Science.gov

Sample records for evaluation technology part

  1. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 1, Technology Evaluation: Part B, Remedial Action

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1 (Technology Evaluation), Vol. 2 (Technology Logic Diagram), and Vol. 3 (Technology Evaluation Data Sheets). Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on D&D. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the ranking os remedial technologies. Volume 2 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. The focus of Vol. 1, Pt. B, is RA, and it has been divided into six chapters. The first chapter is an introduction, which defines problems specific to the ER Program for ORNL. Chapter 2 provides a general overview of the TLD. Chapters 3 through 5 are organized into necessary subelement categories: RA, characterization, and robotics and automation. The final chapter contains regulatory compliance information concerning RA.

  2. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part B, Dismantlement, Remedial action

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1, Technology Evaluation; Vol. 2, Technology Logic Diagram and Vol. 3, Technology EvaLuation Data Sheets. Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on the D&D of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TM, an explanation of the problems facing the volume-specific program, a review of identified technologies, and rankings of technologies applicable to the site. Volume 2 (Pts. A. B. and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A. B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. This volume provides the technology evaluation data sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (D&D, RA and WM) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than is given for the technologies in Vol. 2.

  3. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part C, Robotics/automation, Waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1, Technology Evaluation; Vol. 2, Technology Logic Diagram and Vol. 3, Technology EvaLuation Data Sheets. Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on the D&D of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TM, an explanation of the problems facing the volume-specific program, a review of identified technologies, and rankings of technologies applicable to the site. Volume 2 (Pts. A. B. and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A. B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. This volume provides the technology evaluation data sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (D&D, RA and WM) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than is given for the technologies in Vol. 2.

  4. Y-12 Plant remedial action Technology Logic Diagram: Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part A, Remedial action

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Remedial Action Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) problems at the Y-12 Plant to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to remedial action (RA) activities. The TLD consists of three volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 contains the TLD data sheets. This report is Part A of Volume 3 and contains the Remedial Action section.

  5. Y-12 Plant remedial action Technology Logic Diagram: Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part B, Characterization; robotics/automation

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Remedial Action Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) problems at the Y-12 Plant to potential technologies that can remediate theses problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to remedial action (RA) activities. The TLD consists of three volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 contains the TLD data sheets. This report is Part B of Volume 3 and contains the Characterization and Robotics/Automation sections.

  6. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 1, Technology Evaluation: Part A, Decontamination and Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Strategic Roadmap for the Oak Ridge Reservation is a generalized planning document that identifies broad categories of issues that keep ORNL outside full compliance with the law and other legally binding agreements. Possible generic paths to compliance, issues, and the schedule for resolution of the issues one identified. The role of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) is then to identify specific site issues (problems), identify specific technologies that can be brought to bear on the issues, and assess the current status and readiness of these remediation technologies within the constraints of the schedule commitment. Regulatory requirements and commitments contained in the Strategic Roadmap for the Oak Ridge Reservation are also included in the TLD as constraints to the application of immature technological solutions. Some otherwise attractive technological solutions may not be employed because they may not be deployable on the schedule enumerated in the regulatory agreements. The roadmap for ORNL includes a list of 46 comprehensive logic diagrams for WM of low-level, radioactive-mixed, hazardous, sanitary and industrial. and TRU waste. The roadmapping process gives comparisons of the installation as it exists to the way the installation should exist under full compliance. The identification of the issues is the goal of roadmapping. This allows accurate and timely formulation of activities.

  7. Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets; Part A, Characterization, decontamination, dismantlement

    SciTech Connect

    Fellows, R.L.

    1993-02-26

    The Oak Ridge K-25 Technology Logic Diagram (TLD), a decision support tool for the K-25 Site, was developed to provide a planning document that relates environmental restoration and waste management problems at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD technique identifies the research necessary to develop these technologies to a state that allows for technology transfer and application to waste management, remedial action, and decontamination and decommissioning activities. The TLD consists of four separate volumes-Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3A, and Vol. 3B. Volume 1 provides introductory and overview information about the TLD. Volume 2 contains logic diagrams. Volume 3 has been divided into two separate volumes to facilitate handling and use. This report is part A of Volume 3 concerning characterization, decontamination, and dismantlement.

  8. Soil washing technology evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Suer, A.

    1995-04-01

    Environmental Restoration Engineering (ERE) continues to review innovative, efficient, and cost effective technologies for SRS soil and/or groundwater remediation. As part of this effort, this technical evaluation provides review and the latest information on the technology for SRS soil remediation. Additional technology evaluation reports will be issued periodically to update these reports. The purpose of this report is to review the soil washing technology and its potential application to SRS soil remediation. To assess whether the Soil Washing technology is a viable option for SRS soil remediation, it is necessary to review the technology/process, technology advantages/limitations, performance, applications, and cost analysis.

  9. EVALUATION OF SULFATE ATTACK ON SALTSTONE VAULT CONCRETE AND SALTSTONESIMCO TECHNOLOGIES, INC. PART1 FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C

    2008-08-19

    This report summarizes the preliminary results of a durability analysis performed by SIMCO Technologies Inc. to assess the effects of contacting saltstone Vaults 1/4 and Disposal Unit 2 concretes with highly alkaline solutions containing high concentrations of dissolved sulfate. The STADIUM{reg_sign} code and data from two surrogate concretes which are similar to the Vaults 1/4 and Disposal Unit 2 concretes were used in the preliminary durability analysis. Simulation results for these surrogate concrete mixes are provided in this report. The STADIUM{reg_sign} code will be re-run using transport properties measured for the SRS Vaults 1/4 and Disposal Unit 2 concrete samples after SIMCO personnel complete characterization testing on samples of these materials. Simulation results which utilize properties measured for samples of Vaults 1/4 and Disposal Unit 2 concretes will be provided in Revision 1 of this report after property data become available. The modeling performed to date provided the following information on two concrete mixes that will be used to support the Saltstone PA: (1) Relationship between the rate of advancement of the sulfate front (depth of sulfate ion penetration into the concrete) and the rate of change of the concrete permeability and diffusivity. (2) Relationship between the sulfate ion concentration in the corrosive leachate and the rate of the sulfate front progression. (3) Equation describing the change in hydraulic properties (hydraulic conductivity and diffusivity) as a function of sulfate ion concentration in the corrosive leachate. These results have been incorporated into the current Saltstone PA analysis by G. Flach (Flach, 2008). In addition, samples of the Saltstone Vaults 1/4 and Disposal Unit 2 concretes have been prepared by SIMCO Technologies, Inc. Transport and physical properties for these materials are currently being measured and sulfate exposure testing to three high alkaline, high sulfate leachates provided by SRNL is

  10. Technology. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this session, Session WP3, the discussion focuses on the following topics: Monitoring Physiological Variables With Membrane Probes; Real Time Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy, Potential Applications in Space Medicine and Cell Biology; Optimum Versus Universal Planetary and Interplanetary Habitats; Application of Remote Sensing and Geographic Information System Technologies to the Prevention of Diarrheal Diseases in Nigeria; A Small G Loading Human Centrifuge for Space Station ERA; Use of the Bicycle Ergometer on the International Space Station and Its Influence On The Microgravity Environment; Munich Space Chair (MSC) - A Next Generation Body Restraint System for Astronauts; and Thermoelectric Human-Body Cooling Units Used By NASA Space Shuttle Astronauts.

  11. Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets; Part B, Remedial action, robotics/automation, waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Fellows, R.L.

    1993-02-26

    The Oak Ridge K-25 Technology Logic Diagram (TLD), a decision support tool for the K-25 Site, was developed to provide a planning document that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WN) problems at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. The TLD technique identifies the research necessary to develop these technologies to a state that allows for technology transfer and application to waste management, remediation, decontamination, and decommissioning activities. The TLD consists of four separate volumes-Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3A, and Vol. 3B. Volume 1 provides introductory and overview information about the TLD. Volume 2 contains logic diagrams. Volume 3 has been divided into two separate volumes to facilitate handling and use. This volume 3 B provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (Remedial Action Robotics and Automation, Waste Management) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than each technology in Vol. 2. The TEDS are arranged alphanumerically by the TEDS code number in the upper right corner of each data sheet. Volume 3 can be used in two ways: (1) technologies that are identified from Vol. 2 can be referenced directly in Vol. 3 by using the TEDS codes, and (2) technologies and general technology areas (alternatives) can be located in the index in the front of this volume.

  12. Y-12 Plant decontamination and decommissioning technology logic diagram for Building 9201-4. Volume 3: Technology evaluation data sheets; Part A: Characterization, dismantlement

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4 (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) problems at Bldg. 9201-4 to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD uses information from the Strategic Roadmap for the Oak Ridge Reservation, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram, and a previous Hanford logic diagram. This TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to D and D and waste management (WM) activities. It is essential that follow-on engineering studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in the TLD and by finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk. This report consists of the characterization and dismantlement data sheets.

  13. California Emerging Technology Forum Part II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of the California Emerging Technology Forum Part II is to foster the removal of barriers for the development and use of clean technologies through the development of collaborative technology research projects on promising technologies. The collaborative technology resear...

  14. Future Jet Technologies, Part C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal-Or, Benjamin

    2013-06-01

    This updated, PART C REVIEW, covers the dangerous global spread of JS-stealth, drone technology [1-91], canard-free, stealth, new agile drones and the highly debated, 480 billion F-35 International Program as reported on March 13, 2013 to the U.S. Congress [92]. Due to serious design issues, spiraling high costs and years in delays, alternatives are analyzed here, depicted and proposed, mainly from the propulsion-design point of view. These include fleets of low-cost, stealth, jet-steered-drones mixed with non-stealthy, low-cost, ready-to-be-delivered, U.S. or European or Russian fighter aircraft. Can a few F-35s win against large fleets of stealth agile drones? To understand the dangers and critical issues involved, the author's own, past classified information is partly disclosed, while resorting to images in Figs. 2(a) and 2(b) taken from his book [2] and from Wikipedia, the "Free Encyclopedia", in all other images.

  15. HELIOS Technology Challenge, Part 2

    NASA Video Gallery

    The HELIOS Technology Challenge seeks to combine open source innovation, collaboration and partnership with makerspace and input from the general public to help NASA solve major technology challeng...

  16. HELIOS Technology Challenge, Part 1

    NASA Video Gallery

    The HELIOS Technology Challenge seeks to combine open source innovation, collaboration and partnership with makerspace and input from the general public to help NASA solve major technology challeng...

  17. HELIOS Technology Challenge, Part 4

    NASA Video Gallery

    The HELIOS Technology Challenge seeks to combine open source innovation, collaboration and partnership with makerspace and input from the general public to help NASA solve major technology challeng...

  18. HELIOS Technology Challenge, Part 5

    NASA Video Gallery

    The HELIOS Technology Challenge seeks to combine open source innovation, collaboration and partnership with makerspace and input from the general public to help NASA solve major technology challeng...

  19. HELIOS Technology Challenge, Part 3

    NASA Video Gallery

    The HELIOS Technology Challenge seeks to combine open source innovation, collaboration and partnership with makerspace and input from the general public to help NASA solve major technology challeng...

  20. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT:

    EPA Science Inventory

    A demonstration of the Retech, Inc. Plasma Centrifugal Furnace (PCF) was conducted under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program at the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Component Development and Integration Facility in Butte, Montana. The furnace uses heat gen...

  1. Commercial Parts Technology Qualification Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Many high-reliability systems, including space systems, use selected commercial parts (including Plastic Encapsulated Microelectronics or PEMs) for unique functionality, small size, low weight, high mechanical shock resistance, and other factors. Predominantly this usage is subjected to certain 100% tests (typically called screens) and certain destructive tests usually (but not always) performed on the flight lot (typically called qualification tests). Frequently used approaches include those documented in EEE-INST-002 and JPL DocID62212 (which are sometimes modified by the particular aerospace space systems manufacturer). In this study, approaches from these documents and several space systems manufacturers are compared to approaches from a launch systems manufacturer (SpaceX), an implantable medical electronics manufacturer (Medtronics), and a high-reliability transport system process (automotive systems). In the conclusions section, these processes are outlined for all of these cases and presented in tabular form. Then some simple comparisons are made. In this introduction section, the PEM technology qualification process is described, as documented in EEE-INST-002 (written by the Goddard Space Flight Center, GSFC), as well as the somewhat modified approach employed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Approaches used at several major NASA contractors are also described

  2. NOVOCS TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    An evaluation of the MACTEC Inc., NoVOCs(TM) technology ws conducted under the SITE Program, in partnership with the Naval Facilities Engineering Command SW Division, the Navy Environmental Leadership Program, the EPA Technology Innovation Office and Clean Sites, Inc. Specificall...

  3. Large Space Antenna Systems Technology, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightner, E. B. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    A compilation of the unclassified papers presented at the NASA Conference on Large Space Antenna Systems Technology covers the following areas: systems, structures technology, control technology, electromagnetics, and space flight test and evaluation.

  4. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: BIOTROL SOIL WASHING SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF A WOOD PRESERVING SITE - VOLUME II, PART A

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents and evaluates the extensive database from the SITE Program demonstration at the MacGillis and Gibbs wood treatment facility in New Brighton, MN. oil washing and segregation, biotreatment of contaminated process water, and biodegradation of a slurry of the con...

  5. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: BIOTROL SOIL WASHING SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF A WOOD PRESERVING SITE - VOLUME III, PART B

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents and evaluates the extensive database from the SITE Program demonstration at the MacGillis and Gibbs wood treatment facility in New Brighton, MN. oil washing and segregation, biotreatment of contaminated process water, and biodegradation of a slurry of the con...

  6. MINERGY CORPORATION GLASS FURNACE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION: INNOVATION TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents performance and economic data for a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program demonstration of the Minergy Corporation (Minergy) Glass Furnace Technology (GFT). The demonstration evaluated the techno...

  7. Task 4 supporting technology. Part 2: Detailed test plan for thermal seals. Thermal seals evaluation, improvement and test. CAN8-1, Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), advanced technology demonstrator: X-33. Leading edge and seals thermal protection system technology demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogenson, P. A.; Lu, Tina

    1995-01-01

    The objective is to develop the advanced thermal seals to a technology readiness level (TRL) of 6 to support the rapid turnaround time and low maintenance requirements of the X-33 and the future reusable launch vehicle (RLV). This program is divided into three subtasks: (1) orbiter thermal seals operation history review; (2) material, process, and design improvement; and (3) fabrication and evaluation of the advanced thermal seals.

  8. EVALUATION OF THE BIOGENESIS SOIL WASHING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The BioGenesis Enterprises, Inc. (BioGenesis) soil washing technology was demonstrated as part of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program in November 1992. The demonstration was conducted over three days at a petrol...

  9. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 2, Technology Logic Diagram: Part B, Remedial Action

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1 (Technology Evaluation), Vol. 2 (Technology Logic Diagram), and Vol. 3 (Technology Evaluation Data Sheets). Part A of Vols. 1. and 2 focuses on D&D. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on the RA of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. Remedial action is the focus of Vol. 2, Pt. B, which has been divided into the three necessary subelements of the RA: characterization, RA, and robotics and automation. Each of these sections address general ORNL problems, which are then broken down by problem area/constituents and linked to potential remedial technologies. The diagrams also contain summary information about a technology`s status, its science and technology needs, and its implementation needs.

  10. Parting Thoughts on Foundation Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisely, D. Susan

    2002-01-01

    Discusses four reasons why progress in evaluation in private foundations has been so slow and intermittent. These include: (1) inflated claims for the power of evaluation as a guide; (2) foundations' distance from the consequences of their actions; (3) sensitivity to hostile criticism and the difficulties of learning from legitimate criticism; and…

  11. PCP IMMUMOASSAY TECHNOLOGIES - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technologies for pentachlorophenol (PCP) testing in soil and water were evaluated. Penta RISc Test Systems (formerly ENSYS, Inc.), EnviroGard™ PCP Immunoassay Test Kit (Millipore Corp.), and Pentachlorophenol RaPID Assay (formerly Ohmicron ...

  12. SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION: TECHNOLOGY PROFILES, NINTH EDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, now in its eleventh year, is an integral part of EPA's research into alternative cleanup methods for hazardous waste sites around the nation. The SITE Program was created to encourage the development and routine use o...

  13. Clean Technology Evaluation & Workforce Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Patricia Glaza

    2012-12-01

    The overall objective of the Clean Technology Evaluation portion of the award was to design a process to speed up the identification of new clean energy technologies and match organizations to testing and early adoption partners. The project was successful in identifying new technologies targeted to utilities and utility technology integrators, in developing a process to review and rank the new technologies, and in facilitating new partnerships for technology testing and adoption. The purpose of the Workforce Development portion of the award was to create an education outreach program for middle & high-school students focused on clean technology science and engineering. While originally targeting San Diego, California and Cambridge, Massachusetts, the scope of the program was expanded to include a major clean technology speaking series and expo as part of the USA Science & Engineering Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

  14. MIUS wastewater technology evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poradek, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    A modular integrated utility system wastewater-treatment process is described. Research in the field of wastewater treatment is reviewed, treatment processes are specified and evaluated, and recommendations for system use are made. The treatment processes evaluated are in the broad categories of preparatory, primary, secondary, and tertiary treatment, physical-chemical processing, dissolved-solids removal, disinfection, sludge processing, and separate systems. Capital, operating, and maintenance costs are estimated, and extensive references are given.

  15. National Security Technology Incubator Evaluation Process

    SciTech Connect

    2007-12-31

    This report describes the process by which the National Security Technology Incubator (NSTI) will be evaluated. The technology incubator is being developed as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), funded by a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant. This report includes a brief description of the components, steps, and measures of the proposed evaluation process. The purpose of the NSPP is to promote national security technologies through business incubation, technology demonstration and validation, and workforce development. The NSTI will focus on serving businesses with national security technology applications by nurturing them through critical stages of early development. An effective evaluation process of the NSTI is an important step as it can provide qualitative and quantitative information on incubator performance over a given period. The vision of the NSTI is to be a successful incubator of technologies and private enterprise that assist the NNSA in meeting new challenges in national safety and security. The mission of the NSTI is to identify, incubate, and accelerate technologies with national security applications at various stages of development by providing hands-on mentoring and business assistance to small businesses and emerging or growing companies. To achieve success for both incubator businesses and the NSTI program, an evaluation process is essential to effectively measure results and implement corrective processes in the incubation design if needed. The evaluation process design will collect and analyze qualitative and quantitative data through performance evaluation system.

  16. Manufacturing technology methodology for propulsion system parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McRae, M. M.

