Science.gov

Sample records for examination pulmonary function

  1. Volatile Organic Compounds and Pulmonary Function in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 19881994

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Leslie; Longnecker, Matthew P.; Kissling, Grace E.; London, Stephanie J.

    2006-01-01

    Background Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are present in much higher concentrations indoors, where people spend most of their time, than outdoors and may have adverse health effects. VOCs have been associated with respiratory symptoms, but few studies address objective respiratory end points such as pulmonary function. Blood levels of VOCs may be more indicative of personal exposures than are air concentrations; no studies have addressed their relationship with respiratory outcomes. Objective We examined whether concentrations of 11 VOCs that were commonly identified in blood from a sample of the U.S. population were associated with pulmonary function. Methods We used data from 953 adult participants (2059 years of age) in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (19881994) who had VOC blood measures as well as pulmonary function measures. Linear regression models were used to evaluate the relationship between 11 VOCs and measures of pulmonary function. Results After adjustment for smoking, only 1,4-dichlorobenzene (1,4-DCB) was associated with reduced pulmonary function. Participants in the highest decile of 1,4-DCB concentration had decrements of ?153 mL [95% confidence interval (CI), ?297 to ?8] in forced expiratory volume in 1 sec and ?346 mL/sec (95% CI, ?667 to ?24) in maximum mid-expiratory flow rate, compared with participants in the lowest decile. Conclusions Exposure to 1,4-DCB, a VOC related to the use of air fresheners, toilet bowl deodorants, and mothballs, at levels found in the U.S. general population, may result in reduced pulmonary function. This common exposure may have long-term adverse effects on respiratory health. PMID:16882527

  2. Pulmonary function of herdsmen.

    PubMed Central

    VanderJagt, Dorothy J.; Mcclung, Keith D.; Kassam, Hussein A.; Harkins, Michelle S.; Glew, Robert H.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the pulmonary function deficit documented previously in Fulani children is also present in adult Fulani herdsmen in northern Nigeria. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The subjects for this study consisted of adult Fulani men from the hamlet of Magama Gumau and adult non-Fulani men from the city of Jos. Age, height, weight, mid-arm circumference (MAC), triceps skin-fold thickness, forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), forced expiratory flow during the middle half of the FVC maneuver (FEF25-75%), and peak expiratory flow rate (PEF) were measured. Body mass index (BMI) and FEV1/FVC were calculated for all subjects. Multiple regression analysis was performed to identify correlations between pulmonary function parameters and anthropometric variables. RESULTS: The 44 Fulani subjects and 28 urban subjects were well-matched for age and height. The Fulani men weighed significantly less than the urban men (58.5+/-9.4 versus 67.4+/-11.3 kg, p <0.001) and consequently had significantly lower BMI, MAC, and triceps skin-fold thickness. The only significant difference in pulmonary function parameters between the two groups was in FEV1/FVC (0.93+/-0.1 versus 0.85+/-0.1, p <0.001). Small but significant correlations were found between pulmonary function parameters and anthropometric variables for both study populations. CONCLUSIONS: The pulmonary function deficits documented previously in Fulani children and adolescents were not present in adult Fulani men. However, the observed elevation in FEV1/FVC in the rural Fulani men as compared to their urban counterparts, which is often seen in restrictive pulmonary patterns, deserves further study. PMID:15101676

  3. Pulmonary function in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, J. B.; Elliott, A. R.; Guy, H. J.; Prisk, G. K.

    1997-01-01

    The lung is exquisitely sensitive to gravity, and so it is of interest to know how its function is altered in the weightlessness of space. Studies on National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Spacelabs during the last 4 years have provided the first comprehensive data on the extensive changes in pulmonary function that occur in sustained microgravity. Measurements of pulmonary function were made on astronauts during space shuttle flights lasting 9 and 14 days and were compared with extensive ground-based measurements before and after the flights. Compared with preflight measurements, cardiac output increased by 18% during space flight, and stroke volume increased by 46%. Paradoxically, the increase in stroke volume occurred in the face of reductions in central venous pressure and circulating blood volume. Diffusing capacity increased by 28%, and the increase in the diffusing capacity of the alveolar membrane was unexpectedly large based on findings in normal gravity. The change in the alveolar membrane may reflect the effects of uniform filling of the pulmonary capillary bed. Distributions of blood flow and ventilation throughout the lung were more uniform in space, but some unevenness remained, indicating the importance of nongravitational factors. A surprising finding was that airway closing volume was approximately the same in microgravity and in normal gravity, emphasizing the importance of mechanical properties of the airways in determining whether they close. Residual volume was unexpectedly reduced by 18% in microgravity, possibly because of uniform alveolar expansion. The findings indicate that pulmonary function is greatly altered in microgravity, but none of the changes observed so far will apparently limit long-term space flight. In addition, the data help to clarify how gravity affects pulmonary function in the normal gravity environment on Earth.

  4. Phthalate exposure and pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    Hoppin, Jane A; Ulmer, Ross; London, Stephanie J

    2004-04-01

    Exposure to phthalates is widespread because of their use in plastics, cosmetics, and other consumer products. Phthalate exposure has been associated with adverse respiratory outcomes in children. With urinary phthalate measures, we assessed the association between phthalate exposure and four pulmonary function parameters [forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume at 1 sec (FEV1), peak expiratory flow (PEF), and maximum mid-expiratory flow] among the 240 adult Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) participants with urinary phthalate data. Linear regression models controlled for race, age, age squared, standing height, body mass index, cumulative smoking, and current smoking. Monobutyl phthalate (MBP) was significantly associated with decrements in three measures of pulmonary function (FVC, FEV1, PEF) in males but not in females. For a change from the 25th to the 75th percentile in MBP level among men, FEV1 decreased 112 mL (SE = 51, p = 0.03). Monoethyl phthalate (MEP) was associated with lower FVC and FEV1 values in men. Monoethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), the metabolite of the plasticizer commonly used in medical tubing, was not adversely associated with any of the pulmonary function parameters evaluated. Our results suggest that MBP and MEP, but not MEHP, may influence pulmonary function among adult males. PMID:15064163

  5. Dietary patterns and pulmonary function in Korean women: findings from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2011.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yoonsu; Chung, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Seung-Sup; Shin, Min-Jeong

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the association between dietary patterns and pulmonary functions in Korean women older than 40 years. This study analyzed the data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV and V (2007-2010). In total, 7615 women were included in the analysis. Using principal component analysis, two dietary patterns were identified, namely a balanced diet pattern (vegetables, fish, meat, seaweed, and mushrooms) and a refined diet (snacks, bread, milk, dairy products, and fast food). The refined diet pattern was positively associated with energy from fat but negatively associated with vitamin A, ?-carotene, niacin, and fiber. After adjusting for potential confounders, the refined diet pattern was negatively associated with levels of predicted forced vital capacity (odds ratio (OR): 0.84, 95% confidence intervals (CIs): 0.70, 0.99) and predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (OR: 0.79, 95% CIs: 0.66, 0.93). In conclusion, the refined diet pattern was associated with decreased pulmonary function in Korean women. This information may be useful toward the development of nutritional guidelines for improving pulmonary function in Korean women. PMID:25290855

  6. Pulmonary function in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, H. J.; Prisk, G. K.; West, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    We report the successful collection of a large quantity of human resting pulmonary function data on the SLS-1 mission. Preliminary analysis suggests that cardiac stroke volumes are high on orbit, and that an adaptive reduction takes at least several days, and in fact may still be in progress after 9 days on orbit. It also suggests that pulmonary capillary blood volumes are high, and remain high on orbit, but that the pulmonary interstitium is not significantly impacted. The data further suggest that the known large gravitational gradients of lung function have only a modest influence on single breath tests such as the SBN washout. They account for only approximately 25% of the phase III slope of nitrogen, on vital capacity SBN washouts. These gradients are only a moderate source of the cardiogenic oscillations seen in argon (bolus gas) and nitrogen (resident gas), on such tests. They may have a greater role in generating the normal CO2 oscillations, as here the phase relationship to argon and nitrogen reverses in microgravity, at least at mid exhalation in those subjects studied to date. Microgravity may become a useful tool in establishing the nature of the non-gravitational mechanisms that can now be seen to play such a large part in the generation of intra-breath gradients and oscillations of expired gas concentration. Analysis of microgravity multibreath nitrogen washouts, single breath washouts from more physiological pre-inspiratory volumes, both using our existing SLS-1 data, and data from the upcoming D-2 and SLS-2 missions, should be very fruitful in this regard.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  7. Pulmonary function studies in rowers.

    PubMed

    Kesavachandran, C; Sanil, R; Nair, R H; Rauf, A A; Shashidhar, S

    1997-01-01

    The present study attempts to investigate the pulmonary functions of snake boat rowers before and after rowing. This is made on 12 healthy traditional snake boat rowers ranging from age 16-23 years of Kavanattinkara boat race, Kottayam, Kerala, India. The pulmonary function tests were carried out with vitallograph compact-II spirometer. The results show a decrease in pulmonary functions "lung volumes" and "flow rates" after rowing in comparison to basal condition. PMID:10225029

  8. Examination of the Ability of N-acetylcysteine Administration during Anesthesia to Prevent Perioperative Deterioration of Pulmonary Function in Patients Undergoing Nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Um, Dea Ja; Hong, Seok-Joo; Park, Jong Taek

    2014-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pulmonary complications are associated with significant morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing major surgeries. Acetylcysteine is a known antioxidant and is also used as a mucolytic agent to reduce hypersecretion and the viscosity of mucus secretions by the lung. Several studies have revealed that high doses of N-acetylcysteine can significantly prevent pulmonary complications. However, it has not yet been established whether low doses of N-acetylcysteine are also of clinical benefit. Here, we investigated the efficacy of a low dose of N-acetylcysteine, which was administered intravenously to patients under general anesthesia, in preventing perioperative deterioration of pulmonary function. Methods: A total of 52 patients who were scheduled for nephrectomy were randomly assigned to receive either 600 mg of intravenous N-acetylcysteine or the same volume of normal saline. Patient hemodynamic and pulmonary parameters and the incidence of pulmonary complications were recorded and compared between the groups. Results: No significant pulmonary complications occurred in either group. Moreover, no significant differences were observed regarding either patient characteristics or hemodynamic parameters between the two groups. Contrary to our expectations, the pulmonary parameters were also not significantly different between the two groups. Conclusion: A low dose of N-acetylcysteine appears to have only limited value in preventing perioperative pulmonary complications. PMID:26064860

  9. Obesity and Pulmonary Function in Polio Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Han, Soo Jeong; Lim, Jae-Young

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the correlation between obesity and pulmonary function in polio survivors. Methods This study was conducted based on a questionnaire survey and physical examination. The questionnaire included gender, age, paralyzed regions, physical activity levels, and accompanying diseases. The physical examination included measuring body mass index, waist circumference, muscle power, total fat amount, body fat percentage, and lean body mass. In addition, pulmonary function was tested based on forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), ratio of FEV1 to FVC, and chest circumference. Five university hospitals and a local health clinic participated in this study. Results Pearson and partial correlation coefficients that used data collected from 73 polio survivors showed that obesity had a negative correlation with pulmonary function. Conclusion This study found that pulmonary function has a negative correlation with obesity for polio survivors. Therefore, it is necessary to develop specialized exercise programs to help polio survivors reduce their weight and strengthen their respiratory muscles. PMID:26798602

  10. Lung function in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Low, A T; Medford, A R L; Millar, A B; Tulloh, R M R

    2015-10-01

    Breathlessness is a common symptom in pulmonary hypertension (PH) and an important cause of morbidity. Though this has been attributed to the well described pulmonary vascular abnormalities and subsequent cardiac remodelling, changes in the airways of these patients have also been reported and may contribute to symptoms. Our understanding of these airway abnormalities is poor with conflicting findings in many studies. The present review evaluates these studies for the major PH groups. In addition we describe the role of cardiopulmonary exercise testing in the assessment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) by evaluating cardiopulmonary interaction during exercise. As yet, the reasons for the abnormalities in lung function are unclear, but potential causes and the possible role of inflammation are discussed. Future research is required to provide a better understanding of this to help improve the management of these patients. PMID:26033642

  11. Effect of pelvic floor muscle exercises on pulmonary function

    PubMed Central

    Han, DongWook; Ha, Misook

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the correlation between pelvic floor muscle strength and pulmonary function. In particular, we examined whether pelvic floor muscle exercises can improve pulmonary function. [Subjects] Thirty female college students aged 1921 with no history of nervous or musculoskeletal system injury were randomly divided into experimental and control groups. [Methods] For the pulmonary function test, spirometry items included forced vital capacity and maximal voluntary ventilation. Pelvic floor muscle exercises consisted of Kegel exercises performed three times daily for 4 weeks. [Results] Kegel exercises performed in the experimental group significantly improved forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, PER, FEF 2575%, IC, and maximum voluntary ventilation compared to no improvement in the control group. [Conclusion] Kegel exercises significantly improved pulmonary function. When abdominal pressure increased, pelvic floor muscles performed contraction at the same time. Therefore, we recommend that the use of pelvic floor muscle exercises be considered for improving pulmonary function. PMID:26644681

  12. PULMONARY FUNCTION TESTING IN SMALL LABORATORY MAMMALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The lung is the primary organ likely to be exposed by inhalation studies and, therefore, measurement of changes in lung function are of particular interest to the pulmonary physiologist and toxicologist. Tests of pulmonary function have been developed which can be used with small...

  13. [Pulmonary functional criteria for evaluating the evolution of diffuse interstitial pneumopathy under treatment].

    PubMed

    Du?u, S; Jienescu, Z

    1989-01-01

    It was studied the variation of the pulmonary volumes, of the gaseous transfer through the alveolocapillary membrane and of the indications of pulmonary elasticity on 40 patients with diffuse interstitial lung disease (PID), examined at intervals of 3-6 months, for 2-3 years during the treatment. The levels of the pulmonary elasticity parameters have signaled more frequently the modification (improvement or worsening) of the pulmonary functional state than those of the pulmonary volumes or of the gaseous transfer. Hence the proposal of including the tests for elastic recoil within the ensemble of pulmonary functional investigations through which are studied the effects of the treatment prescribed in PID. PMID:2560247

  14. Pulmonary functions in yogic and sedentary population

    PubMed Central

    Vedala, Shobha Rani; Mane, Abhay B; Paul, C Nliranjan

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Pulmonary Function Tests are important for measuring the fitness of an individual from a physiological point of view. Lung function parameters tend to have a relationship with lifestyle such as regular yoga, an ancient system of Indian Philosophy. Yoga is probably the best lifestyle ever devised in the history of mankind. Hence the present analytical study was undertaken to assess the effects of yoga on respiratory system when compared with sedentary subjects. Objective: To compare the pulmonary function test among the yogic and sedentary groups. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted on 50 subjects practicing yoga and 50 sedentary subjects in the age group of 20-40 years. They were assessed for pulmonary function test in which sedentary group acted as controls. The tests which were recorded as per standard procedure using Medspiror as determinants of pulmonary function were FVC, FEV1, FEV3, PEFR and FVC/FEV1 ratio. Results: Pulmonary Functions were compared between the yoga practitioners and sedentary group. Yoga exercise significantly increased chest wall expansion as observed by higher values of pulmonary functions compared with sedentary controls. The study group were having higher mean of percentage value of FVC 109.1 18.2%, FEV1 of 116.3 15.9%, FEV3 of 105.7 14.9 %, PEFR of 109.2 21.3% and FEV1/FVC ratio of 111.3 6.9% as compared to sedentary group. Conclusions: Regular Yoga practice increases the vital capacity, timed vital capacity, maximum voluntary ventilation, breath holding time and maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures. PMID:25035628

  15. Pulmonary Impairment in Tuberculosis Survivors: The Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008-2012

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae-Woo; Choi, Jae-Chol; Shin, Jong-Wook; Kim, Jae-Yeol; Choi, Byoung-Whui; Park, In-Won

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) can affect lung function, but studies regarding long-term follow-up in patients with no sequelae on chest X-ray (CXR) have not been performed. We evaluated lung functional impairment and persistent respiratory symptoms in those with prior pulmonary TB and those with prior pulmonary TB with no residual sequelae on CXR, and determined risk factors for airflow obstruction. Methods We used data from adults aged ? 40 years from the annual Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys conducted between 2008 and 2012. P values for comparisons were adjusted for age, sex, and smoking status. Results In total of 14,967 adults, 822 subjects (5.5%) had diagnosed and treated pulmonary TB (mean 29.0 years ago). The FVC% (84.9 vs. 92.6), FEV1% (83.4 vs. 92.4), and FEV1/FVC% (73.4 vs. 77.9) were significantly decreased in subjects with prior pulmonary TB compared to those without (p < 0.001, each). In 12,885 subjects with no sequalae on CXR, those with prior pulmonary TB (296, 2.3%) had significantly lower FEV1% (90.9 vs. 93.4, p = 0.001) and FEV1/FVC% (76.6 vs. 78.4, p < 0.001) than those without. Subjects with prior pulmonary TB as well as subjects with no sequalae on CXR were more likely to experience cough and physical activity limitations due to pulmonary symptoms than those without prior pulmonary TB (p < 0.001, each). In total subjects, prior pulmonary TB (OR, 2.314; 95% CI, 1.9222.785), along with age, male, asthma, and smoking mount was risk factor for airflow obstruction. In subjects with prior pulmonary tuberculosis, inactive TB lesion on chest x-ray (OR, 2.300; 95% CI, 1.6063.294) were risk factors of airflow obstruction. Conclusion In addition to subjects with inactive TB lesion on CXR, subjects with no sequelae on CXR can show impaired pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms. Prior TB is a risk factor for airflow obstruction and that the risk is more important when they have inactive lesions on chest X-ray. Hence, the patients with treated TB should need to have regular follow-up of lung function and stop smoking for early detection and prevention of the chronic airway disease. PMID:26496500

  16. Microscopic examination and smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Keflie, Tibebe Seyoum; Ameni, Gobena

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis causes illness among millions of people each year and ranks as the second leading cause of death from infectious disease worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the detection rate of microscopic examination and estimate risk of transmission of TB by smear negative pulmonary TB patients. Methods A cross-sectional study and retrospective data analysis on TB were undertaken in Northwest Shewa, Ethiopia. Microscopic examination, bacterial culture and PCR were performed. The statistical analysis was made by using STATA software version 10. Results A total of 92 suspected TB cases was included in the study. Of these, 27.17% (25/92) were positive for microscopic examination and 51% (47/92) for culture. The sensitivity and specificity of microscopic examination with 95% CI were 48.94% (34.08% to 63.93%) and 95.56% (84.82 to 99.33%), respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 92% (73.93% to 98.78%) and 64.18% (51.53% to 75.53%), respectively. Of 8150 pulmonary TB cases in the retrospective study, 58.9% was smear negative. The proportion of TB-HIV co-infection was 28.66% (96/335). Conclusion The sensitivity of microscopic examination was 48.94% which was very low. The poor sensitivity of this test together with the advent of HIV/AIDS elevated the prevalence of smear negative pulmonary TB. This in turn increased the risk of TB transmission. PMID:25810798

  17. Ambient polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and pulmonary function in children

    PubMed Central

    Padula, Amy M.; Balmes, John R.; Eisen, Ellen A.; Mann, Jennifer; Noth, Elizabeth M.; Lurmann, Frederick W.; Pratt, Boriana; Tager, Ira B.; Nadeau, Kari; Hammond, S. Katharine

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between ambient polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and pulmonary function in children. Major sources include vehicular emissions, home heating, wildland fires, agricultural burning, and power plants. PAHs are an important component of fine particulate matter that has been linked to respiratory health. This cross-sectional study examines the relationship between estimated individual exposures to the sum of PAHs with 4, 5, or 6 rings (PAH456) and pulmonary function tests (forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of vital capacity) in asthmatic and non-asthmatic children. We applied land-use regression to estimate individual exposures to ambient PAHs for averaging periods ranging from 1 week to 1 year. We used linear regression to estimate the relationship between exposure to PAH456 with pre- and postbronchodilator pulmonary function tests in children in Fresno, California (N =297). Among non-asthmatics, there was a statistically significant association between PAH456 during the previous 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year and postbronchodilator FEV1. The magnitude of the association increased with the length of the averaging period ranging from 60 to 110 ml decrease in FEV1 for each 1 ng/m3 increase in PAH456. There were no associations with PAH456 observed among asthmatic children. We identified an association between annual PAHs and chronic pulmonary function in children without asthma. Additional studies are needed to further explore the association between exposure to PAHs and pulmonary function, especially with regard to differential effects between asthmatic and non-asthmatic children. PMID:24938508

  18. Ambient polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and pulmonary function in children.

    PubMed

    Padula, Amy M; Balmes, John R; Eisen, Ellen A; Mann, Jennifer; Noth, Elizabeth M; Lurmann, Frederick W; Pratt, Boriana; Tager, Ira B; Nadeau, Kari; Hammond, S Katharine

    2015-05-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between ambient polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and pulmonary function in children. Major sources include vehicular emissions, home heating, wildland fires, agricultural burning, and power plants. PAHs are an important component of fine particulate matter that has been linked to respiratory health. This cross-sectional study examines the relationship between estimated individual exposures to the sum of PAHs with 4, 5, or 6 rings (PAH456) and pulmonary function tests (forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of vital capacity) in asthmatic and non-asthmatic children. We applied land-use regression to estimate individual exposures to ambient PAHs for averaging periods ranging from 1 week to 1 year. We used linear regression to estimate the relationship between exposure to PAH456 with pre- and postbronchodilator pulmonary function tests in children in Fresno, California (N=297). Among non-asthmatics, there was a statistically significant association between PAH456 during the previous 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year and postbronchodilator FEV1. The magnitude of the association increased with the length of the averaging period ranging from 60 to 110?ml decrease in FEV1 for each 1?ng/m(3) increase in PAH456. There were no associations with PAH456 observed among asthmatic children. We identified an association between annual PAHs and chronic pulmonary function in children without asthma. Additional studies are needed to further explore the association between exposure to PAHs and pulmonary function, especially with regard to differential effects between asthmatic and non-asthmatic children. PMID:24938508

  19. Pulmonary function in survivors of Wilms' tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, N.J.; Eden, O.B.; Jenney, M.E.; Stevens, R.F.; Morris-Jones, P.H.; Craft, A.W.; Castillo, L. )

    1991-04-01

    The respiratory status of 47 patients surviving childhood Wilms' tumor was studied. The group that had received flank irradiation (which impinges on the lower lung) (n = 17) had a significantly lower mean percent predicted for forced expiratory volume in one second, residual volume, and total lung capacity when compared to those who had received no irradiation (n = 23). Those patients who had received whole-lung irradiation (n = 3) had significantly lower transfer factor for carbon monoxide and gas transfer per unit lung volume when compared to the nonirradiated group (n = 23). There was no significant difference in the prevalence of respiratory symptoms between the three groups. Patients receiving any form of radiotherapy for Wilms' tumor may have abnormalities of pulmonary function and should have pulmonary function tests performed as part of their long-term follow-up.

  20. Pulmonary function in aluminium smelters.

    PubMed

    Field, G B

    1984-10-01

    Two studies were conducted at an aluminum smelter employing 113 male workers in the smelting process. Twenty one of the 111 men in the first study experienced chest tightness more often than once a week and had a higher prevalence of cough, dyspnoea, and nasal symptoms but not of positive skin test responses than symptomless men. Lung function in these men did not differ significantly from that in the symptomless men at the beginning of the working week and only marginal deterioration occurred over the week. In the second study serial spirometric measurements were obtained over several shifts in a subset of 31 men from the first study. Impairment of ventilatory function on exposure to smelting fumes was demonstrated in 18 men. Analysis of all data from the 31 subjects revealed that ventilatory function varied significantly in association with heavy exposure to potfumes and a history of recurrent chest tightness. The findings of these two studies indicate that aluminum smelting fumes can cause bronchoconstriction in susceptible individuals. The reaction is dose dependent and is more severe in those with a history of recurrent chest tightness. PMID:6495242

  1. An automated system for pulmonary function testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauldin, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    An experiment to quantitate pulmonary function was accepted for the space shuttle concept verification test. The single breath maneuver and the nitrogen washout are combined to reduce the test time. Parameters are defined from the forced vital capacity maneuvers. A spirometer measures the breath volume and a magnetic section mass spectrometer provides definition of gas composition. Mass spectrometer and spirometer data are analyzed by a PDP-81 digital computer.

  2. Evaluation of pulmonary function in neuromuscular disease.

    PubMed

    Griggs, R C; Donohoe, K M; Utell, M J; Goldblatt, D; Moxley, R T

    1981-01-01

    Pulmonary function tests were performed on 40 patients with neuromuscular disease. The maximum expiratory pressure was the most sensitive indicator of weakness and was decreased in 87% of adult patients. A comparison of Stead-Wells, electronic (Vanguard), and bellows spirometry (Vitalor) indicated an excellent correlation between the Stead-Wells and electronic devices. The bellows spirometer consistently underestimated volumes, particularly in severely weak patients. PMID:7458733

  3. EFFECTS OF SULFURIC ACID MIST EXPOSURE ON PULMONARY FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of 2-hr exposure to sulfuric acid (H2SO4) on pulmonary functions in male nonsmokers were examined. Subjects were exposed to air and 233, 418 and 939 micrograms/cu m H2SO4 at 22C DB/55% RH or air and 314, 600 and 1107 micrograms/cu m H2SO4 at 35C DB/85% RH. Mass media diam...

  4. Pulmonary Function in Infants with Swallowing Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Tutor, James D.; Srinivasan, Saumini; Gosa, Memorie M.; Spentzas, Thomas; Stokes, Dennis C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Swallowing dysfunction can lead to recurring aspiration and is frequently associated with chronic symptoms such as cough and wheezing in infants. Our objective was to describe the characteristics of infants with swallowing dysfunction, determine if pulmonary function abnormalities are detectable, and if they improve after therapy. Methods We studied 38 infants with a history of coughing and wheezing who had pulmonary function tests performed within two weeks of their diagnosis of swallowing dysfunction. The raised lung volume rapid thoracoabdominal compression technique was used. After 6 months of therapy, 17 of the infants repeated the tests. Results Initially, 25 had abnormal spirometry, 18 had abnormal plethysmography, and 15 demonstrated bronchodilator responsiveness. Six months later test were repeated for seventeen patients. Ten patients had continued abnormal spirometry, two patients remained normal, three patients’ abnormal spirometry had normalized, and two patients’ previously normal studies became abnormal. Eight of the 17 patients had continued abnormal plethysmography, six had continued normal plethysmography, and three patients’ normal plethysmography became abnormal. After 6 months of treatment, eight patients demonstrated bronchodilator responsiveness, of which five continued to demonstrate bronchodilator responsiveness and three developed responsiveness. The remainder either continued to be non- bronchodilator responsive (two) or lost responsiveness (three.) The findings of the abnormal tests in most infants tested is complicated by frequent occurrence of other co-morbidities in this population, including gastroesophageal reflux in 23 and passive smoke exposure in 13 of the infants. Conclusions The interpretation of lung function changes is complicated by the frequent association of swallowing dysfunction with gastroesophageal reflux and passive smoke exposure in this population. Six months of medical therapy for swallowing dysfunction/gastroesophageal reflux did not significantly improve pulmonary function in these infants. Long-term studies will be necessary to determine which of these changes persists into adulthood. PMID:25978396

  5. Pulmonary function evaluation during and following Skylab space flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawin, C. F.; Nicogossian, A. E.; Schachter, A. P.; Rummel, J. A.; Michel, E. L.

    1977-01-01

    Cardiac output measurements were made in the laboratory during preflight and postflight exercise tests. Due to the magnitude of decreases in cardiac output following the first and second manned Skylab missions and because the method used is based upon normal pulmonary function, it was decided to perform more thorough pulmonary function screening in conjunction with the final and longest duration Skylab mission. This paper summarized pulmonary function data obtained during all three Skylab missions.

  6. Pulmonary functions in air conditioner users.

    PubMed

    Khaliq, Farah; Sharma, Sameer; Tandon, O P

    2006-01-01

    Air conditioning may affect human health since it has profound effect on our environment, than just lowering temperature. The present study was planned to assess the effect of air conditioners (AC) on pulmonary functions in young healthy non-smoker males. The study group comprised of ten subjects who were using AC's in their cars for at least 1 hr daily since last 6 months. While ten subjects who did not use AC at all served as controls. The pulmonary functions were assessed using PK Morgan 232 spirometer in a closed room. The peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) and Forced expiratory flow between 25-75% of vital capacity (FEF25-75) were significantly reduced in subjects using car AC's. Inspiratory flow rates also showed a trend towards decline in AC users but could not reach the level of significance. The lung volumes and capacities were not significantly different in the two groups except for forced expiratory volume in 0.5 sec (FEV 0.5 sec), which also decreased in AC users. The airway resistance and lung compliance did not show significant change. In the presence of normal FEV1, reduced FEF25-75% which is the flow rate over the middle half of vital capacity, is an evidence of mild airflow limitation. The result is suggestive of predisposition of AC users towards respiratory disorders in form of mild airflow restriction. PMID:16850906

  7. Clinical pulmonary function and industrial respirator wear

    SciTech Connect

    Raven, P.B.; Moss, R.F.; Page, K.; Garmon, R.; Skaggs, B.

    1981-12-01

    This investigation was the initial step in determining a clinical pulmonary test which could be used to evaluate workers as to their suitability to industrial respirator wear. Sixty subjects, 12 superior, 37 normal, and 11 moderately impaired with respect to lung function tests were evaluated with a battery of clinical pulmonary tests while wearing an industrial respirator. The respirator was a full-face mask (MSA-Ultravue) demand breathing type equipped with an inspiratory resistance of 85mm H/sub 2/O at 85 L/min air flow and an expiratory resistance of 25mm H/sub 2/O at 85 L/min air flow. Comparisons of these tests were made between the three groups of subjects both with and without a respirator. It appears that those lung tests which measure the flow characteristics of the lung especially those that are effort dependant are more susceptible to change as a result of respirator wear. Hence, the respirator affects the person with superior lung function to a greater degree than the moderately impaired person. It was suggested that the clinical test of 15 second maximum voluntary ventilations (MVV./sub 25/) may be the test of choice for determining worker capability in wearing an industrial respirator.

  8. Pulmonary functions of welders in gas transmission pipelines in Iran.

    PubMed

    Golbabaei, Farideh; Khadem, Monireh; Ghahri, Asghar; Babai, Mohammad; Hosseini, Mostafa; Seyedsomea, Mirghani; Dinari, Behnam

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of welding on pulmonary functions in welders. Spirometry tests were performed before and after work shift in 91 welders and 25 clerks (control group). We examined forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), FEV1/FVC ratio and forced expiratory flow 25%-75% (FEF 25-75). Significant differences were found for FVC and FEV1/FVC between welders and the control group in pre- and post-shift measurements (p < .001). In welders, smoking and nonsmoking habit had no significant effects on any pulmonary indices before or after shift. Work experience and fume concentrations also had no significant effects on the majority of spirometric indices (p > .05). Most welders had at least 1 of the respiratory symptoms. Significant differences were found between pre- and post-shift indices (as percentage of predicted values calculated with spirometer) and between the welders engaged in some welding tasks and the control group before work shift. This study documented work-related changes in pulmonary functions in the welders and marked drops in these functions without symptoms in some welders. PMID:24321643

  9. Chemosensory Functions for Pulmonary Neuroendocrine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiaoling; Karp, Philip H.; Brody, Steven L.; Pierce, Richard A.; Welsh, Michael J.; Holtzman, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian airways are sensitive to inhaled stimuli, and airway diseases are characterized by hypersensitivity to volatile stimuli, such as perfumes, industrial solvents, and others. However, the identity and function of the cells in the airway that can sense volatile chemicals remain uncertain, particularly in humans. Here, we show that solitary pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNECs), which are morphologically distinct and physiologically undefined, might serve as chemosensory cells in human airways. This conclusion is based on our finding that some human PNECs expressed members of the olfactory receptor (OR) family in vivo and in primary cell culture, and are anatomically positioned in the airway epithelium to respond to inhaled volatile chemicals. Furthermore, apical exposure of primary-culture human airway epithelial cells to volatile chemicals decreased levels of serotonin in PNECs, and the led to the release of the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) to the basal medium. These data suggest that volatile stimulation of PNECs can lead to the secretion of factors that are capable of stimulating the corresponding receptors in the lung epithelium. We also found that the distribution of serotonin and neuropeptide receptors may change in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, suggesting that increased PNEC-dependent chemoresponsiveness might contribute to the altered sensitivity to volatile stimuli in this disease. Together, these data indicate that human airway epithelia harbor specialized cells that respond to volatile chemical stimuli, and may help to explain clinical observations of odorant-induced airway reactions. PMID:24134460

  10. Individual differences in cognitive ability at age 20 predict pulmonary function 35 years later

    PubMed Central

    Vasilopoulos, Terrie; Kremen, William S; Grant, Michael D; Panizzon, Matthew S; Xian, Hong; Toomey, Rosemary; Lyons, Michael J; Jacobson, Kristen C; Franz, Carol E

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor pulmonary function is associated with mortality and age-related diseases, and can affect cognitive performance. However, extant longitudinal studies indicate that early cognitive ability also affects later pulmonary function. Despite the multifaceted nature of pulmonary function, most longitudinal studies were limited to a single index of pulmonary function: forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). In this study, we examined whether early adult cognitive ability predicted five different indices of pulmonary function in mid-life. Methods Mixed modelling tested the association between young adult general cognitive ability (mean age=20), measured by the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT), and mid-life pulmonary function (mean age=55), in 1019 men from the Vietnam Era Twin Study of Aging. Pulmonary function was indexed by per cent predicted values for forced vital capacity (FVC%p), FEV1%p, maximum forced expiratory flow (FEFmax%p), and maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV%p), and by the ratio of FEV1 to FVC (FEV1/FVC), an index of lung obstruction. Results After adjusting for smoking, pulmonary disease, occupation, income and education, age 20 AFQT was significantly (p<0.05) associated with mid-life FVC%p (β=0.10), FEV1%p (β=0.13), FEFmax%p (β=0.13), and MVV%p (β=0.13), but was not significantly associated with FEV1/FVC (β=0.03, p=0.34). Conclusions Early adult cognitive ability is a predictor of multiple indices of aging-related pulmonary function 35 years later, including lung volume, airflow and ventilator capacity. Cognitive deficits associated with impaired aging-related lung function may, thus, be partly pre-existing. However, results also highlight that early life risk factors may be differentially related to different metrics of later-life pulmonary health. PMID:25273357

  11. Obesity and Pulmonary Function in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Mehari, Alem; Afreen, Samina; Ngwa, Julius; Setse, Rosanna; Thomas, Alicia N.; Poddar, Vishal; Davis, Wayne; Polk, Octavius D.; Hassan, Sheik; Thomas, Alvin V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity prevalence in United States (US) adults exceeds 30% with highest prevalence being among blacks. Obesity is known to have significant effects on respiratory function and obese patients commonly report respiratory complaints requiring pulmonary function tests (PFTs). However, there is no large study showing the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and PFTs in healthy African Americans (AA). Objective To determine the effect of BMI on PFTs in AA patients who did not have evidence of underlying diseases of the respiratory system. Methods We reviewed PFTs of 339 individuals sent for lung function testing who had normal spirometry and lung diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) with wide range of BMI. Results Functional residual capacity (FRC) and expiratory reserve volume (ERV) decreased exponentially with increasing BMI, such that morbid obesity resulted in patients breathing near their residual volume (RV). However, the effects on the extremes of lung volumes, at total lung capacity (TLC) and residual volume (RV) were modest. There was a significant linear inverse relationship between BMI and DLCO, but the group means values remained within the normal ranges even for morbidly obese patients. Conclusions We showed that BMI has significant effects on lung function in AA adults and the greatest effects were on FRC and ERV, which occurred at BMI values < 30 kg/m2. These physiological effects of weight gain should be considered when interpreting PFTs and their effects on respiratory symptoms even in the absence of disease and may also exaggerate existing lung diseases. PMID:26488406

  12. Pulmonary Function in Children with Development Coordination Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Sheng K.; Cairney, John; Lin, Hsiao-Hui; Li, Yao-Chuen; Song, Tai-Fen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare pulmonary function in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) with children who are typically developing (TD), and also analyze possible gender differences in pulmonary function between these groups. The Movement ABC test was used to identify the movement coordination ability of children.

  13. 21 CFR 868.1880 - Pulmonary-function data calculator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pulmonary-function data calculator. 868.1880 Section 868.1880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices 868.1880 Pulmonary-function...

  14. 21 CFR 868.1880 - Pulmonary-function data calculator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pulmonary-function data calculator. 868.1880 Section 868.1880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices 868.1880 Pulmonary-function...

  15. 21 CFR 868.1880 - Pulmonary-function data calculator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pulmonary-function data calculator. 868.1880 Section 868.1880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices 868.1880 Pulmonary-function...

  16. 21 CFR 868.1880 - Pulmonary-function data calculator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pulmonary-function data calculator. 868.1880 Section 868.1880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices 868.1880 Pulmonary-function data calculator. (a) Identification....

  17. 21 CFR 868.1880 - Pulmonary-function data calculator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pulmonary-function data calculator. 868.1880 Section 868.1880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices 868.1880 Pulmonary-function...

  18. Pulmonary Function in Children with Development Coordination Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Sheng K.; Cairney, John; Lin, Hsiao-Hui; Li, Yao-Chuen; Song, Tai-Fen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare pulmonary function in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) with children who are typically developing (TD), and also analyze possible gender differences in pulmonary function between these groups. The Movement ABC test was used to identify the movement coordination ability of children.…

  19. Social Integration and Pulmonary Function in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Crittenden, Crista N.; Pressman, Sarah D.; Cohen, Sheldon; Janicki-Deverts, Denise; Smith, Bruce W.; Seeman, Teresa E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study sought to determine whether social integration, defined as number of social roles, is associated with better pulmonary function in the elderly and which roles are associated with greatest benefit. It also examined pathways that connect social integration to better lung health. Methods High functioning men (N = 518) and women (N = 629) ages 70-79 were recruited as part of the MacArthur Study of Successful Aging and data were collected on social roles as well as pulmonary function as assessed by peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR). Multiple regressions predicting PEFR from the number of social roles controlled for age, sex, race, education, weight and height. Physiological, behavioral, social and psychological factors were tested as mediators of the association between the number of social roles and PEFR. Results More social roles were associated with better PEFR. Analysis of specific roles indicated that marriage was the strongest positive correlate of PEFR. However, greater numbers of roles were also associated with better PEFR independent of marriage. Being a relative or friend were each also individually associated with better PEFR. Even so, greater numbers of social roles were associated with better PEFR independent of relative and friend. The data were consistent with greater happiness, not smoking, and more physical activity acting as pathways linking the number of roles to PEFR. Conclusions Number of social roles is an important correlate of healthy lung function in the elderly. This association may be driven by healthier behaviors and greater feelings of well-being. PMID:24884907

  20. Pulmonary functions in tannery workers--a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Vasanthi; Dilara, K; Padmavathi, R

    2014-01-01

    Tannery workers are at potential exposure to detrimental agents rendering them vulnerable to respiratory and dermal problems. Thus by performing pulmonary functions among leather tannery workers, we can decipher the effect of chromium and leather dust on lung functions and also the decline of respiratory functions with increasing years of exposure to leather dust. Pulmonary functions were assessed for 130 tannery workers and compared with the 130 unexposed office workers. Pulmonary function measurements namely FVC, FEV1, FEF25-75% and PEFR were measured using portable data logging Spirometer (KOKO Spirometer). The observed pulmonary functions of Tannery-workers in this study showed a reduction in FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC ratio, FEF25-75 and PEFR in relation to their predicted values and also compared to the unexposed. Smokers showed a decline in pulmonary functions compared to the non smokers because smoking acts as an additional risk factor in the development of respiratory illnesses. It is worthy to mention that the pulmonary function values correlate negatively with the duration of exposure to leather dust. So this study could provide base line information based upon which legal implementation of preventive measures could be undertaken. PMID:25906602

  1. [Perioperative Pulmonary Rehabilitation for Lung Cancer Surgeries in Patients with Poor Pulmonary Function].

    PubMed

    Sano, Yuko

    2016-01-01

    To properly perform preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation is important for lung cancer surgeries in patients with poor pulmonary function such as severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease( COPD) to prevent postoperative complications. Those programs include exercise training, pursed-lip breathing technique, activities of dairy living training and facilitating physical activities, all which are almost same as those for patients with stable COPD. Pedometer is a useful tool to lead patient's physical activities. Postoperative therapeutic programs are also important, which includes early mobilization, nutritional support, and so on. PMID:26975642

  2. Coaching patients during pulmonary function testing: A practical guide

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Heidi J; Cheung, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary function tests are an important tool to assist in the diagnosis and management of patients with respiratory disease. Ensuring that the tests are of acceptable quality is vital. Acceptable pulmonary function test quality requires, among others, optimal patient performance. Optimal patient performance, in turn, requires adequate coaching from registered respiratory therapists (RRTs) and other pulmonary function laboratory personnel. The present article provides techniques and tips to help RRTs coach patients during testing. The authors briefly review the components of pulmonary function testing, then describe factors that may hinder a patients performance, list common mistakes that patients make during testing, and provide tips that RRTs can use to help patients optimize their performance. PMID:26283871

  3. Pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in potash workers

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, B.L.; Dosman, J.A.; Cotton, D.J.; Weisstock, S.R.; Lappi, V.G.; Froh, F.

    1984-03-01

    Over 94% of the workers in each of four Saskatchewan potash mines participated in a respiratory health surveillance program that included a questionnaire and pulmonary function tests. Compared with a nonexposed control group, potash workers had higher prevalences of cough, dyspnea, and chronic bronchitis but better pulmonary function. Prevalences of symptoms and pulmonary function abnormalities were similar among workers at the four mines tested and at the various job locations. Potash dust, diesel fumes, and other air contaminants may have an irritant effect that leads to the increased prevalences of cough and chronic bronchitis. Although no adverse effects of the potash mine environment on pulmonary function were found, these findings reflect a healthy worker effect or some selection process that makes the potash workers appear healthier in a cross-sectional study.

  4. Pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in potash workers

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, B.L.; Dosman, J.A.; Cotton, D.J.; Weisstock, S.R.; Lappi, V.G.; Froh, F.

    1984-03-01

    Over 94% of the workers in each of four Saskatchewan potash mines participated in a respiratory health surveillance program that included a questionnaire and pulmonary function tests. Compared with a nonexposed control group, potash workers had higher prevalences of cough, dyspnea, and chronic bronchitis but better pulmonary function. Prevalences of symptoms and pulmonary function abnormalities were similar among workers at the four mines tested and at the various job locations. Potash dust, diesel fumes, and other air contaminants may have an irritant effect that leads to the increased prevalences of cough and chronic bronchitis. Although we found no adverse effects of the potash mine environment on pulmonary function, these findings reflect a healthy worker effect or some selection process that makes the potash workers appear healthier in a cross-sectional study.

  5. Noninvasive Methods for Determining Pulmonary Vascular Function in Children with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: Application of a Mechanical Oscillator Model

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Kendall S.; Gross, Justin K.; Lanning, Craig J.; Kirby, K. Scott; Dyer, Karrie L.; Ivy, D. Dunbar; Shandas, Robin

    2011-01-01

    Objective Noninvasive diagnostics for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) have traditionally sought to predict main pulmonary artery pressure from qualitative or direct quantitative measures of the flow velocity pattern obtained from spectral Doppler ultrasound examination of the main pulmonary artery. A more detailed quantification of flow velocity patterns in the systemic circuit has been obtained by parameterizing the flow trace with a simple dynamic system model. Here, we investigate such a models utility as a noninvasive predictor of total right heart afterload and right heart function. Design Flow velocity and pressure was measured within the main pulmonary artery during right heart catheterization of patients with normal hemodynamics (19 subjects, 20 conditions) and those with PAH undergoing reactivity evaluation (34 patients, 69 conditions). Our model parameters were obtained by least-squares fitting the model velocity to the measured flow velocity. Results Five parameter means displayed significant (P < .05) differences between normotensive and hypertensive groups. The model stiffness parameter correlated to actual pulmonary vascular resistance (r = 0.4924), pulmonary vascular stiffness (r = 0.6811), pulmonary flow (r = 0.6963), and stroke work (r = 0.7017), while the model initial displacement parameter had good correlation to stiffness (r = 0.6943) and flow (r = 0.6958). Conclusions As predictors of total right heart afterload (resistance and stiffness) and right ventricle work, the model parameters of stiffness and initial displacement offer more comprehensive measures of the disease state than previous noninvasive methods and may be useful in routine diagnostic monitoring of patients with PAH. PMID:18380759

  6. [An unusual association: tracheobronchomegaly with a normal pulmonary function test].

    PubMed

    Braham, W; Daboussi, S; Darouaz, S; Ben Salem, H; Boudawara, N; Knani, J

    2010-12-01

    Tracheobronchomegaly is a rare condition characterised by marked dilation of the trachea and the main bronchi. The clinical presentation of this disease is nonspecific and the diagnosis is based on the radiological features, especially computed tomography of chest. Pulmonary function tests are often abnormal showing airflow limitation with increased residual volume. The authors report a rare case of a 31-year-old man presenting tracheobronchomegaly is normal pulmonary function test. PMID:21167446

  7. The effect of pollutional haze on pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shao-Kun; Cai, Shan; Chen, Yan; Xiao, Bing; Chen, Ping; Xiang, Xu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Detrimental health effects of atmospheric exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) have been investigated in numerous studies. Exposure to pollutional haze, the carrier of air pollutants such as PM and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) has been linked to lung and cardiovascular disease, resulting increases in both hospital admissions and mortality. This review focuses on the constituents of pollutional haze and its effects on pulmonary function. The article presents the available information and seeks to correlate pollutional haze and pulmonary function. PMID:26904252

  8. The effect of pollutional haze on pulmonary function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shao-Kun; Cai, Shan; Chen, Yan; Xiao, Bing; Chen, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Detrimental health effects of atmospheric exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) have been investigated in numerous studies. Exposure to pollutional haze, the carrier of air pollutants such as PM and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) has been linked to lung and cardiovascular disease, resulting increases in both hospital admissions and mortality. This review focuses on the constituents of pollutional haze and its effects on pulmonary function. The article presents the available information and seeks to correlate pollutional haze and pulmonary function. PMID:26904252

  9. Pulmonary function decline in firefighters and non-firefighters in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare changes to pulmonary function among firefighters and non-firefighters who were exposed to harmful substances in their work environments. Methods Firefighters (n = 322) and non-firefighters (n = 107) in Daegu who received a pulmonary function test in 2008 and 2011 as well as a regular health examination were included. Repeated measures ANOVA was performed to evaluate the pulmonary function of the two groups over the three-year period. Results After adjusting for age, height, body mass index, duration of exposure, physical activity, and smoking, which were statistically different between the two groups and known risk factors of pulmonary function, the forced expiratory volume in one s FEV1, forced vital capacity FVC, and FEV1/FVC% over the 3 year period were significantly lower among firefighters compared with non-firefighters. Conclusions Evaluating the working environment of firefighters is difficult; however, our study revealed that pulmonary function declined in firefighters. Thus, more effort should be made to prevent and manage respiratory diseases early by preforming strict and consistent pulmonary function tests in firefighters. PMID:24795815

  10. Cognitive function in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bors, Melinda; Tomic, Rade; Perlman, David M; Kim, Hyun J; Whelan, Timothy P M

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there is evidence that individuals with severe idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) have cognitive deficits when compared to individuals with healthy lungs. Participants completed five neuropsychological tests: Trail Making Test (TMT) A and B, Stroop Color Word Test (1, 2, 3), Hopkins Verbal Learning Test, Boston Naming Test, and Grooved Pegboard Test, additionally, the short form-36 and Beck Depression Index. Twelve participants (7 male, mean age 69.3, 9.4 years) comprised the severe IPF group defined by a diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) <30%. Thirty-four patients (22 male, mean age 63.2, 9.6 years) comprised the mild-to-moderate group with a DLCO >30%. Participating spouses (n = 15, 4 male) served as the control group and had a mean age of 66.0, 10.8 years. Controlling for gender and age, the severe group had a significantly longer mean TMT B time (69.4, 135.9 seconds) than the mild group and the control group (86.7 seconds vs 83.2 seconds; p = 0.004 and 0.008 respectively), suggesting inferior performance on tasks requiring speed divided attention. In addition, the severe group had a significantly lower number of correctly identified colors in the Stroop 3 test (22.4 vs 30.6 vs 38.6; p < 0.001), suggesting slower processing speeds when requiring suppression of a familiar response. Participants with severe IPF had worse cognitive function than mild IPF or control subjects. Further research is needed to explain these findings and to develop interventions tailored to address these deficits. PMID:26374298

  11. Pulmonary function in microgravity: KC-135 experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, Harold J.; Prisk, G. K.

    1991-01-01

    We have commenced a KC-135 program that parallels and proceeds our Spacelab (SLS-1) pulmonary function experiment. Our first task was to elucidate the affect of normal gravitation on the shape of the maximum expiratory flow volume (MEFV) curve. Nine normal subjects performed multiple MEFV maneuvers at 0-G, 1-G, and approximately 1.7-G. The MEFV curves for each subject were filtered, aligned at RV, and ensemble-averaged to produce an average MEFV curve for each state, allowing differences to be studied. Most subjects showed a decrease in the FVC at 0-G, which we attribute to an increased intrathoracic blood volume. In most of these subjects, the mean lung volume associated with a given flow was lower at 0-G, over about the upper half of the vital capacity. This is similar to the change previously reported during heat out immersion and is consistent with the known affect of engorgement of the lung with blood, on elastic recoil. There were also consistent but highly individual changes in the position and magnitude of detailed features of the curve, the individual patterns being similar to those previously reported on transition from the erect to the supine position. This supports the idea that the location and motion of choke points which determine the detailed individual configuration of MEFV curves, can be significantly influenced by gravitational forces, presumably via the effects of change in longitudinal tension on local airway pressure-diameter behavior and wave speed. We have developed a flight mass spectrometer and have commenced a study of single breath gradients in gas exchange, inert gas washouts, and rebreathing cardiac outputs and lung volumes at 0-G, 1-G, and 1.7-G. Comparison of our results with those from SLS-1 should identify the opportunities and limitations of the KC-135 as an accessible microgravity resource.

  12. Pulmonary functions in plastic factory workers: a preliminary study.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Khaliq F; Singh P; Chandra P; Gupta K; Vaney N

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to long term air pollution in the work environment may result in decreased lung functions and various other health problems. A significant occupational hazard to lung functions is experienced by plastic factory workers. The present study is planned to assess the pulmonary functions of workers in the plastic factory where recycling of pastic material was done. These workers were constantly exposed to fumes of various chemicals throughout the day. Thirty one workers of plastic factory were assessed for their pulmonary functions. Parameters were compared with 31 age and sex matched controls not exposed to the same environment. The pulmonary function tests were done using Sibelmed Datospir 120 B portable spirometer. A significant decrease in most of the flow rates (MEF 25%, MEF 50%, MEF 75% and FEF 25-75%) and most of the lung volumes and capacities (FVC, FEV1, VC, TV, ERV, MVV) were observed in the workers. Smoking and duration of exposure were not affecting the lung functions as the non smokers also showed a similar decrement in pulmonary functions. Similarly the workers working for less than 5 years also had decrement in pulmonary functions indicating that their lungs are being affected even if they have worked for one year. Exposure to the organic dust in the work environment should be controlled by adequate engineering measures, complemented by effective personal respiratory protection.

  13. Pulmonary functions in plastic factory workers: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Khaliq, Farah; Singh, Pawan; Chandra, Prakash; Gupta, Keshav; Vaney, Neelam

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to long term air pollution in the work environment may result in decreased lung functions and various other health problems. A significant occupational hazard to lung functions is experienced by plastic factory workers. The present study is planned to assess the pulmonary functions of workers in the plastic factory where recycling of pastic material was done. These workers were constantly exposed to fumes of various chemicals throughout the day. Thirty one workers of plastic factory were assessed for their pulmonary functions. Parameters were compared with 31 age and sex matched controls not exposed to the same environment. The pulmonary function tests were done using Sibelmed Datospir 120 B portable spirometer. A significant decrease in most of the flow rates (MEF 25%, MEF 50%, MEF 75% and FEF 25-75%) and most of the lung volumes and capacities (FVC, FEV1, VC, TV, ERV, MVV) were observed in the workers. Smoking and duration of exposure were not affecting the lung functions as the non smokers also showed a similar decrement in pulmonary functions. Similarly the workers working for less than 5 years also had decrement in pulmonary functions indicating that their lungs are being affected even if they have worked for one year. Exposure to the organic dust in the work environment should be controlled by adequate engineering measures, complemented by effective personal respiratory protection. PMID:22315811

  14. Advanced Techniques in Pulmonary Function Test Analysis Interpretation and Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Gildea, T.J.; Bell, C. William

    1980-01-01

    The Pulmonary Functions Analysis and Diagnostic System is an advanced clinical processing system developed for use at the Pulmonary Division, Department of Medicine at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. The system generates comparative results and diagnostic impressions for a variety of routine and specialized pulmonary functions test data. Routine evaluation deals with static lung volumes, breathing mechanics, diffusing capacity, and blood gases while specialized tests include lung compliance studies, small airways dysfunction studies and dead space to tidal volume ratios. Output includes tabular results of normal vs. observed values, clinical impressions and commentary and, where indicated, a diagnostic impression. A number of pulmonary physiological and state variables are entered or sampled (A to D) with periodic status reports generated for the test supervisor. Among the various physiological variables sampled are respiratory frequency, minute ventilation, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, and arterial oxygen saturation.

  15. Pulmonary function and fuel use: A population survey

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Asim; Mohan Rao, N; Kulkarni, PK; Majumdar, PK; Saiyed, HN

    2005-01-01

    Background In the backdrop of conflicting reports (some studies reported adverse outcomes of biomass fuel use whereas few studies reported absence of any association between adverse health effect and fuel use, may be due to presence of large number of confounding variables) on the respiratory health effects of biomass fuel use, this cross sectional survey was undertaken to understand the role of fuel use on pulmonary function. Method This study was conducted in a village of western India involving 369 randomly selected adult subjects (165 male and 204 female). All the subjects were interviewed and were subjected to pulmonary function test. Analysis of covariance was performed to compare the levels of different pulmonary function test parameters in relation to different fuel use taking care of the role of possible confounding factors. Results This study showed that biomass fuel use (especially wood) is an important factor for deterioration of pulmonary function (particularly in female). FEV1 (p < .05), FEV1 % (p < .01), PEFR (p < .05) and FEF2575 (p < .01) values were significantly lower in biomass fuel using females than nonusers. Comparison of only biomass fuel use vs. only LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas) use and only wood vs. only LPG use has showed that LPG is a safer fuel so far as deterioration of pulmonary function is concerned. This study observes some deterioration of pulmonary function in the male subjects also, who came from biomass fuel using families. Conclusion This study concluded that traditional biomass fuels like wood have adverse effects on pulmonary function. PMID:16255784

  16. Heterogeneity of daily pulmonary function in response to air pollution among asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Aekplakorn, Wichai; Loomis, Dana; Vichit-Vadakan, Nuntavarn; Bangdiwala, Shrikant

    2004-12-01

    Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated the association of short-term exposure to air pollution with transient declines in pulmonary function. Although the magnitudes of declines in pulmonary function found in these studies are relatively small, the effects vary among children. This study examined whether the variation is evidence of biological heterogeneity or due to random variation by analyzing data from a panel study of 83 asthmatic school children exposed to SO2 and PM10 in the Mae Moh district of Thailand. Daily pulmonary function testing was performed on the children for 61 days. General linear mixed models were used to examine and test for the null hypothesis of no variation in the subject-specific slopes of pulmonary functions in response to the air pollutants. The individual daily pulmonary functions measured were FVC, FEV1, PEFR, and FEF(25-75%). These were used as an outcome to compare with air pollutant concentrations as random effects, adjusting for height, gender, time, and temperature. The results indicate evidence of inter-individual variation for subject-specific changes in FVC, FEV1, and PEFR due to the effects of SO2 and PM10 on children. In conclusion, even at low concentrations of daily SO2 and PM10 in the study area, there is evidence of a heterogeneous response to short-term exposure to SO2 and PM10 in children. PMID:15916104

  17. Effects of anaesthesia techniques and drugs on pulmonary function

    PubMed Central

    Saraswat, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    The primary task of the lungs is to maintain oxygenation of the blood and eliminate carbon dioxide through the network of capillaries alongside alveoli. This is maintained by utilising ventilatory reserve capacity and by changes in lung mechanics. Induction of anaesthesia impairs pulmonary functions by the loss of consciousness, depression of reflexes, changes in rib cage and haemodynamics. All drugs used during anaesthesia, including inhalational agents, affect pulmonary functions directly by acting on respiratory system or indirectly through their actions on other systems. Volatile anaesthetic agents have more pronounced effects on pulmonary functions compared to intravenous induction agents, leading to hypercarbia and hypoxia. The posture of the patient also leads to major changes in pulmonary functions. Anticholinergics and neuromuscular blocking agents have little effect. Analgesics and sedatives in combination with volatile anaesthetics and induction agents may exacerbate their effects. Since multiple agents are used during anaesthesia, ultimate effect may be different from when used in isolation. Literature search was done using MeSH key words anesthesia, pulmonary function, respiratory system and anesthesia drugs and lungs in combination in PubMed, Science Direct and Google Scholar filtered by review and research articles sorted by relevance. PMID:26556914

  18. The course of lung function in treated tropical pulmonary eosinophilia

    PubMed Central

    Poh, S. C.

    1974-01-01

    Poh, S. C. (1974).Thorax, 29, 710-712. The course of lung function in treated tropical pulmonary eosinophilia. A follow-up study over a period of two years in the lung function of 15 patients with tropical pulmonary eosinophilia successfully treated with diethylcarbamazine is reported. A return to normal of the lung function with the exception of the transfer factor and forced expiratory volume is observed by the end of six months and these abnormalities persist up to the end of the study. The possible pathological causes of this defect are discussed. PMID:4450181

  19. Pulmonary mechanical function and diffusion capacity after deep saturation dives.

    PubMed Central

    Thorsen, E; Segadal, K; Myrseth, E; Psche, A; Gulsvik, A

    1990-01-01

    To assess the effects of deep saturation dives on pulmonary function, static and dynamic lung volumes, transfer factor for carbon monoxide (T1CO), delta-N2, and closing volume (CV) were measured before and after eight saturation dives to pressures of 3.1-4.6 MPa. The atmospheres were helium-oxygen mixtures with partial pressures of oxygen of 40-60 kPa. The durations of the dives were 14-30 days. Mean rate of decompression was 10.5-13.5 kPa/hour. A total of 43 divers were examined, six of whom took part in two dives, the others in one only. Dynamic lung volumes did not change significantly but total lung capacity (TLC) increased significantly by 4.3% and residual volume (RV) by 14.8% (p less than 0.05). CV was increased by 16.7% (p less than 0.01). The T1CO was reduced from 13.0 +/- 1.6 to 11.8 +/- 1.7 mmol/min/kPa (p less than 0.01) when corrected to a haemoglobin concentration of 146 g/l. Effective alveolar volume was unchanged. The increase in TLC and decrease in T1CO were correlated (r = -0.574, p less than 0.02). A control examination of 38 of the divers four to six weeks after the dives showed a partial normalisation of the changes. The increase in TLC, RV, and CV, and the decrease in T1CO, could be explained by a loss of pulmonary elastic tissue caused by inflammatory reactions induced by oxygen toxicity or venous gas emboli. PMID:2337532

  20. IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF DISEASE USING PULMONARY FUNCTION TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    Pulmonary function testing is used routinely in human medicine to objectively define functional deficits in individuals with respiratory disease. Despite the fact that respiratory disease is a common problem in veterinary medicine, evaluation of the small animal pa...

  1. Pulmonary functions in workers of fertiliser and chemical industry.

    PubMed

    Geetha, B; Nair, R H; Kesavachandran, C; Chandy, S; Shashidhar, S

    2001-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess the pulmonary functions in fertiliser and chemical industry workers of Kerala. Pulmonary function test was performed with Vitalograph Compact-II spirometer. Exposure to different chemicals, noxious gases and particulate matter of fertiliser and chemical industry was injurious to the normal pulmonary function. Significant decline in lung volumes, viz. FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC% (P < 0.01) and flow rates, viz. FEF25-75%, FEF0.2-1.2, FEF25%, FEF50%, FEF75% (P < 0.01) among non-smokers and smokers than that of normal controls was observed. The findings of this study also suggest that with increased duration of exposure to industrial pollutants, lung volumes and flow rates were significantly reduced in workers. PMID:11480228

  2. Self-Efficacy, Pulmonary Function, Perceived Health and Global Quality of Life of Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl, Astrid K.; Rustoen ,Tone; Hanestad, Berit R.; Gjengedal, Eva; Moum, Torbjorn

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the extent that pulmonary function is related to perceived health status and global quality of life in adults suffering from cystic fibrosis, and the extent that self-efficacy modifies these relationships. Our sample comprised 86 adults (48% female; mean age, 29 years; age range, 18-54 years) with cystic fibrosis, recruited

  3. Association Between Pulmonary Function and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in the NHANES III Study

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Tao-Chun; Kao, Tung-Wei; Wu, Li-Wei; Chen, Ying-Jen; Chang, Yaw-Wen; Wang, Chung-Ching; Tsao, Yu-Tzu; Chen, Wei-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Emerging evidence indicates that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with a wide variety of extrahepatic complications. However, the potential association between impaired pulmonary function and NAFLD has been less investigated. This study examined the relationship between pulmonary function and hepatic steatosis in 9976 adults participating in a cross-sectional analysis of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). NAFLD was defined as hepatic steatosis presented on ultrasound examinations in the absence of other known liver diseases. The associations between predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)% or predicted forced vital capacity (FVC)% and NAFLD were examined using multivariable linear regression while controlling for confounders. The association between obstructive or restrictive spirometry patterns and NAFLD was also evaluated using multivariable logistic regression analysis. After adjustment for multiple covariates, predicted FEV1% and FVC% were significantly and inversely associated with the degree of hepatic steatosis (P for trend <0.001 for both). The restrictive lung pattern was significantly related to participants with moderate and severe hepatic steatosis as compared with those without steatosis (OR 1.65, 95% CI 1.142.39 and OR 1.85, 95% CI 1.132.82), whereas the obstructive lung pattern was not associated with the presence of hepatic steatosis. Individuals with a greater degree of hepatic steatosis were at greater risk for poor pulmonary function, especially in restrictive pattern. These novel findings demonstrate that impaired pulmonary function is also an extrahepatic complication of NAFLD. PMID:26020401

  4. Self-Efficacy, Pulmonary Function, Perceived Health and Global Quality of Life of Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl, Astrid K.; Rustoen ,Tone; Hanestad, Berit R.; Gjengedal, Eva; Moum, Torbjorn

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the extent that pulmonary function is related to perceived health status and global quality of life in adults suffering from cystic fibrosis, and the extent that self-efficacy modifies these relationships. Our sample comprised 86 adults (48% female; mean age, 29 years; age range, 18-54 years) with cystic fibrosis, recruited…

  5. EFFECTS OF LARGE (0.9 MICROMETER) SULFURIC ACID AEROSOLS ON HUMAN PULMONARY FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of sulfuric acid particle concentration (mass/volume) and ambient temperatures on pulmonary function of young male nonsmokers were examined. Subjects (n=11) thrice repeated a sequence of 20-min exercise (ventilation approximately 30 liters/min) and 20-min sitting rest...

  6. Occupational health surveillance: Pulmonary function testing in emergency responders

    PubMed Central

    McCluskey, James D.; Harbison, Stephen C.; Johnson, Giffe T.; Xu, Ping; Morris, Steve; Wolfson, Jay; Harbison, Raymond D.

    2014-01-01

    Emergency responders may be exposed to a variety of fumes, gases, and particulates during the course of their job that can affect pulmonary function (PF) and require the use of respiratory protection. This investigation used occupational health monitoring examination data to characterize PF in a population currently employed as emergency responders. PF tests for workers who required health examinations to ensure fitness for continued respirator use were compared to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III Raw Spirometry database to determine if decreased PF was associated with employment as an emergency responder. The results of this research indicated that the emergency responders experienced a modest, but statistically significant, increase in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) mean values over the NHANES III population in both total and stratified analyses, including stratification by age, gender, height, and smoking history. Results are likely due to a combination of effectively controlled exposures in the workplace, and the healthy worker effect among long-term workers. PF testing required by the Occupational and Safety Health Administration (OSHA) has substantial utility for conducting occupational surveillance at the population level. In this investigation, we were able to quickly evaluate if abnormal PF existed in an industrial sector known to have exposures that, when uncontrolled, can lead to PF impairment. PMID:25114428

  7. Indoor air pollution and pulmonary function in children

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, S.; Qin, Y.; Cao, Z.; Shang, J.; Liu, Y.; Yang, X.; Deng, Y.; Huang, J.; Fu, Z.; Song, X. )

    1992-06-01

    Pulmonary function in winter time in 1,343 school children aged 10-13 years was measured in four cities located in northern and southern part of China. The results showed that FVC, FEV1, PEF, V75, V50 and V25 in children living in homes with coal stoves were decreased by 1.5-10.7% compared with children living in homes with gas or LPG stoves in Chengde and Shanghai. In contrast to this, no significant difference in pulmonary function was found in Shenyang and Wuhan. It suggested that this phenomenon was related to indoor air pollution, and partly related to passive smoking or outdoor air pollution.

  8. Influence of treatment with inhalable heroin on pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    Buster, M C A; van den Brink, W; van Brussel, G H A; van Ree, J M

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to asses the influence of inhalable heroin on pulmonary function in chronic heroin-dependent patients treated with inhalable heroin. Among 32 patients (all cigarette smokers), a spirometric test was conducted at baseline and after an average period of 10 months of treatment with medically prescribed heroin. Patients showed a high frequency of pulmonary dysfunction at baseline [34%, with percentage of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (%FEV1)<80%]. However, after excluding those who started pulmonary treatment (n=2) or who used heroin intravenously only (n=2), no statistically significant differences in %FEV1 between baseline and follow-up were observed (n=28; mean %FEV1 86% at baseline vs. 91% at follow-up; p=0.09). This small and relatively brief study suggests that 10 months of co-prescribed inhalable heroine base does not seem to (further) deteriorate pulmonary function in chronic, cigarette smoking treatment refractory heroin addicts. Screening for and treatment of pulmonary dysfunction is recommended for methadone patients with and without co-prescribed heroin. PMID:21422758

  9. Antenatal Hypoxia and Pulmonary Vascular Function and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Papamatheakis, Demosthenes G.; Blood, Arlin B.; Kim, Joon H.; Wilson, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    This review provides evidence that antenatal hypoxia, which represents a significant and worldwide problem, causes prenatal programming of the lung. A general overview of lung development is provided along with some background regarding transcriptional and signaling systems of the lung. The review illustrates that antenatal hypoxic stress can induce a continuum of responses depending on the species examined. Fetuses and newborns of certain species and specific human populations are well acclimated to antenatal hypoxia. However, antenatal hypoxia causes pulmonary vascular disease in fetuses and newborns of most mammalian species and humans. Disease can range from mild pulmonary hypertension, to severe vascular remodeling and dangerous elevations in pressure. The timing, length, and magnitude of the intrauterine hypoxic stress are important to disease development, however there is also a genetic-environmental relationship that is not yet completely understood. Determining the origins of pulmonary vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension and their associated effects is a challenging task, but is necessary in order to develop targeted therapies for pulmonary hypertension in the newborn due to antenatal hypoxia that can both treat the symptoms and curtail or reverse disease progression. PMID:24063380

  10. INDOOR AIR POLLUTION AND PULMONARY FUNCTION GROWTH IN PREADOLESCENT CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results are reported from a study of the association between exposure to sidestream cigarette smoke or gas stove emissions and pulmonary function level and growth rate of 7,834 children seen at 2-5 annual visits between the ages of 6-10 years. Children whose mothers smoked one pa...

  11. EFFECTS OF OZONE ON THE PULMONARY FUNCTION OF CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Healthy active children, 7 to 13 years old, in a summer recreational camp were chosen as subjects to investigate the acute effects of exposure to ambient air pollution. Pulmonary function tests were administered at the camp on 16 days during a five week period in 1982. Ambient ai...

  12. Non-invasive pulmonary function test on Morquio patients.

    PubMed

    Kubaski, Francyne; Tomatsu, Shunji; Patel, Pravin; Shimada, Tsutomu; Xie, Li; Yasuda, Eriko; Mason, Robert; Mackenzie, William G; Theroux, Mary; Bober, Michael B; Oldham, Helen M; Orii, Tadao; Shaffer, Thomas H

    2015-08-01

    In clinical practice, respiratory function tests are difficult to perform in Morquio syndrome patients due to their characteristic skeletal dysplasia, small body size and lack of cooperation of young patients, where in some cases, conventional spirometry for pulmonary function is too challenging. To establish feasible clinical pulmonary endpoints and determine whether age impacts lung function in Morquio patients non-invasive pulmonary tests and conventional spirometry were evaluated. The non-invasive pulmonary tests: impulse oscillometry system, pneumotachography, and respiratory inductance plethysmography in conjunction with conventional spirometry were evaluated in twenty-two Morquio patients (18 Morquio A and 4 Morquio B) (7 males), ranging from 3 to 40 years of age. Twenty-two patients were compliant with non-invasive tests (100%) with the exception of IOS (81.8%-18 patients). Seventeen patients (77.3%) were compliant with spirometry testing. All subjects had normal vital signs at rest including >95% oxygen saturation, end tidal CO2 (38-44 mmHg), and age-appropriate heart rate (mean=98.3, standard deviation=19) (two patients were deviated). All patients preserved normal values in the impulse oscillometry system, pneumotachography, and respiratory inductance plethysmography, although predicted forced expiratory total (72.86.9 SE%) decreased with age and was below normal; phase angle (35.516.5), %rib cage (41.612.7%), resonant frequency, and forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced expiratory volume total (110.03.2 SE%) were normal and not significantly impacted by age. The proposed non-invasive pulmonary function tests are able to cover a greater number of patients (young patients and/or wheel-chair bound), thus providing a new diagnostic approach for the assessment of lung function in Morquio syndrome which in many cases may be difficult to evaluate. Morquio patients studied herein demonstrated no clinical or functional signs of restrictive and/or obstructive lung disease. PMID:26116954

  13. Classification of respiratory functional impairment in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Allegra, L; Bonsignore, G; Cresci, F; Fumagalli, G; Mandelli, V; Morpurgo, M; Panuccio, P; Pasargiklian, M; Rampulla, C; Viroli, L

    1984-01-01

    Starting from a paper published in 1964 by Wilson et al., we explored the possibility of classifying the clinical and functional deficit of patients with chronic obstructive lung disease into six classes, class 0 representing normality and class 5 greatest severity. Each symptom or sign was classified into six degrees of increasing severity. Next, we looked for a possible dependence of the collegially assigned score on anthropometric, clinical, or instrumental data in each case. More particularly, we tried (1) to identify such combinations of variables as would permit classification of the patient with the smallest possible error, and (2) to determine which of the variables reflected the severity of the case more faithfully. The results emerging from this study suggest the possibility of evaluating and classifying respiratory impairment in three different ways, as follows: (1) On the basis of clinical data only. This method is the easiest to use and affords a fairly good determination coefficient (R2 = 0.812). (2) Using only some combinations of laboratory data (static and dynamic pulmonary volumes, blood gases, etc.), with or without the addition of vital statistics and anthropometric data. These subensembles would allow a posteriori estimates in cases where the subject is no longer available for questioning and examination. In that case the best multiple regression affords a determination coefficient R2 = 0.82. (3) Using all clinical and laboratory data available. In that case, the best multiple regression (R2 = 0.899) for predictive purposes is that which includes the sum of clinical data, the pulmonary volumes before and after pharmacological bronchodilation, and the PaCO2 value. For practical purposes, however, the most convenient function is the one that includes the sum of clinical data plus FEV1 and RV (R2 = 0.863). Even with the best of the three functions proposed in this paper, however, the standard error of estimate entails tolerance limits sometimes amounting to one whole class of severity. Still, the probability of making an error exceeding one class of severity occurs in only 3.7% of the cases, an average which seems quite acceptable from the clinical point of view. PMID:6431570

  14. [External respiratory function and pulmonary capillary blood flow in patients with postoperative recurrent pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    El'kin, A V; Savin, I B

    1999-01-01

    To clarify criteria for functional operability, external respiratory function (ERF) and pulmonary capillary blood flow (PCBF) were studied in 116 patients with postoperative recurrent pulmonary tuberculosis who had been admitted to the resurgery unit. Moderate ERF impairments (stages I and II) were identified in 65% of cases, 23% had stage III ventilation disorders (VD), and 11% were found to have stages IV and V VD. In focal recurrences, overall PCBF ranged 19 to 36% of the total pulmonary blood flow with is decrease from 11 to 0.3% in the total number of recurrences. Preoperative preparation improved ERF in 54% of patients. Contraindications for surgery were found in 9% due their low functional reserves. A total of 105 patients were operated on, postoperative mortality was 11.4%. Cardiopulmonary insufficiency was a cause of death in 4 cases, of them 3 patients underwent repeated resection of the lung as pneumonectomy in baseline stage III VD, which allows these patients to refer to as a high surgical risk group. PMID:10420759

  15. 21 CFR 868.1890 - Predictive pulmonary-function value calculator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Predictive pulmonary-function value calculator. 868.1890 Section 868.1890 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... pulmonary-function value calculator. (a) Identification. A predictive pulmonary-function value calculator...

