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Sample records for exchange process pemisahan

  1. Alert Exchange Process Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration of the United States of America (NASA), and the European Space Agency (ESA), and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), acknowledging that NASA, ESA and JAXA have a mutual interest in exchanging Alerts and Alert Status Lists to enhance the information base for each system participant while fortifying the general level of cooperation between the policy agreement subscribers, and each Party will exchange Alert listings on regular basis and detailed Alert information on a need to know basis to the extent permitted by law.

  2. Pu Anion Exchange Process Intensification

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2015-10-08

    This project seeks to improve the efficiency of the plutonium anion-exchange process for purifying Pu through the development of alternate ion-exchange media. The objective of the project in FY15 was to develop and test a porous foam monolith material that could serve as a replacement for the current anion-exchange resin, Reillex® HPQ, used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for purifying Pu. The new material provides advantages in efficiency over the current resin by the elimination of diffusive mass transport through large granular resin beads. By replacing the large resin beads with a porous foam there is much more efficient contact between the Pu solution and the anion-exchange sites present on the material. Several samples of a polystyrene based foam grafted with poly(4-vinylpyridine) were prepared and the Pu sorption was tested in batch contact tests.

  3. ION EXCHANGE ADSORPTION PROCESS FOR PLUTONIUM SEPARATION

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, G.E.; Russell, E.R.; Taylor, M.D.

    1961-07-11

    Ion exchange processes for the separation of plutonium from fission products are described. In accordance with these processes an aqueous solution containing plutonium and fission products is contacted with a cation exchange resin under conditions favoring adsorption of plutonium and fission products on the resin. A portion of the fission product is then eluted with a solution containing 0.05 to 1% by weight of a carboxylic acid. Plutonium is next eluted with a solution containing 2 to 8 per cent by weight of the same carboxylic acid, and the remaining fission products on the resin are eluted with an aqueous solution containing over 10 per cent by weight of sodium bisulfate.

  4. Highly tritiated water processing by isotopic exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, W.M.; Willms, R.S.; Glugla, M.; Cristescu, I.; Michling, R.; Demange, D.

    2015-03-15

    Highly tritiated water (HTW) is produced in fusion machines and one of the promising technologies to process it is isotopic exchange. 3 kinds of Pt-catalyzed zeolite (13X-APG, CBV-100-CY and HiSiv-1000) were tested as candidates for isotopic exchange of highly tritiated water (HTW), and CBV-100-CY (Na-Y type with a SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio of ∼ 5.0) shows the best performance. Small-scale tritium testing indicates that this method is efficient for reaching an exchange factor (EF) of 100. Full-scale non-tritium testing implies that an EF of 300 can be achieved in 24 hours of operation if a temperature gradient is applied along the column. For the isotopic exchange, deuterium recycled from the Isotope Separation System (deuterium with 1% T and/or 200 ppm T) should be employed, and the tritiated water regenerated from the Pt-catalyzed zeolite bed after isotopic exchange should be transferred to Water Detritiation System (WDS) for further processing.

  5. Heat exchanger for coal gasification process

    DOEpatents

    Blasiole, George A.

    1984-06-19

    This invention provides a heat exchanger, particularly useful for systems requiring cooling of hot particulate solids, such as the separated fines from the product gas of a carbonaceous material gasification system. The invention allows effective cooling of a hot particulate in a particle stream (made up of hot particulate and a gas), using gravity as the motive source of the hot particulate. In a preferred form, the invention substitutes a tube structure for the single wall tube of a heat exchanger. The tube structure comprises a tube with a core disposed within, forming a cavity between the tube and the core, and vanes in the cavity which form a flow path through which the hot particulate falls. The outside of the tube is in contact with the cooling fluid of the heat exchanger.

  6. Diffusion-Welded Microchannel Heat Exchanger for Industrial Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Denis E. Clark; Michael V. Glazoff; Michael G. McKellar; Ronald E. Mizia

    2013-03-01

    The goal of next generation reactors is to increase energy ef?ciency in the production of electricity and provide high-temperature heat for industrial processes. The ef?cient transfer of energy for industrial applications depends on the ability to incorporate effective heat exchangers between the nuclear heat transport system and the industrial process. The need for ef?ciency, compactness, and safety challenge the boundaries of existing heat exchanger technology. Various studies have been performed in attempts to update the secondary heat exchanger that is downstream of the primary heat exchanger, mostly because its performance is strongly tied to the ability to employ more ef?cient industrial processes. Modern compact heat exchangers can provide high compactness, a measure of the ratio of surface area-to-volume of a heat exchange. The microchannel heat exchanger studied here is a plate-type, robust heat exchanger that combines compactness, low pressure drop, high effectiveness, and the ability to operate with a very large pressure differential between hot and cold sides. The plates are etched and thereafter joined by diffusion welding, resulting in extremely strong all-metal heat exchanger cores. After bonding, any number of core blocks can be welded together to provide the required ?ow capacity. This study explores the microchannel heat exchanger and draws conclusions about diffusion welding/bonding for joining heat exchanger plates, with both experimental and computational modeling, along with existing challenges and gaps. Also, presented is a thermal design method for determining overall design speci?cations for a microchannel printed circuit heat exchanger for both supercritical (24 MPa) and subcritical (17 MPa) Rankine power cycles.

  7. Moderating Effect of Intimate Exchange on Delinquent Socialization Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaertner, Alden E.; Fite, Paula J.; Colder, Craig R.

    2011-01-01

    Research indicates peer socialization processes affect the development of problem behavior in childhood and adolescence; however moderating peer factors have not been readily examined. Friendship intimate exchange may be an important factor to consider, as literature suggests that intimate exchange becomes an increasingly important aspect of…

  8. Water-hydrogen isotope exchange process analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorchenko, O.; Alekseev, I.; Uborsky, V.

    2008-07-15

    The use of a numerical method is needed to find a solution to the equation system describing a general case of heterogeneous isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and liquid water in a column. A computer model of the column merely outputting the isotope compositions in the flows leaving the column, like the experimental column itself, is a 'black box' to a certain extent: the solution is not transparent and occasionally not fully comprehended. The approximate analytical solution was derived from the ZXY-diagram (McCabe-Thiele diagram), which illustrates the solution of the renewed computer model called 'EVIO-4.2' Several 'unusual' results and dependences have been analyzed and explained. (authors)

  9. Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water

    DOEpatents

    Hindin, Saul G.; Roberts, George W.

    1980-08-12

    A process for exchanging isotopes of hydrogen, particularly tritium, between gaseous hydrogen and water is provided whereby gaseous hydrogen depeleted in tritium and liquid or gaseous water containing tritium are reacted in the presence of a metallic catalyst.

  10. NGNP Process Heat Utilization: Liquid Metal Phase Change Heat Exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Vivek Utgikar; Fred Gunnerson

    2008-09-01

    One key long-standing issue that must be overcome to fully realize the successful growth of nuclear power is to determine other benefits of nuclear energy apart from meeting the electricity demands. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will most likely be producing electricity and heat for the production of hydrogen and/or oil retrieval from oil sands and oil shale to help in our national pursuit of energy independence. For nuclear process heat to be utilized, intermediate heat exchange is required to transfer heat from the NGNP to the hydrogen plant or oil recovery field in the most efficient way possible. Development of nuclear reactor - process heat technology has intensified the interest in liquid metals as heat transfer media because of their ideal transport properties. Liquid metal heat exchangers are not new in practical applications. An important rational for considering liquid metals is the potential convective heat transfer is among the highest known. Thus explains the interest in liquid metals as coolant for intermediate heat exchange from NGNP. For process heat it is desired that, intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) transfer heat from the NGNP in the most efficient way possible. The production of electric power at higher efficiency via the Brayton Cycle, and hydrogen production, requires both heat at higher temperatures and high effectiveness compact heat exchangers to transfer heat to either the power or process cycle. Compact heat exchangers maximize the heat transfer surface area per volume of heat exchanger; this has the benefit of reducing heat exchanger size and heat losses. High temperature IHX design requirements are governed in part by the allowable temperature drop between the outlet and inlet of the NGNP. In order to improve the characteristics of heat transfer, liquid metal phase change heat exchangers may be more effective and efficient. This paper explores the overall heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop of the phase change

  11. Neptunium Valence Chemistry in Anion Exchange Processing

    SciTech Connect

    KYSER, EDWARD

    2003-02-01

    The current anion resin in use in HB-Line Phase II, Reillex{trademark} HPQ, was tested in the laboratory under expected plant conditions for Np processing and was found to load between 50 and 70 g Np per liter of resin. Losses varied from 0.2 to 15 percent depending on a number of parameters. Hydrazine in the feed at 0.02 to 0.05 M appeared to keep the Np from oxidizing and increasing the losses within four to seven days after the FS addition. Losses of up to three percent were observed five days after FS addition when hydrazine was not used in the feed, compared with 0.3 percent when the feed was loaded immediately after FS addition. Based on these test results the following processing conditions are recommended: (1) Feed conditions: 8 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.02 M hydrazine, 0.05 M excess FS, less than 5 days storage of solution after FS addition. (2) Wash conditions: 100 liters of 8 M HNO{sub 3}, no FS, no hydrazine. (3) Elution conditions: 0.17 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.05 M hydrazine, no FS. (4) Precipitation feed conditions: 0.03 M excess ascorbic acid, no additional hydrazine, no FS, precipitation within three days.

  12. MODELING RESULTS FROM CESIUM ION EXCHANGE PROCESSING WITH SPHERICAL RESINS

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.; Hang, T.; Aleman, S.

    2011-01-03

    Ion exchange modeling was conducted at the Savannah River National Laboratory to compare the performance of two organic resins in support of Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX). In-tank ion exchange (IX) columns are being considered for cesium removal at Hanford and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The spherical forms of resorcinol formaldehyde ion exchange resin (sRF) as well as a hypothetical spherical SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 (SL644) are evaluated for decontamination of dissolved saltcake wastes (supernates). Both SuperLig{reg_sign} and resorcinol formaldehyde resin beds can exhibit hydraulic problems in their granular (nonspherical) forms. SRS waste is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste. Using VERSE-LC Version 7.8 along with the cesium Freundlich/Langmuir isotherms to simulate the waste decontamination in ion exchange columns, spherical SL644 was found to reduce column cycling by 50% for high-potassium supernates, but sRF performed equally well for the lowest-potassium feeds. Reduced cycling results in reduction of nitric acid (resin elution) and sodium addition (resin regeneration), therefore, significantly reducing life-cycle operational costs. These findings motivate the development of a spherical form of SL644. This work demonstrates the versatility of the ion exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. The value of a resin with increased selectivity for cesium over potassium can be assessed for further development.

  13. The Dissemination Linking Process: A View from the Regional Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Edward; And Others

    The educational dissemination linking process activities of three Regional Exchange specialists at Research for Better Schools in Philadelphia were empirically analyzed to identify: the activities performed in the transfer of information from research to practice; the decisions made about the organization of activities and; contextual factors…

  14. Process Heat Exchanger Options for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Eung Soo Kim; Michael McKellar; Nolan Anderson

    2011-06-01

    The work reported herein is a significant intermediate step in reaching the final goal of commercial-scale deployment and usage of molten salt as the heat transport medium for process heat applications. The primary purpose of this study is to aid in the development and selection of the required heat exchanger for power production and process heat application, which would support large-scale deployment.

  15. Process Heat Exchanger Options for Fluoride Salt High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Eung Soo Kim; Michael McKellar; Nolan Anderson

    2011-04-01

    The work reported herein is a significant intermediate step in reaching the final goal of commercial-scale deployment and usage of molten salt as the heat transport medium for process heat applications. The primary purpose of this study is to aid in the development and selection of the required heat exchanger for power production and process heat application, which would support large-scale deployment.

  16. Combined system of monothermal chemical exchange process with electrolysis and thermal diffusion process for enriching tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamoto, A.; Hasegawa, K.; Masui, T.

    1988-09-01

    Monothermal chemical exchange process with electrolysis (wellknown as the CECE process) is an effective method for enriching and removing tritium from tritiated water of low to middle level activity. The thermal diffusion process (ThD) is a low inventory gas phase method for enriching tritium from hydrogen. ThD and CECE process can be combined with each other by hydrogen gas line.

  17. Educational software for illustrating gas-exchange processes in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Wullschleger, S.D.; Hanson, P.J. ); Sage, R.F. )

    1991-05-01

    Simulation models are increasingly being used to describe physiological processes in the plant sciences. These models, while useful for research purposes, also offer tremendous potential for demonstrating a wide array of scientific topics to students. The authors have developed an educational software package, based on currently accepted principles, that illustrates the environmental and biochemical control of plant gas-exchange. Graphic and tabular presentations, coupled with on-screen requests for student input, serve to effectively convey the basic fundamentals of photosynthesis and transpiration, as well as the diurnal patterns of plant gas-exchange in response to fluctuating environmental conditions. More advanced topics focus on the biochemical limitations to photosynthesis imposed by Rubisco activity, electron transport capacity, and the regeneration of inorganic phosphorus. Also included is an exercise that challenges students to call upon the lessons learned in order to optimize carbon assimilation, while minimizing water losses, over a 72-h simulation period.

  18. ION EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY AND PURIFICATION OF MATERIALS

    DOEpatents

    Long, R.S.; Bailes, R.H.

    1958-04-15

    A process for the recovery of certain metallic ions from aqueous solutions by ion exchange techniques is described. It is applicable to elements such as vanadium, chromium, nnanganese, and the like, which are capable of forming lower valent cations soluble in aqueous solutions and which also form ldgher valent anions soluble in aqueous acidic solutions. For example, small amounts of vanadium occurring in phosphoric acid prepared from phosphate rock may be recovered by reducing the vanadium to a trivalent cation adsorbing; the vanadium in a cationic exchange resin, then treating the resin with a suitable oxidizing agent to convert the adsorbed vanadium to a higher valent state, and finally eluting; the vanadium as an anion from the resin by means of an aqueous acidic solution.

  19. Magnetization processes in core/shell exchange-spring structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, J. S.

    2015-05-01

    The magnetization reversal processes in cylindrical and spherical soft core/hard shell exchange-spring structures are investigated via the analytical nucleation theory and are verified with numerical micromagnetic simulations. At small core sizes, the nucleation of magnetic reversal proceeds via the modified bulging mode, where the transverse component of the magnetization is only semi-coherent in direction and the nucleation field contains a contribution from self-demagnetization. For large core sizes, the modified curling mode, where the magnetization configuration is vortex-like, is favored at nucleation. The preference for the modified curling mode is beneficial in that the flux-closure allows cylindrical and spherical core/shell exchange-spring elements to be densely packed into bulk permanent magnets without affecting the nucleation field, thereby offering the potential for high energy product.

  20. CATIONIC EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR THE SEPARATION OF RARE EARTHS

    DOEpatents

    Choppin, G.R.; Thompson, S.G.; Harvey, B.G.

    1960-02-16

    A process for separating mixtures of elements in the lanthanum and actinium series of the periodic table is described. The mixture of elements is dissolved in 0.05 M HCI, wherein the elements exist as tripositive ions. The resulting solution is then transferred to a column of cationic exchange resin and the column eluted with 0.1 to 0.6 M aqueous ammonium alpha hydroxy isobutyrate solution of pH 3.8 to 5.0. The use of ammonium alpha hydroxy isobutyrate as an eluting agent results in sharper and more rapid separations than previously obtainable with eluants such as citric, tartaric, glycolic, and lactic acids.

  1. Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sheth, A C; Dharmapurikar, R; Strevel, S D

    1994-01-01

    The following investigations were performed: (1) batch mode screening of eleven(11) commercially available resins and selection of three candidate resins for further evaluation in a fixed-bed setup. (2) Process variables study using three candidate resins in the fixed-bed setup and selection of the ``best`` resin for process economics development. (3) Exhaustion efficiency and solution concentration were found to be inversely related necessitating a trade-off between the resin cost versus the cost of evaporation/concentration of ensuing effluents. (4) Higher concentration of the HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} form of active sites over less active CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}} form of sites in the resin was believed to be the main reason for the observed increase in the equilibrium capacity of the resin at an elevated static CO{sub 2}-pressure. This Increase in capacity was found to level off around 80--120 psig range. The increase in CO{sub 2}-pressure, however, did not appear to affect the overall ion-exchange kinetics. (5) In the fixed-bed mode, the solution concentration was found to affect the equilibrium capacity of candidate resins. Their relationship was well satisfied by the Langmuir type non-linear equilibrium isotherm. Alternatively, the effect of solution concentration on overall ion-exchange kinetics varied from resin to resin. (6) Product inhibition effect on the resin was observed as an initial increase followed by a significant decrease in the resin`s equilibrium capacity for SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} as the HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} molar ratio in the solution was increased from 0 to 1.0. This ratio, however, did not affect the overall ion-exchange kinetics.

  2. Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process

    SciTech Connect

    Sheth, A.C.; Dharmapurikar, R.

    1992-01-01

    Under DOE Grant No. DE-FG22-90PC90309, the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) is contracted to further develop its anion-exchange, resin-based desulfurization concept to desulfurize alkali metal sulfates. From environmental as well as economic viewpoints, it is necessary to remove soluble sulfates from the wastes created by flue gas desulfurization systems. In order to do this economically, a low-cost desulfurization process for spent sorbents is necessary. UTSI's anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization concept is believed to satisfy these requirements. During the reporting period, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992, UTSI has completed the batch mode experiments to evaluate the performance enhancement effect caused by organic acids on the resin's exhaustion efficiency. At present, batch mode experiments are being conducted to locate the position of the CO[sub 3]= and SO[sub 4]= ions in the affinity chart, and also reviewing/assessing the ASPEN Code's capabilities for use in the development of the Best Process Schematic and related economics.

  3. Using solvent extraction to process nitrate anion exchange column effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbro, S.L.

    1987-10-01

    Octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO), a new organophosphorous extractant, and a new centrifugal mixer-settler both recently developed at Argonne were evaluated for their potential use in the recovery of actinides from nitrate anion exchange column effluents. The performance of the extractant was evaluated by measuring the extraction coefficient values as a function of acid and salt concentration. Additional performance parameters include extraction coefficient behavior as a function of the total metal concentration in the organic phase, and comparison of different stripping and organic scrubbing techniques. A simulated effluent stream was used to evaluate the performance of the centrifugal mixer-settlers by comparing experimental and calculated interstage concentration profiles. Both the CMPO extractant and the centrifugal mixer-settlers have potential for processing nitrate column effluents, particularly if the stripping behavior can be improved. Details of the proposed process are presented in the flowsheet and contactor design analyses.

  4. Solar System X-rays from Charge Exchange Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisse, Carey M.; Christian, D. J.; Bhardwaj, A.; Dennerl, K.; Wolk, S. J.; Bodewits, D.; Combi, M. R.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Lepri, S. T.

    2013-04-01

    The discovery of high energy x-ray emission in 1996 from comet C/1996 B2 (Hyakutake) uncovered a new class of x-ray emitting objects. Subsequent detections of the morphology, spectra, and time dependence of the x-rays from more than 20 comets have shown that the very soft (E < 1 keV) emission is due to a charge-exchange interaction between highly charged solar wind minor ions and the comet's extended neutral atmosphere. Many solar system objects are now known to shine in the X-ray, including Venus, Mars, the Moon, the Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn, with total power outputs on the MW - GW scale. Like comets, the X-ray emission from the Earth's geo-corona, the Jovian & Saturnian aurorae, and the Martian halo are thought to be driven by charge exchange between highly charged minor (heavy) ions in the solar wind and gaseous neutral species in the bodies' atmosphere. The non-auroral X-ray emissions from Jupiter, Saturn, and Earth, and those from disks of Mars, Venus, and the Moon are produced by scattering of solar X-rays. The first soft X-ray observations of Earth’s aurora by Chandra shows that it is highly variable, and the giant planet aurorae are fascinating puzzles that are just beginning to yield their secrets and may be the only x-ray sources not driven directly by the Sun in the whole system as well as properties of hot exo-solar Jupiters. Observations of local solar system charge exchange processes can also help inform us about x-rays produced at more distant hot ionized gas/cold neutral gas interfaces, like the heliopause, stellar astrospheres, galactic star forming regions, and starburst galaxies.

  5. Process-based upscaling of surface-atmosphere exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, T. F.; Prentice, I. C.; Canadell, J.; Williams, C. A.; Wang, H.; Raupach, M. R.; Collatz, G. J.; Davis, T.; Stocker, B.; Evans, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Empirical upscaling techniques such as machine learning and data-mining have proven invaluable tools for the global scaling of disparate observations of surface-atmosphere exchange, but are not based on a theoretical understanding of the key processes involved. This makes spatial and temporal extrapolation outside of the training domain difficult at best. There is therefore a clear need for the incorporation of knowledge of ecosystem function, in combination with the strength of data mining. Here, we present such an approach. We describe a novel diagnostic process-based model of global photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration, which is directly informed by a variety of global datasets relevant to ecosystem state and function. We use the model framework to estimate global carbon cycling both spatially and temporally, with a specific focus on the mechanisms responsible for long-term change. Our results show the importance of incorporating process knowledge into upscaling approaches, and highlight the effect of key processes on the terrestrial carbon cycle.

  6. Countercurrent direct contact heat exchange process and system

    DOEpatents

    Wahl, III, Edward F.; Boucher, Frederic B.

    1979-01-01

    Recovery of energy from geothermal brines and other hot water sources by direct contact heat exchange with a working fluid, such as a hydrocarbon working fluid, e.g. isobutane. The process and system consists of a plurality of stages, each stage including mixing and settling units. In the first stage, hot brine and arm working fluid are intimately mixed and passed into a settler wherein the brine settles to the bottom of the settler and the hot working fluid rises to the top. The hot working fluid is passed to a heat engine or turbine to produce work and the working fluid is then recycled back into the system. The system is comprised of a series of stages each containing a settler and mixer, and wherein the working fluid and the brine flow in a countercurrent manner through the stages to recover the heat from the brine in increments and raise the temperature of the working fluid in increments.

  7. EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, J.C.

    1992-09-01

    EXCHANGE is published monthly by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), a multidisciplinary facility operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of EXCHANGE is to inform computer users about about recent changes and innovations in both the mainframe and personal computer environments and how these changes can affect work being performed at DOE facilities.

  8. Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process

    SciTech Connect

    Sheth, A.C.; Strevel, S.D.

    1991-01-01

    Under the current grant (FG22-90PC90309), the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) will carry out the necessary bench scale experiments to further develop it anion-exchange, resin-based desulfurization concept to desulfurize alkali metal sulfates. In particular, it is planned to screen commercially available resins and then carry out process optimization work with three selected resins. Further optimization of the resin regeneration step as well as evaluation of the effect of various performance enhancers will then be carried out with one selected resin. A process schematic, to be developed based on the bench scale results, will be used to estimate the related economics. Some limited scope testing will also be carried out using the spent-seed and sorbent materials obtained from both the coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and the in-duct sorbent injection pilot scale facilities. During this reporting period, 90% of the planned batch mode screening experiments for the eleven samples of candidate resins were completed. Preliminary evaluation of the resulting data is continuing in order to select a smaller number (3--4) of samples for screening in the fixed-bed setup. The installation of the semi-automated fixed-bed setup is about 70% complete and shakedown experiments will be started in 3--4 weeks. Progress made in relation to these activities is presented below. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. IMPACT OF THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS ON THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY - 12112

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Lambert, D.; Fox, K.; Stone, M.

    2011-11-07

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is investigating the deployment of a parallel technology to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF, presently under construction) to accelerate high activity salt waste processing. The proposed technology combines large waste tank strikes of monosodium titanate (MST) to sorb strontium and actinides with two ion exchange columns packed with crystalline silicotitanate (CST) resin to sorb cesium. The new process was designated Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX), since the ion exchange columns were sized to fit within a waste storage tank riser. Loaded resins are to be combined with high activity sludge waste and fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for incorporation into the current glass waste form. Decontaminated salt solution produced by SCIX will be fed to the SRS Saltstone Facility for on-site immobilization as a grout waste form. Determining the potential impact of SCIX resins on DWPF processing was the basis for this study. Accelerated salt waste treatment is projected to produce a significant savings in the overall life cycle cost of waste treatment at SRS.

  10. Measuring gas temperature during spin-exchange optical pumping process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normand, E.; Jiang, C. Y.; Brown, D. R.; Robertson, L.; Crow, L.; Tong, X.

    2016-04-01

    The gas temperature inside a Spin-Exchange Optical Pumping (SEOP) laser-pumping polarized 3He cell has long been a mystery. Different experimental methods were employed to measure this temperature but all were based on either modelling or indirect measurement. To date there has not been any direct experimental measurement of this quantity. Here we present the first direct measurement using neutron transmission to accurately determine the number density of 3He, the temperature is obtained using the ideal gas law. Our result showed a surprisingly high gas temperature of 380°C, compared to the 245°C of the 3He cell wall temperature and 178°C of the optical pumping oven temperature. This experiment result may be used to further investigate the unsolved puzzle of the "X-factor" in the SEOP process which places an upper bound to the 3He polarization that can be achieved. Additional spin relaxation mechanisms might exist due to the high gas temperature, which could explain the origin of the X-factor.

  11. Charge-Exchange Processes of Titanium-Doped Aluminate Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wing Cheong

    1995-01-01

    Titanium exists in more than one charge state in the aluminate crystals: it is stable as Ti^ {3+} and Ti^{4+}. Other than the intense Ti^{4+ } absorption, a ubiquitous absorption/luminescence excitation band in the UV region is identified as a titanium -bound exciton in Al_2rm O_3, Y_3Al_5rm O_{12}, {rm YAlO}_3, MgAl_2O _4, and LaMgAl_{11} {rm O}_{19}. One -step and two-step photoconductivities of Ti^ {3+} are measured and compared. While the selectivity of the two-step process is demonstrated, its use in locating the energy threshold is hampered by the small Franck-Condon factor for the transition between the Ti^{3+} ^2{ rm E} excited state and Ti^ {4+}. The titanium-bound exciton band, together with the one-step photocurrent signal, makes it possible to determine the photoionization energy threshold accurately. The charge-transfer transition energy thresholds of Ti^{4+} are obtained from the emission and the luminescence excitation spectra. Locally and non-locally charge compensated Ti^{4+ } are found in Al_2{rm O}_3. The luminescence kinetics for the two kinds of Ti^{4+} are well explained by a three-level system with a lower triplet excited state and a higher singlet excited state. These charge-exchange threshold energies can be deduced from the Born-Haber thermodynamical cycle. The electrostatic site potentials are calculated and from it, the calculated photoionization and charge-transfer energy thresholds are found to be consistent with the experimental results. The deficiency of this model is pointed out and possible improvement is discussed. Quantitatively, the sum of the two charge-exchange energy thresholds is close to the band-gap energy of the host crystal. This offers a convenient way for material characterization. Provided that any two of the three quantities (band-gap energy, photoionization energy threshold, and charge-transfer transition energy threshold) have been found, the third quantity can be calculated. In addition, the trapping of charge

  12. WASTEWATER DEMINERALIZATION BY CONTINUOUS COUNTER-CURRENT ION EXCHANGE PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wastewater demineralization study employing a 38 lpm (10 gpm) continuous counter-current ion exchange pilot plant, manufactured by the Chemical Separations Corporation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been conducted at the County Sanitation Districts, Pomona Research Facility, Pomona...

  13. Separation of Molybdenum-Uranium by a Process Combining Ion Exchange Resin and Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lounis, A.; Setti, L.; Djennane, A.; Melikchi, R.

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether the electrodeionization with ion-exchange resin is suitable for removing uranium from a solution containing molybdenum. A hybrid process combining ion exchange (resins and membranes) using electric current. For this electroextraction process, the cation exchange resin is introduced into an electrodialysis cell and compressed between two cations exchange membranes. We have investigated a continuous electroextraction process. As important result we note that: The factor of selectivity,r, for molybdenum versus uranium is superior to 3; the concentration in radio active element (U3O8) is lower than 1.5 mg L-1 and small cell voltage is observed.

  14. Basic paths in the development of electrochemical processes using ion exchange membranes. [118 references

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, N.I.; Kirganova, E.V.; Churileva, G.G.

    1980-04-01

    A summary is given of Soviet and foreign literature on the use of cation exchange, anion exchange and bipolar membranes in processes of the desalination of water, demineralization of solutions and the electrochemical synthesis of various inorganic and organic compounds. The specific feature of the electrodialysis process and basic trends of its future development are discussed. 118 references, 2 figures.

  15. Circulation and exchange processes over the continental shelf and slope

    SciTech Connect

    Csanady, G.T.

    1988-01-01

    The theme of the work during the past triennium has been the SEEP experiment, data interpretation and modeling related to the goals of the experiment, and was characterized by increasing cooperation with colleagues from other disciplines. The theoretical contributions dealt with shelf-slope interaction, the dynamics and climatology of currents over the continental slope, and the behavior of fate of organic particles. Observational papers discussed various exchange mechanisms at the shelf edge, with special attention to particle exchange, and the quiescence of currents over the mid continental slope which is presumably responsible for the accumulation of organic particles.

  16. Communication and Social Exchange Processes in Community Theater Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Michael W.

    2005-01-01

    This study explores the communication experiences of two volunteer groups involved in the production of community theater musicals. Based on social exchange theory, it examined what group members perceived to be the positive benefits (primarily meeting people and having an opportunity to perform) and the negative costs (primarily disorganization,…

  17. ION-EXCHANGE PROCESSES AND MECHANISMS IN GLASSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent performance assessment calculations of a disposal system at Hanford, Washington for low activity waste glass show that a Na ion-exchange reaction can effectively increase the radionuclide release rate by over a factor of 1000 and so is a major factor that currently limits ...

  18. Salt Processing Through Ion Exchange at the Savannah River Site Selection of Exchange Media and Column Configuration - 9198

    SciTech Connect

    Spires, Renee; Punch, Timothy; McCabe, Daniel

    2009-02-11

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed, modeled, and tested several different ion exchange media and column designs for cesium removal. One elutable resin and one non-elutable resin were considered for this salt processing application. Deployment of non-elutable Crystalline Silicotitanate and elutable Resorcinol Formaldehyde in several different column configurations were assessed in a formal Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE). Salt solutions were selected that would allow a grouping of non-compliant tanks to be closed. Tests were run with the elutable resin to determine compatibility with the resin configuration required for an in-tank ion exchange system. Models were run to estimate the ion exchange cycles required with the two resins in several column configurations. Material balance calculations were performed to estimate the impact on the High Level Waste (HLW) system at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Conceptual process diagrams were used to support the hazard analysis. Data from the hazard analysis was used to determine the relative impact on safety. This report will discuss the technical inputs, SEE methods, results and path forward to complete the technical maturation of ion exchange.

  19. Progress Report for Diffusion Welding of the NGNP Process Application Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    R.E. Mizia; D.E. Clark; M.V. Glazoff; T.E. Lister; T.L. Trowbridge

    2011-04-01

    The NGNP Project is currently investigating the use of metallic, diffusion welded, compact heat exchangers to transfer heat from the primary (reactor side) heat transport system to the secondary heat transport system. The intermediate heat exchanger will transfer this heat to downstream applications such as hydrogen production, process heat, and electricity generation. The channeled plates that make up the heat transfer surfaces of the intermediate heat exchanger will have to be assembled into an array by diffusion welding.

  20. Knowledge Exchange in the Shrines of Knowledge: The ''How's'' and ''Where's'' of Knowledge Sharing Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reychav, Iris; Te'eni, Dov

    2009-01-01

    Academic conferences are places of situated learning dedicated to the exchange of knowledge. Knowledge is exchanged between colleagues who are looking to enhance their future research by taking part in several formal and informal settings (lectures, discussions and social events). We studied the processes of knowledge sharing and the influence of…

  1. Evaluation of a new, macroporous polyvinylpyridine resin for processing plutonium using nitrate anion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.F.

    1989-04-01

    Anion exchange in nitric acid is the major aqueous process used to recover and purify plutonium from impure scrap materials. Most strong-base anion exchange resins incorporate a styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer. A newly available, macroporous anion exchange resin based on a copolymer of 1-methyl-4-vinylpyridine and divinylbenzene has been evaluated. Comparative data for Pu(IV) sorption kinetics and capacity are presented for this new resin and two other commonly used anion exchange resins. The new resin offers high capacity and rapid sorption kinetics for Pu(IV) from nitric acid, as well as greatly stability to chemical and radiolytic degradation. 8 refs., 14 figs.

  2. Heat exchange apparatus and process for rotary kilns

    SciTech Connect

    De Beus, A.J.

    1987-06-30

    This patent describes a heat exchange apparatus for use in a rotary kiln, the heat exchange apparatus comprising: refractory means for transferring heat from an upper heated portion of a rotary kiln above a bed disposed in a lower portion to within the bed as the rotary kiln is rotated. The refractory means comprises: tubular refractory members; means for attaching the refractory means in a spaced apart relationship with an interior wall of the rotary kiln in order to cause the refractory means to pass through the bed with a portion of the bed passing under the refractory means. A portion of the bed passes over the refractory means in order to enhance heat transfer as the rotary kiln is rotated. The means for attaching the refractory means comprises rods supported by stanchions and tubular refractory member disposed on the rods; the means for attaching the refractory means and the refractory means is configured and operative for stirring the bed as the refractory means pass through the bed without significant lifting of the bed to the heated upper portions of the rotary kiln as the rotary kiln is rotated; and compressible refractory spacer means disposed between each tubular refractory member for accommodating heat expansion and compressible refractory sleeve means dispersed between the rods and the tubular refractory members for accommodating heat expansion of the rods. Compressible refractory sleeve means and tubular refractory member sized so that the tubular refractory members are tightly held against the tubular refractory spacer means when the rotary kiln is at operating temperatures in order to inhibit fracture of the tubular refractory member as they pass through the bed.

  3. Americium purification by a combined anion exchange and bidentate organophosphorus solvent extraction process. [Patent application

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, J.D.; Martella, L.L.

    1981-04-10

    Americium is separated from mixtures containing plutonium, other actinides, and other non-lanthamide impurities, by a combined process of anion exchange resin sorption to remove plutonium, and a bidentate organophosphorus solvent extraction of americium of the anion exchange resin effluent. Dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamylmethylenephosphonate is a preferred solvent. The initial mixture may be subjected to a cation exchange operation to remove monovalent impurities. The process is especially effective when aluminum, zinc, lead, and copper are present in significant quantities in the original mixture.

  4. Efficient separations and processing crosscutting program 1996 technical exchange meeting. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    This document contains summaries of technology development presented at the 1996 Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program Technical Exchange Meeting. This meeting is held annually to promote a free exchange of ideas among technology developers, potential users and other interested parties within the EM community. During this meeting the following many separation processes technologies were discussed such as ion exchange, membrane separation, vacuum distillation, selective sorption, and solvent extraction. Other topics discussed include: waste forms; testing or inorganic sorbents for radionuclide and heavy metal removal; selective crystallization; and electrochemical treatment of liquid wastes. This is the leading abstract, individual papers have been indexed separately for the databases.

  5. EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains the following news headlines: ADPE acquisition process made easy with SRP; scientific reference material available; ORPS WordPerfect macro setup procedure; system managed storage is here; LIBSPOOL for MVS mainframe end-users; training center course schedule for February 1993; enjoy NJOY; scientific user services staff decreased; new release of Forwarn, a static source code analysis tool for FORTRAN programs; out of the cold with HEAT; coping cells from one table to another in word perfect; used PC equipment pool; and video training.

  6. Nanomaterials-Enhanced Electrically Switched Ion Exchange Process for Water Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuehe; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Jun; Bontha, Jagannadha R.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of our work is to develop an electrically switched ion exchange (ESIX) system based on conducting polymer/carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposites as a new and cost-effective approach for removal of radioactive cesium, chromate, and perchlorate from contaminated groundwater. The ESIX technology combines ion exchange and electrochemistry to provide a selective, reversible method for the removal of target species from wastewater. In this technique, an electroactive ion exchange layer is deposited on a conducting substrate, and ion uptake and elution are controlled directly by modulation of the potential of the layer. ESIX offers the advantages of highly-efficient use of electrical energy combined with no secondary waste generation. Recently, we have improved upon the ESIX process by modifying the conducting substrate with carbon nanotubes prior to the deposition of the electroactive ion exchanger. The nanomaterial-based electroactive ion exchange technology will remove cesium-137, chromate, and perchlorate rapidly from wastewater. The high porosity and high surface area of the electroactive ion exchange nanocomposites results in high loading capacity and minimize interferences for non-target species. Since the ion adsorption/desorption is controlled electrically without generating a secondary waste, this electrically active ion exchange process is a green process technology that will greatly reduce operating costs.

  7. Denitration of Rocky Flats Ion-Exchange Resins: Recommendation of Denitration Processes, October 19, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob Espinoza; Mary Barr; Wayne Smith

    1998-12-01

    Resin denitration via anion-exchange is an implementable process that can effectively mitigate the hazards associated with stored resins in which the bulk of the nitrate consists of an "exchangeable nitrate" ionically bound to the cationic sites of the anion-exchange resins. Salicylate has been selected as the exchange anion of choice because of its superior selectivity for the Rocky Flats resins and its unique potential for comprehensive recovery and recycle. This report outlines a single recommended resin denigration procedure that is reasonably independent of the resin composition and the current stored form. This procedure is not optimized but rather seeks to `over-treat' the resins so that a single procedure works for the variety of stored resins. The recommended treatment with sodium salicylate reduces resins by 95-99+% the measured exothermic behavior of the ion-exchange.

  8. Tritiated water processing using liquid phase catalytic exchange and solid oxide electrolyte cell

    SciTech Connect

    Yamai, H.; Konishi, S.; Hara, M.; Okuno, K.; Yamamoto, I.

    1995-10-01

    Liquid phase catalytic exchange (LPCE) is an effective method for enrichment and removal of tritium from tritiated water. Combined electrolysis catalytic exchange (CECE) process is an attractive application of a LPCE column. We proposed a new process that improves the CECE process. Using a solid oxide electrolyte (SOE) cell for electrolysis makes the CECE process more energy efficient and eliminates other disadvantages such as large tritium inventory and extremely slow system response. When the cell is used for recombination, the system becomes even more simple, efficiently, reliable and safe. 21 refs., 9 figs.

  9. A leak-proof plate-fin heat exchanger concept for process plant applications

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, C.F.

    1997-12-31

    Over the last four decades, plate-fin heat exchangers have been used extensively for aerospace applications, their major attributes being compact size, light weight overall assembly, and high reliability. Several million units have seen service for a wide range of fluids, including operation t high temperature and pressure, and clearly a well established technology base exists. Within the process industries the heat exchanger trend is towards units of smaller size and weight, and lower cost, and the utilization of the plate-fin type of construction is viewed as being in concert with these goals. Recognizing that there are applications involving dissimilar fluids, where an internal heat exchanger leak could result in a hazardous condition, a leak-proof concept to avoid this is discussed in this paper. For a plate-fin heat exchanger of brazed construction, this is achieved by means of a double headering bar system, and a buffer layer between the two fluids. On-line monitoring of heat exchanger integrity can be achieved by monitoring a small continuous purge flow in the buffer interspace. The process industry can benefit from a well established aircraft heat exchanger technology base that exists for this type of compact leak-proof heat exchanger.

  10. Purification and neutron emission reduction of 238Plutonium oxide by nitrate anion exchange processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pansoy-Hjelvik, M. E.; Brock, J.; Nixon, J. Z.; Moniz, P.; Silver, G.; Ramsey, K. B.

    2001-02-01

    The use of ion exchange during the aqueous purification of 238Pu oxide results in low levels of uranium, thorium, and americium in the product oxide. Neutron emission rates are also reduced in the product oxide. Fluorine introduced during the dissolution of impure fuel increases the neutron emission rate of the product oxide due to the 238Pu-19F alpha/n reaction. Treating the 238Pu solution with aluminum nitrate prior to ion exchange reduces the neutron emission rate in the product oxide. Data are presented to show that neutron emission rates and concentrations of uranium, thorium, and americium are reduced by ion exchange processing. .

  11. Laser-catalyzed spin-exchange process in a Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, H.; Jiang, Y.; Zhang Weiping; Meystre, P.

    2010-03-15

    We show theoretically that it is possible to optically control collective spin-exchange processes in spinor Bose condensates through virtual photoassociation. The interplay between optically induced spin exchange and spin-dependent collisions provides a flexible tool for the control of atomic spin dynamics, including enhanced or inhibited quantum spin oscillations, the optically induced ferromagnetic-to-antiferromagnetic transition, and coherent matter-wave spin conversion.

  12. Chromatographic evaluation of reversed-phase/anion-exchange/cation-exchange trimodal stationary phases prepared by electrostatically driven self-assembly process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaodong; Pohl, Christopher; Woodruff, Andrew; Chen, Jinhua

    2011-06-01

    This work describes chromatographic properties of reversed-phase/cation-exchange/anion-exchange trimodal stationary phases. These stationary phases were based on high-purity porous spherical silica particles coated with nano-polymer beads using an electrostatically driven self-assembly process. The inner-pore area of the material was modified covalently with an organic layer that provided both reversed-phase and anion-exchange properties while the outer surface was coated with nano-sized polymer beads with strong cation-exchange characteristics. This design ensured spatial separation of the anion-exchange and the cation-exchange regions, and allowed reversed-phase, anion-exchange and cation-exchange retention mechanisms to function simultaneously. Chromatographic evaluation of ions and small molecules suggested that retention of ionic analytes was influenced by the ionic strength, pH, and mobile phase organic solvent content, and governed by both ion-exchange and hydrophobic interactions. Meanwhile, neutral analytes were retained by hydrophobic interaction and was mainly affected by mobile phase organic solvent content. Depending on the specific application, selectivity could be optimized by adjusting the anion-exchange/cation-exchange capacity ratio (selectivity), which was achieved experimentally by using porous silica particles with different surface areas. PMID:21530974

  13. Magnetically controlled exchange process in an ultracold atom-dimer mixture.

    PubMed

    Knoop, S; Ferlaino, F; Berninger, M; Mark, M; Nägerl, H-C; Grimm, R; D'Incao, J P; Esry, B D

    2010-02-01

    We report on the observation of an elementary exchange process in an optically trapped ultracold sample of atoms and Feshbach molecules. We can magnetically control the energetic nature of the process and tune it from endoergic to exoergic, enabling the observation of a pronounced threshold behavior. In contrast to relaxation to more deeply bound molecular states, the exchange process does not lead to trap loss. We find excellent agreement between our experimental observations and calculations based on the solutions of three-body Schrödinger equation in the adiabatic hyperspherical representation. The high efficiency of the exchange process is explained by the halo character of both the initial and final molecular states. PMID:20366759

  14. Basis document for PFP plutonium nitrate ion exchange process in Room 228A

    SciTech Connect

    Risenmay, H.R.

    1997-04-23

    The PFP facility currently has approximately 4300 liters of plutonium nitrate solution in storage. This material will be calcined by the Vertical Denigration Calciner (VDC) located in room 230C. However, part of the material needs to be purified to remove constituents that will interfere with the calcination process. An Ion Exchange process using Reillex{trademark} HPQ anion exchange resin was tested by the Plutonium Process Support Laboratories (PPSL) (I). The Ion exchange process is to be installed in glovebox HC-7 in room 228A/234-5Z. The plutonium separated from the interfering constituents will be in a concentrated condition ready to be calcined by the VDC in room 230C. The oxide product of the VDC will be placed into the 2736-Z vaults for long term storage.

  15. Communication after Job Transfers: Social Exchange Processes in Learning New Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Michael W.

    1993-01-01

    Uses social exchange theory to explore communication in the adjustment process of transferees during the first three months at new locations. Develops descriptions of the process by which transferees learn their roles. Explores the impact of feedback and communication relationships on adjustment and the impact of social support as a buffer against…

  16. Processes Impacting Atmosphere-Surface Exchanges at Arctic Terrestrial Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Ola; Grachev, Andrey; Konopleva, Elena; Cox, Chris; Stone, Robert; Crepinsek, Sara; Shupe, Matthew; Uttal, Taneil

    2015-04-01

    Surface energy fluxes are key to the annual cycle of near-surface and soil temperature and biologic activity in the Arctic. While these energy fluxes are undoubtedly changing to produce the changes observed in the Arctic ecosystem over the last few decades, measurements have generally not been available to quantify what processes are regulating these fluxes and what is determining the characteristics of these annual cycles. The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has established, or contributed to the establishment of, several terrestrial "supersites" around the perimeter of the Arctic Ocean at which detailed measurements of atmospheric structure, surface fluxes, and soil thermal properties are being made. These sites include Barrow, Alaska; Eureka and Alert, Canada; and Tiksi, Russia. Atmospheric structure measurements vary, but include radiosoundings at all sites and remote sensing of clouds at two sites. Additionally, fluxes of sensible heat and momentum are made at all of the sites, while fluxes of moisture and CO2 are made at two of the sites. Soil temperatures are also measured in the upper 120 cm at all sites, which is deep enough to define the soil active layer. The sites have been operating between 3 years (Tiksi) and 24 years (Barrow). While all sites are located north of 71° N, the summer vegetation range from lush tundra grasses to rocky soils with little vegetation. This presentation will illustrate some of the atmospheric processes that are key for determining the annual energy and temperature cycles at these sites, and some of the key characteristics that lead to differences in, for instance, the length of the summer soil active layer between the sites. Atmospheric features and processes such as cloud characteristics, snowfall, downslope wind events, and sea-breezes have impacts on the annual energy cycle. The presence of a "zero curtain" period, when autumn surface temperature remains approximately constant at the freezing point

  17. Query Processing in a Traceable P2P Record Exchange Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fengrong; Ishikawa, Yoshiharu

    As the spread of high-speed networks and the development of network technologies, P2P technologies are actively used today for information exchange in the network. While information exchange in a P2P network is quite flexible, there is an important problem — lack of reliability. Since we cannot know the details of how the data was obtained, it is hard to fully rely on it. To ensure the reliability of exchanged data, we have proposed the framework of a traceable P2P record exchange based on database technologies. In this framework, records are exchanged among autonomous peers, and each peer stores its exchange and modification histories in it. The framework supports the function of tracing queries to query the details of the obtained data. A tracing query is described in datalog and executed as a recursive query in the P2P network. In this paper, we focus on the query processing strategies for the framework. We consider two types of queries, ad hoc queries and continual queries, and present the query processing strategies for their executions.

  18. Measuring the heat exchange of a quantum process.

    PubMed

    Goold, John; Poschinger, Ulrich; Modi, Kavan

    2014-08-01

    Very recently, interferometric methods have been proposed to measure the full statistics of work performed on a driven quantum system [Dorner et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 230601 (2013) and Mazzola et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 230602 (2013)]. The advantage of such schemes is that they replace the necessity to make projective measurements by performing phase estimation on an appropriately coupled ancilla qubit. These proposals are one possible route to the tangible experimental exploration of quantum thermodynamics, a subject which is the center of much current attention due to the current control of mesoscopic quantum systems. In this Rapid Communication we demonstrate that a modification of the phase estimation protocols can be used in order to measure the heat distribution of a quantum process. In addition, we demonstrate how our scheme maybe implemented using ion trap technology. Our scheme should pave the way for experimental explorations of the Landauer principle and hence the intricate energy to information conversion in mesoscopic quantum systems. PMID:25215667

  19. Effect of Vertical Flow Exchange on Biogeochemical Processes in Hyporheic Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Lee, S.; Shin, D.; Hyun, Y.; Lee, K.

    2008-12-01

    Biogeochemical processes in hyporheic zones are of great interest because they make the hyporheic zones highly productive and complex environments. When contaminants or polluted water pass through hyporheic zones, in particular, biogeochemical processes play an important role in removing contaminants or attenuating contamination under certain conditions. The study site, a reach of Munsan stream (Paju-si, South Korea), exhibits severe contamination of surface water by nitrate released from Water Treatment Plant (WTP) nearby. The objectives of this study are to investigate the hydrologic and biogeochemical processes at the riparian area of the site which may contribute to natural attenuation of surface water driven nitrate, and analyze the effect of vertical (hyporheic) flow exchange on the biogeochemical processes in the area. To examine hydraulic mixing or dilution processes, vertical hydraulic gradients were measured at several depth levels using minipiezometers, and then soil temperatures were measured by using i-buttons installed inside the minipiezometers. The microbial analyses by means of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-cloning methods were also done in order to identify the denitrification process in soil samples. In addition, correlation between vertical flow exchange, temperature data, and denitrifying bacteria activity was also investigated so as to examine the effects on one another. The results showed that there were significant effects of vertical flow exchange and hyporheic soil temperature on the biogeochemical processes of the site. This study found strong support for the idea that the biogeochemical function of hyporheic zone is a predictable outcome of the interaction between microbial activity and flow exchange.

  20. Erbium doping of lithium niobate by the ion exchange process for high-gain optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caccavale, Frederico; Fedorov, Vyacheslav A.; Korkishko, Yuri N.; Morozova, Tamara V.; Sada, Cinzia; Segato, Francesco

    2000-04-01

    The erbium-lithium ion exchange is presented as a method for the erbium local doping of lithium niobate crystals. Ion exchange process is performed immersing the LiNbO3 substrates in a liquid melt, containing erbium ions; due to their high mobility, the lithium ions migrate from the crystal to the melt, and are replaced by erbium ions. A systematic analysis of the doping process is performed, and the influence of the process parameters is investigated: exchange time and temperature, crystal cut direction, composition and chemical reactivity of the Er ions liquid source. By structural (X-Ray Diffraction and Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry), compositional (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry) and spectroscopic techniques (optical spectroscopy and micro-luminescence), the formation of lithium deficient phases and the incorporation of the Er ions into the LiNbO3 matrix is studied.

  1. Evaluation Methodology for Advance Heat Exchanger Concepts Using Analytical Hierarchy Process

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Eung Soo Kim

    2012-07-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to aid in the development and selection of the secondary/process heat exchanger (SHX) for power production and process heat application for a Next Generation Nuclear Reactors (NGNR). The potential options for use as an SHX are explored such as shell and tube, printed circuit heat exchanger. A shell and tube (helical coiled) heat exchanger is a recommended for a demonstration reactor because of its reliability while the reactor design is being further developed. The basic setup for the selection of the SHX has been established with evaluation goals, alternatives, and criteria. This study describes how these criteria and the alternatives are evaluated using the analytical hierarchy process (AHP).

  2. Knowledge Exchange Processes in Organizations and Policy Arenas: A Narrative Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Contandriopoulos, Damien; Lemire, Marc; Denis, Jean-Louis; Tremblay, Émile

    2010-01-01

    Context: This article presents the main results from a large-scale analytical systematic review on knowledge exchange interventions at the organizational and policymaking levels. The review integrated two broad traditions, one roughly focused on the use of social science research results and the other focused on policymaking and lobbying processes. Methods: Data collection was done using systematic snowball sampling. First, we used prospective snowballing to identify all documents citing any of a set of thirty-three seminal papers. This process identified 4,102 documents, 102 of which were retained for in-depth analysis. The bibliographies of these 102 documents were merged and used to identify retrospectively all articles cited five times or more and all books cited seven times or more. All together, 205 documents were analyzed. To develop an integrated model, the data were synthesized using an analytical approach. Findings: This article developed integrated conceptualizations of the forms of collective knowledge exchange systems, the nature of the knowledge exchanged, and the definition of collective-level use. This literature synthesis is organized around three dimensions of context: level of polarization (politics), cost-sharing equilibrium (economics), and institutionalized structures of communication (social structuring). Conclusions: The model developed here suggests that research is unlikely to provide context-independent evidence for the intrinsic efficacy of knowledge exchange strategies. To design a knowledge exchange intervention to maximize knowledge use, a detailed analysis of the context could use the kind of framework developed here. PMID:21166865

  3. Anion effects to deliver enhanced iridium catalysts for hydrogen isotope exchange processes.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Alan R; Kerr, William J; Moir, Rory; Reid, Marc

    2014-10-28

    Synthesis of a series of iridium(I) complexes of the type [(COD)Ir(IMes)(PPh3)]X (X = BF4, OTf, and BArF) has been established. Application of these species in mild hydrogen isotope exchange processes revealed more efficient catalysis and, further, a wider solvent scope when employing larger, more weakly coordinating counterions. PMID:25208265

  4. DETERMINING CARBON ISOTOPE SIGNATURES FROM MICROMETEOROLOGICAL MEASUREMENTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDYING BIOSPHERE-ATMOSPHERE EXCHANGE PROCESSES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years considerable effort has been focused on combining micrometeorological and stable isotope techniques to elucidate and study biosphere-atmosphere exchange processes. At the ecosystem scale, these methods are increasingly being used to address a number of challenging problems, including...

  5. The Socialization of Newcomers into Organizations: Integrating Learning and Social Exchange Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korte, Russell F.

    2007-01-01

    Traditional views of socialization focus primarily on the passive learning by the newcomer of the expectations of the organization. Theorizing and research on cognitive learning and social exchange indicate that the socialization process is vastly more complex. This paper views socialization through the lenses of cognitive learning and social…

  6. EPR Studies of Spin-Spin Exchange Processes: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastman, Michael P.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical background, experimental procedures, and analysis of experimental results are provided for an undergraduate physical chemistry experiment on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) linewidths. Source of line broadening observed in a spin-spin exchange process between radicals formed in aqueous solutions of potassium peroxylamine…

  7. Progress Report for Diffusion Welding of the NGNP Process Application Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    R.E. Mizia; D.E. Clark; M.V. Glazoff; T.E. Lister; T.L. Trowbridge

    2011-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy selected the high temperature gas-cooled reactor as the basis for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity, hydrogen production, and process heat applications. The NGNP Project is currently investigating the use of metallic, diffusion welded, compact heat exchangers to transfer heat from the primary (reactor side) heat transport system to the secondary heat transport system. An intermediate heat exchanger will transfer this heat to downstream applications such as hydrogen production, process heat, and electricity generation. The channeled plates that make up the heat transfer surfaces of the intermediate heat exchanger will have to be assembled into an array by diffusion welding. This report describes the preliminary results of a scoping study that evaluated the diffusion welding process parameters and the resultant mechanical properties of diffusion welded joints using Alloy 800H. The long-term goal of the program is to progress towards demonstration of small heat exchanger unit cells fabricated with diffusion welds. Demonstration through mechanical testing of the unit cells will support American Society of Mechanical Engineers rules and standards development, reduce technical risk, and provide proof of concept for heat exchanger fabrication methods needed to deploy heat exchangers in several potential NGNP configurations.1 Researchers also evaluated the usefulness of modern thermodynamic and diffusion computational tools (Thermo-Calc and Dictra) in optimizing the parameters for diffusion welding of Alloy 800H. The modeling efforts suggested a temperature of 1150 C for 1 hour with an applied pressure of 5 MPa using 15 {micro}m nickel foil as joint filler to reduce chromium oxidation on the welded surfaces. Good agreement between modeled and experimentally determined concentration gradients was achieved

  8. Engineering study for the treatment of spent ion exchange resin resulting from nuclear process applications

    SciTech Connect

    Place, B.G.

    1990-09-01

    This document is an engineering study of spent ion exchange resin treatment processes with the purpose of identifying one or more suitable treatment technologies. Classifications of waste considered include all classes of low-level waste (LLW), mixed LLW, transuranic (TRU) waste, and mixed TRU waste. A total of 29 process alternatives have been evaluated. Evaluation parameters have included economic parameters (both total life-cycle costs and capital costs), demonstrated operability, environmental permitting, operational availability, waste volume reduction, programmatic consistency, and multiple utilization. The results of this study suggest that there are a number of alternative process configurations that are suitable for the treatment of spent ion exchange resin. The determinative evaluation parameters were economic variables (total life-cycle cost or capital cost) and waste volume reduction. Immobilization processes are generally poor in volume reduction. Thermal volume reduction processes tend to have high capital costs. There are immobilization processes and thermal volume reduction processes that can treat all classifications of spent ion exchange resin likely to be encountered. 40 refs., 19 figs., 17 tabs.

  9. LITERATURE REVIEWS TO SUPPORT ION EXCHANGE TECHNOLOGY SELECTION FOR MODULAR SALT PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    King, W

    2007-11-30

    This report summarizes the results of literature reviews conducted to support the selection of a cesium removal technology for application in a small column ion exchange (SCIX) unit supported within a high level waste tank. SCIX is being considered as a technology for the treatment of radioactive salt solutions in order to accelerate closure of waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as part of the Modular Salt Processing (MSP) technology development program. Two ion exchange materials, spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (RF) and engineered Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST), are being considered for use within the SCIX unit. Both ion exchange materials have been studied extensively and are known to have high affinities for cesium ions in caustic tank waste supernates. RF is an elutable organic resin and CST is a non-elutable inorganic material. Waste treatment processes developed for the two technologies will differ with regard to solutions processed, secondary waste streams generated, optimum column size, and waste throughput. Pertinent references, anticipated processing sequences for utilization in waste treatment, gaps in the available data, and technical comparisons will be provided for the two ion exchange materials to assist in technology selection for SCIX. The engineered, granular form of CST (UOP IE-911) was the baseline ion exchange material used for the initial development and design of the SRS SCIX process (McCabe, 2005). To date, in-tank SCIX has not been implemented for treatment of radioactive waste solutions at SRS. Since initial development and consideration of SCIX for SRS waste treatment an alternative technology has been developed as part of the River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) Research and Technology program (Thorson, 2006). Spherical RF resin is the baseline media for cesium removal in the RPP-WTP, which was designed for the treatment of radioactive waste supernates and is currently under construction in Hanford, WA

  10. Intensification of heat and mass transfer by ultrasound: application to heat exchangers and membrane separation processes.

