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Sample records for evaporative cooling systems

  1. Evaporative cooling enhanced cold storage system

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Peter

    1991-01-01

    The invention provides an evaporatively enhanced cold storage system wherein a warm air stream is cooled and the cooled air stream is thereafter passed into contact with a cold storage unit. Moisture is added to the cooled air stream prior to or during contact of the cooled air stream with the cold storage unit to effect enhanced cooling of the cold storage unit due to evaporation of all or a portion of the added moisture. Preferably at least a portion of the added moisture comprises water condensed during the cooling of the warm air stream.

  2. Evaporative cooling enhanced cold storage system

    DOEpatents

    Carr, P.

    1991-10-15

    The invention provides an evaporatively enhanced cold storage system wherein a warm air stream is cooled and the cooled air stream is thereafter passed into contact with a cold storage unit. Moisture is added to the cooled air stream prior to or during contact of the cooled air stream with the cold storage unit to effect enhanced cooling of the cold storage unit due to evaporation of all or a portion of the added moisture. Preferably at least a portion of the added moisture comprises water condensed during the cooling of the warm air stream. 3 figures.

  3. Atmospheric impacts of evaporative cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    The observed atmospheric impacts resulting from the use of evaporative cooling systems are minor and usually environmentally acceptable. Although these impacts are also considerably smaller than those usually predicted a few years ago, regulatory agency requirements are such that these effects must be identified and quantified.

  4. New Directions for Evaporative Cooling Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robison, Rita

    1981-01-01

    New energy saving technology can be applied to older cooling towers; in addition, evaporative chilling, a process that links a cooling tower to the chilling equipment, can reduce energy use by 80 percent. (Author/MLF)

  5. Design evaluation of an improved indirect evaporative cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, J. R.

    1982-04-01

    The results of an investigation of an improved indirect evaporative cooling (TRC) system are presented. A cooling system concept which combines an indirect evaporative cooling unit with a conventional vapor compression refrigeration system was studied. In this system, initial cooling of outside air is performed in the IEC unit with additional cooling taking place across the evaporator coil of the conventional refrigeration unit before delivery to the conditioned space. The condenser coil rejects heat to the secondary (humidified) air stream of the IEC before it is discharged outdoors. A simulation model was developed to predict the performance characteristics of the concept for additional conditions beyond those used in the experimental test program. Principal output parameters from both the test program and simulation model included delivery air temperature, cooling capacity, and system COP.

  6. EVA space suit Evaporative Cooling/Heating Glove System (ECHGS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coss, F. A.

    1976-01-01

    A new astronaut glove, the Evaporative Cooling/Heating Glove System (ECHGS), was designed and developed to allow the handling of objects between -200 F and +200 F. Active heating elements, positioned at each finger pad, provide additional heat to the finger pads from the rest of the finger. A water evaporative cooling system provides cooling by the injection of water to the finger areas and the subsequent direct evaporation to space. Thin, flexible insulation has been developed for the finger areas to limit thermal conductivity. Component and full glove tests have shown that the glove meets and exceeds the requirements to hold a 11/2 inch diameter bar at + or - 200 F for three minutes within comfort limits. The ECHGS is flexible, lightweight and comfortable. Tactility is reasonable and small objects can be identified especially by the fingertips beyond the one half width active elements.

  7. Two stage indirect evaporative cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Bourne, Richard C.; Lee, Brian E.; Callaway, Duncan

    2005-08-23

    A two stage indirect evaporative cooler that moves air from a blower mounted above the unit, vertically downward into dry air passages in an indirect stage and turns the air flow horizontally before leaving the indirect stage. After leaving the dry passages, a major air portion travels into the direct stage and the remainder of the air is induced by a pressure drop in the direct stage to turn 180.degree. and returns horizontally through wet passages in the indirect stage and out of the unit as exhaust air.

  8. Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator; An Enhanced Evaporative Cooling Systems for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Portable Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Makinen, Janice V.; Miller, Sean.; Campbell, Colin; Lynch, Bill; Vogel, Matt; Craft, Jesse; Petty, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator - Baseline heat rejection technology for the Portable Life Support System of the Advanced EMU center dot Replaces sublimator in the current EMU center dot Contamination insensitive center dot Can work with Lithium Chloride Absorber Radiator in Spacesuit Evaporator Absorber Radiator (SEAR) to reject heat and reuse evaporated water The Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) is being developed to replace the sublimator for future generation spacesuits. Water in LCVG absorbs body heat while circulating center dot Warm water pumped through SWME center dot SWME evaporates water vapor, while maintaining liquid water - Cools water center dot Cooled water is then recirculated through LCVG. center dot LCVG water lost due to evaporation (cooling) is replaced from feedwater The Independent TCV Manifold reduces design complexity and manufacturing difficulty of the SWME End Cap. center dot The offset motor for the new BPV reduces the volume profile of the SWME by laying the motor flat on the End Cap alongside the TCV.

  9. Evaporative Cooling and Dehumidification Garment for Portable Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael; Chen, Weibo; Bue, Grant

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the design and development of an innovative thermal and humidity control system for future space suits. The system comprises an evaporation cooling and dehumidification garment (ECDG) and a lithium chloride absorber radiator (LCAR). The ECDG absorbs heat and water vapor from inside the suit pressure garment, while the LCAR rejects heat to space without venting water vapor. The ECDG is built from thin, flexible patches with coversheets made of non-porous, water-permeable membranes that -enclose arrays of vapor flow passages. Water vapor from inside the spacesuit diffuses across the water permeable membranes, enters the vapor flow channels, and then flows to the LCAR, thus dehumidifying the internal volume of the space suit pressure garment. Additional water evaporation inside the ECDG provides cooling for sensible heat loads. -The heat released from condensation and absorption in the LCAR is rejected to the environment by thermal radiation. We have assembled lightweight and flexible ECDG pouches from prototypical materials and measured their performance in a series of separate effects tests under well-controlled, prototypical conditions. Sweating hot plate tests at typical space suit pressures show that ECDG pouches can absorb over 60 W/ft of latent heat and 20 W/ft of sensible heat from the pressure garment environment. These results are in good agreement with the predictions of our analysis models.

  10. Next-Generation Evaporative Cooling Systems for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Portable Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makinen, Janice V.; Anchondo, Ian; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Colunga, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    The development of the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) Portable Life Support System (PLSS) is currently underway at NASA Johnson Space Center. The AEMU PLSS features two new evaporative cooling systems, the Reduced Volume Prototype Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (RVP SWME), and the Auxiliary Cooling Loop (ACL). The RVP SWME is the third generation of hollow fiber SWME hardware, and like its predecessors, RVP SWME provides nominal crewmember and electronics cooling by flowing water through porous hollow fibers. Water vapor escapes through the hollow fiber pores, thereby cooling the liquid water that remains inside of the fibers. This cooled water is then recirculated to remove heat from the crewmember and PLSS electronics. Major design improvements, including a 36% reduction in volume, reduced weight, and more flight like back-pressure valve, facilitate the packaging of RVP SWME in the AEMU PLSS envelope. In addition to the RVP SWME, the Auxiliary Cooling Loop (ACL), was developed for contingency crewmember cooling. The ACL is a completely redundant, independent cooling system that consists of a small evaporative cooler--the Mini Membrane Evaporator (Mini-ME), independent pump, independent feed-water assembly and independent Liquid Cooling Garment (LCG). The Mini-ME utilizes the same hollow fiber technology featured in the RVP SWME, but is only 25% of the size of RVP SWME, providing only the necessary crewmember cooling in a contingency situation. The ACL provides a number of benefits when compared with the current EMU PLSS contingency cooling technology; contingency crewmember cooling can be provided for a longer period of time, more contingency situations can be accounted for, no reliance on a Secondary Oxygen Vessel (SOV) for contingency cooling--thereby allowing a SOV reduction in size and pressure, and the ACL can be recharged-allowing the AEMU PLSS to be reused, even after a contingency event. The development of these evaporative cooling

  11. Evaporative Cooling Membrane Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, Curtis (Inventor); Moskito, John (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An evaporative cooling membrane device is disclosed having a flat or pleated plate housing with an enclosed bottom and an exposed top that is covered with at least one sheet of hydrophobic porous material having a thin thickness so as to serve as a membrane. The hydrophobic porous material has pores with predetermined dimensions so as to resist any fluid in its liquid state from passing therethrough but to allow passage of the fluid in its vapor state, thereby, causing the evaporation of the fluid and the cooling of the remaining fluid. The fluid has a predetermined flow rate. The evaporative cooling membrane device has a channel which is sized in cooperation with the predetermined flow rate of the fluid so as to produce laminar flow therein. The evaporative cooling membrane device provides for the convenient control of the evaporation rates of the circulating fluid by adjusting the flow rates of the laminar flowing fluid.

  12. Optimization of evaporative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackett, C. A.; Bradley, C. C.; Hulet, R. G.

    1997-05-01

    Recent experiments have used forced evaporative cooling to produce Bose-Einstein condensation in dilute gases. The evaporative cooling process can be optimized to provide the maximum phase-space density with a specified number of atoms remaining. We show that this global optimization is approximately achieved by locally optimizing the cooling efficiency at each instant. We discuss how this method can be implemented, and present the results for our 7Li trap. The predicted behavior of the gas is found to agree well with experiment.

  13. Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator; An Enhanced Evaporative Cooling System for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Portable Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Makinen, Janice V.; Miller, Sean; Campbell, Colin; Lynch, Bill; Vogel, Matt; Craft, Jesse; Wilkes, Robert; Kuehnel, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Development of the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) portable life support subsystem (PLSS) is currently under way at NASA Johnson Space Center. The AEMU PLSS features a new evaporative cooling system, the Generation 4 Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (Gen4 SWME). The SWME offers several advantages when compared with prior crewmember cooling technologies, including the ability to reject heat at increased atmospheric pressures, reduced loop infrastructure, and higher tolerance to fouling. Like its predecessors, Gen4 SWME provides nominal crew member and electronics cooling by flowing water through porous hollow fibers. Water vapor escapes through the hollow fiber pores, thereby cooling the liquid water that remains inside of the fibers. This cooled water is then recirculated to remove heat from the crew member and PLSS electronics. Test results from the backup cooling system which is based on a similar design and the subject of a companion paper, suggested that further volume reductions could be achieved through fiber density optimization. Testing was performed with four fiber bundle configurations ranging from 35,850 fibers to 41,180 fibers. The optimal configuration reduced the Gen4 SWME envelope volume by 15% from that of Gen3 while dramatically increasing the performance margin of the system. A rectangular block design was chosen over the Gen3 cylindrical design, for packaging configurations within the AEMU PLSS envelope. Several important innovations were made in the redesign of the backpressure valve which is used to control evaporation. A twin-port pivot concept was selected from among three low profile valve designs for superior robustness, control and packaging. The backpressure valve motor, the thermal control valve, delta pressure sensors and temperature sensors were incorporated into the manifold endcaps, also for packaging considerations. Flight-like materials including a titanium housing were used for all components. Performance testing

  14. Performance evaluation of an active solar cooling system utilizing low cost plastic collectors and an evaporatively-cooled absorption chiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lof, G. O.; Westhoff, M. A.; Karaki, S.

    1984-02-01

    During the summer of 1982, air conditioning in Solar House 3 at Colorado State University was provided by an evaporatively-cooled absorption chiller. The single-effect lithium bromide chiller is an experimental three-ton unit from which heat is rejected by direct evaporative cooling of the condenser and absorber walls, thereby eliminating the need for a separate cooling tower. Domestic hot water was also provided by use of a double-walled heat exchanger and 80-gal hot water tank. A schematic of the system is given. Objectives of the project were: (1) evaluation of system performance over the course of one cooling season in Fort Collins, Colorado; (2) optimization of system operation and control; (3) development of a TRNSYS compatible model of the chiller; and (4) determination of cooling system performance in several U.S. climates by use of the model.

  15. Projected Benefits of New Residential Evaporative Cooling Systems: Progress Report #2

    SciTech Connect

    Kutscher, C.; Eastment, M.; Hancock, E.; Reeves, P.

    2006-10-01

    The use of conventional evaporative cooling has rapidly declined in the United States despite the fact that it has high potential for energy savings in dry climates. Evaporative systems are very competitive in terms of first cost and provide significant reductions in operating energy use, as well as peak-load reduction benefits. Significant market barriers still remain and can be addressed through improved systems integration. This report investigates the first of these approaches, exploring innovative components. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America research teams are investigating the use of two promising new pieces of residential cooling equipment that employ evaporative cooling as a part of their system design. The OASys unit, which is a combination of direct and indirect evaporative cooling stages developed by Davis Energy Group (DEG) and manufactured by Speakman CRS, is used to ultimately provide outside air to the living space. The outdoor air provided is indirectly and directly evaporatively cooled in two stages to a condition that can be below the wet-bulb (wb) temperature of the outside air, thus outperforming a conventional single-stage direct evaporative cooler.

  16. Evaporative cooling in microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltezos, George; Rajagopal, Aditya; Scherer, Axel

    2006-08-01

    Evaporative cooling is an effective and energy efficient way to rapidly remove heat from a system. Specifically, evaporative cooling in microfluidic channels can provide a cost-effective solution for the cooling of electronic devices and chemical reactors. Here we present microfluidic devices fabricated by using soft-lithography techniques to form simple fluidic junctions between channels carrying refrigerant and channels carrying N2 gas. The effects of channel geometry and delivery pressure on the performance of refrigeration through vaporization of acetone, isopropyl alcohol, and ethyl ether were characterized. By varying gas inlet pressures, refrigerants, and angles of the microfluidic junctions, optimal cooling conditions were found. Refrigeration rates in excess of 40°C/s were measured, and long lasting subzero cooling in the junction could be observed.

  17. Experimental study on the double-evaporator thermosiphon for cooling HTS (high temperature superconductor) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junghyun; Ko, Junseok; Kim, Youngkwon; Jeong, Sangkwon; Sung, Taehyun; Han, Younghee; Lee, Jeong-Phil; Jung, Seyong

    2009-08-01

    A cryogenic thermosiphons is an efficient heat transfer device between a cryocooler and a thermal load that is to be cooled. This paper presents an idea of thermosiphon which contains two vertically-separated evaporators. This unique configuration of the thermosiphon is suitable for the purpose of cooling simultaneously two superconducting bearings of the HTS (high temperature superconducting) flywheel system at the same temperature. A so-called double-evaporator thermosiphon was designed, fabricated and tested using nitrogen as the working fluid under sub-atmospheric pressure condition. The interior thermal condition of the double-evaporator thermosiphon was examined in detail during its cool-down process according to the internal thermal states. The double-evaporator thermosiphon has operated successfully at steady-state operation under sub-atmospheric pressure. At the heat flow of 10.6 W, the total temperature difference of the thermosiphon was only 1.59 K and the temperature difference between the evaporators was 0.64 K. The temperature difference of two evaporators is attributed to the conductive thermal resistance of the adiabatic section between the evaporators. The method to reduce this temperature difference has been investigated and presented in this paper. The proper area selection of condenser, evaporator 1, and evaporator 2 was studied by using thermal resistance model to optimize the performance of a thermosiphon. The superior heat transfer characteristic of the double-evaporator thermosiphon without involving any cryogenic pump can be a great potential advantage for cooling HTS bulk modules that are separated vertically.

  18. Reduced Volume Prototype Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator; A Next-Generation Evaporative Cooling System for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Portable Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makinen, Janice V.; Anchondo, Ian; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Colunga, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Development of the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) portable life support subsystem (PLSS) is currently under way at NASA Johnson Space Center. The AEMU PLSS features a new evaporative cooling system, the reduced volume prototype (RVP) spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME). The RVP SWME is the third generation of hollow fiber SWME hardware. Like its predecessors, RVP SWME provides nominal crew member and electronics cooling by flowing water through porous hollow fibers. Water vapor escapes through the hollow fiber pores, thereby cooling the liquid water that remains inside of the fibers. This cooled water is then recirculated to remove heat from the crew member and PLSS electronics. Major design improvements, including a 36% reduction in volume, reduced weight, and a more flight-like backpressure valve, facilitate the packaging of RVP SWME in the AEMU PLSS envelope. The development of these evaporative cooling systems will contribute to a more robust and comprehensive AEMU PLSS.

  19. Evaporative cooling system for storage of fruits and vegetables - a review.

    PubMed

    Lal Basediya, Amrat; Samuel, D V K; Beera, Vimala

    2013-06-01

    Horticultural produce are stored at lower temperature because of their highly perishable nature. There are many methods to cool the environment. Hence, preserving these types of foods in their fresh form demands that the chemical, bio-chemical and physiological changes are restricted to a minimum by close control of space temperature and humidity. The high cost involved in developing cold storage or controlled atmosphere storage is a pressing problem in several developing countries. Evaporative cooling is a well-known system to be an efficient and economical means for reducing the temperature and increasing the relative humidity in an enclosure and this effect has been extensively tried for increasing the shelf life of horticultural produce in some tropical and subtropical countries. In this review paper, basic concept and principle, methods of evaporative cooling and their application for the preservation of fruits and vegetables and economy are also reported. Thus, the evaporative cooler has prospect for use for short term preservation of vegetables and fruits soon after harvest. Zero energy cooling system could be used effectively for short-duration storage of fruits and vegetables even in hilly region. It not only reduces the storage temperature but also increases the relative humidity of the storage which is essential for maintaining the freshness of the commodities. PMID:24425938

  20. Nonmagnetic impellers improve evaporative cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Hausman, T. )

    1993-03-01

    This article describes how nonmagnetic impeller flow sensors help improve efficiency of open evaporative cooling water systems. Open evaporative cooling water systems provide economical heat sinks with efficient reuse of water. However, their water loss through evaporation, though minimal, results in an increased concentration of dissolved and suspended impurities in the remaining water. To deconcentrate the water and minimize impurities, the system water is bled off and replaced with fresh makeup water. Bleedoff helps, but to maintain efficient operation and protect the system from water-related catastrophes, various chemical treatments are required for the control of corrosion, deposition, and biological growth. Efficient addition of makeup water and chemical additives can be achieved by a system design employing multiple data points, using flow sensors having high reproducibility for good trend data. In such a system, nonmagnetic flow sensors provide 1% accuracy and excellent reproducibility. In addition, their low initial cost and long service life mean that they can be used cost effectively at multiple data collection points to eliminate approximations.

  1. Thermal design of lithium bromide-water solution vapor absorption cooling system for indirect evaporative cooling for IT pod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, Digvijay Ramkrishna

    Nowadays with increase use of internet, mobile there is increase in heat which ultimately increases the efficient cooling system of server room or IT POD. Use of traditional ways of cooling system has ultimately increased CO2 emission and depletion of CFC's are serious environmental issues which led scientific people to improve cooling techniques and eliminate use of CFC's. To reduce dependency on fossil fuels and 4environmental friendly system needed to be design. For being utilizing low grade energy source such as solar collector and reducing dependency on fossil fuel vapour absorption cooling system has shown a great driving force in today's refrigeration systems. This LiBr-water aabsorption cooling consists of five heat exchanger namely: Evaporator, Absorber, Solution Heat Exchanger, Generator, Condenser. The thermal design was done for a load of 23 kW and the procedure was described in the thesis. There are 120 servers in the IT POD emitting 196 W of heat each on full load and some of the heat was generated by the computer placed inside the IT POD. A detailed procedure has been discussed. A excel spreadsheet was to prepared with varying tube sizes to see the effect on flows and ultimately overall heat transfer coefficient.

  2. Evaporative cooling of potassium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inouye, Shin; Kishimoto, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Jun; Aikawa, Kiyotaka; Noda, Kai; Arae, Takuto; Ueda, Masahito

    2007-06-01

    Recent advances in manipulating interactions between ultracold atoms opened up various new possibilities. One of the major goal of the field is to produce ultracold polar molecules. By utilizing a magnetic field induced Feshbach resonance, it is possible to produce heteronuclear molecules from a degenerate gas mixture. We are setting up an experiment to produce a degenerate gas mixture of fermionic alkali atoms, lithium-6 and potassium-40. Fermionic atoms are good candidate for minimizing the expected inelastic loss at the Feshbach resonance. For keeping the system as simple as possible, we decided to use bosonic potassium (potassium-41) as a coolant, and sympathetically cool the fermionic species. We will present our experimental setup and initial results for evaporatively cooling bosonic potassium atoms.

  3. Evaporative cooling of flare plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Sturrock, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    A one-dimensional loop model for the evaporative cooling of the coronal flare plasma was investigated. Conductive losses dominated radiative cooling, and the evaporative velocities were small compared to the sound speed. The profile and evolution of the temperature were calculated. The model was in agreement with soft X-ray observations on the evolution of flare temperatures and emission measures. The effect of evaporation was to greatly reduce the conductive heat flux into the chromosphere and to enhance the EUV emission from the coronal flare plasma.

  4. Evaporative cooling of flare plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Sturrock, P. A.

    1978-01-01

    We investigate a one-dimensional loop model for the evaporative cooling of the coronal flare plasma. The important assumptions are that conductive losses dominate radiative cooling and that the evaporative velocities are small compared with the sound speed. We calculate the profile and evolution of the temperature and verify the accuracy of our assumptions for plasma parameters typical of flare regions. The model is in agreement with soft X-ray observations on the evolution of flare temperatures and emission measures. The effect of evaporation is to greatly reduce the conductive heat flux into the chromosphere and to enhance the EUV emission from the coronal flare plasma.

  5. Effect of an evaporative cooling and dust control system on rearing environment and performance of male broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Willis, W L; Ouart, M D; Quarles, C L

    1987-10-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effect of a micromist, high pressure, evaporative cooling and dust control system on rearing environment characteristics and performance of broiler chickens. Air of rearing chambers with the cooling and dust control system had significantly lower dust concentrations than that of chambers without the system. Birds reared with the cooling and dust control system were 45 and 165 g heavier at 4 and 7 wk of age, respectively, and had significantly higher 7-wk bursa weights than those reared without the system. Presence of the cooling and dust control system had no effect on mortality or lung weights. PMID:3432185

  6. Evaporative cooling of the dipolar hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Stuhl, Benjamin K; Hummon, Matthew T; Yeo, Mark; Quéméner, Goulven; Bohn, John L; Ye, Jun

    2012-12-20

    Atomic physics was revolutionized by the development of forced evaporative cooling, which led directly to the observation of Bose-Einstein condensation, quantum-degenerate Fermi gases and ultracold optical lattice simulations of condensed-matter phenomena. More recently, substantial progress has been made in the production of cold molecular gases. Their permanent electric dipole moment is expected to generate systems with varied and controllable phases, dynamics and chemistry. However, although advances have been made in both direct cooling and cold-association techniques, evaporative cooling has not been achieved so far. This is due to unfavourable ratios of elastic to inelastic scattering and impractically slow thermalization rates in the available trapped species. Here we report the observation of microwave-forced evaporative cooling of neutral hydroxyl (OH(•)) molecules loaded from a Stark-decelerated beam into an extremely high-gradient magnetic quadrupole trap. We demonstrate cooling by at least one order of magnitude in temperature, and a corresponding increase in phase-space density by three orders of magnitude, limited only by the low-temperature sensitivity of our spectroscopic thermometry technique. With evaporative cooling and a sufficiently large initial population, much colder temperatures are possible; even a quantum-degenerate gas of this dipolar radical (or anything else it can sympathetically cool) may be within reach. PMID:23257881

  7. Rate of runaway evaporative cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Groep, J. van de; Straten, P. van der; Vogels, J. M.

    2011-09-15

    Evaporative cooling is a process that is essential in creating Bose-Einstein condensates in dilute atomic gasses. This process has often been simulated based on a model using a truncated Boltzmann distribution. This model assumes that the energy distribution up to the threshold energy can still be described by a Boltzmann distribution: it assumes detailed balance up to the threshold energy. However, the evolution of the distribution function in time is not taken into account. Here we solve the kinetic Boltzmann equation for a gas undergoing evaporative cooling in a harmonic and linear trap in order to determine the evolution of the energy distribution. The magnitude of the discrepancy with the truncated Boltzmannmodel is calculated by including a polynomial expansion of the distribution function. We find that up to 35% fewer particles are found in the high-energy tail of the distribution with respect to the truncated Boltzmann distribution and up to 15% more collisions are needed to reach quantum degeneracy. Supported by a detailed investigation of the particle loss rate at different energies, we conclude that the limited occupation of high-energy states during the evaporation process causes the lowering of the evaporation speed and efficiency.

  8. Mergers, cooling flows, and evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, W. B.

    1993-01-01

    Mergers (the capture of cold gas, especially) can have a profound influence on the hot coronal gas of early-type galaxies and clusters, potentially inducing symptoms hitherto attributed to a cooling flow, if thermal conduction is operative in the coronal plasma. Heat can be conducted from the hot phase into the cold phase, simultaneously ionizing the cold gas to make optical filaments, while locally cooling the coronal gas to mimic a cooling-flow. If there is heat conduction, though, there is no standard cooling-flow since radiative losses are balanced by conduction and not mass deposition. Amongst the strongest observational support for the existence of cooling-flows is the presence of intermediate temperature gas with x-ray emission-line strengths in agreement with cooling-flow models. Here, x-ray line strengths are calculated for this alternative model, in which mergers are responsible for the observed optical and x-ray properties. Since gas around 10(exp 4) K is thermally stable, the cold cloud need not necessarily evaporate and hydrostatic solutions exist. Good agreement with the x-ray data is obtained. The relative strengths of intermediate temperature x-ray emission lines are in significantly better agreement with a simple conduction model than with published cooling-flow models. The good agreement of the conduction model with optical, infrared and x-ray data indicates that significantly more theoretical effort into this type of solution would be profitable.

  9. A comparison of 2 evaporative cooling systems on a commercial dairy farm in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, X A; Smith, J F; Villar, F; Hall, L; Allen, J; Oddy, A; Al-Haddad, A; Lyle, P; Collier, R J

    2015-12-01

    Efficacy of 2 cooling systems (Korral Kool, KK, Korral Kool Inc., Mesa, AZ; FlipFan dairy system, FF, Schaefer Ventilation Equipment LLC, Sauk Rapids, MN) was estimated utilizing 400 multiparous Holstein dairy cows randomly assigned to 1 of 4 cooled California-style shade pens (2 shade pens per cooling system). Each shaded pen contained 100 cows (days in milk=58±39, milk production=56±18 kg/d, and lactation=3±1). Production data (milk yield and reproductive performance) were collected during 3mo (June-August, 2013) and physiological responses (core body temperature, respiration rates, surface temperatures, and resting time) were measured in June and July to estimate responses of cows to the 2 different cooling systems. Water and electricity consumption were recorded for each system. Cows in the KK system displayed slightly lower respiration rates in the month of June and lower surface temperatures in June and July. However, no differences were observed in the core body temperature of cows, resting time, feed intake, milk yield, services/cow, and conception rate between systems. The FF system used less water and electricity during this study. In conclusion, both cooling systems (KK and FF) were effective in mitigating the negative effects of heat stress on cows housed in arid environments, whereas the FF system consumed less water and electricity and did not require use of curtains on the shade structure. PMID:26409968

  10. 11. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING EVAPORATIVE COOLING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - EVAPORATIVE COOLING TOWER SYSTEM IN FOREGROUND. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  11. Evaporatively cooled chiller for solar air conditioning systems design and field test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrick, R. H.; Murray, J. G.

    1984-06-01

    Design changes to improve reliability, part load performance, and manufacturability characteristics of the chiller are focused upon. Low heat flux was achieved by large transfer area allows scale formation without being a thermal barrier: 80 mils = 1 deg. The scaling rate is minimized by keeping surface temperatures below 100 F and a generous water recirculation flow rate. By integrating the cooling tower function into the chiller itself parasitic power consumption was reduced 35%. This system also provided the winter freeze protection without the specific manual shut down procedures required by separate water cooled units and their towers. The severe reduction in cumulative coefficient of performance (COP) due to cycling conditions has been substantially reduced using the spin down control scheme. The major disappointment was the failure to develop a satisfactory inexpensive protective coating. Hot dip galvanizing was demonstrated to be effective but costly, partially due to transportation expense.

  12. Evaporation-Cooled Protective Suits for Firefighters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard Murray

    2007-01-01

    Suits cooled by evaporation of water have been proposed as improved means of temporary protection against high temperatures near fires. When air temperature exceeds 600 F (316 C) or in the presence of radiative heating from nearby sources at temperatures of 1,200 F (649 C) or more, outer suits now used by firefighters afford protection for only a few seconds. The proposed suits would exploit the high latent heat of vaporization of water to satisfy a need to protect against higher air temperatures and against radiant heating for significantly longer times. These suits would be fabricated and operated in conjunction with breathing and cooling systems like those with which firefighting suits are now equipped

  13. Evaporative Cooling of Antiprotons to Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Hayden, M. E.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; So, C.; Wurtele, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Wilding, D.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.

    2010-07-02

    We report the application of evaporative cooling to clouds of trapped antiprotons, resulting in plasmas with measured temperature as low as 9 K. We have modeled the evaporation process for charged particles using appropriate rate equations. Good agreement between experiment and theory is observed, permitting prediction of cooling efficiency in future experiments. The technique opens up new possibilities for cooling of trapped ions and is of particular interest in antiproton physics, where a precise CPT test on trapped antihydrogen is a long-standing goal.

  14. Evaporative cooling of antiprotons to cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Andresen, G B; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A; Hydomako, R; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wilding, D; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2010-07-01

    We report the application of evaporative cooling to clouds of trapped antiprotons, resulting in plasmas with measured temperature as low as 9 K. We have modeled the evaporation process for charged particles using appropriate rate equations. Good agreement between experiment and theory is observed, permitting prediction of cooling efficiency in future experiments. The technique opens up new possibilities for cooling of trapped ions and is of particular interest in antiproton physics, where a precise CPT test on trapped antihydrogen is a long-standing goal. PMID:20867439

  15. Evaporative Cooling in a Holographic Atom Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, Raymond

    2003-01-01

    We present progress on evaporative cooling of Rb-87 atoms in our Holographic Atom Trap (HAT). The HAT is formed by the interference of five intersecting YAG laser beams: atoms are loaded from a vapor-cell MOT into the bright fringes of the interference pattern through the dipole force. The interference pattern is composed of Talbot fringes along the direction of propagation of the YAG beams, prior to evaporative cooling each Talbot fringe contains 300,000 atoms at 50 micro-K and peak densities of 2 x 10(exp 14)/cu cm. Evaporative cooling is achieved through adiabatically decreasing the intensity of the YAG laser. We present data and calculations covering a range of HAT geometries and cooling procedures.

  16. An Evaporative Cooling Model for Teaching Applied Psychrometrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Donald M.

    2004-01-01

    Evaporative cooling systems are commonly used in controlled environment plant and animal production. These cooling systems operate based on well defined psychrometric principles. However, students often experience considerable difficulty in learning these principles when they are taught in an abstract, verbal manner. This article describes an…

  17. Does groundwater enhance evaporative cooling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouholahnejad, E.

    2015-12-01

    Evaporation is a key process in land-climate interactions, not only because it directly regulates the hydrological cycle, but also because it contributes to the Earth's energy balance. Due to its feedbacks on large-scale water processes and its impact on the dynamics of the atmosphere, it has been considered as a driver of droughts and heatwaves1-3. While evaporation from ocean surfaces is likely to increase with rising temperatures, it is unclear whether evapotranspiration from land surfaces could similarly increase, due to possible limitations imposed by soil moisture and vegetation physiology4. Observations suggest that groundwater (hereafter GW) has an important role in hydrological budgets and soil moisture variability in many regions, supplying moisture for evapotranspiration during dry seasons5, 6. Although modeling studies suggest that GW is often close enough to the surface to interact with the atmosphere7, 8, the soil water storage is often underestimated by land surface models. This is most likely due to neglecting the lateral movement of water from topographically higher altitudes to valley bottoms and its convergence close to the land surface, as well as the upward movement of water in the capillary fringe.The focus of this study is to understand where and when GW may significantly enhance the availability of soil water for evapotranspiration. We also quantified the potential contribution of GW to evapotranspiration in the areas where GW is a major supply. We used the global network of eddy covariance observations9 (FLUXNET) along with global modeled GW depth10 and GLEAM ET model estimates11 to address the current gap in modelling ET due to neglecting GW supply. Having identified areas where GW is tightly coupled with the atmosphere through evaporation processes, the study provides the basis to examine the "air conditioning effect" of GW and test the idea if GW enhances evaporation to the extent that leads to a cooler temperatures and wetter climates.

  18. Hydronic rooftop cooling systems

    DOEpatents

    Bourne, Richard C.; Lee, Brian Eric; Berman, Mark J.

    2008-01-29

    A roof top cooling unit has an evaporative cooling section that includes at least one evaporative module that pre-cools ventilation air and water; a condenser; a water reservoir and pump that captures and re-circulates water within the evaporative modules; a fan that exhausts air from the building and the evaporative modules and systems that refill and drain the water reservoir. The cooling unit also has a refrigerant section that includes a compressor, an expansion device, evaporator and condenser heat exchangers, and connecting refrigerant piping. Supply air components include a blower, an air filter, a cooling and/or heating coil to condition air for supply to the building, and optional dampers that, in designs that supply less than 100% outdoor air to the building, control the mixture of return and ventilation air.

  19. Infrared thermography of dropwise evaporative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, Michael; di Marzo, Marino; Sirkis, James

    1992-01-01

    An infrared thermographic technique is developed to obtain the transient solid surface temperature distribution in the neighborhood of an evaporating droplet. This technique is nonintrusive and is not affected by the time response of the measuring device (i.e., thermocouple). The entire surface is monitored at any instant of time, and information on the area influenced by the evaporative cooling process is easily derived. A detailed description of the image processing based data reduction is provided. A water droplet in the range of 10-50 microliter is deposited on an opaque glasslike material that has an initial surface temperature between 100 and 165 deg C. The evaporative cooling process is fully documented, and these new findings are contrasted with the published literature to gain a better understanding of the phenomena involved.

  20. Mini-Membrane Evaporator for Contingency Spacesuit Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makinen, Janice V.; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Petty, Brian; Craft, Jesse; Lynch, William; Wilkes, Robert; Vogel, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The next-generation Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) Portable Life Support System (PLSS) is integrating a number of new technologies to improve reliability and functionality. One of these improvements is the development of the Auxiliary Cooling Loop (ACL) for contingency crewmember cooling. The ACL is a completely redundant, independent cooling system that consists of a small evaporative cooler--the Mini Membrane Evaporator (Mini-ME), independent pump, independent feedwater assembly and independent Liquid Cooling Garment (LCG). The Mini-ME utilizes the same hollow fiber technology featured in the full-sized AEMU PLSS cooling device, the Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME), but Mini-ME occupies only approximately 25% of the volume of SWME, thereby providing only the necessary crewmember cooling in a contingency situation. The ACL provides a number of benefits when compared with the current EMU PLSS contingency cooling technology, which relies upon a Secondary Oxygen Vessel; contingency crewmember cooling can be provided for a longer period of time, more contingency situations can be accounted for, no reliance on a Secondary Oxygen Vessel (SOV) for contingency cooling--thereby allowing a reduction in SOV size and pressure, and the ACL can be recharged-allowing the AEMU PLSS to be reused, even after a contingency event. The first iteration of Mini-ME was developed and tested in-house. Mini-ME is currently packaged in AEMU PLSS 2.0, where it is being tested in environments and situations that are representative of potential future Extravehicular Activities (EVA's). The second iteration of Mini-ME, known as Mini-ME2, is currently being developed to offer more heat rejection capability. The development of this contingency evaporative cooling system will contribute to a more robust and comprehensive AEMU PLSS.

  1. Mini-Membrane Evaporator for Contingency Spacesuit Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makinen, Janice V.; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Craft, Jesse; Lynch, William; Wilkes, Robert; Vogel, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The next-generation Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) Portable Life Support System (PLSS) is integrating a number of new technologies to improve reliability and functionality. One of these improvements is the development of the Auxiliary Cooling Loop (ACL) for contingency crewmember cooling. The ACL is a completely redundant, independent cooling system that consists of a small evaporative cooler--the Mini Membrane Evaporator (Mini-ME), independent pump, independent feedwater assembly and independent Liquid Cooling Garment (LCG). The Mini-ME utilizes the same hollow fiber technology featured in the full-sized AEMU PLSS cooling device, the Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME), but Mini-ME occupies only 25% of the volume of SWME, thereby providing only the necessary crewmember cooling in a contingency situation. The ACL provides a number of benefits when compared with the current EMU PLSS contingency cooling technology, which relies upon a Secondary Oxygen Vessel; contingency crewmember cooling can be provided for a longer period of time, more contingency situations can be accounted for, no reliance on a Secondary Oxygen Vessel (SOV) for contingency cooling--thereby allowing a reduction in SOV size and pressure, and the ACL can be recharged-allowing the AEMU PLSS to be reused, even after a contingency event. The first iteration of Mini-ME was developed and tested in-house. Mini-ME is currently packaged in AEMU PLSS 2.0, where it is being tested in environments and situations that are representative of potential future Extravehicular Activities (EVA's). The second iteration of Mini-ME, known as Mini- ME2, is currently being developed to offer more heat rejection capability. The development of this contingency evaporative cooling system will contribute to a more robust and comprehensive AEMU PLSS.

  2. The characteristic of evaporative cooling magnet for ECRIS.

    PubMed

    Xiong, B; Ruan, L; Gu, G B; Lu, W; Zhang, X Z; Zhan, W L

    2016-02-01

    Compared with traditional de-ionized pressurized-water cooled magnet of ECRIS, evaporative cooling magnet has some special characteristics, such as high cooling efficiency, simple maintenance, and operation. The analysis is carried out according to the design and operation of LECR4 (Lanzhou Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source No. 4, since July 2013), whose magnet is cooled by evaporative cooling technology. The insulation coolant replaces the de-ionized pressurized-water to absorb the heat of coils, and the physical and chemical properties of coolant remain stable for a long time with no need for purification or filtration. The coils of magnet are immersed in the liquid coolant. For the higher cooling efficiency of coolant, the current density of coils can be greatly improved. The heat transfer process executes under atmospheric pressure, and the temperature of coils is lower than 70 °C when the current density of coils is 12 A/mm(2). On the other hand, the heat transfer temperature of coolant is about 50 °C, and the heat can be transferred to fresh air which can save cost of water cooling system. Two years of LECR4 stable operation show that evaporative cooling technology can be used on magnet of ECRIS, and the application advantages are very obvious. PMID:26931937

  3. The characteristic of evaporative cooling magnet for ECRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, B.; Ruan, L.; Gu, G. B.; Lu, W.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhan, W. L.

    2016-02-01

    Compared with traditional de-ionized pressurized-water cooled magnet of ECRIS, evaporative cooling magnet has some special characteristics, such as high cooling efficiency, simple maintenance, and operation. The analysis is carried out according to the design and operation of LECR4 (Lanzhou Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source No. 4, since July 2013), whose magnet is cooled by evaporative cooling technology. The insulation coolant replaces the de-ionized pressurized-water to absorb the heat of coils, and the physical and chemical properties of coolant remain stable for a long time with no need for purification or filtration. The coils of magnet are immersed in the liquid coolant. For the higher cooling efficiency of coolant, the current density of coils can be greatly improved. The heat transfer process executes under atmospheric pressure, and the temperature of coils is lower than 70 °C when the current density of coils is 12 A/mm2. On the other hand, the heat transfer temperature of coolant is about 50 °C, and the heat can be transferred to fresh air which can save cost of water cooling system. Two years of LECR4 stable operation show that evaporative cooling technology can be used on magnet of ECRIS, and the application advantages are very obvious.

  4. Evaporative cooling and the Mpemba effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vynnycky, M.; Mitchell, S. L.

    2010-10-01

    The Mpemba effect is popularly summarized by the statement that “hot water can freeze faster than cold”, and has been observed experimentally since the time of Aristotle; however, there exist almost no theoretical models that predict the effect. With a view to initiating rigorous modelling activity on this topic, this paper analyzes in some depth the only available model in literature, which considers the potential role of evaporative cooling and treats the cooling water as a lumped mass. Certain omissions in the original work are highlighted and corrected, and results are obtained for a wide range of operating conditions—in particular, initial liquid temperature and cooling temperature. The implications and importance of the results of the model for experimental design are discussed, as are extensions of the model to handle more realistic 1-, 2- and 3-dimensional configurations.

  5. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Conway, Lawrence E.; Stewart, William A.

    1991-01-01

    A containment cooling system utilizes a naturally induced air flow and a gravity flow of water over the containment shell which encloses a reactor core to cool reactor core decay heat in two stages. When core decay heat is greatest, the water and air flow combine to provide adequate evaporative cooling as heat from within the containment is transferred to the water flowing over the same. The water is heated by heat transfer and then evaporated and removed by the air flow. After an initial period of about three to four days when core decay heat is greatest, air flow alone is sufficient to cool the containment.

  6. Evaporative cooling at low trap depth

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, Robert de; Doyle, John

    2004-11-01

    A quantitative, analytic model of evaporative cooling covering both the small- (<4) and large- (>4) {eta} regimes is presented. {eta} is the dimensionless parameter defined as the trap depth divided by the temperature of the trapped sample. Although some of the same general properties present at large {eta} are also present at small {eta}, there are significant quantitative differences. These differences must be taken into account in order to accurately extract from the trapping data quantitative measurements of, for example, collisional atomic cross sections.

  7. Flash evaporator systems test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    A flash evaporator heat rejection system representative of that proposed for the space shuttle orbiter underwent extensive system testing at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) to determine its operational suitability and to establish system performance/operational characteristics for use in the shuttle system. During the tests the evaporator system demonstrated its suitability to meet the shuttle requirements by: (1) efficient operation with 90 to 95% water evaporation efficiency, (2) control of outlet temperature to 40 + or - 2 F for partial heat load operation, (3) stability of control system for rapid changes in Freon inlet temperature, and (4) repeated dormant-to-active device operation without any startup procedures.

  8. Evaporative cooling: effective latent heat of evaporation in relation to evaporation distance from the skin.

    PubMed

    Havenith, George; Bröde, Peter; den Hartog, Emiel; Kuklane, Kalev; Holmer, Ingvar; Rossi, Rene M; Richards, Mark; Farnworth, Brian; Wang, Xiaoxin

    2013-03-15

    Calculation of evaporative heat loss is essential to heat balance calculations. Despite recognition that the value for latent heat of evaporation, used in these calculations, may not always reflect the real cooling benefit to the body, only limited quantitative data on this is available, which has found little use in recent literature. In this experiment a thermal manikin, (MTNW, Seattle, WA) was used to determine the effective cooling power of moisture evaporation. The manikin measures both heat loss and mass loss independently, allowing a direct calculation of an effective latent heat of evaporation (λeff). The location of the evaporation was varied: from the skin or from the underwear or from the outerwear. Outerwear of different permeabilities was used, and different numbers of layers were used. Tests took place in 20°C, 0.5 m/s at different humidities and were performed both dry and with a wet layer, allowing the breakdown of heat loss in dry and evaporative components. For evaporation from the skin, λeff is close to the theoretical value (2,430 J/g) but starts to drop when more clothing is worn, e.g., by 11% for underwear and permeable coverall. When evaporation is from the underwear, λeff reduction is 28% wearing a permeable outer. When evaporation is from the outermost layer only, the reduction exceeds 62% (no base layer), increasing toward 80% with more layers between skin and wet outerwear. In semi- and impermeable outerwear, the added effect of condensation in the clothing opposes this effect. A general formula for the calculation of λeff was developed. PMID:23329814

  9. Evaporative cooling of speleothem drip water.

    PubMed

    Cuthbert, M O; Rau, G C; Andersen, M S; Roshan, H; Rutlidge, H; Marjo, C E; Markowska, M; Jex, C N; Graham, P W; Mariethoz, G; Acworth, R I; Baker, A

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the first use of concurrent high-precision temperature and drip rate monitoring to explore what controls the temperature of speleothem forming drip water. Two contrasting sites, one with fast transient and one with slow constant dripping, in a temperate semi-arid location (Wellington, NSW, Australia), exhibit drip water temperatures which deviate significantly from the cave air temperature. We confirm the hypothesis that evaporative cooling is the dominant, but so far unattributed, control causing significant disequilibrium between drip water and host rock/air temperatures. The amount of cooling is dependent on the drip rate, relative humidity and ventilation. Our results have implications for the interpretation of temperature-sensitive, speleothem climate proxies such as δ(18)O, cave microecology and the use of heat as a tracer in karst. Understanding the processes controlling the temperature of speleothem-forming cave drip waters is vital for assessing the reliability of such deposits as archives of climate change. PMID:24895139

  10. Evaporative cooling of speleothem drip water

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, M. O.; Rau, G. C.; Andersen, M. S.; Roshan, H.; Rutlidge, H.; Marjo, C. E.; Markowska, M.; Jex, C. N.; Graham, P. W.; Mariethoz, G.; Acworth, R. I.; Baker, A.

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the first use of concurrent high-precision temperature and drip rate monitoring to explore what controls the temperature of speleothem forming drip water. Two contrasting sites, one with fast transient and one with slow constant dripping, in a temperate semi-arid location (Wellington, NSW, Australia), exhibit drip water temperatures which deviate significantly from the cave air temperature. We confirm the hypothesis that evaporative cooling is the dominant, but so far unattributed, control causing significant disequilibrium between drip water and host rock/air temperatures. The amount of cooling is dependent on the drip rate, relative humidity and ventilation. Our results have implications for the interpretation of temperature-sensitive, speleothem climate proxies such as δ18O, cave microecology and the use of heat as a tracer in karst. Understanding the processes controlling the temperature of speleothem-forming cave drip waters is vital for assessing the reliability of such deposits as archives of climate change. PMID:24895139

  11. Effects of an evaporative cooling system on plasma cortisol, IGF-I, and milk production in dairy cows in a tropical environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titto, Cristiane Gonçalves; Negrão, João Alberto; Titto, Evaldo Antonio Lencioni; Canaes, Taissa de Souza; Titto, Rafael Martins; Pereira, Alfredo Manuel Franco

    2013-03-01

    Access to an evaporative cooling system can increase production in dairy cows because of improved thermal comfort. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of ambient temperature on thermoregulation, plasma cortisol, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I), and productive status, and to determine the efficiency of an evaporative cooling system on physiological responses under different weather patterns. A total of 28 Holstein cows were divided into two groups, one with and the other without access to a cooling system with fans and mist in the free stall. The parameters were analyzed during morning (0700 hours) and afternoon milking (1430 hours) under five different weather patterns throughout the year (fall, winter, spring, dry summer, and rainy summer). Rectal temperature (RT), body surface temperature (BS), base of tail temperature (TT), and respiratory frequency (RF) were lower in the morning ( P < 0.01). The cooling system did not affect RT, and both the groups had values below 38.56 over the year ( P = 0.11). Cortisol and IGF-I may have been influenced by the seasons, in opposite ways. Cortisol concentrations were higher in winter ( P < 0.05) and IGF-I was higher during spring-summer ( P < 0.05). The air temperature and the temperature humidity index showed positive moderate correlations to RT, BS, TT, and RF ( P < 0.001). The ambient temperature was found to have a positive correlation with the physiological variables, independent of the cooling system, but cooled animals exhibited higher milk production during spring and summer ( P < 0.01).

  12. Multilayer composite material and method for evaporative cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A multilayer composite material and method for evaporative cooling of a person employs an evaporative cooling liquid that changes phase from a liquid to a gaseous state to absorb thermal energy. The evaporative cooling liquid is absorbed into a superabsorbent material enclosed within the multilayer composite material. The multilayer composite material has a high percentage of the evaporative cooling liquid in the matrix. The cooling effect can be sustained for an extended period of time because of the high percentage of phase change liquid that can be absorbed into the superabsorbent. Such a composite can be used for cooling febrile patients by evaporative cooling as the evaporative cooling liquid in the matrix changes from a liquid to a gaseous state to absorb thermal energy. The composite can be made with a perforated barrier material around the outside to regulate the evaporation rate of the phase change liquid. Alternatively, the composite can be made with an imperveous barrier material or semipermeable membrane on one side to prevent the liquid from contacting the person's skin. The evaporative cooling liquid in the matrix can be recharged by soaking the material in the liquid. The multilayer composite material can be fashioned into blankets, garments and other articles.

  13. Combined effects of underlying substrate and evaporative cooling on the evaporation of sessile liquid droplets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yilin; Ma, Liran; Xu, Xuefeng; Luo, Jianbin

    2015-07-28

    The evaporation of pinned, sessile droplets resting on finite thickness substrates was investigated numerically by extending the combined field approach to include the thermal properties of the substrate. By this approach, the combined effects of the underlying substrate and the evaporative cooling were characterized. The results show that the influence of the substrate on the droplet evaporation depends largely on the strength of the evaporative cooling. When the evaporative cooling is weak, the influence of substrate is also weak. As the strength of evaporative cooling increases, the influence of the substrate becomes more and more pronounced. Further analyses indicated that it is the cooling at the droplet surface and the temperature dependence of the saturation vapor concentration that relate the droplet evaporation to the underlying substrate. This indicates that the evaporative cooling number, Ec, can be used to identify the influence of the substrate on the droplet evaporation. The theoretical predictions by the present model are compared and found to be in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The present work may contribute to the body of knowledge concerning droplet evaporation and may have applications in a wide range of industrial and scientific processes. PMID:26059590

  14. Green Data Center Cooling: Achieving 90% Reduction: Airside Economization and Unique Indirect Evaporative Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Weerts, B. A.; Gallaher, D.; Weaver, R.; Van Geet, O.

    2012-01-01

    The Green Data Center Project was a successful effort to significantly reduce the energy use of the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). Through a full retrofit of a traditional air conditioning system, the cooling energy required to meet the data center's constant load has been reduced by over 70% for summer months and over 90% for cooler winter months. This significant change is achievable through the use of airside economization and a new indirect evaporative cooling system. One of the goals of this project was to create awareness of simple and effective energy reduction strategies for data centers. This project's geographic location allowed maximizing the positive effects of airside economization and indirect evaporative cooling, but these strategies may also be relevant for many other sites and data centers in the U.S.

  15. Experimental evaluation of a breadboard heat and product-water removal system for a space-power fuel cell designed with static water removal and evaporative cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagedorn, N. H.; Prokipius, P. R.

