Science.gov

Sample records for exchange rate dynamics

  1. Currency Exchange Rates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siler, Carl R.

    This curriculum unit of the Muncie (Indiana) Southside High School is to simulate the dynamics of foreign currency exchange rates from the perspectives of: (1) a major U.S. corporation, ABB Power T & D Company, Inc., of Muncie, Indiana, a manufacturer of large power transformers for the domestic and foreign markets; and (2) individual consumers…

  2. The long-run dynamic relationship between exchange rate and its attention index: Based on DCCA and TOP method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuan; Guo, Kun; Lu, Xiaolin

    2016-07-01

    The behavior information of financial market plays a more and more important role in modern economic system. The behavior information reflected in INTERNET search data has already been used in short-term prediction for exchange rate, stock market return, house price and so on. However, the long-run relationship between behavior information and financial market fluctuation has not been studied systematically. Further, most traditional statistic methods and econometric models could not catch the dynamic and non-linear relationship. An attention index of CNY/USD exchange rate is constructed based on search data from 360 search engine of China in this paper. Then the DCCA and Thermal Optimal Path methods are used to explore the long-run dynamic relationship between CNY/USD exchange rate and the corresponding attention index. The results show that the significant interdependency exists and the change of exchange rate is 1-2 days lag behind the attention index.

  3. Phase transition of dynamical herd behaviors for Yen Dollar exchange rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seong-Min; Choi, J. S.; Kim, Y.; Kim, Kyungsik

    2006-01-01

    We study the herd behavior and the phase transition for the yen-dollar exchange rate in the Japanese financial market. It is obtained that the probability distribution of returns satisfies the power-law behavior P(R)≃R with scaling exponents β=3.11, 2.81, and 2.29 at time intervals τ=1min, 30min, and 1 h. The crash region in which the probability density increases with the increasing return appears, when the herding parameter h satisfies h⩾2.33 for the case of τ<30min. We especially obtain that no crash occurs τ>30min and that the probability distribution of price returns occurs in the phase transition at τ=30min.

  4. AGRICULTURAL EXCHANGE RATE DATA SHEET

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ERS data set contains annual and monthly data for exchange rates important to U.S. agriculture. It includes both nominal and real exchange rates for 80 countries (plus the European Union) as well as real trade-weighted exchange rate indexes for many commodities and aggregatio...

  5. Exchange Rates and Old People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, James J.

    1980-01-01

    Extends earlier work on aging as a process of exchange by focusing on the issue of exchange rates and how they are negotiated. Access to power resources declines with age, placing the old person in the position of negotiating from weakness. (Author)

  6. Nonadiabatic exchange dynamics during adiabatic frequency sweeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbara, Thomas M.

    2016-04-01

    A Bloch equation analysis that includes relaxation and exchange effects during an adiabatic frequency swept pulse is presented. For a large class of sweeps, relaxation can be incorporated using simple first order perturbation theory. For anisochronous exchange, new expressions are derived for exchange augmented rotating frame relaxation. For isochronous exchange between sites with distinct relaxation rate constants outside the extreme narrowing limit, simple criteria for adiabatic exchange are derived and demonstrate that frequency sweeps commonly in use may not be adiabatic with regard to exchange unless the exchange rates are much larger than the relaxation rates. Otherwise, accurate assessment of the sensitivity to exchange dynamics will require numerical integration of the rate equations. Examples of this situation are given for experimentally relevant parameters believed to hold for in-vivo tissue. These results are of significance in the study of exchange induced contrast in magnetic resonance imaging.

  7. The Dynamics of Multilateral Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausken, Kjell; Moxnes, John F.

    The article formulates a dynamic mathematical model where arbitrarily many players produce, consume, exchange, loan, and deposit arbitrarily many goods over time to maximize utility. Consuming goods constitutes a benefit, and producing, exporting, and loaning away goods constitute a cost. Utilities are benefits minus costs, which depend on the exchange ratios and bargaining functions. Three-way exchange occurs when one player acquires, through exchange, one good from another player with the sole purpose of using this good to exchange against the desired good from a third player. Such a triple handshake is not merely a set of double handshakes since the player assigns no interest to the first good in his benefit function. Cognitive and organization costs increase dramatically for higher order exchanges. An exchange theory accounting for media of exchange follows from simple generalization of two-way exchange. The examples of r-way exchange are the triangle trade between Africa, the USA, and England in the 17th and 18th centuries, the hypothetical hypercycle involving RNAs as players and enzymes as goods, and reaction-diffusion processes. The emergence of exchange, and the role of trading agents are discussed. We simulate an example where two-way exchange gives zero production and zero utility, while three-way exchange causes considerable production and positive utility. Maximum utility for each player is reached when exchanges of the same order as the number of players in society are allowed. The article merges micro theory and macro theory within the social, natural, and physical sciences.

  8. Communication: Rigorous quantum dynamics of O + O{sub 2} exchange reactions on an ab initio potential energy surface substantiate the negative temperature dependence of rate coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yaqin; Sun, Zhigang E-mail: dawesr@mst.edu; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua E-mail: dawesr@mst.edu; Xie, Daiqian; Dawes, Richard E-mail: dawesr@mst.edu

    2014-08-28

    The kinetics and dynamics of several O + O{sub 2} isotope exchange reactions have been investigated on a recently determined accurate global O{sub 3} potential energy surface using a time-dependent wave packet method. The agreement between calculated and measured rate coefficients is significantly improved over previous work. More importantly, the experimentally observed negative temperature dependence of the rate coefficients is for the first time rigorously reproduced theoretically. This negative temperature dependence can be attributed to the absence in the new potential energy surface of a submerged “reef” structure, which was present in all previous potential energy surfaces. In addition, contributions of rotational excited states of the diatomic reactant further accentuate the negative temperature dependence.

  9. Protein dynamics viewed by hydrogen exchange

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, John J; Lim, Woon K; Bédard, Sabrina; Black, Ben E; Englander, S Walter

    2012-01-01

    To examine the relationship between protein structural dynamics and measurable hydrogen exchange (HX) data, the detailed exchange behavior of most of the backbone amide hydrogens of Staphylococcal nuclease was compared with that of their neighbors, with their structural environment, and with other information. Results show that H-bonded hydrogens are protected from exchange, with HX rate effectively zero, even when they are directly adjacent to solvent. The transition to exchange competence requires a dynamic structural excursion that removes H-bond protection and allows exposure to solvent HX catalyst. The detailed data often make clear the nature of the dynamic excursion required. These range from whole molecule unfolding, through smaller cooperative unfolding reactions of secondary structural elements, and down to local fluctuations that involve as little as a single peptide group or side chain or water molecule. The particular motion that dominates the exchange of any hydrogen is the one that allows the fastest HX rate. The motion and the rate it produces are determined by surrounding structure and not by nearness to solvent or the strength of the protecting H-bond itself or its acceptor type (main chain, side chain, structurally bound water). Many of these motions occur over time scales that are appropriate for biochemical function. PMID:22544544

  10. Protein dynamics viewed by hydrogen exchange.

    PubMed

    Skinner, John J; Lim, Woon K; Bédard, Sabrina; Black, Ben E; Englander, S Walter

    2012-07-01

    To examine the relationship between protein structural dynamics and measurable hydrogen exchange (HX) data, the detailed exchange behavior of most of the backbone amide hydrogens of Staphylococcal nuclease was compared with that of their neighbors, with their structural environment, and with other information. Results show that H-bonded hydrogens are protected from exchange, with HX rate effectively zero, even when they are directly adjacent to solvent. The transition to exchange competence requires a dynamic structural excursion that removes H-bond protection and allows exposure to solvent HX catalyst. The detailed data often make clear the nature of the dynamic excursion required. These range from whole molecule unfolding, through smaller cooperative unfolding reactions of secondary structural elements, and down to local fluctuations that involve as little as a single peptide group or side chain or water molecule. The particular motion that dominates the exchange of any hydrogen is the one that allows the fastest HX rate. The motion and the rate it produces are determined by surrounding structure and not by nearness to solvent or the strength of the protecting H-bond itself or its acceptor type (main chain, side chain, structurally bound water). Many of these motions occur over time scales that are appropriate for biochemical function. PMID:22544544

  11. Rate of disappearance of labeled carbon dioxide from the lungs of humans during breath holding: a method for studying the dynamics of pulmonary CO2 exchange

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, Richard W.; Puy, Ricardo J. M.; Raub, William F.; Forster, Robert E.

    1968-01-01

    The dynamics of CO2 exchange in the lungs of man was studied by observing the rate of disappearance of a stable isotope of CO2 (13CO2) from the alveolar gas during breath holding. Over 50% of the inspired isotope disappeared within the first 3 sec followed by a moderately rapid logarithmic decline in which one-half of the remaining 13CO2 disappeared every 10 sec. The large initial disappearance of 13CO2 indicated that alveolar 13CO2 equilibrated in less than 3 sec with the CO2 stored in the pulmonary tissues and capillary blood. The volume of CO2 in the pulmonary tissues calculated from this initial disappearance was 200 ml or 0.33 ml of CO2 per milliliter of pulmonary tissue volume. The alveolar to end-capillary gradient for 13CO2 was calculated by comparing the simultaneous disappearance rates of 13CO2 and acetylene. At rest and during exercise this gradient for 13CO2 was either very small or not discernible, and diffusing capacity for CO2 (DLCO2) exceeded 200 ml/(min × mm Hg). After the administration of a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor the rate of disappearance of 13CO2 decreased markedly. DLCO2 fell to 42 ml/(min × mm Hg) and at least 70% of the exchange of 13CO2 with the CO2 stores in the pulmonary tissues and blood was blocked by the inhibitor. These changes were attributed to impairment of exchange of 13CO2 with the bicarbonate in the pulmonary tissues and blood. The pH of the pulmonary tissues (Vtis) was determined by a method based on the premise that the CO2 space in the pulmonary tissues blocked by the inhibitor represented total bicarbonate content. At an alveolar PCO2 of 40 mm Hg pH of Vtis equalled 6.97 ± 0.09. PMID:5658586

  12. The dynamic multimodeling exchange language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jinho; Fishwick, Paul A.

    2003-09-01

    The web has made it easy to create multimedia content, which is then viewable by the general community at large. By extending multimedia to include the area of modeling, we make it possible to share and process model structures in the same way as the typical web page. For models of the geometric variety, the new X3D (eXtensible 3D) standard will allow sharing and presentation of 3D scene graphs within the web browser. We have created a dynamic model counterpart to X3D, which we call DXL (Dynamics eXchange Language). DXL is low-level XML-based language, comprising blocks, ports, and connectors. We will define how DXL is used for constructing individual level models, as well as multimodels over multiple abstraction layers.

  13. Large Devaluations and the Real Exchange Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burstein, Ariel; Eichenbaum, Martin; Rebelo, Sergio

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we argue that the primary force behind the large drop in real exchange rates that occurs after large devaluations is the slow adjustment in the prices of nontradable goods and services. Our empirical analysis uses data from five large devaluation episodes: Argentina (2002), Brazil (1999), Korea (1997), Mexico (1994), and Thailand…

  14. Water exchange dynamics around H3O+ and OH- ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Santanu; Dang, Liem X.

    2015-05-01

    In this letter, we report the first computer simulation of the dynamics of water exchanging between the first and second solvation shells of H3O+. Employing different rate theories for chemical reactions such as the transition state theory, the Grote-Hynes theory, the reactive flux method, and the Impey-Madden-McDonald method, we calculate the solvent exchange rates from molecular dynamics simulations that account for explicit polarization effects. In addition, we also study water exchanges around OH- and find that the corresponding time scale is much smaller than that for H3O+.

  15. Solvent exchange in liquid methanol and rate theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Liem X.; Schenter, Gregory K.

    2016-01-01

    To enhance our understanding of the solvent exchange mechanism in liquid methanol, we report a systematic study using molecular dynamics simulations. We use transition state theory, the Impey-Madden-McDonald method, the reactive flux method, and Grote-Hynes theory to compute the rate constants for this process. Solvent coupling was found to dominate, resulting in a significantly small transmission coefficient. We predict a positive activation volume for methanol exchange. The essential features of the dynamics as well as the pressure dependence are recovered from a Generalized Langevin Equation description of the dynamics. We find that the response to anharmonicity can be decomposed into two time regimes, one corresponding to short time response (<0.1 ps) and long time response (>5 ps). An effective characterization of the process is obtained from launching dynamics from the planar hypersurface corresponding to Grote-Hynes theory, resulting in improved numerical convergence of correlation functions.

  16. Foreign exchange rate entropy evolution during financial crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stosic, Darko; Stosic, Dusan; Ludermir, Teresa; de Oliveira, Wilson; Stosic, Tatijana

    2016-05-01

    This paper examines the effects of financial crises on foreign exchange (FX) markets, where entropy evolution is measured for different exchange rates, using the time-dependent block entropy method. Empirical results suggest that financial crises are associated with significant increase of exchange rate entropy, reflecting instability in FX market dynamics. In accordance with phenomenological expectations, it is found that FX markets with large liquidity and large trading volume are more inert - they recover quicker from a crisis than markets with small liquidity and small trading volume. Moreover, our numerical analysis shows that periods of economic uncertainty are preceded by periods of low entropy values, which may serve as a tool for anticipating the onset of financial crises.

  17. Marriage exchanges, seed exchanges, and the dynamics of manioc diversity

    PubMed Central

    Delêtre, Marc; McKey, Doyle B.; Hodkinson, Trevor R.

    2011-01-01

    The conservation of crop genetic resources requires understanding the different variables—cultural, social, and economic—that impinge on crop diversity. In small-scale farming systems, seed exchanges represent a key mechanism in the dynamics of crop genetic diversity, and analyzing the rules that structure social networks of seed exchange between farmer communities can help decipher patterns of crop genetic diversity. Using a combination of ethnobotanical and molecular genetic approaches, we investigated the relationships between regional patterns of manioc genetic diversity in Gabon and local networks of seed exchange. Spatially explicit Bayesian clustering methods showed that geographical discontinuities of manioc genetic diversity mirror major ethnolinguistic boundaries, with a southern matrilineal domain characterized by high levels of varietal diversity and a northern patrilineal domain characterized by low varietal diversity. Borrowing concepts from anthropology—kinship, bridewealth, and filiation—we analyzed the relationships between marriage exchanges and seed exchange networks in patrilineal and matrilineal societies. We demonstrate that, by defining marriage prohibitions, kinship systems structure social networks of exchange between farmer communities and influence the movement of seeds in metapopulations, shaping crop diversity at local and regional levels. PMID:22042843

  18. On exchange rate misalignments in the Eurozone's peripheral countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grochová, Ladislava; Plecitá, Klára

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we model equilibrium exchange rates for the Eurozone's countries on the basis of the Behavioural Equilibrium Exchange Rate approach, which assumes, that equilibrium exchange rates are in the long run affected by economic fundamentals. To assess the degree of exchange rate misalignment for the Eurozone's peripheral countries - Portugal, Ireland, Greece and Spain - the gap between the actual and the modelled equilibrium exchange rate value is calculated. Our results show that Spain, Portugal and Ireland had their real exchange rates in equilibrium when they joined the Eurozone; however their real exchange rates have been persistently overvalued since the beginning of the 2000s. Greece, on the other hand, has experienced diminishing undervaluation at the beginning of its membership in the Eurozone and since 2009 has exhibited an overvalued real exchange rate.

  19. Solvent Exchange in Liquid Methanol and Rate Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Liem X.; Schenter, Gregory K.

    2016-01-01

    To enhance our understanding of the solvent exchange mechanism in liquid methanol, we report a systematic study of this process using molecular dynamics simulations. We use transition state theory, the Impey-Madden-McDonald method, the reactive flux method, and Grote-Hynes theory to compute the rate constants for this process. Solvent coupling was found to dominate, resulting in a significantly small transmission coefficient. We predict a positive activation volume for the methanol exchange process. The essential features of the dynamics of the system as well as the pressure dependence are recovered from a Generalized Langevin Equation description of the dynamics. We find that the dynamics and response to anharmonicity can be decomposed into two time regimes, one corresponding to short time response (< 0.1 ps) and long time response (> 5 ps). An effective characterization of the process results from launching dynamics from the planar hypersurface corresponding to Grote-Hynes theory. This results in improved numerical convergence of correlation functions. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  20. Computation of intrabeam charge-exchange rate

    SciTech Connect

    Sacks, R.A.; Arnold, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    ANL's planned Accelerator Development Facility (ADF) for heavy-ion fusion will test and demonstrate virtually all of the beam manipulations thought to be necessary for a heavy-ion inertial-confinement-fusion driver. The relatively simple upgrade of adding synchrotron acceleration capability to the storage ring would also allow important energy-deposition and materials experiments. The feasibility of this upgrade depends critically on the beam loss rate from charge-exchange scattering. A computer program has been written for the purpose of obtaining a better estimate for this lifetime. The code assumes a K-V transverse distribution folded into a Neuffer longitudinal distribution. The emittance ellipse parameters, along with various estimates for the velocity-dependent ion-ion cross sections, are read in and a numerical integration is performed over the distribution, yielding a value for the loss rate -1/N/sup 2/ dN/dt. Preliminary estimates indicate that this mode of beam loss presents no obstacle to upgrading the ADF.

  1. Measuring a hidden coordinate: Rate-exchange kinetics from 3D correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Mark A.; Darvin, Jason R.

    2016-08-01

    Nonexponential kinetics imply the existence of at least one slow variable other than the observable, that is, the system has a "hidden" coordinate. We develop a simple, but general, model that allows multidimensional correlation functions to be calculated for these systems. Homogeneous and heterogeneous mechanisms are both included, and slow exchange of the rates is allowed. This model shows that 2D and 3D correlation functions of the observable measure the distribution and kinetics of the hidden coordinate controlling the rate exchange. Both the mean exchange time and the shape of the exchange relaxation are measurable. However, complications arise because higher correlation functions are sums of multiple "pathways," each of which measures different dynamics. Only one 3D pathway involves exchange dynamics. Care must be used to extract exchange dynamics without contamination from other processes.

  2. Pion double charge exchange and hadron dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper will review theoretical results to show how pion double charge exchange is contributing to our understanding of hadron dynamics in nuclei. The exploitation of the nucleus as a filter is shown to be essential in facilitating the comparison between theory and experiment. 23 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Optimizing replica exchange moves for molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nadler, Walter; Hansmann, Ulrich H E

    2007-11-01

    We sketch the statistical physics framework of the replica exchange technique when applied to molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, we draw attention to generalized move sets that allow a variety of optimizations as well as new applications of the method. PMID:18233794

  4. Dynamic simulation of shell-and-tube heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, D.J.; Marchetti, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The transient operation of a multipass shell-and-tube heat exchanger with baffles is described by a multicell dynamic model where every cell represents a specific part of the exchanger. The proposed modeling technique can be used in a digital computer for the dynamic simulation of almost any type of shell-and-tube heat exchanger. The model includes time-dependent inlet conditions for both the cold and the hot streams. Hence, a number of start-up cases can be simulated and, once the system reaches a stationary operating point, a disturbance can be introduced in the inlet temperatures or the flow rates. This particular feature makes the model very useful not only for design purposes but also for transient analysis and control system design.

  5. Exchange of Standardized Flight Dynamics Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin-Mur, Tomas J.; Berry, David; Flores-Amaya, Felipe; Folliard, J.; Kiehling, R.; Ogawa, M.; Pallaschke, S.

    2004-01-01

    Spacecraft operations require the knowledge of the vehicle trajectory and attitude and also that of other spacecraft or natural bodies. This knowledge is normally provided by the Flight Dynamics teams of the different space organizations and, as very often spacecraft operations involve more than one organization, this information needs to be exchanged between Agencies. This is why the Navigation Working Group within the CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems), has been instituted with the task of establishing standards for the exchange of Flight Dynamics data. This exchange encompasses trajectory data, attitude data, and tracking data. The Navigation Working Group includes regular members and observers representing the participating Space Agencies. Currently the group includes representatives from CNES, DLR, ESA, NASA and JAXA. This Working Group meets twice per year in order to devise standardized language, methods, and formats for the description and exchange of Navigation data. Early versions of some of these standards have been used to support mutual tracking of ESA and NASA interplanetary spacecraft, especially during the arrival of the 2003 missions to Mars. This paper provides a summary of the activities carried out by the group, briefly outlines the current and envisioned standards, describes the tests and operational activities that have been performed using the standards, and lists and discusses the lessons learned from these activities.

  6. Exchange of Standarized Flight Dynamics Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Mur, T.; Berry, D.; Flores-Amaya, F.; Foliard, J.; Kiehling, R.; Ogawa, M.; Pallascke

    Spacecraft operations require the knowledge of the vehicle trajectory and attitude and also that of other spacecraft or natural bodies. This knowledge is normally provided by the Flight Dynamics teams of the different space organizations and, as very often spacecraft operations involve more than one organization, this information needs to be exchanged between Agencies. This is why the Navigation Working Group within the CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) has been instituted with the task of establishing standards for the exchange of Flight Dynamics data. This exchange encompasses trajectory data, attitude data, and tracking data. The Navigation Working Group includes regular members and observers representing the participating Space Agencies. Currently the group includes representatives from CNES, DLR, ESA, NASA and JAXA. This Working Group meets twice per year in order to devise standardized language, methods, and formats for the description and exchange of Navigation data. Early versions of some of these standards have been used to support mutual tracking of ESA and NASA interplanetary spacecraft, especially during the arrival of the 2003 missions to Mars. This paper provides a summary of the activities carried out by the group, briefly outlines the current and envisioned standards, describes the tests and operational activities that have been performed using the standards, and lists and discusses the lessons learned from these activities.

  7. Error and efficiency of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Rosta, Edina; Hummer, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    We derive simple analytical expressions for the error and computational efficiency of replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (and by analogy replica exchange Monte Carlo simulations). The theory applies to the important case of systems whose dynamics at long times is dominated by the slow interconversion between two metastable states. As a specific example, we consider the folding and unfolding of a protein. The efficiency is defined as the rate with which the error in an estimated equilibrium property, as measured by the variance of the estimator over repeated simulations, decreases with simulation time. For two-state systems, this rate is in general independent of the particular property. Our main result is that, with comparable computational resources used, the relative efficiency of REMD and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is given by the ratio of the number of transitions between the two states averaged over all replicas at the different temperatures, and the number of transitions at the single temperature of the MD run. This formula applies if replica exchange is frequent, as compared to the transition times. High efficiency of REMD is thus achieved by including replica temperatures in which the frequency of transitions is higher than that at the temperature of interest. In tests of the expressions for the error in the estimator, computational efficiency, and the rate of equilibration we find quantitative agreement with the results both from kinetic models of REMD and from actual all-atom simulations of the folding of a peptide in water. PMID:19894977

  8. Error and efficiency of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Rosta, Edina; Hummer, Gerhard

    2009-10-28

    We derive simple analytical expressions for the error and computational efficiency of replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (and by analogy replica exchange Monte Carlo simulations). The theory applies to the important case of systems whose dynamics at long times is dominated by the slow interconversion between two metastable states. As a specific example, we consider the folding and unfolding of a protein. The efficiency is defined as the rate with which the error in an estimated equilibrium property, as measured by the variance of the estimator over repeated simulations, decreases with simulation time. For two-state systems, this rate is in general independent of the particular property. Our main result is that, with comparable computational resources used, the relative efficiency of REMD and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is given by the ratio of the number of transitions between the two states averaged over all replicas at the different temperatures, and the number of transitions at the single temperature of the MD run. This formula applies if replica exchange is frequent, as compared to the transition times. High efficiency of REMD is thus achieved by including replica temperatures in which the frequency of transitions is higher than that at the temperature of interest. In tests of the expressions for the error in the estimator, computational efficiency, and the rate of equilibration we find quantitative agreement with the results both from kinetic models of REMD and from actual all-atom simulations of the folding of a peptide in water. PMID:19894977

  9. Measuring fast hydrogen exchange rates by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kateb, Fatiha; Pelupessy, Philippe; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a method to measure hydrogen exchange rates based on the observation of the coherence of a neighboring spin S such as 15N that has a scalar coupling JIS to the exchanging proton I. The decay of Sx coherence under a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) multiple echo train is recorded in the presence and absence of proton decoupling. This method allows one to extract proton exchange rates up to 10 5 s -1. We could extend the pH range for the study of the indole proton in tryptophan, allowing the determination of the exchange constants of the cationic, zwitterionic, and anionic forms of tryptophan.

  10. A dynamical structure of high frequency currency exchange market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazuka, Naoya; Ohira, Toru; Marumo, Kouhei; Shimizu, Tokiko; Takayasu, Misako; Takayasu, Hideki

    2003-06-01

    We analyze tick-by-tick data, the most high frequency data available, of yen-dollar currency exchange rates. We show that a dynamical structure can be observed in binarized data indicating the direction of up and down movement of prices, which is not apparently seen from the price change itself. This result is consistent with our previous study that there exists a conditional probabilistic structure in binarized data. The dynamical and probabilistic structure which we found could indicate that dealers’ decision making is based on a binary strategy, even if they are unconscious of this fact.

  11. Noninvasive detection of gas exchange rate by near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guodong; Mao, Zongzhen; Wang, Bangde

    2008-12-01

    In order to study the relationship among the oxygen concentration in skeletal muscle tissues and the heart rate (HR), oxygen uptake (VO2), respiratory exchange ratio (RER) during incremental running exercises on a treadmill, a near-infrared spectroscopy muscle oxygen monitor system is employed to measure the relative change in muscle oxygenation, with the heart rate, oxygen uptake, production of carbon dioxide (VCO2) and respiratory exchange ratio are recorded synchronously. The results indicate parameters mentioned above present regular changes during the incremental exercise. High correlations are discovered between relative change of oxy-hemoglobin concentration and heart rate, oxygen uptake, respiratory exchange ratio at the significance level (P=0.01). This research might introduce a new measurement technology and/or a novel biological monitoring parameter to the evaluation of physical function status, control the training intensity, estimation of the effectiveness of exercise. Keywords: near-infrared spectroscopy; muscle oxygen concentration; heart rate; oxygen uptake; respiratory exchange ratio.

  12. Statistical Analysis of the Exchange Rate of Bitcoin.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jeffrey; Nadarajah, Saralees; Chan, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Bitcoin, the first electronic payment system, is becoming a popular currency. We provide a statistical analysis of the log-returns of the exchange rate of Bitcoin versus the United States Dollar. Fifteen of the most popular parametric distributions in finance are fitted to the log-returns. The generalized hyperbolic distribution is shown to give the best fit. Predictions are given for future values of the exchange rate. PMID:26222702

  13. Statistical Analysis of the Exchange Rate of Bitcoin

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jeffrey; Nadarajah, Saralees; Chan, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Bitcoin, the first electronic payment system, is becoming a popular currency. We provide a statistical analysis of the log-returns of the exchange rate of Bitcoin versus the United States Dollar. Fifteen of the most popular parametric distributions in finance are fitted to the log-returns. The generalized hyperbolic distribution is shown to give the best fit. Predictions are given for future values of the exchange rate. PMID:26222702

  14. Kinetic isotope effects for fast deuterium and proton exchange rates

    PubMed Central

    Mammoli, Daniele; Kadeřávek, Pavel; Pelupessy, Philippe; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    By monitoring the effect of deuterium decoupling on the decay of transverse 15N magnetization in D–15N spin pairs during multiple-refocusing echo sequences, we have determined fast D–D exchange rates k D and compared them with fast H–H exchange rates k H in tryptophan to determine the kinetic isotope effect as a function of pH and temperature. PMID:27009684

  15. Modeling inflation rates and exchange rates in Ghana: application of multivariate GARCH models.

    PubMed

    Nortey, Ezekiel Nn; Ngoh, Delali D; Doku-Amponsah, Kwabena; Ofori-Boateng, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This paper was aimed at investigating the volatility and conditional relationship among inflation rates, exchange rates and interest rates as well as to construct a model using multivariate GARCH DCC and BEKK models using Ghana data from January 1990 to December 2013. The study revealed that the cumulative depreciation of the cedi to the US dollar from 1990 to 2013 is 7,010.2% and the yearly weighted depreciation of the cedi to the US dollar for the period is 20.4%. There was evidence that, the fact that inflation rate was stable, does not mean that exchange rates and interest rates are expected to be stable. Rather, when the cedi performs well on the forex, inflation rates and interest rates react positively and become stable in the long run. The BEKK model is robust to modelling and forecasting volatility of inflation rates, exchange rates and interest rates. The DCC model is robust to model the conditional and unconditional correlation among inflation rates, exchange rates and interest rates. The BEKK model, which forecasted high exchange rate volatility for the year 2014, is very robust for modelling the exchange rates in Ghana. The mean equation of the DCC model is also robust to forecast inflation rates in Ghana. PMID:25741459

  16. Dynamics of Exchange-Biased Magnetic Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T. Y.; Chan, M. K.; Crowell, P. A.

    2009-03-01

    We have studied magnetization dynamics in micron-sized circular disks composed of ferromagnetic (FM)-antiferromagnetic (AFM) bilayers. The patterned samples of FeMn/NiFe are field-cooled (FC) or zero-field cooled (ZFC) from above the blocking temperature to room temperature. Time-resolved Kerr microscopy measurements show that the vortex gyrotropic mode fluctuates in frequency as the vortex core is displaced by a static in-plane magnetic field. The average gyrotropic frequency and the magnitude of its fluctuations, which are due to pinning of the vortex core, are larger than in single layer FM films. The enhancement of the gyrotropic frequency is largest in the ZFC samples, in which the effective field due to exchange coupling is expected to enhance pinning of the vortex core at the center of the disk. We find, however, that micromagnetic simulations incorporating uniform or vortex-like exchange-bias fields do not explain our results quantitatively. We interpret this discrepancy as a consequence of randomly orientated AFM domains, which are comparable in size to the vortex core. This work was supported by NSF and the Univ. of Minnesota Graduate School.

  17. Dynamic Analysis of Capture Devices for Momentum Exchange with Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    One of the significant challenges in developing a momentum exchange / electrodynamic reboost tether system is in the analysis and design of the capture device and its effects on the overall dynamics of the system. The goal of this work is to develop appropriate tether momentum exchange models that can simulate and evaluate the requirements of such a system, and be used to create specifications on the design of a capture device. This report briefly describes dynamic model development, simulation of the momentum exchange process, evaluation of dynamic effects of errors in the momentum exchange process, and the development of guidelines in selecting dynamic properties in the design of a capture device.

  18. A Role Play on Export Decisions and the Exchange Rate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotterell, Ann

    1987-01-01

    Explains that the goal of this exercise is to encourage an understanding of the effects of exchange rate changes and the use of forward rates. Provides a role play that involves students working in groups to decide whether to export a consignment of golf trollies to Italy and shortbread to Canada. (BSR)

  19. Evidence of multifractality from CEE exchange rates against Euro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caraiani, Petre; Haven, Emmanuel

    2015-02-01

    The multifractal spectrum of a time series can be ascertained with a number of techniques, some based on wavelets, others based on the much newer (multifractal) detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA). We test for the presence of multifractality in daily data on selected exchange rates from Central and Eastern European economies against EURO. The approach is based on a slight modification of the MF-DFA analysis in that local trends are not allowed to be polynomially fitted but rather are estimated through a sifting process which is established through a so called Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) algorithm. We assess the drivers of the multifractal spectrum strength, like temporal correlations or distributions based on surrogate data. Another topic discussed is whether the entrance in the exchange rate mechanism ERM II influenced the multifractality of the exchange rates.

  20. Extreme-value dependence: An application to exchange rate markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Viviana

    2007-04-01

    Extreme value theory (EVT) focuses on modeling the tail behavior of a loss distribution using only extreme values rather than the whole data set. For a sample of 10 countries with dirty/free float regimes, we investigate whether paired currencies exhibit a pattern of asymptotic dependence. That is, whether an extremely large appreciation or depreciation in the nominal exchange rate of one country might transmit to another. In general, after controlling for volatility clustering and inertia in returns, we do not find evidence of extreme-value dependence between paired exchange rates. However, for asymptotic-independent paired returns, we find that tail dependency of exchange rates is stronger under large appreciations than under large depreciations.