    1992-07-01

    A development history and a current status evaluation are presented for lost-wax casting of such gas turbine engine components as turbine vanes and blades. The most advanced such systems employ computer-integrated manufacturing methods for high process repeatability, reprogramming versatility, and feedback monitoring. Stereolithography-based plastic model 3D prototyping has also been incorporated for the wax part of the investment casting; it may ultimately be possible to produce the 3D prototype in wax directly, or even to create a ceramic mold directly. Nonintrusive inspections are conducted by X-radiography and neutron radiography.

  17. SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION - TECHNOLOGY PROFILES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is intended as a reference guide for EPA Regional decision makers and others interested in technologies in the SITE Demonstration and Emerging Technologies programs. The Technologies are described in technology profiles, presented in alphabetical order by developer ...

  18. SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION PROGRAM - TECHNOLOGY PROFILES 4th Edition

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program evaluates new and promising treatment technologies for cleanup of hazardous waste sites. The program was created to encourage the development and routine use of innovative treatment technologies. As a result, the SI...

  19. Coping With the Problems of a Technological Age, Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    This is another report in a series of programs dealing with the problems of a technological age. It is assumed that teachers will use both parts of this report. Part I deals with the problems of technology and how it affects our lives. It also discusses the energy crisis created, in part, by technology and deals specifically with coal and…

  20. Improvement of Automotive Part Supplier Performance Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kongmunee, Chalermkwan; Chutima, Parames

    2016-05-01

    This research investigates the problem of the part supplier performance evaluation in a major Japanese automotive plant in Thailand. Its current evaluation scheme is based on experiences and self-opinion of the evaluators. As a result, many poor performance suppliers are still considered as good suppliers and allow to supply parts to the plant without further improvement obligation. To alleviate this problem, the brainstorming session among stakeholders and evaluators are formally conducted. The result of which is the appropriate evaluation criteria and sub-criteria. The analytical hierarchy process is also used to find suitable weights for each criteria and sub-criteria. The results show that a newly developed evaluation method is significantly better than the previous one in segregating between good and poor suppliers.

  1. Large Space Systems Technology, Part 2, 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, W. J. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    Four major areas of interest are covered: technology pertinent to large antenna systems; technology related to the control of large space systems; basic technology concerning structures, materials, and analyses; and flight technology experiments. Large antenna systems and flight technology experiments are described. Design studies, structural testing results, and theoretical applications are presented with accompanying validation data. These research studies represent state-of-the art technology that is necessary for the development of large space systems. A total systems approach including structures, analyses, controls, and antennas is presented as a cohesive, programmatic plan for large space systems.

  2. Evaluating geographic information systems technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guptill, Stephen C.

    1989-01-01

    Computerized geographic information systems (GISs) are emerging as the spatial data handling tools of choice for solving complex geographical problems. However, few guidelines exist for assisting potential users in identifying suitable hardware and software. A process to be followed in evaluating the merits of GIS technology is presented. Related standards and guidelines, software functions, hardware components, and benchmarking are discussed. By making users aware of all aspects of adopting GIS technology, they can decide if GIS is an appropriate tool for their application and, if so, which GIS should be used.

  3. Overview of nondestructive evaluation technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.

    1995-04-01

    The infrastructure in the US and the world is aging. There is an increasing awareness of the need to assess the severity of the damage occurring to the infrastructure. Limited resources preclude the replacement of all structures that need repairs or have exceeded their life times. Methods to assess the amount and severity of damage are crucial to implementing a systematic, cost effective approach to repair and/or replace the damaged structures. The challenges of inspecting aging structures without impairing their usefulness rely on a variety of technologies and techniques for nondestructive evaluation (NDE). This paper will briefly describe several nondestructive evaluation technologies that are required for inspecting a variety of systems and structures.

  4. Application of remote sensing technology to land evaluation, planning utilization of land resources, and assessment of westland habitat in eastern South Dakota, parts 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, V. I. (Principal Investigator); Cox, T. L.; Best, R. G.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. LANDSAT fulfilled the requirements for general soils and land use information. RB-57 imagery was required to provide the information and detail needed for mapping soils for land evaluation. Soils maps for land evaluation were provided on clear mylar at the scale of the county highway map to aid users in locating mapping units. Resulting mapped data were computer processed to provided a series of interpretive maps (land value, limitations to development, etc.) and area summaries for the users.

  5. GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL CORPORATION; CURE ELECTROCOAGULATION TECHNOLOGY: INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The CURE electrocoagulation technology was demonstrated under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), where water from the solar evaporation ponds (SEPs) was contaminat...

  6. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: PEROX-PURE™ CHEMICAL OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report evaluates the perox-pure™ chemical oxidation technology's ability to remove volatile organic compounds (VOC) and other organic contaminants present in liquid wastes. The report also presents economic data from the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) demon...

  7. SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION PROGRAM - TECHNOLOGY PROFILES - SEVENTH EDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program evaluates new and promising treatment and monitoring and measurement technologies for cleanup of hazardous waste sites. The program was created to encourage the development and routine use of innovative treatment techn...

  8. The SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION program - Technology Profiles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program was created to evaluate new and promising treatment technologies for cleanup at hazardous waste sites. The mission of the SITE program is to encourage the development and routine use of innovative treatment technologie...

  9. SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION PROGRAM TECHNOLOGY PROFILES: SIXTH EDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program evaluates new and promising treatment and monitoring and measurement technologies for cleanup of hazardous waste sites. The program was created to encourage the development and routine use of innovative treatment techn...

  10. Managing Technology Resourcefully: Part I--Technology and Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The transformative powers of digital technology to improve student learning and the resulting effect of that technology to make the business of education more cost-effective are two of the more exciting dynamics in schooling today. Before the current school year ends, new products and upgrades will be available to replace much of the technology.…

  11. Advances in nondestructive evaluation technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    Research at NASA Langley's Materials Characterization Instrumentation Section has followed the philosophy of improving the science base of nondestructive evaluation and advancing the state of the art of quantitative interpretability of physical measurements of materials. Details of several R&D programs choosen to highlight the last several years are given. Applications of these technologies are presented in the area of stress measurement, characterization of metal heat treatment, and evaluation of material internal structure. A second focus of the program is on quantitative transducers/measurements that have resulted in better data in irregular inhomogeneous materials such as composites. Examples are presented of new capabilities resulting from these advances that include fatigue and impact damage evaluation.

  12. Controlling information technology costs, Part 2.

    PubMed

    Honan, Tom; Ciotti, Vince

    2002-01-01

    Health care executives are increasingly frustrated by Information Technology (IT). Although our industry is often accused of underinvesting in technology (hospitals average 2-3 percent of their costs in IT, compared to other industry's 8-10 percent), when IT investments are made, they fail to reflect demonstrable return to the bottom line. Yet the effective deployment of technology is so critical to the success of the organization and can in itself cause the failure of a health care system. While being forced to invest significant amounts of resources in the past two years preparing for Y2K, health care organizations have come under increasing financial pressures due to other industry developments. PMID:11968991

  13. Satellite Communications Technology Database. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Satellite Communications Technology Database is a compilation of data on state-of-the-art Ka-band technologies current as of January 2000. Most U.S. organizations have not published much of their Ka-band technology data, and so the great majority of this data is drawn largely from Japanese, European, and Canadian publications and Web sites. The data covers antennas, high power amplifiers, low noise amplifiers, MMIC devices, microwave/IF switch matrices, SAW devices, ASIC devices, power and data storage. The data herein is raw, and is often presented simply as the download of a table or figure from a site, showing specified technical characteristics, with no further explanation.

  14. High density circuit technology, part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, T. E.

    1982-01-01

    Dry processing - both etching and deposition - and present/future trends in semiconductor technology are discussed. In addition to a description of the basic apparatus, terminology, advantages, glow discharge phenomena, gas-surface chemistries, and key operational parameters for both dry etching and plasma deposition processes, a comprehensive survey of dry processing equipment (via vendor listing) is also included. The following topics are also discussed: fine-line photolithography, low-temperature processing, packaging for dense VLSI die, the role of integrated optics, and VLSI and technology innovations.

  15. Evaluation of manometric temperature measurement (MTM), a process analytical technology tool in freeze drying, part III: heat and mass transfer measurement.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaolin Charlie; Nail, Steven L; Pikal, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    This article evaluates the procedures for determining the vial heat transfer coefficient and the extent of primary drying through manometric temperature measurement (MTM). The vial heat transfer coefficients (Kv) were calculated from the MTM-determined temperature and resistance and compared with Kv values determined by a gravimetric method. The differences between the MTM vial heat transfer coefficients and the gravimetric values are large at low shelf temperature but smaller when higher shelf temperatures were used. The differences also became smaller at higher chamber pressure and smaller when higher resistance materials were being freeze-dried. In all cases, using thermal shields greatly improved the accuracy of the MTM Kv measurement. With use of thermal shields, the thickness of the frozen layer calculated from MTM is in good agreement with values obtained gravimetrically. The heat transfer coefficient "error" is largely a direct result of the error in the dry layer resistance (ie, MTM-determined resistance is too low). This problem can be minimized if thermal shields are used for freeze-drying. With suitable use of thermal shields, accurate Kv values are obtained by MTM; thus allowing accurate calculations of heat and mass flow rates. The extent of primary drying can be monitored by real-time calculation of the amount of remaining ice using MTM data, thus providing a process analytical tool that greatly improves the freeze-drying process design and control. PMID:17285746

  16. Upper stage technology evaluation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Studies to evaluate advanced technology relative to chemical upper stages and orbit-to-orbit stages are reported. The work described includes: development of LH2/LOX stage data, development of data to indicate stage sensitivity to engine tolerance, modified thermal routines to accommodate storable propellants, added stage geometries to computer program for monopropellant configurations, determination of the relative gain obtainable through improvement of stage mass fraction, future propulsion concepts, effect of ultrahigh chamber-pressure increases, and relative gains obtainable through improved mass fraction.

  17. 76 FR 30696 - Technology Evaluation Process

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... is also interested in information from organizations currently conducting technology evaluations or... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Technology Evaluation Process AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of request for information...

  18. PCS Security Technology Evaluation Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-01-30

    P-STET assists in the security technology decision making process from a costlbeneflt perspective. It aids in addressing such questions as whether to acquire and deploy new security technology, to re-configure an existing product or system, or to maintain status quo. P-STET offers both a qualitative and quantitative option. P-STET is most efficient when tailored to an organization’s security cost/benefit environment. It then serves as both a guide to show what types of security questions shouldmore » be addressed and as a means to analyze the data gathered from the questions to make an informed decision. The quantitative option provides a straightforward way to express costs/benefits in terms of dollars. It relies on the organization to quantify benefits or cost avoidances, and, therefore, best serves as a guide to ensure various cost and benefit angles are evaluated. The qualitative option allows the organization to assess costs by levels with respect to security and PCS budgets, operational impacts, and opportunity costs. Benefits are represented in terms of improvements to the organization’s operations and are also assessed by levels with respect to some benchmark such as compliance with best practices. Results are displayed graphically using radar charts, allowing the user to make a more intuitive decision. The shaded area of each chart represents the overall cost and benefit of the security investment. A good investment is denoted when the ratio of benefit shaded area to cost shaded area is large.« less

  19. NASA new technology identification and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lizak, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    Before disclosure in NASA Tech Briefs, reports of new technology are transmitted to the cognizant NASA Field Center Technology Utilization Office (TUO) where they are evaluated for novelty, technical validity and significance, and nonaerospace utility. If uncertainty exists regarding these criteria, the documentation may be forwarded to SRI International for evaluation before recommending publication. From November 1980 to November 1983, some 3,103 technologies were evaluated by SRI. Activities performed and progress made are summarized.

  20. A Report on the Technological Enhancements Project Evaluation: Deepening Early Learning Experiences through Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hupert, Naomi; Cervantes, Francisco; DeGroof, Emily

    2010-01-01

    As part of the "Ready to Learn" Initiative, Education Development Center, Inc. (EDC), was charged with addressing the evaluation of Technological Enhancements for the outreach efforts of three producers: Out of the Blue's Super WHY! Technology Add-On; Sesame Workshop's The Electric Company School's Initiative Curriculum; and WordWorld's eBook…

  1. Technology, Learning, and College Teaching Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fremont, Kimberly Miller

    2013-01-01

    College students utilize technology in vast ways. However, the results of studies evaluating the technological experiences of young people within the academic setting are varied, suggesting that students are more complex in their preferences for academic technology use than once thought. Yet no studies have explored student preferences for…

  2. Evaluation and Assessment in Educational Information Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Leping, Ed.; Johnson, D. LaMont, Ed.; Maddux, Cleborne D., Ed.; Henderson, Norma J., Ed.

    This book contains the following articles on evaluating and assessing educational information technology: (1) "Assessing Learning in the New Age of Information Technology in Education" (Leping Liu, D. LaMont Johnson, Cleborne D. Maddux, and Norma J. Henderson); (2) "Instruments for Assessing the Impact of Technology in Education" (Rhonda…

  3. Evaluating Schools Infused with Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Thomas C.

    1992-01-01

    Evaluating restructured education involves the following four roles or functions: (1) goal refinement; (2) documentation; (3) formative experimentation; and (4) impact assessment. Brief discussions of specific evaluation methods and design issues are provided. Formidable challenges involved in improving evaluation and, ultimately, education in…

  4. GRACE BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES - DARAMEND™ BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Grace Dearborn's DARAMEND™ Bioremediation Technology was developed to treat soils/sediment contaminated with organic contaminants using solid-phase organic amendments. The amendments increase the soil’s ability to supply biologically available water/nutrients to micro...

  5. SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES IN SITU ELECTROKINETIC EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY; INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    As a part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency evaluated the In-Situ Electrokinetic Extraction (ISEE) system at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    The SITE demonstration results show ...

  6. SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION PROGRAM: TECHNOLOGY WITH AN IMPACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    SITE promotes the development and implementation of innovative technologies for remediating hazardous waste sites and for evaluating the nature and extent of hazardous waste site contamination through four component segments. The SITE Program is a key element in EPA's efforts...

  7. Part-Time Faculty Evaluation: A Mirage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Hans A.

    1987-01-01

    Stresses the importance of faculty evaluation in continuing education and community service programs. Discusses the shortcomings of student evaluations. Identifies key steps in evaluation (i.e., establishing minimum qualifications, providing orientation to teaching, conducting in-class observations and evaluations, and taking follow-up action).…

  8. Lust remediation technologies. Part 2. Soil corrective action descriptions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Leaking underground storage tanks (LUSTs) have been recognized as a major potential source of ground water contamination in the U.S. Current state and federal regulations require the remediation of sites where the soil and/or ground water has been contaminated by leaking underground storage tanks. The document presents information on technologies for the remediation of contaminated soils at LUST sites. A companion volume, LUST Remediation Technologies: Part III - Ground Water Corrective Action Descriptions, presents information on technologies for the remediation of contaminated ground water at LUST sites.

  9. Coping With the Problems of a Technological Age, Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idleman, Hillis K.

    This is the tenth module in the series "Expanded Programs of Consumer Education" and is suggested for use either as a discrete unit or with other units in the series. In Part I, technology and its effects are defined and explained, with automation and computers briefly considered. The topics of pollution, recycling, energy sources, and the energy…

  10. A software technology evaluation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novaes-Card, David N.

    1985-01-01

    A set of quantitative approaches is presented for evaluating software development methods and tools. The basic idea is to generate a set of goals which are refined into quantifiable questions which specify metrics to be collected on the software development and maintenance process and product. These metrics can be used to characterize, evaluate, predict, and motivate. They can be used in an active as well as passive way by learning form analyzing the data and improving the methods and tools based upon what is learned from that analysis. Several examples were given representing each of the different approaches to evaluation. The cost of the approaches varied inversely with the level of confidence in the interpretation of the results.

  11. Technology for the Future: In-Space Technology Experiments Program, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckenridge, Roger A. (Compiler); Clark, Lenwood G. (Compiler); Willshire, Kelli F. (Compiler); Beck, Sherwin M. (Compiler); Collier, Lisa D. (Compiler)

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) In-Space Technology Experiment Program (In-STEP) 1988 Workshop was to identify and prioritize technologies that are critical for future national space programs and require validation in the space environment, and review current NASA (In-Reach) and industry/university (Out-Reach) experiments. A prioritized list of the critical technology needs was developed for the following eight disciplines: structures; environmental effects; power systems and thermal management; fluid management and propulsion systems; automation and robotics; sensors and information systems; in-space systems; and humans in space. This is part one of two parts and is the executive summary and experiment description. The executive summary portion contains keynote addresses, strategic planning information, and the critical technology needs summaries for each theme. The experiment description portion contains brief overviews of the objectives, technology needs and backgrounds, descriptions, and development schedules for current industry, university, and NASA space flight technology experiments.

  12. Evaluation of space station solar array technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The research concerning lightweight solar array assemblies since 1970 is reported. A bibliography of abstracts of documents used for reference during this period is included along with an evaluation of available solar array technology. A list of recommended technology programs is presented.

  13. Evaluating, Selecting, and Using Appropriate Assistive Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galvin, Jan C.; Scherer, Marcia J.

    This book addresses all aspects of assistive technology for individuals with disabilities, including policy, legislation, funding, evaluation, selection, and maintenance. Ten of the 15 chapters are written by individuals with disabilities and cover topics related to the use of technology in education, employment, and play. Specific chapters…

  14. SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION PROGRAM - ANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS 1993

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA.) established the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program in 1986, following passage of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA). The SITE Program, now in its eighth year, is an integral part of EPA's ...

  15. Economic impact of stimulated technological activity. Part 1: Overall economic impact of technological progress: Its measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Investigations were performed at the national economic level to explore the aggregate effects of technological progress on economic growth. Inadequacies in existing marco-economic yardsticks forced the study to focus on the cost savings effects achieved through technological progress. The central questions discussed in this report cover: (1) role of technological progress in economic growth, (2) factors determining the rate of economic growth due to technological progress; (3) quantitative measurements of relationships between technological progress, its determinants, and subsequent economic growth; and (4) effects of research and development activities of the space program. For Part 2, see N72-32174.

  16. EVALUATION OF SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE TECHNOLOGY TO REDUCE SOLVENT IN SPRAY COATING APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This evaluation, part of the Pollution Prevention Clean Technology Demonstration (CTD) Program, addresses the product quality, waste reduction, and economic issues of spray paint application using supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2). Anion Carbide has developed this technology and...

  17. EVALUATION OF SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE TECHNOLOGY TO REDUCE SOLVENT IN SPRAY COATING APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This evaluation, part of the Pollution Prevention Clean Technology Demonstration (CTD) Program, addresses the product quality, waste reduction, and economic issues of spray paint application using supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2). nion Carbide has developed this technology and ...

