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Sample records for evaluation lab ndel

  1. Elucidating the relationship between DISC1, NDEL1 and NDE1 and the risk for schizophrenia: Evidence of epistasis and competitive binding

    PubMed Central

    Burdick, Katherine E.; Kamiya, Atsushi; Hodgkinson, Colin A.; Lencz, Todd; DeRosse, Pamela; Ishizuka, Koko; Elashvili, Sarah; Arai, Hiroyuki; Goldman, David; Sawa, Akira; Malhotra, Anil K.

    2008-01-01

    DISC1 influences susceptibility to psychiatric disease and related phenotypes. Intact functions of DISC1 and its binding partners, NDEL1 and NDE1, are critical to neurodevelopmental processes aberrant in schizophrenia (SZ). Despite evidence of an NDEL1–DISC1 protein interaction, there have been no investigations of the NDEL1 gene or the relationship between NDEL1 and DISC1 in SZ. We genotyped six NDEL1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 275 Caucasian SZ patients and 200 controls and tested for association and interaction between the functional SNP Ser704Cys in DISC1 and NDEL1. We also evaluated the relationship between NDE1 and DISC1 genotype and SZ. Finally, in a series of in vitro assays, we determined the binding profiles of NDEL1 and NDE1, in relation to DISC1 Ser704Cys. We observed a single haplotype block within NDEL1; the majority of variation was captured by NDEL1 rs1391768. We observed a significant interaction between rs1391768 and DISC1 Ser704Cys, with the effect of NDEL1 on SZ evident only against the background of DISC1 Ser704 homozygosity. Secondary analyses revealed no direct relationship between NDE1 genotype and SZ; however, there was an opposite pattern of risk for NDE1 genotype when conditioned on DISC1 Ser704Cys, with NDE1 rs3784859 imparting a significant effect but only in the context of a Cys-carrying background. In addition, we report opposing binding patterns of NDEL1 and NDE1 to Ser704 versus Cys704, at the same DISC1 binding domain. These data suggest that NDEL1 significantly influences risk for SZ via an interaction with DISC1. We propose a model where NDEL1 and NDE1 compete for binding with DISC1. PMID:18469341

  2. [Georg Friedrich Händel's eye disease].

    PubMed

    Evers, S

    1993-09-01

    In his last years Georg Friedrich Händel suffered from a loss of sight not definitely to be defined. Based on primary sources, this disease, often mentioned in his biographies, is described and analysed. Altogether, Händel's eye-disease can be best interpreted as a central vascular disorder with degeneration of retina or with ischemic changes in the corresponding nuclei or tractus, complicated by a simple senile or post-traumatic cataract. Händel's profile of risk factors points most probably to a vascular degeneration of macula or a damage of choroidal vessels. Händel's eye-disease must be seen in relation to his cerebro-vascular disorder. His most probable strokes as well as his loss of sight were of vital importance in his biography, as is reflected even by his compositions. However, both disorders did not fundamentally influence his creativity. Only in a few compositions a reference to the loss of sight can be found. Apart from changes in concert-practising during his last years Händel's eye-disease, however, had no direct effect on his musical work. PMID:8264215

  3. Evaluating E-Labs' Experimentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plaisent, Michel; Maguiraga, Lassana; Bernard, Prosper; Larhrib, Samir

    2004-01-01

    This communication discusses preliminary results on an experimentation of e-Learning with MIS students, mainly in order to cope with the logistics of lab organization. A learning management software was installed which changed completely the learning process, from content to logistics. Students have expressed their satisfaction with the e-Learning…

  4. Regulation of the actin cytoskeleton by the Ndel1-Tara complex is critical for cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ji-Ho; Kwak, Yongdo; Woo, Youngsik; Park, Cana; Lee, Seol-Ae; Lee, Haeryun; Park, Sung Jin; Suh, Yeongjun; Suh, Bo Kyoung; Goo, Bon Seong; Mun, Dong Jin; Sanada, Kamon; Nguyen, Minh Dang; Park, Sang Ki

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear distribution element-like 1 (Ndel1) plays pivotal roles in diverse biological processes and is implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple neurodevelopmental disorders. Ndel1 function by regulating microtubules and intermediate filaments; however, its functional link with the actin cytoskeleton is largely unknown. Here, we show that Ndel1 interacts with TRIO-associated repeat on actin (Tara), an actin-bundling protein, to regulate cell movement. In vitro wound healing and Boyden chamber assays revealed that Ndel1- or Tara-deficient cells were defective in cell migration. Moreover, Tara overexpression induced the accumulation of Ndel1 at the cell periphery and resulted in prominent co-localization with F-actin. This redistribution of Ndel1 was abolished by deletion of the Ndel1-interacting domain of Tara, suggesting that the altered peripheral localization of Ndel1 requires a physical interaction with Tara. Furthermore, co-expression of Ndel1 and Tara in SH-SY5Y cells caused a synergistic increase in F-actin levels and filopodia formation, suggesting that Tara facilitates cell movement by sequestering Ndel1 at peripheral structures to regulate actin remodeling. Thus, we demonstrated that Ndel1 interacts with Tara to regulate cell movement. These findings reveal a novel role of the Ndel1-Tara complex in actin reorganization during cell movement. PMID:27546710

  5. Regulation of the actin cytoskeleton by the Ndel1-Tara complex is critical for cell migration.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ji-Ho; Kwak, Yongdo; Woo, Youngsik; Park, Cana; Lee, Seol-Ae; Lee, Haeryun; Park, Sung Jin; Suh, Yeongjun; Suh, Bo Kyoung; Goo, Bon Seong; Mun, Dong Jin; Sanada, Kamon; Nguyen, Minh Dang; Park, Sang Ki

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear distribution element-like 1 (Ndel1) plays pivotal roles in diverse biological processes and is implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple neurodevelopmental disorders. Ndel1 function by regulating microtubules and intermediate filaments; however, its functional link with the actin cytoskeleton is largely unknown. Here, we show that Ndel1 interacts with TRIO-associated repeat on actin (Tara), an actin-bundling protein, to regulate cell movement. In vitro wound healing and Boyden chamber assays revealed that Ndel1- or Tara-deficient cells were defective in cell migration. Moreover, Tara overexpression induced the accumulation of Ndel1 at the cell periphery and resulted in prominent co-localization with F-actin. This redistribution of Ndel1 was abolished by deletion of the Ndel1-interacting domain of Tara, suggesting that the altered peripheral localization of Ndel1 requires a physical interaction with Tara. Furthermore, co-expression of Ndel1 and Tara in SH-SY5Y cells caused a synergistic increase in F-actin levels and filopodia formation, suggesting that Tara facilitates cell movement by sequestering Ndel1 at peripheral structures to regulate actin remodeling. Thus, we demonstrated that Ndel1 interacts with Tara to regulate cell movement. These findings reveal a novel role of the Ndel1-Tara complex in actin reorganization during cell movement. PMID:27546710

  6. Status epilepticus stimulates NDEL1 expression via the CREB/CRE pathway in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Sik; Lee, Boyoung; Hansen, Katelin F; Aten, Sydney; Horning, Paul; Wheaton, Kelin L; Impey, Soren; Hoyt, Kari R; Obrietan, Karl

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear distribution element-like 1 (NDEL1/NUDEL) is a mammalian homolog of the Aspergillus nidulans nuclear distribution molecule NudE. NDEL1 plays a critical role in neuronal migration, neurite outgrowth and neuronal positioning during brain development; however within the adult central nervous system, limited information is available regarding NDEL1 expression and functions. Here, the goal was to examine inducible NDEL1 expression in the adult mouse forebrain. Immunolabeling revealed NDEL1 within the forebrain, including the cortex and hippocampus, as well as the midbrain and hypothalamus. Expression was principally localized to perikarya. Using a combination of immunolabeling and RNA seq profiling, we detected a marked and long-lasting upregulation of NDEL1 expression within the hippocampus following a pilocarpine-evoked repetitive seizure paradigm. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis identified a cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) binding site within the CpG island proximal to the NDEL1 gene, and in vivo transgenic repression of CREB led to a marked downregulation of seizure-evoked NDEL1 expression. Together these data indicate that NDEL1 is inducibly expressed in the adult nervous system, and that signaling via the CREB/CRE transcriptional pathway is likely involved. The role of NDEL1 in neuronal migration and neurite outgrowth during development raises the interesting prospect that inducible NDEL1 in the mature nervous system could contribute to the well-characterized structural and functional plasticity resulting from repetitive seizure activity. PMID:27298008

  7. Evaluating Computer Lab Modules for Large Biology Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichinger, David C.; And Others

    This paper describes the first phase of a study to investigate students' evaluations of computer laboratory modules in a university-level, non-majors biology course. The National Science Foundation-funded project has two primary goals: (1) to develop programmable, multifunctional Bio LabStations for data collection and analysis, lab extensions,…

  8. Ndel1 suppresses ciliogenesis in proliferating cells by regulating the trichoplein-Aurora A pathway.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Hironori; Goto, Hidemasa; Kasahara, Kousuke; Kumamoto, Kanako; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Inoko, Akihito; Yamano, Shotaro; Wanibuchi, Hideki; He, Dongwei; Goshima, Naoki; Kiyono, Tohru; Hirotsune, Shinji; Inagaki, Masaki

    2016-02-15

    Primary cilia protrude from the surface of quiescent cells and disassemble at cell cycle reentry. We previously showed that ciliary reassembly is suppressed by trichoplein-mediated Aurora A activation pathway in growing cells. Here, we report that Ndel1, a well-known modulator of dynein activity, localizes at the subdistal appendage of the mother centriole, which nucleates a primary cilium. In the presence of serum, Ndel1 depletion reduces trichoplein at the mother centriole and induces unscheduled primary cilia formation, which is reverted by forced trichoplein expression or coknockdown of KCTD17 (an E3 ligase component protein for trichoplein). Serum starvation induced transient Ndel1 degradation, subsequent to the disappearance of trichoplein at the mother centriole. Forced expression of Ndel1 suppressed trichoplein degradation and axonemal microtubule extension during ciliogenesis, similar to trichoplein induction or KCTD17 knockdown. Most importantly, the proportion of ciliated and quiescent cells was increased in the kidney tubular epithelia of newborn Ndel1-hypomorphic mice. Thus, Ndel1 acts as a novel upstream regulator of the trichoplein-Aurora A pathway to inhibit primary cilia assembly. PMID:26880200

  9. Genome-wide investigation of schizophrenia associated plasma Ndel1 enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Gadelha, Ary; Coleman, Jonathan; Breen, Gerome; Mazzoti, Diego Robles; Yonamine, Camila M; Pellegrino, Renata; Ota, Vanessa Kiyomi; Belangero, Sintia Iole; Glessner, Joseph; Sleiman, Patrick; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hayashi, Mirian A F; Bressan, Rodrigo A

    2016-04-01

    Ndel1 is a DISC1-interacting oligopeptidase that cleaves in vitro neuropeptides as neurotensin and bradykinin, and which has been associated with both neuronal migration and neurite outgrowth. We previously reported that plasma Ndel1 enzyme activity is lower in patients with schizophrenia (SCZ) compared to healthy controls (HCs). To our knowledge, no previous study has investigated the genetic factors associated with the plasma Ndel1 enzyme activity. In the current analyses, samples from 83 SCZ patients and 92 control subjects that were assayed for plasma Ndel1 enzyme activity were genotyped on Illumina Omni Express arrays. A genetic relationship matrix using genome-wide information was then used for ancestry correction, and association statistics were calculated genome-wide. Ndel1 enzyme activity was significantly lower in patients with SCZ (t=4.9; p<0.001) and was found to be associated with CAMK1D, MAGI2, CCDC25, and GABGR3, at a level of suggestive significance (p<10(-6)), independent of the clinical status. Then, we performed a model to investigate the observed differences for case/control measures. 2 SNPs at region 1p22.2 reached the p<10(-7) level. ZFPM2 and MAD1L1 were the only two genes with more than one hit at 10(-6) order of p value. Therefore, Ndel1 enzyme activity is a complex trait influenced by many different genetic variants that may contribute to SCZ physiopathology. PMID:26851141

  10. Experience in evaluating AAL solutions in living labs.

    PubMed

    Colomer, Juan Bautista Montalvá; Salvi, Dario; Cabrera-Umpierrez, Maria Fernanda; Arredondo, Maria Teresa; Abril, Patricia; Jimenez-Mixco, Viveca; García-Betances, Rebeca; Fioravanti, Alessio; Pastorino, Matteo; Cancela, Jorge; Medrano, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Ambient assisted living (AAL) is a complex field, where different technologies are integrated to offer solutions for the benefit of different stakeholders. Several evaluation techniques are commonly applied that tackle specific aspects of AAL; however, holistic evaluation approaches are lacking when addressing the needs of both developers and end-users. Living labs have been often used as real-life test and experimentation environments for co-designing AAL technologies and validating them with relevant stakeholders. During the last five years, we have been evaluating AAL systems and services in the framework of various research projects. This paper presents the lessons learned in this experience and proposes a set of harmonized guidelines to conduct evaluations in living labs. PMID:24763209

  11. Evaluation of Inter-Mountain Labs infrasound sensors : July 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Darren M.

    2007-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has tested and evaluated three Inter Mountain Labs infrasound sensors. The test results included in this report were in response to static and tonal-dynamic input signals. Most test methodologies used were based on IEEE Standards 1057 for Digitizing Waveform Recorders and 1241 for Analog to Digital Converters; others were designed by Sandia specifically for infrasound application evaluation and for supplementary criteria not addressed in the IEEE standards. The objective of this work was to evaluate the overall technical performance of the Inter Mountain Labs (IML) infrasound sensor model SS. The results of this evaluation were only compared to relevant noise models; due to a lack of manufactures documentation notes on the sensors under test prior to testing. The tests selected for this system were chosen to demonstrate different performance aspects of the components under test.

  12. Experience in Evaluating AAL Solutions in Living Labs

    PubMed Central

    Colomer, Juan Bautista Montalvá; Salvi, Dario; Cabrera-Umpierrez, Maria Fernanda; Arredondo, Maria Teresa; Abril, Patricia; Jimenez-Mixco, Viveca; García-Betances, Rebeca; Fioravanti, Alessio; Pastorino, Matteo; Cancela, Jorge; Medrano, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Ambient assisted living (AAL) is a complex field, where different technologies are integrated to offer solutions for the benefit of different stakeholders. Several evaluation techniques are commonly applied that tackle specific aspects of AAL; however, holistic evaluation approaches are lacking when addressing the needs of both developers and end-users. Living labs have been often used as real-life test and experimentation environments for co-designing AAL technologies and validating them with relevant stakeholders. During the last five years, we have been evaluating AAL systems and services in the framework of various research projects. This paper presents the lessons learned in this experience and proposes a set of harmonized guidelines to conduct evaluations in living labs. PMID:24763209

  13. Genomics Education in Practice: Evaluation of a Mobile Lab Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Mil, Marc H. W.; Boerwinkel, Dirk Jan; Buizer-Voskamp, Jacobine E.; Speksnijder, Annelies; Waarlo, Arend Jan

    2010-01-01

    Dutch genomics research centers have developed the "DNA labs on the road" to bridge the gap between modern genomics research practice and secondary-school curriculum in the Netherlands. These mobile DNA labs offer upper-secondary students the opportunity to experience genomics research through experiments with laboratory equipment that is not…

  14. SuperLab LT: Evaluation and Uses in Teaching Experimental Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragozzine, Frank

    2002-01-01

    I describe and evaluate SuperLab LT (Chase & Abboud, 1990), a software package that enables students to replicate classic experiments in cognitive psychology. I also discuss the package with respect to its uses in teaching an undergraduate course in Experimental Psychology. Although the package has minor flaws, SuperLab LT provides numerous…

  15. Georg Friedrich Händel: a case of large vessel disease with complications in the eighteenth century.

    PubMed

    Bäzner, Hansjörg

    2015-01-01

    Georg Friedrich Händel was not only one of the greatest musical giants ever but also he was probably the first composer who was also the manager and promoter of his own works. Various myths embellish his various biographies. This is also true for his pathography: several articles written by authors from various specialties suggested him having suffered from psychiatric diseases, like cyclothymia or mania, and rheumatologic disorders, like arthritis, while others tended to interpret his recurrent palsies as typical sequelae of ischemic strokes. More recently, reports proposing lead poisoning as the main source of disease in Händel gained the attention of musical and lay press. During his last years of life, Händel was struck with blindness, which in his era had been interpreted as being due to cataracts. This led to three "coucher" operations, all of them without any lasting effect. Although a definite diagnosis cannot be proven from the original sources, the most plausible explanation for Händel's palsies and visual impairment may be based on one single context, i.e., cerebrovascular disease. The possible differential diagnosis will be discussed in this chapter. PMID:25684296

  16. Protein-Protein and Peptide-Protein Interactions of NudE-Like 1 (Ndel1): A Protein Involved in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, M A F; Felicori, L F; Fresqui, M A C; Yonamine, C M

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a devastating chronic mental disease determined by genetic and environmental factors, which susceptibility may involve an impaired neural migration during the neurodevelopmental process. Several candidate risk genes potentially associated with SCZ were related to the formation of protein complexes that ultimately mediate alterations in the neuroplasticity. The most studied SCZ risk gene is the Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene, which functions seem to depend on the binding with cytoskeleton proteins, as the Nuclear-distribution gene E homolog like-1 (Ndel1) protein among others. Interestingly, Ndel1 is the only binding partner of DISC1 proteins with oligopeptidase activity, besides playing roles in multiple processes, including cytoskeletal organization, cell signaling, neuron migration, and neurite outgrowth. It is still not clear if the protein-protein interaction between Ndel1 and DISC1 is enough to explain all cellular functions attributed to these proteins, but there are several lines of evidence suggesting the importance of the catalytic activity of Ndel1 for the neurite outgrowth and neuron migration during embryogenesis. Recent works of the group have demonstrated the modulation of Ndel1 activity by DISC1, which is hypothetically impaired in SCZ patients. In fact, more recently, we also showed a lower Ndel1 activity in the plasma of SCZ patients compared to control health subjects, but the physiopathological significance of this feature is still unknown. Here we discuss Ndel1 ligands involved in protein-protein complex formations related to neurodevelopmental diseases, as (1) lissencephaly or Miller-Dieker Syndrome (MDS), which is characterized by the typical craniofacial features and abnormal smooth cerebral surface, and as (2) SCZ, since they both seem to be determined by defects in neuronal migration. Although impaired lissencephaly protein Lis1 complex formation with Ndel1 is the leading cause of lissencephaly, this

  17. Evaluation and recommendations for work group integration within the Materials and Processes Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrington, Phillip A.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate and make recommendations for improving the level of integration of several work groups within the Materials and Processes Lab at the Marshall Space Flight Center. This evaluation has uncovered a variety of projects that could improve the efficiency and operation of the work groups as well as the overall integration of the system. In addition, this study provides the foundation for specification of a computer integrated manufacturing test bed environment in the Materials and Processes Lab.

  18. The Evaluation of Students' Written Reflection on the Learning of General Chemistry Lab Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Ng Sook; Li, Ho Ket; Sin, Lee Choy; Sin, Keng Pei

    2014-01-01

    Reflective writing is often used to increase understanding and analytical ability. The lack of empirical evidence on the effect of reflective writing interventions on the learning of general chemistry lab experiment supports the examination of this concept. The central goal of this exploratory study was to evaluate the students' written…

  19. Evidence of statistical epistasis between DISC1, CIT and NDEL1 impacting risk for schizophrenia: biological validation with functional neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Nicodemus, Kristin K; Callicott, Joseph H; Higier, Rachel G; Luna, Augustin; Nixon, Devon C; Lipska, Barbara K; Vakkalanka, Radhakrishna; Giegling, Ina; Rujescu, Dan; St Clair, David; Muglia, Pierandrea; Shugart, Yin Yao; Weinberger, Daniel R

    2010-04-01

    The etiology of schizophrenia likely involves genetic interactions. DISC1, a promising candidate susceptibility gene, encodes a protein which interacts with many other proteins, including CIT, NDEL1, NDE1, FEZ1 and PAFAH1B1, some of which also have been associated with psychosis. We tested for epistasis between these genes in a schizophrenia case-control study using machine learning algorithms (MLAs: random forest, generalized boosted regression andMonteCarlo logic regression). Convergence of MLAs revealed a subset of seven SNPs that were subjected to 2-SNP interaction modeling using likelihood ratio tests for nested unconditional logistic regression models. Of the 7C2 = 21 interactions, four were significant at the α = 0.05 level: DISC1 rs1411771-CIT rs10744743 OR = 3.07 (1.37, 6.98) p = 0.007; CIT rs3847960-CIT rs203332 OR = 2.90 (1.45, 5.79) p = 0.003; CIT rs3847960-CIT rs440299 OR = 2.16 (1.04, 4.46) p = 0.038; one survived Bonferroni correction (NDEL1 rs4791707-CIT rs10744743 OR = 4.44 (2.22, 8.88) p = 0.00013). Three of four interactions were validated via functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in an independent sample of healthy controls; risk associated alleles at both SNPs predicted prefrontal cortical inefficiency during the N-back task, a schizophrenia-linked intermediate biological phenotype: rs3847960-rs440299; rs1411771-rs10744743, rs4791707-rs10744743 (SPM5 p < 0.05, corrected), although we were unable to statistically replicate the interactions in other clinical samples. Interestingly, the CIT SNPs are proximal to exons that encode theDISC1 interaction domain. In addition, the 3' UTR DISC1 rs1411771 is predicted to be an exonic splicing enhancer and the NDEL1 SNP is ~3,000 bp from the exon encoding the region of NDEL1 that interacts with the DISC1 protein, giving a plausible biological basis for epistasis signals validated by fMRI. PMID:20084519

  20. An Evaluation of Two Hands-On Lab Styles for Plant Biodiversity in Undergraduate Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basey, John M.; Maines, Anastasia P.; Francis, Clinton D.; Melbourne, Brett

    2014-01-01

    We compared learning cycle and expository formats for teaching about plant biodiversity in an inquiry-oriented university biology lab class (n = 465). Both formats had preparatory lab activities, a hands-on lab, and a postlab with reflection and argumentation. Learning was assessed with a lab report, a practical quiz in lab, and a multiple-choice…

  1. DBZ regulates cortical cell positioning and neurite development by sustaining the anterograde transport of Lis1 and DISC1 through control of Ndel1 dual-phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Masayuki; Iguchi, Tokuichi; Hattori, Tsuyoshi; Matsuzaki, Shinsuke; Koyama, Yoshihisa; Taniguchi, Manabu; Komada, Munekazu; Xie, Min-Jue; Yagi, Hideshi; Shimizu, Shoko; Konishi, Yoshiyuki; Omi, Minoru; Yoshimi, Tomohiko; Tachibana, Taro; Fujieda, Shigeharu; Katayama, Taiichi; Ito, Akira; Hirotsune, Shinji; Tohyama, Masaya; Sato, Makoto

    2015-02-18

    Cell positioning and neuronal network formation are crucial for proper brain function. Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is anterogradely transported to the neurite tips, together with Lis1, and functions in neurite extension via suppression of GSK3β activity. Then, transported Lis1 is retrogradely transported and functions in cell migration. Here, we show that DISC1-binding zinc finger protein (DBZ), together with DISC1, regulates mouse cortical cell positioning and neurite development in vivo. DBZ hindered Ndel1 phosphorylation at threonine 219 and serine 251. DBZ depletion or expression of a double-phosphorylated mimetic form of Ndel1 impaired the transport of Lis1 and DISC1 to the neurite tips and hampered microtubule elongation. Moreover, application of DISC1 or a GSK3β inhibitor rescued the impairments caused by DBZ insufficiency or double-phosphorylated Ndel1 expression. We concluded that DBZ controls cell positioning and neurite development by interfering with Ndel1 from disproportionate phosphorylation, which is critical for appropriate anterograde transport of the DISC1-complex. PMID:25698733

  2. Evaluation of direct-to-consumer low-volume lab tests in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Brian A.; Hoffman, Gabriel; Zimmerman, Noah; Li, Li; Morgan, Joseph W.; Glowe, Patricia K.; Botwin, Gregory J.; Parekh, Samir; Babic, Nikolina; Doust, Matthew W.; Stock, Gregory B.; Schadt, Eric E.; Dudley, Joel T.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Clinical laboratory tests are now being prescribed and made directly available to consumers through retail outlets in the USA. Concerns with these test have been raised regarding the uncertainty of testing methods used in these venues and a lack of open, scientific validation of the technical accuracy and clinical equivalency of results obtained through these services. METHODS. We conducted a cohort study of 60 healthy adults to compare the uncertainty and accuracy in 22 common clinical lab tests between one company offering blood tests obtained from finger prick (Theranos) and 2 major clinical testing services that require standard venipuncture draws (Quest and LabCorp). Samples were collected in Phoenix, Arizona, at an ambulatory clinic and at retail outlets with point-of-care services. RESULTS. Theranos flagged tests outside their normal range 1.6× more often than other testing services (P < 0.0001). Of the 22 lab measurements evaluated, 15 (68%) showed significant interservice variability (P < 0.002). We found nonequivalent lipid panel test results between Theranos and other clinical services. Variability in testing services, sample collection times, and subjects markedly influenced lab results. CONCLUSION. While laboratory practice standards exist to control this variability, the disparities between testing services we observed could potentially alter clinical interpretation and health care utilization. Greater transparency and evaluation of testing technologies would increase their utility in personalized health management. FUNDING. This work was supported by the Icahn Institute for Genomics and Multiscale Biology, a gift from the Harris Family Charitable Foundation (to J.T. Dudley), and grants from the NIH (R01 DK098242 and U54 CA189201, to J.T. Dudley, and R01 AG046170 and U01 AI111598, to E.E. Schadt). PMID:27018593

  3. Side-by-Side Field Evaluation of Highly Insulating Windows in the PNNL Lab Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Widder, Sarah H.; Parker, Graham B.; Baechler, Michael C.; Bauman, Nathan N.

    2012-08-01

    To examine the energy, air leakage, and thermal performance of highly insulating windows, a field evaluation was undertaken in a matched pair of all-electric, factory-built “Lab Homes” located on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) campus in Richland, Washington. The “baseline” Lab Home B was retrofitted with “standard” double-pane clear aluminum-frame slider windows and patio doors, while the “experimental” Lab Home A was retrofitted with Jeld-Wen® triple-pane vinyl-frame slider windows and patio doors with a U-factor of 0.2 and solar heat gain coefficient of 0.19. To assess the window, the building shell air leakage, energy use, and interior temperatures of each home were compared during the 2012 winter heating and summer cooling seasons. The measured energy savings in Lab Home B averaged 5,821 watt-hours per day (Wh/day) during the heating season and 6,518 Wh/day during the cooling season. The overall whole-house energy savings of Lab Home B compared to Lab Home A are 11.6% ± 1.53% for the heating season and 18.4 ± 2.06% for the cooling season for identical occupancy conditions with no window coverings deployed. Extrapolating these energy savings numbers based on typical average heating degree days and cooling degree days per year yields an estimated annual energy savings of 12.2%, or 1,784 kWh/yr. The data suggest that highly insulating windows are an effective energy-saving measure that should be considered for high-performance new homes and in existing retrofits. However, the cost effectiveness of the measure, as determined by the simple payback period, suggests that highly insulating window costs continue to make windows difficult to justify on a cost basis alone. Additional reductions in costs via improvements in manufacturing and/or market penetration that continue to drive down costs will make highly insulating windows much more viable as a cost-effective energy efficiency measure. This study also illustrates that highly

  4. Field Evaluation of Highly Insulating Windows in the Lab Homes: Winter Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Graham B.; Widder, Sarah H.; Bauman, Nathan N.

    2012-06-01

    This field evaluation of highly insulating windows was undertaken in a matched pair of 'Lab Homes' located on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) campus during the 2012 winter heating season. Improving the insulation and solar heat gain characteristics of a home's windows has the potential to significantly improve the home's building envelope and overall thermal performance by reducing heat loss (in the winter), and cooling loss and solar heat gain (in the summer) through the windows. A high quality installation and/or window retrofit will also minimize or reduce air leakage through the window cavity and thus also contribute to reduced heat loss in the winter and cooling loss in the summer. These improvements all contribute to decreasing overall annual home energy use. Occupant comfort (non-quantifiable) can also be increased by minimizing or eliminating the cold 'draft' (temperature) many residents experience at or near window surfaces that are at a noticeably lower temperature than the room air temperature. Lastly, although not measured in this experiment, highly insulating windows (triple-pane in this experiment) also have the potential to significantly reduce the noise transmittance through windows compared to standard double-pane windows. The metered data taken in the Lab Homes and data analysis presented here represent 70 days of data taken during the 2012 heating season. As such, the savings from highly insulating windows in the experimental home (Lab Home B) compared to the standard double-pane clear glass windows in the baseline home (Lab Home A) are only a portion of the energy savings expected from a year-long experiment that would include a cooling season. The cooling season experiment will take place in the homes in the summer of 2012, and results of that experiment will be reported in a subsequent report available to all stakeholders.

  5. An Evaluation of Two Hands-On Lab Styles for Plant Biodiversity in Undergraduate Biology

    PubMed Central

    Maines, Anastasia P.; Francis, Clinton D.; Melbourne, Brett

    2014-01-01

    We compared learning cycle and expository formats for teaching about plant biodiversity in an inquiry-oriented university biology lab class (n = 465). Both formats had preparatory lab activities, a hands-on lab, and a postlab with reflection and argumentation. Learning was assessed with a lab report, a practical quiz in lab, and a multiple-choice exam in the concurrent lecture. Attitudes toward biology and treatments were also assessed. We used linear mixed-effect models to determine impacts of lab style on lower-order cognition (LO) and higher-order cognition (HO) based on Bloom's taxonomy. Relative to the expository treatment, the learning cycle treatment had a positive effect on HO and a negative effect on LO included in lab reports; a positive effect on transfer of LO from the lab report to the quiz; negative impacts on LO quiz performance and on attitudes toward the lab; and a higher degree of perceived difficulty. The learning cycle treatment had no influence on transfer of HO from lab report to quiz or exam; quiz performance on HO questions; exam performance on LO and HO questions; and attitudes toward biology as a science. The importance of LO as a foundation for HO relative to these lab styles is addressed. PMID:25185232

  6. Evaluation of lab-scale EUV microscopy using a table-top laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleiner, Davide; Staub, Felix; Guzenko, Vitaliy; Ekinci, Yasin; Balmer, Jürg E.

    2011-09-01

    High brightness Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) sources for laboratory operation are needed in nano-fabrication and actinic ("at-wavelength") inspection of the masks for high volume manufacturing in next generation lithography. Laser-plasma EUV sources have the required compactness and power scalability to achieve the demanding requirements. However, the incoherent emission lacks the brightness for single-shot high contrast imaging. On the other hand, fully coherent sources are considered to be unsuitable for full-field sample illumination and prone to speckles. We evaluate the capabilities of a lab-scale amplified-spontaneous-emission (ASE) EUV laser source to combine brightness and high quality imaging with full-field imaging, along with rapid acquisition and compactness.

  7. GeoLab's First Field Trials, 2010 Desert RATS: Evaluating Tools for Early Sample Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Cindy A.; Bell, M. S.; Calaway, M. J.; Graff, Trevor; Young, Kelsey

    2011-01-01

    As part of an accelerated prototyping project to support science operations tests for future exploration missions, we designed and built a geological laboratory, GeoLab, that was integrated into NASA's first generation Habitat Demonstration Unit-1/Pressurized Excursion Module (HDU1-PEM). GeoLab includes a pressurized glovebox for transferring and handling samples collected on geological traverses, and a suite of instruments for collecting preliminary data to help characterize those samples. The GeoLab and the HDU1-PEM were tested for the first time as part of the 2010 Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS), NASA's analog field exercise for testing mission technologies. The HDU1- PEM and GeoLab participated in two weeks of joint operations in northern Arizona with two crewed rovers and the DRATS science team.

  8. Long Term Stability Evaluation of Prostacyclin Released from Biomedical Device Through Turbiscan Lab Expert

    PubMed Central

    Celia, Christian; Locatelli, Marcello; Cilurzo, Felisa; Cosco, Donato; Gentile, Emanuela; Scalise, Daniela; Carafa, Maria; Ventura, Cinzia Anna; Fleury, Mathias; Tisserand, Christelle; Barbacane, Renato C.; Fresta, Massimo; Marzio, Luisa Di; Paolino, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic guidelines indicate prostacyclin as the first line of treatment in inflammation and vascular diseases. Prostacyclins prevent formation of the platelet plug involved in primary hemostasis by inhibiting platelet activation and, combined with thromboxane, are effective vasodilators in vascular damage. Trans-Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus Document on Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease II guidelines indicates prostacyclins; in particular, Iloprost, as the first therapeutic option for treating peripheral arterial disease. However, therapeutic efficacy of Iloprost has witnessed several drawbacks that have occurred in patients receiving repeated weekly administration of the drug by intravenous infusions. Adverse reactions arose under perfusion with Iloprost for 6 h and patient compliance was drastically decreased. Biomedical devices could provide a suitable alternative to overcome these drawbacks. In particular, elastomeric pumps, filled with Iloprost isotonic solution, could slowly release the drug, thus decreasing its side effects, representing a valid alternative to hospitalization of patients affected by peripheral arterial disease. However, the home therapy treatment of patients requires long-term stability of Iloprost in solution-loaded elastomeric pumps. The aim of this work was to investigate the long-term stability of Iloprost isotonic solution in biomedical devices using Turbiscan technology. Turbiscan Lab Expert (L’Union, France) predicts the long-term stability of suspensions, emulsions and colloidal formulations by measuring backscattering and transmission of particulates dispersed in solution. The formulations were evaluated by measuring the variation of physical-chemical properties of colloids and suspensions as a function of backscattering and transmission modifications. In addition, the release profile of Iloprost isotonic solution from the biomedical device was evaluated. PMID:25381994

  9. [When we have learned about the brain development from a disease-oriented study: DBZ regulates cortical cell positioning and neurite extension by sustaining the anterograde transport of Lis1/DISC1 through control of Ndel1 phosphorylation].

    PubMed

    Sato, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    Cell positioning and neuronal network formation are crucial for proper brain function. Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is anterogradely transported to the neurite tips, together with Lis1, and functions in neurite extension via suppression of GSK3β activity. Then, transported Lis1 is retrogradely transported and functions in cell migration. Here, we show that DISC1-binding zinc finger protein (DBZ) regulates mouse cortical cell positioning and neurite development in vivo, together with DISC1. DBZ hindered Ndel1 phosphorylation at threonine 219 and serine 251. DBZ depletion or expression of a double-phosphorylated mimetic form of Ndel1 impaired the transport of Lis1 and DISC1 to the neurite tips and hampered microtubule elongation. Moreover, application of DISC1 or a GSK3β inhibitor rescued the impairments caused by DBZ insufficiency or double-phosphorylated Ndel1 expression. We concluded that DBZ controls cell positioning and neurite development by interfering with Ndel1 from disproportionate phosphorylation, which is critical for appropriate anterograde transport of the DISC1-complex. PMID:27333658

  10. Evaluation of Low-E Storm Windows in the PNNL Lab Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, Jake R.; Widder, Sarah H.

    2014-05-31

    This study examines the performance of exterior and interior low-e storm panels with a controlled whole home experimental design using PNNL's Lab Homes. Summing the estimated annual average heating and cooling savings, the installation of low-e storm panels resulted in approximately 10% annual energy savings. The results of the experiment will be used to determine and validate performance of low-e storm windows over double pane clear glass windows in a whole home setting.

  11. SimLAB: Evaluating Geophysical Proxies for the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, D. W.; Hogan, C. M.; Afonso, J. C.; Jones, A. G.; Tromp, J.; Miller, M. S.; Becker, T. W.

    2011-12-01

    The Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary (LAB) is a fundamental but inadequately understood element of the dynamic Earth system. While various geophysical methods can provide useful proxies for imaging the LAB, including modelling flexural studies or heat flow observations, seismic studies (surface-wave inversion, receiver-function analysis, and investigation of seismic anisotropy) and magnetotelluric methods, globally, and even locally, consistent interpretations of these results remain elusive (particularly beneath continents). Here, we are developing a systematic, comprehensive and realistic suite of synthetic data with the aim of benchmarking various seismological and magnetotelluric methods for imaging the LAB. Our study is based on a hypothetical regional geological model (800x800x400km) on a 10 km grid that is smoothly embedded within a standard global Earth model. The regional model extends from oceanic to thick cratonic lithosphere. Physical properties of the regional model (i.e. anisotropic elastic moduli, density, electrical conductivity, thermal and rheological parameters) match prescribed surface heat-flow and geoid boundary conditions and are computed using an approach based on thermodynamics, mineral physics, geochemistry, petrology, and solid-Earth geophysics. Anisotropy is incorporated into the model through both mantle-flow calculations and prescribed fossil anisotropy within cratonic lithosphere. Long-period synthetic seismograms are computed for teleseismic and regional events using SPECFEM3D, which provides full wave-equation modeling of seismic wave propagation incorporating phenomena such as anisotropy, attenuation and fluid-solid interfaces. To ensure a realistic (non-ideal) azimuthal distribution, the event locations are based on a subset of a one-year global catalog within the magnitude range from 6.0 to 7.0. Forward modeling of magnetotelluric response will also be undertaken. The initial public release of the suite of synthetic data for

  12. Virtual Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Ruth

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the potential of computers in teaching laboratories to spare the lives of animals; however, it is felt that in areas of physiology education, virtual labs are not as desirable a learning experience for advanced students as live animal labs. (Author/AIM)

  13. Methods for Evaluating Learner Activities with New Technologies: Guidelines for the Lab@Future Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mwanza-Simwami, Daisy; Engestrom, Yrjo; Amon, Tomaz

    2009-01-01

    The task of evaluating learner activities with new technologies is becoming increasingly complex because traditional evaluation strategies do not adequately consider the unique and often dynamic characteristics of learners and activities carried out. Learner activities are largely driven by motives and relationships that exist in the context in…

  14. CHEMICAL AND TOXICOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF CHLORINATED AND OZONATED-CHLORINATED DRINKING WATER: A COLLABORATION OF THE FOUR NATIONAL LABS OF THE U. S. EPA

    EPA Science Inventory

    CHEMICAL AND TOXICOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF CHLORINATED AND OZONATED-CHLORINATED DRINKING WATER: A COLLABORATION OF THE FOUR NATIONAL LABS OF THE U.S. EPA
    Susan D. Richardson1, Linda K. Teuschler2, Alfred D. Thruston, Jr.,1 Thomas Speth3, Richard J. Miltner3, Glenn Rice2, Kathle...

  15. A Videophone Prototype System Evaluated by Elderly Users in the Living Lab Schwechat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberzaucher, Johannes; Werner, Katharina; Mairböck, Harald P.; Beck, Christian; Panek, Paul; Hlauschek, Walter; Zagler, Wolfgang L.

    Elderly people often experience difficulties in using modern Information and Communication Technologies. This paper presents findings of an evaluation and a field test of a touch screen based internet videophone system mounted in a wooden frame in order to provide a non technical appearance. During a 14-day lasting field test in real-life environment the goal was to evaluate if and to what extent the elderly participants would benefit from using such a modern multimodal way of communication. Four prototype systems were installed in four private homes and were tested successfully by six persons. It was found that the elderly users actually benefited from the touchscreen control, the proportionally large-scale GUI and the VoIP-and video-telephone functions. Despite the small scale of the evaluation the gathered data demonstrates the potential this technology might have in daily life in particular for the emerging ambient assisted living (AAL) area.

  16. Occupational Safety and Health Professionals' Training in Italy: Qualitative Evaluation Using T-LAB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papaleo, Bruno; Cangiano, Giovanna; Calicchia, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the evaluation of a training course on chemicals for occupational safety and health (OSH) professionals. The study aims were to assess the effectiveness of the course; to find out what type of training met these workers' needs best, as their role is vital in the management of safety at work; and to…

  17. Performance of forty-one microbial source tracking methods: A twenty-seven lab evaluation study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The last decade has seen development of numerous new microbial source tracking (MST) methodologies, but many of these have been tested in just a few laboratories with a limited number of fecal samples. This method evaluation study examined the specificity and sensitivity of 43 ...

  18. A description of the focal plane/detector test and evaluation lab at MDAC-HB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beebe, D. D.; Lowe, J. J.; Sheldon, C.; D'Ippolito, E. S.; Osler, A. G.

    1986-01-01

    A description of a test facility for testing and evaluating visible and infrared (IR) focal plane arrays (FPA's) and associated components and subsystems is given. The facility is comprised of three computer controlled test systems for characterization of hybrid FPA's, detector arrays, and readout electronics under cryogenic conditions. Facility capabilities include FPA assembly and dewar test and assembly.

  19. Evaluation of rep-PCR/DiversiLab versus PFGE and spa typing in genotyping methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Aguadero, V; González Velasco, C; Vindel, A; Gonzalez Velasco, M; Moreno, J J

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is the 'gold standard' for genotyping of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); however, the DiversiLab (DL) system, based on rep-PCR, is faster, simpler and could be better adapted to daily routine hospital work. We genotyped 100 MRSA isolates using PFGE, DL, and spa typing, and evaluated the discriminatory power of each technique and the correlation between them by Simpson's index(SI) and adjusted Rand coefficient (ARI), respectively. The isolates were from clinical samples from eight hospitals in Extremadura (Spain) during 2010. DL separated the 100 MRSA into 18 patterns, with 69% of the isolates grouped into four predominant patterns. spa typing reported 17 spa types, classifying 69% of MRSA into two major types (t067 and t002). PFGE revealed the existence of 27 patterns, gathering 54% of MRSA into three pulse types (E8a, E7a and E7b). SI values were 0.819, 0.726, 0.887 and 0.460 for DL, spa typing, PFGE and CC-BURP, respectively. ARI values of DL over PFGE, spa typing and CC-BURP were 0.151, 0.321 and 0.071, respectively. DL has less discriminatory power than PFGE but more than spa typing. The concordance of DL with PFGE is low, primarily because DL does not discriminate between the three predominant MRSA pulse types in our environment. PMID:26510268

  20. Performance of forty-one microbial source tracking methods: a twenty-seven lab evaluation study.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Alexandria B; Van De Werfhorst, Laurie C; Griffith, John F; Holden, Patricia A; Jay, Jenny A; Shanks, Orin C; Wang, Dan; Weisberg, Stephen B

    2013-11-15

    The last decade has seen development of numerous new microbial source tracking (MST) methodologies, but many of these have been tested in just a few laboratories with a limited number of fecal samples. This method evaluation study examined the specificity and sensitivity of 41 MST methodologies by analyzing data generated in 27 laboratories. MST methodologies that targeted human, cow, ruminant, dog, gull, pig, horse, and sheep were tested against sewage, septage, human, cow, dog, deer, pig, chicken, pigeon, gull, horse, and goose fecal samples. Each laboratory received 64 blind samples containing a single source (singletons) or two sources (doubletons), as well as diluted singleton samples to assess method sensitivity. Laboratories utilized their own protocols when performing the methods and data were deposited in a central database before samples were unblinded. Between one and seven laboratories tested each method. The most sensitive and specific assays, based on an analysis of presence/absence of each marker in target and non-target fecal samples, were HF183 endpoint and HF183SYBR (human), CF193 and Rum2Bac (ruminant), CowM2 and CowM3 (cow), BacCan (dog), Gull2SYBR and LeeSeaGull (gull), PF163 and pigmtDNA (pig), HoF597 (horse), PhyloChip (pig, horse, chicken, deer), Universal 16S TRFLP (deer), and Bacteroidales 16S TRFLP (pig, horse, chicken, deer); all had sensitivity and specificity higher than 80% in all or the majority of laboratories. When the abundance of MST markers in target and non-target fecal samples was examined, some assays that performed well in the binary analysis were found to not be sensitive enough as median concentrations fell below a minimum abundance criterion (set at 50 copies per colony forming units of enterococci) in target fecal samples. Similarly, some assays that cross-reacted with non-target fecal sources in the binary analysis were found to perform well in a quantitative analysis because the cross-reaction occurred at very low

  1. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 83-019-1562, Berlex Labs. , Wayne, New Jersey. [Quinidine

    SciTech Connect

    Igliewicz, R.; Schmidt, M.; Gann, P.