  1. Residue-specific NH exchange rates studied by NMR diffusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Torsten; Cabrita, Eurico J.; Morris, Gareth A.; Günther, Robert; Hofmann, Hans-Jörg; Berger, Stefan

    2007-07-01

    We present a novel approach to the investigation of rapid (>2 s -1) NH exchange rates in proteins, based on residue-specific diffusion measurements. 1H, 15N-DOSY-HSQC spectra are recorded in order to observe resolved amide proton signals for most residues of the protein. Human ubiquitin was used to demonstrate the proposed method. Exchange rates are derived directly from the decay data of the diffusion experiment by applying a model deduced from the assumption of a two-site exchange with water and the "pure" diffusion coefficients of water and protein. The "pure" diffusion coefficient of the protein is determined in an experiment with selective excitation of the amide protons in order to suppress the influence of magnetization transfer from water to amide protons on the decay data. For rapidly exchanging residues a comparison of our results with the exchange rates obtained in a MEXICO experiment showed good agreement. Molecular dynamics (MD) and quantum mechanical calculations were performed to find molecular parameters correlating with the exchangeability of the NH protons. The RMS fluctuations of the amide protons, obtained from the MD simulations, together with the NH coupling constants provide a bilinear model which shows a good correlation with the experimental NH exchange rates.

  2. Relationship between air exchange rate and indoor VOC levels

    SciTech Connect

    Otson, R.; Williams, D.T.; Fellin, P.

    1998-12-31

    It is often assumed that the air quality is better in leaky than in airtight buildings. To test this anecdotal hypothesis, data from two Canadian surveys were examined. Indoor measurements of 28 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were made by means of a passive sampling method during the 24 to 48 h study periods in both studies, and air exchange rates were determined by the perfluorocarbon tracer approach. The air exchange rates ranged between about 0.1 to 2.5 air changes per hour in 54 test homes in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). Other information on building age and construction, renovation activities and occupant activities that potentially influenced indoor VOC concentrations in the homes was collected by means of a questionnaire. The statistical relationships between the concentrations of VOCs and air exchange were determined. Correlation coefficients between the airborne concentrations of each VOC and the air exchange rates for the homes were all < 0.1 indicating that the relationship between the air exchange and indoor VOC concentrations is tenuous. Since the questionnaire responses did not provide quantitative estimates of indoor emissions, a quantitative correlation between responses and indoor concentrations could not be established nor was a consistent pattern evident between these responses and the occurrence of high indoor concentrations. The lack of definitive quantitative relationships is not surprising considering the complexity of indoor environments, the lack of a detailed inventory of indoor sources and their emission rates and a lack of information or understanding of indoor sinks. The findings, on the effect of air exchange rates and the value of questionnaires in studies on indoor VOCs are consistent with findings in other similar studies.

  3. The American Foreign Exchange Option in Time-Dependent One-Dimensional Diffusion Model for Exchange Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Rehman, Nasir Shashiashvili, Malkhaz

    2009-06-15

    The classical Garman-Kohlhagen model for the currency exchange assumes that the domestic and foreign currency risk-free interest rates are constant and the exchange rate follows a log-normal diffusion process.In this paper we consider the general case, when exchange rate evolves according to arbitrary one-dimensional diffusion process with local volatility that is the function of time and the current exchange rate and where the domestic and foreign currency risk-free interest rates may be arbitrary continuous functions of time. First non-trivial problem we encounter in time-dependent case is the continuity in time argument of the value function of the American put option and the regularity properties of the optimal exercise boundary. We establish these properties based on systematic use of the monotonicity in volatility for the value functions of the American as well as European options with convex payoffs together with the Dynamic Programming Principle and we obtain certain type of comparison result for the value functions and corresponding exercise boundaries for the American puts with different strikes, maturities and volatilities.Starting from the latter fact that the optimal exercise boundary curve is left continuous with right-hand limits we give a mathematically rigorous and transparent derivation of the significant early exercise premium representation for the value function of the American foreign exchange put option as the sum of the European put option value function and the early exercise premium.The proof essentially relies on the particular property of the stochastic integral with respect to arbitrary continuous semimartingale over the predictable subsets of its zeros. We derive from the latter the nonlinear integral equation for the optimal exercise boundary which can be studied by numerical methods.

  4. Ion momentum and energy transfer rates for charge exchange collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J.; Banks, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    The rates of momentum and energy transfer have been obtained for charge exchange collisions between ion and neutral gases having arbitrary Maxwellian temperatures and bulk transport velocities. The results are directly applicable to the F-region of the ionosphere where 0+ - 0 charge is the dominant mechanism affecting ion momentum and energy transfer.

  5. Extensions to the Dynamic Aerospace Vehicle Exchange Markup Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brian, Geoffrey J.; Jackson, E. Bruce

    2011-01-01

    The Dynamic Aerospace Vehicle Exchange Markup Language (DAVE-ML) is a syntactical language for exchanging flight vehicle dynamic model data. It provides a framework for encoding entire flight vehicle dynamic model data packages for exchange and/or long-term archiving. Version 2.0.1 of DAVE-ML provides much of the functionality envisioned for exchanging aerospace vehicle data; however, it is limited in only supporting scalar time-independent data. Additional functionality is required to support vector and matrix data, abstracting sub-system models, detailing dynamics system models (both discrete and continuous), and defining a dynamic data format (such as time sequenced data) for validation of dynamics system models and vehicle simulation packages. Extensions to DAVE-ML have been proposed to manage data as vectors and n-dimensional matrices, and record dynamic data in a compatible form. These capabilities will improve the clarity of data being exchanged, simplify the naming of parameters, and permit static and dynamic data to be stored using a common syntax within a single file; thereby enhancing the framework provided by DAVE-ML for exchanging entire flight vehicle dynamic simulation models.

  6. Does implied volatility of currency futures option imply volatility of exchange rates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Alan T.

    2007-02-01

    By investigating currency futures options, this paper provides an alternative economic implication for the result reported by Stein [Overreactions in the options market, Journal of Finance 44 (1989) 1011-1023] that long-maturity options tend to overreact to changes in the implied volatility of short-maturity options. When a GARCH process is assumed for exchange rates, a continuous-time relationship is developed. We provide evidence that implied volatilities may not be the simple average of future expected volatilities. By comparing the term-structure relationship of implied volatilities with the process of the underlying exchange rates, we find that long-maturity options are more consistent with the exchange rates process. In sum, short-maturity options overreact to the dynamics of underlying assets rather than long-maturity options overreacting to short-maturity options.

  7. Transition Path Sampling of Water Exchange Rates and Mechanisms around Aqueous Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N; Rosso, Kevin M

    2009-09-21

    The rates and mechanisms of water exchange around two aqueous ions, namely, Na+ and Fe2+, have been determined using transition path sampling. In particular, the pressure dependence of the water exchange rates was computed to determine activation volumes. A common approach for calculating water exchange rates, the reactive flux method, was also employed and the two methods were compared. The water exchange rate around Na+ is fast enough to be calculated by direct molecular dynamics simulations, thus providing a reference for comparison. The transition path sampling approach yielded more accurate rates, although both approaches predicted activation volumes of +2.6 cm3·mol-1, in agreement with the direct simulation results. The only previously determined activation volume for Na+ is from a theoretical estimation (Spångberg, D.; Wojcik, M.; Hermansson, K. Chem. Phys. Lett. 1997, 276, 114-121) and differs in sign and magnitude from that calculated in this work. We show that this is due to an overestimation of the sodium hydration energy in the previous model. For water exchange around Fe2+, transition path sampling predicts an activation volume of +3.8 cm3mol-1, in excellent agreement with available experimental data. The reactive flux approach, however, failed to identify the transition state and predicted the opposite pressure dependence of the rate as a result. Analysis of the reactive trajectories obtained with the transition path sampling approach suggests that the Fe2+ exchange reaction takes place via an associative interchange mechanism, which goes against the conventional mechanistic interpretation of a positive activation volume. Collectively, considerable insight obtains not only for the exchange rates and mechanisms for Na+ and Fe2+, but also for identifying the most robust modeling strategy for these purposes.

  8. Hybrid empirical mode decomposition- ARIMA for forecasting exchange rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadan, Siti Sarah; Shabri, Ani; Ismail, Shuhaida

    2015-02-01

    This paper studied the forecasting of monthly Malaysian Ringgit (MYR)/ United State Dollar (USD) exchange rates using the hybrid of two methods which are the empirical model decomposition (EMD) and the autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA). MYR is pegged to USD during the Asian financial crisis causing the exchange rates are fixed to 3.800 from 2nd of September 1998 until 21st of July 2005. Thus, the chosen data in this paper is the post-July 2005 data, starting from August 2005 to July 2010. The comparative study using root mean square error (RMSE) and mean absolute error (MAE) showed that the EMD-ARIMA outperformed the single-ARIMA and the random walk benchmark model.

  9. Selection, Evaluation, And Rating of Compact Heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Matt

    2014-10-07

    SEARCH determines and optimizes the design of a compact heat exchanger for specified process conditions. The user specifies process boundary conditions including the fluid state and flow rate and SEARCH will determine the optimum flow arrangement, channel geometry, and mechanical design for the unit. Fluids are modeled using NUST Refprop or tabulated values. A variety of thermal-hydraulic correlations are available including user-defined equations to accurately capture the heat transfer and pressure drop behavior of the process flows.

  10. Oil Prices and Interest Rates: Do They Determine the Exchange Rate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, I. A.; Old, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Argues that the relationship between the British pound sterling, interest rates, and oil prices has been overemphasized by economic commentators because they ignored a basic economic theory about the determination of the exchange rate. Provides an example and suggestions for follow up instruction. (Author/JDH)

  11. 26 CFR 1.989(b)-1 - Definition of weighted average exchange rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of weighted average exchange rate. 1... average exchange rate. For purposes of section 989(b)(3) and (4), the term “weighted average exchange rate” means the simple average of the daily exchange rates (determined by reference to a qualified source...

  12. Oxygen ionization rates at Mars and Venus - Relative contributions of impact ionization and charge exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, M. H. G.; Luhmann, J. G.; Nagy, A. F.; Spreiter, J. R.; Stahara, S. S.

    1993-01-01

    Oxygen ion production rates above the ionopauses of Venus and Mars are calculated for photoionization, charge exchange, and solar wind electron impact ionization processes. The latter two require the use of the Spreiter and Stahara (1980) gas dynamic model to estimate magnetosheath velocities, densities, and temperatures. The results indicate that impact ionization is the dominant mechanism for the production of O(+) ions at both Venus and Mars. This finding might explain both the high ion escape rates measured by Phobos 2 and the greater mass loading rate inferred for Venus from the bow shock positions.

  13. Dynamic tube/support interaction in heat exchanger tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.

    1991-01-01

    The supports for heat exchanger tubes are usually plates with drilled holes; other types of supports also have been used. To facilitate manufacture and to allow for thermal expansion of the tubes, small clearances are used between tubes and tube supports. The dynamics of tube/support interaction in heat exchangers is fairly complicated. Understanding tube dynamics and its effects is important for heat exchangers. This paper summarizes the current state of the art on this subject and to identify future research needs. Specifically, the following topics are discussed: dynamics of loosely supported tubes, tube/support gap dynamics, tube response in flow, tube damage and wear, design considerations, and future research needs. 55 refs., 1 fig.

  14. The groundwater exchange rate of the southern Baltic coastal lowland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burzyński, K.; Sadurski, A.

    1990-11-01

    The groundwater of the southern Baltic lowlands usually occurs in particular hydrogeological conditions. The lowland is mostly covered by peats several metres in thickness. Peatbog water is isolated from deeper aquifers and has different chemical composition. Salty, relic groundwater of marine origin from the Atlantic period of the Holocene (Littorina transgression) may have survived in the deeper coastal aquifers in places of sluggish flow. The results of mathematical modelling of groundwater circulation show that the flow rate and local directions of groundwater change during the year, depending on the rate of groundwater recharge by precipitation. We present here an unsteady flow model, which makes it possible to predict the water table fluctuations during a year at any point of the area studied. The calculation of the groundwater exchange rate did not confirm the presence of any places of very sluggish groundwater flow, where salty, young relic water might have survived.

  15. Dynamic line rating in the operating environment

    SciTech Connect

    Foss, S.D. ); Maraio, R.A. )

    1990-04-01

    Much attention has been placed on the benefits derived by the dynamic rating of overhead conductors based on typical or single station weather data. Reported power line capacity show increases from 20 to 70% on the average over existing static rating practices. Because of the necessity of multistation monitoring and the implication with respect to critical span, Niagara Mohawk performed an extensive one year multistation power line study. The study revealed that the dynamic line rating was 20% lower than the average dynamic rating for the power line.

  16. Air exchange rates in new energy-efficient manufactured housing

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, D.; Bailey, S.

    1990-10-01

    During the 1989--1990 heating season, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, for the Bonneville Power Administration, measured the ventilation characteristics of 139 newly constructed energy-efficient manufactured homes and a control sample of 35 newer manufactured homes. A standard door fan pressurization technique was used to estimate shell leakiness, and a passive perfluorocarbon tracer technique was used to estimate overall air exchange rates. A measurement of the designated whole-house exhaust system flow rate was taken as well as an occupant and structure survey. The energy-efficient manufactured homes have very low air exchange rates, significantly lower than either existing manufactured homes or site-built homes. The standard deviation of the effective leakage area for this sample of homes is small (25% to 30% of the mean), indicating that the leakiness of manufactured housing stock can be confidently characterized by the mean value. There is some indication of increased ventilation due to the energy-efficient whole-house ventilation specification, but not directly related to the operation of the whole-house system. The mechanical systems as installed and operated do not provide the intended ventilation; consequently indoor air quality could possibly be adversely impacted and moisture/condensation in the living space is a potential problem. 6 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Peptide-Column Interactions and Their Influence on Back Exchange Rates in Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheff, Joey G.; Rey, Martial; Schriemer, David C.

    2013-07-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) methods generate useful information on protein structure and dynamics, ideally at the individual residue level. Most MS-based HDX methods involve a rapid proteolytic digestion followed by LC/MS analysis, with exchange kinetics monitored at the peptide level. Localizing specific sites of HDX is usually restricted to a resolution the size of the host peptide because gas-phase processes can scramble deuterium throughout the peptide. Subtractive methods may improve resolution, where deuterium levels of overlapping and nested peptides are used in a subtractive manner to localize exchange to smaller segments. In this study, we explore the underlying assumption of the subtractive method, namely, that the measured back exchange kinetics of a given residue is independent of its host peptide. Using a series of deuterated peptides, we show that secondary structure can be partially retained under quenched conditions, and that interactions between peptides and reversed-phase LC columns may both accelerate and decelerate residue HDX, depending upon peptide sequence and length. Secondary structure is induced through column interactions in peptides with a solution-phase propensity for structure, which has the effect of slowing HDX rates relative to predicted random coil values. Conversely, column interactions can orient random-coil peptide conformers to accelerate HDX, the degree to which correlates with peptide charge in solution, and which can be reversed by using stronger ion pairing reagents. The dependency of these effects on sequence and length suggest that subtractive methods for improving structural resolution in HDX-MS will not offer a straightforward solution for increasing exchange site resolution.

  18. Selection, Evaluation, And Rating of Compact Heat exchangers

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-10-07

    SEARCH determines and optimizes the design of a compact heat exchanger for specified process conditions. The user specifies process boundary conditions including the fluid state and flow rate and SEARCH will determine the optimum flow arrangement, channel geometry, and mechanical design for the unit. Fluids are modeled using NUST Refprop or tabulated values. A variety of thermal-hydraulic correlations are available including user-defined equations to accurately capture the heat transfer and pressure drop behavior of themore » process flows.« less

  19. Magnetization dynamics in exchange coupled antiferromagnet spin superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yizhou; Barlas, Yafis; Yin, Gen; Zang, Jiadong; Lake, Roger

    Antiferromagnets (AFMs) are commonly used as the exchange bias layer in magnetic recording and spintronic devices. Recently, several studies on the spin transfer torque and spin pumping in AFMs reveal much more interesting physics in AFMs. Properties of AFMs such as the ultrafast switching within picoseconds and spin superfluidity demonstrate the potential to build AFM based spintronic devices. Here, we study the magnetization dynamics in an exchange coupled AFM systems. Beginning from the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, we derive a Josephson-like equation for the exchange coupled system. We investigate the detailed magnetization dynamics by employing spin injection and spin pumping theory. We also propose a geometry that could be used to measure this magnetization dynamics. This work was supported as part of the Spins and Heat in Nanoscale Electronic Systems (SHINES) an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award #SC0012670.

  20. Air exchange rates from atmospheric CO2 daily cycle

    PubMed Central

    Carrilho, João Dias; Mateus, Mário; Batterman, Stuart; da Silva, Manuel Gameiro

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new approach for measuring ventilation air exchange rates (AERs). The method belongs to the class of tracer gas techniques, but is formulated in the light of systems theory and signal processing. Unlike conventional CO2 based methods that assume the outdoor ambient CO2 concentration is constant, the proposed method recognizes that photosynthesis and respiration cycle of plants and processes associated with fuel combustion produce daily, quasi-periodic, variations in the ambient CO2 concentrations. These daily variations, which are within the detection range of existing monitoring equipment, are utilized for estimating ventilation rates without the need of a source of CO2 in the building. Using a naturally-ventilated residential apartment, AERs obtained using the new method compared favorably (within 10%) to those obtained using the conventional CO2 decay fitting technique. The new method has the advantages that no tracer gas injection is needed, and high time resolution results are obtained. PMID:26236090

  1. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Minimum Capital Components for Interest Rate and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF... CAPITAL Minimum Capital Pt. 1750, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750—Minimum Capital... sheet interest rate and foreign exchange rate contracts: a. Interest Rate Contracts i. Single...

  2. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Minimum Capital Components for Interest Rate and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF... CAPITAL Minimum Capital Pt. 1750, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750—Minimum Capital... sheet interest rate and foreign exchange rate contracts: a. Interest Rate Contracts i. Single...

  3. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Minimum Capital Components for Interest Rate and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF... CAPITAL Minimum Capital Pt. 1750, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750—Minimum Capital... sheet interest rate and foreign exchange rate contracts: a. Interest Rate Contracts i. Single...

  4. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Minimum Capital Components for Interest Rate and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF... CAPITAL Minimum Capital Pt. 1750, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750—Minimum Capital... sheet interest rate and foreign exchange rate contracts: a. Interest Rate Contracts i. Single...

  5. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Minimum Capital Components for Interest Rate and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF... CAPITAL Minimum Capital Pt. 1750, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750—Minimum Capital... sheet interest rate and foreign exchange rate contracts: a. Interest Rate Contracts i. Single...

  6. Dependence and risk assessment for oil prices and exchange rate portfolios: A wavelet based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloui, Chaker; Jammazi, Rania

    2015-10-01

    In this article, we propose a wavelet-based approach to accommodate the stylized facts and complex structure of financial data, caused by frequent and abrupt changes of markets and noises. Specifically, we show how the combination of both continuous and discrete wavelet transforms with traditional financial models helps improve portfolio's market risk assessment. In the empirical stage, three wavelet-based models (wavelet-EGARCH with dynamic conditional correlations, wavelet-copula, and wavelet-extreme value) are considered and applied to crude oil price and US dollar exchange rate data. Our findings show that the wavelet-based approach provides an effective and powerful tool for detecting extreme moments and improving the accuracy of VaR and Expected Shortfall estimates of oil-exchange rate portfolios after noise is removed from the original data.

  7. Glucans monomer-exchange dynamics as an open chemical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Riccardo; Lacoste, David; Esposito, Massimiliano

    2015-12-01

    We describe the oligosaccharides-exchange dynamics performed by the so-called D-enzymes on polysaccharides. To mimic physiological conditions, we treat this process as an open chemical network by assuming some of the polymer concentrations fixed (chemostatting). We show that three different long-time behaviors may ensue: equilibrium states, nonequilibrium steady states, and continuous growth states. We dynamically and thermodynamically characterize these states and emphasize the crucial role of conservation laws in identifying the chemostatting conditions inducing them.

  8. Glucans monomer-exchange dynamics as an open chemical network

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Riccardo Esposito, Massimiliano; Lacoste, David

    2015-12-28

    We describe the oligosaccharides-exchange dynamics performed by the so-called D-enzymes on polysaccharides. To mimic physiological conditions, we treat this process as an open chemical network by assuming some of the polymer concentrations fixed (chemostatting). We show that three different long-time behaviors may ensue: equilibrium states, nonequilibrium steady states, and continuous growth states. We dynamically and thermodynamically characterize these states and emphasize the crucial role of conservation laws in identifying the chemostatting conditions inducing them.

  9. Transitional steady states of exchange dynamics between finite quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Euijin; Yi, Juyeon; Kim, Yong Woon

    2016-08-01

    We examine energy and particle exchange between finite-sized quantum systems and find a new form of nonequilibrium state. The exchange rate undergoes stepwise evolution in time, and its magnitude and sign dramatically change according to system size differences. The origin lies in interference effects contributed by multiply scattered waves at system boundaries. Although such characteristics are utterly different from those of true steady state for infinite systems, Onsager's reciprocal relation remains universally valid. PMID:27627275

  10. Combined Steady-State and Dynamic Heat Exchanger Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal; Bader, Paul N.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a heat-transfer experiment that combines steady-state analysis and dynamic control. A process-water stream is circulated through two tube-in-shell heat exchangers in series. In the first, the process water is heated by steam. In the second, it is cooled by cooling water. The equipment is pilot-plant size: heat-transfer areas…

  11. Computational Studies of Water-Exchange Rates around Aqueous Mg2+ and Be2+

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Liem X.

    2014-12-18

    The water-exchange mechanisms occurring around aqueous divalent Mg2+ and Be2+ ions were studied using molecular dynamics simulations and rate theory methods. Properties associated with the water-exchange process, such as ion-water potentials of mean force, time-dependent transmission coefficients, and rate constants, were examined along with transition rate theory and the reactive flux method, which includes the role of solvent friction. The effects of pressure on water-exchange rates and activation volumes also were studied. The simulated activation volume values and mechanism were different for Mg2+ and Be2+ because of the nature of their solvation shells. We found the agreement with experiments was improved up on solvent effects were taken into account. The Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded this work. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES.

  12. Modeling dynamic exchange of gaseous elemental mercury at polar sunrise.

    PubMed

    Dastoor, Ashu P; Davignon, Didier; Theys, Nicolas; Van Roozendael, Michel; Steffen, Alexandra; Ariya, Parisa A

    2008-07-15

    At polar sunrise, gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) undergoes an exceptional dynamic exchange in the air and at the snow surface during which GEM can be rapidly removed from the atmosphere (the so-called atmospheric mercury depletion events (AMDEs)) as well as re-emitted from the snow within a few hours to days in the Polar Regions. Although high concentrations of total mercury in snow following AMDEs is well documented, there is very little data available on the redox transformation processes of mercury in the snow and the fluxes of mercury at the air/snow interface. Therefore, the net gain of mercury in the Polar Regions as a result of AMDEs is still an open question. We developed a new version of the global mercury model, GRAHM, which includes for the first time bidirectional surface exchange of GEM in Polar Regions in spring and summer by developing schemes for mercury halogen oxidation, deposition, and re-emission. Also for the first time, GOME satellite data-derived boundary layer concentrations of BrO have been used in a global mercury model for representation of halogen mercury chemistry. Comparison of model simulated and measured atmospheric concentrations of GEM at Alert, Canada, for 3 years (2002-2004) shows the model's capability in simulating the rapid cycling of mercury during and after AMDEs. Brooks et al. (1) measured mercury deposition, reemission, and net surface gain fluxes of mercury at Barrow, AK, during an intensive measurement campaign for a 2 week period in spring (March 25 to April 7, 2003). They reported 1.7, 1.0 +/- 0.2, and 0.7 +/- 0.2 microg m(-2) deposition, re-emission, and net surface gain, respectively. Using the optimal configuration of the model, we estimated 1.8 microg m(-2) deposition, 1.0 microg m(-2) re-emission, and 0.8 microg m(-2) net surface gain of mercury for the same time period at Barrow. The estimated net annual accumulation of mercury within the Arctic Circle north of 66.5 degrees is approximately 174 t with +/-7 t of

  13. Flight Dynamic Model Exchange using XML

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, E. Bruce; Hildreth, Bruce L.

    2002-01-01

    The AIAA Modeling and Simulation Technical Committee has worked for several years to develop a standard by which the information needed to develop physics-based models of aircraft can be specified. The purpose of this standard is to provide a well-defined set of information, definitions, data tables and axis systems so that cooperating organizations can transfer a model from one simulation facility to another with maximum efficiency. This paper proposes using an application of the eXtensible Markup Language (XML) to implement the AIAA simulation standard. The motivation and justification for using a standard such as XML is discussed. Necessary data elements to be supported are outlined. An example of an aerodynamic model as an XML file is given. This example includes definition of independent and dependent variables for function tables, definition of key variables used to define the model, and axis systems used. The final steps necessary for implementation of the standard are presented. Software to take an XML-defined model and import/export it to/from a given simulation facility is discussed, but not demonstrated. That would be the next step in final implementation of standards for physics-based aircraft dynamic models.

  14. Nondiffusive mechanisms enhance protein uptake rates in ion exchange particles

    PubMed Central

    Dziennik, S. R.; Belcher, E. B.; Barker, G. A.; DeBergalis, M. J.; Fernandez, S. E.; Lenhoff, A. M.

    2003-01-01

    Scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy and multiphoton fluorescence microscopy were used to image the uptake of the protein lysozyme into individual ion exchange chromatography particles in a packed bed in real time. Self-sharpening concentration fronts penetrating into the particles were observed at low salt concentrations in all of the adsorbents studied, but persisted to 100 mM ionic strength only in some materials. In other adsorbents, diffuse profiles were seen at these higher salt concentrations, with the transition region exhibiting a pronounced fluorescence peak at the front at intermediate salt concentrations. These patterns in the uptake profiles are accompanied by significant increases in protein uptake rates that are also seen macroscopically in batch uptake experiments. The fluorescence peak appears to be a concentration overshoot that may develop, in part, from an electrokinetic contribution to transport that also enhances the uptake rate. Further evidence for an electrokinetic origin is that the effect is correlated with high adsorbent surface charge densities. Predictions of a mathematical model incorporating the electrokinetic effect are in qualitative agreement with the observations. These findings indicate that mechanisms other than diffusion contribute to protein transport in oppositely charged porous materials and may be exploited to achieve rapid uptake in process chromatography. PMID:12522150

  15. Spin and orbital exchange interactions from Dynamical Mean Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secchi, A.; Lichtenstein, A. I.; Katsnelson, M. I.

    2016-02-01

    We derive a set of equations expressing the parameters of the magnetic interactions characterizing a strongly correlated electronic system in terms of single-electron Green's functions and self-energies. This allows to establish a mapping between the initial electronic system and a spin model including up to quadratic interactions between the effective spins, with a general interaction (exchange) tensor that accounts for anisotropic exchange, Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and other symmetric terms such as dipole-dipole interaction. We present the formulas in a format that can be used for computations via Dynamical Mean Field Theory algorithms.

  16. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry for investigation of backbone dynamics of oxidized and reduced cytochrome P450cam.

    PubMed

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Molnar, Kathleen S; Coales, Stephen J; OuYang, Bo; Simorellis, Alana K; Pochapsky, Thomas C

    2008-02-01

    Backbone dynamics of the camphor monoxygenase cytochrome P450(cam) (CYP101) as a function of oxidation/ligation state of the heme iron were investigated via hydrogen/deuterium exchange (H/D exchange) as monitored by mass spectrometry. Main chain amide NH hydrogens can exchange readily with solvent and the rate of this exchange depends upon, among other things, dynamic fluctuations in local structural elements. A fluxional region of the polypeptide will exchange more quickly with solvent than one that is more constrained. In most regions of the enzyme, exchange rates were similar between oxidized high-spin camphor-bound and reduced camphor- and CO-bound CYP101 (CYP-S and CYP-S-CO, respectively). However, in regions of the protein that have previously been implicated in substrate access by structural and molecular dynamics investigations, the reduced enzyme shows significantly slower exchange rates than the oxidized CYP-S. This observation corresponds to increased flexibility of the oxidized enzyme relative to the reduced form. Structural features previously found to be perturbed in CYP-S-CO upon binding of the biologically relevant effector and reductant putidaredoxin (Pdx) as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance are also more protected from exchange in the reduced state. To our knowledge, this study represents the first experimental investigation of backbone dynamics within the P450 family using this methodology. PMID:18023482

  17. Surface nanobubble nucleation dynamics during water-ethanol exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chon U.; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2015-11-01

    Water-ethanol exchange has been a promising nucleation method for surface attached nanobubbles since their discovery. In this process, water and ethanol displace each other sequentially on a substrate. As the gas solubility is 36 times higher in ethanol than water, it was suggested that the exchange process leads to transient supersaturation and is responsible for the nanobubble nucleation. In this work, we visualize the nucleation dynamics by controllably mixing water and ethanol. It depicts the temporal evolution of the conventional exchange in a single field of view, detailing the conditions for surface nanobubble nucleation and the flow field that influences their spatial organization. This technique can also pattern surface nanobubbles with variable size distribution.

  18. Australian Universities' Strategic Goals of Student Exchange and Participation Rates in Outbound Exchange Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Amanda; Barker, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    International student exchange programmes are acknowledged as one aspect of a broader suite of internationalisation strategies aimed at enhancing students' intercultural understanding and competence. The decision to participate in an exchange programme is dependent on both individual and contextual factors such as student exchange policies and…

  19. Dynamic Line Rating: Research and Policy Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Jake P. Gentle; Kurt S. Myers; Michael R. West

    2014-07-01

    Dynamic Line Rating (DLR) is a smart grid technology that allows the rating of electrical conductors to be increased based on local weather conditions. Overhead lines are conventionally given a conservative rating based on worst case scenarios. We demonstrate that observing the conditions in real time leads to additional capacity and safer operation. This paper provides a report of a pioneering scheme in the United States of America in which DLR has been applied. Thereby, we demonstrate that observing the local weather conditions in real time leads to additional capacity and safer operation. Secondly, we discuss limitations involved. In doing so, we arrive at novel insights which will inform and improve future DLR projects. Third, we provide a policy background and discussion to clarify the technology’s potential and identifies barriers to the imminent adoption of dynamic line rating systems. We provide suggestions for regulatory bodies about possible improvements in policy to encourage adoption of this beneficial technology.

  20. Multifractality and value-at-risk forecasting of exchange rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batten, Jonathan A.; Kinateder, Harald; Wagner, Niklas

    2014-05-01

    This paper addresses market risk prediction for high frequency foreign exchange rates under nonlinear risk scaling behaviour. We use a modified version of the multifractal model of asset returns (MMAR) where trading time is represented by the series of volume ticks. Our dataset consists of 138,418 5-min round-the-clock observations of EUR/USD spot quotes and trading ticks during the period January 5, 2006 to December 31, 2007. Considering fat-tails, long-range dependence as well as scale inconsistency with the MMAR, we derive out-of-sample value-at-risk (VaR) forecasts and compare our approach to historical simulation as well as a benchmark GARCH(1,1) location-scale VaR model. Our findings underline that the multifractal properties in EUR/USD returns in fact have notable risk management implications. The MMAR approach is a parsimonious model which produces admissible VaR forecasts at the 12-h forecast horizon. For the daily horizon, the MMAR outperforms both alternatives based on conditional as well as unconditional coverage statistics.

  1. Hyporheic exchange controlled by dynamic hydrologic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmadel, Noah M.; Ward, Adam S.; Lowry, Christopher S.; Malzone, Jonathan M.

    2016-05-01

    The relative roles of dynamic hydrologic forcing and geomorphology as controls on the timescales and magnitudes of stream-aquifer exchange and hyporheic flow paths are unknown but required for management of stream corridors. We developed a comprehensive framework relating diel hydrologic fluctuations to hyporheic exchange in the absence of geomorphic complexity. We simulated groundwater flow through an aquifer bounded by a straight stream and hillslope and under time-varying boundary conditions. We found that diel fluctuations can produce hyporheic flow path lengths and residence times that span orders of magnitude. With these results, hyporheic flow path residence times and lengths can be predicted from the timing and magnitude of diel fluctuations and valley slope. Finally, we demonstrated that dynamic hydrologic boundary conditions can produce spatial and temporal scales of hyporheic flow paths equivalent to those driven by many well-studied geomorphic features, indicating that these controls must be considered together in future efforts of upscaling to stream networks.

  2. Replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid peptide aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecchini, M.; Rao, F.; Seeber, M.; Caflisch, A.

