    2012-08-01

    We report two extremely rare cases of otologic complications caused by hearing aid mold impression material. The symptoms of patients with retained impression material are characteristic of the length of time the impression material is retained. In case 1 had a chronic discharge and granulation tissue of the middle ear, while case 2 presented with acute pain and dizziness. The management for retained impression material may require surgical interventions, which can be safely accomplished by standard otologic techniques. PMID:21862255

  10. Preserving subject variability in group fMRI analysis: performance evaluation of GICA vs. IVA

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Andrew M.; Anderson, Mathew; Miller, Robyn L.; Adalı, Tülay; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2014-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is a widely applied technique to derive functionally connected brain networks from fMRI data. Group ICA (GICA) and Independent Vector Analysis (IVA) are extensions of ICA that enable users to perform group fMRI analyses; however a full comparison of the performance limits of GICA and IVA has not been investigated. Recent interest in resting state fMRI data with potentially higher degree of subject variability makes the evaluation of the above techniques important. In this paper we compare component estimation accuracies of GICA and an improved version of IVA using simulated fMRI datasets. We systematically change the degree of inter-subject spatial variability of components and evaluate estimation accuracy over all spatial maps (SMs) and time courses (TCs) of the decomposition. Our results indicate the following: (1) at low levels of SM variability or when just one SM is varied, both GICA and IVA perform well, (2) at higher levels of SM variability or when more than one SMs are varied, IVA continues to perform well but GICA yields SM estimates that are composites of other SMs with errors in TCs, (3) both GICA and IVA remove spatial correlations of overlapping SMs and introduce artificial correlations in their TCs, (4) if number of SMs is over estimated, IVA continues to perform well but GICA introduces artifacts in the varying and extra SMs with artificial correlations in the TCs of extra components, and (5) in the absence or presence of SMs unique to one subject, GICA produces errors in TCs and IVA estimates are accurate. In summary, our simulation experiments (both simplistic and realistic) and our holistic analyses approach indicate that IVA produces results that are closer to ground truth and thereby better preserves subject variability. The improved version of IVA is now packaged into the GIFT toolbox (http://mialab.mrn.org/software/gift). PMID:25018704

  11. Age-related changes in skin barrier function - quantitative evaluation of 150 female subjects.

    PubMed

    Luebberding, S; Krueger, N; Kerscher, M

    2013-04-01

    The protection against water loss and the prevention of substances and bacteria penetrating into the body rank as the most important functions of the skin. This so-called 'skin barrier function' is the natural frontier between the inner organism and the environment, and is primarily formed by the epidermis. An impairment of the skin barrier function is often found in diseased and damaged skin. An influence of ageing on skin barrier function is widely accepted, but has not been conclusively evaluated yet. Therefore, the aim of this clinical study was to assess the potential influence of ageing on skin barrier function, including transepidermal water loss (TEWL), stratum corneum hydration, sebum content and pH value. One hundred and fifty healthy women aged 18-80, divided into five age groups with 30 subjects each, were evaluated in this study. TEWL, hydration level, sebum secretion and pH value of hydro-lipid acid film were measured with worldwide acknowledged biophysical measuring methods at cheek, neck, décolleté, volar forearm and dorsum of hand. Whereas TEWL and stratum corneum hydration showed only very low correlation with subject's age, the sebum production decreased significantly with age, resulting in the lowest skin surface lipids levels measured in subjects older than 70 years. The highest skin surface pH was measured in subjects between 50 and 60 years, whereas the eldest age group had the lowest mean pH. The dorsum of the hand was the location with the highest TEWL and lowest stratum corneum hydration in all age groups. The results show that only some parameters related to skin barrier function are influenced by ageing. Whereas sebum production decreases significantly over lifetime and skin surface pH is significantly increased in menopausal woman, TEWL and stratum corneum hydration show only minor variations with ageing. PMID:23113564

  12. Correlating objective and subjective evaluation of texture appearance with applications to camera phone imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Jonathan B.; Coppola, Stephen M.; Jin, Elaine W.; Chen, Ying; Clark, James H.; Mauer, Timothy A.

    2009-01-01

    Texture appearance is an important component of photographic image quality as well as object recognition. Noise cleaning algorithms are used to decrease sensor noise of digital images, but can hinder texture elements in the process. The Camera Phone Image Quality (CPIQ) initiative of the International Imaging Industry Association (I3A) is developing metrics to quantify texture appearance. Objective and subjective experimental results of the texture metric development are presented in this paper. Eight levels of noise cleaning were applied to ten photographic scenes that included texture elements such as faces, landscapes, architecture, and foliage. Four companies (Aptina Imaging, LLC, Hewlett-Packard, Eastman Kodak Company, and Vista Point Technologies) have performed psychophysical evaluations of overall image quality using one of two methods of evaluation. Both methods presented paired comparisons of images on thin film transistor liquid crystal displays (TFT-LCD), but the display pixel pitch and viewing distance differed. CPIQ has also been developing objective texture metrics and targets that were used to analyze the same eight levels of noise cleaning. The correlation of the subjective and objective test results indicates that texture perception can be modeled with an objective metric. The two methods of psychophysical evaluation exhibited high correlation despite the differences in methodology.

  13. The Eating Disorder Inventory in evaluation of impaired eating behaviour in subjects requesting nutritional consultation.

    PubMed

    Iorio, D; Margiotta, N; D'Orsi, P; Bellini, O; Boschi, V

    2000-12-01

    The present study evaluated impaired eating behaviour in women seeking participation in a diet-based programme of weight reduction or achievement of ideal body weight. Forty-seven obese, 42 overweight and 14 normal-weight subjects, attending an Italian university outpatient clinic completed the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI). Forty-eight mothers of primary school children (25 normal-weight and 23 overweight) were used as controls. The EDI consists of 8 subscales, 3 evaluating psychopathology related to eating disorders (drive for thinness, bulimia, body dissatisfaction) and 5 evaluating general psychopathology (intereoceptive awareness, ineffectiveness, maturity fears, perfectionism, interpersonal distrust). Significantly altered scores in the first three subscales were observed both in normal-weight and overweight outpatients compared to the controls. The overweight outpatients scored higher than the obese patients in terms of drive for thinness and bulimia and higher than the normal-weight women for terms of bulimia, body dissatisfaction and drive for thinness. The overweight controls scored significantly higher than the normal-weight controls in the first three subscales in the remaining subscales, mean values were also higher in the overweight group, though significance was only reached in the interpersonal distrust and interoceptive awareness subscales. Impaired eating behaviour is frequent in subjects seeking participation in weight reduction or ideal body weight achievement programmes. PMID:11216128

  14. The Effect of Disinfection by Spray Atomization on Dimensional Accuracy of Condensation Silicone Impressions

    PubMed Central

    Saleh Saber, Fariba; Abolfazli, Nader; Kohsoltani, Maryam

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims The condensation silicone impression materials are available, but there is little knowledge of their accuracy after disinfection. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the disinfection by spray atomization on dimensional accuracy of condensation silicone impressions. Materials and methods Impressions were made on a stainless steel master model containing a simulated two complete crown preparation with an edentulous space interposed using Spidex® and Rapid® impression materials. 44 impressions were made with each material, of which 16 were disinfected with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 16 were disinfected with 10% iodophor and 12 were not disinfected. Three dimensional measurements of working casts, including interpreparation distance, height, and diameter, were calculated using a measuring microscope graduated at 0.001 mm. Dimensional changes (mm) between the disinfected and non-disinfected working casts were compared. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was employed to analyze the data (α=0.05). Results Disinfection of each condensation silicone material by spraying atomization with two different disinfectant material resulted in significant change in interpreparation distance (p<0.05). Changes in height and diameter were only significant in Spidex® impressions (p<0.05). Conclusion Significant changes in the mean dimensions were seen as a result of disinfection by spraying; however, the dimensional changes do not seem great enough to cause critical positional distortion of teeth when fixed partial denture restorations are made. PMID:23346339

  15. Impression Management Training: Conceptualization and Application to Personal Selling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leathers, Dale G.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the importance of impression management, an individual's conscious attempt to exercise control over selected communicative behaviors and cues for purposes of making a desired impression. Provides a comprehensive conceptualization of the impression-management process, and demonstrates how this process can facilitate effective training of…

  16. Clinicians reaping benefits of new concepts in impressioning.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Nathaniel C; Burgess, John O

    2015-02-01

    While conventional elastomeric impression materials are still being used to generate excellent impressions, the future of impression-taking is undoubtedly with digital intraoral scanners. Advances in scanning systems are making this technology easier to use and more practical for dentists. PMID:25822643

  17. Evaluating Abstract Art: Relation between Term Usage, Subjective Ratings, Image Properties and Personality Traits

    PubMed Central

    Lyssenko, Nathalie; Redies, Christoph; Hayn-Leichsenring, Gregor U.

    2016-01-01

    One of the major challenges in experimental aesthetics is the uncertainty of the terminology used in experiments. In this study, we recorded terms that are spontaneously used by participants to describe abstract artworks and studied their relation to the second-order statistical image properties of the same artworks (Experiment 1). We found that the usage frequency of some structure-describing terms correlates with statistical image properties, such as PHOG Self-Similarity, Anisotropy and Complexity. Additionally, emotion-associated terms correlate with measured color values. Next, based on the most frequently used terms, we created five different rating scales (Experiment 2) and obtained ratings of participants for the abstract paintings on these scales. We found significant correlations between descriptive score ratings (e.g., between structure and subjective complexity), between evaluative and descriptive score ratings (e.g., between preference and subjective complexity/interest) and between descriptive score ratings and statistical image properties (e.g., between interest and PHOG Self-Similarity, Complexity and Anisotropy). Additionally, we determined the participants’ personality traits as described in the ‘Big Five Inventory’ (Goldberg, 1990; Rammstedt and John, 2005) and correlated them with the ratings and preferences of individual participants. Participants with higher scores for Neuroticism showed preferences for objectively more complex images, as well as a different notion of the term complex when compared with participants with lower scores for Neuroticism. In conclusion, this study demonstrates an association between objectively measured image properties and the subjective terms that participants use to describe or evaluate abstract artworks. Moreover, our results suggest that the description of abstract artworks, their evaluation and the preference of participants for their low-level statistical properties are linked to personality traits

  18. Evaluating Abstract Art: Relation between Term Usage, Subjective Ratings, Image Properties and Personality Traits.

    PubMed

    Lyssenko, Nathalie; Redies, Christoph; Hayn-Leichsenring, Gregor U

    2016-01-01

    One of the major challenges in experimental aesthetics is the uncertainty of the terminology used in experiments. In this study, we recorded terms that are spontaneously used by participants to describe abstract artworks and studied their relation to the second-order statistical image properties of the same artworks (Experiment 1). We found that the usage frequency of some structure-describing terms correlates with statistical image properties, such as PHOG Self-Similarity, Anisotropy and Complexity. Additionally, emotion-associated terms correlate with measured color values. Next, based on the most frequently used terms, we created five different rating scales (Experiment 2) and obtained ratings of participants for the abstract paintings on these scales. We found significant correlations between descriptive score ratings (e.g., between structure and subjective complexity), between evaluative and descriptive score ratings (e.g., between preference and subjective complexity/interest) and between descriptive score ratings and statistical image properties (e.g., between interest and PHOG Self-Similarity, Complexity and Anisotropy). Additionally, we determined the participants' personality traits as described in the 'Big Five Inventory' (Goldberg, 1990; Rammstedt and John, 2005) and correlated them with the ratings and preferences of individual participants. Participants with higher scores for Neuroticism showed preferences for objectively more complex images, as well as a different notion of the term complex when compared with participants with lower scores for Neuroticism. In conclusion, this study demonstrates an association between objectively measured image properties and the subjective terms that participants use to describe or evaluate abstract artworks. Moreover, our results suggest that the description of abstract artworks, their evaluation and the preference of participants for their low-level statistical properties are linked to personality traits. PMID

  19. Nondestructive Evaluation Tests Performed on Space Shuttle Leading- Edge Materials Subjected to Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Martin, Richard E.; Bodis, James R.

    2005-01-01

    In support of the space shuttle Return To Flight efforts at the NASA Glenn Research Center, a series of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) tests were performed on reinforced carbon/carbon (RCC) composite panels subjected to ballistic foam impact. The impact tests were conducted to refine and verify analytical models of an external tank foam strike on the space shuttle leading edge. The NDE tests were conducted to quantify the size and location of the resulting damage zone as well as to identify hidden damage.

  20. Subjective evaluation of the interference protection ratio for frequency modulated NTSC television signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, M.; Chouinard, G.

    The future environment of broadcasting satellites may well be governed by the limiting factor of interference between television signals from neighboring satellites. A program of tests was performed to evaluate subjectively the effect of aggregate interference and/or noise on the impairment of television pictures. Up to four interfering channels were added in an environment resembling that of future broadcasting satellites including up to two co-frequency channels and up to two adjacent channels. The results of these tests are considered valuable in the study of the quality standard for the RARC-83 for the planning of the broadcasting satellite service.

  1. The Deja Connu Phenomenon: A Study in the Formation and Modifiability of First Impressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noffsinger, Edward B.; Pellegrini, Robert J.

    Working from a rationale derived from cognitive learning theory, this study was designed to investigate the extent to which the formation and modifiability of first impressions may be affected by the perceiver's tendency to associate the stimulus person with some other individual. Fifty subjects rated their initial attractions toward male and…

  2. Impact of Internet Images: Impression-Formation Effects of University Web Site Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramasubramanian, Srividya; Gyure, James F.; Mursi, Nasreen M.

    2002-01-01

    Institutions of higher education are increasingly becoming dependent on Web-based marketing to reach out to their target audiences. The current empirical study examines the types of impressions formed by prospective students based on exposure to different university Web site images. A between-subjects experiment was conducted using four identical…

  3. The Influence of Physical Attractiveness and Dress on Campus Recruiters' Impressions of Female Job Applicants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kim K. P.; Roach-Higgins, Mary E.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of physical attractiveness, dress, and job type upon 300 college recruiters' impressions of females' employment potential was investigated. Subjects rated female applicants from a photograph on eight employment potential statements. Results indicate that the applicant's style of dress exerted a consistent influence on recruiters'…

  4. [Evaluation of the risk of anesthetic gases to exposed subjects with different tasks in operating rooms].

    PubMed

    Bolzoni, G; Somenzi, V; Cirla, A M

    1992-01-01

    A research was carried out on risk evaluation of workers with different tasks in operating theatre. The airborne concentrations were determined by an IR analyzer with two distinct sampling lines: the first was placed in surgical zone and the second one in anesthesiological zone. The anesthetists resulted more at risk than surgical team. Nevertheless when the evaluation was based on N2O urinary concentration and data were stratified according to task a prevalent inhalation absorption resulted for non medical staff (instrumentist and professional nurse). Our data concerning N2O ranged between 95-764 ppm indoor and between 3-92 mcg/l in the urines of exposed subjects. PMID:1345720

  5. Personality, culture, and subjective well-being: emotional and cognitive evaluations of life.

    PubMed

    Diener, Ed; Oishi, Shigehiro; Lucas, Richard E

    2003-01-01

    Subjective well-being (SWB), people's emotional and cognitive evaluations of their lives, includes what lay people call happiness, peace, fulfillment, and life satisfaction. Personality dispositions such as extraversion, neuroticism, and self-esteem can markedly influence levels of SWB. Although personality can explain a significant amount of the variability in SWB, life circumstances also influence long-term levels. Cultural variables explain differences in mean levels of SWB and appear to be due to objective factors such as wealth, to norms dictating appropriate feelings and how important SWB is considered to be, and to the relative approach versus avoidance tendencies of societies. Culture can also moderate which variables most influence SWB. Although it is challenging to assess SWB across societies, the measures have some degree of cross-cultural validity. Although nations can be evaluated by their levels of SWB, there are still many open questions in this area. PMID:12172000

  6. The study of surgical image quality evaluation system by subjective quality factor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian J.; Xuan, Jason R.; Yang, Xirong; Yu, Honggang; Koullick, Edouard

    2016-03-01

    GreenLightTM procedure is an effective and economical way of treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH); there are almost a million of patients treated with GreenLightTM worldwide. During the surgical procedure, the surgeon or physician will rely on the monitoring video system to survey and confirm the surgical progress. There are a few obstructions that could greatly affect the image quality of the monitoring video, like laser glare by the tissue and body fluid, air bubbles and debris generated by tissue evaporation, and bleeding, just to name a few. In order to improve the physician's visual experience of a laser surgical procedure, the system performance parameter related to image quality needs to be well defined. However, since image quality is the integrated set of perceptions of the overall degree of excellence of an image, or in other words, image quality is the perceptually weighted combination of significant attributes (contrast, graininess …) of an image when considered in its marketplace or application, there is no standard definition on overall image or video quality especially for the no-reference case (without a standard chart as reference). In this study, Subjective Quality Factor (SQF) and acutance are used for no-reference image quality evaluation. Basic image quality parameters, like sharpness, color accuracy, size of obstruction and transmission of obstruction, are used as subparameter to define the rating scale for image quality evaluation or comparison. Sample image groups were evaluated by human observers according to the rating scale. Surveys of physician groups were also conducted with lab generated sample videos. The study shows that human subjective perception is a trustworthy way of image quality evaluation. More systematic investigation on the relationship between video quality and image quality of each frame will be conducted as a future study.

  7. Research Subject Advocacy: Program Implementation and Evaluation at Clinical and Translational Science Award Centers

    PubMed Central

    Kost, Rhonda G.; Reider, Carson; Stephens, Julie; Schuff, Kathryn G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In 2000, the National Center for Research Resources mandated that General Research Centers create a Research Subject Advocate (RSA) position. In 2008, the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) consortium endorsed a new advocacy model based on four RSA Best Practice Functions. The authors surveyed CTSA centers to learn about their implementation of programs to fulfill the RSA functions. Method In 2010, the RSA taskforce developed a two-part online survey to examine leadership, organizational structure, governance, scope, collaboration and integration, and funding and evaluation of RSA activities implemented at CTSA centers. Results Respondents from 45 RSA programs at 43 CTSA centers completed the survey. Senior university or CTSA officials led all programs. Ninety-six percent (43/45) of programs were funded by a CTSA core. Eighty percent (36/45) designated an individual “RSA.” Ninety-eight percent (44/45) provided diverse services either in collaboration with or complementary to other departments, including development of Data and Safety Monitoring Plans (16/45, 36%), informed consent observation (10/45, 22%), training responsive to audit findings (12/45, 27%), and direct advocacy services to participants (11/45, 24%). Eighty-six percent (24/28) reported qualitative evaluation methods for these activities. Conclusions RSA programs conduct both collaborative and unique research protection activities. This survey, an initial step in developing a more robust mechanism for evaluating RSA programs, collected valuable feedback. The authors recommend defining and developing outcome-based evaluation measures that take the heterogeneity of the individual RSA programs into account while advancing their value and effectiveness in protecting human research subject participants. PMID:22836849

  8. Quantitative evaluation of spasticity in upper limbs in hemiplegic subject using a mathmatical model.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Takanori; Kato, Ryoko; Obata, Shitaro; Uchida, Ryusei

    2005-01-01

    This is a proposal for a new technique for evaluating spasticity in the upper limbs of hemiplegic patients. Each subject sat on a chair or stood up, and his or her forearm was extended or flexed by a physician. The subject was instructed to relax. The elbow joint angle, torque, and electromyograms (EMGs) of the biceps brachii, triceps brachii, and brachioradialis muscles were measured. The relationship between the elbow joint angle and torque was approximated with a mathematical model, which consisted of elastic components depending on both muscle activities and elbow joint angle, by the least squares method. The inertia and visco-elastic coefficients were obtained. The elbow angle response was then estimated with the obtained inertia and visco-elastic coefficients by the Runge-Kutta method, and the estimated elbow angle was compared to the observed one. The relationships between the elbow angle and torque were approximated well with the model. Next, the average elasticity was calculated and compared to the modified Ashworth scale. The average elasticity had a tendency to increase as the Ash- worth scale increased. In addition, the average elasticity varied depending on the posture of the subjects. PMID:17281787

  9. The Bidimensional Impression Management Index (BIMI): measuring agentic and communal forms of impression management.

    PubMed

    Blasberg, Sabrina A; Rogers, Katherine H; Paulhus, Delroy L

    2014-01-01

    Measures of impression management have yet to incorporate two-factor models of person perception. The 2 primary factors are often labeled agency and communion. In Study 1, we assembled a new measure of impression management—the Bidimensional Impression Management Index (BIMI): It comprises 2 subscales designed specifically to tap agentic and communal content. Both subscales showed adequate alpha reliabilities under both honest and faking conditions. In Study 2, the BIMI was cross-validated in a new sample: The subscales remained relatively independent, and their reliabilities remained solid. A coherent pattern of personality correlates also supported the validities of both subscales. In Study 3, the differential sensitivity of the 2 subscales was demonstrated by manipulating the job type in simulated job applications. Implications and applications of the BIMI are discussed. PMID:24328818

  10. Chemical enhancement of footwear impressions in urine on fabric.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kevin J; Bandey, Helen; Bleay, Steve; NicDaéid, Niamh

    2012-01-10

    A range of chemical techniques were utilised for the enhancement of footwear impressions deposited on a variety of fabric types of different colours with urine as a contaminant. A semi-automated stamping device was used to deliver test impressions at a set force to minimise the variability between impressions; multiple impressions were produced and enhanced by each reagent to determine the repeatability of the enhancement. Urine samples from different donors were analysed using a spectrofluorophotometer revealing differences between individuals. Results indicated that the enhancement of footwear impressions in urine was possible using amino acid staining techniques whereas protein stains failed to achieve successful enhancement. PMID:21813253

  11. Cytogenomic Evaluation of Subjects with Syndromic and Nonsyndromic Conotruncal Heart Defects

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Karen Regina; Mergener, Rafaella; Huber, Janaina; Campos Pellanda, Lucia; Riegel, Mariluce

    2015-01-01

    Despite considerable advances in the detection of genomic abnormalities in congenital heart disease (CHD), the etiology of CHD remains largely unknown. CHD is the most common birth defect and is a major cause of infant morbidity and mortality, and conotruncal defects constitute 20% of all CHD cases. We used array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) to retrospectively study 60 subjects with conotruncal defects and identify genomic imbalances. The DNA copy number variations (CNVs) detected were matched with data from genomic databases, and their clinical significance was evaluated. We found that 38.3% (23/60) of CHD cases possessed genomic imbalances. In 8.3% (5/60) of these cases, the imbalances were causal or potentially causal CNVs; in 8.3% (5/60), unclassified CNVs were identified; and in 21.6% (13/60), common variants were detected. Although the interpretation of the results must be refined and there is not yet a consensus regarding the types of CHD cases in which array-CGH should be used as a first-line test, the identification of these CNVs can assist in the evaluation and management of CHD. The results of such studies emphasize the growing importance of the use of genome-wide assays in subjects with CHD to increase the number of genomic data sets associated with this condition. PMID:26137477

  12. Electromyographic Evaluation of the Effect of Lined Dentures on Masticatory Muscle Activity in Edentulous Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shitij; Gaur, Abhishek; Dupare, Arun; Rastogi, Shiksha; Kamatagi, Laxmikant

    2015-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this study was to examine changes in relative electromyographic (EMG) activities of temporal and masseter muscles after relining the dentures with silicone and acrylic-resin based denture liners. Materials and Methods Conventional complete dentures were fabricated for 20 edentulous patients. One month after completing adjustments of the dentures, electromyography of the masseter and temporalis muscle during maximum intercuspation was recorded. The dentures were then relined with a silicone denture liner and after an adaptation period of one month, were again subjected for electromyographic evaluation. Further, the dentures were relined with acrylic denture liner and subjected to electromyographic evaluation. Data was analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 15.0. Intergroup comparisons were done using ANOVA followed by post-hoc assessments using Tukey HSD test. Results Mean amplitude and duration with conventional dentures was found to be significantly lower as compared to silicone lined and acrylic lined dentures for all the comparisons. Statistically, no significant difference between silicone lined and acrylic lined dentures was observed for any of the comparisons. Conclusion Within the limitations of this experimental design, it was concluded that relining significantly increases electromyographic activity of the masseter and temporalis muscles. Thus, resulting in an improved biting force, chewing efficiency and masticatory performance. There were no significant differences between silicone and acrylic based denture liners for both electromyographic variables. PMID:26436054

  13. Phoenix Makes an Impression on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This view from the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows the first impression dubbed Yeti and looking like a wide footprint -- made on the Martian soil by the Robotic Arm scoop on Sol 6, the sixth Martian day of the mission, (May 31, 2008).

    Touching the ground is the first step toward scooping up soil and ice and delivering the samples to the lander's experiments.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. Wettability of nonaqueous elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    Chai, J Y; Yeung, T C

    1991-01-01

    The wettability of eight nonaqueous elastomeric impression materials was studied by comparing their contact angles. The materials included three polyethers (one of which was light activated), three hydrophilic poly(vinyl siloxanes), one conventional poly(vinyl siloxane), and one poly(vinyl siloxane) putty. Extracted teeth were prepared to approximate the roughness of a tooth preparation. Contact angles were measured at different time intervals after the start of mixing but were not shown to be significant. The nonhydrophilic poly(vinyl siloxane) materials and the poly(vinyl siloxane) putty were found to be significantly less wettable. PMID:1817528

  15. Evaluation of a subject-specific musculoskeletal modelling framework for load prediction in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenxian; Zhang, Zhifeng; Wang, Ling; Li, Dichen; Zhang, Yuanzhi; Jin, Zhongmin

    2016-08-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) multibody dynamics (MBD) models have been used to predict in vivo biomechanics in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, a full lower limb MSK MBD modelling approach for TKA that combines subject-specific skeletal and prosthetic knee geometry has not yet been applied and evaluated over a range of patients. This study evaluated a subject-specific MSK MBD modelling framework for TKA using force-dependent kinematics (FDK) and applied it to predict knee contact forces during gait trials for three patients implanted with instrumented prosthetic knees. The prediction accuracy was quantified in terms of the mean absolute deviation (MAD), root mean square error (RMSE), Pearson correlation coefficient (ρ), and Sprague and Geers metrics of magnitude (M), phase (P) and combined error (C). Generally good agreements were found between the predictions and the experimental measurements from all patients for the medial contact forces (150 N < MAD <178 N, 174 N < RMSE < 224 N, 0.87 < ρ < 0.95, -0.04 < M < 0.20, 0.06 < P < 0.09, 0.08 < C < 0.22) and the lateral contact force (113 N < MAD <195 N, 131 N < RMSE < 240 N, 0.41 < ρ < 0.82, -0.25 < M < 0.34, 0.08 < P < 0.22, 0.13 < C < 0.36). The results suggest that the subject-specific MSK MBD modelling framework for TKA using FDK has potential as a powerful tool for investigating the functional outcomes of knee implants. PMID:27245748

  16. Spectral evaluation of aging effects on blood pressure and heart rate variations in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Singh, D; Vinod, K; Saxena, S C; Deepak, K K

    2006-01-01

    The background to heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV), and their determinants and physiological correlates, remain obscure. The impact of age must be taken into account if HRV and BPV are used for predictive purposes in clinical settings. Healthy subjects show wide inter-individual variation in their heart rate behaviour and the factors affecting heart rate dynamics are not well known. This paper has undertaken to evaluate heart rate variability (HRV) and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in a random sample of subjects without evidence of heart disease, and to estimate the relation of HRV and BPV behaviour to age. The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of ageing on HRV and BPV for simultaneous recordings of electrocardiograph (ECG) and blood pressure (BP) signals at rest in healthy subjects. We studied eight young (21-34 years old) and eight elderly (68-85 years old) rigorously screened subjects from the Fantasia Database to make the reproducibility and comparability of the results more extensive. Time- and frequency-domain analysis of HRV and BPV was performed on 5-minute ectopic-free recordings. BRS on the heart was estimated by frequency-domain analysis of spontaneous variability of systolic blood pressure (SBP) and RR interval. It has been observed that compared to young the elderly subjects have (i) diminished HRV; (ii) a shift in the power spectral density and median frequency to low frequency side for HRV and to higher frequency side for BPV; and (iii) increased low-frequency alpha index and decreased high-frequency alpha index of BRS with overall alpha index augmented. The results convey that normal ageing in the absence of disease is associated with lesser parasympathetic regulation of heart rate. Thus it is concluded that the age is an important factor to be considered for prognosis and diagnosis by HRV and BPV. For reliable clinical applications, more research needs to be done on a broad spectrum of subjects. In

  17. An evaluation of the safety and efficacy of bimatoprost for eyelash growth in pediatric subjects

    PubMed Central

    Borchert, Mark; Bruce, Suzanne; Wirta, David; Yoelin, Steven G; Lee, Sungwook; Mao, Cheri; VanDenburgh, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Evaluate the safety and effectiveness of bimatoprost 0.03% for treatment of eyelash hypotrichosis in a pediatric population. Patients and methods This multicenter, randomized, double-masked, parallel-group study was conducted at seven sites in the US and Brazil. Subjects with eyelash hypotrichosis caused by chemotherapy or alopecia areata (aged 5–17 years) or healthy adolescents aged 15–17 years were enrolled (N=71). Subjects applied bimatoprost 0.03% or vehicle to upper eyelid margins once nightly for 4 months and were followed for 1 month post-treatment. Eyelash prominence was assessed using the validated 4-grade Global Eyelash Assessment scale with photonumeric guide. Changes in eyelash length, thickness, and darkness were measured by digital image analysis. Safety was assessed by adverse events and ophthalmic observations. Results Eyelash prominence improved in a significantly greater proportion of subjects treated with bimatoprost compared with vehicle at month 4 (70.8% versus 26.1%; P<0.001). This benefit was sustained at month 5 post-treatment assessment. Digital image analysis measures were significantly improved with bimatoprost. Significant treatment benefits with bimatoprost versus vehicle were evident among the healthy adolescents but not in the postchemotherapy or alopecia areata subgroups. The safety profile of bimatoprost was consistent with previous studies in adults. Conclusion Bimatoprost was safe and well tolerated in pediatric subjects with eyelash hypotrichosis. In this study with limited sample size, subgroup analyses showed that treatment was effective in healthy adolescents with no concurrent contributing medical condition, but not in those with eyelash hypotrichosis due to chemotherapy or alopecia areata. PMID:27022239

  18. Neuro-impressions: interpreting the nature of human creativity

    PubMed Central

    Siler, Todd Lael

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the creative process is essential for realizing human potential. Over the past four decades, the author has explored this subject through his brain-inspired drawings, paintings, symbolic sculptures, and experimental art installations that present myriad impressions of human creativity. These impressionistic artworks interpret rather than illustrate the complexities of the creative process. They draw insights from empirical studies that correlate how human beings create, learn, remember, innovate, and communicate. In addition to offering fresh aesthetic experiences, this metaphorical art raises fundamental questions concerning the deep connections between the brain and its creations. The author describes his artworks as embodiments of everyday observations about the neuropsychology of creativity, and its all-purpose applications for stimulating and accelerating innovation. PMID:23091455

  19. Salaried general practice in Czechoslovakia: personal observations and impressions.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, B

    1993-01-01

    In 1991, a visit was undertaken, to the former Czechoslovakia, during which discussions were held with general practitioners. Some personal observations and impressions from the visit are presented. For four decades, salaried general practice was a feature of the Czechoslovakian health care system. Primary health care comprised three strands: paediatric services, an occupational health service and community general practitioner care. The main point of service delivery was the polyclinic which, although being large and impersonal, provided easy access to other primary and secondary services. General practitioners, over half of whom were women, had regular leave entitlement and predictable hours of work, out of hours work being provided through separate contracts based on primary care emergency centres. However, doctors were poorly paid compared with industrial workers. Following the 'velvet revolution' in 1989, all aspects of the health service have been subject to major review, and salaried general practice is likely to give way to a more entrepreneurial system. PMID:8251221

  20. Chemical enhancement of soil based footwear impressions on fabric.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kevin J; Bandey, Helen; Dawson, Lorna; Daéid, Niamh Nic

    2012-06-10

    This study investigates the enhancement of footwear impressions prepared with soils from different locations on a variety of fabric surfaces with different morphology. Preliminary experiments using seventeen techniques were carried out and the best responding reagents were evaluated further. Results indicated that the soils investigated (a cross-section of soils from Scotland) are more likely to respond to reagents that target iron ions rather than calcium, aluminium or phosphorus ions. Furthermore, the concentration of iron and soil pH did not appear to have an effect on the performance of the enhancement techniques. For the techniques tested, colour enhancement was observed on all light coloured substrates while enhancement on dark coloured fabrics, denim and leatherette was limited due to poor contrast with the background. Of the chemical enhancement reagents tested, 2,2'-dipyridil was a suitable replacement for the more common enhancement technique using potassium thiocyanate. The main advantages are the use of less toxic and flammable solvents and improved clarity and sharpness of the enhanced impression. The surface morphology of the fabrics did not have a significant effect on the enhancement ability of the reagents apart from a slight tendency for diffusion to occur on less porous fabrics such as polyester and nylon/lycra blends. PMID:22153620

  1. Performance evaluation of hydrological models: Statistical significance for reducing subjectivity in goodness-of-fit assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Axel; Muñoz-Carpena, Rafael

    2013-02-01

    SummarySuccess in the use of computer models for simulating environmental variables and processes requires objective model calibration and verification procedures. Several methods for quantifying the goodness-of-fit of observations against model-calculated values have been proposed but none of them is free of limitations and are often ambiguous. When a single indicator is used it may lead to incorrect verification of the model. Instead, a combination of graphical results, absolute value error statistics (i.e. root mean square error), and normalized goodness-of-fit statistics (i.e. Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency coefficient, NSE) is currently recommended. Interpretation of NSE values is often subjective, and may be biased by the magnitude and number of data points, data outliers and repeated data. The statistical significance of the performance statistics is an aspect generally ignored that helps in reducing subjectivity in the proper interpretation of the model performance. In this work, approximated probability distributions for two common indicators (NSE and root mean square error) are derived with bootstrapping (block bootstrapping when dealing with time series), followed by bias corrected and accelerated calculation of confidence intervals. Hypothesis testing of the indicators exceeding threshold values is proposed in a unified framework for statistically accepting or rejecting the model performance. It is illustrated how model performance is not linearly related with NSE, which is critical for its proper interpretation. Additionally, the sensitivity of the indicators to model bias, outliers and repeated data is evaluated. The potential of the difference between root mean square error and mean absolute error for detecting outliers is explored, showing that this may be considered a necessary but not a sufficient condition of outlier presence. The usefulness of the approach for the evaluation of model performance is illustrated with case studies including those with

  2. Changes in Personality Impressions Formed by Status-Oriented Individuals who Differ in Need-for-Social Approval (NA) or Locus-of-Control Reinforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuder, Mary E.; And Others

    Examined are changes in personality impressions formed by status-oriented individuals who differ in Need for Social Approval (NA) or Locus of Control of Reinforcement (I-E). Subjects recorded their initial and final personality impressions of speakers ascribed either high or low social status. High NA observers (or Externals) showed most positive…

  3. Modeling subjective evaluation of soundscape quality in urban open spaces: An artificial neural network approach.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Kang, Jian

    2009-09-01

    This research aims to explore the feasibility of using computer-based models to predict the soundscape quality evaluation of potential users in urban open spaces at the design stage. With the data from large scale field surveys in 19 urban open spaces across Europe and China, the importance of various physical, behavioral, social, demographical, and psychological factors for the soundscape evaluation has been statistically analyzed. Artificial neural network (ANN) models have then been explored at three levels. It has been shown that for both subjective sound level and acoustic comfort evaluation, a general model for all the case study sites is less feasible due to the complex physical and social environments in urban open spaces; models based on individual case study sites perform well but the application range is limited; and specific models for certain types of location/function would be reliable and practical. The performance of acoustic comfort models is considerably better than that of sound level models. Based on the ANN models, soundscape quality maps can be produced and this has been demonstrated with an example. PMID:19739730

  4. A subjective evaluation of high-chroma color with wide color-gamut display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Junko; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Ohyama, Nagaaki

    2009-01-01

    Displays tends to expand its color gamut, such as multi-primary color display, Adobe RGB and so on. Therefore displays got possible to display high chroma colors. However sometimes, we feel unnatural some for the image which only expanded chroma. Appropriate gamut mapping method to expand color gamut is not proposed very much. We are attempting preferred expanded color reproduction on wide color gamut display utilizing high chroma colors effectively. As a first step, we have conducted an experiment to investigate the psychological effect of color schemes including highly saturated colors. We used the six-primary-color projector that we have developed for the presentation of test colors. The six-primary-color projector's gamut volume in CIELAB space is about 1.8 times larger than the normal RGB projector. We conducted a subjective evaluation experiment using the SD (Semantic Differential) technique to find the quantitative psychological effect of high chroma colors.

  5. Subjective evaluation of the effect of noise and interference on frequency modulated NTSC television signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, M.; Chouinard, G.; Trenholm, R.

    1984-12-01

    The future environment of broadcasting satellites may well be governed by the limiting factor of interference between television signals from neighboring satellites. A program of tests was performed to evaluate subjectively the effect of aggregate interference and/or noise on the impairment of television pictures. Up to four interfering channels were added in an environment resembling that of future broadcasting satellite systems including up to two co-frequency channels and up to two adjacent channels. Also results of just-perceptible interference tests due to adjacent channel interferer at various intercarrier spacings and for different receive filter characteristics on the wanted signal path are presented. The results of these tests are considered valuable in the study of the quality standard for the RARC-83 for the planning of the broadcasting-satellite service.

  6. [Preoperative evaluation before non cardiac surgery in subjects older than 65 years].