    1985-09-01

    Breathing-zone samples were analyzed for quinidine at Berlex Laboratories, Wayne, New Jersey in January, February, and June through August, 1983. The evaluation was requested by the local union to investigate work related skin rashes and respiratory symptoms among employees involved in producing quinidine-gluconate. Questionnaire interviews were conducted with 47 employees in April, 1984. Medical examinations including serum immunology and skin prick tests were also performed. Airborne quinidine concentrations ranged from 0.2 mg/m/sup 3/ in the packaging area to 5.0mg/m/sup 3/ in the manufacturing area. There is no federal standard for quinidine. Seventy percent of the employees reported respiratory and skin symptoms such as rashes, stuffy nose, red puffed eyes, chest tightness, and wheezing. Nineteen percent of the employees had allergic contact dermatitis. The results of the immunological and skin prick tests were negative. The authors conclude that a health hazard due to exposure to quinidine powder exists. The primary cause of the symptoms appears to be an irritant effect from exposure to the powder. Recommendations include reducing exposures with engineering controls and work practices and developing a personal air sampling protocol.

  2. Reading Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, Lorna

    This guide is intended for use in conducting a reading lab for a broad group of workers ranging from nonreaders to persons reading at a fifth-grade level. Presented first is a course overview that includes the following: information on the course's targeted population, student selection process, and demographics; strategies for adult remediation;…

  3. Lab Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Linda

    1997-01-01

    Discusses barriers individuals face in using computers in the classroom and the importance of eliminating these barriers. The article notes that visual, mobility, and hearing impairments are the disabilities most often encountered in school labs and that numerous software and hardware tools are available to help individuals with these disabilities…

  4. Labs: 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Igelsrud, Don, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This article presents a variety of topics discussed in this column and at a biology teachers' workshop concerning the quality and value of lab techniques used for teaching high school biology. Topics included are Drosophila salivary glands, sea urchins, innovations, dyes and networking. (CW)

  5. Evaluation of distribution and sources of sewage molecular marker (LABs) in selected rivers and estuaries of Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Magam, Sami M; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi; Halimoon, Normala; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Kannan, Narayanan; Masood, Najat; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Alkhadher, Sadeq; Keshavarzifard, Mehrzad; Vaezzadeh, Vahab; Sani, Muhamad S A; Latif, Mohd Talib

    2016-03-01

    This is the first extensive report on linear alkylbenzenes (LABs) as sewage molecular markers in surface sediments collected from the Perlis, Kedah, Merbok, Prai, and Perak Rivers and Estuaries in the west of Peninsular Malaysia. Sediment samples were extracted, fractionated, and analyzed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The concentrations of total LABs ranged from 68 to 154 (Perlis River), 103 to 314 (Kedah River), 242 to 1062 (Merbok River), 1985 to 2910 (Prai River), and 217 to 329 ng g(-1) (Perak River) dry weight (dw). The highest levels of LABs were found at PI3 (Prai Estuary) due to the rapid industrialization and population growth in this region, while the lowest concentrations of LABs were found at PS1 (upstream of Perlis River). The LABs ratio of internal to external isomers (I/E) in this study ranged from 0.56 at KH1 (upstream of Kedah River) to 1.35 at MK3 (Merbok Estuary) indicating that the rivers receive raw sewage and primary treatment effluents in the study area. In general, the results of this paper highlighted the necessity of continuation of water treatment system improvement in Malaysia. PMID:26581689

  6. Evaluation of single crystal LaB6 cathodes for use in a high frequency backward wave oscillator tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, L. W.; Davis, P. R.; Schwind, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    The results of thermionic emission and evaporation studies of single crystal LaB6 cathodes are given. A comparison between the (100), (210) and (310) crystal planes shows the (310) and (210) planes to possess a work function approx 0.2 eV lower than (100). This translates into a significant increase in current density, J, at a specified temperature. Comparison with a state-of-the-art impregnated dispenser cathode shows that LaB6 (310) is a superior cathode in nearly all respects except operating temperature at j 10 A/sq cm. The 1600 K thermionic and room temperature retarding potential work functions for LaB6 (310) are 2.42 and 2.50 respectively.

  7. Lab architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2008-04-01

    There are few more dramatic illustrations of the vicissitudes of laboratory architecturethan the contrast between Building 20 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and its replacement, the Ray and Maria Stata Center. Building 20 was built hurriedly in 1943 as temporary housing for MIT's famous Rad Lab, the site of wartime radar research, and it remained a productive laboratory space for over half a century. A decade ago it was demolished to make way for the Stata Center, an architecturally striking building designed by Frank Gehry to house MIT's computer science and artificial intelligence labs (above). But in 2004 - just two years after the Stata Center officially opened - the building was criticized for being unsuitable for research and became the subject of still ongoing lawsuits alleging design and construction failures.

  8. Attenuation length measurements of a liquid scintillator with LabVIEW and reliability evaluation of the device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Long; Yu, Bo-Xiang; Ding, Ya-Yun; Zhou, Li; Wen, Liang-Jian; Xie, Yu-Guang; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Cai, Xiao; Sun, Xi-Lei; Fang, Jian; Xue, Zhen; Zhang, Ai-Wu; Lü, Qi-Wen; Sun, Li-Jun; Ge, Yong-Shuai; Liu, Ying-Biao; Niu, Shun-Li; Hu, Tao; Cao, Jun; Lü, Jun-Guang

    2013-07-01

    An attenuation length measurement device was constructed using an oscilloscope and LabVIEW for signal acquisition and processing. The performance of the device has been tested in a variety of ways. The test results show that the set-up has a good stability and high precision (sigma/mean reached 0.4 percent). Besides, the accuracy of the measurement system will decrease by about 17 percent if a filter is used. The attenuation length of a gadolinium-loaded liquid scintillator (Gd-LS) was measured as 15.10±0.35 m where Gd-LS was heavily used in the Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment. In addition, one method based on the Beer-Lambert law was proposed to investigate the reliability of the measurement device, the R-square reached 0.9995. Moreover, three purification methods for Linear Alkyl Benzene (LAB) production were compared in the experiment.

  9. Solar photocatalitycal treatment of carbofuran at lab and pilot scale: effect of classical parameters, evaluation of the toxicity and analysis of organic by-products.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Alvarez, Blady; Torres-Palma, Ricardo A; Peñuela, Gustavo

    2011-07-15

    In this work the TiO(2) solar-photocatalytical degradation of the pesticide carbofuran (CBF) in water, at lab and pilot scale, was studied. At lab scale the evaluation of CBF concentration (14-282 μmol L(-1)) showed that the system followed a Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics type. TiO(2) concentration (0.05-2 g L(-1)) and initial pH (3-9) were also evaluated and optimized using the surface response methodology and the Pareto diagram. In the range of variables studied, initial pH 7.60 and 1.43 g L(-1) of TiO(2) favoured the efficiency of the process. Under optimal conditions the evolution of substrate, chemical oxygen demand, dissolved organic carbon, toxicity and organics by-products were evaluated. In the pilot scale tests, using direct sunlight, 55 mg L(-1) of CBF in a commercial formulation was eliminated after 420 min; while after 900 min of treatment 80% of toxicity (1/E(50) on Vibrium Fischeri), 80% of chemical oxygen demand and 60% of dissolved organic carbon were removed. The analysis and evolution of five CBF by-products, as well the evaluation of the treatment in the presence of isopropanol or using acetonitrile as a solvent suggest that the degradation is mainly carried out by OH radical attack. Finally, a schema depicting the main degradation pathway is proposed. PMID:21592651

  10. Underwater lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    The University of Southern California's Catalina Marine Science Center (CMSC) has announced plans to build an underwater marine research laboratory near Santa Catalina Island off the California coast. The project, which will take 2 years to build, will be sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The laboratory will be similar in concept to the U.S. Navy Sea Lab III, which was canceled some time ago.The project's purpose is to give divers access to a laboratory without having to surface. The project leader, Andrew Pilmanis, of the University of Southern California, stated recently (Industrial Research and Development, July 1983): “By the nature of the work, scientists require a lot of bottom time, and to do it by scuba isn't practical…. The only way to do that is with saturation diving. Once the diver is saturated with inert gas, whether the individual stays a few days or for months, only one decompression is required.” Divers will typically stay in the laboratory for 7-10 days. The laboratory will initially be placed at a depth of 20 m, later to be refloated and located at depths to 37 m.

  11. Evaluation Tools to Guide Students' Peer-Assessment and Self-Assessment in Group Activities for the Lab and Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenzel, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    Evaluation tools are provided that help students' peer-assessment and self-assessment in group activities for the laboratories and classroom. The self- and peer-evaluations have helped teachers provide better feedback to the students and feel more confident in assigning each individual a grade for their contribution to the group laboratory project.

  12. Deciphering Your Lab Report

    MedlinePlus

    ... what a lab report may look like. (Note: Pathology reports, such as for a biopsy , will look ... lab report. For some examples of what a pathology report may look like, see The Doctor’s Doctor: ...

  13. OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT'S FOUR LAB STUDY: TOXICOLOGICCAL AND CHEMICAL EVALUATION OF COMPLEX MIXTURES OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS (DBPS) AND QUALITY ASSURANCE ACTIVITIES FOR A LARGE U. S. EPA MULTILABORATORY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Office of Research and Development's Four Lab Study: Toxicological and Chemical Evaluation of Complex Mixtures of Disinfection By-Products (DBPs), and Quality Assurance Activities for a Large U.S. EPA Multilaboratoty Study

    Thomas J. Hughes, Project and QA Manager, Expe...

  14. Virtual Reality Lab Assistant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Hrishikesh; Palmer, Timothy A.

    1996-01-01

    Virtual Reality Lab Assistant (VRLA) demonstration model is aligned for engineering and material science experiments to be performed by undergraduate and graduate students in the course as a pre-lab simulation experience. This will help students to get a preview of how to use the lab equipment and run experiments without using the lab hardware/software equipment. The quality of the time available for laboratory experiments can be significantly improved through the use of virtual reality technology.

  15. MatLab Script and Functional Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2007-01-01

    MatLab Script and Functional Programming: MatLab is one of the most widely used very high level programming languages for scientific and engineering computations. It is very user-friendly and needs practically no formal programming knowledge. Presented here are MatLab programming aspects and not just the MatLab commands for scientists and engineers who do not have formal programming training and also have no significant time to spare for learning programming to solve their real world problems. Specifically provided are programs for visualization. The MatLab seminar covers the functional and script programming aspect of MatLab language. Specific expectations are: a) Recognize MatLab commands, script and function. b) Create, and run a MatLab function. c) Read, recognize, and describe MatLab syntax. d) Recognize decisions, loops and matrix operators. e) Evaluate scope among multiple files, and multiple functions within a file. f) Declare, define and use scalar variables, vectors and matrices.

  16. Updated version of an interim connection space LabPQR for spectral color reproduction: LabLab.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qian; Wan, Xiaoxia; Li, Junfeng; Liang, Jingxing

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a new interim connection space (ICS) called LabLab, which is an updated version of LabPQR, to overcome the drawback that the last three dimensions of LabPQR have no definite colorimetric meanings. We extended and improved the method by which the first three dimensions of LabPQR are deduced to obtain an ICS consisting of two sets of CIELAB values under different illuminants, and the reconstructed spectra from LabLab were obtained by minimizing colorimetric errors by means of the computational formula of the CIE-XYZ tristimulus values combined with least-squares best fit. The improvement obtained from the proposed method was tested to compress and reconstruct the reflectance spectra of the 1950 Natural Color System color chips and more than 50,000 ISO SOCS color patches as well as six multispectral images acquired by multispectral image acquisition systems using 1600 glossy Munsell color chips as training samples. The performance was evaluated by the mean values of color differences between the original and reconstructed spectra under the CIE 1931 standard colorimetric observer and the CIE standard illuminants D50, D55, D65, D75, F2, F7, F11, and A as well as five multichip white LED light sources. The mean and maximum values of the root mean square errors between the original and reconstructed spectra were also calculated. The experimental results show that the proposed three LabLab interim connection spaces significantly outperform principal component analysis, LabPQR, XYZLMS, Fairman-Brill, and LabRGB in colorimetric reconstruction accuracy at the cost of slight reduction of spectral reconstruction accuracy and illuminant independence of color differences of the suggested LabLab interim connection spaces outperform other interim connection spaces. In addition, the presented LabLab interim connection spaces could be quite compatible with the extensively used colorimetric management system since each dimension has definite colorimetric

  17. Gain Evaluation of Micro-Channel-Plate Photomultipliers in the Upgraded High-B Test Facility at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, Corinne; DIRC at EIC Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The High-B test facility at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility allows researchers to evaluate the gain of compact photon sensors, such as Micro-Channel-Plate Photomultipliers (MCP-PMTs), in magnetic fields up to 5 T. These ongoing studies support the development of a Detector of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light (DIRC) to be used in an Electron Ion Collider (EIC). Here, we present our summer 2015 activities to upgrade and improve the facility, and we show results for MCP-PMT gain changes in high B-fields. To monitor the light stability delivered to the MCP-PMTs being tested, we implemented a Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) in the setup and calibrated the ADC reading this sensor. A 405-nm Light-Emitting Diode (LED) housed in an optical tube compatible with neutral density filters was also installed. The filters provide an alternative way of reducing the light output of the LED to operate the MCP-PMTs in a single-photon mode. We calibrated a set of filters by means of a photodiode and measured the photon flux at multiple positions relative to the LED. This information helped us to design 3D-printed holders unique to each MCP-PMT so that the photocathode receives the greatest amount of light. The improvements to the setup allow for more precise PMT gain evaluation. This team includes 7 collaborators/co-authors besides myself: Yordanka Ilieva, Kijun Park, Greg Kalicy, Carl Zorn, Pawel Nadel-Turonski, Tongtong Cao, and Lee.

  18. Teachers' Perspectives on Online Virtual Labs vs. Hands-On Labs in High School Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohr, Teresa M.

    This study of online science teachers' opinions addressed the use of virtual labs in online courses. A growing number of schools use virtual labs that must meet mandated laboratory standards to ensure they provide learning experiences comparable to hands-on labs, which are an integral part of science curricula. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine teachers' perceptions of the quality and effectiveness of high school virtual labs. The theoretical foundation was constructivism, as labs provide student-centered activities for problem solving, inquiry, and exploration of phenomena. The research questions focused on experienced teachers' perceptions of the quality of virtual vs. hands-on labs. Data were collected through survey questions derived from the lab objectives of The Next Generation Science Standards . Eighteen teachers rated the degree of importance of each objective and also rated how they felt virtual labs met these objectives; these ratings were reported using descriptive statistics. Responses to open-ended questions were few and served to illustrate the numerical results. Many teachers stated that virtual labs are valuable supplements but could not completely replace hands-on experiences. Studies on the quality and effectiveness of high school virtual labs are limited despite widespread use. Comprehensive studies will ensure that online students have equal access to quality labs. School districts need to define lab requirements, and colleges need to specify the lab experience they require. This study has potential to inspire positive social change by assisting science educators, including those in the local school district, in evaluating and selecting courseware designed to promote higher order thinking skills, real-world problem solving, and development of strong inquiry skills, thereby improving science instruction for all high school students.

  19. Evaluating the Impact of Different Sequence Databases on Metaproteome Analysis: Insights from a Lab-Assembled Microbial Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Tanca, Alessandro; Palomba, Antonio; Deligios, Massimo; Cubeddu, Tiziana; Fraumene, Cristina; Biosa, Grazia; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Addis, Maria Filippa; Uzzau, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Metaproteomics enables the investigation of the protein repertoire expressed by complex microbial communities. However, to unleash its full potential, refinements in bioinformatic approaches for data analysis are still needed. In this context, sequence databases selection represents a major challenge. This work assessed the impact of different databases in metaproteomic investigations by using a mock microbial mixture including nine diverse bacterial and eukaryotic species, which was subjected to shotgun metaproteomic analysis. Then, both the microbial mixture and the single microorganisms were subjected to next generation sequencing to obtain experimental metagenomic- and genomic-derived databases, which were used along with public databases (namely, NCBI, UniProtKB/SwissProt and UniProtKB/TrEMBL, parsed at different taxonomic levels) to analyze the metaproteomic dataset. First, a quantitative comparison in terms of number and overlap of peptide identifications was carried out among all databases. As a result, only 35% of peptides were common to all database classes; moreover, genus/species-specific databases provided up to 17% more identifications compared to databases with generic taxonomy, while the metagenomic database enabled a slight increment in respect to public databases. Then, database behavior in terms of false discovery rate and peptide degeneracy was critically evaluated. Public databases with generic taxonomy exhibited a markedly different trend compared to the counterparts. Finally, the reliability of taxonomic attribution according to the lowest common ancestor approach (using MEGAN and Unipept software) was assessed. The level of misassignments varied among the different databases, and specific thresholds based on the number of taxon-specific peptides were established to minimize false positives. This study confirms that database selection has a significant impact in metaproteomics, and provides critical indications for improving depth and

  20. Evaluation of control of blood pressure in chronic kidney disease patients with hypertension attending echo-lab of Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, B; Dhungel, S

    2012-06-01

    Hypertension and Chronic kidney disease (CKD) are common in Nepal. Control of blood pressure (BP) in general hypertensive patients is poor. Evaluation of adequacy of BP control in CKD patients with hypertension is rare. All consecutive indoor patients (52) with CKD and hypertension, attending echo-lab of Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital during prospective study of 3 years period from 16th April 2008 to 15th April 2011, were evaluted. Mean age was 45.3 +/- 16.7 years. Male female ratio was 8:5. Brahman and Chhetri (22, 42.3%) were the usual sufferers. There were two peaks in the age group wise distribution; one in age group 20-29 years and the next in 50-59 years. One hypertensive patient's BP was normalized after starting hemodialysis without antihypertensive therapy and was excluded from this study. Others' BP (n = 51) were followed up during admission for the evaluation of the adequacy of their BP control and their antihypertensive medications were reviewed. The control of hypertension in CKD patients was difficult. More than two third of the patients (68.6%) had BP > 140/90 mm Hg. Intensive BP control was present in less than one tenth (7.9%) of the patients. In comparison to intensive group, uncontrolled group received more antihypertensive agents (3.0 +/- 1.3 vs. 2.0 +/- 0.8, p < 0.05). Amlodipine (39, 76.5%) and frusemide (39, 76.5%) were very popular antihypertensives used followed by Prazocin (20, 39.2%) and Metoprolol (11, 21.6%). Despite good efforts, BP control of Nepalese CKD patients with hypertension, were poor. PMID:23671961

  1. Computer Lab Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wodarz, Nan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the layout and elements of an effective school computer lab. Includes configuration, storage spaces, cabling and electrical requirements, lighting, furniture, and computer hardware and peripherals. (PKP)

  2. To Duct or Not to Duct: Evaluating the Space Conditioning Impacts of Heat Pump Water Heaters in the PNNL Lab Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Widder, Sarah H.; Parker, Graham B.; Peeks, B.; Sullivan, Greg; Shaffer, Scott

    2014-08-22

    Heat pump water heaters (HPWH) are a promising technology for substantially reducing water heating-related energy use in the residential sector. However, concerns have been raised regarding the impact of HPWHs on space conditioning energy when installed in conditioned space, primarily in northern climates. For example, the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA’s) Northern Climate HPWH Specification, which describes the characteristics a HPWH must have to be incentivized in cold climates in the Pacific Northwest (PNW), requires exhaust ducting for their Tier II-specified products and both supply and exhaust ducting for the Tier III-specified product (NEEA 2013). However, these concerns and installation recommendations are based on modeling and comparative field data are not available to verify modeled performance. This study examines the overall performance and operation of two GE GeoSpring HPWHs in conditioned space in the matched pair of PNNL Lab Homes with no ducting, exhaust ducting, and full ducting (supply and exhaust) and explores the interactions between the HPWH and the home’s heating/cooling system. The data collected in this field evaluation suggest that previous modeling may not completely characterize the complex interactions of HPWHs, HVAC systems, and ducting. This report discusses the impact on space conditioning and water heater energy use of configuring an HPWH with exhaust only ducting or full ducting, as compared to an unducted HPWH. Additional cost analysis is necessary to assess the cost effectiveness of ducting and to make formal recommendations regarding appropriate installation of HPWHs in more varied scenarios.

  3. PRIME Lab Radiocarbon Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillegonds, D. J.; Mueller, K. A.; Ma, X.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1996-03-01

    The Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab) is one of three NSF national facilities for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), and is the only one capable of determining six cosmogenic radionuclides: 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, and 129I. This abstract describes the current status of the radiocarbon analysis program at PRIME Lab.

  4. Making Real Virtual Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Harry E.; Keller, Edward E.

    2005-01-01

    Francis Bacon began defining scientific methodology in the early 17th century, and secondary school science classes began to implement science labs in the mid-19th century. By the early 20th century, leading educators were suggesting that science labs be used to develop scientific thinking habits in young students, and at the beginning of the 21st…

  5. Operating a Math Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Elementary Curriculum Development.

    The rationale behind the use of mathematics laboratories is stated, then directions for organizing and implementing a math lab are given. Topics such as housekeeping, keeping an inventory, noise level, record keeping and assignments, giving grades, correlating textbooks with a math lab, and finding meaningful laboratory problems are each discussed…

  6. Physics Labs with Flavor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrest, Mikhail M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes my attempts to look deeper into the so-called "shoot for your grade" labs, started in the '90s, when I began applying my teaching experience in Russia to introductory physics labs at the College of Charleston and other higher education institutions in South Carolina. The term "shoot for your grade" became popular among…

  7. NOT Another Lab Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ende, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Ask students to name the aspects of science class they enjoy most, and working on labs will undoubtedly be mentioned. What often won't be included, however, is writing lab reports. For many students, the process of exploration and data collection is paramount, while the explanation and analysis of findings often takes a backseat. After all, if…

  8. LabSkills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Nick

    2010-01-01

    This article describes LabSkills, a revolutionary teaching tool to improve practical science in schools. LabSkills offers the chance to help improve the exposure that the average Key Stage 5 (age 16-19) student has to practical work. This is a huge area for development being highlighted by universities who are seeing a worryingly growing trend in…

  9. A Museum Learning Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandiver, Kathleen M.; Bijur, Jon Markowitz; Epstein, Ari W.; Rosenthal, Beryl; Stidsen, Don

    2008-01-01

    The "Learning Lab: The Cell" exhibit was developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Museum and the MIT Center for Environmental Health Sciences (CEHS). Specially designed for middle and high school students, the Learning Lab provides museum visitors of all ages with fascinating insights into how our living cells work. The…

  10. Evaluation of functional microbial community's difference in full-scale and lab-scale anaerobic digesters feeding with different organic solid waste: Effects of substrate and operation factors.

    PubMed

    Niu, Qigui; Kobayashi, Takuro; Takemura, Yasuyuki; Kubota, Kengo; Li, Yu-You

    2015-10-01

    Samples taken from the full-scale and lab-scale anaerobic digesters feeding with different organic solid waste were investigated with assessment of the substrate effects. To understand the substrate effects on the microbial community diversity, heterogeneity, and functional structure, twelve samples were analyzed by constructing 16S rRNA gene clone libraries and statistical analysis. Microbial diversity varied according to substrate types and operating parameters. With acetoclastic methanogen of genus Methanosaeta predominated in full scale and Methanosarcina predominated in the lab-scale digesters, a significant difference archaeal communities were found. Principal component analysis clearly indicates that both bacterial and archaeal communities create independent clusters according to substrate types. However, the relationship between acetogenic bacteria and the acetoclastic methanogens had a similar variation tends in most of full-scale and lab-scale reactors. Canonical correlation analysis and variance partitioning analysis implied that bacterial and archaeal community variations were significantly affected by substrate and the operation conditions. PMID:26119052

  11. Comprehensive clone screening and evaluation of fed-batch strategies in a microbioreactor and lab scale stirred tank bioreactor system: application on Pichia pastoris producing Rhizopus oryzae lipase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    . pastoris Mut+ phenotype. The use of fed-batch strategies using mixed substrate feeds resulted in increased biomass and lipolytic activity. The automated processing of fed-batch strategies by the RoboLector considerably facilitates the operation of fermentation processes, while reducing error-prone clone selection by increasing product titers. The scale-up from microbioreactor to lab scale stirred tank bioreactor showed an excellent correlation, validating the use of microbioreactor as a powerful tool for evaluating fed-batch operational strategies. PMID:24606982

  12. Bilingual (German-English) Molecular Biology Courses in an Out-of-School Lab on a University Campus: Cognitive and Affective Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodenhauser, Annika; Preisfeld, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    Taking into account (German) students' deficiencies in scientific literacy as well as reading competence and the "mother tongue + 2" objective of the European commission, a bilingual course on molecular biology was developed. It combines CLIL fundamentals and practical experimentation in an out-of-school lab. Cognitive and affective…

  13. Virtual labs: a substitute for traditional labs?

    PubMed

    Scheckler, Rebecca K

    2003-01-01

    Current technologies give us the ability to enhance and replace developmental biology classes with computer-based resources, often called virtual labs. In the process of using these resources, teachers may be tempted to neglect the simpler technologies and lab bench activities, which can be labor intensive. In this paper, I take a critical look at the role of computer-based materials for the teaching of developmental biology in order to aid teachers in assessing their value. I conclude that while digital tools have value, they should not replace all of the traditional laboratory activities. Clearly, both computer-enhanced activities and traditional labs must be included in laboratory exercises. Reliance on only one or the other is inappropriate. In order to determine when it is appropriate to use a particular educational tool, the goals of the course and the needs of biology students for an education that gives them a realistic and engaged view of biology must be understood. In this paper, I dispel some of the myths of computer tools and give specific guidelines for assessing their usage, taking into account the special needs of a developmental biology class and the difficulties of observing all the developmental stages of subject organisms in the timescale of class meetings. PMID:12705675

  14. GeneLab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrios, Daniel C.; Thompson, Terri G.

    2015-01-01

    NASA GeneLab is expected to capture and distribute omics data and experimental and process conditions most relevant to research community in their statistical and theoretical analysis of NASAs omics data.

  15. Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-05-22

    Take a virtual tour of the campus of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. You can see inside our two accelerators, three experimental areas, accelerator component fabrication and testing areas, high-performance computing areas and laser labs.

  16. Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-13

    Take a virtual tour of the campus of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. You can see inside our two accelerators, three experimental areas, accelerator component fabrication and testing areas, high-performance computing areas and laser labs.

  17. LABS Foundational Technology

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    They are the inventors of our generation dedicated to exceptional science, advancing the technologies of tomorrow. CO-LABS honors the outstanding achievements of researchers and their impact on the world.

  18. Advanced Lab Consortium ``Conspiracy''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert, Jonathan F.

    2006-03-01

    Advanced Laboratory instruction is a time-honored and essential element of an undergraduate physics education. But, from my vantage point, it has been neglected by the two major professional societies, APS and AAPT. At some schools, it has been replaced by ``research experiences,'' but I contend that very few of these experiences in the research lab, particularly in the junior year, deliver what they promise. It is time to focus the attention of APS, AAPT, and the NSF on the advanced lab. We need to create an Advanced Lab Consortium (ALC) of faculty and staff to share experiments, suppliers, materials, pedagogy, ideas, in short to build a professional network for those committed to advanced lab instruction. The AAPT is currently in serious discussions on this topic and my company stands ready with both financial and personnel resources to support the effort. This talk is a plea for co-conspirators.

  19. Are Virtual Labs as Effective as Hands-on Labs for Undergraduate Physics? A Comparative Study at Two Major Universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, Marjorie; Humbert, Roxann; Finstein, Jeanne; Simon, Marllin; Hopkins, John

    2014-12-01

    Most physics professors would agree that the lab experiences students have in introductory physics are central to the learning of the concepts in the course. It is also true that these physics labs require time and money for upkeep, not to mention the hours spent setting up and taking down labs. Virtual physics lab experiences can provide an alternative or supplement to these traditional hands-on labs. However, physics professors may be very hesitant to give up the hands-on labs, which have been such a central part of their courses, for a more cost and time-saving virtual alternative. Thus, it is important to investigate how the learning from these virtual experiences compares to that acquired through a hands-on experience. This study evaluated a comprehensive set of virtual labs for introductory level college physics courses and compared them to a hands-on physics lab experience. Each of the virtual labs contains everything a student needs to conduct a physics laboratory experiment, including: objectives, background theory, 3D simulation, brief video, data collection tools, pre- and postlab questions, and postlab quiz. This research was conducted with 224 students from two large universities and investigated the learning that occurred with students using the virtual labs either in a lab setting or as a supplement to hands-on labs versus a control group of students using the traditional hands-on labs only. Findings from both university settings showed the virtual labs to be as effective as the traditional hands-on physics labs.

  20. Are Virtual Labs as Effective as Hands-on Labs for Undergraduate Physics? A Comparative Study at Two Major Universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, Marjorie; Humbert, Roxann; Finstein, Jeanne; Simon, Marllin; Hopkins, John

    2014-08-01

    Most physics professors would agree that the lab experiences students have in introductory physics are central to the learning of the concepts in the course. It is also true that these physics labs require time and money for upkeep, not to mention the hours spent setting up and taking down labs. Virtual physics lab experiences can provide an alternative or supplement to these traditional hands-on labs. However, physics professors may be very hesitant to give up the hands-on labs, which have been such a central part of their courses, for a more cost and time-saving virtual alternative. Thus, it is important to investigate how the learning from these virtual experiences compares to that acquired through a hands-on experience. This study evaluated a comprehensive set of virtual labs for introductory level college physics courses and compared them to a hands-on physics lab experience. Each of the virtual labs contains everything a student needs to conduct a physics laboratory experiment, including: objectives, background theory, 3D simulation, brief video, data collection tools, pre- and postlab questions, and postlab quiz. This research was conducted with 224 students from two large universities and investigated the learning that occurred with students using the virtual labs either in a lab setting or as a supplement to hands-on labs versus a control group of students using the traditional hands-on labs only. Findings from both university settings showed the virtual labs to be as effective as the traditional hands-on physics labs.

  1. LCOGT Imaging Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tufts, Joseph R.; Lobdill, Rich; Haldeman, Benjamin J.; Haynes, Rachel; Hawkins, Eric; Burleson, Ben; Jahng, David

    2008-07-01

    The Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) is an ambitious project to build and operate, within 5 years, a worldwide robotic network of 50 0.4, 1, and 2 m telescopes sharing identical instrumentation and optimized for precision photometry of time-varying sources. The telescopes, instrumentation, and software are all developed in house with two 2 m telescopes already installed. The LCOGT Imaging Lab is responsible for assembly and characterization of the network's cameras and instrumentation. In addition to a fully equipped CNC machine shop, two electronics labs, and a future optics lab, the Imaging Lab is designed from the ground up to be a superb environment for bare detectors, precision filters, and assembled instruments. At the heart of the lab is an ISO class 5 cleanroom with full ionization. Surrounding this, the class 7 main lab houses equipment for detector characterization including QE and CTE, and equipment for measuring transmission and reflection of optics. Although the first science cameras installed, two TEC cooled e2v 42-40 deep depletion based units and two CryoTiger cooled Fairchild Imaging CCD486-BI based units, are from outside manufacturers, their 18 position filter wheels and the remainder of the network's science cameras, controllers, and instrumentation will be built in house. Currently being designed, the first generation LCOGT cameras for the network's 1 m telescopes use existing CCD486-BI devices and an in-house controller. Additionally, the controller uses digital signal processing to optimize readout noise vs. speed, and all instrumentation uses embedded microprocessors for communication over ethernet.

  2. SenseLab

    PubMed Central

    Crasto, Chiquito J.; Marenco, Luis N.; Liu, Nian; Morse, Thomas M.; Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Lai, Peter C.; Bahl, Gautam; Masiar, Peter; Lam, Hugo Y.K.; Lim, Ernest; Chen, Huajin; Nadkarni, Prakash; Migliore, Michele; Miller, Perry L.; Shepherd, Gordon M.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the latest developments in neuroscience information dissemination through the SenseLab suite of databases: NeuronDB, CellPropDB, ORDB, OdorDB, OdorMapDB, ModelDB and BrainPharm. These databases include information related to: (i) neuronal membrane properties and neuronal models, and (ii) genetics, genomics, proteomics and imaging studies of the olfactory system. We describe here: the new features for each database, the evolution of SenseLab’s unifying database architecture and instances of SenseLab database interoperation with other neuroscience online resources. PMID:17510162

  3. The NOAO Data Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, M.; Olsen, K.; Stobie, E. B.; Mighell, K. J.; Norris, P.

    2015-09-01

    We describe the NOAO Data Lab to help community users take advantage of current large surveys and prepare them even larger surveys in the era of LSST. The Data Lab will allow users to efficiently utilize catalogs of billions of objects, combine traditional telescope image and spectral data with external archives, share custom results with collaborators, publish data products to other users, and experiment with analysis toolkits. Specific science cases will be used to develop a prototype framework and tools, allowing us to work directly with scientists from survey teams to ensure development remains focused on scientifically productive tasks.

  4. A Big Bang Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheider, Walter

    2005-01-01

    The February 2005 issue of The Science Teacher (TST) reminded everyone that by learning how scientists study stars, students gain an understanding of how science measures things that can not be set up in lab, either because they are too big, too far away, or happened in a very distant past. The authors of "How Far are the Stars?" show how the…

  5. Inside Linden Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Tom

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author provides an overview of Second Life[trademark], or simply SL, which was developed at Linden Lab, a San Francisco-based corporation. SL is an online society within a threee-dimensional virtual world entirely built and owned by its residents, where they can explore, build, socialize and participate in their own economy.…

  6. Serial Dilution Simulation Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keler, Cynthia; Balutis, Tabitha; Bergen, Kim; Laudenslager, Bryanna; Rubino, Deanna

    2010-01-01

    Serial dilution is often a difficult concept for students to understand. In this short dry lab exercise, students perform serial dilutions using seed beads. This exercise helps students gain skill at performing dilutions without using reagents, bacterial cultures, or viral cultures, while being able to visualize the process.

  7. Lab with Dad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havers, Brenda; Delmotte, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Family science nights are fantastic, but planning one can be overwhelming, especially when one considers the already overloaded schedule of a classroom teacher. To overcome this challenge, the authors--colleagues with a mutual love of science--developed a much simpler annual event called "Lab With Dad." The purpose was for one target age group of…

  8. Elemental Chem Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franco Mariscal, Antonio Joaquin

    2008-01-01

    This educative material uses the symbols of 45 elements to spell the names of 32 types of laboratory equipment usually found in chemical labs. This teaching material has been divided into three puzzles according to the type of the laboratory equipment: (i) glassware as reaction vessels or containers; (ii) glassware for measuring, addition or…

  9. The Crime Lab Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Annamae J.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Crime Lab Project, which takes an economical, hands-on, interdisciplinary approach to studying the career of forensics in the middle or high school classroom. Includes step-by-step student requirements for the investigative procedure, a sample evidence request form, and an assessment rubric. (KHR)

  10. Writing Better Lab Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Rhiannon; Guarienti, Kristy; Brydon, Barbara; Robb, Jeanine; Royston, Ann; Painter, Heidi; Sutherland, Alex; Passmore, Cynthia; Smith, Martin H.

    2010-01-01

    As science teachers at a suburban California high school, the authors were concerned about the lab report conclusions written by their upper-level chemistry, biology, and ecology students--which were consistently of poor quality. Their work lacked inferences derived from data and support for their concluding statements. Working as part of a…

  11. Labs That Are a Blast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Laura

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities that use a simple homemade apparatus called "the cannon" to demonstrate Newton's Third Law. Reviews the chemistry concepts behind the ignition of the cannon and presents the Momentum Lab and the Projectile Motion Lab. (JRH)

  12. Outreach Science Education: Evidence-Based Studies in a Gene Technology Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharfenberg, Franz-Josef; Bogner, Franz X.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, outreach labs are important informal learning environments in science education. After summarizing research to goals outreach labs focus on, we describe our evidence-based gene technology lab as a model of a research-driven outreach program. Evaluation-based optimizations of hands-on teaching based on cognitive load theory (additional…

  13. The greening of the national labs

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, E.

    1993-04-02

    The big three weapons laboratories - Los Alamos, Livermore, and Sandia - could face dramatic changes in the way they do business if a proposal made by Representative George Brown (D-CA) is enacted. Brown, chairman of the House Science Committee, introduced a bill last week that would consolidate nuclear weapons R D from several labs (without saying at which sites or how). Brown also wants to shift the focus of the labs work more toward civilian projects, and the bill would involve the White House more directly in managing their research agenda. The Brown bill (HR 1432), which has won the backing of Representatives Marilyn Lloyd (D-TN), Tim Valentine (D-NC), Rick Boucher (D-VA), and Ron Wyden (R-OR), asks the secretary of energy to make a comprehensive study of current lab activities and submit a plan to redirect one or more of these labs to civilian missions by 31 March 1994. Brown and other members of Congress had considered turning one of the nuclear weapons centers into a green lab, that is, dedicating it to R D on environmental technology. That idea seems to have been set aside in favor of a more general formula that would be administered by a new Federal Laboratory Mission Evaluation and Coordination Committee, reporting to the president's science adviser. This watchdog panel, according to the bill, would seek to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of all the federal laboratories and ensure that between 10% and 20% of their budgets are devoted to collaborative efforts with industry and state and local governments. Administratively, the bill would also create some new positions at the Dept. of Energy (DOE), including an undersecretary for science and technology who would manage the labs.

  14. e-Learning - Physics Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohottala, Hashini

    2014-03-01

    The general student population enrolled in any college level class is highly diverse. An increasing number of ``nontraditional'' students return to college and most of these students follow distance learning degree programs while engaging in their other commitments, work and family. However, those students tend to avoid taking science courses with labs, mostly because of the incapability of remotely completing the lab components in such courses. In order to address this issue, we have come across a method where introductory level physics labs can be taught remotely. In this process a lab kit with the critical lab components that can be easily accessible are conveniently packed into a box and distributed among students at the beginning of the semester. Once the students are given the apparatus they perform the experiments at home and gather data All communications with reference to the lab was done through an interactive user-friendly webpage - Wikispaces (WikiS). Students who create pages on WikiS can submit their lab write-ups, embed videos of the experiments they perform, post pictures and direct questions to the lab instructor. The students who are enrolled in the same lab can interact with each other through WikiS to discuss labs and even get assistance.

  15. Interactive, Online, Adsorption Lab to Support Discovery of the Scientific Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, K. C.; Ulery, A. L.; Chamberlin, B.; Dettmer, A.

    2014-12-01

    Science students require more than methods practice in lab activities; they must gain an understanding of the application of the scientific process through lab work. Large classes, time constraints, and funding may limit student access to science labs, denying students access to the types of experiential learning needed to motivate and develop new scientists. Interactive, discovery-based computer simulations and virtual labs provide an alternative, low-risk opportunity for learners to engage in lab processes and activities. Students can conduct experiments, collect data, draw conclusions, and even abort a session. We have developed an online virtual lab, through which students can interactively develop as scientists as they learn about scientific concepts, lab equipment, and proper lab techniques. Our first lab topic is adsorption of chemicals to soil, but the methodology is transferrable to other topics. In addition to learning the specific procedures involved in each lab, the online activities will prompt exploration and practice in key scientific and mathematical concepts, such as unit conversion, significant digits, assessing risks, evaluating bias, and assessing quantity and quality of data. These labs are not designed to replace traditional lab instruction, but to supplement instruction on challenging or particularly time-consuming concepts. To complement classroom instruction, students can engage in a lab experience outside the lab and over a shorter time period than often required with real-world adsorption studies. More importantly, students can reflect, discuss, review, and even fail at their lab experience as part of the process to see why natural processes and scientific approaches work the way they do. Our Media Productions team has completed a series of online digital labs available at virtuallabs.nmsu.edu and scienceofsoil.com, and these virtual labs are being integrated into coursework to evaluate changes in student learning.

  16. Introducing ADS Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Henneken, E.; Grant, C. S.; Kurtz, M. J.; Di Milia, G.; Luker, J.; Thompson, D. M.; Bohlen, E.; Murray, S. S.

    2011-05-01

    ADS Labs is a platform that ADS is introducing in order to test and receive feedback from the community on new technologies and prototype services. Currently, ADS Labs features a new interface for abstract searches, faceted filtering of results, visualization of co-authorship networks, article-level recommendations, and a full-text search service. The streamlined abstract search interface provides a simple, one-box search with options for ranking results based on a paper relevancy, freshness, number of citations, and downloads. In addition, it provides advanced rankings based on collaborative filtering techniques. The faceted filtering interface allows users to narrow search results based on a particular property or set of properties ("facets"), allowing users to manage large lists and explore the relationship between them. For any set or sub-set of records, the co-authorship network can be visualized in an interactive way, offering a view of the distribution of contributors and their inter-relationships. This provides an immediate way to detect groups and collaborations involved in a particular research field. For a majority of papers in Astronomy, our new interface will provide a list of related articles of potential interest. The recommendations are based on a number of factors, including text similarity, citations, and co-readership information. The new full-text search interface allows users to find all instances of particular words or phrases in the body of the articles in our full-text archive. This includes all of the scanned literature in ADS as well as a select portion of the current astronomical literature, including ApJ, ApJS, AJ, MNRAS, PASP, A&A, and soon additional content from Springer journals. Fulltext search results include a list of the matching papers as well as a list of "snippets" of text highlighting the context in which the search terms were found. ADS Labs is available at http://adslabs.org

  17. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is an illustration of the analytical procedure of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL) on board the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument. By dissolving small amounts of soil in water, WCL can determine the pH, the abundance of minerals such as magnesium and sodium cations or chloride, bromide and sulfate anions, as well as the conductivity and redox potential.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  18. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is an illustration of soil analysis on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL) on board the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument. By dissolving small amounts of soil in water, WCL will attempt to determine the pH, the abundance of minerals such as magnesium and sodium cations or chloride, bromide and sulfate anions, as well as the conductivity and redox potential.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. Inexpensive DAQ based physics labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Benjamin; Clark, Shane

    2015-11-01

    Quality Data Acquisition (DAQ) based physics labs can be designed using microcontrollers and very low cost sensors with minimal lab equipment. A prototype device with several sensors and documentation for a number of DAQ-based labs is showcased. The device connects to a computer through Bluetooth and uses a simple interface to control the DAQ and display real time graphs, storing the data in .txt and .xls formats. A full device including a larger number of sensors combined with software interface and detailed documentation would provide a high quality physics lab education for minimal cost, for instance in high schools lacking lab equipment or students taking online classes. An entire semester’s lab course could be conducted using a single device with a manufacturing cost of under $20.

  20. Introductory labs; what they don't, should, and can teach (and why)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieman, Carl

    2016-03-01

    Introductory physics labs are widely used and expensive. They have a wide variety of potential learning goals, but these are seldom specified and less often measured if they are achieved. We cover three different research projects on introductory labs: 1) We have done cognitive task analyses of both experimental research in physics and instructional labs. The striking differences explain much of the unhappiness expressed by students with labs: 2) We have measured the effectiveness of two introductory physics lab courses specifically intended to teach the physics content covered in standard introductory courses on mechanics and E & M. As measured by course exams, the benefit is 0 +/-2% for both. 3) We show how it is possible to use lab courses to teach students to correctly evaluate physical models with uncertain data. Such quantitative critical thinking is an important skill that is not learned in typical lab courses, but is well learned by our modified lab instruction.

  1. Lab at Home: Hardware Kits for a Digital Design Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, J. P.; Haim, F.

    2009-01-01

    An innovative laboratory methodology for an introductory digital design course is presented. Instead of having traditional lab experiences, where students have to come to school classrooms, a "lab at home" concept is proposed. Students perform real experiments in their own homes, using hardware kits specially developed for this purpose. They…

  2. Complete Phase I Tests As Described in the Multi-lab Test Plan for the Evaluation of CH3I Adsorption on AgZ

    SciTech Connect

    Bruffey, S. H.; Jubin, R. T.