    2004-12-01

    The replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) approach is applied to four oligomeric peptide systems. At physiologically relevant temperature values REMD samples conformation space and aggregation transitions more efficiently than constant temperature molecular dynamics (CTMD). During the aggregation process the energetic and structural properties are essentially the same in REMD and CTMD. A condensation stage toward disordered aggregates precedes the β-sheet formation. Two order parameters, borrowed from anisotropic fluid analysis, are used to monitor the aggregation process. The order parameters do not depend on the peptide sequence and length and therefore allow to compare the amyloidogenic propensity of different peptides.

  3. Glucans monomer-exchange dynamics as an open chemical network.

    PubMed

    Rao, Riccardo; Lacoste, David; Esposito, Massimiliano

    2015-12-28

    We describe the oligosaccharides-exchange dynamics performed by the so-called D-enzymes on polysaccharides. To mimic physiological conditions, we treat this process as an open chemical network by assuming some of the polymer concentrations fixed (chemostatting). We show that three different long-time behaviors may ensue: equilibrium states, nonequilibrium steady states, and continuous growth states. We dynamically and thermodynamically characterize these states and emphasize the crucial role of conservation laws in identifying the chemostatting conditions inducing them. PMID:26723707

  4. NASA data exchange standards for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Matthew

    1993-01-01

    This paper covers the following topics in viewgraph format: purpose of data exchange standards; data exchange in engineering analysis/CFD; geometry data exchange through existing product data exchange standards, NASA Data Exchange Committee, and NASA-IGES (Initial Graphics Exchange Specification); CFD grid and solution data exchange; and data exchange for multi-disciplinary engineering.

  5. Design and simulation of heat exchangers using Aspen HYSYS, and Aspen exchanger design and rating for paddy drying application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janaun, J.; Kamin, N. H.; Wong, K. H.; Tham, H. J.; Kong, V. V.; Farajpourlar, M.

    2016-06-01

    Air heating unit is one of the most important parts in paddy drying to ensure the efficiency of a drying process. In addition, an optimized air heating unit does not only promise a good paddy quality, but also save more for the operating cost. This study determined the suitable and best specifications heating unit to heat air for paddy drying in the LAMB dryer. In this study, Aspen HYSYS v7.3 was used to obtain the minimum flow rate of hot water needed. The resulting data obtained from Aspen HYSYS v7.3 were used in Aspen Exchanger Design and Rating (EDR) to generate heat exchanger design and costs. The designs include shell and tubes and plate heat exchanger. The heat exchanger was designed in order to produce various drying temperatures of 40, 50, 60 and 70°C of air with different flow rate, 300, 2500 and 5000 LPM. The optimum condition for the heat exchanger were found to be plate heat exchanger with 0.6 mm plate thickness, 198.75 mm plate width, 554.8 mm plate length and 11 numbers of plates operating at 5000 LPM air flow rate.

  6. G-register exchange dynamics in guanine quadruplexes

    PubMed Central

    Harkness, Robert W.; Mittermaier, Anthony K.

    2016-01-01

    G-quadruplexes (GQs) are 4-stranded DNA structures formed by tracts of stacked, Hoogsteen-hydrogen bonded guanosines. GQs are found in gene promoters and telomeres where they regulate gene transcription and telomere elongation. Though GQ structures are well-characterized, many aspects of their conformational dynamics are poorly understood. For example, when there are surplus guanosines in some of the tracts, they can slide with respect to one another, a process we term G-register (GR) exchange. These motions could in principle entropically stabilize the folded state, crucially benefitting GQs as their stabilities are closely tied to biological function. We have developed a method for characterizing GR exchange where each isomer in the wild-type conformational ensemble is trapped by mutation and thermal denaturation data for the set of trapped mutants and wild-type are analyzed simultaneously. This yields GR isomer populations as a function of temperature, quantifies conformational entropy and sheds light on correlated sliding motions of the G-tracts. We measured entropic stabilizations from GR exchange up to 14.3 ± 1.6 J mol−1 K−1, with melting temperature increases up to 7.3 ± 1.6°C. Furthermore, bioinformatic analysis suggests a majority of putative human GQ sequences are capable of GR exchange, pointing to the generality of this phenomenon. PMID:27060139

  7. G-register exchange dynamics in guanine quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Harkness, Robert W; Mittermaier, Anthony K

    2016-05-01

    G-quadruplexes (GQs) are 4-stranded DNA structures formed by tracts of stacked, Hoogsteen-hydrogen bonded guanosines. GQs are found in gene promoters and telomeres where they regulate gene transcription and telomere elongation. Though GQ structures are well-characterized, many aspects of their conformational dynamics are poorly understood. For example, when there are surplus guanosines in some of the tracts, they can slide with respect to one another, a process we term G-register (GR) exchange. These motions could in principle entropically stabilize the folded state, crucially benefitting GQs as their stabilities are closely tied to biological function. We have developed a method for characterizing GR exchange where each isomer in the wild-type conformational ensemble is trapped by mutation and thermal denaturation data for the set of trapped mutants and wild-type are analyzed simultaneously. This yields GR isomer populations as a function of temperature, quantifies conformational entropy and sheds light on correlated sliding motions of the G-tracts. We measured entropic stabilizations from GR exchange up to 14.3 ± 1.6 J mol(-1) K(-1), with melting temperature increases up to 7.3 ± 1.6°C. Furthermore, bioinformatic analysis suggests a majority of putative human GQ sequences are capable of GR exchange, pointing to the generality of this phenomenon. PMID:27060139

  8. Biased Brownian dynamics for rate constant calculation.

    PubMed

    Zou, G; Skeel, R D; Subramaniam, S

    2000-08-01

    An enhanced sampling method-biased Brownian dynamics-is developed for the calculation of diffusion-limited biomolecular association reaction rates with high energy or entropy barriers. Biased Brownian dynamics introduces a biasing force in addition to the electrostatic force between the reactants, and it associates a probability weight with each trajectory. A simulation loses weight when movement is along the biasing force and gains weight when movement is against the biasing force. The sampling of trajectories is then biased, but the sampling is unbiased when the trajectory outcomes are multiplied by their weights. With a suitable choice of the biasing force, more reacted trajectories are sampled. As a consequence, the variance of the estimate is reduced. In our test case, biased Brownian dynamics gives a sevenfold improvement in central processing unit (CPU) time with the choice of a simple centripetal biasing force. PMID:10919998

  9. Dynamic communities in multichannel data: An application to the foreign exchange market during the 2007-2008 credit crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenn, Daniel J.; Porter, Mason A.; McDonald, Mark; Williams, Stacy; Johnson, Neil F.; Jones, Nick S.

    2009-09-01

    We study the cluster dynamics of multichannel (multivariate) time series by representing their correlations as time-dependent networks and investigating the evolution of network communities. We employ a node-centric approach that allows us to track the effects of the community evolution on the functional roles of individual nodes without having to track entire communities. As an example, we consider a foreign exchange market network in which each node represents an exchange rate and each edge represents a time-dependent correlation between the rates. We study the period 2005-2008, which includes the recent credit and liquidity crisis. Using community detection, we find that exchange rates that are strongly attached to their community are persistently grouped with the same set of rates, whereas exchange rates that are important for the transfer of information tend to be positioned on the edges of communities. Our analysis successfully uncovers major trading changes that occurred in the market during the credit crisis.

  10. Water exchange dynamics around H₃O⁺ and OH⁻ ions

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Santanu; Dang, Liem X.

    2015-05-01

    Proton transfer in water and other solvents is a complicated process and an active research area. Conformational changes of water hydrating a proton can have a significant influence on proton dynamics. A hydrated proton leads to H₃O⁺ that forms three hydrogen bonds with neighboring water molecules. In this letter, we report the first computer simulation of the dynamics of water exchanging between the first and second solvation shells of H₃O⁺. Employing different rate theories for chemical reactions such as the transition state theory, the Grote-Hynes theory, the reactive flux method, and the Impey-Madden-McDonald method, we calculate the solvent exchange rates from molecular dynamics simulations that account for explicit polarization effects. In addition, we also study water exchanges around OH⁻ and find that the corresponding time scale (~50 picoseconds [ps]) is much smaller than that for H₃O⁺ (~100 ps). Results from all the rate theories are computed and compared. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  11. DYNACLIPS (DYNAmic CLIPS): A dynamic knowledge exchange tool for intelligent agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cengeloglu, Yilmaz; Khajenoori, Soheil; Linton, Darrell

    1994-01-01

    In a dynamic environment, intelligent agents must be responsive to unanticipated conditions. When such conditions occur, an intelligent agent may have to stop a previously planned and scheduled course of actions and replan, reschedule, start new activities and initiate a new problem solving process to successfully respond to the new conditions. Problems occur when an intelligent agent does not have enough knowledge to properly respond to the new situation. DYNACLIPS is an implementation of a framework for dynamic knowledge exchange among intelligent agents. Each intelligent agent is a CLIPS shell and runs a separate process under SunOS operating system. Intelligent agents can exchange facts, rules, and CLIPS commands at run time. Knowledge exchange among intelligent agents at run times does not effect execution of either sender and receiver intelligent agent. Intelligent agents can keep the knowledge temporarily or permanently. In other words, knowledge exchange among intelligent agents would allow for a form of learning to be accomplished.

  12. Dynamic heart rate measurements from video sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yong-Poh; Raveendran, P.; Lim, Chern-Loon

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows how dynamic heart rate measurements that are typically obtained from sensors mounted near to the heart can also be obtained from video sequences. In this study, two experiments are carried out where a video camera captures the facial images of the seven subjects. The first experiment involves the measurement of subjects’ increasing heart rates (79 to 150 beats per minute (BPM)) while cycling whereas the second involves falling heart beats (153 to 88 BPM). In this study, independent component analysis (ICA) is combined with mutual information to ensure accuracy is not compromised in the use of short video duration. While both experiments are going on measures of heartbeat using the Polar heart rate monitor is also taken to compare with the findings of the proposed method. Overall experimental results show the proposed method can be used to measure dynamic heart rates where the root mean square error (RMSE) and the correlation coefficient are 1.88 BPM and 0.99 respectively. PMID:26203374

  13. Quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer with hyperpolarized nuclei (qHyper-CEST): Sensing xenon-host exchange dynamics and binding affinities by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Kunth, M. Witte, C.; Schröder, L.

    2014-11-21

    The reversible binding of xenon to host molecules has found numerous applications in nuclear magnetic resonance studies. Quantitative characterization of the Xe exchange dynamics is important to understand and optimize the physico-chemical behavior of such Xe hosts, but is often challenging to achieve at low host concentrations. We have investigated a sensitive quantification technique based on chemical exchange saturation transfer with hyperpolarized nuclei, qHyper-CEST. Using simulated signals we demonstrated that qHyper-CEST yielded accurate and precise results and was robust in the presence of large amounts of noise (10%). This is of particular importance for samples with completely unknown exchange rates. Using these findings we experimentally determined the following exchange parameters for the Xe host cryptophane-A monoacid in dimethyl sulfoxide in one type of experiment: the ratio of bound and free Xe, the Xe exchange rate, the resonance frequencies of free and bound Xe, the Xe host occupancy, and the Xe binding constant. Taken together, qHyper-CEST facilitates sensitive quantification of the Xe exchange dynamics and binding to hydrophobic cavities and has the potential to analyze many different host systems or binding sites. This makes qHyper-CEST an indispensable tool for the efficient design of highly specific biosensors.

  14. Optimized explicit-solvent replica exchange molecular dynamics from scratch.

    PubMed

    Nadler, Walter; Hansmann, Ulrich H E

    2008-08-28

    Replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations have become an important tool to study proteins and other biological molecules in silico. However, such investigations require considerable, and often prohibitive, numerical effort when the molecules are simulated in explicit solvents. In this communication we show that in this case the cost can be minimized by choosing the number of replicas as N(opt) approximately 1+0.594 radical C ln(Tmax/Tmin), where C is the specific heat, and the temperatures distributed according to Ti(opt) approximately T min(Tmax/Tmin)(i-1)/(N-1). PMID:18671362

  15. Dynamically corrected gates for an exchange-only qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, G. T.; Wang, Xin; Kestner, J. P.; Das Sarma, S.

    2013-10-01

    We provide analytical composite pulse sequences that perform dynamical decoupling concurrently with arbitrary rotations for a qubit coded in the spin state of a triple quantum dot. The sequences are designed to respect realistic experimental constraints such as strictly nonnegative couplings. Logical errors and leakage errors are simultaneously corrected. A short pulse sequence is presented to compensate nuclear noise and a longer sequence is presented to simultaneously compensate nuclear and charge noise. The capability developed in this work provides a clear prescription for combatting the relevant sources of noise that currently hinder exchange-only qubit experiments.

  16. Predicting Offender-Generated Exchange Rates: Implications for a Theory of Sentence Severity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, David C.; Wood, Peter B.; Mooney, Jennifer L.; Minor, Kevin I.

    2005-01-01

    We solicited offender-generated exchange rates between prison and several noncustodial sanctions from a sample of 588 offenders currently serving community-based punishments. We then regressed these exchange rates on demographic, attitudinal, and correctional experience indicators. Males, Blacks, older offenders, offenders with prison experience,…

  17. Review of Air Exchange Rate Models for Air Pollution Exposure Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    A critical aspect of air pollution exposure assessments is estimation of the air exchange rate (AER) for various buildings, where people spend their time. The AER, which is rate the exchange of indoor air with outdoor air, is an important determinant for entry of outdoor air pol...

  18. Air-water Gas Exchange Rates on a Large Impounded River Measured Using Floating Domes (Poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mass balance models of dissolved gases in rivers typically serve as the basis for whole-system estimates of greenhouse gas emission rates. An important component of these models is the exchange of dissolved gases between air and water. Controls on gas exchange rates (K) have be...

  19. Heterogeneous effects of oil shocks on exchange rates: evidence from a quantile regression approach.

    PubMed

    Su, Xianfang; Zhu, Huiming; You, Wanhai; Ren, Yinghua

    2016-01-01

    The determinants of exchange rates have attracted considerable attention among researchers over the past several decades. Most studies, however, ignore the possibility that the impact of oil shocks on exchange rates could vary across the exchange rate returns distribution. We employ a quantile regression approach to address this issue. Our results indicate that the effect of oil shocks on exchange rates is heterogeneous across quantiles. A large US depreciation or appreciation tends to heighten the effects of oil shocks on exchange rate returns. Positive oil demand shocks lead to appreciation pressures in oil-exporting countries and this result is robust across lower and upper return distributions. These results offer rich and useful information for investors and decision-makers. PMID:27516925

  20. The Importance of Water Exchange Rates in the Design of Responsive Agents for MRI

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, A. Dean; Wu, Yunkou

    2013-01-01

    The rate of water exchange in lanthanide complexes is often overlooked as an important parameter in the design of responsive MR imaging agents. Most often, the number of inner-sphere water coordination sites or the rotational mobility of the complex are considered as the central theme while water exchange is either assumed to be “fast enough” or entirely ignored. On the other hand, relaxation and shift theories predict that water exchange rates may indeed be the key parameter one should consider in any new molecular design. In this short review, the impact of water exchange rates on three classes of lanthanide-based MRI contrast agents, T1-based relaxation agents, T2 exchange line-broadening agents and chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) agents, is illustrated and discussed. PMID:23333571

  1. The simultaneous measurement of low rates of CO2 and O2 exchange in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Willms, J R; Dowling, A N; Dong, Z M; Hunt, S; Shelp, B J; Layzell, D B

    1997-12-15

    An instrument for measuring low rates of biological O2 exchange using an open-flow gas analysis system is described. A novel differential O2 sensor that is capable of measuring as little as 0.4 Pa O2 against a back-ground of ambient air (20,900 Pa O2), yet has a dynamic range of +/- 2000 Pa O2 (i.e., +/- ca. 2% O2) is described. Baseline drift was typically less than 0.025 Pa min-1. The differential O2 sensor was incorporated into a respiratory quotient/photosynthetic quotient analyzer that contained other environmental sensors for atmospheric pressure, absolute O2 and CO2 concentration, temperature of the differential O2 sensor block, and differential pressure between reference and sample streams. Protocols for how these sensors can be used to calibrate the differential O2 sensor and to improve its stability with time are described. Together, the differential O2 sensor, the environmental sensors, and the simple calibration techniques allow for simultaneous, noninvasive, and accurate measurements of O2 and CO2 exchange in tissues with metabolic rates as low as about 0.1 mumol O2 or CO2 h-1. Example data are provided in which O2 differentials of 3 to 41 Pa O2 were measured in an open-flow system. PMID:9417789

  2. [A comparative study of external respiration, gas exchange and circulation during static and dynamic muscular loads].

    PubMed

    Bubeev, Iu A; Khomenko, M N; Poliukhovich, V V; Remizov, Iu I

    1995-01-01

    Indices of external breathing, gas exchange, and circulation were studied during bicycle ergometry and static ergometry of 19 healthy male volunteers which were stopped at critical levels of heart rate, arterial pressure, ECG or subjective fatigue. The bicycle workload maximum averaged 210 Watts, the static ergometric, 224 kg/s. Both types of exercises were characterized by unidirectional shifting of the external breathing and gas exchange indices; however, they were less pronounced at static loads. Arterial pressure and resistance of the peripheral vessels were the only indices of the array the dynamics of which complied with and even exceeded that during bicycling. In contrast to the dynamic muscular load, the maximal dynamics of gas exchange and external breathing during static ergometric workload was observed in the rehabilitation period following restoration of muscle blood flow; this must be taken into account in interpretation of test results. It is concluded that high information virtues of the static ergometric test in the context of predicting aerobatic load tolerance, and similarity of dynamics in the period of rehabilitation hold much promise for using the tests with static muscular loading in aviation and space medicine. PMID:8664858

  3. TIME-VARYING DYNAMICAL STAR FORMATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eve J.; Chang, Philip; Murray, Norman

    2015-02-10

    We present numerical evidence of dynamic star formation in which the accreted stellar mass grows superlinearly with time, roughly as t {sup 2}. We perform simulations of star formation in self-gravitating hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence that is continuously driven. By turning the self-gravity of the gas in the simulations on or off, we demonstrate that self-gravity is the dominant physical effect setting the mass accretion rate at early times before feedback effects take over, contrary to theories of turbulence-regulated star formation. We find that gravitational collapse steepens the density profile around stars, generating the power-law tail on what is otherwise a lognormal density probability distribution function. Furthermore, we find turbulent velocity profiles to flatten inside collapsing regions, altering the size-line width relation. This local flattening reflects enhancements of turbulent velocity on small scales, as verified by changes to the velocity power spectra. Our results indicate that gas self-gravity dynamically alters both density and velocity structures in clouds, giving rise to a time-varying star formation rate. We find that a substantial fraction of the gas that forms stars arrives via low-density flows, as opposed to accreting through high-density filaments.

  4. Estimating long-run equilibrium real exchange rates: short-lived shocks with long-lived impacts on Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Zardad, Asma; Mohsin, Asma; Zaman, Khalid

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the factors that affect real exchange rate volatility for Pakistan through the co-integration and error correction model over a 30-year time period, i.e. between 1980 and 2010. The study employed the autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (ARCH), generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (GARCH) and Vector Error Correction model (VECM) to estimate the changes in the volatility of real exchange rate series, while an error correction model was used to determine the short-run dynamics of the system. The study is limited to a few variables i.e., productivity differential (i.e., real GDP per capita relative to main trading partner); terms of trade; trade openness and government expenditures in order to manage robust data. The result indicates that real effective exchange rate (REER) has been volatile around its equilibrium level; while, the speed of adjustment is relatively slow. VECM results confirm long run convergence of real exchange rate towards its equilibrium level. Results from ARCH and GARCH estimation shows that real shocks volatility persists, so that shocks die out rather slowly, and lasting misalignment seems to have occurred. PMID:23853758

  5. Thermostat artifacts in replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Rosta, Edina; Buchete, Nicolae-Viorel; Hummer, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    We explore the effects of thermostats in replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations. For thermostats that do not produce a canonical ensemble, REMD simulations are found to distort the configuration-space distributions. For bulk water, we find small deviations of the average potential energies, the buildup of tails in the potential energy distributions, and artificial correlations between the energies at different temperatures. If a solute is present, as in protein folding simulations, its conformational equilibrium can be altered. In REMD simulations of a helix-forming peptide with a weak-coupling (Berendsen) thermostat, we find that the folded state is overpopulated by about 10% at low temperatures, and underpopulated at high temperatures. As a consequence, the enthalpy of folding deviates by almost 3 kcal/mol from the correct value. The reason for this population shift is that non-canonical ensembles with narrowed potential energy fluctuations artificially bias toward replica exchanges between low-energy folded structures at the high temperature and high-energy unfolded structures at the low temperature. We conclude that REMD simulations should only be performed in conjunction with thermostats that produce a canonical ensemble. PMID:20046980

  6. Thermostat artifacts in replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Rosta, Edina; Buchete, Nicolae-Viorel; Hummer, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    We explore the effects of thermostats in replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations. For thermostats that do not produce a canonical ensemble, REMD simulations are found to distort the configuration-space distributions. For bulk water, we find small deviations of the average potential energies, the buildup of tails in the potential energy distributions, and artificial correlations between the energies at different temperatures. If a solute is present, as in protein folding simulations, its conformational equilibrium can be altered. In REMD simulations of a helix-forming peptide with a weak-coupling (Berendsen) thermostat, we find that the folded state is overpopulated by about 10% at low temperatures, and underpopulated at high temperatures. As a consequence, the enthalpy of folding deviates by almost 3 kcal/mol from the correct value. The reason for this population shift is that non-canonical ensembles with narrowed potential energy fluctuations artificially bias toward replica exchanges between low-energy folded structures at the high temperature and high-energy unfolded structures at the low temperature. We conclude that REMD simulations should only be performed in conjunction with thermostats that produce a canonical ensemble. PMID:20046980

  7. Wealth distribution of simple exchange models coupled with extremal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagatella-Flores, N.; Rodríguez-Achach, M.; Coronel-Brizio, H. F.; Hernández-Montoya, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Punctuated Equilibrium (PE) states that after long periods of evolutionary quiescence, species evolution can take place in short time intervals, where sudden differentiation makes new species emerge and some species extinct. In this paper, we introduce and study the effect of punctuated equilibrium on two different asset exchange models: the yard sale model (YS, winner gets a random fraction of a poorer player's wealth) and the theft and fraud model (TF, winner gets a random fraction of the loser's wealth). The resulting wealth distribution is characterized using the Gini index. In order to do this, we consider PE as a perturbation with probability ρ of being applied. We compare the resulting values of the Gini index at different increasing values of ρ in both models. We found that in the case of the TF model, the Gini index reduces as the perturbation ρ increases, not showing dependence with the agents number. While for YS we observe a phase transition which happens around ρc = 0.79. For perturbations ρ <ρc the Gini index reaches the value of one as time increases (an extreme wealth condensation state), whereas for perturbations greater than or equal to ρc the Gini index becomes different to one, avoiding the system reaches this extreme state. We show that both simple exchange models coupled with PE dynamics give more realistic results. In particular for YS, we observe a power low decay of wealth distribution.

  8. Dynamic Group Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange under standard assumptions

    SciTech Connect

    Bresson, Emmanuel; Chevassut, Olivier; Pointcheval, David

    2002-02-14

    Authenticated Diffie-Hellman key exchange allows two principals communicating over a public network, and each holding public-private keys, to agree on a shared secret value. In this paper we study the natural extension of this cryptographic problem to a group of principals. We begin from existing formal security models and refine them to incorporate major missing details (e.g., strong-corruption and concurrent sessions). Within this model we define the execution of a protocol for authenticated dynamic group Diffie-Hellman and show that it is provably secure under the decisional Diffie-Hellman assumption. Our security result holds in the standard model and thus provides better security guarantees than previously published results in the random oracle model.

  9. Gas exchange rates of potato stands for bioregenerative life support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.; Stutte, Gary W.; Mackowiak, Cheryl L.; Yorio, Neil C.; Sager, John C.; Knott, William M.

    Plants can provide a means for removing carbon dioxide (CO2) while generating oxygen (O2) and clean water for life support systems in space. To study this, 20 m2 stands of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) plants were grown in a large (113 m3 vol.), atmospherically closed chamber. Photosynthetic uptake of CO2 by the stands was detected about 10 DAP (days after planting), after which photosynthetic rates rose rapidly as stand ground cover and total light interception increased. Photosynthetic rates peaked ca. 50 DAP near 45 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1 under 865 μmol m-2 s-1 PPF (average photosynthetic photon flux), and near 35 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1 under 655 μmol m-2 s-1 PPF. Short term changes in PPF caused a linear response in stand photosynthetic rates up to 1100 μmol m-2 s-1 PPF, with a light compensation point of 185 μmol m-2 s-1 PPF. Comparisons of stand photosynthetic rates at different CO2 concentrations showed a classic C3 response, with saturation occurring near 1200 μmol mol-1 CO2 and compensation near 100 μmol mol-1 CO2. In one study, the photoperiod was changed from 12 h light/12 h dark to continuous light at 58 DAP. This caused a decrease in net photosynthetic rates within 48 h and eventual damage (scorching) of upper canopy leaves, suggesting the abrupt change stressed the plants and/or caused feedback effects on photosynthesis. Dark period (night) respiration rates increased during early growth as standing biomass increased and peaked near 9 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1 ca. 50 DAP, after which rates declined gradually with age. Stand transpiration showed a rapid rise with canopy ground cover and peaked ca. 50 DAP near 8.9 L m-2 d-1 under 860 μmol m-2 s-1 PPF and near 6.3 L m-2 d-1 under 650 μmol m-2 s-1 PPF. Based on the best photosynthetic rates from these studies, approximately 25 m2 of potato plants under continuous cultivation would be required to support the CO2 removal and O2 requirements for one person.

  10. PEE-PEO block copolymer exchange rate between micelles is detergent and temperature activated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schantz, Allen; Saboe, Patrick; Lee, Hee-Young; Sines, Ian; Butler, Paul; Bishop, Kyle; Maranas, Janna; Kumar, Manish

    We examine the kinetics of polymer chain exchange between polymer/detergent micelles, a system relevant to the synthesis of protein-containing biomimetic membranes. Although chain exchange between polymer aggregates in water is too slow to observe, adding detergent allows us to determine chain exchange rates using time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering (TR-SANS). We examine a membrane-protein-relevant, vesicle-forming ultra-short polymer, Poly(ethyl ethylene)20-Poly(ethylene oxide)18 (PEE20-PEO18). PEE20-PEO18 is solubilized in mixed micelles with the membrane-protein-compatible non-ionic detergent octyl- β -D-glucoside (OG). We show that OG activates block copolymer exchange, and obtain rate constants at two detergent concentrations above the CMC (critical micellar concentration) of OG. We find that chain exchange increases two orders of magnitude when temperature increases from 308 to 338 K, and that even a 1 mg/mL increase in OG concentration leads to a noticeable increase in exchange rate. We also calculate the activation energy for chain exchange and find that it is much higher than for lipid exchange. These findings explain the need for high detergent concentration and/or temperature to synthesize densely packed polymer/protein membranes.

  11. Trade balance instability and the optimal exchange rate regime: The case of OPEC countries

    SciTech Connect

    Aljerrah, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    The OPEC members have experienced wide fluctuations in their trade balances. This can be attributed to several factors: (1) heavy dependence of national income and export earnings on a single primary export-oil; (2) instability of price and world demand for oil; and (3) the exchange rate regime practiced in recent years. An exchange rate policy can be used to minimize the fluctuations in trade balance, given the changes in exchange rates of major international currencies. The purpose of this study is two fold; first, examine the effects of fluctuations in trade balance on the OPEC economies, and second, propose appropriate exchange rate regime for selected OPEC members. The study is divided into two parts. The first part demonstrates the impact of trade balance changes on national income and other macroeconomic variables using a Keynesian framework. The second part involves using conventional trade models to search for the appropriate exchange rate regime to minimize the fluctuations in trade balance of each selective country. The study's findings are: first, fluctuations in trade balances had negative effects on the economics of Algeria, Kuwait, Libya, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. Second, the current exchange rate regime of no sample country is optimal in minimizing trade balance fluctuations. Third, in contrast to expectations, U.S. dollar peg did not stabilize the trade balance of any OPEC member. Finally, the results show that the sample OPEC economies could have enjoyed faster - though with different degree - economic growth if they had pegged their currencies to the derived optimal exchange rate regime. These optimal exchange rate regimes are: the SDR for Algeria and the United Arab Emirates, the purchasing power parity for Libya and Saudi Arabia, and the real Yen for Kuwait.

  12. Forecasting of magnitude and duration of currency crises based on the analysis of distortions of fractal scaling in exchange rate fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uritskaya, Olga Y.

    2005-05-01

    Results of fractal stability analysis of daily exchange rate fluctuations of more than 30 floating currencies for a 10-year period are presented. It is shown for the first time that small- and large-scale dynamical instabilities of national monetary systems correlate with deviations of the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) exponent from the value 1.5 predicted by the efficient market hypothesis. The observed dependence is used for classification of long-term stability of floating exchange rates as well as for revealing various forms of distortion of stable currency dynamics prior to large-scale crises. A normal range of DFA exponents consistent with crisis-free long-term exchange rate fluctuations is determined, and several typical scenarios of unstable currency dynamics with DFA exponents fluctuating beyond the normal range are identified. It is shown that monetary crashes are usually preceded by prolonged periods of abnormal (decreased or increased) DFA exponent, with the after-crash exponent tending to the value 1.5 indicating a more reliable exchange rate dynamics. Statistically significant regression relations (R=0.99, p<0.01) between duration and magnitude of currency crises and the degree of distortion of monofractal patterns of exchange rate dynamics are found. It is demonstrated that the parameters of these relations characterizing small- and large-scale crises are nearly equal, which implies a common instability mechanism underlying these events. The obtained dependences have been used as a basic ingredient of a forecasting technique which provided correct in-sample predictions of monetary crisis magnitude and duration over various time scales. The developed technique can be recommended for real-time monitoring of dynamical stability of floating exchange rate systems and creating advanced early-warning-system models for currency crisis prevention.

  13. Rate theory of solvent exchange and kinetics of Li(+) - BF4 (-)/PF6 (-) ion pairs in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Dang, Liem X; Chang, Tsun-Mei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we describe our efforts to apply rate theories in studies of solvent exchange around Li(+) and the kinetics of ion pairings in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). We report one of the first computer simulations of the exchange dynamics around solvated Li(+) in acetonitrile (ACN), which is a common solvent used in LIBs. We also provide details of the ion-pairing kinetics of Li(+)-[BF4] and Li(+)-[PF6] in ACN. Using our polarizable force-field models and employing classical rate theories of chemical reactions, we examine the ACN exchange process between the first and second solvation shells around Li(+). We calculate exchange rates using transition state theory and weighted them with the transmission coefficients determined by the reactive flux, Impey, Madden, and McDonald approaches, and Grote-Hynes theory. We found the relaxation times changed from 180 ps to 4600 ps and from 30 ps to 280 ps for Li(+)-[BF4] and Li(+)-[PF6] ion pairs, respectively. These results confirm that the solvent response to the kinetics of ion pairing is significant. Our results also show that, in addition to affecting the free energy of solvation into ACN, the anion type also should significantly influence the kinetics of ion pairing. These results will increase our understanding of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of LIB systems. PMID:27608999

  14. Experimental studies of alunite: II. Rates of alunite-water alkali and isotope exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoffregen, R.E.; Rye, R.O.; Wasserman, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    Rates of alkali exchange between alunite and water have been measured in hydrothermal experiments of 1 hour to 259 days duration at 150 to 400??C. Examination of run products by scanning electron microscope indicates that the reaction takes place by dissolution-reprecipitation. This exchange is modeled with an empirical rate equation which assumes a linear decrease in mineral surface area with percent exchange (f) and a linear dependence of the rate on the square root of the affinity for the alkali exchange reaction. This equation provides a good fit of the experimental data for f = 17% to 90% and yields log rate constants which range from -6.25 moles alkali m-2s-1 at 400??C to - 11.7 moles alkali m-2s-1 at 200??C. The variation in these rates with temperature is given by the equation log k* = -8.17(1000/T(K)) + 5.54 (r2 = 0.987) which yields an activation energy of 37.4 ?? 1.5 kcal/mol. For comparison, data from O'Neil and Taylor (1967) and Merigoux (1968) modeled with a pseudo-second-order rate expression give an activation energy of 36.1 ?? 2.9 kcal/mol for alkali-feldspar water Na-K exchange. In the absence of coupled alkali exchange, oxygen isotope exchange between alunite and water also occurs by dissolution-reprecipitation but rates are one to three orders of magnitude lower than those for alkali exchange. In fine-grained alunites, significant D-H exchange occurs by hydrogen diffusion at temperatures as low as 100??C. Computed hydrogen diffusion coefficients range from -15.7 to -17.3 cm2s-1 and suggest that the activation energy for hydrogen diffusion may be as low as 6 kcal/mol. These experiments indicate that rates of alkali exchange in the relatively coarse-grained alunites typical of hydrothermal ore deposits are insignificant, and support the reliability of K-Ar age data from such samples. However, the fine-grained alunites typical of low temperature settings may be susceptible to limited alkali exchange at surficial conditions which could cause

  15. Riparian hydraulic gradient and stream-groundwater exchange dynamics in steep headwater valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voltz, Thomas; Gooseff, Michael; Ward, Adam S.; Singha, Kamini; Fitzgerald, Michael; Wagener, Thorsten

    2013-06-01

    of riparian hydraulic gradients and stream-groundwater exchange in headwater catchments provide the hydrologic context for important ecological processes. Although the controls are relatively well understood, their dynamics during periods of hydrologic change is not. We investigate riparian hydraulic gradients over three different time scales in two steep, forested, headwater catchments in Oregon (WS01 and WS03) to determine the potential controls of reach-scale valley slope and cross-sectional valley geometry. Groundwater and stream stage data collected at high spatial and temporal resolutions over a period encompassing a 1.25 year storm and subsequent seasonal baseflow recession indicate that hydraulic gradients in both riparian aquifers exhibit strong persistence of down-valley dominance. Responses to rainfall do not support the simple conceptual models of increased riparian hydraulic gradient toward streams. Hydraulic gradient response in WS01 to both the seasonal baseflow recession and the storm suggested the potential for increased stream-groundwater exchange, but there was less evidence for this in WS03. Results from four constant-rate tracer injections in each stream showed a high baseline level of exchange overall, and both a slight seasonal increase (WS01) and slight decrease (WS03) in the riparian intrusion of tracer-labeled stream water as stream discharge receded. These results indicate that steep headwater valley floors host extensive stream water exchange and very little change in the water table gradients over 3 orders of magnitude of stream discharge.