    PubMed

    Gondrexon, N; Cheze, L; Jin, Y; Legay, M; Tissot, Q; Hengl, N; Baup, S; Boldo, P; Pignon, F; Talansier, E

    2015-07-01

    This paper aims to illustrate the interest of ultrasound technology as an efficient technique for both heat and mass transfer intensification. It is demonstrated that the use of ultrasound results in an increase of heat exchanger performances and in a possible fouling monitoring in heat exchangers. Mass transfer intensification was observed in the case of cross-flow ultrafiltration. It is shown that the enhancement of the membrane separation process strongly depends on the physico-chemical properties of the filtered suspensions. PMID:25216897

  11. Membrane permeation process for dehydration of organic liquid mixtures using sulfonated ion-exchange polyalkene membranes

    DOEpatents

    Cabasso, Israel; Korngold, Emmanuel

    1988-01-01

    A membrane permeation process for dehydrating a mixture of organic liquids, such as alcohols or close boiling, heat sensitive mixtures. The process comprises causing a component of the mixture to selectively sorb into one side of sulfonated ion-exchange polyalkene (e.g., polyethylene) membranes and selectively diffuse or flow therethrough, and then desorbing the component into a gas or liquid phase on the other side of the membranes.

  12. Identifying scale-emergent, nonlinear, asynchronous processes of wetland methane exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturtevant, Cove; Ruddell, Benjamin L.; Knox, Sara Helen; Verfaillie, Joseph; Matthes, Jaclyn Hatala; Oikawa, Patricia Y.; Baldocchi, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Methane (CH4) exchange in wetlands is complex, involving nonlinear asynchronous processes across diverse time scales. These processes and time scales are poorly characterized at the whole-ecosystem level, yet are crucial for accurate representation of CH4 exchange in process models. We used a combination of wavelet analysis and information theory to analyze interactions between whole-ecosystem CH4 flux and biophysical drivers in two restored wetlands of Northern California from hourly to seasonal time scales, explicitly questioning assumptions of linear, synchronous, single-scale analysis. Although seasonal variability in CH4 exchange was dominantly and synchronously controlled by soil temperature, water table fluctuations, and plant activity were important synchronous and asynchronous controls at shorter time scales that propagated to the seasonal scale. Intermittent, subsurface water table decline promoted short-term pulses of methane emission but ultimately decreased seasonal CH4 emission through subsequent inhibition after rewetting. Methane efflux also shared information with evapotranspiration from hourly to multiday scales and the strength and timing of hourly and diel interactions suggested the strong importance of internal gas transport in regulating short-term emission. Traditional linear correlation analysis was generally capable of capturing the major diel and seasonal relationships, but mesoscale, asynchronous interactions and nonlinear, cross-scale effects were unresolved yet important for a deeper understanding of methane flux dynamics. We encourage wider use of these methods to aid interpretation and modeling of long-term continuous measurements of trace gas and energy exchange.

  13. Electron-exchange and quantum screening effects on the Thomson scattering process in quantum Fermi plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Gyeong Won; Jung, Young-Dae; Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, New York 12180-3590

    2013-06-15

    The influence of the electron-exchange and quantum screening on the Thomson scattering process is investigated in degenerate quantum Fermi plasmas. The Thomson scattering cross section in quantum plasmas is obtained by the plasma dielectric function and fluctuation-dissipation theorem as a function of the electron-exchange parameter, Fermi energy, plasmon energy, and wave number. It is shown that the electron-exchange effect enhances the Thomson scattering cross section in quantum plasmas. It is also shown that the differential Thomson scattering cross section has a minimum at the scattering angle Θ=π/2. It is also found that the Thomson scattering cross section increases with an increase of the Fermi energy. In addition, the Thomson scattering cross section is found to be decreased with increasing plasmon energy.

  14. An Effective Deuterium Exchange Method for Neutron Crystal Structure Analysis with Unfolding-Refolding Processes.

    PubMed

    Kita, Akiko; Morimoto, Yukio

    2016-02-01

    A method of hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange with an unfolding-refolding process has been applied to hen egg-white lysozyme (HWL), and accurate evaluation of its deuteration was carried out by time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. Neutron crystallography requires a suitable crystal with enough deuterium exchanged in the protein to decrease incoherent scattering from hydrogens. It is very expensive to prepare a fully deuterated protein, and therefore a simple H/D exchange technique is desirable for this purpose. Acid or base addition to protein solutions with heating effectively increased the number of deuterium up to more than 20 % of that of all hydrogen atoms, and refolded structures were determined by X-ray structure analysis at 1.8 Å resolution. Refolded HWL had increased deuterium content in its protein core and its native structure, determined at atomic resolution, was fully preserved. PMID:26718545

  15. Process industry demand for more efficient, more cost-effective heat exchanger tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Thors, P.

    1987-01-01

    In the future the process industry will see a bigger selection of enhanced heat transfer tubes, one of the reasons being the continued production of special patented technology involved in making them. Here the author mentions only some of the factors that might influence the increased usage of these enhanced tubes. In using more efficient tubing in a heat exchanger the designer has available the options to increase the total heat duty per unit volume, lower operating costs by reducing the mean temperature difference at a given heat duty, save material, or reduce the size and/or pumping power, among others. This can be achieved, for example, by replacing plain tubes with appropriate enhanced tubes in retubing applications, where old heat exchangers need to be upgraded and total efficiency improved. When a new heat exchanger is to be built, it is easier for the designer to include the more efficient tubing to utilize all the benefits of the increased thermal performance.

  16. TRANSIENT HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR ION-EXCHANGE WASTE REMOVAL PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2010-07-12

    The small column ion exchange (SCIX) process treats low curie salt (LCS) waste before feeding it to the saltstone facility to be made into grout. Through this process, radioactive cesium from the salt solution is absorbed into the CST bed. A CST column loaded with radioactive cesium will generate significant heat from radiolytic decay. If engineering designs of the CST sorption column can not handle this thermal load, hot spots may develop locally within the column and degrade the performance of the ion-exchange process. The CST starts to degrade at about 80 to 85 C, and the CST completely changes to another material above 120 C. In addition, the process solution will boil around 130 C. If the column boiled dry, the sorbent could plug the column and require replacement of the column module. The objective of the present work is to compute temperature distributions across the column as a function of transit time after the initiation of accidents when there is loss of the salt solution flow in the CST column under abnormal conditions of the process operations. In this situation, the customer requested that the calculations should be conservative in that the model results would show the maximum centerline temperatures achievable by the CST design configurations. The thermal analysis results will be used to evaluate the fluid temperature distributions and the process component temperatures within the ion exchange system. This information will also assist in the system design and maintenance.

  17. Ultrafast spin exchange-coupling torque via photo-excited charge-transfer processes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, X.; Fang, F.; Li, Q.; Zhu, J.; Yang, Y.; Wu, Y. Z.; Zhao, H. B.; Lüpke, G.

    2015-01-01

    Optical control of spin is of central importance in the research of ultrafast spintronic devices utilizing spin dynamics at short time scales. Recently developed optical approaches such as ultrafast demagnetization, spin-transfer and spin-orbit torques open new pathways to manipulate spin through its interaction with photon, orbit, charge or phonon. However, these processes are limited by either the long thermal recovery time or the low-temperature requirement. Here we experimentally demonstrate ultrafast coherent spin precession via optical charge-transfer processes in the exchange-coupled Fe/CoO system at room temperature. The efficiency of spin precession excitation is significantly higher and the recovery time of the exchange-coupling torque is much shorter than for the demagnetization procedure, which is desirable for fast switching. The exchange coupling is a key issue in spin valves and tunnelling junctions, and hence our findings will help promote the development of exchange-coupled device concepts for ultrafast coherent spin manipulation. PMID:26508587

  18. Ultrafast spin exchange-coupling torque via photo-excited charge-transfer processes.

    PubMed

    Ma, X; Fang, F; Li, Q; Zhu, J; Yang, Y; Wu, Y Z; Zhao, H B; Lüpke, G

    2015-01-01

    Optical control of spin is of central importance in the research of ultrafast spintronic devices utilizing spin dynamics at short time scales. Recently developed optical approaches such as ultrafast demagnetization, spin-transfer and spin-orbit torques open new pathways to manipulate spin through its interaction with photon, orbit, charge or phonon. However, these processes are limited by either the long thermal recovery time or the low-temperature requirement. Here we experimentally demonstrate ultrafast coherent spin precession via optical charge-transfer processes in the exchange-coupled Fe/CoO system at room temperature. The efficiency of spin precession excitation is significantly higher and the recovery time of the exchange-coupling torque is much shorter than for the demagnetization procedure, which is desirable for fast switching. The exchange coupling is a key issue in spin valves and tunnelling junctions, and hence our findings will help promote the development of exchange-coupled device concepts for ultrafast coherent spin manipulation. PMID:26508587

  19. Ultrafast spin exchange-coupling torque via photo-excited charge-transfer processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, X.; Fang, F.; Li, Q.; Zhu, J.; Yang, Y.; Wu, Y. Z.; Zhao, H. B.; Lüpke, G.

    2015-10-28

    In this study, optical control of spin is of central importance in the research of ultrafast spintronic devices utilizing spin dynamics at short time scales. Recently developed optical approaches such as ultrafast demagnetization, spin-transfer and spin-orbit torques open new pathways to manipulate spin through its interaction with photon, orbit, charge or phonon. However, these processes are limited by either the long thermal recovery time or the low-temperature requirement. Here we experimentally demonstrate ultrafast coherent spin precession via optical charge-transfer processes in the exchange-coupled Fe/CoO system at room temperature. The efficiency of spin precession excitation is significantly higher and the recovery time of the exchange-coupling torque is much shorter than for the demagnetization procedure, which is desirable for fast switching. The exchange coupling is a key issue in spin valves and tunnelling junctions, and hence our findings will help promote the development of exchange-coupled device concepts for ultrafast coherent spin manipulation.

  20. Ultrafast spin exchange-coupling torque via photo-excited charge-transfer processes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ma, X.; Fang, F.; Li, Q.; Zhu, J.; Yang, Y.; Wu, Y. Z.; Zhao, H. B.; Lüpke, G.

    2015-10-28

    In this study, optical control of spin is of central importance in the research of ultrafast spintronic devices utilizing spin dynamics at short time scales. Recently developed optical approaches such as ultrafast demagnetization, spin-transfer and spin-orbit torques open new pathways to manipulate spin through its interaction with photon, orbit, charge or phonon. However, these processes are limited by either the long thermal recovery time or the low-temperature requirement. Here we experimentally demonstrate ultrafast coherent spin precession via optical charge-transfer processes in the exchange-coupled Fe/CoO system at room temperature. The efficiency of spin precession excitation is significantly higher and the recoverymore » time of the exchange-coupling torque is much shorter than for the demagnetization procedure, which is desirable for fast switching. The exchange coupling is a key issue in spin valves and tunnelling junctions, and hence our findings will help promote the development of exchange-coupled device concepts for ultrafast coherent spin manipulation.« less

  1. Voltage-dependent processes in the electroneutral amino acid exchanger ASCT2

    PubMed Central

    Zander, Catherine B.; Albers, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Neutral amino acid exchange by the alanine serine cysteine transporter (ASCT)2 was reported to be electroneutral and coupled to the cotransport of one Na+ ion. The cotransported sodium ion carries positive charge. Therefore, it is possible that amino acid exchange is voltage dependent. However, little information is available on the electrical properties of the ASCT2 amino acid transport process. Here, we have used a combination of experimental and computational approaches to determine the details of the amino acid exchange mechanism of ASCT2. The [Na+] dependence of ASCT2-associated currents indicates that the Na+/amino acid stoichiometry is at least 2:1, with at least one sodium ion binding to the amino acid–free apo form of the transporter. When the substrate and two Na+ ions are bound, the valence of the transport domain is +0.81. Consistently, voltage steps applied to ASCT2 in the fully loaded configuration elicit transient currents that decay on a millisecond time scale. Alanine concentration jumps at the extracellular side of the membrane are followed by inwardly directed transient currents, indicative of translocation of net positive charge during exchange. Molecular dynamics simulations are consistent with these results and point to a sequential binding process in which one or two modulatory Na+ ions bind with high affinity to the empty transporter, followed by binding of the amino acid substrate and the subsequent binding of a final Na+ ion. Overall, our results are consistent with voltage-dependent amino acid exchange occurring on a millisecond time scale, the kinetics of which we predict with simulations. Despite some differences, transport mechanism and interaction with Na+ appear to be highly conserved between ASCT2 and the other members of the solute carrier 1 family, which transport acidic amino acids. PMID:23669717

  2. Cumulative Significance of Hyporheic Exchange and Biogeochemical Processing in River Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. W.; Gomez-Velez, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Biogeochemical reactions in rivers that decrease excessive loads of nutrients, metals, organic compounds, etc. are enhanced by hydrologic interactions with microbially and geochemically active sediments of the hyporheic zone. The significance of reactions in individual hyporheic flow paths has been shown to be controlled by the contact time between river water and sediment and the intrinsic reaction rate in the sediment. However, little is known about how the cumulative effects of hyporheic processing in large river basins. We used the river network model NEXSS (Gomez-Velez and Harvey, submitted) to simulate hyporheic exchange through synthetic river networks based on the best available models of network topology, hydraulic geometry and scaling of geomorphic features, grain size, hydraulic conductivity, and intrinsic reaction rates of nutrients and metals in river sediment. The dimensionless reaction significance factor, RSF (Harvey et al., 2013) was used to quantify the cumulative removal fraction of a reactive solute by hyporheic processing. SF scales reaction progress in a single pass through the hyporheic zone with the proportion of stream discharge passing through the hyporheic zone for a specified distance. Reaction progress is optimal where the intrinsic reaction timescale in sediment matches the residence time of hyporheic flow and is less efficient in longer residence time hyporheic flow as a result of the decreasing proportion of river flow that is processed by longer residence time hyporheic flow paths. In contrast, higher fluxes through short residence time hyporheic flow paths may be inefficient because of the repeated surface-subsurface exchanges required to complete the reaction. Using NEXSS we found that reaction efficiency may be high in both small streams and large rivers, although for different reasons. In small streams reaction progress generally is dominated by faster pathways of vertical exchange beneath submerged bedforms. Slower exchange

  3. Magneto-optical indicator film study of the hybrid exchange spring formation and evolution processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitenko, V. I.; Gornakov, V. S.; Kabanov, Yu. P.; Shapiro, A. J.; Shull, R. D.; Chien, C. L.; Jiang, J. S.; Bader, S. D.

    2003-03-01

    The elementary events of the remagnetization processes in nanocomposite magnetic bilayers were investigated using iron-garnet indicator films with in-plane anisotropy. We have observed hybrid domain walls consisting of both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic sections perpendicular to the interface. The external magnetic field shifts only the ferromagnetic part of the domain walls. This leads to the formation of a hybrid exchange spin spring parallel to the interface. The processes of spring nucleation and untwisting occur at different locations. With the field oriented antiparallel to the macroscopic unidirectional anisotropy, remagnetization of the soft ferromagnet layer in the hard/soft nanocomposite starts by the formation of an exchange spring consisting of micrometer-scale sub-domains with opposite direction spin twisting. A rotating magnetic field (smaller than some critical value) creates firstly a single-chiral spin spiral; this spiral then loses stability, incoherently untwists and gradually inverts its chirality with increasing field rotation. Untwisting of the hybrid exchange spring at higher fields leads to the creation of unusual hybrid non-180° domain walls. The initial (ground) state of the bilayer with such noncollinear magnetized domains is not restored after stopping the field rotation and returning it to zero. The revealed phenomena are attributed to the influence of the dispersion in the unidirectional anisotropy induced by magnetization frustration in the interface and bilayer crystal lattice defects.

  4. Modeling the Hydrogen-Proton Charge-Exchange Process in Global Heliospheric Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeStefano, A.; Heerikhuisen, J.

    2015-12-01

    The environment surrounding our Solar System has a vast and dynamic structure. As the Sun rounds the Milky Way galaxy, interstellar dust and gas interact with the Sun's outflow of solar wind. A bubble of hot plasma forms around the Sun due to this interaction, called the heliosphere. In order to understand the structure of the heliosphere, observations and simulations must work in tandem. Within the past decade or so, 3D models of the heliosphere have been developed exhibiting non- symmmetric as well as predicting structures such as the hydrogen wall and the IBEX ribbon. In this poster we explore new ways to compute charge-exchange source terms. The charge-exchange process is the coupling mechanism between the MHD and kinetic theories. The understanding of this process is crucial in order to make valuable predictions. Energy dependant cross section terms will aid in settling non-linear affects coupling the intestellar and solar particles. Through these new ways of computing source terms, resolving fine structures in the plasma in the heliopause may be possible. In addition, other non-trivial situations, such as charge-exchange mediated shocks, may be addressed.

  5. Process-Scale Modeling of Atmosphere-Snowpack Exchange of Nitrogen Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, K. A.; Doskey, P. V.; Ganzeveld, L.

    2013-12-01

    Snowpack over glacial ice is a reservoir for reactive nitrogen gases. Previous studies indicate nitrogen oxides (NOx) are generated in snowpack interstitial air through photolysis of nitrate (NO3-). Gradients in NOx mixing ratios between snowpack interstitial air and the overlying atmosphere regulate exchange of NOx with snowpack, which affects the Arctic ozone budget and climate. To better understand the dynamics of cryosphere-atmosphere exchange of NOx in the Arctic, we collected 2 years of meteorological and chemical data in and above the snowpack at Summit, Greenland. The comprehensive dataset indicates NOx emissions are episodic, with NOx enhancements in snowpack in early spring during high wind speed events (10-20 mph), which elevate NOx levels to ~500 pptv at depths of 2.5 m. Analysis of the observations will be based upon application of a 1-D process-scale model of atmosphere-snowpack exchange of NOx. The model will include representations of the snowpack chemistry in gas and aqueous phases, mass transfer of chemical species between phases, and physical transport by diffusion and wind pumping. The model will calculate the chemical and physical tendencies in three dimensions: depth, time, and intensity. Analysis of the tendencies will allow us to perform model sensitivity tests of pertinent snowpack physical and chemical processes. The end-goal of the project is to simplify the major tendencies into a parameterized model add-on for use in global models to determine the importance of properly representing snowpack in global model simulations.

  6. [Circulation and exchange processes on the South Atlantic Bight Continental Shelf]. [Progress summary for 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-31

    A continuation of the physical oceanography program to investigate circulation and exchange processes on the South Atlantic Bight (SAB) Continental Shelf is proposed. The transport and dispersal of materials entering the inner shelf zone with river discharge is not well understood at present. Climatological data, satellite imagery, and numerical modeling results indicate two removal routes for these nearshore waters: northeast transport and offshore exchange between Cape Fear and Savannah during the spring and summer when maximum run-off and northward winds prevail; and southward transport and offshore exchange near Cape Canaveral during the fall when southward winds prevail. We have conducted interdisciplinary experiments to investigate the transport processes in the inner to outer shelf between Savannah, Georgia and Cape Fear, North Carolina. In addition we propose to continue synthesis and interpretation of current measurements. The analyses will focus on determining the coupling mechanisms of inner shelf and outer shelf waters with special emphasis placed on resolving the modes and rates of shelf water removal.

  7. Time Dependency of Psychotherapeutic Exchanges: The Contribution of the Theory of Dynamic Systems in Analyzing Process

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Sergio; Tschacher, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a general framework for the use of Theory of Dynamic Systems (TDS) in the field of psychotherapy research. Psychotherapy is inherently dynamic, namely a function of time. Consequently, the improvement of construct validity and clinical relevance of psychotherapy process research require the development of models of investigation allowing dynamic mappings of clinical exchange. Thus, TDS becomes a significant theoretical and methodological reference. The paper focuses two topics. First, the main concepts of TDS are briefly introduced together with a basic typology of approaches developed within this domain. Second, we propose a repertoire of investigation strategies that can be used to capture the dynamic nature of clinical exchange. In this way we intend to highlight the feasibility and utility of strategies of analysis informed by TDS. PMID:22848205

  8. Study by XPS of different conditioning processes to improve the cation exchange in clinoptilolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Serrano, D.; Flores-Acosta, M.; Conde-Barajas, E.; Ramírez-Rosales, D.; Yáñez-Limón, J. M.; Ramírez-Bon, R.

    2010-09-01

    We report the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of natural clinoptilolite from a mine in Sonora, México. From these measurements we determined the chemical state and binding energy of the elements in the zeolite framework and of those in the extra framework sites. The analysis was done on natural clinoptilolite and on cation-exchanged clinoptilolites with Na + and NH4+ ions. Complementary analysis by several experimental techniques was performed to determine the structural, chemical composition and chemical state modifications experimented by clinoptilolite samples processed by the two types of cation exchange. The clinoptilolite samples were studied by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to determine their structural composition, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) to measure the chemical composition and electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to determine the chemical state of iron inside the natural zeolites.

  9. Processing of Spent Ion Exchange Resins in a Rotary Calciner - 12212

    SciTech Connect

    Kascheev, Vladimir; Musatov, Nikolay

    2012-07-01

    Processing Russian nuclear ion exchange resin KU-2 using a 'Rotary' calciner was conducted. The resulting product is a dry free flowing powder (moisture content 3 wt.%, Angle of repose of ≅ 20 deg.). Compared with the original exchange resin the volume of the final product is about 3 times less.. Rotary calciner product can be stored in metal drums or in special reinforced concrete cubicles. After thermal treatment in a rotary calciner, the spent resin product can be solidified in cement yielding the following attributes: - The cemented waste is only a 35% increase over the volume of powder product; - The volume of cement calciner product is almost 9 times less (8.7) than the volume of cement solidified resin; - The mechanical strength of cemented calciner product meets the radioactive waste regulations in Russia. (authors)

  10. Thermally Cross-Linked Anion Exchange Membranes from Solvent Processable Isoprene Containing Ionomers

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Ertem, S. Piril; Maes, Ashley M.; Seifert, Soenke; Herring, Andrew M; Coughlin, E. Bryan

    2015-01-28

    Random copolymers of isoprene and 4-vinylbenzyl chloride (VBCl) with varying compositions were synthesized via nitroxide-mediated polymerization. Subsequent quaternization afforded solvent processable and cross-linkable ionomers with a wide range of ion exchange capacities (IECs). Solution cast membranes were thermally cross-linked to form anion exchange membranes. Cross-linking was achieved by taking advantage of the unsaturations on the polyisoprene backbone, without added cross-linkers. A strong correlation was found between water uptake and ion conductivity of the membranes: conductivities of the membranes with IECs beyond a critical value were found to be constant related to their high water absorption. Environmentally controlled small-angle X-ray scattering experiments revealed a correlation between the average distance between ionic clusters and the ion conductivity, indicating that a well-connected network of ion clusters is necessary for efficient ion conduction and high ion conductivity.

  11. Qualification of Reillex{trademark} HPQ anion exchange resin for use in SRS processes

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, W.J. III

    2000-05-18

    The Phase 2 portion of the HB-Line facility was built in the early 1980's to process plutonium and neptunium from nitric acid solutions into oxide suitable for storage in a vault. Although the other portions of HB-Line were started up in the mid 1980's and have operated since that time, the anion exchange and precipitation processes in Phase 2 were never started up. As part of the material stabilization efforts, Phase 2 is currently being started up. A new anion exchange resin is needed because the resins that were proposed for use 10 years ago are limited by performance characteristics, disposal requirements, or are no longer commercially available. SRTC is responsible for qualifying all resins prior to their use in Nuclear Materials Stabilization and Storage (NMSS) processes. Qualification consists of both process suitability and thermal stability with nitric acid. This report describes the thermal stability qualification of Reillex{trademark} HPQ, the new resin proposed for processing plutonium and neptunium in the HB Line facility.

  12. 45 CFR 155.315 - Verification process related to eligibility for enrollment in a QHP through the Exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Verification process related to eligibility for enrollment in a QHP through the Exchange. 155.315 Section 155.315 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS EXCHANGE ESTABLISHMENT STANDARDS AND OTHER RELATED STANDARDS UNDER THE AFFORDABLE...

  13. Impact of natural organic matter properties on the kinetics of suspended ion exchange process.

    PubMed

    Bazri, Mohammad Mahdi; Mohseni, Madjid

    2016-03-15

    Removal kinetics of four standard organic matter isolates under the application of strongly basic ion exchange resins (IEX) in suspended mode was studied under commercial application conditions. Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM), SR fulvic acid (SRFA), and Pony Lake fulvic acid (PLFA) were greatly removed (>90%) and highly preferred by IEX resins (α > 5, over Cl(-), and HCO3(-)) while SR humic acid (SRHA) was the least preferred organic structure among the four isolates studied (α ≈ 1). Moreover, the efficacy of removal for fulvic acids (i.e., SRFA, PLFA) was consistent over consecutive reuse of IEX resins (i.e., loading cycles) whereas it decreased for SRNOM and SRHA over the course of operation. The stoichiometric correlation between the chloride released from the resins as a result of organic molecules uptake indicated that ion exchange was the dominant mechanism. Results obtained indicated that molecular weight and charge density of isolates played a major role in the performance of ion exchange process for organic matter removal. Furthermore, various empirical and physical models were evaluated using the experimental data and pore diffusion was found to be the rate-liming step during the uptake of organic matters; hence, it was used as the appropriate model to predict the kinetics of removal. Consequently, free liquid diffusivities and effective pore diffusion coefficients of organic molecules were estimated and findings were in agreement with the literature data that were obtained from spectrophotometric methods. PMID:26774263

  14. Shelf edge exchange processes-II SEEP2-06, R/V Endeavor cruise 186

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.; Behrens, W.J.; Flagg, C.N.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Wilke, R.J.; Wyman, K.D.

    1989-12-01

    The Shelf Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP) program sponsored by the United States Department of Energy is a multi-institutional effort designed to investigate the flux of suspended material from the continental shelf to the waters of the upper slope, and then possibly into the slope sediments. Phase I of SEEP consisted of a series of nine cruises and a mooring array across the outer continental shelf of New England during 1983--1984. Phase II focused specifically on the shelf/slope frontal region of the mid-Atlantic bight off the Delmarva Peninsula. Hydrographic data were collected on eight of the six cruises.

  15. A study of gas-surface energy exchange processes: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kunc, J.A.; Shemansky, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this theoretical research program was to study the fundamental characteristics of gas-surface energy exchange reactions. The interaction process refers to low density conditions in the gas component and therefore has general application to a number of disparate disciplines, including the maintenance of clean high vacuum systems for research in subjects such as fusion reactions, and many other important areas in engineering and technology. The approach to the calculations is to construct accurate theoretical models of the solid structure on a microscopic scale, and account for the aggregate gas-surface physical interaction using Monte Carlo techniques. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Solvent Processable Tetraalkylammonium-Functionalized Polyethylene for Use as an Alkaline Anion Exchange Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Kostalik, IV, Henry A.; Clark, Timothy J.; Robertson, Nicholas J.; Mutolo, Paul F.; Longo, Julie M.; Abruña, Héctor D.; Coates, Geoffrey W.

    2010-08-02

    We report the synthesis of a solvent processable, tetraalkylammonium-functionalized polyethylene for use as an alkaline anion exchange membrane (AAEM). The membranes are insoluble in both pure water and aqueous methanol (50 vol % water) at 50 °C but exhibit excellent solubility in a variety of other aqueous alcohols (e.g., 5 wt % AAEM in aqueous n-propanol, 50 vol % water). These solubility characteristics extend the potential utility of this system for use as both an AAEM and ionomer electrode material from a single polymer composition. The AAEMs generated are mechanically strong and exhibit high hydroxide and carbonate conductivities.

  17. Aeronautical Satellite-Assisted Process for Information Exchange Through Network Technologies (Aero-SAPIENT) Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zernic, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Broadband satellite communications for aeronautics marries communication and network technologies to address NASA's goals in information technology base research and development, thereby serving the safety and capacity needs of the National Airspace System. This marriage of technology increases the interactivity between airborne vehicles and ground systems. It improves decision-making and efficiency, reduces operation costs, and improves the safety and capacity of the National Airspace System. To this end, a collaborative project called the Aeronautical Satellite Assisted Process for Information Exchange through Network Technologies, or Aero-SAPIENT, was conducted out of Tinker AFB, Oklahoma, during November and December 2000.

  18. Magnetization process in a two-phase exchange-coupled system: A microscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, D.H.; Feutrill, E.H.; Ding, J.

    1997-04-01

    The magnetization process in an exchange-coupled {alpha}-Fe+Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B nanocomposite has been studied by M{umlt o}ssbauer spectroscopy. Measurements in fields of up to 2 T confirm that the magnetization of the soft phase is strongly coupled to that of the hard phase. Analysis of magnetization curves and magic-angle spectra of saturated samples shows that the remanence is dominated by the hard phase. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Design of a fixed-bed ion-exchange process for the treatment of rinse waters generated in the galvanization process using Laminaria hyperborea as natural cation exchanger.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Luciana P; Pozdniakova, Tatiana A; Mayer, Diego A; Boaventura, Rui A R; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the removal of zinc from galvanization wastewaters was performed in a fixed bed column packed with brown macro-algae Laminaria hyperborea, acting as a natural cation exchanger (resin). The rinse wastewater presents a zinc concentration between 9 and 22 mg/L, a high concentration of light metals (mainly Na and Ca), a high conductivity (0.5-1.5 mS/cm) and a low organic content (DOC = 7-15 mg C/L). The zinc speciation diagram showed that approximately 80% of zinc is in the form of Zn(2+) and ≅20% as ZnSO4, considering the effluent matrix. From all operational conditions tested for zinc uptake (17 < bed height<27 cm, 4.5 < flow rate<18.2 BV/h, 0.8 < particle equivalent diameter<2.0 mm), the highest useful capacity (7.1 mg Zn/g algae) was obtained for D/dp = 31, L/D = 11, 9.1 BV/h, τ = 6.4 min, corresponding to a service capacity of 124 BV (endpoint of 2 mg Zn/L). Elution was faster and near to 100% effective using 10 BV of HCl (1 M, 3.0%, 363 g HCl/L of resin), for flow rates higher than 4.5 BV/h. Calcium chloride solution (0.1 M) was selected as the best regenerant, allowing the reuse of the natural resin for more than 3 saturation/elution/regeneration cycles. The best operation conditions were scaled-up and tested in a pre-pilot plant. The scale-up design of the cation exchange process was proposed for the treatment of 2.4 m(3)/day of galvanization wastewater, resulting in an estimated reactants cost of 2.44 €/m(3). PMID:26766159

  20. Exchange between Escherichia coli polymerases II and III on a processivity clamp.

    PubMed

    Kath, James E; Chang, Seungwoo; Scotland, Michelle K; Wilbertz, Johannes H; Jergic, Slobodan; Dixon, Nicholas E; Sutton, Mark D; Loparo, Joseph J

    2016-02-29

    Escherichia coli has three DNA polymerases implicated in the bypass of DNA damage, a process called translesion synthesis (TLS) that alleviates replication stalling. Although these polymerases are specialized for different DNA lesions, it is unclear if they interact differently with the replication machinery. Of the three, DNA polymerase (Pol) II remains the most enigmatic. Here we report a stable ternary complex of Pol II, the replicative polymerase Pol III core complex and the dimeric processivity clamp, β. Single-molecule experiments reveal that the interactions of Pol II and Pol III with β allow for rapid exchange during DNA synthesis. As with another TLS polymerase, Pol IV, increasing concentrations of Pol II displace the Pol III core during DNA synthesis in a minimal reconstitution of primer extension. However, in contrast to Pol IV, Pol II is inefficient at disrupting rolling-circle synthesis by the fully reconstituted Pol III replisome. Together, these data suggest a β-mediated mechanism of exchange between Pol II and Pol III that occurs outside the replication fork. PMID:26657641

  1. Design of a Small Scale High Temperature Gas Loop for Process Heat Exchanger Design Tests

    SciTech Connect

    SungDeok, Hong; DongSeok, Oh; WonJae, Lee; JongHwa, Chang

    2006-07-01

    We designed a small scale gas loop that can simulate reference operating conditions, that is, a temperature up to 950 deg C and a pressure up to 6 MPa. Main objective of the loop is to screen the candidate process-heat-exchanger designs of a very small capacity of 10 {approx} 20 kW. We arranged the components of a primary gas loop and a secondary SO{sub 3} loop. Design requirements are prepared for the safe design of a main heater, a hot-gas-duct and a process heat exchanger that avoid a risk of a failure owing to thermal stresses, a flow-induced vibration or an acoustic vibration in both nitrogen and helium mediums. In the primary and secondary loops, the hot-gas-ducts are internally insulated by a ceramic fiber insulation material to protect the pressure housing from high gas temperatures. We determined a total pressure loss of the primary loop to be 66 kPa and the minimum outer diameter of the loop pressure pipe to be 90 mm at a hot location that will prevent a thermal failure. Very toxic SO{sub 3} secondary loop is needed a scrubber and a SO{sub 3} collector for safety and preventing a contamination of the environment. (authors)

  2. Exchange between Escherichia coli polymerases II and III on a processivity clamp

    PubMed Central

    Kath, James E.; Chang, Seungwoo; Scotland, Michelle K.; Wilbertz, Johannes H.; Jergic, Slobodan; Dixon, Nicholas E.; Sutton, Mark D.; Loparo, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli has three DNA polymerases implicated in the bypass of DNA damage, a process called translesion synthesis (TLS) that alleviates replication stalling. Although these polymerases are specialized for different DNA lesions, it is unclear if they interact differently with the replication machinery. Of the three, DNA polymerase (Pol) II remains the most enigmatic. Here we report a stable ternary complex of Pol II, the replicative polymerase Pol III core complex and the dimeric processivity clamp, β. Single-molecule experiments reveal that the interactions of Pol II and Pol III with β allow for rapid exchange during DNA synthesis. As with another TLS polymerase, Pol IV, increasing concentrations of Pol II displace the Pol III core during DNA synthesis in a minimal reconstitution of primer extension. However, in contrast to Pol IV, Pol II is inefficient at disrupting rolling-circle synthesis by the fully reconstituted Pol III replisome. Together, these data suggest a β-mediated mechanism of exchange between Pol II and Pol III that occurs outside the replication fork. PMID:26657641

  3. An efficient process of generating bispecific antibodies via controlled Fab-arm exchange using culture supernatants.

    PubMed

    Paul, Suparna; Connor, Judy; Nesspor, Tom; Haytko, Peter; Boakye, Ken; Chiu, Mark L; Jiang, Haiyan

    2016-05-01

    Bispecific antibody generation is actively pursued for therapeutic and research antibody development. Although there are multiple strategies for generating bispecific antibodies (bsAbs); the common challenge is to develop a scalable method to prepare bsAbs with high purity and yield. The controlled Fab-arm exchange (cFAE) method combines two parental monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), each with a matched point mutation, F405L and K409R in the respective CH3 domains. The conventional process employs two steps: the purification of two parental mAbs from culture supernatants followed by cFAE. Following a reduction/oxidation reaction, the bispecific mAb is formed with greater than 95% heterodimerization efficiency. In this study, cFAE was initiated in culture supernatants expressing the two parental mAbs, thereby eliminating the need to first purify the parental mAbs. The bsAbs formed in culture supernatant was then purified using a Protein A affinity chromatography. The BsAbs generated in this manner had efficiency comparable to the conventional method using purified parental mAbs. BsAbs prepared by two different routes showed indistinguishable characteristics by SDS capillary electrophoresis, analytical size exclusion, and cation exchange chromatography. This alternative method significantly shortened timelines and reduced resources required for bsAb generation, providing an improved process with potential benefits in large-scale bsAb preparation, as well as for HTP small-scale bsAb matrix selection. PMID:26826313

  4. Bifunctional phenyl monophosphonic/sulfonic acid ion exchange resin and process for using the same

    DOEpatents

    Alexandratos, Spiro; Shelley, Christopher A.; Horwitz, E. Philip; Chiarizia, Renato; Gula, Michael J.; Xue, Sui; Harvey, James T.

    2002-01-01

    A cross-linked water-insoluble ion exchange resin comprised of polymerized monomers having a phenyl ring is disclosed. A contemplated resin contains (i) polymerized phenyl ring-containing monomers having a phosphonic acid ligand linked to the phenyl ring, (ii) about 2 to about 5 millimoles per gram (mmol/g) of phosphorus as phosphonic acid ligands, and (iii) a sufficient amount of a sulfonic acid ligand such that the ratio of mmol/g of phosphonic acid to mmol/g sulfonic acid is up to 3:1. A process for removing polyvalent metal cations from aqueous solution, and a process for removing iron(III) cations from acidic copper(II) cation-containing solutions that utilize the contemplated resin or other resins are disclosed.

  5. Bifunctional phenyl monophosphonic/sulfonic acid ion exchange resin and process for using the same

    DOEpatents

    Alexandratos, Spiro; Shelley, Christopher A.; Horwitz, E. Philip; Chiarizia, Renato

    2001-01-01

    A cross-linked water-insoluble ion exchange resin comprised of polymerized monomers having a phenyl ring is disclosed. A contemplated resin contains (i) polymerized phenyl ring-containing monomers having a phosphonic acid ligand linked to the phenyl ring, (ii) about 2 to about 5 millimoles per gram (mmol/g) of phosphorus as phosphonic acid ligands, and (iii) a sufficient amount of a sulfonic acid ligand such that the ratio of mmol/g of phosphonic acid to mmol/g sulfonic acid is up to 3:1. A process for removing polyvalent metal cations from aqueous solution, and a process for removing iron(III) cations from acidic copper(II) cation-containing solutions that utilize the contemplated resin or other resins are disclosed.

  6. THERMAL ANALYSIS FOR IN-TANK ION-EXCHANGE COLUMN PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Frank02 Smith, F

    2009-01-05

    High Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is stored in three forms: sludge, saltcake, and supernate. A small column ion-exchange (SCIX) process is being designed to treat dissolved saltcake waste before feeding it to the saltstone facility to be made into grout. The waste is caustic with high concentrations of various sodium salts and lower concentrations of radionuclides. Two cation exchange media being considered are a granular form of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) and a spherical form of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin. CST is an inorganic material highly selective for cesium that is not elutable. Through this process, radioactive cesium from the salt solution is absorbed into ion exchange media (either CST or RF) which is packed within a flow-through column. A packed column loaded with radioactive cesium generates significant heat from radiolytic decay. If engineering designs cannot handle this thermal load, hot spots may develop locally which could degrade the performance of the ion-exchange media. Performance degradation with regard to cesium removal has been observed between 50 and 80 C for CST [1] and at 65 C for RF resin [2]. In addition, the waste supernate solution will boil around 130 C. If the columns boiled dry, the sorbent material could plug the column and lead to replacement of the entire column module. Alternatively, for organic resins such as RF there is risk of fire at elevated temperatures. The objective of the work is to compute temperature distributions across CST- and RF-packed columns immersed in waste supernate under accident scenarios involving loss of salt solution flow through the beds and, in some cases, loss of coolant system flow. For some cases, temperature distributions are determined as a function of time after the initiation of a given accident scenario and in other cases only the final steady-state temperature distributions are calculated. In general, calculations are conducted to ensure conservative and

  7. Effects Of Thermal Exchange On Material Flow During Steel Thixoextrusion Process

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Eric; Gu Guochao; Langlois, Laurent; Bigot, Regis; Pesci, Raphael

    2011-01-17

    Semisolid processing is an innovative technology for near net-shape production of components, where the metallic alloys are processed in the semisolid state. Taking advantage of the thixotropic behavior of alloys in the semisolid state, significant progress has been made in semisolid processing. However, the consequences of such behavior on the flow during thixoforming are still not completely understood. To explore and better understand the influence of the different parameters on material flow during thixoextrusion process, thixoextrusion experiments were performed using the low carbon steel C38. The billet was partially melted at high solid fraction. Effects of various process parameters including the initial billet temperature, the temperature of die, the punch speed during process and the presence of a Ceraspray layer at the interface of tool and billet were investigated through experiments and simulation. After analyzing the results thus obtained, it was identified that the aforementioned parameters mainly affect thermal exchanges between die and part. The Ceraspray layer not only plays a lubricant role, but also acts as a thermal barrier at the interface of tool and billet. Furthermore, the thermal effects can affect the material flow which is composed of various distinct zones.

  8. Numerical Modeling of Freezing and Melting Processes around a Borehole Heat Exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Haibing; Zheng, Tianyuan; Nagel, Thomas; Kolditz, Olaf

    2015-04-01

    In ground sourced heat pump (GSHP) systems, heat energy stored in the shallow subsurface is extracted through borehole heat exchangers (BHE) and then utilized for domestic heating. In cold regions, the continuous heat deficit in the vicinity of the BHE can cause freezing of the surrounding soil. Its material properties, such as permeability and heat conductivity, will then significantly change and lead to a series of coupled thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical processes. In particular, the heat exchange performance of the BHE will be altered, and the frozen soil may also induce ground lift or subsidence in the vicinity of the building. As the first step of modelling this coupled system, we followed the approach proposed by Al-Khoury et al (2010) and Diersch et al (2011), where the BHE has been fully integrated into the numerical model in a dual-continuum way. Additionally, we extended the existing heat transport module in the numerical simulator OpenGeoSys to include the freezing and melting processes, whereas the ice volume fraction in the soil is non-linearly dependent on the temperature, and the soil properties were determined based on the degree of freezing/melting. The non-linearity of the coupled model was numerically solved by a Newton scheme. The extended model has been verified by comparing numerical results against analytical solutions and also findings from other numerical codes. Moreover, we proposed and simulated a hypothetical scenario, where ice is gradually forming around a BHE in response to the continuous operation of a heat pump. The model is capable of reproducing the thermodynamic freezing process as well as the heat transport affected by it. Future work will be focused on the integration of deformation processes into the model.

  9. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] removal by the electrochemical ion-exchange process.

    PubMed

    Dharnaik, Amit Shivputra; Ghosh, Pranab Kumar

    2014-01-01

    In the present investigation, the performance of a laboratory-scale plate and frame-type electrochemical ion-exchange (EIX) cell on removal ofhexavalent chromium from synthetic wastewater containing 5 mg/l of Cr(VI) was evaluated under varying applied voltages. Ruthenium dioxide-coated titanium plate (RuO2/Ti) was used as anode and stainless steel plates as cathode. The EIX cell was run at different hydraulic retention time (HRT). Before using in the electrochemical cell, the capacity of ion-exchange resin was evaluated through kinetic and isotherm equilibrium tests in batch mode. The batch kinetic study result showed that the equilibrium time for effective ion exchange with resin is 2 h. The isotherm equilibrium data fit well to both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Maximum capacity (qm) of resin calculated from Langmuir isotherm was 71.42 mg/g. Up to 99% of chromium removal was noticed in the EIX cell containing fresh resin at applied voltages of 10 V and higher. Migration of chromium ion to anode chamber was not noticed while performing the experiment with fresh resin. As high as 50% removal of chromium was observed from the middle chamber containing exhausted resin at an applied voltage of 25 V when the influent flow rate was maintained at 45 min of HRT. The performance of the reactor was increased to 72% when the influent flow rate was decreased to maintain at 90 min of HRT. Build-up of chromium in the anode chamber took place when exhausted resin was used in the process. PMID:25145180

  10. An Evaluation of Solution Algorithms and Numerical Approximation Methods for Modeling an Ion Exchange Process

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Sunyoung; Huang, Jingfang; Boyer, Treavor H.; Miller, Cass T.

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this work is on the modeling of an ion exchange process that occurs in drinking water treatment applications. The model formulation consists of a two-scale model in which a set of microscale diffusion equations representing ion exchange resin particles that vary in size and age are coupled through a boundary condition with a macroscopic ordinary differential equation (ODE), which represents the concentration of a species in a well-mixed reactor. We introduce a new age-averaged model (AAM) that averages all ion exchange particle ages for a given size particle to avoid the expensive Monte-Carlo simulation associated with previous modeling applications. We discuss two different numerical schemes to approximate both the original Monte Carlo algorithm and the new AAM for this two-scale problem. The first scheme is based on the finite element formulation in space coupled with an existing backward-difference-formula-based ODE solver in time. The second scheme uses an integral equation based Krylov deferred correction (KDC) method and a fast elliptic solver (FES) for the resulting elliptic equations. Numerical results are presented to validate the new AAM algorithm, which is also shown to be more computationally efficient than the original Monte Carlo algorithm. We also demonstrate that the higher order KDC scheme is more efficient than the traditional finite element solution approach and this advantage becomes increasingly important as the desired accuracy of the solution increases. We also discuss issues of smoothness, which affect the efficiency of the KDC-FES approach, and outline additional algorithmic changes that would further improve the efficiency of these developing methods for a wide range of applications. PMID:20577570

  11. An evaluation of solution algorithms and numerical approximation methods for modeling an ion exchange process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Sunyoung; Huang, Jingfang; Boyer, Treavor H.; Miller, Cass T.

    2010-07-01

    The focus of this work is on the modeling of an ion exchange process that occurs in drinking water treatment applications. The model formulation consists of a two-scale model in which a set of microscale diffusion equations representing ion exchange resin particles that vary in size and age are coupled through a boundary condition with a macroscopic ordinary differential equation (ODE), which represents the concentration of a species in a well-mixed reactor. We introduce a new age-averaged model (AAM) that averages all ion exchange particle ages for a given size particle to avoid the expensive Monte-Carlo simulation associated with previous modeling applications. We discuss two different numerical schemes to approximate both the original Monte-Carlo algorithm and the new AAM for this two-scale problem. The first scheme is based on the finite element formulation in space coupled with an existing backward difference formula-based ODE solver in time. The second scheme uses an integral equation based Krylov deferred correction (KDC) method and a fast elliptic solver (FES) for the resulting elliptic equations. Numerical results are presented to validate the new AAM algorithm, which is also shown to be more computationally efficient than the original Monte-Carlo algorithm. We also demonstrate that the higher order KDC scheme is more efficient than the traditional finite element solution approach and this advantage becomes increasingly important as the desired accuracy of the solution increases. We also discuss issues of smoothness, which affect the efficiency of the KDC-FES approach, and outline additional algorithmic changes that would further improve the efficiency of these developing methods for a wide range of applications.

  12. THERMAL PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS FOR SMALL ION-EXCHANGE CESIUM REMOVAL PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; King, W.

    2009-12-29

    The In-Riser Ion Exchange program focuses on the development of in-tank systems to decontaminate high level waste (HLW) salt solutions at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and the Hanford Site. Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) treatment for cesium removal is a primary in-riser technology for decontamination prior to final waste immobilization in Saltstone. Through this process, radioactive cesium from the salt solution is adsorbed onto the ion exchange media which is packed within a flow-through column. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (RF) is being considered as the ion exchange media for the application of this technology at both sites. A packed column loaded with media containing radioactive cesium generates significant heat from radiolytic decay. Under normal operating conditions, process fluid flow through the column can provide adequate heat removal from the columns. However, in the unexpected event of loss of fluid flow or fluid drainage from the column, the design must be adequate to handle the thermal load to avoid unacceptable temperature excursions. Otherwise, hot spots may develop locally which could degrade the performance of the ion-exchange media or the temperature could rise above column safety limits. Data exists which indicates that performance degradation with regard to cesium removal occurs with RF at 65C. In addition, the waste supernate solution will boil around 130C. As a result, two temperature limits have been assumed for this analysis. An additional upset scenario was considered involving the loss of the supernate solution due to inadvertent fluid drainage through the column boundary. In this case, the column containing the loaded media could be completely dry. This event is expected to result in high temperatures that could damage the column or cause the RF sorbent material to undergo undesired physical changes. One objective of these calculations is to determine the range of temperatures that should be evaluated during testing with the RF

  13. Modeling Ion-Exchange Processing With Spherical Resins For Cesium Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Hang, T.; Nash, C. A.; Aleman, S. E.

    2012-09-19

    The spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde and hypothetical spherical SuperLig(r) 644 ion-exchange resins are evaluated for cesium removal from radioactive waste solutions. Modeling results show that spherical SuperLig(r) 644 reduces column cycling by 50% for high-potassium solutions. Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde performs equally well for the lowest-potassium wastes. Less cycling reduces nitric acid usage during resin elution and sodium addition during resin regeneration, therefore, significantly decreasing life-cycle operational costs. A model assessment of the mechanism behind ''cesium bleed'' is also conducted. When a resin bed is eluted, a relatively small amount of cesium remains within resin particles. Cesium can bleed into otherwise decontaminated product in the next loading cycle. The bleed mechanism is shown to be fully isotherm-controlled vs. mass transfer controlled. Knowledge of residual post-elution cesium level and resin isotherm can be utilized to predict rate of cesium bleed in a mostly non-loaded column. Overall, this work demonstrates the versatility of the ion-exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. This evaluation justifies further development of a spherical form of the SL644 resin.

  14. Dynamics of the fully stripped ion-hydrogen atom charge exchange process in dense quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ling-yu; Wan, Jiang-feng; Zhao, Xiao-ying; Xiao, Guo-qing; Duan, Wen-shan; Qi, Xin; Yang, Lei

    2014-09-15

    The plasma screening effects of dense quantum plasmas on charge exchange processes of a fully stripped ion colliding with a hydrogen atom are studied by the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method. The inter-particle interactions are described by the exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potentials. It is found that in weak screening conditions, cross sections increase with the increase of the ionic charge Z. However, in strong screening conditions, the dependence of cross sections on the ionic charge is related to the incident particle energy. At high energies, cross sections show a linear increase with the increase of Z, whereas at low energies, cross sections for Z≥4 become approximately the same. The He{sup 2+} and C{sup 6+} impacting charge exchange cross sections in dense quantum plasmas are also compared with those in weakly coupled plasmas. The interactions are described by the static screened Coulomb potential. It is found that for both He{sup 2+} and C{sup 6+}, the oscillatory screening effects of dense quantum plasmas are almost negligible in weak screening conditions. However, in strong screening conditions, the oscillatory screening effects enhance the screening effects of dense quantum plasmas, and the enhancement becomes more and more significant with the increase of the screening parameter and the ionic charge.

  15. Proceedings of the Efficient Separations and Processing Cross-Cutting Program Annual Technical Exchange Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    This document contains summaries of technology development presented at the 1995 Efficient Separations and Processing Cross-Cutting Program (ESP) Annual Technical Exchange Meeting. The ESP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Technology Development. The meeting is held annually to promote a free exchange of ideas among technology developers, potential users (for example, EM focus areas), and other interested parties within EM. During this meeting, developers of ESP-funded technologies describe the problems and needs addressed by their technologies; the technical approach, accomplishments, and resolution of issues; the strategy and schedule for commercialization; and evolving potential applications. Presenters are asked to address the following areas: Target waste management problem, waste stream, or data need; scientific background and technical approach; technical accomplishments and resolution of technical issues; schedule and strategy for commercializing and implementing the technology or acquiring needed data; potential alternate applications of the technology or data, including outside of DOE/EM. The meeting is not a program review of the individual tasks or subtasks; but instead focuses on the technical aspects and implementation of ESP-sponsored technology or data. The meeting is also attended by members of the ESP Technical Review Team, who have the opportunity at that time to review the ESP as a whole.

  16. Fuel processing in integrated micro-structured heat-exchanger reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, G.; Schürer, J.; Tiemann, D.; Wichert, M.; Zapf, R.; Hessel, V.; Löwe, H.

    Micro-structured fuel processors are under development at IMM for different fuels such as methanol, ethanol, propane/butane (LPG), gasoline and diesel. The target application are mobile, portable and small scale stationary auxiliary power units (APU) based upon fuel cell technology. The key feature of the systems is an integrated plate heat-exchanger technology which allows for the thermal integration of several functions in a single device. Steam reforming may be coupled with catalytic combustion in separate flow paths of a heat-exchanger. Reactors and complete fuel processors are tested up to the size range of 5 kW power output of a corresponding fuel cell. On top of reactor and system prototyping and testing, catalyst coatings are under development at IMM for numerous reactions such as steam reforming of LPG, ethanol and methanol, catalytic combustion of LPG and methanol, and for CO clean-up reactions, namely water-gas shift, methanation and the preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide. These catalysts are investigated in specially developed testing reactors. In selected cases 1000 h stability testing is performed on catalyst coatings at weight hourly space velocities, which are sufficiently high to meet the demands of future fuel processing reactors.

  17. Knowledge Transfer and Exchange Processes for Environmental Health Issues in Canadian Aboriginal Communities

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Susan M.; Brooks, Sandy; Furgal, Chris M.; Dobbins, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    Within Canadian Aboriginal communities, the process for utilizing environmental health research evidence in the development of policies and programs is not well understood. This fundamental qualitative descriptive study explored the perceptions of 28 environmental health researchers, senior external decision-makers and decision-makers working within Aboriginal communities about factors influencing knowledge transfer and exchange, beliefs about research evidence and Traditional Knowledge and the preferred communication channels for disseminating and receiving evidence. The results indicate that collaborative relationships between researchers and decision-makers, initiated early and maintained throughout a research project, promote both the efficient conduct of a study and increase the likelihood of knowledge transfer and exchange. Participants identified that empirical research findings and Traditional Knowledge are different and distinct types of evidence that should be equally valued and used where possible to provide a holistic understanding of environmental issues and support decisions in Aboriginal communities. To facilitate the dissemination of research findings within Aboriginal communities, participants described the elements required for successfully crafting key messages, locating and using credible messengers to deliver the messages, strategies for using cultural brokers and identifying the communication channels commonly used to disseminate and receive this type of information. PMID:20616996

  18. Review of exchange processes on Ganymede in view of its planetary protection categorization.

    PubMed

    Grasset, O; Bunce, E J; Coustenis, A; Dougherty, M K; Erd, C; Hussmann, H; Jaumann, R; Prieto-Ballesteros, O

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we provide a detailed review of Ganymede's characteristics that are germane to any consideration of its planetary protection requirements. Ganymede is the largest moon in our solar system and is the subject of one of the main science objectives of the JUICE mission to the jovian system. We explore the probability of the occurrence of potentially habitable zones within Ganymede at present, including those both within the deep liquid ocean and those in shallow liquid reservoirs. We consider the possible exchange processes between the surface and any putative habitats to set some constraints on the planetary protection approach for this moon. As a conclusion, the "remote" versus "significant" chance of contamination will be discussed, according to our current understanding of this giant icy moon. Based on the different estimates we investigate here, it appears extremely unlikely that material would be exchanged downward through the upper icy layer of Ganymede and, thus, bring material into the ocean over timescales consistent with the survival of microorganisms. PMID:24143869

  19. RECENT ADVANCES IN ION EXCHANGE MATERIALS AND PROCESSES FOR POLLUTION PREVENTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this article was to summarize the recent advances in ion exchange technology for the metal finishing industry. Even though the ion exchange technology is mature and is widely employed in the industry, new applications, approaches and ion exchange materials are emergi...

  20. Radionuclide tracers for the fate of metals in the Savannah estuary: River-ocean exchange processes

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, C.R.; Thein, M.; Larsen, I.L.; Byrd, J.T.; Windom, H.L.

    1989-01-01

    Plutonium-238 from the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant labels riverborne particles, providing a unique opportunity for examining the fate of metals in estuaries and for tracing river-ocean exchange processes. Results indicate that plutonium and lead-210 are enriched on estuarine particles and that inputs of plutonium from oceanic sources greatly exceed inputs from riverborne or drainage-basin sources as far upstream as the landward limit of seawater penetration. We suggest that these radionuclides (and other chemically reactive metals) are being scavenged from oceanic water by sorption onto particles in turbid estuarine and coastal areas. Since estuaries, bays, mangroves, and intertidal areas serve as effective traps for fine particles and associated trace substances, these results have important implications concerning the disposal of chemically reactive substances in oceanic waters. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. Surface-segregated Si and Ge ultrathin films formed by Ag-induced layer exchange process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosawa, Masashi; Ohta, Akio; Araidai, Masaaki; Zaima, Shigeaki

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a new method of growing Si or Ge ultrathin films on a Ag(111) surface by using a Ag-induced layer exchange (ALEX) process toward the creation of 2D honeycomb sheets of Si and Ge, known as silicene and germanene, respectively. In the present paper, we clarify ALEX features, specifically the surface segregation of Si (or Ge) atoms from the underlying substrate, focusing on the annealing temperature and time. Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses demonstrate that surface-segregated Si (or Ge) exists on the Ag surfaces after the epitaxial growth of the Ag layer on Si(111) [or Ge(111)] substrates; the amount of segregated Si (or Ge) can be controlled by a subsequent annealing. Also, we find that the segregation of an ultrathin Si or Ge layer proceeds at an interface between Ag and the AlO x capping layer.

  2. 45 CFR 156.805 - Bases and process for imposing civil money penalties in Federally-facilitated Exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-Facilitated Exchanges § 156.805 Bases and process for imposing civil money penalties in Federally-facilitated... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bases and process for imposing civil money... accordance with this part, HHS will send a written notice of this decision to— (1) The QHP issuer...

  3. 45 CFR 156.805 - Bases and process for imposing civil money penalties in Federally-facilitated Exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-Facilitated Exchanges § 156.805 Bases and process for imposing civil money penalties in Federally-facilitated... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bases and process for imposing civil money... accordance with this part, HHS will send a written notice of this decision to— (1) The QHP issuer...