  18. Quantitative Evaluation of Management Courses: Part 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Cyril

    1973-01-01

    The author describes how he developed a method of evaluating and comparing management courses of different types and lengths by applying an ordinal system of relative values using a process of transmutation. (MS)

  19. 10 CFR Appendix K to Part 50 - ECCS Evaluation Models

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false ECCS Evaluation Models K Appendix K to Part 50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Pt. 50, App. K Appendix K to Part 50—ECCS Evaluation Models I. Required and Acceptable Features of Evaluation Models. II. Required Documentation. I. Required...

  20. Technology for the Future: In-Space Technology Experiments Program, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckenridge, Roger A. (Compiler); Clark, Lenwood G. (Compiler); Willshire, Kelli F. (Compiler); Beck, Sherwin M. (Compiler); Collier, Lisa D. (Compiler)

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) In-Space Technology Experiments Program In-STEP 1988 Workshop was to identify and prioritize technologies that are critical for future national space programs and require validation in the space environment, and review current NASA (In-Reach) and industry/ university (Out-Reach) experiments. A prioritized list of the critical technology needs was developed for the following eight disciplines: structures; environmental effects; power systems and thermal management; fluid management and propulsion systems; automation and robotics; sensors and information systems; in-space systems; and humans in space. This is part two of two parts and contains the critical technology presentations for the eight theme elements and a summary listing of critical space technology needs for each theme.

  1. TEXACO GASIFICATION PROCESS - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the evaluation of the Texaco Gasification Process (TGP) conducted under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program. The Texaco Gasification Process was developed by Texaco Inc. The TGP is a comm...

  2. Advanced waste management technology evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Couch, H.; Birbara, P.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this program is to evaluate the feasibility of steam reforming spacecraft wastes into simple recyclable inorganic salts, carbon dioxide and water. Model waste compounds included cellulose, urea, methionine, Igapon TC-42, and high density polyethylenes. These are compounds found in urine, feces, hygiene water, etc. The gasification and steam reforming process used the addition of heat and low quantities of oxygen to oxidize and reduce the model compounds.The studied reactions were aimed at recovery of inorganic residues that can be recycled into a closed biologic system. Results indicate that even at very low concentrations of oxygen (less than 3%) the formation of a carbonaceous residue was suppressed. The use of a nickel/cobalt reforming catalyst at reaction temperature of 1600 degrees yielded an efficient destruction of the organic effluents, including methane and ammonia. Additionally, the reforming process with nickel/cobalt catalyst diminished the noxious odors associated with butyric acid, methionine and plastics.

  3. Workshop on Advanced Technologies for Planetary Instruments, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, John F. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This meeting was conceived in response to new challenges facing NASA's robotic solar system exploration program. This volume contains papers presented at the Workshop on Advanced Technologies for Planetary Instruments on 28-30 Apr. 1993. This meeting was conceived in response to new challenges facing NASA's robotic solar system exploration program. Over the past several years, SDIO has sponsored a significant technology development program aimed, in part, at the production of instruments with these characteristics. This workshop provided an opportunity for specialists from the planetary science and DoD communities to establish contacts, to explore common technical ground in an open forum, and more specifically, to discuss the applicability of SDIO's technology base to planetary science instruments.

  4. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: BABCOCK AND WILCOX CYCLONE FURNACE VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) Cyclone Furnace Vitrification Technology is a treatment process for contaminated soils. he process was evaluated to determine its ability to destroy semivolatile organics and to isolate metals and simulated radionuclides into a non-leachable slag materi...

  5. Concept of using a benchmark part to evaluate rapid prototype processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cariapa, Vikram

    1994-01-01

    A conceptual benchmark part for guiding manufacturers and users of rapid prototyping technologies is proposed. This is based on a need to have some tool to evaluate the development of this technology and to assist the user in judiciously selecting a process. The benchmark part is designed to have unique product details and features. The extent to which a rapid prototyping process can reproduce these features becomes a measure of the capability of the process. Since rapid prototyping is a dynamic technology, this benchmark part should be used to continuously monitor process capability of existing and developing technologies. Development of this benchmark part is, therefore, based on an understanding of the properties required from prototypes and characteristics of various rapid prototyping processes and measuring equipment that is used for evaluation.

  6. ADDENDUM TO SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION PROGRAM TECHNOLOGY PROFILES, TENTH EDITION, VOLUME 1 - DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, now in its thirteenth year, is an integral part of EPA's research into alternative cleanup methods for hazardous waste sites around the nation. The SITE Program was created to encourage the development and routine us...

  7. Portable Diagnostics Technology Assessment for Space Missions. Part 2; Market Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Emily S.; Chait, Arnon

    2010-01-01

    A mission to Mars of several years duration requires more demanding standards for all onboard instruments than a 6-month mission to the Moon or the International Space Station. In Part 1, we evaluated generic technologies and suitability to NASA needs. This prior work considered crew safety, device maturity and flightworthiness, resource consumption, and medical value. In Part 2, we continue the study by assessing the current marketplace for reliable Point-of-Care diagnostics. The ultimate goal of this project is to provide a set of objective analytical tools to suggest efficient strategies for reaching specific medical targets for any given space mission as program needs, technological development, and scientific understanding evolve.

  8. DEMONSTRATION OF AQUAFIX AND SAPS PASSIVE MINE WATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES AT SUMMITVILLE MINE SITE, INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency evaluated two passive water treatment (PWT) technologies for metals removal from acid mine drainage (AMD) at the Summitville Mine Superfund Site in southern Colorado...

  9. Health technology assessment. Evaluation of biomedical innovative technologies.

    PubMed

    Turchetti, Giuseppe; Spadoni, Enza; Geisler, Eliezer Elie

    2010-01-01

    This article describes health technology assessment (HTA) as an evaluation tool that applies systematic methods of inquiry to the generation and use of health technologies and new products. The focus of this article is on the contributions of HTA to the management of the new product development effort in the biomedical organization. Critical success factors (CSFs) are listed, and their role in assessing success is defined and explained. One of the conclusions of this article is that HTA is a powerful tool for managers in the biomedical sector, allowing them to better manage their innovation effort in their continuing struggle for competitiveness and survival. PMID:20659860

  10. Performance Evaluation Methods for Assistive Robotic Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Katherine M.; Feil-Seifer, David J.; Matarić, Maja J.; Yanco, Holly A.

    Robots have been developed for several assistive technology domains, including intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorders, eldercare, and post-stroke rehabilitation. Assistive robots have also been used to promote independent living through the use of devices such as intelligent wheelchairs, assistive robotic arms, and external limb prostheses. Work in the broad field of assistive robotic technology can be divided into two major research phases: technology development, in which new devices, software, and interfaces are created; and clinical, in which assistive technology is applied to a given end-user population. Moving from technology development towards clinical applications is a significant challenge. Developing performance metrics for assistive robots poses a related set of challenges. In this paper, we survey several areas of assistive robotic technology in order to derive and demonstrate domain-specific means for evaluating the performance of such systems. We also present two case studies of applied performance measures and a discussion regarding the ubiquity of functional performance measures across the sampled domains. Finally, we present guidelines for incorporating human performance metrics into end-user evaluations of assistive robotic technologies.

  11. Evaluation of 3D technologies in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Gracco, Antonio; Mazzoli, Alida; Raffaeli, Roberto; Germani, Michele

    2008-01-01

    Quality of service, in terms of improvement in patient satisfaction, is an increasingly important objective in all medical fields, and is especially imperative in orthodontics due to the high numbers of patients treated. Information technology can provide a meaningful contribution to bettering treatment processes, and we maintain that systems such as CAD, CAM and CAE, although initially conceived for industrial purposes, should be evaluated, studied and customized with a view to use in medicine. The present study aims to evaluate Reverse Engineering (RE) and Rapid Prototyping (RP) in order to define an ideal chain of advanced technological solutions to support the critical processes of orthodontic activity. PMID:19294238

  12. Knee Pain in Children: Part I: Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Michael

    2016-01-01

    • On the basis of primarily consensus, due to lack of relevant clinical studies, the information obtained from the history and physical examination is the key to establishing a diagnosis and directing initial management of knee pain. • By applying history and physical examination findings to a diagnosis and management algorithm, clinicians can efficiently and effectively determine the potential cause of the knee pain. • On the basis of primarily consensus, due to lack of relevant clinical studies, the most important step of the evaluation of knee pain is to identify emergent conditions, including limb- and life-threatening conditions (eg, septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and malignancy), hip pathology, or conditions associated with effusions. PMID:26729778

  13. Evaluating innovation. Part 2: Development in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Schnurman, Zane; Kondziolka, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Patients, practitioners, payers, and regulators are advocating for reform in how medical advances are evaluated. Because surgery does not adhere to a standardized developmental pathway, how the medical community accepts a procedure remains unclear. The authors developed a new model, using publication data and patterns, that quantifies this process. Using this technique, the authors identified common archetypes and influences on neurosurgical progress from idea inception to acceptance. METHODS Seven neurosurgical procedures developed in the past 15-25 years were used as developmental case studies (endovascular coil, deep brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-l-nitrosourea wafer, and 3 radiosurgery procedures), and the literature on each topic was evaluated. A new metric the authors termed "progressive scholarly acceptance" (PSA) was used as an end point for community acceptance. PSA was reached when the number of investigations that refine or improve a procedure eclipsed the total number of reports assessing initial efficacy. Report characteristics, including the number of patients studied, study design, and number of authoring groups from the first report to the point of PSA, were assessed. RESULTS Publication data implicated factors that had an outsized influence on acceptance. First, procedural accessibility to investigators was found to influence the number of reports, number of patients studied, and number of authoring groups contributing. Barriers to accessibility included target disease rarity, regulatory restrictions, and cost. Second, the ease or difficulty in applying a randomized controlled trial had an impact on study design. Based on these 2 factors, 3 developmental archetypes were characterized to generally describe the development of surgery. CONCLUSIONS Common surgical development archetypes can be described based on factors that impact investigative methods, data accumulation, and ultimate acceptance by society

  14. Continuous evaluation of evolving behavioral intervention technologies.

    PubMed

    Mohr, David C; Cheung, Ken; Schueller, Stephen M; Hendricks Brown, C; Duan, Naihua

    2013-10-01

    Behavioral intervention technologies (BITs) are web-based and mobile interventions intended to support patients and consumers in changing behaviors related to health, mental health, and well-being. BITs are provided to patients and consumers in clinical care settings and commercial marketplaces, frequently with little or no evaluation. Current evaluation methods, including RCTs and implementation studies, can require years to validate an intervention. This timeline is fundamentally incompatible with the BIT environment, where technology advancement and changes in consumer expectations occur quickly, necessitating rapidly evolving interventions. However, BITs can routinely and iteratively collect data in a planned and strategic manner and generate evidence through systematic prospective analyses, thereby creating a system that can "learn." A methodologic framework, Continuous Evaluation of Evolving Behavioral Intervention Technologies (CEEBIT), is proposed that can support the evaluation of multiple BITs or evolving versions, eliminating those that demonstrate poorer outcomes, while allowing new BITs to be entered at any time. CEEBIT could be used to ensure the effectiveness of BITs provided through deployment platforms in clinical care organizations or BIT marketplaces. The features of CEEBIT are described, including criteria for the determination of inferiority, determination of BIT inclusion, methods of assigning consumers to BITs, definition of outcomes, and evaluation of the usefulness of the system. CEEBIT offers the potential to collapse initial evaluation and postmarketing surveillance, providing ongoing assurance of safety and efficacy to patients and consumers, payers, and policymakers. PMID:24050429

  15. Continuous Evaluation of Evolving Behavioral Intervention Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, David C.; Cheung, Ken; Schueller, Stephen M.; Brown, C. Hendricks; Duan, Naihua

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral intervention technologies (BITs) are web-based and mobile interventions intended to support patients and consumers in changing behaviors related to health, mental health, and well-being. BITs are provided to patients and consumers in clinical care settings and commercial marketplaces, frequently with little or no evaluation. Current evaluation methods, including RCTs and implementation studies, can require years to validate an intervention. This timeline is fundamentally incompatible with the BIT environment, where technology advancement and changes in consumer expectations occur quickly, necessitating rapidly evolving interventions. However, BITs can routinely and iteratively collect data in a planned and strategic manner and generate evidence through systematic prospective analyses, thereby creating a system that can “learn.” A methodologic framework, Continuous Evaluation of Evolving Behavioral Intervention Technologies (CEEBIT), is proposed that can support the evaluation of multiple BITs or evolving versions, eliminating those that demonstrate poorer outcomes, while allowing new BITs to be entered at any time. CEEBIT could be used to ensure the effectiveness of BITs provided through deployment platforms in clinical care organizations or BIT marketplaces. The features of CEEBIT are described, including criteria for the determination of inferiority, determination of BIT inclusion, methods of assigning consumers to BITs, definition of outcomes, and evaluation of the usefulness of the system. CEEBIT offers the potential to collapse initial evaluation and postmarketing surveillance, providing ongoing assurance of safety and efficacy to patients and consumers, payers, and policymakers. PMID:24050429

  16. 76 FR 37344 - Technology Evaluation Process

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ... commercial buildings based on the voluntary submittal of product test data. 76 FR 30696. As explained in the... Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Technology Evaluation Process AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of request for information...

  17. EPA'S SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION (SITE) PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1986, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agen- cy`s Offices of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER), and the Office of Research and Develop- ment (ORD) established a technology research, dem- onstration, and evaluation program to promote the development and use of alterna...

  18. The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program SUMMARY AND CLOSURE REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program promoted the development, commercialization, and implementation of innovative hazardous waste treatment technologies for 20 years. SITE offered a mechanism for conducting joint technology demonstration and evaluation ...

  19. Technologies for evaluating fish passage through turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2003-10-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of two types of technologies to observe fish and near neutrally buoyant drogues as they move through hydropower turbines. Existing or reasonably modified light-emitting and ultrasonic technologies were used to observe flow patterns, the response of fish to flow, and interactions between fish and turbine structures with good spatial and temporal accuracy. This information can be used to assess the biological benefits of turbine design features such as reductions in gaps at the tips and hub of turbine runner blades, reshaping wicket gates and stay vanes, modifications to draft tube splitter piers, and design changes that enhance egress through the powerhouse and tailrace.

  20. WASTE REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY EVALUATIONS AT THREE PRINTED WIRE BOARD MANUFACTURERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technologies at three printed wire board (PWB) manufacturers were evaluated for waste reduction, and costs were compared to existing operations. rom 1989 to 1993, these evaluations were conducted under US EPA's Waste Reduction Innovative Technology Evaluation (WRITE) Program, in ...

  1. Evaluation of innovative arsenic treatment technologies :the arsenic water technology partnership vendors forums summary report.

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, Randy L.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; McConnell, Paul E.; Kirby, Carolyn

    2006-09-01

    The lowering of the drinking water standard (MCL) for arsenic from 50 {micro}g/L to 10 {micro}g/L in January 2006 could lead to significant increases in the cost of water for many rural systems throughout the United States. The Arsenic Water Technology Partnership (AWTP), a collaborative effort of Sandia National Laboratories, the Awwa Research Foundation (AwwaRF) and WERC: A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development, was formed to address this problem by developing and testing novel treatment technologies that could potentially reduce the costs of arsenic treatment. As a member of the AWTP, Sandia National Laboratories evaluated cutting-edge commercial products in three annual Arsenic Treatment Technology Vendors Forums held during the annual New Mexico Environmental Health Conferences (NMEHC) in 2003, 2004 and 2005. The Forums were comprised of two parts. At the first session, open to all conference attendees, commercial developers of innovative treatment technologies gave 15-minute talks that described project histories demonstrating the effectiveness of their products. During the second part, these same technologies were evaluated and ranked in closed sessions by independent technical experts for possible use in pilot-scale field demonstrations being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories. The results of the evaluations including numerical rankings of the products, links to company websites and copies of presentations made by the representatives of the companies are posted on the project website at http://www.sandia.gov/water/arsenic.htm. This report summarizes the contents of the website by providing brief descriptions of the technologies represented at the Forums and the results of the evaluations.

  2. Extended-performance thruster technology evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, J. R.; Poeschel, R. L.; Bechtel, R. T.

    1978-01-01

    Two 30-cm ion thruster technology areas are investigated in support of the extended-performance thruster operation required for the Halley's comet rendezvous mission. These areas include an evaluation of the thruster performance and lifetime characteristics at increased specific impulse and power levels, and the design and evaluation of a high-voltage propellant electrical isolator. Experimental results are presented indicating that all elements of the thruster design function well at the higher specific impulse and power levels. It is shown that the only thruster modifications required for extended-performance operation are a respacing of the ion optics assembly and a redesign of the propellant isolators. Experimental results obtained from three isolator designs are presented, and it is concluded that the design and development of a high-voltage isolator is possible using existing technology.

  3. Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology

    DOEpatents

    Dahlgran, J.R.

    1999-08-17

    Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation uses encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration. 1 fig.

  4. Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology

    DOEpatents

    Dahlgran, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation using encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration.

  5. Decontamination technologies for release from bioprocessing facilities. Part I. Introduction. Part II. Decontamination of wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Wickramanayake, G.B. )

    1990-01-01

    Genetically engineered microorganisms are widely used in biotechnology. Wastewater from bioprocessing facilities will require treatment to ensure that effluents discharged into surface water or other waste streams are not a source of viable organisms or transmittable genetic material. The application of treatment technologies used in other industries to decontaminate the releases from biotechnology processing facilities was evaluated. Since published literature on the inactivation of recombinant-DNA organisms is very limited, information for bacteria, viruses, fungi and subcellular components was obtained. The data indicated that ozone, chlorine, chlorine dioxide, heat, ultraviolet light and ionizing radiation offer good performance potential for decontamination of rDNA processing wastewater. 180 refs., 7 figs., 26 tabs.

  6. 1992 UPDATE OF U.S. EPA'S SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION (SITE) EMERGING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Emerging Technology Program (ETP) has encouraged and financially supported further development of bench- and pilot-scale testing and evaluation of innovative technologies suitable for use at hazardous waste sites for five year...

  7. Zenon Environmental, Inc.: ZenoGem{trademark} biological and ultrafiltration technology. Innovative technology evaluation report; Superfund innovative technology evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    Zenon Environmental Inc. (Zenon), of Burlington, Ontario, Canada had developed an innovative wastewater treatment technology called the ZenoGem{trademark} technology. The ZenoGem{trademark} technology integrates biological treatment with membrane-based ultrafiltration to treat wastewater with high concentrations of organic contaminants that cause elevated concentrations of chemical oxygen demand (COD). The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) demonstration occurred between September and December 1994 at the Nascolite Superfund site (Nascolite) in Millville, Cumberland County, New Jersey. During the SITE demonstration, critical and noncritical measurements were evaluated. Critical measurements consisted of sample analyses and process measurements that directly impacted meeting the project`s primary technical objective. Critical measurements included collection of liquid and air samples for MMA and VOC analyses; liquid samples to evaluate COD; and flow rate measurements of the influent and effluent liquid streams. Noncritical, or system condition measurements, provided information on operating ranges, reliability, variability, cost-effectiveness, and full-scale remediation potential of the technology.