  16. Experiments probing the influence of air exchange rates on secondary organic aerosols derived from indoor chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weschler, Charles J.; Shields, Helen C.

    Reactions between ozone and terpenes have been shown to increase the concentrations of submicron particles in indoor settings. The present study was designed to examine the influence of air exchange rates on the concentrations of these secondary organic aerosols as well as on the evolution of their particle size distributions. The experiments were performed in a manipulated office setting containing a constant source of d-limonene and an ozone generator that was remotely turned "on" or "off" at 6 h intervals. The particle number concentrations were monitored using an optical particle counter with eight-channels ranging from 0.1-0.2 to>2.0 μm diameter. The air exchange rates during the experiments were either high (working hours) or low (non-working hours) and ranged from 1.6 to>12 h -1, with intermediate exchange rates. Given the emission rates of ozone and d-limonene used in these studies, at an air exchange rate of 1.6 h -1 particle number concentration in the 0.1-0.2 μm size-range peaked 1.2 h after the ozone generator was switched on. In the ensuing 4.8 h particle counts increased in successive size-ranges up to the 0.5-0.7 μm diameter range. At higher air exchange rates, the resulting concentrations of total particles and particle mass (calculated from particle counts) were smaller, and at exchange rates exceeding 12 h -1, no excess particle formation was detectable with the instrument used in this study. Particle size evolved through accretion and, in some cases, coagulation. There was evidence for coagulation among particles in the smallest size-range at low air exchange rates (high particle concentrations) but no evidence of coagulation was apparent at higher air exchange rates (lower particle concentrations). At higher air exchange rates the particle count or size distributions were shifted towards smaller particle diameters and less time was required to achieve the maximum concentration in each of the size-ranges where discernable particle growth

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of transducin: interdomain and front to back communication in activation and nucleotide exchange.

    PubMed

    Ceruso, Marc A; Periole, Xavier; Weinstein, Harel

    2004-04-30

    The dynamic events that underlie the nucleotide exchange process for the Galpha subunit of transducin (Galpha(t)) were studied with nanosecond time-scale molecular dynamics simulations. The modeled systems include the active and inactive forms of the wild-type Galpha(t) and three of its mutants (GDP-bound form only): F332A, A322S, and Q326A that are known to exhibit various degrees of enhancement of their basal and receptor-catalyzed rates of nucleotide exchange (150-fold, 70-fold and WT-like, respectively). The results of these computational experiments reveal a number of nucleotide-dependent structural and dynamic changes (involving the alpha(B)-alpha(C) loop, the inter-domain orientation of the helical and GTPase domains and the alpha(5) helix) that were not observed in the various crystal structures of Galpha(t). Notably, the results show the existence of a front to back communication device (involving the beta(2)-beta(3) hairpin, the alpha(1) helix and the alpha(5) helix), strategically located near all elements susceptible to be involved in receptor-mediated activation/nucleotide exchange. The wild-type simulations suggest that the dynamic interplay between the elements of this device would be critical for the activation of the Galpha(t) subunit. This inference is confirmed by the results of the computational experiments on the mutants that show that even in their GDP-bound forms, the A322S and F332A mutants acquire an "active-like" structure and dynamics phenotype. The same is not true for the Q326A mutant whose structural and dynamic properties remain similar to those of the GDP-bound WT. Taken together the results suggest a nucleotide exchange mechanism, analogous to that found in the Arf family GTPases, in which a partially activated state, achievable from a receptor-mediated action of the front to back communication device either by displacement of the C-terminal alpha(5) helix, of the N-terminal alpha(N) helix, or of the Gbetagamma subunit, could

  18. Dynamic Distortion Correction for Endoscopy Systems with Exchangeable Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehle, Thomas; Hennes, Michael; Gross, Sebastian; Behrens, Alexander; Wulff, Jonas; Aach, Til

    Endoscopic images are strongly affected by lens distortion caused by the use of wide angle lenses. In case of endoscopy systems with exchangeable optics, e.g. in bladder endoscopy or sinus endoscopy, the camera sensor and the optics do not form a rigid system but they can be shifted and rotated with respect to each other during an examination. This flexibility has a major impact on the location of the distortion centre as it is moved along with the optics. In this paper, we describe an algorithm for the dynamic correction of lens distortion in cystoscopy which is based on a one time calibration. For the compensation, we combine a conventional static method for distortion correction with an algorithm to detect the position and the orientation of the elliptic field of view. This enables us to estimate the position of the distortion centre according to the relative movement of camera and optics. Therewith, a distortion correction for arbitrary rotation angles and shifts becomes possible without performing static calibrations for every possible combination of shifts and angles beforehand.

  19. Three dimensional dynamics of a flexible Motorised Momentum Exchange Tether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, N. A.; Cartmell, M. P.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a new flexural model for the three dimensional dynamics of the Motorised Momentum Exchange Tether (MMET) concept. This study has uncovered the relationships between planar and nonplanar motions, and the effect of the coupling between these two parameters on pragmatic circular and elliptical orbits. The tether sub-spans are modelled as stiffened strings governed by partial differential equations of motion, with specific boundary conditions. The tether sub-spans are flexible and elastic, thereby allowing three dimensional displacements. The boundary conditions lead to a specific frequency equation and the eigenvalues from this provide the natural frequencies of the orbiting flexible motorised tether when static, accelerating in monotonic spin, and at terminal angular velocity. A rotation transformation matrix has been utilised to get the position vectors of the system's components in an assumed inertial frame. Spatio-temporal coordinates are transformed to modal coordinates before applying Lagrange's equations, and pre-selected linear modes are included to generate the equations of motion. The equations of motion contain inertial nonlinearities which are essentially of cubic order, and these show the potential for intricate intermodal coupling effects. A simulation of planar and non-planar motions has been undertaken and the differences in the modal responses, for both motions, and between the rigid body and flexible models are highlighted and discussed.

  20. Effect of chelate dynamics on water exchange reactions of paramagnetic aminopolycarboxylate complexes.

    PubMed

    Maigut, Joachim; Meier, Roland; Zahl, Achim; van Eldik, Rudi

    2008-07-01

    Because of our interest in evaluating a possible relationship between complex dynamics and water exchange reactivity, we performed (1)H NMR studies on the paramagnetic aminopolycarboxylate complexes Fe (II)-TMDTA and Fe (II)-CyDTA and their diamagnetic analogues Zn (II)-TMDTA and Zn (II)-CyDTA. Whereas a fast Delta-Lambda isomerization was observed for the TMDTA species, no acetate scrambling between in-plane and out-of-plane positions is accessible for any of the CyDTA complexes because the rigid ligand backbone prevents any configurational changes in the chelate system. In variable-temperature (1)H NMR studies, no evidence of spectral coalescence due to nitrogen inversion was found for any of the complexes in the available temperature range. The TMDTA complexes exhibit the known solution behavior of EDTA, whereas the CyDTA complexes adopt static solution structures. Comparing the exchange kinetics of flexible EDTA-type complexes and static CyDTA complexes appears to be a suitable method for evaluating the effect of ligand dynamics on the overall reactivity. In order to assess information concerning the rates and mechanism of water exchange, we performed variable-temperature and -pressure (17)O NMR studies of Ni (II)-CyDTA, Fe (II)-CyDTA, and Mn (II)-CyDTA. For Ni (II)-CyDTA, no significant effects on line widths or chemical shifts were apparent, indicating either the absence of any chemical exchange or the existence of a very small amount of the water-coordinated complex in solution. For [Fe (II)(CyDTA)(H 2O)] (2-) and [Mn (II)(CyDTA)(H 2O)] (2-), exchange rate constant values of (1.1 +/- 0.3) x 10 (6) and (1.4 +/- 0.2) x 10 (8) s (-1), respectively, at 298 K were determined from fits to resonance-shift and line-broadening data. A relationship between chelate dynamics and reactivity seems to be operative, since the CyDTA complexes exhibited significantly slower reactions than their EDTA counterparts. The variable-pressure (17)O NMR measurements for [Mn (II

  1. RESIDENTIAL AIR EXCHANGE RATES FOR USE IN INDOOR AIR AND EXPOSURE MODELING STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data on air exchange rates are important inputs to indoor air quality models. ndoor air models, in turn, are incorporated into the structure of total human exposure models. ragmentary data on residential ventilation rates are available in various governmental reports, journal art...

  2. Effects of flow rate and temperature on cyclic gas exchange in tsetse flies (Diptera, Glossinidae).

    PubMed

    Terblanche, John S; Chown, Steven L

    2010-05-01

    Air flow rates may confound the investigation and classification of insect gas exchange patterns. Here we report the effects of flow rates (50, 100, 200, 400 ml min(-1)) on gas exchange patterns in wild-caught Glossina morsitans morsitans from Zambia. At rest, G. m. morsitans generally showed continuous or cyclic gas exchange (CGE) but no evidence of discontinuous gas exchange (DGE). Flow rates had little influence on the ability to detect CGE in tsetse, at least in the present experimental setup and under these laboratory conditions. Importantly, faster flow rates resulted in similar gas exchange patterns to those identified at lower flower rates suggesting that G. m. morsitans did not show DGE which had been incorrectly identified as CGE at lower flow rates. While CGE cycle frequency was significantly different among the four flow rates (p<0.05), the direction of effects was inconsistent. Indeed, inter-individual variation in CGE cycle frequency exceeded flow rate treatment variation. Using a laboratory colony of closely related, similar-sized G. morsitans centralis we subsequently investigated the effects of temperature, gender and feeding status on CGE pattern variation since these factors can influence insect metabolic rates. At 100 ml min(-1) CGE was typical of G. m. centralis at rest, although it was significantly more common in females than in males (57% vs. 43% of 14 individuals tested per gender). In either sex, temperature (20, 24, 28 and 32 degrees C) had little influence on the number of individuals showing CGE. However, increases in metabolic rate with temperature were modulated largely by increases in burst volume and cycle frequency. This is unusual among insects showing CGE or DGE patterns because increases in metabolic rate are usually modulated by increases in frequency, but either no change or a decline in burst volume. PMID:20399350

  3. Drug injection rates and needle-exchange use in New York City, 1991-1996.

    PubMed

    Marmor, M; Shore, R E; Titus, S; Chen, X; Des Jarlais, D C

    2000-09-01

    Objectives included (1) to develop methods for identifying injection drug users with accelerating injection habits so they might be referred to counseling and treatment and (2) to investigate behavioral correlates of accelerating injection habits, including syringe-exchange program utilization. Data on drug use, enrollment in methadone maintenance, and demographic variables were obtained from 328 subjects who were seronegative for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who attended anywhere from 4 to 11 quarterly study visits for interview, HIV pretest counseling and risk reduction counseling, and blood donation for HIV antibody testing. Subjects were recalled 2 weeks after each study visit to receive their results and post-test counseling. We characterized subjects according to their patterns of drug injection as accelerating, decelerating, or stable, using intraindividual regression analyses and categorization rules, and by syringe-exchange use as consistent users, sporadic users, or nonusers. The present subjects included 52% with decelerating, 29% with stable, and 19% with accelerating rates of drug injection. There were 128 subjects (39%) who were categorized as consistent users of syringe-exchange programs, 84 (25%) were categorized as sporadic users, and 116 (35%) were categorized as nonusers. All syringe-exchange groups showed significantly decelerating drug injection. Rates of decline were significantly less, however, among consistent syringe-exchange users than sporadic or nonusers of syringe exchanges. Categorical analysis also showed significant differences among groups, with 30% of consistent syringe-exchange program users having accelerating rates of drug injection compared to 9% of nonusers and 17% of sporadic users. That consistent syringe-exchange users included a larger proportion of individuals whose drug habits were accelerating than did sporadic users or nonusers of syringe exchanges suggests a need for improved identification and counseling of

  4. Gas exchange patterns and water loss rates in the Table Mountain cockroach, Aptera fusca (Blattodea: Blaberidae).

    PubMed

    Groenewald, Berlizé; Bazelet, Corinna S; Potter, C Paige; Terblanche, John S

    2013-10-15

    The importance of metabolic rate and/or spiracle modulation for saving respiratory water is contentious. One major explanation for gas exchange pattern variation in terrestrial insects is to effect a respiratory water loss (RWL) saving. To test this, we measured the rates of CO2 and H2O release ( and , respectively) in a previously unstudied, mesic cockroach, Aptera fusca, and compared gas exchange and water loss parameters among the major gas exchange patterns (continuous, cyclic, discontinuous gas exchange) at a range of temperatures. Mean , and per unit did not differ among the gas exchange patterns at all temperatures (P>0.09). There was no significant association between temperature and gas exchange pattern type (P=0.63). Percentage of RWL (relative to total water loss) was typically low (9.79±1.84%) and did not differ significantly among gas exchange patterns at 15°C (P=0.26). The method of estimation had a large impact on the percentage of RWL, and of the three techniques investigated (traditional, regression and hyperoxic switch), the traditional method generally performed best. In many respects, A. fusca has typical gas exchange for what might be expected from other insects studied to date (e.g. , , RWL and cuticular water loss). However, we found for A. fusca that expressed as a function of metabolic rate was significantly higher than the expected consensus relationship for insects, suggesting it is under considerable pressure to save water. Despite this, we found no consistent evidence supporting the conclusion that transitions in pattern type yield reductions in RWL in this mesic cockroach. PMID:23821716

  5. Proton exchange rates in transfer RNA as a function of spermidine and magnesium.

    PubMed Central

    Tropp, J S; Redfield, A G

    1983-01-01

    Solvent exchange rates of selected protons were measured by NMR saturation recovery for E. coli tRNAVal, E. colifMet and yeast tRNAPhe, at temperatures from 20 to 40 degrees C, in the presence of 0.12M Na+ and various levels of added spermidine. tRNAVal was also studied with added Mg++. The exchange rates in zero spermidine and Mg++ indicate early melting of the U8 A14 interaction, in accord with thermodynamic melting studies. Exchange rates for secondary protons suggest early melting of the T stem in tRNAfMet and the acceptor stem in tRNAPhe, in contradiction with melting transition assignments from thermodynamic work. Addition of 10 spermidines per tRNA stabilizes the secondary and tertiary interactions more effectively than added Na+, but less so than Mg++. Added spermidine has the curious effect of increasing the exchange rate of the psi 55 N1 proton, while protecting the psi 55 N3 proton from exchange in all three tRNA's. Added Mg++ has the same effect on tRNAVal. PMID:6340067

  6. Self-other rating agreement and leader-member exchange (LMX): a quasi-replication.

    PubMed

    Barbuto, John E; Wilmot, Michael P; Singh, Matthew; Story, Joana S P

    2012-04-01

    Data from a sample of 83 elected community leaders and 391 direct-report staff (resulting in 333 useable leader-member dyads) were reanalyzed to test relations between self-other rating agreement of servant leadership and member-reported leader-member exchange (LMX). Polynomial regression analysis indicated that the self-other rating agreement model was not statistically significant. Instead, all of the variance in member-reported LMX was accounted for by the others' ratings component alone. PMID:22755453

  7. Temporal Dynamics of Social Exchange and the Development of Solidarity: "Testing the Waters" versus "Taking a Leap of Faith"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuwabara, Ko; Sheldon, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    In their concerted efforts to unpack the microprocesses that transform repeated exchanges into an exchange relation, exchange theorists have paid little attention to how actors perceive changes and dynamics in exchanges over time. We help fill this gap by studying how temporal patterns of exchange affect the development of cohesion. Some exchange…

  8. Essays in applied macroeconomics: Asymmetric price adjustment, exchange rate and treatment effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jingping

    This dissertation consists of three essays. Chapter II examines the possible asymmetric response of gasoline prices to crude oil price changes using an error correction model with GARCH errors. Recent papers have looked at this issue. Some of these papers estimate a form of error correction model, but none of them accounts for autoregressive heteroskedasticity in estimation and testing for asymmetry and none of them takes the response of crude oil price into consideration. We find that time-varying volatility of gasoline price disturbances is an important feature of the data, and when we allow for asymmetric GARCH errors and investigate the system wide impulse response function, we find evidence of asymmetric adjustment to crude oil price changes in weekly retail gasoline prices. Chapter III discusses the relationship between fiscal deficit and exchange rate. Economic theory predicts that fiscal deficits can significantly affect real exchange rate movements, but existing empirical evidence reports only a weak impact of fiscal deficits on exchange rates. Based on US dollar-based real exchange rates in G5 countries and a flexible varying coefficient model, we show that the previously documented weak relationship between fiscal deficits and exchange rates may be the result of additive specifications, and that the relationship is stronger if we allow fiscal deficits to impact real exchange rates non-additively as well as nonlinearly. We find that the speed of exchange rate adjustment toward equilibrium depends on the state of the fiscal deficit; a fiscal contraction in the US can lead to less persistence in the deviation of exchange rates from fundamentals, and faster mean reversion to the equilibrium. Chapter IV proposes a kernel method to deal with the nonparametric regression model with only discrete covariates as regressors. This new approach is based on recently developed least squares cross-validation kernel smoothing method. It can not only automatically smooth

  9. Subzero temperature chromatography for reduced back-exchange and improved dynamic range in amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Venable, John D; Okach, Linda; Agarwalla, Sanjay; Brock, Ansgar

    2012-11-01

    Amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange is a commonly used technique for studying the dynamics of proteins and their interactions with other proteins or ligands. When coupled with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, hydrogen/deuterium exchange provides several unique advantages over other structural characterization techniques including very high sensitivity, the ability to analyze proteins in complex environments, and a large mass range. A fundamental limitation of the technique arises from the loss of the deuterium label (back-exchange) during the course of the analysis. A method to limit loss of the label during the separation stage of the analysis using subzero temperature reversed-phase chromatography is presented. The approach is facilitated by the use of buffer modifiers that prevent freezing. We evaluated ethylene glycol, dimethyl formamide, formamide, and methanol for their freezing point suppression capabilities, effects on peptide retention, and their compatibilities with electrospray ionization. Ethylene glycol was used extensively because of its good electrospray ionization compatibility; however, formamide has potential to be a superior modifier if detrimental effects on ionization can be overcome. It is demonstrated using suitable buffer modifiers that separations can be performed at temperatures as low as -30 °C with negligible loss of the deuterium label, even during long chromatographic separations. The reduction in back-exchange is shown to increase the dynamic range of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry in terms of mixture complexity and the magnitude with which changes in deuteration level can be quantified. PMID:23025328

  10. Increase Effect of Available Transfer Capability by Dynamic Rating Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Masaki; Satoh, Takuya; Iwamoto, Shinichi; Kurihara, Ikuo

    As the deregulated environment of power systems has been spread in the world, it is essential to operate power systems efficiently and economy. Under the environments, with the advance of communication technologies and sensors, the so-called dynamic rating is now to be realized. The dynamic rating is a method which determines accurate ratings by utilizing real-time information such as conductor temperatures, ambient temperatures and wind speeds. The dynamic rating is considered to increase the thermal capacities of overhead transmission lines and therefore take on importance in the deregulated electric power industry. The importance of the dynamic rating lies mainly in the area of Available Transfer Capability (ATC) improvement. In this paper, the validity of the proposed dynamic rating application is shown from the viewpoint of ATC, especially, ATC with thermal constraints. In addition, the possibilities of ATC estimations using sensitivities are verified on the purpose of reducing calculating time, considering the importance of real time simulation of ATC.

  11. Residential air exchange rates for use in indoor air and exposure modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Pandian, M D; Ott, W R; Behar, J V

    1993-01-01

    Data on air exchange rates are important inputs to indoor air quality models. Indoor air models, in turn, are incorporated into the structure of total human exposure models. Fragmentary data on residential ventilation rates are available in various governmental reports, journal articles, and contractor reports. Most of the published papers present data on only a few homes to answer very specialized questions, and none of these publications summarize the ventilation rates of a large population of homes across the United States. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has conducted more than 4000 residential perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) measurements and brought them together into a large data base from about 100 studies in the United States and elsewhere. This paper analyzes the BNL PFT data base to generate frequency distributions and summary statistics for different regions of the United States, different seasons, and different levels within the homes. The data analyses suggest that residential ventilation rates are similar in the northeastern and northwestern states but higher in the southwestern states. Winter and fall ventilation rates are similar, but the rates are slightly higher in spring, and much higher in summer. Multi-level residences have higher air exchange rates than single-level residences. Although the BNL data are not a representative sample of homes in the United States, these analyses give insight into the range of air exchange rates found in the United States under a great variety of conditions and are intended for use by developers of models of indoor air quality and total human exposure. PMID:8173341

  12. A Classroom Experiment on Exchange Rate Determination with Purchasing Power Parity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, David T.; Rebelein, Robert P.; Schneider, Patricia H.; Simpson, Nicole B.; Fisher, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The authors developed a classroom experiment on exchange rate determination appropriate for undergraduate courses in macroeconomics and international economics. In the experiment, students represent citizens from different countries and need to obtain currency to purchase goods. By participating in an auction to buy currency, students gain a…

  13. Improving NO(x) cap-and-trade system with adjoint-based emission exchange rates.

    PubMed

    Mesbah, S Morteza; Hakami, Amir; Schott, Stephan

    2012-11-01

    Cap-and-trade programs have proven to be effective instruments for achieving environmental goals while incurring minimum cost. The nature of the pollutant, however, affects the design of these programs. NO(x), an ozone precursor, is a nonuniformly mixed pollutant with a short atmospheric lifetime. NO(x) cap-and-trade programs in the U.S. are successful in reducing total NO(x) emissions but may result in suboptimal environmental performance because location-specific ozone formation potentials are neglected. In this paper, the current NO(x) cap-and-trade system is contrasted to a hypothetical NO(x) trading policy with sensitivity-based exchange rates. Location-specific exchange rates, calculated through adjoint sensitivity analysis, are combined with constrained optimization for prediction of NO(x) emissions trading behavior and post-trade ozone concentrations. The current and proposed policies are examined in a case study for 218 coal-fired power plants that participated in the NO(x) Budget Trading Program in 2007. We find that better environmental performance at negligibly higher system-wide abatement cost can be achieved through inclusion of emission exchange rates. Exposure-based exchange rates result in better environmental performance than those based on concentrations. PMID:23050674

  14. Dynamic communities in multichannel data: an application to the foreign exchange market during the 2007-2008 credit crisis.

    PubMed

    Fenn, Daniel J; Porter, Mason A; McDonald, Mark; Williams, Stacy; Johnson, Neil F; Jones, Nick S

    2009-09-01

    We study the cluster dynamics of multichannel (multivariate) time series by representing their correlations as time-dependent networks and investigating the evolution of network communities. We employ a node-centric approach that allows us to track the effects of the community evolution on the functional roles of individual nodes without having to track entire communities. As an example, we consider a foreign exchange market network in which each node represents an exchange rate and each edge represents a time-dependent correlation between the rates. We study the period 2005-2008, which includes the recent credit and liquidity crisis. Using community detection, we find that exchange rates that are strongly attached to their community are persistently grouped with the same set of rates, whereas exchange rates that are important for the transfer of information tend to be positioned on the edges of communities. Our analysis successfully uncovers major trading changes that occurred in the market during the credit crisis. PMID:19791999

  15. EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, J.C.

    1992-09-01

    EXCHANGE is published monthly by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), a multidisciplinary facility operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of EXCHANGE is to inform computer users about about recent changes and innovations in both the mainframe and personal computer environments and how these changes can affect work being performed at DOE facilities.

  16. A macro-physics model of depreciation rate in economic exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmont Lobo, Rui F.; de Sousa, Miguel Rocha

    2014-02-01

    This article aims at a new approach for a known fundamental result: barter or trade increases economic value. It successfully bridges the gap between the theory of value and the exchange process attached to the transition from endowments to the equilibrium in the core and contract curve. First, we summarise the theory of value; in Section 2, we present the Edgeworth (1881) box and an axiomatic approach and in Section 3, we apply our pure exchange model. Finally (in Section 4), using our open econo-physics pure barter (EPB) model, we derive an improvement in value, which means that pure barter leads to a decline in depreciation rate.

  17. Amplifying the sensitivity of zinc(II) responsive MRI contrast agents by altering water exchange rates.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Martins, André F; Preihs, Christian; Clavijo Jordan, Veronica; Chirayil, Sara; Zhao, Piyu; Wu, Yunkou; Nasr, Khaled; Kiefer, Garry E; Sherry, A Dean

    2015-11-11

    Given the known water exchange rate limitations of a previously reported Zn(II)-sensitive MRI contrast agent, GdDOTA-diBPEN, new structural targets were rationally designed to increase the rate of water exchange to improve MRI detection sensitivity. These new sensors exhibit fine-tuned water exchange properties and, depending on the individual structure, demonstrate significantly improved longitudinal relaxivities (r1). Two sensors in particular demonstrate optimized parameters and, therefore, show exceptionally high longitudinal relaxivities of about 50 mM(-1) s(-1) upon binding to Zn(II) and human serum albumin (HSA). This value demonstrates a 3-fold increase in r1 compared to that displayed by the original sensor, GdDOTA-diBPEN. In addition, this study provides important insights into the interplay between structural modifications, water exchange rate, and kinetic stability properties of the sensors. The new high relaxivity agents were used to successfully image Zn(II) release from the mouse pancreas in vivo during glucose stimulated insulin secretion. PMID:26462412

  18. Tradeoffs between metabolic rate and spiracular conductance in discontinuous gas exchange of Samia cynthia (Lepidoptera, Saturniidae).

    PubMed

    Moerbitz, Christian; Hetz, Stefan K

    2010-05-01

    The insect tracheal system is a unique respiratory system, designed for maximum oxygen delivery at high metabolic demands, e.g. during activity and at high ambient temperatures. Therefore, large safety margins are required for tracheal and spiracular conductance. Spiracles are the entry to the tracheal system and play an important role in controlling discontinuous gas exchange (DGC) between tracheal system and atmosphere in moth pupae. We investigated the effect of modulated metabolic rate (by changing ambient temperature) and modulated spiracular conductance (by blocking all except one spiracles) on gas exchange patterns in Samia pupae. Both, spiracle blocking and metabolic rates, affected respiratory behavior in Samia cynthia pupae. While animals showed discontinuous gas exchange cycles at lower temperatures with unblocked spiracles, the respiratory patterns were cyclic at higher temperatures, with partly blocked spiracles or a combination of these two factors. The threshold for the transition from a discontinuous (DGC) to a cyclic gas exchange ((cyc)GE) was significantly higher in animals with unblocked spiracles (18.7 nmol g(-1) min(-1) vs. 7.9 nmol g(-1) min(-1)). These findings indicate an important influence of spiracle conductance on the DGC, which may occur mostly in insects showing high spiracular conductances and low metabolic rates. PMID:19682454

  19. HTO washout model: on the relationship between exchange rate and washout coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Golubev, A.; Balashov, Y.; Mavrin, S.; Golubeva, V.; Galeriu, D.

    2015-03-15

    Washout coefficient Λ is widely used as a parameter in washout models. These models describes overall HTO washout with rain by a first-order kinetic equation, while washout coefficient Λ depends on the type of rain event and rain intensity and empirical parameters a, b. The washout coefficient is a macroscopic parameter and we have considered in this paper its relationship with a microscopic rate K of HTO isotopic exchange in atmospheric humidity and drops of rainwater. We have shown that the empirical parameters a, b can be represented through the rain event characteristics using the relationships of molecular impact rate, rain intensity and specific rain water content while washout coefficient Λ can be represented through the exchange rate K, rain intensity, raindrop diameter and terminal raindrop velocity.

  20. Impact of precipitation dynamics on net ecosystem exchange

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Net ecosystem carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange (NEE) was measured on shortgrass steppe (SGS) vegetation at the USDA Central Plains Experimental Range in northeastern Colorado from 2001-2003. Large year-to-year differences were observed in annual NEE, with > 95% of the net carbon uptake occurring during...

  1. Dynamic response of surface water-groundwater exchange to currents, tides, and waves in a shallow estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Audrey H.; Shi, Fengyan; Kirby, James T.; Michael, Holly A.

    2013-04-01

    In shallow, fetch-limited estuaries, variations in current and wave energy promote heterogeneous surface water-groundwater mixing (benthic exchange), which influences biogeochemical activity. Here, we characterize heterogeneity in benthic exchange within the subtidal zone of the Delaware Inland Bays by linking hydrodynamic circulation models with mathematical solutions for benthic exchange forced by current-bedform interactions, tides, and waves. Benthic fluxes oscillate over tidal cycles as fluctuating water depths alter fluid interactions with the bed. Maximum current-driven fluxes (~1-10 cm/d) occur in channels with strong tidal currents. Maximum wave-driven fluxes (~1-10 cm/d) occur in downwind shoals. During high-energy storms, simulated wave pumping rates increase by orders of magnitude, demonstrating the importance of storms in solute transfer through the benthic layer. Under moderate wind conditions (~5 m/s), integrated benthic exchange rates due to wave, current, and tidal pumping are each ~1-10 m3/s, on the order of fluid contributions from runoff and fresh groundwater discharge to the estuary. Benthic exchange is thus a significant and dynamic component of an estuary's fluid budget that may influence estuarine geochemistry and ecology.

  2. Measurement of 129Xe -Cs binary spin-exchange rate coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu; Kuzma, Nicholas N.; Happer, William

    2004-06-01

    We report the first measurement of the spin-exchange rate coefficient for binary collisions between Cs and 129Xe atoms in the temperature range 110exchange collisions dominate the longitudinal nuclear spin-relaxation rate 1/ T1 of 129Xe gas. We measured 1/ T1 of a thermally polarized Xe gas using the saturation-recovery of conventional nuclear magnetic resonance. We also directly measured the Cs atomic number density [Cs] by using Faraday rotation of the linear polarization of a probing laser beam passing through the sample. The measured rate coefficient is κ (9.4 T) = d (1/ T1 ) / d [Cs] = (2.81±0.2) × 10-16 cm3 /s , which is about a factor of 1.6 higher than the previously measured spin-exchange rate coefficient of 129Xe -Rb binary collisions. Using a calculated magnetic decoupling factor, we extrapolate our result to zero magnetic field: κ (0 T) = (4.1±0.3) × 10-16 cm3 /s .

  3. Measurement of air exchange rates in residential and commercial buildings in the northwest: techniques and results

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.B.