    1977-01-01

    A test program was conducted to evaluate the design of a heat and product-water removal system to be used with fuel cell having static water removal and evaporative cooling. The program, which was conducted on a breadboard version of the system, provided a general assessment of the design in terms of operational integrity and transient stability. This assessment showed that, on the whole, the concept appears to be inherently sound but that in refining this design, several facets will require additional study. These involve interactions between pressure regulators in the pumping loop that occur when they are not correctly matched and the question of whether an ejector is necessary in the system.

  16. Energy savings from indirect evaporative pre-cooling: Control strategies and commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Felts, D.; Jump, D.A.

    1998-07-01

    Package rooftop air conditioning units (RTU) with evaporative pre-cooling systems were installed at an Agricultural History Museum and conference center in the northern Sacramento Valley in California, a hot and dry summer climate region. The evaporative pre-coolers serve to extend the economizer range of the RTU's. A commissioning team monitored the performance of the RTU evaporative pre-coolers. The purpose of the monitoring was to determine if changes were warranted to optimize the system's energy efficiency. The commissioning process revealed that the RTU evaporative pre-coolers were being controlled by the economizer control cycle. With this control cycle, the evaporative pre-cooler operates when the outdoor air temperature is falling below the space return air temperature. This means that the pre-cooler will never operate at peak load conditions. The conference center is an assembly occupancy. Building codes require significant levels of outdoor air for ventilation. The evaporative pre-cooler system provides the means to significantly offset the energy requirements for cooling down and heating up this ventilation air. A DOE2 energy simulation analysis indicated that the evaporative pre-cooler could cut energy use by over 50% if it were working correctly. Investigation concludes that in buildings with high outdoor air requirements, evaporative pre-cooling, using building exhaust air as the indirect evaporative cooling source, significantly reduce building energy consumption. This evaporative pre-cooling technology works in any climate, regardless of outdoor conditions, since the return air stream exhausted from the building provides a relatively constant temperature and humidity source for evaporative cooling. An added benefit is that the evaporative pre-cooler heat exchanger recovers heat from the exhausted air stream in cold weather.

  17. Evaporative cooling of antiprotons for the production of trappable antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Silveira, D. M.; Cesar, C. L.; Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Hayden, M. E.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; So, C.; Wurtele, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Friesen, T.; Hydomako, R.; and others

    2013-03-19

    We describe the implementation of evaporative cooling of charged particles in the ALPHA apparatus. Forced evaporation has been applied to cold samples of antiprotons held in Malmberg-Penning traps. Temperatures on the order of 10 K were obtained, while retaining a significant fraction of the initial number of particles. We have developed a model for the evaporation process based on simple rate equations and applied it succesfully to the experimental data. We have also observed radial re-distribution of the clouds following evaporation, explained by simple conservation laws. We discuss the relevance of this technique for the recent demonstration of magnetic trapping of antihydrogen.

  18. Passive cooling with solar updraft and evaporative downdraft chimneys

    SciTech Connect

    Mignon, G.V.; Cunningham, W.A.; Thompson, T.L.

    1985-01-01

    Computer models have been developed to describe the operation of both solar updraft and evaporative downdraft chimneys. Design studies are being conducted at the present time to use the towers for cooling an experimental, well instrumented, structure to study passive cooling in residential buildings. (MHR)

  19. Evaporator Development for an Evaporative Heat Pipe System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Leigh C.

    2004-01-01

    As fossil fuel resources continue to deplete, research for alternate power sources continues to develop. One of these alternate technologies is fuel cells. They are a practical fuel source able to provide significant amounts of power for applications from laptops to automobiles and their only byproduct is water. However, although this technology is over a century old and NASA has been working with it since the early 1960 s there is still room for improvement. The research I am involved in at NASA's Glenn Research Center is focusing on what is called a regenerative fuel cell system. The unique characteristic of this type of system is that it used an outside power source to create electrolysis of the water it produces and it then reuses the hydrogen and oxygen to continue producing power. The advantage of this type of system is that, for example, on space missions it can use solar power to recharge its gas supplies between periods when the object being orbited blocks out the sun. This particular system however is far from completion. This is because of the many components that are required to make up a fuel cell that need to be tested individually. The specific part of the system that is being worked on this summer of 2004 is the cooling system. The fuel cell stack, that is the part that actually creates the power, also produces a lot of heat. When not properly cooled, it has been known to cause fires which, needless to say are not conducive to the type of power that is trying to be created. In order to cool the fuel cell stack in this system we are developing a heat pipe cooling system. One of the main components of a heat pipe cooling system is what is known as the evaporator, and that is what happens to be the part of the system we are developing this summer. In most heat pipe systems the evaporator is a tube in which the working fluid is cooled and then re-circulated through the system to absorb more heat energy from the fuel cell stack. For this system, instead

  20. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF A NOVEL FULL-SCALE EVAPORATIVELY COOLED CONDENSER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report compares the performance of a novel evaporatively cooled condenser with that of a conventional air-cooled condenser for a split-system heat pump. The system was tested in an environmentally controlled test chamber that is able to simulate test conditions as specified b...

  1. Three-wire magnetic trap for direct forced evaporative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Shengwang; Oh, Eun

    2009-01-01

    We propose a simple three-wire-based magnetic trap potential for direct forced evaporative cooling of neutral atoms without using induced spin-flip technologies. We have devised a method for controlling the trap depth without sacrificing its frequencies by only varying wire currents and external magnetic fields. By having multiples of these wires on different levels integrated into an atom chip, it is possible to attain Bose-Einstein condensation without the conventional forced evaporation technique.

  2. Correlations for Saturation Efficiency of Evaporative Cooling Pads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, J. K.; Hindoliya, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents some experimental investigations to obtain correlations for saturation efficiency of evaporative cooling pads. Two commonly used materials namely aspen and khus fibers along with new materials namely coconut fibers and palash fibers were tested in a laboratory using suitably fabricated test setup. Simple mathematical correlations have been developed for calculating saturation efficiency of evaporating cooling pads which can be used to predict their performance at any desired mass flow rate. Performances of four different pad materials were also compared using developed correlations. An attempt was made to test two new materials (i.e. fibers of palash wood and coconut) to check their suitability as wetted media for evaporative cooling pads. It was found that Palash wood fibers offered highest saturation efficiency compared to that of other existing materials such as aspen and khus fibers at different mass flow rate of air.

  3. A numerical simulation of heat transfer in evaporative cooling towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benton, D. J.

    1983-09-01

    A phenomenological analysis was developed for the processes which occur within an evaporative cooling tower. The analysis includes the basic principles of mass, momentum, and energy conservation and empirical elationships for component characteristics such as transfer and pressure drop coefficients. A computer model which simulates the processes occurring in evaporative cooling towers was developed. The results of this computer model are compared to field data to verify the analysis and the computer modeling. The computer model may be used to analyze the performance of existing towers or to predict the performance of alternative tower designs.

  4. Hybrid radiator cooling system

    DOEpatents

    France, David M.; Smith, David S.; Yu, Wenhua; Routbort, Jules L.

    2016-03-15

    A method and hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus for implementing enhanced radiator-cooling are provided. The hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus includes an air-side finned surface for air cooling; an elongated vertically extending surface extending outwardly from the air-side finned surface on a downstream air-side of the hybrid radiator; and a water supply for selectively providing evaporative cooling with water flow by gravity on the elongated vertically extending surface.

  5. A study of diamond laminated surfaces in evaporative spray cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehmbey, M. S.; Pais, M. R.; Chow, L. C.

    This effort is directed towards studying the performance of diamond laminated surfaces under conditions of evaporative spray cooling of high-heat-flux electronic components. The experimental results presented illustrate the robustness of the surface, as well as its heat transfer characteristics, wettability and roughness. Exceptional heat flux rates of over 1100 W/sq cm were obtained within superheats of 40 C.

  6. 49. LOOKING NORTH AT EVAPORATIVE WASTE WATER TREATMENT COOLING TOWERS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. LOOKING NORTH AT EVAPORATIVE WASTE WATER TREATMENT COOLING TOWERS, WITH BLOW ENGINE HOUSE No. 3 ON RIGHT, AND FILTER CAKE HOUSE IN FOREGROUND. (Jet Lowe) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  7. Kinetics of the evaporative cooling of an atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lahaye, Thierry; Guery-Odelin, David

    2006-06-15

    We compare two distinct models of evaporative cooling of a magnetically guided atomic beam: a continuous one, consisting in approximating the atomic distribution function by a truncated equilibrium distribution, and a discrete-step one, in which the evaporation process is described in terms of successive steps consisting in a truncation of the distribution followed by rethermalization. Calculations are performed for the semilinear potential relevant for experiments. We show that it is possible to map one model onto the other, allowing us to infer, for the discrete-step model, the rethermalization kinetics, which turns out to be strongly dependent upon the shape of the confining potential.

  8. Evaporative spray cooling of plain and microporous coated surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J. H.; You, S. M.; Choi, S. U.-S.; Energy Technology; Univ. of Texas at Arlington

    2004-07-01

    Experiments were performed on air and evaporative spray cooling of plain and microporous coated surfaces on flat and cylindrical heaters. Micron-size aluminum particles were used to build the microporous structures on the heated surfaces. To analyze the evaporative cooling, heat transfer curves were obtained in the form of the wall temperature difference versus heat flux. The heat transfer coefficients were also determined as a function of heat flux. Three water flow rates (1.25, 1.75 and 2.40 ml/min) were tested for the flat heater and one rate (3.0 ml/min) for the cylindrical heater, maintaining the air pressure of 7 psig (48 kPa) at the inlet of the nozzle. The effect of different particle sizes in the coating was also tested to optimize the microporous coating technique. Spraying water droplets on the microporous coating surface enhanced the heat removal due to the capillary pumping phenomenon through the microporous cavities connecting each other. The evaporative spray cooling increased the heat transfer coefficient by up to 400% relative to that of the uncoated surface cooled by dry air, and this enhancement was maintained at high heat fluxes by using microporous surfaces.

  9. Solitons as the Early Stage of Quasicondensate Formation during Evaporative Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Witkowska, E.; Deuar, P.; Gajda, M.; RzaPzewski, K.

    2011-04-01

    We calculate the evaporative cooling dynamics of trapped one-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates for parameters leading to a range of condensates and quasicondensates in the final equilibrium state, using the classical fields method. We confirm that solitons are created during the evaporation process by the Kibble-Zurek mechanism, but subsequently dissipate during thermalization. However, their signature remains in the phase coherence length, which is approximately conserved during dissipation in this system.

  10. Evaporative cooling on a grooved surface. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, D.

    1979-01-01

    The transition point where water begins to accumulate on the surface during spray evaporative cooling was investigated experimentally to determine the temperatures and corresponding heat flux at which this transition occurs. Several pressure ranges were considered including one below the triple point of water. Additionally, the results using a grooved surface were compared to those using a smooth surface. It was determined that a grooved surface has no effect on the heat transfer.

  11. Influence of electron evaporative cooling on ultracold plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Truman; Chen, Wei-Ting; Roberts, Jacob

    2013-07-15

    The expansion of ultracold neutral plasmas (UCP) is driven primarily by the thermal pressure of the electron component and is therefore sensitive to the electron temperature. For typical UCP spatial extents, evaporative cooling has a significant influence on the UCP expansion rate at lower densities (less than 10{sup 8}/cm{sup 3}). We studied the effect of electron evaporation in this density range. Owing to the low density, the effects of three-body recombination were negligible. We modeled the expansion by taking into account the change in electron temperature owing to evaporation as well as adiabatic expansion and found good agreement with our data. We also developed a simple model for initial evaporation over a range of ultracold plasma densities, sizes, and electron temperatures to determine over what parameter range electron evaporation is expected to have a significant effect. We also report on a signal calibration technique, which relates the signal at our detector to the total number of ions and electrons in the ultracold plasma.

  12. Evaporative cooling over the Tibetan Plateau induced by vegetation growth.

    PubMed

    Shen, Miaogen; Piao, Shilong; Jeong, Su-Jong; Zhou, Liming; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Ciais, Philippe; Chen, Deliang; Huang, Mengtian; Jin, Chun-Sil; Li, Laurent Z X; Li, Yue; Myneni, Ranga B; Yang, Kun; Zhang, Gengxin; Zhang, Yangjian; Yao, Tandong

    2015-07-28

    In the Arctic, climate warming enhances vegetation activity by extending the length of the growing season and intensifying maximum rates of productivity. In turn, increased vegetation productivity reduces albedo, which causes a positive feedback on temperature. Over the Tibetan Plateau (TP), regional vegetation greening has also been observed in response to recent warming. Here, we show that in contrast to arctic regions, increased growing season vegetation activity over the TP may have attenuated surface warming. This negative feedback on growing season vegetation temperature is attributed to enhanced evapotranspiration (ET). The extra energy available at the surface, which results from lower albedo, is efficiently dissipated by evaporative cooling. The net effect is a decrease in daily maximum temperature and the diurnal temperature range, which is supported by statistical analyses of in situ observations and by decomposition of the surface energy budget. A daytime cooling effect from increased vegetation activity is also modeled from a set of regional weather research and forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model simulations, but with a magnitude smaller than observed, likely because the WRF model simulates a weaker ET enhancement. Our results suggest that actions to restore native grasslands in degraded areas, roughly one-third of the plateau, will both facilitate a sustainable ecological development in this region and have local climate cobenefits. More accurate simulations of the biophysical coupling between the land surface and the atmosphere are needed to help understand regional climate change over the TP, and possible larger scale feedbacks between climate in the TP and the Asian monsoon system. PMID:26170316

  13. Evaporative cooling over the Tibetan Plateau induced by vegetation growth

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Miaogen; Piao, Shilong; Jeong, Su-Jong; Zhou, Liming; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Ciais, Philippe; Chen, Deliang; Huang, Mengtian; Jin, Chun-Sil; Li, Laurent Z. X.; Li, Yue; Myneni, Ranga B.; Yang, Kun; Zhang, Gengxin; Zhang, Yangjian; Yao, Tandong

    2015-01-01

    In the Arctic, climate warming enhances vegetation activity by extending the length of the growing season and intensifying maximum rates of productivity. In turn, increased vegetation productivity reduces albedo, which causes a positive feedback on temperature. Over the Tibetan Plateau (TP), regional vegetation greening has also been observed in response to recent warming. Here, we show that in contrast to arctic regions, increased growing season vegetation activity over the TP may have attenuated surface warming. This negative feedback on growing season vegetation temperature is attributed to enhanced evapotranspiration (ET). The extra energy available at the surface, which results from lower albedo, is efficiently dissipated by evaporative cooling. The net effect is a decrease in daily maximum temperature and the diurnal temperature range, which is supported by statistical analyses of in situ observations and by decomposition of the surface energy budget. A daytime cooling effect from increased vegetation activity is also modeled from a set of regional weather research and forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model simulations, but with a magnitude smaller than observed, likely because the WRF model simulates a weaker ET enhancement. Our results suggest that actions to restore native grasslands in degraded areas, roughly one-third of the plateau, will both facilitate a sustainable ecological development in this region and have local climate cobenefits. More accurate simulations of the biophysical coupling between the land surface and the atmosphere are needed to help understand regional climate change over the TP, and possible larger scale feedbacks between climate in the TP and the Asian monsoon system. PMID:26170316

  14. The energy saving potential of precooling incoming outdoor air by indirect evaporative cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.; Qin, H.; Huang, Y.J.; Wu, H.; Blumstein, C.

    1992-09-01

    This paper investigates the energy saving potentials of using indirect evaporative coolers to precool incoming outdoor air as the first stage of a standard cooling system. For dry and moderately humid locations, either exhaust room air or outdoor air can be used as the secondary air to the indirect evaporative precooler with similar energy savings. Under these conditions, the use of outdoor air is recommended due to the simplicity in installing the duct system. For humid locations, the use of exhaust room air is recommended because the precooling capacity and energy savings will be greatly increased. For locations with short cooling seasons, the use of indirect evaporative coolers for precooling may not be worthwhile. The paper also gives some simplified indices for easily predicting the precooling capacity, energy savings and water consumption of an indirect evaporative precooler. These indices can be used for cooling systems with continuous operation, but further work is needed to determine whether the same indices are also suitable for cooling systems with intermittent operations.

  15. Evaporative cooling in a radio-frequency trap

    SciTech Connect

    Garrido Alzar, Carlos L.; Perrin, Helene; Lorent, Vincent; Garraway, Barry M.

    2006-11-15

    A theoretical investigation for implementing a scheme of forced evaporative cooling in radio-frequency (rf) adiabatic potentials is presented. Supposing the atoms to be trapped in a combination of a dc magnetic field and a rf field at frequency {omega}{sub 1}, the cooling procedure is facilitated using a second rf source at frequency {omega}{sub 2}. This second rf field produces a controlled coupling between the spin states dressed by {omega}{sub 1}. The evaporation is then possible in a pulsed or continuous mode. In the pulsed case, atoms with a given energy are transferred into untrapped dressed states by abruptly switching off the {omega}{sub 2} coupling. In the continuous case, it is possible for energetic atoms to adiabatically follow the doubly dressed states and escape out of the trap. Our results also show that when {omega}{sub 1} and {omega}{sub 2} are separated by at least the Rabi frequency associated with {omega}{sub 1}, additional evaporation zones appear which can make this process more efficient.

  16. Axially Tapered And Bilayer Microchannels For Evaporative Cooling Devices

    DOEpatents

    Nilson, Robert; Griffiths, Stewart

    2005-10-04

    The invention consists of an evaporative cooling device comprising one or more microchannels whose cross section is axially reduced to control the maximum capillary pressure differential between liquid and vapor phases. In one embodiment, the evaporation channels have a rectangular cross section that is reduced in width along a flow path. In another embodiment, channels of fixed width are patterned with an array of microfabricated post-like features such that the feature size and spacing are gradually reduced along the flow path. Other embodiments incorporate bilayer channels consisting of an upper cover plate having a pattern of slots or holes of axially decreasing size and a lower fluid flow layer having channel widths substantially greater than the characteristic microscale dimensions of the patterned cover plate. The small dimensions of the cover plate holes afford large capillary pressure differentials while the larger dimensions of the lower region reduce viscous flow resistance.

  17. Evaporative cooling and water balance during flight in birds.

    PubMed

    Torre-Bueno, J R

    1978-08-01

    The rate of evaporative cooling was calculated from the rate of mass loss in starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) during 90 min flights in a wind-tunnel. Evaporative heat loss ranged from 5% of the metabolic rate at -5 degrees C to 19% of the metabolic rate at 29 degrees C. Radiation and convection accounted for the balance of the heat loss. On average, starlings dehydrated during flights at all temperatures above 7 degrees C. The comparison of these results with data from field studies, which indicate that long-distance migrants do not dehydrate, suggests that migrants may maintain water balance by ascending to colder air in which convection carries off most of the heat produced. PMID:702042

  18. Strategies for increasing evaporative cooling during simulated desert patrol mission.

    PubMed

    Ciuha, Ursa; Grönkvist, Mikael; Mekjavic, Igor B; Eiken, Ola

    2016-02-01

    The study evaluated the efficiency of two heat dissipation strategies under simulated desert patrol missions. Ten men participated in four trials, during which they walked on a treadmill (45°C, 20% relative humidity), carrying a load of 35 kg; two 50-min walks were separated by a 20-min rest. Cooling strategies, provided by an ambient air-ventilated vest (active cooling condition, AC), or water spraying of the skin during the rest (passive cooling condition, PC), in addition to reduced clothing and open zippers, were compared to conditions with full protective (FP) clothing and naked condition (NC). Skin temperature was higher during NC (37.9 ± 0.4°C; p < 0.001), and rectal temperature and heart rate were higher during FP (38.6 ± 0.4°C, p < 0.001 and 145 ± 12, p < 0.001, respectively), compared to other conditions. Four subjects terminated the trial prematurely due to signs of heat exhaustion in FP. Both cooling strategies substantially improved evaporative cooling. PMID:26094700

  19. The effect of simulated evaporative cooling on thermal entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing; Cotel, Aline

    1998-11-01

    The effect of simulated evaporative cooling on the entrainment of a thermal impinging on a stratified interface is investigated experimentally. Evaporative cooling in atmospheric clouds results in buoyancy reversal, where the mixed fluid is denser than either parent parcel. This is realized in the laboratory by using a mixture of ethyl alcohol and ethylene glycohol in aqueous solution. A thermal is formed by releasing a small volume of buoyant fluid from the bottom of a lucite tank. It rises first through a relatively dense lower layer and then impinges on a thin stratified interface, above which is a relatively light layer. The entrainment of upper layer across the interface is measured optically. The entrainment rate is found to obey a Ri-3/2 power law for values of the buoyancy reversal parameter, D*, between 0 and 0.5. The entrainment rate is independent of D* for a certain range of Ri. This is consistent with the behavior of the buoyancy-reversing thermal in an unstratified environment observed by Johari.

  20. Analysis of the effects of evaporative cooling on the evaporation of liquid droplets using a combined field approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuefeng; Ma, Liran

    2015-01-01

    During liquid evaporation, the equations for the vapor concentration in the atmosphere and for the temperature in the liquid are coupled and must be solved in an iterative manner. In the present paper, a combined field approach which unifies the coupled fields into one single hybrid field and thus makes the iteration unnecessary is proposed. By using this approach, the influences of the evaporative cooling on the evaporation of pinned sessile droplets are investigated, and its predictions are found in good agreement with the previous theoretical and experimental results. A dimensionless number Ec which can evaluate the strength of the evaporative cooling is then introduced, and the results show that both the evaporation flux along the droplet surface and the total evaporation rate of the droplet decrease as the evaporative cooling number Ec increases. For drying droplets, there exists a critical value EcCrit below which the evaporative cooling effect can be neglected and above which the significance of the effect increases dramatically. The present work may also have more general applications to coupled field problems in which all the fields have the same governing equation. PMID:25721987

  1. Real evaporative cooling efficiency of one-layer tight-fitting sportswear in a hot environment.

    PubMed

    Wang, F; Annaheim, S; Morrissey, M; Rossi, R M

    2014-06-01

    Real evaporative cooling efficiency, the ratio of real evaporative heat loss to evaporative cooling potential, is an important parameter to characterize the real cooling benefit for the human body. Previous studies on protective clothing showed that the cooling efficiency decreases with increasing distance between the evaporation locations and the human skin. However, it is still unclear how evaporative cooling efficiency decreases as the moisture is transported from the skin to the clothing layer. In this study, we performed experiments with a sweating torso manikin to mimic three different phases of moisture absorption in one-layer tight-fitting sportswear. Clothing materials Coolmax(®) (CM; INVISTA, Wichita, Kansas, USA; 100%, profiled cross-section polyester fiber), merino wool (MW; 100%), sports wool (SW; 50% wool, 50% polyester), and cotton (CO; 100%) were selected for the study. The results demonstrated that, for the sportswear materials tested, the real evaporative cooling efficiency linearly decreases with the increasing ratio of moisture being transported away from skin surface to clothing layer (adjusted R(2) >0.97). In addition, clothing fabric thickness has a negative effect on the real evaporative cooling efficiency. Clothing CM and SW showed a good ability in maintaining evaporative cooling efficiency. In contrast, clothing MW made from thicker fabric had the worst performance in maintaining evaporative cooling efficiency. It is thus suggested that thin fabric materials such as CM and SW should be used to manufacture one-layer tight-fitting sportswear. PMID:24033668

  2. Analyzing the possibility of achieving more efficient cooling of water in the evaporative cooling towers of the Armenian NPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, V. G.; Yeghoyan, E. A.

    2015-10-01

    The specific features of the service cooling water system used at the Armenian NPP and modifications made in the arrangement for supplying water to the water coolers in order to achieve more efficient cooling are presented. The mathematical model applied in carrying out the analyses is described, the use of which makes it possible to investigate the operation of parallel-connected cooling towers having different hydraulic and thermal loads. When the third standby cooling tower is put into operation (with the same flow rate of water supplied to the water coolers), the cooled water temperature is decreased by around 2-3°C in the range of atmospheric air temperatures 0-35°C. However, the introduced water distribution arrangement with a decreased spraying density has limitation on its use at negative outdoor air temperatures due to the hazard intense freezing of the fill in the cooling tower peripheral zone. The availability of standby cooling towers in the shutdown Armenian NPP power unit along with the planned full replacement of the cooling tower process equipment create good possibilities for achieving a deeper water cooling extent and better efficiency of the NPP. The present work was carried out with the aim of achieving maximally efficient use of existing possibilities and for elaborating the optimal cooling tower modernization version. Individual specific heat-andmass transfer processes in the chimney-type evaporative cooling towers are analyzed. An improved arrangement for distributing cooled water over the cooling tower spraying area (during its operation with a decreased flow rate) is proposed with the aim of cooling water to a deeper extent and preserving the possibility of using the cooling towers in winter. The main idea behind improving the existing arrangement is to exclude certain zones of the cooling tower featuring inefficient cooling from operation. The effectiveness of introducing the proposed design is proven by calculations (taking as an

  3. Condensation and Evaporation of Solar System Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. M.; Richter, F. M.

    2003-12-01

    absence of isotopic fractionation in a volatile element-depleted condensed phase is more a measure of the degree to which the system maintained thermodynamic equilibrium than a diagnostic of whether the path involved condensation or evaporation.The pervasive volatile element depletion of inner solar system planets and the asteroidal parent bodies of most meteorites is a major, but by no means the only reason to consider evaporation and condensation processes in the early history of the solar system. Chondrules appear to have been rapidly heated and then cooled over a period of minutes to hours (see Chapter 1.07). If this occurred in a gas of solar composition under nonequilibrium conditions, chondrules should have partially evaporated and an isotopic fractionation record should remain. The absence of such effects can be used to chonstrain the conditions of chondrule formation (e.g., Alexander et al., 2000; Alexander and Wang, 2001). There is good petrologic, chemical, and isotopic evidence suggesting that certain solar system materials such as the coarse-grained CAIs are likely evaporation residues. For example, the type B CAIs are often found to have correlated enrichments in the heavy isotopes of silicon and magnesium ( Figure 1), and these isotopic fractionations are very much like those of evaporation residues produced in laboratory experiments. Condensation also appears to be a major control of elemental zoning patterns in metal grains in CH chondrites (Meibom et al., 1999, 2001; Campbell et al., 2001; Petaev et al., 2001; Campbell et al., 2002). A more contemporary example is the isotopic and chemical compositions of deep-sea spherules that have been significantly affected by evaporative loss during atmospheric entry ( Davis et al., 1991a; Davis and Brownlee, 1993; Herzog et al., 1994, 1999; Xue et al., 1995; Alexander et al., 2002). (7K)Figure 1. Isotopic mass fractionation effects in CAIs. Most coarse-grained CAIs have enrichments of a few ‰ amu-1 in magnesium

  4. Optical depletion spectroscopy for probing evaporatively cooled OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummon, Matthew; Wu, Hao; Stuhl, Benjamin; Reens, David; Yeo, Mark; Ye, Jun

    2013-05-01

    Pulsed laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurements provide a sensitive probe for the detection of molecular species. However, the broad linewidth of the pulsed lasers used for molecular excitation obscures spectral information useful for determination of molecule temperature. This limitation can be overcome by the use of a second, narrowband source of radiation that can deplete a subset of the molecules detected using PLIF, and a high resolution depletion spectrum can be obtained. In the past, we have demonstrated the use of microwave depletion spectroscopy to measure magnetically trapped, evaporatively cooled OH temperatures in the range of 5-50 mK. The lower limit of 5 mK is set by the details of the microwave transition. Here we present temperature measurements of trapped OH using an optical depletion technique, which is in principle capable of probing temperatures as low as 50 microkelvin. We acknowledge funding from the NSF Physics Frontier Center, NIST, DOE, and the AFOSR MURI on Cold Molecules.

  5. Establishing feasibility for providing passive cooling with solar updraft and evaporative downdraft chimneys

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, W.A.; Mignon, G.V.

    1986-01-01

    At the present time all experimental towers (chimneys) are completed and operating. This consists of both a solar updraft and a natural-evaporative downdraft tower retrofitted to an existing residence structure and a greenhouse. The residential, experimental, natural-draft cooling system was completed in May, 1985, and five months of summer data on a Hewlet Packard 85 data acquisition computer with a digital voltmeter were acquired. The cooling tower and solar chimney on the experimental greenhouse became operational in September of 1985. A conceptual drawing of both the greenhouse and the residence natural-draft towers is included in the appendix along with the September 85 progress report.

  6. Quantifying Evaporation in a Permeable Pavement System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies quantifying evaporation from permeable pavement systems are limited to a few laboratory studies and one field application. This research quantifies evaporation for a larger-scale field application by measuring the water balance from lined permeable pavement sections. Th...

  7. Evaluation of malodor for automobile air conditioner evaporator by using laboratory-scale test cooling bench.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Sun Hwa; Jung, Young Rim; Kim, Man Goo

    2008-09-12

    As one of the measures to improve the environment in an automobile, malodor caused by the automobile air-conditioning system evaporator was evaluated and analyzed using laboratory-scale test cooling bench. The odor was simulated with an evaporator test cooling bench equipped with an airflow controller, air temperature and relative humidity controller. To simulate the same odor characteristics that occur from automobiles, one previously used automobile air conditioner evaporator associated with unpleasant odors was selected. The odor was evaluated by trained panels and collected with aluminum polyester bags. Collected samples were analyzed by thermal desorption into a cryotrap and subsequent gas chromatographic separation, followed by simultaneous olfactometry, flame ionization detector and identified by atomic emission detection and mass spectrometry. Compounds such as alcohols, aldehydes, and organic acids were identified as responsible odor-active compounds. Gas chromatography/flame ionization detection/olfactometry combined sensory method with instrumental analysis was very effective as an odor evaluation method in an automobile air-conditioning system evaporator. PMID:18701113

  8. CO2 evaporative cooling: The future for tracking detector thermal management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tropea, P.; Daguin, J.; Petagna, P.; Postema, H.; Verlaat, B.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-07-01

    In the last few years, CO2 evaporative cooling has been one of the favourite technologies chosen for the thermal management of tracking detectors at LHC. ATLAS Insertable B-Layer and CMS Pixel phase 1 upgrade have adopted it and their systems are now operational or under commissioning. The CERN PH-DT team is now merging the lessons learnt on these two systems in order to prepare the design and construction of the cooling systems for the new Upstream Tracker and the Velo upgrade in LHCb, due by 2018. Meanwhile, the preliminary design of the ATLAS and CMS full tracker upgrades is started, and both concepts heavily rely on CO2 evaporative cooling. This paper highlights the performances of the systems now in operation and the challenges to overcome in order to scale them up to the requirements of the future generations of trackers. In particular, it focuses on the conceptual design of a new cooling system suited for the large phase 2 upgrade programmes, which will be validated with the construction of a common prototype in the next years.

  9. Data center cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Dang, Hien P; Parida, Pritish R; Schultz, Mark D; Sharma, Arun

    2015-03-17

    A data center cooling system may include heat transfer equipment to cool a liquid coolant without vapor compression refrigeration, and the liquid coolant is used on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack housed in the data center. The system may also include a controller-apparatus to regulate the liquid coolant flow to the liquid cooled information technology equipment rack through a range of liquid coolant flow values based upon information technology equipment temperature thresholds.

  10. Solar Assisted Adsorptive Desiccant Cooling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkura, Masashi; Kodama, Akio

    Desiccant cooling processes can supply dry air by using lower temperature heat energy such as waste heat or solar heat. Especially, solar heat is useful heat source for the desiccant cooling since solar heat in summer tends to be surplus. This paper discusses the hourly cooling performance of the solar assisted desiccant cooling system, which consists of a desiccant wheel, a thermal wheel, two evaporative coolers, a cooling coil and flat plate solar water heater, assuming that the cooling system is applied to an office room of 250m3 in volume. The estimation indicated that the surface area needed to satisfy the dehumidifying performance in a sunny day was at least 30m2. Furthermore, surface area of 40m2 or larger provided a surplus dehumidifying performance causing a sensible cooling effect in evaporative cooler. Surface area of 30 m2 did not satisfy the dehumidifying performance required for high humidity condition, over 18.0g/kg(DA). The cooling demand of the cooling coil increased in such humidity condition due to the decrease in the sensible cooling effect of evaporative cooler. Auxiliary heater was required in a cloudy day since the temperature of water supplied from solar water heater of 40m2 did not reach sufficient level.

  11. Prehospital intranasal evaporative cooling for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a pilot, feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Richard M; Van Antwerp, Jerry; Henderson, Charles; Weaver, Anne; Davies, Gareth; Lockey, David

    2014-10-01

    Intranasal evaporative cooling presents a novel means of initiating therapeutic hypothermia after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Few studies have evaluated the use of intranasal therapeutic hypothermia using the Rhinochill device in the prehospital setting. We sought to evaluate the use of Rhinochill in the Physician Response Unit of London's Air Ambulance, aiming to describe the feasibility of employing it during prehospital resuscitation for OHCA. We prospectively evaluated the Rhinochill device over a 7-month period. Inclusion criteria for deployment included: age above 18 years, Physician Response Unit on-scene within maximum of 10 min after return-of-spontaneous circulation (ROSC), witnessed OHCA or unwitnessed downtime of less than 10 min, pregnancy not suspected, normal nasal anatomy, and likely ICU candidate if ROSC were to be achieved. Thirteen patients were included in the evaluation. The average time from the 999 call to initiation of cooling was 39.5 min (range 22-61 min). The average prehospital temperature change in patients who achieved ROSC was -1.9°C. Patients were cooled for an average of 38 min prehospital. In all cases, the doctor and paramedic involved with the resuscitation reported that the Rhinochill was easy to set up and use during resuscitation and that it did not interfere with standard resuscitation practice. Intranasal evaporative cooling using the Rhinochill system is feasible in an urban, prehospital, doctor/paramedic response unit. Cooling with Rhinochill was not found to interfere with prehospital resuscitation and resulted in significant core body temperature reduction. Further research on the potential benefit of intra-arrest and early initiation of intranasal evaporative cooling is warranted. PMID:24300245

  12. Temperature and humidity control during cooling and dehumidifying by compressor and evaporator fan speed variation

    SciTech Connect

    Krakow, K.I.; Lin, S.; Zeng, Z.S.

    1995-08-01

    The accurate control of temperature and relative humidity during cooling and dehumidifying air-conditioning processes may be achieved by compressor and evaporator fan speed variation. Proportional-integral-differential (PID) control methods are shown to be suitable for attaining compressor and evaporator fan speeds such that the sensible and latent components of the refrigeration system capacity equal the sensible and latent components of the system load. The feasibility of the control method has been verified experimentally. A numerical model of an environmental control system, including refrigeration, space, and PID control subsystems, has been developed. The model is suitable for determining system response to variations of PID coefficient values and to variations of system loads.

  13. Optimization of evaporative cooling towards a large number of Bose-Einstein-condensed atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Makoto; Mukai, Tetsuya; Mukai, Takaaki; Koashi, Masato; Mitsunaga, Masaharu; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2003-02-01

    We study the optimization of evaporative cooling in trapped bosonic atoms on the basis of quantum kinetic theory of a Bose gas. The optimized cooling trajectory for {sup 87}Rb atoms indicates that the acceleration of evaporative cooling around the transition point of Bose-Einstein condensation is very effective against loss of trapped atoms caused by three-body recombination. The number of condensed atoms is largely enhanced by the optimization, more than two orders of magnitude in our present calculation using relevant experimental parameters, as compared with the typical value given by the conventional evaporative cooling where the frequency of radio-frequency magnetic field is swept exponentially. In addition to this optimized cooling, it is also shown that highly efficient evaporative cooling can be achieved by an initial exponential and then a rapid linear sweep of frequency.

  14. Evaporative CO2 microchannel cooling for the LHCb VELO pixel upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Aguiar Francisco, O. A.; Buytaert, J.; Collins, P.; Dumps, R.; John, M.; Mapelli, A.; Romagnoli, G.

    2015-05-01

    The LHCb Vertex Detector (VELO) will be upgraded in 2018 to a lightweight pixel detector capable of 40 MHz readout and operation in very close proximity to the LHC beams. The thermal management of the system will be provided by evaporative CO2 circulating in microchannels embedded within thin silicon plates. This solution has been selected due to the excellent thermal efficiency, the absence of thermal expansion mismatch with silicon ASICs and sensors, the radiation hardness of CO2, and very low contribution to the material budget. Although microchannel cooling is gaining considerable attention for applications related to microelectronics, it is still a novel technology for particle physics experiments, in particular when combined with evaporative CO2 cooling. The R&D effort for LHCb is focused on the design and layout of the channels together with a fluidic connector and its attachment which must withstand pressures up to 170 bar. Even distribution of the coolant is ensured by means of the use of restrictions implemented before the entrance to a race track like layout of the main cooling channels. The coolant flow and pressure drop have been simulated as well as the thermal performance of the device. This proceeding describes the design and optimization of the cooling system for LHCb and the latest prototyping results.

  15. Cooling water distribution system

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Richard

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

  16. Passive cooling system for a vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Terry Joseph; Thoensen, Thomas

    2005-11-15

    A passive cooling system for a vehicle (114) transfers heat from an overheated internal component, for example, an instrument panel (100), to an external portion (116) of the vehicle (114), for example, a side body panel (126). The passive cooling system includes one or more heat pipes (112) having an evaporator section (118) embedded in the overheated internal component and a condenser section (120) at the external portion (116) of the vehicle (114). The evaporator (118) and condenser (120) sections are in fluid communication. The passive cooling system may also include a thermally conductive film (140) for thermally connecting the evaporator sections (118) of the heat pipes (112) to each other and to the instrument panel (100).

  17. Passive Cooling System for a Vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, T. J.; Thoensen, T.

    2005-11-15

    A passive cooling system for a vehicle (114) transfers heat from an overheated internal component, for example, an instrument panel (100), to an external portion (116) of the vehicle (114), for example, a side body panel (126). The passive cooling system includes one or more heat pipes (112) having an evaporator section (118) embedded in the overheated internal component and a condenser section (120) at the external portion (116) of the vehicle (114). The evaporator (118) and condenser (120) sections are in fluid communication. The passive cooling system may also include a thermally conductive film (140) for thermally connecting the evaporator sections (118) of the heat pipes (112) to each other and to the instrument panel (100).

  18. Thin-Film Evaporative Cooling for Side-Pumped Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Brian K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system and method are provided for cooling a crystal rod of a side-pumped laser. A transparent housing receives the crystal rod therethrough so that an annular gap is defined between the housing and the radial surface of the crystal rod. A fluid coolant is injected into the annular gap such the annular gap is partially filled with the fluid coolant while the radial surface of the crystal rod is wetted as a thin film all along the axial length thereof.

  19. Dual-purpose chamber-cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraze, R. E.

    1968-01-01

    Inexpensive, portable system was designed for cooling small environmental test chambers with a temperature-controlled gas stream evaporated from a cryogenic liquid. The system reduces the temperature of a chamber to any desired point in a fraction of the time required by previous systems.

  20. Optimized evaporative cooling for sodium Bose-Einstein condensation against three-body loss

    SciTech Connect

    Shobu, Takahiko; Yamaoka, Hironobu; Imai, Hiromitsu; Morinaga, Atsuo; Yamashita, Makoto

    2011-09-15

    We report on a highly efficient evaporative cooling optimized experimentally. We successfully created sodium Bose-Einstein condensates with 6.4x10{sup 7} atoms starting from 6.6x10{sup 9} thermal atoms trapped in a magnetic trap by employing a fast linear sweep of radio frequency at the final stage of evaporative cooling so as to overcome the serious three-body losses. The experimental results such as the cooling trajectory and the condensate growth quantitatively agree with the numerical simulations of evaporative cooling on the basis of the kinetic theory of a Bose gas carefully taking into account our specific experimental conditions. We further discuss theoretically a possibility of producing large condensates, more than 10{sup 8} sodium atoms, by simply increasing the number of initial thermal trapped atoms and the corresponding optimization of evaporative cooling.

  1. Stabilization of the number of Bose-Einstein-condensed atoms in evaporative cooling via three-body recombination loss

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Makoto; Mukai, Tetsuya

    2003-12-01

    The dynamics of evaporative cooling of magnetically trapped {sup 87}Rb atoms is studied on the basis of the quantum kinetic theory of a Bose gas. We carried out the quantitative calculations of the time evolution of conventional evaporative cooling where the frequency of the radio-frequency magnetic field is swept exponentially. This ''exponential-sweep cooling'' is known to become inefficient at the final stage of the cooling process due to a serious three-body recombination loss. We precisely examine how the growth of a Bose-Einstein condensate depends on the experimental parameters of evaporative cooling, such as the initial number of trapped atoms, the initial temperature, and the bias field of a magnetic trap. It is shown that three-body recombination drastically depletes the trapped {sup 87}Rb atoms as the system approaches the quantum degenerate region and the number of condensed atoms finally becomes insensitive to these experimental parameters. This result indicates that the final number of condensed atoms is well stabilized by a large nonlinear three-body loss against the fluctuations of experimental conditions in evaporative cooling.

  2. Portable brine evaporator unit, process, and system

    DOEpatents

    Hart, Paul John; Miller, Bruce G.; Wincek, Ronald T.; Decker, Glenn E.; Johnson, David K.

    2009-04-07

    The present invention discloses a comprehensive, efficient, and cost effective portable evaporator unit, method, and system for the treatment of brine. The evaporator unit, method, and system require a pretreatment process that removes heavy metals, crude oil, and other contaminates in preparation for the evaporator unit. The pretreatment and the evaporator unit, method, and system process metals and brine at the site where they are generated (the well site). Thus, saving significant money to producers who can avoid present and future increases in transportation costs.

  3. 242-A evaporator vacuum condenser system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, V.A.

    1994-09-28

    This document is written for the 242-A evaporator vacuum condenser system (VCS), describing its purpose and operation within the evaporator. The document establishes the operating parameters specifying pressure, temperature, flow rates, interlock safety features and interfacing sub-systems to support its operation.

  4. Thermal characteristics of a medium-level concentration photovoltaic unit with evaporation cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokotov, Yuri V.; Reyz, Michael A.; Fisher, Yossi

    2009-08-01

    The results of thermal analysis and experiments are presented for a 1-kW brand new medium-level (8X) concentration photovoltaic (CPV) unit that is cooled by evaporation and built as an elongated floating solar unit. The unit keeps the silicon PV elements at low and stable temperature around the clock, significantly outperforms competitors' systems in terms of the power output and the life span of identical PV elements. It is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that the PV element temperature level exceeds the temperature level of water in the water basin (used as a heat sink) by just a few degrees.

  5. Note: A microfluidic freezer based on evaporative cooling of atomized aqueous microdroplets.

    PubMed

    Song, Jin; Chung, Minsub; Kim, Dohyun

    2015-01-01

    We report for the first time water-based evaporative cooling integrated into a microfluidic chip for temperature control and freezing of biological solution. We opt for water as a nontoxic, effective refrigerant. Aqueous solutions are atomized in our device and evaporation of microdroplets under vacuum removes heat effectively. We achieve rapid cooling (-5.1 °C/s) and a low freezing temperature (-14.1 °C). Using this approach, we demonstrate freezing of deionized water and protein solution. Our simple, yet effective cooling device may improve many microfluidic applications currently relying on external power-hungry instruments for cooling and freezing. PMID:25638130

  6. Establish feasibility for providing passive cooling with solar updraft and evaporative downdraft chimneys

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, W.A.; Mignon, G.V.; Thompson, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    Natural draft towers can be used for cooling and ventilating structures. From an operational perspective, the downdraft evaporatively cooled tower is preferred for a dry climate. Solar chimneys, when used alone, tend to require an excessively large solar collector area when appreciable quantities of air must be moved. When used in combination with a downdraft tower, the roof and attic of buildings may assist the solar chimney and their use becomes more attractive. Both a frame building and a greenhouse were successfully cooled during this program. The economics of the downdraft tower compare favorably with conventional evaporative cooling for some application.

  7. Establish feasibility for providing passive cooling with solar updraft and evaporate downdraft chimneys

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, W.A.; Mignon, G.V.; Thompson, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    Natural draft towers can be used for cooling and ventilating structures. From an operational perspective, the downdraft evaporatively cooled tower is preferred for a dry climate. Solar chimneys, when used alone, tend to require an excessively large solar collector area when appreciable quantities of air must be moved. When used in combination with a downdraft tower, the roof and attic of buildings may assist the solar chimney and their use becomes more attractive. Both a frame building and a greenhouse were successfully cooled during this program. The economics of the downdraft tower compare favorably with conventional evaporative cooling for some applications.

  8. Note: A microfluidic freezer based on evaporative cooling of atomized aqueous microdroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jin; Kim, Dohyun; Chung, Minsub

    2015-01-15

    We report for the first time water-based evaporative cooling integrated into a microfluidic chip for temperature control and freezing of biological solution. We opt for water as a nontoxic, effective refrigerant. Aqueous solutions are atomized in our device and evaporation of microdroplets under vacuum removes heat effectively. We achieve rapid cooling (−5.1 °C/s) and a low freezing temperature (−14.1 °C). Using this approach, we demonstrate freezing of deionized water and protein solution. Our simple, yet effective cooling device may improve many microfluidic applications currently relying on external power-hungry instruments for cooling and freezing.

  9. Note: A microfluidic freezer based on evaporative cooling of atomized aqueous microdroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jin; Chung, Minsub; Kim, Dohyun

    2015-01-01

    We report for the first time water-based evaporative cooling integrated into a microfluidic chip for temperature control and freezing of biological solution. We opt for water as a nontoxic, effective refrigerant. Aqueous solutions are atomized in our device and evaporation of microdroplets under vacuum removes heat effectively. We achieve rapid cooling (-5.1 °C/s) and a low freezing temperature (-14.1 °C). Using this approach, we demonstrate freezing of deionized water and protein solution. Our simple, yet effective cooling device may improve many microfluidic applications currently relying on external power-hungry instruments for cooling and freezing.

  10. Effects of air velocity on laying hen production from 24 to 27 weeks under simulated evaporatively cooled conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal conditions play a major role in production efficiency in commercial poultry production. Mitigation of thermal stress can improve productivity, but must be achieved economically. Weather and system design can limit effectiveness of evaporative cooling and increased air movement has been sho...

  11. Personal Cooling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Cool Head, a personal cooling system for use in heat stress occupations, is a spinoff of a channeled cooling garment for space wear. It is portable and includes a heat exchanger, control display unit, liquid reservoir and temperature control unit. The user can eliminate 40 to 60 percent of his body's heat storage and lower heart rate by 50 to 80 beats a minute. The system is used by the Army, Navy, crop dusting pilots, heavy equipment operators and auto racing drivers and is marketed by Life Enhancement Technologies, LLC. Further applications are under consideration.

  12. Passive cooling systems in residential buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingersoll, John G.; Givoni, Baruch

    1985-11-01

    The performance of four passive cooling systems, nocturnal convective cooling, nocturnal radiative cooling, direct evaporative cooling and conductive earth-coupled cooling, is evaluated for representative environmental conditions in the temperate, hot-humid and hot-arid climatic zones of the United States. The analysis indicates that substantial portion of the cooling load of a typical energy-efficient single family residential building can be eliminated with any of these passive systems. Depending on system type and climatic zone, the building cooling load can be reduced by 1/3 to over 4/5 of its original value. The corresponding energy savings would amount to a minimum of 25 TWh/yr and could potentially exceed 50 TWh/yr, if proper passive cooling systems were to be employed throughout the country. Incorporation of passive cooling models in building energy analysis codes will be necessary to determine more precisely the potential of each system. Field testing will also be required to further evaluate this potential. Moreover, the extension of analytical modeling to include additional passive cooling systems and the research of advanced building—natural environment coupling systems and materials constitute tasks requiring further effort.

  13. Effect of evaporative surface cooling on thermographic assessment of burn depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anselmo, V. J.; Zawacki, B. E.

    1977-01-01

    Differences in surface temperature between evaporating and nonevaporating, partial- and full-thickness burn injuries were studied in 20 male, white guinea pigs. Evaporative cooling can disguise the temperature differential of the partial-thickness injury and lead to a false full-thickness diagnosis. A full-thickness burn with blister intact may retain enough heat to result in a false partial-thickness diagnosis. By the fourth postburn day, formation of a dry eschar may allow a surface temperature measurement without the complication of differential evaporation. For earlier use of thermographic information, evaporation effects must be accounted for or eliminated.

  14. Evaporation Loss of Light Elements as a Function of Cooling Rate: Logarithmic Law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Yong-Liang; Hewins, Roger H.

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge about the evaporation loss of light elements is important to our understanding of chondrule formation processes. The evaporative loss of light elements (such as B and Li) as a function of cooling rate is of special interest because recent investigations of the distribution of Li, Be and B in meteoritic chondrules have revealed that Li varies by 25 times, and B and Be varies by about 10 times. Therefore, if we can extrapolate and interpolate with confidence the evaporation loss of B and Li (and other light elements such as K, Na) at a wide range of cooling rates of interest based upon limited experimental data, we would be able to assess the full range of scenarios relating to chondrule formation processes. Here, we propose that evaporation loss of light elements as a function of cooling rate should obey the logarithmic law.

  15. Superconductor rotor cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Gamble, Bruce B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed; Schwall, Robert E.; Driscoll, David I.; Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2002-01-01

    A system for cooling a superconductor device includes a cryocooler located in a stationary reference frame and a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with a rotating reference frame in which the superconductor device is located. A method of cooling a superconductor device includes locating a cryocooler in a stationary reference frame, and transferring heat from a superconductor device located in a rotating reference frame to the cryocooler through a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with the rotating reference frame.

  16. Superconductor rotor cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Gamble, Bruce B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed; Schwall, Robert E.; Driscoll, David I.; Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2004-11-02

    A system for cooling a superconductor device includes a cryocooler located in a stationary reference frame and a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with a rotating reference frame in which the superconductor device is located. A method of cooling a superconductor device includes locating a cryocooler in a stationary reference frame, and transferring heat from a superconductor device located in a rotating reference frame to the cryocooler through a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with the rotating reference frame.