    PubMed

    Mureddu, Gian Francesco; Faggiano, Pompilio; Fattirolli, Francesco

    2014-03-01

    Non cardiac surgery is becoming increasingly common in elderly patients; they are usually affected by overt cardiac disease or show multiple risk factors, responsible for a higher incidence of perioperative fatal or nonfatal cardiac events. Of interest, acute myocardial infarction occurring in the perioperative period shows a high mortality rate in people over 65 years old. The cardiovascular risk stratification and perioperative management of subjects undergoing noncardiac surgery have been recently updated in the 2014 European Society of Cardiology Guidelines. However, several critical points still lack of strong evidence and are based on expert opinions only. For example, the use of drugs, such as beta-blockers, before, during and after the surgery, presents many uncertainties regarding the selection of patients more likely to benefit, dosage and duration of therapy, and effects on outcome. Data on elderly patients undergoing non cardiac surgery are scarce. Accordingly, a prospective registry enrolling a large number of aged subjects undergoing non cardiac surgery (particularly at high or intermediate risk) should be able to give us adequate insights on the management strategies currently used, on the incidence of death or cardiovascular events in the postoperative period and on the areas of potential improvement in care. Furthermore, the effects on outcome of structured programs of Guidelines implementation in the clinical practice of cardiologists, anesthesiologists and other health personnel involved in perioperative care, could be positive and should be evaluated. PMID:25481937

  7. Involving stakeholders in the evaluation of community alcohol projects: finding a balance between subjective insight and objective facts.

    PubMed

    Boots, Kevin; Midford, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The role played by key community representatives in the evaluation of community alcohol projects differs according to the evaluation paradigm adopted. In evaluations that adopt a positivist, experimental design they are cast in the role of independent informants. In post-positivist evaluations they are seen as having an interest in the evaluation and accordingly are considered active stakeholders. However, the degree to which stakeholders can be actively engaged in an evaluation varies considerably along a number of dimensions. Four dimensions of the stakeholder role--stakeholder inclusiveness, participation mode, participation frequency, and evaluation role--are examined in the context of eight evaluation theories. This is integrated into a model that links these dimensions to an object-subject continuum of stakeholder involvement. The model facilitates systematic consideration of these dimensions and will assist evaluators in achieving their desired balance of subjective insight and objective fact. PMID:18075920

  8. Subjective Evaluations of Intelligence and Academic Self-Concept Predict Academic Achievement: Evidence from a Selective Student Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kornilova, Tatiana V.; Kornilov, Sergey A.; Chumakova, Maria A.

    2009-01-01

    The study examined the relationship between implicit theories, goal orientations, subjective and test estimates of intelligence, academic self-concept, and achievement in a selective student population (N=300). There was no direct impact of implicit theories of intelligence and goal orientations on achievement. However, subjective evaluations of…

  9. Articular Cartilage: Evaluation with Fluid-suppressed 7.0-T Sodium MR Imaging in Subjects with and Subjects without Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Babb, James; Xia, Ding; Chang, Gregory; Krasnokutsky, Svetlana; Abramson, Steven B.; Jerschow, Alexej; Regatte, Ravinder R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the potential use of sodium magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of cartilage, with and without fluid suppression by using an adiabatic pulse, for classifying subjects with versus subjects without osteoarthritis at 7.0 T. Materials and Methods: The study was approved by the institutional review board and was compliant with HIPAA. The knee cartilage of 19 asymptomatic (control subjects) and 28 symptomatic (osteoarthritis patients) subjects underwent 7.0-T sodium MR imaging with use of two different sequences: one without fluid suppression (radial three-dimensional sequence) and one with fluid suppression (inversion recovery [IR] wideband uniform rate and smooth truncation [WURST]). Fluid suppression was obtained by using IR with an adiabatic inversion pulse (WURST pulse). Mean sodium concentrations and their standard deviations were measured in the patellar, femorotibial medial, and lateral cartilage regions over four consecutive sections for each subject. The minimum, maximum, median, and average means and standard deviations were calculated over all measurements for each subject. The utility of these measures in the detection of osteoarthritis was evaluated by using logistic regression and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Bonferroni correction was applied to the P values obtained with logistic regression. Results: Measurements from IR WURST were found to be significant predicators of all osteoarthritis (Kellgren-Lawrence score of 1–4) and early osteoarthritis (Kellgren-Lawrence score of 1 or 2). The minimum standard deviation provided the highest AUC (0.83) with the highest accuracy (>78%), sensitivity (>82%), and specificity (>74%) for both all osteoarthritis and early osteoarthritis groups. Conclusion: Quantitative sodium MR imaging at 7.0 T with fluid suppression by using adiabatic IR is a potential biomarker for osteoarthritis. © RSNA, 2013 PMID:23468572

  10. Subjective evaluation of user experience in interactive 3D visualization in a medical context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourancheau, Sylvain; Sjöström, Mårten; Olsson, Roger; Persson, Anders; Ericson, Thomas; Rudling, Johan; Norén, Bengt

    2012-02-01

    New display technologies enable the usage of 3D-visualization in a medical context. Even though user performance seems to be enhanced with respect to 2D thanks to the addition of recreated depth cues, human factors, and more particularly visual comfort and visual fatigue can still be a bridle to the widespread use of these systems. This study aimed at evaluating and comparing two different 3D visualization systems (a market stereoscopic display, and a state-of-the-art multi-view display) in terms of quality of experience (QoE), in the context of interactive medical visualization. An adapted methodology was designed in order to subjectively evaluate the experience of users. 14 medical doctors and 15 medical students took part in the experiment. After solving different tasks using the 3D reconstruction of a phantom object, they were asked to judge their quality of the experience, according to specific features. They were also asked to give their opinion about the influence of 3D-systems on their work conditions. Results suggest that medical doctors are opened to 3D-visualization techniques and are confident concerning their beneficial influence on their work. However, visual comfort and visual fatigue are still an issue of 3D-displays. Results obtained with the multi-view display suggest that the use of continuous horizontal parallax might be the future response to these current limitations.

  11. Subjective evaluation and electroacoustic theoretical validation of a new approach to audio upmixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, John S.

    and subjective methods investigated system performance with a variety of test stimuli for solo musical performances reproduced using a loudspeaker in an orchestral concert-hall and recorded using different microphone techniques. The objective and subjective evaluations combined with a comparative study with two commercial systems demonstrate that the proposed system provides a new, computationally practical, high sound quality solution to upmixing.

  12. Accuracy of a proposed implant impression technique using abutments and metal framework

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeok-Jae; Lim, Young-Jun; Kim, Chang-Whe; Choi, Jung-Han

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE This study compared the accuracy of an abutment-framework (A-F) taken with open tray impression technique combining cementon crown abutments, a metal framework and resin cement to closed tray and resin-splinted open tray impression techniques for the 3-implant definitive casts. The effect of angulation on the accuracy of these 3 techniques was also evaluated. MATERIAL AND METHODS Three definitive casts, each with 3 linearly positioned implant analogs at relative angulations 0, 30, and 40 degrees, were fabricated with passively fitted corresponding reference frameworks. Ten impressions were made and poured, using each of the 3 techniques on each of the 3 definitive casts. To record the vertical gap between reference frameworks and analogs in duplicate casts, a light microscope with image processing was used. Data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test. RESULTS The open tray techniques showed significantly smaller vertical gaps compare to closed tray technique (P < .05). The closed tray and the resin-splinted open tray technique showed significantly different vertical gaps according to the angulation of implant (P < .05), but the A-F impression technique did not (P > .05). CONCLUSION The accuracy of the A-F impression technique was superior to that of conventional techniques, and was not affected by the angulation of the implants. PMID:21165184

  13. How do you say 'hello'? Personality impressions from brief novel voices.

    PubMed

    McAleer, Phil; Todorov, Alexander; Belin, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    On hearing a novel voice, listeners readily form personality impressions of that speaker. Accurate or not, these impressions are known to affect subsequent interactions; yet the underlying psychological and acoustical bases remain poorly understood. Furthermore, hitherto studies have focussed on extended speech as opposed to analysing the instantaneous impressions we obtain from first experience. In this paper, through a mass online rating experiment, 320 participants rated 64 sub-second vocal utterances of the word 'hello' on one of 10 personality traits. We show that: (1) personality judgements of brief utterances from unfamiliar speakers are consistent across listeners; (2) a two-dimensional 'social voice space' with axes mapping Valence (Trust, Likeability) and Dominance, each driven by differing combinations of vocal acoustics, adequately summarises ratings in both male and female voices; and (3) a positive combination of Valence and Dominance results in increased perceived male vocal Attractiveness, whereas perceived female vocal Attractiveness is largely controlled by increasing Valence. Results are discussed in relation to the rapid evaluation of personality and, in turn, the intent of others, as being driven by survival mechanisms via approach or avoidance behaviours. These findings provide empirical bases for predicting personality impressions from acoustical analyses of short utterances and for generating desired personality impressions in artificial voices. PMID:24622283

  14. Impression Management in Survey Responding: Easier for Collectivists or Individualists?

    PubMed Central

    Riemer, Hila; Shavitt, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Three experiments indicate that when individualists and collectivists engage in impression management on self-reports, they do so through different psychological mechanism s. Collectivists do so through a relatively automatic process. Thus, they can impression manage even when cognitively busy. Individualists impression manage through a more effortful process. Therefore, they can do so only when the situation permits effortful processing. These findings highlight distinct conditions under which social norms may influence consumer self-reports across cultures. PMID:23175618

  15. Dynamics of conjunctival impression cytologic changes after vitamin A supplementation.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, S; Kumar, R; Ganguly, N K; Kumar, L; Verma, M; Walia, B N

    1997-06-01

    To investigate the chronological changes in conjunctival epithelium after supplementation with a massive oral dose of vitamin A, conjunctival impression cytology (CIC) with transfer was carried out repeatedly among 200 children aged 6-120 months in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in Chandigarh (India). Significant conversion to normal CIC started 71-80 d after vitamin A supplementation and by 101-110 d conversion had taken place in all children. Compared with the placebo group, plasma retinol concentration at 100 d post-supplement was found to be significantly higher in the vitamin A-supplemented group P = 0.04. This study demonstrates that CIC responds to a massive oral dose of vitamin A 3-4 months after supplementation. These findings should guide future studies and evaluations in which CIC is used to assess response to vitamin A interventions. PMID:9227184

  16. Evaluation of vardenafil for the treatment of subjective tinnitus: a controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Mazurek, Birgit; Haupt, Heidemarie; Szczepek, Agnieszka J; Sandmann, Jörg; Gross, Johann; Klapp, Burghard F; Kiesewetter, Holger; Kalus, Ulrich; Stöver, Timo; Caffier, Philipp P

    2009-01-01

    Background Vardenafil (Levitra®) represents a potent and highly selective phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor, which is established for treatment of various diseases. There are several unpublished reports from patients stating that vardenafil has a considerable therapeutic effect on their concomitant tinnitus. This pilot study was conducted to specifically assess the effect of vardenafil in patients with chronic tinnitus. Methods This trial was based on a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group design. Fourty-two consecutive subjects with mon- or binaural chronic tinnitus received 10 mg vardenafil (N = 21) or matching placebo tablets (N = 21) administered orally twice a day over a period of 12 weeks. Clinical examination and data acquisition took place at each visit: at baseline, after 4 weeks, after 12 weeks (end of treatment with study medication), and at non-medicated follow-up after 16 weeks. Assessment of clinical effectiveness was based on a standardized tinnitus questionnaire (TQ), the Short Form 36 health survey (SF-36), audiometric measurements (mode, pitch and loudness of tinnitus; auditory thresholds) and biomarkers of oxidative stress in patients' blood (malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, homocysteine and total antioxidative status). Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by comparison of subjective and objective parameters with baseline data between both treatment groups (ANCOVA). Results Vardenafil had no superior efficacy over placebo in the treatment of chronic tinnitus during this study. The primary efficacy criterion 'TQ total score' failed to demonstrate significant improvement compared to placebo. Subjective reports of TQ subscales and general quality of life areas (SF-36), objective audiometric examinations as well as investigated biomarkers for oxidative stress did not reveal any significant treatment effects. The safety profile was favorable and consistent with that in other vardenafil studies. Conclusion

  17. The fungicidal effect of ultraviolet light on impression materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, H.; Nahara, Y.; Tamamoto, M.; Hamada, T. )

    1991-04-01

    The effects of ultraviolet (UV) light on fungi and impression materials were tested. UV light (250 microW/cm2) killed most Candida organisms (10(3) cells/ml) within 5 minutes. UV light (8000 microW/cm2) killed most C. albicans (10(7) cells/ml) within 2 minutes of exposure. The effect of UV light on dimensional change and surface roughness of impression materials (irreversible hydrocolloid, agar, and silicone rubber) was tested. The results showed that neither dimensional change nor surface roughness of the impression materials were affected. The results of this study indicate that UV light disinfects impression materials that are contaminated with Candida organisms.

  18. The Warm-Cold Study: A Classroom Demonstration of Impression Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symbaluk, Diane G.; Cameron, Judy

    1998-01-01

    Describes a procedure for teaching experimental design to students in the social sciences. Argues that by replicating Solomon Asch's and H. Kelley's classic studies on impression formation, students learn how to conduct experiments, analyze data, and evaluate the significance of research. Provides instructions for implementing the strategy. (DSK)

  19. [Significance of subjective evaluation of life events as risk factors for predicting future suicide attempts].

    PubMed

    Chrostek Maj, J; Polewka, A; Kroch, S; Mikołaszek-Boba, M; Rachel, W; Datka, W

    2001-01-01

    Among the total population of 180 patients undergoing medical examination between March and December 2000, hospitalized for suicide attempts (drug intoxication) in the Department of Clinical Toxicology CM UJ in Kraków, 159 persons were examined by means of modified questionnaire of life events based on a scale elaborated by Thomas Holmes and Richard Rache. The patients were divided into 2 groups--first group comprised patients after first suicide attempt and second group consisted of those who had reattempted suicide. In regard to sex and age there were no significant differences between these two groups and the total population of 180 patients. In order to obtain the patients' subjective evaluation of the influence of their course of life on their attempting suicide, we asked the patients to select from the list of life events those that had affected their mental and physical state during of whole their life. Objectivization of life events was based on the 'units of life change' by T. Holmes and R. Rache. The sum of units of life events was 373 scores (SD +/- 200, in the range of 39-1042 units). From the total list of life events (max. score--1513) we selected the events estimated at 40 and more units of life change. Those were; marriage, divorce, separation, marital reconciliation, patient's illness, change of behavior and illness of a close relative, death of a husband/wife, child, close relative, imprisonment, pregnancy, unemployment, retirement. In the patients' subjective evaluation part, the events most frequently selected by the patients as those that had affected their mental state were: death of a close relative (56.6%), illness of a relative (40.8%), patient's illness (37.7%). A high number of patients stated events testifying to a conflict in marriage--45.7% of patients stated marital separation, and reconciliation, and 27% of patients stated unemployment as a fact that had influenced their mental state. 30.6% of these patients belonged to the first

  20. Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of levalbuterol in subjects with COPD.

    PubMed

    Donohue, James F; Parsey, Merdad V; Andrews, Charles; D'Urzo, Tony; Sharma, Satyendra; Schaefer, Kendyl; Claus, Raymond; Baumgartner, Rudolf A

    2006-08-01

    The efficacy and safety of nebulized levalbuterol in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was evaluated in this multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel design study. Randomized subjects (n = 209) received levalbuterol (LEV) 0.63 mg or 1.25 mg, racemic albuterol (RAC) 2.5 mg, or placebo (PBO) TID for 6 weeks. Serial spirometry was completed in-clinic after study drug alone (weeks 0, 2, and 6) or in combination with ipratropium bromide 0.5 mg (week 4). The primary endpoint was the averaged FEV1 AUC(0-8 hrs) over weeks 0, 2 and 6 compared with placebo. Other endpoints included rescue medication use, safety parameters, COPD exacerbations, and global evaluations. All active treatments demonstrated improvements in the percent change in FEV1 AUC(0-8 hrs) over the double-blind period and at each visit vs PBO (p < 0.05). Rescue medication use vs. baseline (doses/day) changed over time: PBO +0.38 +/- 3.3; LEV 0.63 mg +0.07 +/- 3.3; LEV 1.25 mg -0.84 +/- 3.8 (p = 0.02 vs. RAC); RAC +0.97 +/- 2.5. The overall rate of adverse events was PBO 56.4%, LEV 0.63 mg 56.6%, LEV 1.25 mg 67.3%, and RAC 65.4%. Protocol-defined COPD exacerbations occurred in all groups (PBO 12.7%, LEV 0.63 mg 11.3%; LEV 1.25 mg 18.4%; RAC 21.2%). Withdrawals due to COPD exacerbations were significantly higher in the RAC group compared with PBO (PBO 0%; LEV 0.63 mg 1.9%; LEV 1.25 mg 4.1%; RAC 9.6% p = 0.01 vs. PBO). In this study, levalbuterol treatment in subjects with COPD was generally well tolerated, produced significant bronchodilation compared with PBO, and improved clinical control of COPD as evidenced by reductions in rescue medication use compared with PBO and/or RAC. PMID:17240614

  1. Antibacterial efficacy and effect of Morinda citrifolia L. mixed with irreversible hydrocolloid for dental impressions: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, A. Shafath; Charles, P. David; Cholan, R.; Russia, M.; Surya, R.; Jailance, L.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to evaluate whether the extract of Morinda citrifolia L. mixed with irreversible hydrocolloid powder decreases microbial contamination during impression making without affecting the resulting casts. Materials and Methods: Twenty volunteers were randomly divided into two groups (n = 10). Group A 30 ml extract of M. citrifolia L diluted in 30 ml of water was mixed to make the impression with irreversible hydrocolloid material. Group B 30 ml deionized water was mixed with irreversible hydrocolloid material to make the impressions following which the surface roughness and dimensional stability of casts were evaluated. Results: Extract of M. citrifolia L. mixed with irreversible hydrocolloid decreased the percentage of microorganisms when compared with water (P < 0.001) but did not affect the surface quality or dimensional stability of the casts. Conclusion: Mixing the extract of M. citrifolia L. with irreversible hydrocolloid powder is an alternative method to prevent contamination without sacrificing impression quality. PMID:26538926

  2. Psychometric Evaluation of the Tagalog and German Subjective Happiness Scales and a Cross-Cultural Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swami, Viren; Stieger, Stefan; Voracek, Martin; Dressler, Stefan G.; Eisma, Laura; Furnham, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    The Subjective Happiness Scale (SHS) has recently been developed as a more complete measure for the assessment of molar subjective happiness. In the present study, we report on the translation and validation of German and Tagalog versions of the SHS and conduct an initial cross-cultural examination of subjective happiness. In Study 1, 960…

  3. Downplaying Positive Impressions: Compensation Between Warmth and Competence in Impression Management

    PubMed Central

    Holoien, Deborah Son; Fiske, Susan T.

    2014-01-01

    The compensation effect demonstrates a negative relationship between the dimensions of warmth and competence in impression formation in comparative contexts. However, does compensation between warmth and competence extend to impression management? Two studies examined whether people actively downplay their warmth in order to appear competent and downplay their competence in order to appear warm. In Studies 1a and 1b, participants selected words pretested to be high or low in warmth and competence to include in an e-mail message to people they wanted to impress. As predicted, participants downplayed their competence when they wanted to appear warm (Study 1a) and downplayed their warmth when they wanted to appear competent (Study 1b). In Studies 2a and 2b, compensation also occurred when participants introduced themselves to another person, as evidenced by the questions they selected to answer about themselves, their self-reported goals, and their open-ended introductions. Compensation occurred uniquely between warmth and competence and not for other dimensions, such as healthiness (Study 2a) and political interest (Study 2b), which suggests that the compensation effect extends beyond a mere zero-sum exchange between dimensions. PMID:24550571

  4. The Dorsomedial Prefrontal Cortex Plays a Causal Role in Integrating Social Impressions from Faces and Verbal Descriptions.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Chiara; Lega, Carlotta; Vernice, Mirta; Tamietto, Marco; Mende-Siedlecki, Peter; Vecchi, Tomaso; Todorov, Alexander; Cattaneo, Zaira

    2016-01-01

    Several neuroimaging studies point to a key role of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) in the formation of socially relevant impressions. In 3 different experiments, participants were required to form socially relevant impressions about other individuals on the basis of text descriptions of their social behaviors, and to decide whether a face alone, a trait adjective (e.g., "selfish"), or a face presented with a trait adjective was consistent or inconsistent with the impression they had formed. Before deciding whether the target stimulus matched the impression they had previously formed, participants received transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the dmPFC, the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG, also implicated in social impression formation), or over a control site (vertex). Results from the 3 experiments converged in showing that interfering with dmPFC activity significantly delayed participants in responding whether a face-adjective pair was consistent with the impression they had formed. No effects of TMS were observed following stimulation of the IFG or when evaluations had to be made on faces or trait adjectives presented alone. Our findings critically extend previous neuroimaging evidence by indicating a causal role of the dmPFC in creating coherent impressions based on the integration of face and verbal description of social behaviors. PMID:25165063

  5. The Effect of Disinfectants and a Surface Wetting Agent on the Wettability of Elastomeric Impression Materials: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Lad, Pritam P; Gurjar, Minal; Gunda, Sachin; Gurjar, Vivek; Rao, Nandan K

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of two commercially available chemical disinfectants namely sodium hypochlorite and glutaraldehyde and a surface wetting agent on the wettability of three high precision elastomeric impression materials, addition silicone, condensation silicone and polyether. Materials and Methods: Three different types of elastomeric impression materials commonly used in prosthodontic practice were selected. The glutaraldehyde and sodium hypochloride solutions were employed to disinfect the impressions made with the above-mentioned elastomeric impression materials. True Blue surface wetting agent was selected. GBX contact angle analyzer was used to measure advancing and receding contact angle. Results: The results of this study have demonstrated that the polyether impression material was the most hydrophilic of all the materials, followed by hydrophilic addition silicone. Condensation silicone was least hydrophilic. All materials showed improvement in the wettability when a topical surfactant was used. Conclusion: The short term disinfection of the three elastomeric impression materials does not affect the wettability of these impression materials. PMID:26124605

  6. Evaluation of the efficacy of orange roughy (Hoplostetbus atlanticus) oil in subjects with dry skin.

    PubMed

    Domoto, N; Koriyama, T; Chu, B-S; Tsuji, T

    2012-08-01

    Moisturizers have beneficial effects in treating dry skin. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus) oil, a marine-derived wax ester, on skin dryness in comparison with a reference commercially available petrolatum-based moisturizer (Vaseline) and untreated control. Subjects (n = 24) with moderate to severe skin dryness at the lower limb of legs (Study 1) and with certain degree of skin dryness on the face and the forearms (n = 22, Study 2) were treated twice a day for 42 consecutive days with the test products in randomized clinical trials. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was measured at the beginning and the end of Study 1, whereas skin hydration was measured at the beginning, after 3 and 6 weeks of the application (the end of the study) in Study 2. Changes in the skin dryness were assessed by a dermatologist using a video microscopy. In Study 1, the dryness score of skin applied with orange roughy oil improved significantly (P < 0.01) in 6 weeks. The skin looked smooth with no or little dry scaly skin. Orange roughy oil was evaluated with a 60% efficacy in treating skin dryness by the expert, which comparable to that of petrolatum (68%). No significant change in TEWL was found either in orange roughy oil or petrolatum treatment, although the values showed a tendency to improve in both cases. Similarly, the results of the skin capacitance in Study 2 showed a significant improvement of the skin symptoms after 3 and 6 weeks. These results showed that the performance of orange roughy oil in treating skin dryness was comparable to that of petrolatum. PMID:22554123

  7. Customized rating assessment of climate suitability (CRACS): climate satisfaction evaluation based on subjective perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tzu-Ping; Yang, Shing-Ru; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Climate not only influences the behavior of people in urban environments but also affects people's schedules and travel plans. Therefore, providing people with appropriate long-term climate evaluation information is crucial. Therefore, we developed an innovative climate assessment system based on field investigations conducted in three cities located in Northern, Central, and Southern Taiwan. The field investigations included the questionnaire surveys and climate data collection. We first analyzed the relationship between the participants and climate parameters comprising physiologically equivalent temperature, air temperature, humidity, wind speed, solar radiation, cloud cover, and precipitation. Second, we established the neutral value, comfort range, and dissatisfied range of each parameter. Third, after verifying that the subjects' perception toward the climate parameters vary based on individual preferences, we developed the customized rating assessment of climate suitability (CRACS) approach, which featured functions such as personalized and default climate suitability information to be used by users exhibiting varying demands. Finally, we performed calculations using the climate conditions of two cities during the past 10 years to demonstrate the performance of the CRACS approach. The results can be used as a reference when planning activities in the city or when organizing future travel plans. The flexibility of the assessment system enables it to be adjusted for varying regions and usage characteristics.

  8. Customized rating assessment of climate suitability (CRACS): climate satisfaction evaluation based on subjective perception.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Ping; Yang, Shing-Ru; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Climate not only influences the behavior of people in urban environments but also affects people's schedules and travel plans. Therefore, providing people with appropriate long-term climate evaluation information is crucial. Therefore, we developed an innovative climate assessment system based on field investigations conducted in three cities located in Northern, Central, and Southern Taiwan. The field investigations included the questionnaire surveys and climate data collection. We first analyzed the relationship between the participants and climate parameters comprising physiologically equivalent temperature, air temperature, humidity, wind speed, solar radiation, cloud cover, and precipitation. Second, we established the neutral value, comfort range, and dissatisfied range of each parameter. Third, after verifying that the subjects' perception toward the climate parameters vary based on individual preferences, we developed the customized rating assessment of climate suitability (CRACS) approach, which featured functions such as personalized and default climate suitability information to be used by users exhibiting varying demands. Finally, we performed calculations using the climate conditions of two cities during the past 10 years to demonstrate the performance of the CRACS approach. The results can be used as a reference when planning activities in the city or when organizing future travel plans. The flexibility of the assessment system enables it to be adjusted for varying regions and usage characteristics. PMID:25900004

  9. Evaluation of genome damage in subjects occupationally exposed to possible carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Zeljezic, Davor; Mladinic, Marin; Kopjar, Nevenka; Radulovic, Azra Hursidic

    2016-09-01

    In occupational exposures, populations are simultaneously exposed to a mixture of chemicals. We aimed to evaluate DNA damage due to possible carcinogen exposure (phenylhydrazine, ethylene oxide, dichloromethane, and 1,2-dichloroethane) in lymphocytes of pharmaceutical industry workers from the same production line. Population comprised 16 subjects (9 females and 7 males) who were exposed to multiple chemicals for 8 months. Genome damage was assessed using alkaline comet assay, micronucleus assay, and comet assay coupled with fluorescent in situ hybridization (comet-FISH). After 8 months of exposure, the issue of irregular use of all available personal protective equipment (PPE) came into light. To decrease the risk of exposure, strict use of PPE was enforced. After 8 months of strict PPE use, micronuclei frequency and comet assay parameters in lymphocytes of pharmaceutical workers significantly decreased compared with prior period of irregular PPE use. Comet-FISH results indicated a significant shift in distribution of signals for the TP 53 gene toward a more frequent occurrence in the comet tail. Prolonged exposure to possible carcinogens may hinder DNA repair mechanisms and affect structural integrity of TP 53 Two indicators of loss of TP 53 gene integrity have risen, namely, TP 53 fragmentation rate in lymphocytes with persistently elevated primary damage and incidence of TP 53 deletions in undamaged lymphocytes. PMID:25653038

  10. Impression Management by Association: Construction and Validation of a Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Martha C.; Kacmar, K. Michele

    2001-01-01

    Impression management (managing associations with others to create a favorable impression) using such tactics as boasting, blurring, blaring, and burying was examined using factor and validity analyses of data from the Image Management by Association Scale. The scale satisfactorily represented the four tactics, although burying and blaring needed…

  11. Impression Management and the Control of Social Anxieties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Rowland S.

    Impression management refers to the concept that people engaged in interaction will attempt to control the image of themselves that others form. This provides a foundation for social interaction, giving others information about who we are and what to expect from us. A central concern of impression management is the manner in which we are evaluated…

  12. Observing and Understanding Children's Social Interactions. An Impression Management Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatch, J. Amos

    1994-01-01

    Describes ways of observing and interpreting children's peer social behavior based on the impression management perspective, which focuses on the social construction of a child's individual self-concept. Suggests that teachers and caregivers can use impression management strategies to observe and promote prosocial development in young children.…

  13. Impressions of College Intructors: Stability and Change in Student Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, Kari L.

    2013-01-01

    Although the topic of stability and change in classroom impressions research is not new, there remain unanswered questions about what impressions are stable, when they are likely to change, and for whom they are likely to change over the course of a semester. My research will begin to answer those questions. My research took place in four college…

  14. Impression Creep Behavior of 316LN Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, M. D.; Naveena; Vijayanand, D.

    2013-02-01

    Impression creep tests have been carried out at 923 K on 316LN SS containing 0.07, 0.14, and 0.22 wt.% nitrogen, under different applied stress levels. It was observed that the impression creep depth versus time curves were similar to the creep curves obtained from conventional uniaxial creep tests. The impression creep curves were characterized by a loading strain and primary and secondary creep stages similar to uniaxial creep curves. The tertiary stage observed in uniaxial creep curves was absent. The steady-state impression velocity was found to increase with increasing applied stress. The equivalent steady-state creep rates calculated from impression velocities were found to be in good agreement with the steady-state creep rates obtained from conventional uniaxial creep tests. Equivalence between applied stress and steady-state impression velocity with uniaxial creep stress and steady-state creep rate, respectively, has been established based on the laws of mechanics for time-dependent plasticity. It was found that impression velocity was sensitive to the variation in nitrogen content in the steel; impression velocity decreased with increasing nitrogen content, and the results obtained in this study were in agreement with those obtained from uniaxial creep tests.

  15. Impression Management: The Web Presence of College Presidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Joanne Cardin

    2013-01-01

    Leadership profile pages on organizational websites have become staged opportunities for impression management. This research uses content analysis to examine the strategies of assertive impression management used to construct the leadership Web presence of the 70 presidents of national public universities, as identified in the "US News and…

  16. Read Two Impress: An Intervention for Disfluent Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Chase; Rasinski, Timothy; Mohr, Kathleen A. J.

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe a research-based method to increase students' reading fluency. The method is called Read Two Impress, which is derived from the Neurological Impress Method and the method of repeated readings. The authors provide step-by-step procedures to effectively implement the reading fluency intervention. Previous research indicates that…

  17. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670 Section 872.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material....

  18. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670 Section 872.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material....

  19. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670 Section 872.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material....

  20. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670 Section 872.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material....

  1. A Study of Peer Tutors Using the Neurological Impress Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllister, Elizabeth A.

    A study investigated the efficacy of using the neurological impress method in peer tutoring during reading instruction. The neurological impress reading method is a unison reading procedure in which the student and teacher or tutor read aloud simultaneously and quickly, with the student placed slightly in front of the teacher so that the teacher's…

  2. Effect of Different Disinfectants on Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans Transferred to Alginate and Polyvinylsiloxane Impression Materials

    PubMed Central

    Parnia, Fereydun; Hafezeqoran, Ali; Moslehifard, Elnaz; Mahboub, Farhang; Nahaei, Mohammadreza; Akbari Dibavar, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Background and aims Several products have been marketed for disinfecting impression materials. The present study evaluated the effect of Deconex, Micro 10, Alprocid and Unisepta Plus sprays on Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans transferred to alginate and polyvinylsiloxane impression materials. Materials and methods A total of 180 impressions of a maxillary model (90 alginate and 90 polyvinylsiloxane im-pressions) were taken for the purpose of this in vitro study. Half of the impressions were infected with Staphylococcus au-reus and the other half were infected with Candida albicans. Then the microorganisms were cultured and their counts were determined. Subsequently, the impressions were divided into groups of 15 impressions each. Each group was disinfected with Deconex, Micro10, Alprocid and Unisepta Plus according to manufacturers' instructions except for the control group. The culturing procedure was repeated after disinfection and microbial counts were determined again. Data was analyzed by ANOVA and paired-sample t-test. Results There were statistically significant differences in the means of S. aureus and C. albicans counts before and after the use of disinfectants (P < 0.05). The use of the four disinfectants reduced S. aureus counts to zero in 80% of the cases. There were no statistically significant differences in S. aureus count reductions between the four disinfectants evaluated (P = 0.31). Micro 10 was more effective on alginate; Deconex was more efficient for polyvinylsiloxane and Alprocid had a better efficacy in both impression materials in eliminating C. albicans (P < 0.05). Conclusion All the disinfectants evaluated have high disinfecting postentials. PMID:23230499

  3. Influence of Social and Behavioural Characteristics of Users on Their Evaluation of Subjective Loudness and Acoustic Comfort in Shopping Malls

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qi; Kang, Jian

    2013-01-01

    A large-scale subjective survey was conducted in six shopping malls in Harbin City, China, to determine the influence of social and behavioural characteristics of users on their evaluation of subjective loudness and acoustic comfort. The analysis of social characteristics shows that evaluation of subjective loudness is influenced by income and occupation, with correlation coefficients or contingency coefficients of 0.10 to 0.40 (p<0.05 or p<0.01). Meanwhile, evaluation of acoustic comfort evaluation is influenced by income, education level, and occupation, with correlation coefficients or contingency coefficients of 0.10 to 0.60 (p<0.05 or p<0.01). The effect of gender and age on evaluation of subjective loudness and acoustic comfort is statistically insignificant. The effects of occupation are mainly caused by the differences in income and education level, in which the effects of income are greater than that of education level. In terms of behavioural characteristics, evaluation of subjective loudness is influenced by the reason for visit, frequency of visit, and length of stay, with correlation coefficients or contingency coefficients of 0.10 to 0.40 (p<0.05 or p<0.01). Evaluation of acoustic comfort is influenced by the reason for visit to the site, the frequency of visit, length of stay, and also season of visit, with correlation coefficients of 0.10 to 0.30 (p<0.05 or p<0.01). In particular, users who are waiting for someone show lower evaluation of acoustic comfort, whereas users who go to shopping malls more than once a month show higher evaluation of acoustic comfort. On the contrary, the influence of the period of visit and the accompanying persons are found insignificant. PMID:23336003

  4. Influence of social and behavioural characteristics of users on their evaluation of subjective loudness and acoustic comfort in shopping malls.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qi; Kang, Jian

    2013-01-01

    A large-scale subjective survey was conducted in six shopping malls in Harbin City, China, to determine the influence of social and behavioural characteristics of users on their evaluation of subjective loudness and acoustic comfort. The analysis of social characteristics shows that evaluation of subjective loudness is influenced by income and occupation, with correlation coefficients or contingency coefficients of 0.10 to 0.40 (p<0.05 or p<0.01). Meanwhile, evaluation of acoustic comfort evaluation is influenced by income, education level, and occupation, with correlation coefficients or contingency coefficients of 0.10 to 0.60 (p<0.05 or p<0.01). The effect of gender and age on evaluation of subjective loudness and acoustic comfort is statistically insignificant. The effects of occupation are mainly caused by the differences in income and education level, in which the effects of income are greater than that of education level. In terms of behavioural characteristics, evaluation of subjective loudness is influenced by the reason for visit, frequency of visit, and length of stay, with correlation coefficients or contingency coefficients of 0.10 to 0.40 (p<0.05 or p<0.01). Evaluation of acoustic comfort is influenced by the reason for visit to the site, the frequency of visit, length of stay, and also season of visit, with correlation coefficients of 0.10 to 0.30 (p<0.05 or p<0.01). In particular, users who are waiting for someone show lower evaluation of acoustic comfort, whereas users who go to shopping malls more than once a month show higher evaluation of acoustic comfort. On the contrary, the influence of the period of visit and the accompanying persons are found insignificant. PMID:23336003

  5. Effect of the impression margin thickness on the linear accuracy of impression and stone dies: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Naveen, Y G; Patil, Raghunath

    2013-03-01

    The space available for impression material in gingival sulcus immediately after the removal of retraction cord has been found to be 0.3-0.4 mm. However after 40 s only 0.2 mm of the retracted space is available. This is of concern when impression of multiple abutments is to be made. Hence a study was planned to determine the minimum width of the retracted sulcus necessary to obtain a good impression. Five metal dies were machined to accurately fit a stainless steel block with a square cavity in the center with spaces, 1 mm deep and of varying widths (0.11-0.3 mm) away from the block. Polyvinyl siloxane impressions were made and poured using a high strength stone. Using traveling microscope, length and widths of abutment, impression and die were measured and compared for linear accuracy and completeness of impression. Results showed 1.5-3 times greater mean distortion and larger coefficient of variance in the 0.11 mm group than in the wider sulcular groups. ANOVA test for distortion also showed statistically significant differences (P < 0.05). 75 % of impressions in 0.11 mm group were defective compared to less than 25 % of impressions in other width groups. It is not always possible to predictably obtain accurate impressions in sulcus width of 0.11 mm or lesser. Dimensionally accurate and defect free impressions were obtained in sulcus width of 0.15 mm and wider. Hence clinicians must choose retraction methods to obtain a width greater than 0.35 mm. Further immediate loading of the impression material after cord removal may improve accuracy. PMID:24431701

  6. Using double-poured alginate impressions to fabricate bleaching trays.

    PubMed

    Haywood, V B; Powe, A

    1998-01-01

    Esthetic and diagnostic treatment often requires two casts of one arch, one for baseline and one for alterations (diagnostic wax-up, bleaching tray, occlusal analysis). The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of stone casts generated from a second pour of a properly handled alginate impression with first-poured casts. A maxillary dentoform was indexed with six reference spaces (#8-15, 9-2, 2-15, and incisal-to-gingival of #3, 9, 14). Irreversible hydrocolloid (Jeltrate) impressions were made in perforated steel trays by a single investigator. Impression material was spatulated for 1 minute. The seated impression and dentoform were wrapped in a damp paper towel to simulate intraoral conditions, and allowed to set for 2 minutes. Upon separation, the impression was stored in a damp towel for 5 minutes. The impression was poured in cast stone (Microstone) according to the manufacturer's instructions. The stone-filled impression was immediately rewrapped in a damp paper towel and allowed to set for 45 minutes at room temperature. Upon removal of the stone, the impression was rinsed with cold water, shaken dry, and repoured in the same manner. Ten impressions were made: the first five impressions were poured to make casts for Group A, then repoured as described above for casts for Group B. The remaining five impressions were poured once to make casts for Group C. The six spaces of each cast were measured three times in random order using a dial caliper and the space average calculated for the cast. At each space, analysis of variance showed no significant difference among Groups A, B, or C (P < 0.05). When alginate impressions that have been poured with cast stone are kept moist during stone setting and repoured within 45 minutes, two casts can be generated from one impression with the same degree of accuracy as two casts made from taking two separate impressions, providing the alginate does not tear during first cast removal. PMID:9656923