    1985-04-01

    In a study of air exchange rates in commercial and residential buildings, several techniques were employed to measure the air exchange: analysis of sulfur hexafluoride tracer gas decay using a portable gas chromatograph; analysis of carbon monoxide decay using a continuous infrared analyzer; analysis of nitrogen oxides decay using a continuous oxides of nitrogen analyzer; and analysis of perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) gas using a programmable automatic sampler, and a passive capillary tube sampler. Using sulfur hexafluoride tracer gas with real-time chromatography was the most labor-intensive method, requiring constant attention for several hours; whereas, analyzing the decay of PFT tracer gas using small capillary tubes required little setup time and virtually no attention. However, the analysis of tracer gas captured by the capillary tubes was difficult and was performed using special analysis equipment. The air exchange rate measured in the commercial buildings ranged from 5 to 0.04 air changes per hour (ACH) depending on the type of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. Air exchange in the residential structures ranged from about 1 ACH to about 0.3 ACH. 6 refs., 5 tabs., 3 figs.

  4. Dynamic Patterns, Parameters, and Climatic Response of CO2 Exchange of Agricultural Crops: Monocotyledons VS. Dicotyledons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmanov, T. G.; Wylie, B. K.; Howard, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    Net CO2 exchange data from long-term flux tower measurements in monocotyledonous (wheat, maize) and dicotyledonous (soybeans, alfalfa, peas, peanuts) crops were partitioned into photosynthesis (P) and respiration (R) using the light-soil temperature-VPD response method. Analysis of the resulting time series of P and R revealed patterns of temporal and phenological dynamics in these plant groups. We established differences in ranges and dynamic patterns of P and R as well as CO2 exchange parameters (quantum yield, photosynthetic capacity, respiration rate, light-use efficiency, curvature of the VPD response). Weekly P and R data combined with remotely sensed 7-day eMODIS NDVI allow identification of the quasi-linear relationships between P, R, and NDVI, as well as estimation of parameters of NDVI response (start of the growing season, duration of the linearity period, slope of NDVI response). While the linear-like patterns occur early in the season, later the flux response to NDVI becomes less pronounced, and for the whole season the flux-NDVI relationship assumes a hysteresis-like pattern. Introduction of VPD and soil moisture limitation as well as phenological controls (growing degree days) leads to more flexible models for P and R in relation to NDVI and on-site drivers. These models allow mapping of the cropland CO2 exchange at regional and larger scales (e.g., the Great Plains). Significant relationships of the crop GPP to the seasonally integrated NDVI were also established, providing an opportunity for mapping of crop productivity using geographically distributed historic NDVI data. On the other hand, long time series (6 to 12 years and longer) of weekly P and R data lead to models of annual photosynthesis and respiration in response to climatic factors that may be used for prognostic purposes. We developed a model of maize GPP on the Great Plains in relation to the sum of temperatures above 5 °C and the hydrologic year precipitation. The model describes 75

  5. Using a spectral approach to compare dynamic and static head driven hyporheic exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörman, Anders; Morén, Ida; Riml, Joakim

    2016-04-01

    Hyporheic exchange is an important process controlling the transportation and fate of solutes in natural streams. The exchange is driven by the hydraulic head gradients over the stream bottom and occurs on a wide range of spatial scales. The hydraulic head gradient is either dominated by the static head, originating from water surface elevation differences or it is dominated by the dynamic head that is created when the velocity head of the stream is transformed to pressure variations along an uneven bed surface. This article uses a power spectral approach to compare the exchange due to the static and dynamic head occurring over a range of spatial scales in the Tullstorps Brook. Prediction of hyporheic exchange is restrained by the complications of performing measurements of high quality and quantity in the field. In this study bottom elevation and water depth was measured with a levelling instrument every 2.56 - 16.83 m along a 500 m long reach of the Tullstorps Brook. The velocity head was calculated at the same sections based on the measured cross section area of the stream and the average discharge during the day when the measurements were done. Parallel to the head investigations a Rhodamine WT tracer test was performed in the reach and the parameters controlling hyporheic exchange was estimated through inverse modelling. These tracer test parameters were compared with theoretical parameters obtained from a spectral model. Hyporheic exchange is often modelled by assuming the head variations to be harmonic with a certain wavelength and amplitude. In the reality the head variation cannot be represented by a single harmonic function, but the representation of head geometry can be improved by superimposing a large number of harmonic functions. Here, to be able to include the whole range of harmonics, we used a power spectral approach to analyse the hydraulic head measurements from the field. The Fourier power spectrum of the data was calculated for the water

  6. Cooperation between bound waters and hydroxyls in controlling isotope-exchange rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasci, Adele F.; McAlpin, J. Gregory; Ohlin, C. André; Christensen, Shauna; Fettinger, James C.; Britt, R. David; Rustad, James R.; Casey, William H.

    2012-02-01

    Mineral oxides differ from aqueous ions in that the bound water molecules are usually attached to different metal centers, or vicinal, and thus separated from one another. In contrast, for most monomeric ions used to establish kinetic reactivity trends, such as octahedral aquo ions (e.g., Al(H 2O) 63+), the bound waters are closely packed, or geminal. Because of this structural difference, the existing literature about ligand substitution in monomer ions may be a poor guide to the reactions of geochemical interest. To understand how coordination of the reactive functional groups might affect the rates of simple water-exchange reactions, we synthesized two structurally similar Rh(III) complexes, [Rh(phen) 2(H 2O) 2] 3+ [ 1] and [Rh(phen) 2(H 2O)Cl] 2+ [ 2] where (phen) = 1,10-phenanthroline. Complex [ 1] has two adjacent, geminal, bound waters in the inner-coordination sphere and [ 2] has a single bound water adjacent to a bound chloride ion. We employed Rh(III) as a trivalent metal rather than a more geochemically relevant metal like Fe(III) or Al(III) to slow the rate of reaction, which makes possible measurement of the rates of isotopic substitution by simple mass spectrometry. We prepared isotopically pure versions of the molecules, dissolved them into isotopically dissimilar water, and measured the rates of exchange from the extents of 18O and 16O exchange at the bound waters. The pH dependency of rates differ enormously between the two complexes. Pseudo-first-order rate coefficients at 298 K for water exchanges from the fully protonated molecules are close: k0298 = 5 × 10 -8(±0.5 × 10 -8) s -1 for [ 1] and k0298 = 2.5 × 10 -9(±1 × 10 -9) for [ 2]. Enthalpy and entropy activation parameters (Δ H‡ and Δ S‡) were measured to be 119(±3) kJ mol -1, and 14(±1) J mol -1 K -1, respectively for [ 1]. The corresponding parameters for the mono-aquo complex, [ 2], are 132(±3) kJ mol -1 and 41.5(±2) J mol -1 K -1. Rates increase by many orders of magnitude

  7. Reduction of Large Dynamical Systems by Minimization of Evolution Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, Sharath S.

    1999-01-01

    Reduction of a large system of equations to a lower-dimensional system of similar dynamics is investigated. For dynamical systems with disparate timescales, a criterion for determining redundant dimensions and a general reduction method based on the minimization of evolution rate are proposed.

  8. Assessment of anxiety using heart rate nonlinear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, Julian F.; Friedman, Bruce H.

    1993-11-01

    Various anxiety states have been linked with disorders of the autonomic nervous system. These autonomic disorders may be revealed by analysis of physiological time series such as the heart rate interbeat interval series. The present paper reports a general model of biological system functioning and related assessment indices based on recent nonlinear dynamical systems approaches. In particular, two experimental studies are reported which suggest the utility of heart rate nonlinear dynamics in the assessment of anxiety.

  9. Charge Exchange and Ablation Rates of a Titanium Wire Plasma Corona

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, Robert E.

    2009-01-21

    Wire ablation rates are important features in any examination of precursors or transparent mode implosions of wire arrays. When ion temperatures in a Ti wire plasma corona exceed a few eV, the process of resonant charge exchange competes with elastic scattering. Ions pushed into the corona from an anode bias wire array can be expected to drive a fast neutral wind into the surrounding volume, while a cathode bias wire array would not show the strong neutral wind.

  10. Cow-calf producers need to blame exchange rates, not bovine spongiform encephalopathy, for lost wealth.

    PubMed

    Schaufele, Brandon; Komirenko, Zoia; Unterschultz, James R

    2009-01-01

    Several studies examined the impacts of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) crisis on the Canadian agricultural sector. However, few investigations determined the on-farm financial repercussions arising from the crisis. This study examined impacts at farm level attributed to the BSE crisis. Cash flow and hedonic price models were used to examine changes in farm wealth for the years 2002 through 2007. While BSE received substantial media coverage, little attention was given to exchange rates and land values. Data demonstrated that exchange-rate fluctuations exerted a much greater impact on producer wealth than did the BSE crisis. Both farm equity and land values temporarily dipped following the BSE crisis but have since followed their previous trend. If the United States had not closed its borders to Canadian beef and cattle exports, producers would have an additional 0.65% growth in wealth. However, had exchange rates remained constant, farmers would have an additional 10.75% increase in equity. Consequently, the BSE crisis produced a smaller impact on farmer wealth than factors that received less media attention. PMID:19697244

  11. Strategies for Optimizing Water-Exchange Rates of Lanthanide-Based Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Siriwardena-Mahanama, Buddhima N.; Allen, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    This review describes recent advances in strategies for tuning the water-exchange rates of contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Water-exchange rates play a critical role in determining the efficiency of contrast agents; consequently, optimization of water-exchange rates, among other parameters, is necessary to achieve high efficiencies. This need has resulted in extensive research efforts to modulate water-exchange rates by chemically altering the coordination environments of the metal complexes that function as contrast agents. The focus of this review is coordination-chemistry-based strategies used to tune the water-exchange rates of lanthanide(III)-based contrast agents for MRI. Emphasis will be given to results published in the 21st century, as well as implications of these strategies on the design of contrast agents. PMID:23921796

  12. Zonal rate model for stacked membrane chromatography part II: characterizing ion-exchange membrane chromatography under protein retention conditions.

    PubMed

    Francis, Patrick; von Lieres, Eric; Haynes, Charles

    2012-03-01

    The Zonal Rate Model (ZRM) has previously been shown to accurately account for contributions to elution band broadening, including external flow nonidealities and radial concentration gradients, in ion-exchange membrane (IEXM) chromatography systems operated under nonbinding conditions. Here, we extend the ZRM to analyze and model the behavior of retained proteins by introducing terms for intra-column mass transfer resistances and intrinsic binding kinetics. Breakthrough curve (BTC) data from a scaled-down anion-exchange membrane chromatography module using ovalbumin as a model protein were collected at flow rates ranging from 1.5 to 20 mL min(-1). Through its careful accounting of transport nonidealities within and external to the membrane stack, the ZRM is shown to provide a useful framework for characterizing putative protein binding mechanisms and models, for predicting BTCs and complex elution behavior, including the common observation that the dynamic binding capacity can increase with linear velocity in IEXM systems, and for simulating and scaling separations using IEXM chromatography. Global fitting of model parameters is used to evaluate the performance of the Langmuir, bi-Langmuir, steric mass action (SMA), and spreading-type protein binding models in either correlating or fundamentally describing BTC data. When combined with the ZRM, the bi-Langmuir, and SMA models match the chromatography data, but require physically unrealistic regressed model parameters to do so. In contrast, for this system a spreading-type model is shown to accurately predict column performance while also providing a realistic fundamental explanation for observed trends, including an observed increase in dynamic binding capacity with flow rate. PMID:22012741

  13. Dynamics of a magnetic dimer with exchange, dipolar, and Dzyalozhinski-Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, A. F.; Martinez, J. M.; Déjardin, J. L.; Kachkachi, H.

    2011-10-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a magnetic system consisting of two magnetic moments coupled by either the exchange, dipole-dipole, or Dzyalozhinski-Moriya interaction. We compare the switching mechanisms and switching rates as induced by the three couplings. For each coupling and each configuration of the two anisotropy axes, we describe the switching modes and, using the kinetic theory of Langer, we provide (semi-)analytical expressions for the switching rate. We then compare the three interactions with regard to their efficiency in the reversal of the net magnetic moment of the dimer. We also investigate how the energy barriers vary with the coupling. For the dipole-dipole interaction we find that the energy barrier may either increase or decrease with the coupling depending on whether the latter is weak or strong. Finally, upon comparing the various switching rates, we find that the dipole-dipole coupling leads to the slowest magnetic dimer, as far as the switching of its net magnetic moment is concerned.

  14. Free energy surface of an intrinsically disordered protein: comparison between temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics and bias-exchange metadynamics.

    PubMed

    Zerze, Gül H; Miller, Cayla M; Granata, Daniele; Mittal, Jeetain

    2015-06-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), which are expected to be largely unstructured under physiological conditions, make up a large fraction of eukaryotic proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations have been utilized to probe structural characteristics of these proteins, which are not always easily accessible to experiments. However, exploration of the conformational space by brute force molecular dynamics simulations is often limited by short time scales. Present literature provides a number of enhanced sampling methods to explore protein conformational space in molecular simulations more efficiently. In this work, we present a comparison of two enhanced sampling methods: temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics and bias exchange metadynamics. By investigating both the free energy landscape as a function of pertinent order parameters and the per-residue secondary structures of an IDP, namely, human islet amyloid polypeptide, we found that the two methods yield similar results as expected. We also highlight the practical difference between the two methods by describing the path that we followed to obtain both sets of data. PMID:26575570

  15. Oral Pseudoephedrine Decreases the Rate of Trans-mucosal Nitrous Oxide Exchange for the Middle Ear

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Miriam S.; Alper, Cuneyt M.; Martin, Brian S; Cullen Doyle, Brendan M.; Doyle, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Determine if oral pretreatment with a vasoconstrictor decreases the blood to middle-ear exchange-rate of the perfusion-limited gas, Nitrous Oxide (N2O). Study Design Randomized, double-blind, crossover study. Methods Ten adult subjects with and 10 without past middle-ear disease completed paired experimental sessions, identical but for oral pretreatment with either pseudoephedrine HCL or lactose placebo. At each session, subjects were fitted with a non-rebreathing mask and breathed room air for 20 minutes (acclimation period), 50% N2O:50% O2 for 20 minutes (experimental period) and 100% O2 for 10 minutes (recovery period). Throughout, heart-rate, blood-pressure and O2 saturation were monitored and bilateral middle-ear pressures were recorded by tympanometry every minute. The primary outcome was the slope of the middle-ear pressure-time function for the experimental period which estimates the volume N2O exchange-rate. Using repeated measures ANOVA, the effects of Group (disease history), Treatment (active vs. placebo) and Period (1 vs. 2) on the recorded vital signs, and of Group, Treatment and Ear (left/right) on the middle-ear pressure-time slope were evaluated for statistical significance. Results Statistically significant effects of Period on O2 saturation (Period 2>Period 1) and of Treatment on heart-rate (Active>Placebo) were documented. Only Treatment was statistically significant for the middle-ear pressure-time slope with a shallower slope characterizing the active treatment session. Conclusion The volume exchange-rate across the middle-ear mucosa of perfusion-limited gases can be modulated pharmacologically. Theoretically, similar drugs can be used to reduce the requisite Eustachian tube opening efficiency for adequate middle-ear pressure regulation. PMID:26152838

  16. Evaluation of Enhanced Sampling Provided by Accelerated Molecular Dynamics with Hamiltonian Replica Exchange Methods

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many problems studied via molecular dynamics require accurate estimates of various thermodynamic properties, such as the free energies of different states of a system, which in turn requires well-converged sampling of the ensemble of possible structures. Enhanced sampling techniques are often applied to provide faster convergence than is possible with traditional molecular dynamics simulations. Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics (H-REMD) is a particularly attractive method, as it allows the incorporation of a variety of enhanced sampling techniques through modifications to the various Hamiltonians. In this work, we study the enhanced sampling of the RNA tetranucleotide r(GACC) provided by H-REMD combined with accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD), where a boosting potential is applied to torsions, and compare this to the enhanced sampling provided by H-REMD in which torsion potential barrier heights are scaled down to lower force constants. We show that H-REMD and multidimensional REMD (M-REMD) combined with aMD does indeed enhance sampling for r(GACC), and that the addition of the temperature dimension in the M-REMD simulations is necessary to efficiently sample rare conformations. Interestingly, we find that the rate of convergence can be improved in a single H-REMD dimension by simply increasing the number of replicas from 8 to 24 without increasing the maximum level of bias. The results also indicate that factors beyond replica spacing, such as round trip times and time spent at each replica, must be considered in order to achieve optimal sampling efficiency. PMID:24625009

  17. Quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (qCEST) MRI--RF spillover effect-corrected omega plot for simultaneous determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Dai, ZhuoZhi; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2014-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is sensitive to dilute proteins and peptides as well as microenvironmental properties. However, the complexity of the CEST MRI effect, which varies with the labile proton content, exchange rate and experimental conditions, underscores the need for developing quantitative CEST (qCEST) analysis. Towards this goal, it has been shown that omega plot is capable of quantifying paramagnetic CEST MRI. However, the use of the omega plot is somewhat limited for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) MRI because it is more susceptible to direct radio frequency (RF) saturation (spillover) owing to the relatively small chemical shift. Recently, it has been found that, for dilute DIACEST agents that undergo slow to intermediate chemical exchange, the spillover effect varies little with the labile proton ratio and exchange rate. Therefore, we postulated that the omega plot analysis can be improved if RF spillover effect could be estimated and taken into account. Specifically, simulation showed that both labile proton ratio and exchange rate derived using the spillover effect-corrected omega plot were in good agreement with simulated values. In addition, the modified omega plot was confirmed experimentally, and we showed that the derived labile proton ratio increased linearly with creatine concentration (p < 0.01), with little difference in their exchange rate (p = 0.32). In summary, our study extends the conventional omega plot for quantitative analysis of DIACEST MRI. PMID:24706610

  18. Cluster fusion-fission dynamics in the Singapore stock exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, Boon Kin; Cheong, Siew Ann

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate how the cross-correlations between stocks in the Singapore stock exchange (SGX) evolve over 2008 and 2009 within overlapping one-month time windows. In particular, we examine how these cross-correlations change before, during, and after the Sep-Oct 2008 Lehman Brothers Crisis. To do this, we extend the complete-linkage hierarchical clustering algorithm, to obtain robust clusters of stocks with stronger intracluster correlations, and weaker intercluster correlations. After we identify the robust clusters in all time windows, we visualize how these change in the form of a fusion-fission diagram. Such a diagram depicts graphically how the cluster sizes evolve, the exchange of stocks between clusters, as well as how strongly the clusters mix. From the fusion-fission diagram, we see a giant cluster growing and disintegrating in the SGX, up till the Lehman Brothers Crisis in September 2008 and the market crashes of October 2008. After the Lehman Brothers Crisis, clusters in the SGX remain small for few months before giant clusters emerge once again. In the aftermath of the crisis, we also find strong mixing of component stocks between clusters. As a result, the correlation between initially strongly-correlated pairs of stocks decay exponentially with average life time of about a month. These observations impact strongly how portfolios and trading strategies should be formulated.

  19. Quantum dynamics of {sup 16}O + {sup 36}O{sub 2} and {sup 18}O + {sup 32}O{sub 2} exchange reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopala Rao, T.; Mahapatra, S.; Guillon, G.; Honvault, P.

    2015-05-07

    We present quantum dynamical investigations of {sup 16}O + {sup 36}O{sub 2} and {sup 18}O + {sup 32}O{sub 2} exchange reactions using a time-independent quantum mechanical method and an accurate global potential energy surface of ozone [Dawes et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 081102 (2011)]. Initial state-selected integral cross sections, rate constants, and Boltzmann averaged thermal rate constants are obtained and compared with earlier experimental and theoretical results. The computed thermal rate constants for the oxygen exchange reactions exhibit a negative temperature dependence, as found experimentally. They are in better agreement with the experiments than the previous studies on the same reactions.

  20. Photolithography and Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy used to examine the rates of exchange in reverse micelle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Zach; Mawson, Cara; Johnson, Kyron; Kessler, Sarah; Rebecca, Anne; Wolf, Nathan; Lim, Michael; Nucci, Nathaniel

    Reverse micelles are molecular complexes that encapsulate a nanoscale pool of water in a surfactant shell dissolved in non-polar solvent. These complexes have a wide range of applications, and in all cases, the degree to which reverse micelles (RM) exchange their contents is relevant for their use. Despite its importance, this aspect of RM behavior is poorly understood. Photolithography is employed here to create micro and nano scale fluidic systems in which mixing rates can be precisely measured using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Micro-channel patterns are etched using reactive ion etching process into a layer of silicon dioxide on crystalline silicon substrates. Solutions containing mixtures of reverse micelles, proteins, and fluorophores are placed into reservoirs in the patterns, while diffusion and exchange between RMs is monitored using a FCS system built from a modified confocal Raman spectrometer. Using this approach, the diffusion and exchange rates for RM systems are measured as a function of the components of the RM mixture. Funding provided by Rowan University.

  1. Respiratory dynamics of discontinuous gas exchange in the tracheal system of the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria.

    PubMed

    Groenewald, Berlizé; Hetz, Stefan K; Chown, Steven L; Terblanche, John S

    2012-07-01

    Gas exchange dynamics in insects is of fundamental importance to understanding evolved variation in breathing patterns, such as discontinuous gas exchange cycles (DGCs). Most insects do not rely solely on diffusion for the exchange of respiratory gases but may also make use of respiratory movements (active ventilation) to supplement gas exchange at rest. However, their temporal dynamics have not been widely investigated. Here, intratracheal pressure, V(CO2) and body movements of the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria were measured simultaneously during the DGC and revealed several important aspects of gas exchange dynamics. First, S. gregaria employs two different ventilatory strategies, one involving dorso-ventral contractions and the other longitudinal telescoping movements. Second, although a true spiracular closed (C)-phase of the DGC could be identified by means of subatmospheric intratracheal pressure recordings, some CO(2) continued to be released. Third, strong pumping actions do not necessarily lead to CO(2) release and could be used to ensure mixing of gases in the closed tracheal system, or enhance water vapour reabsorption into the haemolymph from fluid-filled tracheole tips by increasing the hydrostatic pressure or forcing fluid into the haemocoel. Finally, this work showed that the C-phase of the DGC can occur at any pressure. These results provide further insights into the mechanistic basis of insect gas exchange. PMID:22675191

  2. Coupled acoustic-gravity field for dynamic evaluation of ion exchange with a single resin bead.

    PubMed

    Kanazaki, Takahiro; Hirawa, Shungo; Harada, Makoto; Okada, Tetsuo

    2010-06-01

    A coupled acoustic-gravity field is efficient for entrapping a particle at the position determined by its acoustic properties rather than its size. This field has been applied to the dynamic observation of ion-exchange reactions occurring in a single resin bead. The replacement of counterions in an ion-exchange resin induces changes in its acoustic properties, such as density and compressibility. Therefore, we can visually trace the advancement of an ion-exchange reaction as a time change in the levitation position of a resin bead entrapped in the field. Cation-exchange reactions occurring in resin beads with diameters of 40-120 microm are typically completed within 100-200 s. Ion-exchange equilibrium or kinetics is often evaluated with off-line chemical analyses, which require a batch amount of ion exchangers. Measurements with a single resin particle allow us to evaluate ion-exchange dynamics and kinetics of ions including those that are difficult to measure by usual off-line analyses. The diffusion properties of ions in resins have been successfully evaluated from the time change in the levitation positions of resin beads. PMID:20462180

  3. Simultaneous Disulfide and Boronic Acid Ester Exchange in Dynamic Combinatorial Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Diemer, Sanna L.; Kristensen, Morten; Rasmussen, Brian; Beeren, Sophie R.; Pittelkow, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic combinatorial chemistry has emerged as a promising tool for the discovery of complex receptors in supramolecular chemistry. At the heart of dynamic combinatorial chemistry are the reversible reactions that enable the exchange of building blocks between library members in dynamic combinatorial libraries (DCLs) ensuring thermodynamic control over the system. If more than one reversible reaction operates in a single dynamic combinatorial library, the complexity of the system increases dramatically, and so does its possible applications. One can imagine two reversible reactions that operate simultaneously or two reversible reactions that operate independently. Both these scenarios have advantages and disadvantages. In this contribution, we show how disulfide exchange and boronic ester transesterification can function simultaneous in dynamic combinatorial libraries under appropriate conditions. We describe the detailed studies necessary to establish suitable reaction conditions and highlight the analytical techniques appropriate to study this type of system. PMID:26378519

  4. Reversible Control of Nanoparticle Functionalization and Physicochemical Properties by Dynamic Covalent Exchange**

    PubMed Central

    della Sala, Flavio; Kay, Euan R

    2015-01-01

    Existing methods for the covalent functionalization of nanoparticles rely on kinetically controlled reactions, and largely lack the sophistication of the preeminent oligonucleotide-based noncovalent strategies. Here we report the application of dynamic covalent chemistry for the reversible modification of nanoparticle (NP) surface functionality, combining the benefits of non-biomolecular covalent chemistry with the favorable features of equilibrium processes. A homogeneous monolayer of nanoparticle-bound hydrazones can undergo quantitative dynamic covalent exchange. The pseudomolecular nature of the NP system allows for the in situ characterization of surface-bound species, and real-time tracking of the exchange reactions. Furthermore, dynamic covalent exchange offers a simple approach for reversibly switching—and subtly tuning—NP properties such as solvophilicity. PMID:25973468

  5. NON-EQUILIBRIUM H{sub 2} FORMATION IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE: ENERGY EXCHANGES, RATE COEFFICIENTS, AND SPECTRAL DISTORTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Coppola, C. M.; Longo, S.; D'Introno, R.; Galli, D.; Tennyson, J.

    2012-03-01

    Energy exchange processes play a crucial role in the early universe, affecting the thermal balance and the dynamical evolution of the primordial gas. In the present work we focus on the consequences of a non-thermal distribution of the level populations of H{sub 2}: first, we determine the excitation temperatures of vibrational transitions and the non-equilibrium heat transfer; second, we compare the modifications to chemical reaction rate coefficients with respect to the values obtained assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium; and third, we compute the spectral distortions to the cosmic background radiation generated by the formation of H{sub 2} in vibrationally excited levels. We conclude that non-equilibrium processes cannot be ignored in cosmological simulations of the evolution of baryons, although their observational signatures remain below current limits of detection. New fits to the equilibrium and non-equilibrium heat transfer functions are provided.

  6. Water exchange rates of water-soluble manganese(III) porphyrins of therapeutical potential.

    PubMed

    Budimir, Ana; Kalmár, József; Fábián, István; Lente, Gábor; Bányai, István; Batinić-Haberle, Ines; Birus, Mladen

    2010-05-14

    The activation parameters and the rate constants of the water-exchange reactions of Mn(III)TE-2-PyP(5+) (meso-tetrakis(N-ethylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin) as cationic, Mn(III)TnHex-2-PyP(5+) (meso-tetrakis(N-n-hexylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin) as sterically shielded cationic, and Mn(III)TSPP(3-) (meso-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin) as anionic manganese(iii) porphyrins were determined from the temperature dependence of (17)O NMR relaxation rates. The rate constants at 298 K were obtained as 4.12 x 10(6) s(-1), 5.73 x 10(6) s(-1), and 2.74 x 10(7) s(-1), respectively. On the basis of the determined entropies of activation, an interchange-dissociative mechanism (I(d)) was proposed for the cationic complexes (DeltaS(double dagger) = approximately 0 J mol(-1) K(-1)) whereas a limiting dissociative mechanism (D) was proposed for Mn(III)TSPP(3-) complex (DeltaS(double dagger) = +79 J mol(-1) K(-1)). The obtained water exchange rate of Mn(III)TSPP(3-) corresponded well to the previously assumed value used by Koenig et al. (S. H. Koenig, R. D. Brown and M. Spiller, Magn. Reson. Med., 1987, 4, 52-260) to simulate the (1)H NMRD curves, therefore the measured value supports the theory developed for explaining the anomalous relaxivity of Mn(III)TSPP(3-) complex. A magnitude of the obtained water-exchange rate constants further confirms the suggested inner sphere electron transfer mechanism for the reactions of the two positively charged Mn(iii) porphyrins with the various biologically important oxygen and nitrogen reactive species. Due to the high biological and clinical relevance of the reactions that occur at the metal site of the studied Mn(iii) porphyrins, the determination of water exchange rates advanced our insight into their efficacy and mechanism of action, and in turn should impact their further development for both diagnostic (imaging) and therapeutic purposes. PMID:20422097

  7. Thixoforming of Steel: New Tools Conception to Analyse Thermal Exchanges and Strain Rate Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Cezard, P.; Bigot, R.; Becker, E.; Mathieu, S.; Pierret, J. C.; Rassili, A.

    2007-04-07

    Through different papers, authors shown that the influence of thermal exchanges was a first order parameter on the semi-solid steel behaviour, and certainly for every semi-solid metallic materials. These thermal exchanges hide other parameters effect like, for example, the strain rate influence. This paper tries to determine the influence of these two parameters by using a new extrusion device on a hydraulic press. This new tools conception annihilated the influence of the decrease of the punch speed before stopping and permitted to have a constant speed during the experiment. This work also deals with the homogeneous flow during thixoforming of steel and shows the importance to couple initial temperature of the slug with punch speed. This paper presents different conditions which permitted to have a homogeneous flow by keeping a low load.

  8. Modified perfluorocarbon tracer method for measuring effective multizone air exchange rates.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Naohide; Kataoka, Toshiyuki; Takamine, Koichi; Butsugan, Michio; Nishijima, Hirokazu; Gamo, Masashi

    2010-09-01

    A modified procedure was developed for the measurement of the effective air exchange rate, which represents the relationship between the pollutants emitted from indoor sources and the residents' level of exposure, by placing the dosers of tracer gas at locations that resemble indoor emission sources. To measure the 24-h-average effective air exchange rates in future surveys based on this procedure, a low-cost, easy-to-use perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) doser with a stable dosing rate was developed by using double glass vials, a needle, a polyethylene-sintered filter, and a diffusion tube. Carbon molecular sieve cartridges and carbon disulfide (CS₂) were used for passive sampling and extraction of the tracer gas, respectively. Recovery efficiencies, sampling rates, and lower detection limits for 24-h sampling of hexafluorobenzene, octafluorotoluene, and perfluoroallylbenzene were 40% ± 3%, 72% ± 5%, and 84% ± 6%; 10.5 ± 1.1, 14.4 ± 1.4, and 12.2 ± 0.49 mL min⁻¹; and 0.20, 0.17, and 0.26 μg m⁻³, respectively. PMID:20948928

  9. Jealousy and Trust: Unexplored Dimensions of Social Exchange Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Gerald W.; Osmond, Marie Withers

    Little effort has been made to systematically assess the determinants and consequences of marital jealousy which affect marital, familial and extra-familial expectations, interactions and behavior. A preliminary attempt to rectify this omission provides a conceptual/theoretical perspective on jealousy dynamics in marriage. Marital jealousy, a…

  10. Measurements of soil and canopy exchange rates in the Amazon rain forest using 222Rn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumbore, S. E.; Keller, M.; Wofsy, S. C.; da Costa, J. M.

    1990-09-01

    Measurements of the emission of 222Rn from Amazon forest soils, and profiles of 222Rn in air were used to study the ventilation of the soil atmosphere and the nocturnal forest canopy. The emission of 222Rn from the yellow clay soils dominant in the study area averaged 0.38±0.07 atom cm-2 s-1. Nearby sand soils had similar fluxes, averaging 0.30 ± 0.07 atom cm-2 s-1. The effective diffusivity in the clay soil (0.008±0.004 cm2 s-1), was lower than that for the sand soil (0.033±0.030 cm2 s-1). Profiles of 222Rn and CO2 in air showed steepest concentration gradients in the layer between 0 and 3 m above the soil surface. Aerodynamic resistances calculated for this layer from 222Rn and CO2 varied from 1.6 to 18 s cm-1, with greater resistance during the afternoon than at night. Time averaged profiles of 222Rn in the forest canopy measured during the evening and night were combined with the soil flux measurements to compute the resistance of the subcanopy to exchange with overlying air. The integrated nocturnal rate of gas exchange between the canopy layer (0 to 41 m) and overlying atmosphere based on 222Rn averaged 0.33±0.15 cm s-1. An independent estimate of gas exchange, based on 13 nights of CO2 profiles, averaged 0.21±0.40 cm s-1. These exchange rates correspond to flushing times for the 41 m canopy layer of 3.4 and 5.5 hours, respectively. Comparison of 222Rn and CO2 profiles show that the nocturnal production of CO2 by above-ground vegetation was about 20% of the soil emission source, consistent with data from eddy-correlation experiments (Fan et al., this issue).

