Science.gov

Sample records for exchange rate dynamics

  1. Currency Exchange Rates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siler, Carl R.

    This curriculum unit of the Muncie (Indiana) Southside High School is to simulate the dynamics of foreign currency exchange rates from the perspectives of: (1) a major U.S. corporation, ABB Power T & D Company, Inc., of Muncie, Indiana, a manufacturer of large power transformers for the domestic and foreign markets; and (2) individual consumers…

  2. The long-run dynamic relationship between exchange rate and its attention index: Based on DCCA and TOP method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuan; Guo, Kun; Lu, Xiaolin

    2016-07-01

    The behavior information of financial market plays a more and more important role in modern economic system. The behavior information reflected in INTERNET search data has already been used in short-term prediction for exchange rate, stock market return, house price and so on. However, the long-run relationship between behavior information and financial market fluctuation has not been studied systematically. Further, most traditional statistic methods and econometric models could not catch the dynamic and non-linear relationship. An attention index of CNY/USD exchange rate is constructed based on search data from 360 search engine of China in this paper. Then the DCCA and Thermal Optimal Path methods are used to explore the long-run dynamic relationship between CNY/USD exchange rate and the corresponding attention index. The results show that the significant interdependency exists and the change of exchange rate is 1-2 days lag behind the attention index.

  3. Phase transition of dynamical herd behaviors for Yen Dollar exchange rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seong-Min; Choi, J. S.; Kim, Y.; Kim, Kyungsik

    2006-01-01

    We study the herd behavior and the phase transition for the yen-dollar exchange rate in the Japanese financial market. It is obtained that the probability distribution of returns satisfies the power-law behavior P(R)≃R with scaling exponents β=3.11, 2.81, and 2.29 at time intervals τ=1min, 30min, and 1 h. The crash region in which the probability density increases with the increasing return appears, when the herding parameter h satisfies h⩾2.33 for the case of τ<30min. We especially obtain that no crash occurs τ>30min and that the probability distribution of price returns occurs in the phase transition at τ=30min.

  4. AGRICULTURAL EXCHANGE RATE DATA SHEET

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ERS data set contains annual and monthly data for exchange rates important to U.S. agriculture. It includes both nominal and real exchange rates for 80 countries (plus the European Union) as well as real trade-weighted exchange rate indexes for many commodities and aggregatio...

  5. Exchange Rates and Old People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, James J.

    1980-01-01

    Extends earlier work on aging as a process of exchange by focusing on the issue of exchange rates and how they are negotiated. Access to power resources declines with age, placing the old person in the position of negotiating from weakness. (Author)

  6. Nonadiabatic exchange dynamics during adiabatic frequency sweeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbara, Thomas M.

    2016-04-01

    A Bloch equation analysis that includes relaxation and exchange effects during an adiabatic frequency swept pulse is presented. For a large class of sweeps, relaxation can be incorporated using simple first order perturbation theory. For anisochronous exchange, new expressions are derived for exchange augmented rotating frame relaxation. For isochronous exchange between sites with distinct relaxation rate constants outside the extreme narrowing limit, simple criteria for adiabatic exchange are derived and demonstrate that frequency sweeps commonly in use may not be adiabatic with regard to exchange unless the exchange rates are much larger than the relaxation rates. Otherwise, accurate assessment of the sensitivity to exchange dynamics will require numerical integration of the rate equations. Examples of this situation are given for experimentally relevant parameters believed to hold for in-vivo tissue. These results are of significance in the study of exchange induced contrast in magnetic resonance imaging.

  7. The Dynamics of Multilateral Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausken, Kjell; Moxnes, John F.

    The article formulates a dynamic mathematical model where arbitrarily many players produce, consume, exchange, loan, and deposit arbitrarily many goods over time to maximize utility. Consuming goods constitutes a benefit, and producing, exporting, and loaning away goods constitute a cost. Utilities are benefits minus costs, which depend on the exchange ratios and bargaining functions. Three-way exchange occurs when one player acquires, through exchange, one good from another player with the sole purpose of using this good to exchange against the desired good from a third player. Such a triple handshake is not merely a set of double handshakes since the player assigns no interest to the first good in his benefit function. Cognitive and organization costs increase dramatically for higher order exchanges. An exchange theory accounting for media of exchange follows from simple generalization of two-way exchange. The examples of r-way exchange are the triangle trade between Africa, the USA, and England in the 17th and 18th centuries, the hypothetical hypercycle involving RNAs as players and enzymes as goods, and reaction-diffusion processes. The emergence of exchange, and the role of trading agents are discussed. We simulate an example where two-way exchange gives zero production and zero utility, while three-way exchange causes considerable production and positive utility. Maximum utility for each player is reached when exchanges of the same order as the number of players in society are allowed. The article merges micro theory and macro theory within the social, natural, and physical sciences.

  8. Communication: Rigorous quantum dynamics of O + O{sub 2} exchange reactions on an ab initio potential energy surface substantiate the negative temperature dependence of rate coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yaqin; Sun, Zhigang E-mail: dawesr@mst.edu; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua E-mail: dawesr@mst.edu; Xie, Daiqian; Dawes, Richard E-mail: dawesr@mst.edu

    2014-08-28

    The kinetics and dynamics of several O + O{sub 2} isotope exchange reactions have been investigated on a recently determined accurate global O{sub 3} potential energy surface using a time-dependent wave packet method. The agreement between calculated and measured rate coefficients is significantly improved over previous work. More importantly, the experimentally observed negative temperature dependence of the rate coefficients is for the first time rigorously reproduced theoretically. This negative temperature dependence can be attributed to the absence in the new potential energy surface of a submerged “reef” structure, which was present in all previous potential energy surfaces. In addition, contributions of rotational excited states of the diatomic reactant further accentuate the negative temperature dependence.

  9. Protein dynamics viewed by hydrogen exchange

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, John J; Lim, Woon K; Bédard, Sabrina; Black, Ben E; Englander, S Walter

    2012-01-01

    To examine the relationship between protein structural dynamics and measurable hydrogen exchange (HX) data, the detailed exchange behavior of most of the backbone amide hydrogens of Staphylococcal nuclease was compared with that of their neighbors, with their structural environment, and with other information. Results show that H-bonded hydrogens are protected from exchange, with HX rate effectively zero, even when they are directly adjacent to solvent. The transition to exchange competence requires a dynamic structural excursion that removes H-bond protection and allows exposure to solvent HX catalyst. The detailed data often make clear the nature of the dynamic excursion required. These range from whole molecule unfolding, through smaller cooperative unfolding reactions of secondary structural elements, and down to local fluctuations that involve as little as a single peptide group or side chain or water molecule. The particular motion that dominates the exchange of any hydrogen is the one that allows the fastest HX rate. The motion and the rate it produces are determined by surrounding structure and not by nearness to solvent or the strength of the protecting H-bond itself or its acceptor type (main chain, side chain, structurally bound water). Many of these motions occur over time scales that are appropriate for biochemical function. PMID:22544544

  10. Protein dynamics viewed by hydrogen exchange.

    PubMed

    Skinner, John J; Lim, Woon K; Bédard, Sabrina; Black, Ben E; Englander, S Walter

    2012-07-01

    To examine the relationship between protein structural dynamics and measurable hydrogen exchange (HX) data, the detailed exchange behavior of most of the backbone amide hydrogens of Staphylococcal nuclease was compared with that of their neighbors, with their structural environment, and with other information. Results show that H-bonded hydrogens are protected from exchange, with HX rate effectively zero, even when they are directly adjacent to solvent. The transition to exchange competence requires a dynamic structural excursion that removes H-bond protection and allows exposure to solvent HX catalyst. The detailed data often make clear the nature of the dynamic excursion required. These range from whole molecule unfolding, through smaller cooperative unfolding reactions of secondary structural elements, and down to local fluctuations that involve as little as a single peptide group or side chain or water molecule. The particular motion that dominates the exchange of any hydrogen is the one that allows the fastest HX rate. The motion and the rate it produces are determined by surrounding structure and not by nearness to solvent or the strength of the protecting H-bond itself or its acceptor type (main chain, side chain, structurally bound water). Many of these motions occur over time scales that are appropriate for biochemical function. PMID:22544544

  11. Rate of disappearance of labeled carbon dioxide from the lungs of humans during breath holding: a method for studying the dynamics of pulmonary CO2 exchange

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, Richard W.; Puy, Ricardo J. M.; Raub, William F.; Forster, Robert E.

    1968-01-01

    The dynamics of CO2 exchange in the lungs of man was studied by observing the rate of disappearance of a stable isotope of CO2 (13CO2) from the alveolar gas during breath holding. Over 50% of the inspired isotope disappeared within the first 3 sec followed by a moderately rapid logarithmic decline in which one-half of the remaining 13CO2 disappeared every 10 sec. The large initial disappearance of 13CO2 indicated that alveolar 13CO2 equilibrated in less than 3 sec with the CO2 stored in the pulmonary tissues and capillary blood. The volume of CO2 in the pulmonary tissues calculated from this initial disappearance was 200 ml or 0.33 ml of CO2 per milliliter of pulmonary tissue volume. The alveolar to end-capillary gradient for 13CO2 was calculated by comparing the simultaneous disappearance rates of 13CO2 and acetylene. At rest and during exercise this gradient for 13CO2 was either very small or not discernible, and diffusing capacity for CO2 (DLCO2) exceeded 200 ml/(min × mm Hg). After the administration of a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor the rate of disappearance of 13CO2 decreased markedly. DLCO2 fell to 42 ml/(min × mm Hg) and at least 70% of the exchange of 13CO2 with the CO2 stores in the pulmonary tissues and blood was blocked by the inhibitor. These changes were attributed to impairment of exchange of 13CO2 with the bicarbonate in the pulmonary tissues and blood. The pH of the pulmonary tissues (Vtis) was determined by a method based on the premise that the CO2 space in the pulmonary tissues blocked by the inhibitor represented total bicarbonate content. At an alveolar PCO2 of 40 mm Hg pH of Vtis equalled 6.97 ± 0.09. PMID:5658586

  12. The dynamic multimodeling exchange language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jinho; Fishwick, Paul A.

    2003-09-01

    The web has made it easy to create multimedia content, which is then viewable by the general community at large. By extending multimedia to include the area of modeling, we make it possible to share and process model structures in the same way as the typical web page. For models of the geometric variety, the new X3D (eXtensible 3D) standard will allow sharing and presentation of 3D scene graphs within the web browser. We have created a dynamic model counterpart to X3D, which we call DXL (Dynamics eXchange Language). DXL is low-level XML-based language, comprising blocks, ports, and connectors. We will define how DXL is used for constructing individual level models, as well as multimodels over multiple abstraction layers.

  13. Large Devaluations and the Real Exchange Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burstein, Ariel; Eichenbaum, Martin; Rebelo, Sergio

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we argue that the primary force behind the large drop in real exchange rates that occurs after large devaluations is the slow adjustment in the prices of nontradable goods and services. Our empirical analysis uses data from five large devaluation episodes: Argentina (2002), Brazil (1999), Korea (1997), Mexico (1994), and Thailand…

  14. Water exchange dynamics around H3O+ and OH- ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Santanu; Dang, Liem X.

    2015-05-01

    In this letter, we report the first computer simulation of the dynamics of water exchanging between the first and second solvation shells of H3O+. Employing different rate theories for chemical reactions such as the transition state theory, the Grote-Hynes theory, the reactive flux method, and the Impey-Madden-McDonald method, we calculate the solvent exchange rates from molecular dynamics simulations that account for explicit polarization effects. In addition, we also study water exchanges around OH- and find that the corresponding time scale is much smaller than that for H3O+.

  15. Solvent exchange in liquid methanol and rate theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Liem X.; Schenter, Gregory K.

    2016-01-01

    To enhance our understanding of the solvent exchange mechanism in liquid methanol, we report a systematic study using molecular dynamics simulations. We use transition state theory, the Impey-Madden-McDonald method, the reactive flux method, and Grote-Hynes theory to compute the rate constants for this process. Solvent coupling was found to dominate, resulting in a significantly small transmission coefficient. We predict a positive activation volume for methanol exchange. The essential features of the dynamics as well as the pressure dependence are recovered from a Generalized Langevin Equation description of the dynamics. We find that the response to anharmonicity can be decomposed into two time regimes, one corresponding to short time response (<0.1 ps) and long time response (>5 ps). An effective characterization of the process is obtained from launching dynamics from the planar hypersurface corresponding to Grote-Hynes theory, resulting in improved numerical convergence of correlation functions.

  16. Foreign exchange rate entropy evolution during financial crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stosic, Darko; Stosic, Dusan; Ludermir, Teresa; de Oliveira, Wilson; Stosic, Tatijana

    2016-05-01

    This paper examines the effects of financial crises on foreign exchange (FX) markets, where entropy evolution is measured for different exchange rates, using the time-dependent block entropy method. Empirical results suggest that financial crises are associated with significant increase of exchange rate entropy, reflecting instability in FX market dynamics. In accordance with phenomenological expectations, it is found that FX markets with large liquidity and large trading volume are more inert - they recover quicker from a crisis than markets with small liquidity and small trading volume. Moreover, our numerical analysis shows that periods of economic uncertainty are preceded by periods of low entropy values, which may serve as a tool for anticipating the onset of financial crises.

  17. Marriage exchanges, seed exchanges, and the dynamics of manioc diversity

    PubMed Central

    Delêtre, Marc; McKey, Doyle B.; Hodkinson, Trevor R.

    2011-01-01

    The conservation of crop genetic resources requires understanding the different variables—cultural, social, and economic—that impinge on crop diversity. In small-scale farming systems, seed exchanges represent a key mechanism in the dynamics of crop genetic diversity, and analyzing the rules that structure social networks of seed exchange between farmer communities can help decipher patterns of crop genetic diversity. Using a combination of ethnobotanical and molecular genetic approaches, we investigated the relationships between regional patterns of manioc genetic diversity in Gabon and local networks of seed exchange. Spatially explicit Bayesian clustering methods showed that geographical discontinuities of manioc genetic diversity mirror major ethnolinguistic boundaries, with a southern matrilineal domain characterized by high levels of varietal diversity and a northern patrilineal domain characterized by low varietal diversity. Borrowing concepts from anthropology—kinship, bridewealth, and filiation—we analyzed the relationships between marriage exchanges and seed exchange networks in patrilineal and matrilineal societies. We demonstrate that, by defining marriage prohibitions, kinship systems structure social networks of exchange between farmer communities and influence the movement of seeds in metapopulations, shaping crop diversity at local and regional levels. PMID:22042843

  18. On exchange rate misalignments in the Eurozone's peripheral countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grochová, Ladislava; Plecitá, Klára

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we model equilibrium exchange rates for the Eurozone's countries on the basis of the Behavioural Equilibrium Exchange Rate approach, which assumes, that equilibrium exchange rates are in the long run affected by economic fundamentals. To assess the degree of exchange rate misalignment for the Eurozone's peripheral countries - Portugal, Ireland, Greece and Spain - the gap between the actual and the modelled equilibrium exchange rate value is calculated. Our results show that Spain, Portugal and Ireland had their real exchange rates in equilibrium when they joined the Eurozone; however their real exchange rates have been persistently overvalued since the beginning of the 2000s. Greece, on the other hand, has experienced diminishing undervaluation at the beginning of its membership in the Eurozone and since 2009 has exhibited an overvalued real exchange rate.

  19. Solvent Exchange in Liquid Methanol and Rate Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Liem X.; Schenter, Gregory K.

    2016-01-01

    To enhance our understanding of the solvent exchange mechanism in liquid methanol, we report a systematic study of this process using molecular dynamics simulations. We use transition state theory, the Impey-Madden-McDonald method, the reactive flux method, and Grote-Hynes theory to compute the rate constants for this process. Solvent coupling was found to dominate, resulting in a significantly small transmission coefficient. We predict a positive activation volume for the methanol exchange process. The essential features of the dynamics of the system as well as the pressure dependence are recovered from a Generalized Langevin Equation description of the dynamics. We find that the dynamics and response to anharmonicity can be decomposed into two time regimes, one corresponding to short time response (< 0.1 ps) and long time response (> 5 ps). An effective characterization of the process results from launching dynamics from the planar hypersurface corresponding to Grote-Hynes theory. This results in improved numerical convergence of correlation functions. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  20. Computation of intrabeam charge-exchange rate

    SciTech Connect

    Sacks, R.A.; Arnold, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    ANL's planned Accelerator Development Facility (ADF) for heavy-ion fusion will test and demonstrate virtually all of the beam manipulations thought to be necessary for a heavy-ion inertial-confinement-fusion driver. The relatively simple upgrade of adding synchrotron acceleration capability to the storage ring would also allow important energy-deposition and materials experiments. The feasibility of this upgrade depends critically on the beam loss rate from charge-exchange scattering. A computer program has been written for the purpose of obtaining a better estimate for this lifetime. The code assumes a K-V transverse distribution folded into a Neuffer longitudinal distribution. The emittance ellipse parameters, along with various estimates for the velocity-dependent ion-ion cross sections, are read in and a numerical integration is performed over the distribution, yielding a value for the loss rate -1/N/sup 2/ dN/dt. Preliminary estimates indicate that this mode of beam loss presents no obstacle to upgrading the ADF.

  1. Measuring a hidden coordinate: Rate-exchange kinetics from 3D correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Mark A.; Darvin, Jason R.

    2016-08-01

    Nonexponential kinetics imply the existence of at least one slow variable other than the observable, that is, the system has a "hidden" coordinate. We develop a simple, but general, model that allows multidimensional correlation functions to be calculated for these systems. Homogeneous and heterogeneous mechanisms are both included, and slow exchange of the rates is allowed. This model shows that 2D and 3D correlation functions of the observable measure the distribution and kinetics of the hidden coordinate controlling the rate exchange. Both the mean exchange time and the shape of the exchange relaxation are measurable. However, complications arise because higher correlation functions are sums of multiple "pathways," each of which measures different dynamics. Only one 3D pathway involves exchange dynamics. Care must be used to extract exchange dynamics without contamination from other processes.

  2. Optimizing replica exchange moves for molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nadler, Walter; Hansmann, Ulrich H E

    2007-11-01

    We sketch the statistical physics framework of the replica exchange technique when applied to molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, we draw attention to generalized move sets that allow a variety of optimizations as well as new applications of the method. PMID:18233794

  3. Pion double charge exchange and hadron dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper will review theoretical results to show how pion double charge exchange is contributing to our understanding of hadron dynamics in nuclei. The exploitation of the nucleus as a filter is shown to be essential in facilitating the comparison between theory and experiment. 23 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Dynamic simulation of shell-and-tube heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, D.J.; Marchetti, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The transient operation of a multipass shell-and-tube heat exchanger with baffles is described by a multicell dynamic model where every cell represents a specific part of the exchanger. The proposed modeling technique can be used in a digital computer for the dynamic simulation of almost any type of shell-and-tube heat exchanger. The model includes time-dependent inlet conditions for both the cold and the hot streams. Hence, a number of start-up cases can be simulated and, once the system reaches a stationary operating point, a disturbance can be introduced in the inlet temperatures or the flow rates. This particular feature makes the model very useful not only for design purposes but also for transient analysis and control system design.

  5. Exchange of Standarized Flight Dynamics Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Mur, T.; Berry, D.; Flores-Amaya, F.; Foliard, J.; Kiehling, R.; Ogawa, M.; Pallascke

    Spacecraft operations require the knowledge of the vehicle trajectory and attitude and also that of other spacecraft or natural bodies. This knowledge is normally provided by the Flight Dynamics teams of the different space organizations and, as very often spacecraft operations involve more than one organization, this information needs to be exchanged between Agencies. This is why the Navigation Working Group within the CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) has been instituted with the task of establishing standards for the exchange of Flight Dynamics data. This exchange encompasses trajectory data, attitude data, and tracking data. The Navigation Working Group includes regular members and observers representing the participating Space Agencies. Currently the group includes representatives from CNES, DLR, ESA, NASA and JAXA. This Working Group meets twice per year in order to devise standardized language, methods, and formats for the description and exchange of Navigation data. Early versions of some of these standards have been used to support mutual tracking of ESA and NASA interplanetary spacecraft, especially during the arrival of the 2003 missions to Mars. This paper provides a summary of the activities carried out by the group, briefly outlines the current and envisioned standards, describes the tests and operational activities that have been performed using the standards, and lists and discusses the lessons learned from these activities.

  6. Exchange of Standardized Flight Dynamics Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin-Mur, Tomas J.; Berry, David; Flores-Amaya, Felipe; Folliard, J.; Kiehling, R.; Ogawa, M.; Pallaschke, S.

    2004-01-01

    Spacecraft operations require the knowledge of the vehicle trajectory and attitude and also that of other spacecraft or natural bodies. This knowledge is normally provided by the Flight Dynamics teams of the different space organizations and, as very often spacecraft operations involve more than one organization, this information needs to be exchanged between Agencies. This is why the Navigation Working Group within the CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems), has been instituted with the task of establishing standards for the exchange of Flight Dynamics data. This exchange encompasses trajectory data, attitude data, and tracking data. The Navigation Working Group includes regular members and observers representing the participating Space Agencies. Currently the group includes representatives from CNES, DLR, ESA, NASA and JAXA. This Working Group meets twice per year in order to devise standardized language, methods, and formats for the description and exchange of Navigation data. Early versions of some of these standards have been used to support mutual tracking of ESA and NASA interplanetary spacecraft, especially during the arrival of the 2003 missions to Mars. This paper provides a summary of the activities carried out by the group, briefly outlines the current and envisioned standards, describes the tests and operational activities that have been performed using the standards, and lists and discusses the lessons learned from these activities.

  7. Measuring fast hydrogen exchange rates by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kateb, Fatiha; Pelupessy, Philippe; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a method to measure hydrogen exchange rates based on the observation of the coherence of a neighboring spin S such as 15N that has a scalar coupling JIS to the exchanging proton I. The decay of Sx coherence under a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) multiple echo train is recorded in the presence and absence of proton decoupling. This method allows one to extract proton exchange rates up to 10 5 s -1. We could extend the pH range for the study of the indole proton in tryptophan, allowing the determination of the exchange constants of the cationic, zwitterionic, and anionic forms of tryptophan.

  8. Error and efficiency of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Rosta, Edina; Hummer, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    We derive simple analytical expressions for the error and computational efficiency of replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (and by analogy replica exchange Monte Carlo simulations). The theory applies to the important case of systems whose dynamics at long times is dominated by the slow interconversion between two metastable states. As a specific example, we consider the folding and unfolding of a protein. The efficiency is defined as the rate with which the error in an estimated equilibrium property, as measured by the variance of the estimator over repeated simulations, decreases with simulation time. For two-state systems, this rate is in general independent of the particular property. Our main result is that, with comparable computational resources used, the relative efficiency of REMD and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is given by the ratio of the number of transitions between the two states averaged over all replicas at the different temperatures, and the number of transitions at the single temperature of the MD run. This formula applies if replica exchange is frequent, as compared to the transition times. High efficiency of REMD is thus achieved by including replica temperatures in which the frequency of transitions is higher than that at the temperature of interest. In tests of the expressions for the error in the estimator, computational efficiency, and the rate of equilibration we find quantitative agreement with the results both from kinetic models of REMD and from actual all-atom simulations of the folding of a peptide in water. PMID:19894977

  9. Error and efficiency of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Rosta, Edina; Hummer, Gerhard

    2009-10-28

    We derive simple analytical expressions for the error and computational efficiency of replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (and by analogy replica exchange Monte Carlo simulations). The theory applies to the important case of systems whose dynamics at long times is dominated by the slow interconversion between two metastable states. As a specific example, we consider the folding and unfolding of a protein. The efficiency is defined as the rate with which the error in an estimated equilibrium property, as measured by the variance of the estimator over repeated simulations, decreases with simulation time. For two-state systems, this rate is in general independent of the particular property. Our main result is that, with comparable computational resources used, the relative efficiency of REMD and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is given by the ratio of the number of transitions between the two states averaged over all replicas at the different temperatures, and the number of transitions at the single temperature of the MD run. This formula applies if replica exchange is frequent, as compared to the transition times. High efficiency of REMD is thus achieved by including replica temperatures in which the frequency of transitions is higher than that at the temperature of interest. In tests of the expressions for the error in the estimator, computational efficiency, and the rate of equilibration we find quantitative agreement with the results both from kinetic models of REMD and from actual all-atom simulations of the folding of a peptide in water. PMID:19894977

  10. A dynamical structure of high frequency currency exchange market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazuka, Naoya; Ohira, Toru; Marumo, Kouhei; Shimizu, Tokiko; Takayasu, Misako; Takayasu, Hideki

    2003-06-01

    We analyze tick-by-tick data, the most high frequency data available, of yen-dollar currency exchange rates. We show that a dynamical structure can be observed in binarized data indicating the direction of up and down movement of prices, which is not apparently seen from the price change itself. This result is consistent with our previous study that there exists a conditional probabilistic structure in binarized data. The dynamical and probabilistic structure which we found could indicate that dealers’ decision making is based on a binary strategy, even if they are unconscious of this fact.

  11. Noninvasive detection of gas exchange rate by near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guodong; Mao, Zongzhen; Wang, Bangde

    2008-12-01

    In order to study the relationship among the oxygen concentration in skeletal muscle tissues and the heart rate (HR), oxygen uptake (VO2), respiratory exchange ratio (RER) during incremental running exercises on a treadmill, a near-infrared spectroscopy muscle oxygen monitor system is employed to measure the relative change in muscle oxygenation, with the heart rate, oxygen uptake, production of carbon dioxide (VCO2) and respiratory exchange ratio are recorded synchronously. The results indicate parameters mentioned above present regular changes during the incremental exercise. High correlations are discovered between relative change of oxy-hemoglobin concentration and heart rate, oxygen uptake, respiratory exchange ratio at the significance level (P=0.01). This research might introduce a new measurement technology and/or a novel biological monitoring parameter to the evaluation of physical function status, control the training intensity, estimation of the effectiveness of exercise. Keywords: near-infrared spectroscopy; muscle oxygen concentration; heart rate; oxygen uptake; respiratory exchange ratio.

  12. Statistical Analysis of the Exchange Rate of Bitcoin.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jeffrey; Nadarajah, Saralees; Chan, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Bitcoin, the first electronic payment system, is becoming a popular currency. We provide a statistical analysis of the log-returns of the exchange rate of Bitcoin versus the United States Dollar. Fifteen of the most popular parametric distributions in finance are fitted to the log-returns. The generalized hyperbolic distribution is shown to give the best fit. Predictions are given for future values of the exchange rate. PMID:26222702

  13. Statistical Analysis of the Exchange Rate of Bitcoin

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jeffrey; Nadarajah, Saralees; Chan, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Bitcoin, the first electronic payment system, is becoming a popular currency. We provide a statistical analysis of the log-returns of the exchange rate of Bitcoin versus the United States Dollar. Fifteen of the most popular parametric distributions in finance are fitted to the log-returns. The generalized hyperbolic distribution is shown to give the best fit. Predictions are given for future values of the exchange rate. PMID:26222702

  14. Kinetic isotope effects for fast deuterium and proton exchange rates

    PubMed Central

    Mammoli, Daniele; Kadeřávek, Pavel; Pelupessy, Philippe; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    By monitoring the effect of deuterium decoupling on the decay of transverse 15N magnetization in D–15N spin pairs during multiple-refocusing echo sequences, we have determined fast D–D exchange rates k D and compared them with fast H–H exchange rates k H in tryptophan to determine the kinetic isotope effect as a function of pH and temperature. PMID:27009684

  15. Modeling inflation rates and exchange rates in Ghana: application of multivariate GARCH models.

    PubMed

    Nortey, Ezekiel Nn; Ngoh, Delali D; Doku-Amponsah, Kwabena; Ofori-Boateng, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This paper was aimed at investigating the volatility and conditional relationship among inflation rates, exchange rates and interest rates as well as to construct a model using multivariate GARCH DCC and BEKK models using Ghana data from January 1990 to December 2013. The study revealed that the cumulative depreciation of the cedi to the US dollar from 1990 to 2013 is 7,010.2% and the yearly weighted depreciation of the cedi to the US dollar for the period is 20.4%. There was evidence that, the fact that inflation rate was stable, does not mean that exchange rates and interest rates are expected to be stable. Rather, when the cedi performs well on the forex, inflation rates and interest rates react positively and become stable in the long run. The BEKK model is robust to modelling and forecasting volatility of inflation rates, exchange rates and interest rates. The DCC model is robust to model the conditional and unconditional correlation among inflation rates, exchange rates and interest rates. The BEKK model, which forecasted high exchange rate volatility for the year 2014, is very robust for modelling the exchange rates in Ghana. The mean equation of the DCC model is also robust to forecast inflation rates in Ghana. PMID:25741459

  16. Dynamics of Exchange-Biased Magnetic Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T. Y.; Chan, M. K.; Crowell, P. A.

    2009-03-01

    We have studied magnetization dynamics in micron-sized circular disks composed of ferromagnetic (FM)-antiferromagnetic (AFM) bilayers. The patterned samples of FeMn/NiFe are field-cooled (FC) or zero-field cooled (ZFC) from above the blocking temperature to room temperature. Time-resolved Kerr microscopy measurements show that the vortex gyrotropic mode fluctuates in frequency as the vortex core is displaced by a static in-plane magnetic field. The average gyrotropic frequency and the magnitude of its fluctuations, which are due to pinning of the vortex core, are larger than in single layer FM films. The enhancement of the gyrotropic frequency is largest in the ZFC samples, in which the effective field due to exchange coupling is expected to enhance pinning of the vortex core at the center of the disk. We find, however, that micromagnetic simulations incorporating uniform or vortex-like exchange-bias fields do not explain our results quantitatively. We interpret this discrepancy as a consequence of randomly orientated AFM domains, which are comparable in size to the vortex core. This work was supported by NSF and the Univ. of Minnesota Graduate School.

  17. Dynamic Analysis of Capture Devices for Momentum Exchange with Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    One of the significant challenges in developing a momentum exchange / electrodynamic reboost tether system is in the analysis and design of the capture device and its effects on the overall dynamics of the system. The goal of this work is to develop appropriate tether momentum exchange models that can simulate and evaluate the requirements of such a system, and be used to create specifications on the design of a capture device. This report briefly describes dynamic model development, simulation of the momentum exchange process, evaluation of dynamic effects of errors in the momentum exchange process, and the development of guidelines in selecting dynamic properties in the design of a capture device.

  18. A Role Play on Export Decisions and the Exchange Rate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotterell, Ann

    1987-01-01

    Explains that the goal of this exercise is to encourage an understanding of the effects of exchange rate changes and the use of forward rates. Provides a role play that involves students working in groups to decide whether to export a consignment of golf trollies to Italy and shortbread to Canada. (BSR)

  19. Evidence of multifractality from CEE exchange rates against Euro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caraiani, Petre; Haven, Emmanuel

    2015-02-01

    The multifractal spectrum of a time series can be ascertained with a number of techniques, some based on wavelets, others based on the much newer (multifractal) detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA). We test for the presence of multifractality in daily data on selected exchange rates from Central and Eastern European economies against EURO. The approach is based on a slight modification of the MF-DFA analysis in that local trends are not allowed to be polynomially fitted but rather are estimated through a sifting process which is established through a so called Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) algorithm. We assess the drivers of the multifractal spectrum strength, like temporal correlations or distributions based on surrogate data. Another topic discussed is whether the entrance in the exchange rate mechanism ERM II influenced the multifractality of the exchange rates.

  20. Extreme-value dependence: An application to exchange rate markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Viviana

    2007-04-01

    Extreme value theory (EVT) focuses on modeling the tail behavior of a loss distribution using only extreme values rather than the whole data set. For a sample of 10 countries with dirty/free float regimes, we investigate whether paired currencies exhibit a pattern of asymptotic dependence. That is, whether an extremely large appreciation or depreciation in the nominal exchange rate of one country might transmit to another. In general, after controlling for volatility clustering and inertia in returns, we do not find evidence of extreme-value dependence between paired exchange rates. However, for asymptotic-independent paired returns, we find that tail dependency of exchange rates is stronger under large appreciations than under large depreciations.

  1. Residue-specific NH exchange rates studied by NMR diffusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Torsten; Cabrita, Eurico J.; Morris, Gareth A.; Günther, Robert; Hofmann, Hans-Jörg; Berger, Stefan

    2007-07-01

    We present a novel approach to the investigation of rapid (>2 s -1) NH exchange rates in proteins, based on residue-specific diffusion measurements. 1H, 15N-DOSY-HSQC spectra are recorded in order to observe resolved amide proton signals for most residues of the protein. Human ubiquitin was used to demonstrate the proposed method. Exchange rates are derived directly from the decay data of the diffusion experiment by applying a model deduced from the assumption of a two-site exchange with water and the "pure" diffusion coefficients of water and protein. The "pure" diffusion coefficient of the protein is determined in an experiment with selective excitation of the amide protons in order to suppress the influence of magnetization transfer from water to amide protons on the decay data. For rapidly exchanging residues a comparison of our results with the exchange rates obtained in a MEXICO experiment showed good agreement. Molecular dynamics (MD) and quantum mechanical calculations were performed to find molecular parameters correlating with the exchangeability of the NH protons. The RMS fluctuations of the amide protons, obtained from the MD simulations, together with the NH coupling constants provide a bilinear model which shows a good correlation with the experimental NH exchange rates.

  2. Relationship between air exchange rate and indoor VOC levels

    SciTech Connect

    Otson, R.; Williams, D.T.; Fellin, P.

    1998-12-31

    It is often assumed that the air quality is better in leaky than in airtight buildings. To test this anecdotal hypothesis, data from two Canadian surveys were examined. Indoor measurements of 28 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were made by means of a passive sampling method during the 24 to 48 h study periods in both studies, and air exchange rates were determined by the perfluorocarbon tracer approach. The air exchange rates ranged between about 0.1 to 2.5 air changes per hour in 54 test homes in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). Other information on building age and construction, renovation activities and occupant activities that potentially influenced indoor VOC concentrations in the homes was collected by means of a questionnaire. The statistical relationships between the concentrations of VOCs and air exchange were determined. Correlation coefficients between the airborne concentrations of each VOC and the air exchange rates for the homes were all < 0.1 indicating that the relationship between the air exchange and indoor VOC concentrations is tenuous. Since the questionnaire responses did not provide quantitative estimates of indoor emissions, a quantitative correlation between responses and indoor concentrations could not be established nor was a consistent pattern evident between these responses and the occurrence of high indoor concentrations. The lack of definitive quantitative relationships is not surprising considering the complexity of indoor environments, the lack of a detailed inventory of indoor sources and their emission rates and a lack of information or understanding of indoor sinks. The findings, on the effect of air exchange rates and the value of questionnaires in studies on indoor VOCs are consistent with findings in other similar studies.

  3. The American Foreign Exchange Option in Time-Dependent One-Dimensional Diffusion Model for Exchange Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Rehman, Nasir Shashiashvili, Malkhaz

    2009-06-15

    The classical Garman-Kohlhagen model for the currency exchange assumes that the domestic and foreign currency risk-free interest rates are constant and the exchange rate follows a log-normal diffusion process.In this paper we consider the general case, when exchange rate evolves according to arbitrary one-dimensional diffusion process with local volatility that is the function of time and the current exchange rate and where the domestic and foreign currency risk-free interest rates may be arbitrary continuous functions of time. First non-trivial problem we encounter in time-dependent case is the continuity in time argument of the value function of the American put option and the regularity properties of the optimal exercise boundary. We establish these properties based on systematic use of the monotonicity in volatility for the value functions of the American as well as European options with convex payoffs together with the Dynamic Programming Principle and we obtain certain type of comparison result for the value functions and corresponding exercise boundaries for the American puts with different strikes, maturities and volatilities.Starting from the latter fact that the optimal exercise boundary curve is left continuous with right-hand limits we give a mathematically rigorous and transparent derivation of the significant early exercise premium representation for the value function of the American foreign exchange put option as the sum of the European put option value function and the early exercise premium.The proof essentially relies on the particular property of the stochastic integral with respect to arbitrary continuous semimartingale over the predictable subsets of its zeros. We derive from the latter the nonlinear integral equation for the optimal exercise boundary which can be studied by numerical methods.

  4. Ion momentum and energy transfer rates for charge exchange collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J.; Banks, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    The rates of momentum and energy transfer have been obtained for charge exchange collisions between ion and neutral gases having arbitrary Maxwellian temperatures and bulk transport velocities. The results are directly applicable to the F-region of the ionosphere where 0+ - 0 charge is the dominant mechanism affecting ion momentum and energy transfer.

  5. Extensions to the Dynamic Aerospace Vehicle Exchange Markup Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brian, Geoffrey J.; Jackson, E. Bruce

    2011-01-01

    The Dynamic Aerospace Vehicle Exchange Markup Language (DAVE-ML) is a syntactical language for exchanging flight vehicle dynamic model data. It provides a framework for encoding entire flight vehicle dynamic model data packages for exchange and/or long-term archiving. Version 2.0.1 of DAVE-ML provides much of the functionality envisioned for exchanging aerospace vehicle data; however, it is limited in only supporting scalar time-independent data. Additional functionality is required to support vector and matrix data, abstracting sub-system models, detailing dynamics system models (both discrete and continuous), and defining a dynamic data format (such as time sequenced data) for validation of dynamics system models and vehicle simulation packages. Extensions to DAVE-ML have been proposed to manage data as vectors and n-dimensional matrices, and record dynamic data in a compatible form. These capabilities will improve the clarity of data being exchanged, simplify the naming of parameters, and permit static and dynamic data to be stored using a common syntax within a single file; thereby enhancing the framework provided by DAVE-ML for exchanging entire flight vehicle dynamic simulation models.

  6. Does implied volatility of currency futures option imply volatility of exchange rates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Alan T.

    2007-02-01

    By investigating currency futures options, this paper provides an alternative economic implication for the result reported by Stein [Overreactions in the options market, Journal of Finance 44 (1989) 1011-1023] that long-maturity options tend to overreact to changes in the implied volatility of short-maturity options. When a GARCH process is assumed for exchange rates, a continuous-time relationship is developed. We provide evidence that implied volatilities may not be the simple average of future expected volatilities. By comparing the term-structure relationship of implied volatilities with the process of the underlying exchange rates, we find that long-maturity options are more consistent with the exchange rates process. In sum, short-maturity options overreact to the dynamics of underlying assets rather than long-maturity options overreacting to short-maturity options.

  7. Transition Path Sampling of Water Exchange Rates and Mechanisms around Aqueous Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N; Rosso, Kevin M

    2009-09-21

    The rates and mechanisms of water exchange around two aqueous ions, namely, Na+ and Fe2+, have been determined using transition path sampling. In particular, the pressure dependence of the water exchange rates was computed to determine activation volumes. A common approach for calculating water exchange rates, the reactive flux method, was also employed and the two methods were compared. The water exchange rate around Na+ is fast enough to be calculated by direct molecular dynamics simulations, thus providing a reference for comparison. The transition path sampling approach yielded more accurate rates, although both approaches predicted activation volumes of +2.6 cm3·mol-1, in agreement with the direct simulation results. The only previously determined activation volume for Na+ is from a theoretical estimation (Spångberg, D.; Wojcik, M.; Hermansson, K. Chem. Phys. Lett. 1997, 276, 114-121) and differs in sign and magnitude from that calculated in this work. We show that this is due to an overestimation of the sodium hydration energy in the previous model. For water exchange around Fe2+, transition path sampling predicts an activation volume of +3.8 cm3mol-1, in excellent agreement with available experimental data. The reactive flux approach, however, failed to identify the transition state and predicted the opposite pressure dependence of the rate as a result. Analysis of the reactive trajectories obtained with the transition path sampling approach suggests that the Fe2+ exchange reaction takes place via an associative interchange mechanism, which goes against the conventional mechanistic interpretation of a positive activation volume. Collectively, considerable insight obtains not only for the exchange rates and mechanisms for Na+ and Fe2+, but also for identifying the most robust modeling strategy for these purposes.

  8. Hybrid empirical mode decomposition- ARIMA for forecasting exchange rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadan, Siti Sarah; Shabri, Ani; Ismail, Shuhaida

    2015-02-01

    This paper studied the forecasting of monthly Malaysian Ringgit (MYR)/ United State Dollar (USD) exchange rates using the hybrid of two methods which are the empirical model decomposition (EMD) and the autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA). MYR is pegged to USD during the Asian financial crisis causing the exchange rates are fixed to 3.800 from 2nd of September 1998 until 21st of July 2005. Thus, the chosen data in this paper is the post-July 2005 data, starting from August 2005 to July 2010. The comparative study using root mean square error (RMSE) and mean absolute error (MAE) showed that the EMD-ARIMA outperformed the single-ARIMA and the random walk benchmark model.

  9. Selection, Evaluation, And Rating of Compact Heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Matt

    2014-10-07

    SEARCH determines and optimizes the design of a compact heat exchanger for specified process conditions. The user specifies process boundary conditions including the fluid state and flow rate and SEARCH will determine the optimum flow arrangement, channel geometry, and mechanical design for the unit. Fluids are modeled using NUST Refprop or tabulated values. A variety of thermal-hydraulic correlations are available including user-defined equations to accurately capture the heat transfer and pressure drop behavior of the process flows.

  10. Oil Prices and Interest Rates: Do They Determine the Exchange Rate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, I. A.; Old, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Argues that the relationship between the British pound sterling, interest rates, and oil prices has been overemphasized by economic commentators because they ignored a basic economic theory about the determination of the exchange rate. Provides an example and suggestions for follow up instruction. (Author/JDH)

  11. 26 CFR 1.989(b)-1 - Definition of weighted average exchange rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of weighted average exchange rate. 1... average exchange rate. For purposes of section 989(b)(3) and (4), the term “weighted average exchange rate” means the simple average of the daily exchange rates (determined by reference to a qualified source...

  12. Oxygen ionization rates at Mars and Venus - Relative contributions of impact ionization and charge exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, M. H. G.; Luhmann, J. G.; Nagy, A. F.; Spreiter, J. R.; Stahara, S. S.

    1993-01-01

    Oxygen ion production rates above the ionopauses of Venus and Mars are calculated for photoionization, charge exchange, and solar wind electron impact ionization processes. The latter two require the use of the Spreiter and Stahara (1980) gas dynamic model to estimate magnetosheath velocities, densities, and temperatures. The results indicate that impact ionization is the dominant mechanism for the production of O(+) ions at both Venus and Mars. This finding might explain both the high ion escape rates measured by Phobos 2 and the greater mass loading rate inferred for Venus from the bow shock positions.

  13. Dynamic tube/support interaction in heat exchanger tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.

    1991-01-01

    The supports for heat exchanger tubes are usually plates with drilled holes; other types of supports also have been used. To facilitate manufacture and to allow for thermal expansion of the tubes, small clearances are used between tubes and tube supports. The dynamics of tube/support interaction in heat exchangers is fairly complicated. Understanding tube dynamics and its effects is important for heat exchangers. This paper summarizes the current state of the art on this subject and to identify future research needs. Specifically, the following topics are discussed: dynamics of loosely supported tubes, tube/support gap dynamics, tube response in flow, tube damage and wear, design considerations, and future research needs. 55 refs., 1 fig.

  14. The groundwater exchange rate of the southern Baltic coastal lowland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burzyński, K.; Sadurski, A.

    1990-11-01

    The groundwater of the southern Baltic lowlands usually occurs in particular hydrogeological conditions. The lowland is mostly covered by peats several metres in thickness. Peatbog water is isolated from deeper aquifers and has different chemical composition. Salty, relic groundwater of marine origin from the Atlantic period of the Holocene (Littorina transgression) may have survived in the deeper coastal aquifers in places of sluggish flow. The results of mathematical modelling of groundwater circulation show that the flow rate and local directions of groundwater change during the year, depending on the rate of groundwater recharge by precipitation. We present here an unsteady flow model, which makes it possible to predict the water table fluctuations during a year at any point of the area studied. The calculation of the groundwater exchange rate did not confirm the presence of any places of very sluggish groundwater flow, where salty, young relic water might have survived.

  15. Air exchange rates in new energy-efficient manufactured housing

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, D.; Bailey, S.

    1990-10-01

    During the 1989--1990 heating season, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, for the Bonneville Power Administration, measured the ventilation characteristics of 139 newly constructed energy-efficient manufactured homes and a control sample of 35 newer manufactured homes. A standard door fan pressurization technique was used to estimate shell leakiness, and a passive perfluorocarbon tracer technique was used to estimate overall air exchange rates. A measurement of the designated whole-house exhaust system flow rate was taken as well as an occupant and structure survey. The energy-efficient manufactured homes have very low air exchange rates, significantly lower than either existing manufactured homes or site-built homes. The standard deviation of the effective leakage area for this sample of homes is small (25% to 30% of the mean), indicating that the leakiness of manufactured housing stock can be confidently characterized by the mean value. There is some indication of increased ventilation due to the energy-efficient whole-house ventilation specification, but not directly related to the operation of the whole-house system. The mechanical systems as installed and operated do not provide the intended ventilation; consequently indoor air quality could possibly be adversely impacted and moisture/condensation in the living space is a potential problem. 6 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Dynamic line rating in the operating environment

    SciTech Connect

    Foss, S.D. ); Maraio, R.A. )

    1990-04-01

    Much attention has been placed on the benefits derived by the dynamic rating of overhead conductors based on typical or single station weather data. Reported power line capacity show increases from 20 to 70% on the average over existing static rating practices. Because of the necessity of multistation monitoring and the implication with respect to critical span, Niagara Mohawk performed an extensive one year multistation power line study. The study revealed that the dynamic line rating was 20% lower than the average dynamic rating for the power line.

  17. Selection, Evaluation, And Rating of Compact Heat exchangers

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-10-07

    SEARCH determines and optimizes the design of a compact heat exchanger for specified process conditions. The user specifies process boundary conditions including the fluid state and flow rate and SEARCH will determine the optimum flow arrangement, channel geometry, and mechanical design for the unit. Fluids are modeled using NUST Refprop or tabulated values. A variety of thermal-hydraulic correlations are available including user-defined equations to accurately capture the heat transfer and pressure drop behavior of themore » process flows.« less

  18. Peptide-Column Interactions and Their Influence on Back Exchange Rates in Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheff, Joey G.; Rey, Martial; Schriemer, David C.

    2013-07-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) methods generate useful information on protein structure and dynamics, ideally at the individual residue level. Most MS-based HDX methods involve a rapid proteolytic digestion followed by LC/MS analysis, with exchange kinetics monitored at the peptide level. Localizing specific sites of HDX is usually restricted to a resolution the size of the host peptide because gas-phase processes can scramble deuterium throughout the peptide. Subtractive methods may improve resolution, where deuterium levels of overlapping and nested peptides are used in a subtractive manner to localize exchange to smaller segments. In this study, we explore the underlying assumption of the subtractive method, namely, that the measured back exchange kinetics of a given residue is independent of its host peptide. Using a series of deuterated peptides, we show that secondary structure can be partially retained under quenched conditions, and that interactions between peptides and reversed-phase LC columns may both accelerate and decelerate residue HDX, depending upon peptide sequence and length. Secondary structure is induced through column interactions in peptides with a solution-phase propensity for structure, which has the effect of slowing HDX rates relative to predicted random coil values. Conversely, column interactions can orient random-coil peptide conformers to accelerate HDX, the degree to which correlates with peptide charge in solution, and which can be reversed by using stronger ion pairing reagents. The dependency of these effects on sequence and length suggest that subtractive methods for improving structural resolution in HDX-MS will not offer a straightforward solution for increasing exchange site resolution.

  19. Magnetization dynamics in exchange coupled antiferromagnet spin superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yizhou; Barlas, Yafis; Yin, Gen; Zang, Jiadong; Lake, Roger

    Antiferromagnets (AFMs) are commonly used as the exchange bias layer in magnetic recording and spintronic devices. Recently, several studies on the spin transfer torque and spin pumping in AFMs reveal much more interesting physics in AFMs. Properties of AFMs such as the ultrafast switching within picoseconds and spin superfluidity demonstrate the potential to build AFM based spintronic devices. Here, we study the magnetization dynamics in an exchange coupled AFM systems. Beginning from the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, we derive a Josephson-like equation for the exchange coupled system. We investigate the detailed magnetization dynamics by employing spin injection and spin pumping theory. We also propose a geometry that could be used to measure this magnetization dynamics. This work was supported as part of the Spins and Heat in Nanoscale Electronic Systems (SHINES) an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award #SC0012670.

  20. Air exchange rates from atmospheric CO2 daily cycle

    PubMed Central

    Carrilho, João Dias; Mateus, Mário; Batterman, Stuart; da Silva, Manuel Gameiro

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new approach for measuring ventilation air exchange rates (AERs). The method belongs to the class of tracer gas techniques, but is formulated in the light of systems theory and signal processing. Unlike conventional CO2 based methods that assume the outdoor ambient CO2 concentration is constant, the proposed method recognizes that photosynthesis and respiration cycle of plants and processes associated with fuel combustion produce daily, quasi-periodic, variations in the ambient CO2 concentrations. These daily variations, which are within the detection range of existing monitoring equipment, are utilized for estimating ventilation rates without the need of a source of CO2 in the building. Using a naturally-ventilated residential apartment, AERs obtained using the new method compared favorably (within 10%) to those obtained using the conventional CO2 decay fitting technique. The new method has the advantages that no tracer gas injection is needed, and high time resolution results are obtained. PMID:26236090

  1. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Minimum Capital Components for Interest Rate and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF... CAPITAL Minimum Capital Pt. 1750, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750—Minimum Capital... sheet interest rate and foreign exchange rate contracts: a. Interest Rate Contracts i. Single...

  2. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Minimum Capital Components for Interest Rate and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF... CAPITAL Minimum Capital Pt. 1750, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750—Minimum Capital... sheet interest rate and foreign exchange rate contracts: a. Interest Rate Contracts i. Single...

  3. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Minimum Capital Components for Interest Rate and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF... CAPITAL Minimum Capital Pt. 1750, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750—Minimum Capital... sheet interest rate and foreign exchange rate contracts: a. Interest Rate Contracts i. Single...

  4. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Minimum Capital Components for Interest Rate and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF... CAPITAL Minimum Capital Pt. 1750, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750—Minimum Capital... sheet interest rate and foreign exchange rate contracts: a. Interest Rate Contracts i. Single...

  5. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Minimum Capital Components for Interest Rate and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF... CAPITAL Minimum Capital Pt. 1750, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750—Minimum Capital... sheet interest rate and foreign exchange rate contracts: a. Interest Rate Contracts i. Single...

  6. Dependence and risk assessment for oil prices and exchange rate portfolios: A wavelet based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloui, Chaker; Jammazi, Rania

    2015-10-01

    In this article, we propose a wavelet-based approach to accommodate the stylized facts and complex structure of financial data, caused by frequent and abrupt changes of markets and noises. Specifically, we show how the combination of both continuous and discrete wavelet transforms with traditional financial models helps improve portfolio's market risk assessment. In the empirical stage, three wavelet-based models (wavelet-EGARCH with dynamic conditional correlations, wavelet-copula, and wavelet-extreme value) are considered and applied to crude oil price and US dollar exchange rate data. Our findings show that the wavelet-based approach provides an effective and powerful tool for detecting extreme moments and improving the accuracy of VaR and Expected Shortfall estimates of oil-exchange rate portfolios after noise is removed from the original data.

  7. Glucans monomer-exchange dynamics as an open chemical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Riccardo; Lacoste, David; Esposito, Massimiliano

    2015-12-01

    We describe the oligosaccharides-exchange dynamics performed by the so-called D-enzymes on polysaccharides. To mimic physiological conditions, we treat this process as an open chemical network by assuming some of the polymer concentrations fixed (chemostatting). We show that three different long-time behaviors may ensue: equilibrium states, nonequilibrium steady states, and continuous growth states. We dynamically and thermodynamically characterize these states and emphasize the crucial role of conservation laws in identifying the chemostatting conditions inducing them.

  8. Glucans monomer-exchange dynamics as an open chemical network

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Riccardo Esposito, Massimiliano; Lacoste, David

    2015-12-28

    We describe the oligosaccharides-exchange dynamics performed by the so-called D-enzymes on polysaccharides. To mimic physiological conditions, we treat this process as an open chemical network by assuming some of the polymer concentrations fixed (chemostatting). We show that three different long-time behaviors may ensue: equilibrium states, nonequilibrium steady states, and continuous growth states. We dynamically and thermodynamically characterize these states and emphasize the crucial role of conservation laws in identifying the chemostatting conditions inducing them.

  9. Transitional steady states of exchange dynamics between finite quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Euijin; Yi, Juyeon; Kim, Yong Woon

    2016-08-01

    We examine energy and particle exchange between finite-sized quantum systems and find a new form of nonequilibrium state. The exchange rate undergoes stepwise evolution in time, and its magnitude and sign dramatically change according to system size differences. The origin lies in interference effects contributed by multiply scattered waves at system boundaries. Although such characteristics are utterly different from those of true steady state for infinite systems, Onsager's reciprocal relation remains universally valid. PMID:27627275

  10. Combined Steady-State and Dynamic Heat Exchanger Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal; Bader, Paul N.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a heat-transfer experiment that combines steady-state analysis and dynamic control. A process-water stream is circulated through two tube-in-shell heat exchangers in series. In the first, the process water is heated by steam. In the second, it is cooled by cooling water. The equipment is pilot-plant size: heat-transfer areas…

  11. Computational Studies of Water-Exchange Rates around Aqueous Mg2+ and Be2+

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Liem X.

    2014-12-18

    The water-exchange mechanisms occurring around aqueous divalent Mg2+ and Be2+ ions were studied using molecular dynamics simulations and rate theory methods. Properties associated with the water-exchange process, such as ion-water potentials of mean force, time-dependent transmission coefficients, and rate constants, were examined along with transition rate theory and the reactive flux method, which includes the role of solvent friction. The effects of pressure on water-exchange rates and activation volumes also were studied. The simulated activation volume values and mechanism were different for Mg2+ and Be2+ because of the nature of their solvation shells. We found the agreement with experiments was improved up on solvent effects were taken into account. The Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded this work. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES.

  12. Modeling dynamic exchange of gaseous elemental mercury at polar sunrise.

    PubMed

    Dastoor, Ashu P; Davignon, Didier; Theys, Nicolas; Van Roozendael, Michel; Steffen, Alexandra; Ariya, Parisa A

    2008-07-15

    At polar sunrise, gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) undergoes an exceptional dynamic exchange in the air and at the snow surface during which GEM can be rapidly removed from the atmosphere (the so-called atmospheric mercury depletion events (AMDEs)) as well as re-emitted from the snow within a few hours to days in the Polar Regions. Although high concentrations of total mercury in snow following AMDEs is well documented, there is very little data available on the redox transformation processes of mercury in the snow and the fluxes of mercury at the air/snow interface. Therefore, the net gain of mercury in the Polar Regions as a result of AMDEs is still an open question. We developed a new version of the global mercury model, GRAHM, which includes for the first time bidirectional surface exchange of GEM in Polar Regions in spring and summer by developing schemes for mercury halogen oxidation, deposition, and re-emission. Also for the first time, GOME satellite data-derived boundary layer concentrations of BrO have been used in a global mercury model for representation of halogen mercury chemistry. Comparison of model simulated and measured atmospheric concentrations of GEM at Alert, Canada, for 3 years (2002-2004) shows the model's capability in simulating the rapid cycling of mercury during and after AMDEs. Brooks et al. (1) measured mercury deposition, reemission, and net surface gain fluxes of mercury at Barrow, AK, during an intensive measurement campaign for a 2 week period in spring (March 25 to April 7, 2003). They reported 1.7, 1.0 +/- 0.2, and 0.7 +/- 0.2 microg m(-2) deposition, re-emission, and net surface gain, respectively. Using the optimal configuration of the model, we estimated 1.8 microg m(-2) deposition, 1.0 microg m(-2) re-emission, and 0.8 microg m(-2) net surface gain of mercury for the same time period at Barrow. The estimated net annual accumulation of mercury within the Arctic Circle north of 66.5 degrees is approximately 174 t with +/-7 t of

  13. Flight Dynamic Model Exchange using XML

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, E. Bruce; Hildreth, Bruce L.

    2002-01-01

    The AIAA Modeling and Simulation Technical Committee has worked for several years to develop a standard by which the information needed to develop physics-based models of aircraft can be specified. The purpose of this standard is to provide a well-defined set of information, definitions, data tables and axis systems so that cooperating organizations can transfer a model from one simulation facility to another with maximum efficiency. This paper proposes using an application of the eXtensible Markup Language (XML) to implement the AIAA simulation standard. The motivation and justification for using a standard such as XML is discussed. Necessary data elements to be supported are outlined. An example of an aerodynamic model as an XML file is given. This example includes definition of independent and dependent variables for function tables, definition of key variables used to define the model, and axis systems used. The final steps necessary for implementation of the standard are presented. Software to take an XML-defined model and import/export it to/from a given simulation facility is discussed, but not demonstrated. That would be the next step in final implementation of standards for physics-based aircraft dynamic models.

  14. Nondiffusive mechanisms enhance protein uptake rates in ion exchange particles

    PubMed Central

    Dziennik, S. R.; Belcher, E. B.; Barker, G. A.; DeBergalis, M. J.; Fernandez, S. E.; Lenhoff, A. M.

    2003-01-01

    Scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy and multiphoton fluorescence microscopy were used to image the uptake of the protein lysozyme into individual ion exchange chromatography particles in a packed bed in real time. Self-sharpening concentration fronts penetrating into the particles were observed at low salt concentrations in all of the adsorbents studied, but persisted to 100 mM ionic strength only in some materials. In other adsorbents, diffuse profiles were seen at these higher salt concentrations, with the transition region exhibiting a pronounced fluorescence peak at the front at intermediate salt concentrations. These patterns in the uptake profiles are accompanied by significant increases in protein uptake rates that are also seen macroscopically in batch uptake experiments. The fluorescence peak appears to be a concentration overshoot that may develop, in part, from an electrokinetic contribution to transport that also enhances the uptake rate. Further evidence for an electrokinetic origin is that the effect is correlated with high adsorbent surface charge densities. Predictions of a mathematical model incorporating the electrokinetic effect are in qualitative agreement with the observations. These findings indicate that mechanisms other than diffusion contribute to protein transport in oppositely charged porous materials and may be exploited to achieve rapid uptake in process chromatography. PMID:12522150

  15. Spin and orbital exchange interactions from Dynamical Mean Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secchi, A.; Lichtenstein, A. I.; Katsnelson, M. I.

    2016-02-01

    We derive a set of equations expressing the parameters of the magnetic interactions characterizing a strongly correlated electronic system in terms of single-electron Green's functions and self-energies. This allows to establish a mapping between the initial electronic system and a spin model including up to quadratic interactions between the effective spins, with a general interaction (exchange) tensor that accounts for anisotropic exchange, Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and other symmetric terms such as dipole-dipole interaction. We present the formulas in a format that can be used for computations via Dynamical Mean Field Theory algorithms.

  16. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry for investigation of backbone dynamics of oxidized and reduced cytochrome P450cam.

    PubMed

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Molnar, Kathleen S; Coales, Stephen J; OuYang, Bo; Simorellis, Alana K; Pochapsky, Thomas C

    2008-02-01

    Backbone dynamics of the camphor monoxygenase cytochrome P450(cam) (CYP101) as a function of oxidation/ligation state of the heme iron were investigated via hydrogen/deuterium exchange (H/D exchange) as monitored by mass spectrometry. Main chain amide NH hydrogens can exchange readily with solvent and the rate of this exchange depends upon, among other things, dynamic fluctuations in local structural elements. A fluxional region of the polypeptide will exchange more quickly with solvent than one that is more constrained. In most regions of the enzyme, exchange rates were similar between oxidized high-spin camphor-bound and reduced camphor- and CO-bound CYP101 (CYP-S and CYP-S-CO, respectively). However, in regions of the protein that have previously been implicated in substrate access by structural and molecular dynamics investigations, the reduced enzyme shows significantly slower exchange rates than the oxidized CYP-S. This observation corresponds to increased flexibility of the oxidized enzyme relative to the reduced form. Structural features previously found to be perturbed in CYP-S-CO upon binding of the biologically relevant effector and reductant putidaredoxin (Pdx) as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance are also more protected from exchange in the reduced state. To our knowledge, this study represents the first experimental investigation of backbone dynamics within the P450 family using this methodology. PMID:18023482

  17. Australian Universities' Strategic Goals of Student Exchange and Participation Rates in Outbound Exchange Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Amanda; Barker, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    International student exchange programmes are acknowledged as one aspect of a broader suite of internationalisation strategies aimed at enhancing students' intercultural understanding and competence. The decision to participate in an exchange programme is dependent on both individual and contextual factors such as student exchange policies and…

  18. Surface nanobubble nucleation dynamics during water-ethanol exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chon U.; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2015-11-01

    Water-ethanol exchange has been a promising nucleation method for surface attached nanobubbles since their discovery. In this process, water and ethanol displace each other sequentially on a substrate. As the gas solubility is 36 times higher in ethanol than water, it was suggested that the exchange process leads to transient supersaturation and is responsible for the nanobubble nucleation. In this work, we visualize the nucleation dynamics by controllably mixing water and ethanol. It depicts the temporal evolution of the conventional exchange in a single field of view, detailing the conditions for surface nanobubble nucleation and the flow field that influences their spatial organization. This technique can also pattern surface nanobubbles with variable size distribution.

  19. Multifractality and value-at-risk forecasting of exchange rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batten, Jonathan A.; Kinateder, Harald; Wagner, Niklas

    2014-05-01

    This paper addresses market risk prediction for high frequency foreign exchange rates under nonlinear risk scaling behaviour. We use a modified version of the multifractal model of asset returns (MMAR) where trading time is represented by the series of volume ticks. Our dataset consists of 138,418 5-min round-the-clock observations of EUR/USD spot quotes and trading ticks during the period January 5, 2006 to December 31, 2007. Considering fat-tails, long-range dependence as well as scale inconsistency with the MMAR, we derive out-of-sample value-at-risk (VaR) forecasts and compare our approach to historical simulation as well as a benchmark GARCH(1,1) location-scale VaR model. Our findings underline that the multifractal properties in EUR/USD returns in fact have notable risk management implications. The MMAR approach is a parsimonious model which produces admissible VaR forecasts at the 12-h forecast horizon. For the daily horizon, the MMAR outperforms both alternatives based on conditional as well as unconditional coverage statistics.

  20. Dynamic Line Rating: Research and Policy Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Jake P. Gentle; Kurt S. Myers; Michael R. West

    2014-07-01

    Dynamic Line Rating (DLR) is a smart grid technology that allows the rating of electrical conductors to be increased based on local weather conditions. Overhead lines are conventionally given a conservative rating based on worst case scenarios. We demonstrate that observing the conditions in real time leads to additional capacity and safer operation. This paper provides a report of a pioneering scheme in the United States of America in which DLR has been applied. Thereby, we demonstrate that observing the local weather conditions in real time leads to additional capacity and safer operation. Secondly, we discuss limitations involved. In doing so, we arrive at novel insights which will inform and improve future DLR projects. Third, we provide a policy background and discussion to clarify the technology’s potential and identifies barriers to the imminent adoption of dynamic line rating systems. We provide suggestions for regulatory bodies about possible improvements in policy to encourage adoption of this beneficial technology.

  1. Hyporheic exchange controlled by dynamic hydrologic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmadel, Noah M.; Ward, Adam S.; Lowry, Christopher S.; Malzone, Jonathan M.

    2016-05-01

    The relative roles of dynamic hydrologic forcing and geomorphology as controls on the timescales and magnitudes of stream-aquifer exchange and hyporheic flow paths are unknown but required for management of stream corridors. We developed a comprehensive framework relating diel hydrologic fluctuations to hyporheic exchange in the absence of geomorphic complexity. We simulated groundwater flow through an aquifer bounded by a straight stream and hillslope and under time-varying boundary conditions. We found that diel fluctuations can produce hyporheic flow path lengths and residence times that span orders of magnitude. With these results, hyporheic flow path residence times and lengths can be predicted from the timing and magnitude of diel fluctuations and valley slope. Finally, we demonstrated that dynamic hydrologic boundary conditions can produce spatial and temporal scales of hyporheic flow paths equivalent to those driven by many well-studied geomorphic features, indicating that these controls must be considered together in future efforts of upscaling to stream networks.

  2. Glucans monomer-exchange dynamics as an open chemical network.

    PubMed

    Rao, Riccardo; Lacoste, David; Esposito, Massimiliano

    2015-12-28

    We describe the oligosaccharides-exchange dynamics performed by the so-called D-enzymes on polysaccharides. To mimic physiological conditions, we treat this process as an open chemical network by assuming some of the polymer concentrations fixed (chemostatting). We show that three different long-time behaviors may ensue: equilibrium states, nonequilibrium steady states, and continuous growth states. We dynamically and thermodynamically characterize these states and emphasize the crucial role of conservation laws in identifying the chemostatting conditions inducing them. PMID:26723707

  3. Replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid peptide aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecchini, M.; Rao, F.; Seeber, M.; Caflisch, A.

    2004-12-01

    The replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) approach is applied to four oligomeric peptide systems. At physiologically relevant temperature values REMD samples conformation space and aggregation transitions more efficiently than constant temperature molecular dynamics (CTMD). During the aggregation process the energetic and structural properties are essentially the same in REMD and CTMD. A condensation stage toward disordered aggregates precedes the β-sheet formation. Two order parameters, borrowed from anisotropic fluid analysis, are used to monitor the aggregation process. The order parameters do not depend on the peptide sequence and length and therefore allow to compare the amyloidogenic propensity of different peptides.

  4. NASA data exchange standards for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Matthew

    1993-01-01

    This paper covers the following topics in viewgraph format: purpose of data exchange standards; data exchange in engineering analysis/CFD; geometry data exchange through existing product data exchange standards, NASA Data Exchange Committee, and NASA-IGES (Initial Graphics Exchange Specification); CFD grid and solution data exchange; and data exchange for multi-disciplinary engineering.

  5. Design and simulation of heat exchangers using Aspen HYSYS, and Aspen exchanger design and rating for paddy drying application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janaun, J.; Kamin, N. H.; Wong, K. H.; Tham, H. J.; Kong, V. V.; Farajpourlar, M.

    2016-06-01

    Air heating unit is one of the most important parts in paddy drying to ensure the efficiency of a drying process. In addition, an optimized air heating unit does not only promise a good paddy quality, but also save more for the operating cost. This study determined the suitable and best specifications heating unit to heat air for paddy drying in the LAMB dryer. In this study, Aspen HYSYS v7.3 was used to obtain the minimum flow rate of hot water needed. The resulting data obtained from Aspen HYSYS v7.3 were used in Aspen Exchanger Design and Rating (EDR) to generate heat exchanger design and costs. The designs include shell and tubes and plate heat exchanger. The heat exchanger was designed in order to produce various drying temperatures of 40, 50, 60 and 70°C of air with different flow rate, 300, 2500 and 5000 LPM. The optimum condition for the heat exchanger were found to be plate heat exchanger with 0.6 mm plate thickness, 198.75 mm plate width, 554.8 mm plate length and 11 numbers of plates operating at 5000 LPM air flow rate.