  16. 21 CFR 868.1890 - Predictive pulmonary-function value calculator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Predictive pulmonary-function value calculator. 868.1890 Section 868.1890 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... pulmonary-function value calculator. (a) Identification. A predictive pulmonary-function value calculator...

  17. 21 CFR 868.1890 - Predictive pulmonary-function value calculator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Predictive pulmonary-function value calculator. 868.1890 Section 868.1890 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... pulmonary-function value calculator. (a) Identification. A predictive pulmonary-function value calculator...

  18. 21 CFR 868.1890 - Predictive pulmonary-function value calculator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Predictive pulmonary-function value calculator. 868.1890 Section 868.1890 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... pulmonary-function value calculator. (a) Identification. A predictive pulmonary-function value calculator...

  19. Oxidant-antioxidant status and pulmonary function in welding workers.

    PubMed

    Fidan, Fatma; Unl, Mehmet; Kken, Tlay; Tetik, Levent; Akgn, Sema; Demirel, Reha; Serteser, Mustafa

    2005-07-01

    Welding is a process during which fumes, gases, electromagnetic radiation and noise are emitted as by-products. Metal oxide particles are particularly hazardous components of welding fumes. Welding has been found to be associated with respiratory symptoms and our objective in the present study was to study the effects of welding on pulmonary function and serum oxidant-antioxidant status. Fifty-one welding workers and 31 control subjects were recruited. Face to face interviews were conducted using the respiratory illness questionnaire adapted from the American Thoracic Society with the addition of demographic characteristics, work history and working conditions. Additionally physical examinations and spirometric measurements were performed at workplaces. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), protein carbonyls, protein sulfhydryls (SH) and erythrocyte reduced glutathione (GSH) levels were measured to evaluate oxidant-antioxidant status in 34 welding workers and in 20 control subjects. No statistically significant differences were observed in age, height, weight, body mass index (BMI), smoking status and annual working durations between welding workers and controls. Coughing, sputting and wheezing were significantly higher in welding workers (p<0.05). When adjusted for age, BMI and smoking status in logistic regression, welding work showed a significant risk for chronic bronchitis (OR: 4.78, 95%CI: 1.30-17.54). Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1))/forced vital capacity (FVC) and four parameters of forced expiratory flow (FEF: FEF(25), FEF(50), FEF(75), FEF(25-75)) levels measured in the welding workers were significantly lower than those in the control group (p<0.05). Serum TBARS and protein carbonyl levels were higher in welding workers than those in controls (p<0.001, p<0.05, respectively). On the other hand, total protein SH groups and GSH levels were significantly lower in welders than those in controls (p<0.05, p<0.001, respectively). Pulmonary function tests and oxidant-antioxidant status were found to be negatively affected in welding workers chronically exposed to welding fumes and gases. Preventive measures should be taken to improve the health status of these workers. PMID:16096352

  20. Pulmonary functions in petrol pump workers: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Mayank; Khaliq, Farah; Singhal, Siddarth; Tandon, O P

    2007-01-01

    Occupational exposures to petrol/diesel vapors have been shown to affect functioning of different systems of the body. The present study was planned to assess the pulmonary functions in petrol pump workers (filling attendants) who are continuously exposed to petrol/diesel vapors during duty hours. Thirty healthy non-smoker males working in petrol pump for more than one year formed the study group, while thirty healthy non-smoker males from hospital staff served as control group. The pulmonary functions were assessed using computerized spirometer. The FVC and FEV1 were decreased in the study group while their ratio did not differ much. Both the inspiratory and expiratory flow rates were also decreased in the study group. These findings point towards adverse effects of petrol/diesel fumes mainly on lower airways with restrictive pattern of disease. PMID:18341220

  1. Association Between Marijuana Exposure and Pulmonary Function over 20 Years

    PubMed Central

    Pletcher, Mark J.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Kalhan, Ravi; Richman, Joshua; Safford, Monika; Sidney, Steve; Lin, Feng; Kertesz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Context Marijuana smoke is very similar to tobacco smoke, but whether it has similarly adverse effects on pulmonary function is unclear. Objective To analyze associations between marijuana (both current and lifetime exposure) and pulmonary function Design We used repeated measurements of pulmonary function and smoking collected over 20 years in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study. Mixed linear modeling was used to account for individual age-based trajectories of pulmonary function and other covariates including tobacco use, which was analyzed in parallel as a positive control. Setting 4 US cities, 19852006 Participants Black and white men and women recruited at age 1830 years and followed for 20 years Main Outcome Measures Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) Results Marijuana exposure was nearly as common as tobacco exposure, but was mostly light (median 23 episodes per month). Tobacco exposure, both current and lifetime, was linearly associated with lower FEV1 and FVC. In contrast, the association between marijuana exposure and pulmonary function was non-linear (p<.001): at low levels of exposure, FEV1 increased by 13 ml/joint-year (95% confidence interval (CI): 6.4 20) and FVC by 20 ml/joint-year (95%CI:12 27); but at higher levels of exposure, these associations leveled off or even reversed. The slope for FEV1 was ?2.2 ml/joint-year (95%CI:?4.6 0.3) at >10 joint-years, and ?3.2 ml per marijuana smoking episode/month (95%CI:?5.8 ?0.6) at >20 episodes/month. The net association with FEV1 declined to or below baseline with very heavy use, but FVC remained significantly elevated in even heavy users (e.g., 76 ml [95%CI:34 117) at 20 joint-years). Conclusions Occasional and low cumulative marijuana use was not associated with adverse effects on pulmonary function. PMID:22235088

  2. [Pulmonary function testing: history up to the present].

    PubMed

    Tojo, Naoko

    2014-12-01

    The main roles of pulmonary function testing are: aiding in the diagnosis, assessing disease severity, and monitoring the progress and effects of treatment. The spirometric measurements of highest clinical value are the vital capacity(VC) and forced expiratory volume in one second(FEV1). Measurements of VC were reported in both healthy subjects and patients with respiratory disease during the mid-19th century. The VC, however, was little used in clinical medicine until the second half of the 20th century. The FEV1, FEV1/VC ratio, and/or FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio all came into existence after 1950. Pulmonary function testing evolved over time into a more complex set of lung function measurements using various techniques and devices. If the variability of the results can be minimized and the measurement accuracy can be improved, abnormalities will be more easily detected. In 2005, the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and European Respiratory Society (ERS) together published an updated set of standards for pulmonary function testing that could be applied more widely. These standards are structured to cover definitions, equipment, and patient-related procedures commonly applied for many methods of lung function testing. In 2004, the Japanese Respiratory Society issued an initial set of recommendations for the standardized measurement of VC, FVC, and the single-breath carbon monoxide-diffusing capacity. These recommendations have not been updated, and the prediction equations for pulmonary function testing have not been fully established. The statements need to be periodically updated in accordance with new developments. (Review). PMID:25823236

  3. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in blacks and whites: pulmonary function norms and risk factors.

    PubMed Central

    Gillum, R. F.

    1991-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma are significant causes of illness and death in blacks. Racial differences in normal values of pulmonary function tests must be considered in both patient care and research. Assessment of risk factors is an important part of COPD management and prevention. An extensive review of data from the National Center for Health Statistics and from other population-based studies confirmed lower lung volumes in blacks compared to whites. However, the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity was not lower in blacks; racial differences in flow rates were inconsistently reported. Thoracic dimensions were smaller in blacks than in whites in healthy populations. The cause and the physiologic and pathophysiologic significance of these racial differences are unknown. Population-based studies in blacks have firmly established only age and cigarette smoking as risk factors for COPD other than asthma. In 1987, 43% of black men aged 45 and older smoked cigarettes compared to only 30% of white men. Further research is needed on racial differences in pulmonary function and the effects of multiple risk factors to enhance understanding of COPD etiology and prevention. More vigorous smoking prevention and cessation efforts should be targeted for blacks by physicians and public health organizations. PMID:1875419

  4. Pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms of school children exposed to ambient air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoon Shin; Ko, Ung Ring

    1996-12-31

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the health effect of air pollution on pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms of Korean school children between 7 and 10 years of age during November 1995-January 1996. A standard respiratory symptom questionnaire was administered and spirometry was performed to examine pulmonary function of 121 children in an urban polluted area, Seoul, and of 119 children in non-polluted area, Sokcho, respectively. There was significant difference in the level of pulmonary function [forced expiratory volume in second (FEV{sub 1.0}) and forced vital capacity (FVC)] between exposed groups to polluted area and non-polluted area. Parental smoking was significantly related to respiratory symptoms of cough, phlegm, and the level of pulmonary function. The observed changes in FEV{sub 1.0} and FVC seemed to relate to home cooking fuel, not to respiratory symptoms. The additional longitudinal work that carefully monitors ambient and indoor air pollution and health effects data should be conducted to confirm these results.

  5. Pulmonary function tests in type 1 diabetes adolescents with diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    ?urdk, Peter; Vojtkov, Jarmila; Michnov, Zuzana; Tur?an, Tom; ujansk, Anna; Kuchta, Milan; ?iljakov, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Chronic diabetic complications may afflict all organ tissues including cardiovascular and respiratory system. The aim of the study was to establish if the presence of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) was associated with impaired pulmonary function tests in adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D). 46 adolescents with T1D and 25 healthy subjects at the age 15-19years were enrolled to the study. Basic anthropometric data, diabetes onset and duration, plasma glucose and A1c were established. Pulmonary function tests were measured by spirometry and the presence of CAN was examined by heart rate variability. Adolescents with T1D had significantly lower pulmonary function test parameters - FVC (p<0.01), FEV1 (p<0.01), MMEF (p<0.05) and PEFR (p<0.05) compared to the control subjects. In diabetic group, patients with CAN (CAN+, n=19) had significantly lower FVC (p<0.05), FEV1 (p<0.05) and PEFR (p<0.05) compared to patients without CAN (CAN-, n=27). All spirometric parameters were significantly lower in CAN+ subjects compared to healthy controls; however, no significant difference was found in these parameters between CAN- subjects and healthy controls. Spirometric parameters (FVC, FEV1) significantly positively correlated with diabetes onset and body mass index; and negatively correlated with diabetes duration and resting heart rate. Our results indicate that CAN may be associated with reduced pulmonary functions in adolescents with T1D. PMID:26597599

  6. Analysis of the pulmonary functions of normal adults according to pillow height

    PubMed Central

    Seo, KyoChul; Cho, MiSuk

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to examine changes in pulmonary functions in relation to the sleeping positions of the experimental subjects. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects for this study were twenty randomly selected males and females from K University. Measurements were taken in the supine position at three different pillow heights: 0?cm, 5?cm, and 10?cm. Pulmonary functions (vital capacity, tidal volume, inspiratory reserve volume, and expiratory reserve volume) were evaluated using a Fit mate. [Results] These findings suggest that a pillow height of 5?cm makes a significant difference in vital capacity (VC). When the three pillow heights were compared, significant differences were seen between 0?cm and 5?cm, and between 5?cm and 10?cm, in terms of vital capacity for the pulmonary functions among the three positions. [Conclusion] In conclusion, changing the positions of the subjects produces changes in pulmonary functions. The greatest change occurred in the 5?cm pillow height. Presumably, ventilation is affected by the body structures. The results will provide objective data to establish the most suitable positions for stroke patients when they perform respiratory exercises. PMID:26644649

  7. Reliability of an Electronic Inspiratory Loading Device for Assessing Pulmonary Function in Post-Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong-Bong; Kim, Min-Kyu; Jeong, Ju-Ri; Lee, Wan-Hee

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The purpose of this study was to examine the inter- and intra-rater reliability of an electronic inspiratory loading device for the assessment of pulmonary functions: maximum inspiratory pressure, peak inspiratory flow, and vital capacity. MATERIAL AND METHODS Subjects were 50 patient volunteers in a rehabilitation hospital who had experienced their first episode of unilateral stroke with hemiparesis during the previous 6 months (26 men, 24 women; mean age [±SD], 55.96 [±12.81] years), with no use of medications that could induce drowsiness, evidence of restrictive lung disease, history of asthma, use of psychotropic drugs, or alcohol consumption habit. Maximum inspiratory pressure, peak inspiratory flow, and vital capacity for pulmonary functions were assessed using an electronic inspiratory loading device (PowerBreathe, K5, 2010) by 2 examiners, with patients in an unassisted sitting position, and 1 examiner re-assessed with same patients at the same time of a day after 1 week. Intra-class correlation coefficients were used to assess reliability. RESULTS Intra-rater reliability ranged from intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs)=0.959 to 0.986 in variables. For the inter-rater reliability between 2 examiners, the ICCs ranged from 0.933 to 0.985. Intra-rater and inter-rater reliability were good in variables (maximal inspiratory pressure, peak inspiratory flow, and vital capacity). CONCLUSIONS The intra- and inter-examiner reliability of the pulmonary function measurements, maximum inspiratory pressure, peak inspiratory flow, and vital capacity, for the post-stroke patients was very high. The results suggest that the electronic inspiratory loading device would be useful for clinical rehabilitative assessment of pulmonary function. PMID:26782369

  8. Reliability of an Electronic Inspiratory Loading Device for Assessing Pulmonary Function in Post-Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyeong-Bong; Kim, Min-Kyu; Jeong, Ju-Ri; Lee, Wan-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine the inter- and intra-rater reliability of an electronic inspiratory loading device for the assessment of pulmonary functions: maximum inspiratory pressure, peak inspiratory flow, and vital capacity. Material/Methods Subjects were 50 patient volunteers in a rehabilitation hospital who had experienced their first episode of unilateral stroke with hemiparesis during the previous 6 months (26 men, 24 women; mean age [±SD], 55.96 [±12.81] years), with no use of medications that could induce drowsiness, evidence of restrictive lung disease, history of asthma, use of psychotropic drugs, or alcohol consumption habit. Maximum inspiratory pressure, peak inspiratory flow, and vital capacity for pulmonary functions were assessed using an electronic inspiratory loading device (PowerBreathe, K5, 2010) by 2 examiners, with patients in an unassisted sitting position, and 1 examiner re-assessed with same patients at the same time of a day after 1 week. Intra-class correlation coefficients were used to assess reliability. Results Intra-rater reliability ranged from intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs)=0.959 to 0.986 in variables. For the inter-rater reliability between 2 examiners, the ICCs ranged from 0.933 to 0.985. Intra-rater and inter-rater reliability were good in variables (maximal inspiratory pressure, peak inspiratory flow, and vital capacity). Conclusions The intra- and inter-examiner reliability of the pulmonary function measurements, maximum inspiratory pressure, peak inspiratory flow, and vital capacity, for the post-stroke patients was very high. The results suggest that the electronic inspiratory loading device would be useful for clinical rehabilitative assessment of pulmonary function. PMID:26782369

  9. Influence of Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Cancer on Pulmonary Function

    SciTech Connect

    Tada, Akihiro Hiraki, Takao; Iguchi, Toshihiro; Gobara, Hideo; Mimura, Hidefumi; Toyooka, Shinichi; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Tsuda, Toshihide; Mitsuhashi, Toshiharu; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate altered pulmonary function retrospectively after RFA. Methods: This retrospective study comprised 41 ablation sessions for 39 patients (22 men and 17 women; mean age, 64.8 years). Vital capacity (VC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV{sub 1}) at 1 and 3 months after RFA were compared with the baseline (i.e., values before RFA). To evaluate the factors that influenced impaired pulmonary function, univariate analysis was performed by using multiple variables. If two or more variables were indicated as statistically significant by univariate analysis, these variables were subjected to multivariate analysis to identify independent factors. Results: The mean VC and FEV{sub 1} before RFA and 1 and 3 months after RFA were 3.04 and 2.24 l, 2.79 and 2.11 l, and 2.85 and 2.13 l, respectively. The values at 1 and 3 months were significantly lower than the baseline. Severe pleuritis after RFA was identified as the independent factor influencing impaired VC at 1 month (P = 0.003). For impaired FEV{sub 1} at 1 month, only severe pleuritis (P = 0.01) was statistically significant by univariate analysis. At 3 months, severe pleuritis (VC, P = 0.019; FEV{sub 1}, P = 0.003) and an ablated parenchymal volume {>=}20 cm{sup 3} (VC, P = 0.047; FEV{sub 1}, P = 0.038) were independent factors for impaired VC and FEV{sub 1}. Conclusions: Pulmonary function decreased after RFA. RFA-induced severe pleuritis and ablation of a large volume of marginal parenchyma were associated with impaired pulmonary function.

  10. Associations of Pulmonary Function with Dementia and Depression in an Older Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Suelin; Kang, Hee-Ju; Bae, Kyung-Yeol; Kim, Sung-Wan; Shin, Il-Seon; Yoon, Jin-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Objective Previous studies reported an association between pulmonary function and cognitive function. However, not much has been investigated in this regard concerning dementia in a community population, taking depression into account. We aimed to examine the associations of pulmonary function with dementia and depression in a community-dwelling elderly population. Methods A total of 1,038 participants were evaluated for dementia and depression using the Korean version of the Geriatric Mental State Schedule B3 (GMS B3-K), the Community Screening Interview for Dementia-Korean version (CSID-K) and a modified 10-item Word List Learning from the Consortium to Establish a Registry of Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD). Pulmonary function was measured as forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) from a forced expiratory maneuver. Results Prevalence rates of dementia and depression were 11.0% and 10.4%, respectively. Individuals who were diagnosed with dementia manifested a lower mean FEV1, as compared to those without dementia after adjusting for potential confounders, including disability and depression [OR=1.34 (1.05-1.72)]. Following gender-stratified analysis, the association was only statistically significant in women [OR=1.40 (1.04-1.89)]. The association between depression and mean FEV1 was less significant compared to dementia [OR=1.32 (1.10-1.58)]. However, the association was no longer significant after adjusting for age and years of education. No association was significant in the gender-stratified analysis. Conclusion Decreased pulmonary function was associated with dementia status only in an older female Korean population. Pulmonary function and depression were not significantly associated in either gender. PMID:26508954

  11. Pulmonary function in children after open water SCUBA dives.

    PubMed

    Winkler, B E; Tetzlaff, K; Muth, C-M; Hebestreit, H

    2010-10-01

    An increasing number of children and adolescents is diving with Self-Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus (SCUBA). SCUBA diving is associated with health risks such as pulmonary barotrauma, especially in children and in individuals with airflow limitation. As no data has been published on the effects of open-water diving on pulmonary function in children, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of SCUBA dives on airflow in children. 16 healthy children aged 10-13 years underwent spirometry and a cycle-exercise challenge while breathing cold air. They subsequently performed dives to 1-m and 8-m depth in random order. Pulmonary function was measured before and after the exercise challenge and the dives. There were statistically significant decreases in FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC, MEF25 and MEF50 after the cold-air exercise challenge and the dives. Changes in lung function following the exercise challenge did not predict the responses to SCUBA diving. In 3 children the post-dive decrements in FEV1 exceeded 10%. These children had a lower body weight and BMI percentile. SCUBA diving in healthy children may be associated with relevant airflow limitation. A low body mass might contribute to diving-associated bronchoconstriction. In the majority of subjects, no clinically relevant airway obstruction could be observed. PMID:20677123

  12. Pulmonary function in obese vs non-obese cats.

    PubMed

    Garca-Guasch, Lan; Caro-Vadillo, Alicia; Manubens-Grau, Jordi; Carretn, Elena; Camacho, Aparecido A; Montoya-Alonso, Jos Alberto

    2015-06-01

    Obesity is a risk factor in the development of several respiratory diseases. Lung volumes tend to be decreased, especially expiratory reserve volume, increasing expiratory flow limitation during tidal breathing. Barometric whole-body plethysmography is a non-invasive pulmonary function test that allows a dynamic study of breathing patterns. The objective of this study was to compare pulmonary function variables between obese and non-obese cats through the use of barometric whole-body plethysmography. Nine normal-weight and six obese cats were placed in the plethysmograph chamber, and different respiratory variables were measured. There was a significant decrease in tidal volume per kilogram (P = 0.003), minute volume per kilogram (P = 0.001) and peak inspiratory and expiratory flows per kilogram (P = 0.001) in obese cats compared with non-obese cats. Obesity failed to demonstrate a significant increase in bronchoconstriction index variable enhanced pause (Penh), as previously reported in humans and dogs. The results show that feline obesity impairs pulmonary function in cats, although a significant increase in bronchoconstriction indexes was not observed. Non-invasive barometric whole-body plethysmography can help characterise mechanical dysfunction of the airways in obese cats. PMID:25209968

  13. A Combined Pulmonary Function and Emphysema Score Prognostic Index for Staging in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boutou, Afroditi K.; Nair, Arjun; Douraghi-Zadeh, Dariush; Sandhu, Ranbir; Hansell, David M.; Wells, Athol U.; Polkey, Michael I.; Hopkinson, Nicholas S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is characterized by high morbidity and mortality. Lung computed tomography parameters, individually or as part of a composite index, may provide more prognostic information than pulmonary function tests alone. Aim To investigate the prognostic value of emphysema score and pulmonary artery measurements compared with lung function parameters in COPD and construct a prognostic index using a contingent staging approach. Material-Methods Predictors of mortality were assessed in COPD outpatients whose lung computed tomography, spirometry, lung volumes and gas transfer data were collected prospectively in a clinical database. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis models with bootstrap techniques were used. Results 169 patients were included (59.8% male, 61.1 years old; Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 second % predicted: 40.5±19.2). 20.1% died; mean survival was 115.4 months. Age (HR = 1.098, 95% Cl = 1.04–1.252) and emphysema score (HR = 1.034, 95% CI = 1.007–1.07) were the only independent predictors of mortality. Pulmonary artery dimensions were not associated with survival. An emphysema score of 55% was chosen as the optimal threshold and 30% and 65% as suboptimals. Where emphysema score was between 30% and 65% (intermediate risk) the optimal lung volume threshold, a functional residual capacity of 210% predicted, was applied. This contingent staging approach separated patients with an intermediate risk based on emphysema score alone into high risk (Functional Residual Capacity ≥210% predicted) or low risk (Functional Residual Capacity <210% predicted). This approach was more discriminatory for survival (HR = 3.123; 95% CI = 1.094–10.412) than either individual component alone. Conclusion Although to an extent limited by the small sample size, this preliminary study indicates that the composite Emphysema score-Functional Residual Capacity index might provide a better separation of high and low risk patients with COPD, than other individual predictors alone. PMID:25343258

  14. Spirometry in the Evaluation of Pulmonary Function

    PubMed Central

    Morris, James F.

    1976-01-01

    Spirometry should be more widely used in routine examinations. Equipment should meet the individual physician's or hospital's needs and include either a dependable water-sealed spirometer or an easily calibrated and accurate electronic spirometer. Justifiable concern over the reliability of electronic spirometers has resulted in requests to determine performance standards for these medical devices. Predicted normal standards must apply to the particular spirometer. Recommended tests are those of vital capacity (VC), forced vital capacity (FVC), one-second forced expiratory volume (FEV1), the ratio of one-second forced expiratory flow (FEF200-1200) and forced midexpiratory flow (FEF25-75 percent). The maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV) test may be useful for evaluation of work disability and detection of extrathoracic obstruction. Additional consideration may be given to measurements of total lung capacity (TLC) to discriminate between restrictive and obstructive impairment and the forced end-expiratory flow (FEF75-85 percent) to detect mild small airway obstruction. At this time, flow-volume curves measurement cannot be justified for routine clinical use. PMID:969495

  15. Shared and Distinct Genetic Influences Among Different Measures of Pulmonary Function

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Michael D.; Franz, Carol E.; Panizzon, Matthew S.; Xian, Hong; Toomey, Rosemary; Lyons, Michael J.; Kremen, William S.; Jacobson, Kristen C.

    2015-01-01

    We examined shared and distinct genetic influences among standard measures of pulmonary functions: ratio of forced expiratory volume at 1 s to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) and percent predicted values for forced expiratory volume at 1 s (FEV1%p), forced expiratory flow (FEFmax%p), and maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV%p) in 9781,048 middle-aged (mean age = 55 years) malemale twins from the Vietnam Era Twin Study of Aging. A common latent factor (h2 = 0.30) accounted for the correlations among these measures. This factor accounted for 5481 % of the heritability of FEV1%p, FEFmax%p and MVV%p, but only explained 16 % of the heritability of FEV1/FVC. The remaining heritability of FEV1/FVC was explained by genetic influences independent of the common factor. Our findings suggest that while a common latent phenotype accounts for the relationships among different pulmonary function measures, the majority of genetic influences underlying FEV1/FVCan index of pulmonary obstructionare distinct from those underlying other pulmonary function measures. PMID:23299959

  16. Assessment of Thyroid Function in Idiopathic Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Vakilian, Farveh; Attaran, Davod; Shegofte, Maysam; Lari, Shahrzad; Ghare, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic pulmonary hypertension (IPAH) is a rare, debilitating, and fatal disease. Late-onset treatment can lead to right heart failure, multiple organ damage, and death. Since the thyroid plays a major role in the metabolism and hemodynamics in humans, the screening of thyroid function is crucial. Thyroid dysfunction has been reported to cause pulmonary hypertension, but the thyroid is also involved in IPAH. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate thyroid function in IPAH patients. Patients and Methods: Fifty-three IPAH patients aged 16 - 75 years-old were enrolled in this cross sectional study, and their right ventricular functions, hemodynamics, and six minute walk tests (SMWTs) were evaluated. Thyroid function tests were conducted, and their associations with the patients’ pulmonary arterial pressures (PAPs) and functional capacities were assessed. The data were analyzed using the SPSS 15 statistical software. Results: In this research, 84.8% of the participants were women. The mean PAP was 51.6 mmHg (31-87) and mean thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level was 4.2 mIU/ml (0.7 - 10). Subclinical hypothyroidism was detected in 26 patients (49.1%). There were significant correlations of the TSH level with the right ventricular (RV) end diastolic dimension (P value = 0.05) and triiodothyronine (T3) with the tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) (P value = 0.04), an inverse relationship between the SMWT and the TSH level (P value = 0.004), but no significant relationship between these parameters and the thyroxine (T4) level. Conclusions: IPAH is associated with subclinical hypothyroidism and low patient functional capacity, and is more common in RV failure. PMID:26949688

  17. Framingham Heart Study genome-wide association: results for pulmonary function measures

    PubMed Central

    Wilk, Jemma B; Walter, Robert E; Laramie, Jason M; Gottlieb, Daniel J; O'Connor, George T

    2007-01-01

    Background Pulmonary function measures obtained by spirometry are used to diagnose chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and are highly heritable. We conducted genome-wide association (GWA) analyses (Affymetrix 100K SNP GeneChip) for measures of lung function in the Framingham Heart Study. Methods Ten spirometry phenotypes including percent of predicted measures, mean spirometry measures over two examinations, and rates of change based on forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory flow from the 25th to 75th percentile (FEF2575), the FEV1/FVC ratio, and the FEF2575/FVC ratio were examined. Percent predicted phenotypes were created using each participant's latest exam with spirometry. Predicted lung function was estimated using models defined in the set of healthy never-smokers, and standardized residuals of percent predicted measures were created adjusting for smoking status, pack-years, and body mass index (BMI). All modeling was performed stratified by sex and cohort. Mean spirometry phenotypes were created using data from two examinations and adjusting for age, BMI, height, smoking and pack-years. Change in pulmonary function over time was studied using two to four examinations with spirometry to calculate slopes, which were then adjusted for age, height, smoking and pack-years. Results Analyses were restricted to 70,987 autosomal SNPs with minor allele frequency ? 10%, genotype call rate ? 80%, and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium p-value ? 0.001. A SNP in the interleukin 6 receptor (IL6R) on chromosome 1 was among the best results for percent predicted FEF2575. A non-synonymous coding SNP in glutathione S-transferase omega 2 (GSTO2) on chromosome 10 had top-ranked results studying the mean FEV1 and FVC measurements from two examinations. SNPs nearby the SOD3 and vitamin D binding protein genes, candidate genes for COPD, exhibited association to percent predicted phenotypes. Conclusion GSTO2 and IL6R are credible candidate genes for association to pulmonary function identified by GWA. These and other observed associations warrant replication studies. This resource of GWA results for pulmonary function measures is publicly available at . PMID:17903307

  18. Evaluation of pulmonary function tests by using fuzzy logic theory.

    PubMed

    Unc, Umit

    2010-06-01

    Pulmonary Function Tests (PFTs) are very important in the medical evaluation of patients suffering from "shortness of breath", and they are effectively used for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases, such as COPD (i.e. chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases). Measurement of Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) and Forced Expiratory Flow in the 1st second (FEV1) are very important for controlling the treatment of COPD. During PFTs, some difficulties are encountered which complicate the comparison of produced graphs with the standards. These mainly include the reluctance of the patients to co-operate and the physicians' weaknesses to make healthy interpretations. Main tools of the diagnostic process are the symptoms, laboratory tests or measurements and the medical history of the patient. However, quite frequently, most of the medical information obtained from the patient is uncertain, exaggerated or ignored, incomplete or inconsistent. Fuzziness encountered during PFT is very important. In this study, the purpose is to use "fuzzy logic" approach to facilitate reliable and fast interpretation of PFT graphical outputs. A comparison is made between this approach and methodologies adopted in previous studies. Mathematical models and their coefficients for the spirometric plots are introduced as fuzzy numbers. Firstly, a set of rules for categorizing coefficients of mathematical models obtained. Then, a fuzzy rule-base for a medical inference engine is constructed and a diagnostic "expert system COPDes" designed. This program, COPDes helps for diagnosing the degree of COPD for the patient under test. PMID:20503608

  19. Pulmonary function in patients with Huntingtons Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Huntingtons disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive motor, cognitive and psychiatric disturbances. Chest muscle rigidity, respiratory muscle weakness, difficulty in clearing airway secretions and swallowing abnormalities have been described in patients with neurodegenerative disorders including HD. However limited information is available regarding respiratory function in HD patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate pulmonary function of patients with HD in comparison to healthy volunteers, and its association with motor severity. Methods Pulmonary function measures were taken from 18 (11 male, 7 female) manifest HD patients (53??10years), and 18 (10 male, 8 female) healthy volunteers (52??11years) with similar anthropometric and life-style characteristics to the recruited HD patients. Motor severity was quantified by the Unified Huntingtons Disease Rating Scale-Total Motor Score (UHDRS-TMS). Maximum respiratory pressure was measured on 3 separate days with a week interval to assess test-retest reliability. Results The test-retest reliability of maximum inspiratory and expiratory pressure measurements was acceptable for both HD patient and control groups (ICC ?0.92), but the values over 3days were more variable in the HD group (CV?Pulmonary function is decreased in manifest HD patients, and the magnitude of the decrease is associated with motor severity. PMID:24886346

  20. Computed tomographic-based quantification of emphysema and correlation to pulmonary function and mechanics.

    PubMed

    Washko, George R; Criner, Gerald J; Mohsenifar, Zab; Sciurba, Frank C; Sharafkhaneh, Amir; Make, Barry J; Hoffman, Eric A; Reilly, John J

    2008-06-01

    Computed tomographic based indices of emphysematous lung destruction may highlight differences in disease pathogenesis and further enable the classification of subjects with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. While there are multiple techniques that can be utilized for such radiographic analysis, there is very little published information comparing the performance of these methods in a clinical case series. Our objective was to examine several quantitative and semi-quantitative methods for the assessment of the burden of emphysema apparent on computed tomographic scans and compare their ability to predict lung mechanics and function. Automated densitometric analysis was performed on 1094 computed tomographic scans collected upon enrollment into the National Emphysema Treatment Trial. Trained radiologists performed an additional visual grading of emphysema on high resolution CT scans. Full pulmonary function test results were available for correlation, with a subset of subjects having additional measurements of lung static recoil. There was a wide range of emphysematous lung destruction apparent on the CT scans and univariate correlations to measures of lung function were of modest strength. No single method of CT scan analysis clearly outperformed the rest of the group. Quantification of the burden of emphysematous lung destruction apparent on CT scan is a weak predictor of lung function and mechanics in severe COPD with no uniformly superior method found to perform this analysis. The CT based quantification of emphysema may augment pulmonary function testing in the characterization of COPD by providing complementary phenotypic information. PMID:18568842

  1. Effects of ozone on the pulmonary function of children

    SciTech Connect

    Bock, N.; Lippmann, M.; Lioy, P.; Munoz, A.; Speizer, F.E.

    1985-01-01

    Healthy active children, 7 to 13 years old, in a summer recreational camp were chosen as subjects to investigate the acute effects of exposure to ambient-air pollution. Pulmonary-function tests were administered at the camp on 16 days during a five week period in 1982. Ambient-air-pollution data were collected approximately 6 km from the camp. For each of the 39 children tested on six or more days, a linear regression was calculated between the peak one-hour ozone concentration for a given day and each of three functional parameters determined for the same day from the spirograms: forced vital capacity (FVC), Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (PEV1), and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR). All mean slopes were negative, except for FVC in boys, indicating a general tendency for decreased function with increasing ozone concentration; however only PEFR mean slopes for girls and for all subjects were statistically significantly different from zero. For each of 49 children seen on four or more days, a summary weighted correlation coefficient between peak ozone level and each of the three pulmonary function parameters was calculated. As in the regression analysis, decrements in PEFR were significantly correlated with the ozone exposure. Overall, the decrements were small, approximately a 10% decrease in PEFR with an ozone exposure level of 120 ppb.

  2. Influence of preemptive analgesia on pulmonary function and complications for laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    ?en, Meral; zol, Duygu; Bozer, Mikdat

    2009-12-01

    Pain and diaphragmatic dysfunction are the major reasons for postoperative pulmonary complications after upper abdominal surgery. Preoperative administration of analgesics helps to reduce and prevent pain. The objective of this study was first to research the rate of pulmonary complications for laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) and then analyze the influence of preemptive analgesia on pulmonary functions and complications. Seventy patients scheduled for elective LC were included in our double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, prospective study. Randomly, 35 patients received 1 g etofenamate (group 1) and 35 patients 0.9% saline (group 2) intramuscularly 1 h before surgery. All patients underwent physical examination, chest radiography, lung function tests, and pulse oxygen saturation measurements 2 h before surgery and postoperatively on day 2. Atelectasis was graded as micro, focal, segmental, or lobar. With preemptive analgesia, the need for postoperative analgesia decreased significantly in group 1. In both groups mean spirometric values were reduced significantly after the operation, but the difference and proportional change according to preoperative recordings were found to be similar [29.5 vs. 31.3% reduction in forced vital capacity (FVC) and 32.9 vs. 33.5% reduction in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) for groups 1 and 2, respectively]. There was an insignificant drop in oxygen saturation rates for both groups. The overall incidence of atelectasia was similar for group 1 and 2 (30.2 vs. 29.2%). Although the degree of atelectesia was found to be more severe in the placebo group, the difference was not statistically significant. We concluded that although preemptive analgesia decreased the need for postoperative analgesia, this had no effect on pulmonary functions and pulmonary complications. PMID:19117121

  3. Infection control in the pulmonary function test laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Rasam, Shweta Amol; Apte, Komalkirti Keshavkiran; Salvi, Sundeep Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary function testing plays a crucial role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with lung diseases. Cases of cross infection acquired from the pulmonary function laboratory, although rare, have been reported from various countries. It is therefore imperative to identify the risks and potential organisms implicated in cross infections in a pulmonary function test (PFT) laboratory and implement better and more effective infection control procedures, which will help in preventing cross infections. The infrastructure, the daily patient flow, and the prevalent disinfection techniques used in a PFT laboratory, all play a significant role in transmission of infections. Simple measures to tackle the cross infection potential in a PFT laboratory can help reduce this risk to a bare minimum. Use of specialized techniques and equipment can also be of much use in a set up that has a high turnover of patients. This review aims at creating awareness about the possible pathogens and situations commonly encountered in a PFT laboratory. We have attempted to suggest some relevant and useful infection control measures with regard to disinfection, sterilization, and patient planning and segregation to help minimize the risk of cross infections in a PFT laboratory. The review also highlights the lacuna in the current scenario of PFT laboratories in India and the need to develop newer and better methods of infection control, which will be more user-friendly and cost effective. Further studies to study the possible pathogens in a PFT laboratory and evaluate the prevalent infection control strategies will be needed to enable us to draw more precious conclusions, which can lead to more relevant, contextual recommendations for cross infections control in PFT lab in India. PMID:26180386

  4. Pulmonary function changes in children associated with fine particulate matter

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, J.Q.; Larson, T.V.; Hanley, Q.S.; Rebolledo, V.; Dumler, K.; Checkoway, H.; Wang, S.Z.; Lin, D.; Pierson, W.E. )

    1993-10-01

    During winter months many neighborhoods in the Seattle metropolitan area are heavily affected by particulate matter from residential wood burning. A study was conducted to investigate the relationship between fine particulate matter and pulmonary function in young children. The subjects were 326 elementary school children, including 24 asthmatics, who lived in an area with high particulate concentrations predominantly from residential wood burning. FEV1 and FVC were measured before, during and after the 1988-1989 and 1989-1990 winter heating seasons. Fine particulate matter was assessed using a light-scattering instrument. Analysis of the relationship between light scattering and lung function indicated that an increase in particulate air pollution was associated with a decline in asthmatic children's pulmonary function. FEV1 and FVC in the asthmatic children dropped an average of 34 and 37 ml respectively for each 10(-4) m-1 increase in sigma sp. This sigma sp increase corresponds to an increase in PM2.5 of 20 micrograms/m3. It is concluded that fine particulate matter from wood burning is significantly associated with acute respiratory irritation in young asthmatic children.

  5. Low tidal volume with PEEP and recruitment expedite the recovery of pulmonary function

    PubMed Central

    Pi, Xin; Cui, Yinghua; Wang, Changsong; Guo, Lei; Sun, Bo; Shi, Jinghui; Lin, Ziwei; Zhao, Nana; Wang, Weiwei; Fu, Songbin; Li, Enyou

    2015-01-01

    The potentially harmful effects of short-term mechanical ventilation during surgery have been examined in recent years. An optimal strategy for mechanical ventilation of patients during non-laparoscopic abdominal surgery must be devised. A total of 63 patients undergoing elective open abdominal surgery with more than 2 h of ventilation time were selected for this randomized, open-label, clinical study. They were divided into three ventilation groups: high volume of 9 ml/kg IBW (ideal body weight) with ZEEP (zero end-expiratory pressure); low volume of 7 ml/kg IBW with 8 cm H2O PEEP (positive end expiratory pressure); and low volume of 7 ml/kg IBW with 8 cm H2O PEEP and recruitment. Intraoperative PaO2/FiO2 ratio and pulmonary compliance and postoperative pulmonary function were measured. There were no significant differences in intraoperative PaO2/FiO2 ratio among the three groups (P=0.31). The pulmonary compliance of three groups showed different changes over time (group effect over time P=0.0006). There were no significant differences in FEV1 or FVC among the three groups (P=0.32 and 0.09, respectively), but both of these measurements showed different changes over time (group effect over time P<0.001). On the first postoperative day, the low volume with high PEEP and recruitment group had significantly higher FEV1 than the other two groups (mean ± SD): 1.52±0.37 versus 0.95±0.38 (P<0.001) and 1.52±0.37 versus 0.95±0.34 (P<0.001), respectively. Low tidal volume with PEEP and recruitment showed advantages in maintaining the pulmonary compliance and expediting the recovery of the 1st postoperative day’s pulmonary function in patients undergoing non-laparoscopic abdominal surgery. PMID:26823746

  6. Lung Volume Reduction Surgery and Pulmonary Rehabilitation Improve Exercise Capacity and Reduce Dyspnea During Functional Activities in People with Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the therapeutic effects of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) and pulmonary rehabilitation on levels of dyspnea during functional activities in patients with diffuse emphysema. Methods: Fifteen subjects who had undergone LVRS participated in this study. A visual analog scale (VAS) Activity Dyspnea Scales (VADS) measurement tool developed for this study was determined reliable in 10 subjects. The VADS was used to assess changes in dyspnea with functional activity in 10 subjects prior to and following the interventions of LVRS and pulmonary rehabilitation. Results: Results of this study indicate that LVRS followed by pulmonary rehabilitation significantly reduces levels of dyspnea during functional activities. Conclusion: The VADS developed for this study is a valid and reliable method of assessing changes in levels of dyspnea during functional activities in the LVRS population. PMID:20467532

  7. Improved pulmonary function in working divers breathing nitrox at shallow depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, Daniel T.; Conkin, Johnny

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is limited data about the long-term pulmonary effects of nitrox use in divers at shallow depths. This study examined changes in pulmonary function in a cohort of working divers breathing a 46% oxygen enriched mixture while diving at depths less than 12 m. METHODS: A total of 43 working divers from the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL), NASA-Johnson Space Center completed a questionnaire providing information on diving history prior to NBL employment, diving history outside the NBL since employment, and smoking history. Cumulative dive hours were obtained from the NBL dive-time database. Medical records were reviewed to obtain the diver's height, weight, and pulmonary function measurements from initial pre-dive, first year and third year annual medical examinations. RESULTS: The initial forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) were greater than predicted, 104% and 102%, respectively. After 3 yr of diving at the NBL, both the FVC and FEV1 showed a significant (p < 0.01) increase of 6.3% and 5.5%, respectively. There were no significant changes in peak expiratory flow (PEF), forced mid-expiratory flow rate (FEF(25-75%)), and forced expiratory flow rates at 25%, 50%, and 75% of FVC expired (FEF25%, FEF50%, FEF75%). Cumulative NBL dive hours was the only contributing variable found to be significantly associated with both FVC and FEV1 at 1 and 3 yr. CONCLUSIONS: NBL divers initially belong to a select group with larger than predicted lung volumes. Regular diving with nitrox at shallow depths over a 3-yr period did not impair pulmonary function. Improvements in FVC and FEV1 were primarily due to a training effect.

  8. Change in pulmonary function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease stage 0 patients

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Su-Gang; Yang, Wen-Lan; Liu, Jin-Ming; Liu, Wen-Zeng; Zheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to elucidate the change in pulmonary function in stage 0 COPD patients. A total of 48 stage 0 COPD patients and 46 healthy adults were included in the study. The status of their pulmonary function was determined by an impulse oscillometry (IOS) system, and the spirometric indexes such as forced vital capacity, maximum expiratory flow-volume (MEFV) curve, total respiratory impedance (Zrs) and respiratory resistance (Rrs) between the two groups were compared. Significant decreases in the values of forced expiratory flow (FEF) at both 75% and 50% of the vital capacity of the predicted value (EF75/pre and FEF50/pre) were detected in stage 0 COPD patients compared with those in the control (P < 0.05). Significant increases were found in the resonant frequency (Fres) (14.373.63 VS 11.262.61), total respiratory impedance (Z5) compared with the prediction (Z5/pre) (135.6519.37 VS 104.6920.64), total airway resistance at 5 Hz (R5) compared with prediction (R5/pre) (128.4620.14 VS 100.6020.98) and peripheral airway resistance (R5-R20) compared with prediction (R5-R20/pre) (282.34192.83 VS 109.3180.05) in the study group compared with those in the control(all P < 0.05). The reactance at 5 Hz (X5) (-0.140.05 VS -0.080.05) in the stage 0 COPD group was markedly lower than that in the healthy group (P < 0.05). Disturbance in the small airway may be detected by the MEFV curve and IOS, and these indexes would be valuable in diagnosing stage 0 COPD. PMID:26885083

  9. Change in pulmonary function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease stage 0 patients.

    PubMed

    Gong, Su-Gang; Yang, Wen-Lan; Liu, Jin-Ming; Liu, Wen-Zeng; Zheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to elucidate the change in pulmonary function in stage 0 COPD patients. A total of 48 stage 0 COPD patients and 46 healthy adults were included in the study. The status of their pulmonary function was determined by an impulse oscillometry (IOS) system, and the spirometric indexes such as forced vital capacity, maximum expiratory flow-volume (MEFV) curve, total respiratory impedance (Zrs) and respiratory resistance (Rrs) between the two groups were compared. Significant decreases in the values of forced expiratory flow (FEF) at both 75% and 50% of the vital capacity of the predicted value (EF75/pre and FEF50/pre) were detected in stage 0 COPD patients compared with those in the control (P < 0.05). Significant increases were found in the resonant frequency (Fres) (14.37±3.63 VS 11.26±2.61), total respiratory impedance (Z5) compared with the prediction (Z5/pre) (135.65±19.37 VS 104.69±20.64), total airway resistance at 5 Hz (R5) compared with prediction (R5/pre) (128.46±20.14 VS 100.60±20.98) and peripheral airway resistance (R5-R20) compared with prediction (R5-R20/pre) (282.34±192.83 VS 109.31±80.05) in the study group compared with those in the control(all P < 0.05). The reactance at 5 Hz (X5) (-0.14±0.05 VS -0.08±0.05) in the stage 0 COPD group was markedly lower than that in the healthy group (P < 0.05). Disturbance in the small airway may be detected by the MEFV curve and IOS, and these indexes would be valuable in diagnosing stage 0 COPD. PMID:26885083

  10. Utility of the Physical Examination in Detecting Pulmonary Hypertension. A Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Colman, Rebecca; Whittingham, Heather; Tomlinson, George; Granton, John

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) often present with a variety of physical findings reflecting a volume or pressure overloaded right ventricle (RV). However, there is no consensus regarding the diagnostic utility of the physical examination in PH. Methods We conducted a systematic review of publications that evaluated the clinical examination and diagnosis of PH using MEDLINE (19462013) and EMBASE (19472013). We also prospectively evaluated the diagnostic utility of the physical examination findings. Patients who underwent right cardiac catheterization for any reason were recruited. After informed consent, participants were examined by 6 physicians (3 specialists and 3 generalists) who were unaware of the results of the patient's hemodynamics. Each examiner independently assessed patients for the presence of a RV lift, loud P2, jugular venous distension (JVD), tricuspid insufficiency murmur and right-sided 4th heart sound at rest and during a slow inspiration. A global rating (scale of 15) of the likelihood that the patient had pulmonary hypertension was provided by each examiner. Results 31 articles that assessed the physical examination in PH were included in the final analysis. There was heterogeneity amongst the studies and many did not include control data. The sign most associated with PH in the literature was a loud pulmonic component of the second heart sound (P2). In our prospective study physical examination was performed on 52 subjects (25 met criteria for PH; mPAP ?25 mmHg). The physical sign with the highest likelihood ratio (LR) was a loud P2 on inspiration with a LR +ve 1.9, 95% CrI [1.2, 3.1] when data from all examiners was analyzed together. Results from the specialist examiners had higher diagnostic utility; a loud P2 on inspiration was associated with a positive LR of 3.2, 95% CrI [1.5, 6.2] and a right sided S4 on inspiration had a LR +ve 4.7, 95% CI [1.0, 15.6]. No aspect of the physical exam, could consistently rule out PH (negative LRs 0.71.3). Conclusions The presence of a loud P2 or audible right-sided 4th heart sound are associated with PH. However the physical examination is unreliable for determining the presence of PH. PMID:25343585

  11. Two year follow up of pulmonary function values among welders in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Erkinjuntti-Pekka..., R.; Slater, T.; Cheng, S.; Fishwick, D.; Bradshaw, L.; Kimbell-, D; Dronfield, L.; Pearce, N.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine whether welding is a risk factor for an accelerated decline in pulmonary function. METHODS: 2 Year follow up of pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms among 54 welders and 38 non- welders in eight New Zealand welding sites. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in age, height, smoking habits, ethnicity, or total time in industrial work between welders and non-welders. No overall differences were noted in the changes of pulmonary function variables between the two study groups. However, when the comparison was restricted to smokers, welders had a significantly greater (p = 0.02) annual decline (88.8 ml) in FEV1 than non-welders, who had a slight non-significant annual increase (34.2 ml). Also, welders without respiratory protection or local exhaust ventilation while welding had a greater annual decline both in forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) than welders with protection (p = 0.001 and 0.04, respectively). Among welders a significant association was found between the acute across shift change and the annual decline in FEV1. Chronic bronchitis was more common among welders (24%) than non-welders (5%). Only one welder (2%) but eight non- welders (21%) reported having asthma. CONCLUSIONS: Welders who smoked and welders working without local exhaust ventilation or respiratory protection have an increased risk of accelerated decline in FEV1. PMID:10472307

  12. PULMONARY FUNCTION IN JUVENILE AND YOUNG ADULT RATS EXPOSED TO LOW-LEVEL NO2 WITH DIURNAL SPIKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary function was examined in juvenile and young adult Fischer-344 rats continuously exposed to NO2 (0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 ppm) for up to 6 weeks with twice daily 1 hr spikes equal to 3X the baseline concentration. The spike to baseline ratio was chosen to simulate morning and eve...

  13. MR and CT imaging of the structural and functional changes of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Schiebler, Mark L.; Bhalla, Sanjeev; Runo, James; Jarjour, Nizar; Roldan, Alejandro; Chesler, Naomi; François, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    The current Dana Point classification system (2009) divides elevation of pulmonary artery pressure into Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) and Pulmonary Hypertension (PH). Fortunately, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is not a common disease. However, with the aging of the first world’s population, heart failure is now an important cause of pulmonary hypertension with up to 9% of the population involved. PAH is usually asymptomatic until late in the disease process. While there are indirect features of PAH found on noninvasive imaging studies, the diagnosis and management still requires right heart catheterization. Imaging features of PAH include: 1. Enlargement of the pulmonary trunk and main pulmonary arteries, 2. Decreased pulmonary arterial compliance, 3. Tapering of the peripheral pulmonary arteries, 4. Enlargement of the inferior vena cava, and 5. Increased mean transit time. The chronic requirement to generate high pulmonary arterial pressures measurably affects the right heart and main pulmonary artery. This change in physiology causes the following structural and functional alterations that have been shown to have prognostic significance: Relative area change of the pulmonary trunk, RVSVindex, RVSV, RVEDVindex, LVEDVindex, and baseline RVEF <35%. All of these variables can be quantified non-invasively and followed longitudinally in each patient using MRI to modify the treatment regimen. Untreated PAH frequently results in a rapid clinical decline and death within 3 years of diagnosis. Unfortunately, even with treatment, less than 1/2 of these patients are alive at four years. PMID:23612440

  14. Pulmonary Functions in Normal School Children in the Age Group of 6–15 Years in North India

    PubMed Central

    Budhiraja, Sandeep; Singh, Daljit; Pooni, Puneet A.; Dhooria, Gurdeep S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Lung function tests have become an integral part of assessment of pulmonary disease. As few studies on pulmonary function tests have been carried out in young children in India, the study was carried out in normal urban and rural school children in Ludhiana district of North India to determine pulmonary functions in the age group 6–15 years and to find its correlation with regards to age, sex, height and weight. Methods The study group included 600 normal children between 6–15 years age from different urban and rural schools in the region. A preformed questionnaire was interviewed and detailed general physical and systemic examination was done. Pulmonary function tests were measured by using Micromedical Gold standard fully computerized portable auto spirometer (Superspiro Cat No. SU 6000). Findings The present study shows, all the three independent variables (age, weight and height) have linear positive correlation with lung function parameters, both for boys and girls. Lung function values in boys were significantly higher as compared to that of girls. Urban children had higher lung function parameters than rural children except IRV, FEF25%. Among all anthropometric parameters, height was the most independent variable with maximum coefficient of correlation. Conclusion Equations derived from the present study for estimation of the expected values of lung function will help to interpret the observed lung function values in children of North India. PMID:23056687

  15. Sarcoidosis: correlation of pulmonary parenchymal pattern at CT with results of pulmonary function tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bergin, C.J.; Bell, D.Y.; Coblentz, C.L.; Chiles, C.; Gamsu, G.; MacIntyre, N.R.; Coleman, R.E.; Putman, C.E.

    1989-06-01

    The appearances of the lungs on radiographs and computed tomographic (CT) scans were correlated with degree of uptake on gallium scans and results of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) in 27 patients with sarcoidosis. CT scans were evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively. Patients were divided into five categories on the basis of the pattern of abnormality at CT: 1 = normal (n = 4); 2 = segmental air-space disease (n = 4); 3 = spherical (alveolar) masslike opacities (n = 4); 4 = multiple, discrete, small nodules (n = 6); and 5 = distortion of parenchymal structures (fibrotic end-stage sarcoidosis) (n = 9). The percentage of the volume judged to be abnormal (CT grade) was correlated with PFT results for each CT and radiographic category. CT grades were also correlated with gallium scanning results and percentage of lymphocytes recovered from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Patients in CT categories 1 and 2 had normal lung function, those in category 3 had mild functional impairment, and those in categories 4 and 5 showed moderate to severe dysfunction. The overall CT grade correlated well with PFT results expressed as a percentage of the predicted value. In five patients, CT scans showed extensive parenchymal disease not seen on radiographs. CT grades did not correlate with the results of gallium scanning or BAL lymphocytes. The authors conclude that patterns of parenchymal sarcoidosis seen at CT correlate with the PFT results and can be used to indicate respiratory impairment.

  16. Pulmonary function in advanced uncomplicated singleton and twin pregnancy* **

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Anwar Hasan; Tauheed, Nazia; Ahmad, Aquil; Mohsin, Zehra

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Pregnancy brings about significant changes in respiratory function, as evidenced by alterations in lung volumes and capacities, which are attributable to the mechanical impediment caused by the growing foetus. This study was undertaken in order to identify changes in respiratory function during normal pregnancy and to determine whether such changes are more pronounced in twin pregnancy than in singleton pregnancy. Methods: Respiratory function was assessed in 50 women with twin pregnancies and in 50 women with singleton pregnancies (during the third trimester in both groups), as well as in 50 non-pregnant women. We measured the following pulmonary function test parameters: FVC; FEV1; PEF rate; FEV1/FVC ratio; FEF25-75%; and maximal voluntary ventilation. Results: All respiratory parameters except the FEV1/FVC ratio were found to be lower in the pregnant women than in the non-pregnant women. We found no significant differences between women with twin pregnancies and those with singleton pregnancies, in terms of respiratory function. Conclusions: Despite its higher physiological demands, twin pregnancy does not appear to impair respiratory function to any greater degree than does singleton pregnancy. PMID:25029647

  17. Pulmonary Function Testing After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy to the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Bishawi, Muath; Kim, Bong; Moore, William H.; Bilfinger, Thomas V.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Surgical resection remains the standard of care for operable early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, some patients are not fit for surgery because of comorbidites such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and other medical conditions. We aimed to evaluate pulmonary function and tumor volume before and after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with and without COPD in early-stage lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A review of prospectively collected data of Stage I and II lung cancers, all treated with SBRT, was performed. The total SBRT treatment was 60 Gy administered in three 20 Gy fractions. The patients were analyzed based on their COPD status, using their pretreatment pulmonary function test cutoffs as established by the American Thoracic Society guidelines (forced expiratory volume [FEV]% {<=}50% predicted, FEV%/forced vital capacity [FVC]% {<=}70%). Changes in tumor volume were also assessed by computed tomography. Results: Of a total of 30 patients with Stage I and II lung cancer, there were 7 patients in the COPD group (4 men, 3 women), and 23 in t he No-COPD group (9 men, 14 women). At a mean follow-up time of 4 months, for the COPD and No-COPD patients, pretreatment and posttreatment FEV% was similar: 39 {+-} 5 vs. 40 {+-} 9 (p = 0.4) and 77 {+-} 0.5 vs. 73 {+-} 24 (p = 0.9), respectively. The diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (DL{sub CO}) did significantly increase for the No-COPD group after SBRT treatment: 60 {+-} 24 vs. 69 {+-} 22 (p = 0.022); however, DL{sub CO} was unchanged for the COPD group: 49 {+-} 13 vs. 50 {+-} 14 (p = 0.8). Although pretreatment tumor volume was comparable for both groups, tumor volume significantly shrank in the No-COPD group from 19 {+-} 24 to 9 {+-} 16 (p < 0.001), and there was a trend in the COPD patients from 12 {+-} 9 to 6 {+-} 5 (p = 0.06). Conclusion: SBRT did not seem to have an effect on FEV{sub 1} and FVC, but it shrank tumor volume and improved DL{sub CO} for patients without COPD.

  18. 21 CFR 868.1900 - Diagnostic pulmonary-function interpretation calculator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diagnostic pulmonary-function interpretation... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices 868.1900 Diagnostic pulmonary-function interpretation calculator. (a) Identification. A diagnostic...

  19. 21 CFR 868.1900 - Diagnostic pulmonary-function interpretation calculator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Diagnostic pulmonary-function interpretation... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices 868.1900 Diagnostic pulmonary-function interpretation calculator. (a) Identification. A diagnostic...

  20. 21 CFR 868.1900 - Diagnostic pulmonary-function interpretation calculator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Diagnostic pulmonary-function interpretation calculator. 868.1900 Section 868.1900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Diagnostic pulmonary-function interpretation calculator. (a) Identification. A diagnostic...

  1. 21 CFR 868.1890 - Predictive pulmonary-function value calculator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Predictive pulmonary-function value calculator. 868.1890 Section 868.1890 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices 868.1890 Predictive pulmonary-function value calculator....

  2. 21 CFR 868.1900 - Diagnostic pulmonary-function interpretation calculator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Diagnostic pulmonary-function interpretation calculator. 868.1900 Section 868.1900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Diagnostic pulmonary-function interpretation calculator. (a) Identification. A diagnostic...

  3. 21 CFR 868.1900 - Diagnostic pulmonary-function interpretation calculator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Diagnostic pulmonary-function interpretation calculator. 868.1900 Section 868.1900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Diagnostic pulmonary-function interpretation calculator. (a) Identification. A diagnostic...

  4. Indoor air pollution and pulmonary function growth in preadolescent children

    SciTech Connect

    Berkey, C.S.; Ware, J.H.; Dockery, D.W.; Ferris, B.G. Jr.; Speizer, F.E.

    1986-02-01

    Results are reported from a study of the association between exposure to sidestream cigarette smoke or gas stove emissions and pulmonary function level and growth rate of 7834 children seen at 2-5 annual visits between the ages of 6-10 years. Children whose mothers smoked one pack of cigarettes per day had levels of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) at age eight that were 0.81% lower than children of nonsmoking mothers (p less than 0.0001), and FEV1 growth rates approximately 0.17% per year lower (p = 0.05). For a child of age eight with an FEV1 of 1.62 liters, this corresponds to a deficit in rate of change of FEV1 of approximately 3 ml/annum and a deficit of 13 ml at age eight. Children whose mothers smoked one pack per day had levels of forced vital capacity (FVC) at age eight that were 0.33% higher than children of nonsmokers (p = 0.12); however, their growth rates of FVC were 0.17% per year lower (p = 0.04). Because few mothers changed their smoking habits during the course of the study, it was not possible to determine whether the difference in rate of growth was due to current exposure or to an effect of prenatal and early childhood exposure on the course of development. The magnitude of the effect on FEV1 is consistent with deficits in FEV1 of up to 3% in early adult life due to childhood exposure to sidestream cigarette smoke. The importance of this relatively small effect will be evaluated further through follow-up of these children as they are exposed to other risk factors such as personal active smoking. The data provide some evidence for an association between gas stove exposure and pulmonary function level, especially at younger ages, but no evidence for an effect of gas stove exposure on growth rate.

  5. Effects of acidic mixtures on pulmonary macrophage functions: A pilot study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Phalen, R.F.; Kikkawa, Y.; Nadziejko, C.; Kleinman, M.T.

    1992-02-01

    Fischer 344 rats were examined for effects of inhaled nitric acid and ozone on macrophage cell function, to evaluate new endpoints for future acid inhalation studies. Pulmonary macrophage respiratory burst activity, production of arachidonic acid metabolites (leukotriene B4 and leukotriene C4) by macrophages, and lavage fluid elastase inhibitory capacity were found to be affected by in vivo exposure to nitric acid vapor, alone or in combination with ozone. These results have implications with respect to the development of lung infections, asthma, and emphysema.

  6. Relationship between pulmonary function and degree of spinal deformity, location of apical vertebrae and age among adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Johari, Joehaimey; Sharifudin, Mohd Ariff; Rahman, Azriani Ab; Omar, Ahmad Sabri; Abdullah, Ahmad Tajudin; Nor, Sobri; Lam, Weii Cheak; Yusof, Mohd Imran

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This retrospective review aimed to examine the relationship between preoperative pulmonary function and the Cobb angle, location of apical vertebrae and age in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). To our knowledge, there have been no detailed analyses of preoperative pulmonary function in relation to these three factors in AIS. METHODS A total of 38 patients with thoracic or thoracolumbar scoliosis were included. Curvature of spinal deformity was measured using the Cobb method. Forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) were used to evaluate preoperative pulmonary function. Statistical methods were used to analyse the relationship between preoperative pulmonary function and the factors that may contribute to poor pulmonary function. RESULTS The mean age of the patients was 16.68 ± 6.04 years. An inverse relationship was found between the degree of the Cobb angle and FVC as well as FEV1; however, the relationships were not statistically significant (p = 0.057 and p = 0.072, respectively). There was also a trend towards a significant negative correlation between the thoracic curve and FVC (p = 0.014). Patients with larger thoracic curves had lower pulmonary function. A one-year increase in age significantly decreased FVC by 1.092 units (p = 0.044). No significant relationship between age and preoperative FEV1 was found. The median FVC was significantly higher in patients with affected apical vertebrae located at levels L1–L3 than at T6–T8 or T9–T12 (p = 0.006). CONCLUSION Lung function impairment was seen in more severe spinal deformities, proximally-located curvature and older patients. PMID:26831315

  7. The role of visual feedback in respiratory muscle activation and pulmonary function

    PubMed Central

    Park, Han-Kyu; Kim, Yeong-Ju; Kim, Tae-Ho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] It is well known that visual feedback is an important factor contributing to balance and postural control. Nevertheless, there has been little discussion about the effects of visual feedback on pulmonary function. This study was conducted to investigate the role of visual feedback on respiratory muscle activation and pulmonary function. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 37 healthy adults who consented to participate in this study. The study measured the muscular activation of the trunk and pulmonary function according to the absence or presence of visual feedback. [Results] The results revealed significant changes in muscular activation and pulmonary function with the use of visual feedback. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that visual feedback may play a role in increasing respiratory muscle activity and pulmonary function. PMID:26504317

  8. Effect of valsalva in the pulmonary prosthetic conduit valve on hemodynamic function in a mock circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Tsuboko, Yusuke; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Yamada, Akihiro; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Matsuo, Satoshi; Saiki, Yoshikatsu; Yamagishi, Masaaki

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary conduit valves are used as one of the surgical treatment methods of congenital heart diseases. We have been designing a sophisticated pulmonary conduit valve for the right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction in pediatric patients. In this study, two types of polyester grafts with or without bulging structures for the conduit valves were used and evaluated from the hemodynamic point of view focusing on the application of these conduit valves in the grown-up congenital heart failure patients. We examined valvular function in the originally developed pulmonary mock circulatory system, which consisted of a pneumatic driven right ventricular model, a pulmonary valve chamber, and an elastic pulmonary compliance model with peripheral vascular resistance units. Prior to the measurement, a bileaflet valve was sutured in each conduit. Each conduit valve was installed in the mock right ventricular outflow portion, and its leaflet motion was obtained by using a high-speed camera synchronously with pressure and flow waveforms. As a result, we could obtain hemodynamic changes in two different types of conduits for pulmonary valves, and it was indicated that the presence of the Valsalva shape might be effective for promoting valvular response in the low cardiac output condition. PMID:26736254

  9. Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension and Assessment of Right Ventricular Function in the Piglet.

    PubMed

    Noly, Pierre-Emmanuel; Guihaire, Julien; Coblence, Matthieu; Dorfmller, Peter; Fadel, Elie; Mercier, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    An original piglet model of Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension (CTEPH) associated with chronic Right Ventricular (RV) dysfunction is described. Pulmonary Hypertension (PH) was induced in 3-week-old piglets by a progressive obstruction of the pulmonary vascular bed. A ligation of the left Pulmonary Artery (PA) was performed first through a mini-thoracotomy. Second, weekly embolizations of the right lower pulmonary lobe were done under fluoroscopic guidance with n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate during 5 weeks. Mean Pulmonary Arterial Pressure (mPAP) measured by ritght heart catheterism, increased progressively, as well as Right Atrial pressure and Pulmonary Vascular Resistances (PVR) after 5 weeks compared to sham animals. Right Ventricular (RV) structural and functional remodeling were assessed by transthoracic echocardiography (RV diameters, RV wall thickness, RV systolic function). RV elastance and RV-pulmonary coupling were assessed by Pressure-Volume Loops (PVL) analysis with conductance method. Histologic study of the lung and the right ventricle were also performed. Molecular analyses on RV fresh tissues could be performed through repeated transcutaneous endomyocardial biopsies. Pulmonary microvascular disease in obstructed and unobstructed territories was studied from lung biopsies using molecular analyses and pathology. Furthermore, the reliability and the reproducibility was associated with a range of PH severity in animals. Most aspects of the human CTEPH disease were reproduced in this model, which allows new perspectives for the understanding of the underlying mechanisms (mitochondria, inflammation) and new therapeutic approaches (targeted, cellular or gene therapies) of the overloaded right ventricle but also pulmonary microvascular disease. PMID:26575833

  10. Hemodynamic, Functional, and Clinical Responses to Pulmonary Artery Denervation in Patients With Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension of Different Causes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hang; Xie, Du-Jiang; Zhang, Juan; Zhou, Ling; Rothman, Alexander M.K.

    2015-01-01

    Background— The mechanisms underlying pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are multifactorial. The efficacy of pulmonary artery denervation (PADN) for idiopathic PAH treatment has been evaluated. This study aimed to analyze the hemodynamic, functional, and clinical responses to PADN in patients with PAH of different causes. Methods and Results— Between April 2012 and April 2014, 66 consecutive patients with a resting mean pulmonary arterial pressure ≥25 mm Hg treated with PADN were prospectively followed up. Target drugs were discontinued after the PADN procedure. Hemodynamic response and 6-minute walk distance were repeatedly measured within the 1 year post PADN follow-up. The clinical end point was the occurrence of PAH-related events at the 1-year follow-up. There were no PADN-related complications. Hemodynamic success (defined as the reduction in mean pulmonary arterial pressure by a minimal 10% post PADN) was achieved in 94% of all patients, with a mean absolute reduction in systolic pulmonary arterial pressure and mean pulmonary arterial pressure within 24 hours of −10 mm Hg and −7 mm Hg, respectively. The average increment in 6-minute walk distance after PADN was 94 m. Worse PAH-related events occurred in 10 patients (15%), mostly driven by the worsening of PAH (12%). There were 8 (12%) all-cause deaths, with 6 (9%) PAH-related deaths. Conclusions— PADN was safe and feasible for the treatment of PAH. The PADN procedure was associated with significant improvements in hemodynamic function, exercise capacity, and cardiac function and with less frequent PAH-related events and death at 1 year after PADN treatment. Further randomized studies are required to confirm the efficacy of PADN for PAH. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.chictr.trc.com.cn. Unique identifier: chiCTR-ONC-12002085. PMID:26553699

  11. Respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function among stainless steel welders.

    PubMed

    Sobaszek, A; Edme, J L; Boulenguez, C; Shirali, P; Mereau, M; Robin, H; Haguenoer, J M

    1998-03-01

    In the last few years, many studies have been carried out concerning the effects of fumes from stainless steel (SS) welding on the health of welders. The respiratory effects of exposure to SS welding fumes have already been studied, but the results of lung function investigations have not been consistent. However, the main factor of risk for the welders' health seems to be related to the great concentration of chromium and nickel contained in fumes coming from SS welding. The aim of this study was to detect the chronic effects of SS welding exposure on pulmonary symptoms and ventilatory function tests. Respiratory symptoms and lung function tests were studied in 134 SS welders and 252 controls (C). Welders and controls were of similar average age, height, and duration in employment. The smoking habits of the groups were also similar. The medical questionnaire on respiratory symptoms was a version of the Medical Research Council questionnaire, modified by the British Occupational Hygiene Society. The flow-volume curves were performed with a calibrated pneumotachograph spirometer before each subject started working. After adjustment for tobacco habits, the SS welders presented a higher prevalence of bronchial irritative symptoms such as cough (P = 0.01) or sputum production (P = 0.02) than the controls. On the other hand, chronic bronchitis appeared to be significantly linked to tobacco consumption. The pulmonary function analysis underscored no significant difference between stainless steel welders and controls (forced expiratory volume in one second, observed/predicted: SS = 0.99 vs C = 0.98; maximal midexpiratory flow, observed/predicted: SS = 0.90 vs C = 0.92; maximal expiratory flow at 50 % of the forced vital capacity, observed/predicted: SS = 0.95 vs C = 0.95). On the other hand, by the mean of the two-ways analysis, a significant tobacco effect was found, without exposure or interaction of tobacco-exposure effects. There was no influence of the specific welding processes on the spirographic parameters, but a decrease in spirographic values after 25 years of welding activity was evident. The results of multiple regression indicated that age was not a confounding factor. PMID:9531093

  12. Environmentally persistent free radicals decrease cardiac function and increase pulmonary artery pressure

    PubMed Central

    Mahne, Sarah; Chuang, Gin C.; Pankey, Edward; Kiruri, Lucy; Kadowitz, Philip J.; Dellinger, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have consistently linked inhalation of particulate matter (PM) to increased cardiac morbidity and mortality, especially in at risk populations. However, few studies have examined the effect of PM on baseline cardiac function in otherwise healthy individuals. In addition, airborne PM contain environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFR) capable of redox cycling in biological systems. The purpose of this study was to determine whether nose-only inhalation of EPFRs (20 min/day for 7 days) could decrease baseline left ventricular function in healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats. The model EPFR tested was 1,2-dichlorobenzene chemisorbed to 0.2-?m-diameter silica/CuO particles at 230C (DCB230). Inhalation of vehicle or silica particles served as controls. Twenty-four hours after the last exposure, rats were anesthetized (isoflurane) and ventilated (3 l/min), and left ventricular function was assessed using pressure-volume catheters. Compared with controls, inhalation of DCB230 significantly decreased baseline stroke volume, cardiac output, and stroke work. End-diastolic volume and end-diastolic pressure were also significantly reduced; however, ventricular contractility and relaxation were not changed. DCB230 also significantly increased pulmonary arterial pressure and produced hyperplasia in small pulmonary arteries. Plasma levels of C-reactive protein were significantly increased by exposure to DCB230, as were levels of heme oxygenase-1 and SOD2 in the left ventricle. Together, these data show that inhalation of EPFRs, but not silica particles, decreases baseline cardiac function in healthy rats by decreasing cardiac filling, secondary to increased pulmonary resistance. These EPFRs also produced systemic inflammation and increased oxidative stress markers in the left ventricle. PMID:22942180

  13. Effects of large (0. 9. mu. m) sulfuric acid aerosols on human pulmonary function

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, S.M.; Folinsbee, L.J.; Bedi, J.F.

    1982-06-01

    The effects of sulfuric acid particle concentration (mass/volume) and ambient temperatures on pulmonary function of young male nonsmokers were examined. Subjects (n = 11) thrice repeated a sequence of 20-min exercise (ventilation approximately 30 liters/min) and 20-min sitting rest. Pre- and postexposure pulmonary function tests (forced vital capacity maneuvers, lung volumes, maximum voluntary ventilation, R/sub aw/, TGV, and helium-oxygen FVC) were measured. During the exposure and at 2 min after cessation of each exercise period, forced vital capacity tests (air and helium-oxygen) were performed. Each subject was exposed in random order to filtered air or 233, 418, or 939 ..mu..g/m/sub 3/ particulate sulfuric acid. Mass median diameter (MMD) was 0.90-0.93 ..mu..m, and geometric SD was 1.66-1.73. No major changes in pulmonary function related to sulfate were observed in these subjects. The only measurement to show a significant interaction across time (pre-post) and sulfate concentration was FEV /sub 1.0/, which was significantly decreased with exposure to 939 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ sulfate. The magnitude of the decrease was not considered to be of physiological significance. These results indicate that, even with the added stress of the increased depth and volume of exercise ventilation, exposure to as much as 1 mg/m/sup 3/ of 1 ..mu.. for ..mu..m sulfuric acid aerosol for 2 hr has little if any effect on standard tests of lung function.

  14. Pulmonary function and clearance after prolonged sulfuric acid aerosol exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, P.J. ); Gerrity, T.R.; DeWitt, P.; Folinsbee, L.J. )

    1991-03-15

    The authors studied pulmonary function and clearance responses after a 4 H exposure to 75-100 {mu}g/m{sup 3} sulfuric acid aerosol (SAA). Healthy subjects, who exercised for 30 min/H at ventilation of about 25 L/min, were exposed once to clean air and once to SAA. Oral hygiene and acidic juice gargle were used to minimize oral ammonia. Lung function tests, including spirometry, plethysmography, and partial flow-volume (PEFV) curves were performed before and after exposure. Clearance of 99m-Technetium labeled iron oxide was assessed after each exposure. The first moment of fractional tracheobronchial retention (M1TBR), after correcting for 24 H retention and normalizing to time zero, was used as an index of clearance. There were no significant changes in lung volumes, airways resistance, or maximum expiratory flows after SAA exposure. Flow at 40% of total lung capacity on PEFV curves decreased 17% (NS) after SAA exposure. Tracheobronchial clearance was accelerated after a single exposure to SAA; M1TBR decreased from 73 {plus minus} 5 min (air) to 69 {plus minus} 5 min (SAA). These results suggest that acute prolonged exposure to low levels of SAA has minimal effects on lung mechanics in healthy subjects but does produce a modest acceleration of particle clearance.