  17. Dropwise Evaporative Cooling of Heated Surfaces with Various Wettability Characteristics Obtained by Nanostructure Modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian-nan; Zhang, Zhen; Ouyang, Xiao-long; Jiang, Pei-xue

    2016-03-01

    A numerical and experimental investigation was conducted to analyze dropwise evaporative cooling of heated surfaces with various wettability characteristics. The surface wettability was tuned by nanostructure modifications. Spray-cooling experiments on these surfaces show that surfaces with better wettability have better heat transfer rate and higher critical heat flux (CHF). Single droplet impingement evaporative cooling of a heated surface was then investigated numerically with various wettability conditions to characterize the effect of contact angle on spray-cooling heat transfer. The volume of fluid (VOF) model with variable-time stepping was used to capture the time-dependent liquid-gas interface motion throughout the computational domain with the kinetic theory model used to predict the evaporation rate at the liquid-gas interface. The numerical results agree with the spray-cooling experiments that dropwise evaporative cooling is much better on surfaces with better wettability because of the better liquid spreading and convection, better liquid-solid contact, and stronger liquid evaporation.

  18. Dropwise Evaporative Cooling of Heated Surfaces with Various Wettability Characteristics Obtained by Nanostructure Modifications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Nan; Zhang, Zhen; Ouyang, Xiao-Long; Jiang, Pei-Xue

    2016-12-01

    A numerical and experimental investigation was conducted to analyze dropwise evaporative cooling of heated surfaces with various wettability characteristics. The surface wettability was tuned by nanostructure modifications. Spray-cooling experiments on these surfaces show that surfaces with better wettability have better heat transfer rate and higher critical heat flux (CHF). Single droplet impingement evaporative cooling of a heated surface was then investigated numerically with various wettability conditions to characterize the effect of contact angle on spray-cooling heat transfer. The volume of fluid (VOF) model with variable-time stepping was used to capture the time-dependent liquid-gas interface motion throughout the computational domain with the kinetic theory model used to predict the evaporation rate at the liquid-gas interface. The numerical results agree with the spray-cooling experiments that dropwise evaporative cooling is much better on surfaces with better wettability because of the better liquid spreading and convection, better liquid-solid contact, and stronger liquid evaporation. PMID:27003427

  19. Investigation of annular flow at high evaporation rates in view of liquid film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahstoll, Juergen

    1988-01-01

    The process of liquid film cooling of combustion chamber walls which are subjected to extremely high heat rates was investigated. A theoretical model was developed for a reliable prediction of the film cooling length. The mass transfer at the liquid-gas interface results from evaporated liquid and entrained liquid droplets. The film cooling length analysis, which includes the physical effects in detail, is separated into two regions: heating the liquid and evaporating the liquid. The theoretical results were experimentally verified at high pressures and temperatures using a modified H2/O2-rocket motor. There is a good agreement between the theoretical and the experimental results over the experimental range.

  20. Monitoring Cray Cooling Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Don E; Ezell, Matthew A; Becklehimer, Jeff; Donovan, Matthew J; Layton, Christopher C

    2014-01-01

    While sites generally have systems in place to monitor the health of Cray computers themselves, often the cooling systems are ignored until a computer failure requires investigation into the source of the failure. The Liebert XDP units used to cool the Cray XE/XK models as well as the Cray proprietary cooling system used for the Cray XC30 models provide data useful for health monitoring. Unfortunately, this valuable information is often available only to custom solutions not accessible by a center-wide monitoring system or is simply ignored entirely. In this paper, methods and tools used to harvest the monitoring data available are discussed, and the implementation needed to integrate the data into a center-wide monitoring system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is provided.

  1. Waveguide cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B. C. J.; Hartop, R. W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An improved system is described for cooling high power waveguides by the use of cooling ducts extending along the waveguide, which minimizes hot spots at the flanges where waveguide sections are connected together. The cooling duct extends along substantially the full length of the waveguide section, and each flange at the end of the section has a through hole with an inner end connected to the duct and an opposite end that can be aligned with a flange hole in another waveguide section. Earth flange is formed with a drainage groove in its face, between the through hole and the waveguide conduit to prevent leakage of cooling fluid into the waveguide. The ducts have narrowed sections immediately adjacent to the flanges to provide room for the installation of fasteners closely around the waveguide channel.

  2. Solar-powered cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, Joseph C.

    2015-07-28

    A solar-powered adsorption-desorption refrigeration and air conditioning system that uses nanostructural materials such as aerogels, zeolites, and sol gels as the adsorptive media. Refrigerant molecules are adsorbed on the high surface area of the nanostructural material while the material is at a relatively low temperature, perhaps at night. During daylight hours, when the nanostructural materials is heated by the sun, the refrigerant are thermally desorbed from the surface of the aerogel, thereby creating a pressurized gas phase in the vessel that contains the aerogel. This solar-driven pressurization forces the heated gaseous refrigerant through a condenser, followed by an expansion valve. In the condenser, heat is removed from the refrigerant, first by circulating air or water. Eventually, the cooled gaseous refrigerant expands isenthalpically through a throttle valve into an evaporator, in a fashion similar to that in more conventional vapor recompression systems.

  3. A laboratory study of thermals with evaporative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, Hamid

    In order to study thermals with buoyancy reversals, various mixtures of ethylene glycol and ethyl alcohol were released at the bottom of a water tank, generating thermals. Thermals were found to have a minimum flame length of 3.5 de. The thermal dynamics were shown to depend on a density reversal parameter. The results have application to the study of the dynamic effects of evaporation in cumulus clouds.

  4. Floating Loop System For Cooling Integrated Motors And Inverters Using Hot Liquid Refrigerant

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W [Kingston, TN; Coomer, Chester [Knoxville, TN; Marlino, Laura D [Oak Ridge, TN

    2006-02-07

    A floating loop vehicle component cooling and air-conditioning system having at least one compressor for compressing cool vapor refrigerant into hot vapor refrigerant; at least one condenser for condensing the hot vapor refrigerant into hot liquid refrigerant by exchanging heat with outdoor air; at least one floating loop component cooling device for evaporating the hot liquid refrigerant into hot vapor refrigerant; at least one expansion device for expanding the hot liquid refrigerant into cool liquid refrigerant; at least one air conditioning evaporator for evaporating the cool liquid refrigerant into cool vapor refrigerant by exchanging heat with indoor air; and piping for interconnecting components of the cooling and air conditioning system.

  5. Increased efficiency of rf-induced evaporative cooling by utilizing gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinner, Julian; Wolke, Matthias; Hemmerich, Andreas

    2010-04-01

    We report on an efficient rf-induced forced evaporative cooling of an ensemble of Rb87 atoms in state |F=2,mF=2> magnetically trapped in a quadrupole-Ioffe configuration trap. The cigar-shaped trap is oriented with its weak confining axis along the direction of gravity leading to, first, a significant separation of the trapping positions for low-field-seeking atoms with different mF value and, second, a reduced resonance volume for rf-induced evaporation confined to a small region around the lower tip of the cigar-shaped ensemble. This results in an enhancement of the evaporation efficiency α≡dlnT/(dlnN) due to either reduced or completely vanishing scattering events between cooled and evaporated atoms. We present data illustrating this effect.

  6. Increased efficiency of rf-induced evaporative cooling by utilizing gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Klinner, Julian; Wolke, Matthias; Hemmerich, Andreas

    2010-04-15

    We report on an efficient rf-induced forced evaporative cooling of an ensemble of {sup 87}Rb atoms in state |F=2,m{sub F}=2> magnetically trapped in a quadrupole-Ioffe configuration trap. The cigar-shaped trap is oriented with its weak confining axis along the direction of gravity leading to, first, a significant separation of the trapping positions for low-field-seeking atoms with different m{sub F} value and, second, a reduced resonance volume for rf-induced evaporation confined to a small region around the lower tip of the cigar-shaped ensemble. This results in an enhancement of the evaporation efficiency {alpha}{identical_to}dlnT/(dlnN) due to either reduced or completely vanishing scattering events between cooled and evaporated atoms. We present data illustrating this effect.

  7. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, P.F.; Cooke, F.E.; Fitch, J.R.

    1994-01-25

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA. 1 figure.

  8. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, Paul F.; Cooke, Franklin E.; Fitch, James R.

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA.

  9. Trends in evaporation and surface cooling in the Mississippi River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milly, P.C.D.; Dunne, K.A.

    2001-01-01

    A synthesis of available data for the Mississippi River basin (area 3 ?? 106 km2) reveals an upward trend in evaporation during recent decades, driven primarily by increases in precipitation and secondarily by human water use. A cloud-related decrease in surface net radiation appears to have accompanied the precipitation trend. Resultant evaporative and radiative cooling of the land and lower atmosphere quantitatively explains downward trends in observed pan evaporation. These cooling tendencies also reconcile the observed regional atmospheric cooling with the anticipated regional "greenhouse warming." If recent high levels of precipitation (which correlate with the North Atlantic Oscillation) are mainly caused by an internal climatic fluctuation, an eventual return to normal precipitation could reveal heretofore-unrealized warming in the basin. If, instead, they are caused by some unidentified forcing that will continue to grow in the future, then continued intensification of water cycling and suppression of warming in the basin could result.

  10. The impact of humidity on evaporative cooling in small desert birds exposed to high air temperatures.

    PubMed

    Gerson, Alexander R; Smith, Eric Krabbe; Smit, Ben; McKechnie, Andrew E; Wolf, Blair O

    2014-01-01

    Environmental temperatures that exceed body temperature (Tb) force endothermic animals to rely solely on evaporative cooling to dissipate heat. However, evaporative heat dissipation can be drastically reduced by environmental humidity, imposing a thermoregulatory challenge. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of humidity on the thermoregulation of desert birds and to compare the sensitivity of cutaneous and respiratory evaporation to reduced vapor density gradients. Rates of evaporative water loss, metabolic rate, and Tb were measured in birds exposed to humidities ranging from ∼2 to 30 g H2O m(-3) (0%-100% relative humidity at 30°C) at air temperatures between 44° and 56°C. In sociable weavers, a species that dissipates heat primarily through panting, rates of evaporative water loss were inhibited by as much as 36% by high humidity at 48°C, and these birds showed a high degree of hyperthermia. At lower temperatures (40°-44°C), evaporative water loss was largely unaffected by humidity in this species. In Namaqua doves, which primarily use cutaneous evaporation, increasing humidity reduced rates of evaporative water loss, but overall rates of water loss were lower than those observed in sociable weavers. Our data suggest that cutaneous evaporation is more efficient than panting, requiring less water to maintain Tb at a given temperature, but panting appears less sensitive to humidity over the air temperature range investigated here. PMID:25461643

  11. Mild evaporative cooling applied to the torso provides thermoregulatory benefits during running in the heat.

    PubMed

    Filingeri, D; Fournet, D; Hodder, S; Havenith, G

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the effects of mild evaporative cooling applied to the torso, before or during running in the heat. Nine male participants performed three trials: control-no cooling (CTR), pre-exercise cooling (PRE-COOL), and during-exercise cooling (COOL). Trials consisted of 10-min neutral exposure and 50-min heat exposure (30 °C; 44% humidity), during which a 30-min running protocol (70% VO2max ) was performed. An evaporative cooling t-shirt was worn before the heat exposure (PRE-COOL) or 15 min after the exercise was started (COOL). PRE-COOL significantly lowered local skin temperature (Tsk ) (up to -5.3 ± 0.3 °C) (P < 0.001), mean Tsk (up to -2 ± 0.1 °C) (P < 0.001), sweat losses (-143 ± 40 g) (P = 0.002), and improved thermal comfort (P = 0.001). COOL suddenly lowered local Tsk (up to -3.8 ± 0.2 °C) (P < 0.001), mean Tsk (up to -1 ± 0.1 °C) (P < 0.001), heart rate (up to -11 ± 2 bpm) (P = 0.03), perceived exertion (P = 0.001), and improved thermal comfort (P = 0.001). We conclude that the mild evaporative cooling provided significant thermoregulatory benefits during exercise in the heat. However, the timing of application was critical in inducing different thermoregulatory responses. These findings provide novel insights on the thermoregulatory role of Tsk during exercise in the heat. PMID:25943671

  12. Dew Point Evaporative Comfort Cooling: Report and Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, J.; Herrmann, L.; Kozubal, E.; Geiger, J.; Eastment, M.; Slayzak, S.

    2012-11-01

    The project objective was to demonstrate the capabilities of the high-performance multi-staged IEC technology and its ability to enhance energy efficiency and interior comfort in dry climates, while substantially reducing electric-peak demand. The project was designed to test 24 cooling units in five commercial building types at Fort Carson Army Base in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

  13. Evaporative cooling of microscopic water droplets in vacuo: Molecular dynamics simulations and kinetic gas theory.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Daniel; Sellberg, Jonas A; Nilsson, Anders; Pettersson, Lars G M

    2016-03-28

    In the present study, we investigate the process of evaporative cooling of nanometer-sized droplets in vacuum using molecular dynamics simulations with the TIP4P/2005 water model. The results are compared to the temperature evolution calculated from the Knudsen theory of evaporation which is derived from kinetic gas theory. The calculated and simulation results are found to be in very good agreement for an evaporation coefficient equal to unity. Our results are of interest to experiments utilizing droplet dispensers as well as to cloud micro-physics. PMID:27036456

  14. Evaporative cooling of microscopic water droplets in vacuo: Molecular dynamics simulations and kinetic gas theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlesinger, Daniel; Sellberg, Jonas A.; Nilsson, Anders; Pettersson, Lars G. M.

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, we investigate the process of evaporative cooling of nanometer-sized droplets in vacuum using molecular dynamics simulations with the TIP4P/2005 water model. The results are compared to the temperature evolution calculated from the Knudsen theory of evaporation which is derived from kinetic gas theory. The calculated and simulation results are found to be in very good agreement for an evaporation coefficient equal to unity. Our results are of interest to experiments utilizing droplet dispensers as well as to cloud micro-physics.

  15. Evaporative cooling of microscopic water droplets in vacuo: Molecular dynamics simulations and kinetic gas theory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schlesinger, Daniel; Sellberg, Jonas A.; Nilsson, Anders; Pettersson, Lars G. M.

    2016-03-22

    In the present study, we investigate the process of evaporative cooling of nanometer-sized droplets in vacuum using molecular dynamics simulations with the TIP4P/2005 water model. The results are compared to the temperature evolution calculated from the Knudsen theory of evaporation which is derived from kinetic gas theory. The calculated and simulation results are found to be in very good agreement for an evaporation coefficient equal to unity. Lastly, our results are of interest to experiments utilizing droplet dispensers as well as to cloud micro-physics.

  16. Implementation of natural down-draft evaporative cooling devices in commercial buildings: The international experience

    SciTech Connect

    Chalfoun, N.V.

    1998-07-01

    Conventional evaporative coolers are high-pressure high-volume devices that deliver cool air by water evaporation wetted pads. Natural down-draft evaporative coolers, or Cool Towers, are devices developed at The University of Arizona's Environmental Research Laboratory. Similar to conventional coolers, these devices are equipped with wetted pads and sprays at the top which provide cool air by evaporation but the air is moved by gravity flow saving the energy required by the blower. In arid regions, cool towers are useful for cooling buildings and outdoor private and public areas. This paper focuses on recent implementation of cool towers in two international projects in arid regions. It also demonstrates CoolT{copyright}, a software developed by the author, which was used for sizing and designing the cool towers used in these projects. The two demonstrated projects are: (1) The Botswana Technology Center (BTC), a Headquarters office building in Bostswana, South Africa. The building energy loads were first optimized through energy conservation measures where the heating load, as predicted by computer simulation, was reduced by 89.9% and the cooling load by 24%. The cooling load was further addressed by the use of a series of integrated cool towers. (2) The Ministry of Municipal and Rural Affairs (MOMRA) Environmental Rowdah project in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia is the second, recently built, project which demonstrates the use of cool towers in outdoor spaces. The Rowdah is equipped with a 76 feet high cool tower, the biggest in the world, which provides cool air to the surrounding outdoor space. The tower performance, as predicted by the CoolT program, demonstrated that on a typical June day in Riyadh, at 3:00 p.m. the ambient air temperature of 107.1 F (41.7 C) will be cooled down to 73.9 F (23.2 C) i.e., 33.2 F (18.4 C) lower, but the 13% relative humidity of air is increased to 75% at the tower discharge.

  17. Cooling Floor AC Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Lu; Hao, Ding; Hong, Zhang; Ce, Gao Dian

    The present HVAC equipments for the residential buildings in the Hot-summer-and-Cold-winter climate region are still at a high energy consuming level. So that the high efficiency HVAC system is an urgently need for achieving the preset government energy saving goal. With its advantage of highly sanitary, highly comfortable and uniform of temperature field, the hot-water resource floor radiation heating system has been widely accepted. This paper has put forward a new way in air-conditioning, which combines the fresh-air supply unit and such floor radiation system for the dehumidification and cooling in summer or heating in winter. By analyze its advantages and limitations, we found that this so called Cooling/ Heating Floor AC System can improve the IAQ of residential building while keep high efficiency quality. We also recommend a methodology for the HVAC system designing, which will ensure the reduction of energy cost of users.

  18. A Novel Absorption Cycle for Combined Water Heating, Dehumidification, and Evaporative Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    CHUGH, Devesh; Gluesenkamp, Kyle R; Abdelaziz, Omar; Moghaddam, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    In this study, development of a novel system for combined water heating, dehumidification, and space evaporative cooling is discussed. Ambient water vapor is used as a working fluid in an open system. First, water vapor is absorbed from an air stream into an absorbent solution. The latent heat of absorption is transferred into the process water that cools the absorber. The solution is then regenerated in the desorber, where it is heated by a heating fluid. The water vapor generated in the desorber is condensed and its heat of phase change is transferred to the process water in the condenser. The condensed water can then be used in an evaporative cooling process to cool the dehumidified air exiting the absorber, or it can be drained if primarily dehumidification is desired. Essentially, this open absorption cycle collects space heat and transfers it to process water. This technology is enabled by a membrane-based absorption/desorption process in which the absorbent is constrained by hydrophobic vapor-permeable membranes. Constraining the absorbent film has enabled fabrication of the absorber and desorber in a plate-and-frame configuration. An air stream can flow against the membrane at high speed without entraining the absorbent, which is a challenge in conventional dehumidifiers. Furthermore, the absorption and desorption rates of an absorbent constrained by a membrane are greatly enhanced. Isfahani and Moghaddam (Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 2013) demonstrated absorption rates of up to 0.008 kg/m2s in a membrane-based absorber and Isfahani et al. (Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 2013) have reported a desorption rate of 0.01 kg/m2s in a membrane-based desorber. The membrane-based architecture also enables economical small-scale systems, novel cycle configurations, and high efficiencies. The absorber, solution heat exchanger, and desorber are fabricated on a single metal sheet. In addition to the open arrangement and membrane-based architecture, another novel feature of the

  19. System and method for cooling a combustion gas charge

    DOEpatents

    Massey, Mary Cecelia; Boberg, Thomas Earl

    2010-05-25

    The present invention relates to a system and method for cooling a combustion gas charge prior. The combustion gas charge may include compressed intake air, exhaust gas, or a mixture thereof. An evaporator is provided that may then receive a relatively high temperature combustion gas charge and discharge at a relatively lower temperature. The evaporator may be configured to operate with refrigeration cycle components and/or to receive a fluid below atmospheric pressure as the phase-change cooling medium.

  20. Get the most out of your cooling system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Warm weather poses management challenges to maintain production efficiency in broiler chickens. Proper maintenance and operation of ventilation and cooling system components is essential to maintain the proper thermal environment and efficient use of energy. Fan and evaporative cooling system clea...

  1. Seasonal and geographical variation in heat tolerance and evaporative cooling capacity in a passerine bird.

    PubMed

    Noakes, Matthew J; Wolf, Blair O; McKechnie, Andrew E

    2016-03-01

    Intraspecific variation in avian thermoregulatory responses to heat stress has received little attention, despite increasing evidence that endothermic animals show considerable physiological variation among populations. We investigated seasonal (summer versus winter) variation in heat tolerance and evaporative cooling in an Afrotropical ploceid passerine, the white-browed sparrow-weaver (Plocepasser mahali; ∼ 47 g) at three sites along a climatic gradient with more than 10 °C variation in mid-summer maximum air temperature (Ta). We measured resting metabolic rate (RMR) and total evaporative water loss (TEWL) using open flow-through respirometry, and core body temperature (Tb) using passive integrated transponder tags. Sparrow-weavers were exposed to a ramped profile of progressively higher Ta between 30 and 52 °C to elicit maximum evaporative cooling capacity (N=10 per site per season); the maximum Ta birds tolerated before the onset of severe hyperthermia (Tb ≈ 44 °C) was considered to be their hyperthermia threshold Ta (Ta,HT). Our data reveal significant seasonal acclimatisation of heat tolerance, with a desert population of sparrow-weavers reaching significantly higher Ta in summer (49.5 ± 1.4 °C, i.e. higher Ta,HT) than in winter (46.8 ± 0.9 °C), reflecting enhanced evaporative cooling during summer. Moreover, desert sparrow-weavers had significantly higher heat tolerance and evaporative cooling capacity during summer compared with populations from more mesic sites (Ta,HT=47.3 ± 1.5 and 47.6 ± 1.3 °C). A better understanding of the contributions of local adaptation versus phenotypic plasticity to intraspecific variation in avian heat tolerance and evaporative cooling capacity is needed for modelling species' responses to changing climates. PMID:26787477

  2. Deep mine cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Conan, J.

    1984-11-06

    A deep mine cooling system comprising a compressor supplied with air and rotatively driven by a motor and an expansion turbine supplied with compressed air from said compressor and driving an actuating unit, wherein the compressed air, after leaving the compressor but prior to reaching the expansion turbine, passes through a steam generator whose output provides the energy required to operate an absorption refrigeration machine used to cool utility water for mining, said compressed air on leaving the steam generator going to a first heat exchanger in which it yields calories to a water circuit comprising a second heat exchanger, said second heat exchanger giving off the calories absorbed by the water in the first heat exchanger to the air fed by the second heat exchanger to a drying cell that is regenerated by said air from the second heat exchanger, said drying cell being part of a set of two cells working in alternation, the other cell in the set receiving the compressed air from the first heat exchanger, such that the compressed air is fed to said expansion turbine after leaving said drying unit, and wherein the air exhausted from said expansion turbine is sent to a third heat exchanger after which it is distributed according to the needs of the mine, said third exchanger being traversed by the water collected in the mine, cooled in said exchanger and circulated upon leaving said exchanger to meet the cool water requirements of the mine.

  3. Preoperational test report, recirculation condenser cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Recirculation Condenser Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The four system provide condenser cooling water for vapor space cooling of tanks AY1O1, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102. Each system consists of a valved piping loop, a pair of redundant recirculation pumps, a closed-loop evaporative cooling tower, and supporting instrumentation; equipment is located outside the farm on concrete slabs. Piping is routed to the each ventilation condenser inside the farm via below-grade concrete trenches. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  4. Rotary engine cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Charles (Inventor); Gigon, Richard M. (Inventor); Blum, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A rotary engine has a substantially trochoidal-shaped housing cavity in which a rotor planetates. A cooling system for the engine directs coolant along a single series path consisting of series connected groups of passages. Coolant enters near the intake port, passes downwardly and axially through the cooler regions of the engine, then passes upwardly and axially through the hotter regions. By first flowing through the coolest regions, coolant pressure is reduced, thus reducing the saturation temperature of the coolant and thereby enhancing the nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanism which predominates in the high heat flux region of the engine during high power level operation.

  5. Cold {sup 52}Cr elastic and inelastic collision-rate determination using evaporative cooling analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Scott V.; Carvalho, Robert de; Doyle, John M.

    2007-06-15

    Elastic and inelastic collision-rate constants of {sup 52}Cr in the temperature range of 20 mK to 1 K are inferred from the evaporative cooling of buffer gas loaded atomic chromium. Using a model that describes the dynamics of the trapped chromium cloud during evaporation, we find g{sub el}=2.15(+2.5,-1.2)x10{sup -10} cm{sup 3}/s and g{sub in}=1.36(+1.2,-0.7)x10{sup -12} cm{sup 3}/s, consistent with theory but in disagreement with previously reported measurements.

  6. Emergency core cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Schenewerk, William E.; Glasgow, Lyle E.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor provided with an emergency core cooling system includes a reactor vessel which contains a reactor core comprising an array of fuel assemblies and a plurality of blanket assemblies. The reactor core is immersed in a pool of liquid metal coolant. The reactor also includes a primary coolant system comprising a pump and conduits for circulating liquid metal coolant to the reactor core and through the fuel and blanket assemblies of the core. A converging-diverging venturi nozzle with an intermediate throat section is provided in between the assemblies and the pump. The intermediate throat section of the nozzle is provided with at least one opening which is in fluid communication with the pool of liquid sodium. In normal operation, coolant flows from the pump through the nozzle to the assemblies with very little fluid flowing through the opening in the throat. However, when the pump is not running, residual heat in the core causes fluid from the pool to flow through the opening in the throat of the nozzle and outwardly through the nozzle to the assemblies, thus providing a means of removing decay heat.

  7. Experimental study on the evaporative cooling of an air-cooled condenser with humidifying air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Mao-Yu; Ho, Ching-Yen; Jang, Kuang-Jang; Yeh, Cheng-Hsiung

    2014-02-01

    Using six different materials to construct a water curtain, this study aims to determine the most effective spray cooling of an air cooled heat exchanger under wet conditions. The experiments were carried out at a mass flow rate of 0.005-0.01 kg/s (spraying water), an airspeed of 0.6-2.4 m/s and a run time of 0-72 h for the material degradation tests. The experimental results indicate that the cooling efficiency, the heat rejection, and the sprinkling density increase as the amount of spraying water increases, but, the air-flow of the condenser is reduced at the same time. In addition, the cooling efficiency of the pads decreases with an increase of the inlet air velocity. In terms of experimental range, the natural wood pulp fiberscan can reach 42.7-66 % for cooling efficiency and 17.17-24.48 % for increases of heat rejection. This means that the natural wood pulp fiberscan pad most effectively enhances cooling performance, followed in terms of cooling effectiveness by the special non-woven rayon pad, the woollen blanket, biochemistry cotton and kapok, non-woven cloth of rayon cotton and kapok, and white cotton pad, respectively. However, the natural wood pulp fiberscan and special non-woven rayon display a relatively greater degradation of the cooling efficiency than the other test pads used in the material degradation tests.

  8. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Fanning, Alan W.

    1991-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of cooling medium flow circuits which cooperate to remove and carry heat away from the fuel core upon loss of the normal cooling flow circuit to areas external thereto.

  9. A tabulated chemistry approach for numerical modeling of diesel spray evaporation in a 'stabilized cool flame' environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kolaitis, D.I.; Founti, M.A.

    2006-04-15

    Droplet evaporation in a 'stabilized cool flame' environment leads to a homogeneous, heated air-fuel vapor mixture that can be subsequently either burnt or utilized in fuel-reforming applications for fuel cell systems. The paper investigates the locally occurring physico-chemical phenomena in an atmospheric pressure, diesel spray, stabilized cool flame reactor, utilizing a tabulated chemistry approach in conjunction with a two-phase, Eulerian-Lagrangian computational fluid dynamics code. Actual diesel oil physical properties are used to model spray evaporation in the two-phase simulations, whereas the corresponding chemistry is represented by n-heptane. A lookup table is constructed by performing a plethora of perfectly stirred reactor simulations, utilizing a semidetailed n-heptane oxidation chemical kinetics mechanism. The overall exothermicity of the preignition n-heptane oxidation chemistry and the fuel consumption rates are examined as a function of selected independent parameters, namely temperature, fuel concentration, and residence time; their influence on cool flame reactivity is thoroughly studied. It is shown that the tabulated chemistry approach allows accurate investigation of the chemical phenomena with low computational cost. The two-phase flow inside the stabilized cool flame reactor is simulated, utilizing the developed lookup table. Predictions are presented for a variety of test cases and are compared to available experimental data, with satisfactory agreement. Model validation tests indicate that prediction quality improves with increasing values of air temperature at the reactor's inlet. (author)

  10. Heating and cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Imig, L.A.; Gardner, M.R.

    1982-08-01

    A heating and cooling apparatus capable of cyclic heating and cooling of a test specimen undergoing fatigue testing is discussed. Cryogenic fluid is passed through a block clamped to the speciment to cool the block and the specimen. Heating cartridges penetrate the block to heat the block and the specimen to very hot temperaures. Control apparatus is provided to alternatively activate the cooling and heating modes to effect cyclic heating and cooling between very hot and very cold temperatures. The block is constructed of minimal mass to facilitate the rapid temperature changes. Official Gazette of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

  11. Three-dimensional Marangoni cell in self-induced evaporating cooling unveiled by digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Minetti, Christophe; Buffone, Cosimo

    2014-01-01

    A digital holographic microscope has been used to trace the trajectory of a tracer particle inside the liquid phase of an evaporating meniscus formed at the mouth of a 1-mm2 borosilicate tube filled with ethanol. The Marangoni flow cells are generated by the self-induced differential evaporating cooling along the meniscus interface that creates gradients of surface tension which drive the convection. The competition between surface tension and gravity forces along the curved meniscus interface disrupts the symmetry due to surface tension alone. This distorts the shape of the toroidal Marangoni vortex. Thermocapillary instabilities of the evaporating meniscus are reported by analyzing the trajectories of the tracer particle. It is found that the trajectory of the tracer particle makes different three-dimensional loops and every four loops it returns to the first loop. By analyzing several loops it was found that the characteristic frequency of the periodic oscillatory motion is around 0.125 Hz. PMID:24580320

  12. Thermal panting in dogs: the lateral nasal gland, a source of water for evaporative cooling.

    PubMed

    Blatt, C M; Taylor, C R; Habal, M B

    1972-09-01

    Two lateral nasal glands appear to provide a large part of the water for evaporative cooling in the panting dog; their function is analogous to that of sweat glands in man. Each gland drains through a single duct which opens about 2 centimeters inside the opening of the nostril. This location may be essential to avoid desiccation of the nasal mucosa during thermal panting. The rate of secretion from one gland increased from 0 to an average of 9.6 g (gland . hour)(-1) as air temperature was increased from 10 degrees to 50 degrees C. Evaporation of the fluid from the paired glands could account for between 19 and 36 percent of the increase in respiratory evaporation associated with thermal panting. The fluid secreted by the gland was hypoosmotic to plasma. PMID:5052734

  13. Effect of Water Spray Evaporative Cooling at the Inlet of Regeneration Air Stream on the Performance of an Adsorption Desiccant Cooling Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Kosuke; Kodama, Akio; Hirose, Tsutomu; Goto, Motonobu; Okano, Hiroshi

    This paper shows an influence of evaporative cooler at the inlet of regeneration air stream of an adsorptive desiccant cooling process on the cooling/dehumidifying performance. This evaporative cooling was expected to cause humidity increase in regeneration air reducing the dehumidifying performance of the honeycomb absorber, while the evaporative cooling plays an important role to produce a lower temperature in supply air. Two different airs to be used for the regeneration of the desiccant wheel were considered. One was fresh outside air (OA mode) and the other was air ventilated from the room (RA mode). Experimental results showed that the amount of dehumidified water obtained at the process without water spray evaporative cooler was actually larger than that of process with water spray evaporative cooler. This behavior was mainly due to increase of humidity or relative humidity in the regeneration air as expected. However, temperature of supply air produced by the process with the evaporator was rather lower than that of the other because of the cooled return air, resulting higher CE value. Regarding the operating mode, the evaporative cooler at the OA-mode was no longer useful at higher ambient humidity because of the difficulty of the evaporation of the water in such high humidity. It was also found that its dehumidifying performance was remarkably decreased at higher ambient humidity and lower regeneration temperature since the effective adsorption capacity at the resulting high relative humidity of the regeneration air decreased.

  14. Organic ferroelectric evaporator with substrate cooling and in situ transport capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, K.; Labedz, C.; Shearer, M.; Adenwalla, S.

    2014-04-01

    We report on the design, operation, and performance of a thermal evaporation chamber capable of evaporating organic thin films. Organic thin films are employed in a diverse range of devices and can provide insight into fundamental physical phenomena. However, growing organic thin films is often challenging and requires very specific deposition parameters. The chamber presented here is capable of cooling sample substrates to temperatures below 130 K and allows for the detachment of the sample from the cooling stage and in situ transport. This permits the use of multiple deposition techniques in separate, but connected, deposition chambers without breaking vacuum and therefore provides clean, well characterized interfaces between the organic thin film and any adjoining layers. We also demonstrate a successful thin film deposition of an organic material with a demanding set of deposition parameters, showcasing the success of this design.

  15. Evaporative Cooling and Coherent Axial Oscillations of Highly Charged Ions in a Penning Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Hobein, M.; Solders, A.; Suhonen, M.; Schuch, R.; Liu, Y.

    2011-01-07

    Externally, in an electron beam ion trap, generated Ar{sup 16+} ions were retrapped in a Penning trap and evaporatively cooled in their axial motion. The cooling was observed by a novel extraction technique based on the excitation of a coherent axial oscillation which yields short ion bunches of well-defined energies. The initial temperature of the ion cloud was decreased by a factor of more than 140 within 1 s, while the phase-space density of the coldest extracted ion pulses was increased by a factor of up to about 9.

  16. Solid Desiccant Cooling System Employed with Ventilation Cycle: A Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmar, H.; Hindoliya, D. A.

    2012-10-01

    For better use of evaporative cooling techniques in humid climate, employment of desiccant cooling system (DCS) can be a suitable option. Desiccant augmented evaporative cooling system may be employed for energy saving in buildings in place of conventional vapour compression based cooling system. This article presents a sensitive analysis of DCS simulated under the humid climate of Mumbai, India. Mathematical computations have been performed using outdoor specific humidity, ambient dry bulb temperature and room supply temperature. A sensitive analysis considering some important forcing parameters was conducted. It was observed that the "effectiveness" of direct evaporative cooler to be predominantly high influencing parameter compared to others, for the performance of DCS.

  17. High intensity high charge state ion beam production with an evaporative cooling magnet ECRIS.

    PubMed

    Lu, W; Qian, C; Sun, L T; Zhang, X Z; Fang, X; Guo, J W; Yang, Y; Feng, Y C; Ma, B H; Xiong, B; Ruan, L; Zhao, H W; Zhan, W L; Xie, D

    2016-02-01

    LECR4 (Lanzhou ECR ion source No. 4) is a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source, designed to produce high current, high charge state ion beams for the SSC-LINAC injector (a new injector for sector separated cyclotron) at the Institute of Modern Physics. LECR4 also serves as a PoP machine for the application of evaporative cooling technology in accelerator field. To achieve those goals, LECR4 ECR ion source has been optimized for the operation at 18 GHz. During 2014, LECR4 ion source was commissioned at 18 GHz microwave of 1.6 kW. To further study the influence of injection stage to the production of medium and high charge state ion beams, in March 2015, the injection stage with pumping system was installed, and some optimum results were produced, such as 560 eμA of O(7+), 620 eμA of Ar(11+), 430 eμA of Ar(12+), 430 eμA of Xe(20+), and so on. The comparison will be discussed in the paper. PMID:26931956

  18. High intensity high charge state ion beam production with an evaporative cooling magnet ECRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, W.; Qian, C.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Fang, X.; Guo, J. W.; Yang, Y.; Feng, Y. C.; Ma, B. H.; Xiong, B.; Ruan, L.; Zhao, H. W.; Zhan, W. L.; Xie, D.

    2016-02-01

    LECR4 (Lanzhou ECR ion source No. 4) is a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source, designed to produce high current, high charge state ion beams for the SSC-LINAC injector (a new injector for sector separated cyclotron) at the Institute of Modern Physics. LECR4 also serves as a PoP machine for the application of evaporative cooling technology in accelerator field. To achieve those goals, LECR4 ECR ion source has been optimized for the operation at 18 GHz. During 2014, LECR4 ion source was commissioned at 18 GHz microwave of 1.6 kW. To further study the influence of injection stage to the production of medium and high charge state ion beams, in March 2015, the injection stage with pumping system was installed, and some optimum results were produced, such as 560 eμA of O7+, 620 eμA of Ar11+, 430 eμA of Ar12+, 430 eμA of Xe20+, and so on. The comparison will be discussed in the paper.

  19. Automotive Cooling and Lubricating Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This correspondence course, originally developed for the Marine Corps, is designed to provide new mechanics with a source of study materials to assist them in becoming more proficient in their jobs. The course contains four study units covering automotive cooling system maintenance, cooling system repair, lubricating systems, and lubrication…

  20. Experiences in solar cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D. S.

    The results of performance evaluations for nine solar cooling systems are presented, and reasons fow low or high net energy balances are discussed. Six of the nine systems are noted to have performed unfavorably compared to standard cooling systems due to thermal storage losses, excessive system electrical demands, inappropriate control strategies, poor system-to-load matching, and poor chiller performance. A reduction in heat losses in one residential unit increased the total system efficiency by 2.5%, while eliminating heat losses to the building interior increased the efficiency by 3.3%. The best system incorporated a lithium bromide absorption chiller and a Rankine cycle compression unit for a commercial application. Improvements in the cooling tower and fan configurations to increase the solar cooling system efficiency are indicated. Best performances are expected to occur in climates inducing high annual cooling loads.

  1. Direct evaporative cooling of 39K atoms to Bose-Einstein condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landini, M.; Roy, S.; Roati, G.; Simoni, A.; Inguscio, M.; Modugno, G.; Fattori, M.

    2012-09-01

    We report the realization of a Bose-Einstein condensate of 39K atoms without the aid of an additional atomic coolant. Our route to Bose-Einstein condensation comprises sub-Doppler laser cooling of large atomic clouds with more than 1010 atoms and evaporative cooling in an optical dipole trap where the collisional cross section can be increased using magnetic Feshbach resonances. Large condensates with almost 106 atoms can be produced in less than 15 s. Our achievements eliminate the need for sympathetic cooling with Rb atoms, which was the usual route implemented until now due to the unfavorable collisional property of 39K. Our findings simplify the experimental setup for producing Bose-Einstein condensates of 39K atoms with tunable interactions, which have a wide variety of promising applications, including atom interferometry to studies on the interplay of disorder and interactions in quantum gases.

  2. Theory of evaporative cooling with energy-dependent elastic scattering cross section and application to metastable helium

    SciTech Connect

    Tol, Paul J.J.; Hogervorst, Wim; Vassen, Wim

    2004-07-01

    The kinetic theory of evaporative cooling developed by Luiten et al. [Phys. Rev. A 53, 381 (1996)] is extended to include the dependence of the elastic scattering cross section on collision energy. We introduce a simple approximation by which the transition range between the low-temperature limit and the unitarity limit is described as well. Applying the modified theory to our measurements on evaporative cooling of metastable helium, we find a scattering length a=10(5) nm.

  3. Disk to dual ring deposition transformation in evaporating nanofluid droplets from substrate cooling to heating.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xin; Duan, Fei

    2016-07-27

    Substrate temperature plays an important role in deposited morphologies formed after the evaporation of nanofluid droplets. The deposited patterns are shown to vary from a uniform disk-like profile to a dual ring from cooling to heating of the substrate. The droplet on the substrate with a relatively low temperature reveals three primary stages. Stage I features an outward transport of nanoparticles along the liquid-air interface near the droplet edge. Meanwhile some nanoparticles form sediment on the solid surface with a certain distance to the contact line. In the central region nanoparticles are dominated by Brownian motion so they fluctuate around their positions. Stage II is characterized by an increasing outward transport of nanoparticles in the bulk so the coffee ring is gradually enhanced. Most particles in Stages I and II are central-concentrated, leaving an annular gap sparsely covered adjacent to the outer ring. In Stage III, the pattern is homogenized by filling the gap with the arrival of the interior nanoparticles. Upon increasing the substrate temperature, the accompanied flow pattern exhibits a transition when the substrate still remains cooler than the atmosphere. It is resulted from the evaporative cooling at the droplet apex counteractive to the applied temperature gradient by substrate cooling. Above the transition temperature, the induced inward Marangoni flow takes place earlier at a higher substrate temperature, and in conjunction with the outward radial flow a dual ring pattern is formed. PMID:27411495

  4. Modeling of the Evaporative Cooling of Running-Down Liquid Films in the Slit Channel of the Spraying Device of a Cooling Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashkov, G. V.; Malenko, G. L.; Solodukhin, A. D.; Tyutyuma, V. D.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the results of computational modeling of the nonstationary evaporative cooling of a liquid film running down a vertical surface cooled by a turbulent vapor-air counterflow. The heat and mass transfer problem has been formulated in conjugate form. The calculation data on the total heat flow density at the interface for various instants of time are given.

  5. Combustor liner cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Berkman, Mert Enis

    2013-08-06

    A combustor liner is disclosed. The combustor liner includes an upstream portion, a downstream end portion extending from the upstream portion along a generally longitudinal axis, and a cover layer associated with an inner surface of the downstream end portion. The downstream end portion includes the inner surface and an outer surface, the inner surface defining a plurality of microchannels. The downstream end portion further defines a plurality of passages extending between the inner surface and the outer surface. The plurality of microchannels are fluidly connected to the plurality of passages, and are configured to flow a cooling medium therethrough, cooling the combustor liner.

  6. Direct Numerical Simulation of Evaporative Cooling at the Lateral Boundary of Shallow Cumulus Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heus, T.; Abma, D.; Mellado, J.

    2012-12-01

    This study investigates the dynamics of a narrow region of subsiding air at the lateral boundary of cumulus clouds, focusing on the role of evaporative cooling. Previous observational and large-eddy simulations showed the relevance of this subsiding shell in cloud dynamics, but have also showed that the size of this shell is well below what large-eddy simulations can resolve. Therefore, we have performed direct numerical simulations of an idealized subsiding shell to investigate accurately the complete turbulent field. The system develops a self-similar, Reynolds number independent flow which allows for the determination of explicit scaling laws relating the characteristic length, time and velocity scales of the shell. In particular, it is found that the shell width grows quadratically in time, and linearly with decreasing height. The magnitude of these growth rates confirm the importance of the subsiding shell because of the relatively fast development of entrainment-determining scales: for typical thermodynamic conditions in cumulus clouds, a velocity of the order of 1~m~s-1 and a thickness of the order of 10 meters are established in about 2 minutes. This fits well within the typical cloud life time, suggesting that our idealization is an adequate framework for the analysis of relevant aspects in the subsiding shell associated with buoyancy reversal. It also indicates that the scaling laws derived here can be used to estimate the potential strength of a subsiding shell and the mean lateral entrainment associated with it, provided an estimate of the local thermodynamical state of the cloud boundary. It is shown that the dominant parameter of this system is the saturation buoyancy, whereas the effect of the saturation mixing fraction is minor.uoyancy field in the subsiding shell. Blue colors are low values, red colors are high values.

  7. 46 CFR 153.432 - Cooling systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cooling systems. 153.432 Section 153.432 Shipping COAST... Control Systems § 153.432 Cooling systems. (a) Each cargo cooling system must have an equivalent standby... cooling system. (b) Each tankship that has a cargo tank with a required cooling system must have a...

  8. 46 CFR 153.432 - Cooling systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cooling systems. 153.432 Section 153.432 Shipping COAST... Control Systems § 153.432 Cooling systems. (a) Each cargo cooling system must have an equivalent standby... cooling system. (b) Each tankship that has a cargo tank with a required cooling system must have a...

  9. Progress of a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source using evaporative cooling technology at Institute of Modern Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W.; Xiong, B.; Guo, S. Q.; Cao, R.; Ruan, L.; Zhang, X. Z.; Sun, L. T.; Feng, Y. C.; Ma, B. H.; Zhao, H. W.

    2014-02-15

    A new room temperature ECR ion source, Lanzhou Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source No. 4 (LECR4, previously named DRAGON), is under intense construction at Institute of Modern Physics. LECR4 is designed to operate with 18 GHz microwave frequency. The maximum axial magnetic fields are 2.3 T at injection and 1.3 T at extraction, and the radial field at the plasma chamber wall of 76 mm inner diameter is 1.0–1.2 T. One of the unique features for LECR4 is that its axial solenoids are winded with solid square copper wires which are immersed in a kind of special evaporative cooling medium for cooling purpose. Till now, a prototype of the cooling system has been successfully constructed and tested, which has demonstrated that the cooling efficiency of the designed system could meet the requirements of LECR4 under the routine operation conditions. All the main components of the ion source have been completed. Assembly and commissioning is ongoing. The latest developments and test results will be presented in this paper.

  10. Progress of a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source using evaporative cooling technology at Institute of Modern Physics.

    PubMed

    Lu, W; Xiong, B; Zhang, X Z; Sun, L T; Feng, Y C; Ma, B H; Guo, S Q; Cao, R; Ruan, L; Zhao, H W

    2014-02-01

    A new room temperature ECR ion source, Lanzhou Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source No. 4 (LECR4, previously named DRAGON), is under intense construction at Institute of Modern Physics. LECR4 is designed to operate with 18 GHz microwave frequency. The maximum axial magnetic fields are 2.3 T at injection and 1.3 T at extraction, and the radial field at the plasma chamber wall of 76 mm inner diameter is 1.0-1.2 T. One of the unique features for LECR4 is that its axial solenoids are winded with solid square copper wires which are immersed in a kind of special evaporative cooling medium for cooling purpose. Till now, a prototype of the cooling system has been successfully constructed and tested, which has demonstrated that the cooling efficiency of the designed system could meet the requirements of LECR4 under the routine operation conditions. All the main components of the ion source have been completed. Assembly and commissioning is ongoing. The latest developments and test results will be presented in this paper. PMID:24593505

  11. Enhanced metastable population through evaporation cooling and recombination in the argon afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnetzki, Uwe; Celik, Yusuf; Tsankov, Tsanko; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Yoshimura, Shinji; Luggenholscher, Dirk

    2011-10-01

    Measurements, modelling and numerical simulations performed in a pulsed inductively coupled argon plasma at low pressures (1-5 Pa) show that very low electron temperatures are achieved on a characteristic time scale of a few tens of micro seconds through evaporation cooling. This allows for recombination resulting in the observed increase of the metastable density in the afterglow phase. The previously observed super-linear scaling with the electron density of the electron decay time is well reproduced analytically by assuming that microfield limited electron-stabilized three-body recombination into highly excited Rydberg states takes place. This hypothesis is strongly supported by experimental results from various diagnostic techniques.

  12. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature. 1 fig.

  13. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1994-01-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature.

  14. Passive cooling with solar updraft and evaporative downdraft chimneys. Interim report, June 15, 1984--March 1, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Mignon, G.V.; Cunningham, W.A.; Thompson, T.L.

    1985-12-31

    Computer models have been developed to describe the operation of both solar updraft and evaporative downdraft chimneys. Design studies are being conducted at the present time to use the towers for cooling an experimental, well instrumented, structure to study passive cooling in residential buildings. (MHR)

  15. Superconducting magnet cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Vander Arend, Peter C.; Fowler, William B.

    1977-01-01

    A device is provided for cooling a conductor to the superconducting state. The conductor is positioned within an inner conduit through which is flowing a supercooled liquid coolant in physical contact with the conductor. The inner conduit is positioned within an outer conduit so that an annular open space is formed therebetween. Through the annular space is flowing coolant in the boiling liquid state. Heat generated by the conductor is transferred by convection within the supercooled liquid coolant to the inner wall of the inner conduit and then is removed by the boiling liquid coolant, making the heat removal from the conductor relatively independent of conductor length.

  16. Non-intrusive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Morrison, Edward F.; Bergman, John W.

    2001-05-22

    A readily replaceable heat exchange cooling jacket for applying fluid to a system conduit pipe. The cooling jacket comprises at least two members, separable into upper and lower portions. A chamber is formed between the conduit pipe and cooling jacket once the members are positioned about the pipe. The upper portion includes a fluid spray means positioned above the pipe and the bottom portion includes a fluid removal means. The heat exchange cooling jacket is adaptable with a drain tank, a heat exchanger, a pump and other standard equipment to provide a system for removing heat from a pipe. A method to remove heat from a pipe, includes the steps of enclosing a portion of the pipe with a jacket to form a chamber between an outside surface of the pipe and the cooling jacket; spraying cooling fluid at low pressure from an upper portion of the cooling jacket, allowing the fluid to flow downwardly by gravity along the surface of the pipe toward a bottom portion of the chamber; and removing the fluid at the bottom portion of the chamber.

  17. Solar Assisted Adsorptive Desiccant Cooling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkura, Masashi; Kodama, Akio

    Solar assisted desiccant coo1ing process is an effective means to reduce a latent heat load of the ventilation air. This paper describes the influences of ambient humidity and sensible heat factor (SHF) of the indoor room on the performance and scale of the desiccant cooling system. Two process configurations termed “ambient air mode” and “mixed air mode” were assumed. At “ambient air mode”, only ambient air is dehumidified and cooled in the desiccant process. The dehumidified air stream is mixed with return air and further cooled in the cooling coil. At “mixed air mode”, ambient air is mixed with return air and this mixed air stream is dehumidified in the desiccant process and cooled at the cooling coil. At “ambient air mode”, ambient air humidity had a significant impact on required amount of dehumidification since humid ambient air entered the desiccant process directly. In this case, higher temperature level and quantity, which is impossible to be supplied from commonly commercialized flat panel solar collectors, was required. At “mixed air mode”, the influence of increase of ambient humidity was not significant since humidity of the air entering the desiccant process became low by mixing with return air. At this mode, it was expected that 70°C of the circulating water and 37m2 of surface area of solar collector could produce a sufficient dehumidifying performance even in high latent heat condition. The contributing ratio of the desiccant wheel was also estimated. The ratio increased in higher latent heat condition due to increase of required amount of dehumidification. The contributing ratio of the thermal wheel became lower due to increase of saturated air temperature in the evaporative cooler.

  18. Closed cycle desiccant cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchernev, D. I.; Emerson, D. T.

    1986-10-01

    The breadboard prototype of a closed cycle desiccant cooling system was designed, constructed and its performance tested. The system combines the sorption properties of solid zeolite/refrigerant vapor pairs with the principle of regenerative heat exchangers. Since solid zeolites are difficult to move in vacuum tight containers and in order to avoid intermittent operation, the desiccant is housed in two separate containers which are alternately heated and cooled by a heat transfer fluid. Using the principle of energy regeneration, the heat removed from the container being cooled is recycled in the container being heated. The breadboard system, with 90 pounds of zeolite, demonstrated a recycling efficiency of 75%, while the system capacity was 2,000 Btu/hr. This significantly increased the system thermal Coefficient of Performance (COP) to 1.1 at ARI conditions from the single container thermal COP of 0.4.

  19. Incorporation of an evaporative cooling scheme into a dynamic model of orographic precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barros, Ana Paula; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.