  7. A Paradigm shift in the concept for making dental impressions.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Sanjna; Mahadevan, R

    2015-04-01

    Digital dental impression is a revolutionary technological advancement that so surpasses the accuracy and efficiency of former techniques for obtaining replicas of prepared teeth for the purpose of fabricating restorations that its adoption by dentists is rapidly eclipsing the use of elastomeric impression materials. The ultimate goals of dentists dedicated to quality restorative dentistry are to make their treatment of patients as accurate, stressless, and efficient as possible. By elimination of the everyday problems described above, there is no question that the significant advantages of digital impressions will make intraoral digital scanning standard procedure in most dental offices within the next several years. Furthermore, digital impressions have proven to reduce remakes and returns, as well as increase overall efficiency. The patient also benefits by being provided a far more positive experience. Finally, through the use of digital impression making, it has been determined that laboratory products become more consistent and require less chair time at insertion. PMID:26015714

  8. The associations among prior drinking consequences, subjective evaluations, and subsequent alcohol outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Zaso, Michelle J.; Park, Aesoon; Kim, Jueun; Gellis, Les A.; Kwon, Hoin; Maisto, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Although the many positive and negative psychosocial consequences of alcohol use are well documented, evidence of the association between prior drinking consequences and subsequent alcohol-related outcomes is mixed. Social learning theory highlights that cognitive appraisals of prior drinking consequences play a crucial intermediate role in the relation of prior drinking consequences with subsequent alcohol-related outcomes. This prospective study was designed to test the mediating effects of subjective evaluations (i.e., perceived valence and controllability) in the association of prior drinking consequences with change in binge drinking and drinking consequences over time. Participants were 171 college students (68% female, 74% White, mean age = 18.95 years [SD = 1.35]) who completed two online surveys, with an average interval of 68 days [SD = 10.22] between assessments. Path analyses of the data did not support mediational effects of perceived valence or controllability of prior drinking consequences on subsequent alcohol-related outcomes. Specifically, greater frequency of negative consequences was associated with lower perceived valence and controllability, and greater frequency of positive consequences was associated with lower perceived controllability of the experienced consequences. However, perceptions of valence and controllability were not in turn associated with subsequent binge drinking and drinking consequences. Instead, greater frequency of positive consequences was directly associated with greater subsequent frequency of binge drinking. Findings highlight the importance of prior positive consequences in the escalation of binge drinking over a short period of time, although this relation may not be accounted for by perceptions of valence and controllability of the prior drinking consequences. PMID:27214171

  9. The associations among prior drinking consequences, subjective evaluations, and subsequent alcohol outcomes.

    PubMed

    Zaso, Michelle J; Park, Aesoon; Kim, Jueun; Gellis, Les A; Kwon, Hoin; Maisto, Stephen A

    2016-05-01

    Although the many positive and negative psychosocial consequences of alcohol use are well documented, evidence of the association between prior drinking consequences and subsequent alcohol-related outcomes is mixed. Social learning theory highlights that cognitive appraisals of prior drinking consequences play a crucial intermediate role in the relation of prior drinking consequences with subsequent alcohol-related outcomes. This prospective study was designed to test the mediating effects of subjective evaluations (i.e., perceived valence and controllability) in the association of prior drinking consequences with change in binge drinking and drinking consequences over time. Participants were 171 college students (69% female, 74% White, M age = 18.95 years, SD = 1.35) who completed 2 online surveys, with an average interval of 68 days (SD = 10.22) between assessments. Path analyses of the data did not support mediational effects of perceived valence or controllability of prior drinking consequences on subsequent alcohol-related outcomes. Specifically, greater frequency of negative consequences was associated with lower perceived valence and controllability, and greater frequency of positive consequences was associated with lower perceived controllability of the experienced consequences. However, perceptions of valence and controllability were not in turn associated with subsequent binge drinking and drinking consequences. Instead, greater frequency of positive consequences was directly associated with greater subsequent frequency of binge drinking. Findings highlight the importance of prior positive consequences in the escalation of binge drinking over a short period of time, although this relation may not be accounted for by perceptions of valence and controllability of the prior drinking consequences. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27214171

  10. Accuracy and Precision of Silicon Based Impression Media for Quantitative Areal Texture Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Goodall, Robert H.; Darras, Laurent P.; Purnell, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Areal surface texture analysis is becoming widespread across a diverse range of applications, from engineering to ecology. In many studies silicon based impression media are used to replicate surfaces, and the fidelity of replication defines the quality of data collected. However, while different investigators have used different impression media, the fidelity of surface replication has not been subjected to quantitative analysis based on areal texture data. Here we present the results of an analysis of the accuracy and precision with which different silicon based impression media of varying composition and viscosity replicate rough and smooth surfaces. Both accuracy and precision vary greatly between different media. High viscosity media tested show very low accuracy and precision, and most other compounds showed either the same pattern, or low accuracy and high precision, or low precision and high accuracy. Of the media tested, mid viscosity President Jet Regular Body and low viscosity President Jet Light Body (Coltène Whaledent) are the only compounds to show high levels of accuracy and precision on both surface types. Our results show that data acquired from different impression media are not comparable, supporting calls for greater standardisation of methods in areal texture analysis. PMID:25991505

  11. What can the study of first impressions tell us about attitudinal ambivalence and paranoia in schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Trémeau, Fabien; Antonius, Daniel; Todorov, Alexander; Rebani, Yasmina; Ferrari, Kelsey; Lee, Sang Han; Calderone, Daniel; Nolan, Karen A; Butler, Pamela; Malaspina, Dolores; Javitt, Daniel C

    2016-04-30

    Although social cognition deficits have been associated with schizophrenia, social trait judgments - or first impressions - have rarely been studied. These first impressions, formed immediately after looking at a person's face, have significant social consequences. Eighty-one individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 62 control subjects rated 30 neutral faces on 10 positive or negative traits: attractive, mean, trustworthy, intelligent, dominant, fun, sociable, aggressive, emotionally stable and weird. Compared to controls, patients gave higher ratings for positive traits as well as for negative traits. Patients also demonstrated more ambivalence in their ratings. Patients who were exhibiting paranoid symptoms assigned higher intensity ratings for positive social traits than non-paranoid patients. Social trait ratings were negatively correlated with everyday problem solving skills in patients. Although patients appeared to form impressions of others in a manner similar to controls, they tended to assign higher scores for both positive and negative traits. This may help explain the social deficits observed in schizophrenia: first impressions of higher degree are harder to correct, and ambivalent attitudes may impair the motivation to interact with others. Consistent with research on paranoia and self-esteem, actively-paranoid patients' positive social traits judgments were of higher intensity than non-paranoid patients'. PMID:27086216

  12. Neural correlates of self-deception and impression-management.

    PubMed

    Farrow, Tom F D; Burgess, Jenny; Wilkinson, Iain D; Hunter, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Self-deception and impression-management comprise two types of deceptive, but generally socially acceptable behaviours, which are common in everyday life as well as being present in a number of psychiatric disorders. We sought to establish and dissociate the 'normal' brain substrates of self-deception and impression-management. Twenty healthy participants underwent fMRI scanning at 3T whilst completing the 'Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding' test under two conditions: 'fake good', giving the most desirable impression possible and 'fake bad' giving an undesirable impression. Impression-management scores were more malleable to manipulation via 'faking' than self-deception scores. Response times to self-deception questions and 'fake bad' instructions were significantly longer than to impression-management questions and 'fake good' instructions respectively. Self-deception and impression-management manipulation and 'faking bad' were associated with activation of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC). Impression-management manipulation was additionally associated with activation of left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and left posterior middle temporal gyrus. 'Faking bad' was additionally associated with activation of right vlPFC, left temporo-parietal junction and right cerebellum. There were no supra-threshold activations associated with 'faking good'. Our neuroimaging data suggest that manipulating self-deception and impression-management and more specifically 'faking bad' engages a common network comprising mPFC and left vlPFC. Shorter response times and lack of dissociable neural activations suggests that 'faking good', particularly when it comes to impression-management, may be our most practiced 'default' mode. PMID:25527112

  13. A Single Subject Evaluation of the K-P Diet for Hyperkinesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burlton-Bennet, Jocelyn A.; Robinson, Viviane M. J.

    1987-01-01

    A single subject ABAB design was employed to determine the effectiveness of the Feingold Kaiser Permanente (K-P) diet in the treatment of a six-year-old hyperkinetic male. Results indicated the K-P diet was effective in controlling the subject's hyperkinesis, nutritionally adequate, and moderately difficult to implement. (Author/DB)

  14. Repeatability and reproducibility of individual abutment impression, assessed with a blue light scanner

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Yeon; Lee, Jae-Jun; Kim, Ji-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We assessed the repeatability and reproducibility of abutment teeth dental impressions, digitized with a blue light scanner, by comparing the discrepancies in repeatability and reproducibility values for different types of abutment teeth. MATERIALS AND METHODS To evaluate repeatability, impressions of the canine, first premolar, and first molar, prepared for ceramic crowns, were repeatedly scanned to acquire 5 sets of 3-dimensional data via stereolithography (STL) files. Point clouds were compared and the error sizes were measured (n=10, per type). To evaluate reproducibility, the impressions were rotated by 10-20° on the table and scanned. These data were compared to the first STL data and the error sizes were measured (n=5, per type). One-way analysis of variance was used to assess the repeatability and reproducibility of the 3 types of teeth, and Tukey honest significant differences (HSD) multiple comparison test was used for post hoc comparisons (α=.05). RESULTS The differences with regard to repeatability were 4.5, 2.7, and 3.1 µm for the canine, premolar, and molar, indicating the poorest repeatability for the canine (P<.001). For reproducibility, the differences were 6.6, 5.8, and 11.0 µm indicating the poorest reproducibility for the molar (P=.007). CONCLUSION Our results indicated that impressions of individual abutment teeth, digitized with a blue light scanner, had good repeatability and reproducibility. PMID:27350856

  15. Evaluating a Professional Development Programme for Implementation of a Multidisciplinary Science Subject

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visser, Talitha C.; Coenders, Fer G. M.; Terlouw, Cees; Pieters, Jules

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate a professional development programme that prepares and assists teachers with the implementation of a multidisciplinary science module, basing the evaluation on "participants' reactions," the first level of Guskey's five-level model for evaluation (2002). Positive evaluations at the higher levels in Guskey's…

  16. The CA Integrated Subject File II. Evaluation of Alternative Data Base Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Zipperer, William C.

    1974-01-01

    The relative retrieval performances of the CA Integrated Subject File (CAISF), CA Condensates, and a Merged File created from these two data bases were measured. Retrieval performance is reported in terms of recall, precision values, and costs. (Author/JB)

  17. Improving the National Board of Medical Examiners Internal Medicine Subject Exam for Use in Clerkship Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Elnicki, D Michael; Lescisin, Dianne A; Case, Susan

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To provide a consensus opinion on modifying the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Medicine Subject Exam (Shelf) to: 1) reflect the internal medicine clerkship curriculum, developed by the Society of General Internal Medicine (SGIM) and the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine (CDIM); 2) emphasize knowledge important for a clerkship student; and 3) obtain feedback about students' performances on the Shelf. DESIGN Two-round Delphi technique. PARTICIPANTS The CDIM Research and Evaluation Committee and CDIM members on NBME Step 2 Committees. MEASUREMENTS Using 1–5 Likert scales (5 = highest ratings), the group rated test question content for relevance to the SGIM–CDIM Curriculum Guide and importance for clerkship students' knowledge. The Shelf content is organized into 4 physician tasks and into 11 sections that are generally organ system based. Each iteration of the Shelf has 100 questions. Participants indicated a desired distribution of questions by physician task and section, topics critical for inclusion on each exam, and new topics to include. They specified the types of feedback clerkship directors desired on students' performances. Following the first round, participants viewed pooled results prior to submitting their second-round responses. RESULTS Of 15 individuals contacted, 12 (80%) participated in each round. The desired distribution by physician task was: diagnosis (43), treatment (23), mechanism of disease (20), and health maintenance (15). The sections with the most questions requested were the cardiovascular (17), respiratory (15), and gastroenterology (12) sections. The fewest were requested in aging/ethics (4) and neurology, dermatology, and immunology (5 each). Examples of low-rated content were Wilson's Disease, chancroid and tracheal rupture (all <2.0). Health maintenance in type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease all received 5.0 ratings. Participants desired feedback by: section (4.6) and physician

  18. Social Relevance Enhances Memory for Impressions in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, Brittany S.; Gutchess, Angela H.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that older adults have difficulty retrieving contextual material over items alone. Recent research suggests this deficit can be reduced by adding emotional context, allowing for the possibility that memory for social impressions may show less age-related decline than memory for other types of contextual information. Two studies investigated how orienting to social or self-relevant aspects of information contributed to the learning and retrieval of impressions in young and older adults. Participants encoded impressions of others in conditions varying in the use of self-reference (Experiment 1) and interpersonal meaningfulness (Experiment 2), and completed memory tasks requiring the retrieval of specific traits. For both experiments, age groups remembered similar numbers of impressions. In Experiment 1, using more self-relevant encoding contexts increased memory for impressions over orienting to stimuli in a non-social way, regardless of age. In Experiment 2, older adults had enhanced memory for impressions presented in an interpersonally meaningful relative to a personally irrelevant way, whereas young adults were unaffected by this manipulation. The results provide evidence that increasing social relevance ameliorates age differences in memory for impressions, and enhances older adults’ ability to successfully retrieve contextual information. PMID:22364168

  19. Evaluation of the Highly Variable Agomelatine Pharmacokinetics in Chinese Healthy Subjects to Support Bioequivalence Study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhe-Yi; Liu, Shi-Kun; Tan, Hong-Yi; Guo, Cheng-Xian; Zhang, Ran-Ran; Xiang, Yu-Xia; Huang, Jie; Huang, Lu; Yuan, Hong; Yang, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We aim to obtain the intra-subject coefficient of variability of a highly variable antidepressant agomelatine in humans, and propose an adjusted bioequivalence assessment strategy. Methods A single-dose, randomized crossover design was conducted in four periods (reference administered thrice, placebo administered once) separated by seven days. A validated LC-MS/MS assay was used to measure drug concentrations in serial blood samples. Results The intra-subject coefficient of variability was calculated using the residual variance of ANOVA analysis, and the results for Cmax and AUC0-t was 78.34% and 43.52%, respectively, in Chinese healthy subjects. The sample size required for standard BE study were 124(192, 340) if the expected deviation between the reference and generic products was set to 0 (5%, 10%). Conclusions Agomelatine meets the criteria for highly variable drug in Chinese healthy male subjects, and the traditional BE criteria for agomelatine needs to be adjusted to alleviate the resource and ethical burden of using a large numbers of subjects in clinical trials. Our clinical data on the intra-subject variability of agomelatine PK in Chinese healthy population enables to adjust bioequivalence (BE) assessment approach for agomelatine based on the RSABE approaches recommended by regulatory agencies. Trial Registration ChiCTR.org ChiCTR-TTRCC-13003835 PMID:25330096

  20. Impression Cytology with Transfer in xerophthalmia and conjunctival diseases.

    PubMed

    Resnikoff, S; Luzeau, R; Filliard, G; Amedee-Manesme, O

    1992-11-01

    During a countrywide survey, we assessed the prevalence of clinical signs of xerophthalmia and of major conjunctival diseases in a randomized sample of 2,445 subjects representative of the population of the Republic of Djibouti. On a part of this sample, conjunctival Impression Cytology with Transfer (ICT) test and a plasma retinol determination were performed. Xerophthalmia as a public health problem was displayed by clinical signs (Bitot's spots, corneal scars among preschool children), low plasma retinol levels and ICT test results: 9.3% with deficient cytology in the rural area and 12.3% in the urban one (age-standardized rates). Results of ICT were related to age (p < 0.00001). Vitamin A deficiency was prevalent not only in preschool children but also up to 15 years. Moreover, ICT results are influenced by conjunctival diseases: compared to age-matched controls, there were more abnormal cytologies among patients with trachomatous inflammation (p = 0.025), conjunctivitis (p = 0.024) or Limbal Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis (p = 0.015). Thus ICT shouldn't be performed among children with conjunctival diseases. In the region under study conjunctival diseases had high rates of prevalence: 16.4% of trachomatous scarrings in the urban area (standardized rate), 8% of conjunctivitis among rural preschool children, and 5% of Limbal Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis among children between 5 and 14 years in both areas. PMID:1490836

  1. Replication techniques with new dental impression materials in combination with different negative impression materials.

    PubMed

    Pameijer, C H

    1979-01-01

    New materials and new techniques have enabled the fabrication of more reliable and more accurate replicas. Not only is the reproduction of detail of importance, but the expertise required from the operator and the time involved to produce a replica are considered key factors. For various reasons a reliable and reproducible replication technique for scanning electron microscopy offers many advantages. Recently a new dental precision impression material has been introduced, which in combination with low viscosity resins has produced superior results over other techniques. This combination processed by means of a centrifugal casting machine has produced replicas which could easily be compared to a standard test die at magnifications up to 3000 X. More in depth testing will have to be performed to establish whether these materials can be universally applied to a broad spectrum of replication problems. The combination Reprosil/Spurr low viscosity imbedding medium yielded replicas of high quality which can be made with simple equipment and without possessing special skills. Centrifugation of the positive replication material into the negative impression virtually eliminated the entrapment of airbubbles. PMID:392716

  2. Strategies for managing impressions of racial identity in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Laura Morgan; Cha, Sandra E; Kim, Sung Soo

    2014-10-01

    This article deepens understanding of the workplace experiences of racial minorities by investigating racial identity-based impression management (RIM) by Asian American journalists. Racial centrality, directly or indirectly, predicted the use of 4 RIM strategies (avoidance, enhancement, affiliation, and racial humor). Professional centrality also predicted strategy use, which was related to life satisfaction and perceived career success. By shedding light on proactive strategies that individuals use to influence colleagues' impressions of their racial identity, we contribute to research on diversity in organizations, impression management, and racial identity. PMID:25090148

  3. Consumer impressions of Tender Select beef.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, S D; Wheeler, T L; Meade, M K; Reagan, J O; Byrnes, B L; Koohmaraie, M

    2001-10-01

    With the recent development of technology to classify beef for tenderness, it is now possible for packers and retailers to market brands of beef known to be consistently tender. The present experiment was conducted to determine consumer impressions of Tender Select, a model beef brand comprised of cuts from tender U.S. Select carcasses. A telephone survey was conducted in metropolitan Denver, CO, to recruit consumers (n = 1,036) for this study. Consumers who met minimal limits for household income, age, and beef consumption were invited to participate in a beef shopping and usage study in a local supermarket. Point-of-purchase material was developed that described Tender Select as "the only steak guaranteed tender and lean." When shown a copy of the Tender Select concept card, 89% of participating consumers (n = 759) indicated that they would definitely or probably buy that product. Of those consumers that said they would buy the product, 35% indicated that their purchases of Tender Select would be in addition to their current fresh meat purchases. Most consumers (54.1%) indicated that if Tender Select was available at their grocery store, 1 or 2 of their next 10 purchases of beef cuts would be Tender Select. Sixty-five percent of consumers indicated that if a grocery store carried a line of beef cuts guaranteed to be tender, they would buy all of their beef at that store. Both strip loins from 104 U.S. Select beef carcasses, representing a broad range (8.7 to 43.4 kg; CV = 42%) in slice shear force (SSF) at 14 d postmortem, were used to determine the effect of SSF classification on consumer satisfaction and the correlation among trained sensory panel descriptive attribute ratings and in-home consumer ratings of beef longissimus steaks. Both trained sensory panelists and consumers rated low-SSF steaks higher than the high-SSF steaks for all traits (P < 0.001). All consumer traits (like, tenderness, juiciness, flavor like, flavor amount, and overall satisfaction

  4. Accuracy of Implant Position Transfer and Surface Detail Reproduction with Different Impression Materials and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Alikhasi, Marzieh; Siadat, Hakimeh; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of implant position transfer and surface detail reproduction using two impression techniques and materials. Materials and Methods: A metal model with two implants and three grooves of 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75 mm in depth on the flat superior surface of a die was fabricated. Ten regular-body polyether (PE) and 10 regular-body polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impressions with square and conical transfer copings using open tray and closed tray techniques were made for each group. Impressions were poured with type IV stone, and linear and angular displacements of the replica heads were evaluated using a coordinate measuring machine (CMM). Also, accurate reproduction of the grooves was evaluated by a video measuring machine (VMM). These measurements were compared with the measurements calculated on the reference model that served as control, and the data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and t-test at P= 0.05. Results: There was less linear displacement for PVS and less angular displacement for PE in closed-tray technique, and less linear displacement for PE in open tray technique (P<0.001). Also, the open tray technique showed less angular displacement with the use of PVS impression material. Detail reproduction accuracy was the same in all the groups (P>0.05). Conclusion: The open tray technique was more accurate using PE, and also both closed tray and open tray techniques had acceptable results with the use of PVS. The choice of impression material and technique made no significant difference in surface detail reproduction. PMID:27252761

  5. MicroSIFT Courseware Evaluations (199-222). Set 10. Including Subject and Title Indexes Covering Sets 1-10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    This document consists of 24 microcomputer software package evaluations prepared by the MicroSIFT (Microcomputer Software and Information for Teachers) Clearinghouse at the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory. Each software review lists source, cost, ability level, subject, topic, medium of transfer, required hardware, required software,…

  6. Evaluation of Autonomic Dysfunction in Obese and Non-Obese Hypertensive Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ganai, Jyoti; Muthukrishnan, Shobitha; Kohli, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obesity and more specifically, visceral obesity, has been consistently associated with hypertension and increased cardiovascular risk. Epidemiological studies indicate that at least two-third of the prevalence of hypertension can be directly attributed to obesity. Studies also suggest that hypertensive patients have impaired cardiac autonomic function. Aim The objective of the study was to examine any added effects of obesity on cardiac autonomic dysfunction in hypertensive patients. Materials and Methods Hypertensive subjects (n=45) between 35-60 years of age were divided into two groups; Group A (n=30) consisted of non-obese hypertensive subjects and Group B (n=15) consisted of obese (BMI≥30kg/m2) hypertensive subjects. Cardiac autonomic function was assessed using four tests – Heart rate response to immediate standing (30:15 ratio), standing to lying ratio (S/L ratio), Blood pressure response to immediate standing and Cold Pressor Test (CPT). Results There were no significant differences for autonomic function tests between obese and non-obese hypertensive subjects (p >0.05). Conclusion The results showed that there are no significant differences in the cardiac autonomic function responses between obese and non-obese hypertensive subjects. PMID:27504394

  7. Human subject evaluation of the controlled resistance exercise device (C-red) for spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Paulus, David C; DeWitt, John

    2015-01-01

    Resistance exercise is an effective countermeasure to the muscle and bone atrophy associated with the unloading experienced during spaceflight. Long duration spaceflight will require compact exercise devices that are capable of delivering sufficient loading to prevent physiological losses while meeting strict mass and volume requirements. Accordingly, a controlled resistance exercise device (C-RED), developed as an advanced exercise concept for NASA, uses an electric motor for resistance and is programmed to simulate inertial loading based on barbell acceleration and desired resistance mass. The barbell acts as a movable pulley increasing efficiency by doubling the created load. Human subject testing of the functionality of the device was conducted in a laboratory at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. Subjects performed ten resistance exercises typically used by astronauts at three freely chosen load levels. The results indicate that subjects were able to perform all exercises with resistance loads that were typical to those used in the gymnasium with loads ranges of 4-1600 N, and bilateral symmetry of ground reaction force was quantified for the deadlift. A survey also was given to each subject to allow the users to express their opinions regarding the device. The subject questionnaire showed that the dumbbell attachment exercises were preferred to the barbell exercises. The positive preliminary results indicate promise for the device. PMID:25996698

  8. Subjective evaluations of integer cosine transform compressed Galileo solid state imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.; Gold, Yaron; Grant, Terry; Chuang, Sherry

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a study conducted for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, using 15 evaluators from 12 institutions involved in the Galileo Solid State Imaging (SSI) experiment. The objective of the study was to determine the impact of integer cosine transform (ICT) compression using specially formulated quantization (q) tables and compression ratios on acceptability of the 800 x 800 x 8 monochromatic astronomical images as evaluated visually by Galileo SSI mission scientists. Fourteen different images in seven image groups were evaluated. Each evaluator viewed two versions of the same image side by side on a high-resolution monitor; each was compressed using a different q level. First the evaluators selected the image with the highest overall quality to support them in their visual evaluations of image content. Next they rated each image using a scale from one to five indicating its judged degree of usefulness. Up to four preselected types of images with and without noise were presented to each evaluator.

  9. Evaluation of ride quality measurement procedures by subjective experiments using simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klauder, L. T., Jr.; Clevenson, S. A.

    1975-01-01

    Since ride quality is, by definition, a matter of passenger response, there is need for a qualification procedure (QP) for establishing the degree to which any particular ride quality measurement procedure (RQMP) does correlate with passenger responses. Once established, such a QP will provide very useful guidance for optimal adjustment of the various parameters which any given RQMP contains. A QP is proposed based on use of a ride motion simulator and on test subject responses to recordings of actual vehicle motions. Test subject responses are used to determine simulator gain settings for the individual recordings such as to make all of the simulated rides equally uncomfortable to the test subjects. Simulator platform accelerations vs. time are recorded with each ride at its equal discomfort gain setting. The equal discomfort platform acceleration recordings are then digitzed.

  10. [Relationship between self-evaluation of their emotions and subjective adaptation to school among junior high school students].

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Yoshiyuki; Ishizu, Kenichiro; Kashimura, Masami

    2014-02-01

    The effect of self-evaluation of emotions on subjective adaption to school was investigated among junior high school students (n = 217: 112 boys, 105 girls) who participated in a questionnaire survey. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicated that for boys "Infringement and maladjustment" differed based on their self-evaluation of anger and anxiety. For girls, on the other hand, the self-evaluation of anger alleviated psychological stress, worsened the "Relationship with the teacher" and the "Relationship with the class", whereas self-evaluation of anxiety played a role in increasing psychological stress and deteriorating the "Relationship with the class." Furthermore, negatively evaluating either anger or anxiety heightened the "Motivation for learning" in girls. These results suggest that the evaluation of emotions is different in boys and girls and for different emotions. PMID:24669498

  11. Objective and subjective hardness of a test item used for evaluating food mixing ability.

    PubMed

    Salleh, N M; Fueki, K; Garrett, N R; Ohyama, T

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare objective and subjective hardness of selected common foods with a wax cube used as a test item in a mixing ability test. Objective hardness was determined for 11 foods (cream cheese, boiled fish paste, boiled beef, apple, raw carrot, peanut, soft/hard rice cracker, jelly, plain chocolate and chewing gum) and the wax cube. Peak force (N) to compress each item was obtained from force-time curves generated with the Tensipresser. Perceived hardness ratings of each item were made by 30 dentate subjects (mean age 26.9 years) using a visual analogue scale (100 mm). These subjective assessments were given twice with a 1 week interval. High intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for test-retest reliability were seen for all foods (ICC > 0.68; P < 0.001). One-way anova found a significant effect of food type on both the objective hardness score and the subjective hardness rating (P < 0.001). The wax cube showed significant lower objective hardness score (32.6 N) and subjective hardness rating (47.7) than peanut (45.3 N, 63.5) and raw carrot (82.5 N, 78.4) [P < 0.05; Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch (REGW)-F]. A significant semilogarithmic relationship was found between the logarithm of objective hardness scores and subjective hardness ratings across twelve test items (r = 0.90; P < 0.001). These results suggest the wax cube has a softer texture compared with test foods traditionally used for masticatory performance test, such as peanut and raw carrot. The hardness of the wax cube could be modified to simulate a range of test foods by changing mixture ratio of soft and hard paraffin wax. PMID:17302945

  12. Evaluation on masks with exhaust valves and with exhaust holes from physiological and subjective responses.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yue Ping; Yi, Li; Tokura, Hiromi; Wong, Thomas Kwok Shing; Chung, Joanne Wai Yee; Gohel, Mayur Danny Indulal; Leung, Polly Hang-Mei; Newton, Edward

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of wearing different kinds of masks on the ear canal temperature, heart rate, clothing microclimate, and subjective perception of discomfort. Ten subjects performed intermittent exercise on a treadmill while wearing the protective masks in a climatic chamber controlled at an air temperature of 25 degrees C and a relative humidity of 70%. Two types of mask-mask A, with exhaust valves and mask B, with exhaust holes-were used in the study. The results of this study indicated: (1) The subjects had a tendency toward lower maximum heart rate when wearing mask A than when wearing mask B. (2) Temperatures and absolute humidities (the outer surface of mask, the microclimate inside the mask, the chest wall skin and microclimate) of mask A were significantly lower than those of mask B. (3) The ear canal temperature increased significantly in mask B as compared to that in mask A. (4) The ear canal temperature showed significant augmentation along with increased temperature and humidity inside the mask microclimate. The mask microclimate temperature also affected significantly the chest microclimate temperature. (5) Mask A was rated significantly lower for perception of humidity, heat, breath resistance, tightness, unfitness, odor, fatigue, and offered less overall discomfort than mask B. (6) Subjective preference for mask A was higher. (7) The ratings of subjective overall discomfort showed significant augmentation along with increased wetness and fatigue. We discuss how the ventilation properties of masks A and B induce significantly different temperature and humidity in the microclimates of the masks and the heat loss of the body, which have profound influences on heart rate, thermal stress, and subjective perception of discomfort. PMID:18379166

  13. Hydrophilicity of unset and set elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Frank; Geis-Gerstorfer, Jurgen

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the initial hydrophilicity of unset and set elastomeric impression materials. Initial water contact angles were studied on thin unset and set films of one polyether and six polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impression materials using high-resolution drop shape analysis at drop ages of 1 and 3 seconds. All unset PVS materials were very hydrophobic initially but showed different kinetics of hydrophilization. In contrast, the unset polyether was more hydrophilic initially but lacked distinct hydrophilization. All impression materials showed statistically significant contact angle differences between unset and set surfaces (P < .05). Dependent on the drop age, two PVS materials reached or exceeded the hydrophilicity of the polyether (P < .05). It can be concluded that studies on the wetting behavior of elastomeric impression materials should consider both the experimental drop age and set and unset material surfaces. PMID:21209992

  14. Managing Impression Formation in Computer-Mediated Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yuliang; Ginther, Dean

    2001-01-01

    Offers suggestions for online instructors regarding verbal and nonverbal impression management. The recommendations should facilitate computer mediated teacher-student or manager-client interactions and help develop constructive relationships that promote learning and productivity. (EV)

  15. Persons who most impress gifted youth: a replication.

    PubMed

    Karnes, F A; McGinnis, J C

    1994-06-01

    A replication of a study of the persons who most impressed gifted youth was conducted with 95 students enrolled in a summer residential program for the gifted. Students were asked to indicate the person who most impressed them and to include the reason(s) for choosing that person. The most frequently chosen category of individuals was family members (61.1%), then a tie between persons in the world of arts and culture and persons doing a specific job (8.4%), another tie between comrades and sports stars (6.3%), followed by political or historical figures (4.2%), themselves (3.2%), and moral and religious personalities (2.1%). Consistent with the 1982 study by Karnes and Lee, most impressive to these students were family members and least impressive moral and religious personalities. PMID:8058865

  16. Evaluation of 11th Grade Students' Cognitive Behaviour on Some Subjects of Analysis According to Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevin, Orhun

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate students' cognitive behaviour in the subjects of function, limit, and derivative according to gender. The research was conducted with the participation of 67 female and 58 male 11th grade students of Gazi High School in Eskisehir in the academic year 2000/2001. The data were obtained through a test…

  17. Objective versus Subjective Evaluation of Student Distress at Intake: Considerations for Counseling Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Donald W.; Cairns, Sharon L.

    2002-01-01

    Client and counselor ratings of student distress were compared with MMPI-2 College Maladjustment (Mt) scale (Butcher, et al; 1989) score for 78 Canadian undergraduate students seeking counseling. Mt scores were consistent with subjective ratings of problem severity and accounted for more variance in client ratings of social and general functioning…

  18. Associations Between Message Features and Subjective Evaluations of the Sensation Value of Antidrug Public Service Announcements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Susan E.; Palmgreen, Philip; Stephenson, Michael T.; Hoyle, Rick H.; Lorch, Elizabeth P.

    2003-01-01

    Identifies message design features that show the greatest promise for developing message high in sensation value for anti-drug campaigns and other interventions aimed at sensation-seeking risky behaviors. Investigates certain features of drug prevention Public Service Announcements (PSAs) associated with viewers' subjective responses to them.…

  19. Does My Program Really Make a Difference? Program Evaluation Utilizing Aggregate Single-Subject Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Catherine E.

    2015-01-01

    In the current climate of increasing fiscal and clinical accountability, information is required about overall program effectiveness using clinical data. These requests present a challenge for programs utilizing single-subject data due to the use of highly individualized behavior plans and behavioral monitoring. Subsequently, the diversity of the…

  20. Subjective evaluation of a prototype earmuff exhibiting flat and nonlinear attenuation characteristics.

    PubMed

    Stokes, J P; Royster, L H; Pearson, R G; Royster, J D

    1991-02-01

    Subjective user responses were obtained for a test earmuff exhibiting approximately flat (uniform) attenuation of about 25 dB from 500 to 8000 Hz for sound pressure levels (SPLs) less than 120 dB. At SPLs above 120 dB, the test earmuff exhibited nonlinear (level-dependent) attenuation characteristics such that noise reduction increased with increasing sound level. The study population consisted of police officers from the Raleigh, North Carolina, Police Department as they were performing arms requalification by executing a series of firing programs during two sequential and identical relays. The study subjects wore either the test earmuff or a comparable conventional earmuff during the first relay, then the alternate protector for the second relay with the order counterbalanced. Results indicated a significant preference for the test earmuff in three comparison areas: comfort, perceived hearing protection, and speech understanding. The study demonstrates that ammunition type and level of noise exposure contributed significantly to a preference in favor of the test earmuff. The subjects who used the quietest of the ammunition types rated the test earmuff significantly better than the remaining subjects with respect to speech understanding. PMID:2011979

  1. A Longitudinal Study of Impression Management Strategies and Leadership Emergence: The Moderating Roles of Gender and Virtualness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Yong-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    This study used a longitudinal study spanning a twelve-week time period and involving 165 undergraduate students to examine the combined impact of gender and impression management strategies on leader emergence by members relying on low versus high virtualness. The subjects were formed into 44 self-managed work groups and charged with completing…

  2. Brief Report: Impression Formation in High-Functioning Autism--Role of Nonverbal Behavior and Stereotype Activating Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Caroline; Dratsch, Thomas; Vogeley, Kai; Bente, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about whether stereotypes influence social judgments of autistic individuals, in particular when they compete with tacit face-to-face cues. We compared impression formation of 17 subjects with high-functioning autism (HFA) and 17 age-, gender- and IQ-matched controls. Information about the profession of a job applicant served as…

  3. The surface electromyographic evaluation of the Functional Reach in elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Maranesi, E; Fioretti, S; Ghetti, G G; Rabini, R A; Burattini, L; Mercante, O; Di Nardo, F

    2016-02-01

    This study proposes a comprehensive assessment of myoelectric activity of the main muscles involved in the Functional Reach (FR) test, in 24 elderly subjects. A specific protocol for the surface electromyography (sEMG) signal acquisition during FR-test was developed. Results show that anterior muscles activate following a caudo-cranial order. Tibialis Anterior (TA) is the first to be activated (-18.0±16.3% of the FR-period), together with Rectus Femoris (-10.4±17.9%). Then, Rectus Abdominis (19.7±24.7%) and Sternocleidomastoideus (19.9±15.6%) activate after the FR-start. Hamstrings, Soleus, and L4-level Erectores Spinae (posterior muscles) activate after the FR-start in this order (11.4±16.8%, 17.7±16.6%, and 35.2±29.0%, respectively) and remain active until the movement end. The analysis of the kinematic strategies adopted by subjects revealed an association between TA-activation patterns and two kinematic strategies (hip/mixed strategy), quantified by an increase (p<0.05) of TA-activity duration in subjects adopting the hip strategy (89.9±34.5) vs. subjects adopting the mixed strategy (27.0±16.8). This suggests that TA sEMG activity could be able to discriminate among kinematic strategies, providing different information on balance control. Thus, the present analysis represents the first attempt to quantify the sEMG activity during FR-test in elderly subjects, providing an early contribution in building a reference frame for balance assessment in clinical context. PMID:26752782

  4. An intelligent recovery progress evaluation system for ACL reconstructed subjects using integrated 3-D kinematics and EMG features.