  15. Pulmonary Function in Flight (PuFF) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In this International Space Station (ISS) onboard photo, Expedition Six Science Officer Donald R. Pettit works to set up the Pulmonary Function in Flight (PuFF) experiment hardware in the Destiny Laboratory. Expedition Six is the fourth and final crew to perform the PuFF experiment. The PuFF experiment was developed to better understand what effects long term exposure to microgravity may have on the lungs. The focus is on measuring changes in the everness of gas exchange in the lungs, and on detecting changes in respiratory muscle strength. It allows astronauts to measure blood flow through the lungs, the ability of the lung to take up oxygen, and lung volumes. Each PuFF session includes five lung function tests, which involve breathing only cabin air. For each planned extravehicular (EVA) activity, a crew member performs a PuFF test within one week prior to the EVA. Following the EVA, those crew members perform another test to document the effect of exposure of the lungs to the low-pressure environment of the space suits. This experiment utilizes the Gas Analyzer System for Metabolic Analysis Physiology, or GASMAP, located in the Human Research Facility (HRF), along with a variety of other Puff equipment including a manual breathing valve, flow meter, pressure-flow module, pressure and volume calibration syringes, and disposable mouth pieces.

  16. Commuting mode and pulmonary function in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Adam W; Hang, Jing-Qing; Lee, Mi-Sun; Su, Li; Zhang, Feng-Ying; Christiani, David C

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to air pollution can be particularly high during commuting and may depend on the mode of transportation. We investigated the impact of commuting mode on pulmonary function in Shanghai, China.The Shanghai Putuo Study is a cross-sectional, population-based study. Our primary outcomes were forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) % predicted, and the secondary outcome was spirometric airflow obstruction. We tested the association between mode of transportation and these outcomes after adjusting for confounders.The study population consisted of 20 102 subjects. After adjusting for confounders, the change (95% CI) in FEV1 was -2.15% pred (-2.88- -1.42% pred) among pedestrians, -1.32% pred (-2.05- -0.59% pred) among those taking buses without air conditioning, -1.33% pred (-2.05- -0.61% pred) among those taking buses with air conditioning and -2.83% pred (-5.56- -0.10% pred) among those using underground railways, as compared to cyclists (the reference group). The effects of mode on FVC % predicted were in the same direction. Private car use had a significant protective effect on FVC % predicted and the risk of airflow obstruction (defined by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease but not by lower limit of normal criteria).Mode of transportation is associated with differences in lung function, which may reflect pollution levels in different transportation microenvironments. PMID:26541519

  17. Perception of Pulmonary Function and Asthma Control: The Differential Role of Child Versus Caregiver Anxiety and Depression*

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Dara; Kutner, Haley; Eisenberg, Nina; Hottinger, Kate; Sidora-Arcoleo, Kimberly; Warman, Karen; Serebrisky, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine child and caregiver anxiety and depression as predictors of children’s perception of pulmonary function, quick-relief medication use, and pulmonary function. Method 97 children with asthma, ages 7 to 11 years old, reported their anxiety and depressive symptoms and completed spirometry. Caregivers completed a psychiatric interview. Children’s predictions of their peak expiratory flow were compared with actual values across 6 weeks. Quick-relief medication use was assessed by Dosers. Results Children’s anxiety symptoms were associated with over-perception of respiratory compromise and greater quick-relief medication use. Children’s depressive symptoms were associated with greater quick-relief medication use, but not perception of pulmonary function. Children of caregivers with an anxiety or depressive disorder had lower pulmonary function than children of caregivers without anxiety or depression. Conclusions Child anxiety was associated with a subjective pattern of over-perception. Caregiver anxiety and depression were risk factors for lower lung function assessed by objective measurement. PMID:23873703

  18. Pulmonary function and ambient particulate matter: Epidemiological evidence from NHANES I

    SciTech Connect

    Chestnut, L.G.; Schwartz, J.; Savitz, D.A.; Burchfiel, C.M. )

    1991-05-01

    The relationship between pulmonary function and quarterly average levels of total suspended particulates (TSP) was examined for adults who resided in 49 of the locations where the First National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES I) was conducted. Statistically significant relationships were observed between TSP levels and forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume at one second (FEV1.0). These relationships remained strong across several specifications and sample changes, e.g., exclusion of cities with two highest and two lowest TSP levels, restriction of sample to whites only. Anthropometric measurements and socioeconomic characteristics of the subjects were included in the analysis, and we restricted the sample to never smokers. The results indicate a 1 standard deviation increase (about 34 micrograms/m3) in TSP from the sample mean of 87 micrograms/m3 was associated with an average decrease in FVC of 2.25%. The results of this analysis also suggest that there is a threshold level (i.e., {approximately} 60 micrograms/m3 (quarterly average)) of TSP below which a relationship with pulmonary function ceases to exist.

  19. Examining Students' Conceptions Using Sum Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratliff, Kevin; Garofalo, Joe

    2006-01-01

    Students' understanding of functions is a topic that has been researched extensively. In this qualitative study, five university students of varying mathematical backgrounds were interviewed to reveal strategies and misconceptions as they struggled with graphical and analytical tasks relating to sum functions. Weaker students are seen to rely

  20. Echocardiographic evaluation of ventricular function in children with pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Vorhies, Erika E; Gajarski, Robert J; Yu, Sunkyung; Donohue, Janet E; Fifer, Carlen G

    2014-06-01

    Although described in adults, it remains unclear whether ventricular dysfunction exists in pediatric patients with pulmonary hypertension (PHN). The goal of this study was to identify differences in echocardiographic indices of ventricular function among pediatric PHN patients. From 2009 to 2011, pediatric PHN patients with normal intracardiac anatomy and age-matched controls (1:3 ratio) were enrolled in this retrospective case-control study. Diagnosis of PHN was based on tricuspid regurgitation velocity or septal position estimating right-ventricular (RV) pressure >50 % systemic. Measures of RV and left ventricular systolic and diastolic function, including tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) of the mitral annulus (MA) and tricuspid annulus (TA), were compared. Enrollees included 25 PHN patients and 75 age-matched controls (mean age 7.5 years [range 1 day to 19 years]). Parameters of RV systolic and diastolic function were worse in PHN patients. Compared with controls, PHN patients had significantly decreased tricuspid valve inflow ratio, decreased TA TDI early diastolic velocities, decreased systolic velocities, increased tricuspid E/E' ratio (all p < 0.01) and increased myocardial performance index. In an age-stratified analysis, TDI measures in PHN patients <1 year of age were similar to controls, whereas differences in TA TDI velocities and MA TDI velocities were noted in patients ?1 year of age. Abnormalities in Doppler echocardiographic indices of ventricular systolic and diastolic function were identified in pediatric PHN patients and were more prominent with older age. These indices are promising for serial noninvasive monitoring of disease severity, but further correlation with catheterization-derived measures is needed. PMID:24370763

  1. 4DCT-based measurement of changes in pulmonary function following a course of radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Kai; Bayouth, John E.; Buatti, John M.; Christensen, Gary E.; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer is commonly limited to subtherapeutic doses due to unintended toxicity to normal lung tissue. Reducing the frequency of occurrence and magnitude of normal lung function loss may benefit from treatment plans that incorporate the regional lung and radiation dose information. In this article, the authors propose a method that quantitatively measures the regional changes in lung tissue function following a course of radiation therapy by using 4DCT and image registration techniques. Methods: 4DCT data sets before and after RT from two subjects are used in this study. Nonlinear 3D image registration is applied to register an image acquired near end inspiration to an image acquired near end expiration to estimate the pulmonary function. The Jacobian of the image registration transformation, indicating local lung expansion or contraction, serves as an index of regional pulmonary function. Approximately 120 annotated vascular bifurcation points are used as landmarks to evaluate registration accuracy. The authors compare regional pulmonary function before and after RT to the planned radiation dose at different locations of the lung. Results: In all registration pairs, the average landmark distances after registration are on the order of 1 mm. The pulmonary function change as indicated by the Jacobian change ranges from -0.15 to 0.1 in the contralateral lung and -0.22 to 0.23 in the ipsilateral lung for subject A, and ranges from -0.4 to 0.39 in the contralateral lung and -0.25 to 0.5 in the ipsilateral lung for subject B. Both of the subjects show larger range of the increase in the pulmonary function in the ipsilateral lung than the contralateral lung. For lung tissue regions receiving a radiation dose larger than 24 Gy, a decrease in pulmonary function was observed. For regions receiving a radiation dose smaller than 24 Gy, either an increase or a decrease in pulmonary function was observed. The relationship between the pulmonary function change and the radiation dose varies at different locations. Conclusions: With the use of 4DCT and image registration techniques, the pulmonary function prior to and following a course of radiation therapy can be measured. In the preliminary application of this approach for two subjects, changes in pulmonary function were observed with a weak correlation between the dose and pulmonary function change. In certain sections of the lung, detected locally compromised pulmonary function may have resulted from radiation injury.

  2. 4DCT-based measurement of changes in pulmonary function following a course of radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Kai; Bayouth, John E.; Buatti, John M.; Christensen, Gary E.; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer is commonly limited to subtherapeutic doses due to unintended toxicity to normal lung tissue. Reducing the frequency of occurrence and magnitude of normal lung function loss may benefit from treatment plans that incorporate the regional lung and radiation dose information. In this article, the authors propose a method that quantitatively measures the regional changes in lung tissue function following a course of radiation therapy by using 4DCT and image registration techniques. Methods: 4DCT data sets before and after RT from two subjects are used in this study. Nonlinear 3D image registration is applied to register an image acquired near end inspiration to an image acquired near end expiration to estimate the pulmonary function. The Jacobian of the image registration transformation, indicating local lung expansion or contraction, serves as an index of regional pulmonary function. Approximately 120 annotated vascular bifurcation points are used as landmarks to evaluate registration accuracy. The authors compare regional pulmonary function before and after RT to the planned radiation dose at different locations of the lung. Results: In all registration pairs, the average landmark distances after registration are on the order of 1 mm. The pulmonary function change as indicated by the Jacobian change ranges from ?0.15 to 0.1 in the contralateral lung and ?0.22 to 0.23 in the ipsilateral lung for subject A, and ranges from ?0.4 to 0.39 in the contralateral lung and ?0.25 to 0.5 in the ipsilateral lung for subject B. Both of the subjects show larger range of the increase in the pulmonary function in the ipsilateral lung than the contralateral lung. For lung tissue regions receiving a radiation dose larger than 24 Gy, a decrease in pulmonary function was observed. For regions receiving a radiation dose smaller than 24 Gy, either an increase or a decrease in pulmonary function was observed. The relationship between the pulmonary function change and the radiation dose varies at different locations. Conclusions: With the use of 4DCT and image registration techniques, the pulmonary function prior to and following a course of radiation therapy can be measured. In the preliminary application of this approach for two subjects, changes in pulmonary function were observed with a weak correlation between the dose and pulmonary function change. In certain sections of the lung, detected locally compromised pulmonary function may have resulted from radiation injury. PMID:20384264

  3. Parathyroid Hormone as a Novel Biomarker for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joo-Hyun; Park, Hye Kyeong; Jung, Hoon; Lee, Sung-Soon; Koo, Hyeon-Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To understand and predict chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a biomarker that reflects disease severity is needed. Research Design and Methods Data from 10269 adults aged over 40 years of age were retrieved from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), and 1302 patients met the criteria for COPD. The association between values of vitamin D and parathyroid hormone (PTH), and COPD severity including lung function and quality of life, were analyzed. Results In COPD patients, lung function was inversely related to PTH values (P = 0.02 for FVC [% predicted]; P < 0.001 for FEV1 [% predicted]); however, the association of lung function with vitamin D levels was not statistically significant in a multivariable analysis. Value of PTH was independently associated with EQ5D-index (P = 0.04), but vitamin D level showed no significant relationship with EQ5D-index (P = 0.59) or EQ5D-VAS (P = 0.81). Conclusions Elevation of PTH, unlike vitamin D, is independently associated with COPD severity, and may be a better biomarker for COPD. PMID:26398210

  4. Evaluation of bedside pulmonary function in the neonate: From the past to the future.

    PubMed

    Reiterer, F; Sivieri, E; Abbasi, S

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary function testing and monitoring plays an important role in the respiratory management of neonates. A noninvasive and complete bedside evaluation of the respiratory status is especially useful in critically ill neonates to assess disease severity and resolution and the response to pharmacological interventions as well as to guide mechanical respiratory support. Besides traditional tools to assess pulmonary gas exchage such as arterial or transcutaenous blood gas analysis, pulse oximetry, and capnography, additional valuable information about global lung function is provided through measurement of pulmonary mechanics and volumes. This has now been aided by commercially available computerized pulmonary function testing systems, respiratory monitors, and modern ventilators with integrated pulmonary function readouts. In an attempt to apply easy-to-use pulmonary function testing methods which do not interfere with the infant?s airflow, other tools have been developed such as respiratory inductance plethysmography, and more recently, electromagnetic and optoelectronic plethysmography, electrical impedance tomography, and electrical impedance segmentography. These alternative technologies allow not only global, but also regional and dynamic evaluations of lung ventilation. Although these methods have proven their usefulness for research applications, they are not yet broadly used in a routine clinical setting. This review will give a historical and clinical overview of different bedside methods to assess and monitor pulmonary function and evaluate the potential clinical usefulness of such methods with an outlook into future directions in neonatal respiratory diagnostics. PMID:26139200

  5. Which pulmonary function tests best differentiate between COPD phenotypes?

    PubMed

    Salzman, Steve H

    2012-01-01

    We are still at the early phase of finding useful phenotypes in COPD that can guide therapy. However, in a simple sense, "sick patients die." Many phenotypic measurements of severity correlate with mortality in COPD: FEV(1), the ratio of inspiratory capacity to total lung capacity (IC/TLC), diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (D(LCO)), 6-min walk distance, and maximum oxygen (O(2)) consumption or maximum watts on exercise testing. However, composite parameters, such as the BODE index (body mass index, air flow obstruction, dyspnea, exercise capacity), perform better, likely because they capture different aspects of severity that affect functional impairment and risk of death. Bronchodilator responsiveness is just a relative feature that aids in distinction of asthma and COPD but is not diagnostic in this use. A normal D(LCO) helps to rule out exercise-induced O(2) desaturation, but those with a low D(LCO) and COPD need exercise measurements to confirm desaturation. Currently, pulmonary function tests (PFTs) alone do not define subsets who respond to particular therapies. The presence of air flow obstruction and its severity increase the risk of lung cancer in COPD patients. Inflammatory biomarkers (exhaled nitric oxide and eosinophilia in sputum or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) help distinguish asthma from COPD. Genetics is a promising area to elucidate pathophysiology and treatment for asthma and COPD, but currently alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is the only genetically-determined phenotype that has relevance for COPD management. The best promise for the future seems to be in composite phenotypes or scores, both for distinguishing asthma from COPD, and for guiding therapeutic options. It may be better to throw out the old, limiting diagnostic concepts. If, instead, we start from outcomes of interest, perhaps we can work back to predictors of these outcomes, and organize new diagnostic entities that have predictive relevance for treatment choices, functional outcomes, and mortality. PMID:22222125

  6. Pulmonary function defects in nonsmoking vinyl chloride workers.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A

    1975-01-01

    Pulmonary function was assessed by spirometry and maximum expiratory flow-volume curves to determine whether exposure to an occupational environment contaminated with vinyl chloride (VC) fumes and poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) dust is associated with an increased risk of respiratory impairment. Data were analyzed for smoking, duration of exposure, and age. The high prevalence of impaired flow (57.5%) could not be attributed to smoking. Prevalence in nonsmokers was 36.4% when exposure was less than 10 yr, 42% when exposure was between 10 and 20 yr, and 80% when exposure exceeded 20 yr. The last is virtually the same rate as for smokers exposed more than 20 years. The same trend is shown with increasing age. Unlike younger workers, when smokers and nonsmokers more than or equal to 40 years of age are compared, prevalence rates of air flow impairment are not statistically different. The present investigation is one of the few in which the effects of occupational exposure could be separated from and were found to predominate over the effects of smoking. PMID:1175564

  7. Short term exposure to cooking fumes and pulmonary function

    PubMed Central

    Svedahl, Sindre; Svendsen, Kristin; Qvenild, Torgunn; Sjaastad, Ann Kristin; Hilt, Bjrn

    2009-01-01

    Background Exposure to cooking fumes may have different deleterious effects on the respiratory system. The aim of this study was to look at possible effects from inhalation of cooking fumes on pulmonary function. Methods Two groups of 12 healthy volunteers (A and B) stayed in a model kitchen for two and four hours respectively, and were monitored with spirometry four times during twenty four hours, on one occasion without any exposure, and on another with exposure to controlled levels of cooking fumes. Results The change in spirometric values during the day with exposure to cooking fumes, were not statistically significantly different from the changes during the day without exposure, with the exception of forced expiratory time (FET). The change in FET from entering the kitchen until six hours later, was significantly prolonged between the exposed and the unexposed day with a 15.7% increase on the exposed day, compared to a 3.2% decrease during the unexposed day (p-value = 0.03). The same tendency could be seen for FET measurements done immediately after the exposure and on the next morning, but this was not statistically significant. Conclusion In our experimental setting, there seems to be minor short term spirometric effects, mainly affecting FET, from short term exposure to cooking fumes. PMID:19409114

  8. Indoor air pollution and pulmonary function growth in preadolescent children

    SciTech Connect

    Berkey, C.S.; Ware, J.H.; Dockery, D.W.; Ferris, B.G.; Speizer, F.E.

    1986-01-01

    Results are reported from a study of the association between exposure to sidestream cigarette smoke or gas-stove emissions and pulmonary-function level and growth rate of 7,834 children seen at 2-5 annual visits between the ages of 6-10 years. Children whose mothers smoked one pack of cigarettes per day had levels of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) at age eight that were 0.81% lower than children of nonsmoking mothers (p<0.0001), and FEV1 growth rates approximately 0.17% per year lower (p=0.05). For a child of age eight with an FEV1 of 1.62 liters, this corresponds to a deficit in rate of change of FEV1 of approximately 3 ml/annum and a deficit of 13 ml at age eight. Children whose mothers smoked one pack per day had levels of forced vital capacity (FVC) at age eight that were 0.33% higher than children of nonsmokers (p=0.12); however, their growth rates of FVC were 0.17% per year lower (p=0.04). Because few mothers changed their smoking habits during the course of the study, it was not possible to determine whether the difference in rate of growth was due to current exposure or to an effect of prenatal and early childhood exposure on the course of development.

  9. Obstructive pulmonary function impairment among Korean male workers exposed to organic solvents, iron oxide dust, and welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Ji Young; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Dae Hwan

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated spirometric obstructive pulmonary function impairment among workers who were occupationally exposed to organic solvents, iron oxide dust, or welding fumes. Data were collected from records of periodic health examinations of workers. In total, 448 Korean male workers were enrolled and classified into three exposure groups: exposure to organic solvents, iron oxide dust, or welding fumes. Logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the association between occupational exposure and pulmonary function. Compared to exposure to organic solvents, exposure to iron oxide dust was significantly associated with obstructive pulmonary function impairment (odds ratio [OR], 9.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.20-41.97). The group exposed to welding fumes did not show a significantly higher OR compare to those exposed to organic solvents (OR, 2.83; 95% CI, 0.74-10.8). These results suggest that exposure to iron oxide dust has a greater association with obstructive pulmonary function impairment than exposure to organic solvents or welding fumes. PMID:24131874

  10. Obstructive Pulmonary Function Impairment among Korean Male Workers Exposed to Organic Solvents, Iron Oxide Dust, and Welding Fumes

    PubMed Central

    RYU, Ji Young; LEE, Sang-Yoon; KIM, Dae Hwan

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated spirometric obstructive pulmonary function impairment among workers who were occupationally exposed to organic solvents, iron oxide dust, or welding fumes. Data were collected from records of periodic health examinations of workers. In total, 448 Korean male workers were enrolled and classified into three exposure groups: exposure to organic solvents, iron oxide dust, or welding fumes. Logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the association between occupational exposure and pulmonary function. Compared to exposure to organic solvents, exposure to iron oxide dust was significantly associated with obstructive pulmonary function impairment (odds ratio [OR], 9.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.20–41.97). The group exposed to welding fumes did not show a significantly higher OR compare to those exposed to organic solvents (OR, 2.83; 95% CI, 0.74–10.8). These results suggest that exposure to iron oxide dust has a greater association with obstructive pulmonary function impairment than exposure to organic solvents or welding fumes. PMID:24131874

  11. Methods for measuring right ventricular function and hemodynamic coupling with the pulmonary vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Bellofiore, Alessandro; Chesler, Naomi C.

    2013-01-01

    The right ventricle (RV) is a pulsatile pump, the efficiency of which depends on proper hemodynamic coupling with the compliant pulmonary circulation. The RV and pulmonary circulation exhibit structural and functional differences with the more extensively investigated left ventricle (LV) and systemic circulation. In light of these differences, metrics of LV function and efficiency of coupling to the systemic circulation cannot be used without modification to characterize RV function and efficiency of coupling to the pulmonary circulation. In this article, we review RV physiology and mechanics, established and novel methods for measuring RV function and hemodynamic coupling, and findings from application of these methods to RV function and coupling changes with pulmonary hypertension. We especially focus on non-invasive measurements, as these may represent the future for clinical monitoring of disease progression and the effect of drug therapies. PMID:23423705

  12. Effects of sildenafil on hypoxic pulmonary vascular function in dogs.

    PubMed

    Fesler, Pierre; Pagnamenta, Alberto; Rondelet, Benoit; Kerbaul, François; Naeije, Robert

    2006-10-01

    Sildenafil has been shown to be an effective treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension and is believed to present with pulmonary selectivity. This study was designed to determine the site of action of sildenafil compared with inhaled nitric oxide (NO) and intravenous sodium nitroprusside (SNP), known as selective and nonselective pulmonary vasodilators, respectively. Inhaled NO (40 ppm), and maximum tolerated doses of intravenous SNP and sildenafil, (5 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1) and 0.1 mg x kg(-1) x h(-1)), respectively, were administered to eight dogs ventilated in hypoxia. Pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) was evaluated by pulmonary arterial pressure (Ppa) minus left atrial pressure (Pla) vs. flow curves, and partitioned into arterial and venous segments by the occlusion method. Right ventricular hydraulic load was defined by pulmonary arterial characteristic impedance (Zc) and elastance (Ea) calculations. Right ventricular arterial coupling was estimated by the ratio of end-systolic elastance (Ees) to Ea. Decreasing the inspired oxygen fraction from 0.4 to 0.1 increased Ppa - Pla at a standardized flow of 3 l x min(-1) x m(-2) from 6 +/- 1 to 18 +/- 1 mmHg (mean +/- SE). Ppa - Pla was decreased to 9 +/- 1 by inhaled NO, 14 +/- 1 by SNP, and 14 +/- 1 mmHg by sildenafil. The partition of PVR, Zc, Ea, and Ees/Ea was not affected by the three interventions. Inhaled NO did not affect systemic arterial pressure, which was similarly decreased by sildenafil and SNP, from 115 +/- 4 to 101 +/- 4 and 98 +/- 5 mmHg, respectively. We conclude that inhaled NO inhibits hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction more effectively than sildenafil or SNP, and sildenafil shows no more selectivity for the pulmonary circulation than SNP. PMID:16778005

  13. Behavior Management: Examining the Functions of Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alstot, Andrew E.; Alstot, Crystal D.

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate student behavior is essential for the success of a physical education lesson. Despite using effective proactive management strategies, teachers may need to also use reactive techniques to reduce problem behaviors by applying suitable consequences. For these consequences to be effective, they must be aligned with the function, or cause,

  14. Pulmonary physiology: future directions for lung function testing in COPD.

    PubMed

    Brusasco, Vito; Barisione, Giovanni; Crimi, Emanuele

    2015-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a term that encompasses different pathological conditions having excessive airflow limitation in common. A wide body of knowledge has been accumulated over the last century explaining the mechanisms by which airway (chronic bronchitis) and parenchymal (emphysema) diseases lead to an indistinguishable spirometric abnormality. Although the definition of emphysema is anatomical, early studies showed that its presence can be inferred with good approximation from measurements of lung mechanics and gas exchange, in addition to simple spirometry. Studies using tests of ventilation distribution showed that abnormalities are present in smokers with normal spirometry, although these tests were not predictive of development of COPD. At the beginning of the third millennium, new documents and guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of COPD were developed, in which the functional diagnosis of COPD was restricted, for the sake of simplicity, to simple spirometry. In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest in separating bronchitic from emphysematous phenotype of COPD. For this purpose, high-resolution computed tomography scanning has been added to diagnostic work-up. At the same time, methods for lung function testing have been refined and seem promising for detection of early small airways abnormalities. Among them are the forced oscillation technique and the nitrogen phase III slope analysis of the multiple-breath washout test, which may provide information on ventilation inhomogeneity. Moreover, the combined assessment of diffusing capacity for nitric oxide and carbon monoxide may be more sensitive than the latter alone for partitioning diffusive components at parenchymal level. PMID:25257934

  15. Relationship between Right Ventricular Longitudinal Strain, Invasive Hemodynamics, and Functional Assessment in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Hyeong; Kusunose, Kenya; Kwon, Deborah H.; Park, Margaret M.; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Thomas, James D.; Grimm, Richard A.; Griffin, Brian P.; Marwick, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Right ventricular longitudinal strain (RVLS) is a new parameter of RV function. We evaluated the relationship of RVLS by speckle-tracking echocardiography with functional and invasive parameters in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) patients. Subjects and Methods Thirty four patients with World Health Organization group 1 PAH (29 females, mean age 4513 years old). RVLS were analyzed with velocity vector imaging. Results Patients with advanced symptoms {New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class III/IV} had impaired RVLS in global RV (RVLSglobal, -175 vs. -123%, p<0.01) and RV free wall (RVLSFW, -195 vs. -144%, p<0.01 to NYHA class I/II). Baseline RVLSglobal and RVLSFW showed significant correlation with 6-minute walking distance (r=-0.54 and r=-0.57, p<0.01 respectively) and logarithmic transformation of brain natriuretic peptide concentration (r=0.65 and r=0.65, p<0.01, respectively). These revealed significant correlations with cardiac index (r=-0.50 and r=-0.47, p<0.01, respectively) and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR, r=0.45 and r=0.45, p=0.01, respectively). During a median follow-up of 33 months, 25 patients (74%) had follow-up examinations. Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP, 5413 to 4616 mmHg, p=0.03) and PVR (115 to 62 wood units, p<0.01) were significantly decreased with pulmonary vasodilator treatment. RVLSglobal (-125 to -165%, p<0.01) and RVLSFW (-145 to -185%, p<0.01) were significantly improved. The decrease of mPAP was significantly correlated with improvement of RVLSglobal (r=0.45, p<0.01) and RVLSFW (r=0.43, p<0.01). The PVR change demonstrated significant correlation with improvement of RVLSglobal (r=0.40, p<0.01). Conclusion RVLS correlates with functional and invasive hemodynamic parameters in PAH patients. Decrease of mPAP and PVR as a result of treatment was associated with improvement of RVLS. PMID:26413108

  16. Pulmonary airways tree segmentation from CT examinations using adaptive volume of interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Cheol; Kim, Won Pil; Zheng, Bin; Leader, Joseph K.; Pu, Jiantao; Tan, Jun; Gur, David

    2009-02-01

    Airways tree segmentation is an important step in quantitatively assessing the severity of and changes in several lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and cystic fibrosis. It can also be used in guiding bronchoscopy. The purpose of this study is to develop an automated scheme for segmenting the airways tree structure depicted on chest CT examinations. After lung volume segmentation, the scheme defines the first cylinder-like volume of interest (VOI) using a series of images depicting the trachea. The scheme then iteratively defines and adds subsequent VOIs using a region growing algorithm combined with adaptively determined thresholds in order to trace possible sections of airways located inside the combined VOI in question. The airway tree segmentation process is automatically terminated after the scheme assesses all defined VOIs in the iteratively assembled VOI list. In this preliminary study, ten CT examinations with 1.25mm section thickness and two different CT image reconstruction kernels ("bone" and "standard") were selected and used to test the proposed airways tree segmentation scheme. The experiment results showed that (1) adopting this approach affectively prevented the scheme from infiltrating into the parenchyma, (2) the proposed method reasonably accurately segmented the airways trees with lower false positive identification rate as compared with other previously reported schemes that are based on 2-D image segmentation and data analyses, and (3) the proposed adaptive, iterative threshold selection method for the region growing step in each identified VOI enables the scheme to segment the airways trees reliably to the 4th generation in this limited dataset with successful segmentation up to the 5th generation in a fraction of the airways tree branches.

  17. [THE GENETIC EXAMINATION OF BRONCHIAL LAVAGE ENABLES THE PROMPT DIAGNOSIS OF PULMONARY MYCOBACTERIUM KANSASII--A CASE REPORT].

    PubMed

    Mori, Masahide; Ageshio, Fumitaka; Kagawa, Hiroyuki; Oshitani, Yohei; Fujikawa, Takeya; Saito, Haruko; Sako, Hajime; Yano, Yukihiro; Kitada, Seigo; Maekura, Ryoji

    2015-08-01

    A 59-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchial asthma presented at our hospital with an abnormal shadow on the chest radiograph, which was obtained as part of a routine medical examination. Computed tomography of the chest revealed two nodules in the right upper lung with the longest diameter measuring 29 mm and 10 mm, respectively. A granulomatous disease was strongly suspected based on the histological features of the transbronchial lung biopsy specimen. Results of smear examination for mycobacteria and genetic examination of the bronchial lavage aspirate by the transcription reverse transcription concerted (TRC) reaction method for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium complex (MAC), were both negative. However, three days after the bronchoscopic examination, an additional genetic examination by the TRC method confirmed the diagnosis of M. kansasii infection. About two weeks later, the culture results were positive and M. kansasii infection was re-confirmed with the DNA probe method. The patient responded well to treatment with a combination of isoniazid, rifampicin, and ethambutol. In Japan, among the nontuberculous mycobacterial infections, the prevalence of pulmonary M.kansasii disease is second only to infection with MAC. However, it is often difficult to distinguish this disease from pulmonary tuberculosis. In this patient, a genetic examination with the TRC method enabled a prompt diagnosis of M. kansasii infection. The TRC method appears to be a useful tool for diagnosing nontubercular mycobacterial infections. PMID:26665518

  18. The effect of thoracic region self-mobilization on chest expansion and pulmonary function

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ju-hyeon; Moon, Dong-chul

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effects of thoracic region self-mobilization on chest expansion and pulmonary function in healthy adults. [Subjects] Nineteen healthy adults were randomly allocated to either an intervention group (n = 8) or a control group (n = 11). [Methods] Subjects in the intervention group performed self-mobilization of the thoracic region 3 times per week for 6 weeks (18 sessions). The outcome measures included chest expansion when breathing, pulmonary function, and predicted pulmonary function. [Results] There was a significant difference in chest expansion between the intervention group and the control group. However, there was no significant difference in pulmonary function between the intervention group and the control group. [Conclusion] Thoracic region self-mobilization may be beneficial for increasing chest expansion in healthy adults. PMID:26504292

  19. Association of indoor nitrogen dioxide with respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function in children

    SciTech Connect

    Neas, L.M.; Dockery, D.W.; Ware, J.H.; Spengler, J.D.; Speizer, F.E.; Ferris, B.G. Jr. )

    1991-07-15

    The effect of indoor nitrogen dioxide on the cumulative incidence of respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function level was studied in a cohort of 1,567 white children aged 7-11 years examined in six US cities from 1983 through 1988. Week-long measurements of nitrogen dioxide were obtained at three indoor locations over 2 consecutive weeks in both the winter and the summer months. The household annual average nitrogen dioxide concentration was modeled as a continuous variable and as four ordered categories. Multiple logistic regression analysis of symptom reports from a questionnaire administered after indoor monitoring showed that a 15-ppb increase in the household annual nitrogen dioxide mean was associated with an increased cumulative incidence of lower respiratory symptoms (odds ratio (OR) = 1.4, 95% confidence interval (95% Cl) 1.1-1.7). The response variable indicated the report of one or more of the following symptoms: attacks of shortness of breath with wheeze, chronic wheeze, chronic cough, chronic phlegm, or bronchitis. Girls showed a stronger association (OR = 1.7, 95% Cl 1.3-2.2) than did boys (OR = 1.2, 95% Cl 0.9-1.5). An analysis of pulmonary function measurements showed no consistent effect of nitrogen dioxide. These results are consistent with earlier reports based on categorical indicators of household nitrogen dioxide sources and provide a more specific association with nitrogen dioxide as measured in children's homes.

  20. Relationship Between Vertebral Fracture Burden, Height Loss, and Pulmonary Function in Postmenopausal Women With Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Krege, John H; Kendler, David; Krohn, Kelly; Genant, Harry; Alam, Jahangir; Berclaz, Pierre-Yves; Coffey, Barbara; Loghin, Corina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to assess the association of osteoporosis-related vertebral fracture burden and pulmonary function. This study also examined the relationship between vertebral fracture burden and height loss, estimated by arm span - height. This was a single-site and single-visit study. Patients had a history of at least 1 moderate or severe vertebral fracture. Vertebral fracture burden was quantified using the spinal deformity index (SDI). Pulmonary function during inspiration was determined by spirometry. Forty-one women aged 70-91 completed the study. Vertebral fracture burden negatively correlated with forced inspiratory vital capacity and inspiratory time. For each unit increase in SDI, forced inspiratory vital capacity decreased by 1.62%, and inspiratory time decreased by 2.39%. There was no correlation between SDI and measures of inspiratory flow. For each unit increase in SDI, height decreased by about 0.5 cm. Vertebral fractures were associated with decreased lung volume and height loss. PMID:25824332

  1. Longitudinal pulmonary functional loss in cotton textile workers: A 5-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Kahraman, Hasan; Sucakli, Mustafa Haki; Kilic, Talat; Celik, Mustafa; Koksal, Nurhan; Ekerbicer, Hasan Cetin

    2013-01-01

    Background Occupational exposure to cotton dust causes several diseases affecting the lungs, but only limited information is available on effects of long-term exposure. In this study, we aimed to evaluate longitudinal changes in selected parameters of pulmonary function in textile workers. Material/Methods This prospective cohort study began with 196 textile workers in 2006 and was completed in 2011 with 49 workers. We used standardized tests for pulmonary function on participants on the first day of the workweek in June of 2006 and 2011. Environmental samples of cotton dust were gathered with a vertical elutriator. Loss of pulmonary function was assessed based on gender and smoking status. Results The mean number of years participants worked in the textile factory was 7.611.83 years, and the mean age was 35.3+5.8 years. The annual FEV1 loss of all workers was 53.2 ml, giving a ratio of annual FEV1 loss to baseline FEV1 of 1.4%. Pulmonary function parameters of all participants in 2011 were significantly lower than those in 2006 (for all, p<0.05). In both surveys, pulmonary function in current smokers was lower, but this difference was not significant (p>0.05). Conclusions This study provides the first data on pulmonary functional loss in Turkish textile workers and supports the findings of other cohort studies that workers with long-term exposure to cotton dust may lose some pulmonary function. The ratio of annual FEV1 loss to baseline FEV1 appears to be a more accurate and comparable method than annual FEV1 loss for evaluating pulmonary functional loss. PMID:24346118

  2. Growth and functional assessment of pulmonary valves in pigs after replacement of sinuses of Valsalva.

    PubMed

    Walls, J T; McDaniel, W C; Pope, E R; Smith, J A; Fish, R E; Flaker, G C; Curtis, J J; Turk, J R; Wagner-Mann, C C

    1992-01-01

    Neopulmonary artery stenosis may occur after the arterial switching procedure to correct transposition of the great arteries. One technique to reduce this complication is to use a single rectangular piece of autogenous pericardium to reconstruct two adjacent sinuses of Valsalva and maintain pulmonary artery size. The long-term effect of this technique on pulmonary artery and valve growth and function is unknown. To assess this technique, Yorkshire-cross pigs (n = 5) weighing 29 +/- 1.7 kg (mean +/- SEM) were anesthetized, and during cardiopulmonary bypass, the pulmonary artery was transected distal to the pulmonary valve. Pulmonary artery diameter and commissure distances were measured. Two adjacent pulmonary artery sinuses of Valsalva were completely excised from the anulus to 4 mm distal to the commissures, leaving 2 mm of pulmonary artery tissue attached to the skeletonized commissure and on each side of the one remaining intact sinus of Valsalva. A single rectangular patch of fresh autologous pericardium was sutured to the anulus and remnant of the pulmonary artery along the commissure and edges of the one intact sinus of Valsalva. Pericardium composed two thirds of the circumference of the proximal pulmonary artery; this was anastomosed to the distal pulmonary artery. Weight gain occurred at a rate of 0.6 kg/day (median). The animals underwent right heart catheterization and cineangiography. They were killed 157.2 +/- 12.9 days post-operatively. The reconstructed pulmonary artery grew from 17.6 +/- 0.8 mm to 30.8 +/- 1.5 mm (p < 0.01), and the commissure distances grew from 17.0 +/- 1 mm to 27.2 +/- 1.6 mm (p < 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1457914

  3. The Relationship of Metabolic Syndrome with Stress, Coronary Heart Disease and Pulmonary Function - An Occupational Cohort-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Nowobilski, Roman; Dropinski, Jerzy; Kotula-Horowitz, Katarzyna; Laskowicz, Bartosz; Stanisz, Andrzej; Lelakowski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Higher levels of stress impact the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and coronary heart disease. The association between MetS, impaired pulmonary function and low level of physical activity is still pending assessment in the subjects exposed to stress. The study aimed to examine whether higher levels of stress might be related to MetS and the plaque presence, as well as whether MetS might affect pulmonary function. Design and Methods The study embraced 235 police officers (mean age 40.97 years) from the south of Poland. The anthropometrics and biochemical variables were measured; MetS was diagnosed using the International Diabetes Federation criteria. Computed tomography coronary angiography of coronary arteries, exercise ECG, measurements of brachial flow-mediated dilation, and carotid artery intima-media thickness were completed. In order to measure the self-perception of stress, 10-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10) was applied. Pulmonary function and physical activity levels were also addressed. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied to determine the relationships between: 1/ incidence of coronary plaque and MetS per se, MetS components and the number of classical cardiovascular risk factors, 2/ perceived stress and MetS, 3/ MetS and pulmonary function parameters. Results Coronary artery atherosclerosis was less associated with MetS (OR = 2.62, 95%CI 1.24–5.52; p = 0.011) than with a co-existence of classical cardiovascular risk factors (OR = 5.67, 95% CI 1.07–29.85, p = 0.03; for 3 risk factors and OR = 9.05; 95% CI 1.24–66.23, p = 0.02; for 6 risk factors, respectively). Perceived stress increased MetS prevalence (OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.03–1.13; p = 0.03), and impacted coronary plaque prevalence (OR = 1.05, 95% CI 1.001–1.10; p = 0.04). Leisure-time physical activity reduced the chances of developing MetS (OR = 0.98 95% CI 0.96–0.99; p = 0.02). MetS subjects had significantly lower values of certain pulmonary function parameters. Conclusions Exposure to job-specific stress among police officers increased the prevalence of MetS and impacted coronary plaque presence. MetS subjects had worse pulmonary function parameters. Early-stage, comprehensive therapeutic intervention may reduce overall risk of cardiovascular events and prevent pulmonary function impairment in this specific occupational population. PMID:26274823

  4. Effects of high-intensity interval training on pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    Dunham, Cali; Harms, Craig A

    2012-08-01

    To determine whether high-intensity interval training (HIT) would increase respiratory muscle strength and expiratory flow rates more than endurance training (ET), 15 physically active, healthy subjects (untrained) were randomly assigned to an ET group (n = 7) or a HIT group (n = 8). All subjects performed an incremental test to exhaustion (VO2max) on a cycle ergometer before and after training. Standard pulmonary function tests, maximum inspiratory pressure (PImax), maximum expiratory pressure (PEmax), and maximal flow volume loops were performed pre training and after each week of training. HIT subjects performed a 4-week training program, 3 days a week, on a cycle ergometer at 90% of their VO2max final workload, while the ET subjects performed exercise at 60-70% VO2max. The HIT group performed five 1-min bouts with 3-min recovery periods and the ET group cycled for 45 min continuously. A five-mile time trial (TT) was performed prior to, after 2 weeks, and after completion of training. Both groups showed improvements (P < 0.05) in VO2max (~8-10%) and TT (HIT 6.5 1.3%, ET 4.4 1.8%) following training with no difference (P > 0.05) between groups. Both groups increased (P < 0.05) PImax post training (ET ~ 25%, HIT ~ 43%) with values significantly higher for HIT than ET. There was no change (P > 0.05) in expiratory flow rates with training in either group. These data suggest that both whole-body exercise training and HIT are effective in increasing inspiratory muscle strength with HIT offering a time-efficient alternative to ET in improving aerobic capacity and performance. PMID:22194005

  5. Family-Based Association Study of Pulmonary Function in a Population in Northeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Jin; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Gombojav, Bayasgalan; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Park, Daniel S.; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Min, Kyung-Up; Sung, Joohon; Seo, Jeong-Sun; Kim, Jong-Il

    2015-01-01

    The spirometric measurement of pulmonary function by measuring the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) is a heritable trait that reflects the physiological condition of the lung and airways. Genome-wide linkage and association studies have identified a number of genes and genetic loci associated with pulmonary function. However, limited numbers of studies have been reported for Asian populations. In this study, we aimed to investigate genetic evidence of pulmonary function in a population in northeast Asia. We conducted a family-based association test with 706 GENDISCAN study participants from 72 Mongolian families to determine candidate genetic determinants of pulmonary function. For the replication, we chose seven candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the 5 loci, and tested 1062 SNPs for association with FEV1 from 2,729 subjects of the Korea Healthy Twin study. We identified TMEM132C as a potential candidate gene at 12q24.3, which is a previously reported locus of asthma and spirometric indices. We also found two adjacent candidate genes (UNC93A and TTLL2) in the 6q27 region, which has been previously identified as a pulmonary function locus in the Framingham cohort study. Our findings suggest that novel candidate genes (TMEM132C, UNC93A and TTLL2) in two different regions are associated with pulmonary function in a population in northeast Asia. PMID:26430897

  6. Should chest examination be reinstated in the early diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    PubMed Central

    Oshaug, Katja; Halvorsen, Peder A; Melbye, Hasse

    2013-01-01

    Background Although proven to be associated with bronchial obstruction, chest signs are not listed among cues that should prompt spirometry in the early diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in established guidelines. Aims We aimed to explore how chest findings add to respiratory symptoms and a history of smoking in the diagnosis of COPD. Methods In a cross-sectional study, patients aged 40 years or older, previously diagnosed with either asthma or COPD in primary care, answered questionnaires and underwent physical chest examination and spirometry. Results Among the 375 patients included, 39.7% had forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity <0.7. Hyperresonance to percussion was the strongest predictor of COPD, with a sensitivity of 20.8, a specificity of 97.8, and likelihood ratio of 9.5. In multivariate logistic regression, where pack-years, shortness of breath, and chest findings were among the explanatory variables, three physical chest findings were independent predictors of COPD. Hyperresonance to percussion yielded the highest odds ratio (OR = 6.7), followed by diminished breath sounds (OR = 5.0), and thirdly wheezes (OR = 2.3). These three chest signs also gave significant diagnostic information when added to shortness of breath and pack-years in receiver operating-characteristic curve analysis. Conclusion We found that chest signs may add to respiratory symptoms and a history of smoking in the diagnosis of COPD, and we conclude that chest signs should be reinstated as cues to early diagnosis of COPD in patients 40 years or older. PMID:23983462

  7. Paxillin regulates pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell function in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Veith, Christine; Marsh, Leigh M; Wygrecka, Małgorzata; Rutschmann, Katrin; Seeger, Werner; Weissmann, Norbert; Kwapiszewska, Grażyna

    2012-11-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a fatal disease characterized by remodeling processes such as increased migration and proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC), enhanced matrix deposition, and dysregulation of cytoskeletal proteins. However, the contribution of cytoskeletal proteins in PH is still not fully understood. In this study, we have used a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify novel binding partners of the cytoskeletal adaptor protein four-and-a-half LIM domains 1 (Fhl-1). This identified paxillin as a new Fhl-1 interacting partner, and consequently we assessed its contribution to vascular remodeling processes. Native protein-protein binding was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation studies in murine and human PASMC. Both proteins co-localized in PASMC in vitro and in vivo. In lung samples from idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension patients, paxillin expression was increased on mRNA and protein levels. Laser-microdissection of murine intrapulmonary arteries revealed elevated paxillin expression in hypoxia-induced PH. Furthermore, hypoxia-dependent upregulation of paxillin was HIF-1α dependent. Silencing of paxillin expression led to decreased PASMC adhesion, proliferation, and increased apoptosis. Regulation of these processes occurred via Akt and Erk1/2 kinases. In addition, adhesion of PASMC to the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin was critically dependent on paxillin expression. To summarize, we identified paxillin as a new regulator protein of PASMC growth. PMID:22959909

  8. [The time variations in pulmonary functional parameters in children with bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Bsc?, N; Du?u, S; Jienescu, Z; Fierbin?eanu, O; Murgoci, G

    1990-01-01

    28 children with bronchial asthma, between 6 and 18 years old, were followed by a varied period of time - 3 months - 5 years. 7-8 functional tests were carried out. The cases were studied in different clinical phases: asymptomatic, manifest, crisis of bronchial asthma. The functional pulmonary investigation included: spirographic examination [vital capacity (VC), maximum expiratory volume per second (MEVS) the VC/MEVS ratio], plethysmographic examination (VGT, Raw), measurement of the maximum instantaneous expiratory flows on the flux-volume curve (MEF50). The average value, standard residual deviation and the variation coefficient were calculated for each parameter studied in different clinical moments. The results are presented on 3 groups: per total, symptomatic and asymptomatic. The analysis of the data found showed that the variation of the parameters measured during repeated functional examinations in children with bronchial asthma ranges within broad limits (2.9%-11.5%); the broadest variation was recorded for Raw followed by MEF50 and the slightest variation was that of the VC/MEVS ratio. This indicated the lower value of the information furnished by this ratio in children, in appreciating the presence or severeness degree of the obstructive syndrome. PMID:2131812

  9. 20 CFR 718.103 - Pulmonary function tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... OR DEATH DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Criteria for the Development of Medical Evidence 718.103 Pulmonary... with a claim for benefits shall also include a statement signed by the physician or technician..., height, and weight of claimant at the time of the test; (3) Name of technician; (4) Name and signature...

  10. 20 CFR 718.103 - Pulmonary function tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... OR DEATH DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Criteria for the Development of Medical Evidence 718.103 Pulmonary... with a claim for benefits shall also include a statement signed by the physician or technician..., height, and weight of claimant at the time of the test; (3) Name of technician; (4) Name and signature...

  11. 20 CFR 718.103 - Pulmonary function tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... OR DEATH DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Criteria for the Development of Medical Evidence 718.103 Pulmonary... with a claim for benefits shall also include a statement signed by the physician or technician..., height, and weight of claimant at the time of the test; (3) Name of technician; (4) Name and signature...

  12. 20 CFR 718.103 - Pulmonary function tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... OR DEATH DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Criteria for the Development of Medical Evidence 718.103 Pulmonary... with a claim for benefits shall also include a statement signed by the physician or technician..., height, and weight of claimant at the time of the test; (3) Name of technician; (4) Name and signature...

  13. Effect of oxidant gases on membrane fluidity and function in pulmonary endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, J.M.; Block, E.R.

    1988-01-01

    Free radicals and oxidant gases, such as oxygen (O/sub 2/) and nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/), are injurious to mammalian lung cells. One of the postulated mechanisms for the cellular injury associated with these gases and free radicals involves peroxidative cleavage of membrane lipids. We have hypothesized that oxidant-related alterations in membrane lipids may result in disordering of the plasma membrane lipid bilayer, leading to derangements in membrane-dependent functions. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effect of exposure to high partial pressures of O/sub 2/ or NO/sub 2/ on the physical state and function of pulmonary endothelial cell plasma membranes. Both hyperoxia (95% O/sub 2/ at 1 ATA) and NO/sub 2/ exposure (5 ppm) caused early and significant decreases in fluidity in the hydrophobic interior of the plasma membrane lipid bilayer and subsequent depressions in plasma membrane-dependent transport of 5-hydroxytryptamine. Lipid domains at the surface of pulmonary endothelial cell plasma membranes are more susceptible to NO/sub 2/-induced injury than to hyperoxic injury. Alterations in the fluidity of these more superficial domains are associated with derangements in surface dependent functions, such as receptor-ligand interaction. These results support our hypothesis and advance our understanding of how the chemical events of free radical injury associated with high O/sub 2/ and NO/sub 2/ tensions are translated into functional manifestations of O/sub 2/ and NO/sub 2/-induced cellular injury. 62 references.

  14. Pulmonary function in firefighters: acute changes in ventilatory capacity and their correlates.

    PubMed Central

    Musk, A W; Smith, T J; Peters, J M; McLaughlin, E

    1979-01-01

    A group of 39 firefighters was examined during routine firefighing duty. Following smoke exposure the average decrease in one-second forced expiratory volume (FEV1.0) was 0.05 litre (137 observations). This decline in FEV1.0 was related to the severity of smoke exposure as estimated by the firefighter and to the measured particulate concentration of the smoke to which he was exposed. Decreases in FEV1.0 in excess of 0.10 litre were recorded in 30% of observations. Changes in FEV1.0 resulting from a second exposure to smoke on the same tour of duty were greater when smoke exposure at the previous fire was heavy. The repeated episodes of irritation of the bronchial tree that have been documented in this investigation may explain the origin of the previously observed chronic effect of firefighting on respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function. PMID:444439

  15. Poor outcome for patients with totally anomalous pulmonary venous connection and functionally single ventricle.

    PubMed

    Sinzobahamvya, Nicodme; Arenz, Claudia; Reckers, Julia; Photiadis, Joachim; Murin, Peter; Schindler, Ehrenfried; Hraska, Viktor; Asfour, Boulos

    2009-12-01

    Totally anomalous pulmonary venous connection, when also associated with a functionally univentricular connection, is known to have a poor outcome. We retrospectively analysed results for 19 patients undergoing surgery for this combination of lesions between 1995 and February 2009.Of the patients, 12 were neonates, with 11 presenting with signs of pulmonary venous obstruction. In 3 patients, a modified Blalock-Taussig shunt had been constructed. The dominant ventricle was of right ventricular morphology in 17 of the 19 patients, and double inlet was present in all bar 1. Pulmonary atresia or stenosis was found in 14 patients, a common atrioventricular junction in 14 patients, and isomerism of the right atrial appendages in 12 patients, respectively. Comprehensive Aristotle scores ranged from 14 to 23.50. The mean was 16.55, with a standard deviation of 2.19. Pulmonary venous rerouting was combined in 6 patients with construction of a modified Blalock-Taussig, in 4 with banding of the pulmonary trunk, in another 4 with a bidirectional Glenn anastomosis, in 3 with creation of a total cavo-pulmonary connection, and in 1 each with enlargement of the right ventricular outflow tract and the Norwood procedure. Of the cohort, 8 patients died early due to pulmonary hypertension, with all patients having Aristotle scores of at least 18 points dying. Among the 11 early survivors, 5 needed mechanical ventilation for over a week, but 5 patients died later, 3 due to pulmonary hypertension and 2 due to infection. Actuarial survival stabilized at 31.6%, with standard error of 10.7%, from one year onwards. Conversion to the Fontan circulation was successful in 5 patients.Our experience confirms that totally anomalous pulmonary venous connection, when associated with the functionally univentricular arrangement, carries one of the worst outcomes in current surgical practice. Use of the Aristotle comprehensive complexity scores effectively discriminates those patients with this condition at particularly high risk. PMID:19849875

  16. A detailed examination of pulmonary uptake of (99m)Tc-Tin colloid in healthy mature miniature pigs.

    PubMed

    Shim, Kyung Mi; Kim, Se Eun; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Sung-Ho; Bae, Chun-Sik; Han, Ho Jae; Kang, Seong Soo

    2009-01-01

    (99m)Tc-Tin colloid is a commonly used colloidal radiopharmaceutical in human medicine for evaluating liver function and morphology. (99m)Tc-Tin colloid is taken up in the liver by the phagocytic activity of Kupffer cells, the reticuloendothelial cells of the liver. Unlike what occurs in human beings, we demonstrated (99m)Tc-Tin colloid uptake within the lungs and liver in healthy, mature, miniature pigs. Our observations may be explained by the presence of pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIMs) closely apposed to the endothelium of the pulmonary capillaries in several animal species, such as the sheep, horse, goat, cat and pig. In the current study, we compared scintigraphic images using (99m)Tc-Tin colloid in rats with those in mature, miniature pigs, and identified the presence of PIMs, reticuloentothelial cells similar to Kupffer cells, by immunohistochemistry in pigs. Pulmonary uptake of (99m)Tc-Tin colloid occurred only in pigs, and PIMs in the pulmonary capillaries stained positively for mouse monoclonal MAC387 antibodies to macrophages in lung sections, as well as Kupffer cells in liver sections. Therefore, we conclude that the uptake of intravenously injected (99m)Tc-Tin colloid within both Kupffer cells and PIMs results in scintigraphic imaging of the lung and liver in miniature pigs. PMID:19567389

  17. Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Artery Hypertension in a Patient with Compensated Cardiac Disease: Hemodynamic and Functional Response to Sildenafil Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaidis, Lazaros; Memon, Nabeel

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 54-year-old man who presented with exertional dyspnea and fatigue that had worsened over the preceding 2 years, despite a normally functioning bioprosthetic aortic valve and stable, mild left ventricular dysfunction (left ventricular ejection fraction, 0.45). His symptoms could not be explained by physical examination, an extensive biochemical profile, or multiple cardiac and pulmonary investigations. However, abnormal cardiopulmonary exercise test results and a right heart catheterization—combined with the use of a symptom-limited, bedside bicycle ergometer—revealed that the patient's exercise-induced pulmonary artery hypertension was out of proportion to his compensated left heart disease. A trial of sildenafil therapy resulted in objective improvements in hemodynamic values and functional class. PMID:25873799

  18. Hemodynamics and right-ventricle functional characteristics of a swine carotid artery-jugular vein shunt model of pulmonary arterial hypertension: An 18-month experimental study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ji; Luo, Xiaoju; Huang, Yuanyuan; He, Yun; Li, Zhixian

    2015-10-01

    The continuous changes in pulmonary hemodynamic properties and right ventricular (RV) function in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) have not been fully characterized in large animal model of PAH induced by a carotid artery-jugular vein shunt. A minipig model of PAH was induced by a surgical anastomosis between the left common carotid artery and the left jugular vein. The model was validated by catheter examination and pathologic analyses, and the hemodynamic features and right-ventricle functional characteristics of the model were continuously observed by Doppler echocardiography. Of the 45 minipigs who received the surgery, 27 survived and were validated as models of PAH, reflected by mean pulmonary artery pressure ?25?mmHg, and typical pathologic changes of pulmonary arterial remodeling and RV fibrosis. Non-invasive indices of pulmonary hemodynamics (pulmonary artery accelerating time and its ratio to RV ventricular ejection time) were temporarily increased, then reduced later, similar to changes in tricuspid annular displacement. The Tei index of the RV was elevated, indicating a progressive impairment in RV function. Surgical anastomosis between carotid artery and jugular vein in a minipig is effective to establish PAH, and non-invasive hemodynamic and right-ventricle functional indices measured by Doppler echocardiography may be used as early indicators of PAH. PMID:25595189

  19. Pulmonary function of adolescents from Tripura, a North-eastern state of India

    PubMed Central

    Choudhuri, Dipayan; Sutradhar, Balaram

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Spirometric evaluation of pulmonary function has been evolved as clinical tool in diagnosis, management, and follow-up of respiratory disorders. There are very few studies on normative reference values of pulmonary function parameters for adolescents from Tripura, a North-eastern state of India. The present study was aimed to evaluate pulmonary function and their predictors in male and female adolescents of Tripura. Materials and Methods: A total of 640 (320 from tribal and 320 non-tribal) healthy, non-smoking male and female school children (age 10-14 years) from four different districts of Tripura were randomly sampled for the study. The pulmonary function parameters analysed included forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% expired volume (FEF25-75%), ratio of FEV1/FVC and maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV). Results: The results revealed that body weight, body mass index (BMI), PEFR, FEF25-75% and MVV are significantly high among male tribal children in comparison to non-tribal children. Height, weight, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), PEFR and MVV were found to be significantly more in tribal girls. In case of adolescents from Tripura, most of the pulmonary function parameters correlated with anthropometric parameters of the subject like height, weight, BMI, WHR, and WHtR. Conclusion: From the present study, it can be concluded that both anthropometric and pulmonary function status of tribal and non-tribal adolescents from Tripura are comparable. The computed regression norms may be used to predict pulmonary function of adolescents from Tripura by using anthropometric indices. PMID:26180385

  20. INTERPRETATIONS AND LIMITATION OF PULMONARY FUNCTION TESTING IN SMALL LABORATORY ANIMALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary function tests are tools available to the researcher and clinician to evaluate the ability of the lung to perform its essential function of gas exchange. o meet this principal function, the lung needs to operate efficiently with minimal mechanical work as well as provid...

  1. Acute effects of PM10 pollution on pulmonary function of smokers with mild to moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Pope, C A; Kanner, R E

    1993-06-01

    This study assessed the association between respirable particulate air pollution (PM10) and changes in the pulmonary function (FEV1, FEV1/FVC, and FVC) of smokers with mild to moderate airflow limitation. Spirometric data of Salt Lake City participants in The Lung Health Study were used from two screening visits 10 to 90 days apart after an initial screening visit, which included spirometry. We analyzed differences in pulmonary function (delta FEV1, delta FEV1/FVC, and delta FVC) for participants between the two spirometry visits. Significant associations between changes in pulmonary function and PM10 were observed. delta FEV1 and delta FEV1/FVC were inversely associated with changes in PM10. Although these associations were small, explaining only about 2 to 3% of the variance in delta FEV1, they were consistently negative and statistically significant (p < or = 0.01). On average, an increase in PM10 equal to 100 micrograms/m3 was associated with a marginal decline in FEV1 equal to approximately 2%. Associations between delta FVC and PM10 were consistently negative, but they were not statistically significant. No consistent or statistically significant associations between delta FEV1, delta FEV1/FVC, or delta FVC with changes in daily temperatures were observed. The effect of PM10 was greater for men than for women. The effect was nearly the same for those with nonspecific airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), based on methacholine inhalation challenge testing, versus those without AHR. We conclude that in current smokers PM10 possibly has a small transient negative effect on lung function that is not entirely obscured by their smoking habit. PMID:8503541

  2. Comparing the differential effects of LPA on the barrier function of human pulmonary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yonglin; Guo, Liang; Tang, Xiaoyan; Apparsundaram, Subramaniam; Kitson, Christopher; Deguzman, Jeremy; Fuentes, Maria E; Coyle, Luke; Majmudar, Rupal; Allard, John; Truitt, Theresa; Hamid, Rachid; Chen, Yun; Qian, Yimin; Budd, David C

    2013-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a class of bioactive lyso-phospholipid that mediates most of its biological effects through a family of G protein-coupled receptors of which six have been identified. The role of the LPA pathway in driving chronic lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) has gained considerable academic and industry attention. Modulation of the pulmonary artery endothelial barrier function by the LPA1 receptor has been shown to drive pulmonary fibrosis in murine models of disease. The purpose of this study was (i) to assess the effect of LPA on the barrier function of human pulmonary arterial (HPAEC) and microvascular (HMVEC) endothelial cells and (ii) to identify the LPA receptor subtype(s) responsible for changes in human pulmonary endothelial cell permeability using LPA receptor antagonists and siRNA technology. Analysis of the LPA receptor subtype expression demonstrated predominant expression of LPA2 and LPA6 receptor subtypes in both HPAECs and HMVECs. HPAECs also exhibit low expression of LPA1, LPA3, and LPA4 receptor subtypes. Treatment of cells with increasing concentrations of LPA caused loss of barrier function in HPAECs but not HMVECs, despite both cell types exhibiting very similar LPA receptor expression profiles. The LPA-mediated loss of barrier function in HPAECs appears to be independent of the LPA1 receptor and likely to be mediated via the LPA6 receptor although we cannot exclude an additional role for the LPA2 and LPA4 receptors in mediating these effects. These results suggest cell-specific mechanisms exist in human pulmonary endothelial cells to permit regulation of barrier function downstream of LPA receptors. More importantly, our data indicate that selective LPA1 receptor antagonism may be insufficient for therapeutic use in pulmonary diseases where impaired endothelial barrier function is related to disease initiation and progression. PMID:23084965

  3. The Changes of Pulmonary Function in COPD During Four-Year Period

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna; Lovre, Vladimir; Ustamujic, Aida

    2013-01-01

    Conflict of interest: none declared. Introduction COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is characterized by airflow limitation that is not fully reversible. OBJECTIVE: to show the changes of pulmonary function in COPD during the 4 -year evolution of illness. Material and Methods The research was done on patients suffering from COPD treated at the Clinic “Podhrastovi” during 2006 and 2007. The tested parameters were examined from the date of receiving patient with COPD to hospital treatment in 2006 and 2007 and then followed prospectively until 2010 or 2011 (the follow-up period was 4 years). There were total 199 treated patients who were chosen at random and regularly attended the control examinations. The study was conducted on adult patients of both sexes, different age group. In each patient the duration of illness was recorded so is sex, age, data of smoking habits, information about the regularity of taking bronchodilator therapy during remissions of disease, about the treatment of disease exacerbations, results of pulmonary functional tests as follows: FVC (forced vital capacity), FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in one second) and bronchodilator reversibility testing. All these parameters were measured at the beginning and at the end of each hospital treatment on the apparatuses of Clinic “Podhrastovi”. We took in elaboration those data obtained in the beginning of the first hospitalization and at the end of the last hospitalization or at the last control in outpatient department when patient was in stable state. Patients were divided into three groups according to the number of exacerbations per year. Results airflow limitation in COPD is progressive; both FVC and FEV1 shows the statistically significant decrease during follow-up period of 4 years (p values / for both parameters/ =0.05) . But in patients regularly treated in phases of remission and exacerbations of illness the course of illness is slower. The fall of FVC and FEV1 is statistically significantly smaller in those received regular treatment in phases of remissions and exacerbations of illness (p values / for both parameters/ =0.01). The number of patients responding properly to bronchodilators decreased statistically significantly in patients with COPD during follow-up period (p=0.05). Conclusion COPD is characterized with airflow limitation which is progressive in the course of illness, but that course may be made slower using appropriate treatment during remission and exacerbations of diseases. PMID:24082829

  4. Cardiorespiratory fitness, pulmonary function and C-reactive protein levels in nonsmoking individuals with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, C.O.; Catai, A.M.; Moura-Tonello, S.C.G.; Lopes, S.L.B.; Benze, B.G.; Del Vale, A.M.; Leal, A.M.O.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate cardiorespiratory fitness and pulmonary function and the relationship with metabolic variables and C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels in individuals with diabetes mellitus (DM). Nineteen men with diabetes and 19 age- and gender-matched control subjects were studied. All individuals were given incremental cardiopulmonary exercise and pulmonary function tests. In the exercise test, maximal workload (158.322.3 vs 135.125.2, P=0.005), peak heart rate (HRpeak: 14912 vs 13910, P=0.009), peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak: 24.23.2 vs 18.92.8, P<0.001), and anaerobic threshold (VO2VT: 14.13.4 vs 12.22.2, P=0.04) were significantly lower in individuals with diabetes than in control subjects. Pulmonary function test parameters, blood pressure, lipid profile (triglycerides, HDL, LDL, and total cholesterol), and CRP plasma levels were not different in control subjects and individuals with DM. No correlations were observed between hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c), CRP and pulmonary function test and cardiopulmonary exercise test performance. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that nonsmoking individuals with DM have decreased cardiorespiratory fitness that is not correlated with resting pulmonary function parameters, HbA1c, and CRP plasma levels. PMID:24760118

  5. Preoperative and Postoperative Pulmonary Function in Elderly Patients with Thoracolumbar Kyphoscoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Tomohiko; Yamato, Yu; Kobayashi, Sho; Togawa, Daisuke; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case series. Purpose The objective of this study was to investigate the change in pulmonary function in adult patients with a spinal deformity who underwent spinal corrective surgery. Overview of Literature Degenerative lumbar and/or thoraco-lumbar deformities are is often prominent in adult spinal deformity cases, whereas a thoracic deformity involving the chest wall is inconspicuous. A lumbar spine deformity could affect the pulmonary function; however, few reports have investigated pulmonary function in adult patients with a spinal deformity. Methods This study included 14 adult patients with a spinal deformity who underwent posterior corrective fusion (3 males, 11 females; mean age, 67.4 years). We measured percent vital capacity (%VC) and percent forced expiratory volume in 1 second (%FEV1) before surgery and six months after surgery. We investigated the change in pulmonary function after corrective surgery and the correlation between radiographic parameters and pulmonary function. Results Mean preoperative %VC and %FEV1 values were 99.9% and 79.3%, respectively. Two cases were diagnosed with restrictive impairment, and two cases were diagnosed with obstructive impairment before surgery. %VC improved in the restrictive impairment cases six months after surgery. However, %FEV1 did not improve significantly after surgery in the obstructive impairment cases. Conclusions Restrictive impairment was improved in adult patients with a spinal deformity by corrective spinal surgery. However, spinal surgery did not improve obstructive impairment. PMID:26713126

  6. Endobronchial valves for persistent postoperative pulmonary air leak: accurate monitoring and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Dooms, Christophe A; De Leyn, Paul R; Yserbyt, Jonas; Decaluwe, Herbert; Ninane, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    An alveolar-pleural fistula is a communication between the pulmonary parenchyma distal to a segmental bronchus and the pleural space. A postoperative pulmonary expiratory air leak after an anatomic pulmonary resection is usually managed conservatively. The use of endobronchial valves is a minimal invasive method that may be effective for the treatment of a persistent postoperative pulmonary air leak. We present and discuss the advantages of a digital thoracic drainage system for the accurate, objective and reproducible air leak assessment during endobronchial valve placement. Our case also illustrates that, even after lobectomy, lobar exclusion with valves allows air leak resolution without atelectasis and with moderate functional alteration. We discuss the anatomic and physiologic changes induced by valves placed for air leak closure. PMID:22889916

  7. Short- and Mid-Term Changes in Lung Function after Bilateral Pulmonary Metastasectomy.

    PubMed

    Welter, Stefan; Cheufou, Danjouma; Zahin, Mahmood; Kampe, Sandra; Darwiche, Kaid; Weinreich, Gerhard; Stamatis, Georgios

    2016-03-01

    Introduction?The resection of pulmonary metastases is associated with a loss of lung function. The amount of functional impairment after bilateral metastasectomy remains unclear. Because only around 35% of those patients may expect long-term survival, it is important to preserve enough pulmonary function for an adequate quality of life. This analysis of 31 bilaterally operated patients was performed to describe the amount of pulmonary function loss. Methods?This is a post-hoc subanalysis and comparison of a population that was published before. All pulmonary metastasectomies were performed through an anteroaxillary thoracotomy in all patients. Resections were performed with staplers, electrocautery, or laser. All patients had pulmonary function tests (PFTs) preoperative and after 3 months at the follow-up visit, including spirometry, diffusing capacity of lung for carbon monoxide (Dlco) and blood gases. Of the 31 bilaterally operated cases, 15 had additional PFTs after each staged operation before discharge from hospital. Results?Altogether, 271 nodules (median 7, mean 8.2) were removed from the 31 patients with a lobectomy in 2, a segmentectomy in 8, and multiple wedge resections in 21 patients, with this being the largest resection. The mean loss of pulmonary function at follow-up visit was forced vital capacity (FVC)?-?15.2%, total lung capacity (TLC)?-?13.8%, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)?-?16.3%, and Dlco?-?10.3%, all of which were significant (p?=?< 0.001). The 15 patients with PFTs after each operation showed a stepwise decrease of volume parameters and Dlco with deepest values after the second surgery of around?-?-40% from preoperative values. At this time, Po 2 was also significantly reduced by 10?mm Hg (p?=?0.01). Comparing the bilateral group with 86 patients after unilateral metastasectomy, we found significantly more nodules removed in the bilateral group (8.2 vs. 3.1; p?pulmonary function impairment after bilateral pulmonary metastasectomy is 15% of spirometry values and 10% of Dlco. Reduction of spirometry values is almost twice compared with the group after unilateral surgery. Early functional loss after the second intervention causes FVC, TLC, and FEV1 reduction of around 40% and is associated with lower Po 2 (- 10?mm Hg). Therefore, bilateral metastasectomy can be offered to patients who do not have greater pulmonary limitations. PMID:25068776

  8. Baseline Pulmonary Function as a Predictor for Survival and Decline in Pulmonary Function Over Time in Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Mark; McGarry, Ronald Yiannoutsos, Constantin; Fakiris, Achilles; Hoopes, David; Williams, Mark; Timmerman, Robert

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of baseline forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV{sub 1}) and diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide (DL{sub co}) on posttreatment survival and pulmonary function decrease after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Seventy medically inoperable patients with Stage I NSCLC were treated with definitive SBRT to a dose of 6,000 (Stage IA) or 6,600 cGy (Stage IB), given in three equal fractions. Baseline and serial posttreatment pulmonary function data were collected. Results: Median age was 70.5 years, and median follow-up was 2.17 years. Median pretreatment FEV{sub 1} and DL{sub co} were 1.05 L and 10.06 mg/min/mm Hg, respectively. There was no significant decrease in survival in patients with baseline FEV{sub 1} and DL{sub co} less than the median value and less than the lowest quartile, whereas patients with values greater than the highest quartile of baseline FEV{sub 1} had significantly inferior survival. There was no significant effect of pretreatment FEV{sub 1} or DL{sub co} on posttreatment levels. There was a statistically significant decrease in DL{sub co} of 1.11 mg/min/mm Hg/y. Conclusions: Poor baseline pulmonary function did not predict decreased survival or pulmonary function after treatment. A statistically significant decrease in DL{sub co} after treatment was seen, similar to decreases seen in studies delivering standard thoracic radiotherapy. We conclude that low pretreatment FEV{sub 1} and/or DL{sub co} alone should not be used to exclude patients with NSCLC from treatment with SBRT.