  4. Unmasking the effect of a precipitation pulse on the biological processes composing Net Ecosystem Carbon Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Ballesteros, Ana; Sanchez-Cañete, Enrique P.; Serrano-Ortiz, Penelope; Oyonarte, Cecilio; Kowalski, Andrew S.; Perez-Priego, Oscar; Domingo, Francisco

    2015-04-01

    Drylands occupy 47.2% of the global terrestrial area and are key ecosystems that significantly determine the inter-annual variability of the global carbon balance. However, it is still necessary to delve into the functional behavior of arid and semiarid ecosystems due to the complexity of drivers and interactions between underpinning processes (whether biological or abiotic) that modulate net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE). In this context, water inputs are crucial to biological organisms survival in arid ecosystems and frequently arrive via rain events that are commonly stochastic and unpredictable (i.e. precipitation pulses) and strongly control arid land ecosystem structure and function. The eddy covariance technique can be used to investigate the effect of precipitation pulses on NEE, but provide limited understanding of what exactly happens after a rain event. The chief reasons are that, firstly, we cannot measure separately autotrophic and heterotrophic components, and secondly, the partitioning techniques widely utilized to separate Gross Primary Production and Total Ecosystem Respiration, do not work properly in these water-limited ecosystems, resulting in biased estimations of plant and soil processes. Consequently, it is essential to combine eddy covariance measurements with other techniques to disentangle the different biological processes composing NEE that are activated by a precipitation pulse. Accordingly, the main objectives of this work were: (i) to quantify the contribution of precipitation pulse events to annual NEE using the eddy covariance technique in a semiarid steppe located in Almería (Spain), and (ii) to simulate a realistic precipitation pulse in order to understand its effect on the ecosystem, soil and plant CO2 exchanges by using a transitory-state closed canopy chamber, soil respiration chambers and continuous monitoring CO2 sensors inserted in the subsoil. Preliminary results showed, as expected, a delay between soil and plant

  5. Fouling of an anion exchange chromatography operation in a monoclonal antibody process: Visualization and kinetic studies

    PubMed Central

    Close, Edward J; Salm, Jeffrey R; Iskra, Timothy; Sørensen, Eva; Bracewell, Daniel G

    2013-01-01

    Fouling of chromatographic resins over their operational lifetimes can be a significant problem for commercial bioseparations. In this article, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), batch uptake experiments, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and small-scale column studies were applied to characterize a case study where fouling had been observed during process development. The fouling was found to occur on an anion exchange (AEX) polishing step following a protein A affinity capture step in a process for the purification of a monoclonal antibody. Fouled resin samples analyzed by SEM and batch uptake experiments indicated that after successive batch cycles, significant blockage of the pores at the resin surface occurred, thereby decreasing the protein uptake rate. Further studies were performed using CLSM to allow temporal and spatial measurements of protein adsorption within the resin, for clean, partially fouled and extensively fouled resin samples. These samples were packed within a miniaturized flowcell and challenged with fluorescently labeled albumin that enabled in situ measurements. The results indicated that the foulant has a significant impact on the kinetics of adsorption, severely decreasing the protein uptake rate, but only results in a minimal decrease in saturation capacity. The impact of the foulant on the kinetics of adsorption was further investigated by loading BSA onto fouled resin over an extended range of flow rates. By decreasing the flow rate during BSA loading, the capacity of the resin was recovered. These data support the hypothesis that the foulant is located on the particle surface, only penetrating the particle to a limited degree. The increased understanding into the nature of the fouling can help in the continued process development of this industrial example. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), batch uptake experiments, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and small-scale column experiments were applied to characterize a

  6. Removal of fluorescent dissolved organic matter in biologically treated textile effluents by NDMP anion exchange process: efficiency and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Tao; Xu, Zi-Xiao; Shuang, Chen-Dong; Zhou, Qing; Li, Hai-Bo; Li, Ai-Min

    2016-03-01

    The efficiency and mechanism of anion exchange resin Nanda Magnetic Polymer (NDMP) for removal of fluorescent dissolved organic matter in biologically treated textile effluents were studied. The bench-scale experiments showed that as well as activated carbon, anion exchange resin could efficiently remove both aniline-like and humic-like fluorescent components, which can be up to 40 % of dissolved organic matter. The humic-like fluorescent component HS-Em460-Ex3 was more hydrophilic than HS-Em430-Ex2 and contained fewer alkyl chains but more acid groups. As a result, HS-Em460-Ex3 was eliminated more preferentially by NDMP anion exchange. However, compared with adsorption resins, the polarity of fluorescent components had a relatively small effect on the performance of anion exchange resin. The long-term pilot-scale experiments showed that the NDMP anion exchange process could remove approximately 30 % of the chemical oxygen demand and about 90 % of color from the biologically treated textile effluents. Once the issue of waste brine from resin desorption is solved, the NDMP anion exchange process could be a promising alternative for the advanced treatment of textile effluents. PMID:26578375

  7. [Cation exchanges during the process of Cd(2+) absorption by Alfalfa in aqueous solutions].

    PubMed

    Li, Yue-Peng; Yin, Hua; Ye, Jin-Shao; Peng, Hua; Qin, Hua-Ming; Long, Yan; He, Bao-Yan; Zhang, Na; Tong, Yao; Peng, Su-Fen

    2011-11-01

    A hydroponic experiment was conducted to investigate the cation exchanges during the process of Cd2+ absorption by Alfalfa in aqueous solution. The absorption efficiency of Alfalfa plants with 0-10 mg x L(-1) Cd2+ treatments, changes of Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+ and NH4(+) concentration, and the variation of pH values at different absorption time (0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24 and 72 h) were studied separately. The multiple linear regressions between Cd2+ absorption and cation variation were analyzed. The results indicated that when Cd2+ concentrations were 0.1, 1, 5, 10 mg x L(-1), the absorption efficiencies of Cd2+ by Alfalfa after 72 h were 85.86%, 52.14%, 15.97% and 7.81%. Cation exchange was involved in the removal of Cd2+ by Alfalfa in aqueous solution. Except for NH4(+), the concentrations of cationic metals Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+ in aqueous solution increased over time, which increased 11.30% - 61.72%, 21.44% - 98.73%, 24.09% - 8.90% and 37.04% - 191.96%, respectively. Kinetic studies illuminated that the release of Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+ by Alfalfa in Cd2+ solution with initial concentrations of 0, 0. 1, 1, 5, 10 mg x L(-1) best fitted pseudo-second-order equation,while the NH4(+) release fitted this model when Cd2+ concentrations were 1, 5, 10 mg x L(-1). The gradual decrease of pH during adsorption of Cd2+ by Alfalfa was observed. As the competition ion of Cd2+, H+ might affect the capacity of Alfalfa root system to absorb Cd2+. The ternary linear equation results demonstrated that the content of Cd2+ absorption by Alfalfa strongly related with the release of Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+. And this exchange mainly occurred among Cd2+ and divalent cations. PMID:22295633

  8. Increase of ionic conductivity in the microporous lithosilicate RUB-29 by Na-ion exchange processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.-H.; Senyshyn, A.; Paulmann, C.

    2007-12-01

    The ionic conductivity in the zeolite-like lithosilicate RUB-29 (Cs 14Li 24[Li 18Si 72O 172]·14H 2O [S.-H. Park, J.B. Parise, H. Gies, H. Liu, C.P. Grey, B.H. Toby, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 122 (2000) 11023-11024]) increases via simple ion-exchange processes, in particular when Na cations replace a part of Cs + and Li + of the material. The resulting ionic conductivity value of 3.2×10 -3 S cm -1 at 885 K is about two orders higher than that for the original material [S.-H. Park, J.B. Parise, M.E. Franke, T. Seydel, C. Paulmann, Micropor. Mesopor. Mater., in print ( doi:10.1016/j.micromeso.2007.03.040 available online since April 19, 2007)]. The structural basis of a Na +-exchanged RUB-29 sample (Na-RUB-29) at 673 K could be elucidated by means of neutron powder diffraction. Rietveld refinements confirmed the replacement of Na + for both parts of Cs and Li cations, agreeing with idealized cell content, Na 8Cs 8Li 40Si 72O 172. As a result of the incorporation of Na + in large pores, the number of Li + vacancies in dense Li 2O-layers of the structure could increase. This can be one of the main reasons for the improved conductivity in Na-RUB-29. In addition, mobile Na cations may also contribute to the conductivity in Na-RUB-29 as continuous scattering length densities were found around the sites for Na in difference Fourier map.

  9. A novel process for key exchange avoiding man-inmiddle attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Barun; Basuli, Krishnendu

    2012-09-01

    For the security porpoise in the internet cryptography is one of the most important subjects nowadays. Designing a cypher for data exchange between two nodes or receiver and sender deals with one of the troubleshoot jobs. In our proposed algorithm we try to introduce a new technique in the field of cryptography. We are hopeful that this new technique will sure reduces the overhead of data or key exchange between nodes. Here we will discuss the symmetric key exchange between nodes

  10. Shelf Edge Exchange Processes, II: SEEP2-08, R/V ENDEAVOR cruise 188

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.; Behrens, W.J.; Flagg, C.N.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Wilke, R.J.; Wyman, K.D.

    1989-12-01

    The Shelf Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP) program sponsored by the United States Department of Energy is a multi-institutional effort designed to investigate the flux of suspended material from the continental shelf to the waters of the upper slope, and then possibly into the slope sediments. Phase I of SEEP consisted of a series of nine cruises and a mooring array across the outer continental shelf of New England during 1983--1984 (Behrens and Flagg, 1986). Phase II focused specifically on the shelf/slope frontal region of the mid-Atlantic bight off the Delmarva Peninsula. This project consisted of a series of ten cruises, a mooring array, and a series of over-flights by NASA aircraft. Hydrographic data were collected on eight of the cruises, six of which were primarily mooring deployment or recovery cruises. The cruises were consecutively designated SEEP2-01 to SEEP2-10. Two cruises (SEEP2-04 and SEEP2-07) were dedicated to investigating benthic processes and hydrographic data were not collected.

  11. TRENTA Facility for Trade-Off Studies Between Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange and Cryogenic Distillation Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Cristescu, I.; Cristescu, I.R.; Doerr, L.; Glugla, M.; Hellriegel, G.; Schaefer, P.; Welte, S.; Kveton, O.; Murdoch, D

    2005-07-15

    One of the most used methods for tritium recovery from different sources of tritiated water is based on the combination between Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange (CECE) and Cryogenic Distillation (CD) processes. The development, i.e. configuration, design and performance testing of critical components, of a tritium recovery system based on the combination CECE-CD is essential for both JET and ITER. For JET, a Water Detritiation System (WDS) is not only needed to process tritiated water which has already been accumulated from operation, but also for the tritiated water which will be generated during decommissioning. For ITER, the WDS is one of the key systems to control the tritium content in the effluents streams, to recover as much tritium as possible and consequently to minimize the impact on the environment. A cryogenic distillation facility with the aim to investigate the trade-off between CECE-CD, to validate different components and mathematical modelling software is current under development at Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK) as an extension of the existing CECE facility.

  12. Novel simple process for tocopherols selective recovery from vegetable oils by adsorption and desorption with an anion-exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Hiromori, Kousuke; Shibasaki-Kitakawa, Naomi; Nakashima, Kazunori; Yonemoto, Toshikuni

    2016-03-01

    A novel and simple low-temperature process was used to recover tocopherols from a deodorizer distillate, which is a by-product of edible oil refining. The process consists of three operations: the esterification of free fatty acids with a cation-exchange resin catalyst, the adsorption of tocopherols onto an anion-exchange resin, and tocopherol desorption from the resin. No degradation of tocopherols occurred during these processes. In the tocopherol-rich fraction, no impurities such as sterols or glycerides were present. These impurities are commonly found in the product of the conventional process. This novel process improves the overall recovery ratio and the mass fraction of the product (75.9% and 51.0wt%) compared with those in the conventional process (50% and 35wt%). PMID:26471519

  13. River temperature processes under contrasting riparian land cover: linking microclimate, heat exchange and water thermal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannah, D. M.; Kantola, K.; Malcolm, I.

    2012-12-01

    River temperature influences strongly growth and survival in salmonid fish, which are often the target of river management strategies. Temperature is controlled by transfers of heat and water to/ from the river system, with land and water management modifying exchanges and consequently thermal regime. In the UK, fisheries managers are promoting riparian forest planting as a climate change adaption measure to reduce water temperature extremes. However, scientific understanding lags behind management and policy needs. Specifically, there is an urgent requirement to determine planting strategies that maximise expected benefits of riparian forest in terms of reduction in maximum water temperature. Scientific knowledge is necessary to underpin conceptual and deterministic models to inform management. To address this research gap, this paper analyses high resolution (15 minute) hydrometeorological data collected over a calendar year in the western Scottish Highlands (Loch Ard) to understand the controls and processes determining river temperature dynamics under open moorland (control), semi-natural woodland and commercial forest. The research programme aims: (1) to characterise spatial and temporal variability in riparian microclimate and stream water temperature regime across forest treatments; (2) to identify the hydrological, climatological and site-specific factors affecting stream temperature; (3) to estimate the energy balance at sites representative of each forest treatment and, thus, yield physical process understanding about dominant heat exchanges driving thermal variability; and (4) to use 1-3 to predict stream temperature sensitivity under different forestry and hydroclimatological scenarios. Results indicated that inter-treatment differences in mean and maximum daily water column temperature were ordered open > semi-natural > commercial during summer, but semi-natural > commercial > open during winter. Minimum water temperature was ordered commercial > semi

  14. Design of a Carousel Process for Removing Cesium from SRS Waste Using Crystalline Silicotitanate Ion Exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    1999-01-15

    Designs of a three-column carousel process based on crystalline silicotitanate (CST) ion exchanger have been developed for removing radioactive 137Cs+ from Savannah River Site's (SRS) nuclear wastes. A multicomponent ion exchange equilibrium model (Zheng et al., 1997) from Texas A&M University, which is based on batch data obtained from CST powder, is used to generate cesium loading data at different cesium concentrations for various types of SRS wastes. These loading data are fit to the Langmuir equation to obtain effective single-component cesium isotherm parameters. The predictions are in reasonable agreement with batch test data obtained from CST powder, an early CST pellet batch (38B), and a later batch (IE911) using two SRS waste simulants. The ratios between experimental cesium distribution coefficients and predicted values are between 0.56 and 1.0. The variation appears to be due to inadequate equilibration time in some of the batches. Mass transfer parameters are estimated by analyzing column data of a simulated SRS waste and Melton Valley Storage Tank W29 (MVST-W29) waste. The intraparticle diffusivity estimated for the two wastes can be well correlated by means of the Stokes-Einstein equation.Simulations are performed to determine the length of the mass transfer zone for given feed compositions, Cs+ concentrations, and linear velocities. In order to ensure high column utilization during both the transient and cyclic steady state periods, the length of a single segment in the carousel process is chosen to be the mass transfer zone length after the concentration wave achieves a constant pattern. Analysis of the dimensionless groups in the differential mass balance equations reveals that the normalized mass transfer zone length is linearly proportional to the particle Peclet number. The proportionality constant is a function of the waste composition and the Cs+ concentration in the waste. The higher the effective Cs+ capacity and the higher the Cs

  15. 45 CFR 155.150 - Transition process for existing State health insurance exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS EXCHANGE ESTABLISHMENT STANDARDS AND OTHER RELATED STANDARDS UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT General Standards Related to the Establishment of an Exchange § 155.150... the Affordable Care Act, according to the Congressional Budget Office estimates for projected...

  16. 45 CFR 155.150 - Transition process for existing State health insurance exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS EXCHANGE ESTABLISHMENT STANDARDS AND OTHER RELATED STANDARDS UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT General Standards Related to the Establishment of an Exchange § 155.150... the Affordable Care Act, according to the Congressional Budget Office estimates for projected...

  17. 45 CFR 155.150 - Transition process for existing State health insurance exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS EXCHANGE ESTABLISHMENT STANDARDS AND OTHER RELATED STANDARDS UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT General Standards Related to the Establishment of an Exchange § 155.150... the Affordable Care Act, according to the Congressional Budget Office estimates for projected...

  18. Transport properties of proton-exchange membranes: Effect of supercritical-fluid processing and chemical functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido Ayazo

    NafionRTM membranes commonly used in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC), are tipically limited by high methanol permeability (also known as the cross-over limitation). These membranes have phase segregated sulfonated ionic domains in a perfluorinated backbone, which makes processing challenging and limited by phase equilibria considerations. This study used supercritical fluids (SCFs) as a processing alternative, since the gas-like mass transport properties of SCFs allow a better penetration into the membranes and the use of polar co-solvents influenced their morphology, fine-tuning the physical and transport properties in the membrane. Measurements of methanol permeability and proton conductivity were performed to the NafionRTM membranes processed with SCFs at 40ºC and 200 bar and the co-solvents as: acetone, tetrahydrofuran (THF), isopropyl alcohol, HPLC-grade water, acetic acid, cyclohexanone. The results obtained for the permeability data were of the order of 10 -8-10-9 cm2/s, two orders of magnitude lower than unprocessed Nafion. Proton conductivity results obtained using AC impedance electrochemical spectroscopy was between 0.02 and 0.09 S/cm, very similar to the unprocessed Nafion. SCF processing with ethanol as co-solvent reduced the methanol permeability by two orders of magnitude, while the proton conductivity was only reduced by 4%. XRD analysis made to the treated samples exhibited a decreasing pattern in the crystallinity, which affects the transport properties of the membrane. Also, SAXS profiles of the Nafion membranes processed were obtained with the goal of determining changes produced by the SCF processing in the hydrophilic domains of the polymer. With the goal of searching for new alternatives in proton exchange membranes (PEMs) triblock copolymer of poly(styrene-isobutylene-styrene) (SIBS) and poly(styrene-isobutylene-styrene) SEBS were studied. These sulfonated tri-block copolymers had lower methanol permeabilities, but also lower proton

  19. Inter-annual variability of exchange processes at the outer Black Sea shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Georgy; Wobus, Fred; Yuan, Dongliang; Wang, Zheng

    2014-05-01

    The advection of cold water below the surface mixed layer has a significant role in shaping the properties of the Cold Intermediate Layer (CIL) in the Black Sea, and thus the horizontal redistribution of nutrients. The minimal temperature of the CIL in the southwest deep region of the sea in summer was shown to be lower than the winter surface temperature at the same location, indicating the horizontal advective nature of CIL formation in the area (Kolesnikov, 1953). In addition to advection in the deep area of the sea, the transport of cold waters from the northwest Black Sea shelf across the shelf break in winter was shown to contribute to the formation of the CIL (Filippov, 1968; Staneva and Stanev, 1997). However less is known of the exchanges between the CIL waters and the outer shelf areas in summer, when a surface mixed layer and the underlying seasonal thermocline are formed. Ivanov et al. (1997) suggested that the cross frontal exchange within the CIL is strongly inhibited, so that CIL waters formed in the deep sea (i.e. offshore of the Rim Current) do not replenish the CIL waters onshore of the Rim Current (also known as near-bottom shelf waters, or BSW), due to strong cross frontal gradients in potential vorticity (PV). To the contrary, Shapiro et al. (2011) analysed in-situ observations over the period of 1950-2001 and showed a high correlation between the CIL temperatures in the open sea and outer shelf. However, the statistical methods alone were not able to clearly establish the relation between the cause and the consequences. In this study we use a 3D numerical model of the Black Sea (NEMO-SHELF-BLS) to quantify the exchange of CIL waters between the open sea and the outer northwest Black Sea shelf and to assess its significance for the replenishment of BSW on the outer shelf. The model has a resolution of 1/16º latitude × 1/12º longitude and 33 levels in the vertical. In order to represent near-bottom processes better, the model uses a hybrid

  20. RHEOLOGY OF SETTLED SOLIDS IN THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, C.; Prior, M.; Koopman, D.; Edwards, T.

    2011-06-20

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank as process housing. This method includes the addition of monosodium titanate (MST) to a waste tank containing salt solution and entrained sludge solids, followed by tank mixing and filtration. The filtrate is then processed through in-tank ion exchange columns containing crystalline silicotitanate (CST) media. While the process is operating, it is known that solid particles begin to settle in the tank and temperatures may reach beyond 45 C. Previous testing has shown that sludge-MST slurries that sit for extended periods at elevated temperatures can develop large shear strengths, making them difficult to resuspend and remove from the tank. The authors conducted rheological testing of mixtures containing various concentrations of sludge simulant, MST, and CST (three preparations) that were aged at different times (i.e., 0 to 13 weeks) and isothermally maintained to 30, 45, or 60 C. Two types of grinding methodologies were employed to prepare CST for this testing, herein called Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) ground materials. Unground CST particles were also tested. A small number of samples were irradiated prior to 4 week settling and 60 C temperature treatment, with exposures ranging from 0 to 100 MRad. Additional tests are also being conducted that will allow the solid particles to settle at 45 C for 6, 12, and 24 months. The objectives of this task are to determine the impact of feed composition, settling time, and temperature on the shear strength, yield stress, and consistency of the slurries and to determine the impact of radiation on slurry rheology. The testing will determine the relative impact of these parameters rather than predict the shear strength, yield stress, and consistency as a function of feed and operating conditions. This

  1. On charge exchange and knock-on processes in the exosphere of Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ip, W.-H.

    1982-01-01

    One direct consequence of magnetospheric interaction of Io is the strong dynamical coupling of its neutral atmosphere with the corotating plasma. The absorption of the thermal ions and the associated neutral injection is an improtant issue not yet explored. As far as nonthermal escape of the neutral atmosphere is concerned, three processes stand out. That is, apart from sputtering, exospheric interactions like atom-ion knock-on collision and charge exchange recombination could be a significant source of the neutral clouds in the Jovian system. Using a current electrodynamic model of Io, both the absorption rate of the corotating thermal plasma and the production rates of new exospheric ions and the fast neutrals are considered. It is found that the source strength of the neutral atoms and molecules with speeds of about 100 km/sec could amount to 10 to the 26th/sec whereas exospheric neutrals emitted at lower speed (of about 10 km/sec) amounts to 4 x 10 to the 25th/sec. The generation of the new ions in connection with the streaming of the magnetospheric plasma around Io could also produce an asymmetric sputtering with a neutral flux of about 10 to the 27th/sec emitted from the region of Io which faces Jupiter. These results may be related to a number of sodium observations.

  2. Modeling coupled thermal-mechanical processes of frozen soil induced by borehole heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.

    2015-12-01

    To utilize the shallow geothermal energy, heat pumps are often coupled with Borehole Heat Exchangers (BHE) to provide heating and cooling for buildings. In cold regions, soil freezing around the BHE is a potential problem which will dramatically influence the underground soil temperature distribution, subsequently the inlet and outlet refrigerant temperature of the BHE, and finally the efficiency of the heat pump. In this study, a numerical model has been developed to simulate the coupled temperature evolution both inside the BHE, and the propagating freezing front in the surrounding soil. The coupled model was validated against analytical solutions and experimental data. The influence of the freezing process on the overall system performance is investigated by comparing one long BHE configuration without freezing and another short one with latent heat from the frozen groundwater. It is found that when freezing happens, the coefficient of performance (COP) of the heat pump will decrease by around 0.5, leading to more electricity consumption. Furthermore, analysis of the simulation result reveals that the exploitation of latent heat through groundwater freezing is only economically attractive if electricity price is low and interest rate high, and it is not the case is most European countries.

  3. Reaction Engineering International and Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff exchange: Addressing computational fluid dynamics needs of the chemical process industry

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, J.A.

    1995-07-01

    Staff exchanges, such as the one described in this report, are intended to facilitate communications and collaboration among scientists and engineers at Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories, in US industry, and academia. Funding support for these exchanges is provided by the DOE, Office of Energy Research, Laboratory Technology Transfer Program. Funding levels for each exchange typically range from $20,000 to $40,000. The exchanges offer the opportunity for the laboratories to transfer technology and expertise to industry, gain a perspective to industry`s problems, and develop the basis for further cooperative efforts through Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAS) or other mechanisms. Information in this report on the staff exchange of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff with Reaction Engineering International (REI) includes the significant accomplishments, significant problems, industry benefits realized, recommended follow-on work and potential benefit of that work. The objectives of this project were as follows: Work with REI to develop an understanding of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) needs of the chemical process industry; assess the combined capabilities of the PNL and REI software analysis tools to address these needs; and establish a strategy for a future programmatically funded, joint effort to develop a new CFD tool for the chemical process industry.

  4. Aquatic flower-inspired cell culture platform with simplified medium exchange process for facilitating cell-surface interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyeonjun; Park, Sung Jea; Han, Seon Jin; Lim, Jiwon; Kim, Dong Sung

    2016-02-01

    Establishing fundamentals for regulating cell behavior with engineered physical environments, such as topography and stiffness, requires a large number of cell culture experiments. However, cell culture experiments in cell-surface interaction studies are generally labor-intensive and time-consuming due to many experimental tasks, such as multiple fabrication processes in sample preparation and repetitive medium exchange in cell culture. In this work, a novel aquatic flower-inspired cell culture platform (AFIP) is presented. AFIP aims to facilitate the experiments on the cell-surface interaction studies, especially the medium exchange process. AFIP was devised to capture and dispense cell culture medium based on interactions between an elastic polymer substrate and a liquid medium. Thus, the medium exchange can be performed easily and without the need of other instruments, such as a vacuum suction and pipette. An appropriate design window of AFIP, based on scaling analysis, was identified to provide a criterion for achieving stability in medium exchange as well as various surface characteristics of the petal substrates. The developed AFIP, with physically engineered petal substrates, was also verified to exchange medium reliably and repeatedly. A closed structure capturing the medium was sustained stably during cell culture experiments. NIH3T3 proliferation results also demonstrated that AFIP can be applied to the cell-surface interaction studies as an alternative to the conventional method. PMID:26683462

  5. Comparison of platinum/MWCNTs Nanocatalysts Synthesis Processes for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuan

    Due to the growing concerns on the depletion of petroleum based energy resources and climate change; fuel cell technologies have received much attention in recent years. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFCs) features high energy conversion efficiency and nearly zero greenhouse gas emissions, because of its combination of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) at anode side and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at cathode side. Synthesis of Pt nanoparticles supported on multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) possess a highly durable electrochemical surface area (ESA) and show good power output on proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell performance. Platinum on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) support were synthesized by two different processes to transfer PtCl62- from aqueous to organic phase. While the first method of Pt/MWCNTs synthesis involved dodecane thiol (DDT) and octadecane thiol (ODT) as anchoring agent, the second method used ammonium lauryl sulfate (ALS) as the dispersion/anchoring agent. The particle size and distribution of platinum were examined by high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The TEM images showed homogenous distribution and uniform particle size of platinum deposited on the surface of MWCNTs. The single cell fuel cell performance of the Pt/MWCNTs synthesized thiols and ALS based electrode containing 0.2 (anode) and 0.4 mg (cathode) Pt.cm-2 were evaluated using Nafion-212 electrolyte with H2 and O2 gases at 80 °C and ambient pressure. The catalyst synthesis with ALS is relatively simple compared to that with thiols and also showed higher performance (power density reaches about 1070 mW.cm -2). The Electrodes with Pt/MWCNTs nanocatalysts synthesized using ALS were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) for durability evaluation using humidified H2 and N2 gases at room temperature (21 °C) along with commercial Pt/C for comparison. The ESA measured by cyclic voltammetry between 0.15 and 1.2 V showed significant

  6. The Intercultural and Non-Formal Learning Processes of Children in Primary School Exchange Programmes in France and Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melin, Valérie; Wagner, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    This paper is based on educational anthropology, and presents the initial findings of a three-year international comparative study of primary school children's learning-processes during travel and cross-cultural encounters. A French-German research team investigated and here reports on primary school exchange programmes. Open coding of the…

  7. Soy protein recovery in a solvent-free process using continuous liquid-solid circulating fluidized bed ion exchanger.

    PubMed

    Prince, Andrew; Bassi, Amarjeet S; Haas, Christine; Zhu, Jesse X; Dawe, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Soy protein concentrates and soy protein isolates act as ingredients in bakery, meat and dairy products, baby formulas, starting materials for spun textured vegetable products, and other nutritional supplements. In this study, the effectiveness of a liquid-solid circulating fluidized bed (LSCFB) ion exchanger is demonstrated for the recovery of soluble soy proteins from full fat and defatted soy flour. Under steady-state operating conditions, about 50% of the proteins could be recovered from the feed streams entering the ion exchanger. The LSCFB was shown to be a promising system for the recovery of soy protein from both defatted and full fat soy flour solutions. As the ion exchange process captures dissolved proteins, the system may offer a less damaging form of processing compared with the acid precipitation process where soy protein aggregates form and functionality is affected. In addition, the LSCFB allows simultaneous adsorption and desorption of the proteins allowing for a continuous operation. No prefiltration of feed containing suspended particles is required as well, because fluidization is used in place of packed bed technology to improve on current ion exchange processes. PMID:22002948

  8. SCALING SOLID RESUSPENSION AND SORPTION FOR THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESSING TANK

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Qureshi, Z.

    2010-12-14

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing 1.3 million gallon waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for suspending and resuspending Monosodium Titanate (MST), Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST), and simulated sludge. In addition, SRNL will also be conducting pilot-scale tests to determine the mixing requirements for the strontium and actinide sorption. As part of this task, the results from the pilot-scale tests must be scaled up to a full-scale waste tank. This document describes the scaling approach. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scale model of Tank 41H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 41H. The pump locations correspond to the proposed locations in Tank 41H by the SCIX Program (Risers B5 and B2 for two pump configurations and Risers B5, B3, and B1 for three pump configurations). MST additions are through Riser E1, the proposed MST addition riser in Tank 41H. To determine the approach to scaling the results from the pilot-scale tank to Tank 41H, the authors took the following approach. They reviewed the technical literature for methods to scale mixing with jets and suspension of solid particles with jets, and the technical literature on mass transfer from a liquid to a solid particle to develop approaches to scaling the test data. SRNL assembled a team of internal experts to review the scaling approach and to identify alternative approaches that should be considered.

  9. F- and H-Area Seepage Basins Water Treatment System Process Optimization and Alternative Chemistry Ion Exchange/Sorbent Material Screening Clearwell Overflow Study

    SciTech Connect

    Serkiz, S.M.

    2000-08-30

    This study investigated alternative ion exchange/sorbent materials and polishing chemistries designed to remove specific radionuclides not removed during the neutralization/precipitation/clarification process.

  10. What can be Learned from X-ray Spectroscopy Concerning Hot Gas in Local Bubble and Charge Exchange Processes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, Steve

    2007-01-01

    What can be learned from x-ray spectroscopy in observing hot gas in local bubble and charge exchange processes depends on spectral resolution, instrumental grasp, instrumental energy band, signal-to-nose, field of view, angular resolution and observatory location. Early attempts at x-ray spectroscopy include ROSAT; more recently, astronomers have used diffuse x-ray spectrometers, XMM Newton, sounding rocket calorimeters, and Suzaku. Future observations are expected with calorimeters on the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma mission, and the Solar Wind Charge Exchange (SWCX). The Geospheric SWCX may provide remote sensing of the solar wind and magnetosheath and remote observations of solar CMEs moving outward from the sun.

  11. Processes of ammonia air-surface exchange in a fertilized Zea mays canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, J. T.; Jones, M. R.; Bash, J. O.; Myles, L.; Meyers, T.; Schwede, D.; Herrick, J.; Nemitz, E.; Robarge, W.

    2013-02-01

    Recent incorporation of coupled soil biogeochemical and bi-directional NH3 air-surface exchange algorithms into regional air quality models holds promise for further reducing uncertainty in estimates of NH3 emissions from fertilized soils. While this represents a significant advancement over previous approaches, the evaluation and improvement of such modeling systems for fertilized crops requires process-level field measurements over extended periods of time that capture the range of soil, vegetation, and atmospheric conditions that drive short-term (i.e., post-fertilization) and total growing season NH3 fluxes. This study examines the processes of NH3 air-surface exchange in a fertilized corn (Zea mays) canopy over the majority of a growing season to characterize soil emissions after fertilization and investigate soil-canopy interactions. Micrometeorological flux measurements above the canopy, measurements of soil, leaf apoplast and dew/guttation chemistry, and a combination of in-canopy measurements, inverse source/sink, and resistance modeling were employed. Over a period of approximately 10 weeks following fertilization, daily mean and median net canopy-scale fluxes yielded cumulative total N losses of 8.4% and 6.1%, respectively, of the 134 kg N ha-1 surface applied to the soil as urea ammonium nitrate (UAN). During the first month after fertilization, daily mean emission fluxes were positively correlated with soil temperature and soil volumetric water. Diurnally, maximum hourly average fluxes of ≈ 700 ng N m-2 s-1 occurred near mid-day, coincident with the daily maximum in friction velocity. Net emission was still observed 5 to 10 weeks after fertilization, although mid-day peak fluxes had declined to ≈ 125 ng N m-2 s-1. A key finding of the surface chemistry measurements was the observation of high pH (7.0-8.5) in leaf dew/guttation, which reduced the ability of the canopy to recapture soil emissions during wet periods. In-canopy measurements near peak

  12. Processes of ammonia air-surface exchange in a fertilized Zea mays canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, J. T.; Jones, M. R.; Bash, J. O.; Myles, L.; Meyers, T.; Schwede, D.; Herrick, J.; Nemitz, E.; Robarge, W.

    2012-06-01

    Recent incorporation of coupled soil biogeochemical and bi-directional NH3 air-surface exchange algorithms into regional air quality models holds promise for further reducing uncertainty in estimates of NH3 emissions from fertilized soils. While this represents a significant advancement over previous approaches, the evaluation and improvement of such modeling systems for fertilized crops requires process level field measurements over extended periods of time that capture the range of soil, vegetation, and atmospheric conditions that drive short term (i.e., post fertilization) and total growing seasonNH3 fluxes. This study examines the processes of NH3 air-surface exchange in a fertilized corn (Zea mays) canopy over the majority of a growing season to characterize soil emissions after fertilization and investigate soil-canopy interactions. Micrometeorological flux measurements above the canopy, measurements of soil, leaf apoplast and dew/guttation chemistry, and a combination of in-canopy measurements, inverse source/sink, and resistance modeling were employed. Over a period of approximately 10 weeks following fertilization, daily mean and median net canopy-scale fluxes yielded cumulative total N losses of 8.4% and 6.1%, respectively, of the 134 kg N ha-1 surface applied to the soil as urea ammonium nitrate (UAN). During the first month after fertilization, daily mean emission fluxes were positively correlated with soil temperature and soil volumetric water. Diurnally, maximum hourly average fluxes of ≈700 ng N m-2 s-1 occurred near mid-day, coincident with the daily maximum in friction velocity. Net emission was still observed 5 to 10 weeks after fertilization, although mid-day peak fluxes had declined to ≈125 ng N m-2 s-1 A key finding of the surface chemistry measurements was the observation of high pH (7.0 - 8.5) in leaf dew/guttation, which reduced the ability of the canopy to recapture soil emissions during wet periods. In-canopy measurements near peak LAI

  13. MODELING AN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR CESIUM REMOVAL FROM ALKALINE RADIOACTIVE WASTE SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F; Luther Hamm, L; Sebastian Aleman, S; Johnston Michael, J

    2008-08-26

    The performance of spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde ion-exchange resin for the removal of cesium from alkaline radioactive waste solutions has been investigated through computer modeling. Cesium adsorption isotherms were obtained by fitting experimental data using a thermodynamic framework. Results show that ion-exchange is an efficient method for cesium removal from highly alkaline radioactive waste solutions. On average, two 1300 liter columns operating in series are able to treat 690,000 liters of waste with an initial cesium concentration of 0.09 mM in 11 days achieving a decontamination factor of over 50,000. The study also tested the sensitivity of ion-exchange column performance to variations in flow rate, temperature and column dimensions. Modeling results can be used to optimize design of the ion exchange system.

  14. Removal of uranium, arsenic, and nitrate by continuously regenerated ion exchange process

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, D.; Awad, J.; Panahi, Z.

    1996-11-01

    Groundwater is the major source of water supply for the City of Riverside (the City). Groundwater from some of the local wells contains high levels of uranium, arsenic, and nitrate. The City is evaluating treatment technologies that can remove these contaminants, in order to be prepared to select appropriate treatment technologies when groundwater treatment is required. Treatment technologies identified by the USEPA as best available technology (BAT) for uranium and arsenic removal are coagulation/filtration, lime softening, ion exchange, and reverse osmosis. Among these technologies, ion exchange is the most cost-effective and suitable for wellhead treatment applications. Ion exchange is also effective for nitrate removal. An ion exchange pilot study was conducted for the removal of uranium, arsenic and nitrate from groundwater. This paper presents a summary of the tests results, conceptual design criteria, and preliminary cost estimate for a full-scale facility.

  15. Microchannel heat exchanger for two-phase Mixed Refrigerant Joule Thomson process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Seungwhan; Lee, Jisung; Lee, Cheonkyu; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2014-01-01

    Mixed Refrigerant Joule Thomson (MR-JT) refrigerators are widely used in various kinds of cryogenic systems these days. Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger (PCHE) is one of the promising cryogenic compact recuperators for MR-JT refrigerators due to its compactness, high NTU and robustness. However, PCHE composed with microchannel bundles can cause flow mal-distribution, and it can cause the degradation of thermal performance of the system. To mitigate the flow mal-distribution problem, the cross link (or intra-layer bypass) can be adapted to parallel microchannels. Two heat exchangers are fabricated in this study; one has straight channels, and the other one has intra-layer bypass structure between channels to enhance the flow distribution. The MR-JT refrigerators are operated with these two heat exchanger and the no-load temperatures are compared. The lower no load temperature achieved with the intra-layer bypass structured heat exchanger. The results indicate that the flow mal-distribution in the microchannel heat exchanger can be mitigated with intra-layer bypass structure, and relaxation of flow mal-distribution in the heat exchanger guarantee the MR-JT refrigerator's performance.

  16. Mechanistic modeling of ion-exchange process chromatography of charge variants of monoclonal antibody products.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijesh; Leweke, Samuel; von Lieres, Eric; Rathore, Anurag S

    2015-12-24

    Ion-exchange chromatography (IEX) is universally accepted as the optimal method for achieving process scale separation of charge variants of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutic. These variants are closely related to the product and a baseline separation is rarely achieved. The general practice is to fractionate the eluate from the IEX column, analyze the fractions and then pool the desired fractions to obtain the targeted composition of variants. This is, however, a very cumbersome and time consuming exercise. A mechanistic model that is capable of simulating the peak profile will be a much more elegant and effective way to make a decision on the pooling strategy. This paper proposes a mechanistic model, based on the general rate model, to predict elution peak profile for separation of the main product from its variants. The proposed approach uses inverse fit of process scale chromatogram for estimation of model parameters using the initial values that are obtained from theoretical correlations. The packed bed column has been modeled along with the chromatographic system consisting of the mixer, tubing and detectors as a series of dispersed plug flow and continuous stirred tank reactors. The model uses loading ranges starting at 25% to a maximum of 70% of the loading capacity and hence is applicable to process scale separations. Langmuir model has been extended to include the effects of salt concentration and temperature on the model parameters. The extended Langmuir model that has been proposed uses one less parameter than the SMA model and this results in a significant ease of estimating the model parameters from inverse fitting. The proposed model has been validated with experimental data and has been shown to successfully predict peak profile for a range of load capacities (15-28mg/mL), gradient lengths (10-30CV), bed heights (6-20cm), and for three different resins with good accuracy (as measured by estimation of residuals). The model has been also

  17. Inter-annual variability of exchange processes at the outer Black Sea shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Georgy; Wobus, Fred; Yuan, Dongliang; Wang, Zheng

    2014-05-01

    The advection of cold water below the surface mixed layer has a significant role in shaping the properties of the Cold Intermediate Layer (CIL) in the Black Sea, and thus the horizontal redistribution of nutrients. The minimal temperature of the CIL in the southwest deep region of the sea in summer was shown to be lower than the winter surface temperature at the same location, indicating the horizontal advective nature of CIL formation in the area (Kolesnikov, 1953). In addition to advection in the deep area of the sea, the transport of cold waters from the northwest Black Sea shelf across the shelf break in winter was shown to contribute to the formation of the CIL (Filippov, 1968; Staneva and Stanev, 1997). However less is known of the exchanges between the CIL waters and the outer shelf areas in summer, when a surface mixed layer and the underlying seasonal thermocline are formed. Ivanov et al. (1997) suggested that the cross frontal exchange within the CIL is strongly inhibited, so that CIL waters formed in the deep sea (i.e. offshore of the Rim Current) do not replenish the CIL waters onshore of the Rim Current (also known as near-bottom shelf waters, or BSW), due to strong cross frontal gradients in potential vorticity (PV). To the contrary, Shapiro et al. (2011) analysed in-situ observations over the period of 1950-2001 and showed a high correlation between the CIL temperatures in the open sea and outer shelf. However, the statistical methods alone were not able to clearly establish the relation between the cause and the consequences. In this study we use a 3D numerical model of the Black Sea (NEMO-SHELF-BLS) to quantify the exchange of CIL waters between the open sea and the outer northwest Black Sea shelf and to assess its significance for the replenishment of BSW on the outer shelf. The model has a resolution of 1/16º latitude × 1/12º longitude and 33 levels in the vertical. In order to represent near-bottom processes better, the model uses a hybrid

  18. PILOT SCALE TESTING OF MONOSODIUM TITANATE MIXING FOR THE SRS SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS - 11224

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Restivo, M.; Williams, M.; Herman, D.; Steeper, T.

    2011-01-25

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and select actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for suspending monosodium titanate (MST), crystalline silicotitanate (CST), and simulated sludge. The purpose of this pilot scale testing is to determine the requirements for the pumps to suspend the MST particles so that they can contact the strontium and actinides in the liquid and be removed from the tank. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scaled model of SRS Tank 41H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 41H. The pump locations correspond to the proposed locations in Tank 41H by the SCIX program (Risers B5 and B2 for two pump configurations and Risers B5, B3, and B1 for three pump configurations). The conclusions from this work follow: (i) Neither two standard slurry pumps nor two quad volute slurry pumps will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. (ii) Two Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs) will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. However, the testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is close to the maximum discharge velocity of the pump (within 12%). (iii) Three SMPs will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 66% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. (iv) Three SMPs are needed to resuspend MST that has settled in a waste tank at nominal 45 C for four weeks. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 77% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. Two SMPs are not sufficient to resuspend MST that settled under these

  19. A numerical investigation of coherent structures and mass exchange processes in channel flow with two lateral submerged groynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Andrew; Constantinescu, George; Weber, Larry

    2007-05-01

    Large eddy simulation is used to investigate the dynamics of the main coherent structures present in the flow around two vertical submerged groynes situated in a long flatbed open channel. The mass exchange processes between the embayment region and the main channel are investigated by studying the ejection of a contaminant introduced instantaneously inside the embayment. The instantaneous and mean structure of the horseshoe vortex system forming at the base of the upstream groyne and the bed shear distributions that determine the evolution of the scour in the groyne region are investigated. It is found that the amplification of the bed shear stress in the accelerating region around the tip of the upstream groyne is around one order of magnitude larger relative to the mean bed shear stress in the incoming flow. Analysis of the instantaneous flow fields shows that the eddies that are shed inside the horizontal and vertical detached shear layers play an important role in controlling the mass exchange at the lateral and roof interfaces. It is found that most of the pollutant leaves the embayment through the roof and bottom lateral sections. The overall mass exchange process is qualitatively different and substantially accelerated compared to the case when the groynes are emerged. However, it is shown that similar to the emerged case, the decay of the mass of contaminant within the embayment cannot be characterized by a unique value of the exchange coefficient used in simple dead zone theory models.

  20. Ontology-Based Exchange and Immediate Application of Business Calculation Definitions for Online Analytical Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehlenbeck, Matthias; Breitner, Michael H.

    Business users define calculated facts based on the dimensions and facts contained in a data warehouse. These business calculation definitions contain necessary knowledge regarding quantitative relations for deep analyses and for the production of meaningful reports. The business calculation definitions are implementation and widely organization independent. But no automated procedures facilitating their exchange across organization and implementation boundaries exist. Separately each organization currently has to map its own business calculations to analysis and reporting tools. This paper presents an innovative approach based on standard Semantic Web technologies. This approach facilitates the exchange of business calculation definitions and allows for their automatic linking to specific data warehouses through semantic reasoning. A novel standard proxy server which enables the immediate application of exchanged definitions is introduced. Benefits of the approach are shown in a comprehensive case study.

  1. ELECTROLYSIS AND ION EXCHANGE FOR THE IN PROCESS RECYCLING OF COPPER FROM SEMI-CONDUCTOR PROCESSING SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of the study are to develop an understanding of the electrodeposition of copper onto extended-area electrodes, and of the adsorption/desorption of copper onto ion exchange resins with a high affinity for copper. The principles elucidated in this work will pave the ...

  2. Circulation and exchange processes over the continental shelf and slope. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Csanady, G.T.

    1988-12-31

    The theme of the work during the past triennium has been the SEEP experiment, data interpretation and modeling related to the goals of the experiment, and was characterized by increasing cooperation with colleagues from other disciplines. The theoretical contributions dealt with shelf-slope interaction, the dynamics and climatology of currents over the continental slope, and the behavior of fate of organic particles. Observational papers discussed various exchange mechanisms at the shelf edge, with special attention to particle exchange, and the quiescence of currents over the mid continental slope which is presumably responsible for the accumulation of organic particles.

  3. Fractionation of sulphite spent liquor for biochemical processing using ion exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, D L A; Silva, C M; Xavier, A M R B; Evtuguin, D V

    2012-12-31

    Sulphite spent liquor (SSL) is a side product from acidic sulphite pulping of wood, which organic counterpart is composed mainly by lignosulphonates (LS) and sugars. The last are a prominent substrate for the bioprocessing although a previous purification step is necessary to eliminate microbial inhibitors. In this study a fractionation of hardwood SSL (HSSL) has been accomplished employing ion exchange resins in order to separate sugars fraction from concomitant inhibitors: LS, acetic acid, furan derivatives, phenolics, acetic acid and excess of inorganic salts. The fractionation of HSSL has been carried out using two fixed-bed ion exchangers in series (cationic+anionic). The first cation exchange column packed with Dowex 50WX2 resin was able to eliminate free cations and partially separate sugars from high molecular weight LS and furan derivatives. The second anion exchange column packed with Amberlite IRA-96 sorbed remaining LS, phenolics and acetic acid. Overall, the series arrangement under investigation has removed 99.99% of Mg(2+), 99.0% of Ca(2+), 99.6% of LS, and 100% of acetic acid, whereas the yield of recovered sugars was at least 72% of their total amount in HSSL. PMID:22465600

  4. Perspectives on an Induction Process for International Exchange Teachers: A Leadership Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siler, James Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This study traces the first year experiences of six international exchange teachers employed in three public and charter schools settings from three districts in two southeastern states. Interviews with these teachers from China, Germany and Colombia, and with their school and district leaders enabled me to produce a narrative of how international…

  5. Processes of Ammonia Air-Surface Exchange in a Fertilized Zea Mays Canopy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent incorporation of coupled soil biogeochemical and bi-directional NH3 air-surface exchange algorithms into regional air quality models holds promise for further reducing uncertainty in estimates of NH3 emissions from fertilized soils. While this advancement represents a sig...

  6. Continuous process of preparation of n-butyl(meth)acrylate by esterification of (meth)acrylic acid by butanol on thermostable sulfo-cation exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Zheleznaya, L.L.; Karakhanov, R.A.; Lunin, A.F.; Magadov, R.S.; Meshcheryakov, S.V.; Mkrtychan, V.R.; Fomin, V.A.

    1987-11-10

    The authors propose an effective thermostable sulfo-cation exchanger based on polymers with a system of conjugated bonds, sulfopolyphenylene ketone (SPP) differing from the known cation exchangers by the high thermostability (up to 250/sup 0/C), and also having the effect of the stabilization of the double bond in unsaturated monomers. The combination of inhibiting and cation exchange properties makes it also possible to use these sulfo-cation exchangers in the processes of esterification of (meth)acrylic acids by alcohols without addition of special inhibitors. The SPP catalyst was tested in esterification processes of acrylic an methacrylic acid by butanol at a pilot plant.

  7. An evaluation of a hybrid ion exchange electrodialysis process in the recovery of heavy metals from simulated dilute industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Akrama; Hoadley, Andrew F A

    2012-06-15

    Hybrid ion exchange electrodialysis, also called electrodeionization (IXED), is a technology in which a conventional ion exchange (IX) is combined with electrodialysis (ED) to intensify mass transfer and to increase the limiting current density and therefore to carry out the treatment process more effectively. It allows the purification of metal-containing waters, as well as the production of concentrated metal salt solutions, which could be recycled. The objective of this paper was to investigate the ability of the IXED technique for the treatment of acidified copper sulphate solutions simulating rinsing water of copper plating lines. A single-stage IXED process at lab-scale with a small bed of ion exchanger resin with a uniform composition was evaluated, and the treatment performance of the process was thoroughly investigated. The IXED stack was assembled as a bed layered with the ion exchanger resin (strong acid cation-exchange Dowex™) and inert materials. The stack configuration was designed to prevent a non-uniform distribution of the current in the bed and to allow faster establishment of steady-state in the cell for IXED operation. The influence of operating conditions (e.g. ion exchanger resin with a cross-linking degree from 2 to 8% DVB, and current density) on IXED performance was examined. A response surface methodology (RSM) was used to evaluate the effects of the processing parameters of IXED on (i) the abatement yield of the metal cation, which is a fundamental purification parameter and an excellent indicator of the extent of IXED, (ii) the current yield or the efficiency of copper transport induced by the electrical field and (iii) the energy consumption. The experimental results showed that the performance at steady-state of the IXED operation with a layered bed remained modest, because of the small dimension of the bed and notably the current efficiency varied from 25 to 47% depending on the conditions applied. The feasibility of using the IXED

  8. Safety research of multi-functional reprocessing process considering nonproliferation based on an ion-exchange method

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, Shin-ichi; Ozawa, Masaki |; Okada, Ken; Kurosawa, Kiyoko; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2007-07-01

    A simplified separation process was proposed based on an ion-exchange technique. A tertiary pyridine-type ion-exchange resin was used in this process to treat the mixed oxide fuel highly irradiated in the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO'. It was demonstrated that the process is a realistic candidate for future reprocessing using hydrochloric acid and a mixed eluent solution of nitric acid and methanol. In order to develop an engineering scale concept, it is indispensable to establish the conditions for safe operation, so two types of experiments were done to obtain fundamental aspects. The corrosion experiment for structural materials in hydrochloric acid at room temperature was done using tantalum, zirconium, niobium, hastelloy and SUS316L. Results showed that tantalum, zirconium, niobium, and hastelloy had good corrosion resistance to hydrochloric acid. The second experiment looked at the thermal hazards of pyridine-type ion-exchange resin and the methanol, or nitric acid eluent system from the viewpoints of fire and explosion safety. No hazardous reactions occurred between the resin and the eluent system. Above 150 deg. C, attention should be paid to the exothermic reactions for the dried resin. (authors)

  9. SPECIAL ANALYSIS FOR SLIT TRENCH DISPOSAL OF THE REACTOR PROCESS HEAT EXCHANGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, L.; Collard, L.; Aleman, S.; Gorensek, M.; Butcher, T.

    2012-06-18

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), in response to a request from Solid Waste Management (SWM), conducted a Special Analysis (SA) to evaluate the performance of nineteen heat exchangers that are to be disposed in the E-Area low level waste facility Slit Trench 9 (ST 9). Although these nineteen heat exchangers were never decontaminated, the majority of the radionuclides in the heat exchanger inventory list were determined to be acceptable for burial because they are less than the 'generic' waste form inventory limits given in the 2008 Performance Assessment (PA) (WSRC, 2008). However, as generic waste, the H-3 and C-14 inventories resulted in unacceptable sum-of-fractions (SOFs). Initial scoping analyses performed by SRNL indicated that if alterations were made to certain external nozzles to mitigate various potential leak paths, acceptable SOFs could be achieved through the use of a 'Special' waste form. This SA provides the technical basis for this new 'Special' waste form and provides the inventory limits for H-3 and C-14 for these nineteen heat exchangers such that the nineteen heat exchangers can be disposed in ST 9. This 'Special' waste form is limited to these nineteen heat exchangers in ST 9 and applies for H-3 and C-14, which are designated as H-3X and C-14X, respectively. The SA follows the same methodology used in the 2008 PA and the 2008 SA except for the modeling enhancements noted below. Infiltration rates above the heat exchangers are identical to those used in the 2008 PA; however, flow through the heat exchangers is unique. Because it is unknown exactly how sealed heat exchanger openings will perform and how surface and embedded contaminants will be released, multiple base cases or scenarios were established to investigate a set of performances. Each scenario consists of flow options (based on the performance of sealed openings) and a near-field release of contaminants (based on corrosion and diffusion performance). Two disposal

  10. The characteristic assessment of spent ion exchange resin from PUSPATI TRIGA REACTOR (RTP) for immobilization process

    SciTech Connect

    Wahida, Nurul; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Majid, Amran Ab; Irwan, M. N.; Wahab, Mohd Abd; Marzukee, Nik; Paulus, Wilfred; Phillip, Esther; Thanaletchumy

    2014-09-03

    In this paper, spent ion exchange resin generated from PUSPATI TRIGA reactor (RTP) in Malaysian Nuclear Agency were characterized based on the water content, radionuclide content and radionuclide leachability. The result revealed that the water content in the spent resin is 48%. Gamma spectrometry analysis indicated the presence of {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 152}Eu, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 58}Co, {sup 60}Co and {sup 65}Zn. The leachability test shows a small concentrations (<1 Bq/l) of {sup 152}Eu and {sup 134}Cs were leached out from the spent resin while {sup 60}Co activity concentrations slightly exceeded the limit generally used for industrial wastewater i.e. 1 Bq/l. Characterization of spent ion exchange resin sampled from RTP show that this characterization is important as a basis to immobilize this radioactive waste using geopolymer technology.

  11. Improving Information Exchange in the Chicken Processing Sector Using Standardised Data Lists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Kathryn Anne-Marie; van der Roest, Joop; Höskuldsson, Stefán Torfi; Olsen, Petter; Karlsen, Kine Mari

    Research has shown that to improve electronic communication between companies, universal standardised data lists are necessary. In food supply chains in particular there is an increased need to exchange data in the wake of food safety incidents. Food supply chain companies already record numerous measurements, properties and parameters. These records are necessary for legal reasons, labelling, traceability, profiling desirable characteristics, showing compliance and for meeting customer requirements. Universal standards for name and content of each of these data elements would improve information exchange between buyers, sellers, authorities, consumers and other interested parties. A case study, carried out for the chicken sector, attempted to identify the most relevant parameters including which of these were already communicated to external bodies.

  12. The characteristic assessment of spent ion exchange resin from PUSPATI TRIGA REACTOR (RTP) for immobilization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahida, Nurul; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Majid, Amran Ab; Wahab, Mohd Abd; Marzukee, Nik; Paulus, Wilfred; Phillip, Esther; Thanaletchumy, Irwan, M. N.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, spent ion exchange resin generated from PUSPATI TRIGA reactor (RTP) in Malaysian Nuclear Agency were characterized based on the water content, radionuclide content and radionuclide leachability. The result revealed that the water content in the spent resin is 48%. Gamma spectrometry analysis indicated the presence of 134Cs, 137Cs, 152Eu, 54Mn, 58Co, 60Co and 65Zn. The leachability test shows a small concentrations (<1 Bq/l) of 152Eu and 134Cs were leached out from the spent resin while 60Co activity concentrations slightly exceeded the limit generally used for industrial wastewater i.e. 1 Bq/l. Characterization of spent ion exchange resin sampled from RTP show that this characterization is important as a basis to immobilize this radioactive waste using geopolymer technology.

  13. Relativistic four-component static-exchange approximation for core-excitation processes in molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ekstroem, Ulf; Norman, Patrick; Carravetta, Vincenzo

    2006-02-15

    A generalization of the static-exchange approximation for core-electron spectroscopies to the relativistic four-component realm is presented. The initial state is a Kramers restricted Hartree-Fock state and the final state is formed as the configuration-interaction single excited state, based on the average of configurations for (n-1) electrons in n near-degenerate core orbitals for the reference ionic state. It is demonstrated that the static-exchange Hamiltonian can be made real by considering a set of time-reversal symmetric electron excitation operators. The static-exchange Hamiltonian is constructed at a cost that parallels a single Fock matrix construction in a quaternion framework that fully exploits time-reversal and spatial symmetries for the D{sub 2h} point group and subgroups. The K- and L-edge absorption spectra of H{sub 2}S are used to illustrate the methodology. The calculations adopt the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian, but the theory is open ended toward improvements in the electron-electron interaction operator. It is demonstrated that relativistic effects are substantial for the L-edge spectrum of sulfur, and substantial deviations from the statistical 2:1 spin-orbit splitting of the intensity distribution are found. The average ratio in the mixed region is 1.54 at the present level of theory.

  14. Spatiotemporal processes that contribute to hydrologic exchange between hillslopes, valley bottoms, and streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergstrom, Anna; Jencso, Kelsey; McGlynn, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Quantifying how watershed structure influences the exchanges of water among component parts of a watershed, particularly the connection between uplands, valley bottoms, and in-stream hydrologic exchange, remains a challenge. However, this understanding is critical for ascertaining the source areas and temporal contributions of water and associated biogeochemical constituents in streams. We used dilution gauging, mass recovery, and recording discharge stations to characterize streamflow dynamics across 52 reaches, from peak snowmelt to base flow, in the Tenderfoot Creek Experimental forest, Montana, USA. We found that watershed-contributing area was only a significant predictor of net changes in streamflow at high moisture states and larger spatial scales. However, at the scale of individual stream reaches, the lateral contributing area in conjunction with underlying lithology and vegetation densities were significant predictors of gross hydrologic gains to the stream. Reach lateral contributing areas underlain by more permeable sandstone yielded less water across flow states relative to those with granite gneiss. Additionally, increases in the frequency of steps across each stream reach contributed to greater hydrologic gross losses. Together, gross gains and losses of water along individual reaches resulted in net changes of discharge that cumulatively scale to the observed outlet discharge dynamics. Our results provide a framework for understanding how hillslope topography, geology, vegetation, and valley bottom structure contribute to the exchange of water and cumulative increases of stream flow across watersheds of increasing size.