  6. G-register exchange dynamics in guanine quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Harkness, Robert W; Mittermaier, Anthony K

    2016-05-01

    G-quadruplexes (GQs) are 4-stranded DNA structures formed by tracts of stacked, Hoogsteen-hydrogen bonded guanosines. GQs are found in gene promoters and telomeres where they regulate gene transcription and telomere elongation. Though GQ structures are well-characterized, many aspects of their conformational dynamics are poorly understood. For example, when there are surplus guanosines in some of the tracts, they can slide with respect to one another, a process we term G-register (GR) exchange. These motions could in principle entropically stabilize the folded state, crucially benefitting GQs as their stabilities are closely tied to biological function. We have developed a method for characterizing GR exchange where each isomer in the wild-type conformational ensemble is trapped by mutation and thermal denaturation data for the set of trapped mutants and wild-type are analyzed simultaneously. This yields GR isomer populations as a function of temperature, quantifies conformational entropy and sheds light on correlated sliding motions of the G-tracts. We measured entropic stabilizations from GR exchange up to 14.3 ± 1.6 J mol(-1) K(-1), with melting temperature increases up to 7.3 ± 1.6°C. Furthermore, bioinformatic analysis suggests a majority of putative human GQ sequences are capable of GR exchange, pointing to the generality of this phenomenon. PMID:27060139

  7. G-register exchange dynamics in guanine quadruplexes

    PubMed Central

    Harkness, Robert W.; Mittermaier, Anthony K.

    2016-01-01

    G-quadruplexes (GQs) are 4-stranded DNA structures formed by tracts of stacked, Hoogsteen-hydrogen bonded guanosines. GQs are found in gene promoters and telomeres where they regulate gene transcription and telomere elongation. Though GQ structures are well-characterized, many aspects of their conformational dynamics are poorly understood. For example, when there are surplus guanosines in some of the tracts, they can slide with respect to one another, a process we term G-register (GR) exchange. These motions could in principle entropically stabilize the folded state, crucially benefitting GQs as their stabilities are closely tied to biological function. We have developed a method for characterizing GR exchange where each isomer in the wild-type conformational ensemble is trapped by mutation and thermal denaturation data for the set of trapped mutants and wild-type are analyzed simultaneously. This yields GR isomer populations as a function of temperature, quantifies conformational entropy and sheds light on correlated sliding motions of the G-tracts. We measured entropic stabilizations from GR exchange up to 14.3 ± 1.6 J mol−1 K−1, with melting temperature increases up to 7.3 ± 1.6°C. Furthermore, bioinformatic analysis suggests a majority of putative human GQ sequences are capable of GR exchange, pointing to the generality of this phenomenon. PMID:27060139

  8. Biased Brownian dynamics for rate constant calculation.

    PubMed

    Zou, G; Skeel, R D; Subramaniam, S

    2000-08-01

    An enhanced sampling method-biased Brownian dynamics-is developed for the calculation of diffusion-limited biomolecular association reaction rates with high energy or entropy barriers. Biased Brownian dynamics introduces a biasing force in addition to the electrostatic force between the reactants, and it associates a probability weight with each trajectory. A simulation loses weight when movement is along the biasing force and gains weight when movement is against the biasing force. The sampling of trajectories is then biased, but the sampling is unbiased when the trajectory outcomes are multiplied by their weights. With a suitable choice of the biasing force, more reacted trajectories are sampled. As a consequence, the variance of the estimate is reduced. In our test case, biased Brownian dynamics gives a sevenfold improvement in central processing unit (CPU) time with the choice of a simple centripetal biasing force. PMID:10919998

  9. Dynamic communities in multichannel data: An application to the foreign exchange market during the 2007-2008 credit crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenn, Daniel J.; Porter, Mason A.; McDonald, Mark; Williams, Stacy; Johnson, Neil F.; Jones, Nick S.

    2009-09-01

    We study the cluster dynamics of multichannel (multivariate) time series by representing their correlations as time-dependent networks and investigating the evolution of network communities. We employ a node-centric approach that allows us to track the effects of the community evolution on the functional roles of individual nodes without having to track entire communities. As an example, we consider a foreign exchange market network in which each node represents an exchange rate and each edge represents a time-dependent correlation between the rates. We study the period 2005-2008, which includes the recent credit and liquidity crisis. Using community detection, we find that exchange rates that are strongly attached to their community are persistently grouped with the same set of rates, whereas exchange rates that are important for the transfer of information tend to be positioned on the edges of communities. Our analysis successfully uncovers major trading changes that occurred in the market during the credit crisis.

  10. Water exchange dynamics around H₃O⁺ and OH⁻ ions

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Santanu; Dang, Liem X.

    2015-05-01

    Proton transfer in water and other solvents is a complicated process and an active research area. Conformational changes of water hydrating a proton can have a significant influence on proton dynamics. A hydrated proton leads to H₃O⁺ that forms three hydrogen bonds with neighboring water molecules. In this letter, we report the first computer simulation of the dynamics of water exchanging between the first and second solvation shells of H₃O⁺. Employing different rate theories for chemical reactions such as the transition state theory, the Grote-Hynes theory, the reactive flux method, and the Impey-Madden-McDonald method, we calculate the solvent exchange rates from molecular dynamics simulations that account for explicit polarization effects. In addition, we also study water exchanges around OH⁻ and find that the corresponding time scale (~50 picoseconds [ps]) is much smaller than that for H₃O⁺ (~100 ps). Results from all the rate theories are computed and compared. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  11. DYNACLIPS (DYNAmic CLIPS): A dynamic knowledge exchange tool for intelligent agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cengeloglu, Yilmaz; Khajenoori, Soheil; Linton, Darrell

    1994-01-01

    In a dynamic environment, intelligent agents must be responsive to unanticipated conditions. When such conditions occur, an intelligent agent may have to stop a previously planned and scheduled course of actions and replan, reschedule, start new activities and initiate a new problem solving process to successfully respond to the new conditions. Problems occur when an intelligent agent does not have enough knowledge to properly respond to the new situation. DYNACLIPS is an implementation of a framework for dynamic knowledge exchange among intelligent agents. Each intelligent agent is a CLIPS shell and runs a separate process under SunOS operating system. Intelligent agents can exchange facts, rules, and CLIPS commands at run time. Knowledge exchange among intelligent agents at run times does not effect execution of either sender and receiver intelligent agent. Intelligent agents can keep the knowledge temporarily or permanently. In other words, knowledge exchange among intelligent agents would allow for a form of learning to be accomplished.

  12. Dynamic heart rate measurements from video sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yong-Poh; Raveendran, P.; Lim, Chern-Loon

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows how dynamic heart rate measurements that are typically obtained from sensors mounted near to the heart can also be obtained from video sequences. In this study, two experiments are carried out where a video camera captures the facial images of the seven subjects. The first experiment involves the measurement of subjects’ increasing heart rates (79 to 150 beats per minute (BPM)) while cycling whereas the second involves falling heart beats (153 to 88 BPM). In this study, independent component analysis (ICA) is combined with mutual information to ensure accuracy is not compromised in the use of short video duration. While both experiments are going on measures of heartbeat using the Polar heart rate monitor is also taken to compare with the findings of the proposed method. Overall experimental results show the proposed method can be used to measure dynamic heart rates where the root mean square error (RMSE) and the correlation coefficient are 1.88 BPM and 0.99 respectively. PMID:26203374

  13. Quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer with hyperpolarized nuclei (qHyper-CEST): Sensing xenon-host exchange dynamics and binding affinities by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Kunth, M. Witte, C.; Schröder, L.

    2014-11-21

    The reversible binding of xenon to host molecules has found numerous applications in nuclear magnetic resonance studies. Quantitative characterization of the Xe exchange dynamics is important to understand and optimize the physico-chemical behavior of such Xe hosts, but is often challenging to achieve at low host concentrations. We have investigated a sensitive quantification technique based on chemical exchange saturation transfer with hyperpolarized nuclei, qHyper-CEST. Using simulated signals we demonstrated that qHyper-CEST yielded accurate and precise results and was robust in the presence of large amounts of noise (10%). This is of particular importance for samples with completely unknown exchange rates. Using these findings we experimentally determined the following exchange parameters for the Xe host cryptophane-A monoacid in dimethyl sulfoxide in one type of experiment: the ratio of bound and free Xe, the Xe exchange rate, the resonance frequencies of free and bound Xe, the Xe host occupancy, and the Xe binding constant. Taken together, qHyper-CEST facilitates sensitive quantification of the Xe exchange dynamics and binding to hydrophobic cavities and has the potential to analyze many different host systems or binding sites. This makes qHyper-CEST an indispensable tool for the efficient design of highly specific biosensors.

  14. Optimized explicit-solvent replica exchange molecular dynamics from scratch.

    PubMed

    Nadler, Walter; Hansmann, Ulrich H E

    2008-08-28

    Replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations have become an important tool to study proteins and other biological molecules in silico. However, such investigations require considerable, and often prohibitive, numerical effort when the molecules are simulated in explicit solvents. In this communication we show that in this case the cost can be minimized by choosing the number of replicas as N(opt) approximately 1+0.594 radical C ln(Tmax/Tmin), where C is the specific heat, and the temperatures distributed according to Ti(opt) approximately T min(Tmax/Tmin)(i-1)/(N-1). PMID:18671362

  15. Dynamically corrected gates for an exchange-only qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, G. T.; Wang, Xin; Kestner, J. P.; Das Sarma, S.

    2013-10-01

    We provide analytical composite pulse sequences that perform dynamical decoupling concurrently with arbitrary rotations for a qubit coded in the spin state of a triple quantum dot. The sequences are designed to respect realistic experimental constraints such as strictly nonnegative couplings. Logical errors and leakage errors are simultaneously corrected. A short pulse sequence is presented to compensate nuclear noise and a longer sequence is presented to simultaneously compensate nuclear and charge noise. The capability developed in this work provides a clear prescription for combatting the relevant sources of noise that currently hinder exchange-only qubit experiments.

  16. Review of Air Exchange Rate Models for Air Pollution Exposure Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    A critical aspect of air pollution exposure assessments is estimation of the air exchange rate (AER) for various buildings, where people spend their time. The AER, which is rate the exchange of indoor air with outdoor air, is an important determinant for entry of outdoor air pol...

  17. Air-water Gas Exchange Rates on a Large Impounded River Measured Using Floating Domes (Poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mass balance models of dissolved gases in rivers typically serve as the basis for whole-system estimates of greenhouse gas emission rates. An important component of these models is the exchange of dissolved gases between air and water. Controls on gas exchange rates (K) have be...

  18. Predicting Offender-Generated Exchange Rates: Implications for a Theory of Sentence Severity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, David C.; Wood, Peter B.; Mooney, Jennifer L.; Minor, Kevin I.

    2005-01-01

    We solicited offender-generated exchange rates between prison and several noncustodial sanctions from a sample of 588 offenders currently serving community-based punishments. We then regressed these exchange rates on demographic, attitudinal, and correctional experience indicators. Males, Blacks, older offenders, offenders with prison experience,…

  19. Heterogeneous effects of oil shocks on exchange rates: evidence from a quantile regression approach.

    PubMed

    Su, Xianfang; Zhu, Huiming; You, Wanhai; Ren, Yinghua

    2016-01-01

    The determinants of exchange rates have attracted considerable attention among researchers over the past several decades. Most studies, however, ignore the possibility that the impact of oil shocks on exchange rates could vary across the exchange rate returns distribution. We employ a quantile regression approach to address this issue. Our results indicate that the effect of oil shocks on exchange rates is heterogeneous across quantiles. A large US depreciation or appreciation tends to heighten the effects of oil shocks on exchange rate returns. Positive oil demand shocks lead to appreciation pressures in oil-exporting countries and this result is robust across lower and upper return distributions. These results offer rich and useful information for investors and decision-makers. PMID:27516925

  20. The Importance of Water Exchange Rates in the Design of Responsive Agents for MRI

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, A. Dean; Wu, Yunkou

    2013-01-01

    The rate of water exchange in lanthanide complexes is often overlooked as an important parameter in the design of responsive MR imaging agents. Most often, the number of inner-sphere water coordination sites or the rotational mobility of the complex are considered as the central theme while water exchange is either assumed to be “fast enough” or entirely ignored. On the other hand, relaxation and shift theories predict that water exchange rates may indeed be the key parameter one should consider in any new molecular design. In this short review, the impact of water exchange rates on three classes of lanthanide-based MRI contrast agents, T1-based relaxation agents, T2 exchange line-broadening agents and chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) agents, is illustrated and discussed. PMID:23333571

  1. The simultaneous measurement of low rates of CO2 and O2 exchange in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Willms, J R; Dowling, A N; Dong, Z M; Hunt, S; Shelp, B J; Layzell, D B

    1997-12-15

    An instrument for measuring low rates of biological O2 exchange using an open-flow gas analysis system is described. A novel differential O2 sensor that is capable of measuring as little as 0.4 Pa O2 against a back-ground of ambient air (20,900 Pa O2), yet has a dynamic range of +/- 2000 Pa O2 (i.e., +/- ca. 2% O2) is described. Baseline drift was typically less than 0.025 Pa min-1. The differential O2 sensor was incorporated into a respiratory quotient/photosynthetic quotient analyzer that contained other environmental sensors for atmospheric pressure, absolute O2 and CO2 concentration, temperature of the differential O2 sensor block, and differential pressure between reference and sample streams. Protocols for how these sensors can be used to calibrate the differential O2 sensor and to improve its stability with time are described. Together, the differential O2 sensor, the environmental sensors, and the simple calibration techniques allow for simultaneous, noninvasive, and accurate measurements of O2 and CO2 exchange in tissues with metabolic rates as low as about 0.1 mumol O2 or CO2 h-1. Example data are provided in which O2 differentials of 3 to 41 Pa O2 were measured in an open-flow system. PMID:9417789

  2. [A comparative study of external respiration, gas exchange and circulation during static and dynamic muscular loads].

    PubMed

    Bubeev, Iu A; Khomenko, M N; Poliukhovich, V V; Remizov, Iu I

    1995-01-01

    Indices of external breathing, gas exchange, and circulation were studied during bicycle ergometry and static ergometry of 19 healthy male volunteers which were stopped at critical levels of heart rate, arterial pressure, ECG or subjective fatigue. The bicycle workload maximum averaged 210 Watts, the static ergometric, 224 kg/s. Both types of exercises were characterized by unidirectional shifting of the external breathing and gas exchange indices; however, they were less pronounced at static loads. Arterial pressure and resistance of the peripheral vessels were the only indices of the array the dynamics of which complied with and even exceeded that during bicycling. In contrast to the dynamic muscular load, the maximal dynamics of gas exchange and external breathing during static ergometric workload was observed in the rehabilitation period following restoration of muscle blood flow; this must be taken into account in interpretation of test results. It is concluded that high information virtues of the static ergometric test in the context of predicting aerobatic load tolerance, and similarity of dynamics in the period of rehabilitation hold much promise for using the tests with static muscular loading in aviation and space medicine. PMID:8664858

  3. TIME-VARYING DYNAMICAL STAR FORMATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eve J.; Chang, Philip; Murray, Norman

    2015-02-10

    We present numerical evidence of dynamic star formation in which the accreted stellar mass grows superlinearly with time, roughly as t {sup 2}. We perform simulations of star formation in self-gravitating hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence that is continuously driven. By turning the self-gravity of the gas in the simulations on or off, we demonstrate that self-gravity is the dominant physical effect setting the mass accretion rate at early times before feedback effects take over, contrary to theories of turbulence-regulated star formation. We find that gravitational collapse steepens the density profile around stars, generating the power-law tail on what is otherwise a lognormal density probability distribution function. Furthermore, we find turbulent velocity profiles to flatten inside collapsing regions, altering the size-line width relation. This local flattening reflects enhancements of turbulent velocity on small scales, as verified by changes to the velocity power spectra. Our results indicate that gas self-gravity dynamically alters both density and velocity structures in clouds, giving rise to a time-varying star formation rate. We find that a substantial fraction of the gas that forms stars arrives via low-density flows, as opposed to accreting through high-density filaments.

  4. Estimating long-run equilibrium real exchange rates: short-lived shocks with long-lived impacts on Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Zardad, Asma; Mohsin, Asma; Zaman, Khalid

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the factors that affect real exchange rate volatility for Pakistan through the co-integration and error correction model over a 30-year time period, i.e. between 1980 and 2010. The study employed the autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (ARCH), generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (GARCH) and Vector Error Correction model (VECM) to estimate the changes in the volatility of real exchange rate series, while an error correction model was used to determine the short-run dynamics of the system. The study is limited to a few variables i.e., productivity differential (i.e., real GDP per capita relative to main trading partner); terms of trade; trade openness and government expenditures in order to manage robust data. The result indicates that real effective exchange rate (REER) has been volatile around its equilibrium level; while, the speed of adjustment is relatively slow. VECM results confirm long run convergence of real exchange rate towards its equilibrium level. Results from ARCH and GARCH estimation shows that real shocks volatility persists, so that shocks die out rather slowly, and lasting misalignment seems to have occurred. PMID:23853758

  5. Thermostat artifacts in replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Rosta, Edina; Buchete, Nicolae-Viorel; Hummer, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    We explore the effects of thermostats in replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations. For thermostats that do not produce a canonical ensemble, REMD simulations are found to distort the configuration-space distributions. For bulk water, we find small deviations of the average potential energies, the buildup of tails in the potential energy distributions, and artificial correlations between the energies at different temperatures. If a solute is present, as in protein folding simulations, its conformational equilibrium can be altered. In REMD simulations of a helix-forming peptide with a weak-coupling (Berendsen) thermostat, we find that the folded state is overpopulated by about 10% at low temperatures, and underpopulated at high temperatures. As a consequence, the enthalpy of folding deviates by almost 3 kcal/mol from the correct value. The reason for this population shift is that non-canonical ensembles with narrowed potential energy fluctuations artificially bias toward replica exchanges between low-energy folded structures at the high temperature and high-energy unfolded structures at the low temperature. We conclude that REMD simulations should only be performed in conjunction with thermostats that produce a canonical ensemble. PMID:20046980

  6. Thermostat artifacts in replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Rosta, Edina; Buchete, Nicolae-Viorel; Hummer, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    We explore the effects of thermostats in replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations. For thermostats that do not produce a canonical ensemble, REMD simulations are found to distort the configuration-space distributions. For bulk water, we find small deviations of the average potential energies, the buildup of tails in the potential energy distributions, and artificial correlations between the energies at different temperatures. If a solute is present, as in protein folding simulations, its conformational equilibrium can be altered. In REMD simulations of a helix-forming peptide with a weak-coupling (Berendsen) thermostat, we find that the folded state is overpopulated by about 10% at low temperatures, and underpopulated at high temperatures. As a consequence, the enthalpy of folding deviates by almost 3 kcal/mol from the correct value. The reason for this population shift is that non-canonical ensembles with narrowed potential energy fluctuations artificially bias toward replica exchanges between low-energy folded structures at the high temperature and high-energy unfolded structures at the low temperature. We conclude that REMD simulations should only be performed in conjunction with thermostats that produce a canonical ensemble. PMID:20046980

  7. Wealth distribution of simple exchange models coupled with extremal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagatella-Flores, N.; Rodríguez-Achach, M.; Coronel-Brizio, H. F.; Hernández-Montoya, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Punctuated Equilibrium (PE) states that after long periods of evolutionary quiescence, species evolution can take place in short time intervals, where sudden differentiation makes new species emerge and some species extinct. In this paper, we introduce and study the effect of punctuated equilibrium on two different asset exchange models: the yard sale model (YS, winner gets a random fraction of a poorer player's wealth) and the theft and fraud model (TF, winner gets a random fraction of the loser's wealth). The resulting wealth distribution is characterized using the Gini index. In order to do this, we consider PE as a perturbation with probability ρ of being applied. We compare the resulting values of the Gini index at different increasing values of ρ in both models. We found that in the case of the TF model, the Gini index reduces as the perturbation ρ increases, not showing dependence with the agents number. While for YS we observe a phase transition which happens around ρc = 0.79. For perturbations ρ <ρc the Gini index reaches the value of one as time increases (an extreme wealth condensation state), whereas for perturbations greater than or equal to ρc the Gini index becomes different to one, avoiding the system reaches this extreme state. We show that both simple exchange models coupled with PE dynamics give more realistic results. In particular for YS, we observe a power low decay of wealth distribution.

  8. Dynamic Group Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange under standard assumptions

    SciTech Connect

    Bresson, Emmanuel; Chevassut, Olivier; Pointcheval, David

    2002-02-14

    Authenticated Diffie-Hellman key exchange allows two principals communicating over a public network, and each holding public-private keys, to agree on a shared secret value. In this paper we study the natural extension of this cryptographic problem to a group of principals. We begin from existing formal security models and refine them to incorporate major missing details (e.g., strong-corruption and concurrent sessions). Within this model we define the execution of a protocol for authenticated dynamic group Diffie-Hellman and show that it is provably secure under the decisional Diffie-Hellman assumption. Our security result holds in the standard model and thus provides better security guarantees than previously published results in the random oracle model.

  9. Gas exchange rates of potato stands for bioregenerative life support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.; Stutte, Gary W.; Mackowiak, Cheryl L.; Yorio, Neil C.; Sager, John C.; Knott, William M.

    Plants can provide a means for removing carbon dioxide (CO2) while generating oxygen (O2) and clean water for life support systems in space. To study this, 20 m2 stands of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) plants were grown in a large (113 m3 vol.), atmospherically closed chamber. Photosynthetic uptake of CO2 by the stands was detected about 10 DAP (days after planting), after which photosynthetic rates rose rapidly as stand ground cover and total light interception increased. Photosynthetic rates peaked ca. 50 DAP near 45 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1 under 865 μmol m-2 s-1 PPF (average photosynthetic photon flux), and near 35 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1 under 655 μmol m-2 s-1 PPF. Short term changes in PPF caused a linear response in stand photosynthetic rates up to 1100 μmol m-2 s-1 PPF, with a light compensation point of 185 μmol m-2 s-1 PPF. Comparisons of stand photosynthetic rates at different CO2 concentrations showed a classic C3 response, with saturation occurring near 1200 μmol mol-1 CO2 and compensation near 100 μmol mol-1 CO2. In one study, the photoperiod was changed from 12 h light/12 h dark to continuous light at 58 DAP. This caused a decrease in net photosynthetic rates within 48 h and eventual damage (scorching) of upper canopy leaves, suggesting the abrupt change stressed the plants and/or caused feedback effects on photosynthesis. Dark period (night) respiration rates increased during early growth as standing biomass increased and peaked near 9 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1 ca. 50 DAP, after which rates declined gradually with age. Stand transpiration showed a rapid rise with canopy ground cover and peaked ca. 50 DAP near 8.9 L m-2 d-1 under 860 μmol m-2 s-1 PPF and near 6.3 L m-2 d-1 under 650 μmol m-2 s-1 PPF. Based on the best photosynthetic rates from these studies, approximately 25 m2 of potato plants under continuous cultivation would be required to support the CO2 removal and O2 requirements for one person.

  10. PEE-PEO block copolymer exchange rate between micelles is detergent and temperature activated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schantz, Allen; Saboe, Patrick; Lee, Hee-Young; Sines, Ian; Butler, Paul; Bishop, Kyle; Maranas, Janna; Kumar, Manish

    We examine the kinetics of polymer chain exchange between polymer/detergent micelles, a system relevant to the synthesis of protein-containing biomimetic membranes. Although chain exchange between polymer aggregates in water is too slow to observe, adding detergent allows us to determine chain exchange rates using time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering (TR-SANS). We examine a membrane-protein-relevant, vesicle-forming ultra-short polymer, Poly(ethyl ethylene)20-Poly(ethylene oxide)18 (PEE20-PEO18). PEE20-PEO18 is solubilized in mixed micelles with the membrane-protein-compatible non-ionic detergent octyl- β -D-glucoside (OG). We show that OG activates block copolymer exchange, and obtain rate constants at two detergent concentrations above the CMC (critical micellar concentration) of OG. We find that chain exchange increases two orders of magnitude when temperature increases from 308 to 338 K, and that even a 1 mg/mL increase in OG concentration leads to a noticeable increase in exchange rate. We also calculate the activation energy for chain exchange and find that it is much higher than for lipid exchange. These findings explain the need for high detergent concentration and/or temperature to synthesize densely packed polymer/protein membranes.

  11. Trade balance instability and the optimal exchange rate regime: The case of OPEC countries

    SciTech Connect

    Aljerrah, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    The OPEC members have experienced wide fluctuations in their trade balances. This can be attributed to several factors: (1) heavy dependence of national income and export earnings on a single primary export-oil; (2) instability of price and world demand for oil; and (3) the exchange rate regime practiced in recent years. An exchange rate policy can be used to minimize the fluctuations in trade balance, given the changes in exchange rates of major international currencies. The purpose of this study is two fold; first, examine the effects of fluctuations in trade balance on the OPEC economies, and second, propose appropriate exchange rate regime for selected OPEC members. The study is divided into two parts. The first part demonstrates the impact of trade balance changes on national income and other macroeconomic variables using a Keynesian framework. The second part involves using conventional trade models to search for the appropriate exchange rate regime to minimize the fluctuations in trade balance of each selective country. The study's findings are: first, fluctuations in trade balances had negative effects on the economics of Algeria, Kuwait, Libya, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. Second, the current exchange rate regime of no sample country is optimal in minimizing trade balance fluctuations. Third, in contrast to expectations, U.S. dollar peg did not stabilize the trade balance of any OPEC member. Finally, the results show that the sample OPEC economies could have enjoyed faster - though with different degree - economic growth if they had pegged their currencies to the derived optimal exchange rate regime. These optimal exchange rate regimes are: the SDR for Algeria and the United Arab Emirates, the purchasing power parity for Libya and Saudi Arabia, and the real Yen for Kuwait.

  12. Forecasting of magnitude and duration of currency crises based on the analysis of distortions of fractal scaling in exchange rate fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uritskaya, Olga Y.

    2005-05-01

    Results of fractal stability analysis of daily exchange rate fluctuations of more than 30 floating currencies for a 10-year period are presented. It is shown for the first time that small- and large-scale dynamical instabilities of national monetary systems correlate with deviations of the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) exponent from the value 1.5 predicted by the efficient market hypothesis. The observed dependence is used for classification of long-term stability of floating exchange rates as well as for revealing various forms of distortion of stable currency dynamics prior to large-scale crises. A normal range of DFA exponents consistent with crisis-free long-term exchange rate fluctuations is determined, and several typical scenarios of unstable currency dynamics with DFA exponents fluctuating beyond the normal range are identified. It is shown that monetary crashes are usually preceded by prolonged periods of abnormal (decreased or increased) DFA exponent, with the after-crash exponent tending to the value 1.5 indicating a more reliable exchange rate dynamics. Statistically significant regression relations (R=0.99, p<0.01) between duration and magnitude of currency crises and the degree of distortion of monofractal patterns of exchange rate dynamics are found. It is demonstrated that the parameters of these relations characterizing small- and large-scale crises are nearly equal, which implies a common instability mechanism underlying these events. The obtained dependences have been used as a basic ingredient of a forecasting technique which provided correct in-sample predictions of monetary crisis magnitude and duration over various time scales. The developed technique can be recommended for real-time monitoring of dynamical stability of floating exchange rate systems and creating advanced early-warning-system models for currency crisis prevention.

  13. Rate theory of solvent exchange and kinetics of Li(+) - BF4 (-)/PF6 (-) ion pairs in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Dang, Liem X; Chang, Tsun-Mei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we describe our efforts to apply rate theories in studies of solvent exchange around Li(+) and the kinetics of ion pairings in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). We report one of the first computer simulations of the exchange dynamics around solvated Li(+) in acetonitrile (ACN), which is a common solvent used in LIBs. We also provide details of the ion-pairing kinetics of Li(+)-[BF4] and Li(+)-[PF6] in ACN. Using our polarizable force-field models and employing classical rate theories of chemical reactions, we examine the ACN exchange process between the first and second solvation shells around Li(+). We calculate exchange rates using transition state theory and weighted them with the transmission coefficients determined by the reactive flux, Impey, Madden, and McDonald approaches, and Grote-Hynes theory. We found the relaxation times changed from 180 ps to 4600 ps and from 30 ps to 280 ps for Li(+)-[BF4] and Li(+)-[PF6] ion pairs, respectively. These results confirm that the solvent response to the kinetics of ion pairing is significant. Our results also show that, in addition to affecting the free energy of solvation into ACN, the anion type also should significantly influence the kinetics of ion pairing. These results will increase our understanding of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of LIB systems. PMID:27608999

  14. Experimental studies of alunite: II. Rates of alunite-water alkali and isotope exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoffregen, R.E.; Rye, R.O.; Wasserman, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    Rates of alkali exchange between alunite and water have been measured in hydrothermal experiments of 1 hour to 259 days duration at 150 to 400??C. Examination of run products by scanning electron microscope indicates that the reaction takes place by dissolution-reprecipitation. This exchange is modeled with an empirical rate equation which assumes a linear decrease in mineral surface area with percent exchange (f) and a linear dependence of the rate on the square root of the affinity for the alkali exchange reaction. This equation provides a good fit of the experimental data for f = 17% to 90% and yields log rate constants which range from -6.25 moles alkali m-2s-1 at 400??C to - 11.7 moles alkali m-2s-1 at 200??C. The variation in these rates with temperature is given by the equation log k* = -8.17(1000/T(K)) + 5.54 (r2 = 0.987) which yields an activation energy of 37.4 ?? 1.5 kcal/mol. For comparison, data from O'Neil and Taylor (1967) and Merigoux (1968) modeled with a pseudo-second-order rate expression give an activation energy of 36.1 ?? 2.9 kcal/mol for alkali-feldspar water Na-K exchange. In the absence of coupled alkali exchange, oxygen isotope exchange between alunite and water also occurs by dissolution-reprecipitation but rates are one to three orders of magnitude lower than those for alkali exchange. In fine-grained alunites, significant D-H exchange occurs by hydrogen diffusion at temperatures as low as 100??C. Computed hydrogen diffusion coefficients range from -15.7 to -17.3 cm2s-1 and suggest that the activation energy for hydrogen diffusion may be as low as 6 kcal/mol. These experiments indicate that rates of alkali exchange in the relatively coarse-grained alunites typical of hydrothermal ore deposits are insignificant, and support the reliability of K-Ar age data from such samples. However, the fine-grained alunites typical of low temperature settings may be susceptible to limited alkali exchange at surficial conditions which could cause

  15. Riparian hydraulic gradient and stream-groundwater exchange dynamics in steep headwater valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voltz, Thomas; Gooseff, Michael; Ward, Adam S.; Singha, Kamini; Fitzgerald, Michael; Wagener, Thorsten

    2013-06-01

    of riparian hydraulic gradients and stream-groundwater exchange in headwater catchments provide the hydrologic context for important ecological processes. Although the controls are relatively well understood, their dynamics during periods of hydrologic change is not. We investigate riparian hydraulic gradients over three different time scales in two steep, forested, headwater catchments in Oregon (WS01 and WS03) to determine the potential controls of reach-scale valley slope and cross-sectional valley geometry. Groundwater and stream stage data collected at high spatial and temporal resolutions over a period encompassing a 1.25 year storm and subsequent seasonal baseflow recession indicate that hydraulic gradients in both riparian aquifers exhibit strong persistence of down-valley dominance. Responses to rainfall do not support the simple conceptual models of increased riparian hydraulic gradient toward streams. Hydraulic gradient response in WS01 to both the seasonal baseflow recession and the storm suggested the potential for increased stream-groundwater exchange, but there was less evidence for this in WS03. Results from four constant-rate tracer injections in each stream showed a high baseline level of exchange overall, and both a slight seasonal increase (WS01) and slight decrease (WS03) in the riparian intrusion of tracer-labeled stream water as stream discharge receded. These results indicate that steep headwater valley floors host extensive stream water exchange and very little change in the water table gradients over 3 orders of magnitude of stream discharge.

  16. Experiments probing the influence of air exchange rates on secondary organic aerosols derived from indoor chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weschler, Charles J.; Shields, Helen C.

    Reactions between ozone and terpenes have been shown to increase the concentrations of submicron particles in indoor settings. The present study was designed to examine the influence of air exchange rates on the concentrations of these secondary organic aerosols as well as on the evolution of their particle size distributions. The experiments were performed in a manipulated office setting containing a constant source of d-limonene and an ozone generator that was remotely turned "on" or "off" at 6 h intervals. The particle number concentrations were monitored using an optical particle counter with eight-channels ranging from 0.1-0.2 to>2.0 μm diameter. The air exchange rates during the experiments were either high (working hours) or low (non-working hours) and ranged from 1.6 to>12 h -1, with intermediate exchange rates. Given the emission rates of ozone and d-limonene used in these studies, at an air exchange rate of 1.6 h -1 particle number concentration in the 0.1-0.2 μm size-range peaked 1.2 h after the ozone generator was switched on. In the ensuing 4.8 h particle counts increased in successive size-ranges up to the 0.5-0.7 μm diameter range. At higher air exchange rates, the resulting concentrations of total particles and particle mass (calculated from particle counts) were smaller, and at exchange rates exceeding 12 h -1, no excess particle formation was detectable with the instrument used in this study. Particle size evolved through accretion and, in some cases, coagulation. There was evidence for coagulation among particles in the smallest size-range at low air exchange rates (high particle concentrations) but no evidence of coagulation was apparent at higher air exchange rates (lower particle concentrations). At higher air exchange rates the particle count or size distributions were shifted towards smaller particle diameters and less time was required to achieve the maximum concentration in each of the size-ranges where discernable particle growth

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of transducin: interdomain and front to back communication in activation and nucleotide exchange.

    PubMed

    Ceruso, Marc A; Periole, Xavier; Weinstein, Harel

    2004-04-30

    The dynamic events that underlie the nucleotide exchange process for the Galpha subunit of transducin (Galpha(t)) were studied with nanosecond time-scale molecular dynamics simulations. The modeled systems include the active and inactive forms of the wild-type Galpha(t) and three of its mutants (GDP-bound form only): F332A, A322S, and Q326A that are known to exhibit various degrees of enhancement of their basal and receptor-catalyzed rates of nucleotide exchange (150-fold, 70-fold and WT-like, respectively). The results of these computational experiments reveal a number of nucleotide-dependent structural and dynamic changes (involving the alpha(B)-alpha(C) loop, the inter-domain orientation of the helical and GTPase domains and the alpha(5) helix) that were not observed in the various crystal structures of Galpha(t). Notably, the results show the existence of a front to back communication device (involving the beta(2)-beta(3) hairpin, the alpha(1) helix and the alpha(5) helix), strategically located near all elements susceptible to be involved in receptor-mediated activation/nucleotide exchange. The wild-type simulations suggest that the dynamic interplay between the elements of this device would be critical for the activation of the Galpha(t) subunit. This inference is confirmed by the results of the computational experiments on the mutants that show that even in their GDP-bound forms, the A322S and F332A mutants acquire an "active-like" structure and dynamics phenotype. The same is not true for the Q326A mutant whose structural and dynamic properties remain similar to those of the GDP-bound WT. Taken together the results suggest a nucleotide exchange mechanism, analogous to that found in the Arf family GTPases, in which a partially activated state, achievable from a receptor-mediated action of the front to back communication device either by displacement of the C-terminal alpha(5) helix, of the N-terminal alpha(N) helix, or of the Gbetagamma subunit, could

  18. Dynamic Distortion Correction for Endoscopy Systems with Exchangeable Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehle, Thomas; Hennes, Michael; Gross, Sebastian; Behrens, Alexander; Wulff, Jonas; Aach, Til

    Endoscopic images are strongly affected by lens distortion caused by the use of wide angle lenses. In case of endoscopy systems with exchangeable optics, e.g. in bladder endoscopy or sinus endoscopy, the camera sensor and the optics do not form a rigid system but they can be shifted and rotated with respect to each other during an examination. This flexibility has a major impact on the location of the distortion centre as it is moved along with the optics. In this paper, we describe an algorithm for the dynamic correction of lens distortion in cystoscopy which is based on a one time calibration. For the compensation, we combine a conventional static method for distortion correction with an algorithm to detect the position and the orientation of the elliptic field of view. This enables us to estimate the position of the distortion centre according to the relative movement of camera and optics. Therewith, a distortion correction for arbitrary rotation angles and shifts becomes possible without performing static calibrations for every possible combination of shifts and angles beforehand.

  19. Three dimensional dynamics of a flexible Motorised Momentum Exchange Tether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, N. A.; Cartmell, M. P.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a new flexural model for the three dimensional dynamics of the Motorised Momentum Exchange Tether (MMET) concept. This study has uncovered the relationships between planar and nonplanar motions, and the effect of the coupling between these two parameters on pragmatic circular and elliptical orbits. The tether sub-spans are modelled as stiffened strings governed by partial differential equations of motion, with specific boundary conditions. The tether sub-spans are flexible and elastic, thereby allowing three dimensional displacements. The boundary conditions lead to a specific frequency equation and the eigenvalues from this provide the natural frequencies of the orbiting flexible motorised tether when static, accelerating in monotonic spin, and at terminal angular velocity. A rotation transformation matrix has been utilised to get the position vectors of the system's components in an assumed inertial frame. Spatio-temporal coordinates are transformed to modal coordinates before applying Lagrange's equations, and pre-selected linear modes are included to generate the equations of motion. The equations of motion contain inertial nonlinearities which are essentially of cubic order, and these show the potential for intricate intermodal coupling effects. A simulation of planar and non-planar motions has been undertaken and the differences in the modal responses, for both motions, and between the rigid body and flexible models are highlighted and discussed.

  20. Effect of chelate dynamics on water exchange reactions of paramagnetic aminopolycarboxylate complexes.

    PubMed

    Maigut, Joachim; Meier, Roland; Zahl, Achim; van Eldik, Rudi

    2008-07-01

    Because of our interest in evaluating a possible relationship between complex dynamics and water exchange reactivity, we performed (1)H NMR studies on the paramagnetic aminopolycarboxylate complexes Fe (II)-TMDTA and Fe (II)-CyDTA and their diamagnetic analogues Zn (II)-TMDTA and Zn (II)-CyDTA. Whereas a fast Delta-Lambda isomerization was observed for the TMDTA species, no acetate scrambling between in-plane and out-of-plane positions is accessible for any of the CyDTA complexes because the rigid ligand backbone prevents any configurational changes in the chelate system. In variable-temperature (1)H NMR studies, no evidence of spectral coalescence due to nitrogen inversion was found for any of the complexes in the available temperature range. The TMDTA complexes exhibit the known solution behavior of EDTA, whereas the CyDTA complexes adopt static solution structures. Comparing the exchange kinetics of flexible EDTA-type complexes and static CyDTA complexes appears to be a suitable method for evaluating the effect of ligand dynamics on the overall reactivity. In order to assess information concerning the rates and mechanism of water exchange, we performed variable-temperature and -pressure (17)O NMR studies of Ni (II)-CyDTA, Fe (II)-CyDTA, and Mn (II)-CyDTA. For Ni (II)-CyDTA, no significant effects on line widths or chemical shifts were apparent, indicating either the absence of any chemical exchange or the existence of a very small amount of the water-coordinated complex in solution. For [Fe (II)(CyDTA)(H 2O)] (2-) and [Mn (II)(CyDTA)(H 2O)] (2-), exchange rate constant values of (1.1 +/- 0.3) x 10 (6) and (1.4 +/- 0.2) x 10 (8) s (-1), respectively, at 298 K were determined from fits to resonance-shift and line-broadening data. A relationship between chelate dynamics and reactivity seems to be operative, since the CyDTA complexes exhibited significantly slower reactions than their EDTA counterparts. The variable-pressure (17)O NMR measurements for [Mn (II

  1. RESIDENTIAL AIR EXCHANGE RATES FOR USE IN INDOOR AIR AND EXPOSURE MODELING STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data on air exchange rates are important inputs to indoor air quality models. ndoor air models, in turn, are incorporated into the structure of total human exposure models. ragmentary data on residential ventilation rates are available in various governmental reports, journal art...

  2. Effects of flow rate and temperature on cyclic gas exchange in tsetse flies (Diptera, Glossinidae).

    PubMed

    Terblanche, John S; Chown, Steven L

    2010-05-01

    Air flow rates may confound the investigation and classification of insect gas exchange patterns. Here we report the effects of flow rates (50, 100, 200, 400 ml min(-1)) on gas exchange patterns in wild-caught Glossina morsitans morsitans from Zambia. At rest, G. m. morsitans generally showed continuous or cyclic gas exchange (CGE) but no evidence of discontinuous gas exchange (DGE). Flow rates had little influence on the ability to detect CGE in tsetse, at least in the present experimental setup and under these laboratory conditions. Importantly, faster flow rates resulted in similar gas exchange patterns to those identified at lower flower rates suggesting that G. m. morsitans did not show DGE which had been incorrectly identified as CGE at lower flow rates. While CGE cycle frequency was significantly different among the four flow rates (p<0.05), the direction of effects was inconsistent. Indeed, inter-individual variation in CGE cycle frequency exceeded flow rate treatment variation. Using a laboratory colony of closely related, similar-sized G. morsitans centralis we subsequently investigated the effects of temperature, gender and feeding status on CGE pattern variation since these factors can influence insect metabolic rates. At 100 ml min(-1) CGE was typical of G. m. centralis at rest, although it was significantly more common in females than in males (57% vs. 43% of 14 individuals tested per gender). In either sex, temperature (20, 24, 28 and 32 degrees C) had little influence on the number of individuals showing CGE. However, increases in metabolic rate with temperature were modulated largely by increases in burst volume and cycle frequency. This is unusual among insects showing CGE or DGE patterns because increases in metabolic rate are usually modulated by increases in frequency, but either no change or a decline in burst volume. PMID:20399350

  3. Drug injection rates and needle-exchange use in New York City, 1991-1996.

    PubMed

    Marmor, M; Shore, R E; Titus, S; Chen, X; Des Jarlais, D C

    2000-09-01

    Objectives included (1) to develop methods for identifying injection drug users with accelerating injection habits so they might be referred to counseling and treatment and (2) to investigate behavioral correlates of accelerating injection habits, including syringe-exchange program utilization. Data on drug use, enrollment in methadone maintenance, and demographic variables were obtained from 328 subjects who were seronegative for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who attended anywhere from 4 to 11 quarterly study visits for interview, HIV pretest counseling and risk reduction counseling, and blood donation for HIV antibody testing. Subjects were recalled 2 weeks after each study visit to receive their results and post-test counseling. We characterized subjects according to their patterns of drug injection as accelerating, decelerating, or stable, using intraindividual regression analyses and categorization rules, and by syringe-exchange use as consistent users, sporadic users, or nonusers. The present subjects included 52% with decelerating, 29% with stable, and 19% with accelerating rates of drug injection. There were 128 subjects (39%) who were categorized as consistent users of syringe-exchange programs, 84 (25%) were categorized as sporadic users, and 116 (35%) were categorized as nonusers. All syringe-exchange groups showed significantly decelerating drug injection. Rates of decline were significantly less, however, among consistent syringe-exchange users than sporadic or nonusers of syringe exchanges. Categorical analysis also showed significant differences among groups, with 30% of consistent syringe-exchange program users having accelerating rates of drug injection compared to 9% of nonusers and 17% of sporadic users. That consistent syringe-exchange users included a larger proportion of individuals whose drug habits were accelerating than did sporadic users or nonusers of syringe exchanges suggests a need for improved identification and counseling of

  4. Gas exchange patterns and water loss rates in the Table Mountain cockroach, Aptera fusca (Blattodea: Blaberidae).

    PubMed

    Groenewald, Berlizé; Bazelet, Corinna S; Potter, C Paige; Terblanche, John S

    2013-10-15

    The importance of metabolic rate and/or spiracle modulation for saving respiratory water is contentious. One major explanation for gas exchange pattern variation in terrestrial insects is to effect a respiratory water loss (RWL) saving. To test this, we measured the rates of CO2 and H2O release ( and , respectively) in a previously unstudied, mesic cockroach, Aptera fusca, and compared gas exchange and water loss parameters among the major gas exchange patterns (continuous, cyclic, discontinuous gas exchange) at a range of temperatures. Mean , and per unit did not differ among the gas exchange patterns at all temperatures (P>0.09). There was no significant association between temperature and gas exchange pattern type (P=0.63). Percentage of RWL (relative to total water loss) was typically low (9.79±1.84%) and did not differ significantly among gas exchange patterns at 15°C (P=0.26). The method of estimation had a large impact on the percentage of RWL, and of the three techniques investigated (traditional, regression and hyperoxic switch), the traditional method generally performed best. In many respects, A. fusca has typical gas exchange for what might be expected from other insects studied to date (e.g. , , RWL and cuticular water loss). However, we found for A. fusca that expressed as a function of metabolic rate was significantly higher than the expected consensus relationship for insects, suggesting it is under considerable pressure to save water. Despite this, we found no consistent evidence supporting the conclusion that transitions in pattern type yield reductions in RWL in this mesic cockroach. PMID:23821716

  5. Proton exchange rates in transfer RNA as a function of spermidine and magnesium.

    PubMed Central

    Tropp, J S; Redfield, A G

    1983-01-01

    Solvent exchange rates of selected protons were measured by NMR saturation recovery for E. coli tRNAVal, E. colifMet and yeast tRNAPhe, at temperatures from 20 to 40 degrees C, in the presence of 0.12M Na+ and various levels of added spermidine. tRNAVal was also studied with added Mg++. The exchange rates in zero spermidine and Mg++ indicate early melting of the U8 A14 interaction, in accord with thermodynamic melting studies. Exchange rates for secondary protons suggest early melting of the T stem in tRNAfMet and the acceptor stem in tRNAPhe, in contradiction with melting transition assignments from thermodynamic work. Addition of 10 spermidines per tRNA stabilizes the secondary and tertiary interactions more effectively than added Na+, but less so than Mg++. Added spermidine has the curious effect of increasing the exchange rate of the psi 55 N1 proton, while protecting the psi 55 N3 proton from exchange in all three tRNA's. Added Mg++ has the same effect on tRNAVal. PMID:6340067

  6. Self-other rating agreement and leader-member exchange (LMX): a quasi-replication.

    PubMed

    Barbuto, John E; Wilmot, Michael P; Singh, Matthew; Story, Joana S P

    2012-04-01

    Data from a sample of 83 elected community leaders and 391 direct-report staff (resulting in 333 useable leader-member dyads) were reanalyzed to test relations between self-other rating agreement of servant leadership and member-reported leader-member exchange (LMX). Polynomial regression analysis indicated that the self-other rating agreement model was not statistically significant. Instead, all of the variance in member-reported LMX was accounted for by the others' ratings component alone. PMID:22755453

  7. Temporal Dynamics of Social Exchange and the Development of Solidarity: "Testing the Waters" versus "Taking a Leap of Faith"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuwabara, Ko; Sheldon, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    In their concerted efforts to unpack the microprocesses that transform repeated exchanges into an exchange relation, exchange theorists have paid little attention to how actors perceive changes and dynamics in exchanges over time. We help fill this gap by studying how temporal patterns of exchange affect the development of cohesion. Some exchange…

  8. Essays in applied macroeconomics: Asymmetric price adjustment, exchange rate and treatment effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jingping

    This dissertation consists of three essays. Chapter II examines the possible asymmetric response of gasoline prices to crude oil price changes using an error correction model with GARCH errors. Recent papers have looked at this issue. Some of these papers estimate a form of error correction model, but none of them accounts for autoregressive heteroskedasticity in estimation and testing for asymmetry and none of them takes the response of crude oil price into consideration. We find that time-varying volatility of gasoline price disturbances is an important feature of the data, and when we allow for asymmetric GARCH errors and investigate the system wide impulse response function, we find evidence of asymmetric adjustment to crude oil price changes in weekly retail gasoline prices. Chapter III discusses the relationship between fiscal deficit and exchange rate. Economic theory predicts that fiscal deficits can significantly affect real exchange rate movements, but existing empirical evidence reports only a weak impact of fiscal deficits on exchange rates. Based on US dollar-based real exchange rates in G5 countries and a flexible varying coefficient model, we show that the previously documented weak relationship between fiscal deficits and exchange rates may be the result of additive specifications, and that the relationship is stronger if we allow fiscal deficits to impact real exchange rates non-additively as well as nonlinearly. We find that the speed of exchange rate adjustment toward equilibrium depends on the state of the fiscal deficit; a fiscal contraction in the US can lead to less persistence in the deviation of exchange rates from fundamentals, and faster mean reversion to the equilibrium. Chapter IV proposes a kernel method to deal with the nonparametric regression model with only discrete covariates as regressors. This new approach is based on recently developed least squares cross-validation kernel smoothing method. It can not only automatically smooth

  9. Subzero temperature chromatography for reduced back-exchange and improved dynamic range in amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Venable, John D; Okach, Linda; Agarwalla, Sanjay; Brock, Ansgar

    2012-11-01

    Amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange is a commonly used technique for studying the dynamics of proteins and their interactions with other proteins or ligands. When coupled with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, hydrogen/deuterium exchange provides several unique advantages over other structural characterization techniques including very high sensitivity, the ability to analyze proteins in complex environments, and a large mass range. A fundamental limitation of the technique arises from the loss of the deuterium label (back-exchange) during the course of the analysis. A method to limit loss of the label during the separation stage of the analysis using subzero temperature reversed-phase chromatography is presented. The approach is facilitated by the use of buffer modifiers that prevent freezing. We evaluated ethylene glycol, dimethyl formamide, formamide, and methanol for their freezing point suppression capabilities, effects on peptide retention, and their compatibilities with electrospray ionization. Ethylene glycol was used extensively because of its good electrospray ionization compatibility; however, formamide has potential to be a superior modifier if detrimental effects on ionization can be overcome. It is demonstrated using suitable buffer modifiers that separations can be performed at temperatures as low as -30 °C with negligible loss of the deuterium label, even during long chromatographic separations. The reduction in back-exchange is shown to increase the dynamic range of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry in terms of mixture complexity and the magnitude with which changes in deuteration level can be quantified. PMID:23025328

  10. Residential air exchange rates for use in indoor air and exposure modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Pandian, M D; Ott, W R; Behar, J V

    1993-01-01

    Data on air exchange rates are important inputs to indoor air quality models. Indoor air models, in turn, are incorporated into the structure of total human exposure models. Fragmentary data on residential ventilation rates are available in various governmental reports, journal articles, and contractor reports. Most of the published papers present data on only a few homes to answer very specialized questions, and none of these publications summarize the ventilation rates of a large population of homes across the United States. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has conducted more than 4000 residential perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) measurements and brought them together into a large data base from about 100 studies in the United States and elsewhere. This paper analyzes the BNL PFT data base to generate frequency distributions and summary statistics for different regions of the United States, different seasons, and different levels within the homes. The data analyses suggest that residential ventilation rates are similar in the northeastern and northwestern states but higher in the southwestern states. Winter and fall ventilation rates are similar, but the rates are slightly higher in spring, and much higher in summer. Multi-level residences have higher air exchange rates than single-level residences. Although the BNL data are not a representative sample of homes in the United States, these analyses give insight into the range of air exchange rates found in the United States under a great variety of conditions and are intended for use by developers of models of indoor air quality and total human exposure. PMID:8173341

  11. Increase Effect of Available Transfer Capability by Dynamic Rating Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Masaki; Satoh, Takuya; Iwamoto, Shinichi; Kurihara, Ikuo

    As the deregulated environment of power systems has been spread in the world, it is essential to operate power systems efficiently and economy. Under the environments, with the advance of communication technologies and sensors, the so-called dynamic rating is now to be realized. The dynamic rating is a method which determines accurate ratings by utilizing real-time information such as conductor temperatures, ambient temperatures and wind speeds. The dynamic rating is considered to increase the thermal capacities of overhead transmission lines and therefore take on importance in the deregulated electric power industry. The importance of the dynamic rating lies mainly in the area of Available Transfer Capability (ATC) improvement. In this paper, the validity of the proposed dynamic rating application is shown from the viewpoint of ATC, especially, ATC with thermal constraints. In addition, the possibilities of ATC estimations using sensitivities are verified on the purpose of reducing calculating time, considering the importance of real time simulation of ATC.

  12. A Classroom Experiment on Exchange Rate Determination with Purchasing Power Parity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, David T.; Rebelein, Robert P.; Schneider, Patricia H.; Simpson, Nicole B.; Fisher, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The authors developed a classroom experiment on exchange rate determination appropriate for undergraduate courses in macroeconomics and international economics. In the experiment, students represent citizens from different countries and need to obtain currency to purchase goods. By participating in an auction to buy currency, students gain a…

  13. Improving NO(x) cap-and-trade system with adjoint-based emission exchange rates.

    PubMed

    Mesbah, S Morteza; Hakami, Amir; Schott, Stephan

    2012-11-01

    Cap-and-trade programs have proven to be effective instruments for achieving environmental goals while incurring minimum cost. The nature of the pollutant, however, affects the design of these programs. NO(x), an ozone precursor, is a nonuniformly mixed pollutant with a short atmospheric lifetime. NO(x) cap-and-trade programs in the U.S. are successful in reducing total NO(x) emissions but may result in suboptimal environmental performance because location-specific ozone formation potentials are neglected. In this paper, the current NO(x) cap-and-trade system is contrasted to a hypothetical NO(x) trading policy with sensitivity-based exchange rates. Location-specific exchange rates, calculated through adjoint sensitivity analysis, are combined with constrained optimization for prediction of NO(x) emissions trading behavior and post-trade ozone concentrations. The current and proposed policies are examined in a case study for 218 coal-fired power plants that participated in the NO(x) Budget Trading Program in 2007. We find that better environmental performance at negligibly higher system-wide abatement cost can be achieved through inclusion of emission exchange rates. Exposure-based exchange rates result in better environmental performance than those based on concentrations. PMID:23050674

  14. Dynamic communities in multichannel data: an application to the foreign exchange market during the 2007-2008 credit crisis.

    PubMed

    Fenn, Daniel J; Porter, Mason A; McDonald, Mark; Williams, Stacy; Johnson, Neil F; Jones, Nick S

    2009-09-01

    We study the cluster dynamics of multichannel (multivariate) time series by representing their correlations as time-dependent networks and investigating the evolution of network communities. We employ a node-centric approach that allows us to track the effects of the community evolution on the functional roles of individual nodes without having to track entire communities. As an example, we consider a foreign exchange market network in which each node represents an exchange rate and each edge represents a time-dependent correlation between the rates. We study the period 2005-2008, which includes the recent credit and liquidity crisis. Using community detection, we find that exchange rates that are strongly attached to their community are persistently grouped with the same set of rates, whereas exchange rates that are important for the transfer of information tend to be positioned on the edges of communities. Our analysis successfully uncovers major trading changes that occurred in the market during the credit crisis. PMID:19791999

  15. EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, J.C.

    1992-09-01

    EXCHANGE is published monthly by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), a multidisciplinary facility operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of EXCHANGE is to inform computer users about about recent changes and innovations in both the mainframe and personal computer environments and how these changes can affect work being performed at DOE facilities.

  16. A macro-physics model of depreciation rate in economic exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmont Lobo, Rui F.; de Sousa, Miguel Rocha

    2014-02-01

    This article aims at a new approach for a known fundamental result: barter or trade increases economic value. It successfully bridges the gap between the theory of value and the exchange process attached to the transition from endowments to the equilibrium in the core and contract curve. First, we summarise the theory of value; in Section 2, we present the Edgeworth (1881) box and an axiomatic approach and in Section 3, we apply our pure exchange model. Finally (in Section 4), using our open econo-physics pure barter (EPB) model, we derive an improvement in value, which means that pure barter leads to a decline in depreciation rate.

  17. Amplifying the sensitivity of zinc(II) responsive MRI contrast agents by altering water exchange rates.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Martins, André F; Preihs, Christian; Clavijo Jordan, Veronica; Chirayil, Sara; Zhao, Piyu; Wu, Yunkou; Nasr, Khaled; Kiefer, Garry E; Sherry, A Dean

    2015-11-11

    Given the known water exchange rate limitations of a previously reported Zn(II)-sensitive MRI contrast agent, GdDOTA-diBPEN, new structural targets were rationally designed to increase the rate of water exchange to improve MRI detection sensitivity. These new sensors exhibit fine-tuned water exchange properties and, depending on the individual structure, demonstrate significantly improved longitudinal relaxivities (r1). Two sensors in particular demonstrate optimized parameters and, therefore, show exceptionally high longitudinal relaxivities of about 50 mM(-1) s(-1) upon binding to Zn(II) and human serum albumin (HSA). This value demonstrates a 3-fold increase in r1 compared to that displayed by the original sensor, GdDOTA-diBPEN. In addition, this study provides important insights into the interplay between structural modifications, water exchange rate, and kinetic stability properties of the sensors. The new high relaxivity agents were used to successfully image Zn(II) release from the mouse pancreas in vivo during glucose stimulated insulin secretion. PMID:26462412

  18. Tradeoffs between metabolic rate and spiracular conductance in discontinuous gas exchange of Samia cynthia (Lepidoptera, Saturniidae).

    PubMed

    Moerbitz, Christian; Hetz, Stefan K

    2010-05-01

    The insect tracheal system is a unique respiratory system, designed for maximum oxygen delivery at high metabolic demands, e.g. during activity and at high ambient temperatures. Therefore, large safety margins are required for tracheal and spiracular conductance. Spiracles are the entry to the tracheal system and play an important role in controlling discontinuous gas exchange (DGC) between tracheal system and atmosphere in moth pupae. We investigated the effect of modulated metabolic rate (by changing ambient temperature) and modulated spiracular conductance (by blocking all except one spiracles) on gas exchange patterns in Samia pupae. Both, spiracle blocking and metabolic rates, affected respiratory behavior in Samia cynthia pupae. While animals showed discontinuous gas exchange cycles at lower temperatures with unblocked spiracles, the respiratory patterns were cyclic at higher temperatures, with partly blocked spiracles or a combination of these two factors. The threshold for the transition from a discontinuous (DGC) to a cyclic gas exchange ((cyc)GE) was significantly higher in animals with unblocked spiracles (18.7 nmol g(-1) min(-1) vs. 7.9 nmol g(-1) min(-1)). These findings indicate an important influence of spiracle conductance on the DGC, which may occur mostly in insects showing high spiracular conductances and low metabolic rates. PMID:19682454

  19. HTO washout model: on the relationship between exchange rate and washout coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Golubev, A.; Balashov, Y.; Mavrin, S.; Golubeva, V.; Galeriu, D.

    2015-03-15

    Washout coefficient Λ is widely used as a parameter in washout models. These models describes overall HTO washout with rain by a first-order kinetic equation, while washout coefficient Λ depends on the type of rain event and rain intensity and empirical parameters a, b. The washout coefficient is a macroscopic parameter and we have considered in this paper its relationship with a microscopic rate K of HTO isotopic exchange in atmospheric humidity and drops of rainwater. We have shown that the empirical parameters a, b can be represented through the rain event characteristics using the relationships of molecular impact rate, rain intensity and specific rain water content while washout coefficient Λ can be represented through the exchange rate K, rain intensity, raindrop diameter and terminal raindrop velocity.

  20. Impact of precipitation dynamics on net ecosystem exchange

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Net ecosystem carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange (NEE) was measured on shortgrass steppe (SGS) vegetation at the USDA Central Plains Experimental Range in northeastern Colorado from 2001-2003. Large year-to-year differences were observed in annual NEE, with > 95% of the net carbon uptake occurring during...

  1. Dynamic response of surface water-groundwater exchange to currents, tides, and waves in a shallow estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Audrey H.; Shi, Fengyan; Kirby, James T.; Michael, Holly A.

    2013-04-01

    In shallow, fetch-limited estuaries, variations in current and wave energy promote heterogeneous surface water-groundwater mixing (benthic exchange), which influences biogeochemical activity. Here, we characterize heterogeneity in benthic exchange within the subtidal zone of the Delaware Inland Bays by linking hydrodynamic circulation models with mathematical solutions for benthic exchange forced by current-bedform interactions, tides, and waves. Benthic fluxes oscillate over tidal cycles as fluctuating water depths alter fluid interactions with the bed. Maximum current-driven fluxes (~1-10 cm/d) occur in channels with strong tidal currents. Maximum wave-driven fluxes (~1-10 cm/d) occur in downwind shoals. During high-energy storms, simulated wave pumping rates increase by orders of magnitude, demonstrating the importance of storms in solute transfer through the benthic layer. Under moderate wind conditions (~5 m/s), integrated benthic exchange rates due to wave, current, and tidal pumping are each ~1-10 m3/s, on the order of fluid contributions from runoff and fresh groundwater discharge to the estuary. Benthic exchange is thus a significant and dynamic component of an estuary's fluid budget that may influence estuarine geochemistry and ecology.

  2. Measurement of 129Xe -Cs binary spin-exchange rate coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu; Kuzma, Nicholas N.; Happer, William

    2004-06-01

    We report the first measurement of the spin-exchange rate coefficient for binary collisions between Cs and 129Xe atoms in the temperature range 110exchange collisions dominate the longitudinal nuclear spin-relaxation rate 1/ T1 of 129Xe gas. We measured 1/ T1 of a thermally polarized Xe gas using the saturation-recovery of conventional nuclear magnetic resonance. We also directly measured the Cs atomic number density [Cs] by using Faraday rotation of the linear polarization of a probing laser beam passing through the sample. The measured rate coefficient is κ (9.4 T) = d (1/ T1 ) / d [Cs] = (2.81±0.2) × 10-16 cm3 /s , which is about a factor of 1.6 higher than the previously measured spin-exchange rate coefficient of 129Xe -Rb binary collisions. Using a calculated magnetic decoupling factor, we extrapolate our result to zero magnetic field: κ (0 T) = (4.1±0.3) × 10-16 cm3 /s .

  3. Measurement of air exchange rates in residential and commercial buildings in the northwest: techniques and results

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.B.

    1985-04-01

    In a study of air exchange rates in commercial and residential buildings, several techniques were employed to measure the air exchange: analysis of sulfur hexafluoride tracer gas decay using a portable gas chromatograph; analysis of carbon monoxide decay using a continuous infrared analyzer; analysis of nitrogen oxides decay using a continuous oxides of nitrogen analyzer; and analysis of perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) gas using a programmable automatic sampler, and a passive capillary tube sampler. Using sulfur hexafluoride tracer gas with real-time chromatography was the most labor-intensive method, requiring constant attention for several hours; whereas, analyzing the decay of PFT tracer gas using small capillary tubes required little setup time and virtually no attention. However, the analysis of tracer gas captured by the capillary tubes was difficult and was performed using special analysis equipment. The air exchange rate measured in the commercial buildings ranged from 5 to 0.04 air changes per hour (ACH) depending on the type of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. Air exchange in the residential structures ranged from about 1 ACH to about 0.3 ACH. 6 refs., 5 tabs., 3 figs.

  4. Dynamic Patterns, Parameters, and Climatic Response of CO2 Exchange of Agricultural Crops: Monocotyledons VS. Dicotyledons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmanov, T. G.; Wylie, B. K.; Howard, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    Net CO2 exchange data from long-term flux tower measurements in monocotyledonous (wheat, maize) and dicotyledonous (soybeans, alfalfa, peas, peanuts) crops were partitioned into photosynthesis (P) and respiration (R) using the light-soil temperature-VPD response method. Analysis of the resulting time series of P and R revealed patterns of temporal and phenological dynamics in these plant groups. We established differences in ranges and dynamic patterns of P and R as well as CO2 exchange parameters (quantum yield, photosynthetic capacity, respiration rate, light-use efficiency, curvature of the VPD response). Weekly P and R data combined with remotely sensed 7-day eMODIS NDVI allow identification of the quasi-linear relationships between P, R, and NDVI, as well as estimation of parameters of NDVI response (start of the growing season, duration of the linearity period, slope of NDVI response). While the linear-like patterns occur early in the season, later the flux response to NDVI becomes less pronounced, and for the whole season the flux-NDVI relationship assumes a hysteresis-like pattern. Introduction of VPD and soil moisture limitation as well as phenological controls (growing degree days) leads to more flexible models for P and R in relation to NDVI and on-site drivers. These models allow mapping of the cropland CO2 exchange at regional and larger scales (e.g., the Great Plains). Significant relationships of the crop GPP to the seasonally integrated NDVI were also established, providing an opportunity for mapping of crop productivity using geographically distributed historic NDVI data. On the other hand, long time series (6 to 12 years and longer) of weekly P and R data lead to models of annual photosynthesis and respiration in response to climatic factors that may be used for prognostic purposes. We developed a model of maize GPP on the Great Plains in relation to the sum of temperatures above 5 °C and the hydrologic year precipitation. The model describes 75

  5. Cooperation between bound waters and hydroxyls in controlling isotope-exchange rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasci, Adele F.; McAlpin, J. Gregory; Ohlin, C. André; Christensen, Shauna; Fettinger, James C.; Britt, R. David; Rustad, James R.; Casey, William H.

    2012-02-01

    Mineral oxides differ from aqueous ions in that the bound water molecules are usually attached to different metal centers, or vicinal, and thus separated from one another. In contrast, for most monomeric ions used to establish kinetic reactivity trends, such as octahedral aquo ions (e.g., Al(H 2O) 63+), the bound waters are closely packed, or geminal. Because of this structural difference, the existing literature about ligand substitution in monomer ions may be a poor guide to the reactions of geochemical interest. To understand how coordination of the reactive functional groups might affect the rates of simple water-exchange reactions, we synthesized two structurally similar Rh(III) complexes, [Rh(phen) 2(H 2O) 2] 3+ [ 1] and [Rh(phen) 2(H 2O)Cl] 2+ [ 2] where (phen) = 1,10-phenanthroline. Complex [ 1] has two adjacent, geminal, bound waters in the inner-coordination sphere and [ 2] has a single bound water adjacent to a bound chloride ion. We employed Rh(III) as a trivalent metal rather than a more geochemically relevant metal like Fe(III) or Al(III) to slow the rate of reaction, which makes possible measurement of the rates of isotopic substitution by simple mass spectrometry. We prepared isotopically pure versions of the molecules, dissolved them into isotopically dissimilar water, and measured the rates of exchange from the extents of 18O and 16O exchange at the bound waters. The pH dependency of rates differ enormously between the two complexes. Pseudo-first-order rate coefficients at 298 K for water exchanges from the fully protonated molecules are close: k0298 = 5 × 10 -8(±0.5 × 10 -8) s -1 for [ 1] and k0298 = 2.5 × 10 -9(±1 × 10 -9) for [ 2]. Enthalpy and entropy activation parameters (Δ H‡ and Δ S‡) were measured to be 119(±3) kJ mol -1, and 14(±1) J mol -1 K -1, respectively for [ 1]. The corresponding parameters for the mono-aquo complex, [ 2], are 132(±3) kJ mol -1 and 41.5(±2) J mol -1 K -1. Rates increase by many orders of magnitude

  6. Using a spectral approach to compare dynamic and static head driven hyporheic exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörman, Anders; Morén, Ida; Riml, Joakim

    2016-04-01

    Hyporheic exchange is an important process controlling the transportation and fate of solutes in natural streams. The exchange is driven by the hydraulic head gradients over the stream bottom and occurs on a wide range of spatial scales. The hydraulic head gradient is either dominated by the static head, originating from water surface elevation differences or it is dominated by the dynamic head that is created when the velocity head of the stream is transformed to pressure variations along an uneven bed surface. This article uses a power spectral approach to compare the exchange due to the static and dynamic head occurring over a range of spatial scales in the Tullstorps Brook. Prediction of hyporheic exchange is restrained by the complications of performing measurements of high quality and quantity in the field. In this study bottom elevation and water depth was measured with a levelling instrument every 2.56 - 16.83 m along a 500 m long reach of the Tullstorps Brook. The velocity head was calculated at the same sections based on the measured cross section area of the stream and the average discharge during the day when the measurements were done. Parallel to the head investigations a Rhodamine WT tracer test was performed in the reach and the parameters controlling hyporheic exchange was estimated through inverse modelling. These tracer test parameters were compared with theoretical parameters obtained from a spectral model. Hyporheic exchange is often modelled by assuming the head variations to be harmonic with a certain wavelength and amplitude. In the reality the head variation cannot be represented by a single harmonic function, but the representation of head geometry can be improved by superimposing a large number of harmonic functions. Here, to be able to include the whole range of harmonics, we used a power spectral approach to analyse the hydraulic head measurements from the field. The Fourier power spectrum of the data was calculated for the water

  7. Charge Exchange and Ablation Rates of a Titanium Wire Plasma Corona

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, Robert E.