  9. Echocardiographic evaluation of pulmonary venous blood flow and cardiac function changes during one-lung ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su Hyun; Kim, Namo; Kim, Hyun IL; Oh, Young Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The intra-pulmonary shunt induced by one-lung ventilation (OLV), is alleviated by increased pulmonary blood flow by gravitational redistribution and hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. We investigated the changes of pulmonary venous blood flow (PVBF) and biventricular function during OLV with echocardiography. And the correlation between PVBF and intra-pulmonary shunt fraction (Qs/Qt) was evaluated. Methods: PVBF of the left upper pulmonary vein and cardiac function were measured with echocardiography in twenty-five patients who underwent elective thoracic surgery in left lateral decubitus. Qs/Qt and PaO2 were measured with blood gas analysis. Data was obtained at 10 min after two-lung ventilation in supine (TLV-S) and lateral decubitus position (TLV-L), and at 10, 20 and 30 min after OLV in lateral decubitus position (OLV-10, -20 and -30). Results: There were significant changes in PVBF among TLV-S, TLV-L and OLV-10 (959.5280.8, 1416.9489.7 and 1999.9670.5 ml/min; P<0.05, respectively). There were not differences in PVBF, Qs/Qt and PaO2 among OLV-10, -20 and -30. There were an inverse correlation between percent change of PVBF and change of Qs/Qt (r2 = 0.5; P<0.0001) and positive correlations between the percent change of PVBF and change of PaO2 (r2 = 0.4; P<0.0001) during OLV over TLV-L. No significant changes in biventricular systolic and diastolic function were observed during positional change and OLV. Conclusions: A remarkable change of PVBF relevant to gravitational distribution and hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction was proved by echocardiography. And PVBF changes could represent the changes of Qs/Qt and PaO2 during OLV. However, biventricular function was not impaired during OLV. PMID:26550232

  10. Heritability of pulmonary function estimated from pedigree and whole-genome markers.

    PubMed

    Klimentidis, Yann C; Vazquez, Ana I; de Los Campos, Gustavo; Allison, David B; Dransfield, Mark T; Thannickal, Victor J

    2013-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are major worldwide health problems. Pulmonary function testing is a useful diagnostic tool for these diseases, and is known to be influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Previous studies have demonstrated that a substantial proportion of the variation in pulmonary function phenotypes can be explained by familial relationships. The availability of whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data enables us to further evaluate the extent to which genetic factors account for variation in pulmonary function and to compare pedigree- to SNP-based estimates of heritability. Here, we employ methods developed in the animal breeding field to estimate the heritability of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and the ratio of these two measures (FEV1/FVC) among subjects in the Framingham Heart Study dataset. We compare heritability estimates based on pedigree-based relationships to those based on genome-wide SNPs. We find that, in a family-based study, estimates of heritability using SNP data are nearly identical to estimates based on pedigree information, and range from 0.50 for FEV1 to 0.66 for FEV1/FVC. Therefore, we conclude that genetic factors account for a sizable proportion of inter-individual differences in pulmonary function, and that estimates of heritability based on SNP data are nearly identical to estimates based on pedigree data. Finally, our findings suggest a higher heritability for FEV1/FVC compared to either FEV1 or FVC. PMID:24058366

  11. Ultrasonographic Diaphragmatic Motion Analysis and Its Correlation With Pulmonary Function in Hemiplegic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kang-Jae; Hwang, Do-Won; Kim, Jeong-Hawn; Kim, Jae-Hyung

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate diaphragmatic motion via M-mode ultrasonography and to correlate it with pulmonary function in stroke patients. Methods This was a preliminary study comprised of ten stroke patients and sixteen healthy volunteers. The M-mode ultrasonographic probe was positioned in the subcostal anterior region of the abdomen for transverse scanning of the diaphragm during quiet breathing, voluntary sniffing, and deep breathing. We analyzed diaphragmatic motion and the relationship between diaphragmatic motion and pulmonary function. Results All stroke patients had restrictive pulmonary dysfunction. Compared to that exhibited by control subjects, stroke patients exhibited a significant unilateral reduction in motion on the hemiplegic side, primarily during volitional breathing. Diaphragmatic excursion in right-hemiplegic patients was reduced on both sides compared to that in control subjects. However, diaphragmatic excursion was reduced only on the left side and increased on the right side in left-hemiplegic patients compared to that in control subjects. Left diaphragmatic motion during deep breathing correlated positively with forced vital capacity (rho=0.86, p=0.007) and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (rho=0.79, p=0.021). Conclusion Reductions in diaphragmatic motion and pulmonary function can occur in stroke patients. Thus, this should be assessed prior to the initiation of rehabilitation therapy, and M-mode ultrasonography can be used for this purpose. It is a non-invasive method providing quantitative information that is correlated with pulmonary function. PMID:24639923

  12. Acute changes in pulmonary function following microinstillation inhalation exposure to soman in nonatropenized guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Michael W; Pierre, Zdenka; Rezk, Peter; Song, Jian; Oguntayo, Samuel; Sciuto, Alfred M; Doctor, Bhupendra P; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P

    2011-05-01

    Barometric whole-body plethysmography (WBP) was used to examine pulmonary functions at 4 and 24 hours postexposure to soman (GD) in guinea pigs without therapeutics to improve survival. Endotracheal aerosolization by microinstillation was used to administer GD (280, 561, and 841 mg/m(3)) or saline to anesthetized guinea pigs. Significant increases in respiratory frequency (RF), tidal volume (TV), and minute volume (MV) were observed with 841 mg/m(3) GD at 4 hours and that were reduced at 24 hours postexposure. A dose-dependent increase in peak inspiration flow and peak expiration flow was present at 4-hour post-GD exposure that was reduced at 24 hours. Time of inspiration and expiration were decreased in all doses of GD exposure at 4 and 24 hours, with significant inhibition at 841 mg/m(3). End-expiratory pause (EEP) increased at 280 and 561 mg/m(3), but decreased in animals exposed 841 mg/m(3) at 24 hours postexposure. Pseudo-lung resistance (Penh) and pause followed similar patterns and increased at 4 hours, but decreased at 24 hours postexposure to 841 mg/m(3) of GD compared to control. These studies indicate GD exposure induces dose-dependent changes in pulmonary function that are significant at 841 mg/m(3) at 4 hours and remains 24 hours postexposure. Furthermore, at 4 hours, GD induces bronchoconstriction possibly due to copious airway secretion and ongoing lung injury in addition to cholinergic effects, while at 24 hours GD induces bronchodilation a possible consequence of initial compensatory mechanisms. PMID:21527644

  13. Left ventricular function in adults with mild pulmonary insufficiency late after Fallot repair

    PubMed Central

    Niezen, R; Helbing, W; van der Wall, E E; van der Geest, R J; Vliegen, H; de Roos, A

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVETo assess left ventricular function in adult Fallot patients with residual pulmonary regurgitation.?SETTINGThe radiology department of a tertiary referral centre.?PATIENTS14 patients with chronic pulmonary regurgitation and right ventricular volume overload after repair of tetralogy of Fallot and 10healthy subjects were studied using magnetic resonance imaging.?MAIN OUTCOME MEASURESBiventricular volumes, global biventricular function, and regional left ventricular function were assessed in all subjects.?RESULTSThe amount of pulmonary regurgitation in patients (mean (SD)) was 25(18)% of forward flow and correlated significantly with right ventricular enlargement (p<0.05). Left ventricular end diastolic volume was decreased in patients (78(11) v 88(10) ml/m2; p<0.05), ejection fraction was not significantly altered (59(5)% v 55(7)%; NS). No significant correlation was found between pulmonary regurgitation and left ventricular function. Overall left ventricular end diastolic wall thickness was significantly lower in patients (5.06(0.72) v 6.06(1.06) mm; p<0.05), predominantly in the free wall. At the apical level, left ventricular systolic wall thickening was 20% higher in Fallot patients (p<0.05). Left ventricular shape was normal.?CONCLUSIONSAdult Fallot patients with mild chronic pulmonary regurgitation and subsequent right ventricular enlargement showed a normal left ventricular shape and global function. Although the left ventricular free wall had reduced wall thickness, compensatory hypercontractility of the apex may contribute to preserved global function.???Keywords: left ventricular function; pulmonary insufficiency; tetralogy of Fallot; magnetic resonance imaging PMID:10573497

  14. Pulmonary Function and Response to Exercise in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, S.; Mearns, Margaret

    1971-01-01

    Results of physiological studies at rest and during exercise in 41 patients with cystic fibrosis of the lungs are presented. The patients were evenly distributed by age between 5 and 21 years, and were grouped into 3 clinical grades corresponding to mild, moderate, and fairly severe disease. There was a linear relation between tests of lung mechanics such as the FEV1 and the MVV and the clinical grading. These tests also correlated well with one another. Certain tests, notably those reflecting parenchymal damage such as the TLCO showed a non-linear relation to clinical severity, deteriorating more rapidly from grade 2 to 3 than from grade 1 to 2. A very specific pattern emerged of enlargement of physiological deadspace even in the mildest cases. As the disease progressed, venous admixture occurred at rest, which was initially returned to normal by exercise. In the severest cases, there was never a complete return to normal. These changes may be explicable in terms of pathology. Exercise was limited by pulmonary mechanics. Total ventilation was increased to accommodate the increased deadspace so that arterial Pco2 remained normal. Cardiac output was normal. Adequate evaluation of the pulmonary physiological abnormality could be obtained by measuring the FEV1 (or MVV), TLCO, and maximum work load possible, but very useful extra information is obtained by measuring arterial saturation (or venous admixture) and dead space. PMID:5576246

  15. Restoration of Impaired Endothelial MEF2 Function Rescues Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jongmin; Hwangbo, Cheol; Hu, Xiaoyue; Kang, Yujung; Papangeli, Irinna; Mehrotra, Devi; Park, Hyekyung; Ju, Hyekyung; McLean, Danielle L.; Comhair, Suzy A.; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Chun, Hyung J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease of the pulmonary arterioles, characterized by increased pulmonary arterial pressure and right ventricular failure. The etiology of PAH is complex, but aberrant proliferation of the pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) and pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) is thought to play an important role in its pathogenesis. Understanding the mechanisms of transcriptional gene regulation involved in pulmonary vascular homeostasis can provide key insights into potential therapeutic strategies. Methods and Results We demonstrate that the activity of the transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) is significantly impaired in the PAECs derived from subjects with PAH. We identified MEF2 as the key cis-acting factor that regulates expression of a number of transcriptional targets involved in pulmonary vascular homeostasis, including microRNAs 424 and 503, connexins 37, connexin 40, Kr?ppel Like Factor 2 (KLF2) and KLF4, which were found to be significantly decreased in PAH PAECs. The impaired MEF2 activity in PAH PAECs was mediated by excess nuclear accumulation of two class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs) that inhibit its function, namely HDAC4 and HDAC5. Selective, pharmacologic inhibition of class IIa HDACs led to restoration of MEF2 activity in PAECs, as demonstrated by increased expression of its transcriptional targets, decreased cell migration and proliferation, and rescue of experimental pulmonary hypertension (PH) models. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that strategies to augment MEF2 activity holds potential therapeutic value in PAH. Moreover, we identify selective HDAC IIa inhibition as a viable alternative approach to avoid the potential adverse effects of broad spectrum HDAC inhibition in PAH. PMID:25336633

  16. Bosentan for pulmonary hypertension secondary to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Onda, Naomi; Tanaka, Yosuke; Hino, Mitsunori; Gemma, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a poor prognostic factor in patients with interstitial lung disease. No established treatment exists for pulmonary hypertension secondary to interstitial pneumonia. We describe the case of an 81-year-old woman with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), who was admitted to our hospital due to aggravation of dyspnea and decreased oxygen saturation, as well as onset of orthopnea and rapidly progressing edema. The transthoracic echocardiography and right heart catheterization showed the mean pulmonary artery pressure was 39mmHg and the mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure was 9mmHg. After various examinations, the diagnoses of pulmonary hypertension (PH) due to IPF and of congestive heart failure secondary to PH were established. Diuretic therapy was started, but the patient's condition showed poor improvement. Subsequent initiation of oral bosentan therapy led to improvement in symptoms and findings. At the follow-up assessment one year later her pulmonary function showed no significant changes and no apparent worsening of arterial blood gases, with evident improvement of PH, WHO functional class, maximum exercise tolerance on treadmill exercise testing, right heart catheterization, and transthoracic echocardiography. This report describes a case of successful treatment with bosentan for severe pulmonary hypertension in a patient with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. We also present a review of the literature on treatment of pulmonary hypertension in patients with chronic lung disease. Bosentan appears to be efficacious in some patients with pulmonary hypertension secondary to idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis. PMID:26029570

  17. Implication of Sarcopenia and Sarcopenic Obesity on Lung Function in Healthy Elderly: Using Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Ji Hyun; Kong, Mi Hee

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a positive association between obesity and decreased lung function. However, the effect of muscle and fat has not been fully assessed, especially in a healthy elderly population. In this study, we evaluated the impact of low muscle mass (LMM) and LMM with obesity on pulmonary impairment in healthy elderly subjects. Our study used data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2008 to 2011. Men and women aged 65 yr or older were included. Muscle mass was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. LMM was defined as two standard deviations below the sex-specific mean for young healthy adults. Obesity was defined as body mass index ? 25 kg/m2. The prevalence of LMM in individuals aged over 65 was 11.9%. LMM and pulmonary function (forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second) were independently associated after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol consumption, and frequency of exercise. LMM with obesity was also related to a decrease in pulmonary function. This study revealed that LMM is an independent risk factor of decreased pulmonary function in healthy Korean men and women over 65 yr of age. PMID:26539015

  18. Implication of Sarcopenia and Sarcopenic Obesity on Lung Function in Healthy Elderly: Using Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji Hyun; Kong, Mi Hee; Kim, Hyeon Ju

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a positive association between obesity and decreased lung function. However, the effect of muscle and fat has not been fully assessed, especially in a healthy elderly population. In this study, we evaluated the impact of low muscle mass (LMM) and LMM with obesity on pulmonary impairment in healthy elderly subjects. Our study used data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2008 to 2011. Men and women aged 65 yr or older were included. Muscle mass was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. LMM was defined as two standard deviations below the sex-specific mean for young healthy adults. Obesity was defined as body mass index ? 25 kg/m(2). The prevalence of LMM in individuals aged over 65 was 11.9%. LMM and pulmonary function (forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second) were independently associated after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol consumption, and frequency of exercise. LMM with obesity was also related to a decrease in pulmonary function. This study revealed that LMM is an independent risk factor of decreased pulmonary function in healthy Korean men and women over 65 yr of age. PMID:26539015

  19. Influenza A virus-dependent remodeling of pulmonary clock function in a mouse model of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Sundar, Isaac K.; Ahmad, Tanveer; Yao, Hongwei; Hwang, Jae-woong; Gerloff, Janice; Lawrence, B. Paige; Sellix, Michael T.; Rahman, Irfan

    2015-01-01

    Daily oscillations of pulmonary function depend on the rhythmic activity of the circadian timing system. Environmental tobacco/cigarette smoke (CS) disrupts circadian clock leading to enhanced inflammatory responses. Infection with influenza A virus (IAV) increases hospitalization rates and death in susceptible individuals, including patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). We hypothesized that molecular clock disruption is enhanced by IAV infection, altering cellular and lung function, leading to severity in airway disease phenotypes. C57BL/6J mice exposed to chronic CS, BMAL1 knockout (KO) mice and wild-type littermates were infected with IAV. Following infection, we measured diurnal rhythms of clock gene expression in the lung, locomotor activity, pulmonary function, inflammatory, pro-fibrotic and emphysematous responses. Chronic CS exposure combined with IAV infection altered the timing of clock gene expression and reduced locomotor activity in parallel with increased lung inflammation, disrupted rhythms of pulmonary function, and emphysema. BMAL1 KO mice infected with IAV showed pronounced detriments in behavior and survival, and increased lung inflammatory and pro-fibrotic responses. This suggests that remodeling of lung clock function following IAV infection alters clock-dependent gene expression and normal rhythms of lung function, enhanced emphysematous and injurious responses. This may have implications for the pathobiology of respiratory virus-induced airway disease severity and exacerbations. PMID:25923474

  20. Melatonin reduces oxidative stress and improves vascular function in pulmonary hypertensive newborn sheep.

    PubMed

    Torres, Flavio; Gonzlez-Candia, Alejandro; Montt, Camilo; Ebensperger, Germn; Chubretovic, Magdalena; Sern-Ferr, Mara; Reyes, Roberto V; Llanos, Anbal J; Herrera, Emilio A

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PHN) constitutes a critical condition with severe cardiovascular and neurological consequences. One of its main causes is hypoxia during gestation, and thus, it is a public health concern in populations living above 2500 m. Although some mechanisms are recognized, the pathophysiological facts that lead to PHN are not fully understood, which explains the lack of an effective treatment. Oxidative stress is one of the proposed mechanisms inducing pulmonary vascular dysfunction and PHN. Therefore, we assessed whether melatonin, a potent antioxidant, improves pulmonary vascular function. Twelve newborn sheep were gestated, born, and raised at 3600 meters. At 3 days old, lambs were catheterized and daily cardiovascular measurements were recorded. Lambs were divided into two groups, one received daily vehicle as control and another received daily melatonin (1 mg/kg/d), for 8 days. At 11 days old, lung tissue and small pulmonary arteries (SPA) were collected. Melatonin decreased pulmonary pressure and resistance for the first 3 days of treatment. Further, melatonin significantly improved the vasodilator function of SPA, enhancing the endothelial- and muscular-dependent pathways. This was associated with an enhanced nitric oxide-dependent and nitric oxide independent vasodilator components and with increased nitric oxide bioavailability in lung tissue. Further, melatonin reduced the pulmonary oxidative stress markers and increased enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant capacity. Finally, these effects were associated with an increase of lumen diameter and a mild decrease in the wall of the pulmonary arteries. These outcomes support the use of melatonin as an adjuvant in the treatment for PHN. PMID:25736256

  1. Abnormal pulmonary function and associated risk factors in children and adolescents with sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Arteta, Manuel; Campbell, Andrew; Nouraie, Mehdi; Rana, Sohail; Onyekwere, Onyinye; Ensing, Gregory; Sable, Craig; Dham, Niti; Darbari, Deepika; Luchtman-Jones, Lori; Kato, Gregory J.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Castro, Oswaldo L.; Minniti, Caterina P.; Gordeuk, Victor R.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive and restrictive pulmonary changes develop in children with sickle cell disease, but reports conflict as to the type of change that predominates. We prospectively performed spirometry, plethysmography and lung diffusing capacity in 146 children aged 720 years with hemoglobin SS or S?0-thalassemia. Nineteen percent of the patients had obstructive physiology as defined according to guidelines of the American Thoracic Society. In addition, 9% had restrictive physiology and 11% had abnormal but not categorized physiology. Increasing age, patient- or family-reported history of asthma or wheezing, and higher lactate dehydrogenase concentration were independent predictors of obstruction as reflected in lower FEV1/FVC. In conclusion, abnormal pulmonary function, most often obstructive, is common in children with hemoglobin SS and S?0-thalassemia. Full pulmonary function testing should be performed in children with hemoglobin SS or S?0 thalassemia, especially with history of asthma or wheezing and accentuated elevations in hemolytic markers. PMID:24309610

  2. [A Resected Case Whose Poor Pulmonary Function was Improved through Preoperative Comprehensive Respiratory Rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Handa, Yoshinori; Harada, Hiroaki; Yamashita, Yoshinori

    2015-09-01

    A 70-years-old man was diagnosed as having primary lung adenocarcinoma (cT1aN0M0, cStage I A) in the left lingula. Because of poor pulmonary function [vital capacity (VC):1,840 ml, forced expiratory volume (FEV)1.0:790 ml],we thought he could not tolerate the surgery and should be treated by chemoradiation therapy. However,by his strong hope for surgical treatment,comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation by nutritional therapy and physiotherapy of breathing was started and was continued for about 1 month. As the value of pulmonary function test was improved (VC:2,010 ml,FEV1.0:1,040 ml), we did left lingulectomy. Postoperative complications did not occur and the patient shows a favorable condition without respiratory failure 18 months postoperation. PMID:26329630

  3. Variability in pulmonary function following rapid altitude ascent to the Amundsen-Scott South Pole station.

    PubMed

    Lalande, S; Anderson, P J; Miller, A D; Ceridon, M L; Beck, K C; O'Malley, K A; Johnson, J B; Johnson, B D

    2011-09-01

    The impact of acute altitude exposure on pulmonary function is variable. A large inter-individual variability in the changes in forced expiratory flows (FEFs) is reported with acute exposure to altitude, which is suggested to represent an interaction between several factors influencing bronchial tone such as changes in gas density, catecholamine stimulation, and mild interstitial edema. This study examined the association between FEF variability, acute mountain sickness (AMS) and various blood markers affecting bronchial tone (endothelin-1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), catecholamines, angiotensin II) in 102 individuals rapidly transported to the South Pole (2835 m). The mean FEF between 25 and 75% (FEF(25-75)) and blood markers were recorded at sea level and after the second night at altitude. AMS was assessed using Lake Louise questionnaires. FEF(25-75) increased by an average of 12% with changes ranging from -26 to +59% from sea level to altitude. On the second day, AMS incidence was 36% and was higher in individuals with increases in FEF(25-75) (41 vs. 22%, P = 0.05). Ascent to altitude induced an increase in endothelin-1 levels, with greater levels observed in individuals with decreased FEF(25-75). Epinephrine levels increased with ascent to altitude and the response was six times larger in individuals with decreased FEF(25-75). Greater levels of endothelin-1 in individuals with decreased FEF(25-75) suggest a response consistent with pulmonary hypertension and/or mild interstitial edema, while epinephrine may be upregulated in these individuals to clear lung fluid through stimulation of β(2)-adrenergic receptors. PMID:21327792

  4. Radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis in non-small-cell lung cancer: Pulmonary function, prediction, and prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, Vivek . E-mail: Vivek.Mehta@swedish.org

    2005-09-01

    Although radiotherapy improves locoregional control and survival in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer, radiation pneumonitis is a common treatment-related toxicity. Many pulmonary function tests are not significantly altered by pulmonary toxicity of irradiation, but reductions in DL{sub CO}, the diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide, are more commonly associated with pneumonitis. Several patient-specific factors (e.g. age, smoking history, tumor location, performance score, gender) and treatment-specific factors (e.g. chemotherapy regimen and dose) have been proposed as potential predictors of the risk of radiation pneumonitis, but these have not been consistently demonstrated across different studies. The risk of radiation pneumonitis also seems to increase as the cumulative dose of radiation to normal lung tissue increases, as measured by dose-volume histograms. However, controversy persists about which dosimetric parameter optimally predicts the risk of radiation pneumonitis, and whether the volume of lung or the dose of radiation is more important. Radiation oncologists ought to consider these dosimetric factors when designing radiation treatment plans for all patients who receive thoracic radiotherapy. Newer radiotherapy techniques and technologies may reduce the exposure of normal lung to irradiation. Several medications have also been evaluated for their ability to reduce radiation pneumonitis in animals and humans, including corticosteroids, amifostine, ACE inhibitors or angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers, pentoxifylline, melatonin, carvedilol, and manganese superoxide dismutase-plasmid/liposome. Additional research is warranted to determine the efficacy of these medications and identify nonpharmacologic strategies to predict and prevent radiation pneumonitis.

  5. Parametric modeling for quantitative analysis of pulmonary structure to function relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Clifton R.; Bartholmai, Brian J.; Holmes, David R., III; Camp, Jon J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2005-04-01

    While lung anatomy is well understood, pulmonary structure-to-function relationships such as the complex elastic deformation of the lung during respiration are less well documented. Current methods for studying lung anatomy include conventional chest radiography, high-resolution computed tomography (CT scan) and magnetic resonance imaging with polarized gases (MRI scan). Pulmonary physiology can be studied using spirometry or V/Q nuclear medicine tests (V/Q scan). V/Q scanning and MRI scans may demonstrate global and regional function. However, each of these individual imaging methods lacks the ability to provide high-resolution anatomic detail, associated pulmonary mechanics and functional variability of the entire respiratory cycle. Specifically, spirometry provides only a one-dimensional gross estimate of pulmonary function, and V/Q scans have poor spatial resolution, reducing its potential for regional assessment of structure-to-function relationships. We have developed a method which utilizes standard clinical CT scanning to provide data for computation of dynamic anatomic parametric models of the lung during respiration which correlates high-resolution anatomy to underlying physiology. The lungs are segmented from both inspiration and expiration three-dimensional (3D) data sets and transformed into a geometric description of the surface of the lung. Parametric mapping of lung surface deformation then provides a visual and quantitative description of the mechanical properties of the lung. Any alteration in lung mechanics is manifest by alterations in normal deformation of the lung wall. The method produces a high-resolution anatomic and functional composite picture from sparse temporal-spatial methods which quantitatively illustrates detailed anatomic structure to pulmonary function relationships impossible for translational methods to provide.

  6. Impaired respiratory function and heightened pulmonary inflammation in episodic binge ethanol intoxication and burn injury.

    PubMed

    Shults, Jill A; Curtis, Brenda J; Chen, Michael M; O'Halloran, Eileen B; Ramirez, Luis; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2015-11-01

    Clinical data indicate that cutaneous burn injuries covering greater than 10% of the total body surface area are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, in which pulmonary complications, including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), contribute to nearly half of all patient deaths. Approximately 50% of burn patients are intoxicated at the time of hospital admission, which increases days on ventilators by 3-fold, and doubles the length of hospitalization, compared to non-intoxicated burn patients. The most common drinking pattern in the United States is binge drinking, where an individual rapidly consumes alcoholic beverages (4 for women, 5 for men) in 2 h. An estimated 38 million Americans binge drink, often several times per month. Experimental data demonstrate that a single binge-ethanol exposure, prior to scald injury, impairs innate and adaptive immune responses, thereby enhancing infection susceptibility and amplifying pulmonary inflammation, neutrophil infiltration, and edema, and is associated with increased mortality. Since these characteristics are similar to those observed in ARDS burn patients, our study objective was to determine whether ethanol intoxication and burn injury and the subsequent pulmonary congestion affect physiological parameters of lung function, using non-invasive and unrestrained plethysmography in a murine model system. Furthermore, to mirror young adult binge-drinking patterns, and to determine the effect of multiple ethanol exposures on pulmonary inflammation, we utilized an episodic binge-ethanol exposure regimen, where mice were exposed to ethanol for a total of 6 days (3 days ethanol, 4 days rest, 3 days ethanol) prior to burn injury. Our analyses demonstrate mice exposed to episodic binge ethanol and burn injury have higher mortality, increased pulmonary congestion and neutrophil infiltration, elevated neutrophil chemoattractants, and respiratory dysfunction, compared to burn or ethanol intoxication alone. Overall, our study identifies plethysmography as a useful tool for characterizing respiratory function in a murine burn model and for future identification of therapeutic compounds capable of restoring pulmonary functionality. PMID:26364264

  7. DURATION OF INCREASED PULMONARY FUNCTION SENSITIVITY TO AN INITIAL OZONE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The metabolic and pulmonary function effects were investigated in 6 non-smoking, young adults who were exposed for 2 hours (22 deg. WBGT) to: (1) Filtered air (FA), (2) 0.45 ppm ozone (DAY), and (3) Two days later to a second exposure to 0.45 ppm ozone exposure (DAY2). The subjec...

  8. THE EFFECTS OF INHALED OXIDANTS AND ACID AEROSOLS ON PULMONARY FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drs. Koenig and Utell each conducted studies in which human volunteers received either combined or sequential exposures to oxidant gases and acid aerosols. In each case, standard pulmonary function tests were performed and symptoms were recorded. Dr. Koenig exposed 28 adole...

  9. Effects of diaphragm respiration exercise on pulmonary function of male smokers in their twenties

    PubMed Central

    Seo, KyoChul; Park, Seung Hwan; Park, KwangYong

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] We investigated how diaphragm respiration exercises can affect pulmonary function in long-term male smokers in their twenties. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight healthy males between 20 and 29 years of age were randomly divided into an experimental and a control group (14 members each). The experiment was conducted during 30 min sessions, 3 times a week for 4 weeks. The experimental group performed diaphragm respiration exercises and the control group performed exercises using MOTOmed. Pulmonary function (tidal volume, breathing capacity, inspiratory reserve volume, inspiratory capacity, and expiratory reserve volume) was evaluated and analyzed before and after the experiment. [Results] Our results revealed significant increases in tidal volume, inspiratory reserve volume, inspiratory capacity, and breathing capacity in the experimental group. These increases were greater in the experimental group than in the control group. [Conclusion] In our study, the experimental group which performed diaphragm respiration exercises showed a greater improvement in pulmonary function compared with the control group. It is hypothesized that greater improvement in pulmonary function is expected if diaphragm respiration exercises are implemented taking into account the age of the smokers. PMID:26311972

  10. PuFT: Computer-Assisted Program for Pulmonary Function Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Joseph

    1983-01-01

    PuFT computer program (Microsoft Basic) is designed to help in understanding/interpreting pulmonary function tests (PFT). The program provides predicted values for common PFT after entry of patient data, calculates/plots graph simulating force vital capacity (FVC), and allows observations of effects on predicted PFT values and FVC curve when

  11. Wheelchair rugby improves pulmonary function in people with tetraplegia after 1 year of training.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Marlene A; Paris, Juliana V; Sarro, Karine J; Lodovico, Anglica; Silvatti, Amanda P; Barros, Ricardo M L

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of 1 year of regular wheelchair rugby training on the pulmonary function of subjects with tetraplegia. A total of 15 male subjects with tetraplegia participated in this study and were divided into an experimental group of rugby players (n = 8) and a control group (n = 7) of sedentary tetraplegic subjects. Both groups underwent spirometry, and the experimental group was tested before and after participating of a regular 1-year program of wheelchair rugby training. At the beginning of the training program, all the subjects presented reduced pulmonary function compared with predicted values (p < 0.05) for healthy subjects. There were a significant increase in forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expired volume after 1 second (FEV1), and maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV, p < 0.05) values after 1 year of regular wheelchair rugby training. The regression analysis between total training time and spirometric variables FVC (r = 0.97, p < 0.0001) and MVV (r = 0.58, p = 0.02) revealed that the players with longer training time had higher pulmonary function values. This study showed that regular wheelchair rugby training can improve the pulmonary function of subjects with spinal cord injuries. PMID:23254487

  12. INFLUENCE OF EXERCISE AND HEAT STRESS ON PULMONARY FUNCTION DURING OZONE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The authors studied the effects of 2-h exposure to ozone in 14 nonsmoking males under four environmental conditions. Thirty minutes of exercise at 40% Vo2max was performed from 60 to 90 min for group A and 30 to 60 min for group B. Pulmonary Function changes, determined throughou...

  13. Functional characterization of pulmonary neuroendocrine cells in lung development, injury, and tumorigenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNECs) are proposed to be the first specialized cell type to appear in the lung, but their ontogeny remains obscure. Although studies of PNECs have suggested their involvement in a number of lung functions, neither their in vivo significance nor the molecular mechanis...

  14. Cardio-Pulmonary Function Testing. Continuing Education Curriculum for Respiratory Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Paul Technical Vocational Inst., MN.

    Compiled from interviews with personnel in pulmonary function testing (PFT) laboratories in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area, this competency-based curriculum guide is intended to provide a knowledge of PFT for persons who provide respiratory care. The guide contains 20 sections covering the following topics: vital capacity, flow measurements,

  15. Relationship of respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide yield of cigarettes

    SciTech Connect

    Krzyzanowski, M.; Sherrill, D.L.; Paoletti, P.; Lebowitz, M.D. )

    1991-02-01

    The data from consecutive surveys of the Tucson Epidemiologic Study (1981-1988) were used to evaluate the relationship in cigarette smokers of respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide (CO) yields of the cigarette. There were 690 subjects who reported smoking regularly in at least one survey, over age 15. After adjustment for intensity and duration of smoking and for depth of inhalation, the risk of chronic phlegm, cough, and dyspnea were not related to the tar and nicotine yields. In 414 subjects with pulmonary function tested in at least one of the three surveys the spirometric indices used were significantly related to the daily dose of tar, nicotine, and CO (product of the cigarette yield and daily number of cigarettes smoked). The effects were more pronounced for past than for current doses. However, the differentiation of pulmonary function due to various yields of cigarettes was small in comparison to the difference in pulmonary function between smokers and nonsmokers.

  16. COCKROACHES, PESTICIDE USE, AND CHILDREN'S PULMONARY FUNCTION IN AN ARID COMMUNITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cockroaches, pesticide use, and children's pulmonary function in an arid community

    Erik Svendsen1, Mary Ross1, Melissa Gonzales2, Debra Walsh1, Scott Rhoney1, Gina Terrill1, Lucas Neas1
    1US EPA, Chapel Hill, NC; 2University of New Mexico

    The El Paso Children's He...

  17. PULMONARY FUNCTION AND PATHOLOGY IN CATS EXPOSED 28 DAYS TO DIESEL EXHAUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Young adult male cats were exposed 28 days, 20 hours per day, to a 1:14 dilution of diesel exhaust emissions. Following termination of exposure, the following pulmonary function measurements were carried out: lung volumes, maximum expiratory flow rates (MEF), MEF at 50%, 25% and ...

  18. Athletes and Sedentary Individuals: An Intergroup Comparison Utilizing a Pulmonary Function Ratio Obtained During Submaximal Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maud, Peter J.

    A pulmonary function ratio describing oxygen extraction from alveolar ventilation was used for an intergroup comparison between three groups of athletes (rugby, basketball, and football players) and one group of sedentary subjects during steady-state submaximal exercise. The ratio and its component parts are determined from only three gas…

  19. Cardio-Pulmonary Function Testing. Continuing Education Curriculum for Respiratory Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Paul Technical Vocational Inst., MN.

    Compiled from interviews with personnel in pulmonary function testing (PFT) laboratories in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area, this competency-based curriculum guide is intended to provide a knowledge of PFT for persons who provide respiratory care. The guide contains 20 sections covering the following topics: vital capacity, flow measurements,…

  20. Nitric oxide synthase polymorphisms, gene expression and lung function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to the pleiotropic effects of nitric oxide (NO) within the lungs, it is likely that NO is a significant factor in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this study was to test for association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in three NO synthase (NOS) genes and lung function, as well as to examine gene expression and protein levels in relation to the genetic variation. Methods One SNP in each NOS gene (neuronal NOS (NOS1), inducible NOS (NOS2), and endothelial NOS (NOS3)) was genotyped in the Lung Health Study (LHS) and correlated with lung function. One SNP (rs1800779) was also analyzed for association with COPD and lung function in four COPD casecontrol populations. Lung tissue expression of NOS3 mRNA and protein was tested in individuals of known genotype for rs1800779. Immunohistochemistry of lung tissue was used to localize NOS3 expression. Results For the NOS3 rs1800779 SNP, the baseline forced expiratory volume in one second in the LHS was significantly higher in the combined AG?+?GG genotypic groups compared with the AA genotypic group. Gene expression and protein levels in lung tissue were significantly lower in subjects with the AG?+?GG genotypes than in AA subjects. NOS3 protein was expressed in the airway epithelium and subjects with the AA genotype demonstrated higher NOS3 expression compared with AG and GG individuals. However, we were not able to replicate the associations with COPD or lung function in the other COPD study groups. Conclusions Variants in the NOS genes were not associated with lung function or COPD status. However, the G allele of rs1800779 resulted in a decrease of NOS3 gene expression and protein levels and this has implications for the numerous disease states that have been associated with this polymorphism. PMID:24192154

  1. Diagnosis of upper airway obstruction by pulmonary function testing.

    PubMed

    Rotman, H H; Liss, H P; Weg, J G

    1975-12-01

    We compared 11 patients with upper airway obstruction (obstruction at or proximal to the carina) to 22 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and to 15 normal subjects utilizing spirometry, lung volumes, airway resistance, maximal voluntary ventilation, single-breath diffusion capacity, and maximal inspiratory and expiratory flow-volume loops. Four values usually distinguished patients with upper airway obstruction: (1) forced inspiratory flow at 50 percent of the vital capacity (FIF50%) less than or equal to 100 L/min; (2) ratio of forced expiratory flow at 50 percent of the vital capacity of the FIR50% (FEF50%/FIF50%) larger than or equal to 1; (3) ratio of the forced expiratory volume in one second measured in milliliters to the peak expiratory flow rate in liters per minute (FEV1/PEFR) larger than or equal to 10 ml/L/min; and (4) ratio of the forced expired volume in one second to the forced expired volume in 0.5 second (FEV1/FEV0.5) larger than or equal to 1.5. The last ratio can be determined with a simple spirometer. PMID:1192859

  2. Antioxidant enzymes and pulmonary function in steel mill welders.

    PubMed

    Stepnewski, Marek; Kolarzyk, Emilia; Pietrzycka, Agata; Kitlinski, Mariusz; Helbin, Jadwiga; Brzyszczan, Klaudyna

    2003-01-01

    It is known that high levels of nitric oxide and ozone lead to disturbances of the balance between oxidants and antioxidants. The purpose of this study was to investigate ventilatory parameters in relation to the antioxidant status measured as total antioxidant status (TAS), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CT). The study group consisted of 94 welders, aged 41.2 +/- 10.0 years, employed in the Steel Mill in Krakw, Poland, and exposed to nitric oxides and ozone in concentrations exceeding the threshold limit values. The control group consisted of 115 unexposed healthy workers aged 40.8 +/- 10.2 years. All the subjects under study were smokers. Determination of ventilatory efficiency was based on a "flow-volume" curve and spirometry. TAS was measured using reagents from the Randox Laboratories Ltd, SOD according to Fridovich and CT with Aebi's method. It was found that in the group of welders, the concentrations of TAS, CT and SOD were lower compared to controls (TAS-1.15/1.33 mmol/ml; CT-18.1/28.4 m/gHb, SOD-767.6/855.6 U/gHb). The incidence of extreme obstructive pulmonary disease and small airway disease in the welder group was more frequent than in controls. Changes in the concentration (or activity) of antioxidant parameters cannot be used as early markers of ventilatory dysfunction, although the values in the lowest class of TAS, SOD and CT showed a significantly larger number of welders than controls. PMID:12705716

  3. Relationship of cumulative dust exposure dose and cumulative abnormal rate of pulmonary function in coal mixture workers.

    PubMed

    Qian, Qing-Zeng; Cao, Xiang-Ke; Qian, Qing-Qiang; Shen, Fu-Hai; Wang, Qian; Liu, Hai-Yan; Tong, Jun-Wang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the dose-response relationship between cumulative dust exposure (CDE) and cumulative abnormal rate of pulmonary function in coal mixture workers. Three hundred and twenty eight coal mixture workers (exposed group) and 169 nondust-exposed workers (control group) were recruited. Basic information data were collected and pulmonary function tests were performed. Pulmonary function was compared between the two groups after comparing smoking behaviors. Pulmonary function indices [forced vital capacity in 1second after full inspiration (FVC)%, forced expiratory volume (FEV)1%, and FEV1/FVC%] were compared among groups stratified by service length (exposure duration). The relationship between CDE dose and cumulative abnormal rate of pulmonary function in coal mixture workers was analyzed. Abnormal rate of pulmonary function in the exposed group (35.1%) was significantly higher than the control group (10.1%; p<0.001); FVC%, FEV1%, and FEV1/FVC% in the exposed group decreased significantly compared with the control group (all p<0.05). Differences in FVC%, FEV1%, and FEV1/FVC% among coal mixture workers stratified by exposure duration in the exposed group were statistically significant (all p<0.05). The discernible increase in the cumulative abnormal rate was observed, from ? 1000mg/m(3)years group to ? 1700mg/m(3)years group. Correlation analysis revealed a positive correlation between the CDE dose and the cumulative abnormal rate of pulmonary function. Higher abnormal pulmonary function rate was found among coal mixture workers, characterized by decreased pulmonary function indices. Our results suggested a positive relationship between CDE dose and cumulative abnormal pulmonary function rate, and a rapid increase in cumulative abnormal rate within a certain range of CDE dose. A lower limit value of 1000mg/m(3)years has reference significance. PMID:26853175

  4. Health effects of acid aerosols on North American children: Pulmonary function

    SciTech Connect

    Raizenne, M. |; Damokosh, A.I.; Spengler, J.D.

    1996-05-01

    We examined the health effects of exposure to acidic air pollution among children living in 24 communities in the United States and Canada. Parents of children between the ages of 8 and 12 completed a self-administered questionnaire and provided consent for their child to perform a standardized forced expiratory maneuver at school in 22 of these communities. Air quality and meteorology were measured in each community for the year preceding the pulmonary function tests. Forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV{sub 1.0}) measurements of 10,251 white children were examined in a two-stage regression analysis that adjusted for age, sex, height, weight, and sex-height interaction. In this study, a 52 nmol/m{sup 3} difference in annual mean particle strong acidity was associated with a 3.5% (95% CI, 2.0-4.9) decrement in adjusted FVC and a 3.1% (95% CI, 1.6-4.6) decrement in adjusted FEV{sub 1.0}. The FVC decrement was larger, although not significantly different, for children who were lifelong residents of their communities (4.1%, 95% CI, 2.5-5.8). The relative odds for low lung function (that is, measured FVC less than or equal to 85% of predicted), was 2.5 (95% CI, 1.8-3.6) across the range of particle strong acidity exposures. These data suggest that long-term exposure to ambient particle strong acidity may have a deleterious effect on lung growth, development, and function. 45 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Reduction in pulmonary function after CABG surgery is related to postoperative inflammation and hypercortisolemia

    PubMed Central

    Roncada, Gert; Dendale, Paul; Linsen, Loes; Hendrikx, Marc; Hansen, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary function is significantly reduced in the acute phase after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Because pulmonary function partly depends on respiratory muscle strength, we studied whether reductions in pulmonary function are related to postoperative alterations in circulatory factors that affect muscle protein synthesis. Methods: Slow vital capacity (SVC) was assessed in 22 subjects before and 9 3 days after CABG surgery. Blood testosterone, cortisol, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), growth hormone, sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG), glucose, insulin, c-peptide, c-reactive protein (CRP) content, and free androgen index, cortisol/testosterone ratio, HOMA-IR index were assessed before surgery and during the first three days after surgery. Intubation, surgery time and cumulative chest tube drainage were measured. Correlations between changes in SVC and blood parameters after surgery or subject characteristics were studied. This was a prospective observational study. Results: After CABG surgery SVC decreased by 37 18% (P < 0.01). Free androgen index, blood SHBG, testosterone and IGF-1 content decreased, while HOMA-IR index, cortisol/testosterone ratio, blood growth hormone, insulin and CRP content increased (P < 0.0025) in the first three days after surgery. Decrease in SVC was independently (P < 0.05) related to higher preoperative SVC (SC ? = 0.66), and greater increase in blood cortisol (SC ? = 0.54) and CRP (SC ? = 0.37) content after surgery. Conclusions: Larger reductions in pulmonary function after CABG surgery are present in patients experiencing greater postoperative increases in blood CRP and cortisol levels. Decrements in pulmonary function after CABG surgery are, at least in part, thus related to alterations in circulatory factors that affect muscle protein synthesis. PMID:26379888

  6. Pulmonary function test in formalin exposed and nonexposed subjects: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Uthiravelu, P.; Saravanan, A.; Kumar, C. Kishor; Vaithiyanandane, V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The main function of the lung is gas exchange, which can be assessed in several ways. A spirometer measures the flow and the volumes of the inspired and expired air. The thoracic and abdominal muscle strength plays an important role in pulmonary function and diffusing lung capacity. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the effects of formalin exposure on the pulmonary function to compare with healthy individuals. To assess the chronic effects of formalin exposure on Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) in the faculties, lab technicians and attender of the Department of Anatomy and Pathology of SRM Medical Hospital and Research Centre, Kattankulathur. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was carried out in 50 healthy formalin exposed subjects (at least 5 years exposure) from Department of Anatomy and Pathology of SRM Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, Kattankulathur and 50 healthy controls of same age group of this study were included after obtaining ethical clearance and consent ‘Easy One Pro Spirometer (Ndd Medical Technologies, Cheshire SK 101LT, United Kingdom) was used to find out the PFT. Results: Student's t-test was applied to compare the PFT parameters between formalin exposed and formalin nonexposed group. There was a significant difference in mean and standard deviation of pulmonary parameters with the P < 0.005 in formalin exposed, which shows that they have lesser ventilatory drive. Conclusion: The formalin exposed subjects in our study presented with a mixed disorder of both obstructive and restrictive type. We also found that there was a negative correlation of pulmonary function with that of the degree and duration of exposure to formalin. PMID:26015743

  7. Pulmonary thallium uptake: Correlation with systolic and diastolic left ventricular function at rest and during exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Mannting, F. )

    1990-05-01

    Quantified pulmonary 201-thallium uptake, assessed as pulmonary/myocardial ratios (PM) and body surface area-corrected absolute pulmonary uptake (Pc), was determined from single photon emission computed tomography studies in 22 normal subjects and 46 consecutive patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). By means of equilibrium radionuclide angiography (ERNA), ejection fraction (EF), peak ejection rate (PER) in end-diastolic volume (EDV/sec) and peak filling rate (PFR) in EDV/sec and stroke volume (SV/sec) units, PFR/PER ratio, and time to peak filling rate (TPFR) in milliseconds were computed at rest and during exercise (n = 35). Left ventricular response to exercise was assessed as delta EF, relative delta EF, delta EDV, and delta ESV. In normal subjects the PM ratios showed significant inverse correlation with PER at rest and with EF, PER, and PFRedv during exercise. For the left ventricular response to exercise, delta ESV showed significant correlation with the PM ratios. The body surface area-corrected pulmonary uptake values showed no correlation with any of the variables. In patients with CAD the PM ratios and Pc uptake showed significant inverse correlation with EF, PER, PFRedv and to exercise EF, exercise PER, and exercise PFRedv. For the left ventricular response to exercise, delta EF showed significant inverse correlation with the PM ratios but not with the Pc uptake. Neither in normal subjects nor in patients with CAD did any of the independent diastolic variables show significant correlation with the PM ratios or Pc values. Thus pulmonary thallium uptake is correlated with systolic left ventricular function at rest and during exercise in normal subjects and in patients with CAD but not with diastolic function. In normal subjects delta ESV and in patients with CAD, delta EF showed correlation with pulmonary thallium uptake.

  8. Osteoporosis is highly prevalent in Japanese males with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and is associated with deteriorated pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Reiko; Tanaka, Takeshi; Aita, Keisuke; Hagiya, Masaaki; Homma, Toshiaki; Yokosuka, Kyoko; Yamakawa, Hisami; Yarita, Tsutomu; Tai, Nobuyuki; Hirano, Junko; Inoue, Daisuke; Okazaki, Ryo

    2015-07-01

    Osteoporosis has recently been recognized as a major comorbidity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We conducted a cross-sectional study in a cohort of 136 Japanese males with COPD to evaluate the prevalence of vertebral fracture (VF) and to explore its relationship with pulmonary function parameters. VFs were present in 108 (79.4%); multiple and severe (SQ grade 2 or 3) VFs were found in 77 (56.6%) and 25 (18.4%), respectively. Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that decrease in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1.0)/forced vital capacity (FVC) [odds ratio (OR) 0.963, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.929-998, p = 0.036] was associated with the presence of VF after adjustment for age and that FVC (OR 0.462, 95% CI 0.220-0.968, p = 0.041) and current smoking (OR 2.992, 95% CI 1.128-7.940, p = 0.028) were associated with VF severity (grade 2-3 vs. 1). We also found that FEV1.0 was the sole independent determinant of the number of VFs by stepwise multivariate linear regression (p < 0.001). Bone mineral density (BMD) values were available in 49 subjects. Mean T scores were -2.0 1.2 in femoral neck, -1.4 1.2 in total hip and -1.1 1.4 in lumbar spine. Nineteen patients (38.8%) had a BMD T score less than -2.5. BMD Z scores of all the sites showed a progressive decrease as GOLD stage of COPD advanced (p < 0.05). Our results indicate a high prevalence of osteoporosis in Japanese male COPD patients and a strong inter-relationship between the two diseases, re-emphasizing the urgent need for appropriate intervention to maintain both bone and lung health. PMID:24996527

  9. Lung function, transfusion, pulmonary capillary blood volume and sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Lunt, Alan; McGhee, Emily; Robinson, Polly; Rees, David; Height, Susan; Greenough, Anne

    2016-02-01

    Lung function abnormalities occur in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) and may be associated with elevated pulmonary blood volume. To investigate that association, we determined whether blood transfusion in SCD children acutely increased pulmonary capillary blood volume (PCBV) and increased respiratory system resistance (Rrs5). Measurements of Rrs5 and spirometry were made before and after blood transfusion in 18 children, median age 14.2 (6.6-18.5) years. Diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide and nitric oxide were assessed to calculate the PCBV. Post transfusion, the median Rrs5 had increased from 127.4 to 141.3% predicted (p<0.0001) and pulmonary capillary blood volume from 39.7 to 64.1ml/m2 (p<0.0001); forced expiratory volume in one second (p=0.0056) and vital capacity (p=0.0008) decreased. The increase in Rrs5 correlated with the increase in PCBV (r=0.50, p=0.0493). Increased pulmonary capillary blood volume may at least partially explain the lung function abnormalities in SCD children. PMID:26592148

  10. Effects of Tonsil size on Pulmonary Function test Results after Tonsillectomy in Children

    PubMed Central

    Samareh Fekri, Mitra; Arabi Mianroodi, Aliasghar; Shakeri, Hossein; Khanjani, Narges

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adenotonsillar hypertrophy is a typical cause of surgery in children. Evaluation and identification of patients as potential candidates tonsillectomy is a primary concern for otolaryngologists. This study focuses on the results of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) after tonsillectomy in children. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study examined 50 patients suffering from tonsillar hypertrophy in 2013. Full details and results of otolaryngology examinations were recorded. Moreover, patients were examined with respect to forced inspiratory flow at 50% of vital capacity (FIF50%), forced expiratory flow at 50% of vital capacity (FEF50%), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)/peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), and FEV1/forced expired volume in 0.5 seconds (FEV0.5) before and after surgery using spirometry. All data were analyzed using SPSS Software (version 19), and central descriptive measures, and data were compared by performing T-test and Chi-square tests. Results: According to tonsil size, patients were distributed as follows: 18 patients (36%) with +1 tonsil size, 18 patients (36%) with +2 tonsil size, and seven patients (14%) with +3 tonsil size, and seven patients (14%) with +4 tonsil size. Thirty-three (66%) and 17 patients (34%) were female and male, respectively, with a mean of age of 9.7±2.97 years (range, 7–18 years). Seventy-eight percent of patients were aged 10 years or less. Moreover, 25 patients (50%), 17 patients (34%), and eight patients (16%), respectively, reported obstructive symptoms, recurrent tonsillitis, and both symptoms. In patients with +3 and +4 tonsil size, spirometric parameters indicated relief of symptoms of obstruction. Only in patients with +4 tonsil size were the changes statistically significant. Conclusion: Tonsillectomy can relieve obstructive symptoms in patients with tonsils larger than +3 to a great extent. Additionally, spirometry can identify patients with +3 and +4 tonsils who do not have clinical signs of an obstructive upper airway. PMID:26878005

  11. Pulmonary function of nonsmoking female asbestos workers without radiographic signs of asbestosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.R.; Yano, E.; Nonaka, Koichi; Wang, M.; Wang, Z.

    1998-07-01

    Researchers disagree about whether exposure to asbestos causes significant respiratory impairments and airway obstruction in the absence of radiographic asbestosis and smoking. To obtain confirmatory information, the authors examined pulmonary function of 208 nonsmoking female asbestos workers who did not have asbestosis and 136 controls. The authors observed an overall lower single-breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity in the asbestos workers than in controls. In addition, significant decreases in percentage vital capacity, percentage forced vital capacity, and percentage mean forced expiratory flow during the middle half of the forced vital capacity were evident in the older workers. Logistic regression analysis revealed that asbestos exposure was associated with abnormal single-breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity, vital capacity, and mean forced expiratory flow during the middle half of the forced vital capacity among the older workers. The age-related decline in vital capacity, forced vital capacity, and mean forced expiratory flow during the middle half of the forced vital capacity was significantly greater in the asbestos workers than the controls. The findings imply that asbestos-exposure per se contributes predominantly to restricted lung volume and reduced single-breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity. Asbestos may also cause slight airway obstruction, especially in workers who are heavily exposed.

  12. Airborne endotoxin and its relationship to pulmonary function among workers in an Indian jute mill.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Ashit K; Chattopadhyay, Bhakar P; Bhattacharya, Sanat K; Saiyed, Habibullah N

    2004-04-01

    Air samples from various processing areas of an Indian jute mill were examined for endotoxin. The authors assessed work-related respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function changes in the dust-exposed workers from the different processing areas using a standard questionnaire and spirometry. Endotoxin was estimated in water extract of jute dust from 3 milling areas, and in outside air, by the Limulus amebocyte lysate gel clot technique. The batching, spinning, and weaving areas of the jute mill showed endotoxin levels of 0.22-4.42 microg/m3, 0.04-1.47 microg/m3, and 0.01-0.07 microg/m3, respectively, values similar to those found in Indian cotton mills. Respiratory morbidities among the workers included typical byssinotic symptoms, along with acute changes in postshift forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1.0) (31.8%). Results of this study demonstrated that increased exposure to bacterial endotoxin in airborne dust is related to byssinotic symptoms among Indian jute mill workers. Findings were similar to those reported previously for workers in the cotton, flax, and hemp industries. PMID:16189993

  13. Improvement of Pulmonary Functions Following Septoplasty: How Are Lower Airways Affected?

    PubMed Central

    Tuzuner, Arzu; Bilgin, Gulden; Demirci, Sule; Yuce, Gulbahar Darilmaz; Acikgoz, Cemile; Samim, Ethem Erdal

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Nasal septal deviation is a frequent cause of increased nasal airway resistance. A narrow nasal airway would result in a decreased airflow into the lungs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the alterations of the pulmonary functions following septoplasty using spirometry and 6 minutes walking test (6mWT). And reveal the correlation of symptom score improvement with nasal obstruction symptom score (NOSE) and sino-nasal outcome test (SNOT22) questionnaires following surgery. Methods Thirty patients with obvious nasal septal deviations were enrolled in the study. All patients had a detailed otorhinolaryngologic examination, filled NOSE/SNOT22 questionnaires, performed spirometry and 6mWT preoperatively. One month after surgery, NOSE/SNOT22 questionnaires filled by subjects and spirometry with 6mWT were performed again, and the results were compared. Results The mean total walking distance was 702.3±68.2 m preoperatively, and it improved to 753.2±72.6 m postoperatively (P<0.001). Total tour count increased from 11 (range, 10.8 to 12.0) to 12 (range, 11 to 13.3), and the difference was found statistically significant (P<0.001). When the preoperative and postoperative mean 6mWT results were compared, diastolic blood pressure increased from 70 to 80 mmHg (P=0.031), heart rate increased from 83.5±13.2 to 90.1±12.5 bpm (P=0.017), dyspnea rate decreased from 1 to 0 (P=0.002), and fatigue scores reduced from 2 to 1 (P=0.003). Evaluation on spirometry findings revealed that FIF50% (maximum inspiratory flow at 50% of forced vital capacity [FVC]) scores and peak expiratory flow (PEF) values improved significantly after surgery. Septoplasty improves the nasal breathing pattern. While reducing FEF50% (maximum expiratory flow at 50% of FVC)/FIF50%, it increases PEF and FIF50% values. In addition, as shown by 6mWT, exercise capacity improves following surgery. Postoperative NOSE and SNOT22 scores reduced markedly compared to preoperative values (P<0.001). Conclusion These findings suggest that nasal septal surgery has a positive effect on pulmonary functions, and this can be an important clue for the relationship of lung disorders and nasal obstruction. PMID:26976027

  14. Pulmonary Congestion and Physical Functioning in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Enia, Giuseppe; Tripepi, Rocco; Panuccio, Vincenzo; Torino, Claudia; Garozzo, Maurizio; Battaglia, Giovanni Giorgio; Zoccali, Carmine

    2012-01-01

    ? Purpose: Decline in physical function is commonly observed in patients with kidney failure on dialysis. Whether lung congestion, a predictable consequence of cardiomyopathy and fluid overload, may contribute to the low physical functioning of these patients has not been investigated. ? Methods: In 51 peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, we investigated the cross-sectional association between the physical functioning scale of the Kidney Disease Quality of Life Short Form (KDQOL-SF: Rand Corporation, Santa Monica, CA, USA) and an ultrasonographic measure of lung water recently validated in dialysis patients. The relationship between physical functioning and lung water was also analyzed taking into account the severity of dyspnea measured using the New York Heart Association (NYHA) classification currently used to grade the severity of heart failure. ? Results: Evidence of moderate-to-severe lung congestion was evident in 20 patients, and this alteration was asymptomatic (that is, NHYHA class I) in 11 patients (55%). On univariate analysis, physical functioning was inversely associated with lung water (r = -0.48, p < 0.001), age (r = -0.44, p = 0.001), previous cardiovascular events (r = -0.46, p = 0.001), and fibrinogen (r = -0.34, p = 0.02). Physical functioning was directly associated with blood pressure, the strongest association being with diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.38, p = 0.006). The NYHA class correlated inversely with physical functioning (r = -0.51, p < 0.001). In multiple regression analysis, only lung water and fibrinogen remained independent correlates of physical functioning. The NYHA class failed to maintain its independent association. ? Conclusions: This cross-sectional study supports the hypothesis that symptomatic and asymptomatic lung congestion is a relevant factor in the poor physical functioning of patients on PD. PMID:22942271

  15. A cross-sectional study of pulmonary function in autobody repair workers.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, D L; Waller, K; Himrich, B; Martinez, A; Martin, F

    1991-01-01

    This study evaluated pulmonary function in workers from 39 autobody repair shops. Based on 152 White male workers with known smoking status, the mean percent predicted FEV1, FVC, and FEV1/FVC were 93.6, 96.8, and 96.6, respectively. Twenty-three percent of workers had a FEV1/FVC ratio less than the fifth percentile. Isocyanate levels ranged from nondetectable to 0.06 parts per million (STEL = 0.02 ppm). No shop had an adequate respiratory protection program. We concluded that there was an increase in abnormal pulmonary function in autobody workers. Three recommendations were made to shop owners: functional paint booths should be maintained, respiratory protection programs should be developed, and isocyanate-free paints should be used. PMID:2029053

  16. Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Newman, John H.

    2005-01-01

    The modern era in cardiopulmonary medicine began in the 1940s, when Cournand and Richards pioneered right-heart catheterization. Until that time, no direct measurement of central vascular pressure had been performed in humans. Right-heart catheterization ignited an explosion of insights into function and dysfunction of the pulmonary circulation, cardiac performance, ventilationperfusion relationships, lungheart interactions, valvular function, and congenital heart disease. It marked the beginnings of angiocardiography with its diagnostic implications for diseases of the left heart and peripheral circulation. Pulmonary hypertension was discovered to be the consequence of a large variety of diseases that either raised pressure downstream of the pulmonary capillaries, induced vasoconstriction, increased blood flow to the lung, or obstructed the pulmonary vessels, either by embolism or in situ fibrosis. Hypoxic vasoconstriction was found to be a major cause of acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension, and surprising vasoreactivity of the pulmonary vascular bed was discovered to be present in many cases of severe pulmonary hypertension, initially in mitral stenosis. Diseases as disparate as scleroderma, cystic fibrosis, kyphoscoliosis, sleep apnea, and sickle cell disease were found to have shared consequences in the pulmonary circulation. Some of the achievements of Cournand and Richards and their scientific descendents are discussed in this article, including success in the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, and management of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:15994464

  17. Examining Search Functions of EAD Finding Aids Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Xiaomu

    2006-01-01

    This article examined the search functions for all individual EAD Web sites listed on the Library of Congress Web site in 2003. In particular, the type of search engine, search modes, options for searching, search results display, search feedback, and other features of the search systems were studied. The data analysis suggests that there have

  18. Pulmonary hypertension

    MedlinePLUS

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension; Sporadic primary pulmonary hypertension; Familial primary pulmonary hypertension; Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension; Primary pulmonary hypertension; PPH; Secondary pulmonary hypertension

  19. Asymptomatic Pulmonary Congestion and Physical Functioning in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Torino, Claudia; Panuccio, Vincenzo; Tripepi, Rocco; Postorino, Maurizio; Aliotta, Roberta; Bellantoni, Marianna; Tripepi, Giovanni; Mallamaci, Francesca; Zoccali, Carmine

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Poor physical performance is common in patients with kidney failure on dialysis (CKD-5D). Whether lung congestion, a predictable consequence of cardiomyopathy and fluid overload, may contribute to the low physical performance of CKD-5D patients has not been investigated in hemodialysis patients. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This study investigated the relationship between the physical functioning scale of the Kidney Disease Quality of Life Short Form and a validated ultrasonographic measure of lung water in a multicenter survey of 270 hemodialysis patients studied between 2009 and 2010. Results Moderate to severe lung congestion by lung ultrasonography was observed in 156 (58%) patients; among these, 60 (38%) were asymptomatic (New York Heart Association [NYHA] class I). On univariate analysis, physical functioning was inversely associated with lung water in the whole group (r=?0.22; P<0.001) and in the subgroup of asymptomatic patients (r=?0.40; P=0.002). Age (r=?0.45; P<0.001) and past cardiovascular events (r=?0.22; P=0.002) were also inversely associated with physical functioning, whereas albumin (r=0.23; P<0.001) was directly associated with the same parameter. NYHA class correlated strongly with physical functioning (r=?0.52; P<0.001). In a multiple regression analysis, both NYHA class and lung water maintained an independent association with physical functioning, whereas albumin and background cardiovascular events failed to independently relate with the same outcome. Conclusions Symptomatic and asymptomatic lung congestion is associated with poor physical functioning in hemodialysis patients. This association is independent of NYHA, suggesting that this measurement and NYHA may have complementary value to explain the variability in physical performance in hemodialysis patients. PMID:23580785

  20. Examination of chemosensory functions in patients with dysosmia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ling; Wei, Yongxiang; Zhang, Wei; Ren, Yuanyuan; Yu, Di; Li, Kunyan; Guo, Yichen; Zhang, Jinfeng

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background To examine changes of chemical sensory functions in patients with dysosmia. Material/Methods The 272 study subjects included 98 healthy volunteers, 86 subjects with hyposmia and 88 subjects with functional anosmia. Their chemical sensory functions were examined using olfactory event-related potentials (oERPs), trigeminal event-related potentials (tERPs), T&T olfactometer and triple drop method, respectively. Results The T&T results showed that the difference between patients and healthy subjects had statistical significance. The oERPs and tERPs results showed that patients with functional anosmia had N1 and P2 waves of prolonged latency and reduced amplitude when compared to healthy subjects with the difference of statistical significance. When compared to healthy subjects, patients with functional anosmia had clear hypogeusia and the difference had statistical significance. For the younger group there was significant difference between healthy subjects and patients in T&T, oERPs and tERPs results. Conclusions It is suggested by the apparently concomitant trigeminal nerve dysfunction and hypogeusia in patients with functional anosmia in this study that olfactory and nasal trigeminal function in young patients was clearly decreased. Our study suggests the possible application of oERPs, tERPs and three drops method in clinical diagnosis in Chinese populations and provides scientific evidence for treatment. PMID:22367126

  1. Diaphragmatic plication offers functional improvement in dyspnoea and better pulmonary function with low morbidity.

    PubMed

    Gazala, Sayf; Hunt, Ian; Bdard, Eric L R

    2012-09-01

    A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was as follows: In adults with unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis, does diaphragmatic plication offer functional improvement in dyspnoea, better pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and return to activity? A total of 126 papers were found using the reported search, of which 13 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, date and country of publication, patient group studied, surgical approach, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these articles are tabulated. Those articles reporting improvement in PFTs following plication, documented this benefit in the following parameters: mean forced vital capacity (range 17-40%), forced expiratory volume at 1 sec (range 21-27%), functional residual capacity (range 20-21%) and total lung capacity (range 16-19%). The percentage of postoperative improvement in shortness of breath as measured by a dyspnoea score was reported to be between 90 and 96% in the thoracotomy group and 100% in the Video Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery (VATS) group, the dyspnoea score that was used in all the studies was a visual analogue scale between 0 and 10 where 0 is no dyspnoea and 10 is the worst dyspnoea a patient can have. One of the studies reported postoperative normalization in ventilation perfusion scan (VQ) scan parameters when compared with the preoperative mismatch. Complication rate was similar between the two groups, while the mortality rate was 4% in the thoracotomy group and 0% in the VATS group. The total number of patients included in all the studies combined was 161. All reports included in this review are observational studies (one cohort study and the remainder being case series); therefore, the risk of selection, information and publication biases are high and conclusions should be implemented with caution. We conclude that diaphragmatic plication can improve the functional status, shortness of breath and PFTs of patients with unilateral diaphragm paralysis. Patients undergoing a VATS approach appear to have more advantages in objective and subjective measures (including PFTs, dyspnoea score, length of hospital stay and postoperative complications). Further research with high-quality study designs is advised, focussing mainly on the long-term benefits and assessment of health-related quality of life. PMID:22691375

  2. Vitamin C prevents the effects of prenatal nicotine on pulmonary function in newborn monkeys.

    PubMed

    Proskocil, Becky J; Sekhon, Harmanjatinder S; Clark, Jennifer A; Lupo, Stacie L; Jia, Yibing; Hull, William M; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Starcher, Barry C; Spindel, Eliot R

    2005-05-01

    Smoking during pregnancy leads to decreased pulmonary function and increased respiratory illness in offspring. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that many effects of smoking during pregnancy are mediated by nicotine. We now report that vitamin C supplementation can prevent some of the effects of maternal nicotine exposure on pulmonary function of offspring. Timed-pregnant rhesus monkeys were treated with 2 mg/kg/day nicotine bitartrate from Gestation Days 26 to 160. On Gestation Day 160 (term, 165 days) fetuses were delivered by C-section and subjected to pulmonary function testing the following day. Nicotine exposure significantly reduced forced expiratory flows, but supplementation of mothers with 250 mg vitamin C per day prevented the effects of nicotine on expiratory flows. Vitamin C supplementation also prevented the nicotine-induced increases in surfactant apoprotein-B protein. Neither nicotine nor nicotine plus vitamin C significantly affected levels of cortisol or cytokines, which have been shown to affect lung development and surfactant expression. Prenatal nicotine exposure significantly decreased levels of elastin content in the lungs of offspring, and these effects were slightly attenuated by vitamin C. These findings suggest that vitamin C supplementation may potentially be clinically useful to limit the deleterious effects of maternal smoking during pregnancy on offspring's lung function. PMID:15709053

  3. Correlation of pulmonary function tests with body fat percentage in young individuals.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Anuradha R; Singh, Ratan; Joshi, A R

    2008-01-01

    The present study was planned to assess the correlation of pulmonary functions with body fat percentage in young individuals. A total of 132 (males--68, females--64) young students (18 to 21 years) with moderately sedentary lifestyle were recruited in this study. Their height, weight, body mass index (BMI) and waist to hip ratio (WHR) were measured. Pulmonary function tests (static and dynamic) were recorded on a computerized portable Schiller lung function unit SP-1. The percentage of body fat was estimated by measuring skin fold thickness at four sites (4SFT-biceps, triceps, subscapular and suprailiac) with the help of Harpenden's caliper. In males body fat % showed negative correlation with expiratory reserve volume (ERV), forced vital capacity (FVC), maximum ventilatory volume (MVV), peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) and forced expiratory volume at the end of first second (FEV1). It was observed that in females body fat % had negative correlation with ERV, FVC, and MVV. These results indicate that increase in percentage of body fat and central pattern of fat distribution may affect the pulmonary function tests. PMID:19585755

  4. Monitoring of pulmonary endothelial enzyme function: an animal model for a simplified clinically applicable procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Toivonen, H.J.; Makari, N.; Catravas, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present a simple and clinically applicable method for the serial monitoring of pulmonary microvascular enzyme function in vivo. This method requires the intravenous injection of trace amounts of a radiolabelled substrate and the collection of a single arterial blood sample. Simultaneous measurement of pulmonary blood flow, (e.g., by dye- or thermo-dilution) and the determination of blood hematocrit are also needed for the calculations. This method was compared to the multiple blood sample indicator dilution method in normal anesthesized rabbits. Both methods gave identical results for the metabolism of the synthetic, hemodynamically inactive tripeptide, /sup 3/H-benzoyl-Phe-Ala-Pro (/sup 3/H-BPAP), by pulmonary microvascular endothelial angiotensin converting enzyme. The parameters measured were: 1) substrate utilization, expressed linearly and logarithmically, and 2) the apparent first order reaction constant. The new method was also used for the simultaneous measurement of single pass, transpulmonary metabolism of /sup 3/H-BPAP by angiotensin converting enzyme and of 5'-adenosine monophosphate by 5'-nucleotidase in rabbits in vivo. The authors propose that similar enzyme kinetic measurements could be used in clinical studies to test their usefulness as an aid in the early diagnosis of incipient pulmonary endothelial dysfunction, e.g., adult respiratory distress syndrome.

  5. Environmental control to maintain stabled COPD horses in clinical remission: effects on pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    Vandenput, S; Duvivier, D H; Votion, D; Art, T; Lekeux, P

    1998-03-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that stabled COPD horses can be maintained in clinical remission by replacing hay by grass silage and bedding made of wood shavings (Period B) and of wheat straw (Period C) during 6 weeks, respectively. At the end of these different periods, the pulmonary function of the horses was assessed by mechanics of breathing and arterial blood analyses. These results were compared to those measured in clinical remission obtained after 2 months in pasture (Period A). No significant difference was observed between these 3 periods neither to values obtained for healthy horses placed during 6 weeks in a hay environment. For all that, COPD horses placed in contact with hay in the same barn developed within mean +/- s.d. 8+/-3 days clinical signs of heaves and significant alterations of pulmonary function parameters. PMID:9535063

  6. Low level CO2 effects on pulmonary function in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sexton, J.; Mueller, K.; Elliott, A.; Gerzer, D.; Strohl, K. P.; West, J. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether chamber exposure to low levels of CO2 results in functional alterations in gas mixing and closing volume in humans. Four healthy volunteer subjects were exposed to 0.7% CO2 and to 1.2% CO2. Spirometry, lung volumes, single breath nitrogen washout, diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) by two methods, and cardiac output were measured in triplicate. Values were obtained over two non-consecutive days during the training period (control) and on days 2 or 3, 4, 6, 10, 13, and 23 of exposure to each CO2 level. Measurements were made during the same time of day. There was one day of testing after exposure, while still in the chamber but off carbon dioxide. The order of testing, up until measurements of DLCO and cardiac output, were randomized to avoid presentation effects. The consistent findings were a reduction in diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide and a fall in cardiac output, occurring to a similar degree with both exposures. For the group as a whole, there was no indication of major effects on spirometry, lung volumes, gas mixing or dead space. We conclude that small changes may occur in the function of distal gas exchanging units; however, these effects were not associated with any adverse health effects. The likelihood of pathophysiologic changes in lung function or structure with 0.7 or 1.2% CO2 exposure for this period of time, is therefore, low.

  7. CT densitovolumetry in children with obliterative bronchiolitis: correlation with clinical scores and pulmonary function test results*,**

    PubMed Central

    Mocelin, Helena; Bueno, Gilberto; Irion, Klaus; Marchiori, Edson; Sarria, Edgar; Watte, Guilherme; Hochhegger, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether air trapping (expressed as the percentage of air trapping relative to total lung volume [AT%]) correlates with clinical and functional parameters in children with obliterative bronchiolitis (OB). METHODS: CT scans of 19 children with OB were post-processed for AT% quantification with the use of a fixed threshold of −950 HU (AT%950) and of thresholds selected with the aid of density masks (AT%DM). Patients were divided into three groups by AT% severity. We examined AT% correlations with oxygen saturation (SO2) at rest, six-minute walk distance (6MWD), minimum SO2 during the six-minute walk test (6MWT_SO2), FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC, and clinical parameters. RESULTS: The 6MWD was longer in the patients with larger normal lung volumes (r = 0.53). We found that AT%950 showed significant correlations (before and after the exclusion of outliers, respectively) with the clinical score (r = 0.72; 0.80), FVC (r = 0.24; 0.59), FEV1 (r = −0.58; −0.67), and FEV1/FVC (r = −0.53; r = −0.62), as did AT%DM with the clinical score (r = 0.58; r = 0.63), SO2 at rest (r = −0.40; r = −0.61), 6MWT_SO2 (r = −0.24; r = −0.55), FVC (r = −0.44; r = −0.80), FEV1 (r = −0.65; r = −0.71), and FEV1/FVC (r = −0.41; r = −0.52). CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that AT% correlates significantly with clinical scores and pulmonary function test results in children with OB. PMID:24473764

  8. Results of a prospective study evaluating the effects of mantle irradiation on pulmonary function

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.M.; Mendenhall, N.P.; Cicale, M.J.; Block, E.R.; Carter, R.L.; Million, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty patients with Stages I-III Hodgkin's disease receiving mantle irradiation were prospectively evaluated prior to therapy with spirometry, lung volumes, and tests of diffusing capacity (DLCO). Follow-up examinations were performed at 3, 6, and 12 months and then yearly. Sixteen patients had Hodgkin's disease involving the mediastinum at presentation, 10 were smokers, and 16 received either preirradiation or postirradiation chemotherapy. Mantle doses ranged between 2300 cGy and 4000 cGy (mode of 3750 cGy) given at 150 cGy to 170 cGy tumor dose per day with split-course technique. Twenty patients have been tested greater than or equal to 4 years after treatment with a median time from treatment to last pulmonary function test of 8 years. Changes over time in spirometry included an early, mild decrease in both forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume at 1 second (FEV1), which returned to baseline by 2 years and then gradually decreased to a 10-15% deficit as compared with predicted values at 6-10 years. Additionally, there was a very slight decrease in FEV1/FVC beginning at 1 year and gradually increasing to an 8% deficit at 6-10 years. Changes over time in lung volumes included a mild nadir of total lung capacity (TLC) and functional residual capacity (FRC) at 6 months to a year, which returned to baseline at 2-4 years and then gradually dropped to a 5-10% deficit at 6-10 years. Mean DLCO for the study group was 20% below predicted values prior to treatment and dropped to a low of 30% below predicted at 6 months following treatment, then gradually returned to baseline by 4 years and showed continued improvement to an overall deficit of approximately 10% at 6-10 years.