    2014-09-30

    Silver-exchanged mordenite (AgZ) has been identified as a potential sorbent for iodine present in the off-gas streams of a used nuclear fuel reprocessing facility. In such a facility, both elemental and organic forms of iodine are released from the dissolver in gaseous form. These species of iodine must be captured with high efficiency for a facility to avoid radioactive iodine release above regulatory limits in the gaseous effluent of the plant. Studies completed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) examined the adsorption of organic iodine in the form of CH3I by AgZ. Upon breakthrough of the feed gas through the sorbent bed, elemental iodine was observed in the effluent stream, despite the fact that the only source of iodine in the system was the CH3I in the feed gas.1 This behavior does not appear to have been reported previously nor has it been independently confirmed. Thus, as a result of these prior studies, multiple knowledge gaps relating to the adsorption of CH3I by AgZ were identified, and a multi-lab test plan, including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), INL, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and Sandia National Laboratories, was formulated to address each in a systematic way.2 For this report, the scope of work for ORNL was further narrowed to three thin-bed experiments that would characterize CH3I adsorption onto AgZ in the presence of water, NO, and NO2. Completion of these three-thin bed experiments demonstrated that organic iodine in the form of CH3I was adsorbed by reduced silver mordenite (Ag0Z) to a 50% higher loading than that of I2 when adsorbed from a dry air stream. Adsorption curves suggest different adsorption mechanisms for I2 and CH3I. In the presence of NO and NO2 gas, the loading of CH3I onto Ag0Z is suppressed and may be reversible. Further, the presence of NO and NO2 gas appears to oxidize CH3I to I2; this is indicated by an adsorption curve similar to that of I2 on Ag0Z. Finally, the loss of organic iodine loading

  3. EarthLabs: A National Model for Earth Science Lab Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaris, J. R.; Dahlman, L.; Barstow, D.

    2008-12-01

    As a response to the need for more rigorous, inquiry-based high school Earth science courses, a coalition of scientists, educators, and five states have created EarthLabs, a set of pilot modules that can serve as a national model for lab-based science courses. The content of EarthLabs chapters focuses on Earth system science and environmental literacy and conforms to the National Science Education Standards as well as the states' curriculum frameworks. The effort is funded by NOAA's Environmental Literacy program. The pilot modules present activities on Corals, Drought, Fisheries, and Hurricanes. The Fisheries and Hurricanes units were reviewed and field-tested by educators in Texas and Arizona. The feedback from this evaluation led to revisions of these units and guided development of the Corals and Drought chapters. Each module consists of activities that use online data sets, satellite imagery, web-based readings, and hands-on laboratory experiments. The project comprises two separate websites, one for the instructor and one for students. The instructor's site contains the pedagogical underpinnings for each lab including teaching materials, assessment strategies, and the alignment of activities with state and national science standards. The student site provides access to all materials that students need to complete the activities or, in the case of the hands-on labs, where they access additional information to help extend their learning. There are also formative and summative questions embedded in the student webpages to help scaffold learning through the activities.

  4. Physics Labs with Flavor II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrest, Mikhail M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper was inspired by the numerous requests from "TPT" readers to expand the number of examples of "recurrent study" lab exercises described in my previous paper "Physics Labs with Flavor." I recommend that readers examine it first in order to better understand this one as my attempt here is to be brief. In that paper, one can find details…

  5. Business Lab Curriculum. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dill, Cheri; Weitman, Karlene

    Curriculum materials are provided for courses to be taught in business labs, including typing I, advanced and production typing, office procedures (clerical and secretarial), recordkeeping, accounting I and II, consumer math, and business law. Introductory materials include suggestions for setting up labs and a listing of required and suggested…

  6. TQM in a Computer Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Dewey A.; Phillips, Julie A.

    At the Purdue University School of Technology (PST) at Columbus, Indiana, the Total Quality Management (TQM) philosophy was used in the computer laboratories to better meet student needs. A customer satisfaction survey was conducted to gather data on lab facilities, lab assistants, and hardware/software; other sections of the survey included…

  7. Methamphetamine Lab Incidents, 2004-2014

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liderazgo de la DEA Resource Center » Statistics & Facts » Methamphetamine Lab Incidents Methamphetamine Lab Incidents, 2004-2014 NOTE: These maps include all meth incidents, including labs, "dumpsites" or "chemical and glassware" ...

  8. GeoLab: A Geological Workstation for Future Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Cynthia; Calaway, Michael; Bell, Mary Sue; Li, Zheng; Tong, Shuo; Zhong, Ye; Dahiwala, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    characterization for mission planning, operations, and sample prioritization, 3) evaluate analytical instruments and tools for providing efficient and meaningful data in advance of sample return and 4) identify science operations that leverage human presence with robotic tools. In the first year of tests (2010), GeoLab examined basic glovebox operations performed by one and two crewmembers and science operations performed by a remote science team. The 2010 tests also examined the efficacy of basic sample characterization [descriptions, microscopic imagery, X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyses] and feedback to the science team. In year 2 (2011), the GeoLab team tested enhanced software and interfaces for the crew and science team (including Web-based and mobile device displays) and demonstrated laboratory configurability with a new diagnostic instrument (the Multispectral Microscopic Imager from the JPL and Arizona State University). In year 3 (2012), the GeoLab team installed and tested a robotic sample manipulator and evaluated robotic-human interfaces for science operations.

  9. Neutron Transversity at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen; Xiaodong Jiang; Jen-chieh Peng; Lingyan Zhu

    2005-09-07

    Nucleon transversity and single transverse spin asymmetries have been the recent focus of large efforts by both theorists and experimentalists. On-going and planned experiments from HERMES, COMPASS and RHIC are mostly on the proton or the deuteron. Presented here is a planned measurement of the neutron transversity and single target spin asymmetries at Jefferson Lab in Hall A using a transversely polarized {sup 3}He target. Also presented are the results and plans of other neutron transverse spin experiments at Jefferson Lab. Finally, the factorization for semi-inclusive DIS studies at Jefferson Lab is discussed.

  10. What's your lab's strategy?

    PubMed

    Francis, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Important strategic choices cascade throughout a laboratory. Senior management should create a document that answers each of the five key questions explained on page 60. Once this has been detailed in writing, it remains important to disseminate the basics to all employees so they are singing the same tune. A useful way to accomplish this is through a coherent strategy statement that specifies three components: 1) objectives; 2) scope; and 3) advantages. Commercial and hospital outreach labs should be in business to win. It all starts with a definition of what winning looks like. To "participate" in your market contributes to mediocrity-and it's self-defeating. With no clear strategic direction of where-to-play and how-to-win choices that associate with the aspiration, a mission or vision statement can be frustrating rather than inspiring for employees. Articulate it plainly and concisely for everybody. With a care-fully prepared and designed strategy, you will be on your way to winning in the zero-sum game! PMID:27548928

  11. Network protocol changes can improve DisCom WAN performance : evaluating TCP modifications and SCTP in the ASC tri-lab environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Tolendino, Lawrence F.; Hu, Tan Chang

    2005-06-01

    The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Distance Computing (DisCom) Wide Area Network (WAN) is a high performance, long distance network environment that is based on the ubiquitous TCP/IP protocol set. However, the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and the algorithms that govern its operation were defined almost two decades ago for a network environment vastly different from the DisCom WAN. In this paper we explore and evaluate possible modifications to TCP that purport to improve TCP performance in environments like the DisCom WAN. We also examine a much newer protocol, SCTP (Stream Control Transmission Protocol) that claims to provide reliable network transport while also implementing multi-streaming, multi-homing capabilities that are appealing in the DisCom high performance network environment. We provide performance comparisons and recommendations for continued development that will lead to network communications protocol implementations capable of supporting the coming ASC Petaflop computing environments.

  12. Generalized Nanosatellite Avionics Testbed Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Chad R.; Sorgenfrei, Matthew C.; Nehrenz, Matt

    2015-01-01

    The Generalized Nanosatellite Avionics Testbed (G-NAT) lab at NASA Ames Research Center provides a flexible, easily accessible platform for developing hardware and software for advanced small spacecraft. A collaboration between the Mission Design Division and the Intelligent Systems Division, the objective of the lab is to provide testing data and general test protocols for advanced sensors, actuators, and processors for CubeSat-class spacecraft. By developing test schemes for advanced components outside of the standard mission lifecycle, the lab is able to help reduce the risk carried by advanced nanosatellite or CubeSat missions. Such missions are often allocated very little time for testing, and too often the test facilities must be custom-built for the needs of the mission at hand. The G-NAT lab helps to eliminate these problems by providing an existing suite of testbeds that combines easily accessible, commercial-offthe- shelf (COTS) processors with a collection of existing sensors and actuators.

  13. State of the Lab 2012

    SciTech Connect

    King, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King delivers the annual State of the Lab address on Thursday, May 17, 2012, the 65th Anniversary of the founding of The Ames Laboratory. This video contains highlights from the address.

  14. State of the Lab 2012

    ScienceCinema

    King, Alex

    2013-03-01

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King delivers the annual State of the Lab address on Thursday, May 17, 2012, the 65th Anniversary of the founding of The Ames Laboratory. This video contains highlights from the address.

  15. Evaluation of a Sequential Spot Sampler (S3) for time-resolved measurement of PM2.5 sulfate and nitrate through lab and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecobian, A.; Evanoski-Cole, A.; Eiguren-Fernandez, A.; Sullivan, A. P.; Lewis, G. S.; Hering, S. V.; Collett, J. L., Jr.

    2015-10-01

    The Sequential Spot Sampler (S3), a newly developed instrument to collect aerosols for time resolved chemical composition measurements, was evaluated in the laboratory and field for the measurement of particulate sulfate and nitrate. The S3 uses a multi-temperature condensation growth tube to grow individual aerosols to droplets which are then deposited as a ~ 1 mm diameter dry spot at the end of the growth tube on a 100 μL well of a multi-well plate. The well plate advances automatically to provide a sequence of time-resolved samples. The collected aerosols are subsequently analyzed in the laboratory. The sample is concentrated during the collection process and the laboratory extraction and analysis steps can be automated. The well plate, as received from the field, is placed onto a needle-based autosampler that adds liquid for sample extraction and injects sample extract from each well onto an ion chromatograph for analysis. Laboratory evaluation for sulfate and nitrate ions showed that PEEK used as well plate material does not contribute any artifacts; a 60 min extraction procedure leads to the recovery of sulfate and nitrate from the dry spots at above 95 % extraction efficiency; and samples stored frozen and analyzed up to 23 months later show less than a 10 % change in sulfate and nitrate concentrations. In a month long field study conducted in Southern California, two S3s were deployed alongside a URG denuder/filter-pack and a Particle-Into-Liquid Sampler combined with an Ion Chromatograph (PILS-IC). Collocated S3 sampler concentrations compared by linear regression show good agreement with r2 = 0.99 and slope = 0.99 (±0.004) μg m-3 for sulfate and r2 = 0.99 and slope =1.0 (±0.006) μg m-3 for nitrate. When compared to the URG denuder/filter-pack and the PILS-IC, the S3 sulfate and nitrate concentrations yielded correlations above 0.84 for the square of the correlation coefficient and regression slopes close to one.

  16. Evaluation of the Sequential Spot Sampler (S3) for time-resolved measurement of PM2.5 sulfate and nitrate through lab and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecobian, A.; Evanoski-Cole, A.; Eiguren-Fernandez, A.; Sullivan, A. P.; Lewis, G. S.; Hering, S. V.; Collett, J. L., Jr.

    2016-02-01

    The Sequential Spot Sampler (S3), a newly developed instrument to collect aerosols for time-resolved chemical composition measurements, was evaluated in the laboratory and field for the measurement of particulate sulfate and nitrate. The S3 uses a multi-temperature condensation growth tube to grow individual aerosols to droplets which are then deposited as a ˜ 1 mm diameter dry spot at the end of the growth tube in a 100 µL well of a multi-well plate. The well plate advances automatically to provide a sequence of time-resolved samples. The collected aerosols are subsequently analyzed in the laboratory. The sample is concentrated during the collection process, and the laboratory extraction and analysis steps can be automated. The well plate, as received from the field, is placed onto a needle-based autosampler that adds liquid for sample extraction and injects sample extract from each well onto an ion chromatograph for analysis. Laboratory evaluation for sulfate and nitrate ions showed that poly ether ether ketone (PEEK) used as well plate material does not contribute any artifacts; a 60 min extraction procedure leads to the recovery of sulfate and nitrate from the dry spots at above 95 % extraction efficiency; and samples stored frozen and analyzed up to 23 months later show less than a 10 % change in sulfate and nitrate concentrations. The limit of detection was 0.5 µg m-3 for sulfate and 0.2 µg m-3 for nitrate for a 1 h sampling period. In a month-long field study conducted in southern California, two S3s were deployed alongside a URG denuder-filter-pack and a Particle-Into-Liquid Sampler combined with an Ion Chromatograph (PILS-IC). Collocated S3 sampler concentrations compared by linear regression show good agreement, with r2 = 0.99 and slope = 0.99 (±0.004) µg m-3 for sulfate and r2 = 0.99 and slope = 1.0 (±0.006) µg m-3 for nitrate. When compared to the URG denuder-filter-pack and the PILS-IC, the S3 sulfate and nitrate concentrations yielded

  17. GridLAB-D/SG

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-08-30

    GridLAB-D is a new power system simulation tool that provides valuable information to users who design and operate electric power transmission and distribution systems, and to utilities that wish to take advantage of the latest smart grid technology. This special release of GridLAB-D was developed to study the proposed Smart Grid technology that is used by Battelle Memorial Institute in the AEP gridSMART demonstration project in Northeast Columbus, Ohio.

  18. Experimental Setup and Commissioning of a Test Facility for Gain Evaluation of Microchannel-Plate Photomultipliers in High Magnetic Field at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringley, Eric; Cao, Tongtong; Ilieva, Yordonka; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Park, Kijun; Zorn, Carl

    2014-09-01

    At the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) a research and development project for a Detector of Internally-Reflected Cherenkov light for the upcoming Electron Ion Collider is underway. One goal is the development of a compact readout camera that can operate in high magnetic fields. Small-size photon sensors, such as Microchannel-Plate Photomultipliers (MCP-PMT), are key components of the readout. Here we present our work to set up and commission a dedicated test facility at JLab where MCP-PMT gain is evaluated in magnetic fields of up to 5 T, and to develop a test procedure and analysis software to determine the gain. We operate the setup in a single-photon mode, where a light-emitting diode delivers photons to the sensor's photocathode. The PMT spectrum is measured with a flash Analog-to-Digital converter (fADC). We model the spectrum as a sum of an exponential background and a convolution of Poisson and Gaussian distributions of the pedestal and multiple photoelectron peaks, respectively. We determine the PMT's gain from the position of the single-photoelectron peak obtained by fitting the fADC spectrum to the model. Our gain uncertainty is <10%. The facility is now established and will have a long-lasting value for sensor tests and beyond-nuclear-physics applications.

  19. Virtual Labs and Virtual Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehler, Ted

    2006-12-01

    Virtual Labs and Virtual Worlds Coastline Community College has under development several virtual lab simulations and activities that range from biology, to language labs, to virtual discussion environments. Imagine a virtual world that students enter online, by logging onto their computer from home or anywhere they have web access. Upon entering this world they select a personalized identity represented by a digitized character (avatar) that can freely move about, interact with the environment, and communicate with other characters. In these virtual worlds, buildings, gathering places, conference rooms, labs, science rooms, and a variety of other “real world” elements are evident. When characters move about and encounter other people (players) they may freely communicate. They can examine things, manipulate objects, read signs, watch video clips, hear sounds, and jump to other locations. Goals of critical thinking, social interaction, peer collaboration, group support, and enhanced learning can be achieved in surprising new ways with this innovative approach to peer-to-peer communication in a virtual discussion world. In this presentation, short demos will be given of several online learning environments including a virtual biology lab, a marine science module, a Spanish lab, and a virtual discussion world. Coastline College has been a leader in the development of distance learning and media-based education for nearly 30 years and currently offers courses through PDA, Internet, DVD, CD-ROM, TV, and Videoconferencing technologies. Its distance learning program serves over 20,000 students every year. sponsor Jerry Meisner

  20. The Cardiac Electrophysiology Web Lab.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jonathan; Scharm, Martin; Mirams, Gary R

    2016-01-19

    Computational modeling of cardiac cellular electrophysiology has a long history, and many models are now available for different species, cell types, and experimental preparations. This success brings with it a challenge: how do we assess and compare the underlying hypotheses and emergent behaviors so that we can choose a model as a suitable basis for a new study or to characterize how a particular model behaves in different scenarios? We have created an online resource for the characterization and comparison of electrophysiological cell models in a wide range of experimental scenarios. The details of the mathematical model (quantitative assumptions and hypotheses formulated as ordinary differential equations) are separated from the experimental protocol being simulated. Each model and protocol is then encoded in computer-readable formats. A simulation tool runs virtual experiments on models encoded in CellML, and a website (https://chaste.cs.ox.ac.uk/WebLab) provides a friendly interface, allowing users to store and compare results. The system currently contains a sample of 36 models and 23 protocols, including current-voltage curve generation, action potential properties under steady pacing at different rates, restitution properties, block of particular channels, and hypo-/hyperkalemia. This resource is publicly available, open source, and free, and we invite the community to use it and become involved in future developments. Investigators interested in comparing competing hypotheses using models can make a more informed decision, and those developing new models can upload them for easy evaluation under the existing protocols, and even add their own protocols. PMID:26789753

  1. Advanced Physics Lab at TCU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarles, C. A.

    2009-04-01

    The one semester, one credit hour Modern Physics Lab is viewed as a transition between the structured Physics 1 and 2 labs and junior/senior research. The labs focus on a variety of experiments built around a multichannel analyzer, various alpha, beta and gamma ray detectors and weak radioactive sources. Experiments include radiation safety and detection with a Geiger counter and NaI detector, gamma ray spectroscopy with a germanium detector, beta spectrum, alpha energy loss, gamma ray absorption, Compton effect, nuclear and positron annihilation lifetime, speed of gamma rays. Other experiments include using the analog oscilloscope, x-ray diffraction of diamond and using an SEM/EDX. Error analysis is emphasized throughout. The semester ends with an individual project, often an extension of one of the earlier experiments, and students present their results as a paper and an APS style presentation to the department.

  2. Viable intestinal passage of a canine jejunal commensal strain Lactobacillus acidophilus LAB20 in dogs.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yurui; Saris, Per E J

    2014-10-01

    The strain Lactobacillus acidophilus LAB20 with immunomodulatory properties was previously found dominant in the jejunal chyme of four dogs, and the novel surface layer protein of LAB20 suggested its competitive colonization in canine gut. To evaluate the persistence and survival of LAB20 in healthy dogs, LAB20 was fed to five healthy pet dogs for 3 days, at a dosage of 10(8) CFU daily as fermented milk supplement. The fecal samples, from 1 day prior to feeding, three continuous feeding days, and on day 5, 7, 14, and 21, were collected for strain-specific detection of LAB20 using real-time PCR. We found that LAB20 count was significantly increased in dog fecal samples at the second feeding day, but rapidly decreased after feeding ceased. The fecal samples from prior to feeding, during feeding, and post-cessation days were plated onto mLBS7 agar, from where LAB20 was recovered and distinguishable from other fecal lactobacilli based on its colony morphotype. Using strain-specific PCR detection, the colonies were further verified as LAB20 indicating that LAB20 can survive through the passage of the canine intestine. This study suggested that canine-derived strain LAB20 maintained at high numbers during feeding, viably transited through the dog gut, and could be identified based on its colony morphotype. PMID:24849733

  3. Teaching about Theory-Laden Observation to Secondary Students through Manipulated Lab Inquiry Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Kwok-chi; Chan, Shi-lun

    2013-01-01

    This study seeks to develop and evaluate a modified lab inquiry approach to teaching about nature of science (NOS) to secondary students. Different from the extended, open-ended inquiry, this approach makes use of shorter lab inquiry activities in which one or several specific NOS aspects are manipulated deliberately so that students are compelled…

  4. Fraud strikes top genome lab

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, E.

    1996-11-08

    Francis Collins, head of NIH`s Human Genome Project has informed colleagues that a junior researcher in his lab facke data in five papers co-authored by Collins. This article describes the whole scenario, how it was discovered, and what the reprocussions are.

  5. Safety Equipment in the Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denham, Willard A.S.

    1964-01-01

    Findings of two recent surveys on safety equipment in laboratory facilities are presented. The first survey was a pilot study of emergency shower and eye wash equipment. This study was followed by a more comprehensive random survey of safety equipment in 2,820 labs. Among other findings, the surveys indicate that many plants are underequipped, or…

  6. Biodiversity Lab: Using Local Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillie, Lynn L.

    1997-01-01

    Examining living organisms in one's own backyard is a key first step toward appreciating the scope and importance of biological diversity throughout the world. The goals of this lab are to involve students in exploring the biodiversity around them, appreciating its scope, and asking questions of new organisms that they may never have noticed…

  7. The Mobile Math Lab Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Elaine

    1991-01-01

    Describes a mobile computer lab set up in a converted bus that is used by fourth graders as part of the math curriculum. The program, which emphasizes problem solving and spatial visualization, also addresses gender differences and in-service teacher training. The physical arrangements, including provisions for computer security, are described.…

  8. A Lab for All Reasons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin-Jones, Linda L.

    1990-01-01

    Described is a demonstration science laboratory at the University of Florida. Discussed is laboratory design, including instructional space, lab stations, sink areas, safety areas, and a storage and distribution area. The impact of this type of design is cited. Diagrams and photographs are included. (CW)

  9. State of the Lab Address

    ScienceCinema

    King, Alex

    2013-03-01

    In his third-annual State of the Lab address, Ames Laboratory Director Alex King called the past year one of "quiet but strong progress" and called for Ames Laboratory to continue to build on its strengths while responding to changing expectations for energy research.

  10. State of the Lab Address

    SciTech Connect

    King, Alex

    2010-01-01

    In his third-annual State of the Lab address, Ames Laboratory Director Alex King called the past year one of "quiet but strong progress" and called for Ames Laboratory to continue to build on its strengths while responding to changing expectations for energy research.

  11. A Simple, Successful Capacitor Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ennis, William

    2011-01-01

    Capacitors are a fundamental component of modern electronics. They appear in myriad devices and in an enormous range of sizes. Although our students are taught the function and analysis of capacitors, few have the opportunity to use them in our labs.

  12. Where Lab Tests Are Performed

    MedlinePlus

    ... labs also vary in complexity, the volume of tests performed, the technology utilized, and the number and type of professionals who conduct the testing . There are important differences among the various testing settings. This information will be useful in ... Proudly sponsored by ... Learn ...

  13. The Utility of Computer-Assisted Power Analysis Lab Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrocelli, John V.

    2007-01-01

    Undergraduate students (N = 47), enrolled in 2 separate psychology research methods classes, evaluated a power analysis lab demonstration and homework assignment. Students attended 1 of 2 lectures that included a basic introduction to power analysis and sample size analysis. One lecture included a demonstration of how to use a computer-based power…

  14. Flexible HVAC System for Lab or Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedan, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Discusses an effort to design a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system flexible enough to accommodate an easy conversion of classrooms to laboratories and dry labs to wet labs. The design's energy efficiency and operations and maintenance are examined. (GR)

  15. Incorporation of Advanced Laboratory Equipment into Introductory Physics Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, John; Bellis, Matt; Cummings, John

    2015-04-01

    Siena College recently completed construction of the Stewart's Advanced Instrumentation and Technology Center (SAInt Center) which includes both a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an atomic force microscope (AFM). The goal of this project is to design laboratory exercises for introductory physics courses that make use of this equipment. Early involvement with the SAInt center aims to increase undergraduate lab skills and expand research possibilities. These lab exercises are tested on select students and evaluated as to their effectiveness in contributing to the learning goals.The current status of this work is presented here.

  16. The Development of MSFC Usability Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Yiwei; Richardson, Sally

    2010-01-01

    This conference poster reviews the development of the usability lab at Marshall Space Flight Center. The purpose of the lab was to integrate a fully functioning usability laboratory to provide a resource for future human factor assessments. and to implement preliminary usability testing on a MSFC website to validate the functionality of the lab.

  17. Experiences with Lab-Centric Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titterton, Nathaniel; Lewis, Colleen M.; Clancy, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Lab-centric instruction emphasizes supervised, hands-on activities by substituting lab for lecture time. It combines a multitude of pedagogical techniques into the format of an extended, structured closed lab. We discuss the range of benefits for students, including increased staff interaction, frequent and varied self-assessments, integrated…

  18. LabNet Project plan

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel, G.

    1985-06-24

    LabNet value-added service is a high-speed packet-switched network that ties computers together. From the point-of-view of a single computer, or of a local network of computers within a building or a group of buildings, the LabNet high-speed network is a long-haul network (like Tymnet or ARPANET) for getting to other buildings. This service is provided through channels of the backbone that are shared by everyone at the Laboratory. The focus of the high-speed network is the efficient transfer of data between computers as opposed to the interconnection of people's terminals to these computers. The latter function is best served by the local networks, or by a separate network.

  19. New Features in ADS Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Kurtz, M. J.; Henneken, E. A.; Grant, C. S.; Thompson, D.; Di Milia, G.; Luker, J.; Murray, S. S.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) has been working hard on updating its services and interfaces to better support our community's research needs. ADS Labs is a new interface built on the old tried-and-true ADS Abstract Databases, so all of ADS's content is available through it. In this presentation we highlight the new features that have been developed in ADS Labs over the last year: new recommendations, metrics, a citation tool and enhanced fulltext search. ADS Labs has long been providing article-level recommendations based on keyword similarity, co-readership and co-citation analysis of its corpus. We have now introduced personal recommendations, which provide a list of articles to be considered based on a individual user's readership history. A new metrics interface provides a summary of the basic impact indicators for a list of records. These include the total and normalized number of papers, citations, reads, and downloads. Also included are some of the popular indices such as the h, g and i10 index. The citation helper tool allows one to submit a set of records and obtain a list of top 10 papers which cite and/or are cited by papers in the original list (but which are not in it). The process closely resembles the network approach of establishing "friends of friends" via an analysis of the citation network. The full-text search service now covers more than 2.5 million documents, including all the major astronomy journals, as well as physics journals published by Springer, Elsevier, the American Physical Society, the American Geophysical Union, and all of the arXiv eprints. The full-text search interface interface allows users and librarians to dig deep and find words or phrases in the body of the indexed articles. ADS Labs is available at http://adslabs.org

  20. Characterization of Tri-lab Tantalum Plate.

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, Thomas E.; Cerreta, Ellen K.; Deibler, Lisa Anne; Chen, Shu-Rong; Michael, Joseph R.

    2014-09-01

    This report provides a detailed characterization Tri-lab Tantalum (Ta) plate jointly purchased from HCStark Inc. by Sandia, Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Data in this report was compiled from series of material and properties characterization experiments carried out at Sandia (SNL) and Los Alamos (LANL) Laboratories through a leveraged effort funded by the C2 campaign. Results include microstructure characterization detailing the crystallographic texture of the material and an increase in grain size near the end of the rolled plate. Mechanical properties evaluations include, compression cylinder, sub-scale tension specimen, micohardness and instrumented indentation testing. The plate was found to have vastly superior uniformity when compare with previously characterized wrought Ta material. Small but measurable variations in microstructure and properties were noted at the end, and at the top and bottom edges of the plate.

  1. eCAT: Online electronic lab notebook for scientific research

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background eCAT is an electronic lab notebook (ELN) developed by Axiope Limited. It is the first online ELN, the first ELN to be developed in close collaboration with lab scientists, and the first ELN to be targeted at researchers in non-commercial institutions. eCAT was developed in response to feedback from users of a predecessor product. By late 2006 the basic concept had been clarified: a highly scalable web-based collaboration tool that possessed the basic capabilities of commercial ELNs, i.e. a permissions system, controlled sharing, an audit trail, electronic signature and search, and a front end that looked like the electronic counterpart to a paper notebook. Results During the development of the beta version feedback was incorporated from many groups including the FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research, Uppsala University, Children's Hospital Boston, Alex Swarbrick's lab at the Garvan Institute in Sydney and Martin Spitaler at Imperial College. More than 100 individuals and groups worldwide then participated in the beta testing between September 2008 and June 2009. The generally positive response is reflected in the following quote about how one lab is making use of eCAT: "Everyone uses it as an electronic notebook, so they can compile the diverse collections of data that we generate as biologists, such as images and spreadsheets. We use to it to take minutes of meetings. We also use it to manage our common stocks of antibodies, plasmids and so on. Finally, perhaps the most important feature for us is the ability to link records, reagents and experiments." Conclusion By developing eCAT in close collaboration with lab scientists, Axiope has come up with a practical and easy-to-use product that meets the need of scientists to manage, store and share data online. eCAT is already being perceived as a product that labs can continue to use as their data management and sharing grows in scale and complexity. PMID:20334629

  2. EarthLabs Meet Sister Corita Kent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quartini, E.; Ellins, K. K.; Cavitte, M. G.; Thirumalai, K.; Ledley, T. S.; Haddad, N.; Lynds, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthLabs project provides a framework to enhance high school students' climate literacy and awareness of climate change. The project provides climate science curriculum and teacher professional development, followed by research on students' learning as teachers implement EarthLabs climate modules in the classroom. The professional development targets high school teachers whose professional growth is structured around exposure to current climate science research, data observation collection and analysis. During summer workshops in Texas and Mississippi, teachers work through the laboratories, experiments, and hand-on activities developed for their students. In summer 2013, three graduate students from the University of Texas at Austin Institute for Geophysics with expertise in climate science participated in two weeklong workshops. The graduate students partnered with exemplary teacher leaders to provide scientific content and lead the EarthLabs learning activities. As an experiment, we integrated a visit to the Blanton Museum and an associated activity in order to motivate participants to think creatively, as well as analytically, about science. This exercise was inspired by the work and educational philosophy of Sister Corita Kent. During the visit to the Blanton Museum, we steered participants towards specific works of art pre-selected to emphasize aspects of the climate of Texas and to draw participants' attention to ways in which artists convey different concepts. For example, artists use of color, lines, and symbols conjure emotional responses to imagery in the viewer. The second part of the exercise asked participants to choose a climate message and to convey this through a collage. We encouraged participants to combine their experience at the museum with examples of Sister Corita Kent's artwork. We gave them simple guidelines for the project based on techniques and teaching of Sister Corita Kent. Evaluation results reveal that participants enjoyed the

  3. NCL Objective #5 - Nanotechnology Characterization Lab (NCL)

    Cancer.gov

    Nanotechnology Characterization Lab (NCL) Objective #5: Engage and Facilitate Academic and Industrial-based Knowledge Sharing of Nanomaterial Performance Data and Behavior Resulting from Pre-Clinical Testing.

  4. Jefferson Lab, a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, B.M.

    1996-10-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab; formerly known as CEBAF), operates a 4 GeV, 200 {micro}A continuous wave (CW) electron accelerator that re-circulates the beam five times through two superconducting 400 MeV linacs. Electrons can be extracted from any of the five recirculation passes and beam can be simultaneously delivered to the three experimental halls. As the commissioning stage nears completion, the accelerator is becoming a fully operational machine. Experiments in Hall C have been underway since November 1995 with beam powers of over 300 kW at various energies. Hall A has received beam for spectrometer commissioning, while Hall B is expected to receive its first beam in the fall of 1996. Accelerator availability of greater than 70% during physics runs and excellent beam quality have contributed to making Jefferson Lab a world class laboratory for accelerator-based electromagnetic nuclear physics. With the high performance of the superconducting RF cavities, machine upgrades to 6 GeV, and eventually 8 to 10 GeV are now in the planning stages. Operational and commissioning details concerning all aspects of the machine will be discussed.

  5. Aerosciences at Sandia National Labs.

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Jeffrey L.

    2010-10-01

    A brief overview of Sandia National Laboratories will be presented highlighting the mission of Engineering Science Center. The Engineering Science Center provides a wide range of capabilities to support the lab's missions. As part of the Engineering Science Center the Aeroscience department provides research, development and application expertise in both experimental and computation compressible fluid mechanics. The role of Aeroscience at Sandia National Labs will be discussed with a focus on current research and development activities within the Aeroscience Department. These activities will be presented within the framework of a current program to highlight the synergy between computational and experimental work. The research effort includes computational and experimental activities covering fluid and structural dynamics disciplines. The presentation will touch on: probable excitation sources that yield the level of random vibration observed during flight; the methods that have been developed to model the random pressure fields in the turbulent boundary layer using a combination of CFD codes and a model of turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuations; experimental measurement of boundary layer fluctuations; the methods of translating the random pressure fields to time-domain spatially correlated pressure fields.

  6. PLUTONIUM FEED IMPURITY TESTING IN A LANTHANIDE BOROSILICATE (LABS) GLASS

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J; Kevin Fox, K; Elizabeth Hoffman, E; Tommy Edwards, T; Charles Crawford, C

    2007-08-29

    A vitrification technology utilizing a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass is a viable option for dispositioning excess weapons-useable plutonium that is not suitable for processing into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. A significant effort to develop a glass formulation and vitrification process to immobilize plutonium was completed in the mid-1990s. The LaBS glass formulation was found to be capable of immobilizing in excess of 10 wt % Pu and to be tolerant of a range of impurities. A more detailed study is now needed to quantify the ability of the glass to accommodate the anticipated impurities associated with the Pu feeds now slated for disposition. The database of Pu feeds was reviewed to identify impurity species and concentration ranges for these impurities. Based on this review, a statistically designed test matrix of glass compositions was developed to evaluate the ability of the LaBS glass to accommodate the impurities. Sixty surrogate LaBS glass compositions were prepared in accordance with the statistically designed test matrix. The heterogeneity (e.g. degree of crystallinity) and durability (as measured by the Product Consistency Test - Method A (PCT-A)) of the glasses were used to assess the effects of impurities on glass quality.

  7. Undergraduate Labs for Biological Physics: Brownian Motion and Optical Trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Kelvin; Laughney, A.; Williams, J.

    2006-12-01

    We describe a set of case-study driven labs for an upper-division biological physics course. These labs are motivated by case-studies and consist of inquiry-driven investigations of Brownian motion and optical-trapping experiments. Each lab incorporates two innovative educational techniques to drive the process and application aspects of scientific learning. Case studies are used to encourage students to think independently and apply the scientific method to a novel lab situation. Student input from this case study is then used to decide how to best do the measurement, guide the project and ultimately evaluate the success of the program. Where appropriate, visualization and simulation using VPython is used. Direct visualization of Brownian motion allows students to directly calculate Avogadro's number or the Boltzmann constant. Following case-study driven discussion, students use video microscopy to measure the motion of latex spheres in different viscosity fluids arrive at a good approximation of NA or kB. Optical trapping (laser tweezer) experiments allow students to investigate the consequences of 100-pN forces on small particles. The case study consists of a discussion of the Boltzmann distribution and equipartition theorem followed by a consideration of the shape of the potential. Students can then use video capture to measure the distribution of bead positions to determine the shape and depth of the trap. This work supported by NSF DUE-0536773.

  8. LabWrite: Transforming Lab Reports from Busy Work to Meaningful Learning Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferzli, Miriam; Carter, Michael; Wiebe, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Lab reports are the dreaded assignments of the laboratory course. Students dislike them, because they can be tedious and time-consuming. Instructors dislike them, because they significantly increase the grading load. For this reason, lab reports are often omitted or replaced by alternatives such as responses to lab questions, fill-in-the-blank lab…

  9. Attracting STEM talent: do STEM students prefer traditional or work/life-interaction labs?

    PubMed

    DeFraine, William C; Williams, Wendy M; Ceci, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    The demand for employees trained in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields continues to increase, yet the number of Millennial students pursuing STEM is not keeping pace. We evaluated whether this shortfall is associated with Millennials' preference for flexibility and work/life-interaction in their careers-a preference that may be inconsistent with the traditional idea of a science career endorsed by many lab directors. Two contrasting approaches to running STEM labs and training students were explored, and we created a lab recruitment video depicting each. The work-focused video emphasized the traditional notions of a science lab, characterized by long work hours and a focus on individual achievement and conducting research above all else. In contrast, the work/life-interaction-focused video emphasized a more progressive view - lack of demarcation between work and non-work lives, flexible hours, and group achievement. In Study 1, 40 professors rated the videos, and the results confirmed that the two lab types reflected meaningful real-world differences in training approaches. In Study 2, we recruited 53 current and prospective graduate students in STEM fields who displayed high math-identification and a commitment to science careers. In a between-subjects design, they watched one of the two lab-recruitment videos, and then reported their anticipated sense of belonging to and desire to participate in the lab depicted in the video. Very large effects were observed on both primary measures: Participants who watched the work/life-interaction-focused video reported a greater sense of belonging to (d = 1.49) and desire to participate in (d = 1.33) the lab, relative to participants who watched the work-focused video. These results suggest Millennials possess a strong desire for work/life-interaction, which runs counter to the traditional lab-training model endorsed by many lab directors. We discuss implications of these findings for STEM

  10. Attracting STEM Talent: Do STEM Students Prefer Traditional or Work/Life-Interaction Labs?

    PubMed Central

    DeFraine, William C.; Williams, Wendy M.; Ceci, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    The demand for employees trained in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields continues to increase, yet the number of Millennial students pursuing STEM is not keeping pace. We evaluated whether this shortfall is associated with Millennials' preference for flexibility and work/life-interaction in their careers-a preference that may be inconsistent with the traditional idea of a science career endorsed by many lab directors. Two contrasting approaches to running STEM labs and training students were explored, and we created a lab recruitment video depicting each. The work-focused video emphasized the traditional notions of a science lab, characterized by long work hours and a focus on individual achievement and conducting research above all else. In contrast, the work/life-interaction-focused video emphasized a more progressive view – lack of demarcation between work and non-work lives, flexible hours, and group achievement. In Study 1, 40 professors rated the videos, and the results confirmed that the two lab types reflected meaningful real-world differences in training approaches. In Study 2, we recruited 53 current and prospective graduate students in STEM fields who displayed high math-identification and a commitment to science careers. In a between-subjects design, they watched one of the two lab-recruitment videos, and then reported their anticipated sense of belonging to and desire to participate in the lab depicted in the video. Very large effects were observed on both primary measures: Participants who watched the work/life-interaction-focused video reported a greater sense of belonging to (d = 1.49) and desire to participate in (d = 1.33) the lab, relative to participants who watched the work-focused video. These results suggest Millennials possess a strong desire for work/life-interaction, which runs counter to the traditional lab-training model endorsed by many lab directors. We discuss implications of these findings for

  11. SLAC All Access: Laser Labs

    ScienceCinema

    Minitti, Mike; Woods Mike

    2014-06-03

    From supermarket checkouts to video game consoles, lasers are ubiquitous in our lives. Here at SLAC, high-power lasers are critical to the cutting-edge research conducted at the laboratory. But, despite what you might imagine, SLAC's research lasers bear little resemblance to the blasters and phasers of science fiction. In this edition of All Access we put on our safety goggles for a peek at what goes on inside some of SLAC's many laser labs. LCLS staff scientist Mike Minitti and SLAC laser safety officer Mike Woods detail how these lasers are used to study the behavior of subatomic particles, broaden our understanding of cosmic rays and even unlock the mysteries of photosynthesis.

  12. Jefferson Lab: Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Patrizia

    2016-04-01

    The continuous electron beam accelerator facility and associated experimental equipment at Jefferson Lab comprise a unique facility for nuclear physics research whose upgrade is presently underway, with completion expected in 2017. The upgraded facility will accelerate electron beams to 11 GeV for experiments in the existing Halls A, B and C. In addition, a 12 GeV beam can be provided to a new experimental hall, Hall D, to generate a 9 GeV tagged photon beam. This upgrade will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address important topics in hadronic, nuclear, and electroweak physics. Further in the future, it is envisioned that the Laboratory will evolve into an electron-ion colliding beam facility.

  13. Jefferson Lab: Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Patrizia

    2016-08-01

    The continuous electron beam accelerator facility and associated experimental equipment at Jefferson Lab comprise a unique facility for nuclear physics research whose upgrade is presently underway, with completion expected in 2017. The upgraded facility will accelerate electron beams to 11 GeV for experiments in the existing Halls A, B and C. In addition, a 12 GeV beam can be provided to a new experimental hall, Hall D, to generate a 9 GeV tagged photon beam. This upgrade will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address important topics in hadronic, nuclear, and electroweak physics. Further in the future, it is envisioned that the Laboratory will evolve into an electron-ion colliding beam facility.

  14. Jefferson Lab's Trim Card II

    SciTech Connect

    Trent Allison; Sarin Philip; C. Higgins; Edward Martin; William Merz

    2005-05-01

    Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) uses Trim Card I power supplies to drive approximately 1900 correction magnets. These trim cards have had a long and illustrious service record. However, some of the employed technology is now obsolete, making it difficult to maintain the system and retain adequate spares. The Trim Card II is being developed to act as a transparent replacement for its aging predecessor. A modular approach has been taken in its development to facilitate the substitution of sections for future improvements and maintenance. The resulting design has been divided into a motherboard and 7 daughter cards which has also allowed for parallel development. The Trim Card II utilizes modern technologies such as a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and a microprocessor to embed trim card controls and diagnostics. These reprogrammable devices also provide the versatility to incorporate future requirements.

  15. Z Machine at Sandia Labs

    SciTech Connect

    2007-10-17

    Sandia Labs' Z machine is the largest laboratory source of x-rays in the world. For the few nanoseconds of a Z Machine test, its electrical output equals the output of 50x the electrical generating stations of all the power plants on earth. The Z Machine complex encompasses an area roughly the size of a major college basketball arena. Originally created to validate nuclear weapons models, the Z Machine is also considered a "dark horse" in the race for viable fusion energy production. After the famous "arcs and sparks" photo of Z (a photo no longer possible after its refurbishment), this is a fast-motion video of workers completing Z's recent refurbishment.

  16. SLAC All Access: Laser Labs

    SciTech Connect

    Minitti, Mike; Woods Mike

    2013-03-01

    From supermarket checkouts to video game consoles, lasers are ubiquitous in our lives. Here at SLAC, high-power lasers are critical to the cutting-edge research conducted at the laboratory. But, despite what you might imagine, SLAC's research lasers bear little resemblance to the blasters and phasers of science fiction. In this edition of All Access we put on our safety goggles for a peek at what goes on inside some of SLAC's many laser labs. LCLS staff scientist Mike Minitti and SLAC laser safety officer Mike Woods detail how these lasers are used to study the behavior of subatomic particles, broaden our understanding of cosmic rays and even unlock the mysteries of photosynthesis.

  17. The DVCS program at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Niccolai, Silvia

    2014-06-01

    Recent promising results, obtained at Jefferson Lab, on cross sections and asymmetries for DVCS and their link to the Generalized Parton Distributions are the focus of this paper. The extensive experimental program to measure DVCS with the 12-GeV-upgraded CEBAF in three experimental Halls (A, B, C) of Jefferson Lab, will also be presented.

  18. Science Action Labs Part 1: Sciencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shevick, Ed; Adams, Linda, Ed.

    This book contains innovative hands-on science laboratory activities that teach basic scientific method skills and are designed to be used directly with 4th- through 9th-grade students. The background materials and instructions included in each activity are written for students to work together in teams. Lab titles are: observation lab,…

  19. Innovation - A view from the Lab

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA Ag Lab in Peoria helps bridge the gap between agricultural producers and commercial manufacturers. In 2015, the Ag Lab, officially known as the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research (NCAUR), is celebrating 75 years of research in Peoria. T...