    2009-01-21

    Wire ablation rates are important features in any examination of precursors or transparent mode implosions of wire arrays. When ion temperatures in a Ti wire plasma corona exceed a few eV, the process of resonant charge exchange competes with elastic scattering. Ions pushed into the corona from an anode bias wire array can be expected to drive a fast neutral wind into the surrounding volume, while a cathode bias wire array would not show the strong neutral wind.

  8. Reduction of Large Dynamical Systems by Minimization of Evolution Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, Sharath S.

    1999-01-01

    Reduction of a large system of equations to a lower-dimensional system of similar dynamics is investigated. For dynamical systems with disparate timescales, a criterion for determining redundant dimensions and a general reduction method based on the minimization of evolution rate are proposed.

  9. Assessment of anxiety using heart rate nonlinear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, Julian F.; Friedman, Bruce H.

    1993-11-01

    Various anxiety states have been linked with disorders of the autonomic nervous system. These autonomic disorders may be revealed by analysis of physiological time series such as the heart rate interbeat interval series. The present paper reports a general model of biological system functioning and related assessment indices based on recent nonlinear dynamical systems approaches. In particular, two experimental studies are reported which suggest the utility of heart rate nonlinear dynamics in the assessment of anxiety.

  10. Cow-calf producers need to blame exchange rates, not bovine spongiform encephalopathy, for lost wealth.

    PubMed

    Schaufele, Brandon; Komirenko, Zoia; Unterschultz, James R

    2009-01-01

    Several studies examined the impacts of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) crisis on the Canadian agricultural sector. However, few investigations determined the on-farm financial repercussions arising from the crisis. This study examined impacts at farm level attributed to the BSE crisis. Cash flow and hedonic price models were used to examine changes in farm wealth for the years 2002 through 2007. While BSE received substantial media coverage, little attention was given to exchange rates and land values. Data demonstrated that exchange-rate fluctuations exerted a much greater impact on producer wealth than did the BSE crisis. Both farm equity and land values temporarily dipped following the BSE crisis but have since followed their previous trend. If the United States had not closed its borders to Canadian beef and cattle exports, producers would have an additional 0.65% growth in wealth. However, had exchange rates remained constant, farmers would have an additional 10.75% increase in equity. Consequently, the BSE crisis produced a smaller impact on farmer wealth than factors that received less media attention. PMID:19697244

  11. Strategies for Optimizing Water-Exchange Rates of Lanthanide-Based Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Siriwardena-Mahanama, Buddhima N.; Allen, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    This review describes recent advances in strategies for tuning the water-exchange rates of contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Water-exchange rates play a critical role in determining the efficiency of contrast agents; consequently, optimization of water-exchange rates, among other parameters, is necessary to achieve high efficiencies. This need has resulted in extensive research efforts to modulate water-exchange rates by chemically altering the coordination environments of the metal complexes that function as contrast agents. The focus of this review is coordination-chemistry-based strategies used to tune the water-exchange rates of lanthanide(III)-based contrast agents for MRI. Emphasis will be given to results published in the 21st century, as well as implications of these strategies on the design of contrast agents. PMID:23921796

  12. Zonal rate model for stacked membrane chromatography part II: characterizing ion-exchange membrane chromatography under protein retention conditions.

    PubMed

    Francis, Patrick; von Lieres, Eric; Haynes, Charles

    2012-03-01

    The Zonal Rate Model (ZRM) has previously been shown to accurately account for contributions to elution band broadening, including external flow nonidealities and radial concentration gradients, in ion-exchange membrane (IEXM) chromatography systems operated under nonbinding conditions. Here, we extend the ZRM to analyze and model the behavior of retained proteins by introducing terms for intra-column mass transfer resistances and intrinsic binding kinetics. Breakthrough curve (BTC) data from a scaled-down anion-exchange membrane chromatography module using ovalbumin as a model protein were collected at flow rates ranging from 1.5 to 20 mL min(-1). Through its careful accounting of transport nonidealities within and external to the membrane stack, the ZRM is shown to provide a useful framework for characterizing putative protein binding mechanisms and models, for predicting BTCs and complex elution behavior, including the common observation that the dynamic binding capacity can increase with linear velocity in IEXM systems, and for simulating and scaling separations using IEXM chromatography. Global fitting of model parameters is used to evaluate the performance of the Langmuir, bi-Langmuir, steric mass action (SMA), and spreading-type protein binding models in either correlating or fundamentally describing BTC data. When combined with the ZRM, the bi-Langmuir, and SMA models match the chromatography data, but require physically unrealistic regressed model parameters to do so. In contrast, for this system a spreading-type model is shown to accurately predict column performance while also providing a realistic fundamental explanation for observed trends, including an observed increase in dynamic binding capacity with flow rate. PMID:22012741

  13. Dynamics of a magnetic dimer with exchange, dipolar, and Dzyalozhinski-Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, A. F.; Martinez, J. M.; Déjardin, J. L.; Kachkachi, H.

    2011-10-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a magnetic system consisting of two magnetic moments coupled by either the exchange, dipole-dipole, or Dzyalozhinski-Moriya interaction. We compare the switching mechanisms and switching rates as induced by the three couplings. For each coupling and each configuration of the two anisotropy axes, we describe the switching modes and, using the kinetic theory of Langer, we provide (semi-)analytical expressions for the switching rate. We then compare the three interactions with regard to their efficiency in the reversal of the net magnetic moment of the dimer. We also investigate how the energy barriers vary with the coupling. For the dipole-dipole interaction we find that the energy barrier may either increase or decrease with the coupling depending on whether the latter is weak or strong. Finally, upon comparing the various switching rates, we find that the dipole-dipole coupling leads to the slowest magnetic dimer, as far as the switching of its net magnetic moment is concerned.

  14. Free energy surface of an intrinsically disordered protein: comparison between temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics and bias-exchange metadynamics.

    PubMed

    Zerze, Gül H; Miller, Cayla M; Granata, Daniele; Mittal, Jeetain

    2015-06-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), which are expected to be largely unstructured under physiological conditions, make up a large fraction of eukaryotic proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations have been utilized to probe structural characteristics of these proteins, which are not always easily accessible to experiments. However, exploration of the conformational space by brute force molecular dynamics simulations is often limited by short time scales. Present literature provides a number of enhanced sampling methods to explore protein conformational space in molecular simulations more efficiently. In this work, we present a comparison of two enhanced sampling methods: temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics and bias exchange metadynamics. By investigating both the free energy landscape as a function of pertinent order parameters and the per-residue secondary structures of an IDP, namely, human islet amyloid polypeptide, we found that the two methods yield similar results as expected. We also highlight the practical difference between the two methods by describing the path that we followed to obtain both sets of data. PMID:26575570

  15. Oral Pseudoephedrine Decreases the Rate of Trans-mucosal Nitrous Oxide Exchange for the Middle Ear

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Miriam S.; Alper, Cuneyt M.; Martin, Brian S; Cullen Doyle, Brendan M.; Doyle, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Determine if oral pretreatment with a vasoconstrictor decreases the blood to middle-ear exchange-rate of the perfusion-limited gas, Nitrous Oxide (N2O). Study Design Randomized, double-blind, crossover study. Methods Ten adult subjects with and 10 without past middle-ear disease completed paired experimental sessions, identical but for oral pretreatment with either pseudoephedrine HCL or lactose placebo. At each session, subjects were fitted with a non-rebreathing mask and breathed room air for 20 minutes (acclimation period), 50% N2O:50% O2 for 20 minutes (experimental period) and 100% O2 for 10 minutes (recovery period). Throughout, heart-rate, blood-pressure and O2 saturation were monitored and bilateral middle-ear pressures were recorded by tympanometry every minute. The primary outcome was the slope of the middle-ear pressure-time function for the experimental period which estimates the volume N2O exchange-rate. Using repeated measures ANOVA, the effects of Group (disease history), Treatment (active vs. placebo) and Period (1 vs. 2) on the recorded vital signs, and of Group, Treatment and Ear (left/right) on the middle-ear pressure-time slope were evaluated for statistical significance. Results Statistically significant effects of Period on O2 saturation (Period 2>Period 1) and of Treatment on heart-rate (Active>Placebo) were documented. Only Treatment was statistically significant for the middle-ear pressure-time slope with a shallower slope characterizing the active treatment session. Conclusion The volume exchange-rate across the middle-ear mucosa of perfusion-limited gases can be modulated pharmacologically. Theoretically, similar drugs can be used to reduce the requisite Eustachian tube opening efficiency for adequate middle-ear pressure regulation. PMID:26152838

  16. Quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (qCEST) MRI--RF spillover effect-corrected omega plot for simultaneous determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Dai, ZhuoZhi; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2014-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is sensitive to dilute proteins and peptides as well as microenvironmental properties. However, the complexity of the CEST MRI effect, which varies with the labile proton content, exchange rate and experimental conditions, underscores the need for developing quantitative CEST (qCEST) analysis. Towards this goal, it has been shown that omega plot is capable of quantifying paramagnetic CEST MRI. However, the use of the omega plot is somewhat limited for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) MRI because it is more susceptible to direct radio frequency (RF) saturation (spillover) owing to the relatively small chemical shift. Recently, it has been found that, for dilute DIACEST agents that undergo slow to intermediate chemical exchange, the spillover effect varies little with the labile proton ratio and exchange rate. Therefore, we postulated that the omega plot analysis can be improved if RF spillover effect could be estimated and taken into account. Specifically, simulation showed that both labile proton ratio and exchange rate derived using the spillover effect-corrected omega plot were in good agreement with simulated values. In addition, the modified omega plot was confirmed experimentally, and we showed that the derived labile proton ratio increased linearly with creatine concentration (p < 0.01), with little difference in their exchange rate (p = 0.32). In summary, our study extends the conventional omega plot for quantitative analysis of DIACEST MRI. PMID:24706610

  17. Evaluation of Enhanced Sampling Provided by Accelerated Molecular Dynamics with Hamiltonian Replica Exchange Methods

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many problems studied via molecular dynamics require accurate estimates of various thermodynamic properties, such as the free energies of different states of a system, which in turn requires well-converged sampling of the ensemble of possible structures. Enhanced sampling techniques are often applied to provide faster convergence than is possible with traditional molecular dynamics simulations. Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics (H-REMD) is a particularly attractive method, as it allows the incorporation of a variety of enhanced sampling techniques through modifications to the various Hamiltonians. In this work, we study the enhanced sampling of the RNA tetranucleotide r(GACC) provided by H-REMD combined with accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD), where a boosting potential is applied to torsions, and compare this to the enhanced sampling provided by H-REMD in which torsion potential barrier heights are scaled down to lower force constants. We show that H-REMD and multidimensional REMD (M-REMD) combined with aMD does indeed enhance sampling for r(GACC), and that the addition of the temperature dimension in the M-REMD simulations is necessary to efficiently sample rare conformations. Interestingly, we find that the rate of convergence can be improved in a single H-REMD dimension by simply increasing the number of replicas from 8 to 24 without increasing the maximum level of bias. The results also indicate that factors beyond replica spacing, such as round trip times and time spent at each replica, must be considered in order to achieve optimal sampling efficiency. PMID:24625009

  18. Cluster fusion-fission dynamics in the Singapore stock exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, Boon Kin; Cheong, Siew Ann

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate how the cross-correlations between stocks in the Singapore stock exchange (SGX) evolve over 2008 and 2009 within overlapping one-month time windows. In particular, we examine how these cross-correlations change before, during, and after the Sep-Oct 2008 Lehman Brothers Crisis. To do this, we extend the complete-linkage hierarchical clustering algorithm, to obtain robust clusters of stocks with stronger intracluster correlations, and weaker intercluster correlations. After we identify the robust clusters in all time windows, we visualize how these change in the form of a fusion-fission diagram. Such a diagram depicts graphically how the cluster sizes evolve, the exchange of stocks between clusters, as well as how strongly the clusters mix. From the fusion-fission diagram, we see a giant cluster growing and disintegrating in the SGX, up till the Lehman Brothers Crisis in September 2008 and the market crashes of October 2008. After the Lehman Brothers Crisis, clusters in the SGX remain small for few months before giant clusters emerge once again. In the aftermath of the crisis, we also find strong mixing of component stocks between clusters. As a result, the correlation between initially strongly-correlated pairs of stocks decay exponentially with average life time of about a month. These observations impact strongly how portfolios and trading strategies should be formulated.

  19. Photolithography and Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy used to examine the rates of exchange in reverse micelle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Zach; Mawson, Cara; Johnson, Kyron; Kessler, Sarah; Rebecca, Anne; Wolf, Nathan; Lim, Michael; Nucci, Nathaniel

    Reverse micelles are molecular complexes that encapsulate a nanoscale pool of water in a surfactant shell dissolved in non-polar solvent. These complexes have a wide range of applications, and in all cases, the degree to which reverse micelles (RM) exchange their contents is relevant for their use. Despite its importance, this aspect of RM behavior is poorly understood. Photolithography is employed here to create micro and nano scale fluidic systems in which mixing rates can be precisely measured using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Micro-channel patterns are etched using reactive ion etching process into a layer of silicon dioxide on crystalline silicon substrates. Solutions containing mixtures of reverse micelles, proteins, and fluorophores are placed into reservoirs in the patterns, while diffusion and exchange between RMs is monitored using a FCS system built from a modified confocal Raman spectrometer. Using this approach, the diffusion and exchange rates for RM systems are measured as a function of the components of the RM mixture. Funding provided by Rowan University.

  20. Quantum dynamics of {sup 16}O + {sup 36}O{sub 2} and {sup 18}O + {sup 32}O{sub 2} exchange reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopala Rao, T.; Mahapatra, S.; Guillon, G.; Honvault, P.

    2015-05-07

    We present quantum dynamical investigations of {sup 16}O + {sup 36}O{sub 2} and {sup 18}O + {sup 32}O{sub 2} exchange reactions using a time-independent quantum mechanical method and an accurate global potential energy surface of ozone [Dawes et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 081102 (2011)]. Initial state-selected integral cross sections, rate constants, and Boltzmann averaged thermal rate constants are obtained and compared with earlier experimental and theoretical results. The computed thermal rate constants for the oxygen exchange reactions exhibit a negative temperature dependence, as found experimentally. They are in better agreement with the experiments than the previous studies on the same reactions.

  1. Respiratory dynamics of discontinuous gas exchange in the tracheal system of the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria.

    PubMed

    Groenewald, Berlizé; Hetz, Stefan K; Chown, Steven L; Terblanche, John S

    2012-07-01

    Gas exchange dynamics in insects is of fundamental importance to understanding evolved variation in breathing patterns, such as discontinuous gas exchange cycles (DGCs). Most insects do not rely solely on diffusion for the exchange of respiratory gases but may also make use of respiratory movements (active ventilation) to supplement gas exchange at rest. However, their temporal dynamics have not been widely investigated. Here, intratracheal pressure, V(CO2) and body movements of the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria were measured simultaneously during the DGC and revealed several important aspects of gas exchange dynamics. First, S. gregaria employs two different ventilatory strategies, one involving dorso-ventral contractions and the other longitudinal telescoping movements. Second, although a true spiracular closed (C)-phase of the DGC could be identified by means of subatmospheric intratracheal pressure recordings, some CO(2) continued to be released. Third, strong pumping actions do not necessarily lead to CO(2) release and could be used to ensure mixing of gases in the closed tracheal system, or enhance water vapour reabsorption into the haemolymph from fluid-filled tracheole tips by increasing the hydrostatic pressure or forcing fluid into the haemocoel. Finally, this work showed that the C-phase of the DGC can occur at any pressure. These results provide further insights into the mechanistic basis of insect gas exchange. PMID:22675191

  2. Coupled acoustic-gravity field for dynamic evaluation of ion exchange with a single resin bead.

    PubMed

    Kanazaki, Takahiro; Hirawa, Shungo; Harada, Makoto; Okada, Tetsuo

    2010-06-01

    A coupled acoustic-gravity field is efficient for entrapping a particle at the position determined by its acoustic properties rather than its size. This field has been applied to the dynamic observation of ion-exchange reactions occurring in a single resin bead. The replacement of counterions in an ion-exchange resin induces changes in its acoustic properties, such as density and compressibility. Therefore, we can visually trace the advancement of an ion-exchange reaction as a time change in the levitation position of a resin bead entrapped in the field. Cation-exchange reactions occurring in resin beads with diameters of 40-120 microm are typically completed within 100-200 s. Ion-exchange equilibrium or kinetics is often evaluated with off-line chemical analyses, which require a batch amount of ion exchangers. Measurements with a single resin particle allow us to evaluate ion-exchange dynamics and kinetics of ions including those that are difficult to measure by usual off-line analyses. The diffusion properties of ions in resins have been successfully evaluated from the time change in the levitation positions of resin beads. PMID:20462180

  3. Reversible Control of Nanoparticle Functionalization and Physicochemical Properties by Dynamic Covalent Exchange**

    PubMed Central

    della Sala, Flavio; Kay, Euan R

    2015-01-01

    Existing methods for the covalent functionalization of nanoparticles rely on kinetically controlled reactions, and largely lack the sophistication of the preeminent oligonucleotide-based noncovalent strategies. Here we report the application of dynamic covalent chemistry for the reversible modification of nanoparticle (NP) surface functionality, combining the benefits of non-biomolecular covalent chemistry with the favorable features of equilibrium processes. A homogeneous monolayer of nanoparticle-bound hydrazones can undergo quantitative dynamic covalent exchange. The pseudomolecular nature of the NP system allows for the in situ characterization of surface-bound species, and real-time tracking of the exchange reactions. Furthermore, dynamic covalent exchange offers a simple approach for reversibly switching—and subtly tuning—NP properties such as solvophilicity. PMID:25973468

  4. Simultaneous Disulfide and Boronic Acid Ester Exchange in Dynamic Combinatorial Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Diemer, Sanna L.; Kristensen, Morten; Rasmussen, Brian; Beeren, Sophie R.; Pittelkow, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic combinatorial chemistry has emerged as a promising tool for the discovery of complex receptors in supramolecular chemistry. At the heart of dynamic combinatorial chemistry are the reversible reactions that enable the exchange of building blocks between library members in dynamic combinatorial libraries (DCLs) ensuring thermodynamic control over the system. If more than one reversible reaction operates in a single dynamic combinatorial library, the complexity of the system increases dramatically, and so does its possible applications. One can imagine two reversible reactions that operate simultaneously or two reversible reactions that operate independently. Both these scenarios have advantages and disadvantages. In this contribution, we show how disulfide exchange and boronic ester transesterification can function simultaneous in dynamic combinatorial libraries under appropriate conditions. We describe the detailed studies necessary to establish suitable reaction conditions and highlight the analytical techniques appropriate to study this type of system. PMID:26378519

  5. Water exchange rates of water-soluble manganese(III) porphyrins of therapeutical potential.

    PubMed

    Budimir, Ana; Kalmár, József; Fábián, István; Lente, Gábor; Bányai, István; Batinić-Haberle, Ines; Birus, Mladen

    2010-05-14

    The activation parameters and the rate constants of the water-exchange reactions of Mn(III)TE-2-PyP(5+) (meso-tetrakis(N-ethylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin) as cationic, Mn(III)TnHex-2-PyP(5+) (meso-tetrakis(N-n-hexylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin) as sterically shielded cationic, and Mn(III)TSPP(3-) (meso-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin) as anionic manganese(iii) porphyrins were determined from the temperature dependence of (17)O NMR relaxation rates. The rate constants at 298 K were obtained as 4.12 x 10(6) s(-1), 5.73 x 10(6) s(-1), and 2.74 x 10(7) s(-1), respectively. On the basis of the determined entropies of activation, an interchange-dissociative mechanism (I(d)) was proposed for the cationic complexes (DeltaS(double dagger) = approximately 0 J mol(-1) K(-1)) whereas a limiting dissociative mechanism (D) was proposed for Mn(III)TSPP(3-) complex (DeltaS(double dagger) = +79 J mol(-1) K(-1)). The obtained water exchange rate of Mn(III)TSPP(3-) corresponded well to the previously assumed value used by Koenig et al. (S. H. Koenig, R. D. Brown and M. Spiller, Magn. Reson. Med., 1987, 4, 52-260) to simulate the (1)H NMRD curves, therefore the measured value supports the theory developed for explaining the anomalous relaxivity of Mn(III)TSPP(3-) complex. A magnitude of the obtained water-exchange rate constants further confirms the suggested inner sphere electron transfer mechanism for the reactions of the two positively charged Mn(iii) porphyrins with the various biologically important oxygen and nitrogen reactive species. Due to the high biological and clinical relevance of the reactions that occur at the metal site of the studied Mn(iii) porphyrins, the determination of water exchange rates advanced our insight into their efficacy and mechanism of action, and in turn should impact their further development for both diagnostic (imaging) and therapeutic purposes. PMID:20422097

  6. NON-EQUILIBRIUM H{sub 2} FORMATION IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE: ENERGY EXCHANGES, RATE COEFFICIENTS, AND SPECTRAL DISTORTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Coppola, C. M.; Longo, S.; D'Introno, R.; Galli, D.; Tennyson, J.

    2012-03-01

    Energy exchange processes play a crucial role in the early universe, affecting the thermal balance and the dynamical evolution of the primordial gas. In the present work we focus on the consequences of a non-thermal distribution of the level populations of H{sub 2}: first, we determine the excitation temperatures of vibrational transitions and the non-equilibrium heat transfer; second, we compare the modifications to chemical reaction rate coefficients with respect to the values obtained assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium; and third, we compute the spectral distortions to the cosmic background radiation generated by the formation of H{sub 2} in vibrationally excited levels. We conclude that non-equilibrium processes cannot be ignored in cosmological simulations of the evolution of baryons, although their observational signatures remain below current limits of detection. New fits to the equilibrium and non-equilibrium heat transfer functions are provided.

  7. Thixoforming of Steel: New Tools Conception to Analyse Thermal Exchanges and Strain Rate Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Cezard, P.; Bigot, R.; Becker, E.; Mathieu, S.; Pierret, J. C.; Rassili, A.

    2007-04-07

    Through different papers, authors shown that the influence of thermal exchanges was a first order parameter on the semi-solid steel behaviour, and certainly for every semi-solid metallic materials. These thermal exchanges hide other parameters effect like, for example, the strain rate influence. This paper tries to determine the influence of these two parameters by using a new extrusion device on a hydraulic press. This new tools conception annihilated the influence of the decrease of the punch speed before stopping and permitted to have a constant speed during the experiment. This work also deals with the homogeneous flow during thixoforming of steel and shows the importance to couple initial temperature of the slug with punch speed. This paper presents different conditions which permitted to have a homogeneous flow by keeping a low load.

  8. Modified perfluorocarbon tracer method for measuring effective multizone air exchange rates.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Naohide; Kataoka, Toshiyuki; Takamine, Koichi; Butsugan, Michio; Nishijima, Hirokazu; Gamo, Masashi

    2010-09-01

    A modified procedure was developed for the measurement of the effective air exchange rate, which represents the relationship between the pollutants emitted from indoor sources and the residents' level of exposure, by placing the dosers of tracer gas at locations that resemble indoor emission sources. To measure the 24-h-average effective air exchange rates in future surveys based on this procedure, a low-cost, easy-to-use perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) doser with a stable dosing rate was developed by using double glass vials, a needle, a polyethylene-sintered filter, and a diffusion tube. Carbon molecular sieve cartridges and carbon disulfide (CS₂) were used for passive sampling and extraction of the tracer gas, respectively. Recovery efficiencies, sampling rates, and lower detection limits for 24-h sampling of hexafluorobenzene, octafluorotoluene, and perfluoroallylbenzene were 40% ± 3%, 72% ± 5%, and 84% ± 6%; 10.5 ± 1.1, 14.4 ± 1.4, and 12.2 ± 0.49 mL min⁻¹; and 0.20, 0.17, and 0.26 μg m⁻³, respectively. PMID:20948928

  9. Jealousy and Trust: Unexplored Dimensions of Social Exchange Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Gerald W.; Osmond, Marie Withers

    Little effort has been made to systematically assess the determinants and consequences of marital jealousy which affect marital, familial and extra-familial expectations, interactions and behavior. A preliminary attempt to rectify this omission provides a conceptual/theoretical perspective on jealousy dynamics in marriage. Marital jealousy, a…

  10. Measurements of soil and canopy exchange rates in the Amazon rain forest using 222Rn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumbore, S. E.; Keller, M.; Wofsy, S. C.; da Costa, J. M.

    1990-09-01

    Measurements of the emission of 222Rn from Amazon forest soils, and profiles of 222Rn in air were used to study the ventilation of the soil atmosphere and the nocturnal forest canopy. The emission of 222Rn from the yellow clay soils dominant in the study area averaged 0.38±0.07 atom cm-2 s-1. Nearby sand soils had similar fluxes, averaging 0.30 ± 0.07 atom cm-2 s-1. The effective diffusivity in the clay soil (0.008±0.004 cm2 s-1), was lower than that for the sand soil (0.033±0.030 cm2 s-1). Profiles of 222Rn and CO2 in air showed steepest concentration gradients in the layer between 0 and 3 m above the soil surface. Aerodynamic resistances calculated for this layer from 222Rn and CO2 varied from 1.6 to 18 s cm-1, with greater resistance during the afternoon than at night. Time averaged profiles of 222Rn in the forest canopy measured during the evening and night were combined with the soil flux measurements to compute the resistance of the subcanopy to exchange with overlying air. The integrated nocturnal rate of gas exchange between the canopy layer (0 to 41 m) and overlying atmosphere based on 222Rn averaged 0.33±0.15 cm s-1. An independent estimate of gas exchange, based on 13 nights of CO2 profiles, averaged 0.21±0.40 cm s-1. These exchange rates correspond to flushing times for the 41 m canopy layer of 3.4 and 5.5 hours, respectively. Comparison of 222Rn and CO2 profiles show that the nocturnal production of CO2 by above-ground vegetation was about 20% of the soil emission source, consistent with data from eddy-correlation experiments (Fan et al., this issue).

  11. Soil Net Nitrification Rates and Exchangeable Calcium in Ten Small Upland Watersheds of the Northeastern USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, D.; Bailey, S.; Shanley, J.; Fredriksen, G.; Jamison, A.

    2004-05-01

    Possible links have been suggested between soil nitrification rates, soil calcium concentrations and tree species composition (e.g. sugar maple). We are measuring soil nitrification rates and stream nitrate export in ten watersheds in Vermont, New Hampshire and New York. These include relatively Ca-poor sites at Cone Pond NH and Ca-rich sites at Sleepers River, VT. Our objectives are to determine the relationship between nitrification rates and watershed characteristics (e.g. vegetation, soils, topography), and to explore the link between these rates and watershed nitrate export. Net nitrification rates are highly variable both within and among the eight sites and are related to the soil C/N ratio and vegetation characteristics at some, but not all, sites. Our preliminary results show distinct differences in exchangeable Ca concentrations among watersheds. Although some locations are enriched in Ca and high in sugar maple density, we have not found a good overall relationship between Ca and net nitrification rates. High rates can be found in Ca-enriched sites that are also relatively high in pH.

  12. Dynamic Recrystallization During High-Strain-Rate Tension of Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi, Nooshin; Bonora, Nicola; Ruggiero, Andrew; Hörnqvist Colliander, Magnus

    2016-06-01

    Discontinuous dynamic recrystallization can occur during dynamic tensile extrusion of copper, which is subjected to uniaxial tensile strains of ~5 and strain rates up to 106 s-1 in the extruded section. Through high-resolution transmission Kikuchi diffraction, we show that nucleation occurs through subgrain rotation and grain boundary bulging at boundaries between <001> and <111> oriented grains. The observed nuclei consist of subgrains with a size of approximately 200 to 400 nm.

  13. On Value at Risk for Foreign Exchange Rates --- the Copula Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworski, P.

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine the Value at Risk (VaR) of the portfolio consisting of long positions in foreign currencies on an emerging market. Basing on empirical data we restrict ourselves to the case when the tail parts of distributions of logarithmic returns of these assets follow the power laws and the lower tail of associated copula C follows the power law of degree 1. We will illustrate the practical usefulness of this approach by the analysis of the exchange rates of EUR and CHF at the Polish forex market.

  14. Time Dependency of Psychotherapeutic Exchanges: The Contribution of the Theory of Dynamic Systems in Analyzing Process

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Sergio; Tschacher, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a general framework for the use of Theory of Dynamic Systems (TDS) in the field of psychotherapy research. Psychotherapy is inherently dynamic, namely a function of time. Consequently, the improvement of construct validity and clinical relevance of psychotherapy process research require the development of models of investigation allowing dynamic mappings of clinical exchange. Thus, TDS becomes a significant theoretical and methodological reference. The paper focuses two topics. First, the main concepts of TDS are briefly introduced together with a basic typology of approaches developed within this domain. Second, we propose a repertoire of investigation strategies that can be used to capture the dynamic nature of clinical exchange. In this way we intend to highlight the feasibility and utility of strategies of analysis informed by TDS. PMID:22848205

  15. Exchange explosions: Magnetization dynamics during vortex-antivortex annihilation.

    PubMed

    Hertel, Riccardo; Schneider, Claus M

    2006-10-27

    A magnetic vortex and an antivortex can annihilate, resulting in a homogeneous magnetization. A detailed description of the magnetization dynamics of such annihilation processes is obtained by micromagnetic simulations based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. We show that, depending on the relative polarization of the vortex-antivortex pair, the annihilation process is either a continuous transformation of the magnetic structure or it involves the propagation of a micromagnetic singularity (Bloch point) causing a burstlike emission of spin waves. These results provide new insight into a fundamental micromagnetic process that has recently been proposed for a controlled generation of spin waves. PMID:17155502

  16. Growth-rate-dependent dynamics of a bacterial genetic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osella, Matteo; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino

    2013-01-01

    Gene networks exhibiting oscillatory dynamics are widespread in biology. The minimal regulatory designs giving rise to oscillations have been implemented synthetically and studied by mathematical modeling. However, most of the available analyses generally neglect the coupling of regulatory circuits with the cellular “chassis” in which the circuits are embedded. For example, the intracellular macromolecular composition of fast-growing bacteria changes with growth rate. As a consequence, important parameters of gene expression, such as ribosome concentration or cell volume, are growth-rate dependent, ultimately coupling the dynamics of genetic circuits with cell physiology. This work addresses the effects of growth rate on the dynamics of a paradigmatic example of genetic oscillator, the repressilator. Making use of empirical growth-rate dependencies of parameters in bacteria, we show that the repressilator dynamics can switch between oscillations and convergence to a fixed point depending on the cellular state of growth, and thus on the nutrients it is fed. The physical support of the circuit (type of plasmid or gene positions on the chromosome) also plays an important role in determining the oscillation stability and the growth-rate dependence of period and amplitude. This analysis has potential application in the field of synthetic biology, and suggests that the coupling between endogenous genetic oscillators and cell physiology can have substantial consequences for their functionality.

  17. Dynamic Models of Learning That Characterize Parent-Child Exchanges Predict Vocabulary Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ober, David R.; Beekman, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Cumulative vocabulary models for infants and toddlers were developed from models of learning that predict trajectories associated with low, average, and high vocabulary growth rates (14 to 46 months). It was hypothesized that models derived from rates of learning mirror the type of exchanges provided to infants and toddlers by parents and…

  18. The dynamics of sorption of sulfuric acid by weakly basic polyacrylic anion exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamchenko, A. V.; Kushnir, T. V.

    2009-05-01

    The nonequilibrium dynamics of sorption of sulfuric acid by free base forms of Amberlite IRA-67 and Lewatite VP.OC.1072 weakly basic anion exchangers is studied. It is established that, in hydrodynamic regimes of filtration, which are typical of OH filters of the first stage of water-desalting plants, the limiting stage of sorption kinetics is inside diffusion. It is concluded that the process is correctly described by an asymptotic solution to the inside-diffusion model of sorption dynamics.

  19. Dynamics of polymeric brushes: End exchange and bridging kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johner, A.; Joanny, J. F.

    1993-01-01

    We study some dynamical aspects of grafted polymer layers in a solvent. The structure of the brush is described in a θ solvent by the self-consistent mean field theory and in a good solvent using scaling laws. The Rouse-Zimm model including hydrodynamic interactions is used for the dynamic properties. A given chain end explores the entire thickness of a free grafted layer in a time Te proportional to the cube of the thickness. The exploration time is much larger than the Rouse time that characterizes the relaxation of the fluctuations of the chains conformations. In a θ-solvent we give a detailed study of the relaxation of the density of a few labeled chain ends towards its equilibrium value. The bridging kinetics between a grafting plate and a plate adsorbing the free ends is also discussed. When adsorption proceeds, an exclusion zone grows in the vicinity of the adsorbing plate. To cross the exclusion zone and adsorb, a chain end must overcome an energy barrier. The typical adsorption time is the first passage time through this barrier. Except in the very late stages where the fraction of chains η forming bridges saturates at its equilibrium value, the energy barrier against adsorption increases as a power law of η and the bridging fraction increases very slowly (logarithmically) with time. Both weak bridging where only a small fraction of chains form bridges and total bridging where all the chains form bridges are studied.

  20. The evolutionary rate dynamically tracks changes in HIV-1 epidemics

    SciTech Connect

    Maljkovic-berry, Irina; Athreya, Gayathri; Daniels, Marcus; Bruno, William; Korber, Bette; Kuiken, Carla; Ribeiro, Ruy M

    2009-01-01

    Large-sequence datasets provide an opportunity to investigate the dynamics of pathogen epidemics. Thus, a fast method to estimate the evolutionary rate from large and numerous phylogenetic trees becomes necessary. Based on minimizing tip height variances, we optimize the root in a given phylogenetic tree to estimate the most homogenous evolutionary rate between samples from at least two different time points. Simulations showed that the method had no bias in the estimation of evolutionary rates and that it was robust to tree rooting and topological errors. We show that the evolutionary rates of HIV-1 subtype B and C epidemics have changed over time, with the rate of evolution inversely correlated to the rate of virus spread. For subtype B, the evolutionary rate slowed down and tracked the start of the HAART era in 1996. Subtype C in Ethiopia showed an increase in the evolutionary rate when the prevalence increase markedly slowed down in 1995. Thus, we show that the evolutionary rate of HIV-1 on the population level dynamically tracks epidemic events.

  1. Experience with dynamic reinforcement rates decreases resistance to extinction.

    PubMed

    Craig, Andrew R; Shahan, Timothy A

    2016-03-01

    The ability of organisms to detect reinforcer-rate changes in choice preparations is positively related to two factors: the magnitude of the change in rate and the frequency with which rates change. Gallistel (2012) suggested similar rate-detection processes are responsible for decreases in responding during operant extinction. Although effects of magnitude of change in reinforcer rate on resistance to extinction are well known (e.g., the partial-reinforcement-extinction effect), effects of frequency of changes in rate prior to extinction are unknown. Thus, the present experiments examined whether frequency of changes in baseline reinforcer rates impacts resistance to extinction. Pigeons pecked keys for variable-interval food under conditions where reinforcer rates were stable and where they changed within and between sessions. Overall reinforcer rates between conditions were controlled. In Experiment 1, resistance to extinction was lower following exposure to dynamic reinforcement schedules than to static schedules. Experiment 2 showed that resistance to presession feeding, a disruptor that should not involve change-detection processes, was unaffected by baseline-schedule dynamics. These findings are consistent with the suggestion that change detection contributes to extinction. We discuss implications of change-detection processes for extinction of simple and discriminated operant behavior and relate these processes to the behavioral-momentum based approach to understanding extinction. PMID:26813330

  2. NASA geometry data exchange specification for computational fluid dynamics (NASA IGES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Matthew W.; Kerr, Patricia A.; Thorp, Scott A.; Jou, Jin J.

    1994-01-01

    This document specifies a subset of an existing product data exchange specification that is widely used in industry and government. The existing document is called the Initial Graphics Exchange Specification. This document, a subset of IGES, is intended for engineers analyzing product performance using tools such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. This document specifies how to define mathematically and exchange the geometric model of an object. The geometry is represented utilizing nonuniform rational B-splines (NURBS) curves and surfaces. Only surface models are represented; no solid model representation is included. This specification does not include most of the other types of product information available in IGES (e.g., no material properties or surface finish properties) and does not provide all the specific file format details of IGES. The data exchange protocol specified in this document is fully conforming to the American National Standard (ANSI) IGES 5.2.

  3. Structure of Met-enkephalin in explicit aqueous solution using replica exchange molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sanbonmatsu, K Y; García, A E

    2002-02-01

    Replica exchange molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of Met-enkephalin in explicit solvent reveal helical and nonhelical structures. Four predominant structures of Met-enkephalin are sampled with comparable probabilities (two helical and two nonhelical). The energy barriers between these configurations are low, suggesting that Met-enkephalin switches easily between configurations. This is consistent with the requirement that Met-enkephalin be sufficiently flexible to bind to several different receptors. Replica exchange simulations of 32 ns are shown to sample approximately five times more configurational space than constant temperature MD simulations of the same duration. The energy landscape for the replica exchange simulation is presented. A detailed study of replica trajectories demonstrates that the significant increases in temperature provided by the replica exchange technique enable transitions from nonhelical to helical structures that would otherwise be prevented by kinetic trapping. Met-enkephalin (Type Entrez Proteins; Value A61445; Service Entrez Proteins). PMID:11807951

  4. Theoretical investigation on the mechanism and dynamics of oxo exchange of neptunyl(VI) hydroxide in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xia; Chai, Zhifang; Wang, Dongqi

    2015-03-21

    Four types of reaction mechanisms for the oxo ligand exchange of monomeric and dimeric neptunyl(VI) hydroxide in aqueous solution were explored computationally using density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio classical molecular dynamics. The obtained results were compared with previous studies on the oxo exchange of uranyl hydroxide, as well as with experiments. It is found that the stable T-shaped [NpO3(OH)3](3-) intermediate is a key species for oxo exchange in the proton transfer in mononuclear Path I and binuclear Path IV, similar to the case of uranyl(VI) hydroxide. Path I is thought to be the preferred oxo exchange mechanism for neptunyl(VI) hydroxide in our calculations, due to the lower activation energy (22.7 and 13.1 kcal mol(-1) for ΔG(‡) and ΔH(‡), respectively) of the overall reaction. Path II via a cis-neptunyl structure assisted by a water molecule might be a competitive channel against Path I with a mononuclear mechanism, owing to a rapid dynamical process occurring in Path II. In Path IV with the binuclear mechanism, oxo exchange is accomplished via the interaction between [NpO2(OH)4](2-) and T-shaped [NpO3(OH)3](3-) with a low activation energy for the rate-determining step, however, the overall energy required to fulfill the reaction is slightly higher than that in mononuclear Path I, suggesting a possible binuclear process in the higher energy region. The chemical bonding evolution along the reaction pathways was discussed by using topological methodologies of the electron localization function (ELF). PMID:25706188

  5. Probing ultrafast photo-induced dynamics of the exchange energy in a Heisenberg antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batignani, G.; Bossini, D.; di Palo, N.; Ferrante, C.; Pontecorvo, E.; Cerullo, G.; Kimel, A.; Scopigno, T.

    2015-08-01

    Manipulating the macroscopic phases of solids using ultrashort light pulses has resulted in spectacular phenomena, including metal-insulator transitions, superconductivity and subpicosecond modification of magnetic order. The development of this research area strongly depends on the understanding and optical control of fundamental interactions in condensed matter, in particular the exchange interaction. However, disentangling the timescales relevant for the contributions of the exchange interaction and spin dynamics to the exchange energy, Eex, is a challenge. Here, we introduce femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering to unravel the ultrafast photo-induced dynamics of magnetic excitations at the edge of the Brillouin zone. We find that femtosecond laser excitation of the antiferromagnet KNiF3 triggers a spectral shift of the two-magnon line, the energy of which is proportional to Eex. By unravelling the photo-induced modification of the two-magnon line frequency from a dominating nonlinear optical effect, we find that Eex is increased by the electromagnetic stimulus.

  6. Dynamic exchanges between DOM and POM pools in coastal and inland aquatic ecosystems: A review.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Chen, Meilian; Schlautman, Mark A; Hur, Jin

    2016-05-01

    Dynamic exchanges between dissolved organic matter (DOM) and particulate organic matter (POM) plays a critical role in organic carbon cycling in coastal and inland aquatic ecosystems, interactions with aquatic organisms, mobility and bioavailability of pollutants, among many other ecological and geochemical phenomena. Although DOM-POM exchange processes have been widely studied from different aspects, little to no effort has been made to date to provide a comprehensive, mechanistic, and micro-spatial schema for understanding various exchange processes occurring in different aquatic ecosystems in a unified way. The phenomena occurring between DOM and POM were explained here with the homogeneous and heterogeneous mechanisms. In the homogeneous mechanism, the participating components are only organic matter (OM) constituents themselves with aggregation and dissolution involved, whereas OM is associated with other components such as minerals and particulate colloids in the heterogeneous counterpart. Besides the generally concerned processes of aggregation/dissolution and adsorption/desorption, other ecological factors such as sunlight and organisms can also participate in DOM-POM exchanges through altering the chemical nature of OM. Despite the limitation of current analytical technologies, many unknown and/or unquantified processes need to be identified to unravel the complicated exchanges of OM between its dissolved and particulate states. Based on the review of several previous mathematical models, we proposed a unified conceptual model to describe all major dynamic exchange mechanisms on the basis of exergy theory. More knowledge of dynamic DOM-POM exchanges is warranted to overcome the potential problems arising from a simple division of OM into dissolved versus particulate states and to further develop more sophisticated mathematic models. PMID:26881732

  7. The effect of water exchange on bacterioplankton depletion and inorganic nutrient dynamics in coral reef cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Duyl, F. C.; Scheffers, S. R.; Thomas, F. I. M.; Driscoll, M.

    2006-03-01

    We studied the effect of water exchange on the depletion (or accumulation) of bacterioplankton, dissolved organic matter and inorganic nutrients in small open framework cavities (50-70 l) at 15 m depth on the coral reef along Curaçao, Netherlands Antilles. The bacterioplankton removal rate in cavities increased with increasing water exchange rates up to a threshold of 0.0045 s-1, reaching values of 50-100 mg C m-2 total interior cavity surface area (CSA) per day. Beyond the threshold, bacterioplankton removal dropped. The cryptic community is apparently adapted to the average water exchange in these cavities (0.0041 s-1). Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), nitrate + nitrite (NO x ) in particular, accumulated in cavity water and the accumulation decreased with increasing water exchange. Net NO x effluxes exceeded net DIN effluxes from cavities (average efflux rate of 1.9 mmol NO x vs. 0.8 mmol DIN m-2 interior CSA per day). The difference is ascribed to net ammonium losses (NH4) in cavities at reef concentrations >0.025 μM NH4, possibly due to enhanced nitrification. Dissolved inorganic phosphate accumulated in cavities, but was not related to water exchange. The cryptic biota in cavities depend on water exchange for optimization of consumption of bacterioplankton and removal of inorganic nitrogen. Coral cavities are an evident sink of bacterioplankton and a source of NO x and PO{4/3-}.

  8. Monitoring the Dynamics of Monomer Exchange Using Electrospray Mass Spectrometry: The Case of the Dimeric Glucosamine-6-Phosphate Synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevreux, Guillaume; Atmanene, Cédric; Lopez, Philippe; Ouazzani, Jamal; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Badet, Bernard; Badet-Denisot, Marie-Ange; Sanglier-Cianférani, Sarah

    2011-03-01

    Escherichia coli glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase (GlmS) is a dimeric enzyme from the glutamine-dependent amidotransferases family, which catalyses the conversion of D-fructose-6-phosphate (Fru6P) and glutamine (Gln) into D-glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P) and glutamate, respectively. Extensive X-ray crystallography investigations have been reported, highlighting the importance of the dimeric association to form the sugar active site as well as significant conformational changes of the protein upon substrate and product binding. In the present work, an approach based on time-resolved noncovalent mass spectrometry has been developed to study the dynamics of GlmS subunit exchange. Using 14N versus 15N labeled proteins, the kinetics of GlmS subunit exchange was monitored with the wild-type enzyme in the presence of different substrates and products as well as with the protein bearing a key amino acid mutation specially designed to weaken the dimer interface. Determination of rate constants of subunit exchange revealed important modifications of the protein dynamics: while glutamine, glutamate, and K603A mutation accelerates subunit exchange, Fru6P and GlcN6P totally prevent it. These results are described in light of the available structural information, providing additional useful data for both the characterization of GlmS catalytic process and the design of new GlmS inhibitors. Finally, time-resolved noncovalent MS can be proposed as an additional biophysical technique for real-time monitoring of protein dynamics.

  9. High-field measurement of the 129Xe-Cs binary spin-exchange rate coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu; Kuzma, Nicholas N.; Happer, William

    2004-03-01

    We report the first measurement of the binary spin-exchange rate coefficient κ in the ^129Xe-Cs system. Data were taken using ^129Xe NMR in glass cells containing isotopically enriched xenon gas at pressures on the order of atmospheres and a small amount of liquid Cs metal, in the temperature range from 120 to 140^rcC and at a magnetic field of 9.4 T. The contribution of CsXe van der Waals molecules to spin exchange should have been nearly eliminated by the high magnetic field, as confirmed by our measurements of the ^129Xe longitudinal relaxation time T1 in a series of cells with various densities of xenon. The Cs atomic number density [Cs] was controlled by the cell temperature, and was experimentally determined by analysis of the Faraday rotation of linearly polarized probe laser light. We measured κ = d (T_1-1)/d[Cs]= (2.81± 0.2) × 10-16 cm^3 s-1 . This is about 60% larger than the previously measured rate coefficient for the ^129Xe-Rb system(Y.-Y. Jau, N. N. Kuzma, and W. Happer, Phys. Rev. A 66, 052710 (2002).), κ =d (T_1-1)/d[Rb]= (1.75± 0.12) × 10-16 cm^3 s-1 . A comparison with theory(Y.-Y. Jau, N. N. Kuzma, and W. Happer, Phys. Rev. A 67, 022720 (2003).) will be discussed.

  10. A review of air exchange rate models for air pollution exposure assessments.

    PubMed

    Breen, Michael S; Schultz, Bradley D; Sohn, Michael D; Long, Thomas; Langstaff, John; Williams, Ronald; Isaacs, Kristin; Meng, Qing Yu; Stallings, Casson; Smith, Luther

    2014-11-01

    A critical aspect of air pollution exposure assessments is estimation of the air exchange rate (AER) for various buildings where people spend their time. The AER, which is the rate of exchange of indoor air with outdoor air, is an important determinant for entry of outdoor air pollutants and for removal of indoor-emitted air pollutants. This paper presents an overview and critical analysis of the scientific literature on empirical and physically based AER models for residential and commercial buildings; the models highlighted here are feasible for exposure assessments as extensive inputs are not required. Models are included for the three types of airflows that can occur across building envelopes: leakage, natural ventilation, and mechanical ventilation. Guidance is provided to select the preferable AER model based on available data, desired temporal resolution, types of airflows, and types of buildings included in the exposure assessment. For exposure assessments with some limited building leakage or AER measurements, strategies are described to reduce AER model uncertainty. This review will facilitate the selection of AER models in support of air pollution exposure assessments. PMID:23715084

  11. Long range dependence in the high frequency USD/INR exchange rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dilip

    2014-02-01

    Using high frequency data, this paper examines the long memory property in the unconditional and conditional volatility of the USD/INR exchange rate at different time scales using the Local Whittle (LW), the Exact Local Whittle (ELW) and the FIAPARCH models. Results indicate that the long memory property remains quite stable across different time scales for both unconditional and conditional volatility measures. Results from the non-overlapping moving window approach indicate that the extreme events (such as the subprime crisis and the European debt crisis) resulted in highly persistent behavior of the USD/INR exchange rate and thus lead to market inefficiency. This paper also examines the long memory property in the realized volatility based on different time scale data. Results indicate that the realized volatility measures based on different scales of the high frequency data exhibit a consistent and stable long memory property. However, the realized volatility measures based on daily data exhibit lower degree of long-range dependence. This study has implications for traders and investors (with different trading horizons) and can be helpful in predicting expected future volatility and in designing and implementing trading strategies at different time scales.

  12. Metabolic analyzer. [for measuring metabolic rate and breathing dynamics of human beings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, J. A.; Perry, C. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An apparatus is described for the measurement of metabolic rate and breathing dynamics in which inhaled and exhaled breath are sensed by sealed, piston-displacement type spirometers. These spirometers electrically measure the volume of inhaled and exhaled breath. A mass spectrometer analyzes simultaneously for oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen and water vapor. Computation circuits are responsive to the outputs of the spirometers, mass spectrometer, temperature, pressure and timing signals and compute oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, minute volume and respiratory exchange ratio. A selective indicator provides for read-out of these data at predetermined cyclic intervals.

  13. Local dynamics of heart rate: detection and prognostic implications.

    PubMed

    Moss, Travis J; Lake, Douglas E; Moorman, J Randall

    2014-10-01

    The original observation that reduced heart rate variability (HRV) confers poor prognosis after myocardial infarction has been followed by many studies of heart rate dynamics. We tested the hypothesis that an entropy-based local dynamics measure gave prognostic information in ambulatory patients undergoing 24-h electrocardiography. In this context, entropy is the probability that short templates will find matches in the time series. We studied RR interval time series from 24-h Holter monitors of 1564 consecutive patients over age 39. We generated histograms of the count of templates as a function of the number of templates matches in short RR interval time series, and found characteristic appearance of histograms for atrial fibrillation, sinus rhythm with normal HRV, and sinus rhythm with reduced HRV and premature ventricular contractions (PVCs). We developed statistical models to detect the abnormal dynamic phenotype of reduced HRV with PVCs and fashioned a local dynamics score (LDs) that, after controlling for age, added more prognostic information than other standard risk factors and common HRV metrics, including, to our surprise, the PVC count and the HRV of normal-to-normal intervals. Addition of the LDs to a predictive model using standard risk factors significantly increased the ROC area and the net reclassification improvement was 27%. We conclude that abnormal local dynamics of heart rate confer adverse prognosis in patients undergoing 24-h ambulatory electrocardiography. PMID:25229393

  14. Maximizing T2-exchange in Dy3+DOTA-(amide)X chelates: Fine-tuning the water molecule exchange rate for enhanced T2 contrast in MRI

    PubMed Central

    Soesbe, Todd C.; Ratnakar, S. James; Milne, Mark; Zhang, Shanrong; Do, Quyen N.; Kovacs, Zoltan; Sherry, A. Dean

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The water molecule exchange rates in a series of DyDOTA-(amide)X chelates were fine-tuned to maximize the effects of T2-exchange line broadening and improve T2 contrast. Methods Four DyDOTA-(amide)X chelates having a variable number of glycinate side-arms were prepared and characterized as T2-exchange agents. The non-exchanging DyTETA chelate was also used to measure the bulk water T2 reduction due solely to T2*. The total transverse relaxivity (r2tot) at 22, 37, and 52 °C for each chelate was measured in vitro at 9.4 T (400 MHz) by fitting plots of total T2−1 versus concentration. The water molecule exchange rates for each complex were measured by fitting 17O line-width versus temperature data taken at 9.4 T (54.3 MHz). Results The measured transverse relaxivities due to water molecule exchange (r2ex) and bound water lifetimes (τM) were in excellent agreement with Swift-Connick theory, with DyDOTA-(gly)3 giving the largest r2ex = 11.8 s−1 mM−1 at 37 °C. Conclusion By fine-tuning the water molecule exchange rate at 37 °C, the transverse relaxivity has been increased by 2 to 30 times compared to previously studied Dy3+-based chelates. Polymerization or dendrimerization of the optimal chelate could yield a highly sensitive, molecule-sized T2 contrast agent for improved molecular imaging applications. PMID:24390729

  15. Distribution and variability of the 24-h average air exchange rates and interzonal flow rates in 26 Japanese residences in 5 seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Naohide; Kataoka, Toshiyuki; Takamine, Koichi; Gamo, Masashi

    2011-07-01

    In this study, to evaluate the distribution of air exchange rates in Japan, daily, seasonal, and inter-residence variabilities were determined as well as the air exchange rate itself. In addition, airflows among multiple zones were also evaluated. For this purpose, the 24 h average air exchange rates and interzonal air flow rates were measured using a passive perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) method with three kinds of tracer gases for 1 week in three rooms of 26 Japanese residences over five seasons: summer and autumn of 2005, and winter, spring, and summer of 2006. During these seasons, the weekly average air exchange rates were found to be 1.6 ± 1.7, 0.58 ± 0.94, 0.61 ± 0.93, 1.2 ± 2.5, and 1.7 ± 1.8 h -1, respectively. Two-way repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that the air exchange rates differed significantly with respect to the seasons, residences, and interaction of seasons and residences ( p < 0.01). In addition, the air exchange rates in both summers and spring were statistically higher than those in autumn and winter (Sheffe test, p < 0.01). According to the ANOVA, the percentage contribution of inter-residence variability, seasonal variability, interaction of seasonal and inter-residence variabilities, and daily variability to the total variability of the 24 h average air exchange rates in the present survey was 51%, 44%, 3.7%, and 1.0%, respectively.

  16. On The Temporal Dynamics Of Coupled Water And Carbon Exchange: Implications For Predictions Over Meteorological And Climate Time Scales.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albertson, J. D.; Williams, C. A.; Scanlon, T. M.

    2002-12-01

    Short term water and carbon exchanges between vegetation and the atmosphere are strongly coupled through the stomatal function of plants. These high-frequency exchange rates are modulated by the lower-frequency variability in vegetation cover, as it responds to changes in forcing, such as water availability, across a range of time scales. Furthermore, the relative fractions of the dominant plant functional groups on the landscape possess different sensitivities and strategies (i.e. niches) with respect to environmental variables. An example of this is the classical difference in rooting depth (reservoir size) and wilting points of herbaceous and woody vegetation. Therefore, low frequency changes in the vegetation structure have clear mechanistic impacts on the functional behavior of the landscape in the context of water and carbon cycling. In this talk we highlight the interplay between functional dynamics and structural dynamics, with a focus on water and carbon exchange in a semi-arid context. We explore field data and remotely sensed data collected along the Kalahari Transect in southern Africa to gain insights into the processes and there effects on diurnal, inter-storm, seasonal, and inter-annual time scales. In particular, we highlight the hydrological implications of the contrasting frequency response of grasses and woody vegetation in water-limited systems.

  17. On the temporal dynamics of coupled water and carbon exchange: implications for predictions over meteorological and climate time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albertson, J.; Scanlon, T.; Williams, C.

    2003-04-01

    Short term water and carbon exchanges between vegetation and the atmosphere are strongly coupled through the stomatal function of plants. These high-frequency exchange rates are modulated by the lower-frequency variability in vegetation cover, as it responds to changes in forcing, such as water availability, across a range of time scales. Furthermore, the relative fractions of the dominant plant functional groups on the landscape possess different sensitivities and strategies (i.e. niches) with respect to environmental variables. An example of this is the classical difference in rooting depth (reservoir size) and wilting points of herbaceous and woody vegetation. Therefore, low frequency changes in the vegetation structure have clear mechanistic impacts on the functional behavior of the landscape in the context of water and carbon cycling. In this talk we highlight the interplay between functional dynamics and structural dynamics, with a focus on water and carbon exchange in a semi-arid context. We explore field data and remotely sensed data collected along the Kalahari Transect in southern Africa to gain insights into the processes and there effects on diurnal, inter-storm, seasonal, and inter-annual time scales. In particular, we highlight the hydrological implications of the contrasting frequency response of grasses and woody vegetation in water-limited systems.

  18. Upper limit on the rate constant for isotope exchange between molecular oxygen and ozone at 298 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, S. M.; Morton, J.; Mauersberger, K.

    1987-01-01

    The gas phase bimolecular isotope exchange reaction between molecular oxygen and ozone has been investigated directly for the first time. Its rate coefficient is found to be less than 2 x 10 to the -25th cu cm/sec at 298 K, over six orders of magnitude below recent estimates. Much faster exchange was observed over condensed ozone at 77 K, suggesting isotopic scrambling is catalyzed under these conditions. The low rate coefficient implies that homogeneous exchange between ground state oxygen and ozone molecules cannot play a significant role in heavy ozone chemistry.

  19. Transfer Rate Edited experiment for the selective detection of Chemical Exchange via Saturation Transfer (TRE-CEST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Joshua I.; Xia, Ding; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Jerschow, Alexej

    2015-07-01

    Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) magnetic resonance experiments have become valuable tools in magnetic resonance for the detection of low concentration solutes with far greater sensitivity than direct detection methods. Accurate measures of rates of chemical exchange provided by CEST are of particular interest to biomedical imaging communities where variations in chemical exchange can be related to subtle variations in biomarker concentration, temperature and pH within tissues using MRI. Despite their name, however, traditional CEST methods are not truly selective for chemical exchange and instead detect all forms of magnetization transfer including through-space NOE. This ambiguity crowds CEST spectra and greatly complicates subsequent data analysis. We have developed a Transfer Rate Edited CEST experiment (TRE-CEST) that uses two different types of solute labeling in order to selectively amplify signals of rapidly exchanging proton species while simultaneously suppressing 'slower' NOE-dominated magnetization transfer processes. This approach is demonstrated in the context of both NMR and MRI, where it is used to detect the labile amide protons of proteins undergoing chemical exchange (at rates ⩾ 30 s-1) while simultaneously eliminating signals originating from slower (∼5 s-1) NOE-mediated magnetization transfer processes. TRE-CEST greatly expands the utility of CEST experiments in complex systems, and in-vivo, in particular, where it is expected to improve the quantification of chemical exchange and magnetization transfer rates while enabling new forms of imaging contrast.

  20. Measurements of soil and canopy exchange rates in the Amazon rain forest using sup 222 Rn

    SciTech Connect

    Trumbore, S.E. Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, Palisades, NY ); Keller, M. ); Wofsy, S.C. ); Da Costa, J.M. )

    1990-09-20

    Measurements of the emission of {sup 222}Rn from Amazon forest soils, and profiles of {sup 222}Rn in air were used to study the ventilation of the soil atmosphere and the nocturnal forest canopy. The emission of {sup 222}Rn from the yellow clay soils dominant in the study area averaged 0.38 {plus minus} 0.07 atom cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. Nearby sand soils had similar fluxes, averaging 0.30 {plus minus} 0.07 atom cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The effective diffusivity in the clay soil (0.008 {plus minus} 0.004 cm{sup 2} s{sup {minus}1}), was lower than that for the sand soil (0.033 {plus minus} 0.030 cm{sup 2} s{sup {minus}1}). Profiles of {sup 222}Rn and CO{sub 2} in air showed steepest concentration gradients in the layer between 0 and 3 m above the soil surface. Aerodynamic resistances calculated for this layer from {sup 222}Rn and CO{sub 2} varied from 1.6 to 18 s cm{sup {minus}1}, with greater resistance during the afternoon than at night. Time averaged profiles of {sup 222}Rn in the forest canopy measured during the evening and night were combined with the soil flux measurements to compute the resistance of the subcanopy to exchange with overlying air. The integrated nocturnal rate of gas exchange between the canopy layer (0 to 41 m) and overlying atmosphere based on {sup 222}Rn averaged 0.33 {plus minus} 0.15 cm s{sup {minus}1}. An independent estimate of gas exchange, based on 13 nights of CO{sub 2} profiles, averaged 0.21 {plus minus} 0.40 cm s{sup {minus}1}. These exchange rates correspond to flushing times for the 41 m canopy layer of 3.4 and 5.5 hours, respectively. Comparison of {sup 222}Rn and CO{sub 2} profiles show that the nocturnal production of CO{sub 2} by above-ground vegetation was about 20% of the soil emission source, consistent with data from eddy-correlation experiments.

  1. Tungsten polyoxometalate molecules as active nodes for dynamic carrier exchange in hybrid molecular/semiconductor capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Balliou, A.; Douvas, A. M.; Normand, P.; Argitis, P.; Glezos, N.; Tsikritzis, D.; Kennou, S.

    2014-10-14

    In this work we study the utilization of molecular transition metal oxides known as polyoxometalates (POMs), in particular the Keggin structure anions of the formula PW₁₂O₄₀³⁻, as active nodes for potential switching and/or fast writing memory applications. The active molecules are being integrated in hybrid Metal-Insulator/POM molecules-Semiconductor capacitors, which serve as prototypes allowing investigation of critical performance characteristics towards the design of more sophisticated devices. The charging ability as well as the electronic structure of the molecular layer is probed by means of electrical characterization, namely, capacitance-voltage and current-voltage measurements, as well as transient capacitance measurements, C (t), under step voltage polarization. It is argued that the transient current peaks observed are manifestations of dynamic carrier exchange between the gate electrode and specific molecular levels, while the transient C (t) curves under conditions of molecular charging can supply information for the rate of change of the charge that is being trapped and de-trapped within the molecular layer. Structural characterization via surface and cross sectional scanning electron microscopy as well as atomic force microscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, UV and Fourier-transform IR spectroscopies, UPS, and XPS contribute to the extraction of accurate electronic structure characteristics and open the path for the design of new devices with on-demand tuning of their interfacial properties via the controlled preparation of the POM layer.

  2. Is the surface oxygen exchange rate linked to bulk ion diffusivity in mixed conducting Ruddlesden–Popper phases?

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tomkiewicz, Alex C.; Tamimi, Mazin A.; Huq, Ashfia; McIntosh, Steven

    2015-03-02

    There is a possible link between oxygen surface exchange rate and bulk oxygen anion diffusivity in mixed ionic and electronic conducting oxides; it is a topic of great interest and debate. While a large body of experimental evidence and theoretical analyses support a link, observed differences between bulk and surface composition of these materials are hard to reconcile with this observation. This is further compounded by potential problems with simultaneous measurement of both parameters. Here we utilize separate techniques, in situ neutron diffraction and pulsed isotopic surface exchange, to examine bulk ion mobility and surface oxygen exchange rates of threemore » Ruddlesden-Popper phases, general form An-1A2'BnO3n+1, An-1A2'BnX3n+1; LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ (n = 1), La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ (n = 2) and LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ (n = 3). These measurements are complemented by surface composition determination via high sensitivity-low energy ion scattering. We observe a correlation between bulk ion mobility and surface exchange rate between materials. The surface exchange rates vary by more than one order of magnitude with high anion mobility in the bulk of an oxygen vacancy-rich n = 2 Ruddlesden-Popper material correlating with rapid oxygen exchange. Furthermore this is in contrast with the similar surface exchange rates which we may expect due to similar surface compositions across all three samples. This paper conclude that experimental limitations lead to inherent convolution of surface and bulk rates, and that surface exchange steps are not likely to be rate limiting in oxygen incorporation.« less

  3. Structure-dynamic basis of splicing-dependent regulation in tissue-specific variants of the sodium-calcium exchanger.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su Youn; Giladi, Moshe; Bohbot, Hilla; Hiller, Reuben; Chung, Ka Young; Khananshvili, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Tissue-specific splice variants of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers contain 2 Ca(2+)-binding regulatory domains (CBDs), CBD1 and CBD2. Ca(2+) interaction with CBD1 activates sodium-calcium exchangers (NCXs), and Ca(2+) binding to CBD2 alleviates Na(+)-dependent inactivation. A combination of mutually exclusive (A, B) and cassette (C-F) exons in CBD2 raises functionally diverse splice variants through unknown mechanisms. Here, the effect of exons on CBDs backbone dynamics were investigated in the 2-domain tandem (CBD12) of the brain, kidney, and cardiac splice variants by using hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and stopped-flow techniques. Mutually exclusive exons stabilize interdomain interactions in the apoprotein, which primarily predefines the extent of responses to Ca(2+) binding. Deuterium uptake levels were up to 20% lower in the cardiac vs. the brain CBD12, reveling that elongation of the CBD2 FG loop by cassette exons rigidifies the interdomain Ca(2+) salt bridge at the 2-domain interface, which secondarily modulates the Ca(2+)-bound states. In matching splice variants, the extent of Ca(2+)-induced rigidification correlates with decreased (up to 10-fold) Ca(2+) off rates, where the cardiac CBD12 exhibits the slowest Ca(2+) off rates. Collectively, structurally disordered/dynamic segments at mutually exclusive and cassette exons have local and distant effects on the folded structures nearby the Ca(2+) binding sites, which may serve as a structure-dynamic basis for splicing-dependent regulation of NCX. PMID:26644350

  4. Dynamic UltraFast 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (UF-EXSY) of hyperpolarized substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon Swisher, Christine; Koelsch, Bertram; Sukumar, Subramianam; Sriram, Renuka; Santos, Romelyn Delos; Wang, Zhen Jane; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel; Larson, Peder

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we present a new ultrafast method for acquiring dynamic 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (EXSY) within a single acquisition. This technique reconstructs two-dimensional EXSY spectra from one-dimensional spectra based on the phase accrual during echo times. The Ultrafast-EXSY acquisition overcomes long acquisition times typically needed to acquire 2D NMR data by utilizing sparsity and phase dependence to dramatically undersample in the indirect time dimension. This allows for the acquisition of the 2D spectrum within a single shot. We have validated this method in simulations and hyperpolarized enzyme assay experiments separating the dehydration of pyruvate and lactate-to-pyruvate conversion. In a renal cell carcinoma cell (RCC) line, bidirectional exchange was observed. This new technique revealed decreased conversion of lactate-to-pyruvate with high expression of monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), known to correlate with aggressive cancer phenotypes. We also showed feasibility of this technique in vivo in a RCC model where bidirectional exchange was observed for pyruvate-lactate, pyruvate-alanine, and pyruvate-hydrate and were resolved in time. Broadly, the technique is well suited to investigate the dynamics of multiple exchange pathways and applicable to hyperpolarized substrates where chemical exchange has shown great promise across a range of disciplines.

  5. Dynamic UltraFast 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (UF-EXSY) of hyperpolarized substrates

    PubMed Central

    Swisher, Christine Leon; Koelsch, Bertram; Sukumar, Subramianam; Sriram, Renuka; Santos, Romelyn Delos; Wang, Zhen Jane; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel; Larson, Peder

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present a new ultrafast method for acquiring dynamic 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (EXSY) within a single acquisition. This technique reconstructs two-dimensional EXSY spectra from one-dimensional spectra based on the phase accrual during echo times. The Ultrafast-EXSY acquisition overcomes long acquisition times typically needed to acquire 2D NMR data by utilizing sparsity and phase dependence to dramatically undersample in the indirect time dimension. This allows for the acquisition of the 2D spectrum within a single shot. We have validated this method in simulations and hyperpolarized enzyme assay experiments separating the dehydration of pyruvate and lactate-to-pyruvate conversion. In a renal cell carcinoma cell (RCC) line, bidirectional exchange was observed. This new technique revealed decreased conversion of lactate-to-pyruvate with high expression of monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), known to correlate with aggressive cancer phenotypes. We also showed feasibility of this technique in vivo in a RCC model where bidirectional exchange was observed for pyruvate–lactate, pyruvate–alanine, and pyruvate–hydrate and were resolved in time. Broadly, the technique is well suited to investigate the dynamics of multiple exchange pathways and applicable to hyperpolarized substrates where chemical exchange has shown great promise across a range of disciplines. PMID:26117655

  6. Environmental variation, vegetation distribution, carbon dynamics and water/energy exchange at high latitudes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGuire, A.D.; Wirth, C.; Apps, M.; Beringer, J.; Clein, J.; Epstein, H.; Kicklighter, D.W.; Bhatti, J.; Chapin, F. S., III; De Groot, B.; Efremov, D.; Eugster, W.; Fukuda, M.; Gower, T.; Hinzman, L.; Huntley, B.; Jia, G.J.; Kasischke, E.; Melillo, J.; Romanovsky, V.; Shvidenko, A.; Vaganov, E.; Walker, D.