  9. Sensitive subgroups and normal variation in pulmonary function response to air pollution episodes.

    PubMed Central

    Brunekreef, B; Kinney, P L; Ware, J H; Dockery, D; Speizer, F E; Spengler, J D; Ferris, B G

    1991-01-01

    The Clean Air Act requires that sensitive subgroups of exposed populations be protected from adverse health effects of air pollution exposure. Hence, data suggesting the existence of sensitive subgroups can have an important impact on regulatory decisions. Some investigators have interpreted differences among individuals in observed pulmonary function response to air pollution episodes as evidence that individuals differ in their sensitivity. An alternative explanation is that the differences are due entirely to normal variation in repeated pulmonary function measurements. This paper investigates this question by reanalyzing data from three studies of children exposed to air pollution episodes to determine whether the observed variability in pulmonary function response indicates differences in sensitivity or natural interoccasion variability. One study investigated exposures to total suspended particulates (TSP), the other two investigated exposure to ozone. In all studies, each child's response to air pollution exposures was summarized by regressing that child's set of pulmonary function measurements on the air pollution concentrations on the day or days before measurement. The within-child and between-child variances of these slopes were used to test the hypothesis of variable sensitivity. Regression slopes did not vary significantly among children exposed to episodes of high TSP concentration, but there was evidence of heterogeneity in both studies of ozone exposures. The finding of heterogeneous response to ozone exposure is consistent with the epidemiologic and chamber studies of ozone exposures, but the lack of evidence for heterogeneous response to TSP exposures implies that observed variation in response can be explained by sampling variability rather than the presence of sensitive subgroup. PMID:2050060

  10. Natural history of pulmonary function in collagen VI-related myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Foley, A. Reghan; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Collins, James; Straub, Volker; McCallum, Michelle; Deconinck, Nicolas; Mercuri, Eugenio; Pane, Marika; DAmico, Adele; Bertini, Enrico; North, Kathryn; Ryan, Monique M.; Richard, Pascale; Allamand, Valrie; Hicks, Debbie; Lamand, Shireen; Hu, Ying; Gualandi, Francesca; Auh, Sungyoung; Muntoni, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The spectrum of clinical phenotypes associated with a deficiency or dysfunction of collagen VI in the extracellular matrix of muscle are collectively termed collagen VI-related myopathies and include Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, Bethlem myopathy and intermediate phenotypes. To further define the clinical course of these variants, we studied the natural history of pulmonary function in correlation to motor abilities in the collagen VI-related myopathies by analysing longitudinal forced vital capacity data in a large international cohort. Retrospective chart reviews of genetically and/or pathologically confirmed collagen VI-related myopathy patients were performed at 10 neuromuscular centres: USA (n = 2), UK (n = 2), Australia (n = 2), Italy (n = 2), France (n = 1) and Belgium (n = 1). A total of 486 forced vital capacity measurements obtained in 145 patients were available for analysis. Patients at the severe end of the clinical spectrum, conforming to the original description of Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy were easily identified by severe muscle weakness either preventing ambulation or resulting in an early loss of ambulation, and demonstrated a cumulative decline in forced vital capacity of 2.6% per year (P < 0.0001). Patients with better functional abilities, in whom walking with/without assistance was achieved, were initially combined, containing both intermediate and Bethlem myopathy phenotypes in one group. However, one subset of patients demonstrated a continuous decline in pulmonary function whereas the other had stable pulmonary function. None of the patients with declining pulmonary function attained the ability to hop or run; these patients were categorized as intermediate collagen VI-related myopathy and the remaining patients as Bethlem myopathy. Intermediate patients had a cumulative decline in forced vital capacity of 2.3% per year (P < 0.0001) whereas the relationship between age and forced vital capacity in patients with Bethlem myopathy was not significant (P = 0.1432). Nocturnal non-invasive ventilation was initiated in patients with Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy by 11.3 years (4.0) and in patients with intermediate collagen VI-related myopathy by 20.7 years (1.5). The relationship between maximal motor ability and forced vital capacity was highly significant (P < 0.0001). This study demonstrates that pulmonary function profiles can be used in combination with motor function profiles to stratify collagen VI-related myopathy patients phenotypically. These findings improve our knowledge of the natural history of the collagen VI-related myopathies, enabling proactive optimization of care and preparing this patient population for clinical trials. PMID:24271325

  11. Pulmonary function in beryllium workers: assessment of exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Kriebel, D; Sprince, N L; Eisen, E A; Greaves, I A

    1988-01-01

    The inhalation of beryllium causes a serious lung disease characterised by pronounced radiographic and functional impairments and occurs in workers engaged in the extraction and manufacture of the metal. This paper describes the beryllium exposure levels and refining processes in a large beryllium factory operating since the 1930s. Lifetime beryllium exposure histories were estimated for the 309 workers present at a health survey conducted in 1977. Beryllium exposure levels in the plant were high for many years, with some estimated exposure levels in excess of 100 micrograms/m3. As late as 1975, there were exposures to beryllium above 10 micrograms/m3 in some jobs. After about 1977, the plant was in compliance with the permissible exposure limit of 2.0 micrograms/m3. The median cumulative exposure in this cohort was 65 micrograms/m3-years and the median duration of exposure was 17 years. From these data a series of exposure parameters, functions of the exposure histories that characterise biologically important dimensions of exposure were calculated for each worker. PMID:3342199

  12. Pulmonary function evaluation during the Skylab and Apollo-Soyuz missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawin, C. F.; Nicogossian, A. E.; Rummel, J. A.; Michel, E. L.

    1976-01-01

    Previous experience during Apollo postflight exercise testing indicated no major changes in pulmonary function. Pulmonary function has been studied in detail following exposure to hypoxic and hyperoxic normal gravity environments, but no previous study has reported on men exposed to an environment that was both normoxic at 258 torr total pressure and at null gravity as encountered in Skylab. Forced vital capacity (FVC) was measured during the preflight and postflight periods of the Skylab 2 mission. Inflight measurements of vital capacity (VC) were obtained during the last 2 weeks of the second manned mission (Skylab 3). More detailed pulmonary function screening was accomplished during the Skylab 4 mission. The primary measurements made during Skylab 4 testing included residual volume determination (RV), closing volume (CV), VC, FVC and its derivatives. In addition, VC was measured in flight at regular intervals during the Skylab 4 mission. Vital capacity was decreased slightly (-10%) in flight in all Skylab 4 crewmen. No major preflight-to-postflight changes were observed. The Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) crewmen were studied using equipment and procedures similar to those employed during Skylab 4. Postflight evaluation of the ASTP crewmen was complicated by their inadvertent exposure to nitrogen tetroxide gas fumes upon reentry.

  13. The effects of inhaled sulfuric acid on pulmonary function in adolescent asthmatics

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, J.Q.; Pierson, W.E.; Horike, M.

    1983-08-01

    Ten adolescent subjects with extrinsic asthma and exercise-induced bronchospasm were studied. The subjects were exposed for 30 min at rest followed by 10 min during moderate exercise on a treadmill to either 100 micrograms/m3 sodium chloride (NaCl) or 100 micrograms/m3 sulfuric acid (H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) droplet aerosols. All exposures were at approximately 75% relative humidity and 22 degrees C. Pulmonary functional measurements were recorded before, during, and after exposure while the subject was seated in a body plethysmograph. Exposure to the NaCl aerosol during exercise produced a small (12%) but significant drop in maximal expiratory flow (V/sub max/75) (p less than 0.05). However, exposure to the H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ aerosol produced larger reductions in V/sub max/75 (29%; p less than 0.01) and also significant changes in 3 other parameters of pulmonary function: V/sub max/50, FEV1, and total respiratory resistance (RT). The changes were similar to those reported for exposure to 0.5 ppm of sulfur dioxide in a similar group of adolescents with extrinsic asthma. Our results are the first report of reversible pulmonary functional changes after H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ exposure in a group of adolescent asthmatic subjects.

  14. CT Densitometry as a Predictor of Pulmonary Function in Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Moloney, Fiachra; McWilliams, Sebastian; Crush, Lee; Laughlin, Patrick D Mc; Kenneddy, Marcus; Henry, Michael; O Connor, OJ; Maher, Michael M

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative pulmonary assessment is undertaken in patients with resectable lung cancer to identify those at increased risk of perioperative complications. Guidelines from the American College of Chest Physicians indicate that if the FEV1 and DLCO are ?60% of predicted, patients are suitable for resection without further evaluation. The aim of our study is to determine if quantitative measures of lung volume and density obtained from pre-operative CT scans correlate with pulmonary function tests. This may allow us to predict pulmonary function in patients with lung cancer and identify patients who would tolerate surgical resection. Materials and Methods: Patients were identified retrospectively from the lung cancer database of a tertiary hospital. Image segmentation software was utilized to estimate total lung volume, normal lung volume (values -500 HU to -910 HU), emphysematous volume (values less than -910 HU), and mean lung density from pre-operative CT studies for each patient and these values were compared to contemporaneous pulmonary function tests. Results: A total of 77 patients were enrolled. FEV1 was found to correlate significantly with the mean lung density (r=.762, p<.001) and the volume of emphysema (r= -.678, p<.001). DLCO correlated significantly with the mean lung density (r =.648, p<.001) and the volume of emphysematous lung (r= -.535, p<.001). Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that both FEV1 and DLCO correlate significantly with volume of emphysema and mean lung density. We now plan to prospectively compare these CT parameters with measures of good and poor outcome postoperatively to identify CT measures that may predict surgical outcome preoperatively PMID:23264834

  15. Pulmonary Function and Survival in Idiopathic vs Secondary Usual Interstitial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Matthew J.; Sprunger, David; Cosgrove, Gregory P.; Fernandez-Perez, Evans R.; Frankel, Stephen K.; Huie, Tristan J.; Olson, Amy L.; Solomon, Joshua; Brown, Kevin K.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) pattern of lung injury may occur in the setting of connective tissue disease (CTD), but it is most commonly found in the absence of a known cause, in the clinical context of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Our objective was to observe and compare longitudinal changes in pulmonary function and survival between patients with biopsy-proven UIP found in the clinical context of either CTD or IPF. METHODS: We used longitudinal data analytic models to compare groups (IPF [n = 321] and CTD-UIP [n = 56]) on % predicted FVC (FVC %) or % predicted diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (Dlco %), and we used both unadjusted and multivariable techniques to compare survival between these groups. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between groups in longitudinal changes in FVC % or Dlco % up to diagnosis, or from diagnosis to 10 years beyond (over which time, the mean decrease in FVC % per year [95% CI] was 4.1 [3.4, 4.9] for IPF and 3.5 [1.8, 5.1] for CTD-UIP, P = .49 for difference; and the mean decrease in Dlco % per year was 4.7 [4.0, 5.3] for IPF and 4.3 [3.0, 5.6] for CTD-UIP, P = .60 for difference). Despite the lack of differences in pulmonary function, subjects with IPF had worse survival in unadjusted (log-rank P = .003) and certain multivariable analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Despite no significant differences in changes in pulmonary function over time, patients with CTD-UIP (at least those with certain classifiable CTDs) live longer than patients with IPF—an observation that we suspect is due to an increased rate of mortal acute exacerbations in patients with IPF. PMID:24700149

  16. Local pulmonary function measurements by serial ct imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Serago, C.F.

    1983-01-01

    Currently accepted radioisotope techniques for determining regional perfusion and ventilation in the lung are limited by their lack of resolution, superposition of three dimensional data onto a two dimensional image, differential absorption of the distributed radioisotope's ..gamma.. rays, and the relatively long scan time required. Many of these limitations may be reduced by measuring the temporal distribution of a contrast agent into either the respiratory or circulatory system with dynamic computed tomography, and subsequently analyzing the accumulated data to provide information regarding the local functional state of the lung. The proposed perfusion study entailed an intravenous injection of an iodine contrast agent, while xenon gas was administered by inhalation for the ventilation study. The time dependent enhancement of these contrast agents were subsequently measured via dynamic computed tomography. From these data, regional ventilation rates and regional relative perfusion in the lung were determined. This new technique produced transverse perfursion and ventilation images of the lung which may be used as an additional tool for studying the physiology of the lung, and has the potential for future clinical applications.

  17. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in our asthma patients: the presence of dysphagia can influence pulmonary function

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The prevalence of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) in Turkey is reported as 11.6%. Studies of pulmonary function in asthmatics have demonstrated a correlation between lung resistance and the occurrence of spontaneous gastroesophageal reflux. Few studies have included measures of lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide. The aim of this study is to assess whether asthma patients had worse lung function and gas diffusion according to diversity of GERD symptoms they concurrently experienced. The secondary aim of the study is to determine the frequency and different faces of GERD in our asthma patients compared to healthy controls. Methods Sixty consecutive asthma patients evaluatd at the pulmonary specialty outpatient clinic were included in the study. The control group included 60 healthy volunteers who had normal pulmonary function and routine laboratory tests. A modified version of a self-reported questionnaire developed by Locke and associates at the Mayo Clinic was conducted face-to-face with consecutive asthma patients and control subjects. Pulmonary function measurements were taken using spirometry. DLCO (mL/dk/mmHg) and DLCO/VA (DLCO adjusted according to alveolar volume) were measured using a single-breath technique. Statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS 17.0 statistical software. Results DLCO and DLCO/VA were significantly lower in asthma patients who had dysphagia symptoms. Frequent and significant acid regurgitations were seen in 28.33% (n?=?17) of patients in the study group and 6.7% (n?=?4) of patients in the control group. Severe, troublesome heartburn symptoms were reported by 28.2% (n?=?17) of patients in the study group and 16.7% (n?=?10) of subjects in the control group. Dysphagia was detected in 38.3% (n?=?23) of all asthma cases and in 1.7% (n?=?1) of the subjects in the control group. Conclusions There were many faces of gastroesophageal reflux disease in our asthmatic patients. Dysphagia was the only GERD symptom influencing on pulmonary function tests, while gastroesophageal reflux symptoms and nocturnal awakening attacks were common in this study. PMID:23244779

  18. A study on quantifying COPD severity by combining pulmonary function tests and CT image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Honma, Hirotoshi; Takabatake, Hirotsugu; Mori, Masaki; Natori, Hiroshi; Mori, Kensaku

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes a novel method that can evaluate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) severity by combining measurements of pulmonary function tests and measurements obtained from CT image analysis. There is no cure for COPD. However, with regular medical care and consistent patient compliance with treatments and lifestyle changes, the symptoms of COPD can be minimized and progression of the disease can be slowed. Therefore, many diagnosis methods based on CT image analysis have been proposed for quantifying COPD. Most of diagnosis methods for COPD extract the lesions as low-attenuation areas (LAA) by thresholding and evaluate the COPD severity by calculating the LAA in the lung (LAA%). However, COPD is usually the result of a combination of two conditions, emphysema and chronic obstructive bronchitis. Therefore, the previous methods based on only LAA% do not work well. The proposed method utilizes both of information including the measurements of pulmonary function tests and the results of the chest CT image analysis to evaluate the COPD severity. In this paper, we utilize a multi-class AdaBoost to combine both of information and classify the COPD severity into five stages automatically. The experimental results revealed that the accuracy rate of the proposed method was 88.9% (resubstitution scheme) and 64.4% (leave-one-out scheme).

  19. Abnormal pulmonary function and associated risk factors in children and adolescents with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Arteta, Manuel; Campbell, Andrew; Nouraie, Mehdi; Rana, Sohail; Onyekwere, Onyinye C; Ensing, Gregory; Sable, Craig; Dham, Niti; Darbari, Deepika; Luchtman-Jones, Lori; Kato, Gregory J; Gladwin, Mark T; Castro, Oswaldo L; Minniti, Caterina P; Gordeuk, Victor R

    2014-04-01

    Obstructive and restrictive pulmonary changes develop in children with sickle cell disease, but reports conflict as to the type of change that predominates. We prospectively performed spirometry, plethysmography, and lung diffusing capacity in 146 children aged 7 to 20 years with hemoglobin SS or S?(0)-thalassemia. Nineteen percent of the patients had obstructive physiology as defined according to guidelines of the American Thoracic Society. In addition, 9% had restrictive physiology and 11% had abnormal but not categorized physiology. Increasing age, patient-reported or family-reported history of asthma or wheezing, and higher lactate dehydrogenase concentration were independent predictors of obstruction as reflected in lower forced expiratory volume in the first second/forced vital capacity. In conclusion, abnormal pulmonary function, most often obstructive, is common in children with hemoglobin SS and S?(0)-thalassemia. Full pulmonary function testing should be performed in children with hemoglobin SS or S?(0)-thalassemia, especially with history of asthma or wheezing and accentuated elevations in hemolytic markers. PMID:24309610

  20. Pulmonary function tests--a comparison between urban industrial and rural agricultural workers of Andhra Pradesh.

    PubMed

    Mohan Rao, N; Kulkarni, P K; Kashyap, S K; Chatterjee, S K

    1993-01-01

    Physical parameters and pulmonary function tests (VC, FEV1, FEV1% and FEF25-75%) were collected in 112 urban industrial workers and 104 rural agricultural workers. These average values, values according to age and smoking habits were compared between urban and rural workers. Inspite of no differences in age, rural workers average height, weight, BSA is significantly lower than urban workers. A significant increase in VC value to the extent of 0.22 lit (7.1%), significantly lower FEV 1% value by 4.7% and reduce FEF25-75% value (4.7%) is demonstrated in rural than urban workers. Smoking is shown to produce airway obstruction in both urban and rural workers. A wide variation of PFT values between the present workers and other reported values in India is observed. This study indicates rural workers have better pulmonary capacity and less flow rates than their urban counterpart. PMID:8138287

  1. Pulmonary Ventilation Imaging Based on 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography: Comparison With Pulmonary Function Tests and SPECT Ventilation Images

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Kabus, Sven; Lorenz, Cristian; Mittra, Erik; Hong, Julian C.; Chung, Melody; Eclov, Neville; To, Jacqueline; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.; Keall, Paul J.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT)-based pulmonary ventilation imaging is an emerging functional imaging modality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological significance of 4D-CT ventilation imaging by comparison with pulmonary function test (PFT) measurements and single-photon emission CT (SPECT) ventilation images, which are the clinical references for global and regional lung function, respectively. Methods and Materials: In an institutional review board–approved prospective clinical trial, 4D-CT imaging and PFT and/or SPECT ventilation imaging were performed in thoracic cancer patients. Regional ventilation (V{sub 4DCT}) was calculated by deformable image registration of 4D-CT images and quantitative analysis for regional volume change. V{sub 4DCT} defect parameters were compared with the PFT measurements (forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV{sub 1}; % predicted) and FEV{sub 1}/forced vital capacity (FVC; %). V{sub 4DCT} was also compared with SPECT ventilation (V{sub SPECT}) to (1) test whether V{sub 4DCT} in V{sub SPECT} defect regions is significantly lower than in nondefect regions by using the 2-tailed t test; (2) to quantify the spatial overlap between V{sub 4DCT} and V{sub SPECT} defect regions with Dice similarity coefficient (DSC); and (3) to test ventral-to-dorsal gradients by using the 2-tailed t test. Results: Of 21 patients enrolled in the study, 18 patients for whom 4D-CT and either PFT or SPECT were acquired were included in the analysis. V{sub 4DCT} defect parameters were found to have significant, moderate correlations with PFT measurements. For example, V{sub 4DCT}{sup HU} defect volume increased significantly with decreasing FEV{sub 1}/FVC (R=−0.65, P<.01). V{sub 4DCT} in V{sub SPECT} defect regions was significantly lower than in nondefect regions (mean V{sub 4DCT}{sup HU} 0.049 vs 0.076, P<.01). The average DSCs for the spatial overlap with SPECT ventilation defect regions were only moderate (V{sub 4DCT}{sup HU}0.39 ± 0.11). Furthermore, ventral-to-dorsal gradients of V{sub 4DCT} were strong (V{sub 4DCT}{sup HU} R{sup 2} = 0.69, P=.08), which was similar to V{sub SPECT} (R{sup 2} = 0.96, P<.01). Conclusions: An 18-patient study demonstrated significant correlations between 4D-CT ventilation and PFT measurements as well as SPECT ventilation, providing evidence toward the validation of 4D-CT ventilation imaging.

  2. Engineering analysis of the effects of bulging sinuses in a newly designed pediatric pulmonary heart valve on hemodynamic function.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ichiro; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Yabe, Shota; Tsuboko, Yusuke; Sugai, Telma Keiko; Matsue, Ken; Kameyama, Takeyoshi; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Tanaka, Takashi; Okamoto, Yoshihiro; Feng, Zhonggang; Miyazaki, Takako; Yamagishi, Masaaki; Yoshizawa, Makoto; Umezu, Mitsuo; Yambe, Tomoyuki

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the hemodynamic characteristics of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) pulmonary valves with bulging sinuses quantitatively in a pediatric pulmonary mechanical circulatory system designed by us, in order to propose the optimal design for clinical applications. In this study, we developed a pediatric pulmonary mock circulation system, which consisted of a pneumatic right ventricular model, a pulmonary heart valve chamber, and a pulmonary elastic compliance tubing with resistive units. The hemodynamic characteristics of four different types of ePTFE valves and a monoleaflet mechanical heart valve were examined. Relationships between the leaflet movements and fluid characteristics were evaluated based on engineering analyses using echocardiography and a high-speed video camera under the pediatric circulatory conditions of the mock system. We successfully performed hemodynamic simulations in our pediatric pulmonary circulatory system that could be useful for quantitatively evaluating the pediatric heart valves. In the simulation study, the ePTFE valve with bulging sinuses exhibited a large eddy in the vicinity of the leaflets, whereas the straight tubing exhibited turbulent flow. The Reynolds number obtained in the valve with bulging sinuses was calculated to be 1667, which was smaller than that in the straight tubing (R (e) = 2454).The hemodynamic characteristics of ePTFE pediatric pulmonary heart valves were examined in our mock circulatory system. The presence of the bulging sinuses in the pulmonary heart valve decreased the hydrodynamic energy loss and increased the systolic opening area. Based on an in vitro experiment, we were able to propose an optimal selection of pulmonary valve design parameters that could yield a more sophisticated pediatric ePTFE valve shape. PMID:21956206

  3. Reduced pulmonary function in children with the Fontan circulation affects their exercise capacity.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Iren Lindbak; Fredriksen, Per Morten; Bjrnstad, Per G; Thaulow, Erik; Gronn, Morten

    2006-06-01

    Most children with functionally univentricular hearts nowadays are treated surgically by creating a total cavopulmonary connection. In the resulting Fontan circulation, the venous return and the pulmonary arterial bed are coupled in series, bypassing the heart. This gives the potential for interaction between the abnormal circulation and function of the lungs. In this study, we investigated the pattern of impairment of pulmonary function, and its relation to decreased exercise capacity. We performed spirometry in 33 (85 percent) of 39 eligible Norwegian children, aged from 8 to 16, with a total cavopulmonary connection, along with whole body plethysmography, the carbon monoxide single breath test, and a peak treadmill exercise test. The single breath test showed a mean corrected diffusing capacity of 66.5 percent of predicted, giving a z score of minus 2.88. The mean residual volume measured by whole body plethysmography was 146.8 percent, equivalent to a z score of 2.46, whereas the mean residual volume measured by the single breath test was 102.4 percent of predicted, this being the same as a z score of 0.43. The mean peak treadmill exercise test was 70.0 percent of predicted, equivalent with a z score of minus 3.07. Mean forced vital capacity was 85.7 percent of predicted, the equivalent z score being minus 0.92. Lung function correlated with the peak treadmill exercise test. We have shown, therefore, that children with the Fontan circulation have reduced diffusing capacity, possibly caused by the abnormal circulation through the lungs. The difference between residual volume measured by plethysmography and the single breath test implies trapping of air. The correlation of parameters for lung function with peak consumption of oxygen during exercise indicates that the abnormalities of pulmonary function may affect physical capacity. PMID:16725065

  4. Pulmonary function test in transfusion-dependent ?-thalassemia major patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Alyasin, Soheila; Moghtaderi, Mozhgan; Amin, Reza; Kashef, Sara; Karimi, Mehran

    2011-05-01

    Lung involvement is one of known complications of thalassemia. The aim of this study was to determine predominant type of pulmonary dysfunction and its relationship to iron overload in ?-thalassemia children. Fifty thalassemia major children with treatment of regular blood transfusion and desferrioxamine participated in the study. Thirty-three boys and 17 girls (median age 12.5 years) with ?-thalassemia enrolled in the study. Other information including body mass index, hematocrit, and the number of years of blood transfusion were recorded. Serum ferritin level and hematocrit were 3346 1667 mg/dL and 27.7 2, respectively. Pulmonary function tests were performed in all subjects for detecting pulmonary dysfunction. Thirty-five patients (70%) with thalassemia had abnormal result of spirometry. Obstructive airway disease based on reduced forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)) and FEV(1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio <80% was detected in 4 patients (8%). Six patients (12%) showed restrictive pattern, as defined by a reduction FVC <80% and FEV(1)/FVC ratio ?80%. In this study, small airway involvement based on presence of forced expiratory flow (FEF(25%-75%)) <60%, FEV(1)/FVC ratio >70%, and FVC >80% was detected in 25 subjects (50%). Decreased values of peak expiratory flow rate (PEF) were detected in 23 (46%) and low FEV(1) in 10 (20%) subjects. There was no significant correlation between abnormal pulmonary function test and serum ferritin level in children with thalassemia. This study showed small airway disease was predominant abnormality in thalassemia patients, although additional larger studies are needed to evaluate underlying mechanisms and validate these findings. PMID:21345079

  5. Vitamin E intake, ?-tocopherol levels and pulmonary function in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Woestenenk, Janna W; Broos, Nancy; Stellato, Rebecca K; Arets, Hubertus G M; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Houwen, Roderick H J

    2015-04-14

    Pancreatic insufficiency cystic fibrosis (CF) patients receive vitamin E supplementation according to CF-specific recommendations in order to prevent deficiencies. It has been suggested that higher serum ?-tocopherol levels could have protective effects on pulmonary function (PF) in patients with CF. Whether current recommendations are indeed optimal for preventing deficiency and whether vitamin E has therapeutic benefits are subjects of debate. Therefore, we studied vitamin E intake as well as the long-term effects of vitamin E intake, the coefficient of fat absorption (CFA) and IgG on ?-tocopherol levels. We also examined the long-term effects of serum ?-tocopherol and serum IgG on forced expiratory volume in 1 s expressed as percentage of predicted (FEV?% pred.) in paediatric CF patients during a 7-year follow-up period. We found that CF patients failed to meet the CF-specific vitamin E recommendations, but serum ?-tocopherol below the 25th percentile was found in only twenty-three of the 1022 measurements (2 %). Furthermore, no clear effect of vitamin E intake or the CFA on serum ?-tocopherol was found (both P? 0103). FEV?% pred. was longitudinally inversely associated with age (P< 0001) and serum IgG (P= 0003), but it was not related to serum ?-tocopherol levels. We concluded that in the present large sample of children and adolescents with CF, vitamin E intake was lower than recommended, but serum ?-tocopherol deficiency was rare. We found no evidence that higher serum ?-tocopherol levels had protective effects on PF. Adjustment of the recommendations to the real-life intake of these patients may be considered. PMID:25762411

  6. The peroxynitrite catalyst WW-85 improves pulmonary function in ovine septic shock.

    PubMed

    Maybauer, Dirk M; Maybauer, Marc O; Szab, Csaba; Cox, Robert A; Westphal, Martin; Kiss, Levente; Horvath, Eszter M; Traber, Lillian D; Hawkins, Hal K; Salzman, Andrew L; Southan, Garry J; Herndon, David N; Traber, Daniel L

    2011-02-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome is associated with excessive production of nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide (O2), forming peroxynitrite, which in turn, acts as a terminal mediator of cellular injury by producing cell necrosis and apoptosis. We examined the effect of the peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst, WW-85, in a sheep model of acute lung injury and septic shock. Eighteen sheep were operatively prepared and randomly allocated to the sham, control, or WW-85 group (n = 6 each). After a tracheotomy, acute lung injury was produced in the control and WW-85 groups by insufflation of four sets of 12 breaths of cotton smoke. Then, a 30-mL suspension of live Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria (containing 2 - 5 10 colony-forming units) was instilled into the lungs according to an established protocol. The sham group received only the vehicle (30 mL saline). The sheep were studied in awake state for 24 h and ventilated with 100% oxygen. WW-85 was administered 1 h after injury as bolus infusion (0.1 mg/kg), followed by a continuous infusion of 0.02 mgkg?h? until the end of the 24-h experimental period. Compared with injured but untreated controls, WW-85-treated animals had significantly improved gas exchange, reductions in airway obstruction, shunt formation, lung myeloperoxidase concentrations, lung malondialdehyde concentrations, lung 3-nitrotyrosine concentrations, and plasma nitrate-to-nitrite levels. Animals treated with WW-85 exhibited less microvascular leakage and improvements in pulmonary function. These results provide evidence that blockade of the nitric oxide-peroxynitrite pathway improves disturbances from septic shock, as demonstrated in a clinically relevant ovine experimental model. PMID:20577150

  7. Effect of thoracic arthrodesis in prepubertal New Zealand white rabbits on cardio-pulmonary function

    PubMed Central

    Canavese, Federico; Dimeglio, Alain; Barbetta, Davide; Pereira, Bruno; Fabbro, Sergio; Bassini, Federica; Canavese, Bartolomeo

    2014-01-01

    Background: This experimental study was aimed at evaluating the type of cardiac and pulmonary involvement, in relation to changes of the thoracic spine and cage in prepubertal rabbits with nondeformed spine following dorsal arthrodesis. The hypothesis was that T1-T12 arthrodesis modified thoracic dimensions, but would not modify cardiopulmonary function once skeletal maturity was reached. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in 16 female New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. Nine rabbits were subjected to T1-T12 dorsal arthrodesis while seven were sham-operated. Echocardiographic images were obtained at 12 months after surgery and parameters for 2-dimensional and M-mode echocardiographic variables were assessed. One week before echocardiographic examination, blood samples were withdrawn from the animals’ central artery of the left ear to obtain blood gas values. One week after echocardiographic assessment, a thoracic CT scan was performed under general anesthesia. Chest depth (CD) and width (CW), thoracic kyphosis (ThK) and sternal length (StL) were measured; thoracic index (ThI), expressed as CD/CW ratio. All subjects were euthanized after the CT scan. Heart and lungs were subsequently removed to measure weight and volume. Results: The values for 2-dimensional and M-mode echocardiographic variables were found to be uniformly and significantly higher, compared to those reported in anesthetized rabbits. CD, ThK, and StL were considerably lower in operated rabbits, as compared to the ones that were sham-operated. Similarly, the ThI was lower in operated rabbits than in sham-operated ones. Conclusion: Irregularities in thoracic cage growth resulting from thoracic spine arthrodesis did not alter blood and echocardiographic parameters in NZW rabbits. PMID:24741141

  8. Influence of mildronat on left ventricular systolic, diastolic functional parameters, pulmonary arterial flow and systolic dyssynchrony in patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tsverava, M D

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of metabolic treatment with Mildronat on left and right ventricular function, pulmonary flow and systolic synchrony in patient with heart failure. We studied 16 persons with 2-3-d NYHA class Heart Failure, 8 male and 8 female (age 69.2±9.3). All where in stable condition at last for 3 months and take traditional medical treatment (ACE inhibitors or AT2-blockers, beta-blockers, Furosemide, Spirolactone). It was added Mildronat (500 mg 2x daily per os) for 2 months. All patient undergone standard EchoCG, PW and Color Tissue Doppler (TD) examination before and after 2 months of treatment with Mildronat. It was noted significant decrease LV end systolic volume and increase of Ejection Fraction and Fractional Shortening of LV after 2 month treatment with Mildronat. LV Tissue Doppler parameters did not change significantly, it was noted only tendency of increasing Right Ventricular systolic velocity. Pulmonary Arterial Acceleration Time significantly increased, right ventricular (RV) isovolumic relaxation time and RV TEI index (Systolic-Diastolic Index) on Tissue Doppler was significantly decreased after the treatment, which indicates improvement of RV function and decrease of Pulmonary Arterial Pressure. There was improvement of Intraventricular synchrony, systolic delay time between intraventricular septum and lateral wall became shorter after 2 month treatment with Mildronat but interventricular delay did not change significantly. Addition of Mildronat to traditional medical treatment improves left ventricular systolic function in patients with Heart Failure. Mildronat improves left ventricular systolic dissynchroni in patients with Heart Failure. Mildronat increases the pulmonary arterial flow acceleration time and shortens Right Ventricular isovolumic relaxation time and TEI index, this means that it reduces the Pulmonary Arterial Pressure and improves right ventricular function. PMID:23787504

  9. Differences in the effects of Asian dust on pulmonary function between adult patients with asthma and those with asthma–chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Masanari; Noma, Hisashi; Kurai, Jun; Sano, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Yasuto; Mikami, Masaaki; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Tokuyasu, Hirokazu; Kato, Kazuhiro; Konishi, Tatsuya; Tatsukawa, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Eiji; Kitano, Hiroya

    2016-01-01

    Background Asian dust (AD) exposure exacerbates pulmonary dysfunction in patients with asthma. Asthma–chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome (ACOS), characterized by coexisting symptoms of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, is considered a separate disease entity. Previously, we investigated the effects of AD on pulmonary function in adult patients with asthma. Here, we present the findings of our further research on the differences in the effects of AD exposure on pulmonary function between patients with asthma alone and those with ACOS. Methods Between March and May 2012, we conducted a panel study wherein we monitored daily peak expiratory flow (PEF) values in 231 adult patients with asthma. These patients were divided into 190 patients with asthma alone and 41 patients with ACOS in this study. Daily AD particle levels were measured using light detection and ranging systems. Two heavy AD days (April 23 and 24) were determined according to the Japan Meteorological Agency definition. A linear mixed model was used to estimate the association between PEF and AD exposure. Results Increments in the interquartile range of AD particles (0.018 km−1) led to PEF changes of −0.50 L/min (95% confidence interval, −0.98 to −0.02) in patients with asthma alone and −0.11 L/min (−0.11 to 0.85) in patients with ACOS. The PEF changes after exposure to heavy AD were −2.21 L/min (−4.28 to −0.15) in patients with asthma alone and −2.76 L/min (−6.86 to 1.35) in patients with ACOS. In patients with asthma alone, the highest decrease in PEF values was observed on the heavy AD day, with a subsequent gradual increase over time. Conclusion Our results suggest that the effects of AD exposure on pulmonary function differ between patients with asthma alone and ACOS, with the former exhibiting a greater likelihood of decreased pulmonary function after AD exposure. PMID:26869784

  10. Pulmonary Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Valeyre, Dominique; Bernaudin, Jean-François; Jeny, Florence; Duchemann, Boris; Freynet, Olivia; Planès, Carole; Kambouchner, Marianne; Nunes, Hilario

    2015-12-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease, with lung involvement in almost all cases. Abnormal chest radiography is usually a key step for considering diagnosis. Lung impact is investigated through imaging; pulmonary function; and, when required, 6-minute walk test, cardiopulmonary exercise testing, or right heart catheterization. There is usually a reduction of lung volumes, and forced vital capacity is the most accurate parameter to reflect the impact of pulmonary sarcoidosis with or without pulmonary infiltration at imaging. Various evolution patterns have been described. Increased risk of death is associated with advanced pulmonary fibrosis or cor pulmonale, particularly in African American patients. PMID:26593138

  11. Functional capacity, physical activity, and quality of life in hypoxemic patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Saglam, Melda; Vardar-Yagli, Naciye; Savci, Sema; Inal-Ince, Deniz; Calik-Kutukcu, Ebru; Arikan, Hlya; Coplu, Lutfi

    2015-01-01

    Background The risk of hypoxemia increases with the progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and the deterioration of pulmonary function. The aim of this study was to compare functional capacity, physical activity, and quality of life in hypoxemic and non-hypoxemic patients with COPD. Methods Thirty-nine COPD patients (mean age: 62.07.03 years) were included in this study. Arterial blood gas tensions were measured, and patients were divided into two groups according to oxygen partial pressure (PaO2), the hypoxemic COPD (PaO2 <60 mmHg) (n=18), and the control (PaO2 ?60 mmHg) (n=21) groups. Functional exercise capacity was evaluated using the 6-minute walk test (6MWT). Oxygen saturation, dyspnea, and fatigue perception were measured before and after the 6MWT. Physical activity was assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and an accelerometer. Quality of life was assessed using the St Georges Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). Results The number of emergency visits and hospitalizations were higher in hypoxemic patients (P<0.05). Lung function parameters, 6MWT distance, exercise oxygen saturation, IPAQ total score, and energy expenditure during daily life were significantly lower, but percentage of maximum heart rate reached during the 6MWT was significantly higher, in hypoxemic COPD patients than in controls (P<0.05). Conclusion Hypoxemia has a profound effect on functional capacity and physical activity in patients with COPD. PMID:25750524

  12. Reduction of Pulmonary Function After Surgical Lung Resections of Different Volume

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In recent years an increasing number of lung resections are being done because of the rising prevalence of lung cancer that occurs mainly in patients with limited lung function, what is caused with common etiologic factor - smoking cigarettes. Objective: To determine how big the loss of lung function is after surgical resection of lung of different range. Methods: The study was done on 58 patients operated at the Clinic for thoracic surgery KCU Sarajevo, previously treated at the Clinic for pulmonary diseases “Podhrastovi” in the period from 01.06.2012. to 01.06.2014. The following resections were done: pulmectomy (left, right), lobectomy (upper, lower: left and right). The values of postoperative pulmonary function were compared with preoperative ones. As a parameter of lung function we used FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in one second), and changes in FEV1 are expressed in liters and in percentage of the recorded preoperative and normal values of FEV1. Measurements of lung function were performed seven days before and 2 months after surgery. Results: Postoperative FEV1 was decreased compared to preoperative values. After pulmectomy the maximum reduction of FEV1 was 44%, and after lobectomy it was 22% of the preoperative values. Conclusion: Patients with airway obstruction are limited in their daily life before the surgery, and an additional loss of lung tissue after resection contributes to their inability. Potential benefits of lung resection surgery should be balanced in relation to postoperative morbidity and mortality. PMID:25568542

  13. NIH EXAMINER: conceptualization and development of an executive function battery.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Joel H; Mungas, Dan; Possin, Katherine L; Rankin, Katherine P; Boxer, Adam L; Rosen, Howard J; Bostrom, Alan; Sinha, Lena; Berhel, Ashley; Widmeyer, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Executive functioning is widely targeted when human cognition is assessed, but there is little consensus on how it should be operationalized and measured. Recognizing the difficulties associated with establishing standard operational definitions of executive functioning, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke entered into a contract with the University of California-San Francisco to develop psychometrically robust executive measurement tools that would be accepted by the neurology clinical trials and clinical research communities. This effort, entitled Executive Abilities: Measures and Instruments for Neurobehavioral Evaluation and Research (EXAMINER), resulted in a series of tasks targeting working memory, inhibition, set shifting, fluency, insight, planning, social cognition and behavior. We describe battery conceptualization and development, data collection, scale construction based on item response theory, and lay the foundation for studying the battery's utility and validity for specific assessment and research goals. PMID:24103232

  14. Intravascular disorders of microcirculation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the results of clinical and morphological examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiodorova, Tatiana A.

    1999-05-01

    We have evaluated the results of clinical and morphological study of microcirculation and its intravascular factors in 120 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). Conjunctival biomicroscopy with quantitative evaluation of microcirculatory changes we performed. This data were compared with the results of laboratory study of erythrocytes and thrombocytes aggregation, some plasma hemostasis indices and morphological examination of microcirculation. The results of conjunctival biomicroscopy showed the close correlation between the clinical severity of the disease, the degree of respiratory failure and the degree of microcirculatory disorders. Progress of the disease with the development of respiratory failure and cor pulmonale was characterized by the expansion of the process of erythrocytes aggregation to the whole parts of the microcirculatory bad and was associated with perivascular hemorrhages. In some patients with severe COPD laboratory data showed chronic disseminated intravascular microcoagulation (DVS-syndrome). Intravascular platelets, erythrocytes and mixed aggregates which completely cork the vessels and compressed endothelium were uncovered by electron microscopy. Platelets membrane injuring with its degranulation was seen. This discovered correlation between microcirculatory abnormalities in lungs and in conjunctiva in patients with COPD demonstrate that this abnormalities of microcirculation are prevalent. This allows to use in clinical accessible and informative method of conjunctival biomicroscopy to estimate the condition of microcirculation in this pathology.

  15. TRPV4 inhibition counteracts edema and inflammation and improves pulmonary function and oxygen saturation in chemically induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Song, Weifeng; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Doran, Stephen F.; Liu, Boyi; Kaelberer, Melanie M.; Yu, Zhihong; Sui, Aiwei; Cheung, Mui; Leishman, Emma; Eidam, Hilary S.; Ye, Guosen; Willette, Robert N.; Thorneloe, Kevin S.; Bradshaw, Heather B.; Matalon, Sadis

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of acute lung injury caused by exposure to reactive chemicals remains challenging because of the lack of mechanism-based therapeutic approaches. Recent studies have shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), an ion channel expressed in pulmonary tissues, is a crucial mediator of pressure-induced damage associated with ventilator-induced lung injury, heart failure, and infarction. Here, we examined the effects of two novel TRPV4 inhibitors in mice exposed to hydrochloric acid, mimicking acid exposure and acid aspiration injury, and to chlorine gas, a severe chemical threat with frequent exposures in domestic and occupational environments and in transportation accidents. Postexposure treatment with a TRPV4 inhibitor suppressed acid-induced pulmonary inflammation by diminishing neutrophils, macrophages, and associated chemokines and cytokines, while improving tissue pathology. These effects were recapitulated in TRPV4-deficient mice. TRPV4 inhibitors had similar anti-inflammatory effects in chlorine-exposed mice and inhibited vascular leakage, airway hyperreactivity, and increase in elastance, while improving blood oxygen saturation. In both models of lung injury we detected increased concentrations of N-acylamides, a class of endogenous TRP channel agonists. Taken together, we demonstrate that TRPV4 inhibitors are potent and efficacious countermeasures against severe chemical exposures, acting against exaggerated inflammatory responses, and protecting tissue barriers and cardiovascular function. PMID:24838754

  16. TRPV4 inhibition counteracts edema and inflammation and improves pulmonary function and oxygen saturation in chemically induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Song, Weifeng; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Doran, Stephen F; Liu, Boyi; Kaelberer, Melanie M; Yu, Zhihong; Sui, Aiwei; Cheung, Mui; Leishman, Emma; Eidam, Hilary S; Ye, Guosen; Willette, Robert N; Thorneloe, Kevin S; Bradshaw, Heather B; Matalon, Sadis; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2014-07-15

    The treatment of acute lung injury caused by exposure to reactive chemicals remains challenging because of the lack of mechanism-based therapeutic approaches. Recent studies have shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), an ion channel expressed in pulmonary tissues, is a crucial mediator of pressure-induced damage associated with ventilator-induced lung injury, heart failure, and infarction. Here, we examined the effects of two novel TRPV4 inhibitors in mice exposed to hydrochloric acid, mimicking acid exposure and acid aspiration injury, and to chlorine gas, a severe chemical threat with frequent exposures in domestic and occupational environments and in transportation accidents. Postexposure treatment with a TRPV4 inhibitor suppressed acid-induced pulmonary inflammation by diminishing neutrophils, macrophages, and associated chemokines and cytokines, while improving tissue pathology. These effects were recapitulated in TRPV4-deficient mice. TRPV4 inhibitors had similar anti-inflammatory effects in chlorine-exposed mice and inhibited vascular leakage, airway hyperreactivity, and increase in elastance, while improving blood oxygen saturation. In both models of lung injury we detected increased concentrations of N-acylamides, a class of endogenous TRP channel agonists. Taken together, we demonstrate that TRPV4 inhibitors are potent and efficacious countermeasures against severe chemical exposures, acting against exaggerated inflammatory responses, and protecting tissue barriers and cardiovascular function. PMID:24838754

  17. Association of Ambient Air Quality with Pulmonary Function of Youngster Footballers

    PubMed Central

    Das, Paulomi; Chatterjee, Pinaki

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Air pollution has remained a major health concern in Kolkata. The present study was carried out to analyze the association between the levels of air pollutants and pulmonary function of youngster footballers living in two different air pollutant zones of Kolkata, West Bengal. Methods Air pollution data of the two ambient air quality-monitoring stations located at Rabindrabharati and Victoria Memorial was collected for the period from January 2012 to March 2012. Study was conducted on two hundred and twenty boys of the age range 14-16 years living within 3km radius of the two monitoring stations. Sample consisted of 60 footballers (30 from Rabindrabharati and 30 from Victoria Memorial) and 160 sedentary boys (80 from Rabindrabharati and 80 from Victoria Memorial). They were investigated for their spirometric lung functions by the method and technique recommended by American Thoracic Society. Results were expressed as mean SD and independent samples T test was conducted to compare between two groups. Results Results revealed that particulate matter (PM10), oxides of sulfur (SO2) concentrations were significantly higher in Rabindrabharati zone, whereas no significant differences were noted in oxides of nitrogen (NO2) and carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations though values were higher at Rabindrabharati than Victoria Memorial. Forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), forced mid expiratory flow (FEF25-75%), maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV) were significantly lower both in footballers (P<0.05) and sedentary boys (P<0.01) of Rabindrabharati zone. Conclusion Exposure to high air pollutant concentration might be associated with reduced pulmonary function in both sedentary and trained boys in spite of the fact that regular participation in training program may improve pulmonary function. PMID:24868430

  18. Effect of Pranayama and Suryanamaskar on Pulmonary Functions in Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekhar, M.; Ambareesha, Kondam; Nikhil, C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pranayama improved lung functions in numerous studies. Yoga involve isometric contraction and improves skeletal muscle strength. Yoga training improves the strength of expiratory as well as inspiratory muscles. Aim: The present study is planned to find the effect of pranayama on pulmonary functions in medical students. Materials and Methods: This study is conducted on 50 students doing lst year M.B.B.S. Consent form has been taken from them. They have been given yoga training 30 min daily for 2 mnth under the guidance of a trained yoga instructor. Vital capacity (VC), Tidal volume (TV), Expiratory Reserve volume (ERV), Breath holding time (BHT), 40 mm endurance, Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) are measured before & after yoga training. Results: VC has increased from 2972 213.151 to 3372 528.7722. TV has increased from 496 84.06347 to 588 150.8863. ERV also shows increase in values from 888 183.303 to 1096 386.7385. BHT also shows increase in values from 33 5.773503 to 58.6 12.78019. 40 mm endurance also shows increase in values from 30.8 5.139715 to 53.52 15.68736. PEFR also shows increase in value from 388.8 15.36229 to 425.2 38.74274. Conclusion: There is a statistically significant increase in all the above mentioned pulmonary functions following yoga training. Yoga practice can be advocated to improve pulmonary functions in healthy individuals and hence to prevent respiratory diseases in future. PMID:25653936

  19. Identification of Functionally Segregated Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Stores in Pulmonary Arterial Smooth Muscle*

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Jill H.; Kinnear, Nicholas P.; Kalujnaia, Svetlana; Cramb, Gordon; Fleischer, Sidney; Jeyakumar, Loice H.; Wuytack, Frank; Evans, A. Mark

    2010-01-01

    In pulmonary arterial smooth muscle, Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) via ryanodine receptors (RyRs) may induce constriction and dilation in a manner that is not mutually exclusive. We show here that the targeting of different sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCA) and RyR subtypes to discrete SR regions explains this paradox. Western blots identified protein bands for SERCA2a and SERCA2b, whereas immunofluorescence labeling of isolated pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells revealed striking differences in the spatial distribution of SERCA2a and SERCA2b and RyR1, RyR2, and RyR3, respectively. Almost all SERCA2a and RyR3 labeling was restricted to a region within 1.5 ?m of the nucleus. In marked contrast, SERCA2b labeling was primarily found within 1.5 ?m of the plasma membrane, where labeling for RyR1 was maximal. The majority of labeling for RyR2 lay in between these two regions of the cell. Application of the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 induced global Ca2+ waves in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells, which were markedly attenuated upon depletion of SR Ca2+ stores by preincubation of cells with the SERCA inhibitor thapsigargin but remained unaffected after preincubation of cells with a second SERCA antagonist, cyclopiazonic acid. We conclude that functionally segregated SR Ca2+ stores exist within pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. One sits proximal to the plasma membrane, receives Ca2+ via SERCA2b, and likely releases Ca2+ via RyR1 to mediate vasodilation. The other is located centrally, receives Ca2+ via SERCA2a, and likely releases Ca2+ via RyR3 and RyR2 to initiate vasoconstriction. PMID:20177054

  20. Identification of functionally segregated sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium stores in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jill H; Kinnear, Nicholas P; Kalujnaia, Svetlana; Cramb, Gordon; Fleischer, Sidney; Jeyakumar, Loice H; Wuytack, Frank; Evans, A Mark

    2010-04-30

    In pulmonary arterial smooth muscle, Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) via ryanodine receptors (RyRs) may induce constriction and dilation in a manner that is not mutually exclusive. We show here that the targeting of different sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases (SERCA) and RyR subtypes to discrete SR regions explains this paradox. Western blots identified protein bands for SERCA2a and SERCA2b, whereas immunofluorescence labeling of isolated pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells revealed striking differences in the spatial distribution of SERCA2a and SERCA2b and RyR1, RyR2, and RyR3, respectively. Almost all SERCA2a and RyR3 labeling was restricted to a region within 1.5 microm of the nucleus. In marked contrast, SERCA2b labeling was primarily found within 1.5 microm of the plasma membrane, where labeling for RyR1 was maximal. The majority of labeling for RyR2 lay in between these two regions of the cell. Application of the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 induced global Ca(2+) waves in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells, which were markedly attenuated upon depletion of SR Ca(2+) stores by preincubation of cells with the SERCA inhibitor thapsigargin but remained unaffected after preincubation of cells with a second SERCA antagonist, cyclopiazonic acid. We conclude that functionally segregated SR Ca(2+) stores exist within pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. One sits proximal to the plasma membrane, receives Ca(2+) via SERCA2b, and likely releases Ca(2+) via RyR1 to mediate vasodilation. The other is located centrally, receives Ca(2+) via SERCA2a, and likely releases Ca(2+) via RyR3 and RyR2 to initiate vasoconstriction. PMID:20177054

  1. Molecular and functional significance of Ca2+-activated Cl− channels in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Abigail S.; Ayon, Ramon J.; Wiwchar, Michael; Angermann, Jeff E.; Pritchard, Harry A. T.; Singer, Cherie A.; Valencik, Maria L.; Britton, Fiona; Greenwood, Iain A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Increased peripheral resistance of small distal pulmonary arteries is a hallmark signature of pulmonary hypertension (PH) and is believed to be the consequence of enhanced vasoconstriction to agonists, thickening of the arterial wall due to remodeling, and increased thrombosis. The elevation in arterial tone in PH is attributable, at least in part, to smooth muscle cells of PH patients being more depolarized and displaying higher intracellular Ca2+ levels than cells from normal subjects. It is now clear that downregulation of voltage-dependent K+ channels (e.g., Kv1.5) and increased expression and activity of voltage-dependent (Cav1.2) and voltage-independent (e.g., canonical and vanilloid transient receptor potential [TRPC and TRPV]) Ca2+ channels play an important role in the functional remodeling of pulmonary arteries in PH. This review focuses on an anion-permeable channel that is now considered a novel excitatory mechanism in the systemic and pulmonary circulations. It is permeable to Cl− and is activated by a rise in intracellular Ca2+ concentration (Ca2+-activated Cl− channel, or CaCC). The first section outlines the biophysical and pharmacological properties of the channel and ends with a description of the molecular candidate genes postulated to encode for CaCCs, with particular emphasis on the bestrophin and the newly discovered TMEM16 and anoctamin families of genes. The second section provides a review of the various sources of Ca2+ activating CaCCs, which include stimulation by mobilization from intracellular Ca2+ stores and Ca2+ entry through voltage-dependent and voltage-independent Ca2+ channels. The third and final section summarizes recent findings that suggest a potentially important role for CaCCs and the gene TMEM16A in PH. PMID:26064450

  2. Short-term effect of ozone on the pulmonary function of children in primary school.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, P C; Lai, Y M; Chan, C C; Hwang, J S; Yang, C Y; Wang, J D

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the short-term effect of ambient air pollution on the pulmonary function of schoolchildren. We sampled 941 children in primary school in three communities in Taiwan (Sanchun, Taihsi, and Linyuan). The nearby stations of the Taiwan air quality monitoring network provided the hourly ambient concentrations of sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, ozone, particulate matter < or = to 10 microm in aerodynamic diameter, and nitrogen dioxide. Spirometry was performed once for each sampled child. We also obtained the status of indoor air pollution and chronic respiratory disease history by using a structured questionnaire. Multivariate linear model analysis was used to evaluate pulmonary function effects of each pollutant in addition to determinants of indoor air pollution and meteorologic conditions. We found a significantly negative association of peak O(3) concentration on the day before spirometry with individual forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 sec. The decrease in children's lung function can occur at peak hourly O(3) concentrations < 80 ppb. The slope of lung function decrease for Taiwanese children is approximately 1 mL/ppb for peak hourly O(3) exposure. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10544161

  3. Effect of bisoprolol on respiratory function and exercise capacity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Mainguy, Vincent; Girard, Daniel; Maltais, Franois; Saey, Didier; Milot, Julie; Snchal, Mario; Poirier, Paul; Provencher, Steeve

    2012-07-15

    Cardioselective ? blockers are considered to have little impact on lung function at rest in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, their effects on dynamic hyperinflation, an important mechanism contributing to symptoms and exercise tolerance in patients with COPD, have not been evaluated. Twenty-seven patients with moderate to severe COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 second 52 13% predicted) completed pulmonary function tests, echocardiography, maximal exercise tests, and cycle endurance tests at baseline. Inspiratory capacity was measured at 2-minute intervals during the cycle endurance test to quantify dynamic hyperinflation. Pulmonary function and cycle endurance testing were repeated after 14 days of bisoprolol 10 mg/day and 14 days of placebo in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. The extent of dynamic hyperinflation at peak isotime exercise with bisoprolol and placebo was compared. Peak isotime was defined as the latest time point that was reached during the 2 cycle endurance tests. Changes in inspiratory capacity from rest to peak isotime were different with bisoprolol compared to placebo (-0.50 0.35 vs -0.41 0.33 L, p = 0.01). Exercise duration tended to be lower with bisoprolol compared to placebo (305 125 vs 353 172 seconds, p = 0.11). The magnitude of change in exercise duration between the bisoprolol and placebo conditions was correlated with the magnitude of change in inspiratory capacity (r = 0.57, p <0.01). In conclusion, bisoprolol was associated with modest worsening dynamic hyperinflation, whereas exercise duration remained unchanged in patients with moderate to severe COPD. The magnitude of these effects was small and should not contraindicate the use of bisoprolol in patients with COPD. PMID:22497677

  4. Respiratory function responses of animals and man to oxidant gases and to pulmonary emphysema

    SciTech Connect

    Mauderly, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Data on the respiratory functional responses of animals and humans to inhaled oxidant gases and to pulmonary emphysema were reviewed and compared. Comparisons included responses to short-term inhalation of ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and oxygen and the functional manifestations of chronic emphysema. The comparisons illustrated that animals and humans have qualitatively similar functional responses to the irritant, bronchoconstrictive, and sensitizing effects of acutely inhaled ozone and nitrogen dioxide. Animals and humans responded similarly to the inflammatory and edematous effects of inhaled oxygen. Similar changes in maximal expiratory flow-volume curves, pressure-volume curves, lung volumes, and alveolar-capillary gas exchange occurred in animals and humans with emphysema. These results suggest that similar respiratory functional changes occur in both animals and humans when similar morphological changes result from lung injury. This observation lends confidence to the use of laboratory animals in studies to predict the effects of long-term exposure of humans to inhaled oxidant gases. 42 references.

  5. Lung function and metabolic syndrome: Findings of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 20072010*

    PubMed Central

    FORD, Earl S.; CUNNINGHAM, Timothy J.; MERCADO, Carla I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Considerable uncertainty remains about obstructive lung function (OLF) in adults with metabolic syndrome (MetS). The aim of the present study was to examine pulmonary function status in adults with and without MetS. Methods We used data from 3109 participants aged ?20 years of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 20072010. Subjects MetS status was established on the basis of the 2009 harmonizing definition. Participants received spirometry. Results After age adjustment, 79.3% (SE 1.1) of participants with MetS had normal lung function, 8.7% (0.9) had restrictive lung function (RLF), 7.1% (0.8) had mild OLF, and 4.8% (0.6) had moderate OLF or worse. Among participants without MetS, these estimates were 78.7% (1.2), 3.9% (0.6), 10.9% (1.1), and 6.4% (0.8), respectively. After multiple adjustment, participants with MetS were more likely to have RLF (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] 2.20; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.67, 2.90) and less likely to have any OLF (aPR 0.73; 95% CI 0.62, 0.86) than those without MetS. Furthermore, participants with MetS had lower mean levels of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), FEV1 % predicted, forced vital capacity (FVC), and FVC % predicted, but a higher FEV1/FVC ratio than participants without MetS. Mean levels of FEV1, FEV1 % predicted, FVC, and FVC % predicted declined significantly, but not the FEV1/FVC ratio, as the number of components increased. Conclusions Compared with adults without MetS, spirometry is more likely to show a restrictive pattern and less likely to show an obstructive pattern among adults with MetS. PMID:26677470

  6. Functional outcomes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a multivariate analysis

    PubMed Central

    Athayde, Filipe T. S.; Vieira, Danielle S. R.; Britto, Raquel R.; Parreira, Verônica F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Multiple factors can influence the severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and the functioning of patients with COPD, such as personal characteristics and systemic manifestations. Objective To evaluate the different factors that can influence the activity and psychosocial impact domains of the Saint George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) in COPD patients. Method Participants, recruited in a university-based hospital, responded to the SGRQ, and in addition, personal, anthropometric, and clinical data were collected. The study was approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee. Data were analyzed using multiple linear regression models, with the SGRQ activity and psychosocial impact scores as outcome variables, and 10 explanatory variables (age, gender, forced expiratory volume in the first second - FEV1, smoking load, body mass index, oxygen therapy, associated diseases, regular physical activity, participation in a formal rehabilitation program, and SGRQ symptoms score) were considered. Results The best regression model for predicting the SGRQ activity score (r2=0.477) included gender, FEV1, and SGRQ symptoms. In contrast, the predictive model with the highest proportion of explained variance in psychosocial impact score (r2=0.426) included the variables gender, oxygen therapy, and SGRQ symptoms. Conclusions The results indicate that the outcomes, while based on functioning parameters in COPD patients, could be partly explained by the personal and clinical factors analyzed, especially by the symptoms assessed by the SGRQ. Thus, it appears that the health conditions of these patients cannot be described by isolated variables, including pulmonary function parameters. PMID:24675914

  7. The relationships among sleep efficiency, pulmonary functions, and quality of life in patients with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Akira; Kawasaki, Yuji; Takeda, Kenichi; Harada, Tomoya; Fukushima, Takehito; Takata, Miki; Hashimoto, Kiyoshi; Watanabe, Masanari; Kurai, Jun; Nishimura, Koichi; Shimizu, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    Background Sleep disturbance is commonly observed in patients with asthma, especially in those with poorly controlled asthma. Evaluating sleep quality to achieve good control of asthma is important since nocturnal asthmatic symptoms such as cough, wheezing, and chest tightness may disturb sleep. Actigraphy is an objective, ambulatory monitoring method for tracking a patient’s sleep and wake activities and for assessing sleep quality, as reflected by total sleep time, sleep efficiency, duration of awakening after sleep onset (WASO), and sleep onset latency. Patients and methods Fifty patients with asthma were enrolled in this study. Sleep quality was assessed employing wristwatch-type actigraphy (Actiwatch 2). The level of asthma control was assessed by the Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ), and asthma-related quality of life was assessed by the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ). The parameters for sleep quality were compared using ACQ scores, AQLQ scores, and pulmonary function test results. Results The total sleep time was 387.2 minutes, WASO was 55.8 minutes, sleep efficiency was 87.01%, sleep onset latency was 8.17 minutes, and the average ACQ was 0.36. Neither sleep efficiency nor WASO correlated with respiratory functions, ACQ scores, or AQLQ scores. Conclusion Sleep-related parameters assessed by actigraphy in well-controlled asthma do not correlate with pulmonary functions, the asthma control level, or daytime quality of life. Sleep quality should be evaluated independently when asthma is well-controlled. PMID:25419157

  8. Pulmonary artery pressure and cardiac function in children and adolescents after rapid ascent to 3,450 m.

    PubMed

    Allemann, Yves; Stuber, Thomas; de Marchi, Stefano F; Rexhaj, Emrush; Sartori, Claudio; Scherrer, Urs; Rimoldi, Stefano F

    2012-06-15

    High-altitude destinations are visited by increasing numbers of children and adolescents. High-altitude hypoxia triggers pulmonary hypertension that in turn may have adverse effects on cardiac function and may induce life-threatening high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), but there are limited data in this young population. We, therefore, assessed in 118 nonacclimatized healthy children and adolescents (mean ± SD; age: 11 ± 2 yr) the effects of rapid ascent to high altitude on pulmonary artery pressure and right and left ventricular function by echocardiography. Pulmonary artery pressure was estimated by measuring the systolic right ventricular to right atrial pressure gradient. The echocardiography was performed at low altitude and 40 h after rapid ascent to 3,450 m. Pulmonary artery pressure was more than twofold higher at high than at low altitude (35 ± 11 vs. 16 ± 3 mmHg; P < 0.0001), and there existed a wide variability of pulmonary artery pressure at high altitude with an estimated upper 95% limit of 52 mmHg. Moreover, pulmonary artery pressure and its altitude-induced increase were inversely related to age, resulting in an almost twofold larger increase in the 6- to 9- than in the 14- to 16-yr-old participants (24 ± 12 vs. 13 ± 8 mmHg; P = 0.004). Even in children with the most severe altitude-induced pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular systolic function did not decrease, but increased, and none of the children developed HAPE. HAPE appears to be a rare event in this young population after rapid ascent to this altitude at which major tourist destinations are located. PMID:22523248

  9. Pulmonary function and symptoms of Nigerian workers exposed to Carbon black in dry cell battery and tire factories.

    PubMed

    Oleru, U G; Elegbeleye, O O; Enu, C C; Olumide, Y M

    1983-02-01

    The pulmonary function and symptoms of 125 workers exposed to carbon black in dry cell battery and tire manufacturing plants were investigated. There was no significant difference in the pulmonary function of the subjects in the two plants. There was good agreement in the symptoms reported in the two different factories: cough with phlegm production, tiredness, chest pain, catarrh, headache, and skin irritation. The symptoms also corroborate those reported in the few studies on the pulmonary effects of carbon black. The suspended particulate levels in the dry cell battery plant ranged from 25 to 34 mg/m3 and the subjects with the highest probable exposure level had the most impaired pulmonary function. The pulmonary function of the exposed subjects was significantly lower than that of a control, nonindustrially exposed population. The drop in the lung function from the expected value per year of age was relatively constant for all the study subgroups but the drop per year of duration of employment was more severe in the earlier years of employment. This study has underscored the need for occupational health regulations in the industries of developing countries. PMID:6832105

  10. Correlation between basic physical fitness and pulmonary function in Korean children and adolescents: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Ju Yong; Jang, Ki Sung; Kang, Sunghwun; Han, Don Hee; Yang, Wonho; Shin, Ki Ok

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to determine whether there was a correlation between basic physical fitness and pulmonary function in Korean school students, to present an alternative method for improving their pulmonary function. [Subjects and Methods] Two hundred forty healthy students aged 6–17 years performed physical fitness tests of hand-grip strength, sit and reach, Sargent jump, single leg stance, and pulmonary function tests of forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) using a Quark PFT. [Results] Muscle strength and power of boys improved in the late period of elementary school and middle school. Muscle strength of girls improved in the late period of elementary school. Analysis of factors affecting pulmonary function revealed that height, weight, BMI, and body fat significantly correlated with spirometric parameters. Right hand-grip strength, left hand-grip strength, and Sargent jump also significantly correlated with FVC and FEV1. [Conclusion] In order to improve the pulmonary function of children and adolescents, aerobic exercise and an exercise program to increase muscle strength and power is needed, and it should start in the late period of elementary school when muscle strength and power are rapidly increasing. PMID:26504269

  11. Pulmonary function and symptoms of Nigerian workers exposed to carbon black in dry cell battery and tire factories

    SciTech Connect

    Oleru, U.G.; Elegbeleye, O.O.; Enu, C.C.; Olumide, Y.M.

    1983-02-01

    The pulmonary function and symptoms of 125 workers exposed to carbon black in dry cell battery and tire manufacturing plants were investigated. There was no significant difference in the pulmonary function of the subjects in the two plants. There was good agreement in the symptoms reported in the two different factories: cough with phlegm production, tiredness, chest pain, catarrh, headache, and skin irritation. The symptoms also corroborate those reported in the few studies on the pulmonary effects of carbon black. The suspended particulate levels in the dry cell battery plant ranged from 25 to 34 mg/m/sup 3/ and the subjects with the highest probable exposure level had the most impaired pulmonary function. The pulmonary function of the exposed subjects was significantly lower than that of a control, nonindustrially exposed population. The drop in the lung function from the expected value per year of age was relatively constant for all the study subgroups but the drop per year of duration of employment was more severe in the earlier years of employment. This study has underscored the need for occupational health regulations in the industries of developing countries.

  12. Correlation between basic physical fitness and pulmonary function in Korean children and adolescents: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ju Yong; Jang, Ki Sung; Kang, Sunghwun; Han, Don Hee; Yang, Wonho; Shin, Ki Ok

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to determine whether there was a correlation between basic physical fitness and pulmonary function in Korean school students, to present an alternative method for improving their pulmonary function. [Subjects and Methods] Two hundred forty healthy students aged 6-17 years performed physical fitness tests of hand-grip strength, sit and reach, Sargent jump, single leg stance, and pulmonary function tests of forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) using a Quark PFT. [Results] Muscle strength and power of boys improved in the late period of elementary school and middle school. Muscle strength of girls improved in the late period of elementary school. Analysis of factors affecting pulmonary function revealed that height, weight, BMI, and body fat significantly correlated with spirometric parameters. Right hand-grip strength, left hand-grip strength, and Sargent jump also significantly correlated with FVC and FEV1. [Conclusion] In order to improve the pulmonary function of children and adolescents, aerobic exercise and an exercise program to increase muscle strength and power is needed, and it should start in the late period of elementary school when muscle strength and power are rapidly increasing. PMID:26504269

  13. The use of spirometry to evaluate pulmonary function in olive ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea) with positive buoyancy disorders.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Todd L; Munns, Suzanne; Adams, Lance; Hicks, James

    2013-09-01

    This study utilized computed spirometry to compare the pulmonary function of two stranded olive ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea) presenting with a positive buoyancy disorder with two healthy captive olive ridley sea turtles held in a large public aquarium. Pulmonary function test (PFT) measurements demonstrated that the metabolic cost of breathing was much greater for animals admitted with positive buoyancy than for the normal sea turtles. Positively buoyant turtles had higher tidal volumes and significantly lower breathing-frequency patterns with significantly higher expiration rates, typical of gasp-type breathing. The resulting higher energetic cost of breathing in the diseased turtles may have a significant impact on their long-term survival. The findings represent a method for clinical respiratory function analysis for an individual animal to assist with diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to evaluate objectively sea turtles presenting with positive buoyancy and respiratory disease using pulmonary function tests. PMID:24063092

  14. Effect of thoracic and cervical joint mobilization on pulmonary function in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sang-Hun; Bang, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to conduct thoracic and cervical mobilization in stroke patients and determine its effects on respiratory function. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one stroke patients were studied. Subjects were divided into a control group (control group, n=11) who did not undergo thoracic and cervical joint mobilization, and an experimental group (thoracic and cervical mobilization group, n=10) who underwent thoracic and cervical joint mobilization. Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in the first second, well-known indicators of respiratory capabilities, were measured. Peak cough flow was measured as an indicator of cough capability. [Results] After the exercise, respiratory function in the thoracic and cervical mobilization group showed statistically significant improvements demonstrated by increases in forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in the first second, and peak cough flow. [Conclusion] The findings indicate that thoracic and cervical mobilization can improve the thoracic movements of stroke patients resulting in improved pulmonary function. PMID:26957769

  15. A Critical Examination of Wind-Wave Spectral Functional Form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E.; Long, Steven R.

    1999-01-01

    Traditionally, data from random ocean waves are presented in spectral functions. The spectra are the result of Fourier analysis. Fourier spectral analysis has dominated data analysis for, at least, the last hundred years. It has been the standard method for is examining the global amplitude-frequency distributions. Although Fourier transform valid under extremely general conditions, there are some crucial restrictions for the Fourier spectral analysis. The system must be linear, and the data must be stationary- otherwise, the resulting spectrum will make little physical sense. The stationarity requirement is also a common required criterion for most of other available data analysis methods. Nevertheless, few, if any, natural phenomena are linear and stationary. To compound these complications is the imperfection of our probes or numerical schemes the interactions of the imperfect probes even with a perfect linear system can make the final data nonlinear. Furthermore, all the available data are usually of finite duration. Under these conditions, Fourier analysis is of limited use, For lack of alternatives, however, Fourier analysis is still used to process such data. The loose application of Fourier analysis and the insouciant adoption of the stationary and linear assumptions may lead to misleading conclusions. Ocean waves are know to be nonlinear, and the wind system generating the wave field are seldom stationary- As a result, the traditional examination of the spectral form hardly made physical sense. A new method for analyzing nonlinear and nonstationary data has been developed. The key part is the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) method with which any complicated data set can be decomposed into a finite and often small number of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF) that serve as the basis of the representation of the data, This decomposition method is adaptive, and, therefore, highly efficient. The IMFs admit well-behaved Hilbert transforms, and yield instantaneous energy and frequency as functions of time that give sharp identifications of imbedded structures. The final presentation of the results is an energy-frequency-time distribution, designated as the Hilbert Spectrum. Among the main conceptual innovations is the introduction of the instantaneous frequencies for complicated data sets, which eliminate the need of spurious harmonics to represent nonlinear and nonstationary signals. The spectral forms of the ocean waves are very different. This new method offers the first physical meaningful view of the wave spectrum. Data from laboratory and field will be presented to illustrate the differences.

  16. Examining the Relationship between Differential Item Functioning and Differential Test Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pae, Tae-Il; Park, Gi-Pyo

    2006-01-01

    The present study utilized both the IRT-LR (item response theory likelihood ratio) and a series of CFA (confirmatory factor analysis) multi-sample analyses to systematically examine the relationships between DIF (differential item functioning) and DTF (differential test functioning) with a random sample of 15 000 Korean examinees. Specifically,

  17. The Surface Charge and Cellular Processing of Covalently Functionalized Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes Determine Pulmonary Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruibin; Wang, Xiang; Ji, Zhaoxia; Sun, Bingbing; Zhang, Haiyuan; Chang, Chong Hyun; Lin, Sijie; Meng, Huan; Liao, Yu-Pei; Wang, Meiying; Li, Zongxi; Hwang, Angela; Song, Tze-Bin; Xu, Run; Yang, Yang; Zink, Jeffrey I.; Nel, Andr E.; Xia, Tian

    2014-01-01

    Functionalized carbon nanotubes (f-CNTs) are being produced in increased volume because of the ease of dispersion and maintenance of the pristine material physicochemical properties when used in composite materials as well as for other commercial applications. However, the potential adverse effects of f-CNTs have not been quantitatively or systematically explored, and in this study we used a library of covalently functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs), established from the same starting material, to assess the impact of surface charge in a predictive toxicological model that relates the tubes pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrogenic effects at cellular level to the development of pulmonary fibrosis. Carboxylated (COOH), polyethylene glycol (PEG), amine (NH2), sidewall amine (sw-NH2) and polyetherimide (PEI) modified MWCNTs were successfully established from raw or as-prepared (AP-) MWCNTs, and comprehensively characterized by TEM, XPS, FTIR and DLS to obtain information about morphology, length, degree of functionalization, hydrodynamic size and surface charge. Cellular screening in BEAS-2B and THP-1 cells showed that, compared to AP-MWCNTs, anionic functionalization (COOH and PEG) decreased the production of pro-fibrogenic cytokines and growth factors (including IL-1?, TGF-?1 and PDGF-AA), while neutral and weak cationic functionalization (NH2 and sw-NH2) showed intermediary effects. In contrast, the strongly cationic PEI-functionalized tubes induced robust biological effects. These differences could be attributed to differences in cellular uptake and NLRP3 inflammasome activation, which depends on the propensity towards lysosomal damage and cathepsin B release in macrophages. Moreover, the in vitro hazard ranking was validated by the pro-fibrogenic potential of the tubes in vivo. Compared to pristine MWCNTs, strong cationic PEIMWCNTs induced significant lung fibrosis, while carboxylation significantly decreased the extent of pulmonary fibrosis. These results demonstrate that surface charge plays an important role in the structure-activity relationships that determine the pro-fibrogenic potential of f-CNTs in the lung. PMID:23414138

  18. Indomethacin pretreatment reduces ozone-induced pulmonary function decrements in human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Schelegle, E.S.; Adams, W.C.; Siefkin, A.D.

    1987-12-01

    We studied whether O/sub 3/-induced pulmonary function decrements could be inhibited by the prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor, indomethacin, in healthy human subjects. Fourteen college-age males completed six 1-h exposure protocols consisting of no drug, placebo, and indomethacin (Indocin SR 75 mg every 12 h for 5 days) pretreatments, with filtered air and O/sub 3/ (0.35 ppm) exposures within each pretreatment. Pretreatments were delivered weekly in random order in a double-blind fashion. Ozone and filtered air exposures, separated by 72 h, were delivered in random order in a single-blind fashion. Exposures consisted of 1-h exercise on a bicycle ergometer with work loads set to elicit a mean minute ventilation of 60 L/min. Statistical analysis revealed significant (p less than 0.05) across pretreatment effects for FVC and FEV1, with no drug versus indomethacin and placebo versus indomethacin comparisons being significant. These findings suggest that cyclooxygenase products of arachidonic acid, which are sensitive to indomethacin inhibition, play a prominent role in the development of pulmonary function decrements consequent to acute O/sub 3/ exposure.