    1994-01-01

    A simple evaporative cooling scheme was incorporated into a dynamic model to estimate orographic precipitation in mountainous regions. The orographic precipitation model is based on the transport of atmospheric moisture and the quantification of preciptable water across a 3D representation of the terrain from the surface up to 250 hPa. Advective wind fields are computed independently and boundary conditions are extracted from radiosonde data. Precipitation rates are obtained through calibration of a spatially distributed precipitation efficiency parameter. The model was applied to the central Sierra Nevada. Results show a gain of the order of 20% in threat-score coefficients designed to measure the forecast ability of the model. Accuracy gains are largest at high elevations and during intense storms associated with warm air masses.

  20. Effects of evaporative cooling on reproductive performance and milk production of dairy cows in hot wet conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khongdee, S.; Chaiyabutr, N.; Hinch, G.; Markvichitr, K.; Vajrabukka, C.

    2006-05-01

    Fourteen animals of second and third lactation of Thai Friesian crossbred cows (87.5% Friesian × 12.5% Bos indicus) located at Sakol Nakhon Research and Breeding Centre, Department of Livestock Development, Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives, were divided randomly into two groups of seven each to evaluate the effects of evaporative cooling on reproductive and physiological traits under hot, humid conditions. Results indicated that installation of evaporating cooling in the open shed gave a further improvement in ameliorating heat stress in dairy cows in hot-wet environments by utilising the low humidity conditions that naturally occur during the day. The cows housed in an evaporatively cooled environment had both a rectal temperature and respiration rate (39.09°C, 61.39 breaths/min, respectively) significantly lower than that of the non-cooled cows (41.21°C; 86.87 breaths/min). The former group also had higher milk yield and more efficient reproductive performance (pregnancy rate and reduced days open) than the latter group. It is suggested that the non-evaporatively cooled cows did not gain benefit from the naturally lower heat stress during night time.

  1. Solar-powered cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C

    2013-12-24

    A solar-powered adsorption-desorption refrigeration and air conditioning system uses nanostructural materials made of high specific surface area adsorption aerogel as the adsorptive media. Refrigerant molecules are adsorbed on the high surface area of the nanostructural material. A circulation system circulates refrigerant from the nanostructural material to a cooling unit.

  2. Effects of evaporative cooling on the regulation of body water and milk production in crossbred Holstein cattle in a tropical environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaiyabutr, N.; Chanpongsang, S.; Suadsong, S.

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how evaporative cooling modifies body function with respect to water metabolism and other variables relevant to milk synthesis in crossbred cattle. The study was conducted on two groups of 0.875HF:0.125RS crossbred Holstein cattle (87.5%) housed in an open-sided barn with a tiled roof (non-cooled animals) and in a close-sided barn under an evaporative cooling system (cooled animals). The maximum ambient temperature and relative humidity for the non-cooled group were 33°C and 61%, with the corresponding values for the evaporatively cooled barn being 28°C and 84%, respectively. The temperature humidity index (THI) of under non-cooled conditions was higher ( P < 0.05) than that in the cooled barn. Rectal temperatures and respiration rates of non-cooled animals were higher ( P < 0.05) than those of cooled animals. Daily dry matter intake (DMI) of cooled animals was higher while water intakes were lower ( P < 0.05) than those of non-cooled animals. The mean absolute values of plasma volume, blood volume, and extracellular fluid (ECF) of cooled animals were significantly higher ( P < 0.05) than those of non-cooled animals throughout all stages of lactation. Milk yields of cooled animals were higher by 42%, 36% and 79% on average than those of non-cooled animals during early-, mid- and late-lactation, respectively. The decline in milk yields as lactation advances was markedly apparent in late-lactating non-cooled animals, while no significant changes in milk composition at different stages of lactation were observed in either group. Mean arterial plasma concentrations, arteriovenous concentration differences (A-V differences) and the extraction ratio across the mammary gland for acetate, glucose and triglyceride of cooled animals were not significantly different compared with values for non-cooled animals. No differences were seen in plasma hormonal levels for triiodotyronine (T3) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), but

  3. Effects of evaporative cooling on the regulation of body water and milk production in crossbred Holstein cattle in a tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Chaiyabutr, N; Chanpongsang, S; Suadsong, S

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how evaporative cooling modifies body function with respect to water metabolism and other variables relevant to milk synthesis in crossbred cattle. The study was conducted on two groups of 0.875HF:0.125RS crossbred Holstein cattle (87.5%) housed in an open-sided barn with a tiled roof (non-cooled animals) and in a close-sided barn under an evaporative cooling system (cooled animals). The maximum ambient temperature and relative humidity for the non-cooled group were 33 degrees C and 61%, with the corresponding values for the evaporatively cooled barn being 28 degrees C and 84%, respectively. The temperature humidity index (THI) of under non-cooled conditions was higher (P < 0.05) than that in the cooled barn. Rectal temperatures and respiration rates of non-cooled animals were higher (P < 0.05) than those of cooled animals. Daily dry matter intake (DMI) of cooled animals was higher while water intakes were lower (P < 0.05) than those of non-cooled animals. The mean absolute values of plasma volume, blood volume, and extracellular fluid (ECF) of cooled animals were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those of non-cooled animals throughout all stages of lactation. Milk yields of cooled animals were higher by 42%, 36% and 79% on average than those of non-cooled animals during early-, mid- and late-lactation, respectively. The decline in milk yields as lactation advances was markedly apparent in late-lactating non-cooled animals, while no significant changes in milk composition at different stages of lactation were observed in either group. Mean arterial plasma concentrations, arteriovenous concentration differences (A-V differences) and the extraction ratio across the mammary gland for acetate, glucose and triglyceride of cooled animals were not significantly different compared with values for non-cooled animals. No differences were seen in plasma hormonal levels for triiodotyronine (T(3)) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1

  4. Compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system

    DOEpatents

    Donahoo, Eric E; Ross, Christopher W

    2014-11-25

    A compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids from a compressor to a turbine airfoil cooling system to supply cooling fluids to one or more airfoils of a rotor assembly is disclosed. The compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system may enable cooling fluids to be exhausted from a compressor exhaust plenum through a downstream compressor bleed collection chamber and into the turbine airfoil cooling system. As such, the suction created in the compressor exhaust plenum mitigates boundary layer growth along the inner surface while providing flow of cooling fluids to the turbine airfoils.

  5. Indirect passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Boardman, Charles E.

    1990-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel. The passive cooling system includes a closed primary fluid circuit through the partitions surrounding the reactor vessel and a partially adjoining secondary open fluid circuit for carrying transferred heat out into the atmosphere.

  6. Passive cooling safety system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Boardman, Charles E.; Hui, Marvin M.; Berglund, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel. The passive cooling system includes a closed primary fluid circuit through the partitions surrounding the reactor vessel and a partially adjoining secondary open fluid circuit for carrying transferred heat out into the atmosphere.

  7. Cooling system for electronic components

    DOEpatents

    Anderl, William James; Colgan, Evan George; Gerken, James Dorance; Marroquin, Christopher Michael; Tian, Shurong

    2016-05-17

    Embodiments of the present invention provide for non interruptive fluid cooling of an electronic enclosure. One or more electronic component packages may be removable from a circuit card having a fluid flow system. When installed, the electronic component packages are coincident to and in a thermal relationship with the fluid flow system. If a particular electronic component package becomes non-functional, it may be removed from the electronic enclosure without affecting either the fluid flow system or other neighboring electronic component packages.

  8. Cooling system for electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Anderl, William James; Colgan, Evan George; Gerken, James Dorance; Marroquin, Christopher Michael; Tian, Shurong

    2015-12-15

    Embodiments of the present invention provide for non interruptive fluid cooling of an electronic enclosure. One or more electronic component packages may be removable from a circuit card having a fluid flow system. When installed, the electronic component packages are coincident to and in a thermal relationship with the fluid flow system. If a particular electronic component package becomes non-functional, it may be removed from the electronic enclosure without affecting either the fluid flow system or other neighboring electronic component packages.

  9. Numerical Investigation of the Flow Dynamics and Evaporative Cooling of Water Droplets Impinging onto Heated Surfaces: An Effective Approach To Identify Spray Cooling Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Nan; Zhang, Zhen; Xu, Rui-Na; Ouyang, Xiao-Long; Jiang, Pei-Xue

    2016-09-13

    Numerical investigations of the dynamics and evaporative cooling of water droplets impinging onto heated surfaces can be used to identify spray cooling mechanisms. Droplet impingement dynamics and evaporation are simulated using the presented numerical model. Volume-of-fluid method is used in the model to track the free surface. The contact line dynamics was predicted from a dynamic contact angle model with the evaporation rate predicted by a kinetic theory model. A species transport equation was solved in the gas phase to describe the vapor convection and diffusion. The numerical model was validated by experimental data. The physical effects including the contact angle hysteresis and the thermocapillary effect are analyzed to offer guidance for future numerical models of droplet impingement cooling. The effects of various parameters including surface wettability, surface temperature, droplet velocity, droplet size, and droplet temperature were numerically studied from the standpoint of spray cooling. The numerical simulations offer profound analysis and deep insight into the spray cooling heat transfer mechanisms. PMID:27531256

  10. Evaporative cooling in late-gestation Murrah buffaloes potentiates immunity around transition period and overcomes reproductive disorders.

    PubMed

    Aarif, Ovais; Aggarwal, Anjali

    2015-10-15

    The objective of the study was to observe the effect of evaporative cooling during late gestation on immunity around the transition period and the probable outcome on reproductive disorders in Murrah buffaloes. Sixteen pregnant dry Murrah buffaloes at 60 days prepartum were selected and divided into two groups of eight animals each. Group 1 buffaloes remained without the provision of cooling, whereas the second group of buffaloes was managed under fans and mist cooling during the dry period. After parturition, all the animals were managed under evaporative cooling. Dry matter intake was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in cooled relative to noncooled animals at -15, 0, and +20 days of parturition. Cortisol and prolactin levels were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in noncooled relative to cooled animals at -15 and 0 days of parturition. However, prolactin was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in cooled animals at +20 days. Messenger RNA expression of prolactin receptor gene (PRL-R) was upregulated and suppressor of cytokine signaling gene 1 (SOCS-1) was downregulated in cooled animals at -20, 0, and +20 days of parturition. Tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 4 levels remained significantly (P < 0.05) higher in cooled animals at -20, 0, and +20 days of parturition. Interleukin 6 was significantly (P < 0.05) lower in cooled animals at -20 and 0 days. Interferon γ levels were significantly higher at -20 and +20 days of parturition in cooled relative to noncooled animals. The reproductive disorders such as retention of placenta, metritis, and endometritis occurred at the rate of 37.25%, 25%, and 12.25% in the noncooled group, whereas only retention of placenta was observed in the cooled (12.5%) group. PMID:26211430

  11. Optimal design variable considerations in the use of phase change materials in indirect evaporative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilakapaty, Ankit Paul

    The demand for sustainable, energy efficient and cost effective heating and cooling solutions is exponentially increasing with the rapid advancement of computation and information technology. Use of latent heat storage materials also known as phase change materials (PCMs) for load leveling is an innovative solution to the data center cooling demands. These materials are commercially available in the form of microcapsules dispersed in water, referred to as the microencapsulated phase change slurries and have higher heat capacity than water. The composition and physical properties of phase change slurries play significant role in energy efficiency of the cooling systems designed implementing these PCM slurries. Objective of this project is to study the effect of PCM particle size, shape and volumetric concentration on overall heat transfer potential of the cooling systems designed with PCM slurries as the heat transfer fluid (HTF). In this study uniform volume heat source model is developed for the simulation of heat transfer potential using phase change materials in the form of bulk temperature difference in a fully developed flow through a circular duct. Results indicate the heat transfer potential increases with PCM volumetric concentration with gradually diminishing returns. Also, spherical PCM particles offer greater heat transfer potential when compared to cylindrical particles. Results of this project will aid in efficient design of cooling systems based on PCM slurries.

  12. Heat pump system with selective space cooling

    DOEpatents

    Pendergrass, Joseph C.

    1997-01-01

    A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve.

  13. Heat pump system with selective space cooling

    DOEpatents

    Pendergrass, J.C.

    1997-05-13

    A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve. 4 figs.

  14. Dust formation, growth and evaporation in a cool pulsating circumstellar shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauger, A.; Sedlmayr, E.; Gail, H.-P.

    1990-08-01

    The variability of the dust forming environment in circumstellar shell of long-period variables requires both, a treatment of dust formation and growth, and a treatment of the destruction of dust due to thermal evaporation. Therefore, a system of moment equations which describes the time evolution of the dust component in both situations is derived. A special representation for the size distribution of dust particles is developed which comprises the actual distribution function and its history at every instant during the calculation. As a consequence, the computational effort for a time-dependent treatment of dust destruction by thermal evaporation reduces substantially. The method is applied to the formation and destruction of carbon dust in an adiabatic gas undergoing sinusoidal time variations of the temperature. It turns out, that thermal destruction of dust particles requires temperatures much higher than the temperature of condensation. Nevertheless, evaporation is important already at lower temperatures, because the particle radius and therefore the amount of condensed material is reduced significantly before the dust particles are destroyed.

  15. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

    1984-09-12

    The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

  16. A Novel Pre-cooling System for a Cryogenic Pulsating Heat Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dong; Liu, Huiming; Gong, Linghui; Xu, Xiangdong; Li, Laifeng

    To reduce the influence of the pipe material on the measurement of effective thermal conductivity, the pipe of a cryogenic pulsating heat pipe is generally made of stainless steel. Because of the low thermal conductivity of stainless steel, the pre-cooling of the evaporator in cryogenic pulsating heat pipe using helium as working fluid at 4.2 K is a problem. We designed a mechanical-thermal switch between the cryocooler and the evaporator, which was on during the pre-cooling process and off during the test process. By using the pre-cooling system, the cool down time of the cryogenic pulsating heat pipe was reduced significantly.

  17. Passive thermal regulation of flat PV modules by coupling the mechanisms of evaporative and fin cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekar, M.; Senthilkumar, T.

    2015-08-01

    A passive thermal regulation technique with fins in conjunction with cotton wicks is developed in the present work for controlling the temperature of PV module during its operation. Experiments were conducted with the developed technique in the location of Tiruchirappalli (78.6°E and 10.8°N), Tamil Nadu, India with flat 25 Wp PV module and its viability was confirmed. The PV module temperature got reduced by 12 % while the electrical yield is increased by 14 % with the help of the developed cooling system. Basic energy balance equation applicable for PV module was used to evaluate the module temperatures and a fair agreement was obtained between the theoretical and experimental values for the cases of with cooling and without cooling.

  18. Passive thermal regulation of flat PV modules by coupling the mechanisms of evaporative and fin cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekar, M.; Senthilkumar, T.

    2016-07-01

    A passive thermal regulation technique with fins in conjunction with cotton wicks is developed in the present work for controlling the temperature of PV module during its operation. Experiments were conducted with the developed technique in the location of Tiruchirappalli (78.6°E and 10.8°N), Tamil Nadu, India with flat 25 Wp PV module and its viability was confirmed. The PV module temperature got reduced by 12 % while the electrical yield is increased by 14 % with the help of the developed cooling system. Basic energy balance equation applicable for PV module was used to evaluate the module temperatures and a fair agreement was obtained between the theoretical and experimental values for the cases of with cooling and without cooling.

  19. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF CEILING RADIANT COOLING SYSTEM IN COMPOSITE CLIMATE

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Anuj; Mathur, Jyotirmay; Bhandari, Mahabir S

    2015-01-01

    Radiant cooling systems are proving to be an energy efficient solution due to higher thermal capacity of cooling fluid especially for the buildings that require individual zone controls and where the latent loads are moderate. The Conventional air conditioners work at very low temperature i.e.5-8 c (refrigerant evaporator inlet) while the radiant cooling systems, also referred as high temperature cooling system, work at high temperatures i.e. 14-18 c. The radiant cooling systems can maintain lower MRT (Mean Radiant Temperature) as ceiling panels maintain uniform temperature gradient inside room and provide higher human comfort. The radiant cooling systems are relatively new systems and their operation and energy savings potential are not quantified for a large number of buildings and operational parameters. Moreover, there are only limited numbers of whole building simulation studies have been carried out for these systems to have a full confidence in the capability of modelling tools to simulate these systems and predict the impact of various operating parameters. Theoretically, savings achieve due to higher temperature set point of chilled water, which reduces chiller-running time. However, conventional air conditioner runs continuously to maintain requisite temperature. In this paper, experimental study for performance evaluation of radiant cooling system carried out on system installed at Malaviya National Institute of Technology Jaipur. This paper quantifies the energy savings opportunities and effective temperature by radiant cooling system at different chilled water flow rates and temperature range. The data collected/ analysed through experimental study will used for calibration and validation of system model of building prepared in building performance simulation software. This validated model used for exploring optimized combinations of key parameters for composite climate. These optimized combinations will used in formulation of radiant cooling system

  20. Open cycle lithium chloride cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, T. G.; Loef, G. O. G.; Iyer, R.; Wenger, J.

    1983-05-01

    A lithium chloride open cycle absorption chiller has been designed, built and tested. Solution reconcentration takes place in a small counter current packed column supplied with solar heated air. Removal of noncondensable gases that enter the chiller dissolved in the strong solution and the make-up refrigerant streams is accomplished by a liquid-jet ejector and a small vacuum pump. Cooling capacities approaching 1.4 tons and COP levels of 0.58 have been achieved at non-optimum operating conditions. Test results from preliminary system operation suggest that mass transfer processes in both the packed column reconcentrator and the absorber are controlled by concentration gradients in the lithium chloride solution. Liquid phase controlled mass transfer dictates an operating strategy different from the previously assumed gas phase controlled process to obtain maximum rates of evaporation in the packed column. Determination of optimal operating conditions leading to decreased electrical power consumption and improved cooling capacity and coefficient of performance will require further analysis and testing.

  1. Cooling systems for satellite remote sensing instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, R. J.; Oren, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of a cryogenic cooling system for the Pollution Monitoring Satellite (PMS) are discussed. Studies were conducted to make the following determinations: (1) the characteristics and use of proven and state-of-the-art cryogenic cooling systems for six specified ranges of performance, (2) the system most applicable for each of the six cooling categories, and (3) conceptual designs for candidate system for each of the six representative cooling categories. The six cooling categories of electrical loads are defined. The desired mission life for the cooling system is two years with both continuous and intermittent operating conditions.

  2. Thermodynamic performance testing of the orbiter flash evaporator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaax, J. R.; Melgares, M. A.; Frahm, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    System level testing of the space shuttle orbiter's development flash evaporator system (FES) was performed in a thermal vacuum chamber capable of simulating ambient ascent, orbital, and entry temperature and pressure profiles. The test article included the evaporator assembly, high load and topping exhaust duct and nozzle assemblies, and feedwater supply assembly. Steady state and transient heat load, water pressure/temperature and ambient pressure/temperature profiles were imposed by especially designed supporting test hardware. Testing in 1978 verified evaporator and duct heater thermal design, determined FES performance boundaries, and assessed topping evaporator plume characteristics. Testing in 1979 combined the FES with the other systems in the orbiter active thermal control subsystem (ATCS). The FES met or exceeded all nominal and contingency performance requirements during operation with the integrated ATCS. During both tests stability problems were encountered during steady state operations which resulted in subsequent design changes to the water spray nozzle and valve plate assemblies.

  3. Information technology equipment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2014-06-10

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools warm air generated by the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat from the rack of information technology equipment.

  4. Cooling system for superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Gamble, B.B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.

    1998-12-15

    A cooling system is configured to control the flow of a refrigerant by controlling the rate at which the refrigerant is heated, thereby providing an efficient and reliable approach to cooling a load (e.g., magnets, rotors). The cooling system includes a conduit circuit connected to the load and within which a refrigerant circulates; a heat exchanger, connected within the conduit circuit and disposed remotely from the load; a first and a second reservoir, each connected within the conduit, each holding at least a portion of the refrigerant; a heater configured to independently heat the first and second reservoirs. In a first mode, the heater heats the first reservoir, thereby causing the refrigerant to flow from the first reservoir through the load and heat exchanger, via the conduit circuit and into the second reservoir. In a second mode, the heater heats the second reservoir to cause the refrigerant to flow from the second reservoir through the load and heat exchanger via the conduit circuit and into the first reservoir. 3 figs.

  5. Cooling system for superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Gamble, Bruce B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed

    1998-01-01

    A cooling system is configured to control the flow of a refrigerant by controlling the rate at which the refrigerant is heated, thereby providing an efficient and reliable approach to cooling a load (e.g., magnets, rotors). The cooling system includes a conduit circuit connected to the load and within which a refrigerant circulates; a heat exchanger, connected within the conduit circuit and disposed remotely from the load; a first and a second reservoir, each connected within the conduit, each holding at least a portion of the refrigerant; a heater configured to independently heat the first and second reservoirs. In a first mode, the heater heats the first reservoir, thereby causing the refrigerant to flow from the first reservoir through the load and heat exchanger, via the conduit circuit and into the second reservoir. In a second mode, the heater heats the second reservoir to cause the refrigerant to flow from the second reservoir through the load and heat exchanger via the conduit circuit and into the first reservoir.

  6. Vehicle hydraulic cooling fan system

    SciTech Connect

    Nilson, C.A.

    1993-06-08

    A hydraulic cooling system for vehicles having an internal combustion engine cooled by a radiator and a coolant is described, comprising, in combination, a shroud adapted to be mounted adjacent the radiator having a wall forming an air passage and defining a first port disposed adjacent the radiator and a second port spaced from the first port, a fan located within the second port, a hydraulic fan motor operatively connected to the fan, a hydraulic pump operatively connected to the engine for producing a pressurized hydraulic fluid flow, a hydraulic circuit interconnecting the pump to the fan motor, the circuit including a control valve, a hydraulic fluid reservoir and a heat exchanger, the heat exchanger being mounted within the shroud air passage.

  7. Avian thermoregulation in the heat: evaporative cooling capacity in an archetypal desert specialist, Burchell's sandgrouse (Pterocles burchelli).

    PubMed

    McKechnie, Andrew E; Smit, Ben; Whitfield, Maxine C; Noakes, Matthew J; Talbot, William A; Garcia, Mateo; Gerson, Alexander R; Wolf, Blair O

    2016-07-15

    Sandgrouse (Pterocliformes) are quintessential examples of avian adaptation to desert environments, but relatively little is known about the limits to their heat tolerance and evaporative cooling capacity. We predicted that evaporative cooling in Burchell's sandgrouse (Pterocles burchelli) is highly efficient and provides the basis for tolerance of very high air temperature (Ta). We measured body temperature (Tb), resting metabolic rate (RMR) and evaporative water loss (EWL) at Ta between 25°C and ∼58°C in birds exposed to successive increments in Ta Normothermic Tb averaged 39.0°C, lower than typical avian values. At Ta>34.5°C, Tb increased linearly to a maximum of 43.6°C at Ta=56°C. The upper critical limit of thermoneutrality (Tuc) was Ta=43.8°C, closely coinciding with the onset of panting and gular flutter. Above the Tuc, RMR increased 2.5-fold to 2.89 W at Ta=56°C, a fractional increase far exceeding that of many other species under comparable conditions. Rates of EWL increased rapidly at Ta>42.9°C to 7.84±0.90 g h(-1) at Ta=56°C, an 11-fold increase above minimal levels. Maximum evaporative cooling efficiency (ratio of evaporative heat loss to metabolic heat production) was 2.03, but could be as high as 2.70 if our assumption that the birds were metabolising lipids is incorrect. Thermoregulation at very high Ta in P. burchelli was characterised by large increases in RMR and EWL, and is much less efficient than in taxa such as columbids and caprimulgids. PMID:27207634

  8. Turbine airfoil with ambient cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Jr, Christian X.; Marra, John J.; Marsh, Jan H.

    2016-06-07

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one ambient air cooling system is disclosed. At least a portion of the cooling system may include one or more cooling channels configured to receive ambient air at about atmospheric pressure. The ambient air cooling system may have a tip static pressure to ambient pressure ratio of at least 0.5, and in at least one embodiment, may include a tip static pressure to ambient pressure ratio of between about 0.5 and about 3.0. The cooling system may also be configured such that an under root slot chamber in the root is large to minimize supply air velocity. One or more cooling channels of the ambient air cooling system may terminate at an outlet at the tip such that the outlet is aligned with inner surfaces forming the at least one cooling channel in the airfoil to facilitate high mass flow.

  9. Study of batch maltitol (4- O-α- D-glucopyranosyl- D-glucitol) crystallization by cooling and water evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharsallaoui, Adem; Rogé, Barbara; Mathlouthi, Mohamed

    2010-10-01

    It is obvious that maltitol, like other disaccharides, owes some of its functional properties to structural features such as the flexibility of the glycosidic bond and hydrogen bonding and to its aqueous solution physicochemical properties, especially solubility and metastable zone width. This is particularly the case for molecular arrangements, which take place before and during crystallization process. We have previously used FTIR spectra to study structural properties of the maltitol molecule in concentrated solution like molecular associations or changes in conformation [1]. To complement these molecular properties, the different maltitol solution physicochemical properties having a relationship with maltitol-water or maltitol-maltitol interactions like solubility, metastable zone width, viscosity, and density were determined [2]. In this work we used these physicochemical results to optimize maltitol crystallization both by reducing the process duration and by improving the obtained crystal quality. Two strategies have been tested: the optimization of the time/temperature profile during the classical cooling crystallization and the application to maltitol of evaporative crystallization, a process usually used for sucrose preparation. The obtained results mainly showed remarkable difference in crystal mean size and crystal size distribution when the cooling profile was modified. On the other hand, evaporative crystallization was shown to make it possible to lower considerably the crystallization time compared to the cooling process but crystal morphological properties seem to be considerably modified by evaporation.

  10. Performance Assessment of a Desiccant Cooling System in a CHP Application with an IC Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Jalalzadeh-Azar, A. A.; Slayzak, S.; Judkoff, R.; Schaffhauser, T.; DeBlasio, R.

    2005-04-01

    Performance of a desiccant cooling system was evaluated in the context of combined heat and power (CHP). The baseline system incorporated a desiccant dehumidifier, a heat exchanger, an indirect evaporative cooler, and a direct evaporative cooler. The desiccant unit was regenerated through heat recovery from a gas-fired reciprocating internal combustion engine. The system offered sufficient sensible and latent cooling capacities for a wide range of climatic conditions, while allowing influx of outside air in excess of what is typically required for commercial buildings. Energy and water efficiencies of the desiccant cooling system were also evaluated and compared with those of a conventional system. The results of parametric assessments revealed the importance of using a heat exchanger for concurrent desiccant post cooling and regeneration air preheating. These functions resulted in enhancement of both the cooling performance and the thermal efficiency, which are essential for fuel utilization improvement. Two approaches for mixing of the return air and outside air were examined, and their impact on the system cooling performance and thermal efficiency was demonstrated. The scope of the parametric analyses also encompassed the impact of improving the indirect evaporative cooling effectiveness on the overall cooling system performance.

  11. Cool systems for hot cities

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, Hashem; Bretz, Sarah

    1998-09-02

    On a hot summer day, Los Angeles, CA, like Baltimore, MD, Phoenix, AZ, Washington, D.C., and Tokyo, Japan, is c. 6-8 degrees F hotter than its surrounding areas. Dark buildings and pavement have replaced urban vegetation in these cities, absorbing more solar heat. The urban heat islands that are created result in increased air-conditioning costs, energy use, and pollution. Scientists at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have been studying the effects of roof system color and type on the energy used to cool a building. The results of this research indicate that roofing professionals should consider the reflectance (albedo) and emittance (release of absorbed heat) of the roof systems they install.

  12. Radiant vessel auxiliary cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1987-01-01

    In a modular liquid-metal pool breeder reactor, a radiant vessel auxiliary cooling system is disclosed for removing the residual heat resulting from the shutdown of a reactor by a completely passive heat transfer system. A shell surrounds the reactor and containment vessel, separated from the containment vessel by an air passage. Natural circulation of air is provided by air vents at the lower and upper ends of the shell. Longitudinal, radial and inwardly extending fins extend from the shell into the air passage. The fins are heated by radiation from the containment vessel and convect the heat to the circulating air. Residual heat from the primary reactor vessel is transmitted from the reactor vessel through an inert gas plenum to a guard or containment vessel designed to contain any leaking coolant. The containment vessel is conventional and is surrounded by the shell.

  13. Heat exchanger with auxiliary cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Coleman, John H.

    1980-01-01

    A heat exchanger with an auxiliary cooling system capable of cooling a nuclear reactor should the normal cooling mechanism become inoperable. A cooling coil is disposed around vertical heat transfer tubes that carry secondary coolant therethrough and is located in a downward flow of primary coolant that passes in heat transfer relationship with both the cooling coil and the vertical heat transfer tubes. A third coolant is pumped through the cooling coil which absorbs heat from the primary coolant which increases the downward flow of the primary coolant thereby increasing the natural circulation of the primary coolant through the nuclear reactor.

  14. Use of Air2Air Technology to Recover Fresh-Water from the Normal Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Mortensen

    2009-06-30

    This program was undertaken to build and operate the first Air2Air{trademark} Water Conservation Cooling Tower at a power plant, giving a validated basis and capability for water conservation by this method. Air2Air{trademark} water conservation technology recovers a portion of the traditional cooling tower evaporate. The Condensing Module provides an air-to-air heat exchanger above the wet fill media, extracting the heat from the hot saturated moist air leaving in the cooling tower and condensing water. The rate of evaporate water recovery is typically 10%-25% annually, depending on the cooling tower location (climate).

  15. Establish feasibility for providing passive cooling with solar updraft and evaporative downdraft chimneys. Final report, June 15, 1984--December 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, W.A.; Mignon, G.V.; Thompson, T.L.

    1987-12-31

    Natural draft towers can be used for cooling and ventilating structures. From an operational perspective, the downdraft evaporatively cooled tower is preferred for a dry climate. Solar chimneys, when used alone, tend to require an excessively large solar collector area when appreciable quantities of air must be moved. When used in combination with a downdraft tower, the roof and attic of buildings may assist the solar chimney and their use becomes more attractive. Both a frame building and a greenhouse were successfully cooled during this program. The economics of the downdraft tower compare favorably with conventional evaporative cooling for some application.

  16. Establish feasibility for providing passive cooling with solar updraft and evaporate downdraft chimneys. Final report, June 15, 1984--December 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, W.A.; Mignon, G.V.; Thompson, T.L.

    1987-12-31

    Natural draft towers can be used for cooling and ventilating structures. From an operational perspective, the downdraft evaporatively cooled tower is preferred for a dry climate. Solar chimneys, when used alone, tend to require an excessively large solar collector area when appreciable quantities of air must be moved. When used in combination with a downdraft tower, the roof and attic of buildings may assist the solar chimney and their use becomes more attractive. Both a frame building and a greenhouse were successfully cooled during this program. The economics of the downdraft tower compare favorably with conventional evaporative cooling for some applications.

  17. High temperature cooling system and method

    DOEpatents

    Loewen, Eric P.

    2006-12-12

    A method for cooling a heat source, a method for preventing chemical interaction between a vessel and a cooling composition therein, and a cooling system. The method for cooling employs a containment vessel with an oxidizable interior wall. The interior wall is oxidized to form an oxide barrier layer thereon, the cooling composition is monitored for excess oxidizing agent, and a reducing agent is provided to eliminate excess oxidation. The method for preventing chemical interaction between a vessel and a cooling composition involves introducing a sufficient quantity of a reactant which is reactive with the vessel in order to produce a barrier layer therein that is non-reactive with the cooling composition. The cooling system includes a containment vessel with oxidizing agent and reducing agent delivery conveyances and a monitor of oxidation and reduction states so that proper maintenance of a vessel wall oxidation layer occurs.

  18. NWCF Evaporator Tank System 2001 Offgas Emissions Inventory

    SciTech Connect

    Boardman, R.D.; Lamb, K.M.; Matejka, L.A.; Nenni, J.A.

    2002-02-27

    An offgas emissions inventory and liquid stream characterization of the Idaho New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Evaporator Tank System (ETS), formerly known as the High Level Liquid Waste Evaporator (HLLWE), has been completed. The emissions rates of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds, multiple metals, particulate, and hydrochloric acid were measured in accordance with an approved Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) and Test Plan that invoked U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard sample collection and analysis procedures. Offgas samples were collected during the start up and at the end of evaporator batches when it was hypothesized the emissions would be at peak rates. Corresponding collection of samples from the evaporator feed overhead condensate, and bottoms was made at approximately the same time as the emissions inventory to support material balance determinations for the evaporator process. The data indicate that organic compound emissions are slightly higher at the beginning of the batch while metals emissions, including mercury, are slightly higher at the end of the evaporator batch. The maximum emissions concentrations are low for all constituents of primary concern. Mercury emissions were less than 5 ppbv, while the sum of HCl and Cl2 emissions was less than 1 ppmv. The sum of all organic emissions also was less than 1 ppmv. The estimated hazardous quotient (HQ) for the evaporator was 6.2e-6 as compared to 0.25 for the EPA target criteria. The cancer risk was 1.3e-10 compared to an EPA target of le-5.

  19. NWCF Evaporator Tank System 2001 Offgas Emissions Inventory

    SciTech Connect

    Boardman, Richard Doin; Lamb, Kenneth Mitchel; Matejka, Leon Anthony; Nenni, Joseph A

    2002-02-01

    An offgas emissions inventory and liquid stream characterization of the Idaho New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Evaporator Tank System (ETS), formerly known as the High Level Liquid Waste Evaporator (HLLWE), has been completed. The emissions rates of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds, multiple metals, particulate, and hydrochloric acid were measured in accordance with an approved Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) and Test Plan that invoked U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard sample collection and analysis procedures. Offgas samples were collected during the start up and at the end of evaporator batches when it was hypothesized the emissions would be at peak rates. Corresponding collection of samples from the evaporator feed overhead condensate, and bottoms was made at approximately the same time as the emissions inventory to support material balance determinations for the evaporator process. The data indicate that organic compound emissions are slightly higher at the beginning of the batch while metals emissions, including mercury, are slightly higher at the end of the evaporator batch. The maximum emissions concentrations are low for all constituents of primary concern. Mercury emissions were less than 5 ppbv, while the sum of HCl and Cl2 emissions was less than 1 ppmv. The sum of all organic emissions also was less than 1 ppmv. The estimated hazardous quotient (HQ) for the evaporator was 6.2e-6 as compared to 0.25 for the EPA target criteria. The cancer risk was 1.3e-10 compared to an EPA target of le-5.

  20. Avian thermoregulation in the heat: efficient evaporative cooling allows for extreme heat tolerance in four southern hemisphere columbids.

    PubMed

    McKechnie, Andrew E; Whitfield, Maxine C; Smit, Ben; Gerson, Alexander R; Smith, Eric Krabbe; Talbot, William A; McWhorter, Todd J; Wolf, Blair O

    2016-07-15

    Birds show phylogenetic variation in the relative importance of respiratory versus cutaneous evaporation, but the consequences for heat tolerance and evaporative cooling capacity remain unclear. We measured evaporative water loss (EWL), resting metabolic rate (RMR) and body temperature (Tb) in four arid-zone columbids from southern Africa [Namaqua dove (Oena capensis, ∼37 g), laughing dove (Spilopelia senegalensis, ∼89 g) and Cape turtle dove (Streptopelia capicola, ∼148 g)] and Australia [crested pigeon (Ocyphaps lophotes), ∼186 g] at air temperatures (Ta) of up to 62°C. There was no clear relationship between body mass and maximum Ta tolerated during acute heat exposure. Maximum Tb at very high Ta was 43.1±1.0, 43.7±0.8, 44.7±0.3 and 44.3±0.8°C in Namaqua doves, laughing doves, Cape turtle doves and crested pigeons, respectively. In all four species, RMR increased significantly at Ta above thermoneutrality, but the increases were relatively modest with RMR at Ta=56°C being 32, 60, 99 and 11% higher, respectively, than at Ta=35°C. At the highest Ta values reached, evaporative heat loss was equivalent to 466, 227, 230 and 275% of metabolic heat production. The maximum ratio of evaporative heat loss to metabolic production observed in Namaqua doves, 4.66, exceeds by a substantial margin previous values reported for birds. Our results support the notion that cutaneous evaporation provides a highly efficient mechanism of heat dissipation and an enhanced ability to tolerate extremely high Ta. PMID:27207640

  1. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, F.E.

    1992-12-08

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom. 1 figure.

  2. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, Franklin E.

    1992-01-01

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom.

  3. Emergency cooling system and method

    DOEpatents

    Oosterkamp, W.J.; Cheung, Y.K.

    1994-01-04

    An improved emergency cooling system and method are disclosed that may be adapted for incorporation into or use with a nuclear BWR wherein a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) containing a nuclear core and a heat transfer fluid for circulation in a heat transfer relationship with the core is housed within an annular sealed drywell and is fluid communicable therewith for passage thereto in an emergency situation the heat transfer fluid in a gaseous phase and any noncondensibles present in the RPV, an annular sealed wetwell houses the drywell, and a pressure suppression pool of liquid is disposed in the wetwell and is connected to the drywell by submerged vents. The improved emergency cooling system and method has a containment condenser for receiving condensible heat transfer fluid in a gaseous phase and noncondensibles for condensing at least a portion of the heat transfer fluid. The containment condenser has an inlet in fluid communication with the drywell for receiving heat transfer fluid and noncondensibles, a first outlet in fluid communication with the RPV for the return to the RPV of the condensed portion of the heat transfer fluid and a second outlet in fluid communication with the drywell for passage of the noncondensed balance of the heat transfer fluid and the noncondensibles. The noncondensed balance of the heat transfer fluid and the noncondensibles passed to the drywell from the containment condenser are mixed with the heat transfer fluid and the noncondensibles from the RPV for passage into the containment condenser. A water pool is provided in heat transfer relationship with the containment condenser and is thermally communicable in an emergency situation with an environment outside of the drywell and the wetwell for conducting heat transferred from the containment condenser away from the wetwell and the drywell. 5 figs.

  4. Capillary Action may Cool Systems and Precisely balance Chemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriske, Richard

    2011-10-01

    It is well known that it takes no work for Water to rise in a Capillary tube against the force of Gravity. There is a precise balance in this system that resembles Robert Millikan's ``Oil Drop'' experiment, where mass was balanced against the electrostatic force. If at the top of the capillary tube there is evaporation, one can see that the system is cooled as another water molecule has room to move up the column. Furthermore, if the evaporation process can be controlled one photon at a time, a precise balance is created between a photon, and the height/mass of the column. If other molecules are place in the column, they can be moved up and down the column, in a chromatograph way, in a fairly precise manner, by controlling evaporation and molecular weight. If in addition to all of this, the interface of the solution against the walls of the column have Fermi levels, it can be seen as a very precise Electrochemical Device. In the situation of nanotubes, as opposed to trees and plants, these properties can be used to create measure environmental properties and to Balance Chemical Reactions. Forests, and Plants may cool themselves and their environment using this process, and using this process coupled with more energetic photons through photosynthesis.

  5. A new cylinder cooling system using oil

    SciTech Connect

    Harashina, Kenichi; Murata, Katsuhiro; Satoh, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Yasuo; Hamamura, Masahiro

    1995-12-31

    The design of engine cylinders must satisfy two conflicting requirements, good cooling performance and ease of manufacture. A cooling system was designed to permit the circulation of engine lubricating oil as a coolant at high speed through grooves provided on the external periphery of the cylinder liner. Testing in an actual operating engine confirmed that this cooling system design not only provides better heat transfer and higher cooling performance but also simplifies the manufacturing of the cylinder since external cooling fins are not required. In this paper, the authors will discuss the cylinder cooling effect of the new cylinder cooling system, referring mainly to the test results of a single-cylinder motorcycle engine with lubricating oil from the crankcase used as the coolant.

  6. Representative shuttle evaporative heat sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of a representative shuttle evaporative heat sink (RSEHS) system which vaporizes an expendable fluid to provide cooling for the shuttle heat transport fluid loop is reported. The optimized RSEHS minimum weight design meets or exceeds the shuttle flash evaporator system requirements. A cold trap which cryo-pumps flash evaporator exhaust water from the CSD vacuum chamber test facility to prevent water contamination of the chamber pumping equipment is also described.

  7. A device for recharging evaporation sources in ultrahigh vacuum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuenzalida, V. M.; Grahmann, C. R.; Herrera, C.

    1998-08-01

    We describe a device capable of recharging the evaporation sources of ultrahigh vacuum systems without breaking the vacuum. The device is operated through the same load lock used for the introduction of the substrates and is able to place grains of materials on resistively heated boats.

  8. End-evaporation kinetics in living-polymer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, C. M.; Turner, M. S.; Cates, M. E.

    1993-11-01

    We study theoretically the process of ``end-evaporation'' in living polymer systems, such as wormlike surfactant micelles. End-evaporation occurs when single monomers either break away from, or join onto, a chain end, the rates being described by the (mean-field) rate constants k and k', respectively. Thus the chains can exchange material with one-another via a bath of free monomers. The relaxation of a system of living polymers after a small temperature jump (T-jump) is studied theoretically. The effect of a T-jump is to prepare the system with the wrong mean chain length, which relaxes to its equilibrium value L¯ by end-evaporation. It is found that the number of free monomers in the system relaxes almost completely in a time of order 1/kL¯, while the weight-average chain length, which is the quantity measured in light scattering experiments, relaxes on a time scale τD=4L¯2/k, which is three powers of L¯ longer. We also predict that the stress relaxation after a step strain is dominated by end-evaporation whenever τD≲τrep, where τrep is the reptation (disengagement) time for a chain of length L¯. In this case the stress relaxation is found to be ``stretched exponential'' for times smaller than τD and single exponential for longer times.

  9. Effects of intensive evaporative cooling on performance characteristics of land-based gas turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Utamura, Motoaki; Kuwahara, Takaaki; Murata, Hidetaro; Horii, Nobuyuki

    1999-07-01

    Injection of finely-atomized water droplets at inlet to compressor is demonstrated to increase the power and augment the efficiency of gas turbine using a 115MW simple cycle commercial power plant. Power-up mechanism of the present system is identified to be a composite of three existing methods. Design requirement on droplet diameter is discussed in view of blade erosion as well as evaporation efficiency within the compressor. Special spray nozzle to generate water droplets with sauter mean diameter of 10 {micro} m is developed and applied to demonstration test. Experiments show that injection of spray water of 1% to air mass ratio would increase power output by about 10% and thermal efficiency by 3% (relative) respectively. A newly introduced incremental efficiency defined as the ratio of incremental power to additional fuel energy is found to be in excess of 10% (absolute) over thermal efficiency in case without water injection and to be independent of spray amount. It is also revealed that the operation of water spraying suppresses dust deposition on compressor blades under proper control of water quality, which mitigates the deterioration of compressor adiabatic efficiency.

  10. Rankine-cycle heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Design for domestic or commercial solar heating and cooling system based on rankine heat pump cycle includes detailed drawings, performance data, equipment specifications, and other pertinent information.

  11. Safety and feasibility of the RhinoChill immediate transnasal evaporative cooling device during out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A single-center, observational study.

    PubMed

    Grave, Marie-Sophie; Sterz, Fritz; Nürnberger, Alexander; Fykatas, Stergios; Gatterbauer, Mathias; Stättermayer, Albert Friedrich; Zajicek, Andreas; Malzer, Reinhard; Sebald, Dieter; van Tulder, Raphael

    2016-08-01

    We investigated feasibility and safety of the RhinoChill (RC) transnasal cooling system initiated before achieving a protected airway during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in a prehospital setting.In out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), transnasal evaporative cooling was initiated during CPR, before a protected airway was established and continued until either the patient was declared dead, standard institutional systemic cooling methods were implemented or cooling supply was empty. Patients were monitored throughout the hypothermia period until either death or hospital discharge. Clinical assessments and relevant adverse events (AEs) were documented over this period of time.In total 21 patients were included. Four were excluded due to user errors or meeting exclusion criteria. Finally, 17 patients (f = 6; mean age 65.5 years, CI95%: 57.7-73.4) were analyzed. Device-related AEs, like epistaxis or nose whitening, occurred in 2 patients. They were mild and had no consequence on the patient's outcome. According to the field reports of the emergency medical services (EMS) personnel, no severe technical problems occurred by using the RC device that led to a delay or the impairment of quality of the CPR.Early application of the RC device, during OHCA is feasible, safe, easy to handle, and does not delay or hinder CPR, or establishment of a secure intubation. For efficacy and further safety data additional studies will be needed. PMID:27559978

  12. An experimental and numerical investigation of thermocapillary driven phenomena for evaporating menisci in capillary tubes related to microelectronics cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffone, Cosimo

    The present work is an experimental and numerical investigation of the hydrodynamics of a meniscus formed by a liquid in capillary tubes undergoing phase change. The non uniform evaporation process along the liquid-vapour interface leads to self-induced temperature field that in turn generates surface tension gradients along the meniscus. The interfacial stress so created drives a vigorous liquid convection that is measured by using a micro-Particle Image Velocimetry (micro-PIV) technique. Temperature measurements using advanced Infra Red (IR) and Thermochromic Liquid Crystal (TLC) techniques allowed us to measure the interfacial temperature profile (IR) and external capillary tube temperature (TLC). Measuring velocity and temperature at such scales is not trivial because conventional techniques such as thermocouples cannot be used. Therefore, efforts have been made to compare the measurements gathered from different techniques: TLC and IR external wall measurements for the temperature field and micro-PIV measurements and numerical analysis for the velocity field. The TLC temperature measurements show the important sink effect close to the meniscus near contact line region. By measuring the evaporation mass flux and performing a heat transfer analysis based on the measured wall temperature of the system, a very good agreement was found, giving confidence to the temperature measurements performed with TLC. IR measurement of the external capillary tube wall was also taken and compares well with the TLC ones. Tube sizes ranging from 200 to 1,630 mm and four volatile liquids were investigated. Different experimental studies were conducted with both vertically and horizontally oriented capillaries, with and without external heating. It is observed that symmetrical flow patterns found in horizontal diametrical sections of the tube are dramatically distorted in vertical diametrical sections, presumably due to gravity. The IR measurements of the liquid-vapour interface

  13. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor plant system

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Boardman, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting for fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. The reactor system is enhanced with sealing means for excluding external air from contact with the liquid metal coolant leaking from the reactor vessel during an accident. The invention also includes a silo structure which resists attack by leaking liquid metal coolant, and an added unique cooling means.

  14. Advances in Solar Heating and Cooling Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Dan S.

    1976-01-01

    Reports on technological advancements in the fields of solar collectors, thermal storage systems, and solar heating and cooling systems. Diagrams aid in the understanding of the thermodynamics of the systems. (CP)

  15. Radiant vessel auxiliary cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Germer, J.H.

    1987-07-07

    This patent describes an improved radiant vessel passive cooling system for liquid-metal poor-type modular nuclear reactors having a reactor vessel and a surrounding containment vessel spaced apart from the reactor vessel to form a first interstitial region containing an inert gas, the improvement comprising: a shell spaced apart from and surrounding the containment vessel to form a second interstitial region comprising a circulatory air passage. The circulatory air passage has an air inlet at a first position and an air outlet at a second position which is vertically higher than the first position. The second interstitial region lies between the shell and the containment vessel; and surface area extension means in the shell is longitudinally disposed from the shell into the second interstitial region towards the containment vessel to receive thermal radiation from the containment vessel. The surface area extension means is spaced apart from the external surface of the containment vessel where heat radiated form the containment vessel is received at the surface extension means for convection, conduction and radiation to air in the circulatory passage.

  16. Quantifying Evaporation and Evaluating Runoff Estimation Methods in a Permeable Pavement System - abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies on quantifying evaporation in permeable pavement systems are limited to few laboratory studies that used a scale to weigh evaporative losses and a field application with a tunnel-evaporation gauge. A primary objective of this research was to quantify evaporation for a la...

  17. Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers

    SciTech Connect

    German, A.; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline on evaporative condensers is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for energy and demand savings in homes with cooling loads. This is a prescriptive approach that outlines selection criteria, design and installation procedures, and operation and maintenance best practices. This document has been prepared to provide a process for properly designing, installing, and maintaining evaporative condenser systems as well as understanding the benefits, costs, and tradeoffs.

  18. Superconducting magnet system for muon beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, N.; Johnson, R.P.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Novitski, I.; Yonehara, K.; Zlobin, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    A helical cooling channel has been proposed to quickly reduce the six-dimensional phase space of muon beams for muon colliders, neutrino factories, and intense muon sources. A novel superconducting magnet system for a muon beam cooling experiment is being designed at Fermilab. The inner volume of the cooling channel is filled with liquid helium where passing muon beam can be decelerated and cooled in a process of ionization energy loss. The magnet parameters are optimized to match the momentum of the beam as it slows down. The results of 3D magnetic analysis for two designs of magnet system, mechanical and quench protection considerations are discussed.

  19. Feasibility of cool storage systems in refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmahgary, Yehia; Kekkonen, Veikko; Laitinen, Ari; Pihala, Hannu

    1989-05-01

    In the present report, the economic viability and technical feasibility of selected cool storage systems are considered. Cool storage has clear potential for several applications: in connection with air-conditioning systems, domestic refrigerating and freezing systems; commercially e.g., in the dairy and vegetable industries; and in deep freezing, as in the meat industry. Air-conditioning has limited significance in Finland. For this reason it was not investigated in this study. In domestic refrigeration and freezing two systems were investigated; a controlled cooling/heating system and a simple built-in system in individual refrigerators and freezers. The central cooling/heating system in houses was found to be economically unattractive. It also has several technical drawbacks. The simple built-in system appeared to be promising. The amount of savings is rationally a function of the difference between day and night tariffs and the costs of installing an automatic switch and storage media. In the vegetable and dairy industries cool storage also has considerable potential. Several systems were investigated in this respect and compared to the conventional system. The cool storage system using Cristopia balls, one of the most common commercial systems available in Europe, was not economical at a tariff difference of 10 p/k Wh or more. Cool storage for freezing in meat plants was also investigated.

  20. Hot gas path component cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Bunker, Ronald Scott; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2014-02-18

    A cooling system for a hot gas path component is disclosed. The cooling system may include a component layer and a cover layer. The component layer may include a first inner surface and a second outer surface. The second outer surface may define a plurality of channels. The component layer may further define a plurality of passages extending generally between the first inner surface and the second outer surface. Each of the plurality of channels may be fluidly connected to at least one of the plurality of passages. The cover layer may be situated adjacent the second outer surface of the component layer. The plurality of passages may be configured to flow a cooling medium to the plurality of channels and provide impingement cooling to the cover layer. The plurality of channels may be configured to flow cooling medium therethrough, cooling the cover layer.