    PubMed

    Malik, Owais A; Senanayake, S M N Arosha; Zaheer, Dansih

    2015-03-01

    An intelligent recovery evaluation system is presented for objective assessment and performance monitoring of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed (ACL-R) subjects. The system acquires 3-D kinematics of tibiofemoral joint and electromyography (EMG) data from surrounding muscles during various ambulatory and balance testing activities through wireless body-mounted inertial and EMG sensors, respectively. An integrated feature set is generated based on different features extracted from data collected for each activity. The fuzzy clustering and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference techniques are applied to these integrated feature sets in order to provide different recovery progress assessment indicators (e.g., current stage of recovery, percentage of recovery progress as compared to healthy group, etc.) for ACL-R subjects. The system was trained and tested on data collected from a group of healthy and ACL-R subjects. For recovery stage identification, the average testing accuracy of the system was found above 95% (95-99%) for ambulatory activities and above 80% (80-84%) for balance testing activities. The overall recovery evaluation performed by the proposed system was found consistent with the assessment made by the physiotherapists using standard subjective/objective scores. The validated system can potentially be used as a decision supporting tool by physiatrists, physiotherapists, and clinicians for quantitative rehabilitation analysis of ACL-R subjects in conjunction with the existing recovery monitoring systems. PMID:24801517

  5. Simplified custom impression post for implant-supported restorations.

    PubMed

    Patras, Michael; Martin, William

    2016-05-01

    The esthetic outcome of an implant-supported restoration is greatly influenced by the relationship between the contours of the definitive prosthesis and the periimplant tissues. In this clinical technique, an implant analog holder and autopolymerizing acrylic resin were used to accurately register the soft-tissue transition zone created by the interim restoration and transfer it to the impression post during the definitive impression. PMID:26774317

  6. A new generation of sterile and radiopaque impression materials: an in vitro cytotoxicity study.

    PubMed

    Coppi, Chiara; Paolinelli Devincenzi, Chiara; Bortolini, Sergio; Consolo, Ugo; Tiozzo, Roberta

    2007-07-01

    Impression materials are largely used to record the geometry of dental tissue. Hence, the assessment of their possible cytotoxicity is a necessary step in the evaluation of their biocompatibility. The present study is carried out to evaluate the cytotoxicity of a new elastomeric sterile and radiopaque impression material. Human gingival fibroblasts, cultured in vitro are exposed directly to Elite Implant in three different viscosities, heavy, medium, and light. At 3, 9, 24, 48, and 72 h, the cellular proliferation is evaluated. In parallel, human gingival fibroblasts are exposed indirectly by means of fluid extracts of Elite Implant. The cellular viability is evaluated by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, (MTT) assay (Sigma, St Louis, Mo). The gingival fibroblasts proliferation and viability are unaffected by the presence of Elite Implant. This new impression material may represent a safe medical device for clinical and surgical applications. In addition, this material is radiopaque and, thus, can be identified radiographically. PMID:17065163

  7. Reproducibility of optic disk evaluation in supine subjects with a Heidelberg Retina Tomograph II laser tomographic scanner

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Yosuke; Akita, Tomoyuki; Takenaka, Joji; Nakamura-Kadohiro, Yuko; Tanaka, Junko; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to determine the reproducibility and reliability of optic disk evaluation in supine subjects with a Heidelberg Retina Tomograph II (HRT II). Methods One eye was randomly selected for evaluation by HRT II in each of eleven healthy subjects. Five images were obtained by each of two experienced operators at two separate visits with the subjects in both sitting and supine positions. A stand was constructed to allow stable, handheld operation of the HRT II head for imaging of the supine subjects. Measurements of optic disk parameters obtained in the supine position were compared with those obtained in the sitting position. The reliability of measurements in the supine position was evaluated by calculating both the coefficients of variation for measurements made by one observer on the first visit and the interobserver and intervisit intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs); the values obtained were compared with those obtained for the sitting position. Results Measurements of all parameters made in the supine position were highly similar to those made in the sitting position. The coefficients of variation obtained for each parameter in the sitting and supine positions ranged from 5.67% to 14.16% and from 2.18% to 16.08%, respectively. The interobserver ICC values in the sitting and supine positions were ≥0.978 and ≥0.989, respectively. The intervisit ICC values in the sitting and supine positions were ≥0.958 and ≥0.983, respectively. Conclusion Handheld operation of the HRT II in a custom-designed stand is feasible for optic disk evaluation in the supine subjects who were not able to maintain the sitting position. PMID:27601876

  8. Stress Strengthens Memory of First Impressions of Others' Positive Personality Traits

    PubMed Central

    Lass-Hennemann, Johanna; Kuehl, Linn K.; Schulz, André; Oitzl, Melly S.; Schachinger, Hartmut

    2011-01-01

    Encounters with strangers bear potential for social conflict and stress, but also allow the formation of alliances. First impressions of other people play a critical role in the formation of alliances, since they provide a learned base to infer the other's future social attitude. Stress can facilitate emotional memories but it is unknown whether stress strengthens our memory for newly acquired impressions of other people's personality traits. To answer this question, we subjected 60 students (37 females, 23 males) to an impression-formation task, viewing portraits together with brief positive vs. negative behavior descriptions, followed by a 3-min cold pressor stress test or a non-stressful control procedure. The next day, novel and old portraits were paired with single trait adjectives, the old portraits with a trait adjective matching the previous day's behavior description. After a filler task, portraits were presented again and subjects were asked to recall the trait adjective. Cued recall was higher for old (previously implied) than the novel portraits' trait adjectives, indicating validity of the applied test procedures. Overall, recall rate of implied trait adjectives did not differ between the stress and the control group. However, while the control group showed a better memory performance for others' implied negative personality traits, the stress group showed enhanced recall for others' implied positive personality traits. This result indicates that post-learning stress affects consolidation of first impressions in a valence-specific manner. We propose that the stress-induced strengthening of memory of others' positive traits forms an important cue for the formation of alliances in stressful conditions. PMID:21298099

  9. A video Clinical Global Impression (CGI) in obsessive compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Bourredjem, Abderrahmane; Pelissolo, Antoine; Rotge, Jean-Yves; Jaafari, Nematollah; Machefaux, Sebastien; Quentin, Solene; Bui, Eric; Bruno, Nicolas; Pochon, Jean-Baptiste; Polosan, Mircea; Baup, Nicolas; Papetti, François; Chéreau, Isabelle; Arbus, Christophe; Mallet, Luc; du Montcel, Sophie Tezenas

    2011-03-30

    The Clinical Global Impression scale (CGI) is frequently used in clinical research because of its face validity and ease of use but data on its reliability are scarce. Our goal was to estimate the reliability of the scale and compare reliability between face-to-face and video scoring. We analyzed 50 different video interviews recorded during 5 visits of a crossover trial to study the effect of subthalamic nucleus stimulation. Six specialized clinicians rated the CGI using these videos, providing 300 different ratings. The intraclass correlation was lower at inclusion (0.30 [0.13-0.50]) than at later visits (0.68 [0.61-0.80]). Reliability was not influenced by the patients' stimulation status. The mean of at least two independent evaluations of the video is needed to achieve an ICC greater than 0.8. The video CGI is a valid clinical outcome measure suitable for clinical trials (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00169377). PMID:20621362

  10. Subjective evaluation of auralizations created from multi-channel anechoic recordings of a talker in motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigeant, Michelle C.; Wang, Lily M.

    2005-04-01

    A high degree of speech intelligibility is very important in educational environments. When designing such spaces, like classrooms, auralizations can be used to subjectively assess the degree of speech intelligibility and clarity. Auralizations are most commonly made by convolving the impulse response (IR) of an omni-directional source with a single channel anechoic speech recording. This paper explores the idea of using multi-channel recordings to create the auralizations, using a female talker in motion. An omni-directional source is split into quadrants and the IR is calculated for each section. These IR's are convolved with the appropriate channel of the anechoic recording and then the four auralizations are mixed to create one final auralization. The auralizations were made using four-channel anechoic recordings of a person walking on a platform while talking. Subjective tests were conducted to determine the ease with which subjects could identify the direction of the movement of the source in rooms with varying amounts of absorption. This method can be used to create more realistic classroom auralizations, as teachers typically move around the room as they teach. [Work supported by the National Science Foundation.

  11. Demographic and psychological variables affecting test subject evaluations of ride quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, N. C.; Conley, H. W.

    1975-01-01

    Ride-quality experiments similar in objectives, design, and procedure were conducted, one using the U.S. Air Force Total In-Flight Simulator and the other using the Langley Passenger Ride Quality Apparatus to provide the motion environments. Large samples (80 or more per experiment) of test subjects were recruited from the Tidewater Virginia area and asked to rate the comfort (on a 7-point scale) of random aircraft motion typical of that encountered during STOL flights. Test subject characteristics of age, sex, and previous flying history (number of previous airplane flights) were studied in a two by three by three factorial design. Correlations were computed between one dependent measure, the subject's mean comfort rating, and various demographic characteristics, attitudinal variables, and the scores on Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. An effect of sex was found in one of the studies. Males made higher (more uncomfortable) ratings of the ride than females. Age and number of previous flights were not significantly related to comfort ratings. No significant interactions between the variables of age, sex, or previous number of flights were observed.

  12. Evaluating growth measures in an immigration process subject to binomial and geometric catastrophes.

    PubMed

    Artalejo, J R; Economou, A; Lopez-Herrero, M J

    2007-10-01

    Populations are often subject to the effect of catastrophic events that cause mass removal. In particular, metapopulation models, epidemics, and migratory flows provide practical examples of populations subject to dis asters (e.g., habitat destruction, environmental catastrophes). Many stochastic models have been developed to explain the behavior of these populations. Most of the reported results concern the measures of the risk of extinction and the distribution of the population size in the case of total catastrophes where all individuals in the population are removed simultaneously. In this paper, we investigate the basic immigration process subject to binomial and geometric catastrophes; that is, the population size is reduced according to a binomial or a geometric law. We carry out an extensive analysis including first extinction time, number of individuals removed, survival time of a tagged individual, and maximum population size reached between two consecutive extinctions. Many explicit expressions are derived for these system descriptors, and some emphasis is put to show that some of them deserve extra attention. PMID:17924712

  13. Decisions in Motion: Decision Dynamics during Intertemporal Choice reflect Subjective Evaluation of Delayed Rewards

    PubMed Central

    O’Hora, Denis; Carey, Rachel; Kervick, Aoife; Crowley, David; Dabrowski, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    People tend to discount rewards or losses that occur in the future. Such delay discounting has been linked to many behavioral and health problems, since people choose smaller short-term gains over greater long-term gains. We investigated whether the effect of delays on the subjective value of rewards is expressed in how people move when they make choices. Over 600 patrons of the RISK LAB exhibition hosted by the Science Gallery DublinTM played a short computer game in which they used a computer mouse to choose between amounts of money at various delays. Typical discounting effects were observed and decision dynamics indicated that choosing smaller short-term rewards became easier (i.e., shorter response times, tighter trajectories, less vacillation) as the delays until later rewards increased. Based on a sequence of choices, subjective values of delayed outcomes were estimated and decision dynamics during initial choices predicted these values. Decision dynamics are affected by subjective values of available options and thus provide a means to estimate such values. PMID:26867497

  14. Design and evaluation guidelines for Department of Energy facilities subjected to natural phenomena hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R.P. ); Short, S.A. ); McDonald, J.R. ); McCann, M.W. Jr. and Associates, Inc., Mountain View, CA ); Murray, R.C. ); Hill, J.R. (USDOE Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and He

    1990-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and the DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Panel have developed uniform design and evaluation guidelines for protection against natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites throughout the United States. The goal of the guidelines is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of natural phenomena such as earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, and flooding. The guidelines apply to both new facilities (design) and existing facilities (evaluation, modification, and upgrading). The intended audience is primarily the civil/structural or mechanical engineers conducting the design or evaluation of DOE facilities. The likelihood of occurrence of natural phenomena hazards at each DOE site has been evaluated by the DOE Natural Phenomena Hazard Program. Probabilistic hazard models are available for earthquake, extreme wind/tornado, and flood. Alternatively, site organizations are encouraged to develop site-specific hazard models utilizing the most recent information and techniques available. In this document, performance goals and natural hazard levels are expressed in probabilistic terms, and design and evaluation procedures are presented in deterministic terms. Design/evaluation procedures conform closely to common standard practices so that the procedures will be easily understood by most engineers. Performance goals are expressed in terms of structure or equipment damage to the extent that: (1) the facility cannot function; (2) the facility would need to be replaced; or (3) personnel are endangered. 82 refs., 12 figs., 18 tabs.

  15. Fertilizing ROSES through the STEM: Interdisciplinary Modules as Pre-service Research Experiences for Secondary STEM Educators (IMPRESS-Ed)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, N. B.; Kavic, M.; Benoit, M. H.; Wiita, P.

    2011-12-01

    IMPRESS-Ed is a program designed to provide authentic summer research experiences in the space, earth, and atmospheric sciences for pre-service K-12 educators at The College of New Jersey (TCNJ). In 2011, the program involved five students and took place over eight weeks with recruitment occurring during the preceding academic year. The program was divided into two modules: A common core module and an individual mentored research experience. The common module consisted of three units focusing on data-driven pedagogical approaches in astrophysics, tectonophysics, and atmospheric science, respectively. The common module also featured training sessions in observational astronomy, and use of a 3D geowall and state of the art planetarium. Participants in the program are also offered the opportunity to utilize the available TCNJ facilities with their future students. Given that a large number of graduates from the TCNJ take positions in local New Jersey schools, the opportunity to make use of these facilities at a future time would be of great significance to them and their future students. The individual mentored research module matched student interests with potential projects. Research led by M.H. Benoit analyzed gravity data from the NASA-GRACE mission to find lithospheric density contrasts beneath the eastern US. A student working with N.B. Magee used data from NASA satellites CALIPSO, CloudSat, and AQUA-MODIS to study the dynamics of convective cloud tops. Research projects led by M. Kavic performed simulations to investigate the possibility of detecting superconducting cosmic strings using radio observations and also designed and constructed a radio interferometer based on the NASA's Radio-Jove program. P. Wiita supervised a research project studying star-forming regions of active galaxies through analysis of images from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and GALEX. The research program was also incorporated into the framework of the TCNJ Mentored Undergraduate Summer

  16. New stereo shooting evaluation metric based on stereoscopic distortion and subjective perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jiachen; Gao, Zhiqun; Chu, Rongrong; Liu, Yun; Lin, Yancong

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we examined the stereoscopic distortion by varying image acquisition parameters including but not limited to inter-camera distance, camera focal length, and shooting distance. Since a lot of new elements or problems about stereoscopic perception have not been considered or precisely defined before, an advanced shooting principle is raised in this paper to guarantee the overall quality of stereoscopic images. In this paper, based on stereoscopic distortion and features of camera configurations, we present new shooting formulae for both toed-in and parallel camera configurations. Besides, a new shooting evaluation metric is proposed for the evaluation of stereo camera quality. The experimental results show that the proposed approach can precisely assess the visual perception quality of stereo images according to the shooting parameters and can effectively evaluate the quality of stereo camera.

  17. Subjective evaluation of HDTV stereoscopic videos in IPTV scenarios using absolute category rating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Barkowsky, M.; Cousseau, R.; Brunnström, K.; Olsson, R.; Le Callet, P.; Sjöström, M.

    2011-03-01

    Broadcasting of high definition (HD) stereobased 3D (S3D) TV are planned, or has already begun, in Europe, the US, and Japan. Specific data processing operations such as compression and temporal and spatial resampling are commonly used tools for saving network bandwidth when IPTV is the distribution form, as this results in more efficient recording and transmission of 3DTV signals, however at the same time it inevitably brings quality degradations to the processed video. This paper investigated observers quality judgments of state of the art video coding schemes (simulcast H.264/AVC or H.264/MVC), with or without added temporal and spatial resolution reduction of S3D videos, by subjective experiments using the Absolute Category Rating method (ACR) method. The results showed that a certain spatial resolution reduction working together with high quality video compressing was the most bandwidth efficient way of processing video data when the required video quality is to be judged as "good" quality. As the subjective experiment was performed in two different laboratories in two different countries in parallel, a detailed analysis of the interlab differences was performed.

  18. Subjective evaluation of the combined influence of satellite temperature sounding data and increased model resolution on numerical weather forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, R.; Halem, M.; Ghil, M.

    1979-01-01

    The present evaluation is concerned with (1) the significance of prognostic differences resulting from the inclusion of satellite-derived temperature soundings, (2) how specific differences between the SAT and NOSAT prognoses evolve, and (3) comparison of two experiments using the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences general circulation model. The subjective evaluation indicates that the beneficial impact of sounding data is enhanced with increased resolution. It is suggested that satellite sounding data posses valuable information content which at times can correct gross analysis errors in data sparse regions.

  19. Evaluation of Efficacy of Ultrasonography in the Assessment of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Subjects with Myositis and Myofascial Pain

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Seema; Iyengar, Asha R; B V, Subash; Joshi, Revan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background The study aimed to determine if ultrasonography of masseter can be used to evaluate the outcome of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in subjects with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) such as myositis and myofascial pain. Methods Fifteen TMD subjects with myofascial pain/myositis who satisfied the RDC/McNeil criteria were included in the study. All the subjects were administered TENS therapy for a period of 6 days (30 minutes per session). The mouth opening (in millimeters) and severity of pain (visual analogue scale score) and ultrasonographic thickness of the masseter (in millimeters) in the region of trigger/tender areas was assessed in all the subjects both prior and post TENS therapy. A comparison of the pre-treatment and post-treatment values of the VAS score, mouth opening and masseter thickness was done with the help of a t-test. Results There was a significant reduction in the thickness of masseter muscle (P = 0.028) and VAS scores (P < 0.001) post TENS therapy. There was also a significant improvement in the mouth opening (P = 0.011) post TENS therapy. Conclusions In the present study, ultrasonography was found to be an effective measuring tool in the assessment of TENS therapy in subjects with myositis and myofascial pain. PMID:26839665

  20. Lifting bloody footwear impressions using alginate casts followed by chemical enhancement.

    PubMed

    Wiesner, Sarena; Izraeli, Elad; Shor, Yaron; Domb, Avi

    2013-05-01

    A method for lifting bloody footwear impressions using alginate casts and enhancing the lifted impressions with amido black is presented. On rough or dark substrates, background interferences may conceal significant details of footwear impressions. Illumination with alternative light sources and chemically enhancing the bloody footwear impressions may reveal additional details, but sometimes, lifting footwear impressions prior to enhancing is the only way to expose hidden details (by using blood reagents not adequate on the original). Several cast formulations were tested for lifting the footwear impressions. The best results were achieved using Aroma fine®. Enhancement of the footwear impressions was attempted with several reagents prior to lifting, during the casting process, and on the lifted footwear impressions. Applying amido black to footwear impressions lifted with alginate produced the sharpest and most detailed footwear impressions. Alginate castings followed by chemical enhancement with amido black may produce high-quality footwear impressions for comparison. PMID:23488772

  1. In Search of a Gold Standard Scoring System for the Subjective Evaluation of Cosmetic Outcomes Following Breast-Conserving Therapy.

    PubMed

    Racz, Jennifer M; Hong, Nicole Look; Latosinsky, Steven

    2015-01-01

    The absence of a widely accepted method for aesthetic evaluation following breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer limits the ability to evaluate cosmetic outcomes. In this study, two different panel scoring approaches were compared in an attempt to identify a gold standard scoring system for subjectively assessing cosmetic outcomes following breast-conserving therapy. Standardized photographs of each participant were evaluated independently by twelve health care professionals involved in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment using the Danoff four-point scale. Individual Danoff scores were combined using two methods, a random sample "three-panel" score and an iterative "Delphi-panel" score, in order to create a final cosmetic score for each patient. Agreement between these two aggregative approaches was assessed with a weighted kappa (wk) statistic. Patient and professional recruitment occurred at two separate tertiary care multi-disciplinary breast health centers. Women with unilateral breast cancer who underwent breast-conserving therapy (segmental mastectomy or lumpectomy and radiotherapy) and were at least 2 years after radiotherapy were asked to participate. Ninety-seven women were evaluated. The Delphi approach required three rounds of evaluation to obtain greater than 50% agreement in all photographs. The wk statistic between scores generated from the "three-panel" and "Delphi-panel" approaches was 0.80 (95% CI: 0.71-0.89), thus demonstrating substantial agreement. Evaluation of cosmetic outcomes following breast-conserving therapy using a "three-panel" and "Delphi-panel" score provide similar results, confirming the reliability of either approach for subjective evaluation. Simplicity of use and interpretation favors the "three-panel" score. Future work should concentrate on the integration of the three-panel score with objective and patient-reported scales to generate a comprehensive cosmetic evaluation platform. PMID:25940058

  2. Teaching Evaluations: Influence of Test Difficulty and Perceived Difficulty of Subject Matter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combs, Natalie N.; And Others

    Students' evaluations of a lesson were made on the same videotaped lesson after students were informed that the lesson was difficult or that it was easy, and after they were given a hard or easy content test. A two-way factorial design was employed with 92 undergraduate students, who were randomly assigned to conditions. After all students…

  3. Quality evaluation of packaged acidified vegetables subjected to continuous microwave pasteurization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study evaluated the use of 915 MHz continuous microwave processing with a rotation apparatus for pasteurization of acidified vegetable packages. Broccoli florets, and 1.2 cm cubes of broccoli stems, red bell pepper, and sweetpotato were pre-equilibrated to 1 g/100 g NaCl and 0.38 g/100 mL citric...

  4. Subjectivity, Intentionality, and Manufactured Moves: Teachers' Perceptions of Voice in the Evaluation of Secondary Students' Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffery, Jill V.

    2011-01-01

    Composition theorists concerned with students' academic writing ability have long questioned the application of voice as a standard for writing competence, and second language compositionists have suggested that English language learners may be disadvantaged by the practice of emphasizing voice in the evaluation of student writing. Despite these…

  5. Impression Cytology in Different Types of Contact Lens Users

    PubMed Central

    ISKELELI, Guzin; ARICI, Ceyhun; DEGER BILGEC, Mustafa; DEMIRKESEN, Cuyan; SERAP ARSLAN, Hilal

    2015-01-01

    This study compared tear function tests and cytologic changes on the conjunctival surface in asymptomatic patients wearing contact lens of different materials. Included in this study were 40 eyes wearing daily wear 4 week replacement hydrogel (H) lenses, 32 eyes wearing silicone hydrogel (SiH) lenses, 18 eyes wearing rigid gas-permeable (RGP) lenses, and 21 healthy eyes (no lenses) as the control group. Epithelial morphology of the conjunctival surface was evaluated, based on Nelson classification with conjunctival impression cytology (CIC), after the tear break-up time (TBUT) and Schirmer test were performed. The mean values of the Schirmer and TBUT tests were significantly higher in the control group than in the other lens groups (p < 0.001). Grade 0 was the most frequent CIC in the control group (66.7%) and least frequent in the SiH lens group (40.6%); grade I was least frequent in the control and RGP groups (33.3%) and most frequent in the SiH lens group (40.6%). Moreover, grade 2 was most frequent in the SiH lens group (18.8%). There was no statistically significant difference in goblet cell densities between the groups (p = 0.462). In addition to the different Schirmer and TBUT test results between contact lens wearers and healthy non-wearers, some cytologic changes may occur on the ocular surface with direct mechanical effects of contact lenses. This simple and noninvasive technique may be used to evaluate the ocular surface with regard to intolerance to contact lenses. PMID:27350951

  6. Impression Cytology in Different Types of Contact Lens Users.

    PubMed

    Iskeleli, Guzin; Arici, Ceyhun; Deger Bilgec, Mustafa; Demirkesen, Cuyan; Serap Arslan, Hilal

    2015-01-01

    This study compared tear function tests and cytologic changes on the conjunctival surface in asymptomatic patients wearing contact lens of different materials. Included in this study were 40 eyes wearing daily wear 4 week replacement hydrogel (H) lenses, 32 eyes wearing silicone hydrogel (SiH) lenses, 18 eyes wearing rigid gas-permeable (RGP) lenses, and 21 healthy eyes (no lenses) as the control group. Epithelial morphology of the conjunctival surface was evaluated, based on Nelson classification with conjunctival impression cytology (CIC), after the tear break-up time (TBUT) and Schirmer test were performed. The mean values of the Schirmer and TBUT tests were significantly higher in the control group than in the other lens groups (p < 0.001). Grade 0 was the most frequent CIC in the control group (66.7%) and least frequent in the SiH lens group (40.6%); grade I was least frequent in the control and RGP groups (33.3%) and most frequent in the SiH lens group (40.6%). Moreover, grade 2 was most frequent in the SiH lens group (18.8%). There was no statistically significant difference in goblet cell densities between the groups (p = 0.462). In addition to the different Schirmer and TBUT test results between contact lens wearers and healthy non-wearers, some cytologic changes may occur on the ocular surface with direct mechanical effects of contact lenses. This simple and noninvasive technique may be used to evaluate the ocular surface with regard to intolerance to contact lenses. PMID:27350951

  7. Flexible Interior-Impression-Molding Tray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Jeffrey E.

    1991-01-01

    Device used inside combustion chamber of complicated shape for nondestructive evaluation of qualities of welds, including such features as offset, warping, misalignment of parts, and dropthrough. Includes flexible polypropylene tray trimmed to fit desired interior surface contour. Two neodymium boron magnets and inflatable bladder attached to tray. Tray and putty inserted in cavity to make mold of interior surface.

  8. Subjective evaluation of experimental dyspnoea – Effects of isocapnia and repeated exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hayen, Anja; Herigstad, Mari; Wiech, Katja; Pattinson, Kyle T.S.

    2015-01-01

    Resistive respiratory loading is an established stimulus for the induction of experimental dyspnoea. In comparison to unloaded breathing, resistive loaded breathing alters end-tidal CO2 (PETCO2), which has independent physiological effects (e.g. upon cerebral blood flow). We investigated the subjective effects of resistive loaded breathing with stabilized PETCO2 (isocapnia) during manual control of inspired gases on varying baseline levels of mild hypercapnia (increased PETCO2). Furthermore, to investigate whether perceptual habituation to dyspnoea stimuli occurs, the study was repeated over four experimental sessions. Isocapnic hypercapnia did not affect dyspnoea unpleasantness during resistive loading. A post hoc analysis revealed a small increase of respiratory unpleasantness during unloaded breathing at +0.6 kPa, the level that reliably induced isocapnia. We did not observe perceptual habituation over the four sessions. We conclude that isocapnic respiratory loading allows stable induction of respiratory unpleasantness, making it a good stimulus for multi-session studies of dyspnoea. PMID:25578628

  9. Dissociable neural modulation underlying lasting first impressions, changing your mind for the better, and changing it for the worse.

    PubMed

    Bhanji, Jamil P; Beer, Jennifer S

    2013-05-29

    Unattractive job candidates face a disadvantage when interviewing for a job. Employers' evaluations are colored by the candidate's physical attractiveness even when they take job interview performance into account. This example illustrates unexplored questions about the neural basis of social evaluation in humans. What neural regions support the lasting effects of initial impressions (even after getting to know someone)? How does the brain process information that changes our minds about someone? Job candidates' competence was evaluated from photographs and again after seeing snippets of job interviews. Left lateral orbitofrontal cortex modulation serves as a warning signal for initial reactions that ultimately undermine evaluations even when additional information is taken into account. The neural basis of changing one's mind about a candidate is not a simple matter of computing the amount of competence-affirming information in their job interview. Instead, seeing a candidate for the better is somewhat distinguishable at the neural level from seeing a candidate for the worse. Whereas amygdala modulation marks the extremity of evaluation change, favorable impression change additionally draws on parametric modulation of lateral prefrontal cortex and unfavorable impression change additionally draws on parametric modulation of medial prefrontal cortex, temporal cortex, and striatum. Investigating social evaluation as a dynamic process (rather than a one-time impression) paints a new picture of its neural basis and highlights the partially dissociable processes that contribute to changing your mind about someone for the better or the worse. PMID:23719802

  10. Manager behavior in a social context: the impact of impression management on attributions and disciplinary actions.

    PubMed

    Wood, R E; Mitchell, T R

    1981-12-01

    Two experimental studies were run to test the effects of subordinate impression management on the appraisals and responses of a manager, following an incident of poor performance. Two common impression management tactics, accounts and apologies, were manipulated in each of the studies. Subjects in both studies were experienced nursing supervisors. On the basis of the "discounting effect" reported in the attributional literature it was hypothesized that accounts of external causes for poor performance, i.e., excuses, would lead subjects to (1) attribute less responsibility to the subordinate, (2) be less personal in their responses, and (3) be less punitive in their responses. Apologies, because of their "equity restoration" effects, were expected to influence subjects' disciplinary responses to the poor performance, without necessarily affecting their attributions of responsibility. Experiment 1. which employed written stimulus materials and a repeated-measures design, provided strong support for all hypotheses. Experiment 2. which employed a film stimulus and between-subjects design, provided strong support for the accounts hypotheses but only minimal support for the apology hypotheses. The results highlight the importance of social information cues in the appraisal of performance. PMID:10253557

  11. Evaluation of Damage in Steels Subjected to Exploitation Loading - Destructive and Non-Destructive Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewski, Zbigniew L.; Mackiewicz, Sławomir; Szelążek, Jacek; Pietrzak, Krystyna; Augustyniak, Bolesław

    Damage due to creep and plastic flow is assessed using destructive and non-destructive methods in steels (40HNMA and P91). In the destructive methods the standard tension tests were carried out after prestraining and variations of the selected tension parameters were taken into account for damage identification. In order to assess a damage development during the creep and plastic deformation the tests for both steels were interrupted for a range of the selected strain magnitudes. The ultrasonic and magnetic techniques were used as the non-destructive methods for damage evaluation. The last step of the experimental programme contained microscopic observations. A very promising correlation between parameters of methods for damage development evaluation was achieved. It is well proved for the ultimate tensile stress and birefringence coefficient.

  12. Evaluation of Candida albicans formation on feldspathic porcelain subjected to four surface treatment methods.

    PubMed

    Karayazgan, Banu; Atay, Arzu; Saracli, Mehmet Ali; Gunay, Yumushan

    2010-03-01

    Candida albicans, known for its adhesion on prosthetic materials and oral tissues, is the most frequently encountered fungal infection in dentistry. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of four different surface treatment methods and immersion in artificial saliva on the surface roughness of and candida adhesion on dental porcelains. The four surface treatment methods were namely: natural glaze, overglaze, dual ion exchange, and polishing. Surface roughness of porcelain was evaluated using a surface profilometer and by SEM. Candida adhesion was examined by culturing two Candida strains on porcelain specimens followed by a colorimetric method using XTT/Coenzyme Q0. It became evident that Candida adhesion was found more in the specimens treated with natural glaze and polishing. Further, by the visual inspection of SEM images and comparison of surface roughness, polished and natural-glazed specimens showed rougher surface characteristics than overglazed and dual-ion-exchanged specimens. PMID:20379024

  13. Prefabricated stock trays for impression of auricular region.

    PubMed

    Vibha, Shetty; Anandkrishna, G N; Anupam, Purwar; Namratha, N

    2010-06-01

    The conventional methods of impression making for maxillofacial defects are cumbersome and time consuming for both patient and operator. This study focuses upon standardizing and simplifying the impression making methodology for auricular prosthesis with the help of prefabricated stock trays for auricular region. The stock trays were designed on positive replicas of anatomical structures, broadly divided into long and narrow, short and broad and long and broad ear. For each stock tray, impressions of auricle, of patients of different morphology were made with plastic funnels of different shape and size ensuring at least 6 mm of space between the anatomical part and inner surface of funnel and master cast was obtained. Subsequent adaptation of wax was done and fabrications of stock stainless steel trays were done. A standardized stock tray for making of auricular impressions was developed. From this innovative technical procedure it is possible to get an accurate impression of auricular defects now by the use of prefabricated stock trays rather than the cumbersome conventional method. PMID:21629455

  14. Outcome dependency alters the neural substrates of impression formation.

    PubMed

    Ames, Daniel L; Fiske, Susan T

    2013-12-01

    How do people maintain consistent impressions of other people when other people are often inconsistent? The present research addresses this question by combining recent neuroscientific insights with ecologically meaningful behavioral methods. Participants formed impressions of real people whom they met in a personally involving situation. fMRI and supporting behavioral data revealed that outcome dependency (i.e., depending on another person for a desired outcome) alters previously identified neural dynamics of impression formation. Consistent with past research, a functional localizer identified a region of dorsomedial PFC previously linked to social impression formation. In the main task, this ROI revealed the predicted patterns of activity across outcome dependency conditions: greater BOLD response when information confirmed (vs. violated) social expectations if participants were outcome-independent, and the reverse pattern if participants were outcome-dependent. We suggest that, although social perceivers often discount expectancy-disconfirming information as noise, being dependent on another person for a desired outcome focuses impression-formation processing on the most diagnostic information, rather than on the most tractable information. PMID:23850465

  15. Outcome dependency alters the neural substrates of impression formation

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Daniel L.; Fiske, Susan T.

    2015-01-01

    How do people maintain consistent impressions of other people when other people are often inconsistent? The present research addresses this question by combining recent neuroscientific insights with ecologically meaningful behavioral methods. Participants formed impressions of real people whom they met in a personally involving situation. fMRI and supporting behavioral data revealed that outcome dependency (i.e., depending on another person for a desired outcome) alters previously identified neural dynamics of impression formation. Consistent with past research, a functional localizer identified a region of dorsomedial PFC previously linked to social impression formation. In the main task, this ROI revealed the predicted patterns of activity across outcome dependency conditions: greater BOLD response when information confirmed (vs. violated) social expectations if participants were outcome-independent and the reverse pattern if participants were outcome-dependent. We suggest that, although social perceivers often discount expectancy-disconfirming information as noise, being dependent on another person for a desired outcome focuses impression-formation processing on the most diagnostic information, rather than on the most tractable information. PMID:23850465

  16. Comparison of Dimensional Accuracy between Open-Tray and Closed-Tray Implant Impression Technique in 15° Angled Implants

    PubMed Central

    Balouch, F; Jalalian, E; Nikkheslat, M; Ghavamian, R; Toopchi, Sh; Jallalian, F; Jalalian, S

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Various impression techniques have different effects on the accuracy of final cast dimensions. Meanwhile; there are some controversies about the best technique. Purpose: This study was performed to compare two kinds of implant impression methods (open tray and closed tray) on 15 degree angled implants. Materials and Method: In this experimental study, a steel model with 8 cm in diameter and 3 cm in height were produced with 3 holes devised inside to stabilize 3 implants. The central implant was straight and the other two implants were 15° angled. The two angled implants had 5 cm distance from each other and 3.5 cm from the central implant. Dental stone, high strength (type IV) was used for the main casts. Impression trays were filled with poly ether, and then the two impression techniques (open tray and closed tray) were compared. To evaluate positions of the implants, each cast was analyzed by CMM device in 3 dimensions (x,y,z). Differences in the measurements obtained from final casts and laboratory model were analyzed using t-Test. Results: The obtained results indicated that closed tray impression technique was significantly different in dimensional accuracy when compared with open tray method. Dimensional changes were 129 ± 37μ and 143.5 ± 43.67μ in closed tray and open tray, while coefficient of variation in closed- tray and open tray were reported to be 27.2% and 30.4%, respectively. Conclusion: Closed impression technique had less dimensional changes in comparison with open tray method, so this study suggests that closed tray impression technique is more accurate. PMID:24724130

  17. Evaluating auditory stream segregation of SAM tone sequences by subjective and objective psychoacoustical tasks, and brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Dolležal, Lena-Vanessa; Brechmann, André; Klump, Georg M.; Deike, Susann

    2014-01-01

    Auditory stream segregation refers to a segregated percept of signal streams with different acoustic features. Different approaches have been pursued in studies of stream segregation. In psychoacoustics, stream segregation has mostly been investigated with a subjective task asking the subjects to report their percept. Few studies have applied an objective task in which stream segregation is evaluated indirectly by determining thresholds for a percept that depends on whether auditory streams are segregated or not. Furthermore, both perceptual measures and physiological measures of brain activity have been employed but only little is known about their relation. How the results from different tasks and measures are related is evaluated in the present study using examples relying on the ABA- stimulation paradigm that apply the same stimuli. We presented A and B signals that were sinusoidally amplitude modulated (SAM) tones providing purely temporal, spectral or both types of cues to evaluate perceptual stream segregation and its physiological correlate. Which types of cues are most prominent was determined by the choice of carrier and modulation frequencies (fmod) of the signals. In the subjective task subjects reported their percept and in the objective task we measured their sensitivity for detecting time-shifts of B signals in an ABA- sequence. As a further measure of processes underlying stream segregation we employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). SAM tone parameters were chosen to evoke an integrated (1-stream), a segregated (2-stream), or an ambiguous percept by adjusting the fmod difference between A and B tones (Δfmod). The results of both psychoacoustical tasks are significantly correlated. BOLD responses in fMRI depend on Δfmod between A and B SAM tones. The effect of Δfmod, however, differs between auditory cortex and frontal regions suggesting differences in representation related to the degree of perceptual ambiguity of the sequences

  18. Evaluating risks of acquired clinical vulnerability among subjects exposed to E-waste.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anup Kumar; Kesavachandran, Chandrasekharan Nair; Kumar, Sushil

    2011-01-01

    Acquired clinical vulnerability (ACV) results from insults that produce consequential pathophysiological changes and predispose exposed subjects to future disease. ACV comprises a complex biological process that is manifested by exposure to toxicants, generally over the course of many years, and results from subtle changes that occur at the cellular and molecular level. A large proportion of the world's population has already been, or will be, exposed to toxicants emanating from E-waste during the course of their lives. In countries where E-waste recycling is an important economic activity (China, India, among others), the challenge facing researchers is to devise suitable methods for identifying and objectively measuring ACV. Primary prevention can be achieved through legislation/awareness/monitoring and secondary prevention by developing innovative diagnostic tools and corrective measures. Studies in which attempts are made to define the health impact of multiple exposures, as routinely occurs in E-waste recycling, should include measures of as many of the following parameters as possible: (a) characterization of pollutant levels in air/water/soil at the residential or workplace, (b) periodical clinical examination of exposed subjects, (c) assessments of circulating toxicant loads in blood/urine/hair, (d) genomic variation and resultant susceptibility to complex biological responses, (viz, inflammation/dysplasia/immunosuppression/tissue regeneration) that derive from pathway modulation (viz., cytoskeleton/metabolism/cell adhesion/immune system/neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction/cytokine/signaling), (e) routine monitoring of altered gene expression from modulation of hematology or the above-mentioned pathways. E-waste exposure may also serve as a model for the types of multiple exposures that occur in other industrial or environmental exposures. Moreover, the approach used to study and address or alleviate E-waste exposure may also be useful in other

  19. Evaluation of a closed loop inductive power transmission system on an awake behaving animal subject.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Mehdi; Kwon, Ki Yong; Zhang, Fei; Oweiss, Karim; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents in vivo experimental results for a closed loop wireless power transmission system to implantable devices on an awake behaving animal subject. In this system, wireless power transmission takes place across an inductive link, controlled by a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) radio frequency identification (RFID) transceiver (TRF7960) operating at 13.56 MHz. Induced voltage on the implantable secondary coil is rectified, digitized by a 10-bit analog to digital converter, and transmitted back to the primary via back telemetry. Transmitter (Tx) and receiver (Rx) circuitry were mounted on the back of an adult rat with a nominal distance of ~7 mm between their coils. Our experiments showed that the closed loop system was able to maintain the Rx supply voltage at the designated 3.8 V despite changes in the coils' relative distance and alignment due to animal movements. The Tx power consumption changed between 410 ~ 560 mW in order to deliver 27 mW to the receiver. The open loop system, on the other hand, showed undesired changes in the Rx supply voltage while the Tx power consumption was constant at 660 mW. PMID:22256112

  20. Economic Evaluation of Pharmacogenetic Tests in Patients Subjected to Renal Transplantation: A Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rancic, Nemanja; Dragojevic-Simic, Viktorija; Vavic, Neven; Kovacevic, Aleksandra; Segrt, Zoran; Djordjevic, Natasa

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for the patients with end-stage renal failure. Genetic factors, among others, can influence variability in response to immunosuppressive drugs. Nowadays, due to restrictive health resources, the question arises whether routine pharmacogenetic analyses should be done in the renal transplant recipients or not. The aim of this literature review was to present the up-to-date information considering the economic feasibility of pharmacogenetic testing in patients subjected to renal transplantation. The organization United Network for Organ Sharing in the US estimated that total costs per renal transplant concerning these analyses were $334,300 in 2014. Pharmacogenetic testing prior to treatment initiation could be helpful to predict and assess treatment response and the risks for adverse drug reactions. This kind of testing before treatment initiation seems to be one of the most promising applications of pharmacokinetics. Although pharmacogenetic tests were found to be a cost-effective or cost-saving strategy in many cases, some authors represent another opinion. However, if the real costs of renal transplantation are recognized, the application of these tests in the standard daily practice could be considered more realistic, which additionally emphasizes the importance of future studies assessing their cost effectiveness.