  20. Uses of Labs and Learning Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Blink, Clare

    2009-01-01

    How can an IT department transform traditional computer labs given the resource limits of a university setting? Before engaging a redesign team, conduct some groundwork and initial research to help guide design and resource decisions. When the author and her colleagues considered modifying the lab spaces at Cornell, they initially engaged in…

  1. Traditional Labs + New Questions = Improved Student Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rezba, Richard J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents three typical lab activities involving the breathing rate of fish, the behavior of electromagnets, and tests for water hardness to demonstrate how labs can be modified to teach process skills. Discusses how basic concepts about experimentation are developed and ways of generating and improving science experiments. Includes a laboratory…

  2. California State University, Northridge: Hybrid Lab Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EDUCAUSE, 2014

    2014-01-01

    California State University, Northridge's Hybrid Lab course model targets high failure rate, multisection, gateway courses in which prerequisite knowledge is a key to success. The Hybrid Lab course model components incorporate interventions and practices that have proven successful at CSUN and other campuses in supporting students, particularly…

  3. Practical Physics Labs: A Resource Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Peter

    This resource manual focuses on physics labs that relate to the world around us and utilize simple equipment and situations. Forty-five laboratories are included that relate to thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, dynamics, optics, wave transmission, centripetal force, and atomic physics. Each lab has three sections. The first section…

  4. Berkeley Lab 2nd Grader Outreach

    ScienceCinema

    Scoggins, Jackie; Louie, Virginia

    2013-05-29

    The Berkeley Lab IT Department sponsored a community outreach program aimed at teaching young children about computers and networks. Second graders from LeConte Elementary School joined Lab IT Staff for a day of in-depth exercises and fun.

  5. LANGUAGE LABS--AN UPDATED REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1963

    REPORTS FROM SEVERAL SCHOOL DISTRICTS ON THE USE OF AND PLANNING OF LANGUAGE LABORATORIES ARE PRESENTED. LABORATORIES SHOULD BE ARRANGED FOR FLEXIBLE USE. THE AVERAGE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT CAN USE A LAB PROFITABLY FOR 20 TO 25 MINUTES. THERE ARE THREE DIFFERENT TYPES OF LANGUAGE LABORATORIES THAT ARE DESCRIBED. THE SATELLITE LAB IS DIVIDED BY A…

  6. Berkeley Lab 2nd Grader Outreach

    SciTech Connect

    Scoggins, Jackie; Louie, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    The Berkeley Lab IT Department sponsored a community outreach program aimed at teaching young children about computers and networks. Second graders from LeConte Elementary School joined Lab IT Staff for a day of in-depth exercises and fun.

  7. A Virtual Lab in Research Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Barbara A.; Sommer, Robert

    2003-01-01

    A hands-on lab for a lower division research methods course used an online format with Web page, Web forms, an e-mail listproc, and chat room. The virtual section received a higher rating for overall value than did the in-person labs. Students liked its convenience and flexibility. There were no significant differences in examination performance…

  8. Supercharging Lessons with a Virtual Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Jefferson; Vincent, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The authors describes their experiences incorporating the virtual lab into a simple circuit lesson during an energy unit in a sixth-grade class. The lesson included a hands-on group experiment using wire, batteries, and light bulbs to make a circuit and an online simulation, using a virtual lab. Class discussions, student inquiries, and the study…

  9. Latest results from FROST at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, Barry G.

    2014-06-01

    The spectrum of broad and overlapping nucleon excitations can be greatly clarified by use of a polarized photon beam incident on a polarized target in meson photoproduction experiments. At Jefferson Lab, a program of such measurements has made use of the Jefferson Lab FROzen Spin Target (FROST). An overview of preliminary results are presented.

  10. Extracurricular Science Labs for STEM Talent Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hausamann, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade, a growing lack of engineers, natural scientists, information technology experts, and mathematicians has been noted, especially in Europe. Corresponding to the need to attract young people to science and technology, numerous extracurricular science labs ("out-of-school labs") have been established, especially in Germany. One of…

  11. Hydrogel Beads: The New Slime Lab?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockway, Debra; Libera, Matthew; Welner, Heidi

    2011-01-01

    Creating slime fascinates students. Unfortunately, though intrigue is at its peak, the educational aspect of this activity is often minimal. This article describes a chemistry lab that closely relates to the slime lab and allows high school students to explore the concepts of chemical bonding, properties, and replacement reactions. It involves the…

  12. Portable AI Lab for Teaching Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosner, Michael; Baj, Fabio.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the Portable AI Lab, a computing environment containing artificial intelligence (AI) tools, examples, and documentation for use with university AI courses. Two modules of the lab are highlighted: the automated theorem proving module and the natural language processing module, which includes augmented transition networks. (23 references)…

  13. Learning Resource Lab: Academic Coaching for Freshmen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierson, Gregory N.

    1996-01-01

    To assist incoming freshmen, a Colorado Springs high school initiated learning resource labs staffed with academic coaches. Combining study hall, homeroom, and advisory group, the labs offer adult tutors, workshops on conflict resolution and study skills, career and technology exploration opportunities, a learning styles inventory, free reading…

  14. A Comparative Study on Real Lab and Simulation Lab in Communication Engineering from Students' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balakrishnan, B.; Woods, P. C.

    2013-01-01

    Over the years, rapid development in computer technology has engendered simulation-based laboratory (lab) in addition to the traditional hands-on (physical) lab. Many higher education institutions adopt simulation lab, replacing some existing physical lab experiments. The creation of new systems for conducting engineering lab activities has raised…

  15. Nonproliferation through international lab-to-lab technology cooperation

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlop, W H

    1998-09-10

    Lab-to- Lab activities are currently with the FSU, that experience is leading to important and productive interactions with other countries and regions, most significantly, China and the Middle East. In contrast to the Cold War years, when most technologies developed at LLNL were solely for the US national defense efforts and therefore classified, many of NAI's new technologies and tools are unclassified and designed for use in a multilateral security environment. PPAC is the proliferation "Prevention" element of NAI's four-element "Prevention-Reversal-Response-Avoid Surprise" program. We direct some twenty different projects. which have realized about a factor of ten growth in the last four years.

  16. Sandia National Lab`s precision laser tracking systems

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, D.

    1995-04-01

    Sandia Labs` mobile tracking systems have only one moving part. The double gimballed 18 inch diameter beryllium mirror is capable of constant tracking velocities up to 5 rads/sec in both axes, and accelerations to 150 rads/sec/sec in both axes. Orthogonality is <10 microradians. The mirror directs the 488 and 514 nm wavelength CW laser beams to adhesive-backed reflective material applied to the test unit. The mirror catches the return beam and visual image, directing the visual image to three camera bays, and the return beam to an image dissector behind an 80 inch gathering telescope. The image dissector or image position sensor is a photomultiplier with amplifying drift tube and electron aperture and its associated electronics. During the test, the image dissector scan senses the change in position of the reflective material and produces signals to operate the azimuth and elevation torque motors in the gimbal assembly. With the help of 1 1/8 inch diameter azimuth and elevation galvonometer steering mirrors in the optical path, the laser beam is kept on the target at extremely high velocities. To maintain a constant return signal strength, the outgoing beam is run through a microprocessor controlled beam focusing telescope.

  17. Labs21 Environmental Performance Criteria: Toward 'LEED (trademark) for Labs'

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Paul; Sartor, Dale; Lintner, William; Wirdzek, Phil

    2002-10-14

    Laboratory facilities present a unique challenge for energy efficient and sustainable design, with their inherent complexity of systems, health and safety requirements, long-term flexibility and adaptability needs, energy use intensity, and environmental impacts. The typical laboratory is about three to five times as energy intensive as a typical office building and costs about three times as much per unit area. In order to help laboratory stakeholders assess the environmental performance of their laboratories, the Labs21 program, sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the US Department of Energy, is developing the Environmental Performance Criteria (EPC), a point-based rating system that builds on the LEED(TM) rating system. Currently, LEED(TM) is the primary tool used to rate the sustainability of commercial buildings. However, it lacks some attributes essential to encouraging the application of sustainable design principles to laboratory buildings. Accordingly, the EPC has additions and modifications to the prerequisites and credits in each of the six sections of LEED(TM). It is being developed in a consensus-based approach by a diverse group of architects, engineers, consulting experts, health & safety personnel and facilities personnel. This report describes the EPC version 2.0, highlighting the underlying technical issues, and describes implications for the development of a LEED version for Laboratories.

  18. Experiences with lab-centric instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titterton, Nathaniel; Lewis, Colleen M.; Clancy, Michael J.

    2010-06-01

    Lab-centric instruction emphasizes supervised, hands-on activities by substituting lab for lecture time. It combines a multitude of pedagogical techniques into the format of an extended, structured closed lab. We discuss the range of benefits for students, including increased staff interaction, frequent and varied self-assessments, integrated collaborative activities, and a systematic sequence of activities that gradually increases in difficulty. Instructors also benefit from a deeper window into student progress and understanding. We follow with discussion of our experiences in courses at U.C. Berkeley, and using data from some of these investigate the effects of lab-centric instruction on student learning, procrastination, and course pacing. We observe that the lab-centric format helped students on exams but hurt them on extended programming assignments, counter to our hypothesis. Additionally, we see no difference in self-ratings of procrastination and limited differences in ratings of course pace. We do find evidence that the students who choose to attend lab-centric courses are different in several important ways from students who choose to attend the same course in a non-lab-centric format.

  19. Integrating Robotic Observatories into Astronomy Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruch, Gerald T.

    2015-01-01

    The University of St. Thomas (UST) and a consortium of five local schools is using the UST Robotic Observatory, housing a 17' telescope, to develop labs and image processing tools that allow easy integration of observational labs into existing introductory astronomy curriculum. Our lab design removes the burden of equipment ownership by sharing access to a common resource and removes the burden of data processing by automating processing tasks that are not relevant to the learning objectives.Each laboratory exercise takes place over two lab periods. During period one, students design and submit observation requests via the lab website. Between periods, the telescope automatically acquires the data and our image processing pipeline produces data ready for student analysis. During period two, the students retrieve their data from the website and perform the analysis. The first lab, 'Weighing Jupiter,' was successfully implemented at UST and several of our partner schools. We are currently developing a second lab to measure the age of and distance to a globular cluster.

  20. Teaching Chemistry Lab Safety through Comics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Raddo, Pasquale

    2006-04-01

    As a means for raising students' interest in aspects pertaining to chemistry lab safety, this article presents a novel approach to teaching this important subject. Comic book lab scenes that involve fictional characters familiar to many students are presented and discussed as to the safety concerns represented in those images. These are discussed in a safety prelab session. For the sake of comparison, students are then shown images taken from current chemistry journals of safety-conscious contemporary chemists at work in their labs. Finally the need to adhere to copyright regulations for the use of the images is discussed so as to increase students' awareness of academic honesty and copyright issues.

  1. Lawrence Berkeley Lab Indexing Toolbox

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2003-09-08

    The Lawrence Berkeley Lab Indexing Toolbox is intended to be used in the context of X-ray crystallography experiments involving biological macromolecules. Macromolecules such as proteins form 3-dimensional periodic arrays (crystal) which in turn lead to lattice-like diffraction patterns when the crystal sample is irradiated with collimated X-rays from a synchrotron or other X-ray source. Once the diffraction pattern is captured on an imaging device the next step is to deduce the periodic nature of themore » crystal sample, along with its internal symmetry. this analysis, known as "indexing" is a well-studied problem. However, there are no other implementations designed to operate in an automated setting, in which the human experimentalist is not prosent to manually verify the results of indexing. In particular LABELIT uses three novel algorithms to facilitate automation: a more robust way to verify the position of the incident X-ray beam on the image, a better way to verify that the deduced lattice is consistent with the observed crystal lattice, and new method to deduce the internal symmetry from measurements of the lattice. Moreover, the algorithms are implemented in a Python framework that permits indexing to fail (in rare cases) without crashing the program, thus allowing the software to be incorporated in robotic systems where unattended operation is expected. It will be especially useful for high throughput operations at snychrotron beamlines.« less

  2. Strangeness Production at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Raue, Brian

    2003-11-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has an extensive program of studying the electromagnetic production of strange particles. One of the main components of this program has been the study of both photo- and electropro- duction of K+ + â º0 and K+ + Å 0 final states. Experiments are being, or have been conducted in all three of Jefferson Lab s experimental halls measuring a wide range of observables at kinematics from threshold up to W H 3.0 GeV and Q2 from 0.4 up to 5 (GeV/c)2. The largest effort in this endeavor is taking place in Hall B using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). Data have been taken at about ten different polarized electron beam energies and are currently being analyzed. Preliminary results [1] for one beam energy exist wherein the unpolarized cross section has been separated into three components: AT + eLAL, ATT , and ALT . The data indicate a t-channel dominance for the â º0 production and a strong s-channel dominance for Å 0 produc

  3. Jefferson Lab's Distributed Data Acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Trent Allison; Thomas Powers

    2006-05-01

    Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) occasionally experiences fast intermittent beam instabilities that are difficult to isolate and result in downtime. The Distributed Data Acquisition (Dist DAQ) system is being developed to detect and quickly locate such instabilities. It will consist of multiple Ethernet based data acquisition chassis distributed throughout the seven-eights of a mile CEBAF site. Each chassis will monitor various control system signals that are only available locally and/or monitored by systems with small bandwidths that cannot identify fast transients. The chassis will collect data at rates up to 40 Msps in circular buffers that can be frozen and unrolled after an event trigger. These triggers will be derived from signals such as periodic timers or accelerator faults and be distributed via a custom fiber optic event trigger network. This triggering scheme will allow all the data acquisition chassis to be triggered simultaneously and provide a snapshot of relevant CEBAF control signals. The data will then be automatically analyzed for frequency content and transients to determine if and where instabilities exist.

  4. Teaching Resistance through an interactive gaming lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, James G.; Sirokman, Greg; Rueckert, Franz; Cascio, Derek

    2015-04-01

    The use of gaming as an educational tool has proven to be an effective paradigm in modern pedagogy. Following the success of their previous work ``Sector Vector,'' the authors present a new interactive game-based laboratory to highlight the basic manipulation and calculation of resistors in circuits. ``Resistance is Futile'' delivers the lesson of basic resistor combinations in a game based exercise where teams build a continually evolving circuit. As the game progresses, students must develop long and short term plans to modify an ever-changing circuit and meet primary and secondary objectives. Each turn requires quick calculations of resistor combinations and the assessment of future options. Students are also exposed to the creation of a modular circuit, which may not conform to standard textbook examples. To determine a winner, the students work together to analyze and evaluate a potentially complex final circuit diagram. The dynamic atmosphere and competitive nature established by the gaming environment have been shown to increase student engagement and concept retention. In this presentation, we will discuss both the structure of the lab-based game and the pedagogical implications this implementation versus the traditional resistor combination laboratory exercise.

  5. Labs not in a lab: A case study of instructor and student perceptions of an online biology lab class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doiron, Jessica Boyce

    Distance learning is not a new phenomenon but with the advancement in technology, the different ways of delivering an education have increased. Today, many universities and colleges offer their students the option of taking courses online instead of sitting in a classroom on campus. In general students like online classes because they allow for flexibility, the comfort of sitting at home, and the potential to save money. Even though there are advantages to taking online classes, many students and instructors still debate the effectiveness and quality of education in a distant learning environment. Many universities and colleges are receiving pressure from students to offer more and more classes online. Research argues for both the advantages and disadvantages of online classes and stresses the importance of colleges and universities weighing both sides before deciding to adopt an online class. Certain classes may not be suitable for online instruction and not all instructors are suitable to teach online classes. The literature also reveals that there is a need for more research on online biology lab classes. With the lack of information on online biology labs needed by science educators who face the increasing demand for online biology labs, this case study hopes to provide insight into the use of online biology lab classes and the how students and an instructor at a community college in Virginia perceive their online biology lab experience as well as the effectiveness of the online labs.

  6. Learning from an Ambient Assisted Living Lab: the case of the intelligent bed.

    PubMed

    Bygholm, Ann; Kanstrup, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents methodological lessons learned from an Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) lab exploring the use of intelligent beds in a nursing home. The living lab study was conducted over a period of three month. 20 intelligent beds were installed. Data was collected via self-registration, diaries, observations, interviews and workshops with residents, nurses, nursing assistants, management, building officers, and purchasers from the Municipality. The paper presents an analysis within the overall themes of technology, use, and care, which is discussed by use of the SWOT framework presenting strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats identified in the living lab of the intelligent bed. The paper concludes by emphasizing the need for mature technology, long-term studies, clarification of role and tasks of different stakeholders, and attention on methods used for living lab evaluations. PMID:25160198

  7. Undergraduate student construction and interpretation of graphs in physics lab activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Ryan S.; Godfrey, T. J.; Mayhew, Nicholas T.; Wiegert, Craig C.

    2016-06-01

    Lab activities are an important element of an undergraduate physics course. In these lab activities, students construct and interpret graphs in order to connect the procedures of the lab with an understanding of the related physics concepts. This study investigated undergraduate students' construction and interpretation of graphs with best-fit lines in the context of two physics lab activities. Students' graphs were evaluated for overall graph quality and for the quality of the best-fit line. The strategies students used and their understanding of the meaning of the graph were accessed through interviews. The results suggest that undergraduate introductory physics students can successfully construct graphs with best-fit lines while not connecting the meaning of the graph to the underlying physics concepts. Furthermore, results indicated that the most challenging aspect of constructing a graph is setting up the scale, and that graphing is situated in specific contexts.

  8. NCL Objective #3 - Nanotechnology Characterization Lab (NCL)

    Cancer.gov

    The Nanotechnology Characterization Lab (NCL) Objective #3: Identify and Characterize Critical Parameters Related to Nanomaterials' Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Excretion, and Acute Toxicity (ADME/Tox) Profile in Animal Models.

  9. System of Labs Direct Fabrication Technology

    SciTech Connect

    DIMOS,DUANE B.; OLIVER,MICHAEL S.; SCHLIENGER,M. ERIC

    1999-11-01

    The System of Labs Direct Fabrication Technology program was intended to foster cooperation and development in a cooperative effort between Sandia National Labs, Idaho National Energy and Environment Lab and Oak Ridge National Lab. The goal of this program was to bring together LENS (Laser Engineered Net Shaping) from Sandia, INEEL's spray forming process and the alloy development expertise of ORNL. This program investigated the feasibility of combining the LENS and spray forming processes to exploit the best features of both approaches. Further, since both processes were thought to result in a rapidly solidified structure, the alloy design expertise of ORNL offered the opportunity for alloy design or processing options which could more fully utilize the unique capabilities of the processes.

  10. Building a lab-in/on-fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Libo

    2015-07-01

    Recently the "lab-on-fiber" technology has been rapidly developed and demonstrated in several interdisciplinary application fields. It expressed as multifunctional photonic devices and components arising from the integration onto optical fibers of different materials at micro and nano-scale with suitable physical, chemical and biological properties. In this paper, a briefly introduction about the concept of "lab-in/on-fiber" has been given. Then, we concentrate to discuss in-fiber waveguides integration technology which provides an infrastructure for "lab-in/on-fiber". Finally, we give several examples to show each unique experimental lab-in/on-fiber in different application fields and to demonstrate how it is possible to exploit the micro laboratories platforms.

  11. NCL Objective #4 - Nanotechnology Characterization Lab (NCL)

    Cancer.gov

    The Nanotechnology Characterization Lab (NCL) Objective #4: Examine the Biological and Functional Characteristics of MultiComponent/Combinatorial Aspects of Nanoscaled Therapeutic, Molecular and Clinical Diagnostics, and Detection Platforms.

  12. Microspectroscopy At Beamline 73 MAX-lab

    SciTech Connect

    Engdahl, Anders

    2010-02-03

    Presentation of some projects at the infrared microspectroscopy experimental station at beamline 73 MAX-lab. Among the subjects are found identification of organic residues in fossil material and examination of the chemistry in an old oak wood wreck.

  13. Jefferson Lab physics overview: Recent results

    SciTech Connect

    Meziani, Zein-Eddine

    2007-09-01

    I review highlights of the Jefferson Lab nucleon structure program. I shall emphasize recent results from experiments exploring the spin structure of the nucleon and from dedicated experiments aimed at accessing the generalized parton distributions (GPDs).

  14. Thanatology for Everyone: Developmental Labs and Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connell, Walter E.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    In an effort to "treat" the growing death concerns of many medical staffs, an experiential death and dying lab was created. Its evolution to meet changing needs is discussed, as well as future potential for work in this area. (Author)

  15. Infrared Spectroscopy in the General Chemistry Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Margaret A.

    2001-01-01

    Acquisition of infrared spectrometers for use in general chemistry lab was made possible through the NSF-sponsored Instrumentation and Laboratory Improvement (ILI) program. Three laboratory exercises suitable for first-year students are described in which students learn to interpret infrared spectra for simple structural identification. A polymer identification lab is the first of these with minimal sample preparation. It uses familiar household polymer samples and teaches students how to use infrared spectral data to determine what bond types are present in the polymers. In a second lab, students learn to prepare potassium bromide pellets of fluorene derivatives and identify them by their functional group differences. The final exercise combines IR with several other lab techniques to identify an organic acid from a field of fourteen possibilities.

  16. Administrator Helps Students Discover Lab Day

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden visited the Langdon Elementary School in Washington to support National Lab Day. Bolden, a veteran of four space shuttle flights, spoke with the fifth graders abou...

  17. Jefferson Lab Plotting Toolkit for accelerator controls

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J; Keesee, M; Larrieu, C; Lei, G

    1999-03-01

    Experimental physics generates numerous data sets that scientists analyze using plots, graphs, etc. The Jefferson Lab Plotting Toolkit, JPT, a graphical user interface toolkit, was developed at Jefferson Lab to do data plotting. JPT provides data structures for sets of data, analyzes the range of the data, calculates the reasonable maximum, minimum, and scale of axes, sets line styles and marker styles, plots curves and fills areas.

  18. PLC Support Software at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    P. Chevtsov; S. Higgins; S. Schaffner; D. Seidman

    2002-10-01

    Several Automation Direct (DirectNet) Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) have been integrated into the accelerator control system at Jefferson Lab. The integration is based on new software that consists of three main parts: a PLC driver with a state machine control block, a device support module, and a common serial driver. The components of new software and experience gained with the use of this software for beam dump systems at Jefferson Lab are presented.

  19. Artists-in-Labs: Processes of Inquiry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Jill

    This book verifies the need for the arts and the sciences to work together in order to develop more creative and conceptual approaches to innovation and presentation. By blending ethnographical case studies, scientific viewpoints and critical essays, the focus of this research inquiry is the lab context. For scientists, the lab context is one of the most important educational experiences. For contemporary artists, laboratories are inspiring spaces to investigate, share know-how transfer and search for new collaboration potentials.

  20. A comparative study on real lab and simulation lab in communication engineering from students' perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, B.; Woods, P. C.

    2013-05-01

    Over the years, rapid development in computer technology has engendered simulation-based laboratory (lab) in addition to the traditional hands-on (physical) lab. Many higher education institutions adopt simulation lab, replacing some existing physical lab experiments. The creation of new systems for conducting engineering lab activities has raised concerns among educators on the merits and shortcomings of both physical and simulation labs; at the same time, many arguments have been raised on the differences of both labs. Investigating the effectiveness of both labs is complicated, as there are multiple factors that should be considered. In view of this challenge, a study on students' perspectives on their experience related to key aspects on engineering laboratory exercise was conducted. In this study, the Visual Auditory Read and Kinetic model was utilised to measure the students' cognitive styles. The investigation was done through a survey among participants from Multimedia University, Malaysia. The findings revealed that there are significant differences for most of the aspects in physical and simulation labs.

  1. Assessing Usage and Maximizing Finance Lab Impact: A Case Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noguera, Magdy; Budden, Michael Craig; Silva, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey conducted to assess students' usage and perceptions of a finance lab. Finance labs differ from simple computer labs as they typically contain data boards, streaming market quotes, terminals and software that allow for real-time financial analyses. Despite the fact that such labs represent significant and…

  2. Are Virtual Labs as Effective as Hands-on Labs for Undergraduate Physics? A Comparative Study at Two Major Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darrah, Marjorie; Humbert, Roxann; Finstein, Jeanne; Simon, Marllin; Hopkins, John

    2014-01-01

    Most physics professors would agree that the lab experiences students have in introductory physics are central to the learning of the concepts in the course. It is also true that these physics labs require time and money for upkeep, not to mention the hours spent setting up and taking down labs. Virtual physics lab experiences can provide an…

  3. Communication acoustics in Bell Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, J. L.

    2001-05-01

    Communication aoustics has been a central theme in Bell Labs research since its inception. Telecommunication serves human information exchange. And, humans favor spoken language as a principal mode. The atmospheric medium typically provides the link between articulation and hearing. Creation, control and detection of sound, and the human's facility for generation and perception are basic ingredients of telecommunication. Electronics technology of the 1920s ushered in great advances in communication at a distance, a strong economical impetus being to overcome bandwidth limitations of wireline and cable. Early research established criteria for speech transmission with high quality and intelligibility. These insights supported exploration of means for efficient transmission-obtaining the greatest amount of speech information over a given bandwidth. Transoceanic communication was initiated by undersea cables for telegraphy. But these long cables exhibited very limited bandwidth (order of few hundred Hz). The challenge of sending voice across the oceans spawned perhaps the best known speech compression technique of history-the Vocoder, which parametrized the signal for transmission in about 300 Hz bandwidth, one-tenth that required for the typical waveform channel. Quality and intelligibility were grave issues (and they still are). At the same time parametric representation offered possibilities for encryption and privacy inside a traditional voice bandwidth. Confidential conversations between Roosevelt and Churchill during World War II were carried over high-frequency radio by an encrypted vocoder system known as Sigsaly. Major engineering advances in the late 1940s and early 1950s moved telecommunications into a new regime-digital technology. These key advances were at least three: (i) new understanding of time-discrete (sampled) representation of signals, (ii) digital computation (especially binary based), and (iii) evolving capabilities in microelectronics that

  4. RoboLab and virtual environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giarratano, Joseph C.

    1994-01-01

    A useful adjunct to the manned space station would be a self-contained free-flying laboratory (RoboLab). This laboratory would have a robot operated under telepresence from the space station or ground. Long duration experiments aboard RoboLab could be performed by astronauts or scientists using telepresence to operate equipment and perform experiments. Operating the lab by telepresence would eliminate the need for life support such as food, water and air. The robot would be capable of motion in three dimensions, have binocular vision TV cameras, and two arms with manipulators to simulate hands. The robot would move along a two-dimensional grid and have a rotating, telescoping periscope section for extension in the third dimension. The remote operator would wear a virtual reality type headset to allow the superposition of computer displays over the real-time video of the lab. The operators would wear exoskeleton type arms to facilitate the movement of objects and equipment operation. The combination of video displays, motion, and the exoskeleton arms would provide a high degree of telepresence, especially for novice users such as scientists doing short-term experiments. The RoboLab could be resupplied and samples removed on other space shuttle flights. A self-contained RoboLab module would be designed to fit within the cargo bay of the space shuttle. Different modules could be designed for specific applications, i.e., crystal-growing, medicine, life sciences, chemistry, etc. This paper describes a RoboLab simulation using virtual reality (VR). VR provides an ideal simulation of telepresence before the actual robot and laboratory modules are constructed. The easy simulation of different telepresence designs will produce a highly optimum design before construction rather than the more expensive and time consuming hardware changes afterwards.

  5. Do Online Labs Work? An Assessment of an Online Lab on Cell Division

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilman, Sharon L.

    2006-01-01

    Some studies show students successfully learning science through online courses. This study compared students doing an online and in-class lab exercise on cell division. Online students performed slightly but significantly better on a follow-up content quiz, however, about half those expressed a strong preference for in-class lab work.

  6. Improving the Quality of Lab Reports by Using Them as Lab Instructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haagen-Schuetzenhoefer, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Lab exercises are quite popular in teaching science. Teachers have numerous goals in mind when teaching science laboratories. Nevertheless, empirical research draws a heterogeneous picture of the benefits of lab work. Research has shown that it does not necessarily contribute to the enhancement of practical abilities or content knowledge. Lab…

  7. Recirculating Beam Breakup Study for the 12 GeV Upgrade at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Ilkyoung Shin, Todd Satogata, Shahid Ahmed, Slawomir Bogacz, Mircea Stirbet, Haipeng Wang, Yan Wang, Byung Yunn, Ryan Bodenstein

    2012-07-01

    Two new high gradient C100 cryomodules with a total of 16 new cavities were installed at the end of the CEBAF south linac during the 2011 summer shutdown as part of the 12-GeV upgrade project at Jefferson Lab. We surveyed the higher order modes (HOMs) of these cavities in the Jefferson Lab cryomodule test facility and CEBAF tunnel. We then studied recirculating beam breakup (BBU) in November 2011 to evaluate CEBAF low energy performance, measure transport optics, and evaluate BBU thresholds due to these HOMs. This paper discusses the experiment setup, cavity measurements, machine setup, optics measurements, and lower bounds on BBU thresholds by new cryomodules.

  8. MEMS practice: from the lab to the telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morzinski, Katie M.; Norton, Andrew P.; Evans, Julia W.; Reza, Layra; Severson, Scott A.; Dillon, Daren; Reinig, Marc; Gavel, Donald T.; Cornelissen, Steven; Macintosh, Bruce A.; Max, Claire E.

    2012-03-01

    Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology can provide for deformable mirrors (DMs) with excellent performance within a favorable economy of scale. Large MEMS-based astronomical adaptive optics (AO) systems such as the Gemini Planet Imager are coming on-line soon. As MEMS DM end-users, we discuss our decade of practice with the micromirrors, from inspecting and characterizing devices to evaluating their performance in the lab. We also show MEMS wavefront correction on-sky with the "Villages" AO system on a 1-m telescope, including open-loop control and visible-light imaging. Our work demonstrates the maturity of MEMS technology for astronomical adaptive optics.

  9. RiskLab - a joint Teaching Lab on Hazard and Risk Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruffini, Mi.; Baruffini, Mo.; Thuering, M.

    2009-04-01

    In the future natural disasters are expected to increase due to climatic changes that strongly affect environmental, social and economical systems. For this reason and because of the limited resources, governments require analytical risk analysis for a better mitigation planning. Risk analysis is a process to determine the nature and extent of risk by estimating potential hazards and evaluating existing conditions of vulnerability that could pose a potential threat or harm to people, property, livelihoods and environment. This process has become a generally accepted approach for the assessment of cost-benefit scenarios; originating from technical risks it is being applied to natural hazards for several years now in Switzerland. Starting from these premises "Risk Lab", a joint collaboration between the Institute of Earth Sciences of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland and the Institute for Economic Research of the University of Lugano, has been started in 2006, aiming to become a competence centre about Risk Analysis and Evaluation. The main issue studied by the lab concerns the topic "What security at what price?" and the activities follow the philosophy of the integral risk management as proposed by PLANAT, that defines the process as a cycle that contains different and interrelated phases. The final aim is to change the population and technician idea about risk from "defending against danger" to "being aware of risks" through a proper academic course specially addressed to young people. In fact the most important activity of the laboratory consists in a degree course, offered both to Engineering and Architecture students of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland and Economy Students of the University of Lugano. The course is structured in two main parts: an introductive, theoretical part, composed by class lessons, where the main aspects of natural hazards, risk perception and evaluation and risk management are presented

  10. ESA SnowLab project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesmann, Andreas; Caduff, Rafael; Frey, Othmar; Werner, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Retrieval of the snow water equivalaent (SWE) from passive microwave observations dates back over three decades to initial studies made using the first operational radiometers in space. However, coarse spatial resolution (25 km) is an acknowledged limitation for the application of passive microwave measurements. The natural variability of snow cover itself is also notable; properties such as stratigraphy and snow microstructure change both spatially and over time, affecting the microwave signature. To overcome this deficit, the satellite mission COld REgions Hydrology High-resolution Observatory (CoReH2O) was proposed to the European Space Agency (ESA) in 2005 in response to the call for Earth Explorer 7 candidate missions. CoReH2O was a dual frequency (X- and Ku-band) SAR mission aimed to provide maps of SWE over land and snow accumulation on glaciers at a spatial resolution of 200 to 500 meters with an unprecedented accuracy. Within the frame of preparatory studies for CoReH2O Phase A, ESA undertook several research initiatives from 2009 to 2013 to study the mission concept and capabilities of the proposed sensor. These studies provided a wealth of information on emission and backscattering signatures of natural snow cover, which can be exploited to study new potential mission concepts for retrieval of snow cover properties and other elements of the cryosphere. Currently data related to multi-frequency, multi-polarisation, multitemporal of active and passive microwave measurements are still not available. In addition, new methods related to e.g. tomography are currently under development and need to be tested with real data. Also, the potential of interferometric and polarimetric measurements of the snow cover and its possible impact for novel mission/retrieval concepts must be assessed. . The objective of the SnowLab activity is to fill this gap and complement these datasets from earlier campaigns by acquiring a comprehensive multi-frequency, multi

  11. eComLab: remote laboratory platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontual, Murillo; Melkonyan, Arsen; Gampe, Andreas; Huang, Grant; Akopian, David

    2011-06-01

    Hands-on experiments with electronic devices have been recognized as an important element in the field of engineering to help students get familiar with theoretical concepts and practical tasks. The continuing increase the student number, costly laboratory equipment, and laboratory maintenance slow down the physical lab efficiency. As information technology continues to evolve, the Internet has become a common media in modern education. Internetbased remote laboratory can solve a lot of restrictions, providing hands-on training as they can be flexible in time and the same equipment can be shared between different students. This article describes an on-going remote hands-on experimental radio modulation, network and mobile applications lab project "eComLab". Its main component is a remote laboratory infrastructure and server management system featuring various online media familiar with modern students, such as chat rooms and video streaming.

  12. BEAMS Lab at MIT: Status report

    PubMed Central

    Liberman, Rosa G.; Skipper, Paul L.; Tannenbaum, Steven R.

    2009-01-01

    The Biological Engineering Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (BEAMS) Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is a facility dedicated to incorporating AMS into life sciences research. As such, it is focused exclusively on radiocarbon and tritium AMS and makes use of a particularly compact instrument of a size compatible with most laboratory space. Recent developments at the BEAMS Lab were aimed to improve different stages of the measurement process, such as the carbon sample injection interface, the simultaneous detection of tritium and hydrogen and finally, the overall operation of the system. Upgrades and results of those efforts are presented here. PMID:20383276

  13. An Online Lab Manual for Neurophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Olivo, Richard F.

    2003-01-01

    A combination of student interest, a grant for computers, and a suggestion from a colleague led me to convert the printed lab manual for my neurophysiology course into an online version. The web-based version incorporates videos of procedures, color photos, diagrams, links to articles, and other supplementary materials. This paper discusses designing for the web, retaining compatibility with print, layering information, making videos in digital format, and sharing self-published resources. The labs themselves (appendix) are traditional “wet” experiments with crayfish that have been used in many neurobiology courses. PMID:23494073

  14. A study on the effect of varying sequence of lab performance skills on lab performance of high school physics students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bournia-Petrou, Ethel A.

    The main goal of this investigation was to study how student rank in class, student gender and skill sequence affect high school students' performance on the lab skills involved in a laboratory-based inquiry task in physics. The focus of the investigation was the effect of skill sequence as determined by the particular task. The skills considered were: Hypothesis, Procedure, Planning, Data, Graph, Calculations and Conclusion. Three physics lab tasks based on the simple pendulum concept were administered to 282 Regents physics high school students. The reliability of the designed tasks was high. Student performance was evaluated on individual student written responses and a scoring rubric. The tasks had high discrimination power and were of moderate difficulty (65%). It was found that, student performance was weak on Conclusion (42%), Hypothesis (48%), and Procedure (51%), where the numbers in parentheses represent the mean as a percentage of the maximum possible score. Student performance was strong on Calculations (91%), Data (82%), Graph (74%) and Plan (68%). Out of all seven skills, Procedure had the strongest correlation (.73) with the overall task performance. Correlation analysis revealed some strong relationships among the seven skills which were grouped in two distinct clusters: Hypothesis, Procedure and Plan belong to one, and Data, Graph, Calculations, and Conclusion belong to the other. This distinction may indicate different mental processes at play within each skill cluster. The effect of student rank was not statistically significant according to the MANOVA results due to the large variation of rank levels among the participating schools. The effect of gender was significant on the entire test because of performance differences on Calculations and Graph, where male students performed better than female students. Skill sequence had a significant effect on the skills of Procedure, Plan, Data and Conclusion. Students are rather weak in proposing a

  15. GeoLab in NASA's Pressurized Excursion Module: First Results from the 2010 Field Trials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Cynthia A.; Calaway, Michael; Bell, Mary Sue; Graff, Trevor

    2010-01-01

    Before humans explore other planets, NASA must develop advanced techniques for collection, preservation and return of unique extraterrestrial samples. To help evaluate hardware requirements and operational concepts for future sample-return missions, we designed and built GeoLab our first generation lab for geological samples into NASA s Habitat Demonstration Unit in the Pressurized Excursion Module (HDU1-PEM). The center of GeoLab is a glovebox for the examination of samples in a shirt-sleeve environment. As part of a deployable habitat, GeoLab can participate in NASA s analog missions that simulate planetary exploration activities and support the testing of relevant technologies for collecting and handling geological samples. Over time, these tests will evaluate sample handling environments (field and lab), sampling tools and analytical instruments, and different scenarios involving both robotic and human procedures. The GeoLab design supports evolving tests and configurations. The glovebox is mounted on the habitat bulkhead, with three sample pass-though chambers that allow for direct sample transfer into the glovebox from the outside. The glovebox design and construction (low-particle shedding, minimally off-gassing materials) provides a clean environment to reduce sample contamination; in the future, we will integrate a positive pressure, enriched nitrogen atmosphere. The glovebox is equipped with configurable instrument ports. The 2010 test included a mass balance, a stereomicroscope with a HD camera for detailed imaging of samples, and a handheld XRF analyzer for preliminary geochemical characterization of samples. Network cameras provided context imagery and sample handling activities. We present early results from the initial field trial of GeoLab during the 2010 Desert Research and Technology Studies (D-RATS) planetary analog test near Flagstaff AZ. The 2010 D-RATS mission involved two rovers, the habitat with GeoLab, four crew members, and a team of

  16. Improving the Quality of Lab Reports by Using Them as Lab Instructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haagen-Schuetzenhoefer, Claudia

    2012-10-01

    Lab exercises are quite popular in teaching science. Teachers have numerous goals in mind when teaching science laboratories. Nevertheless, empirical research draws a heterogeneous picture of the benefits of lab work. Research has shown that it does not necessarily contribute to the enhancement of practical abilities or content knowledge. Lab activities are frequently based on recipe-like, step-by-step instructions ("cookbook style"), which do not motivate students to engage cognitively. Consequently, students put the emphasis on "task completion" or "manipulating equipment."2

  17. SCFA lead lab technical assistance at Oak Ridge Y-12 nationalsecurity complex: Evaluation of treatment and characterizationalternatives of mixed waste soil and debris at disposal area remedialaction DARA solids storage facility (SSF)

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry

    2002-08-26

    On July 17-18, 2002, a technical assistance team from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) met with the Bechtel Jacobs Company Disposal Area Remedial Action (DARA) environmental project leader to review treatment and characterization options for the baseline for the DARA Solids Storage Facility (SSF). The technical assistance request sought suggestions from SCFA's team of technical experts with experience and expertise in soil treatment and characterization to identify and evaluate (1) alternative treatment technologies for DARA soils and debris, and (2) options for analysis of organic constituents in soil with matrix interference. Based on the recommendations, the site may also require assistance in identifying and evaluating appropriate commercial vendors.

  18. Awakening interest in the natural sciences - BASF's Kids' Labs.

    PubMed

    Lang, Cinthia

    2012-01-01

    At BASF's Ludwigshafen headquarters, kids and young adults in grades 1-13 can learn about chemistry in the Kids' Labs. Different programs exist for different levels of knowledge. In the two 'Hands-on Lab H(2)O & Co.' Kids' Labs, students from grades 1-6 explore the secrets of chemistry. BASF Kids' Labs have now been set up in over 30 countries. In Switzerland alone, almost 2,000 students have taken part in the 'Water Loves Chemistry' Kids' Lab since it was started in 2011. In Alsace, 600 students have participated to date. In the Teens' Lab 'Xplore Middle School', middle school students explore five different programs with the themes 'substance labyrinth', 'nutrition', 'coffee, caffeine & co.', 'cosmetics' and 'energy'. Biotechnological methods are the focus of the Teens' Lab 'Xplore Biotech' for students taking basic and advanced biology courses. In the 'Xplore High School' Teens' Lab, chemistry teachers present their own experimental lab instruction for students in basic and advanced chemistry courses. The Virtual Lab has been expanding the offerings of the BASF Kids' Labs since 2011. The online lab was developed by the company for the International Year Of Chemistry and gives kids and young adults the opportunity to do interactive experiments outside of the lab. PMID:23394237

  19. No weapons in the weapons lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trebino, Rick

    2010-03-01

    I spent 12 years working at a top-secret nuclear-weapons lab that had its own dedicated force of heavily armed security guards. Of course, security-related incidents were rare, so the guards' main challenge was simply staying awake.

  20. Favorite Labs from Outstanding Teachers. Monograph VII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, Daniel S., Ed.; Penick, John E., Ed.

    This monograph is the first attempt to collect and share some of the teaching techniques, activities, and ideas of former recipients of the Outstanding Biology Teacher Award. The lessons are organized into topical themes to facilitate their incorporation into standard curriculum. The manual is divided into two main sections, "Labs" and "Ideas."…

  1. Berkeley Lab's Cool Your School Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ivan Berry

    2012-07-30

    Cool Your School is a series of 6th-grade, classroom-based, science activities rooted in Berkeley Lab's cool-surface and cool materials research and aligned with California science content standards. The activities are designed to build knowledge, stimulate curiosity, and carry the conversation about human-induced climate change, and what can be done about it, into the community.

  2. Encouraging Creativity in the Science Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyster, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Although science is a creative endeavor (NRC 1996, p. 46), many students think they are not encouraged--or even allowed--to be creative in the laboratory. When students think there is only one correct way to do a lab, their creativity is inhibited. Park and Seung (2008) argue for the importance of creativity in science classrooms and for the…

  3. Medical Lab Technician. Post Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Bruce; And Others

    Intended to provide a model for organizing vocational instructional content, this curriculum guide consists of information pertinent to conducting a postsecondary level course for training medical lab technicians. While the guide is primarily oriented towards the classroom, whether as a primary resource or as a supplement to other teaching…

  4. Computer Labs Report to the Holodeck

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raths, David

    2011-01-01

    In many ways, specialized computer labs are the black holes of IT organizations. Budgets, equipment, employees--even space itself--are sucked in. Given a choice, many IT shops would engage warp drive and escape their gravitational pull forever. While Captain Kirk might have looked to Scotty for a fix to the problem, colleges and universities are…

  5. Design Lab. USMES "How To" Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahoe, Charles; And Others

    The major emphasis in all Unified Sciences and Mathematics for Elementary Schools (USMES) units is on open-ended, long-range investigations of real problems. Since children often design and build things in USMES, 26 "Design Lab" cards provide information on the safe use and simple maintenance of tools. Each card has a large photograph of the tool…

  6. Designing Inquiry-Oriented Science Lab Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Mr. Smith and Ms. D'Amico are two veteran science teachers in a well-performing school district. Both teachers use weekly lab exercises and experiments as formative assessments. In their middle school classrooms, children are engaged and eager to learn. As students walk into Mr. Smith's classroom, a prescribed, step-by-step procedure of the day's…

  7. Gapminder: An AP Human Geography Lab Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Kenneth H.

    2012-01-01

    This lesson is designed as a lab assignment for Advanced Placement (AP) Human Geography students wherein they use the popular Gapminder web site to compare levels of development in countries from different world regions. For this lesson, it is important for the teacher to practice with Gapminder before giving the assignment to students. (Contains…

  8. Developing and Maintaining a Multimedia Language Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingham, Scott; Humphries, Marshall

    1998-01-01

    Recent trends in education have pushed for multimedia to be made a part of every effective language program. As a result, language programs around the world are incorporating computer labs into their curricula. However, as many instructors and administrators are unfamiliar with this newer technology, integrating computer assisted language learning…

  9. How Do New Teachers Choose New Labs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMeo, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Forty-eight new secondary science teachers participated in a study that required a listing, discussion, and application of criteria to rank three chemistry laboratory procedures. The three similar lab procedures involved synthesis of a compound from its elements. The top criteria noted by teachers focused on procedural issues (i.e., timeliness,…

  10. Berkeley Lab's Cool Your School Program

    ScienceCinema

    Ivan Berry

    2013-06-24

    Cool Your School is a series of 6th-grade, classroom-based, science activities rooted in Berkeley Lab's cool-surface and cool materials research and aligned with California science content standards. The activities are designed to build knowledge, stimulate curiosity, and carry the conversation about human-induced climate change, and what can be done about it, into the community.