  15. Dewaxing process using agitated heat exchanger to chill solvent-oil and wax slurry to wax filtration temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhurst, Th.E.

    1984-04-10

    In an improved process for dewaxing waxy hydrocarbon oils, wherein said waxy oil is cooled in an indirect chilling zone to a temperature greater than the wax separation temperature whereby wax is precipitated to form a wax-oil-solvent slurry, cooling the slurry to the wax separation temperature in an indirect chilling zone thereby precipitating a further portion of wax from said waxy oil and separating said precipitated wax from the wax-oil-solvent slurry in solid-liquid separation means, the improvement comprises using as the indirect chilling zone an indirect heat exchanger means operated at a high level of agitation. Expressed in terms of Impeller Reynolds Number the agitation is on the order of about 1,000 to 1,000,000. Alternatively, the direct chilling zone is totally replaced by the high agitation indirect heat exchanger means.

  16. Dynamic NMR of Intramolecular Exchange Processes in EDTA Complexes of Sc[superscript 3+], Y[superscript 3+], and La[superscript 3+

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ba, Yong; Han, Steven; Ni, Lily; Su, Tony; Garcia, Andres

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic NMR makes use of the effect of chemical exchanges on NMR spectra to study kinetics and thermodynamics. An advanced physical chemistry lab experiment was developed to study the intramolecular exchange processes of EDTA (the disodium salt of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) metal complexes. EDTA is an important chelating agent, used in…

  17. Role of energy exchange in vibrational dephasing processes in liquids and solids

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, S.

    1981-08-01

    Three theories which claim relevance to the dephasing of molecular vibrations in condensed phase matter are presented. All of these theories predict (in certain limiting cases) that the widths and shifts of molecular vibrations will obey an Arrhenius temperature dependence. The basic tenets of the theories are detailed so that the differences between them may be used in an experiment to distinguish between them. One model, based on intermolecular energy exchange of low-frequency modes, results in dephasing the high-frequency modes when anharmonic coupling is present. A computer analysis of temperature dependent experimental lineshapes can result in the extraction of various parameters such as the anharmonic shifts and the exchange rates. It is shown that, in order to properly assess the relative validity of the three models, other evidence must be obtained such as the spectral parameters of the low-frequency modes, the combination bands, and the isotopic dilution behavior. This evidence is presented for d/sub 14/-durene (perdeutero-1,2,4,5-tetramethylbenzene) and compared to previous data obtained on pure h/sub 14/-durene. An extension of the (HSC) intermolecular energy exchange model which allows for the possibility of partial delocalization of the low-frequency modes gives an adequate description of the experimental evidence. Isotopic dilution experiments, in particular, have resulted in a detailed picture of the energy transfer dynamics of the low-frequency modes. A section in which some spontaneous Raman spectra support a model of inhomogeneous broadening in liquids based on results of picosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy is presented. The model is that a distribution of environmental sites is created by a distribution in the local density and thus creates inhomogeneous broadening.

  18. Practically convenient and industrially-aligned methods for iridium-catalysed hydrogen isotope exchange processes.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, A R; Idziak, C; Kerr, W J; Mondal, B; Paterson, L C; Tuttle, T; Andersson, S; Nilsson, G N

    2014-06-14

    The use of alternative solvents in the iridium-catalysed hydrogen isotope exchange reaction with developing phosphine/NHC Ir(I) complexes has identified reaction media which are more widely applicable and industrially acceptable than the commonly employed chlorinated solvent, dichloromethane. Deuterium incorporation into a variety of substrates has proceeded to deliver high levels of labelling (and regioselectivity) in the presence of low catalyst loadings and over short reaction times. The preparative outputs have been complemented by DFT studies to explore ligand orientation, as well as solvent and substrate binding energies within the catalyst system. PMID:24756541

  19. Precipitation, dissolution, and ion exchange processes coupled with a lattice Boltzmann advection diffusion solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiorth, A.; Jettestuen, E.; Cathles, L. M.; Madland, M. V.

    2013-03-01

    Pore water chemistry can dramatically affect the mechanical strength of chalk cores and the recovery of oil from them, but despite a great many core experiments, the mechanisms responsible remain unclear. This is in part because no single model is presently available that can address the changes in surface complexes and potential and mineral dissolution and precipitation that occur when fluids of different chemistry are injected. We report here the construction of a lattice Boltzmann model that includes non-linear dissolution-precipitation kinetics, surface complexation, and ion exchange. A link-based boundary condition which allows mineral boundaries to move and porosity to change is shown to converge to a correct representation of the macroscopic pore surface area. We show the chemical LB model developed predicts mineral dissolution and ion exchange similar to those predicted by PHREEQC for similar parameters, and we show how the methods developed can be applied to chalk core experiments where synthetic seawater is flooded through the core at 130 °C.

  20. Modeling Electronic Polarizability Changes in the Course of a Magnesium Ion Water Ligand Exchange Process.

    PubMed

    Kurnikov, Igor V; Kurnikova, Maria

    2015-08-13

    This paper introduces explicit dependence of atomic polarizabilities on intermolecular interactions within the framework of a polarizable force field AMOEBA. Polarizable models used in biomolecular simulations often poorly describe molecular electrostatic induction in condensed phase, in part, due to neglect of a strong dependency of molecular electronic polarizability on intermolecular interactions at short distances. Our variable polarizability model parameters are derived from quantum chemical calculations of small clusters of atoms and molecules, and can be applied in simulations in condensed phase without additional scaling factors. The variable polarizability model is applied to simulate a ligand exchange reaction for a Mg(2+) ion solvated in water. Explicit dependence of water polarizability on a distance between a water oxygen and Mg(2+) is derived from in vacuum MP2 calculations of Mg(2+)-water dimer. The simulations yield a consistent description of the energetics of the Mg(2+)-water clusters of different size. Simulations also reproduce thermodynamics of ion solvation as well as kinetics of a water ligand exchange reaction. In contrast, simulations that used the additive force field or that used the constant polarizability models were not able to consistently and quantitatively describe the properties of the solvated Mg(2+) ion. PMID:26109375

  1. Radioactive Spent Ion-Exchange Resins Conditioning by the Hot Supercompaction Process at Tihange NPP - Early Experience - 12200

    SciTech Connect

    Braet, Johan; Charpentier, David; Centner, Baudouin; Vanderperre, Serge

    2012-07-01

    Spent ion-exchange resins are considered to be problematic waste that, in many cases, requires special approaches and precautions during their conditioning to meet the acceptance criteria for disposal. In Belgium, for economical reasons, the Volume Reduction Factor is a key criterion. After Tractebel Engineering performed a technical and economical comparison of the industrially available systems, Tihange NPP decided to install a spent ion-exchange resins hot supercompaction unit with Tractebel Engineering in the role of architect-engineer. The treatment and conditioning unit processes the spent ion-exchange resins through the following steps: dewatering of the resins, drying the resins under deep vacuum, discharging the dried resins into compactable drums, super-compacting the drums to generate pellets, grouting the pellets into standard 400 litres waste drums (overpacks) licensed for final disposal in the near-surface repository in Belgium. Several developments were required to adapt the reference process and equipment to PWR spent ion-exchange bead resins and Belgian radioactive waste acceptance criteria. In order to avoid cracks on the compacted drum, and external surface contamination from resin leaks, some improvements were achieved to minimize spring-back as well as the risk of cracking the drum wall. Placing the compactable drum inside a second, slightly larger drum, guarantees clean and reproducible pellets. Currently the commissioning phase is on-going. Numerous process validation tests have been completed. An acceptance file was transmitted to the Belgian Waste Management Authority recently. This will be followed by demonstration tests necessary to obtain their final acceptance of the installation. More than 3 800 drums of mixed powdered and bead resins have been processed by the reference Hot Compaction process, achieving a Volume Reduction Factor (VRF) of 2.5. The equipment has been proven to be a reliable technology with low operation and maintenance

  2. Savannah River reactor process water heat exchanger tube structural integrity margin Task Number 92-005-1

    SciTech Connect

    Mertz, G.E.; Barnes, D.M.; Sindelar, R.L.

    1992-02-01

    Twelve process water heat exchangers are designed to remove heat generated in the reactor tank. Each heat exchanger has approximately 9000, 1/2 inch diameter {times} 0.049 inches thick tubes. Minimum structural tubing requirements and the leak rate through postulated tubing defects are developed in this report A comparison of the structural requirements and the defect size calculated to produce leak rates of 0.5 lbs./day demonstrate adequate structural margins against gross tube rupture. Commercial nuclear experience with pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator plugging criteria are used for guidance in performing this analysis. It is important to note that the SRS reactors are low energy systems with normal operating pressures of 203 psig at 130{degree}F while the PWR is a high energy system with operating pressures near 2200 psig at 600{degree}F. Clearly the PVM steam generator has loadings which are more severe than the SRS heat exchangers. Consistent with the Regulatory Guide 1.121 criteria both wastage (wall thinning) and cracking are addressed. Structural limits on wall thinning and crack size are developed to preclude gross rupture. ASME Section XI criteria, with the factors of safety recommended by Regulatory Guide 1.121 are used to develop the allowable crack size criteria. Normal operating conditions (pressure, dead weight, and hydraulic drag) are considered with seismic and water hammer accident conditions. Both the wall thinning and crack size criteria are developed for the end-of-evaluation period. Allowances for corrosion, wear, or crack growth have not been included in this analysis Structurally, the tubing is over designed and can tolerate large defects with adequate margins against gross rupture. The structural margins of heat exchanger tubing are evident by contrasting the tubing`s structural capacity, per the ASME Code, with its operating conditions/configuration.

  3. Savannah River reactor process water heat exchanger tube structural integrity margin Task Number 92-005-1

    SciTech Connect

    Mertz, G.E.; Barnes, D.M.; Sindelar, R.L.

    1992-02-01

    Twelve process water heat exchangers are designed to remove heat generated in the reactor tank. Each heat exchanger has approximately 9000, 1/2 inch diameter {times} 0.049 inches thick tubes. Minimum structural tubing requirements and the leak rate through postulated tubing defects are developed in this report A comparison of the structural requirements and the defect size calculated to produce leak rates of 0.5 lbs./day demonstrate adequate structural margins against gross tube rupture. Commercial nuclear experience with pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator plugging criteria are used for guidance in performing this analysis. It is important to note that the SRS reactors are low energy systems with normal operating pressures of 203 psig at 130{degree}F while the PWR is a high energy system with operating pressures near 2200 psig at 600{degree}F. Clearly the PVM steam generator has loadings which are more severe than the SRS heat exchangers. Consistent with the Regulatory Guide 1.121 criteria both wastage (wall thinning) and cracking are addressed. Structural limits on wall thinning and crack size are developed to preclude gross rupture. ASME Section XI criteria, with the factors of safety recommended by Regulatory Guide 1.121 are used to develop the allowable crack size criteria. Normal operating conditions (pressure, dead weight, and hydraulic drag) are considered with seismic and water hammer accident conditions. Both the wall thinning and crack size criteria are developed for the end-of-evaluation period. Allowances for corrosion, wear, or crack growth have not been included in this analysis Structurally, the tubing is over designed and can tolerate large defects with adequate margins against gross rupture. The structural margins of heat exchanger tubing are evident by contrasting the tubing's structural capacity, per the ASME Code, with its operating conditions/configuration.

  4. Weak interaction processes in supernovae: New probes using charge exchange reaction at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frekers, Dieter

    2005-04-01

    Spin-isospin-flip excitations in nuclei at vanishing momentum transfer are generally referred to as Gamov-Teller (GT) transitions. They are being studied because the simplicity of the excitation makes them an ideal probe for testing nuclear structure models. In astrophysics, GT transitions provide an important input for model calculations and element formation during the explosive phase of a massive star at the end of its life-time. GT transitions in the β- direction (also referred to as isospin lowering T< transitions) have extensively been studied through (p,n) and (3He,t) charge-exchange reactions [B.D. Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. C 36 (1987) 2195, B.D. Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. C 43 (1991) 50, J. Rapaport et al., Phys. Rev. C 24 (1981) 335, H. Akimune et al., Nucl. Phys. A 569 (1994) 245c, Y. Fujita et al., Phys. Lett. B 365 (1996) 29]. The generally good resolution allows easy extraction of the GT distribution and the total B(GT-) strength in the final nucleus. On the other hand, determination of B(GT+) strength through a charge-exchange reaction in the T> direction were mostly done with secondary neutron beams, and as such, they come with significant experimental difficulties. TRIUMF has pioneered this field in the late 80's and early 90's with a rich and highly successful (n,p) program using a several hundred MeV neutron beam from a 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction [R. Helmer, Can. J. Phys. 65 (1987) 588]. In this paper we present the (d,2He) reaction at intermediate energies as another and potentially even more powerful tool for charge-exchange reactions in the T>, resp. β+ direction. The key issue here will be the high resolution of order 100 keV, which provides new and sometimes unexpected insight into nuclear structure phenomena. This program has been launched at the AGOR Superconducting Cyclotron Facility at the KVI Groningen. By now, it covers a wide field of physics questions ranging from few-body physics, the structure of halo-nuclei, to questions pertaining

  5. ANIONIC EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM AND VANADIUM FROM CARBONATE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Bailes, R.H.; Ellis, D.A.; Long, R.S.

    1958-12-16

    Uranium and vanadium can be economically purified and recovered from non- salt roast carbonate leach liquors by adsorption on a strongly basic anionic exchange resin and subsequent selective elution by one of three alternative methods. Method 1 comprises selectively eluting uranium from the resin with an ammonium sulfate solution followed by eluting vanadium from the resin with either 5 M NaCl, saturated (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, saturated NaHCO/sub 3/, 1 M NaOH, or saturated S0/sub 2/ solutions. Method II comprises selectively eluting vanadium from the resin with either concentrated NaCl or S0/sub 2/ solutions subsequent to pretreatment of the column with either S0/sub 2/ gas, 1 N HCl, or 0.1 N H/sub 2/8O/sub 4/ followed by eluting uranium from the resin with solutions containing 0.9 M NH/sub 4/Cl or NaCl and 0.1 Cl. Method III comprises flowing the carbonate leac solutlon through a first column of a strongly basic anlonlc exchange resin untll vanadium breakthrough occurs, so that the effluent solution is enriched ln uranium content and the vanadium is chiefly retalned by the resln, absorbing the uranlum from the enriched effluent solution on a second column of a strongly basic anionic exchange resin, pretreating the first column with either 0.1 N HCl, 0.1 H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, C0/sub 2/ gas, or ammonium sulfate, selectively eluting the vanadlum from the column with saturated S0/sub 2/ solution, pretreatlng the second column with either 0.1 N HCl or S0/sub 2/ gas, selectively eluting residual vanadium from the column with saturated S0/sub 2/ solution, and then eluting the uranium from the column with either 0.1 N HCl and 1 N NaCl orO.l N HCl and 1 N NH/sub 4/Cl.

  6. Shelf edge exchange processes-II SEEP2-06, R/V Endeavor cruise 186. Hydrographic data report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.; Behrens, W.J.; Flagg, C.N.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Wilke, R.J.; Wyman, K.D.

    1989-12-01

    The Shelf Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP) program sponsored by the United States Department of Energy is a multi-institutional effort designed to investigate the flux of suspended material from the continental shelf to the waters of the upper slope, and then possibly into the slope sediments. Phase I of SEEP consisted of a series of nine cruises and a mooring array across the outer continental shelf of New England during 1983--1984. Phase II focused specifically on the shelf/slope frontal region of the mid-Atlantic bight off the Delmarva Peninsula. Hydrographic data were collected on eight of the six cruises.

  7. Circulation and exchange processes on the South Atlantic Bight Continental Shelf: Progress report, July 1, 1988 to June 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.N.

    1989-03-01

    The work reported here is part of the Department of Energy sponsored Southeast US Continental Shelf Program. The DOE Program is a coordinated, multi-university, interdisciplinary investigation aimed at understanding the physical, chemical and biological processes in the South Atlantic Bight (SAB: east coast continental shelf region from Cape Hatteras to Cape Canaveral). The program is coordinated by Dr. David Menzel of Skidaway Oceanographic Institute. The activities of the other Program Investigators will be discussed briefly under Program Overview. The University of Miami component of the program involves an investigation of the physical processes regulating the transport and exchange of materials in the shelf waters. The guiding scientific objective of this work is to improve the capability for prediction of the physical environment. The principal scientific task is to determine the relative importance of the forces driving shelf circulation and exchange and to measure the shelf waters' response over variable time and space scales. The influence of physical processes on chemical and biological distributions and their interactions is studied through interdisciplinary investigations, joint analysis and interpretation of data and joint publications. 103 refs., 14 figs.

  8. The organic sea surface microlayer in the upwelling region off Peru and implications for air-sea exchange processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, A.; Galgani, L.

    2015-07-01

    The sea surface microlayer (SML) is at the very surface of the ocean, linking the hydrosphere with the atmosphere, and central to a range of global biogeochemical and climate-related processes. The presence and enrichment of organic compounds in the SML have been suggested to influence air-sea gas exchange processes as well as the emission of primary organic aerosols. Among these organic compounds, primarily of plankton origin, are dissolved exopolymers, specifically polysaccharides and proteins, and gel particles, such as Transparent Exopolymer Particles (TEP) and Coomassie Stainable Particles (CSP). These organic substances often accumulate in the surface ocean when plankton productivity is high. Here, we report results obtained in December 2012 during the SOPRAN Meteor 91 cruise to the highly productive, coastal upwelling regime off Peru. Samples were collected from the SML and from ~ 20 cm below, and were analyzed for polysaccharidic and proteinaceous compounds, gel particles, total and dissolved organic carbon, bacterial and phytoplankton abundance. Our study provides insight to the physical and biological control of organic matter enrichment in the SML, and discusses the potential role of organic matter in the SML for air-sea exchange processes.

  9. Process for carbonaceous material conversion and recovery of alkali metal catalyst constituents held by ion exchange sites in conversion residue

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, David W.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered for the particles by contacting or washing them with an aqueous solution containing calcium or magnesium ions in an alkali metal recovery zone at a low temperature, preferably below about 249.degree. F. During the washing or leaching process, the calcium or magnesium ions displace alkali metal ions held by ion exchange sites in the particles thereby liberating the ions and producing an aqueous effluent containing alkali metal constituents. The aqueous effluent from the alkali metal recovery zone is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  10. Simulation calculations for a catalytic exchange/cryogenic distillation hydrogen isotope separation process

    SciTech Connect

    Rodman, M.; Howard, D.W.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the aspects of the optimization and simulation calculations for the Moderator Detritiation Plant thay may be applicable to other processes are described. The FORTRAN optimization program and the CPES and PROCESS distillation calculation are covered.

  11. Modeling foreign exchange market activity around macroeconomic news: Hawkes-process approach.

    PubMed

    Rambaldi, Marcello; Pennesi, Paris; Lillo, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    We present a Hawkes-model approach to the foreign exchange market in which the high-frequency price dynamics is affected by a self-exciting mechanism and an exogenous component, generated by the pre-announced arrival of macroeconomic news. By focusing on time windows around the news announcement, we find that the model is able to capture the increase of trading activity after the news, both when the news has a sizable effect on volatility and when this effect is negligible, either because the news in not important or because the announcement is in line with the forecast by analysts. We extend the model by considering noncausal effects, due to the fact that the existence of the news (but not its content) is known by the market before the announcement. PMID:25679668

  12. Carbon mass-balance modeling and carbon isotope exchange processes in the Curonian Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barisevičiūtė, Rūta; Žilius, Mindaugas; Ertürk, Ali; Petkuvienė, Jolita

    2016-04-01

    The Curonian lagoon one of the largest coastal lagoons in Europe is located in the southeastern part of the Baltic Sea and lies along the Baltic coast of Lithuania and the Kaliningrad region of Russia. It is influenced by a discharge of the Nemunas and other smaller rivers and saline water of the Baltic Sea. The narrow (width 0.4 km, deep 8-14 m) Klaipėda Strait is the only way for fresh water run-off and brackish water intrusions. This research is focused on carbon isotope fractionations related with air - water exchange, primary production and organic carbon sedimentation, mineralization and uptake from both marine and terrestrial sources.

  13. Social support and stress: the role of social comparison and social exchange processes.

    PubMed

    Buunk, B P; Hoorens, V

    1992-11-01

    This paper first presents four different conceptualizations of social support: social integration, satisfying relationships, perceived helpfulness and enacted support. Then, classic and contemporary social comparison theory and social exchange theory are analysed as they are two theoretical perspectives that are particularly useful in understanding social support. These perspectives are employed to explain three seemingly paradoxical phenomena in the domain of social support: (1) the fact that support sometimes has negative effects; (2) the fact that the occurrence of stress itself can sometimes decrease the availability of support resources; and (3) the phenomenon that people believe that they give more support than they receive, and that there is more support available for them than for others. PMID:1483155

  14. Modeling foreign exchange market activity around macroeconomic news: Hawkes-process approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambaldi, Marcello; Pennesi, Paris; Lillo, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    We present a Hawkes-model approach to the foreign exchange market in which the high-frequency price dynamics is affected by a self-exciting mechanism and an exogenous component, generated by the pre-announced arrival of macroeconomic news. By focusing on time windows around the news announcement, we find that the model is able to capture the increase of trading activity after the news, both when the news has a sizable effect on volatility and when this effect is negligible, either because the news in not important or because the announcement is in line with the forecast by analysts. We extend the model by considering noncausal effects, due to the fact that the existence of the news (but not its content) is known by the market before the announcement.

  15. Using Process Knowledge to Manage Disposal Classification of Ion-Exchange Resin - 13566

    SciTech Connect

    Bohnsack, Jonathan N.; James, David W.

    2013-07-01

    It has been previously shown by EPRI [1] that Class B and C resins represent a small portion by volume of the overall generation of radioactively contaminated resins. In fact, if all of the resins were taken together the overall classification would meet Class A disposal requirements. Lowering the classification of the ion exchange resins as they are presented for disposal provides a path for minimizing the amount of waste stored. Currently there are commercial options for blending wastes from various generators for Class A disposal in development. The NRC may have by this time introduced changes and clarifications to the Branch Technical Position (BTP) on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation [2] that may ultimately add more flexibility to what can be done at the plant level. The BTP has always maintained that mixtures of resins that are combined for ALARA purposes or operational efficiency can be classified on the basis of the mixture. This is a point often misinterpreted and misapplied. This paper will address options that can be exercised by the generator that can limit B and C waste generation by more rigorous tracking of generation and taking advantage of the normal mix of wastes. This can be achieved through the monitoring of reactor coolant chemistry data and coupled with our knowledge of radionuclide production mechanisms. This knowledge can be used to determine the overall accumulation of activity in ion-exchange resins and provides a 'real-time' waste classification determination of the resin and thereby provide a mechanism to reduce the production of waste that exceeds class A limits. It should be noted that this alternative approach, although rarely used in a nuclear power plant setting, is acknowledged in the original BTP on classification [3] as a viable option for determining radionuclide inventories for classification of waste. Also included is a discussion of an examination performed at the Byron plant to estimate radionuclide content in the

  16. Comparing observations and process-based simulations of biosphere-atmosphere exchanges on multiple timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahecha, M. D.; Reichstein, M.; Jung, M.; Seneviratne, S. I.; Zaehle, S.; Beer, C.; Braakhekke, M. C.; Carvalhais, N.; Lange, H.; Le Maire, G.; Moors, E.

    2010-06-01

    Terrestrial biosphere models are indispensable tools for analyzing the biosphere-atmosphere exchange of carbon and water. Evaluation of these models using site level observations scrutinizes our current understanding of biospheric responses to meteorological variables. Here we propose a novel model-data comparison strategy considering that CO2 and H2O exchanges fluctuate on a wide range of timescales. Decomposing simulated and observed time series into subsignals allows to quantify model performance as a function of frequency, and to localize model-data disagreement in time. This approach is illustrated using site level predictions from two models of different complexity, Organizing Carbon and Hydrology in Dynamic Ecosystems (ORCHIDEE) and Lund-Potsdam-Jena (LPJ), at four eddy covariance towers in different climates. Frequency-dependent errors reveal substantial model-data disagreement in seasonal-annual and high-frequency net CO2 fluxes. By localizing these errors in time we can trace these back, for example, to overestimations of seasonal-annual periodicities of ecosystem respiration during spring greenup and autumn in both models. In the same frequencies, systematic misrepresentations of CO2 uptake severely affect the performance of LPJ, which is a consequence of the parsimonious representation of phenology. ORCHIDEE shows pronounced model-data disagreements in the high-frequency fluctuations of evapotranspiration across the four sites. We highlight the advantages that our novel methodology offers for a rigorous model evaluation compared to classical model evaluation approaches. We propose that ongoing model development will benefit from considering model-data (dis)agreements in the time-frequency domain.

  17. A counter-intuitive approach to calculating non-exchangeable 2H isotopic composition of hair: treating the molar exchange fraction fE as a process-related rather than compound-specific variable

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landwehr, J.M.; Meier-Augenstein, W.; Kemp, H.F.

    2011-01-01

    Hair is a keratinous tissue that incorporates hydrogen from material that an animal consumes but it is metabolically inert following synthesis. The stable hydrogen isotope composition of hair has been used in ecological studies to track migrations of mammals as well as for forensic and archaeological purposes to determine the provenance of human remains or the recent geographic life trajectory of living people. Measurement of the total hydrogen isotopic composition of a hair sample yields a composite value comprised of both metabolically informative, non-exchangeable hydrogen and exchangeable hydrogen, with the latter reflecting ambient or sample preparation conditions. Neither of these attributes is directly measurable, and the non-exchangeable hydrogen composition is obtained by estimation using a commonly applied mathematical expression incorporating sample measurements obtained from two distinct equilibration procedures. This commonly used approach treats the fraction of exchangeable hydrogen as a mixing ratio, with a minimal procedural fractionation factor assumed to be close or equal to 1. Instead, we propose to use full molar ratios to derive an expression for the non-exchangeable hydrogen composition explicitly as a function of both the procedural fractionation factor α and the molar hydrogen exchange fraction fE. We apply these derivations in a longitudinal study of a hair sample and demonstrate that the molar hydrogen exchange fraction fE should, like the procedural fractionation factor α, be treated as a process-dependent parameter, i.e. a reaction-specific constant. This is a counter-intuitive notion given that maximum theoretical values for the molar hydrogen exchange fraction fE can be calculated that are arguably protein-type specific and, as such, fE could be regarded as a compound-specific constant. We also make some additional suggestions for future approaches to determine the non-exchangeable hydrogen composition of hair and the use of

  18. Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sheth, A.C.; Dharmapurikar, R.

    1992-12-31

    Under DOE Grant No. DE-FG22-90PC90309, the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) is contracted to further develop its anion-exchange, resin-based desulfurization concept to desulfurize alkali metal sulfates. From environmental as well as economic viewpoints, it is necessary to remove soluble sulfates from the wastes created by flue gas desulfurization systems. In order to do this economically, a low-cost desulfurization process for spent sorbents is necessary. UTSI`s anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization concept is believed to satisfy these requirements. During the reporting period, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992, UTSI has completed the batch mode experiments to evaluate the performance enhancement effect caused by organic acids on the resin`s exhaustion efficiency. At present, batch mode experiments are being conducted to locate the position of the CO{sub 3}= and SO{sub 4}= ions in the affinity chart, and also reviewing/assessing the ASPEN Code`s capabilities for use in the development of the Best Process Schematic and related economics.

  19. A Weibull distribution with power-law tails that describes the first passage time processes of foreign currency exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazuka, Naoya; Inoue, Jun-Ichi

    2007-03-01

    A Weibull distribution with power-law tails is confirmed as a good candidate to describe the first passage time process of foreign currency exchange rates. The Lorentz curve and the corresponding Gini coefficient for a Weibull distribution are derived analytically. We show that the coefficient is in good agreement with the same quantity calculated from the empirical data. We also calculate the average waiting time which is an important measure to estimate the time for customers to wait until the next price change after they login to their computer systems. By assuming that the first passage time distribution might change its shape from the Weibull to the power-law at some critical time, we evaluate the averaged waiting time by means of the renewal-reward theorem. We find that our correction of tails of the distribution makes the averaged waiting time much closer to the value obtained from empirical data analysis. We also discuss the deviation from the estimated average waiting time by deriving the waiting time distribution directly. These results make us conclude that the first passage process of the foreign currency exchange rates is well described by a Weibull distribution with power-law tails.

  20. The magnetization process and magnetoresistance of exchange-spring bilayer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagahama, T.; Mibu, K.; Shinjo, T.

    1998-01-01

    A perfectly reversible magnetization process was observed in NiFe/CoSm bilayers. During this process, the magnetic moments in the soft magnetic layer (NiFe) are pinned at the interface with the hard magnetic layer (CoSm), so that the direction of the magnetic moment distributes successively like a Bloch wall. The characteristic reversible magnetization process is explained by an atomic layer model. The magnetoresistance also exhibits a reversible change reflecting the magnetization process. The basic feature of the reversible magnetoresistance curve is understood to be anisotropic magnetoresistance.

  1. Isotopic exchange processes in cold plasmas of H2/D2 mixtures.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Redondo, Miguel; Carrasco, Esther; Herrero, Víctor J; Tanarro, Isabel

    2011-05-28

    Isotope exchange in low pressure cold plasmas of H(2)/D(2) mixtures has been investigated by means of mass spectrometric measurements of neutrals and ions, and kinetic model calculations. The measurements, which include also electron temperatures and densities, were performed in a stainless steel hollow cathode reactor for three discharge pressures: 1, 2 and 8 Pa, and for mixture compositions ranging from 100% H(2) to 100% D(2). The data are analyzed in the light of the model calculations, which are in good global agreement with the experiments. Isotope selective effects are found both in the surface recombination and in the gas-phase ionic chemistry. The dissociation of the fuel gas molecules is followed by wall recycling, which regenerates H(2) and D(2) and produces HD. Atomic recombination at the wall is found to proceed through an Eley-Rideal mechanism, with a preference for reaction of the adsorbed atoms with gas phase D atoms. The best fit probabilities for Eley-Rideal abstraction with H and D are: γ(ER H) = 1.5 × 10(-3), γ(ER D) = 2.0 × 10(-3). Concerning ions, at 1 Pa the diatomic species H(2)(+), D(2)(+) and HD(+), formed directly by electron impact, prevail in the distributions, and at 8 Pa, the triatomic ions H(3)(+), H(2)D(+), HD(2)(+) and D(3)(+), produced primarily in reactions of diatomic ions with molecules, dominate the plasma composition. In this higher pressure regime, the formation of the mixed ions H(2)D(+) and HD(2)(+) is favoured in comparison with that of H(3)(+) and D(3)(+), as expected on statistical grounds. The model results predict a very small preference, undetectable within the precision of the measurements, for the generation of triatomic ions with a higher degree of deuteration, which is probably a residual influence at room temperature of the marked zero point energy effects (ZPE), relevant for deuterium fractionation in interstellar space. In contrast, ZPE effects are found to be decisive for the observed distribution of

  2. Extensive separations (CLEAN) processing strategy compared to TRUEX strategy and sludge wash ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, B.J.; Jansen, G.; Zimmerman, B.D.; Seeman, S.E.; Lauerhass, L.; Hoza, M.

    1994-08-01

    Numerous pretreatment flowsheets have been proposed for processing the radioactive wastes in Hanford`s 177 underground storage tanks. The CLEAN Option is examined along with two other flowsheet alternatives to quantify the trade-off of greater capital equipment and operating costs for aggressive separations with the reduced waste disposal costs and decreased environmental/health risks. The effect on the volume of HLW glass product and radiotoxicity of the LLW glass or grout product is predicted with current assumptions about waste characteristics and separations processes using a mass balance model. The prediction is made on three principal processing options: washing of tank wastes with removal of cesium and technetium from the supernatant, with washed solids routed directly to the glass (referred to as the Sludge Wash C processing strategy); the previous steps plus dissolution of the solids and removal of transuranic (TRU) elements, uranium, and strontium using solvent extraction processes (referred to as the Transuranic Extraction Option C (TRUEX-C) processing strategy); and an aggressive yet feasible processing strategy for separating the waste components to meet several main goals or objectives (referred to as the CLEAN Option processing strategy), such as the LLW is required to meet the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Class A limits; concentrations of technetium, iodine, and uranium are reduced as low as reasonably achievable; and HLW will be contained within 1,000 borosilicate glass canisters that meet current Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant glass specifications.

  3. Conversion of ion-exchange resins, catalysts and sludges to glass with optional noble metal recovery using the GMODS process

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.

    1996-11-01

    Chemical processing and cleanup of waste streams (air and water) typically result in products, clean air, clean water, and concentrated hazardous residues (ion exchange resins, catalysts, sludges, etc.). Typically, these streams contain significant quantities of complex organics. For disposal, it is desirable to destroy the organics and immobilize any heavy metals or radioactive components into stable waste forms. If there are noble metals in the residues, it is desirable to recover these for reuse. The Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS) is a new process that directly converts radioactive and hazardous chemical wastes to borosilicate glass. GMODS oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass; converts metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; converts halides (eg chlorides) to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium halide stream; and recovers noble metals. GMODS has been demonstrated on a small laboratory scale (hundreds of grams), and the equipment needed for larger masses has been identified.

  4. Influence of exchange group of modified glycidyl methacrylate polymer on phenol removal: A study by batch and continuous flow processes.

    PubMed

    Aversa, Thiago Muza; da Silva, Carla Michele Frota; da Rocha, Paulo Cristiano Silva; Lucas, Elizabete Fernandes

    2016-11-01

    Contamination of water by phenol is potentially a serious problem due to its high toxicity and its acid character. In this way some treatment process to remove or reduce the phenol concentration before contaminated water disposal on the environment is required. Currently, phenol can be removed by charcoal adsorption, but this process does not allow easy regeneration of the adsorbent. In contrast, polymeric resins are easily regenerated and can be reused in others cycles of adsorption process. In this work, the interaction of phenol with two polymeric resins was investigated, one of them containing a weakly basic anionic exchange group (GD-DEA) and the other, a strongly basic group (GD-QUAT). Both ion exchange resins were obtained through chemical modifications from a base porous resin composed of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) and divinyl benzene (DVB). Evaluation tests with resins were carried out with 30 mg/L of phenol in water solution, at pH 6 and 10, employing two distinct processes: (i) batch, to evaluate the effect of temperature, and (ii) continuous flow, to assess the breakthrough of the resins. Batch tests revealed that the systems did not follow the model proposed by Langmuir due to the negative values obtained for the constant b and for the maximum adsorption capacity, Q0. However, satisfactory results for the constants KF and n allowed assuming that the behavior of systems followed the Freundlich model, leading to the conclusion that resin GD-DEA had the best interaction with the phenol when in a solution having pH 10 (phenoxide ions). The continuous flow tests corroborated this conclusion since the performance of GD-DEA in removing phenol was also best at pH 10, indicating that the greater availability of the electron pair in the resin with the weakly basic donor group contributed to enhance the resin's interaction with the phenoxide ions. PMID:27494606

  5. Using digital repeat photography to investigate phenology and its control on carbon dioxide exchange processes in a boreal minerogenic mire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnentag, Oliver; Peichl, Matthias; Nilsson, Mats B.

    2013-04-01

    Phenology is an important driver of the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of carbon dioxide (CO2) since seasonal plant development is tightly coupled to the processes of photosynthesis and respiration. Digital repeat photography has been previously used in other terrestrial ecosystems (i.e., forest, cropland and grassland) to continuously monitor and quantitatively describe changes in ecosystem phenology. Here, we present a first attempt to apply this technique in a peatland. We use the chromatic greenness index (Gc) derived from digital images analysis to investigate the control of phenology on the ecosystem CO2 exchange measured by the eddy covariance technique in a minerogenic mire in Northern Sweden over two growing seasons (2011 - 2012). We found that Gc was closely linked to the leaf area index of the vascular plant community. Moreover, Gc correlated well with gross ecosystem production (GEP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) during the spring green-up and the autumn periods. During the late summer however, the patterns of Gc and GEP were decoupled and environmental conditions (i.e. drought stress) were the dominating control on GEP during this period. Meanwhile, no correlation was observed between Gc and NEE. We conclude that digital repeat photography may serve as a simple, cheap and automated method to continuously track seasonal changes in phenology and to evaluate its effects on the CO2 exchange in peatland ecosystems. We further suggest that Gc derived from digital image analysis could help improving gap-filling of flux data and modeling of the seasonal development of GEP, especially during the shoulder seasons.

  6. The Exchange of Soil Nitrite and Atmospheric HONO: a Missing Process in the Nitrogen Cycle and Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yafang; Su, Hang; Oswald, Robert; Behrendt, Thomas; Trebs, Ivonne; Meixner, Franz X.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    Hydroxyl radicals (OH) are a key species in atmospheric photochemistry. In the lower atmosphere, up to ~30% of the primary OH radical production is attributed to the photolysis of nitrous acid (HONO), and field observations suggest a large missing source of HONO. The dominant sources of N(III) in soil, however, are biological nitrification and denitrification processes, which produce nitrite ions from ammonium (by nitrifying microbes) as well as from nitrate (by denitrifying microbes). We show that soil nitrite can release HONO and explain the reported strength and diurnal variation of the missing source. We also show that the soil-atmosphere exchange of N(III), though not considered in the N cycle, might result in significant amount of reactive nitrogen emission (comparable to soil NO emissions). Fertilized soils with low pH appear to be particularly strong sources of HONO and OH. Thus, agricultural activities and land-use changes may strongly influence the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. Because of the widespread occurrence of nitrite-producing microbes and increasing N and acid deposition, the release of HONO from soil may also be important in natural environments, including forests and boreal regions. In view of the potentially large impact on atmospheric chemistry and global environmental change, we recommend further studies of HONO release from soil nitrite and related processes in the biogeochemical cycling of N in both agricultural and natural environments. Reference: Su, H., Cheng, Y., et al., Soil Nitrite as a Source of Atmospheric HONO and OH Radicals, Science, 333, 1616-1618, 10.1126/science.1207687, 2011. Su, H., et al., The Exchange of Soil Nitrite and Atmospheric HONO: A Missing Process in the Nitrogen Cycle and Atmospheric Chemistry, NATO Science for Peace and Security Series C: Environmental Security, Springer Netherlands, 93-99, 2013.

  7. Sexual deception as a social-exchange process: development of a behavior-based sexual deception scale.

    PubMed

    Marelich, William D; Lundquist, Jessica; Painter, Kimberly; Mechanic, Mindy B

    2008-01-01

    The use of deception in association with sexual encounters may take many forms, ranging from outright lies to more subtle, evasive manipulations. To address such deceptions, a behavior-based sexual deception scale was developed utilizing social exchange theory. Participants were 267 individuals associated with two large universities who were surveyed regarding different aspects of their sexual deceptive behaviors. In addition, items addressing sexually related behaviors and attitudes were assessed for validation purposes. Principal components analysis identified three components of sexual deception, labeled Blatant Lying, Self-Serving, and Avoiding Confrontation. Confirmatory factor analysis verified the resulting structure, and promising validity was noted. In general, those using any of these deceptions reported more sexual partners and one-night stands. Those telling blatant lies to have sex were more likely to report greater needs for sex, while those using self-serving lies or having sex to avoid confrontation experienced greater worry about partner loss. Men were more likely to use blatant lies to have sex, while women were more likely to have sex to avoid confrontation. Results support sexual deception as an exchange process, with sex for pleasure and positive relationship outcomes acting as rewards, and unwanted sex and deception consequences as costs. Implications for health interventions and primary prevention applications are discussed. PMID:18321028

  8. Processes for washing a spent ion exchange bed and for treating biomass-derived pyrolysis oil, and apparatuses for treating biomass-derived pyrolysis oil

    DOEpatents

    Baird, Lance Awender; Brandvold, Timothy A.

    2015-11-24

    Processes and apparatuses for washing a spent ion exchange bed and for treating biomass-derived pyrolysis oil are provided herein. An exemplary process for washing a spent ion exchange bed employed in purification of biomass-derived pyrolysis oil includes the step of providing a ion-depleted pyrolysis oil stream having an original oxygen content. The ion-depleted pyrolysis oil stream is partially hydrotreated to reduce the oxygen content thereof, thereby producing a partially hydrotreated pyrolysis oil stream having a residual oxygen content that is less than the original oxygen content. At least a portion of the partially hydrotreated pyrolysis oil stream is passed through the spent ion exchange bed. Water is passed through the spent ion exchange bed after passing at least the portion of the partially hydrotreated pyrolysis oil stream therethrough.

  9. 45 CFR 155.315 - Verification process related to eligibility for enrollment in a QHP through the Exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... eligible for enrollment in a QHP through the Exchange. (b) Validation of Social Security number. (1) For any individual who provides his or her Social Security number to the Exchange, the Exchange must transmit the Social Security number and other identifying information to HHS, which will submit it to...

  10. 45 CFR 155.315 - Verification process related to eligibility for enrollment in a QHP through the Exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... eligible for enrollment in a QHP through the Exchange. (b) Validation of Social Security number. (1) For any individual who provides his or her Social Security number to the Exchange, the Exchange must transmit the Social Security number and other identifying information to HHS, which will submit it to...

  11. 22 CFR 41.57 - International cultural exchange visitors and visitors under the Irish Peace Process Cultural and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false International cultural exchange visitors and... AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Business and Media Visas § 41.57 International cultural exchange...) International cultural exchange visitors—(1) Requirements for classification under INA section...

  12. 22 CFR 41.57 - International cultural exchange visitors and visitors under the Irish Peace Process Cultural and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false International cultural exchange visitors and... AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Business and Media Visas § 41.57 International cultural exchange...) International cultural exchange visitors—(1) Requirements for classification under INA section...

  13. Cancellation of Glauber Gluon Exchange in the Double Drell-Yan Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Markus; Gaunt, Jonathan R.; Ostermeier, Daniel; Plößl, Peter; Schäfer, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    For any factorisation proof, a crucial step is a demonstration of the cancellation of so-called Glauber gluons. We summarise a recent paper in which we demonstrated this cancellation for double Drell-Yan production (the double parton scattering process in which a pair of electroweak gauge bosons is produced), both for the integrated cross section and for the cross section differential in the boson transverse momenta.

  14. A numerical study of synchronization in the process of biochemical substance exchange in a diffusively coupled ring of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailović, Dragutin T.; Balaž, Igor; Arsenić, Ilija

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we numerically investigate a model of a diffusively coupled ring of cells. To model the dynamics of individual cells we propose a map with cell affinity, which is a generalization of the logistic map. First, the basic features of a one-cell system are studied in terms of the Lyapunov exponent, Kolmogorov complexity and Sample Entropy. Second, the notion of observational heterarchy, which is a perpetual negotiation process between different levels of the description of a phenomenon, is reviewed. After these preliminaries, we study how the active coupling induced by the consideration of the observational heterarchy modifies the synchronization property of the model with N=100 cells. It is shown numerically that the active coupling enhances synchronization of biochemical substance exchange in several different conditions of cell affinity.

  15. What Can Be Learned from X-Ray Spectroscopy Concerning Hot Gas in the Local Bubble and Charge Exchange Processes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.

    2008-01-01

    Both solar wind charge exchange emission and diffuse thermal emission from the Local Bubble are strongly dominated in the soft X-ray band by lines from highly ionized elements. While both processes share many of the same lines, the spectra should differ significantly due to the different production mechanisms, abundances, and ionization states. Despite their distinct spectral signatures, current and past observatories have lacked the spectral resolution to adequately distinguish between the two sources. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy instrumentation proposed for future missions has the potential to answer fundamental questions such as whether there is any hot plasma in the Local Hot Bubble, and if so, what are the abundances of the emitting plasma and whether the plasma is in equilibrium. Such instrumentation will provide dynamic information about the solar wind including data on ion species which are currently difficult to track. It will also make possible remote sensing of the solar wind.

  16. Reverse process of usual optical analysis of boson-exchange superconductors: impurity effects on s- and d-wave superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jungseek

    2015-03-01

    We performed a reverse process of the usual optical data analysis of boson-exchange superconductors. We calculated the optical self-energy from two (MMP and MMP+peak) input model electron-boson spectral density functions using Allen's formula for one normal and two (s- and d-wave) superconducting cases. We obtained the optical constants including the optical conductivity and the dynamic dielectric function from the optical self-energy using an extended Drude model, and finally calculated the reflectance spectrum. Furthermore, to investigate impurity effects on optical quantities we added various levels of impurities (from the clean to the dirty limit) in the optical self-energy and performed the same reverse process to obtain the optical conductivity, the dielectric function, and reflectance. From these optical constants obtained from the reverse process we extracted the impurity-dependent superfluid densities for two superconducting cases using two independent methods (the Ferrel-Glover-Tinkham sum rule and the extrapolation to zero frequency of -ɛ1(ω)ω2) we found that a certain level of impurities is necessary to get a good agreement on results obtained by the two methods. We observed that impurities give similar effects on various optical constants of s- and d-wave superconductors; the greater the impurities the more distinct the gap feature and the lower the superfluid density. However, the s-wave superconductor gives the superconducting gap feature more clearly than the d-wave superconductor because in the d-wave superconductors the optical quantities are averaged over the anisotropic Fermi surface. Our results supply helpful information to see how characteristic features of the electron-boson spectral function and the s- and d-wave superconducting gaps appear in various optical constants including raw reflectance spectrum. Our study may help with a thorough understanding of the usual optical analysis process. Further systematic study of experimental data

  17. Ab initio study of the H + HONO reaction: Direct abstraction versus indirect exchange processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.C.; Lin, M.C.; Mebel, A.M.; Melius, C.F.

    1997-01-02

    The mechanism of the H + HONO reaction (for which no experimental data are available) has been elucidated by ab initio molecular orbital calculations using modified G2 and BAC-MP4 methods. These results indicate that the reaction occurs predominantly by two indirect metathetical processes. One produces OH + HNO and H{sub 2}O + NO from the decomposition of vibrationally excited hydroxyl nitroxide, HN(O)OH, formed by H atom addition to the N atom of HONO. The other produces H{sub 2}O + NO from the decomposition of vibrationally excited dihydroxylamino radical, N(OH){sub 2}, formed by H atom addition to the terminal O atom. These indirect displacement processes are much more efficient than the commonly assumed, direct H-abstraction reaction producing H{sub 2} + NO{sub 2}. A transition-state theory calculation for the direct abstraction reaction and RRKM calculations for the two indirect displacement processes give rise to the following rate constants, in units of cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} for the 300-3500 K temperature range under atmospheric conditions: k{sub H(2)} = 3.33 x 10{sup -16}T{sup 1.55} exp(-3328.5/T), k{sub OH} = 9.36 x 10{sup -14}T{sup 0.86} exp(-2500.8/T), k{sub H(2)O} = 1.35 x 10{sup -17}T{sup 1.89} exp-(-1935.7/T), where the rate constant for H{sub 2}O production represents the sum from both indirect displacement reactions. 32 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. K Basin Sludge Conditioning Process Testing Project Results from Test 4, ''Acid Digestion of Mixed-Bed Ion Exchange Resin''

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Delegard, C.H.; Schmidt, A.J.; Thornton, B.M.; Silvers, K.L.

    1999-04-02

    Approximately 73 m{sup 3} of heterogeneous solid material, ''sludge,'' (upper bound estimate, Packer 1997) have accumulated at the bottom of the K Basins in the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site. This sludge is a mixture of spent fuel element corrosion products, ion exchange materials (organic and inorganic), graphite-based gasket materials, iron and aluminum metal corrosion products, sand, and debris (Makenas et al. 1996, 1997). In addition, small amounts of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been found. Ultimately, it is planned to transfer the K Basins sludge to the Hanford double shell tanks (DSTs). The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel (HSNF) project has conducted a number of evaluations to examine technology and processing alternatives to pretreat K Basin sludge to meet storage and disposal requirements. From these evaluations, chemical pretreatment has been selected to address criticality issues, reactivity, and the destruction or removal of PCBs before the K Basin sludge can be transferred to the DSTs. Chemical pretreatment, referred to as the K Basin sludge conditioning process, includes nitric acid dissolution of the sludge (with removal of acid insoluble solids), neutrons absorber addition, neutralization, and reprecipitation. Laboratory testing is being conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide data necessary to develop the sludge conditioning process.

  19. Summary of innovative concepts for industrial process improvement: An experimental technology exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Conger, R.L.; Lee, V.E.; Buel, L.M.

    1995-08-01

    This document is a compilation of one-page technical briefs that summarize the highlights of thirty-eight innovations that were presented at the seventh Innovative Concepts Fair, held in Denver, Colorado on April 20--21, 1995. Sixteen of the innovations were funded through the Innovative Concepts Program, and twenty-two innovations represent other state or federally funded programs. The concepts in this year`s fair addressed innovations that can substantially improve industrial processes. Each tech brief describes the need for the proposed concept; the concept being proposed; and the concept`s economics and market potential, key experimental results, and future development needs. A contact block is also included with each flier.

  20. Multilayered composite proton exchange membrane and a process for manufacturing the same

    DOEpatents

    Santurri, Pasco R; Duvall, James H; Katona, Denise M; Mausar, Joseph T; Decker, Berryinne

    2015-05-05

    A multilayered membrane for use with fuel cells and related applications. The multilayered membrane includes a carrier film, at least one layer of an undoped conductive polymer electrolyte material applied onto the carrier film, and at least one layer of a conductive polymer electrolyte material applied onto the adjacent layer of polymer electrolyte material. Each layer of conductive polymer electrolyte material is doped with a plurality of nanoparticles. Each layer of undoped electrolyte material and doped electrolyte material may be applied in an alternating configuration, or alternatively, adjacent layers of doped conductive polymer electrolyte material is employed. The process for producing a multilayered composite membrane includes providing a carrier substrate and solution casting a layer of undoped conductive polymer electrolyte material and a layer of conductive polymer electrolyte material doped with nanoparticles in an alternating arrangement or in an arrangement where doped layers are adjacent to one another.

  1. ISO 18629 PSL : A Standardized Language for Specifying and Exchanging Process Information

    SciTech Connect

    Pouchard, Line Catherine; Cutting-Decelle, A. F.; Michel, Jean-Jacques; Gruninger, Michael

    2006-01-01

    As enterprise integration increases, developers face increasingly complex problems related to interoperability. When enterprises collaborate, a common frame of reference or at least a common terminology is necessary for human-to-human, human-to-machine, and machine-to-machine communication. Ontology engineering offers a direction towards solving the inter-operability problems brought about by semantic obstacles related to the definitions of business terms and software classes. Ontology engineering is a set of tasks related to the development of ontologies for a particular domain. This paper is aimed at presenting the approach of ISO 18629, i.e., the Process Specification Language (PSL), to this problem. In the first part, the architecture of the standard is described, with the main features of the language. Then, the problems of the interoperability with PSL and the conformance to the standard are presented. The paper ends with an example showing the use of the standard for interoperability.

  2. Processing Information about Support Exchanges in Close Relationships: The Role of a Knowledge Structure.

    PubMed

    Turan, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    People develop knowledge of interpersonal interaction patterns (e.g., prototypes and schemas), which shape how they process incoming information. One such knowledge structure based on attachment theory was examined: the secure base script (the prototypic sequence of events when an attachment figure comforts a close relationship partner in distress). In two studies (N = 53 and N = 119), participants were shown animated film clips in which geometric figures depicted the secure base script and asked to describe the animations. Both studies found that many people readily recognize the secure-base script from these minimal cues quite well, suggesting that this script is not only available in the context of specific relationships (i.e., a relationship-specific knowledge): The generalized (abstract) structure of the script is also readily accessible, which would make it possible to apply it to any relationship (including new relationships). Regression analyses suggested that participants who recognized the script were more likely to (a) include more animation elements when describing the animations, (b) see a common theme in different animations, (c) create better organized stories, and (d) later recall more details of the animations. These findings suggest that access to this knowledge structure helps a person organize and remember relevant incoming information. Furthermore, in both Study 1 and Study 2, individual differences in the ready recognition of the script were associated with individual differences in having access to another related knowledge: indicators suggesting that a potential relationship partner can be trusted to be supportive and responsive at times of stress. Results of Study 2 also suggest that recognizing the script is associated with those items of an attachment measure that concern giving and receiving support. Thus, these knowledge structures may shape how people process support-relevant information in their everyday lives, potentially affecting

  3. Processing Information about Support Exchanges in Close Relationships: The Role of a Knowledge Structure

    PubMed Central

    Turan, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    People develop knowledge of interpersonal interaction patterns (e.g., prototypes and schemas), which shape how they process incoming information. One such knowledge structure based on attachment theory was examined: the secure base script (the prototypic sequence of events when an attachment figure comforts a close relationship partner in distress). In two studies (N = 53 and N = 119), participants were shown animated film clips in which geometric figures depicted the secure base script and asked to describe the animations. Both studies found that many people readily recognize the secure-base script from these minimal cues quite well, suggesting that this script is not only available in the context of specific relationships (i.e., a relationship-specific knowledge): The generalized (abstract) structure of the script is also readily accessible, which would make it possible to apply it to any relationship (including new relationships). Regression analyses suggested that participants who recognized the script were more likely to (a) include more animation elements when describing the animations, (b) see a common theme in different animations, (c) create better organized stories, and (d) later recall more details of the animations. These findings suggest that access to this knowledge structure helps a person organize and remember relevant incoming information. Furthermore, in both Study 1 and Study 2, individual differences in the ready recognition of the script were associated with individual differences in having access to another related knowledge: indicators suggesting that a potential relationship partner can be trusted to be supportive and responsive at times of stress. Results of Study 2 also suggest that recognizing the script is associated with those items of an attachment measure that concern giving and receiving support. Thus, these knowledge structures may shape how people process support-relevant information in their everyday lives, potentially affecting

  4. Boundary Layer Vertical Exchange Processes and the Mass Budget of Ozone: Observations and Model Results

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, Carl M.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.

    2000-06-16

    An Eulerian chemical model is used to assess the relative importance of a variety of processes associated with producing high surface ozone episodes during selected periods of the NARSTO 1995 field campaign over the northeastern United States. A comparison of the observed and predicted hourly surface ozone mixing ratios showed that the model qualitatively reproduced the observed ozone trends over the northeastern U.S. The model, however, over-predicted the surface concentrations by 10 to 15 ppb. The simulated mass budget tendency terms are compared for days with low ozone values immediately followed by days with high values. The later days showed observed and simulated ozone mixing ratios aloft to be of order twice that found on preceding days, although the associated chemical mix appeared to have relatively little potential for the subsequent generation of "new" ozone. Under conditions of shallow mixing over urban regions, simulated surface ozone production rates were negative (a net loss) throughout much of the day with convective mixing bringing newly produced ozone from aloft to the surface. It is noted that surface ozone levels appeared to be relatively insensitive to mixing layer growth rates.

  5. Modeling of a data exchange process in the Automatic Process Control System on the base of the universal SCADA-system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topolskiy, D.; Topolskiy, N.; Solomin, E.; Topolskaya, I.

    2016-04-01

    In the present paper the authors discuss some ways of solving energy saving problems in mechanical engineering. In authors' opinion one of the ways of solving this problem is integrated modernization of power engineering objects of mechanical engineering companies, which should be intended for the energy supply control efficiency increase and electric energy commercial accounting improvement. The author have proposed the usage of digital current and voltage transformers for these purposes. To check the compliance of this equipment with the IEC 61850 International Standard, we have built a mathematic model of the data exchange process between measuring transformers and a universal SCADA-system. The results of modeling show that the discussed equipment corresponds to the mentioned Standard requirements and the usage of the universal SCADA-system for these purposes is preferable and economically reasonable. In modeling the authors have used the following software: MasterScada, Master OPC_DI_61850, OPNET.

  6. Engineering Analysis of Intermediate Loop and Process Heat Exchanger Requirements to Include Configuration Analysis and Materials Needs

    SciTech Connect

    T.M. Lillo; R.L. Williamson; T.R. Reed; C.B. Davis; D.M. Ginosar

    2005-09-01

    The need to locate advanced hydrogen production facilities a finite distance away from a nuclear power source necessitates the need for an intermediate heat transport loop (IHTL). This IHTL must not only efficiently transport energy over distances up to 500 meters but must also be capable of operating at high temperatures (>850oC) for many years. High temperature, long term operation raises concerns of material strength, creep resistance and general material stability (corrosion resistance). IHTL design is currently in the initial stages. Many questions remain to be answered before intelligent design can begin. The report begins to look at some of the issues surrounding the main components of an IHTL. Specifically, a stress analysis of a compact heat exchanger design under expected operating conditions is reported. Also the results of a thermal analysis performed on two ITHL pipe configurations for different heat transport fluids are presented. The configurations consist of separate hot supply and cold return legs as well as annular design in which the hot fluid is carried in an inner pipe and the cold return fluids travels in the opposite direction in the annular space around the hot pipe. The effects of insulation configurations on pipe configuration performance are also reported. Finally, a simple analysis of two different process heat exchanger designs, one a tube in shell type and the other a compact or microchannel reactor are evaluated in light of catalyst requirements. Important insights into the critical areas of research and development are gained from these analyses, guiding the direction of future areas of research.