  1. Desiccant cooling system performance: A simple approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, M.; Grolmes, M. A.

    1982-10-01

    The wave nature of heat and mass transfer in fixed desiccant bed adsorption is explained. A simple algebraic model of wave motion under single low desiccant bed operation is developed and applied to the prediction of the performance potential of the overall desiccant cooling system. The model is used to explain the increase in cooling system performance that is realized through the use of mixed inert desiccant material adsorption beds. The response of cooling system performance to changes in external process conditions is examined and conclusions are drawn relative to optimization of system characteristics.

  2. Improvement to Air2Air Technology to Reduce Fresh-Water Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Mortensen

    2011-12-31

    This program was undertaken to enhance the manufacturability, constructability, and cost of the Air2Air{TM} Water Conservation and Plume Abatement Cooling Tower, giving a validated cost basis and capability. Air2Air{TM} water conservation technology recovers a portion of the traditional cooling tower evaporate. The Condensing Module provides an air-to-air heat exchanger above the wet fill media, extracting the heat from the hot saturated moist air leaving in the cooling tower and condensing water. The rate of evaporate water recovery is typically 10% - 25% annually, depending on the cooling tower location (climate). This program improved the efficiency and cost of the Air2Air{TM} Water Conservation Cooling Tower capability, and led to the first commercial sale of the product, as described.

  3. Cooling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Amtmann, Hans H.

    1982-01-01

    A cooling system for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor is disclosed which includes at least one primary cooling loop adapted to pass coolant gas from the reactor core and an associated steam generator through a duct system having a main circulator therein, and at least one auxiliary cooling loop having communication with the reactor core and adapted to selectively pass coolant gas through an auxiliary heat exchanger and circulator. The main and auxiliary circulators are installed in a common vertical cavity in the reactor vessel, and a common return duct communicates with the reactor core and intersects the common cavity at a junction at which is located a flow diverter valve operative to effect coolant flow through either the primary or auxiliary cooling loops.

  4. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ternes, Mark P.; Kedl, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    This invention is a process for formation of a gas hydrate to be used as a cool storage medium using a refrigerant in water. Mixing of the immiscible refrigerant and water is effected by addition of a surfactant and agitation. The difficult problem of subcooling during the process is overcome by using the surfactant and agitation and performance of the process significantly improves and approaches ideal.

  5. Elastocaloric cooling materials and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    We are actively pursuing applications of thermoelastic (elastocaloric) cooling using shape memory alloys. Latent heat associated with martensitic transformation of shape memory alloys can be used to run cooling cycles with stress-inducing mechanical drives. The coefficient of performance of thermoelastic cooling materials can be as high as 11 with the directly measured DT of around 17 °C. Depending on the stress application mode, the number of cycles to fatigue can be as large as of the order of 105. Efforts to design and develop thermoelastic alloys with long fatigue life will be discussed. The current project at the University of Maryland is focused on development of building air-conditioners, and at Maryland Energy and Sensor Technologies, smaller scale commercial applications are being pursued. This work is carried out in collaboration with Jun Cui, Yiming Wu, Suxin Qian, Yunho Hwang, Jan Muehlbauer, and Reinhard Radermacher, and it is funded by the ARPA-E BEETIT program and the State of Maryland.

  6. Gas-phase saturation and evaporative cooling effects during wet compression of a fuel aerosol under RCM conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsborough, S.S.; Johnson, M.V.; Zhu, G.S.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    2011-01-15

    Wet compression of a fuel aerosol has been proposed as a means of creating gas-phase mixtures of involatile diesel-representative fuels and oxidizer + diluent gases for rapid compression machine (RCM) experiments. The use of high concentration aerosols (e.g., {proportional_to}0.1 mL{sub fuel}/L{sub gas}, {proportional_to}1 x 10{sup 9} droplets/L{sub gas} for stoichiometric fuel loading at ambient conditions) can result in droplet-droplet interactions which lead to significant gas-phase fuel saturation and evaporative cooling during the volumetric compression process. In addition, localized stratification (i.e., on the droplet scale) of the fuel vapor and of temperature can lead to non-homogeneous reaction and heat release processes - features which could prevent adequate segregation of the underlying chemical kinetic rates from rates of physical transport. These characteristics are dependent on many factors including physical parameters such as overall fuel loading and initial droplet size relative to the compression rate, as well as fuel and diluent properties such as the boiling curve, vaporization enthalpy, heat capacity, and mass and thermal diffusivities. This study investigates the physical issues, especially fuel saturation and evaporative cooling effects, using a spherically-symmetric, single-droplet wet compression model. n-Dodecane is used as the fuel with the gas containing 21% O{sub 2} and 79% N{sub 2}. An overall compression time and compression ratio of 15.3 ms and 13.4 are used, respectively. It is found that smaller droplets (d{sub 0}{proportional_to} 2-3 {mu}m) are more affected by 'far-field' saturation and cooling effects, while larger droplets (d{sub 0}{proportional_to} 14 {mu}m) result in greater localized stratification of the gas-phase due to the larger diffusion distances for heat and mass transport. Vaporization of larger droplets is more affected by the volumetric compression process since evaporation requires more time to be completed

  7. Evaporation as a diagnostic test for hydrodynamic cooling of laser-ablated clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Klots, C.E.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of materials laser-ablated from a surface are of considerable interest. The interrogation of these properties inevitably occurs at a point some distance from the surface. One might then ask what processes have occurred in the intervening path length. Immediately, for example, one wonders whether the material was released as such from the surface or was formed as a result of collisions at a distant point. Similarly, one might ask if an observed temperature'' of the materials is characteristic of the ablation process of of subsequent events. We will indicate here how measurements of metastable evaporation rates can provide clues which are pertinent to these questions. 7 refs.

  8. Biomedical Application of Aerospace Personal Cooling Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Lee, Hank C.; Montgomery, Leslie D.; Webbon, Bruce W.; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Personal thermoregulatory systems which are used by astronauts to alleviate thermal stress during extravehicular activity have been applied to the therapeutic management of multiple sclerosis. However, little information is available regarding the physiologic and circulatory changes produced by routine operation of these systems. The objectives of this study were to compare the effectiveness of two passive and two active cooling vests and to measure the body temperature and circulatory changes produced by each cooling vest configuration. The MicroClimate Systems and the Life Enhancement Tech(LET) lightweight liquid cooling vests, the Steele Vest and LET's Zipper Front Garment were used to cool the chest region of 10 male and female subjects (25 to 55 yr.) in this study. Calf, forearm and finger blood flows were measured using a tetrapolar impedance rheograph. The subjects, seated in an upright position at normal room temperature (approx.22C), were tested for 60 min. with the cooling system operated at its maximum cooling capacity. Blood flows were recorded continuously using a computer data acquisition system with a sampling frequency of 250 Hz. Oral, right and left ear temperatures and cooling system parameters were logged manually every 5 min. Arm, leg, chest and rectal temperatures; heart rate; respiration; and an activity index were recorded continuously on a U.F.I., Inc. Biolog ambulatory monitor. In general, the male and female subjects' oral and ear temperature responses to cooling were similar for all vest configurations tested. Oral temperatures during the recovery period were significantly (P<0.05) lower than during the control period, approx. 0.2 - 0.5C, for both men and women wearing any of the four different garments. The corresponding ear temperatures were significantly (P<0.05) decreased approx.0.2 - 0.4C by the end of the recovery period. Compared to the control period, no significant differences were found in rectal temperatures during cooling and

  9. Analysis of Dehumidification Effects on Cooling Capacity of an Evaporative Cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, Mohammad Hassan; Aghanajafi, Cyrus; Mohammadian, Masoud

    In this study, effect of desiccant wheel, heat exchanger and cooling coil will be evaluated on decreasing the wet bulb temperature of entering air to cooling tower and decreasing the outlet cold water temperature. For this purpose, change effect of desiccant wheel parameters will be investigated on wet bulb temperature of outlet air from heat exchanger. After that, optimum parameters and minimum wet bulb temperature will be selected. Then, outlet cold water temperature will be achieved for various cooling coil surface temperature with definition of by pass factor and also by using optimum desiccant wheel parameters and entrance air wet bulb temperature to tower related to cooling coil surface temperature. To calculate wet bulb temperature, a mathematical model will be used that shows physical properties of air. After that a nomograph will be used to predict effect of decrease of entrance air wet bulb temperature on reducing the outlet water temperature and it will be done for several cities in Iran. At the end, an equation will be used to calculate required water to air mass flow rate for each outlet cold water temperature. With considering of known circulating water mass flow rate, required air for tower would be calculated and suitable desiccant wheel can be selected.

  10. Cooling system for cooling the bits of a cutting machine

    SciTech Connect

    Wrulich, H.; Gekle, S.; Schetina, O.; Zitz, A.

    1984-06-26

    The invention refers to a system for cooling the bits of a cutting machine and comprising a nozzle for the cooling water to be ejected under pressure, said nozzle being arranged at the area of the bit, the water supply to said nozzle being closable by means of a shutoff valve and the bit being supported on the bit holder for limited axial shifting movement under the action of the cutting pressure against the force of a spring and against the hydraulic pressure of the cooling water and the shutoff valve being coupled with the bit by means of a coupling member such that the shutoff valve is opened on shifting movement of the bit in direction of the cutting pressure. In this system the arrangement is such that the bit (6) has in a manner known per se the shape of a cap and is enclosing a bit shaft (3) adapted to be inserted into the bit holder (1), in that the cap-shaped bit (6) is supported on the shaft (3) for shifting movement in axial direction and in that the shutoff valve (11) and the coupling member (10) are arranged within the bit shaft (3). The coupling member is formed of a push rod (10) acting on the closure member (11) of the valve, said push rod being guided within a central bore (9) of the bit shaft and the closure member (11) closing the valve in opposite direction to the action of the cutting pressure and being moved in open position by the push rod (10) in direction of the acting cutting pressure.

  11. Effectiveness-weighted control of cooling system components

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Levi A.; Chu, Richard C.; David, Milnes P.; Ellsworth Jr., Michael J.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Simmons, Robert E.

    2015-12-22

    Energy efficient control of cooling system cooling of an electronic system is provided based, in part, on weighted cooling effectiveness of the components. The control includes automatically determining speed control settings for multiple adjustable cooling components of the cooling system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on weighted cooling effectiveness of the components of the cooling system, and the determining operates to limit power consumption of at least the cooling system, while ensuring that a target temperature associated with at least one of the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range by provisioning, based on the weighted cooling effectiveness, a desired target temperature change among the multiple adjustable cooling components of the cooling system. The provisioning includes provisioning applied power to the multiple adjustable cooling components via, at least in part, the determined control settings.

  12. Effectiveness-weighted control method for a cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Levi A.; Chu, Richard C.; David, Milnes P.; Ellsworth Jr., Michael J.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Simons, Robert E.

    2015-12-15

    Energy efficient control of cooling system cooling of an electronic system is provided based, in part, on weighted cooling effectiveness of the components. The control includes automatically determining speed control settings for multiple adjustable cooling components of the cooling system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on weighted cooling effectiveness of the components of the cooling system, and the determining operates to limit power consumption of at least the cooling system, while ensuring that a target temperature associated with at least one of the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range by provisioning, based on the weighted cooling effectiveness, a desired target temperature change among the multiple adjustable cooling components of the cooling system. The provisioning includes provisioning applied power to the multiple adjustable cooling components via, at least in part, the determined control settings.

  13. New desalination concept: the solar evaporator and condenser system (SEACS)

    SciTech Connect

    ElDifrawi, A.; Yudow, B.; Grotheer, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    A new concept for a solar-powered, modular desalination plant has been developed. Plants will utilize a Solar Evaporator and Condenser System which provides a simple, reliable, and low-cost method for desalination. The system is an augmented solar still. Air drawn at low velocity over glazed solar ponds picks up moisture and transports it to a condenser where it picks up the latent heat of condensation. The warm seawater then flows by gravity through the ponds and is pumped over an evaporator pad at the air stream inlet. Most of the latent heat of condensation recovered at the condenser will provide additional moisture to the air stream. The cold brine will flow by gravity back to the sea. Product water from the condenser is stored for subsequent use by the community. The level of technology is low. Major components are low speed pumps and fans, heat exchangers, battery storage systems, and photovoltaic power panels. Plant capacity is determined by the number of modules in the plant. Total electric power requirements are anticipated to be as low as 1.2 to 1.5 kWhr/m/sup 3/ of product water. Cost of water production over the 20-year plant life is estimated to be $2.40/m/sup 3/. System is attractive in its simplicity, both from a construction and operation standpoint.

  14. Passive cooling system for top entry liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Boardman, Charles E.; Hunsbedt, Anstein; Hui, Marvin M.

    1992-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear fission reactor plant having a top entry loop joined satellite assembly with a passive auxiliary safety cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. This satellite type reactor plant is enhanced by a backup or secondary passive safety cooling system which augments the primary passive auxiliary cooling system when in operation, and replaces the primary cooling system when rendered inoperative.

  15. In vitro assessment of solvent evaporation from commercial adhesive systems compared to experimental systems.

    PubMed

    Nihi, Fabio Mitugui; Fabre, Hebert Samuel Carafa; Garcia, Georges; Fernandes, Karen Barros Parron; Ferreira, Flaviana Bombarda de Andrade; Wang, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Solvents should be properly evaporated after application to dental substrates. The aim of this study was to assess the evaporation of commercial, experimental and neat solvents. The tested null hypotheses were that there are no differences in solvent evaporation regardless of its formulation and over time. Evaporation from commercial adhesive systems (Scotchbond Multipurpose Primer, Scotchbond Multipurpose Adhesive, Prime & Bond NT, Multi Bond, Excite, Single Bond 2, Adhese Primer, Adhese Bond, Xeno III A and Xeno III B) and experimental primers (35% HEMA plus 65% acetone or ethanol or water v/v) were compared to neat solvents (acetone, ethanol and water). Samples (10 microL) of these products were dripped into glass containers placed on a digital precision balance. Evaporation was assessed at 0, 5, 10, 15, 30, 60, 120, 300 and 600 s times to calculate mass loss. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Bonferroni's correction (a=0.05). Acetone-based products exhibited a remarkable capacity to evaporate spontaneously over time. Neat acetone evaporated significantly more than the HEMA-mixtures and the commercial formulations (p<0.05). The incorporation of monomers and other ingredients in the commercial formulations seem to reduce the evaporation capacity. Solvent evaporation was time and material-dependent. PMID:20126908

  16. Cooling system with automated seasonal freeze protection

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Levi A.; Chu, Richard C.; David, Milnes P.; Ellsworth, Jr., Michael J.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Simons, Robert E.; Singh, Prabjit; Zhang, Jing

    2016-05-24

    An automated multi-fluid cooling system and method are provided for cooling an electronic component(s). The cooling system includes a coolant loop, a coolant tank, multiple valves, and a controller. The coolant loop is at least partially exposed to outdoor ambient air temperature(s) during normal operation, and the coolant tank includes first and second reservoirs containing first and second fluids, respectively. The first fluid freezes at a lower temperature than the second, the second fluid has superior cooling properties compared with the first, and the two fluids are soluble. The multiple valves are controllable to selectively couple the first or second fluid into the coolant in the coolant loop, wherein the coolant includes at least the second fluid. The controller automatically controls the valves to vary first fluid concentration level in the coolant loop based on historical, current, or anticipated outdoor air ambient temperature(s) for a time of year.

  17. A computer simulation appraisal of non-residential low energy cooling systems in California

    SciTech Connect

    Bourassa, Norman; Haves, Philip; Huang, Joe

    2002-05-17

    An appraisal of the potential performance of different Low Energy Cooling (LEC) systems in nonresidential buildings in California is being conducted using computer simulation. The paper presents results from the first phase of the study, which addressed the systems that can be modeled, with the DOE-2.1E simulation program. The following LEC technologies were simulated as variants of a conventional variable-air-volume system with vapor compression cooling and mixing ventilation in the occupied spaces: Air-side indirect and indirect/direct evaporative pre-cooling. Cool beams. Displacement ventilation. Results are presented for four populous climates, represented by Oakland, Sacramento, Pasadena and San Diego. The greatest energy savings are obtained from a combination of displacement ventilation and air-side indirect/direct evaporative pre-cooling. Cool beam systems have the lowest peak demand but do not reduce energy consumption significantly because the reduction in fan energy is offse t by a reduction in air-side free cooling. Overall, the results indicate significant opportunities for LEC technologies to reduce energy consumption and demand in nonresidential new construction and retrofit.

  18. Cooling system for continuous metal casting machines

    DOEpatents

    Draper, R.; Sumpman, W.C.; Baker, R.J.; Williams, R.S.

    1988-06-07

    A continuous metal caster cooling system is provided in which water is supplied in jets from a large number of small nozzles against the inner surface of rim at a temperature and with sufficient pressure that the velocity of the jets is sufficiently high that the mode of heat transfer is substantially by forced convection, the liquid being returned from the cooling chambers through return pipes distributed interstitially among the nozzles. 9 figs.

  19. Cooling system for continuous metal casting machines

    DOEpatents

    Draper, Robert; Sumpman, Wayne C.; Baker, Robert J.; Williams, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    A continuous metal caster cooling system is provided in which water is supplied in jets from a large number of small nozzles 19 against the inner surface of rim 13 at a temperature and with sufficient pressure that the velocity of the jets is sufficiently high that the mode of heat transfer is substantially by forced convection, the liquid being returned from the cooling chambers 30 through return pipes 25 distributed interstitially among the nozzles.

  20. Rust Inhibitor And Fungicide For Cooling Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James F.; Greer, D. Clay

    1988-01-01

    Mixture of benzotriazole, benzoic acid, and fungicide prevents growth of rust and fungus. Water-based cooling mixture made from readily available materials prevents formation of metallic oxides and growth of fungi in metallic pipes. Coolant remains clear and does not develop thick sludge tending to collect in low points in cooling systems with many commercial rust inhibitors. Coolant compatible with iron, copper, aluminum, and stainless steel. Cannot be used with cadmium or cadmium-plated pipes.

  1. Evaporative cooling by a pulsed jet spray of binary ethanol-water mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, P. N.; Nazarov, A. D.; Serov, A. F.; Terekhov, V. I.

    2015-07-01

    We have experimentally studied the heat transfer under conditions of pulsed multinozzle jet spray impact onto a vertical surface. The working coolant fluid was aqueous ethanol solution in a range of concentrations K 1 = 0-96%. The duration of spray pulses was τ = 2, 4, and 10 ms at a repetition frequency of 10 Hz. The maximum heat transfer coefficient was achieved at an ethanol solution concentration within 50-60%. The thermal efficiency of pulsed spray cooling grows with increasing ethanol concentration and decreasing jet spray pulse duration.

  2. Effect of nanofluid on thermal performance of heat pipe with two evaporators; application to satellite equipment cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashaei, P. R.; Shahryari, M.

    2015-06-01

    A study on the behavior of nanofluid in a cylindrical heat pipe with two heat sources is performed to analyze the nanofluid application in heat-dissipating satellite equipment cooling. Pure water, Al2O3-water and TiO2-water nanofluids are used as working fluids. An analytical modeling is presented to predict the wall temperature profile for the heat pipe assuming saturated vapor and conduction heat transfer for porous media and wall, respectively. The effects of particle concentration levels (φ=0 (distilled water), 2, 4, and 8%), particle diameters (dp=10, 20, and 40 nm) on the local wall temperature, heat transfer coefficient, thermal resistance, and the size of the heat pipe are investigated. It is observed that the better wall temperature uniformity can be achieved using nanofluid which results in lower temperature difference between evaporators and condenser sections. Results reveal that applying nanoparticle with smaller size and higher concentration level increases heat transfer coefficient remarkably by reducing thermal resistance of saturated porous media. It is also found that the presence of nanoparticles in water can lead to a reduction in weight of heat pipe, and thus satellite, under nearly identical condition. The findings of this paper prove the potential of nanofluid in satellite equipment cooling application.

  3. Residential solar-heating/cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Report documents progress of residential solar-heating and cooling system development program at 5-month mark of anticipated 17-month program. System design has been completed, and development and component testing has been initiated. Report includes diagrams, operation overview, optimization studies of subcomponents, and marketing plans for system.

  4. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A collection of monthly status reports on the development of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems is presented. The effort calls for the development, manufacture, test, system installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation. The systems are 3, 25, and 75 ton size units.

  5. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A collection of monthly status reports are given on the development of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems. This effort calls for the development, manufacturing, test, system installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation. The systems are 3-, 25-, and 75-ton size units.

  6. Controlled cooling of an electronic system for reduced energy consumption

    DOEpatents

    David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.

    2016-08-09

    Energy efficient control of a cooling system cooling an electronic system is provided. The control includes automatically determining at least one adjusted control setting for at least one adjustable cooling component of a cooling system cooling the electronic system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on power being consumed by the cooling system and temperature of a heat sink to which heat extracted by the cooling system is rejected. The automatically determining operates to reduce power consumption of the cooling system and/or the electronic system while ensuring that at least one targeted temperature associated with the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range. The automatically determining may be based, at least in part, on one or more experimentally obtained models relating the targeted temperature and power consumption of the one or more adjustable cooling components of the cooling system.

  7. Effect of Over-Tree Evaporative Cooling in Orchards on Microclimate and Accuracy of Insect Model Predictions.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Ute; Jones, Vincent P

    2015-12-01

    Orchard design and management practices can alter microclimate and, thus, potentially affect insect development. If sufficiently large, these deviations in microclimate can compromise the accuracy of phenology model predictions used in integrated pest management (IPM) programs. Sunburn causes considerable damage in the Pacific Northwest, United States, apple-producing region. Common prevention strategies include the use of fruit surface protectants, evaporative cooling (EC), or both. This study focused on the effect of EC on ambient temperatures and model predictions for four insects (codling moth, Cydia pomonella L.; Lacanobia fruitworm, Lacanobia subjuncta Grote and Robinson; oblique-banded leafroller, Choristoneura rosaceana Harris; and Pandemis leafroller, Pandemis pyrusana Kearfott). Over-tree EC was applied in July and August when daily maximum temperatures were predicted to be ≥30°C between 1200-1700 hours (15/15 min on/off interval) in 2011 and between 1200-1800 hours (15/10 min on/off interval, or continuous on) in 2012. Control plots were sprayed once with kaolin clay in early July. During interval and continuous cooling, over-tree cooling reduced average afternoon temperatures compared with the kaolin treatment by 2.1-3.2°C. Compared with kaolin-treated controls, codling moth and Lacanobia fruitworm egg hatch in EC plots was predicted to occur up to 2 d and 1 d late, respectively. The presence of fourth-instar oblique-banded leafroller and Pandemis leafroller was predicted to occur up to 2 d and 1 d earlier in EC plots, respectively. These differences in model predictions were negligible, suggesting that no adjustments in pest management timing are needed when using EC in high-density apple orchards. PMID:26331306

  8. Methods to reduce bacterial contamination of recycling cooling systems of a CHPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichirova, N. D.; Chichirov, A. A.; Vlasov, S. M.; Vlasova, A. Yu.

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial contamination of circulating and make-up water of the nonconjugated recycling cooling system with evaporative cooling towers of thermal power plants is studied. The nonconjugated recycling cooling system of Naberezhnochelninskaya CHP Plant was selected as the object of study. It was found that circulating water of recycling cooling is highly contaminated with aerobic heterotrophic bacteria. At the same time, make-up water for the cooling system from the Kama River is moderately polluted with anaerobic bacteria. Measurements of biological contamination in different parts of the recycling cooling system showed that populations of colonies of microorganisms abruptly decreases in turbine condensers, which is probably indicative of their death and deposition on the heat transfer surface of the condenser. Calculation using a special program showed that biological contamination of the recycling cooling system poses the greatest risks for clogging of the equipment (seven points on a nine-point scale), its corrosion (two points), and damage to the health of personnel (two points). Rapid development of aerobic bacteria apparently occurs under elevated temperature and intense aeration of water in the cooling tower. It is suggested to periodically monitor the recycling cooling system for biological pollution and to set a timetable for bactericidal treatment of circulating water depending on the level of its bacterial contamination.

  9. Analysis of cooling systems for hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petley, Dennis H.; Jones, Stuart C.; Dziedzic, William M.

    1991-01-01

    A computer program has been written to analyze cooling systems of hypersonic aircraft. This computer program called NASP/SINDA is written into the SINDA'85 command structure and uses the SINDA'85 finite difference subroutines. Both internal fluid flow and heat transfer must be analyzed, because increased heating causes a decrease in the flow of the coolant. Also local hot spots will cause a redistribution of the coolant in the system. Both steady state and transient analyses have been performed. Details of empirical correlations are presented. Results for two cooling system applications are given.

  10. Comparison of Model and Experimental Results for Material and Energy Flow in a Titanium Evaporation System with Deforming Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, M A; Westerberg, K W; Meier, T C; Braun, D G; Frischknecht, K D; Anklam, T M

    2003-05-12

    Finite element calculations and measurements are compared for material and energy flow in a system to evaporate pure titanium. A 40 kW electron beam is used to heat the end of a 7.62 cm diameter cylindrical rod which is fed vertically through a water-cooled crucible. Vapor emanates from a liquid pool in which flow is driven strongly by buoyancy and capillary forces. At high evaporation rates, the vapor exerts strong shear and normal forces on the liquid-vapor interface. The MELT finite element code is used to calculate steady-state, axisymmetric flow and temperature fields along with liquid-solid and liquid-vapor interface locations. The influence of the vapor on the liquid top surface is treated using boundary conditions with parameters derived from Monte Carlo simulations. The upper and lower interfaces of the liquid pool are tracked using a mesh structured with rotating spines. Experimental evaporation rates are obtained from measured feed rates, and heat flow rates are determined from measured temperature rises in the cooling water. The finite element model provides a good representation of the measured evaporation rates, heat flows, and lower pool boundary locations.

  11. Evaluation of three commercial microclimate cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadarette, Bruce S.; Decristofano, Barry S.; Speckman, Karen N.; Sawka, Michael N.

    1988-11-01

    Three commercially available microclimate cooling systems were evaluated for their ability to reduce heat stress in men exercising in a hot environment while wearing high insulative, low permeability clothing. The cooling systems were: (1) ILC Dover Model 19 Coolvest (ILC) (2) LSSI Coolhead(LSSI), and (3) Thermacor Cooling vest (THERM). Endurance Time (ET), Heart Rate (HR), rectal temperature (Tre), mean skin temperature (TSK), Sweating Rate (SR), Rated Perceived Exertion (RPE) and Thermal Sensation (TS) were measured. The subjects self-terminated on all LSSI tests because of headaches. Statistical analyses were performed on data collected at 60 minutes to have values on all subjects. There were no differences in HR, Tre, SR or TS values among the cooling vests. The subjects' TSK was lower (P less than 0.05) for the LSSI than THERM: and RPE values were higher (P less than 0.05) for LSSI than the other two vests. These data suggest an improved physiological response to exercise heat stress with all three commercial systems with the greatest benefit in performance time provided by the ILC cooling system.

  12. The development of a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source (Lanzhou electron cyclotron resonance ion source No. 4) with evaporative cooling technology at Institute of Modern Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W. Sun, L. T.; Qian, C.; Feng, Y. C.; Ma, H. Y.; Zhang, X. Z.; Ma, B. H.; Zhao, H. W.; Guo, J. W.; Fang, X.; Yang, Y.; Xiong, B.; Guo, S. Q.; Ruan, L.

    2015-04-15

    LECR4 (Lanzhou electron cyclotron resonance ion source No. 4) has been successfully constructed at IMP and has also been connected with the Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) and Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) systems. These source magnet coils are cooled through evaporative cooling technology, which is the first attempt with an ECR ion source in the world. The maximum mirror field is 2.5 T (with iron plug) and the effective plasma chamber volume is 1.2 l. It was designed to be operated at 18 GHz and aimed to produce intense multiple charge state heavy ion beams for the linear injector project SSC-Linac at IMP. In February 2014, the first analyzed beam at 18 GHz was extracted. During about three months’ commissioning, some outstanding results have been achieved, such as 1.97 emA of O{sup 6+}, 1.7 emA of Ar{sup 8+}, 1.07 emA of Ar{sup 9+}, and 118 euA of Bi{sup 28+}. The source has also successfully delivered O{sup 5+} and Ar{sup 8+} ion beams for RFQ commissioning in April 2014. This paper will give a brief overview of the design of LECR4. Then, the latest results of this source at 18 GHz will be presented.

  13. The development of a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source (Lanzhou electron cyclotron resonance ion source No. 4) with evaporative cooling technology at Institute of Modern Physics.

    PubMed

    Lu, W; Sun, L T; Qian, C; Guo, J W; Fang, X; Feng, Y C; Yang, Y; Ma, H Y; Zhang, X Z; Ma, B H; Xiong, B; Guo, S Q; Ruan, L; Zhao, H W

    2015-04-01

    LECR4 (Lanzhou electron cyclotron resonance ion source No. 4) has been successfully constructed at IMP and has also been connected with the Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) and Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) systems. These source magnet coils are cooled through evaporative cooling technology, which is the first attempt with an ECR ion source in the world. The maximum mirror field is 2.5 T (with iron plug) and the effective plasma chamber volume is 1.2 l. It was designed to be operated at 18 GHz and aimed to produce intense multiple charge state heavy ion beams for the linear injector project SSC-Linac at IMP. In February 2014, the first analyzed beam at 18 GHz was extracted. During about three months' commissioning, some outstanding results have been achieved, such as 1.97 emA of O(6+), 1.7 emA of Ar(8+), 1.07 emA of Ar(9+), and 118 euA of Bi(28+). The source has also successfully delivered O(5+) and Ar(8+) ion beams for RFQ commissioning in April 2014. This paper will give a brief overview of the design of LECR4. Then, the latest results of this source at 18 GHz will be presented. PMID:25933849

  14. Gemini helium closed cycle cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazo, Manuel; Galvez, Ramon; Rogers, Rolando; Solis, Hernan; Tapia, Eduardo; Maltes, Diego; Collins, Paul; White, John; Cavedoni, Chas; Yamasaki, Chris; Sheehan, Michael P.; Walls, Brian

    2008-07-01

    The Gemini Observatory presents the Helium Closed Cycle Cooling System that provides cooling capacity at cryogenic temperatures for instruments and detectors. It is implemented by running three independent helium closed cycle cooling circuits with several banks of compressors in parallel to continuously supply high purity helium gas to cryocoolers located about 100-120 meters apart. This poster describes how the system has been implemented, the required helium pressures and gas flow to reach cryogenic temperature, the performance it has achieved, the helium compressors and cryocoolers in use and the level of vibration the cryocoolers produce in the telescope environment. The poster also describes the new technology for cryocoolers that Gemini is considering in the development of new instruments.

  15. A cooling water system copper corrosion study

    SciTech Connect

    Pulkrabek, J.W.

    1998-07-01

    The plant has four units that have been operating normally for 12--33 years. Two of the units are 70 MW sister units that have copper alloy once-through condensers. The other two units are 350 MW and 500 MW units with copper alloy condensers and cooling towers. No cooling water related tube leaks had been experienced. Until 1993, the only chemicals used were sulfuric acid for pH control of the cooling tower systems and chlorine for biological control. The units were chlorinated for one hour per day per condenser. In early July 1992, their copper grab sample at the plant discharge to the river exceeded the weekly environmental limit. In fact, it was so high that there was a slim chance of coming in under their monthly average copper limit unless something was done quickly. The result of this incident was an extensive study of their plant wastewater and cooling systems. The study revealed that the elevated copper problem had existed sporadically for several years. Initially, copper control was achieved by altering the wastewater treatment processes and cooling tower blowdown flow path. Two extended trials, one with tolyltriazole (TTA) and one with a chemically modified benzotriazole (BZT) were performed. Optimal control of copper corrosion was eventually achieved by the application of a TTA treatment program in which the feed rates are adjusted based on on-line corrosion monitoring measurements. This report documents experiences and results over the past six years.

  16. Passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with backup coolant flow path

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Boardman, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear fission reactor plant having a passive auxiliary safety cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. This reactor plant is enhanced by a backup or secondary passive safety cooling system which augments the primary passive auxiliary cooling system when in operation, and replaces the primary system when rendered inoperable.

  17. Passive decay heat removal system for water-cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1991-01-01

    A passive decay-heat removal system for a water-cooled nuclear reactor employs a closed heat transfer loop having heat-exchanging coils inside an open-topped, insulated box located inside the reactor vessel, below its normal water level, in communication with a condenser located outside of containment and exposed to the atmosphere. The heat transfer loop is located such that the evaporator is in a position where, when the water level drops in the reactor, it will become exposed to steam. Vapor produced in the evaporator passes upward to the condenser above the normal water level. In operation, condensation in the condenser removes heat from the system, and the condensed liquid is returned to the evaporator. The system is disposed such that during normal reactor operations where the water level is at its usual position, very little heat will be removed from the system, but during emergency, low water level conditions, substantial amounts of decay heat will be removed.

  18. PCM Passive Cooling System Containing Active Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanding, David E.; Bass, David I.

    2005-01-01

    A multistage system has been proposed for cooling a circulating fluid that is subject to intermittent intense heating. The system would be both flexible and redundant in that it could operate in a basic passive mode, either sequentially or simultaneously with operation of a first, active cooling subsystem, and either sequentially or simultaneously with a second cooling subsystem that could be active, passive, or a combination of both. This flexibility and redundancy, in combination with the passive nature of at least one of the modes of operation, would make the system more reliable, relative to a conventional cooling system. The system would include a tube-in-shell heat exchanger, within which the space between the tubes would be filled with a phase-change material (PCM). The circulating hot fluid would flow along the tubes in the heat exchanger. In the basic passive mode of operation, heat would be conducted from the hot fluid into the PCM, wherein the heat would be stored temporarily by virtue of the phase change.

  19. Cooled baffle system for spaceborne infrared telescopes.

    PubMed

    Bock, J J; Lange, A E; Matsuhara, H; Matsumoto, T; Onaka, T; Sato, S

    1995-05-01

    We report the design and testing of a compact system of baffles for cooled infrared telescopes. The baffle system consists of a reflecting forebaffle and a black aftbaffle and provides a high level of rejection of emission from off-axis sources. The forebaffle reflects radiation incident at angles greater than 40° off axis out of the telescope, thereby reducing the aperture heat load. The black aftbaffle absorbs radiation scattered or diffracted by the forebaffle, as well as radiation from sources within 40° off axis. We describe ground-based measurements at λ = 0.9 µm of the baffle system at ambient temperature and rocketborne measurements at far-infrared wavelengths of the baffle system at ~3 K. The effective emissivity of the cooled forebaffle was measured to be 7 × 10(-3). The system has been successfully used in rocketborne measurements of the diffuse infrared background and will be used in the Infrared Telescope in Space. PMID:21037777

  20. Cooling system for a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Ian David; Salamah, Samir Armando; Bylina, Noel Jacob

    2003-01-01

    A plurality of arcuate circumferentially spaced supply and return manifold segments are arranged on the rim of a rotor for respectively receiving and distributing cooling steam through exit ports for distribution to first and second-stage buckets and receiving spent cooling steam from the first and second-stage buckets through inlet ports for transmission to axially extending return passages. Each of the supply and return manifold segments has a retention system for precluding substantial axial, radial and circumferential displacement relative to the rotor. The segments also include guide vanes for minimizing pressure losses in the supply and return of the cooling steam. The segments lie substantially equal distances from the centerline of the rotor and crossover tubes extend through each of the segments for communicating steam between the axially adjacent buckets of the first and second stages, respectively.

  1. Method of fabricating a cooled electronic system

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Gaynes, Michael A; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Schultz, Mark D; Simco, Daniel P; Steinke, Mark E

    2014-02-11

    A method of fabricating a liquid-cooled electronic system is provided which includes an electronic assembly having an electronics card and a socket with a latch at one end. The latch facilitates securing of the card within the socket. The method includes providing a liquid-cooled cold rail at the one end of the socket, and a thermal spreader to couple the electronics card to the cold rail. The thermal spreader includes first and second thermal transfer plates coupled to first and second surfaces on opposite sides of the card, and thermally conductive extensions extending from end edges of the plates, which couple the respective transfer plates to the liquid-cooled cold rail. The extensions are disposed to the sides of the latch, and the card is securable within or removable from the socket using the latch without removing the cold rail or the thermal spreader.

  2. A shortcut for designing evaporators

    SciTech Connect

    Durand, M.I.A.A.

    1996-01-01

    Multiple-effect evaporation is commonly used in chemical process plants to minimize energy consumption and cooling water. In this system, several evaporators are connected by piping so that vapor passes from one effect to the next in series. Thus, the heat supplied to the first evaporator is used to vaporize water in the first effect; this vapor, in turn, passes to the next effect, until, finally, the heat in the vapor supplied to the last effect passes on to the condenser. The net result of this arrangement is the multiple reuse of heat, and a marked increase in the economic of the evaporation system. In addition to savings in steam use, there is also a saving in condenser cooling water as the number of effects increases. On the other hand, an increase in the number of effects represents an increase in capital costs since more heat transfer area is required in the evaporator system. Thus, the choice of the proper--that is, optimum--number of effects is dictated by an economic balance between the savings in steam and cooling water versus that of the additional investment costs. The paper describes the basic equations and an economic analysis of evaporator systems, and illustrates the method with an example.

  3. Development and test of a cryogenic pulsating heat pipe and a pre-cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Fabien; Gully, Philippe; Nikolayev, Vadim

    2012-06-01

    The needs of thermal links in cryogenic applications are increasing, especially because of the use of cryocoolers which offer a reduced size cold finger. The Pulsating Heat Pipe (PHP) is a passive two-phase high performance thermal link. Like the conventional heat pipe, it features a closed tube filled with a two-phase fluid able to transfer heat from its hot part (evaporator) to the cold part (condenser). A general problem for any two-phase cryogenic thermal link is the pre-cooling of the evaporator to ensure the presence of liquid inside the evaporator to start the flow motion. In conventional heat pipes, this problem is by passed by the wick but in the case of PHPs it has to be specially addressed. We have designed, manufactured and tested a helium PHP associated to a novel pre-cooling system. The cool down time of the PHP evaporator is reduced significantly. The maximum transferred power of the PHP is 145 mW with a cold source at 4.2 K.

  4. Method for passive cooling liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors, and system thereof

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Busboom, Herbert J.

    1991-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel.

  5. Narcissus analysis for cooled staring IR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Feng-Yun; Cui, Ji-Cheng; Feng, Shu-Long; Zhang, Xin

    2007-12-01

    Narcissus can have a deleterious effect on image quality for cooled infrared imaging systems. Therefore, analysis of narcissus is important for designing both scanning and staring optics. Narcissus is generally assumed to be negligible in staring IR optical designs because the shading effects can be removed by calibration of the detector array data. However, the calibration usually decreases sensitiveness of the system and Narcissus variation may be noticeable for sensors when the conditions changes as follows: 1. warming and cooling the optical housing, 2. zooming optical elements, 3. movement of lenses for focus. In that case, it will result in shading and other image defects even after calibration. To minimize these effects, narcissus should be assessed and controlled during the design of staring array IR system. We provided a direct and fast method for analyzing the narcissus variation in the presence of software such as LightTools, TracePro and ASAP, and proposed the principles in optical design of staring IR systems to reduce narcissus. A cooled staring IR system with serious narcissus was estimated and reoptimized. Narcissus analysis of this IR system confirmed the efficiency of the analysis method.

  6. Technical Evaluation of Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers

    SciTech Connect

    2012-10-01

    Cooling towers are an integral component of many refrigeration systems, providing comfort or process cooling across a broad range of applications. Cooling towers represent the point in a cooling system where heat is dissipated to the atmosphere through evaporation. Cooling towers are commonly used in industrial applications and in large commercial buildings to release waste heat extracted from a process or building system through evaporation of water.

  7. POOL WATER TREATMENT AND COOLING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect

    V. King

    2000-06-19

    The Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System is located in the Waste Handling Building (WHB), and is comprised of various process subsystems designed to support waste handling operations. This system maintains the pool water temperature within an acceptable range, maintains water quality standards that support remote underwater operations and prevent corrosion, detects leakage from the pool liner, provides the capability to remove debris from the pool, controls the pool water level, and helps limit radiological exposure to personnel. The pool structure and liner, pool lighting, and the fuel staging racks in the pool are not within the scope of the Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System. Pool water temperature control is accomplished by circulating the pool water through heat exchangers. Adequate circulation and mixing of the pool water is provided to prevent localized thermal hotspots in the pool. Treatment of the pool water is accomplished by a water treatment system that circulates the pool water through filters, and ion exchange units. These water treatment units remove radioactive and non-radioactive particulate and dissolved solids from the water, thereby providing the water clarity needed to conduct waste handling operations. The system also controls pool water chemistry to prevent advanced corrosion of the pool liner, pool components, and fuel assemblies. Removal of radioactivity from the pool water contributes to the project ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) goals. A leak detection system is provided to detect and alarm leaks through the pool liner. The pool level control system monitors the water level to ensure that the minimum water level required for adequate radiological shielding is maintained. Through interface with a demineralized water system, adequate makeup is provided to compensate for loss of water inventory through evaporation and waste handling operations. Interface with the Site Radiological Monitoring System provides continuous

  8. Passive-solar-cooling system concepts for small office buildings. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Whiddon, W.I.; Hart, G.K.

    1983-02-01

    This report summarizes the efforts of a small group of building design professionals and energy analysis experts to develop passive solar cooling concepts including first cost estimates for small office buildings. Two design teams were brought together at each of two workshops held in the fall of 1982. Each team included an architect, mechanical engineer, structural engineer, and energy analysis expert. This report presents the passive cooling system concepts resulting from the workshops. It summarizes the design problems, solutions and first-cost estimates relating to each technology considered, and documents the research needs identified by the participants in attempting to implement the various technologies in an actual building design. Each design problem presented at the workshops was based on the reference (base case) small office building analyzed as part of LBL's Cooling Assessment. Chapter II summarizes the thermal performance, physical specifications and estimated first-costs of the base case design developed for this work. Chapters III - VI describe the passive cooling system concepts developed for each technology: beam daylighting; mass with night ventilation; evaporative cooling; and integrated passive cooling systems. The final Chapters, VII and VIII present the preliminary implications for economics of passive cooling technologies (based on review of the design concepts) and recommendations of workshop participants for future research in passive cooling for commercial buildings. Appendices provide backup information on each chapter as indicated.

  9. Personal cooling systems: Possibilities and limitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunneley, Sarah A.

    1994-01-01

    Personal thermal control by means of gas- or liquid-conditioned garments was developed during the 1960s and has been applied in a variety of aerospace and industrial settings. Both USAF fighter pilots and astronauts are required to wear heavy protective clothing which insulates them from the environment and thus creates stress through storage of metabolic heat. The problem is particularly severe in astronauts who perform heavy physical work during extra-vehicular activity (EVA); without artificial cooling they could reach incapacitating hyperthermia in a matter of minutes. This paper reviews the factors which influence the design of personal cooling systems. An important early step is determination of acceptable heat stress level, taking into account possible interactions of heat stress with other physiological problems such as motion sickness, diminished plasma volume, decompression sickness and acceleration tolerance. Other factors which require consideration include the work schedule, the area to be covered by the cooling garment, and the practicalities of a fixed or body-mounted heat sink and its power source. Nearly every imaginable heat sink has been proposed or tried over the past 30 years, including direct gas systems, phase-change systems with open or closed loops and thermoelectric heat sinks. The latter are now the system of choice for aircraft.

  10. 1998 242-A interim evaporator tank system integrity assessment plan

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, C.E.

    1998-03-31

    Portions of the 242-A Evaporator on the Hanford Site must be assessed to meet the requirements of the Washington State Department of Ecology`s Dangerous Waste Regulation, Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. The assessment is limited to the provisions of Section 173-303-640. This Integrity Assessment Plan (IAP) identifies tasks which will be performed during the assessment phase and describes the intended assessment techniques. The 242-A Evaporator facility processes waste solutions from most of the operating laboratories and plants of the Hanford Site. The waste solutions are concentrated in the evaporator to a slurry of liquid and crystallized salts. This concentrated slurry is returned to the Tank Farms at a significantly reduce volume. The water vapor from the evaporation process is condensed, filtered, and can be pumped through an ion exchange bed before transfer to a retention basin. The non-condensable portion of the vapor is filtered and continuously monitored before venting to the atmosphere. The 242-A Evaporator will be assessed as seven subsystems. Four of the subsystems store, transport or treat Washington State Dangerous wastes, the other three subsystems are integral parts of the process, however, they do not directly store, transfer, or treat listed dangerous wastes. The facility will be inspected, tested, and analyzed through this assessment. The seven subsystems, defined in detail in Appendix B, are: Evaporator Process and Slurry Subsystem; Vapor Condenser Subsystem; Vessel Vent Subsystem; Process Condensate Subsystem; Steam Condensate Subsystem; Raw Water Disposal Subsystem; and Building and Secondary Containment Subsystem.

  11. Cooling system for high speed aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawing, P. L.; Pagel, L. L. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    The system eliminates the necessity of shielding an aircraft airframe constructed of material such as aluminum. Cooling is accomplished by passing a coolant through the aircraft airframe, the coolant acting as a carrier to remove heat from the airframe. The coolant is circulated through a heat pump and a heat exchanger which together extract essentially all of the added heat from the coolant. The heat is transferred to the aircraft fuel system via the heat exchanger and the heat pump. The heat extracted from the coolant is utilized to power the heat pump. The heat pump has associated therewith power turbine mechanism which is also driven by the extracted heat. The power turbines are utilized to drive various aircraft subsystems, the compressor of the heat pump, and provide engine cooling.

  12. Modeling of vapor transport of electron beam evaporation based coating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Namita; Tak, Atul; Khabade, Yashodhan; Suryawanshi, V. B.; Das, A. K.

    2012-06-01

    The modeling of vapor transport of an electron beam evaporation based coating system has been carried out in this work. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling has been tailored to analyze the evaporation and deposition of titanium material. Based on the physical model, the model relates the output power of the electron gun and the temperature profile on the evaporant surface. The simulated vapor distribution helps in predicting the coating thickness. The experimental results presented here agree with the simulation results.

  13. Estimating daily pan evaporation using adaptive neural-based fuzzy inference system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keskin, M. Erol; Terzi, Özlem; Taylan, Dilek

    2009-09-01

    Estimation of evaporation is important for water planning, management, and hydrological practices. There are many available methods to estimate evaporation from a water surface, comprising both direct and indirect methods. All the evaporation models are based on crisp conceptions with no uncertainty element coupled into the model structure although in daily evaporation variations there are uncontrollable effects to a certain extent. The probabilistic, statistical, and stochastic approaches require large amounts of data for the modeling purposes and therefore are not practical in local evaporation studies. It is therefore necessary to adopt a better approach for evaporation modeling, which is the fuzzy sets and adaptive neural-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) as used in this paper. ANFIS and fuzzy sets have been evaluated for its applicability to estimate evaporation from meteorological data which is including air and water temperatures, solar radiation, and air pressure obtained from Automated GroWheather meteorological station located near Lake Eğirdir and daily pan evaporation values measured by XVIII. District Directorate of State Hydraulic Works. Results of ANFIS and fuzzy logic approaches were analyzed and compared with measured daily pan evaporation values. ANFIS approach could be employed more successfully in modeling the evaporation process than fuzzy sets.

  14. Preliminary design package for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Summarized preliminary design information on activities associated with the development, delivery and support of solar heating and cooling systems is given. These systems are for single family dwellings and commercial applications. The heating/cooling system use a reversible vapor compression heat pump that is driven in the cooling mode by a Rankine power loop, and in the heating mode by a variable speed electric motor. The heating/cooling systems differ from the heating-only systems in the arrangement of the heat pump subsystem and the addition of a cooling tower to provide the heat sink for cooling mode operation.

  15. Advanced solar/gas desiccant cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huskey, B.; Sharp, J.; Venero, A.; Yen, M.

    1982-02-01

    A desiccant cooling system with significantly higher thermal efficiency than current state of the art desiccant systems is studied. The findings and data are based on extensive computer modeling and actual operating test results of an experimental breadboard unit employing an approach developed for the separation of moisture from an airstream using solid desiccants (silica gel). The results confirmed the theoretical concept of efficiency improvement over desiccant concepts and validated the computer model used for sizing and simulating the desiccant process. The results also identified specific components and areas of the system needing improvements such as air seals, wheel drive mechanisms, air distribution and materials.

  16. Low pressure cooling seal system for a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Marra, John J

    2014-04-01

    A low pressure cooling system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids at low pressure, such as at ambient pressure, through at least one cooling fluid supply channel and into a cooling fluid mixing chamber positioned immediately downstream from a row of turbine blades extending radially outward from a rotor assembly to prevent ingestion of hot gases into internal aspects of the rotor assembly. The low pressure cooling system may also include at least one bleed channel that may extend through the rotor assembly and exhaust cooling fluids into the cooling fluid mixing chamber to seal a gap between rotational turbine blades and a downstream, stationary turbine component. Use of ambient pressure cooling fluids by the low pressure cooling system results in tremendous efficiencies by eliminating the need for pressurized cooling fluids for sealing this gap.

  17. Controlled cooling of an electronic system based on projected conditions

    DOEpatents

    David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.

    2016-05-17

    Energy efficient control of a cooling system cooling an electronic system is provided based, in part, on projected conditions. The control includes automatically determining an adjusted control setting(s) for an adjustable cooling component(s) of the cooling system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on projected power consumed by the electronic system at a future time and projected temperature at the future time of a heat sink to which heat extracted is rejected. The automatically determining operates to reduce power consumption of the cooling system and/or the electronic system while ensuring that at least one targeted temperature associated with the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range. The automatically determining may be based, at least in part, on an experimentally obtained model(s) relating the targeted temperature and power consumption of the adjustable cooling component(s) of the cooling system.

  18. Controlled cooling of an electronic system based on projected conditions

    DOEpatents

    David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.

    2015-08-18

    Energy efficient control of a cooling system cooling an electronic system is provided based, in part, on projected conditions. The control includes automatically determining an adjusted control setting(s) for an adjustable cooling component(s) of the cooling system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on projected power consumed by the electronic system at a future time and projected temperature at the future time of a heat sink to which heat extracted is rejected. The automatically determining operates to reduce power consumption of the cooling system and/or the electronic system while ensuring that at least one targeted temperature associated with the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range. The automatically determining may be based, at least in part, on an experimentally obtained model(s) relating the targeted temperature and power consumption of the adjustable cooling component(s) of the cooling system.