  11. The Hidden Costs of Wireless Computer Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Una

    2005-01-01

    Various elementary schools and middle schools across the U.S. have purchased one or more mobile laboratories. Although the wireless labs have provided more classroom computing, teachers and technology aides still have mixed views about their cost-benefit ratio. This is because the proliferation of viruses and spyware has dramatically increased…

  12. Chemistry Lab Adapted for Blind Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seltzer, Richard J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses a project at the University of Louisville in which chemistry laboratories are being adapted for use by blind students. Describes the operational analysis of tasks normally performed in labs. Provides specific recommendations on how to utilize new technologies to enable blind students to conduct hands-on learning experiments. (TW)

  13. Every Day Is National Lab Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Glen

    2010-01-01

    President Barack Obama recently issued a call for increased hands-on learning in U.S. schools in an address at the National Academy of Sciences. Obama concluded that the future of the United States depends on one's ability to encourage young people to "create, and build, and invent." In this article, the author discusses National Lab Day (NLD)…

  14. Lab-on a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Helen Cole, the project manager for the Lab-on-a-Chip Applications Development program, and Lisa Monaco, the project scientist for the program, insert a lab on a chip into the Caliper 42 which is specialized equipment that controls processes on commercial chips to support development of lab-on-a-chip applications. The system has special microscopes and imaging systems, so scientists can process and study different types of fluid, chemical, and medical tests conducted on chips. For example, researchers have examined fluorescent bacteria as it flows through the chips' fluid channels or microfluidic capillaries. Researchers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, have been studying how the lab-on-a-chip technology can be used for microbial detection, water quality monitoring, and detecting biosignatures of past or present life on Mars. The Marshall Center team is also collaborating with scientists at other NASA centers and at universities to develop custom chip designs for not only space applications, but for many Earth applications, such as for detecting deadly microbes in heating and air systems. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

  15. The Hall D Detector at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis A. Meyer

    2000-12-12

    The Hall D experiment at Jefferson Lab is part of the proposed CEBAF upgrade to 12 GeV beam energy. The Experiment will study gluonic excitations of mesons in the 1.5 to 2.5 GeV/c{sup 2} mass region using an 8 to 9 GeV beam of linearly polarized photons.

  16. Ames Lab 101: Single Crystal Growth

    ScienceCinema

    Schlagel, Deborah

    2014-06-04

    Ames Laboratory scientist Deborah Schlagel talks about the Lab's research in growing single crystals of various metals and alloys. The single crystal samples are vital to researchers' understanding of the characteristics of a materials and what gives these materials their particular properties.

  17. Ames Lab 101: Single Crystal Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Schlagel, Deborah

    2013-09-27

    Ames Laboratory scientist Deborah Schlagel talks about the Lab's research in growing single crystals of various metals and alloys. The single crystal samples are vital to researchers' understanding of the characteristics of a materials and what gives these materials their particular properties.

  18. "Probeware" on Increase in Schools' Science Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Though the term, "probeware" may not be a household word, it has grown more familiar to science educators over the past decade, as a new generation of high-tech instruments for collecting and analyzing data from the physical world have been introduced into school science labs. Today, those tools include digital scientific probes or sensors that…

  19. Technology Rich Biology Labs: Effects of Misconceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuech, Robert; Zogg, Gregory; Zeeman, Stephan; Johnson, Mark

    This paper describes a study conducted on the lab sections of the general biology course for non-science majors at the University of New England, and reports findings of student misconceptions about photosynthesis and the mass/carbon uptake during plant growth. The current study placed high technology analytic tools in the hands of introductory…

  20. World's Tallest Barometer, an Educational Lab Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, T. E.

    2012-12-01

    The barometer has been around since the early 1640's when Italian scientists Berte inadvertently made a water barometer and Torricelli purposely made a mercury barometer. A water barometer has the problem of high vapor pressure, so that it does not maintain a good vacuum above the water column unless continually vacuum pumped. The high density of mercury and its low vapor pressure allows a mercury barometer to be a compact and accurate lab apparatus. The newly being built barometer at Portland State University's Maseeh College of Engineering atrium makes use of doubly distilled synthetic vacuum pump oil as the working fluid. The fluid has a specific gravity of 0.83 and very low vapor pressure. The nominal height of this barometer is expected to be 12.4m. This barometer will be used in the Civil Engineering Fluids Lab as a lab apparatus and the reservoir has the capability of being pressurized or depressurized artificially, so that the fluid column can be manipulated and measured by the lab students. With the placement of the tall barometer in the atrium of the Engineering Building, the barometer will be visible to the public and to touring student groups.

  1. A New Twist on Torque Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, W. Brian

    2014-01-01

    The traditional introductory-level meterstick-balancing lab assumes that students already know what torque is and that they readily identify it as a physical quantity of interest. We propose a modified version of this activity in which students qualitatively and quantitatively measure the amount of force required to keep the meterstick level. The…

  2. A New Take on Student Lab Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazzard, Edmund

    2014-01-01

    The written lab report--a concise and accurate accounting of an experiment, including a summary of the procedure, presentation of the results, reasoned analysis, and thoughtful explanation--is essential to the scientific endeavor and a key expression and product of inquiry. Generally, however, students and teachers dislike these reports, the…

  3. Surfactant Adsorption: A Revised Physical Chemistry Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresler, Marc R.; Hagen, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Many physical chemistry lab courses include an experiment in which students measure surface tension as a function of surfactant concentration. In the traditional experiment, the data are fit to the Gibbs isotherm to determine the molar area for the surfactant, and the critical micelle concentration is used to calculate the Gibbs energy of micelle…

  4. Tap Teens' Curiosity with Lab Band.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Jane

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Lab Band project used with 12th grade students at the Westgate Collegiate and Vocational Institute in Thunder Bay, Ontario (Canada). Explains that each band student taught a peer how to play their instrument which created versatility in the band. States that all students kept a reflective journal. (CMK)

  5. A Natural Selection Lab for Environmental Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiero, Brad; Mackie, Steve

    1997-01-01

    Presents a lab that investigates the evolution of genetic resistance, the importance of genetic variability in the process of adaptation, and the ecological and economic consequences of pesticide use. Allows students to investigate the relationship between population size, genetic variability, and adaptability. Appendices contain the genetic card…

  6. A Measured Approach to Microcomputer Lab Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duggan, Brian

    1994-01-01

    Explores design considerations for a functional microcomputer lab, including ergonomics and furnishings; access for the disabled; the use of other media; hardware security; and software security, including virus protection. A summary paragraph comments on the role of planning and forecasting. A bibliography of eight titles for further reading is…

  7. From Computer Lab to Technology Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherwood, Sandra

    1999-01-01

    Discussion of integrating technology into elementary school classrooms focuses on teacher training that is based on a three-year plan developed at an elementary school in Marathon, New York. Describes the role of a technology teacher who facilitates technology integration by running the computer lab, offering workshops, and developing inservice…

  8. Folding Inquiry into Cookbook Lab Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gooding, Julia; Metz, Bill

    2012-01-01

    Cookbook labs have been a part of science programs for years, even though they serve little purpose other than to verify phenomena that have been previously presented by means other than through investigations. Cookbook science activities follow a linear path to a known outcome, telling students what procedures to follow, which materials to use,…

  9. Auditors Scour Labs in Search of Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broad, William J.

    1982-01-01

    A federal audit which began in June 1982 and should be completed by November is being conducted to determine possible extravagance, misuse, waste, fraud and abuse of laboratory equipment purchased on federal contracts and grants. A list of waste and abuse found mostly at industrial labs is included. (JN)

  10. RSVP Basic Math Lab: MAT 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Sunny

    During Spring and Summer 1978, the basic mathematics lab course offered at Miami-Dade Community College began to use the college's Response System with Variable Prescriptions (RSVP) to assist in individualizing instruction and record-keeping. The RSVP computer software package permits the maintenance of a record on each student, which includes…

  11. Chemical Analysis of Drinking Water Concentrates in the Four Lab Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the Four Lab study was to evaluate potential health effects from exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs). Unchlorinated water taken from a full-scale drinking water treatment plant was concentrated and chlorinated to form DBPs. Both the unchlorinated (control...

  12. Online Physics Lab Exercises--A Binational Study on the Transfer of Teaching Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theyßen, Heike; Struzyna, Sarah; Mylott, Elliot; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design and the results of a comparative study that evaluated the success of a transfer of an online-teaching resource between two universities, one in Germany and one in the USA. The teaching resource is an online physics lab that has been used in the physics education of medical students in Germany since 2003. The…

  13. Online Statistics Labs in MSW Research Methods Courses: Reducing Reluctance toward Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, William; Choi, Eunhee; Friedline, Terri

    2013-01-01

    This article presents results from an evaluation of an online statistics lab as part of a foundations research methods course for master's-level social work students. The article discusses factors that contribute to an environment in social work that fosters attitudes of reluctance toward learning and teaching statistics in research methods…

  14. NASA GeneLab Concept of Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Terri; Gibbs, Kristina; Rask, Jon; Coughlan, Joseph; Smith, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    NASA's GeneLab aims to greatly increase the number of scientists that are using data from space biology investigations on board ISS, emphasizing a systems biology approach to the science. When completed, GeneLab will provide the integrated software and hardware infrastructure, analytical tools and reference datasets for an assortment of model organisms. GeneLab will also provide an environment for scientists to collaborate thereby increasing the possibility for data to be reused for future experimentation. To maximize the value of data from life science experiments performed in space and to make the most advantageous use of the remaining ISS research window, GeneLab will apply an open access approach to conducting spaceflight experiments by generating, and sharing the datasets derived from these biological studies in space.Onboard the ISS, a wide variety of model organisms will be studied and returned to Earth for analysis. Laboratories on the ground will analyze these samples and provide genomic, transcriptomic, metabolomic and proteomic data. Upon receipt, NASA will conduct data quality control tasks and format raw data returned from the omics centers into standardized, annotated information sets that can be readily searched and linked to spaceflight metadata. Once prepared, the biological datasets, as well as any analysis completed, will be made public through the GeneLab Space Bioinformatics System webb as edportal. These efforts will support a collaborative research environment for spaceflight studies that will closely resemble environments created by the Department of Energy (DOE), National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), and other institutions in additional areas of study, such as cancer and environmental biology. The results will allow for comparative analyses that will help scientists around the world take a major leap forward in understanding the effect of microgravity, radiation, and other aspects of the space environment on model organisms

  15. Comparison of LabSOCS and GESPECOR codes used in gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Done, L; Tugulan, L C; Gurau, D; Dragolici, F; Alexandru, C

    2016-03-01

    Two dedicated software packages -LabSOCS and GESPECOR- for efficiency evaluation in gamma-ray spectrometry, were compared for equivalence. The detection efficiency and the coincidence-summing corrections coefficients were calculated for a specific HPGe detector, for different sample parameters and energies typically encountered in environmental radioactivity measurements. The discrepancy between the results obtained with the two codes were acceptable for most of the applications. Furthermore, the deviations between the values of the standard sources/ reference materials activities from the certificate and the values obtained after Monte Carlo simulation were less than 8% for LabSOCS and 9% for GESPECOR. PMID:26625727

  16. The Portable Usability Testing Lab: A Flexible Research Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Michael E.; And Others

    A group of faculty at the University of Georgia obtained funding for a research and development facility called the Learning and Performance Support Laboratory (LPSL). One of the LPSL's primary needs was obtaining a portable usability lab for software testing, so the facility obtained the "Luggage Lab 2000." The lab is transportable to any site…

  17. Introduction to Computing: Lab Manual. Faculty Guide [and] Student Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frasca, Joseph W.

    This lab manual is designed to accompany a college course introducing students to computing. The exercises are designed to be completed by the average student in a supervised 2-hour block of time at a computer lab over 15 weeks. The intent of each lab session is to introduce a topic and have the student feel comfortable with the use of the machine…

  18. Constructing the Components of a Lab Report Using Peer Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David E.; Fawkes, Kelli L.

    2010-01-01

    A protocol that emphasizes lab report writing using a piecemeal approach coupled with peer review is described. As the lab course progresses, the focus of the report writing changes sequentially through the abstract and introduction, the discussion, and the procedure. Two styles of lab programs are presented. One style rotates the students through…

  19. Behind the Scenes at Berkeley Lab - The Mechanical Fabrication Facility

    ScienceCinema

    Wells, Russell; Chavez, Pete; Davis, Curtis; Bentley, Brian

    2014-09-15

    Part of the Behind the Scenes series at Berkeley Lab, this video highlights the lab's mechanical fabrication facility and its exceptional ability to produce unique tools essential to the lab's scientific mission. Through a combination of skilled craftsmanship and precision equipment, machinists and engineers work with scientists to create exactly what's needed - whether it's measured in microns or meters.

  20. Behind the Scenes at Berkeley Lab - The Mechanical Fabrication Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Russell; Chavez, Pete; Davis, Curtis; Bentley, Brian

    2013-05-17

    Part of the Behind the Scenes series at Berkeley Lab, this video highlights the lab's mechanical fabrication facility and its exceptional ability to produce unique tools essential to the lab's scientific mission. Through a combination of skilled craftsmanship and precision equipment, machinists and engineers work with scientists to create exactly what's needed - whether it's measured in microns or meters.

  1. Revising Geology Labs To Explicitly Use the Scientific Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannula, Kimberly A.

    2003-01-01

    Proposes that content- or skill-based labs can be revised to explicitly involve the scientific method by asking students to propose hypotheses before making observations. Students' self-assessment showed they felt that they learned a great deal from this style of labs and found the labs to be fun; however, students felt that they learned little…

  2. Simulations, Games, and Virtual Labs for Science Education: a Compendium and Some Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    We have assembled a list of computer-based simulations, games, and virtual labs for science education. This list, with links to the sources of these resources, is available online. The entries span a broad range of science, math, and engineering topics. They also span a range of target student ages, from elementary school to university students. We will provide a brief overview of this web site and the resources found on it. We will also briefly demonstrate some of our own educational simulations, including the "Very, Very Simple Climate Model", and report on formative evaluations of these resources. Computer-based simulations and virtual labs are valuable resources for science educators in various settings, allowing learners to experiment and explore "what if" scenarios. Educational computer games can motivate learners in both formal and informal settings, encouraging them to spend much more time exploring a topic than they might otherwise be inclined to do. Part of this presentation is effectively a "literature review" of numerous sources of simulations, games, and virtual labs. Although we have encountered several nice collections of such resources, those collections seem to be restricted in scope. They either represent materials developed by a specific group or agency (e.g. NOAA's games web site) or are restricted to a specific discipline (e.g. geology simulations and virtual labs). This presentation directs viewers to games, simulations, and virtual labs from many different sources and spanning a broad range of STEM disciplines.

  3. Web-based Pre-Lab Quizzes for the Introductory E&M Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julian, Glenn

    2000-05-01

    A sequence of new experiments in electromagnetism (1) forms, at Miami University, part of an introductory laboratory course with one weekly two-hour meeting. This serves about 400 students annually, from both a 4-credit calculus-based lecture course for majors in physical sciences and engineering, and a 3-credit lecture course for majors in biological sciences. A guided-discovery Lab Manual and course Website (2) provide introduction to the physics. Pre-Lab Quizzes are intended to motivate students to prepare before coming to the lab. The entire test bank is posted in advance on the Web, and consists of multiple-choice questions which deal with fundamental concepts needed to appreciate lab observations. We have had students take the quizzes on-line with automatic scoring, but prefer having students justify in writing their answers to selected questions. Student reactions and evaluation by external referees are described. (1) Glenn M. Julian, Joseph Priest, and Peter Heller, Announcer 26 (2), 50 (1996). (2) http://www.muohio.edu/ lab184

  4. Teaching About Theory-Laden Observation to Secondary Students Through Manipulated Lab Inquiry Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Kwok-chi; Chan, Shi-lun

    2013-10-01

    This study seeks to develop and evaluate a modified lab inquiry approach to teaching about nature of science (NOS) to secondary students. Different from the extended, open-ended inquiry, this approach makes use of shorter lab inquiry activities in which one or several specific NOS aspects are manipulated deliberately so that students are compelled to experience and then reflect on these NOS aspects. In this study, to let students experience theory-laden observation, they were provided with different "theories" in order to bias their observations in the lab inquiry. Then, in the post-lab discussion, the teacher guided students to reflect on their own experience and explicitly taught about theory-ladenness. This study employs a quasi-experimental pretest-posttest design using the historical approach as the control group. The results show that the manipulated lab inquiry approach was much more effective than the historical approach in fostering students' theory-laden views, and it was even more effective when the two approaches were combined. Besides, the study also sought to examine the practical epistemological beliefs of students concerning theory-ladenness, but limited evidence could be found.

  5. Student-led microfluidics lab practicals: Improving engagement and learning outcomes.

    PubMed

    Morton, J A S; Bridle, H

    2016-05-01

    Microfluidics has shown rapid growth in both research and development and offers significant commercialisation potential for biomedical and diagnostic applications in particular. However, there is a lack of awareness of microfluidics outside the field of study, and few dedicated educational programmes are available. While many topics incorporate microfluidics teaching, reported initiatives in the literature have not yet taken a problem based learning (PBL) approach to the delivery of practical sessions. The educational approaches already reported typically focus upon production and testing of pre-determined device designs for specific applications, using a "recipe" style of lab teaching. Here, we report on a newly designed lab section of a microfluidic teaching component utilising problem based learning (PBL) to involve the students in all aspects of design, manufacture, and performance characterisation of microfluidic solutions. Details of the lab design and development are given enabling others to replicate the lab structure described here or use it as a basis for the design of similar PBL microfluidics teaching labs. A key focus of the work has been the evaluation of the student experience, and the results of a survey indicate a high degree of student satisfaction and skills development due to the PBL approach. PMID:27375822

  6. National Labs Host Classroom Ready Energy Educational Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, C. D.

    2009-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has a clear goal of joining all climate and energy agencies in the task of taking climate and energy research and development to communities across the nation and throughout the world. Only as information on climate and energy education is shared with the nation and world do research labs begin to understand the massive outreach work yet to be accomplished. The work at hand is to encourage and ensure the climate and energy literacy of our society. The national labs have defined the K-20 population as a major outreach focus, with the intent of helping them see their future through the global energy usage crisis and ensure them that they have choices and a chance to redirect their future. Students embrace climate and energy knowledge and do see an opportunity to change our energy future in a positive way. Students are so engaged that energy clubs are springing up in highschools across the nation. Because of such global clubs university campuses are being connected throughout the world (Energy Crossroads www.energycrossroads.org) etc. There is a need and an interest, but what do teachers need in order to faciliate this learning? It is simple, they need financial support for classroom resources; standards based classroom ready lessons and materials; and, training. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a Department of Energy Lab, provides standards based education materials to schools across the nation. With a focus on renewable energy and energy efficiency education, NREL helps educators to prompt students to analyze and then question their energy choices and evaluate their carbon footprint. Classrooms can then discover the effects of those choices on greenhouse gas emmissions and climate change. The DOE Office of Science has found a way to contribute to teachers professional development through the Department of Energy Academics Creating Teacher Scientists (DOE ACTS) Program. This program affords teachers an opportunity to

  7. MI-Lab - A Laboratory Environment for Medical Informatics Students.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Karsten; Löbe, Matthias; Schaaf, Michael; Jahn, Franziska; Winter, Alfred; Stäubert, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Medical research and health care highly depend on the use of information technology. There is a wide range of application systems (patient administration system, laboratory information system, communication server etc.) and heterogeneous data types (administrative data, clinical data, laboratory data, image data, genomic data etc.). Students and researchers do not often have the possibility to use productive application systems of e.g. hospitals or medical practices to gain practical experiences or examine new components and technologies. Therefore, the aim of this project is to develop a dedicated laboratory environment for patient health care and clinical research. Essential application systems were identified and a suitable architecture was designed for this purpose. It is accompanied by a teaching plan that considers learning modules for bachelor and master degrees in medical informatics. We implemented the laboratory environment called MI-Lab with multiple free and open source software components. All components are installed on virtual machines and/or Docker containers. This modular architecture creates a flexible system which can be deployed in various scenarios. The preliminary evaluation results suggests that laboratory environments like MI-Lab work well in teaching practical aspects of medical informatics and are widely accepted by students. PMID:27577339

  8. Analysis of a Constellation Lab Cooperative Learning Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, A. J.

    2001-12-01

    A cooperative learning activity was designed for use in the undergraduate laboratory course Introduction to Astronomical Observation. This group exercise enhances the student's learning of constellations and will hopefully increase retention of the material throughout the semester. It also serves as an "ice-breaker" during the first week of lab, promoting student involvement and vested interest in the course. To gain some insight into the student mind, a survey was conducted to evaluate the usefulness and overall opinion of this method. The students who completed the survey had previously been enrolled in a pre-requisite astronomy course that also required a constellation lab. In this previous course they "learned" the constellations from an instructor and a flashlight beam, studied them on their own, and then promptly took a quiz. Both methods are analyzed from an instructional designer's point of view and suggestions for future activities are presented. The preliminary results and accompanying activity will be discussed in poster and hand-out medium.

  9. Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAnany, Emile G.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Two lead articles set the theme for this issue devoted to evaluation as Emile G. McAnany examines the usefulness of evaluation and Robert C. Hornik addresses four widely accepted myths about evaluation. Additional articles include a report of a field evaluation done by the Accion Cultural Popular (ACPO); a study of the impact of that evaluation by…

  10. Evaluation of Mouse Oocyte In Vitro Maturation Developmental Competency in Dynamic Culture Systems by Design and Construction of A Lab on A Chip Device and Its Comparison with Conventional Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghzadeh Oskouei, Behnaz; Pashaiasl, Maryam; Heidari, Mohammad Hasan; Salehi, Mohammad; Veladi, Hadi; Ghaderi Pakdel, Firuz; Shahabi, Parviz; Novin, Marefat Ghaffari

    2016-01-01

    Objective In conventional assisted reproductive technology (ART), oocytes are cultured in static microdrops within Petri dishes that contain vast amounts of media. However, the in vivo environment is dynamic. This study assesses in vitro oocyte maturation through the use of a new microfluidic device. We evaluate oocyte fertilization to the blastocyct stage and their glutathione (GSH) contents in each experimental group. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we established a dynamic culture condition. Immature oocytes were harvested from ovaries of Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) mice. Oocytes were randomly placed in static (passive) and dynamic (active) in vitro maturation (IVM) culture medium for 24 hours. In vitro matured oocytes underwent fertilization, after which we placed the pronucleus (PN) stage embryos in microdrops and followed their developmental stages to blastocyst formation after 3 days. GSH content of the in vitro matured oocytes was assessed by monochlorobimane (MCB) staining. Results We observed significantly higher percentages of mature metaphase II oocytes (MII) in the passive and active dynamic culture systems (DCS) compared to the static group (P<0.01). There were significantly less mean numbers of germinal vesicle (GV) and degenerated oocytes in the passive and active dynamic groups compared to the static group (P<0.01). Fertilization and blastocyst formation rate in the dynamic systems were statistically significant compared to the static cultures (P<0.01). There was significantly higher GSH content in dynamically matured oocytes compared to statically matured oocytes (P<0.01). Conclusion Dynamic culture for in vitro oocyte maturation improves their developmental competency in comparison with static culture conditions. PMID:27540525

  11. Living Labs: Arbiters of Mid- and Ground-Level Innovation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almirall, Esteve; Wareham, Jonathan

    We perform a comparative case analysis of four working Living Labs to identify their common functions. Theoretically, we ground our analysis in terms of how they function, their processes of exploration and exploitation, where they work in the innovation strata, how new socially negotiated meanings are negotiated and diffused. Our research highlights four novel insights: first, Living Labs function at the low and mid level innovation strata; second, Living Labs are technologically agnostic; third, Living Labs use context based experience to surface new, socially constructed meanings for products and services; and finally, Living Labs are equally focused on exploration and exploitation.

  12. LAB and other lithospheric discontinuities below Cratons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodoudi, Forough

    2013-04-01

    Cratons are extremely stable continental areas of the Earth's crust, which have been formed and remained largely unchanged since Precambrian. However, their formation and how they survived destruction over billions of years remains a subject of debate. Seismic properties of the cratonic lithosphere reflect its composition and physical state and obtain basic constraints on processes of the formation and evolution of continents. Insight on these issues may be gained by determining the depth and the nature of the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary (LAB), which is a necessary element of the plate tectonic theory. However, It has proved quite "elusive" beneath the oldest continental areas. What is missing to date is a consensus on the feature that would correspond to the LAB and whether such a feature exists everywhere beneath cratons. The relatively recently developed S receiver function technique employing S-to-P conversions appears promising for detecting the LAB with a sufficiently high resolution and density. A growing number of regional observations obtained from S receiver function studies has detected discontinuities characterized by a significant negative velocity contrast in the upper mantle. However, challenges still remain in detecting the S-to-P conversions from the LAB beneath the Precambrian cratons. Some recent SRF studies observed a deep (> 160 km) negative velocity contrast beneath cratons and interpreted it as the LAB. For example, a deep LAB at about 250 km was reported beneath the Kalahari craton by different authors. Similar results were also obtained beneath some parts of the Canadian shield, East European Craton, Australia, the Arabian Shield and Tanzania craton. In contrast, other SRF studies found no evidence for negative discontinuities at these depths in the North American craton, in Kalahari craton or in Australia. Instead they revealed a very sharp negative velocity gradient at much shallower depth (60-150 km), leading some authors to infer

  13. Expert system for scheduling simulation lab sessions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, Chet

    1990-01-01

    Implementation and results of an expert system used for scheduling session requests for the Systems Engineering Simulator (SES) laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) are discussed. Weekly session requests are received from astronaut crew trainers, procedures developers, engineering assessment personnel, software developers, and various others who wish to access the computers, scene generators, and other simulation equipment available to them in the SES lab. The expert system under discussion is comprised of a data acquisition portion - two Pascal programs run on a personal computer - and a CLIPS program installed on a minicomputer. A brief introduction to the SES lab and its scheduling background is given. A general overview of the system is provided, followed by a detailed description of the constraint-reduction process and of the scheduler itself. Results from a ten-week trial period using this approach are discussed. Finally, a summary of the expert system's strengths and shortcomings are provided.

  14. Code update: MicroWaveLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeFord, John F.

    1997-02-01

    MicroWaveLab is a commercial software package that is used for design of RF and microwave components. The finite-element method is used to solve the frequency-domain Maxwell equations in 3-D volumes containing isotropic and/or anisotropic media. Edge elements are employed to avoid spurious modes, and several different element topologies have been implemented. The finite-element matrix is solved via either LU decomposition or a conjugate-gradient iterative method. Another approach is available wherein the total fields due to an excitation are expanded in terms of the 3-D eigenmodes of the structure. MicroWaveLab has geometry creation capabilities based on the ACIS solid geometry kernel, and pre- and postprocessing support for network parameters and antennas.

  15. Jefferson Lab Data Acquisition Run Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Vardan Gyurjyan; Carl Timmer; David Abbott; William Heyes; Edward Jastrzembski; David Lawrence; Elliott Wolin

    2004-10-01

    A general overview of the Jefferson Lab data acquisition run control system is presented. This run control system is designed to operate the configuration, control, and monitoring of all Jefferson Lab experiments. It controls data-taking activities by coordinating the operation of DAQ sub-systems, online software components and third-party software such as external slow control systems. The main, unique feature which sets this system apart from conventional systems is its incorporation of intelligent agent concepts. Intelligent agents are autonomous programs which interact with each other through certain protocols on a peer-to-peer level. In this case, the protocols and standards used come from the domain-independent Foundation for Intelligent Physical Agents (FIPA), and the implementation used is the Java Agent Development Framework (JADE). A lightweight, XML/RDF-based language was developed to standardize the description of the run control system for configuration purposes.

  16. Overview of Nuclear Physics at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Robert D.

    2013-08-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and associated experimental equipment at Jefferson Lab comprise a unique facility for experimental nuclear physics. This facility is presently being upgraded, which will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address important topics in nuclear, hadronic, and electroweak physics. Further in the future, it is envisioned that the Laboratory will evolve into an electron-ion colliding beam facility.

  17. Optical Calibration For Jefferson Lab HKS Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    L. Yuan; L. Tang

    2005-11-04

    In order to accept very forward angle scattering particles, Jefferson Lab HKS experiment uses an on-target zero degree dipole magnet. The usual spectrometer optics calibration procedure has to be modified due to this on-target field. This paper describes a new method to calibrate HKS spectrometer system. The simulation of the calibration procedure shows the required resolution can be achieved from initially inaccurate optical description.

  18. Jefferson Lab Science: Past and Future

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Robert

    2015-09-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and associated experimental equipment at Jefferson Lab comprise a unique facility for experimental nuclear physics. This facility is presently being upgraded, which will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address important topics in nuclear, hadronic, and electroweak physics. Further in the future, it is envisioned that the Laboratory will evolve into an electron-ion colliding beam facility.

  19. Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences: Accelerating Scientific Discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hules, John A

    2008-12-12

    Scientists today rely on advances in computer science, mathematics, and computational science, as well as large-scale computing and networking facilities, to increase our understanding of ourselves, our planet, and our universe. Berkeley Lab's Computing Sciences organization researches, develops, and deploys new tools and technologies to meet these needs and to advance research in such areas as global climate change, combustion, fusion energy, nanotechnology, biology, and astrophysics.

  20. Cofactor regeneration at the lab scale.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, R; Vasic-Racki, D

    2005-01-01

    Progress made in lab-scale applications of various coenzyme regeneration systems over the last two decades has mainly focused on the applications of NAD+/NADH- and NADP+/NADPH-dependent oxidoreductase reactions. In situ regeneration systems for these reactions, as well as whole cell, enzymatic, electro-enzymatic, chemical, and photochemical reactions are presented, including details about their efficiency and novelty. The progress of enzyme reaction engineering is also reported. PMID:15791939

  1. Jefferson Lab Science: Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, R. D.

    2015-09-01

    The continuous electron beam accelerator facility and associated experimental equipment at Jefferson Lab comprise a unique facility for experimental nuclear physics. This facility is presently being upgraded, which will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address important topics in nuclear, hadronic, and electroweak physics. Further in the future, it is envisioned that the Laboratory will evolve into an electron-ion colliding beam facility.

  2. Jefferson Lab Science: Present and Future

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McKeown, Robert D.

    2015-02-12

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and associated experimental equipment at Jefferson Lab comprise a unique facility for experimental nuclear physics. Furthermore, this facility is presently being upgraded, which will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address important topics in nuclear, hadronic, and electroweak physics. Further in the future, it is envisioned that the Laboratory will evolve into an electron-ion colliding beam facility.

  3. Programmable Electro Osmotic Lab on a Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Class, Andreas G.

    2014-11-01

    We propose to use a 2D check-board patterned surface with alternating zeta potential made of semiconductors and individually controllable electrodes surrounding each field to drive by electro osmosis an arbitrary flow along the surface within the cavity of a lab-on-a-chip. In contrast to other fluid mechanic devices the flow is not driven by pressure gradients but rather by a controllable fluid velocity within the Debay boundary layer. Thus fluid is transported like a parcel on a conveyor belt. The use of alternating zeta potential fields and alternating electrode polarities allows to transport flow along multiple fields without the need to increase voltage. Basic functionality of the chip is accomplished by appropriate programming: fluid transport along straight and curved path, merging and splitting flow paths, flow crossing by red light traffic control, and mixing. Implementing sensors for electric resistance on the Lab-On-A-Chip allows to program a diagnosis application using electrophoresis for detection. Transport within the Lab-On-A-Chip can be described by Stokes-flow subject to the boundary conditions given by asymptotic theory in the thin-Debay-layer-limit describing field driven electro kinetic effects.

  4. The NASA Langley Isolator Dynamics Research Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, Troy F.; Balla, Robert J.; Baurle, Robert A.; Humphreys, William M.; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    2010-01-01

    The Isolator Dynamics Research Lab (IDRL) is under construction at the NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. A unique test apparatus is being fabricated to support both wall and in-stream measurements for investigating the internal flow of a dual-mode scramjet isolator model. The test section is 24 inches long with a 1-inch by 2-inch cross sectional area and is supplied with unheated, dry air through a Mach 2.5 converging-diverging nozzle. The test section is being fabricated with two sets (glass and metallic) of interchangeable sidewalls to support flow visualization and laser-based measurement techniques as well as static pressure, wall temperature, and high frequency pressure measurements. During 2010, a CFD code validation experiment will be conducted in the lab in support of NASA s Fundamental Aerodynamics Program. This paper describes the mechanical design of the Isolator Dynamics Research Lab test apparatus and presents a summary of the measurement techniques planned for investigating the internal flow field of a scramjet isolator model.

  5. Lab-on-a-brane: nanofibrous polymer membranes to recreate organ-capillary interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budhwani, Karim I.; Thomas, Vinoy; Sethu, Palaniappan

    2016-03-01

    Drug discovery is a complex and time consuming process involving significant basic research and preclinical evaluation prior to testing in patients. Preclinical studies rely extensively on animal models which often fail in human trials. Biomimetic microphysiological systems (MPS) using human cells can be a promising alternative to animal models; where critical interactions between different organ systems are recreated to provide physiologically relevant in vitro human models. Central here are blood-vessel networks, the interface controlling transport of cellular and biomolecular components between the circulating fluid and underlying tissue. Here we present a novel lab-on-a-brane (or lab-on-a-membrane) nanofluidics MPS that combines the elegance of lab-on-a-chip with the more realistic morphology of 3D fibrous tissue-engineering constructs. Our blood-vessel lab-on-a-brane effectively simulates in vivo vessel-tissue interface for evaluating transendothelial transport in various pharmacokinetic and nanomedicine applications. Attributes of our platform include (a) nanoporous barrier interface enabling transmembrane molecular transport, (b) transformation of substrate into nanofibrous 3D tissue matrix, (c) invertible-sandwich architecture, and (d) simple co-culture mechanism for endothelial and smooth muscle layers to accurately mimic arterial anatomy. Structural, mechanical, and transport characterization using scanning electron microscopy, stress/strain analysis, infrared spectroscopy, immunofluorescence, and FITC-Dextran hydraulic permeability confirm viability of this in vitro system. Thus, our lab-on-a-brane provides an effective and efficient, yet considerably inexpensive, physiologically relevant alternative for pharmacokinetic evaluation; possibly reducing animals used in preclinical testing, costs from false starts, and time-to-market. Furthermore, it can be configured in multiple simultaneous arrays for personalized and precision medicine applications and for

  6. Robust speckle metrology for stress measurements outside the lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viotti, Matias R.; Albertazzi G., Armando, Jr.

    2015-05-01

    Optical techniques are usually related to laboratory rooms, which are places equipped with temperature, humidity and vibration control. These techniques are very suitable for fast measurements due to their non-contact nature and full-field capability. Among them, optical methods based on the speckle phenomenon have had a great development during the last two decades because of the development of digital image processing, cameras, computers, lasers and optical components. Speckle techniques have the advantages cited for optical methods. Additionally, they are adequate for the evaluation of real components without further preparation of the surface and without high time consuming to be analyzed. This paper supplies tools, tips and reference parameters to develop interferometers based on the speckle phenomenon to be used outside the laboratory room. Finally, applications outside the lab for the measurement of mechanical and residual stresses are presented. These examples show the high potential of speckle metrology as an auxiliary tool for structure integrity assessment.

  7. Creating a lab to facilitate high school student engagement in authentic paleoclimate science practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, A.; Walsh, E.

    2012-12-01

    A solid understanding of timescales is crucial for any climate change discussion. This hands-on lab was designed as part of a dual-credit climate change course in which high school students can receive college credit. Using homemade ice cores, students have the opportunity to participate in scientific practices associated with collecting, processing, and interpreting temperature and CO2 data. Exploring millennial-scale cycles in ice core data and extending the CO2 record to the present allows students to discover timescales from an investigators perspective. The Ice Core Lab has been piloted in two high school classrooms and student engagement, and epistemological and conceptual understanding was evaluated using quantitative pre and post assessment surveys. The process of creating this lab involved a partnership between an education assessment professional, high school teachers, and University of Washington professors and graduate students in Oceanography, Earth and Space Sciences, Atmospheric Sciences and the Learning Sciences as part of the NASA Global Climate Change University of Washington in the High School program. This interdisciplinary collaboration led to the inception of the lab and was necessary to ensure that the lesson plan was pedagogically appropriate and scientifically accurate. The lab fits into a unit about natural variability and is paired with additional hands-on activities created by other graduate students that explore short-timescale temperature variations, Milankovitch cycles, isotopes, and other proxies. While the Ice Core Lab is intended to follow units that review the scientific process, global energy budget, and transport, it can be modified to fit any teaching platform.

  8. Worldwide Lineages of Clinical Pneumococci in a Japanese Teaching Hospital Identified by DiversiLab System.

    PubMed

    Kashiwaya, Kiyoshi; Saga, Tomoo; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Sakata, Ryuji; Iwata, Morihiro; Yoshizawa, Sadako; Chang, Bin; Ohnishi, Makoto; Tateda, Kazuhiro

    2016-06-01

    Pneumococcal Molecular Epidemiology Network (PMEN) clones are representatives of worldwide-spreading pathogens. DiversiLab system, a repetitive PCR system, has been proposed as a less labor-and time-intensive genotyping platform alternative to conventional methods. However, the utility and analysis parameters of DiversiLab for identifying worldwide lineages was not established. To evaluate and optimize the performance of DiversiLab for identifying worldwide pneumococcal lineages, we examined 245 consecutive isolates of clinical Streptococcus pneumoniae from all age-group patients at a teaching hospital in Japan. The capsular swelling reaction of all isolates yielded 24 different serotypes. Intensive visual observation (VO) of DiversiLab band pattern difference divided all isolates into 73 clusters. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of representative 73 isolates from each VO cluster yielded 51 different STs. Among them, PMEN-related lineages accounted for 63% (46/73). Although the serotype of PMEN-related isolates was identical to that of the original PMEN clone in 70% (32/46), CC156-related PMEN lineages, namely Greece(6B)-22 and Colombia(23F)-26, harbored various capsular types discordant to the original PMEN clones. Regarding automated analysis, genotyping by extended Jaccard (XJ) with a 75% similarity index cutoff (SIC) showed the highest correlation with serotyping (adjusted Rand's coefficient, 0.528). Elevating the SIC for XJ to 85% increased the discriminatory power sufficient for distinguishing two major PMEN-related isolates of Taiwan(19F)-14 and Netherlands(3)-31. These results demonstrated a potential utility of DiversiLab for identifying worldwide lineage of pneumococcus. An optimized parameters of automated analysis should be useful especially for comparison for reference strains by "identification" function of DiversiLab. PMID:27107736

  9. MacroscoMacroscopic Cracking Determination in LaBS Glasspic Cracking Determination in LaBS Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, James

    2005-08-01

    The DOE/EM plans to conduct the Plutonium Vitrification Project at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An important part of this project is to reduce the attractiveness of the plutonium by fabricating a plutonium glass form and immobilizing the Pu form within the high level waste (HLW) glass prepared in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This requires that a project schedule that is consistent with EM plans for DWPF and cleanup of the SRS be developed. Critical inputs to key decisions in the vitrification project schedule are near-term data that will increase confidence that the lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass product is suitable for disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository. A workshop was held on April 28, 2005 at Bechtel SAIC Company (BSC) facility in Las Vegas, NV to define the near term data needs. Dissolution rate data and the fate of plutonium oxide and the neutron absorbers during the dissolution process were defined as key data needs. A suite of short-term tests were defined at the workshop to obtain the needed data. The objectives of these short-term tests are to obtain data that can be used to show that the dissolution rate of a LaBS glass is acceptable and to show that the extent of Pu separation from neutron absorbers, as the glass degrades and dissolves, is not likely to lead to criticality concerns. An additional data need was identified regarding the degree of macroscopic cracking and/or voiding that occurs during processing of the Pu glass waste form and subsequent pouring of HLW glass in the DWPF. A final need to evaluate new frit formulations that may increase the durability of the plutonium glass and/or decrease the degree to which neutron absorbers separate from the plutonium during dissolution was identified. This task plan covers the need to evaluate the degree of macroscopic cracking and/or voiding that occurs during processing of the Vitrified Plutonium Waste Form (i.e. the can-in-canister configuration containing the vitrified

  10. Programmed Instruction Manual for a New Solar and Energy Conservation Laboratory. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Farmingdale. Agricultural and Technical Coll.

    A programmed instruction course was developed, consisting of fifteen experiments encompassing eleven separate pieces of equipment operational in a solar and energy conservation lab. The programmed instruction manual for the lab was evaluated and revised during a workshop. This evaluation indicated that both the lab and manual are valuable tools…

  11. E-Labs - Learning with Authentic Data

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, Marjorie G.; Wayne, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    the success teachers have had providing an opportunity for students to: • Organize and conduct authentic research. • Experience the environment of scientific collaborations. • Possibly make real contributions to a burgeoning scientific field. We've created projects that are problem-based, student driven and technology dependent. Students reach beyond classroom walls to explore data with other students and experts and share results, publishing original work to a worldwide audience. Students can discover and extend the research of other students, modeling the processes of modern, large-scale research projects. From start to finish e-Labs are student-led, teacher-guided projects. Students need only a Web browser to access computing techniques employed by professional researchers. A Project Map with milestones allows students to set the research plan rather than follow a step-by-step process common in other online projects. Most importantly, e-Labs build the learning experience around the students' own questions and let them use the very tools that scientists use. Students contribute to and access shared data, most derived from professional research databases. They use common analysis tools, store their work and use metadata to discover, replicate and confirm the research of others. This is where real scientific collaboration begins. Using online tools, students correspond with other research groups, post comments and questions, prepare summary reports, and in general participate in the part of scientific research that is often left out of classroom experiments. Teaching tools such as student and teacher logbooks, pre- and post-tests and an assessment rubric aligned with learner outcomes help teachers guide student work. Constraints on interface designs and administrative tools such as registration databases give teachers the "one-stop-shopping" they seek for multiple e-Labs. Teaching and administrative tools also allow us to track usage and assess the impact on

  12. Painless dental laser - Keith Murry in lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA inventor Keith Murray checks out laser technology that promises to make painless dental lasers affordable for dentists and their patients. Developed at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va., the dual-wavelength laser can be electronically switched between the two laser frequencies important to dentists. Co-inventors of the technology are Murray, Norman Barnes, also of Langley, and Ralph Hutcheson of Scientific Materials Corp., Bozeman, Montana. The technology was originally developed for studies of atmospheric wind change. Photographed in building 1202, laser lab.

  13. Phoenix Carries Soil to Wet Chemistry Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows the lander's Robotic Arm scoop positioned over the Wet Chemistry Lab delivery funnel on Sol 29, the 29th Martian day after landing, or June 24, 2008. The soil will be delivered to the instrument on Sol 30.

    This image has been enhanced to brighten the scene.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. Microbes to Biomes at Berkeley Lab

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-28

    Microbes are the Earth's most abundant and diverse form of life. Berkeley Lab's Microbes to Biomes initiative -- which will take advantage of research expertise at the Joint Genome Institute, Advanced Light Source, Molecular Foundry, and the new computational science facility -- is designed to explore and reveal the interactions of microbes with one another and with their environment. Microbes power our planet’s biogeochemical cycles, provide nutrients to our plants, purify our water and are integral components in keeping the human body free of disease and may hold the key to the Earth’s future.