  7. Glacier winds in the Rongbuk Valley, north of Mount Everest: 2. Their role in vertical exchange processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xuhui; Song, Yu; Zhu, Tong; Lin, Weili; Kang, Ling

    2007-06-01

    High ozone concentrations, combined with low humidity and strong, persistent glacier winds, were found at the surface of Rongbuk Valley, north of Mount Everest, with sharply increased ozone concentrations in their vertical profiles. Glacier winds and their roles in vertical exchange of the atmosphere were investigated numerically to understand the phenomena. A Lagrangian particle dispersion model was used to carry out numerical experiments (forward-in-time simulations) and footprint analysis (backward-in-time simulations). The meteorological data inputs for these experiments were derived from the Advanced Regional Prediction System. Results showed that glacier winds may lead to significant downward transport of 1.5-2 km during the daytime from the northern slopes of Mount Everest. Glacier winds could advance down through the valley, with strong upward motions shown as a rolling up in front of their leading edge. Combining with upslope winds at two sidewalls of the valley or up-valley winds of tributaries, the lifting flows produced strong mixing of the atmosphere to a depth of approximately 3 km. Three-dimensional footprints derived from the particle dispersion model for the observational site, Rongbuk Monastery, clearly show influence from the mountainside of Mount Everest and from the southern part of the valley. The vertical extension of influence was as much as 2-3 km. Good correlation was found between the influence height and the ozone concentration. All the simulation results strongly indicate that the glacier winds and their related vertical exchange processes "pump down" ozone-rich air from upper levels to the surface of the valley.

  8. Mechanism of cation exchange process for epitaxy of superconducting mercury barium calcium copper oxide films and passive microwave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hua

    The record high superconducting transition temperature (T c) in Hg-based High temperature superconducting (HTS) cuprates make them very promising for both fundamental physics and practical applications. The high volatile nature of Hg presents a major challenge in epitaxy of high quality Hg-based HTS films. In a novel cation exchange process developed by our group recently, epitaxial HgBa2CaCu2O6+delta (Hg-1212) films can be obtained by diffusing volatile Tl cations out of, and simultaneously diffusing Hg cations into, the lattice of epitaxial Tl2Ba2CaCu2O8 (Tl-2212) or TlBa 2CaCu2O7 (Tl-1212) precursor films. Aiming at the remained issues in understanding the mechanism of the cation exchange (CE) process, this thesis work has studied the reversibility of CE. We have found that the CE process is completely reversible between Hg-1212 and Tl-2212, confirming further the thermal perturbation diffusion model. One of the experimental works unveiled that the conversion from Hg-1212 to Tl-2212 involves two steps: conversion from Hg-1212 to Tl-1212 via CE followed by Tl intercalation to form double Tl--O plans in each unit cell. Two improvements have been made in raising the quality of the Hg-1212 films. First, by successfully introducing micro-channels in Tl-1212 precursor with reversible CE, purer HTS Hg-1212 thin films have been obtained. Secondly, by pinning lattice with nonvolatile Re atoms, the surface morphology of Hg-1212 films have been improved. In addition to making the high quality Hg-1212 films, we have fabricated a two-pole X-band Hg-1212 microstrip filter and then investigated its nonlinearity by measuring the third-order intermodulation (IM3) signals since the major limitation for real application still comes from the nonlinearity. By a comparison between different structural materials of Hg-1212, Tl-2212 and YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO), the third-order intercept (IP3) of the Hg-1212 filter is consistently higher than that in the YBCO and Tl-2212. The surprising

  9. European seismological data exchange, access and processing: current status of the Research Infrastructure project NERIES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardini, D.; van Eck, T.; Bossu, R.; Wiemer, S.

    2009-04-01

    The EC Research infrastructure project NERIES, an Integrated Infrastructure Initiative in seismology for 2006-2010 has passed its mid-term point. We will present a short concise overview of the current state of the project, established cooperation with other European and global projects and the planning for the last year of the project. Earthquake data archiving and access within Europe has dramatically improved during the last two years. This concerns earthquake parameters, digital broadband and acceleration waveforms and historical data. The Virtual European Broadband Seismic Network (VEBSN) consists currently of more then 300 stations. A new distributed data archive concept, the European Integrated Waveform Data Archive (EIDA), has been implemented in Europe connecting the larger European seismological waveform data. Global standards for earthquake parameter data (QuakeML) and tomography models have been developed and are being established. Web application technology has been and is being developed to make a jump start to the next generation data services. A NERIES data portal provides a number of services testing the potential capacities of new open-source web technologies. Data application tools like shakemaps, lossmaps, site response estimation and tools for data processing and visualisation are currently available, although some of these tools are still in an alpha version. A European tomography reference model will be discussed at a special workshop in June 2009. Shakemaps, coherent with the NEIC application, are implemented in, among others, Turkey, Italy, Romania, Switzerland, several countries. The comprehensive site response software is being distributed and used both inside and outside the project. NERIES organises several workshops inviting both consortium and non-consortium participants and covering a wide range of subjects: ‘Seismological observatory operation tools', ‘Tomography', ‘Ocean bottom observatories', 'Site response software training

  10. Air-snow exchange of nitrate: a modelling approach to investigate physicochemical processes in surface snow at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Josué; Savarino, Joël; Picard, Ghislain

    2016-04-01

    Snowpack is a multiphase (photo)chemical reactor that strongly influences the air composition in polar and snow-covered regions. Snowpack plays a special role in the nitrogen cycle, as it has been shown that nitrate undergoes numerous recycling stages (including photolysis) in the snow before being permanently buried in the firn. However, the current understanding of these physicochemical processes remains very poor. Several modelling studies have attempted to reproduce (photo)chemical reactions inside snow grains, but these required strong assumptions to characterise snow reactive properties, which are not well defined. Physical processes such as adsorption, solid state diffusion and co-condensation also affect snow chemical composition. We developed a model including a physically based parameterisation of these air-snow exchange processes for nitrate. This modelling study divides into two distinct parts: firstly, surface concentration of nitrate adsorbed onto snow is calculated using existing isotherm parametrisation. Secondly, bulk concentration of nitrate in solid solution into the ice matrix is modelled. In this second approach, solid state diffusion drives the evolution of nitrate concentration inside a layered spherical snow grain. A physically-based parameterisation defining the concentration at the air-snow interface was developed to account for the the co-condensation process. The model uses as input a one-year long time series of atmospheric nitrate concentration measured at Dome C, Antarctica. The modelled nitrate concentration in surface snow is compared to field measurements. We show that on the one hand, the adsorption of nitric acid on the surface of the snow grains fails to fit the observed variations. During winter and spring, the modelled adsorbed concentration of nitrate is 2.5 and 8.3-fold higher than the measured one, respectively. A strong diurnal variation driven by the temperature cycle and a peak occurring in early spring are two other

  11. Recovery of salts from ion-exchange regeneration streams by a coupled nanofiltration-membrane distillation process.

    PubMed

    Jiříček, Tomáš; De Schepper, Wim; Lederer, Tomáš; Cauwenberg, Peter; Genné, Inge

    2015-01-01

    Ion-exchange tap water demineralization for process water preparation results in a saline regeneration wastewater (20-100 mS cm(-1)) that is increasingly problematic in view of discharge. A coupled nanofiltration-membrane distillation (NF-MD) process is evaluated for the recovery of water and sodium chloride from this wastewater. NF-MD treatment of mixed regeneration wastewater is compared to NF-MD treatment of separate anion- and cation-regenerate fractions. NF on mixed regeneration wastewater results in a higher flux (30 L m(-2) h(-1) at 7 bar) compared to NF on the separate fractions (6-9 L m(-2) h(-1) at 30 bar). NF permeate recovery is strongly limited by scaling (50% for separate and 60% for mixed, respectively). Physical signs of scaling were found during MD treatment of the NF permeates but did not result in flux decline for mixed regeneration wastewater. Final salt composition is expected to qualify as a road de-icing salt. NF-MD is an economically viable alternative compared to external disposal of wastewater for larger-scale installations (1.4 versus 2.5 euro m(-3) produced demineralized water for a 10 m3 regenerate per day plant). The cost benefits of water re-use and salt recuperation are small when compared to total treatment costs for mixed regenerate wastewater. PMID:26177408

  12. SEEP II, Shelf Edge Exchange Processes-II: Chlorophyll a fluorescence, temperature, and beam attenuation measurements from moored fluorometers

    SciTech Connect

    Medeiros, W.H.; Wirick, C.D.

    1992-02-01

    The Shelf Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP) program sponsored by the United States Department of Energy is a multi-institutional effort designed to investigate the flux of suspended material from the continental shelf to the waters of the upper slope, and then possibly into the slope sediments. The first SEEP experiment (SEEP I) was across the outer continental shelf of New England during 1983--1984 and consisted of a series of nine cruises and a mooring array. The second experiment (SEEP II) focused specifically of the shelf/slope frontal region of the mid-Atlantic Bight off the Delmarva peninsula. This report presents data collected during SEEP II. The SEEP II experiment consisted of a series of ten cruises and mooring arrays as well as over-flights by NASA aircraft. The cruises were consecutively designated SEEP2-01 to SEEP2-10. Hydrographic data were collected on all cruises except SEEP2-04 and SEEP2-07 during which benthic processes were investigated. Mooring arrays were deployed during three cruises in the Spring, Summer and Winter of 1988. Brookhaven National Laboratory deployed sixteen fluorometer instrument packages on their moorings with sensors to measure: the in vivo fluorescence of phytoplankton, temperature, subsurface light, dissolved oxygen, and water transparency. Data from the fluorometer, temperature, and transmissometer sensors are reported herein.

  13. Shelf Edge Exchange Processes, II: SEEP2-08, R/V ENDEAVOR cruise 188. Hydrographic data report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.; Behrens, W.J.; Flagg, C.N.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Wilke, R.J.; Wyman, K.D.

    1989-12-01

    The Shelf Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP) program sponsored by the United States Department of Energy is a multi-institutional effort designed to investigate the flux of suspended material from the continental shelf to the waters of the upper slope, and then possibly into the slope sediments. Phase I of SEEP consisted of a series of nine cruises and a mooring array across the outer continental shelf of New England during 1983--1984 (Behrens and Flagg, 1986). Phase II focused specifically on the shelf/slope frontal region of the mid-Atlantic bight off the Delmarva Peninsula. This project consisted of a series of ten cruises, a mooring array, and a series of over-flights by NASA aircraft. Hydrographic data were collected on eight of the cruises, six of which were primarily mooring deployment or recovery cruises. The cruises were consecutively designated SEEP2-01 to SEEP2-10. Two cruises (SEEP2-04 and SEEP2-07) were dedicated to investigating benthic processes and hydrographic data were not collected.

  14. Preliminary flowsheet: Ion exchange process for the separation of cesium from Hanford tank waste using Duolite{trademark} CS-100 resin

    SciTech Connect

    Eager, K.M.; Penwell, D.L.; Knutson, B.J.

    1994-12-01

    This preliminary flowsheet document describes an ion exchange process which uses Duolite{trademark} CS-100 resin to remove cesium from Hanford Tank waste. The flowsheet describes one possible equipment configuration, and contains mass balances based on that configuration with feeds of Neutralized Current Acid Waste, and Double Shell Slurry Feed. Process alternatives, unresolved issues, and development needs are discussed which relate to the process.

  15. Hydra: software for tailored processing of H/D exchange data from MS or tandem MS analyses

    PubMed Central

    Slysz, Gordon W; Baker, Charles AH; Bozsa, Benjamin M; Dang, Anthony; Percy, Andrew J; Bennett, Melissa; Schriemer, David C

    2009-01-01

    Background Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (H/DX-MS) experiments implemented to characterize protein interaction and protein folding generate large quantities of data. Organizing, processing and visualizing data requires an automated solution, particularly when accommodating new tandem mass spectrometry modes for H/DX measurement. We sought to develop software that offers flexibility in defining workflows so as to support exploratory treatments of H/DX-MS data, with a particular focus on the analysis of very large protein systems and the mining of tandem mass spectrometry data. Results We present a software package ("Hydra") that supports both traditional and exploratory treatments of H/DX-MS data. Hydra's software architecture tolerates flexible data analysis procedures by allowing the addition of new algorithms without significant change to the underlying code base. Convenient user interfaces ease the organization of raw data files and input of peptide data. After executing a user-defined workflow, extracted deuterium incorporation values can be visualized in tabular and graphical formats. Hydra also automates the extraction and visualization of deuterium distribution values. Manual validation and assessment of results is aided by an interface that aligns extracted ion chromatograms and mass spectra, while providing a means of rapidly reprocessing the data following manual adjustment. A unique feature of Hydra is the automated processing of tandem mass spectrometry data, demonstrated on a large test data set in which 40,000 deuterium incorporation values were extracted from replicate analysis of approximately 1000 fragment ions in one hour using a typical PC. Conclusion The customizable workflows and user-friendly interfaces of Hydra removes a significant bottleneck in processing and visualizing H/DX-MS data and helps the researcher spend more time executing new experiments and interpreting results. This increased efficiency will encourage the

  16. STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SORPTION BY MST AND MMST UNDER CONDITIONS REVELANT TO THE SMALL COLUMN ION-EXCHANGE PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Hobbs, D.; Poirier, M.

    2011-05-06

    A series of tests were performed to examine the kinetics of Sr and actinide removal by monosodium titanate (MST) and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) under mixing conditions similar to what will be provided in the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) Program. Similar removal kinetics were seen for two different mixing energies, indicating that under these conditions bulk solution transport is not the rate limiting step for Sr and actinide removal. Sr removal was found to be rapid for both MST and mMST, reaching steady-state conditions within six hours. In contrast, at least six weeks is necessary to reach steady-state conditions for Pu with MST. For mMST, steady-state conditions for Pu were achieved within two weeks. The actual contact time required for the SCIX process will depend on starting sorbate concentrations as well as the requirements for the decontaminated salt solution. During testing leaks occurred in both the MST and mMST tests and evidence of potential desorption was observed. The desorption likely occurred as a result of the change in solids to liquid phase ratio that occurred due to the loss of solution. Based on these results, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recommended additional testing to further study the effect of changing phase ratios on desorption. This testing is currently in progress and results will be documented in a separate report.

  17. A continuous process for biodiesel production in a fixed bed reactor packed with cation-exchange resin as heterogeneous catalyst.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yaohui; Zhang, Aiqing; Li, Jianxin; He, Benqiao

    2011-02-01

    Continuous esterification of free fatty acids (FFA) from acidified oil with methanol was carried out with NKC-9 cation-exchange resin in a fixed bed reactor with an internal diameter of 25 mm and a height of 450 mm to produce biodiesel. The results showed that the FFA conversion increased with increases in methanol/oil mass ratio, reaction temperature and catalyst bed height, whereas decreased with increases in initial water content in feedstock and feed flow rate. The FFA conversion kept over 98.0% during 500 h of continuous esterification processes under 2.8:1 methanol to oleic acid mass ratio, 44.0 cm catalyst bed height, 0.62 ml/min feed flow rate and 65°C reaction temperature, showing a much high conversion and operational stability. Furthermore, the loss of sulfonic acid groups from NKC-9 resin into the production was not found during continuous esterification. In sum, NKC-9 resin shows the potential commercial applications to esterification of FFA. PMID:21078550

  18. How do leader-member exchange quality and differentiation affect performance in teams? An integrated multilevel dual process model.

    PubMed

    Li, Alex Ning; Liao, Hui

    2014-09-01

    Integrating leader-member exchange (LMX) research with role engagement theory (Kahn, 1990) and role system theory (Katz & Kahn, 1978), we propose a multilevel, dual process model to understand the mechanisms through which LMX quality at the individual level and LMX differentiation at the team level simultaneously affect individual and team performance. With regard to LMX differentiation, we introduce a new configural approach focusing on the pattern of LMX differentiation to complement the traditional approach focusing on the degree of LMX differentiation. Results based on multiphase, multisource data from 375 employees of 82 teams revealed that, at the individual level, LMX quality positively contributed to customer-rated employee performance through enhancing employee role engagement. At the team level, LMX differentiation exerted negative influence on teams' financial performance through disrupting team coordination. In particular, teams with the bimodal form of LMX configuration (i.e., teams that split into 2 LMX-based subgroups with comparable size) suffered most in team performance because they experienced greatest difficulty in coordinating members' activities. Furthermore, LMX differentiation strengthened the relationship between LMX quality and role engagement, and team coordination strengthened the relationship between role engagement and employee performance. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:25000359

  19. Quantitative evaluation of fabrication processes of proton-exchanged layers in LiTaO3 optoelectronic devices by the line-focus-beam ultrasonic material characterization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushibiki, J.; Miyashita, M.

    2001-02-01

    Experimental investigations are conducted in order to collect basic data for evaluating proton-exchanged LiTaO3 optical waveguides and their fabrication processes and systems using the line-focus-beam ultrasonic material characterization system, in the frequency range 100-300 MHz. Seven Z-cut LiTaO3 substrates are proton exchanged at several process temperatures (220-280 °C) and times (5-30 min) in a pyrophosphoric acid solution. Leaky surface acoustic wave (LSAW) velocities, measured for all specimens, decrease for all propagation directions. The decrease rate is at maximum in the Y-axis propagation direction, in which the measurement sensitivity to the process conditions is highest. The fH dependences of LSAW velocities, obtained from frequency dependences of LSAW velocities and proton-exchanged layer depths analyzed by secondary-ion mass spectrometry, have almost constant gradients of -0.78 (m/s)/(Hz m). Normalized depth distributions of the elastic properties of proton-exchanged layers are nearly equal; only the depths differ. Also, the relationships among LSAW velocities, layer depths, process times, process temperatures, and diffusion coefficients are experimentally obtained. Homogeneity evaluation of a proton-exchanged, 2-in., Z-cut LiTaO3 wafer processed at 260 °C for 14 min is demonstrated, resulting in a maximum LSAW velocity variation of 1.3 m/s. This corresponds to a depth variation of 7.4 nm and a temperature variation of 0.8 °C for the whole surface.

  20. A combined process of activated carbon adsorption, ion exchange resin treatment and membrane concentration for recovery of dissolved organics in pre-hydrolysis liquor of the kraft-based dissolving pulp production process.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jing; Kaur, Ishneet; Baktash, Mir Mojtaba; He, Zhibin; Ni, Yonghao

    2013-01-01

    To recover dissolved organics in pre-hydrolysis liquor (PHL) of the kraft-based dissolving pulp production process, a new combined process concept of sequential steps of activated carbon adsorption, ion exchange resin treatment, and membrane concentration, was proposed. The removal of lignin in the PHL was achieved in the activated carbon adsorption step, which also facilitates the subsequent operations, such as the membrane filtration and ion exchange resin treatment. The ion exchange resin treatment resulted in the removal/concentration of acetic acid, which opens the door for acetic acid recovery. The membrane filtration is to recover/concentrate the dissolved sugars. The combined process resulted in the production of PHL-based concentrate with relatively high concentration of hemicellulosic sugars, i.e., 22.13%. PMID:23131623

  1. Evapotranspiration: A process driving mass transport and energy exchange in the soil-plant-atmosphere-climate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katul, Gabriel G.; Oren, Ram; Manzoni, Stefano; Higgins, Chad; Parlange, Marc B.

    2012-09-01

    The role of evapotranspiration (ET) in the global, continental, regional, and local water cycles is reviewed. Elevated atmospheric CO2, air temperature, vapor pressure deficit (D), turbulent transport, radiative transfer, and reduced soil moisture all impact biotic and abiotic processes controlling ET that must be extrapolated to large scales. Suggesting a blueprint to achieve this link is the main compass of this review. Leaf-scale transpiration (fe) as governed by the plant biochemical demand for CO2 is first considered. When this biochemical demand is combined with mass transfer formulations, the problem remains mathematically intractable, requiring additional assumptions. A mathematical "closure" that assumes stomatal aperture is autonomously regulated so as to maximize the leaf carbon gain while minimizing water loss is proposed, which leads to analytical expressions for leaf-scale transpiration. This formulation predicts well the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 and increases in D on fe. The case of soil moisture stress is then considered using extensive gas exchange measurements collected in drought studies. Upscaling the fe to the canopy is then discussed at multiple time scales. The impact of limited soil water availability within the rooting zone on the upscaled ET as well as some plant strategies to cope with prolonged soil moisture stress are briefly presented. Moving further up in direction and scale, the soil-plant system is then embedded within the atmospheric boundary layer, where the influence of soil moisture on rainfall is outlined. The review concludes by discussing outstanding challenges and how to tackle them by means of novel theoretical, numerical, and experimental approaches.

  2. Excess titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the cell surface induce cytotoxicity by hindering ion exchange and disrupting exocytosis processes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanli; Yao, Chenjie; Li, Chenchen; Ding, Lin; Liu, Jian; Dong, Peng; Fang, Haiping; Lei, Zhendong; Shi, Guosheng; Wu, Minghong

    2015-08-14

    To date, considerable effort has been devoted to determine the potential toxicity of nanoparticles to cells and organisms. However, determining the mechanism of cytotoxicity induced by different types of nanoparticles remains challenging. Herein, typically low toxicity nanomaterials were used as a model to investigate the mechanism of cytotoxicity induced by low toxicity nanomaterials. We studied the effect of nano-TiO2, nano-Al2O3 and nano-SiO2 deposition films on the ion concentration on a cell-free system simulating the cell membrane. The results showed that the ion concentration of K(+), Ca(2+), Na(+), Mg(2+) and SO4(2-) decreased significantly following filtration of the prepared deposition films. More specifically, at a high nano-TiO2 concentration (200 mg L(-1)) and a long nano-TiO2 deposition time (48 h), the concentration of Na(+) decreased from 2958.01 to 2775.72, 2749.86, 2757.36, and 2719.82 mg L(-1), respectively, for the four types of nano-TiO2 studied. Likewise, the concentration of SO4(2-) decreased from 38.83 to 35.00, 35.80, 35.40, and 35.27 mg L(-1), respectively. The other two kinds of typical low toxicity nanomaterials (nano-Al2O3 and nano-SiO2) have a similar impact on the ion concentration change trend. Adsorption of ions on nanoparticles and the hydrated shell around the ions strongly hindered the ions through the nanoparticle films. The endocytosed nanoparticles could be released from the cells without inducing cytotoxicity. Hindering the ion exchange and disrupting the exocytosis process are the main factors that induce cytotoxicity in the presence of excess nano-TiO2 on the cell surface. The current findings may offer a universal principle for understanding the mechanism of cytotoxicity induced by low toxicity nanomaterials. PMID:26176908

  3. Excess titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the cell surface induce cytotoxicity by hindering ion exchange and disrupting exocytosis processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanli; Yao, Chenjie; Li, Chenchen; Ding, Lin; Liu, Jian; Dong, Peng; Fang, Haiping; Lei, Zhendong; Shi, Guosheng; Wu, Minghong

    2015-07-01

    To date, considerable effort has been devoted to determine the potential toxicity of nanoparticles to cells and organisms. However, determining the mechanism of cytotoxicity induced by different types of nanoparticles remains challenging. Herein, typically low toxicity nanomaterials were used as a model to investigate the mechanism of cytotoxicity induced by low toxicity nanomaterials. We studied the effect of nano-TiO2, nano-Al2O3 and nano-SiO2 deposition films on the ion concentration on a cell-free system simulating the cell membrane. The results showed that the ion concentration of K+, Ca2+, Na+, Mg2+ and SO42- decreased significantly following filtration of the prepared deposition films. More specifically, at a high nano-TiO2 concentration (200 mg L-1) and a long nano-TiO2 deposition time (48 h), the concentration of Na+ decreased from 2958.01 to 2775.72, 2749.86, 2757.36, and 2719.82 mg L-1, respectively, for the four types of nano-TiO2 studied. Likewise, the concentration of SO42- decreased from 38.83 to 35.00, 35.80, 35.40, and 35.27 mg L-1, respectively. The other two kinds of typical low toxicity nanomaterials (nano-Al2O3 and nano-SiO2) have a similar impact on the ion concentration change trend. Adsorption of ions on nanoparticles and the hydrated shell around the ions strongly hindered the ions through the nanoparticle films. The endocytosed nanoparticles could be released from the cells without inducing cytotoxicity. Hindering the ion exchange and disrupting the exocytosis process are the main factors that induce cytotoxicity in the presence of excess nano-TiO2 on the cell surface. The current findings may offer a universal principle for understanding the mechanism of cytotoxicity induced by low toxicity nanomaterials.To date, considerable effort has been devoted to determine the potential toxicity of nanoparticles to cells and organisms. However, determining the mechanism of cytotoxicity induced by different types of nanoparticles remains challenging

  4. PAPER STUDY EVALUATIONS OF THE INTRODUCTION OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE WASTE STREAMS TO THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.; Stone, M.; Koopman, D.

    2010-06-29

    The objective of this paper study is to provide guidance on the impact of Monosodium Titanate (MST) and Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) streams from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet and glass waste form. A series of waste processing scenarios was evaluated, including projected compositions of Sludge Batches 8 through 17 (SB8 through SB17), MST additions, CST additions to Tank 40 or to a sludge batch preparation tank (Tank 42 or Tank 51, referred to generically as Tank 51 in this report), streams from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), and two canister production rates. A wide array of potential glass frit compositions was used to support this assessment. The sludge and frit combinations were evaluated using the predictive models in the current DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS). The results were evaluated based on the number of frit compositions available for a particular sludge composition scenario. A large number of candidate frit compositions (e.g., several dozen to several hundred) is typically a good indicator of a sludge composition for which there is flexibility in forming an acceptable waste glass and meeting canister production rate commitments. The MST and CST streams will significantly increase the concentrations of certain components in glass, such as Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, TiO{sub 2}, and ZrO{sub 2}, to levels much higher than have been previously processed at DWPF. Therefore, several important assumptions, described in detail in the report, had to be made in performing the evaluations. The results of the paper studies, which must be applied carefully given the assumptions made concerning the impact of higher Ti, Zr, and Nb concentrations on model validity, provided several observations: (1) There was difficulty in identifying a reasonable number of candidate frits (and in some cases an inability to identify any candidate frits) when a waste loading of 40% is

  5. Capture and isotopic exchange method for water and hydrogen isotopes on zeolite catalysts up to technical scale for pre-study of processing highly tritiated water

    SciTech Connect

    Michling, R.; Braun, A.; Cristescu, I.; Dittrich, H.; Gramlich, N.; Lohr, N.; Glugla, M.; Shu, W.; Willms, S.

    2015-03-15

    Highly tritiated water (HTW) may be generated at ITER by various processes and, due to the excessive radio toxicity, the self-radiolysis and the exceedingly corrosive property of HTW, a potential hazard is associated with its storage and process. Therefore, the capture and exchange method for HTW utilizing Molecular Sieve Beds (MSB) was investigated in view of adsorption capacity, isotopic exchange performance and process parameters. For the MSB, different types of zeolite were selected. All zeolite materials were additionally coated with platinum. The following work comprised the selection of the most efficient zeolite candidate based on detailed parametric studies during the H{sub 2}/D{sub 2}O laboratory scale exchange experiments (about 25 g zeolite per bed) at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK). For the zeolite, characterization analytical techniques such as Infrared Spectroscopy, Thermogravimetry and online mass spectrometry were implemented. Followed by further investigation of the selected zeolite catalyst under full technical operation, a MSB (about 22 kg zeolite) was processed with hydrogen flow rates up to 60 mol*h{sup -1} and deuterated water loads up to 1.6 kg in view of later ITER processing of arising HTW. (authors)

  6. The influence of inner-shell electron promotion on charge exchange processes in low energy ion scattering from surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting Li; MacDonald, R. J.

    1997-11-01

    The influence of inner-shell electron promotion on charge exchange in low energy (1-7 keV) Ne + ions scattered from the Cu (1 0 0), Ni (1 0 0) and Fe (1 1 0) surfaces has been studied systematically. The yield of Ne + ion scattered from these surfaces has been measured as a function of incident ion energy under various scattering geometries. The relative Ne + ion fraction, which is proportional to the normalised ion yield divided by the differential scattering cross section, is studied and an empirical formula for relative ion fraction has been extracted. The formula combines the charge exchanges along the incoming trajectory, during the close encounter, and along the outgoing trajectory into one simple expression. It can be concluded that inner-shell electron excitations during close encounters contribute significantly to the charge exchange in the scattering systems studied in this work.

  7. What can be Learned from X-Ray Spectroscopy Concerning Hot Gas in the Local Bubble and Charge Exchange Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, Steven L.

    2007-01-01

    Solar wind charge exchange produces diffuse X-ray emission with a variable surface brightness comparable to that of the cosmic background. While the temporal variation of the charge exchange emission allows some separation of the components, there remains a great deal of uncertainty as to the zero level of both. Because the production mechanisms of the two components are considerably different, their spectra would provide critical diagnostics to the understanding of both. However, current X-ray observatories are very limited in both spectral resolution and sensitivity in the critical soft X-ray (less than 1.0 keV) energy range. Non-dispersive high-resolution spectrometers, such as the calorimeter proposed for the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma mission, will be extremely useful in distinguishing the cascade emission of charge exchange from the spectra of thermal bremsstrahlung cosmic plasmas.

  8. Wherever I may roam: Processes of self-esteem development from adolescence to emerging adulthood in the context of international student exchange.

    PubMed

    Hutteman, Roos; Nestler, Steffen; Wagner, Jenny; Egloff, Boris; Back, Mitja D

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies on self-esteem development show substantial changes as well as interindividual differences in change from adolescence to young adulthood. However, the processes underlying these developmental trajectories are still not well understood. The aim of the present study was to shed light on the macro- and microprocesses of self-esteem development. We investigated a sample of 876 German high school students (M = 16.0 years at Time 1) participating in an international exchange year. Exchange students provided 3 waves of trait self-esteem data (shortly before they departed, immediately after return, and 1 year later), as well as 9 monthly state measures of self-esteem and social inclusion during their stay abroad. In addition, a control group of high school students who stayed in Germany (N = 714) provided 2 waves of trait self-esteem data. From a macroperspective, results showed an effect of student exchange on trait self-esteem development: Exchange students showed a steeper mean-level increase and a lower rank-order stability compared with control students. Zooming in on the microprocesses underlying these developmental patterns, we found trait changes in exchange students to be mediated by state changes in self-esteem during their exchange. These fluctuations in state self-esteem were found to be predicted by feelings of social inclusion in the host country, and vice versa, providing support for both sociometer and self-broadcasting perspectives on self-esteem dynamics. In sum, our findings emphasize the importance of incorporating a microanalytical approach when investigating self-esteem development by showing that the environment triggers changes in this relatively stable personality trait through changes in states. PMID:25285967

  9. Determination of {sup 16}O and {sup 18}O sensitivity factors and charge-exchange processes in low-energy ion scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tellez, H.; Chater, R. J.; Fearn, S.; Symianakis, E.; Kilner, J. A.; Brongersma, H. H.

    2012-10-08

    Quantitative analysis in low-energy ion scattering (LEIS) requires an understanding of the charge-exchange processes to estimate the elemental sensitivity factors. In this work, the neutralization of He{sup +} scattered by {sup 18}O-exchanged silica at energies between 0.6 and 7 keV was studied. The process is dominated by Auger neutralization for E{sub i} < 0.8 keV. An additional mechanism starts above the reionization threshold. This collision-induced neutralization becomes the dominant mechanism for E{sub i} > 2 keV. The ion fractions P{sup +} were determined for Si and O using the characteristic velocity method to quantify the surface density. The {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O sensitivity ratio indicates an 18% higher sensitivity for the heavier O isotope.

  10. Development of Novel Heterogeneous Catalyst Using Inorganic Ion Exchanger and Their Applications for Green Organic Transformation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Takayoshi

    In order to achieve green organic transformation of high-valued chemicals, the use of inorganic ion exchanger as a catalyst support is capable of creating precisely controlled catalytically active species responsible for targeted organic reactions. Layered hydroxy double salts (HDSs) have received considerable interest as anion exchangers due to their potential applications as catalysts and catalyst supports. The Ni-Zn mixed basic salt (NiZn) has a typical chemical composition of Ni1-xZn2x(CH3COO)2x(OH)2·nH2O (0.15exchanged NiZn catalyst based on the unique characteristics of NiZn, e.g., a strong electrostatic interaction with guest anion, high anion exchange ability, and dispersion of monomeric metal cation sites in its matrix. The green organic transformations such as aerobic alcohol oxidation, 1,4-addition reaction between boronic acid and α,β-unsaturated ketones, Knoevenagel reaction in water, and chemical fixation of CO2 into epoxide are also demonstrated by use of our catalysts.

  11. EXCHANGE PROCESSES OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ABOVE A TROPICAL RAIN FOREST: IMPLICATIONS FOR MODELING TROPOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY ABOVE DENSE VEGETATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements of bi-directional ammonia exchange over a fertilized soybean canopy are presented for an 8 week period during the summer of 2002. This modified Bowen-ratio approach was used to determine fluxes from vertical NH3 and temperature gradients in combination with eddy cova...

  12. 41 CFR 102-33.360 - What is the process for selling or exchanging aircraft parts for replacement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... FAA requirements. You are solely responsible for bringing the parts into compliance with 14 CFR part... or GSA, Federal Supply Service (FSS)) may transact an exchange or sale directly with a non-federal... arising from or incident to purchase, use, or resale of this item. (b) GSA, Federal Supply Service...

  13. 22 CFR 41.57 - International cultural exchange visitors and visitors under the Irish Peace Process Cultural and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS VISAS: DOCUMENTATION OF NONIMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Business and Media Visas § 41.57 International cultural exchange... a petition does not establish that the alien is eligible to receive a nonimmigrant visa....

  14. 22 CFR 41.57 - International cultural exchange visitors and visitors under the Irish Peace Process Cultural and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS VISAS: DOCUMENTATION OF NONIMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Business and Media Visas § 41.57 International cultural exchange... a petition does not establish that the alien is eligible to receive a nonimmigrant visa....

  15. 22 CFR 41.57 - International cultural exchange visitors and visitors under the Irish Peace Process Cultural and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS VISAS: DOCUMENTATION OF NONIMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Business and Media Visas § 41.57 International cultural exchange... a petition does not establish that the alien is eligible to receive a nonimmigrant visa....

  16. An Experimental Investigation of the Process of Isotope Exchange that Takes Place when Heavy Water Is Exposed to the Atmosphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeney, F. A.; O'Leary, J. P.

    2009-01-01

    We have used the recently developed method for rapid measurement of maximum density temperature to determine the rate at which hydrogen and deuterium isotope exchange takes place when a sample of heavy water is exposed to the atmosphere. We also provide a simple explanation for the observed linear rate of transition. (Contains 2 figures.)

  17. Reverse ion exchange as a major process controlling the groundwater chemistry in an arid environment: a case study from northwestern Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Faisal K; Nazzal, Yousef; Jafri, Muhammad Kamran; Naeem, Muhammad; Ahmed, Izrar

    2015-10-01

    Assessment of groundwater quality is of utmost significance in arid regions like Saudi Arabia where the lack of present-day recharge and high evaporation rates coupled with increasing groundwater withdrawal may restrict its usage for domestic or agricultural purposes. In the present study, groundwater samples collected from agricultural farms in Hail (15 samples), Al Jawf (15 samples), and Tabuk (30 samples) regions were analyzed for their major ion concentration. The objective of the study was to determine the groundwater facies, the main hydrochemical process governing the groundwater chemistry, the saturation index with respect to the principal mineral phases, and the suitability of the groundwater for irrigational use. The groundwater samples fall within the Ca-Cl type, mixed Ca-Mg-Cl type, and Na-Cl type. Evaporation and reverse ion exchange appear to be the major processes controlling the groundwater chemistry though reverse ion exchange process is the more dominating factor. The various ionic relationships confirmed the reverse ion exchange process where the Ca and Mg in the aquifer matrix have been replaced by Na at favorable exchange sites. This phenomenon has accounted for the dominance of Ca and Mg ions over Na ion at all the sites. The process of reverse ion exchange was further substantiated by the use of modified Piper diagram (Chadha's classification) and the chloro-alkaline indices. Evaporation as a result of extreme aridity has resulted in the groundwater being oversaturated with aragonite/calcite and dolomite as revealed by the saturation indices. The groundwater samples were classified as safe (less than 10) in terms of sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) values, good (less than 1.25) in terms of residual sodium carbonate (RSC) values, and safe to moderate (between 0 and 3) in terms of Mg hazard for irrigation purposes. Though the high salinity groundwater in the three regions coupled with low SAR values are good for the soil structure, it can have a

  18. Search for and Identification of Graviton Exchange Effects in Drell-Yan Process at Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankov, A. A.; Serenkova, I. A.; Tsytrinov, A. V.

    New physics signatures arising from different sources may be confused when first observed at future colliders. Thus it is important to examine how various scenarios may be differentiated given the availability of only limited information. Here, we explore the capability of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to distinguish spin-2 Kaluza-Klein towers of gravitons exchange from other new physics effects which might be conveniently parametrized by the four-fermion contact interactions. We find that the LHC with planned energies and luminosities will be capable of discovering (and identifying) graviton exchange effects in the large extra dimensions with the cutoff parameter of order 4.6 - 9.4 TeV (3.6 - 6.0 TeV) depending on energy, luminosity and number of extra dimensions.

  19. A three-dimensional, quantum mechanical study of exchange and charge transfer processes in the (Ar+H2) + system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Michael; Nakamura, Hiroki

    1987-10-01

    A three-dimensional quantum mechanical study of the (Ar+H2)+ system was carried out within the reactive infinite order sudden approximation. All three arrangement channels for exchange and charge transfer were treated simultaneously. Steric factors, opacity functions, angular distributions, and integral cross sections were calculated. Whenever possible, these were compared with both experimental and trajectory surface hopping (TSH) results. Whereas the fit with the TSH results was reasonable, the fit obtained with the experiment was less satisfactory. The reason for that can be attributed at least partially to the semiempirical DIM potential employed in the calculation.

  20. Chemical fractionation and speciation modelling for optimization of ion-exchange processes to recover palladium from industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Folens, K; Van Hulle, S; Vanhaecke, F; Du Laing, G

    2016-01-01

    Palladium is used in several industrial applications and, given its high intrinsic value, intense efforts are made to recover the element. In this hydrometallurgic perspective, ion-exchange (IEX) technologies are principal means. Yet, without incorporating the chemical and physical properties of the Pd present in real, plant-specific conditions, the recovery cannot reach its technical nor economic optimum. This study characterized a relevant Pd-containing waste stream of a mirror manufacturer to provide input for a speciation model, predicting the Pd speciation as a function of pH and chloride concentration. Besides the administered neutral PdCl2 form, both positively and negatively charged [PdCln](2-n) species occur depending on the chloride concentration in solution. Purolite C100 and Relite 2AS IEX resins were selected and applied in combination with other treatment steps to optimize the Pd recovery. A combination of the cation and anion exchange resins was found successful to quantitatively recover Pd. Given the fact that Pd was also primarily associated with particles, laboratory-scale experiments focused on physical removal of the Pd-containing flow were conducted, which showed that particle-bound Pd can already be removed by physical pre-treatment prior to IEX, while the ionic fraction remains fully susceptible to the IEX mechanism. PMID:27054747

  1. Optimizing liquid waste treatment processing in PWRs: focus on modeling of the variation of ion-exchange resins selectivity coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Gressier, Frederic; Van der Lee, Jan; Schneider, Helene; Bachet, Martin; Catalette, Hubert

    2007-07-01

    A bibliographic survey has highlighted the essential role of selectivity on resin efficiency, especially the variation of selectivity coefficients in function of the resin saturation state and the operating conditions. This phenomenon has been experimentally confirmed but is not yet implemented into an ion-exchange model specific for resins. This paper reviews the state of the art in predicting sorption capacity of ion-exchange resins. Different models accounting for ions activities inside the resin phase are available. Moreover, a comparison between the values found in the literature and our results has been done. The results of sorption experiments of cobalt chloride on a strong cationic gel type resin used in French PWRs are presented. The graph describing the variation of selectivity coefficient with respect to cobalt equivalent fraction is drawn. The parameters determined by the analysis of this graph are injected in a new physico-chemical law. Implementation of this model in the chemical speciation simulation code CHESS enables to study the overall effect of this approach for the sorption in a batch. (authors)

  2. Leach studies on cement-solidified ion exchange resins from decontamination processes at operating nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect

    McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W.; Morcos, N.

    1992-08-01

    The effects of varying pH and leachant compositions on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents were determined for cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small scale waste-form specimens were collected during waste solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station. The collected specimens were leach tested, and their compressive strength was measured in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s ``Technical Position on Waste Form`` (Revision 1), from the Low-Level Waste Management Branch. Leachates from these studies were analyzed for radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to assess the leachability of these waste form constituents. Leachants used for the study were deionized water, simulated seawater, and groundwater compositions similar to those found at Barnwell, South Carolina and Hanford, Washington. Results of this study indicate that initial leachant pH does not affect leachate pH or releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms. However, differences in leachant composition and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. In addition, results from this study indicate that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents observed for forms that disintegrated were similar to those for forms that maintained their general physical integrity.

  3. Leach studies on cement-solidified ion exchange resins from decontamination processes at operating nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect

    McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W.; Morcos, N.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of varying pH and leachant compositions on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents were determined for cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small scale waste-form specimens were collected during waste solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station. The collected specimens were leach tested, and their compressive strength was measured in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Technical Position on Waste Form'' (Revision 1), from the Low-Level Waste Management Branch. Leachates from these studies were analyzed for radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to assess the leachability of these waste form constituents. Leachants used for the study were deionized water, simulated seawater, and groundwater compositions similar to those found at Barnwell, South Carolina and Hanford, Washington. Results of this study indicate that initial leachant pH does not affect leachate pH or releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms. However, differences in leachant composition and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. In addition, results from this study indicate that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents observed for forms that disintegrated were similar to those for forms that maintained their general physical integrity.

  4. An experimental study of the flow through and over two dimensional rectangular roughness elements: Deductions for urban boundary layer parameterizations and exchange processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neophytou, M. K.-A.; Markides, C. N.; Fokaides, P. A.

    2014-08-01

    This paper investigates the flow through and over two-dimensional rectangular roughness elements, arranged in a building-street canyon geometry through a series of experiments. Geometries of different packing densities of the roughness elements (λp) were examined and the packing density values ranged from λp = 0.30 to 0.67. The purpose of the work is: (i) to investigate the flow physics observed both at the boundary layer scale as well as at the scale within the roughness elements for a range of packing densities, (ii) to deduce parameterizations of the adjusted rough boundary layer and their variation with a change in the packing density, and (iii) given a particular interest in and application to the urban atmosphere, a final aim at the roughness-element scale is to deduce the variation of the breathability with the packing density variation. Particle image velocimetery measurements of the velocity flow field as well as the turbulent kinetic energy and the Reynolds Stress (within and up to well-above the street canyons) were conducted. The results reveal qualitative flow features as well as features of the adjusted boundary layer structure—in particular the roughness and inertial sublayers, which can be associated with the surface roughness length, zero-plane displacement thickness, and the friction velocity. The lowest friction velocities are exhibited in the geometries with the highest- and lowest packing densities while the maximum friction velocities are observed in the medium-packed geometries. The exchange processes and breathability at the level of the roughness elements top were characterized and quantified by a mean exchange velocity. The results show that unlike friction velocity, the normalized exchange velocity (over the mean bulk velocity) for the most dense and sparse geometries differ by more than 80%, with the denser-packed geometries exhibiting lower exchange velocities; this is shown to be related with the thickness of the developed

  5. Correlation of the antimicrobial activity of salicylaldehydes with broadening of the NMR signal of the hydroxyl proton. Possible involvement of proton exchange processes in the antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Elo, Hannu; Kuure, Matti; Pelttari, Eila

    2015-03-01

    Certain substituted salicylaldehydes are potent antibacterial and antifungal agents and some of them merit consideration as potential chemotherapeutic agents against Candida infections, but their mechanism of action has remained obscure. We report here a distinct correlation between broadening of the NMR signal of the hydroxyl proton of salicylaldehydes and their activity against several types of bacteria and fungi. When proton NMR spectra of the compounds were determined using hexadeuterodimethylsulfoxide as solvent and the height of the OH proton signal was measured, using the signal of the aldehyde proton as an internal standard, it was discovered that a prerequisite of potent antimicrobial activity is that the proton signal is either unobservable or relatively very low, i.e. that it is extremely broadened. Thus, none of the congeners whose OH proton signal was high were potent antimicrobial agents. Some congeners that gave a very low OH signal were, however, essentially inactive against the microbes, indicating that although drastic broadening of the OH signal appears to be a prerequisite, also other (so far unknown) factors are needed for high antimicrobial activity. Because broadening of the hydroxyl proton signal is related to the speed of the proton exchange process(es) involving that proton, proton exchange may be involved in the mechanism of action of the compounds. Further studies are needed to analyze the relative importance of different factors (such as electronic effects, strength of the internal hydrogen bond, co-planarity of the ring and the formyl group) that determine the rates of those processes. PMID:25621992

  6. The Na+/H+ Exchanger NHE6 Modulates Endosomal pH to Control Processing of Amyloid Precursor Protein in a Cell Culture Model of Alzheimer Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Hari; Rao, Rajini

    2015-01-01

    Early intervention may be key to safe and effective therapies in patients with Alzheimer disease. Endosomal dysfunction is an early step in neurodegeneration. Endosomes are a major site of production of Aβ peptide from the processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by clipping enzymes (β- and γ-secretases). The β-secretase enzyme BACE1 requires acidic lumen pH for optimum function, and acid pH promotes Aβ aggregation. The Na+/H+ exchanger NHE6 provides a leak pathway for protons, limiting luminal acidification by proton pumps. Like APP, NHE6 expression was induced upon differentiation of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and localized to an endosomal compartment. Therefore, we investigated whether NHE6 expression altered APP localization and processing in a stably transfected cell culture model of human APP expression. We show that co-expression with NHE6 or treatment with the Na+/H+ ionophore monensin shifted APP away from the trans-Golgi network into early and recycling endosomes in HEK293 cells. NHE6 alkalinized the endosomal lumen, similar to monensin, and significantly attenuated APP processing and Aβ secretion. In contrast, Aβ production was elevated upon NHE6 knockdown. We show that NHE6 transcript and protein levels are lowered in Alzheimer brains relative to control. These findings, taken together with emerging genetic evidence linking endosomal Na+/H+ exchangers with Alzheimer disease, suggest that proton leak pathways may regulate Aβ generation and contribute to disease etiology. PMID:25561733

  7. Higher-order processes of excitation energy transfer in supramolecular complexes: Liouville space analysis of bridge molecule mediated transfer and direct photon exchange.

    PubMed

    May, Volkhard

    2008-09-21

    Long-range electronic excitation energy transfer is studied in the framework of a generalized master equation approach, which offers a systematic account for higher-order processes. Bridge molecule mediated transfer is confronted with the direct excitation energy exchange via photon emission and absorption. It is the central aim of this paper to present a systematic study of fourth-order rates, which describe both types of transfer processes characterized by the presence of intermediate states. While such a Liouville space formulation of rates is known from bridge mediated transfer, it is new for the case of photon mediated processes. In the former case, however, a novel approach to account for intermediate state relaxation is introduced. Finally and for illustration, some estimates are offered for the length dependence of the various discussed transfer rates. PMID:19044952

  8. Structural incorporation of silver in soda-lime glass by the ion-exchange process: a photoluminescence spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsella, E.; Battaglin, G.; Garcia, M. A.; Gonella, F.; Mazzoldi, P.; Polloni, R.; Quaranta, A.

    The structural incorporation of silver in ion-exchanged soda-lime glass is investigated by studying spectral and time-resolved photoluminescence as a function of the temperature. The observed spectroscopic features are related to silver electronic state coupling, following a progressive rearrangement of the Ag+ ion environment at increasing silver incorporation in glass. The bi-exponential luminescence decay at various temperatures in the range 80-294 K is interpreted on the basis of a four-level model. In particular, the energy splitting of the two lower excited states is observed to increase with the silver concentration in glass. The temperature dependence of the slow and fast decay times is related to the thermal quenching of the emission from the lower excited states to the ground state.

  9. Interface exchange processes in LaAlO3/Sr TiO3 induced by oxygen vacancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrmann, Malte; Lechermann, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the role of defects in oxide heterostructures is crucial for future materials control and functionalization. We hence study the impact of oxygen vacancies (OVs) at variable concentrations on orbital and spin exchange in the LaAlO3/Sr TiO3 interface by first-principles many-body theory and real-space model-Hamiltonian techniques. Intricate interplay between the Hubbard U and Hund's coupling JH for OV-induced correlated states is demonstrated. Orbital polarization towards an effective eg state with predominant local antiferromagnetic alignment on Ti sites near OVs is contrasted with t2 g(x y ) states with ferromagnetic tendencies in the defect-free regions. Different magnetic phases are identified, giving rise to distinct net-moment behavior at low and high OV concentrations. This provides a theoretical basis for prospective tailored magnetism by defect manipulation in oxide interfaces.

  10. Gamma irradiation-induced modifications of polymers found in nuclear waste embedding processes Part II: The ion-exchange resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debré, O.; Nsouli, B.; Thomas, J.-P.; Stevenson, I.; Colombini, D.; Romero, M.-A.

    1997-08-01

    Ion exchange resins (IERs) saturated in cesium and borate ions are well representative of low and medium activity nuclear waste to be embedded in an epoxy resin/amine hardener, such a conditioning procedure being under qualification. In order to test these materials in realistic conditions they are externally irradiated (air and water), in mixed beds saturated in fixed ions (cesium and borate) and water. Irradiation effects are evidenced with the HSF-SIMS technique by the variation of the emission characteristic of both the fixed ions, the chemical structure of the IERs and their interrelationship, both from the analysis of the solid material and of the residual or rinsing water. It appears that the fixed ions can be released in surrounding water as a consequence of radiation-induced resin fragments solubility.

  11. Determination of some aliphatic carboxylic acids in anaerobic digestion process waters by ion-exclusion chromatography with conductimetric detection on a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin column.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kazuaki; Takayama, Yohichi; Ikedo, Mikaru; Mori, Masanobu; Taoda, Hiroshi; Xu, Qun; Hu, Wenzhi; Sunahara, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Tsuneo; Sato, Shinji; Hirokawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2004-06-11

    The determination of seven aliphatic carboxylic acids, formic, acetic, propionic, isobutyric, n-butyric, isovaleric and n-valeric acids in anaerobic digestion process waters was examined using ion-exclusion chromatography with conductimetric detection. The analysis of these biologically important carboxylic acids is necessary as a measure for evaluating and controlling the process. The ion-exclusion chromatography system employed consisted of polymethacrylate-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin columns (TSKgel OApak-A or TSKgel Super IC-A/C). weakly acidic eluent (benzoic acid), and conductimetric detection. Particle size and cation-exchange capacity were 5 microm and 0.1 meq./ml for TSKgel OApak-A and 3 microm and 0.2 meq./ml for TSKgel Super IC-A/C, respectively. A dilute eluent (1.0-2.0 mM) of benzoic acid was effective for the high resolution and highly conductimetric detection of the carboxylic acids. The good separation of isobutyric and n-butyric acids was performed using the TSKgel Super IC-A/C column (150 mm x 6.0 mm i.d. x 2). The simple and good chromatograms were obtained by the optimized ion-exclusion chromatography conditions for real samples from mesophilic anaerobic digestors, thus the aliphatic carboxylic acids were successfully determined without any interferences. PMID:15250416

  12. CdS and CdS/CdSe sensitized ZnO nanorod array solar cells prepared by a solution ions exchange process

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ling; Gong, Haibo; Zheng, Xiaopeng; Zhu, Min; Zhang, Jun; Yang, Shikuan; Cao, Bingqiang

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CdS and CdS/CdSe quantum dots are assembled on ZnO nanorods by ion exchange process. • The CdS/CdSe sensitization of ZnO effectively extends the absorption spectrum. • The performance of ZnO/CdS/CdSe cell is improved by extending absorption spectrum. - Abstract: In this paper, cadmium sulfide (CdS) and cadmium sulfide/cadmium selenide (CdS/CdSe) quantum dots (QDs) are assembled onto ZnO nanorod arrays by a solution ion exchange process for QD-sensitized solar cell application. The morphology, composition and absorption properties of different photoanodes were characterized with scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray spectrum and Raman spectrum in detail. It is shown that conformal and uniform CdS and CdS/CdSe shells can grow on ZnO nanorod cores. Quantum dot sensitized solar cells based on ZnO/CdS and ZnO/CdS/CdSe nanocable arrays were assembled with gold counter electrode and polysulfide electrolyte solution. The CdS/CdSe sensitization of ZnO can effectively extend the absorption spectrum up to 650 nm, which has a remarkable impact on the performance of a photovoltaic device by extending the absorption spectrum. Preliminary results show one fourth improvement in solar cell efficiency.

  13. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of chromium(VI) reduction and EDTA oxidization by photoelectrocatalysis combining cationic exchange membrane processes.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hung-Te; Chen, Shiao-Shing; Tang, Yi-Fang; Hsi, Hsing-Cheng

    2013-03-15

    A novel technology of photoelectrocatalysis (PEC) combining with cationic exchange membrane (CEM) was proposed for simultaneous reduction of chromium(VI) and oxidization of EDTA. The application of CEM was used to enhance the efficiency for prevention of the re-oxidation of reduced chromium with the electron-hole pairs. In this study, effects of current density, pH, TiO2 dosage, hydraulic retention time (HRT), light intensity and EDTA/Cr(VI) molar ratio were all investigated. The results showed that the optimum conversion efficiency occurred at 4mA/cm(2) with the presence of CEM. Higher conversion efficiencies were observed at lower pH due to the electrostatic attractions between positive charged TiOH2(+), and negatively charged Cr(VI) and EDTA. The optimum TiO2 loading of 1g/L was depended mainly on the acidic pH range, especially at higher HRT and irradiation intensity. In addition, higher EDTA/Cr(VI) molar ratio enhanced the reduction efficiency of Cr(VI), indicating EDTA plays the role of hole scavenger in this system. Moreover, incomplete EDTA decomposition contributes to the occurrence of intermediates, including nitrilotriacetic acid, iminodiacetic acid, glycine, oxamic acid, lyoxylic acid, oxalic acid, acetic acid and formic acid, as identified by GC/MS. Consequently, transformation pathway was determined from these analyzed byproducts and molecular orbital package analysis. PMID:23380448

  14. Hexicon 2: automated processing of hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry data with improved deuteration distribution estimation.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Robert; Lou, Xinghua; Reinstein, Jochen; Shoeman, Robert L; Hamprecht, Fred A; Winkler, Andreas

    2014-06-01

    Hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) experiments analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS) provide information about the dynamics and the solvent accessibility of protein backbone amide hydrogen atoms. Continuous improvement of MS instrumentation has contributed to the increasing popularity of this method; however, comprehensive automated data analysis is only beginning to mature. We present Hexicon 2, an automated pipeline for data analysis and visualization based on the previously published program Hexicon (Lou et al. 2010). Hexicon 2 employs the sensitive NITPICK peak detection algorithm of its predecessor in a divide-and-conquer strategy and adds new features, such as chromatogram alignment and improved peptide sequence assignment. The unique feature of deuteration distribution estimation was retained in Hexicon 2 and improved using an iterative deconvolution algorithm that is robust even to noisy data. In addition, Hexicon 2 provides a data browser that facilitates quality control and provides convenient access to common data visualization tasks. Analysis of a benchmark dataset demonstrates superior performance of Hexicon 2 compared with its predecessor in terms of deuteration centroid recovery and deuteration distribution estimation. Hexicon 2 greatly reduces data analysis time compared with manual analysis, whereas the increased number of peptides provides redundant coverage of the entire protein sequence. Hexicon 2 is a standalone application available free of charge under http://hx2.mpimf-heidelberg.mpg.de. PMID:24676893

  15. Hexicon 2: Automated Processing of Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry Data with Improved Deuteration Distribution Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Robert; Lou, Xinghua; Reinstein, Jochen; Shoeman, Robert L.; Hamprecht, Fred A.; Winkler, Andreas

    2014-06-01

    Hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) experiments analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS) provide information about the dynamics and the solvent accessibility of protein backbone amide hydrogen atoms. Continuous improvement of MS instrumentation has contributed to the increasing popularity of this method; however, comprehensive automated data analysis is only beginning to mature. We present Hexicon 2, an automated pipeline for data analysis and visualization based on the previously published program Hexicon (Lou et al. 2010). Hexicon 2 employs the sensitive NITPICK peak detection algorithm of its predecessor in a divide-and-conquer strategy and adds new features, such as chromatogram alignment and improved peptide sequence assignment. The unique feature of deuteration distribution estimation was retained in Hexicon 2 and improved using an iterative deconvolution algorithm that is robust even to noisy data. In addition, Hexicon 2 provides a data browser that facilitates quality control and provides convenient access to common data visualization tasks. Analysis of a benchmark dataset demonstrates superior performance of Hexicon 2 compared with its predecessor in terms of deuteration centroid recovery and deuteration distribution estimation. Hexicon 2 greatly reduces data analysis time compared with manual analysis, whereas the increased number of peptides provides redundant coverage of the entire protein sequence. Hexicon 2 is a standalone application available free of charge under http://hx2.mpimf-heidelberg.mpg.de.

  16. Gamma-aminobutyric acid production using immobilized glutamate decarboxylase followed by downstream processing with cation exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungwoon; Ahn, Jungoh; Kim, Yeon-Gu; Jung, Joon-Ki; Lee, Hongweon; Lee, Eun Gyo

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) production technique using his-tag mediated immobilization of Escherichia coli-derived glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of glutamate to GABA. The GAD was obtained at 1.43 g/L from GAD-overexpressed E. coli fermentation and consisted of 59.7% monomer, 29.2% dimer and 2.3% tetramer with a 97.6% soluble form of the total GAD. The harvested GAD was immobilized to metal affinity gel with an immobilization yield of 92%. Based on an investigation of specific enzyme activity and reaction characteristics, glutamic acid (GA) was chosen over monosodium glutamate (MSG) as a substrate for immobilized GAD, resulting in conversion of 2.17 M GABA in a 1 L reactor within 100 min. The immobilized enzymes retained 58.1% of their initial activities after ten consecutive uses. By using cation exchange chromatography followed by enzymatic conversion, GABA was separated from the residual substrate and leached GAD. As a consequence, the glutamic acid was mostly removed with no detectable GAD, while 91.2% of GABA was yielded in the purification step. PMID:23322022

  17. Microtube strip heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F.D.

    1991-10-16

    This progress report is for the September--October 1991 quarter. We have demonstrated feasibility of higher specific conductance by a factor of five than any other work in high-temperature gas-to-gas exchangers. These laminar-flow, microtube exchangers exhibit extremely low pressure drop compared to alternative compact designs under similar conditions because of their much shorter flow length and larger total flow area for lower flow velocities. The design appears to be amenable to mass production techniques, but considerable process development remains. The reduction in materials usage and the improved heat exchanger performance promise to be of enormous significance in advanced engine designs and in cryogenics.