  19. Impact of Different Etiologies of Bronchiectasis on the Pulmonary Function Tests

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Agnaldo Jos; Camilo, Gustavo Bittencourt; de Menezes, Sara Lucia Silveira; Guimares, Fernando Silva

    2015-01-01

    Background Bronchiectasis develops along the natural course of several respiratory and systemic conditions and induces significant changes in the morphofunctional structure of airways. Our objective was to assess the impact of various causes of bronchiectasis on clinical data, pulmonary function tests, and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Methods The present report was a cross-sectional study that was conducted with 112 consecutive patients with bronchiectasis, who were allocated to five groups, as follows: sequelae of tuberculosis, history of non-tuberculosis infection, cystic fibrosis (CF), primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), and rheumatoid arthritis. All of the participants underwent spirometry, whole-body plethysmography, measurement of the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLco), and HRCT. Results The highest HRCT score was exhibited in patients with CF (6.031.03). The values of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) (52.217.7%) and DLco (74.115.2%) were lower in patients with sequelae of tuberculosis. The increase in the residual volume was more accentuated in the patients with CF (193.5 39.5%) and PCD (189 36.4%). By the multivariate analysis, the cause of FEV1 and bronchiectasis, HRCT score, and degree of dyspnea behaved as independent predictors of DLco. Conclusion In individuals with bronchiectasis, the pulmonary function abnormalities are associated with the etiology of the underlying disease. PMID:25380609

  20. Pulmonary Function Studies of Healthy Non-smoking Male University Students of Kolkata, India — Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Bhattacharjee, Ishita; Dalui, Rishna; Pal, Sangita

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) need to be revisited in light of rapid economic growth and industrial development. Questions have been raised about the validity of existing population-specific norms for predicting PFTs, and therefore, the present study aimed to determine the applicability of existing norms for PFTs in young healthy non-smoking male university students of Kolkata. Methods: PFTs were carried out for 87 non-smoking male university students who were randomly sampled from the University of Calcutta, Kolkata, India. Results: The PFTs data obtained in this study did not show a significant variation with that obtained in a previous study. Significant (P < 0.001) differences in the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1%) and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) between the two studies may be attributed to differences in the age and body height, which exhibited significant correlations with the vital capacity (VC), forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV1, FEV1%, and PEFR. Regression equations have been computed to predict PFTs parameters from age and body height. Conclusion: Pulmonary function in the university students of Kolkata was found to have remained mostly unchanged in the last 24 years. The equations computed in this study are considered preferable owing to their substantially smaller standard error of estimate (SEE) than those proposed in the previous study. PMID:23983573

  1. Analysis of changes in pulmonary functions at rest following humidity changes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hyun; Hyong, In Hyouk

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of humidity changes on the values of pulmonary function at rest. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted with 30 young adults (9 males, 21 females; mean age 19.4?years). Participants' mean height was 165.1?cm, and their mean weight was 60.2?kg. The experimental setting was a laboratory in which temperature was fixed at 25?C. Using a humidifier, relative humidity was successively to adjusted 25%, 50%, and 90%, and pulmonary were measured functions at each level. Using a spirometer, forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), expiratory reserve volume (ERV), and tidal volume (TV) were measured, and the results were compared and analyzed. [Results] Controlling for temperature, FVC and FEV1 showed statistically significant differences among different levels of relative humidity, but FEV1/FVC, TV, and ERV showed no significant difference. [Conclusion] In the case of exercises that require large respiration volumes, such as aerobic exercises or exercise load tests, it is recommended that higher than normal humidity levels should be maintained. PMID:25995557

  2. Analysis of changes in pulmonary functions at rest following humidity changes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Hyun; Hyong, In Hyouk

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of humidity changes on the values of pulmonary function at rest. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted with 30 young adults (9 males, 21 females; mean age 19.4?years). Participants mean height was 165.1?cm, and their mean weight was 60.2?kg. The experimental setting was a laboratory in which temperature was fixed at 25?C. Using a humidifier, relative humidity was successively to adjusted 25%, 50%, and 90%, and pulmonary were measured functions at each level. Using a spirometer, forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), expiratory reserve volume (ERV), and tidal volume (TV) were measured, and the results were compared and analyzed. [Results] Controlling for temperature, FVC and FEV1 showed statistically significant differences among different levels of relative humidity, but FEV1/FVC, TV, and ERV showed no significant difference. [Conclusion] In the case of exercises that require large respiration volumes, such as aerobic exercises or exercise load tests, it is recommended that higher than normal humidity levels should be maintained. PMID:25995557

  3. Efficacy of Halotherapy for Improvement of Pulmonary function Tests and Quality of Life of Non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectatic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rabbani, Bita; Najafizadeh, Katayoon; Vishteh, Hamid Reza Khodami; Shafaghi, Shadi; Karimi, Shirin; Mahmoodian, Saeid

    2013-01-01

    Background Halotherapy is a treatment modality suggested for patients with chronic pulmonary diseases. In this technique, inhalation of crystal salt stones extracted from mines improves patients’ pulmonary function tests and symptoms by facilitating the secretion or expulsion of phlegm and mucus and reducing the risk of bacterial infections. Bronchiectasis is chronic disease of the airways characterized by irreversible dilation of airways. It has a progressive course and despite the available treatments, many of these patients eventually enter the advanced phase of disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of halotherapy on pulmonary function tests and quality of life of non-CF bronchiectatic patients. Materials and Methods This clinical trial evaluated the results of spirometry and 6-minute walk test as well as the quality of life (according to SF-36 questionnaire) of stable non-CF bronchiectatic patients presenting to the pulmonary clinic before and after the use of salt spray for 2 months. Results Of 40 study patients, 20 were excluded due to various reasons and 20 were evaluated. The mean age of patients was 35±11 years and the underlying cause of disease was chronic pulmonary infection in 65% of cases. Comparison of the results of pulmonary function tests and 6-minute walk test and quality of life indices in SF-36 questionnaire before and after the intervention showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). However, 65% of patients were satisfied with halotherapy and requested to receive the medication again. Conclusion Our study results indicated that 2-month halotherapy with Salitair inhaler containing salt crystals extracted from the Klodawa mine in Poland could not improve the pulmonary function tests or quality of life of non-CF bronchiectatic patients. No significant side effects were noted in understudy patients. Future studies with larger sample size and longer duration of treatment are recommended to better determine the efficacy of this treatment modality. PMID:25191458

  4. Study of pulmonary functions of the tourist guides in two show caves in Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debevec Gerjevic, V.; Jovanovič, P.

    2009-04-01

    Park Škocjan Caves is located in South Eastern part of Slovenia. It was established with aim of conserving and protecting exceptional geomorphological, geological and hydrological outstanding features, rare and endangered plant and animal species, paleontological and archaeological sites, ethnological and architectural characteristics and cultural landscape and for the purpose of ensuring opportunities for suitable development, by the National Assembly of the Republic of Slovenia in 1996. Due to their exceptional significance for cultural and natural heritage, the Škocjan Caves were entered on UNESCO's list of natural and cultural world heritage sites in 1986. Caves have always been special places for people all over the world. There has been a lot of research done in the field of speleology and also in medicine in relation to speleotherapy. There is still one field left partial unexplored and its main issue covers the interaction between special ecosystems as caves and human activities and living. Implementing the Slovene legislation in the field of radiation protection, we are obligated to perform special measurements in the caves and also having our guides and workers in the caves regularly examined according to established procedure. The medical exams are performed at Institution of Occupational Safety, Ljubljana in order to monitor the influence of Radon to the workers in the cave. The issue of epidemiologic research encompass several factors that are not necessarily related to the radon. Park Škocjan Caves established research monitoring projects such as caves microclimate parameters, quality of the water, every day's data from our meteorological station useful tool in public awareness related to pollution and climate change. Last year a special study was started in order to evaluate pulmonary functions of persons who work in the caves and those who work mostly in offices. Two groups of tourist guides from Škocjan Caves and Postojna Cave were included in the study. The promising results will highlight the need of medical survey of people working in the caves and help managers of the caves to adopt reactive management process. In order to facilitate decision process related to protection of people and caves environment, special recommendation in form of index of environment's use will be proposed after the study.

  5. Under-recognized complications in patients with paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria: raised pulmonary pressure and reduced right ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Hill, Anita; Sapsford, Robert J; Scally, Andrew; Kelly, Richard; Richards, Stephen J; Khurisgara, Gus; Sivananthan, Mohan U; Hillmen, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is becoming a recognized complication of the hereditary and acquired haemolytic anaemias, associated with a poor prognosis. Recently we reported that patients with paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH) have high levels of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), a biomarker associated with both right and left ventricular dysfunction and cardiac dysfunction. In the current study we evaluated a cohort of patients (N = 29) with haemolytic PNH for elevated pulmonary artery systolic pressure and cardiac function by Doppler-echocardiography. Of the 29 patients, eight were further studied using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as two additional patients (number of patients studied using cardiac MRI = 10). Plasma from the first cohort (N = 29) demonstrated intravascular haemolysis associated with a 12-fold increase in median nitric oxide (NO) consumption when compared with healthy volunteers (P < 0·001). Doppler echocardiography demonstrated normal left ventricular function and elevated pulmonary artery systolic pressure in 41% of patients. Cardiac MRI from the second cohort (N = 10) demonstrated depressed right ventricular function in 80% of PNH patients tested, and 60% had findings suggestive of subclinical small pulmonary emboli. Together, these data suggest a high prevalence of haemolysis-associated NO scavenging, Doppler-estimated systolic pulmonary hypertension, and depressed right ventricular function in patients with PNH. PMID:22639982

  6. The effects of Mount St. Helens volcanic ash on the pulmonary function of 120 elementary school children.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K G; Loftsgaarden, D O; Gideon, R A

    1982-12-01

    The 1977 Montana legislature funded an extensive Montana Air Pollution Study (MAPS). One hundred and twenty children in the fourth and fifth grades in Missoula, Montana had their pulmonary functions tested on 6 days during the 1979-80 school year. On May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens erupted, resulting in very high total suspended particulates (TSP) levels due to ash (peak day = 11,054 micrograms/m3 24-hour average) through May 22. When these children returned to school on May 23, they had their pulmonary functions tested a seventh time. There was no substantial decrease in pulmonary function after the ash exposure. By comparison, the childrens' pulmonary tests did show a significant decrease after 3 days of high urban air pollution (440 micrograms/m3 3-day average). Businesses and schools were closed for 4 days after the eruption and people were advised to remain indoors; hence, lack of measured pulmonary function test effects from the ash may be due to the protective precautions taken by the children. PMID:7181226

  7. Lung ultrasound in systemic sclerosis: correlation with high-resolution computed tomography, pulmonary function tests and clinical variables of disease.

    PubMed

    Gigante, Antonietta; Rossi Fanelli, Filippo; Lucci, Silvio; Barilaro, Giuseppe; Quarta, Silvia; Barbano, Biagio; Giovannetti, Antonello; Amoroso, Antonio; Rosato, Edoardo

    2016-03-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a hallmark of systemic sclerosis (SSc). Although high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is the gold standard to diagnose ILD, recently lung ultrasound (LUS) has emerged in SSc patients as a new promising technique for the ILD evaluation, noninvasive and radiation-free. The aim of this study was to evaluate if there is a correlation between LUS, chest HRCT, pulmonary function tests findings and clinical variables of the disease. Thirty-nine patients (33 women and 6 men; mean age 51 ± 15.2 years) underwent clinical examination, HRCT, pulmonary function tests and LUS for detection of B-lines. A positive correlation exists between the number of B-lines and the HRCT score (r = 0.81, p < 0.0001), conversely a negative correlation exists between the number of B-lines and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) (r = -0.63, p < 0.0001). The number of B-lines increases along with the progression of the capillaroscopic damage. A statistically significant difference in the number of B-lines was found between patients with and without digital ulcers [42 (3-84) vs 16 (4-55)]. We found that the number of B-lines increased with the progression of both HRCT score and digital vascular damage. LUS may therefore, be a useful tool to determine the best timing for HRCT execution, thus, preventing for many patients a continuous and useless exposure to ionizing radiation. PMID:26494471

  8. Sirtuin 3 deficiency is associated with inhibited mitochondrial function and pulmonary arterial hypertension in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Paulin, Roxane; Dromparis, Peter; Sutendra, Gopinath; Gurtu, Vikram; Zervopoulos, Sotirios; Bowers, Lyndsay; Haromy, Alois; Webster, Linda; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sebastien; Michelakis, Evangelos D

    2014-11-01

    Suppression of mitochondrial function promoting proliferation and apoptosis suppression has been described in the pulmonary arteries and extrapulmonary tissues in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), but the cause of this metabolic remodeling is unknown. Mice lacking sirtuin 3 (SIRT3), a mitochondrial deacetylase, have increased acetylation and inhibition of many mitochondrial enzymes and complexes, suppressing mitochondrial function. Sirt3KO mice develop spontaneous PAH, exhibiting previously described molecular features of PAH pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC). In human PAH PASMC and rats with PAH, SIRT3 is downregulated, and its normalization with adenovirus gene therapy reverses the disease phenotype. A loss-of-function SIRT3 polymorphism, linked to metabolic syndrome, is associated with PAH in an unbiased cohort of 162 patients and controls. If confirmed in large patient cohorts, these findings may facilitate biomarker and therapeutic discovery programs in PAH. PMID:25284742

  9. High-resolution CT in simple coal workers' pneumoconiosis. Lack of correlation with pulmonary function tests and arterial blood gas values

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.C.; Willing, S.; Bretz, R.; Harty, M.; Lane, E.; Anderson, W.H. )

    1993-10-01

    We examined 21 miners by means of standard chest radiography, high-resolution computerized tomography (HRCT), pulmonary function tests, and resting arterial blood gas levels. Using the ILO/UC classification of pneumoconiosis, 7 miners had category 1/0 or 2/1 simple coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP). By HRCT, nodules were identified in 12 miners; 4 of 9 were classified as category 0/0 CWP; 2 of 5, 0/1 CWP; 5 of 6, 1/0 CWP; and 1 of 1, 2/1 CWP by chest radiograph. Focal emphysema was identified by HRCT in 7 miners; 4 of 9 were classified as 0/0 CWP; 2 of 5, 0/1 CWP; and 1 of 6, 1/0 CWP by standard chest radiography. Four miners with definite nodules confirmed by HRCT had focal emphysema, while three without nodules had focal emphysema. Pulmonary function testing was not different between miners with or without CWP by standard chest radiography, nor was it different between miners with or without definite nodules evidenced by HRCT. No difference in resting oxygenation was found between any group of miners. The presence of focal emphysema confirmed by HRCT did not significantly affect pulmonary function tests on resting arterial blood gas values. There was, however, a significantly lower FEV1 and mean forced expiratory flow during the middle half of forced vital capacity with lifetime nonsmoking miners. The presence of CWP on chest radiography was significantly correlated with smoking cigarettes but not the years of mining. The presence of nodules on HRCT approached a significant correlation with cigarette smoking, but focal emphysema did not. For detecting evidence of coal dust accumulation in lung parenchyma and identifying focal emphysema, HRCT was more sensitive than standard chest radiography. However, despite earlier detection of parenchymal abnormalities, abnormal pulmonary function attributable to coal dust could not be identified.

  10. Change in obstructive pulmonary function as a result of cumulative exposure to welding fumes as determined by magnetopneumography in Japanese arc welders

    PubMed Central

    Nakadate, T.; Aizawa, Y.; Yagami, T.; Zheg, Y. Q.; Kotani, M.; Ishiwata, K.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the effect of chronic exposure to welding fumes on pulmonary function by a direct estimate of fumes accumulated in the lungs. METHODS: The strength of the residual magnetic field of externally magnetised lungs (LMF) was used as an estimate of fumes accumulated in the lungs. The results of forced spirometry manoeuvres obtained in 143 of 153 male welders in the original sample were cross sectionally evaluated according to LMF. Seven conventional forced spirogram indices and two time domain spirogram indices were used as pulmonary function indices, and height squared proportional correction was performed when necessary. RESULTS: The distribution of LMF values was considerably skewed towards positive. There was a weak but significant positive relation between age and log transformed LMF. Obstructive pulmonary function indices correlated well with LMF. After adjustment for age and smoking, however, a significant association with LMF was only found with percentage rate of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1%) divided by forced vital capacity (FVC) and mu, and average component of assumed time constant distribution of lung peripheral units. Neither FVC nor vital capacity (VC), as indices of restrictive disorders, showed a significant association with LMF. Based on the results of multiple regression analyses, a 0.6% decrease in FEV1% and 0.039 unit increase in mu were expected for each doubling of LMF. CONCLUSION: Obstructive changes in pulmonary function were found to be related to level of cumulative exposure to welding fume in male Japanese arc welders after controlling for age and smoking, assuming that LMF adequately reflects accumulation of welding fumes in the lungs. PMID:9930088

  11. Pulmonary function and pathology in cats exposed 28 days to diesel exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Pepelko, W.E.; Mattox, J.K.; Yang, Y.Y.; Moore, W. Jr.

    1980-09-01

    Young adult male cats were exposed 28 days, 20 hrs per day, to a 1:14 dilution of diesel exhaust emissions. Following termination of exposure, the following pulmonary function measurements were carried out: lung volumes, maximum expiratory flow rates (MEF), MEF at 50%, 25% and 10% of vital capacity (VC): forced expiratory volume (FEV) after 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 sec, dynamic compliance, resistance and helium washout at 25, 50, 75, and 100 breaths per min. The only significant functional change was a decrease in MEF at 10% of VC (P x .02). The lungs of the exposed cats appeared charcoal grey with frequent focal black spots visible on the pleural surface. Pathologic changes in the exposed cats included a predominantly peribronchiolar localization of black-pigmented macrophages within the alveoli producing a focal pneumonitis or alveolitis. In general, evidence of serious lung damage was not observed following the 28-day exposure period.

  12. Pulmonary function status of Kolkata inhabitants of different economic class during rainy and winter seasons.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, B P; Nandy, A; Hossain, M; Alam, J

    2011-10-01

    The pulmonary function status of the Kolkata inhabitants was evaluated during rainy and winter seasons. The pulmonary function tests (PFT) of the 1st study was carried out in the months of July to August when the environment is pollution free and the 2nd study was carried out between November to January when the environment is polluted. In the 1st study a total of 162 (male-88, female-74) inhabitants were investigated and again they were repeated in same way in the 2nd study. To evaluate the respiratory function status, Slow Vital Capacity (SVC), Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) and Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) were recorded. Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec as the percentage of FVC (FEV1%), forced expiratory flow at 200mL-1200 mL, 25-75% and 75-85% were calculated from the same tracings. Males were having higher mean PFT values compared to females because of sex difference. In the 2nd study PFT values were significantly lower compared to 1st study. According to different durations of stay category the PFT values were significantly reduced in winter season. The regression lines showed decrement as the duration of stay on that area was increased and it was more in 2nd study compared to 1st study. In both studies the PFT values found higher in high economic class of people. Between the same economic class of people PFT values were significantly lower in winter season. Respiratory impairments were also found higher during winter and males were having more impairment compared to females. Respiratory impairments in both sexes were more in winter and low economic class of people had maximum respiratory impairments. In rainy season and winter season the respiratory impairments were less in non-smokers. Males had more respiratory function impairments compared to females. PMID:23505833

  13. Voluntary pulmonary function screening with GOLD standard: an effective and simple approach to detect lung obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Wei; Tian, Yao; Yang, Min

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence of lung obstruction is probably underestimated. Early detection and screening may alter the course and prognosis associated with lung disease. We investigated the effectiveness of voluntary lung function screening program and the agreement between the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) and the lower limit of normal (LLN) standard for public screening in Xian China. Methods Pulmonary function testing was conducted on volunteers recruited from eight community centers in Xian, China between July and August 2012. Participants underwent three forced vital capacity (FVC) maneuvers. The maneuver with the best FEV1 was retained. Participants filled out a medical history survey before undergoing pulmonary function testing. Patients that self-reported lung disease on the health survey were excluded from the analysis. Results A total of 803 volunteers participated in this study. And 722 participants (93.8%) did not self-report chronic lung disease and were analyzed. Of these participants, 143 subjects (19.8%) were diagnosed by GOLD standard and 134 subjects (18.6%) had obstruction with LLN definition. GOLD definition can identify more asymptomatic subjects (19.1%) with respect to LLN. GOLD definition can detect more lung obstruction in elder subjects compared with young people, the difference is significant (P=0.0007). The overall agreement between the 2 methods was good: the kappa estimate was 0.822. The agreement in subjects aged 40-49, 50-59 and 60-69 years was good: the kappa estimate was 0.82, 0.936 and 0.907 respectively and the agreement in subjects aged 18-29 was inferior: the kappa estimate was only 0.555. Conclusions Voluntary lung function screening program with GOLD standard may be a simple and effective approach to ensuring high yield detection of lung obstruction in subjects aged 40-69. PMID:26716035

  14. Interaction of endothelial nitric oxide synthase with mitochondria regulates oxidative stress and function in fetal pulmonary artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Konduri, Girija G; Afolayan, Adeleye J; Eis, Annie; Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Teng, Ru-Jeng

    2015-11-01

    An increase in oxygen tension at birth is one of the key signals that initiate pulmonary vasodilation in the fetal lung. We investigated the hypothesis that targeting endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) to the mitochondrial outer membrane regulates reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in the fetal pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAEC) during this transition. We isolated PAEC and pulmonary arteries from 137-day gestation fetal lambs (term = 144 days). We exposed PAEC to a simulated transition from fetal to (3% O2) to normoxic (21%) or hyperoxic (95% O2) postnatal Po2 or to the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) agonist ATP. We assessed the effect of O2 and ATP on eNOS interactions with the mitochondrial outer membrane protein porin and with the chaperone hsp90. We also investigated the effect of decoy peptides that blocked eNOS interactions with porin or hsp90 on PAEC angiogenesis and vasodilator function of pulmonary arteries. Transition of fetal PAEC from 3 to 21% O2 but not to 95% O2 or exposure to ATP increased eNOS association with hsp90 and porin. Decoy peptides that blocked eNOS interactions decreased NO release, increased O2 consumption and mitochondrial ROS levels, and impaired PAEC angiogenesis. Decoy peptides also inhibited the relaxation responses of pulmonary artery rings and dilation of resistance size pulmonary arteries to ATP. The mitochondrial-antioxidant mito-ubiquinone restored the response to ATP in decoy peptide-treated pulmonary arteries. These data indicate that targeting eNOS to mitochondria decreases endothelial oxidative stress and facilitates vasodilation in fetal pulmonary circulation at birth. PMID:26320159

  15. Early effects of intratracheal instillation of elastase on mortality, respiratory function, and pulmonary morphometry of F-344 rats

    SciTech Connect

    Damon, E.G.; Mauderly, J.L.; Jones, R.K.

    1982-01-01

    Rats were intratracheally instilled with purified elastase at doses ranging from 0.3 to 1.6 IU/g of body weight to induce pulmonary emphysema. In 50 rats exposed to elastase at doses ranging from 0.3 to 1.6 IU/g, the LD/sub 50/ was approximately 1.2 IU/g. A mortality of 9% occurred in 94 rats instilled with a dose of 1.0 IU/g. Pulmonary function tests were conducted on nine surviving rats 2 to 4 weeks after instillation of elastase at doses ranging from 0.8 to 1.2 IU/g and on 20 untreated controls. The treated rats exhibited significant differences in pulmonary function similar to those observed in human emphysema. In rats treated at dose of 1.0 or 1.2 IU/g, histopathological studies showed there was an extensive loss of alveolar fine structure resulting in alveolar spaces ranging from 3 to 10 times the size of those in untreated control rats. Morphometric measurements of the mean linear intercepts of the alveolar septa confirmed these findings. Since the changes in pulmonary function and structure in rats treated with elastase at a dose of 1.0 IU/g body weight were consistent with changes observed in human patients with pulmonary emphysema, and since the mortality rate of 9% was considered acceptable, this dose was selected for use in subsequent studies requiring an animal model of emphysema.

  16. Liver enzyme elevation and normal pulmonary function in an adult with a declining forced expiratory volume in 1 second.

    PubMed

    Rider, Nicholas L; Craig, Timothy J

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a case report of a 41-year-old male firefighter with cholecystitis and a history of mildly elevated alanine aminotransferase. Liver biopsy showed periodic acid Schiff-positive, diastase-resistant periportal globules. Retrospective review of clinical data revealed progressive lung function decline despite absent pulmonary symptoms and normal pulmonary function testing. The following disorders should be considered in any patient with elevated transaminases without an apparent etiology: viral hepatitides, medication toxicity, autoimmune hepatitis, alcohol-induced hepatic injury, and alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency. PMID:18534093

  17. What is the effect of peripheral muscle fatigue, pulmonary function, and body composition on functional exercise capacity in acromegalic patients?

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Agnaldo Jos; Guedes da Silva, Dbora Pedroza; Ferreira, Arthur de S; Kasuki, Leandro; Gadelha, Mnica Roberto; Guimares, Fernando Silva

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The six-minute walk test (6MWT) is increasingly being used as an important tool for analyzing functional capacity in patients with multisystem disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of body composition, peripheral muscle function, and pulmonary function on the six-minute walk distance (6MWD) in acromegalic patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-two patients with active acromegaly, with a mean age of 48.6 12.1?years, underwent an evaluation of body composition using electrical bioimpedance, isometric dynamometry with surface electromyography, tests of pulmonary function, and the 6MWT. [Results] The mean SD values for the 6MWD, fat-free mass (FFM), and maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) were 65.5 11.7% predicted, 55.1 10.6?kg, and 55.2 16.8% predicted, respectively. There was a significant correlation between the 6MWD and the following parameters: the angle of the linear regression line obtained using the values of the median frequency electromyography signal over time during the fatigability test for the vastus medialis muscle (MDF, r=0.65), FFM (r=0.62), MEP (r=0.60), height(2)/resistance index (r=0.52), resistance (r=?0.50), and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (r=0.50). Multivariate analysis showed that MDF, FFM, and MEP were independent predictors of the 6MWD (R2=0.52). [Conclusion] The fatigability of the peripheral muscles, FFM, and MEP are the primary determinants of the 6MWD in acromegalics. PMID:25931716

  18. Effects of slow breathing exercise on cardiovascular functions, pulmonary functions & galvanic skin resistance in healthy human volunteers - a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Turankar, A.V.; Jain, S.; Patel, S.B.; Sinha, S.R.; Joshi, A.D.; Vallish, B.N.; Mane, P.R.; Turankar, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Regular practice of slow breathing has been shown to improve cardiovascular and respiratory functions and to decrease the effects of stress. This pilot study was planned to evaluate the short term effects of pranayama on cardiovascular functions, pulmonary functions and galvanic skin resistance (GSR) which mirrors sympathetic tone, and to evaluate the changes that appear within a short span of one week following slow breathing techniques. Methods: Eleven normal healthy volunteers were randomized into Pranayama group (n=6) and a non-Pranayama control group (n=5); the pranayama volunteers were trained in pranayama, the technique being Anuloma-Viloma pranayama with Kumbhak. All the 11 volunteers were made to sit in similar environment for two sessions of 20 min each for seven days, while the pranayama volunteers performed slow breathing under supervision, the control group relaxed without conscious control on breathing. Pulse, GSR, blood pressure (BP) and pulmonary function tests (PFT) were measured before and after the 7-day programme in all the volunteers. Results: While no significant changes were observed in BP and PFT, an overall reduction in pulse rate was observed in all the eleven volunteers; this reduction might have resulted from the relaxation and the environment. Statistically significant changes were observed in the Pranayama group volunteers in the GSR values during standing phases indicating that regular practice of Pranayama causes a reduction in the sympathetic tone within a period as short as 7 days. Interpretation & conclusions: Beneficial effects of pranayama started appearing within a week of regular practice, and the first change appeared to be a reduction in sympathetic tone. PMID:23760377

  19. Reducing lung function decline in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: potential of nintedanib

    PubMed Central

    Woodcock, Hannah V; Molyneaux, Philip L; Maher, Toby M

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic, progressive, fibrotic lung disease with no clear etiology and a paucity of therapeutic options. Nintedanib (previously known as BIBF 1120) is a tyrosine kinase receptor antagonist which inhibits a number of key receptors, including those for platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and fibroblast growth factor (FGF). These growth factors are profibrotic and each has been investigated as a potential standalone therapeutic target in IPF. Simultaneous inhibition of these receptors, with an analog of nintedanib, has proved to be effective in experimental animal models of pulmonary fibrosis. This observation, together with extensive safety and pharmacokinetic data from studies of nintedanib in malignancy, paved the way for the clinical development of this drug in IPF. The Phase IIb TOMORROW trial demonstrated that treatment with nintedanib may potentially slow decline in lung function, decrease the frequency of acute exacerbations, and improve quality of life in patients with IPF. While these observations are drawn from a single clinical trial, taken together with the preclinical data they suggest that nintedanib may yet become an important therapeutic option for individuals with IPF. The results of ongoing parallel, international, multicenter Phase III clinical trials are therefore eagerly awaited. PMID:23818761

  20. Aerobic Exercise Capacity and Pulmonary Function in Athletes With and Without Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, William R.; Barros Neto, Turibio L.; Chacra, Antonio R.; Dib, Sergio A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the aerobic exercise capacity and pulmonary function between athletes with and without type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Fifty-one adult age-matched individuals were assessed in random order to the maximum volume of O2 consumption (Vo2peak max) (ml/kg/min), anaerobic threshold (ml/kg/min), peak pulmonary ventilation (Ve), heart rate (beats per min), time to exhaustion (min), forced vital capacity (FEV) (%), forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) (%), total lung capacity (TLC) (%), and lung diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) (%). Individuals were 27 with type 1 diabetes: 15 athletes (ADM) and 12 nonathletes (NADM); and 24 healthy individuals: 12 ADM and 12 NADM. Duration of diabetes was 14.6 ± 6.2 and 15.2 ± 6.7 years in ADM and NADM, respectively. RESULTS Vo2peak max was higher in ADM than in NADM (P < 0.001). The anaerobic threshold was lower in subjects with type 1 diabetes than in control subjects (P < 0.001). FEV1 was lower in ADM than in other groups (NADM, athletes control, and nonathletes control, P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Aerobic capacity in subjects with type 1 diabetes with programmed exercise is similar to the capacity of normal athletes despite lower anaerobic threshold and FEV1. PMID:20807874

  1. PPAR-? Regulates Carnitine Homeostasis and Mitochondrial Function in a Lamb Model of Increased Pulmonary Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Rafikov, Ruslan; Kumar, Sanjiv; Hou, Yali; Oishi, Peter E.; Datar, Sanjeev A.; Raff, Gary; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Carnitine homeostasis is disrupted in lambs with endothelial dysfunction secondary to increased pulmonary blood flow (Shunt). Our recent studies have also indicated that the disruption in carnitine homeostasis correlates with a decrease in PPAR-? expression in Shunt lambs. Thus, this study was carried out to determine if there is a causal link between loss of PPAR-? signaling and carnitine dysfunction, and whether the PPAR-? agonist, rosiglitazone preserves carnitine homeostasis in Shunt lambs. Methods and Results siRNA-mediated PPAR-? knockdown significantly reduced carnitine palmitoyltransferases 1 and 2 (CPT1 and 2) and carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT) protein levels. This decrease in carnitine regulatory proteins resulted in a disruption in carnitine homeostasis and induced mitochondrial dysfunction, as determined by a reduction in cellular ATP levels. In turn, the decrease in cellular ATP attenuated NO signaling through a reduction in eNOS/Hsp90 interactions and enhanced eNOS uncoupling. In vivo, rosiglitazone treatment preserved carnitine homeostasis and attenuated the development of mitochondrial dysfunction in Shunt lambs maintaining ATP levels. This in turn preserved eNOS/Hsp90 interactions and NO signaling. Conclusion Our study indicates that PPAR-? signaling plays an important role in maintaining mitochondrial function through the regulation of carnitine homeostasis both in vitro and in vivo. Further, it identifies a new mechanism by which PPAR-? regulates NO signaling through Hsp90. Thus, PPAR-? agonists may have therapeutic potential in preventing the endothelial dysfunction in children with increased pulmonary blood flow. PMID:22962578

  2. Clinical Validation of 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography Ventilation With Pulmonary Function Test Data

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, Douglas; Schubert, Leah; Diot, Quentin; Castillo, Richard; Castillo, Edward; Guerrero, Thomas; Martel, Mary K.; Linderman, Derek; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Miften, Moyed; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: A new form of functional imaging has been proposed in the form of 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) ventilation. Because 4DCTs are acquired as part of routine care for lung cancer patients, calculating ventilation maps from 4DCTs provides spatial lung function information without added dosimetric or monetary cost to the patient. Before 4DCT-ventilation is implemented it needs to be clinically validated. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) provide a clinically established way of evaluating lung function. The purpose of our work was to perform a clinical validation by comparing 4DCT-ventilation metrics with PFT data. Methods and Materials: Ninety-eight lung cancer patients with pretreatment 4DCT and PFT data were included in the study. Pulmonary function test metrics used to diagnose obstructive lung disease were recorded: forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and FEV1/forced vital capacity. Four-dimensional CT data sets and spatial registration were used to compute 4DCT-ventilation images using a density change–based and a Jacobian-based model. The ventilation maps were reduced to single metrics intended to reflect the degree of ventilation obstruction. Specifically, we computed the coefficient of variation (SD/mean), ventilation V20 (volume of lung ≤20% ventilation), and correlated the ventilation metrics with PFT data. Regression analysis was used to determine whether 4DCT ventilation data could predict for normal versus abnormal lung function using PFT thresholds. Results: Correlation coefficients comparing 4DCT-ventilation with PFT data ranged from 0.63 to 0.72, with the best agreement between FEV1 and coefficient of variation. Four-dimensional CT ventilation metrics were able to significantly delineate between clinically normal versus abnormal PFT results. Conclusions: Validation of 4DCT ventilation with clinically relevant metrics is essential. We demonstrate good global agreement between PFTs and 4DCT-ventilation, indicating that 4DCT-ventilation provides a reliable assessment of lung function. Four-dimensional CT ventilation enables exciting opportunities to assess lung function and create functional avoidance radiation therapy plans. The present work provides supporting evidence for the integration of 4DCT-ventilation into clinical trials.

  3. [Use of pulmonary function tests and biomarkers studies to diagnose and follow-up interstitial lung disease in systemic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Hua-Huy, T; Rivière, S; Tiev, K P; Dinh-Xuan, A T

    2014-12-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is becoming one of the main causes of death of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). The prevalence of ILD associated with SSc (SSc-ILD) varies from 33% to 100% according to diagnostic methods. Clinical features such as dyspnea on exertion, dry cough, and chest pains are not specific and usually late-appearing, implying more specific tests in the diagnostic, prognosis, and follow-up of ILD in patients with SSc. High resolution thoracic CT scanner (HRCT) is more sensitive than chest X-ray in the detection of SSc-ILD. Pulmonary function tests (PFT) are non-invasive and periodically used to assess the impacts of SSc on respiratory function. Diagnostic values of bronchoalveolar lavage and histological examination on lung biopsy are controversial. However, these techniques are essential for studying cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of SSc-ILD. Several biomarkers such as surfactant-A (SP-A), -D (SP-D), mucin-like high molecular weight glycoprotein (KL-6), and chemokine CCL-18 have been implicated in SSc-PID. Serum levels of these proteins are correlated with the severity of SSc-ILD, as assessed by HRCT and/or PFT. Finally, alveolar concentration of exhaled nitric oxide can be used to screen SSc patients with high risk of deterioration of respiratory function, in whom immunosuppressant treatment could be useful in preventing the evolution to irreversible lung fibrosis. PMID:25457218

  4. Combination of Echocardiographic and Pulmonary Function Test Parameters Improves Sensitivity for the Diagnosis of Systemic Sclerosis-Associated Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension- Analysis of Two Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Gladue, Heather; Steen, Virginia; Allanore, Yannick; Saggar, Rajeev; Saggar, Rajan; Maranian, Paul; Berrocal, Veronica J.; Avouac, Jerome; Meune, Christophe; Trivedi, Mona; Khanna, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate routinely collected non-invasive tests from two systemic sclerosis (SSc) cohorts to determine their predictive value alone and in combination vs. right heart catheterization (RHC)- confirmed pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Methods We evaluated two cohorts of patients who were at risk or with incident PAH: (1) The Pulmonary Hypertension Assessment and Recognition Outcomes in Scleroderma (PHAROS) cohort and (2) an inception SSc cohort at Cochin Hospital. Estimated right ventricular systolic pressure (eRVSP) on echocardiogram (TTE) and and pulmonary function tests (PFT) parameters were evaluated and their predictive values determined. We then evaluated patients with PAH missed on TTE cutoffs that were subsequently identified by a PFT parameter. Results In the PHAROS cohort (N=206), 59 (29%) had RHC-defined PAH. An eRVSP threshold of 3550mmHg failed to diagnose PAH in 731% of patients, 5070% of which (N=213) were captured by PFT parameters. In the Cochin cohort (N=141), 10 (7%) patients had RHC confirmed PAH. An eRVSP threshold of 3550mmHg missed 070% (N = 07) patients, of which 068% (N = 06) were captured by PFT parameters. The combination of TTE and PFT improved the negative predictive value for diagnosing PAH. Conclusion In 2 large SSc cohorts, screening with TTE and PFT captured majority of patients with PAH. TTE and PFT complement each other for the diagnosis of PAH. PMID:23950183

  5. Respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function tests in security and safety products plant workers

    PubMed Central

    Balbay, Ege Gulec; Toru, Umran; Arbak, Peri; Balbay, Oner; Suner, Kezban Ozmen; Annakkaya, Ali Nihat

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Lock and key factory workers are under the risk of metal pneumoconiosis and occupational asthma. In this cross-sectional study, its aimed to evaluate the relationship between metal dust exposure and respiratory symptoms, pulmonary function tests of workers in different section of lock and key factory. Methods: 54 male workers (mean age, 32.8 5.4) in a security and safety products plant were evaluated for respiratory symptoms, pulmonary function tests and smoking habits. Results have been interpreted by comparison of the painting (28/54) and grinding group workers (26/54). Results: There was no significant difference between painting (32.1 4.8) and grinding (33.6 6.1) groups regarding mean age (P > 0.05). Smokers were in significantly higher in grinding group (18/26). Cough and sputum were reported 14.3% (4/28) in painting and 3.8% (1/26) in grinding workers (P > 0.05). Chest tightness was seen in 7.1% and 7.7% of painting and grinding workers, respectively (P > 0.05). But no chest tightness was reported in both groups when they were away work. Breathlessness was seen in 10.7% and 7.7% of painting and grinding workers, respectively (P > 0.05). Breathlessness was similar in both groups (7.1% vs. 3.8%) when they were away work. When comparing painting and grinding workers respiratory functions no significant difference observed. Chest radiography in painting and grinding workers showed hyperlucency (3.6% vs.11.4%), respectively. Conclusion: Painting groups in lock and key factory workers had more but statistically insignificantrespiratory complaints. Interestingly, chest tightness was only observed when both groups were at work. It was thought that ventilation and using personal protective equipment in factory could provide significant benefits. PMID:25126195

  6. The effect of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on pulmonary surfactant function and ultrastructure

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Pulmonary surfactant reduces surface tension and is present at the air-liquid interface in the alveoli where inhaled nanoparticles preferentially deposit. We investigated the effect of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanosized particles (NSP) and microsized particles (MSP) on biophysical surfactant function after direct particle contact and after surface area cycling in vitro. In addition, TiO2 effects on surfactant ultrastructure were visualized. Methods A natural porcine surfactant preparation was incubated with increasing concentrations (50-500 ?g/ml) of TiO2 NSP or MSP, respectively. Biophysical surfactant function was measured in a pulsating bubble surfactometer before and after surface area cycling. Furthermore, surfactant ultrastructure was evaluated with a transmission electron microscope. Results TiO2 NSP, but not MSP, induced a surfactant dysfunction. For TiO2 NSP, adsorption surface tension (?ads) increased in a dose-dependent manner from 28.2 2.3 mN/m to 33.2 2.3 mN/m (p < 0.01), and surface tension at minimum bubble size (?min) slightly increased from 4.8 0.5 mN/m up to 8.4 1.3 mN/m (p < 0.01) at high TiO2 NSP concentrations. Presence of NSP during surface area cycling caused large and significant increases in both ?ads (63.6 0.4 mN/m) and ?min (21.1 0.4 mN/m). Interestingly, TiO2 NSP induced aberrations in the surfactant ultrastructure. Lamellar body like structures were deformed and decreased in size. In addition, unilamellar vesicles were formed. Particle aggregates were found between single lamellae. Conclusion TiO2 nanosized particles can alter the structure and function of pulmonary surfactant. Particle size and surface area respectively play a critical role for the biophysical surfactant response in the lung. PMID:19793393

  7. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Pulmonary Hypertension Overview What is pulmonary hypertension? "Pulmonary" means "in the lungs," and "hypertension" means "high blood pressure." Pulmonary hypertension is an increase ...

  8. The effect of chemical warfare on respiratory symptoms, pulmonary function tests and their reversibility 23-25years after exposure.

    PubMed

    Boskabady, Mrteza; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Zabihi, Narges Amel; Boskabady, Marzie

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary complications due to mustard gas exposure range from no effect to severe bronchial stenosis. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and respiratory symptoms in chemical war victims were studied 23-25years after exposure to sulfur mustard (SM). Respiratory symptoms were evaluated in a sample of 142 chemical war victims and 120 control subjects with similar age from the general population using a questionnaire including questions on respiratory symptoms in the past year. PFT values were also measured in chemical war victims before and 15min after the inhalation of 200g salbutamol and baseline PFT in controls. All chemical war victims (100%) reported respiratory symptoms. Wheezing (66.19%), cough (64.78%), and chest tightness (54.4%) were the most common symptoms and only 15.5% of chemical war victims reported sputum (p<0.01 for sputum and p<0.001 for other symptoms compared with control group). In addition, 49.3% of chemical war victims had wheeze in chest examination, which were significantly higher than control group (p<0.001). The severity of respiratory symptoms was also significantly higher than control subjects (p<0.05 for sputum and p<0.001 for other symptoms). All the PFT values were also significantly lower in chemical war victims than that in control subjects (p<0.001 for all cases). In addition, all the PFT values improved significantly after the inhalation of 200g salbutamol (p<0.05-p<0.001). These results showed that chemical war victims, 23-25years after exposure to chemical warfare have higher frequencies and severity of respiratory symptoms. PFT values were also significantly reduced among chemical war victims, which showed reversibility due to the inhalation of 200g salbutamol. PMID:23258738

  9. Higher Lipoprotein (a) Levels Are Associated with Better Pulmonary Function in Community-Dwelling Older People – Data from the Berlin Aging Study II

    PubMed Central

    Buchmann, Nikolaus; Kassner, Ursula; Norman, Kristina; Goldeck, David; Eckardt, Rahel; Pawelec, Graham; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Demuth, Ilja

    2015-01-01

    Reduced pulmonary function and elevated serum cholesterol levels are recognized risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Currently, there is some controversy concerning relationships between cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, serum triglycerides and lung function. However, most previous studies compared patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with healthy controls, and only a small number examined this relationship in population-based cohorts. Moreover, lipoprotein a [Lp(a)], another lipid parameter independently associated with cardiovascular diseases, appears not to have been addressed at all in studies of lung function at the population level. Here, we determined relationships between lung function and several lipid parameters including Lp(a) in 606 older community-dwelling participants (55.1% women, 68±4 years old) from the Berlin Aging Study II (BASE-II). We found a significantly lower forced expiration volume in 1 second (FEV1) in men with low Lp(a) concentrations (t-test). This finding was further substantiated by linear regression models adjusting for known covariates, showing that these associations are statistically significant in both men and women. According to the highest adjusted model, men and women with Lp(a) levels below the 20th percentile had 217.3ml and 124.2ml less FEV1 and 239.0ml and 135.2ml less FVC, respectively, compared to participants with higher Lp(a) levels. The adjusted models also suggest that the known strong correlation between pro-inflammatory parameters and lung function has only a marginal impact on the Lp(a)-pulmonary function association. Our results do not support the hypothesis that higher Lp(a) levels are responsible for the increased CVD risk in people with reduced lung function, at least not in the group of community-dwelling older people studied here. PMID:26421427

  10. The value of regional ventilation measurements in the prediction of postoperative pulmonary function following lobectomy

    SciTech Connect

    LaManna, M.M.; Rambaran, N.; Mezic, E.T.; Murphy, D.M.F.; Ora-Cajulis, M. )

    1990-06-01

    Eleven patients, mean age 62, considered for lobectomy for lung carcinoma underwent regional quantitative ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy. Preoperative selection criteria included an FEV{sub 1} (forced expiratory volume) of 55% predicted or less, and/or an FEV{sub 1}/FVC% (forced vital capacity) of <70%. A patients underwent a complete set of pulmonary function tests including flow rates, lung volumes, diffusing capacity and blood gases. The statistical correlation between the predicted postoperative FEV{sub 1} and actual yielded an r value of 0.67 with a p value of 0.56. There was good correlation between the predicted postoperative FEV{sub 1} utilizing scintigraphy and the actual, but in several cases the predicted postoperative FEV{sub 1} was underestimated. Although the degree of underestimation is insignificant, patients may be excluded from lobectomy when their values are marginal.

  11. Pulmonary function in aluminium smelter and surrounding community--a case study.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, B P; Saiyed, H N; Roychowdhury, A; Alam, J

    2007-10-01

    The increase of industrial activities in the Angul-Talcher area, Orissa resulted in indiscriminate disposal of waste into the environment leading to the deterioration of the quality of the environment, which affects the health of the workers as well as the community people. Considering the magnitude of the problem, the pulmonary function study had been carried out in one of the largest aluminium producing plant of the country as well as surrounding community people. Aluminium is produced from oxides of alumina by Hall-Heroult smelting process. The electrolysis called as aluminium smelting is carried out in an electrolytic cell (pot) having anode, cathode and electrolyte. The aluminium is deposited in the cathode and the oxygen moves towards anode is released. The workers working at the captive power plant (CPP), which is necessary to meet the power demand of the smelter plant were also investigated. 180 smelter plants workers (non-smoker 129, smoker-51) of different sections and 37 captive power plant workers (non-smoker 29, smoker-8) had undergone pulmonary function tests. Besides these, 85 persons from the surrounding community (non-smoker-66, smoker-19) were also investigated. The workers were all male. Spirometric assessments of Vital Capacity (VC), Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), and Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) were done by Spirovit-sp-10 (Schiller Health Care Ltd, Switzerland) and Wrights Peak flow meter (Clement and Clarke, UK). Different lung volumes like FEV1, FEV1%, and flow rates like FEF200-1200ml, FEF25-75% and FEF75-85% were calculated from the same tracings pulmonary function test (PFT) results of the workers according to different age groups, duration of exposures and smoking habits. The mean values of SVC, FVC and FEV1 of smelter plant workers were found higher compared to the community people but the values of captive power plant workers were very much close to the values of the community people. A gradual decrement of the PFT values was found as duration of exposure increased. Lung volumes and the flow rates were decreased as age increases but in some age groups that trend was not followed. It has been found that in each category of subjects, smokers have the higher mean pulmonary function values compared to the non-smokers. Except the community people in all other cases the different flow rates were found higher in nonsmokers compared to smokers. The restrictive, obstructive and combined restrictive and obstructive types of impairments among the subjects were noticed. The respiratory impairment among the workers as a whole was found higher in smelter plant workers (9.44%) followed by the captive power plant workers (5.40%) and the community people (2.35%). In smelter plant workers both the restrictive and obstructive impairments were found higher compared to captive power plant and the community people. PMID:18476380

  12. Respiratory muscle and pulmonary function in polymyositis and other proximal myopathies.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, N M; Arora, N S; Rochester, D F

    1983-01-01

    We studied 53 patients with proximal myopathy to determine at what level of muscle weakness hypercapnic respiratory failure is likely, and which tests of pulmonary function or respiratory muscle strength would best suggest this development. Respiratory muscle strength was determined from maximal static efforts and in half the patients, both inspiratory and expiratory muscle strengths were less than 50% of normal. In the 37 patients without lung disease respiratory muscle weakness was accompanied by significant decreases in vital capacity, total lung capacity, and maximum voluntary ventilation; by significant increases in residual volume and arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2); and greater likelihood of dependence on ventilators, atelectasis, and pneumonia. Hypercapnia was particularly likely when respiratory muscle strength was less than 30% of normal in uncomplicated myopathy, and when vital capacity was less than 55% of the predicted value in any patient. PMID:6412385

  13. Respiratory Symptoms and Pulmonary Functions of Workers Employed in Turkish Textile Dyeing Factories

    PubMed Central

    Ozkurt, Sibel; Kargi, Beyza Akdag; Kavas, Murat; Evyapan, Fatma; Kiter, Göksel; Baser, Sevin

    2012-01-01

    Dyes are known to be a causative agent of occupational asthma in workers exposed to them. We have evaluated respiratory symptoms among textile workers. The study population comprised 106 exposed workers and a control (unexposed) group. Data were collected by a questionnaire. PFTs (Pulmonary Function Test) were performed. Among the exposed workers 36.8% defined phlegm. Respiratory symptoms were not significantly different between two groups. The employment duration of the exposed workers with phlegm was longer than those without phlegm (p = 0.027). The mean % predicted of FEF25–75 of the exposed workers was found to be significantly lower than the control (unexposed) group (p = 0.01). Our study suggests that textile dyeing might cause respiratory symptoms in workers. PMID:22690183

  14. Pulmonary function testing in the screening of workers: guidelines for instrumentation, performance, and interpretation.

    PubMed

    Hankinson, J L

    1986-10-01

    Medical surveillance of workers exposed to potential respiratory hazards may be a valuable tool in early recognition and prevention of certain occupational lung diseases. The use of pulmonary function tests, particularly spirometry, has been widely accepted as an integral part of respiratory surveillance. A National Aeronautics and Space Administration contract report on the Occupational Safety and Health Administration medical and workplace surveillance requirements and recommendations by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health is a recent detailed study of medical surveillance requirements and recommendations (unpublished study, 1983). This paper is a brief guide for those in the medical profession attempting to establish or improve their medical surveillance programs for occupational respiratory diseases. It describes procedures to use and techniques for interpreting test results, and finally includes a study of normal reference values. In addition, the references should provide additional information for establishing a respiratory medical surveillance program. PMID:3772542

  15. Pulmonary function in aluminium smelter and surrounding community--a case study.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Chattopadhyay BP; Saiyed HN; Roychowdhury A; Alam J

    2007-10-01

    The increase of industrial activities in the Angul-Talcher area, Orissa resulted in indiscriminate disposal of waste into the environment leading to the deterioration of the quality of the environment, which affects the health of the workers as well as the community people. Considering the magnitude of the problem, the pulmonary function study had been carried out in one of the largest aluminium producing plant of the country as well as surrounding community people. Aluminium is produced from oxides of alumina by Hall-Heroult smelting process. The electrolysis called as aluminium smelting is carried out in an electrolytic cell (pot) having anode, cathode and electrolyte. The aluminium is deposited in the cathode and the oxygen moves towards anode is released. The workers working at the captive power plant (CPP), which is necessary to meet the power demand of the smelter plant were also investigated. 180 smelter plants workers (non-smoker 129, smoker-51) of different sections and 37 captive power plant workers (non-smoker 29, smoker-8) had undergone pulmonary function tests. Besides these, 85 persons from the surrounding community (non-smoker-66, smoker-19) were also investigated. The workers were all male. Spirometric assessments of Vital Capacity (VC), Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), and Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) were done by Spirovit-sp-10 (Schiller Health Care Ltd, Switzerland) and Wrights Peak flow meter (Clement and Clarke, UK). Different lung volumes like FEV1, FEV1%, and flow rates like FEF200-1200ml, FEF25-75% and FEF75-85% were calculated from the same tracings pulmonary function test (PFT) results of the workers according to different age groups, duration of exposures and smoking habits. The mean values of SVC, FVC and FEV1 of smelter plant workers were found higher compared to the community people but the values of captive power plant workers were very much close to the values of the community people. A gradual decrement of the PFT values was found as duration of exposure increased. Lung volumes and the flow rates were decreased as age increases but in some age groups that trend was not followed. It has been found that in each category of subjects, smokers have the higher mean pulmonary function values compared to the non-smokers. Except the community people in all other cases the different flow rates were found higher in nonsmokers compared to smokers. The restrictive, obstructive and combined restrictive and obstructive types of impairments among the subjects were noticed. The respiratory impairment among the workers as a whole was found higher in smelter plant workers (9.44%) followed by the captive power plant workers (5.40%) and the community people (2.35%). In smelter plant workers both the restrictive and obstructive impairments were found higher compared to captive power plant and the community people.

  16. Multidetector computed tomography pulmonary angiography in childhood acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chun Xiang; Schoepf, U Joseph; Chowdhury, Shahryar M; Fox, Mary A; Zhang, Long Jiang; Lu, Guang Ming

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a life-threatening condition affecting people of all ages. Multidetector row CT pulmonary angiography has improved the imaging of pulmonary embolism in both adults and children and is now regarded as the routine modality for detection of pulmonary embolism. Advanced CT pulmonary angiography techniques developed in recent years, such as dual-energy CT, have been applied as a one-stop modality for pulmonary embolism diagnosis in children, as they can simultaneously provide anatomical and functional information. We discuss CT pulmonary angiography techniques, common and uncommon findings of pulmonary embolism in both conventional and dual-energy CT pulmonary angiography, and radiation dose considerations. PMID:25846076

  17. Decreased proteasomal function accelerates cigarette smoke-induced pulmonary emphysema in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yosuke; Tomaru, Utano; Ishizu, Akihiro; Ito, Tomoki; Kiuchi, Takayuki; Ono, Ayako; Miyajima, Syota; Nagai, Katsura; Higashi, Tsunehito; Matsuno, Yoshihiro; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Miwa, Soichi; Kasahara, Masanori

    2015-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a disease common in elderly people, characterized by progressive destruction of lung parenchyma and chronic inflammation of the airways. The pathogenesis of COPD remains unclear, but recent studies suggest that oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in alveolar cells contributes to emphysematous lung destruction. The proteasome is a multicatalytic enzyme complex that plays a critical role in proteostasis by rapidly destroying misfolded and modified proteins generated by oxidative and other stresses. Proteasome activity decreases with aging in many organs including lungs, and an age-related decline in proteasomal function has been implicated in various age-related pathologies. However, the role of the proteasome system in the pathogenesis of COPD has not been investigated. Recently, we have established a transgenic (Tg) mouse model with decreased proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity, showing age-related phenotypes. Using this model, we demonstrate here that decreased proteasomal function accelerates cigarette smoke (CS)-induced pulmonary emphysema. CS-exposed Tg mice showed remarkable airspace enlargement and increased foci of inflammation compared with wild-type controls. Importantly, apoptotic cells were found in the alveolar walls of the affected lungs. Impaired proteasomal activity also enhanced apoptosis in cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-exposed fibroblastic cells derived from mice and humans in vitro. Notably, aggresome formation and prominent nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor were observed in CSE-exposed fibroblastic cells isolated from Tg mice. Collective evidence suggests that CS exposure and impaired proteasomal activity coordinately enhance apoptotic cell death in the alveolar walls that may be involved in the development and progression of emphysema in susceptible individuals such as the elderly. PMID:25915723

  18. Lung Function and Breathing Pattern in Subjects Developing High Altitude Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Clarenbach, Christian F.; Senn, Oliver; Christ, Andreas L.; Fischler, Manuel; Maggiorini, Marco; Bloch, Konrad E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of the study was to comprehensively evaluate physiologic changes associated with development of high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). We tested whether changes in pulmonary function and breathing pattern would herald clinically overt HAPE at an early stage. Methods In 18 mountaineers, spirometry, diffusing capacity, nitrogen washout, nocturnal ventilation and pulse oximetry were recorded at 490 m and during 3 days after rapid ascent to 4559 m. Findings were compared among subjects developing HAPE and those remaining well (controls). Results In 8 subjects subsequently developing radiographically documented HAPE at 4559 m, median FVC declined to 82% of low altitude baseline while closing volume increased to 164% of baseline (P<0.05, both instances). In 10 controls, FVC decreased slightly (to 93% baseline, P<0.05) but significantly less than in subjects with HAPE and closing volume remained unchanged. Sniff nasal pressure was reduced in both subjects with and without subsequent HAPE. During nights at 4559 m, mean nocturnal oxygen saturation dropped to lower values while minute ventilation, the number of periodic breathing cycles and heart rate were higher (60%; 8.6 L/min; 97 cycles/h; 94 beats/min, respectively) in subjects subsequently developing HAPE than in controls (73%; 5.1 L/min; 48 cycles/h; 79 beats/min; P<0.05 vs. HAPE, all instances). Conclusion The results comprehensively represent the pattern of physiologic alterations that precede overt HAPE. The changes in lung function are consistent with reduced lung compliance and impaired gas exchange. Pronounced nocturnal hypoxemia, ventilatory control instability and sympathetic stimulation are further signs of subsequent overt HAPE. Registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00274430 PMID:22829927

  19. A comparative study of the effects of yoga and swimming on pulmonary functions in sedentary subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shilpa S; Sawane, Manish V

    2012-01-01

    Context: The modality of exercise that is most beneficial and easy to perform has become a topic of research. Yogic exercises are being widely studied; however, postulated benefits of yogic exercises over other exercises must be scientifically explored. Prospective randomized comparative studies involving yoga and other endurance exercises are conspicuous by their absence. Aim: This study was, therefore, designed to assess and compare the effects of yogic training and swimming on pulmonary functions in normal healthy young volunteers. Materials and Methods: 100 volunteers were inducted into the study and randomly divided into two groups: One group underwent 12 weeks training for yogic exercises and other for swimming. The training and data acquisition was done in small cohorts of 10 subjects each. The subjects were assessed by studying their anthropometric parameters and pulmonary function parameters (FVC, FEV1/FVC ratio, PEFR, FEF25-75%, FEF 0.2-1.2 l and MVV) both before and after training. Results: All parameters showed statistically significant improvements after both yoga and swimming. Comparison of these improvements for different parameters statistically analyzed by unpaired t test or Mann Whitney U test depicted a statistically better improvement in FVC, FEF25-75% and MVV with swimming as compared to yogic exercises. Conclusions: The output of this study gives slight edge to swimming as a preferred modality of exercise though either yoga or swimming can be advocated as an exercise prescription as both the modalities cause significant improvement of respiratory health. However, other factors like ability of any exercise regime to keep continued motivation and interest of the trainees must be taken into account for exercise prescription. PMID:22869997

  20. Prediction equations for pulmonary function values in healthy children in Mashhad city, North East Iran

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabaie, Syad Saleh; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Mohammadi, Sakinah Shah; Mohammadi, Oranus; Saremi, Prisa; Amery, Sediqa; Esmaili, Hbibolah; Ghafari, Zahra; Boskabady, Marziah

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) are used in assessing physiological to clinical status of the respiratory system, which is expressed as a percentage of predicted values. Predicted PFTs values are varies in different ethnics. Predicted PFTs values were studied in a sample of Iranian children. Materials and Methods: Prediction equations for PFTs were derived from urban children in the city of Mashhad (northeast Iran). Regression analysis using height and age as independent variables was applied to provide predicted values for both sexes. PFT values were measured in 414 healthy children (192 boy and 222 female, aged 4-10 years). Forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), maximal mid-expiratory flow (MMEF), peak expiratory flow (PEF), MEF at 75%, 50% and 25% of the FVC (MEF75, MEF50 and MEF25 respectively) were measured. Results: There were positive correlations between each pulmonary function variable with height and age. The largest positive correlations were found for FVC (r = 0.712, P < 0.0001) and FEV1 (r = 0.642, P < 0.0001) in boys and girls respectively with height and for PEF (0.698, P < 0.0001) and MEF (r = 0.624, P < 0.0001) with age. Comparison of PFTs derived from the equations of the present study showed significant differences with those of several previous studies (P < 0.001 for most cases). Conclusion: A set of PFT reference values and prediction equations for both sexes has been derived using relatively large, healthy, Iranian children for the first time, which the generated results were differ from several prediction equations. PMID:24778666

  1. Acute pulmonary function response to ozone in young adults as a function of body mass index

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have shown enhanced responsiveness to ozone in obese mice. Adiposity has not been examined as a possible modulator of ozone response in humans. We therefore examined the relationship between body mass index and the acute spirometric response to ozone (O(3)) exposur...

  2. Pulmonary function changes after radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer patients with long-term disease-free survival

    SciTech Connect

    Borst, Gerben R.; Jaeger, Katrien de; Belderbos, Jose; Burgers, Sjaak A.; Lebesque, Joos V. . E-mail: j.lebesque@nki.nl

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the changes in pulmonary function after high-dose radiotherapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer in patients with a long-term disease-free survival. Methods and Materials: Pulmonary function was measured in 34 patients with inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer before RT and at 3 and 18 months of follow-up. Thirteen of these patients had a pulmonary function test (PFT) 36 months after RT. The pulmonary function parameters (forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV{sub 1}], diffusion capacity [T{sub lcoc}], forced vital capacity, and alveolar volume) were expressed as a percentage of normal values. Changes were expressed as relative to the pre-RT value. We evaluated the impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, radiation pneumonitis, mean lung dose, and PFT results before RT on the changes in pulmonary function. Results: At 3, 18, and 36 months, a significant decrease was observed for the T{sub lcoc} (9.5%, 14.6%, and 22.0%, respectively) and the alveolar volume (5.8%, 6.6%, and 15.8%, respectively). The decrease in FEV{sub 1} was significant at 18 and 36 months (8.8% and 13.4%, respectively). No recovery of any of the parameters was observed. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was an important risk factor for larger PFT decreases. FEV{sub 1} and T{sub lcoc} decreases were dependent on the mean lung dose. Conclusion: A significant decrease in pulmonary function was observed 3 months after RT. No recovery in pulmonary function was seen at 18 and 36 months after RT. The decrease in pulmonary function was dependent on the mean lung dose, and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease had larger reductions in the PFTs.

  3. Effect of a set stabled environmental control on pulmonary function and airway reactivity of COPD affected horses.

    PubMed

    Vandenput, S; Votion, D; Duvivier, D H; Van Erck, E; Anciaux, N; Art, T; Lekeux, P

    1998-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the respiratory function of horses affected with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) when maintained in a barn on wood shavings and fed grass silage for a period of 6 weeks. The mechanics of breathing, blood gas analysis and bronchial reactivity were examined on five horses with COPD at the end of the environment-controlled period (Period B) and the results compared with values obtained after 2 months at pasture (Period A) and after the onset of clinical signs of acute crisis (Period C). The results showed that clinical and functional parameters were similar in healthy horses and in COPD horses placed on pasture or stabled and fed grass silage. Moreover, the bronchial reactivity of COPD horses at pasture was similar to the bronchial reactivity of healthy horses. COPD horses fed grass silage however presented a bronchial reactivity intermediate between those measured after Period A and Period C which suggested they would be more susceptible to develop bronchoconstriction when in contact with inhaled irritants. PMID:9564273

  4. Effects of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Cognitive Functions: Evidence for a Common Nature

    PubMed Central

    Andreou, Georgia; Makanikas, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) show similar neurocognitive impairments. Effects are more apparent in severe cases, whereas in moderate and mild cases the effects are equivocal. The exact mechanism that causes cognitive dysfunctions in both diseases is still unknown and only suggestions have been made for each disease separately. The primary objective of this review is to present COPD and OSAS impact on cognitive functions. Secondly, it aims to examine the potential mechanisms by which COPD and OSAS can be linked and provide evidence for a common nature that affects cognitive functions in both diseases. Patients with COPD and OSAS compared to normal distribution show significant deficits in the cognitive abilities of attention, psychomotor speed, memory and learning, visuospatial and constructional abilities, executive skills, and language. The severity of these deficits in OSAS seems to correlate with the physiological events such as sleep defragmentation, apnea/hypopnea index, and hypoxemia, whereas cognitive impairments in COPD are associated with hypoventilation, hypoxemia, and hypercapnia. These factors as well as vascocerebral diseases and changes in systemic hemodynamic seem to act in an intermingling and synergistic way on the cause of cognitive dysfunctions in both diseases. However, low blood oxygen pressure seems to be the dominant factor that contributes to the presence of cognitive deficits in both COPD and OSAS. PMID:24649370

  5. PULMONARY FUNCTION AND BRONCHIAL REACTIVITY IN HUMAN SUBJECTS WITH EXPOSURE TO OZONE AND RESPIRABLE SULFURIC ACID AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A three-year research study was conducted investigating the effects of individual and sequential exposures to ozone and sulfuric acid aerosol on pulmonary function and bronchial reactivity in human subjects. PHASE I: In healthy smokers and nonsmokers exposed for 4 hours to 98 mic...

  6. Pulmonary function response and effects of antioxidant genetic polymorphisms in healthy young adults exposed to low concentration ozone.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rational: Ozone is known to induce a variety of pulmonary effects including decrement of spirometric lung function and inflammatory reaction, and antioxidant genes are known to play an important role in modulating the effects. It is unclear, however, if such effects may occur at...

  7. EFFECTS OF INSTILLATION OF RESIDUAL OIL FLY ASH ON INDICES OF CARDIAC, PULMONARY, AND THERMOREGULATORY FUNCTION IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory


    EFFECTS OF INSTILLED RESIDUAL OIL FLY ASH (ROFA) ON INDICES OF CARDIAC, PULMONARY, AND THERMOREGULATORY FUNCTION IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE (SH) RATS. LB Wichers1, JP Nolan2, UP Kodavanti2, MCJ Schladweiler2, R Hauser3, DW Winsett2, DL Costa2, and WP Watkinson2. 1UNC Sch...

  8. Lung function declines in patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis and increased respiratory epithelial permeability to sup 99m Tc-DTPA

    SciTech Connect

    Chinet, T.; Dusser, D.; Labrune, S.; Collignon, M.A.; Chretien, J.; Huchon, G.J. )

    1990-02-01

    Respiratory epithelial clearance of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA (RC-Tc-DTPA) and pulmonary function tests (PFT) were determined at intervals of 6 or 12 months in 37 untreated, nonsmoking patients with sarcoidosis over a period of 6 to 36 months. PFT included the measurements of total lung capacity (TLC), vital capacity (VC), FEV1, and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide. No difference was found between the respiratory clearance of {sup 113m}In-DTPA (2.25 +/- 1.00%/min) and RC-Tc-DTPA (2.29 +/- 1.11%/min) in eight patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis. Pulmonary function decreased 15% or more in at least 2 function tests during 11 follow-up periods, but it remained stable during 47 follow-up periods. In patients whose lung function deteriorated, RC-Tc-DTPA increased to 3.51 +/- 1.55%/min; in contrast, in patients whose lung function remained stable, regardless of the initial values, RC-Tc-DTPA was normal (1.00 +/- 0.50%/min; p less than 0.001). In eight patients who were treated with corticosteroids, RC-Tc-DTPA decreased from 3.48 +/- 1.31%/min to 1.56 +/- 0.64%/min (p less than 0.001), and PFT improved. We conclude that in nonsmokers with pulmonary sarcoidosis, increased RC-Tc-DTPA is not related to dissociation of 99mTc from DTPA, RC-Tc-DTPA is increased when pulmonary function decreases, and, when increased, RC-Tc-DTPA decreases with corticosteroid therapy.

  9. Evaluation of high-resolution computed tomography and pulmonary function tests in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Okutan, Oguzhan; Kartaloglu, Zafer; Ilvan, Ahmet; Kutlu, Ali; Bozkanat, Erkan; Silit, Emir

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate pulmonary involvement via pulmonary function tests (PFT) and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. METHODS: Thirty-four patients with chronic HCV infection without diagnosis of any pulmonary diseases and 10 healthy cases were enrolled in the study. PFT and HRCT were performed in all cases. RESULTS: A decrease lower than 80% of the predicted value was detected in vital capacity in 9/34 patients, in forced expiratory volume in one second in 8/34 patients, and in forced expiratory flow 25 - 75 in 15/34 patients, respectively. Carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO) was decreased in 26/34 patients. Findings of interstitial pulmonary involvement were detected in the HRCT of 16/34 patients. Significant difference was found between controls and patients with HCV infection in findings of HRCT (?2 = 4.7, P = 0.003). Knodell histological activity index (KHAI) of 28/34 patients in whom liver biopsy was applied was 9.0 4.7. HRCT findings, PFT values and DLCO were not affected by KHAI in patients with HCV infection. In these patients, all the parameters were related with age. CONCLUSION: We suggest that chronic hepatitis C virus infection may cause pulmonary interstitial involvement without evident respiratory symptoms. PMID:14760762

  10. Obesity-induced adipokine imbalance impairs mouse pulmonary vascular endothelial function and primes the lung for injury

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Duong, Michelle; Wang, Nadan; Paudyal, Bishnuhari; Suratt, Benjamin T.; Kallen, Caleb B.; Sun, Jianxin; Zhu, Ying; Walsh, Kenneth; Summer, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) but mechanisms mediating this association are unknown. While obesity is known to impair systemic blood vessel function, and predisposes to systemic vascular diseases, its effects on the pulmonary circulation are largely unknown. We hypothesized that the chronic low grade inflammation of obesity impairs pulmonary vascular homeostasis and primes the lung for acute injury. The lung endothelium from obese mice expressed higher levels of leukocyte adhesion markers and lower levels of cell-cell junctional proteins when compared to lean mice. We tested whether systemic factors are responsible for these alterations in the pulmonary endothelium; treatment of primary lung endothelial cells with obese serum enhanced the expression of adhesion proteins and reduced the expression of endothelial junctional proteins when compared to lean serum. Alterations in pulmonary endothelial cells observed in obese mice were associated with enhanced susceptibility to LPS-induced lung injury. Restoring serum adiponectin levels reversed the effects of obesity on the lung endothelium and attenuated susceptibility to acute injury. Our work indicates that obesity impairs pulmonary vascular homeostasis and enhances susceptibility to acute injury and provides mechanistic insight into the increased prevalence of ARDS in obese humans. PMID:26068229

  11. High ICAM-1 gene expression in pulmonary fibroblasts of COPD patients: a reflection of an enhanced immunological function.

    PubMed

    Zandvoort, A; van der Geld, Y M; Jonker, M R; Noordhoek, J A; Vos, J T W M; Wesseling, J; Kauffman, H F; Timens, W; Postma, D S

    2006-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by destruction of extracellular matrix (ECM) in parenchymal areas, whereas the bronchial walls can show fibrosis. In addition, an extensive inflammatory process is observed. CD8+ T-cells, located throughout the lung, and epithelial cells in centrally located airways, produce cytokines involved in the inflammatory process. These cytokines may influence the present fibroblasts, the key effectors in the defective ECM repair and maintenance in COPD. The current authors explored the effects of the cytokine microenvironment on cell-cell interaction gene expression in pulmonary fibroblasts of controls (n = 6), and Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage II (n = 7) and stage IV (n = 7) COPD patients. The current authors simulated the in vivo microenvironment using supernatants of CD3/CD28 stimulated CD8+ T-cells isolated from peripheral blood of COPD patients, supernatant of a bronchial-epithelial cell line, or a combination of both. The present data show that fibroblasts of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients display an altered response to the cytokine microenvironment, depending on both the disease stage and the central or peripheral location in the lung. Especially adhesion-related genes are upregulated in fibroblasts of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, which can indicate a more pronounced role of fibroblasts in the inflammatory process in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, possibly resulting in reduced function as effectors of extracellular matrix repair. PMID:16611655

  12. Diesel exhaust particles suppress macrophage function and slow the pulmonary clearance of Listeria monocytogenes in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H M; Antonini, J M; Barger, M W; Butterworth, L; Roberts, B R; Ma, J K; Castranova, V; Ma, J Y

    2001-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) may increase susceptibility of the host to pulmonary infection. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received a single dose of DEP (5 mg/kg), carbon black (CB, 5 mg/kg), or saline intratracheally. Three days later, the rats were inoculated intratracheally with approximately 5,000 Listeria monocytogenes and sacrificed at 3, 5, and 7 days postinfection, and we determined the number of viable Listeria in the left lobe of lungs. The remaining lungs underwent bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and the retrieved BAL cells were identified and counted. Luminol-dependent chemiluminescence, a measure of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, generated by BAL cells was monitored and the levels of nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-[alpha] produced by macrophages in culture were determined. At 7 days postinfection, we excised the lung-draining lymph nodes and phenotyped the lymphocyte subpopulations. Exposure of rats to DEP, but not to CB, decreased the clearance of Listeria from the lungs. Listeria-induced generation of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence by pulmonary phagocytes decreased by exposure to DEP but not CB. Similarly, Listeria-induced production of NO by alveolar macrophages was negated at 3, 5, and 7 days after inoculation in DEP-exposed rats. In contrast, CB exposure had no effect on Listeria-induced NO production at 3 days after infection and had a substantially smaller effect than DEP at later days. Exposure to DEP or CB resulted in enlarged lung-draining lymph nodes and increased the number and percentage of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. These results showed that exposure to DEP decreased the ability of macrophages to produce antimicrobial oxidants in response to Listeria, which may play a role in the increased susceptibility of rats to pulmonary infection. This DEP-induced suppression is caused partially by chemicals adsorbed onto the carbon core of DEP, because impaired macrophage function and decreased Listeria clearance were not observed following exposure to CB. PMID:11401764

  13. Physical Function Traits of Long-term Officially Acknowledged Victims of Pollution-related Illnesses Compared with Elderly Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takako; Miyamoto, Naomi; Kozu, Ryo; Satomi, Kazuhiko; Honda, Sumihisa; Senjyu, Hideaki

    2014-10-01

    [Purpose] To examine the long-term effects of air pollution on the physical functioning of a group of officially acknowledged victims of pollution-related illnesses (Victims group) who were exposed to air pollution more than 50?years ago, we compared them with age-matched patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD group). [Subjects and Methods] The Victims group comprised 34 subjects and the COPD group 24, all of whom were aged over 65?years. Respiratory function, muscle strength, exercise capacity and physical activity were measured and compared between the groups. [Results] The Victims group had significantly higher forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), proportion of predicted FEV1, proportion of predicted vital capacity (VC), and ratio of FEV1 to forced VC than the COPD group. Surprisingly, the muscle strength of the Victims group was significantly weaker, their incremental shuttle walking test distance was significantly shorter, and their physical activity was significantly less than those of the COPD group. [Conclusion] Although the pulmonary function of Victims was better than that of the COPD group, their physical functioning was worse. Exposure to air pollution 50?years ago appears to continue to adversely affect their physical function. It is particularly important to offer Victims rehabilitation to improve their exercise performance and physical activity. PMID:25364124

  14. Examining Functions in Mathematics and Science Using Computer Interfacing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Karen Doyle

    1988-01-01

    Introduces microcomputer interfacing as a method for explaining and demonstrating various aspects of the concept of function. Provides three experiments with illustrations and typical computer graphic displays: pendulum motion, pendulum study using two pendulums, and heat absorption and radiation. (YP)

  15. Automatic classication of pulmonary function in COPD patients using trachea analysis in chest CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rikxoort, E. M.; de Jong, P. A.; Mets, O. M.; van Ginneken, B.