  8. The challenge for stormwater technology evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hjertberg, E.

    1999-07-01

    Manufacturers of innovative ultra-urban stormwater treatment technologies see an upsurge in demand for their engineered devices driven largely by new regulatory compliance requirements. In spite of this, they are having difficulty selling their products on the scale they envisioned because prospective buyers and operators of stormwater treatment equipment are unsure about how these new devices will actually perform in a given application. Government officials worry about the validity of manufacturer claims. Besides the obvious concern over bias introduced in tests, they are concerned about the transferability of test results from location to location. The demand-side community wants assurances that testing was performed consistently in well-defined site conditions and that the technical protocols under which various field tests were conducted were rigorous and carefully observed. The marketplace needs relevant information it can trust. The most effective way to provide that information is through a consensus-based process, directly involving the community of stakeholders who will ultimately make the decisions regarding the approval, adoption, and use of the technology. To provide a private sector, market-based approach to this objective evaluation process, a new Environmental Technology Evaluation center (EvTEC) was created in October 1996 through the Civil Engineering Research Foundation (CERF).

  9. 77 FR 48169 - The Information Technology Agreement: Advice and Information on the Proposed Expansion: Part 1...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... COMMISSION The Information Technology Agreement: Advice and Information on the Proposed Expansion: Part 1; The Information Technology Agreement: Advice and Information on the Proposed Expansion: Part 2 AGENCY... Information Technology Agreement: Advice and Information on the Proposed Expansion: Part 1, and...

  10. DOE underground storage tank waste remediation chemical processing hazards. Part I: Technology dictionary

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuth, S.F.

    1996-10-01

    This document has been prepared to aid in the development of Regulating guidelines for the Privatization of Hanford underground storage tank waste remediation. The document has been prepared it two parts to facilitate their preparation. Part II is the primary focus of this effort in that it describes the technical basis for established and potential chemical processing hazards associated with Underground Storage Tank (UST) nuclear waste remediation across the DOE complex. The established hazards involve those at Sites for which Safety Analysis Reviews (SARs) have already been prepared. Potential hazards are those involving technologies currently being developed for future applications. Part I of this document outlines the scope of Part II by briefly describing the established and potential technologies. In addition to providing the scope, Part I can be used as a technical introduction and bibliography for Regulatory personnel new to the UST waste remediation, and in particular Privatization effort. Part II of this document is not intended to provide examples of a SAR Hazards Analysis, but rather provide an intelligence gathering source for Regulatory personnel who must eventually evaluate the Privatization SAR Hazards Analysis.

  11. End-User Evaluations of Semantic Web Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    McCool, Rob; Cowell, Andrew J.; Thurman, David A.

    2005-11-07

    Stanford University's Knowledge Systems Laboratory (KSL) is working in partnership with Battelle Memorial Institute and IBM Watson Research Center to develop a suite of technologies for information extraction, knowledge representation & reasoning, and human-information interaction, in unison entitled 'Knowledge Associates for Novel Intelligence' (KANI). We have developed an integrated analytic environment composed of a collection of analyst associates, software components that aid the user at different stages of the information analysis process. An important part of our participatory design process has been to ensure our technologies and designs are tightly integrate with the needs and requirements of our end users, To this end, we perform a sequence of evaluations towards the end of the development process that ensure the technologies are both functional and usable. This paper reports on that process.

  12. SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION PROGRAM DEMONSTRATION PLAN FOR WESTINGHOUSE BIO-ANALYTIC SYSTEMS PENTACHLOROPHENOL IMMUNOASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This plan provides a detailed design and description of the demonstration and evaluation program for the Westinghouse Bio-Analytic Systems immunoassay technologies specific for the analysis of pentachlorophenol. he immunoassays measure parts per billion concentrations of pentachl...

  13. GEOSAFE CORPORATION IN SITU VITRIFICATION: INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the findings associated with a Demonstration of the Geosafe Corporation (Geosafe) In Situ Vitrification (ISV) Process. he Geosafe ISV Technology was evaluated under the EPA Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program in conjuction with remedia...

  14. GEOSAFE CORPORATION IN SITU VITRIFICATION: INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the findings associated with a Demonstration of the Geosafe Corporation (Geosafe) In Situ Vitrification (ISV) Process. The Geosafe ISV Technology was evaluated under the EPA Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program in conjuction with remedi...

  15. Orientation, Evaluation, and Integration of Part-Time Nursing Faculty.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Joanne S

    2015-01-01

    This study helps to quantify and describe orientation, evaluation, and integration practices pertaining to part-time clinical nursing faculty teaching in prelicensure nursing education programs. A researcher designed Web-based survey was used to collect information from a convenience sample of part-time clinical nursing faculty teaching in prelicensure nursing programs. Survey questions focused on the amount and type of orientation, evaluation, and integration practices. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze results. Respondents reported on average four hours of orientation, with close to half reporting no more than two hours. Evaluative feedback was received much more often from students than from full-time faculty. Most respondents reported receiving some degree of mentoring and that it was easy to get help from full-time faculty. Respondents reported being most informed about student evaluation procedures, grading, and the steps to take when students are not meeting course objectives, and less informed about changes to ongoing curriculum and policy. PMID:26151905

  16. Understanding Technology Literacy: A Framework for Evaluating Educational Technology Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Randall S.

    2011-01-01

    Federal legislation in the United States currently mandates that technology be integrated into school curricula because of the popular belief that learning is enhanced through the use of technology. The challenge for educators is to understand how best to teach with technology while developing the technological expertise of their students. This…

  17. Portable Diagnostics Technology Assessment for Space Missions. Part 1; General Technology Capabilities for NASA Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Emily S.; Chait, Arnon

    2010-01-01

    The changes in the scope of NASA s mission in the coming decade are profound and demand nimble, yet insightful, responses. On-board clinical and environmental diagnostics must be available for both mid-term lunar and long-term Mars exploration missions in an environment marked by scarce resources. Miniaturization has become an obvious focus. Despite solid achievements in lab-based devices, broad-based, robust tools for application in the field are not yet on the market. The confluence of rapid, wide-ranging technology evolution and internal planning needs are the impetus behind this work. This report presents an analytical tool for the ongoing evaluation of promising technology platforms based on mission- and application-specific attributes. It is not meant to assess specific devices, but rather to provide objective guidelines for a rational down-select of general categories of technology platforms. In this study, we have employed our expertise in the microgravity operation of fluidic devices, laboratory diagnostics for space applications, and terrestrial research in biochip development. A rating of the current state of technology development is presented using the present tool. Two mission scenarios are also investigated: a 30-day lunar mission using proven, tested technology in 5 years; and a 2- to 3-year mission to Mars in 10 to 15 years.

  18. Design and evaluation of the ONC health information technology curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Vishnu; Abbott, Patricia; Acteson, Shelby; Berner, Eta S; Devlin, Corkey; Hammond, William E; Kukafka, Rita; Hersh, William

    2014-01-01

    Objective As part of the Heath Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) implemented its Workforce Development Program, which included initiatives to train health information technology (HIT) professionals in 12 workforce roles, half of them in community colleges. To achieve this, the ONC tasked five universities with established informatics programs with creating curricular materials that could be used by community colleges. The five universities created 20 components that were made available for downloading from the National Training and Dissemination Center (NTDC) website. This paper describes an evaluation of the curricular materials by its intended audience of educators. Methods We measured the quantity of downloads from the NTDC site and administered a survey about the curricular materials to its registered users to determine use patterns and user characteristics. The survey was evaluated using mixed methods. Registered users downloaded nearly half a million units or components from the NTDC website. We surveyed these 9835 registered users. Results 1269 individuals completed all or part of the survey, of whom 339 identified themselves as educators (26.7% of all respondents). This paper addresses the survey responses of educators. Discussion Successful aspects of the curriculum included its breadth, convenience, hands-on and course planning capabilities. Several areas were identified for potential improvement. Conclusions The ONC HIT curriculum met its goals for community college programs and will likely continue to be a valuable resource for the larger informatics community in the future. PMID:23831832

  19. Evaluating technologies of oil spill surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Hover, G.L.

    1993-07-01

    Surveillance and monitoring of oil in the marine environment imposes a broad spectrum of remote sensing requirements. At the US Coast Guard Research Development Center, the environmental safety branch is sponsoring oil spill remote sensing research in four areas of technology: Synthetic aperture radar (SAR), Frequency-scanning microwave radiometry (FSR), Laser fluorosensing (LFS), and Forward-looking infrared (FLIR) imagers. SAR technology uses sophisticated signal processing to overcome prior limitations, providing images of higher and more uniform spatial acuity which may enable interpreters to more-readily distinguish petroleum slicks from others. The ability to determine the distribution of oil thickness within a slick is necessary when an estimate of oil volume is desired. Scientists at MIT have formulated a new approach to radiometric oil thickness measurement that takes advantage of recent advances in electronic component technology. The initial data collected with a prototype FSR instrument have validated the FSR concept and more work is ongoing. The Coast Guard is co-funding a program to demonstrate and evaluate the capabilities of an airborne laser fluorosensor to support oil spill response operations. During a controlled test, the instrument successfully demonstrated an ability to detect oil on water, ice, and various beach surfaces. Additional testing included different oil types and allowed for weathering. Data analysis is ongoing. Recent developments in infrared imager technology have produced a wide variety of off-the-shelf, portable cameras that could potentially provide a rapid-response spill assessment capability. The R D Center has been involved in the testing of many of these sensors.

  20. Cyber Security Evaluation of II&C Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Thomas

    2014-11-01

    cyber security team with expertise in nuclear utility cyber security programs and experience in conducting these evaluations. The evaluation has determined that, for the most part, cyber security will not be a limiting factor in the application of these technologies to nuclear power plant applications.

  1. Cement manufacture and the environment - Part I: Chemistry and technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Oss, H. G.; Padovani, A.C.

    2002-01-01

    Hydraulic (chiefly portland) cement is the binding agent in concrete and mortar and thus a key component of a country's construction sector. Concrete is arguably the most abundant of all manufactured solid materials. Portland cement is made primarily from finely ground clinker, which itself is composed dominantly of hydraulically active calcium silicate minerals formed through high-temperature burning of limestone and other materials in a kiln. This process requires approximately 1.7 tons of raw materials perton of clinker produced and yields about 1 ton of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, of which calcination of limestone and the combustion of fuels each contribute about half. The overall level of CO2 output makes the cement industry one of the top two manufacturing industry sources of greenhouse gases; however, in many countries, the cement industry's contribution is a small fraction of that from fossil fuel combustion by power plants and motor vehicles. The nature of clinker and the enormous heat requirements of its manufacture allow the cement industry to consume a wide variety of waste raw materials and fuels, thus providing the opportunity to apply key concepts of industrial ecology, most notably the closing of loops through the use of by-products of other industries (industrial symbiosis). In this article, the chemistry and technology of cement manufacture are summarized. In a forthcoming companion article (part II), some of the environmental challenges and opportunities facing the cement industry are described. Because of the size and scope of the U.S. cement industry, the analysis relies primarily on data and practices from the United States.

  2. 34 CFR Appendix A to Part 379 - Evaluation Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION PROJECTS WITH INDUSTRY Pt. 379, App. A Appendix A to Part 379—Evaluation Standards Standard 1: The primary objective of the project must be to assist individuals...

  3. 34 CFR Appendix A to Part 379 - Evaluation Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION PROJECTS WITH INDUSTRY Pt. 379, App. A Appendix A to Part 379—Evaluation Standards Standard 1: The primary objective of the project must be to assist individuals...

  4. Peer Dynamics Final Evaluation Report. 1979/1980. Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Cathy; Walker, Connie

    This is Part I of a final evaluation of a program designed to reduce the incidence of destructive risk-taking behavior (e.g. drug-alcohol abuse, and juvenile delinquency) among school-age youth. Background research indicates that peer group pressure is the single most important factor in dictating the presence or absence of juvenile delinquency…

  5. Peer Dynamics 1979-1980 Evaluation Report. Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Cathy; Walker, Connie

    This is Part 2 of a final evaluation of a program to reduce destructive risk-taking behavior (e.g., drug-alcohol abuse and juvenile delinquency) in school-age youth. The program uses peer counseling in schools to develop self-esteem and better communication skills in students. Analysis of attitude tests is performed and factors affecting the…

  6. DYNAPHORE, INC., FORAGER SPONGE TECHNOLOGY - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Forager Sponge is a volume reduction technology in which heavy metal contaminants from an aqueous medium are selectively concentrated into a smaller volume for facilitated disposal. he technology treats contaminated groundwater, surface voters and porous waters by absorbing d...

  7. Evaluating Technology Resistance and Technology Satisfaction on Students' Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norzaidi, Mohd Daud; Salwani, Mohamed Intan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Using the extended task-technology fit (TTF) model, this paper aims to examine technology resistance, technology satisfaction and internet usage on students' performance. Design/methodology/approach: The study was conducted at Universiti Teknologi MARA, Johor, Malaysia and questionnaires were distributed to 354 undergraduate students.…

  8. Technology Evaluation Report - SITE PROGRAM DEMONSTRATION OF THE ULTROX INTERNATIONAL ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In support of EPA's Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, this report presents the results of the Ultrox International technology demonstration. The Ultrox® technology (a registered trademark of Ultrox International) simultaneously uses ultraviolet (UV) radi...

  9. Analysis and correction of defects within parts fabricated using powder bed fusion technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mireles, Jorge; Ridwan, Shakerur; Morton, Philip A.; Hinojos, Alejandro; Wicker, Ryan B.

    2015-09-01

    Quality assurance is an important topic for additive manufacturing (AM) and often seen as a requirement for the transition and adoption of the technology toward fabrication of end use applications. As AM technologies are used for production, it is necessary to ensure high quality, repeatable, and reproducible components are manufactured. Various nondestructive examination techniques have been used to evaluate AM-fabricated parts to determine part quality post-fabrication (e.g. scanning and/or microstructural characterization). In situ monitoring methods have been developed for AM technologies to enable defect detection and have potential to be used for in situ monitoring and correction of fabrication anomalies (e.g. undesired temperature gradients and porosity). In this research, defects (e.g. pores) were seeded into parts fabricated using the powder bed fusion AM process, electron beam melting, and monitored using in situ infrared (IR) thermography. Results from layerwise thermography were compared with results obtained using computer tomography (CT) scanning techniques. Although the measured geometry of the seeded defects between IR thermography and CT was substantially different (area difference of ∼60%), the thermographs did provide a good indication of defects present within a fabricated part. Furthermore, defect correction methods were evaluated including post-processing methods such as hot isostatic pressing as well as in situ correction methods such as layer re-melting. Re-melting a porous layer successfully corrected defects and demonstrates a potential method for in situ defect correction if implemented in future systems equipped with automatic feedback control of powder bed fusion processes.

  10. Evaluation of engine coolant recycling processes: Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, W.H.

    1999-08-01

    Engine coolant recycling continues to provide solutions to both economic and environmental challenges often faced with the disposal of used engine coolant. General Motors` Service Technology Group (STG), in a continuing effort to validate the general practice of recycling engine coolants, has conducted an in-depth study on the capabilities of recycled coolants. Various recycling processes ranging from complex forms of fractional distillation to simple filtration were evaluated in this study to best represent the current state of coolant recycling technology. This study incorporates both lab and (limited) fleet testing to determine the performance capabilities of the recycled coolants tested. While the results suggest the need for additional studies in this area, they reveal the true capabilities of all types of engine coolant recycling technologies.

  11. Taking Part in Technology Education: Elements in Students' Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Autio, Ossi; Hietanoro, Jenni; Ruismaki, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the elements motivating comprehensive school students to study technology education. In addition, we tried to discover how students' motivation towards technology education developed over the period leading up to their school experience and the effect this might have on their future involvement with…

  12. Evaluation of Soil Salinity Amelioration Technologies in Timpaki, Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagea, Ioanna; Daliakopoulos, Ioannis; Tsanis, Ioannis; Schwilch, Gudrun

    2015-04-01

    Salinization is a soil threat that adversely affects ecosystem services and diminishes soil functions in many arid and semi-arid regions. Soil salinity management depends on a range of factors, and can be complex expensive and time demanding. Besides taking no action, possible management strategies include amelioration and adaptation measures. The WOCAT Technologies Questionnaire is a standardized methodology for monitoring, evaluating and documenting sustainable land management practices through interaction with the stakeholders. Here we use WOCAT for the systematic analysis and evaluation of soil salinization amelioration measures, for the RECARE project Case Study in Greece, the Timpaki basin, a semi-arid region in south-central Crete where the main land use is horticulture in greenhouses irrigated by groundwater. Excessive groundwater abstractions have resulted in a drop of the groundwater level in the coastal part of the aquifer, thus leading to seawater intrusion and in turn to soil salinization due to irrigation with brackish water. Amelioration technologies that have already been applied in the case study by the stakeholders are examined and classified depending on the function they promote and/or improve. The documented technologies are evaluated for their impacts on ecosystem services, cost and input requirements. Preliminary results show that technologies which promote maintaining existing crop types while enhancing productivity and decreasing soil salinity such as composting, mulching, rain water harvesting and seed biopriming are preferred by the stakeholders. Further work will include result validation using qualitative approaches. Keywords: soil salinity; salinization; evaluation of soil salinization amelioration techniques; WOCAT; RECARE FP7 project; Timpaki Crete

  13. Second International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review related recent developments in sensors and controls approaches, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the Second International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held. The symposium included 18 technical sessions in which 44 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of bearings, bearing modeling, controls, vibration isolation, micromachines, superconductivity, wind tunnel magnetic suspension systems, magnetically levitated trains (MAGLEV), rotating machinery and energy storage, and applications. A list of attendees appears at the end of the document.

  14. Third International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review recent developments in sensors, controls, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the Third International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Holiday Inn Capital Plaza in Tallahassee, Florida on 13-15 Dec. 1995. The symposium included 19 sessions in which a total of 55 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of bearings, superconductivity, vibration isolation, maglev, controls, space applications, general applications, bearing/actuator design, modeling, precision applications, electromagnetic launch and hypersonic maglev, applications of superconductivity, and sensors.

  15. Second International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review related recent developments in sensors and controls approaches, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the 2nd International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Westin Hotel in Seattle, WA, on 11-13 Aug. 1993. The symposium included 18 technical sessions in which 44 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of bearings, bearing modelling, controls, vibration isolation, micromachines, superconductivity, wind tunnel magnetic suspension systems, magnetically levitated trains (MAGLEV), rotating machinery and energy storage, and applications. A list of attendees appears at the end of the document.