  1. Soil properties and perceived disturbance of grasslands subjected to mechanized military training: Evaluation of an index

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Althoff, D.P.; Althoff, P.S.; Lambrecht, N.D.; Gipson, P.S.; Pontius, J.S.; Woodford, P.B.

    2007-01-01

    Mechanized maneuver training impacts the landscape by creating depressions, compacting soils, producing bare ground areas, transporting seeds of invasive plants, and crushing vegetation. We measured 3 physical, 13 chemical, and 2 biological soil properties and used a disturbance index (DI) based on perceptions of soil conditions on a military installation to assess the condition of 100 ?? 100 m plots (1 ha): 10 in 2002 and 10 in 2004. Potential DI scores range from 0 (no appreciable evidence of disturbance) to 1 (>95 per cent of the plot disturbed). Bulk density, porosity (%), and water content (%) - all at 5-1-10-0cm depth, and nematode family richness (NFR) were significantly, negatively correlated (Spearman coefficients, rs) with the DI of both years. The strong negative correlation (rs., = -0.69 in 2002, -0.79 in 2004) of NFR with the DI appears to reflect the status of nematode diversity and, therefore, may serve as a useful, inexpensive approach to rapidly assessing grasslands subjected to mechanized military training. Copyright ?? 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Comprehensive evaluation of coagulation in swine subjected to isolated primary blast injury.

    PubMed

    Prat, Nicolas J; Montgomery, Robbie; Cap, Andrew P; Dubick, Michael A; Sarron, Jean-Claude; Destombe, Casimir; May, Philippe; Magnan, Pascal

    2015-06-01

    Blast is one of the major causes of injury and death in recent armed conflicts. With increased use of improvised explosive devices in Iraq and Afghanistan, more than 71% of combat casualties are caused by explosions. Blast injuries can range from primary (caused by shock wave) to quaternary injuries (e.g., burns), and such injuries can result in an acute coagulopathy denoted by a hypocoagulable state. It is not clear if this coagulopathy observed in victims of explosion is caused by local or general effect of the primary blast injury itself. In this study, 13 pigs were subjected to severe isolated open-field blast injury and we measured indices of coagulation impairment during the first hour after injury: ROTEM, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, coagulation factors, thrombin generation potential, platelet count, platelet activation, platelet function, and procoagulant microparticle formation. After 1 h, the mortality was 33%. No coagulation dysfunction was observed in the survivors in this period. This study presented a highly reproducible and consistent isolated blast injury in large mammals with comprehensive coagulation testing. The data suggest that isolated primary blast injury is not responsible for acute coagulopathy of trauma in victims of explosion but seems to lead to an early hypercoagulable state. PMID:25643012

  3. [Subjective perception and comfort/discomfort ergonomic evaluation in school environment].

    PubMed

    Donisi, M; Gurin, R; Marino, S; Papale, A; Silvetti, A

    2007-01-01

    In order to carry out the present study a school place representative of the entire Italian school have been identified, an Institute within Rome province have been selected. The first step has been the measurement of the dimensional and structural features of the classrooms considered, their furniture and work-posts, also considering the activities carried on in the classrooms and their environmental conditions. Pictures and videos have been shot so as to have a deep analysis of the ergonomic level of the work-posts and, at the same time, an inquiry to understand the needs of the students with respect to the environment "classroom", the work-posts and didactical tools utilized, by means of a multiple answers questionnaire, drawing, and the implementation of the shared design method. Applying with the young users the creative sharing design method it have been produced the "diagnosis paper", where the problems and the criticalities relevant to the well-being and healthiness of the users of the school environment have been listed, and which allow to identify patterns, useful basis for future re-designs. The data obtained have been then the subject of an exact and deep analytical and statistical examination carried on by the multi-discipline. PMID:18409887

  4. Evaluation of thermal comfort in university classrooms through objective approach and subjective preference analysis.

    PubMed

    Nico, Maria Anna; Liuzzi, Stefania; Stefanizzi, Pietro

    2015-05-01

    Assessing thermal comfort becomes more relevant when the aim is to maximise learning and productivity performances, as typically occurs in offices and schools. However, if, in the offices, the Fanger model well represents the thermal occupant response, then on the contrary, in schools, adaptive mechanisms significantly influence the occupants' thermal preference. In this study, an experimental approach was performed in the Polytechnic University of Bari, during the first days of March, in free running conditions. First, the results of questionnaires were compared according to the application of the Fanger model and the adaptive model; second, using a subjective scale, a complete analysis was performed on thermal preference in terms of acceptability, neutrality and preference, with particular focus on the influence of gender. The user possibility to control the indoor plant system produced a significant impact on the thermal sensation and the acceptability of the thermal environment. Gender was also demonstrated to greatly influence the thermal judgement of the thermal environment when an outdoor cold climate occurs. PMID:25683538

  5. Effects of voice style, noise level, and acoustic feedback on objective and subjective voice evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Bottalico, Pasquale; Graetzer, Simone; Hunter, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Speakers adjust their vocal effort when communicating in different room acoustic and noise conditions and when instructed to speak at different volumes. The present paper reports on the effects of voice style, noise level, and acoustic feedback on vocal effort, evaluated as sound pressure level, and self-reported vocal fatigue, comfort, and control. Speakers increased their level in the presence of babble and when instructed to talk in a loud style, and lowered it when acoustic feedback was increased and when talking in a soft style. Self-reported responses indicated a preference for the normal style without babble noise. PMID:26723357

  6. Effects of voice style, noise level, and acoustic feedback on objective and subjective voice evaluations.

    PubMed

    Bottalico, Pasquale; Graetzer, Simone; Hunter, Eric J

    2015-12-01

    Speakers adjust their vocal effort when communicating in different room acoustic and noise conditions and when instructed to speak at different volumes. The present paper reports on the effects of voice style, noise level, and acoustic feedback on vocal effort, evaluated as sound pressure level, and self-reported vocal fatigue, comfort, and control. Speakers increased their level in the presence of babble and when instructed to talk in a loud style, and lowered it when acoustic feedback was increased and when talking in a soft style. Self-reported responses indicated a preference for the normal style without babble noise. PMID:26723357

  7. [Consistency of zinc oxide-eugenol impression materials].

    PubMed

    Gomes, W L; Santos, J F; Muench, A

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this work was investigate the consistency of three zinc oxide-eugenol impression pastes, considering its flow. Flow tests were performed based on the AMERICAN DENTAL ASSOCIATION-Specification no 16. Setting time was based at that one when should be applied the load to get considered disc diameter; the values were obtained graphically. Considering the results it was possible to conclude: a) the first two materials (Equalizing and Horus) present high initial flow, which however drops down earlier on the second one; b) both materials may be used with non compressive impression technic but the second one has shorter working time; c) the third material (Lysanda) as it presents lower flow and faster setting time, may be used with compressive impression technic. PMID:2135423

  8. It's all in the past: temporal-context effects modulate subjective evaluations of emotional visual stimuli, regardless of presentation sequence

    PubMed Central

    Czekóová, Kristína; Shaw, Daniel J.; Janoušová, Eva; Urbánek, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if and how temporal context influences subjective affective responses to emotional images. To do so, we examined whether the subjective evaluation of a target image is influenced by the valence of its preceding image, and/or its overall position in a sequence of images. Furthermore, we assessed if these potentially confounding contextual effects can be moderated by a common procedural control: randomized stimulus presentation. Four groups of participants evaluated the same set of 120 pictures from the International Affective System (IAPS) presented in four different sequences. Our data reveal strong effects of both aspects of temporal context in all presentation sequences, modified only slightly in their nature and magnitude. Furthermore, this was true for both valence and arousal ratings. Subjective ratings of negative target images were influenced by temporal context most strongly across all sequences. We also observed important gender differences: females expressed greater sensitivity to temporal-context effects and design manipulations relative to males, especially for negative images. Our results have important implications for future emotion research that employs normative picture stimuli, and contributes to our understanding of context effects in general. PMID:25904877

  9. Subject matter expert and public evaluations of a veterinary toxicology course brochure-writing assignment.

    PubMed

    Dorman, David C; Alpi, Kristine M; Chappell, Kimberly H

    2013-01-01

    Veterinary schools are increasingly developing students' communication skills, with an emphasis placed on practice conveying medical and scientific knowledge to different audiences. We describe how patient-centered written communication has been integrated into the training of veterinary students using toxicology-related preventive materials. Third-year veterinary students were given an assignment to prepare a client-focused brochure related to veterinary toxicology. Since 2010, 148 students have completed this assignment, with an average score of 93.4%. Use of a grading rubric was instituted in 2011 and resulted in a more rigorous assessment of the brochures by the course instructors. In this study, we evaluated a sample (n=6) selected from 10 brochures volunteered for further public and expert assessment. Each brochure was measured for readability and assessed with a rubric for perceived usefulness and acceptability by 12 veterinary toxicologists and 10 or 11 adult members of the public attending a college of veterinary medicine open house. Veterinary toxicologist review anticipated that the brochures would be useful for most clients, and the public reviewers confirmed this assessment. Evaluation of the brochures using set marking criteria and readability indexes showed that students had successfully targeted the chosen audiences. Feedback showed that the general public rated the sample brochures highly in terms of quality, usefulness, and interest. Completion of this study has resulted in revision of the grading rubric, an increased use of brochure examples, and additional instruction in readability assessment and brochure development, thereby improving the assignment as a learning exercise. PMID:23475408

  10. Subjective evaluation of physical and mental workload interactions across different muscle groups.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Ranjana K; Agnew, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Both physical and mental demands, and their interactions, have been shown to increase biomechanical loading and physiological reactivity as well as impair task performance. Because these interactions have shown to be muscle-dependent, the aim of this study was to determine the sensitivity of the NASA Task Load Index (NASA TLX) and Ratings of Perceived Exertion (RPE) to evaluate physical and mental workload during muscle-specific tasks. Twenty-four participants performed upper extremity and low back exertions at three physical workload levels in the absence and presence of a mental stressor. Outcome measures included RPE and NASA TLX (six sub-scales) ratings. The findings indicate that while both RPEs and NASA TLX ratings were sensitive to muscle-specific changes in physical demand, only an additional mental stressor and its interaction with either physical demand or muscle groups influenced the effort sub-scale and overall workload scores of the NASA TLX. While additional investigations in actual work settings are warranted, the NASA TLX shows promise in evaluating perceived workload that is sensitive not only to physical and mental demands but also sensitive in determining workload for tasks that employ different muscle groups. PMID:25025738

  11. Automatic control of a robot camera for broadcasting and subjective evaluation and analysis of reproduced images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Daiichiro; Ishikawa, Akio; Tsuda, Takao; Shimoda, Shigeru; Fukushima, Hiroshi

    2000-06-01

    We are studying about an intelligent robot camera that can automatically shoot an object and produce images with a powerful sense of reality as if a very skilled cameraman were at work. In this study, we designed a control algorithm based on cameramen's techniques for the control of the robot camera and conducted a series of experiments to understand the effects of camera work on how images look to viewers. The findings were as follows: (1) Evaluation scores are high when actual data by cameraman, especially typical data, are used as the position adjusting velocity curve of the target. (2) Evaluation scores are relatively high for images taken with feedback-feedforward camera control method when the target moves in one direction. (3) When both the direction and velocity of the target change and when the target gets bigger and faster in the view finder, it becomes increasingly difficult to keep the target within the view finder using the control method that imitates the human camera handling. (4) The method with mechanical feedback, on the other hand, is able to cope with rapid changes in the target's direction and velocity, constantly keeping the target within the view finder. Even so, the viewer finds the image rather mechanical than natural.

  12. Subjective evaluations of multiple three-dimensional displays by a stereo-deficient viewer: an interesting case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntire, John P.; Ellis, Sharon A.; Harrington, Lawrence K.; Havig, Paul R.

    2014-06-01

    A study was conducted with sixteen observers evaluating four different three-dimensional (3D) displays for usability, quality, and physical comfort. One volumetric display and three different stereoscopic displays were tested. The observers completed several different types of questionnaires before, during and after each test session. All observers were tested for distance acuity, color vision, and stereoscopic acuity. One observer in particular appeared to have either degraded or absent binocular vision on the stereo acuity test. During the subjective portions of the data collection, this observer showed no obvious signs of depth perception problems and finished the study with no issues reported. Upon further post-hoc stereovision testing of this observer, we discovered that he essentially failed all tests requiring depth judgments of fine disparity and had at best only gross levels of stereoscopic vision (failed all administered stereoacuity threshold tests, testing up to about 800 arc sec of disparity). When questioned about this, the stereo-deficiency was unknown to the observer, who reported having seen several stereoscopic 3D movies (and enjoyed the 3D experiences). Interestingly, we had collected subjective reports about the quality of three-dimensional imagery across multiple stereoscopic displays from a person with deficient stereo-vision. We discuss the participant's unique pattern of results and compare and contrast these results with the other stereo-normal participants. The implications for subjective measurements on stereoscopic three-dimensional displays and for subjective display measurement in general are considered.

  13. Outer planet probe cost estimates: First impressions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niehoff, J.

    1974-01-01

    An examination was made of early estimates of outer planetary atmospheric probe cost by comparing the estimates with past planetary projects. Of particular interest is identification of project elements which are likely cost drivers for future probe missions. Data are divided into two parts: first, the description of a cost model developed by SAI for the Planetary Programs Office of NASA, and second, use of this model and its data base to evaluate estimates of probe costs. Several observations are offered in conclusion regarding the credibility of current estimates and specific areas of the outer planet probe concept most vulnerable to cost escalation.

  14. Valuing Women in Management: An Impression Management Perspective of Gender Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, William L., III; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Applies a model of impression management to explore the process whereby women in organizations present themselves to others and the impressions they create. Devotes particular attention to how these impressions influence women's experiences in organizations. Suggests future research direction for clarifying the impact of gender impression and…

  15. Evaluation of Salivary Leptin Levels in Healthy Subjects and Patients with Advanced Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Khorsand, Afshin; Bayani, Mojtaba; Torabi, Sepehr; Kharrazifard, Mohammad Javad; Mohammadnejhad, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Leptin is a hormone-like protein produced by the adipose tissue. It plays an important role in protection of host against inflammation and infection. Some studies have reported changes in leptin levels in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), saliva and blood serum of patients with periodontal disease compared to healthy individuals. The aim of the present study was to compare the salivary leptin levels in patients with advanced periodontitis and healthy individuals. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, the salivary samples of healthy individuals and patients with advanced periodontitis with clinical attachment loss >5mm were obtained using a standardized method and the leptin levels were measured in the salivary samples by means of ELISA. The effects of the periodontal status and sex on the salivary leptin levels of both groups were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA. Results: The means ± standard deviation (SD) of salivary leptin levels in healthy subjects and patients with advanced periodontitis were 34.27±6.88 and 17.87±5.89 pg/mL, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that the effect of sex on the salivary leptin levels was not significant (P=0.91), while the effect of advanced periodontitis on the salivary leptin levels was significant compared to healthy individuals (P<0.0001). Conclusions: In patients with advanced periodontitis, the salivary leptin levels were significantly lower compared to healthy individuals. Thus, assessment of salivary leptin can be done as a non-invasive and simple method to determine the susceptibility of patients to advanced periodontitis. PMID:27536322

  16. Instructor and student pilots' subjective evaluation of a general aviation simulator with a terrain visual system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiteley, G. W.; Harris, R. L., Sr.

    1978-01-01

    Ten student pilots were given a 1 hour training session in the NASA Langley Research Center's General Aviation Simulator by a certified flight instructor and a follow-up flight evaluation was performed by the student's own flight instructor, who has also flown the simulator. The students and instructors generally felt that the simulator session had a positive effect on the students. They recommended that a simulator with a visual scene and a motion base would be useful in performing such maneuvers as: landing approaches, level flight, climbs, dives, turns, instrument work, and radio navigation, recommending that the simulator would be an efficient means of introducing the student to new maneuvers before doing them in flight. The students and instructors estimated that about 8 hours of simulator time could be profitably devoted to the private pilot training.

  17. Numerical Evaluation Of Shape Memory Alloy Recentering Braces In Reinforced Concrete Buildings Subjected To Seismic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Winsbert Curt

    Seismic protective techniques utilizing specialized energy dissipation devices within the lateral resisting frames have been successfully used to limit inelastic deformation in reinforced concrete buildings by increasing damping and/or altering the stiffness of these structures. However, there is a need to investigate and develop systems with self-centering capabilities; systems that are able to assist in returning a structure to its original position after an earthquake. In this project, the efficacy of a shape memory alloy (SMA) based device, as a structural recentering device is evaluated through numerical analysis using the OpenSees framework. OpenSees is a software framework for simulating the seismic response of structural and geotechnical systems. OpenSees has been developed as the computational platform for research in performance-based earthquake engineering at the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER). A non-ductile reinforced concrete building, which is modelled using OpenSees and verified with available experimental data is used for the analysis in this study. The model is fitted with Tension/Compression (TC) SMA devices. The performance of the SMA recentering device is evaluated for a set of near-field and far-field ground motions. Critical performance measures of the analysis include residual displacements, interstory drift and acceleration (horizontal and vertical) for different types of ground motions. The results show that the TC device's performance is unaffected by the type of ground motion. The analysis also shows that the inclusion of the device in the lateral force resisting system of the building resulted in a 50% decrease in peak horizontal displacement, and inter-story drift elimination of residual deformations, acceleration was increased up to 110%.

  18. Peritoneal Reactivity Evaluation in Horses Subjected to Experimental Small Colon Enterotomy and Treated with Subcutaneous Heparin

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Juliana de Moura; Rodrigues, Karoline Alves; Yamada, Ana Lúcia Miluzzi; Watanabe, Marcos Jun; Alves, Ana Liz Garcia; Rodrigues, Celso Antonio; Hussni, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Heparin is routinely administered in postoperative abdominal surgery aiming to prevent adhesions formation; however, there is no consensus indicating its effectiveness. This study evaluated the effect of heparin on peritoneal reactivity after abdominal surgery, through the association between peritoneal fluid features and ultrasonographic and laparoscopic examination. Ten adult horses were used: control group (CG) and treated group (TG). Both groups underwent laparotomy and small colon enterotomy. TG received subcutaneous heparin at 150 IU/kg every 12 hours for 5 days. The animals underwent ultrasonography and peritoneal fluid examination prior to enterotomy (M0) 12 hours (M1), 1 day (M2), 2 days (M3), 4 days (M4), 6 days (M5), 10 days (M6), and 14 days after enterotomy (M7) with laparoscopic examination being performed on the fifth postoperative day. Peritoneal inflammatory response was observed in both groups. The peritoneal fluid of TG animals showed higher echogenicity during heparin therapy. No inflammatory difference was observed between groups through peritoneal fluid features, except for the higher D-dimer concentration in CG. On laparoscopy, slightly diffuse peritoneal reactivity for both groups was observed, being higher for TG. Laparoscopy and ultrasonography association allowed detailed access to the abdominal cavity. Ultrasonography assessed the diffuse peritoneal inflammation, and laparoscopy allowed the detailed analysis of the segments. No gross beneficial reactions resulting from the use of heparin on peritoneal reactivity were observed; however, it was observed by D-dimer evaluation that the TG had less fibrin deposition, which is directly related to a lower rate of abdominal adhesions formation. PMID:25436172

  19. Comparative in vitro and in vivo evaluation of three tablet formulations of amiodarone in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study The relative in vivo bioavailability and in vitro dissolution studies of three chemically equivalent amiodarone generic products in healthy volunteers was evaluated in three separate occasions. The possibility of a correlation between in vitro and in vivo performances of these tablet formulations was also evaluated. Methods The bioequivalence studies were conducted based on a single dose, two-sequence, cross over randomized design. The bioavailability was compared using AUC0–72, AUC0–8, Cmax and Tmax. Similarity factor, dissolution efficiency (DE), and mean dissolution time (MDT) was used to compare the dissolution profiles. Polynomial linear correlation models were tested using either MDT vs mean residence time (MRT) or fraction of the drug dissolved (FRD) vs fraction of the drug absorbed (FRA). Results Significant differences were found in the dissolution performances of the tested formulations and therefore they were included in the development of the correlation. The 90% confidence intervals of the log-transformed AUC0-72, AUC0–8, and Cmax of each two formulations in each bioequivalence studies were within the acceptable range of 80–125%. Differences were not observed between the untransformed Tmax values. Poor correlation was found between MRT and MDT of the products. A point-to-point correlation which is essential for a reliable correlation was not obtained between pooled FRD and FRA. The dissolution condition which was used for amiodarone tablets failed for formulations which were bioequivalent in vivo and significant difference between the dissolution characteristics of products (f2<50) did not reflect their in vivo properties. Major conclusions Bioequivalence studies should be considered as the only acceptable way to ensure the interchangeability and in vivo equivalence of amiodarone generic drug products. The dissolution conditions used of the present study could be used for routine and in-process quality

  20. Evaluating the relationship between carisoprodol concentrations and meprobamate formation and inter-subject and intra-subject variability in urinary excretion data of pain patients.

    PubMed

    Tse, Stephanie A; Atayee, Rabia S; Best, Brookie M; Pesce, Amadeo J

    2012-05-01

    Using urinary carisoprodol data from pain patients, our objectives were to determine the relationship between carisoprodol concentration and its conversion to meprobamate, and quantify the intra-subject and inter-subject variability in carisoprodol metabolism. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to quantitate carisoprodol and meprobamate concentrations in urine specimens. The log creatinine-corrected carisoprodol versus log creatinine-corrected meprobamate showed a marginal positive relationship (R(2) = 0.395), with a 29.1-fold variance between subjects at the mean carisoprodol concentration. The geometric mean carisoprodol and meprobamate urine concentrations were 0.519 ± 3.38 mg and 28.2 ± 2.34 mg analyte per gram creatinine, respectively. The log metabolic ratio (MR) versus log creatinine-corrected carisoprodol displayed a marginal positive correlation. A subpopulation of outliers with higher carisoprodol and lower meprobamate levels were considered poor metabolizers and represented 0.483% (n = 21) of the study population. Using a curve-fit mathematical model, we estimated 0.318% (n = 10) to be ultra-rapid metabolizers. The inter-subject population geometric standard deviation (SD) of the MR was 3.64. The intra-subject geometric median and mean SD of the MR were 1.60 (interquartile range: 1.28, 2.07) and 1.72 ± 1.60, respectively. Inter-subject variability was 2.27 times greater than the median intra-subject variability. With a better understanding of urine carisoprodol and meprobamate concentrations and variability, urine drug testing provides a useful monitoring reference for clinicians. PMID:22511696

  1. Post Test Evaluation of HSCT Nozzle Acoustic Liner Subcomponents Subjected to a Hot Acoustic Durability Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Lee, Kuan

    2008-01-01

    The acoustic liner system designed for use in the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) was tested in a thermal-acoustic environment. Five ceramic matrix composite (CMC) acoustic tile configurations, five bulk acoustic absorbers, and one thermal protection system design were tested. The CMC acoustic tiles were subjected to two 2 3/4 hr ambient temperature acoustic exposures to measure their dynamic response. One exposure was conducted on the tiles alone and the second exposure included the tiles and the T-foam bulk absorber. The measured tile RMS strains were small. With or without the T-foam absorber, the dynamic strains were below strain levels that would cause damage during fatigue loading. After the ambient exposure, a 75-hr durability test of the entire acoustic liner system was conducted using a thermal-acoustic cycle that approximated the anticipated service cycle. Acoustic loads up to 139 dB/Hz and temperatures up to 1670 F (910 C) were employed during this 60 cycle test. During the durability test, the CMC tiles were exposed to temperatures up to 1780 F and a transient through thickness gradient up to 490 F. The TPS peak temperatures on the hot side of the panels ranged from 750 to 1000 F during the 60 cycles. The through thickness delta T ranged from 450 to 650 F, varying with TPS location and cycle number. No damage, such as cracks or chipping, was observed in the CMC tiles after completion of the testing. However, on tile warped during the durability test and was replaced after 43 or 60 cycles. No externally observed damage was found in this tile. No failure of the CMC fasteners occurred, but damage was observed. Cracks and missing material occurred, only in the fastener head region. No indication of damage was observed in the T-foam acoustic absorbers. The SiC foam acoustic absorber experienced damage after about 43 cycles. Cracking in the TPS occurred around the attachment holes and under a vent. In spite of the development of damage, the TPS maintained

  2. Evaluating the subject-performed task effect in healthy older adults: relationship with neuropsychological tests

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ana Rita; Pinho, Maria Salomé; Souchay, Céline; Moulin, Christopher J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background An enhancement in recall of simple instructions is found when actions are performed in comparison to when they are verbally presented – the subject-performed task (SPT) effect. This enhancement has also been found with older adults. However, the reason why older adults, known to present a deficit in episodic memory, have a better performance for this type of information remains unclear. In this article, we explored this effect by comparing the performance on the SPT task with the performance on other tasks, in order to understand the underlying mechanisms that may explain this effect. Objective We hypothesized that both young and older adult groups should show higher recall in SPT compared with the verbal learning condition, and that the differences between age groups should be lower in the SPT condition. We aimed to explore the correlations between these tasks and known neuropsychological tests, and we also measured source memory for the encoding condition. Design A mixed design was used with 30 healthy older adults, comparing their performance with 30 healthy younger adults. Each participant was asked to perform 16 simple instructions (SPT condition) and to only read the other 16 instructions (Verbal condition – VT). The test phase included a free recall task. Participants were also tested with a set of neuropsychological measures (speed of processing, working memory and verbal episodic memory). Results The SPT effect was found for both age groups; but even for SPT materials, group differences in recall persisted. Source memory was found to be preserved for the two groups. Simple correlations suggested differences in correlates of SPT performance between the two groups. However, when controlling for age, the SPT and VT tasks correlate with each other, and a measure of episodic memory correlated moderately with both SPT and VT performance. Conclusions A strong effect of SPT was observed for all but one, which still displayed the expected aging

  3. Evaluation of oro-facial function in young subjects with temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, F Y; Gavião, M B D; Montes, A B M; Marquezin, M C S; Castelo, P M

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate bite force (BF) and oro-facial functions at different dentition phases (initial-mixed, intermediate-mixed, final-mixed and permanent dentition) in children and adolescents diagnosed with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). The sample was selected from four public schools in Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brazil. Of the 289 participants recruited, aged 8-14 years old, 46 were placed into the TMD group. TMD was diagnosed using Axis I of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (2011). Oro-facial functions were evaluated using the Nordic Orofacial Test-Screening (NOT-S), which involves both an interview and a clinical examination. BF was measured using a digital gnathodynamometer. Age and body mass index (BMI) were also considered. The data were analysed by the following tests: Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Student's t-test, Spearman and Pearson coefficients, Qui-square test, Fisher's exact or binomial test, as indicated. Moreover, univariate and multivariable logistic regression were applied. For the TMD group, scores associated with NOT-S interview and NOT-S total were higher than for the control group (P = 0.033 and P = 0.0062, respectively). No differences in BF between genders or groups (P > 0.05) were detected. Variables included in the multivariate logistic regression were BMI and NOT-S total. Based on this analysis, NOT-S total was associated with TMDs. Reported sensory function was the specific domain within NOT-S interview that established the significant difference between the groups (P = 0.021). The TMD group also had a greater number of alterations in the face-at-rest domain of the NOT-S exam (P = 0.007). Concluding, it did not detect an association between TMDs and either dentition phase or BF. Instead, BF correlated with age and BMI. Oro-facial dysfunction was associated with TMD in the studied sample, but this association may be bidirectional, requiring further researches. PMID:24661101

  4. Evaluation of the effects of exercise and a mild hypocaloric diet on cardiovascular risk factors in obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Himeno, E; Nishino, K; Nanri, H; Okazaki, T; Komatsu, T; Ikeda, M

    2001-03-01

    A weight reduction program to improve cardiovascular risk factors was implemented in obese subjects. The program consisted of exercise training corresponding to the anaerobic threshold (AT) and a mild hypocaloric diet for 12 weeks. In this program, we evaluated the effects of a combination of exercise training and a diet on cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity, dyslipidemia, and poor exercise performance in obese subjects. In addition, we also evaluated the independent effects of exercise training and dietary modification. For this purpose, we adopted a relative training time and a diet score. A relative training time was calculated as the number of times that the subject performed exercises divided by all of the training sessions scheduled, and the diet score was calculated from information which each subject provided on a self-assessment questionnaire. Twenty three obese subjects (Age: 24-54 years old, 19 men and 4 women, body mass index (BMI) > 26 kg/m2) participated in this study. After the 12-week intervention, the mean reductions in body weight, body mass index and body fat were 4.7 kg, 1.7 kg/m2 and 2.9%, respectively (P < 0.0001). The % change in body weight was significantly associated with the diet score and with the relative training time. The mean reductions in total cholesterol, triglyceride and low density lipoprotein cholesterol were 21 mg/dl (P < 0.002), 34 mg/dl (P < 0.01) and 15.9 mg/dl (P < 0.01), respectively, and the % change in triglyceride was significantly associated with the diet score (P = 0.0056) and tended to correlate with the relative training time (P = 0.0596). Oxygen uptake at AT and at peak exercise were increased from 14.1 +/- 1.6 to 16.0 +/- 3.1 ml/min/kg (P < 0.005) and from 26.3 +/- 4.8 to 28.4 +/- 4.9 ml/min/kg (P < 0.002), respectively. A combination of aerobic exercise and a mild hypocaloric diet significantly contributed not only to weight loss but also to the improvement of dyslipidemia and exercise performance, but

  5. Objective versus Subjective Assessment of Methylphenidate Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manor, Iris; Meidad, Sheera; Zalsman, Gil; Zemishlany, Zvi; Tyano, Sam; Weizman, Abraham

    2008-01-01

    Subjective improvement-assessment in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), following a single dose of methylphenidate (MPH) was compared to performance on the Test-of-Variables-of-Attention (TOVA). Self-perception was assessed with the clinical-global-impression-of-change (CGI-C). Participants included 165 ADHD subjects (M:F ratio…

  6. Design and Evaluation of Composite Fuselage Panels Subjected to Combined Loading Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Rouse, Marshall

    1998-01-01

    Methodologies used in industry for designing transport aircraft composite fuselage structures are discussed. Several aspects of the design methodologies are based on assumptions from metallic fuselage technology which requires that full-scale structures be tested with the actual loading conditions to validate the designs. Composite panels which represent crown and side regions of a fuselage structure are designed using this approach and tested in biaxial tension. Descriptions of the state-of-the-art test facilities used for this structural evaluation are presented. These facilities include a pressure-box test machine and a D-box test fixture in a combined loads test machine which are part of a Combined Loads Test System (COLTS). Nonlinear analysis results for a reference shell and a stiffened composite panel tested in the pressure-box test machine with and without damage are presented. The analytical and test results are compared to assess the ability of the pressure-box test machine to simulate a shell stress state with and without damage. A combined loads test machine for testing aircraft primary structures is described. This test machine includes a D-box test fixture to accommodate curved stiffened panels and the design features of this test fixture are presented. Finite element analysis results for a curved panel to be tested in the D-box test fixture are also discussed.

  7. Microstructural Evaluation of KM4 and SR3 Samples Subjected to Various Heat Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David; Gabb, Timothy; Garg, Anita

    2004-01-01

    The gamma-gamma microstructures of two advanced powder metallurgy disk alloys, KM4 and SR3, were quantified after a series of heat treatments using transmission electron microscopy and image analysis. Relationships between the heat treatments and the resulting gamma distributions were evaluated. Statistical correlations between the gamma distributions and the reported tensile strengths, creep resistances, and dwell crack growth resistances were separately assessed for each alloy. To avoid the effects of grain size related mechanisms, the grain size of the samples used in the correlations for each alloy were limited to narrow ranges of about 1.5 in ASTM grain size number. In both alloys, yield and tensile strength increased with increasing fraction of medium sized gamma. The strength increased as the size of the medium gamma decreased and the size of the fine gamma increased. Time to 0.2 percent creep in SR3 increased with increasing medium gamma volume fraction, and decreasing fine gamma sizes. However, 0.2 percent creep time was not clearly correlated with the gamma microstructures of KM4 specimens, apparently due to effects of stabilization heat treatments which greatly suppress creep resistance. Dwell fatigue crack growth rate decreased with increasing medium gamma volume fraction, indicating more medium gamma is beneficial. The crack growth rate also decreased with decreasing gamma size, indicating finer gamma is better.

  8. Cardiovascular risk evaluation and prevalence of silent myocardial ischemia in subjects with asymptomatic carotid artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Niccoli-Asabella, Artor; Scicchitano, Pietro; Gesualdo, Michele; Notaristefano, Antonio; Chieppa, Domenico; Carbonara, Santa; Ricci, Gabriella; Sassara, Marco; Altini, Corinna; Quistelli, Giovanni; Lepera, Mario Erminio; Favale, Stefano; Rubini, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Silent ischemia is an asymptomatic form of myocardial ischemia, not associated with angina or anginal equivalent symptoms, which can be demonstrated by changes in ECG, left ventricular function, myocardial perfusion, and metabolism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of silent myocardial ischemia in a group of patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis. Methods: A total of 37 patients with asymptomatic carotid plaques, without chest pain or dyspnea, was investigated. These patients were studied for age, sex, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, smoking, and family history of cardiac disease, and underwent technetium-99 m sestamibi myocardial stress-rest scintigraphy and echo-color Doppler examination of carotid arteries. Results: A statistically significant relationship (P = 0.023) was shown between positive responders and negative responders to scintigraphy test when both were tested for degree of stenosis. This relationship is surprising in view of the small number of patients in our sample. Individuals who had a positive scintigraphy test had a mean stenosis degree of 35% ± 7% compared with a mean of 44% ± 13% for those with a negative test. Specificity of our detection was 81%, with positive and negative predictive values of 60% and 63%, respectively. Conclusion: The present study confirms that carotid atherosclerosis is associated with coronary atherosclerosis and highlights the importance of screening for ischemic heart disease in patients with asymptomatic carotid plaques, considering eventually plaque morphology (symmetry, composition, eccentricity or concentricity of the plaque, etc) for patient stratification. PMID:21468172

  9. Performance evaluation of a novel rotational damper for structural reinforcement steel frames subjected to lateral excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanati, M.; Khadem, S. E.; Mirzabagheri, S.; Sanati, H.; Khosravieh, M. Y.

    2014-03-01

    In this study, a novel rotational damper called a Rotational Friction Viscoelastic Damper (RFVD) is introduced. Some viscoelastic pads are added to the Rotational Friction Damper (RFD) in addition to the friction discs used in this conventional device. Consequently, the amount of energy dissipated by the damper increases in low excitation frequencies. In fact, the input energy to the structure is simultaneously dissipated in the form of friction and heat by frictional discs and viscoelastic pads. In order to compare the performance of this novel damper with the earlier types, a set of experiments were carried out. According to the test results, the RFVD showed a better performance in dissipating input energy to the structure when compared to the RFD. The seismic behavior of steel frames equipped with these dampers was also numerically evaluated based on a nonlinear time history analysis. The numerical results verified the performance of the dampers in increasing the energy dissipation and decreasing the energy input to the structural elements. In order to achieve the maximum dissipated energy, the dampers need to be installed in certain places called critical points in the structure. An appropriate approach is presented to properly find these points. Finally, the performance of the RFVDs installed at these critical points was investigated in comparison to some other configurations and the validity of the suggested method in increasing the energy dissipation was confirmed.