  19. Thermodynamic Modeling of the SRS Evaporators: Part II. The 3H System

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    2001-10-02

    Accumulations of two solid phases have formed scale deposits in the Savannah River Site 2H Evaporator system since late 1996. The aluminosilicate scale deposits caused the evaporator pot to become inoperable in October 1999. Accumulations of the diuranate phase have caused criticality concerns in the SRS 2H Evaporator. In order to ensure that similar deposits are not and will not form in the SRS 3H Evaporator, thermodynamically derived activity diagrams specific to the feeds processed from Tanks 30 and 32 are evaluated in this report.

  20. Survey and Alignment of the Fermilab Electron Cooling System

    SciTech Connect

    Oshinowo, Babatunde O'Sheg; Leibfritz, Jerry

    2006-09-01

    The goal of achieving the Tevatron luminosity of 3 x 10{sup 32} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} requires Electron Cooling in the Recycler Ring to provide an increased flux of antiprotons. The Fermilab Electron Cooling system has been designed to assist accumulation of antiprotons for the Tevatron collider operations. The installation along with the survey and alignment of the Electron Cooling system in the Recycler Ring were completed in November 2004. The Electron Cooling system was fully commissioned in May 2005 and the first cooling of antiprotons was achieved in July 2005. This paper discusses the alignment methodology employed to survey and align the Electron Cooling system.

  1. OPTIMIZATION OF DESIGN SPECIFICATIONS FOR LARGE DRY COOLING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents a methodology for optimizing design specifications of large, mechanical-draft, dry cooling systems. A multivariate, nonlinear, constrained optimization technique searches for the combination of design variables to determine the cooling system with the lowest a...

  2. A fuselage/tank structure study for actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles: Active cooling system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of fuselage cross section and structural arrangement on the performance of actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles are investigated. An active cooling system which maintains the aircraft's entire surface area at temperatures below 394 K at Mach 6 is developed along with a hydrogen fuel tankage thermal protection system. Thermodynamic characteristics of the actively cooled thermal protection systems established are summarized. Design heat loads and coolant flowrate requirements are defined for each major structural section and for the total system. Cooling system weights are summarized at the major component level. Conclusions and recommendations are included.

  3. Control methods and systems for indirect evaporative coolers

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Jason; Kozubal, Erik

    2015-09-22

    A control method for operating an indirect evaporative cooler to control temperature and humidity. The method includes operating an airflow control device to provide supply air at a flow rate to a liquid desiccant dehumidifier. The supply air flows through the dehumidifier and an indirect evaporative cooler prior to exiting an outlet into a space. The method includes operating a pump to provide liquid desiccant to the liquid desiccant dehumidifier and sensing a temperature of an airstream at the outlet of the indirect evaporative cooler. The method includes comparing the temperature of the airstream at the outlet to a setpoint temperature at the outlet and controlling the pump to set the flow rate of the liquid desiccant. The method includes sensing space temperature, comparing the space temperature with a setpoint temperature, and controlling the airflow control device to set the flow rate of the supply air based on the comparison.

  4. 40 CFR 89.329 - Engine cooling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine cooling system. 89.329 Section...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 89.329 Engine cooling system. An engine cooling system is required with sufficient capacity...

  5. 40 CFR 90.307 - Engine cooling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine cooling system. 90.307 Section...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.307 Engine cooling system. An engine cooling system is required with sufficient capacity...

  6. 40 CFR 89.329 - Engine cooling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine cooling system. 89.329 Section...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 89.329 Engine cooling system. An engine cooling system is required with sufficient capacity...

  7. 40 CFR 89.329 - Engine cooling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine cooling system. 89.329 Section...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 89.329 Engine cooling system. An engine cooling system is required with sufficient capacity...

  8. 40 CFR 90.307 - Engine cooling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine cooling system. 90.307 Section...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.307 Engine cooling system. An engine cooling system is required with sufficient capacity...

  9. 40 CFR 91.307 - Engine cooling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine cooling system. 91.307 Section...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 91.307 Engine cooling system. An engine cooling system is required with sufficient capacity to maintain the engine...

  10. 40 CFR 91.307 - Engine cooling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine cooling system. 91.307 Section...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 91.307 Engine cooling system. An engine cooling system is required with sufficient capacity to maintain the engine...

  11. 40 CFR 90.307 - Engine cooling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine cooling system. 90.307 Section...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.307 Engine cooling system. An engine cooling system is required with sufficient capacity...

  12. 40 CFR 89.329 - Engine cooling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine cooling system. 89.329 Section...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 89.329 Engine cooling system. An engine cooling system is required with sufficient capacity...

  13. 40 CFR 90.307 - Engine cooling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine cooling system. 90.307 Section...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.307 Engine cooling system. An engine cooling system is required with sufficient capacity...

  14. 40 CFR 91.307 - Engine cooling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine cooling system. 91.307 Section...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 91.307 Engine cooling system. An engine cooling system is required with sufficient capacity to maintain the engine...

  15. 40 CFR 91.307 - Engine cooling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine cooling system. 91.307 Section...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 91.307 Engine cooling system. An engine cooling system is required with sufficient capacity to maintain the engine...

  16. 40 CFR 89.329 - Engine cooling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine cooling system. 89.329 Section...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 89.329 Engine cooling system. An engine cooling system is required with sufficient capacity...

  17. 40 CFR 91.307 - Engine cooling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine cooling system. 91.307 Section...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 91.307 Engine cooling system. An engine cooling system is required with sufficient capacity to maintain the engine...

  18. 40 CFR 90.307 - Engine cooling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine cooling system. 90.307 Section...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.307 Engine cooling system. An engine cooling system is required with sufficient capacity...

  19. A passive cooling system of residential and commercial buildings in summer or hot season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Mashud, M.; Chu, C. M.; Misaran, M. S. bin; Sarker, M.; Kumaresen, S.

    2015-12-01

    The increasing number of high rise buildings may contribute to lack of natural ventilation in modern buildings. Generally, fans and air conditioning are used in the modern building for cooling and air ventilation. Most of the energy in tropical regions are consumed by heating, cooling and ventilation appliances. Therefore, solar power appliances for cooling, heating and ventilation will be a suitable option for saving energy from the household sector. A modified-structure building is designed and constructed with solar chimney to enhance ventilation rate that increases cooling performance and ensure thermal comfort. An evaporative cooler is introduced with a newly designed room to enhance the temperature reduction capacity. The room temperature is compared with a non-modified room as well as with ambient temperature. The results show that passive cooling system with evaporative cooler was able to reduce temperature by 5°C compared to the ambient temperature and about 2°C to 3°C below the reference room temperature.

  20. Analysis of Radiant Cooling System Configurations Integrated with Cooling Tower for Different Indian Climatic Zones

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, Jyotirmay; Bhandari, Mahabir S; Jain, Robin; Srivastava, Prateek

    2016-01-01

    Radiant cooling system has proven to be a low energy consumption system for building cooling needs. This study describes the use of cooling tower in radiant cooling system to improve the overall system efficiency. A comprehensive simulation feasibility study of the application of cooling tower in radiant cooling system was performed for the fifteen cities in different climatic zones of India. It was found that in summer, the wet bulb temperature (WBT) of the different climatic zones except warm-humid is suitable for the integration of cooling tower with radiant cooling system. In these climates, cooling tower can provide on average 24 C to 27 C water In order to achieve the energy saving potential, three different configurations of radiant cooling system have been compared in terms of energy consumption. The different configurations of the radiant cooling system integrated with cooling tower are: (1) provide chilled water to the floor, wall and ceiling mounted tubular installation. (2) provide chilled water to the wall and ceiling mounted tabular installation. In this arrangement a separate chiller has also been used to provide chilled water at 16 C to the floor mounted tubular installation. (3) provide chilled water to the wall mounted tabular installation and a separate chiller is used to provide chilled water at 16 C to the floor and ceiling mounted tabular installation. A dedicated outdoor air system is also coupled for dehumidification and ventilation in all three configurations. A conventional all-air system was simulated as a baseline to compare these configurations for assessing the energy saving potential.

  1. Forced-Flow Evaporative Cooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Wilbert E.; Niggemann, Richard E.

    1987-01-01

    Evaporative cooler absorbs heat efficiently under unusual gravitational conditions by using centrifugal force and vapor vortexes to maintain good thermal contact between heat-transfer surface and vaporizable coolant. System useful for cooling electronic or other equipment under low gravity encountered in spacecraft or under multiple-gravity conditions frequently experienced in high-performance airplanes.

  2. Membrane evaporator/sublimator investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, J.; Ruder, J.; Strumpf, H.

    1974-01-01

    Data are presented on a new evaporator/sublimator concept using a hollow fiber membrane unit with a high permeability to liquid water. The aim of the program was to obtain a more reliable, lightweight and simpler Extra Vehicular Life Support System (EVLSS) cooling concept than is currently being used.

  3. Evaporation in space manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    'Normal evaporation' equations for predicting the compositional changes with time and temperature have been developed and correlated with actual experimental data. An evaporative congruent temperature is defined and used to explain, predict, or plan space experiments on anomalous constitutional melting (on cooling) or solidification (on heating). Uneven evaporation causes reactive jetting forces capable of initiating new convection currents, nongravitational accelerations, surface vibrations, or other disturbances. Applications of evaporation to space manufacturing are described concerning evaporative purification, surface cooling, specimen selection, particles splitting, freezing data interpretation, material loss and dimensional control, and surface contamination or compositional changes.

  4. Polk power station syngas cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, S.D.

    1995-01-01

    Tampa Electric Company (TEC) is in the site development and construction phase of the new Polk Power Station Unit No. 1. This will be the first unit at a new site and will use Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Technology. The unit will utilize Texaco`s oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasification, along with combined cycle power generation, to produce nominal 260MW. Integral to the gasification process is the syngas cooling system. The design, integration, fabrication, transportation, and erection of this equipment have provided and continue to provide major challenges for this project.

  5. Electromechanically cooled germanium radiation detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavietes, Anthony D.; Joseph Mauger, G.; Anderson, Eric H.

    1999-02-01

    We have successfully developed and fielded an electromechanically cooled germanium radiation detector (EMC-HPGe) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This detector system was designed to provide optimum energy resolution, long lifetime, and extremely reliable operation for unattended and portable applications. For most analytical applications, high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors are the standard detectors of choice, providing an unsurpassed combination of high energy resolution performance and exceptional detection efficiency. Logistical difficulties associated with providing the required liquid nitrogen (LN) for cooling is the primary reason that these systems are found mainly in laboratories. The EMC-HPGe detector system described in this paper successfully provides HPGe detector performance in a portable instrument that allows for isotopic analysis in the field. It incorporates a unique active vibration control system that allows the use of a Sunpower Stirling cycle cryocooler unit without significant spectral degradation from microphonics. All standard isotopic analysis codes, including MGA and MGA++ [1], GAMANL [2], GRPANL [3]and MGAU [4], typically used with HPGe detectors can be used with this system with excellent results. Several national and international Safeguards organisations including the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have expressed interest in this system. The detector was combined with custom software and demonstrated as a rapid Field Radiometric Identification System (FRIS) for the U.S. Customs Service [5]. The European Communities' Safeguards Directorate (EURATOM) is field-testing the first Safeguards prototype in their applications. The EMC-HPGe detector system design, recent applications, and results will be highlighted.

  6. Solar heating and cooling system design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The development of eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems is reported. Manufacture, test, installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and monitoring the operation of prototype systems is included. Heating and cooling equipment for single family residential and commercial applications and eight operational test sites (four heating and four heating and cooling) is described.

  7. Solar heating and cooling systems design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The development and delivery of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems for installation and operational test was reported. Two heating and six heating and cooling units will be delivered for single family residences, multiple family residences and commercial applications.

  8. Apparatus and method for evaporator defrosting

    DOEpatents

    Mei, Viung C.; Chen, Fang C.; Domitrovic, Ronald E.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method for warm-liquid defrosting of the evaporator of a refrigeration system. The apparatus includes a first refrigerant expansion device that selectively expands refrigerant for cooling the evaporator, a second refrigerant expansion device that selectively expands the refrigerant after the refrigerant has passed through the evaporator, and a defrosting control for the first refrigerant expansion device and second refrigerant expansion device to selectively defrost the evaporator by causing warm refrigerant to flow through the evaporator. The apparatus is alternately embodied with a first refrigerant bypass and/or a second refrigerant bypass for selectively directing refrigerant to respectively bypass the first refrigerant expansion device and the second refrigerant expansion device, and with the defrosting control connected to the first refrigerant bypass and/or the second refrigerant bypass to selectively activate and deactivate the bypasses depending upon the current cycle of the refrigeration system. The apparatus alternately includes an accumulator for accumulating liquid and/or gaseous refrigerant that is then pumped either to a refrigerant receiver or the first refrigerant expansion device for enhanced evaporator defrosting capability. The inventive method of defrosting an evaporator in a refrigeration system includes the steps of compressing refrigerant in a compressor and cooling the refrigerant in the condenser such that the refrigerant is substantially in liquid form, passing the refrigerant substantially in liquid form through the evaporator, and expanding the refrigerant with a refrigerant expansion device after the refrigerant substantially passes through the evaporator.

  9. Integrated exhaust gas recirculation and charge cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ko-Jen

    2013-12-10

    An intake system for an internal combustion engine comprises an exhaust driven turbocharger configured to deliver compressed intake charge, comprising exhaust gas from the exhaust system and ambient air, through an intake charge conduit and to cylinders of the internal combustion engine. An intake charge cooler is in fluid communication with the intake charge conduit. A cooling system, independent of the cooling system for the internal combustion engine, is in fluid communication with the intake charge cooler through a cooling system conduit. A coolant pump delivers a low temperature cooling medium from the cooling system to and through the intake charge cooler for the transfer of heat from the compressed intake charge thereto. A low temperature cooler receives the heated cooling medium through the cooling system conduit for the transfer or heat therefrom.

  10. The impact of surface chemistry on the performance of localized solar-driven evaporation system

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shengtao; Zhang, Yao; Duan, Haoze; Liu, Yanming; Quan, Xiaojun; Tao, Peng; Shang, Wen; Wu, Jianbo; Song, Chengyi; Deng, Tao

    2015-01-01

    This report investigates the influence of surface chemistry (or wettability) on the evaporation performance of free-standing double-layered thin film on the surface of water. Such newly developed evaporation system is composed of top plasmonic light-to-heat conversion layer and bottom porous supporting layer. Under solar light illumination, the induced plasmonic heat will be localized within the film. By modulating the wettability of such evaporation system through the control of surface chemistry, the evaporation rates are differentiated between hydrophilized and hydrophobized anodic aluminum oxide membrane-based double layered thin films. Additionally, this work demonstrated that the evaporation rate mainly depends on the wettability of bottom supporting layer rather than that of top light-to-heat conversion layer. The findings in this study not only elucidate the role of surface chemistry of each layer of such double-layered evaporation system, but also provide additional design guidelines for such localized evaporation system in applications including desalination, distillation and power generation. PMID:26337561

  11. The impact of surface chemistry on the performance of localized solar-driven evaporation system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shengtao; Zhang, Yao; Duan, Haoze; Liu, Yanming; Quan, Xiaojun; Tao, Peng; Shang, Wen; Wu, Jianbo; Song, Chengyi; Deng, Tao

    2015-01-01

    This report investigates the influence of surface chemistry (or wettability) on the evaporation performance of free-standing double-layered thin film on the surface of water. Such newly developed evaporation system is composed of top plasmonic light-to-heat conversion layer and bottom porous supporting layer. Under solar light illumination, the induced plasmonic heat will be localized within the film. By modulating the wettability of such evaporation system through the control of surface chemistry, the evaporation rates are differentiated between hydrophilized and hydrophobized anodic aluminum oxide membrane-based double layered thin films. Additionally, this work demonstrated that the evaporation rate mainly depends on the wettability of bottom supporting layer rather than that of top light-to-heat conversion layer. The findings in this study not only elucidate the role of surface chemistry of each layer of such double-layered evaporation system, but also provide additional design guidelines for such localized evaporation system in applications including desalination, distillation and power generation. PMID:26337561

  12. The impact of surface chemistry on the performance of localized solar-driven evaporation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shengtao; Zhang, Yao; Duan, Haoze; Liu, Yanming; Quan, Xiaojun; Tao, Peng; Shang, Wen; Wu, Jianbo; Song, Chengyi; Deng, Tao

    2015-09-01

    This report investigates the influence of surface chemistry (or wettability) on the evaporation performance of free-standing double-layered thin film on the surface of water. Such newly developed evaporation system is composed of top plasmonic light-to-heat conversion layer and bottom porous supporting layer. Under solar light illumination, the induced plasmonic heat will be localized within the film. By modulating the wettability of such evaporation system through the control of surface chemistry, the evaporation rates are differentiated between hydrophilized and hydrophobized anodic aluminum oxide membrane-based double layered thin films. Additionally, this work demonstrated that the evaporation rate mainly depends on the wettability of bottom supporting layer rather than that of top light-to-heat conversion layer. The findings in this study not only elucidate the role of surface chemistry of each layer of such double-layered evaporation system, but also provide additional design guidelines for such localized evaporation system in applications including desalination, distillation and power generation.

  13. Coolerado Cooler Helps to Save Cooling Energy and Dollars: New Cooling Technology Targets Peak Load Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Robichaud, R.

    2007-06-01

    This document is about a new evaporative cooling technology that can deliver cooler supply air temperatures than either direct or indirect evaporative cooling systems, without increasing humidity. The Coolerado Cooler technology can help Federal agencies reach the energy-use reduction goals of EPAct 2005, particularly in the western United States.

  14. 8-megapixel thermoelectrically cooled CCD imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diercks, Alan H.; Angione, John; Stubbs, Christopher W.; Cook, Kem H.; Bowell, Edward; Koehn, Bruce W.; Nye, Ralph A.; Dodgen, Dave

    1995-03-01

    We are developing an astronomical imaging system which employs a thermoelectrically cooled focal plane consisting of two 'edge-buttable' Loral 2048 X 2048 pixel CCDs. To allow strip scanning, the columns of the CCDs are mutually aligned on a custom Kovar mount. The clocking and bias voltage levels for each CCD are independently adjustable, but both CCDs are operated synchronously. Each chip is read out from one output and measured at 14 bits with commercially available A/D converters at a rate of 250 kpixels/s, permitting scanning across the sky at up to 1000 deg2/hr (about twenty times faster than the equatorial sidereal rate) to a limiting magnitude (S/N equals 3) near V equals 19. The instrument will be used as part of the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth-Object Search (LONEOS) using a 57-cm Schmidt telescope at Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona.

  15. Design of Transpiration Cooled Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callens, E. Eugene, Jr.; Vinet, Robert F.

    1999-01-01

    This study explored three approaches for the utilization of transpiration cooling in thermal protection systems. One model uses an impermeable wall with boiling water heat transfer at the backface (Model I). A second model uses a permeable wall with a boiling water backface and additional heat transfer to the water vapor as it flows in channels toward the exposed surface (Model II). The third model also uses a permeable wall, but maintains a boiling condition at the exposed surface of the material (Model III). The governing equations for the models were developed in non-dimensional form and a comprehensive parametric investigation of the effects of the independent variables on the important dependent variables was performed. In addition, detailed analyses were performed for selected materials to evaluate the practical limitations of the results of the parametric study.

  16. Sympathetic cooling of a membrane oscillator in a hybrid mechanical-atomic system.

    PubMed

    Jöckel, Andreas; Faber, Aline; Kampschulte, Tobias; Korppi, Maria; Rakher, Matthew T; Treutlein, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Sympathetic cooling with ultracold atoms and atomic ions enables ultralow temperatures in systems where direct laser or evaporative cooling is not possible. It has so far been limited to the cooling of other microscopic particles, with masses up to 90 times larger than that of the coolant atom. Here, we use ultracold atoms to sympathetically cool the vibrations of a Si3N4 nanomembrane, the mass of which exceeds that of the atomic ensemble by a factor of 10(10). The coupling of atomic and membrane vibrations is mediated by laser light over a macroscopic distance and is enhanced by placing the membrane in an optical cavity. We observe cooling of the membrane vibrations from room temperature to 650 ± 230 mK, exploiting the large atom-membrane cooperativity of our hybrid optomechanical system. With technical improvements, our scheme could provide ground-state cooling and quantum control of low-frequency oscillators such as nanomembranes or levitated nanoparticles, in a regime where purely optomechanical techniques cannot reach the ground state. PMID:25420032

  17. Intelligent Engine Systems: Thermal Management and Advanced Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergholz, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the Advanced Turbine Cooling and Thermal Management program is to develop intelligent control and distribution methods for turbine cooling, while achieving a reduction in total cooling flow and assuring acceptable turbine component safety and reliability. The program also will develop embedded sensor technologies and cooling system models for real-time engine diagnostics and health management. Both active and passive control strategies will be investigated that include the capability of intelligent modulation of flow quantities, pressures, and temperatures both within the supply system and at the turbine component level. Thermal management system concepts were studied, with a goal of reducing HPT blade cooling air supply temperature. An assessment will be made of the use of this air by the active clearance control system as well. Turbine component cooling designs incorporating advanced, high-effectiveness cooling features, will be evaluated. Turbine cooling flow control concepts will be studied at the cooling system level and the component level. Specific cooling features or sub-elements of an advanced HPT blade cooling design will be downselected for core fabrication and casting demonstrations.

  18. An objective method for screening and selecting personal cooling systems based on cooling properties.

    PubMed

    Elson, John; Eckels, Steve

    2015-05-01

    A method is proposed for evaluation and selection of a personal cooling system (PCS) incorporating PCS, subject, and equipment weights; PCS run time; user task time; PCS cooling power; and average metabolic rate. The cooling effectiveness method presented is derived from first principles and allows those who select PCSs for specific applications to compare systems based on their projected use. This can lower testing costs by screening for the most applicable system. Methods to predict cooling power of PCSs are presented and are compared to data taken through standard manikin testing. The cooling effectiveness ranking is presented and validated against human subject test data. The proposed method provides significant insight into the application of PCS on humans. However, the interaction a humans with a PCS is complex, especially considering the range of clothing ensembles, physiological issues, and end use scenarios, and requires additional analysis. PMID:25683529

  19. Passive cooling system for nuclear reactor containment structure

    DOEpatents

    Gou, Perng-Fei; Wade, Gentry E.

    1989-01-01

    A passive cooling system for the contaminant structure of a nuclear reactor plant providing protection against overpressure within the containment attributable to inadvertent leakage or rupture of the system components. The cooling system utilizes natural convection for transferring heat imbalances and enables the discharge of irradiation free thermal energy to the atmosphere for heat disposal from the system.

  20. Natural circulating passive cooling system for nuclear reactor containment structure

    DOEpatents

    Gou, Perng-Fei; Wade, Gentry E.

    1990-01-01

    A passive cooling system for the contaminant structure of a nuclear reactor plant providing protection against overpressure within the containment attributable to inadvertent leakage or rupture of the system components. The cooling system utilizes natural convection for transferring heat imbalances and enables the discharge of irradiation free thermal energy to the atmosphere for heat disposal from the system.

  1. Design and development of a split-evaporator heat-pump system

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, M.H.; Penoncello, S.G.

    1981-12-01

    The designs and experimental results of three types of multiple source heat pumps are presented. The three designs are the parallel evaporator, the series evaporator, and the parallel evaporator with active subcooling, with the parallel evaporator with the active subcooling showing the most promise for solving the problem of defrosting of air evaporators. Three design procedures for multiple source heat pumps were developed. One of these is a hand calculational procedure, the others are computer based. The models are based upon the refrigerant flow rate, rather than the refrigeration effect of the evaporator. The technical results of a detailed analytical and experimental model of the heat transfer rates on a flat plate ice maker are presented. It is shown, both analytically and experimentally, that the temperature of the air surrounding the flat plate ice maker can play a dominant role in the rate of ice formation. A detailed weather analysis for forty cities located throughout the nation was completed. These data were processed to allow easy computation of thermal storage requirements for full, partial, or minimum ACES systems, or upon other design requirements, such as off-peak air conditioning. The results of an innovative ice storage system that is thermally coupled to the earth are described. This system has the potential for meeting both the off-peak air conditioning needs and the thermal storage requirements for the heating cycle. An economic and energy comparison of multiple source heat pumps with ACES, and air-to-air heat pump systems is presented.

  2. Peltier cooling of fermionic quantum gases.

    PubMed

    Grenier, Ch; Georges, A; Kollath, C

    2014-11-14

    We propose a cooling scheme for fermionic quantum gases, based on the principles of the Peltier thermoelectric effect and energy filtering. The system to be cooled is connected to another harmonically trapped gas acting as a reservoir. The cooling is achieved by two simultaneous processes: (i) the system is evaporatively cooled, and (ii) cold fermions from deep below the Fermi surface of the reservoir are injected below the Fermi level of the system, in order to fill the "holes" in the energy distribution. This is achieved by a suitable energy dependence of the transmission coefficient connecting the system to the reservoir. The two processes can be viewed as simultaneous evaporative cooling of particles and holes. We show that both a significantly lower entropy per particle and faster cooling rate can be achieved in this way than by using only evaporative cooling. PMID:25432033

  3. A comparison of evaporation duct models for IREPS (Integrated Refractive Effects Prediction System)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, W.

    1984-06-01

    An evaluation of current meteorological measurement techniques to determine adequate description of the surface meteorological processes used to infer evaporation duct height includes a comparison of relative performance, sensitivities to meteorological inputs, and ease of computation for several standard evaporation duct height models. EM wave propagation pathloss models are compared and evaluated, and a maximum range of detection error is determined for the modified NOSC propagation model employed by the Integrated Refractive Effects Prediction System (IREPS).

  4. Potential of solar cooling systems for peak demand reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A A; Neymark, J

    1994-11-01

    We investigated the technical feasibility of solar cooling for peak demand reduction using a building energy simulation program (DOE2.1D). The system studied was an absorption cooling system with a thermal coefficient of performance of 0.8 driven by a solar collector system with an efficiency of 50% with no thermal storage. The analysis for three different climates showed that, on the day with peak cooling load, about 17% of the peak load could be met satisfactorily with the solar-assisted cooling system without any thermal storage. A performance availability analysis indicated that the solar cooling system should be designed for lower amounts of available solar resources that coincide with the hours during which peak demand reduction is required. The analysis indicated that in dry climates, direct-normal concentrating collectors work well for solar cooling; however, in humid climates, collectors that absorb diffuse radiation work better.

  5. Solar heating and cooling system design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The progress made in the manufacture, test, evaluation, installation, problem resolution, performance evaluation, and development of eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems is described.

  6. Prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems are being developed. The effort includes development, manufacture, test, installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation.

  7. Prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems are considered. This effort includes development, manufacture, test, installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation.

  8. Solar space heating and cooling by selective use of the components of a desiccant cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbud, Ihsan Aladdin

    The economic advantages of by-passing various components of a desiccant cooling system under conditions not requiring their use are estimated by evaluating the annual costs of heating and cooling a commercial building in three representative U.S. cities. Life-cycle costs of systems employing solar heat for space heating and desiccant regeneration are compared with those using electric heat. The costs of purchasing and operating heating and desiccant cooling systems, with and without solar heat supply, are compared with those employing conventional heating and vapor compression cooling. The conditions under which commercial buildings can be cooled with desiccant systems at costs competitive with conventional systems are identified. A commercially available vapor compression air conditioner is used as a standard of comparison for energy consumption and room comfort. Heating and cooling requirements of the building are determined by use of the BLAST computer model in a simulation of long term system operation. Performance of the desiccant cooling system and life cycle savings obtained by its use are determined by simulation employing the TRNSYS computer model. TRNSYS compatible subroutines are developed to simulate operation of the desiccant equipment, the building, and the controllers that operate and monitor the system components. The results are presented in tabular and graphical form. This study shows that in the widely different climates represented in Los Angeles, New York, and Miami, by-passing various components in the desiccant cooling system when they are not needed is economically advantageous. Operation cost of the complete system decreased by 47.3% in Los Angeles, by 30.9% in New York City, and by 23.9% in Miami by not operating the desiccant wheel and other elements. The ventilation desiccant cooling system has major economic advantage over conventional systems under conditions of moderate humidity, as in Los Angeles and New York City. In Miami, however

  9. Debris trap in a turbine cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Ian David

    2002-01-01

    In a turbine having a rotor and a plurality of stages, each stage comprising a row of buckets mounted on the rotor for rotation therewith; and wherein the buckets of at least one of the stages are cooled by steam, the improvement comprising at least one axially extending cooling steam supply conduit communicating with an at least partially annular steam supply manifold; one or more axially extending cooling steam feed tubes connected to the manifold at a location radially outwardly of the cooling steam supply conduit, the feed tubes arranged to supply cooling steam to the buckets of at least one of the plurality of stages; the manifold extending radially beyond the feed tubes to thereby create a debris trap region for collecting debris under centrifugal loading caused by rotation of the rotor.

  10. Study of the Thermosyphon Cooling System with a Vessel in the Sea States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Kota; Sato, Ryo; Miki, Motohiro; Yamagata, Kotohiro; Ikeda, Tatsuya; Izumi, Mitsuru; Murase, Youhei; Umemoto, Katsuya; Yokoyama, Minoru

    Thermosyphon cooling by using neon gas has been studied at temperatures between 25 K and 40 K, since it provides advantage of large capacity of heat transport, less complicated and compact construction. This cooling system seems to suitable for a variety of on-board mechanical system with superconductors such as rotating machines. However, it is necessary to clarify the effect of both pitching and rolling motions on thermosyphon. They are temperature stability and the maximum thermal load to maintain the target temperature. In this study, we introduced the thermosyphon cooling system into the research vessel "Shioji-maru", a 425 ton vessel and studied its working properties. We focus on the heat load capability, which is applied to the evaporator, under the influence of the pitching and rolling of the vessel. The incremental or single step-wise heat load was systematically applied to study the effect of the neon quantity on the cooling performance at sea states. The on-board testing results for cooling with the thermosyphon are comparatively discussed with those obtained on the ground. The finite pitching and rolling of the ship considerably encouraged the heat exchange. The obtained result is caused by enhanced thermal exchange on the effective surface area originating from the ship motions.

  11. Avian thermoregulation in the heat: scaling of heat tolerance and evaporative cooling capacity in three southern African arid-zone passerines.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Maxine C; Smit, Ben; McKechnie, Andrew E; Wolf, Blair O

    2015-06-01

    Many birds can defend body temperature (Tb) far below air temperature (Ta) during acute heat exposure, but relatively little is known about how avian heat tolerance and evaporative cooling capacity varies with body mass (Mb), phylogeny or ecological factors. We determined maximum rates of evaporative heat dissipation and thermal end points (Tb and Ta associated with thermoregulatory failure) in three southern African ploceid passerines, the scaly-feathered weaver (Sporopipes squamifrons, Mb≈10 g), sociable weaver (Philetairus socius, Mb≈25 g) and white-browed sparrow-weaver (Plocepasser mahali, Mb≈40 g). Birds were exposed to a ramped profile of progressively increasing Ta, with continuous monitoring of behaviour and Tb used to identify the onset of severe hyperthermia. The maximum Ta birds tolerated ranged from 48°C to 54°C, and was positively related to Mb. Values of Tb associated with severe heat stress were in the range of 44 to 45°C. Rates of evaporative water loss (EWL) increased rapidly when Ta exceeded Tb, and maximum evaporative heat dissipation was equivalent to 141-222% of metabolic heat production. Fractional increases in EWL between Ta<40°C and the highest Ta reached by each species were 10.8 (S. squamifrons), 18.4 (P. socius) and 16.0 (P. mahali). Resting metabolic rates increased more gradually with Ta than expected, probably reflecting the very low chamber humidity values we maintained. Our data suggest that, within a taxon, larger species can tolerate higher Ta during acute heat stress. PMID:26041032

  12. Nuclear reactor cooling system decontamination reagent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Anstine, Larry D.; James, Dean B.; Melaika, Edward A.; Peterson, Jr., John P.

    1985-01-01

    An improved method for decontaminating the coolant system of water-cooled nuclear power reactors and for regenerating the decontamination solution. A small amount of one or more weak-acid organic complexing agents is added to the reactor coolant, and the pH is adjusted to form a decontamination solution which is circulated throughout the coolant system to dissolve metal oxides from the interior surfaces and complex the resulting metal ions and radionuclide ions. The coolant containing the complexed metal ions and radionuclide ions is passed through a strong-base anion exchange resin bed which has been presaturated with a solution containing the complexing agents in the same ratio and having the same pH as the decontamination solution. As the decontamination solution passes through the resin bed, metal-complexed anions are exchanged for the metal-ion-free anions on the bed, while metal-ion-free anions in the solution pass through the bed, thus removing the metal ions and regenerating the decontamination solution.

  13. Heat Transfer Analysis of an Engine Exhaust-Based Thermoelectric Evaporation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Tan, Gangfeng; Guo, Xuexun; Deng, Yadong; Zhang, Hongguang; Yang, Kai

    2016-03-01

    Engine exhaust can be used by thermoelectric generators for improving thermal efficiency of internal combustion engines. In his paper, the performance of a thermoelectric evaporation system is investigated. First, the thermal characteristics of diesel engines are obtained according to the experiment data. Then, mathematical models are created based on the specified conditions of the coolant cycle and the evaporator geometric parameters. Finally, the heat transfer characteristics and power performance of the thermoelectric evaporation system are estimated, and a comparison with the system in which the heat exchanger operates with all-liquid coolant is investigated. The results show that the overall heat transfer rate of the thermoelectric evaporator system increases with engine power. At the rated condition, the two-phase zone with an area of 0.8689 m2 dominates the evaporator's heat transfer area compared with the preheated zone area of 0.0055 m2, and for the thermoelectric module, the cold-side temperature is stable at 74°C while the hot-side temperature drops from 341.8°C to 304.9°C along the exhaust direction. For certain thermoelectric cells, the temperature difference between the cold side and hot side rises with the engine load, and the temperature difference drops from 266.9°C to 230.6°C along the exhaust direction. For two cold-side systems with the same heat transfer, coolant mass flow rate in the evaporator with two-phase state is much less, and the temperature difference along with equivalent heat transfer length L is significantly larger than in the all-liquid one. At rated power point, power generated by thermoelectric cells in the two-phase evaporation system is 508.4 W, while the other is only 328.8 W.

  14. Heating and Cooling System Design for a Modern Transportable Container

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Jason E.

    2015-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been tasked with the design of a modern transportable container (MTC) for use in high reliability transportation environments. The container is required to transport cargo capable of generating its own heat and operate under the United States’ climatic extremes. In response to these requirements, active heating and cooling is necessary to maintain a controlled environment inside the container. The following thesis project documents the design of an active heating, active cooling, and combined active heating and cooling system (now referred to as active heating and cooling systems) through computational thermal analyses, scoping of commercial system options, and mechanical integration with the container’s structure.

  15. The MANX Muon Cooling Experiment Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, S. A.; Abrams, R. J.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Cummings, M. A. C.; Johnson, R. P.; Robertsa, T. J.; Yoneharab, K.

    2010-03-30

    The MANX experiment is being proposed to demonstrate the reduction of 6D muon phase space emittance, using a continuous liquid absorber to provide ionization cooling in a helical solenoid magnetic channel. The experiment involves the construction of a two-period-long helical cooling channel (HCC) to reduce the muon invariant emittance by a factor of two. The HCC would replace the current cooling section of the MICE experiment now being set up at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The MANX experiment would use the existing MICE spectrometers and muon beam line. We discuss the placement of detection planes to optimize the muon track resolution.

  16. Avian thermoregulation in the heat: resting metabolism, evaporative cooling and heat tolerance in Sonoran Desert doves and quail.

    PubMed

    Smith, Eric Krabbe; O'Neill, Jacqueline; Gerson, Alexander R; Wolf, Blair O

    2015-11-01

    Birds in subtropical deserts face significant thermoregulatory challenges because environmental temperatures regularly exceed avian body temperature. To understand the differing susceptibility of desert birds to increasing temperatures, we examined thermoregulatory performance and estimated heat tolerance limits (HTLs) for three Sonoran Desert nesting bird species - Gambel's quail, mourning doves and white-winged doves. Using flow-through respirometry we measured daytime resting metabolism, evaporative water loss and real-time body temperature at air temperatures (T(air)) from 30°C to 66°C. We found marked increases in resting metabolism at the upper critical temperature (T(uc)), which was significantly lower in the quail (T(air)=41.1°C) than in both dove species (T(air)=45.9-46.5°C). Gambel's quail maintained low resting metabolic rates and low rates of evaporative water loss at their T(uc) (0.71 W and 1.20 g H2O h(-1), respectively), but were more sensitive to increasing air temperature, reaching their HTL at T(air) of 52°C. Mourning doves and white-winged doves maintained low resting metabolic rates (0.66 and 0.94 W), but higher rates of evaporative water loss (1.91 and 2.99 g H2O h(-1)) at their T(uc) and reached their HTL at T(air) of 58-60°C. Mass-specific evaporative water loss in white-winged doves (147 g) and mourning doves (104 g) was 45% and 30% greater, respectively, than the rate observed in Gambel's quail (161 g) at Tair of 48°C. Higher rates of evaporation and higher T(uc) made the doves exceptionally heat tolerant, allowing them to maintain body temperatures at least 14°C below air temperatures as high as 60°C (140°F). PMID:26582934

  17. Helium cooling systems for large superconducting physics detector magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, M. A.

    The large superconducting detector magnets used for high energy physics experiments are virtually all indirectly cooled. In general, these detector magnets are not cryogenically stabilized. Therefore, there are a number of choices for cooling large indirectly cooled detector magnets. These choices include; 1) forced two-phase helium cooling driven by the helium refrigerator J-T circuit, 2) forced two-phase helium cooling driven by a helium pump, and 3) a peculation gravity feed cooling system which uses liquid helium from a large storage dewar. The choices for the cooling of a large detector magnet are illustrated by applying these concepts to a 4.2 meter diameter 0.5 tesla thin superconducting solenoid for an experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

  18. Preliminary design activities for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Information on the development of solar heating and cooling systems is presented. The major emphasis is placed on program organization, system size definition, site identification, system approaches, heat pump and equipment design, collector procurement, and other preliminary design activities.

  19. Venus Surface Power and Cooling System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Mellott, Kenneth D.

    2004-01-01

    A radioisotope power and cooling system is designed to provide electrical power for the a probe operating on the surface of Venus. Most foreseeable electronics devices and sensors simply cannot operate at the 450 C ambient surface temperature of Venus. Because the mission duration is substantially long and the use of thermal mass to maintain an operable temperature range is likely impractical, some type of active refrigeration may be required to keep certain components at a temperature below ambient. The fundamental cooling requirements are comprised of the cold sink temperature, the hot sink temperature, and the amount of heat to be removed. In this instance, it is anticipated that electronics would have a nominal operating temperature of 300 C. Due to the highly thermal convective nature of the high-density atmosphere, the hot sink temperature was assumed to be 50 C, which provided a 500 C temperature of the cooler's heat rejecter to the ambient atmosphere. The majority of the heat load on the cooler is from the high temperature ambient surface environment on Venus. Assuming 5 cm radial thickness of ceramic blanket insulation, the ambient heat load was estimated at approximately 77 watts. With an estimated quantity of 10 watts of heat generation from electronics and sensors, and to accommodate some level of uncertainty, the total heat load requirement was rounded up to an even 100 watts. For the radioisotope Stirling power converter configuration designed, the Sage model predicts a thermodynamic power output capacity of 478.1 watts, which slightly exceeds the required 469.1 watts. The hot sink temperature is 1200 C, and the cold sink temperature is 500 C. The required heat input is 1740 watts. This gives a thermodynamic efficiency of 27.48 %. The maximum theoretically obtainable efficiency is 47.52 %. It is estimated that the mechanical efficiency of the power converter design is on the order of 85 %, based on experimental measurements taken from 500 watt power

  20. Rankine-cycle solar-cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weathers, H. M.

    1979-01-01

    Report reviews progress made by three contractors to Marshall Space Flight Center and Department of Energy in developing Rankine-cycle machines for solar cooling and testing of commercially available equipment involved.

  1. Direct Evaporative Precooling Model and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bo; Ally, Moonis Raza; Rice, C Keith; Craddick, William G

    2011-01-01

    Evaporative condenser pre-cooling expands the availability of energy saving, cost-effective technology options (market engagement) and serves to expedite the range of options in upcoming codes and equipment standards (impacting regulation). Commercially available evaporative pre-coolers provide a low cost retrofit for existing packaged rooftop units, commercial unitary split systems, and air cooled chillers. We map the impact of energy savings and peak energy reduction in the 3 building types (medium office, secondary school, and supermarket) in 16 locations for three building types with four pad effectivenesses and show the effect for HVAC systems using either refrigerants R22 or R410A

  2. Solar heating and cooling systems design and development. [prototype development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The development of twelve prototype solar heating/cooling systems, six heating and six heating and cooling systems, two each for single family, multi-family, and commercial applications, is reported. Schedules and technical discussions, along with illustrations on the progress made from April 1, 1977 through June 30, 1977 are detailed.

  3. A hemolysis study of an intravascular blood cooling system for localized organ tissue cooling.

    PubMed

    Merrill, T L; Mingin, T; Merrill, D R; Botbyl, J; Akers, J E

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia can reduce both ischemic and reperfusion injury arising after strokes and heart attacks. New localized organ cooling systems offer a way to reduce tissue damage more effectively with fewer side effects. To assess initial blood safety of our new organ cooling system, the CoolGuide Cooling System (CCS), we investigated safe operating conditions and configurations from a hemolysis perspective. The CCS consists of a peristaltic pump, a custom-built external heat exchanger, a chiller, biocompatible polyvinyl cellulose (PVC) tubing, and a control console. The CCS cools and circulates autologous blood externally and re-delivers cooled blood to the patient through a conventional catheter inserted directly into the organ at risk. Catheter configurations used included: a 7F guide catheter only, a 7F guide with a 0.038" wire inserted through the center and advanced 2 cm distal to the catheter distal tip, a 6F guide catheter only and a 6F guide with a 0.014" guidewire similarly inserted through the center. Using porcine blood, an in vitro test rig was used to measure the degree of hemolysis generation, defined as the percentage change in free hemoglobin, adjusted for total hemoglobin and hematocrit, between exiting and entering blood. The highest degree of hemolysis generation was 0.11±0.04%, based on the average behavior with a 6F catheter and a 0.014" guidewire configuration at a blood flow rate of approximately 130 mL/min. In terms of average percentage free hemoglobin exiting the system, based on total hemoglobin, the highest value measured was 0.17%±0.03%, using this 6F and 0.014" guidewire configuration. This result is significantly below the most stringent European guideline of 0.8% used for blood storage and transfusion. This study provides initial evidence showing hemolysis generation arising from the CoolGuide Cooling System is likely to be clinically insignificant. PMID:23047283

  4. Cooling System Using Natural Circulation for Air Conditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okazaki, Takashi; Seshimo, Yu

    In this paper, Cooling systems with natural circulation loop of refrigerants are reviewed. The cooling system can largely reduce energy consumption of a cooling system for the telecommunication base site. The cooling system consists of two refrigeration units; vapor compression refrigeration unit and sub-cooling unit with a natural-circulation loop. The experiments and calculations were carried out to evaluate the cycle performance of natural circulation loop with HFCs and CO2. The experimental results showed that the cooling capacity of R410A is approximately 30% larger than that of R407C at the temperature difference of 20K and the cooling capacity of CO2 was approximately 4-13% larger than that of R410A under the two-phase condition. On the other hand, the cooling capacity of CO2 was approximately 11% smaller than that of R410A under the supercritical condition. The cooling capacity took a maximum value at an amount of refrigerant and lineally increased as the temperature difference increases and the slightly increased as the height difference. The air intake temperature profile in the inlet of the heat exchangers makes the reverse circulation under the supercritical state and the driving head difference for the reverse circulation depends on the density change to temperature under the supercritical state. Also, a new fan control method to convert the reverse circulation into the normal circulation was reviewed.

  5. Highly porous activated carbon based adsorption cooling system employing difluoromethane and a mixture of pentafluoroethane and difluoromethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askalany, Ahmed A.; Saha, Bidyut B.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a simulation for a low-grade thermally powered two-beds adsorption cooling system employing HFC-32 and a mixture of HFC-32 and HFC-125 (HFC-410a) with activated carbon of type Maxsorb III. The present simulation model adopts experimentally measured adsorption isotherms, adsorption kinetics and isosteric heat of adsorption data. Effect of operating conditions (mass flow rate of hot water, driving heat source temperature and evaporator temperature) on the system performance has been studied in detail. The simulation results showed that the system could be powered by low-grade heat source temperature (below 85 °C). AC/HFC-32 and AC/HFC-410a adsorption cooling cycles achieved close specific cooling power and coefficient of performance values of 0.15 kW/kg and 0.3, respectively at a regeneration temperature of 90 °C along with evaporator temperature of 10 °C. The investigated semi continuous adsorption cooling system could produce a cooling power of 9 kW.

  6. Cooling systems for ultra-high temperature turbines.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, T

    2001-05-01

    This paper describes an introduction of research and development activities on steam cooling in gas turbines at elevated temperature of 1500 C and 1700 C level, partially including those on water cooling. Descriptions of a new cooling system that employs heat pipes are also made. From the view point of heat transfer, its promising applicability is shown with experimental data and engine performance numerical evaluation. PMID:11460628

  7. Automotive non-pressure cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, A.A.

    1987-07-07

    This patent describes a non-pressure automotive engine cooling system comprising: a radiator containing a liquid coolant, coupling hoses that intercouple the radiator to the engine, pump means associated with the engine for circulating coolant through the engine and radiator. The pump means has a suction side, a radiator cap sealed on the radiator, an expansion tank disposed in the engine compartment, vent means on the tank for venting the tank to atmosphere, a coupling tube disposed between the radiator below the radiator cap and the expansion tank to enable free flow of the coolant under expansion from the radiator to the expansion tank. The radiator cap seals the radiator but provides a substantially non-pressure and unimpeded fluid path from the radiator to the coupling tube, a return line coupled from the expansion tank to the suction side of the pump means. The radiator has a gooseneck with the radiator cap sealably engaged with the gooseneck, an outlet port from the top of the radiator to which the coupling tube is connected. The outlet port is continuously open and unblocked by the radiator cap to provide free fluid flow from the radiator to the expansion tank over the entire operating temperature range, the radiator cap sealing only at the top of the gooseneck, and means for supporting the expansion tank at a position at a height corresponding to the top of the radiator. Under normal temperature operating conditions, the liquid level line is substantially the same in both the radiator and the expansion tank.

  8. A portable personal cooling system for mine rescue operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webbon, B.; Williams, B.; Kirk, P.; Elkins, W.; Stein, R.

    1977-01-01

    Design of a portable personal cooling system to reduce physiological stress in high-temperature, high-humidity conditions is discussed. The system, based on technology used in the thermal controls of space suits, employs a combination of head and thoracic insulation and cooling through a heat sink unit. Average metabolic rates, heart rates, rectal temperature increase and sweat loss were monitored for test subjects wearing various configurations of the cooling system, as well as for a control group. The various arrangements of the cooling garment were found to provide significant physiological benefits; however, increases in heat transfer rate of the cooling unit and more effective insulation are suggested to improve the system's function.

  9. An experimental study of heat pipe thermal management system with wet cooling method for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Rui; Gu, Junjie; Liu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    An effective battery thermal management (BTM) system is required for lithium-ion batteries to ensure a desirable operating temperature range with minimal temperature gradient, and thus to guarantee their high efficiency, long lifetime and great safety. In this paper, a heat pipe and wet cooling combined BTM system is developed to handle the thermal surge of lithium-ion batteries during high rate operations. The proposed BTM system relies on ultra-thin heat pipes which can efficiently transfer the heat from the battery sides to the cooling ends where the water evaporation process can rapidly dissipate the heat. Two sized battery packs, 3 Ah and 8 Ah, with different lengths of cooling ends are used and tested through a series high-intensity discharges in this study to examine the cooling effects of the combined BTM system, and its performance is compared with other four types of heat pipe involved BTM systems and natural convection cooling method. A combination of natural convection, fan cooling and wet cooling methods is also introduced to the heat pipe BTM system, which is able to control the temperature of battery pack in an appropriate temperature range with the minimum cost of energy and water spray.

  10. Analysis of an evaporator-condenser-separated mechanical vapor compression system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hong; Li, Yulong; Chen, Jiang

    2013-04-01

    An evaporator-condenser-separated mechanical vapor compression (MVC) system was presented. The better effect of descaling and antiscaling was obtained by the new system. This study focused on the method of thermodynamic analysis, and the energy and exergy flow diagrams were established by using the first and second law of thermodynamics analysis. The results show that the energy utilization rate is very high and the specific power consumption is low. Exergy analysis indicates that the exergy efficiency is low, and the largest exergy loss occurs within the evaporator -condenser and the compressor.

  11. Prototype solar heating and combined heating cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The design and development of eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems is discussed. The program management and systems engineering are reported, and operational test sites are identified.

  12. Solar heating and cooling systems design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Solar heating and heating/cooling systems were designed for single family, multifamily, and commercial applications. Subsystems considered included solar collectors, heat storage systems, auxiliary energy sources, working fluids, and supplementary controls, piping, and pumps.

  13. Solar heating and cooling systems design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Progress in the development of prototype solar heating/cooling systems is reported. Results obtained from refinement/improvement of the single family, multifamily, and commercial systems configurations and generalized studies on several of the subsystems are presented.

  14. Solar heating and cooling technical data and systems analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    The research activities described herein were concentrated on the areas of economics, heating and cooling systems, architectural design, materials characteristics, climatic conditions, educational information packages, and evaluation of solar energy systems and components.

  15. Closed loop air cooling system for combustion turbines

    DOEpatents

    Huber, D.J.; Briesch, M.S.

    1998-07-21

    Convective cooling of turbine hot parts using a closed loop system is disclosed. Preferably, the present invention is applied to cooling the hot parts of combustion turbine power plants, and the cooling provided permits an increase in the inlet temperature and the concomitant benefits of increased efficiency and output. In preferred embodiments, methods and apparatus are disclosed wherein air is removed from the combustion turbine compressor and delivered to passages internal to one or more of a combustor and turbine hot parts. The air cools the combustor and turbine hot parts via convection and heat is transferred through the surfaces of the combustor and turbine hot parts. 1 fig.