  16. Technology evaluation: SAGE, Genzyme molecular oncology.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, J

    2001-02-01

    Genzyme Molecular Oncology (GMO) is using its SAGE (Serial Analysis of Gene Expression) combinatorial chemistry technology to screen compound libraries. SAGE is a high-throughput, high-efficiency method to simultaneously detect and measure the expression levels of genes expressed in a cell at a given time, including rare genes. SAGE can be used in a wide variety of applications to identify disease-related genes, to analyze the effect of drugs on tissues and to provide insights into disease pathways. It works by isolating short fragments of genetic information from the expressed genes that are present in the cell being studied. These short sequences, called SAGE tags, are linked together for efficient sequencing. The sequence data are then analyzed to identify each gene expressed in the cell and the levels at which each gene is expressed. This information forms a library that can be used to analyze the differences in gene expression between cells [293437]. By December 1999, GMO had identified a set of 40 genes from 3.5 million transcripts that were expressed at elevated levels in all cancer tissue but not seen in normal tissue. The company hope these may provide diagnostic markers or therapeutic targets. The studies also provided data furthering the understanding of the way cells use their genome [349968]. GMO has signed a collaborative agreement with the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to search for new drug candidates in the field of cancer chemotherapy. The collaboration combines GMO's SAGE technology with the NCI's extensive array of 60 cell-based cancer screens. Under the agreement, the NCI will evaluate Genzyme's library consisting of one million compounds against selected cancer screens to identify compounds with anticancer properties [255082]. Xenometrix granted a license agreement for gene expression profiling to GMO in February 1999, giving company access to claims covered in issued US and European patents. The license is non-exclusive and covers the

  17. Evaluation of volatile organic compound reduction technologies for metal coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Huang, E.W.

    1997-12-31

    Under the sponsorship of California Air Resources Board, AeroVironment Environmental Services, Inc. (AVES) is currently conducting a study to demonstrate a new zero-VOC Industrial Maintenance Metal Coating. This new technology can help the coating industry reduce emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). In a previous study conducted by AVES, current VOCs technologies available on the market for metal parts and product coatings were evaluated for compliance with the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) proposed Rule 1107 (Metal Parts and Product Coatings). There are low-VOC coating products available for industries of interest. For general metal coating applications, certain coating products can comply with current SCAQMD Rule 1107 VOC limits. Some of the low-VOC products that are considered as a substitute or an alternative to high-VOC petroleum-based products are summarized. The current available emerging technologies offer a great opportunity for emission reduction through a gradual shift from high to low/no VOC coatings. By phasing in low/no VOC coatings, industries will be able to reduce energy use and air emissions without installation of add-on controls.

  18. Technology: English Learners and Machine Translation, Part 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, Royal

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author touches on the ways that technology can come to the aid of teachers with students who don't speak English. He discusses different word processors that successfully translate foreign text.

  19. Demystifying Learning Technology Standards. Part II: Acceptance and Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonwalkar, Nishikant

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of learning technology standards focuses on acceptance and implementation, illustrated by SCORM specifications as applied to courseware development. Highlights include course structure; content hierarchy; multimedia assets; sharable content objects (SCOs); content aggregation; content packaging; categories of metadata; and content…

  20. International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Groom, N.J.; Britcher, C.P.

    1992-05-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review related recent developments in sensors and controls approaches, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, a symposium was held. The proceedings are presented. The sessions covered the areas of bearings, sensors and controls, microgravity and vibration isolation, superconductivity, manufacturing applications, wind tunnel magnetic suspension systems, magnetically levitated trains (MAGLEV), space applications, and large gap magnetic suspension systems.

  1. International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology, Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review related recent developments in sensors and controls approaches, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, a symposium was held. The proceedings are presented. The sessions covered the areas of bearings, sensors and controls, microgravity and vibration isolation, superconductivity, manufacturing applications, wind tunnel magnetic suspension systems, magnetically levitated trains (MAGLEV), space applications, and large gap magnetic suspension systems.

  2. Aerospace Applications of Magnetic Suspension Technology, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension with potential aerospace applications, and to review related recent developments in sensors and control approaches, superconducting technology, and design/implementation practices, a workshop was held at NASA-Langley. Areas of concern are pointing and isolation systems, microgravity and vibration isolation, bearing applications, wind tunnel model suspension systems, large gap magnetic suspension systems, controls, rotating machinery, science and applications of superconductivity, and sensors. Papers presented are included.

  3. REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION AT THE GILT EDGE MINE, SOUTH DAKOTA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document reports the findings of the Mine Waste Technology Program's Activity III, Project 29,The Remediation Technology Evaluation Project at the Gilt Edge Mine, S.D. This project consisted of evaluating three emerging acidic waste rock stabilization technologies and compar...

  4. Assessment of battery technologies for electric vehicles. Volume 2, part 1: Appendices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksen, G. L.; Ratner, E. Z.

    1990-02-01

    To help guide future EV battery R and D programs, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned a comprehensive assessment of viable secondary battery technologies. A total of 55 battery developers, from the United States, Canada, Europe, Asia, and Africa, were solicited to submit battery design concepts for an Improved Dual-Shaft Electric Propulsion (IDSEP) van. A team of 7 representatives from DOE laboratories and 10 independent EV and Battery consultants evaluated 42 design concepts. Using six criteria, five technical/economic criteria and a maturity/technical barriers criterion, the Assessment Team identified 12 most-promising batteries. This document Volume 2, Part 1 provides the following appendices to the report: information solicitation package; listing of battery technology developers; improved dual-shaft electric propulsion van; and battery design concepts.

  5. ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF CO2 SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bert R. Bock; Richard G. Rhudy; David E. Nichols

    2001-07-01

    In order to plan for potential CO{sub 2} mitigation mandates, utilities need better information on CO{sub 2} mitigation options, especially carbon sequestration options that involve non-utility operations. One of the major difficulties in evaluating CO{sub 2} sequestration technologies and practices, both geologic storage of captured CO{sub 2} and storage in biological sinks, is obtaining consistent, transparent, accurate, and comparable economics. This project is comparing the economics of major technologies and practices under development for CO{sub 2} sequestration, including captured CO{sub 2} storage options such as active oil reservoirs, depleted oil and gas reservoirs, deep aquifers, coal beds, and oceans, as well as the enhancement of biological sinks such as forests and croplands. An international group of experts has been assembled to compare on a consistent basis the economics of this diverse array of CO{sub 2} sequestration options. Designs and data collection are nearly complete for each of the CO{sub 2} sequestration options being compared. Initial spreadsheet development has begun on concepts involving storage of captured CO{sub 2}. No significant problems have been encountered, but some additional outside expertise will be accessed to supplement the team's expertise in the areas of life cycle analysis, oil and gas exploration and production, and comparing CO{sub 2} sequestration options that differ in timing and permanence of CO{sub 2} sequestration. Plans for the next reporting period are to complete data collection and a first approximation of the spreadsheet. We expect to complete this project on time and on budget.

  6. OVERVIEW AND UPDATE OF THE SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION (SITE) DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program is now in its sixth year of demonstrating technologies applicable to Superfund sites, and 56 projects are now part of the Program. nder the SITE Demonstration Program, the developer and EPA participate in a joint ventu...

  7. Part 2: NASA Future Forum Panel: Technology and Innovation

    NASA Video Gallery

    How important these factors are to the future of the nation’s economy is stressed by experts in a discussion moderated by NASA Deputy Chief Technologist, Joe Parrish. (Part 2 of 4) Since 2008, th...

  8. International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Groom, N.J.; Britcher, C.P.

    1992-05-01

    The goal of the symposium was to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review related recent developments in sensors and controls approaches, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices. The symposium included 17 technical sessions in which 55 papers were presented. The technical session covered the areas of bearings, sensors and controls, microgravity and vibration isolation, superconductivity, manufacturing applications, wind tunnel magnetic suspension systems, magnetically levitated trains (MAGLEV), space applications, and large gap magnetic suspension systems.

  9. First NASA Advanced Composites Technology Conference, Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John G., Jr. (Compiler); Bohon, Herman L. (Compiler)

    1991-01-01

    Presented here is a compilation of papers presented at the first NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Conference held in Seattle, Washington, from 29 Oct. to 1 Nov. 1990. The ACT program is a major new multiyear research initiative to achieve a national goal of technology readiness before the end of the decade. Included are papers on materials development and processing, innovative design concepts, analysis development and validation, cost effective manufacturing methodology, and cost tracking and prediction procedures. Papers on major applications programs approved by the Department of Defense are also included.

  10. Third NASA Advanced Composites Technology Conference, volume 1, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John G., Jr. (Compiler); Bohon, Herman L. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at the Third NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Conference. The ACT Program is a major multi-year research initiative to achieve a national goal of technology readiness before the end of the decade. Conference papers recorded results of research in the ACT Program in the specific areas of automated fiber placement, resin transfer molding, textile preforms, and stitching as these processes influence design, performance, and cost of composites in aircraft structures. Papers sponsored by the Department of Defense on the Design and Manufacturing of Low Cost Composites (DMLCC) are also included in Volume 2 of this document.

  11. International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology, Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the symposium was to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review related recent developments in sensors and controls approaches, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices. The symposium included 17 technical sessions in which 55 papers were presented. The technical session covered the areas of bearings, sensors and controls, microgravity and vibration isolation, superconductivity, manufacturing applications, wind tunnel magnetic suspension systems, magnetically levitated trains (MAGLEV), space applications, and large gap magnetic suspension systems.

  12. An Evaluation of Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Jelacic, Allan; Fortuna, Raymond; LaSala, Raymond; Nathwani, Jay; Nix, Gerald; Visser, Charles; Green, Bruce; Renner, Joel; Blankenship, Douglas; Kennedy, Mack; Bruton, Carol

    2008-04-01

    This 2008 document presents the results of an eight-month study by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its support staff at the national laboratories concerning the technological requirements to commercialize a new geothermal technology, Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS).

  13. An Institutional Approach to the Evaluation of Educational Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Gregor E.

    2003-01-01

    Outlines an institutional approach that guides the evaluation of educational technology in the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences at the University of Melbourne (Victoria, Australia). Roles for an internal evaluator and educational technology practitioners are proposed, and a conceptual framework that guides the evaluation process…

  14. Introduction to cadet center for advanced data evaluation technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulbach, Cathy; Jorgensen, C.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the Center for Advanced Data Evaluation Technology are presented. Topics covered include: technology problem; human problem; goals and objectives; key CADET focus; and elements of the modeling process.

  15. SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION (SITE) PROGRAM SPRING UPDATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, now in its fifth year, serves several purposes, including (1) the development and implementation of innovative treatment technologies for hazardous waste remediation and (2) the...

  16. FIELD EVALUATION OF DNAPL EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGIES: PROJECT OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five DNAPL remediation technologies were evaluated at the Dover National Test Site, Dover AFB, Delaware. The technologies were cosolvent solubilization, cosolvent mobilization, surfactant solubilization, complex sugar flushing and air sparging/soil vapor extraction. The effectiv...

  17. Evaluation of thermographic phosphor technology for aerodynamic model testing

    SciTech Connect

    Cates, M.R.; Tobin, K.W.; Smith, D.B.

    1990-08-01

    The goal for this project was to perform technology evaluations applicable to the development of higher-precision, higher-temperature aerodynamic model testing at Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) in Tullahmoa, Tennessee. With the advent of new programs for design of aerospace craft that fly at higher speeds and altitudes, requirements for detailed understanding of high-temperature materials become very important. Model testing is a natural and critical part of the development of these new initiatives. The well-established thermographic phosphor techniques of the Applied Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are highly desirable for diagnostic evaluation of materials and aerodynamic shapes as studied in model tests. Combining this state-of-the-art thermographic technique with modern, higher-temperature models will greatly improve the practicability of tests for the advanced aerospace vehicles and will provide higher precision diagnostic information for quantitative evaluation of these tests. The wavelength ratio method for measuring surface temperatures of aerodynamic models was demonstrated in measurements made for this project. In particular, it was shown that the appropriate phosphors could be selected for the temperature range up to {approximately}700 {degree}F or higher and emission line ratios of sufficient sensitivity to measure temperature with 1% precision or better. Further, it was demonstrated that two-dimensional image- processing methods, using standard hardware, can be successfully applied to surface thermography of aerodynamic models for AEDC applications.

  18. A graphical workstation based part-task flight simulator for preliminary rapid evaluation of advanced displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanke, Craig; Kuchar, James; Hahn, Edward; Pritchett, Amy; Hansman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Advances in avionics and display technology are significantly changing the cockpit environment in current transport aircraft. The MIT Aeronautical Systems Lab (ASL) has developed a part-task flight simulator specifically to study the effects of these new technologies on flight crew situational awareness and performance. The simulator is based on a commercially-available graphics workstation, and can be rapidly reconfigured to meet the varying demands of experimental studies. The simulator has been successfully used to evaluate graphical microburst alerting displays, electronic instrument approach plates, terrain awareness and alerting displays, and ATC routing amendment delivery through digital datalinks.

  19. A graphical workstation based part-task flight simulator for preliminary rapid evaluation of advanced displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanke, Craig; Kuchar, James; Hahn, Edward; Pritchett, A.; Hansman, R. John

    1994-01-01

    Advances in avionics and display technology are significantly changing the cockpit environment in current transport aircraft. The MIT Aeronautical Systems Lab (ASL) developed a part-task flight simulator specifically to study the effects of these new technologies on flight crew situational awareness and performance. The simulator is based on a commercially-available graphics workstation, and can be rapidly reconfigured to meet the varying demands of experimental studies. The simulator was successfully used to evaluate graphical microbursts alerting displays, electronic instrument approach plates, terrain awareness and alerting displays, and ATC routing amendment delivery through digital datalinks.

  20. ARCTIC FOUNDATIONS, INC. FREEZE BARRIER TECHNOLOGY; INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arctic Foundations, Inc. (AFI), of Anchorage, Alaska has developed a freeze barrier technology designed to prevent the migration of contaminants in groundwater by completely isolating contaminant source areas until appropriate remediation techniques can be applied. With this tech...

  1. IITRI RADIO FREQUENCY HEATING TECHNOLOGY - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The IIT Research Institute's Radiofrequency Heating System is an innovative technology used to heat soil contaminated with organic chemicals. y increasing the temperature of the contaminated soil, radiofrequency heating increases the efficiency of soil vapor extraction systems. h...

  2. Aerospace Applications of Magnetic Suspension Technology, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Papers presented at the conference on aerospace applications of magnetic suspension technology are compiled. The following subject areas are covered: pointing and isolation systems; microgravity and vibration isolation; bearing applications; wind tunnel model suspension systems; large gap magnetic suspension systems; control systems; rotating machinery; science and application of superconductivity; and sensors.

  3. The Mixed Waste Management Facility: Technology selection and implementation plan, Part 2, Support processes

    SciTech Connect

    Streit, R.D.; Couture, S.A.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to establish the foundation for the selection and implementation of technologies to be demonstrated in the Mixed Waste Management Facility, and to select the technologies for initial pilot-scale demonstration. Criteria are defined for judging demonstration technologies, and the framework for future technology selection is established. On the basis of these criteria, an initial suite of technologies was chosen, and the demonstration implementation scheme was developed. Part 1, previously released, addresses the selection of the primary processes. Part II addresses process support systems that are considered ``demonstration technologies.`` Other support technologies, e.g., facility off-gas, receiving and shipping, and water treatment, while part of the integrated demonstration, use best available commercial equipment and are not selected against the demonstration technology criteria.

  4. Evaluation of Smart Gun Technologies preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Smart Gun Technology Project has a goal to eliminate the capability of an unauthorized user from firing a law enforcement officer`s firearm by implementing {open_quote}smart{close_quote} technologies. Smart technologies are those that can in some manner identify an officer. This report will identify, describe, and grade various technologies as compared to the requirements that were obtained from officers. This report does not make a final recommendation for a smart gun technology, nor does it give the complete design of a smart gun system.

  5. Evaluation of Trenchless Installation Technology for Radioactive Wastewater Piping Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Sharon M; Jubin, Robert Thomas; Patton, Bradley D; Sullivan, Nicholas M; Bugbee, Kathy P

    2009-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) cleanup mission at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) includes dispositioning facilities, contaminated legacy materials/waste, and contamination sources and remediation of soil under facilities, groundwater, and surface water to support final Records of Decision (RODs). The Integrated Facilities Disposition Project (IFDP) is a roughly $15B project for completion of the EM mission at Oak Ridge, with a project duration of up to 35 years. The IFDP Mission Need Statement - Critical Decision-0 (CD-0) - was approved by DOE in July 2007, and the IFDP Alternative Selection and Cost Range - Critical Decision-1 (CD-1) - was approved in November 2008. The IFDP scope includes reconfiguration of waste collection and treatment systems as needed to complete the IFDP remediation and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) missions in a safe and cost-effective manner while maintaining compliance with all governing regulations and bodies and preserving the support of continuing operations at ORNL. A step in the CD-1 approval process included an external technical review (ETR) of technical approaches proposed in the CD-1 document related to the facility reconfiguration for the ORNL radioactive waste and liquid low-level waste management systems. The ETR team recommended that the IFDP team consider the use of trenchless technologies for installing pipelines underground in and around contaminated sites as part of the alternatives evaluations required in support of the CD-2 process. The team specifically recommended evaluating trenchless technologies for installing new pipes in existing underground pipelines as an alternative to conventional open trench installation methods. Potential benefits could include reduction in project costs, less costly underground piping, fewer disruptions of ongoing and surface activities, and lower risk for workers. While trenchless technologies have been used extensively in the

  6. Evaluation of the Texas Technology Immersion Pilot: An Analysis of the Baseline Conditions and First-Year Implementation of Technology Immersion in Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapley, Kelly; Sheehan, Daniel; Sturges, Keith; Caranikas-Walker, Fanny; Huntsberger, Briana; Maloney, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    The Texas Education Agency (TEA) used Title II, Part D monies to fund a wireless learning environment for high-need middle schools through the Technology Immersion Pilot (TIP). A concurrent research project funded by a federal Evaluating State Education Technology Programs grant is scientifically evaluating whether student achievement improves…

  7. Evaluation of the Texas Technology Immersion Pilot: An Analysis of the Baseline Conditions and First-Year Implementation of Technology Immersion in Middle Schools. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapley, Kelly; Sheehan, Daniel; Sturges, Keith; Caranikas-Walker, Fanny; Huntsberger, Briana; Maloney, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    The Texas Education Agency (TEA) used Title II, Part D monies to fund a wireless learning environment for high-need middle schools through the Technology Immersion Pilot (TIP). A concurrent research project funded by a federal Evaluating State Education Technology Programs grant is scientifically evaluating whether student achievement improves…

  8. Third NASA Advanced Composites Technology Conference, volume 1, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John G., Jr. (Compiler); Bohon, Herman L. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at the Third NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Conference held at Long Beach, California, 8-11 June 1992. The ACT Program is a major multi-year research initiative to achieve a national goal of technology readiness before the end of the decade. Conference papers recorded results of research in the ACT Program in the specific areas of automated fiber placement, resin transfer molding, textile preforms, and stitching as these processes influence design, performance, and cost of composites in aircraft structures. Papers sponsored by the Department of Defense on the Design and Manufacturing of Low Cost Composites (DMLCC) are also included in Volume 2 of this document.