  11. Dynamic Recrystallization During High-Strain-Rate Tension of Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi, Nooshin; Bonora, Nicola; Ruggiero, Andrew; Hörnqvist Colliander, Magnus

    2016-06-01

    Discontinuous dynamic recrystallization can occur during dynamic tensile extrusion of copper, which is subjected to uniaxial tensile strains of ~5 and strain rates up to 106 s-1 in the extruded section. Through high-resolution transmission Kikuchi diffraction, we show that nucleation occurs through subgrain rotation and grain boundary bulging at boundaries between <001> and <111> oriented grains. The observed nuclei consist of subgrains with a size of approximately 200 to 400 nm.

  12. Soil Net Nitrification Rates and Exchangeable Calcium in Ten Small Upland Watersheds of the Northeastern USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, D.; Bailey, S.; Shanley, J.; Fredriksen, G.; Jamison, A.

    2004-05-01

    Possible links have been suggested between soil nitrification rates, soil calcium concentrations and tree species composition (e.g. sugar maple). We are measuring soil nitrification rates and stream nitrate export in ten watersheds in Vermont, New Hampshire and New York. These include relatively Ca-poor sites at Cone Pond NH and Ca-rich sites at Sleepers River, VT. Our objectives are to determine the relationship between nitrification rates and watershed characteristics (e.g. vegetation, soils, topography), and to explore the link between these rates and watershed nitrate export. Net nitrification rates are highly variable both within and among the eight sites and are related to the soil C/N ratio and vegetation characteristics at some, but not all, sites. Our preliminary results show distinct differences in exchangeable Ca concentrations among watersheds. Although some locations are enriched in Ca and high in sugar maple density, we have not found a good overall relationship between Ca and net nitrification rates. High rates can be found in Ca-enriched sites that are also relatively high in pH.

  13. On Value at Risk for Foreign Exchange Rates --- the Copula Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworski, P.

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine the Value at Risk (VaR) of the portfolio consisting of long positions in foreign currencies on an emerging market. Basing on empirical data we restrict ourselves to the case when the tail parts of distributions of logarithmic returns of these assets follow the power laws and the lower tail of associated copula C follows the power law of degree 1. We will illustrate the practical usefulness of this approach by the analysis of the exchange rates of EUR and CHF at the Polish forex market.

  14. Time Dependency of Psychotherapeutic Exchanges: The Contribution of the Theory of Dynamic Systems in Analyzing Process

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Sergio; Tschacher, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a general framework for the use of Theory of Dynamic Systems (TDS) in the field of psychotherapy research. Psychotherapy is inherently dynamic, namely a function of time. Consequently, the improvement of construct validity and clinical relevance of psychotherapy process research require the development of models of investigation allowing dynamic mappings of clinical exchange. Thus, TDS becomes a significant theoretical and methodological reference. The paper focuses two topics. First, the main concepts of TDS are briefly introduced together with a basic typology of approaches developed within this domain. Second, we propose a repertoire of investigation strategies that can be used to capture the dynamic nature of clinical exchange. In this way we intend to highlight the feasibility and utility of strategies of analysis informed by TDS. PMID:22848205

  15. Exchange explosions: Magnetization dynamics during vortex-antivortex annihilation.

    PubMed

    Hertel, Riccardo; Schneider, Claus M

    2006-10-27

    A magnetic vortex and an antivortex can annihilate, resulting in a homogeneous magnetization. A detailed description of the magnetization dynamics of such annihilation processes is obtained by micromagnetic simulations based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. We show that, depending on the relative polarization of the vortex-antivortex pair, the annihilation process is either a continuous transformation of the magnetic structure or it involves the propagation of a micromagnetic singularity (Bloch point) causing a burstlike emission of spin waves. These results provide new insight into a fundamental micromagnetic process that has recently been proposed for a controlled generation of spin waves. PMID:17155502

  16. Growth-rate-dependent dynamics of a bacterial genetic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osella, Matteo; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino

    2013-01-01

    Gene networks exhibiting oscillatory dynamics are widespread in biology. The minimal regulatory designs giving rise to oscillations have been implemented synthetically and studied by mathematical modeling. However, most of the available analyses generally neglect the coupling of regulatory circuits with the cellular “chassis” in which the circuits are embedded. For example, the intracellular macromolecular composition of fast-growing bacteria changes with growth rate. As a consequence, important parameters of gene expression, such as ribosome concentration or cell volume, are growth-rate dependent, ultimately coupling the dynamics of genetic circuits with cell physiology. This work addresses the effects of growth rate on the dynamics of a paradigmatic example of genetic oscillator, the repressilator. Making use of empirical growth-rate dependencies of parameters in bacteria, we show that the repressilator dynamics can switch between oscillations and convergence to a fixed point depending on the cellular state of growth, and thus on the nutrients it is fed. The physical support of the circuit (type of plasmid or gene positions on the chromosome) also plays an important role in determining the oscillation stability and the growth-rate dependence of period and amplitude. This analysis has potential application in the field of synthetic biology, and suggests that the coupling between endogenous genetic oscillators and cell physiology can have substantial consequences for their functionality.

  17. Dynamic Models of Learning That Characterize Parent-Child Exchanges Predict Vocabulary Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ober, David R.; Beekman, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Cumulative vocabulary models for infants and toddlers were developed from models of learning that predict trajectories associated with low, average, and high vocabulary growth rates (14 to 46 months). It was hypothesized that models derived from rates of learning mirror the type of exchanges provided to infants and toddlers by parents and…

  18. The dynamics of sorption of sulfuric acid by weakly basic polyacrylic anion exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamchenko, A. V.; Kushnir, T. V.

    2009-05-01

    The nonequilibrium dynamics of sorption of sulfuric acid by free base forms of Amberlite IRA-67 and Lewatite VP.OC.1072 weakly basic anion exchangers is studied. It is established that, in hydrodynamic regimes of filtration, which are typical of OH filters of the first stage of water-desalting plants, the limiting stage of sorption kinetics is inside diffusion. It is concluded that the process is correctly described by an asymptotic solution to the inside-diffusion model of sorption dynamics.

  19. The evolutionary rate dynamically tracks changes in HIV-1 epidemics

    SciTech Connect

    Maljkovic-berry, Irina; Athreya, Gayathri; Daniels, Marcus; Bruno, William; Korber, Bette; Kuiken, Carla; Ribeiro, Ruy M

    2009-01-01

    Large-sequence datasets provide an opportunity to investigate the dynamics of pathogen epidemics. Thus, a fast method to estimate the evolutionary rate from large and numerous phylogenetic trees becomes necessary. Based on minimizing tip height variances, we optimize the root in a given phylogenetic tree to estimate the most homogenous evolutionary rate between samples from at least two different time points. Simulations showed that the method had no bias in the estimation of evolutionary rates and that it was robust to tree rooting and topological errors. We show that the evolutionary rates of HIV-1 subtype B and C epidemics have changed over time, with the rate of evolution inversely correlated to the rate of virus spread. For subtype B, the evolutionary rate slowed down and tracked the start of the HAART era in 1996. Subtype C in Ethiopia showed an increase in the evolutionary rate when the prevalence increase markedly slowed down in 1995. Thus, we show that the evolutionary rate of HIV-1 on the population level dynamically tracks epidemic events.

  20. Experience with dynamic reinforcement rates decreases resistance to extinction.

    PubMed

    Craig, Andrew R; Shahan, Timothy A

    2016-03-01

    The ability of organisms to detect reinforcer-rate changes in choice preparations is positively related to two factors: the magnitude of the change in rate and the frequency with which rates change. Gallistel (2012) suggested similar rate-detection processes are responsible for decreases in responding during operant extinction. Although effects of magnitude of change in reinforcer rate on resistance to extinction are well known (e.g., the partial-reinforcement-extinction effect), effects of frequency of changes in rate prior to extinction are unknown. Thus, the present experiments examined whether frequency of changes in baseline reinforcer rates impacts resistance to extinction. Pigeons pecked keys for variable-interval food under conditions where reinforcer rates were stable and where they changed within and between sessions. Overall reinforcer rates between conditions were controlled. In Experiment 1, resistance to extinction was lower following exposure to dynamic reinforcement schedules than to static schedules. Experiment 2 showed that resistance to presession feeding, a disruptor that should not involve change-detection processes, was unaffected by baseline-schedule dynamics. These findings are consistent with the suggestion that change detection contributes to extinction. We discuss implications of change-detection processes for extinction of simple and discriminated operant behavior and relate these processes to the behavioral-momentum based approach to understanding extinction. PMID:26813330

  1. Dynamics of polymeric brushes: End exchange and bridging kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johner, A.; Joanny, J. F.

    1993-01-01

    We study some dynamical aspects of grafted polymer layers in a solvent. The structure of the brush is described in a θ solvent by the self-consistent mean field theory and in a good solvent using scaling laws. The Rouse-Zimm model including hydrodynamic interactions is used for the dynamic properties. A given chain end explores the entire thickness of a free grafted layer in a time Te proportional to the cube of the thickness. The exploration time is much larger than the Rouse time that characterizes the relaxation of the fluctuations of the chains conformations. In a θ-solvent we give a detailed study of the relaxation of the density of a few labeled chain ends towards its equilibrium value. The bridging kinetics between a grafting plate and a plate adsorbing the free ends is also discussed. When adsorption proceeds, an exclusion zone grows in the vicinity of the adsorbing plate. To cross the exclusion zone and adsorb, a chain end must overcome an energy barrier. The typical adsorption time is the first passage time through this barrier. Except in the very late stages where the fraction of chains η forming bridges saturates at its equilibrium value, the energy barrier against adsorption increases as a power law of η and the bridging fraction increases very slowly (logarithmically) with time. Both weak bridging where only a small fraction of chains form bridges and total bridging where all the chains form bridges are studied.

  2. Structure of Met-enkephalin in explicit aqueous solution using replica exchange molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sanbonmatsu, K Y; García, A E

    2002-02-01

    Replica exchange molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of Met-enkephalin in explicit solvent reveal helical and nonhelical structures. Four predominant structures of Met-enkephalin are sampled with comparable probabilities (two helical and two nonhelical). The energy barriers between these configurations are low, suggesting that Met-enkephalin switches easily between configurations. This is consistent with the requirement that Met-enkephalin be sufficiently flexible to bind to several different receptors. Replica exchange simulations of 32 ns are shown to sample approximately five times more configurational space than constant temperature MD simulations of the same duration. The energy landscape for the replica exchange simulation is presented. A detailed study of replica trajectories demonstrates that the significant increases in temperature provided by the replica exchange technique enable transitions from nonhelical to helical structures that would otherwise be prevented by kinetic trapping. Met-enkephalin (Type Entrez Proteins; Value A61445; Service Entrez Proteins). PMID:11807951

  3. NASA geometry data exchange specification for computational fluid dynamics (NASA IGES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Matthew W.; Kerr, Patricia A.; Thorp, Scott A.; Jou, Jin J.

    1994-01-01

    This document specifies a subset of an existing product data exchange specification that is widely used in industry and government. The existing document is called the Initial Graphics Exchange Specification. This document, a subset of IGES, is intended for engineers analyzing product performance using tools such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. This document specifies how to define mathematically and exchange the geometric model of an object. The geometry is represented utilizing nonuniform rational B-splines (NURBS) curves and surfaces. Only surface models are represented; no solid model representation is included. This specification does not include most of the other types of product information available in IGES (e.g., no material properties or surface finish properties) and does not provide all the specific file format details of IGES. The data exchange protocol specified in this document is fully conforming to the American National Standard (ANSI) IGES 5.2.

  4. Theoretical investigation on the mechanism and dynamics of oxo exchange of neptunyl(VI) hydroxide in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xia; Chai, Zhifang; Wang, Dongqi

    2015-03-21

    Four types of reaction mechanisms for the oxo ligand exchange of monomeric and dimeric neptunyl(VI) hydroxide in aqueous solution were explored computationally using density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio classical molecular dynamics. The obtained results were compared with previous studies on the oxo exchange of uranyl hydroxide, as well as with experiments. It is found that the stable T-shaped [NpO3(OH)3](3-) intermediate is a key species for oxo exchange in the proton transfer in mononuclear Path I and binuclear Path IV, similar to the case of uranyl(VI) hydroxide. Path I is thought to be the preferred oxo exchange mechanism for neptunyl(VI) hydroxide in our calculations, due to the lower activation energy (22.7 and 13.1 kcal mol(-1) for ΔG(‡) and ΔH(‡), respectively) of the overall reaction. Path II via a cis-neptunyl structure assisted by a water molecule might be a competitive channel against Path I with a mononuclear mechanism, owing to a rapid dynamical process occurring in Path II. In Path IV with the binuclear mechanism, oxo exchange is accomplished via the interaction between [NpO2(OH)4](2-) and T-shaped [NpO3(OH)3](3-) with a low activation energy for the rate-determining step, however, the overall energy required to fulfill the reaction is slightly higher than that in mononuclear Path I, suggesting a possible binuclear process in the higher energy region. The chemical bonding evolution along the reaction pathways was discussed by using topological methodologies of the electron localization function (ELF). PMID:25706188

  5. Probing ultrafast photo-induced dynamics of the exchange energy in a Heisenberg antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batignani, G.; Bossini, D.; di Palo, N.; Ferrante, C.; Pontecorvo, E.; Cerullo, G.; Kimel, A.; Scopigno, T.

    2015-08-01

    Manipulating the macroscopic phases of solids using ultrashort light pulses has resulted in spectacular phenomena, including metal-insulator transitions, superconductivity and subpicosecond modification of magnetic order. The development of this research area strongly depends on the understanding and optical control of fundamental interactions in condensed matter, in particular the exchange interaction. However, disentangling the timescales relevant for the contributions of the exchange interaction and spin dynamics to the exchange energy, Eex, is a challenge. Here, we introduce femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering to unravel the ultrafast photo-induced dynamics of magnetic excitations at the edge of the Brillouin zone. We find that femtosecond laser excitation of the antiferromagnet KNiF3 triggers a spectral shift of the two-magnon line, the energy of which is proportional to Eex. By unravelling the photo-induced modification of the two-magnon line frequency from a dominating nonlinear optical effect, we find that Eex is increased by the electromagnetic stimulus.

  6. Dynamic exchanges between DOM and POM pools in coastal and inland aquatic ecosystems: A review.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Chen, Meilian; Schlautman, Mark A; Hur, Jin

    2016-05-01

    Dynamic exchanges between dissolved organic matter (DOM) and particulate organic matter (POM) plays a critical role in organic carbon cycling in coastal and inland aquatic ecosystems, interactions with aquatic organisms, mobility and bioavailability of pollutants, among many other ecological and geochemical phenomena. Although DOM-POM exchange processes have been widely studied from different aspects, little to no effort has been made to date to provide a comprehensive, mechanistic, and micro-spatial schema for understanding various exchange processes occurring in different aquatic ecosystems in a unified way. The phenomena occurring between DOM and POM were explained here with the homogeneous and heterogeneous mechanisms. In the homogeneous mechanism, the participating components are only organic matter (OM) constituents themselves with aggregation and dissolution involved, whereas OM is associated with other components such as minerals and particulate colloids in the heterogeneous counterpart. Besides the generally concerned processes of aggregation/dissolution and adsorption/desorption, other ecological factors such as sunlight and organisms can also participate in DOM-POM exchanges through altering the chemical nature of OM. Despite the limitation of current analytical technologies, many unknown and/or unquantified processes need to be identified to unravel the complicated exchanges of OM between its dissolved and particulate states. Based on the review of several previous mathematical models, we proposed a unified conceptual model to describe all major dynamic exchange mechanisms on the basis of exergy theory. More knowledge of dynamic DOM-POM exchanges is warranted to overcome the potential problems arising from a simple division of OM into dissolved versus particulate states and to further develop more sophisticated mathematic models. PMID:26881732

  7. The effect of water exchange on bacterioplankton depletion and inorganic nutrient dynamics in coral reef cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Duyl, F. C.; Scheffers, S. R.; Thomas, F. I. M.; Driscoll, M.

    2006-03-01

    We studied the effect of water exchange on the depletion (or accumulation) of bacterioplankton, dissolved organic matter and inorganic nutrients in small open framework cavities (50-70 l) at 15 m depth on the coral reef along Curaçao, Netherlands Antilles. The bacterioplankton removal rate in cavities increased with increasing water exchange rates up to a threshold of 0.0045 s-1, reaching values of 50-100 mg C m-2 total interior cavity surface area (CSA) per day. Beyond the threshold, bacterioplankton removal dropped. The cryptic community is apparently adapted to the average water exchange in these cavities (0.0041 s-1). Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), nitrate + nitrite (NO x ) in particular, accumulated in cavity water and the accumulation decreased with increasing water exchange. Net NO x effluxes exceeded net DIN effluxes from cavities (average efflux rate of 1.9 mmol NO x vs. 0.8 mmol DIN m-2 interior CSA per day). The difference is ascribed to net ammonium losses (NH4) in cavities at reef concentrations >0.025 μM NH4, possibly due to enhanced nitrification. Dissolved inorganic phosphate accumulated in cavities, but was not related to water exchange. The cryptic biota in cavities depend on water exchange for optimization of consumption of bacterioplankton and removal of inorganic nitrogen. Coral cavities are an evident sink of bacterioplankton and a source of NO x and PO{4/3-}.

  8. Metabolic analyzer. [for measuring metabolic rate and breathing dynamics of human beings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, J. A.; Perry, C. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An apparatus is described for the measurement of metabolic rate and breathing dynamics in which inhaled and exhaled breath are sensed by sealed, piston-displacement type spirometers. These spirometers electrically measure the volume of inhaled and exhaled breath. A mass spectrometer analyzes simultaneously for oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen and water vapor. Computation circuits are responsive to the outputs of the spirometers, mass spectrometer, temperature, pressure and timing signals and compute oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, minute volume and respiratory exchange ratio. A selective indicator provides for read-out of these data at predetermined cyclic intervals.

  9. Local dynamics of heart rate: detection and prognostic implications.

    PubMed

    Moss, Travis J; Lake, Douglas E; Moorman, J Randall

    2014-10-01

    The original observation that reduced heart rate variability (HRV) confers poor prognosis after myocardial infarction has been followed by many studies of heart rate dynamics. We tested the hypothesis that an entropy-based local dynamics measure gave prognostic information in ambulatory patients undergoing 24-h electrocardiography. In this context, entropy is the probability that short templates will find matches in the time series. We studied RR interval time series from 24-h Holter monitors of 1564 consecutive patients over age 39. We generated histograms of the count of templates as a function of the number of templates matches in short RR interval time series, and found characteristic appearance of histograms for atrial fibrillation, sinus rhythm with normal HRV, and sinus rhythm with reduced HRV and premature ventricular contractions (PVCs). We developed statistical models to detect the abnormal dynamic phenotype of reduced HRV with PVCs and fashioned a local dynamics score (LDs) that, after controlling for age, added more prognostic information than other standard risk factors and common HRV metrics, including, to our surprise, the PVC count and the HRV of normal-to-normal intervals. Addition of the LDs to a predictive model using standard risk factors significantly increased the ROC area and the net reclassification improvement was 27%. We conclude that abnormal local dynamics of heart rate confer adverse prognosis in patients undergoing 24-h ambulatory electrocardiography. PMID:25229393

  10. Monitoring the Dynamics of Monomer Exchange Using Electrospray Mass Spectrometry: The Case of the Dimeric Glucosamine-6-Phosphate Synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevreux, Guillaume; Atmanene, Cédric; Lopez, Philippe; Ouazzani, Jamal; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Badet, Bernard; Badet-Denisot, Marie-Ange; Sanglier-Cianférani, Sarah

    2011-03-01

    Escherichia coli glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase (GlmS) is a dimeric enzyme from the glutamine-dependent amidotransferases family, which catalyses the conversion of D-fructose-6-phosphate (Fru6P) and glutamine (Gln) into D-glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P) and glutamate, respectively. Extensive X-ray crystallography investigations have been reported, highlighting the importance of the dimeric association to form the sugar active site as well as significant conformational changes of the protein upon substrate and product binding. In the present work, an approach based on time-resolved noncovalent mass spectrometry has been developed to study the dynamics of GlmS subunit exchange. Using 14N versus 15N labeled proteins, the kinetics of GlmS subunit exchange was monitored with the wild-type enzyme in the presence of different substrates and products as well as with the protein bearing a key amino acid mutation specially designed to weaken the dimer interface. Determination of rate constants of subunit exchange revealed important modifications of the protein dynamics: while glutamine, glutamate, and K603A mutation accelerates subunit exchange, Fru6P and GlcN6P totally prevent it. These results are described in light of the available structural information, providing additional useful data for both the characterization of GlmS catalytic process and the design of new GlmS inhibitors. Finally, time-resolved noncovalent MS can be proposed as an additional biophysical technique for real-time monitoring of protein dynamics.

  11. A review of air exchange rate models for air pollution exposure assessments.

    PubMed

    Breen, Michael S; Schultz, Bradley D; Sohn, Michael D; Long, Thomas; Langstaff, John; Williams, Ronald; Isaacs, Kristin; Meng, Qing Yu; Stallings, Casson; Smith, Luther

    2014-11-01

    A critical aspect of air pollution exposure assessments is estimation of the air exchange rate (AER) for various buildings where people spend their time. The AER, which is the rate of exchange of indoor air with outdoor air, is an important determinant for entry of outdoor air pollutants and for removal of indoor-emitted air pollutants. This paper presents an overview and critical analysis of the scientific literature on empirical and physically based AER models for residential and commercial buildings; the models highlighted here are feasible for exposure assessments as extensive inputs are not required. Models are included for the three types of airflows that can occur across building envelopes: leakage, natural ventilation, and mechanical ventilation. Guidance is provided to select the preferable AER model based on available data, desired temporal resolution, types of airflows, and types of buildings included in the exposure assessment. For exposure assessments with some limited building leakage or AER measurements, strategies are described to reduce AER model uncertainty. This review will facilitate the selection of AER models in support of air pollution exposure assessments. PMID:23715084

  12. High-field measurement of the 129Xe-Cs binary spin-exchange rate coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu; Kuzma, Nicholas N.; Happer, William

    2004-03-01

    We report the first measurement of the binary spin-exchange rate coefficient κ in the ^129Xe-Cs system. Data were taken using ^129Xe NMR in glass cells containing isotopically enriched xenon gas at pressures on the order of atmospheres and a small amount of liquid Cs metal, in the temperature range from 120 to 140^rcC and at a magnetic field of 9.4 T. The contribution of CsXe van der Waals molecules to spin exchange should have been nearly eliminated by the high magnetic field, as confirmed by our measurements of the ^129Xe longitudinal relaxation time T1 in a series of cells with various densities of xenon. The Cs atomic number density [Cs] was controlled by the cell temperature, and was experimentally determined by analysis of the Faraday rotation of linearly polarized probe laser light. We measured κ = d (T_1-1)/d[Cs]= (2.81± 0.2) × 10-16 cm^3 s-1 . This is about 60% larger than the previously measured rate coefficient for the ^129Xe-Rb system(Y.-Y. Jau, N. N. Kuzma, and W. Happer, Phys. Rev. A 66, 052710 (2002).), κ =d (T_1-1)/d[Rb]= (1.75± 0.12) × 10-16 cm^3 s-1 . A comparison with theory(Y.-Y. Jau, N. N. Kuzma, and W. Happer, Phys. Rev. A 67, 022720 (2003).) will be discussed.

  13. Long range dependence in the high frequency USD/INR exchange rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dilip

    2014-02-01

    Using high frequency data, this paper examines the long memory property in the unconditional and conditional volatility of the USD/INR exchange rate at different time scales using the Local Whittle (LW), the Exact Local Whittle (ELW) and the FIAPARCH models. Results indicate that the long memory property remains quite stable across different time scales for both unconditional and conditional volatility measures. Results from the non-overlapping moving window approach indicate that the extreme events (such as the subprime crisis and the European debt crisis) resulted in highly persistent behavior of the USD/INR exchange rate and thus lead to market inefficiency. This paper also examines the long memory property in the realized volatility based on different time scale data. Results indicate that the realized volatility measures based on different scales of the high frequency data exhibit a consistent and stable long memory property. However, the realized volatility measures based on daily data exhibit lower degree of long-range dependence. This study has implications for traders and investors (with different trading horizons) and can be helpful in predicting expected future volatility and in designing and implementing trading strategies at different time scales.

  14. Maximizing T2-exchange in Dy3+DOTA-(amide)X chelates: Fine-tuning the water molecule exchange rate for enhanced T2 contrast in MRI

    PubMed Central

    Soesbe, Todd C.; Ratnakar, S. James; Milne, Mark; Zhang, Shanrong; Do, Quyen N.; Kovacs, Zoltan; Sherry, A. Dean

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The water molecule exchange rates in a series of DyDOTA-(amide)X chelates were fine-tuned to maximize the effects of T2-exchange line broadening and improve T2 contrast. Methods Four DyDOTA-(amide)X chelates having a variable number of glycinate side-arms were prepared and characterized as T2-exchange agents. The non-exchanging DyTETA chelate was also used to measure the bulk water T2 reduction due solely to T2*. The total transverse relaxivity (r2tot) at 22, 37, and 52 °C for each chelate was measured in vitro at 9.4 T (400 MHz) by fitting plots of total T2−1 versus concentration. The water molecule exchange rates for each complex were measured by fitting 17O line-width versus temperature data taken at 9.4 T (54.3 MHz). Results The measured transverse relaxivities due to water molecule exchange (r2ex) and bound water lifetimes (τM) were in excellent agreement with Swift-Connick theory, with DyDOTA-(gly)3 giving the largest r2ex = 11.8 s−1 mM−1 at 37 °C. Conclusion By fine-tuning the water molecule exchange rate at 37 °C, the transverse relaxivity has been increased by 2 to 30 times compared to previously studied Dy3+-based chelates. Polymerization or dendrimerization of the optimal chelate could yield a highly sensitive, molecule-sized T2 contrast agent for improved molecular imaging applications. PMID:24390729

  15. Distribution and variability of the 24-h average air exchange rates and interzonal flow rates in 26 Japanese residences in 5 seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Naohide; Kataoka, Toshiyuki; Takamine, Koichi; Gamo, Masashi

    2011-07-01

    In this study, to evaluate the distribution of air exchange rates in Japan, daily, seasonal, and inter-residence variabilities were determined as well as the air exchange rate itself. In addition, airflows among multiple zones were also evaluated. For this purpose, the 24 h average air exchange rates and interzonal air flow rates were measured using a passive perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) method with three kinds of tracer gases for 1 week in three rooms of 26 Japanese residences over five seasons: summer and autumn of 2005, and winter, spring, and summer of 2006. During these seasons, the weekly average air exchange rates were found to be 1.6 ± 1.7, 0.58 ± 0.94, 0.61 ± 0.93, 1.2 ± 2.5, and 1.7 ± 1.8 h -1, respectively. Two-way repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that the air exchange rates differed significantly with respect to the seasons, residences, and interaction of seasons and residences ( p < 0.01). In addition, the air exchange rates in both summers and spring were statistically higher than those in autumn and winter (Sheffe test, p < 0.01). According to the ANOVA, the percentage contribution of inter-residence variability, seasonal variability, interaction of seasonal and inter-residence variabilities, and daily variability to the total variability of the 24 h average air exchange rates in the present survey was 51%, 44%, 3.7%, and 1.0%, respectively.

  16. On The Temporal Dynamics Of Coupled Water And Carbon Exchange: Implications For Predictions Over Meteorological And Climate Time Scales.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albertson, J. D.; Williams, C. A.; Scanlon, T. M.

    2002-12-01

    Short term water and carbon exchanges between vegetation and the atmosphere are strongly coupled through the stomatal function of plants. These high-frequency exchange rates are modulated by the lower-frequency variability in vegetation cover, as it responds to changes in forcing, such as water availability, across a range of time scales. Furthermore, the relative fractions of the dominant plant functional groups on the landscape possess different sensitivities and strategies (i.e. niches) with respect to environmental variables. An example of this is the classical difference in rooting depth (reservoir size) and wilting points of herbaceous and woody vegetation. Therefore, low frequency changes in the vegetation structure have clear mechanistic impacts on the functional behavior of the landscape in the context of water and carbon cycling. In this talk we highlight the interplay between functional dynamics and structural dynamics, with a focus on water and carbon exchange in a semi-arid context. We explore field data and remotely sensed data collected along the Kalahari Transect in southern Africa to gain insights into the processes and there effects on diurnal, inter-storm, seasonal, and inter-annual time scales. In particular, we highlight the hydrological implications of the contrasting frequency response of grasses and woody vegetation in water-limited systems.

  17. On the temporal dynamics of coupled water and carbon exchange: implications for predictions over meteorological and climate time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albertson, J.; Scanlon, T.; Williams, C.

    2003-04-01

    Short term water and carbon exchanges between vegetation and the atmosphere are strongly coupled through the stomatal function of plants. These high-frequency exchange rates are modulated by the lower-frequency variability in vegetation cover, as it responds to changes in forcing, such as water availability, across a range of time scales. Furthermore, the relative fractions of the dominant plant functional groups on the landscape possess different sensitivities and strategies (i.e. niches) with respect to environmental variables. An example of this is the classical difference in rooting depth (reservoir size) and wilting points of herbaceous and woody vegetation. Therefore, low frequency changes in the vegetation structure have clear mechanistic impacts on the functional behavior of the landscape in the context of water and carbon cycling. In this talk we highlight the interplay between functional dynamics and structural dynamics, with a focus on water and carbon exchange in a semi-arid context. We explore field data and remotely sensed data collected along the Kalahari Transect in southern Africa to gain insights into the processes and there effects on diurnal, inter-storm, seasonal, and inter-annual time scales. In particular, we highlight the hydrological implications of the contrasting frequency response of grasses and woody vegetation in water-limited systems.

  18. Upper limit on the rate constant for isotope exchange between molecular oxygen and ozone at 298 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, S. M.; Morton, J.; Mauersberger, K.

    1987-01-01

    The gas phase bimolecular isotope exchange reaction between molecular oxygen and ozone has been investigated directly for the first time. Its rate coefficient is found to be less than 2 x 10 to the -25th cu cm/sec at 298 K, over six orders of magnitude below recent estimates. Much faster exchange was observed over condensed ozone at 77 K, suggesting isotopic scrambling is catalyzed under these conditions. The low rate coefficient implies that homogeneous exchange between ground state oxygen and ozone molecules cannot play a significant role in heavy ozone chemistry.

  19. Transfer Rate Edited experiment for the selective detection of Chemical Exchange via Saturation Transfer (TRE-CEST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Joshua I.; Xia, Ding; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Jerschow, Alexej

    2015-07-01

    Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) magnetic resonance experiments have become valuable tools in magnetic resonance for the detection of low concentration solutes with far greater sensitivity than direct detection methods. Accurate measures of rates of chemical exchange provided by CEST are of particular interest to biomedical imaging communities where variations in chemical exchange can be related to subtle variations in biomarker concentration, temperature and pH within tissues using MRI. Despite their name, however, traditional CEST methods are not truly selective for chemical exchange and instead detect all forms of magnetization transfer including through-space NOE. This ambiguity crowds CEST spectra and greatly complicates subsequent data analysis. We have developed a Transfer Rate Edited CEST experiment (TRE-CEST) that uses two different types of solute labeling in order to selectively amplify signals of rapidly exchanging proton species while simultaneously suppressing 'slower' NOE-dominated magnetization transfer processes. This approach is demonstrated in the context of both NMR and MRI, where it is used to detect the labile amide protons of proteins undergoing chemical exchange (at rates ⩾ 30 s-1) while simultaneously eliminating signals originating from slower (∼5 s-1) NOE-mediated magnetization transfer processes. TRE-CEST greatly expands the utility of CEST experiments in complex systems, and in-vivo, in particular, where it is expected to improve the quantification of chemical exchange and magnetization transfer rates while enabling new forms of imaging contrast.