  10. Inorganic particle analysis of dental impression elastomers.

    PubMed

    Carlo, Hugo Lemes; Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; Soares, Carlos José; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine quantitatively and qualitatively the inorganic particle fraction of commercially available dental elastomers. The inorganic volumetric fraction of two addition silicones (Reprosil Putty/Fluid and Flexitime Easy Putty/Fluid), three condensation silicones (Clonage Putty/Fluid, Optosil Confort/Xantopren VL and Silon APS Putty/Fluid), one polyether (Impregum Soft Light Body) and one polysulfide (Permlastic Light Body) was accessed by weighing a previously determined mass of each material in water before and after burning samples at 600 ºC, during 3 h. Unsettled material samples were soaked in acetone and chloroform for removal of the organic portion. The remaining filler particles were sputter-coated with gold evaluation of their morphology and size, under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Flexitime Easy Putty was the material with the highest results for volumetric particle fraction, while Impregum Soft had the lowest values. Silon 2 APS Fluid presented the lowest mean filler size values, while Clonage Putty had the highest values. SEM micrographs of the inorganic particles showed several morphologies - lathe-cut, spherical, spherical-like, sticks, and sticks mixed to lathe-cut powder. The results of this study revealed differences in particle characteristics among the elastometic materials that could lead to different results when testing mechanical properties. PMID:21271042

  11. Comparing the Accuracy of Three Different Impression Materials in Making Duplicate Dies

    PubMed Central

    Bajoghli, Farshad; Sabouhi, Mahmoud; Nosouhian, Saeid; Davoudi, Amin; Behnamnia, Zeynab

    2015-01-01

    Background: Marginal adaptation is very important in cast restorations. Maladaptation leads to plaque retention, reduction of mechanical and esthetic properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the precision of three different impression materials (including: Additional silicone [AS] and condensational silicone [CS] and polyether [PE]) for duplicating master dies. Materials and Methods: Three master dies from an acrylic tooth model-with supragingival and shoulder finishing line was made by using PE: Impergum, CS: Speedex, and AS: Panasil separately. The Ni-Cr copings were prepared from master dies separately. They were placed on the acrylic model and the mean marginal difference was recorded by using a stereomicroscope. Then 30 duplicate test dies were made by using the same impression materials and the marginal gaps were recorded. The comparison was done by one-way ANOVA and SPSS software (Version 13) at a significant level of 0.05. Results: The mean marginal difference of four walls from Impergum (38.56 um) was the lowest than Speedex (38.92 um) and Panasil (38.24 um). The Impergum had the highest capability in making duplicate dies (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The Impergum impression material manifested the highest capability in making a better marginal adaptation of duplicate dies but further studies are needed to make a precise decision. PMID:26229364

  12. In vivo Study of the Accuracy of Dual-arch Impressions

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Luciana Martinelli Santayana; Borges, Gilberto Antonio; Junior, Luiz Henrique Burnett; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated in vivo the accuracy of metal (Smart®) and plastic (Triple Tray®) dual-arch trays used with vinyl polysiloxane (Flexitime®), in the putty/wash viscosity, as well as polyether (Impregum Soft®) in the regular viscosity. Materials and Methods: In one patient, an implant-level transfer was screwed on an implant in the mandibular right first molar, serving as a pattern. Ten impressions were made with each tray and impression material. The impressions were poured with Type IV gypsum. The width and height of the pattern and casts were measured in a profile projector (Nikon). The results were submitted to Student’s t-test for one sample (α = 0.05). Results: For the width distance, the plastic dual-arch trays with vinyl polysiloxane (4.513 mm) and with polyether (4.531 mm) were statistically wider than the pattern (4.489 mm). The metal dual-arch tray with vinyl polysiloxane (4.504 mm) and with polyether (4.500 mm) did not differ statistically from the pattern. For the height distance, only the metal dual-arch tray with polyether (2.253 mm) differed statistically from the pattern (2.310 mm). Conclusion: The metal dual-arch tray with vinyl polysiloxane, in the putty/wash viscosities, reproduced casts with less distortion in comparison with the same technique with the plastic dual-arch tray. The plastic or metal dual-arch trays with polyether reproduced cast with greater distortion. How to cite the article: Santayana de Lima LM, Borges GA, Burnett LH Jr, Spohr AM. In vivo study of the accuracy of dual-arch impressions. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):50-5. PMID:25083032

  13. Accuracy assessment of high frequency 3D ultrasound for digital impression-taking of prepared teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heger, Stefan; Vollborn, Thorsten; Tinschert, Joachim; Wolfart, Stefan; Radermacher, Klaus

    2013-03-01

    Silicone based impression-taking of prepared teeth followed by plaster casting is well-established but potentially less reliable, error-prone and inefficient, particularly in combination with emerging techniques like computer aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) of dental prosthesis. Intra-oral optical scanners for digital impression-taking have been introduced but until now some drawbacks still exist. Because optical waves can hardly penetrate liquids or soft-tissues, sub-gingival preparations still need to be uncovered invasively prior to scanning. High frequency ultrasound (HFUS) based micro-scanning has been recently investigated as an alternative to optical intra-oral scanning. Ultrasound is less sensitive against oral fluids and in principal able to penetrate gingiva without invasively exposing of sub-gingival preparations. Nevertheless, spatial resolution as well as digitization accuracy of an ultrasound based micro-scanning system remains a critical parameter because the ultrasound wavelength in water-like media such as gingiva is typically smaller than that of optical waves. In this contribution, the in-vitro accuracy of ultrasound based micro-scanning for tooth geometry reconstruction is being investigated and compared to its extra-oral optical counterpart. In order to increase the spatial resolution of the system, 2nd harmonic frequencies from a mechanically driven focused single element transducer were separated and corresponding 3D surface models were calculated for both fundamentals and 2nd harmonics. Measurements on phantoms, model teeth and human teeth were carried out for evaluation of spatial resolution and surface detection accuracy. Comparison of optical and ultrasound digital impression taking indicate that, in terms of accuracy, ultrasound based tooth digitization can be an alternative for optical impression-taking.

  14. The Subjective Evaluation Experiments on an Automatic Video Editing System Using Vision-based Head Tracking for Multiparty Conversations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemae, Yoshinao; Otsuka, Kazuhiro; Yamato, Junji; Ozawa, Shinji

    This paper presents experiments conducted to evaluate an automatic video editing system, founded on vision-based head tracking, that clearly conveys face-to-face multiparty conversations, such as meetings, to viewers. Systems that archive meetings and teleconferences to effectively facilitate human communication are attracting considerable interest. Conventional systems use a fixed-viewpoint camera and simple camera selection based on participants' utterances. Unfortunately, they fail to adequately convey who is talking to whom and nonverbal information about participants etc., to viewers. To solve this problem, we previously proposed an automatic video editing system using vision-based head tracking. This paper describes subjective evaluation experiments in which videos of entire conversations with 3 participants were presented to viewers; the results confirm the effectiveness of our system.

  15. Self-compassion training modulates alpha-amylase, heart rate variability, and subjective responses to social evaluative threat in women

    PubMed Central

    Arch, Joanna J.; Brown, Kirk Warren; Dean, Derek J.; Landy, Lauren N.; Brown, Kimberley; Laudenslager, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of research has revealed that social evaluative stressors trigger biological and psychological responses that in chronic forms have been linked to aging and disease. Recent research suggests that self-compassion may protect the self from typical defensive responses to evaluation. We investigated whether brief training in self-compassion moderated biopsychological responses to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) in women. Compared to attention (placebo) and no-training control conditions, brief self-compassion training diminished sympathetic (salivary alpha-amylase), cardiac parasympathetic, and subjective anxiety responses, though not HPA-axis (salivary cortisol) responses to the TSST. Self-compassion training also led to greater self-compassion under threat relative to the control groups. In that social stress pervades modern life, self-compassion represents a promising approach to diminishing its potentially negative psychological and biological effects. PMID:24636501

  16. Accuracy of different impression materials in parallel and nonparallel implants

    PubMed Central

    Vojdani, Mahroo; Torabi, Kianoosh; Ansarifard, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Background: A precise impression is mandatory to obtain passive fit in implant-supported prostheses. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of three impression materials in both parallel and nonparallel implant positions. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, two partial dentate maxillary acrylic models with four implant analogues in canines and lateral incisors areas were used. One model was simulating the parallel condition and the other nonparallel one, in which implants were tilted 30° bucally and 20° in either mesial or distal directions. Thirty stone casts were made from each model using polyether (Impregum), additional silicone (Monopren) and vinyl siloxanether (Identium), with open tray technique. The distortion values in three-dimensions (X, Y and Z-axis) were measured by coordinate measuring machine. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests were used for data analysis (α = 0.05). Results: Under parallel condition, all the materials showed comparable, accurate casts (P = 0.74). In the presence of angulated implants, while Monopren showed more accurate results compared to Impregum (P = 0.01), Identium yielded almost similar results to those produced by Impregum (P = 0.27) and Monopren (P = 0.26). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, in parallel conditions, the type of impression material cannot affect the accuracy of the implant impressions; however, in nonparallel conditions, polyvinyl siloxane is shown to be a better choice, followed by vinyl siloxanether and polyether respectively. PMID:26288620

  17. Cross-Cultural Impression Management: A Cultural Knowledge Audit Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spong, Abigail; Kamau, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Many people moving into a new culture for work or study do so without prior cross-cultural training, yet successful cultural adaptation has important ramifications. The purpose of this paper is to focus on cross-cultural impression management as an element of cultural adaptation. Does cultural adaptation begin by paying strong attention…

  18. Method for creating stomatal impressions directly onto archivable microscope slides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stomatal density has been shown to be a primary determinant of water use efficiency, limitation to CO2 assimilation rate and yield. Widely used methods of stomatal impressioning sample small regions of the leaf, are labor intensive, or do not yield stable archivable samples for potentially revisitin...

  19. Mechanical Properties of Elastomeric Impression Materials: An In Vitro Comparison

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Francesco; Caputi, Sergio; D'Amario, Maurizio; D'Arcangelo, Camillo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Although new elastomeric impression materials have been introduced into the market, there are still insufficient data about their mechanical features. The tensile properties of 17 hydrophilic impression materials with different consistencies were compared. Materials and Methods. 12 vinylpolysiloxane, 2 polyether, and 3 hybrid vinylpolyether silicone-based impression materials were tested. For each material, 10 dumbbell-shaped specimens were fabricated (n = 10), according to the ISO 37:2005 specifications, and loaded in tension until failure. Mean values for tensile strength, yield strength, strain at break, and strain at yield point were calculated. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). Results. Vinylpolysiloxanes consistently showed higher tensile strength values than polyethers. Heavy-body materials showed higher tensile strength than the light bodies from the same manufacturer. Among the light bodies, the highest yield strength was achieved by the hybrid vinylpolyether silicone (2.70 MPa). Polyethers showed the lowest tensile (1.44 MPa) and yield (0.94 MPa) strengths, regardless of the viscosity. Conclusion. The choice of an impression material should be based on the specific physical behavior of the elastomer. The light-body vinylpolyether silicone showed high tensile strength, yield strength, and adequate strain at yield/brake; those features might help to reduce tearing phenomena in the thin interproximal and crevicular areas. PMID:26693227

  20. Making an Impression: YA Authors and Their Influential Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenbach, Brooke; Kaywell, Joan F.

    2013-01-01

    This article recounts significant moments from online interviews these authors conducted with Young Adult (YA) authors concerning the teachers who left a lasting impression on them and assisted them in finding their voice and unique writing abilities. S. E. Hinton, Walter Dean Myers, Erin Gruwell, Chris Crutcher, and other popular YA authors…

  1. Modeling first impressions from highly variable facial images

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, Richard J. W.; Sutherland, Clare A. M.; Young, Andrew W.; Hartley, Tom

    2014-01-01

    First impressions of social traits, such as trustworthiness or dominance, are reliably perceived in faces, and despite their questionable validity they can have considerable real-world consequences. We sought to uncover the information driving such judgments, using an attribute-based approach. Attributes (physical facial features) were objectively measured from feature positions and colors in a database of highly variable “ambient” face photographs, and then used as input for a neural network to model factor dimensions (approachability, youthful-attractiveness, and dominance) thought to underlie social attributions. A linear model based on this approach was able to account for 58% of the variance in raters’ impressions of previously unseen faces, and factor-attribute correlations could be used to rank attributes by their importance to each factor. Reversing this process, neural networks were then used to predict facial attributes and corresponding image properties from specific combinations of factor scores. In this way, the factors driving social trait impressions could be visualized as a series of computer-generated cartoon face-like images, depicting how attributes change along each dimension. This study shows that despite enormous variation in ambient images of faces, a substantial proportion of the variance in first impressions can be accounted for through linear changes in objectively defined features. PMID:25071197

  2. First Impressions: Gait Cues Drive Reliable Trait Judgements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoresen, John C.; Vuong, Quoc C.; Atkinson, Anthony P.

    2012-01-01

    Personality trait attribution can underpin important social decisions and yet requires little effort; even a brief exposure to a photograph can generate lasting impressions. Body movement is a channel readily available to observers and allows judgements to be made when facial and body appearances are less visible; e.g., from great distances.…

  3. Alkaptonuria Presenting with Impressive Osteoarticular Changes and Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Roca, Bernardino; Roca, Manuel; Monferrer, Raquel

    2016-03-01

    Alkaptonuria, or ochronosis, a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disorder, causes an excess of homogentisic acid that results in dark pigmentation, calcification, and inflammation of cartilaginous and other tissues. Cardiovascular complications are also typical of the disease. We report the case of a 78-year-old male who presented with impressive osteoarticular changes and aortic stenosis associated with alkaptonuria. PMID:27169295

  4. Shared impression formation in the cognitively interdependent dyad.

    PubMed

    Ruscher, Janet B; Santuzzi, Alecia M; Hammer, Elizabeth Yost

    2003-09-01

    We examined the role of cognitive interdependence in determining how close friends form shared impressions of another person. Cognitive interdependence should provide a processing advantage, such that close friends are more efficient in forming shared impressions and are more successful at doing so. Under normal circumstances, the conversations of close friends should be marked by little necessity to make explicit requests for information, mutual recognition of who currently is controlling the flow of conversation, and willingness to express differences in opinion. Given these advantages, close friends also should be able to form complex shared impressions that go beyond mere one-sided stereotypic judgments and that instead resolve apparent discrepancies in the target's personality. However, if the cognitive interdependence system is disrupted by mutual distraction, these advantages should attenuate or even reverse. Dyads of varying degrees of closeness were mutually distracted or not while discussing their impressions of another female college student. Results supported predictions and are discussed with reference to how cognitive interdependence may help close dyads function within their mutual social networks. PMID:14567845

  5. Temporary Employment and Perceived Employability: Mediation by Impression Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Cuyper, Nele; De Witte, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Perceived employability (PE) has been advanced as the upcoming resource for career development, particularly for temporary workers. The question is how temporary workers become employable. Our hypothesis is that temporary workers more than permanent workers use impression management to become employable, both on the internal and the external labor…

  6. Modeling first impressions from highly variable facial images.

    PubMed

    Vernon, Richard J W; Sutherland, Clare A M; Young, Andrew W; Hartley, Tom

    2014-08-12

    First impressions of social traits, such as trustworthiness or dominance, are reliably perceived in faces, and despite their questionable validity they can have considerable real-world consequences. We sought to uncover the information driving such judgments, using an attribute-based approach. Attributes (physical facial features) were objectively measured from feature positions and colors in a database of highly variable "ambient" face photographs, and then used as input for a neural network to model factor dimensions (approachability, youthful-attractiveness, and dominance) thought to underlie social attributions. A linear model based on this approach was able to account for 58% of the variance in raters' impressions of previously unseen faces, and factor-attribute correlations could be used to rank attributes by their importance to each factor. Reversing this process, neural networks were then used to predict facial attributes and corresponding image properties from specific combinations of factor scores. In this way, the factors driving social trait impressions could be visualized as a series of computer-generated cartoon face-like images, depicting how attributes change along each dimension. This study shows that despite enormous variation in ambient images of faces, a substantial proportion of the variance in first impressions can be accounted for through linear changes in objectively defined features. PMID:25071197

  7. Using Teacher Impression Journals to Improve Intervention Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, SeonYeong; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.; Meyer, Lori E.; Favazza, Paddy C.; Mouzourou, Chryso; van Luling, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of "Teacher Impression Journals" during a larger study that examined the efficacy of an intervention program designed to promote kindergarteners' positive attitudes toward peers with disabilities (i.e., the "Special Friends" program). The journals were designed to gather information about…

  8. DETAIL OF THE IMPRESSION IN THE CONCRETE SLAB OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF THE IMPRESSION IN THE CONCRETE SLAB OF THE SOUTH END OF THE ABOVE-GROUND PORTION. NOTE STEP DOWN TO THE STEEL PLATE IN BACKGROUND. VIEW FACING NORTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  9. Impressions of a Middle Grades STEM Integration Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stohlmann, Micah; Moore, Tamara J.; McClelland, J.; Roehrig, Gillian H.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of one Minnesota middle school that implemented a year-long integrated STEM program with the cooperation of graduate student fellows from a local university. The authors, two of whom were among the graduate students involved in the project, describe their impressions of the program, share some lessons they…

  10. Subjective Evaluation of a Semi-Automatic Optical See-Through Head-Mounted Display Calibration Technique.

    PubMed

    Moser, Kenneth; Itoh, Yuta; Oshima, Kohei; Swan, J Edward; Klinker, Gudrun; Sandor, Christian

    2015-04-01

    With the growing availability of optical see-through (OST) head-mounted displays (HMDs) there is a present need for robust, uncomplicated, and automatic calibration methods suited for non-expert users. This work presents the results of a user study which both objectively and subjectively examines registration accuracy produced by three OST HMD calibration methods: (1) SPAAM, (2) Degraded SPAAM, and (3) Recycled INDICA, a recently developed semi-automatic calibration method. Accuracy metrics used for evaluation include subject provided quality values and error between perceived and absolute registration coordinates. Our results show all three calibration methods produce very accurate registration in the horizontal direction but caused subjects to perceive the distance of virtual objects to be closer than intended. Surprisingly, the semi-automatic calibration method produced more accurate registration vertically and in perceived object distance overall. User assessed quality values were also the highest for Recycled INDICA, particularly when objects were shown at distance. The results of this study confirm that Recycled INDICA is capable of producing equal or superior on-screen registration compared to common OST HMD calibration methods. We also identify a potential hazard in using reprojection error as a quantitative analysis technique to predict registration accuracy. We conclude with discussing the further need for examining INDICA calibration in binocular HMD systems, and the present possibility for creation of a closed-loop continuous calibration method for OST Augmented Reality. PMID:26357099

  11. The effects of air temperature on office workers' well-being, workload and productivity-evaluated with subjective ratings.

    PubMed

    Lan, Li; Lian, Zhiwei; Pan, Li

    2010-12-01

    Productivity bears a close relationship to the indoor environmental quality (IEQ), but how to evaluate office worker's productivity remains to be a challenge for ergonomists. In this study, the effect of indoor air temperature (17 °C, 21 °C, and 28 °C) on productivity was investigated with 21 volunteered participants in the laboratory experiment. Participants performed computerized neurobehavioral tests during exposure in the lab; their physiological parameters including heart rate variation (HRV) and electroencephalograph (EEG) were also measured. Several subjective rating scales were used to tap participant's emotion, well-being, motivation and the workload imposed by tasks. It was found that the warm discomfort negatively affected participants' well-being and increased the ratio of low frequency (LF) to high frequency (HF) of HRV. In the moderately uncomfortable environment, the workload imposed by tasks increased and participants had to exert more effort to maintain their performance and they also had lower motivation to do work. The results indicate that thermal discomfort caused by high or low air temperature had negative influence on office workers' productivity and the subjective rating scales were useful supplements of neurobehavioral performance measures when evaluating the effects of IEQ on productivity. PMID:20478555

  12. Analogy between training for dancers and problems of adjustment to microgravity: an evaluation of the subjective vertical in dancers.

    PubMed

    Dubois, K

    1991-01-01

    "Moderne dance" (as opposed to a more academic or classical dance form) uses techniques from kinesiology, anatomy and improvization which are adapted to a cultural, technological and political environment. The function of a choreographic system is to take and give a measure of the world. This includes, with the present tendency of the evolution of culture, a new "naturalism" which seeks the secrets of the body. Dance movements express in terms of space the dimension fo the infinite. It gives somehow the measure of a world within which everything is relative. Except for the speed of light, time and space are bound together by the same principle. The qualities of body awareness and specific motricity in dancers imply--besides a strict discipline--balance, coordination, muscular performance and perfect orientation, problems that astronauts also encounter in microgravity. Could chosen exercises used in modern dance technique be applied to the training of astronauts? Dancer-choreographer Kitsou Dubois has been working in this direction since 1988. She was granted a "Villa Medicis Hors Les Murs" by the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, to carry on with her research at NASA, Houston, Tex. in April 1989. It allowed her to investigate the reality of this analogy. She intends to evaluate the dancers' subjective vertical refering to Mittelstaedt's observations on the proportional relationship between "space sickness" and some astronauts poor evaluation of the subjective vertical. This study should create a relationship between a choreographer's empirical intuition and a scientific reality. PMID:11540741

  13. Analogy between training for dancers and problems of adjustment to microgravity: An evaluation of the subjective vertical in dancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Kitsou

    "Moderne dance" (as opposed to a more academic or classical dance form) uses techniques from kinesiology, anatomy and improvization which are adapted to a cultural, technological and political environment. The function of a choreographic system is to take and give a measure of the world. This includes, with the present tendency of the evolution of culture, a new "naturalism" which seeks the secrets of the body. Dance movements express in terms of space the dimension fo the infinite. It gives somehow the measure of a world within which everything is relative. Except for the speed of light, time and space are bound together by the same principle. The qualities of body awareness and specific motricity in dancers imply—besides a strict discipline—balance, coordination, muscular performance and perfect orientation, problems that astronauts also encounter in microgravity. Could chosen exercises used in modern dance technique be applied to the training of astronauts? Dancer-choreographer Kitsou Dubois has been working in this direction since 1988. She was granted a "Villa Medicis Hors Les Murs" by the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, to carry on with her research at NASA, Houston, Tex. in April 1989. It allowed her to investigate the reality of this analogy. She intends to evaluate the dancers' subjective vertical refering to Mittelstaedt's observations on the proportional relationship between "space sickness" and some astronauts poor evaluation of the subjective vertical. This study should create a relationship between a choreographer's empirical intuition and a scientific reality.

  14. Effect of rider experience and evaluator expertise on subjective grading of lameness in sound and unsound sports horses under saddle.

    PubMed

    Marqués, Fernando J; Waldner, Cheryl; Reed, Stephen; Autet, Fernando; Corbeil, Louise; Campbell, John

    2014-04-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate whether rider experience influences the assessment and grading of lameness in horses based on under-saddle gait analysis. Thirteen adult sports horses in active training were included in the study. After a baseline lameness and neurologic examination by the principal investigators, horses were videotaped while being ridden by an experienced and a less experienced rider. A 3-minute video was made for each horse and rider and 26 videos were randomly ordered and compiled on a DVD. Veterinarians with different levels of experience in evaluating lameness and veterinary students viewed the DVD and assigned a lameness score to each horse/rider combination. In a model accounting for the expertise of the evaluator, there was no difference in overall lameness scores between experienced and less experienced riders. This result was consistent for both sound and unsound horses. The overall lameness scores reported by specialists and students, however, differed significantly. The lameness score reported by the study participants while the horse was ridden was significantly associated with the subjective baseline lameness assessment reported by the principal investigators for the same limb when the horse was not under saddle. Additional work is necessary to determine whether riders with even lower skill levels would further alter the balance and motion pattern of the horse and have more influence on subjective grading of lameness. PMID:24688169

  15. Impression technique for the assessment of oedema: comparison with a new tactile sensor that measures physical properties of tissue.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, O A; Omata, S

    1995-01-01

    To measure tissue oedema, the impression technique and a new tactile sensor technique are compared and evaluated in a silicone rubber model and in an in vivo rat testis model. The principles of the two techniques differ in that the impression technique evaluates interstitial fluid flow FT and peak force F(O) when tissue is compressed, whereas the tactile sensor evaluates the hardness/softness or change in resonance frequency delta f when a vibrating rod is attached to tissue. Both techniques can detect changes in silicone hardness/softness or in hormone-induced changes of testis interstitial fluid. Although both F(O) and FT are significantly correlated to delta f in the experiments, it is concluded that F(O) is the most promising impression parameter to give valuable information about the hardness of living tissue as compared with delta f. The comparison indicates that the impression technique is the most easy to interpret, non-invasive tool to assess tissue oedema so far developed. PMID:7616777

  16. Subjective and objective parameters in the evaluation of radiofrequency ablation of the inferior turbinate do not correlate: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tomazic, Peter Valentin; Gerstenberger, Claus; Rant, Bettina; Nemetz, Ulrike; Brezjak-Kahlert, Christiana; Wolf, Axel; Freudenschuss, Kurt; Wolf, Gerald

    2016-08-01

    Inferior turbinate hypertrophy is a common cause of nasal obstruction. We conducted a prospective study to correlate subjective and objective parameters in assessing the effectiveness of radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Our initial study population was made up of 10 patients who presented with nasal obstruction; 1 patient was lost to follow-up, leaving us with 7 women and 2 men, aged 26 to 65 years (mean: 37.9 ± 12.8), and 16 turbinates (7 bilateral, 1 right, and 1 left). Visual analogue scale (VAS) scores, Nasal Obstruction and Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) questionnaire scores, rhinomanometry results, and CT- and MRI-based volumetry were obtained before RFA and 6 months afterward. For the subjective parameters, the mean pre- and postoperative VAS scores for the 16 turbinates were 6.6 ± 1.6 and 2.8 ± 2.0 (p < 0.001), respectively, and the mean pre- and postoperative NOSE scores in the 9 patients were 15.3 ± 3.1 and 5.8 ± 5.4 (p = 0.003). For the objective parameters, the mean pre- and postoperative rhinomanometry values at 150 Pa were 241.0 ± 141.3 and 265.4 ± 157.3 ml/sec (p = 0.403), and the mean pre- and postoperative volumetry values were 5.3 ± 2.5 and 5.0 ± 2.1 cm(3) (p = 0.551). Note that only the differences in the subjective parameters reached statistical significance. RFA of the inferior turbinates as a treatment for nasal obstruction is safe and easy. However, our study found a discrepancy between the subjective and objective outcomes parameters, as the former showed highly significant improvement and the latter showed only a slight improvement that did not reach statistical significance. PMID:27551845

  17. The Apathy Evaluation Scale: A Comparison of Subject, Informant, and Clinician Report in Cognitively Normal Elderly and Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Guercio, Brendan; Donovan, Nancy J.; Munro, Catherine E.; Aghjayan, Sarah L.; Wigman, Sarah E.; Locascio, Joseph J.; Amariglio, Rebecca E.; Rentz, Dorene M.; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Marshall, Gad A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Apathy is a common neuropsychiatric symptom in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Detecting apathy accurately may facilitate earlier diagnosis of AD. The Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES) is a promising tool for measurement of apathy in prodromal and possibly preclinical AD. Objective To compare the three AES sub-scales—subject-reported (AES-S), informant-reported (AES-I), and clinician-reported (AES-C)—over time in individuals at risk for AD due to MCI and advanced age (cognitively normal [CN] elderly). Methods Mixed effects longitudinal models were used to assess predictors of score for each AES sub-scale. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess which AES sub-scales predict progression from MCI to AD dementia. Results Fifty seven MCI and 18 CN subjects (ages 53–86) were followed for 1.4±1.2 years and 0.7±0.7 years, respectively. Across the three mixed effects longitudinal models, the common findings were associations between greater apathy and greater years in study, a baseline diagnosis of MCI (compared to CN), and male sex. CN elderly self-reported greater apathy compared to that reported by informants and clinicians, while individuals with MCI under-reported their apathy compared to informants and clinicians. Of the three sub-scales, the clinician-reported AES (AES-C) best predicted transition from MCI to AD dementia. Conclusion In a sample of CN elderly and elderly with MCI, apathy increased over time, particularly in men and those with MCI. Self-reported AES scores may be more sensitive than informant and clinician-report when subjects are CN, but less reliable if subjects have MCI. Moreover, the clinician-reported AES sub-scale predicted progression from MCI to AD dementia. PMID:26401564

  18. Statistical analysis on the concordance of the radiological evaluation of fractures of the distal radius subjected to traction☆

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Daniel Gonçalves; da Cruz Cerqueira, Sergio Auto; de Lima, Alexandre Fernandes; de Mathias, Marcelo Bezerra; Aramburu, José Paulo Gabbi; Rodarte, Rodrigo Ribeiro Pinho

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the current classifications for fractures of the distal extremity of the radius, since the classifications made using traditional radiographs in anteroposterior and lateral views have been questioned regarding their reproducibility. In the literature, it has been suggested that other options are needed, such as use of preoperative radiographs on fractures of the distal radius subjected to traction, with stratification by the evaluators. The aim was to demonstrate which classification systems present better statistical reliability. Results In the Universal classification, the results from the third-year resident group (R3) and from the group of more experienced evaluators (Staff) presented excellent correlation, with a statistically significant p-value (p < 0.05). Neither of the groups presented a statistically significant result through the Frykman classification. In the AO classification, there were high correlations in the R3 and Staff groups (respectively 0.950 and 0.800), with p-values lower than 0.05 (respectively <0.001 and 0.003). Conclusion It can be concluded that radiographs performed under traction showed good concordance in the Staff group and in the R3 group, and that this is a good tactic for radiographic evaluations of fractures of the distal extremity of the radius. PMID:26962498

  19. Influence of Some Hypnotist and Subject Variables on Hypnotic Susceptibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Robert P.; Land, Jay M.

    1971-01-01

    As predicted, subjects run by the objectively warmer, more competent appearing hypnosis obtained significantly higher susceptibility scores. Structured warmth produced significant differences only in subjects run by the objectively less warm hypnotists. Both structured warmth and experience affected subjects' subjective impressions of whether they…

  20. Effect of Storage Time of Extended-Pour and Conventional Alginate Impressions on Dimensional Accuracy of Casts

    PubMed Central

    Rohanian, Ahmad; Ommati Shabestari, Ghasem; Zeighami, Somayeh; Samadi, Mohammad Javad; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Some manufacturers claim to have produced new irreversible hydro-colloids that are able to maintain their dimensional stability during storage. The present study evaluated the effect of storage time on dimensional stability of three alginates: Hydrogum 5, Tropicalgin and Alginoplast. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in-vitro trial, a total of 90 alginate impressions were made from a Dentoform model using Hydrogum 5, Tropicalgin and Alginoplast alginates. The impressions were stored in a sealed plastic bag without a damp paper towel for 0, 24, 48, 72 and 120 hours and then poured with type III dental stone. Cross-arch (facial of 6 to facial of 6 on the opposite side) and antero-posterior (distal of right first molar to the ipsilateral central incisor) measurements were made with a digital caliper on the casts. Data were analyzed by two-way and one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc test (P<0.05). Results: Alginate type and the pouring time significantly affected the dimensional stability of alginate impressions (both Ps<0.001). Pouring of Hydrogum 5 impressions can be delayed for up to 120 hours without significant dimensional changes. Alginoplast impressions may be poured after 72 hours, but Tropicalgin should be poured immediately and the storage time should not be more than 24 hours. Conclusion: Immediate pouring of alginate impressions provides the highest accuracy in reproducing the teeth and adjacent tissues; however, this study demonstrated that pouring may be delayed for up to five days using extended-pour (Hydrogum 5) alginates. PMID:25628695

  1. Subjective results of a simulator evaluation using synthetic terrain imagery presented on a helmet-mounted display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rate, Christopher R.; Probert, Andrew; Wright, David; Corwin, William H.; Royer, Rick

    1994-06-01

    Combat mission scenarios require pilots to maneuver their aircraft over and around various terrain features at high speeds and low altitudes day, night, or in adverse meteorological conditions. While current systems (e.g., Night Vision Goggles and FLIR) provide some support for the pilot, they are not adequate in many weather conditions. However, the effects of adverse weather can be overcome using the U. S. Defense Mapping Agency's digital terrain elevation database to create a synthetic terrain image (STI). The concept of synthetically derived terrain imagery, projected as background on a Helmet-Mounted Display, was investigated in regards to its utility for enhancing pilot terrain awareness. An initial study using four Lockheed pilots and six USAF pilots was conducted to determine subjective preference of STI formats. A follow-on study, using two preferred formats, evaluated STI in a full-mission simulation environment. Six F-16 pilots completed a half day of training and a one day evaluation. Data was collected on missions involving low level navigation, followed by a laser guided bomb loft or offset roll- in dive bomb attack. Thirteen missions per pilot were completed including bomb runs using LANTIRN without STI. All the runs were at night with either 'poor' or 'good' FLIR conditions over rough or moderately rolling terrain. The evaluation indicated that pilots found STI to be useful and offered real-time support for low level navigation. Some problems still exist (e.g., field of view of HMD), which will be investigated in future studies.

  2. An evaluation of the influence of a magnetic field on a human subject with the use of bio-impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papezova, S.; Papez, V.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of a magnetic field on a living human organism was monitored using a bio-impedance evaluation of vasodilatation effects. A quantitative evaluation of the influence of a magnetic field on a human being was implemented by means of a quantitative evaluation of changes in the bio-impedance of the tissue. The pulse of the magnetic field was controlled by a pseudo-random impulse signal using a power switch that controlled the current of the applicator coil. The peak magnetic field flux density was approximately 60 mT. The bio-impedance was measured by a four-electrode method by means of a radiofrequency narrow band vector bioimpedance meter. Experiments were performed on the magnetic exposure of the forearm of an exposed human subject. During exposure to a magnetic field, the bio-impedance change signal level increases above the normal level, and reaches the maximum level after about 10 minutes. The maximum value is approximately 50 % higher than the normal level.

  3. Parents' subjective evaluation of a self-help education-exercise program for asthmatic children and their parents.

    PubMed

    Selner, J C; Staudenmayer, H

    1979-10-01

    A self-help education-exercise program for asthmatic children and their parents was evaluated in Denver, Colorado. The objective of the program was to instill better self-care practices in the child which are expected to reduce utilization and cost of medical services and reduce the amount of interference in the child's normal activities. The program was designed to educate the family about the nature of asthma and its treatment, the importance of self-responsibility for the child, and the psychosocial aspects which may affect both the child and the parents in a family with an asthmatic child. The program also included specific lessons pertaining to self-care practices including general health exercises on land and in water, relaxation training, and diaphragmatic breathing. The results of subjective evaluations of the parents indicated that the program was successful in achieving its goals to: Reduce the number of severe attacks, reduce medication usage, improve compliance, reduce days of school missed, increase exercise activity, and control wheezing by the steps taught in the course. While the results are suggestive, a further, controlled evaluation of the program is recommended. PMID:262455

  4. The Subjective Effects of Alcohol Scale: Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Novel Assessment Tool for Measuring Subjective Response to Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Morean, Meghan E.; Corbin, William R.; Treat, Teresa A.

    2013-01-01

    Three decades of research demonstrate that individual differences in subjective response (SR) to acute alcohol effects predict heavy drinking and alcohol-related problems. However, the SR patterns conferring the greatest risk remain under debate. Morean and Corbin (2010) highlighted that extant SR measures commonly have limitations within the following areas: assessment of a comprehensive range of effects, assessment of effects over the complete course of a drinking episode, and/or psychometric validation. Furthermore, the consistent pairing of certain SR measures and theoretical models has made integration of findings difficult. To address these issues, we developed the Subjective Effects of Alcohol Scale (SEAS), a novel, psychometrically sound SR measure for use in alcohol administration studies. Pilot data ensured that the SEAS comprised a comprehensive range of effects that varied in terms of valence and arousal and were perceived as plausible effects of drinking. For validation purposes, the SEAS was included in a two-site placebo-controlled alcohol administration study (N=215). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses identified a 14-item, 4-factor model categorizing effects into affective quadrants (high/low arousal positive; high/low arousal negative). SEAS scores evidenced the following: (1) scalar measurement invariance by limb of the blood alcohol curve (BAC) and beverage condition (2) good internal consistency, (3) convergence/divergence with extant SR measures, alcohol expectancies, and alcohol use, and (4) concurrent/incremental utility in accounting for alcohol-related outcomes, highlighting the novel high arousal negative and low arousal positive subscales. PMID:23647036

  5. Standardizing evaluation of pQCT image quality in the presence of subject movement: qualitative versus quantitative assessment.

    PubMed

    Blew, Robert M; Lee, Vinson R; Farr, Joshua N; Schiferl, Daniel J; Going, Scott B

    2014-02-01

    Peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) is an essential tool for assessing bone parameters of the limbs, but subject movement and its impact on image quality remains a challenge to manage. The current approach to determine image viability is by visual inspection, but pQCT lacks a quantitative evaluation. Therefore, the aims of this study were to (1) examine the reliability of a qualitative visual inspection scale and (2) establish a quantitative motion assessment methodology. Scans were performed on 506 healthy girls (9-13 years) at diaphyseal regions of the femur and tibia. Scans were rated for movement independently by three technicians using a linear, nominal scale. Quantitatively, a ratio of movement to limb size (%Move) provided a measure of movement artifact. A repeat-scan subsample (n = 46) was examined to determine %Move's impact on bone parameters. Agreement between measurers was strong (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.732 for tibia, 0.812 for femur), but greater variability was observed in scans rated 3 or 4, the delineation between repeat and no repeat. The quantitative approach found ≥95% of subjects had %Move <25 %. Comparison of initial and repeat scans by groups above and below 25% initial movement showed significant differences in the >25 % grouping. A pQCT visual inspection scale can be a reliable metric of image quality, but technicians may periodically mischaracterize subject motion. The presented quantitative methodology yields more consistent movement assessment and could unify procedure across laboratories. Data suggest a delineation of 25% movement for determining whether a diaphyseal scan is viable or requires repeat. PMID:24077875

  6. Pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence evaluation of risperidone in healthy male subjects with different CYP2D6 genotypes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hea-Young; Lee, Yong-Bok

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioequivalence of risperidone in healthy male subjects representing different CYP2D6 genotypes with respect to risperidone, 9-hydroxyrisperidone (9-OH-risperidone), and active moiety. A total of 506 Korean subjects were genotyped for CYP2D6*10 by means of allele-specific polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Based on the genotype analysis, 24 subjects, 7 homozygous for CYP2D6*1, 10 for *10, and 7 heterozygous for *10, were recruited and received a single oral dose of 2 mg risperidone tablet in this study. Serum concentrations of risperidone and 9-OHrisperidone up to 48 h were simultaneously determined. There were no significant differences of the active moiety, risperidone, and 9-OH-risperidone between the two preparations in AUC0-proportinal to, and Cmax. The 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for the ratio of means of the log-transformed AUC0-proportional to. and Cmax for the active moiety, risperidone, and 9-OH-risperidone were all within the bioequivalence acceptance criteria of 0.80-1.25. The CYP2D6*10 allele particularly was associated with higher serum concentrations of risperidone and the risperidone/9-OH-risperidone ratio compared with the CYP2D6*1 allele. The results demonstrate that the two preparations of risperidone are bioequivalent and it can be assumed that they are therapeutically equivalent and exchangeable in clinical practice. Furthermore, the pharmacokinetic parameters of risperidone and the risperidone/9-OH-risperidone ratio are highly dependent on the CYP2D6 genotypes. PMID:16833023

  7. Evaluation through in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy of the cutaneous neurogenic inflammatory reaction induced by capsaicin in human subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Căruntu, Constantin; Boda, Daniel

    2012-08-01

    We perform an in vivo analysis of the effects of capsaicin on cutaneous microvascularization. A total of 29 healthy subjects are administered a solution of capsaicin (CAP group) or a vehicle solution (nonCAP group) on the dorsal side of the nondominant hand. The evaluation is performed using in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM). Ten minutes after administration, the area of the section, the perimeter, and the Feret's diameter of the capillaries in the dermal papillae become significantly larger in the CAP group as against the nonCAP group, and this difference is maintained until the conclusion of the experiment. In vivo RCM allows the investigation of cutaneous vascular reactions induced by capsaicin. As such, this method may constitute an useful technique both for research and clinical practice.