  9. Practice improvement, part II: update on patient communication technologies.

    PubMed

    Roett, Michelle A; Coleman, Mary Thoesen

    2013-11-01

    Patient portals (ie, secure web-based services for patient health record access) and secure messaging to health care professionals are gaining popularity slowly. Advantages of web portals include timely communication and instruction, access to appointments and other services, and high patient satisfaction. Limitations include inappropriate use, security considerations, organizational costs, and exclusion of patients who are uncomfortable with or unable to use computers. Attention to the organization's strategic plan and office policies, patient and staff expectations, workflow and communication integration, training, marketing, and enrollment can facilitate optimal use of this technology. Other communication technologies that can enhance patient care include automated voice or text reminders and brief electronic communications. Social media provide another method of patient outreach, but privacy and access are concerns. Incorporating telehealthcare (health care provided via telephone or Internet), providing health coaching, and using interactive health communication applications can improve patient knowledge and clinical outcomes and provide social support. PMID:24261435

  10. Part 2 -- current program integrating strategies and lubrication technology

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.

    1996-12-01

    This paper is the second of two that describe the Predictive Maintenance Program for rotating machinery at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station. The Predictive Maintenance program has been enhanced through organizational changes and improved interdisciplinary usage of technology. This paper will discuss current program strategies that have improved the interaction between the Vibration and Lube Oil programs. The {open_quotes}Lube Oil{close_quotes} view of the combined program along with case studies will then be presented.

  11. The First NASA Advanced Composites Technology Conference, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John G., Jr. (Compiler); Bohon, Herman L. (Compiler)

    1991-01-01

    Papers are presented from the conference. The ACT program is a multiyear research initiative to achieve a national goal of technology readiness before the end of the decade. Conference papers recorded results of research in the ACT program on new materials development and processing, innovative design concepts, analysis development and validation, cost effective manufacturing methodology, and cost tracking and prediction procedures. Papers presented on major applications programs approved by the Department of Defense are also included.

  12. From Lunar Regolith to Fabricated Parts: Technology Developments and the Utilization of Moon Dirt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLemore, C. A.; Fikes, J. C.; McCarley, K. S.; Good, J. E.; Gilley, S. D.; Kennedy, J. P.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Space Exploration Policy has as a cornerstone the establishment of an outpost on the moon. This lunar outpost wil1 eventually provide the necessary planning, technology development, testbed, and training for manned missions in the future beyond the Moon. As part of the overall activity, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is investigating how the in situ resources can be utilized to improve mission success by reducing up-mass, improving safety, reducing risk, and bringing down costs for the overall mission. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), along with other NASA centers, is supporting this endeavor by exploring how lunar regolith can be mined for uses such as construction, life support, propulsion, power, and fabrication. An infrastructure capable of fabrication and nondestructive evaluation will be needed to support habitat structure development and maintenance, tools and mechanical parts fabrication, as well as repair and replacement of space-mission hardware such as life-support items, vehicle components, and crew systems, This infrastructure will utilize the technologies being developed under the In Situ Fabrication and Repair (ISFR) element, which is working in conjunction with the technologies being developed under the In Situ Resources Utilization (ISRU) element, to live off the land. The ISFR Element supports the Space Exploration Initiative by reducing downtime due to failed components; decreasing risk to crew by recovering quickly from degraded operation of equipment; improving system functionality with advanced geometry capabilities; and enhancing mission safety by reducing assembly part counts of original designs where possible. This paper addresses the need and plan for understanding the properties of the lunar regolith to determine the applicability of using this material in a fabrication process. This effort includes the development of high fidelity simulants that will be used in fabrication processes on the ground to

  13. Mathematics on the Move: Using Mobile Technologies to Support Student Learning (Part 2)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attard, Catherine; Northcote, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Continuing the series of articles on teaching mathematics with technology, this article furthers the authors' exploration of the use of a range of mobile technologies to enhance teachers' practices in the primary mathematics classroom. In Part 1 of this article, the authors explored the use of the iPod Touch and iPad. In Part 2, they explore…

  14. Manufacturing Component Parts of Mining Equipment With Application of Hardening Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valuev, D. V.; Malushin, N. N.; Valueva, A. V.; Dariev, R. S.; Mamadaliev, R. A.

    2016-04-01

    To ensure highest hardness and wear resistance the authors develop an aggregate technology of manufacturing mining equipment component parts. The aggregate technology of manufacturing faced component parts includes the following operations: plasma-jet hard-facing with high-speed steels; high-temperature tempering after the facing, ultrasonic surface strengthening treatment, additional tempering, reconstructive facing.

  15. COMPOST-FREE BIOREACTOR TREATMENT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE LEVIATHAN MINE, CALIFORNIA INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program, an evaluation of the compost-free bioreactor treatment of acid rock drainage (ARD) from the Aspen Seep was conducted at the Leviathan Mine Superfund site located in a remote, high altitude area of Alpine Co...

  16. Bench-Scale Evaluation Of Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramic Technology To Stabilize Mercury Waste Mixtures

    EPA Science Inventory

    This bench-scale study was conducted to evaluate the stabilization of mercury (Hg) and mercuric chloride-containing surrogate test materials by the chemically bonded phosphate ceramics technology. This study was performed as part of a U.S. EPA program to evaluate treatment and d...

  17. Innovative technology evaluation report, radio frequency heating, KAI Technologies, Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    Groeber, M.; Krietemeyer, S.; Saylor, E.

    1995-04-01

    A demonstration of KAI Technologies in-situ radio frequency heating system for soil treatment was conducted from January 1994 to July 1994 at Kelly Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas. This demonstration was conducted as a joint effort between the USEAP and the USAF. The technology was used to remove hydrocarbon contamination from a contaminated site that had been used during waste treatment and storage operations in the past. This report discusses the results of this demonstration and presents an economic analysis of the process.

  18. Technology evaluation: PRO-542, Progenics Pharmaceuticals inc.

    PubMed

    Mukhtar, M; Parveen, Z; Pomerantz, R J

    2000-12-01

    Progenics's rCD4-IgG2 (PRO-542) is a recombinant fusion protein, which has been developed using the company's Universal Antiviral Binding (UnAB) technology, and is in phase I/II clinical trials for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) infection [273391]. At the beginning of 1997, Progenics received a Phase II Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR) grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious diseases (NIAID) to fund the development of PRO-542 [236048]. A further grant of $2.7 million was awarded in August 1998 for the clinical evaluation of PRO-542 and other anti-HIV therapies [294200]. Progenics is collaborating with the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center (ADARC) in New York and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta [178410]. In February 2000, Progenics and Genzyme Transgenics Corp signed an agreement to continue the development of a transgenic source of PRO-542. Genzyme will develop transgenic goats that produce PRO-542 in their milk in exchange for undisclosed fees and milestone payments. Genzyme will supply PRO-542 to Progenics for clinical trials with a possibility for eventual commercial supply [357291]. Following on from this, in October 2000, Progenics received an SBIR grant to fund a two-year project with Genzyme Transgenics into the development of cost-effective methods for the manufacture of PRO-542, by optimization of the production of the drug in the milk of transgenic dairy animals [385982]. In August 2000, Punk, Ziegel & Company predicted that Progenics Pharmaceuticals will become sustainably profitable in 2003 following the launch of PRO-542 and GMK (Progenics Pharmaceuticals) in 2002 [390063]. PMID:11249748

  19. COGNIS TERRAMET® LEAD EXTRACTION PROCESS; INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents an evaluation of lead removal from sands and fines fractions of contaminated soils by the COGNIS TERRAMET® lead extraction process (COGNIS process). The evaluation was performed under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Superfund Innovative Technolog...

  20. IITRI RADIO FREQUENCY HEATING TECHNOLOGY - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    IITRI's patented in situ RFH technology enhances the removal of volatile and semi-volatile organics by soil vapor extraction (SVE). Electromagnetic energy heats the soil resulting in increased contaminant vapor pressures and potentially higher soil permeability. RFH heats soil us...

  1. MATRIX PHOTOCATALYTIC, INC. PHOTOCATALYTIC OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Matrix Technology involves the exposure of titanium dioxide (Ti02) particles to ultraviolet light (UV). The Ti02 is activated by UV light to produce high oxidizing hydroxyl radicals. Maxtrix also uses hydrogen peroxide (H202) and ozone (03) to enhance the treatment systems p...

  2. DYNAPHORE, INC. FORAGER™ SPONGE TECHNOLOGY - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Forager™ Sponge is an open-celled cellulose sponge incorporating an amine-containing chelating polymer that selectively absorbs dissolved heavy metals from aqueous waste streams. The Developer states that the technology can be utilized to remove and concentrate heavy metals f...

  3. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: RADIO FREQUENCY HEATING, KAI TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A demonstration of KAI Technologies in-situ radio frequency heating system for soil treatment was conducted from January 1994 to July 1994 at Kelly Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas. This demonstration was conducted as a joint effort between the USEPA and the USAF. The technol...

  4. 15 CFR Supplement No. 2 to Part 774 - General Technology and Software Notes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General Technology and Software Notes... REGULATIONS THE COMMERCE CONTROL LIST Pt. 774, Supp. 2 Supplement No. 2 to Part 774—General Technology and Software Notes 1. General Technology Note. The export of “technology” that is “required” for...

  5. Advanced technology airfoil research, volume 1, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    This compilation contains papers presented at the NASA Conference on Advanced Technology Airfoil Research held at Langley Research Center on March 7-9, 1978, which have unlimited distribution. This conference provided a comprehensive review of all NASA airfoil research, conducted in-house and under grant and contract. A broad spectrum of airfoil research outside of NASA was also reviewed. The major thrust of the technical sessions were in three areas: development of computational aerodynamic codes for airfoil analysis and design, development of experimental facilities and test techniques, and all types of airfoil applications.

  6. What Every Teacher Needs to Know about Technology. Part I: Technology in Education: Getting the Upper Hand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyrli, Odvard Egil; Kinnaman, Daniel E.

    1995-01-01

    This first in a five-part series of articles that form the basis for a professional development course on the impact of technology on classroom curriculum focuses on obstacles faced by teachers in bringing technology into the classroom and strategies to overcome them. Multimedia instruction, hypermedia, and computer networking are discussed. (LRW)

  7. Using Innovative Technologies for Manufacturing and Evaluating Rocket Engine Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, Erin M.; Hardin, Andy

    2011-01-01

    Many of the manufacturing and evaluation techniques that are currently used for rocket engine component production are traditional methods that have been proven through years of experience and historical precedence. As we enter into a new space age where new launch vehicles are being designed and propulsion systems are being improved upon, it is sometimes necessary to adopt new and innovative techniques for manufacturing and evaluating hardware. With a heavy emphasis on cost reduction and improvements in manufacturing time, manufacturing techniques such as Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) and white light scanning are being adopted and evaluated for their use on J-2X, with hopes of employing both technologies on a wide variety of future projects. DMLS has the potential to significantly reduce the processing time and cost of engine hardware, while achieving desirable material properties by using a layered powdered metal manufacturing process in order to produce complex part geometries. The white light technique is a non-invasive method that can be used to inspect for geometric feature alignment. Both the DMLS manufacturing method and the white light scanning technique have proven to be viable options for manufacturing and evaluating rocket engine hardware, and further development and use of these techniques is recommended.

  8. Lab on fiber technology and related devices, part I: a new technological scenario; Lab on fiber technology and related devices, part II: the impact of the nanotechnologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusano, A.; Consales, M.; Pisco, M.; Crescitelli, A.; Ricciardi, A.; Esposito, E.; Cutolo, A.

    2011-05-01

    PART ONE: The "Lab on Fiber" concept envisions novel and highly functionalized technological platforms completely integrated in a single optical fiber that would allow the development of advanced devices, components and sub-systems to be incorporated in modern optical systems for communication and sensing applications. The realization of integrated optical fiber devices requires that several structures and materials at nano and micro scale are constructed, embedded and connected all together to provide the necessary physical connections and light-matter interactions. This paper reviews the strategies, the main achievements and related devices in the "Lab on Fiber" roadmap discussing perspectives and challenges that lie ahead. PART TWO: After having reviewed, in the previous part, the main results achieved in the "Lab o Fiber" roadmap through the development of several wavelength-scale devices and components based on the lab on fiber concept, here we focus the attention on new trends involving innovative nano-fabrication strategies enabling to exploit further intriguing photonic and/or plasmonic phenomena at the forefront of optical research. Novel complex fabrication techniques of "Lab-on-fiber" device at the nanoscale are here presented and discussed, from advanced multi material stacks and drawing technique up to the use of nanotechnologies, including standard lithographic tools as well as new nano-imprinting approaches. In particular, for the first time, we report some preliminary results obtained by our multidisciplinary research group concerning the design and fabrication of a 2D hybrid metallo-dielectric photonic crystal (PC) nanostructure, directly realized by innovatively applying the electron beam lithography technique on the cleaved end of standard single mode optical fibers.

  9. Swirl technology: enhancement of design, evaluation, and application

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.; O`Connor, T.P. |

    1996-08-01

    While different forms of swirl and vortex technologies have been developed during the last thirty years, their major function has been the dual purpose of flow regulation and settleable-solids concentration for combined sewer overflows. A variety of opinions have developed regarding the application of these technologies, which vary from overwhelming support to reservations of their effectiveness. Performance of swirl/vortex devices depends on the settling characteristics of the suspended solids and the fraction of dissolved solids in the storm flow. When correctly installed with other controls of the combined-sewerage or separately sewered storm-water system, swirl/vortex devices can play an important role in combined sewer overflow and storm-water discharge pollution control. Reliable determination of performance depends principally upon accurate sampling techniques, suspended solids and other pollutant analyses, and settling-velocity distribution of the influent and effluent. Simultaneous flow-rate measurement synchronized to sampling times is also necessary. This paper discusses design, evaluation, and application practice enhancements for the use of swirl/vortex technologies as part of a combined sewer overflow and storm-water pollution control system.

  10. The Utah Educational Technology Initiative: Evaluation Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mergendoller, John R.; And Others

    This report begins with an overview of the Utah Educational Technology Initiative (ETI) that describes the state's financial commitment to educational improvement through educational technology, the ETI allocation process, the requirement that school districts and colleges of education match ETI funds with locally-generated funds or in-kind…

  11. 1994 UPDATE OF U.S. EPA'S SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION (SITE) EMERGING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE), Emerging Technology Partnership (ETP) has initiated actions since 1987 that support the Clinton Administration's policy to foster and accelerate the research and development of inn...

  12. HIGH VOLTAGE ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS, INC.ELECTRON BEAM TECHNOLOGY - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report evaluates a high-voltage electron beam (E-beam) technology's ability to destroy volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other contaminants present in liquid wastes. Specifically, this report discusses performance and economic data from a Superfund Innovative Technology...

  13. Development and evaluation of sealing technologies for photovoltaic panels

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S.J.; Hosking, F.M.; Baca, P.M.

    1998-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of a study to develop and evaluate low temperature glass sealing technologies for photovoltaic applications. This work was done as part of Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) No. SC95/01408. The sealing technologies evaluated included low melting temperature glass frits and solders. Because the glass frit joining required a material with a melting temperature that exceeded the allowable temperature for the active elements on the photovoltaic panels a localized heating scheme was required for sealing the perimeter of the glass panels. Thermal and stress modeling were conducted to identify the feasibility of this approach and to test strategies designed to minimize heating of the glass panel away from its perimeter. Hardware to locally heat the glass panels during glass frit joining was designed, fabricated, and successfully tested. The same hardware could be used to seal the glass panels using the low temperature solders. Solder adhesion to the glass required metal coating of the glass. The adhesion strength of the solder was dependent on the surface finish of the glass. Strategies for improving the polyisobutylene (PIB) adhesive currently being used to seal the panels and the use of Parylene coatings as a protective sealant deposited on the photovoltaic elements were also investigated. Starting points for further work are included.

  14. H Scan/AHP advanced technology proposal evaluation process

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, S.; Valladares, M.R.S. de

    1996-10-01

    It is anticipated that a family of high value/impact projects will be funded by the Hydrogen Program to field test hydrogen technologies that are at advanced stages of development. These projects will add substantial value to the Program in several ways, by: demonstrating successful integration of multiple advanced technologies, providing critical insight on issues of larger scale equipment design, construction and operations management, yielding cost and performance data for competitive analysis, refining and deploying enhanced safety measures. These projects will be selected through a competitive proposal evaluation process. Because of the significant scope and funding levels of projects at these development phases, Program management has indicated the need for an augmented proposal evaluation strategy to ensure that supported projects are implemented by capable investigative teams and that their successful completion will optimally advance programmatic objectives. These objectives comprise a complex set of both quantitative and qualitative factors, many of which can only be estimated using expert judgment and opinion. To meet the above need, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Energetics Inc. have jointly developed a proposal evaluation methodology called H Scan/AHP. The H Scan component of the process was developed by NREL. It is a two-part survey instrument that substantially augments the type and scope of information collected in a traditional proposal package. The AHP (Analytic Hierarchy Process) component was developed by Energetics. The AHP is an established decision support methodology that allows the Program decision makers to evaluate proposals relatively based on a unique set of weighted criteria that they have determined.

  15. Evaluation of User Acceptance of Mixed Reality Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yusoff, Rasimah Che Mohd; Zaman, Halimah Badioze; Ahmad, Azlina

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates users' perception and acceptance of mixed reality (MR) technology. Acceptance of new information technologies has been important research area since 1990s. It is important to understand the reasons why people accept information technologies, as this can help to improve design, evaluation and prediction how users will…

  16. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 218 - Requirements and Considerations for Implementing Technology Aided Point Protection

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... or yard access crossings equipped with approved supplemental safety devices (see 49 CFR part 222, app... Technology Aided Point Protection D Appendix D to Part 218 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... PRACTICES Pt. 218, App. D Appendix D to Part 218—Requirements and Considerations for Implementing...