  20. Measurements of soil and canopy exchange rates in the Amazon rain forest using sup 222 Rn

    SciTech Connect

    Trumbore, S.E. Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, Palisades, NY ); Keller, M. ); Wofsy, S.C. ); Da Costa, J.M. )

    1990-09-20

    Measurements of the emission of {sup 222}Rn from Amazon forest soils, and profiles of {sup 222}Rn in air were used to study the ventilation of the soil atmosphere and the nocturnal forest canopy. The emission of {sup 222}Rn from the yellow clay soils dominant in the study area averaged 0.38 {plus minus} 0.07 atom cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. Nearby sand soils had similar fluxes, averaging 0.30 {plus minus} 0.07 atom cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The effective diffusivity in the clay soil (0.008 {plus minus} 0.004 cm{sup 2} s{sup {minus}1}), was lower than that for the sand soil (0.033 {plus minus} 0.030 cm{sup 2} s{sup {minus}1}). Profiles of {sup 222}Rn and CO{sub 2} in air showed steepest concentration gradients in the layer between 0 and 3 m above the soil surface. Aerodynamic resistances calculated for this layer from {sup 222}Rn and CO{sub 2} varied from 1.6 to 18 s cm{sup {minus}1}, with greater resistance during the afternoon than at night. Time averaged profiles of {sup 222}Rn in the forest canopy measured during the evening and night were combined with the soil flux measurements to compute the resistance of the subcanopy to exchange with overlying air. The integrated nocturnal rate of gas exchange between the canopy layer (0 to 41 m) and overlying atmosphere based on {sup 222}Rn averaged 0.33 {plus minus} 0.15 cm s{sup {minus}1}. An independent estimate of gas exchange, based on 13 nights of CO{sub 2} profiles, averaged 0.21 {plus minus} 0.40 cm s{sup {minus}1}. These exchange rates correspond to flushing times for the 41 m canopy layer of 3.4 and 5.5 hours, respectively. Comparison of {sup 222}Rn and CO{sub 2} profiles show that the nocturnal production of CO{sub 2} by above-ground vegetation was about 20% of the soil emission source, consistent with data from eddy-correlation experiments.

  1. Tungsten polyoxometalate molecules as active nodes for dynamic carrier exchange in hybrid molecular/semiconductor capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Balliou, A.; Douvas, A. M.; Normand, P.; Argitis, P.; Glezos, N.; Tsikritzis, D.; Kennou, S.

    2014-10-14

    In this work we study the utilization of molecular transition metal oxides known as polyoxometalates (POMs), in particular the Keggin structure anions of the formula PW₁₂O₄₀³⁻, as active nodes for potential switching and/or fast writing memory applications. The active molecules are being integrated in hybrid Metal-Insulator/POM molecules-Semiconductor capacitors, which serve as prototypes allowing investigation of critical performance characteristics towards the design of more sophisticated devices. The charging ability as well as the electronic structure of the molecular layer is probed by means of electrical characterization, namely, capacitance-voltage and current-voltage measurements, as well as transient capacitance measurements, C (t), under step voltage polarization. It is argued that the transient current peaks observed are manifestations of dynamic carrier exchange between the gate electrode and specific molecular levels, while the transient C (t) curves under conditions of molecular charging can supply information for the rate of change of the charge that is being trapped and de-trapped within the molecular layer. Structural characterization via surface and cross sectional scanning electron microscopy as well as atomic force microscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, UV and Fourier-transform IR spectroscopies, UPS, and XPS contribute to the extraction of accurate electronic structure characteristics and open the path for the design of new devices with on-demand tuning of their interfacial properties via the controlled preparation of the POM layer.

  2. Structure-dynamic basis of splicing-dependent regulation in tissue-specific variants of the sodium-calcium exchanger.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su Youn; Giladi, Moshe; Bohbot, Hilla; Hiller, Reuben; Chung, Ka Young; Khananshvili, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Tissue-specific splice variants of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers contain 2 Ca(2+)-binding regulatory domains (CBDs), CBD1 and CBD2. Ca(2+) interaction with CBD1 activates sodium-calcium exchangers (NCXs), and Ca(2+) binding to CBD2 alleviates Na(+)-dependent inactivation. A combination of mutually exclusive (A, B) and cassette (C-F) exons in CBD2 raises functionally diverse splice variants through unknown mechanisms. Here, the effect of exons on CBDs backbone dynamics were investigated in the 2-domain tandem (CBD12) of the brain, kidney, and cardiac splice variants by using hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and stopped-flow techniques. Mutually exclusive exons stabilize interdomain interactions in the apoprotein, which primarily predefines the extent of responses to Ca(2+) binding. Deuterium uptake levels were up to 20% lower in the cardiac vs. the brain CBD12, reveling that elongation of the CBD2 FG loop by cassette exons rigidifies the interdomain Ca(2+) salt bridge at the 2-domain interface, which secondarily modulates the Ca(2+)-bound states. In matching splice variants, the extent of Ca(2+)-induced rigidification correlates with decreased (up to 10-fold) Ca(2+) off rates, where the cardiac CBD12 exhibits the slowest Ca(2+) off rates. Collectively, structurally disordered/dynamic segments at mutually exclusive and cassette exons have local and distant effects on the folded structures nearby the Ca(2+) binding sites, which may serve as a structure-dynamic basis for splicing-dependent regulation of NCX. PMID:26644350

  3. Is the surface oxygen exchange rate linked to bulk ion diffusivity in mixed conducting Ruddlesden–Popper phases?

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tomkiewicz, Alex C.; Tamimi, Mazin A.; Huq, Ashfia; McIntosh, Steven

    2015-03-02

    There is a possible link between oxygen surface exchange rate and bulk oxygen anion diffusivity in mixed ionic and electronic conducting oxides; it is a topic of great interest and debate. While a large body of experimental evidence and theoretical analyses support a link, observed differences between bulk and surface composition of these materials are hard to reconcile with this observation. This is further compounded by potential problems with simultaneous measurement of both parameters. Here we utilize separate techniques, in situ neutron diffraction and pulsed isotopic surface exchange, to examine bulk ion mobility and surface oxygen exchange rates of threemore » Ruddlesden-Popper phases, general form An-1A2'BnO3n+1, An-1A2'BnX3n+1; LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ (n = 1), La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ (n = 2) and LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ (n = 3). These measurements are complemented by surface composition determination via high sensitivity-low energy ion scattering. We observe a correlation between bulk ion mobility and surface exchange rate between materials. The surface exchange rates vary by more than one order of magnitude with high anion mobility in the bulk of an oxygen vacancy-rich n = 2 Ruddlesden-Popper material correlating with rapid oxygen exchange. Furthermore this is in contrast with the similar surface exchange rates which we may expect due to similar surface compositions across all three samples. This paper conclude that experimental limitations lead to inherent convolution of surface and bulk rates, and that surface exchange steps are not likely to be rate limiting in oxygen incorporation.« less

  4. Dynamic UltraFast 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (UF-EXSY) of hyperpolarized substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon Swisher, Christine; Koelsch, Bertram; Sukumar, Subramianam; Sriram, Renuka; Santos, Romelyn Delos; Wang, Zhen Jane; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel; Larson, Peder

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we present a new ultrafast method for acquiring dynamic 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (EXSY) within a single acquisition. This technique reconstructs two-dimensional EXSY spectra from one-dimensional spectra based on the phase accrual during echo times. The Ultrafast-EXSY acquisition overcomes long acquisition times typically needed to acquire 2D NMR data by utilizing sparsity and phase dependence to dramatically undersample in the indirect time dimension. This allows for the acquisition of the 2D spectrum within a single shot. We have validated this method in simulations and hyperpolarized enzyme assay experiments separating the dehydration of pyruvate and lactate-to-pyruvate conversion. In a renal cell carcinoma cell (RCC) line, bidirectional exchange was observed. This new technique revealed decreased conversion of lactate-to-pyruvate with high expression of monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), known to correlate with aggressive cancer phenotypes. We also showed feasibility of this technique in vivo in a RCC model where bidirectional exchange was observed for pyruvate-lactate, pyruvate-alanine, and pyruvate-hydrate and were resolved in time. Broadly, the technique is well suited to investigate the dynamics of multiple exchange pathways and applicable to hyperpolarized substrates where chemical exchange has shown great promise across a range of disciplines.

  5. Dynamic UltraFast 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (UF-EXSY) of hyperpolarized substrates

    PubMed Central

    Swisher, Christine Leon; Koelsch, Bertram; Sukumar, Subramianam; Sriram, Renuka; Santos, Romelyn Delos; Wang, Zhen Jane; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel; Larson, Peder

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present a new ultrafast method for acquiring dynamic 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (EXSY) within a single acquisition. This technique reconstructs two-dimensional EXSY spectra from one-dimensional spectra based on the phase accrual during echo times. The Ultrafast-EXSY acquisition overcomes long acquisition times typically needed to acquire 2D NMR data by utilizing sparsity and phase dependence to dramatically undersample in the indirect time dimension. This allows for the acquisition of the 2D spectrum within a single shot. We have validated this method in simulations and hyperpolarized enzyme assay experiments separating the dehydration of pyruvate and lactate-to-pyruvate conversion. In a renal cell carcinoma cell (RCC) line, bidirectional exchange was observed. This new technique revealed decreased conversion of lactate-to-pyruvate with high expression of monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), known to correlate with aggressive cancer phenotypes. We also showed feasibility of this technique in vivo in a RCC model where bidirectional exchange was observed for pyruvate–lactate, pyruvate–alanine, and pyruvate–hydrate and were resolved in time. Broadly, the technique is well suited to investigate the dynamics of multiple exchange pathways and applicable to hyperpolarized substrates where chemical exchange has shown great promise across a range of disciplines. PMID:26117655

  6. Environmental variation, vegetation distribution, carbon dynamics and water/energy exchange at high latitudes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGuire, A.D.; Wirth, C.; Apps, M.; Beringer, J.; Clein, J.; Epstein, H.; Kicklighter, D.W.; Bhatti, J.; Chapin, F. S., III; De Groot, B.; Efremov, D.; Eugster, W.; Fukuda, M.; Gower, T.; Hinzman, L.; Huntley, B.; Jia, G.J.; Kasischke, E.; Melillo, J.; Romanovsky, V.; Shvidenko, A.; Vaganov, E.; Walker, D.

    2002-01-01

    The responses of high latitude ecosystems to global change involve complex interactions among environmental variables, vegetation distribution, carbon dynamics, and water and energy exchange. These responses may have important consequences for the earth system. In this study, we evaluated how vegetation distribution, carbon stocks and turnover, and water and energy exchange are related to environmental variation spanned by the network of the IGBP high latitude transects. While the most notable feature of the high latitude transects is that they generally span temperature gradients from southern to northern latitudes, there are substantial differences in temperature among the transects. Also, along each transect temperature co-varies with precipitation and photosynthetically active radiation, which are also variable among the transects. Both climate and disturbance interact to influence latitudinal patterns of vegetation and soil carbon storage among the transects, and vegetation distribution appears to interact with climate to determine exchanges of heat and moisture in high latitudes. Despite limitations imposed by the data we assembled, the analyses in this study have taken an important step toward clarifying the complexity of interactions among environmental variables, vegetation distribution, carbon stocks and turnover, and water and energy exchange in high latitude regions. This study reveals the need to conduct coordinated global change studies in high latitudes to further elucidate how interactions among climate, disturbance, and vegetation distribution influence carbon dynamics and water and energy exchange in high latitudes.

  7. On the use of a weak-coupling thermostat in replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhixiong; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F.

    2015-07-01

    In a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, various thermostat algorithms, including Langevin dynamics (LD), Nosé-Hoover (NH), and weak-coupling (WC) thermostats, can be used to keep the simulation temperature constant. A canonical ensemble is generated by the use of LD and NH, while the nature of the ensemble produced by WC has not yet been identified. A few years ago, it was shown that when using a WC thermostat with particular values of the temperature coupling time for liquid water at ambient temperature and pressure, the distribution of the potential energy is less wide than the canonical one. This led to an artifact in temperature replica-exchange molecular dynamics (T-REMD) simulations in which the potential energy distributions appear not to be equal to the ones of standard MD simulations. In this paper, we re-investigate this problem. We show that this artifact is probably due to the ensemble generated by WC being incompatible with the T-REMD replica-exchange criterion, which assumes a canonical configurational ensemble. We also show, however, that this artifact can be reduced or even eliminated by particular choices of the temperature coupling time of WC and the replica-exchange time period of T-REMD, i.e., when the temperature coupling time is chosen very close to the MD time step or when the exchange time period is chosen large enough. An attempt to develop a T-REMD replica-exchange criterion which is likely to be more compatible with the WC configurational ensemble is reported. Furthermore, an exchange criterion which is compatible with a microcanonical ensemble is used in total energy REMD simulations.

  8. Amide proton exchange rates of a bound pepsin inhibitor determined by isotope-edited proton NMR experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fesik, S.W.; Luly, J.R.; Stein, H.H.; BaMaung, N.

    1987-09-30

    From a series of isotope-edited proton NMR spectra, amide proton exchange rates were measured at 20 C, 30 C, and 40/sup 0/C for a tightly bound /sup 15/N-labeled tripeptide inhibitor of porcine pepsin (IC50 = 1.7 X 10(-) M). Markedly different NH exchange rates were observed for the three amide protons of the bound inhibitor. The P1 NH exchanged much more slowly than the P2 NH and P3 NH. These results are discussed in terms of the relative solvent accessibility in the active site and the role of the NH protons of the inhibitor for hydrogen bonding to the enzyme. In this study a useful approach is demonstrated for obtaining NH exchange rates on ligands bound to biomacromolecules, the knowledge of which could be of potential utility in the design of therapeutically useful nonpeptide enzyme inhibitors from peptide leads.

  9. Charge-exchange reactions and electron-capture rates for presupernova stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zegers, Remco

    2015-04-01

    Weak reaction rates such as electron captures and beta decays play major roles in a variety of astrophysical phenomena, such as core-collapse and thermonuclear supernovae and accreting neutron stars. Consequently, the use of accurate weak reaction rates in astrophysical simulations to understand these phenomena is important. Unfortunately, the number of relevant nuclei is typically very large, and, except for a few special cases, it is impossible to rely on experimental results only: theoretical models must be used to estimate the weak reaction rates. These models can then be benchmarked and improved on the basis of a limited number of experimental data. The most important nuclear structure input that is required for calculating weak reaction rates are Gamow-Teller transition strengths. Although these can be extracted from beta and electron-capture decay data, the energy window accessible by such experiments is limited, if accessible at all. However, at the high temperatures and densities that occur in massive stars prior to the cataclysmic demise, transitions to final states at high excitation energies are important. In addition, to properly test theory, full Gamow-Teller transition strength distributions are very valuable. Fortunately, nature is kind: charge-exchange experiments at intermediate energies can provide the relevant strength distributions over a wide energy window and a variety of charge-exchange probes, such as (p,n), (n,p), (d,2 He) and (t,3 He) have been used to extract strengths of relevance for astrophysics (and for other purposes). This presentation will focus on efforts to validate electron capture rates calculated based on nuclear structure models for nuclei with masses ranging from A ~ 40-65, and on studies aimed at testing astrophysical sensitivities to uncertainties/deviations in the theoretical rates. These efforts include experiments with unstable isotopes, and special gamma-ray coincidence techniques to localize very weak, but

  10. Asymmetry in the static and dynamic magnetic properties of a weak exchange spring trilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubbiotti, G.; Carlotti, G.; Weston, J.; Zangari, G.; Crew, D. C.; Stamps, R. L.

    2005-02-01

    Experimental results and theoretical calculations are presented for the static and dynamic magnetic properties of a weak exchange-spring symmetric FeTaN/FeSm/FeTaN trilayer. Static properties were investigated by means of alternating gradient field and magneto-optic Kerr effect magnetometries. The frequencies of three spin wave modes were measured by inelastic light scattering from long wavelength thermal spin waves. The combined analysis of spin wave frequencies and magnetometry data provides a consistent set of exchange, anisotropy and film thickness parameters.

  11. Competition between abstraction and exchange channels in H + HCN reaction: Full-dimensional quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua

    2013-12-14

    Dynamics of the title reaction is investigated on an ab initio based potential energy surface using a full-dimensional quantum wave packet method within the centrifugal sudden approximation. It is shown that the reaction between H and HCN leads to both the hydrogen exchange and hydrogen abstraction channels. The exchange channel has a lower threshold and larger cross section than the abstraction channel. It also has more oscillations due apparently to quantum resonances. Both channels are affected by long-lived resonances supported by potential wells. Comparison with experimental cross sections indicates underestimation of the abstraction barrier height.

  12. Initial rate and isotope exchange studies of rat skeletal muscle hexokinase

    SciTech Connect

    Ganson, N.J.; Fromm, H.J.

    1985-10-05

    The kinetic mechanism of rat skeletal muscle hexokinase (hexokinase II) was investigated in light of a proposal by Cornish-Bowden and his co-workers. The authors investigated the mechanism of action of hexokinase II by studying initial rate kinetics in the nonphysiological direction and by isotope exchange at chemical equilibrium. The former experiments were carried out in the absence of inhibitors and then with AMP, which is a competitive inhibitor of ADP, and with glucose 1,6-bisphosphate, a competitive inhibitor of glucose-6-P. The findings from these experiments suggest that the kinetic mechanism is rapid equilibrium Random Bi Bi. Isotope exchange at equilibrium studies also supports the random nature of the muscle hexokinase reaction; however, they also suggest that the mechanism is partially ordered, i.e. there is a preferred pathway associated with the branched mechanism. Approximately two-thirds of the flux through the hexokinase reaction involves the glucose on first glucose-6-P off last branch of the Random Bi Bi mechanism. These results imply that the kinetic mechanism is steady state Random Bi Bi. There is some evidence to suggest that glucose-6-P binds to an allosteric site on muscle hexokinase, but none to suppose that ATP binds allosterically.

  13. Amide proton exchange rates of oxidized and reduced Saccharomyces cerevisiae iso-1-cytochrome c.

    PubMed Central

    Marmorino, J. L.; Auld, D. S.; Betz, S. F.; Doyle, D. F.; Young, G. B.; Pielak, G. J.

    1993-01-01

    Proton NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the rate constant, kobs, for exchange of labile protons in both oxidized (Fe(III)) and reduced (Fe(II)) iso-1-cytochrome c. We find that slowly exchanging backbone amide protons tend to lack solvent-accessible surface area, possess backbone hydrogen bonds, and are present in regions of regular secondary structure as well as in omega-loops. Furthermore, there is no correlation between kobs and the distance from a backbone amide nitrogen to the nearest solvent-accessible atom. These observations are consistent with the local unfolding model. Comparisons of the free energy change for denaturation, delta Gd, at 298 K to the free energy change for local unfolding, delta Gop, at 298 K for the oxidized protein suggest that certain conformations possessing higher free energy than the denatured state are detected at equilibrium. Reduction of the protein results in a general increase in delta Gop. Comparisons of delta Gd to delta Gop for the reduced protein show that the most open states of the reduced protein possess more structure than its chemically denatured form. This persistent structure in high-energy conformations of the reduced form appears to involve the axially coordinated heme. PMID:8268806

  14. Effects of flooding on ion exchange rates in an Upper Mississippi River floodplain forest impacted by herbivory, invasion, and restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kreiling, Rebecca; DeJager, Nathan R.; Whitney Swanson; Eric A. Strauss; Meredith Thomsen

    2015-01-01

    We examined effects of flooding on supply rates of 14 nutrients in floodplain areas invaded by Phalaris arundinacea (reed canarygrass), areas restored to young successional forests (browsed by white-tailed deer and unbrowsed), and remnant mature forests in the Upper Mississippi River floodplain. Plant Root Simulator ion-exchange probes were deployed for four separate 28-day periods. The first deployment occurred during flooded conditions, while the three subsequent deployments were conducted during progressively drier periods. Time after flooding corresponded with increases in NO3 −-N, K+ and Zn+2, decreases in H2PO4 −-P, Fe+3, Mn+2, and B(OH)4-B, a decrease followed by an increase in NH4 +-N, Ca+2, Mg+2 and Al+3, and an increase followed by a decrease for SO4 −2-S. Plant community type had weak to no effects on nutrient supply rates compared to the stronger effects of flooding duration. Our results suggest that seasonal dynamics in floodplain nutrient availability are similarly driven by flood pulses in different community types. However, reed canarygrass invasion has potential to increase availability of some nutrients, while restoration of forest cover may promote recovery of nutrient availability to that observed in reference mature forests.

  15. Improved measurement of labile proton concentration-weighted chemical exchange rate (kws) with experimental factor-compensated and T1-normalized quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Renhua; Liu, Charng-Ming; Liu, Philip K; Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2012-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI enables measurement of dilute CEST agents and microenvironment properties such as pH and temperature, holding great promise for in vivo applications. However, because of confounding concomitant RF irradiation and relaxation effects, the CEST-weighted MRI contrast may not fully characterize the underlying CEST phenomenon. We postulated that the accuracy of quantitative CEST MRI could be improved if the experimental factors (labeling efficiency and RF spillover effect) were estimated and taken into account. Specifically, the experimental factor was evaluated as a function of exchange rate and CEST agent concentration ratio, which remained relatively constant for intermediate RF irradiation power levels. Hence, the experimental factors can be calculated based on the reasonably estimated exchange rate and labile proton concentration ratio, which significantly improved quantification. The simulation was confirmed with Creatine phantoms of serially varied concentration titrated to the same pH, whose reverse exchange rate (kws) was found to be linearly correlated with the concentration. In summary, the proposed solution provides simplified yet reasonably accurate quantification of the underlying CEST system, which may help guide the ongoing development of quantitative CEST MRI. PMID:22649044

  16. Two-component mixture model: Application to palm oil and exchange rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phoong, Seuk-Yen; Ismail, Mohd Tahir; Hamzah, Firdaus Mohamad

    2014-12-01

    Palm oil is a seed crop which is widely adopt for food and non-food products such as cookie, vegetable oil, cosmetics, household products and others. Palm oil is majority growth in Malaysia and Indonesia. However, the demand for palm oil is getting growth and rapidly running out over the years. This phenomenal cause illegal logging of trees and destroy the natural habitat. Hence, the present paper investigates the relationship between exchange rate and palm oil price in Malaysia by using Maximum Likelihood Estimation via Newton-Raphson algorithm to fit a two components mixture model. Besides, this paper proposes a mixture of normal distribution to accommodate with asymmetry characteristics and platykurtic time series data.

  17. Bioaccessibility of metal cations in soil is linearly related to its water exchange rate constant.

    PubMed

    Laird, Brian D; Peak, Derek; Siciliano, Steven D

    2011-05-01

    Site-specific risk assessments often incorporate the concepts of bioaccessibility (i.e., contaminant fraction released into gastrointestinal fluids) or bioavailability (i.e., contaminant fraction absorbed into systemic circulation) into the calculation of ingestion exposure. We evaluated total and bioaccessible metal concentrations for 19 soil samples under simulated stomach and duodenal conditions using an in vitro gastrointestinal model. We demonstrated that the median bioaccessibility of 23 metals ranged between <1 and 41% under simulated stomach conditions and < 1 and 63% under simulated duodenal conditions. Notably, these large differences in metal bioaccessibility were independent of equilibrium solubility and stability constants. Instead, the relationship (stomach phase R = 0.927; duodenum phase R = 0.891) between bioaccessibility and water exchange rates of metal cations (k(H₂O)) indicated that desorption kinetics may influence if not control metal bioaccessibility. PMID:21466150

  18. Multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis on gold, crude oil and foreign exchange rate time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Mayukha; Madhusudana Rao, P.; Manimaran, P.

    2014-12-01

    We apply the recently developed multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis method to investigate the cross-correlation behavior and fractal nature between two non-stationary time series. We analyze the daily return price of gold, West Texas Intermediate and Brent crude oil, foreign exchange rate data, over a period of 18 years. The cross correlation has been measured from the Hurst scaling exponents and the singularity spectrum quantitatively. From the results, the existence of multifractal cross-correlation between all of these time series is found. We also found that the cross correlation between gold and oil prices possess uncorrelated behavior and the remaining bivariate time series possess persistent behavior. It was observed for five bivariate series that the cross-correlation exponents are less than the calculated average generalized Hurst exponents (GHE) for q<0 and greater than GHE when q>0 and for one bivariate series the cross-correlation exponent is greater than GHE for all q values.

  19. Table 5.1. Exchange current densities and rate constants in aqueous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holze, R.

    This document is part of Volume 9 `Electrochemistry', Subvolume A, of Landolt-Börnstein - Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. This document lists the exchange current densities and the electrode reaction rate constants of the following metallic electrodes in aqueous systems for various electrolyte reactions: silver (Ag), aluminium (Al), gold (Au), bismuth (Bi), carbon (C), cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), cesium (Cs), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), gallium (Ga), mercury (Hg), indium (In), iridium (Ir), potassium (K), lithium (Li), molybdenum (Mo), natrium (Na), niobium (Nb), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), palladium (Pd), platinum (Pt), rubidium (Rb), rhodium (Rh), ruthenium (Ru), antimony (Sb), tin (Sn), tantalum (Ta), titanium (Ti), thallium (Tl), vanadium (V), tungsten (W), zinc (Zn). For each electrolyte reaction the electrolyte solution, the educt, product and concentration are specified along with the temperature of determination of the given values.

  20. Simulation of ceramics fracture due to high rate dynamic impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazarinov, N. A.; Bratov, V. A.; Petrov, Y. V.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper dynamic fracture process due to high-speed impact of steel plunger into ceramic sample is simulated. The developed numerical model is based on finite element method and a concept of incubation time criterion, which is proven applicable in order to predict brittle fracture under high-rate deformation. Simulations were performed for ZrO2(Y2O3) ceramic plates. To characterize fracture process quantitatively fracture surface area parameter is introduced and controlled. This parameter gives the area of new surface created during dynamic fracture of a sample and is essentially connected to energetic peculiarities of fracture process. Multiple simulations with various parameters made it possible to explore dependencies of fracture area on plunger velocity and material properties. Energy required to create unit of fracture area at fracture initiation (dynamic analogue of Griffith surface energy) was evaluated and was found to be an order of magnitude higher as comparing to its static value.

  1. Heart rate dynamics preceding hemorrhage in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Moss, Travis J; Clark, Matthew T; Lake, Douglas E; Moorman, J Randall; Calland, J Forrest

    2015-01-01

    Occult hemorrhage in surgical/trauma intensive care unit (STICU) patients is common and may lead to circulatory collapse. Continuous electrocardiography (ECG) monitoring may allow for early identification and treatment, and could improve outcomes. We studied 4,259 consecutive admissions to the STICU at the University of Virginia Health System. We collected ECG waveform data captured by bedside monitors and calculated linear and non-linear measures of the RR interbeat intervals. We tested the hypothesis that a transfusion requirement of 3 or more PRBC transfusions in a 24 hour period is preceded by dynamical changes in these heart rate measures and performed logistic regression modeling. We identified 308 hemorrhage events. A multivariate model including heart rate, standard deviation of the RR intervals, detrended fluctuation analysis, and local dynamics density had a C-statistic of 0.62. Earlier detection of hemorrhage might improve outcomes by allowing earlier resuscitation in STICU patients. PMID:26342251

  2. Generalized rate-equation analysis of excitation exchange between silicon nanoclusters and erbium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, A. J.; Wojdak, M.; Ahmad, I.; Loh, W. H.; Oton, C. J.

    2008-01-15

    We discuss the use of rate equations to analyze the sensitization of erbium luminescence by silicon nanoclusters. In applying the general form of second-order coupled rate-equations to the Si nanocluster-erbium system, we find that the photoluminescence dynamics cannot be described using a simple rate equation model. Both rise and fall times exhibit a stretched exponential behavior, which we propose arises from a combination of a strongly distance-dependent nanocluster-erbium interaction, along with the finite size distribution and indirect band gap of the silicon nanoclusters. Furthermore, the low fraction of erbium ions that can be excited nonresonantly is a result of the small number of ions coupled to nanoclusters.

  3. Rapid amide proton exchange rates in peptides and proteins measured by solvent quenching and two-dimensional NMR.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y. Z.; Paterson, Y.; Roder, H.

    1995-01-01

    In an effort to develop a more versatile quenched hydrogen exchange method for studies of peptide conformation and protein-ligand interactions, the mechanism of amide proton exchange for model peptides in DMSO-D2O mixtures was investigated by NMR methods. As in water, H-D exchange rates in the presence of 90% or 95% DMSO exhibit characteristic acid- and base-catalyzed processes and negligible water catalysis. However, the base-catalyzed rate is suppressed by as much as four orders of magnitude in 95% DMSO. As a result, the pH at which the exchange rate goes through a minimum is shifted up by about two pH units and the minimum exchange rate is approximately 100-fold reduced relative to that in D2O. The solvent-dependent decrease in base-catalyzed exchange rates can be attributed primarily to a large increase in pKa values for the NH group, whereas solvent effects on pKW seem less important. Addition of toluene and cyclohexane resulted in improved proton NMR chemical shift dispersion. The dramatic reduction in exchange rates observed in the solvent mixture at optimal pH makes it possible to apply 2D NMR for NH exchange measurements on peptides under conditions where rates are too rapid for direct NMR analysis. To test this solvent-quenching method, melittin was exchanged in D2O (pH 3.2, 12 degrees C), aliquots were quenched by rapid freezing, lyophilized, and dissolved in quenching buffer (70% DMSO, 25% toluene, 4% D2O, 1% cyclohexane, 75 mM dichloroacetic acid) for NMR analysis. Exchange rates for 21 amide protons were measured by recording 2D NMR spectra on a series of samples quenched at different times. The results are consistent with a monomeric unfolded conformation of melittin at acidic pH. The ability to trap labile protons by solvent quenching makes it possible to extend amide protection studies to peptide ligands or labile protons on the surface of a protein involved in macromolecular interactions. PMID:7613478

  4. New model describing the dynamical behaviour of penetration rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashiro, Tohru; Minagawa, Hiroe; Chiba, Michiko

    2013-02-01

    We propose a hierarchical logistic equation as a model to describe the dynamical behaviour of a penetration rate of a prevalent stuff. In this model, a memory, how many people who already possess it a person who does not process it yet met, is considered, which does not exist in the logistic model. As an application, we apply this model to iPod sales data, and find that this model can approximate the data much better than the logistic equation.

  5. Dynamics of leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence and stem diameter changes during freezing and thawing of Scots pine seedlings.

    PubMed

    Lindfors, Lauri; Hölttä, Teemu; Lintunen, Anna; Porcar-Castell, Albert; Nikinmaa, Eero; Juurola, Eija

    2015-12-01

    Boreal trees experience repeated freeze-thaw cycles annually. While freezing has been extensively studied in trees, the dynamic responses occurring during the freezing and thawing remain poorly understood. At freezing and thawing, rapid changes take place in the water relations of living cells in needles and in stem. While freezing is mostly limited to extracellular spaces, living cells dehydrate, shrink and their osmotic concentration increases. We studied how the freezing-thawing dynamics reflected on leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence and xylem and living bark diameter changes of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) saplings in controlled experiments. Photosynthetic rate quickly declined following ice nucleation and extracellular freezing in xylem and needles, almost parallel to a rapid shrinking of xylem diameter, while that of living bark followed with a slightly longer delay. While xylem and living bark diameters responded well to decreasing temperature and water potential of ice, the relationship was less consistent in the case of increasing temperature. Xylem showed strong temporal swelling at thawing suggesting water movement from bark. After thawing xylem diameter recovered to a pre-freezing level but living bark remained shrunk. We found that freezing affected photosynthesis at multiple levels. The distinct dynamics of photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance reveals that the decreased photosynthetic rate reflects impaired dark reactions rather than stomatal closure. Freezing also inhibited the capacity of the light reactions to dissipate excess energy as heat, via non-photochemical quenching, whereas photochemical quenching of excitation energy decreased gradually with temperature in agreement with the gas exchange data. PMID:26423334

  6. Short-term and long-term effects of low total pressure on gas exchange rates of spinach.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, K; Kurata, K

    2003-01-01

    In this study, spinach plants were grown under atmospheric and low pressure conditions with constant O2 and CO2 partial pressures, and the effects of low total pressure on gas exchange rates were investigated. CO2 assimilation and transpiration rates of spinach grown under atmospheric pressure increased after short-term exposure to low total pressure due to the enhancement of leaf conductance. However, gas exchange rates of plants grown at 25 kPa total pressure were not greater than those grown at atmospheric pressure. Stomatal pore length and width were significantly smaller in leaves grown at low total pressure. This result suggested that gas exchange rates of plants grown under low total pressure were not stimulated even with the enhancement of gas diffusion because the stomatal size and stomatal aperture decreased. PMID:12580188

  7. Short-term and long-term effects of low total pressure on gas exchange rates of spinach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwabuchi, K.; Kurata, K.