  18. Ion exchange technology assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Duhn, E.F.

    1992-01-01

    In the execution of its charter, the SRS Ion Exchange Technology Assessment Team has determined that ion exchange (IX) technology has evolved to the point where it should now be considered as a viable alternative to the SRS reference ITP/LW/PH process. The ion exchange media available today offer the ability to design ion exchange processing systems tailored to the unique physical and chemical properties of SRS soluble HLW's. The technical assessment of IX technology and its applicability to the processing of SRS soluble HLW has demonstrated that IX is unquestionably a viable technology. A task team was chartered to evaluate the technology of ion exchange and its potential for replacing the present In-Tank Precipitation and proposed Late Wash processes to remove Cs, Sr, and Pu from soluble salt solutions at the Savannah River Site. This report documents the ion exchange technology assessment and conclusions of the task team.

  19. Ion exchange technology assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Duhn, E.F.

    1992-12-31

    In the execution of its charter, the SRS Ion Exchange Technology Assessment Team has determined that ion exchange (IX) technology has evolved to the point where it should now be considered as a viable alternative to the SRS reference ITP/LW/PH process. The ion exchange media available today offer the ability to design ion exchange processing systems tailored to the unique physical and chemical properties of SRS soluble HLW`s. The technical assessment of IX technology and its applicability to the processing of SRS soluble HLW has demonstrated that IX is unquestionably a viable technology. A task team was chartered to evaluate the technology of ion exchange and its potential for replacing the present In-Tank Precipitation and proposed Late Wash processes to remove Cs, Sr, and Pu from soluble salt solutions at the Savannah River Site. This report documents the ion exchange technology assessment and conclusions of the task team.

  20. Modeling of the Process of Three-Isotope (H, D, T) Exchange Between Hydrogen Gas and Water Vapour on Pt-SDBC Catalyst over a Wide Range of Deuterium Concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorchenko, O.A.; Alekseev, I.A.; Tchijov, A.S.; Uborsky, V.V.

    2005-07-15

    The large scale studies of Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange (CECE) process in Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute showed a complicated influence of various factors on the process caused by the presence of two simultaneous isotope exchange sub processes: counter-current phase exchange (between liquid water and water vapour) and co-current catalytic exchange (between hydrogen gas and water vapour). A laboratory scale set-up of glass made apparatuses was established in such a way that it allows us to study phase and catalytic exchange apart. A computer model of the set-up has been developed.The catalytic isotope exchange model formulation is presented. A collection of reversible chemical reactions is accompanied by diffusion of the gaseous reactants and reaction products in the pores of catalyst carrier. This has some interesting features that are demonstrated. Thus it was noted that the flow rates ratio (gas to vapour - {lambda} = G/V) as well as the concentrations of reactants exert influence on the process efficiency.

  1. Cl-OH ion-exchanging process in chlorapatite (Ca5(PO4)3Cl(x)(OH)(1-x))--a deep insight.

    PubMed

    García-Tuñón, Esther; Dacuña, Bruno; Zaragoza, Guillermo; Franco, Jaime; Guitián, Francisco

    2012-10-01

    We have synthesized large chlorapatite [ClAp, Ca(5)(PO(4))(3)Cl(x)(OH)(1-x), where x = 1] single crystals using the molten salt method. We have corroborated that the hexagonal symmetry P6(3)/m describes the crystal structure best, even though the crystals are synthetic and stoichiometric. Moreover, we have performed several thermal treatments on these ClAp crystals, generating new single crystals in the apatite system [Ca(5)(PO(4))(3)Cl(x)(OH)(1-x), where x ≤ 1], where the chloride anions (Cl(-)) were systematically substituted by hydroxyl anions (OH(-)). These new single crystals were methodically characterized by powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform-IR spectroscopy (FT-IR), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). We have discovered a previously unreported OH(-) inclusion site substituting the Cl(-) anion during the ion-exchanging process. Finally, we evaluated the atomic rearrangements of the other species involved in the structure. These movements are associated with ionic exchange, which can be justified from an energetic point of view. We also found a novel phase transformation at high temperature. When the crystals are heated over 1753 K the apatite system evolves to a less ordered monoclinic structure, in which the complete loss of the species in the anionic channel (Cl(-), OH(-)) has been confirmed. PMID:22992792

  2. HEAT EXCHANGER

    DOEpatents

    Fox, T.H. III; Richey, T. Jr.; Winders, G.R.

    1962-10-23

    A heat exchanger is designed for use in the transfer of heat between a radioactive fiuid and a non-radioactive fiuid. The exchanger employs a removable section containing the non-hazardous fluid extending into the section designed to contain the radioactive fluid. The removable section is provided with a construction to cancel out thermal stresses. The stationary section is pressurized to prevent leakage of the radioactive fiuid and to maintain a safe, desirable level for this fiuid. (AEC)

  3. 41 CFR 102-33.360 - What is the process for selling or exchanging aircraft parts for replacement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FAA requirements. You are solely responsible for bringing the parts into compliance with 14 CFR part... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the process for... Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL...

  4. Ecological perspectives on biosphere-atmosphere trace gas exchange: Viewing gases in the context of ecosystem processes

    SciTech Connect

    Matson, P.A.

    1995-06-01

    Predictions and control of global climate change and regional changes in air chemistry depend on knowledge of sources and sinks of trace gases and their responses to the suite of global changes. In the past decade, major advances in the understanding of trace gas sources and sinks have been made through collaborations among ecologists and atmospheric scientists. Ecologists have brought to this topic a wholly new perspective -- one that emphasizes the need to view trace gas fluxes in terms of the ecosystem and microbial processes that produce them, and in terms of the environmental and edaphic factors that in turn control the processes. One consequence of this viewpoint is the transition from single gas measurement campaigns to the simultaneous measurement of fluxes of multiple gases and their often interacting controlling processes within ecosystems. Case studies illustrating the benefits of such an approach, in terms both of process-level understanding and of atmospheric dynamics, will be presented for the combinations of nitrous oxide and nitric oxide, nitrous oxide and methane, and non-methane hydrocarbons and nitric oxide.

  5. 41 CFR 102-33.360 - What is the process for selling or exchanging aircraft parts for replacement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... FAA requirements. You are solely responsible for bringing the parts into compliance with 14 CFR part... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What is the process for... Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL...

  6. Production of citric acid using its extraction wastewater treated by anaerobic digestion and ion exchange in an integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Chen, Yang-Qiu; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Tang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2014-08-01

    In order to solve the problem of extraction wastewater pollution in citric acid industry, an integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process is proposed in this study. Extraction wastewater was treated by mesophilic anaerobic digestion and then used to make mash for the next batch of citric acid fermentation. The recycling process was done for seven batches. Citric acid production (82.4 g/L on average) decreased by 34.1 % in the recycling batches (2nd-7th) compared with the first batch. And the residual reducing sugar exceeded 40 g/L on average in the recycling batches. Pigment substances, acetic acid, ammonium, and metal ions in anaerobic digestion effluent (ADE) were considered to be the inhibitors, and their effects on the fermentation were studied. Results indicated that ammonium, Na(+) and K(+) in the ADE significantly inhibited citric acid fermentation. Therefore, the ADE was treated by acidic cation exchange resin prior to reuse to make mash for citric acid fermentation. The recycling process was performed for ten batches, and citric acid productions in the recycling batches were 126.6 g/L on average, increasing by 1.7 % compared with the first batch. This process could eliminate extraction wastewater discharge and reduce water resource consumption. PMID:24522611

  7. Intimacy as an interpersonal process: the importance of self-disclosure, partner disclosure, and perceived partner responsiveness in interpersonal exchanges.

    PubMed

    Laurenceau, J P; Barrett, L F; Pietromonaco, P R

    1998-05-01

    H. T. Reis and P. Shaver's (1988) interpersonal process model of intimacy suggests that both self-disclosure and partner responsiveness contribute to the experience of intimacy in interactions. Two studies tested this model using an event-contingent diary methodology in which participants provided information immediately after their social interactions over 1 (Study 1) or 2 (Study 2) weeks. For each interaction, participants reported on their self-disclosures, partner disclosures, perceived partner responsiveness, and degree of intimacy experienced in the interaction. Overall, the findings strongly supported the conceptualization of intimacy as a combination of self-disclosure and partner disclosure at the level of individual interactions with partner responsiveness as a partial mediator in this process. Additionally, in Study 2, self-disclosure of emotion emerged as a more important predictor of intimacy than did self-disclosure of facts and information. PMID:9599440

  8. Building Cohesion in Positively Connected Exchange Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, David R.; Kornienko, Olga

    2009-01-01

    This research investigates the process through which individuals build cohesive relationships in positively connected exchange relations. Positive connections exist any time exchange in one relation must precede exchange in another. Such situations arise through gatekeeping, in generalized exchange contexts, and when resources diffuse across a…

  9. Exploring the ester-exchange reactions of diester-diterpenoid alkaloids in the aconite decoction process by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Shi, Lei; Song, Fengrui; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shuying

    2003-01-01

    The chemical components in the decoctions of Chinese herbal medicines are not always the same as those in the crude herbs because of the insolubility or instability of some compounds. In this work electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry was used to explore the ester-exchange reactions for aconitine-type diester-diterpenoid alkaloids occurring during the process of decocting aconite root. The aconitines were screened in a diverse range of samples, including crude aconite, decoction of crude aconite, residues from decoction of crude aconite, prepared aconite, decoction of prepared aconite, decoction of prepared aconite with added palmitic acid, and decoction of a mixture of mesaconitine and hypaconitine standards with liquorice root. It was found that diester-diterpenoid aconitines were converted into lipo-alkaloids as well as monoester alkaloids by the decoction of aconite. PMID:12569436

  10. Contaminant-mobilizing capability of fullerene nanoparticles (nC60): Effect of solvent-exchange process in nC60 formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lilin; Fortner, John D; Hou, Lei; Zhang, Chengdong; Kan, Amy T; Tomson, Mason B; Chen, Wei

    2013-02-01

    Fullerene nanoparticles (nC(60)) in aqueous environments can significantly enhance the transport of hydrophobic organic contaminants by serving as a contaminant carrier. In the present study, the authors examine the effect of the solvent-exchange process on nC(60) aggregate formation and, subsequently, on nC(60) 's contaminant-mobilizing capability. A series of nC(60) samples were prepared using a modified toluene-water solvent-exchange method through the inclusion of a secondary organic solvent in the phase transfer of molecular C(60) in toluene to nC(60) in water. Two groups of solvents--a water-miscible group and a non-water-miscible group-of varied polarity were selected as secondary solvents. The involvement of a secondary solvent in the phase transfer process had only small effects on the particle size and distribution, ζ potential, and mobility of the nC(60) products but significantly influenced the capability of nC(60) to enhance the transport of 2,2',5,5'-polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) in a saturated sandy soil column, regardless of whether the secondary solvent was water-miscible or non-water-miscible. The two groups of secondary solvents appear to affect the aggregation properties of nC(60) in water via different mechanisms. In general, nC(60) products made with a secondary water-miscible solvent have stronger capabilities to enhance PCB transport. Taken together, the results indicate that according to formation conditions and solvent constituents, nC(60) will vary significantly in its interactions with organic contaminants, specifically as related to adsorption or desorption as well as transport in porous media. PMID:23172734

  11. The organic sea-surface microlayer in the upwelling region off the coast of Peru and potential implications for air-sea exchange processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Anja; Galgani, Luisa

    2016-02-01

    The sea-surface microlayer (SML) is at the uppermost surface of the ocean, linking the hydrosphere with the atmosphere. The presence and enrichment of organic compounds in the SML have been suggested to influence air-sea gas exchange processes as well as the emission of primary organic aerosols. Here, we report on organic matter components collected from an approximately 50 µm thick SML and from the underlying water (ULW), ˜ 20 cm below the SML, in December 2012 during the SOPRAN METEOR 91 cruise to the highly productive, coastal upwelling regime off the coast of Peru. Samples were collected at 37 stations including coastal upwelling sites and off-shore stations with less organic matter and were analyzed for total and dissolved high molecular weight (> 1 kDa) combined carbohydrates (TCCHO, DCCHO), free amino acids (FAA), total and dissolved hydrolyzable amino acids (THAA, DHAA), transparent exopolymer particles (TEP), Coomassie stainable particles (CSPs), total and dissolved organic carbon (TOC, DOC), total and dissolved nitrogen (TN, TDN), as well as bacterial and phytoplankton abundance. Our results showed a close coupling between organic matter concentrations in the water column and in the SML for almost all components except for FAA and DHAA that showed highest enrichment in the SML on average. Accumulation of gel particles (i.e., TEP and CSP) in the SML differed spatially. While CSP abundance in the SML was not related to wind speed, TEP abundance decreased with wind speed, leading to a depletion of TEP in the SML at about 5 m s-1. Our study provides insight to the physical and biological control of organic matter enrichment in the SML, and discusses the potential role of organic matter in the SML for air-sea exchange processes.

  12. Process for oil shale retorting using gravity-driven solids flow and solid-solid heat exchange

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, A.E.; Braun, R.L.; Mallon, R.G.; Walton, O.R.

    1983-09-21

    A cascading bed retorting process and apparatus are disclosed in which cold raw crushed shale enters at the middle of a retort column into a mixer stage where it is rapidly mixed with hot recycled shale and thereby heated to pyrolysis temperature. The heated mixture then passes through a pyrolyzer stage where it resides for a sufficient time for complete pyrolysis to occur. The spent shale from the pyrolyzer is recirculated through a burner stage where the residual char is burned to heat the shale which then enters the mixer stage.

  13. Process for oil shale retorting using gravity-driven solids flow and solid-solid heat exchange

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Arthur E.; Braun, Robert L.; Mallon, Richard G.; Walton, Otis R.

    1986-01-01

    A cascading bed retorting process and apparatus in which cold raw crushed shale enters at the middle of a retort column into a mixer stage where it is rapidly mixed with hot recycled shale and thereby heated to pyrolysis temperature. The heated mixture then passes through a pyrolyzer stage where it resides for a sufficient time for complete pyrolysis to occur. The spent shale from the pyrolyzer is recirculated through a burner stage where the residual char is burned to heat the shale which then enters the mixer stage.

  14. Proceedings of waste stream minimization and utilization innovative concepts: An experimental technology exchange. Volume 2, Industrial liquid waste processing, industrial gaseous waste processing

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.E.; Watts, R.L.

    1993-04-01

    This two-volume proceedings summarize the results of fifteen innovations that were funded through the US Department of Energy`s Innovative Concept Program. The fifteen innovations were presented at the sixth Innovative Concepts Fair, held in Austin, Texas, on April 22--23, 1993. The concepts in this year`s fair address innovations that can substantially reduce or use waste streams. Each paper describes the need for the proposed concept, the concept being proposed, and the concept`s economics and market potential, key experimental results, and future development needs. The papers are divided into two volumes: Volume 1 addresses innovations for industrial solid waste processing and municipal waste reduction/recycling, and Volume 2 addresses industrial liquid waste processing and industrial gaseous waste processing. Individual reports are indexed separately.

  15. Importance of intertidal sediment processes and porewater exchange on the water column biogeochemistry in a pristine mangrove creek (Ras Dege, Tanzania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouillon, S.; Middelburg, J. J.; Dehairs, F.; Borges, A. V.; Abril, G.; Flindt, M. R.; Ulomi, S.; Kristensen, E.

    2007-01-01

    has a signature of -22.4‰, which shows that imported POC and DOC from the marine environment contributes strongly to overall mineralization within the mangrove system. Our data show a striking example of how biogeochemical processes in the intertidal zone appear to be prominent drivers of element concentrations and isotope signatures in the water column, and how pathways of dissolved and particulate matter exchange are fundamentally different. The estimated export of DIC through porewater exchange appears considerably larger than for DOC, suggesting that if this mechanism is indeed a major driver of solute exchange, benthic mineralization and subsequent export as DIC could represent a very significant and previously unaccounted fate of mangrove-derived C. Budgeting efforts should therefore pay attention to understanding the mechanisms and quantification of different pathways of exchange within and between both zones.

  16. Land-Use and Land-Cover Change and Associated Changes in Hydrological Cycle and Energy Exchange Processes in Monsoon Asian Region (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, A.; Liang, M.; Barman, R.; Erickson, M.; Cao, L.; Bala, G.

    2009-12-01

    The climate system is affected by land-use and land-cover changes (LULCC) through changes in hydrological cycle, energy exchange processes and soil biogeochemistry. These changes affect climate both at global and regional scales. Here, we use the terrestrial component of the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM), with satellite data to examine the effects of LULCC and other terrestrial ecosystem processes on variability in soil hydrology and energy fluxes in monsoon Asian region. ISAM’s energy and hydrology processes have been adapted from the Common Land Model (CoLM) and the Community Land Model (CLM 3.5), respectively. CoLM uses a two-big-leaf scheme for modeling canopy temperature, photosynthesis and stomatal conductance, improving CO2 and water flux estimates. The soil/snow hydrology, incorporated from CLM3.5 (10 layers for soil and up to 5 layers for snow) improves runoff and ground water table predictions. This talk will focus on describing the results of a series of modeling experiments investigating the influence of LULCC on terrestrial moisture flux, latent and sensible heat fluxes, and continental runoff (surface & subsurface) in monsoon Asian region. These experiments were conducted based on measured activities of LULCC and observed atmospheric forcings over the last century.

  17. Strong ion exchange in centrifugal partition extraction (SIX-CPE): effect of partition cell design and dimensions on purification process efficiency.

    PubMed

    Hamzaoui, Mahmoud; Hubert, Jane; Reynaud, Romain; Marchal, Luc; Foucault, Alain; Renault, Jean-Hugues

    2012-07-20

    The aim of this article was to evaluate the influence of the column design of a hydrostatic support-free liquid-liquid chromatography device on the process efficiency when the strong ion-exchange (SIX) development mode is used. The purification of p-hydroxybenzylglucosinolate (sinalbin) from a crude aqueous extract of white mustard seeds (Sinapis alba L.) was achieved on two types of devices: a centrifugal partition chromatograph (CPC) and a centrifugal partition extractor (CPE). They differ in the number, volume and geometry of their partition cells. The SIX-CPE process was evaluated in terms of productivity and sinalbin purification capability as compared to previously optimized SIX-CPC protocols that were carried out on columns of 200 mL and 5700 mL inner volume, respectively. The objective was to determine whether the decrease in partition cell number, the increase in their volume and the use of a "twin cell" design would induce a significant increase in productivity by applying higher mobile phase flow rate while maintaining a constant separation quality. 4.6g of sinalbin (92% recovery) were isolated from 25 g of a crude white mustard seed extract, in only 32 min and with a purity of 94.7%, thus corresponding to a productivity of 28 g per hour and per liter of column volume (g/h/LV(c)). Therefore, the SIX-CPE process demonstrates promising industrial technology transfer perspectives for the large-scale isolation of ionized natural products. PMID:22677413

  18. Shelf Edge Exchange Processes: 2, SEEP2-09, R/V ENDEAVOR cruise 193: Hydrographic data report

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, W.J.; Wilson, C.; Flagg, C.N.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Wilke, R.J.; Wyman, K.D.

    1990-01-01

    The R/V ENDEAVOR cruise 193, SEEP2-09, took place from 17--23 March 1989 and focused primarily on biological processes in the SEEP2 area. Mooring 1 was recovered and re-deployed and a replacement for mooring 4 was deployed. A 24 hour time series was conducted at mooring 1 to study primary and secondary production. The time series involved sampling nutrients, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll {und a}, zooplankton abundance and distribution and fecal pellet production. Experiments to estimate grazing rates the fecal pellet production of the dominant copepods were also done. MOCNESS tows and box core samples were also taken during the cruise. Sediment and zooplankton data are not reported here. During this cruise 46 CTD casts were made measuring pressure, temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, fluorescence and light transmission. Discrete samples were taken in rosette-mounted Niskin bottles and analyzed for concentration of nutrients, chlorophyll {und a}, dissolved oxygen, and particulate organic carbon and nitrogen.

  19. Ion-exchange reactions on clay minerals coupled with advection/dispersion processes. Application to Na+/Ca2+ exchange on vermiculite: Reactive-transport modeling, batch and stirred flow-through reactor experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tertre, E.; Hubert, F.; Bruzac, S.; Pacreau, M.; Ferrage, E.; Prêt, D.

    2013-07-01

    The present study aims at testing the validity of using an Na+/Ca2+ ion-exchange model, derived from batch data to interpret experimental Ca2+-for-Na+ exchange breakthrough curves obtained on vermiculite (a common swelling clay mineral in surface environments). The ion-exchange model was constructed considering the multi-site nature of the vermiculite surface as well as the exchange of all aqueous species (Mg2+ derived from the dissolution of the solid and H+). The proposed ion-exchange model was then coupled with a transport model, and the predicted breakthrough curves were compared with the experimental ones obtained using a well stirred flow-through reactor. For a given solute residence time in the reactor (typically 50 min), our thermodynamic model based on instantaneous equilibrium was found to accurately reproduce several of the experimental breakthrough curves, depending on the Na+ and Ca2+ concentrations of the influents pumped through the reactor. However the model failed to reproduce experimental breakthrough curves obtained at high flow rates and low chemical gradient between the exchanger phase and the solution. An alternative model based on a hybrid equilibrium/kinetic approach was thus used and allowed predicting experimental data. Based on these results, we show that a simple parameter can be used to differentiate between thermodynamic and kinetic control of the exchange reaction with water flow. The results of this study are relevant for natural systems where two aquatic environments having contrasted chemistries interact. Indeed, the question regarding the attainment of a full equilibrium in such a system during the contact time of the aqueous phase with the particle/colloid remains most often open. In this context, we show that when a river (a flow of fresh water) encounters marine colloids, a systematic full equilibrium can be assumed (i.e., the absence of kinetic effects) when the residence time of the solute in 1 m3 of the system is ⩾6200 h.

  20. Science exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Dwindling scientific and technical exchange between the United States and the Soviet Union and prospects for enhancing such exchanges were discussed at an August 2 hearing by the Foreign Affairs Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives. The committee also heard overviews on the United States' approach to international exchange of science and technology. The hearing was the first in a series on current and future international science and technology programs.Four of eight science and technology agreements with the USSR that have expired in the last 15 months, including one on space, have not been renewed. The remaining four agreements have been extended into 1987 and 1988. Two others, including one on oceanography, are scheduled to run out in 1984.

  1. The importance of sub-mesoscale processes for the exchange of properties through the Strait of Gibraltar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, M.; Chioua, J.; Romero, J.; Vázquez, A.; Macías, D.; Dastis, C.; Ramírez-Romero, E.; Echevarria, F.; Reyes, J.; García, C. M.

    2013-09-01

    This article presents a detailed analysis of the sub-mesoscale transport processes in the Strait of Gibraltar. The interest is focussed on the Camarinal Sill region, and special attention is paid to the across-strait transport processes, the divergences and convergences in the central zone, and the small-scale circulation patterns along the northern coastal margin. The analysis is based on high-resolution (7 m) SST images acquired by an air-borne hyper-spectral scanner, and has been complemented with a rhodamine-release experiment, continuous thermo-salinograph records, acoustic Doppler current (ADCP) profiles from both moorings and vessel-mounted experiments, and numerical modelling. It is deduced from the analysis that the coupling between the upwelling processes, induced by the internal tide and the generation of large-amplitude internal waves, and the cyclonic eddies formed on the coastal margin, seems to be the mechanism that explains the chlorophyll maxima frequently found on the coastal margin of the studied area. Further, as a consequence of the small-scale patterns of circulation induced by the internal waves, the suspended substances are displaced from the coastal margins toward the central zones and later are carried by the westward current toward the convergence zones created by the internal waves, where they may be retained and accumulate. Then, in the eastward phase of the tidal current over the Camarinal Sill, these nuclei of concentrated substances (nutrients, chlorophyll, and plankton) are transported toward the Alboran Sea, where they must contribute, in part, to the primary productivity there. High-resolution (7 m) SST images acquired by an Airborne Hyper-spectral Scanner (AHS) provided by the Spanish Institute of Aerospace Techniques (INTA). Measurements made along vessel transects crossing the studied zone, of current velocity and echo-intensity profiles acquired by ADCP, and sea surface temperature, salinity and released rhodamine (see Fig. 1

  2. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) Processing by a Unit of Mitochondrial Ca(2+) Uniporter and Na(+)/Ca(2+) Exchanger Supports the Neuronal Ca(2+) Influx via Activated Glutamate Receptors.

    PubMed

    Strokin, Mikhail; Reiser, Georg

    2016-06-01

    The current study demonstrates that in hippocampal neurons mitochondrial Ca(2+) processing supports Ca(2+) influx via ionotropic glutamate (Glu) receptors. We define mitochondrial Ca(2+) processing as Ca(2+) uptake via mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) combined with subsequent Ca(2+) release via mitochondrial Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX). Our tool is to measure the Ca(2+) influx rate in primary hippocampal co-cultures, i.e. neurons and astrocytes, by fluorescent digital microscopy, using a Fura-2-quenching method where we add small amounts of Mn(2+) in the superfusion medium. Thus, Ca(2+) influx is measured with Mn(2+) in the bath. Ru360 as inhibitor of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake through MCU strongly reduces the rate of Ca(2+) influx in Glu-stimulated primary hippocampal neurons. Similarly, the Ca(2+) influx rate in Glu-stimulated neurons declines after suppression of potential-dependent MCU, when we depolarize mitochondria with rotenone. With inhibition of Ca(2+) release from mitochondria via NCX using CGP-37157 the Ca(2+) influx via N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)- and kainate-sensitive receptors is slowed down. Working jointly as mitochondrial Ca(2+) processing unit, MCU and NCX, apparently sustain the Ca(2+) throughput of activated Glu-sensitive receptors. Our results revise the role frequently attributed to mitochondria in neuronal Ca(2+) homeostasis, where mitochondria function mainly as Ca(2+) buffer, and prevent excessively high cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration increase during neuronal activity. The mechanism to control Ca(2+) influx in neurons, as discovered in this study, highlights mitochondrial Ca(2+) processing as a promising pharmacological target. We discuss this pathway in relation to the endoplasmic reticulum-related mechanisms of Ca(2+) processing. PMID:26842930

  3. Heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, C.R.

    1988-02-02

    A heat exchanger having primary and secondary conduits in heat-exchanging relationship is described comprising: at least one serpentine tube having parallel sections connected by reverse bends, the serpentine tube constituting one of the conduits; a group of open-ended tubes disposed adjacent to the parallel sections, the open-ended tubes constituting the other of the conduits, and forming a continuous mass of contacting tubes extending between and surrounding the serpentine tube sections; and means securing the mass of tubes together to form a predetermined cross-section of the entirety of the mass of open-ended tubes and tube sections.

  4. Heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Daman, Ernest L.; McCallister, Robert A.

    1979-01-01

    A heat exchanger is provided having first and second fluid chambers for passing primary and secondary fluids. The chambers are spaced apart and have heat pipes extending from inside one chamber to inside the other chamber. A third chamber is provided for passing a purge fluid, and the heat pipe portion between the first and second chambers lies within the third chamber.

  5. A high-throughput 2D-analytical technique to obtain single protein parameters from complex cell lysates for in silico process development of ion exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kröner, Frieder; Elsäßer, Dennis; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2013-11-29

    The accelerating growth of the market for biopharmaceutical proteins, the market entry of biosimilars and the growing interest in new, more complex molecules constantly pose new challenges for bioseparation process development. In the presented work we demonstrate the application of a multidimensional, analytical separation approach to obtain the relevant physicochemical parameters of single proteins in a complex mixture for in silico chromatographic process development. A complete cell lysate containing a low titre target protein was first fractionated by multiple linear salt gradient anion exchange chromatography (AEC) with varying gradient length. The collected fractions were subsequently analysed by high-throughput capillary gel electrophoresis (HT-CGE) after being desalted and concentrated. From the obtained data of the 2D-separation the retention-volumes and the concentration of the single proteins were determined. The retention-volumes of the single proteins were used to calculate the related steric-mass action model parameters. In a final evaluation experiment the received parameters were successfully applied to predict the retention behaviour of the single proteins in salt gradient AEC. PMID:24139506

  6. The effect of gold nanoparticles on exchange processes in collision complexes of triplet and singlet oxygen molecules with excited eosin molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryukhanov, V. V.; Minaev, B. M.; Tsibul'nikova, A. V.; Slezhkin, V. A.

    2015-07-01

    We have studied exchange processes in contact complexes of triplet eosin molecules with oxygen molecules in the triplet (3Σ{/g -}) and singlet (1Δ g ) states in thin polyvinylbutyral films in the presence of gold nanoparticles. Upon resonant excitation of surface plasmons in gold nanoparticles into the absorption band of eosin molecules-singlet oxygen sensitizers-we have obtained an increase in the intensity of the delayed fluorescence and an increase in the lifetime of the dye with simultaneous quenching of the luminescence of singlet oxygen. The kinetics of the delayed fluorescence of the dye as a result of singlet-triplet annihilation of triplet eosin molecules with singlet oxygen molecules has been investigated. To compare theoretical and experimental data, we have numerically simulated energy transfer processes. Rate constants of energy transfer and of singlet-triplet annihilation, as well as quenching constants of triplet states of the dye by molecular oxygen, have been calculated. Luminescence quantum yield 1Δ g of polyvinylbutyral has been estimated. We have analyzed quantum-chemically electronic mechanisms of singlet-triplet annihilation of oxygen and eosin.

  7. Defects in processing and trafficking of the AE1 Cl-/HCO3- exchanger associated with inherited distal renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Shayakul, Chairat; Alper, Seth L

    2004-03-01

    Distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) results from impaired urinary acidification by the renal collecting duct. Acquired dRTA can be secondary to diverse pathological processes, including diabetic, ischemic, fibrosing, or immunological processes; less frequently it presents as a familial disorder with either an autosomal recessive or dominant pattern of transmission. Mutations in the SLC4A1/AE1/band 3 Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchanger gene have been identified as causes for both dominant and recessive forms of dRTA. These mutations comprise a group almost entirely distinct from the SLC4A1 mutations that underlie the familial hemolytic anemia of hereditary spherocytosis. Why does one group of mutations express almost exclusively an isolated erythroid phenotype, whereas the second group of mutations expresses almost exclusively a phenotype explicable entirely by defective function of renal collecting duct type A intercalated cells? This review summarizes current research addressing this central question in the pathobiology of inherited dRTA associated with mutations in the SLC4A1 gene. Studying dRTA-associated mutant AE1 polypeptides can provide novel insights into the biology of the intercalated cell and the collecting duct as well as more generally into mechanisms by which epithelial cells generate and maintain functional polarity. PMID:15067510

  8. Heat exchanger restart evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.M.; Hirst, C.W.; Lentz, T.F.

    1992-02-28

    On December 24, 1991, the K-Reactor was in the shutdown mode with full AC process water flow and full cooling water flow. Safety rod testing was being performed as part of the power ascension testing program. The results of cooling water samples indicated tritium concentrations higher than allowable. Further sampling and testing confirmed a Process Water System to Cooling Water System leak in heat exchanger 4A (HX 4A). The heat exchanger was isolated and the plant shutdown. Heat exchanger 4kA was removed from the plant and moved to C-Area prior to performing examinations and diagnostic testing. This included locating and identifying the leaking tube or tubes, eddy current examination of the leaking tube and a number of adjacent tubes, visually inspecting the leaking tube from both the inside as well as the area surrounding the failure mechanism. In addition ten other tubes that either exhibited eddy current indications or would represent a baseline condition were removed from heat exchanger 4A for metallurgical examination. Additional analysis and review of heat exchanger leakage history was performed to determine if there are any patterns which can be used for predictive purposes. Compensatory actions have been taken to improve the sensitivity and response time to any future events of this type. The results of these actions are summarized herein.

  9. Heat exchanger restart evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.M.; Hirst, C.W.; Lentz, T.F.

    1992-03-18

    On December 24, 1991, the K-Reactor was in the shutdown mode with full AC process water flow and full cooling water flow. Safety rod testing was being performed as part of the power ascension testing program. The results of cooling water samples indicated tritium concentrations higher than allowable. Further sampling and testing confirmed a Process Water System to Cooling Water System leak in heat exchanger 4A (HX 4A). The heat exchanger was isolated and the plant shutdown. Heat exchanger 4A was removed from the plant and moved to C-Area prior to performing examinations and diagnostic testing. This included locating and identifying the leaking tube or tubes, eddy current examination of the leaking tube and a number of adjacent tubes, visually inspecting the leaking tube from both the inside as well as the area surrounding the identified tube. The leaking tube was removed and examined metallurgically to determine the failure mechanism. In addition ten other tubes that either exhibited eddy current indications or would represent a baseline condition were removed from heat exchanger 4A for metallurgical examination. Additional analysis and review of heat exchanger leakage history was performed to determine if there are any patterns which can be used for predictive purposes. Compensatory actions have been taken to improve the sensitivity and response time to any future events of this type. The results of these actions are summary herein.

  10. Heat exchanger restart evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.M.; Hirst, C.W.; Lentz, T.F.

    1992-03-18

    On December 24, 1991, the K-Reactor was in the shutdown mode with full AC process water flow and full cooling water flow. Safety rod testing was being performed as part of the power ascension testing program. The results of cooling water samples indicated tritium concentrations higher than allowable. Further sampling and testing confirmed a Process Water System to Cooling Water System leak in heat exchanger 4A (HX 4A). The heat exchanger was isolated and the plant shutdown. Heat exchanger 4A was removed from the plant and moved to C-Area prior to performing examinations and diagnostic testing. This included locating and identifying the leaking tube or tubes, eddy current examination of the leaking tube and a number of adjacent tubes, visually inspecting the leaking tube from both the inside as well as the area surrounding the identified tube. The leaking tube was removed and examined metallurgically to determine the failure mechanism. In addition ten other tubes that either exhibited eddy current indications or would represent a baseline condition were removed from heat exchanger 4A for metallurgical examination. Additional analysis and review of heat exchanger leakage history was performed to determine if there are any patterns which can be used for predictive purposes. Compensatory actions have been taken to improve the sensitivity and response time to any future events of this type. The results of these actions are summarized.

  11. The Dynamics of Multilateral Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausken, Kjell; Moxnes, John F.

    The article formulates a dynamic mathematical model where arbitrarily many players produce, consume, exchange, loan, and deposit arbitrarily many goods over time to maximize utility. Consuming goods constitutes a benefit, and producing, exporting, and loaning away goods constitute a cost. Utilities are benefits minus costs, which depend on the exchange ratios and bargaining functions. Three-way exchange occurs when one player acquires, through exchange, one good from another player with the sole purpose of using this good to exchange against the desired good from a third player. Such a triple handshake is not merely a set of double handshakes since the player assigns no interest to the first good in his benefit function. Cognitive and organization costs increase dramatically for higher order exchanges. An exchange theory accounting for media of exchange follows from simple generalization of two-way exchange. The examples of r-way exchange are the triangle trade between Africa, the USA, and England in the 17th and 18th centuries, the hypothetical hypercycle involving RNAs as players and enzymes as goods, and reaction-diffusion processes. The emergence of exchange, and the role of trading agents are discussed. We simulate an example where two-way exchange gives zero production and zero utility, while three-way exchange causes considerable production and positive utility. Maximum utility for each player is reached when exchanges of the same order as the number of players in society are allowed. The article merges micro theory and macro theory within the social, natural, and physical sciences.

  12. A process-based model to estimate gas exchange and monoterpene emission rates in the mediterranean maquis - comparisons between modelled and measured fluxes at different scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, M.; Matteucci, G.; Fares, S.; Davison, B.

    2009-02-01

    This paper concerns the application of a process-based model (MOCA, Modelling of Carbon Assessment) as an useful tool for estimating gas exchange, and integrating the empirical algorithms for calculation of monoterpene fluxes, in a Mediterranean maquis of central Italy (Castelporziano, Rome). Simulations were carried out for a range of hypothetical but realistic canopies of the evergreen Quercus ilex (holm oak), Arbutus unedo (strawberry tree) and Phillyrea latifolia. More, the dependence on total leaf area and leaf distribution of monoterpene fluxes at the canopy scale has been considered in the algorithms. Simulation of the gas exchange rates showed higher values for P. latifolia and A. unedo (2.39±0.30 and 3.12±0.27 gC m-2 d-1, respectively) with respect to Q. ilex (1.67±0.08 gC m-2 d-1) in the measuring campaign (May-June). Comparisons of the average Gross Primary Production (GPP) values with those measured by eddy covariance were well in accordance (7.98±0.20 and 6.00±1.46 gC m-2 d-1, respectively, in May-June), although some differences (of about 30%) were evident in a point-to-point comparison. These differences could be explained by considering the non uniformity of the measuring site where diurnal winds blown S-SW direction affecting thus calculations of CO2 and water fluxes. The introduction of some structural parameters in the algorithms for monoterpene calculation allowed to simulate monoterpene emission rates and fluxes which were in accord to those measured (6.50±2.25 vs. 9.39±4.5μg g-1DW h-1 for Q. ilex, and 0.63±0.207μg g-1DW h-1 vs. 0.98±0.30μg g-1DW h-1 for P. latifolia). Some constraints of the MOCA model are discussed, but it is demonstrated to be an useful tool to simulate physiological processes and BVOC fluxes in a very complicated plant distributions and environmental conditions, and necessitating also of a low number of input data.

  13. High Temperature Heat Exchanger Project

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony E. Hechanova, Ph.D.

    2008-09-30

    The UNLV Research Foundation assembled a research consortium for high temperature heat exchanger design and materials compatibility and performance comprised of university and private industry partners under the auspices of the US DOE-NE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative in October 2003. The objectives of the consortium were to conduct investigations of candidate materials for high temperature heat exchanger componets in hydrogen production processes and design and perform prototypical testing of heat exchangers. The initial research of the consortium focused on the intermediate heat exchanger (located between the nuclear reactor and hydrogen production plan) and the components for the hydrogen iodine decomposition process and sulfuric acid decomposition process. These heat exchanger components were deemed the most challenging from a materials performance and compatibility perspective

  14. The Kinetics of Isotopic Exchange Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, S. R.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are the kinetic interactions of these chemical processes and the determination of the actual order of such reactions. Included are multiple exchange, catalytic exchange with deuterium, and depletion of the original substrate. (CW)

  15. Exchange Rates and Old People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, James J.

    1980-01-01

    Extends earlier work on aging as a process of exchange by focusing on the issue of exchange rates and how they are negotiated. Access to power resources declines with age, placing the old person in the position of negotiating from weakness. (Author)

  16. Heat exchanger bypass test report

    SciTech Connect

    De Vries, M.L.

    1995-01-26

    This test report documents the results that were obtained while conducting the test procedure which bypassed the heat exchangers in the HC-21C sludge stabilization process. The test was performed on November 15, 1994 using WHC-SD-CP-TC-031, ``Heat Exchanger Bypass Test Procedure.`` The primary objective of the test procedure was to determine if the heat exchangers were contributing to condensation of moisture in the off-gas line. This condensation was observed in the rotameters. Also, a secondary objective was to determine if temperatures at the rotameters would be too high and damage them or make them inaccurate without the heat exchangers in place.

  17. EMISSION AND SURFACE EXCHANGE PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This task supports the development, evaluation, and application of emission and dry deposition algorithms in air quality simulation models, such as the Models-3/Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system. Emission estimates influence greatly the accuracy of air qual...

  18. Process coupling and control over the response of net ecosystem CO2 exchange to climate variability and insect disturbance in subalpine forests of the Western US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monson, R. K.; Moore, D. J.; Trahan, N. A.; Scott-Denton, L.; Burns, S. P.; Hu, J.; Bowling, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Following ten years of studies in subalpine forest ecosystems of the Western US, we have concluded that the tight coupling between gross primary productivity (GPP) and the autotrophic component of soil respiration (Ra) drives responses of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) to climate variability and insect disturbance. This insight has been gained through long-term eddy flux observations, manipulative plot experiments, analyses of dynamics in the stable isotope compositions of CO2 and H2O, and chamber gas-exchange measurements. Using past observations from these studies, we deployed model-data assimilation techniques and forecast weather/climate modeling to estimate how the coupling between GPP and Ra is likely to affect future (Year 2100) dynamics in NEE. The amount of winter snow and its melting dynamics in the spring represents the dominant control over interannual variation in GPP. Using the SIPNET ecosystem process model, combined with knowledge about the stable isotope content of different water sources, we estimated that approximately 75% of growing season GPP is coupled to the use of snowmelt water, whereas approximately 25% is coupled to summer rain. The tight coupling between GPP and winter snow pack drives a similar tight coupling between soil respiration (Rs) and winter snow pack. Manipulation of snow pack on forest plots has shown that Rs increases with increased snow pack, and this effect disappears when trees are girdled, which stops the transfer of GPP to roots and the soil rhizosphere. Higher-than-normal winter snowpacks cause the carbon isotope ratios of soil-respired CO2 to be depleted in 13C, reflecting a signal of lower photosynthetic water-use efficiency in the GPP that is transferred to the soil rhizosphere. Large-scale forest disturbance due to catastrophic tree mortality from mountain pine beetle attack causes an initial (2-3 year) reduction in Rs, which is attributable to the loss of GPP and its effect on Ra. This near-term reduction in Rs

  19. Can simulations of flux exchanges between the land surface and the atmosphere be improved by a more complex description of soil and plant processes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Can simulations of flux exchanges between the land surface and the atmosphere be improved by a more complex description of soil and plant processes? Christian Klein, Christian Biernath, Peter Hoffmann and Eckart Priesack Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Soil Ecology, Oberschleissheim, Germany christian.klein@helmholtz-muenchen.de, ++ 49 89 3187 3015 Recent studies show, that uncertainties in regional and global climate simulations are partly caused by inadequate descriptions of soil-plant-atmosphere. Therefore, we coupled the soil-plant model system Expert-N to the regional climate and weather forecast model WRF. Key features of the Expert-N model system are the simulation of water flow, heat transfer and solute transport in soils and the transpiration of grassland and forest stands. Particularly relevant for the improvement of regional weather forecast are simulations of the feedback between the land surface and atmosphere, which influences surface temperature, surface pressure and precipitation. The WRF model was modified to optionally select either the land surface model Expert-N or NOAH to simulate the exchange of water and energy fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere for every single grid cell within the simulation domain. Where the standard land surface model NOAH interpolates monthly LAI input values to simulate interactions between plant and atmosphere Expert-N simulates a dynamic plant growth with respect to water and nutrient availability in the soil. In this way Expert-N can be applied to study the effect of dynamic vegetation growth simulation on regional climate simulation results. For model testing Expert-N was used with two different soil parameterizations. The first parametrization used the USGS soil texture classification and simplifies the soil profile to one horizon (similar to the NOAH model). The second parameterization is based on the German soil texture classification

  20. Hexanedioic acid mediated surface-ligand-exchange process for transferring NaYF4:Yb/Er (or Yb/Tm) up-converting nanoparticles from hydrophobic to hydrophilic.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingbin; Song, Kai; Zhao, Junwei; Kong, Xianggui; Sun, Yajuan; Liu, Xiaomin; Zhang, Youlin; Zeng, Qinghui; Zhang, Hong

    2009-08-01

    Water-soluble and carboxyl-functionalized up-converting rare-earth nanoparticles (UCNPs) are obtained via an efficient surface-ligand-exchange procedure. Hexanedioic acid molecules are employed to replace the original hydrophobic ligands in diethylene glycol solvent at high temperature. Various characterizations indicate the ligand-exchange process has negligible adverse effect on the quality of the UCNPs. The resulting hydrophilic UCNPs show small size, strong up-converting emission and high water stability. The specific molecular recognition capacity of avidin-modified hydrophilic UCNPs confirms that hydrophilic UCNPs are suitable for potential biological labeling. PMID:19428023

  1. Heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbury, Phillip J.

    1986-04-01

    A heat exchanger comparising a shell attached at its open end to one side of a tube sheet and a detachable head connected to the other side of said tube sheet. The head is divided into a first and second chamber in fluid communication with a nozzle inlet and nozzle outlet, respectively, formed in said tube sheet. A tube bundle is mounted within said shell and is provided with inlets and outlets formed in said tube sheet in communication with said first and second chambers, respectively.

  2. Thermal decomposition of [Co(en)3][Fe(CN)6]∙ 2H2O: Topotactic dehydration process, valence and spin exchange mechanism elucidation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Prussian blue analogues represent well-known and extensively studied group of coordination species which has many remarkable applications due to their ion-exchange, electron transfer or magnetic properties. Among them, Co-Fe Prussian blue analogues have been extensively studied due to the photoinduced magnetization. Surprisingly, their suitability as precursors for solid-state synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles is almost unexplored. In this paper, the mechanism of thermal decomposition of [Co(en)3][Fe(CN)6] ∙∙ 2H2O (1a) is elucidated, including the topotactic dehydration, valence and spins exchange mechanisms suggestion and the formation of a mixture of CoFe2O4-Co3O4 (3:1) as final products of thermal degradation. Results The course of thermal decomposition of 1a in air atmosphere up to 600°C was monitored by TG/DSC techniques, 57Fe Mössbauer and IR spectroscopy. As first, the topotactic dehydration of 1a to the hemihydrate [Co(en)3][Fe(CN)6] ∙∙ 1/2H2O (1b) occurred with preserving the single-crystal character as was confirmed by the X-ray diffraction analysis. The consequent thermal decomposition proceeded in further four stages including intermediates varying in valence and spin states of both transition metal ions in their structures, i.e. [FeII(en)2(μ-NC)CoIII(CN)4], FeIII(NH2CH2CH3)2(μ-NC)2CoII(CN)3] and FeIII[CoII(CN)5], which were suggested mainly from 57Fe Mössbauer, IR spectral and elemental analyses data. Thermal decomposition was completed at 400°C when superparamagnetic phases of CoFe2O4 and Co3O4 in the molar ratio of 3:1 were formed. During further temperature increase (450 and 600°C), the ongoing crystallization process gave a new ferromagnetic phase attributed to the CoFe2O4-Co3O4 nanocomposite particles. Their formation was confirmed by XRD and TEM analyses. In-field (5 K / 5 T) Mössbauer spectrum revealed canting of Fe(III) spin in almost fully inverse spinel structure of CoFe2O4. Conclusions It has been found

  3. Improved simulation of fire-vegetation interactions in the Land surface Processes and eXchanges dynamic global vegetation model (LPX-Mv1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, D. I.; Harrison, S. P.; Prentice, I. C.

    2014-01-01

    The Land surface Processes and eXchanges (LPX) model is a fire-enabled dynamic global vegetation model that performs well globally but has problems representing fire regimes and vegetative mix in savannas. Here we focus on improving the fire module. To improve the representation of ignitions, we introduced a treatment of lightning that allows the fraction of ground strikes to vary spatially and seasonally, realistically partitions strike distribution between wet and dry days, and varies the number of dry-days with strikes. Fuel availability and moisture content were improved by implementing decomposition rates specific to individual plant functional types and litter classes, and litter drying rates driven by atmospheric water content. To improve water extraction by grasses, we use realistic plant-specific treatments of deep roots. To improve fire responses, we introduced adaptive bark thickness and post-fire resprouting for tropical and temperate broadleaf trees. All improvements are based on extensive analyses of relevant observational data sets. We test model performance for Australia, first evaluating parameterisations separately and then measuring overall behaviour against standard benchmarks. Changes to the lightning parameterisation produce a more realistic simulation of fires in southeastern and central Australia. Implementation of PFT-specific decomposition rates enhances performance in central Australia. Changes in fuel drying improve fire in northern Australia, while changes in rooting depth produce a more realistic simulation of fuel availability and structure in central and northern Australia. The introduction of adaptive bark thickness and resprouting produces more realistic fire regimes in savannas, including simulating biomass recovery rates consistent with observations. The new model (LPX-Mv1) improves Australian vegetation composition by 33% and burnt area by 19% compared to LPX.

  4. Improved simulation of fire-vegetation interactions in the Land surface Processes and eXchanges dynamic global vegetation model (LPX-Mv1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, D. I.; Harrison, S. P.; Prentice, I. C.

    2014-10-01

    The Land surface Processes and eXchanges (LPX) model is a fire-enabled dynamic global vegetation model that performs well globally but has problems representing fire regimes and vegetative mix in savannas. Here we focus on improving the fire module. To improve the representation of ignitions, we introduced a reatment of lightning that allows the fraction of ground strikes to vary spatially and seasonally, realistically partitions strike distribution between wet and dry days, and varies the number of dry days with strikes. Fuel availability and moisture content were improved by implementing decomposition rates specific to individual plant functional types and litter classes, and litter drying rates driven by atmospheric water content. To improve water extraction by grasses, we use realistic plant-specific treatments of deep roots. To improve fire responses, we introduced adaptive bark thickness and post-fire resprouting for tropical and temperate broadleaf trees. All improvements are based on extensive analyses of relevant observational data sets. We test model performance for Australia, first evaluating parameterisations separately and then measuring overall behaviour against standard benchmarks. Changes to the lightning parameterisation produce a more realistic simulation of fires in southeastern and central Australia. Implementation of PFT-specific decomposition rates enhances performance in central Australia. Changes in fuel drying improve fire in northern Australia, while changes in rooting depth produce a more realistic simulation of fuel availability and structure in central and northern Australia. The introduction of adaptive bark thickness and resprouting produces more realistic fire regimes in Australian savannas. We also show that the model simulates biomass recovery rates consistent with observations from several different regions of the world characterised by resprouting vegetation. The new model (LPX-Mv1) produces an improved simulation of observed

  5. Pharmaceutical Applications of Ion-Exchange Resins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elder, David

    2005-01-01

    The historical uses of ion-exchanged resins and a summary of the basic chemical principles involved in the ion-exchanged process are discussed. Specific applications of ion-exchange are provided that include drug stabilization, pharmaceutical excipients, taste-masking agents, oral sustained-release products, topical products for local application…

  6. Counterflow Regolith Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubrin, Robert; Jonscher, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A problem exists in reducing the total heating power required to extract oxygen from lunar regolith. All such processes require heating a great deal of soil, and the heat energy is wasted if it cannot be recycled from processed material back into new material. The counterflow regolith heat exchanger (CoRHE) is a device that transfers heat from hot regolith to cold regolith. The CoRHE is essentially a tube-in-tube heat exchanger with internal and external augers attached to the inner rotating tube to move the regolith. Hot regolith in the outer tube is moved in one direction by a right-hand - ed auger, and the cool regolith in the inner tube is moved in the opposite direction by a left-handed auger attached to the inside of the rotating tube. In this counterflow arrangement, a large fraction of the heat from the expended regolith is transferred to the new regolith. The spent regolith leaves the heat exchanger close to the temperature of the cold new regolith, and the new regolith is pre-heated close to the initial temperature of the spent regolith. Using the CoRHE can reduce the heating requirement of a lunar ISRU system by 80%, reducing the total power consumption by a factor of two. The unique feature of this system is that it allows for counterflow heat exchange to occur between solids, instead of liquids or gases, as is commonly done. In addition, in variants of this concept, the hydrogen reduction can be made to occur within the counterflow heat exchanger itself, enabling a simplified lunar ISRU (in situ resource utilization) system with excellent energy economy and continuous nonbatch mode operation.

  7. Segmented heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Baldwin, Darryl Dean; Willi, Martin Leo; Fiveland, Scott Byron; Timmons, Kristine Ann

    2010-12-14

    A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

  8. Preselective Screening for Linear-Scaling Exact Exchange-Gradient Calculations for Graphics Processing Units and General Strong-Scaling Massively Parallel Calculations.

    PubMed

    Kussmann, Jörg; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2015-03-10

    We present an extension of our recently presented PreLinK scheme (J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 134114) for the exact exchange contribution to nuclear forces. The significant contributions to the exchange gradient are determined by preselection based on accurate shell-pair contributions to the SCF exchange energy prior to the calculation. Therefore, our method is highly suitable for massively parallel electronic structure calculations because of an efficient load balancing of the significant contributions only and an unhampered control flow. The efficiency of our method is shown for several illustrative calculations on single GPU servers, as well as for hybrid MPI/CUDA parallel calculations with the largest system comprising 3369 atoms and 26952 basis functions. PMID:26579745

  9. Fault-Tolerant Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Crowley, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    A compact, lightweight heat exchanger has been designed to be fault-tolerant in the sense that a single-point leak would not cause mixing of heat-transfer fluids. This particular heat exchanger is intended to be part of the temperature-regulation system for habitable modules of the International Space Station and to function with water and ammonia as the heat-transfer fluids. The basic fault-tolerant design is adaptable to other heat-transfer fluids and heat exchangers for applications in which mixing of heat-transfer fluids would pose toxic, explosive, or other hazards: Examples could include fuel/air heat exchangers for thermal management on aircraft, process heat exchangers in the cryogenic industry, and heat exchangers used in chemical processing. The reason this heat exchanger can tolerate a single-point leak is that the heat-transfer fluids are everywhere separated by a vented volume and at least two seals. The combination of fault tolerance, compactness, and light weight is implemented in a unique heat-exchanger core configuration: Each fluid passage is entirely surrounded by a vented region bridged by solid structures through which heat is conducted between the fluids. Precise, proprietary fabrication techniques make it possible to manufacture the vented regions and heat-conducting structures with very small dimensions to obtain a very large coefficient of heat transfer between the two fluids. A large heat-transfer coefficient favors compact design by making it possible to use a relatively small core for a given heat-transfer rate. Calculations and experiments have shown that in most respects, the fault-tolerant heat exchanger can be expected to equal or exceed the performance of the non-fault-tolerant heat exchanger that it is intended to supplant (see table). The only significant disadvantages are a slight weight penalty and a small decrease in the mass-specific heat transfer.

  10. Ion Exchange and Adsorption of Inorganic Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the first part of the chapter, the fundamentals of ion exchange and adsorption processes are explained, with the goal of demonstrating how these principles influence process design for inorganic contaminant removal. In the second part, ion exchange and adsorption processes th...

  11. Importance of intertidal sediment processes and porewater exchange on the water column biogeochemistry in a pristine mangrove creek (Ras Dege, Tanzania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouillon, S.; Middelburg, J. J.; Dehairs, F.; Borges, A. V.; Abril, G.; Flindt, M. R.; Ulomi, S.; Kristensen, E.

    2007-06-01

    We sampled a tidal creek (Ras Dege, Tanzania) during a 24-h cycle to document the variations in a suite of creek water column characteristics and to determine the relative influence of tidal and biological driving forces. Since the creek has no upstream freshwater inputs, highest salinity was observed at low tide, due to evaporation effects and porewater seepage. Total suspended matter (TSM) and particulate organic carbon (POC) showed distinct maxima at periods of highest water flow, indicating that erosion of surface sediments and/or resuspension of bottom sediments were an important source of particulate material. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), in contrast, varied in phase with water height and was highest at low tide. Stable isotope data of POC and DOC displayed large variations in both pools, and similarly followed the variations in water height. Although the variation of δ13CDOC (-23.8 to -13.8‰) was higher than that of δ13CPOC (-26.2 to -20.5‰), due to the different end-member pool sizes, the δ13C signatures of both pools differed only slightly at low tide, but up to 9‰ at high tide. Thus, at low tide both DOC and POC originated from mangrove production. At high tide, however, the DOC pool had signatures consistent with a high contribution of seagrass-derived material, whereas the POC pool was dominated by marine phytoplankton. Daily variations in CH4, and partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) were similarly governed by tidal influence and were up to 7- and 10-fold higher at low tide, which stresses the importance of exchange of porewater and diffusive fluxes to the water column. When assuming that the high dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) levels in the upper parts of the creek (i.e. at low tide) are due to inputs from mineralization, δ13C data on DIC indicate that the organic matter source for mineralization had a signature of -22.4‰. Hence, imported POC and DOC from the marine environment contributes strongly to overall mineralization within the

  12. The impact of water exchange rate and treatment processes on water-borne hormones in recirculation aquaculture systems containing sexually maturing Atlantic salmon Salmo salar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A controlled seven-month study was conducted in six replicated water recirculation aquaculture systems (WRAS) to assess post-smolt Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) performance in relation to WRAS water exchange rate. Unexpectedly high numbers of precocious sexually mature fish were observed in all WRAS...

  13. Educator Exchange Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garza, Cris; Rodriguez, Victor

    This resource guide was developed for teachers and administrators interested in participating in intercultural and international exchange programs or starting an exchange program. An analysis of an exchange program's critical elements discusses exchange activities; orientation sessions; duration of exchange; criteria for participation; travel,…

  14. Charge-exchange processes in collisions of H+,H2+,H3+,He+ , and He2+ ions with CO and CO2 molecules at energies below 1000 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werbowy, S.; Pranszke, B.