    2002-01-01

    The responses of high latitude ecosystems to global change involve complex interactions among environmental variables, vegetation distribution, carbon dynamics, and water and energy exchange. These responses may have important consequences for the earth system. In this study, we evaluated how vegetation distribution, carbon stocks and turnover, and water and energy exchange are related to environmental variation spanned by the network of the IGBP high latitude transects. While the most notable feature of the high latitude transects is that they generally span temperature gradients from southern to northern latitudes, there are substantial differences in temperature among the transects. Also, along each transect temperature co-varies with precipitation and photosynthetically active radiation, which are also variable among the transects. Both climate and disturbance interact to influence latitudinal patterns of vegetation and soil carbon storage among the transects, and vegetation distribution appears to interact with climate to determine exchanges of heat and moisture in high latitudes. Despite limitations imposed by the data we assembled, the analyses in this study have taken an important step toward clarifying the complexity of interactions among environmental variables, vegetation distribution, carbon stocks and turnover, and water and energy exchange in high latitude regions. This study reveals the need to conduct coordinated global change studies in high latitudes to further elucidate how interactions among climate, disturbance, and vegetation distribution influence carbon dynamics and water and energy exchange in high latitudes.

  7. On the use of a weak-coupling thermostat in replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhixiong; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F.

    2015-07-01

    In a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, various thermostat algorithms, including Langevin dynamics (LD), Nosé-Hoover (NH), and weak-coupling (WC) thermostats, can be used to keep the simulation temperature constant. A canonical ensemble is generated by the use of LD and NH, while the nature of the ensemble produced by WC has not yet been identified. A few years ago, it was shown that when using a WC thermostat with particular values of the temperature coupling time for liquid water at ambient temperature and pressure, the distribution of the potential energy is less wide than the canonical one. This led to an artifact in temperature replica-exchange molecular dynamics (T-REMD) simulations in which the potential energy distributions appear not to be equal to the ones of standard MD simulations. In this paper, we re-investigate this problem. We show that this artifact is probably due to the ensemble generated by WC being incompatible with the T-REMD replica-exchange criterion, which assumes a canonical configurational ensemble. We also show, however, that this artifact can be reduced or even eliminated by particular choices of the temperature coupling time of WC and the replica-exchange time period of T-REMD, i.e., when the temperature coupling time is chosen very close to the MD time step or when the exchange time period is chosen large enough. An attempt to develop a T-REMD replica-exchange criterion which is likely to be more compatible with the WC configurational ensemble is reported. Furthermore, an exchange criterion which is compatible with a microcanonical ensemble is used in total energy REMD simulations.

  8. Amide proton exchange rates of a bound pepsin inhibitor determined by isotope-edited proton NMR experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fesik, S.W.; Luly, J.R.; Stein, H.H.; BaMaung, N.

    1987-09-30

    From a series of isotope-edited proton NMR spectra, amide proton exchange rates were measured at 20 C, 30 C, and 40/sup 0/C for a tightly bound /sup 15/N-labeled tripeptide inhibitor of porcine pepsin (IC50 = 1.7 X 10(-) M). Markedly different NH exchange rates were observed for the three amide protons of the bound inhibitor. The P1 NH exchanged much more slowly than the P2 NH and P3 NH. These results are discussed in terms of the relative solvent accessibility in the active site and the role of the NH protons of the inhibitor for hydrogen bonding to the enzyme. In this study a useful approach is demonstrated for obtaining NH exchange rates on ligands bound to biomacromolecules, the knowledge of which could be of potential utility in the design of therapeutically useful nonpeptide enzyme inhibitors from peptide leads.

  9. Charge-exchange reactions and electron-capture rates for presupernova stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zegers, Remco

    2015-04-01

    Weak reaction rates such as electron captures and beta decays play major roles in a variety of astrophysical phenomena, such as core-collapse and thermonuclear supernovae and accreting neutron stars. Consequently, the use of accurate weak reaction rates in astrophysical simulations to understand these phenomena is important. Unfortunately, the number of relevant nuclei is typically very large, and, except for a few special cases, it is impossible to rely on experimental results only: theoretical models must be used to estimate the weak reaction rates. These models can then be benchmarked and improved on the basis of a limited number of experimental data. The most important nuclear structure input that is required for calculating weak reaction rates are Gamow-Teller transition strengths. Although these can be extracted from beta and electron-capture decay data, the energy window accessible by such experiments is limited, if accessible at all. However, at the high temperatures and densities that occur in massive stars prior to the cataclysmic demise, transitions to final states at high excitation energies are important. In addition, to properly test theory, full Gamow-Teller transition strength distributions are very valuable. Fortunately, nature is kind: charge-exchange experiments at intermediate energies can provide the relevant strength distributions over a wide energy window and a variety of charge-exchange probes, such as (p,n), (n,p), (d,2 He) and (t,3 He) have been used to extract strengths of relevance for astrophysics (and for other purposes). This presentation will focus on efforts to validate electron capture rates calculated based on nuclear structure models for nuclei with masses ranging from A ~ 40-65, and on studies aimed at testing astrophysical sensitivities to uncertainties/deviations in the theoretical rates. These efforts include experiments with unstable isotopes, and special gamma-ray coincidence techniques to localize very weak, but

  10. Competition between abstraction and exchange channels in H + HCN reaction: Full-dimensional quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua

    2013-12-14

    Dynamics of the title reaction is investigated on an ab initio based potential energy surface using a full-dimensional quantum wave packet method within the centrifugal sudden approximation. It is shown that the reaction between H and HCN leads to both the hydrogen exchange and hydrogen abstraction channels. The exchange channel has a lower threshold and larger cross section than the abstraction channel. It also has more oscillations due apparently to quantum resonances. Both channels are affected by long-lived resonances supported by potential wells. Comparison with experimental cross sections indicates underestimation of the abstraction barrier height.

  11. Asymmetry in the static and dynamic magnetic properties of a weak exchange spring trilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubbiotti, G.; Carlotti, G.; Weston, J.; Zangari, G.; Crew, D. C.; Stamps, R. L.

    2005-02-01

    Experimental results and theoretical calculations are presented for the static and dynamic magnetic properties of a weak exchange-spring symmetric FeTaN/FeSm/FeTaN trilayer. Static properties were investigated by means of alternating gradient field and magneto-optic Kerr effect magnetometries. The frequencies of three spin wave modes were measured by inelastic light scattering from long wavelength thermal spin waves. The combined analysis of spin wave frequencies and magnetometry data provides a consistent set of exchange, anisotropy and film thickness parameters.

  12. Initial rate and isotope exchange studies of rat skeletal muscle hexokinase

    SciTech Connect

    Ganson, N.J.; Fromm, H.J.

    1985-10-05

    The kinetic mechanism of rat skeletal muscle hexokinase (hexokinase II) was investigated in light of a proposal by Cornish-Bowden and his co-workers. The authors investigated the mechanism of action of hexokinase II by studying initial rate kinetics in the nonphysiological direction and by isotope exchange at chemical equilibrium. The former experiments were carried out in the absence of inhibitors and then with AMP, which is a competitive inhibitor of ADP, and with glucose 1,6-bisphosphate, a competitive inhibitor of glucose-6-P. The findings from these experiments suggest that the kinetic mechanism is rapid equilibrium Random Bi Bi. Isotope exchange at equilibrium studies also supports the random nature of the muscle hexokinase reaction; however, they also suggest that the mechanism is partially ordered, i.e. there is a preferred pathway associated with the branched mechanism. Approximately two-thirds of the flux through the hexokinase reaction involves the glucose on first glucose-6-P off last branch of the Random Bi Bi mechanism. These results imply that the kinetic mechanism is steady state Random Bi Bi. There is some evidence to suggest that glucose-6-P binds to an allosteric site on muscle hexokinase, but none to suppose that ATP binds allosterically.

  13. Amide proton exchange rates of oxidized and reduced Saccharomyces cerevisiae iso-1-cytochrome c.

    PubMed Central

    Marmorino, J. L.; Auld, D. S.; Betz, S. F.; Doyle, D. F.; Young, G. B.; Pielak, G. J.

    1993-01-01

    Proton NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the rate constant, kobs, for exchange of labile protons in both oxidized (Fe(III)) and reduced (Fe(II)) iso-1-cytochrome c. We find that slowly exchanging backbone amide protons tend to lack solvent-accessible surface area, possess backbone hydrogen bonds, and are present in regions of regular secondary structure as well as in omega-loops. Furthermore, there is no correlation between kobs and the distance from a backbone amide nitrogen to the nearest solvent-accessible atom. These observations are consistent with the local unfolding model. Comparisons of the free energy change for denaturation, delta Gd, at 298 K to the free energy change for local unfolding, delta Gop, at 298 K for the oxidized protein suggest that certain conformations possessing higher free energy than the denatured state are detected at equilibrium. Reduction of the protein results in a general increase in delta Gop. Comparisons of delta Gd to delta Gop for the reduced protein show that the most open states of the reduced protein possess more structure than its chemically denatured form. This persistent structure in high-energy conformations of the reduced form appears to involve the axially coordinated heme. PMID:8268806

  14. Effects of flooding on ion exchange rates in an Upper Mississippi River floodplain forest impacted by herbivory, invasion, and restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kreiling, Rebecca; DeJager, Nathan R.; Whitney Swanson; Eric A. Strauss; Meredith Thomsen

    2015-01-01

    We examined effects of flooding on supply rates of 14 nutrients in floodplain areas invaded by Phalaris arundinacea (reed canarygrass), areas restored to young successional forests (browsed by white-tailed deer and unbrowsed), and remnant mature forests in the Upper Mississippi River floodplain. Plant Root Simulator ion-exchange probes were deployed for four separate 28-day periods. The first deployment occurred during flooded conditions, while the three subsequent deployments were conducted during progressively drier periods. Time after flooding corresponded with increases in NO3 −-N, K+ and Zn+2, decreases in H2PO4 −-P, Fe+3, Mn+2, and B(OH)4-B, a decrease followed by an increase in NH4 +-N, Ca+2, Mg+2 and Al+3, and an increase followed by a decrease for SO4 −2-S. Plant community type had weak to no effects on nutrient supply rates compared to the stronger effects of flooding duration. Our results suggest that seasonal dynamics in floodplain nutrient availability are similarly driven by flood pulses in different community types. However, reed canarygrass invasion has potential to increase availability of some nutrients, while restoration of forest cover may promote recovery of nutrient availability to that observed in reference mature forests.

  15. Improved measurement of labile proton concentration-weighted chemical exchange rate (kws) with experimental factor-compensated and T1-normalized quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Renhua; Liu, Charng-Ming; Liu, Philip K; Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2012-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI enables measurement of dilute CEST agents and microenvironment properties such as pH and temperature, holding great promise for in vivo applications. However, because of confounding concomitant RF irradiation and relaxation effects, the CEST-weighted MRI contrast may not fully characterize the underlying CEST phenomenon. We postulated that the accuracy of quantitative CEST MRI could be improved if the experimental factors (labeling efficiency and RF spillover effect) were estimated and taken into account. Specifically, the experimental factor was evaluated as a function of exchange rate and CEST agent concentration ratio, which remained relatively constant for intermediate RF irradiation power levels. Hence, the experimental factors can be calculated based on the reasonably estimated exchange rate and labile proton concentration ratio, which significantly improved quantification. The simulation was confirmed with Creatine phantoms of serially varied concentration titrated to the same pH, whose reverse exchange rate (kws) was found to be linearly correlated with the concentration. In summary, the proposed solution provides simplified yet reasonably accurate quantification of the underlying CEST system, which may help guide the ongoing development of quantitative CEST MRI. PMID:22649044

  16. Multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis on gold, crude oil and foreign exchange rate time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Mayukha; Madhusudana Rao, P.; Manimaran, P.

    2014-12-01

    We apply the recently developed multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis method to investigate the cross-correlation behavior and fractal nature between two non-stationary time series. We analyze the daily return price of gold, West Texas Intermediate and Brent crude oil, foreign exchange rate data, over a period of 18 years. The cross correlation has been measured from the Hurst scaling exponents and the singularity spectrum quantitatively. From the results, the existence of multifractal cross-correlation between all of these time series is found. We also found that the cross correlation between gold and oil prices possess uncorrelated behavior and the remaining bivariate time series possess persistent behavior. It was observed for five bivariate series that the cross-correlation exponents are less than the calculated average generalized Hurst exponents (GHE) for q<0 and greater than GHE when q>0 and for one bivariate series the cross-correlation exponent is greater than GHE for all q values.

  17. Table 5.1. Exchange current densities and rate constants in aqueous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holze, R.

    This document is part of Volume 9 `Electrochemistry', Subvolume A, of Landolt-Börnstein - Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. This document lists the exchange current densities and the electrode reaction rate constants of the following metallic electrodes in aqueous systems for various electrolyte reactions: silver (Ag), aluminium (Al), gold (Au), bismuth (Bi), carbon (C), cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), cesium (Cs), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), gallium (Ga), mercury (Hg), indium (In), iridium (Ir), potassium (K), lithium (Li), molybdenum (Mo), natrium (Na), niobium (Nb), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), palladium (Pd), platinum (Pt), rubidium (Rb), rhodium (Rh), ruthenium (Ru), antimony (Sb), tin (Sn), tantalum (Ta), titanium (Ti), thallium (Tl), vanadium (V), tungsten (W), zinc (Zn). For each electrolyte reaction the electrolyte solution, the educt, product and concentration are specified along with the temperature of determination of the given values.

  18. Two-component mixture model: Application to palm oil and exchange rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phoong, Seuk-Yen; Ismail, Mohd Tahir; Hamzah, Firdaus Mohamad

    2014-12-01

    Palm oil is a seed crop which is widely adopt for food and non-food products such as cookie, vegetable oil, cosmetics, household products and others. Palm oil is majority growth in Malaysia and Indonesia. However, the demand for palm oil is getting growth and rapidly running out over the years. This phenomenal cause illegal logging of trees and destroy the natural habitat. Hence, the present paper investigates the relationship between exchange rate and palm oil price in Malaysia by using Maximum Likelihood Estimation via Newton-Raphson algorithm to fit a two components mixture model. Besides, this paper proposes a mixture of normal distribution to accommodate with asymmetry characteristics and platykurtic time series data.

  19. Bioaccessibility of metal cations in soil is linearly related to its water exchange rate constant.

    PubMed

    Laird, Brian D; Peak, Derek; Siciliano, Steven D

    2011-05-01

    Site-specific risk assessments often incorporate the concepts of bioaccessibility (i.e., contaminant fraction released into gastrointestinal fluids) or bioavailability (i.e., contaminant fraction absorbed into systemic circulation) into the calculation of ingestion exposure. We evaluated total and bioaccessible metal concentrations for 19 soil samples under simulated stomach and duodenal conditions using an in vitro gastrointestinal model. We demonstrated that the median bioaccessibility of 23 metals ranged between <1 and 41% under simulated stomach conditions and < 1 and 63% under simulated duodenal conditions. Notably, these large differences in metal bioaccessibility were independent of equilibrium solubility and stability constants. Instead, the relationship (stomach phase R = 0.927; duodenum phase R = 0.891) between bioaccessibility and water exchange rates of metal cations (k(H₂O)) indicated that desorption kinetics may influence if not control metal bioaccessibility. PMID:21466150

  20. Simulation of ceramics fracture due to high rate dynamic impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazarinov, N. A.; Bratov, V. A.; Petrov, Y. V.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper dynamic fracture process due to high-speed impact of steel plunger into ceramic sample is simulated. The developed numerical model is based on finite element method and a concept of incubation time criterion, which is proven applicable in order to predict brittle fracture under high-rate deformation. Simulations were performed for ZrO2(Y2O3) ceramic plates. To characterize fracture process quantitatively fracture surface area parameter is introduced and controlled. This parameter gives the area of new surface created during dynamic fracture of a sample and is essentially connected to energetic peculiarities of fracture process. Multiple simulations with various parameters made it possible to explore dependencies of fracture area on plunger velocity and material properties. Energy required to create unit of fracture area at fracture initiation (dynamic analogue of Griffith surface energy) was evaluated and was found to be an order of magnitude higher as comparing to its static value.

  1. Generalized rate-equation analysis of excitation exchange between silicon nanoclusters and erbium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, A. J.; Wojdak, M.; Ahmad, I.; Loh, W. H.; Oton, C. J.

    2008-01-15

    We discuss the use of rate equations to analyze the sensitization of erbium luminescence by silicon nanoclusters. In applying the general form of second-order coupled rate-equations to the Si nanocluster-erbium system, we find that the photoluminescence dynamics cannot be described using a simple rate equation model. Both rise and fall times exhibit a stretched exponential behavior, which we propose arises from a combination of a strongly distance-dependent nanocluster-erbium interaction, along with the finite size distribution and indirect band gap of the silicon nanoclusters. Furthermore, the low fraction of erbium ions that can be excited nonresonantly is a result of the small number of ions coupled to nanoclusters.

  2. Heart rate dynamics preceding hemorrhage in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Moss, Travis J; Clark, Matthew T; Lake, Douglas E; Moorman, J Randall; Calland, J Forrest

    2015-01-01

    Occult hemorrhage in surgical/trauma intensive care unit (STICU) patients is common and may lead to circulatory collapse. Continuous electrocardiography (ECG) monitoring may allow for early identification and treatment, and could improve outcomes. We studied 4,259 consecutive admissions to the STICU at the University of Virginia Health System. We collected ECG waveform data captured by bedside monitors and calculated linear and non-linear measures of the RR interbeat intervals. We tested the hypothesis that a transfusion requirement of 3 or more PRBC transfusions in a 24 hour period is preceded by dynamical changes in these heart rate measures and performed logistic regression modeling. We identified 308 hemorrhage events. A multivariate model including heart rate, standard deviation of the RR intervals, detrended fluctuation analysis, and local dynamics density had a C-statistic of 0.62. Earlier detection of hemorrhage might improve outcomes by allowing earlier resuscitation in STICU patients. PMID:26342251

  3. Rapid amide proton exchange rates in peptides and proteins measured by solvent quenching and two-dimensional NMR.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y. Z.; Paterson, Y.; Roder, H.

    1995-01-01

    In an effort to develop a more versatile quenched hydrogen exchange method for studies of peptide conformation and protein-ligand interactions, the mechanism of amide proton exchange for model peptides in DMSO-D2O mixtures was investigated by NMR methods. As in water, H-D exchange rates in the presence of 90% or 95% DMSO exhibit characteristic acid- and base-catalyzed processes and negligible water catalysis. However, the base-catalyzed rate is suppressed by as much as four orders of magnitude in 95% DMSO. As a result, the pH at which the exchange rate goes through a minimum is shifted up by about two pH units and the minimum exchange rate is approximately 100-fold reduced relative to that in D2O. The solvent-dependent decrease in base-catalyzed exchange rates can be attributed primarily to a large increase in pKa values for the NH group, whereas solvent effects on pKW seem less important. Addition of toluene and cyclohexane resulted in improved proton NMR chemical shift dispersion. The dramatic reduction in exchange rates observed in the solvent mixture at optimal pH makes it possible to apply 2D NMR for NH exchange measurements on peptides under conditions where rates are too rapid for direct NMR analysis. To test this solvent-quenching method, melittin was exchanged in D2O (pH 3.2, 12 degrees C), aliquots were quenched by rapid freezing, lyophilized, and dissolved in quenching buffer (70% DMSO, 25% toluene, 4% D2O, 1% cyclohexane, 75 mM dichloroacetic acid) for NMR analysis. Exchange rates for 21 amide protons were measured by recording 2D NMR spectra on a series of samples quenched at different times. The results are consistent with a monomeric unfolded conformation of melittin at acidic pH. The ability to trap labile protons by solvent quenching makes it possible to extend amide protection studies to peptide ligands or labile protons on the surface of a protein involved in macromolecular interactions. PMID:7613478

  4. New model describing the dynamical behaviour of penetration rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashiro, Tohru; Minagawa, Hiroe; Chiba, Michiko

    2013-02-01

    We propose a hierarchical logistic equation as a model to describe the dynamical behaviour of a penetration rate of a prevalent stuff. In this model, a memory, how many people who already possess it a person who does not process it yet met, is considered, which does not exist in the logistic model. As an application, we apply this model to iPod sales data, and find that this model can approximate the data much better than the logistic equation.

  5. Short-term and long-term effects of low total pressure on gas exchange rates of spinach.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, K; Kurata, K

    2003-01-01

    In this study, spinach plants were grown under atmospheric and low pressure conditions with constant O2 and CO2 partial pressures, and the effects of low total pressure on gas exchange rates were investigated. CO2 assimilation and transpiration rates of spinach grown under atmospheric pressure increased after short-term exposure to low total pressure due to the enhancement of leaf conductance. However, gas exchange rates of plants grown at 25 kPa total pressure were not greater than those grown at atmospheric pressure. Stomatal pore length and width were significantly smaller in leaves grown at low total pressure. This result suggested that gas exchange rates of plants grown under low total pressure were not stimulated even with the enhancement of gas diffusion because the stomatal size and stomatal aperture decreased. PMID:12580188

  6. Short-term and long-term effects of low total pressure on gas exchange rates of spinach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwabuchi, K.; Kurata, K.

    In this study, spinach plants were grown under atmospheric and low pressure conditions with constant O2 and CO2 partial pressures, and the effects of low total pressure on gas exchange rates were investigated. CO2 assimilation and transpiration rates of spinach grown under atmospheric pressure increased after short-term exposure to low total pressure due to the enhancement of leaf conductance. However, gas exchange rates of plants grown at 25 kPa total pressure were not greater than those grown at atmospheric pressure. Stomatal pore length and width were significantly smaller in leaves grown at low total pressure. This result suggested that gas exchange rates of plants grown under low total pressure were not stimulated even with the enhancement of gas diffusion because the stomatal size and stomatal aperture decreased.

  7. Removal Dynamics of Immunoglobulin and Fibrinogen by Conventional Plasma Exchange, Selective Plasma Exchange, and a Combination of the Two.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Satoko; Ohkubo, Atsushi; Seshima, Hiroshi; Maeda, Takuma; Itagaki, Ayako; Kurashima, Naoki; Iimori, Soichiro; Naito, Shotaro; Sohara, Eisei; Rai, Tatemitsu; Uchida, Shinichi; Okado, Tomokazu

    2016-08-01

    While plasma exchange (PE) can eliminate plasma proteins, including all immunoglobulin (Ig) and coagulation factors, selective plasma exchange (SePE) can retain fibrinogen (Fbg). Here, we investigated the removal dynamics of Ig and Fbg in 53 patients with immunological disorders by PE, SePE, and a combination of the two. When the mean processed plasma volume (PPV) was 0.9 plasma volume (PV), the mean percent reductions of Ig and Fbg by PE were both approximately 62%-65%. When the mean PPV was 1.1 PV, the mean percent reductions by SePE were 53.1% for IgG, 30.1% for IgA, 3.6% for IgM, and 19.0% for Fbg, respectively. In the three plasmapheresis sessions performed on alternate days, we classified treatments into three categories: PE group (PE-PE-PE, N = 2), SePE group (SePE-SePE-SePE, N = 14), and PE/SePE group (PE-SePE-SePE, N = 4). The mean percent reductions of IgG, IgA, IgM, and Fbg were 82.0%, 80.4%, 87.3%, and 80.9%, respectively, for the PE group; 76.4%, 57.7%, 43.3%, and 35.9%, respectively, for the PE/SePE group; and 75.4%, 50.6%, 3.2%, and 29.3%, respectively, for the SePE group. Plasmapheresis modalities can be combined according to clinical conditions, for instance, to achieve both the unspecific removal of pathogens by PE and retention of coagulation factors, such as Fbg, by SePE. PMID:27523073

  8. Dynamics of leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence and stem diameter changes during freezing and thawing of Scots pine seedlings.

    PubMed

    Lindfors, Lauri; Hölttä, Teemu; Lintunen, Anna; Porcar-Castell, Albert; Nikinmaa, Eero; Juurola, Eija

    2015-12-01

    Boreal trees experience repeated freeze-thaw cycles annually. While freezing has been extensively studied in trees, the dynamic responses occurring during the freezing and thawing remain poorly understood. At freezing and thawing, rapid changes take place in the water relations of living cells in needles and in stem. While freezing is mostly limited to extracellular spaces, living cells dehydrate, shrink and their osmotic concentration increases. We studied how the freezing-thawing dynamics reflected on leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence and xylem and living bark diameter changes of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) saplings in controlled experiments. Photosynthetic rate quickly declined following ice nucleation and extracellular freezing in xylem and needles, almost parallel to a rapid shrinking of xylem diameter, while that of living bark followed with a slightly longer delay. While xylem and living bark diameters responded well to decreasing temperature and water potential of ice, the relationship was less consistent in the case of increasing temperature. Xylem showed strong temporal swelling at thawing suggesting water movement from bark. After thawing xylem diameter recovered to a pre-freezing level but living bark remained shrunk. We found that freezing affected photosynthesis at multiple levels. The distinct dynamics of photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance reveals that the decreased photosynthetic rate reflects impaired dark reactions rather than stomatal closure. Freezing also inhibited the capacity of the light reactions to dissipate excess energy as heat, via non-photochemical quenching, whereas photochemical quenching of excitation energy decreased gradually with temperature in agreement with the gas exchange data. PMID:26423334

  9. On the accuracy of instantaneous gas exchange rates, energy expenditure, and respiratory quotient calculations obtained in indirect whole room calorimeter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper analyzes the accuracy of metabolic rate calculations performed in the whole room indirect calorimeter using the molar balance equations. The equations are treated from the point of view of cause-effect relationship where the gaseous exchange rates representing the unknown causes need to b...

  10. Dynamics of heat, water, and soluble gas exchange in the human airways: 1. A model study.

    PubMed

    Tsu, M E; Babb, A L; Ralph, D D; Hlastala, M P

    1988-01-01

    In order to provide a means for analysis of heat, water, and soluble gas exchange with the airways during tidal ventilation, a one dimensional theoretical model describing heat and water exchange in the respiratory airways has been extended to include soluble gas exchange with the airway mucosa and water exchange with the mucous layer lining the airways. Not only do heat, water, and gas exchange occur simultaneously, but they also interact. Heating and cooling of the airway surface and mucous lining affects both evaporative water and soluble gas exchange. Water evaporation provides a major source of heat exchange. The model-predicted mean airway temperature profiles agree well with literature data for both oral and nasal breathing validating that part of the model. With model parameters giving the best fit to experimental data, the model shows: (a) substantial heat recovery in the upper airways, (b) minimal respiratory heat and water loss, and (c) low average mucous temperatures and maximal increases in mucous thickness. For resting breathing of room air, heat and water conservation appear to be more important than conditioning efficiency. End-tidal expired partial pressures of very soluble gases eliminated by the lungs are predicted to be lower than the alveolar partial pressures due to the absorption of the expired gases by the airway mucosa. The model may be usable for design of experiments to examine mechanisms associated with the local hydration and dehydration dynamics of the mucosal surface, control of bronchial perfusion, triggering of asthma, mucociliary clearance and deposition of inhaled pollutant gases. PMID:3228218

  11. Exact-exchange time-dependent density-functional theory for static and dynamic polarizabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, So; Ivanov, Stanislav; Bartlett, Rodney J.; Grabowski, Ireneusz

    2005-03-01

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) employing the exact-exchange functional has been formulated on the basis of the optimized-effective-potential (OEP) method of Talman and Shadwick for second-order molecular properties and implemented into a Gaussian-basis-set, trial-vector algorithm. The only approximation involved, apart from the lack of correlation effects and the use of Gaussian-type basis functions, was the consistent use of the adiabatic approximation in the exchange kernel and in the linear response function. The static and dynamic polarizabilities and their anisotropy predicted by the TDDFT with exact exchange (TDOEP) agree accurately with the corresponding values from time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory, the exact-exchange counterpart in the wave function theory. The TDOEP is free from the nonphysical asymptotic decay of the exchange potential of most conventional density functionals or from any other manifestations of the incomplete cancellation of the self-interaction energy. The systematic overestimation of the absolute values and dispersion of polarizabilities that plagues most conventional TDDFT cannot be seen in the TDOEP.

  12. Kinetic bottlenecks to chemical exchange rates for deep-sea animals II: Carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, A. F.; Peltzer, E. T.; Brewer, P. G.

    2012-11-01

    Increased ocean acidification from fossil fuel CO2 invasion, from temperature-driven changes in respiration, and from possible leakage from sub-seabed geologic CO2 disposal has aroused concern over the impacts of elevated CO2 concentrations on marine life. Discussion of these impacts has so far focused only on changes in the oceanic bulk fluid properties (ΔpH, Δ[∑CO2] etc.) as the critical variable and with a major focus on carbonate shell dissolution. Here we describe the rate problem for animals that must export CO2 at about the same rate at which O2 is consumed. We analyze the basic properties controlling CO2 export within the diffusive boundary layer around marine animals in an ocean changing in temperature (T) and CO2 concentration in order to compare the challenges posed by O2 uptake under stress with the equivalent problem of CO2 expulsion. The problem is more complex than that for a non-reactive gas since, as with gas exchange of CO2 at the air-sea interface, the influence of the ensemble of reactions within the CO2-HCO3--CO32- acid-base system needs to be considered. These reactions significantly facilitate CO2 efflux compared to O2 intake at equal temperature, pressure and flow rate under typical oceanic concentrations.The effect of these reactions can be described by an enhancement factor. For organisms, this means mechanically increasing flow over their surface to thin the boundary layer as is required to alleviate O2 stress seems not necessary to facilitate CO2 efflux. Nevertheless the elevated pCO2 cost most likely is non-zero. Regionally as with O2 the combination of T, P, and pH/pCO2 creates a zone of maximum CO2 stress at around 1000 m depth. But the net result is that, for the problem of gas exchange with the bulk ocean, the combination of an increasing T combined with declining O2 poses a greater challenge to marine life than does increasing CO2. The relationships developed here allow a more accurate prediction of the impacts on marine life

  13. Influence of molecular packing and phospholipid type on rates of cholesterol exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Lund-Katz, S.; Laboda, H.M.; McLean, L.R.; Phillips, M.C.

    1986-05-01

    The rate-limiting step for transfer of cholesterol molecules between membranes and lipoproteins is desorption from the donor lipid-water interface. Cholesterol-phospholipid (PL) interactions influence this process so that at 50/sup 0/C the halftimes for transfer of (/sup 14/C)cholesterol from liquid-crystal, small unilamellar vesicles (SUV) containing 10 mol % cholesterol in egg phosphatidylcholine (PC), dipalmitoyl PC and egg or brain sphingomyelin (SM) are about 0.5, 3 and 5 h, respectively. The molecular packing in these cholesterol-PC mixtures has been investigated using (/sup 13/C)NMR and monolayer techniques. The relaxation times of the 4-(/sup 13/C)cholesterol nucleus in SUV of the above PL are essentially the same suggesting that the fast and slow molecular motions of the cholesterol molecules are similar in all bilayers. Comparison of surface pressure-molecular area isotherms of mixed cholesterol-PL monolayers indicates that the relative condensations of average PL molecular areas by cholesterol increase in the order unsaturated PC < saturated PC < SM. It follows that tighter molecular packing in the lipid-water interface correlates with a slower rate of cholesterol exchange. Because SM are generally more saturated than PC, increasing the SM/PC ratio increases the residence time of cholesterol molecules in a given PL environment. Such an effect is observed in human LDL compared to HDL.

  14. A high rate of telomeric sister chromatid exchange occurs in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia B-cells.

    PubMed

    Medves, Sandrine; Auchter, Morgan; Chambeau, Laetitia; Gazzo, Sophie; Poncet, Delphine; Grangier, Blandine; Verney, Aurélie; Moussay, Etienne; Ammerlaan, Wim; Brisou, Gabriel; Morjani, Hamid; Géli, Vincent; Palissot, Valérie; Berchem, Guy; Salles, Gilles; Wenner, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Cancer cells protect their telomere ends from erosion through reactivation of telomerase or by using the Alternative Lengthening of Telomere (ALT) mechanism that depends on homologous recombination. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) B cells are characterized by almost no telomerase activity, shelterin deregulation and telomere fusions. To characterize telomeric maintenance mechanisms in B-CLL patients, we measured their telomere length, telomerase expression and the main hallmarks of the ALT activity i.e. C-circle concentration, an extra-chromosomal telomere repeat (ECTR), and the level of telomeric sister chromatid exchange (T-SCE) rate. Patients showed relative homogenous telomere length although almost no TERT transcript and nearly no C-circle were evidenced. Nevertheless, compared with normal B cells, B-CLL cells showed an increase in T-SCE rate that was correlated with a strong down-regulation of the topoisomerase III alpha (TOP3A) expression, involved in the dissolution of Holliday Junctions (HJ), together with an increased expression of SLX1A, SLX4, MUS81 and GEN1, involved in the resolution of HJ. Altogether, our results suggest that the telomere maintenance mechanism of B-CLL cells do not preferentially use telomerase or ALT. Rather, the rupture of the dissolvasome/resolvasome balance may increase telomere shuffling that could homogenize telomere length, slowing telomere erosion in this disease. PMID:26970083

  15. Cr(3+) Binding to DNA Backbone Phosphate and Bases: Slow Ligand Exchange Rates and Metal Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenhu; Yu, Tianmeng; Vazin, Mahsa; Ding, Jinsong; Liu, Juewen

    2016-08-15

    The interaction between chromium ions and DNA is of great interest in inorganic chemistry, toxicology, and analytical chemistry. Most previous studies focused on in situ reduction of Cr(VI), producing Cr(3+) for DNA binding. Recently, Cr(3+) was reported to activate the Ce13d DNAzyme for RNA cleavage. Herein, the Ce13d is used to study two types of Cr(3+) and DNA interactions. First, Cr(3+) binds to the DNA phosphate backbone weakly through reversible electrostatic interactions, which is weakened by adding competing inorganic phosphate. However, Cr(3+) coordinates with DNA nucleobases forming stable cross-links that can survive denaturing gel electrophoresis condition. The binding of Cr(3+) to different nucleobases was further studied in terms of binding kinetics and affinity by exploiting carboxyfluorescein-labeled DNA homopolymers. Once binding takes place, the stable Cr(3+)/DNA complex cannot be dissociated by EDTA, attributable to the ultraslow ligand exchange rate of Cr(3+). The binding rate follows the order of G > C > T ≈ A. Finally, Cr(3+) gradually loses its DNA binding ability after being stored at neutral or high pH, attributable to hydrolysis. This hydrolysis can be reversed by lowering the pH. This work provides a deeper insight into the bioinorganic chemistry of Cr(3+) coordination with DNA, clarifies some inconsistency in the previous literature, and offers practically useful information for generating reproducible results. PMID:27478904

  16. Influence of magnesium sulfate on HCO3/Cl transmembrane exchange rate in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chernyshova, Ekaterina S; Zaikina, Yulia S; Tsvetovskaya, Galina A; Strokotov, Dmitry I; Yurkin, Maxim A; Serebrennikova, Elena S; Volkov, Leonid; Maltsev, Valeri P; Chernyshev, Andrei V

    2016-03-21

    Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) is widely used in medicine but molecular mechanisms of its protection through influence on erythrocytes are not fully understood and are considerably controversial. Using scanning flow cytometry, in this work for the first time we observed experimentally (both in situ and in vitro) a significant increase of HCO3(-)/Cl(-) transmembrane exchange rate of human erythrocytes in the presence of MgSO4 in blood. For a quantitative analysis of the obtained experimental data, we introduced and verified a molecular kinetic model, which describes activation of major anion exchanger Band 3 (or AE1) by its complexation with free intracellular Mg(2+) (taking into account Mg(2+) membrane transport and intracellular buffering). Fitting the model to our in vitro experimental data, we observed a good correspondence between theoretical and experimental kinetic curves that allowed us to evaluate the model parameters and to estimate for the first time the association constant of Mg(2+) with Band 3 as KB~0.07mM, which is in agreement with known values of the apparent Mg(2+) dissociation constant (from 0.01 to 0.1mM) that reflects experiments on enrichment of Mg(2+) at the inner erythrocyte membrane (Gunther, 2007). Results of this work partly clarify the molecular mechanisms of MgSO4 action in human erythrocytes. The method developed allows one to estimate quantitatively a perspective of MgSO4 treatment for a patient. It should be particularly helpful in prenatal medicine for early detection of pathologies associated with the risk of fetal hypoxia. PMID:26780645

  17. Stochastic heart-rate model can reveal pathologic cardiac dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuusela, Tom

    2004-03-01

    A simple one-dimensional Langevin-type stochastic difference equation can simulate the heart-rate fluctuations in a time scale from minutes to hours. The model consists of a deterministic nonlinear part and a stochastic part typical of Gaussian noise, and both parts can be directly determined from measured heart-rate data. Data from healthy subjects typically exhibit the deterministic part with two or more stable fixed points. Studies of 15 congestive heart-failure subjects reveal that the deterministic part of pathologic heart dynamics has no clear stable fixed points. Direct simulations of the stochastic model for normal and pathologic cases can produce statistical parameters similar to those of real subjects. Results directly indicate that pathologic situations simplify the heart-rate control system.

  18. Dynamics of Two Populations with Different Birth Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Julia; Pekalski, Andrzej

    We propose a simple model describing the dynamics of a system of two populations — more numerous natives and less numerous immigrants. The immigrants' birth rate is higher than that of the natives. Several modifications of this model taking into account changes of the birth rates due to external factors and/or possibility of contacts between the populations, are also introduced. The model is studied within two approaches — by solving a set of differential equations and through a Monte Carlo simulations. We show that the question of which population will eventually dominate depends on such factors as the probability of producing offsprings of mixed origin, assimilation of the immigrants, the ratio of the birth rates, initial numbers of the populations and the average age of an individual. In all, but two extreme cases, both populations will survive.

  19. Rowing Crew Coordination Dynamics at Increasing Stroke Rates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In rowing, perfect synchronisation is important for optimal performance of a crew. Remarkably, a recent study on ergometers demonstrated that antiphase crew coordination might be mechanically more efficient by reducing the power lost to within-cycle velocity fluctuations of the boat. However, coupled oscillator dynamics predict the stability of the coordination to decrease with increasing stroke rate, which in case of antiphase may eventually yield breakdowns to in-phase. Therefore, this study examined the effects of increasing stroke rate on in- and antiphase crew coordination in rowing dyads. Eleven experienced dyads rowed on two mechanically coupled ergometers on slides, which allowed the ergometer system to move back and forth as one ‘boat’. The dyads performed a ramp trial in both in- and antiphase pattern, in which stroke rates gradually increased from 30 strokes per minute (spm) to as fast as possible in steps of 2 spm. Kinematics of rowers, handles and ergometers were captured. Two dyads showed a breakdown of antiphase into in-phase coordination at the first stroke rate of the ramp trial. The other nine dyads reached between 34–42 spm in antiphase but achieved higher rates in in-phase. As expected, the coordinative accuracy in antiphase was worse than in in-phase crew coordination, while, somewhat surprisingly, the coordinative variability did not differ between the patterns. Whereas crew coordination did not substantially deteriorate with increasing stroke rate, stroke rate did affect the velocity fluctuations of the ergometers: fluctuations were clearly larger in the in-phase pattern than in the antiphase pattern, and this difference significantly increased with stroke rate. Together, these results suggest that although antiphase rowing is less stable (i.e., less resistant to perturbation), potential on-water benefits of antiphase over in-phase rowing may actually increase with stroke rate. PMID:26185987

  20. Influence of exercise modality on agreement between gas exchange and heart rate variability thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, F.A.; Montenegro, R.A.; Midgley, A.W.; Vasconcellos, F.; Soares, P.P.; Farinatti, P.

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the level of agreement between the gas exchange threshold (GET) and heart rate variability threshold (HRVT) during maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) using three different exercise modalities. A further aim was to establish whether there was a 1:1 relationship between the percentage heart rate reserve (%HRR) and percentage oxygen uptake reserve (%V˙O2 R) at intensities corresponding to GET and HRVT. Sixteen apparently healthy men 17 to 28 years of age performed three maximal CPETs (cycling, walking, and running). Mean heart rate and V˙O2 at GET and HRVT were 16 bpm (P<0.001) and 5.2 mL·kg-1·min-1 (P=0.001) higher in running than cycling, but no significant differences were observed between running and walking, or cycling and walking (P>0.05). There was a strong relationship between GET and HRVT, with R2 ranging from 0.69 to 0.90. A 1:1 relationship between %HRR and %V˙O2 R was not observed at GET and HRVT. The %HRR was higher during cycling (GET mean difference=7%; HRVT mean difference=11%; both P<0.001), walking (GET mean difference=13%; HRVT mean difference=13%; both P<0.001), or running (GET mean difference=11%; HRVT mean difference=10%; both P<0.001). Therefore, using HRVT to prescribe aerobic exercise intensity appears to be valid. However, to assume a 1:1 relationship between %HRR and %V˙O2 R at HRVT would probably result in overestimation of the energy expenditure during the bout of exercise. PMID:25003546

  1. Turning Rate Dynamics of Zebrafish Exposed to Ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwaffo, Violet; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-06-01

    Zebrafish is emerging as a species of choice in alcohol-related pharmacological studies. In these studies, zebrafish are often exposed to acute ethanol treatments and their activity scored during behavioral assays. Computational modeling of zebrafish behavior is expected to positively impact these efforts by offering a predictive toolbox to plan hypothesis-driven studies, reduce the number of subjects, perform pilot trials, and refine behavioral screening. In this work, we demonstrate the use of the recently proposed jump persistent turning walker to model the turning rate dynamics of zebrafish exposed to acute ethanol administration. This modeling framework is based on a stochastic mean reverting jump process to capture the sudden and large changes in orientation of swimming zebrafish. The model is calibrated on an available experimental dataset of 40 subjects, tested at different ethanol concentrations. We demonstrate that model parameters are modulated by ethanol administration, whereby both the relaxation rate and jump frequency of the turning rate dynamics are influenced by ethanol concentration. This effort offers a first evidence for the possibility of complementing zebrafish pharmacological research with computational modeling of animal behavior.

  2. IMPACT OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE STREAMS ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION MELT RATE STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Miller, D.; Koopman, D.

    2011-04-26

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the potential impacts of the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) streams - particularly the addition of Monosodium Titanate (MST) and Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) - on the melt rate of simulated feed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Additional MST was added to account for contributions from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Melt Rate Furnace (MRF) was used to evaluate four melter feed compositions: two with simulated SCIX and SWPF material and two without. The Slurry-fed Melt Rate Furnace (SMRF) was then used to compare two different feeds: one with and one without bounding concentrations of simulated SCIX and SWPF material. Analyses of the melter feed materials confirmed that they met their targeted compositions. Four feeds were tested in triplicate in the MRF. The linear melt rates were determined by using X-ray computed tomography to measure the height of the glass formed along the bottom of the beakers. The addition of the SCIX and SWPF material reduced the average measured melt rate by about 10% in MRF testing, although there was significant scatter in the data. Two feeds were tested in the SMRF. It was noted that the ground CST alone (ground CST with liquid in a bucket) was extremely difficult to resuspend during preparation of the feed with material from SCIX and SWPF. This feed was also more difficult to pump than the material without MST and CST due to settling occurring in the melter feed line, although the yield stress of both feeds was high relative to the DWPF design basis. Steady state feeding conditions were maintained for about five hours for each feed. There was a reduction in the feed and pour rates of approximately 15% when CST and MST were added to the feed, although there was significant scatter in the data. Analysis of samples collected from the SMRF pour stream showed that the composition of the glass changed as expected when MST and

  3. Circulating protein synthesis rates reveal skeletal muscle proteome dynamics.

    PubMed

    Shankaran, Mahalakshmi; King, Chelsea L; Angel, Thomas E; Holmes, William E; Li, Kelvin W; Colangelo, Marc; Price, John C; Turner, Scott M; Bell, Christopher; Hamilton, Karyn L; Miller, Benjamin F; Hellerstein, Marc K

    2016-01-01

    Here, we have described and validated a strategy for monitoring skeletal muscle protein synthesis rates in rodents and humans over days or weeks from blood samples. We based this approach on label incorporation into proteins that are synthesized specifically in skeletal muscle and escape into the circulation. Heavy water labeling combined with sensitive tandem mass spectrometric analysis allowed integrated synthesis rates of proteins in muscle tissue across the proteome to be measured over several weeks. Fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of plasma creatine kinase M-type (CK-M) and carbonic anhydrase 3 (CA-3) in the blood, more than 90% of which is derived from skeletal muscle, correlated closely with FSR of CK-M, CA-3, and other proteins of various ontologies in skeletal muscle tissue in both rodents and humans. Protein synthesis rates across the muscle proteome generally changed in a coordinate manner in response to a sprint interval exercise training regimen in humans and to denervation or clenbuterol treatment in rodents. FSR of plasma CK-M and CA-3 revealed changes and interindividual differences in muscle tissue proteome dynamics. In human subjects, sprint interval training primarily stimulated synthesis of structural and glycolytic proteins. Together, our results indicate that this approach provides a virtual biopsy, sensitively revealing individualized changes in proteome-wide synthesis rates in skeletal muscle without a muscle biopsy. Accordingly, this approach has potential applications for the diagnosis, management, and treatment of muscle disorders. PMID:26657858

  4. Circulating protein synthesis rates reveal skeletal muscle proteome dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Mahalakshmi; King, Chelsea L.; Angel, Thomas E.; Holmes, William E.; Li, Kelvin W.; Colangelo, Marc; Price, John C.; Turner, Scott M.; Bell, Christopher; Hamilton, Karyn L.; Miller, Benjamin F.; Hellerstein, Marc K.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we have described and validated a strategy for monitoring skeletal muscle protein synthesis rates in rodents and humans over days or weeks from blood samples. We based this approach on label incorporation into proteins that are synthesized specifically in skeletal muscle and escape into the circulation. Heavy water labeling combined with sensitive tandem mass spectrometric analysis allowed integrated synthesis rates of proteins in muscle tissue across the proteome to be measured over several weeks. Fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of plasma creatine kinase M-type (CK-M) and carbonic anhydrase 3 (CA-3) in the blood, more than 90% of which is derived from skeletal muscle, correlated closely with FSR of CK-M, CA-3, and other proteins of various ontologies in skeletal muscle tissue in both rodents and humans. Protein synthesis rates across the muscle proteome generally changed in a coordinate manner in response to a sprint interval exercise training regimen in humans and to denervation or clenbuterol treatment in rodents. FSR of plasma CK-M and CA-3 revealed changes and interindividual differences in muscle tissue proteome dynamics. In human subjects, sprint interval training primarily stimulated synthesis of structural and glycolytic proteins. Together, our results indicate that this approach provides a virtual biopsy, sensitively revealing individualized changes in proteome-wide synthesis rates in skeletal muscle without a muscle biopsy. Accordingly, this approach has potential applications for the diagnosis, management, and treatment of muscle disorders. PMID:26657858

  5. Dynamic Strength of Peridotite at Seismic Slip Rates: Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Gaudio, P.; di Toro, G.; Han, R.; Hirose, T.; Shimamoto, T.; Cocco, M.

    2006-12-01

    Ultramafic pseudotachylytes (solidified melts produced during seismic slip) decorate exhumed faults within the Balmuccia peridotite from the Ivrea zone (Italy). Unpublished studies suggest that these pseudotachylytes were produced in the upper-mantle/lower-crust. Kanamori et al. (1998) proposed extensive production of seismic melts during the Mw = 8.3 Bolivian 1994 deep focus (~600 km in depth) earthquake. It follows that seismic melting might occur in the mantle. We conducted high-velocity rock friction experiments with the Balmuccia peridotite to determine the dynamic strength of faults in the presence of ultramafic melts. During each experiment, shear stress evolved with displacement: after an initial peak shear stress, fault strength gradually decreased towards a steady-state value. Dynamic fault weakening was associated with the formation of a molten layer along the slipping zone. By performing experiments for increasing normal stresses (5 to 13 MPa) and slip rates (0.37÷1.14 m/s or ~seismic slip rates), steady-state shear stress (1) slightly increased with increasing normal stress and (2), for a given normal stress, decreased with increasing slip rate. The ratio between steady-state shear stress and normal stress was 0.13, well below the solid rock friction coefficient (~0.8). Experiments conducted under argon or fresh air flux yielded similar shear stress magnitudes, suggesting that olivine oxidation did not affect significantly the fault strength in the high-velocity experiments. The slight dependence of shear stress with normal stress suggests melt lubrication. Since the physics of melt lubrication is somehow predictable (see poster by Nielsen et al.), these experimental results might be extrapolated to the study of rupture dynamics in mantle rocks.

  6. Dynamics of radionuclide exchange in the calcareous algae Halimeda at Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect

    Spies, R.B.; Marsh, K.V.; Kercher, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of /sup 239+240/Pu in the detrital inclusions and in acid-soluble and acid-insoluble fractions of Halimeda macrophysa showed a 10-fold higher concentration in the acid-insoluble coenocytic filaments than in the acid-soluble fraction. In a depuration experiment with Halimeda incrassata at Enewetak Atoll the loss rate of six radionuclides was measured. Data for /sup 60/Co, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 102m/Rh were fit to loss curves by using one term for exponential loss; data for /sup 155/Eu, /sup 239+240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am required two terms. For each radionuclide, compartment size and transfer functions were determined for the appropriate one- and two-compartment models. Of 26 possible two-compartment models, only seven gave solutions with our data. Nearly identical loss rates were obtained for /sup 155/Eu, /sup 239+240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am in the fast-exchanging compartments for all seven models. The uptake rates for these nuclides were also similar when uptake rates were normalized to local sediment concentrations. The fast-exchanging compartment probably corresponds to the mucilage surface layer of the coenocytic filaments. The identity of the slow-exchanging compartment is less certain but it may correspond to the skeletal surface.

  7. Dynamics of radionuclide exchange in the calcareous algae Halimeda at Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect

    Spies, R.B.; Marsh, K.V.; Kercher, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of /sup 239 +240/Pu in the detrital inclusions and in acid-soluble and acid-insoluble fractions of Halimeda macrophysa showed a 10-fold higher concentration in the acid-insoluble coenocytic filaments than in the acid-soluble fraction. In a depuration experiment with Halimeda incrassata at Enewetak Atoll the loss rate of six radionuclides was measured. Data for /sup 60/Co, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 102//sup m/Rh were fit to loss curves by using one term for exponential loss; data for /sup 155/Eu, /sup 239 +240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am required two terms. For each radionuclide, compartment size and transfer functions were determined for the apropriate one- and two-compartment models. Of 26 possible two-compartment models, only seven gave solutions with our data. Nearly identical loss rates were obtained for /sup 155/Eu, /sup 239 +240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am in the fast-exchanging compartments for all seven models. The uptake rates for these nuclides were also similar when uptake rates were normalized to local sediment concentrations. The fast-exchanging compartment probably corresponds to the mucilage surface layer of the coenocytic filaments. The identity of the slow-exchanging compartment is less certain but it may correspond to the skeletal surface.

  8. Is the surface oxygen exchange rate linked to bulk ion diffusivity in mixed conducting Ruddlesden–Popper phases?

    SciTech Connect

    Tomkiewicz, Alex C.; Tamimi, Mazin A.; Huq, Ashfia; McIntosh, Steven

    2015-03-02

    There is a possible link between oxygen surface exchange rate and bulk oxygen anion diffusivity in mixed ionic and electronic conducting oxides; it is a topic of great interest and debate. While a large body of experimental evidence and theoretical analyses support a link, observed differences between bulk and surface composition of these materials are hard to reconcile with this observation. This is further compounded by potential problems with simultaneous measurement of both parameters. Here we utilize separate techniques, in situ neutron diffraction and pulsed isotopic surface exchange, to examine bulk ion mobility and surface oxygen exchange rates of three Ruddlesden-Popper phases, general form An-1A2'BnO3n+1, An-1A2'BnX3n+1; LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ (n = 1), La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ (n = 2) and LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ (n = 3). These measurements are complemented by surface composition determination via high sensitivity-low energy ion scattering. We observe a correlation between bulk ion mobility and surface exchange rate between materials. The surface exchange rates vary by more than one order of magnitude with high anion mobility in the bulk of an oxygen vacancy-rich n = 2 Ruddlesden-Popper material correlating with rapid oxygen exchange. Furthermore this is in contrast with the similar surface exchange rates which we may expect due to similar surface compositions across all three samples. This paper conclude that experimental limitations lead to inherent convolution of surface and bulk rates, and that surface exchange steps are not likely to be rate limiting in oxygen incorporation.

  9. Intelligent Soft Computing on Forex: Exchange Rates Forecasting with Hybrid Radial Basis Neural Network.

    PubMed

    Falat, Lukas; Marcek, Dusan; Durisova, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with application of quantitative soft computing prediction models into financial area as reliable and accurate prediction models can be very helpful in management decision-making process. The authors suggest a new hybrid neural network which is a combination of the standard RBF neural network, a genetic algorithm, and a moving average. The moving average is supposed to enhance the outputs of the network using the error part of the original neural network. Authors test the suggested model on high-frequency time series data of USD/CAD and examine the ability to forecast exchange rate values for the horizon of one day. To determine the forecasting efficiency, they perform a comparative statistical out-of-sample analysis of the tested model with autoregressive models and the standard neural network. They also incorporate genetic algorithm as an optimizing technique for adapting parameters of ANN which is then compared with standard backpropagation and backpropagation combined with K-means clustering algorithm. Finally, the authors find out that their suggested hybrid neural network is able to produce more accurate forecasts than the standard models and can be helpful in eliminating the risk of making the bad decision in decision-making process. PMID:26977450

  10. Measuring and modeling air exchange rates inside taxi cabs in Los Angeles, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Shi; Yu, Nu; Wang, Yueyan; Zhu, Yifang

    2015-12-01

    Air exchange rates (AERs) have a direct impact on traffic-related air pollutant (TRAP) levels inside vehicles. Taxi drivers are occupationally exposed to TRAP on a daily basis, yet there is limited measurement of AERs in taxi cabs. To fill this gap, AERs were quantified in 22 representative Los Angeles taxi cabs including 10 Prius, 5 Crown Victoria, 3 Camry, 3 Caravan, and 1 Uplander under realistic driving (RD) conditions. To further study the impacts of window position and ventilation settings on taxi AERs, additional tests were conducted on 14 taxis with windows closed (WC) and on the other 8 taxis with not only windows closed but also medium fan speed (WC-MFS) under outdoor air mode. Under RD conditions, the AERs in all 22 cabs had a mean of 63 h-1 with a median of 38 h-1. Similar AERs were observed under WC condition when compared to those measured under RD condition. Under WC-MFS condition, AERs were significantly increased in all taxi cabs, when compared with those measured under RD condition. A General Estimating Equation (GEE) model was developed and the modeling results showed that vehicle model was a significant factor in determining the AERs in taxi cabs under RD condition. Driving speed and car age were positively associated with AERs but not statistically significant. Overall, AERs measured in taxi cabs were much higher than typical AERs people usually encounter in indoor environments such as homes, offices, and even regular passenger vehicles.

  11. Predicting Residential Air Exchange Rates from Questionnaires and Meteorology: Model Evaluation in Central North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A critical aspect of air pollution exposure models is the estimation of the air exchange rate (AER) of individual homes, where people spend most of their time. The AER, which is the airflow into and out of a building, is a primary mechanism for entry of outdoor air pollutants and removal of indoor source emissions. The mechanistic Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) AER model was linked to a leakage area model to predict AER from questionnaires and meteorology. The LBL model was also extended to include natural ventilation (LBLX). Using literature-reported parameter values, AER predictions from LBL and LBLX models were compared to data from 642 daily AER measurements across 31 detached homes in central North Carolina, with corresponding questionnaires and meteorological observations. Data was collected on seven consecutive days during each of four consecutive seasons. For the individual model-predicted and measured AER, the median absolute difference was 43% (0.17 h−1) and 40% (0.17 h−1) for the LBL and LBLX models, respectively. Additionally, a literature-reported empirical scale factor (SF) AER model was evaluated, which showed a median absolute difference of 50% (0.25 h−1). The capability of the LBL, LBLX, and SF models could help reduce the AER uncertainty in air pollution exposure models used to develop exposure metrics for health studies. PMID:21069949

  12. Intelligent Soft Computing on Forex: Exchange Rates Forecasting with Hybrid Radial Basis Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Marcek, Dusan; Durisova, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with application of quantitative soft computing prediction models into financial area as reliable and accurate prediction models can be very helpful in management decision-making process. The authors suggest a new hybrid neural network which is a combination of the standard RBF neural network, a genetic algorithm, and a moving average. The moving average is supposed to enhance the outputs of the network using the error part of the original neural network. Authors test the suggested model on high-frequency time series data of USD/CAD and examine the ability to forecast exchange rate values for the horizon of one day. To determine the forecasting efficiency, they perform a comparative statistical out-of-sample analysis of the tested model with autoregressive models and the standard neural network. They also incorporate genetic algorithm as an optimizing technique for adapting parameters of ANN which is then compared with standard backpropagation and backpropagation combined with K-means clustering algorithm. Finally, the authors find out that their suggested hybrid neural network is able to produce more accurate forecasts than the standard models and can be helpful in eliminating the risk of making the bad decision in decision-making process. PMID:26977450

  13. Determinants of protein elution rates from preparative ion-exchange adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Angelo, James M; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2016-04-01

    The rate processes involved in elution in preparative chromatography can affect both peak resolution and hence selectivity as well as practical factors such as facility fit. These processes depend on the physical structure of the adsorbent particles, the amount of bound solute, the solution conditions for operation or some combination of these factors. Ion-exchange adsorbents modified with covalently attached or grafted polymer layers have become widely used in preparative chromatography. Their often easily accessible microstructures offer substantial binding capacities for biomolecules, but elution has sometimes been observed to be undesirably slow. In order to determine which physicochemical phenomena control elution behavior, commercially available cellulosic, dextran-grafted and unmodified agarose materials were characterized here by their elution profiles at various conditions, including different degrees of loading. Elution data were analyzed under the assumption of purely diffusion-limited control, including the role of pore structure properties such as porosity and tortuosity. In general, effective elution rates decreased with the reduction of accessible pore volume, but differences among different proteins indicated the roles of additional factors. Additional measurements and analysis, including the use of confocal laser scanning microscopy to observe elution within single chromatographic particles, indicated the importance of protein association within the particle during elution. The use of protein stabilizing agents was explored in systems presenting atypical elution behavior, and l-arginine and disaccharide excipients were shown to alleviate the effects for one protein, lysozyme, in the presence of sodium chloride. Incorporation of these excipients into eluent buffer gave rise to faster elution and significantly lower pool volumes in elution from polymer-modified adsorbents. PMID:26948763

  14. Rate and mechanism of ligand exchange of tris(acetylacetonato)scandium(III) in acetonitrile

    SciTech Connect

    Katakeyama, Yoshihiro; Kido, Hiroaki; Harada, Masayuki; Tomiyasu, Hiroshi; Fukutomi, Hiroshi

    1988-03-23

    Tris(acetylaceotnato)scandium(III) undergoes ligand exchange with the enolate form of acetylacetone in CD/sub 3/CN at 30-74/degree/C. The observed first-order rate constant, obtained by the /sup 1/H NMR method, is expressed by k/sub 0/ = k/sub 1//prime/(enol) + k/sub 2//prime/ at (complex) /approx equal/ 0.05 M. (Hacac) = 0.19 /minus/ 0.58 M, and (H/sub 2/O) = 0.026-0.26 M; k/sub 1//prime/ = 52 /plus minus/ 3 M/sup /minus/1/ s/sup /minus/1/ and k/sub 2//prime/ = 1.5 /plus minus/ 0.9 s/sup /minus/1/ at 56/degree/C. No water catalysis was observed. The k/sub 2//prime/ term is minor in the concentration region. The /Delta/H/double dagger/ and /Delta/S/double dagger/ values for k/sub 1//prime/ are 36 /plus minus/ 5 kJ mol/sup /minus/1/ and /minus/105 /plus minus/ 16 J K/sup /minus/1/ mol/sup /minus/1/, respectively. The deuterium isotope effect k/sub 1//prime/(H)/k/sub 1//prime/(D) was significant (ca. 5). The I/sub a/ mechanism is assigned to the rate-determining formation of an intermediate containing a one-ended acac/sup /minus// and a unidentate Hacac in the enol form. 16 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. 78 FR 69418 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Exchanges and Qualified Health Plans, Quality Rating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... Plans; Exchange Standards for Employers, 77 FR 18310 (Mar. 27, 2012) (to be codified at 45 CFR parts 155... Quality for Exchanges: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-11-27/pdf/2012-28473.pdf . Importance: the... Rule 78 FR 12834 (Feb. 25, 2013) (to be codified at 45 CFR parts 147, 155 and 156). The draft...

  16. THE EFFECT OF SALINITY ON RATES OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY AIR/WATER EXCHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA laboratory in Athens, Georgia i spursuing the goal of developing a model for describing toxicant vapor phase air/water exchange under all relevant environmental conditions. To date, the two-layer exchange model (suitable for low wind speed conditions) has been modif...

  17. Quantification of fetal heart rate regularity using symbolic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, P.; Cysarz, D.; Lange, S.; Geue, D.; Groenemeyer, D.

    2007-03-01

    Fetal heart rate complexity was examined on the basis of RR interval time series obtained in the second and third trimester of pregnancy. In each fetal RR interval time series, short term beat-to-beat heart rate changes were coded in 8bit binary sequences. Redundancies of the 28 different binary patterns were reduced by two different procedures. The complexity of these sequences was quantified using the approximate entropy (ApEn), resulting in discrete ApEn values which were used for classifying the sequences into 17 pattern sets. Also, the sequences were grouped into 20 pattern classes with respect to identity after rotation or inversion of the binary value. There was a specific, nonuniform distribution of the sequences in the pattern sets and this differed from the distribution found in surrogate data. In the course of gestation, the number of sequences increased in seven pattern sets, decreased in four and remained unchanged in six. Sequences that occurred less often over time, both regular and irregular, were characterized by patterns reflecting frequent beat-to-beat reversals in heart rate. They were also predominant in the surrogate data, suggesting that these patterns are associated with stochastic heart beat trains. Sequences that occurred more frequently over time were relatively rare in the surrogate data. Some of these sequences had a high degree of regularity and corresponded to prolonged heart rate accelerations or decelerations which may be associated with directed fetal activity or movement or baroreflex activity. Application of the pattern classes revealed that those sequences with a high degree of irregularity correspond to heart rate patterns resulting from complex physiological activity such as fetal breathing movements. The results suggest that the development of the autonomic nervous system and the emergence of fetal behavioral states lead to increases in not only irregular but also regular heart rate patterns. Using symbolic dynamics to

  18. High-resolution determination of 147Pm in urine using dynamic ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Elchuk, S; Lucy, C A; Burns, K I

    1992-10-15

    A procedure has been developed for measuring 147Pm in bioassay samples, based on the separation and preconcentration of 147Pm from the urine matrix by adsorption onto a conventional cation-exchange column with final separation and purification by HPLC using dynamic ion-exchange chromatography. The concentration of 147Pm is determined by collecting the appropriate HPLC fraction and measuring the 147Pm by liquid scintillation counting. The limit of detection is 0.1 Bq (3 fg) 147Pm based on a 500-mL sample of urine and a counting time of 30 min with a background of 100 cpm. Ten samples can be processed in 1.5-2 days. PMID:1466450

  19. Simulating the frontal instability of lock-exchange density currents with dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanggui; Geng, Xingguo; Wang, Heping; Zhuang, Xin; Ouyang, Jie

    2016-06-01

    The frontal instability of lock-exchange density currents is numerically investigated using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) at the mesoscopic particle level. For modeling two-phase flow, the “color” repulsion model is adopted to describe binary fluids according to Rothman-Keller method. The present DPD simulation can reproduce the flow phenomena of lock-exchange density currents, including the lobe-and-cleft instability that appears at the head, as well as the formation of coherent billow structures at the interface behind the head due to the growth of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. Furthermore, through the DPD simulation, some small-scale characteristics can be observed, which are difficult to be captured in macroscopic simulation and experiment.

  20. El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) Enhances CO2 Exchange Rates in Freshwater Marsh Ecosystems in the Florida Everglades

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Sparkle L.; Staudhammer, Christina L.; Oberbauer, Steven F.; Olivas, Paulo; Ryan, Michael G.; Schedlbauer, Jessica L.; Loescher, Henry W.; Starr, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the relationships between El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), water level, precipitation patterns and carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange rates in the freshwater wetland ecosystems of the Florida Everglades. Data was obtained over a 5-year study period (2009–2013) from two freshwater marsh sites located in Everglades National Park that differ in hydrology. At the short-hydroperiod site (Taylor Slough; TS) and the long-hydroperiod site (Shark River Slough; SRS) fluctuations in precipitation patterns occurred with changes in ENSO phase, suggesting that extreme ENSO phases alter Everglades hydrology which is known to have a substantial influence on ecosystem carbon dynamics. Variations in both ENSO phase and annual net CO2 exchange rates co-occurred with changes in wet and dry season length and intensity. Combined with site-specific seasonality in CO2 exchanges rates, El Niño and La Niña phases magnified season intensity and CO2 exchange rates at both sites. At TS, net CO2 uptake rates were higher in the dry season, whereas SRS had greater rates of carbon sequestration during the wet season. As La Niña phases were concurrent with drought years and extended dry seasons, TS became a greater sink for CO2 on an annual basis (−11 to −110 g CO2 m−2 yr−1) compared to El Niño and neutral years (−5 to −43.5 g CO2 m−2 yr−1). SRS was a small source for CO2 annually (1.81 to 80 g CO2 m−2 yr−1) except in one exceptionally wet year that was associated with an El Niño phase (−16 g CO2 m−2 yr−1). Considering that future climate predictions suggest a higher frequency and intensity in El Niño and La Niña phases, these results indicate that changes in extreme ENSO phases will significantly alter CO2 dynamics in the Florida Everglades. PMID:25521299

  1. El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) enhances CO2 exchange rates in freshwater Marsh ecosystems in the Florida everglades.