  15. Strangeness Physics with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, Reinhard

    2010-08-05

    We review recent developments in strangeness photo- and electro- production off the proton and neutron, as investigated using CLAS in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. By measuring sufficient spin observables one can decompose the reaction mechanism into elementary amplitudes. We discuss progress toward this end in recent data from CLAS, including cross sections and spin observables. We next discuss new results on the mass distribution of the {Lambda}(1405), which shows signs of being a composite meson-baryon object of mixed isospin. The work on other hyperons such as the {Xi} resonances will be mentioned, and future prospects for the CLAS program outlined.

  16. Strangeness Physics with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhard Schumacher

    2010-08-01

    We review recent developments in strangeness photo- and electro- production off the proton and neutron, as investigated using CLAS in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. By measuring sufficient spin observables one can decompose the reaction mechanism into elementary amplitudes. We discuss progress toward this end in recent data from CLAS, including cross sections and spin observables. We next discuss new results on the mass distribution of the Lambda(1405), which shows signs of being a composite meson-baryon object of mixed isospin. The work on other hyperons such as the Xi resonances will be mentioned, and future prospects for the CLAS program outlined.

  17. DOSAR/CalLab Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Bogard, J.S.

    2000-03-01

    The Life Sciences Division (LSD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a long record of radiation dosimetry research, primarily using the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) and the Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) Program Calibration Laboratory (CalLab), referred to formerly as the Radiation Calibration Laboratory. These facilities have been used by a broad segment of the research community to perform a variety of experiments in areas including, but not limited to, radiobiology, radiation dosimeter and instrumentation development and calibration, and the testing of materials in a variety of radiation environments.

  18. The EG4 Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    X. Zheng

    2009-07-01

    The main physics goal of the CLAS EG4 experiment at Jefferson Lab is to measure the generalized GDH sum for the proton and the neutron at very low Q2 down to Q2 = 0.015 (GeV/c)2 (inclusive channels). The same data can be used to extract asymmetries of pion electroproduction in the resonance region (exclusive channels). An overview of the experiment is presented here, as well as the analysis status of both inclusive and exclusive analyses. Some preliminary results on the single-target and the beam-target asymmetries of charged pion electroproductions are presented.

  19. The Work Smart Standards process at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, J.R.; Prior, S.; Hanson, E.; Morgan, B.

    1997-12-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) has developed a set of Work Smart Standards for the Lab. The effort incorporated the Lab`s performance-based contract into the Necessary and Sufficient (N and S) Standards identification process of the DOE. A rigorous protocol identified hazards in the workplace and standards that provide adequate protection of workers, public, and the environment at reasonable cost. The intensive process was a joint effort between the Lab and DOE and it required trained teams of knowledgeable experts in three fields: (1) actual required work conditions at Jefferson Lab; (2) laws, regulations, DOE directives and performance-based contracts; and (3) Environmental Health and Safety (EH and S), Rad Con, and QA. The criteria for selection of the teams, the database designed and used for the process, and lessons learned are discussed.

  20. WetLab-2: Wet Lab RNA SmartCycler Providing PCR Capability on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, Macarena; Schonfeld, Julie

    2015-01-01

    The WetLab-2 system will provide sample preparation and qRT-PCR analysis on-board the ISS, a capability to enable using the ISS as a real laboratory. The system will be validated on SpX-7, and is planned for its first PI use on SpX-9.

  1. Using round table labs to complement didactic lectures and experimental labs.

    PubMed

    Nekvasil, N P

    1998-06-01

    In an effort to teach the volume of material needed by physiology students as well as to enhance the student's understanding of physiological mechanisms, a combination of teaching methods is being used at the undergraduate level. Didactic lectures are used to convey the mass of information needed, experimental labs are used to aid the student in visualizing concepts, and situational labs [called round table labs (RTLs) here] are used to provide an opportunity for the student to learn, in a risk-free setting, how to answer application questions. The RTLs utilize discussion, writing, verbal communication, and analytic thinking. The major emphasis of the RTLs is on the integrative nature of physiology. Use of the RTLs bridges, the gap among the facts learned in the didactic lecture, the hands-on learning of the experimental lab, and the need to be able to apply what is being learned. Using this combination facilitates student learning such that the student reaches a level of proficiency with the subject beyond that which can be attained with the more traditional lecture-exam format. PMID:9841568

  2. OpenLabNotes--An Electronic Laboratory Notebook Extension for OpenLabFramework.

    PubMed

    List, Markus; Franz, Michael; Tan, Qihua; Mollenhauer, Jan; Baumbach, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Electronic laboratory notebooks (ELNs) are more accessible and reliable than their paper based alternatives and thus find widespread adoption. While a large number of commercial products is available, small- to mid-sized laboratories can often not afford the costs or are concerned about the longevity of the providers. Turning towards free alternatives, however, raises questions about data protection, which are not sufficiently addressed by available solutions. To serve as legal documents, ELNs must prevent scientific fraud through technical means such as digital signatures. It would also be advantageous if an ELN was integrated with a laboratory information management system to allow for a comprehensive documentation of experimental work including the location of samples that were used in a particular experiment. Here, we present OpenLabNotes, which adds state-of-the-art ELN capabilities to OpenLabFramework, a powerful and flexible laboratory information management system. In contrast to comparable solutions, it allows to protect the intellectual property of its users by offering data protection with digital signatures. OpenLabNotes effectively closes the gap between research documentation and sample management, thus making Open-LabFramework more attractive for laboratories that seek to increase productivity through electronic data management. PMID:26673790

  3. The Mysterious Death: An HPLC Lab Experiment. An Undergraduate Forensic Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beussman, Douglas J.

    2007-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) laboratory experiment based on the separation of four prescription drugs (disopyramide, lidocaine, procainamide, and quinidine) is presented. The experiment is set within the forensic science context of the discovery of a patient's mysterious death where a drug overdose is suspected. Each lab group…

  4. The Design of NetSecLab: A Small Competition-Based Network Security Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, C. P.; Uluagac, A. S.; Fairbanks, K. D.; Copeland, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a competition-style of exercise to teach system and network security and to reinforce themes taught in class. The exercise, called NetSecLab, is conducted on a closed network with student-formed teams, each with their own Linux system to defend and from which to launch attacks. Students are expected to learn how to: 1) install…

  5. Fabrication of Polymerase Chain Reaction Plastic Lab-on-a-Chip Device for Rapid Molecular Diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We aim to fabricate a thermoplastic poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) Lab-on-a-Chip device to perform continuous- flow polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) for rapid molecular detection of foodborne pathogen bacteria. Methods: A miniaturized plastic device was fabricated by utilizing PMMA substrates mediated by poly(dimethylsiloxane) interfacial coating, enabling bonding under mild conditions, and thus avoiding the deformation or collapse of microchannels. Surface characterizations were carried out and bond strength was measured. The feasibility of the Lab-on-a-Chip device for performing on-chip PCR utilizing a lab-made, portable dual heater was evaluated. The results were compared with those obtained using a commercially available thermal cycler. Results: A PMMA Lab-on-a-Chip device was designed and fabricated for conducting PCR using foodborne pathogens as sample targets. A robust bond was established between the PMMA substrates, which is essential for performing miniaturized PCR on plastic. The feasibility of on-chip PCR was evaluated using Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Cronobacter condimenti, two worldwide foodborne pathogens, and the target amplicons were successfully amplified within 25 minutes. Conclusions: In this study, we present a novel design of a low-cost and high-throughput thermoplastic PMMA Lab-on-a-Chip device for conducting microscale PCR, and we enable rapid molecular diagnoses of two important foodborne pathogens in minute resolution using this device. In this regard, the introduced highly portable system design has the potential to enable PCR investigations of many diseases quickly and accurately. PMID:27230459

  6. The EarthLabs Approach to Curriculum and Professional Development: Earth Science Education in the 21st Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mote, A. S.; Ellins, K. K.; Haddad, N.

    2011-12-01

    Humans are modifying planet Earth at an alarming rate without fully understanding how our actions will affect the atmosphere, hydrosphere, or biosphere. Recognizing the value of educating people to become citizens who can make informed decisions about Earth's resources and challenges, Texas currently offers Earth and Space Science as a rigorous high school capstone course. The new course has created a need for high quality instructional resources and professional development to equip teachers with the most up to date content knowledge, pedagogical approaches, and technological skills to be able to teach a rigorous Earth and Space Science course. As a participant in the NSF-sponsored Texas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution teacher professional development program, I was selected to participate in a curriculum development project led by TERC to create Earth System Science and climate change resources for the EarthLabs collection. To this end, I am involved in multiple phases of the EarthLabs project, including reviewing the lab-based units during the development phase, pilot teaching the units with my students, participating in research, and ultimately delivering professional development to other teachers to turn them on to the new modules. My partnership with the EarthLabs project has strengthened my teaching practice by increasing my involvement with curriculum development and collaboration and interaction with other Earth science educators. Critically evaluating the lab modules prior to delivering the lessons to my students has prepared me to more effectively teach the EarthLabs modules in my classroom and present the material to other teachers during professional development workshops. The workshop was also strengthened by planning meetings held with EarthLabs partner teachers in which we engaged in lively discussions regarding misconceptions in Earth science, held by both students and adults, and pedagogical approaches to uncover these misconceptions

  7. Lab-on-a-Chip Instrument Development for Titan Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, P. A.; Greer, F.; Fisher, A.; Hodyss, R. P.; Grunthaner, F.; Jiao, H.; Mair, D.; Harrison, J.

    2009-12-01

    of these stationary phases into microdevices, both by the packing of submicron-sized beads, and by the growth of porous polymer monoliths inside empty channels via a photoinitiated chemical polymerization process. References: 1. “Monolithic photolithographically patterned Fluorocur™ PFPE membrane valves and pumps for in situ planetary exploration”, P. A. Willis et al., Lab Chip 8, 1024 (2008). 2. “The Urey Instrument: An Advanced In Situ Organic and Oxidant Detector for Mars Exploration”, A. Aubrey et al., Astrobiology 8, 583 (2008). 3. “Development and evaluation of a microdevice for amino acid biomarker detection and analysis on Mars” A. M. Skelley et al., PNAS 102, 1041 (2005).

  8. Stream piracy in the Black Hills: A geomorphology lab exercise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaprowski, B.J.; Evenson, E.B.; Epstein, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    The Black Hills of South Dakota exhibits many fine examples of stream piracy that are very suitable for teaching geomorphology lab exercises. This lab goes beyond standard topographic map interpretation by using geologic maps, well logs, gravel provenance and other types of data to teach students about stream piracy. Using a step-by-step method in which the lab exercises ramp up in difficulty, students hone their skills in deductive reasoning and data assimilation. The first exercises deal with the identification of stream piracy at a variety of spatial scales and the lab culminates with an exercise on landscape evolution and drainage rearrangement.

  9. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. BEVATRON SHIELDING - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  10. The History of Science and Technology at Bell Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, David

    2008-03-01

    Over the last 80 years, Bell Labs has been one of the most scientifically and technologically productive research labs in the world. Inventions such as the transistor, laser, cell phone, solar cell, negative feedback amplifier, communications satellite and many others were made there. Scientific breakthroughs such as discovery of the Big Bang, the wave nature of the electron, electron localization and the fractional quantum hall effect were also made there making Bell Labs almost unique in terms of large impacts in both science and technology. In my talk, I will discuss the history of the lab, talk about the present and give some suggestions for how I see it evolving into the future.

  11. The interventional cardiologist as cath lab team leader.

    PubMed

    Blankenship, James C; Feldman, Barry; Ranaweera, Priyantha; Dent, John; Huang, Xiaoyan; Singer, Sara

    2015-06-01

    Interventional cardiologists act as leaders every time they step into a catheterization laboratory (cath lab), but leadership training is rarely included in cardiology training programs. Cath lab physicians should cultivate and practice effective leadership skills. Specifically, (1) before each procedure assess whether the cath lab team is prepared; (2) delegate authority to trainees and team members when appropriate; (3) use every procedure to improve the performance of team members through teaching, coaching, and mentorship; (4) debrief the team after adverse events; (5) develop the traits, styles, and skills associated with successful leadership; and (6) provide team training for the cath lab team. PMID:26028665

  12. PC/104 Embedded IOCs at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Jianxun Yan, Trent Allison, Sue Witherspoon, Anthony Cuffe

    2009-10-01

    Jefferson Lab has developed embedded IOCs based on PC/104 single board computers (SBC) for low level control systems. The PC/104 IOCs run EPICS on top of the RTEMS operating system. Two types of control system configurations are used in different applications, PC/104 SBC with commercial PC/104 I/O cards and PC/104 SBC with custom designed FPGA-based boards. RTEMS was built with CEXP shell to run on the PC/104 SBC. CEXP shell provides the function of dynamic object loading, which is similar to the widely used VxWorks operating system. Standard software configurations were setup for PC/104 IOC application development to provide a familiar format for new projects as well as ease the conversion of applications from VME based IOCs to PC/104 IOCs. Many new projects at Jefferson Lab are going to employ PC/104 SBCs as IOCs and some applications have already been running them for accelerator operations. The PC/104 - RTEMS IOC provides a free open source Real-Time Operating System (RTOS), low cost/maintenance, easily installed/ configured, flexible, and reliable solution for accelerator control and 12GeV Upgrade projects.

  13. A Bernoulli's Law Lab in a Bottle:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Guerra; Plaisted, Aaron; Smith, Michael

    2004-03-01

    Bernoulli's law is a fundamental relationship in fluid dynamics, which is covered in most introductory physics classes. The concept is used to explain many important phenomena from fluid flow in pipes to aircraft flight. In an effort to help demonstrate the way in which Bernoulli's law is often applied in fluid dynamics, we have developed a laboratory exercise that employs a common physics lab motion sensor to measure the time it takes water to drain out of an inverted plastic seltzer bottle. Using a series of bottle caps with different sized holes drilled in them, students can easily measure the drain time for systems with different parameters. With the simple data analysis capabilities provided with the sensor students can attain good agreement between experiment and theory. This simple lab gives students an example of how Bernoulli's equation, the continuity equation (conservation of mass), and a few fundamental equations of kinematics can be combined to predict the behavior of a fluid dynamic system. In addition, a closer look at the data also provides an opportunity to discuss some of the subtleties of the system.

  14. On my association with Bell Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sondhi, M. Mohan

    2001-05-01

    I joined the Acoustics Research department at Bell Labs in 1962, just eight days before AT&T launched the first communications satellite, Telstar. During the 39 years between 1962 and my retirement in 2001, I worked on several problems related in one way or another to the processing of speech signals. Schroeder and Flanagan are presenting talks from a broad perspective in this session, so I will confine this talk to just my own contributions and collaborations for some of the topics on which I worked, e.g., echo cancellation, inverse problems in acoustics, speech analysis, synthesis, and recognition. I will tell you about one of these contributions that fortunately turned out to yield considerable profits to AT&T. To give you a flavor of the spirit of free inquiry at Bell Labs during that period, I will tell you about the contribution that I am most proud of (which was supported for several years even though it had no monetary value). And I will also mention the contribution that is most often cited of all my papers (which was in collaboration with two mathematicians, and had nothing at all to do with acoustics).

  15. MarsLab: A HEDS Lander Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, M. H.; McKay, C.; Connolly, J.

    2000-01-01

    Recognizing that the human exploration of Mars will be a science-focused enterprise, the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) program set out three years ago to develop a mix of science and technology Lander payloads as a first step toward a human mission. With three experiments ready for flight and four more in development, the HEDS Mars program has the capability to stage missions with considerable impact. This presentation describes one such mission design by no means unique. Ambitious in scope, it encompasses elements of all seven HEDS payloads in a configuration with a uniquely HEDS character. Pragmatically, a subset of these elements could be selected for existing small Lander platforms. Bristling with scientific experiments, technology demonstrations, and outreach elements, MarsLab represents a prototype of a manned science station or scientific outpost. A cartoon overview of MarsLab defines its major elements, explained more fully in the sections that follow. The concept is endorsed by PI's of the various HEDS payloads, details of which are presented elsewhere at this workshop.

  16. The evolution of Jefferson Lab's control system

    SciTech Connect

    K. S. White; M. Bickley; W. Watson

    1999-10-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's (Jefferson Lab) accelerator controls were initially implemented as a proprietary in-house system. During machine commissioning, problems were encountered leading to a decision to migrate to the Experimental Physics and Industrial Controls System (EPICS). Since then, the accelerator and all other laboratory controls have been successfully converted. In addition to implementing Jefferson Lab's controls using EPICS, new data visualization tools have been developed and existing programs have been enhanced with new capabilities. In order to provide a more generic interface for high level applications development, a device abstraction layer, called Common DEVice (CDEV), was implemented. These additions have been made available to other laboratories and are in use at many sites, including some that do not use EPICS. Control System development is not limited to computer scientists; operators, engineers and physicists frequently add capabilities using EPICS, CDEV, Tel/tk, and other tools. These contributions have tailored the control system for many different types of customers. For the future, the authors envision more intelligent processing and more capable tools for data storage, retrieval and visualization.

  17. Changes in Urban Youths' Attitude Towards Science and Perception of a Mobile Science Lab Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Jared

    This dissertation examined changes in urban youth's attitude towards science as well as their perception of the informal science education setting and third space opportunity provided by the BioBus, a mobile science lab. Science education researchers have often suggested that informal science education settings provide one possible way to positively influence student attitude towards science and engage marginalized urban youth within the traditional science classroom (Banks et al., 2007; Hofstein & Rosenfeld, 1996; National Research Council, 2009; Schwarz & Stolow, 2006; Stocklmayer, Rennie, & Gilbert, 2010). However, until now, this possibility has not been explored within the setting of a mobile science lab nor examined using a theoretical framework intent on analyzing how affective outcomes may occur. The merits of this analytical stance were evaluated via observation, attitudinal survey, open-response questionnaire, and interview data collected before and after a mobile science lab experience from a combination of 239 students in Grades 6, 8, 9, 11, and 12 from four different schools within a major Northeastern metropolitan area. Findings from this study suggested that urban youth's attitude towards science changed both positively and negatively in statistically significant ways after a BioBus visit and that the experience itself was highly enjoyable. Furthermore, implications for how to construct a third space within the urban science classroom and the merits of utilizing the theoretical framework developed to analyze cultural tensions between urban youth and school science are discussed. Key Words: Attitude towards science, third space, mobile science lab, urban science education.

  18. Teaching Ocean Sciences in the 21st Century Classroom: Lab to Classroom Videoconferencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, C. L.; Gerwick, W.; Gerwick, L.; Senise, M.; Jones, C. S.; Malloy, K.; Jones, A.; Trentacoste, E.; Nunnery, J.; Mendibles, T.; Tayco, D.; Justice, L.; Deutscher, R.

    2010-12-01

    2009 3-day videoconferencing event, 3 graduate students and the lab PI connected to nine, 7th grade life science classes (~300 students) using SKYPE. Each of the nine videoconferences lasted for ~50 minutes and included a mini-lab tour, a short presentation on the graduate students’ field and lab-based research activities, and interspersed question and answer sessions. Teachers are currently exploring ways they can further capitalize on the connection to the research lab and are writing up a “how to” guide for SKYPE lab to classroom videoconferencing. LHS has been evaluating this videoconference project to get feedback from the participants about the collaboration, the technology, and the format in order to improve the program in the future. The collaboration has now been turned over to the graduate students and teachers with little facilitation by COSEE CA staff. COSEE CA is applying the approach to other earth and ocean science topics by offering “Virtual Lab Tours” as a broader impact option.

  19. Lab-on-Chip-Based Platform for Fast Molecular Diagnosis of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cabibbe, Andrea M.; Miotto, Paolo; Moure, Raquel; Alcaide, Fernando; Feuerriegel, Silke; Pozzi, Gianni; Nikolayevskyy, Vladislav; Drobniewski, Francis; Niemann, Stefan; Reither, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of the molecular lab-on-chip-based VerePLEX Biosystem for detection of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), obtaining a diagnostic accuracy of more than 97.8% compared to sequencing and MTBDRplus assay for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and rifampin and isoniazid resistance detection on clinical isolates and smear-positive specimens. The speed, user-friendly interface, and versatility make it suitable for routine laboratory use. PMID:26246486

  20. Computer-based Astronomy Labs for Non-science Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. B. E.; Murray, S. D.; Ward, R. A.

    1998-12-01

    We describe and demonstrate two laboratory exercises, Kepler's Third Law and Stellar Structure, which are being developed for use in an astronomy laboratory class aimed at non-science majors. The labs run with Microsoft's Excel 98 (Macintosh) or Excel 97 (Windows). They can be run in a classroom setting or in an independent learning environment. The intent of the labs is twofold; first and foremost, students learn the subject matter through a series of informational frames. Next, students enhance their understanding by applying their knowledge in lab procedures, while also gaining familiarity with the use and power of a widely-used software package and scientific tool. No mathematical knowledge beyond basic algebra is required to complete the labs or to understand the computations in the spreadsheets, although the students are exposed to the concepts of numerical integration. The labs are contained in Excel workbook files. In the files are multiple spreadsheets, which contain either a frame with information on how to run the lab, material on the subject, or one or more procedures. Excel's VBA macro language is used to automate the labs. The macros are accessed through button interfaces positioned on the spreadsheets. This is done intentionally so that students can focus on learning the subject matter and the basic spreadsheet features without having to learn advanced Excel features all at once. Students open the file and progress through the informational frames to the procedures. After each procedure, student comments and data are automatically recorded in a preformatted Lab Report spreadsheet. Once all procedures have been completed, the student is prompted for a filename in which to save their Lab Report. The lab reports can then be printed or emailed to the instructor. The files will have full worksheet and workbook protection, and will have a "redo" feature at the end of the lab for students who want to repeat a procedure.

  1. Toward Better Physics Labs for Future Biologists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannini, John; Moore, Kim; Losert, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a set of laboratories and hands on activities to accompany a new two-semester interdisciplinary physics course that has been successfully developed and tested in two small test classes of students at the University of Maryland, College Park (UMD) in 2012-2013, and is currently being used on a wider scale. We have designed the laboratories to be taken accompanying a reformed course in the student's second year, with calculus, biology, and chemistry as prerequisites. This permits the laboratories to include significant content on physics relevant to cellular scales, from chemical interactions to random motion and charge screening in fluids. One major focus of the laboratories is to introduce the students to research-grade equipment and modern physics analysis tools in contexts relevant to biology, while maintaining the pedagogically valuable open-ended laboratory structure of reformed laboratories. Lab development procedures along with some preliminary student results from these two small test classes are discussed.

  2. The SPARC_LAB Thomson source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccarezza, C.; Alesini, D.; Anania, M. P.; Bacci, A.; Biagioni, A.; Bisesto, F.; Bellaveglia, M.; Cardarelli, P.; Cardelli, F.; Cianchi, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Croia, M.; Curcio, A.; Delogu, P.; Giovenale, D. Di; Domenico, G. Di; Pirro, G. Di; Drebot, I.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Gallo, A.; Galletti, M.; Gambaccini, M.; Giribono, A.; Golosio, B.; Li, W.; Mostacci, A.; Oliva, P.; Palmer, D.; Petrillo, V.; Petrarca, M.; Pioli, S.; Piersanti, L.; Pompili, R.; Romeo, S.; Rossi, A. R.; Scifo, J.; Serafini, L.; Suliman, G.; Villa, F.

    2016-09-01

    The SPARC_LAB Thomson source is a compact X-ray source based on the Thomson backscattering process presently under its second phase of commissioning at the LNF. The electron beam energy ranges between 30 and 150 MeV, the electrons collide head-on with the Ti:Sapphire FLAME laser pulse the energy of which ranges between 1 and 5 J with pulse lengths in the 25 fs-10 ps range, this provides an X-ray energy tunability in the range of 20-500 keV, with the further capability to generate strongly non-linear phenomena and to drive diffusion processes due to multiple and plural scattering effects. The experimental results of the obtained X-ray radiation are presented.

  3. The G0 Experiment At Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    L. Lee

    2003-07-01

    The electron-proton parity-violation G0 experiment at Jefferson Lab aims to make a determination of the `strange' quark currents in the proton. Two new proton ground state matrix elements will be measured which are sensitive to point-like `strange' quarks and hence to the quark-antiquark sea in the proton. The matrix elements of interest are the elastic-scattering vector weak neutral-current `charge' and `magnetic' form factors, GZE and GZM, respectively. By measuring the very small parity-violating asymmetries in elastic electron-proton scattering at momentum transfers between 0.1 and 1.0 GeV2, and combining these asymmetries with previously measured electromagnetic form factors, new information about the proton weak form factors can be obtained. This new high precision experiment is presently in the installation and commissioning phase.

  4. Wuenscher Examines Sky lab Experiment Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Hans F. Wuenscher, assistant director for Advanced Space Projects Engineering Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), examined the facility to be used by Skylab astronauts in performing a number of experiments in material science and manufacturing in space. The equipment shown here is a duplicate of the M512 Experiment hardware flown in the Multiple Docking Adapter section of the Sky lab. This equipment, itself an experiment, was be used for conducting 5 other experiments in the round vacuum chamber. Inside was a cavity which held the M518 Multipurpose Electric Furnace, a facility which was used for conducting other experiments. In all, a total of 17 experiments were conducted using this facility and furnace.

  5. The Jefferson lab FEL driver ERLs

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, David R.; Tennant, Christopher D.

    2013-11-01

    Jefferson Lab has - for over a decade - been operating high power IR and UV FELs using CW energy recovering linacs based on DC photocathode electron sources and CEBAF SRF technology. These machines have unique combinations of beam quality, power, and operational flexibility, and thus offer significant opportunity for experiments that use low and medium energy (several tens - few hundreds of MeV) electron beams. We will describe the systems and detail their present and near-term (potential) performance. Recent internal-target analysis and validation testing will be discussed, and schemes for single- and two-pass fixed target operation described. An introduction to subsequent discussions of beam quality and upgrade paths to polarized operation/higher energy will be given.

  6. Making the Case for Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Franz

    2011-06-01

    This chapter is a personal account of the initial planning and competition for a new laboratory, which eventually became known as the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, with the official nickname "Jefferson Lab." The period covered starts as far back as 1964, with the introduction of quarks, and extends up to the late 1980s after the initial team was assembled, the superconducting design was in place, and construction was well underway. I describe some of the major experiments that were proposed to justify the laboratory, reflect on the present status of those initially proposed experiments, and very briefly outline some of the new ideas that emerged after the laboratory was constructed. The science is presented in a simple manner intended for a lay audience, with some of the ideas illustrated by cartoons that were often used in popular lectures given during this period.

  7. A Paperless Lab Manual - Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatten, Daniel L.; Hatten, Maggie W.

    1999-10-01

    Every freshman entering Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology is equipped with a laptop computer and a software package that allow classroom and laboratory instructors the freedom to make computer-based assignments, publish course materials in electronic form, etc. All introductory physics laboratories and many of our classrooms are networked, and students routinely take their laptop computers to class/lab. The introductory physics laboratory manual was converted to HTML in the summer of 1997 and was made available to students over the Internet vice printing a paper manual during the 1998-99 school year. The aim was to reduce paper costs and allow timely updates of the laboratory experiments. A poll conducted at the end of the school year showed a generally positive student response to the online laboratory manual, with some reservations.

  8. Nucleon Form Factors - A Jefferson Lab Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    John Arrington, Kees de Jager, Charles F. Perdrisat

    2011-06-01

    The charge and magnetization distributions of the proton and neutron are encoded in their elastic electromagnetic form factors, which can be measured in elastic electron--nucleon scattering. By measuring the form factors, we probe the spatial distribution of the proton charge and magnetization, providing the most direct connection to the spatial distribution of quarks inside the proton. For decades, the form factors were probed through measurements of unpolarized elastic electron scattering, but by the 1980s, progress slowed dramatically due to the intrinsic limitations of the unpolarized measurements. Early measurements at several laboratories demonstrated the feasibility and power of measurements using polarization degrees of freedom to probe the spatial structure of the nucleon. A program of polarization measurements at Jefferson Lab led to a renaissance in the field of study, and significant new insight into the structure of matter.

  9. RICH Detector for Jefferson Labs CLAS12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trotta, Richard; Torisky, Ben; Benmokhtar, Fatiha

    2015-10-01

    Jefferson Lab (Jlab) is performing a large-scale upgrade to its Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) up to 12GeV beams. The Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12) in Hall B is being upgraded and a new hybrid Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector is being developed to provide better kaon - pion separation throughout the 3 to 8 GeV/c momentum range. This detector will be used for a variety of Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering experiments. Cherenkov light can be accurately detected by a large array of sophisticated Multi-Anode Photomultiplier Tubes (MA-PMT) and heavier particles, like kaons, will span the inner radii. We are presenting our work on the creation of the RICH's geometry within the CLAS12 java framework. This development is crucial for future calibration, reconstructions and analysis of the detector.

  10. The Jefferson Lab Frozen Spin Target

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Keith, James Brock, Christopher Carlin, Sara Comer, David Kashy, Josephine McAndrew, David Meekins, Eugene Pasyuk, Joshua Pierce, Mikell Seely

    2012-08-01

    A frozen spin polarized target, constructed at Jefferson Lab for use inside a large acceptance spectrometer, is described. The target has been utilized for photoproduction measurements with polarized tagged photons of both longitudinal and circular polarization. Protons in TEMPO-doped butanol were dynamically polarized to approximately 90% outside the spectrometer at 5 T and 200-300 mK. Photoproduction data were acquired with the target inside the spectrometer at a frozen-spin temperature of approximately 30 mK with the polarization maintained by a thin, superconducting coil installed inside the target cryostat. A 0.56 T solenoid was used for longitudinal target polarization and a 0.50 T dipole for transverse polarization. Spin relaxation times as high as 4000 hours were observed. We also report polarization results for deuterated propanediol doped with the trityl radical OX063.

  11. Smartphones as portable oscilloscopes for physics labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forinash, Kyle; Wisman, Raymond F.

    2012-04-01

    Given that today's smartphones are mobile and have more computing power and means to measure the external world than early PCs, they may also revolutionize data collection, both in structured physics laboratory settings and in less predictable situations, outside the classroom. Several examples using the internal sensors available in a smartphone were presented in earlier papers in this column.1, 2 But data collection is not limited only to the phone's internal sensors since most also have a headphone port for connecting an external microphone and speakers. This port can be used to connect to external equipment in much the same way as the game port on the early Apple II was used in school labs. Below is an illustration using the headphone port to receive data from an external circuit: smartphones as a portable oscilloscope using commercially available hardware and applications.

  12. The Living Labs: Innovation in Real-Life Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawk, Nathan; Bartle, Gamin; Romine, Martha

    2012-01-01

    The living lab (LL) is an open innovation ecosystem serving to provide opportunities for local stakeholders to practice research and to experiment with meaningful improvements for cities and other organizations. Living labs aim at involving the user as a cocreator. In this article the relationship between the LLs and a variety of stakeholders is…

  13. Letters Home as an Alternative to Lab Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, W. Brian

    2014-01-01

    The traditional lab report is known to create several pedagogical shortcomings in the introductory physics course, particularly with regard to promoting student engagement and encouraging quality writing. This paper discusses the use of a "letter home" written to a non-physicist as an alternative to lab reports that creates a more…

  14. Hooked on Inquiry: History Labs in the Methods Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Linda Sargent

    2012-01-01

    Methods courses provide a rich opportunity to unpack what it means to "learn history by doing history." To help explain what "doing history" means, the author has created history labs to walk teacher candidates through the historical process. Each lab poses a historical problem, requires analysis of primary and secondary sources, and demands…

  15. Labs at Elementary Level Help Bring Science Alive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2008-01-01

    State and district science standards typically call for students to take part in hands-on labs and experiments in the elementary grades. The 1996 National Science Education Standards, which were written by the National Research Council and serve as a reference for many states, emphasize similar activities. Yet the use of even simple labs and…

  16. THIRD LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB (SECOND FLOOR OF BUILDING) SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    THIRD LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB (SECOND FLOOR OF BUILDING) SHOWING MISSILE TUBE. VIEW FACING SOUTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. OVERVIEW OF FOURTH LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB (ROOFTOP LEVEL OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF FOURTH LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB (ROOFTOP LEVEL OF BUILDING) SHOWING TOP OF MISSILE TUBE. VIEW FACING WEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  18. VIEW OF SECOND LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB WITH MISSILE TUBE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF SECOND LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB WITH MISSILE TUBE WITH HATCH ON LEFT AND CONTROL PANEL ON RIGHT. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  19. Time Trials--An AP Physics Challenge Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, David

    2009-01-01

    I have come to the conclusion that for high school physics classroom and laboratory experiences, simpler is better! In this paper I describe a very simple and effective lab experience that my AP students have thoroughly enjoyed year after year. I call this lab exercise "Time Trials." The experiment is simple in design and it is a lot of fun for…

  20. Planning and Implementing an Effective Reading and Study Skills Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Suzanne

    The factors necessary for implementing and maintaining an individualized adult reading lab are outlined briefly in this paper. Teaching approaches that make the lab suitable for remedial readers, as well as how the individualized approach can help the student beyond the basics of reading are discussed under the heading of components. Suggestions…

  1. Teaching Introductory Economics with a Collaborative Learning Lab Component.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    Answers the what, why, how, and for whom questions concerning a collaborative-learning-lab component of the introductory economics course at Occidental College (California). Reports on the program's effectiveness based on a student questionnaire: they overwhelmingly report that the lab is worthwhile and that group work is both enjoyable and…

  2. Strategic Design of an Interactive Video Learning Lab (IVL).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Switzer, Ralph V., Jr.; Switzer, Jamie S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes a study that researched elements necessary for the design of an interactive video learning (IVL) lab for business courses. Highlights include a review of pertinent literature; guidelines for the use of an IVL lab; IVL systems integration; system specifications; hardware costs; and system software. (five references) (LRW)

  3. Facilitating Student and Teacher Empowerment in a Writing Computer Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Shirley W.

    Concern that computers in the classroom might alienate learners and depersonalize learning raises questions about the impact of computers on writing instruction. A study examined relationships in one school's computer writing lab among instructor, student tutors, and students through what was called the "computer lab matrix of interaction."…

  4. LIVING LAB: User-Driven Innovation for Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liedtke, Christa; Welfens, Maria Jolanta; Rohn, Holger; Nordmann, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to summarize and discuss the results from the LIVING LAB design study, a project within the 7th Framework Programme of the European Union. The aim of this project was to develop the conceptual design of the LIVING LAB Research Infrastructure that will be used to research human interaction with, and stimulate…

  5. The Multisensory Sound Lab: Sounds You Can See and Feel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lederman, Norman; Hendricks, Paula

    1994-01-01

    A multisensory sound lab has been developed at the Model Secondary School for the Deaf (District of Columbia). A special floor allows vibrations to be felt, and a spectrum analyzer displays frequencies and harmonics visually. The lab is used for science education, auditory training, speech therapy, music and dance instruction, and relaxation…

  6. OBLIQUE VIEW OF MISSILE LAB WITH CRANE SHOWING SOUTHWEST AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF MISSILE LAB WITH CRANE SHOWING SOUTHWEST AND NORTHWEST SIDES. VIEW FACING EAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. OBLIQUE VIEW OF MISSILE LAB WITH CRANE SHOWING SOUTHEAST AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF MISSILE LAB WITH CRANE SHOWING SOUTHEAST AND SOUTHWEST SIDES. VIEW FACING NORTH/NORTHWEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. Online Writing Labs as Sites for Community Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Jaclyn Michelle

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the Community Writing and Education Station (CWEST), a community engagement project that partners a community adult basic literacy program with a university writing lab. The author argues that the community and university partners, the Lafayette Adult Resource Academy (LARA) and the Purdue Writing Lab, offer positive…

  9. Being a Clinical Psychologist at the Lab School of Baltimore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Edwin

    2010-01-01

    Each day, seeking to address the never ending challenge of helping students with learning disabilities, the author's Baltimore Lab School and Lab School of Washington (LSW) colleagues remember a similar situation in the past and they try to recall what Sally Smith taught them. Smith taught the author a lot in his seven years of working with…

  10. Networking Labs in the Online Environment: Indicators for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahoud, Hilmi A.; Krichen, Jack P.

    2010-01-01

    Several techniques have been used to provide hands-on educational experiences to online learners, including remote labs, simulation software, and virtual labs, which offer a more structured environment, including simulations and scheduled asynchronous access to physical resources. This exploratory study investigated how these methods can be used…

  11. A Computer Lab that Students Use but Never See

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    North Carolina State University may never build another computer lab. Instead the university has installed racks of equipment in windowless rooms where students and professors never go. This article describes a project called the Virtual Computing Lab. Users enter it remotely from their own computers in dormitory rooms or libraries. They get all…

  12. Macromolecules Inquiry: Transformation of a Standard Biochemistry Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unsworth, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Identification of macromolecules in food is a standard introductory high school biology lab. The intent of this article is to describe the conversion of this standard cookbook lab into an inquiry investigation. Instead of verifying the macromolecules found in food, students use their knowledge of the macromolecules in food to determine the…

  13. A Concept-Oriented Custom Lab Manual for Astronomy 101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrady, Nate; Rice, Emily L.

    2016-01-01

    Astronomy 101 students are typically non-science majors fulfilling a general education requirement in the physical sciences. Many schools require that students complete a lab component with the course in order to meet the graduation requirement. The introductory astronomy course curriculum varies widely between instructors, and as such there is no agreed-upon standard set of topics or skills for lab activities. This is very challenging for the busy, heavily-loaded faculty member who needs a range of lab activities for their students. We have developed a collection of 40 concept-oriented activities for Astro 101 lab courses across a wide range of topics. The labs are designed to develop foundational skills and deep conceptual understanding in a hands-on, collaborative, learner-centered environment. They emphasize simple, inexpensive equipment to focus attention on key concepts rather than complicated apparatus, and to ease implementation for instructors working with limited resources. Instructors select only those labs that match their own course content, sequence the topics to align with their curriculum, and provide a fully custom lab manual to their students. Students, in turn, need only pay for labs they will use, keeping the materials affordable. On the web, see mccradyricelabs.com for more information.

  14. Lab-on a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Labs on chips are manufactured in many shapes and sizes and can be used for numerous applications, from medical tests to water quality monitoring to detecting the signatures of life on other planets. The eight holes on this chip are actually ports that can be filled with fluids or chemicals. Tiny valves control the chemical processes by mixing fluids that move in the tiny channels that look like lines, connecting the ports. Scientists at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama designed this chip to grow biological crystals on the International Space Station (ISS). Through this research, they discovered that this technology is ideally suited for solving the challenges of the Vision for Space Exploration. For example, thousands of chips the size of dimes could be loaded on a Martian rover looking for biosignatures of past or present life. Other types of chips could be placed in handheld devices used to monitor microbes in water or to quickly conduct medical tests on astronauts. The portable, handheld Lab-on-a Chip Application Development Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS) made its debut flight aboard Discovery during the STS-116 mission launched December 9, 2006. The system allowed crew members to monitor their environment for problematic contaminants such as yeast, mold, and even E.coli, and salmonella. Once LOCAD-PTS reached the ISS, the Marshall team continued to manage the experiment, monitoring the study from a console in the Payload Operations Center at MSFC. The results of these studies will help NASA researchers refine the technology for future Moon and Mars missions. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

  15. The Jefferson Lab High Power Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Boyce

    2006-01-01

    Jefferson Lab has designed, built and operated two high average power free-electron lasers (FEL) using superconducting RF (SRF) technology and energy recovery techniques. Between 1999-2001 Jefferson Lab operated the IR Demo FEL. This device produced over 2 kW in the mid-infrared, in addition to producing world record average powers in the visible (50 W), ultraviolet (10 W) and terahertz range (50 W) for tunable, short-pulse (< ps) light. This FEL was the first high power demonstration of an accelerator configuration that is being exploited for a number of new accelerator-driven light source facilities that are currently under design or construction. The driver accelerator for the IR Demo FEL uses an Energy Recovered Linac (ERL) configuration that improves the energy efficiency and lowers both the capital and operating cost of such devices by recovering most of the power in the spent electron beam after optical power is extracted from the beam. The IR Demo FEL was de-commissioned in late 2001 for an upgraded FEL for extending the IR power to over 10 kW and the ultraviolet power to over 1 kW. The FEL Upgrade achieved 10 kW of average power in the mid-IR (6 microns) in July of 2004, and its IR operation currently is being extended down to 1 micron. In addition, we have demonstrated the capability of on/off cycling and recovering over a megawatt of electron beam power without diminishing machine performance. A complementary UV FEL will come on-line within the next year. This paper presents a summary of the FEL characteristics, user community accomplishments with the IR Demo, and planned user experiments.

  16. Overview Of Control System For Jefferson Lab`s High Power Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hofler, A. S.; Grippo, A. C.; Keesee, M. S.; Song, J.

    1997-12-31

    In this paper the current plans for the control system for Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility`s (Jefferson Lab`s) Infrared Free Electron Laser (FEL) are presented. The goals for the FEL control system are fourfold: (1) to use EPICS and EPICS compatible tools, (2) to use VME and Industry Pack (IPs) interfaces for FEL specific devices such as controls and diagnostics for the drive laser, high power optics, photocathode gun and electron-beam diagnostics, (3) to migrate Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) technologies to VME when possible, and (4) to use CAMAC solutions for systems that duplicate CEBAF technologies such as RF linacs and DC magnets. This paper will describe the software developed for FEL specific devices and provide an overview of the FEL control system.

  17. Investigation of Science Inquiry Items for Use on an Alternate Assessment Based on Modified Achievement Standards Using Cognitive Lab Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickenson, Tammiee S.; Gilmore, Joanna A.; Price, Karen J.; Bennett, Heather L.