    2016-02-01

    Absolute measurements of charge-exchange cross sections of H+,H2+,H3+,He+, and He2+ ions in CO and CO2 have been made for energies below 1000 eV, an equivalent of the energy of ionized particles at typical solar-wind conditions. An attenuation method for the case of complex ions of a molecule, taking into account the influence on the ion beam composition of the processes of disintegration of the primary ions into secondary ones with different charge-exchange cross sections, is described. Also the secondary effects, like three-body collisions and re-ionization processes that could emerge at higher pressures of the gas layer, are discussed. Dependence of the cross sections on the number of atomic centers in the projectile have been explained on the basis of the energy defect of the reactions and asymmetric near-resonant charge-exchange process between the ion and target molecule including the Doppler broadening in the interaction of the monoenergetic ion beam and target molecules having an isotropic Maxwellian velocity distribution corresponding to room temperature. Using the semiempirical approach based on the parametrized numerical coupled-channel two-state calculations, we have extrapolated the cross sections to a broader range of velocities.

  15. Lipid Exchange by Ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Drachmann, Nikolaj Düring; Olesen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Lipids play an important role in maintaining P-type ATPase structure and function, and often they are crucial for ATPase activity. When the P-type ATPases are in the membrane, they are surrounded by a mix of different lipid species with varying aliphatic chain lengths and saturation, and the complex interplay between the lipids and the P-type ATPases are still not well understood. We here describe a robust method to exchange the majority of the lipids surrounding the ATPase after solubilisation and/or purification with a target lipid of interest. The method is based on an ultracentrifugation step, where the protein sample is spun through a dense buffer containing large excess of the target lipid, which results in an approximately 80-85 % lipid exchange. The method is a very gently technique that maintains protein folding during the process, hence allowing further characterization of the protein in the presence of a target lipid of interest. PMID:26695050

  16. Corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, Scott L.

    1989-01-01

    A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

  17. Role of ω -meson exchange in scaling of the γ p →π0p process from a Regge-type model with resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Kook-Jin; Choi, Tae Keun; Yu, Byung-Geel

    2016-08-01

    The scaling of photoproduction γ p →π0p is investigated in the Reggeized model with N* and Δ resonances included to describe resonance peaks up to photon energy Eγ=3 GeV . Given the t -channel exchanges ρ (770 ) +ω (780 ) +b1(1235 ) +h1(1170 ) Reggeized for the background contribution, the resonances of the Breit-Wigner form are introduced to agree with cross sections for total, differential, and beam asymmetry in the low energy region. The scaled differential cross sections s7d σ /d t are reproduced to agree with the recent JLab data, revealing the production mechanism of the big bump structure around W ≈2.2 GeV by the deep-dip pattern of the ω exchange that originates from the zeros of the trajectory αω(t ) =0 in the canonical phase, 1/2 (-1 +e-i π αω(t )) .

  18. Influence of phase transformations and heat and mass exchange on the course of the processes of pyrolysis of single high-ash-coal particles at elevated pressures

    SciTech Connect

    V.P. Patskov

    2007-03-15

    A comparative analysis of equilibrium and nonequilibrium models for calculation of the rates of phase transitions (evaporation and condensation) of pyrolysis products and the influence of convective heat and mass exchange with inert ash particles and the gas flow in pyrolysis of single particles of high-ash bituminous coals in the operation of technological units with a circulating fluidized bed under pressure is made.

  19. The influence of particle size and AgNO3 concentration in the ionic exchange process on the fungicidal action of antimicrobial glass.

    PubMed

    Mendes, E; Piletti, R; Barichello, T; Oliveira, C M; Kniess, C T; Angioletto, E; Riella, H G; Fiori, M A

    2012-08-01

    Antimicrobial materials have long been used as an effective means of reducing the risks posed to humans by fungi, bacteria and other microorganisms. These materials are essential in environments where cleanliness, comfort and hygiene are the predominate concerns. This work presents preliminary results for the development of a fungicidal vitreous material that is produced by the incorporation of a silver ionic specimen through ionic exchange reactions. Silver ions were incorporated into powdered glass via ionic exchange in an ionic medium containing silver species with different concentrations of AgNO3. The fungicidal efficiency of the samples was studied as a function of the AgNO3 concentration and the particle size of the glass using the agar diffusion test for the microbiological analysis of the fungus species Candida albicans. The samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The experimental results showed that the fungicidal effect was dependent on the AgNO3 concentration in the ionic exchange medium but was not dependent on the particle size of the glass. PMID:24364954

  20. 21 CFR 173.20 - Ion-exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ion-exchange membranes. 173.20 Section 173.20 Food... for Food Treatment § 173.20 Ion-exchange membranes. Ion-exchange membranes may be safely used in the processing of food under the following prescribed conditions: (a) The ion-exchange membrane is prepared...

  1. Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange (CECE)

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R.E.; Mills, T.K.; Rogers, M.L.

    1980-09-30

    Starting from an effort to control airborne emissions, the Mound tritium containment program has evolved to include development of the Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange (CECE) process. This process separates tritiated aqueous streams into detritiated water and an enriched hydrogen stream that is suitable for use by other tritium recovery processes. Experimentation has shown that the process performs as predicted by bench-scale measurements, and that available process components exhibit acceptable resistance to damage by radiation from tritium exposure. Planned future efforts are concentrated on finalizing automatic control of the process and on developing feed treatment methods for the protection of process components.

  2. Cross-Shelf Exchange.

    PubMed

    Brink, K H

    2016-01-01

    Cross-shelf exchange dominates the pathways and rates by which nutrients, biota, and materials on the continental shelf are delivered and removed. This follows because cross-shelf gradients of most properties are usually far greater than those in the alongshore direction. The resulting transports are limited by Earth's rotation, which inhibits flow from crossing isobaths. Thus, cross-shelf flows are generally weak compared with alongshore flows, and this leads to interesting observational issues. Cross-shelf flows are enabled by turbulent mixing processes, nonlinear processes (such as momentum advection), and time dependence. Thus, there is a wide range of possible effects that can allow these critical transports, and different natural settings are often governed by different combinations of processes. This review discusses examples of representative transport mechanisms and explores possible observational and theoretical paths to future progress. PMID:26747520

  3. Woven heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Piscitella, Roger R.

    1987-05-05

    In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  4. Effect of Diffusion Control Layer on Reverse Al-Induced Layer Exchange Process for High-Quality Ge/Al/Glass Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, K.; Toko, K.; Suemasu, T.

    2015-05-01

    Fabricating large-grained polycrystalline Ge (poly-Ge) thin films on conducting-layer coated glass is a promising approach to lower the manufacturing cost of high-efficiency III-V tandem solar cells. We investigated the self-organizing formation of poly-Ge/Al/glass structures by using Al-induced layer exchange. The layer exchange between amorphous Ge and Al layers was completed at a low temperature of 350°C. Forming the interlayer between Ge and Al, i.e., limiting the diffusion of Ge to Al lowered the Ge nucleation rate and then enlarged the grain size of the resulting poly-Ge layer. The natively oxidized Al interlayer, formed by exposing a thin Al membrane (2-nm thickness) to air for 180 min, led to the poly-Ge with grains 46 μm in size. Moreover, the Ge layer was highly (111)-oriented. This Ge/Al/glass structure appears promising for use in the bottom cell of the III-V semiconductor based tandem solar cells, as well as in the epitaxial templates for aligned nanowires and other advanced materials.

  5. Woven heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Piscitella, R.R.

    1984-07-16

    This invention relates to a heat exchanger for waste heat recovery from high temperature industrial exhaust streams. In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  6. Proceedings of the DOE/Advanced Heat Exchangers Program Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-02-01

    Semiannual review meetings of the USDOE's Advanced Heat Exchanger Program with the objective of reviewing ongoing and recently completed project activities. Personnel from industrial contractors and National Laboratories present technical aspects of their projects. The projects deal with high temperature heat exchangers for waste heat recuperation and process heat exchange and other areas such as materials performance and heat transfer enhancement. Topics presented are high pressure heat exchangers, ceramic heat exchangers, enhanced tubes, and materials studies to include silicon carbide whiskers and alumina.

  7. Host-guest chemistry of a water-soluble pillar[5]arene: evidence for an ionic-exchange recognition process and different complexation modes.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Borja; Francisco, Vitor; Fernández-Nieto, Fernando; Garcia-Rio, Luis; Martín-Pastor, M; Paleo, M Rita; Sardina, F Javier

    2014-09-15

    The complexation of an anionic guest by a cationic water-soluble pillararene is reported. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), (1)H NMR, (1)H and (19)F DOSY, and STD NMR experiments were performed to characterize the complex formed under aqueous neutral conditions. The results of ITC and (1)H NMR analyses showed the inclusion of the guest inside the cavity of the pillar[5]arene, with the binding constant and thermodynamic parameters influenced by the counter ion of the macrocycle. NMR diffusion experiments showed that although a fraction of the counter ions are expelled from the host cavity by exchange with the guest, a complex with both counter ions and the guest inside the pillararene is formed. The results also showed that at higher concentrations of guest in solution, in addition to the inclusion of one guest molecule in the cavity, the pillararene can also form an external complex with a second guest molecule. PMID:25110897

  8. Electrically Switched Cesium Ion Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    JPH Sukamto; ML Lilga; RK Orth

    1998-10-23

    This report discusses the results of work to develop Electrically Switched Ion Exchange (ESIX) for separations of ions from waste streams relevant to DOE site clean-up. ESIX combines ion exchange and electrochemistry to provide a selective, reversible method for radionuclide separation that lowers costs and minimizes secondary waste generation typically associated with conventional ion exchange. In the ESIX process, an electroactive ion exchange film is deposited onto. a high surface area electrode, and ion uptake and elution are controlled directly by modulating the potential of the film. As a result, the production of secondary waste is minimized, since the large volumes of solution associated with elution, wash, and regeneration cycles typical of standard ion exchange are not needed for the ESIX process. The document is presented in two parts: Part I, the Summary Report, discusses the objectives of the project, describes the ESIX concept and the approach taken, and summarizes the major results; Part II, the Technology Description, provides a technical description of the experimental procedures and in-depth discussions on modeling, case studies, and cost comparisons between ESIX and currently used technologies.

  9. Design of heat exchange element for plastic film heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyer, E. C.; Brownell, D. L.

    1984-12-01

    This report presents the results of an effort to design a plastic film heat exchanger element (PFHX) suitable for use in an industrial heat pump evaporator. This report addresses the selection of materials, the expected flow and heat transfer behavior, and the mechanical design features of a parallel plate type exchanger that uses thin plastic films as the boundary between the two process fluids. Criteria for material selection are presented, candidate materials are reviewed, and material recommendations are provided. Heat transfer performance is addressed in terms of the overall or total coefficient of heat transfer between condensing steam and a confined falling film of water. Appropriate mechanical designs of water flow manifolds are described along with methods of fabrication and assembly. This report addresses only the individual heat exchange element.

  10. Timing matters in foreign exchange markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Yoshito; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2012-02-01

    We show using nonlinear time series analysis that the timing of trades in foreign exchange markets has significant information. We apply a set of methods for analyzing point process data developed in neuroscience and nonlinear science. Our results imply that foreign exchange markets might be chaotic and have short-term predictability.

  11. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, A.W.; Gatrone, R.C.; Alexandratos, S.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1997-04-08

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorus. The pendent groups have the formula as shown in the patent wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R{sup 1} is hydrogen or an C{sub 1}-C{sub 2} alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

  12. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, Andrzej W.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Alexandratos, Spiro; Horwitz, E. Philip

    1997-01-01

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

  13. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, Andrzej W.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Alexandratos, Spiro; Horwitz, E. Philip

    1998-01-27

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange-resin are also disclosed.

  14. Indiana Health Information Exchange

    Cancer.gov

    The Indiana Health Information Exchange is comprised of various Indiana health care institutions, established to help improve patient safety and is recognized as a best practice for health information exchange.

  15. Effects of ionizing radiation on modern ion exchange materials

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.F.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1993-10-01

    We review published studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on ion exchange materials, emphasizing those published in recent years. A brief overview is followed by a more detailed examination of recent developments. Our review includes styrene/divinylbenzene copolymers with cation-exchange or anion-exchange functional groups, polyvinylpyridine anion exchangers, chelating resins, multifunctional resins, and inorganic exchangers. In general, strong-acid cation exchange resins are more resistant to radiation than are strong-base anion exchange resins, and polyvinylpyridine resins are more resistant than polystyrene resins. Cross-linkage, salt form, moisture content, and the surrounding medium all affect the radiation stability of a specific exchanger. Inorganic exchangers usually, but not always, exhibit high radiation resistance. Liquid ion exchangers, which have been used so extensively in nuclear processing applications, also are included.

  16. Interannual variability of the air-sea heat exchange in the western Mediterranean in relation to the deep-water formation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, J.; Criado Aldeanueva, F.; García Lafuente, J.; Sanchez Román, A.; Carracedo, L.

    2009-04-01

    A 60-year long time series of heat fluxes (long and short wave radiation, sensible and latent contributions) from NCEP reanalysis dataset and a 22-year long time series of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) from JPL AVHRR Oceans Pathfinder dataset have been combined to study the seasonal and interannual variability of air-sea heat exchanges over the Mediterranean Sea and correlate them with the characteristics of the Mediterranean outflow through the Strait of Gibraltar collected in the frame of the INGRES projects in the last years. Special attention has been devoted to the historically reported deep-water formation basin of the Western Mediterranean (Gulf of Lions) during the pre-conditioning (November and December) and winter seasons. Until around 1970, no clear trend is found in the net heat flux winter series since positive and negative anomalies are observed alternatively. From then onwards, negative anomalies are frequently observed until the 2003-2006 positive events. A net heat loss of about 150 W/m2 is observed in 2005, the highest value since 1956, especially due to evaporation losses towards the atmosphere. The anomalously cold air and sea surface temperature in the area help to increase this contribution that reflects in a higher fraction of Western Mediterranean Deep Water (WMDW) in the outflow through the Strait.

  17. Spaceborne microwave remote sensing of seasonal freeze-thaw processes in theterrestrial high l atitudes : relationships with land-atmosphere CO2 exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, Kyle C.; Kimball, John S.; Zhao, Maosheng; Njoku, Eni; Zimmermann, Reiner; Running, Steven W.

    2004-01-01

    Landscape transitions between seasonally frozen and thawed conditions occur each year over roughly 50 million square kilometers of Earth's Northern Hemisphere. These relatively abrupt transitions represent the closest analog to a biospheric and hydrologic on/off switch existing in nature, affecting surface meteorological conditions, ecological trace gas dynamics, energy exchange and hydrologic activity profoundly. We utilize time series satellite-borne microwave remote sensing measurements from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) to examine spatial and temporal variability in seasonal freeze/thaw cycles for the pan-Arctic basin and Alaska. Regional measurements of spring thaw timing are derived using daily brightness temperature measurements from the 19 GHz, horizontally polarized channel, separately for overpasses with 6 AM and 6 PM equatorial crossing times. Spatial and temporal patterns in regional freeze/thaw dynamics show distinct differences between North America and Eurasia, and boreal forest and Arctic tundra biomes. Annual anomalies in the timing of thawing in spring also correspond closely to seasonal atmospheric CO2 concentration anomalies derived from NOAA CMDL arctic and subarctic monitoring stations. Classification differences between AM and PM overpass data average approximately 5 days for the region, though both appear to be effective surrogates for monitoring annual growing seasons at high latitudes.

  18. Spaceborne Microwave Remote Sensing of Seasonal Freeze-Thaw Processes in the Terrestrial High Latitudes: Relationships with Land-Atmosphere CO2 exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, Kyle C.; Kimball, John S.; Zhao, Maosheng; Njoku, Eni; Zimmermann, Reiner; Running, Steven W.

    2004-01-01

    Landscape transitions between seasonally frozen and thawed conditions occur each year over roughly 50 million square kilometers of Earth's Northern Hemisphere. These relatively abrupt transitions represent the closest analog to a biospheric and hydrologic on/off switch existing in nature, affecting surface meteorological conditions, ecological trace gas dynamics, energy exchange and hydrologic activity profoundly. We utilize time series satellite-borne microwave remote sensing measurements from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) to examine spatial and temporal variability in seasonal freeze/thaw cycles for the pan-Arctic basin and Alaska. Regional measurements of spring thaw timing are derived using daily brightness temperature measurements from the 19 GHz, horizontally polarized channel, separately for overpasses with 6 AM and 6 PM equatorial crossing times. Spatial and temporal patterns in regional freeze/thaw dynamics show distinct differences between North America and Eurasia, and boreal forest and Arctic tundra biomes. Annual anomalies in the timing of thawing in spring also correspond closely to seasonal atmospheric CO2 concentration anomalies derived from NOAA CMDL arctic and subarctic monitoring stations. Classification differences between AM and PM overpass data average approximately 5 days for the region, though both appear to be effective surrogates for monitoring annual growing seasons at high latitudes.

  19. Indeterminacy in foreign exchange markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquini, Michele; Serva, Maurizio

    2000-03-01

    We discuss price variations distributions in foreign exchange markets, characterizing them both in calendar and business time frameworks. The price dynamics is found to be the result of two distinct processes, a multi-variance diffusion and an error process. The presence of the latter, which dominates at short time scales, leads to indeterminacy principle in finance. Furthermore, dynamics does not allow for a scheme based on independent probability distributions, since volatility exhibits a strong correlation even at the shortest time scales.

  20. Pharmaceutical Applications of Ion-Exchange Resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, David P.

    2005-04-01

    The historical uses of ion-exchange resins and a summary of the basic chemical principles involved in the ion-exchange process are discussed. Specific applications of ion-exchange resins are provided. The utility of these agents to stabilize drugs are evaluated. Commonly occurring chemical and physical incompatibilities are reviewed. Ion-exchange resins have found applicability as inactive pharmaceutical constituents, particularly as disintegrants (inactive tablet ingredient whose function is to rapidly disrupt the tablet matrix on contact with gastric fluid). One of the more elegant approaches to improving palatability of ionizable drugs is the use of ion-exchange resins as taste-masking agents. The selection, optimization of drug:resin ratio and particle size, together with a review of scaleup of typical manufacturing processes for taste-masked products are provided. Ion-exchange resins have been extensively utilized in oral sustained-release products. The selection, optimization of drug:resin ratio and particle size, together with a summary of commonly occurring commercial sustained-release products are discussed. Ion-exchange resins have also been used in topical products for local application to the skin, including those where drug flux is controlled by a differential electrical current (ionotophoretic delivery). General applicability of ion-exchange resins, including ophthalmic delivery, nasal delivery, use as drugs in their own right (e.g., colestyramine, formerly referred to as cholestyramine), as well as measuring gastrointestinal transit times, are discussed. Finally, pharmaceutical monographs for ion-exchange resins are reviewed.

  1. Charge exchange system

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1978-01-01

    An improved charge exchange system for substantially reducing pumping requirements of excess gas in a controlled thermonuclear reactor high energy neutral beam injector. The charge exchange system utilizes a jet-type blanket which acts simultaneously as the charge exchange medium and as a shield for reflecting excess gas.

  2. Multinucleon exchange in quasifission reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayik, S.; Yilmaz, B.; Yilmaz, O.

    2015-12-01

    The nucleon exchange mechanism is investigated in the central collisions of 40Ca+238U and 48Ca+238U systems near the quasifission regime in the framework of the stochastic mean-field (SMF) approach. Sufficiently below the fusion barrier, a dinuclear structure in the collisions is maintained to a large extent. Consequently, it is possible to describe nucleon exchange as a diffusion process familiar from deep-inelastic collisions. Diffusion coefficients for proton and neutron exchange are determined from the microscopic basis of the SMF approach in the semiclassical framework. Calculations show that after a fast charge equilibration the system drifts toward symmetry over a very long interaction time. Large dispersions of proton and neutron distributions of the produced fragments indicate that the diffusion mechanism may help to populate heavy transuranium elements near the quasifission regime in these collisions.

  3. South Atlantic interbasin exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rintoul, Stephen Rich

    1991-01-01

    The exchange of mass and heat between the South Atlantic and the neighboring ocean basins was estimated using hydrographic data and inverse methods, in order to gain information on the links between the deep-water formation processes occurring within the Atlantic and the global thermohaline circulation. Results demonstrate that the global thermohaline cell associated with the formation and export of North Atlantic deep water (NADW) is closed primarily by a 'cold water path' in which deep water leaving the Atlantic ultimately returns as intermediate water entering the basin through Drake Passage. This conclusion conflicts with the suggestion by Gordon (1986) that the global thermohaline circulation associated with the formation of NADW is closed primarily by a 'warm water path', in which the export of NADW is compensated by an inflow of warm Indian Ocean thermocline water south of Africa.

  4. Lipid exchange between membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Jähnig, F

    1984-01-01

    The exchange of lipid molecules between vesicle bilayers in water and a monolayer forming at the water surface was investigated theoretically within the framework of thermodynamics. The total number of exchanged molecules was found to depend on the bilayer curvature as expressed by the vesicle radius and on the boundary condition for exchange, i.e., whether during exchange the radius or the packing density of the vesicles remains constant. The boundary condition is determined by the rate of flip-flop within the bilayer relative to the rate of exchange between bi- and monolayer. If flip-flop is fast, exchange is independent of the vesicle radius; if flip-flop is slow, exchange increases with the vesicle radius. Available experimental results agree with the detailed form of this dependence. When the theory was extended to exchange between two bilayers of different curvature, the direction of exchange was also determined by the curvatures and the boundary conditions for exchange. Due to the dependence of the boundary conditions on flip-flop and, consequently, on membrane fluidity, exchange between membranes may partially be regulated by membrane fluidity. PMID:6518251

  5. Proceedings of waste stream minimization and utilization innovative concepts: An experimental technology exchange. Volume 1, Industrial solid waste processing municipal waste reduction/recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.E.; Watts, R.L.

    1993-04-01

    This two-volume proceedings summarizes the results of fifteen innovations that were funded through the US Department of Energy`s Innovative Concept Program. The fifteen innovations were presented at the sixth Innovative Concepts Fair, held in Austin, Texas, on April 22--23, 1993. The concepts in this year`s fair address innovations that can substantially reduce or use waste streams. Each paper describes the need for the proposed concept, the concept being proposed, and the concept`s economics and market potential, key experimental results, and future development needs. The papers are divided into two volumes: Volume 1 addresses innovations for industrial solid waste processing and municipal waste reduction/recycling, and Volume 2 addresses industrial liquid waste processing and industrial gaseous waste processing. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  6. A novel process for fabricating membrane-electrode assemblies with low platinum loading for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Shahram

    A novel method based on pulse current electrodeposition (PCE) employing four different waveforms was developed and utilized for fabricating membrane-electrode assemblies (MEAs) with low platinum loading for use in low-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells. It was found that both peak deposition current density and duty cycle control the nucleation rate and the growth of platinum crystallites. Based on the combination of parameters used in this study, the optimum conditions for PCE were found to be a peak deposition current density of 400 mA cm-2, a duty cycle of 4%, and a pulse generated and delivered in the microsecond range utilizing a ramp-down waveform. MEAs prepared by PCE using the ramp-down waveform show performance comparable with commercial MEAs that employ ten times the loading of platinum catalyst. The thickness of the pulse electrodeposited catalyst layer is about 5-7 mum, which is ten times thinner than that of commercial state-of-the-art electrodes. MEAs prepared by PCE outperformed commercial MEAs when subjected to a series of steady-state and transient lifetime tests. In steady-state lifetime tests, the average cell voltage over a 3000-h period at a constant current density of 619 mA cm-2 for the in-house and the state-of-the-art MEAs were 564 mV and 505 mV, respectively. In addition, the influence of substrate and carbon powder type, hydrophobic polymer content in the gas diffusion layer, microporous layer loading, and the through-plane gas permeability of different gas diffusion layers on fuel cell performance were investigated and optimized. Finally, two mathematical models based on the microhardness model developed by Molina et al. [J. Molina, B. A. Hoyos, Electrochim. Acta, 54 (2009) 1784-1790] and Milchev [A. Milchev, "Electrocrystallization: Fundamentals of Nucleation And Growth" 2002, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 189-215] were refined and further developed, one based on pure diffusion control and another based on joint diffusion

  7. Charge exchange and dissociative processes in collisions of slow He{sup 2+} ions with H{sub 2}O molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Seredyuk, B.; McCullough, R.W.; Tawara, H.; Gilbody, H.B.; Bodewits, D.; Hoekstra, R.; Tielens, A.G.G.M.; Sobocinski, P.; Pesic, D.; Hellhammer, R.; Sulik, B.; Stolterfoht, N.; Abu-Haija, O.; Kamber, E.Y.

    2005-02-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of one-electron capture in collisions of He{sup 2+} ions with H{sub 2}O molecules have been carried out in the range 0.025-12 keV amu{sup -1} corresponding to typical solar wind velocities of 70-1523 km s{sup -1}. Translational energy spectroscopy (TES), photon emission spectroscopy (PES), and fragment ion spectroscopy were employed to identify and quantify the collision mechanisms involved. Cross sections for selective single electron capture into n=1, 2, and 3 states of the He{sup +} ion were obtained using TES while PES provided cross sections for capture into the He{sup +}(2p) and He{sup +}(3p) states. Our model calculations show that He{sup +}(n=2) and He{sup +}(n=3) formation proceeds via a single-electron process governed by the nucleus-electron interaction. In contrast, the He{sup +}(1s) formation mechanism involves an exothermic two-electron process driven by the electron-electron interaction, where the potential energy released by the electron capture is used to remove a second electron thereby resulting in fragmentation of the H{sub 2}O molecule. This process is found to become increasingly important as the collision energy decreases. The experimental cross sections are found to be in reasonable agreement with cross sections calculated using the Demkov and Landau-Zener models.

  8. Setting Up an Exchange Operation in the Small Special Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Harriet H.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the planning process and the procedures established to get the Fels Research Institute Library started in exchange activities through the ALA Duplicates Exchange Union and the MLA Exchange. Methods for evaluating the success of these programs after one year are explained. (Author/MBR)

  9. Nonsurvivable momentum exchange system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roder, Russell (Inventor); Ahronovich, Eliezer (Inventor); Davis, III, Milton C. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A demiseable momentum exchange system includes a base and a flywheel rotatably supported on the base. The flywheel includes a web portion defining a plurality of web openings and a rim portion. The momentum exchange system further includes a motor for driving the flywheel and a cover for engaging the base to substantially enclose the flywheel. The system may also include components having a melting temperature below 1500 degrees Celsius. The momentum exchange system is configured to demise on reentry.

  10. The Electrically Controlled Exchange Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Jacob

    Controlling magnetism via voltage in the virtual absence of electric current is the key to reduce power consumption while enhancing processing speed, integration density and functionality in comparison with present-day information technology. Almost all spintronic devices rely on tailored interface magnetism. Controlling magnetism at thin-film interfaces, preferably by purely electrical means, is therefore a key challenge to better spintronics. However, there is no direct interaction between magnetization and electric fields, thus making voltage control of magnetism in general a scientific challenge. The significance of controlled interface magnetism started with the exchange-bias effect. Exchange bias is a coupling phenomenon at magnetic interfaces that manifests itself prominently in the shift of the ferromagnetic hysteresis loop along the magnetic-field axis. Various attempts on controlling exchange bias via voltage utilizing different scientific principles have been intensively studied recently. The majority of present research is emphasizing on various complex oxides. Our approach can be considered as a paradigm shift away from complex oxides. We focus on a magnetoelectric antiferromagnetic simple oxide Cr2O3. From a combination of experimental and theoretical efforts, we show that the (0001) surface of magnetoelectric Cr2O3 has a roughness-insensitive, electrically switchable magnetization. Using a ferromagnetic Pd/Co multilayer deposited on the (0001) surface of a Cr2O3 single crystal, we achieve reversible, room-temperature isothermal switching of the exchange-bias between positive and negative values by reversing the electric field while maintaining a permanent magnetic field. This is a significant scientific breakthrough providing a new route towards potentially revolutionizing information technology. In addition, a second path of electrically controlled exchange bias is introduced by exploiting the piezoelectric property of BaTiO3. An exchange-bias Co

  11. Text Exchange System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, W. V.; Hanson, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Text Exchange System (TES) exchanges and maintains organized textual information including source code, documentation, data, and listings. System consists of two computer programs and definition of format for information storage. Comprehensive program used to create, read, and maintain TES files. TES developed to meet three goals: First, easy and efficient exchange of programs and other textual data between similar and dissimilar computer systems via magnetic tape. Second, provide transportable management system for textual information. Third, provide common user interface, over wide variety of computing systems, for all activities associated with text exchange.

  12. Heat exchanger demonstration expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagby, D. G.; Cormier, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    A real-time expert system intended for detecting and diagnosing faults in a 20 kW microwave transmitter heat exchanger is described. The expert system was developed on a LISP machine, Incorporated (LMI), Lambda Plus computer using Process Intelligent Control (PICON) software. The Heat Exhanger Expert System was tested and debugged. Future applications and extensions of the expert system to transmitters, masers, and antenna subassemblies are discussed.

  13. Heat exchanger demonstration expert system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagby, D. G.; Cormier, R. A.

    1988-05-01

    A real-time expert system intended for detecting and diagnosing faults in a 20 kW microwave transmitter heat exchanger is described. The expert system was developed on a LISP machine, Incorporated (LMI), Lambda Plus computer using Process Intelligent Control (PICON) software. The Heat Exhanger Expert System was tested and debugged. Future applications and extensions of the expert system to transmitters, masers, and antenna subassemblies are discussed.

  14. Heat exchanger expert system logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormier, R.

    1988-01-01

    The reduction is described of the operation and fault diagnostics of a Deep Space Network heat exchanger to a rule base by the application of propositional calculus to a set of logic statements. The value of this approach lies in the ease of converting the logic and subsequently implementing it on a computer as an expert system. The rule base was written in Process Intelligent Control software.

  15. Higher Education Exchange, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  16. Higher Education Exchange, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  17. Direct fired heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.; Root, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    A gas-to-liquid heat exchanger system which transfers heat from a gas, generally the combustion gas of a direct-fired generator of an absorption machine, to a liquid, generally an absorbent solution. The heat exchanger system is in a counterflow fluid arrangement which creates a more efficient heat transfer.

  18. Handicapping Social Exchange Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishler, Barbara

    The economic theory of social exchange has some serious shortcomings when applied to minorities--especially the disabled. First, it assumes dyads comprise the basic unit where exchange occurs and that rewards and costs must occur at that level. Second, the model standardizes the experience of white, Western European and American males. The model…

  19. Building Relationships through Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Primavera, Angi; Hall, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    From the moment of birth, children form and develop relationships with others in their world based on exchange. Children recognize that engaging in such encounters offers them the opportunity to enter into a relationship with another individual and to nurture that relationship through the exchange of messages and gifts, items and ideas. At Boulder…

  20. Higher Education Exchange, 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  1. Optimization of Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Ivan Catton

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this research is to develop tools to design and optimize heat exchangers (HE) and compact heat exchangers (CHE) for intermediate loop heat transport systems found in the very high temperature reator (VHTR) and other Generation IV designs by addressing heat transfer surface augmentation and conjugate modeling. To optimize heat exchanger, a fast running model must be created that will allow for multiple designs to be compared quickly. To model a heat exchanger, volume averaging theory, VAT, is used. VAT allows for the conservation of mass, momentum and energy to be solved for point by point in a 3 dimensional computer model of a heat exchanger. The end product of this project is a computer code that can predict an optimal configuration for a heat exchanger given only a few constraints (input fluids, size, cost, etc.). As VAT computer code can be used to model characteristics )pumping power, temperatures, and cost) of heat exchangers more quickly than traditional CFD or experiment, optimization of every geometric parameter simultaneously can be made. Using design of experiment, DOE and genetric algorithms, GE, to optimize the results of the computer code will improve heat exchanger disign.

  2. Higher Education Exchange, 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  3. Higher Education Exchange, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" discuss the concept of growing public scholars; each contribution incorporates a student component. Articles include: (1) "Foreword"…

  4. Money and Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walstad, William B.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    This teaching guide begins with an explanation of the role of money in the economy, focusing on its circulation or exchange. The use of money as a unit of account, a store of value, and a medium of exchange are explained. Three brief teaching units are included. The grade K-2 unit, "Money Counts," provides games and activities which develop the…

  5. Energy-Exchange Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine what energy savings can be achieved by coordinating the resources and requirements of two facilities, the 26th Ward Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) and a housing development named Starrett City with its own total energy system. It was determined that three energy exchange options were economically and technically feasible. These include: the transfer of digester gas produced at the 26th Ward to the boilers at the Starrett City's total energy plant (TEP); the transfer of hot water heated at the TEP to the 26th Ward for space and process heating; and the transfer of coal effluent waste water from the 26th Ward to the condenser cooling systems at the TEP. Technical information is presented to support the findings. The report addresses those tasks of the statement of work dedicated to data acquisition, analysis, and energy conservation strategies internal to the Starrett City TEP and the community it supplies as well as to the 26th Ward WPCP. (MCW)

  6. Electrically switched ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Lilga, M.A.; Schwartz, D.T.; Genders, D.

    1997-10-01

    A variety of waste types containing radioactive {sup 137}Cs are found throughout the DOE complex. These waste types include water in reactor cooling basins, radioactive high-level waste (HLW) in underground storage tanks, and groundwater. Safety and regulatory requirements and economics require the removal of radiocesium before these wastes can be permanently disposed of. Electrically Switched Ion Exchange (ESIX) is an approach for radioactive cesium separation that combines IX and electrochemistry to provide a selective, reversible, and economic separation method that also produces little or no secondary waste. In the ESIX process, an electroactive IX film is deposited electrochemically onto a high-surface area electrode, and ion uptake and elution are controlled directly by modulating the potential of the film. For cesium, the electroactive films under investigation are ferrocyanides, which are well known to have high selectivities for cesium in concentrated sodium solutions. When a cathode potential is applied to the film, Fe{sup +3} is reduced to the Fe{sup +2} state, and a cation must be intercalated into the film to maintain charge neutrality (i.e., Cs{sup +} is loaded). Conversely, if an anodic potential is applied, a cation must be released from the film (i.e., Cs{sup +} is unloaded). Therefore, to load the film with cesium, the film is simply reduced; to unload cesium, the film is oxidized.

  7. How to buy the right heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Crisi, G.S.

    1992-02-01

    Engineers are generally well schooled in the process aspects related to selecting, specifying and obtaining heat exchangers, and much literature on the subject is available. This paper reports that apart from this technical knowledge, however, an extensive amount of useful practical lore has accumulated on how to acquire exchangers effectively and without mishap. The discussion here relates mainly to heat-exchange devices, such as shell-and-tube, double-pipe and plate exchangers, that regularly accommodate process fluids on both the hot and cold sides. However, many of the same considerations apply to other heat-transfer devices used in the CPI, including air coolers, heating or cooling coils for vessels, and barometric condensers. Acquiring a heat exchanger generally consists of following these steps: Establish the process conditions; Make the thermal balance; Select the type of exchanger; Size the exchanger; Choose the materials of construction; Determine key construction details; Write the Data Sheet and the General Specification; Prepare the vendor list; Send the inquiries; Make the bid analysis; Check vendor drawings; Follow manufacture and testing. Selecting the type of exchanger entails process considerations, capacity, ease of maintenance, suitability for the site, cost, and perhaps other factors. Some can be resolved fairly readily. The first step in contacting suppliers is to assess their previous experience in equal or similar services. Whenever possible, visit the actual customer site and talk directly with the personnel who operate and maintain the equipment. When a visit is not possible, make at least a phone call. Also keep in mind the possibility of a quite different kind of pitfall during the selection step: your own subjective preferences.

  8. Four particle exchange in solid He-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmahan, A. K.

    1975-01-01

    Calculations which demonstrate a physically important four-atom exchange process in bodycentered cubic He crystal and thus an important four-spin term in the exchange Hamiltonian are discussed. A simple, mean-field analysis of this Hamiltonian appears to account for a number of the perplexing properties of bodycentered cubic He crystal. It is suggested that an understanding of other properties may require treatment of the exact four-spin term.

  9. Exploring knowledge exchange: a useful framework for practice and policy.

    PubMed

    Ward, Vicky; Smith, Simon; House, Allan; Hamer, Susan

    2012-02-01

    Knowledge translation is underpinned by a dynamic and social knowledge exchange process but there are few descriptions of how this unfolds in practice settings. This has hampered attempts to produce realistic and useful models to help policymakers and researchers understand how knowledge exchange works. This paper reports the results of research which investigated the nature of knowledge exchange. We aimed to understand whether dynamic and fluid definitions of knowledge exchange are valid and to produce a realistic, descriptive framework of knowledge exchange. Our research was informed by a realist approach. We embedded a knowledge broker within three service delivery teams across a mental health organisation in the UK, each of whom was grappling with specific challenges. The knowledge broker participated in the team's problem-solving process and collected observational fieldnotes. We also interviewed the team members. Observational and interview data were analysed quantitatively and qualitatively in order to determine and describe the nature of the knowledge exchange process in more detail. This enabled us to refine our conceptual framework of knowledge exchange. We found that knowledge exchange can be understood as a dynamic and fluid process which incorporates distinct forms of knowledge from multiple sources. Quantitative analysis illustrated that five broadly-defined components of knowledge exchange (problem, context, knowledge, activities, use) can all be in play at any one time and do not occur in a set order. Qualitative analysis revealed a number of distinct themes which better described the nature of knowledge exchange. By shedding light on the nature of knowledge exchange, our findings problematise some of the linear, technicist approaches to knowledge translation. The revised model of knowledge exchange which we propose here could therefore help to reorient thinking about knowledge exchange and act as a starting point for further exploration and

  10. Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal in Exchange Bias Systems*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimmons, Michael

    2001-03-01

    Polarized neutron reflectometry measured the in-plane projection of the net-magnetization vector of polycrystalline Fe films exchange-coupled to (110) FeF2 antiferromagnetic (AF) films of controlled crystalline quality. For the sample with the single crystal AF film, we observed perpendicular exchange coupling across the ferromagnetic (F)-AF interface on either side of the hysteresis loop at coercivity. Perpendicular exchange coupling was observed regardless of cooling field orientation parallel or perpendicular to the AF anisotropy axis. Yet, for one orientation the exchange bias was zero; thus, perpendicular exchange coupling is not a sufficient condition for exchange bias. For samples with twinned AF films, an asymmetry in the spin flip scattering on either side of the hysteresis loop, and consequently in the magnetization reversal process, was observed. The origin of the asymmetry is explained by frustration of perpendicular exchange coupling, which enhances exchange bias and leads to 45° exchange coupling across the F-AF interface. The easy axis in the ferromagnet, which gives rise to asymmetric magnetization reversal in the twinned samples, is not present in samples with (110) textured polycrystalline AF films; and consequently exchange bias is reduced. *Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, BES-DMS under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-36, Grant No. DE-FG03-87ER-45332 and funds from the University of California Collaborative University and Laboratory Assisted Research. ÝWork in collaboration with A. Hoffmann, P. Yashar, J. Groves, R. Springer, P. Arendt (LANL), C. Leighton, K. Liu, Ivan K. Schuller (UCSD), J. Nogués (UAB), C.F. Majkrzak, J.A. Dura (NIST), H. Fritzsche (HMI), V. Leiner, H. Lauter (ILL).

  11. Anion exchange membrane

    DOEpatents

    Verkade, John G; Wadhwa, Kuldeep; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-05-07

    An anion exchange membrane and fuel cell incorporating the anion exchange membrane are detailed in which proazaphosphatrane and azaphosphatrane cations are covalently bonded to a sulfonated fluoropolymer support along with anionic counterions. A positive charge is dispersed in the aforementioned cations which are buried in the support to reduce the cation-anion interactions and increase the mobility of hydroxide ions, for example, across the membrane. The anion exchange membrane has the ability to operate at high temperatures and in highly alkaline environments with high conductivity and low resistance.

  12. Wound tube heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1983-01-01

    What is disclosed is a wound tube heat exchanger in which a plurality of tubes having flattened areas are held contiguous adjacent flattened areas of tubes by a plurality of windings to give a double walled heat exchanger. The plurality of windings serve as a plurality of effective force vectors holding the conduits contiguous heat conducting walls of another conduit and result in highly efficient heat transfer. The resulting heat exchange bundle is economical and can be coiled into the desired shape. Also disclosed are specific embodiments such as the one in which the tubes are expanded against their windings after being coiled to insure highly efficient heat transfer.

  13. Heat and mass exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Lowenstein, Andrew; Sibilia, Marc J.; Miller, Jeffrey A.; Tonon, Thomas

    2011-06-28

    A mass and heat exchanger includes at least one first substrate with a surface for supporting a continuous flow of a liquid thereon that either absorbs, desorbs, evaporates or condenses one or more gaseous species from or to a surrounding gas; and at least one second substrate operatively associated with the first substrate. The second substrate includes a surface for supporting the continuous flow of the liquid thereon and is adapted to carry a heat exchange fluid therethrough, wherein heat transfer occurs between the liquid and the heat exchange fluid.

  14. Heat and mass exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Lowenstein, Andrew; Sibilia, Marc J.; Miller, Jeffrey A.; Tonon, Thomas

    2007-09-18

    A mass and heat exchanger includes at least one first substrate with a surface for supporting a continuous flow of a liquid thereon that either absorbs, desorbs, evaporates or condenses one or more gaseous species from or to a surrounding gas; and at least one second substrate operatively associated with the first substrate. The second substrate includes a surface for supporting the continuous flow of the liquid thereon and is adapted to carry a heat exchange fluid therethrough, wherein heat transfer occurs between the liquid and the heat exchange fluid.

  15. Process

    SciTech Connect

    Geenen, P.V.; Bennis, J.

    1989-04-04

    A process is described for minimizing the cracking tendency and uncontrolled dimensional change, and improving the strength of a rammed plastic refractory reactor liner comprising phosphate-bonded silicon carbide or phosphate-bonded alumina. It consists of heating the reactor liner placed or mounted in a reactor, prior to its first use, from ambient temperature up to a temperature of from about 490/sup 0/C to about 510/sup 0/C, the heating being carried out by heating the liner at a rate to produce a temperature increase of the liner not greater than about 6/sup 0/C per hour.

  16. Outdoor heat exchanger section

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, A.F.; Smiley, W.A. III; Wendt, M.E.

    1988-02-09

    An outdoor section for an air conditioning system is described comprising: a compressor; a heat exchanger; a cabinet having an upper cabinet section, a lower cabinet section and a louvered lower section top cover, the heat exchanger and the compressor being housed in the lower cabinet section and the upper cabinet section having a solid top which overlies the louvers in the lower section top cover; and a fan disposed in the lower cabinet section to draw air through the sides of the lower cabinet section and through the heat exchanger housed therein, the fan discharging air, after having been drawn through the heat exchanger, upward through the louvers in the lower cabinet section top cover and into the interior of the upper cabinet section.

  17. Exchange transfusion - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... her back, usually under a radiant warmer. The umbilical vein is catheterized with a fluid-filled catheter. ... plasma is injected. After the exchange transfusion, an umbilical catheter may be left in place in case ...

  18. Active microchannel heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Roberts, Gary L [West Richland, WA; Call, Charles J [Pasco, WA; Wegeng, Robert S [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an active microchannel heat exchanger with an active heat source and with microchannel architecture. The microchannel heat exchanger has (a) an exothermic reaction chamber; (b) an exhaust chamber; and (c) a heat exchanger chamber in thermal contact with the exhaust chamber, wherein (d) heat from the exothermic reaction chamber is convected by an exothermic reaction exhaust through the exhaust chamber and by conduction through a containment wall to the working fluid in the heat exchanger chamber thereby raising a temperature of the working fluid. The invention is particularly useful as a liquid fuel vaporizer and/or a steam generator for fuel cell power systems, and as a heat source for sustaining endothermic chemical reactions and initiating exothermic reactions.

  19. Anion exchange polymer electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yu Seung; Kim, Dae Sik

    2015-06-02

    Anion exchange polymer electrolytes that include guanidinium functionalized polymers may be used as membranes and binders for electrocatalysts in preparation of anodes for electrochemical cells such as solid alkaline fuel cells.

  20. Porous Ceramic Spheres From Cation Exchange Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred

    2005-01-01

    This document is a slide presentation that examines the use of a simple templating process to produce hollow ceramic spheres with a pore size of 1 to 10 microns. Using ion exchange process it was determined that the method produces porous ceramic spheres with a unique structure: (i.e., inner sphere surrounded by an outer sphere.)

  1. Ion Exchange Formation via Sulfonated Bicomponent Nonwovens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoughton, Hannah L.

    For many years ion exchange resins were used to: remove heavy metals from water, recover materials from wastewater, and eliminate harmful gases from the air. While use of these resin beads dominates the ion exchange industry, the beads have limitations that should be considered when decisions are made to employ them. For instance, officials must balance the inherent zero sum surface area and porosity of the materials. This series of studies investigates the use of bicomponent nonwovens as a base substrate for producing high surface area ion exchange materials for the removal of heavy metal ions. Functionalized materials were produced in a two-step process: (1) PET/PE spunbond bicomponent fibers were fractured completely, producing the high surface area nonwoven to be used as the base ion exchange material, and (2) the conditions for functionalizing the PET fibers of the nonwoven webs were investigated where an epoxy containing monomer was grafted to the surface followed by sulfonation of the monomer. The functionalization reactions of the PET fibers were monitored based on: weight gain, FTIR, TOF-SIMS, and SEM. Ion exchange properties were evaluated using titration and copper ion removal capacity from test solutions. The relationship between web structure and removal efficiency of the metal ions was defined through a comparison of the bicomponent and homocomponent nonwovens for copper ion removal efficiency. The investigation revealed that utilizing the high surface area, fractured bicomponent nonwoven ion exchange materials with capacities comparable to commercially available ion exchange resins could be produced.

  2. Data exchange in metrology.

    PubMed

    Badger, P

    1996-01-01

    The adoption of the directives 71/316/EEC on measuring instruments and 90/384/EEC on non-automatic weighing instruments has resulted in a considerable quantity of certificates to be exchanged between the Central Metrological Authorities and the Local Metrological Authorities, in the member states. This requirement to exchange data, prompted the setting up of the WELMEC working group, to explore how computerisation could help the member states perform their tasks. PMID:10172832

  3. Microtube Strip Heat Exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F.D.

    1990-12-27

    Doty Scientific (DSI) believes their Microtube-Strip Heat Exchanger will contribute significantly to (a) the closed Brayton cycles being pursued at MIT, NASA, and elsewhere; (b) reverse Brayton cycle cryocoolers, currently being investigated by NASA for space missions, being applied to MRI superconducting magnets; and (c) high-efficiency cryogenic gas separation schemes for CO{sub 2} removal from exhaust stacks. The goal of this current study is to show the potential for substantial progress in high-effectiveness, low-cost, gas-to-gas heat exchangers for diverse applications at temperatures from below 100 K to above 1000 K. To date, the highest effectiveness measured is about 98%, and relative pressure drops below 0.1% with a specific conductance of about 45 W/kgK are reported. During the pre-award period DSI built and tested a 3-module heat exchanger bank using 103-tube microtube strip (MTS) modules. To add to their analytical capabilities, DSI has acquired computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. This report describes the pre-award work and the status of the ten tasks of the current project, which are: analyze flow distribution and thermal stresses within individual modules; design a heat exchanger bank of ten modules with 400 microtube per module; obtain production quality tubestrip die and AISI 304 tubestrips; obtain production quality microtubing; construct revised MTS heat exchanger; construct dies and fixtures for prototype heat exchanger; construct 100 MTS modules; assemble 8-10 prototype MTS heat exchangers; test prototype MTS heat exchanger; and verify test through independent means. 7 refs., 9 figs. 1 tab. (CK)

  4. Cryptographic Combinatorial Securities Exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, Christopher; Parkes, David C.

    We present a useful new mechanism that facilitates the atomic exchange of many large baskets of securities in a combinatorial exchange. Cryptography prevents information about the securities in the baskets from being exploited, enhancing trust. Our exchange offers institutions who wish to trade large positions a new alternative to existing methods of block trading: they can reduce transaction costs by taking advantage of other institutions’ available liquidity, while third party liquidity providers guarantee execution—preserving their desired portfolio composition at all times. In our exchange, institutions submit encrypted orders which are crossed, leaving a “remainder”. The exchange proves facts about the portfolio risk of this remainder to third party liquidity providers without revealing the securities in the remainder, the knowledge of which could also be exploited. The third parties learn either (depending on the setting) the portfolio risk parameters of the remainder itself, or how their own portfolio risk would change if they were to incorporate the remainder into a portfolio they submit. In one setting, these third parties submit bids on the commission, and the winner supplies necessary liquidity for the entire exchange to clear. This guaranteed clearing, coupled with external price discovery from the primary markets for the securities, sidesteps difficult combinatorial optimization problems. This latter method of proving how taking on the remainder would change risk parameters of one’s own portfolio, without revealing the remainder’s contents or its own risk parameters, is a useful protocol of independent interest.

  5. Radial flow heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Valenzuela, Javier

    2001-01-01

    A radial flow heat exchanger (20) having a plurality of first passages (24) for transporting a first fluid (25) and a plurality of second passages (26) for transporting a second fluid (27). The first and second passages are arranged in stacked, alternating relationship, are separated from one another by relatively thin plates (30) and (32), and surround a central axis (22). The thickness of the first and second passages are selected so that the first and second fluids, respectively, are transported with laminar flow through the passages. To enhance thermal energy transfer between first and second passages, the latter are arranged so each first passage is in thermal communication with an associated second passage along substantially its entire length, and vice versa with respect to the second passages. The heat exchangers may be stacked to achieve a modular heat exchange assembly (300). Certain heat exchangers in the assembly may be designed slightly differently than other heat exchangers to address changes in fluid properties during transport through the heat exchanger, so as to enhance overall thermal effectiveness of the assembly.

  6. Vacuum powered heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffolo, R.F.

    1986-06-24

    In an internal combustion engine including an oil lubrication system, a liquid cooling system, and an improved air intake system is described. The improved air intake system comprises: a housing including a first opening in one end, which opening is open to the atmosphere and a second opening comprising an air outlet opening in the other end open to the air intake manifold of the engine, a heat exchanger positioned in the first opening. The heat exchanger consists of a series of coils positioned in the flow path of the atmospheric air as it enters the housing, the heat exchanger being fluidly connected to either the engine lubrication system or the cooling system to provide a warm heat source for the incoming air to the housing, acceleration means positioned in the housing downstream of the heat exchanger, the acceleration means comprising a honeycomb structure positioned across the air intake flow path. The honey-comb structure includes a multitude of honey combed mini-venturi cells through which the heated air flows in an accelerated mode, a removable air filter positioned between the heat exchanger and the acceleration means and a single opening provided in the housing through which the air filter can be passed and removed, and additional openings in the housing positioned downstream of the heat exchanger and upstream of the air filter, the additional openings including removable flaps for opening and closing the openings to control the temperature of the air flowing through the housing.

  7. 8. VIEW OF GLOVE BOXES USED IN THE ANION EXCHANGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF GLOVE BOXES USED IN THE ANION EXCHANGE PROCESS. THE ANION EXCHANGE PROCESS PURIFIED AND CONCENTRATED PLUTONIUM-BEARING NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS TO MAKE THEM ACCEPTABLE AS FEED FOR CONVERSION TO METAL. (6/20/60) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Recovery & Fabrication Facility, North-central section of plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  8. Seed exchange networks, ethnicity, and sorghum diversity

    PubMed Central

    Labeyrie, Vanesse; Thomas, Mathieu; Muthamia, Zachary K.; Leclerc, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies investigating the relationship between crop genetic diversity and human cultural diversity patterns showed that seed exchanges are embedded in farmers’ social organization. However, our understanding of the social processes involved remains limited. We investigated how farmers’ membership in three major social groups interacts in shaping sorghum seed exchange networks in a cultural contact zone on Mount Kenya. Farmers are members of residence groups at the local scale and of dialect groups clustered within larger ethnolinguistic units at a wider scale. The Chuka and Tharaka, who are allied in the same ethnolinguistic unit, coexist with the Mbeere dialect group in the study area. We assessed farmers’ homophily, propensity to exchange seeds with members of the same group, using exponential random graph models. We showed that homophily is significant within both residence and ethnolinguistic groups. At these two levels, homophily is driven by the kinship system, particularly by the combination of patrilocal residence and ethnolinguistic endogamy, because most seeds are exchanged among relatives. Indeed, residential homophily in seed exchanges results from local interactions between women and their in-law family, whereas at a higher level, ethnolinguistic homophily is driven by marriage endogamy. Seed exchanges and marriage ties are interrelated, and both are limited between the Mbeere and the other groups, although frequent between the Chuka and Tharaka. The impact of these social homophily processes on crop diversity is discussed. PMID:26699480

  9. Seed exchange networks, ethnicity, and sorghum diversity.

    PubMed

    Labeyrie, Vanesse; Thomas, Mathieu; Muthamia, Zachary K; Leclerc, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies investigating the relationship between crop genetic diversity and human cultural diversity patterns showed that seed exchanges are embedded in farmers' social organization. However, our understanding of the social processes involved remains limited. We investigated how farmers' membership in three major social groups interacts in shaping sorghum seed exchange networks in a cultural contact zone on Mount Kenya. Farmers are members of residence groups at the local scale and of dialect groups clustered within larger ethnolinguistic units at a wider scale. The Chuka and Tharaka, who are allied in the same ethnolinguistic unit, coexist with the Mbeere dialect group in the study area. We assessed farmers' homophily, propensity to exchange seeds with members of the same group, using exponential random graph models. We showed that homophily is significant within both residence and ethnolinguistic groups. At these two levels, homophily is driven by the kinship system, particularly by the combination of patrilocal residence and ethnolinguistic endogamy, because most seeds are exchanged among relatives. Indeed, residential homophily in seed exchanges results from local interactions between women and their in-law family, whereas at a higher level, ethnolinguistic homophily is driven by marriage endogamy. Seed exchanges and marriage ties are interrelated, and both are limited between the Mbeere and the other groups, although frequent between the Chuka and Tharaka. The impact of these social homophily processes on crop diversity is discussed. PMID:26699480

  10. Modeling of Crystalline Silicotitanate Ion Exchange Columns

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    1999-03-09

    Non-elutable ion exchange is being considered as a potential replacement for the In-Tank Precipitation process for removing cesium from Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste. Crystalline silicotitanate (CST) particles are the reference ion exchange medium for the process. A major factor in the construction cost of this process is the size of the ion exchange column required to meet product specifications for decontaminated waste. To validate SRS column sizing calculations, SRS subcontracted two reknowned experts in this field to perform similar calculations: Professor R. G. Anthony, Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A&038;M University, and Professor S. W. Wang, Department of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University. The appendices of this document contain reports from the two subcontractors. Definition of the design problem came through several meetings and conference calls between the participants and SRS personnel over the past few months. This document summarizes the problem definition and results from the two reports.

  11. Downhole heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

    1999-09-01

    The downhole heat exchanger (DHE) eliminates the problem of disposal of geothermal fluid, since only heat is taken from the well. The exchanger consists of a system of pipes or tubes suspended in the well through which clean secondary water is pumped or allowed to circulate by natural convection. These systems offer substantial economic savings over surface heat exchangers where a single-well system is adequate (typically less than 0.8 MWt, with well depths up to about 500 ft) and may be economical under certain conditions at well depths to 1500 ft. Several designs have proven successful; but, the most popular are a simple hairpin loop or multiple loops of iron pipe (similar to the tubes in a U-tube and shell exchanger) extending to near the well bottom. An experimental design consisting of multiple small tubes with headers at each end suspended just below the water surface appears to offer economic and heating capacity advantages. The paper describes design and construction details and New Zealand`s experience with downhole heat exchangers.

  12. Exchange bias in nearly perpendicularly coupled ferromagnetic/ferromagnetic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, K. M.; Kwon, H. Y.; Oh, S. W.; Won, C.

    2012-04-01

    Exchange bias phenomena appear not only in ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic systems but also in ferromagnetic/ferromagnetic systems in which two layers are nearly perpendicularly coupled. We investigated the origin of the symmetry-breaking mechanism and the relationship between the exchange bias and the system's energy parameters. We compared the results of computational Monte Carlo simulations with those of theoretical model calculation. We found that the exchange bias exhibited nonlinear behaviors, including sign reversal and singularities. These complicated behaviors were caused by two distinct magnetization processes depending on the interlayer coupling strength. The exchange bias reached a maximum at the transition between the two magnetization processes.

  13. Shell-and-double concentric-tube heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougriou, Chérif; Baadache, Khireddine

    2010-03-01

    This study concerns a new type of heat exchangers, which is that of shell-and-double concentric-tube heat exchangers. These heat exchangers can be used in many specific applications such as air conditioning, waste heat recovery, chemical processing, pharmaceutical industries, power production, transport, distillation, food processing, cryogenics, etc. The case studies include both design calculations and performance calculations. It is demonstrated that the relative diameter sizes of the two tubes with respect to each other are the most important parameters that influence the heat exchanger size.

  14. Dynamic Analysis of Capture Devices for Momentum Exchange with Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    One of the significant challenges in developing a momentum exchange / electrodynamic reboost tether system is in the analysis and design of the capture device and its effects on the overall dynamics of the system. The goal of this work is to develop appropriate tether momentum exchange models that can simulate and evaluate the requirements of such a system, and be used to create specifications on the design of a capture device. This report briefly describes dynamic model development, simulation of the momentum exchange process, evaluation of dynamic effects of errors in the momentum exchange process, and the development of guidelines in selecting dynamic properties in the design of a capture device.