    PubMed

    Malone, Sparkle L; Staudhammer, Christina L; Oberbauer, Steven F; Olivas, Paulo; Ryan, Michael G; Schedlbauer, Jessica L; Loescher, Henry W; Starr, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the relationships between El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), water level, precipitation patterns and carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange rates in the freshwater wetland ecosystems of the Florida Everglades. Data was obtained over a 5-year study period (2009-2013) from two freshwater marsh sites located in Everglades National Park that differ in hydrology. At the short-hydroperiod site (Taylor Slough; TS) and the long-hydroperiod site (Shark River Slough; SRS) fluctuations in precipitation patterns occurred with changes in ENSO phase, suggesting that extreme ENSO phases alter Everglades hydrology which is known to have a substantial influence on ecosystem carbon dynamics. Variations in both ENSO phase and annual net CO2 exchange rates co-occurred with changes in wet and dry season length and intensity. Combined with site-specific seasonality in CO2 exchanges rates, El Niño and La Niña phases magnified season intensity and CO2 exchange rates at both sites. At TS, net CO2 uptake rates were higher in the dry season, whereas SRS had greater rates of carbon sequestration during the wet season. As La Niña phases were concurrent with drought years and extended dry seasons, TS became a greater sink for CO2 on an annual basis (-11 to -110 g CO2 m-2 yr-1) compared to El Niño and neutral years (-5 to -43.5 g CO2 m-2 yr-1). SRS was a small source for CO2 annually (1.81 to 80 g CO2 m-2 yr-1) except in one exceptionally wet year that was associated with an El Niño phase (-16 g CO2 m-2 yr-1). Considering that future climate predictions suggest a higher frequency and intensity in El Niño and La Niña phases, these results indicate that changes in extreme ENSO phases will significantly alter CO2 dynamics in the Florida Everglades. PMID:25521299

  2. Dynamic Line Rating Oncor Electric Delivery Smart Grid Program

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Justin; Smith, Cale; Young, Mike; Donohoo, Ken; Owen, Ross; Clark, Eddit; Espejo, Raul; Aivaliotis, Sandy; Stelmak, Ron; Mohr, Ron; Barba, Cristian; Gonzalez, Guillermo; Malkin, Stuart; Dimitrova, Vessela; Ragsdale, Gary; Mitchem, Sean; Jeirath, Nakul; Loomis, Joe; Trevino, Gerardo; Syracuse, Steve; Hurst, Neil; Mereness, Matt; Johnson, Chad; Bivens, Carrie

    2013-05-04

    Electric transmission lines are the lifeline of the electric utility industry, delivering its product from source to consumer. This critical infrastructure is often constrained such that there is inadequate capacity on existing transmission lines to efficiently deliver the power to meet demand in certain areas or to transport energy from high-generation areas to high-consumption regions. When this happens, the cost of the energy rises; more costly sources of power are used to meet the demand or the system operates less reliably. These economic impacts are known as congestion, and they can amount to substantial dollars for any time frame of reference: hour, day or year. There are several solutions to the transmission constraint problem, including: construction of new generation, construction of new transmission facilities, rebuilding and reconductoring of existing transmission assets, and Dynamic Line Rating (DLR). All of these options except DLR are capital intensive, have long lead times and often experience strong public and regulatory opposition. The Smart Grid Demonstration Program (SGDP) project co-funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) and Oncor Electric Delivery Company developed and deployed the most extensive and advanced DLR installation to demonstrate that DLR technology is capable of resolving many transmission capacity constraint problems with a system that is reliable, safe and very cost competitive. The SGDP DLR deployment is the first application of DLR technology to feed transmission line real-time dynamic ratings directly into the system operation’s State Estimator and load dispatch program, which optimizes the matching of generation with load demand on a security, reliability and economic basis. The integrated Dynamic Line Rating (iDLR)1 collects transmission line parameters at remote locations on the lines, calculates the real-time line rating based on the equivalent conductor temperature, ambient temperature and influence of wind and solar

  3. The impact of water exchange rate on the health and performance of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in recirculation aquaculture systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fish mortality in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) has been observed by the authors to increase when RAS are managed at low makeup water exchange rates with relatively high feed loading. The precise etiology of this elevated mortality was unknown, all typical water quality parameters were wit...

  4. On the accuracy of instantaneous gas exchange rates, energy expenditure, and respiratory quotient calculations obtained in indirect whole room calorimetry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molar balance equations of indirect calorimetry are treated from the point of view of cause-effect relationship where the gaseous exchange rates representing the unknown causes heed to be inferred from a known noisy effect – gaseous concentrations. Two methods of such inversion are analyzed. Th...

  5. 76 FR 26549 - Removal of Certain References to Credit Ratings Under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ..., Securities Act of 1933 (``Securities Act'') Release No. 9193 (Mar. 3, 2011), 76 FR 12896 (Mar. 9, 2011) and Security Ratings, Exchange Act Release No. 63874 (Feb. 9, 2011), 76 FR 8946 (Feb. 16, 2011). As is... Release No. 11497 (Jun. 26, 1975), 40 FR 29795 (Jul. 16, 1975) and 17 CFR 240.15c3-1. \\12\\ See...

  6. Feedbacks between Exchange-Rate Movements and Domestic Inflation: Vicious and Not So Virtuous Cycles, Old and New.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaventa, Luigi

    1983-01-01

    Theories and models dealing with the vicious cycle between exchange rates and domestic inflation and the way in which this relationship has influenced the economic policies of European nations are reviewed. Attempts of European nations to avoid the cycle of depreciation and inflation are covered. New theories may be necessary. (IS)

  7. Temperature dependence of the rate coefficient for charge exchange of metastable O/+//2D/ with N2. [in atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, M. R.; Torr, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    Using a data base of aeronomical parameters measured on board the Atmosphere Explorer-C satellite, temperature dependence of the reaction rate coefficient is deduced for the charge exchange of O(+)(2D) with N2. The results indicate the Explorer values determined over the temperature range from 700 to 1900 K are not in conflict with laboratory measurements made at higher temperatures.

  8. Development and Evaluation of a New Air Exchange Rate Algorithm for the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    between-home and between-city variability in residential pollutant infiltration. This is likely a result of differences in home ventilation, or air exchange rates (AER). The Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) model is a population exposure model that uses a pro...

  9. Dehumidification: Prediction of Condensate Flow Rate for Plate-Fin Tube Heat Exchangers Using the Latent j Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, V.D.; Chen, D.T.; Conklin, J.C.

    1999-03-15

    Condensate flow rate is an important factor in designing dehumidifiers or evaporators. In this paper, the latentj fimtor is used to analyze the dehumidification performance of two plate-fin tube heat exchangers. This latent j factor, analogous to the total j factor, is a flmction of the mass transfa coefllcient, the volumetric air flow rate, and the Schmidt number. This latent j factor did predict condensate flow rate more directly and accurately than any other sensiblej factor method. The Iatentj factor has been used in the present study because the sensible j factor correlations presented in the literature failed to predict the condensate flow rate at high Reynolds numbers. Results show that the latent j i%ctor em be simply correlated as a fhnction of the Reynolds number based on the tube outside diameter and number of rows of the heat exchanger.

  10. The Dynamic Hyporheic Zone: Variability of Groundwater-Surface Water Exchange at Multiple Temporal Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binley, A. M.; Dudley-Southern, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The pathways of exchange of surface water and groundwater can have a significant influence on the delivery of nutrient-rich groundwater to streams. Many studies have revealed how the spatial variability of physical properties (sediment permeability, bedform structures, etc.) at the interface of groundwater and surface water can impact on flow pathways and residence times of hyporheic exchange flow. Here we explore the temporal variability of flow pathways at this interface. We focus on observations made on a study reach of the River Leith, UK but also provide evidence of dynamic exchanges at a number of other study sites. Under baseflow conditions, the study reach of the River Leith shows a predominance of upwelling of groundwater to the river, and in some sections of the reach a significant groundwater discharge zone in evident. However, from observations of piezometric heads made over a two year study period, repeated reversal of flow direction was observed during storm events. By deploying novel miniature electrode sensors in the river bed we were able to monitor the migration of surface water during these events. Penetration of river water to depths of 30cm was observed during monitored events, which support the reported reversal of hydraulic gradients. We, therefore, observed event-driven hyporheic exchange flow. The duration and frequency of such events may have significant impact on the biogeochemistry of shallow river bed sediments within this reach. Furthermore, temporal variability of exchange is not limited to such events: changes in regional groundwater flow pathways over longer time scales may have a significant impact on the location of localised upwelling; at much shorter timescales we see evidence of diurnal fluctuations in hydraulic heads due to evapotranspiration processes. We report on similar observations at companion study sites and discuss implications on the management of water quality in these groundwater fed systems.

  11. pH-replica exchange molecular dynamics in proteins using a discrete protonation method.

    PubMed

    Sabri Dashti, Danial; Meng, Yilin; Roitberg, Adrian E

    2012-08-01

    Protonation equilibria in biological molecules modulates structure, dynamics, and function. A pH-replica exchange molecular dynamics (pH-REMD) method is described here to improve the coupling between conformational and protonation sampling. Under a Hamiltonian replica exchange setup, conformations are swapped between two neighboring replicas, which themselves are at different pHs. The method has been validated on a series of biological systems. We applied pH-REMD to a series of model compounds, to an terminally charged ADFDA pentapeptide, and to a heptapeptide derived from the ovomucoid third domain (OMTKY3). In all of those systems, the predicted pK(a) by pH-REMD is very close to the experimental value and almost identical to the ones obtained by constant pH molecular dynamics (CpH MD). The method presented here, pH-REMD, has the advantage of faster convergence properties due to enhanced sampling of both conformation and protonation spaces. PMID:22694266

  12. Probing protein dynamics and function under native and mildly denaturing conditions with hydrogen exchange and mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltashov, Igor A.

    2005-02-01

    A combination of hydrogen exchange and mass spectrometry emerged in recent years as a powerful experimental tool capable of probing both structural and dynamic features of proteins. Although its concept is very simple, the interpretation of experimental data is not always straightforward, as a combination of chemical reactions (isotope exchange) and dynamic processes within protein molecules give rise to convoluted exchange patterns. This paper provides a historical background of this technique, candid assessment of its current state and limitations and a discussion of promising recent developments that can result in tremendous improvements and a dramatic expansion of the scope of its applications.

  13. RPMDRATE: Bimolecular chemical reaction rates from ring polymer molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleimanov, Yu. V.; Allen, J. W.; Green, W. H.

    2013-03-01

    We present RPMDRATE, a computer program for the calculation of gas phase bimolecular reaction rate coefficients using the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method. The RPMD rate coefficient is calculated using the Bennett-Chandler method as a product of a static (centroid density quantum transition state theory (QTST) rate) and a dynamic (ring polymer transmission coefficient) factor. The computational procedure is general and can be used to treat bimolecular polyatomic reactions of any complexity in their full dimensionality. The program has been tested for the H+H2, H+CH4, OH+CH4 and H+C2H6 reactions. Catalogue identifier: AENW_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENW_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: MIT license No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 94512 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1395674 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90/95, Python (version 2.6.x or later, including any version of Python 3, is recommended). Computer: Not computer specific. Operating system: Any for which Python, Fortran 90/95 compiler and the required external routines are available. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: The program can efficiently utilize 4096+ processors, depending on problem and available computer. At low temperatures, 110 processors are reasonable for a typical umbrella integration run with an analytic potential energy function and gradients on the latest x86-64 machines.

  14. Super-Resolution of Dynamic Scenes Using Sampling Rate Diversity.

    PubMed

    Salem, Faisal; Yagle, Andrew E

    2016-08-01

    In earlier work, we proposed a super-resolution (SR) method that required the availability of two low resolution (LR) sequences corresponding to two different sampling rates, where images from one sequence were used as a basis to represent the polyphase components (PPCs) of the high resolution (HR) image, while the other LR sequences provided the reference LR image (to be super-resolved). The (simple) algorithm implemented by Salem and Yagle is only applicable when the scene is static. In this paper, we recast our approach to SR as a two-stage example-based algorithm to process dynamic scenes. We employ feature selection to create, from the LR frames, local LR dictionaries to represent PPCs of HR patches. To enforce sparsity, we implement Gaussian generative models as an efficient alternative to L1-norm minimization. Estimation errors are further reduced using what we refer to as the anchors, which are based on the relationship between PPCs corresponding to different sampling rates. In the second stage, we revert to simple single frame SR (applied to each frame), using HR dictionaries extracted from the super-resolved sequence of the previous stage. The second stage is thus a reiteration of the sparsity coding scheme, using only one LR sequence, and without involving PPCs. The ability of the modified algorithm to super-resolve challenging LR sequences reintroduces sampling rate diversity as a prerequisite of robust multiframe SR. PMID:27249832

  15. Flow dynamics of ash deposition in heat-exchanger tube banks

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, F.; Ekmann, J.; Mathur, M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate experimental data to describe flow fields in heat-exchanger tube banks. One of the main applications of this data is in the evaluation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models which are an important part of an ash deposition model. The CFD models under evaluation include a large eddy simulation (LES) being developed by Textron Inc. under DOE-PETC funding and the CLEW code developed at the University of California at Berkeley. Various CFD modeling approaches, e.g., implementation of a transition-to-turbulence and modified wall functions, are also being tested using the PHOENICS code.

  16. Flow dynamics of ash deposition in heat-exchanger tube banks

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, F.; Ekmann, J.; Mathur, M.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this project is to generate experimental data to describe flow fields in heat-exchanger tube banks. One of the main applications of this data is in the evaluation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models which are an important part of an ash deposition model. The CFD models under evaluation include a large eddy simulation (LES) being developed by Textron Inc. under DOE-PETC funding and the CLEW code developed at the University of California at Berkeley. Various CFD modeling approaches, e.g., implementation of a transition-to-turbulence and modified wall functions, are also being tested using the PHOENICS code.

  17. Numerical simulation of gas dynamics and heat exchange tasks in fuel assemblies of the nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuchenko, S. V.

    2014-11-12

    This report presents a PC-based program for solution gas dynamics and heat exchange mathematical tasks in fuel assemblies of the fast-neutron nuclear reactors. A fuel assembly consisting of bulk heat-generating elements, which are integrated together by the system of supply and pressure manifolds, is examined. Spherical heat-generating microelements, which contain nuclear fuel, are pulled into the heat-generating elements. Gaseous coolant proceed from supply manifolds to heat-generating elements, where it withdraws the nuclear reaction heat and assembles in pressure manifolds.

  18. Gas exchange rates across the sediment-water and air-water interfaces in south San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartman, Blayne; Hammond, Douglas E.

    1984-01-01

    Radon 222 concentrations in the water and sedimentary columns and radon exchange rates across the sediment-water and air-water interfaces have been measured in a section of south San Francisco Bay. Two independent methods have been used to determine sediment-water exchange rates, and the annual averages of these methods agree within the uncertainty of the determinations, about 20%. The annual average of benthic fluxes from shoal areas is nearly a factor of 2 greater than fluxes from the channel areas. Fluxes from the shoal and channel areas exceed those expected from simple molecular diffusion by factors of 4 and 2, respectively, apparently due to macrofaunal irrigation. Values of the gas transfer coefficient for radon exchange across the air-water interface were determined by constructing a radon mass balance for the water column and by direct measurement using floating chambers. The chamber method appears to yield results which are too high. Transfer coefficients computed using the mass balance method range from 0.4 m/day to 1.8 m/day, with a 6-year average of 1.0 m/day. Gas exchange is linearly dependent upon wind speed over a wind speed range of 3.2–6.4 m/s, but shows no dependence upon current velocity. Gas transfer coefficients predicted from an empirical relationship between gas exchange rates and wind speed observed in lakes and the oceans are within 30% of the coefficients determined from the radon mass balance and are considerably more accurate than coefficients predicted from theoretical gas exchange models.

  19. Authentic Assessment in the Geometry Classroom: Calculating the Classroom Air-Exchange Rate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erich, David J.

    2002-01-01

    Introduces a room air-exchange activity designed to assess student understanding of the concept of volume. Lists materials for the activity and its procedures. Includes the lesson plan and a student worksheet. (KHR)

  20. Rates of water exchange for two cobalt(II) heteropolyoxotungstate compounds in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ohlin, C André; Harley, Stephen J; McAlpin, J Gregory; Hocking, Rosalie K; Mercado, Brandon Q; Johnson, Rene L; Villa, Eric M; Fidler, Mary Kate; Olmstead, Marilyn M; Spiccia, Leone; Britt, R David; Casey, William H

    2011-04-11

    Polyoxometalate ions are used as ligands in water-oxidation processes related to solar energy production. An important step in these reactions is the association and dissociation of water from the catalytic sites, the rates of which are unknown. Here we report the exchange rates of water ligated to Co(II) atoms in two polyoxotungstate sandwich molecules using the (17)O-NMR-based Swift-Connick method. The compounds were the [Co(4)(H(2)O)(2)(B-α-PW(9)O(34))(2)](10-) and the larger αββα-[Co(4)(H(2)O)(2)(P(2)W(15)O(56))(2)](16-) ions, each with two water molecules bound trans to one another in a Co(II) sandwich between the tungstate ligands. The clusters, in both solid and solution state, were characterized by a range of methods, including NMR, EPR, FT-IR, UV-Vis, and EXAFS spectroscopy, ESI-MS, single-crystal X-ray crystallography, and potentiometry. For [Co(4)(H(2)O)(2)(B-α-PW(9)O(34))(2)](10-) at pH 5.4, we estimate: k(298)=1.5(5)±0.3×10(6) s(-1), ΔH(≠)=39.8±0.4 kJ mol(-1), ΔS(≠)=+7.1±1.2 J mol(-1) K(-1) and ΔV(≠)=5.6 ±1.6 cm(3) mol(-1). For the Wells-Dawson sandwich cluster (αββα-[Co(4)(H(2)O)(2)(P(2)W(15)O(56))(2)](16-)) at pH 5.54, we find: k(298)=1.6(2)±0.3×10(6) s(-1), ΔH(≠)=27.6±0.4 kJ mol(-1) ΔS(≠)=-33±1.3 J mol(-1) K(-1) and ΔV(≠)=2.2±1.4 cm(3) mol(-1) at pH 5.2. The molecules are clearly stable and monospecific in slightly acidic solutions, but dissociate in strongly acidic solutions. This dissociation is detectable by EPR spectroscopy as S=3/2 Co(II) species (such as the [Co(H(2)O)(6)](2+) monomer ion) and by the significant reduction of the Co-Co vector in the XAS spectra. PMID:21416515

  1. Laser-enhanced dynamics in molecular rate processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, T. F.; Zimmerman, I. H.; Devries, P. L.; Yuan, J.-M.; Lam, K.-S.; Bellum, J. C.; Lee, H.-W.; Slutsky, M. S.

    1978-01-01

    The present discussion deals with some theoretical aspects associated with the description of molecular rate processes in the presence of intense laser radiation, where the radiation actually interacts with the molecular dynamics. Whereas for weak and even moderately intense radiation, the absorption and stimulated emission of photons by a molecular system can be described by perturbative methods, for intense radiation, perturbation theory is usually not adequate. Limiting the analysis to the gas phase, an attempt is made to describe nonperturbative approaches applicable to the description of such processes (in the presence of intense laser radiation) as electronic energy transfer in molecular (in particular atom-atom) collisions; collision-induced ionization and emission; and unimolecular dissociation.

  2. Nucleation Rate Analysis of Methane Hydrate from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yuhara, Daisuke; Barnes, Brian C.; Suh, Donguk; Knott, Brandon C.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Yasuoka, Kenji; Wu, David T.; Amadeu K. Sum

    2015-01-06

    Clathrate hydrates are solid crystalline structures most commonly formed from solutions that have nucleated to form a mixed solid composed of water and gas. Understanding the mechanism of clathrate hydrate nucleation is essential to grasp the fundamental chemistry of these complex structures and their applications. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is an ideal method to study nucleation at the molecular level because the size of the critical nucleus and formation rate occur on the nano scale. Moreover, various analysis methods for nucleation have been developed through MD to analyze nucleation. In particular, the mean first-passage time (MFPT) and survival probability (SP)more » methods have proven to be effective in procuring the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size for monatomic systems. This study assesses the MFPT and SP methods, previously used for monatomic systems, when applied to analyzing clathrate hydrate nucleation. Because clathrate hydrate nucleation is relatively difficult to observe in MD simulations (due to its high free energy barrier), these methods have yet to be applied to clathrate hydrate systems. In this study, we have analyzed the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size of methane hydrate using MFPT and SP methods from data generated by MD simulations at 255 K and 50 MPa. MFPT was modified for clathrate hydrate from the original version by adding the maximum likelihood estimate and growth effect term. The nucleation rates were calculated by MFPT and SP methods and are within 5%; the critical nucleus size estimated by the MFPT method was 50% higher, than values obtained through other more rigorous but computationally expensive estimates. These methods can also be extended to the analysis of other clathrate hydrates.« less

  3. Nucleation Rate Analysis of Methane Hydrate from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Yuhara, Daisuke; Barnes, Brian C.; Suh, Donguk; Knott, Brandon C.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Yasuoka, Kenji; Wu, David T.; Amadeu K. Sum

    2015-01-06

    Clathrate hydrates are solid crystalline structures most commonly formed from solutions that have nucleated to form a mixed solid composed of water and gas. Understanding the mechanism of clathrate hydrate nucleation is essential to grasp the fundamental chemistry of these complex structures and their applications. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is an ideal method to study nucleation at the molecular level because the size of the critical nucleus and formation rate occur on the nano scale. Moreover, various analysis methods for nucleation have been developed through MD to analyze nucleation. In particular, the mean first-passage time (MFPT) and survival probability (SP) methods have proven to be effective in procuring the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size for monatomic systems. This study assesses the MFPT and SP methods, previously used for monatomic systems, when applied to analyzing clathrate hydrate nucleation. Because clathrate hydrate nucleation is relatively difficult to observe in MD simulations (due to its high free energy barrier), these methods have yet to be applied to clathrate hydrate systems. In this study, we have analyzed the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size of methane hydrate using MFPT and SP methods from data generated by MD simulations at 255 K and 50 MPa. MFPT was modified for clathrate hydrate from the original version by adding the maximum likelihood estimate and growth effect term. The nucleation rates were calculated by MFPT and SP methods and are within 5%; the critical nucleus size estimated by the MFPT method was 50% higher, than values obtained through other more rigorous but computationally expensive estimates. These methods can also be extended to the analysis of other clathrate hydrates.

  4. Dynamic measurement rate allocation for distributed compressive video sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hung-Wei; Kang, Li-Wei; Lu, Chun-Shien

    2010-07-01

    We address an important issue of fully low-cost and low-complexity video encoding for use in resource limited sensors/devices. Conventional distributed video coding (DVC) does not actually meet this requirement because the acquisition of video sequences still relies on the high-cost mechanism (sampling + compression). Recently, we have proposed a distributed compressive video sensing (DCVS) framework to directly capture compressed video data called measurements, while exploiting correlations among successive frames for video reconstruction at the decoder. The core is to integrate the respective characteristics of DVC and compressive sensing (CS) to achieve CS-based single-pixel camera-compatible video encoder. At DCVS decoder, video reconstruction can be formulated as a convex unconstrained optimization problem via solving the sparse coefficients with respect to some basis functions. Nevertheless, the issue of measurement rate allocation has not been considered yet in the literature. Actually, different measurement rates should be adaptively assigned to different local regions by considering the sparsity of each region for improving reconstructed quality. This paper investigates dynamic measurement rate allocation in block-based DCVS, which can adaptively adjust measurement rates by estimating the sparsity of each block via feedback information. Simulation results have indicated the effectiveness of our scheme. It is worth noting that our goal is to develop a novel fully low-complexity video compression paradigm via the emerging compressive sensing and sparse representation technologies, and provide an alternative scheme adaptive to the environment, where raw video data is not available, instead of competing compression performances against the current compression standards (e.g., H.264/AVC) or DVC schemes which need raw data available for encoding.

  5. Material dynamics under extreme conditions of pressure and strain rate

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A; Allen, P; Bringa, E; Hawreliak, J; Ho, D; Lorenz, K T; Lorenzana, H; Meyers, M A; Pollaine, S W; Rosolankova, K; Sadik, B; Schneider, M S; Swift, D; Wark, J; Yaakobi, B

    2005-09-06

    Solid state experiments at extreme pressures (10-100 GPa) and strain rates ({approx}10{sup 6}-10{sup 8}s{sup -1}) are being developed on high-energy laser facilities, and offer the possibility for exploring new regimes of materials science. These extreme solid-state conditions can be accessed with either shock loading or with a quasi-isentropic ramped pressure drive. Velocity interferometer measurements establish the high pressure conditions. Constitutive models for solid-state strength under these conditions are tested by comparing 2D continuum simulations with experiments measuring perturbation growth due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solid-state samples. Lattice compression, phase, and temperature are deduced from extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements, from which the shock-induced {alpha}-{omega} phase transition in Ti and the {alpha}-{var_epsilon} phase transition in Fe are inferred to occur on sub-nanosec time scales. Time resolved lattice response and phase can also be measured with dynamic x-ray diffraction measurements, where the elastic-plastic (1D-3D) lattice relaxation in shocked Cu is shown to occur promptly (< 1 ns). Subsequent large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations elucidate the microscopic dynamics that underlie the 3D lattice relaxation. Deformation mechanisms are identified by examining the residual microstructure in recovered samples. The slip-twinning threshold in single-crystal Cu shocked along the [001] direction is shown to occur at shock strengths of {approx}20 GPa, whereas the corresponding transition for Cu shocked along the [134] direction occurs at higher shock strengths. This slip-twinning threshold also depends on the stacking fault energy (SFE), being lower for low SFE materials. Designs have been developed for achieving much higher pressures, P > 1000 GPa, in the solid state on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser.

  6. Autonomic neural control of heart rate during dynamic exercise: revisited

    PubMed Central

    White, Daniel W; Raven, Peter B

    2014-01-01

    The accepted model of autonomic control of heart rate (HR) during dynamic exercise indicates that the initial increase is entirely attributable to the withdrawal of parasympathetic nervous system (PSNS) activity and that subsequent increases in HR are entirely attributable to increases in cardiac sympathetic activity. In the present review, we sought to re-evaluate the model of autonomic neural control of HR in humans during progressive increases in dynamic exercise workload. We analysed data from both new and previously published studies involving baroreflex stimulation and pharmacological blockade of the autonomic nervous system. Results indicate that the PSNS remains functionally active throughout exercise and that increases in HR from rest to maximal exercise result from an increasing workload-related transition from a 4 : 1 vagal–sympathetic balance to a 4 : 1 sympatho–vagal balance. Furthermore, the beat-to-beat autonomic reflex control of HR was found to be dependent on the ability of the PSNS to modulate the HR as it was progressively restrained by increasing workload-related sympathetic nerve activity. In conclusion: (i) increases in exercise workload-related HR are not caused by a total withdrawal of the PSNS followed by an increase in sympathetic tone; (ii) reciprocal antagonism is key to the transition from vagal to sympathetic dominance, and (iii) resetting of the arterial baroreflex causes immediate exercise-onset reflexive increases in HR, which are parasympathetically mediated, followed by slower increases in sympathetic tone as workloads are increased. PMID:24756637

  7. Material dynamics at extreme pressures and strain rates

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A; Cavallo, R M; Edwards, M J; Ho, D D; Lasinski, B F; Lorenz, K T; Lorenzana, H E; McNaney, J M; Pollaine, S M; Yaakobi, B

    2004-08-25

    Solid state experiments at extreme pressures (10-100 GPa) and strain rates ({approx}10{sup 6}-10{sup 8}s{sup -1}) are being developed on high-energy laser facilities, and offer the possibility for exploring new regimes of materials science. [Re 2004] These extreme solid-state conditions can be accessed with either shock loading or with quasi-isentropic ramped pressure pulses being developed on the Omega laser. [Ed 2004] Velocity interferometer measurements establish the high strain rates. Constitutive models for solid-state strength under these conditions are tested by comparing 2D continuum simulations with experiments measuring perturbation growth due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solid-state samples. Lattice compression, phase, and temperature are deduced from extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements, from which the shock-induced a-w phase transition in Ti is inferred to occur on sub-nanosecond time scales. [Ya 2004] Time resolved lattice response and phase can be inferred from dynamic x-ray diffraction measurements, where the elastic-plastic (1D-3D) lattice relaxation in shocked Cu is shown to occur promptly (< 1 ns). [Lo 2003] Subsequent large-scale MD simulations have elucidated the microscopic dynamics that underlie the 3D lattice relaxation. Deformation mechanisms are identified by examining the residual microstructure in recovered samples. [Re 2004] For example, the slip-twinning threshold in single-crystal Cu shocked along the [001] direction is shown to occur at shock strengths of 20-40 GPa, whereas the corresponding transition for Cu shocked along the [134] direction occurs at shock strengths of 40-60 GPa. We present highlights from our group's research in laser-based material science including our newest approach for achieving much higher pressures, P > 1000 GPa, in the solid state on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser.

  8. Adaptive Partitioning QM/MM Dynamics Simulations for Substrate Uptake, Product Release, and Solvent Exchange.

    PubMed

    Duster, A; Garza, C; Lin, H

    2016-01-01

    Combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) plays an important role in multiscale simulations of biological systems including enzymes. The adaptive-partitioning (AP) schemes surpass the conventional QM/MM methods in that they allow the on-the-fly, smooth exchange of particles between QM and MM subsystems in molecular dynamics simulations, leading to a seamless and dynamic integration of the QM and MM realms. Originally developed for simulating ion solvation in bulk solutions, the AP schemes have recently been extended to the treatment of proteins, fostering applications in the simulations of enzymes. The present contribution provides a detailed account of the AP schemes. We delineate the background of the algorithms and their parallel implementation, as well as offer practical advice and examples for their applications in the simulations of biological systems. PMID:27498644

  9. Dynamics of Exchange at Gas-Zeolite Interfaces 1: Pure Component n-Butane and Isobutane

    SciTech Connect

    CHANDROSS,MICHAEL E.; WEBB III,EDMUND B.; GREST,GARY S.; MARTIN,MARCUS G.; THOMPSON,AIDAN P.; ROTH,M.W.

    2000-07-13

    The authors present the results of molecular dynamics simulations of n-butane and isobutane in silicalite. They begin with a comparison of the bulk adsorption and diffusion properties for two different parameterizations of the interaction potential between the hydrocarbon species, both of which have been shown to reproduce experimental gas-liquid coexistence curves. They examine diffusion as a function of the loading of the zeolite, as well as the temperature dependence of the diffusion constant at loading and for infinite dilution. They continue with simulations in which interfaces are formed between single component gases and the zeolite. After reaching equilibrium, they examine the dynamics of exchange between the bulk gas and the zeolite. Finally, they calculate the permeability of the zeolite for n-butane and isobutane as a function of pressure. Their simulations are performed for a number of different gas temperatures and pressures, covering a wide range of state points.

  10. Dynamic characteristics of heat exchanger tubes vibrating in a tube support plate inactive mode

    SciTech Connect

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.

    1984-06-01

    Tubes in shell-and-tube heat exchangers, including nuclear plant steam generators, derive their support from longitudinally positioned tube support plates (TSPs). Typically there is a clearance between the tube and TSP hole. Depending on design and fabrication tolerances, the tube may or may not contract all of the TSPs. Noncontact results in an inactive TSP which can lead to detrimental flow induced tube vibrations under certain conditions dependent on the resulting tube-TSP interaction dynamics and the fluid excitation forces. The purpose of this study is to investigate the tube-TSP interaction dynamics. Results of an experimental study of damping and natural frequency as functions of tube-TSP diametral clearance and TSP thickness are reported. Calculated values of damping ratio and frequency of a tube vibrating within an inactive TSP are also presented together with a comparison of calculated and experimental quantities.

  11. Dynamic characteristics of heat exchanger tubes vibrating in a tube support plate inactive mode

    SciTech Connect

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Tubes in shell-and-tube heat exchangers, including nuclear plant steam generators, derive their support from longitudinally positioned tube support plates (TSPs). Typically there is a clearance between the tube and TSP hole. Depending on design and fabrication tolerances, the tube may or may not contact all of the TSPs. Noncontact results in an inactive TSP which can lead to detrimental flow induced tube vibrations under certain conditions dependent on the resulting tube-TSP interaction dynamics and the fluid excitation forces. The purpose of this study is to investigate the tube-TSP interaction dynamics. Results of an experimental study of damping and natural frequency as functions of tube-TSP diametral clearance and TSP thickness are reported. Calculated values of damping ratio and frequency of a tube vibrating within an inactive TSP are also presented together with a comparison of calculated and experimetnal quantities.

  12. A Model for Dynamic Simulation and Analysis of Tether Momentum Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Stephen; Johnson, David; Sorensen, Kirk; Welzyn, Ken; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Momentum-exchange/electrodynamic reboost (MXER) tether systems may enable high-energy missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond by serving as an 'upper stage in space'. Existing rockets that use an MXER tether station could double their capability to launch communications satellites and help improve US competitiveness. A MXER tether station would boost spacecraft from low Earth orbit to a high-energy orbit quickly, like a high-thrust rocket. Then, using the same principles that make an electric motor work, it would slowly rebuild its orbital momentum by pushing against the Earth's magnetic field-without using any propellant. One of the significant challenges in developing a momentum-exchange/electrodynamic reboost tether systems is in the analysis and design of the capture mechanism and its effects on the overall dynamics of the system. This paper will present a model for a momentum-exchange tether system that can simulate and evaluate the performance and requirements of such a system.

  13. Cryogenic sample exchange NMR probe for magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Alexander B.; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Matsuki, Yoh; Bajaj, Vikram S.; van der Wel, Patrick C. A.; DeRocher, Ronald; Bryant, Jeffrey; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Lugtenburg, Johan; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a cryogenic sample exchange system that dramatically improves the efficiency of magic angle spinning (MAS) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments by reducing the time required to change samples and by improving long-term instrument stability. Changing samples in conventional cryogenic MAS DNP/NMR experiments involves warming the probe to room temperature, detaching all cryogenic, RF, and microwave connections, removing the probe from the magnet, replacing the sample, and reversing all the previous steps, with the entire cycle requiring a few hours. The sample exchange system described here — which relies on an eject pipe attached to the front of the MAS stator and a vacuum jacketed dewar with a bellowed hole — circumvents these procedures. To demonstrate the excellent sensitivity, resolution, and stability achieved with this quadruple resonance sample exchange probe, we have performed high precision distance measurements on the active site of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. We also include a spectrum of the tripeptide N-f-MLF-OH at 100 K which shows 30 Hz linewidths. PMID:19356957

  14. Modeling the dynamic operation of a small fin plate heat exchanger - parametric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motyliński, Konrad; Kupecki, Jakub

    2015-09-01

    Given its high efficiency, low emissions and multiple fuelling options, the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) offer a promising alternative for stationary power generators, especially while engaged in micro-combined heat and power (μ-CHP) units. Despite the fact that the fuel cells are a key component in such power systems, other auxiliaries of the system can play a critical role and therefore require a significant attention. Since SOFC uses a ceramic material as an electrolyte, the high operating temperature (typically of the order of 700-900 °C) is required to achieve sufficient performance. For that reason both the fuel and the oxidant have to be preheated before entering the SOFC stack. Hot gases exiting the fuel cell stack transport substantial amount of energy which has to be partly recovered for preheating streams entering the stack and for heating purposes. Effective thermal integration of the μ-CHP can be achieved only when proper technical measures are used. The ability of efficiently preheating the streams of oxidant and fuel relies on heat exchangers which are present in all possible configurations of power system with solid oxide fuel cells. In this work a compact, fin plate heat exchanger operating in the high temperature regime was under consideration. Dynamic model was proposed for investigation of its performance under the transitional states of the fuel cell system. Heat exchanger was simulated using commercial modeling software. The model includes key geometrical and functional parameters. The working conditions of the power unit with SOFC vary due to the several factors, such as load changes, heating and cooling procedures of the stack and others. These issues affect parameters of the incoming streams to the heat exchanger. The mathematical model of the heat exchanger is based on a set of equations which are simultaneously solved in the iterative process. It enables to define conditions in the outlets of both the hot and the cold sides

  15. Kinetic Analyses of Cation Exchange Rates in Synthetic Birnessite Measured by Time- Resolved Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopano, C. L.; Heaney, P. J.; Post, J. E.; Bandstra, J.; Brantley, S. L.

    2006-05-01

    -stage model produced the following rate equation: R = 0.081 ⋆ XNa ⋆ [K(aq)], where [K(aq)] is the molar concentration of the aqueous cation The two-stage model generated a rate equation of R = 0.146 ⋆ (1- (XK(dis) + XK(ord))) - 0.01153 ⋆ XK(dis), where X is mole fraction interlayer cation and R is the rate of exchange in terms sec-1. We assume a linear relationship between mole fraction and unit-cell volume based on Vegard's Law. Further kinetic analyses are in progress in order to determine the cation exchange rate dependence on concentration and to compare cation exchange rates for K-, Cs- and Ba- exchange.

  16. Reconstructing the Most Probable Folding Transition Path from Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Cruz, Camilo Andres; Garcia, Angel E

    2013-08-13

    The characterization of transition pathways between long-lived states, and the identification of the corresponding transition state ensembles are useful tools in the study of rare events such as protein folding. In this work we demonstrate how the most probable transition path between metastable states can be recovered from replica exchange molecular dynamic simulation data by using the dynamic string method. The local drift vector in collective variables is determined via short continuous trajectories between replica exchanges at a given temperature, and points along the string are updated based on this drift vector to produce reaction pathways between the folded and unfolded state. The method is applied to a designed beta hairpin-forming peptide to obtain information on the folding mechanism and transition state using different sets of collective variables at various temperatures. Two main folding pathways differing in the order of events are found and discussed, and the relative free energy differences for each path estimated. Finally, the structures near the transition state are found and described. PMID:26584126

  17. Considerably Unfolded Transthyretin Monomers Preceed and Exchange with Dynamically Structured Amyloid Protofibrils

    PubMed Central

    Groenning, Minna; Campos, Raul I.; Hirschberg, Daniel; Hammarström, Per; Vestergaard, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous studies, a detailed description of the transthyretin (TTR) self-assembly mechanism and fibril structure in TTR amyloidoses remains unresolved. Here, using a combination of primarily small -angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HXMS) analysis, we describe an unexpectedly dynamic TTR protofibril structure which exchanges protomers with highly unfolded monomers in solution. The protofibrils only grow to an approximate final size of 2,900 kDa and a length of 70 nm and a comparative HXMS analysis of native and aggregated samples revealed a much higher average solvent exposure of TTR upon fibrillation. With SAXS, we reveal the continuous presence of a considerably unfolded TTR monomer throughout the fibrillation process, and show that a considerable fraction of the fibrillating protein remains in solution even at a late maturation state. Together, these data reveal that the fibrillar state interchanges with the solution state. Accordingly, we suggest that TTR fibrillation proceeds via addition of considerably unfolded monomers, and the continuous presence of amyloidogenic structures near the protofibril surface offers a plausible explanation for secondary nucleation. We argue that the presence of such dynamic structural equilibria must impact future therapeutic development strategies. PMID:26108284

  18. A canonical replica exchange molecular dynamics implementation with normal pressure in each replica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Emanuel K.; Pivkin, Igor V.; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present a new canonical replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulation method with normal pressure for all replicas (REMD-NV(p) T). This method is suitable for systems for which conventional constant NPT-setups are difficult to implement. In this implementation, each replica has an individual volume, with normal pressure maintained for each replica in the simulation. We derive a novel exchange term and validate this method on the structural properties of SPC/E water and dialanine (Ala2) in the bulk and in the presence of a graphene layer. Compared to conventional constant NPT-REMD and NVT-REMD simulations, we find that the structural properties of our new method are in good agreement with simulations in the NPT-ensemble at all temperatures. The structural properties of the systems considered are affected by high pressures at elevated temperatures in the constant NVT-ensemble, an effect that our method corrects for. Unprojected distributions reveal that essential motions of the peptide are affected by the presence of the barostat in the NPT implementation but that the dynamical eigenmodes of the NV(p)T method are in close quantitative agreement with the NVT-ensemble.

  19. A canonical replica exchange molecular dynamics implementation with normal pressure in each replica.

    PubMed

    Peter, Emanuel K; Pivkin, Igor V; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2016-07-28

    In this paper, we present a new canonical replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulation method with normal pressure for all replicas (REMD-NV(p) T). This method is suitable for systems for which conventional constant NPT-setups are difficult to implement. In this implementation, each replica has an individual volume, with normal pressure maintained for each replica in the simulation. We derive a novel exchange term and validate this method on the structural properties of SPC/E water and dialanine (Ala2) in the bulk and in the presence of a graphene layer. Compared to conventional constant NPT-REMD and NVT-REMD simulations, we find that the structural properties of our new method are in good agreement with simulations in the NPT-ensemble at all temperatures. The structural properties of the systems considered are affected by high pressures at elevated temperatures in the constant NVT-ensemble, an effect that our method corrects for. Unprojected distributions reveal that essential motions of the peptide are affected by the presence of the barostat in the NPT implementation but that the dynamical eigenmodes of the NV(p)T method are in close quantitative agreement with the NVT-ensemble. PMID:27475393

  20. Dynamics of intramolecular spin exchange interaction of a nitronyl nitroxide diradical in solution and on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lloveras, V; Badetti, E; Veciana, J; Vidal-Gancedo, J

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we report the study of the dynamics of a thermally modulated intramolecular spin exchange interaction of a novel diradical nitronyl nitroxide-substituted disulfide in solution and when it is grafted on a gold surface. The structure of this diradical was designed to have flexible chains leading to intramolecular collisions and hence spin exchange interaction, and with an appropriate binding group to be grafted on the gold surface to study its behavior on the surface. In solution, this diradical shows a strong spin exchange interaction between both radicals which is modulated by temperature, but also gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with this diradical permit investigation of such a phenomenon in surface-grafted radicals. The spin-labelled AuNP synthesis was optimized to obtain high coverage of spin labels to lead to high spin exchange interaction. The obtained AuNPs were studied by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), UV-Vis, and IR spectroscopies, HR-TEM microscopy, Cyclic Voltammetry (CV), Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA). This inorganic-organic hybrid material also showed dipolar interactions between its radicals which were confirmed by the appearance in the EPR spectra of an |Δms| = 2 transition at half-field. This signal gives direct evidence of the presence of a high-spin state and permitted us to study the nature of the magnetic coupling between the spins which was found to be antiferromagnetic. Self-Assembled Monolayers (SAMs) of these radicals on the Au (111) substrate were also prepared and studied by contact angle, X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), Cyclic Voltammetry and EPR. The magnetic as well as the electrochemical properties of the hybrid surfaces were studied and compared with the properties of this diradical in solution. Analogies between the properties of AuNPs with high coverage of radicals and those of SAM were

  1. Superior bit error rate and jitter due to improved switching field distribution in exchange spring magnetic recording media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suess, D.; Fuger, M.; Abert, C.; Bruckner, F.; Vogler, C.

    2016-06-01

    We report two effects that lead to a significant reduction of the switching field distribution in exchange spring media. The first effect relies on a subtle mechanism of the interplay between exchange coupling between soft and hard layers and anisotropy that allows significant reduction of the switching field distribution in exchange spring media. This effect reduces the switching field distribution by about 30% compared to single-phase media. A second effect is that due to the improved thermal stability of exchange spring media over single-phase media, the jitter due to thermal fluctuation is significantly smaller for exchange spring media than for single-phase media. The influence of this overall improved switching field distribution on the transition jitter in granular recording and the bit error rate in bit-patterned magnetic recording is discussed. The transition jitter in granular recording for a distribution of Khard values of 3% in the hard layer, taking into account thermal fluctuations during recording, is estimated to be a = 0.78 nm, which is similar to the best reported calculated jitter in optimized heat-assisted recording media.

  2. Superior bit error rate and jitter due to improved switching field distribution in exchange spring magnetic recording media.

    PubMed

    Suess, D; Fuger, M; Abert, C; Bruckner, F; Vogler, C

    2016-01-01

    We report two effects that lead to a significant reduction of the switching field distribution in exchange spring media. The first effect relies on a subtle mechanism of the interplay between exchange coupling between soft and hard layers and anisotropy that allows significant reduction of the switching field distribution in exchange spring media. This effect reduces the switching field distribution by about 30% compared to single-phase media. A second effect is that due to the improved thermal stability of exchange spring media over single-phase media, the jitter due to thermal fluctuation is significantly smaller for exchange spring media than for single-phase media. The influence of this overall improved switching field distribution on the transition jitter in granular recording and the bit error rate in bit-patterned magnetic recording is discussed. The transition jitter in granular recording for a distribution of Khard values of 3% in the hard layer, taking into account thermal fluctuations during recording, is estimated to be a = 0.78 nm, which is similar to the best reported calculated jitter in optimized heat-assisted recording media. PMID:27245287

  3. Superior bit error rate and jitter due to improved switching field distribution in exchange spring magnetic recording media

    PubMed Central

    Suess, D.; Fuger, M.; Abert, C.; Bruckner, F.; Vogler, C.

    2016-01-01

    We report two effects that lead to a significant reduction of the switching field distribution in exchange spring media. The first effect relies on a subtle mechanism of the interplay between exchange coupling between soft and hard layers and anisotropy that allows significant reduction of the switching field distribution in exchange spring media. This effect reduces the switching field distribution by about 30% compared to single-phase media. A second effect is that due to the improved thermal stability of exchange spring media over single-phase media, the jitter due to thermal fluctuation is significantly smaller for exchange spring media than for single-phase media. The influence of this overall improved switching field distribution on the transition jitter in granular recording and the bit error rate in bit-patterned magnetic recording is discussed. The transition jitter in granular recording for a distribution of Khard values of 3% in the hard layer, taking into account thermal fluctuations during recording, is estimated to be a = 0.78 nm, which is similar to the best reported calculated jitter in optimized heat-assisted recording media. PMID:27245287

  4. Rate of water exchange between Al(C 2O 4)(H 2O) 4+(aq) complexes and aqueous solutions determined by 17O-NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Brian L.; Crawford, Susan Neugebauer; Casey, William H.

    1997-12-01

    Substitution of an oxalate molecule for two inner-coordination-sphere waters of Al(H 2O) 63+(aq) enhances, by a factor of ≈ 10 2, the rate of exchange of water molecules from the innercoordination sphere to the bulk solution. The rate parameters for chemical exchange are: k ex298 = 109 s -1, ΔH ‡ = 68.9 ± 2.4 kJ/mol, and ΔS ‡ = 25.3 ± 6.7 J/mol/K, measured via dynamic 17O-NMR. This reactivity enhancement of coordinated waters by oxalate results from a change in bonding between Al(III) and oxygens throughout the complex upon ligation by oxalate. A similar process has been proposed to explain ligand-enhanced dissolution of oxide minerals (e.g., Stumm, 1991; Casey and Ludwig, 1995; Phillips et al., 1997) where a stable adsorbate increases the flux of metals from a surface. These new rate coefficients for aluminum-oxalate complexes, along with previous work on aluminum-fluoride complexes, show a correlation with the respective equilibrium constants similar to that obtained by Ludwig et al. (1995, 1996).

  5. Atomic hydrogen escape rate due to charge exchange with hot plasmaspheric ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maher, L. J.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    Data on ion and electron temperatures and concentrations to several thousand kilometers of altitude were obtained from the Atmosphere Explorer C satellite for 1974 and to 850 km from Arecibo incoherent scatter radar measurements. These data were used to normalize diffusive equilibrium profiles. From these profiles and by using the neutral atmospheric model of Jacchia (1971) and a new hydrogen model, the charge-exchange-induced neutral hydrogen escape fluxes for equatorial and middle latitudes were calculated. The data confirm earlier estimates that the charge exchange loss is more important than Jeans escape for the earth. It is also found that inside the plasmapause this charge exchange process with hot plasmapheric ions is the major production and loss process for the satellite population in the hydrogen geocorona.

  6. The effectiveness of China's RMB exchange rate reforms: An insight from multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jing; Lu, Xinsheng; Zhou, Ying; Qu, Ling

    2015-03-01

    This paper examines the effectiveness of the RMB regime reforms on market efficiency improving for the mainland onshore market and Hong Kong offshore market. Based on multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA), we study the multifractal properties as well as multifractality degree of RMB/USD and RMB/HKD exchange markets. Our empirical results show that, the first RMB regime reform undertaken on July 21, 2005 has a greater impact on RMB/USD exchange market in the short term, while the second RMB exchange reform undertaken on June 19, 2010 exerts the long-term influences on the efficiency of both RMB/USD and RMB/HKD markets. Further, RMB/HKD market is found to work more efficiently, although both mainland onshore market and Hong Kong offshore market have achieved a higher level of efficiency post reforms.

  7. Rates of water exchange for two cobalt(II) heteropoly-oxotungstate compounds in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlin, C. Andre; Harley, Stephen J.; McAlpin, J. Gregory; Hocking, Rosalie K.; Mercado, Brandon Q.; Johnson, Rene L.; Villa, Eric M.; Fidler, Mary Kate; Olmstead, Marilyn M.; Spiccia, Leone; Britt, R. David; Casey, William H.

    2011-03-17

    Polyoxometalate ions are used as ligands in water-oxidation processes related to solar energy production. An important step in these reactions is the association and dissociation of water from the catalytic sites, the rates of which are unknown. Here we report the exchange rates of water ligated to CoII atoms in two polyoxotungstate sandwich molecules using the 17O-NMR-based Swift–Connick method. The compounds were the [Co4(H2O)2(B-α-W9O34)2]-10 and the larger αββα-[Co4(H2O)2(P2W15O56)2]-16 ions, each with two water molecules bound trans to one another in a CoII sandwich between the tungstate ligands. The clusters, in both solid and solution state, were characterized by a range of methods, including NMR, EPR, FT-IR, UV-Vis, and EXAFS spectroscopy, ESI-MS, single-crystal X-ray crystallography, and potentiometry. For [Co4(H2O)2(B-α-PW9O34)2]-10 at pH 5.4, we estimate: k 298=1.5(5)±0.3×106 s-1, ΔH=39.8±0.4 kJ mol-1, ΔS=+7.1±1.2 J mol-1 K-1 and ΔV=5.6 ±1.6 cm3 mol-1. For the Wells–Dawson sandwich cluster (αββα-[Co4(H2O)2(P2W15O56)2]-16) at pH 5.54, we find: k298=1.6(2)±0.3×106 s-1, ΔH=27.6±0.4 kJ mol-1 ΔS=-33±1.3 J mol-1 K-1 and ΔV=2.2±1.4 cm3mol-1 at pH 5.2. The molecules are clearly stable and monospecific in slightly acidic solutions, but dissociate in strongly acidic solutions. This dissociation is detectable by EPR

  8. Protein Folding Simulations Combining Self-Guided Langevin Dynamics and Temperature-Based Replica Exchange.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael S; Olson, Mark A

    2010-08-10

    Computer simulations are increasingly being used to predict thermodynamic observables for folding small proteins. Key to continued progress in this area is the development of algorithms that accelerate conformational sampling. Temperature-based replica exchange (ReX) is a commonly used protocol whereby simulations at several temperatures are simultaneously performed and temperatures are exchanged between simulations via a Metropolis criterion. Another method, self-guided Langevin dynamics (SGLD), expedites conformational sampling by accelerating low-frequency, large-scale motions through the addition of an ad hoc momentum memory term. In this work, we combined these two complementary techniques and compared the results against conventional ReX formulations of molecular dynamics (MD) and Langevin dynamics (LD) simulations for the prediction of thermodynamic folding observables of the Trp-cage mini-protein. All simulations were performed with CHARMM using the PARAM22+CMAP force field and the generalized Born molecular volume implicit solvent model. While SGLD-ReX does not fold up the protein significantly faster than the two conventional ReX approaches, there is some evidence that the method improves sampling convergence by reducing topological folding barriers between energetically similar near-native states. Unlike MD-ReX and LD-ReX, SGLD-ReX predicts melting temperatures, heat capacity curves, and folding free energies that are closer in agreement to the experimental observations. However, this favorable result may be due to distortions of the relative free energies of the folded and unfolded conformational basins caused by the ad hoc force term in the SGLD model. PMID:26613500

  9. Measuring Sediment Exchange Rates On Two Intertidal Banks In The Trent/ouse System, Uk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, S. B.; Lawler, D. M.; West, J. R.; Couperthwaite, J. S.

    Results from PEEP sensors installed at two inter-tidal sites at Burringham, on the Trent estuary, and Blacktoft, near the confluence of the Trent and Ouse rivers, York- shire, UK will be presented for the period 1 March 1997 to 28 September, 1997. The PEEP system allows detailed erosion and deposition event sequences to be monitored automatically, and this considerably improves process information collected. It con- sists of linear arrays of photovoltaic cells covering an active length of 200 mm, housed within a transparent acrylic tube (f=16 mm). Following insertion of the PEEP sen- sors in the bank, subsequent erosion of sediment reveals more photosensitive cells to light, which increases the recorded output voltage. Accretion of sediment causes the recorded output voltages to drop. The sensors are connected to a data logger. This sys- tem permits data to be obtained on the magnitude, timing and frequency of individual erosion and deposition events, and hence sediment cycling patterns on estuarine banks. These events can be related much more sensitively to local hydraulic and meteorolog- ical conditions such as wind speed, tidal range and river flow. This enables calibration of process-based models of sediment transport regime. The main conclusions to this study are as follows: (1) Spring tides lead to higher sediment deposition through in- creased sediment availability. Sediment availability is modified by the proximity of the turbidity maximum to the study site. (2) Erosion is linked with wind speed, with high wind events leading to locally generated waves, which cause removal of surface sediment. Episodic erosion due to collapse of ScliffS forms has also been observed for ´ the Burringham site. (3) Observed Erosion and deposition rates of up to 50 mm per day are generally 2-3 times higher for the Burringham site compared with the Black- toft site. This more dynamic environment may be related to higher tidal velocities, and steeper banks at Burringham

  10. Breaking the Barrier to Slow Water Exchange Rates for Optimal Magnetic Resonance Detection of paraCEST Agents.

    PubMed

    Fernando, W Shirangi; Martins, André F; Zhao, Piyu; Wu, Yunkou; Kiefer, Garry E; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Sherry, A Dean

    2016-03-21

    EuDOTA-tetraamide complexes as paraCEST agents offer an attractive platform for designing biological sensors and responsive agents. The early versions of these agents showed low sensitivity at temperature and power levels suitable for in vivo applications partly due to non-optimal water exchange rates. Here we report two new EuDOTA derivatives having glutamyl-phosphonate side arms that display the slowest water exchange rates of any other paraCEST agent reported so far. The advantages of such systems are demonstrated experimentally both in vitro and in vivo and DFT calculations were performed to help understand the physical-chemical reasons for this interesting behavior. PMID:26937683

  11. The relative rates of thiol-thioester exchange and hydrolysis for alkyl and aryl thioalkanoates in water.

    PubMed

    Bracher, Paul J; Snyder, Phillip W; Bohall, Brooks R; Whitesides, George M

    2011-10-01

    This article reports rate constants for thiol-thioester exchange (k (ex)), and for acid-mediated (k (a)), base-mediated (k (b)), and pH-independent (k (w)) hydrolysis of S-methyl thioacetate and S-phenyl 5-dimethylamino-5-oxo-thiopentanoate-model alkyl and aryl thioalkanoates, respectively-in water. Reactions such as thiol-thioester exchange or aminolysis could have generated molecular complexity on early Earth, but for thioesters to have played important roles in the origin of life, constructive reactions would have needed to compete effectively with hydrolysis under prebiotic conditions. Knowledge of the kinetics of competition between exchange and hydrolysis is also useful in the optimization of systems where exchange is used in applications such as self-assembly or reversible binding. For the alkyl thioester S-methyl thioacetate, which has been synthesized in simulated prebiotic hydrothermal vents, k (a) = 1.5 × 10(-5) M(-1) s(-1), k (b) = 1.6 × 10(-1) M(-1) s(-1), and k (w) = 3.6 × 10(-8) s(-1). At pH 7 and 23°C, the half-life for hydrolysis is 155 days. The second-order rate constant for thiol-thioester exchange between S-methyl thioacetate and 2-sulfonatoethanethiolate is k (ex) = 1.7 M(-1) s(-1). At pH 7 and 23°C, with [R″S(H)] = 1 mM, the half-life of the exchange reaction is 38 h. These results confirm that conditions (pH, temperature, pK (a) of the thiol) exist where prebiotically relevant thioesters can survive hydrolysis in water for long periods of time and rates of thiol-thioester exchange exceed those of hydrolysis by several orders of magnitude. PMID:21728078

  12. Src Kinase Determines the Dynamic Exchange of the Docking Protein NEDD9 (Neural Precursor Cell Expressed Developmentally Down-regulated Gene 9) at Focal Adhesions*

    PubMed Central

    Bradbury, Peta; Bach, Cuc T.; Paul, Andre; O'Neill, Geraldine M.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic exchange of molecules between the cytoplasm and integrin-based focal adhesions provides a rapid response system for modulating cell adhesion. Increased residency time of molecules that regulate adhesion turnover contributes to adhesion stability, ultimately determining migration speed across two-dimensional surfaces. In the present study we test the role of Src kinase in regulating dynamic exchange of the focal adhesion protein NEDD9/HEF1/Cas-L. Using either chemical inhibition or fibroblasts genetically null for Src together with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), we find that Src significantly reduces NEDD9 exchange at focal adhesions. Analysis of NEDD9 mutant constructs with the two major Src-interacting domains disabled revealed the greatest effects were due to the NEDD9 SH2 binding domain. This correlated with a significant change in two-dimensional migratory speed. Given the emerging role of NEDD9 as a regulator of focal adhesion stability, the time of NEDD9 association at the focal adhesions is key in modulating rates of migration and invasion. Our study suggests that Src kinase activity determines NEDD9 exchange at focal adhesions and may similarly modulate other focal adhesion-targeted Src substrates to regulate cell migration. PMID:25059660

  13. Effect of ionophores on the rate of intramolecular cation exchange in durosemiquinone ion pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, M. P.; Bruno, G. V.; Mcguyer, C. A.; Gutierrez, A. R.; Shannon, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of the ionophores 15-crown-5 (15C5), 18-crown-6 (18C6), dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DBC) and cryptand 222 (C222) on intramolecular cation exchange in ion pairs of the sodium salt of the durosemiquinone anion in benzene solution are investigated. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the 18C6 and 15C5 complexes with durosemiquinone reduced by contact with a sodium mirror show an alternating line width which indicates that the sodium ion is being exchanged between equivalent sites near the oxygens of the semiquinone with activation energies of 8.7 and 6.0 kcal/mole and Arrhenius preexponential factors of 9 x 10 to the 12th/sec and 10 to the 12th/sec, respectively. Spectra obtained for the DBC complexes show no evidence of exchange, while those of C222 indicate rapid exchange. It is also noted that the hyperfine splitting constants measured do not change over the 50-K temperature interval studied.

  14. THE ROLE OF AQUEOUS THIN FILM EVAPORATIVE COOLING ON RATES OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY AIR-WATER EXCHANGE UNDER TEMPERATURE DISEQUILIBRIUM CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The technical conununity has only recently addressed the role of atmospheric temperature variations on rates of air-water vapor phase toxicant exchange. The technical literature has documented that: 1) day time rates of elemental mercury vapor phase air-water exchange can exceed ...

  15. Recent advancements on modelling the exchange flow dynamics through the Turkish Strait System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannino, Gianmaria; Sözer, Adil; Özsoy, Emin

    2014-05-01

    The system composed by the two narrow Straits, Dardanelles and Bosphorus, and the Marmara Sea is known as the Turkish Straits System (TSS). The scientific questions on the role of the TSS in coupling the adjacent basins of the Mediterranean and Black Seas with highly contrasting properties, in a region of high climatic variability and materials transport depending critically on the cycle of water can only be answered by model predictions of the processes that determine the integral properties of the coupled sub-systems. This can only be achieved if the entire TSS is modeled as a finely resolved integral system that appropriately accounts for the high contrasts in seawater properties, steep topography, hydraulic controls, fine and meso-scale turbulence, nonlinear and non-hydrostatic effects, thermodynamic states and an active free-surface in the fullest extent, based on well represented fluid dynamical principles. In this study the MITgcm is used at very high resolution to study this extreme environment that needs to be represented as a whole and with the full details of its highly contrasting properties. The model domain chosen extends over the entire TSS, including also part of the north-east Aegean Sea at south, and the Black Sea at north of the domain. A non-uniform curvilinear orthogonal grid covers the domain at variable resolution: from less than 50 m in the two Straits up to about 1 Km in the Marmara Sea. To adequately resolve the complex hydraulic dynamics of the TSS, the model grid is made by 100 vertical z-levels. The model is initialized with three different water masses filling the western part of the domain, the Marmara Sea and the eastern side of the domain respectively, with vertical profiles selected from CTD casts obtained during the cruise of the R/V BİLİM of the Institute of Marine Sciences in June-July 2013. With the initial condition specified as lock-exchanges at the two straits, the model is left free to adjust to the expected two

  16. Interest rate change and Omori dynamics in the Stock Market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Alexander; Wang, Fengzhong; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2009-03-01

    I present the behavior of U.S. markets on the day of U.S. Federal Open Market Commission (FOMC) meetings from the perspective of Statistical Physics. The announcement of key U.S. Federal Reserve rate changes causes a small financial shock, where the dynamics before and after the announcement can be described by an Omori law. We find that markets respond sharply to the news in a complex way reminiscent of physical earthquakes described by the Omori law, which describes the power-law relaxation of aftershocks following a singular perturbation. We find Omori laws in both the volatility of the price (also known as the absolute returns) and the volume traded, using 1-minute resolution financial time series. These results suggest that the perturbative response of the stock market is the same for both financial news and financial crises. The intraday response can be measured by the Omori power-law exponent φ, which has opposite sign before and after the announcement. We estimate the magnitude of news by relating φ to the behavior of the U. S. Treasury Bill before and after FOMC announcements.

  17. A system dynamics evaluation model: implementation of health information exchange for public health reporting

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Jacqueline A; Deegan, Michael; Wilson, Rosalind V; Kaushal, Rainu; Fredericks, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the complex dynamics involved in implementing electronic health information exchange (HIE) for public health reporting at a state health department, and to identify policy implications to inform similar implementations. Materials and methods Qualitative data were collected over 8 months from seven experts at New York State Department of Health who implemented web services and protocols for querying, receipt, and validation of electronic data supplied by regional health information organizations. Extensive project documentation was also collected. During group meetings experts described the implementation process and created reference modes and causal diagrams that the evaluation team used to build a preliminary model. System dynamics modeling techniques were applied iteratively to build causal loop diagrams representing the implementation. The diagrams were validated iteratively by individual experts followed by group review online, and through confirmatory review of documents and artifacts. Results Three casual loop diagrams captured well-recognized system dynamics: Sliding Goals, Project Rework, and Maturity of Resources. The findings were associated with specific policies that address funding, leadership, ensuring expertise, planning for rework, communication, and timeline management. Discussion This evaluation illustrates the value of a qualitative approach to system dynamics modeling. As a tool for strategic thinking on complicated and intense processes, qualitative models can be produced with fewer resources than a full simulation, yet still provide insights that are timely and relevant. Conclusions System dynamics techniques clarified endogenous and exogenous factors at play in a highly complex technology implementation, which may inform other states engaged in implementing HIE supported by federal Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) legislation. PMID:23292910

  18. Correlating structure, dynamics, and function in transmembrane segment VII of the Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Tyler; Li, Xiuju; Fliegel, Larry; Sykes, Brian D; Rainey, Jan K

    2010-02-01

    We place (15)N nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation analysis and functional mutagenesis studies in the context of our previous structural and mutagenesis work to correlate structure, dynamics and function for the seventh transmembrane segment of the human Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 1. Although G261-S263 was previously identified as an interruption point in the helical structure of this isolated transmembrane peptide in dodecylphosphocholine micelles, and rapid conformational exchange was implicated in the NOE measurements, the six (15)N labelled residues examined in this study all have similar dynamics on the ps-ns time scale. A mathematical model incorporating chemical exchange is the best fit for residues G261, L264, and A268. This implies that a segment of residues from G261 to A268 samples different conformations on the mus-ms time scale. Chemical exchange on an intermediate time scale is consistent with an alternating-access cycle where E262 is bent away from the cytosol during proton translocation by the exchanger. The functional importance of chemical exchange at G261-A268 is corroborated by the abrogated activity of the full-length exchanger with the bulky and restricting Ile substitutions F260I, G261I, E262I, S263I, and A268I. PMID:19595986

  19. The loss rates of O{sup +} in the inner magnetosphere caused by both magnetic field line curvature scattering and charge exchange reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Y.; Shen, C.

    2014-03-15

    With consideration of magnetic field line curvature (FLC) pitch angle scattering and charge exchange reactions, the O{sup +} (>300 keV) in the inner magnetosphere loss rates are investigated by using an eigenfunction analysis. The FLC scattering provides a mechanism for the ring current O{sup +} to enter the loss cone and influence the loss rates caused by charge exchange reactions. Assuming that the pitch angle change is small for each scattering event, the diffusion equation including a charge exchange term is constructed and solved; the eigenvalues of the equation are identified. The resultant loss rates of O{sup +} are approximately equal to the linear superposition of the loss rate without considering the charge exchange reactions and the loss rate associated with charge exchange reactions alone. The loss time is consistent with the observations from the early recovery phases of magnetic storms.

  20. Assessing the Dynamics of Bittorrent Swarms Topologies Using the Peer Exchange Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauzie, Mohamad Dikshie; Thamrin, Achmad Husni; van Meter, Rodney; Murai, Jun

    Bittorrent is one of the most popular and successful applications in the current Internet. However, we still have little knowledge about the topology of real Bittorrent swarms, how dynamic the topology is, and how it affects overall behavior. This paper describes an experimental study of the overlay topologies of real-world Bittorrent networks, focusing on the activity of the nodes of its P2P topology and especially their dynamic relationships. Peer Exchange Protocol (PEX) messages are analyzed to infer topologies and their properties, capturing the variations of their behavior. Our measurements, verified using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness of fit test and the likelihood ratio test and confirmed via simulation, show that a power-law with exponential cutoff is a more plausible model than a pure power-law distribution. We also found that the average clustering coefficient is very low, supporting this observation. Bittorrent swarms are far more dynamic than has been recognized previously, potentially impacting attempts to optimize the performance of the system as well as the accuracy of simulations and analyses.

  1. Analysis of bubbles and crashes in the TRY/USD, TRY/EUR, TRY/JPY and TRY/CHF exchange rate within the scope of econophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deviren, Bayram; Kocakaplan, Yusuf; Keskin, Mustafa; Balcılar, Mehmet; Özdemir, Zeynel Abidin; Ersoy, Ersan

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we analyze the Turkish Lira/US Dollar (TRY/USD), Turkish Lira/Euro (TRY/EUR), Turkish Lira/Japanese Yen (TRY/JPY) and Turkish Lira/Swiss Franc (TRY/CHF) exchange rates in the global financial crisis period to detect the bubbles and crashes in the TRY by using a mathematical methodology developed by Watanabe et al. (2007). The methodology defines the bubbles and crashes in financial market price fluctuations by considering an exponential fitting of the associated data. This methodology is applied to detect the bubbles and crashes in the TRY/USD, TRY/EUR, TRY/JPY and TRY/CHF exchange rates from January, 1, 2005 to December, 20, 2013. In this mathematical methodology, the whole period of bubbles and crashes can be determined purely from past data, and the start of bubbles and crashes can be identified even before its bursts. In this way, the periods of bubbles and crashes in the TRY/USD, TRY/EUR, TRY/JPY and TRY/CHF are determined, and the beginning and end points of these periods are detected. The results show that the crashes in the TRY/CHF exchange rate are commonly finished earlier than in the other exchange rates; hence it is probable that the crashes in the other exchange rates would be finished soon when the crashes in the TRY/CHF exchange rate ended. We also find that the periods of crashes in the TRY/EUR exchange rate take longer time than in the other exchange rates. This information can be used in risk management and/or speculative gain. The crashes' periods in the TRY/EUR and TRY/USD exchange rates are observed to be relatively longer than in the other exchange rates.

  2. Conformational sampling enhancement of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations using swarm particle intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamberaj, Hiqmet

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we present a new method based on swarm particle social intelligence for use in replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations. In this method, the replicas (representing the different system configurations) are allowed communicating with each other through the individual and social knowledge, in additional to considering them as a collection of real particles interacting through the Newtonian forces. The new method is based on the modification of the equations of motion in such way that the replicas are driven towards the global energy minimum. The method was tested for the Lennard-Jones clusters of N = 4, 5, and 6 atoms. Our results showed that the new method is more efficient than the conventional replica exchange method under the same practical conditions. In particular, the new method performed better on optimizing the distribution of the replicas among the thermostats with time and, in addition, ergodic convergence is observed to be faster. We also introduce a weighted histogram analysis method allowing analyzing the data from simulations by combining data from all of the replicas and rigorously removing the inserted bias.