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the benefits of item enhancements applied to science-inquiry items for incorporation into an alternate assessment based on modified achievement standards for high school students. Six items were included in the cognitive lab sessions involving both students with and without disabilities. The enhancements (e.g., use of visuals,…

  18. Seeing an Old Lab in a New Light: Transforming a Traditional Optics Lab into Full Guided Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maley, Tim; Stoll, Will; Demir, Kadir

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the authors' experiences transforming a "cookbook" lab into an inquiry-based investigation and the powerful effect the inquiry-oriented lab had on our students' understanding of lenses. We found the inquiry-oriented approach led to richer interactions between students as well as a deeper conceptual…

  19. Pilot Residential Deep Energy Retrofits and the PNNL Lab Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Widder, Sarah H.; Chandra, Subrato; Parker, Graham B.; Sande, Susan; Blanchard, Jeremy; Stroer, Dennis; McIlvaine, Janet; Chasar, David; Beal, David; Sutherland, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes research investigating the technical and economic feasibility of several pilot deep energy retrofits, or retrofits that save 30% to 50% or more on a whole-house basis while increasing comfort, durability, combustion safety, and indoor air quality. The work is being conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program as part of the Building America Program. As part of the overall program, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers are collecting and analyzing a comprehensive dataset that describes pre- and post-retrofit energy consumption, retrofit measure cost, health and comfort impacts, and other pertinent information for each home participating in the study. The research and data collection protocol includes recruitment of candidate residences, a thorough test-in audit, home energy modeling, and generation of retrofit measure recommendations, implementation of the measures, test-out, and continued evaluation. On some homes, more detailed data will be collected to disaggregate energy-consumption information. This multi-year effort began in October 2010. To date, the PNNL team has performed test-in audits on 51 homes in the marine, cold, and hot-humid climate zones, and completed 3 retrofits in Texas, 10 in Florida, and 2 in the Pacific Northwest. Two of the retrofits are anticipated to save 50% or more in energy bills and the others - savings are in the 30% to 40% range. Fourteen other retrofits are under way in the three climate zones. Metering equipment has been installed in seven of these retrofits - three in Texas, three in Florida, and one in the Pacific Northwest. This report is an interim update, providing information on the research protocol and status of the PNNL deep energy retrofit project as of December, 2011. The report also presents key findings and lessons learned, based on the body of work to date. In addition, the report summarizes the status of the PNNL Lab Homes that are new

  20. Designing virtual science labs for the Islamic Academy of Delaware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlZahrani, Nada Saeed

    Science education is a basic part of the curriculum in modern day classrooms. Instructional approaches to science education can take many forms but hands-on application of theory via science laboratory activities for the learner is common. Not all schools have the resources to provide the laboratory environment necessary for hands-on application of science theory. Some settings rely on technology to provide a virtual laboratory experience instead. The Islamic Academy of Delaware (IAD), a typical community-based organization, was formed to support and meet the essential needs of the Muslim community of Delaware. IAD provides science education as part of the overall curriculum, but cannot provide laboratory activities as part of the science program. Virtual science labs may be a successful model for students at IAD. This study was conducted to investigate the potential of implementing virtual science labs at IAD and to develop an implementation plan for integrating the virtual labs. The literature has shown us that the lab experience is a valuable part of the science curriculum (NBPTS, 2013, Wolf, 2010, National Research Council, 1997 & 2012). The National Research Council (2012) stressed the inclusion of laboratory investigations in the science curriculum. The literature also supports the use of virtual labs as an effective substitute for classroom labs (Babateen, 2011; National Science Teachers Association, 2008). Pyatt and Simms (2011) found evidence that virtual labs were as good, if not better than physical lab experiences in some respects. Although not identical in experience to a live lab, the virtual lab has been shown to provide the student with an effective laboratory experience in situations where the live lab is not possible. The results of the IAD teacher interviews indicate that the teachers are well-prepared for, and supportive of, the implementation of virtual labs to improve the science education curriculum. The investigator believes that with the

  1. Distributed Energy Communications & Controls, Lab Activities - Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Rizy, D Tom

    2010-01-01

    The purpose is to develop controls for inverter-based renewable and non-renewable distributed energy systems to provide local voltage, power and power quality support for loads and the power grid. The objectives are to (1) develop adaptive controls for inverter-based distributed energy (DE) systems when there are multiple inverters on the same feeder and (2) determine the impact of high penetration high seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER) air conditioning (A/C) units on power systems during sub-transmission faults which can result in an A/C compressor motor stall and assess how inverter-based DE can help to mitigate the stall event. The Distributed Energy Communications & Controls Laboratory (DECC) is a unique facility for studying dynamic voltage, active power (P), non-active power (Q) and power factor control from inverter-based renewable distributed energy (DE) resources. Conventionally, inverter-based DE systems have been designed to provide constant, close to unity power factor and thus not provide any voltage support. The DECC Lab interfaces with the ORNL campus distribution system to provide actual power system testing of the controls approach. Using mathematical software tools and the DECC Lab environment, we are developing and testing local, autonomous and adaptive controls for local voltage control and P & Q control for inverter-based DE. We successfully tested our active and non-active power (P,Q) controls at the DECC laboratory along with voltage regulation controls. The new PQ control along with current limiter controls has been tested on our existing inverter test system. We have tested both non-adaptive and adaptive control modes for the PQ control. We have completed several technical papers on the approaches and results. Electric power distribution systems are experiencing outages due to a phenomenon known as fault induced delayed voltage recovery (FIDVR) due to air conditioning (A/C) compressor motor stall. Local voltage collapse from FIDVR is

  2. Virus removal retention challenge tests performed at lab scale and pilot scale during operation of membrane units.

    PubMed

    Humbert, H; Machinal, C; Labaye, Ivan; Schrotter, J C

    2011-01-01

    The determination of the virus retention capabilities of UF units during operation is essential for the operators of drinking water treatment facilities in order to guarantee an efficient and stable removal of viruses through time. In previous studies, an effective method (MS2-phage challenge tests) was developed by the Water Research Center of Veolia Environnement for the measurement of the virus retention rates (Log Removal Rate, LRV) of commercially available hollow fiber membranes at lab scale. In the present work, the protocol for monitoring membrane performance was transferred from lab scale to pilot scale. Membrane performances were evaluated during pilot trial and compared to the results obtained at lab scale with fibers taken from the pilot plant modules. PFU culture method was compared to RT-PCR method for the calculation of LRV in both cases. Preliminary tests at lab scale showed that both methods can be used interchangeably. For tests conducted on virgin membrane, a good consistency was observed between lab and pilot scale results with the two analytical methods used. This work intends to show that a reliable determination of the membranes performances based on RT-PCR analytical method can be achieved during the operation of the UF units. PMID:21252428

  3. Can Direct Measurement Videos Inspire Lab-like Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonk, M.; Bohacek, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    Hands-on labs can offer students a rare opportunity to confront the laws of physics first hand and to gain experience using science practices. As such, hands-on labs are an important learning tool which have played a foundational role in science education since the time of Galileo. But labs also have features that make them difficult to implement in practice. They are often time consuming for the instructor to plan and setup, time consuming for students to perform, expensive to implement, and fraught with potential missteps that can send confused students into a spiral of misunderstanding. Our Direct Measurement Video team is working to create several series' of videos with an interface that allows students to interact with them in a way that (we hope) will start to feel lab-like, but with fewer of the impediments that tend to undermine lab-learning in the real world. We hope that lab-like videos will soon provide a needed complement to traditional hands-on labs in science classrooms across the nation. In this talk, I will present our vision of the pedagogical possibilities of video and highlight our progress toward the goal. This work is supported by NSF TUES award #1245268

  4. ChromPlot for MicroChemLab

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-12-19

    The software entitled "ChromPlot for MicroChemLab" is used to collect, display, and save data from the Sandia National Laboratories chemical analysis system dubbed MicroChemLab. Sensor data is streamed from a MicroChemLab unit into a computer thru RS-232 in a manner that is not amenable to plotting. Also, there is no direct way to start and stop the unit as is. This software rearranges the data into something that can be easily plotted in real-time thenmore » save the data into a text file. In addition, this software provides the users a means to start and stop the hardware. This software was written specifically for MicroChemLab. MicroChemLab data is delivered at 6- 7 pts/sec/channel in a two-channel system for 1-2 min. This code is written around that premise. It is written for Pentium or higher machines running Windows 9x/Me/NT/2000/XP. This software was not developed under the BMS CRADA; it is software we use in the lab for our own testing. Bristol Meyers Squibb (BMS) will use this software for testing an online process monitor based on MicroChemLab. They have not indicated their interest in marketing our device or the software.« less

  5. Learning by Viewing - Nobel Labs 360

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2013-01-01

    First of all, my thanks to the Nobel Lindau Foundation for their inspiration and leadership in sharing the excitement of scientific discovery with the public and with future scientists! I have had the pleasure of participating twice in the Lindau meetings, and recently worked with the Nobel Labs 360 project to show how we are building the world's greatest telescope yet, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). For the future, I see the greatest challenges for all the sciences in continued public outreach and inspiration. Outreach, so the public knows why we are doing what we are doing, and what difference it makes for them today and in the long-term future. Who knows what our destiny may be? It could be glorious, or not, depending on how we all behave. Inspiration, so that the most creative and inquisitive minds can pursue the scientific and engineering discoveries that are at the heart of so much of human prosperity, health, and progress. And, of course, national and local security depend on those discoveries too; scientists have been working with "the government" throughout recorded history. For the Lindau Nobel experiment, we have a truly abundant supply of knowledge and excitement, through the interactions of young scientists with the Nobelists, and through the lectures and the video recordings we can now share with the whole world across the Internet. But the challenge is always to draw attention! With 7 billion inhabitants on Earth, trying to earn a living and have some fun, there are plenty of competing opportunities and demands on us all. So what will draw attention to our efforts at Lindau? These days, word of mouth has become word of (computer) mouse, and ideas propagate as viruses ( or memes) across the Internet according to the interests of the participants. So our challenge is to find and match those interests, so that the efforts of our scientists, photographers, moviemakers, and writers are rewarded by our public. The world changes every day, so there

  6. An update on Lab Rover: A hospital material transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattaboni, Paul

    1994-01-01

    The development of a hospital material transporter, 'Lab Rover', is described. Conventional material transport now utilizes people power, push carts, pneumatic tubes and tracked vehicles. Hospitals are faced with enormous pressure to reduce operating costs. Cyberotics, Inc. developed an Autonomous Intelligent Vehicle (AIV). This battery operated service robot was designed specifically for health care institutions. Applications for the AIV include distribution of clinical lab samples, pharmacy drugs, administrative records, x-ray distribution, meal tray delivery, and certain emergency room applications. The first AIV was installed at Lahey Clinic in Burlington, Mass. Lab Rover was beta tested for one year and has been 'on line' for an additional 2 years.

  7. Perspectives on Industrial Innovation from Agilent, HP, and Bell Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollenhorst, James

    2014-03-01

    Innovation is the life blood of technology companies. I will give perspectives gleaned from a career in research and development at Bell Labs, HP Labs, and Agilent Labs, from the point of view of an individual contributor and a manager. Physicists bring a unique set of skills to the corporate environment, including a desire to understand the fundamentals, a solid foundation in physical principles, expertise in applied mathematics, and most importantly, an attitude: namely, that hard problems can be solved by breaking them into manageable pieces. In my experience, hiring managers in industry seldom explicitly search for physicists, but they want people with those skills.

  8. Di-hadron production at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Anefalos Pereira, Sergio; et. al.,

    2014-10-01

    Semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) has been used extensively in recent years as an important testing ground for QCD. Studies so far have concentrated on better determination of parton distribution functions, distinguishing between the quark and antiquark contributions, and understanding the fragmentation of quarks into hadrons. Hadron pair (di-hadron) SIDIS provides information on the nucleon structure and hadronization dynamics that complement single hadron SIDIS. Di-hadrons allow the study of low- and high-twist distribution functions and Dihadron Fragmentation Functions (DiFF). Together with the twist-2 PDFs ( f1, g1, h1), the Higher Twist (HT) e and hL functions are very interesting because they offer insights into the physics of the largely unexplored quark-gluon correlations, which provide access into the dynamics inside hadrons. The CLAS spectrometer, installed in Hall-B at Jefferson Lab, has collected data using the CEBAF 6 GeV longitudinally polarized electron beam on longitudinally polarized solid NH3 targets. Preliminary results on di-hadron beam-, target- and double-spin asymmetries will be presented.

  9. BOREAS TE-1 SSA Soil Lab Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Nerbas, Tim; Anderson, Darwin

    2000-01-01

    This data set was collected by TE-1 to provide a set of soil properties for BOREAS investigators in the SSA. The soil samples were collected at sets of soil pits in 1993 and 1994. Each set of soil pits was in the vicinity of one of the five flux towers in the BOREAS SSA. The collected soil samples were sent to a lab, where the major soil properties were determined. These properties include, but are not limited to, soil horizon; dry soil color; pH; bulk density; total, organic, and inorganic carbon; electric conductivity; cation exchange capacity; exchangeable sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and hydrogen; water content at 0.01, 0.033, and 1.5 MPascals; nitrogen; phosphorus; particle size distribution; texture; pH of the mineral soil and of the organic soil; extractable acid; and sulfur. The data are stored in tabular ASCII text files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  10. Jefferson Lab: New opportunities in hadronic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Patrizia

    2014-11-01

    Jefferson Lab (JLab) is a fundamental research laboratory located in Newport News (Virginia-USA) whose primary mission is to explore the fundamental nature of confined states of quarks and gluons. It consists of a high-intensity electron accelerator based on continuous wave superconducting radio frequency technology and a sophisticated array of particle detectors. The design features and excellent performance of the accelerator made it possible to plan an upgrade in energy from 6 to 12 GeV without substantially altering the construction scheme of the accelerator. The program includes the construction of major new experimental facilities for the existing three Halls, A, B, C and the construction of the new experimental Hall D. The research program that motivated the upgrade in energy includes: the study of the nucleon "tomography" through the study of generalized parton distribution functions (GPDs) and transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs), the study of exotics and hybrid mesons to explore the nature of the quarks confinement, precision test of the Standard Model through parity-violating electron scattering experiments. Major highlights of the program at 6 GeV will be presented as well as an overview of the 12 GeV physics program.

  11. Jefferson Lab: New opportunities in hadronic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Patrizia

    2014-11-11

    Jefferson Lab (JLab) is a fundamental research laboratory located in Newport News (Virginia-USA) whose primary mission is to explore the fundamental nature of confined states of quarks and gluons. It consists of a high-intensity electron accelerator based on continuous wave superconducting radio frequency technology and a sophisticated array of particle detectors. The design features and excellent performance of the accelerator made it possible to plan an upgrade in energy from 6 to 12 GeV without substantially altering the construction scheme of the accelerator. The program includes the construction of major new experimental facilities for the existing three Halls, A, B, C and the construction of the new experimental Hall D. The research program that motivated the upgrade in energy includes: the study of the nucleon 'tomography' through the study of generalized parton distribution functions (GPDs) and transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs), the study of exotics and hybrid mesons to explore the nature of the quarks confinement, precision test of the Standard Model through parity-violating electron scattering experiments. Major highlights of the program at 6 GeV will be presented as well as an overview of the 12 GeV physics program.

  12. Beamline Insertions Manager at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Michael C.

    2015-09-01

    The beam viewer system at Jefferson Lab provides operators and beam physicists with qualitative and quantitative information on the transverse electron beam properties. There are over 140 beam viewers installed on the 12 GeV CEBAF accelerator. This paper describes an upgrade consisting of replacing the EPICS-based system tasked with managing all viewers with a mixed system utilizing EPICS and high-level software. Most devices, particularly the beam viewers, cannot be safely inserted into the beam line during high-current beam operations. Software is partly responsible for protecting the machine from untimely insertions. The multiplicity of beam-blocking and beam-vulnerable devices motivates us to try a data-driven approach. The beamline insertions application components are centrally managed and configured through an object-oriented software framework created for this purpose. A rules-based engine tracks the configuration and status of every device, along with the beam status of the machine segment containing the device. The application uses this information to decide on which device actions are allowed at any given time.

  13. Distributed Energy Communications & Controls, Lab Activities - Synopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Rizy, D Tom

    2010-01-01

    Electric power distribution systems are experiencing outages due to a phenomenon known as fault induced delayed voltage recovery (FIDVR) due to air conditioning (A/C) compressor motor stall. Local voltage collapse from FIDVR is occurring in part because modern air-conditioner and heat pump compressor motors are much more susceptible to stalling during a voltage sag or dip than older motors. These motors can stall in less than three cycles (0.05 s) when a fault, for example, on the sub-transmission system, causes voltage on the distribution system to sag to 70% or less of nominal. We completed a new test system for A/C compressor motor stall testing at the DECC Lab. The A/C Stall test system is being used to characterize when and how compressor motors stall under low voltage and high compressor pressure conditions. However, instead of using air conditioners, we are using high efficiency heat pumps. We have gathered A/C stall characterization data for both sustained and momentary voltage sags of the test heat pump. At low enough voltage, the heat pump stalls (compressor motor stops and draws 5-6 times normal current in trying to restart) due to low inertia and low torque of the motor. For the momentary sag, we are using a fast acting contactor/switch to quickly switch from nominal to the sagged voltage in cycles.

  14. In-lab three-dimensional printing

    PubMed Central

    Partridge, Roland; Conlisk, Noel; Davies, Jamie A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of the microscope in 1590 by Zacharias Janssenby and Hans Lippershey gave the world a new way of visualizing details of morphogenesis and development. More recent improvements in this technology including confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical projection tomography (OPT) have enhanced the quality of the resultant image. These technologies also allow a representation to be made of a developing tissue’s three-dimensional (3-D) form. With all these techniques however, the image is delivered on a flat two-dimensional (2-D) screen. 3-D printing represents an exciting potential to reproduce the image not simply on a flat screen, but in a physical, palpable three-dimensional structure. Here we explore the scope that this holds for exploring and interacting with the structure of a developing organ in an entirely novel way. As well as being useful for visualization, 3-D printers are capable of rapidly and cost-effectively producing custom-made structures for use within the laboratory. We here describe the advantages of producing hardware for a tissue culture system using an inexpensive in-lab printer. PMID:22652907

  15. The Harvard Pigeon Lab under Herrnstein.

    PubMed Central

    Baum, William M

    2002-01-01

    The history of the Harvard Pigeon Lab is a history of two periods of remarkable productivity, the first under Skinner's leadership and the second under Herrnstein's. In each period, graduate students flocked to the leader and then began stimulating one another. Chance favored Herrnstein's leadership, too, because an unusually large number of graduate students were admitted in the fall of 1962. In each period, productivity declined as the leader lost interest in the laboratory and withdrew. Directly and indirectly, the laboratory finally died as a result of the cognitive "revolution." Skinner and his students saw the possibility of a natural science of behavior and set about establishing that science based on concepts such as response rate, stimulus control, and schedules of reinforcement. Herrnstein and his students saw that the science could be quantitative and set about making it so, with relative response rate, the matching law, and the psychophysics of choice (analogous to S. S. Stevens' psychophysics). The history might provide a golden research opportunity for someone interested in the impact of such self-organizing research groups on the progress of science. PMID:12083686

  16. National Labs and Nuclear Emergency Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budil, Kimberly

    2015-04-01

    The DOE national laboratories, and in particular the three NNSA national security laboratories, have long supported a broad suite of national nuclear security missions for the U.S. government. The capabilities, infrastructure and base of expertise developed to support the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile have been applied to such challenges as stemming nuclear proliferation, understanding the nuclear capabilities of adversaries, and assessing and countering nuclear threats including essential support to nuclear emergency response. This talk will discuss the programs that are underway at the laboratories and the essential role that science and technology plays therein. Nuclear scientists provide expertise, fundamental understanding of nuclear materials, processes and signatures, and tools and technologies to aid in the identification and mitigation of nuclear threats as well as consequence management. This talk will also discuss the importance of direct engagement with the response community, which helps to shape research priorities and to enable development of useful tools and techniques for responders working in the field. National Labs and Nuclear Emergency Response.

  17. The effect of lab sequence in science instruction: The consequences of shifting labs to the beginning of learning units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Thomas R.

    This study examined the relationship between activity sequence and student outcomes in science instruction. Traditionally sequenced teacher learning units with lab activities late in activity sequence were compared to learning units with labs first in their activity sequence. A mixed-methods, quasi-experimental approach was used to test the effectiveness of a lab-first lesson approach suggested by the literature. Quantitative methods were used to assess content achievement; and qualitative methods were used to assess perception. No statistically significant difference was found between the approaches, although the researcher interpreted the results as suggesting some learning advantage for a lab-first approach. Although the teacher thought lab-first appeared to enhance learning, and students seemed to notice no difference during instruction, students preferred and thought they learned best with a lab-last approach. The teacher's view of the lab-first approach was positive; and he is inclined to continue to use it in his practice following the study.

  18. Towards Bringing EEG Research and Diagnostics out of the Lab.

    PubMed

    Bitsch, Jó Ágila; Ramos, Roann; Severijns, Cassandra; Wehrle, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Bringing brain research tools like EEG devices out of the lab into the pockets of practitioners and researchers may fundamentally change the way we perform diagnostics and research. While most of the current techniques are limited to research clinics and require excessive set-up, new consumer EEG devices connected to standard, off-the-shelf mobile devices allow us to lift these limitations. This allows neuropsychological assessment and research in mobile settings, possibly even in remote areas with limited accessibility and infrastructure, thus bringing the equipment to the patient, instead of bringing the patient to the equipment. We are developing an Android based mobile framework to perform EEG studies. By connecting a mobile consumer EEG headset directly to an unmodified mobile device, presenting auditory and visual stimuli, as well as user interaction, we create a self-contained experimental platform. We complement this platform by a toolkit for immediate evaluation of the recorded data directly on the device, even without Internet connectivity. Initial results from the replication of two Event Related Potentials studies indicate the feasibility of the approach. PMID:25980867

  19. Towards a Computable Data Corpus of Temporal Correlations between Drug Administration and Lab Value Changes

    PubMed Central

    Newe, Axel; Wimmer, Stefan; Neubert, Antje; Becker, Linda; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Ganslandt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background The analysis of electronic health records for an automated detection of adverse drug reactions is an approach to solve the problems that arise from traditional methods like spontaneous reporting or manual chart review. Algorithms addressing this task should be modeled on the criteria for a standardized case causality assessment defined by the World Health Organization. One of these criteria is the temporal relationship between drug intake and the occurrence of a reaction or a laboratory test abnormality. Appropriate data that would allow for developing or validating related algorithms is not publicly available, though. Methods In order to provide such data, retrospective routine data of drug administrations and temporally corresponding laboratory observations from a university clinic were extracted, transformed and evaluated by experts in terms of a reasonable time relationship between drug administration and lab value alteration. Result The result is a data corpus of 400 episodes of normalized laboratory parameter values in temporal context with drug administrations. Each episode has been manually classified whether it contains data that might indicate a temporal correlation between the drug administration and the change of the lab value course, whether such a change is not observable or whether a decision between those two options is not possible due to the data. In addition, each episode has been assigned a concordance value which indicates how difficult it is to assess. This is the first open data corpus of a computable ground truth of temporal correlations between drug administration and lab value alterations. Discussion The main purpose of this data corpus is the provision of data for further research and the provision of a ground truth which allows for comparing the outcome of other assessments of this data with the outcome of assessments made by human experts. It can serve as a contribution towards systematic, computerized ADR detection in

  20. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-047). March 2005. AREA OF MAGNET REMOVAL, NORTHEAST QUADRANT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  1. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. WALL AND WINDOW OVERLOOKING MAGNET ROOM, SECOND STORY OFFICE-AND-SHOPS SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  2. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. SIDE OF MAGNET OF BEAMLINE EXITING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  3. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. END OF BEAMLINE LEAVING SHIELDING, MAGNET COILS IN EPOXY, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  4. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. FLOOR AND CEILING OF MAGNET ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  5. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. BEVATRON IN CENTER OF MAGNET ROOM - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  6. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. MAGNET OF BEAMLINE, EXITING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  7. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-158). March 2005. CONNECTION OF MAGNET ROOM CRANE TO OUTER TRACK, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  8. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. ENTRANCE TO STAIRWAY TO TUNNEL UNDER MAIN FLOOR OF MAGNET ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  9. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-006). March 2005. JACKBOLTS BETWEEN MAGNET AND MAGNET FOUNDATION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  10. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-015). March 2005. INTERIOR WALL OF MAGNET INSIDE CENTER OF BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  11. BASEMENT, A view looking west in Room 8 at lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BASEMENT, A view looking west in Room 8 at lab counters and various machines - Department of Energy, Mound Facility, Hydrolysis House Building (HH Building), One Mound Road, Miamisburg, Montgomery County, OH

  12. Berkeley Lab: A Place of Wonder, Spring 2006

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-01

    Video produced in early 2006. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab has been a leader in science and engineering research for more than 75 years. The Lab conducts a wide range of scientific research with key efforts in fundamental studies of the universe, quantitative biology, nanoscience, new energy systems and environmental solutions, and the use of computing as a tool for discovery. Located on a 200 acre site in the hills above the University of California's Berkeley campus, adjacent to the San Francisco Bay, Berkeley Lab holds the distinction of being the oldest of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Laboratories. Eleven Nobel laureates are associated with Berkeley Lab. It is managed by the University of California.

  13. Ames Lab 101: Danny Shechtman Returns to the Ames Laboratory

    ScienceCinema

    Shechtman, Danny

    2013-03-01

    Danny Shechtman, Ames Laboratory Scientist and winner of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2011, returned to the Ames Lab on February 14, 2012. During this time, the Nobel Laureate met with the press as well as ISU students.

  14. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Hazards in a Photography Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houk, Cliff; Hart, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Described are case studies illustrating chemical hazards in a photography lab due to compounds containing cyanide. Suggestions for preventing problems including proper procedures, housekeeping, facilities, and ventilation are considered. (RH)

  15. Effects of reducing scaffolding in an undergraduate electronics lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halstead, Evan

    2016-07-01

    Design and scientific investigation are recognized as key components of undergraduate physics laboratory curricula. In light of this, many successful lab programs have been developed to train students to develop these abilities, and students in these programs have been shown to exhibit a higher transfer rate of scientific abilities to new situations. This paper describes data from students in an electronics class for physics majors, in which steps were removed from traditional "cookbook" lab guides in order to give students the opportunity to design circuits. Post-lab quizzes were given to investigate how this later affected the students' ability to determine the function of circuits they hadn't seen before. Results are compared with post-lab quiz results from students who were given complete explicit procedures, and no statistically significant difference between the two groups is found. Possible explanations for the null effect and recommended future research directions are provided.

  16. 22. BUILDING 1006, BACTERIOLOGY LAB LOCATED ON FIRST FLOOR EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. BUILDING 1006, BACTERIOLOGY LAB LOCATED ON FIRST FLOOR EAST OF THE MORGUE. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 27, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  17. 4. INTERIOR VIEW OF CHEMISTRY LAB LOOKING SOUTHEAST; NOTE FUME ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. INTERIOR VIEW OF CHEMISTRY LAB LOOKING SOUTHEAST; NOTE FUME EXHAUST HOOD AT LEFT & ORIGINAL CEILING FIXTURE - Fort McCoy, Building No. T-1033, North side of South Tenth Avenue, Block 10, Sparta, Monroe County, WI

  18. VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, OF CHEMISTRY LAB, LOCATED ON MEZZANINE ABOVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, OF CHEMISTRY LAB, LOCATED ON MEZZANINE ABOVE AND EAST OF FLOTATION CELLS. MAIN USE WAS SAMPLE ANALYSIS TO DETERMINE OPTIMUM REAGENT MIXES AND QUANTITIES. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  19. Blowing Bubbles: An Interdisciplinary Science and Mathematics Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallings, Lynn; Wimpey, Kim

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a bubble activity to teach about the nature of molecules, surface tension, light waves, and color. Explains how to make the bubble solution and includes a lab worksheet with answers to the questions. (YDS)

  20. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. STUB OF BEAMLINE EXITING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  1. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. ROOF BLOCKS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  2. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. STAIRWAY FROM MAIN FLOOR OF 51A TO SECOND FLOOR EXTERIOR EXIT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  3. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-066). March 2005. LOCAL INJECTOR, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  4. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. PUMP MOUNTS, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  5. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. GENERATOR MOTORS OPPOSITE SWITCHGEAR RACKS, MECHANIC SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  6. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-108). March 2005. FAN ROOM WITH STAIR TO FILTER BANKS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  7. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-143). March 2005. BUILDING 51A, EXTERIOR WALL, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  8. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-005). March 2005. PASSAGEWAY UNDER SOUTHEAST QUADRANT, AIR DUCT OPENINGS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  9. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. GENERATOR ROOM, MECHANICAL SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  10. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-107). March 2005. NORTH FAN, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  11. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. REMNANTS OF HYDRAULIC FIXTURES, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  12. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-082). June 2005. CEILING AND CRANE OF BUILDING 51A, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  13. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. SWITCHGEAR, MECHANICAL SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  14. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. SWITCHGEAR AND POWER GENERATOR MOTORS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  15. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-106). March 2005. SOUTH FAN, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  16. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. CENTRAL SUPPORT COLUMN EXTENDING THROUGH CRANES AND ROOF SUPPORT TRUSS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  17. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-052). March 2005. LOCAL INJECTOR, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  18. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. STAIRWAY FROM MAIN FLOOR TO SECOND FLOOR OF MECHANICAL WINE, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  19. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. SWITCHGEAR AND POWER GENERATOR MOTORS, MECHANICAL SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  20. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-087). March 2005. GENERATOR PIT AREA, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  1. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-110). March 2005. SOUTH FAN FROM MEZZANINE, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  2. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. CABLE RACEWAYS, CATWALK, AND WINDOWS OF OFFICE-AND-SHOPS SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  3. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-054). March 2005. LOCAL INJECTOR ENTERING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  4. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-004). March 2005. ENTRY TO IGLOO, ILLUSTRATING THICKNESS OF IGLOO WALL, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  5. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-077). March 2005. STUB OF SUPERHILAC BEAM, ENTERING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  6. NASA Glenn Propulsion Systems Lab (PSL) Icing Facility Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    This oral presentation is an update to the Propulsion Systems Lab (PSL) engine ice testing. It provides a summary of the modifications done to the facility and recently completed calibrations and test program.

  7. Looking northwest, first floor, South Wing, Paleontology Lab. The quarry ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking northwest, first floor, South Wing, Paleontology Lab. The quarry wall can be seen through the window - Quarry Visitor Center, U.S. Highway 40, 8 miles north of Jensen, Jensen, Uintah County, UT

  8. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection XBD200503-00117-089). March 2005. GENERATOR PIT AREA, CONCRETE FOUNDATION FOR EQUIPMENT MOUNTS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  9. Improving physician practice efficiency by learning lab test ordering pattern.

    PubMed

    Cai, Peng; Cao, Feng; Ni, Yuan; Shen, Weijia; Zheng, Tao

    2013-01-01

    The system of electronic medical records (EMR) has been widely used in physician practice. In China, physicians have the time pressure to provide care to many patients in a short period. Improving practice efficiency is a promising direction to mitigate this predicament. During the encounter, ordering lab test is one of the most frequent actions in EMR system. In this paper, our motivation is to save physician's time by providing lab test ordering list to facilitate physician practice. To this end, we developed weight based multi-label classification framework to learn to order lab test for the current encounter according to the historical EMR. Particularly, we propose to learn the physician-specific lab test ordering pattern as different physicians may have different practice behavior on the same population. Experimental results on the real data set demonstrate that physician-specific models can outperform the baseline. PMID:23920762

  10. Ames Lab 101: Danny Shechtman Returns to the Ames Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Shechtman, Danny

    2012-01-01

    Danny Shechtman, Ames Laboratory Scientist and winner of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2011, returned to the Ames Lab on February 14, 2012. During this time, the Nobel Laureate met with the press as well as ISU students.

  11. Looking North into Lab Metallurgy Testing Area and Enrichment Motor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking North into Lab Metallurgy Testing Area and Enrichment Motor within Recycle Recovery Building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Recycle Recovery Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  12. Interview With Stuart Lee, Lead Scientist, Cardiovascular Lab

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Josh Byerly talks with Stuart Lee, one of the lead scientists for the Cardiovascular Lab at the Johnson Space Center where scientists are studying the effects of long-du...

  13. After the Lab: Learning Begins when Cleanup Starts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gooding, Julia; Metz, Bill

    2011-01-01

    Having students design their own methods regarding data collection during a lab may help them formulate appropriate investigative procedures. The authors use a modified gallery walk to develop science skills. (Contains 3 figures.)

  14. Lab Creates 'Fake Vomit' To Test Space Trash Bag

    NASA Video Gallery

    After answering the question of how the space potty works, astronaut Mike Massimino now visits a NASA lab where chemists have been working hard to develop a next-generation trash bag for future exp...

  15. 13. BUILDING NO. 445, PHYSICS LAB (FORMERLY GUN BAG LOADING), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. BUILDING NO. 445, PHYSICS LAB (FORMERLY GUN BAG LOADING), VIEW NORTH AT SOUTH END OF BUILDING. - Picatinny Arsenal, 400 Area, Gun Bag Loading District, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  16. Ion engine neutralizer erosion in lab and space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuharski, R. A.; Mandell, M. J.; Gardner, B. M.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present calculations of neutralizer erosion due to both of these sources, including the difference between lab and space environments, and compare the results with laboratory test data.

  17. Development of Unified Lab Test Result Master for Multiple Facilities.

    PubMed

    Kume, Naoto; Suzuki, Kenji; Kobayashi, Shinji; Araki, Kenji; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    A clinical study requires massive amounts of of lab test data, especially for rare diseases. Before creating a protocol, the hypothesis if the protocol will work with enough amount of patients' dataset has to be proved. However, a single facility, such as a university hospital, often faces a lack of number of patients for specific target diseases. Even if collecting datasets from several facilities, there is no active master table that can merge lab test results between the facility datasets. Therefore, the authors develop a unified lab test result master. Because test master standards such as JLAC10 and LOINC are provided from a viewpoint of academic classification of laboratory medicine, the classification does not fit clinical classification, which doctors understand with a mind-set of establishing a clinical study protocol. The authors establish a method to unify masters using an active lab test result master from two university hospitals. PMID:26262349

  18. 4. VIEW SOUTHWEST COMPONENTS TEST LAB TEST BAY DETAIL SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW SOUTHWEST COMPONENTS TEST LAB TEST BAY DETAIL SHOWING EMERGENCY SHOWER, AND EYEWASH, AND OBSERVATION WINDOW. STORAGE TANKS ON ROOF. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Components Test Laboratory, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  19. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-043). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT, PLUNGING MECHANISM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  20. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-027). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  1. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-026). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT, LOOKING TOWARD EAST TANGENT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  2. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-012). March 2005. PASSAGEWAY UNDER QUADRANT AND DIFFUSION PUMPS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  3. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-050). March 2005. DIFFUSION PUMPS UNDER WEST TANGENT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  4. 21. NBS SUIT LAB. THREE GLOVES, HELMET, AND SCREW DRIVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. NBS SUIT LAB. THREE GLOVES, HELMET, AND SCREW DRIVER TORQUE WRENCH FOR ASSEMBLY AND REPAIR OF BOTH. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  5. 1. View of EPA Farm Lab Building 1506, facing south ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View of EPA Farm Lab Building 15-06, facing south - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Laboratory Building, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  6. 7. View of interior, EPA Farm Lab Building 1506 milk ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View of interior, EPA Farm Lab Building 15-06 milk room, facing west - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Laboratory Building, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  7. 6. View of interior, EPA Farm Lab Building 1506 milking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View of interior, EPA Farm Lab Building 15-06 milking area, facing northwest - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Laboratory Building, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  8. LabTalk/2: a middleware approach to HIS integration.

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, A. M.; Giuse, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    LabTalk/2 is an intelligent interface between a legacy order-entry system and a legacy laboratory information system. Unlike other interfaces, LabTalk/2 does more than just transform data from one format to another; it transforms the manner in which data is processed. Utilizing the "middleware" concept, it sits independently between the two systems, decoupling their maintenance needs. Implementation has been successful. PMID:8563250

  9. VIEW OF THIRD LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB (SECOND FLOOR OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THIRD LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB (SECOND FLOOR OF BUILDING) SHOWING MISSILE TUBE IN CENTER WITH OPEN HATCH AT RIGHT. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. Commerce Lab: Mission analysis and payload integration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The needs of an aggressive commercial microgravity program are identified, space missions are defined, and infrastructural issues are identified and analyzed. A commercial laboratory, commerce lab, is conceived to be one or more an array of carriers which would fly aboard the space shuttle and accommodate microgravity science experiment payloads. Commerce lab is seen as a logical transition between currently planned space shuttle missions and future microgravity missions centered around the space station.

  11. LabNet: Toward a community of practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruopp, Richard

    1993-03-01

    It is common currency that science education in America isn't working well enough. We are failing to excite the curiosity of young minds in the great questions of the physical universe. LabNet—a prototype teacher-support project developed by TERC, and funded by the National Science Foundation, is dedicated to addressing this issue. The first three year phase of LabNet began in January 1989 and ended in mid-1992. During that time, some 562 high school teachers of physics in 37 states were involved. Three interconnected threads are woven through the fabric of LabNet. The first, and most vivid, is the use of projects to enhance students' science learning. LabNet's second thread is building a community of practice among LabNet teachers. The third thread woven into LabNet is promoting the use of new technologies in science teaching and learning. The most notable use of new technology in the LabNet project is telecommunications—computer-to-computer communication via telephone lines. A dedicated network has been created and made available to all participants. As the first national network designed for high school teachers of physical science, the LabNetwork is a dynamic medium for building and sustaining a community of practice for physics teachers separated by many thousands of miles. In recommendations directed at teachers, scientists, and particularly the National Science Foundation, steps are outlined that can be taken to strengthen the community and the teaching of science in both the secondary and elementary grades.

  12. Human Engineering Modeling and Performance Lab Study Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J.

    2014-01-01

    The HEMAP (Human Engineering Modeling and Performance) Lab is a joint effort between the Industrial and Human Engineering group and the KAVE (Kennedy Advanced Visualiations Environment) group. The lab consists of sixteen camera system that is used to capture human motions and operational tasks, through te use of a Velcro suit equipped with sensors, and then simulate these tasks in an ergonomic software package know as Jac, The Jack software is able to identify the potential risk hazards.

  13. Production of Resonances Using CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Kei

    2015-07-01

    Measurements of hadronic resonances produced in photoproduction reactions at Jefferson Lab are shown and discussed. Emphasis is placed on the production of the excited hyperon states Sigma(1385), Lambda(1405), and Lambda(1520). Some future prospects for the upcoming Jefferson Lab 12 GeV era are given, where the CLAS12 and GlueX detectors will see unprecedented amounts of data using electromagnetic probes and further our knowledge of hadronic resonances.

  14. The analysis of image acquisition in LabVIEW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wuni; Zhong, Lanxiang

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, four methods of image acquisition in LabVIEW were described, and its realization principles and the procedures in combination with different hardware architectures were illustrated in the virtual instrument laboratory. Experiment results show that the methods of image acquisition in LabVIEW have many advantages such as easier configuration, lower complexity and stronger practicability than in VB and C++. Thus the methods are fitter to set the foundation for image processing, machine vision, pattern recognition research.

  15. Proton Form Factor Measurements at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi

    2004-09-27

    In two experiments at Jefferson Lab in Hall A, the first one in 1998 and the second in 2000, the ratio of the electromagnetic form factors of the proton was obtained by measuring P{sub t} and P{sub ell}, the transverse and longitudinal recoil proton polarization components, respectively, in {rvec e}p {yields} e{rvec p}; the ratio G{sub E{sub p}}/G{sub M{sub p}} is proportional to P{sub t}/P{sub {ell}}. Simultaneous measurement of P{sub t} and P{sub {ell}} provides good control of the systematic uncertainty. The first measurement of G{sub E{sub p}}/G{sub M{sub p}} ratio was made to Q{sup 2} = 3.5 GeV{sup 2} and the second measurement to Q{sup 2} = 5.6 GeV{sup 2}. The results from these two experiments indicate that the ratio scales like 1/Q{sup 2}, in stark contrast with cross section data analyzed by the Rosenbluth separation method which gives a constant value for this ratio. The incompatibility of the recoil polarization results with most of the Rosenbluth separation results appears now well established above Q{sup 2} of about 3 GeV{sup 2}. The consensus at the present time is that the interference of the two-photon exchange with the Born term, which had been deemed negligible until recently, might explain the discrepancy between the results of the two techniques; the possibility that the discrepancy is due to incomplete radiative correction has also been recently discussed.

  16. Performance and Architecture Lab Modeling Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-19

    Analytical application performance models are critical for diagnosing performance-limiting resources, optimizing systems, and designing machines. Creating models, however, is difficult. Furthermore, models are frequently expressed in forms that are hard to distribute and validate. The Performance and Architecture Lab Modeling tool, or Palm, is a modeling tool designed to make application modeling easier. Palm provides a source code modeling annotation language. Not only does the modeling language divide the modeling task into sub problems, it formally links an application's source code with its model. This link is important because a model's purpose is to capture application behavior. Furthermore, this link makes it possible to define rules for generating models according to source code organization. Palm generates hierarchical models according to well-defined rules. Given an application, a set of annotations, and a representative execution environment, Palm will generate the same model. A generated model is a an executable program whose constituent parts directly correspond to the modeled application. Palm generates models by combining top-down (human-provided) semantic insight with bottom-up static and dynamic analysis. A model's hierarchy is defined by static and dynamic source code structure. Because Palm coordinates models and source code, Palm's models are 'first-class' and reproducible. Palm automates common modeling tasks. For instance, Palm incorporates measurements to focus attention, represent constant behavior, and validate models. Palm's workflow is as follows. The workflow's input is source code annotated with Palm modeling annotations. The most important annotation models an instance of a block of code. Given annotated source code, the Palm Compiler produces executables and the Palm Monitor collects a representative performance profile. The Palm Generator synthesizes a model based on the static and dynamic mapping of annotations to program behavior

  17. More Soil Delivered to Phoenix Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image, taken by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager, documents the delivery of a soil sample from the 'Snow White' trench to the Wet Chemistry Laboratory. A small pile of soil is visible on the lower edge of the second cell from the top.This deck-mounted lab is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA).

    The delivery was made on Sept. 12, 2008, which was Sol 107 (the 107th Martian day) of the mission, which landed on May 25, 2008.

    The Wet Chemistry Laboratory mixes Martian soil with an aqueous solution from Earth as part of a process to identify soluble nutrients and other chemicals in the soil. Preliminary analysis of this soil confirms that it is alkaline, and composed of salts and other chemicals such as perchlorate, sodium, magnesium, chloride and potassium. This data validates prior results from that same location, said JPL's Michael Hecht, the lead scientist for MECA.

    In the coming days, the Phoenix team will also fill the final four of eight single-use ovens on another soil-analysis instrument, the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer, or TEGA. The team's strategy is to deliver as many samples as possible before the power produced by Phoenix's solar panels declines due to the end of the Martian summer.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  18. Petabyte Class Storage at Jefferson Lab (CEBAF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Rita; Davis, Mark

    1996-01-01

    By 1997, the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility will collect over one Terabyte of raw information per day of Accelerator operation from three concurrently operating Experimental Halls. When post-processing is included, roughly 250 TB of raw and formatted experimental data will be generated each year. By the year 2000, a total of one Petabyte will be stored on-line. Critical to the experimental program at Jefferson Lab (JLab) is the networking and computational capability to collect, store, retrieve, and reconstruct data on this scale. The design criteria include support of a raw data stream of 10-12 MB/second from Experimental Hall B, which will operate the CEBAF (Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility) Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). Keeping up with this data stream implies design strategies that provide storage guarantees during accelerator operation, minimize the number of times data is buffered allow seamless access to specific data sets for the researcher, synchronize data retrievals with the scheduling of postprocessing calculations on the data reconstruction CPU farms, as well as support the site capability to perform data reconstruction and reduction at the same overall rate at which new data is being collected. The current implementation employs state-of-the-art StorageTek Redwood tape drives and robotics library integrated with the Open Storage Manager (OSM) Hierarchical Storage Management software (Computer Associates, International), the use of Fibre Channel RAID disks dual-ported between Sun Microsystems SMP servers, and a network-based interface to a 10,000 SPECint92 data processing CPU farm. Issues of efficiency, scalability, and manageability will become critical to meet the year 2000 requirements for a Petabyte of near-line storage interfaced to over 30,000 SPECint92 of data processing power.

  19. Performance and Architecture Lab Modeling Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-06-19

    Analytical application performance models are critical for diagnosing performance-limiting resources, optimizing systems, and designing machines. Creating models, however, is difficult. Furthermore, models are frequently expressed in forms that are hard to distribute and validate. The Performance and Architecture Lab Modeling tool, or Palm, is a modeling tool designed to make application modeling easier. Palm provides a source code modeling annotation language. Not only does the modeling language divide the modeling task into sub problems, itmore » formally links an application's source code with its model. This link is important because a model's purpose is to capture application behavior. Furthermore, this link makes it possible to define rules for generating models according to source code organization. Palm generates hierarchical models according to well-defined rules. Given an application, a set of annotations, and a representative execution environment, Palm will generate the same model. A generated model is a an executable program whose constituent parts directly correspond to the modeled application. Palm generates models by combining top-down (human-provided) semantic insight with bottom-up static and dynamic analysis. A model's hierarchy is defined by static and dynamic source code structure. Because Palm coordinates models and source code, Palm's models are 'first-class' and reproducible. Palm automates common modeling tasks. For instance, Palm incorporates measurements to focus attention, represent constant behavior, and validate models. Palm's workflow is as follows. The workflow's input is source code annotated with Palm modeling annotations. The most important annotation models an instance of a block of code. Given annotated source code, the Palm Compiler produces executables and the Palm Monitor collects a representative performance profile. The Palm Generator synthesizes a model based on the static and dynamic mapping of annotations to program

  20. Link Analysis in the Mission Planning Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarthy, Jessica A.; Cervantes, Benjamin W.; Daugherty, Sarah C.; Arroyo, Felipe; Mago, Divyang

    2011-01-01

    The legacy communications link analysis software currently used at Wallops Flight Facility involves processes that are different for command destruct, radar, and telemetry. There is a clear advantage to developing an easy-to-use tool that combines all the processes in one application. Link Analysis in the Mission Planning Lab (MPL) uses custom software and algorithms integrated with Analytical Graphics Inc. Satellite Toolkit (AGI STK). The MPL link analysis tool uses pre/post-mission data to conduct a dynamic link analysis between ground assets and the launch vehicle. Just as the legacy methods do, the MPL link analysis tool calculates signal strength and signal- to-noise according to the accepted processes for command destruct, radar, and telemetry assets. Graphs and other custom data are generated rapidly in formats for reports and presentations. STK is used for analysis as well as to depict plume angles and antenna gain patterns in 3D. The MPL has developed two interfaces with the STK software (see figure). The first interface is an HTML utility, which was developed in Visual Basic to enhance analysis for plume modeling and to offer a more user friendly, flexible tool. A graphical user interface (GUI) written in MATLAB (see figure upper right-hand corner) is also used to quickly depict link budget information for multiple ground assets. This new method yields a dramatic decrease in the time it takes to provide launch managers with the required link budgets to make critical pre-mission decisions. The software code used for these two custom utilities is a product of NASA's MPL.