    2012-03-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a chronic lung disease that is characterized by airflow limitation. COPD is clinically diagnosed and monitored using pulmonary function testing (PFT), which measures global inspiration and expiration capabilities of patients and is time-consuming and labor-intensive. It is becoming standard practice to obtain paired inspiration-expiration CT scans of COPD patients. Predicting the PFT results from the CT scans would alleviate the need for PFT testing. It is hypothesized that the change of the trachea during breathing might be an indicator of tracheomalacia in COPD patients and correlate with COPD severity. In this paper, we propose to automatically measure morphological changes in the trachea from paired inspiration and expiration CT scans and investigate the influence on COPD GOLD stage classification. The trachea is automatically segmented and the trachea shape is encoded using the lengths of rays cast from the center of gravity of the trachea. These features are used in a classifier, combined with emphysema scoring, to attempt to classify subjects into their COPD stage. A database of 187 subjects, well distributed over the COPD GOLD stages 0 through 4 was used for this study. The data was randomly divided into training and test set. Using the training scans, a nearest mean classifier was trained to classify the subjects into their correct GOLD stage using either emphysema score, tracheal shape features, or a combination. Combining the proposed trachea shape features with emphysema score, the classification performance into GOLD stages improved with 11% to 51%. In addition, an 80% accuracy was achieved in distinguishing healthy subjects from COPD patients.

  16. Relevance analysis of clinical and lung function parameters changing and prognosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xueren; Peng, Shouchun; Wei, Luqing; Li, Zhenhua

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is defined as a specific form of chronic, progressive fibrosing interstitial pneumonia with unknown cause. We analyzed the changed rate of pulmonary function and arterial blood gas in IPF patients, and evaluated their influence of changed rate to IPF prognosis. Methods: 81 patients with IPF were recruited successfully, they were followed-up at 6 and 12 months. Dyspnea score and respiratory assessment parameters including FVC, FEV1, TLC, SaO2, PA-aO2, and DLCO were evaluated at their 6 and 12 months follow-up. The changed value and changed rate of above parameters were calculated, and their treatment effects were divided into 3 subgroup: improved, stable and deteriorated group. Statistical analysis was performed between groups for survival and hazards regression analysis. Results: 55 of 81 patients were follow-up at 12 months. Dyspnea score and its changed rate, the changed value of FEV1%, FVC%, TLC%, DLCO%, and PaO2, SaO2, PA-aO2 were prognosis effect factors in IPF patients in 6 and 12 months group. The survival analysis of dyspnea scores, FVC%, TLC%, DLCO%, PaO2, SaO2 and PA-aO2 at K-M were all statistical significant (P < 0.05) in improved, stable and deteriorated group. Conclusion: FVC% changed rate, dyspnea score changed rate and PaO2 changed rate were IPF patient prognosis associated factors in 6 months group; and FVC% changed rate, DLCO% changed rate and TLC% changed rate were prognosis associated factors for IPF patient in 12 months group. PMID:25663972

  17. Poor Baseline Pulmonary Function May Not Increase the Risk of Radiation-Induced Lung Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jingbo; Cao, Jianzhong; Yuan, Shuanghu; Arenberg, Douglas; Stanton, Paul; Tatro, Daniel; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Kong, Feng-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Poor pulmonary function (PF) is often considered a contraindication to definitive radiation therapy for lung cancer. This study investigated whether baseline PF was associated with radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving conformal radiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: NSCLC patients treated with CRT and tested for PF at baseline were eligible. Baseline predicted values of forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and diffusion capacity of lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) were analyzed. Additional factors included age, gender, smoking status, Karnofsky performance status, coexisting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), tumor location, histology, concurrent chemotherapy, radiation dose, and mean lung dose (MLD) were evaluated for RILT. The primary endpoint was symptomatic RILT (SRILT), including grade ≥2 radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Results: There was a total of 260 patients, and SRILT occurred in 58 (22.3%) of them. Mean FEV1 values for SRILT and non-SRILT patients were 71.7% and 65.9% (P=.077). Under univariate analysis, risk of SRILT increased with MLD (P=.008), the absence of COPD (P=.047), and FEV1 (P=.077). Age (65 split) and MLD were significantly associated with SRILT in multivariate analysis. The addition of FEV1 and age with the MLD-based model slightly improved the predictability of SRILT (area under curve from 0.63-0.70, P=.088). Conclusions: Poor baseline PF does not increase the risk of SRILT, and combining FEV1, age, and MLD may improve the predictive ability.

  18. Baroreflex failure increases the risk of pulmonary edema in conscious rats with normal left ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kazuo; Hosokawa, Kazuya; Saku, Keita; Sakamoto, Takafumi; Tobushi, Tomoyuki; Oga, Yasuhiro; Kishi, Takuya; Ide, Tomomi; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2016-01-15

    In heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), the complex pathogenesis hinders development of effective therapies. Since HFpEF and arteriosclerosis share common risk factors, it is conceivable that stiffened arterial wall in HFpEF impairs baroreflex function. Previous investigations have indicated that the baroreflex regulates intravascular stressed volume and arterial resistance in addition to cardiac contractility and heart rate. We hypothesized that baroreflex dysfunction impairs regulation of left atrial pressure (LAP) and increases the risk of pulmonary edema in freely moving rats. In 15-wk Sprague-Dawley male rats, we conducted sinoaortic denervation (SAD, n = 6) or sham surgery (Sham, n = 9), and telemetrically monitored ambulatory arterial pressure (AP) and LAP. We compared the mean and SD (lability) of AP and LAP between SAD and Sham under normal-salt diet (NS) or high-salt diet (HS). SAD did not increase mean AP but significantly increased AP lability under both NS (P = 0.001) and HS (P = 0.001). SAD did not change mean LAP but significantly increased LAP lability under both NS (SAD: 2.57 0.43 vs. Sham: 1.73 0.30 mmHg, P = 0.01) and HS (4.13 1.18 vs. 2.45 0.33 mmHg, P = 0.02). SAD markedly increased the frequency of high LAP, and SAD with HS prolonged the duration of LAP > 18 mmHg by nearly 20-fold compared with Sham (SAD + HS: 2,831 2,366 vs. Sham + HS: 148 248 s, P = 0.01). We conclude that baroreflex failure impairs volume tolerance and together with salt loading increases the risk of pulmonary edema even in the absence of left ventricular dysfunction. Baroreflex failure may contribute in part to the pathogenesis of HFpEF. PMID:26589328

  19. Effect of cardiac resynchronization therapy on pulmonary function in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Cundrle, Ivan; Johnson, Bruce D; Somers, Virend K; Scott, Christopher G; Rea, Robert F; Olson, Lyle J

    2013-09-15

    Pulmonary congestion due to heart failure causes abnormal lung function. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a proven effective treatment for heart failure. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that CRT promotes increased lung volumes, bronchial conductance, and gas diffusion. Forty-four consecutive patients with heart failure were prospectively investigated before and after CRT. Spirometry, gas diffusion (diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide), cardiopulmonary exercise testing, New York Heart Association class, brain natriuretic peptide, the left ventricular ejection fraction, left atrial volume, and right ventricular systolic pressure were assessed before and 4 to 6 months after CRT. Pre- and post-CRT measures were compared using either paired Student's t tests or Wilcoxon's matched-pair test; p values <0.05 were considered significant. Improved New York Heart Association class, left ventricular ejection fraction, left atrial volume, right ventricular systolic pressure, and brain natriuretic peptide were observed after CRT (p <0.05 for all). Spirometry after CRT demonstrated increased percentage predicted total lung capacity (90 17% vs 96 15%, p <0.01) and percentage predicted forced vital capacity (80 19% vs 90 19%, p <0.01). Increased percentage predicted total lung capacity was significantly correlated with increased peak exercise end-tidal carbon dioxide (r = 0.43, p = 0.05). Increased percentage predicted forced vital capacity was significantly correlated with decreased right ventricular systolic pressure (r = -0.30, p = 0.05), body mass index (r = -0.35, p = 0.02) and creatinine (r = -0.49, p = 0.02), consistent with an association of improved bronchial conductance and decreased congestion. Diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide did not significantly change. In conclusion, increased lung volumes and bronchial conductance due to decreased pulmonary congestion and increased intrathoracic space contribute to an improved breathing pattern and decreased hyperventilation after CRT. Persistent alveolar-capillary membrane remodeling may account for unchanged diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide. PMID:23747043

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells protect cigarette smoke-damaged lung and pulmonary function partly via VEGF-VEGF receptors.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiao-Jun; Song, Lin; Han, Feng-Feng; Cui, Zhi-Lei; Chen, Xi; Guo, Xue-Jun; Xu, Wei-Guo

    2013-02-01

    Progressive pulmonary inflammation and emphysema have been implicated in the progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), while current pharmacological treatments are not effective. Transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been identified as one such possible strategy for treatment of lung diseases including acute lung injury (ALI) and pulmonary fibrosis. However, their role in COPD still requires further investigation. The aim of this study is to test the effect of administration of rat MSCs (rMSCs) on emphysema and pulmonary function. To accomplish this study, the rats were exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) for 11 weeks, followed by administration of rMSCs into the lungs. Here we show that rMSCs infusion mediates a down-regulation of pro-inflammatory mediators (TNF-?, IL-1?, MCP-1, and IL-6) and proteases (MMP9 and MMP12) in lung, an up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptor 2, and transforming growth factor (TGF?-1), while reducing pulmonary cell apoptosis. More importantly, rMSCs administration improves emphysema and destructive pulmonary function induced by CS exposure. In vitro co-culture system study of human umbilical endothelial vein cells (EA.hy926) and human MSCs (hMSCs) provides the evidence that hMSCs mediates an anti-apoptosis effect, which partly depends on an up-regulation of VEGF. These findings suggest that MSCs have a therapeutic potential in emphysematous rats by suppressing the inflammatory response, excessive protease expression, and cell apoptosis, as well as up-regulating VEGF, VEGF receptor 2, and TGF?-1. PMID:22949406

  1. Pulmonary function tests, aerobic capacity, respiratory muscle strength and endurance of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cimen, B; Deviren, S D; Yorganclo?lu, Z R

    2001-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) show lower cardiorespiratory fitness than normal subjects. This study was planned to investigate the pulmonary function tests (PFT), respiratory muscle strength and endurance, and aerobic capacity of patients with RA, as well as the relationship of these parameters to clinical and functional status. Twenty-five RA patients aged 25-71 (48.52 +/- 14.09) and 21 control subjects aged 25-66 (45.67 +/- 13.27) participated in the study. PFT, maximum volunteer ventilation, maximum inspiratory and maximum expiratory pressures and cardiorespiratory exercise tests were carried out in all subjects to evaluate the respiratory involvement, inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength and endurance, and aerobic capacity. Patients' duration of disease, smoking and alcohol habits, duration of morning stiffness, visual analogue scale scores, ARA functional classifications and Ritchie articular indexes were recorded. All the patients and control subjects were non-exercising individuals. As a result, we found that RA patients have normal PFT but reduced respiratory muscle strength and endurance, and also reduced aerobic capacity compared to controls. According to this result, respiratory and aerobic exercises may be recommended to improve respiratory muscle strength and endurance and aerobic capacity in these patients. PMID:11434466

  2. Evaluation of pulmonary function changes in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus in Upper Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Mohamad, Ismail L.; Abdel-Azeem, Ali; Mohamed, Sherif A.A.; Othman, Hisham A.K.; Abdel Baseer, Khaled A.; Thabet, Ahmad F.; El-Houfey, Amira A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among children across the world and is responsible for a growing proportion of global healthcare expenditure. However, limited data are available on lung dysfunction in children with diabetes. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the pulmonary function changes in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Methods: We studied 60 children with T1DM (mean age 10.5 2.32 years; disease duration 2.45 0.6 years, and 50 healthy control children (mean age 9.9 2.5 years). Spirometry was performed for all individuals to measure forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), FEV1/FVC ratio, and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR). Glycemic control was assessed on the basis of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), with HbA1c values <8% considered to indicate good glycemic control, and HbA1c values ?8% to indicate poor control. Results: There was significant reduction in all spirometeric parameters in diabetic children in comparison with healthy control children. Children with poor glycemic control had significant impairment in lung functions compared with those with good glycemic control. Conclusions: T1DM in children leads to impairment of lung functions and this impairment increases with poor glycemic control. PMID:26137212

  3. Pulmonary angiography

    MedlinePLUS

    ... narrowing of the pulmonary vessels Pulmonary artery aneurysms Pulmonary hypertension , high blood pressure in the arteries of the ... the lungs (pulmonary embolism) Narrowed blood vessel Primary pulmonary hypertension Tumor in the lung

  4. Efficacy of Tiotropium Bromide and Rehabilitation Treatment on Pulmonary Function of Patients With Sulfur Mustard Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shohrati, Majid; Jalili, Maryam; Afshar, Homa; Najafian, Bita; Qazvini, Ali; Zaeri, Meysam; Amini Harandi, Ali; Ghanei, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic pulmonary complication is the most common delayed toxic effect of sulfur mustard (SM) and it has no treatment so far. Objectives: To evaluate short-term therapeutic effects of inhaled tiotropium bromide and pulmonary rehabilitation on pulmonary function of patients with SM induced lung injury. Patients and Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, using convenient sampling method, 54 patients with chronic lung disease due to SM exposure were recruited in Baqiyatallah General Hospital, Tehran, Iran for a period of 2-month study. They were randomly divided into 3 groups of 18 participants each. Group 1 received routine drugs (Serevent, Flixotide), pulmonary rehabilitation 30 minutes/2 times a week, and tiotropium bromide 18 µg/day. Group 2 was treated with routine drugs and pulmonary rehabilitation and group 3 was only on the routine drugs. cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET), plethysmographic measurements, and respiratory symptoms evaluation were performed before and after medical intervention. Results: In group 1, compared to group 3, significant differences were found with regard to symptoms of cough ([difference between the first and last visit in group 1: Diff 1] = -1.6, Diff 3 = -0.3, P = 0.01) and nocturnal dyspnea (Diff 1 = -1.9, Diff 3 = 0.0, P = 0.01), likewise, compared to group 2, significant differences were found with regard to lung function parameters of forced vital capacity (Diff 1 = 3.0, Diff 2 = -3.5, P = 0.03), forced expiratory volume in one second (Diff 1 = 3.9, Diff 2 = -5.6, P = 0.009), maximal mid-expiratory flow rate 25% - 75% (Diff 1 = 1.5, Diff 2 = -3.2, P = 0.007) and peak expiratory flow (Diff 1 = -2.06, Diff 2 = -4.3, P = 0.04). Total lung capacity (Diff 2 = 9.28, Diff 3 = -12.07, P = 0.02) and residual volume (Diff2 = 32.1, Diff3 = -27.6, P = 0.04) were increased in group 2 compared to group 3. There were no significant differences with regard to CPET results among all groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Inhalation of tiotropium bromide in combination with pulmonary rehabilitation could improve some plethysmographic lung volumes and clinical outcomes in patients with chronic pulmonary disease due to SM. Short-term prescription of pulmonary rehabilitation has no effect on CPET of patients. PMID:26756006

  5. In utero and postnatal exposure to arsenic alters pulmonary structure and function

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, R. Clark Chau, Binh; Sarihan, Priyanka; Witten, Mark L.; Pivniouk, Vadim I.; Chen, Guan Jie

    2009-02-15

    In addition to cancer endpoints, arsenic exposures can also lead to non-cancerous chronic lung disease. Exposures during sensitive developmental time points can contribute to the adult disease. Using a mouse model, in utero and early postnatal exposures to arsenic (100 ppb or less in drinking water) were found to alter airway reactivity to methacholine challenge in 28 day old pups. Removal of mice from arsenic exposure 28 days after birth did not reverse the alterations in sensitivity to methacholine. In addition, adult mice exposed to similar levels of arsenic in drinking water did not show alterations. Therefore, alterations in airway reactivity were irreversible and specific to exposures during lung development. These functional changes correlated with protein and gene expression changes as well as morphological structural changes around the airways. Arsenic increased the whole lung levels of smooth muscle actin in a dose dependent manner. The level of smooth muscle mass around airways was increased with arsenic exposure, especially around airways smaller than 100 {mu}m in diameter. This increase in smooth muscle was associated with alterations in extracellular matrix (collagen, elastin) expression. This model system demonstrates that in utero and postnatal exposure to environmentally relevant levels of arsenic can irreversibly alter pulmonary structure and function in the adults.

  6. Chronic hypoxia impairs extracellular nucleotide metabolism and barrier function in pulmonary artery vasa vasorum endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Helenius, Mikko; Kaczmarek, Elzbieta; Burns, Nana; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Stenmark, Kurt; Gerasimovskaya, Evgenia V.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular remodeling plays a pivotal role in a variety of pathophysiological conditions where hypoxia and inflammation are prominent features. Intravascular ATP, ADP and adenosine are known as important regulators of vascular tone, permeability and homeostasis, however contribution of purinergic signalling to endothelial cell growth and angiogenesis remains poorly understood. By using vasa vasorum endothelial cells (VVEC) isolated from pulmonary artery adventitia of control and chronically hypoxic neonatal calves, these studies were aimed to evaluate the effect of hypoxia on biochemical and functional properties of microvascular endothelial network at the sites of angiogenesis. In comparison with normoxic controls, VVEC from hypoxic animals are characterized by (1) drastically impaired nucleoside triphosphate diphos-phohydrolase-1 (NTPDase-1/CD39) and ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 activities with respective increases in basal extracellular ATP and ADP levels (2) higher proliferative responses to low micromolar concentrations of ATP and ADP; and (3) enhanced permeability and disordered adenosinergic control of vascular barrier function (measured as a paracellular flux of 70 kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran). Together, these results suggest that unique pattern of purine-mediated angiogenic activation and enhanced leakiness of VVEC from chronically hypoxic vessels may be defined by disordered endothelial nucleotide homeostasis at sites of active neovascularization. PMID:21922294

  7. Phenotyping mouse pulmonary function in vivo with the lung diffusing capacity.

    PubMed

    Limjunyawong, Nathachit; Fallica, Jonathan; Ramakrishnan, Amritha; Datta, Kausik; Gabrielson, Matthew; Horton, Maureen; Mitzner, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    The mouse is now the primary animal used to model a variety of lung diseases. To study the mechanisms that underlie such pathologies, phenotypic methods are needed that can quantify the pathologic changes. Furthermore, to provide translational relevance to the mouse models, such measurements should be tests that can easily be done in both humans and mice. Unfortunately, in the present literature few phenotypic measurements of lung function have direct application to humans. One exception is the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide, which is a measurement that is routinely done in humans. In the present report, we describe a means to quickly and simply measure this diffusing capacity in mice. The procedure involves brief lung inflation with tracer gases in an anesthetized mouse, followed by a 1 min gas analysis time. We have tested the ability of this method to detect several lung pathologies, including emphysema, fibrosis, acute lung injury, and influenza and fungal lung infections, as well as monitoring lung maturation in young pups. Results show significant decreases in all the lung pathologies, as well as an increase in the diffusing capacity with lung maturation. This measurement of lung diffusing capacity thus provides a pulmonary function test that has broad application with its ability to detect phenotypic structural changes with most of the existing pathologic lung models. PMID:25590416

  8. In utero and postnatal exposure to arsenic alters pulmonary structure and function.

    PubMed

    Lantz, R Clark; Chau, Binh; Sarihan, Priyanka; Witten, Mark L; Pivniouk, Vadim I; Chen, Guan Jie

    2009-02-15

    In addition to cancer endpoints, arsenic exposures can also lead to non-cancerous chronic lung disease. Exposures during sensitive developmental time points can contribute to the adult disease. Using a mouse model, in utero and early postnatal exposures to arsenic (100 ppb or less in drinking water) were found to alter airway reactivity to methacholine challenge in 28 day old pups. Removal of mice from arsenic exposure 28 days after birth did not reverse the alterations in sensitivity to methacholine. In addition, adult mice exposed to similar levels of arsenic in drinking water did not show alterations. Therefore, alterations in airway reactivity were irreversible and specific to exposures during lung development. These functional changes correlated with protein and gene expression changes as well as morphological structural changes around the airways. Arsenic increased the whole lung levels of smooth muscle actin in a dose dependent manner. The level of smooth muscle mass around airways was increased with arsenic exposure, especially around airways smaller than 100 microm in diameter. This increase in smooth muscle was associated with alterations in extracellular matrix (collagen, elastin) expression. This model system demonstrates that in utero and postnatal exposure to environmentally relevant levels of arsenic can irreversibly alter pulmonary structure and function in the adults. PMID:19095001

  9. Nitrotyrosine impairs mitochondrial function in fetal lamb pulmonary artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Teng, Ru-Jeng; Wu, Tzong-Jin; Afolayan, Adeleye J; Konduri, Girija G

    2016-01-01

    Nitration of both protein-bound and free tyrosine by reactive nitrogen species results in the formation of nitrotyrosine (NT). We previously reported that free NT impairs microtubule polymerization and uncouples endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) function in pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAEC). Because microtubules modulate mitochondrial function, we hypothesized that increased NT levels during inflammation and oxidative stress will lead to mitochondrial dysfunction in PAEC. PAEC isolated from fetal lambs were exposed to varying concentrations of free NT. At low concentrations (1-10 ?M), NT increased nitration of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) protein subunit complexes I-V and state III oxygen consumption. Higher concentrations of NT (50 ?M) caused decreased microtubule acetylation, impaired eNOS interactions with mitochondria, and decreased ETC protein levels. We also observed increases in heat shock protein-90 nitration, mitochondrial superoxide formation, and fragmentation of mitochondria in PAEC. Our data suggest that free NT accumulation may impair microtubule polymerization and exacerbate reactive oxygen species-induced cell damage by causing mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26491046

  10. Impact of nutritional status on body functioning in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and how to intervene

    PubMed Central

    Aniwidyaningsih, Wahju; Varraso, Raphalle; Cano, Noel; Pison, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of review Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fifth cause of mortality in the world. This article reviews diet as a risk or protective factor for COPD, mechanisms of malnutrition, undernutrition consequences on body functioning and how to modulate nutritional status of COPD patients. Recent findings Different dietary factors (dietary pattern, foods, nutrients) have been associated with COPD and the course of the disease. Mechanical disadvantage, energy imbalance, disuse muscle atrophy, hypoxemia, systemic inflammation and oxidative stress have been reported to cause systemic consequences such as cachexia and compromise whole body functioning. Nutritional intervention makes it possible to modify the natural course of the disease provide that it is included in respiratory rehabilitation combining bronchodilators optimization, infection control, exercise and in some patients correction of hypogonadism. Summary Diet, as a modifiable risk factor, appears more as an option to prevent and modify the course of COPD. Reduction of mechanical disadvantage, physical training and anabolic agents should be used conjointly with oral nutrition supplements to overcome undernutrition and might change the prognosis of the disease in some cases. Major research challenges address the role of systemic inflammation and the best interventions for control it besides smoking cessation. PMID:18542004

  11. Increased Decline in Pulmonary Function Among Employees in Norwegian Smelters Reporting Work-Related Asthma-Like Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Søyseth, Vidar; Johnsen, Helle Laier; Henneberger, Paul K.; Kongerud, Johny

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate associations between work-related asthma-like symptoms (WASTH) and annual pulmonary function decline among employees of 18 Norwegian smelters. Methods A 5-year longitudinal study in which WASTH was defined as a combination of dyspnea and wheezing that improved on rest days and vacation. Results A total of 12,966 spirometry examinations were performed in 3084 employees. Crude annual decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) (dFEV1) was 32.9 mL/yr (95% confidence interval, 30.5 to 35.3), and crude annual decline in forced vital capacity (FVC) (dFVC) was 40.9 mL/yr (37.8 to 43.9). After adjustment for relevant covariates, employees reporting WASTH showed higher dFEV1 by 16.0 m:/yr (3.4 to 28.6) and higher dFVC by 20.5 mL/yr (6.0 to 35.0) compared with employees not reporting WASTH. Conclusion Work-related asthma-like symptom was associated with greater annual declines in FEV1 and FVC, indicating a restrictive pattern. PMID:26340289

  12. Loss- and Gain-of-Function Approaches Indicate a Dual Role Exerted by Regulatory T Cells in Pulmonary Paracoccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, Silvia B.; Costa, Tania A.; de Araújo, Eliseu Frank; Feriotti, Claudia; Loures, Flávio V.; Pretel, Fernando D.; Calich, Vera L. G.

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), is a pulmonary fungal disease whose severity depends on the adequate development of T cell immunity. Although regulatory T (Treg) cells were shown to control immunity against PCM, deleterious or protective effects were described in different experimental settings. To clarify the function of Treg cells in pulmonary PCM, loss-and gain-of-function approaches were performed with Foxp3GFP knock-in mice and immunodeficient Rag1-/- mice, respectively, which were intratracheally infected with 106 yeast cells. The activity of Foxp3-expressing Treg cells in pulmonary PCM was determined in Foxp3GFP transgenic mice. First, it was verified that natural Treg cells migrate to the lungs of infected mice, where they become activated. Depletion of Treg cells led to reduced fungal load, diminished pathogen dissemination and increased Th1/Th2/Th17 immunity. Further, adoptive transfer of diverse T cell subsets to Rag1-/- mice subsequently infected by the pulmonary route demonstrated that isolated CD4+Foxp3+ Treg cells were able to confer some degree of immunoprotection and that CD4+Foxp3- T cells alone reduced fungal growth and enhanced T cell immunity, but induced vigorous inflammatory reactions in the lungs. Nevertheless, transfer of Treg cells combined with CD4+Foxp3- T cells generated more efficient and balanced immune Th1/Th2/Th17 responses able to limit pathogen growth and excessive tissue inflammation, leading to regressive disease and increased survival rates. Altogether, these loss- and gain-of-function approaches allow us to clearly demonstrate the dual role of Treg cells in pulmonary PCM, their deleterious effects by impairing T cell immunity and pathogen eradication, and their protective role by suppressing exacerbated tissue inflammation. PMID:26512987

  13. Pulmonary Function After Treatment for Embryonal Brain Tumors on SJMB03 That Included Craniospinal Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Daniel M.; Merchant, Thomas E.; Billups, Catherine A.; Stokes, Dennis C.; Broniscer, Alberto; Bartels, Ute; Chintagumpala, Murali; Hassall, Timothy E.; Gururangan, Sridharan; McCowage, Geoffrey B.; Heath, John A.; Cohn, Richard J.; Fisher, Michael J.; Srinivasan, Ashok; Robinson, Giles W.; Gajjar, Amar

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The treatment of children with embryonal brain tumors (EBT) includes craniospinal irradiation (CSI). There are limited data regarding the effect of CSI on pulmonary function. Methods: Protocol SJMB03 enrolled patients 3 to 21 years of age with EBT. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV{sub 1}] and forced vital capacity [FVC] by spirometry, total lung capacity [TLC] by nitrogen washout or plethysmography, and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide corrected for hemoglobin [DLCO{sub corr}]) were obtained. Differences between PFTs obtained immediately after the completion of CSI and 24 or 60 months after the completion of treatment (ACT) were compared using exact Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and repeated-measures models. Results: Between June 24, 2003, and March 1, 2010, 303 eligible patients (spine dose: ≤2345 cGy, 201; >2345 cGy, 102; proton beam, 20) were enrolled, 260 of whom had at least 1 PFT. The median age at diagnosis was 8.9 years (range, 3.1-20.4 years). The median thoracic spinal radiation dose was 23.4 Gy (interquartile range [IQR], 23.4-36.0 Gy). The median cyclophosphamide dose was 16.0 g/m{sup 2} (IQR, 15.7-16.0 g/m{sup 2}). At 24 and 60 months ACT, DLCO{sub corr} was <75% predicted in 23% (27/118) and 25% (21/84) of patients, FEV{sub 1} was <80% predicted in 20% (34/170) and 29% (32/109) of patients, FVC was <80% predicted in 27% (46/172) and 28% (30/108) of patients, and TLC was <75% predicted in 9% (13/138) and 11% (10/92) of patients. DLCO{sub corr} was significantly decreased 24 months ACT (median difference [MD] in % predicted, 3.00%; P=.028) and 60 months ACT (MD in % predicted, 6.00%; P=.033) compared with the end of radiation therapy. These significant decreases in DLCO{sub corr} were also observed in repeated-measures models (P=.011 and P=.032 at 24 and 60 months ACT, respectively). Conclusions: A significant minority of EBT survivors experience PFT deficits after CSI. Continued monitoring of this cohort is planned.

  14. Changes in pulmonary function after incidental lung irradiation for breast cancer: A prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Jaen, Javier . E-mail: javier.jaen.sspa@juntadeandalucia.es; Vazquez, Gonzalo; Alonso, Enrique; Leon, Antonio; Guerrero, Rafael; Almansa, Julio F.

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to analyze changes in pulmonary function after radiation therapy (RT) for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 39 consecutive eligible women, who underwent postoperative irradiation for breast cancer, were entered in the study. Spirometry consisting of forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV{sub 1}), carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO), and gammagraphic (ventilation and perfusion) pulmonary function tests (PFT) were performed before RT and 6, 12, and 36 months afterwards. Dose-volume and perfusion-weighted parameters were obtained from 3D dose planning: Percentage of lung volume receiving more than a threshold dose (V{sub i}) and between 2 dose levels (V{sub (i-j)}). The impact of clinical and dosimetric parameters on PFT changes ({delta}PFT) after RT was evaluated by Pearson correlation coefficients and stepwise lineal regression analysis. Results: No significant differences on mean PFT basal values (before RT) with respect to age, smoking, or previous chemotherapy (CT) were found. All the PFT decreased at 6 to 12 months. Furthermore FVC, FEV{sub 1}, and ventilation recovered almost to their previous values, whereas DLCO and perfusion continued to decrease until 36 months (-3.3% and -6.6%, respectively). Perfusion-weighted and interval-scaled dose-volume parameters (pV{sub (i-j)}) showed better correlation with {delta}PFT (only {delta}perfusion reached statistically significance at 36 months). Multivariate analysis showed a significant relation between pV{sub (10-20)} and {delta}perfusion at 3 years, with a multiple correlation coefficient of 0.48. There were no significant differences related to age, previous chemotherapy, concurrent tamoxifen and smoking, although a tendency toward more perfusion reduction in older and nonsmoker patients was seen. Conclusions: Changes in FVC, FEV{sub 1} and ventilation were reversible, but not the perfusion and DLCO. We have not found a conclusive mathematical predictive model, provided that the best model only explained 48% of the variability. We suggest the use of dose-perfused volume and interval-scaled parameters (i.e., pV{sub (10-20)}) for further studies.

  15. Pulmonary function abnormalities in adult patients with acute exacerbation of bronchiectasis: A retrospective risk factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanliang; Niu, Yuqian; Tian, Guizhen; Wei, Jingan; Gao, Zhancheng

    2015-08-01

    Lung function impairments, especially airflow obstruction, are important features during acute exacerbation in patients with bronchiectasis. Recognition of the risk factors associated with airflow obstruction is important in the management of these exacerbations. The medical records of adult patients admitted to the Peking University People's Hospital, Beijing, China, from 2004 to 2011 with a diagnosis of bronchiectasis were reviewed retrospectively. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to evaluate the risk factors associated with airflow obstruction. Airflow obstruction was found in 55.6% of 156 patients hospitalized with acute exacerbation of bronchiectasis, and the risk factors associated with airflow obstruction included young age (?14 years old) at diagnosis (odds ratio (OR) = 3.454, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.709-6.982, p = 0.001) as well as the presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; OR = 14.677, 95% CI 5.696-37.819, p = 0.001), asthma (OR = 3.063, 95% CI 1.403-6.690, p = 0.005), and wheezing on auscultation (OR = 3.279, 95% CI 1.495-7.194, p = 0.003). The C-reactive protein (13.9 mg/dl vs. 6.89 mg/dl, p = 0.005), partial pressure of arterial oxygen (66.7 8.57 mmHg vs. 89.56 12.80 mmHg, p < 0.001), and partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (40.52 2.77 mmHg vs. 42.87 5.39 mmHg, p = 0.02) profiles were different between patients with or without airflow obstruction. In addition, patients colonized with potential pathogenic microorganisms had a decreased diffusing capacity (56.0% vs. 64.7%, p = 0.04). Abnormal pulmonary function was common in hospitalized patients with bronchiectasis exacerbations. Airflow obstruction was correlated with the patient's age at diagnosis, as well as the presence of combined COPD and asthma, and wheezing on auscultation, which also resulted in more severe systemic inflammation and hypoxemia. PMID:25882894

  16. Causes and prevalence of inadequate pulmonary function testing among patients with systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sumphao-Ngern, Pichaporn; Boonsawat, Watchara; Mahakkanukrauh, Ajanee; Suwannaroj, Siraphop; Sae-Oue, Uraiwan; Netwijitpan, Sittichai; Nanagara, Ratanavadee

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Spirometry is a screening tool for evaluating the degree of restrictive lung disease in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Observations indicated that some patients could not complete the test. The aim of the study was to identify the prevalence, causes and clinical predictors of an inadequate pulmonary function test (PFT) in SSc. Material and methods A cross-sectional study was performed among SSc patients over 18 years old followed up at Srinagarind Hospital, Khon Kaen, Thailand, during January 2006–December 2012. The adequacy of the PFT was based on the acceptable blow criteria as set out by the American Thoracic Society and the European Respiratory Society 2005 Standardizations of Spirometry. Results Two hundred and forty-nine patients were included (female to male ratio was 2 : 1). The mean age at performing PFT was 51.4 ±11.1 years (range: 19.6–79.5). Median duration of disease at performing PFT was 2 years (IQR: 0.6–4.4). Inadequate PFT occurred in 73 cases (prevalence 29.3%: 95% CI: 23.6–35.0); the majority (60 cases; 82.2%) had an expiration time < 6 s and the others were due to plateau < 1 s (11 cases; 15%), air leak around mouth piece (1 case; 1.4%) and hesitation (1 case; 1.4%). Thirteen of 73 (17.8%) had an unusable graph with the overall prevalence of 5.2% (95% CI: 2.4–8.0). The factor associated with inadequate PFT was docy mass index (BMI) < 18.5 kg/m2 (OR = 2.17: 95% CI: 1.49–3.17); the same factor was associated with an unusable graph, which was confirmed by the multivariate analysis (OR = 5.21; 95% CI: 1.60–16.95). Conclusions One-third of Thai SSc patients had an inadequate pulmonary function test – the majority because of inadequate time for expiring. Low BMI influenced the effectiveness of the test, leading to an incomplete graph for evaluating lung disease in SSc. PMID:26788088

  17. Effects of SO/sub 2/ exposure on canine pulmonary epithelial functions

    SciTech Connect

    Man, S.F.; Hulbert, W.C.; Man, G.; Mok, K.; Williams, D.J.

    1989-03-01

    We examined the effects of a single exposure of high concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) on the pulmonary epithelium in adult dogs over a period of several weeks. Mucociliary tracheal transport rates and alveolar clearance of /sup 99m/Tc-labeled diethylene triamine pentacetate (/sup 99m/TcO/sub 4/minus//) were measured in vivo, before and immediately after inhalation of 100 ppm or 500 ppm SO/sub 2/, and then weekly for 3-5 weeks. At the completion of the in vivo studies, tracheal epithelium was studied in Ussing chambers for bioelectric properties (short-circuited current, transepithelial potential difference), nonelectrolyte permeability for calculation of pore sizes, and changes in bioelectric properties following pharmacological manipulations. These tissues were then fixed for scanning electron microscopy studies. Additional dogs were sacrificed for microscopy studies at several time intervals to provide a histological basis for the altered mucociliary transport. We found that despite marked derangement of mucociliary transport caused by damage to the ciliated cells, recovery occurred over a period of several weeks, and alveolar permeability as assessed by the radioaerosol technique did not change. We concluded that the solubility of SO/sub 2/ and perhaps a more severe damaging effect of SO/sub 2/ specific on the ciliated cells might be the explanation for the observations.

  18. The innate pulmonary granuloma: characterization and demonstration of dendritic cell recruitment and function.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Bo-Chin; Freeman, Christine M; Stolberg, Valerie R; Hu, Jerry S; Komuniecki, Eric; Chensue, Stephen W

    2004-03-01

    Granulomas are innate sequestration responses that can be modified by superimposed acquired immune mechanisms. The present study examined the innate stage of pulmonary granuloma responses to bead-immobilized Th1- and Th2-inducing pathogen antigens (Ags), Mycobacteria bovis purified protein derivative (PPD) and Schistosoma mansoni soluble egg Ags (SEA). Compared to a nonpathogen Ag, PPD and SEA bead elicited larger lesions with the former showing accelerated inflammation. Temporal analyses of cytokine and chemokine transcripts showed all Ag beads induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha mRNA but indicated biased interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and IL-12 expression with PPD challenge. All beads elicited comparable levels of CXCL9, CXL10, CCL2, CCL17, and CCL22 mRNA, but PPD beads caused biased CXCL2 CXCL5, CCL3, and CCL4 expression whereas both pathogen Ags induced CCL7. Immunohistochemical, electron microscopic, and flow cytometric analyses showed that Ag beads mobilized CD11c+ dendritic cells (DCs) of comparable maturation. Transfer of DCs from PPD Ag-challenged lungs conferred a Th1 anamnestic cytokine response in recipients. Surprisingly, transfer of DCs from the helminth SEA-challenged lungs did not confer the expected Th2 response, but instead rendered recipients incapable of Ag-elicited IL-4 production. These results provide in vivo evidence that lung DCs recruited under inflammatory conditions favor Th1 responses and alternative mechanisms are required for Th2 commitment. PMID:14982855

  19. Iptakalim attenuates hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats by endothelial function protection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rong; Bi, Li-Qing; Wu, Su-Ling; Li, Lan; Kong, Hui; Xie, Wei-Ping; Wang, Hong; Meng, Zi-Li

    2015-08-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the protective effects of iptakalim, an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium channel opener, on the inflammation of the pulmonary artery and endothelial cell injury in a hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) rat model. Ninety-six Sprague-Dawley rats were placed into normobaric hypoxia chambers for four weeks and were treated with iptakalim (1.5 mg/kg/day) or saline for 28 days. The right ventricle systolic pressures (RVSP) were measured and small pulmonary arterial morphological alterations were analyzed with hematoxylin and eosin staining. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed to analyze the content of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-10. Immunohistochemical analysis for ED1(+) monocytes was performed to detect the inflammatory cells surrounding the pulmonary arterioles. Western blot analysis was performed to analyze the expression levels of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the lung tissue. Alterations in small pulmonary arteriole morphology and the ultrastructure of pulmonary arterial endothelial cells were observed via light and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Iptakalim significantly attenuated the increase in mean pulmonary artery pressure, RVSP, right ventricle to left ventricle plus septum ratio and small pulmonary artery wall remodeling in hypoxia-induced PAH rats. Iptakalim also prevented an increase in IL-1β and a decrease in IL-10 in the peripheral blood and lung tissue, and alleviated inflammatory cell infiltration in hypoxia-induced PAH rats. Furthermore, iptakalim enhanced PECAM-1 and eNOS expression and prevented the endothelial cell injury induced by hypoxic stimuli. Iptakalim suppressed the pulmonary arteriole and systemic inflammatory responses and protected against the endothelial damage associated with the upregulation of PECAM-1 and eNOS, suggesting that iptakalim may represent a potential therapeutic agent for PAH. PMID:25936382

  20. Ecstasy Exposure & Gender: Examining Components of Verbal Memory Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Price, Jenessa S.; Shear, Paula; Lisdahl, Krista M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Studies have demonstrated verbal memory deficits associated with past year ecstasy use, although specific underlying components of these deficits are less understood. Further, prior research suggests potential gender differences in ecstasy-induced serotonergic changes. Therefore, the current study investigated whether gender moderated the relationship between ecstasy exposure and components of verbal memory after controlling for polydrug use and confounding variables. Method Data were collected from 65 polydrug users with a wide range of ecstasy exposure (ages 1835; 48 ecstasy and 17 marijuana users; 02310 ecstasy tablets). Participants completed a verbal learning and memory task, psychological questionnaires, and a drug use interview. Results Increased past year ecstasy exposure predicted poorer short and long delayed free and cued recalls, retention, and recall discrimination. Male ecstasy users were more susceptible to dose-dependent deficits in retention than female users. Conclusion Past year ecstasy consumption was associated with verbal memory retrieval, retention, and discrimination deficits in a dose-dependent manner in a sample of healthy young adult polydrug users. Male ecstasy users were at particular risk for deficits in retention following a long delay. Gender difference may be reflective of different patterns of polydrug use as well as increased hippocampal sensitivity. Future research examining neuronal correlates of verbal memory deficits in ecstasy users are needed. PMID:25545890

  1. Pulmonary Function Abnormalities in Regard to Age at the Time of Diagnosis of Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Nowicka, U; Wiatr, E; Radzikowska, E; Martusewicz-Boros, M; Boros, P; Fijo?ek, J; Jakubowska, L; Szamotulska, K; Roszkowski-?li?, K

    2015-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is a complex syndrome caused by exaggerated immune response to inhalation of a variety of organic particles in susceptible individuals. In this study we assessed the relationship between age at the time of diagnosis and the degree of functional and radiological changes in HP. The diagnosis of HP was made on the basis of a combination of clinical symptoms, medical history, serological tests, radiologic evidence of diffuse lung disease, and absence of other identifiable causes of lung disease. We reviewed the records of 111 patients (68 women) diagnosed with HP over a period of 18years (1995-2013). The patients were stratified into 3 age-groups: <30, 30-49, and ?50years old. The commonest cause of HP was avian antigens (56.8%). Dyspnea was present in 97.3% of patients, weight loss in 54.7% of patients, and respiratory insufficiency in 24.3% of patients. Lung fibrosis in chest computed tomography was found in 35.1% of patients. Lung function was impaired more seriously in the youngest age-group, with lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) <40% in 69.2% of these patients. Restrictive pattern was present in 92.3% of patients in this group, as compared with the 41.0% in the whole cohort. In this group, desaturation in the six minute walk test also was most notable, amounting to a median of 11%. In conclusion, diagnosis of HP at young age is predictive of a more severe clinical course of disease, with lung fibrosis and higher disturbances in pulmonary function. PMID:26017728

  2. Pulmonary function indices in children with sickle cell anemia in Enugu, south-east Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Achigbu, Kingsley I.; Odetunde, Odutola I.; Chinawa, Josephat M.; Achigbu, Eberechukwu O.; Ikefuna, Anthony N.; Emodi, Ifeoma J.; Ibe, Bede C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the pulmonary function indices of children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) attending the pediatric sickle cell clinic at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, south-east Nigeria and to compare these indices with the results obtained from other regions. Methods: A case control study of lung function in children with SCA aged 6-20 years. The study was carried out in the University of Nigeria/University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu State, Nigeria between October 2014 and January 2015. Measurements of the peak expiratory flow rate, forced vital capacity (FVC), and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) were evaluated. Results: A total of 80 subjects were recruited into the study, comprising 40 homozygous HbSS (hemoglobin SS) patients and an equal number of controls. Children with SCA had statistically lower values of FEV1 (1.6±0.52), FVC (1.76±0.95), and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) (309.00±82.64) when compared with normal hemoglobin genotype FEV1 (12.01±0.53), FVC (2.12±0.54), and PEFR (364.10±87.85). The mean FVC, FEV1/FVC, and PEFR were also higher in the male control group compared with the HbSS male group, but these differences were not statistically significant. Female controls had significantly larger FEV1, FVC, and PEFR values compared with the HbSS females. Conclusion: The lung function indices were significantly lower in children and adolescents with SCA compared with the matched controls with a hemoglobin genotype AA. PMID:26219442

  3. Decreased Pulmonary Function Measured in Children Exposed to High Environmental Relative Moldiness Index Homes

    PubMed Central

    Vesper, Stephen J.; Wymer, Larry; Kennedy, Suzanne; Grimsley, L. Faye

    2013-01-01

    Background: Exposures to water-damaged homes/buildings has been linked to deficits in respiratory health. However, accurately quantifying this linkage has been difficult because of the methods used to assess water damage and respiratory health. Purpose: The goal of this analysis was to determine the correlation between the water-damage, as defined by the Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) value in an asthmatic child’s home, and the child’s pulmonary function measured by spirometry, “forced expiratory volume in one second, percent predicted” or FEV1%. Methods: This analysis utilized data obtained from the “Heads-off Environmental Asthma in Louisiana” (HEAL) study. The children (n= 109), 6 to 12 years of age, who had completed at least one spirometry evaluation and a dust sample collected for ERMI analysis from the home at approximately the same time as the spirometry testing, were included in the analysis. Statistical evaluation of the correlation between ERMI values and FEV1% was performed using the Spearman’s Rank Correlation analysis. The relationship between ERMI values and FEV1% was performed using B-spline regression. Results: The average ERMI value in the HEAL study homes was 7.3. For homes with ERMI values between 2.5 and 15, there was a significant inverse correlation with the child’s lung function or FEV1% measurement (Spearman’s rho -0.23; p= 0.03), i.e. as the ERMI value increased, the FEV1% value decreased. Conclusions: Measures of water-damage (the ERMI) and clinical assessments of lung function (FEV1%) provided a quantitative assessment of the impact of water-damaged home exposures on children’s respiratory health. PMID:24494033

  4. The alveolitis of pulmonary sarcoidosis. Evaluation of natural history and alveolitis-dependent changes in lung function

    SciTech Connect

    Keogh, B.A.; Hunninghake, G.W.; Line, B.R.; Crystal, R.G.

    1983-08-01

    Current concepts of the pathogenesis of pulmonary sarcoidosis suggest that a mononuclear cell alveolitis, comprised of activated T-lymphocytes and activated alveolar macrophages, precedes and modulates the formation of granuloma and fibrosis. To evaluate the natural history of this alveolitis and determine the relationship it has to subsequent changes in lung function, 19 untreated patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis without extrapulmonary manifestations were studied with bronchoalveolar lavage, /sup 67/Ga scanning, and pulmonary function tests to evaluate lung T-cells, lung alveolar macrophages, and lung function, respectively. In patients with sarcoidosis, low intensity alveolitis (lung T-cells less than or equal to 28% of all lung effector cells and/or /sup 67/Ga scan negative) was much more common (80% of all observations) than high intensity alveolitis (lung T-cells greater than 28% and /sup 67/Ga scan positive, 20% of all observations). Conventional clinical, roentgenographic, or physiologic studies could not predict the alveolitis status. Interestingly, of the 51 alveolitis evaluations in the 19 patients, there were 24 occurrences (47%) where the alveolitis was ''split,'' i.e., /sup 67/Ga scans positive and T-cells low (39%) or /sup 67/Ga negative and T-cells high (8%). Most untreated patients with sarcoidosis without extrapulmonary symptoms may have some inflammatory processes ongoing in their alveolar structures. Overall, whenever a high intensity alveolitis episode occurred, it was followed by deterioration over the next 6 months in at least one lung function parameter. A low intensity alveolitis episode was followed by functional deterioration only 8% of the time. The alveolitis parameters (lavage and /sup 67/Ga scanning) clearly predicted prognosis. These observations should prove useful in understanding the natural history of pulmonary sarcoidosis, in staging patients with this disease, and in making rational therapy decisions.

  5. Comparison between two thoracotomy closure techniques: postoperative pain and pulmonary function*

    PubMed Central

    Leandro, Juliana Duarte; Rodrigues, Olavo Ribeiro; Slaets, Annie France Frere; Schmidt, Aurelino F.; Yaekashi, Milton L.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare two thoracotomy closure techniques (pericostal and transcostal suture) in terms of postoperative pain and pulmonary function. METHODS: This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind study carried out in the Department of Thoracic Surgery of the Luzia de Pinho Melo Hospital das Clnicas and at the University of Mogi das Cruzes, both located in the city of Mogi das Cruzes, Brazil. We included 30 patients (18-75 years of age) undergoing posterolateral or anterolateral thoracotomy. The patients were randomized into two groups by the type of thoracotomy closure: pericostal suture (PS; n = 16) and transcostal suture (TS; n = 14). Pain intensity during the immediate and late postoperative periods was assessed by a visual analogic scale and the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Spirometry variables (FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC ratio, and PEF) were determined in the preoperative period and on postoperative days 21 and 60. RESULTS: Pain intensity was significantly greater in the PS group than in the TS group. Between the preoperative and postoperative periods, there were decreases in the spirometry variables studied. Those decreases were significant in the PS group but not in the TS group. CONCLUSIONS: The patients in the TS group experienced less immediate and late post-thoracotomy pain than did those in the PS group, as well as showing smaller reductions in the spirometry parameters. Therefore, transcostal suture is recommended over pericostal suture as the thoracotomy closure technique of choice. PMID:25210961

  6. Effect of Supine Posture on Airway Blood Flow and Pulmonary Function in Stable Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Ceridon, Maile L.; Morris, Norman R.; Olson, Thomas P.; Lalande, Sophie; Johnson, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between body position, pulmonary function (PF) and bronchial blood flow (Qaw) in a group of heart failure (HF) and control subjects. Methods Thirty-six subjects were studied: 24 stable, ambulatory HF patients (HF: LVEF=276%, age=659yr) and 12 age- and sex-matched controls (CTRL: LVEF=607%, age=628yr). Measures of Q?aw (soluble gas method) and PF were collected upright and following 30 min in the supine position. Results Q?aw was similar between groups and remained unchanged with body position. Declines in forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) with the supine position were observed in both groups; declines in forced expiratory flow 2575% (FEF2575) and FEF 75% (FEF75) with the supine position were observed in the HF group only. Changes in Q?aw were related to changes in PF only in the HF patient groups (?FVC, %predicted, r=?0.45, p<0.04, ?FEV1 r=?0.61, p<0.01, ?FEV1 %predicted, r=?0.45, p<0.04). Conclusion These data demonstrate that relationships between postural changes in Q?aw and PF exist only in the HF population and that the bronchial circulation may contribute to postural PF decline in HF. PMID:21741500

  7. Functional reconstitution of receptors for bradykinin and des argZ-bradykinin from pulmonary artery membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, M.C.; Polgar, P.; Dickey, B.F.; Fishman, J.B.

    1987-05-01

    Bradykinin (BK) is a vasoactive peptide which mediates a number of vascular functions, including activation of prostaglandin biosynthesis and modulation of vasomotor tone. BK and its kinase II metabolite, des argZ-BK, have been reported to activate the B2 and B1 receptors, respectively. The authors prepared membranes from the bovine pulmonary artery and solubilized membrane proteins using the zwitterionic detergent CHAPS (3-((3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate). The solubilized proteins were reconstituted into liposomes via a gel filtration method. The vesicles specifically bound both TH-BK and TH-des argZ-BK, although the latter bound with significantly lower affinity. The binding of TH-BK was inhibited 65% by guanosine 5'-0-thiotriphosphate S while the binding of TH-des argZ-BK was unaffected. This suggests that the receptor for BK was associated with a guanine-nucleotide binding protein whereas the receptor for des argZ-BK was not. Since des argZ-BK has recently been reported to be considerably less potent than BK at activating the turnover of phosphatidylinositol, the authors data suggest that this is due to the des argZ-BK receptor not being coupled to a G-protein. Further work towards characterizing these receptors is now underway.

  8. The effects of sequential exposure to acidic fog and ozone on pulmonary function in exercising subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Aris, R.; Christian, D.; Sheppard, D.; Balmes, J.R. )

    1991-01-01

    In Southern California coastal regions, morning fog is often acidified by the presence of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). Peak exposure to ozone (O{sub 3}) usually occurs in the afternoon and evening, after the fog has dissipated. To determine whether fog containing HNO{sub 3} might enhance pulmonary responses to O{sub 3}, we studied a group of healthy, athletic subjects selected for lung function sensitivity to O{sub 3}. On 3 separate days, the subjects exercised for 2 h in atmospheres containing HNO{sub 3} fog (0.5 mg/ml), H{sub 2}O fog, or clean, filtered air. After a 1-h break, they exercised for an additional 3 h in an atmosphere containing 0.20 ppm O{sub 3}. Surprisingly, the mean O{sub 3}-induced decrements in FEV1 and FVC were smaller after exercise in each fog-containing atmosphere than they were after exercise in clean, filtered air. The mean (+/- SEM) O{sub 3}-induced decrements in FEV1 were 26.4 +/- 5.3% after air, 17.1 +/- 3.7% after H{sub 2}O fog, and 18.0 +/- 4.3% after HNO{sub 3} fog, and in FVC they were 19.9 +/- 4.7% after air, 13.6 +/- 2.8% after H{sub 2}O fog, and 13.6 +/- 4.2% after HNO{sub 3} fog.

  9. Ozone-induced changes in pulmonary function and bronchial responsiveness in asthmatics

    SciTech Connect

    Kreit, J.W.; Gross, K.B.; Moore, T.B.; Lorenzen, T.J.; D'Arcy, J.; Eschenbacher, W.L.

    1989-01-01

    To compare the responses of asthmatic and normal subjects to high effective doses of ozone, nine asthmatic and nine normal subjects underwent two randomly assigned 2-h exposures to filtered, purified air and 0.4 ppm ozone with alternating 15-min periods of rest and exercise on a cycle ergometer (minute ventilation = 30 l.min-1.m-2). Before and after each exposure, pulmonary function and bronchial responsiveness to methacholine were measured and symptoms were recorded. Ozone exposure was associated with a statistically significant decrease in forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expired volume in 1 s (FEV1), percent FEV1 (FEV1%), and forced expired flow at 25-75% FVC (FEF25-75) in both normal and asthmatic subjects. However, comparing the response of asthmatic and normal subjects to ozone revealed a significantly greater percent decrease in FEV1, FEV1%, and FEF25-75 in the asthmatic subjects. The effect of ozone on FVC and symptom scores did not differ between the two groups. In both normal and asthmatic subjects, exposure to ozone was accompanied by a significant increase in bronchial responsiveness. We conclude that exposure to a high effective ozone dose produces 1) increased bronchial responsiveness in both normal and asthmatic subjects, 2) greater airways obstruction in asthmatic than in normal subjects, and 3) similar symptoms and changes in lung volumes in the two groups.

  10. Pulmonary function of children with acute leukemia in maintenance phase of chemotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    de Macdo, Thalita Medeiros Fernandes; Campos, Tania Fernandes; Mendes, Raquel Emanuele de Frana; Frana, Danielle Corra; Chaves, Gabriela Sullen da Silva; de Mendona, Karla Morganna Pereira Pinto

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the pulmonary function of children with acute leukemia. METHODS: Cross-sectional observational analytical study that enrolled 34 children divided into groups A (17 with acute leukemia in the maintenance phase of chemotherapy) and B (17 healthy children). The groups were matched for sex, age and height. Spirometry was measured using a spirometer Microloop Viasys(r) in accordance with American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society guidelines. Maximal respiratory pressures were measured with an MVD300 digital manometer (Globalmed(r)). Maximal inspiratory pressures and maximal expiratory pressures were measured from residual volume and total lung capacity, respectively. RESULTS: Group A showed a significant decrease in maximal inspiratory pressures when compared to group B. No significant difference was found between the spirometric values of the two groups, nor was there any difference between maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal expiratory pressure values in group A compared to the lower limit values proposed as reference. CONCLUSION: Children with acute leukemia, myeloid or lymphoid, during the maintenance phase of chemotherapy exhibited unchanged spirometric variables and maximal expiratory pressure; However, there was a decrease in inspiratory muscle strength. PMID:25510995

  11. Assessment of diastolic function by tissue Doppler echocardiography: comparison with standard transmitral and pulmonary venous flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farias, C. A.; Rodriguez, L.; Garcia, M. J.; Sun, J. P.; Klein, A. L.; Thomas, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the utility of Doppler tissue echocardiography in the evaluation of diastolic filling and in discriminating between normal subjects and those with various stages of diastolic dysfunction. We measured myocardial velocities in 51 patients with various stages of diastolic dysfunction and in 27 normal volunteers. The discriminating power of each of the standard Doppler indexes of left ventricular filling, pulmonary venous flow, and myocardial velocities was determined with the use of Spearman rank correlation and analysis of variance F statistics. Early diastolic myocardial velocity (E(m)) was higher in normal subjects (16.0 +/- 3.8 cm/s) than in patients with either delayed relaxation (n = 15, 7.5 +/- 2.2 cm/s), pseudonormal filling (n = 26, 7.6 +/- 2.3 cm/s), or restrictive filling (n = 10, 7.4 +/- 2.4 cm/s, P <.0001). E(m ) was the best single discriminator between control subjects and patients with diastolic dysfunction (P =.7, F = 64.5). Myocardial velocities assessed by Doppler tissue echocardiography are useful in differentiating patients with normal from those with abnormal diastolic function. Myocardial velocity remains reduced even in those stages of diastolic dysfunction characterized by increased preload compensation.

  12. Influence of Bronchial Blood Flow and Conductance on Pulmonary Function in Stable Systolic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Ceridon, Maile L.; Morris, Norman R.; Hulsebus, Minelle L.; Olson, Thomas P.; Lalande, Sophie; Johnson, Bruce D.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between airway blood flow (Q?aw), airway conductance (Gf-aw) and pulmonary function in patients with stable HF. 12 controls (CTRL: age=639yr, FVC=9815%pred, LVEF=616%) (all data presented as meanSD), 16 patients with mild HF (HF-A, NYHA III: age=649yr, FVC=9017%pred, LVEF=286%), and 14 patients with moderate/severe HF (HF-B, NYHA IIIIV: age=656yr, FVC=8412%pred, LVEF=266%) were studied. Q?aw was assessed using soluble gas measurements; perfusion pressure across airway bed (?Paw) was estimated from systemic and pulmonary pressure measurements; Gf-aw was calculated as Q?aw/?Paw; PF was assessed by spirometry. While Q?aw was not significantly different between CTRL (61.317.9 ?Lmin?1ml?1), HF-A (70.126.9 ?Lmin?1ml?1) and HF-B (56.214.9 ?Lmin?1ml?1) groups, Gf-aw, was elevated in HF-A (1.10.4 ?Lmin?1ml?1mmHg?1, p<0.03) and tended to be elevated in HF-B (1.20.6 ?Lmin?1ml?1mmHg?1, p=0.07) when compared to CTRL (0.80.3 ?Lmin?1ml?1mmHg?1). Significant positive correlations were found between Gf-aw and RV/TLC for HF-A (r=0.63, p<0.02) and HF-B (r=0.58, p<0.05). These results support the hypothesis that increased bronchial conductance and bronchial congestion may be related to greater small airway obstruction and as such may play a role in the PF abnormalities and symptoms of congestion commonly observed in HF patients. PMID:21545852

  13. Regional correlation of emphysematous changes in lung function and structure: a comparison between pulmonary function testing and hyperpolarized MRI metrics

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Elaine; Kadlecek, Stephen; MacDuffie-Woodburn, John P.; Zhu, Jianliang; Pickup, Stephen; Blum, Allison; Ishii, Masaru; Rizi, Rahim R.

    2011-01-01

    Regional and global relationships of lung function and structure were studied using hyperpolarized 3He MRI in a rat elastase-induced model of emphysema (n = 4) and healthy controls (n = 5). Fractional ventilation (r) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of 3He were measured at a submillimeter planar resolution in ventral, middle, and dorsal slices 6 mo after model induction. Pulmonary function testing (PFT) was performed before MRI to yield forced expiratory volume in 50 ms (FEV50), airway resistance (RI), and dynamic compliance (Cdyn). Cutoff threshold values of ventilation and diffusion, r* and ADC*, were computed corresponding to 80% population of pixels falling above or below each threshold value, respectively. For correlation analysis, r* was compared with FEV50/functional residual capacity (FRC), RI and Cdyn, whereas ADC* was compared with FEV50/FRC, total lung capacity (TLC), and Cdyn. Regional correlation of r and ADC was evaluated by dividing each of the three lung slices into four quadrants. Cdyn was significantly larger in elastase rats (0.92 ± 0.16 vs. 0.61 ± 0.12 ml/cmH2O). The difference of RI and FEV50 was insignificant between the two groups. The r* of healthy rats was significantly larger than the elastase group (0.42 ± 0.03 vs. 0.28 ± 0.06), whereas ADC* was significantly smaller in healthy animals (0.27 ± 0.04 vs. 0.36 ± 0.01 cm2/s). No systematic difference in these quantities was observed between the three lung slices. A significant 33% increase in ADC* and a significant 31% decline in r* for elastase rats was observed compared with a significant 51% increase in Cdyn and a nonsignificant 26% decline in FEV50/FRC. Correlation of imaging and PFT metrics revealed that r and ADC divide the rats into two separate clusters in the sample space. PMID:20884833

  14. Reflective Functioning in Fathers: An Initial Empirical Examination

    PubMed Central

    Stover, Carla Smith; Kiselica, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Parental reflective functioning (RF) is a parent’s capacity to understand and take into account the mental states of their children. Research on RF is somewhat scarce and has focused primarily on mothers. Mothers high in RF have improved parent-child relationships in terms of attachment, sensitivity, and more balanced mental representations of their children, in addition to displaying more caregiving behaviors than those low in this characteristic. Moreover, better maternal RF appears to be a key to the parenting success of substance abusing mothers and predicts changes in the caregiving behaviors of these mothers following attachment-based interventions. Research on RF in fathers, on the other hand, is limited to a few studies. This research suggested that about half of new fathers have deficits in RF, but did not assess predictors of RF or measure RF in relation to parenting. The present study sought to present an initial exploration of the association of RF to the parenting of fathers in a sample of 79 fathers, approximately half with substance abuse and violence problems and half without. Fathers were administered the Parent Developmental Interview and self-report measures of parenting. Results suggested that less education and increased drug use are associated with lower RF. RF was not predictive of self-reported parenting behaviors in this sample. Although RF may vary with substance abuse level and socioeconomic status among both men and women, these results indicate RF may be less associated with parenting behaviors of fathers. However, further research in this area is needed. PMID:25798495

  15. Pneumomediastinum, subcutaneous emphysema, and pneumothorax after a pulmonary function testing in a patient with bleomycin-induced interstitial pneumonitis*

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Mariana Sponholz; Fernandes, Frederico Leon Arrabal; Kay, Fernando Uliana; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous pneumomediastinum is an uncommon event, the clinical picture of which includes retrosternal chest pain, subcutaneous emphysema, dyspnea, and dysphonia. The pathophysiological mechanism involved is the emergence of a pressure gradient between the alveoli and surrounding structures, causing alveolar rupture with subsequent dissection of the peribronchovascular sheath and infiltration of the mediastinum and subcutaneous tissue with air. Known triggers include acute exacerbations of asthma and situations that require the Valsalva maneuver. We described and documented with HRCT scans the occurrence of pneumomediastinum after a patient with bleomycin-induced interstitial lung disease underwent pulmonary function testing. Although uncommon, the association between pulmonary function testing and air leak syndromes has been increasingly reported in the literature, and lung diseases, such as interstitial lung diseases, include structural changes that facilitate the occurrence of this complication. PMID:24310635

  16. Development and application of pulmonary structure-function registration methods: towards pulmonary image-guidance tools for improved airway targeted therapies and outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fumin; Pike, Damien; Svenningsen, Sarah; Coxson, Harvey O.; Drozd, John J.; Yuan, Jing; Fenster, Aaron; Parraga, Grace

    2014-03-01

    Objectives: We aimed to develop a way to rapidly generate multi-modality (MRI-CT) pulmonary imaging structurefunction maps using novel non-rigid image registration methods. This objective is part of our overarching goal to provide an image processing pipeline to generate pulmonary structure-function maps and guide airway-targeted therapies. Methods: Anatomical 1H and functional 3He MRI were acquired in 5 healthy asymptomatic ex-smokers and 7 ex-smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) at inspiration breath-hold. Thoracic CT was performed within ten minutes of MRI using the same breath-hold volume. Landmark-based affine registration methods previously validated for imaging of COPD, was based on corresponding fiducial markers located in both CT and 1H MRI coronal slices and compared with shape-based CT-MRI non-rigid registration. Shape-based CT-MRI registration was developed by first identifying the shapes of the lung cavities manually, and then registering the two shapes using affine and thin-plate spline algorithms. We compared registration accuracy using the fiducial localization error (FLE) and target registration error (TRE). Results: For landmark-based registration, the TRE was 8.4±5.3 mm for whole lung and 7.8±4.6 mm for the R and L lungs registered independently (p=0.4). For shape-based registration, the TRE was 8.0±4.6 mm for whole lung as compared to 6.9±4.4 mm for the R and L lung registered independently and this difference was significant (p=0.01). The difference for shape-based (6.9±4.4 mm) and landmark-based R and L lung registration (7.8±4.6 mm) was also significant (p=.04) Conclusion: Shape-based registration TRE was significantly improved compared to landmark-based registration when considering L and R lungs independently.

  17. Pulmonary embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Dunnick, N.R.; Newman, G.E.; Perlmutt, L.M.; Braun, S.D.

    1988-11-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a common medical problem whose incidence is likely to increase in our aging population. Although it is life-threatening, effective therapy exists. The treatment is not, however, without significant complications. Thus, accurate diagnosis is important. Unfortunately, the clinical manifestations of pulmonary embolism are nonspecific. Furthermore, in many patients the symptoms of an acute embolism are superimposed on underlying chronic heart or lung disease. Thus, a high index of suspicion is needed to identify pulmonary emboli. Laboratory parameters, including arterial oxygen tensions and electrocardiography, are as nonspecific as the clinical signs. They may be more useful in excluding another process than in diagnosing pulmonary embolism. The first radiologic examination is the chest radiograph, but the clinical symptoms are frequently out of proportion to the findings on the chest films. Classic manifestations of pulmonary embolism on the chest radiograph include a wedge-shaped peripheral opacity and a segmental or lobar diminution in vascularity with prominent central arteries. However, these findings are not commonly seen and, even when present, are not specific. Even less specific findings include cardiomegaly, pulmonary infiltrate, elevation of a hemidiaphragm, and pleural effusion. Many patients with pulmonary embolism may have a normal chest radiograph. The chest radiograph is essential, however, for two purposes. First, it may identify another cause of the patient's symptoms, such as a rib fracture, dissecting aortic aneurysm, or pneumothorax. Second, a chest radiograph is essential to interpretation of the radionuclide V/Q scan. The perfusion scan accurately reflects the perfusion of the lung. However, a perfusion defect may result from a variety of etiologies. Any process such as vascular stenosis or compression by tumor may restrict blood flow. 84 references.

  18. Doxycycline use in patients with lymphangioleiomyomatosis: biomarkers and pulmonary function response *, **

    PubMed Central

    Pimenta, Suzana Pinheiro; Baldi, Bruno Guedes; Kairalla, Ronaldo Adib; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess blockade of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, as well as the variation in FEV1, in patients with lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) treated with doxycycline (a known MMP inhibitor) for 12 months. METHODS: An open-label, single-arm, interventional clinical trial in which LAM patients received doxycycline (100 mg/day) for 12 months. Patients underwent full pulmonary function testing, a six-minute walk test, and quality of life assessment, as well as blood and urine sampling for quantification of MMP-2, MMP-9, and VEGF-D levels-at baseline, as well as at 6 and 12 months after the initiation of doxycycline. RESULTS: Thirty-one LAM patients received doxycycline for 12 months. Although there was effective blockade of urinary MMP-9 and serum MMP-2 after treatment, there were no significant differences between pre and post-doxycycline serum levels of MMP-9 and VEGF-D. On the basis of their response to doxycycline (as determined by the variation in FEV1), the patients were divided into two groups: the doxycycline-responder (doxy-R) group (n = 13); and the doxycycline-nonresponder (doxy-NR) group (n = 18). The patients with mild spirometric abnormalities responded better to doxycycline. The most common side effects were mild epigastric pain, nausea, and diarrhea. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with LAM, doxycycline treatment results in effective MMP blockade, as well as in improved lung function and quality of life in those with less severe disease. However, these benefits do not seem to be related to the MMP blockade, raising the hypothesis that there is a different mechanism of action. PMID:23503480

  19. Predictive Models for Pulmonary Function Changes After Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer and Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Nieto, Beatriz; Goset, Karen C.; Caviedes, Ivan; Delgado, Iris O.; Cordova, Andres

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To propose multivariate predictive models for changes in pulmonary function tests ({Delta}PFTs) with respect to preradiotherapy (pre-RT) values in patients undergoing RT for breast cancer and lymphoma. Methods and Materials: A prospective study was designed to measure {Delta}PFTs of patients undergoing RT. Sixty-six patients were included. Spirometry, lung capacity (measured by helium dilution), and diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide tests were used to measure lung function. Two lung definitions were considered: paired lung vs. irradiated lung (IL). Correlation analysis of dosimetric parameters (mean lung dose and the percentage of lung volume receiving more than a threshold dose) and {Delta}PFTs was carried out to find the best dosimetric predictor. Chemotherapy, age, smoking, and the selected dose-volume parameter were considered as single and interaction terms in a multivariate analysis. Stability of results was checked by bootstrapping. Results: Both lung definitions proved to be similar. Modeling was carried out for IL. Acute and late damage showed the highest correlations with volumes irradiated above {approx}20 Gy (maximum R{sup 2} = 0.28) and {approx}40 Gy (maximum R{sup 2} = 0.21), respectively. RT alone induced a minor and transitory restrictive defect (p = 0.013). Doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide-paclitaxel (Taxol), when administered pre-RT, induced a late, large restrictive effect, independent of RT (p = 0.031). Bootstrap values confirmed the results. Conclusions: None of the dose-volume parameters was a perfect predictor of outcome. Thus, different predictor models for {Delta}PFTs were derived for the IL, which incorporated other nondosimetric parameters mainly through interaction terms. Late {Delta}PFTs seem to behave more serially than early ones. Large restrictive defects were demonstrated in patients pretreated with doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide-paclitaxel.

  20. Correlation between heart rate variability and pulmonary function adjusted by confounding factors in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Bianchim, M S; Sperandio, E F; Martinhão, G S; Matheus, A C; Lauria, V T; da Silva, R P; Spadari, R C; Gagliardi, A R T; Arantes, R L; Romiti, M; Dourado, V Z

    2016-03-01

    The autonomic nervous system maintains homeostasis, which is the state of balance in the body. That balance can be determined simply and noninvasively by evaluating heart rate variability (HRV). However, independently of autonomic control of the heart, HRV can be influenced by other factors, such as respiratory parameters. Little is known about the relationship between HRV and spirometric indices. In this study, our objective was to determine whether HRV correlates with spirometric indices in adults without cardiopulmonary disease, considering the main confounders (e.g., smoking and physical inactivity). In a sample of 119 asymptomatic adults (age 20-80 years), we evaluated forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). We evaluated resting HRV indices within a 5-min window in the middle of a 10-min recording period, thereafter analyzing time and frequency domains. To evaluate daily physical activity, we instructed participants to use a triaxial accelerometer for 7 days. Physical inactivity was defined as <150 min/week of moderate to intense physical activity. We found that FVC and FEV1, respectively, correlated significantly with the following aspects of the RR interval: standard deviation of the RR intervals (r =0.31 and 0.35), low-frequency component (r =0.38 and 0.40), and Poincaré plot SD2 (r =0.34 and 0.36). Multivariate regression analysis, adjusted for age, sex, smoking, physical inactivity, and cardiovascular risk, identified the SD2 and dyslipidemia as independent predictors of FVC and FEV1 (R2=0.125 and 0.180, respectively, for both). We conclude that pulmonary function is influenced by autonomic control of cardiovascular function, independently of the main confounders. PMID:26840706

  1. Alterations in cardiomyocyte function after pulmonary treatment with stainless steel welding fume in rats.

    PubMed

    Popstojanov, Risto; Antonini, James M; Salmen, Rebecca; Ye, Morgan; Zheng, Wen; Castranova, Vincent; Fekedulegn, Desta B; Kan, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Welding fume is composed of a complex of different metal particulates. Pulmonary exposure to different welding fumes may exert a negative impact on cardiac function, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. To explore the effect of welding fumes on cardiac function, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed by intratracheal instillation to 2 mg/rat of manual metal arc hard surfacing welding fume (MMA-HS) once per week for 7 wk. Control rats received saline. Cardiomyocytes were isolated enzymatically at d 1 and 7 postexposure. Intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) transients (fluorescence ratio) were measured on the stage of an inverted phase-contrast microscope using a myocyte calcium imaging/cell length system. Phosphorylation levels of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) were determined by Western blot. The levels of nonspecific inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) and proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in serum were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Contraction of isolated cardiomyocytes was significantly reduced at d 1 and d 7 postexposure. Intracellular calcium levels were decreased in response to extracellular calcium stimulation at d 7 postexposure. Changes of intracellular calcium levels after isoprenaline hydrochloride (ISO) stimulation were not markedly different between groups at either time point. Phosphorylation levels of cTnI in the left ventricle were significantly lower at d 1 postexposure. The serum levels of CRP were not markedly different between groups at either time point. Serum levels of IL-6 were not detectable in both groups. Cardiomyocyte alterations observed after welding fume treatment were mainly due to alterations in intracellular calcium handling and phosphorylation levels of cTnI. PMID:24786677

  2. Oxidative stress, inflammation, and pulmonary function assessment in rats exposed to laboratory-generated pollutant mixtures.