  8. Evaluation of acceleration and deceleration cardiac processes using phase-rectified signal averaging in healthy and idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy subjects.

    PubMed

    Bas, Rosana; Vallverdú, Montserrat; Valencia, Jose F; Voss, Andreas; de Luna, Antonio Bayés; Caminal, Pere

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the suitability of the Phase-Rectified Signal Averaging (PRSA) method for improved risk prediction in cardiac patients. Moreover, this technique, which separately evaluates acceleration and deceleration processes of cardiac rhythm, allows the effect of sympathetic and vagal modulations of beat-to-beat intervals to be characterized. Holter recordings of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC) patients were analyzed: high-risk (HR), who suffered sudden cardiac death (SCD) during the follow-up; and low-risk (LR), without any kind of cardiac-related death. Moreover, a control group of healthy subjects was analyzed. PRSA indexes were analyzed, for different time scales T and wavelet scales s, from RR series of 24 h-ECG recordings, awake periods and sleep periods. Also, the behavior of these indexes from simulated data was analyzed and compared with real data results. Outcomes demonstrated the PRSA capacity to significantly discriminate healthy subjects from IDC patients and HR from LR patients on a higher level than traditional temporal and spectral measures. The behavior of PRSA indexes agrees with experimental evidences related to cardiac autonomic modulations. Also, these parameters reflect more regularity of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in HR patients. PMID:25585858

  9. Evaluating variation in human gut microbiota profiles due to DNA extraction method and inter-subject differences

    PubMed Central

    Wagner Mackenzie, Brett; Waite, David W.; Taylor, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    The human gut contains dense and diverse microbial communities which have profound influences on human health. Gaining meaningful insights into these communities requires provision of high quality microbial nucleic acids from human fecal samples, as well as an understanding of the sources of variation and their impacts on the experimental model. We present here a systematic analysis of commonly used microbial DNA extraction methods, and identify significant sources of variation. Five extraction methods (Human Microbiome Project protocol, MoBio PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit, QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit, ZR Fecal DNA MiniPrep, phenol:chloroform-based DNA isolation) were evaluated based on the following criteria: DNA yield, quality and integrity, and microbial community structure based on Illumina amplicon sequencing of the V4 region of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes. Our results indicate that the largest portion of variation within the model was attributed to differences between subjects (biological variation), with a smaller proportion of variation associated with DNA extraction method (technical variation) and intra-subject variation. A comprehensive understanding of the potential impact of technical variation on the human gut microbiota will help limit preventable bias, enabling more accurate diversity estimates. PMID:25741335

  10. Evaluating variation in human gut microbiota profiles due to DNA extraction method and inter-subject differences.

    PubMed

    Wagner Mackenzie, Brett; Waite, David W; Taylor, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The human gut contains dense and diverse microbial communities which have profound influences on human health. Gaining meaningful insights into these communities requires provision of high quality microbial nucleic acids from human fecal samples, as well as an understanding of the sources of variation and their impacts on the experimental model. We present here a systematic analysis of commonly used microbial DNA extraction methods, and identify significant sources of variation. Five extraction methods (Human Microbiome Project protocol, MoBio PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit, QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit, ZR Fecal DNA MiniPrep, phenol:chloroform-based DNA isolation) were evaluated based on the following criteria: DNA yield, quality and integrity, and microbial community structure based on Illumina amplicon sequencing of the V4 region of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes. Our results indicate that the largest portion of variation within the model was attributed to differences between subjects (biological variation), with a smaller proportion of variation associated with DNA extraction method (technical variation) and intra-subject variation. A comprehensive understanding of the potential impact of technical variation on the human gut microbiota will help limit preventable bias, enabling more accurate diversity estimates. PMID:25741335

  11. Subjective diffuseness of music signals convolved with binaural impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimokura, Ryota; Tronchin, Lamberto; Cocchi, Alessandro; Soeta, Yoshiharu

    2011-07-01

    The spatial impression of sound in a hall can be quantified using sound field factors such as the interaural cross-correlation coefficient (IACC) calculated from binaural impulse response (BIR), henceforth denoted by IACC IR. The subjective diffuseness for the listener is a spatial attribute which depends on factors associated both with the source signal and with the actual sound field, and is quantified using the IACC of the signal received by the listener, henceforth denoted by IACC SR. Therefore, the subjective diffuseness in a given hall may change with the music. The aims of this study are to estimate the IACC SR from the IACC IR and the factors, which is obtained from autocorrelation function (ACF) of music signal, and to evaluate the subjective diffuseness by these factors. First, the relationship between the IACC IR and IACC SR was investigated. Second, subjective diffuseness was measured by a psycho-acoustical experiment. As a result, the IACC SR could be estimated from the IACC IR of the BIR and the effective duration ( τe) from the ACF of music signal. It was found that the effects of BIRs on subjective diffuseness could be evaluated by IACC IR for almost all subjects, while the effects of music signals could be evaluated by the τe and the width of the peak at τ=0 ( Wϕ(0) ) of the ACF.

  12. Evaluation of Genotoxicity in Patients Subjected to Panoramic Radiography by Micronucleus Assay on Epithelial Cells of the Oral Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pallak; Devi, Parvathi; Wazir, Sartaj Singh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Radiography is one of the most valuable diagnostic tools used in comprehensive dental care. Although there is no safe level of radiation exposure, the possible risk associated with exposure to radiation, must be elucidated. To date, a variety of assays have been proposed to assess the mutagenic potential of genotoxicants; however, these methods are typically laborious and time consuming. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible genotoxic effect of routinely used panoramic radiation exposure in exfoliated epithelial cells as measured by the formation of micronuclei and to compare the genotoxicity of X-rays on keratinized epithelial gingival cells and the nonkeratinized buccal epithelial cells. Materials and Methods: The study included 53 healthy individuals with a mean age of 25.21 ±12.67 years. Specimens of exfoliated epithelial cells were collected from patients subjected to panoramic radiography before and 10 days after radiation exposure. The cells were stained with Giemsa and evaluated for micronuclei by scoring 1000 cells per slide. Results: In our study, the genotoxic effect of radiation exposure from panoramic radiography showed a statistically significant increase in the MN frequency in buccal epithelial cells. A significant correlation was observed between the age of the subjects and micronuclei, although no such correlation was found between gender and micronuclei count. Conclusion: MN test serves as a simple biomarker indicating the direct exposure to DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation, emphasizing great sensitivity even for exposure to low doses during radiation screening. Thus, panoramic dental radiography should be cautiously used only when necessary. PMID:24910676

  13. Finite Element Analysis of Plastic Deformation During Impression Creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveena; Ganesh Kumar, J.; Mathew, M. D.

    2015-04-01

    Finite element (FE) analysis of plastic deformation associated with impression creep deformation of 316LN stainless steel was carried out. An axisymmetric FE model of 10 × 10 × 10 mm specimen with 1-mm-diameter rigid cylindrical flat punch was developed. FE simulation of impression creep deformation was performed by assuming elastic-plastic-power-law creep deformation behavior. Evolution of the stress with time under the punch during elastic, plastic, and creep processes was analyzed. The onset of plastic deformation was found to occur at a nominal stress about 1.12 times the yield stress of the material. The size of the developed plastic zone was predicted to be about three times the radius of the punch. The material flow behavior and the pile-up on specimen surface have been modeled.

  14. First impressions: gait cues drive reliable trait judgements.

    PubMed

    Thoresen, John C; Vuong, Quoc C; Atkinson, Anthony P

    2012-09-01

    Personality trait attribution can underpin important social decisions and yet requires little effort; even a brief exposure to a photograph can generate lasting impressions. Body movement is a channel readily available to observers and allows judgements to be made when facial and body appearances are less visible; e.g., from great distances. Across three studies, we assessed the reliability of trait judgements of point-light walkers and identified motion-related visual cues driving observers' judgements. The findings confirm that observers make reliable, albeit inaccurate, trait judgements, and these were linked to a small number of motion components derived from a Principal Component Analysis of the motion data. Parametric manipulation of the motion components linearly affected trait ratings, providing strong evidence that the visual cues captured by these components drive observers' trait judgements. Subsequent analyses suggest that reliability of trait ratings was driven by impressions of emotion, attractiveness and masculinity. PMID:22717166

  15. Laboratory assessment of impression accuracy by clinical simulation.

    PubMed

    Wassell, R W; Abuasi, H A

    1992-04-01

    Some laboratory tests of impression material accuracy mimic the clinical situation (simulatory) while others attempt to quantify a material's individual properties. This review concentrates on simulatory testing and aims to give a classification of the numerous tests available. Measurements can be made of the impression itself or the resulting cast. Cast measurements are divided into those made of individual dies and those made of interdie relations. Contact measurement techniques have the advantage of simplicity but are potentially inaccurate because of die abrasion. Non-contact techniques can overcome the abrasion problem but the measurements, especially those made in three dimensions, may be difficult to interpret. Nevertheless, providing that care is taken to avoid parallax error non-contact methods are preferable as experimental variables are easier to control. Where measurements are made of individual dies these should include the die width across the finishing line, as occlusal width measurements provide only limited information. A new concept of 'differential die distortion' (dimensional difference from the master model in one plane minus the dimensional difference in the perpendicular plane) provides a clinically relevant method of interpreting dimensional changes. Where measurements are made between dies movement of the individual dies within the master model must be prevented. Many of the test methods can be criticized as providing clinically unrealistic master models/dies or impression trays. Phantom head typodonts form a useful basis for the morphology of master models providing that undercuts are standardized and the master model temperature adequately controlled. PMID:1564180

  16. Comparison of subjective lameness evaluation, force platforms and an inertial-sensor system to identify mild lameness in an equine osteoarthritis model.

    PubMed

    Donnell, J R; Frisbie, D D; King, M R; Goodrich, L R; Haussler, K K

    2015-11-01

    When mild lameness exists, agreement between clinicians is often controversial due to its subjective nature. The goal of the study was to compare subjective and objective methods to identify the presence of mild lameness using an established model of osteoarthritis (OA) in which OA was induced by creating a unilateral carpal osteochondral fragment (OCF) in the middle carpal joint of 16 horses. Subjective lameness evaluations (blinded and unblinded), force platforms (FP), and an inertial-sensor system (ISS) were used to detect forelimb lameness at four time points. Limbs identified as lame by each method were compared as well as compared with the OCF limb at each time point. Spearman correlations were calculated between all outcome parameters. Independent of time, blinded subjective evaluation (54%) and the ISS (60%) identified a higher percentage of horses as lame in the OCF limb compared to FP (40%). Blinded subjective evaluation and the ISS agreed which forelimb was lame more often (50%) compared with blinded subjective evaluation and the FP (38%). Induction of mild lameness within the OCF limb was supported by an increase in the frequency of horses considered lame by both subjective evaluations the ISS and a decrease (3.6%) in mean (among all horses) peak vertical force from baseline to post OCF induction. The percentage of horses identified as lame in the OCF limb, independent of time, was highest with the ISS (60%) followed by blinded subjective evaluation (51%) and the FP (42%). It was concluded that the best agreement was between subjective evaluation and the inertial-sensor system. PMID:26361749

  17. Assessing Impression Management With the MMPI-2 in Child Custody Litigation.

    PubMed

    Arce, Ramón; Fariña, Francisca; Seijo, Dolores; Novo, Mercedes

    2015-12-01

    Forensic psychological evaluation of parents in child custody litigation is primarily focused on evaluating parenting capacity and underreporting. The biased responses of underreporting have been classified as Impression Management (IM) or as Self-Deceptive Positivity (S-DP), which are regarded to be conscious or unconscious in nature, respectively. A field study was undertaken to assess impression management on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) in child custody cases, the accuracy of the MMPI-2 scales in classifying IM, and what parents in child custody litigation actually manipulate in terms of IM. A total of 244 parents in child custody litigation and 244 parents under standard instructions were administered the MMPI-2. The results revealed that the L, Mp, Wsd, and Od scales discriminated between both samples of parents; the rate of satisfactory classification (i.e., odds ratio ranged from 5.7 for Wsd to 23.3 for Od) and an incremental validity of Od over Mp and Wsd. As for the effects of IM, the results show IM effects in the Basic Clinical Scales, the Restructured Clinical Scales, the Personality Psychopathology Five Scales, the Content Scales, and the Supplementary Scales. The implications of the results are discussed in relation to the forensic evaluation of parents in child custody litigation. PMID:25410722

  18. Comparison of the Accuracy of Different Transfer Impression Techniques for Osseointegrated Implants.

    PubMed

    Zen, Bruno Massucato; Soares, Eveline Freitas; Rodrigues, Mariana Agustinho; Luthi, Leonardo Flores; Consani, Rafael Leonardo X; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz; Henriques, Guilherme Elias Pessanha

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate 3 transfer techniques used to obtain working casts of implant-supported prostheses through the marginal misfit and strain induced to metallic framework. Thirty working casts were obtained from a metallic master cast, each one containing 2 implant analogs simulating a clinical situation of 3-unit implant-supported fixed prostheses according to the following transfer impression techniques: group A, squared transfers splinted with dental floss and acrylic resin, sectioned, and re-splinted; group B, squared transfers splinted with dental floss and bis-acrylic resin; and group N, squared transfers not splinted. A metallic framework was made for marginal misfit and strain measurements from the metallic master cast. The misfit between the metallic framework and working casts was evaluated with an optical microscope following the single-screw test protocol. In the same conditions, the strain was evaluated using strain gauges placed on the metallic framework. The data were submitted to one-way analysis of variance followed by the Tukey test (α = 5%). For both marginal misfit and strain, there were statistically significant differences between groups A and N (P < .01) and groups B and N (P < .01), with greater values for group N. According to the Pearson test, there was a positive correlation between the misfit and strain variables (r = 0.5642). The results of this study showed that the impression techniques with splinted transfers promoted better accuracy than the nonsplinted technique, regardless of the splinting material used. PMID:25438007

  19. Evaluation of the Fracture Toughness of a SMSS Subjected to Common Heat Treatment Cycles in an Aggressive Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieta, G.; Leite, R.; Kwietniewski, C.; Clarke, T.; Strohaecker, T.

    2010-12-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steels (SMSS) are an alternative to corrosion-prone carbon steels and expensive duplex stainless steels in offshore tubing applications for the oil and gas industry. Due to their differentiated alloying, SMSS exhibit superior toughness, corrosion resistance, and weldability properties when compared with another viable option, conventional martensitic stainless steels. However, when cathodically protected in a seawater environment they can be susceptible to embrittlement due to hydrogen charging. In the present study, SMSS samples were removed from deep water pipelines and their fracture toughness in the as-received condition and with different heat treatments was evaluated. Tests were carried out in air and in harsh environmental and loading conditions, which were ensured by subjecting specimens to cathodic overprotection, simulating effects seen in structures with complex geometries, and to incremental step loads in a synthetic seawater environment, thus favoring hydrogen diffusion to the precrack tip. The fracture surfaces of the specimens were analyzed in order to identify hydrogen-induced embrittlement and fracture toughness values of specimens tested in air were compared to values obtained in environment-assisted experiments. The influence of microstructure was evaluated by control of the retained austenite and δ-ferrite contents of the specimens. The results show a significant drop in the fracture toughness of steel in the studied environment, with a fracture mode which is clearly more brittle and dependent on microstructural characteristics of the samples.

  20. Evaluation of a software package for automated quality assessment of contrast detail images—comparison with subjective visual assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoal, A.; Lawinski, C. P.; Honey, I.; Blake, P.

    2005-12-01

    Contrast detail analysis is commonly used to assess image quality (IQ) associated with diagnostic imaging systems. Applications include routine assessment of equipment performance and optimization studies. Most frequently, the evaluation of contrast detail images involves human observers visually detecting the threshold contrast detail combinations in the image. However, the subjective nature of human perception and the variations in the decision threshold pose limits to the minimum image quality variations detectable with reliability. Objective methods of assessment of image quality such as automated scoring have the potential to overcome the above limitations. A software package (CDRAD analyser) developed for automated scoring of images produced with the CDRAD test object was evaluated. Its performance to assess absolute and relative IQ was compared with that of an average observer. Results show that the software does not mimic the absolute performance of the average observer. The software proved more sensitive and was able to detect smaller low-contrast variations. The observer's performance was superior to the software's in the detection of smaller details. Both scoring methods showed frequent agreement in the detection of image quality variations resulting from changes in kVp and KERMAdetector, which indicates the potential to use the software CDRAD analyser for assessment of relative IQ.

  1. Morphometric evaluation of the frontal sinus in relation to age and gender in subjects residing in Davangere, Karnataka

    PubMed Central

    Soman, Bhakti A.; Sujatha, G. P.; Lingappa, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The main objective of the study was morphometric evaluation of the frontal sinus in relation to age and gender and to establish its forensic importance and application. Materials and Method: The study group consisted of 200 subjects (100 males and 100 females) in the age groups 14-20 years, 21-30 years, 31-45 years, 45 years and above. Posteroanterior (PA) cephalogram radiographs were taken using standardized technique. The processed films were traced and frontal sinus pattern was established as per Yoshino's classification system. Results: The mean values for length, width, and area of the frontal sinus were found to be higher in males as compared to females and area of frontal sinuses increase with age except in males who were 45 years and above. The left width, left area, and bilateral asymmetry in relation to gender was found to be statistically significant. Conclusion: The morphologic evaluation of frontal sinus is a useful technique to determine gender and seems promising in personal identification. PMID:27051227

  2. The Role of Profanity and Sex Variables in Interpersonal Impression Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Marshall M.; Saine, Thomas J.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses a study designed to identify areas of research which may increase under standing of the relationship between speaker profanity and impression formation. Provides an experimental test of the predicted interrelationships between profanity, sex variables, and impression formation. (MH)

  3. Characterization and impression creep testing of silicon aluminum oxynitride ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Kevin M.

    2005-11-01

    Three Yb-containing SiAlON materials were studied for potential use as hot section components in advanced microturbine engines. Two of the materials consisted of equiaxed alpha-SiAlON grains, elongated beta-SiAlON grains, and an amorphous intergranular phase containing a relatively large amount of Yb. The third material consisted of alpha- and beta-SiAlON grains with equiaxed morphologies and virtually no intergranular phase. An instrument was designed and constructed for impression creep testing of the YbSiAlON materials. Uniaxial compression creep experiments were also performed for comparison. In compression creep, the SiAlON materials exhibited activation energies that were similar to those of other SiAlONs reports in the literature, and stress exponents that were approximately 1. In impression creep, the SiAlONs tested exhibited activation energies similar to those reported in the literature for SiAlONs tested in uniaxial compression and tension. However, the SiAlON composition with equiaxed beta-SiAlON grains showed an exaggerated activation energy due to a change in creep mechanism above 1340°C. The measured stress exponents in impression creep were approximately 2. The stress state present below the punch in impression creep caused dilation to occur in the grain structure. The dilation results in an increase in the volume of the multi-grain junctions, and an increased dependence of strain rate on stress. The enlarged multi-grain junctions can become filled with the intergranular glassy phase. These large pockets of the glassy phase can enable an additional creep mechanism whereby the equiaxed grains slide past each other viscously. All of the SiAlONs developed an additional volume of the intergranular glassy phase during creep testing. A microstructure containing elongated beta-SiAlON grains is most effective in enhancing creep performance of the Yb-SiAlON materials tested. The impression creep data for the Yb-SiAlON materials can be related to the

  4. [Direct hearing aid provision by ENT specialists: Recommendations for prevention and treatment of complications after taking ear impressions].

    PubMed

    Caffier, Ph P; Sedlmaier, B; Hölzl, M

    2009-07-01

    In times of budgeting, rising costs and monetary losses, an increasing number of ENT specialists considers the hearing system sector due to the distinct undersupply and the expected demographic development to be a market of the future and appropriate to enlarge their field of competence. Exact prevalence of direct hearing aid provision by German otorhinolaryngologists as well as its complication rate are not well-known. Retrospectively, all patients were evaluated who presented at our department with complications in the context of outpatient direct hearing aid supply within the last 3 years. Inappropriate fitting contains the danger of malformed or displaced ear impressions with various injury patterns comprising the external auditory canal, tympanic membrane and ossicular chain. Practical advices for prevention of complications include the accurate modeling and placement of sufficient impression pads behind the second bend of the auditory canal, using an adequate type of impression material as well as performing the correct application procedures. Recommendations for diagnostic patterns and treatment of complications after taking ear impressions are presented, the differences between German "traditional" and "direct" hearing aid provision are critically discussed. PMID:19579285

  5. A comparative analysis of the accuracy of implant master casts fabricated from two different transfer impression techniques

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Rupali; Kadam, Pankaj; Oswal, Chetan; Patil, Seema; Jajoo, Shweta; Gachake, Arati

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study evaluated and compared two impression techniques in terms of their dimensional accuracies to reproduce implant positions on working casts. Materials and Methods: A master model was designed to simulate a clinical situation. Impressions were made using four techniques: (1) Stock open tray (SOT) technique; (2) stock closed tray (SCT) technique; (3) custom open tray (COT) technique; and (3) custom closed tray (CCT) technique. Reference points on the hexagonal silhouette of the implant on master model and onto the analogs of the obtained master casts were compared after using the four impression techniques. Measurements were made using an optical microscope, capable of recording under 50x magnifications. The means and standard deviations of all the groups and subgroups were calculated and statically analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test. Results: The open tray impressions showed significantly less variation from the master model and all the techniques studied were comparable. Conclusion: All the techniques studied shown some distortion. COT showed the most accurate results of all the techniques. PMID:27114954

  6. Evaluation of a subject-specific finite-element model of the equine metacarpophalangeal joint under physiological load.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Simon M; Whitton, R Chris; Kawcak, Chris E; Stover, Susan M; Pandy, Marcus G

    2014-01-01

    The equine metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint is frequently injured, especially by racehorses in training. Most injuries result from repetitive loading of the subchondral bone and articular cartilage rather than from acute events. The likelihood of injury is multi-factorial but the magnitude of mechanical loading and the number of loading cycles are believed to play an important role. Therefore, an important step in understanding injury is to determine the distribution of load across the articular surface during normal locomotion. A subject-specific finite-element model of the MCP joint was developed (including deformable cartilage, elastic ligaments, muscle forces and rigid representations of bone), evaluated against measurements obtained from cadaver experiments, and then loaded using data from gait experiments. The sensitivity of the model to force inputs, cartilage stiffness, and cartilage geometry was studied. The FE model predicted MCP joint torque and sesamoid bone flexion angles within 5% of experimental measurements. Muscle-tendon forces, joint loads and cartilage stresses all increased as locomotion speed increased from walking to trotting and finally cantering. Perturbations to muscle-tendon forces resulted in small changes in articular cartilage stresses, whereas variations in joint torque, cartilage geometry and stiffness produced much larger effects. Non-subject-specific cartilage geometry changed the magnitude and distribution of pressure and the von Mises stress markedly. The mean and peak cartilage stresses generally increased with an increase in cartilage stiffness. Areas of peak stress correlated qualitatively with sites of common injury, suggesting that further modelling work may elucidate the types of loading that precede joint injury and may assist in the development of techniques for injury mitigation. PMID:24210848

  7. Computer-Mediated Impression Formation: A Test of the Sticky Cues Model Using Facebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Der Heide, Brandon Lee

    2009-01-01

    This research offers a model of online impression formation that explains how different impression-bearing cues may carry more or less informational value. This research considers the possibility that impression-bearing cues have greater informational value when those cues are distinctive and are task-relevant. This research refers to such cues as…

  8. On the Role of Subjectivity in Establishing, Using, Operating and Evaluating Information Retrieval Systems. Treatise II on Retrieval System Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fugmann, Robert

    1973-01-01

    The personal literature search of a scientist is strongly governed by subjective influences. If he delegates his query, he must be aware of the problems emanating from this subjectivity. The information scientist, on the other hand, must consider the subjective character of the fundamental notions of information and order. (33 references)…

  9. Interfering with activity in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex via TMS affects social impressions updating.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Chiara; Vecchi, Tomaso; Todorov, Alexander; Cattaneo, Zaira

    2016-08-01

    In our everyday social interactions we often need to deal with others' unpredictable behaviors. Integrating unexpected information in a consistent representation of another agent is a cognitively demanding process. Several neuroimaging studies point to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) as a critical structure in mediating social evaluations. Our aim here was to shed light on the possible causal role of the mPFC in the dynamic process of forming and updating social impressions about others. We addressed this issue by suppressing activity in the mPFC by means of 1 Hz offline transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) prior to a task requiring participants to evaluate other agents' trustworthiness after reading about their social behavior. In two different experiments, we found that inhibiting activity in the mPFC increased perceived trustworthiness when inconsistent information about one agent's behavior was provided. In turn, when only negative or positive behaviors of a person were described, TMS over the mPFC did not affect judgments. Our results indicate that the mPFC is causally involved in mediating social impressions updating-at least in cases in which judgment is uncertain due to conflicting information to be processed. PMID:27012713

  10. [Effects of swing on music appreciation: a study on perceived impressions of various swing ratios].

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Shimpei; Shigeno, Sumi

    2013-06-01

    Swing is a musical performance technique, whose magnitude is indicated by the swing ratio. This study examines the effects of swing on music-listening appreciation. In Experiment 1, 21 participants were presented with synthesized performances with three swing ratios, and were asked to rate their impressions using the semantic differential method. The results show that there exists a certain relationship between swing and the affective evaluation of music and tempo. Experiment 2 explored the relationship between swing and melody, another dimension of music, in perceived dynamism and preference for swing. Two musical instruments were used: piano and drums. Twenty-two participants were presented with synthesized performances and were asked to rate the degree of dynamism and their preference using Scheffé's paired comparison method. The evaluations for five swing conditions were similar for those performed by the piano and by the drums. The discussion looks at the swing ratio and its psychological attributes as well as the relationships of perceived impressions of swing to tempo and musical instruments. PMID:23847999

  11. Doing Good Is a Hustle, Too: Effects of Motives To Impression Manage, Communication Style, and Licensing on the Reputation of the Public Relations Practitioner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sallot, Lynne M.

    A study tested effects of motives, communication style, and licensing (whether the practitioner is licensed or not) on public relations practitioners' reputations. Impression management theory suggests that perceived motives and self-interests may explain the poor reputation sometimes attributed to public relations practitioners. Subjects, 585…

  12. Influence of scanning system and dentist's level of training in the accuracy of digital impressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hategan, Simona; Gabor, Alin; Zaharia, Cristian; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Jivanescu, Anca

    2016-03-01

    Background: The principal aim of our study was to evaluate digital impressions, taken with spray powder and powderfree scan systems, in order to determine the influence of the dentist's commitment to training as a critical factor regarding quality. Material and method: Two digital intraoral impression systems from the same manufacture (Sirona) : Apollo DI and CEREC Omnicam, were used to scan 16 crown preparations on teeth on a typodont maxillary model. Because an Apollo Di intraoral camera is a powder system, an adhesive was applied before using the powder spray. Three groups were used to scan the crown preparations in order to determine coating thickness homogeneity. One group consisted of senior year dental students, a second consisted of prosthodontics residents, and the third consisted of prosthodontics specialists. The same procedure was applied with a CEREC Omnicam intraoral camera, which is a powder-free system. By using the two systems software parameters we were able to determine the scanning precision. Results: Homogeneity scores for Apollo Di regarding the spray layer was significantly thinner for all dental surfaces in the first group, while the second group had thinner coatings for buccal and distal surfaces. For the third group, the crown preparations were coated more homogeneously than the first two groups. The powder-free system CEREC Omnicam can, to a degree, mask the lack of experience in direct optical impressions by avoiding the poor quality coating, which can lead to defective marginal adaptation of definitive restoration. Conclusions: The dentist's lack of experience can be mitigated, and partially avoided, by using powder-free systems. At the same time, the dentist can give more time towards learning how to integrate computerized fabricated restoration into the practice. The commitment to training is a critical factor in the successful integration of the technology. In

  13. Full arch scans: conventional versus digital impressions--an in-vitro study.

    PubMed

    Ender, A; Mehl, A

    2011-01-01

    The digital intraoral impression has become a central part of the CAD/CAM technique. The objective of the present study was to compare the accuracy (trueness and precision) of digital impressions of the full arch with that of conventional impressions on the in-vitro model. For this purpose, a master model was acquired with a new reference scanning process, the measuring trueness of which was +/- 4.1 microm and the precision +/- 2.5 microm. On the one hand, conventional impressions and then plaster models (n = 5) were produced from this master model, and on the other hand, digital impressions were made with the Cerec AC Bluecam and the Lava COS system (each n = 5). The plaster models were also scanned with the reference scanner. The available data records were superimposed and the differences determined. The deviation from the master model defines the trueness of the impression method. The deviations of the models among one another demonstrate the precision of the method. The trueness of the impressions was 55 +/- 21.8 microm in the conventional impression group, for digital impressions with Cerec Bluecam it was 49 +/- 14.2 microm and for digital impressions with Lava COS 40.3 +/- 14.1 microm. The precision was 61.3 +/- 17.9 microm for conventional impression with Impregum, 30.9 +/- 7.1 microm for digital impression with the Cerec Bluecam and 60.1 +/- 31.3 microm for digital impression with Lava COS. These in-vitro results show that accuracy of the digital impression is similar to that of the conventional impression. These results will have to be confirmed in further clinical studies. PMID:21657122

  14. Peri-implant evaluation of osseointegrated implants subjected to orthodontic forces: results after three years of functional loading

    PubMed Central

    Marins, Bruna de Rezende; Pramiu, Suy Ellen; Busato, Mauro Carlos Agner; Marchi, Luiz Carlos; Togashi, Adriane Yaeko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The objective of this study was to clinically and radiographically assess the peri-implant conditions of implants used as orthodontic anchorage. Methods: Two groups were studied: 1) a test group in which osseointegrated implants were used as orthodontic anchorage, with the application of 200-cN force; and 2) a control group in which implants were not subjected to orthodontic force, but supported a screw-retained prosthesis. Clinical evaluations were performed three, six and nine months after prosthesis installation and 1- and 3-year follow-up examinations. Intraoral periapical radiographs were obtained 30 days after surgical implant placement, at the time of prosthesis installation, and one, two and three years thereafter. The results were compared by Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in clinical probing depth (p = 0.1078) or mesial and distal crestal bone resorption (p = 0.1832) during the study period. After three years of follow-up, the mean probing depth was 2.21 mm for the control group and 2.39 mm for the test group. The implants of the control group showed a mean distance between the bone crest and implant shoulder of 2.39 mm, whereas the implants used as orthodontic anchorage showed a mean distance of 2.58 mm at the distal site. Conclusion: Results suggest that the use of stable intraoral orthodontic anchorage did not compromise the health of peri-implant tissues or the longevity of the implant. PMID:27275618

  15. Subjective perceptions and ergonomics evaluation of a liquid cooled garment worn under protective ensemble during an intermittent treadmill exercise.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Coca, Aitor; Williams, W Jon; Roberge, Raymond J

    2011-07-01

    While a personal protective equipment (PPE) ensemble effectively provides workers with protection from occupational hazards, working in a vapour-resistant ensemble increases the risk of heat illness/injuries and physiological burdens. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of body cooling via a liquid-cooled garment (LCG) underneath a PPE ensemble on perceived thermal strain, physiological responses and ergonomics during an intermittent treadmill exercise in warm environmental conditions. The results of the present study indicated that the concomitant wearing of LCG underneath the PPE ensemble significantly reduced subjective perception of heat and alleviated overall increase in body temperature and heart rate while no impact of wearing LCG on ergonomic features was found. The extension of the present findings to practical applications in occupational settings requires further research on a LCG system design and performance evaluations while the LCG is incorporated within the PPE ensemble. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Implementation of a LCG underneath PPE for body cooling was investigated, focusing on its impact on individuals' perceived thermal strain, physiological responses and ergonomics. The findings of the present study indicated that body cooling via a wearable LCG underneath PPE significantly alleviated both perceived thermal and physiological strain in uncompensable heat stress condition. PMID:21770750

  16. Digital impression-taking: Fundamentals and benefits in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Lecocq, Guillaume

    2016-06-01

    The digital era has burst into our offices in a big way. 3D camera technology has improved, enabling us to record our impressions and the occlusion in a digital format file. This file can then be used to make set-ups and manufacture orthodontic devices. Like any new technology, it needs to be studied and understood in order to grasp it fully and master the information and digital flow which can be generated between one's office and any external party involved in treatment, such as laboratories or other colleagues. PMID:27080602

  17. Sectional impression tray and sectional denture for a microstomia patient.

    PubMed

    Colvenkar, Shreya S

    2010-02-01

    Microstomia presents a unique challenge to the patient. Patients with microstomia who must wear removable dental prostheses often face the difficulty of being unable to insert or remove the prosthesis because of the constricted opening of the oral cavity. A completely edentulous patient, who developed microstomia along with Raynaud's phenomenon induced by scleroderma, is presented. This clinical report describes a quick and easy method for fabrication of a sectional custom impression tray connected by press button and a sectional complete denture retained by magnets. A sectional denture that provides ease in placement and removal can be successfully used in clinical practice for treatment of microstomia patients. PMID:19895427

  18. Basilar Invagination, Basilar Impression, and Platybasia: Clinical and Imaging Aspects.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Nandor K; McVige, Jennifer; Mechtler, Laszlo

    2016-08-01

    The congenital and acquired deformities of the craniovertebral junction (CVJ), such as basilar invagination, basilar impression, or platybasia, can present in the form of slowly progressive or acute neurologic deterioration. In many cases, an insidious headache is the only symptom and can be a diagnostic challenge for the neurologist. Proper imaging studies as well as recognizing often associated neurologic or systemic conditions are required for early diagnosis and effective therapy. In the current report, the primary focus will be on clinical aspects of these CVJ abnormalities; the pathologic and radiologic aspects, such as developmental and pathophysiologic background or radiographic analysis, will be discussed briefly, confined to clinically relevant data. PMID:27344347

  19. Remembering first impressions: Effects of intentionality and diagnosticity on subsequent memory

    PubMed Central

    Gilron, Roee; Gutchess, Angela H.