  3. Walking freely in the energy and temperature space by the modified replica exchange molecular dynamics method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changjun; Huang, Yanzhao

    2016-06-30

    Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics (REMD) method is a powerful sampling tool in molecular simulations. Recently, we made a modification to the standard REMD method. It places some inactive replicas at different temperatures as well as the active replicas. The method completely decouples the number of the active replicas and the number of the temperature levels. In this article, we make a further modification to our previous method. It uses the inactive replicas in a different way. The inactive replicas first sample in their own knowledge-based energy databases and then participate in the replica exchange operations in the REMD simulation. In fact, this method is a hybrid between the standard REMD method and the simulated tempering method. Using different active replicas, one can freely control the calculation quantity and the convergence speed of the simulation. To illustrate the performance of the method, we apply it to some small models. The distribution functions of the replicas in the energy space and temperature space show that the modified REMD method in this work can let the replicas walk freely in both of the two spaces. With the same number of the active replicas, the free energy surface in the simulation converges faster than the standard REMD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27059441

  4. Conformational sampling enhancement of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations using swarm particle intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Kamberaj, Hiqmet

    2015-09-28

    In this paper, we present a new method based on swarm particle social intelligence for use in replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations. In this method, the replicas (representing the different system configurations) are allowed communicating with each other through the individual and social knowledge, in additional to considering them as a collection of real particles interacting through the Newtonian forces. The new method is based on the modification of the equations of motion in such way that the replicas are driven towards the global energy minimum. The method was tested for the Lennard-Jones clusters of N = 4,  5, and 6 atoms. Our results showed that the new method is more efficient than the conventional replica exchange method under the same practical conditions. In particular, the new method performed better on optimizing the distribution of the replicas among the thermostats with time and, in addition, ergodic convergence is observed to be faster. We also introduce a weighted histogram analysis method allowing analyzing the data from simulations by combining data from all of the replicas and rigorously removing the inserted bias.

  5. Hydrated fractions of cellulosics probed by infrared spectroscopy coupled with dynamics of deuterium exchange.

    PubMed

    Driemeier, Carlos; Mendes, Fernanda M; Ling, Liu Yi

    2015-08-20

    This article presents a novel method to selectively probe the non-crystalline, hydrated fractions of cellulosic biomass. The method is based on time-resolved infrared spectra analyzed to provide information on spectral and dynamical features of deuterium exchange (OH → OD) in D2O atmosphere. We assign deuterium exchange spectral regions (700-3800 cm(-1)) and explore changes due to relative humidity, different cellulosic samples, and infrared polarization. Here, two results are highlighted. First, a wide range of celluloses isolated from plants show remarkable spectral similarities whatever the relative amounts of cellulose and xylan. This result supports an inherent type of hydrated disorder which is mostly insensitive to the molecular identities of the associated polysaccharides. Second, polarized infrared analysis of cotton reveals hydrated cellulose having chains preferentially aligned with those of crystals, while the hydroxyls of hydrated cellulose present much more randomized orientation. Our results provide new insights on molecular and group orientation and on hydrogen bonding in hydrated fractions of cellulosic biomass. PMID:25965468

  6. A High-Resolution Modeling Study of the Bosphorus Strait Dynamics and Exchange Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sözer, Adil; Sannino, Gianmaria; Özsoy, Emin

    2013-04-01

    An all-time modelling challenge aims to establish a sound understanding of the high energy environment of the Turkish Straits System, relating to inter-basin water and material transports and their influence on the sensitive ecosystems of the adjacent seas. As a first step in this direction, well resolved, high level, physically representative predictive models of the Bosphorus Strait exchange flow hydrodynamics are developed, adequately representing its complex topography, hydraulic controls, dissipative hydraulic jumps, mixing and turbulence mechanisms, with the application of appropriate basin boundary and initial conditions and judiciously selected numerical and physical model options. Both the ROMS and MITgcm models are used and compared for performance. Idealized and real case model results successfully reproduce observed flow features. The unique maximal exchange regime of the Bosphorus Strait, with hydraulic controls are demonstrated, although frictional effects, especially of the highly irregular lateral boundaries, are found to be extremely important, associated with mixing and entrainment and nonlinear dynamics determining the two-way fluxes as a function of sea-level changes across the strait. The intercomparison of ROMS and MITgcm results are extremely satisfactory in the basic elements of the flow, except for some small differences.

  7. Fluid Analysis and Improved Structure of an ATEG Heat Exchanger Based on Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Z. B.; Deng, Y. D.; Su, C. Q.; Yuan, X. H.

    2015-06-01

    In this study, a numerical model has been employed to analyze the internal flow field distribution in a heat exchanger applied for an automotive thermoelectric generator based on computational fluid dynamics. The model simulates the influence of factors relevant to the heat exchanger, including the automotive waste heat mass flow velocity, temperature, internal fins, and back pressure. The result is in good agreement with experimental test data. Sensitivity analysis of the inlet parameters shows that increase of the exhaust velocity, compared with the inlet temperature, makes little contribution (0.1 versus 0.19) to the heat transfer but results in a detrimental back pressure increase (0.69 versus 0.21). A configuration equipped with internal fins is proved to offer better thermal performance compared with that without fins. Finally, based on an attempt to improve the internal flow field, a more rational structure is obtained, offering a more homogeneous temperature distribution, higher average heat transfer coefficient, and lower back pressure.

  8. High-field measurement of the 129Xe-Rb spin-exchange rate due to binary collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu; Kuzma, Nicholas N.; Happer, William

    2002-11-01

    We have measured the binary spin-exchange rate coefficient for collisions between Rb and 129Xe atoms at a magnetic field B=9.4 T and in the temperature range 160rate 1/T1 of 129Xe is dominated by 129Xe-Rb binary collisions. We measured 1/T1 using the methods of conventional nuclear magnetic resonance, with no spin enhancement by optical pumping. At the high magnetic field and large gas pressures used in this work, the contribution of 129Xe-Rb molecules to the spin-exchange rate was less than 0.1% of the binary-collision rate. The Rb atomic number density [Rb] was measured directly from the large Faraday rotation of the polarization of near-resonant light passing through the sample cells. The rate coefficient is κ=d(1/T1)/d [Rb]=(1.75+/-0.12)×10-16 cm3/s.

  9. Stability of single sheet GNNQQNY aggregates analyzed by replica exchange molecular dynamics: Antiparallel versus parallel association

    SciTech Connect

    Vitagliano, Luigi; Esposito, Luciana; Pedone, Carlo; De Simone, Alfonso

    2008-12-26

    Protein and peptide aggregation into amyloid plaques is associated with a large variety of neurodegenerative diseases. The definition of the molecular bases of these pathologies is hampered by the transient nature of pre-fibrillar small-oligomers that are considered the toxic species. The ability of the peptide GNNQQNY to form amyloid-like structures makes it a good model to investigate the complex processes involved into amyloid fiber formation. By employing full atomistic replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations, we constructed the free energy surface of small assemblies of GNNQQNY to gain novel insights into the fiber formation process. The calculations suggest that the peptide exhibits a remarkable tendency to form both parallel and antiparallel {beta}-sheets. The data show that GNNQQNY preference for parallel or antiparallel {beta}-sheets is governed by a subtle balance of factors including assemblies' size, sidechain-sidechain interactions and pH. The samplings analysis provides a rationale to the observed trends.

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study on Energy Exchange Between Vibration Modes of a Square Graphene Nanoflake Oscillator.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunae; Kang, Jeong Won; Kim, Ki-Sub; Kwon, Oh-Kuen

    2016-02-01

    Superlubricity in nanoscale graphene structures has been of interest for developing graphene-based nanoelectromechanical systems, as well as for the study of basic mechanical properties. Here, we investigated the translational and rotational motions of a square graphene nanoflake with retracting motions by performing classical molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that the kinetic energy of the translational motion was exchanged into the kinetic energy of the rotational motion. Thus, square graphene nanoflake oscillators have very low quality factors in translational motions. We discuss that square graphene nanoflakes have great potential to be a core component in nanoelectromechanical systems by detecting their motions with ultrahigh sensitivity to facilitate the development of sensor, memory, and quantum computing. PMID:27433628

  11. 75% success rate after open debridement, exchange of tibial insert, and antibiotics in knee prosthetic joint infections

    PubMed Central

    Thórhallsdóttir, Valdís Gudrún; Robertsson, Otto; W-Dahl, Annette; Stefánsdóttir, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a leading cause of early revision after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Open debridement with exchange of tibial insert allows treatment of infection with retention of fixed components. We investigated the success rate of this procedure in the treatment of knee PJIs in a nationwide material, and determined whether the results were affected by microbiology, antibiotic treatment, or timing of debridement. Patients and methods 145 primary TKAs revised for the first time, due to infection, with debridement and exchange of the tibial insert were identified in the Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register (SKAR). Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogen (37%) followed by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) (23%). Failure was defined as death before the end of antibiotic treatment, revision of major components due to infection, life-long antibiotic treatment, or chronic infection. Results The overall healing rate was 75%. The type of infecting pathogen did not statistically significantly affect outcome. Staphylococcal infections treated without a combination of antibiotics including rifampin had a higher failure rate than those treated with rifampin (RR = 4, 95% CI: 2–10). In the 16 cases with more than 3 weeks of symptoms before treatment, the healing rate was 62%, as compared to 77% in the other cases (p = 0.2). The few patients with a revision model of prosthesis at primary operation had a high failure rate (5 of 8). Interpretation Good results can be achieved by open debridement with exchange of tibial insert. It is important to use an antibiotic combination including rifampin in staphylococcal infections. PMID:25753311

  12. Dynamic behavior of chemical exchange column in a water detritiation system for a fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanishi, T.; Iwai, Y.

    2008-07-15

    The dynamic behavior of a CECE column used for a demonstration reactor (DEMO) plant has been studied. In the case where the column was filled with natural water, the time required to achieve steady state was almost the same as that for the column operated under the total reflux mode. The manipulated variables were flow rate of the bottom stream for the control of the bottom tritium concentration, and flow rate of the hydrogen stream for the control of the top tritium concentration. For both the variables, the response curve was expressed by the first-order lag system, and a PID controller could be applied. (authors)

  13. Dynamic analysis of heart rate may predict subsequent ventricular tachycardia after myocardial infarction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makikallio, T. H.; Seppanen, T.; Airaksinen, K. E.; Koistinen, J.; Tulppo, M. P.; Peng, C. K.; Goldberger, A. L.; Huikuri, H. V.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamics analysis of RR interval behavior and traditional measures of heart rate variability were compared between postinfarction patients with and without vulnerability to ventricular tachyarrhythmias in a case-control study. Short-term fractal correlation of heart rate dynamics was better than traditional measures of heart rate variability in differentiating patients with and without life-threatening arrhythmias.

  14. Proton dynamics in sulfonated ionic salt composites: Alternative membrane materials for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Almeida, N. E.; Goward, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrated Nafion, the most prevalent proton exchange membrane utilizes a vehicular mechanism for proton conduction. However, there is an increasing need for such membranes to perform under anhydrous conditions, at high temperatures, which would employ a structural transport mechanism for proton conductivity. Here, several solid-acids are characterized, both as pristine salts, and as polymer composites. Materials of interest include benzimidazolium methanesulfonate (BMSA), imidazolium methanesulfonate (IMSA), and imidazolium trifluoromethanesulfate (IFMS). The proton dynamics of these solid acids are characterized as pure salts, and as composites, embedded into porous Teflon, by solid state NMR. It was determined that spin lattice (T1) relaxation of the composites are systematically lower than that of the pure salt, indicating that local dynamics are enhanced in the composites. Spin-spin relaxation (T2∗) was measured as a function of temperature to determine the activation energy for local mobility for each salt and composite. The activation energy for local proton mobility in each salt decreased after being inserted into porous Teflon. Finally, the long-range ion transport was characterized using impedance spectroscopy. The IFMS-Teflon composite possessed the lowest activation energy for local proton mobility, the highest thermal stability, and the most favorable proton conductivity, among the investigated materials.

  15. Influence of Hydration Level on Polymer and Water Dynamics in Alkaline Anion Exchange Fuel Cell Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Jacob; Kim, Jenny; Tyagi, Madhu; Soles, Christopher; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Coughlin, Bryan

    2015-03-01

    Triblock copolymers based on poly(chloromethylstyrene)-b-poly(ethylene)-b-poly(chloromethylstyrene) can be quaternized to different extents to yield anion exchange membranes for alkaline fuel cells. In the absence of moisture, these membranes demonstrate bilayer lamellar morphology. Upon high levels of hydration, however, in-situ small angle neutron scattering reveals the emergence of higher-order diffraction peaks. This phenomena has previously been observed in analogous diblock copolymer-based membranes and has been attributed to the induction of a multilayer lamellar morphology in which selective striping of water occurs in the center of the ion-rich domain. By conducting humidity-resolved quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) measurements using deuterated water, we are able to isolate differences in the pico- to nanosecond timescale dynamics of the hydrogenated membrane upon hydration. QENS measurements in the presence of a hydrogenated water source subsequently permit deconvolution and isolation of the translational and rotational dynamics of water as a function of relative humidity, revealing spatial and temporal changes in polymer and water motion at high levels of hydration.

  16. The dynamics of stock exchange based on the formalism of weak continuous quantum measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnyk, S.; Tuluzov, I.

    2010-07-01

    The problem of measurement in economic models and the possibility of their quantum-mechanical description are considered. It is revealed that the apparent paradox of such a description is associated with a priori requirement of conformity of the model to all the alternatives of free choice of the observer. The measurement of the state of a trader on a stock exchange is formally defined as his responses to the proposals of sale at a fixed price. It is shown that an analogue of Bell's inequalities for this measurement model is violated at the most general assumptions related to the strategy of the trader and requires a quantum-mechanical description of the dynamics of his condition. In the framework of the theory of weak continuous quantum measurements, the equation of stock price dynamics and the quantum-mechanical generalization of the F. Black and M. Scholes model for pricing options are obtained. The fundamental distinctions between the obtained model and the classical one are discussed.

  17. Predicting Precession Rates from Secular Dynamics for Extra-solar Multi-planet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Laerhoven, Christa

    2015-12-01

    Considering the secular dynamics of multi-planet systems provides substantial insight into the interactions between planets in those systems. Secular interactions are those that don't involve knowing where a planet is along its orbit, and they dominate when planets are not involved in mean motion resonances. These interactions exchange angular momentum among the planets, evolving their eccentricities and inclinations. To second order in the planets' eccentricities and inclinations, the eccentricity and inclination perturbations are decoupled. Given the right variable choice, the relevant differential equations are linear and thus the eccentricity and inclination behaviors can be described as a sum of eigenmodes. Since the underlying structure of the secular eigenmodes can be calculated using only the planets' masses and semi-major axes, one can elucidate the eccentricity and inclination behavior of planets in exoplanet systems even without knowing the planets' current eccentricities and inclinations. I have calculated both the eccentricity and inclination secular eigenmodes for the population of known multi-planet systems whose planets have well determined masses and periods and have used this to predict what range of pericenter precession (and nodal regression) rates the planets may have. One might have assumed that in any given system the planets with shorter periods would have faster precession rates, but I show that this is not necessarily the case. Planets that are 'loners' have narrow ranges of possible precession rates, while planets that are 'groupies' can have a wider range of possible precession rates. Several planets are expected to undergo significant precession on few-year timescales and many planets (though not the majority of planets) will undergo significant precession on decade timescales.

  18. Measurements of soil and canopy exchange rates in the Amazon rain forest using Rn-222

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trumbore, S. E.; Keller, M.; Wofsy, S. C.; Da Costa, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements were taken of the emission of Rn-222 from Amazon forest rocks and soils and used as a tracer of ventilation of the forest canopy layer at night. It was determined that the greatest resistance to transfer of trace gases from the soil to the atmosphere lies in the soil air space. Profiles of Rn-222 and CO2 showed steepest concentration gradients in the layer between 0 and 3 m above soil surface. Aerodynamic resistances calculated for this layer from Rn-222 and CO2 varied from 1.6 to 18 s/cm, with greater resistance during the afternoon than at night. The resistance to exchange with air from the entire 41 m layer below the canopy averaged 4.8 s/cm during 13 nights of CO2 profiles. The calculated average time to flush the layer below 41 m is 5.5 hr, and it is concluded that this indicates that significant exchange occurs despite nocturnal stratification.

  19. Catalysis in a Cage: Condition-Dependent Speciation and Dynamics of Exchanged Cu Cations in SSZ-13 Zeolites.

    PubMed

    Paolucci, Christopher; Parekh, Atish A; Khurana, Ishant; Di Iorio, John R; Li, Hui; Albarracin Caballero, Jonatan D; Shih, Arthur J; Anggara, Trunojoyo; Delgass, W Nicholas; Miller, Jeffrey T; Ribeiro, Fabio H; Gounder, Rajamani; Schneider, William F

    2016-05-11

    The relationships among the macroscopic compositional parameters of a Cu-exchanged SSZ-13 zeolite catalyst, the types and numbers of Cu active sites, and activity for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with NH3 are established through experimental interrogation and computational analysis of materials across the catalyst composition space. Density functional theory, stochastic models, and experimental characterizations demonstrate that within the synthesis protocols applied here and across Si:Al ratios, the volumetric density of six-membered-rings (6MR) containing two Al (2Al sites) is consistent with a random Al siting in the SSZ-13 lattice subject to Löwenstein's rule. Further, exchanged Cu(II) ions first populate these 2Al sites before populating remaining unpaired, or 1Al, sites as Cu(II)OH. These sites are distinguished and enumerated ex situ through vibrational and X-ray absorption spectroscopies (XAS) and chemical titrations. In situ and operando XAS follow Cu oxidation state and coordination environment as a function of environmental conditions including low-temperature (473 K) SCR catalysis and are rationalized through first-principles thermodynamics and ab initio molecular dynamics. Experiment and theory together reveal that the Cu sites respond sensitively to exposure conditions, and in particular that Cu species are solvated and mobilized by NH3 under SCR conditions. While Cu sites are spectroscopically and chemically distinct away from these conditions, they exhibit similar turnover rates, apparent activation energies and apparent reaction orders at the SCR conditions, even on zeolite frameworks other than SSZ13. PMID:27070199

  20. Dynamics of intramolecular spin exchange interaction of a nitronyl nitroxide diradical in solution and on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloveras, V.; Badetti, E.; Veciana, J.; Vidal-Gancedo, J.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we report the study of the dynamics of a thermally modulated intramolecular spin exchange interaction of a novel diradical nitronyl nitroxide-substituted disulfide in solution and when it is grafted on a gold surface. The structure of this diradical was designed to have flexible chains leading to intramolecular collisions and hence spin exchange interaction, and with an appropriate binding group to be grafted on the gold surface to study its behavior on the surface. In solution, this diradical shows a strong spin exchange interaction between both radicals which is modulated by temperature, but also gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with this diradical permit investigation of such a phenomenon in surface-grafted radicals. The spin-labelled AuNP synthesis was optimized to obtain high coverage of spin labels to lead to high spin exchange interaction. The obtained AuNPs were studied by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), UV-Vis, and IR spectroscopies, HR-TEM microscopy, Cyclic Voltammetry (CV), Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA). This inorganic-organic hybrid material also showed dipolar interactions between its radicals which were confirmed by the appearance in the EPR spectra of an |Δms| = 2 transition at half-field. This signal gives direct evidence of the presence of a high-spin state and permitted us to study the nature of the magnetic coupling between the spins which was found to be antiferromagnetic. Self-Assembled Monolayers (SAMs) of these radicals on the Au (111) substrate were also prepared and studied by contact angle, X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), Cyclic Voltammetry and EPR. The magnetic as well as the electrochemical properties of the hybrid surfaces were studied and compared with the properties of this diradical in solution. Analogies between the properties of AuNPs with high coverage of radicals and those of SAM were

  1. Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics Study of Dimerization in Prion Protein: Multiple Modes of Interaction and Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Chamachi, Neharika G; Chakrabarty, Suman

    2016-08-01

    The pathological forms of prions are known to be a result of misfolding, oligomerization, and aggregation of the cellular prion. While the mechanism of misfolding and aggregation in prions has been widely studied using both experimental and computational tools, the structural and energetic characterization of the dimer form have not garnered as much attention. On one hand dimerization can be the first step toward a nucleation-like pathway to aggregation, whereas on the other hand it may also increase the conformational stability preventing self-aggregation. In this work, we have used extensive all-atom replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations of both monomer and dimer forms of a mouse prion protein to understand the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic stability of dimeric prion as compared to the monomeric form. We show that prion proteins can dimerize spontaneously being stabilized by hydrophobic interactions as well as intermolecular hydrogen bonding and salt bridge formation. We have computed the conformational free energy landscapes for both monomer and dimer forms to compare the thermodynamic stability and misfolding pathways. We observe large conformational heterogeneity among the various modes of interactions between the monomers and the strong intermolecular interactions may lead to as high as 20% β-content. The hydrophobic regions in helix-2, surrounding coil regions, terminal regions along with the natively present β-sheet region appear to actively participate in prion-prion intermolecular interactions. Dimerization seems to considerably suppress the inherent dynamic instability observed in monomeric prions, particularly because the regions of structural frustration constitute the dimer interface. Further, we demonstrate an interesting reversible coupling between the Q160-G131 interaction (which leads to inhibition of β-sheet extension) and the G131-V161 H-bond formation. PMID:27390876

  2. Protein structural dynamics at the gas/water interface examined by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yiming; Konermann, Lars

    2015-08-01

    Gas/water interfaces (such as air bubbles or foam) are detrimental to the stability of proteins, often causing aggregation. This represents a potential problem for industrial processes, for example, the production and handling of protein drugs. Proteins possess surfactant-like properties, resulting in a high affinity for gas/water interfaces. The tendency of previously buried nonpolar residues to maximize contact with the gas phase can cause significant structural distortion. Most earlier studies in this area employed spectroscopic tools that could only provide limited information. Here we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for probing the conformational dynamics of the model protein myoglobin (Mb) in the presence of N(2) bubbles. HDX/MS relies on the principle that unfolded and/or highly dynamic regions undergo faster deuteration than tightly folded segments. In bubble-free solution Mb displays EX2 behavior, reflecting the occurrence of short-lived excursions to partially unfolded conformers. A dramatically different behavior is seen in the presence of N(2) bubbles; EX2 dynamics still take place, but in addition the protein shows EX1 behavior. The latter results from interconversion of the native state with conformers that are globally unfolded and long-lived. These unfolded species likely correspond to Mb that is adsorbed to the surface of gas bubbles. N(2) sparging also induces aggregation. To explain the observed behavior we propose a simple model, that is, "semi-unfolded" ↔ "native" ↔ "globally unfolded" → "aggregated". This model quantitatively reproduces the experimentally observed kinetics. To the best of our knowledge, the current study marks the first exploration of surface denaturation phenomena by HDX/MS. PMID:25761782

  3. Protein structural dynamics at the gas/water interface examined by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yiming; Konermann, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Gas/water interfaces (such as air bubbles or foam) are detrimental to the stability of proteins, often causing aggregation. This represents a potential problem for industrial processes, for example, the production and handling of protein drugs. Proteins possess surfactant-like properties, resulting in a high affinity for gas/water interfaces. The tendency of previously buried nonpolar residues to maximize contact with the gas phase can cause significant structural distortion. Most earlier studies in this area employed spectroscopic tools that could only provide limited information. Here we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for probing the conformational dynamics of the model protein myoglobin (Mb) in the presence of N2 bubbles. HDX/MS relies on the principle that unfolded and/or highly dynamic regions undergo faster deuteration than tightly folded segments. In bubble-free solution Mb displays EX2 behavior, reflecting the occurrence of short-lived excursions to partially unfolded conformers. A dramatically different behavior is seen in the presence of N2 bubbles; EX2 dynamics still take place, but in addition the protein shows EX1 behavior. The latter results from interconversion of the native state with conformers that are globally unfolded and long-lived. These unfolded species likely correspond to Mb that is adsorbed to the surface of gas bubbles. N2 sparging also induces aggregation. To explain the observed behavior we propose a simple model, that is, “semi-unfolded” ↔ “native” ↔ “globally unfolded” → “aggregated”. This model quantitatively reproduces the experimentally observed kinetics. To the best of our knowledge, the current study marks the first exploration of surface denaturation phenomena by HDX/MS. PMID:25761782

  4. Maximal sum of metabolic exchange fluxes outperforms biomass yield as a predictor of growth rate of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Zarecki, Raphy; Oberhardt, Matthew A; Yizhak, Keren; Wagner, Allon; Shtifman Segal, Ella; Freilich, Shiri; Henry, Christopher S; Gophna, Uri; Ruppin, Eytan

    2014-01-01

    Growth rate has long been considered one of the most valuable phenotypes that can be measured in cells. Aside from being highly accessible and informative in laboratory cultures, maximal growth rate is often a prime determinant of cellular fitness, and predicting phenotypes that underlie fitness is key to both understanding and manipulating life. Despite this, current methods for predicting microbial fitness typically focus on yields [e.g., predictions of biomass yield using GEnome-scale metabolic Models (GEMs)] or notably require many empirical kinetic constants or substrate uptake rates, which render these methods ineffective in cases where fitness derives most directly from growth rate. Here we present a new method for predicting cellular growth rate, termed SUMEX, which does not require any empirical variables apart from a metabolic network (i.e., a GEM) and the growth medium. SUMEX is calculated by maximizing the SUM of molar EXchange fluxes (hence SUMEX) in a genome-scale metabolic model. SUMEX successfully predicts relative microbial growth rates across species, environments, and genetic conditions, outperforming traditional cellular objectives (most notably, the convention assuming biomass maximization). The success of SUMEX suggests that the ability of a cell to catabolize substrates and produce a strong proton gradient enables fast cell growth. Easily applicable heuristics for predicting growth rate, such as what we demonstrate with SUMEX, may contribute to numerous medical and biotechnological goals, ranging from the engineering of faster-growing industrial strains, modeling of mixed ecological communities, and the inhibition of cancer growth. PMID:24866123

  5. Foreign capital and the impact of exchange rate adjustments in oil-exporting developing countries with an application to Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Tadjuddin, A.

    1989-01-01

    The efficacy of exchange rate adjustments as an instrument of economic policy in developing countries has long been the subject of considerable controversy. Theoretical treatments of currency devaluation generally conclude that it improves the trade balance and stimulates economic activity. However, this traditional view has been challenged in recent years on the grounds that trade flows, including factor imports, are relatively insensitive to price and exchange rate changes, especially in developing countries. This study analyzes the effects of exchange rate changes in oil exporting developing countries which host foreign capital by using a modified model of the Krugman-Taylor (l978) and Barbone-Batiz (1987) types. It is shown that the impact of devaluation on GNP is influenced by (a) the initial state of the current account balance, (b) the elasticity of demand for non-oil exports, (c) the elasticity of demand for final good imports, (d) the foreign ownership effects, and (e) the impact of devaluation on the government revenues. Devaluation can lead to an increase in national output, but only if the elasticity effects in the non-oil export sector and in the final good imports are large enough to dominate the government revenue effect, the foreign-ownership effect in the oil sector and the impact of any initial current account deficit. The model was applied to the economy of Indonesia, an oil exporting developing country. The net effect of devaluation on national output is known to be contradictory following devaluation, thus supporting the structuralist view that devaluation has negative real effects in this country, at least in the short run. It was also found that the estimated price elasticities of non-oil imports and exports are low in the short-run. Devaluation would lead to improvement in the non-oil trade account in the long run after devaluation.

  6. Dynamics of carbon dioxide exchange of a wheat community grown in a semi-closed environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corey, Kenneth A.

    1989-01-01

    A wheat (Triticum aestivum Yecora Rojo) community was grown in the semi-closed conditions of the NASA/KSC Biomass Production Chamber (BPC). Experiments were conducted to determine whole community carbon dioxide exchange rates as influenced by growth and development, carbon dioxide concentration, time within the photoperiod, irradiance, and temperature. Plants were grown at a population of about 1500 per sq meter using a 20 hour light/4 hour dark daily regime. Light was supplied by HPS vapor lamps and irradiance was maintained in the range of 590 to 675 mu mol per sq meter. The temperature regime was 20 C light/16 C dark and nutrients were supplied hydroponically as a thin film. Fractional interception of PPF by the community increased rapidly during growth reaching a maximum of 0.96, 24 days after planting. This time corresponded to canopy closure and maximum rates of net photosynthesis (NP). Net daily CO2 utilization rates were calculated to day 48 and a 4th order regression equation integrated to obtain total moles of CO2 fixed by the community. This procedure may be useful for monitoring and prediction of biomass yields in a closed ecology life support system (CELSS).

  7. Asymmetrical long-run dependence between oil price and US dollar exchange rate-Based on structural oil shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jiaqi; Gu, Rongbao

    2016-08-01

    The multifractal behavior in cross-correlation between oil prices and exchange rates is examined in this paper. We use the multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis to investigate the general cross-correlations, and further show that these cross-correlations are asymmetric by multifractal asymmetric cross-correlation analysis. We recover the structural oil shocks and then use these indicators to characterize the asymmetries along with oil price trend itself. Our empirical results show that their asymmetric degrees vary significantly. The sign of oil supply shock leads to the most significant asymmetry among them.

  8. An evaluation of multiple-schedule variations to reduce high-rate requests in the picture exchange communication system.

    PubMed

    Landa, Robin; Hanley, Gregory P

    2016-06-01

    Using procedures similar to those of Tiger, Hanley, and Heal (2006), we compared two multiple-schedule variations (S+/S- and S+ only) to treat high-rate requests for edible items in the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS). Two individuals with autism participated, after they showed persistent requests for edible items after PECS training. Stimulus control was achieved only with the multiple schedule that involved presentation of a discriminative stimulus during reinforcement components and its removal during extinction components (S+ only). Discriminated requests were maintained for the 1 participant who experienced schedule thinning. PMID:26814152

  9. Hysteresis of heart rate and heat exchange of fasting and postprandial savannah monitor lizards (Varanus exanthematicus).

    PubMed

    Zaar, Morten; Larsen, Einer; Wang, Tobias

    2004-04-01

    Reptiles are ectothermic, but regulate body temperatures (T(b)) by behavioural and physiological means. Body temperature has profound effects on virtually all physiological functions. It is well known that heating occurs faster than cooling, which seems to correlate with changes in cutaneous perfusion. Increased cutaneous perfusion, and hence elevated cardiac output, during heating is reflected in an increased heart rate (f(H)), and f(H), at a given T(b), is normally higher during heating compared to cooling ('hysteresis of heart rate'). Digestion is associated with an increased metabolic rate. This is associated with an elevated f(H) and many species of reptiles also exhibited a behavioural selection of higher T(b) during digestion. Here, we examine whether digestion affects the rate of heating and cooling as well as the hysteresis of heart rate in savannah monitor lizards (Varanus exanthematicus). Fasting lizards were studied after 5 days of food deprivation while digesting lizards were studied approximately 24 h after ingesting dead mice that equalled 10% of their body mass. Heart rate was measured while T(b) increased from 28 to 38 degrees C under a heat lamp and while T(b) decreased during a subsequent cooling phase. The lizards exhibited hysteresis of heart rate, and heating occurred faster than cooling. Feeding led to an increased f(H) (approximately 20 min(-1) irrespective of T(b)), but did not affect the rate of temperature change during heating or cooling. Therefore, it is likely that the increased blood flows during digestion are distributed exclusively to visceral organs and that the thermal conductance remains unaffected by the elevated metabolic rate during digestion. PMID:15123175

  10. Confirmatory analysis of the AP1000 passive residual heat removal heat exchanger with 3-D computational fluid dynamic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Schwall, James R.; Karim, Naeem U.; Thakkar, Jivan G.; Taylor, Creed; Schulz, Terry; Wright, Richard F.

    2006-07-01

    The AP1000 is an 1100 MWe advanced nuclear power plant that uses passive safety features to enhance plant safety and to provide significant and measurable improvements in plant simplification, reliability, investment protection and plant costs. The AP1000 received final design approval from the US-NRC in 2004. The AP1000 design is based on the AP600 design that received final design approval in 1999. Wherever possible, the AP1000 plant configuration and layout was kept the same as AP600 to take advantage of the maturity of the design and to minimize new design efforts. As a result, the two-loop configuration was maintained for AP1000, and the containment vessel diameter was kept the same. It was determined that this significant power up-rate was well within the capability of the passive safety features, and that the safety margins for AP1000 were greater than those of operating PWRs. A key feature of the passive core cooling system is the passive residual heat removal heat exchanger (PRHR HX) that provides decay heat removal for postulated LOCA and non-LOCA events. The PRHR HX is a C-tube heat exchanger located in the in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST) above the core promoting natural circulation heat removal between the reactor cooling system and the tank. Component testing was performed for the AP600 PRHR HX to determine the heat transfer characteristics and to develop correlations to be used for the AP1000 safety analysis codes. The data from these tests were confirmed by subsequent integral tests at three separate facilities including the ROSA facility in Japan. Owing to the importance of this component, an independent analysis has been performed using the ATHOS-based computational fluid dynamics computer code PRHRCFD. Two separate models of the PRHR HX and IRWST have been developed representing the ROSA test geometry and the AP1000 plant geometry. Confirmation of the ROSA test results were used to validate PRHRCFD, and the AP1000 plant model

  11. Effect of low /sup 60/Co dose rates on sister chromatid exchange incidence in the benthic worm. Neanthes arenaceodentata

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, F.L.; Rice, D.W. Jr.

    1981-10-13

    The usefulness of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induction as a measure of low-level radiation effect was examined in a benthic marine worm, Neanthes arenaceodentata. Larvae were exposed to /sup 60/Co radiation for 12 to 24 h at total doses ranging from 0.5 to 309 R and at dose rates from 0.04 to 13 R/h. Animals exposed at intermediate dose rates (0.5, 0.6, 1.25, 2.0, and 2.5 R/h) had SCE frequencies per chromosome about twice that of those receiving no radiation (controls), whereas those exposed at the higher dose rates (7.0 and 13 R/h) had SCE frequencies lower than the controls. Animals exposed at the lower dose rates (0.04 and 0.1 R/h) had lower SCE frequencies than those exposed at intermediate dose rates (and higher SCE frequencies than controls). The length of chromosome pair number one differed among metaphase spreads and was used as an index of chromosome condensation in a given metaphase. Because there is a possibility that chromosome morphology may affect the ability to resolve SCEs, morphology will be monitored in future studies. A preliminary experiment was performed to assess the effects of 2.2 and 11.5 R/h for 24 h on growth and development. Larvae observed at 6 and 17 d after irradiation did not have significantly different numbers of abnormal larvae or survival rates.

  12. Exposing Differences in Monomer Exchange Rates of Multicomponent Supramolecular Polymers in Water.

    PubMed

    Baker, Matthew B; Gosens, Ronald P J; Albertazzi, Lorenzo; Matsumoto, Nicholas M; Palmans, Anja R A; Meijer, E W

    2016-02-01

    The formation of multicomponent and bioactive supramolecular polymers is a promising strategy for the formation of biomaterials that match the dynamic and responsive nature of biological systems. In order to fully realize the potential of this strategy, knowledge of the location and behavior of bioactive components within the system is crucial. By employing synthetic strategies to create multifunctional monomers, coupled with FRET and STORM techniques, we have investigated the formation and behavior of a bioactive and multicomponent supramolecular polymer. By creating a peptide-dye-monomer conjugate, we were able to measure high degrees of monomer incorporation and to visualize the equal distribution of monomers within the supramolecular polymer. Furthermore, by tracking the movement of monomers, we uncovered small differences in the dynamics of the bioactive monomers. PMID:26603687

  13. Quantum dynamics of two-optical modes and a single mechanical mode optomechanical system: Selective energy exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Neha; Bhattacherjee, Aranya B.

    2014-01-01

    We study the quantum dynamics of an optomechanical setup comprising two optical modes and one mechanical mode. We show that the same system can undergo a dynamical phase transition analogous to Dicke-Hepp-Lieb superradiant type phase transition. We found that the coupling between the momentum quadratures of the two optical fields gives rise to a new dynamical critical point. We show that selective energy exchange between any two modes is possible by coherent control of the coupling parameters. In addition we also demonstrate the occurrence of normal mode splitting (NMS) in the mechanical displacement spectrum.

  14. Spatiotemporally‐Resolved Air Exchange Rate as a Modifier of Acute Air Pollution‐Related Morbidity in AtlantaMorbidity in Atlanta

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies frequently use central site concentrations as surrogates of exposure to air pollutants. Variability in air pollutant infiltration due to differential air exchange rates (AERs) is potentially a major factor affecting the relationship between central site c...

  15. Development and Evaluation of a New Air Exchange Rate Algorithm for the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model (ISES Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous exposure assessment panel studies have observed considerable seasonal, between-home and between-city variability in residential pollutant infiltration. This is likely a result of differences in home ventilation, or air exchange rates (AER). The Stochastic Human Exposure ...

  16. Modeling variations in the cedi/dollar exchange rate in Ghana: an autoregressive conditional heteroscedastic (ARCH) models.

    PubMed

    Techie Quaicoe, Michael; Twenefour, Frank B K; Baah, Emmanuel M; Nortey, Ezekiel N N

    2015-01-01

    This research article aimed at modeling the variations in the dollar/cedi exchange rate. It examines the applicability of a range of ARCH/GARCH specifications for modeling volatility of the series. The variants considered include the ARMA, GARCH, IGARCH, EGARCH and M-GARCH specifications. The results show that the series was non stationary which resulted from the presence of a unit root in it. The ARMA (1, 1) was found to be the most suitable model for the conditional mean. From the Box-Ljung test statistics x-squared of 1476.338 with p value 0.00217 for squared returns and 16.918 with 0.0153 p values for squared residuals, the null hypothesis of no ARCH effect was rejected at 5% significance level indicating the presence of an ARCH effect in the series. ARMA (1, 1) + GARCH (1, 1) which has all parameters significant was found to be the most suitable model for the conditional mean with conditional variance, thus showing adequacy in describing the conditional mean with variance of the return series at 5% significant level. A 24 months forecast for the mean actual exchange rates and mean returns from January, 2013 to December, 2014 made also showed that the fitted model is appropriate for the data and a depreciating trend of the cedi against the dollar for forecasted period respectively. PMID:26180749

  17. Investigation of the influence of groundwater advection on energy extraction rates for sustainable borehole heat exchanger operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelenz, Sophie; Dietrich, Peter; Vienken, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    A sustainable thermal exploitation of the shallow subsurface requires a precise understanding of all relevant heat transport processes. Currently, planning practice of shallow geothermal systems (especially for systems < 30 kW) focuses on conductive heat transport as the main energy source while the impact of groundwater flow as the driver for advective heat transport is neglected or strongly simplified. The presented study proves that those simplifications of complex geological and hydrogeological subsurface characteristics are insufficient for a precise evaluation of site-specific energy extraction rates. Based on synthetic model scenarios with varying subsurface conditions (groundwater flow velocity and aquifer thickness) the impact of advection on induced long term temperature changes in 5 and 10 m distance of the borehole heat exchanger is presented. Extending known investigations, this study enhances the evaluation of shallow geothermal energy extraction rates by considering conductive and advective heat transport under varying aquifer thicknesses. Further, it evaluates the impact of advection on installation lengths of the borehole heat exchanger to optimize the initial financial investment. Finally, an evaluation approach is presented that classifies relevant heat transport processes according to their Péclet number to enable a first quantitative assessment of the subsurface energy regime and recommend further investigation and planning procedures.

  18. Dynamics of ligand exchange mechanism at Cu(II) in water: An ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics study with extended quantum mechanical region

    SciTech Connect

    Moin, Syed Tarique; Hofer, Thomas S.; Weiss, Alexander K. H.; Rode, Bernd M.

    2013-07-07

    Ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics (QMCF-MD) were successfully applied to Cu(II) embedded in water to elucidate structure and to understand dynamics of ligand exchange mechanism. From the simulation studies, it was found that using an extended large quantum mechanical region including two shells of hydration is required for a better description of the dynamics of exchanging water molecules. The structural features characterized by radial distribution function, angular distribution function and other analytical parameters were consistent with experimental data. The major outcome of this study was the dynamics of exchange mechanism and reactions in the first hydration shell that could not be studied so far. The dynamical data such as mean residence time of the first shell water molecules and other relevant data from the simulations are close to the results determined experimentally. Another major characteristic of hydrated Cu(II) is the Jahn-Teller distortion which was also successfully reproduced, leading to the final conclusion that the dominating aqua complex is a 6-coordinated species. The ab initio QMCF-MD formalism proved again its capabilities of unraveling even ambiguous properties of hydrated species that are far difficult to explore by any conventional quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach or experiment.

  19. River temperature processes under contrasting riparian land cover: linking microclimate, heat exchange and water thermal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannah, D. M.; Kantola, K.; Malcolm, I.

    2012-12-01

    River temperature influences strongly growth and survival in salmonid fish, which are often the target of river management strategies. Temperature is controlled by transfers of heat and water to/ from the river system, with land and water management modifying exchanges and consequently thermal regime. In the UK, fisheries managers are promoting riparian forest planting as a climate change adaption measure to reduce water temperature extremes. However, scientific understanding lags behind management and policy needs. Specifically, there is an urgent requirement to determine planting strategies that maximise expected benefits of riparian forest in terms of reduction in maximum water temperature. Scientific knowledge is necessary to underpin conceptual and deterministic models to inform management. To address this research gap, this paper analyses high resolution (15 minute) hydrometeorological data collected over a calendar year in the western Scottish Highlands (Loch Ard) to understand the controls and processes determining river temperature dynamics under open moorland (control), semi-natural woodland and commercial forest. The research programme aims: (1) to characterise spatial and temporal variability in riparian microclimate and stream water temperature regime across forest treatments; (2) to identify the hydrological, climatological and site-specific factors affecting stream temperature; (3) to estimate the energy balance at sites representative of each forest treatment and, thus, yield physical process understanding about dominant heat exchanges driving thermal variability; and (4) to use 1-3 to predict stream temperature sensitivity under different forestry and hydroclimatological scenarios. Results indicated that inter-treatment differences in mean and maximum daily water column temperature were ordered open > semi-natural > commercial during summer, but semi-natural > commercial > open during winter. Minimum water temperature was ordered commercial > semi

  20. Assessment of the Draft AIAA S-119 Flight Dynamic Model Exchange Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, E. Bruce; Murri, Daniel G.; Hill, Melissa A.; Jessick, Matthew V.; Penn, John M.; Hasan, David A.; Crues, Edwin Z.; Falck, Robert D.; McCarthy, Thomas G.; Vuong, Nghia; Zimmerman, Curtis

    2011-01-01

    An assessment of a draft AIAA standard for flight dynamics model exchange, ANSI/AIAA S-119-2011, was conducted on behalf of NASA by a team from the NASA Engineering and Safety Center. The assessment included adding the capability of importing standard models into real-time simulation facilities at several NASA Centers as well as into analysis simulation tools. All participants were successful at importing two example models into their respective simulation frameworks by using existing software libraries or by writing new import tools. Deficiencies in the libraries and format documentation were identified and fixed; suggestions for improvements to the standard were provided to the AIAA. An innovative tool to generate C code directly from such a model was developed. Performance of the software libraries compared favorably with compiled code. As a result of this assessment, several NASA Centers can now import standard models directly into their simulations. NASA is considering adopting the now-published S-119 standard as an internal recommended practice.

  1. Conformation study of ɛ-cyclodextrin: Replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Khuntawee, Wasinee; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada; Wolschann, Peter; Pongsawasdi, Piamsook; Kungwan, Nawee; Okumura, Hisashi; Hannongbua, Supot

    2016-05-01

    There is growing interest in large-ring cyclodextrins (LR-CDs) which are known to be good host molecules for larger ligands. The isolation of a defined size LR-CD is an essential prerequisite for studying their structural properties. Unfortunately the purification procedure of these substances turned out to be very laborious. Finally the problem could be circumvented by a theoretical consideration: the highly advantageous replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulation (particularly suitable for studies of conformational changes) offers an ideal approach for studying the conformational change of ɛ-cyclodextrin (CD10), a smaller representative of LR-CDs. Three carbohydrate force fields and three solvent models were tested. The conformational behavior of CD10 was analyzed in terms of the flip (turn) of the glucose subunits within the macrocyclic ring. In addition a ranking of conformations with various numbers of turns was preformed. Our findings might be also helpful in the temperature controlled synthesis of LR-CDs as well as other experimental conditions, in particular for the host-guest reaction. PMID:26877001

  2. Efficient Determination of Relative Entropy Using Combined Temperature and Hamiltonian Replica-Exchange Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jo, Sunhwan; Chipot, Christophe; Roux, Benoît

    2015-05-12

    The performance and accuracy of different simulation schemes for estimating the entropy inferred from free energy calculations are tested. The results obtained from replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations based on a simplified toy model are compared to exact numerically derived ones to assess accuracy and convergence. It is observed that the error in entropy estimation decreases by at least an order of magnitude and the quantities of interest converge much faster when the simulations are coupled via a temperature REMD algorithm and the trajectories from different temperatures are combined. Simulations with the infinite-swapping method and its variants show some improvement over the traditional nearest-neighbor REMD algorithms, but they are more computationally expensive. To test the methodologies further, the free energy profile for the reversible association of two methane molecules in explicit water was calculated and decomposed into its entropic and enthalpic contributions. Finally, a strategy based on umbrella sampling computations carried out via simultaneous temperature and Hamiltonian REMD simulations is shown to yield the most accurate entropy estimation. The entropy profile between the two methane molecules displays the characteristic signature of a hydrophobic interaction. PMID:26574422

  3. Gas-Substrate Heat Exchange During Cold-Gas Dynamic Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, A. G.; Ryabinin, A. N.; Irissou, E.; Legoux, J.-G.

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the temperature distribution of the surfaces of several substrates under an impinging gas jet from a cold spray nozzle was determined. A low-pressure cold-gas dynamic spraying unit was used to generate a jet of hot compressed nitrogen that impinged upon flat substrates. Computer codes based on a finite differences method were used to solve a simplified 2D temperature distribution equation for the substrate to produce nondimensional relationships between the surface temperature and the radius of the impinging fluid jet, the axial velocity of the cold spray nozzle, the substrate thickness, and the heating time. It was found that a single profile of the transient nondimensional maximum surface temperature could be used to estimate the dimensional maximum surface temperature, regardless of the value of the compressed gas temperature. It was found further that, as the thermal conductance of the substrate increased, the maximum surface temperature of the substrate beneath the gas jet decreased. Heat exchange between the substrate and the compressed gas jet during motion of the nozzle to produce heat conduction within the substrate was characterized by the nondimensional Peclét number. It was found that lower Peclét numbers produced higher temperatures within the substrate. The close agreement of the numerical results with the experimental results suggests that the nondimensionalized results may be applied to a wide range of conditions and materials.

  4. Custom-tailored adsorbers: A molecular dynamics study on optimal design of ion exchange chromatography material.

    PubMed

    Lang, Katharina M H; Kittelmann, Jörg; Pilgram, Florian; Osberghaus, Anna; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2015-09-25

    The performance of functionalized materials, e.g., ion exchange resins, depends on multiple resin characteristics, such as type of ligand, ligand density, the pore accessibility for a molecule, and backbone characteristics. Therefore, the screening and identification process for optimal resin characteristics for separation is very time and material consuming. Previous studies on the influence of resin characteristics have focused on an experimental approach and to a lesser extent on the mechanistic understanding of the adsorption mechanism. In this in silico study, a previously developed molecular dynamics (MD) tool is used, which simulates any given biomolecule on resins with varying ligand densities. We describe a set of simulations and experiments with four proteins and six resins varying in ligand density, and show that simulations and experiments correlate well in a wide range of ligand density. With this new approach simulations can be used as pre-experimental screening for optimal adsorber characteristics, reducing the actual number of screening experiments, which results in a faster and more knowledge-based development of custom-tailored adsorbers. PMID:26319376

  5. Evaluation of Instrumentation and Dynamic Thermal Ratings for Overhead Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, A.

    2013-01-31

    In 2010, a project was initiated through a partnership between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the New York Power Authority (NYPA) to evaluate EPRI's rating technology and instrumentation that can be used to monitor the thermal states of transmission lines and provide the required real-time data for real-time rating calculations. The project included the installation and maintenance of various instruments at three 230 kV line sites in northern New York. The instruments were monitored, and data collection and rating calculations were performed for about a three year period.

  6. Firing rate of noisy integrate-and-fire neurons with synaptic current dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Andrieux, David; Monnai, Takaaki

    2009-08-15

    We derive analytical formulas for the firing rate of integrate-and-fire neurons endowed with realistic synaptic dynamics. In particular, we include the possibility of multiple synaptic inputs as well as the effect of an absolute refractory period into the description. The latter affects the firing rate through its interaction with the synaptic dynamics.

  7. Firing rate of noisy integrate-and-fire neurons with synaptic current dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrieux, David; Monnai, Takaaki

    2009-08-01

    We derive analytical formulas for the firing rate of integrate-and-fire neurons endowed with realistic synaptic dynamics. In particular, we include the possibility of multiple synaptic inputs as well as the effect of an absolute refractory period into the description. The latter affects the firing rate through its interaction with the synaptic dynamics.

  8. Charge-exchange collision dynamics and ion engine grid geometry optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Bradford

    The development of a new three-dimensional model for determining the absolute energy distribution of ions at points corresponding to spacecraft surfaces to the side of an ion engine is presented. The ions resulting from elastic collisions, both charge-exchange (CEX) and direct, between energetic primary ions and thermal neutral xenon atoms are accounted for. Highly resolved energy distributions of CEX ions are found by integration over contributions from all points in space within the main beam formed by the primary ions.The sputtering rate due to impingement of these ions on a surface is calculated. The CEX ions that obtain significant energy (10 eV or more) in the collision are responsible for the majority of the sputtering, though this can depend on the specific material being sputtered. In the case of a molybdenum surface located 60 cm to the side of a 30 cm diameter grid, nearly 90% of the sputtering is due to the 5% of ions with the highest collision exit energies. Previous models that do not model collision energetics cannot predict this. The present results agree with other models and predict that the majority of the ion density is due to collisions where little to no energy is transferred.The sputtering model is combined with a grid-structure model in an optimization procedure where the sputtering rate at specified locations is minimized by adjustment of parameters defining the physical shape of the engine grids. Constraints are imposed that require that the deflection of the grid under a specified load does not exceed a maximum value, in order to ensure survivability of the grids during launch. To faciliate faster execution of the calculations, simplifications based on the predicted behavior of the CEX ions are implemented. For diametrically opposed sputtering locations, a rounded barrel-vault shape reduces the expected sputtering rate by up to 30% in comparison to an NSTAR-shaped grid.

  9. Statistical distribution of height-integrated energy exchange rates in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikio, A. T.; Cai, L.; Nygrén, T.

    2012-10-01

    The EISCAT radar in Tromsø (67° cgmLat) has been used to estimate statistics of electromagnetic (EM) energy transfer rates by utilizing calculated electric fields, conductivities and E-region neutral winds. It was found that the magnetospheric EM energy input is slightly larger in the evening than morning sector, but due to winds, the Joule heating rate has the largest values in the morning sector. The duskside subauroral region contains large northward electric fields and is a site of significant magnetospheric EM energy input and Joule heating. For quiet conditions (Kp: 0-2+), the neutral wind is the major source for Joule heating at all MLT except at the evening maximum of magnetospheric EM input. For medium (Kp: 3--4+) and high (Kp ≥ 5-) activity levels, winds increase Joule heating rates in the morning, but decrease them in the evening. The positive contribution of winds during the morning maximum is 30% and 20% for medium and high activity levels, respectively. The region where winds are a net load for the magnetospheric EM energy input is 17-20 MLT for medium and 13-18 MLT for high activity conditions. The median EM energy transfer to mechanical work made on winds is 20% at maximum. An event with a long-lasting high electric field showed that the ion drag acting on neutrals can decrease the Joule (ion-neutral collisional) heating by more than 50%.

  10. The role of dynamic surface water-groundwater exchange on streambed denitrification in a first-order, low-relief agricultural watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rahimi Kazerooni, Mina N.; Essaid, Hedeff I.; Wilson, John T.

    2015-01-01

    The role of temporally varying surface water-groundwater (SW-GW) exchange on nitrate removal by streambed denitrification was examined along a reach of Leary Weber Ditch (LWD), Indiana, a small, first-order, low-relief agricultural watershed within the Upper Mississippi River basin, using data collected in 2004 and 2005. Stream stage, GW heads (H), and temperatures (T) were continuously monitored in streambed piezometers and stream bank wells for two transects across LWD accompanied by synoptic measurements of stream stage, H, T, and nitrate (NO3) concentrations along the reach. The H and T data were used to develop and calibrate vertical two-dimensional, models of streambed water flow and heat transport across and along the axis of the stream. Model-estimated SW-GW exchange varied seasonally and in response to high-streamflow events due to dynamic interactions between SW stage and GW H. Comparison of 2004 and 2005 conditions showed that small changes in precipitation amount and intensity, evapotranspiration, and/or nearby GW levels within a low-relief watershed can readily impact SW-GW interactions. The calibrated LWD flow models and observed stream and streambed NO3 concentrations were used to predict temporal variations in streambed NO3 removal in response to dynamic SW-GW exchange. NO3 removal rates underwent slow seasonal changes, but also underwent rapid changes in response to high-flow events. These findings suggest that increased temporal variability of SW-GW exchange in low-order, low-relief watersheds may be a factor contributing their more efficient removal of NO3.

  11. The role of dynamic surface water-groundwater exchange on streambed denitrification in a first-order, low-relief agricultural watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Mina; Essaid, Hedeff I.; Wilson, John T.

    2015-12-01

    The role of temporally varying surface water-groundwater (SW-GW) exchange on nitrate removal by streambed denitrification was examined along a reach of Leary Weber Ditch (LWD), Indiana, a small, first-order, low-relief agricultural watershed within the Upper Mississippi River basin, using data collected in 2004 and 2005. Stream stage, GW heads (H), and temperatures (T) were continuously monitored in streambed piezometers and stream bank wells for two transects across LWD accompanied by synoptic measurements of stream stage, H, T, and nitrate (NO3) concentrations along the reach. The H and T data were used to develop and calibrate vertical two-dimensional, models of streambed water flow and heat transport across and along the axis of the stream. Model-estimated SW-GW exchange varied seasonally and in response to high-streamflow events due to dynamic interactions between SW stage and GW H. Comparison of 2004 and 2005 conditions showed that small changes in precipitation amount and intensity, evapotranspiration, and/or nearby GW levels within a low-relief watershed can readily impact SW-GW interactions. The calibrated LWD flow models and observed stream and streambed NO3 concentrations were used to predict temporal variations in streambed NO3 removal in response to dynamic SW-GW exchange. NO3 removal rates underwent slow seasonal changes, but also underwent rapid changes in response to high-flow events. These findings suggest that increased temporal variability of SW-GW exchange in low-order, low-relief watersheds may be a factor contributing their more efficient removal of NO3.

  12. Simplified quantification of labile proton concentration-weighted chemical exchange rate (kws) with RF saturation time dependent ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA) - Normalization of relaxation and RF irradiation spillover effects for improved quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2012-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is an emerging imaging technique capable of detecting dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, with promising in vivo applications. However, CEST MRI contrast is complex, varying not only with the labile proton concentration and exchange rate, but also with experimental conditions such as field strength and RF irradiation scheme. Furthermore, the optimal RF irradiation power depends on the exchange rate, which must be estimated in order to optimize the CEST MRI experiments. Although methods including numerical fitting with modified Bloch-McConnell equations, quantification of exchange rate with RF saturation time and power (QUEST and QUESP), have been proposed to address this relationship, they require multiple-parameter non-linear fitting and accurate relaxation measurement. Our work here extended the QUEST algorithm with ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA) that normalizes the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) at labile and reference frequencies, which effectively eliminates the confounding relaxation and RF spillover effects. Specifically, the QUESTRA contrast approaches its steady state mono-exponentially at a rate determined by the reverse exchange rate (kws), with little dependence on bulk water T1, T2, RF power and chemical shift. The proposed algorithm was confirmed numerically, and validated experimentally using a tissue-like phantom of serially titrated pH compartments. PMID:21842497

  13. Ligand binding and proton exchange dynamics in site-specific mutants of human myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Lambright, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    Site specific mutagenesis was used to make substitutions of four residues in the distal heme pocket of human myoglobin: Val68, His64, Lys45, and Asp60. Strongly diffracting crystals of the conservative mutation K45R in the met aquo form were grown in the trigonal space group P3[sub 2]21 and the X-ray crystal structure determined at 1.6 [angstrom] resolution. The overall structure is similar to that of sperm whale met aquo myoglobin. Several of the mutant proteins were characterized by 2-D NMR spectroscopy. The NMR data suggest the structural changes are localized to the region of the mutation. The dynamics of ligand binding to myoglobin mutants were studied by transient absorption spectroscopy following photolysis of the CO complexes. Transient absorption kinetics and spectra on the ns to ms timescale were measured in aqueous solution from 280 K to 310 K and in 75% glycerol: water from 250 K to 310 K. Two significant basis spectra were obtained from singular value decomposition of the matrix of time dependent spectra. The information was used to obtain approximations for the extent of ligand rebinding and the kinetics of conformational relaxation. Except for K45R, substitutions at Lys45 or Asp60 produce changes in the kinetics for ligand rebinding. Replacement of Lys45 with Arg increases the rate of ligand rebinding from the protein matrix by a factor of 2, but does not alter the rates for ligand escape or entry into the protein or the dynamics of the conformational relaxation. Substitutions at His64 and Val68 influence the kinetics of ligand rebinding and the dynamics of conformational relaxation. The results do not support the hypothesis that ligand migration between the heme pocket and solvent is determined solely by fluctuations of Arg45 and His64 between open and closed conformations of the heme pocket but can be rationalized if ligand diffusion through the protein matrix involves multiple competing pathways.

  14. Firing rate dynamics in the hippocampus induced by trajectory learning.

    PubMed

    Ji, Daoyun; Wilson, Matthew A

    2008-04-30

    The hippocampus is essential for spatial navigation, which may involve sequential learning. However, how the hippocampus encodes new sequences in familiar environments is unknown. To study the impact of novel spatial sequences on the activity of hippocampal neurons, we monitored hippocampal ensembles while rats learned to switch from two familiar trajectories to a new one in a familiar environment. Here, we show that this novel spatial experience induces two types of changes in firing rates, but not locations of hippocampal place cells. First, place-cell firing rates on the two familiar trajectories start to change before the actual behavioral switch to the new trajectory. Second, repeated exposure on the new trajectory is associated with an increased dependence of place-cell firing rates on immediate past locations. The result suggests that sequence encoding in the hippocampus may involve integration of information about the recent past into current state. PMID:18448645

  15. Scaling laws in the dynamics of crime growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Luiz G. A.; Ribeiro, Haroldo V.; Mendes, Renio S.

    2013-06-01

    The increasing number of crimes in areas with large concentrations of people have made cities one of the main sources of violence. Understanding characteristics of how crime rate expands and its relations with the cities size goes beyond an academic question, being a central issue for contemporary society. Here, we characterize and analyze quantitative aspects of murders in the period from 1980 to 2009 in Brazilian cities. We find that the distribution of the annual, biannual and triannual logarithmic homicide growth rates exhibit the same functional form for distinct scales, that is, a scale invariant behavior. We also identify asymptotic power-law decay relations between the standard deviations of these three growth rates and the initial size. Further, we discuss similarities with complex organizations.

  16. Kinetic bottlenecks to chemical exchange rates for deep-sea animals - Part 2: Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, A. F.; Peltzer, E. T.; Brewer, P. G.

    2013-04-01

    Increased ocean acidification from fossil fuel CO2 invasion, from temperature-driven changes in respiration, and from possible leakage from sub-seabed geologic CO2 disposal has aroused concern over the impacts of elevated CO2 concentrations on marine life. Discussion of these impacts has so far focused only on changes in the oceanic bulk fluid properties (ΔpH, Δ[∑ CO2], etc.) as the critical variable and with a major focus on carbonate shell formation. Here we describe the rate problem for animals that must export CO2 at about the same rate at which O2 is consumed. We analyse the basic properties controlling CO2 export within the diffusive boundary layer around marine animals in an ocean changing in temperature (T) and CO2 concentration in order to compare the challenges posed by O2 uptake under stress with the equivalent problem of CO2 expulsion. The problem is more complex than that for a non-reactive gas, since with CO2 the influence of the seawater carbonate acid-base system needs to be considered. These reactions significantly facilitate CO2 efflux compared to O2 intake at equal temperature, pressure and fluid flow rate under typical oceanic concentrations. The effect of these reactions can be described by an enhancement factor, similar to that widely used for CO2 invasion at the sea surface. While organisms do need to actively regulate flow over their surface to thin the boundary layer to take up enough O2, this seems to be not necessary to facilitate CO2 efflux. Instead, the main impacts of rising oceanic CO2 will most likely be those associated with classical ocean acidification science. Regionally, as with O2, the combination of T, P and pH/pCO2 creates a zone of maximum CO2 stress at around 1000 m depth.

  17. Wind-tunnel simulation of infiltration across permeable building envelopes: Energy and air pollution exchange rates

    SciTech Connect

    Meroney, R.N.; Neff, D.E.; Birdsall, J.B.

    1995-12-31

    This study investigates the fluid-modeling techniques used to simulate wind-forced natural ventilation rates of rectangular, single-cell low-rise buildings. A 1:25 scale model of the Texas Tech University Wind Engineering Research Field Laboratory is used in a boundary-layer wind tunnel to evaluate alternative strategies for simulating infiltration into permeable buildings. A new approach is proposed which should permit evaluation of a wide range of leakage situations. In addition data is used to critique standard full-scale tracer gas test methods.

  18. Differential heating and cooling rates in bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus Lowe): a model of non-steady state heat exchange.

    PubMed

    Malte, Hans; Larsen, Christina; Musyl, Michael; Brill, Richard

    2007-08-01

    We analyzed water temperature, visceral cavity temperature and depth data from archival tags retrieved from bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus) at liberty in the central Pacific for up to 57 days using a mathematical model of heat exchange. Our model took into account the transfer of heat between the portions of the myotomes comprising red muscle fibers adjacent to the spinal column and served by vascular counter current heat exchanges (henceforth referred to as ;red muscle') and the water, as well as between the red muscle and the temperature sensor of the archival tags in the visceral cavity. Our model successfully predicted the recorded visceral cavity temperatures during vertical excursions provided that the rate constants for heat transfer between the ambient water and the red muscle during cooling (k(low)) and those during heating (k(high)) were very dissimilar. Least-squares fitting of k(low) and k(high) for the entire period that the fish were at liberty yielded values generally in the ranges 0.02-0.04 min(-1) and 0.2-0.6 min(-1) (respectively), with an average ratio k(high)/k(low) of approximately 12. Our results confirmed those from previous studies showing that bigeye tuna have extensive physiological thermoregulatory abilities probably exerted through changes of blood flow patterns that controlled the efficiency of vascular countercurrent heat exchanges. There was a small but significant negative correlation between k(low) and size, whereas there was no correlation between k(high) and size. The maximum swimming speeds during vertical excursions (calculated from the pressure data) occurred midway during ascents and averaged approximately 2 FL s(-1) (where FL=fork length), although speeds as high approximately 4-7 FL s(-1) were also noted. PMID:17644676

  19. Simultaneous experimental determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate with irradiation radio frequency power-dependent quantitative CEST MRI analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2013-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging is sensitive to dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, and has been increasingly evaluated for molecular imaging and in vivo applications. However, the experimentally measured CEST effect depends on the CEST agent concentration, exchange rate and relaxation time. In addition, there may be non-negligible direct radio-frequency (RF) saturation effects, particularly severe for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) agents owing to their relatively small chemical shift difference from that of the bulk water resonance. As such, the commonly used asymmetry analysis only provides CEST-weighted information. Recently, it has been shown with numerical simulation that both labile proton concentration and exchange rate can be determined by evaluating the RF power dependence of DIACEST effect. To validate the simulation results, we prepared and imaged two CEST phantoms: a pH phantom of serially titrated pH at a fixed creatine concentration and a concentration phantom of serially varied creatine concentration titrated to the same pH, and solved the labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate per-pixel. For the concentration phantom, we showed that the labile proton fraction ratio is proportional to the CEST agent concentration with negligible change in the exchange rate. Additionally, we found the exchange rate of the pH phantom is dominantly base-catalyzed with little difference in the labile proton fraction ratio. In summary, our study demonstrated quantitative DIACEST MRI, which remains promising to augment the conventional CEST-weighted MRI analysis. PMID:23606428

  20. Simultaneous determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate with irradiation radio frequency (RF) power dependent quantitative CEST MRI analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2014-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging is sensitive to dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, and has been increasingly evaluated for molecular imaging and in vivo applications. However, the experimentally measured CEST effect depends on the CEST agent concentration, exchange rate and relaxation time. In addition, there may be non-negligible direct radio-frequency (RF) saturation effects, particularly severe for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) agents due to their relatively small chemical shift difference from that of the bulk water resonance. As such, the commonly used asymmetry analysis only provides CEST-weighted information. Recently, it has been shown with numerical simulation that both labile proton concentration and exchange rate can be determined by evaluating the RF power dependence of DIACEST effect. To validate the simulation results, we prepared and imaged two CEST phantoms: a pH phantom of serially titrated pH at a fixed creatine concentration and a concentration phantom of serially varied creatine concentration titrated to the same pH, and solved the labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate per-pixel. For the concentration phantom, we showed that the labile proton fraction ratio is proportional to the CEST agent concentration with negligible change in the exchange rate. Additionally, we found the exchange rate of the pH phantom is dominantly base-catalyzed with little difference in the labile proton fraction ratio. In summary, our study demonstrated quantitative DIACEST MRI, which remains promising to augment the conventional CEST-weighted MRI analysis. PMID:23606428

  1. Improve Synergy Between Health Information Exchange and Electronic Health Records to Increase Rates of Continuously Insured Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Rachel; Burdick, Tim; Angier, Heather; Wallace, Lorraine; Nelson, Christine; Likumahuwa-Ackman, Sonja; Sumic, Aleksandra; DeVoe, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The Affordable Care Act increases health insurance options, yet many Americans may struggle to consistently maintain coverage. While health care providers have traditionally not been involved in providing insurance enrollment support to their patients, the ability for them to do so now exists. We propose that providers could capitalize on the expansion of electronic health records (EHRs) and the advances in health information exchanges (HIEs) to improve their patients’ insurance coverage rates and continuity. Evidence for Argument: We describe a project in which we are building strategies for linking, and thus improving synergy between, payer and EHR data. Through this effort, care teams will have access to new automated tools and increased EHR functionality designed to help them assist their patients in obtaining and maintaining health insurance coverage. Suggestion for the Future: The convergence of increasing EHR adoption, improving HIE functionality, and expanding insurance coverage options, creates new opportunities for clinics to help their patients obtain public health insurance. Harnessing this nascent ability to exchange information between payers and providers may improve synergies between HIE and EHRs, and thus support clinic-based efforts to keep patients continuously insured. PMID:26355818

  2. Dynamic exchange coupling and spin pumping in ferromagnetic/normal metal bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Roberto; Rezende, Sergio; Azevedo, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    It is known that in ultra-thin ferromagnetic (FM) layers in contact with normal metals (NM), the spin pumping is the most important magnetic relaxation channel. In this work we present a detailed calculation of the NM thickness dependence of the magnetic relaxation in FM/NM bilayers. To calculate the relaxation rate we consider that at the FM/NM interface the spins of the FM layer interact with the NM conduction electron spins through the s-d exchange interaction. The coupled motion of the FM magnetization with the NM spin accumulation transfers to the FM magnetization an additional relaxation from the overdamped motion of the conduction electron spins in the NM layer. We compare our results with the well know treatment that consider only spin currents and show that both yield the same result. Research supported in Brazil by the agencies CNPq, CAPES, FINEP and FACEPE and in Chile by the Millennium Science Nucleus ``Basic and Applied Magnetism'' No. P10-061-F and FONDECYT No. 1130705 and 1120836.