    PubMed

    Seagrave, JeanClare; Campen, Matthew J; McDonald, Jacob D; Mauderly, Joe L; Rohr, Annette C

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative stress may mediate adverse health effects of many inhaled pollutants. Cardiopulmonary responses of Sprague-Dawley rats to inhalation of whole or filtered gasoline engine exhaust (GEE, FGEE); simulated downwind coal emission atmospheres (SDCAs) from two types of coal, each tested at two concentrations; and two concentrations of re-aerosolized paved road dust (RD) were evaluated. In situ chemiluminescence and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) were used to evaluate oxidative reactions in the lungs, heart, and liver immediately following exposures. Pulmonary inflammatory responses were measured by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell counts. Respiratory function parameters during exposure were measured by plethysmography. Only GEE significantly enhanced in situ chemiluminescence (all three organs), but only exposure to the high RD concentration increased TBARS (hearts only). There was a weak trend toward increased macrophages recovered in lavage fluid from both SDCAs, and macrophages were significantly elevated by both FGEE and the lower concentration of RD. Respiratory function effects were small, though the effects of the Central Appalachian low-sulfur SDCA on enhanced pause and the effects of the Powder River Basin SCDA on tidal volume were significant. The discordance between the oxidative stress indicators may relate to the use of a single time point in the context of dynamic changes in compensatory mechanisms. These results further suggest that inflammatory responses measured by BAL cellularity may not always correlate with oxidative stress. Overall, the toxicological effects from exposure to these pollutant mixtures were subtle, but the results show differences in the effects of atmospheres having different physical/chemical characteristics. PMID:18704828

  3. ALTERATIONS IN CARDIOMYOCYTE FUNCTION AFTER PULMONARY TREATMENT WITH STAINLESS STEEL WELDING FUME IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Popstojanov, Risto; Antonini, James M.; Salmen, Rebecca; Ye, Morgan; Zheng, Wen; Castranova, Vincent; Fekedulegn, Desta B.; Kan, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Welding fume is composed of a complex of different metal particulates. Pulmonary exposure to different welding fumes may exert a negative impact on cardiac function, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. To explore the effect of welding fumes on cardiac function, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed by intratracheal instillation to 2 mg/rat of manual metal arc hard surfacing welding fume (MMA-HS) once per week for 7 wk. Control rats received saline. Cardiomyocytes were isolated enzymatically at d 1 and 7 postexposure. Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) transients (fluorescence ratio) were measured on the stage of an inverted phase-contrast microscope using a myocyte calcium imaging/cell length system. Phosphorylation levels of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) were determined by Western blot. The levels of nonspecific inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) and proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in serum were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Contraction of isolated cardiomyocytes was significantly reduced at d 1 and d 7 postexposure. Intracellular calcium levels were decreased in response to extracellular calcium stimulation at d 7 postexposure. Changes of intracellular calcium levels after isoprenaline hydrochloride (ISO) stimulation were not markedly different between groups at either time point. Phosphorylation levels of cTnI in the left ventricle were significantly lower at d 1 post-exposure. The serum levels of CRP were not markedly different between groups at either time point. Serum levels of IL-6 were not detectable in both groups. Cardiomyocyte alterations observed after welding fume treatment were mainly due to alterations in intracellular calcium handling and phosphorylation levels of cTnI. PMID:24786677

  4. Correlation between heart rate variability and pulmonary function adjusted by confounding factors in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Bianchim, M.S.; Sperandio, E.F.; Martinhão, G.S.; Matheus, A.C.; Lauria, V.T.; da Silva, R.P.; Spadari, R.C.; Gagliardi, A.R.T.; Arantes, R.L.; Romiti, M.; Dourado, V.Z.

    2016-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system maintains homeostasis, which is the state of balance in the body. That balance can be determined simply and noninvasively by evaluating heart rate variability (HRV). However, independently of autonomic control of the heart, HRV can be influenced by other factors, such as respiratory parameters. Little is known about the relationship between HRV and spirometric indices. In this study, our objective was to determine whether HRV correlates with spirometric indices in adults without cardiopulmonary disease, considering the main confounders (e.g., smoking and physical inactivity). In a sample of 119 asymptomatic adults (age 20-80 years), we evaluated forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). We evaluated resting HRV indices within a 5-min window in the middle of a 10-min recording period, thereafter analyzing time and frequency domains. To evaluate daily physical activity, we instructed participants to use a triaxial accelerometer for 7 days. Physical inactivity was defined as <150 min/week of moderate to intense physical activity. We found that FVC and FEV1, respectively, correlated significantly with the following aspects of the RR interval: standard deviation of the RR intervals (r =0.31 and 0.35), low-frequency component (r =0.38 and 0.40), and Poincaré plot SD2 (r =0.34 and 0.36). Multivariate regression analysis, adjusted for age, sex, smoking, physical inactivity, and cardiovascular risk, identified the SD2 and dyslipidemia as independent predictors of FVC and FEV1 (R 2=0.125 and 0.180, respectively, for both). We conclude that pulmonary function is influenced by autonomic control of cardiovascular function, independently of the main confounders. PMID:26840706

  5. Air stacking: effects on pulmonary function in patients with spinal muscular atrophy and in patients with congenital muscular dystrophy*,**

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Tanyse Bahia Carvalho; Neves, Juliana de Carvalho; Portes, Leslie Andrews; Salge, Joo Marcos; Zanoteli, Edmar; Reed, Umbertina Conti

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Respiratory complications are the main causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with neuromuscular disease (NMD). The objectives of this study were to determine the effects that routine daily home air-stacking maneuvers have on pulmonary function in patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and in patients with congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD), as well as to identify associations between spinal deformities and the effects of the maneuvers. METHODS: Eighteen NMD patients (ten with CMD and eight with SMA) were submitted to routine daily air-stacking maneuvers at home with manual resuscitators for four to six months, undergoing pulmonary function tests before and after that period. The pulmonary function tests included measurements of FVC; PEF; maximum insufflation capacity (MIC); and assisted and unassisted peak cough flow (APCF and UPCF, respectively) with insufflations. RESULTS: After the use of home air-stacking maneuvers, there were improvements in the APCF and UPCF. In the patients without scoliosis, there was also a significant increase in FVC. When comparing patients with and without scoliosis, the increases in APCF and UPCF were more pronounced in those without scoliosis. CONCLUSIONS: Routine daily air-stacking maneuvers with a manual resuscitator appear to increase UPCF and APCF in patients with NMD, especially in those without scoliosis. PMID:25410841

  6. The Effect of Thoracic Joint Mobilization and Self-stretching Exercise on Pulmonary Functions of Patients with Chronic Neck Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hwangbo, Pil-Neo; Hwangbo, Gak; Park, Jungseo; Lee, Sangyong

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to determine the effect of thoracic joint mobilization and self-stretching exercise on the pulmonary functions of patients with chronic neck pain. [Subjects] The present study was performed with 34 patients with chronic neck pain featuring thoracic kyphosis; we divided them into a thoracic joint mobilization group (TJMG, n = 11), self-stretching exercise group (SSEG, n = 11), and thoracic joint mobilization and self-stretching exercise group (TJMSSEG, n = 12). [Methods] Treatments and exercise were conducted three times a week for six weeks in TJMG, SSEG, and TJMSSEG; the subjects pulmonary functions in terms of forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume at one second (FEV1), and peak expiratory flow (PEF) were measured using CardioTouch equipment. [Results] Comparisons of the individuals within each of the TJMG, SSEG, and TJMSSEG showed that all of FVC, FEV1, and PEF increased significantly; Comparisons within each of the showed that FVC, FEV1, and PEF increased significantly. Among the study groups, FVC was significantly higher in TJMSSEG than in TJMG after six weeks; FEV1 was significantly higher in TJMSSEG than in TJMG and SSEG after four and six weeks; and PEF was significantly higher in TJMSSEG than in TJMG and SSEG after six weeks. [Conclusion] The study results indicate that thoracic joint mobilization and self-stretching exercise are effective interventions for increasing FVC, FEV1, and PEF among pulmonary functions. PMID:25435700

  7. Na+/H+ exchange and hypoxic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Intracellular pH (pHi) homeostasis is key to the functioning of vascular smooth muscle cells, including pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Sodium-hydrogen exchange (NHE) is an important contributor to pHi control in PASMCs. In this review, we examine the role of NHE in PASMC function, in both physiologic and pathologic conditions. In particular, we focus on the contribution of NHE to the PASMC response to hypoxia, considering both acute hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and the development of pulmonary vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension in response to chronic hypoxia. Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension remains a disease with limited therapeutic options. Thus, this review explores past efforts at disrupting NHE signaling and discusses the therapeutic potential that such efforts may have in the field of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26064449

  8. A hospital-based study on pulmonary function tests and exercise tolerance in patients of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and other diseases.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sonali; Sen, Sangita; Mandal, Salil Kumar

    2007-10-01

    A total of 105 male and 60 female patients were screened in the respiratory medicine outpatients' department, Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education & Research, Kolkata between December, 2002 and January, 2005. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients were diagnosed on the basis of history and clinical examination while patients with body mass index > or =25 and otherwise disease-free were grouped as overweights. Patients suffering from other diseases like systemic hypertension, etc, were referred from other departments after proper evaluation. The patients and controls (n=10) each for male and female groups were subjected to spirometry using computerised electronic spirometer while exercise tolerance was evaluated by modified Harvard step test. Thirty-nine male and 21 female patients were diagnosed and grouped in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease group. Both purely obstructive [forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)/forced vital capacity (FVC)% pred<70 and reduced FEV1% pred] and mixed (both obstructive and restrictive pattern ie, FEV1/FVC% pred normal or supernormal, FVC% pred <80 indicating restrictive pattern and forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of the vital capacity (FEF(25-75)) pred or peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR)% pred <70 indicating early small airway obstruction pattern were seen in both sexes. Although the exercise tolerance values were non-significant in both sexes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease obstructive pattern group, in mixed pattern group it was seen significant reduction compared to control. Hypertensives (21 males and 7 females) showed obstructive spirometric pattern. Exercise tolerance values were significantly reduced compared to controls. Male overweights (n=13) showed restrictive pattern while female overweights (n=8) showed obstructive pattern in spirometry. Exercise tolerance values were non-significant compared to control in both the groups. In ischaemic heart disease patients (n=6) FEV1%pred showed significant reduction in spirometry. In patients suffering from type 2 diabetes mellitus (n=4), post-tuberculous group (n=7), hypothyroid (n=6), collagen vascular disease group (n=6) showed restrictive spirometric pattern and the above groups including IHD patients showed significant reduction in exercise tolerance values. Some authors have stated that mixed ventilatory defect is characterised by low FEV1/FVC% pred in spirometry and low lung volumes where the lung volumes have to be ascertained by other methods but in the present investigation it was observed that mixed ventilatory defect can be estimated by spirometry; PEFR and/or FEF(25-75%). pred <70% whereas FEV1/FVC% pred is normal or supernormal. This finding is completely new one to predict mixed ventilatory defect. PMID:18383952

  9. Estimating the U.S. prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using pre- and post-bronchodilator spirometry: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 20072010

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background During 20072010, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) conducted a spirometry component which obtained pre-bronchodilator pulmonary lung function data on a nationally representative sample of US adults aged 679 years and post-bronchodilator pulmonary lung function data for the subset of adults with airflow limitation. The goals of this study were to 1) compute prevalence estimates of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) using pre-bronchodilator and post-bronchodilator spirometry measurements and fixed ratio and lower limit of normal (LLN) diagnostic criteria and 2) examine the potential impact of nonresponse on the estimates. Methods This analysis was limited to those aged 4079 years who were eligible for NHANES pre-bronchodilator spirometry (n=7,104). Examinees with likely airflow limitation were further eligible for post-bronchodilator testing (n=1,110). Persons were classified as having COPD based on FEV1/FVC < 70% (fixed ratio) or FEV1/FVC < lower limit of normal (LLN) based on persons age, sex, height, and race/ethnicity. Those without spirometry but self-reporting both daytime supplemental oxygen therapy plus emphysema and/or current chronic bronchitis were also classified as having COPD. The final analytic samples for pre-bronchodilator and post-bronchodilator analyses were 77.1% (n=5,477) and 50.8% (n=564) of those eligible, respectively. To account for non-response, NHANES examination weights were adjusted to the eligible pre-bronchodilator and post-bronchodilator subpopulations. Results In 20072010, using the fixed ratio criterion and pre-bronchodilator test results, COPD prevalence was 20.9% (SE 1.1) among US adults aged 4079 years. Applying the same criterion to post-bronchodilator test results, prevalence was 14.0% (SE 1.0). Using the LLN criterion and pre-bronchodilator test results, the COPD prevalence was 15.4% (SE 0.8), while applying the same criterion to post-bronchodilator test results, prevalence was 10.2% (SE 0.8). Conclusions The overall COPD prevalence among US adults aged 4079 years varied from 10.2% to 20.9% based on whether pre- or post-bronchodilator values were used and which diagnostic criterion (fixed ratio or LLN) was applied. The overall prevalence decreased by approximately 33% when airflow limitation was based on post-bronchodilator as compared to pre-bronchodilator spirometry, regardless of which diagnostic criterion was used. PMID:24107140

  10. Association between body composition and pulmonary function in elderly people: the Korean Longitudinal Study on Health and Aging.

    PubMed

    Lim, Soo; Kwon, Sung-Youn; Yoon, Ji Won; Kim, So Yeon; Choi, Sung Hee; Park, Young Joo; Yoon, Ho Il; Chang, Yoon Seok; Lee, Jae Ho; Lee, Choon-Taek; Kim, Ki Woong; Park, Kyong Soo; Jang, Hak Chul

    2011-03-01

    The age-related increase in body fat and decrease in muscle mass are associated with increased morbidity in elderly populations. Pulmonary function also decreases with age, but no study has investigated whether regional body composition is associated with pulmonary function in an older population. The Korean Longitudinal Study on Health and Aging is a community-based cohort study of people aged > 65 years selected by random stratified sampling. Anthropometrics, biochemical factors, and lung function by spirometry were evaluated in 439 men (mean age of 75.9 ± 8.6 years) and 561 women (mean age of 76.0 ± 8.8 years). Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was performed to assess the whole and regional body composition. Computed tomography (CT) was also used to measure fat or muscle distribution at the abdominal and mid-thigh levels. Although pulmonary function and muscle mass were inversely related to age, fat mass was not. After adjusting for age, height, BMI, smoking and exercise status, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), fat mass in trunk or central area was inversely associated with lung function in both sexes (P < 0.01). Men with more muscle in trunk and mid-thigh level had better lung function (P < 0.01). The results of this community-based study show that regional body composition is significantly associated with lung function. Augmentation of muscle in the trunk and low extremity in men, and reduction of fat in the trunk and upper body in men and women may be helpful in maintaining lung function in the elderly population. PMID:20706206

  11. Recovery from welding-fume-exposure-induced lung fibrosis and pulmonary function changes in sprague dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jae Hyuck; Choi, Byung-Gil; Maeng, Seung-Hee; Kim, Soo-Jin; Chung, Yong Hyun; Han, Jeong Hee; Song, Kyung Seuk; Lee, Yong Hwan; Cho, Yong Bong; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Kwang Jong; Hyun, Jin Suk; Yu, Il Je

    2004-12-01

    Welder's pneumoconiosis has generally been determined as benign based on the absence of pulmonary function abnormalities in welders with marked radiographic abnormalities. Yet, there have also been several reports on welders with respiratory symptoms, indicating lung function impairment, X-ray abnormalities, and extensive fibrosis. Accordingly, this study attempted to investigate the inflammatory responses and pulmonary function changes in rats during a 60-day welding-fume-inhalation exposure period to elucidate the process of fibrosis. The rats were exposed to manual metal-arc stainless-steel welding fumes (MMA-SS) with total suspended particulate concentrations of 64.8 +/- 0.9 (low dose) and 107.8 +/- 2.6 mg/m3 (high dose) for 2 h per day in an inhalation chamber for 60 days. Animals were sacrificed after the initial 2-h exposure and after 15, 30, and 60 days, and the pulmonary function was also measured every week after the daily exposure. Elevated cellular differential counts were also measured in the acellular bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of the rats exposed to the MMA-SS fumes for 60 days. Among the pulmonary function test parameters, only the tidal volume showed a statistically significant and dose-dependent decrease after 35 to 60 days of MMA-SS welding-fume exposure. When the rats exposed to the welding fumes were left for 60 days to recover their lung function and cellular differentiation, recovery was observed in both the high and low-dose rats exposed up to 30 days, resulting in the disappearance of inflammatory cells and restoration of the tidal volume. The rats exposed for 60 days at the low dose also recovered from the inflammation and tidal volume loss, yet the rats exposed for 60 days at the high dose did not fully recover even after a 60-day recovery period. Therefore, when taken together, the results of the current study suggest that a decrease in the tidal volume could be used as an early indicator of pulmonary fibrosis induced by welding-fume exposure in Sprague Dawley rats, and fibrosis would seem to be preventable if the exposure is short-term and moderate. PMID:15456923

  12. Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your medical history, imaging tests, a biopsy, and lung function tests to diagnose pulmonary fibrosis. There is no cure. Treatments can help with symptoms and improve your quality of life. ... or a lung transplant. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  13. Impact of Exercise Training in Aerobic Capacity and Pulmonary Function in Children and Adolescents After Congenital Heart Disease Surgery: A Systematic Review with Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Neto, Mansueto; Saquetto, Micheli Bernardone; da Silva E Silva, Cassio Magalhães; Conceição, Cristiano Sena; Oliveira Carvalho, Vitor

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effects of exercise training on aerobic capacity and pulmonary function in children and adolescents after congenital heart disease surgery. We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, EMBASE, (from the earliest date available to January 2015) for controlled trials that evaluated the effects of exercise training on aerobic capacity and pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1 s and forced vital capacity) in children and adolescents after congenital heart disease surgery. Weighted mean differences and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated,, and heterogeneity was assessed using the I (2) test. Eight trials (n = 292) met the study criteria. The results suggested that exercise training compared with control had a positive impact on peak VO2. Exercise training resulted in improvement in peak VO2 weighted mean difference (3.68 mL kg(-1) min(-1), 95 % CI 1.58-5.78). The improvement in forced expiratory volume in 1 s and forced vital capacity after exercise training was not significant. Exercise training may improve peak VO2 in children and adolescents after congenital heart disease surgery and should be considered for inclusion in cardiac rehabilitation. Further larger randomized controlled trials are urgently needed to investigate different types of exercise and its effects on the quality of life. PMID:26396114

  14. The effect of home-based inspiratory muscle training on exercise capacity, exertional dyspnea and pulmonary function in COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Bavarsad, Maryam Bakhshandeh; Shariati, Abdolali; Eidani, Esmaeil; Latifi, Mahmud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is currently the fourth cause of mortality worldwide. Patients with COPD experience periods of dyspnea, fatigue, and disability, which impact on their life. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of short-term inspiratory muscle training on exercise capacity, exertional dyspnea, and pulmonary lung function. Materials and Methods: A randomized, controlled trial was performed. Thirty patients (27 males, 3 females) with mild to very severe COPD were randomly assigned to a training group (group T) or to a control group (group C). Patients in group T received training for 8 weeks (15 min/day for 6 days/week) with flow-volumetric inspiratory exerciser named (Respivol). Each patient was assessed before and after 8 weeks of training for the following clinical parameters: exercise capacity by 6-min walking test (6MWT), exertional dyspnea by Borg scale, and pulmonary lung function by spirometry. Patients used training together with medical treatment. The data were analyzed using paired t-test and independent t-test. Results: Results showed statistically significant increase in 6MWT at the end of the training from 445.6 22.99 to 491.06 17.67 meters? (P < 0.001) and statistically significant decrease in dyspnea from 3.76 0.64 to 1.13 0.36 (P = 0.0001) in the training group but not in the control group. The values for exercise capacity and dyspnea improved after 8 weeks in group T in comparison with group C (P = 0.001 and P = 0.0001, respectively). No changes were observed in any measure of pulmonary function in both groups. Conclusions: Short-term inspiratory muscle training has beneficial effects on exercise capacity and exertional dyspnea in COPD patients. PMID:26457101

  15. Chronic pulmonary artery dissection associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary artery dissection is a complication associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension. This complication is described as acute in onset and is frequently fatal without intervention. We describe a patient with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and chest pain found to have an unsuspected chronic pulmonary artery dissection on postmortem examination. Chronic pulmonary artery dissection should be considered in patients with chest pain and worsening dyspnea, as the frequency this condition may be underestimated. PMID:24618553

  16. Airway size and the rate of pulmonary function decline in grain handlers

    SciTech Connect

    Vedal, S.; Enarson, D.A.; Chan-Yeung, M.

    1988-12-01

    Tracheal diameter and chest dimensions were measured from postero-anterior chest radiographs in grain handlers to prospectively identify airway size and chest size-related predictors of the rate of pulmonary function decline. A total of 634 grain workers were studied at the initial survey, of whom 239 satisfied the following inclusion criteria: (1) had a satisfactory chest radiograph taken at the initial survey in 1975, (2) performed spirometry at the 1975, 1978, and 1981 surveys, and (3) had no change in smoking status from 1975 to 1981. Radiographic measurements consisted of height of the right lung, transverse diameter of the chest at the level of the right diaphragm and at a level two-thirds up the right lung, and tracheal diameter (Tr). Areas of both lungs were measured by planimetry. Tr was only weakly related to height (r = 0.24). Increasing age was strongly associated with faster rates of FEV1 decline. After adjusting for the effects of age and cigarette smoking, Tr was the only radiographic measurement associated with FEV1 decline. Workers with Tr of 16 mm or less lost an average of 0.2% of their FEV1 per year compared to 0.9% per year for those with larger tracheas. This association was not modified by dust exposure estimates based on measurements of total dust. However, the strength of the association did depend upon smoking status, being strongest in current cigarette smokers (Tr less than or equal to 16 mm lost 0.2% annually and Tr greater than or equal to 21 mm lost 1.4% annually).

  17. A portable single-sided magnet system for remote NMR measurements of pulmonary function

    PubMed Central

    Mikayel, Dabaghyan; Iga, Muradyan; James, Butler; Eric, Frederick; Feng, Zhou; Angelos, Kyriazis; Charles, Hardin; Samuel, Patz; Mirko, Hrovat

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we report initial results from a light-weight, low field magnetic resonance device designed to make relative pulmonary density measurements at the bedside. The development of this device necessarily involves special considerations for the magnet, RF and data acquisition schemes as well as a careful analysis of what is needed to provide useful information in the ICU. A homogeneous field region is created remotely from the surface of the magnet such that when the magnet is placed against the chest, an NMR signal is measured from a small volume in the lung. In order to achieve portability, one must trade off field strength and therefore spatial resolution. We report initial measurements from a ping-pong ball size region in the lung as a function of lung volume. As expected, we measured decreased signal at larger lung volumes since lung density decreases with increasing lung volume. Using a CPMG sequence with ?TE=3.5 ms and a 20 echo train, a signal to noise ratio ~1100 was obtained from an 8.8mT planar magnet after signal averaging for 43 s. This is the first demonstration of NMR measurements made on a human lung with a light-weight planar NMR device. We argue that very low spatial resolution measurements of different lobar lung regions will provide useful diagnostic information for clinicians treating Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as clinicians want to avoid ventilator pressures that cause either lung over distension (too much pressure) or lung collapse (too little pressure). PMID:24953556

  18. Incremental value of pulmonary function and sputum DNA image cytometry in lung cancer risk prediction.

    PubMed

    Tammemagi, Martin C; Lam, Stephen C; McWilliams, Annette M; Sin, Don D

    2011-04-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Accurate prediction of lung cancer risk is of value for individuals, clinicians, and researchers. The aims of this study were to characterize the associations between pulmonary function and sputum DNA image cytometry (SDIC) and lung cancer, and their contributions to risk prediction. During 1990 to 2007, 2,596 high-risk individuals were enrolled and followed prospectively for development of lung cancer (n = 139; median follow-up 7.7 years) in trials at the British Columbia Cancer Agency. At baseline, an epidemiologic questionnaire was administered, sputum was collected for aneuploidy measurement and spirometry was obtained. Multivariable logistic models were prepared including known lung cancer predictors (model 1), that additionally included percent-expected-forced expiratory volume in 1 second [forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)%), model 2], and that additionally included SDIC (model 3). Prediction was assessed by evaluating discrimination (receiver operator characteristic area under the curve (ROC AUC)) and calibration. Net reclassification indices (NRI) were calculated with cutoff points for 8-year risks identifying low, intermediate, and high risk at 1.5% and 3%. Lung cancer risk increased with decline in FEV(1)%, but did so more for men than for women (interaction P < 0.001). SDIC demonstrated a dose-response with lung cancer (P = 0.022). The ROC AUCs for models 1, 2, and 3 were 0.718 (95% CI: 0.671-0.765), 0.767 (95% CI: 0.725-0.809), and 0.773 (95% CI: 0.732-0.815), respectively. Model 2 versus 1 had a NRI of 12.6% (P < 0.0001) and model 3 versus 2 had a NRI of 3.1% (P = 0.059). Spirometry and SDIC data substantially and minimally improved lung cancer prediction, respectively. PMID:21411501

  19. A Dynamic Bronchial Airway Gene Expression Signature of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Lung Function Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Steiling, Katrina; van den Berge, Maarten; Hijazi, Kahkeshan; Florido, Roberta; Campbell, Joshua; Liu, Gang; Xiao, Ji; Zhang, Xiaohui; Duclos, Grant; Drizik, Eduard; Si, Huiqing; Perdomo, Catalina; Dumont, Charles; Coxson, Harvey O.; Alekseyev, Yuriy O.; Sin, Don; Pare, Peter; Hogg, James C.; McWilliams, Annette; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Sterk, Peter J.; Timens, Wim; Chang, Jeffrey T.; Sebastiani, Paola; OConnor, George T.; Bild, Andrea H.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Lam, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Molecular phenotyping of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been impeded in part by the difficulty in obtaining lung tissue samples from individuals with impaired lung function. Objectives: We sought to determine whether COPD-associated processes are reflected in gene expression profiles of bronchial airway epithelial cells obtained by bronchoscopy. Methods: Gene expression profiling of bronchial brushings obtained from 238 current and former smokers with and without COPD was performed using Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST Arrays. Measurements and Main Results: We identified 98 genes whose expression levels were associated with COPD status, FEV1% predicted, and FEV1/FVC. In silico analysis identified activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) as a potential transcriptional regulator of genes with COPD-associated airway expression, and ATF4 overexpression in airway epithelial cells in vitro recapitulates COPD-associated gene expression changes. Genes with COPD-associated expression in the bronchial airway epithelium had similarly altered expression profiles in prior studies performed on small-airway epithelium and lung parenchyma, suggesting that transcriptomic alterations in the bronchial airway epithelium reflect molecular events found at more distal sites of disease activity. Many of the airway COPD-associated gene expression changes revert toward baseline after therapy with the inhaled corticosteroid fluticasone in independent cohorts. Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate a molecular field of injury throughout the bronchial airway of active and former smokers with COPD that may be driven in part by ATF4 and is modifiable with therapy. Bronchial airway epithelium may ultimately serve as a relatively accessible tissue in which to measure biomarkers of disease activity for guiding clinical management of COPD. PMID:23471465

  20. Changes in Pulmonary Function Up to 10 Years After Locoregional Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Erven, Katrien; Weltens, Caroline; Nackaerts, Kristiaan; Fieuws, Steffen; Decramer, Marc; Lievens, Yolande

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term impact of locoregional breast radiotherapy (RT) on pulmonary function tests (PFTs). Methods and Materials: This study included 75 women who underwent postoperative locoregional breast RT. PFTs were performed before RT and 3, 6, and 12 months and 8 to 10 years after RT. By use of univariate and multivariate analyses, the impact of treatment- and patient-related factors on late changes in PFTs was evaluated. Results: During the first year after RT, all PFTs significantly worsened at 3 to 6 months after RT (p < 0.05). At 12 months, forced vital capacity (FVC), vital capacity (VC), and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV{sub 1}) recovered almost to baseline values, whereas total lung capacity (TLC) and diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide (DL{sub CO}) recovered only slightly and were still found to be decreased compared with baseline (p < 0.05). At 8 to 10 years after RT, mean reductions in FEV{sub 1} of 4% (p = 0.03) and in VC, DL{sub CO}, and TLC of 5%, 9%, and 11% (all p < 0.0001), respectively, were observed compared with pre-RT values. On multivariate analysis, tamoxifen use negatively affected TLC at 8 to 10 years after RT (p = 0.033), whereas right-sided irradiation was associated with a late reduction in FEV{sub 1} (p = 0.027). For FEV{sub 1} and DL{sub CO}, an early decrease was predictive for a late decrease (p = 0.003 and p = 0.0009, respectively). Conclusions: The time course of PFT changes after locoregional RT for breast cancer follows a biphasic pattern. An early reduction in PFTs at 3 to 6 months with a partial recovery at 12 months after RT is followed by a late, more important PFT reduction up to 8 to 10 years after RT. Tamoxifen use may have an impact on this late decline in PFTs.

  1. A portable single-sided magnet system for remote NMR measurements of pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    Dabaghyan, Mikayel; Muradyan, Iga; Hrovat, Alan; Butler, James; Frederick, Eric; Zhou, Feng; Kyriazis, Angelos; Hardin, Charles; Patz, Samuel; Hrovat, Mirko

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we report initial results from a light-weight, low field magnetic resonance device designed to make relative pulmonary density measurements at the bedside. The development of this device necessarily involves special considerations for the magnet, RF and data acquisition schemes as well as a careful analysis of what is needed to provide useful information in the ICU. A homogeneous field region is created remotely from the surface of the magnet such that when the magnet is placed against the chest, an NMR signal is measured from a small volume in the lung. In order to achieve portability, one must trade off field strength and therefore spatial resolution. We report initial measurements from a ping-pong ball size region in the lung as a function of lung volume. As expected, we measured decreased signal at larger lung volumes since lung density decreases with increasing lung volume. Using a CPMG sequence with ΔTE=3.5 ms and a 20 echo train, a signal to noise ratio ~1100 was obtained from an 8.8mT planar magnet after signal averaging for 43 s. This is the first demonstration of NMR measurements made on a human lung with a light-weight planar NMR device. We argue that very low spatial resolution measurements of different lobar lung regions will provide useful diagnostic information for clinicians treating Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as clinicians want to avoid ventilator pressures that cause either lung over distension (too much pressure) or lung collapse (too little pressure). PMID:24953556

  2. Influence of perioperative oxygen fraction on pulmonary function after abdominal surgery: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A high perioperative inspiratory oxygen fraction (FiO2) may reduce the frequency of surgical site infection. Perioperative atelectasis is caused by absorption, compression and reduced function of surfactant. It is well accepted, that ventilation with 100% oxygen for only a few minutes is associated with significant formation of atelectasis. However, it is still not clear if a longer period of 80% oxygen results in more atelectasis compared to a low FiO2. Our aim was to assess if a high FiO2 is associated with impaired oxygenation and decreased pulmonary functional residual capacity (FRC). Methods Thirty-five patients scheduled for laparotomy for ovarian cancer were randomized to receive either 30% oxygen (n?=?15) or 80% oxygen (n?=?20) during and for 2?h after surgery. The oxygenation index (PaO2/FiO2) was measured every 30?min during anesthesia and 90?min after extubation. FRC was measured the day before surgery and 2?h after extubation by a rebreathing method using the inert gas SF6. Results Five min after intubation, the median PaO2/FiO2 was 69 kPa [53-71] in the 30%-group vs. 60 kPa [47-69] in the 80%-group (P?=?0.25). At the end of anesthesia, the PaO2/FiO2 was 58 kPa [40-70] vs. 57 kPa [46-67] in the 30%- and 80%-group, respectively (P?=?0.10). The median FRC was 1993?mL [1610-2240] vs. 1875?mL [1545-2048] at baseline and 1615?mL [1375-2318] vs. 1633?mL [1343-1948] postoperatively in the 30%- and 80%-group, respectively (P?=?0.70). Conclusion We found no significant difference in oxygenation index or functional residual capacity between patients given 80% and 30% oxygen for a period of approximately 5 hours. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00637936. PMID:22840231

  3. Diesel exhaust particulate induces pulmonary and systemic inflammation in rats without impairing endothelial function ex vivo or in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Inhalation of diesel exhaust impairs vascular function in man, by a mechanism that has yet to be fully established. We hypothesised that pulmonary exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) would cause endothelial dysfunction in rats as a consequence of pulmonary and systemic inflammation. Methods Wistar rats were exposed to DEP (0.5 mg) or saline vehicle by intratracheal instillation and hind-limb blood flow, blood pressure and heart rate were monitored in situ 6 or 24 h after exposure. Vascular function was tested by administration of the endothelium-dependent vasodilator acetylcholine (ACh) and the endothelium-independent vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in vivo and ex vivo in isolated rings of thoracic aorta, femoral and mesenteric artery from DEP exposed rats. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and blood plasma were collected to assess pulmonary (cell differentials, protein levels & interleukin-6 (IL-6)) and systemic (IL-6), tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF?) and C-reactive protein (CRP)) inflammation, respectively. Results DEP instillation increased cell counts, total protein and IL-6 in BALF 6 h after exposure, while levels of IL-6 and TNF? were only raised in blood 24 h after DEP exposure. DEP had no effect on the increased hind-limb blood flow induced by ACh in vivo at 6 or 24 h. However, responses to SNP were impaired at both time points. In contrast, ex vivo responses to ACh and SNP were unaltered in arteries isolated from rats exposed to DEP. Conclusions Exposure of rats to DEP induces both pulmonary and systemic inflammation, but does not modify endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. Other mechanisms in vivo limit dilator responses to SNP and these require further investigation. PMID:22480168

  4. Effect of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus on pulmonary function and exercise tolerance in chronic congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Guazzi, Marco; Brambilla, Roberto; Pontone, Gianluca; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Guazzi, Maurizio D

    2002-01-15

    In chronic congestive heart failure (CHF), backward effects of left ventricular dysfunction alter pulmonary volumes and gas diffusion. Some of these disorders are detected in some patients with diabetes mellitus, possibly due to a microangiopathic process and nonenzymatic glycosylation of lung tissue proteins. We explored the possibility that coexistence of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) may potentiate the deterioration of lung function in CHF. In 20 normoglycemic patients (group 1) and in 20 patients with NIDDM (group 2), with New York Heart Association class II to III CHF due to idiopathic or ischemic cardiac disease, and in 20 controls (groups were age- and gender-matched), we investigated cardiac function, pulmonary volumes, carbon monoxide diffusion (DL(CO)) and its alveolar-capillary membrane (D(M)) subcomponent, oxygen uptake and dead space-to-tidal volume ratio (pVD/VT) at peak exercise (individualized ramp test), and slope of ventilation-to-carbon dioxide production ratio (VE/VCO(2)) during exercise. Although, compared with reference subjects, both patient groups had similar variations in left ventricular diastolic volume, ejection fraction, and pulmonary wedge pressure; in group 2 lung volumes, DL(CO), D(M), and oxygen uptake were significantly more reduced; in this group there was no overlap of individual results of DL(CO) and D(M) with those in controls; VE/VCO(2) slope and pVD/VT also were significantly increased, and inversely correlated with D(M). Thus, coexistence of NIDDM makes pulmonary dysfunction worse in CHF, and significantly enhances exercise intolerance. PMID:11792341

  5. Efficacy of indacaterol on quality of life and pulmonary function in patients with COPD and inhaler device preferences

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Takeshi; Wada, Shota; Hanada, Souichirou; Sawaguchi, Hirochiyo; Muraki, Masato; Tohda, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Background Indacaterol is a novel, once-daily, inhaled, long-acting b2-agonist for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The study objective was to evaluate the efficacy of indacaterol on quality of life and pulmonary function in patients with COPD in a real-world setting, and also to evaluate its inhaler device (Breezhaler), which is important for both adherence and management. Methods Twenty-eight outpatients with COPD were treated with indacaterol (150 ?g once daily for 8 weeks), and the effects on pulmonary function were evaluated using a questionnaire survey with the modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) dyspnea scale and COPD assessment test (CAT) before and after treatment. Similar investigations were also performed separately among different baseline medications. Moreover, original questionnaire surveys for indacaterol and its device were performed. Results Overall, mMRC dyspnea scale and CAT scores significantly improved (1.961.04 to 1.571.07 and 17.398.23 to 12.828.42, respectively; P<0.05). Significant improvements in forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) were also observed on pulmonary function tests (2.910.66 L to 3.070.65 L and 1.460.60 L to 1.580.59 L, respectively; P<0.05). Replacement therapy from salmeterol to indacaterol significantly improved mMRC and FVC values, but did not significantly improve CAT scores or other pulmonary functions. Add-on therapy with indacaterol significantly improved mMRC score, CAT score, FVC, and FEV1, regardless of whether tiotropium was used as a baseline treatment. All subjects in a questionnaire survey found the inhaler device easy to use. There were no serious adverse events leading to treatment discontinuation. Conclusion Indacaterol is thought to be effective and well tolerated as a bronchodilator for the management of COPD. Treatment with indacaterol in addition to a long-acting muscarinic antagonist was also useful. PMID:24489464

  6. The Critical Role of Pulmonary Arterial Compliance in Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Thenappan, Thenappan; Prins, Kurt W; Pritzker, Marc R; Scandurra, John; Volmers, Karl; Weir, E Kenneth

    2016-02-01

    The normal pulmonary circulation is a low-pressure, high-compliance system. Pulmonary arterial compliance decreases in the presence of pulmonary hypertension because of increased extracellular matrix/collagen deposition in the pulmonary arteries. Loss of pulmonary arterial compliance has been consistently shown to be a predictor of increased mortality in patients with pulmonary hypertension, even more so than pulmonary vascular resistance in some studies. Decreased pulmonary arterial compliance causes premature reflection of waves from the distal pulmonary vasculature, leading to increased pulsatile right ventricular afterload and eventually right ventricular failure. Evidence suggests that decreased pulmonary arterial compliance is a cause rather than a consequence of distal small vessel proliferative vasculopathy. Pulmonary arterial compliance decreases early in the disease process even when pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance are normal, potentially enabling early diagnosis of pulmonary vascular disease, especially in high-risk populations. With the recognition of the prognostic importance of pulmonary arterial compliance, its impact on right ventricular function, and its contributory role in the development and progression of distal small-vessel proliferative vasculopathy, pulmonary arterial compliance is an attractive target for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26848601

  7. Percutaneous Pulmonary Valve Placement

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Lourdes R.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with congenital heart disease and pulmonary valve disease need multiple procedures over their lifetimes to replace their pulmonary valves. Chronic pulmonary stenosis, regurgitation, or both have untoward effects on ventricular function and on the clinical status of these patients. To date, all right ventriclepulmonary artery conduits have had relatively short lifespans. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation, although relatively new, will probably reduce the number of operative procedures that these patients will have to undergo over a lifetime. Refinement and further development of this procedure holds promise for the extension of this technology to other patient populations. PMID:26175629

  8. Influence of Pulmonary Rehabilitation on Lung Function Changes After the Lung Resection for Primary Lung Cancer in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mujovic, Natasa; Mujovic, Nebojsa; Subotic, Dragan; Ercegovac, Maja; Milovanovic, Andjela; Nikcevic, Ljubica; Zugic, Vladimir; Nikolic, Dejan

    2015-01-01

    Influence of physiotherapy on the outcome of the lung resection is still controversial. Study aim was to assess the influence of physiotherapy program on postoperative lung function and effort tolerance in lung cancer patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) that are undergoing lobectomy or pneumonectomy. The prospective study included 56 COPD patients who underwent lung resection for primary non small-cell lung cancer after previous physiotherapy (Group A) and 47 COPD patients (Group B) without physiotherapy before lung cancer surgery. In Group A, lung function and effort tolerance on admission were compared with the same parameters after preoperative physiotherapy. Both groups were compared in relation to lung function, effort tolerance and symptoms change after resection. In patients with tumors requiring a lobectomy, after preoperative physiotherapy, a highly significant increase in FEV1, VC, FEF50 and FEF25 of 20%, 17%, 18% and 16% respectively was registered with respect to baseline values. After physiotherapy, a significant improvement in 6-minute walking distance was achieved. After lung resection, the significant loss of FEV1 and VC occurred, together with significant worsening of the small airways function, effort tolerance and symptomatic status. After the surgery, a clear tendency existed towards smaller FEV1 loss in patients with moderate to severe, when compared to patients with mild baseline lung function impairment. A better FEV1 improvement was associated with more significant loss in FEV1. Physiotherapy represents an important part of preoperative and postoperative treatment in COPD patients undergoing a lung resection for primary lung cancer. PMID:26618048

  9. Pulmonary function responses to ozone in smokers with a limited smoking history

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, Melissa L.; Brenza, Timothy M.; Ben-Jebria, Abdellaziz; Bascom, Rebecca; Eldridge, Marlowe W.; Ultman, James S.

    2014-07-01

    In non-smokers, ozone (O{sub 3}) inhalation causes decreases in forced expiratory volume (FEV{sub 1}) and dead space (V{sub D}) and increases the slope of the alveolar plateau (S{sub N}). We previously described a population of smokers with a limited smoking history that had enhanced responsiveness to brief O{sub 3} boluses and aimed to determine if responsiveness to continuous exposure was also enhanced. Thirty smokers (19 M, 11 F, 24 ± 4 years, 6 ± 4 total years smoking,4 ± 2 packs/week) and 30 non-smokers (17 M, 13 F, 25 ± 6 years) exercised for 1 h on a cycle ergometer while breathing 0.30 ppm O{sub 3}. Smokers and non-smokers were equally responsive in terms of FEV{sub 1} (− 9.5 ± 1.8% vs − 8.7 ± 1.9%). Smokers alone were responsive in terms of V{sub D} (− 6.1 ± 1.2%) and S{sub N} (9.1 ± 3.4%). There was no difference in total delivered dose. Dead space ventilation (V{sub D}/V{sub T}) was not initially different between the two groups, but increased in the non-smokers (16.4 ± 2.8%) during the exposure, suggesting that the inhaled dose may be distributed more peripherally in smokers. We also conclude that these cigarette smokers retain their airway responsiveness to O{sub 3} and, uniquely, experience changes in V{sub D} that lead to heterogeneity in airway morphometry and an increase in S{sub N}. - Highlights: • We previously found lung function responses to O{sub 3} bolus exposure in smokers. • Here, we describe their responsiveness to continuous O{sub 3} exposure with exercise. • Spirometry and capnography were used to assess pulmonary function changes. • Enhanced bronchoconstriction in smokers increases parenchymal delivery of O{sub 3}.

  10. Optical Coherence Tomography in Pulmonary Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgu, Septimiu Dan; Brenner, Matthew; Chen, Zhongping; Suter, Melissa J.

    Advances in pulmonary diagnostics and therapeutics offer a major potential for optical imaging applications both in clinical practice and research settings. Complexities of pulmonary structures and function have restricted widespread OCT investigations and clinical applications, but these will likely be overcome by developments in OCT technology [1]. Some factors that have limited adaptation of OCT into the pulmonary setting in the past have been the shallow depth of penetration, resolution limitations, relatively slow access times, need to examine large surface areas with numerous branching airways, motion artifacts, as well as a need for development of practical imaging probes to reach the relevant locations in a minimally invasive way. Considerable recent engineering and analytical advances in OCT technology [2-8] have already overcome several of these obstacles and will enable much more extensive investigations into the role for structural and functional pulmonary OCT imaging [1].

  11. Smoking-associated fibrosis and pulmonary asbestosis.

    PubMed

    Bledsoe, Jacob R; Christiani, David C; Kradin, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of pulmonary asbestosis is most often established based on clinical criteria and has both clinical and legal implications. Unfortunately, one of the confounding features in the diagnosis may be a history of cigarette abuse, which can produce interstitial opacities on chest imaging as well as diffusion defects on pulmonary function testing, criteria that are used in the diagnosis of pulmonary asbestosis. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the correlation of radiographically detected pulmonary fibrosis with fibrosis established histopathologically as attributable to asbestos, in a cohort referred for diagnosis of an asbestos-related malignancy in the context of litigation. We examined the slides of 186 cases with reported asbestos exposure, referred in consultation for asbestos-related malignancy and the presence of pulmonary fibrosis. Sixty-five cases had what was judged to be adequate tissue sampling for histopathologic evaluation of asbestosis as well as an existing radiologic assessment of pulmonary fibrosis by B-reader report. Of 24 cases judged to have asbestosis radiographically, which had sufficient tissue for pathologic examination, six showed asbestosis histopathologically. The remaining 18 cases (mean smoking history of 53 pack-years) showed interstitial fibrosis that was judged to be most consistent with smoking-associated pulmonary fibrosis. We conclude that the clinical diagnosis of mild asbestosis cannot be reliably distinguished from interstitial fibrosis in heavy smokers. PMID:25565798

  12. Gamma-Tocopherol Nebulization by A Lipid Aerosolization Device Improves Pulmonary Function in Sheep with Burn and Smoke Inhalation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hamahata, Atsumori; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Kraft, Edward R.; Lange, Matthias; Leonard, Scott W.; Traber, Maret G.; Cox, Robert A.; Schmalstieg, Frank C.; Hawkins, Hal K.; Whorton, Elbert B.; Horvath, Eszter M.; Szabo, Csaba; Traber, Lillian D.; Herndon, David N.; Traber, Daniel L.

    2008-01-01

    Fire accident victims, who sustain both thermal injury to skin and smoke inhalation, have gross evidence of systemic and pulmonary oxidant damage and acute lung injury. We hypothesized that gamma-Tocopherol (gT), a reactive O2 and N2scavenger, when delivered into the airway will attenuate lung injury induced by burn and smoke inhalation. Acute lung injury was induced in chronically prepared, anesthetized sheep by 40% total burn surface area, 3rd degree skin burn and smoke insufflation (48 breaths of cotton smoke, <40C). Study groups: 1) Sham (not injured, flax (FO)-nebulized, n=6); 2) SA-neb (injured, saline-nebulized, n=6); 3) FO-neb (injured, FO-nebulized, n=6); 4) gT+FO-neb (injured, FO+gT-nebulized, n=6). Nebulization was started 1 h post-injury and 24 ml of FO with or without gT (51 mg/ml) was delivered into airways over 47 h using our newly developed lipid aerosolization device (droplet size-2.55 ?m). The burn and smoke inhalation-induced pathological changes seen in the saline group were attenuated by FO nebulization; gT addition further improved pulmonary function. Pulmonary gT delivery along with a FO source may be a novel effective treatment strategy in management of patients with acute lung injury. PMID:18503777

  13. Assessment of Right Ventricular Structure and Function in Mouse Model of Pulmonary Artery Constriction by Transthoracic Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Susan; Bauer, Michael; Ngoy, Soeun; Qiu, Yiling; Guan, Jian; Mishra, Shikha; Mbah, Christopher; Liao, Ronglih

    2014-01-01

    Emerging clinical data support the notion that RV dysfunction is critical to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease and heart failure1-3. Moreover, the RV is significantly affected in pulmonary diseases such as pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH). In addition, the RV is remarkably sensitive to cardiac pathologies, including left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, valvular disease or RV infarction4. To understand the role of RV in the pathogenesis of cardiac diseases, a reliable and noninvasive method to access the RV structurally and functionally is essential. A noninvasive trans-thoracic echocardiography (TTE) based methodology was established and validated for monitoring dynamic changes in RV structure and function in adult mice. To impose RV stress, we employed a surgical model of pulmonary artery constriction (PAC) and measured the RV response over a 7-day period using a high-frequency ultrasound microimaging system. Sham operated mice were used as controls. Images were acquired in lightly anesthetized mice at baseline (before surgery), day 0 (immediately post-surgery), day 3, and day 7 (post-surgery). Data was analyzed offline using software. Several acoustic windows (B, M, and Color Doppler modes), which can be consistently obtained in mice, allowed for reliable and reproducible measurement of RV structure (including RV wall thickness, end-diastolicand end-systolic dimensions), and function (fractional area change, fractional shortening, PA peak velocity, and peak pressure gradient) in normal mice and following PAC. Using this method, the pressure-gradient resulting from PAC was accurately measured in real-time using Color Doppler mode and was comparable to direct pressure measurements performed with a Millar high-fidelity microtip catheter. Taken together, these data demonstrate that RV measurements obtained from various complimentary views using echocardiography are reliable, reproducible and can provide insights regarding RV structure and function. This method will enable a better understanding of the role of RV cardiac dysfunction. PMID:24513696

  14. Effects of milrinone and epinephrine or dopamine on biventricular function and hemodynamics in right heart failure after pulmonary regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Hyldebrandt, Janus Adler; Agger, Peter; Sivn, Eleonora; Wemmelund, Kristian Borup; Heiberg, Johan; Frederiksen, Christian Alcaraz; Ravn, Hanne Berg

    2015-09-01

    Right ventricular failure (RVF) secondary to pulmonary regurgitation (PR) impairs right ventricular (RV) function and interrupts the interventricular relationship. There are few recommendations for the medical management of severe RVF after prolonged PR. PR was induced in 16 Danish landrace pigs by plication of the pulmonary valve leaflets. Twenty-three pigs served as controls. At reexamination the effect of milrinone, epinephrine, and dopamine was evaluated using biventricular conductance and pulmonary catheters. Seventy-nine days after PR was induced, RV end-diastolic volume index (EDVI) had increased by 33% (P = 0.006) and there was a severe decrease in the load-independent measurement of contractility (PRSW) (-58%; P = 0.003). Lower cardiac index (CI) (-28%; P < 0.0001), mean arterial pressure (-15%; P = 0.01) and mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2) (36%; P < 0.0001) were observed compared with the control group. The interventricular septum deviated toward the left ventricle (LV). Milrinone improved RV-PRSW and CI and maintained systemic pressure while reducing central venous pressure (CVP). Epinephrine and dopamine further improved biventricular PRSW and CI equally in a dose-dependent manner. Systemic and pulmonary pressures were higher in the dopamine-treated animals compared with epinephrine-treated animals. None of the treatments improved stroke volume index (SVI) despite increases in contractility. Strong correlation was detected between SVI and LV-EDVI, but not SVI and biventricular contractility. In RVF due to PR, milrinone significantly improved CI, SvO2, and CVP and increased contractility in the RV. Epinephrine and dopamine had equal inotropic effect, but a greater vasopressor effect was observed for dopamine. SV was unchanged due to inability of both treatments to increase LV-EDVI. PMID:26092988

  15. Alterations in Cardiac and Pulmonary Function in Pediatric Rapid Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Disease Progressors

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, William T.; Lipshultz, Steven E.; Easley, Kirk A.; McIntosh, Kenneth; Pitt, Jane; Quinn, Thomas C.; Kattan, Meyer; Goldfarb, Johanna; Cooper, Ellen; Bryson, Yvonne; Kovacs, Andrea; Bricker, Timothy; Peavy, Hannah; Mellins, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Infants with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can be divided into rapid progressors (RPs) and non-rapid progressors (non-RPs) based on symptoms and immunologic status, but detailed information about cardiac and pulmonary function in RP and non-RP children needs to be adequately described. Methodology Cardiac, pulmonary, and immunologic data and HIV-1 RNA burden were periodically measured in 3 groups: group I, 205 vertically infected children enrolled from 1990 to 1994 and followed through 1996; group II, a prospectively studied cohort enrolled at birth that included 93 infected (group IIa); and 463 noninfected infants (group IIb). Results Mean respiratory rates were generally higher in group IIa RP than non-RP children throughout the period of follow-up, achieving statistical signifance at 1 month, 12 months, 24 months, 30 months, and 48 months of follow-up. Non-RP and group IIb (HIV-uninfected children) had similar mean respiratory rates from birth to 5 years of age. Significant differences in mean respiratory rates were found between group I RP and non-RP at 7 age intervals over the first 6 years of life. Mean respiratory rates were higher in RP than in non-RP at <1 year, 2.0 years, 2.5 years, 3.0 years, 3.5 years, 4.0 years, and 6.0 years of age. Mean heart rates in group IIa RP, non-RP, and group IIb differed at every age. Rapid progressors had higher mean heart rates than non-RP at all ages through 24 months. Mean heart rates at 30 months through 60 months of age were similar for RP and non-RP children. Non-RP children had higher mean heart rates than did group IIb at 8 months, 24 months, 36 months, 42 months, 48 months, 54 months, and 60 months of age. In group I, RP had higher mean heart rates than non-RP at 2.0 years, 2.5 years, 3.0 years, and 4.0 years of age. After 4 years of age, the non-RP and RP had similar mean heart rates. Mean fractional shortening differed between the 3 group II subsets (RP, non-RP, and IIb) at 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 months of age. Although mean fractional shortening was lower in RP than in non-RP in group II at all time points between 1 and 20 months, the mean fractional shortening was significantly lower in RP only at 8 months when restricting the statistical comparisons to the 2 HIV-infected groups (RP and non-RP). Mean fractional shortening increased in the first 8 months of life followed by a gradual decline through 5 years of age among group IIb children. No significant differences among the 3 groups in mean fractional shortening were detected after 20 months of age. In group I, differences between RP and non-RP in mean fractional shortening were detected at 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 years of age. After 3 years of age, group means for fractional shortening in RP and non-RP did not differ. Because of the limited data from the first months of the group I patients, it could not be determined whether this group experienced the gradual early rise in mean fractional shortening seen in the group II infants. In group IIa, RP had more clinical (eg, oxygen saturation <96%) and chest radiographic abnormalities (eg, cardiomegaly) at 18 months of life. RP also had significantly higher 5-year cumulative mortality than non-RP, higher HIV-1 viral burdens than non-RP, and lower CD8+ T-cell counts. Conclusions Rapid disease progression in HIV-1-infected infants is associated with significant alterations in heart and lung function: increased respiratory rate, increased heart rate, and decreased fractional shortening. The same children exhibited the anticipated significantly increased 5-year cumulative mortality, increased serum HIV-1 RNA load, and decreased CD8+ (cytotoxic) T-cell counts. Measurements of cardiopulmonary function in HIV-1-infected children seem to be useful in the total assessment of HIV-1 disease progression. PMID:10617746

  16. Effect of Bhramari pranayama and OM chanting on pulmonary function in healthy individuals: A prospective randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Mooventhan, A; Khode, Vitthal

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim: Yoga is an ancient Indian science as well as the way of life. Pranayama is a part of yoga, which improves pulmonary function in combination of many pranayama, but the aim of our study is to evaluate the effect of only Bhramari pranayama and OM chanting on pulmonary function in healthy individuals. Materials and Methods: A total of 82 subjects were randomized into the study group (SG) (n = 41) and control group (CG) (n = 41). Baseline assessment was performed before intervention for both groups. SG practiced Bhramari pranayama and OM chanting for the duration of 10 min (5 min for each practice)/day for the period of 6 days/week for 2 weeks and CG did not practice so. After intervention post-assessment was performed for SG (n = 40) and CG (n = 39). Statistical analysis was performed by Independent samples t-test and Student's paired t-test with the use of Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 16 (2007, USA). Results: The result showed a significant improvement in peak expiratory flow (PEF), forced expiratory flow (FEF)25% and maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV) along with a significant reduction in weight in SG compared with CG in independent samples t-test. Significant improvement in slow vital capacity (SVC), forced expired volume in 1 s (FEV1) along with PEF, FEF25% and MVV; Significant reduction in weight and body mass index were observed in SG unlike in CG in Student's paired t-test. No significant changes were found in forced vital capacity, FEV1 /SVC and FEF50% , between and within the group analysis of SG and CG. Conclusion: Bhramari pranayama and OM chanting are effective in improving pulmonary function in healthy individuals. PMID:25035619

  17. Effects of cardiopulmonary bypass on lung nuclear factor-kappa B activity, cytokine release, and pulmonary function in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Gaisheng; Xue, Xiaodong; Chen, Yanying; Song, Zhihong; Jiang, Zhen; Hu, Kejian

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): To study the effect of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) on nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and cytokine expression and pulmonary function in dogs. Materials and Methods: Twelve male mongrel dogs were divided into a methylprednisolone group (group M) and a control group (group C). All animals underwent aortic and right atrial catheterization under general anesthesia. Changes in pulmonary function and hemodynamics were monitored and the injured site was histologically evaluated. Results: The activity of NF-κB and myeloperoxidase (MPO), levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8, and the wet/dry (W/D) weight ratio were significantly higher after CPB than before CPB in both groups (P<0.01), with the lower values in group M than in group C, at different time points (P<0.01). Histological evaluation revealed neutrophilic infiltration and thickening of the alveolar interstitium in both groups; however, the degree of pathological changes was significantly lower in group M than in group C. The alveolar–arterial O2 tension difference (PA-aDO2) was significantly higher after CPB than before CBP (P<0.01), and lower in group M than in group C (P<0.01). The pulmonary compliance after removal of the aortic clamp obviously decreased in group C (P<0.05), with no significant change in group M. Conclusion: CPB can significantly enhance the activation of NF-κB in lung tissues and increase the expression of inflammatory cytokines, thus inducing lung injury. Methylprednisolone can inhibit the NF-κB activation, thus inhibiting the release of cytokines and protecting the lung function. PMID:26877854

  18. Pulmonary arterial compliance and exercise capacity after pulmonary endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Ghio, Stefano; Morsolini, Marco; Corsico, Angelo; Klersy, Catherine; Mattiucci, Gabriella; Raineri, Claudia; Scelsi, Laura; Vistarini, Nicola; Oltrona Visconti, Luigi; D'Armini, Andrea Maria

    2014-05-01

    Patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), despite successful pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA), can continue to suffer from a limitation in exercise capacity. The objective of this study was to assess whether pulmonary arterial compliance is a predictor of exercise capacity after PEA. Right heart haemodynamics, treadmill incremental exercise test, spirometry, carbon monoxide transfer factor, arterial blood gas and echocardiographic examinations were retrospectively analysed in a population of CTEPH patients who underwent PEA at a single centre. Baseline and 3-month haemodynamic data were available in 296 patients; 5-year follow-up data were available in 68 patients. In a multivariable model the following parameters were found to be independent predictors of exercise capacity after surgery: age, sex, pulmonary arterial compliance, tricuspid annular plane excursion, arterial oxygen tension and carbon monoxide transfer factor (p<0.0001); the model showed good discrimination (Harrell's c=0.84) and calibration (shrinkage coefficient=0.91). Poor exercise capacity at 3 months was loosely associated with higher death rate during subsequent survival (Harrell's c=0.61). In conclusion, after successful PEA, reduced pulmonary arterial compliance is an important determinant of exercise capacity in association with the age and sex of the patients, and the extent of recovery of both cardiac and respiratory function. However, exercise capacity does not explain a large proportion of the effect of surgery on subsequent survival. PMID:24435007

  19. Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells function as airway sensors to control lung immune response.

    PubMed

    Branchfield, Kelsey; Nantie, Leah; Verheyden, Jamie M; Sui, Pengfei; Wienhold, Mark D; Sun, Xin

    2016-02-12

    The lung is constantly exposed to environmental atmospheric cues. How it senses and responds to these cues is poorly defined. Here, we show that Roundabout receptor (Robo) genes are expressed in pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNECs), a rare, innervated epithelial population. Robo inactivation in mouse lung results in an inability of PNECs to cluster into sensory organoids and triggers increased neuropeptide production upon exposure to air. Excess neuropeptides lead to an increase in immune infiltrates, which in turn remodel the matrix and irreversibly simplify the alveoli. We demonstrate in vivo that PNECs act as precise airway sensors that elicit immune responses via neuropeptides. These findings suggest that the PNEC and neuropeptide abnormalities documented in a wide array of pulmonary diseases may profoundly affect symptoms and progression. PMID:26743624

  20. [Effect of droperidol on the functional state of the lesser circulation in patients with pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Gimmel'farb, G N; Kle?nerman, V E; Gerasimov, N M

    1983-10-01

    The investigation of indices of hemodynamics of the small circle of blood circulation and the level of catecholamines in 34 patients at the main stages of closed mitral commissurotomy has shown that in pronounced pulmonary hypertension worse indices of hemodynamics of the small circle of blood circulation could be prevented by administration of droperidol. It is followed by a relatively stable content of serotonin, histamin, adrenalin and noradrenalin without any disturbance of gas exchange in the lungs. PMID:6659267

  1. Mast cell number, phenotype, and function in human pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Farha, Samar; Sharp, Jacqueline; Asosingh, Kewal; Park, Margaret; Comhair, Suzy A. A.; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Thomas, Jim; Farver, Carol; Hsieh, Fred; Loyd, James E.; Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2012-01-01

    A proliferation of mast cells around the small pulmonary blood vessels and the alveolar septae has been noted in models of pulmonary hypertension, and in plexiform lesions of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in patients. Here, we hypothesize that total mast cell numbers and activation are increased in PAH and that they contribute to vascular remodeling through cellular and soluble proangiogenic effectors. To test this, blood and urine were collected from patients with PAH (N=44), asthma (N=18) and healthy controls (N=29) to quantitate biomarkers of total body mast cell numbers and activation (total and mature tryptase, N-methyl histamine, leukotriene LTE4 and prostaglandin PGD-M). Serum total tryptase was higher in PAH than that in controls suggesting greater numbers of mast cells, but indicators of mast cell activation (mature tryptase, LTE4 and PGD-M) were similar among PAH, asthma, and controls. Immunohistochemistry of lung tissues identified mast cells as primarily perivascular and connective tissue chymase+ type in PAH, rather than mucosal phenotype. Intervention with mast cell inhibitors cromolyn and fexofenadine was performed in 9 patients for 12 weeks to identify the influence of mast cell products on the pathologic proangiogenic environment. Treatment decreased total tryptase and LTE-4 levels over time of treatment. This occurred in parallel to a drop in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and circulating proangiogenic CD34+CD133+ progenitor cells, which suggests that mast cells may promote vascular remodeling and dysfunction. In support of this, levels of exhaled nitric oxide, a vasodilator that is generally low in PAH, increased at the end of the 12-week mast cell blockade and antihistamine. These results suggest that mast cells might contribute to the pulmonary vascular pathologic processes underlying PAH. More studies are needed to confirm their potential contribution to the disease. PMID:22837863

  2. p18, a novel adaptor protein, regulates pulmonary endothelial barrier function via enhanced endocytic recycling of VE-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Chichger, Havovi; Duong, Huetran; Braza, Julie; Harrington, Elizabeth O

    2015-03-01

    Vascular permeability is a hallmark of several disease states including acute lung injury (ALI). Endocytosis of VE-cadherin, away from the interendothelial junction (IEJ), causes acute endothelial barrier permeability. A novel protein, p18, anchors to the endosome membrane and plays a role in late endosomal signaling via MAPK and mammalian target of rapamycin. However, the fate of the VE-cadherin-positive endosome has yet to be elucidated. We sought to elucidate a role for p18 in VE-cadherin trafficking and thus endothelial barrier function, in settings of ALI. Endothelial cell (EC) resistance, whole-cell ELISA, and filtration coefficient were studied in mice or lung ECs overexpressing wild-type or nonendosomal-binding mutant p18, using green fluorescent protein as a control. We demonstrate a protective role for the endocytic protein p18 in endothelial barrier function in settings of ALI in vitro and in vivo, through enhanced recycling of VE-cadherin-positive early endosomes to the IEJ. In settings of LPS-induced ALI, we show that Src tethered to the endosome tyrosine phosphorylates p18 concomitantly with VE-cadherin internalization and pulmonary edema formation. We conclude that p18 regulates pulmonary endothelial barrier function in vitro and in vivo, by enhancing recycling of VE-cadherin-positive endosomes to the IEJ. PMID:25404710

  3. The Effects of Game-Based Breathing Exercise on Pulmonary Function in Stroke Patients: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Sunghee; Shin, Doochul; Song, Changho

    2015-01-01

    Background Reduction of respiratory function along with hemiparesis leads to decreased endurance, dyspnea, and increased sedentary behavior, as well as to an increased risk of stroke. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the preliminary effects of game-based breathing exercise (GBE) on pulmonary function in stroke patients. Material/Methods Thirty-eight in-patients with stroke (22 men, 16 women) were recruited for the study. Participants were randomly allocated into 2 groups: patients assigned to the GBE group (n=19), and the control group (n=19). The GBE group participated in a GBE program for 25 minutes a day, 3 days a week, during a 5 week period. For the same period, both groups participated in a conventional stroke rehabilitation program. Forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume at 1 second (FEV1), FEV1/FVC, and maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV) were measured by a spirometer in pre- and post-testing. Results The GBE group had significantly improved FVC, FEV1, and MVV values compared with the control group (p<0.05), although there was no significant difference in FEV1/FVC value between groups. Significant short-term effects of the GBE program on pulmonary function in stroke patients were recorded in this study. Conclusions These findings gave some indications that it may be feasible to include GBE in rehabilitation interventions with this population. PMID:26098853

  4. Comparison of pulmonary function and back muscle strength according to the degree of spinal curvature of healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    You, Jae Eung; Lee, Hye Young; Kim, Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Degree of curvature on the spine is known to affect respiratory function and back muscle activation. We compared pulmonary function and back muscle strength according to the degree of curvature of the spine of healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-three healthy volunteers were enrolled. They were divided into two groups according to the degree of curvature of the spine: the below 2 group, and the above 2 group. The degree of curvature was assessed using the Adams forward bending test and a scoliometer. A pulmonary function test (PFT) was conducted, and back muscle strength was measured. [Results] No significant differences in PFT were found between the below 2 group and the above 2 group, in terms of forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC), or peak expiratory flow (PEF). However, back muscle strength in the below 2 group was significantly higher than that of the above 2 group. [Conclusion] Our findings indicate that the degree of curvature of the spine is associated with back muscle strength in subjects who have spinal curvature within the normal range. Therefore, evaluation and treatment of back muscle strength might be helpful for preventing the progress of curvature of the spine in adolescents with potential scoliosis. PMID:26180321

  5. Comparison of pulmonary function and back muscle strength according to the degree of spinal curvature of healthy adults.

    PubMed

    You, Jae Eung; Lee, Hye Young; Kim, Kyoung

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] Degree of curvature on the spine is known to affect respiratory function and back muscle activation. We compared pulmonary function and back muscle strength according to the degree of curvature of the spine of healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-three healthy volunteers were enrolled. They were divided into two groups according to the degree of curvature of the spine: the below 2 group, and the above 2 group. The degree of curvature was assessed using the Adams forward bending test and a scoliometer. A pulmonary function test (PFT) was conducted, and back muscle strength was measured. [Results] No significant differences in PFT were found between the below 2 group and the above 2 group, in terms of forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC), or peak expiratory flow (PEF). However, back muscle strength in the below 2 group was significantly higher than that of the above 2 group. [Conclusion] Our findings indicate that the degree of curvature of the spine is associated with back muscle strength in subjects who have spinal curvature within the normal range. Therefore, evaluation and treatment of back muscle strength might be helpful for preventing the progress of curvature of the spine in adolescents with potential scoliosis. PMID:26180321

  6. Structural and functional prevention of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension by individualized exercise training in mice.

    PubMed

    Weissmann, Norbert; Peters, Dorothea M; Klpping, Christina; Krger, Karsten; Pilat, Christian; Katta, Susmitha; Seimetz, Michael; Ghofrani, Hossein A; Schermuly, Ralph T; Witzenrath, Martin; Seeger, Werner; Grimminger, Friedrich; Mooren, Frank C

    2014-06-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a disease with a poor prognosis characterized by a vascular remodeling process and an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance. While a variety of reports demonstrated that exercise training exerts beneficial effects on exercise performance and quality of life in PH patients, it is not known how physical exercise affects vascular remodeling processes occurring in hypoxia-induced PH. Therefore, we investigated the effect of individualized exercise training on the development of hypoxia-induced PH in mice. Training effects were compared with pharmacological treatment with the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor Sildenafil or a combination of training plus Sildenafil. Trained mice who received Sildenafil showed a significantly improved walking distance (from 88.9 8.1 to 146.4 13.1 m) and maximum oxygen consumption (from 93.3 2.9 to 105.5 2.2% in combination with Sildenafil, to 102.2 3.0% with placebo) compared with sedentary controls. Right ventricular systolic pressure, measured by telemetry, was at the level of healthy normoxic animals, whereas right heart hypertrophy did not benefit from training. Most interestingly, the increase in small pulmonary vessel muscularization was prevented by training. Respective counterregulatory processes were detected for the nitric oxide-soluble guanylate cyclase-phosphodiesterase system. We conclude that individualized daily exercise can prevent vascular remodeling in hypoxia-induced PH. PMID:24705723

  7. Pulmonary Function in HIV-Infected Recreational Drug Users in the Era of Anti-Retroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Simonetti, Joseph A; Gingo, Matthew R; Kingsley, Lawrence; Kessinger, Cathy; Lucht, Lorrie; Balasubramani, GK; Leader, Joseph K; Huang, Laurence; Greenblatt, Ruth M; Dermand, John; Kleerup, Eric C; Morris, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Background Individuals with HIV infection commonly have pulmonary function abnormalities, including airflow obstruction and diffusion impairment, which may be more prevalent among recreational drug users. To date, the relationship between drug use and pulmonary function abnormalities among those with HIV remains unclear. Objective To determine associations between recreational drug use and airflow obstruction, diffusion impairment, and radiographic emphysema in men and women with HIV. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of pulmonary function and self-reported recreational drug use data from a cohort of 121 men and 63 women with HIV. Primary outcomes were the presence (yes/no) of: 1) airflow obstruction, (pre- or post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity<0.70); 2) moderate diffusion impairment (diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide <60% predicted); and 3) radiographic emphysema (>1% of lung voxels pulmonary diseases could have a significant impact on HIV and chronic disease management. PMID:25664201

  8. The effects of prostaglandin E1 on interleukin-6, pulmonary function and postoperative recovery in oesophagectomised patients.

    PubMed

    Farrokhnia, E; Makarem, J; Khan, Z H; Mohagheghi, M; Maghsoudlou, M; Abdollahi, A

    2009-11-01

    The inflammatory reactions and tissue response after oesophagectomy are leading causes of postoperative morbidity and mortality. We evaluated the effects of intraoperative infusion of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) on interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels, (A-a) DO2, pulmonary function and complications. This randomised double-blind clinical trial study was performed on patients undergoing transthoracic oesophagectomy due to cancer Thirty patients were randomly allocated to two groups: the PGE1 group (infusion of PGE1 20 ng kg(-1) min(-1)) and a placebo group (infusion of normal saline 0.9%). The infusion was started before induction of anaesthesia and continued until the end of the operation. The groups were comparable in basic characteristics and preoperative pulmonary function. Patients in the PGE1 group were discharged significantly earlier from the intensive care unit (72+/-9 vs 83+/-17 hours) and hospital (13+/-4 vs 18+/-8 days) (P=0.04 and 0.03, respectively). The (A-a) DO2 was significantly less in the PGE1 group at 12 and 24 hours after the operation (P=0.001, P=0.003, respectively). Postoperatively, IL-6 levels were significantly higher in the placebo group than in the PGE1 group. There were no differences in the forced expiratory volume in the first second or forced vital capacity. The findings indicate that infusion of PGE1 attenuates the increase in serum levels of IL-6 in patients undergoing esophagectomy and improves the (A-a) DO2. Stays in the intensive care unit and hospital were shorter in the PGE1 group. However, there were no differences in pulmonary complications. PMID:20014600

  9. Systemic interleukin-2 administration improves lung function and modulates chorioamnionitis-induced pulmonary inflammation in the ovine fetus.

    PubMed

    Willems, Monique G M; Ophelders, Daan R M G; Nikiforou, Maria; Jellema, Reint K; Butz, Anke; Delhaas, Tammo; Kramer, Boris W; Wolfs, Tim G A M

    2016-01-01

    Chorioamnionitis, an inflammatory reaction of the fetal membranes to microbes, is an important cause of preterm birth and associated with inflammation-driven lung injury. However, inflammation in utero overcomes immaturity of the premature lung by inducing surfactant lipids and lung gas volume. Previously, we found that lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced chorioamnionitis resulted in pulmonary inflammation with increased effector T cells and decreased regulatory T cell (Treg) numbers. Because Tregs are crucial for immune regulation, we assessed the effects of interleukin (IL)-2-driven selective Treg expansion on the fetal lung in an ovine chorioamnionitis model. Instrumented fetuses received systemic prophylactic IL-2 treatment [118 days gestational age (dGA)] with or without subsequent exposure to intra-amniotic LPS (122 dGA). Following delivery at 129 dGA (term 147 dGA), pulmo