  16. Closed loop air cooling system for combustion turbines

    DOEpatents

    Huber, David John; Briesch, Michael Scot

    1998-01-01

    Convective cooling of turbine hot parts using a closed loop system is disclosed. Preferably, the present invention is applied to cooling the hot parts of combustion turbine power plants, and the cooling provided permits an increase in the inlet temperature and the concomitant benefits of increased efficiency and output. In preferred embodiments, methods and apparatus are disclosed wherein air is removed from the combustion turbine compressor and delivered to passages internal to one or more of a combustor and turbine hot parts. The air cools the combustor and turbine hot parts via convection and heat is transferred through the surfaces of the combustor and turbine hot parts.

  17. Solar residential heating and cooling system development test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, W. R.; Melton, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    A solar heating and cooling system is described, which was installed in a simulated home at Marshall Space Flight Center. Performance data are provided for the checkout and initial operational phase for key subsystems and for the total system. Valuable information was obtained with regard to operation of a solar cooling system during the first summer of operation. Areas where improvements and modifications are required to optimize such a system are discussed.

  18. Compact Solid State Cooling Systems: Compact MEMS Electrocaloric Module

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-01

    BEETIT Project: UCLA is developing a novel solid-state cooling technology to translate a recent scientific discovery of the so-called giant electrocaloric effect into commercially viable compact cooling systems. Traditional air conditioners use noisy, vapor compression systems that include a polluting liquid refrigerant to circulate within the air conditioner, absorb heat, and pump the heat out into the environment. Electrocaloric materials achieve the same result by heating up when placed within an electric field and cooling down when removed—effectively pumping heat out from a cooler to warmer environment. This electrocaloric-based solid state cooling system is quiet and does not use liquid refrigerants. The innovation includes developing nano-structured materials and reliable interfaces for heat exchange. With these innovations and advances in micro/nano-scale manufacturing technologies pioneered by semiconductor companies, UCLA is aiming to extend the performance/reliability of the cooling module.

  19. HEATING AND COOLING SYSTEM FOR CALUTRON

    DOEpatents

    Starr, A.M.

    1960-06-28

    An apparatus is invented for heating or cooling the electrostatic liner conventionally disposed in a calutron tank. The apparatus is additionally arranged to mount the liner in its intended position in a readily detachable manner so as to facilitate disassembly of the calutron.

  20. Modelling an actively-cooled CPV system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonomano, A.; Mittelman, G.; Faiman, D.; Biryukov, S.; Melnichak, V.; Bukobza, D.; Kabalo, S.

    2012-10-01

    We have constructed a 7-node, 1-dimensional model of the heat flow in a water-cooled CPV receiver. The model is validated against data from a module exposed to solar irradiance at various concentrations up to 1,000X at the PETAL solar dish facility at Sede Boqer.

  1. Analysis of a solar heat pipe heating and absorption cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munje, S. R.

    A new concept which combines a flat-plate heat-pipe solar collector for daytime solar water heating by evaporation of a refrigerant and night-time water chilling by absorption refrigeration was analyzed. A comprehensive survey of literature was completed to establish the existing state of knowledge on intermittent absorption refrigeration, flat-plate solar heat collectors and night sky radiation cooling. The literature survey showed that the idea of using a passive device such as a heat pipe with the absorption refrigeration principle for both heating and cooling is relatively new. A mathematical model for the heat-pipe flat-plate collector and the absorption refrigeration process was developed. A cost-effectiveness study was also carried out to find the optimum thickness of the collector plate. The optimum plate thickness was used in the parametric study of the system.

  2. Prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Schedules and technical progress in the development of eight prototype solar heating and combined solar heating and cooling systems are reported. Particular emphasis is given to the analysis and preliminary design for the cooling subsystem, and the setup and testing of a horizontal thermal energy storage tank configuration and collector shroud evaluation.

  3. Cryogenic cooling system for the ground test accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Edeskuty, F.J.; Stewart, W.F.; Moeller, J.; Durham, F.; Spulgis, I.

    1993-06-01

    A cryogenic cooling system has been designed, built and tested for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Major components of the GTA require cooling to less than 50 K to reduce rf-heating and to increase thermal stability. The cooling system is capable of cooling (at an acceptable rate for thermal stresses) the cryogenically cooled components and then maintaining them at their operating temperature during accelerator testing for all modes and power levels of operation. The accelerator components are cooled by circulating cold, dense helium gas (about 21 K and 2.1 MPa) through the components. The circulating helium is refrigerated in a heat exchanger that uses boiling liquid hydrogen as a source of refrigeration. The cryogenic cooling system consists of the following major components: a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) storage Dewar with a transfer line to an LH{sub 2} run tank containing an LH{sub 2}/gaseous helium (GHe) heat exchanger, circulation lines, and a circulation pump. The system, sized to cool a load of approximately 40 kW at temperatures as low as 20 K, is operational, but has not yet been operated in conjunction with the accelerator.

  4. Cryogenic cooling system for the ground test accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Edeskuty, F.J.; Stewart, W.F.; Moeller, J.; Durham, F. ); Spulgis, I. )

    1993-01-01

    A cryogenic cooling system has been designed, built and tested for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Major components of the GTA require cooling to less than 50 K to reduce rf-heating and to increase thermal stability. The cooling system is capable of cooling (at an acceptable rate for thermal stresses) the cryogenically cooled components and then maintaining them at their operating temperature during accelerator testing for all modes and power levels of operation. The accelerator components are cooled by circulating cold, dense helium gas (about 21 K and 2.1 MPa) through the components. The circulating helium is refrigerated in a heat exchanger that uses boiling liquid hydrogen as a source of refrigeration. The cryogenic cooling system consists of the following major components: a liquid hydrogen (LH[sub 2]) storage Dewar with a transfer line to an LH[sub 2] run tank containing an LH[sub 2]/gaseous helium (GHe) heat exchanger, circulation lines, and a circulation pump. The system, sized to cool a load of approximately 40 kW at temperatures as low as 20 K, is operational, but has not yet been operated in conjunction with the accelerator.

  5. Cryogenic cooling system for the Ground Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Edeskuty, F.J.; Stewart, W.F.; Moeller, J.; Durham, F.; Spulgis, I.

    1994-12-31

    A cryogenic cooling system has been designed, built and tested for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Major components of the GTA require cooling to less than 50 K to reduce rf-heating and to increase thermal stability. The cooling system is capable of cooling (at an acceptable rate for thermal stresses) the cryogenically cooled components and then maintaining them at their operating temperature during accelerator testing for all modes and power levels of operation. The accelerator components are cooled by circulating cold, dense helium gas (about 21 K and 2.1 MPa) through the components. The circulating helium is refrigerated in a heat exchanger that uses boiling liquid hydrogen as a source of refrigeration. The cryogenic cooling system consists of the following major components: a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) storage Dewar with a transfer line to an LH{sub 2} run tank containing an LH{sub 2}/gaseous helium (GHe) heat exchanger, circulation lines, and a circulation pump. The system, sized to cool a load of approximately 40 kW at temperatures as low as 20 K, is operational, but has not yet been operated in conjunction with the accelerator.

  6. Analytical determination of PID coefficients for temperature and humidity control during cooling and dehumidifying by compressor and evaporator fan speed variation

    SciTech Connect

    Krakow, K.I.; Lin, S.; Zeng, Z.S.

    1995-08-01

    A linearized analysis of temperature and relative humidity control using proportional-integral-differential (PID) controls to vary compressor motor speed and evaporator fan speed enables analytical determination of suitable PID coefficients. The PID coefficients are related to refrigeration system performance parameters and the volume of the conditioned space. Analytical determination of coefficients may eliminate or supplement trial-and-error methods. System response characteristics--damping ratios and periods--are related to PID coefficients, sampling intervals, performance parameters of a refrigeration system, and the volume of a conditioned space. Two control strategies are possible in order to control space temperature and relative humidity simultaneously. One strategy controls temperature by varying compressor speed and controls relative humidity by varying evaporator fan speed. The other strategy controls temperature by varying evaporator fan speed and controls relative humidity by varying compressor fan speed The first strategy was successfully implemented experimentally as well as by simulation. The second strategy was not successfully implemented due to an adverse interaction between the two control systems.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Water Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Chengyuan; Grest, Gary; Cheng, Shengfeng

    2015-03-01

    The evaporation of water from the liquid/vapor interface is studied via large-scale molecular dynamics simulations for systems of more than a million atoms at 550K and 600K. The TIP4P-2005 water model whose liquid/vapor surface tension is in excellent agreement with experiments is used. Evaporative cooling at the interface is observed from temperature profiles determined from both translational and rotational kinetic energy. During evaporation, the density of water is slightly enhanced near the liquid-vapor interface. The velocity distribution of water molecules in the vapor phase during evaporation at various distances relative to the interface fit a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. While our results indicate an imbalance between evaporating and condensing water molecules, local thermal equilibrium is found to hold in addition to mechanical equilibrium. Department of Physics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA.

  8. Impact of advanced fluids on costs of district cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, U.S. ); France, D.M.; Knodel, B.D. Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    Three alternate fluids, ice-water slurry, friction reduction additive and the combination of them, have been compared for use in District Cooling Systems (DCS). The effect of the fluids on cost and cooling capacities were considered for the two cases of new and existing DCS separately. Two criteria were used in comparisons among fluids in each case: constant pumping power which allows for the most benefit, and constant velocity which is more practical consideration. An economic assessment for a 500 ton system shows a potential cost difference in the total pipe cost for a new system of 70% when a 30% ice slurry is used in place of chilled water. The pipe diameter is reduced to 40% using the slurry. These results apply to the constant comparison and are independent of the use of additive. Friction reduction additives serve to reduce pumping power and pressure drop. The ice-water slurry also has a significant impact on existing district cooling systems. It can potentially expand the cooling capacity by 500% without new piping being installed while maintaining the same pumping power, velocity and pressure-drop as the chilled water system. Again, friction reduction additives serve to reduce pumping power and pressure-drop. They do not influence cooling capacity. The cost for expanding the piping to increase the cooling capacity by the same amount by the use of conventional district cooling technology has been shown to be extremely high compared to the ice-water slurry system.

  9. Impact of advanced fluids on costs of district cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, U.S.; France, D.M.; Knodel, B.D. |

    1992-07-01

    Three alternate fluids, ice-water slurry, friction reduction additive and the combination of them, have been compared for use in District Cooling Systems (DCS). The effect of the fluids on cost and cooling capacities were considered for the two cases of new and existing DCS separately. Two criteria were used in comparisons among fluids in each case: constant pumping power which allows for the most benefit, and constant velocity which is more practical consideration. An economic assessment for a 500 ton system shows a potential cost difference in the total pipe cost for a new system of 70% when a 30% ice slurry is used in place of chilled water. The pipe diameter is reduced to 40% using the slurry. These results apply to the constant comparison and are independent of the use of additive. Friction reduction additives serve to reduce pumping power and pressure drop. The ice-water slurry also has a significant impact on existing district cooling systems. It can potentially expand the cooling capacity by 500% without new piping being installed while maintaining the same pumping power, velocity and pressure-drop as the chilled water system. Again, friction reduction additives serve to reduce pumping power and pressure-drop. They do not influence cooling capacity. The cost for expanding the piping to increase the cooling capacity by the same amount by the use of conventional district cooling technology has been shown to be extremely high compared to the ice-water slurry system.

  10. IR window design for hypersonic missile seekers: thermal shock and cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hingst, Uwe; Koerber, Stefan

    2001-10-01

    Infra-red (IR) seekers on missiles at high Mach-numbers in the lower tier air defence often suffer from degradation in performance due to aerothermodynamic effects. The kind and rate of degradation depends on the geometric design (shape) and location of the IR-window. Optimal design may reduce those effects but still misses to totally withstand the imposed thermal stresses (thermal shock). Proper thermal protection systems and/or window cooling systems will be needed. The first part of this paper deals particularly with passive IR- window design features to reduce the thermal stresses. A series of wind-tunnel testings focused on the thermal shock behavior of different IR-window shapes under critical flight conditions. The variation of typical design parameters demonstrates the available features to reduce thermal shock by passive ways. The second part presents active thermal stress reduction devices, e.g. an active cooling system. Among others the most efficient reduction of thermal heating is based on three components: A partial coverage of the IR-dome to protect most parts against heating effects, a rotating system bearing the IR-dome and a liquid spray-cooling system in the gap between the cover and the IR-dome. The hemispherical or pyramidal dome can be located either midways in the missile nose section or sideways on the structure. The liquid spray cooling system combines both, a heat exchange by fluid evaporation and a heat transfer by fluid and gas cross flow (convection), causing a low fluid consumption. Such a cooling system along with their driving parameters and the resulting analytical performance will be presented.

  11. Application of Modular Modeling System to Predict Evaporation, Infiltration, Air Temperature, and Soil Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggs, Johnny; Birgan, Latricia J.; Tsegaye, Teferi; Coleman, Tommy; Soman, Vishwas

    1997-01-01

    Models are used for numerous application including hydrology. The Modular Modeling System (MMS) is one of the few that can simulate a hydrology process. MMS was tested and used to compare infiltration, soil moisture, daily temperature, and potential and actual evaporation for the Elinsboro sandy loam soil and the Mattapex silty loam soil in the Microwave Radiometer Experiment of Soil Moisture Sensing at Beltsville Agriculture Research Test Site in Maryland. An input file for each location was created to nut the model. Graphs were plotted, and it was observed that the model gave a good representation for evaporation for both plots. In comparing the two plots, it was noted that infiltration and soil moisture tend to peak around the same time, temperature peaks in July and August and the peak evaporation was observed on September 15 and July 4 for the Elinsboro Mattapex plot respectively. MMS can be used successfully to predict hydrological processes as long as the proper input parameters are available.

  12. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems, including potable hot water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomquist, D.; Oonk, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    Progress made in the development, delivery, and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water is reported. The system consists of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition. A comparison of the proposed Solaron Heat Pump and Solar Desiccant Heating and Cooling Systems, installation drawings, data on the Akron House at Akron, Ohio, and other program activities are included.

  13. Cooling system for three hook ring segment

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Christian X.; Eng, Darryl; Lee, Ching-Pang; Patat, Harry

    2014-08-26

    A triple hook ring segment including forward, midsection and aft mounting hooks for engagement with respective hangers formed on a ring segment carrier for supporting a ring segment panel, and defining a forward high pressure chamber and an aft low pressure chamber on opposing sides of the midsection mounting hook. An isolation plate is provided on the aft side of the midsection mounting hook to form an isolation chamber between the aft low pressure chamber and the ring segment panel. High pressure air is supplied to the forward chamber and flows to the isolation chamber through crossover passages in the midsection hook. The isolation chamber provides convection cooling air to an aft portion of the ring segment panel and enables a reduction of air pressure in the aft low pressure chamber to reduce leakage flow of cooling air from the ring segment.

  14. Design and Control of Hydronic Radiant Cooling Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jingjuan

    Improving energy efficiency in the Heating Ventilation and Air conditioning (HVAC) systems in buildings is critical to achieve the energy reduction in the building sector, which consumes 41% of all primary energy produced in the United States, and was responsible for nearly half of U.S. CO2 emissions. Based on a report by the New Building Institute (NBI), when HVAC systems are used, about half of the zero net energy (ZNE) buildings report using a radiant cooling/heating system, often in conjunction with ground source heat pumps. Radiant systems differ from air systems in the main heat transfer mechanism used to remove heat from a space, and in their control characteristics when responding to changes in control signals and room thermal conditions. This dissertation investigates three related design and control topics: cooling load calculations, cooling capacity estimation, and control for the heavyweight radiant systems. These three issues are fundamental to the development of accurate design/modeling tools, relevant performance testing methods, and ultimately the realization of the potential energy benefits of radiant systems. Cooling load calculations are a crucial step in designing any HVAC system. In the current standards, cooling load is defined and calculated independent of HVAC system type. In this dissertation, I present research evidence that sensible zone cooling loads for radiant systems are different from cooling loads for traditional air systems. Energy simulations, in EnergyPlus, and laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the heat transfer dynamics in spaces conditioned by radiant and air systems. The results show that the magnitude of the cooling load difference between the two systems ranges from 7-85%, and radiant systems remove heat faster than air systems. For the experimental tested conditions, 75-82% of total heat gain was removed by radiant system during the period when the heater (simulating the heat gain) was on, while for air

  15. Results from evaporation tests to support the MWTF heat removal system design

    SciTech Connect

    Crea, B.A.

    1994-12-22

    An experimental tests program was conducted to measure the evaporative heat removal from the surface of a tank of simulated waste. The results contained in this report constitute definition design data for the latest heat removal function of the MWTF primary ventilation system.

  16. Characterization of Samples from the 3H Evaporator System Including Effects of Recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, W.R.

    2001-05-15

    Analysis of several series of samples from the 3H Evaporator System have been completed. The goal of this work was to determine the effects of 3H operation including recycle of concentrated supernate from Tank 30H into the sludge layer of Tank 32H.

  17. Sheet Membrane Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis; Zapata, Felipe; Dillion, Paul; Castillo, Juan; Vonau, Walter; Wilkes, Robert; Vogel, Matthew; Frodge, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    A document describes a sheet membrane spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME), which allows for the use of one common water tank that can supply cooling water to the astronaut and to the evaporator. Test data showed that heat rejection performance dropped only 6 percent after being subjected to highly contaminated water. It also exhibited robustness with respect to freezing and Martian atmospheric simulation testing. Water was allowed to freeze in the water channels during testing that simulated a water loop failure and vapor backpressure valve failure. Upon closing the backpressure valve and energizing the pump, the ice eventually thawed and water began to flow with no apparent damage to the sheet membrane. The membrane evaporator also serves to de-gas the water loop from entrained gases, thereby eliminating the need for special degassing equipment such as is needed by the current spacesuit system. As water flows through the three annular water channels, water evaporates with the vapor flowing across the hydrophobic, porous sheet membrane to the vacuum side of the membrane. The rate at which water evaporates, and therefore, the rate at which the flowing water is cooled, is a function of the difference between the water saturation pressure on the water side of the membrane, and the pressure on the vacuum side of the membrane. The primary theory is that the hydrophobic sheet membrane retains water, but permits vapor pass-through when the vapor side pressure is less than the water saturation pressure. This results in evaporative cooling of the remaining water.

  18. The use of processes evaporation and condensation to provide a suitable operating environment of systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolková, Zuzana; Holubčík, Michal; Malcho, Milan

    2016-06-01

    All electronic components which exhibit electrical conductor resistance, generates heat when electricity is passed (Joule - Lenz's Law). The generated heat is necessary to take into surrounding environment. To reduce the operating temperature of electronic components are used various types of cooling in electronic devices. The released heat is removed from the outside of the device in several ways, either alone or in combination. Intensification of cooling electronic components is in the use of heat transfer through phase changes. From the structural point of view it is important to create a cooling system which would be able to drain the waste heat converter for each mode of operation device. Another important criterion is the reliability of the cooling, and it is appropriate to choose cooling system, which would not contain moving elements. In this article, the issue tackled by the phase change in the heat pipe.

  19. Preoperational test report, primary ventilation condenser cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-10-29

    This represents the preoperational test report for the Primary Ventilation Condenser Cooling System, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system uses a closed chilled water piping loop to provide offgas effluent cooling for tanks AY101, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102; the offgas is cooled from a nominal 100 F to 40 F. Resulting condensation removes tritiated vapor from the exhaust stack stream. The piping system includes a package outdoor air-cooled water chiller with parallel redundant circulating pumps; the condenser coil is located inside a shielded ventilation equipment cell. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  20. Design and performance of cooled perches for alternative egg laying production systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat stress in both mechanically and naturally ventilated egg production facilities is a problem for the egg industry. Various means of providing supplemental cooling to hens in facilities are available, including tunnel ventilation to increase convective losses and evaporative cooling from either p...

  1. Desiccant-based, heat-actuated cooling assessment for DHC (District Heating and Cooling) systems

    SciTech Connect

    Patch, K.D.; DiBella, F.A.; Becker, F.E.

    1990-07-01

    An assessment has been completed of the use of desiccant-based, heat-actuated cooling for District Heating and Cooling (DHC) systems, showing that such desiccant-based cooling (DBC) systems are generally applicable to District Heating (DH) systems. Since the DH system only has to supply hot water (or steam) to its customers, systems that were designed as conventional two-pipe DH systems can now be operated as DHC systems without major additional capital expense. Desiccant-based DHC systems can be operated with low-grade DH-supplied heat, at temperatures below 180{degree}F, without significant loss in operating capacity, relative to absorption chillers. During this assessment, a systems analysis was performed, an experimental investigation was conducted, developmental requirements for commercializing DBC systems were examined, and two case studies were conducted. As a result of the case studies, it was found that the operating cost of a DBC system was competitive with or lower than the cost of purchasing DHC-supplied chilled water. However, because of the limited production volume and the current high capital costs of desiccant systems, the payback period is relatively long. In this regard, through the substitution of low-cost components specifically engineered for low-temperature DHC systems, the capital costs should be significantly reduced and overall economics made attractive to future users. 17 figs.

  2. Evaporating firewalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Raamsdonk, Mark

    2014-11-01

    In this note, we begin by presenting an argument suggesting that large AdS black holes dual to typical high-energy pure states of a single holographic CFT must have some structure at the horizon, i.e. a fuzzball/firewall, unless the procedure to probe physics behind the horizon is state-dependent. By weakly coupling the CFT to an auxiliary system, such a black hole can be made to evaporate. In a case where the auxiliary system is a second identical CFT, it is possible (for specific initial states) that the system evolves to precisely the thermofield double state as the original black hole evaporates. In this case, the dual geometry should include the "late-time" part of the eternal AdS black hole spacetime which includes smooth spacetime behind the horizon of the original black hole. Thus, if a firewall is present initially, it evaporates. This provides a specific realization of the recent ideas of Maldacena and Susskind that the existence of smooth spacetime behind the horizon of an evaporating black hole can be enabled by maximal entanglement with a Hawking radiation system (in our case the second CFT) rather than prevented by it. For initial states which are not finely-tuned to produce the thermofield double state, the question of whether a late-time infalling observer experiences a firewall translates to a question about the gravity dual of a typical high-energy state of a two-CFT system.

  3. Cooling performance and evaluation of automotive refrigeration system for a passenger car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajitno, Deendarlianto, Majid, Akmal Irfan; Mardani, Mahardeka Dhias; Wicaksono, Wendi; Kamal, Samsul; Purwanto, Teguh Pudji; Fauzun

    2016-06-01

    A new design of automotive refrigeration system for a passenger car was proposed. To ensure less energy consumption and optimal thermal comfort, the performance of the system were evaluated. This current research was aimed to evaluate the refrigeration characteristics of the system for several types of cooling load. In this present study, a four-passenger wagon car with 1500 cc gasoline engine that equipped by a belt driven compressor (BDC) was used as the tested vehicle. To represent the tropical condition, a set of lamps and wind sources are installed around the vehicle. The blower capacity inside a car is varied from 0.015 m/s to 0.027 m/s and the compressor speed is varied at variable 820, 1400, and 2100 rpm at a set temperature of 22°C. A set of thermocouples that combined by data logger were used to measure the temperature distribution. The system uses R-134a as the refrigerant. In order to determine the cooling capacity of the vehicle, two conditions were presented: without passengers and full load conditions. As the results, cooling capacity from any possible heating sources and transient characteristics of temperature in both systems for the cabin, engine, compressor, and condenser are presented in this work. As the load increases, the outlet temperature of evaporator also increases due to the increase of condensed air. This phenomenon also causes the increase of compressor work and compression ratio which associated to the addition of specific volume in compressor inlet.

  4. Cooling and shielding systems for infrared detectors - requirements and limits.

    PubMed

    Wiecek, B

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents three main cooling systems used for infrared detectors. At first thermoelectric devices are discussed. They allow cooling down the detector with low efficiency and not to the very low temperature. They do not generate any vibrations and therefore are suitable for thermal detectors, where the microphone effect can decrease their performance. Photon detectors need to be cooled down even to 77K or better. The only way to have such deep cooling is to use the cooler based on thermodynamic cycle such as Stirling one. With the high efficiency one can easily obtain cryogenic temperature for a detector. The electromagnetic noise and vibration generation are the main disadvantages of using such devices. Joule-Thomson effect during gas expansion is 3rdcooling system discussed in the paper. It is highly effective process, used for gas liquefaction too. The working gas is being removed during cooling into the atmosphere, so the need of continuous supplying with compressed one, what makes this system very difficult for remote applications. In the paper, simple calculations are presented to illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of the different cooling systems. PMID:17282258

  5. Preliminary design package for prototype solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A summary is given of the preliminary analysis and design activity on solar heating and cooling systems. The analysis was made without site specific data other than weather; therefore, the results indicate performance expected under these special conditions. Major items include a market analysis, design approaches, trade studies and other special data required to evaluate the preliminary analysis and design. The program calls for the development and delivery of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems for installation and operational test. Two heating and six heating and cooling units will be delivered for Single Family Residences, Multiple-family Residences and commercial applications.

  6. System and method for pre-cooling of buildings

    DOEpatents

    Springer, David A.; Rainer, Leo I.

    2011-08-09

    A method for nighttime pre-cooling of a building comprising inputting one or more user settings, lowering the indoor temperature reading of the building during nighttime by operating an outside air ventilation system followed, if necessary, by a vapor compression cooling system. The method provides for nighttime pre-cooling of a building that maintains indoor temperatures within a comfort range based on the user input settings, calculated operational settings, and predictions of indoor and outdoor temperature trends for a future period of time such as the next day.

  7. Heating and Cooling: Measurement of Temperature for Thermally Connected Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baines, John

    1995-01-01

    Discusses a series of experiments to establish a significance of temperature difference in rates of cooling, to illustrate the connection between energy transfer and the consequent temperature changes for thermally connected systems that are not in equilibrium. (MKR)

  8. 2. VIEW SOUTH OF WIND TUNNEL 138 AND COOLING SYSTEM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTH OF WIND TUNNEL 138 AND COOLING SYSTEM 140, NORTH ELEVATION - Naval Surface Warfare Center, Subsonic Wind Tunnel Building, Bounded by Clara Barton Parkway & McArthur Boulevard, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  9. Detail exterior view looking southwest of gas cooling system. Engine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail exterior view looking southwest of gas cooling system. Engine house is shown in right background. - Burnsville Natural Gas Pumping Station, Saratoga Avenue between Little Kanawha River & C&O Railroad line, Burnsville, Braxton County, WV

  10. Validation of the RVACS (Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System)/RACS (Reactor Air Cooling System) model in SASSYS-1

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, F.E.

    1987-01-01

    The SASSYS-1 LMR systems analysis code contains a model for transient analysis of heat removal by a RVACS (Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System) or a RACS (Reactor Air Cooling System) in an LMR (Liquid Metal Reactor). This model has been validated by comparisons of model predictions with experimental data from a large scale RVACS/RACS simulation experiment performed at Argonne National Laboratory. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Effects of solvent evaporation on water sorption/solubility and nanoleakage of adhesive systems

    PubMed Central

    CHIMELI, Talita Baumgratz Cachapuz; D'ALPINO, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; PEREIRA, Patrícia Nóbrega; HILGERT, Leandro Augusto; DI HIPÓLITO, Vinicius; GARCIA, Fernanda Cristina Pimentel

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the influence of solvent evaporation in the kinetics of water diffusion (water sorption-WS, solubility-SL, and net water uptake) and nanoleakage of adhesive systems. Material and Methods Disk-shaped specimens (5.0 mm in diameter x 0.8 mm in thickness) were produced (N=48) using the adhesives: Clearfil S3 Bond (CS3)/Kuraray, Clearfil SE Bond - control group (CSE)/Kuraray, Optibond Solo Plus (OS)/Kerr and Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SBU)/3M ESPE. The solvents were either evaporated for 30 s or not evaporated (N=24/per group), and then photoactivated for 80 s (550 mW/cm2). After desiccation, the specimens were weighed and stored in distilled water (N=12) or mineral oil (N=12) to evaluate the water diffusion over a 7-day period. Net water uptake (%) was also calculated as the sum of WS and SL. Data were submitted to 3-way ANOVA/Tukey's test (α=5%). The nanoleakage expression in three additional specimens per group was also evaluated after ammoniacal silver impregnation after 7 days of water storage under SEM. Results Statistical analysis revealed that only the factor "adhesive" was significant (p<0.05). Solvent evaporation had no influence in the WS and SL of the adhesives. CSE (control) presented significantly lower net uptake (5.4%). The nanoleakage was enhanced by the presence of solvent in the adhesives. Conclusions Although the evaporation has no effect in the kinetics of water diffusion, the nanoleakage expression of the adhesives tested increases when the solvents are not evaporated. PMID:25141201

  12. Developing, testing, evaluating, and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-01-01

    The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991 to 92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems; (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters; (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems; (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project; (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research; and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

  13. Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-24

    The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems; (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters; (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems; (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project; (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research; and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

  14. Long term measurement of lake evaporation using a pontoon mounted Eddy Covariance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, H. A.; McGloin, R.; McJannet, D.; Burn, S.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate quantification of evaporation from water storages is essential for design of water management and allocation policy that aims to balance demands for water without compromising the sustainability of future water resources, particularly during periods of prolonged and severe drought. Precise measurement of evaporation from lakes and dams however, presents significant research challenges. These include design and installation of measurement platforms that can withstand a range of wind and wave conditions; accurate determination of the evaporation measurement footprint and the influence of changing water levels. In this paper we present results from a two year long deployment of a pontoon mounted Eddy Covariance (EC) system on a 17.2ha irrigation reservoir in southeast Queensland, Australia. The EC unit included a CSAT-3 sonic anemometer (Campbell Scientific, Utah, United States) and a Li-Cor CS7500 open-path H2O/CO2 infrared gas analyzer (LiCor, Nebraska, United States) at a height of 2.2m, a net radiometer (CNR1, Kipp & Zonen, Netherlands) at a height of 1.2m and a humidity and temperature probe (HMP45C,Vaisala, Finland) at 2.3m. The EC unit was controlled by a Campbell Scientific CR3000 data logger with flux measurements made at 10 Hz and block averaged values logged every 15 minutes. Power to the EC system was from mounted solar panels that charged deep cycle lead-acid batteries while communication was via a cellphone data link. The pontoon was fitted with a weighted central beam and gimbal ring system that allowed self-levelling of the instrumentation and minimized dynamic influences on measurements (McGowan et al 2010; Wiebe et al 2011). EC measurements were corrected for tilt errors using the double rotation method for coordinate rotation described by Wilczak et al. (2001). High and low frequency attenuation of the measured co-spectrum was corrected using Massman's (2000) method for estimating frequency response corrections, while measurements were

  15. Performance study of a heat recovery desiccant cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabek, Seifennasr; Ben Nasr, Kaouther; Chouikh, Ridha; Guizani, Amenallah

    2015-04-01

    The comparison between the experimental and theoretical simulations of a desiccant cooling system under various climatic conditions (outdoor temperature and relative humidity) on the system performance has been presented. The performance of the system is evaluated using Cooling Capacity (CC) parameter. The system under a typical summer day of hot and humid climate was tested. A remarkable decrease about 40-65% in the specific humidity and with a supply air temperature lower than 25°C of the proposed system was observed. The study is important and helpful to improve the effectiveness of this kind of liquid desiccant system in hot and humid places.

  16. Steam cooling system for a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Ian David; Barb, Kevin Joseph; Li, Ming Cheng; Hyde, Susan Marie; Mashey, Thomas Charles; Wesorick, Ronald Richard; Glynn, Christopher Charles; Hemsworth, Martin C.

    2002-01-01

    The steam cooling circuit for a gas turbine includes a bore tube assembly supplying steam to circumferentially spaced radial tubes coupled to supply elbows for transitioning the radial steam flow in an axial direction along steam supply tubes adjacent the rim of the rotor. The supply tubes supply steam to circumferentially spaced manifold segments located on the aft side of the 1-2 spacer for supplying steam to the buckets of the first and second stages. Spent return steam from these buckets flows to a plurality of circumferentially spaced return manifold segments disposed on the forward face of the 1-2 spacer. Crossover tubes couple the steam supply from the steam supply manifold segments through the 1-2 spacer to the buckets of the first stage. Crossover tubes through the 1-2 spacer also return steam from the buckets of the second stage to the return manifold segments. Axially extending return tubes convey spent cooling steam from the return manifold segments to radial tubes via return elbows.

  17. Overview of Helium Cooled System Applications with RELAP at ENEA

    SciTech Connect

    Meloni, Paride; Casamirra, Maddalena

    2006-07-01

    Some years ago, within the framework of the study for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), ENEA assessed the RELAP5 code capability to simulate Helium cooled systems on the experimental data provided by the helium facility HEFUS3 (Brasimone, Italy). This activity allowed acquiring a certain experience on the limits and capabilities of the code that, in the following years, was used for a wide range of applications concerning transient and accident analysis of helium cooled systems. At first the paper summarizes the results of the assessment activity, then describes the accident analyses performed for the conceptual study of the Fusion Power Reactor with Helium-Cooled Pebble Bed Blanket (HCPBB) and the studies to support the safety design of the gas cooled Accelerator Driven System (ADS) concept. The paper concludes highlighting the RELAP adaptations to realize within the framework of the feasibility studies for a combined cycle concept of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). (authors)

  18. Cooling systems of the resting area in free stall dairy barn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calegari, F.; Calamari, L.; Frazzi, E.

    2016-04-01

    A study during the summer season evaluated the effect of different cooling systems on behavioral and productive responses of Italian Friesian dairy cows kept in an experimental-free stall barn located in the Po Valley in Italy. The study involved 30 lactating dairy cows subdivided into two groups kept in two pens with external hard court paddock in each free stall. The same cooling system was applied in the feeding area in both pens. A different cooling system in the resting area was applied to the two pens: in the pen SW, the resting area was equipped with fans and misters; in the other, there was simple ventilation (SV). Breathing rate, rectal temperature, milk yield, and milk characteristics (fat, protein, and somatic cell count) were measured. Behavioral activities (standing and lying cows in the different areas, as well as the animals in the feed bunk) were recorded. Mild to moderate heat waves during the trial were observed. On average, the breathing rate was numerically greater in SV compared with SW cows (60.2 and 55.8 breath/min, respectively), and mean rectal temperature remained below 39 °C in both groups during the trial (on average 38.7 and 38.8 °C in SV and SW, respectively. During the hotter periods of the trial, the time spent lying indoor in the free stall was greater in SW (11.8 h/day) than SV (10.7 h/day). Conversely, the time spent standing indoor without feeding was greater in SV (4.3 h/day) than SW (3.8 h/day). Milk yield was slightly better maintained during hotter period in SW compared with SV and somatic cell count was also slightly greater in the former. In conclusion, the adoption of the cooling system by means of evaporative cooling also in the resting area reduces the alteration of time budget caused by heat stress.

  19. Solar heating and cooling system design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The design and development of marketable solar heating and cooling systems for single family and commercial applications is described. The delivery, installation, and monitoring of the prototype systems are discussed. Seven operational test sites are discussed in terms of system performance. Problems encountered with equipment and installation were usually due to lack of skills required for solar system installation.

  20. Active noise canceling system for mechanically cooled germanium radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Karl Einar; Burks, Morgan T

    2014-04-22

    A microphonics noise cancellation system and method for improving the energy resolution for mechanically cooled high-purity Germanium (HPGe) detector systems. A classical adaptive noise canceling digital processing system using an adaptive predictor is used in an MCA to attenuate the microphonics noise source making the system more deployable.

  1. Experimental study on resonant frequency of the thermoacoustic cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Shin-ichi; Hirano, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Takashi; Watanabe, Yoshiaki

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of our study is to construct a new cooling system applying the thermoacoustic effect. Stainless loop-tube is employed as our thermoacoustic cooling system and temperature decrease of 40 degrees C from the room temperature has been confirmed. In this paper, it is investigated that the relation between the viscosity boundary layer and the resonant frequency of the generated sound is investigated. Also, the sound pressure and temperature variation are observed with various total lengths of the loop-tube, with the view toward improvement in the cooling effect of the thermoacoustic cooling system. It was generally considered that the sound generated in the thermoacoustic cooling system is resonated with the tube length by 1 wavelength. However, when the total length of the loop-tube is over 2600 mm and inner pressure is 0.1 MPa, the resonant wavelength is 2. This is resulted from the influence of the viscosity boundary layer. It is found that the loop-tube decides the resonant frequency so that the thickness of the viscosity boundary layer is smaller than the stack channel radius. As a result, the resonant wavelength is 2 in a certain condition. The frequency is an important parameter for the thermoacoustic cooling system. From obtained results, one of the factors to select the frequency is found.

  2. Cooling Panel Optimization for the Active Cooling System of a Hypersonic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youn, B.; Mills, A. F.

    1995-01-01

    Optimization of cooling panels for an active cooling system of a hypersonic aircraft is explored. The flow passages are of rectangular cross section with one wall heated. An analytical fin-type model for incompressible flow in smooth-wall rectangular ducts with coupled wall conduction is proposed. Based on this model, the a flow rate of coolant to each design minimum mass flow rate or coolant for a single cooling panel is obtained by satisfying hydrodynamic, thermal, and Mach number constraints. Also, the sensitivity of the optimal mass flow rate of coolant to each design variable is investigated. In addition, numerical solutions for constant property flow in rectangular ducts, with one side rib-roughened and coupled wall conduction, are obtained using a k-epsilon and wall function turbulence model, these results are compared with predictions of the analytical model.

  3. Simulation of an active cooling system for photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelhakim, Lotfi

    2016-06-01

    Photovoltaic cells are devices that convert solar radiation directly into electricity. However, solar radiation increases the photovoltaic cells temperature [1] [2]. The temperature has an influence on the degradation of the cell efficiency and the lifetime of a PV cell. This work reports on a water cooling technique for photovoltaic panel, whereby the cooling system was placed at the front surface of the cells to dissipate excess heat away and to block unwanted radiation. By using water as a cooling medium for the photovoltaic solar cells, the overheating of closed panel is greatly reduced without prejudicing luminosity. The water also acts as a filter to remove a portion of solar spectrum in the infrared band but allows transmission of the visible spectrum most useful for the PV operation. To improve the cooling system efficiency and electrical efficiency, uniform flow rate among the cooling system is required to ensure uniform distribution of the operating temperature of the PV cells. The aims of this study are to develop a 3D thermal model to simulate the cooling and heat transfer in Photovoltaic panel and to recommend a cooling technique for the PV panel. The velocity, pressure and temperature distribution of the three-dimensional flow across the cooling block were determined using the commercial package, Fluent. The second objective of this work is to study the influence of the geometrical dimensions of the panel, water mass flow rate and water inlet temperature on the flow distribution and the solar panel temperature. The results obtained by the model are compared with experimental results from testing the prototype of the cooling device.

  4. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Eight prototype systems were developed. The systems are 3, 25, and 75-ton size units. The manufacture, test, installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation of the systems is described. Size activities for the various systems are included.

  5. Integrated numerical methods for hypersonic aircraft cooling systems analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petley, Dennis H.; Jones, Stuart C.; Dziedzic, William M.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical methods have been developed for the analysis of hypersonic aircraft cooling systems. A general purpose finite difference thermal analysis code is used to determine areas which must be cooled. Complex cooling networks of series and parallel flow can be analyzed using a finite difference computer program. Both internal fluid flow and heat transfer are analyzed, because increased heat flow causes a decrease in the flow of the coolant. The steady state solution is a successive point iterative method. The transient analysis uses implicit forward-backward differencing. Several examples of the use of the program in studies of hypersonic aircraft and rockets are provided.

  6. NONWATER QUALITY IMPACTS OF CLOSED-CYCLE COOLING SYSTEMS AND THE INTERACTION OF STACK GAS AND COOLING TOWER PLUMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a literature survey of the nonwater quality impacts of closed-cycle cooling systems. Following discussions of cooling tower and stack gas plumes, interactions of these plumes are considered. For cooling tower plumes, plume types, behavior, salt drift g...

  7. Investihation on the differentially cooled system

    SciTech Connect

    Kirloskar, C.S.; Chandorkar, S.B.; Rao, N.N.

    1984-01-01

    In order to clarify certain aspects of the combustion process in differentially cooled engines, a special engine was built in which the surface temperatures of the piston crown, cylinder liner and cyinder head bottom could be varied independently. A computer program to calculate the swirl and turbulence intensity in the combustion chamber was developed. Investigations showed that in order to improve the mixing process, the liner temperature should be kept low while the piston temperature may be increased only if the cylinder head temperature is kept low, and vice versa. A low coefficient of regression in the plotted results indicated that the flow parameters investigated were not the determining parameters but only one among many others which need further investigation. The present investigation however indicates that the high piston temperature found desirable earlier should preferably be combined with low cylinder head and liner temperatures.

  8. Evaluation of two cooling systems under a firefighter coverall.

    PubMed

    Teunissen, Lennart P J; Wang, Li-Chu; Chou, Shih-Nung; Huang, Chin-Hsien; Jou, Gwo-Tsuen; Daanen, Hein A M

    2014-11-01

    Firemen often suffer from heat strain. This study investigated two chest cooling systems for use under a firefighting suit. In nine male subjects, a vest with water soaked cooling pads and a vest with water perfused tubes were compared to a control condition. Subjects performed 30 min walking and 10 min recovery in hot conditions, while physiological and perceptual parameters were measured. No differences were observed in heart rate and rectal temperature, but scapular skin temperature and fluid loss were lower using the perfused vest. Thermal sensation was cooler for the perfused vest than for the other conditions, while the cool pad vest felt initially cooler than control. However, comfort and RPE scores were similar. We conclude that the cooling effect of both tested systems, mainly providing a (temporally) cooler thermal sensation, was limited and did not meet the expectations. PMID:24798511

  9. Desiccant dehumidification and cooling systems assessment and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, R.K. Jr.

    1997-09-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a preliminary analysis of the principles, sensitivities, and potential for national energy savings of desiccant cooling and dehumidification systems. The report is divided into four sections. Section I deals with the maximum theoretical performance of ideal desiccant cooling systems. Section II looks at the performance effects of non-ideal behavior of system components. Section III examines the effects of outdoor air properties on desiccant cooling system performance. Section IV analyzes the applicability of desiccant cooling systems to reduce primary energy requirements for providing space conditioning in buildings. A basic desiccation process performs no useful work (cooling). That is, a desiccant material drying air is close to an isenthalpic process. Latent energy is merely converted to sensible energy. Only when heat exchange is applied to the desiccated air is any cooling accomplished. This characteristic is generic to all desiccant cycles and critical to understanding their operation. The analyses of Section I show that desiccant cooling cycles can theoretically achieve extremely high thermal CoP`s (>2). The general conclusion from Section II is that ventilation air processing is the most viable application for the solid desiccant equipment analyzed. The results from the seasonal simulations performed in Section III indicate that, generally, the seasonal performance of the desiccant system does not change significantly from that predicted for outdoor conditions. Results from Section IV show that all of the candidate desiccant systems can save energy relative to standard vapor-compression systems. The largest energy savings are achieved by the enthalpy exchange devise.

  10. Evaporative modeling for idealized lithographic pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oinuma, Ryoji; Best, Frederick

    2002-01-01

    As a demand for the high performance and small size electronics devices increased, the heat removal from those electronic devices for space use is getting critical factor more than devices on the earth due to the limitation of the size. The purpose of this paper is to show a study of optimized size of coherent pores or slits in the evaporative wick of a heat pipe to cool down the high heat flux density heat source. Our system considered in this paper consists of a plate heat source, the evaporative wick with coherent pores and conducting walls connecting between the heat source and the evaporator. The evaporation rate of working fluid along the meniscus interface in a micro-order pore or slit was calculated based on the kinetic theory and the statistical rate theory to find a proper diameter of pores to cool down the heat source effectively. The results show the smaller diameter of pores is preferred to achieve the smallest total size of the evaporator although it will involve the cost issue. As a demand for the high performance and small size electronics devices increased, the heat removal from those electronic devices for space use is getting critical factor more than devices on the earth due to the limitation of the size. The purpose of this paper is to show a study of optimized size of coherent pores or slits in the evaporative wick of a heat pipe to cool down the high heat flux density heat source. Our system considered in this paper consists of a plate heat source, the evaporative wick with coherent pores and conducting walls connecting between the heat source and the evaporator. The evaporation rate of working fluid along the meniscus interface in a micro-order pore or slit was calculated based on the kinetic theory and the statistical rate theory to find a proper diameter of pores to cool down the heat source effectively. The results show that the smaller diameter of pores uses the pore for evaporation effectively and is preferred to achieve the smallest

  11. Closed-loop air cooling system for a turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    North, William Edward

    2000-01-01

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for providing a closed-loop air cooling system for a turbine engine. The method and apparatus provide for bleeding pressurized air from a gas turbine engine compressor for use in cooling the turbine components. The compressed air is cascaded through the various stages of the turbine. At each stage a portion of the compressed air is returned to the compressor where useful work is recovered.

  12. Electron beam size measurements in the Fermilab Electron Cooling System

    SciTech Connect

    Kroc, T.K.; Burov, A.V.; Bolshakov, T.B.; Shemyakin, A.; Seletskiy, S.M.; /Rochester U.

    2005-09-01

    The Fermilab Electron Cooling Project requires a straight trajectory and constant beam size to provide maximum cooling of the antiprotons in the Recycler. A measurement system was developed using movable apertures and steering bumps to measure the beam size in a 20m long, nearly continuous, solenoid. This paper will focus on results of these measurements of the beam size and the difficulties in making those measurements.

  13. Electron Beam Size Measurements in the Fermilab Electron Cooling System

    SciTech Connect

    Kroc, T. K.; Burov, A. V.; Bolshakov, T. B.; Shemyakin, A.; Seletskiy, S. M.

    2006-03-20

    The Fermilab Electron Cooling Project requires a straight trajectory and constant beam size to provide maximum cooling of the antiprotons in the Recycler. A measurement system was developed using movable apertures and steering bumps to measure the beam size in a 20m long, nearly continuous, solenoid. This paper will focus on results of these measurements of the beam size and the difficulties in making those measurements.

  14. Effect of input power on cooling property of a thermoacoustic cooling system with diameter-expanded prime movers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, So; Sakamoto, Shin-ichi; Orino, Yuichiro; Wada, Takahiro; Inui, Yoshitaka; Watanabe, Yoshiaki

    2016-07-01

    We studied a thermoacoustic cooling system driven at low temperatures to make practical use of the system. Aiming to reduce the driving temperature of the thermoacoustic system, we developed a loop-tube-type thermoacoustic system with diameter-expanded two-stage prime movers, i.e., a heat-to-sound transducer. The system drove at 67 °C. Additionally, we developed a prototype for a thermoacoustic cooling system with a diameter-expanded two-stage prime mover. In the experiment, the cooling point temperature was decreased by 4.4 °C from room temperature, i.e., 20 °C. To improve the cooling performance of the prototype thermoacoustic cooling system, we experimentally investigated the effect of increasing the input power on the cooling performance.

  15. A spacecraft cooling system for a charged coupled device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Mary S.; Tulkoff, Philip

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the thermal analysis, design, and testing of a dedicated cooling system for a Spartan spacecraft payload. A simple reliable design that requires minimum power consumption and minimum weight was developed. The payload has a CCD detector that must be maintained at a temperature of approximately -40 C or colder. The cooling system consists of a fin radiator, dual redundant heat pipes, and a thermal electric device (TED). The system was analytically modeled through the use of the Simplified Shuttle Payload Thermal Analyzer (SSPTA) computer program. A thermal test of the system simulating flight conditions was conducted to correlate the computer model and verify performance specifications.

  16. Solar heating and cooling system design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The progress of the program during the sixth program quarter is reported. The program calls for the development and delivery of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems for installation and operational test. The William O'Brien single-family heating system was installed and is operational. The New Castle single-family heating residence is under construction. The Kansas University (KU) system is in the final design stages. The 25 ton cooling subsystem for KU is the debugging stage. Pressure drops that were greater than anticipated were encountered. The 3 ton simulation work is being finalized and the design parameters for the Rankine system were determined from simulation output.

  17. Inhibitor analysis for a solar heating and cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabony, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    A study of potential corrosion inhibitors for the NASA solar heating and cooling system which uses aluminum solar panels is provided. Research consisted of testing using a dynamic corrosion system, along with an economic analysis of proposed corrosion inhibitors. Very good progress was made in finding a suitable inhibitor for the system.

  18. Automatic pre-cooling system for large infrared instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omata, Koji; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Colley, Stephen; Cook, David; Gorman, William; Magrath, Barney; Ramos, Lucio; Kleinman, Scot; Tokoku, Chihiro; Konishi, Masahiro; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Ichi; Suzuki, Ryuji

    2008-07-01

    An infrared instrument used for observation has to keep the detector and optical components in a very cold environment during operation. However, because of maintenance, upgrades, and other routine work, there are situations that require the instrument to be warmed-up and then cooled-down again. At Subaru Observatory, our MOIRCS infrared instrument has required warm-up and cool-down several times a year for routine maintenance and filter replacement. The MOIRCS instrument has a large heat capacity and cool-down using only the closed cycle cooler is impractical due to the huge amount of time it would require. To address this problem Subaru engineers have created a mechanism to allow PRE-COOLING of the instrument via liquid nitrogen - allowing for a much faster pre-cool process. Even with liquid nitrogen, the pre-cool process requires 10 tanks and almost a week of continual monitoring in order to reach the desired target temperature. It is very difficult to work for such a long period of time at the oxygen starved summit of Mauna Kea (4205 meters),and issues of man-power and scheduling conflicts only add to the problems. To address these concerns Subaru developed an automated pre-cooling system which works continuously and remotely at the summit. The strategy was to have basic functionality for pre-cooling and user friendly interface. i.e. (1) Continuous cooling until the target temperature is reached by automated liquid nitrogen tank exchanges and precision temperature control by automated changes to the liquid nitrogen flow. (2) Remote monitoring and control of all parameter setting by Web browser as user interface (UI). The goal of the Subaru pre-cooling system was to make it both inexpensive and quick to implement by using existing technologies. The original goal (to cut down on labor and precision temperature control) has been attained through several pre-cooling and software/hardware modification cycles. We will report on the progress and status of our pre-cooling

  19. ATP technology, a tool for monitoring microbes in cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Czechowski, M.H.