  3. Fluence-dependent dynamics of the 5d6s exchange splitting in Gd metal after femtosecond laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frietsch, Björn; Carley, Robert; Gleich, Markus; Teichmann, Martin; Bowlan, John; Weinelt, Martin

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the fluence-dependent dynamics of the exchange-split 5d6s valence bands of Gd metal after femtosecond, near-infrared (IR) laser excitation. Time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (tr-ARPES) with extreme ultraviolet (XUV) probe pulses is used to simultaneously map the transient binding energies of the minority and majority spin valence bands. The decay constant of the exchange splitting increases with fluence. This reflects the slower response of the occupied majority-spin component, which we attribute to Elliot–Yafet spin-flip scattering in accordance with the microscopic three-temperature model (M3TM). In contrast, the time constant of the partly unoccupied minority-spin band stays unaffected by a change in pump fluence. Here, we introduce as an alternative to superdiffusive spin transport exchange scattering, which is an ultrafast electronic mechanism explaining the observed dynamics. Exchange scattering can reduce the spin polarization in the partially unoccupied minority-spin band and thus its energetic position without effective demagnetization.

  4. Dual-axis high-data-rate atom interferometer via cold ensemble exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Rakholia, Akash V.; McGuinness, Hayden J.; Biedermann, Grant W.

    2014-11-24

    We demonstrate a dual-axis accelerometer and gyroscope atom interferometer, which can form the building blocks of a six-axis inertial measurement unit. By recapturing the atoms after the interferometer sequence, we maintain a large atom number at high data rates of 50 to 100 measurements per second. Two cold ensembles are formed in trap zones located a few centimeters apart and are launched toward one another. During their ballistic trajectory, they are interrogated with a stimulated Raman sequence, detected, and recaptured in the opposing trap zone. As a result, we achieve sensitivities at μg/ √Hz and μrad/s/ √Hz levels, making this a compelling prospect for expanding the use of atom interferometer inertial sensors beyond benign laboratory environments.

  5. Dual-axis high-data-rate atom interferometer via cold ensemble exchange

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rakholia, Akash V.; McGuinness, Hayden J.; Biedermann, Grant W.

    2014-11-24

    We demonstrate a dual-axis accelerometer and gyroscope atom interferometer, which can form the building blocks of a six-axis inertial measurement unit. By recapturing the atoms after the interferometer sequence, we maintain a large atom number at high data rates of 50 to 100 measurements per second. Two cold ensembles are formed in trap zones located a few centimeters apart and are launched toward one another. During their ballistic trajectory, they are interrogated with a stimulated Raman sequence, detected, and recaptured in the opposing trap zone. As a result, we achieve sensitivities at μg/ √Hz and μrad/s/ √Hz levels, making thismore » a compelling prospect for expanding the use of atom interferometer inertial sensors beyond benign laboratory environments.« less

  6. The dynamics of hyporheic exchange flows during storm events in a strongly gaining urban river.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuthbert, Mark O.; Durand, V.; Aller, M.-F.; Greswell, R. G.; Rivett, M. O.; Mackay, R.

    2010-05-01

    There is little published research to date investigating the transient nature of hyporheic exchange flows in strongly gaining rivers. Furthermore, there is a paucity of research describing high temporal frequency river bed water quality variations. This paper addresses both of these research gaps by presenting pressure, electrical conductivity (EC) and temperature data at high temporal frequency (5 minute resolution) collected from within riverbed sediments, the river channel and from the deeper groundwater system, of a well characterised reach of the urban River Tame, Birmingham, UK. The following conclusions have been reached based on data analysis, analytical modelling, and variably saturated numerical flow and transport modelling: • During storm events, flow reversals observed in the recorded pressure data can lead to substantial changes in EC (>20% in some cases) in the river bed down to depths of greater than 30 cm over periods of tens of hours. • A variable, but significant, proportion of the ‘bank storage' volume during a given storm event comes from the ‘backing up' of groundwater that would have been discharged to the river in the absence of the fluctuating river stage. Thus an important control on the extent and dynamics of the reversal is the storage capacity of the riverbank and bed which can be variable and heavily modified in the urban environment. • Return flows may occur along distinct flowlines in comparison with the path taken by the infiltrating water due to the changing geometry of flows through the storm event. Thus, discharging groundwater may be caused to spiral with each storm event, increasing the dispersion of solutes/contaminants. The magnitude of the exchange flows, and the degree of spiralling is likely to increase with distance away from the centre of the river channel. • Gas is present within the river bed in quantities up to around 14% by volume, and to at least 0.8 m depth below river bed. Given the indications from

  7. Reaction Engineering International and Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff exchange: Addressing computational fluid dynamics needs of the chemical process industry

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, J.A.

    1995-07-01

    Staff exchanges, such as the one described in this report, are intended to facilitate communications and collaboration among scientists and engineers at Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories, in US industry, and academia. Funding support for these exchanges is provided by the DOE, Office of Energy Research, Laboratory Technology Transfer Program. Funding levels for each exchange typically range from $20,000 to $40,000. The exchanges offer the opportunity for the laboratories to transfer technology and expertise to industry, gain a perspective to industry`s problems, and develop the basis for further cooperative efforts through Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAS) or other mechanisms. Information in this report on the staff exchange of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff with Reaction Engineering International (REI) includes the significant accomplishments, significant problems, industry benefits realized, recommended follow-on work and potential benefit of that work. The objectives of this project were as follows: Work with REI to develop an understanding of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) needs of the chemical process industry; assess the combined capabilities of the PNL and REI software analysis tools to address these needs; and establish a strategy for a future programmatically funded, joint effort to develop a new CFD tool for the chemical process industry.

  8. Structure and Dynamics of NBD1 from CFTR Characterized Using Crystallography and Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, H.A.; Wang, C.; Zhao, X.; Hamuro, Y.; Conners, K.; Kearins, M.C.; Lu, F.; Sauder, J.M.; Molnar, K.S.; Coales, S.J.; Maloney, P.C.; Guggino, W.B.; Wetmore, D.R.; Weber, P.C.; Hunt, J.F.

    2012-04-30

    The {Delta}F508 mutation in nucleotide-binding domain 1 (NBD1) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is the predominant cause of cystic fibrosis. Previous biophysical studies on human F508 and {Delta}F508 domains showed only local structural changes restricted to residues 509-511 and only minor differences in folding rate and stability. These results were remarkable because {Delta}F508 was widely assumed to perturb domain folding based on the fact that it prevents trafficking of CFTR out of the endoplasmic reticulum. However, the previously reported crystal structures did not come from matched F508 and {Delta}F508 constructs, and the {Delta}F508 structure contained additional mutations that were required to obtain sufficient protein solubility. In this article, we present additional biophysical studies of NBD1 designed to address these ambiguities. Mass spectral measurements of backbone amide {sup 1}H/{sup 2}H exchange rates in matched F508 and {Delta}F508 constructs reveal that {Delta}F508 increases backbone dynamics at residues 509-511 and the adjacent protein segments but not elsewhere in NBD1. These measurements also confirm a high level of flexibility in the protein segments exhibiting variable conformations in the crystal structures. We additionally present crystal structures of a broader set of human NBD1 constructs, including one harboring the native F508 residue and others harboring the {Delta}F508 mutation in the presence of fewer and different solubilizing mutations. The only consistent conformational difference is observed at residues 509-511. The side chain of residue V510 in this loop is mostly buried in all non-{Delta}F508 structures but completely solvent exposed in all {Delta}F508 structures. These results reinforce the importance of the perturbation {Delta}F508 causes in the surface topography of NBD1 in a region likely to mediate contact with the transmembrane domains of CFTR. However, they also suggest that increased

  9. Study of the aggregation mechanism of polyglutamine peptides using replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Miki; Ebina, Kuniyoshi; Tanaka, Shigenori

    2013-04-01

    Polyglutamine (polyQ, a peptide) with an abnormal repeat length is the causative agent of polyQ diseases, such as Huntington's disease. Although glutamine is a polar residue, polyQ peptides form insoluble aggregates in water, and the mechanism for this aggregation is still unclear. To elucidate the detailed mechanism for the nucleation and aggregation of polyQ peptides, replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations were performed for monomers and dimers of polyQ peptides with several chain lengths. Furthermore, to determine how the aggregation mechanism of polyQ differs from those of other peptides, we compared the results for polyQ with those of polyasparagine and polyleucine. The energy barrier between the monomeric and dimeric states of polyQ was found to be relatively low, and it was observed that polyQ dimers strongly favor the formation of antiparallel β-sheet structures. We also found a characteristic behavior of the monomeric polyQ peptide: a turn at the eighth residue is always present, even when the chain length is varied. We previously showed that a structure including more than two sets of β-turns is stable, so a long monomeric polyQ chain can act as an aggregation nucleus by forming several pairs of antiparallel β-sheet structures within a single chain. Since the aggregation of polyQ peptides has some features in common with an amyloid fibril, our results shed light on the mechanism for the aggregation of polyQ peptides as well as the mechanism for the formation of general amyloid fibrils, which cause the onset of amyloid diseases. PMID:23288093

  10. Dynamics of Inorganic Nutrients in Intertidal Sediments: Porewater, Exchangeable, and Intracellular Pools

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; Bohorquez, Julio; Corzo, Alfonso; Jimenez-Arias, Juan L.; Papaspyrou, Sokratis

    2016-01-01

    The study of inorganic nutrients dynamics in shallow sediments usually focuses on two main pools: porewater (PW) nutrients and exchangeable (EX) ammonium and phosphate. Recently, it has been found that microphytobenthos (MPB) and other microorganisms can accumulate large amounts of nutrients intracellularly (IC), highlighting the biogeochemical importance of this nutrient pool. Storing nutrients could support the growth of autotrophs when nutrients are not available, and could also provide alternative electron acceptors for dissimilatory processes such as nitrate reduction. Here, we studied the magnitude and relative importance of these three nutrient pools (PW, IC, and EX) and their relation to chlorophylls (used as a proxy for MPB abundance) and organic matter (OM) contents in an intertidal mudflat of Cadiz Bay (Spain). MPB was localized in the first 4 mm of the sediment and showed a clear seasonal pattern; highest chlorophylls content was found during autumn and lowest during spring-summer. The temporal and spatial distribution of nutrients pools and MPB were largely correlated. Ammonium was higher in the IC and EX fractions, representing on average 59 and 37% of the total ammonium pool, respectively. Similarly, phosphate in the IC and EX fractions accounted on average for 40 and 31% of the total phosphate pool, respectively. Nitrate in the PW was low, suggesting low nitrification activity and rapid consumption. Nitrate accumulated in the IC pool during periods of moderate MPB abundance, being up to 66% of the total nitrate pool, whereas it decreased when chlorophyll concentration peaked likely due to a high nitrogen demand. EX-Nitrate accounted for the largest fraction of total sediment nitrate, 66% on average. The distribution of EX-Nitrate was significantly correlated with chlorophyll and OM, which probably indicates a relation of this pool to an increased availability of sites for ionic adsorption. This EX-Nitrate pool could represent an alternative nitrate

  11. Changes in ecosystem structure related to the type and extent of woody cover alter carbon dynamics and surface energy exchange in central Texas ecosystems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, M. E.; Heilman, J.; McInnes, K.; Owens, K.; Kjelgaard, J.; Thijs, A.

    2006-12-01

    Rangeland ecosystems account for almost two thirds the total land area in Texas. Over the past century, heavy livestock grazing and fire suppression coupled with changes in climate have facilitated the expansion of woody species into rangelands throughout the state. Based in part on the assumption that woody species use more water than their herbaceous counterparts, land managers have used a variety of techniques to reduce tree and shrub abundance to combat the loss of forage for cattle. As a result, the structure of rangelands in Texas is complex, characterized by woody vegetation that is patchy in distribution, and continually changing between grassland, savanna and woodland. Despite the large areal extent of Texas rangelands, very little is known about how the observed changes in ecosystem structure impact carbon cycle dynamics and surface energy exchange. To reduce these uncertainties, we explored explicit relationships between structure and function in these ecosystems by comparing tower-based measurements of carbon and water vapor exchange made simultaneously from July 2004-Dec 2005 across three representative land covers in central Texas: open grassland, savanna with 30% Ashe juniper and honey mesquite cover, and closed canopy woodland. Here we report our findings on what impact the type and pattern of woody plant cover has on biological controls and patterns of carbon sequestration, evapotranspiration, and sensitivity to precipitation pulses. Monthly measurements of leaf level gas exchange, soil respiration rates, herbaceous net ecosystem exchange, and sap flow measurements on dominant woody species were used to augment eddy covariance estimates of ecosystem-atmosphere exchange. The addition of woody species significantly increased carbon sequestration in these ecosystems. Net ecosystem production from July 05-Jun 05 in the grassland, savanna and forest ecosystems was -14 g C m-2, -413 g C m-2, -450 g C m-2, respectively. Evapotranspiration was less

  12. Experimental investigation of rates and mechanisms of isotope exchange (O, H) between volcanic ash and isotopically-labeled water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Gary S.; Bindeman, Ilya N.

    2013-06-01

    The hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios in hydrous minerals and volcanic glass are routinely used as paleo-proxies to infer the isotopic values of meteoric waters and thus paleo-climatic conditions. We report a series of long-term exposure experiments of distal 7700 BP Mt. Mazama ash (-149‰ δ2H, +7‰ δ18O, 3.8 wt.% H2O) with isotopically-labeled water (+650‰ δ2H, +56‰ δ18O). Experiments were done at 70, 40 and 20 °C, and ranged in duration from 1 to 14454 h (˜20 months), to evaluate the rates of deuterium and 18O exchange, and investigate the relative role of exchange and diffusion. We also investigate the effect of drying on H2Otot and δ2H in native and reacted ash that can be used in defining the protocols for natural sample preparation. We employ Thermal Conversion Elemental Analyzer (TCEA) mass spectrometry, thermogravimetric analysis and a KBr pellet technique with infrared spectroscopy to measure the evolution of δ2H, total water, and OH water peaks in the course of exposure experiments, and in varying lengths of vacuum drying. Time series experiments aided by infrared measurements demonstrate the following new results: (i) It wasobserved that from 5 to >100‰ δ2H increases with time, with faster deuterium exchange at higher temperatures. Times at 15% of theoretical "full δ2H exchange" are: 15.8 years at 20 °C, 5.2 years at 40 °C, and 0.4 years at 70 °C. (ii) Even at extended exposure durations experiments show no net increase in water weight percent nor in δ18O in ash; water released from ash rapidly by thermal decomposition is not enriched in δ18O. This observation clearly suggests that it is hydrogen exchange, and not water addition or oxygen exchange that characterizes the process. (iii) Our time series drying, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR)-KBr and Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA) analyses collectively suggest a simple mechanistic view that there are three kinds of "water" in ash: water (mostly H2O) that is less strongly bonded

  13. Ozone dynamics and snow-atmosphere exchanges during ozone depletion events at Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmig, Detlev; Boylan, Patrick; Johnson, Bryan; Oltmans, Sam; Fairall, Chris; Staebler, Ralf; Weinheimer, Andrew; Orlando, John; Knapp, David J.; Montzka, Denise D.; Flocke, Frank; Frieß, Udo; Sihler, Holger; Shepson, Paul B.

    2012-10-01

    The behavior of lower atmospheric ozone and ozone exchanges at the snow surface were studied using a suite of platforms during the Ocean-Atmosphere-Sea Ice-Snow (OASIS) Spring 2009 experiment at an inland, coastal site east of Barrow, Alaska. A major objective was to investigate if and how much chemistry at the snow surface at the site contributes to springtime ozone depletion events (ODEs). Between March 8 and April 16, seven ODEs, with atmospheric ozone dropping below 1.0 ppbv, were observed. The depth of the ozone-depleted layer was variable, extending from the surface to ˜200-800 m. ODEs most commonly occurred during low wind speed conditions with flow coming from the Arctic Ocean. Two high-sensitivity ozone chemiluminescence instruments were used to accurately define the remaining sub-ppbv ozone levels during ODEs. These measurements showed variable residual ODE ozone levels ranging between 0.010 and 0.100 ppbv. During the most extended ODE, when ozone remained below 1.0 ppbv for over 78 h, these measurements showed a modest ozone recovery or production in the early afternoon hours, resulting in increases in the ozone mixing ratio of 0.100 to 0.800 ppbv. The comparison between high-sensitivity ozone measurements and BrO measured by longpath differential absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) during ODEs indicated that at low ozone levels formation of BrO is controlled by the amount of available ozone. Measurements of ozone in air drawn from below the snow surface showed depleted ozone in the snowpack, with levels consistently remaining <6 ppbv independent of above-surface ambient air concentrations. The snowpack was always a sink of ozone. Ozone deposition velocities determined from ozone surface flux measurements by eddy covariance were on the order of 0.01 cm s-1, which is of similar magnitude as ozone uptake rates found over snow at other polar sites that are not subjected to ODEs. The results from these multiple platform measurements unequivocally show that snow

  14. Influence of intergranular exchange coupling on the magnetization dynamics of CoCrPt:SiO{sub 2} granular media

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, R.; Schmidt, H.; Tibus, S.; Springer, F.; Fassbender, J.; Rohrmann, H.; Albrecht, M.

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the effect of Co{sup +} irradiation on the magnetization dynamics of CoCrPt:SiO{sub 2} granular media. Increasing irradiation levels reduce the saturation magnetization and effective anisotropy, which decrease the intrinsic magnetization precession frequency. Furthermore, increasing intergranular exchange coupling results in a qualitative change in the behavior of the magnetic material from a collection of individual grains to a homogeneous thin film, as evidenced in both the switching behavior and dynamics. The frequency change cannot be explained by single crystal macrospin modeling, and can only be reproduced by the inclusion of the dipolar effects and anisotropy distribution inherent in a granular medium.

  15. Influence of intergranular exchange coupling on the magnetization dynamics of CoCrPt:SiO2 granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, R.; Tibus, S.; Springer, F.; Fassbender, J.; Rohrmann, H.; Albrecht, M.; Schmidt, H.

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the effect of Co+ irradiation on the magnetization dynamics of CoCrPt:SiO2 granular media. Increasing irradiation levels reduce the saturation magnetization and effective anisotropy, which decrease the intrinsic magnetization precession frequency. Furthermore, increasing intergranular exchange coupling results in a qualitative change in the behavior of the magnetic material from a collection of individual grains to a homogeneous thin film, as evidenced in both the switching behavior and dynamics. The frequency change cannot be explained by single crystal macrospin modeling, and can only be reproduced by the inclusion of the dipolar effects and anisotropy distribution inherent in a granular medium.

  16. Solubility, diffusivity, and isotopic exchange rate of hydrogen isotopes in Li-Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Y.; Edao, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Fukada, S.

    2008-07-15

    The diffusion, solution and permeation coefficients of hydrogen isotopes in liquid Li-Pb which is a candidate liquid blanket material for fusion reactors were determined in the temperature range 573-973 K using an unsteady permeation method. Each coefficients was correlated to temperature as follows: D{sub Li-Pb} = 1.8 x 10{sup -8} exp(-11590/RT) [m{sup 2}/s] (1) K{sub Li-Pb} = 2.1x10{sup -6} exp(-18700/RT) [1/Pa{sup 0.5}] (2) P{sub Li-Pb} = 1.8x10{sup -9} exp(-30290/RT) [mol/msPa{sup 0.5}] (3) The hydrogen permeation flux depends on the square root of pressure at 773-973 K. Although the power of pressure declined below 0.4 when temperature was below 673 K, the effects of surface resistance were neglected above 673 K. The hydrogen solubility in liquid Li-Pb was found to correlate with a Sievert's constant. We calculated a height-equivalent to theoretical-plate of a gas-liquid countercurrent extraction tower for tritium recovery rates in liquid Li-Pb to be H{sub L}= 7.0x10{sup -2} [m] (4). (authors)

  17. Effects of the turnover rate on the size distribution of firms: An application of the kinetic exchange models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Anindya S.

    2012-12-01

    We address the issue of the distribution of firm size. To this end we propose a model of firms in a closed, conserved economy populated with zero-intelligence agents who continuously move from one firm to another. We then analyze the size distribution and related statistics obtained from the model. There are three well known statistical features obtained from the panel study of the firms i.e., the power law in size (in terms of income and/or employment), the Laplace distribution in the growth rates and the slowly declining standard deviation of the growth rates conditional on the firm size. First, we show that the model generalizes the usual kinetic exchange models with binary interaction to interactions between an arbitrary number of agents. When the number of interacting agents is in the order of the system itself, it is possible to decouple the model. We provide exact results on the distributions which are not known yet for binary interactions. Our model easily reproduces the power law for the size distribution of firms (Zipf’s law). The fluctuations in the growth rate falls with increasing size following a power law (though the exponent does not match with the data). However, the distribution of the difference of the firm size in this model has Laplace distribution whereas the real data suggests that the difference of the log of sizes has the same distribution.

  18. Does amifostine reduce metabolic rate? Effect of the drug on gas exchange and acute ventilatory hypoxic response in humans.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Jaideep J; Allen, Caroline; Little, Evelyn; Formenti, Federico; Harris, Adrian L; Robbins, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Amifostine is added to chemoradiation regimens in the treatment of many cancers on the basis that, by reducing the metabolic rate, it protects normal cells from toxic effects of therapy. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the metabolic rate (by gas exchange) over 255 min in 6 healthy subjects, at two doses (500 mg and 1000 mg) of amifostine infused over 15 min at the start of the protocol. We also assessed the ventilatory response to six 1 min exposures to isocapnic hypoxia mid-protocol. There was no change in metabolic rate with amifostine as measured by oxygen uptake (p = 0.113). However in carbon dioxide output and respiratory quotient, we detected a small decline over time in control and drug protocols, consistent with a gradual change from carbohydrate to fat metabolism over the course of the relatively long study protocol. A novel result was that amifostine (1000 mg) increased the mean ± SD acute hypoxic ventilatory response from 12.4 ± 5.1 L/min to 20.3 ± 11.9 L/min (p = 0.045). In conclusion, any cellular protective effects of amifostine are unlikely due to metabolic effects. The stimulatory effect on hypoxic ventilatory responses may be due to increased levels of hypoxia inducible factor, either peripherally in the carotid body, or centrally in the brain. PMID:25894815

  19. Dynamics of CO2-exchange and C-budgets due to soil erosion: Insights from a 4 years observation period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Mathias; Albiac Borraz, Elisa; Garcia Alba, Juana; Augustin, Jürgen; Sommer, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Agriculture in the hummocky ground moraine landscape of NE-Germany is characterized by an increase in energy crop cultivation, like maize or sorghum. Both enhance lateral C fluxes by erosion and induce feedbacks on C dynamics of agroecosystems as a result of reduced wintertime plant cover and vigorous crop growth during summer. However, the actual impact of these phenomena on the CO2-sink/-source function of agricultural landscapes, is still not clear. Therefore, the interdisciplinary project "CarboZALF" was established in Dedelow/Prenzlau (NE-Germany) in 2009. Within the field experiment CarboZALF-D, CO2 fluxes for the soil-plant systems were monitored, covering typical landscape relevant soil states in respect to erosion and deposition, like Calcic Cutanic Luvisol and Endogleyic Colluvic Regosol. Automated chamber systems, each consisting of four transparent chambers (2.5 m height, basal area 2.25 m2), were placed along gradients at both measurement sites. Monitored CO2 fluxes were gap-filled on a high-temporal resolution by modelling ecosystem respiration (Reco), gross primary productivity (GPP) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) based on parallel and continuous measurements of the CO2 exchange, soil and air temperatures as well as photosynthetic active radiation (PAR). Gap-filling was e.g. needed in case of chamber malfunctions and abrupt disturbances by farming practice. The monitored crop rotation was corn-winter wheat (2 a), sorghum-winter triticale and alfalfa (1.5 a). In our presentation we would like to show insights from a 4 years observation period, with prounounced differences between the eroded and the colluvial soil: The Endogleyic Colluvic Regosol showed higher flux rates for Reco, GPP and NEE compared to the Calcic Cutanic Luvisol. Site-specific NEE and C-balances were positively related to soil C-stocks as well as biomass production, and generated a minor C-sink in case of the Calcic Cutanic Luvisol and a highly variable C-source in case of the

  20. Application of static and dynamic enclosures for determining dimethyl sulfide and carbonyl sulfide exchange in Sphagnum peatlands: Implications for the magnitude and direction of flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Mello, William Z.; Hines, Mark E.

    1994-01-01

    A static enclosure method was applied to determine the exchange of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and carbonyl sulfide (OCS) between the surface of Sphagnum peatlands and the atmosphere. Measurements were performed concurrently with dynamic (flow through) enclosure measurements with sulfur-free air used as sweep gas. This latter technique has been used to acquire the majority of available data on the exchange of S gases between the atmosphere and the continental surfaces and has been criticized because it is thought to overestimate the true flux of gases by disrupting natural S gas gradients. DMS emission rates determined by both methods were not statistically different between 4 and greater than 400 nmol/sq m/h, indicating that previous data on emissions of at least DMS are probably valid. However, the increase in DMS in static enclosures was not linear, indicating the potential for a negative feedback of enlosure DMS concentrations on efflux. The dynamic enclosure method measured positive OCS flux rates (emission) at all sites, while data using static enclosures indicated that OCS was consumed from the atmosphere at these same sites at rates of 3.7 to 55 nmol/sq m/h. Measurements using both enclosure techniques at a site devoid of vegetation showed that peat was a source of both DMS and OCS. However, the rate of OCS efflux from decomposing peat was more than counterbalanced by OCS consumption by vegetation, including Sphagnum mosses, and net OCS uptake occurred at all sites. We propose that all wetlands are net sinks for OCS.

  1. Dynamic mathematical model of high rate algal ponds (HRAP).

    PubMed

    Jupsin, H; Praet, E; Vasel, J L

    2003-01-01

    This article presents a mathematical model to describe High-Rate Algal Ponds (HRAPs). The hydrodynamic behavior of the reactor is described as completely mixed tanks in series with recirculation. The hydrodynamic pattern is combined with a subset of River Water Quality Model 1 (RWQM1), including the main processes in liquid phase. Our aim is to develop models for WSPs and aerated lagoons, too, but we focused on HRAPs first for several reasons: Sediments are usually less abundant in HRAP and can be neglected, Stratification is not observed and state variables are constant in a reactor cross section, Due to the system's geometry, the reactor is quite similar to a plugflow type reactor with recirculation, with a simple advection term. The model is based on mass balances and includes the following processes: *Phytoplankton growth with NO3-, NO2- and death, *Aerobic growth of heterotrophs with NO3-, NH4+ and respiration, *Anoxic growth of heterotrophs with NO3-, NO2- and anoxic respiration, *Growth of nitrifiers (two stages) and respiration. The differences with regard to RWQM1 are that we included a limiting term associated with inorganic carbon on the growth rate of algae and nitrifiers, gas transfers are taken into account by the familiar Adeney equation, and a subroutine calculates light intensity at the water surface. This article presents our first simulations. PMID:14510211

  2. Nonlinear dynamical effects on reaction rates in thermally fluctuating environments.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Shinnosuke; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2010-07-21

    A framework to calculate the rate constants of condensed phase chemical reactions of manybody systems is presented without relying on the concept of transition state. The theory is based on a framework we developed recently adopting a multidimensional underdamped Langevin equation in the region of a rank-one saddle. The theory provides a reaction coordinate expressed as an analytical nonlinear functional of the position coordinates and velocities of the system (solute), the friction constants, and the random force of the environment (solvent). Up to moderately high temperature, the sign of the reaction coordinate can determine the final destination of the reaction in a thermally fluctuating media, irrespective of what values the other (nonreactive) coordinates may take. In this paper, it is shown that the reaction probability is analytically derived as the probability of the reaction coordinate being positive, and that the integration with the Boltzmann distribution of the initial conditions leads to the exact reaction rate constant when the local equilibrium holds and the quantum effect is negligible. Because of analytical nature of the theory taking into account all nonlinear effects and their combination with fluctuation and dissipation, the theory naturally provides us with the firm mathematical foundation of the origin of the reactivity of the reaction in a fluctuating media. PMID:20544104

  3. Dynamics of ion exchange between self-assembled redox polyelectrolyte multilayer modified electrode and liquid electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Grumelli, Doris E; Garay, Fernando; Barbero, Cesar A; Calvo, Ernesto J

    2006-08-10

    A probe beam deflection (PBD) study of ion exchange between an electroactive polymer poly(allylamine)-bipyridyl-pyridine osmium complex film and liquid electrolyte is reported. The PBD measurements were made simultaneously to chronoamperometric oxidation-reduction cycles, to be able to detect kinetic effects in the ion exchange. Layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembled redox polyelectrolyte films with osmium bipyridyl complex covalently attached to poly(allylamine) (PAH-Os) and poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS) have been built by alternate electrostatic adsorption from soluble polyelectrolytes. The ionic exchange during initial conditioning of the film ("break-in") undergoing oxidation-reduction cycles and recovery after equilibration in the reduced state have shown an exchange of anions and cations with time lag between them. The effect of the nature of cation on the ionic exchange has been investigated with dilute HCl, LiCl, NaCl, and CsCl electrolytes. The ratio of anion to cation exchanged at the film-electrolyte interface has a strong dependence on the nature of charge in the topmost layer, that is, when negatively charged PSS is the capping layer, a larger proportion of cation exchange is observed. This demonstrates that the electrical potential distribution at the redox polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM)/electrolyte interface determines the ionic flux in response to charge injection in the film. PMID:16884254

  4. Heart Rate Variability Dynamics for the Prognosis of Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Villegas, Juan F.; Lam-Espinosa, Eric; Ramirez-Moreno, David F.; Calvo-Echeverry, Paulo C.; Agredo-Rodriguez, Wilfredo

    2011-01-01

    Statistical, spectral, multi-resolution and non-linear methods were applied to heart rate variability (HRV) series linked with classification schemes for the prognosis of cardiovascular risk. A total of 90 HRV records were analyzed: 45 from healthy subjects and 45 from cardiovascular risk patients. A total of 52 features from all the analysis methods were evaluated using standard two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (KS-test). The results of the statistical procedure provided input to multi-layer perceptron (MLP) neural networks, radial basis function (RBF) neural networks and support vector machines (SVM) for data classification. These schemes showed high performances with both training and test sets and many combinations of features (with a maximum accuracy of 96.67%). Additionally, there was a strong consideration for breathing frequency as a relevant feature in the HRV analysis. PMID:21386966

  5. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Takara, L.S.; Cunha, T.M.; Barbosa, P.; Rodrigues, M.K.; Oliveira, M.F.; Nery, L.E.; Neder, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(VCW) = rib cage (VRC) + abdomen (VAB)] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III) underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim) at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE) VCW increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of VCW regulation as EEVCW increased non-linearly in 17/30 “hyperinflators” and decreased in 13/30 “non-hyperinflators” (P < 0.05). EEVAB decreased slightly in 8 of the “hyperinflators”, thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI) VCW (P < 0.05). In contrast, decreases in EEVCW in the “non-hyperinflators” were due to the combination of stable EEVRC with marked reductions in EEVAB. These patients showed lower EIVCW and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05). Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIVCW regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001). However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid) their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment. PMID:23250012

  6. Enhancement of specific absorption rate by exchange coupling of the core-shell structure of magnetic nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadatare, M. R.; Meshram, J. V.; Gurav, K. V.; Hyeok Kim, Jin; Pawar, S. H.

    2016-03-01

    Conversion of electromagnetic energy into heat by nanoparticles (NPs) has the potential to be a powerful, non-invasive technique for biomedical applications such as magnetic fluid hyperthermia, drug release, disease treatment and remote control of single cell functions, but poor conversion efficiencies have hindered practical applications so far. In this paper, an attempt has been made to increase the efficiency of magnetic thermal induction by NPs. To increase the efficiency of magnetic thermal induction by NPs, one can take advantage of the exchange coupling between a magnetically hard core and magnetically soft shell to tune the magnetic properties of the NP and maximize the specific absorption rate, which is the gauge of conversion efficiency. In order to examine the tunability of magnetocrystalline anisotropy and its magnetic heating power, a representative magnetically hard material (CoFe2O4) has been coupled to a soft material (Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4). The synthesized NPs show specific absorption rates that are of an order of magnitude larger than the conventional one.

  7. The rates of exchange of water molecules from Al(III)-methylmalonate complexes: The effect of chelate ring size

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, W.H.; Phillips, B.L.; Nordin, J.P.; Sullivan, D.J.

    1998-08-01

    Rate coefficients are reported for exchange of hydration waters in the inner-coordination-sphere of Al(III)-methylmalonate complexes with bulk solution as determined via {sup 17}O-NMR. Surprisingly, water molecules in the thermodynamically less-stable complexes containing six-membered chelates are much more labile than those in five-membered oxalate-A(III) complexes. The surprising trend in reactivity is attributable either to differences in the Lewis basicities of oxygens in bidentate oxalate and methylmalonate ligands, or to rapid dissociation/reassociation of one of the acetate groups to the metal center. These results identify a useful case where trends in the apparent labilities of dissolved and presumed surface complexes deviate sharply. This deviation could be usefully exploited to probe surfaces if ligand-promoted dissolution rates could be compared at conditions where inner-sphere and outer-sphere chelate complexes could be distinguished spectroscopically. The authors expect inner-sphere oxalate to have a smaller labilizing effect than malonate or methylmalonate. A contrary result would indicate structural dissimilarity between complexes on the surface and in solution, or perhaps steric hindrance.

  8. Effects of ozone on growth, yield and leaf gas exchange rates of two Bangladeshi cultivars of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Nahid; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Inada, Hidetoshi; Hoshino, Daiki; Kondo, Taisuke; Izuta, Takeshi

    2010-05-01

    To clarify the effects of O(3) on crop plants cultivated in Bangladesh, two Bangladeshi wheat cultivars (Sufi and Bijoy) were grown in plastic boxes filled with Andisol and exposed daily to charcoal-filtered air or O(3) at 60 and 100 nl l(-1) (10:00-17:00) from 13 March to 4 June 2008. The whole-plant dry mass and grain yield per plant of the two cultivars at the final harvest were significantly reduced by the exposure to O(3). Although there was no significant effect of O(3) on stomatal diffusive conductance to H(2)O of flag leaf, net photosynthetic rate of the leaf was significantly reduced by the exposure to O(3.) The sensitivity of growth, yield, yield components and leaf gas exchange rates to O(3) was not significantly different between the two cultivars. The results obtained in the present study suggest that ambient levels of O(3) may detrimentally affect wheat production in Bangladesh. PMID:19962222

  9. [DOTA-bis(amide)]lanthanide complexes: NMR evidence for differences in water-molecule exchange rates for coordination isomers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Kovacs, Z; Burgess, S; Aime, S; Terreno, E; Sherry, A D

    2001-01-01

    Two derivatives of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane with trans-acetate and trans-amide side-chain ligating groups have been prepared and their complexes with lanthanide cations examined by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. These lanthanide complexes exist in aqueous solution as a mixture of slowly interconverting coordination isomers with 1H chemical shifts similar to those reported previously for the major (M) and minor (m) forms of the tetraacetate ([Ln(dota)]-) and tetraamide ([Ln(dtma)]3+) complexes. As in the [Ln(dota)]- and [Ln(dtma)]3+ complexes, the m/M ratio proved to be a sensitive function of lanthanide size and temperature. An analysis of 1H hyperfine shifts in spectra of the Yb3+ complexes revealed significant differences between the axial (D1) and non-axial (D2) components of the magnetic susceptibility tensor anisotropy in the m and M coordination isomers and the energetics of ring inversion and m <==> M isomerization as determined by two-dimensional exchange spectroscopy (EXSY). (17)O shift data for the Dy3+ complexes showed that both have one inner-sphere water molecule. A temperature-dependent (17)O NMR study of bulk water linewidths for solutions of the Gd3+ complexes provided direct evidence for differences in water exchange rates for the two coordination isomers. The bound-water lifetimes (tauM298) in the M and m isomers of the Gd3+ complexes ranged from 1.4-2.4 micros and 3-14 ns, respectively. This indicates that 1) the inner-sphere water lifetimes for the complexes with a single positive charge reported here are considerably shorter for both coordination isomers than the corresponding values for the [Gd(dtma)]3+ complex with three positive charges, and 2) the difference in water lifetimes for M and m isomers in these two series is magnified in the [Gd[dota-bis(amide)

  10. Dynamic NMR of Intramolecular Exchange Processes in EDTA Complexes of Sc[superscript 3+], Y[superscript 3+], and La[superscript 3+

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ba, Yong; Han, Steven; Ni, Lily; Su, Tony; Garcia, Andres

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic NMR makes use of the effect of chemical exchanges on NMR spectra to study kinetics and thermodynamics. An advanced physical chemistry lab experiment was developed to study the intramolecular exchange processes of EDTA (the disodium salt of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) metal complexes. EDTA is an important chelating agent, used in…

  11. Spin dynamics induced by ultrafast heating with ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic interfacial exchange in perpendicularly magnetized hard/soft bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Q. L.; Iihama, S.; Zhang, X. M.; Miyazaki, T.; Mizukami, S.

    2015-11-01

    The laser-induced spin dynamics of FeCo in perpendicularly magnetized L10-MnGa/FeCo bilayers with ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interfacial exchange coupling (IEC) are examined using the time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect. We found a precessional phase reversal of the FeCo layer as the IEC changes from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic. Moreover, a precession-suspension window was observed when the magnetic field was applied in a certain direction for the bilayer with ferromagnetic IEC. Our observations reveal that the spin dynamics modulation is strongly dependent on the IEC type within the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert depiction. The IEC dependence of the precessional phase and amplitude suggests the interesting method for magnetization dynamics modulation.

  12. Spin dynamics induced by ultrafast heating with ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic interfacial exchange in perpendicularly magnetized hard/soft bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Q. L. E-mail: mizukami@wpi-aimr.tohoku.ac.jp; Miyazaki, T.; Mizukami, S. E-mail: mizukami@wpi-aimr.tohoku.ac.jp; Iihama, S.; Zhang, X. M.

    2015-11-30

    The laser-induced spin dynamics of FeCo in perpendicularly magnetized L1{sub 0}-MnGa/FeCo bilayers with ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interfacial exchange coupling (IEC) are examined using the time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect. We found a precessional phase reversal of the FeCo layer as the IEC changes from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic. Moreover, a precession-suspension window was observed when the magnetic field was applied in a certain direction for the bilayer with ferromagnetic IEC. Our observations reveal that the spin dynamics modulation is strongly dependent on the IEC type within the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert depiction. The IEC dependence of the precessional phase and amplitude suggests the interesting method for magnetization dynamics modulation.

  13. Dynamic tensile fracture of mortar at ultra-high strain-rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erzar, B.; Buzaud, E.; Chanal, P.-Y.

    2013-12-01

    During the lifetime of a structure, concrete and mortar may be exposed to highly dynamic loadings, such as impact or explosion. The dynamic fracture at high loading rates needs to be well understood to allow an accurate modeling of this kind of event. In this work, a pulsed-power generator has been employed to conduct spalling tests on mortar samples at strain-rates ranging from 2 × 104 to 4 × 104 s-1. The ramp loading allowed identifying the strain-rate anytime during the test. A power law has been proposed to fit properly the rate-sensitivity of tensile strength of this cementitious material over a wide range of strain-rate. Moreover, a specimen has been recovered damaged but unbroken. Micro-computed tomography has been employed to study the characteristics of the damage pattern provoked by the dynamic tensile loading.

  14. Dynamic tensile fracture of mortar at ultra-high strain-rates

    SciTech Connect

    Erzar, B. Buzaud, E.; Chanal, P.-Y.

    2013-12-28

    During the lifetime of a structure, concrete and mortar may be exposed to highly dynamic loadings, such as impact or explosion. The dynamic fracture at high loading rates needs to be well understood to allow an accurate modeling of this kind of event. In this work, a pulsed-power generator has been employed to conduct spalling tests on mortar samples at strain-rates ranging from 2 × 10{sup 4} to 4 × 10{sup 4} s{sup −1}. The ramp loading allowed identifying the strain-rate anytime during the test. A power law has been proposed to fit properly the rate-sensitivity of tensile strength of this cementitious material over a wide range of strain-rate. Moreover, a specimen has been recovered damaged but unbroken. Micro-computed tomography has been employed to study the characteristics of the damage pattern provoked by the dynamic tensile loading.

  15. Exchange Rates and Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, Charles; West, Kenneth D.

    2005-01-01

    We show analytically that in a rational expectations present-value model, an asset price manifests near-random walk behavior if fundamentals are I (1) and the factor for discounting future fundamentals is near one. We argue that this result helps explain the well-known puzzle that fundamental variables such as relative money supplies, outputs,…

  16. Solute-solvent complex switching dynamics of chloroform between acetone and dimethylsulfoxide-two-dimensional IR chemical exchange spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Kyungwon; Rosenfeld, Daniel E; Chung, Jean K; Fayer, Michael D

    2008-11-01

    Hydrogen bonds formed between C-H and various hydrogen bond acceptors play important roles in the structure of proteins and organic crystals, and the mechanisms of C-H bond cleavage reactions. Chloroform, a C-H hydrogen bond donor, can form weak hydrogen-bonded complexes with acetone and with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). When chloroform is dissolved in a mixed solvent consisting of acetone and DMSO, both types of hydrogen-bonded complexes exist. The two complexes, chloroform-acetone and chloroform-DMSO, are in equilibrium, and they rapidly interconvert by chloroform exchanging hydrogen bond acceptors. This fast hydrogen bond acceptor substitution reaction is probed using ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) vibrational echo chemical exchange spectroscopy. Deuterated chloroform is used in the experiments, and the 2D-IR spectrum of the C-D stretching mode is measured. The chemical exchange of the chloroform hydrogen bonding partners is tracked by observing the time-dependent growth of off-diagonal peaks in the 2D-IR spectra. The measured substitution rate is 1/30 ps for an acetone molecule to replace a DMSO molecule in a chloroform-DMSO complex and 1/45 ps for a DMSO molecule to replace an acetone molecule in a chloroform-acetone complex. Free chloroform exists in the mixed solvent, and it acts as a reactive intermediate in the substitution reaction, analogous to a SN1 type reaction. From the measured rates and the equilibrium concentrations of acetone and DMSO, the dissociation rates for the chloroform-DMSO and chloroform-acetone complexes are found to be 1/24 ps and 1/5.5 ps, respectively. The difference between the measured rate for the complete substitution reaction and the rate for complex dissociation corresponds to the diffusion limited rate. The estimated diffusion limited rate agrees well with the result from a Smoluchowski treatment of diffusive reactions. PMID:18855462

  17. [The conformational dynamic of the tetramer hemoglobin molecule as revealed by hydrogen exchange. II. Influence of the intersubunit contact splitting].

    PubMed

    Abaturov, L V; Molchanova, T P; Nosova, N G; Shliapnikov, S V; Faĭzulin, D A

    2006-01-01

    The rate of the H-D exchange of the peptide NH atoms of the isolated alpha and beta subunits of human Hb were studied at the pH range 5.5-9.0 and 20 degrees C by the IR spectroscopy. The factor retardation of the exchange rate of subunits -P in the range -10(2)-10(7). In comparison with tetramer Hb the probability of local fluctuations (1/P) is increased to a slightly greater extent for the monomeric alpha subunits then for the tetramer beta subunits. Unlike Hb oxygenation of subunits does not influence on the probability of the local fluctuations and subunits have no the pH-dependent change of the value 1/P observable for the ligand Hb. The possible mechanisms of the overall intensification of the local fluctuations upon the splitting of the Hb tetrameric contacts between subunits are discussed with the inviting of the structural crystallographic data. PMID:16813166

  18. Investigation of mercury exchange between forest canopy vegetation and the atmosphere using a new dynamic chamber

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graydon, J.A.; St. Louis, V.L.; Lindberg, S.E.; Hintelmann, H.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a dynamic chamber system that allows full transmission of PAR and UV radiation and permits enclosed intact foliage to maintain normal physiological function while Hg(0) flux rates are quantified in the field. Black spruce and jack pine foliage both emitted and absorbed Hg(0), exhibiting compensation points near atmospheric Hg(0) concentrations of ???2-3 ng m-3. Using enriched stable Hg isotope spikes, patterns of spike Hg(II) retention on foliage were investigated. Hg(0) evasion rates from foliage were simultaneously measured using the chamber to determine if the decline of foliar spike Hg(II) concentrations overtime could be explained by the photoreduction and re-emission of spike Hg to the atmosphere. This mass balance approach suggested that spike Hg(0) fluxes alone could not account for the measured decrease in spike Hg(II) on foliage following application, implying that either the chamber underestimates the true photoreduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) on foliage, or other mechanisms of Hg(II) loss from foliage, such as cuticle weathering, are in effect. The radiation spectrum responsible for the photoreduction of newly deposited Hg(II) on foliage was also investigated. Our spike experiments suggest that some of the Hg(II) in wet deposition retained by the forest canopy may be rapidly photoreduced to Hg(0) and re-emitted back to the atmosphere, while another portion may be retained by foliage at the end of the growing season, with some being deposited in litterfall. This finding has implications for the estimation of Hg dry deposition based on throughfall and litterfall fluxes. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  19. Dynamics of hadronic molecule in one-boson exchange approach and possible heavy flavor molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Guijun; Liu Jiafeng; Yan Mulin

    2009-03-01

    We extend the one pion exchange model at quark level to include the short distance contributions coming from {eta}, {sigma}, {rho} and {omega} exchange. This formalism is applied to discuss the possible molecular states of DD*/DD*, BB*/BB*, DD*, BB*, the pseudoscalar-vector systems with C=B=1 and C=-B=1 respectively. The ''{delta} function'' term contribution and the S-D mixing effects have been taken into account. We find the conclusions reached after including the heavier mesons exchange are qualitatively the same as those in the one pion exchange model. The previous suggestion that 1{sup ++} BB*/BB* molecule should exist, is confirmed in the one-boson exchange model, whereas DD* bound state should not exist. The DD*/DD* system can accommodate a 1{sup ++} molecule close to the threshold, the mixing between the molecule and the conventional charmonium has to be considered to identify this state with X(3872). For the BB* system, the pseudoscalar-vector systems with C=B=1 and C=-B=1, near threshold molecular states may exist. These bound states should be rather narrow, isospin is violated and the I=0 component is dominant. Experimental search channels for these states are suggested.

  20. Effects of loading rate and temperature on dynamic fracture of ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, K. H.; Kobayashi, A. S.; Emery, A. F.

    1989-01-01

    A hybrid experimental-numerical procedure was used to determine the dynamic fracture initiation toughnesses and the dynamic stress intensity factors of alumina, TiB2-particulate/SiC-matrix, and SiC(w)/Al2O3-matrix composites at room and elevated temperatures under static and impact loadings. The dynamic fracture initiation toughnesses at room and elevated temperatures were greater than the corresponding static fracture toughness. The crack velocity versus the dynamic stress intensity factor relations showed minor differences due to temperature changes but significant differences due to the change in loading rates.

  1. SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS FROM DYNAMICALLY ASSEMBLED COMPACT BINARIES IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS: PATHWAYS, RATES, HYDRODYNAMICS, AND COSMOLOGICAL SETTING

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, William H.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Van de Ven, Glenn E-mail: enrico@ucolick.or

    2010-09-01

    We present a detailed assessment of the various dynamical pathways leading to the coalescence of compact objects in globular clusters (GCs) and Short Gamma-ray Burst (SGRB) production. We consider primordial binaries, dynamically formed binaries (through tidal two-body and three-body exchange interactions), and direct impacts of compact objects (WD/NS/BH). Here, we show that if the primordial binary fraction is small, close encounters dominate the production rate of coalescing compact systems. We find that the two dominant channels are the interaction of field neutron stars (NSs) with dynamically formed binaries and two-body encounters. Under such conditions, we estimate the redshift distribution and host galaxy demographics of SGRB progenitors, and find that GCs can provide a significant contribution to the overall observed rate. Regarding the newly identified channel of close stellar encounters involving WD/NS/BH, we have carried out precise modeling of the hydrodynamical evolution, giving us a detailed description of the resulting merged system. Our calculations show that there is in principle no problem in accounting for the global energy budget of a typical SGRB. The particulars of each encounter, however, are variable in several aspects and can lead to interesting diversity. First and most importantly, the characteristics of the encounter are highly dependent on the impact parameter. This is in contrast to the merger scenario, where the masses of the compact objects dictate a typical length and luminosity scale for SGRB activity. Second, the nature of the compact star itself can produce very different outcomes. Finally, the presence of tidal tails in which material will fall back onto the central object at a later time is a robust feature of the present set of calculations. The mass involved in these structures is considerably larger than for binary mergers. It is thus possible to account generically in this scenario for a prompt episode of energy release, as

  2. Analysis of one-dimensional pure-exchange NMR experiments for studying dynamics with broad distributions of correlation times.

    PubMed

    deAzevedo, E R; Tozoni, J R; Schmidt-Rohr, K; Bonagamba, T J

    2005-04-15

    One-dimensional (1D) exchange NMR experiments can elucidate the geometry, time scale, memory, and heterogeneity of slow molecular motions (1 ms-1 s) in solids. The one-dimensional version of pure-exchange (PUREX) solid-state exchange NMR, which is applied to static samples and uses the chemical shift anisotropy as a probe for molecular motion, is particularly promising and convenient in applications where site resolution is not a problem, i.e., in systems with few chemical sites. In this work, some important aspects of the 1D PUREX experiment applied to systems with complex molecular motions are analyzed. The influence of intermediate-regime (10 micros-1 ms) motions and of the distribution of reorientation angles on the pure-exchange intensity are discussed, together with a simple method for estimating the activation energy of motions occurring with a single correlation time. In addition, it is demonstrated that detailed information on the motional geometry can be obtained from 1D PUREX spectral line shapes. Experiments on a molecular crystal, dimethyl sulfone, confirm the analysis quantitatively. In two amorphous polymers, atactic polypropylene (aPP) and polyisobutylene (PIB), which differ only by one methyl group in the repeat unit, the height of the normalized exchange intensity clearly reveals a striking difference in the width of the distribution of correlation times slightly above the glass transition. The aPP shows the broad distribution and Williams-Landel-Ferry temperature dependence of correlation times typical of polymers and other "fragile" glass formers. In contrast, the dynamics in PIB occur essentially with a single correlation time and exhibits Arrhenius behavior, which is more typical of "strong" glass formers; this is somewhat surprising given the weak intermolecular forces in PIB. PMID:15945644

  3. Global Dynamics of a Parasite-Host Model with Nonlinear Incidence Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yilei

    The paper is concerned with the effect of a nonlinear incidence rate Sp Iq on dynamical behaviors of a parasite-host model. It is shown that the global attractor of the parasite-host model is an equilibrium if q = 1, which is similar to that of the parasite-host model with a nonlinear incidence rate of the fractional function (SI)/(S+I). However, when q is greater than one, more positive equilibria appear and limit cycles arise from Hopf bifurcations at the positive equilibria for the model with the incidence rate Sp Iq. It reveals that the nonlinear incidence rate of the exponential function Sp Iq for generic p and q can lead to more complicated and richer dynamics than the bilinear incidence rate or the fractional incidence rate for this model.

  4. Effect of OPEC oil pricing on output, prices, and exchange rates in the United States and other industrialized countries

    SciTech Connect

    Fleisig, H.

    1981-01-01

    Following each major oil price increase, real gross national product (GNP) has fallen, unemployment and inflation have risen, and exchange rates have moved erratically. But how do oil price increases produce these effects. This paper discusses some of the macroeconomic consequences of too high and rising oil prices, and some of the policy options that might control these effects. It finds that the high and rising price of oil imports from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) burdens the industrial oil-importing countries in two ways. First, because total expenditures on oil rise relative to income, the potential real standard of living in oil-importing countries falls. Together, the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), for example, may have paid as much as $150 billion more for oil in 1979 than they would have paid in a competitive oil market. Second, the rising oil price increases unemployment and inflation in ways that are difficult for policymakers in oil-importing countries to manage; on the one hand, the rising oil price produces general inflation, and on the other hand, it depresses domestic demand and employment. Policymakers attempt to control part of the inflation, at the cost of increasing unemployment. The total loss in output from the 1974 to 1975 recession, though part of it may have followed from factors unrelated to oil, was about $350 billion.

  5. Effects of pulse rate on threshold and dynamic range in Clarion cochlear-implant users (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreft, Heather A.; Donaldson, Gail S.; Nelson, David A.

    2004-05-01

    The effects of pulse rate on absolute threshold (THS), maximum acceptable loudness (MAL), and dynamic range (DR) were evaluated in 15 Clarion cochlear implant users. A wider range of pulse rates was assessed than in previous studies, and subjects with both standard and perimodiolar electrode arrays were tested. THS and MAL decreased with pulse rate, and DR increased with pulse rate, for pulse rates between 200 and 6500 pulses per second (pps). However, slopes of THS-vs-pulse rate and MAL-vs-pulse rate functions became shallower above 3250 pps. Subjects with standard electrode arrays had similar THSs as subjects with perimodiolar electrode arrays at all pulse rates. In contrast, subjects with standard arrays had significantly higher MALs and larger DRs than subjects with perimodiolar arrays, and these differences became larger with increasing pulse rate.

  6. Dynamics of a network-based SIS epidemic model with nonmonotone incidence rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-Hsien

    2015-06-01

    This paper studies the dynamics of a network-based SIS epidemic model with nonmonotone incidence rate. This type of nonlinear incidence can be used to describe the psychological effect of certain diseases spread in a contact network at high infective levels. We first find a threshold value for the transmission rate. This value completely determines the dynamics of the model and interestingly, the threshold is not dependent on the functional form of the nonlinear incidence rate. Furthermore, if the transmission rate is less than or equal to the threshold value, the disease will die out. Otherwise, it will be permanent. Numerical experiments are given to illustrate the theoretical results. We also consider the effect of the nonlinear incidence on the epidemic dynamics.

  7. Gender- and age-related differences in heart rate dynamics: are women more complex than men?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, S. M.; Goldberger, A. L.; Pincus, S. M.; Mietus, J.; Lipsitz, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This study aimed to quantify the complex dynamics of beat-to-beat sinus rhythm heart rate fluctuations and to determine their differences as a function of gender and age. BACKGROUND. Recently, measures of heart rate variability and the nonlinear "complexity" of heart rate dynamics have been used as indicators of cardiovascular health. Because women have lower cardiovascular risk and greater longevity than men, we postulated that there are important gender-related differences in beat-to-beat heart rate dynamics. METHODS. We analyzed heart rate dynamics during 8-min segments of continuous electrocardiographic recording in healthy young (20 to 39 years old), middle-aged (40 to 64 years old) and elderly (65 to 90 years old) men (n = 40) and women (n = 27) while they performed spontaneous and metronomic (15 breaths/min) breathing. Relatively high (0.15 to 0.40 Hz) and low (0.01 to 0.15 Hz) frequency components of heart rate variability were computed using spectral analysis. The overall "complexity" of each heart rate time series was quantified by its approximate entropy, a measure of regularity derived from nonlinear dynamics ("chaos" theory). RESULTS. Mean heart rate did not differ between the age groups or genders. High frequency heart rate power and the high/low frequency power ratio decreased with age in both men and women (p < 0.05). The high/low frequency power ratio during spontaneous and metronomic breathing was greater in women than men (p < 0.05). Heart rate approximate entropy decreased with age and was higher in women than men (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS. High frequency heart rate spectral power (associated with parasympathetic activity) and the overall complexity of heart rate dynamics are higher in women than men. These complementary findings indicate the need to account for gender-as well as age-related differences in heart rate dynamics. Whether these gender differences are related to lower cardiovascular disease risk and greater longevity in

  8. Isobaric molecular dynamics version of the generalized replica exchange method (gREM): Liquid–vapor equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Secor, Maxim; Keyes, Tom

    2015-09-23

    A prescription for sampling isobaric generalized ensembles with molecular dynamics is presented and applied to the generalized replica exchange method (gREM), which was designed for simulating first-order phase transitions. The properties of the isobaric gREM ensemble are discussed and a study is presented of the liquid-vapor equilibrium of the guest molecules given for gas hydrate formation with the mW water model. As a result, phase diagrams, critical parameters, and a law of corresponding states are obtained.

  9. Isobaric Molecular Dynamics Version of the Generalized Replica Exchange Method (gREM): Liquid-Vapor Equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Małolepsza, Edyta; Secor, Maxim; Keyes, Tom

    2015-10-22

    A prescription for sampling isobaric generalized ensembles with molecular dynamics is presented and applied to the generalized replica exchange method (gREM), which was designed to simulate first-order phase transitions. The properties of the isobaric gREM ensemble are discussed, and a study is presented for the liquid-vapor equilibrium of the guest molecules given for gas hydrate formation with the mW water model. Phase diagrams, critical parameters, and a law of corresponding states are obtained. PMID:26398582

  10. Interactions among K+-Ca2+ Exchange, Sorption of m-Dinitrobenzene, and Smectite Quasicrystal Dynamics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fate of organic compounds in soils and sediments is influenced by sorption of the compounds on surfaces of soil materials. We investigated the interaction among sorption of an organic compound, cation exchange reactions, and both the size and swelling of smectite quasicrystals. Two reference sme...

  11. The Role of IRF Exchanges in the Discursive Dynamics of E-Mail Tutored Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giordan, Marcelo

    2003-01-01

    Initiation, response and follow-up (IRF) exchanges produced by a student and his tutor in an internet-based tutorial interaction have been analysed in terms of the multifunctional characteristics of each utterance. Different functions, related to different purposes, were observed in the IRF moves performed by the student. The control over the…

  12. High-resolution determination of {sup 147}Pm in urine using dynamic ion-exchange chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Elchuk, S.; Lucy, C.A.; Burns, K.I.

    1992-10-15

    Ion exchange preconcentration followed by HPLC purification prior to scintillation counting was used to measure the concentration of {sup 147}Pm in urine. the detection limit for this method was found to be 0.1 Bq (3 fg) of {sup 147}Pm in 500 ml of urine.

  13. Investigation of hydrogen isotope exchange reaction rate in mixed gas (H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}) at pressure up to 200 MPa using Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhonov, V.V.; Yukhimchuk, A.A.; Musyayev, R.K.; Gurkin, A.I.

    2015-03-15

    Raman spectroscopy is a relevant method for obtaining objective data on isotopic exchange rate in a gaseous mix of hydrogen isotopes, since it allows one to determine a gaseous mix composition in real time without sampling. We have developed a high-pressure fiber-optic probe to be used for obtaining protium Raman spectra under pressures up to 400 MPa and we have recorded spectral line broadening induced by molecule collisions starting from ∼ 40 MPa. Using this fiber-optic probe we have performed experiments to study isotopic exchange kinetics in a gaseous mix of hydrogen isotopes (protium-deuterium) at pressures up to 200 MPa. Preliminary results show that the dependence of the average isotopic exchange rate related to pressure take unexpected values at the very beginning of the time evolution. More work is required to understand this inconsistency.

  14. Comparison of two dynamic measurement methods of odor and odorant emission rates from freshly dewatered biosolids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tingting; Sattayatewa, Chakkrid; Venkatesan, Dhesikan; Noll, Kenneth E; Pagilla, Krishna R; Moschandreas, Demetrios J

    2011-06-01

    Odor and odorant emission rates from freshly dewatered biosolids in a dewatering building of a Water Reclamation Plant (WRP) are measured using the EPA flux chamber and wind tunnel methods. Experimental results are compared statistically to test whether the two methods result in similar emission rates when experiments are performed under field conditions. To the best of our knowledge the literature is void of studies comparing the two methods indoors. In this paper the two methods are compared indoors where the wind velocity and air exchange rate are pertinent field conditions and can be measured. The difference between emission rates of odor and hydrogen sulfide measured with the two methods is not statistically significant (P values: 0.505 for odor, 0.130 for H(2)S). It is concluded that both methods can be used to estimate source emissions but selection of the most effective or efficient method depends on prevailing environmental conditions. The wind tunnel is appropriate for outdoor environments where wind effects on source emissions are more pronounced than indoors. The EPA flux chamber depends on the air exchange rate of the chamber, which simulates corresponding conditions of the indoor environment under investigation and is recommended for estimation of indoor pollution sources. PMID:21552636

  15. Temperature- and body mass-related variation in cyclic gas exchange characteristics and metabolic rate of seven weevil species: Broader implications.

    PubMed

    Klok, C J; Chown, S L

    2005-07-01

    The influence of temperature on metabolic rate and characteristics of the gas exchange patterns of flightless, sub-Antarctic Ectemnorhinus-group species from Heard and Marion islands was investigated. All of the species showed cyclic gas exchange with no Flutter period, indicating that these species are not characterized by discontinuous gas exchange cycles. Metabolic rate estimates were substantially lower in this study than in a previous one of a subset of the species, demonstrating that open-system respirometry methods provide more representative estimates of standard metabolic rate than do many closed-system methods. We recommend that the latter, and especially constant-pressure methods, either be abandoned for estimates of standard metabolic rate in insects, or have their outputs subject to careful scrutiny, given the wide availability of the former. V(.)CO(2) increase with an increase in temperature (range: 0-15 degrees C) was modulated by an increase in cycle frequency, but typically not by an increase in burst volume. Previous investigations of temperature-related changes in cyclic gas exchange (both cyclic and discontinuous) in several other insect species were therefore substantiated. Interspecific mass-scaling of metabolic rate (ca. 0.466-0.573, excluding and including phylogenetic non-independence, respectively) produced an exponent lower than 0.75 (but not distinguishable from it or from 0.67). The increase of metabolic rate with mass was modulated by an increase in burst volume and not by a change in cycle frequency, in keeping with investigations of species showing discontinuous gas exchange. These findings are discussed in the context of the emerging macrophysiological metabolic theory of ecology. PMID:15907926

  16. Sensitivity of high strain rate of structural elements in relation to dynamics properties of material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruszka, Leopold; Vorobiov, Iurii S.; Ovcharova, Nataliia Iu.

    2015-09-01

    Protective structures such as process chambers, protective boxes, facing elements of vehicles, personal protection equipment, motors cases etc. widely used in modern technology has been tested in the following project. Under the influence of impact loads, the three-dimensional dynamic stress-strain state with finite dynamic displacements and deformations has arised. The deformations occur in the elastic- plastic stage. In the analysis of the high-rate deformations, the dynamic properties of the materials, which are determined based on experimental data should be taken into account. The dynamic stress state of structural elements depends essentially on the dynamic properties of the materials used. The problem is solved using the finite element method, which takes into account the specifics of the process. Boundary conditions in the element nodes must satisfy the equality movement as well as derivatives. The formed function allows to describe continuous and smooth stress changes. The numerical analysis of the dynamic stress-strain state of structural elements under impact loads, takes into account different dynamic properties of the materials. A series of numerical calculations allows to reveal the features of high-rate deformation elements of protective structures and makes recommendations to improve their dynamic strength under different loading conditions.

  17. The impact of water exchange rate and treatment processes on water-borne hormones in recirculation aquaculture systems containing sexually maturing Atlantic salmon Salmo salar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A controlled seven-month study was conducted in six replicated water recirculation aquaculture systems (WRAS) to assess post-smolt Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) performance in relation to WRAS water exchange rate. Unexpectedly high numbers of precocious sexually mature fish were observed in all WRAS...

  18. The effects of ozone and water exchange rates on water quality and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss performance in replicated water recirculating systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss performance and water quality were evaluated and compared within six replicated 9.5 cubic meter water recirculating aquaculture systems (WRAS) operated with and without ozone at various water exchange rates. Three separate studies were conducted: 1) low water exchan...

  19. A General Econometric Model of the Determinants of Library Subscription Prices of Scholarly Journals: The Role of Exchange Rate Risk and Other Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chressanthis, George A.; Chressanthis, June D.

    1994-01-01

    Provides regression-based empirical evidence of the effects of variations in exchange rate risk on 1985 library prices of the top-ranked 99 journals in economics. The relationship between individual journal prices and library prices is shown, and other factors associated with increases and decreases in library journal prices are given. (Contains…

  20. Identifying Housing and Meteorological Conditions Influencing Residential Air Exchange Rates in the DEARS and RIOPA Studies: Development of Distributions for Human Exposure Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Appropriate prediction of residential air exchange rate (AER) is important for estimating human exposures in the residential microenvironment, as AER drives the infiltration of outdoor-generated air pollutants indoors. AER differences among homes may result from a number of fact...

  1. Structure and water exchange dynamics of hydrated oxo halo ions in aqueous solution using QMCF MD simulation, large angle X-ray scattering and EXAFS

    PubMed Central

    Eklund, Lars; Hofer, Tomas S.

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics (QMCF MD) has been applied in conjunction with experimental large angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and EXAFS measurements to study structure and dynamics of the hydrated oxo chloro anions chlorite, ClO2−, chlorate, ClO3−, and perchlorate, ClO4−. In addition, the structures of the hydrated hypochlorite, ClO−, bromate, BrO3−, iodate, IO3− and metaperiodate, IO4−, ions have been determined in aqueous solution by means of LAXS. The structures of the bromate, metaperiodate, and orthoperiodate, H2IO63−, ions have been determined by EXAFS as solid sodium salts and in aqueous solution as well. The results show clearly that the only form of periodate present in aqueous solution is metaperiodate. The Cl-O bond distances in the hydrated oxo chloro anions as determined by LAXS and obtained in the QMCF MD simulations are in excellent agreement, being 0.01–0.02 Å longer than in solid anhydrous salts due to hydration through hydrogen bonding to water molecules. The oxo halo anions, all with unit negative charge, have low charge density making them typical structure breakers, thus the hydrogen bonds formed to the hydrating water molecules are weaker and more short-lived than those between water molecules in pure water. The water exchange mechanism of the oxo chloro anions resembles those of the oxo sulfur anions with a direct exchange at the oxygen atoms for perchlorate and sulfate. The water exchange rate for the perchlorate ion is significantly faster, τ0.5=1.4 ps, compared to the hydrated sulfate ion and pure water, τ0.5=2.6 and 1.7 ps, respectively. The angular radial distribution functions show that the chlorate and sulfite ions have a more complex water exchange mechanism. As the chlorite and chlorate ions are more weakly hydrated than the sulfite ion the spatial occupancy is less well-defined and it is not possible to follow any well-defined migration pattern as it is difficult to

  2. Structure and water exchange dynamics of hydrated oxo halo ions in aqueous solution using QMCF MD simulation, large angle X-ray scattering and EXAFS.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Lars; Hofer, Tomas S; Persson, Ingmar

    2015-01-28

    Theoretical ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics (QMCF MD) has been applied in conjunction with experimental large angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and EXAFS measurements to study structure and dynamics of the hydrated oxo chloro anions chlorite, ClO2(-), chlorate, ClO3(-), and perchlorate, ClO4(-). In addition, the structures of the hydrated hypochlorite, ClO(-), bromate, BrO3(-), iodate, IO3(-) and metaperiodate, IO4(-), ions have been determined in aqueous solution by means of LAXS. The structures of the bromate, metaperiodate, and orthoperiodate, H2IO6(3-), ions have been determined by EXAFS as solid sodium salts and in aqueous solution as well. The results show clearly that the only form of periodate present in aqueous solution is metaperiodate. The Cl-O bond distances in the hydrated oxo chloro anions as determined by LAXS and obtained in the QMCF MD simulations are in excellent agreement, being 0.01-0.02 Å longer than in solid anhydrous salts due to hydration through hydrogen bonding to water molecules. The oxo halo anions, all with unit negative charge, have low charge density making them typical structure breakers, thus the hydrogen bonds formed to the hydrating water molecules are weaker and more short-lived than those between water molecules in pure water. The water exchange mechanism of the oxo chloro anions resembles those of the oxo sulfur anions with a direct exchange at the oxygen atoms for perchlorate and sulfate. The water exchange rate for the perchlorate ion is significantly faster, τ0.5 = 1.4 ps, compared to the hydrated sulfate ion and pure water, τ0.5 = 2.6 and 1.7 ps, respectively. The angular radial distribution functions show that the chlorate and sulfite ions have a more complex water exchange mechanism. As the chlorite and chlorate ions are more weakly hydrated than the sulfite ion the spatial occupancy is less well-defined and it is not possible to follow any well-defined migration pattern as it is difficult to

  3. Dynamic C and N stocks - key factors controlling the C gas exchange of maize in a heterogenous peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, M.; Hoffmann, M.; Hagemann, U.; Giebels, M.; Albiac Borraz, E.; Sommer, M.; Augustin, J.