  15. Enhanced exchange algorithm without detailed balance condition for replica exchange method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Hiroko X.; Taiji, Makoto

    2013-06-01

    The replica exchange method (REM) is a powerful tool for the conformational sampling of biomolecules. In this study, we propose an enhanced exchange algorithm for REM not meeting the detailed balance condition (DBC), but satisfying the balance condition in all considered exchanges between two replicas. Breaking the DBC can minimize the rejection rate and make an exchange process rejection-free as the number of replicas increases. To enhance the efficiency of REM, all possible pairs—not only the nearest neighbor—were considered in the exchange process. The test simulations of the alanine dipeptide confirmed the correctness of our method. The average traveling distance of each replica in the temperature distribution was also increased in proportion to an increase in the exchange rate. Furthermore, we applied our algorithm to the conformational sampling of the 10-residue miniprotein, chignolin, with an implicit solvent model. The results showed a faster convergence in the calculation of its free energy landscape, compared to that achieved using the normal exchange method of adjacent pairs. This algorithm can also be applied to the conventional near neighbor method and is expected to reduce the required number of replicas.

  16. Modular heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Culver, Donald W.

    1978-01-01

    A heat exchanger for use in nuclear reactors includes a heat exchange tube bundle formed from similar modules each having a hexagonal shroud containing a large number of thermally conductive tubes which are connected with inlet and outlet headers at opposite ends of each module, the respective headers being adapted for interconnection with suitable inlet and outlet manifold means. In order to adapt the heat exchanger for operation in a high temperature and high pressure environment and to provide access to all tube ports at opposite ends of the tube bundle, a spherical tube sheet is arranged in sealed relation across the chamber with an elongated duct extending outwardly therefrom to provide manifold means for interconnection with the opposite end of the tube bundle.

  17. Ion exchange phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-05-01

    Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

  18. On exchangeable multinomial distributions

    PubMed Central

    George, E. Olusegun; Cheon, Kyeongmi; Yuan, Yilian; Szabo, Aniko

    2016-01-01

    We derive an expression for the joint distribution of exchangeable multinomial random variables, which generalizes the multinomial distribution based on independent trials while retaining some of its important properties. Unlike de Finneti's representation theorem for a binary sequence, the exchangeable multinomial distribution derived here does not require that the finite set of random variables under consideration be a subset of an infinite sequence. Using expressions for higher moments and correlations, we show that the covariance matrix for exchangeable multinomial data has a different form from that usually assumed in the literature, and we analyse data from developmental toxicology studies. The proposed analyses have been implemented in R and are available on CRAN in the CorrBin package.

  19. Microgravity condensing heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Christopher M. (Inventor); Ma, Yonghui (Inventor); North, Andrew (Inventor); Weislogel, Mark M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A heat exchanger having a plurality of heat exchanging aluminum fins with hydrophilic condensing surfaces which are stacked and clamped between two cold plates. The cold plates are aligned radially along a plane extending through the axis of a cylindrical duct and hold the stacked and clamped portions of the heat exchanging fins along the axis of the cylindrical duct. The fins extend outwardly from the clamped portions along approximately radial planes. The spacing between fins is symmetric about the cold plates, and are somewhat more closely spaced as the angle they make with the cold plates approaches 90.degree.. Passageways extend through the fins between vertex spaces which provide capillary storage and communicate with passageways formed in the stacked and clamped portions of the fins, which communicate with water drains connected to a pump externally to the duct. Water with no entrained air is drawn from the capillary spaces.

  20. TECHNICAL COMPARISON OF CANDIDATE ION EXCHANGE MEDIA FOR SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE (SCIX) APPLICATIONS IN SUPPORT OF SUPPLEMENTAL LAW PRETREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    RAMSEY AA; THORSON MR

    2010-12-28

    At-tank supplemental pretreatment including both filtration and small column ion exchange is currently under evaluation to facilitate salt waste retrieval and processing in the Hanford tank farms. Spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) resin is the baseline ion exchange resin for use in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). This document provides background and technical rationale to assist in determining whether spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) is also the appropriate ion exchange resin for supplemental LAW pretreatment processes and compares sRF with crystalline silicotitanate (CST) as potential supplemental pretreatment ion exchange media.

  1. Heat exchanger panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warburton, Robert E. (Inventor); Cuva, William J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heat exchanger panel which has broad utility in high temperature environments. The heat exchanger panel has a first panel, a second panel, and at least one fluid containment device positioned intermediate the first and second panels. At least one of the first panel and the second panel have at least one feature on an interior surface to accommodate the at least one fluid containment device. In a preferred embodiment, each of the first and second panels is formed from a high conductivity, high temperature composite material. Also, in a preferred embodiment, the first and second panels are joined together by one or more composite fasteners.

  2. Microscale Regenerative Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Stelter, Stephan; Stelter, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    The device described herein is designed primarily for use as a regenerative heat exchanger in a miniature Stirling engine or Stirling-cycle heat pump. A regenerative heat exchanger (sometimes called, simply, a "regenerator" in the Stirling-engine art) is basically a thermal capacitor: Its role in the Stirling cycle is to alternately accept heat from, then deliver heat to, an oscillating flow of a working fluid between compression and expansion volumes, without introducing an excessive pressure drop. These volumes are at different temperatures, and conduction of heat between these volumes is undesirable because it reduces the energy-conversion efficiency of the Stirling cycle.

  3. Multiscale hyporheic exchange through strongly heterogeneous sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryshlak, Timothy T.; Sawyer, Audrey H.; Stonedahl, Susa H.; Soltanian, Mohamad Reza

    2015-11-01

    Heterogeneity in hydraulic conductivity (K) and channel morphology both control surface water-groundwater exchange (hyporheic exchange), which influences stream ecosystem processes and biogeochemical cycles. Here we show that heterogeneity in K is the dominant control on exchange rates, residence times, and patterns in hyporheic zones with abrupt lithologic contrasts. We simulated hyporheic exchange in a representative low-gradient stream with 300 different bimodal K fields composed of sand and silt. Simulations span five sets of sand-silt ratios and two sets of low and high K contrasts (1 and 3 orders of magnitude). Heterogeneity increases interfacial flux by an order of magnitude relative to homogeneous cases, drastically changes the shape of residence time distributions, and decreases median residence times. The positioning of highly permeable sand bodies controls patterns of interfacial flux and flow paths. These results are remarkably different from previous studies of smooth, continuous K fields that indicate only moderate effects on hyporheic exchange. Our results also show that hyporheic residence times are least predictable when sand body connectivity is low. As sand body connectivity increases, the expected residence time distribution (ensemble average for a given sand-silt ratio) remains approximately constant, but the uncertainty around the expectation decreases. Including strong heterogeneity in hyporheic models is imperative for understanding hyporheic fluxes and solute transport. In streams with strongly heterogeneous sediments, characterizing lithologic structure is more critical for predicting hyporheic exchange metrics than characterizing channel morphology.

  4. Securities and Exchange Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... [Securities and Exchange Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] Part XXIII Securities and Exchange Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (SEC) SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION 17 CFR Ch. II Regulatory Flexibility Agenda AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission. ACTION: Semiannual regulatory...

  5. Reliability analysis on a shell and tube heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingeswara, S.; Omar, R.; Mohd Ghazi, T. I.

    2016-06-01

    A shell and tube heat exchanger reliability was done in this study using past history data from a carbon black manufacturing plant. The heat exchanger reliability study is vital in all related industries as inappropriate maintenance and operation of the heat exchanger will lead to major Process Safety Events (PSE) and loss of production. The overall heat exchanger coefficient/effectiveness (Uo) and Mean Time between Failures (MTBF) were analyzed and calculated. The Aspen and down time data was taken from a typical carbon black shell and tube heat exchanger manufacturing plant. As a result of the Uo calculated and analyzed, it was observed that the Uo declined over a period caused by severe fouling and heat exchanger limitation. This limitation also requires further burn out period which leads to loss of production. The MTBF calculated is 649.35 hours which is very low compared to the standard 6000 hours for the good operation of shell and tube heat exchanger. The guidelines on heat exchanger repair, preventive and predictive maintenance was identified and highlighted for better heat exchanger inspection and repair in the future. The fouling of heat exchanger and the production loss will be continuous if proper heat exchanger operation and repair using standard operating procedure is not followed.

  6. Polymer-based heat exchanger desiccant systems

    SciTech Connect

    Staton, J.C.; Howard, J.L.; Scott, E.P.; Kander, R.G.

    1999-07-01

    The increasing popularity of desiccant-enhanced air conditioning systems has sparked new interest in the search for a better, more efficient desiccant material. The ultimate goal of this research was to develop a material that, when applied to an existing air-to-air heat exchanger, would achieve the necessary heat and mass transfer in a single process, thus transforming a sensible heat exchanger into a total enthalpy exchanger. This study focused on the development and determination of appropriate polymeric desiccant materials for use in different heat and mass transfer systems. The specific objectives for the study were to select an appropriate polymer desiccant, determine the necessary materials properties for this material, and develop and implement mathematical models to analyze the desiccant performance. Two systems were investigated for this study: a rotary wheel total enthalpy exchanger and a fixed plate total enthalpy exchanger. Seven different polymer materials were analyzed to determine the most suitable candidate. Although for the specific conditions studied, the commercial paper-ceramic desiccant out-performed the PVOH materials in both rotary wheel and fixed plate systems, the results suggested that two PVOH materials, PVOH open-cell foam and PVOH/silica gel/molecular sieve composite, have potential for use in total energy exchange applications. By modifying the design conditions, total efficiencies exceeding 70% were achieved for both PVOH foam and PVOH/ceramic composite in rotary wheel systems. In addition, modified the design conditions resulted in total efficiencies greater than 90% for the PVOH foam in both counter-flow and cross-flow flat plate systems. These findings indicated that with appropriate optimization of the exchanger design, these two PVOH materials could have the potential to perform as well as desiccant materials in current rotary wheel and fixed plate exchanger systems.

  7. Currency Exchange Rates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siler, Carl R.

    This curriculum unit of the Muncie (Indiana) Southside High School is to simulate the dynamics of foreign currency exchange rates from the perspectives of: (1) a major U.S. corporation, ABB Power T & D Company, Inc., of Muncie, Indiana, a manufacturer of large power transformers for the domestic and foreign markets; and (2) individual consumers…

  8. Estimate exchanger vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, C.D.; Zengyan, H.

    1986-04-01

    Based on the classical beam theory, a simple method for calculating the natural frequency of unequally spanned tubes is presented. The method is suitable for various boundary conditions. Accuracy of the calculations is sufficient for practical applications. This method will help designers and operators estimate the vibration of tubular exchangers. In general, there are three reasons why a tube vibrates in cross flow: vortex shedding, fluid elasticity and turbulent buffeting. No matter which is the cause, the basic reason is that the frequency of exciting force is approximately the same as or equal to the natural frequency of the tube. To prevent the heat exchanger from vibrating, it is necessary to select correctly the shell-side fluid velocity so that the frequency of exciting force is different from the natural frequency of the tube, or to vary the natural frequency of the heat exchanger tube. So precisely determining the natural frequency of the heat exchanger, especially its foundational frequency under various supporting conditions, is of significance.

  9. Research Exchange, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Exchange, 2002

    2002-01-01

    These three issues of the "Research Exchange" focus on how better to conduct disability research and disseminate research results. The first issue examines the topic of human subject/human research participant protection, with a focus on research funded through the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). It provides…

  10. Higher Education Exchange 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Contributors to this issue of the Higher Education Exchange debate the issues around knowledge production, discuss the acquisition of deliberative skills for democracy, and examine how higher education prepares, or does not prepare, students for citizenship roles. Articles include: (1) "Foreword" (Deborah Witte); (2) "Knowledge, Judgment and…

  11. Technology Performance Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-01

    To address the need for accessible, high-quality data, the Department of Energy has developed the Technology Performance Exchange (TPEx). TPEx enables technology suppliers, third-party testing laboratories, and other entities to share product performance data. These data are automatically transformed into a format that technology evaluators can easily use in their energy modeling assessments to inform procurement decisions.

  12. Heat exchange enhancement structure

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelison, R.C.; Kreith, F.

    1980-12-02

    A passive heat exchange enhancement structure which operates by free convection includes a flat mounting portion having a plurality of integral fins bent outwardly from one side edge thereof. The mounting portion is securable around a stovepipe, to a flat surface or the like for transferring heat from the pipe through the fins to the surrounding air by rotation-enhanced free convection.

  13. Higher Education Exchange, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    Research shows that not only does higher education not see the public; when the public, in turn, looks at higher education, it sees mostly malaise, inefficiencies, expense, and unfulfilled promises. Yet, the contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" tell of bright spots in higher education where experiments in working…

  14. Nature's Heat Exchangers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, George

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the heat-transfer systems of different animals. Systems include heat conduction into the ground, heat transferred by convection, heat exchange in lizards, fish and polar animals, the carotid rete system, electromagnetic radiation from animals and people, and plant and animal fiber optics. (MDH)

  15. Chimney heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteley, I.C.

    1981-09-01

    A heat exchanger for installation on the top of a chimney of a building includes a housing having a lower end receiving the top of the chimney and an upper end with openings permitting the escape of effluent from the chimney and a heat exchanger assembly disposed in the housing including a central chamber and a spirally arranged duct network defining an effluent spiral path between the top of the chimney and the central chamber and a fresh air spiral path between an inlet disposed at the lower end of the housing and the central chamber, the effluent and fresh air spiral paths being in heat exchange relationship such that air passing through the fresh air spiral path is heated by hot effluent gases passing upward through the chimney and the effluent spiral path for use in heating the building. A pollution trap can be disposed in the central chamber of the heat exchanger assembly for removing pollutants from the effluent, the pollution trap including a rotating cage carrying pumice stones for absorbing pollutants from the effluent with the surface of the pumice gradually ground off to reveal fresh stone as the cage rotates.

  16. Visiting Scholar Exchange Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Kyna, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Provides reports of four United States scholars who visited China as part of the Visiting Scholar Exchange Program. The titles of the reports are (1) "China Journey: A Political Scientist's Look at Yan'an," (2) "The Social Consequences of Land Reclamation in Chinese Coastal Ecosystems," (3) "Anthropology Lectures in South China," and (4) "The Use…

  17. Higher Education Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This volume begins with an essay by Noelle McAfee, a contributor who is familiar to readers of Higher Education Exchange (HEX). She reiterates Mathews' argument regarding the disconnect between higher education's sense of engagement and the public's sense of engagement, and suggests a way around the epistemological conundrum of "knowledge produced…

  18. Higher Education Exchange, 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This volume begins with an essay by Noelle McAfee, a contributor who is familiar to readers of Higher Education Exchange (HEX). She reiterates Kettering's president David Mathews' argument regarding the disconnect between higher education's sense of engagement and the public's sense of engagement, and suggests a way around the epistemological…

  19. Composite ion exchange materials

    SciTech Connect

    Amarasinghe, S.; Zook, L.; Leddy, J.

    1994-12-31

    Composite ion exchange materials can be formed by sorbing ion exchange polymers on inert, high surface area substrates. In general, the flux of ions and molecules through these composites, as measured electrochemically, increases as the ratio of the surface area of the substrate increases relative to the volume of the ion exchanger. This suggests that fields and gradients established at the interface between the ion exchanger and substrate are important in determining the transport characteristics of the composites. Here, the authors will focus on composites formed with a cation exchange polymer, Nafion, and two different types of microbeads: polystyrene microspheres and polystyrene coated magnetic microbeads. For the polystyrene microbeads, scanning electron micrographs suggest the beads cluster in a self-similar manner, independent of the bead diameter. Flux of Ru(NH3)63+ through the composites was studied as a function of bead fraction, bead radii, and fixed surface area with mixed bead sizes. Flux was well modeled by surface diffusion along a fractal interface. Magnetic composites were formed with columns of magnetic microbeads normal to the electrode surface. Flux of Ru(NH3)63+ through these composites increased exponentially with bead fraction. For electrolyses, the difference in the molar magnetic susceptibility of the products and reactants, Dcm, tends to be non-zero. For seven redox reactions, the ratio of the flux through the magnetic composites to the flux through a Nafion film increases monotonically with {vert_bar}Dcm{vert_bar}, with enhancements as large as thirty-fold. For reversible species, the electrolysis potential through the magnetic composites is 35 mV positive of that for the Nafion films.

  20. Heat exchanger restart evaluation. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.M.; Hirst, C.W.; Lentz, T.F.

    1992-03-18

    On December 24, 1991, the K-Reactor was in the shutdown mode with full AC process water flow and full cooling water flow. Safety rod testing was being performed as part of the power ascension testing program. The results of cooling water samples indicated tritium concentrations higher than allowable. Further sampling and testing confirmed a Process Water System to Cooling Water System leak in heat exchanger 4A (HX 4A). The heat exchanger was isolated and the plant shutdown. Heat exchanger 4A was removed from the plant and moved to C-Area prior to performing examinations and diagnostic testing. This included locating and identifying the leaking tube or tubes, eddy current examination of the leaking tube and a number of adjacent tubes, visually inspecting the leaking tube from both the inside as well as the area surrounding the identified tube. The leaking tube was removed and examined metallurgically to determine the failure mechanism. In addition ten other tubes that either exhibited eddy current indications or would represent a baseline condition were removed from heat exchanger 4A for metallurgical examination. Additional analysis and review of heat exchanger leakage history was performed to determine if there are any patterns which can be used for predictive purposes. Compensatory actions have been taken to improve the sensitivity and response time to any future events of this type. The results of these actions are summary herein.

  1. A corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, S.L.

    1987-08-10

    A corrosive and erosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is pumped through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Ion exchange polymers for anion separations

    DOEpatents

    Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Marsh, S. Fredric; Bartsch, Richard A.

    1997-01-01

    Anion exchange resins including at least two positively charged sites and a ell-defined spacing between the positive sites are provided together with a process of removing anions or anionic metal complexes from aqueous solutions by use of such resins. The resins can be substituted poly(vinylpyridine) and substituted polystyrene.

  3. Ion exchange polymers for anion separations

    DOEpatents

    Jarvinen, G.D.; Marsh, S.F.; Bartsch, R.A.

    1997-09-23

    Anion exchange resins including at least two positively charged sites and a well-defined spacing between the positive sites are provided together with a process of removing anions or anionic metal complexes from aqueous solutions by use of such resins. The resins can be substituted poly(vinylpyridine) and substituted polystyrene.

  4. New Trends in Magnetic Exchange Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougin, Alexandra; Mangin, Stéphane; Bobo, Jean-Francois; Loidl, Alois

    2005-05-01

    -of-plane exchange bias, depending on the field cooling direction. This is of particular interest since it allows probing of the three-dimensional spin structure of the AF layer. The interface magnetic configuration is extremely important in the perpendicular geometry, as the short-range exchange coupling competes with a long-range dipolar interaction; the induced uniaxial anisotropy must overcome the demagnetization energy to establish perpendicular anisotropy films. Those new studies are of primary importance for the magnetic media industry as perpendicular recording exhibits potential for strongly increased storage densities. 3. Parameters tuning exchange bias in polycrystalline samples and magnetic configurations: Different parameters can be used to tune the exchange bias coupling in polycrystalline samples similar to those used in devices. Particularly fascinating aspects are the questions of the appearance of exchange bias or coercivity in ferromagnet/antiferromagnet heterostructures, and its relation to magnetic configurations formed on either side of the interface. Several papers report on either growth choices or post preparation treatments that enable tuning of the exchange bias in bilayers. The additional complexity and novel features of the exchange coupled interface make the problem particularly rich. 4. Dynamics and magnetization reversal: Linear response experiments, such as ferromagnetic resonance, have been used with great success to identify interface, surface anisotropies and interlayer exchange in multilayer systems. The exchange bias structure is particularly well suited to study because interface driven changes in the spin wave frequencies in the ferromagnet can be readily related to interlayer exchange and anisotropy parameters associated with the antiferromagnet. Because the exchange bias is intimately connected with details of the magnetization process during reversal and the subsequent formation of hysteresis, considerations of time dependence and

  5. 45 CFR 155.230 - General standards for Exchange notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CARE ACCESS EXCHANGE ESTABLISHMENT STANDARDS AND OTHER RELATED STANDARDS UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT..., electronically, provided that the requirements for electronic notices in 42 CFR 435.918 are met, except that the individual market Exchange is not required to implement the process specified in 42 CFR 435.918(b)(1)...

  6. 40 CFR 63.654 - Heat exchange systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... modifications to the leaking heat exchanger, such as welding the leak or replacing a tube; (2) Blocking the leaking tube within the heat exchanger; (3) Changing the pressure so that water flows into the process... multiplying the VOC concentration in the cooling water, ppmw, by the flow rate of the cooling water from...

  7. Probing hard color singlet exchange at D Zero

    SciTech Connect

    Goussiou, A.

    1998-06-01

    We present latest preliminary results on hard color-singlet exchange in proton-antiproton collisions. The fraction of dijet events produced via color-singlet exchange is measured as a function of jet transverse energy, dijet pseudorapidity separation, and proton-antiproton center-of-mass energy. The results favour a color-singlet fraction that increases with increasing quark-initiated processes.

  8. Organic ion exchange resin separation methods evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Witwer, K.S.

    1998-05-27

    This document describes testing to find effective methods to separate Organic Ion Exchange Resin (OIER) from a sludge simulant. This task supports a comprehensive strategy for treatment and processing of K-Basin sludge. The simulant to be used resembles sludge that has accumulated in the 105KE and 105KW Basins in the 1OOK area of the Hanford Site. The sludge is an accumulation of fuel element corrosion products, organic and inorganic ion exchange materials, canister gasket materials, iron and aluminum corrosion products, sand, dirt, and other minor amounts of organic matter.

  9. Exchange of deeply trapped and interstitial hydrogen in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, B.; Van de Walle, C.G.; Adams, J.B.

    1999-02-01

    Using {ital ab initio} density-functional calculations, we examine possible exchange mechanisms between an interstitial hydrogen atom and a deeply bound H at a silicon-hydrogen bond. We determine a low-energy pathway for exchange, which involves an intermediate, metastable {equivalent_to}SiH{sub 2} complex with both hydrogen atoms strongly bound to the silicon atom. The energy barrier for the exchange process is E{sub ex}{lt}0.2 eV, consistent with observations of hydrogen-deuterium exchange in a-Si:H(D) films. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Improved ceramic heat exchange material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccollister, H. L.

    1977-01-01

    Improved corrosion resistant ceramic materials that are suitable for use as regenerative heat exchangers for vehicular gas turbines is reported. Two glass-ceramic materials, C-144 and C-145, have superior durability towards sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate compared to lithium aluminosilicate (LAS) Corning heat exchange material 9455. Material C-144 is a leached LAS material whose major crystalline phase is silica keatite plus mullite, and C-145 is a LAS keatite solid solution (S.S.) material. In comparison to material 9455, material C-144 is two orders of magnitude better in dimensional stability to sulfuric acid at 300 C, and one order of magnitude better in stability to sodium sulfate at 1000 C. Material C-145 is initially two times better in stability to sulfuric acid, and about one order of magnitude better in stability to sodium sulfate. Both C-144 and C-145 have less than 300 ppm delta L/L thermal expansion from ambient to 1000 C, and good dimensional stability of less than approximately 100 ppm delta L/L after exposure to 1000 C for 100 hours. The glass-ceramic fabrication process produced a hexagonal honeycomb matrix having an 85% open frontal area, 50 micrometer wall thickness, and less than 5% porosity.

  11. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1995-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  12. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1995-09-12

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  13. Heat exchanger tube mounts

    DOEpatents

    Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.; Dawson, B.E.

    1974-01-01

    A heat exchanger in which tubes are secured to a tube sheet by internal bore welding is described. The tubes may be moved into place in preparation for welding with comparatively little trouble. A number of segmented tube support plates are provided which allow a considerable portion of each of the tubes to be moved laterally after the end thereof has been positioned in preparation for internal bore welding to the tube sheet. (auth)

  14. Thermoelectric heat exchange element

    DOEpatents

    Callas, James J.; Taher, Mahmoud A.

    2007-08-14

    A thermoelectric heat exchange module includes a first substrate including a heat receptive side and a heat donative side and a series of undulatory pleats. The module may also include a thermoelectric material layer having a ZT value of 1.0 or more disposed on at least one of the heat receptive side and the heat donative side, and an electrical contact may be in electrical communication with the thermoelectric material layer.

  15. Heat exchange apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2003-08-12

    A heat exchange apparatus comprising a coolant conduit or heat sink having attached to its surface a first radial array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins or needles and a second radial array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins or needles thermally coupled to a body to be cooled and meshed with, but not contacting the first radial array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins or needles.

  16. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope exchange reactions between clay minerals and water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, J.R.; Kharaka, Y.K.

    1976-01-01

    The extent of hydrogen and oxygen isotope exchange between clay minerals and water has been measured in the temperature range 100-350?? for bomb runs of up to almost 2 years. Hydrogen isotope exchange between water and the clays was demonstrable at 100??. Exchange rates were 3-5 times greater for montmorillonite than for kaolinite or illite and this is attributed to the presence of interlayer water in the montmorillonite structure. Negligible oxygen isotope exchange occurred at these low temperatures. The great disparity in D and O18 exchange rates observed in every experiment demonstrates that hydrogen isotope exchange occurred by a mechanism of proton exchange independent of the slower process of O18 exchange. At 350?? kaolinite reacted to form pyrophyllite and diaspore. This was accompanied by essentially complete D exchange but minor O18 exchange and implies that intact structural units in the pyrophyllite were inherited from the kaolinite precursor. ?? 1976.

  17. Use of Cation Exchange Resins for Production of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Suitable for the Al-U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Powder Metallurgy Process

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    2001-09-17

    This report describes the production of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} powders from three types of cation exchange resins: Dowex 50W, a strong acid, sulfonate resin; AG MP-50, a macroporous form of sulfonate resin; and Bio-Rex 70, a weak acid, carboxylic resin.

  18. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.; Stohl, F.V.

    1983-07-21

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  19. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchanges

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, Robert G.; Stephens, Howard P.; Stohl, Frances V.

    1985-01-01

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  20. Soviets seek scientific exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GEOS-A, associated with the Soviet Union's Institute of Earth Physics, is seeking to promote exchange between Soviet and Western geophysicists. GEOS-A is a nonprofit, private organization formed by specialists from the U.S.S.R. Academy of Scientists.GEOS-A aims to promote the transfer of academic research results to industry and education. It also seeks to stimulate international scientific exchange and to support independent nongovernmental programs and expertise in geophysics and ecology. The organization would like to cooperate with Western universities in exchanging students and young scientists and in building scientific relationships between the two countries. This would include inviting students and young specialists for collaborative scientific research, consultations, language practice, and graduate study in any institute of the U.S.S.R. Academy of Sciences. Participants would live in rented private apartments in downtown Moscow for approximately one week to several months. All living expenses would be covered at a rate higher than the academy's standard one (unfortunately travel to and from the Soviet Union cannot be covered).

  1. The exchangeability of shape

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Landmark based geometric morphometrics (GM) allows the quantitative comparison of organismal shapes. When applied to systematics, it is able to score shape changes which often are undetectable by traditional morphological studies and even by classical morphometric approaches. It has thus become a fast and low cost candidate to identify cryptic species. Due to inherent mathematical properties, shape variables derived from one set of coordinates cannot be compared with shape variables derived from another set. Raw coordinates which produce these shape variables could be used for data exchange, however they contain measurement error. The latter may represent a significant obstacle when the objective is to distinguish very similar species. Results We show here that a single user derived dataset produces much less classification error than a multiple one. The question then becomes how to circumvent the lack of exchangeability of shape variables while preserving a single user dataset. A solution to this question could lead to the creation of a relatively fast and inexpensive systematic tool adapted for the recognition of cryptic species. Conclusions To preserve both exchangeability of shape and a single user derived dataset, our suggestion is to create a free access bank of reference images from which one can produce raw coordinates and use them for comparison with external specimens. Thus, we propose an alternative geometric descriptive system that separates 2-D data gathering and analyzes. PMID:20964872

  2. NCLX: the mitochondrial sodium calcium exchanger.

    PubMed

    Boyman, Liron; Williams, George S B; Khananshvili, Daniel; Sekler, Israel; Lederer, W J

    2013-06-01

    The free Ca(2+) concentration within the mitochondrial matrix ([Ca(2+)]m) regulates the rate of ATP production and other [Ca(2+)]m sensitive processes. It is set by the balance between total Ca(2+) influx (through the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) and any other influx pathways) and the total Ca(2+) efflux (by the mitochondrial Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger and any other efflux pathways). Here we review and analyze the experimental evidence reported over the past 40years which suggest that in the heart and many other mammalian tissues a putative Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger is the major pathway for Ca(2+) efflux from the mitochondrial matrix. We discuss those reports with respect to a recent discovery that the protein product of the human FLJ22233 gene mediates such Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange across the mitochondrial inner membrane. Among its many functional similarities to other Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger proteins is a unique feature: it efficiently mediates Li(+)/Ca(2+) exchange (as well as Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange) and was therefore named NCLX. The discovery of NCLX provides both the identity of a novel protein and new molecular means of studying various unresolved quantitative aspects of mitochondrial Ca(2+) movement out of the matrix. Quantitative and qualitative features of NCLX are discussed as is the controversy regarding the stoichiometry of the NCLX Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange, the electrogenicity of NCLX, the [Na(+)]i dependency of NCLX and the magnitude of NCLX Ca(2+) efflux. Metabolic features attributable to NCLX and the physiological implication of the Ca(2+) efflux rate via NCLX during systole and diastole are also briefly discussed. PMID:23538132

  3. Charge exchange in the Io torus and exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. E.; Strobel, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    Charge-exchange cross sections and their velocity dependence have been estimated for the most important reactions in the Io torus and exosphere. The methods used for calculating the cross sections are given and discussed in some detail. For symmetric-resonant single and double charge exchange, the cross sections are slowly varying functions of velocity. For inelastic charge-exchange collisions, the transition probabilities into a given final state can depend critically on velocity. Models are described which can be used to estimate both the most rapid charge-exchange processes and those states which play an important role. Calculated cross sections are used to obtain reaction rates as a function of radial position, demonstrating the importance of charge exchange in the inner torus. Charge-exchange reactions of torus ions with molecular species in Io's exosphere may yield a net supply of neutrals and plasma to the torus.

  4. AGRICULTURAL EXCHANGE RATE DATA SHEET

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ERS data set contains annual and monthly data for exchange rates important to U.S. agriculture. It includes both nominal and real exchange rates for 80 countries (plus the European Union) as well as real trade-weighted exchange rate indexes for many commodities and aggregatio...

  5. Impact of watershed topography on hyporheic exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, Alice; Ridolfi, Luca; Boano, Fulvio

    2016-08-01

    Among the interactions between surface water bodies and aquifers, hyporheic exchange has been recognized as a key process for nutrient cycling and contaminant transport. Even though hyporheic exchange is strongly controlled by groundwater discharge, our understanding of the impact of the regional groundwater flow on hyporheic fluxes is still limited because of the complexity arising from the multi-scale nature of these interactions. In this work, we investigate the role of watershed topography on river-aquifer interactions by way of a semi-analytical model, in which the landscape topography is used to approximate the groundwater head distribution. The analysis of a case study shows how the complex topographic structure is the direct cause of a substantial spatial variability of the aquifer-river exchange. Groundwater upwelling along the river corridor is estimated and its influence on the hyporheic zone is discussed. In particular, the fragmentation of the hyporeic corridor induced by groundwater discharge at the basin scale is highlighted.

  6. Informational exchange between different highly organized systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panovkin, B. N.

    The conditions under which information exchange is possible between different highly organized systems are considered in relation to problems of establishing informational contact with extraterrestrial civilizations. It is pointed out that the basis for mutual understanding among terrestrial societies has been the commonality of the subject relationship to the material and social world, which influences both articulation and cognitive processes. A model of information exchange between highly organized systems (automata) making use of different schemes for the classification of the objects of activity is then examined. It is shown that, in the most favorable case, information exchange is possible between actively interacting systems in direct contact according to a high-rank reflexive game with verification.

  7. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura treated with plasma exchange or exchange transfusions.

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, K. V.; Fishleder, A.; Lucas, F. V.; Goormastic, M.; Bukowski, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    Of 40 patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, 17 were treated with plasma exchange, 15 with exchange transfusions, and 6 with both types of therapy. One patient died before being treated and another patient was seen but not treated. Plasma exchange was performed daily for a mean of seven exchanges per patient. The replacement fluid during plasma exchange was fresh frozen plasma in all cases. The complete response rates for each type of treatment were as follows: 88% for plasma exchange (15 patients), 47% for exchange transfusions (7 patients), and 67% for exchange transfusions and plasma exchange (4 patients). Clinical and laboratory factors were examined for any statistically significant association with therapy response. Treatment with plasma exchange was statistically the initial factor most strongly associated with prognosis. Paresis, paresthesias, seizures, mental status change, and coma showed no association with response to treatment. Some of the laboratory factors that did not show significant association with treatment response were the initial creatinine, hemoglobin, platelet count, lactate dehydrogenase, and total bilirubin. This study supports the hypothesis that plasma exchange has significantly improved the prognosis of patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. These patients should be treated aggressively regardless of the severity of their symptoms. PMID:1877181

  8. Solvent Extraction and Ion Exchange in Radiochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarnemark, G.

    In 1805, Bucholz extracted uranium from a nitric acid solution into ether and back-extracted it into pure water. This is probably the first reported solvent-extraction investigation. During the following decades, the distribution of neutral compounds between aqueous phases and pure solvents was studied, e.g., by Peligot, Berthelot and Jungfleisch, and Nernst. Selective extractants for analytical purposes became available during the first decades of the twentieth century. From about 1940, extractants such as organophosphorous esters and amines were developed for use in the nuclear fuel cycle. This connection between radiochemistry and solvent-extraction chemistry made radiochemists heavily involved in the development of new solvent extraction processes, and eventually solvent extraction became a major separation technique in radiochemistry. About 160 years ago, Thompson and Way observed that soil can remove potassium and ammonium ions from an aqueous solution and release calcium ions. This is probably the first scientific report on an ion-exchange separation. The first synthesis of the type of organic ion exchangers that are used today was performed by Adams and Holmes in 1935. Since then, ion-exchange techniques have been used extensively for separations of various radionuclides in trace as well as macro amounts. During the last 4 decades, inorganic ion exchangers have also found a variety of applications. Today, solvent extraction as well as ion exchange are used extensively in the nuclear industry and for nuclear, chemical, and medical research. Some of these applications are discussed in the chapter.

  9. The dynamic multimodeling exchange language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jinho; Fishwick, Paul A.

    2003-09-01

    The web has made it easy to create multimedia content, which is then viewable by the general community at large. By extending multimedia to include the area of modeling, we make it possible to share and process model structures in the same way as the typical web page. For models of the geometric variety, the new X3D (eXtensible 3D) standard will allow sharing and presentation of 3D scene graphs within the web browser. We have created a dynamic model counterpart to X3D, which we call DXL (Dynamics eXchange Language). DXL is low-level XML-based language, comprising blocks, ports, and connectors. We will define how DXL is used for constructing individual level models, as well as multimodels over multiple abstraction layers.

  10. Lightweight Long Life Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, E. K.

    1976-01-01

    A shuttle orbiter flight configuration aluminum heat exchanger was designed, fabricated, and tested. The heat exchanger utilized aluminum clad titanium composite parting sheets for protection against parting sheet pin hole corrosion. The heat exchanger, which is fully interchangeable with the shuttle condensing heat exchanger, includes slurpers (a means for removing condensed water from the downstream face of the heat exchanger), and both the core air passes and slurpers were hydrophilic coated to enhance wettability. The test program included performance tests which demonstrated the adequacy of the design and confirmed the predicted weight savings.

  11. Emittance and Phase Space Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Dao; Chao, Alex; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    Alternative chicane-type beam lines are proposed for exact emittance exchange between horizontal phase space (x; x{prime}) and longitudinal phase space (z; {delta}). Methods to achieve exact phase space exchanges, i.e. mapping x to z, x{prime} to {delta}, z to x and {delta} to x{prime} are suggested. Methods to mitigate the thick-lens effect of the transverse cavity on emittance exchange are discussed. Some applications of the phase space exchanger and the feasibility of an emittance exchange experiment with the proposed chicane-type beam line at SLAC are discussed.

  12. Colour-singlet exchange in ep interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, P. R.

    1997-04-01

    Results presented at the DIS97 workshop by the H1, ZEUS and E665 collaborations on processes yielding large rapidity gaps and energetic leading baryons are reviewed. A consistent picture begins to emerge in which diffractive processes dominate when the fractional longitudinal momentum loss at the baryon vertex xP is small, with substantial contributions from other processes as xP increases. The diffractive mechanism in the deep-inelastic regime is found, both from inclusive measurements and final state studies, to involve the exchange of a gluon carrying a large fraction of the exchange momentum. Vector meson results show with increasing precision the transition from soft to hard production mechanisms.

  13. 1-MWE heat exchangers for OTEC. Final design report

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouse, A.M.

    1980-06-19

    The design of a 1 MWe OTEC heat exchanger is documented, including the designs of the evaporator and associated systems, condenser, instrumentation, and materials for corrosion/erosion control and fabrication processes. (LEW)

  14. Cesium Separation Using Electrically Switched Ion Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Lilga, Michael A.); Orth, Rick J.); Sukamto, Johanes H.); Rassat, Scot D.); Genders, J D.; Gopal, R

    2001-09-01

    Electrically Switched Ion Exchange (ESIX) is a separation technology being developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as an alternative to conventional ion exchange for removing metal ions from wastewater. In ESIX, which combines ion exchange and electro-chemistry, ion uptake and elution can be controlled directly by modulating the potential of an ion exchange film that has been electrochemically deposited onto an electrode. This paper presents the results of experiments on high surface area electrodes and the development of a flow system for cesium ion separation. Bench-scale flow system studies showed no change in capacity or performance of the ESIX films at a flow rate up to 113 BV/h, the maxi-mum flow rate tested, and breakthrough curves supported once-through waste processing. A comparison of results for a stacked 5-electrode cell versus a single-electrode cell showed enhanced breakthrough performance. In the stacked configuration, break-through began at about 120 BV for a feed containing 0.2 ppm cesium at a flow rate of 13 BV/h. A case study for the KE Basin (a spent nuclear fuel storage basin) on the Hanford Site demonstrated that KE Basin wastewater could be processed continuously with minimal waste generation, reduced disposal costs, and lower capital expenditures.

  15. SPEEDUP{trademark} ion exchange column model

    SciTech Connect

    Hang, T.

    2000-03-06

    A transient model to describe the process of loading a solute onto the granular fixed bed in an ion exchange (IX) column has been developed using the SpeedUp{trademark} software package. SpeedUp offers the advantage of smooth integration into other existing SpeedUp flowsheet models. The mathematical algorithm of a porous particle diffusion model was adopted to account for convection, axial dispersion, film mass transfer, and pore diffusion. The method of orthogonal collocation on finite elements was employed to solve the governing transport equations. The model allows the use of a non-linear Langmuir isotherm based on an effective binary ionic exchange process. The SpeedUp column model was tested by comparing to the analytical solutions of three transport problems from the ion exchange literature. In addition, a sample calculation of a train of three crystalline silicotitanate (CST) IX columns in series was made using both the SpeedUp model and Purdue University's VERSE-LC code. All test cases showed excellent agreement between the SpeedUp model results and the test data. The model can be readily used for SuperLig{trademark} ion exchange resins, once the experimental data are complete.

  16. Minimizing back exchange in the hydrogen exchange-mass spectrometry experiment.

    PubMed

    Walters, Benjamin T; Ricciuti, Alec; Mayne, Leland; Englander, S Walter

    2012-12-01

    The addition of mass spectrometry (MS) analysis to the hydrogen exchange (HX) proteolytic fragmentation experiment extends powerful HX methodology to the study of large biologically important proteins. A persistent problem is the degradation of HX information due to back exchange of deuterium label during the fragmentation-separation process needed to prepare samples for MS measurement. This paper reports a systematic analysis of the factors that influence back exchange (solution pH, ionic strength, desolvation temperature, LC column interaction, flow rates, system volume). The many peptides exhibit a range of back exchange due to intrinsic amino acid HX rate differences. Accordingly, large back exchange leads to large variability in D-recovery from one residue to another as well as one peptide to another that cannot be corrected for by reference to any single peptide-level measurement. The usual effort to limit back exchange by limiting LC time provides little gain. Shortening the LC elution gradient by 3-fold only reduced back exchange by ~2%, while sacrificing S/N and peptide count. An unexpected dependence of back exchange on ionic strength as well as pH suggests a strategy in which solution conditions are changed during sample preparation. Higher salt should be used in the first stage of sample preparation (proteolysis and trapping) and lower salt (<20 mM) and pH in the second stage before electrospray injection. Adjustment of these and other factors together with recent advances in peptide fragment detection yields hundreds of peptide fragments with D-label recovery of 90% ± 5%. PMID:22965280

  17. Compact heat exchangers for condensation applications: Yesterday, today and tomorrow

    SciTech Connect

    Panchal, C.B.

    1993-07-01

    Compact heat exchangers are being increasingly considered for condensation applications in the process, cryogenic, aerospace, power and refrigeration industries. In this paper, different configurations available for condensation applications are analyzed and the current state-of-the-knowledge for the design of compact condensers is evaluated. The key technical issues for the design and development of compact heat exchangers for condensation applications are analyzed and major advantages are identified. The experimental data and performance prediction methods reported in the literature are analyzed to evaluate the present design capabilities for different compact heat-exchanger configurations. The design flexibility is evaluated for the development of new condensation applications, including integration with other process equipment.

  18. Heat exchanger for fuel cell power plant reformer

    DOEpatents

    Misage, Robert; Scheffler, Glenn W.; Setzer, Herbert J.; Margiott, Paul R.; Parenti, Jr., Edmund K.

    1988-01-01

    A heat exchanger uses the heat from processed fuel gas from a reformer for a fuel cell to superheat steam, to preheat raw fuel prior to entering the reformer and to heat a water-steam coolant mixture from the fuel cells. The processed fuel gas temperature is thus lowered to a level useful in the fuel cell reaction. The four temperature adjustments are accomplished in a single heat exchanger with only three heat transfer cores. The heat exchanger is preheated by circulating coolant and purge steam from the power section during startup of the latter.

  19. Exchange lists: revised 1986.

    PubMed

    Franz, M J; Barr, P; Holler, H; Powers, M A; Wheeler, M L; Wylie-Rosett, J

    1987-01-01

    A committee composed of members of The American Dietetic Association and the American Diabetes Association has revised Exchange List for Meal Planning. Changes were made, as deemed necessary, on the basis of nutritional recommendations for persons with diabetes as understood in 1986. Major changes include rewriting the text to make it more useful in the education of persons with diabetes; changing the order of the exchange lists to emphasize a high-carbohydrate, high-fiber diet, as well as to better reflect the order of foods in menu planning; adding symbols to foods high in fiber and sodium; changing nutritive values for the starch/bread and fruit lists; adding lists of combination foods, free foods, and foods recommended only for occasional use; developing a data base; and initiating a plan for field testing and evaluation. The committee also developed a simplified meal planning tool, Healthy Food Choices, to be used for initial or "survival" level education. In poster format, foods are grouped by calories into six food groups. Approximate portion sizes of commonly used foods are listed. Blank lines are provided for the nutrition counselor to write in a suggested menu or meal plan for the client. Because the booklet does not use the word "diabetes" specifically, it is appropriate as a general teaching tool. PMID:3794130

  20. Heat exchanger-accumulator

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1980-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat exchanger-accumulator for vaporizing a refrigerant or the like, characterized by an upright pressure vessel having a top, bottom and side walls; an inlet conduit eccentrically and sealingly penetrating through the top; a tubular overflow chamber disposed within the vessel and sealingly connected with the bottom so as to define an annular outer volumetric chamber for receiving refrigerant; a heat transfer coil disposed in the outer volumetric chamber for vaporizing the liquid refrigerant that accumulates there; the heat transfer coil defining a passageway for circulating an externally supplied heat exchange fluid; transferring heat efficiently from the fluid; and freely allowing vaporized refrigerant to escape upwardly from the liquid refrigerant; and a refrigerant discharge conduit penetrating sealingly through the top and traversing substantially the length of the pressurized vessel downwardly and upwardly such that its inlet is near the top of the pressurized vessel so as to provide a means for transporting refrigerant vapor from the vessel. The refrigerant discharge conduit has metering orifices, or passageways, penetrating laterally through its walls near the bottom, communicating respectively interiorly and exteriorly of the overflow chamber for controllably carrying small amounts of liquid refrigerant and oil to the effluent stream of refrigerant gas.

  1. The ratio R{sub dp} of the quasielastic nd {yields} p(nn) to the elastic np {yields} pn charge-exchange-process yields at the proton emitting angle {theta}{sub p,lab} = 0 deg. over 0.55-2.0 GeV neutron beam energy region. Experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Sharov, V. I. Morozov, A. A.; Shindin, R. A.; Antonenko, V. G.; Borzakov, S. B.; Borzunov, Yu. T.; Chernykh, E. V.; Chumakov, V. F.; Dolgii, S. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Golovanov, L. B.; Guriev, D. K.; Janata, A.; Kirillov, A. D.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Krasnov, V. A.; Kuzmin, N. A.; Kurilkin, A. K.; Kurilkin, P. K.

    2009-06-15

    New experimental results on ratio R{sub dp} of the quasielastic charge-exchange yield at the outgoing proton angle {theta}{sub p,lab} = 0 deg. for the nd {yields} p(nn) reaction to the elastic np {yields} pn charge-exchange yield, are presented. The measurements were carried out at the Nuclotron of the Veksler and Baldin Laboratory of High Energies of the JINR (Dubna) at the neutron-beam kinetic energies of 0.55, 0.8, 1.0, 1.2, 1.4, 1.8, and 2.0 GeV. The intense neutron beam with small momentum spread was produced by breakup of deuterons which were accelerated and extracted to the experimental hall. In both reactions mentioned above the outgoing protons with the momenta p{sub p} approximately equal to the neutron-beam momentum p{sub n,beam} were detected in the directions close to the direction of incident neutrons, i.e., in the vicinity of the scattering angle {theta}{sub p,lab} = 0 deg. Measured in the same data-taking runs, the angular distributions of the charge-exchange-reaction products were corrected for the well-known instrumental effects and averaged in the vicinity of the incident-neutron-beam direction. These corrected angular distributions for every of nd {yields} p(nn) and np {yields} pn charge-exchange processes were proportional to the differential cross sections of the corresponding reactions. The data were accumulated by Delta-Sigma setup magnetic spectrometer with two sets of multiwire proportional chambers located upstream and downstream of the momentum analyzing magnet. Inelastic processes were considerably reduced by the additional detectors surrounding the hydrogen and deuterium targets. The time-of-flight system was applied to identify the detected particles. The accumulated data treatment and analysis, as well as possible sources of the systematic errors are discussed.

  2. Exchange of Librarians between the "City of Brotherly Love" and the "Land Down Under."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarr, Hal; Kotasek, Ivana

    1988-01-01

    Two participants in an international exchange program describe their experiences. Hal Tarr, a technical services librarian at Peirce Junior College in Pennsylvania, exchanged positions with Ivana Kotasek, head librarian at Port Adelaide College in Australia. Both discuss the logistics of the exchange process and their impressions. (DMM)

  3. 78 FR 5236 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; National Stock Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; National Stock Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change to Provide for the Payment of Exchange Fees Through an Integrated Billing Process January 17, 2013. Pursuant...

  4. 40 CFR 63.1085 - What are the general requirements for heat exchange systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Ethylene Manufacturing Process Units: Heat Exchange Systems and Waste Operations Heat Exchange System Requirements § 63.1085 What are the general... heat exchange systems? 63.1085 Section 63.1085 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  5. 40 CFR 63.1085 - What are the general requirements for heat exchange systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Ethylene Manufacturing Process Units: Heat Exchange Systems and Waste Operations Heat Exchange System Requirements § 63.1085 What are the general... heat exchange systems? 63.1085 Section 63.1085 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  6. 40 CFR 63.1085 - What are the general requirements for heat exchange systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Ethylene Manufacturing Process Units: Heat Exchange Systems and Waste Operations Heat Exchange System Requirements § 63.1085 What are the general... heat exchange systems? 63.1085 Section 63.1085 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  7. 40 CFR 63.1085 - What are the general requirements for heat exchange systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Ethylene Manufacturing Process Units: Heat Exchange Systems and Waste Operations Heat Exchange System Requirements § 63.1085 What are the general... heat exchange systems? 63.1085 Section 63.1085 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  8. 40 CFR 63.1085 - What are the general requirements for heat exchange systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Ethylene Manufacturing Process Units: Heat Exchange Systems and Waste Operations Heat Exchange System Requirements § 63.1085 What are the general... heat exchange systems? 63.1085 Section 63.1085 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  9. (Re)integrating Simmel in Contemporary Social Exchange: The Effect of Nonpartisans on Relational Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collett, Jessica L.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the increased prevalence of neutral third parties in both formal and informal exchange processes, social exchange theory has yet to consider the effect of nonpartisans on important cognitive and affective outcomes of exchange. This research integrates Simmel's conceptualization of small groups and nonpartisans with contemporary theory and…

  10. Processes affecting the stable isotope composition of calcite during precipitation on the surface of stalagmites: Laboratory experiments investigating the isotope exchange between DIC in the solution layer on top of a speleothem and the CO2 of the cave atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreybrodt, Wolfgang; Hansen, Maximilian; Scholz, Denis

    2016-02-01

    We present a theoretical derivation of the exchange time, τex, needed to establish isotopic equilibrium between atmospheric CO2 in a cave and HCO3- dissolved in a thin water film covering the surface of a speleothem. The result is τex = τredex · [HCO3-]/ (KH · pCO2 cave) , where τredex depends on the depth, a, of the water film and on temperature. [HCO3-] is the concentration of bicarbonate, pCO2 cave the partial pressure of CO2, and KH is Henry's constant. To test the theory we prepared stagnant or flowing thin films of a NaHCO3 solution and exposed them at 20 °C to an CO2 containing atmosphere of pCO2 500, 12,500, or 25,000 ppmV and defined isotope composition. The δ13C and δ18O values of the DIC in the solution were measured as a function of the exposure time. For stagnant films with depths between 0.06 and 0.2 cm the δ13C values exhibit an exponential approach towards isotope equilibrium with the atmospheric CO2 with exchange time, τex. The δ18O values first evolve towards isotopic equilibrium with atmospheric CO2, reach a minimum value and then drift away from the isotopic equilibrium with atmospheric CO2 approaching a steady state caused by isotopic exchange of oxygen with water. The experimental findings are in satisfactory agreement with the theoretical predictions. To further investigate isotope evolution in cave analogue conditions, a water film containing 5 mmol/L of NaHCO3 with a depth of 0.013 cm flowing down an inclined borosilicate glass plate was exposed to an atmosphere with pCO2 = 500 ppmV at a temperature of 20 °C. The δ13C and δ18O values were measured as a function of flow (exposure) time, t. The isotope compositions in the DIC of the water film decrease linear in time by δDIC (t) =δDIC (0) - (δDIC (0) -δDIC (∞)) · t /τex where δDIC (0) is the initial isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the water film and δDIC (∞) its final value. From these data an exchange time τex of ca. 7000 s was obtained

  11. Biological Ion Exchanger Resins

    PubMed Central

    Damadian, Raymond; Goldsmith, Michael; Zaner, K. S.

    1971-01-01

    Biological selectivity is shown to vary with medium osmotic strength and temperature. Selectivity reversals occur at 4°C and at an external osmolality of 0.800 indicating that intracellular hydration and endosolvent (intracellular water) structure are important determinants in selectivity. Magnetic resonance measurements of line width by steady-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) indicate a difference in the intracellular water signal of 16 Hz between the K form and Na form of Escherichia coli, providing additional evidence that changes in the ionic composition of cells are accompanied by changes in endosolvent structure. The changes were found to be consistent with the thermodynamic and magnetic resonance properties of aqueous electrolyte solutions. Calculation of the dependence of ion-pairing forces on medium dielectric reinforces the role of endosolvent structure in determining ion exchange selectivity. PMID:4943653

  12. Monogroove liquid heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Richard F. (Inventor); Edelstein, Fred (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A liquid supply control is disclosed for a heat transfer system which transports heat by liquid-vapor phase change of a working fluid. An assembly (10) of monogroove heat pipe legs (15) can be operated automatically as either heat acquisition devices or heat discharge sources. The liquid channels (27) of the heat pipe legs (15) are connected to a reservoir (35) which is filled and drained by respective filling and draining valves (30, 32). Information from liquid level sensors (50, 51) on the reservoir (35) is combined (60) with temperature information (55) from the liquid heat exchanger (12) and temperature information (56) from the assembly vapor conduit (42) to regulate filling and draining of the reservoir (35), so that the reservoir (35) in turn serves the liquid supply/drain needs of the heat pipe legs (15), on demand, by passive capillary action (20, 28).

  13. Hybrid Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Jianping Gene; Shih, Wei

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid light-weight heat exchanger concept has been developed that uses high-conductivity carbon-carbon (C-C) composites as the heat-transfer fins and uses conventional high-temperature metals, such as Inconel, nickel, and titanium as the parting sheets to meet leakage and structural requirements. In order to maximize thermal conductivity, the majority of carbon fiber is aligned in the fin direction resulting in 300 W/m.K or higher conductivity in the fin directions. As a result of this fiber orientation, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the C-C composite in both non-fiber directions matches well with the CTE of various high-temperature metal alloys. This allows the joining of fins and parting sheets by using high-temperature braze alloys.

  14. Time and foreign exchange markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berardi, Luca; Serva, Maurizio

    2005-08-01

    The definition of time is still an open question when one deals with high-frequency time series. If time is simply the calendar time, prices can be modeled as continuous random processes and values resulting from transactions or given quotes are discrete samples of this underlying dynamics. On the contrary, if one takes the business time point of view, price dynamics is a discrete random process, and time is simply the ordering according to which prices are quoted in the market. In this paper, we suggest that the business time approach is perhaps a better way of modeling price dynamics than calendar time. This conclusion comes from testing probability densities and conditional variances predicted by the two models against the experimental ones. The data set we use contains the DEM/USD exchange quotes provided to us by Olsen & Associates during a period of one year from January to December 1998. In this period, 1,620,843 quotes entries in the EFX system were recorded.

  15. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Yen, S. P. S.; Klein, E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, crosslinked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  16. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  17. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  18. Gas Exchange of Algae

    PubMed Central

    Ammann, Elizabeth C. B.; Lynch, Victoria H.

    1966-01-01

    Changes in the oxygen partial pressure of air over the range of 8 to 258 mm of Hg did not adversely affect the photosynthetic capacity of Chlorella pyrenoidosa. Gas exchange and growth measurements remained constant for 3-week periods and were similar to air controls (oxygen pressure of 160 mm of Hg). Oxygen partial pressures of 532 and 745 mm of Hg had an adverse effect on algal metabolism. Carbon dioxide consumption was 24% lower in the gas mixture containing oxygen at a pressure 532 mm of Hg than in the air control, and the growth rate was slightly reduced. Oxygen at a partial pressure of 745 mm of Hg decreased the photosynthetic rate 39% and the growth rate 37% over the corresponding rates in air. The lowered metabolic rates remained constant during 14 days of measurements, and the effect was reversible after this time. Substitution of helium or argon for the nitrogen in air had no effect on oxygen production, carbon dioxide consumption, or growth rate for 3-week periods. All measurements were made at a total pressure of 760 mm of Hg, and all gas mixtures were enriched with 2% carbon dioxide. Thus, the physiological functioning and reliability of a photosynthetic gas exchanger should not be adversely affected by: (i) oxygen partial pressures ranging from 8 to 258 mm of Hg; (ii) the use of pure oxygen at reduced total pressure (155 to 258 mm of Hg) unless pressure per se affects photosynthesis, or (iii) the inclusion of helium or argon in the gas environment (up to a partial pressure of 595 mm of Hg). PMID:5927028

  19. Three-phase flow? Consider helical-coil heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Haraburda, S.S.

    1995-07-01

    In recent years, chemical process plants are increasingly encountering processes that require heat exchange in three-phase fluids. A typical application, for example, is heating liquids containing solid catalyst particles and non-condensable gases. Heat exchangers designed for three-phase flow generally have tubes with large diameters (typically greater than two inches), because solids can build-up inside the tube and lead to plugging. At the same time, in order to keep heat-transfer coefficients high, the velocity of the process fluid within the tube should also be high. As a result, heat exchangers for three-phase flow may require less than five tubes -- each having a required linear length that could exceed several hundred feet. Given these limitations, it is obvious that a basic shell-and-tube heat exchanger is not the most practical solution for this purpose. An alternative for three-phase flow is a helical-coil heat exchanger. The helical-coil units offer a number of advantages, including perpendicular, counter-current flow and flexible overall dimensions for the exchanger itself. The paper presents equations for: calculating the tube-side heat-transfer coefficient; calculating the shell-side heat-transfer coefficient; calculating the heat-exchanger size; calculating the tube-side pressure drop; and calculating shell-side pressure-drop.

  20. Physical explosion analysis in heat exchanger network design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasha, M.; Zaini, D.; Shariff, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    The failure of shell and tube heat exchangers is being extensively experienced by the chemical process industries. This failure can create a loss of production for long time duration. Moreover, loss of containment through heat exchanger could potentially lead to a credible event such as fire, explosion and toxic release. There is a need to analyse the possible worst case effect originated from the loss of containment of the heat exchanger at the early design stage. Physical explosion analysis during the heat exchanger network design is presented in this work. Baker and Prugh explosion models are deployed for assessing the explosion effect. Microsoft Excel integrated with process design simulator through object linking and embedded (OLE) automation for this analysis. Aspen HYSYS V (8.0) used as a simulation platform in this work. A typical heat exchanger network of steam reforming and shift conversion process was presented as a case study. It is investigated from this analysis that overpressure generated from the physical explosion of each heat exchanger can be estimated in a more precise manner by using Prugh model. The present work could potentially assist the design engineer to identify the critical heat exchanger in the network at the preliminary design stage.