  17. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 218 - Requirements and Considerations for Implementing Technology Aided Point Protection

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... or yard access crossings equipped with approved supplemental safety devices (see 49 CFR part 222, app... Technology Aided Point Protection D Appendix D to Part 218 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... PRACTICES Pt. 218, App. D Appendix D to Part 218—Requirements and Considerations for Implementing...

  18. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 218 - Requirements and Considerations for Implementing Technology Aided Point Protection

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... or yard access crossings equipped with approved supplemental safety devices (see 49 CFR part 222, app... Technology Aided Point Protection D Appendix D to Part 218 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... PRACTICES Pt. 218, App. D Appendix D to Part 218—Requirements and Considerations for Implementing...

  19. A Collaborative Process for Evaluating New Educational Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Greta

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to propose a collaborative process for evaluating, piloting and selecting, new and emerging educational technologies. It aims to promote discussion about how such an evaluative process can be inclusive of interdisciplinary stakeholders and envision the actual application of these technologies in real teaching and learning…

  20. Activity Theory and Higher Education: Evaluating Learning Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlon, E.; Issroff, K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines current practice in the evaluation of learning technology in the UK and proposes a new approach informed by Activity Theory. It is based on our experiences of using Activity Theory to understand students' and lecturers' experiences of technology-based teaching environments. We discuss the activity of evaluating learning…

  1. New Technologies, New Approaches to Evaluating Academic Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Peter J.; West, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    Technology has enabled a proliferation of publication venues for disseminating academic work. The task of evaluating the relative quality of each of these venues is simultaneously exacerbated and resolved by the use of new technologies. In this article, the authors propose a three-pronged framework for evaluating the quality of scholarly work that…

  2. Technology Skills as a Criterion in Teacher Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whale, David

    2006-01-01

    Few teachers are evaluated on their ability to use technology in the classroom despite conclusive evidence that its effective use has a positive impact on student achievement and that large amounts of resources are dedicated to placing technology in schools. Teacher evaluations in 220 school districts were reviewed for this study. Only one-fifth…

  3. An Ethical Framework for Evaluating Experimental Technology.

    PubMed

    van de Poel, Ibo

    2016-06-01

    How are we to appraise new technological developments that may bring revolutionary social changes? Currently this is often done by trying to predict or anticipate social consequences and to use these as a basis for moral and regulatory appraisal. Such an approach can, however, not deal with the uncertainties and unknowns that are inherent in social changes induced by technological development. An alternative approach is proposed that conceives of the introduction of new technologies into society as a social experiment. An ethical framework for the acceptability of such experiments is developed based on the bioethical principles for experiments with human subjects: non-maleficence, beneficence, respect for autonomy, and justice. This provides a handle for the moral and regulatory assessment of new technologies and their impact on society. PMID:26573302

  4. Mars in Situ Resource Utilization Technology Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Anthony C.; Santago-Maldonado, Edgardo

    2012-01-01

    We have examined the technologies required to enable Mars In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) because our understanding of Mars resources has changed significantly in the last five years as a result of recent robotic missions to the red planet. Two major developments, (1) confirmation of the presence of near-surface water in the form of ice in very large amounts at high latitudes by the Phoenix Lander and (2) the likely existence of water at lower latitudes in the form of hydrates or ice in the top one meter of the regolith, have the potential to change ISRU technology selection. A brief technology assessment was performed for the most promising Mars atmospheric gas processing techniques: Reverse Water Gas Shift (RWGS) and Methanation (aka Sabatier), as well as an overview of soil processing technology to extract water from Martian soil.

  5. Managing Technology Resourcefully: Part II--Working with Your District's Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Richard

    2009-01-01

    A large school district may have a technology department staffed by a chief technology officer who supervises two or more directors of operations, project managers, and technicians. On the other hand, a small district may employ an information technologist who works with technicians, consultants, volunteers with a knack for technology, and…

  6. RIPE integrity primitives, part 1 (RACE Integrity Primitives Evaluation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denboer, B.; Boly, J. P.; Bosselaers, A.; Brandt, J.; Chaum, D.; Damgaard, I.; Dichtl, M.; Fumy, W.; Vanderham, M.; Jansen, C. J. A.

    1993-04-01

    A manual intended for those seeking to secure information systems by applying modern cryptography is presented. It represents the successful attainment of goals by RIPE (RACE (Research and development of Advanced Communication technology in Europe) Integrity Primitives Evaluation). The recommended portfolio of integrity primitives, which is the main product of the project, forms the heart of the manual. By integrity, is meant the kinds of security that can be achieved through cryptography, apart from keeping messages secret. Thus included are ways to ensure that stored or communicated data is not illicitly modified, that parties exchanging messages are actually present, and that 'signed' electronic messages can be recognized as authentic by anyone. Of particular concern to the project were the high speed requirements of broadband communication. The project also aimed for completeness in its recommendations. As a result, the portfolio contains primitives, that is building blocks, that can meet most of today's perceived needs for integrity.

  7. RIPE integrity primitives, part 2 (RACE Integrity Primitives Evaluation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denboer, B.; Boly, J. P.; Bosselaers, A.; Brandt, J.; Chaum, D.; Damgaard, I.; Dichtl, M.; Fumy, W.; Vanderham, M.; Jansen, C. J. A.

    1993-04-01

    A manual intended for those seeking to secure information systems by applying modern cryptography is presented. It represents the successful attainment of goals by RIPE (RACE (Research and development of Advanced Communications technology in Europe) Integrity Primitives Evaluation). The recommended portfolio of integrity primitives, which is the main product of the project, forms the heart of the manual. By integrity, is meant the kinds of security that can be achieved through cryptography, apart from keeping messages secret. Thus included are ways to ensure that stored or communicated data is not illicitly modified, that parties exchanging messages are actually present, and that 'signed' electronic messages can be recognized as authentic by anyone. Of particular concern to the project were the high speed requirements of broadband communication. The project also aimed for completeness in its recommendations. As a result, the portfolio contains primitives, that is building blocks, that can meet most of today's perceived needs for integrity.

  8. Weapons of Mass Destruction Technology Evaluation and Training Range

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Larry Young

    2009-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has a long history for providing technology evaluation and training for military and other federal level Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) response agencies. Currently there are many federal organizations and commercial companies developing technologies related to detecting, assessing, mitigating and protecting against hazards associated with a WMD event. Unfortunately, very few locations exist within the United States where WMD response technologies are realistically field tested and evaluated using real chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive materials. This is particularly true with biological and radiological hazards. Related to this lack of adequate WMD, multi-hazard technology testing capability is the shortage of locations where WMD response teams can train using actual chemical, biological, and radiological material or highly realistic simulates. In response to these technology evaluation and training needs, the INL has assembled a consortium of subject matter experts from existing programs and identified dedicated resources for the purpose of establishing an all-hazards, WMD technology evaluation and training range. The author describes the challenges associated with creating the all-hazards WMD technology evaluation and training range and lists the technical, logistical and financial benefits of an all-hazards technology evaluation and training range. Current resources and capabilities for conducting all-hazard technology evaluation and training at the INL are identified. Existing technology evaluation and training programs at the INL related to radiological, biological and chemical hazards are highlighted, including successes and lessons learned. Finally, remaining gaps in WMD technology evaluation and training capabilities are identified along with recommendations for closing those gaps.

  9. Structural properties of H13 tool steel parts produced with use of selective laser melting technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šafka, J.; Ackermann, M.; Voleský, L.

    2016-04-01

    This paper deals with establishing of building parameters for 1.2344 (H13) tool steel processed using Selective Laser Melting (SLM) technology with layer thickness of 50 µm. In the first part of the work, testing matrix of models in the form of a cube with chamfered edge were built under various building parameters such as laser scanning speed and laser power. Resulting models were subjected to set of tests including measurement of surface roughness, inspection of inner structure with aid of Light Optical Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy and evaluation of micro-hardness. These tests helped us to evaluate an influence of changes in building strategy to the properties of the resulting model. In the second part of the work, mechanical properties of the H13 steel were examined. For this purpose, the set of samples in the form of “dog bone” were printed under three different alignments towards the building plate and tested on universal testing machine. Mechanical testing of the samples should then reveal if the different orientation and thus different layering of the material somehow influence its mechanical properties. For this type of material, the producer provides the parameters for layer thickness of 30 µm only. Thus, our 50 µm building strategy brings shortening of the building time which is valuable especially for large models. Results of mechanical tests show slight variation in mechanical properties for various alignment of the sample.

  10. Site selection and technology evaluation for pilot demonstrations in the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership program.

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, Randy L.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Aragon, Alicia R.; Dwyer, Brian P.

    2004-10-01

    As part of the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership program, Sandia National Laboratories will carry out field demonstration testing of innovative technologies that have the potential to substantially reduce the costs associated with arsenic removal from drinking water. The scope for this work includes: (1) selection of sites for pilot demonstrations, (2) identification of candidate technologies through Vendor Forums, proof-of-principle bench-scale studies managed by the American Water Works Association Research Foundation (AwwaRF) or the WERC design contest, and (3) pilot-scale studies involving side-by-side tests of innovative technologies. The goal of site selection is identification of a suite of sites that exhibit a sufficiently wide range of groundwater chemistries to allow examination of treatment processes and systems under conditions that are relevant to different geochemical settings throughout the country. A number of candidate sites have been identified through reviews of groundwater quality databases, conference proceedings and discussions with state and local officials. These include sites in New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, Oklahoma, Illinois, Michigan, Florida, Massachusetts and New Hampshire. In New Mexico, discussions have been held with water utility board staffs in Chama, Jemez Pueblo, Placitas, Socorro and several communities near Las Cruces to determine the suitability of those communities for pilot studies. The initial pilot studies will be carried at Socorro and Jemez Pueblo; other communities will be included as the program progresses. The proposed pilot test at a hot spring water source near Socorro will provide an opportunity to test treatment technologies at relatively high temperatures. If approved by the Tribal Government, the proposed pilot at the Jemez Pueblo would provide an opportunity to test technologies that will remove arsenic in the presence of relatively high concentrations of iron and manganese while leaving the beneficial

  11. Trends in Energy Management Technology - Part 3: State of Practiceof Energy Management, Control, and Information Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Gaymond; Webster, Tom

    2004-02-01

    In this report, the third in a series, we provide an evaluation of several products that exemplify the current state of practice of Energy Management, Control, and Information Systems (EMCIS). The available features for these products are summarized and analyzed with regard to emerging trends in EMCIS and potential benefits to the federal sector. The first report [1] covered enabling technologies for emerging energy management systems. The second report [2] serves as a basic reference for building control system (BCS) networking fundamentals and includes an assessment of current approaches to open communications. Part 4 of this series will discuss applications software from a user's perspective. It is important for energy managers in the Federal sector to have a high level of knowledge and understanding of these complex energy management systems. This series of reports provides energy practitioners with some basic informational and educational tools to help make decisions relative to energy management systems design, specification, procurement, and energy savings potential.

  12. Charged fog technology. Part I. Theoretical background and instrumentation development

    SciTech Connect

    Mathai, C.V.

    1983-07-01

    Waters sprays, the most common method of controlling dust in mines and from fugitive emission sources, do not control inhalable particles very effectively. Since most industrial pollutants and naturally occurring fugitive dust particles acquire electric charges as they are dispersed into the air, the inhalable particle control efficiency of water sprays can be significantly improved if the water droplets are also electrically charged to the opposite polarity. This paper reviews the basic principles of charged fog technology and describes a new charged fog generator which overcomes the problems of commercial charged fog devices. In the charged fog generator (CFG), water from a reservoir is introduced into a rotating cup where the water forms a thin layer due to centrifugal forces. As the water moves towards the lip of the cup, high speed air from an axial fan strikes the thin water film, breaks it into fine droplets and projects the droplets forward. The droplets thus generated have a typical mass median diameter of about 200 ..mu..m and a concentration median diameter of about 100 ..mu..m. The droplets are electrically charged by contact charging the inflowing water, providing a typical charge to mass ratio of 1.2 X 10/sup -6/ C/g with an applied voltage of about 15 kV. The water flow rate in the CFG can be varied from 4-70 L/h and the spray pattern can be easily adjusted to conform to the size and shape of the dust source to be treated. Other advantages of this device are that it uses only about 1 kW power, it is portable, and it is easily adaptable for use at remote areas where commerical electrical power supply is not available.

  13. Technologies for Nondestructive Evaluation of Surfaces and Thin Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The effort included in this project included several related activities encompassing basic understanding, technological development, customer identification and commercial transfer of several methodologies for nondestructive evaluation of surfaces and thin surface coatings. Consistent with the academic environment, students were involved in the effort working with established investigators to further their training, provide a nucleus of experienced practitioners in the new technologies during their industrial introduction, and utilize their talents for project goals. As will be seen in various portions of the report, some of the effort has led to commercialization. This process has spawned other efforts related to this project which are supported from outside sources. These activities are occupying the efforts of some of the people who were previously supported within this grant and its predecessors. The most advanced of the supported technologies is thermography, for which the previous joint efforts of the investigators and NASA researchers have developed several techniques for extending the utility of straight thermographic inspection by producing methods of interpretation and analysis accessible to automatic image processing with computer data analysis. The effort reported for this technology has been to introduce the techniques to new user communities, who are then be able to add to the effective uses of existing products with only slight development work. In a related development, analysis of a thermal measurement situation in past efforts led to a new insight into the behavior of simple temperature probes. This insight, previously reported to the narrow community in which the particular measurement was made, was reported to the community of generic temperature measurement experts this year. In addition to the propagation of mature thermographic techniques, the development of a thermoelastic imaging system has been an important related development. Part of the

  14. Science and technology in the white house, 1977 to 1980: part 2.

    PubMed

    Press, F

    1981-01-16

    This is the second half of a two-part article on Administration science and technology policy during the period 1977 to 1980. The first part discussed the role of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) in the context of the overall federal policy-making framework and institutional structure and described specific activities aimed at strengthening U.S. science and technology, fostering industrial innovation, enhancing relationships among government, universities, and industry, and improving the regulatory process. This part focuses on OSTP activities related to national security and foreign policy, space, energy and the environment, health, and agriculture, and discusses OSTP advisory mechanisms and planning efforts. PMID:17748010

  15. The NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program: Insertion of New Electronics Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Sampson, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program's new electronics technology trends. The topics include: 1) The Changing World of Radiation Testing of Memories; 2) Even Application-Specific Tests are Costly!; 3) Hypothetical New Technology Part Qualification Cost; 4) Where we are; 5) Approaching FPGAs as a More Than a "Part" for Reliability; 6) FPGAs Beget Novel Radiation Test Setups; 7) Understanding the Complex Radiation Data; 8) Tracking Packaging Complexity and Reliability for FPGAs; 9) Devices Supporting the FPGA Need to be Considered; 10) Summary of the New Electronic Technologies and Insertion into Flight Programs Workshop; and 11) Highlights of Panel Notes and Comments

  16. Evaluation and diagnosis of the hair loss patient: part II. Trichoscopic and laboratory evaluations.

    PubMed

    Mubki, Thamer; Rudnicka, Lidia; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Shapiro, Jerry

    2014-09-01

    The use of trichoscopy for evaluating a number of hair and scalp disorders is gaining popularity. It is a simple and noninvasive in vivo tool for visualizing hair shafts and the scalp. Recently, alopecias have been classified according to their trichoscopic findings. The second part of this 2-part continuing medical education article reviews recent advances in this field and describes a systematic approach for using the differential diagnostic findings of trichoscopy in alopecia. PMID:25128119

  17. Evaluation of Cryofreezer Technology through Simulation and Testing (DRAFT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Molly; Curley, Su

    2005-01-01

    A cryofreezer system is being evaluated as a new method of compressing and storing carbon dioxide (CO2) in an Advanced Life Support (ALS) Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS). A cryocooler is used to provide cold temperatures and heat removal while CO2 freezes and accumulates around a coldtip. The CO2 can then be stored as a liquid or high-pressure gas after it has been accumulated. This system was originally conceived as an In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) application for collecting CO2 from the Mars atmosphere to be converted to methane fuel with a Sabatier reaction. In the ALS application, this system could collect CO2 from the International Space Station (ISS) Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) for delivery to the Sabatier reactor. The Sabatier reaction is an important part of proposed Air Revitalization System (ARS) for ALS, and technology sharing is often possible between ISRU and ARS applications in CO2 processing systems. A prototype system developed and initially tested by Lockheed Martin Astronautics is now being evaluated in the Air Revitalization Technology Evaluation Facility (ARTEF) at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). This paper will discuss testing conducted through December 2004 to examine the performance and capacity of the system under a variety of input conditions. A simulation of the system was developed simultaneously using the Aspen Custom Modeler (ACM) software package. Several approaches using varying levels of detail could be used when modeling the system, and this paper will discuss the assumptions and choices made in this simulation, as well as the validity of the simulation for predicting performance of the prototype unit.

  18. Swirl technology: Proper design, application, and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.; O`Connor, T.P.

    1995-10-01

    Swirl and vortex technologies have been with us for over thirty years now, ever since Bernard Smisson incorporated a cylindrical vortex-type combined sewer overflow (CSO) regulator/settleable-solids concentrator into the Bristol, England sewerage system back in the early 1960`s. In the early 1970`s the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted a series of projects to develop and demonstrate swirl flow regulator/settleable-solids concentrator (swirl) technology. These projects resulted in the EPA swirl and helical-bend flow regulators/settleable-solids concentrators and the swirl degritter. New generations of this technology emerged after the EPA versions were developed including the Fluidsep{trademark} and the Storm King{trademark} vortex-hydrodynamic separators. However, despite different designs and applications, the main intent of the technologies are the same, i.e., to use the forces that arise from a change in flow direction to enhance settleable-solids separation from the storm flow. A variety of opinions have developed regarding the application of these technologies varying from overwhelming support to detractions that question their effectiveness. This abstract will show that proper design and placement in the sewerage system results in effective use of swirl technology. Reliable swirl pollution control efficiency determination is principally dependent on proper sampling and suspended and settleable-solids analysis techniques of the influent and effluent. Simultaneous flowrate measurement is also important. Without the complete capture of heavy and stratified suspended solids (SS) across the influent flow channel or water column, the apparent performance of the swirl will be less than the actual. Particle-settleability tests which are presented, must be conducted before and after installation, but especially before in order to decide if the inertial characteristics of SS in the storm flow warrants the use of a swirl.

  19. A new strategy for stiffness evaluation of sheet metal parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Q.; Volk, W.; Düster, A.; Rank, E.