    2012-01-01

    People rely on first impressions every day as an important tool to interpret social behavior. While research is beginning to reveal the neural underpinnings of first impressions, particularly through understanding the role of dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC), little is known about the way in which first impressions are encoded into memory. This is surprising because first impressions are relevant from a social perspective for future interactions, requiring that they be transferred to memory. The present study used a subsequent memory paradigm to test the conditions under which the dmPFC is implicated in the encoding of first impressions. We found that intentionally forming impressions engages the dmPFC more than incidentally forming impressions and that this engagement supports the encoding of remembered impressions. In addition, we found that diagnostic information, which more readily lends itself to forming trait impressions, engages the dmPFC more than neutral information. These results indicate that the neural system subserving memory for impressions is sensitive to consciously formed impressions. The results also suggest a distinction between a social memory system and other explicit memory systems governed by the medial temporal lobes. PMID:22139633

  20. Evaluation of Electrocardiographic T-peak to T-end Interval in Subjects with Increased Epicardial Fat Tissue Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Ozgur; Kurtoglu, Ertugrul; Nar, Gokay; Yasar, Erdogan; Gozubuyuk, Gokhan; Dogan, Cem; Boz, Ahmet Ugur; Hidayet, Sıho; Pekdemir, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Background The association between periatrial adiposity and atrial arrhythmias has been shown in previous studies. However, there are not enough available data on the association between epicardial fat tissue (EFT) thickness and parameters of ventricular repolarization. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the association of EFT thickness with indices of ventricular repolarization by using T-peak to T-end (Tp-e) interval and Tp-e/QT ratio. Methods The present study included 50 patients whose EFT thickness ≥ 9 mm (group 1) and 40 control subjects with EFT thickness < 9 mm (group 2). Transthoracic echocardiographic examination was performed in all participants. QT parameters, Tp-e intervals and Tp-e/QT ratio were measured from the 12-lead electrocardiogram. Results QTd (41.1 ± 2.5 vs 38.6 ± 3.2, p < 0.001) and corrected QTd (46.7 ± 4.7 vs 43.7 ± 4, p = 0.002) were significantly higher in group 1 when compared to group 2. The Tp-e interval (76.5 ± 6.3, 70.3 ± 6.8, p < 0.001), cTp-e interval (83.1 ± 4.3 vs. 76±4.9, p < 0.001), Tp-e/QT (0.20 ± 0.02 vs. 0.2 ± 0.02, p < 0.001) and Tp-e/QTc ratios (0.2 ± 0.01 vs. 0.18 ± 0.01, p < 0.001) were increased in group 1 in comparison to group 2. Significant positive correlations were found between EFT thickness and Tp-e interval (r = 0.548, p < 0.001), cTp-e interval (r = 0.259, p = 0.01), and Tp-e/QT (r = 0.662, p < 0.001) and Tp-e/QTc ratios (r = 0.560, p < 0.001). Conclusion The present study shows that Tp-e and cTp-e interval, Tp-e/QT and Tp-e/QTc ratios were increased in subjects with increased EFT, which may suggest an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmia. PMID:26465871

  1. A comparison of dimensional accuracy between three different addition cured silicone impression materials.

    PubMed

    Forrester-Baker, L; Seymour, K G; Samarawickrama, D; Zou, L; Cherukara, G; Patel, M

    2005-06-01

    Ten impressions of a metal implant abutment were made with each of three addition-cured silicone impression materials. Using the technique of co-ordinate metrology, the shoulder region of the abutment and corresponding regions of both impressions and dies made from these impressions were scanned and measured. Comparison of these measurements indicated that the mean dimension measured from the shoulder region for each group of impression materials was significantly different from those taken from the original metal implant abutment. However, when these impressions were cast in a gypsum based die material, none of the measured dimensions taken from the casts were significantly different from those taken from the original metal implant abutment. Thus, any change in measured dimensions occurring during impression making, was compensated for in some way by the casting process. PMID:16011234

  2. Impression Procedures for Metal Frame Removable Partial Dentures as Applied by General Dental Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Fokkinga, Wietske A; van Uchelen, Judith; Witter, Dick J; Mulder, Jan; Creugers, Nico H J

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study analyzed impression procedures for conventional metal frame removable partial dentures (RPDs). Heads of RPD departments of three dental laboratories were asked to record features of all incoming impressions for RPDs during a 2-month period. Records included: (1) impression procedure, tray type (stock/custom), impression material (elastomer/alginate), use of border-molding material (yes/no); and (2) RPD type requested (distal-extension/tooth-bounded/combination). Of the 132 total RPD impressions, 111 (84%) involved custom trays, of which 73 (55%) were combined with an elastomer. Impression border-molding material was used in 4% of the cases. Associations between impression procedure and RPD type or dentists' year/university of graduation were not found. PMID:26929957

  3. Chemical enhancement of footwear impressions in blood on fabric - part 3: amino acid staining.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kevin J; Bandey, Helen; Savage, Kathleen; NicDaéid, Niamh

    2013-03-01

    Enhancement of footwear impressions, using ninhydrin or ninhydrin analogues is not considered common practice and such techniques are generally used to target amino acids present in fingermarks where the reaction gives rise to colour and possibly fluorescence. Ninhydrin and two of its analogues were used for the enhancement of footwear impressions in blood on various types, colours and porosities of fabric. Test footwear impressions on fabric were prepared using a specifically built rig to minimise the variability between each impression. Ninhydrin enhancement of footwear impressions in blood on light coloured fabric yielded good enhancement results, however the contrast was weak or non-existent on dark coloured fabrics. Other ninhydrin analogues which have the advantage of fluorescence failed to enhance the impressions in blood on all fabrics. The sequential treatment of impressions in blood on fabric with other blood enhancing reagents (e.g. protein stains and heme reagents) was also investigated. PMID:23380056

  4. Influence of the intentional voice quality on the impression of female speaker.

    PubMed

    Lukkarila, Päivi; Laukkanen, Anne-Maria; Palo, Pertti

    2012-12-01

    This study examines the relationship of voice quality and speech-based personality assessment of Finnish-speaking female speakers. Five Finnish-speaking female subjects recorded a text passage with eight different vocal qualities. Samples that passed the preselection test for the voice qualities were played to 50 Finnish-speaking listeners, who reported speaker impressions on a scale of 18 opposite trait pairs. Voices produced with forward placement received assessments of femininity and friendliness. Readers speaking with backward placement were considered less feminine, while breathy voice evoked assessments of emotionality and implausibility. Tense phonation as well as creakiness, nasality, and denasality gave rise to numerous negative notions. The results suggest that voice stereotypes have both internationality and cultural dependency. PMID:22616785

  5. Gender and Racial Stereotypes in Impression Formation and Social Decision-Making Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branscombe, Nyla R.; Smith, Eliot R.

    1990-01-01

    Male and female subjects asked to evaluate six candidates for a management training program responded more favorably toward female and Black subjects, in a manner suggesting a "reverse discrimination" effect in their final decisions. (DM)

  6. Lateral Orbitofrontal Cortex Involvement in Initial Negative Aesthetic Impression Formation

    PubMed Central

    Munar, Enric; Nadal, Marcos; Rosselló, Jaume; Flexas, Albert; Moratti, Stephan; Maestú, Fernando; Marty, Gisèle; Cela-Conde, Camilo J.

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that aesthetic appreciation is related with activity in several different brain regions. The identification of the neural correlates of beauty or liking ratings has been the focus of most prior studies. Not much attention has been directed towards the fact that humans are surrounded by objects that lead them to experience aesthetic indifference or leave them with a negative aesthetic impression. Here we explore the neural substrate of such experiences. Given the neuroimaging techniques that have been used, little is known about the temporal features of such brain activity. By means of magnetoencephalography we registered the moment at which brain activity differed while participants viewed images they considered to be beautiful or not. Results show that the first differential activity appears between 300 and 400 ms after stimulus onset. During this period activity in right lateral orbitofrontal cortex (lOFC) was greater while participants rated visual stimuli as not beautiful than when they rated them as beautiful. We argue that this activity is associated with an initial negative aesthetic impression formation, driven by the relative hedonic value of stimuli regarded as not beautiful. Additionally, our results contribute to the understanding of the nature of the functional roles of the lOFC. PMID:22675517

  7. Neural dissociations between meaningful and mere inconsistency in impression updating.

    PubMed

    Mende-Siedlecki, Peter; Todorov, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Recent neuroimaging work has identified a network of regions that work in concert to update impressions of other people, particularly in response to inconsistent behavior. However, the specific functional contributions of these regions to the updating process remain unclear. Using fMRI, we tested whether increases in activity triggered by inconsistent behavior reflect changes in the stored representations of other people in response to behavioral inconsistency, or merely a response to the inconsistency itself. Participants encountered a series of individuals whose behavior either changed in an attributionally meaningful fashion or was merely inconsistent with the immediately preceding behavior. We observed that left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC) and left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) were preferentially recruited in response to unexpected, immoral behavior, whereas a separate set of regions (including dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cingulate cortex and temporoparietal junction/inferior parietal lobule) was preferentially recruited in response to more mundane inconsistencies in behavior. These results shed light on the distributed systems supporting impression updating. Specifically, while many regions supporting updating may primarily respond to moment-to-moment changes in behavior, a subset of regions (e.g. vlPFC and IFG) may contribute to updating person representations in response to trait-relevant changes in behavior. PMID:27217118

  8. Three dimensional visualization and comparison of impressions on fired bullets.

    PubMed

    Banno, Atsuhiko; Masuda, Tomohito; Ikeuchi, Katsushi

    2004-03-10

    Currently, optical devices, such as microscopes and CCD cameras, are utilized for identification of bullets and tool marks in the field of forensic science. While these optical methods are easily manageable and effective, they are under great influence of illumination condition. In other words, appearances of striations through these optical devices have possibility to be changed by lighting condition. Besides these appearance-based approaches, we can utilize three dimensional (3D) geometric data of tool marks that are free from lighting condition. In this study, we focused on 3D geometric data of landmark impressions on fired bullets for identification. We obtained the 3D surface data of tool marks by a confocal microscope and reconstructed virtual impressions on a PC monitor from the geometric data. Furthermore, the 3D data are exploited to numerical matching of two surface shapes. We also visualized the difference of two shapes. In order to do this, two surface models are aligned automatically. In this process, pairings of correspondent points on both surfaces are determined. Distance analysis between these pairs leads to a shape comparison. Since comparison results are visualized, they are intuitive and easily perceptive. PMID:15036444

  9. Similar impressions of humanness for human and artificial singing voices in autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Kuriki, Shinji; Tamura, Yuri; Igarashi, Miki; Kato, Nobumasa; Nakano, Tamami

    2016-08-01

    People with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) exhibit impairments in the perception of and orientation to social information related to humans, and some people with ASD show higher preference toward human-like robots than other humans. We speculated that this behavioural bias in people with ASD is caused by a weakness in their perception of humanness. To address this issue, we investigated whether people with ASD detect a subtle difference between the same song sung by human and artificial voices even when the lyrics, melody and rhythm are identical. People without ASD answered that the songs sung by a human voice evoked more impressions of humanness (human-likeness, animateness, naturalness, emotion) and more positive feelings (warmth, familiarity, comfort) than those sung by an artificial voice. In contrast, people with ASD had similar impressions of humanness and positive feelings for the songs sung by the human and artificial voices. The evaluations of musical characteristics (complexity, regularity, brightness) did not differ between people with and without ASD. These results suggest that people with ASD are weak in their ability to perceive psychological attributes of humanness. PMID:27107740

  10. Evaluation of Mangosteen juice blend on biomarkers of inflammation in obese subjects: a pilot, dose finding study

    PubMed Central

    Udani, Jay K; Singh, Betsy B; Barrett, Marilyn L; Singh, Vijay J

    2009-01-01

    Background The ability to reduce inflammation in overweight and obese individuals may be valuable in preventing the progression to metabolic syndrome with associated risks for heart disease and diabetes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of multiple dosages of a proprietary Mangosteen Juice blend on indicators of inflammation and antioxidant levels in obese patients with elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Methods The study was an 8 week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study with a pre-study 2 week washout period. The study included four groups including placebo and three difference doses of the test product, XanGo Juice™: 3, 6 or 9 oz twice daily. The primary outcome measure of this study was high-sensitivity (HS)-CRP. Secondary outcome measures included other biochemical indicators of inflammation, anthropomorphic measures and a safety evaluation. Results One hundred twenty two (122) persons were screened for the study, 44 were randomized and 40 completed the study. HS-CRP measurements dropped after 8 weeks treatment compared to baseline in all 3 dose groups and increased in the placebo group. The changes from baseline were not significant but the comparison of change from baseline was significant for the 18 oz group when compared to placebo (p = 0.02). Other markers of inflammation (inflammatory cytokines) and a marker for lipid peroxidation (F2 isoprostane) did not show any significant differences when compared with placebo. There was a trend towards a decrease in BMI in the juice groups. There were no side effects reported in any of the groups and none of the laboratory or EKG safety assessments indicated clinically significant changes for any subject. Conclusion In this pilot, dose-finding study, a proprietary mangosteen juice blend (XanGo Juice™) reduced CRP levels (increased change from baseline) compared to placebo for those taking the highest dose of 18 oz per day. Further studies with a larger population are

  11. The Role of the Open and Distance Learning Subject Specialists in Promoting Self-Directed and Independent Learning: An Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castolo, Carmencita L.

    2006-01-01

    This study tries to assess the roles of the Open and Distance learning subject specialists in the Polytechnic University of the Philippines Open University (PUP OU) in promoting self-directed and independent learning as perceived by themselves. Results of analysis showed that PUP OU subject specialists were also active teachers with an accredited…

  12. Thiol-Ene functionalized siloxanes for use as elastomeric dental impression materials

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Megan A.; Jankousky, Katherine C.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Thiol- and allyl-functionalized siloxane oligomers are synthesized and evaluated for use as a radical-mediated, rapid set elastomeric dental impression material. Thiol-ene siloxane formulations are crosslinked using a redox-initiated polymerization scheme, and the mechanical properties of the thiol-ene network are manipulated through the incorporation of varying degrees of plasticizer and kaolin filler. Formulations with medium and light body consistencies are further evaluated for their ability to accurately replicate features on both the gross and microscopic levels. We hypothesize that thiol-ene functionalized siloxane systems will exhibit faster setting times and greater detail reproduction than commercially available polyvinylsiloxane (PVS) materials of comparable consistencies. Methods Thiol-ene functionalized siloxane mixtures formulated with varying levels of redox initiators, plasticizer, and kaolin filler are made and evaluated for their polymerization speed (FTIR), consistency (ISO4823.9.2), and surface energy (goniometer). Feature replication is evaluated quantitatively by SEM. The Tg, storage modulus, and creep behavior are determined by DMA. Results Increasing redox initiation rate increases the polymerization rate but at high levels also limits working time. Combining 0.86 wt% oxidizing agent with up to 5 wt% plasticizer gave a working time of 3 min and a setting time of 2 min. The selected medium and light body thiol-ene formulations also achieved greater qualitative detail reproduction than the commercial material and reproduced micrometer patterns with 98% accuracy. Significance Improving detail reproduction and setting speed is a primary focus of dental impression material design and synthesis. Radical-mediated polymerizations, particularly thiol-ene reactions, are recognized for their speed, reduced shrinkage, and ‘click’ nature. PMID:24553250

  13. Fertilizing ROSES through the STEM: Interdisciplinary Modules as Pre-service Research Experiences for Secondary STEM Educators (IMPRESS-Ed)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavic, Michael; Wiita, P. J.; Benoit, M.; Magee, N.

    2013-01-01

    IMPRESS-Ed is a program designed to provide authentic summer research experiences in the space, earth, and atmospheric sciences for pre-service K-12 educators at Long Island University (LIU) and The College of New Jersey (TCNJ). In 2011 and 2012, the program involved five students and took place over eight weeks with recruitment occurring during the preceding academic year. The program was divided into two modules: A common core module and an individual mentored research experience. The common module consisted of three units focusing on data-driven pedagogical approaches in astrophysics, tectonophysics, and atmospheric science, respectively. The common module also featured training sessions in observational astronomy, and use of a 3D geowall and state of the art planetarium. Participants in the program are also offered the opportunity to utilize the available TCNJ facilities with their future students. The individual mentored research module matched student interests with potential projects. All five students demonstrated strong gains in earth and space science literacy compared to a baseline measurement. Each student also reported gaining confidence to incorporate data and research-driven instruction in the space and earth sciences into the K-12 STEM classroom setting. All five research projects were also quite successful: several of the students plan to continue research during the academic year and two students are presenting research findings as first authors here at AAS. Other research results are likely to be presented at this year's American Geophysical Union meeting.

  14. [Morphometric study of total edentulous maxilla of Moroccan subjects].

    PubMed

    Zeroual, R; Andoh, A; El Mouahid, N; Chemlali, S

    2014-09-01

    Despite the importance of taking the primary dental impression, this act remains unfortunately neglected by most practitioners. Think to succeed a total removable prosthesis from a failed primary dental impression is a challenge for the practitioner and seems utopia. For this, you wish through our work give the importance to the choice of the mass-produced impression tray that is paramount for the success of the primary dental impression. This study examines a sample of 160 plaster primary models (80 maxillary and 80 mandibular) from primary dental impression carried out with mass-produced impression trays whether or not modified for new total edentulous patients having consulted at the University Dental centre in Casablanca for a prosthetic rehabilitation by total prosthesis. Thirty-six women and 44 men have been selected. The study showed that men have maxillary and mandibular arches longer and wider than those of women, and that the average value for several parameters measured is close to the measurements of the maxilla trays U3 and mandibular L3; Where the need for acquisition of large size dental impression tray, in accordance with the dimensions of our population in order to meet our expectations, namely: to respect the integrity of the support surfaces, to meet the mechanical qualities of the prosthesis, to restore the aesthetics and function by minimizing the grievances of the toothless total subject. PMID:25975064

  15. Ultrasound evaluation in combination with finger extension force measurements of the forearm musculus extensor digitorum communis in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Brorsson, Sofia; Nilsdotter, Anna; Hilliges, Marita; Sollerman, Christer; Aurell, Ylva

    2008-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of an ultrasound-based method of examining extensor muscle architecture, especially the parameters important for force development. This paper presents the combination of two non-invasive methods for studying the extensor muscle architecture using ultrasound simultaneously with finger extension force measurements. Methods M. extensor digitorum communis (EDC) was examined in 40 healthy subjects, 20 women and 20 men, aged 35–73 years. Ultrasound measurements were made in a relaxed position of the hand as well as in full contraction. Muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), pennation angle and contraction patterns were measured with ultrasound, and muscle volume and fascicle length were also estimated. Finger extension force was measured using a newly developed finger force measurement device. Results The following muscle parameters were determined: CSA, circumference, thickness, pennation angles and changes in shape of the muscle CSA. The mean EDC volume in men was 28.3 cm3 and in women 16.6 cm3. The mean CSA was 2.54 cm2 for men and 1.84 cm2 for women. The mean pennation angle for men was 6.5° and for women 5.5°. The mean muscle thickness for men was 1.2 cm and for women 0.76 cm. The mean fascicle length for men was 7.3 cm and for women 5.0 cm. Significant differences were found between men and women regarding EDC volume (p < 0.001), CSA (p < 0.001), pennation angle (p < 0.05), muscle thickness (p < 0.001), fascicle length (p < 0.001) and finger force (p < 0.001). Changes in the shape of muscle architecture during contraction were more pronounced in men than women (p < 0.01). The mean finger extension force for men was 96.7 N and for women 39.6 N. Muscle parameters related to the extension force differed between men and women. For men the muscle volume and muscle CSA were related to extension force, while for women muscle thickness was related to the extension force. Conclusion Ultrasound is a useful tool

  16. Impressions of the Meson Spectrum: Hybrids & Exotics, present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, M. R.

    2016-03-01

    It has long been expected that the spectrum of hadrons in QCD would be far richer and extensive than experiment has so far revealed. While there have been experimental hints of this richness for some time, it is really only in the last few years that dramatic progress has been seen in the exploration both experimentally and in calculations on the lattice. Precision studies enabled by new technology both with detectors and high performance computations are converging on an understanding of the spectrum in strong coupling QCD. These methodologies are laying the foundation for a decade of potential discovery that electro and photoproduction experiments at Jefferson Lab, which when combined with key results on B and charmonium decays from both e+e- and pp colliders, should turn mere impressions of the light meson spectrum into a high definition picture.

  17. The complex interplay between semantics and grammar in impression formation.

    PubMed

    Shreves, Wyley B; Hart, William; Adams, John M; Guadagno, Rosanna E; Eno, Cassie A

    2014-09-01

    We sought to bridge findings showing that (a) describing a person's behavior with the perfective verb aspect (did), compared to the imperfective aspect (was doing), increases processing of semantic knowledge unrelated to the target's action such as stereotypes and (b) an increased recognition of stereotypical thoughts often promotes a judgment correction for the stereotypes. We hypothesized an interplay between grammar (verb conjugation) and semantic information (gender) in impression-formation. Participants read a resume, attributed to a male or female, for a traditionally masculine job. When the resume was written in the imperfective, people rated a male (vs. female) more positively. When the resume was in the perfective, this pattern reversed. Only these latter effects of gender were influenced by cognitive load. Further, people more quickly indicated the applicant's gender in the perfective condition, suggesting an enhanced focus on gender during processing. PMID:24950389

  18. Study on impression smears of hepatic coccidiosis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sivajothi, S; Reddy, B Sudhakara; Rayulu, V C

    2016-09-01

    Hepatic coccidiosis is a contagious and lethal disease condition in rabbits. The disease was recorded in six rabbits suffering with watery diarrhoea. Clinically, affected rabbits showed decreased growth rate, anorexia, debilitation, diarrhea and rough hair coat. Examination of the faecal samples revealed the presence of unsporulated oocysts of Eimeria spp. After sporulation Eimeria stiedae oocysts were identified. Postmortem examination revealed hepatomegaly with presence of discrete yellowish-white nodules on the surface of the liver. Impression smears from the liver revealed the presence of numerous developmental stages of E. stiedae corresponding with the stage of the liver lesion and also represent the histological changes of the liver. Rabbits were treated with a combination of sulphaquinoxaline and diaveridine for five days. PMID:27605807

  19. Optical impression systems for CAD-CAM restorations.

    PubMed

    Galhano, Graziela Ávila Prado; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Mazaro, José Vitor Quinelli

    2012-11-01

    Computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing images can be taken through either direct or indirect imaging. For the indirect systems, the digitalization is obtained from the impression material or cast, and for the direct ones the image is taken directly from the mouth using intraoral scanners.The direct acquisition systems have been constantly improved because these are less invasive, quicker, and more precise than the conventional method. Besides, the digital images can be easily stored for a long time. Therefore, the aim of this paper was to describe and discuss based on the literature the main direct image acquisition systems available on the market: CEREC Bluecam (Sirona), Lava C.O.S. System (3M ESPE), iTero System (Cadent/Straumann), and E4D System (D4D Technologies). PMID:23172483

  20. Impression Creep Behavior of a Cast AZ91 Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabirian, F.; Mahmudi, R.

    2009-01-01

    The creep behavior of the cast AZ91 magnesium alloy was investigated by impression testing. The tests were carried out under constant punching stress in the range 100 to 650 MPa, corresponding to 0.007 ≤ σ imp/ G ≤ 0.044, at temperatures in the range 425 to 570 K. Assuming a power-law relationship between the impression velocity and stress, depending on the testing temperature, stress exponents of 4.2 to 6.0 were obtained. When the experimental creep rates were normalized to the grain size and effective diffusion coefficient, a stress exponent of approximately 5 was obtained, which is in complete agreement with stress exponents determined by the conventional creep testing of the same material reported in the literature. Calculation of the activation energy showed a slight decrease in the activation energy with increasing stress such that the creep-activation energy of 122.9 kJ/mol at σ imp/ G = 0.020 decreases to 94.0 kJ/mol at σ imp/ G = 0.040. Based on the obtained stress exponents and activation energy data, it is proposed that dislocation climb is the controlling creep mechanism. However, due to the decreasing trend of creep-activation energy with stress, it is suggested that two parallel mechanisms of lattice and pipe-diffusion-controlled dislocation climb are competing. To elucidate the contribution of each mechanism to the overall creep deformation, the creep rates were calculated based on the effective activation energy. This yielded a criterion that showed that, in the high-stress regimes, the experimental activation energies fall in the range in which the operative creep mechanism is dislocation climb controlled by dislocation pipe diffusion. In the low-stress regime, however, the lattice-diffusion dislocation climb is dominant.

  1. Patient Impression and Satisfaction of a Self-administered, Automated Medical History-taking Device in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sanjay; Goldberg, Andrew D.; Menchine, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We evaluated patient impressions and satisfaction of an innovative self-administered, hand-held touch-screen tablet to gather detailed medical information from emergency department (ED) patients in the waiting room prior to physician contact. Methods: Adult, medically stable patients presenting to the ED at Los Angeles County Hospital used the PatientTouch™ system to answer a series of questions about their current history of present illness and past medical/surgical histories in English or Spanish. Patients then completed a survey rating their experience. Results: Among 173 participants, opinion of PatientTouch™ was strongly positive; 93.6% (95%CI 90.0–97.3%) felt the physical product was easy to hold and handle, and 97.1% (94.6–99.6%) felt the questions were detailed enough for them to fully describe their condition; 97.8% (95.4–100.0%) felt using PatientTouch™ would help them organize their thoughts and communicate better with their physician, 94.8% (91.4–98.1%) thought it would improve the quality of their care, and 97.1% (94.6–99.6%) expressed desire to use the product again in the future. Conclusion: The study was conducted at a largely Hispanic county ED, and only patients with 1 of 6 pre-determined chief complaints participated. We did not include a control group to assess if perceived improvements in communication translated to measurable differences. In this pilot study, patients were highly satisfied with all aspects of the PatientTouch™ self-administered, hand-held, touch-screen tablet. Importantly, subjects felt it would help them better communicate with their doctor, would improve their overall quality of care and overwhelmingly expressed a desire to use it in the future. PMID:24695871

  2. To study the flow property of seven commercially available zinc oxide eugenol impression material at various time intervals after mixing.

    PubMed

    Katna, Vishal; Suresh, S; Vivek, Sharma; Meenakshi, Khandelwal; Ankita, Gaur

    2014-12-01

    Aims and objective of the study was to evaluate the flow property of seven commercially available zinc oxide eugenol impression materials at various time intervals, after mixing 49 samples (seven groups) were fabricated for flow property of the material. The sample were fabricated as equal length of base and accelerator paste of the test materials was taken on the glass slab and mixed with a rigid stainless steel spatula as per manufacturers recommendation till the homogenous mix was obtained. The mix material was loaded in glass syringe and 0.5 ml material was injected on a cellophane sheet placed on marked glass plate. A cellophane sheet and glass plate 70 and 500 g weight was carefully placed on freshly dispensed zinc oxide eugenol impression paste sequentially. The diameter of the mix was noted after 30 s and 1 min of load application and also after the final set of material. The diameter gives the flow of material. The samples were stored at the room temperature. The data of the flow property was analyzed with analysis of variance, Post hoc test and t test. The flow of the zinc oxide eugenol impression paste after 30 s, 1 min and final set of load application for Group A to Group G was noted. Maximum flow was seen for Group G zinc oxide eugenol impression material followed by Group F, D, E, B, C and A in descending order respectively after 30 s, where as the flow property changed after 1 min in the sequence of maximum for Group G followed by Group E, D, B, A, C, and F. Lastly after final set of the impression material the flow maximum for Group G followed by Group E, D, C, F, A and B in descending order. Based on statistical analysis of the results and within in the limitations of this in-vitro study, the following conclusions were drawn that; the flow of zinc oxide eugenol impression material after 30 s, 1 min and that after the final set was maximum for P.S.P. (Group G) and the flow for PYREX (Group A) was minimum. PMID:25489163

  3. Interpretation of appearance: the effect of facial features on first impressions and personality.

    PubMed

    Wolffhechel, Karin; Fagertun, Jens; Jacobsen, Ulrik Plesner; Majewski, Wiktor; Hemmingsen, Astrid Sofie; Larsen, Catrine Lohmann; Lorentzen, Sofie Katrine; Jarmer, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Appearance is known to influence social interactions, which in turn could potentially influence personality development. In this study we focus on discovering the relationship between self-reported personality traits, first impressions and facial characteristics. The results reveal that several personality traits can be read above chance from a face, and that facial features influence first impressions. Despite the former, our prediction model fails to reliably infer personality traits from either facial features or first impressions. First impressions, however, could be inferred more reliably from facial features. We have generated artificial, extreme faces visualising the characteristics having an effect on first impressions for several traits. Conclusively, we find a relationship between first impressions, some personality traits and facial features and consolidate that people on average assess a given face in a highly similar manner. PMID:25233221

  4. Interpretation of Appearance: The Effect of Facial Features on First Impressions and Personality

    PubMed Central

    Wolffhechel, Karin; Fagertun, Jens; Jacobsen, Ulrik Plesner; Majewski, Wiktor; Hemmingsen, Astrid Sofie; Larsen, Catrine Lohmann; Lorentzen, Sofie Katrine; Jarmer, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Appearance is known to influence social interactions, which in turn could potentially influence personality development. In this study we focus on discovering the relationship between self-reported personality traits, first impressions and facial characteristics. The results reveal that several personality traits can be read above chance from a face, and that facial features influence first impressions. Despite the former, our prediction model fails to reliably infer personality traits from either facial features or first impressions. First impressions, however, could be inferred more reliably from facial features. We have generated artificial, extreme faces visualising the characteristics having an effect on first impressions for several traits. Conclusively, we find a relationship between first impressions, some personality traits and facial features and consolidate that people on average assess a given face in a highly similar manner. PMID:25233221

  5. Evaluation of the Effects of Argumentation Based Science Teaching on 5th Grade Students' Conceptual Understanding of the Subjects Related to "Matter and Change"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çinar, Derya; Bayraktar, Sule

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of Argumentation Based Science Teaching on 5th grade students' conceptual understanding of the subjects related to "Matter and Change". This research is a qualitative research and its design is a multiple (compare) case study. In this study, semi-structured interviews related to the…

  6. Evaluation of the Effects of Argumentation Based Science Teaching on 5th Grade Students' Conceptual Understanding of the Subjects Related to "Matter and Change"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çinar, Derya; Bayraktar, Sule

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of Argumentation Based Science Teaching on 5th grade students' conceptual understanding of the subjects related to "Matter and Change". This research is a qualitative research and its design is a multiple (compare) case study. In this study, semi-structured interviews related to the…

  7. Comparative Analyses of the Teaching Methods and Evaluation Practices in English Subject at Secondary School Certificate (SSC) and General Certificate of Education (GCE O-Level) in Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behlol, Malik Ghulam; Anwar, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    The study was conducted to compare the teaching methods and evaluation practices in English subject at secondary school certificate (SSC) and general certificate of education GCE-O-level in Pakistan. The population of the study was students, teachers and experts at SSC and 0-level in the Punjab province. Purposive and random sampling techniques…

  8. A Single Step Impression Technique of Flabby Ridges Using Monophase Polyvinylsiloxane Material: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Umesh Y.; Reddy, Vikram Simha; Hosi, Rushad Nariman

    2014-01-01

    Complete denture fabrication in clinically compromised situations such as flabby ridges is a challenging task for the clinician. Accurate impressioning of these tissues plays a major role in ensuring a well-fitting prosthesis. In this paper, the authors have proposed a newer technique of impression making of the flabby tissues using a combination of readily available newer and older materials to ensure an accurate and easy impression of these tissues. PMID:24872897

  9. Objective forensic analysis of striated, quasi-striated and impressed toolmarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spotts, Ryan E.

    Following the 1993 Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc. court case and continuing to the 2010 National Academy of Sciences report, comparative forensic toolmark examination has received many challenges to its admissibility in court cases and its scientific foundations. Many of these challenges deal with the subjective nature in determining whether toolmarks are identifiable. This questioning of current identification methods has created a demand for objective methods of identification - "objective" implying known error rates and statistically reliability. The demand for objective methods has resulted in research that created a statistical algorithm capable of comparing toolmarks to determine their statistical similarity, and thus the ability to separate matching and nonmatching toolmarks. This was expanded to the creation of virtual toolmarking (characterization of a tool to predict the toolmark it will create). The statistical algorithm, originally designed for two-dimensional striated toolmarks, had been successfully applied to striated screwdriver and quasi-striated plier toolmarks. Following this success, a blind study was conducted to validate the virtual toolmarking capability using striated screwdriver marks created at various angles of incidence. Work was also performed to optimize the statistical algorithm by implementing means to ensure the algorithm operations were constrained to logical comparison regions (e.g. the opposite ends of two toolmarks do not need to be compared because they do not coincide with each other). This work was performed on quasi-striated shear cut marks made with pliers - a previously tested, more difficult application of the statistical algorithm that could demonstrate the difference in results due to optimization. The final research conducted was performed with pseudostriated impression toolmarks made with chisels. Impression marks, which are more complex than striated marks, were analyzed using the algorithm to separate

  10. Identification by ultrasound evaluation of the carotid and femoral arteries of high-risk subjects missed by three validated cardiovascular disease risk algorithms.

    PubMed

    Postley, John E; Luo, Yanting; Wong, Nathan D; Gardin, Julius M

    2015-11-15

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) events are the leading cause of death in the United States and globally. Traditional global risk algorithms may miss 50% of patients who experience ASCVD events. Noninvasive ultrasound evaluation of the carotid and femoral arteries can identify subjects at high risk for ASCVD events. We examined the ability of different global risk algorithms to identify subjects with femoral and/or carotid plaques found by ultrasound. The study population consisted of 1,464 asymptomatic adults (39.8% women) aged 23 to 87 years without previous evidence of ASCVD who had ultrasound evaluation of the carotid and femoral arteries. Three ASCVD risk algorithms (10-year Framingham Risk Score [FRS], 30-year FRS, and lifetime risk) were compared for the 939 subjects who met the algorithm age criteria. The frequency of femoral plaque as the only plaque was 18.3% in the total group and 14.8% in the risk algorithm groups (n = 939) without a significant difference between genders in frequency of femoral plaque as the only plaque. Those identified as high risk by the lifetime risk algorithm included the most men and women who had plaques either femoral or carotid (59% and 55%) but had lower specificity because the proportion of subjects who actually had plaques in the high-risk group was lower (50% and 35%) than in those at high risk defined by the FRS algorithms. In conclusion, ultrasound evaluation of the carotid and femoral arteries can identify subjects at risk of ASCVD events missed by traditional risk-predicting algorithms. The large proportion of subjects with femoral plaque only supports the use of including both femoral and carotid arteries in ultrasound evaluation. PMID:26434511

  11. The slope parameter approach to marine cathodic protection design and its application to impressed current systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hartt, W.H.

    1999-07-01

    The recently developed slope parameter approach to design of galvanic anode cathodic protection (cp) systems for marine structures constitutes an advancement in this technology compared to current practice, primarily because the former is first principles based and the latter is an empirical algorithm. In this paper, the slope parameter approach is reviewed; and related applications for which it can be utilized, including (1) design of new and retrofit cp systems, (2) evaluation of potential survey data, and (3) cp system design for complex geometries, are mentioned. The design current density is identified as the single remaining parameter for which values must be projected solely by experience or experimentation. In addition, the slope parameter approach is applied to the results of impressed current cp experiments, and it is shown how parameters for this can be interrelated with those of galvanic anode cp. Advantages of this capability are identified and discussed.

  12. [Value of results of animal experiments for the evaluation of drugs. 3. Animal trials and subjective probability].

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, R; Kienle, G; Knipping, W

    1976-04-22

    Inasmuch as the findings in pharmacology and toxicology are based on animal trials these disciplines have to be considered as subjective sciences, since the experimentally obtained objective data become medically relevant only on the basis of subjective probabilities. The value of pharmacological and toxicological tests is dependent on the quality of the investigator. Data obtained in animals trials are of no relevance for human medicine unless the investigator substantiates his subjective probabilities and at the same time demonstrates how the hypotheses won in animal trials can be verified in man. Toxicological testing methods allowing the "preselection" of drugs or any other kind of deductions without verification in man do not exist. Animal studies which are not based on the principles of decision theory serve merely as an alibi and may lead to wrong conclusions. Besides, they interfere with the German Animal Protection Law. Methodological problems can neither be solved by normative regulations of an administrative authority nor by increasing experimental activity. PMID:964836

  13. Properties of a new polyether urethane dimethacrylate photoinitiated elastomeric impression material.

    PubMed

    Craig, R G; Hare, P H

    1990-01-01

    The photoinitiated impression material is supplied premixed as a light-bodied material in a light-tight plastic syringe and as a heavy-bodied material in a tube. The impression material has excellent physical, mechanical, and clinical qualities with noteworthy long working times, short setting times, dimensional stability, accuracy, high tear strength, good wettability, biocompatibility, and ease of cold disinfection without loss of quality. The impression material is also compatible with gypsum and silver or copper metallizing baths. Accurate casts can be obtained by means of either a double-impression technique or a double-mix technique. PMID:2295985

  14. Establishing versus preserving impressions: Predicting success in the multiple audience problem.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Austin Lee; Cottrell, Catherine A

    2015-12-01

    People sometimes seek to convey discrepant impressions of themselves to different audiences simultaneously. Research suggests people are generally successful in this "multiple audience problem." Adding to previous research, the current research sought to examine factors that may limit this success by measuring social anxiety and placing participants into situations requiring them to either establish or preserve multiple impressions simultaneously. In general, participants were more successful when preserving previously conveyed impressions than when establishing impressions for the first time. In contrast, social anxiety did not affect multiple audience success. In all, this research offers valuable insight into potential challenges that people face in many social situations. PMID:25581114

  15. An innovative impression technique for fabrication of a custom made ocular prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tripuraneni, Sunil Chandra; Vadapalli, Sriharsha Babu; Ravikiran, P; Nirupama, N

    2015-01-01

    Various impression and fitting techniques have been described in the past for restoring ocular defects. The present article describes a new direct impression technique for recording and rehabilitating ocular defects, by custom-made ocular prosthesis. All the techniques described in the history, mainly concentrated in recording the tissue surface of the defect, which made it difficult to contour the palpebral surface resulting in the poor esthetics of the prosthesis. The present impression technique uses heavy bodied polyvinyl siloxane impression material, which facilitates accurate recording of the tissue surface and the palpebral surface of the defect, resulting in the fabrication of functionally and esthetically acceptable prosthesis. PMID:26265651

  16. Chemical enhancement of footwear impressions in blood on fabric - part 2: peroxidase reagents.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kevin J; Savage, Kathleen A; Bandey, Helen; Ciuksza, Tomasz; Nic Daéid, Niamh

    2011-09-01

    This study investigates the optimisation of peroxidase based enhancement techniques for footwear impressions made in blood on various fabric surfaces. Four different haem reagents: leuco crystal violet (LCV), leuco malachite green (LMG), fluorescein and luminol were used to enhance the blood contaminated impressions. The enhancement techniques in this study were used successfully to enhance the impressions in blood on light coloured surfaces, however, only fluorescent and/or chemiluminescent techniques allowed visualisation on dark coloured fabrics, denim and leather. Luminol was the only technique to enhance footwear impressions made in blood on all the fabrics investigated in this study. PMID:21889107

  17. How Good Is Our School? Using ICT in Learning and Teaching: Curriculum Area and Subject Appendix. Self-Evaluation Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This document contains curriculum areas where information and communications technology (ICT) can be an effective tool in learning and teaching when used by pupils and/or teachers. These include: (1) Art and design; (2) Business education subjects; (3) Biology and science; (4) Chemistry and science; (5) English, English as an additional language…

  18. Objective and Subjective Evaluations of a TV-Program versus Small Group Instruction for the Iowa Drug Information Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Domingo; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A study to determine whether the TV approach for instructing drug information systems is more efficient, in terms of cost and learning effectiveness than traditional educational programing, is described. Students preferred traditional teaching over the TV production; however, students subjected to the TV variable achieved better test scores.…

  19. Retrospective and Prospective Evaluations of Environmental Quality under Urban Renewal as Determinants of Residents' Subjective Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Chau-kiu; Leung, Kwan-kwok

    2008-01-01

    Claims about the impacts of environmental quality associated with urban renewal on the resident's subjective quality of life are more speculative than empirically grounded. To clarify the impacts of environmental quality under urban renewal, this study surveyed 876 residents living in housing surrounding seven urban renewal sites in Hong Kong. It…

  20. Problems Related to the Use of Human Subjects in Clinical Evaluation/Responsibility for Follow-up Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Richard N.

    1991-01-01

    This presentation on licensing and credentialing in dentistry denounces the use of human subjects for entry level clinical examinations in dentistry as contrary to the values of the profession that the patient's welfare is paramount. Recommended, instead, are various forms of simulation. (DB)