    2014-11-01

    Drainage and cultivation of fen peatlands creates complex small-scale mosaics of soils with extremely variable soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and groundwater-level (GWL). To date, it remains unclear if such sites are sources or sinks for greenhouse gases like CO2 and CH4, especially if used for cropland. As individual control factors like GWL fail to account for this complexity, holistic approaches combining gas fluxes with the underlying processes are required to understand the carbon (C) gas exchange of drained fens. It can be assumed that the stocks of SOC and N located above the variable GWL - defined as dynamic C and N stocks - play a key role in the regulation of plant- and microbially mediated C gas fluxes of these soils. To test this assumption, the present study analysed the C gas exchange (gross primary production - GPP, ecosystem respiration - Reco, net ecosystem exchange - NEE, CH4) of maize using manual chambers for four years. The study sites were located near Paulinenaue, Germany. Here we selected three soils, which represent the full gradient in pedogenesis, GWL and SOC stocks (0-1 m) of the fen peatland: (a) Haplic Arenosol (AR; 8 kg C m-2); (b) Mollic Gleysol (GL; 38 kg C m-2); and (c) Hemic Histosol (HS; 87 kg C m-2). Daily GWL data was used to calculate dynamic SOC (SOCdyn) and N (Ndyn) stocks. Average annual NEE differed considerably among sites, ranging from 47 ± 30 g C m-2 a-1 at AR to -305 ± 123 g C m-2 a-1 at GL and -127 ± 212 g C m-2 a-1 at HS. While static SOC and N stocks showed no significant effect on C fluxes, SOCdyn and Ndyn and their interaction with GWL strongly influenced the C gas exchange, particularly NEE and the GPP:Reco ratio. Moreover, based on nonlinear regression analysis, 86% of NEE variability was explained by GWL and SOCdyn. The observed high relevance of dynamic SOC and N stocks in the aerobic zone for plant and soil gas exchange likely originates from the effects of GWL-dependent N availability on C formation and

  4. Dynamic C and N stocks - key factors controlling the C gas exchange of maize in heterogenous peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, M.; Hoffmann, M.; Hagemann, U.; Giebels, M.; Albiac Borraz, E.; Sommer, M.; Augustin, J.

    2015-05-01

    The drainage and cultivation of fen peatlands create complex small-scale mosaics of soils with extremely variable soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and groundwater levels (GWLs). To date, the significance of such sites as sources or sinks for greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4 is still unclear, especially if the sites are used for cropland. As individual control factors such as GWL fail to account for this complexity, holistic approaches combining gas fluxes with the underlying processes are required to understand the carbon (C) gas exchange of drained fens. It can be assumed that the stocks of SOC and N located above the variable GWL - defined as dynamic C and N stocks - play a key role in the regulation of the plant- and microbially mediated CO2 fluxes in these soils and, inversely, for CH4. To test this assumption, the present study analysed the C gas exchange (gross primary production - GPP; ecosystem respiration - Reco; net ecosystem exchange - NEE; CH4) of maize using manual chambers for 4 years. The study sites were located near Paulinenaue, Germany, where we selected three soil types representing the full gradient of GWL and SOC stocks (0-1 m) of the landscape: (a) Haplic Arenosol (AR; 8 kg C m-2); (b) Mollic Gleysol (GL; 38 kg C m-2); and (c) Hemic Histosol (HS; 87 kg C m-2). Daily GWL data were used to calculate dynamic SOC (SOCdyn) and N (Ndyn) stocks. Average annual NEE differed considerably among sites, ranging from 47 ± 30 g C m-2 yr-1 in AR to -305 ± 123 g C m-2 yr-1 in GL and -127 ± 212 g C m-2 yr-1 in HS. While static SOC and N stocks showed no significant effect on C fluxes, SOCdyn and Ndyn and their interaction with GWL strongly influenced the C gas exchange, particularly NEE and the GPP : Reco ratio. Moreover, based on nonlinear regression analysis, 86% of NEE variability was explained by GWL and SOCdyn. The observed high relevance of dynamic SOC and N stocks in the aerobic zone for plant and soil gas exchange likely originates from the

  5. Placing the Dynamics of Syringe Exchange Programs in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Drawing upon the broader health, social, and political geography literature this paper outlines a framework for considering place-based processes through which syringe exchange availability may be understood. It is argued that the geographic distribution of syringe exchange programs (SEPs) in the United States is linked to the social and political conditions of particular localities through three place characteristics: (1) structural constraints; (2) social and spatial distancing of injection drug users; and (3) localized action. Although SEPs remain a controversial issue and face ongoing obstacles from the government, law enforcement and local communities, they continue to operate through the efforts of grassroots organizations and local activists. Action on this issue occurs locally, and the characteristics of place-based factors will affect whether particular areas adopt SEPs. PMID:16797217

  6. Long-term influence of tillage and fertilization on net carbon dioxide exchange rate on two soils with different textures.

    PubMed

    Feiziene, Dalia; Feiza, Virginijus; Slepetiene, Alvyra; Liaudanskiene, Inga; Kadziene, Grazina; Deveikyte, Irena; Vaideliene, Asta

    2011-01-01

    The importance of agricultural practices to greenhouse gas mitigation is examined worldwide. However, there is no consensus on soil organic carbon (SOC) content and CO emissions as affected by soil management practices and their relationships with soil texture. No-till (NT) agriculture often results in soil C gain, though, not always. Soil net CO exchange rate (NCER) and environmental factors (SOC, soil temperature [T], and water content [W]), as affected by soil type (loam and sandy loam), tillage (conventional, reduced, and NT), and fertilization, were quantified in long-term field experiments in Lithuania. Soil tillage and fertilization affected total CO flux (heterotrophic and autotrophic) through effect on soil SOC sequestration, water, and temperature regime. After 11 yr of different tillage and fertilization management, SOC content was 23% more in loam than in sandy loam. Long-term NT contributed to 7 to 27% more SOC sequestration on loam and to 29 to 33% more on sandy loam compared with reduced tillage (RT) or conventional tillage (CT). Soil water content in loam was 7% more than in sandy loam. Soil gravimetric water content, averaged across measurement dates and fertilization treatments, was significantly less in NT than CT and RT in both soils. Soil organic carbon content and water storage capacity of the loam and sandy loam soils exerted different influences on NCER. The NCER from the sandy loam soil was 13% greater than that from the loam. In addition, NCER was 4 to 9% less with NT than with CT and RT systems on both loam and sandy loam soils. Application of mineral NPK fertilizers promoted significantly greater NCER from loam but suppressed NCER by 15% from sandy loam. PMID:22031561

  7. Cation Exchange in Dynamic 3D Porous Magnets: Improvement of the Physical Properties.

    PubMed

    Grancha, Thais; Acosta, Alvaro; Cano, Joan; Ferrando-Soria, Jesús; Seoane, Beatriz; Gascon, Jorge; Pasán, Jorge; Armentano, Donatella; Pardo, Emilio

    2015-11-16

    We report two novel three-dimensional porous coordination polymers (PCPs) of formulas Li4{Mn4[Cu2(Me3mpba)2]3}·68H2O (2) and K4{Mn4[Cu2(Me3mpba)2]3}·69H2O (3) obtained-via alkali cation exchange in a single-crystal to single-crystal process-from the earlier reported anionic manganese(II)-copper(II) PCP of formula Na4{Mn4[Cu2(Me3mpba)2]3}·60H2O (1) [Me3mpba(4-) = N,N'-2,4,6-trimethyl-1,3-phenylenebis(oxamate)]. This postsynthetic process succeeds where the direct synthesis in solution from the corresponding building blocks fails and affords significantly more robust PCPs with enhanced magnetic properties [long-range 3D magnetic ordering temperatures for the dehydrated phases (1'-3') of 2.0 (1'), 12.0 (2'), and 20.0 K (3')]. Changes in the adsorptive properties upon postsynthetic exchange suggest that the nature, electrostatic properties, mobility, and location of the cations within the framework are crucial for the enhanced structural stability. Overall, these results further confirm the potential of postsynthetic methods (including cation exchange) to obtain PCPs with novel or enhanced physical properties while maintaining unaltered their open-framework structures. PMID:26492551

  8. Modelling and Simulation of Dynamic Recrystallization (DRX) In OFHC Copper at Very High Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, Gabriel; Bonora, Nicola; Ruggiero, Andrew; Iannitti, Gianluca; Hörnqvist, Magnus; Mortazavi, Nooshin

    2015-06-01

    At high strain rates, the deformation process is essentially adiabatic and if the plastic work is large enough, dynamic recrystallization can occur. In this work, an examination on microstructure evolution in Dynamic Tensile Extrusion (DTE) test of OFHC copper, performed at 400 m/s, was carried out. EBSD investigations, along the center line of the fragment remaining in the extrusion die, showed a progressive elongation of the grains, and an accompanying development of a strong < 001 > + < 111 > dual fiber texture. Meta-dynamic discontinuous dynamic recrystallization (DRX) occurred at larger strains, and it was showed that nucleation occurred during straining. A criterion, based on the evolution of Zener-Hollomon parameter during the dynamic deformation process, was proposed. Finally, DTE test was simulated using the modified Rusinek-Klepaczko constitutive model incorporating restoring effects induced by recrystallization processes.

  9. The Seasonal Dynamics of Artificial Nest Predation Rates along Edges in a Mosaic Managed Reedbed.

    PubMed

    Malzer, Iain; Helm, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Boundaries between different habitats can be responsible for changes in species interactions, including modified rates of encounter between predators and prey. Such 'edge effects' have been reported in nesting birds, where nest predation rates can be increased at habitat edges. The literature concerning edge effects on nest predation rates reveals a wide variation in results, even within single habitats, suggesting edge effects are not fixed, but dynamic throughout space and time. This study demonstrates the importance of considering dynamic mechanisms underlying edge effects and their relevance when undertaking habitat management. In reedbed habitats, management in the form of mosaic winter reed cutting can create extensive edges which change rapidly with reed regrowth during spring. We investigate the seasonal dynamics of reedbed edges using an artificial nest experiment based on the breeding biology of a reedbed specialist. We first demonstrate that nest predation decreases with increasing distance from the edge of cut reed blocks, suggesting edge effects have a pivotal role in this system. Using repeats throughout the breeding season we then confirm that nest predation rates are temporally dynamic and decline with the regrowth of reed. However, effects of edges on nest predation were consistent throughout the season. These results are of practical importance when considering appropriate habitat management, suggesting that reed cutting may heighten nest predation, especially before new growth matures. They also contribute directly to an overall understanding of the dynamic processes underlying edge effects and their potential role as drivers of time-dependent habitat use. PMID:26448338

  10. Steady-State Computation of Constant Rotational Rate Dynamic Stability Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Green, Lawrence L.

    2000-01-01

    Dynamic stability derivatives are essential to predicting the open and closed loop performance, stability, and controllability of aircraft. Computational determination of constant-rate dynamic stability derivatives (derivatives of aircraft forces and moments with respect to constant rotational rates) is currently performed indirectly with finite differencing of multiple time-accurate computational fluid dynamics solutions. Typical time-accurate solutions require excessive amounts of computational time to complete. Formulating Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations in a rotating noninertial reference frame and applying an automatic differentiation tool to the modified code has the potential for directly computing these derivatives with a single, much faster steady-state calculation. The ability to rapidly determine static and dynamic stability derivatives by computational methods can benefit multidisciplinary design methodologies and reduce dependency on wind tunnel measurements. The CFL3D thin-layer N-S computational fluid dynamics code was modified for this study to allow calculations on complex three-dimensional configurations with constant rotation rate components in all three axes. These CFL3D modifications also have direct application to rotorcraft and turbomachinery analyses. The modified CFL3D steady-state calculation is a new capability that showed excellent agreement with results calculated by a similar formulation. The application of automatic differentiation to CFL3D allows the static stability and body-axis rate derivatives to be calculated quickly and exactly.

  11. The Seasonal Dynamics of Artificial Nest Predation Rates along Edges in a Mosaic Managed Reedbed

    PubMed Central

    Malzer, Iain; Helm, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Boundaries between different habitats can be responsible for changes in species interactions, including modified rates of encounter between predators and prey. Such ‘edge effects’ have been reported in nesting birds, where nest predation rates can be increased at habitat edges. The literature concerning edge effects on nest predation rates reveals a wide variation in results, even within single habitats, suggesting edge effects are not fixed, but dynamic throughout space and time. This study demonstrates the importance of considering dynamic mechanisms underlying edge effects and their relevance when undertaking habitat management. In reedbed habitats, management in the form of mosaic winter reed cutting can create extensive edges which change rapidly with reed regrowth during spring. We investigate the seasonal dynamics of reedbed edges using an artificial nest experiment based on the breeding biology of a reedbed specialist. We first demonstrate that nest predation decreases with increasing distance from the edge of cut reed blocks, suggesting edge effects have a pivotal role in this system. Using repeats throughout the breeding season we then confirm that nest predation rates are temporally dynamic and decline with the regrowth of reed. However, effects of edges on nest predation were consistent throughout the season. These results are of practical importance when considering appropriate habitat management, suggesting that reed cutting may heighten nest predation, especially before new growth matures. They also contribute directly to an overall understanding of the dynamic processes underlying edge effects and their potential role as drivers of time-dependent habitat use. PMID:26448338

  12. Nonlinear dynamics of heart rate variability in cocaine-exposed neonates during sleep.

    PubMed

    Garde, S; Regalado, M G; Schechtman, V L; Khoo, M C

    2001-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) on the dynamics of heart rate variability in full-term neonates during sleep. R-R interval (RRI) time series from 9 infants with PCE and 12 controls during periods of stable quiet sleep and active sleep were analyzed using autoregressive modeling and nonlinear dynamics. There were no differences between the two groups in spectral power distribution, approximate entropy, correlation dimension, and nonlinear predictability. However, application of surrogate data analysis to these measures revealed a significant degree of nonlinear RRI dynamics in all subjects. A parametric model, consisting of a nonlinear delayed-feedback system with stochastic noise as the perturbing input, was employed to estimate the relative contributions of linear and nonlinear deterministic dynamics in the data. Both infant groups showed similar proportional contributions in linear, nonlinear, and stochastic dynamics. However, approximate entropy, correlation dimension, and nonlinear prediction error were all decreased in active versus quiet sleep; in addition, the parametric model revealed a doubling of the linear component and a halving of the nonlinear contribution to overall heart rate variability. Spectral analysis indicated a shift in relative power toward lower frequencies. We conclude that 1) RRI dynamics in infants with PCE and normal controls are similar; and 2) in both groups, sympathetic dominance during active sleep produces primarily periodic low-frequency oscillations in RRI, whereas in quiet sleep vagal modulation leads to RRI fluctuations that are broadband and dynamically more complex. PMID:11356653

  13. Effect of variability in weather conditions on conductor temperature and the dynamic rating of transmission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Foss, S.D.; Lin, S.H. ); Maraio, R.A.; Schrayshuen, H. )

    1988-10-01

    Simultaneous weather and conductor data were collected from these locations situated in New York State and Western Massachusetts. The two New York State locations represent the termination points of a 230 kV seventy-mile overhead line. The transmission line consists of a Drake 795 kcmil ACSR conductor. Data were monitored using on-line sensor equipment developed by the Research and Development Department of the Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation. The purposes of the investigation were to analyze variability in weather conditions, conductor temperature and calculated dynamic ratings that exist along transmission lines. Reported here are variabilities in air temperature, wind speed, conductor current, conductor surface temperature and calculated dynamic ratings.

  14. Injector Beam Dynamics for a High-Repetition Rate 4th-Generation Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Papadopoulos, C. F.; Corlett, J.; Emma, P.; Filippetto, D.; Penn, G.; Qiang, J.; Reinsch, M.; Sannibale, F.; Steier, C.; Venturini, M.; Wells, R.

    2013-05-20

    We report on the beam dynamics studies and optimization methods for a high repetition rate (1 MHz) photoinjector based on a VHF normal conducting electron source. The simultaneous goals of beamcompression and reservation of 6-dimensional beam brightness have to be achieved in the injector, in order to accommodate a linac driven FEL light source. For this, a parallel, multiobjective optimization algorithm is used. We discuss the relative merits of different injector design points, as well as the constraints imposed on the beam dynamics by technical considerations such as the high repetition rate.

  15. Constant pH Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics in Explicit Solvent Using Discrete Protonation States: Implementation, Testing, and Validation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    By utilizing Graphics Processing Units, we show that constant pH molecular dynamics simulations (CpHMD) run in Generalized Born (GB) implicit solvent for long time scales can yield poor pKa predictions as a result of sampling unrealistic conformations. To address this shortcoming, we present a method for performing constant pH molecular dynamics simulations (CpHMD) in explicit solvent using a discrete protonation state model. The method involves standard molecular dynamics (MD) being propagated in explicit solvent followed by protonation state changes being attempted in GB implicit solvent at fixed intervals. Replica exchange along the pH-dimension (pH-REMD) helps to obtain acceptable titration behavior with the proposed method. We analyzed the effects of various parameters and settings on the titration behavior of CpHMD and pH-REMD in explicit solvent, including the size of the simulation unit cell and the length of the relaxation dynamics following protonation state changes. We tested the method with the amino acid model compounds, a small pentapeptide with two titratable sites, and hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). The proposed method yields superior predicted pKa values for HEWL over hundreds of nanoseconds of simulation relative to corresponding predicted values from simulations run in implicit solvent. PMID:24803862

  16. Isotopic exchange in mineral-fluid systems. 4. The crystal chemical controls on oxygen isotope exchange rates in carbonate-H{sub 2}O and layer silicate-H{sub 2}O systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, D.R.

    2000-03-01

    Oxygen isotope exchange between minerals and water in systems far from chemical equilibrium is controlled largely by surface reactions such as dissolution-precipitation. In many cases, this behavior can be modeled adequately by a simple pseudo-first order rate model that accounts for changes in surface area of the solid. Previous modeling of high temperature isotope exchange data for carbonates, sulfates, and silicates indicated that within a given mineral group there appears to be a systematic relationship between rate and mineral chemistry. The author tested this idea by conducting oxygen isotope exchange experiments in the systems, carbonate-H{sub 2}O and layer silicate-H{sub 2}O at 300 and 350 C, respectively. Witherite (BaCO{sub 3}), strontianite (SrCO{sub 3}) and calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) were reacted with pure H{sub 2}O for different lengths of time (271--1,390 H) at 300 C and 100 bars. The layer silicates, chlorite, biotite and muscovite were reacted with H{sub 2}O for durations ranging from 132 to 3,282 h at 350 C and 250 bars. A detailed survey of grain sizes and grain habits using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that grain regrowth occurred in all experiments to varying extents. The isotopic rates (ln r) for the carbonate-H{sub 2}O system are {minus}20.75 {+-} 0.44, {minus}18.95 {+-} 0.62 and {minus}18.51 {+-} 0.48 mol O/m{sup 2} s for calcite, strontianite and witherite, respectively. The oxygen isotope exchange rates for layer silicate-H{sub 2}O systems are {minus}23.99 {+-} 0.89, {minus}23.14 {+-} 0.74 and {minus}22.40 {+-} 0.66 mol O/m{sup 2} s for muscovite, biotite and chlorite, respectively.

  17. Dynamic Mechanical Response of Biomedical 316L Stainless Steel as Function of Strain Rate and Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woei-Shyan; Chen, Tao-Hsing; Lin, Chi-Feng; Luo, Wen-Zhen

    2011-01-01

    A split Hopkinson pressure bar is used to investigate the dynamic mechanical properties of biomedical 316L stainless steel under strain rates ranging from 1 × 103 s−1 to 5 × 103 s−1 and temperatures between 25°C and 800°C. The results indicate that the flow stress, work-hardening rate, strain rate sensitivity, and thermal activation energy are all significantly dependent on the strain, strain rate, and temperature. For a constant temperature, the flow stress, work-hardening rate, and strain rate sensitivity increase with increasing strain rate, while the thermal activation energy decreases. Catastrophic failure occurs only for the specimens deformed at a strain rate of 5 × 103 s−1 and temperatures of 25°C or 200°C. Scanning electron microscopy observations show that the specimens fracture in a ductile shear mode. Optical microscopy analyses reveal that the number of slip bands within the grains increases with an increasing strain rate. Moreover, a dynamic recrystallisation of the deformed microstructure is observed in the specimens tested at the highest temperature of 800°C. PMID:22216015

  18. Selection on Network Dynamics Drives Differential Rates of Protein Domain Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Mannakee, Brian K.; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.

    2016-01-01

    The long-held principle that functionally important proteins evolve slowly has recently been challenged by studies in mice and yeast showing that the severity of a protein knockout only weakly predicts that protein’s rate of evolution. However, the relevance of these studies to evolutionary changes within proteins is unknown, because amino acid substitutions, unlike knockouts, often only slightly perturb protein activity. To quantify the phenotypic effect of small biochemical perturbations, we developed an approach to use computational systems biology models to measure the influence of individual reaction rate constants on network dynamics. We show that this dynamical influence is predictive of protein domain evolutionary rate within networks in vertebrates and yeast, even after controlling for expression level and breadth, network topology, and knockout effect. Thus, our results not only demonstrate the importance of protein domain function in determining evolutionary rate, but also the power of systems biology modeling to uncover unanticipated evolutionary forces. PMID:27380265

  19. Static and dynamic strain energy release rates in toughened thermosetting composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Douglas S.

    1992-01-01

    In this work, the static and dynamic fracture properties of several thermosetting resin based composite laminates are presented. Two classes of materials are explored. These are homogeneous, thermosetting resins and toughened, multi-phase, thermosetting resin systems. Multi-phase resin materials have shown enhancement over homogenous materials with respect to damage resistance. The development of new dynamic tests are presented for composite laminates based on Width Tapered Double Cantilevered Beam (WTDCB) for Mode 1 fracture and the End Notched Flexure (ENF) specimen. The WTDCB sample was loaded via a low inertia, pneumatic cylinder to produce rapid cross-head displacements. A high rate, piezo-electric load cell and an accelerometer were mounted on the specimen. A digital oscilloscope was used for data acquisition. Typical static and dynamic load versus displacement plots are presented. The ENF specimen was impacted in three point bending with an instrumented impact tower. Fracture initiation and propagation energies under static and dynamic conditions were determined analytically and experimentally. The test results for Mode 1 fracture are relatively insensitive to strain rate effects for the laminates tested in this study. The test results from Mode 2 fracture indicate that the toughened systems provide superior fracture initiation and higher resistance to propagation under dynamic conditions. While the static fracture properties of the homogeneous systems may be relatively high, the apparent Mode 2 dynamic critical strain energy release rate drops significantly. The results indicate that static Mode 2 fracture testing is inadequate for determining the fracture performance of composite structures subjected to conditions such as low velocity impact. A good correlation between the basic Mode 2 dynamic fracture properties and the performance is a combined material/structural Compression After Impact (CAI) test is found. These results underscore the importance of

  20. A single-rate context-dependent learning process underlies rapid adaptation to familiar object dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ingram, James N; Howard, Ian S; Flanagan, J Randall; Wolpert, Daniel M

    2011-09-01

    Motor learning has been extensively studied using dynamic (force-field) perturbations. These induce movement errors that result in adaptive changes to the motor commands. Several state-space models have been developed to explain how trial-by-trial errors drive the progressive adaptation observed in such studies. These models have been applied to adaptation involving novel dynamics, which typically occurs over tens to hundreds of trials, and which appears to be mediated by a dual-rate adaptation process. In contrast, when manipulating objects with familiar dynamics, subjects adapt rapidly within a few trials. Here, we apply state-space models to familiar dynamics, asking whether adaptation is mediated by a single-rate or dual-rate process. Previously, we reported a task in which subjects rotate an object with known dynamics. By presenting the object at different visual orientations, adaptation was shown to be context-specific, with limited generalization to novel orientations. Here we show that a multiple-context state-space model, with a generalization function tuned to visual object orientation, can reproduce the time-course of adaptation and de-adaptation as well as the observed context-dependent behavior. In contrast to the dual-rate process associated with novel dynamics, we show that a single-rate process mediates adaptation to familiar object dynamics. The model predicts that during exposure to the object across multiple orientations, there will be a degree of independence for adaptation and de-adaptation within each context, and that the states associated with all contexts will slowly de-adapt during exposure in one particular context. We confirm these predictions in two new experiments. Results of the current study thus highlight similarities and differences in the processes engaged during exposure to novel versus familiar dynamics. In both cases, adaptation is mediated by multiple context-specific representations. In the case of familiar object dynamics

  1. Nonlinear systems dynamics in cardiovascular physiology: The heart rate delay map and lower body negative pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, John C.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary study of the applicability of nonlinear dynamic systems analysis techniques to low body negative pressure (LBNP) studies. In particular, the applicability of the heart rate delay map is investigated. It is suggested that the heart rate delay map has potential as a supplemental tool in the assessment of subject performance in LBNP tests and possibly in the determination of susceptibility to cardiovascular deconditioning with spaceflight.

  2. A fast vectorized multispin coding algorithm for 3D Monte Carlo simulations using Kawasaki spin-exchange dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M. Q.

    1989-09-01

    A new Monte Carlo algorithm for 3D Kawasaki spin-exchange simulations and its implementation on a CDC CYBER 205 is presented. This approach is applicable to lattices with sizes between 4×4×4 and 256×L2×L3 ((L2+2)(L3+4)/4⩽65535) and periodic boundary conditions. It is adjustable to various kinetic models in which the total magnetization is conserved. Maximum speed on 10 million steps per second can be reached for 3-D Ising model with Metropolis rate.

  3. Experimental Determination of Mechanisms and Rates of Fe-Mg Exchange Between Spinel Grains Mediated by a Fluid Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, T.; Dohmen, R.; Chakraborty, S.

    2008-12-01

    The overall mechanism and kinetics of mineral reactions results from a complex interaction of several processes such as surface reaction kinetics, volume diffusion and net transfer. In order to quantify the kinetics of reactions involving multiple phases in multicomponent systems, it is necessary to understand and characterize the nature and rates of each of these processes. Most laboratory experiments up to now have focused on kinetics of reactions where the reactants and products are in direct physical contact with each other. However, there is abundant textural evidence in rocks that reactions occurred between mineral grains that are physically separated from each other, frequently mediated by a fluid phase. We have devised an experimental setup to study the mechanism and kinetics of such reactions in the laboratory. Polished single crystals of two spinels (synthetic MgAl2O4 and a natural spinel with 44 mol% Hercynite component), 2mm on a side, were placed in a gold capsule (length: 2cm, diameter: 4mm) separated from each other by a 5mm long tube of Au or alumina. The capsule was welded shut after adding distilled water (80-100μl). Such capsules were annealed (2 Kbar, 700-750°C, up to 21 hours) in hydrothermal cold seal vessels. After annealing the crystals were cleaned in an ultrasonic bath in order to rinse them of possible quench products. The surfaces were examined optically and near surface chemistry was determined using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS). We observe time dependent changes in the morphology as well as the chemistry of the crystals, as follows: After short times, the surface of the Mg spinel shows scattered etch pits while terraces form on the Fe spinel. After longer anneals, the etch pits disappear and the surface of the Mg spinels appear polished. Surface compositions are found to be different, depending on whether a Au or alumina separator was used in the experiments. The Fe rich spinel composition remains unchanged whereas

  4. Ab initio calculation of transition state normal mode properties and rate constants for the H(T)+CH4(CD4) abstraction and exchange reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatz, George C.; Walch, Stephen P.; Wagner, Albert F.

    1980-11-01

    We present ab initio (GVB-POL-CI) calculations for enough of the region about the abstraction and exchange saddle points for H(T)+CH4(CD4) to perform a full normal mode analysis of the transition states. The resulting normal mode frequencies are compared to four other published surfaces: an ab initio UHF-SCF calculation by Carsky and Zahradnik, a semiempirical surface by Raff, and two semiempirical surfaces by Kurylo, Hollinden, and Timmons. Significant quantitative and qualitative differences exist between the POL-CI results and those of the other surfaces. Transition state theory rate constants and vibrationally adiabatic reaction threshold energies were computed for all surfaces and compared to available experimental values. For abstraction, the POL-CI rates are in good agreement with experimental rates and in better agreement than are the rates of any of the other surfaces. For exchange, uncertainties in the experimental values and in the importance of vibrationally nonadiabatic effects cloud the comparison of theory to experiment. Tentative conclusions are that the POL-CI barrier is too low by several kcal. Unless vibrationaly nonadiabatic effects are severe, the POL-CI surface is still in better agreement with experiment than are the other surfaces. The rates for a simple 3-atom transition state theory model (where CH3 is treated as an atom) are compared to the rates for the full 6-atom model. The kinetic energy coupling of reaction coordinate modes to methyl group modes is identified as being of primary importance in determining the accuracy of the 3-atom model for this system. Substantial coupling in abstraction, but not exchange, causes the model to fail for abstraction but succeed for exchange.

  5. Computational modeling of dynamic mechanical properties of pure polycrystalline magnesium under high loading strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qizhen

    2015-09-01

    Computational simulations were performed to investigate the dynamic mechanical behavior of pure polycrystalline magnesium under different high loading strain rates with the values of 800, 1000, 2000, and 3600 s-1. The Johnson-Cook model was utilized in the simulations based on finite element modeling. The results showed that the simulations provided well-matched predictions of the material behavior such as the strain rate-time history, the stress-strain curve, and the temperature increase. Under high loading strain rates, the tested material experienced linear strain hardening at the early stage of plastic deformation, increased strain hardening at the intermediate plastic deformation region, and decreased strain hardening at the region before fracture. The strain hardening rates for the studied high loading strain rate cases do not vary much with the change of strain rates.

  6. Influence of fluid dynamic conditions on enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass: Effect of mass transfer rate.

    PubMed

    Wojtusik, Mateusz; Zurita, Mauricio; Villar, Juan C; Ladero, Miguel; Garcia-Ochoa, Felix

    2016-09-01

    The effect of fluid dynamic conditions on enzymatic hydrolysis of acid pretreated corn stover (PCS) has been assessed. Runs were performed in stirred tanks at several stirrer speed values, under typical conditions of temperature (50°C), pH (4.8) and solid charge (20% w/w). A complex mixture of cellulases, xylanases and mannanases was employed for PCS saccharification. At low stirring speeds (<150rpm), estimated mass transfer coefficients and rates, when compared to chemical hydrolysis rates, lead to results that clearly show low mass transfer rates, being this phenomenon the controlling step of the overall process rate. However, for stirrer speed from 300rpm upwards, the overall process rate is controlled by hydrolysis reactions. The ratio between mass transfer and overall chemical reaction rates changes with time depending on the conditions of each run. PMID:27233094

  7. Reduced Sensitivity to Slow-Rate Dynamic Auditory Information in Children with Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poelmans, Hanne; Luts, Heleen; Vandermosten, Maaike; Boets, Bart; Ghesquiere, Pol; Wouters, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of developmental dyslexia remains widely debated. An appealing theory postulates that the reading and spelling problems in individuals with dyslexia originate from reduced sensitivity to slow-rate dynamic auditory cues. This low-level auditory deficit is thought to provoke a cascade of effects, including inaccurate speech perception…

  8. Cooling Rate Dependent Ellipsometry Measurements to Determine the Dynamics of Thin Glassy Films.

    PubMed

    Glor, Ethan C; Fakhraai, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    This report aims to fully describe the experimental technique of using ellipsometry for cooling rate dependent Tg (CR-Tg) experiments. These measurements are simple high-throughput characterization experiments, which can determine the glass transition temperature (Tg), average dynamics, fragility and the expansion coefficient of the super-cooled liquid and glassy states for a variety of glassy materials. This technique allows for these parameters to be measured in a single experiment, while other methods must combine a variety of different techniques to investigate all of these properties. Measurements of dynamics close to Tg are particularly challenging. The advantage of cooling rate dependent Tg measurements over other methods which directly probe bulk and surface relaxation dynamics is that they are relatively quick and simple experiments, which do not utilize fluorophores or other complicated experimental techniques. Furthermore, this technique probes the average dynamics of technologically relevant thin films in temperature and relaxation time (τα) regimes relevant to the glass transition (τα > 100 sec). The limitation to using ellipsometry for cooling rate dependent Tg experiments is that it cannot probe relaxation times relevant to measurements of viscosity (τα < 1 sec). Other cooling rate dependent Tg measurement techniques, however, can extend the CR-Tg method to faster relaxation times. Furthermore, this technique can be used for any glassy system so long as the integrity of the film remains throughout the experiment. PMID:26863256

  9. Selection Dynamics in Joint Matching to Rate and Magnitude of Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, J. J.; Popa, Andrei; Calvin, Nicholas T.

    2012-01-01

    Virtual organisms animated by a selectionist theory of behavior dynamics worked on concurrent random interval schedules where both the rate and magnitude of reinforcement were varied. The selectionist theory consists of a set of simple rules of selection, recombination, and mutation that act on a population of potential behaviors by means of a…

  10. Bridge load rating from dynamic response collected using wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, A. K. M. Anwarul; Jaroo, Amer S.; Li, Frank

    2014-03-01

    We propose a method for load rating of prestressed box beam (PSBB) bridges based on their dynamic response collected using wireless sensor networks (WSNs). The hypothesis includes that the health of a bridge is associated with its vibration signatures. We deployed two WSNs on a 25-year old PSBB bridge, and ran trucks with variable loads and speeds for collecting its real-time dynamic response at current condition. We also performed FE simulations of 3-D bridge models under vehicular loads to acquire the representative dynamic response at its newest condition. We validated the bridge model by field testing and numerical analysis. We used Fast Fourier Transform and peak-picking algorithms to find maximum peak amplitudes and their corresponding frequencies. We calculated the in-service stiffness of the bridge to determine its load rating, which resembles the actual load rating of the bridge. The application software developed from this research can instantly determine the load rating of a PSBB bridge by collecting its real-time dynamic response. The research outcome will help reduce bridge maintenance costs and increase public safety.

  11. Dynamics of Rate of Returns for Postgraduate Education in Taiwan: The Impact of Higher Education Expansion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Chih-Hai; Lin, Chun-Hung A.; Lin, Chien-Ru

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes the dynamics of rate of returns for postgraduate education and the determinants of wage premiums for postgraduate labor, especially for the impact of higher education expansions, in terms of quantity and quality, since the late 1990s in Taiwan. Utilizing quasi-panel data over the 1990-2004 period and employing the double fixed…

  12. Erionite-Na upon heating: dehydration dynamics and exchangeable cations mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballirano, Paolo; Pacella, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    Erionite is a fibrous zeolite significantly more tumorigenic than crocidolite asbestos upon inhalation. In recent years, several papers have been published aimed at characterizing from the crystal-chemical point of view erionite fibres. As their toxicity has been ascribed to Fe acquired within the human body, studies aimed at characterizing the iron topochemistry have also been published, suggesting a possible important role played by the ionic exchange properties and cations mobility of this zeolite on developing carcinogenicity. Here we report the analysis results of the thermal behaviour of erionite-Na, which has been found to deviate significantly from that of erionite-K. This result is in contrast with the current scientific view that differences in weighted ionic potential, Si/Al ratio and size of exchangeable cations result in significantly different thermal behaviours, all those parameters being nearly identical or very similar in both species. The different mobility of the extraframework cations observed in erionite samples with dissimilar chemistry is of particular interest within the frame of the hypothesis that their biological activity could depend, apart from surface interactions, also on bulk effects.

  13. Free energies and mechanisms of water exchange around Uranyl from first principles molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Atta-Fynn, Raymond; Bylaska, Eric J.; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2012-02-01

    From density functional theory (DFT) based ab initio (Car-Parrinello) metadynamics, we compute the activation energies and mechanisms of water exchange between the first and second hydration shells of aqueous Uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) using the primary hydration number of U as the reaction coordinate. The free energy and activation barrier of the water dissociation reaction [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2}){sub 5}]{sup 2+}(aq) {yields} [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2})4]{sup 2+}(aq) + H{sub 2}O are 0.7 kcal and 4.7 kcal/mol respectively. The free energy is in good agreement with previous theoretical (-2.7 to +1.2 kcal/mol) and experimental (0.5 to 2.2 kcal/mol) data. The associative reaction [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2}){sub 5}]{sup 2+}(aq) + H{sub 2}O {yields} [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2})6]{sup 2+}(aq) is short-lived with a free energy and activation barrier of +7.9 kcal/mol and +8.9 kca/mol respectively; it is therefore classified as associative-interchange. On the basis of the free energy differences and activation barriers, we predict that the dominant exchange mechanism between [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2}){sub 5}]{sup 2+}(aq) and bulk water is dissociative.

  14. Price dynamics and market power in an agent-based power exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cincotti, Silvano; Guerci, Eric; Raberto, Marco

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents an agent-based model of a power exchange. Supply of electric power is provided by competing generating companies, whereas demand is assumed to be inelastic with respect to price and is constant over time. The transmission network topology is assumed to be a fully connected graph and no transmission constraints are taken into account. The price formation process follows a common scheme for real power exchanges: a clearing house mechanism with uniform price, i.e., with price set equal across all matched buyer-seller pairs. A single class of generating companies is considered, characterized by linear cost function for each technology. Generating companies compete for the sale of electricity through repeated rounds of the uniform auction and determine their supply functions according to production costs. However, an individual reinforcement learning algorithm characterizes generating companies behaviors in order to attain the expected maximum possible profit in each auction round. The paper investigates how the market competitive equilibrium is affected by market microstructure and production costs.

  15. Erionite-Na upon heating: dehydration dynamics and exchangeable cations mobility

    PubMed Central

    Ballirano, Paolo; Pacella, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Erionite is a fibrous zeolite significantly more tumorigenic than crocidolite asbestos upon inhalation. In recent years, several papers have been published aimed at characterizing from the crystal-chemical point of view erionite fibres. As their toxicity has been ascribed to Fe acquired within the human body, studies aimed at characterizing the iron topochemistry have also been published, suggesting a possible important role played by the ionic exchange properties and cations mobility of this zeolite on developing carcinogenicity. Here we report the analysis results of the thermal behaviour of erionite-Na, which has been found to deviate significantly from that of erionite-K. This result is in contrast with the current scientific view that differences in weighted ionic potential, Si/Al ratio and size of exchangeable cations result in significantly different thermal behaviours, all those parameters being nearly identical or very similar in both species. The different mobility of the extraframework cations observed in erionite samples with dissimilar chemistry is of particular interest within the frame of the hypothesis that their biological activity could depend, apart from surface interactions, also on bulk effects. PMID:26948139

  16. Dynamics of the fully stripped ion-hydrogen atom charge exchange process in dense quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ling-yu; Wan, Jiang-feng; Zhao, Xiao-ying; Xiao, Guo-qing; Duan, Wen-shan; Qi, Xin; Yang, Lei

    2014-09-15

    The plasma screening effects of dense quantum plasmas on charge exchange processes of a fully stripped ion colliding with a hydrogen atom are studied by the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method. The inter-particle interactions are described by the exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potentials. It is found that in weak screening conditions, cross sections increase with the increase of the ionic charge Z. However, in strong screening conditions, the dependence of cross sections on the ionic charge is related to the incident particle energy. At high energies, cross sections show a linear increase with the increase of Z, whereas at low energies, cross sections for Z≥4 become approximately the same. The He{sup 2+} and C{sup 6+} impacting charge exchange cross sections in dense quantum plasmas are also compared with those in weakly coupled plasmas. The interactions are described by the static screened Coulomb potential. It is found that for both He{sup 2+} and C{sup 6+}, the oscillatory screening effects of dense quantum plasmas are almost negligible in weak screening conditions. However, in strong screening conditions, the oscillatory screening effects enhance the screening effects of dense quantum plasmas, and the enhancement becomes more and more significant with the increase of the screening parameter and the ionic charge.

  17. Dynamic Crushing Response of Closed-cell Aluminium Foam at Variable Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, M. A.; Kader, M. A.; Escobedo, J. P.; Hazell, P. J.; Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Quadir, M. Z.

    2015-06-01

    The impact response of aluminium foams is essential for assessing their crashworthiness and energy absorption capacity for potential applications. The dynamic compactions of closed-cell aluminium foams (CYMAT) have been tested at variable strain rates. Microstructural characterization has also been carried out. The low strain rate impact test has been carried out using drop weight experiments while the high strain compaction test has been carried out via plate impact experiments. The post impacted samples have been examined using optical and electron microscopy to observe the microstructural changes during dynamic loading. This combination of dynamic deformation during impact and post impact microstructural analysis helped to evaluate the pore collapse mechanism and impact energy absorption characteristics.

  18. State Anxiety and Nonlinear Dynamics of Heart Rate Variability in Students

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriev, Aleksey D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Clinical and experimental research studies have demonstrated that the emotional experience of anxiety impairs heart rate variability (HRV) in humans. The present study investigated whether changes in state anxiety (SA) can also modulate nonlinear dynamics of heart rate. Methods A group of 96 students volunteered to participate in the study. For each student, two 5-minute recordings of beat intervals (RR) were performed: one during a rest period and one just before a university examination, which was assumed to be a real-life stressor. Nonlinear analysis of HRV was performed. The Spielberger’s State-Trait Anxiety Inventory was used to assess the level of SA. Results Before adjusting for heart rate, a Wilcoxon matched pairs test showed significant decreases in Poincaré plot measures, entropy, largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE), and pointwise correlation dimension (PD2), and an increase in the short-term fractal-like scaling exponent of detrended fluctuation analysis (α1) during the exam session, compared with the rest period. A Pearson analysis indicated significant negative correlations between the dynamics of SA and Poincaré plot axes ratio (SD1/SD2), and between changes in SA and changes in entropy measures. A strong negative correlation was found between the dynamics of SA and LLE. A significant positive correlation was found between the dynamics of SA and α1. The decreases in Poincaré plot measures (SD1, complex correlation measure), entropy measures, and LLE were still significant after adjusting for heart rate. Corrected α1 was increased during the exam session. As before, the dynamics of adjusted LLE was significantly correlated with the dynamics of SA. Conclusions The qualitative increase in SA during academic examination was related to the decrease in the complexity and size of the Poincaré plot through a reduction of both the interbeat interval and its variation. PMID:26807793

  19. Beam dynamics simulations of the transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange proof-of-principle experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Rihaoui, M.; Gai, W.; Kim, K.J.; Piot, Philippe; Power, John Gorham; Sun, Y.E.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange has promising applications in various advanced acceleration and light source concepts. A proof-of-principle experiment to demonstrate this phase space manipulation method is currently being planned at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator. The experiment focuses on exchanging a low longitudinal emittance with a high transverse horizontal emittance and also incorporates room for possible parametric studies e.g. using an incoming flat beam with tunable horizontal emittance. In this paper, we present realistic start-to-end beam dynamics simulation of the scheme, explore the limitations of this phase space exchange.

  20. Beam dynamics simulations of the transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange proof-of-principle experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator.

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, F.; Gai, W.; Power, J. G.; Kim, K. J.; Sun, Y. E.; Piot, P.; Rihaoui, M.; High Energy Physics; Northern Illinois Univ.; FNAL

    2009-01-01

    Transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange has promising applications in various advanced acceleration and light source concepts. A proof-of-principle experiment to demonstrate this phase space manipulation method is currently being planned at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator. The experiment focuses on exchanging a low longitudinal emittance with a high transverse horizontal emittance and also incorporates room for possible parametric studies e.g. using an incoming flat beam with tunable horizontal emittance. In this paper, we present realistic start-to-end beam dynamics simulation of the scheme, explore the limitations of this phase space exchange.

  1. Beam dynamics simulations of the transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange proof-of-principle experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Rihaoui, M.; Gai, W.; Kim, K.-J.; Power, J. G.; Piot, P.; Sun, Y.-E.

    2009-01-22

    Transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange has promising applications in various advanced acceleration and light source concepts. A proof-of-principle experiment to demonstrate this phase space manipulation method is currently being planned at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator. The experiment focuses on exchanging a low longitudinal emittance with a high transverse horizontal emittance and also incorporates room for possible parametric studies e.g. using an incoming flat beam with tunable horizontal emittance. In this paper, we present realistic start-to-end beam dynamics simulation of the scheme, explore the limitations of this phase space exchange.

  2. Atomic hydrogen production rates for comet P/Halley from observations with Dynamics Explorer I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craven, J. D.; Frank, L. A.

    1987-01-01

    Newly analyzed observations of the Dynamics Explorer I (DE1), launched on August 3, 1981, were used to determine the hydrogen production rate for Comet Halley at heliocentric distances, r, less than about 1.5 AU from measurements of the total Lyman-alpha flux at earth due to the cometary neutral hydrogen distribution. The production rates, determined as a function of r, were found to be consistent with in situ measurements from the Giotto and Vega spacecraft. The calculated rates are also consistent with remote observations using two sounding rockets and with the Pioneer-Venus and IUE spacecraft.

  3. Interaction of cholesterol with sphingomyelin in bilayer membranes: Evidence that the hydroxy group of sphingomyelin does not modulate the rate of cholesterol exchange between vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Chucheng Kan; Zhongshi Ruan; Bittman, R. )

    1991-08-06

    Cholesterol undergoes exchange between membranes containing sphingomyelin at a much slower rate than between membranes lacking sphingomyelin. To investigate the role of the hydroxy group at the 3-position of sphingomyelin in the interaction between sphingomyelin and cholesterol, the authors have measured the rates of (4-{sup 14}C)cholesterol exchange between unilamellar vesicles prepared with N-alkyl group or with hydrogen. Vesicles prepared from 3-deoxy- and 3-0-methyl-N-stearoylsphingomyelin had the same rate of ({sup 14}C) cholesterol desorption. The half-times for exchange from vesicles prepared with 3-0-methyl- and 3-deoxy-N-stearoylsphingomyelins and 10 mol% of cholesterol were only slightly faster than that found from vesicles prepared from N-stearoylsphingomyelin and 10 mol% cholesterol. The rate of cholesterol desorption from vesicles could be accelerated by preparing vesicles from bulky 3-0-alkyl analogues of sphingomyelin. These data indicate that insertion of sterically bulky groups at the 3-position of sphingomyelin in place of hydroxy interferes markedly with the molecular packing of cholesterol and sphingomyelin in bilayer membranes; however, the hydroxy group of sphingomyelin is not critical for the strong interaction of cholesterol with sphingomyelin. These results suggest that van der Waals interactions are more important than hydrogen-bonding interactions involving the hydroxy group in contributing to tight lateral packing of cholesterol with sphingomyelin.

  4. Estimation of seawater-groundwater exchange rate: case study in a tidal flat with a large-scale seepage face (Laizhou Bay, China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qian; Li, Hailong; Wang, Xuejing; Wang, Chaoyue; Wan, Li; Wang, Xusheng; Jiang, Xiaowei

    2015-03-01

    The exchange rate between seawater and groundwater in a tidal flat was investigated at Laizhou Bay, China, where there are large-scale seepage faces with horizontal extension of several hundred meters developed during low tides. Taking into account the effects of seepage face and density, a simple and efficient method for estimating seawater-groundwater exchange rate is proposed, based on field measurements of groundwater hydraulic head, temperature and salinity. First, the exchange rate at each well was obtained using the generalized Darcy's law, then the results were interpolated and integrated along the whole transect. The total submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) and inflow were estimated to be 8.8 and 15.3 m3 d-1 m-1, respectively. The spatial distributions of SGD and inflow were different from those of sandy or gravel beaches possibly owing to the low-permeability sediment (silty sand with mud), very gentle slope, and the large-scale seepage faces. A freshwater discharge tube was identified near the low-tide line, as evidenced by significant increase in outflow and low salinity of groundwater observed there. The SGD from the seepage faces accounted for ˜21 % of the total SGD. The outflow rate that occurred from the seepage faces, and the ratio of the outflow from the seepage faces to the total outflow, decreased seaward significantly and monotonically.

  5. Influence of the exchange-correlation functional on the quasi-harmonic lattice dynamics of II-VI semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skelton, Jonathan M.; Tiana, Davide; Parker, Stephen C.; Togo, Atsushi; Tanaka, Isao; Walsh, Aron

    2015-08-01

    We perform a systematic comparison of the finite-temperature structure and properties of four bulk semiconductors (PbS, PbTe, ZnS, and ZnTe) predicted by eight popular exchange-correlation functionals from quasi-harmonic lattice-dynamics calculations. The performance of the functionals in reproducing the temperature dependence of a number of material properties, including lattice parameters, thermal-expansion coefficients, bulk moduli, heat capacities, and phonon frequencies, is evaluated quantitatively against available experimental data. We find that the phenomenological over- and under-binding characteristics of the local-density approximation and the PW91 and Perdew-Burke-Enzerhof (PBE) generalised-gradient approximation (GGA) functionals, respectively, are exaggerated at finite temperature, whereas the PBEsol GGA shows good general performance across all four systems. The Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS) and revTPSS meta-GGAs provide relatively small improvements over PBE, with the latter being better suited to calculating structural and dynamical properties, but both are considerably more computationally demanding than the simpler GGAs. The dispersion-corrected PBE-D2 and PBE-D3 functionals perform well in describing the lattice dynamics of the zinc chalcogenides, whereas the lead chalcogenides appear to be challenging for these functionals. These findings show that quasi-harmonic calculations with a suitable functional can predict finite-temperature structure and properties with useful accuracy, and that this technique can serve as a means of evaluating the performance of new functionals in the future.

  6. INVESTIGATION OF A DYNAMIC POWER LINE RATING CONCEPT FOR IMPROVED WIND ENERGY INTEGRATION OVER COMPLEX TERRAIN

    SciTech Connect

    Jake P. Gentle; Kurt S Myers; Tyler B Phillips; Inanc Senocak; Phil Anderson

    2014-08-01

    Dynamic Line Rating (DLR) is a smart grid technology that allows the rating of power line to be based on real-time conductor temperature dependent on local weather conditions. In current practice overhead power lines are generally given a conservative rating based on worst case weather conditions. Using historical weather data collected over a test bed area, we demonstrate there is often additional transmission capacity not being utilized with the current static rating practice. We investigate a new dynamic line rating methodology using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to determine wind conditions along transmission lines at dense intervals. Simulated results are used to determine conductor temperature by calculating the transient thermal response of the conductor under variable environmental conditions. In calculating the conductor temperature, we use both a calculation with steady-state assumption and a transient calculation. Under low wind conditions, steady-state assumption predicts higher conductor temperatures that could lead to curtailments, whereas transient calculations produce conductor temperatures that are significantly lower, implying the availability of additional transmission capacity.

  7. Strain-rate-dependent model for the dynamic compression of elastoplastic spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgoyne, Hayden A.; Daraio, Chiara

    2014-03-01

    We present a force-displacement contact model for the compressive loading of elastoplastic spheres. This model builds from the well known Hertz contact law for elastic, quasistatic compression to incorporate a material's strain-rate-dependent plasticity in order to describe collisions between particles. In the quasistatic regime, finite-element analysis is used to derive an empirical function of the material properties. A Johnson-Cook strain rate dependence is then included into the model to study dynamic effects. We validate the model using split Hopkinson bar experiments and show that the model can accurately simulate the force-displacement response of strain-rate-dependent elastoplastic spheres during dynamic compression and unloading.

  8. Strain-rate-dependent model for the dynamic compression of elastoplastic spheres.

    PubMed

    Burgoyne, Hayden A; Daraio, Chiara

    2014-03-01

    We present a force-displacement contact model for the compressive loading of elastoplastic spheres. This model builds from the well known Hertz contact law for elastic, quasistatic compression to incorporate a material's strain-rate-dependent plasticity in order to describe collisions between particles. In the quasistatic regime, finite-element analysis is used to derive an empirical function of the material properties. A Johnson-Cook strain rate dependence is then included into the model to study dynamic effects. We validate the model using split Hopkinson bar experiments and show that the model can accurately simulate the force-displacement response of strain-rate-dependent elastoplastic spheres during dynamic compression and unloading. PMID:24730833

  9. Sodium sulfate impacts feeding, specific dynamic action, and growth rate in the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea.

    PubMed

    Soucek, David John

    2007-08-01

    Sodium sulfate is a ubiquitous salt that reaches toxic concentrations due to mining and other industrial activities, yet is currently unregulated at the Federal level in the United States. Previous studies have documented reduced growth of clams downstream of sulfate-dominated effluents, altered bioenergetics in filter-feeding invertebrates, and interactions between sulfate and other toxicants. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if sodium sulfate affects the bioenergetics of the filter-feeding, freshwater bivalve, Corbicula fluminea, and the mechanism by which the effects are elicited. In addition to measuring effects on feeding, respiration and growth rates, I evaluated the relative sensitivity of a green algae consumed by clams to determine if top-down or bottom-up effects might be exhibited under field conditions. This study demonstrated that sodium sulfate had no effect on basal metabolic rates, but significantly reduced the feeding, post-feeding metabolic, and growth rates of C. fluminea. The proposed mechanism for these impacts is that filtering rates are reduced upon exposure, resulting in reduced food consumption and therefore, preventing increased metabolic rates normally associated with post-feeding specific dynamic action (SDA). In the field, these effects may cause changes in whole stream respiration rates and organic matter dynamics, as well as alter uptake rates of other food-associated contaminants like selenium, the toxicity of which is known to be antagonized by sulfate, in filter-feeding bivalves. PMID:17590452

  10. Long-term dynamics of production, respiration, and net CO2 exchange in two sagebrush-steppe ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilmanov, T.G.; Svejcar, T.J.; Johnson, D.A.; Angell, R.F.; Saliendra, Nicanor Z.; Wylie, B.K.

    2006-01-01

    We present a synthesis of long-term measurements of CO2 exchange in 2 US Intermountain West sagebrush-steppe ecosystems. The locations near Burns, Oregon (1995-2001), and Dubois, Idaho (1996-2001), are part of the AgriFlux Network of the Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture. Measurements of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (F c) during the growing season were continuously recorded at flux towers using the Bowen ratio-energy balance technique. Data were partitioned into gross primary productivity (Pg) and ecosystem respiration (Re) using the light-response function method. Wintertime fluxes were measured during 1999/2000 and 2000/2001 and used to model fluxes in other winters. Comparison of daytime respiration derived from light-response analysis with nighttime tower measurements showed close correlation, with daytime respiration being on the average higher than nighttime respiration. Maxima of Pg and Re at Burns were both 20 g CO2?? m-2??d-1 in 1998. Maxima of Pg and R e at Dubois were 37 and 35 g CO2??m -2??d-1, respectively, in 1997. Mean annual gross primary production at Burns was 1 111 (range 475-1 715) g CO2?? m-2??y-1 about 30% lower than that at Dubois (1 602, range 963-2 162 g CO2??m-2??y-1). Across the years, both ecosystems were net sinks for atmospheric CO2 with a mean net ecosystem CO2 exchange of 82 g CO2?? m-2??y-1 at Burns and 253 g CO2?? m-2??y-1 at Dubois, but on a yearly basis either site could be a C sink or source, mostly depending on precipitation timing and amount. Total annual precipitation is not a good predictor of carbon sequestration across sites. Our results suggest that Fc should be partitioned into Pg and Re components to allow prediction of seasonal and yearly dynamics of CO2 fluxes.

  11. Free Energy Perturbation Hamiltonian Replica-Exchange Molecular Dynamics (FEP\\H-REMD) for absolute ligand binding free energy calculations.

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, W.; Roux, B.

    2010-09-01

    Free Energy Perturbation with Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics (FEP/REMD) offers a powerful strategy to improve the convergence of free energy computations. In particular, it has been shown previously that a FEP/REMD scheme allowing random moves within an extended replica ensemble of thermodynamic coupling parameters '{lambda}' can improve the statistical convergence in calculations of absolute binding free energy of ligands to proteins [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2009, 5, 2583]. In the present study, FEP/REMD is extended and combined with an accelerated MD simulations method based on Hamiltonian replica-exchange MD (H-REMD) to overcome the additional problems arising from the existence of kinetically trapped conformations within the protein receptor. In the combined strategy, each system with a given thermodynamic coupling factor {lambda} in the extended ensemble is further coupled with a set of replicas evolving on a biased energy surface with boosting potentials used to accelerate the interconversion among different rotameric states of the side chains in the neighborhood of the binding site. Exchanges are allowed to occur alternatively along the axes corresponding to the thermodynamic coupling parameter {lambda} and the boosting potential, in an extended dual array of coupled {lambda}- and H-REMD simulations. The method is implemented on the basis of new extensions to the REPDSTR module of the biomolecular simulation program CHARMM. As an illustrative example, the absolute binding free energy of p-xylene to the nonpolar cavity of the L99A mutant of the T4 lysozyme was calculated. The tests demonstrate that the dual {lambda}-REMD and H-REMD simulation scheme greatly accelerates the configurational sampling of the rotameric states of the side chains around the binding pocket, thereby improving the convergence of the FEP computations.

  12. An Autoethnographic Exchange: Exploring the Dynamics of Selves as Adult Learners and Adult Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plakhotnik, Maria S.; Delgado, Antonio; Seepersad, Rehana

    2015-01-01

    This article explores four former doctoral students' perceptions about their selves as adult learners and adult educators through the use of autoethnography and reflective dialogue. The dynamics between the two selves were explored to identify emerging themes and implications for practice in adult education. The duality of their roles as learners…

  13. DYNAMICS OF N-EXCHANGE BETWEEN CORN (ZEA MAYS L.) ROOTS AND SOIL MICROBES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic N released in soil by roots is mineralized by microbes to be recycled in roots. The dynamics of this N mineralization-immobilization turnover between corn roots and microbes was quantified by the model NCSWAP/NCSOIL with data from corn field plots. The kinetics of inorganic N-15 in the 0- t...

  14. Constant pH Molecular Dynamics in Explicit Solvent with Enveloping Distribution Sampling and Hamiltonian Exchange

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present a new computational approach for constant pH simulations in explicit solvent based on the combination of the enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) and Hamiltonian replica exchange (HREX) methods. Unlike constant pH methods based on variable and continuous charge models, our method is based on discrete protonation states. EDS generates a hybrid Hamiltonian of different protonation states. A smoothness parameter s is used to control the heights of energy barriers of the hybrid-state energy landscape. A small s value facilitates state transitions by lowering energy barriers. Replica exchange between EDS potentials with different s values allows us to readily obtain a thermodynamically accurate ensemble of multiple protonation states with frequent state transitions. The analysis is performed with an ensemble obtained from an EDS Hamiltonian without smoothing, s = ∞, which strictly follows the minimum energy surface of the end states. The accuracy and efficiency of this method is tested on aspartic acid, lysine, and glutamic acid, which have two protonation states, a histidine with three states, a four-residue peptide with four states, and snake cardiotoxin with eight states. The pKa values estimated with the EDS-HREX method agree well with the experimental pKa values. The mean absolute errors of small benchmark systems range from 0.03 to 0.17 pKa units, and those of three titratable groups of snake cardiotoxin range from 0.2 to 1.6 pKa units. This study demonstrates that EDS-HREX is a potent theoretical framework, which gives the correct description of multiple protonation states and good calculated pKa values. PMID:25061443

  15. Probing the dynamic regulation of peripheral membrane proteins using hydrogen deuterium exchange-MS (HDX-MS).

    PubMed

    Vadas, Oscar; Burke, John E

    2015-10-01

    Many cellular signalling events are controlled by the selective recruitment of protein complexes to membranes. Determining the molecular basis for how lipid signalling complexes are recruited, assembled and regulated on specific membrane compartments has remained challenging due to the difficulty of working in conditions mimicking native biological membrane environments. Enzyme recruitment to membranes is controlled by a variety of regulatory mechanisms, including binding to specific lipid species, protein-protein interactions, membrane curvature, as well as post-translational modifications. A powerful tool to study the regulation of membrane signalling enzymes and complexes is hydrogen deuterium exchange-MS (HDX-MS), a technique that allows for the interrogation of protein dynamics upon membrane binding and recruitment. This review will highlight the theory and development of HDX-MS and its application to examine the molecular basis of lipid signalling enzymes, specifically the regulation and activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks). PMID:26517882

  16. Dynamics and energy exchanges between a linear oscillator and a nonlinear absorber with local and global potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlemagne, S.; Lamarque, C.-H.; Ture Savadkoohi, A.

    2016-08-01

    The dynamical behavior of a two degree-of-freedom system made up of a linear oscillator and a coupled nonlinear energy sink with nonlinear global and local potentials is studied. The nonlinear global potential of the energy sink performs direct interactions with the linear oscillator, while its local potential depends only on its own behavior during vibratory energy exchanges between two oscillators. A time multiple scale method around 1:1:1 resonance is used to detect slow invariant manifold of the system, its equilibrium and singular points. Detected equilibrium points permit us to predict periodic regime(s) while singular points can lead the system to strongly modulated responses characterized by persistent bifurcations. Several possible scenarios occurring during these strongly modulated regimes are highlighted. All analytical predictions are compared with those which are obtained by direct numerical integration of system equations.

  17. Effects of Forest Succession on Exchangeable Cation Concentrations and Nitrogen Mineralization Rates in Soils Following Logging of Eastern Hemlock Forest, Whately, Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, A. L.; Sweezy, T.; Zukswert, J. M.; Dwyer, C. H.

    2012-12-01

    Ecological forest successions associated with invasive species and human disturbance may alter biogeochemical cycles within New England forests. Spread of the invasive insect hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae) to eastern North America is causing mortality of the eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), prompting salvage logging. Regrowth by deciduous hardwood trees is often observed. To evaluate whether changes in nutrient cycling could be altered by forest succession, we investigated exchangeable cation chemistry and nitrogen mineralization rates for soil in a mature, eastern hemlock forest and in a juvenile black birch (Betula lenta) forest in western MA. Eastern hemlock on this property was selectively logged 20 years ago, with black birch regrowth succeeding hemlock. We measured soil pH, exchangeable acidity (Al3+ and H+), exchangeable base cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, and K+), and nitrogen mineralization rates of organic and mineral horizons for 7 incubation periods between May 2011 - July 2012. We also measured the cation exchange capacity and nitrogen mineralization rates of soils from May - July 2012 (2 incubations) in a mature deciduous forest composed primarily of black birch. At each field site, 7 soil cores were collected. Soil horizons (organic and mineral) were separated and homogenized, and 3 replicates of each composite sample were analyzed for soil geochemistry. Organic soils within the juvenile black birch plot (BB) exhibit a low pH (4.3) similar to hemlock organic soils (HEM, pH=4.2). Surprisingly, exchangeable Al3+—the dominant cation in both plots—is significantly greater in organic soils at BB than at HEM (p<.001), and base saturation is less at BB (29%) than at HEM (46%, p<0.001) due to less Ca2+. There are no significant differences in the exchangeable cation chemistry of the mineral horizons at both sites, suggesting that the acidity difference of organic matter is not due to different soil mineralogy. In comparison, organic soil at the

  18. Iron isotope fractionation between aqueous Fe(II) and goethite revisited: New insights based on a multi-direction approach to equilibrium and isotopic exchange rate modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frierdich, Andrew J.; Beard, Brian L.; Reddy, Thiruchelvi R.; Scherer, Michelle M.; Johnson, Clark M.

    2014-08-01

    The Fe isotope compositions of naturally occurring Fe oxide minerals provide insights into biogeochemical processes that occur in modern and ancient environments. Key to understanding isotopic variations in such minerals is knowledge of the equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation factors between common minerals and aqueous Fe species. Because experimental measurements of isotopic fractionation may reflect a combination of kinetic and equilibrium fractionations during rapid dissolution and precipitation, even in experiments that employ the three-isotope method, assessment of the attainment of equilibrium is often difficult. Here, we re-examine Fe isotope exchange, via a 57Fe tracer, and natural mass-dependent fractionation, through changes in initial 56Fe/54Fe ratios, between aqueous Fe(II) (Fe(II)aq) and goethite. This approach uses the three-isotope method, but is distinct in its evaluation of kinetic isotope fractionation and the attainment of equilibrium by: (i) employing a multi-direction approach to equilibrium at 22 °C via reaction of three Fe(II)aq solutions that had different initial 56Fe/54Fe ratios, (ii) conducting isotopic exchange experiments at elevated temperature (50 °C), and (iii) modifying the rate of isotopic exchange through a combination of trace-element substitutions and particle coarsening to evaluate corresponding temporal changes in fractionation trajectories that may reflect changing instantaneous fractionation factors. We find that rapid isotopic exchange produces kinetic isotope effects between Fe(II)aq and goethite, which shifts the 56Fe/54Fe ratios of Fe(II)aq early in reactions toward that of goethite, indicating that the instantaneous Fe(II)aq-goethite fractionation factor under kinetic conditions is small. Importantly, however, this kinetic fractionation is “erased” with continued reaction, and this is evident by the congruence for multiple-exchange trajectories of distinct initial Fe(II)aq solutions toward the same final value

  19. Dynamic characteristics of very-high-rate GPS observations for seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebinuma, Takuji; Kato, Teruyuki

    2012-05-01

    GPS observations with higher than once-per-second sampling are becoming increasingly important for seismology. A number of reports have shown that very-high-rate GPS receivers are capable of capturing dynamic ground displacements from significant earthquakes. The higher output rate, however, does not necessarily mean higher frequency content of the corresponding observations. In order to examine dynamic effects on very-high-rate GPS observations, the frequency response characteristics of several geodetic GPS receivers were evaluated using a GPS signal simulator in controlled laboratory conditions. The tested receivers include Trimble Net-R8, NovAtel OEMV, and TOPCON Net-G3A. The experiment results suggest that the dynamic characteristics of the signal tracking loops put a limit on the frequency of the received signals, and all the tested receivers except for Trimble show good signal tracking performance at up to 5 Hz under dynamic stress of 2 G acceleration. The power spectral densities of the kinematic solutions obtained from the simulated seismic motion of the 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Inland earthquake ( M w 6.8) are also evaluated. The power spectral densities of both the NovAtel and TOPCON receivers agree with the simulated ground displacement at up to 5 Hz. By contrast, the Trimble receiver provides a pronounced increase in spectral energy above 2 Hz.

  20. Assessment of electrocardiography, echocardiography, and heart rate variability in dynamic and static type athletes

    PubMed Central

    Toufan, Mehrnoush; Kazemi, Babak; Akbarzadeh, Fariborz; Ataei, Amin; Khalili, Majid

    2012-01-01

    Background: Over the last two decades, morphological cardiac changes induced by athletic conditioning have been of great interest. Therefore, several studies have been orchestrated to delineate electrocardiography (ECG), echocardiography, and heart rate variability (HRV) findings in athletes. Purpose: To assess the ECG, echocardiography, and HRV in a group of dynamic and static type athletes. Methods: Fifty professional athletes (20 static and 30 dynamic exercise athletes) and 50 healthy nonathletes (control group) were recruited. Standard 12-lead ECG and transthoracic echocardiography was performed on all athletes and the control group. Through echocardiography, variables including left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic/systolic diameter, LV mass, and left atrial volume index were measured. In addition, both the athletes and the control group underwent ECG Holter monitoring for 15 minutes and several parameters related to HRV (time and frequency domain) were recorded. Results: The most common ECG abnormalities among the athletes were sinus bradycardia and incomplete right bundle branch block. LV end-diastolic diameter and left atrial volume index were significantly greater in the dynamic athletes (P < 0.001). LV end-systolic diameter was significantly lower in the static group (P < 0.001). LV mass of the dynamic and static athletes was significantly greater than that of the controls (P < 0.001). Among the ECG Holter monitoring findings, the dynamic athletes had lower systolic blood pressure than the controls (P = 0.01). Heart rate was lowest in the control group (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The most common ECG abnormalities among adolescent Iranian athletes were sinus bradycardia and incomplete right bundle branch block. Static exercise seemed to reduce LV end-systolic diameter, while dynamic exercise resulted in increased LV end-diastolic diameter and left atrial volume index. Additionally, Iranian athletes showed no differences in HRV parameters, excluding heart rate