    2011-08-01

    In the automotive industry, surfaces of styling models are shaped very often in physical models. For example, in the styling process of a car body important design work is realized by clay models and the resulting geometry information typically comes from optical scans. The scanned data is given in the form of point clouds which is then utilized in the virtual planning process for engineering work, e.g. to evaluate the load-carrying capacity. This is an important measure for the stiffness of the car body panels. In this contribution, the following two issues are discussed: what is the suitable geometric representation of the stiffness of the car body and how it is computed if only discrete point clouds exist. In the first part, the suitable geometric representation is identified by constructing continuous CAD models with different geometric parameters, e.g. Gaussian curvature and mean curvature. The stiffness of models is then computed in LS-DYNA and the influence of different geometric parameters is presented based on the simulation result. In the second part, the point clouds from scanned data, rather than continuous CAD models, are directly utilized to estimate the Gaussian curvature, which is normally derived from continuous surfaces. The discrete Gauss-Bonnet algorithm is applied to estimate the Gaussian curvature of the point clouds and the sensitivity of the algorithm with respect to the mesh quality is analyzed. In this way, the stiffness evaluation process in an early stage can be accelerated since the transformation from discrete data to continuous CAD data is labor-intensive. The discrete Gauss-Bonnet algorithm is finally applied to a sheet metal model of the BMW 3 series.

  20. The Study on Educational Technology Abilities Evaluation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Duan

    The traditional methods used to evaluate the test, the test did not really measure that we want to measuring things. Test results and can not serve as a basis for evaluation, so it was worth the natural result of its evaluation of weighing. This system is full use of technical means of education, based on education, psychological theory, to evaluate the object-based, evaluation tools, evaluation of secondary teachers to primary and secondary school teachers in educational technology as the goal, using a variety of evaluation of side France, from various angles established an informal evaluation system.

  1. DESIGN OF A MTBE REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examines the intrinsic variability of dissolved MTBE concentrations in ground water during the course of a pilot-scale bioremedial technology trial in Port Hueneme, California. A pre-trial natural gradient tracer experiment using bromide was conducted in an anaerobic t...

  2. Language Integrated Technology Project Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiegemeier, Lois

    The goal of the Language Integrated Technology Grant Project (LIT) consortium was to help provide critical components of successful reading programs through a combination of proven computer/print programs and teacher training. Through leadership provided by the Educational Service District 113 (Olympia, Washington), the LIT consortium of schools…

  3. Innovative Rehabilitation Technology Demonstration and Evaluation Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    The needs associated with the aging water infrastructure are immense and have been estimated at more than $1 trillion dollars over the next 20 years for water and wastewater utilities. To meet this growing need, utilities require the use of innovative technologies and procedures...

  4. Evaluation of the Texas Technology Immersion Pilot: An Analysis of Second-Year (2005-06) Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapley, Kelly; Sheehan, Daniel; Maloney, Catherine; Caranikas-Walker, Fanny; Huntsberger, Briana

    2007-01-01

    The Technology Immersion Pilot (TIP), a project sponsored by the Texas Education Agency (TEA), leverages federal Title II, Part D funds to support a wireless learning environment for high-need middle schools. A concurrent research project funded by a federal Evaluating State Educational Technology Programs grant is evaluating whether student…

  5. Evaluation of the Texas Technology Immersion Pilot: An Analysis of Second-Year (2005-06) Implementation. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Center for Educational Research, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Technology Immersion Pilot (TIP), a project sponsored by the Texas Education Agency (TEA), leverages federal Title II, Part D funds to support a wireless learning environment for high-need middle schools. A concurrent research project funded by a federal Evaluating State Educational Technology Programs grant is evaluating whether student…

  6. SYMPOSIUM ON MULTIMODALITY CARDIOVASCULAR MOLECULAR IMAGING IMAGING TECHNOLOGY - PART 2

    PubMed Central

    de Kemp, Robert A.; Epstein, Frederick H.; Catana, Ciprian; Tsui, Benjamin M.W.; Ritman, Erik L.

    2013-01-01

    -polymers. Conclusion With the increasing use of small animals for evaluating new clinical imaging techniques as well as providing increased insights into patho-physiological phenomena, the availability of improved detection systems, scanning protocols and associated software, the repertoire of molecular imaging is greatly increased in sensitivity and specificity. PMID:20457793

  7. Oxidative stress profiling: part II. Theory, technology, and practice.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Richard G; Plummer, John; Chowdhury, Kajal; Heward, Christopher

    2005-12-01

    Many of the most serious human diseases have a strong association with the steady-state level of oxidative damage in tissues. On an individual level this damage is defined as the patient's oxidative stress status (OSS). OSS is associated with many of the major age-related diseases such as cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease, as well as with the aging process itself. In general, the greater the OSS of the individual, the higher the risk for disease development. To further understand the role that OSS has as a causative or an associated factor for these diseases, and to develop more effective personalized therapy to minimize OSS, requires a reliable means to measure the many different components contributing to an individual's OSS. This procedure is called oxidative stress profiling (OSP) and represents a new strategy to simultaneously assess an individual's OSS as well as to identify key physiological parameters, such as the hormone, lipid, antioxidant, or iron profile, that may be responsible for that individual's OSS. The OSP strategy provides physicians with information that enable them to make a more accurate diagnosis of the patient's condition and to recommend specific types of therapy based on better scientific data. Follow-up studies of the patient would then be conducted using these same tests until the OSS of the patient has been minimized. The OSP strategy is particularly well suited for a personalized health optimization program. The procedure is based on measuring both the steady-state levels of oxidative damage in nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids and the protective and defense processes of these components using blood, urine, and breath samples. Testing individuals before and after a controlled amount of exercise (70% VO2) may also help to obtain greater sensitivity and reproducibility. Evaluation of test results to obtain an integrated calculated OSS result for a patient represents a major challenge. One approach is to present

  8. Assessment and evaluation of technologies for environmental restoration. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Uzochukwu, G.A.

    1999-01-15

    Nuclear and commercial non-nuclear technologies that have the potential of meeting the environmental restoration objectives of the Department of Energy are being evaluated. A detailed comparison of innovative technologies available will be performed to determine the safest and most economical technology for meeting these objectives. Information derived from this effort will be matched with the multi-objective of the environmental restoration effort to ensure that the best, most economical, and the safest technologies are used in decision making at USDOE-SRS. Technology-related variables will be developed and the resulting data formatted and computerized for multimedia systems. The multimedia system will be made available to technology developers and evaluators to ensure that the safest and most economical technologies are developed for use at SRS and other DOE sites.

  9. Assessment and evaluation of technologies for environmental restoration. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Uzochukwu, G. A.

    2000-06-30

    Nuclear and commercial non-nuclear technologies that have the potential of meeting the environmental restoration objectives of the Department of Energy are being evaluated. A detailed comparison of innovative technologies available will be performed to determine the safest and most economical technology for meeting these objectives. Information derived from this effort will be matched with the multi-objective of the environmental restoration effort to ensure that the best, most economical, and the safest technologies are used in decision making at USDOE-SRS. Technology-related variables will be developed and the resulting data formatted and computerized for multimedia systems. The multimedia system will be made available to technology developers and evaluators to ensure that the safest and most economical technologies are developed for use at SRS and other DOE sites.

  10. Test-Ease: An Innovative Evaluation Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Bill; And Others

    1976-01-01

    With the aid of funds received through a Title III ESEA, Section 306 grant, the San Juan Board of Cooperative Services (Colorado) has developed a system to aid teachers in evaluating their students. (Author)

  11. ROY F. WESTON, INC. AND IEG TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION UNTERDRUCK-VERDAMPFER-BRUNNEN (UVB) TECHNOLOGY; INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the findings of an evaluation of the Unterdruck-Verdampfer-Brunnen (UVB) technology developed by IEG Technologies and demonstrated in association with Roy F. Weston, Inc. This evaluation was conducted under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Su...

  12. Geosafe corporation in situ vitrification. Innovative technology evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The report summarizes the findings associated with a Demonstration of the Geosafe Corporation (Geosafe) In Situ Vitrification (ISV) Process. The Geosafe ISV technology was evaluated under the EPA Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program in conjunction with remediation activities associated with an EPA Region V removal action. The technology was assessed regarding its ability to treat pesticides (specifically chlordane, dieldrin, and 4,4`-DDT), radioactive contaminants, heavy metals and mercury to below Region V mandated limits. It was evaluated against the nine criteria for decision-making in the Superfund Feasilibity Study process.

  13. Technology evaluation for space station atmospheric leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, D.K.; Friesel, M.A.; Griffin, J.W.; Skorpik, J.R.; Shepard, C.L.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Kurtz, R.J.

    1990-02-01

    A concern in operation of a space station is leakage of atmosphere through seal points and through the walls as a result of damage from particle (space debris and micrometeoroid) impacts. This report describes a concept for a monitoring system to detect atmosphere leakage and locate the leak point. The concept is based on analysis and testing of two basic methods selected from an initial technology survey of potential approaches. 18 refs., 58 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Evaluating glaucoma damage: emerging imaging technologies

    PubMed Central

    Kostanyan, Tigran; Wollstein, Gadi; Schuman, Joel S

    2015-01-01

    The use of ocular imaging tools to estimate structural and functional damage in glaucoma has become a common clinical practice and a substantial focus of vision research. The evolution of the imaging technologies through increased scanning speed, penetration depth, image registration and development of multimodal devices has the potential to detect the pathology more reliably and in earlier stages. This review is focused on new ocular imaging modalities used for glaucoma diagnosis. PMID:27087829

  15. User evaluation of ride technology research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, J. R.; Brumaghim, S. H.

    1976-01-01

    The 23 organizations queried represent government, carrier, and manufacturing interests in air, marine, rail, and surface transportation systems. Results indicate a strong need for common terminology and data analysis/reporting techniques. The various types of ride criteria currently in use are discussed, particularly in terms of their respective data base requirements. A plan of action is proposed for fulfilling the ride technology needs identified by this study.

  16. SEPS solar array design and technology evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elms, R. V., Jr.; Young, L. E.

    1975-01-01

    The technology developments required and a preliminary design of a lightweight 25 kW solar array for the solar electric propulsion stage (SEPS) have been defined. The requirements for a 65 W/Kg SEPS solar array system requires significant component weight reductions over present state-of-the-art flexible solar arrays in both electrical and structural-mechanical designs. A requirement for operation from 0.3 au to 6.0 au presents a wide range of temperature environments as well as severe combined thermal/vacuum/UV radiation environments. Additional requirements are capability for partial array retraction operation, and capability for full retraction and automatic preloading for survival of the Shuttle reentry environment. An assessment of current lightweight flexible solar array technology is made against the SEPS solar array requirements and new technology requirements are defined. A preliminary design and the operating characteristics of a flat-fold solar array system meeting the SEPS requirements is presented. A full-width, 10-ft-tall functional array model, including representative welded electrical modules and a model astromast, was fabricated and tested.

  17. Evaluation across Contexts: Evaluating the Impact of Technology Integration Professional Development Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smolin, Louanne; Lawless, Kimberly A.

    2011-01-01

    Professional development is a necessary component for effectively integrating technology into classrooms. Unfortunately, the evaluation of technology integration professional development (TIPD) rarely moves beyond participation satisfaction surveys, nor does it reflect the concerns of the multiple stakeholders participating in technology…

  18. Science and Technology in the White House, 1977 to 1980: Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Press, Frank

    1981-01-01

    This is the second half of a two-part article on administration science and technology policy during the period 1977 to 1980. It focuses on activities of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) related to national security and foreign policy, space, energy, and the environment, health and agriculture, and OSTP advisory mechanisms and…

  19. Using Digital Technology to See Angles from Different Angles. Part 1: Corners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Host, Erin; Baynham, Emily; McMaster, Heather

    2014-01-01

    In Part 1 of their article, Erin Host, Emily Baynham and Heather McMaster use a combination of digital technology and concrete materials to explore the concept of "corners". They provide a practical, easy to follow sequence of activities that builds on students' understandings. [For "Using Digital Technology to See Angles from…

  20. Automated generation of uniform Group Technology part codes from solid model data

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, A.L.

    1987-01-01

    Group Technology is a manufacturing theory based on the identification of similar parts and the subsequent grouping of these parts to enhance the manufacturing process. Part classification and coding systems group parts into families based on design and manufacturing attributes. Traditionally, humans code parts by examining a blueprint of the part to find important features as defined in a set of part classification rules. This process can be difficult and time consuming due to the complexity of the classification system. Coding specifications can require considerable interpretation, making consistency a problem for organizations employing many (human) part coders. A solution to these problems is to automate the part coding process in software, using a CAD database as input. It is straightforward to translate the part classification rules into a rule based expert system. A more difficult task is the recognition of part coding features from a CAD database. Previous research in feature recognition has concentrated on material removal features (depressions such as holes, pockets and slots). Part classification requires the ability to recognize such features, plus other features such as hole patterns, symmetries and overall part shape. This paper extends feature recognition to include part classification and coding features and describes an expert system for automated part classification and coding being developed. This system accepts boundary-representation solid model data and generates a part code. Specific feature recognition problems (such as intersecting features) and the methods developed to solve these problems are presented.

  1. Active material based active sealing technology: Part 1. Active seal requirements vs. active material actuator properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Christopher P.; Carter, William; Herrera, Guillermo A.; McKnight, Geoffrey P.; Browne, Alan L.; Johnson, Nancy L.; Bazzi, Imad F.

    2010-04-01

    Current seals used for vehicle closures/swing panels are essentially flexible, frequently hollow structures whose designs are constrained by numerous requirements, many of them competing, including door closing effort (both air bind and seal compression), sound isolation, prevention of water leaks, and accommodation of variations in vehicle build. This paper documents the first portion of a collaborative research study/exploration of the feasibility of and approaches for using active materials with shape and stiffness changing attributes to produce active seal technologies, seals with improved performance. An important design advantage of an active material approach compared to previous active seal technologies is the distribution of active material regions throughout the seal length, which would enable continued active function even with localized failure. Included as a major focus of this study was the assessment of polymeric active materials because of their potential ease of integration into the current seal manufacturing process. In Part 1 of this study, which is documented in this paper, potential materials were evaluated in terms of their cost, activation mechanisms, and mechanical and actuation properties. Based on these properties, simple designs were proposed and utilized to help determine which materials are best suited for active seals. Shape memory alloys (SMA) and electroactive polymers (EAP) were judged to be the most promising.

  2. Technology transfer and evaluation for Space Station telerobotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Charles R.; Stokes, Lebarian; Diftler, Myron A.

    1994-01-01

    The international space station (SS) must take advantage of advanced telerobotics in order to maximize productivity and safety and to reduce maintenance costs. The Automation and Robotics Division at the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) has designed, developed, and constructed the Automated Robotics Maintenance of Space Station (ARMSS) facility for the purpose of transferring and evaluating robotic technology that will reduce SS operation costs. Additionally, JSC had developed a process for expediting the transfer of technology from NASA research centers and evaluating these technologies in SS applications. Software and hardware system developed at the research centers and NASA sponsored universities are currently being transferred to JSC and integrated into the ARMSS for flight crew personnel testing. These technologies will be assessed relative to the SS baseline, and, after refinements, those technologies that provide significant performance improvements will be recommended as upgrades to the SS. Proximity sensors, vision algorithms, and manipulator controllers are among the systems scheduled for evaluation.

  3. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION AND APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT: UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI/RISK REDUCTION ENGINEERING LABORATORY - HYDRAULIC FRACTURING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two pilot-scale demonstrations of the hydraulic fracturing technology for enhancing the permeability of contaminated silty clays have been evaluated under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program.The hydraulic fracturing technology was demonstrated in 1991 an...

  4. EVALUATION OF THIRTEEN SPILL RESPONSE TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thirteen spill response devices, concepts, or prototypes, developed under previous contracts to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for detection, containment, and cleanup of chemicals, were evaluated by potential users and manufacturers. The main goal of the project was to ...

  5. MOLECULAR BONDING SYSTEM - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document presents an evaluation of the Molecular Bonding System (MBS) and its ability to chemically stabilize three metals-contaminated wstes/soils during a SITe demo. The MBS process treated approximately 500 tons each of soil/Fill, Slag, and Miscellaneous Smelter Waste wit...

  6. Advanced technology wind shear prediction system evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gering, Greg

    1992-01-01

    The program overviews: (1) American Airline (AA)/Turbulence Prediction Systems (TPS), which have installed forward looking infrared predictive windshear system on 3 MD-80 aircraft; (2) AA/TPS AWAS III evaluation, which is a joint effort and is installed in the noise landing gear (NLG) area and a data recorder installed in the E/E compartment.

  7. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION OF THE DUAL DIGESTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Full-scale performance and costs of an innovative sludge stabilization process were evaluated at the three plants. The DDS incorporates a 1-day-detention-time, pure oxygen aerobic digester followed in series by an 8-day-detention-time anaerobic digester. Heat of biological oxidat...

  8. BIOLOGICAL PHOSPHORUS REMOVAL: A TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study of alternative biological phosphorus (bio-P) removal processes was undertaken to evaluate their effectiveness and reliability. Thirty such facilities were identified in the United States and Canada. Four plants were selected for detailed study. The PhoStrip process is use...

  9. Panel 1 - comparative evaluation of deposition technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Fenske, G.R.; Stodolsky, F.; Benson, D.K.; Pitts, R.J.; Bhat, D.G.; Yulin Chen; Gat, R.; Sunkara, M.K.; Kelly, M.; Lawler, J.E.; Nagle, D.C.; Outka, D.; Revankar, G.S.; Subramaniam, V.V.; Wilbur, P.J.; Mingshow Wong; Woolam, W.E.

    1993-01-01

    This working group attempted to evaluate/compare the different types of deposition techniques currently under investigation for depositing diamond and diamond-like carbon films. A table lists the broad types of techniques that were considered for depositing diamond and diamond-like carbon films. After some discussion, it was agreed that any evaluation of the various techniques would be dependent on the end application. Thus the next action was to list the different areas where diamond and DLC films could find applications in transportation. These application areas are listed in a table. The table intentionally does not go into great detail on applications because that subject is dealt with specifically by Panel No. 4 - Applications To Transportation. The next action concentrated on identifying critical issues or limitations that need to be considered in evaluating the different processes. An attempt was then made to rank different broad categories of deposition techniques currently available or under development based on the four application areas and the limitations. These rankings/evaluations are given for diamond and DLC techniques. Finally, the working group tried to identify critical development and research issues that need to be incorporated into developing a long-term program that focuses on diamond/DLC coatings for transportation needs. 5 tabs.

  10. Curriculum Development--Post-Secondary Electro-Mechanical Technology. Parts I-IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Technical Inst., Sweetwater.

    This curriculum guide consists of materials for use in teaching a four-part course in electromechanical technical technology. The first part contains nine units dealing with hydraulics and nine units on pneumatics. Addressed in the individual units are the following topics: an introduction to hydraulics; control of hydraulic energy; check valves…