    1996-11-01

    Rapid and accurate measurement of microbes is important for controlling the formation of troublesome microbial slimes in cooling water systems. One method for accomplishing this involves the measurement of Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP), a compound used to store and transfer energy in microbial cells. Cellular ATP is determined by chemically rupturing cells, which releases ATP that reacts with a luciferase reagent (the firefly enzyme). This reaction produces light which can be detected by a sensitive luminometer/photometer. The amount of light produced is proportional to the amount of ATP in the cell. A quantitative indication of biological activity is obtained in minutes, compared to traditional plating methods which often require days of incubation. The use of ATP for microbial detection has been available for many years; however, industrial usage was limited because the ATP procedure was neither easy to perform nor was it cost effective. Recently, advances in instrument technology, extractant chemistry and enzyme stability have made ATP detection more practical and less expensive. ATP technology can be used for determining microbial content in cooling water systems, predicting biocide effectiveness, and monitoring efficacy of biocides in cooling systems. A good correlation (0.85) was found between microbial ATP values and bacterial Colony Forming Units (CFU) in cooling waters. ATP technology was used to determine the effectiveness of different concentrations of a biocide in a test system within 1 hour after biocide addition. Test results accurately predicted the biocide efficacy in the cooling tower. Effectiveness of other biocides in cooling systems were monitored with results being obtained within minutes after sampling. These findings indicate the potential for ATP technology to be an effective tool in monitoring microbes in cooling water systems.

  20. Pulse tube cryocooler SQUID cooling system involving an infrared temperature controller cooled by a cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, S.; Iwao, S.; Hatsukade, Y.

    2005-10-01

    We propose a pulse tube cryocooler SQUID cooling system, which temperature was controlled by an infrared source. A high-Tc SQUID magnetometer was mounted and cooled by a coaxial pulse tube cryocooler. A light from a halogen lamp was guided by a quartz flexible bundle fiber and was introduced to the cold head. The output power of the lamp was controlled by a temperature controller in accordance with the cold stage temperature. As a result, the flux noise of the SQUID output was not changed in the range of 1-1000 Hz regardless of the lamp power. The temperature could be controlled at 77 K with accuracy of ±0.03 K for long time duration more than 2 h. This demonstrated that the system can be applied to any applications such as NDE systems.

  1. Evaluation of materials for systems using cooled, treated geothermal or high-saline brines

    SciTech Connect

    Suciu, D.F.; Wikoff, P.M.

    1982-09-01

    Lack of adequate quantities of clean surface water for use in wet (evaporative) cooling systems indicates the use of high-salinity waste waters, or cooled geothermal brines, for makeup purposes. High-chloride, aerated water represents an extremely corrosive environment. In order to determine metals suitable for use in such an environment, metal coupons were exposed to aerated, treated geothermal brine salted to a chloride concentration of 10,000 and 50,000 ppM (mg/L) for periods of up to 30 days. The exposed coupons were evaluated to determine the general, pitting, and crevice corrosion characteristics of the metals. The metals exhibiting corrosion resistance at 50,000 ppM chloride were then evaluated at 100,000 and 200,000 ppM chloride. Since these were screening tests to select materials for components to be used in a cooling system, with primary emphasis on condenser tubing, several materials were exposed for 4 to 10 months in pilot cooling tower test units with heat transfer for further corrosion evaluation. The results of the screening tests indicate that ferritic stainless steels (29-4-2 and SEA-CURE) exhibit excellent corrosion resistance at all levels of chloride concentration. Copper-nickel alloys (70/30 and Monel 400) exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the high-saline water. The 70/30 copper-nickel alloy, which showed excellent resistance to general corrosion, exhibited mild pitting in the 30-day tests. This pitting was not apparent, however, after 6 months of exposure in the pilot cooling tower tests. The nickel-base alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance, but their high cost prevents their use unless no other material is found feasible. Other materials tested, although unsuitable for condenser tubing material, would be suitable as tube sheet material.

  2. Use of a temperature-initiated passive cooling system (TIPACS) for the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Conklin, J.; Reich, W.J.

    1994-04-01

    A new type of passive cooling system has been invented (Forsberg 1993): the Temperature-Initiated Passive Cooling System (TIPACS). The characteristics of the TIPACS potentially match requirements for an improved reactor-cavity-cooling system (RCCS) for the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR). This report is an initial evaluation of the TIPACS for the MHTGR with a Rankines (steam) power conversion cycle. Limited evaluations were made of applying the TIPACS to MHTGRs with reactor pressure vessel temperatures up to 450 C. These temperatures may occur in designs of Brayton cycle (gas turbine) and process heat MHTGRs. The report is structured as follows. Section 2 describes the containment cooling issues associated with the MHTGR and the requirements for such a cooling system. Section 3 describes TIPACS in nonmathematical terms. Section 4 describes TIPACS`s heat-removal capabilities. Section 5 analyzes the operation of the temperature-control mechanism that determines under what conditions the TIPACS rejects heat to the environment. Section 6 addresses other design and operational issues. Section 7 identifies uncertainties, and Section 8 provides conclusions. The appendixes provide the detailed data and models used in the analysis.

  3. Soil Evaporation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil evaporation can significantly influence energy flux partitioning of partially vegetated surfaces, ultimately affecting plant transpiration. While important, quantification of soil evaporation, separately from canopy transpiration, is challenging. Techniques for measuring soil evaporation exis...

  4. Effects of crop residue on soil and plant water evaporation in a dryland cotton system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascano, R. J.; Baumhardt, R. L.

    1996-03-01

    Dryland agricultural cropping systems emphasize sustaining crop yields with limited use of fertilizer while conserving both rain water and the soil. Conservation of these resources may be achieved with management systems that retain residues at the soil surface simultaneously modifying both its energy and water balance. A conservation practice used with cotton grown on erodible soils of the Texas High Plains is to plant cotton into chemically terminated wheat residues. In this study, the partitioning of daily and seasonal evapotranspiration ( E t) into soil and plant water evaporation was compared for a conventional and a terminated-wheat cotton crop using the numerical model ENWATBAL. The model was configured to account for the effects of residue on the radiative fluxes and by introducing an additional resistance to latent and sensible heat fluxes derived from measurements of wind speed and vapor conductance from a soil covered with wheat-stubble. Our results showed that seasonal E t was similar in both systems and that cumulative soil water evaporation was 50% of E t in conventional cotton and 31% of E t in the wheat-stubble cotton. Calculated values of E t were in agreement with measured values. The main benefit of the wheat residues was to suppress soil water evaporation by intercepting irradiance early in the growing season when the crop leaf area index (LAI) was low. In semiarid regions LAI of dryland cotton seldom exceeds 2 and residues can improve water conservation. Measured soil temperatures showed that early in the season residues reduced temperature at 0.1 m depth by as much as 5°C and that differences between systems diminished with depth and over time. Residues increased lint yield per unit of E t while not modifying seasonal E t and reducing cumulative soil water evaporation.

  5. Replacement inhibitors for tank farm cooling coil systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, T.C.

    1995-03-23

    Sodium chromate has been an effective corrosion inhibitor for the cooling coil systems in Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tanks for over 40 years. Due to their age and operating history, cooling coils occasionally fail allowing chromate water to leak into the environment. When the leaks spill 10 lbs. or more of sodium chromate over a 24-hr period, the leak incidents are classified as Unusual Occurrences (UO) per CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act). The cost of reporting and cleaning up chromate spills prompted High Level Waste Engineering (HLWE) to initiate a study to investigate alternative tank cooling water inhibitor systems and the associated cost of replacement. Several inhibitor systems were investigated as potential alternatives to sodium chromate. All would have a lesser regulatory impact, if a spill occurred. However, the conversion cost is estimated to be $8.5 million over a period of 8 to 12 months to convert all 5 cooling systems. Although each of the alternative inhibitors examined is effective in preventing corrosion, there is no inhibitor identified that is as effective as chromate. Assuming 3 major leaks a year (the average over the past several years), the cost of maintaining the existing inhibitor was estimated at $0.5 million per year. Since there is no economic or regulatory incentive to replace the sodium chromate with an alternate inhibitor, HLWE recommends that sodium chromate continue to be used as the inhibitor for the waste tank cooling systems.

  6. Development of a higher power cooling system for lithium targets.

    PubMed

    Phoenix, B; Green, S; Scott, M C; Bennett, J R J; Edgecock, T R

    2015-12-01

    The accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy beam at the University of Birmingham is based around a solid thick lithium target cooled by heavy water. Significant upgrades to Birmingham's Dynamitron accelerator are planned prior to commencing a clinical trial. These upgrades will result in an increase in maximum achievable beam current to at least 3 mA. Various upgrades to the target cooling system to cope with this increased power have been investigated. Tests of a phase change coolant known as "binary ice" have been carried out using an induction heater to provide a comparable power input to the Dynamitron beam. The experimental data shows no improvement over chilled water in the submerged jet system, with both systems exhibiting the same heat input to target temperature relation for a given flow rate. The relationship between the cooling circuit pumping rate and the target temperature in the submerged jet system has also been tested. PMID:26254970

  7. A novel personal cooling system (PCS) incorporated with phase change materials (PCMs) and ventilation fans: An investigation on its cooling efficiency.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yehu; Wei, Fanru; Lai, Dandan; Shi, Wen; Wang, Faming; Gao, Chuansi; Song, Guowen

    2015-08-01

    Personal cooling systems (PCS) have been developed to mitigate the impact of severe heat stress for humans working in hot environments. It is still a great challenge to develop PCSs that are portable, inexpensive, and effective. We studied the performance of a new hybrid PCS incorporating both ventilation fans and phase change materials (PCMs). The cooling efficiency of the newly developed PCS was investigated on a sweating manikin in two hot conditions: hot humid (HH, 34°C, 75% RH) and hot dry (HD, 34°C, 28% RH). Four test scenarios were selected: fans off with no PCMs (i.e., Fan-off, the CONTROL), fans on with no PCMs (i.e., Fan-on), fans off with fully solidified PCMs (i.e., PCM+Fan-off), and fans on with fully solidified PCMs (i.e., PCM+Fan-on). It was found that the addition of PCMs provided a 54∼78min cooling in HH condition. In contrast, the PCMs only offered a 19-39min cooling in HD condition. In both conditions, the ventilation fans greatly enhanced the evaporative heat loss compared with Fan-off. The hybrid PCS (i.e., PCM+Fan-on) provided a continuous cooling effect during the three-hour test and the average cooling rate for the whole body was around 111 and 315W in HH and HD conditions, respectively. Overall, the new hybrid PCS may be an effective means of ameliorating symptoms of heat stress in both hot-humid and hot-dry environments. PMID:26267508

  8. Dew-point hygrometry system for measurement of evaporative water loss in infants.

    PubMed

    Ariagno, R L; Glotzbach, S F; Baldwin, R B; Rector, D M; Bowley, S M; Moffat, R J

    1997-03-01

    Evaporation of water from the skin is an important mechanism in thermal homeostasis. Resistance hygrometry, in which the water vapor pressure gradient above the skin surface is calculated, has been the measurement method of choice in the majority of pediatric investigations. However, resistance hygrometry is influenced by changes in ambient conditions such as relative humidity, surface temperature, and convection currents. We have developed a ventilated capsule method that minimized these potential sources of measurement error and that allowed second-by-second, long-term, continuous measurements of evaporative water loss in sleeping infants. Air with a controlled reference humidity (dew-point temperature = 0 degree C) is delivered to a small, lightweight skin capsule and mixed with the vapor on the surface of the skin. The dew point of the resulting mixture is measured by using a chilled mirror dew-point hygrometer. The system indicates leaks, is mobile, and is accurate within 2%, as determined by gravimetric calibration. Examples from a recording of a 13-wk-old full-term infant obtained by using the system give evaporative water loss rates of approximately 0.02 mgH2O.cm-2.min-1 for normothermic baseline conditions and values up to 0.4 mgH2O.cm-2. min-1 when the subject was being warmed. The system is effective for clinical investigations that require dynamic measurements of water loss. PMID:9074995

  9. Seminar 14 - Desiccant Enhanced Air Conditioning: Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kozubal, E.

    2013-02-01

    This presentation explains how liquid desiccant based coupled with an indirect evaporative cooler can efficiently produce cool, dry air, and how a liquid desiccant membrane air conditioner can efficiently provide cooling and dehumidification without the carryover problems of previous generations of liquid desiccant systems. It provides an overview to a liquid desiccant DX air conditioner that can efficiently provide cooling and dehumidification to high latent loads without the need for reheat, explains how liquid desiccant cooling and dehumidification systems can outperform vapor compression based air conditioning systems in hot and humid climates, explains how liquid desiccant cooling and dehumidification systems work, and describes a refrigerant free liquid desiccant based cooling system.

  10. Effect of working fluid on the performance of a miniature heat pipe system for cooling desktop processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Ahmed Imtiaz; Feroz, Chowdhury Md.

    2009-11-01

    The heat transfer performance of a miniature heat pipe system (MHPS) used for cooling a desktop computer processor is presented in this paper. The MHPS consists of 6 parallel cylindrical miniature heat pipes (MHPs) which are connected to a copper block at the evaporator section and which are provided with 15 parallel perpendicular copper sheets at the condenser section, used as external cooling fins. Acetone and ethanol are used as working fluids. As heat source a processor is employed which is attached to the copper block. Heat transfer characteristics of the individual MHPs and the complete MHPS using the two working fluids are experimentally determined. The results show that the maximum and steady state temperature of the processor has been significantly reduced by using MHPs with acetone, more than with ethanol, instead of a conventional finned aluminum heat sink with cooling fan. Additional use of a fan results in a much lower processor temperature for both working fluids.

  11. Cooling system optimization analysis for hot forming processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoo, Bonyoung; Umezu, Yasuyoshi; Watanabe, Yuko

    2013-12-01

    Hot forming technology was developed to produce automotive panels having ultra-high tensile stress over 1500MPa. The elevated temperature corresponds with decreased flow stress and increased ductility. Furthermore, hot forming products have almost zero springback amounts. This advanced forming technology accelerates the needs for numerical simulations coupling with thermal-mechanical formulations. In the present study, 3-dimensional finite element analyses for hot forming processes are conducted using JSTAMP/NV and LS-DYNA considering cooling system. Special attention is paid to the optimization of cooling system using thermo-mechanical finite element analysis through the influence of various cooling parameters. The presented work shows an adequate cooling system functions and microstructural phase transformation material model together with a proper set of numerical parameters can give both efficient and accurate design insight in hot forming manufacturing process. JSTAMP/NV and LS-DYNA can become a robust combination set for complex hot forming analysis which needs thermo-mechanical and microstructural material modeling and various process modeling. The use of the new JSTAMP/NV function for multishot manufacturing process is shown good capabilities in cooling system evaluation. And the use of the advanced LS-DYNA microstructural phase transformation model is shown good evaluation results in martensite amount and Vickers hardness after quenching.

  12. Reactor with natural convection backup cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Koutz, S.L.; Cavallaro, L.; Kapich, D.D.

    1988-07-26

    A nuclear reactor is described comprising: a closed vessel containing a pool of secondary coolant; a reactor core located within the pool; an inlet conduit system for directing primary coolant to the lower end of the core; pumping means for effecting flow of the primary coolant into the inlet conduit system; an outlet conduit system located above the core for receiving coolant from the upper end of the core and carrying it to an exterior outlet pipe; and pressure reduction means for reducing fluid pressure in the inlet conduit system adjacent all of the one or more opening therein by locally increasing fluid velocity adjacent all of the one or more openings.

  13. Thermal hydraulic modeling of integrated cooling water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Niyogi, K.K.; Rathi, J.S.; Phan, T.Q.; Chaudhary, A.

    1994-12-31

    Thermal hydraulic modeling of cooling water systems has been extended to multiple system configurations with heat exchangers as interface components between systems. The computer program PC-TRAX has been used as the basic tool for the system simulation. Additional heat exchanger modules have been incorporated to accurately predict the thermal performance of systems for the design as well as off-design conditions. The modeling accommodates time-dependent changes in conditions, temperature and pressure controllers, and detailed physical parameters of the heat exchangers. The modeling has been illustrated with examples from actual plant systems. An integrated system consisting of Spent Fuel Pool, Primary Component Cooling Water, and Service Water System has been successfully modeled to predict their performance under normal operations and emergency conditions. System configurations are changed from the base model by using a command module.

  14. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Progress is reviewed in the development, delivery, and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. The system consisted of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

  15. Problems encountered in solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, M.

    1979-01-01

    Report discussing various experiences of workers at Marshall Space Flight Center in developing solar heating and cooling systems is presented. Presents compilation of problems and their resolutions which can assist designers of solar-energy systems and prevent repetition of errors.

  16. Preliminary design study of astronomical detector cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    The preliminary design of an astronomical detector cooling system for possible use in the NASA C-141 Airborne Infrared Observatory is presented. The system consists of the following elements: supercritical helium tank, Joule-Thomson supply gas conditioner, Joule-Thomson expander (JTX), optical cavity dewar, optical cavity temperature controller, adjustable J-T discharge gas pressure controller, and vacuum pump.

  17. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    These combined quarterly reports summarize the activities from November 1977 through September 1978, and over the progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. The system consists of the following subsystems: solar collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

  18. A System for Cooling inside a Glove Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanz, Martial

    2010-01-01

    An easy, efficient, reliable, and low-cost method of constructing a cooling system using a simple circulating pump is described. The system is employed in conjunction with an inert atmosphere glove box to achieve the synthesis of air- and moisture-sensitive compounds inside the glove box at controlled, low temperatures without contaminating the…

  19. An assessment of dehumidifier geometries for desiccant cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, R. S.

    1983-06-01

    Dehumidifier geometries for open-cycle, solid desiccant cooling systems are assessed in order to identify those configurations which have the greatest potential of achieving performance levels that will make desiccant cooling systems economically competitive with conventional vapor-compression systems. Five dehumidifier designs are described and compared quantitatively. Compared characteristics were then related to the requirements of solar cooling application. The wound-ribbon dehumidifer design showed the highest ratio of Stanton number to friction factor and the lowest solid-side resistance to mass transfer of any geometry tested. Because of the high potential of the wound-ribbon configuration, it is recommended that further research be carried out to fully characterized this type of dehumidifier.

  20. Traveling Wave RF Systems for Helical Cooling Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K.; Lunin, A.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Romanov, G.; Neubauer, M.; Johnson, R.P.; Thorndahl, L.; /CERN

    2009-05-01

    The great advantage of the helical ionization cooling channel (HCC) is its compact structure that enables the fast cooling of muon beam 6-dimensional phase space. This compact aspect requires a high average RF gradient, with few places that do not have cavities. Also, the muon beam is diffuse and requires an RF system with large transverse and longitudinal acceptance. A traveling wave system can address these requirements. First, the number of RF power coupling ports can be significantly reduced compared with our previous pillbox concept. Secondly, by adding a nose on the cell iris, the presence of thin metal foils traversed by the muons can possibly be avoided. We show simulations of the cooling performance of a traveling wave RF system in a HCC, including cavity geometries with inter-cell RF power couplers needed for power propagation.

  1. An In-House Thermal Evaporation System for Anti-Reflection An In-House Thermal Evaporation System for Anti-Reflection Coating of Laser Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, Sarah; Nguyen, Duong; Killian, Thomas; Hulet, Randall

    2006-05-01

    Laser diodes have become a very popular and powerful tool in AMO research due to their frequency tunability, small size and low cost. These devices are often used in external cavity diode lasers (ECDL) and injection locked amplifers. In both cases, in order to maintain frequency stability, the reflectivity of the diode facet must be as low as possible. Anti-reflection coating these devices is a commerically available, but rather expensive, procedure. In this poster, we present an in-house thermal evaporation system designed for coating diode lasers with SiO in a vacuum chamber capable of reaching 10-5 torr. We monitor the coating process by measuing the threshold current of the laser diode in-situ. We present reflectivity and coating stability results.

  2. Simulation model for the performance analysis of roof pond systems for heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Tavana, M.; Kammerud, R.; Akbari, H.; Borgers, T.

    1980-06-01

    A detailed computer model has been developed for simulating the dynamic thermal behavior of roof pond systems. The model is composed of outer movable insulation, an optional evaporative water layer over water bags on steel decking, and an inner movable insulation. A control strategy for the movable insulations which provides near optimum thermal performance is included in the model. An hourly thermal balance analysis of the system is performed using theoretical and/or empirical expressions to determine the heat transfer coefficients for each of the surfaces in the model. The model has been used to study the effect on system thermal performance of (1) the R-value of both the top and bottom movable insulations; (2) the depth of the pond water, and (3) the depth of the evaporative layer. The heating and cooling potentials of the roof pond have also been investigated in four climates. The model was developed for incorporation into the public domain building energy analysis computer program BLAST.

  3. Application of the TXM system to EB evaporation of alloys -- an update

    SciTech Connect

    Schiller, N.

    1994-12-31

    High Rate E.B. evaporation of alloys with volatile components demands a sophisticated process control to obtain the required layer composition as well as the required deposition rate. In recent years, the analysis of X-radiation emitted from the melting bath of an electron beam facility has been successfully investigated in relation with real time determination of bath composition. X-ray analytical on-line measurements during E.B. evaporation of alloys show that the bath composition is indicative of material feed and layer composition. By the X-ray analytical monitoring of the bath composition the layer composition as well as the deposition rate can be controlled. The TXM-System offers a way to put this approach into effect for high power industrial applications. High analysing accuracies can be achieved. In addition the integration of the TXM-System into the E.B. evaporation as well as E.B. melting technology of a producer permits him to understand better the interaction between process parameters and alloy composition.

  4. Thermotunneling Based Cooling Systems for High Efficiency Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Aimi, Marco; Arik, Mehmet; Bray, James; Gorczyca, Thomas; Michael, Darryl; Weaver, Stan

    2007-09-30

    GE Global Research's overall objective was to develop a novel thermotunneling-cooling device. The end use for these devices is the replacement of vapor cycle compression (VCC) units in residential and commercial cooling and refrigeration systems. Thermotunneling devices offer many advantages over vapor cycle compression cooling units. These include quiet, reliable, non-moving parts operation without refrigerant gases. Additionally theoretical calculations suggest that the efficiency of thermotunneling devices can be 1.5-2x that of VCC units. Given these attributes it can be seen that thermotunneling devices have the potential for dramatic energy savings and are environmentally friendly. A thermotunneling device consists of two low work function electrodes separated by a sub 10 nanometer-sized gap. Cooling by thermotunneling refers to the transport of hot electrons across the gap, from the object to be cooled (cathode) to the heat rejection electrode (anode), by an applied potential. GE Global Research's goal was to model, design, fabricate devices and demonstrate cooling base on the thermotunneling technology.

  5. Vapor compression evaporator concentrates, recovers alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.N.; Robe, K.; Bacchetti, J.A.

    1982-11-01

    This article focuses on presenting a solution to the high energy cost of operating a steam heated, single effect evaporator used by Monsanto Industrial Chemical Company at a plant in Seattle, Wash., to produce vanillin from pulp and paper mill sulfite. Use of the single effect flash evaporator resulted in high energy usage due not only to the ''single effect'' use of steam, but also because energy consumption was reduced only slightly at low operating rates. The solution to this problem was the replacement of the single effect evaporator with a vapor recompression evaporator. Operating for over 1 1/2 years, the vapor recompression evaporator system has had no significant maintenance problems. The system operates with only 1/60th the steam consumption and 15% of the total energy consumption of the previous evaporator and has had no tube fouling. Also, since the distillate is condensed within the evaporator, less cooling water is required, allowing two heat exchangers to be taken out of service. When operating at less than design capacity, the energy consumption drops almost linearly with the feed rate. At low feed rates, a by-pass valve unloads the compressor to reduce energy consumption. Total energy consumption, now 15% of the previous level, results in an estimated pay-back of less than three years.

  6. Systems Evaluation at the Cool Energy House

    SciTech Connect

    J. Williamson and S. Puttagunta

    2013-09-01

    Steven Winter Associates, Inc. (SWA) monitored several advanced mechanical systems within a 2012 deep energy retrofitted home in the small Orlando suburb of Windermere, FL. This report provides performance results of one of the home's heat pump water heaters (HPWH) and the whole-house dehumidifier (WHD) over a six month period. In addition to assessing the energy performance of these systems, this study sought to quantify potential comfort improvements over traditional systems. This information is applicable to researchers, designers, plumbers, and HVAC contractors. Though builders and homeowners can find useful information within this report, the corresponding case studies are a likely better reference for this audience.

  7. Systems Evaluation at the Cool Energy House

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, J.; Puttagunta, S.

    2013-09-01

    Steven Winter Associates, Inc. (SWA) monitored several advanced mechanical systems within a 2012 deep energy retrofitted home in the small Orlando suburb of Windermere, FL. This report provides performance results of one of the home's heat pump water heaters (HPWH) and the whole-house dehumidifier (WHD) over a six month period. In addition to assessing the energy performance of these systems,this study sought to quantify potential comfort improvements over traditional systems. This information is applicable to researchers, designers, plumbers, and HVAC contractors. Though builders and homeowners can find useful information within this report, the corresponding case studies are a likely better reference for this audience.

  8. The development of a solar residential heating and cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The MSFC solar heating and cooling facility was assembled to demonstrate the engineering feasibility of utilizing solar energy for heating and cooling buildings, to provide an engineering evaluation of the total system and the key subsystems, and to investigate areas of possible improvement in design and efficiency. The basic solar heating and cooling system utilizes a flat plate solar energy collector, a large water tank for thermal energy storage, heat exchangers for space heating, and an absorption cycle air conditioner for space cooling. A complete description of all systems is given. Development activities for this test system included assembly, checkout, operation, modification, and data analysis, all of which are discussed. Selected data analyses for the first 15 weeks of testing are included, findings associated with energy storage and the energy storage system are outlined, and conclusions resulting from test findings are provided. An evaluation of the data for summer operation indicates that the current system is capable of supplying an average of 50 percent of the thermal energy required to drive the air conditioner. Preliminary evaluation of data collected for operation in the heating mode during the winter indicates that nearly 100 percent of the thermal energy required for heating can be supplied by the system.

  9. Cavity Cooling of A Mechanical Resonator in Amorphous Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lin

    2011-03-01

    The quantum backaction force generated by a cavity coupled with a mechanical resonator can be exploited to achieve sideband cooling of the mechanical mode. By applying a red-detuned driving, the quantum ground state of the mechanical mode can be reached in the resolved-sideband regime, which has recently be demonstrated in experiments. However, in many of these materials, surface defects or adsorbates can couple with the mechanical mode and impair the cavity cooling. These defects can be treated as quantum two-level system (TLS). The mechanical vibration changes the local strain tensor and generates coupling with the TLS via the deformation potential. In this work, we study the cavity cooling of the mechanical mode in the presence of a TLS. By applying the adiabatic elimination technique widely used in quantum optics, we derive the cooling master equation for the resonator-TLS system in the eigenbasis of this system. Our results show that the stationary phonon number depends non- monotonically on the energy of the TLS. We also show that the cooling depends strongly on the decoherence rate of the TLS. This work is supported by the DARPA/MTO ORCHID program through AFOSR, NSF-DMR-0956064, NSF-CCF-0916303, and NSF COINS program.

  10. AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE 1. UNIT IV, MAINTAINING THE COOLING SYSTEM--DETROIT DIESEL ENGINES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Engineering Inst., Cleveland, OH.

    THIS MODULE OF A 30-MODULE COURSE IS DESIGNED TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF THE DIESEL ENGINE COOLING SYSTEM. TOPICS ARE PURPOSE OF THE COOLING SYSTEM, CARE MAINTENANCE OF THE COOLING SYSTEM, COOLING SYSTEM COMPONENTS, AND TROUBLESHOOTING TIPS. THE MODULE CONSISTS OF A SELF-INSTRUCTIONAL BRANCH PROGRAMED TRAINING…

  11. Radiation detector system having heat pipe based cooling

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Saveliev, Valeri D.; Barkan, Shaul

    2006-10-31

    A radiation detector system having a heat pipe based cooling. The radiation detector system includes a radiation detector thermally coupled to a thermo electric cooler (TEC). The TEC cools down the radiation detector, whereby heat is generated by the TEC. A heat removal device dissipates the heat generated by the TEC to surrounding environment. A heat pipe has a first end thermally coupled to the TEC to receive the heat generated by the TEC, and a second end thermally coupled to the heat removal device. The heat pipe transfers the heat generated by the TEC from the first end to the second end to be removed by the heat removal device.

  12. A Field-Test of Solar Assisted Adsorptive Desiccant Cooling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkura, Masashi; Kodama, Akio; Hirose, Tsutomu

    A field-test of solar assisted desiccant evaporative cooling process has been carried out, which is a quite attractive cooling / dehumidification process considering various environmental problems caused by conventional electricity driven air conditioners. The process performance has been examined by means of temperature drop between outside air and supply air and COPs (COP value based on solar irradiation). This cooling performance was strongly influenced by solar irradiation and ambient air condition. Stable irradiation produced a higher regeneration temperature resulting higher dehumidifying performance. At one day with as table solar irradiation, the cooling process could produce cool supply air of 18.7°C against the ambient air of 30.1°C and averaged COP, was 0.41. On the other hand, unstable irradiation due to some clouds made the dehumidifying performance lower. However, decrease in the cooling performance was small compared to that obtained at the stable irradiation condition. This is due to buffering by thermal storage of the water circulating in solar collectors. Influence of ambient humidity on the cooling performance was rather serious. At higher humidity condition, the amount of dehumidified water became larger due to increase of effective adsorption capacity of the desiccant rotor. However, the temperature drop was decreased to 6.9°C. This behavior was mainly due to simultaneous increase of humidity and temperature in the dehumidified air. In this situation, an effective evaporation in the following water spray evaporative cooler did not occur.

  13. Development of liquid-film tracking models for analysis of AP-600 passive containment cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J.G.; Sha, W.T.; Chen, Y.S.

    1993-10-01

    The AP-600, an advanced pressurized water reactor, utilizes a passive containment cooling system (PCCS) to remove heat released inside the containment vessel following postulated design-base accidents (DBAS) such as a main-steam-line break or loss-of-coolant accident. The containment vessel consists of a vertical cylindrical shell and is capped at both top and bottom by a dome that is also a body of revolution with a meridian cross section in the shape of a semiellipse with a horizontal major axis. During a DBA, heat released to the interior of the steel containment vessel is removed by evaporation of a continuously flowing thin liquid film on the outside surface of the vessel, thus lowering the temperature of the steel vessel wall so that steam condenses on its inside surface. The external liquid film is formed by flooding water at top of the ellipsoidal dome. Evaporation of the falling liquid film is enhanced by buoyancy-driven flows of moist air in an annular space outside the steel containment vessel. To ensure PCCS performance, it is necessary to predict both the evaporating film on the outside surface of the vessel and the condensate film on its inside. To this end, two liquid-film tracking models for time-dependent flows (a simplified model and a comprehensive model) have been developed and implemented in the COMMIX code. COMMIX is a general-purpose, time-dependent, multidimensional computer code for thermal hydraulic analysis of single- or multicomponent engineering systems. It solves a system of conservation equations of continuities for up to six species, mixture momentum, and mixture energy, and a k-{epsilon} two-equation turbulent model. A unique feature of the COMMIX code is its porous-media formulation, which represents the first unified approach to thermal-hydraulic analysis. The tracking models discussed in this report compute the liquid-film thickness, its mean velocity, and its temperature on both sides of the steel containment vessel.

  14. Better Duct Systems for Home Heating and Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-11-01

    Duct systems used in forced-air space-conditioning systems are a vital element in home energy efficiency. How well a system works makes a big difference in the cost and the effectiveness of heating and cooling a home. At the same time, a duct system that is poorly designed or maintained can have a detrimental effect on the health of the people who live in the house, through the unintended distribution of indoor air pollution.

  15. Wind turbine generators having wind assisted cooling systems and cooling methods

    DOEpatents

    Bagepalli, Bharat; Barnes, Gary R.; Gadre, Aniruddha D.; Jansen, Patrick L.; Bouchard, Jr., Charles G.; Jarczynski, Emil D.; Garg, Jivtesh

    2008-09-23

    A wind generator includes: a nacelle; a hub carried by the nacelle and including at least a pair of wind turbine blades; and an electricity producing generator including a stator and a rotor carried by the nacelle. The rotor is connected to the hub and rotatable in response to wind acting on the blades to rotate the rotor relative to the stator to generate electricity. A cooling system is carried by the nacelle and includes at least one ambient air inlet port opening through a surface of the nacelle downstream of the hub and blades, and a duct for flowing air from the inlet port in a generally upstream direction toward the hub and in cooling relation to the stator.

  16. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A combination of monthly progress reports are presented. It contains a summary of activities and progress made from November 1, 1978, to February 28, 1979. The effort calls for the development, manufacture, test, system installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation.

  17. Energy Integrated Lighting-Heating-Cooling System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meckler, Gershon; And Others

    1964-01-01

    Energy balance problems in the design of office buildings are analyzed. Through the use of integrated systems utilizing dual purpose products, a controlled environment with minimum expenditure of energy, equipment and space can be provided. Contents include--(1) office building occupancy loads, (2) office building heating load analysis, (3) office…

  18. Development of an Integrated Residential Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification System for Residences

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeschele, M.A.; D.A. Springer

    2008-06-18

    The Need and the Opportunity Codes such as ASHRAE 90.2 and IECC, and programs such as Energy Star and Builders Challenge, are causing new homes to be built to higher performance standards. As a result sensible cooling loads in new homes are going down, but indoor air quality prerogatives are causing ventilation rates and moisture loads to increase in humid climates. Conventional air conditioners are unable to provide the low sensible heat ratios that are needed to efficiently cool and dehumidify homes since dehumidification potential is strongly correlated with cooling system operating hours. The project team saw an opportunity to develop a system that is at least as effective as a conventional air conditioner plus dehumidifier, removes moisture without increasing the sensible load, reduces equipment cost by integrating components, and simplifies installation. Project Overview Prime contractor Davis Energy Group led a team in developing an Integrated Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification (I-HVCD) system under the DOE SBIR program. Phase I and II SBIR project activities ran from July 2003 through December 2007. Tasks included: (1) Mechanical Design and Prototyping; (2) Controls Development; (3) Laboratory and Field Testing; and (4) Commercialization Activities Technology Description. Key components of the prototype I-HVCD system include an evaporator coil assembly, return and outdoor air damper, and controls. These are used in conjunction with conventional components that include a variable speed air handler or furnace, and a two-stage condensing unit. I-HVCD controls enable the system to operate in three distinct cooling modes to respond to indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) levels. When sensible cooling loads are high, the system operates similar to a conventional system but varies supply airflow in response to indoor RH. In the second mode airflow is further reduced, and the reheat coil adds heat to the supply air. In the third mode, the

  19. X-ray driven evaporation of exoplanet atmospheres: discovery of a uniquely suited test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppenhaeger, Katja

    2013-09-01

    The evaporation of exoplanetary atmospheres is thought to be driven by high-energy irradiation. However, the actual mass loss rates are not well constrained. Co-I Kipping has recently discovered that the star KOI-314, an M1V dwarf at 65 pc distance, is orbited by two earth-sized planets, the inner one of them rocky and the outer one gaseous (P_orb = 14d and 23d). Other recent works have shown an abundance of small rocky planets in very close orbits around their host stars, suggesting that the stellar high-energy irradiation evaporates away gaseous envelopes. KOI-314 is the first nearby system in which earth-sized planets of both types are detected, allowing us to constrain the efficiency of planetary evaporation if the stellar X-ray irradiation is measured. We therefore propose a 10 ks Chandra ACIS-S pointing to determine the stellar X-ray luminosity and hardness ratio. The accuracy of the orbital solution decreases quickly due to Transit-Timing Variations, which is why we ask for DDT.

  20. The performance of a mobile air conditioning system with a water cooled condenser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Battista, Davide; Cipollone, Roberto

    2015-11-01

    Vehicle technological evolution lived, in recent years, a strong acceleration due to the increased awareness of environmental issues related to pollutants and climate altering emissions. This resulted in a series of international regulations on automotive sector which put technical challenges that must consider the engine and the vehicle as a global system, in order to improve the overall efficiency of the system. The air conditioning system of the cabin, for instance, is the one of the most important auxiliaries in a vehicle and requires significant powers. Its performances can be significantly improved if it is integrated within the engine cooling circuit, eventually modified with more temperature levels. In this paper, the Authors present a mathematical model of the A/C system, starting from its single components: compressors, condenser, flush valve and evaporator and a comparison between different refrigerant fluid. In particular, it is introduced the opportunity to have an A/C condenser cooled by a water circuit instead of the external air linked to the vehicle speed, as in the actual traditional configuration. The A/C condenser, in fact, could be housed on a low temperature water circuit, reducing the condensing temperature of the refrigeration cycle with a considerable efficiency increase.

  1. Gas cooled fuel cell systems technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feret, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    The first phase of a planned multiphase program to develop a Phosphoric is addressed. This report describes the efforts performed that culminated in the: (1) Establishment of the preliminary design requirements and system conceptual design for the nominally rated 375 kW PAFC module and is interfacing power plant systems; (2) Establishment of PAFC component and stack performance, endurance, and design parameter data needed for design verification for power plant application; (3) Improvement of the existing PAFC materials data base and establishment of materials specifications and process procedes for the cell components; and (4) Testing of 122 subscale cell atmospheric test for 110,000 cumulative test hours, 12 subscale cell pressurized tests for 15,000 cumulative test hours, and 12 pressurized stack test for 10,000 cumulative test hours.

  2. He-3 cooling systems for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, P.

    1984-01-01

    The development of a space-compatible He(3) refrigerator would provide a significant improvement in several areas of research in the 0.3 to 1 K temperature range. There are several methods of achieving these temperatures on Earth: He(3) refrigeration, dilution refrigeration, and adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration. The progress of adapting He(3) refrigeration for use in space is described. Various cycles and possible embodiments of He(3) refrigerators are described. Also included is an analysis of the liquid confinement and liquid-vapor phase-separation system. A possible configuration is then analyzed. Finally, the results of ground-based experiments will be discussed.

  3. Corrosion inhibitors for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Deramus, G. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Problems dealing with corrosion and corrosion protection of solar heating and cooling systems are discussed. A test program was conducted to find suitable and effective corrosion inhibitors for systems employing either water or antifreeze solutions for heat transfer and storage. Aluminum-mild-steel-copper-stainless steel assemblies in electrical contact were used to simulate a multimetallic system which is the type most likely to be employed. Several inhibitors show promise for this application.

  4. BETTER DUCT SYSTEMS FOR HOME HEATING AND COOLING.

    SciTech Connect

    ANDREWS,J.

    2001-01-01

    This is a series of six guides intended to provide a working knowledge of residential heating and cooling duct systems, an understanding of the major issues concerning efficiency, comfort, health, and safety, and practical tips on installation and repair of duct systems. These guides are intended for use by contractors, system designers, advanced technicians, and other HVAC professionals. The first two guides are also intended to be accessible to the general reader.

  5. Solar Heating and Cooling of Residential Buildings: Design of Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins. Solar Energy Applications Lab.

    This is the second of two training courses designed to develop the capability of practitioners in the home building industry to design solar heating and cooling systems. The course is organized in 23 modules to separate selected topics and to facilitate learning. Although a compact schedule of one week is shown, a variety of formats can be…

  6. Twelve solar-heating/cooling systems: Design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Two quarterly reports describe first 6 months of development on single family, multifamily, and commercial installations in Minneapolis area. Reports discuss basic requirements, and reasons for selecting specific configurations. Systems consist of liquid cooled flat plate collectors, two fluid loops, and gas-fired forced-air auxiliary heat source.

  7. Cooling System: Automotive Mechanics Instructional Program. Block 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Ralph D.

    The last of six instructional blocks in automotive mechanics, the lessons and supportive information in the document provide a guide for teachers in planning an instructional program in the automotive cooling system at the secondary and post secondary level. The material, as organized, is a suggested sequence of instruction within each block. Each…

  8. System design package for a solar heating and cooling system installed at Akron, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Information used to evaluate the design of a solar heating, cooling, and domestic hot water system is given. A conventional heat pump provides summer cooling items as the design data brochure, system performance specification, system hazard analysis, spare parts list, and detailed design drawings. A solar system is installed in a single-family dwelling at Akron, Ohio, and at Duffield, Virginia.

  9. Experimental study of high-performance cooling system pipeline diameter and working fluid amount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Patrik; Malcho, Milan; Hrabovsky, Peter; Papučík, Štefan

    2016-03-01

    This work deals with heat transfer resulting from the operation of power electronic components. Heat is removed from the mounting plate, which is the evaporator of the loop thermosyphon to the condenser and by natural convection is transferred to ambient. This work includes proposal of cooling device - loop thermosyphon, with its construct and follow optimization of cooling effect. Optimization proceeds by selecting the quantity of working fluid and selection of diameters vapour line and liquid line of loop thermosyphon.

  10. Air conditioning system with supplemental ice storing and cooling capacity

    DOEpatents

    Weng, Kuo-Lianq; Weng, Kuo-Liang

    1998-01-01

    The present air conditioning system with ice storing and cooling capacity can generate and store ice in its pipe assembly or in an ice storage tank particularly equipped for the system, depending on the type of the air conditioning system. The system is characterized in particular in that ice can be produced and stored in the air conditioning system whereby the time of supplying cooled air can be effectively extended with the merit that the operation cycle of the on and off of the compressor can be prolonged, extending the operation lifespan of the compressor in one aspect. In another aspect, ice production and storage in great amount can be performed in an off-peak period of the electrical power consumption and the stored ice can be utilized in the peak period of the power consumption so as to provide supplemental cooling capacity for the compressor of the air conditioning system whereby the shift of peak and off-peak power consumption can be effected with ease. The present air conditioning system can lower the installation expense for an ice-storing air conditioning system and can also be applied to an old conventional air conditioning system.

  11. The integration of cryogenic cooling systems with superconducting electronic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.

    2003-07-01

    The need for cryogenic cooling has been critical issue that has kept superconducting electronic devices from reaching the market place. Even though the performance of the superconducting circuit is superior to silicon electronics, the requirement for cryogenic cooling has put the superconducting devices at a disadvantage. This report will talk about the various methods for refrigerating superconducting devices. Cryocooler types will be compared for vibration, efficiency, and cost. Some solutions to specific problems of integrating cryocoolers to superconducting devices are presented.

  12. An innovative system for heating and cooling a gymnasium using integrated photovoltaic-thermal solar collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fanchiotti, A.; Herkel, S.; Laukamp, H.; Priolo, C.

    1996-11-01

    The paper describes a new solar energy based system to heat and cool a gymnasium and to generate electricity in the city of Palermo, Italy. The gymnasium will be built in 1996 as part of the structures that will host the Universiadi Games in 1997. Main objectives of the project are: (a) to grant better environmental conditions in the area occupied by the public, with limited use of fossil energy; (b) to reduce the temperature of the photovoltaic elements, thus increasing their efficiency. The system consists of an array of 203 m{sup 2} integrated photovoltaic-thermal solar air collectors. In the winter mode of operation, the heated air is passed through the concrete benches where the public is seated. In the summer mode of operation outside air is evaporatively cooled, passed through the benches, then exhausted to the outside after passing through the collectors. The paper presents some of the results obtained by simulating the system at the design stage for winter conditions.

  13. Successful water reuse in open recirculating cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vaska, M.; Lee, B.

    1994-12-31

    Water reuse in open recirculating cooling water systems is becoming increasingly prevalent in industry. Reuse can incorporate a number of varied approaches with the primary goal being water conservation. Market forces driving this trend include scarcity of fresh water makeup sources and higher costs associated with pretreatment of natural waters. Utilization of reuse water for cooling tower makeup has especially detrimental effects on corrosion and deposit rates. Additionally, once the reuse water is cycled and treated with inhibitors, dispersants and microbiocides, acceptability for discharge to a public waterway can be a concern. The task for water treatment suppliers is to guide industry in the feasibility and procedures for successfully achieving these goals. This paper focuses particularly on reuse of municipal wastewater for cooling tower makeup and explores techniques which have been found especially effective. Case histories are described where these concepts have been successfully applied in practice.

  14. Solar heating and cooling system installed at Leavenworth, Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A solar heating and cooling is described which is designed to furnish 90 percent of the overall heating load, 70 percent of the cooling load and 100 percent of the domestic hot water load. The building has two floors with a total of 12,000 square feet gross area. The system has 120 flat-plate liquid solar panels with a net area of 2,200 square feet. Five 3 ton Arkla solar assisted absorption units provide the cooling, in conjunction with a 3,000 gallon chilled water storage tank. Two 3,000 gallon storage tanks are provided with one designated for summer use, whereas both tanks are utilized during winter.

  15. Solar heating and cooling system installed at Leavenworth, Kansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-06-01

    A solar heating and cooling is described which is designed to furnish 90 percent of the overall heating load, 70 percent of the cooling load and 100 percent of the domestic hot water load. The building has two floors with a total of 12,000 square feet gross area. The system has 120 flat-plate liquid solar panels with a net area of 2,200 square feet. Five 3 ton Arkla solar assisted absorption units provide the cooling, in conjunction with a 3,000 gallon chilled water storage tank. Two 3,000 gallon storage tanks are provided with one designated for summer use, whereas both tanks are utilized during winter.

  16. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Cavity Cooling System

    SciTech Connect

    Frisani, Angelo; Hassan, Yassin A; Ugaz, Victor M

    2010-11-02

    The design of passive heat removal systems is one of the main concerns for the modular very high temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTR) vessel cavity. The reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) is a key heat removal system during normal and off-normal conditions. The design and validation of the RCCS is necessary to demonstrate that VHTRs can survive to the postulated accidents. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) STAR-CCM+/V3.06.006 code was used for three-dimensional system modeling and analysis of the RCCS. A CFD model was developed to analyze heat exchange in the RCCS. The model incorporates a 180-deg section resembling the VHTR RCCS experimentally reproduced in a laboratory-scale test facility at Texas A&M University. All the key features of the experimental facility were taken into account during the numerical simulations. The objective of the present work was to benchmark CFD tools against experimental data addressing the behavior of the RCCS following accident conditions. Two cooling fluids (i.e., water and air) were considered to test the capability of maintaining the RCCS concrete walls' temperature below design limits. Different temperature profiles at the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) wall obtained from the experimental facility were used as boundary conditions in the numerical analyses to simulate VHTR transient evolution during accident scenarios. Mesh convergence was achieved with an intensive parametric study of the two different cooling configurations and selected boundary conditions. To test the effect of turbulence modeling on the RCCS heat exchange, predictions using several different turbulence models and near-wall treatments were evaluated and compared. The comparison among the different turbulence models analyzed showed satisfactory agreement for the temperature distribution inside the RCCS cavity medium and at the standpipes walls. For such a complicated geometry and flow conditions, the tested turbulence models demonstrated that the

  17. Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well a previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--1992 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space hearing systems, (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters, (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems, (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project, (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research, and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Experimental Studies of NGNP Reactor Cavity Cooling System With Water

    SciTech Connect

    Corradini, Michael; Anderson, Mark; Hassan, Yassin; Tokuhiro, Akira

    2013-01-16

    This project will investigate the flow behavior that can occur in the reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) with water coolant under the passive cooling-mode of operation. The team will conduct separate-effects tests and develop associated scaling analyses, and provide system-level phenomenological and computational models that describe key flow phenomena during RCCS operation, from forced to natural circulation, single-phase flow and two-phase flow and flashing. The project consists of the following tasks: Task 1. Conduct separate-effects, single-phase flow experiments and develop scaling analyses for comparison to system-level computational modeling for the RCCS standpipe design. A transition from forced to natural convection cooling occurs in the standpipe under accident conditions. These tests will measure global flow behavior and local flow velocities, as well as develop instrumentation for use in larger scale tests, thereby providing proper flow distribution among standpipes for decay heat removal. Task 2. Conduct separate-effects experiments for the RCCS standpipe design as two-phase flashing occurs and flow develops. As natural circulation cooling continues without an ultimate heat sink, water within the system will heat to temperatures approaching saturation , at which point two-phase flashing and flow will begin. The focus is to develop a phenomenological model from these tests that will describe the flashing and flow stability phenomena. In addition, one could determine the efficiency of phase separation in the RCCS storage tank as the two-phase flashing phenomena ensues and the storage tank vents the steam produced. Task 3. Develop a system-level computational model that will describe the overall RCCS behavior as it transitions from forced flow to natural circulation and eventual two-phase flow in the passive cooling-mode of operation. This modeling can then be used to test the phenomenological models developed as a function of scale.

  19. Hydraulic tests of emergency cooling system: L-Area

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, J H

    1988-01-01

    The delay in L-Area startup provided an opportunity to obtain valuable data on the Emergency Cooling System (ECS) which will permit reactor operation at the highest safe power level. ECS flow is a major input to the FLOOD code which calculates reactor ECS power limits. The FLOOD code assesses the effectiveness of the ECS cooling capacity by modeling the core and plenum hydraulics under accident conditions. Presently, reactor power is not limited by the ECS cooling capacity (power limit). However, the manual calculations of ECS flows had been recently updated to include piping changes (debris strainer, valve changes, pressure release systems) and update fitting losses. Both updates resulted in reduced calculated ECS flows. Upon completion of the current program to update, validate, and document, reactor power may be limited under certain situations by ECS cooling capacity for some present reactor charge designs. A series of special hydraulic tests (Reference 1, 3) were conducted in L-Area using all sources of emergency coolant including the ECS pumps (Reference 2). The tests provided empirical hydraulic data on the ECS piping. These data will be used in computer models of the system as well as manual calculations of ECS flows. The improved modeling and accuracy of the flow calculations will permit reactor operation at the highest safe power level with respect to an ECS power limit.

  20. Turbine airfoil with an internal cooling system having vortex forming turbulators

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ching-Pang

    2014-12-30

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one cooling system is disclosed. At least a portion of the cooling system may include one or more cooling channels having a plurality of turbulators protruding from an inner surface and positioned generally nonorthogonal and nonparallel to a longitudinal axis of the airfoil cooling channel. The configuration of turbulators may create a higher internal convective cooling potential for the blade cooling passage, thereby generating a high rate of internal convective heat transfer and attendant improvement in overall cooling performance. This translates into a reduction in cooling fluid demand and better turbine performance.