  1. a Spectroscopy Based P-Chem Lab, Including a Detailed Text and Lab Manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muenter, John

    2015-06-01

    Rochester's second semester physical chemistry lab course is based on spectroscopy experiments and follows a full semester of quantum mechanics lectures. The laboratory course is fully separate from the traditional physical chemistry course and has its own lectures. The lab course is constructed to achieve three major goals: provide a detailed knowledge of the instrumentation that acquires data, establish a good understanding of how that data is analyzed, and give students a familiarity with spectroscopic techniques and quantum mechanical models. Instrumentation is emphasized by using common components to construct different experiments. Microwave, modulation and detection components are used for both OCS pure rotation and ESR experiments. Optical components, a monochromator, and PMT detectors are used in a HeNe laser induced fluorescence experiment on I2 {(J. Chem. Ed. 73, 576 (1996)) and a photoluminescence experiment on pyrene {(J. Chem. Ed. 73, 580 (1996)). OCS is studied in both the microwave and infrared regions, and the C=S stretching vibration is identified through microwave intensity measurements. Lecture notes and laboratory instructions are combined in an exhaustive text of more than 400 pages, containing 325 figures, 285 equations and numerous MathCad data analysis programs. This text can be downloaded as a 10 Mbyte pdf file at chem.rochester.edu/˜muenter/CHEM232Manual.

  2. The Earth is our lab: Ten years of geoscience school lab in Potsdam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaus Küppers, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Starting in 2004, a geoscientific school lab for senior high school students was developed in the historical "Großer Refraktor" premises on the Telegraphenberg in Potsdam. Based on a one-day course architecture, laboratory days were developed covering singular themes: - Magnetic field of the Earth - Geographical Information Systems and geodata - Gravity field of the Earth - Geodynamics: seismology and seismics - Geoscience math - Geodata Brandenburg (Geological mapping with aerophotographs, remote sensing, underground data processing) With a focus on geophysical methodologies, course days generally focused on the field work around the Telegraphenberg site while introducing into the art of handling original professional equipment. Field data were afterwards compiled, analysed and interpreted in the group. Single days could be combined as clusters of up to one week and were bookable for national and international groups of max. 25 students. The courses were taught by active scientists with the assistance of student guides as the larger groups had to be split up. The paper gives an overview over the development history of the school lab and explains the course contents, the teaching methods and several employed escorting measures. Possible impact on the professional career decisions of the students is discussed.

  3. Multiplex genomic walking: Integration of the wet lab and computer lab into a single prototyping environment

    SciTech Connect

    Gillevet, P.M.

    1993-12-31

    The authors are presently sequencing the entire genome of Mycoplasma capricolum, one of the smallest of free living organisms by a Multiplex Genomic Walking strategy. This technique involves the repetitive hybridization of sequencing membranes with oligonucleotide probes to acquire sequence data in discrete steps along the genome. The technique allows one to walk a genome in a directed manner eliminating the problems associated with random shotgun assembly. Furthermore, the repetitive stripping and hybridization process is relatively simple to reproduce and has the potential to be easily automated. The Genetic Data Environment (GDE), an X Windows based Graphic User Interface has allowed the seamless integration of a core multiple sequence editor with pre-existing external sequence analysis programs and internally developed programs into a single prototypic environment. This system has facilitated linkage of the 9 Harvard Genome Lab`s internal database and automated data control systems into one Graphic User Interface which can handle the archiving and analysis of both random fluorescent sequencing data and genomic walking data from the Mycoplasma project. Finally, it has facilitated the integration of the Genomic sequence data into a PROLOG database environment for the comparative analysis of Mycoplasma capricolum and other organisms.

  4. Future{at}Labs.Prosperity Game{trademark}

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, D.F.; Boyack, K.W.; Berman, M.

    1996-10-01

    Prosperity Games{trademark} are an outgrowth and adaptation of move/countermove and seminar War Games, Prosperity Games{trademark} are simulations that explore complex issues in a variety of areas including economics, politics, sociology, environment, education, and research. These issues can be examined from a variety of perspectives ranging from global, macroeconomic and geopolitical viewpoint down to the details of customer/supplier/market interactions specific industries. All Prosperity Games{trademark} are unique in that both the game format and the player contributions vary from game to game. This report documents the Future{at}Labs.Prosperity Game{trademark} conducted under the sponsorship of the Industry Advisory Boards of the national labs, the national labs, Lockheed Martin Corporation, and the University of California. Players were drawn from all stakeholders involved including government, industry, labs, and academia. The primary objectives of this game were to: (1) explore ways to optimize the role of the multidisciplinary labs in serving national missions and needs; (2) explore ways to increase collaboration and partnerships among government, laboratories, universities, and industry; and (3) create a network of partnership champions to promote findings and policy options. The deliberations and recommendations of these players provided valuable insights as to the views of this diverse group of decision makers concerning the future of the labs.

  5. Practical Clinical Training in Skills Labs: Theory and Practice.

    PubMed

    Bugaj, T J; Nikendei, C

    2016-01-01

    Today, skills laboratories or "skills labs", i.e. specific practical skill training facilities, are a firmly established part of medical education offering the possibility of training clinical procedures in a safe and fault-forging environment prior to real life application at bedside or in the operating room. Skills lab training follows a structured teaching concept, takes place under supervision and in consideration of methodological-didactic concepts, ideally creating an atmosphere that allows the repeated, anxiety- and risk-free practice of targeted skills. In this selective literature review, the first section is devoted to (I) the development and dissemination of the skills lab concept. There follows (II) an outline of the underlying idea and (III) an analysis of key efficacy factors. Thereafter, (IV) the training method's effectiveness and transference are illuminated, before (V) the use of student tutors, in the sense of peer-assisted-learning, in skills labs is discussed separately. Finally, (VI) the efficiency of the skills lab concept is analyzed, followed by an outlook on future developments and trends in the field of skills lab training. PMID:27579363

  6. A review of digital microfluidics as portable platforms for lab-on a-chip applications.

    PubMed

    Samiei, Ehsan; Tabrizian, Maryam; Hoorfar, Mina

    2016-07-01

    Following the development of microfluidic systems, there has been a high tendency towards developing lab-on-a-chip devices for biochemical applications. A great deal of effort has been devoted to improve and advance these devices with the goal of performing complete sets of biochemical assays on the device and possibly developing portable platforms for point of care applications. Among the different microfluidic systems used for such a purpose, digital microfluidics (DMF) shows high flexibility and capability of performing multiplex and parallel biochemical operations, and hence, has been considered as a suitable candidate for lab-on-a-chip applications. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances in the DMF platforms, and evaluate the feasibility of developing multifunctional packages for performing complete sets of processes of biochemical assays, particularly for point-of-care applications. The progress in the development of DMF systems is reviewed from eight different aspects, including device fabrication, basic fluidic operations, automation, manipulation of biological samples, advanced operations, detection, biological applications, and finally, packaging and portability of the DMF devices. Success in developing the lab-on-a-chip DMF devices will be concluded based on the advances achieved in each of these aspects. PMID:27272540

  7. International Space Station Internal Thermal Control System Lab Module Simulator Build-Up and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieland, Paul; Miller, Lee; Ibarra, Tom

    2003-01-01

    As part of the Sustaining Engineering program for the International Space Station (ISS), a ground simulator of the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) in the Lab Module was designed and built at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). To support prediction and troubleshooting, this facility is operationally and functionally similar to the flight system and flight-like components were used when available. Flight software algorithms, implemented using the LabVIEW(Registered Trademark) programming language, were used for monitoring performance and controlling operation. Validation testing of the low temperature loop was completed prior to activation of the Lab module in 2001. Assembly of the moderate temperature loop was completed in 2002 and validated in 2003. The facility has been used to address flight issues with the ITCS, successfully demonstrating the ability to add silver biocide and to adjust the pH of the coolant. Upon validation of the entire facility, it will be capable not only of checking procedures, but also of evaluating payload timelining, operational modifications, physical modifications, and other aspects affecting the thermal control system.

  8. Design of Inquiry-Oriented Science Labs: Impacts on Students' Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baseya, J. M.; Francis, C. D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Changes in lab style can lead to differences in learning. Two inquiry-oriented lab styles are guided inquiry (GI) and problem-based (PB). Students' attitudes towards lab are important to consider when choosing between GI and PB styles during curriculum design. Purpose: We examined the degree to which lab experiences are explained by a…

  9. An Integrated Lab-on-Chip for Rapid Identification and Simultaneous Differentiation of Tropical Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Mitsuharu; Watthanaworawit, Wanitda; Ling, Clare L.; Mauduit, Marjorie; Malleret, Benoît; Grüner, Anne-Charlotte; Tan, Rosemary; Nosten, François H.; Snounou, Georges; Rénia, Laurent; Ng, Lisa F. P.

    2014-01-01

    Tropical pathogens often cause febrile illnesses in humans and are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality. The similarities in clinical symptoms provoked by these pathogens make diagnosis difficult. Thus, early, rapid and accurate diagnosis will be crucial in patient management and in the control of these diseases. In this study, a microfluidic lab-on-chip integrating multiplex molecular amplification and DNA microarray hybridization was developed for simultaneous detection and species differentiation of 26 globally important tropical pathogens. The analytical performance of the lab-on-chip for each pathogen ranged from 102 to 103 DNA or RNA copies. Assay performance was further verified with human whole blood spiked with Plasmodium falciparum and Chikungunya virus that yielded a range of detection from 200 to 4×105 parasites, and from 250 to 4×107 PFU respectively. This lab-on-chip was subsequently assessed and evaluated using 170 retrospective patient specimens in Singapore and Thailand. The lab-on-chip had a detection sensitivity of 83.1% and a specificity of 100% for P. falciparum; a sensitivity of 91.3% and a specificity of 99.3% for P. vivax; a positive 90.0% agreement and a specificity of 100% for Chikungunya virus; and a positive 85.0% agreement and a specificity of 100% for Dengue virus serotype 3 with reference methods conducted on the samples. Results suggested the practicality of an amplification microarray-based approach in a field setting for high-throughput detection and identification of tropical pathogens. PMID:25078474

  10. An integrated lab-on-chip for rapid identification and simultaneous differentiation of tropical pathogens.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jeslin J L; Capozzoli, Monica; Sato, Mitsuharu; Watthanaworawit, Wanitda; Ling, Clare L; Mauduit, Marjorie; Malleret, Benoît; Grüner, Anne-Charlotte; Tan, Rosemary; Nosten, François H; Snounou, Georges; Rénia, Laurent; Ng, Lisa F P

    2014-01-01

    Tropical pathogens often cause febrile illnesses in humans and are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality. The similarities in clinical symptoms provoked by these pathogens make diagnosis difficult. Thus, early, rapid and accurate diagnosis will be crucial in patient management and in the control of these diseases. In this study, a microfluidic lab-on-chip integrating multiplex molecular amplification and DNA microarray hybridization was developed for simultaneous detection and species differentiation of 26 globally important tropical pathogens. The analytical performance of the lab-on-chip for each pathogen ranged from 102 to 103 DNA or RNA copies. Assay performance was further verified with human whole blood spiked with Plasmodium falciparum and Chikungunya virus that yielded a range of detection from 200 to 4×105 parasites, and from 250 to 4×107 PFU respectively. This lab-on-chip was subsequently assessed and evaluated using 170 retrospective patient specimens in Singapore and Thailand. The lab-on-chip had a detection sensitivity of 83.1% and a specificity of 100% for P. falciparum; a sensitivity of 91.3% and a specificity of 99.3% for P. vivax; a positive 90.0% agreement and a specificity of 100% for Chikungunya virus; and a positive 85.0% agreement and a specificity of 100% for Dengue virus serotype 3 with reference methods conducted on the samples. Results suggested the practicality of an amplification microarray-based approach in a field setting for high-throughput detection and identification of tropical pathogens. PMID:25078474

  11. Seeing an Old Lab in a New Light: Transforming a Traditional Optics Lab into Full Guided Inquiry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maley, Tim; Stoll, Will; Demir, Kadir

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes the authors' experiences transforming a "cookbook" lab into an inquiry-based investigation and the powerful effect the inquiry-oriented lab had on our students' understanding of lenses. We found the inquiry-oriented approach led to richer interactions between students as well as a deeper conceptual understanding of how images are formed. We observed engaged students participating in scientific discourse full of hypothesizing, modeling, and argumentation based on evidence.

  12. Hybrid Reality Lab Capabilities - Video 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Francisco J.; Noyes, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Our Hybrid Reality and Advanced Operations Lab is developing incredibly realistic and immersive systems that could be used to provide training, support engineering analysis, and augment data collection for various human performance metrics at NASA. To get a better understanding of what Hybrid Reality is, let's go through the two most commonly known types of immersive realities: Virtual Reality, and Augmented Reality. Virtual Reality creates immersive scenes that are completely made up of digital information. This technology has been used to train astronauts at NASA, used during teleoperation of remote assets (arms, rovers, robots, etc.) and other activities. One challenge with Virtual Reality is that if you are using it for real time-applications (like landing an airplane) then the information used to create the virtual scenes can be old (i.e. visualized long after physical objects moved in the scene) and not accurate enough to land the airplane safely. This is where Augmented Reality comes in. Augmented Reality takes real-time environment information (from a camera, or see through window, and places digitally created information into the scene so that it matches with the video/glass information). Augmented Reality enhances real environment information collected with a live sensor or viewport (e.g. camera, window, etc.) with the information-rich visualization provided by Virtual Reality. Hybrid Reality takes Augmented Reality even further, by creating a higher level of immersion where interactivity can take place. Hybrid Reality takes Virtual Reality objects and a trackable, physical representation of those objects, places them in the same coordinate system, and allows people to interact with both objects' representations (virtual and physical) simultaneously. After a short period of adjustment, the individuals begin to interact with all the objects in the scene as if they were real-life objects. The ability to physically touch and interact with digitally created

  13. MACMA: a Virtual Lab for Plate Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigne, C.; Combes, M.; Tisseau, C.

    2013-12-01

    MACMA (Multi-Agent Convective MAntle) is a tool developed to simulate evolutive plate tectonics and mantle convection in a 2-D cylindrical geometry (Combes et al., 2012). The model relies mainly on a force balance to compute the velocity of each plate, and on empirical rules to determine how plate boundaries move and evolve. It includes first-order features of plate tectonics: (a) all plates on Earth do not have the same size, (b) subduction zones are asymmetric, (c) plates driven by subducting slabs and upper plates do not exhibit the same velocities, and (d) plate boundaries are mobile, can collide, merge and disappear, and new plate boundaries can be created. The MACMA interface was designed to be user-friendly and a simple use of the simulator can be achieved without any prerequisite knowledge in fluid dynamics, mantle rheology, nor in numerical methods. As a preliminary study, the simulator was used by a few students from bachelor's degree to master's degree levels. An initial configuration for plate tectonics has to be created before starting a simulation: the number and types of plate boundaries (ridge, subduction, passive margins) has to be defined and seafloor ages must be given. A simple but interesting exercise consists in letting students build such an initial configuration: they must analyze a map of tectonic plates, choose a 2-D section and examine carefully a map of seafloor ages. Students mentioned that the exercise made them realize that the 3-D spherical structure of plate tectonics does not translate directly in a simple 2-D section, as opposed to what is usually shown in books. Physical parameters: e.g. mantle viscosity, number of layers to consider in the mantle (upper and lower mantle, possible asthenosphere), initial time and mantle temperature, have to be chosen, and students can use this virtual lab to see how different scenarios emerge when parameters are varied. Very importantly, the direct visualization of the mobility of plate

  14. Use of the International Space Station as an Exercise Physiology Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is now in its prime utilization phase with great opportunity to use the ISS as a lab. With respect to exercise physiology there is considerable research opportunity. Crew members exercise for up to 2 hours per day using a cycle ergometer, treadmill, and advanced resistive exercise device (ARED). There are several ongoing exercise research studies by NASA, ESA and CSA. These include studies related to evaluation of new exercise prescriptions (SPRINT), evaluation of aerobic capacity (VO2max), biomechanics (Treadmill Kinematics), energy expenditure during spaceflight (Energy), evaluation of cartilage (Cartilage), and evaluation of cardiovascular health (Vascular). Examples of how ISS is used for exercise physiology research will be presented.

  15. The College of Charleston's 400-Student Observational Lab Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    True, C. M.

    2006-06-01

    For over thirty years the College of Charleston has been teaching a year-long introductory astronomy course incorporating a mandatory 3 hour lab. Despite our location in a very light polluted, coastal, high humidity, and often cloudy metropolitan area we have emphasized observational activities as much as possible. To accommodate our population of between 300-400 students per semester, we have 28 8-inch Celestron Telescopes and 25 GPS capable 8-inch Meade LX-200 telescopes. Finally, we have a 16 DFM adjacent to our rooftop observing decks. For indoor activities we have access to 42 computers running a variety of astronomy education software. Some of the computer activities are based on the Starry Night software (Backyard and Pro), the CLEA software from Gettysburg College, and Spectrum Explorer from Boston University. Additionally, we have labs involving cratering, eclipses and phases, coordinate systems with celestial globes, the inverse square law, spectroscopy and spectral classification, as well as others. In this presentation we will discuss the difficulties in managing a program of this size. We have approximately 14 lab sections a week. The lab manager's task involves coordinating 8-10 lab instructors and the same number of undergraduate teaching assistants as well as trying to maintain a coherent experience between the labs and lecture sections. Our lab manuals are produced locally with yearly updates. Samples from the manuals will be available. This program has been developed by a large number of College of Charleston astronomy faculty, including Don Drost, Bob Dukes, Chris Fragile, Tim Giblin, Jon Hakkila, Bill Kubinec, Lee Lindner, Jim Neff, Laura Penny, Al Rainis, Terry Richardson, and D. J. Williams, as well as adjunct and visiting faculty Bill Baird, Kevin Bourque, Ethan Denault, Kwayera Davis, Francie Halter, and Alan Johnson. Part of this work has been funded by NSF DUE grants to the College of Charleston.

  16. Engineering students' experiences from physics group work in learning labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strøm Mellingsæter, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Background: This paper presents a case study from a physics course at a Norwegian university college, investigating key aspects of a group-work project, so-called learning labs, from the participating students' perspective. Purpose: In order to develop these learning labs further, the students' perspective is important. Which aspects are essential for how the students experience the learning labs, and how do these aspects relate to the emergence of occurrences termed joint workspace, i.e. the maintenance of content-related dialogues within the group? Programme description: First year mechanical engineering students attended the learning labs as a compulsory part of the physics course. The student groups were instructed to solve physics problems using the interactive whiteboard and then submit their work as whiteboard files. Sample: One group of five male students was followed during their work in these learning labs through one term. Design and methods: Data were collected as video recordings and fieldwork observation. In this paper, a focus group interview with the students was the main source of analysis. The interpretations of the interview data were compared with the video material and the fieldwork observations. Results: The results show that the students' overall experience with the learning labs was positive. They did, however, point to internal aspects of conflicting common and personal goals, which led to a group-work dynamics that seemed to inhibit elaborate discussions and collaboration. The students also pointed to external aspects, such as a close temporal proximity between lectures and exercises, which also seemed to inhibit occurrences termed joint workspace. Conclusions: In order to increase the likelihood of a joint workspace throughout the term in the learning labs, careful considerations have to be made with regard to timing between lectures and exercises, but also with regard to raising the students' awareness about shared and personal goals.

  17. "Is It the Real Thing?" Cola Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Neva; McGraw, Dana

    1988-01-01

    Introduces an interdisciplinary activity using a cola drink. Describes the lesson plan, including objectives, procedures, evaluation, projects, and conclusions. Provides two laboratory sheets containing problem, hypothesis, materials, procedure, observations, and conclusions, vocabulary table, and data table. (YP)

  18. Coordinating a Lecture & Lab Course Using PSI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapp, John

    1975-01-01

    Describes self-paced freshmen courses in electronics using study guides with questions answerable entirely from laboratory measurements. Discusses the problem of supplying students with needed results of evaluation quickly. No statistics are included. (GH)

  19. The LUSI LAB project: a platform for multidisciplinary experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzini, Adriano; Svensen, Henrik; Hensen, Christian; Scholz, Florian; Romeo, Giovanni; Hadi, Soffian; Husein, Alwi; Planke, Sverre; Akhmanov, Grigorii; Krueger, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Lusi is a spectacular mud eruption that started in northeast Java the 29 of May 2006 following a 6.3 M earthquake. Nearly eight years later Lusi is still active. The Lusi Lab is an ERC-funded project to perform multidisciplinary studies using Lusi as a natural laboratory. This represents an unprecedented opportunity to study an ongoing active high-temperature mud eruption and to evaluate the role of seismicity, local faulting and the neighbouring Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex on the long-lasting mud eruption. A multipurpose hexacopter has been designed and constructed to access and monitor the otherwise inaccessible Lusi crater and its mud-filled outskirts. The "Lusi drone" showed to be a powerful monitoring and sampling tool duringteh fieldwork in Dec. 2013. Videos and photogrammetry were acquired with various cameras. Designed tools allow the drone to measure and log temperature and to complete remote-controlled sampling of mud, water and gas from the erupting crater. A collection of evenly spaced mud samples has been taken along a transect that extends for 1100 m outside the crater. The incubation of these will be used for geomicrobiological studies and will help to shed light on the type of the ongoing hydrocarbon generation and degradation. A network of temperature loggers deployed around the crater aims to investigate a correlation between seismic activity and temperature variation of the erupted mud. Geochemical analyses indicate that the geochemistry of the crater water represents a geochemical anomaly when comparing with both basinal brines and volcano-hosted hot springs. A combination of high temperatures in the source region and fluid-rock interactions with silicates and carbonate-rich lithologies can explain the geochemistry. This is consistent with the result of gas analyses and with a deep-seated (>4 km) source region, possibly related to the presence of hot igneous intrusions from the volcanic arc.

  20. Molecules in Space: A Chemistry lab using Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekberg, M. J.; Pratap, P.

    2000-12-01

    We present the results of a laboratory exercise developed with the support of the NSF Research Experiences for Teachers program at MIT Haystack Observatory. The exercise takes the students beyond the traditional test tubes of a chemistry laboratory into the interstellar medium, where the same principles that they study about in the classroom are found to hold. It also utilizes the true multi-disciplinary nature of radio astronomy and allows the students to realize how much can be learnt by studying the universe at various wavelengths. The astronomical chemistry laboratory is presented wherein students from Chelmsford High School in Massachusetts operate the 37-m telescope at Haystack Observatory via the internet to observe radio signals from galactic chemicals. The laboratory is designed to be the means by which students witness physical evidence for molecular and orbital shapes by observing the radio emission from rotating dipoles. The laboratory described is a lynch pin activity for an integrated unit that moves from the valance shell electron configurations through molecular and orbital geometry to an understanding that many physical and chemical properties of chemicals are ultimately dependent upon the shape/geometry and consequently, dipole of the molecule. Students are expected to interpret and evaluate the nature of molecular dipoles and account for the diversity of rotational spectra using their conceptual knowledge of bonding orbital theory and their knowledge of the electronic atom. Flexibility in the lab allows students to identify individual chemicals by cross referencing radio emission from the galactic sources they have chosen against a prepared catalogue listing or by choosing to "listen" for specific chemicals at exact frequencies. A teacher resource manual containing information and data on a variety of daytime galactic source and individual chemical flux densities of molecular candidates has been prepared. Collaborative exercises and activities

  1. Practical Clinical Training in Skills Labs: Theory and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bugaj, T. J.; Nikendei, C.

    2016-01-01

    Today, skills laboratories or “skills labs”, i.e. specific practical skill training facilities, are a firmly established part of medical education offering the possibility of training clinical procedures in a safe and fault-forging environment prior to real life application at bedside or in the operating room. Skills lab training follows a structured teaching concept, takes place under supervision and in consideration of methodological-didactic concepts, ideally creating an atmosphere that allows the repeated, anxiety- and risk-free practice of targeted skills. In this selective literature review, the first section is devoted to (I) the development and dissemination of the skills lab concept. There follows (II) an outline of the underlying idea and (III) an analysis of key efficacy factors. Thereafter, (IV) the training method’s effectiveness and transference are illuminated, before (V) the use of student tutors, in the sense of peer-assisted-learning, in skills labs is discussed separately. Finally, (VI) the efficiency of the skills lab concept is analyzed, followed by an outlook on future developments and trends in the field of skills lab training. PMID:27579363

  2. Documentation generator application for MatLab source codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niton, B.; Pozniak, K. T.; Romaniuk, R. S.

    2011-06-01

    The UML, which is a complex system modeling and description technology, has recently been expanding its uses in the field of formalization and algorithmic approach to such systems like multiprocessor photonic, optoelectronic and advanced electronics carriers; distributed, multichannel measurement systems; optical networks, industrial electronics, novel R&D solutions. The paper describes a realization of an application for documenting MatLab source codes. There are presented own novel solution based on Doxygen program which is available on the free license, with accessible source code. The used supporting tools for parser building were Bison and Flex. There are presented the practical results of the documentation generator. The program was applied for exemplary MatLab codes. The documentation generator application is used for design of large optoelectronic and electronic measurement and control systems. The paper consists of three parts which describe the following components of the documentation generator for photonic and electronic systems: concept, MatLab application and VHDL application. This is part two which describes the MatLab application. MatLab is used for description of the measured phenomena.

  3. Virtual Labs in proteomics: new E-learning tools.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sandipan; Koshy, Nicole Rachel; Reddy, Panga Jaipal; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2012-05-17

    Web-based educational resources have gained enormous popularity recently and are increasingly becoming a part of modern educational systems. Virtual Labs are E-learning platforms where learners can gain the experience of practical experimentation without any direct physical involvement on real bench work. They use computerized simulations, models, videos, animations and other instructional technologies to create interactive content. Proteomics being one of the most rapidly growing fields of the biological sciences is now an important part of college and university curriculums. Consequently, many E-learning programs have started incorporating the theoretical and practical aspects of different proteomic techniques as an element of their course work in the form of Video Lectures and Virtual Labs. To this end, recently we have developed a Virtual Proteomics Lab at the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, which demonstrates different proteomics techniques, including basic and advanced gel and MS-based protein separation and identification techniques, bioinformatics tools and molecular docking methods, and their applications in different biological samples. This Tutorial will discuss the prominent Virtual Labs featuring proteomics content, including the Virtual Proteomics Lab of IIT-Bombay, and E-resources available for proteomics study that are striving to make proteomic techniques and concepts available and accessible to the student and research community. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 14). Details can be found at: http://www.proteomicstutorials.org/. PMID:22484059

  4. Symptoms experienced by law enforcement personnel during methamphetamine lab investigations.

    PubMed

    Witter, Roxana Z; Martyny, John W; Mueller, Kathryn; Gottschall, Bibi; Newman, Lee S

    2007-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine if law enforcement personnel experience symptoms associated with methamphetamine lab investigation and to assess those factors that may result in more symptoms. A total of 258 standardized, self-administered surveys were distributed to law enforcement personnel attending national/regional training classes, between June 2004-February 2005. Ninety-three percent of the surveys were returned and used to determine symptoms experienced while investigating clandestine methamphetamine labs, as well as the job duties of the respondent and the personal protective equipment used. More than 70% of respondents reported headaches, central nervous system symptoms, respiratory symptoms, sore throat, and other symptoms. Unadjusted and adjusted risk of symptoms was higher for those who investigated more than 30 labs. Other significant risk factors included time spent in the lab, phase of investigation, presence of active chemical processes, and coexistent disease. Respirator use was not independently associated with the likelihood of reporting symptoms. It was concluded that methamphetamine lab investigation is positively associated with symptom reporting in a high percentage of law enforcement personnel involved in these tasks. For most individuals, the reported symptoms were transitory and diminished in a short time, but some individuals reported needing to seek medical attention with symptoms that persisted. PMID:17943587

  5. Assessing the therapeutic potential of lab-made hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Milad; Grimm, Andrew A; Willenbring, Holger

    2016-07-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation has potential as a bridge or even alternative to whole-organ liver transplantation. Because donor livers are scarce, realizing this potential requires the development of alternative cell sources. To be therapeutically effective, surrogate hepatocytes must replicate the complex function and ability to proliferate of primary human hepatocytes. Ideally, they are also autologous to eliminate the need for immune suppression, which can have severe side effects and may not be sufficient to prevent rejection long term. In the past decade, several methods have been developed to generate hepatocytes from other readily and safely accessible somatic cells. These lab-made hepatocytes show promise in animal models of liver diseases, supporting the feasibility of autologous liver cell therapies. Here, we review recent preclinical studies exemplifying different types of lab-made hepatocytes that can potentially be used in autologous liver cell therapies. To define the therapeutic efficacy of current lab-made hepatocytes, we compare them to primary human hepatocytes, focusing on engraftment efficiency and posttransplant proliferation and function. In addition to summarizing published results, we discuss animal models and assays effective in assessing therapeutic efficacy. This analysis underscores the therapeutic potential of current lab-made hepatocytes, but also highlights deficiencies and uncertainties that need to be addressed in future studies aimed at developing liver cell therapies with lab-made hepatocytes. (Hepatology 2016;64:287-294). PMID:27014802

  6. Design of inquiry-oriented science labs: impacts on students' attitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baseya, J. M.; Francis, C. D.

    2011-11-01

    Background: Changes in lab style can lead to differences in learning. Two inquiry-oriented lab styles are guided inquiry (GI) and problem-based (PB). Students' attitudes towards lab are important to consider when choosing between GI and PB styles during curriculum design. Purpose: We examined the degree to which lab experiences are explained by a GI or a PB lab style vs. students' attitudes towards specific aspects of the experience, reflected by perceived excitement (exc), difficulty (dif), time efficiency (eff) and association between lab and lecture material (help). Sample: Approximately 1000 students attending first-semester, college biology lab for science majors at the University of Colorado at Boulder, USA, participated in the study. Design and method: In 2007, two labs were run as GI and one as PB. Formats were switched in 2008. Attitudes were assessed with a post-semester survey. Results: Only the four attitude variables (not lab style) had a strong relationship with overall lab rating which was most strongly related to exc, followed by dif and help/eff. Dif and eff had the greatest influence on attitudes for or against GI vs. PB labs, and help and exc had little influence on a GI vs. a PB lab. Also, when dif was low, students' attitudes were not significantly different between PB and GI labs, but when dif was high, students' significantly rated GI labs higher than PB labs. Conclusions: Students' attitudes towards lab are more dependent on specific aspects of the experience than on lab style. Changes in GI vs. PB lab styles primarily influence dif and eff rather than exc and help. Dif may be an important factor to consider when implementing a lab in the PB vs. the GI format. It might be good to go with a GI when dif is high and a PB when dif is low.

  7. Indicators and Metrics for Evaluating the Sustainability of Chemical Processes

    EPA Science Inventory

    A metric-based method, called GREENSCOPE, has been developed for evaluating process sustainability. Using lab-scale information and engineering assumptions the method evaluates full-scale epresentations of processes in environmental, efficiency, energy and economic areas. The m...

  8. Do the Choices for Field, Lab, and Data Analysis Methods Affect the Site Assessments in Biomonitoring Programs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silldorff, E. L.; Herbst, D. B.

    2005-05-01

    Broad differences remain in the field, lab, and data analysis methods used for bioassessment programs across local, state, national, and international boundaries. Recent calls for direct comparisons among these methods have begun to be fulfilled, including performance-based evaluations, but such comparisons remain limited to a handful of studies. Here, we present the results from our research on 3 intensive methods currently used by California bioassessment groups. These 3 methods were simultaneously used to collect and process samples from the same 40 streams in the eastern Sierra Nevada. The resulting data from each method were then analyzed using both multi-metric IBI and RIVPACS-type multivariate predictive models. Although the field and lab methods differed with respect to replication (1, 3, or 5 composite samples per stream), level of identification (family vs. genus for Chironomidae), and number of individuals processed per site (500 vs. 900 vs. 1500), all field/lab protocols clearly discriminated between independently identified reference and impaired streams. Furthermore, both the multimetric IBI analyses and the RIVPACS-type models produced effective separation of the reference sites from the impaired sites for all field/lab methodologies. These results suggest that alternative methodologies are interchangeable and could complement one another. Thus, the decisions among methods may hinge on objectives, costs, interpretability, and ease of use rather than ability to detect impairment.

  9. EUSO@TurLab: An experimental replica of ISS orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertaina, M.; Bowaire, A.; Cambursano, S.; Caruso, R.; Contino, G.; Cotto, G.; Crivello, F.; Forza, R.; Guardone, N.; Manfrin, M.; Mignone, M.; Mulas, R.; Suino, G.; Tibaldi, P. S.

    2015-03-01

    The EUSO@TurLab project is an on-going activity aimed to reproduce atmospheric and luminous conditions that JEM-EUSO will encounter on its orbits around the Earth. The use of the TurLab facility, part of the Department of Physics of the University of Torino, allows the simulation of different surface conditions in a very dark and rotating environment in order to test the response of JEM-EUSO's sensors and sensitivity. The experimental setup currently in operation has been used to check the potential of the TurLab facility for the above purposes, and the acquired data will be used to test the concept of JEM-EUSO's trigger system.

  10. Promoting Metacognition in Introductory Calculus-based Physics Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grennell, Drew; Boudreaux, Andrew

    2010-10-01

    In the Western Washington University physics department, a project is underway to develop research-based laboratory curriculum for the introductory calculus-based course. Instructional goals not only include supporting students' conceptual understanding and reasoning ability, but also providing students with opportunities to engage in metacognition. For the latter, our approach has been to scaffold reflective thinking with guided questions. Specific instructional strategies include analysis of alternate reasoning presented in fictitious dialogues and comparison of students' initial ideas with their lab group's final, consensus understanding. Assessment of student metacognition includes pre- and post- course data from selected questions on the CLASS survey, analysis of written lab worksheets, and student opinion surveys. CLASS results are similar to a traditional physics course and analysis of lab sheets show that students struggle to engage in a metacognitive process. Future directions include video studies, as well as use of additional written assessments adapted from educational psychology.

  11. Bethune-Cookman University STEM Research Lab. DOE Renovation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Herbert W.

    2012-03-31

    DOE funding was used to renovate 4,500 square feet of aging laboratories and classrooms that support science, engineering, and mathematics disciplines (specifically environmental science, and computer engineering). The expansion of the labs was needed to support robotics and environmental science research, and to better accommodate a wide variety of teaching situations. The renovated space includes a robotics laboratory, two multi-use labs, safe spaces for the storage of instrumentation, modern ventilation equipment, and other “smart” learning venues. The renovated areas feature technologies that are environmentally friendly with reduced energy costs. A campus showcase, the laboratories are a reflection of the University’s commitment to the environment and research as a tool for teaching. As anticipated, the labs facilitate the exploration of emerging technologies that are compatible with local and regional economic plans.

  12. Entomology: Promoting Creativity in the Science Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akcay, Behiye B.

    2013-01-01

    A class activity has been designed to help fourth grade students to identify basic insect features as a means of promoting student creativity while making an imaginary insect model. The 5Es (Engage, Explore, Explain, Extend [or Elaborate], and Evaluate) learning cycle teaching model is used. The 5Es approach allows students to work in small…

  13. Accuracy of the SpaceLabs 90207 ambulatory blood pressure monitor in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Belsha; Wells; Bowe Rice H; Neaville; Berry

    1996-04-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the accuracy of the SpaceLabs 90207 ambulatory blood pressure monitor for measurement of systolic and Korotkoff phases IV and V diastolic blood pressures in children aged 6-18 years. DESIGN: Monitor evaluation was performed using the 1990 British Hypertension Society (BHS) protocol, adapted for use in children. METHODS: Three SpaceLabs 90207 monitors were evaluated according to the five phases of the 1990 BHS protocol: observer training and assessment; before-use interdevice variability assessment; in-use (field) assessment; after-use interdevice variability assessment; and device validation. Outcome was classified according to the criteria from the BHS (1990) and Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI) protocols. RESULTS: During in-use assessment, the monitor failed to achieve the required 70% valid readings on four of 25 recording days. On three of four failed days, kinked tubing errors were noted, possibly caused by excess tubing length. After adjustment of tubing length to body size, criteria were satisfied on 24 additional recording days. During validation, the monitor achieved BHS grade C for systolic blood pressure and satisfied AAMI criteria with a mean difference of 5.0+/- 6.4 mmHg. The monitor received grade D for Korotkoff phase IV and V diastolic blood pressure and failed to satisfy AAMI criteria with a mean difference of -7.2+/- 11.0 mmHg for Korotkoff phase IV and 0.8+/-11.1 mmHg for Korotkoff phase V. CONCLUSION: The SpaceLabs 90207 monitor satisfied the minimum accuracy criteria for measurement of systolic, but not diastolic, blood pressure in children aged 6-18 years. PMID:10226214

  14. First results on GlioLab/GlioSat Precursors Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelletti, Chantal; Notarangelo, Angelo; Demoss, Darrin; Carella, Massimo

    2012-07-01

    Since 2009 GAUSS group is involved in a joint collaboration with Morehead State University (MSU) Space Science Center and IRCCS Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza (CSS) research labs with the aim to design a biomedical project in order to investigate if the combined effects of microgravity conditions and ionizing radiation increase or decrease the survival rate of cancer cells. The biological sample consists of Glioblastoma cancer cell line ANGM-CSS. Glioblastoma is a kind of cancer that can be treated after surgery only by radiotherapy using ionizing radiation. This treatment, anyway, results in a very low survival rate. This project uses different university space platforms: a CubeLab, named GlioLab, on board the International Space Station and the university microsatellite UniSat-5 designed by GAUSS. In addition a GlioLab/GlioSat precursor experiment has already flown two times with the Space Shuttle during the missions STS-134 and STS-135. The phase 0 or the precursor of GlioLab uses a COTS system, named Liquid Mixing Apparatus (LMA), to board the biological samples inside the Space Shuttle for thirty day . The LMA allows to board liquids inside a vial but is not equipped with environment control system. After landing the samples were investigated by researchers at CSS in Italy and at MSU in Kentucky. This paper deals with the experimental set up and the results obtained during the STS-134 and STS-135 missions and with the new evidences on the behavior of this kind of cancer. In particular the results obtained on the DNA analysis give a confirmation of the original idea of GLioLab/Gliosat project justifying the development of the two systems.

  15. Evaluating Astronomy Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirbel, E. L.

    2002-12-01

    A set of non-traditional astronomy laboratories for non-science majors will be presented along with evaluations of lab technicians (these labs were originally developed at the College of Staten Island of the City University of New York). The goal of these labs is twofold: (a) to provide the students with hands-on experiences of scientific methodology and (b) to provoke critical thinking. Because non-science majors are often rather resistant to learning the relevant methodology - and especially to thinking critically - this manual is structured differently. It does not only provide traditional cook-book recipes but also contains several leading questions to make the students realize why they are doing what. The students are encouraged to write full sentences and explain how they reach which conclusions. This poster summarizes the experiences of the laboratory assistants that worked with the instructor and presents how they judge the effectiveness of the laboratories.

  16. NASA Dryden: Flight Loads Lab Capabilities and Mass Properties Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, David Michael; Bakalyar, John A.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation covers the basic capabilities of the Dryden Flight Loads Lab. It also covers in detail the mass properties capabilities of the loads lab, focusing on the recent mass properties testing of the X-48B, and the recent tests of the Dynamic Inertia Measurement method (DIMM). Presentation focuses on the test methods and issues discovered during the mass properties testing of the X-48B leading to the requirement of new instrumentation on all conventional mass properties testing. Presentation also focuses on development of DIMM for replacement of conventional mass properties tests.

  17. Pulse shaping analysis with LAB-based liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. S.; Kim, Y. H.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, M. K.; Ma, K. J.; Jeon, E. J.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, N. Y.; Kim, Y. D.; Lee, J. Y.

    2012-02-01

    We report on a pulse shaping analysis for alpha-beta discrimination using a linear alkylbenzene (LAB)-based liquid scintillator developed for reactor neutrino experiments. The scintillation properties are measured with an internal alpha source diluted in the same scintillator and an external gamma source. The comparison of the fast and the slow parts in the signal waveforms provide clear separations of alpha and gamma events in the liquid scintillator. The discrimination power is compared between the LAB-based liquid scintillator and other commercially available liquid scintillators. The potential use of this scintillator when loaded with 6Li is discussed with regard to neutron measurements.

  18. Short pulse photoemission from LaB 6-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblond, B.; Kuznetsov, G.; Batazova, M.

    1996-02-01

    Experimental results obtained in picosecond regime with new LaB 6 compounds are presented and compared to LaB 6 monocrystal <100>. Quantum yield values up to 6.8 × 10 -4 are obtained by using the fourth harmonic of a ND:YAG laser. The lifetime of these classical thermionic cathodes can be improved by heating the photocathode just below the thermoemission threshold. Measurements are performed to verify the temperature effects on this parameter. Effects of pressure in the experimental cell on the lifetime of the photocathode are also given.

  19. EarthLabs - Investigating Hurricanes: Earth's Meteorological Monsters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaris, J. R.; Dahlman, L.; Barstow, D.

    2007-12-01

    Earth science is one of the most important tools that the global community needs to address the pressing environmental, social, and economic issues of our time. While, at times considered a second-rate science at the high school level, it is currently undergoing a major revolution in the depth of content and pedagogical vitality. As part of this revolution, labs in Earth science courses need to shift their focus from cookbook-like activities with known outcomes to open-ended investigations that challenge students to think, explore and apply their learning. We need to establish a new model for Earth science as a rigorous lab science in policy, perception, and reality. As a concerted response to this need, five states, a coalition of scientists and educators, and an experienced curriculum team are creating a national model for a lab-based high school Earth science course named EarthLabs. This lab course will comply with the National Science Education Standards as well as the states' curriculum frameworks. The content will focus on Earth system science and environmental literacy. The lab experiences will feature a combination of field work, classroom experiments, and computer access to data and visualizations, and demonstrate the rigor and depth of a true lab course. The effort is being funded by NOAA's Environmental Literacy program. One of the prototype units of the course is Investigating Hurricanes. Hurricanes are phenomena which have tremendous impact on humanity and the resources we use. They are also the result of complex interacting Earth systems, making them perfect objects for rigorous investigation of many concepts commonly covered in Earth science courses, such as meteorology, climate, and global wind circulation. Students are able to use the same data sets, analysis tools, and research techniques that scientists employ in their research, yielding truly authentic learning opportunities. This month-long integrated unit uses hurricanes as the story line by

  20. Commerce lab: Mission analysis and payload integration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Conceived as one or more arrays of carriers which would fly aboard space shuttle, Commerce Lab can provide a point of focus for implementing a series of shuttle flights, co-sponsored by NASA and U.S. domestic concerns, for performing materials processing in research and pre-commercial investigations. As an orbiting facility for testing, developing, and implementing hardware and procedures, Commerce Lab can enhance space station development and hasten space platform production capability. Tasks considered include: (1) synthesis of user requirements and identification of common element and voids; (2) definition of performance and infrastructure requirement and alternative approaches; and (3) carrier, mission model, and infrastructure development.