    In this study, spinach plants were grown under atmospheric and low pressure conditions with constant O2 and CO2 partial pressures, and the effects of low total pressure on gas exchange rates were investigated. CO2 assimilation and transpiration rates of spinach grown under atmospheric pressure increased after short-term exposure to low total pressure due to the enhancement of leaf conductance. However, gas exchange rates of plants grown at 25 kPa total pressure were not greater than those grown at atmospheric pressure. Stomatal pore length and width were significantly smaller in leaves grown at low total pressure. This result suggested that gas exchange rates of plants grown under low total pressure were not stimulated even with the enhancement of gas diffusion because the stomatal size and stomatal aperture decreased.

  8. Removal Dynamics of Immunoglobulin and Fibrinogen by Conventional Plasma Exchange, Selective Plasma Exchange, and a Combination of the Two.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Satoko; Ohkubo, Atsushi; Seshima, Hiroshi; Maeda, Takuma; Itagaki, Ayako; Kurashima, Naoki; Iimori, Soichiro; Naito, Shotaro; Sohara, Eisei; Rai, Tatemitsu; Uchida, Shinichi; Okado, Tomokazu

    2016-08-01

    While plasma exchange (PE) can eliminate plasma proteins, including all immunoglobulin (Ig) and coagulation factors, selective plasma exchange (SePE) can retain fibrinogen (Fbg). Here, we investigated the removal dynamics of Ig and Fbg in 53 patients with immunological disorders by PE, SePE, and a combination of the two. When the mean processed plasma volume (PPV) was 0.9 plasma volume (PV), the mean percent reductions of Ig and Fbg by PE were both approximately 62%-65%. When the mean PPV was 1.1 PV, the mean percent reductions by SePE were 53.1% for IgG, 30.1% for IgA, 3.6% for IgM, and 19.0% for Fbg, respectively. In the three plasmapheresis sessions performed on alternate days, we classified treatments into three categories: PE group (PE-PE-PE, N = 2), SePE group (SePE-SePE-SePE, N = 14), and PE/SePE group (PE-SePE-SePE, N = 4). The mean percent reductions of IgG, IgA, IgM, and Fbg were 82.0%, 80.4%, 87.3%, and 80.9%, respectively, for the PE group; 76.4%, 57.7%, 43.3%, and 35.9%, respectively, for the PE/SePE group; and 75.4%, 50.6%, 3.2%, and 29.3%, respectively, for the SePE group. Plasmapheresis modalities can be combined according to clinical conditions, for instance, to achieve both the unspecific removal of pathogens by PE and retention of coagulation factors, such as Fbg, by SePE. PMID:27523073

  9. On the accuracy of instantaneous gas exchange rates, energy expenditure, and respiratory quotient calculations obtained in indirect whole room calorimeter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper analyzes the accuracy of metabolic rate calculations performed in the whole room indirect calorimeter using the molar balance equations. The equations are treated from the point of view of cause-effect relationship where the gaseous exchange rates representing the unknown causes need to b...

  10. Dynamics of heat, water, and soluble gas exchange in the human airways: 1. A model study.

    PubMed

    Tsu, M E; Babb, A L; Ralph, D D; Hlastala, M P

    1988-01-01

    In order to provide a means for analysis of heat, water, and soluble gas exchange with the airways during tidal ventilation, a one dimensional theoretical model describing heat and water exchange in the respiratory airways has been extended to include soluble gas exchange with the airway mucosa and water exchange with the mucous layer lining the airways. Not only do heat, water, and gas exchange occur simultaneously, but they also interact. Heating and cooling of the airway surface and mucous lining affects both evaporative water and soluble gas exchange. Water evaporation provides a major source of heat exchange. The model-predicted mean airway temperature profiles agree well with literature data for both oral and nasal breathing validating that part of the model. With model parameters giving the best fit to experimental data, the model shows: (a) substantial heat recovery in the upper airways, (b) minimal respiratory heat and water loss, and (c) low average mucous temperatures and maximal increases in mucous thickness. For resting breathing of room air, heat and water conservation appear to be more important than conditioning efficiency. End-tidal expired partial pressures of very soluble gases eliminated by the lungs are predicted to be lower than the alveolar partial pressures due to the absorption of the expired gases by the airway mucosa. The model may be usable for design of experiments to examine mechanisms associated with the local hydration and dehydration dynamics of the mucosal surface, control of bronchial perfusion, triggering of asthma, mucociliary clearance and deposition of inhaled pollutant gases. PMID:3228218

  11. Exact-exchange time-dependent density-functional theory for static and dynamic polarizabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, So; Ivanov, Stanislav; Bartlett, Rodney J.; Grabowski, Ireneusz

    2005-03-01

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) employing the exact-exchange functional has been formulated on the basis of the optimized-effective-potential (OEP) method of Talman and Shadwick for second-order molecular properties and implemented into a Gaussian-basis-set, trial-vector algorithm. The only approximation involved, apart from the lack of correlation effects and the use of Gaussian-type basis functions, was the consistent use of the adiabatic approximation in the exchange kernel and in the linear response function. The static and dynamic polarizabilities and their anisotropy predicted by the TDDFT with exact exchange (TDOEP) agree accurately with the corresponding values from time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory, the exact-exchange counterpart in the wave function theory. The TDOEP is free from the nonphysical asymptotic decay of the exchange potential of most conventional density functionals or from any other manifestations of the incomplete cancellation of the self-interaction energy. The systematic overestimation of the absolute values and dispersion of polarizabilities that plagues most conventional TDDFT cannot be seen in the TDOEP.

  12. Kinetic bottlenecks to chemical exchange rates for deep-sea animals II: Carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, A. F.; Peltzer, E. T.; Brewer, P. G.

    2012-11-01

    Increased ocean acidification from fossil fuel CO2 invasion, from temperature-driven changes in respiration, and from possible leakage from sub-seabed geologic CO2 disposal has aroused concern over the impacts of elevated CO2 concentrations on marine life. Discussion of these impacts has so far focused only on changes in the oceanic bulk fluid properties (ΔpH, Δ[∑CO2] etc.) as the critical variable and with a major focus on carbonate shell dissolution. Here we describe the rate problem for animals that must export CO2 at about the same rate at which O2 is consumed. We analyze the basic properties controlling CO2 export within the diffusive boundary layer around marine animals in an ocean changing in temperature (T) and CO2 concentration in order to compare the challenges posed by O2 uptake under stress with the equivalent problem of CO2 expulsion. The problem is more complex than that for a non-reactive gas since, as with gas exchange of CO2 at the air-sea interface, the influence of the ensemble of reactions within the CO2-HCO3--CO32- acid-base system needs to be considered. These reactions significantly facilitate CO2 efflux compared to O2 intake at equal temperature, pressure and flow rate under typical oceanic concentrations.The effect of these reactions can be described by an enhancement factor. For organisms, this means mechanically increasing flow over their surface to thin the boundary layer as is required to alleviate O2 stress seems not necessary to facilitate CO2 efflux. Nevertheless the elevated pCO2 cost most likely is non-zero. Regionally as with O2 the combination of T, P, and pH/pCO2 creates a zone of maximum CO2 stress at around 1000 m depth. But the net result is that, for the problem of gas exchange with the bulk ocean, the combination of an increasing T combined with declining O2 poses a greater challenge to marine life than does increasing CO2. The relationships developed here allow a more accurate prediction of the impacts on marine life

  13. Stochastic heart-rate model can reveal pathologic cardiac dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuusela, Tom

    2004-03-01

    A simple one-dimensional Langevin-type stochastic difference equation can simulate the heart-rate fluctuations in a time scale from minutes to hours. The model consists of a deterministic nonlinear part and a stochastic part typical of Gaussian noise, and both parts can be directly determined from measured heart-rate data. Data from healthy subjects typically exhibit the deterministic part with two or more stable fixed points. Studies of 15 congestive heart-failure subjects reveal that the deterministic part of pathologic heart dynamics has no clear stable fixed points. Direct simulations of the stochastic model for normal and pathologic cases can produce statistical parameters similar to those of real subjects. Results directly indicate that pathologic situations simplify the heart-rate control system.

  14. Dynamics of Two Populations with Different Birth Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Julia; Pekalski, Andrzej

    We propose a simple model describing the dynamics of a system of two populations — more numerous natives and less numerous immigrants. The immigrants' birth rate is higher than that of the natives. Several modifications of this model taking into account changes of the birth rates due to external factors and/or possibility of contacts between the populations, are also introduced. The model is studied within two approaches — by solving a set of differential equations and through a Monte Carlo simulations. We show that the question of which population will eventually dominate depends on such factors as the probability of producing offsprings of mixed origin, assimilation of the immigrants, the ratio of the birth rates, initial numbers of the populations and the average age of an individual. In all, but two extreme cases, both populations will survive.

  15. Influence of molecular packing and phospholipid type on rates of cholesterol exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Lund-Katz, S.; Laboda, H.M.; McLean, L.R.; Phillips, M.C.

    1986-05-01

    The rate-limiting step for transfer of cholesterol molecules between membranes and lipoproteins is desorption from the donor lipid-water interface. Cholesterol-phospholipid (PL) interactions influence this process so that at 50/sup 0/C the halftimes for transfer of (/sup 14/C)cholesterol from liquid-crystal, small unilamellar vesicles (SUV) containing 10 mol % cholesterol in egg phosphatidylcholine (PC), dipalmitoyl PC and egg or brain sphingomyelin (SM) are about 0.5, 3 and 5 h, respectively. The molecular packing in these cholesterol-PC mixtures has been investigated using (/sup 13/C)NMR and monolayer techniques. The relaxation times of the 4-(/sup 13/C)cholesterol nucleus in SUV of the above PL are essentially the same suggesting that the fast and slow molecular motions of the cholesterol molecules are similar in all bilayers. Comparison of surface pressure-molecular area isotherms of mixed cholesterol-PL monolayers indicates that the relative condensations of average PL molecular areas by cholesterol increase in the order unsaturated PC < saturated PC < SM. It follows that tighter molecular packing in the lipid-water interface correlates with a slower rate of cholesterol exchange. Because SM are generally more saturated than PC, increasing the SM/PC ratio increases the residence time of cholesterol molecules in a given PL environment. Such an effect is observed in human LDL compared to HDL.

  16. Cr(3+) Binding to DNA Backbone Phosphate and Bases: Slow Ligand Exchange Rates and Metal Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenhu; Yu, Tianmeng; Vazin, Mahsa; Ding, Jinsong; Liu, Juewen

    2016-08-15

    The interaction between chromium ions and DNA is of great interest in inorganic chemistry, toxicology, and analytical chemistry. Most previous studies focused on in situ reduction of Cr(VI), producing Cr(3+) for DNA binding. Recently, Cr(3+) was reported to activate the Ce13d DNAzyme for RNA cleavage. Herein, the Ce13d is used to study two types of Cr(3+) and DNA interactions. First, Cr(3+) binds to the DNA phosphate backbone weakly through reversible electrostatic interactions, which is weakened by adding competing inorganic phosphate. However, Cr(3+) coordinates with DNA nucleobases forming stable cross-links that can survive denaturing gel electrophoresis condition. The binding of Cr(3+) to different nucleobases was further studied in terms of binding kinetics and affinity by exploiting carboxyfluorescein-labeled DNA homopolymers. Once binding takes place, the stable Cr(3+)/DNA complex cannot be dissociated by EDTA, attributable to the ultraslow ligand exchange rate of Cr(3+). The binding rate follows the order of G > C > T ≈ A. Finally, Cr(3+) gradually loses its DNA binding ability after being stored at neutral or high pH, attributable to hydrolysis. This hydrolysis can be reversed by lowering the pH. This work provides a deeper insight into the bioinorganic chemistry of Cr(3+) coordination with DNA, clarifies some inconsistency in the previous literature, and offers practically useful information for generating reproducible results. PMID:27478904

  17. A high rate of telomeric sister chromatid exchange occurs in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia B-cells.

    PubMed

    Medves, Sandrine; Auchter, Morgan; Chambeau, Laetitia; Gazzo, Sophie; Poncet, Delphine; Grangier, Blandine; Verney, Aurélie; Moussay, Etienne; Ammerlaan, Wim; Brisou, Gabriel; Morjani, Hamid; Géli, Vincent; Palissot, Valérie; Berchem, Guy; Salles, Gilles; Wenner, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Cancer cells protect their telomere ends from erosion through reactivation of telomerase or by using the Alternative Lengthening of Telomere (ALT) mechanism that depends on homologous recombination. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) B cells are characterized by almost no telomerase activity, shelterin deregulation and telomere fusions. To characterize telomeric maintenance mechanisms in B-CLL patients, we measured their telomere length, telomerase expression and the main hallmarks of the ALT activity i.e. C-circle concentration, an extra-chromosomal telomere repeat (ECTR), and the level of telomeric sister chromatid exchange (T-SCE) rate. Patients showed relative homogenous telomere length although almost no TERT transcript and nearly no C-circle were evidenced. Nevertheless, compared with normal B cells, B-CLL cells showed an increase in T-SCE rate that was correlated with a strong down-regulation of the topoisomerase III alpha (TOP3A) expression, involved in the dissolution of Holliday Junctions (HJ), together with an increased expression of SLX1A, SLX4, MUS81 and GEN1, involved in the resolution of HJ. Altogether, our results suggest that the telomere maintenance mechanism of B-CLL cells do not preferentially use telomerase or ALT. Rather, the rupture of the dissolvasome/resolvasome balance may increase telomere shuffling that could homogenize telomere length, slowing telomere erosion in this disease. PMID:26970083

  18. Influence of magnesium sulfate on HCO3/Cl transmembrane exchange rate in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chernyshova, Ekaterina S; Zaikina, Yulia S; Tsvetovskaya, Galina A; Strokotov, Dmitry I; Yurkin, Maxim A; Serebrennikova, Elena S; Volkov, Leonid; Maltsev, Valeri P; Chernyshev, Andrei V

    2016-03-21

    Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) is widely used in medicine but molecular mechanisms of its protection through influence on erythrocytes are not fully understood and are considerably controversial. Using scanning flow cytometry, in this work for the first time we observed experimentally (both in situ and in vitro) a significant increase of HCO3(-)/Cl(-) transmembrane exchange rate of human erythrocytes in the presence of MgSO4 in blood. For a quantitative analysis of the obtained experimental data, we introduced and verified a molecular kinetic model, which describes activation of major anion exchanger Band 3 (or AE1) by its complexation with free intracellular Mg(2+) (taking into account Mg(2+) membrane transport and intracellular buffering). Fitting the model to our in vitro experimental data, we observed a good correspondence between theoretical and experimental kinetic curves that allowed us to evaluate the model parameters and to estimate for the first time the association constant of Mg(2+) with Band 3 as KB~0.07mM, which is in agreement with known values of the apparent Mg(2+) dissociation constant (from 0.01 to 0.1mM) that reflects experiments on enrichment of Mg(2+) at the inner erythrocyte membrane (Gunther, 2007). Results of this work partly clarify the molecular mechanisms of MgSO4 action in human erythrocytes. The method developed allows one to estimate quantitatively a perspective of MgSO4 treatment for a patient. It should be particularly helpful in prenatal medicine for early detection of pathologies associated with the risk of fetal hypoxia. PMID:26780645

  19. Rowing Crew Coordination Dynamics at Increasing Stroke Rates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In rowing, perfect synchronisation is important for optimal performance of a crew. Remarkably, a recent study on ergometers demonstrated that antiphase crew coordination might be mechanically more efficient by reducing the power lost to within-cycle velocity fluctuations of the boat. However, coupled oscillator dynamics predict the stability of the coordination to decrease with increasing stroke rate, which in case of antiphase may eventually yield breakdowns to in-phase. Therefore, this study examined the effects of increasing stroke rate on in- and antiphase crew coordination in rowing dyads. Eleven experienced dyads rowed on two mechanically coupled ergometers on slides, which allowed the ergometer system to move back and forth as one ‘boat’. The dyads performed a ramp trial in both in- and antiphase pattern, in which stroke rates gradually increased from 30 strokes per minute (spm) to as fast as possible in steps of 2 spm. Kinematics of rowers, handles and ergometers were captured. Two dyads showed a breakdown of antiphase into in-phase coordination at the first stroke rate of the ramp trial. The other nine dyads reached between 34–42 spm in antiphase but achieved higher rates in in-phase. As expected, the coordinative accuracy in antiphase was worse than in in-phase crew coordination, while, somewhat surprisingly, the coordinative variability did not differ between the patterns. Whereas crew coordination did not substantially deteriorate with increasing stroke rate, stroke rate did affect the velocity fluctuations of the ergometers: fluctuations were clearly larger in the in-phase pattern than in the antiphase pattern, and this difference significantly increased with stroke rate. Together, these results suggest that although antiphase rowing is less stable (i.e., less resistant to perturbation), potential on-water benefits of antiphase over in-phase rowing may actually increase with stroke rate. PMID:26185987

  20. Influence of exercise modality on agreement between gas exchange and heart rate variability thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, F.A.; Montenegro, R.A.; Midgley, A.W.; Vasconcellos, F.; Soares, P.P.; Farinatti, P.

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the level of agreement between the gas exchange threshold (GET) and heart rate variability threshold (HRVT) during maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) using three different exercise modalities. A further aim was to establish whether there was a 1:1 relationship between the percentage heart rate reserve (%HRR) and percentage oxygen uptake reserve (%V˙O2 R) at intensities corresponding to GET and HRVT. Sixteen apparently healthy men 17 to 28 years of age performed three maximal CPETs (cycling, walking, and running). Mean heart rate and V˙O2 at GET and HRVT were 16 bpm (P<0.001) and 5.2 mL·kg-1·min-1 (P=0.001) higher in running than cycling, but no significant differences were observed between running and walking, or cycling and walking (P>0.05). There was a strong relationship between GET and HRVT, with R2 ranging from 0.69 to 0.90. A 1:1 relationship between %HRR and %V˙O2 R was not observed at GET and HRVT. The %HRR was higher during cycling (GET mean difference=7%; HRVT mean difference=11%; both P<0.001), walking (GET mean difference=13%; HRVT mean difference=13%; both P<0.001), or running (GET mean difference=11%; HRVT mean difference=10%; both P<0.001). Therefore, using HRVT to prescribe aerobic exercise intensity appears to be valid. However, to assume a 1:1 relationship between %HRR and %V˙O2 R at HRVT would probably result in overestimation of the energy expenditure during the bout of exercise. PMID:25003546

  1. Turning Rate Dynamics of Zebrafish Exposed to Ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwaffo, Violet; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-06-01

    Zebrafish is emerging as a species of choice in alcohol-related pharmacological studies. In these studies, zebrafish are often exposed to acute ethanol treatments and their activity scored during behavioral assays. Computational modeling of zebrafish behavior is expected to positively impact these efforts by offering a predictive toolbox to plan hypothesis-driven studies, reduce the number of subjects, perform pilot trials, and refine behavioral screening. In this work, we demonstrate the use of the recently proposed jump persistent turning walker to model the turning rate dynamics of zebrafish exposed to acute ethanol administration. This modeling framework is based on a stochastic mean reverting jump process to capture the sudden and large changes in orientation of swimming zebrafish. The model is calibrated on an available experimental dataset of 40 subjects, tested at different ethanol concentrations. We demonstrate that model parameters are modulated by ethanol administration, whereby both the relaxation rate and jump frequency of the turning rate dynamics are influenced by ethanol concentration. This effort offers a first evidence for the possibility of complementing zebrafish pharmacological research with computational modeling of animal behavior.

  2. IMPACT OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE STREAMS ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION MELT RATE STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Miller, D.; Koopman, D.

    2011-04-26

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the potential impacts of the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) streams - particularly the addition of Monosodium Titanate (MST) and Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) - on the melt rate of simulated feed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Additional MST was added to account for contributions from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Melt Rate Furnace (MRF) was used to evaluate four melter feed compositions: two with simulated SCIX and SWPF material and two without. The Slurry-fed Melt Rate Furnace (SMRF) was then used to compare two different feeds: one with and one without bounding concentrations of simulated SCIX and SWPF material. Analyses of the melter feed materials confirmed that they met their targeted compositions. Four feeds were tested in triplicate in the MRF. The linear melt rates were determined by using X-ray computed tomography to measure the height of the glass formed along the bottom of the beakers. The addition of the SCIX and SWPF material reduced the average measured melt rate by about 10% in MRF testing, although there was significant scatter in the data. Two feeds were tested in the SMRF. It was noted that the ground CST alone (ground CST with liquid in a bucket) was extremely difficult to resuspend during preparation of the feed with material from SCIX and SWPF. This feed was also more difficult to pump than the material without MST and CST due to settling occurring in the melter feed line, although the yield stress of both feeds was high relative to the DWPF design basis. Steady state feeding conditions were maintained for about five hours for each feed. There was a reduction in the feed and pour rates of approximately 15% when CST and MST were added to the feed, although there was significant scatter in the data. Analysis of samples collected from the SMRF pour stream showed that the composition of the glass changed as expected when MST and

  3. Circulating protein synthesis rates reveal skeletal muscle proteome dynamics.

    PubMed

    Shankaran, Mahalakshmi; King, Chelsea L; Angel, Thomas E; Holmes, William E; Li, Kelvin W; Colangelo, Marc; Price, John C; Turner, Scott M; Bell, Christopher; Hamilton, Karyn L; Miller, Benjamin F; Hellerstein, Marc K

    2016-01-01

    Here, we have described and validated a strategy for monitoring skeletal muscle protein synthesis rates in rodents and humans over days or weeks from blood samples. We based this approach on label incorporation into proteins that are synthesized specifically in skeletal muscle and escape into the circulation. Heavy water labeling combined with sensitive tandem mass spectrometric analysis allowed integrated synthesis rates of proteins in muscle tissue across the proteome to be measured over several weeks. Fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of plasma creatine kinase M-type (CK-M) and carbonic anhydrase 3 (CA-3) in the blood, more than 90% of which is derived from skeletal muscle, correlated closely with FSR of CK-M, CA-3, and other proteins of various ontologies in skeletal muscle tissue in both rodents and humans. Protein synthesis rates across the muscle proteome generally changed in a coordinate manner in response to a sprint interval exercise training regimen in humans and to denervation or clenbuterol treatment in rodents. FSR of plasma CK-M and CA-3 revealed changes and interindividual differences in muscle tissue proteome dynamics. In human subjects, sprint interval training primarily stimulated synthesis of structural and glycolytic proteins. Together, our results indicate that this approach provides a virtual biopsy, sensitively revealing individualized changes in proteome-wide synthesis rates in skeletal muscle without a muscle biopsy. Accordingly, this approach has potential applications for the diagnosis, management, and treatment of muscle disorders. PMID:26657858

  4. Circulating protein synthesis rates reveal skeletal muscle proteome dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Mahalakshmi; King, Chelsea L.; Angel, Thomas E.; Holmes, William E.; Li, Kelvin W.; Colangelo, Marc; Price, John C.; Turner, Scott M.; Bell, Christopher; Hamilton, Karyn L.; Miller, Benjamin F.; Hellerstein, Marc K.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we have described and validated a strategy for monitoring skeletal muscle protein synthesis rates in rodents and humans over days or weeks from blood samples. We based this approach on label incorporation into proteins that are synthesized specifically in skeletal muscle and escape into the circulation. Heavy water labeling combined with sensitive tandem mass spectrometric analysis allowed integrated synthesis rates of proteins in muscle tissue across the proteome to be measured over several weeks. Fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of plasma creatine kinase M-type (CK-M) and carbonic anhydrase 3 (CA-3) in the blood, more than 90% of which is derived from skeletal muscle, correlated closely with FSR of CK-M, CA-3, and other proteins of various ontologies in skeletal muscle tissue in both rodents and humans. Protein synthesis rates across the muscle proteome generally changed in a coordinate manner in response to a sprint interval exercise training regimen in humans and to denervation or clenbuterol treatment in rodents. FSR of plasma CK-M and CA-3 revealed changes and interindividual differences in muscle tissue proteome dynamics. In human subjects, sprint interval training primarily stimulated synthesis of structural and glycolytic proteins. Together, our results indicate that this approach provides a virtual biopsy, sensitively revealing individualized changes in proteome-wide synthesis rates in skeletal muscle without a muscle biopsy. Accordingly, this approach has potential applications for the diagnosis, management, and treatment of muscle disorders. PMID:26657858

  5. Dynamic Strength of Peridotite at Seismic Slip Rates: Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Gaudio, P.; di Toro, G.; Han, R.; Hirose, T.; Shimamoto, T.; Cocco, M.

    2006-12-01

    Ultramafic pseudotachylytes (solidified melts produced during seismic slip) decorate exhumed faults within the Balmuccia peridotite from the Ivrea zone (Italy). Unpublished studies suggest that these pseudotachylytes were produced in the upper-mantle/lower-crust. Kanamori et al. (1998) proposed extensive production of seismic melts during the Mw = 8.3 Bolivian 1994 deep focus (~600 km in depth) earthquake. It follows that seismic melting might occur in the mantle. We conducted high-velocity rock friction experiments with the Balmuccia peridotite to determine the dynamic strength of faults in the presence of ultramafic melts. During each experiment, shear stress evolved with displacement: after an initial peak shear stress, fault strength gradually decreased towards a steady-state value. Dynamic fault weakening was associated with the formation of a molten layer along the slipping zone. By performing experiments for increasing normal stresses (5 to 13 MPa) and slip rates (0.37÷1.14 m/s or ~seismic slip rates), steady-state shear stress (1) slightly increased with increasing normal stress and (2), for a given normal stress, decreased with increasing slip rate. The ratio between steady-state shear stress and normal stress was 0.13, well below the solid rock friction coefficient (~0.8). Experiments conducted under argon or fresh air flux yielded similar shear stress magnitudes, suggesting that olivine oxidation did not affect significantly the fault strength in the high-velocity experiments. The slight dependence of shear stress with normal stress suggests melt lubrication. Since the physics of melt lubrication is somehow predictable (see poster by Nielsen et al.), these experimental results might be extrapolated to the study of rupture dynamics in mantle rocks.

  6. Dynamics of radionuclide exchange in the calcareous algae Halimeda at Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect

    Spies, R.B.; Marsh, K.V.; Kercher, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of /sup 239+240/Pu in the detrital inclusions and in acid-soluble and acid-insoluble fractions of Halimeda macrophysa showed a 10-fold higher concentration in the acid-insoluble coenocytic filaments than in the acid-soluble fraction. In a depuration experiment with Halimeda incrassata at Enewetak Atoll the loss rate of six radionuclides was measured. Data for /sup 60/Co, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 102m/Rh were fit to loss curves by using one term for exponential loss; data for /sup 155/Eu, /sup 239+240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am required two terms. For each radionuclide, compartment size and transfer functions were determined for the appropriate one- and two-compartment models. Of 26 possible two-compartment models, only seven gave solutions with our data. Nearly identical loss rates were obtained for /sup 155/Eu, /sup 239+240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am in the fast-exchanging compartments for all seven models. The uptake rates for these nuclides were also similar when uptake rates were normalized to local sediment concentrations. The fast-exchanging compartment probably corresponds to the mucilage surface layer of the coenocytic filaments. The identity of the slow-exchanging compartment is less certain but it may correspond to the skeletal surface.

  7. Dynamics of radionuclide exchange in the calcareous algae Halimeda at Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect

    Spies, R.B.; Marsh, K.V.; Kercher, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of /sup 239 +240/Pu in the detrital inclusions and in acid-soluble and acid-insoluble fractions of Halimeda macrophysa showed a 10-fold higher concentration in the acid-insoluble coenocytic filaments than in the acid-soluble fraction. In a depuration experiment with Halimeda incrassata at Enewetak Atoll the loss rate of six radionuclides was measured. Data for /sup 60/Co, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 102//sup m/Rh were fit to loss curves by using one term for exponential loss; data for /sup 155/Eu, /sup 239 +240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am required two terms. For each radionuclide, compartment size and transfer functions were determined for the apropriate one- and two-compartment models. Of 26 possible two-compartment models, only seven gave solutions with our data. Nearly identical loss rates were obtained for /sup 155/Eu, /sup 239 +240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am in the fast-exchanging compartments for all seven models. The uptake rates for these nuclides were also similar when uptake rates were normalized to local sediment concentrations. The fast-exchanging compartment probably corresponds to the mucilage surface layer of the coenocytic filaments. The identity of the slow-exchanging compartment is less certain but it may correspond to the skeletal surface.

  8. Is the surface oxygen exchange rate linked to bulk ion diffusivity in mixed conducting Ruddlesden–Popper phases?

    SciTech Connect

    Tomkiewicz, Alex C.; Tamimi, Mazin A.; Huq, Ashfia; McIntosh, Steven

    2015-03-02

    There is a possible link between oxygen surface exchange rate and bulk oxygen anion diffusivity in mixed ionic and electronic conducting oxides; it is a topic of great interest and debate. While a large body of experimental evidence and theoretical analyses support a link, observed differences between bulk and surface composition of these materials are hard to reconcile with this observation. This is further compounded by potential problems with simultaneous measurement of both parameters. Here we utilize separate techniques, in situ neutron diffraction and pulsed isotopic surface exchange, to examine bulk ion mobility and surface oxygen exchange rates of three Ruddlesden-Popper phases, general form An-1A2'BnO3n+1, An-1A2'BnX3n+1; LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ (n = 1), La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ (n = 2) and LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ (n = 3). These measurements are complemented by surface composition determination via high sensitivity-low energy ion scattering. We observe a correlation between bulk ion mobility and surface exchange rate between materials. The surface exchange rates vary by more than one order of magnitude with high anion mobility in the bulk of an oxygen vacancy-rich n = 2 Ruddlesden-Popper material correlating with rapid oxygen exchange. Furthermore this is in contrast with the similar surface exchange rates which we may expect due to similar surface compositions across all three samples. This paper conclude that experimental limitations lead to inherent convolution of surface and bulk rates, and that surface exchange steps are not likely to be rate limiting in oxygen incorporation.

  9. Measuring and modeling air exchange rates inside taxi cabs in Los Angeles, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Shi; Yu, Nu; Wang, Yueyan; Zhu, Yifang

    2015-12-01

    Air exchange rates (AERs) have a direct impact on traffic-related air pollutant (TRAP) levels inside vehicles. Taxi drivers are occupationally exposed to TRAP on a daily basis, yet there is limited measurement of AERs in taxi cabs. To fill this gap, AERs were quantified in 22 representative Los Angeles taxi cabs including 10 Prius, 5 Crown Victoria, 3 Camry, 3 Caravan, and 1 Uplander under realistic driving (RD) conditions. To further study the impacts of window position and ventilation settings on taxi AERs, additional tests were conducted on 14 taxis with windows closed (WC) and on the other 8 taxis with not only windows closed but also medium fan speed (WC-MFS) under outdoor air mode. Under RD conditions, the AERs in all 22 cabs had a mean of 63 h-1 with a median of 38 h-1. Similar AERs were observed under WC condition when compared to those measured under RD condition. Under WC-MFS condition, AERs were significantly increased in all taxi cabs, when compared with those measured under RD condition. A General Estimating Equation (GEE) model was developed and the modeling results showed that vehicle model was a significant factor in determining the AERs in taxi cabs under RD condition. Driving speed and car age were positively associated with AERs but not statistically significant. Overall, AERs measured in taxi cabs were much higher than typical AERs people usually encounter in indoor environments such as homes, offices, and even regular passenger vehicles.

  10. Predicting Residential Air Exchange Rates from Questionnaires and Meteorology: Model Evaluation in Central North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A critical aspect of air pollution exposure models is the estimation of the air exchange rate (AER) of individual homes, where people spend most of their time. The AER, which is the airflow into and out of a building, is a primary mechanism for entry of outdoor air pollutants and removal of indoor source emissions. The mechanistic Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) AER model was linked to a leakage area model to predict AER from questionnaires and meteorology. The LBL model was also extended to include natural ventilation (LBLX). Using literature-reported parameter values, AER predictions from LBL and LBLX models were compared to data from 642 daily AER measurements across 31 detached homes in central North Carolina, with corresponding questionnaires and meteorological observations. Data was collected on seven consecutive days during each of four consecutive seasons. For the individual model-predicted and measured AER, the median absolute difference was 43% (0.17 h−1) and 40% (0.17 h−1) for the LBL and LBLX models, respectively. Additionally, a literature-reported empirical scale factor (SF) AER model was evaluated, which showed a median absolute difference of 50% (0.25 h−1). The capability of the LBL, LBLX, and SF models could help reduce the AER uncertainty in air pollution exposure models used to develop exposure metrics for health studies. PMID:21069949